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Sample records for krik kalev prna

  1. pRNA

    PubMed Central

    Wehner, Stefanie; Dörrich, Anja K; Ciba, Philipp; Wilde, Annegret; Marz, Manja

    2014-01-01

    Promoter-associated RNAs (pRNAs) are a family of ~90–100 nt-long divergent RNAs overlapping the promoter of the rRNA (rDNA) operon. pRNA transcripts interact with TIP5, a component of the chromatin remodeling complex NoRC, which recruits enzymes for heterochromatin formation and mediates silencing of rRNA genes. Here we present a comprehensive analysis of pRNA homologs, including different versions per species, as result of in silico studies in available metazoan genome assemblies. Comparative sequence analysis and secondary structure prediction ended up in two possible secondary structures, which let us assume a possible dual function of pRNAs for regulation of rRNA operons. Furthermore, we validated parts of our computational predictions experimentally by RT-PCR and sequencing. A representative seed alignment of the pRNA family, annotated with possible secondary structures was released to the Rfam database. PMID:24440945

  2. Ocular Delivery of pRNA Nanoparticles: Distribution and Clearance After Subconjunctival Injection

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Liang; Liu, Hongshan; Liu, Chia-Yang; LaSance, Kathleen; Haque, Farzin; Shu, Dan; Guo, Peixuan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose RNA nanoparticles derived from the three-way junction (3WJ) of the pRNA of bacteriophage phi29 DNA packaging motor were previously found to be thermodynamically stable. As the nanoparticles could have potential in ocular drug delivery, the objectives in the present study were to investigate the distribution of pRNA nanoparticles after subconjunctival injection and examine the feasibility to deliver the nanoparticles to the cells of cornea and retina. Methods Alexa647-labeled pRNA nanoparticles (pRNA-3WJ and pRNA-X) and double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) were administered via subconjunctival injection in mice. Alexa647 dye was a control. Topical administration was performed for comparison. Ocular clearance of pRNA nanoparticles and dsRNA after the injection was assessed using whole-body fluorescence imaging of the eyes. The numbers of cells in the ocular tissues with nanoparticle cell internalization were determined in fluorescence microscopy of dissected eye tissues. Results After subconjunctival injection, pRNA nanoparticles and dsRNA were observed to distribute into the eyes and cleared through the lymph. pRNA-3WJ, pRNA-X, and dsRNA were found in the cells of the conjunctiva, cornea, and sclera, but only pRNA-X was in the cells of the retina. Topical administration was not effective in delivering the nanoparticles to the eye. Conclusions The pRNA nanoparticles were delivered to the cells in the eye via subconjunctival injection, and cell internalization was achieved in the cornea with pRNA-3WJ and pRNA-X and in the retina with pRNA-X. Only the X-shape pRNA-X could enter the retina. PMID:24297069

  3. Circularly permuted viral pRNA active and specific in the packaging of bacteriophage phi 29 DNA.

    PubMed

    Zhang, C; Trottier, M; Guo, P

    1995-03-10

    A viral-encoded 120-base pRNA has been shown to have an essential role in the packaging of bacteriophage phi 29 DNA. The finding that both the 5'- and 3'-termini of the pRNA are proximate and crucial for biological function (C. Zhang, C. Lee, and P. Guo, 1994, Virology, 201, 77-85) prompted investigation of the activity of circularly permuted pRNAs (cpRNA) and of the expandability and essentiality of bases extending from the termini. A 117-base pRNA with a deletion of three bases downstream of the proximal terminus was active in DNA packaging. Concatemeric DNAs containing two tandem pRNA genes separated by a short or a long loop sequence were constructed. The cpRNAs from these DNA templates were transcribed in vitro and shown to be active in phi 29 DNA packaging, with activity comparable to the parental (noncircularly permuted) pRNA, indicating that neither of the loops tested affected the activity and folding of the cpRNA. As few as four bases were sufficient to serve as a loop for the terminal 180 degree turn, and a loop as long as 27 bases did not affect the cpRNA structure and function. Eight cpRNAs were constructed to assess the effect of openings within the wild-type pRNA structure. Opening of the bulge at residue 38 did not affect cpRNA activity, but opening the bulge at residue 55 greatly reduced it. Although the sequence of the 5',3'-terminal loop was not important for the folding and activity of the cpRNA, the activities of cpRNAs with openings at individual bulges or hairpins were different, indicating that each region plays a different role in pRNA folding and function. Our results indicate that it is possible to generate active circularly permuted pRNA by assigning internal sites of the pRNA as new 3'- and 5'-termini. The creation of new variable ends makes the labeling of internal bases of the pRNA molecule possible and will facilitate the analysis of pRNA secondary and tertiary structure. PMID:7533964

  4. The structure of tryptophan 7-halogenase (PrnA) suggests a mechanism for regioselective chlorination

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Changjiang; Flecks, Silvana; Unversucht, Susanne; Haupt, Caroline; van Pée, Karl-Heinz; Naismith, James H

    2012-01-01

    Chlorinated natural products include vancomycin and cryptophycin A. Their biosyntheses involves regioselective chlorination by flavin-dependent halogenases. We report the structural characterization of tryptophan 7-halogenase (PrnA), which regioselectively chlorinates tryptophan. Tryptophan and FAD are separated by a 10Å-long tunnel and bound by distinct enzyme modules. The FAD module is conserved in halogenases and is related to flavin-dependent monooxygenases. Based on biochemical studies, crystal structures and by analogy with monooxygenases, we predict FADH2 reacts with O2 making peroxy-flavin which is decomposed by Cl−. The resulting HOCl is guided through the tunnel, to tryptophan, where it is activated to participate in electrophilic aromatic substitution. PMID:16195462

  5. Bottom-up assembly of RNA nanoparticles containing phi29 motor pRNA to silence the asthma STAT5b gene.

    PubMed

    Qiu, C; Peng, W K; Shi, F; Zhang, T

    2012-09-13

    Activation of the transcription factor signal transducer and activator of transcription 5b (STAT5b) is a key event in the development of asthma. The potent ability of small interfering RNA (siRNA) to inhibit the expression of STAT5b mRNA has provided a new class of therapeutics for asthma. However, efficient delivery of siRNAs remains a key obstacle to their successful application. A targeted intracellular delivery approach for siRNA to specific cell types would be highly desirable. We used packaging RNA (pRNA), a component of the bacteriophage phi29-packaging motor, to deliver STAT5b siRNA to asthmatic spleen lymphocytes. This pRNA was able to spontaneously carry siRNA/STAT5b and aptamer/CD4, which is a ligand to CD4 molecule. Based on RT-PCR data, the pRNA dimer effectively inhibited STAT5b gene mRNA expression of asthmatic spleen lymphocytes, without the need for additional transfections. We conclude that the pRNA dimer carrying both siRNA and aptamer can deliver functional siRNA to cells; possibly, the aptamer acts as a ligand to interact with specific receptors. The pRNAs were evaluated with a CCK-8 kit and were found to have little cytotoxicity. We conclude that pRNA as a novel nanovehicle for RNA worth further study.

  6. RNA Nanoparticles Derived from Three-Way Junction of Phi29 Motor pRNA Are Resistant to I-125 and Cs-131 Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hui; Rychahou, Piotr G.; Cui, Zheng; Pi, Fengmei; Evers, B. Mark; Shu, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Radiation reagents that specifically target tumors are in high demand for the treatment of cancer. The emerging field of RNA nanotechnology might provide new opportunities for targeted radiation therapy. This study investigates whether chemically modified RNA nanoparticles derived from the packaging RNA (pRNA) three-way junction (3WJ) of phi29 DNA-packaging motor are resistant to potent I-125 and Cs-131 radiation, which is a prerequisite for utilizing these RNA nanoparticles as carriers for targeted radiation therapy. pRNA 3WJ nanoparticles were constructed and characterized, and the stability of these nanoparticles under I-125 and Cs-131 irradiation with clinically relevant doses was examined. RNA nanoparticles derived from the pRNA 3WJ targeted tumors specifically and they were stable under irradiation of I-125 and Cs-131 with clinically relevant doses ranging from 1 to 90 Gy over a significantly long time up to 20 days, while control plasmid DNA was damaged at 20 Gy or higher. PMID:26017686

  7. Entropy-Driven One-Step Formation of Phi29 pRNA 3WJ from Three RNA Fragments

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The emerging field of RNA nanotechnology necessitates creation of functional RNA nanoparticles but has been limited by particle instability. It has been shown that the three-way junction of bacteriophage phi29 motor pRNA has unusual stability and can self-assemble from three fragments with high efficiency. It is generally believed that RNA and DNA folding is energy landscape-dependent, and the folding of RNA is driven by enthalpy. Here we examine the thermodynamic characteristics of the 3WJ components as 2′-fluoro RNA, DNA, and RNA. It was seen that the three fragments existed either in 3WJ complex or as monomers, with the intermediate of dimers almost undetectable. It seems that the three fragments can lead to the formation of the 3WJ complex efficiently within a rapid time. A low dissociation constant (apparent KD) of 11.4 nM was determined for RNA, inclusion of 2′-F pyrimidines strengthened the KD to 4.5 nM, and substitution of DNA weakened it to 47.7 nM. The ΔG°37, were −36, −28, and −15 kcal/mol for 3WJ2′-F, 3WJRNA, and 3WJDNA, respectively. It is found that the formation of the three-component complex was governed by entropy, instead of enthalpy, as usually found in RNA complexes. PMID:24694349

  8. Assembly of Multifunctional Phi29 pRNA Nanoparticles for Specific Delivery of SiRNA and other Therapeutics to Targeted Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Yi; Cinier, Mathieu; Shu, Dan; Guo, Peixuan

    2011-01-01

    Recent advances in RNA nanotechnology have led to the emergence of a new field and brought vitality to the area of therapeutics (Guo P, The Emerging Field of RNA Nanotechnology, Nature Nanotechnology, 2010). Due to the complementary nature of the four nucleotides and its special catalytic activity, RNA can be manipulated with simplicity characteristic of DNA, while possessing versatile structure and diverse function similar to proteins. Loops and tertiary architecture serve as mounting dovetails or wedges to eliminate external linking dowels. Unique features in transcription, termination, self-assembly, self-processing, and acid-resistance enable in vivo production of nanoparticles harboring aptamer, siRNA, ribozyme, riboswitch, or other regulators for therapy, detection, regulation, and intracellular computation. The unique property of noncanonical base-pairing and stacking enables RNA to fold into well-defined structures for constructing nanoparticles with special functionalities. Bacteriophage phi29 DNA packaging motor is geared by a ring consisting of six packaging RNA (pRNA) molecules. pRNA is able to form a multimeric complex via the interaction of two reengineered interlocking loops. This unique feature makes it an ideal polyvalent vehicle for nanomachine fabrication, pathogen detection, and delivery of siRNA or other therapeutics. This review describes methods in using pRNA as a building block for the construction of RNA dimers, trimers and hexamers as nanoparticles in medical applications. Methods for industrial-scale production of large and stable RNA nanoparticles will be introduced. The unique favorable PK (pharmokinetics) profile with a half life (T1/2) of 5–10 hours comparing to 0.25 of conventional 2′-F siRNA, and advantageous in vivo features such as non-toxicity, non-induction of interferons or non-stimulating of cytokine response in animals will also be reviewed. PMID:21320601

  9. Assembly of multifunctional phi29 pRNA nanoparticles for specific delivery of siRNA and other therapeutics to targeted cells.

    PubMed

    Shu, Yi; Cinier, Mathieu; Shu, Dan; Guo, Peixuan

    2011-06-01

    Recent advances in RNA nanotechnology have led to the emergence of a new field and brought vitality to the area of therapeutics [P. Guo, The emerging field of RNA nanotechnology, Nat. Nanotechnol., 2010]. Due to the complementary nature of the four nucleotides and its special catalytic activity, RNA can be manipulated with simplicity characteristic of DNA, while possessing versatile structure and diverse function similar to proteins. Loops and tertiary architecture serve as mounting dovetails or wedges to eliminate external linking dowels. Unique features in transcription, termination, self-assembly, self-processing, and acid-resistance enable in vivo production of nanoparticles harboring aptamer, siRNA, ribozyme, riboswitch, or other regulators for therapy, detection, regulation, and intracellular computation. The unique property of noncanonical base-pairing and stacking enables RNA to fold into well-defined structures for constructing nanoparticles with special functionalities. Bacteriophage phi29 DNA packaging motor is geared by a ring consisting of six packaging RNA (pRNA) molecules. pRNA is able to form a multimeric complex via the interaction of two reengineered interlocking loops. This unique feature makes it an ideal polyvalent vehicle for nanomachine fabrication, pathogen detection, and delivery of siRNA or other therapeutics. This review describes methods in using pRNA as a building block for the construction of RNA dimers, trimers, and hexamers as nanoparticles in medical applications. Methods for industrial-scale production of large and stable RNA nanoparticles will be introduced. The unique favorable PK (pharmacokinetics) profile with a half life (T(1/2)) of 5-10h comparing to 0.25 of conventional 2'-F siRNA, and advantageous in vivo features such as non-toxicity, non-induction of interferons or non-stimulating of cytokine response in animals will also be reviewed.

  10. SU-E-T-338: Ultrastable PRNA 3WJ Nanoparticles as Potential I-125 and C-131 Carriers for Targeted Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, W; Li, H; Guo, P

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To study the feasibility of using the pRNA 3WJ nanoparticles to carry I-125 or Cs-131 to target and treat cancer. As the first step, we investigated the stabilities of pRNA 3WJ nanoparticles that are essential for cancer targeting and treatment in this study. Methods: The thermodynamic stability of assembled RNA 3WJ nanoparticles was studied using the TGGE system. The nanoparticles were irradiated with I-125 or Cs-131 radioactive sources that were immersed in the RNA nanoparticle/DNA structure sample liquid contained in a small vial. The irradiation of the RNA samples was performed for different time periods and doses. The purpose was to distinguish the effects of radiation on DNA and RNA structures. Unradiated samples were used as control. Results: RNA nanoparticles were formed by mixing three pieces of oligos, 3WJa, 3WJb, and 3WJc at 1:1:1 molar ratio. Figure 4 demonstrates that 2′-F modified 3WJ nanoparticles remained stable at temperatures as high as 66.8 ± 2°C, and exhibited melting temperatures of 71 ± 2°C. The radiation stability test was performed with I- 125 and Cs-131 irradiation. Several DNA structures including plasmids were included as control. The first test introduced I-125 and a low dose of 1 Gy to both RNA and DNA samples, but no change was observed. When the dose was increased to 30 Gy, DNA was damaged while RNA remained unchanged. Three tests were also conducted with Cs-131 with 7 Gy, 21 Gy, 30 Gy, and 89 Gy, and the results were similar to those with I-125. Conclusion: pRNA 3WJ nanoparticles are able to form efficiently by onepot self-assembly. They remained stable at high temperatures and high therapeutic doses over a long time. These unique features suggest that RNA 3WJ nanoparticles have the potential to be used for targeted radiation therapy for cancer treatment.

  11. Construction and 3-D computer modeling of connector arrays with tetragonal to decagonal transition induced by pRNA of phi29 DNA-packaging motor.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yin Yin; Blocker, Forrest; Xiao, Feng; Guo, Peixuan

    2005-06-01

    The bottom-up assembly of patterned arrays is an exciting and important area in current nanotechnology. Arrays can be engineered to serve as components in chips for a virtually inexhaustible list of applications ranging from disease diagnosis to ultrahigh-density data storage. In attempting to achieve this goal, a number of methods to facilitate array design and production have been developed. Cloning and expression of the gene coding for the connector of the bacterial virus phi29 DNA-packaging motor, overproduction of the gene products, and the in vitro construction of large-scale carpet-like arrays composed of connector are described in this report. The stability of the arrays under various conditions, including varied pH, temperature and ionic strength, was tested. The addition of packaging RNA (pRNA) into the array caused a dramatic shift in array structure, and resulted in the conversion of tetragonal arrays into larger decagonal structures comprised of both protein and RNA. RNase digestion confirmed that the conformational shift was caused by pRNA, and that RNA was present in the decagons. As has been demonstrated in biomotors, conformational shift of motor components can generate force for motor motion. The conformational shift reported here can be utilized as a potential force-generating mechanism for the construction of nanomachines. Three-dimensional computer models of the constructed arrays were also produced using a variety of connector building blocks with or without the N- or C-terminal sequence, which is absent from the current published crystal structures. Both the connector array and the decagon are ideal candidates to be used as templates to build patterned suprastructures in nanotechnology.

  12. Prohead RNA: a noncoding viral RNA of novel structure and function.

    PubMed

    Hill, Alyssa C; Bartley, Laura E; Schroeder, Susan J

    2016-07-01

    Prohead RNA (pRNA) is an essential component of the powerful Φ29-like bacteriophage DNA packaging motor. However, the specific role of this unique RNA in the Φ29 packaging motor remains unknown. This review examines pRNA as a noncoding RNA of novel structure and function. In order to highlight the reasons for exploring the structure and function of pRNA, we (1) provide an overview of Φ29-like bacteriophage and the Φ29 DNA packaging motor, including putative motor mechanisms and structures of its component parts; (2) discuss pRNA structure and possible roles for pRNA in the Φ29 packaging motor; (3) summarize pRNA self-assembly; and (4) describe the prospective therapeutic applications of pRNA. Many questions remain to be answered in order to connect what is currently known about pRNA structure to its novel function in the Φ29 packaging motor. The knowledge gained from studying the structure, function, and sequence variation in pRNA will help develop tools to better navigate the conformational landscapes of RNA. WIREs RNA 2016, 7:428-437. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1330 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  13. Prohead RNA: a noncoding viral RNA of novel structure and function

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Alyssa C.; Bartley, Laura E.

    2016-01-01

    Prohead RNA (pRNA) is an essential component of the powerful Φ29‐like bacteriophage DNA packaging motor. However, the specific role of this unique RNA in the Φ29 packaging motor remains unknown. This review examines pRNA as a noncoding RNA of novel structure and function. In order to highlight the reasons for exploring the structure and function of pRNA, we (1) provide an overview of Φ29‐like bacteriophage and the Φ29 DNA packaging motor, including putative motor mechanisms and structures of its component parts; (2) discuss pRNA structure and possible roles for pRNA in the Φ29 packaging motor; (3) summarize pRNA self‐assembly; and (4) describe the prospective therapeutic applications of pRNA. Many questions remain to be answered in order to connect what is currently known about pRNA structure to its novel function in the Φ29 packaging motor. The knowledge gained from studying the structure, function, and sequence variation in pRNA will help develop tools to better navigate the conformational landscapes of RNA. WIREs RNA 2016, 7:428–437. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1330 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:26810250

  14. Structure and assembly of the essential RNA ring component of a viral DNA packaging motor

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Fang; Lu, Changrui; Zhao, Wei; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R.; Anderson, Dwight L.; Jardine, Paul J.; Grimes, Shelley; Ke, Ailong

    2011-07-25

    Prohead RNA (pRNA) is an essential component in the assembly and operation of the powerful bacteriophage {psi}29 DNA packaging motor. The pRNA forms a multimeric ring via intermolecular base-pairing interactions between protomers that serves to guide the assembly of the ring ATPase that drives DNA packaging. Here we report the quaternary structure of this rare multimeric RNA at 3.5 {angstrom} resolution, crystallized as tetrameric rings. Strong quaternary interactions and the inherent flexibility helped rationalize how free pRNA is able to adopt multiple oligomerization states in solution. These characteristics also allowed excellent fitting of the crystallographic pRNA protomers into previous prohead/pRNA cryo-EM reconstructions, supporting the presence of a pentameric, but not hexameric, pRNA ring in the context of the DNA packaging motor. The pentameric pRNA ring anchors itself directly to the phage prohead by interacting specifically with the fivefold symmetric capsid structures that surround the head-tail connector portal. From these contacts, five RNA superhelices project from the pRNA ring, where they serve as scaffolds for binding and assembly of the ring ATPase, and possibly mediate communication between motor components. Construction of structure-based designer pRNAs with little sequence similarity to the wild-type pRNA were shown to fully support the packaging of {psi}29 DNA.

  15. Genotypic Variation in the Bordetella pertussis Virulence Factors Pertactin and Pertussis Toxin in Historical and Recent Clinical Isolates in the United Kingdom

    PubMed Central

    Fry, Norman K.; Neal, Shona; Harrison, Timothy G.; Miller, Elizabeth; Matthews, Ruth; George, Robert C.

    2001-01-01

    The reemergence of pertussis has been reported in several countries despite high vaccination coverage. Studies in The Netherlands and Finland have investigated polymorphism in the genes coding for two important virulence factors of Bordetella pertussis, pertactin and pertussis toxin, and identified the emergence and subsequent dominance in circulating strains of pertactin and toxin variants not found in the whole-cell vaccine (WCV). The study described here investigated whether such variation had occurred in the United Kingdom, which presently has low levels of pertussis. Sequence analysis of the genes for pertactin (prnA) and the pertussis toxin S1 subunit (ptxA) among isolates of B. pertussis from 285 United Kingdom patients, from 1920 to 1999, revealed three prnA variants, prnA(1), prnA(2), and prnA(3), and two ptxA variants, ptxA(1) and ptxA(2), showing differences in nucleic acid sequence. The proportion of pertactin gene types not included in the United Kingdom WCV, i.e., prnA(2) and prnA(3), has increased in recent years and was found in 21 of 86 (24%) strains from the 1980s and 56 of 105 (53%) strains from the 1990s. To date, the presence of these nonvaccine prnA types has not been associated with a resurgence of pertussis in the United Kingdom. The distribution of prnA and ptxA types in The Netherlands, Finland, and the United Kingdom in the 1990s is distinct. The most striking difference in the United Kingdom isolates is that all 105 of the most recent circulating strains (from 1998 to 1999) are of a pertussis toxin type found in the United Kingdom WCV, i.e., ptxA(1). PMID:11500425

  16. Global Structure of a Three-Way Junction in a Phi29 Packaging RNA Dimer Determined Using Site-Directed Spin Labeling

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xiaojun; Tung, Chang-Shung; Sowa, Glenna; Hatmal, Ma'mon M.; Haworth, Ian S.; Qin, Peter Z.

    2012-02-08

    The condensation of bacteriophage phi29 genomic DNA into its preformed procapsid requires the DNA packaging motor, which is the strongest known biological motor. The packaging motor is an intricate ring-shaped protein/RNA complex, and its function requires an RNA component called packaging RNA (pRNA). Current structural information on pRNA is limited, which hinders studies of motor function. Here, we used site-directed spin labeling to map the conformation of a pRNA three-way junction that bridges binding sites for the motor ATPase and the procapsid. The studies were carried out on a pRNA dimer, which is the simplest ring-shaped pRNA complex and serves as a functional intermediate during motor assembly. Using a nucleotide-independent labeling scheme, stable nitroxide radicals were attached to eight specific pRNA sites without perturbing RNA folding and dimer formation, and a total of 17 internitroxide distances spanning the three-way junction were measured using Double Electron-Electron Resonance spectroscopy. The measured distances, together with steric chemical constraints, were used to select 3662 viable three-way junction models from a pool of 65 billion. The results reveal a similar conformation among the viable models, with two of the helices (HT and HL) adopting an acute bend. This is in contrast to a recently reported pRNA tetramer crystal structure, in which HT and HL stack onto each other linearly. The studies establish a new method for mapping global structures of complex RNA molecules, and provide information on pRNA conformation that aids investigations of phi29 packaging motor and developments of pRNA-based nanomedicine and nanomaterial.

  17. Construction of RNA-Quantum Dot Chimera for Nanoscale Resistive Biomemory Application

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Taek; Yagati, Ajay Kumar; Pi, Fengmei; Sharma, Ashwani; Choi, Jeong-Woo; Guo, Peixuan

    2015-01-01

    RNA nanotechnology offer advantages to construct thermally and chemically stable nanoparticles with well-defined shape and structure. Here we report the development of an RNA-Qd (quantum dot) chimera for resistive biomolecular memory application. Each Qd holds two copies of the pRNA three-way junction (pRNA-3WJ) of bacteriophage phi29 DNA-packaging motor. The fixed quantity of two RNA per Qd was achieved by immobilizing pRNA-3WJ harboring Sephadex aptamer for resin binding. Two thiolated pRNA-3WJ serves as two feet of the chimera to stand on the gold plate. The RNA nanostructure served as both an insulator and a mediator to provide defined distance between Qd and gold. Immobilization of chimera nanoparticle was confirmed through scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). As revealed by scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS), the conjugated pRNA-3WJ-Qd chimera exhibited excellent electrical bi-stability signal for biomolecular memory function, demonstrating great potential for the development of resistive biomolecular memory and nanobio-inspired electronic device for information processing and computing. PMID:26135474

  18. Construction of RNA-Quantum Dot Chimera for Nanoscale Resistive Biomemory Application.

    PubMed

    Lee, Taek; Yagati, Ajay Kumar; Pi, Fengmei; Sharma, Ashwani; Choi, Jeong-Woo; Guo, Peixuan

    2015-07-28

    RNA nanotechnology offers advantages to construct thermally and chemically stable nanoparticles with well-defined shape and structure. Here we report the development of an RNA-QD (quantum dot) chimera for resistive biomolecular memory application. Each QD holds two copies of the pRNA three-way junction (pRNA-3WJ) of the bacteriophage phi29 DNA packaging motor. The fixed quantity of two RNAs per QD was achieved by immobilizing the pRNA-3WJ with a Sephadex aptamer for resin binding. Two thiolated pRNA-3WJ serve as two feet of the chimera that stand on the gold plate. The RNA nanostructure served as both an insulator and a mediator to provide defined distance between the QD and gold. Immobilization of the chimera nanoparticle was confirmed with scanning tunneling microscopy. As revealed by scanning tunneling spectroscopy, the conjugated pRNA-3WJ-QD chimera exhibited an excellent electrical bistability signal for biomolecular memory function, demonstrating great potential for the development of resistive biomolecular memory and a nano-bio-inspired electronic device for information processing and computing.

  19. Affinity of molecular interactions in the bacteriophage φ29 DNA packaging motor

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Mark A.; Wood, Jonathan P.A.; Capaldi, Stephanie A.; Baron, Andrew J.; Gell, Christopher; Smith, D. Alastair; Stonehouse, Nicola J.

    2006-01-01

    DNA packaging in the bacteriophage φ29 involves a molecular motor with protein and RNA components, including interactions between the viral connector protein and molecules of pRNA, both of which form multimeric complexes. Data are presented to demonstrate the higher order assembly of pRNA together with the affinity of pRNA:pRNA and pRNA:connector interactions, which are used to propose a model for motor function. In solution, pRNA can form dimeric and trimeric multimers in a magnesium-dependent manner, with dissociation constants for multimerization in the micromolar range. pRNA:connector binding is also facilitated by the presence of magnesium ions, with a nanomolar apparent dissociation constant for the interaction. From studies with a mutant pRNA, it appears that multimerization of pRNA is not essential for connector binding and it is likely that connector protein is involved in the stabilization of higher order RNA multimers. It is proposed that magnesium ions may promote conformational change that facilitate pRNA:connector interactions, essential for motor function. PMID:16714447

  20. Affinity of molecular interactions in the bacteriophage phi29 DNA packaging motor.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Mark A; Wood, Jonathan P A; Capaldi, Stephanie A; Baron, Andrew J; Gell, Christopher; Smith, D Alastair; Stonehouse, Nicola J

    2006-01-01

    DNA packaging in the bacteriophage phi29 involves a molecular motor with protein and RNA components, including interactions between the viral connector protein and molecules of pRNA, both of which form multimeric complexes. Data are presented to demonstrate the higher order assembly of pRNA together with the affinity of pRNA:pRNA and pRNA:connector interactions, which are used to propose a model for motor function. In solution, pRNA can form dimeric and trimeric multimers in a magnesium-dependent manner, with dissociation constants for multimerization in the micromolar range. pRNA:connector binding is also facilitated by the presence of magnesium ions, with a nanomolar apparent dissociation constant for the interaction. From studies with a mutant pRNA, it appears that multimerization of pRNA is not essential for connector binding and it is likely that connector protein is involved in the stabilization of higher order RNA multimers. It is proposed that magnesium ions may promote conformational change that facilitate pRNA:connector interactions, essential for motor function.

  1. Conservation of the pyrrolnitrin biosynthetic gene cluster among six pyrrolnitrin-producing strains.

    PubMed

    Hammer, P E; Burd, W; Hill, D S; Ligon, J M; van Pée, K

    1999-11-01

    The prnABCD gene cluster from Pseudomonas fluorescens encodes the biosynthetic pathway for pyrrolnitrin, a secondary metabolite derived from tryptophan which has strong anti-fungal activity. We used the prn genes from P. fluorescens strain BL915 as a probe to clone and sequence homologous genes from three other Pseudomonas strains, Burkholderia cepacia and Myxococcus fulvus. With the exception of the prnA gene from M. fulvus59% similar among the strains, indicating that the biochemical pathway for pyrrolnitrin biosynthesis is highly conserved. The prnA gene from M. fulvus is about 45% similar to prnA from the other strains and contains regions which are highly conserved among all six strains.

  2. Creative Movement and Physical Development. Books for Professionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagens, Helen E.

    1994-01-01

    Reviews three books on creative movement and physical development appropriate for early childhood teachers: (1) "Hello Toes! Movement Games for Children" (A. F. Barlin and N. Kalev); (2) "Movement Activities for Early Childhood" (C. T. Hammett); and (3) "Designing Preschool Movement Programs" (S. W. Sanders). (MDM)

  3. lncRNA maturation to initiate heterochromatin formation in the nucleolus is required for exit from pluripotency in ESCs.

    PubMed

    Savić, Nataša; Bär, Dominik; Leone, Sergio; Frommel, Sandra C; Weber, Fabienne A; Vollenweider, Eva; Ferrari, Elena; Ziegler, Urs; Kaech, Andres; Shakhova, Olga; Cinelli, Paolo; Santoro, Raffaella

    2014-12-01

    The open chromatin of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) condenses into repressive heterochromatin as cells exit the pluripotent state. How the 3D genome organization is orchestrated and implicated in pluripotency and lineage specification is not understood. Here, we find that maturation of the long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) pRNA is required for establishment of heterochromatin at ribosomal RNA genes, the genetic component of nucleoli, and this process is inactivated in pluripotent ESCs. By using mature pRNA to tether heterochromatin at nucleoli of ESCs, we find that localized heterochromatin condensation of ribosomal RNA genes initiates establishment of highly condensed chromatin structures outside of the nucleolus. Moreover, we reveal that formation of such highly condensed, transcriptionally repressed heterochromatin promotes transcriptional activation of differentiation genes and loss of pluripotency. Our findings unravel the nucleolus as an active regulator of chromatin plasticity and pluripotency and challenge current views on heterochromatin regulation and function in ESCs.

  4. Bottom-up Assembly of RNA Arrays and Superstructures as Potential Parts in Nanotechnology.

    PubMed

    Shu, Dan; Moll, Wulf-Dieter; Deng, Zhaoxiang; Mao, Chengde; Guo, Peixuan

    2004-09-01

    DNA and protein have been extensively scrutinized for feasibility as parts in nanotechnology, but another natural building block, RNA, has been largely ignored. RNA can be manipulated to form versatile shapes, thus providing an element of adaptability to DNA nanotechnology, which is predominantly based upon a double-helical structure. The DNA-packaging motor of bacterial virus phi29 contains six DNA-packaging RNAs (pRNA), which together form a hexameric ring via loop/loop interaction. Here we report that this pRNA can be redesigned to form a variety of structures and shapes, including twins, tetramers, rods, triangles, and 3D arrays several microns in size via interaction of programmed helical regions and loops. Three dimensional RNA array formation required a defined nucleotide number for twisting of the interactive helix and a palindromic sequence. Such arrays are unusually stable and resistant to a wide range of temperatures, salt concentrations, and pH.

  5. Characterization of the archaeal ribonuclease P proteins from Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3.

    PubMed

    Terada, Atsushi; Honda, Takashi; Fukuhara, Hideo; Hada, Kazumasa; Kimura, Makoto

    2006-08-01

    Ribonuclease P (RNase P) is a ribonucleoprotein complex involved in the processing of the 5'-leader sequence of precursor tRNA (pre-tRNA). Our earlier study revealed that RNase P RNA (pRNA) and five proteins (PhoPop5, PhoRpp38, PhoRpp21, PhoRpp29, and PhoRpp30) in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3 reconstituted RNase P activity that exhibits enzymatic properties like those of the authentic enzyme. In present study, we investigated involvement of the individual proteins in RNase P activity. Two particles (R-3Ps), in which pRNA was mixed with three proteins, PhoPop5, PhoRpp30, and PhoRpp38 or PhoPop5, PhoRpp30, and PhoRpp21 showed a detectable RNase P activity, and five reconstituted particles (R-4Ps) composed of pRNA and four proteins exhibited RNase P activity, albeit at reduced level compared to that of the reconstituted particle (R-5P) composed of pRNA and five proteins. Time-course analysis of the RNase P activities of R-4Ps indicated that the R-4Ps lacking PhoPop5, PhoRpp21, or PhoRpp30 had virtually reduced activity, while omission of PhoRpp29 or PhoRpp38 had a slight effect on the activity. The results indicate that the proteins contribute to RNase P activity in order of PhoPop5 > PhoRpp30 > PhoRpp21 > PhoRpp29 > PhoRpp38. It was further found that R-4Ps showed a characteristic Mg2+ ion dependency approximately identical to that of R-5P. However, R-4Ps had optimum temperature of around at 55 degrees C which is lower than 70 degrees C for R-5P. Together, it is suggested that the P. horikoshii RNase P proteins are predominantly involved in optimization of the pRNA conformation, though they are individually dispensable for RNase P activity in vitro.

  6. Approaches to determine stoichiometry of viral assembly components.

    PubMed

    Trottier, M; Guo, P

    1997-01-01

    Due to the rapidity of biological reactions, it is difficult to isolate intermediates or to determine the stoichiometry of participants in intermediate reactions. Instead of determining the absolute amount of each component, this study involved the use of relative parameters, such as dilution factors, percentages probabilities, and slopes of titration curves, that can be more accurately quantified to determine the stoichiometry of components involved in bacteriophage phi29 assembly. This work takes advantage of the sensitive in vitro phage phi29 assembly system, in which 10(8) infectious virions per ml without background can be assembled from eight purified components. It provides a convenient assay for quantification of the stoichiometry of packaging components, including the viral procapsid, genomic DNA, DNA-packaging pRNA, and other structural proteins and enzymes. The presence of a procapsid binding domain and another essential functional domain within the pRNA makes it an ideal component for constructing lethal mutants for competitive procapsid binding. Two methods were used for stoichiometry determination. Method 1 was to determine the combination probability of mutant and wild-type pRNAs bound to procapsids. The probability of procapsids that possess a certain amount of mutant and a certain amount of wild-type pRNA, both with an equal binding affinity, was predicted with the binomial equation [EQUATION IN TEXT] where Z is the total number of pRNAs per procapsid, M is the number of mutant pRNAs bound to one procapsid, and (ZM) is equal to [FORMULA IN TEXT]. With various ratios of mutant to wild-type pRNA in in vitro viral assembly, the percent mutant pRNA versus the yield of virions was plotted and compared to a series of predicted curves to find a best fit. It was determined that five or six copies of pRNA were required for one DNA-packaging event, while only one mutant pRNA per procapsid was sufficient to block packaging. Method 2 involved the comparison of

  7. Choice of measurement as the secret

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bin; Gao, Fei; Qin, Su-Juan; Huang, Wei; Liu, Feng; Wen, Qiao-Yan

    2014-04-01

    Recently, Kalev et al. [A. Kalev, A. Mann, and M. Revzen, Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 260502 (2013)., 10.1103/PhysRevLett.110.260502] proposed a quantum (public) communication protocol with an interesting encoding style, where the signal is encoded in the choice of the measurement basis of one of the communicating parties (Bob) and Bob's measurement results are irrelevant for the communication. As we know, one of the main advantages of quantum technique in communication over the classical one is the higher security. Therefore, as Kalev et al. have mentioned in their paper, an interesting open question is whether one could and how to utilize this new encoding style to design a secure communication protocol, i.e., translate the choice of measurement into the secret. Here we propose a quantum key distribution protocol, which is a secure communication protocol, with this encoding style, where Bob's measurement results are still irrelevant. Furthermore, the security of the proposed protocol in the zero-error case has been proved.

  8. [Usefulness++ of total parenteral nutrition in radical surgery for bladder cancer].

    PubMed

    Herranz Amo, F; García Peris, P; Jara Rascón, J; Moncada Iribarren, I; Basquero González, B; Martín Martínez, J C; Díez Cordero, J M; Verdú Tartajo, F

    1991-01-01

    Thirty patients diagnosed with non-metastatic infiltrating vesical cancer (pT2-3, NoMo) due to receive radical cystectomy and transintestinal urinary by-pass, underwent Pre-operative Nutritional Assessment (PRNA), Cystectomy, post-operative Total Parenteral Nutrition (TPN), and Post-operative Nutritional Assessment (PONA) in day 7. The purposes of this prospective, uncontrolled clinical trial were: to identify, prior to surgery, undernourished patients, to assess the effectiveness of post-operative TPN with regard to a decrease in morbidity and mortality, and to evaluate the influence of a deficient nutritional condition in the occurrence of post-operative complications. It was found the 16.6% patients were undernourished prior to surgery, 80% of which showed complications, while only 28% patients considered to be in a normal state of nutrition had complications (there were no fistulae, intraabdominal abscesses, and abdominal sepsis). 6.6% complications were TPN-related. The conclusions were: the percentage of patients with malnutrition prior to surgery is large enough to justify a routine PRNA; TPN decreases morbidity and mortality in patients with previous good nutritional state but not in those with malnutrition; undernourished patients have a very high rate of complications and surgery should be delayed until a acceptable state of nutrition is achieved. PMID:1807121

  9. Intracellular delivery of poly(I:C) induces apoptosis of fibroblast-like synoviocytes via an unknown dsRNA sensor.

    PubMed

    Karpus, Olga N; Hsiao, Cheng-Chih; de Kort, Hanneke; Tak, Paul P; Hamann, Jörg

    2016-08-26

    Fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) express functional membranous and cytoplasmic sensors for double-stranded (ds)RNA. Notably, FLS undergo apoptosis upon transfection with the synthetic dsRNA analog poly(I:C). We here studied the mechanism of intracellular poly(I:C) recognition and subsequent cell death in FLS. FLS responded similarly to poly(I:C) or 3pRNA transfection; however, only intracellular delivery of poly(I:C) induced significant cell death, accompanied by upregulation of pro-apoptotic proteins Puma and Noxa, caspase 3 cleavage, and nuclear segregation. Knockdown of the DExD/H-box helicase MDA5 did not affect the response to intracellular poly(I:C); in contrast, knockdown of RIG-I abrogated the response to 3pRNA. Knockdown of the downstream adaptor proteins IPS, STING, and TRIF or inhibition of TBK1 did not affect the response to intracellular poly(I:C), while knockdown of IFNAR blocked intracellular poly(I:C)-mediated signaling and cell death. We conclude that a so far unknown intracellular sensor recognizes linear dsRNA and induces apoptosis in FLS. PMID:27343555

  10. Construction of Bacteriophage Phi29 DNA Packaging Motor and its Applications in Nanotechnology and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tae Jin; Schwartz, Chad; Guo, Peixuan

    2010-01-01

    Nanobiotechnology involves the creation, characterization, and modification of organized nanomaterials to serve as building blocks for constructing nanoscale devices in technology and medicine. Living systems contain a wide variety of nanomachines and highly ordered structures of macromolecules. The novelty and ingenious design of the bacterial virus phi29 DNA packaging motor and its parts inspired the synthesis of this motor and its components as biomimetics. This 30-nm nanomotor uses six copies of an ATP-binding pRNA to gear the motor. The structural versatility of pRNA has been utilized to construct dimers, trimers, hexamers, and patterned superstructures via the interaction of two interlocking loops. The approach, based on bottom-up assembly, has also been applied to nanomachine fabrication, pathogen detection and the delivery of drugs, siRNA, ribozymes, and genes to specific cells in vitro and in vivo. Another essential component of the motor is the connector, which contains 12 copies of a protein gp10 to form a 3.6-nm central channel as a path for DNA. This article will review current studies of the structure and function of the phi29 DNA packaging motor, as well as the mechanism of motion, the principle of in vitro construction, and its potential nanotechnological and medical applications. PMID:19495981

  11. Stimulation of StAR expression by cAMP is controlled by inhibition of highly inducible SIK1 via CRTC2, a co-activator of CREB.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jinwoo; Tong, Tiegang; Takemori, Hiroshi; Jefcoate, Colin

    2015-06-15

    In mouse steroidogenic cells the activation of cholesterol metabolism is mediated by steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR). Here, we visualized a coordinated regulation of StAR transcription, splicing and post-transcriptional processing, which are synchronized by salt inducible kinase (SIK1) and CREB-regulated transcription coactivator (CRTC2). To detect primary RNA (pRNA), spliced primary RNA (Sp-RNA) and mRNA in single cells, we generated probe sets by using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). These methods allowed us to address the nature of StAR gene expression and to visualize protein-nucleic acid interactions through direct detection. We show that SIK1 represses StAR expression in Y1 adrenal and MA10 testis cells through inhibition of processing mediated by CRTC2. Digital image analysis matches qPCR analyses of the total cell culture. Evidence is presented for spatially separate accumulation of StAR pRNA and Sp-RNA at the gene loci in the nucleus. These findings establish that cAMP, SIK and CRTC mediate StAR expression through activation of individual StAR gene loci.

  12. Genetic and biochemical characterization of mutations in the ATPase and helicase regions of the Upf1 protein.

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Y; Czaplinski, K; Peltz, S W

    1996-01-01

    mRNA degradation is an important control point in the regulation of gene expression and has been linked to the process of translation. One clear example of this linkage is the nonsense-mediated mRNA decay pathway, in which nonsense mutations in a gene can reduce the abundance of the mRNA transcribed from that gene. For the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the Upf1 protein (Upf1p), which contains a cysteine- and histidine-rich region and nucleoside triphosphate hydrolysis and helicase motifs, was shown to be a trans-acting factor in this decay pathway. Biochemical analysis of the wild-type Upf1p demonstrates that it has RNA-dependent ATPase, RNA helicase, and RNA binding activities. A UPF1 gene disruption results in stabilization of nonsense-containing mRNAs, leading to the production of enough functional product to overcome an auxotrophy resulting from a nonsense mutation. A genetic and biochemical study of the UPF1 gene was undertaken in order to understand the mechanism of Upf1p function in the nonsense-mediated mRNA decay pathway. Our analysis suggests that Upf1p is a multifunctional protein with separable activities that can affect mRNA turnover and nonsense suppression. Mutations in the conserved helicase motifs of Upf1p that inactivate its mRNA decay function while not allowing suppression of leu2-2 and tyr7-1 nonsense alleles have been identified. In particular, one mutation located in the ATP binding and hydrolysis motif of Upf1p that changed the aspartic and glutamic acid residues to alanine residues (DE572AA) lacked ATPase and helicase activities, and the mutant formed a Upf1p:RNA complex in the absence of ATP; surprisingly, however, the Upf1p:RNA complex dissociated as a consequence of ATP binding. This result suggests that ATP binding, independent of its hydrolysis, can modulate Upf1p:RNA complex formation for this mutant protein. The role of the RNA binding activity of Upf1p in modulating nonsense suppression is discussed. PMID:8816461

  13. Simple Method for Constructing RNA Triangle, Square, Pentagon by Tuning Interior RNA 3WJ Angle from 60° to 90° or 108°.

    PubMed

    Khisamutdinov, Emil F; Bui, My Nguyen Hoan; Jasinski, Daniel; Zhao, Zhengyi; Cui, Zheng; Guo, Peixuan

    2015-01-01

    Precise shape control of architectures at the nanometer scale is an intriguing but extremely challenging facet. RNA has recently emerged as a unique material and thermostable building block for use in nanoparticle construction. Here, we describe a simple method from design to synthesis of RNA triangle, square, and pentagon by stretching RNA 3WJ native angle from 60° to 90° and 108°, using the three-way junction (3WJ) of the pRNA from bacteriophage phi29 dsDNA packaging motor. These methods for the construction of elegant polygons can be applied to other RNA building blocks including the utilization and application of RNA 4-way, 5-way, and other multi-way junctions.

  14. Delivery of RNA nanoparticles into colorectal cancer metastases following systemic administration.

    PubMed

    Rychahou, Piotr; Haque, Farzin; Shu, Yi; Zaytseva, Yekaterina; Weiss, Heidi L; Lee, Eun Y; Mustain, William; Valentino, Joseph; Guo, Peixuan; Evers, B Mark

    2015-02-24

    The majority of deaths from all cancers, including colorectal cancer (CRC), is a result of tumor metastasis to distant organs. To date, an effective and safe system capable of exclusively targeting metastatic cancers that have spread to distant organs or lymph nodes does not exist. Here, we constructed multifunctional RNA nanoparticles, derived from the three-way junction (3WJ) of bacteriophage phi29 motor pRNA, to target metastatic cancer cells in a clinically relevant mouse model of CRC metastasis. The RNA nanoparticles demonstrated metastatic tumor homing without accumulation in normal organ tissues surrounding metastatic tumors. The RNA nanoparticles simultaneously targeted CRC cancer cells in major sites of metastasis, such as liver, lymph nodes, and lung. Our results demonstrate the therapeutic potential of these RNA nanoparticles as a delivery system for the treatment of CRC metastasis.

  15. Simple Method for Constructing RNA Triangle, Square, Pentagon by Tuning Interior RNA 3WJ Angle from 60° to 90° or 108°.

    PubMed

    Khisamutdinov, Emil F; Bui, My Nguyen Hoan; Jasinski, Daniel; Zhao, Zhengyi; Cui, Zheng; Guo, Peixuan

    2015-01-01

    Precise shape control of architectures at the nanometer scale is an intriguing but extremely challenging facet. RNA has recently emerged as a unique material and thermostable building block for use in nanoparticle construction. Here, we describe a simple method from design to synthesis of RNA triangle, square, and pentagon by stretching RNA 3WJ native angle from 60° to 90° and 108°, using the three-way junction (3WJ) of the pRNA from bacteriophage phi29 dsDNA packaging motor. These methods for the construction of elegant polygons can be applied to other RNA building blocks including the utilization and application of RNA 4-way, 5-way, and other multi-way junctions. PMID:25967062

  16. The structure of flavin-dependent tryptophan 7-halogenase RebH

    SciTech Connect

    Bitto, Eduard; Huang, Yu; Bingman, Craig A.; Singh, Shanteri; Thorson, Jon S.; Phillips, Jr., George N.

    2010-02-19

    Enzyme catalyzed regio- and stereo-specific halogenations influence the biological activity of a diverse array of therapeutically important natural products, including the antibiotics vancomycin and chloramphenicol as well as the anticancer agents calicheamicin and rebeccamycin. The major class of enzymes responsible for this challenging synthetic reaction, the flavin-dependent halogenases, catalyzes the formation of carbon-halogen bonds using flavin, a halide ion (Cl{sup -}, Br{sup -} or I{sup -}), and O{sub 2}. Recent mechanistic and structural advances achieved with the model flavin-dependent tryptophan 7-halogenases PrnA and RebH have greatly enhanced the level of understanding of this unique reaction. According to these studies, the mechanism for tryptophan halogenation proceeds via FAD(C4a)-OOH activation of a chloride ion into the transient chlorinating species HOCl. The key evidence for the requirement of a transient chlorinating species is the discovery that a {approx}10-{angstrom}-long tunnel separates FAD and tryptophan in the ligand-bound form of PrnA. In a recent compelling study to elucidate the strategy by which RebH controls this highly reactive and indiscriminant oxidant, a Lys79-{var_epsilon}NH-Cl chloramine intermediate was implicated as the actual chlorinating species within RebH and a structural investigation of RebH was reported. Here we report our independent structural analysis of Lechevalieria aerocolonigenes RebH (Uni-Prot accession number Q8KHZ8, 530 amino acids) in its apo-form as well as in a complex with both tryptophan and FAD.

  17. Bacillus subtilis 6S-2 RNA serves as a template for short transcripts in vivo.

    PubMed

    Hoch, Philipp G; Schlereth, Julia; Lechner, Marcus; Hartmann, Roland K

    2016-04-01

    The global transcriptional regulator 6S RNA is abundant in a broad range of bacteria. The RNA competes with DNA promoters for binding to the housekeeping RNA polymerase (RNAP) holoenzyme. When bound to RNAP, 6S RNA serves as a transcription template for RNAP in an RNA-dependent RNA polymerization reaction. The resulting short RNA transcripts (so-called product RNAs = pRNAs) can induce a stable structural rearrangement of 6S RNA when reaching a certain length. This rearrangement leads to the release of RNAP and thus the recovery of transcription at DNA promoters. While most bacteria express a single 6S RNA, some harbor a second 6S RNA homolog (termed 6S-2 RNA in Bacillus subtilis). Bacillus subtilis 6S-2 RNA was recently shown to exhibit essentially all hallmark features of a bona fide 6S RNA in vitro, but evidence for the synthesis of 6S-2 RNA-derived pRNAs in vivo has been lacking so far. This raised the question of whether the block of RNAP by 6S-2 RNA might be lifted by a mechanism other than pRNA synthesis. However, here we demonstrate that 6S-2 RNA is able to serve as a template for pRNA synthesis in vivo. We verify this finding by using three independent approaches including a novel primer extension assay. Thus, we demonstrate the first example of an organism that expresses two distinct 6S RNAs that both exhibit all mechanistic features defined for this type of regulatory RNA.

  18. Dose Dependent Activation of Retinoic Acid-Inducible Gene-I Promotes Both Proliferation and Apoptosis Signals in Human Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Ming; Zhu, Chao; Ye, Weimin; Zhu, Hanguang; Chen, Wantao; Zhang, Chenping; Zhang, Zhiyuan

    2013-01-01

    The retinoic-acid-inducible gene (RIG)-like receptor (RLR) family proteins are major pathogen reorganization receptors (PRR) responsible for detection of viral RNA, which initiates antiviral response. Here, we evaluated the functional role of one RLR family member, RIG-I, in human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). RIG-I is abundantly expressed both in poorly-differentiated primary cancer and lymph node metastasis, but not in normal adjacent tissues. Activation of RIG-I by transfection with low dose of 5′-triphosphate RNA (3p-RNA) induces low levels of interferon and proinflammatory cytokines and promotes NF-κB- and Akt-dependent cell proliferation, migration and invasion. In contrast, activation of RIG-I by a high dose of 3p-RNA induces robust mitochondria-derived apoptosis accompanied by decreased activation of Akt, which is independent of the interferon and TNFα receptor, but can be rescued by over-expression of constitutively active Akt. Furthermore, co-immunoprecipitation experiments indicate that the CARD domain of RIG-I is essential for inducing apoptosis by interacting with caspase-9. Together, our results reveal a dual role of RIG-I in HNSCC through regulating activation of Akt, in which RIG-I activation by low-dose viral dsRNA increases host cell surviral, whereas higher level of RIG-I activation leads to apopotosis. These findings highlight the therapeutic potential of dsRNA mediated RIG-I activation in the treatment of HNSCC. PMID:23484008

  19. Endothelial RIG-I activation impairs endothelial function

    SciTech Connect

    Asdonk, Tobias; Nickenig, Georg; Zimmer, Sebastian

    2012-03-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RIG-I activation impairs endothelial function in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RIG-I activation alters HCAEC biology in vitro. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EPC function is affected by RIG-I stimulation in vitro. -- Abstract: Background: Endothelial dysfunction is a crucial part of the chronic inflammatory atherosclerotic process and is mediated by innate and acquired immune mechanisms. Recent studies suggest that pattern recognition receptors (PRR) specialized in immunorecognition of nucleic acids may play an important role in endothelial biology in a proatherogenic manner. Here, we analyzed the impact of endothelial retinoic acid inducible gene I (RIG-I) activation upon vascular endothelial biology. Methods and results: Wild type mice were injected intravenously with 32.5 {mu}g of the RIG-ligand 3pRNA (RNA with triphosphate at the 5 Prime end) or polyA control every other day for 7 days. In 3pRNA-treated mice, endothelium-depended vasodilation was significantly impaired, vascular oxidative stress significantly increased and circulating endothelial microparticle (EMP) numbers significantly elevated compared to controls. To gain further insight in RIG-I dependent endothelial biology, cultured human coronary endothelial cells (HCAEC) and endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) were stimulated in vitro with 3pRNA. Both cells types express RIG-I and react with receptor upregulation upon stimulation. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation is enhanced in both cell types, whereas apoptosis and proliferation is not significantly affected in HCAEC. Importantly, HCAEC release significant amounts of proinflammatory cytokines in response to RIG-I stimulation. Conclusion: This study shows that activation of the cytoplasmatic nucleic acid receptor RIG-I leads to endothelial dysfunction. RIG-I induced endothelial damage could therefore be an important pathway in atherogenesis.

  20. Synthesis of PCR-derived, single-stranded DNA probes suitable for in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Hannon, K; Johnstone, E; Craft, L S; Little, S P; Smith, C K; Heiman, M L; Santerre, R F

    1993-08-01

    We report the novel synthesis of polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-derived single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) probes and their subsequent application in in situ hybridizations. Serial transverse sections of an 11.5-day postcoitum mouse embryo were hybridized to a 33P-ssDNA, 33P-RNA, or 35S-RNA probe corresponding to the same 181-bp sequence in the myogenin cDNA. Signal obtained using 33P-ssDNA was more intense than that using 33P-RNA probe, while signal/noise ratios obtained with both 33P-probes were far superior to those obtained with 35S-probe. Digoxigenin-labeled chicken growth hormone (GH) ssDNA gave slightly more intense signal than did digoxigenin-labeled chicken GH RNA when hybridized to chicken pituitary sections. 32P-ssDNA probes were found to be suitable for Northern blot hybridization. Advantages of using ssDNA probes for in situ hybridization include: (1) The ssDNA technique is rapid and simple. There was no need to clone a DNA template into a special RNA vector or order special T7-containing PCR primers. ssDNA probes can be synthesized in less than 1 day using any primers which currently exist in a laboratory (optimal probe length for in situ hybridization is between 50 and 200 bp). (2) In three separate in situ experiments, ssDNA probes yielded more intense signal than RNA probes. (3) ssDNA probes are potentially more stable than RNA probes. (4) Since the RNAse rinse is eliminated, posthybridization rinses are shortened when hybridizing with ssDNA probes. The ssDNA probes produced by this protocol can be labeled with a variety of different isotopes (both radioactive and nonradioactive), and are excellent probes for use in in situ hybridizations.

  1. Isolation and Characterization of Suppressors of Two Escherichia Coli Dnag Mutations, Dnag2903 and Parb

    PubMed Central

    Britton, R. A.; Lupski, J. R.

    1997-01-01

    The dnaG gene of Escherichia coli encodes the primase protein, which synthesizes a short pRNA that is essential for the initiation of both leading and lagging strand DNA synthesis. Two temperature-sensitive mutations in the 3' end of the dnaG gene, dnaG2903 and parB, cause a defect in chromosome partitioning at the nonpermissive temperature 42°. We have characterized 24 cold-sensitive suppressor mutations of these two dnaG alleles. By genetic mapping and complementation, five different classes of suppressors have been assigned: sdgC, sdgD, sdgE, sdgG and sdgH. The genes responsible for suppression in four of the five classes have been determined. Four of the sdgC suppressor alleles are complemented by the dnaE gene, which encodes the enzymatic subunit of DNA polymerase III. The sdgE class are mutations in era, an essential GTPase of unknown function. The sdgG suppressor is likely a mutation in one of three genes: ubiC, ubiA or yjbI. The sdgH class affects rpsF, which encodes the ribosomal protein S6. Possible mechanisms of suppression by these different classes are discussed. PMID:9093842

  2. Regression of Gastric Cancer by Systemic Injection of RNA Nanoparticles Carrying both Ligand and siRNA

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Daxiang; Zhang, Chunlei; Liu, Bing; Shu, Yi; Du, Tong; Shu, Dan; Wang, Kan; Dai, Fangping; Liu, Yanlei; Li, Chao; Pan, Fei; Yang, Yuming; Ni, Jian; Li, Hui; Brand-Saberi, Beate; Guo, Peixuan

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. RNA nanotechnology has recently emerged as an important field due to recent finding of its high thermodynamic stability, favorable and distinctive in vivo attributes. Here we reported the use of the thermostable three-way junction (3WJ) of bacteriophage phi29 motor pRNA to escort folic acid, a fluorescent image marker and BRCAA1 siRNA for targeting, imaging, delivery, gene silencing and regression of gastric cancer in animal models. In vitro assay revealed that the RNA nanoparticles specifically bind to gastric cancer cells, and knock-down the BRCAA1 gene. Apoptosis of gastric cancer cells was observed. Animal trials confirmed that these RNA nanoparticles could be used to image gastric cancer in vivo, while showing little accumulation in crucial organs and tissues. The volume of gastric tumors noticeably decreased during the course of treatment. No damage to important organs by RNA nanoparticles was detectible. All the results indicated that this novel RNA nanotechnology can overcome conventional cancer therapeutic limitations and opens new opportunities for specific delivery of therapeutics to stomach cancer without damaging normal cells and tissues, reduce the toxicity and side effect, improve the therapeutic effect, and exhibit great potential in clinical tumor therapy. PMID:26137913

  3. Regression of Gastric Cancer by Systemic Injection of RNA Nanoparticles Carrying both Ligand and siRNA.

    PubMed

    Cui, Daxiang; Zhang, Chunlei; Liu, Bing; Shu, Yi; Du, Tong; Shu, Dan; Wang, Kan; Dai, Fangping; Liu, Yanlei; Li, Chao; Pan, Fei; Yang, Yuming; Ni, Jian; Li, Hui; Brand-Saberi, Beate; Guo, Peixuan

    2015-07-03

    Gastric cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. RNA nanotechnology has recently emerged as an important field due to recent finding of its high thermodynamic stability, favorable and distinctive in vivo attributes. Here we reported the use of the thermostable three-way junction (3WJ) of bacteriophage phi29 motor pRNA to escort folic acid, a fluorescent image marker and BRCAA1 siRNA for targeting, imaging, delivery, gene silencing and regression of gastric cancer in animal models. In vitro assay revealed that the RNA nanoparticles specifically bind to gastric cancer cells, and knock-down the BRCAA1 gene. Apoptosis of gastric cancer cells was observed. Animal trials confirmed that these RNA nanoparticles could be used to image gastric cancer in vivo, while showing little accumulation in crucial organs and tissues. The volume of gastric tumors noticeably decreased during the course of treatment. No damage to important organs by RNA nanoparticles was detectible. All the results indicated that this novel RNA nanotechnology can overcome conventional cancer therapeutic limitations and opens new opportunities for specific delivery of therapeutics to stomach cancer without damaging normal cells and tissues, reduce the toxicity and side effect, improve the therapeutic effect, and exhibit great potential in clinical tumor therapy.

  4. Phosphorylation of an HP1-like Protein Regulates Heterochromatin Body Assembly for DNA Elimination

    PubMed Central

    Kataoka, Kensuke; Mochizuki, Kazufumi

    2015-01-01

    Summary Heterochromatic loci are often assembled into higher-order heterochromatin bodies in diverse eukaryotes. However, the formation and biological roles of heterochromatin bodies are poorly understood. In the ciliated protozoan Tetrahymena, de novo heterochromatin body formation is accompanied by programmed DNA elimination. Here, we show that the heterochromatin body component Jub1p promotes heterochromatin body formation and dephosphorylation of the Heterochromatin Protein 1-like protein Pdd1p. Through the mutagenesis of the phosphorylated residues of Pdd1p, we demonstrate that Pdd1p dephosphorylation promotes the electrostatic interaction between Pdd1p and RNA in vitro and heterochromatin body formation in vivo. We therefore propose that heterochromatin body is assembled by the Pdd1p-RNA interaction. Pdd1p dephosphorylation and Jub1p are required for heterochromatin body formation and DNA elimination but not for local heterochromatin assembly, indicating that heterochromatin body plays an essential role in DNA elimination. PMID:26688337

  5. Molecular Basis of Histone Tail Recognition by Human TIP5 PHD Finger and Bromodomain of the Chromatin Remodeling Complex NoRC

    PubMed Central

    Tallant, Cynthia; Valentini, Erica; Fedorov, Oleg; Overvoorde, Lois; Ferguson, Fleur M.; Filippakopoulos, Panagis; Svergun, Dmitri I.; Knapp, Stefan; Ciulli, Alessio

    2015-01-01

    Summary Binding of the chromatin remodeling complex NoRC to RNA complementary to the rDNA promoter mediates transcriptional repression. TIP5, the largest subunit of NoRC, is involved in recruitment to rDNA by interactions with promoter-bound TTF-I, pRNA, and acetylation of H4K16. TIP5 domains that recognize posttranslational modifications on histones are essential for recruitment of NoRC to chromatin, but how these reader modules recognize site-specific histone tails has remained elusive. Here, we report crystal structures of PHD zinc finger and bromodomains from human TIP5 and BAZ2B in free form and bound to H3 and/or H4 histones. PHD finger functions as an independent structural module in recognizing unmodified H3 histone tails, and the bromodomain prefers H3 and H4 acetylation marks followed by a key basic residue, KacXXR. Further low-resolution analyses of PHD-bromodomain modules provide molecular insights into their trans histone tail recognition, required for nucleosome recruitment and transcriptional repression of the NoRC complex. PMID:25533489

  6. 5'-Triphosphate RNA is the ligand for RIG-I.

    PubMed

    Hornung, Veit; Ellegast, Jana; Kim, Sarah; Brzózka, Krzysztof; Jung, Andreas; Kato, Hiroki; Poeck, Hendrik; Akira, Shizuo; Conzelmann, Karl-Klaus; Schlee, Martin; Endres, Stefan; Hartmann, Gunther

    2006-11-10

    The structural basis for the distinction of viral RNA from abundant self RNA in the cytoplasm of virally infected cells is largely unknown. We demonstrated that the 5'-triphosphate end of RNA generated by viral polymerases is responsible for retinoic acid-inducible protein I (RIG-I)-mediated detection of RNA molecules. Detection of 5'-triphosphate RNA is abrogated by capping of the 5'-triphosphate end or by nucleoside modification of RNA, both occurring during posttranscriptional RNA processing in eukaryotes. Genomic RNA prepared from a negative-strand RNA virus and RNA prepared from virus-infected cells (but not from noninfected cells) triggered a potent interferon-alpha response in a phosphatase-sensitive manner. 5'-triphosphate RNA directly binds to RIG-I. Thus, uncapped 5'-triphosphate RNA (now termed 3pRNA) present in viruses known to be recognized by RIG-I, but absent in viruses known to be detected by MDA-5 such as the picornaviruses, serves as the molecular signature for the detection of viral infection by RIG-I.

  7. Trm4 and Nsun2 RNA:m5C methyltransferases form metabolite-dependent, covalent adducts with previously methylated RNA.

    PubMed

    Moon, Haley J; Redman, Kent L

    2014-11-18

    Trm4p from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and its mammalian orthologue Nsun2 fabricate 5-methylcytosine (m(5)C) in RNA molecules utilizing a dual-cysteine catalytic mechanism. These enzymes are now shown to form covalent complexes with previously methylated RNA. Enzyme linkage to methylated RNA requires S-adenosylhomocysteine (AdoHcy), and the removal of this metabolite results in the disassembly of preexisting complexes. The fraction of Trm4p linked to modified RNA is influenced by the AdoHcy concentration and by the pH of the solution, with maximal formation of Trm4p-RNA complexes observed in the pH range of 5.5-6.5. Four active-site residues critical for Trm4p-mediated tRNA methylation are also required for the formation of the denaturant-resistant complexes with m(5)C-containing RNA. On the basis of these findings, it is proposed that formation of a covalent complex between dual-cysteine RNA:m(5)C methyltransferases and methylated RNA provides a unique means by which metabolic factors can influence RNA. By controlling the degree of formation of the enzyme-RNA covalent complex, AdoHcy and pH are likely to influence the extent of m(5)C formation and the rate of release of methylated RNA from RNA:m(5)C methyltransferases. Metabolite-induced covalent complexes could plausibly affect the processing and function of m(5)C-containing RNAs.

  8. The Rabies Virus L Protein Catalyzes mRNA Capping with GDP Polyribonucleotidyltransferase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Ogino, Minako; Ito, Naoto; Sugiyama, Makoto; Ogino, Tomoaki

    2016-01-01

    The large (L) protein of rabies virus (RABV) plays multiple enzymatic roles in viral RNA synthesis and processing. However, none of its putative enzymatic activities have been directly demonstrated in vitro. In this study, we expressed and purified a recombinant form of the RABV L protein and verified its guanosine 5′-triphosphatase and GDP polyribonucleotidyltransferase (PRNTase) activities, which are essential for viral mRNA cap formation by the unconventional mechanism. The RABV L protein capped 5′-triphosphorylated but not 5′-diphosphorylated RABV mRNA-start sequences, 5′-AACA(C/U), with GDP to generate the 5′-terminal cap structure G(5′)ppp(5′)A. The 5′-AAC sequence in the substrate RNAs was found to be strictly essential for RNA capping with the RABV L protein. Furthermore, site-directed mutagenesis showed that some conserved amino acid residues (G1112, T1170, W1201, H1241, R1242, F1285, and Q1286) in the PRNTase motifs A to E of the RABV L protein are required for cap formation. These findings suggest that the putative PRNTase domain in the RABV L protein catalyzes the rhabdovirus-specific capping reaction involving covalent catalysis of the pRNA transfer to GDP, thus offering this domain as a target for developing anti-viral agents. PMID:27213429

  9. Analysis of specific RNA in cultured cells through quantitative integration of q-PCR and N-SIM single cell FISH images: Application to hormonal stimulation of StAR transcription.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jinwoo; Foong, Yee Hoon; Musaitif, Ibrahim; Tong, Tiegang; Jefcoate, Colin

    2016-07-01

    The steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) has been proposed to serve as the switch that can turn on/off steroidogenesis. We investigated the events that facilitate dynamic StAR transcription in response to cAMP stimulation in MA-10 Leydig cells, focusing on splicing anomalies at StAR gene loci. We used 3' reverse primers in a single reaction to respectively quantify StAR primary (p-RNA), spliced (sp-RNA/mRNA), and extended 3' untranslated region (UTR) transcripts, which were quantitatively imaged by high-resolution fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). This approach delivers spatio-temporal resolution of initiation and splicing at single StAR loci, and transfers individual mRNA molecules to cytoplasmic sites. Gene expression was biphasic, initially showing slow splicing, transitioning to concerted splicing. The alternative 3.5-kb mRNAs were distinguished through the use of extended 3'UTR probes, which exhibited distinctive mitochondrial distribution. Combining quantitative PCR and FISH enables imaging of localization of RNA expression and analysis of RNA processing rates.

  10. The Rabies Virus L Protein Catalyzes mRNA Capping with GDP Polyribonucleotidyltransferase Activity.

    PubMed

    Ogino, Minako; Ito, Naoto; Sugiyama, Makoto; Ogino, Tomoaki

    2016-01-01

    The large (L) protein of rabies virus (RABV) plays multiple enzymatic roles in viral RNA synthesis and processing. However, none of its putative enzymatic activities have been directly demonstrated in vitro. In this study, we expressed and purified a recombinant form of the RABV L protein and verified its guanosine 5'-triphosphatase and GDP polyribonucleotidyltransferase (PRNTase) activities, which are essential for viral mRNA cap formation by the unconventional mechanism. The RABV L protein capped 5'-triphosphorylated but not 5'-diphosphorylated RABV mRNA-start sequences, 5'-AACA(C/U), with GDP to generate the 5'-terminal cap structure G(5')ppp(5')A. The 5'-AAC sequence in the substrate RNAs was found to be strictly essential for RNA capping with the RABV L protein. Furthermore, site-directed mutagenesis showed that some conserved amino acid residues (G1112, T1170, W1201, H1241, R1242, F1285, and Q1286) in the PRNTase motifs A to E of the RABV L protein are required for cap formation. These findings suggest that the putative PRNTase domain in the RABV L protein catalyzes the rhabdovirus-specific capping reaction involving covalent catalysis of the pRNA transfer to GDP, thus offering this domain as a target for developing anti-viral agents.

  11. Signature motifs of GDP polyribonucleotidyltransferase, a non-segmented negative strand RNA viral mRNA capping enzyme, domain in the L protein are required for covalent enzyme-pRNA intermediate formation.

    PubMed

    Neubauer, Julie; Ogino, Minako; Green, Todd J; Ogino, Tomoaki

    2016-01-01

    The unconventional mRNA capping enzyme (GDP polyribonucleotidyltransferase, PRNTase; block V) domain in RNA polymerase L proteins of non-segmented negative strand (NNS) RNA viruses (e.g. rabies, measles, Ebola) contains five collinear sequence elements, Rx(3)Wx(3-8)ΦxGxζx(P/A) (motif A; Φ, hydrophobic; ζ, hydrophilic), (Y/W)ΦGSxT (motif B), W (motif C), HR (motif D) and ζxxΦx(F/Y)QxxΦ (motif E). We performed site-directed mutagenesis of the L protein of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV, a prototypic NNS RNA virus) to examine participation of these motifs in mRNA capping. Similar to the catalytic residues in motif D, G1100 in motif A, T1157 in motif B, W1188 in motif C, and F1269 and Q1270 in motif E were found to be essential or important for the PRNTase activity in the step of the covalent L-pRNA intermediate formation, but not for the GTPase activity that generates GDP (pRNA acceptor). Cap defective mutations in these residues induced termination of mRNA synthesis at position +40 followed by aberrant stop-start transcription, and abolished virus gene expression in host cells. These results suggest that the conserved motifs constitute the active site of the PRNTase domain and the L-pRNA intermediate formation followed by the cap formation is essential for successful synthesis of full-length mRNAs.

  12. Hormonal Regulation of alpha-Amylase Gene Transcription in Wild Oat (Avena fatua L.) Aleurone Protoplasts.

    PubMed

    Zwar, J A; Hooley, R

    1986-02-01

    The time of appearance and relative amounts of alpha-amylase mRNA in wild oat (Avena fatua L.) aleurone protoplasts incubated with 1 micromolar gibberellin A(4) (GA(4)) were closely correlated with the amounts of alpha-amylase enzyme secreted by the protoplasts. In the absence of GA(4), or when protoplasts were incubated with 25 micromolar abscisic acid (ABA) together with 1 micromolar GA(4) no alpha-amylase mRNA was detected and only very low levels of alpha-amylase were secreted. Nuclei were isolated in high yields (65-71%) from aleurone protoplasts and in an in vitro transcription system displayed characteristics of a faithful DNA-dependent RNA synthesizing system. The time course of incorporation of [(3)H]-UTP suggested that the RNA synthesized was mainly ;run off' transcription and therefore that the transcripts produced in vitro were those being synthesized in the protoplasts at the times when the nuclei were isolated. By hybridizing in vitro synthesized [(32)P]RNA to barley alpha-amylase cDNA and control filters we have estimated that 90 +/- 10 ppm of the transcripts synthesized by nuclei isolated from GA(4) treated protoplasts can be attributed to alpha-amylase sequences and that statistically insignificant amounts of these transcripts are obtained from control and GA(4) plus ABA treatments. The results suggest that GA(4) and ABA influence the transcription of alpha-amylase genes in aleurone protoplasts of wild oat.

  13. Using RNA nanoparticles with thermostable motifs and fluorogenic modules for real-time detection of RNA folding and turnover in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Pi, Fengmei; Shu, Dan; Vieweger, Mario; Guo, Peixuan

    2015-01-01

    RNA nanotechnology is an emerging field at the interface of biochemistry and nanomaterials that shows immense promise for applications in nanomedicines, therapeutics and nanotechnology. Noncoding RNAs, such as siRNA, miRNA, ribozymes, and riboswitches, play important roles in the regulation of cellular processes. They carry out highly specific functions on a compact and efficient footprint. The properties of specificity and small size make them excellent modules in the construction of multifaceted RNA nanoparticles for targeted delivery and therapy. Biological activity of RNA molecules, however, relies on their proper folding. Therefore their thermodynamic and biochemical stability in the cellular environment is critical. Consequently, it is essential to assess global fold and intracellular lifetime of multifaceted RNA nanoparticles to optimize their therapeutic effectiveness. Here, we describe a method to express and assemble stable RNA nanoparticles in cells, and to assess the folding and turnover rate of RNA nanoparticles in vitro as well as in vivo in real time using a thermostable core motif derived from pRNA of bacteriophage Phi29 DNA packaging motor and fluorogenic RNA modules.

  14. Engineering of the fluorescent-energy-conversion arm of phi29 DNA packaging motor for single-molecule studies.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tae Jin; Zhang, Hui; Chang, Chun-Li; Savran, Cagri; Guo, Peixuan

    2009-11-01

    The bacteriophage phi29 DNA packaging motor contains a protein core with a central channel comprising twelve copies of re-engineered gp10 protein geared by six copies of packaging RNA (pRNA) and a DNA packaging protein gp16 with unknown copies. Incorporation of this nanomotor into a nanodevice would be beneficial for many applications. To this end, extension and modification of the motor components are necessary for the linkage of this motor to other nanomachines. Here the re-engineering of the motor DNA packaging protein gp16 by extending its length and doubling its size using a fusion protein technique is reported. The modified motor integrated with the eGFP-gp16 maintains the ability to convert the chemical energy from adenosine triphosphate (ATP) hydrolysis to mechanical motion and package DNA. The resulting DNA-filled capsid is subsequently converted into an infectious virion. The extended part of the gp16 arm is a fluorescent protein eGFP, which serves as a marker for tracking the motor in single-molecule studies. The activity of the re-engineered motor with eGFP-gp16 is also observed directly with a bright-field microscope via its ability to transport a 2-microm-sized cargo bound to the DNA.

  15. The sub-nucleolar localization of PHF6 defines its role in rDNA transcription and early processing events.

    PubMed

    Todd, Matthew A M; Huh, Michael S; Picketts, David J

    2016-10-01

    Ribosomal RNA synthesis occurs in the nucleolus and is a tightly regulated process that is targeted in some developmental diseases and hyperactivated in multiple cancers. Subcellular localization and immunoprecipitation coupled mass spectrometry demonstrated that a proportion of plant homeodomain (PHD) finger protein 6 (PHF6) protein is localized within the nucleolus and interacts with proteins involved in ribosomal processing. PHF6 sequence variants cause Börjeson-Forssman-Lehmann syndrome (BFLS, MIM#301900) and are also associated with a female-specific phenotype overlapping with Coffin-Siris syndrome (MIM#135900), T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (MIM#613065), and acute myeloid leukemia (MIM#601626); however, very little is known about its cellular function, including its nucleolar role. HEK 293T cells were treated with RNase A, DNase I, actinomycin D, or 5,6-dichloro-β-D-ribofuranosylbenzimadole, followed by immunocytochemistry to determine PHF6 sub-nucleolar localization. We observed RNA-dependent localization of PHF6 to the sub-nucleolar fibrillar center (FC) and dense fibrillar component (DFC), at whose interface rRNA transcription occurs. Subsequent ChIP-qPCR analysis revealed strong enrichment of PHF6 across the entire rDNA-coding sequence but not along the intergenic spacer (IGS) region. When rRNA levels were quantified in a PHF6 gain-of-function model, we observed an overall decrease in rRNA transcription, accompanied by a modest increase in repressive promoter-associated RNA (pRNA) and a significant increase in the expression levels of the non-coding IGS36RNA and IGS39RNA transcripts. Collectively, our results demonstrate a role for PHF6 in carefully mediating the overall levels of ribosome biogenesis within a cell.

  16. PtrA Is Functionally Intertwined with GacS in Regulating the Biocontrol Activity of Pseudomonas chlororaphis PA23

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Nidhi; Klaponski, Natasha; Selin, Carrie; Rudney, Rachel; Fernando, W. G. Dilantha; Belmonte, Mark F.; de Kievit, Teresa R.

    2016-01-01

    In vitro inhibition of the fungal pathogen Sclerotinia sclerotiorum by Pseudomonas chlororaphis PA23 is reliant upon a LysR-type transcriptional regulator (LTTR) called PtrA. In the current study, we show that Sclerotinia stem rot and leaf infection are significantly increased in canola plants inoculated with the ptrA-mutant compared to the wild type, establishing PtrA as an essential regulator of PA23 biocontrol. LTTRs typically regulate targets that are upstream of and divergently transcribed from the LTTR locus. We identified a short chain dehydrogenase (scd) gene immediately upstream of ptrA. Characterization of a scd mutant revealed that it is phenotypically identical to the wild type. Moreover, scd transcript abundance was unchanged in the ptrA mutant. These findings indicate that PtrA regulation does not involve scd, rather this LTTR controls genes located elsewhere on the chromosome. Employing a combination of complementation and transcriptional analysis we investigated whether connections exist between PtrA and other regulators of biocontrol. Besides ptrA, gacS was the only gene able to partially rescue the wild-type phenotype, establishing a connection between PtrA and the sensor kinase GacS. Transcriptomic analysis revealed decreased expression of biosynthetic (phzA, prnA) and regulatory genes (phzI, phzR, rpoS, gacA, rsmX, rsmZ, retS) in the ptrA mutant; conversely, rsmE, and rsmY were markedly upregulated. The transcript abundance of ptrA was nine-fold higher in the mutant background indicating that this LTTR negatively autoregulates itself. In summary, PtrA is an essential regulator of genes required for PA23 biocontrol that is functionally intertwined with GacS. PMID:27713742

  17. Physicochemically tunable polyfunctionalized RNA square architecture with fluorogenic and ribozymatic properties.

    PubMed

    Jasinski, Daniel L; Khisamutdinov, Emil F; Lyubchenko, Yuri L; Guo, Peixuan

    2014-08-26

    Recent advances in RNA nanotechnology allow the rational design of various nanoarchitectures. Previous methods utilized conserved angles from natural RNA motifs to form geometries with specific sizes. However, the feasibility of producing RNA architecture with variable sizes using native motifs featuring fixed sizes and angles is limited. It would be advantageous to display RNA nanoparticles of diverse shape and size derived from a given primary sequence. Here, we report an approach to construct RNA nanoparticles with tunable size and stability. Multifunctional RNA squares with a 90° angle were constructed by tuning the 60° angle of the three-way junction (3WJ) motif from the packaging RNA (pRNA) of the bacteriophage phi29 DNA packaging motor. The physicochemical properties and size of the RNA square were also easily tuned by modulating the “core” strand and adjusting the length of the sides of the square via predictable design. Squares of 5, 10, and 20 nm were constructed, each showing diverse thermodynamic and chemical stabilities. Four “arms” extending from the corners of the square were used to incorporate siRNA, ribozyme, and fluorogenic RNA motifs. Unique intramolecular contact using the pre-existing intricacy of the 3WJ avoids relatively weaker intermolecular interactions via kissing loops or sticky ends. Utilizing the 3WJ motif, we have employed a modular design technique to construct variable-size RNA squares with controllable properties and functionalities for diverse and versatile applications with engineering, pharmaceutical, and medical potential. This technique for simple design to finely tune physicochemical properties adds a new angle to RNA nanotechnology. PMID:24971772

  18. Fabrication of 14 different RNA nanoparticles for specific tumor targeting without accumulation in normal organs.

    PubMed

    Shu, Yi; Haque, Farzin; Shu, Dan; Li, Wei; Zhu, Zhenqi; Kotb, Malak; Lyubchenko, Yuri; Guo, Peixuan

    2013-06-01

    Due to structural flexibility, RNase sensitivity, and serum instability, RNA nanoparticles with concrete shapes for in vivo application remain challenging to construct. Here we report the construction of 14 RNA nanoparticles with solid shapes for targeting cancers specifically. These RNA nanoparticles were resistant to RNase degradation, stable in serum for >36 h, and stable in vivo after systemic injection. By applying RNA nanotechnology and exemplifying with these 14 RNA nanoparticles, we have established the technology and developed "toolkits" utilizing a variety of principles to construct RNA architectures with diverse shapes and angles. The structure elements of phi29 motor pRNA were utilized for fabrication of dimers, twins, trimers, triplets, tetramers, quadruplets, pentamers, hexamers, heptamers, and other higher-order oligomers, as well as branched diverse architectures via hand-in-hand, foot-to-foot, and arm-on-arm interactions. These novel RNA nanostructures harbor resourceful functionalities for numerous applications in nanotechnology and medicine. It was found that all incorporated functional modules, such as siRNA, ribozymes, aptamers, and other functionalities, folded correctly and functioned independently within the nanoparticles. The incorporation of all functionalities was achieved prior, but not subsequent, to the assembly of the RNA nanoparticles, thus ensuring the production of homogeneous therapeutic nanoparticles. More importantly, upon systemic injection, these RNA nanoparticles targeted cancer exclusively in vivo without accumulation in normal organs and tissues. These findings open a new territory for cancer targeting and treatment. The versatility and diversity in structure and function derived from one biological RNA molecule implies immense potential concealed within the RNA nanotechnology field.

  19. Genomics of pyrrolnitrin biosynthetic loci: evidence for conservation and whole-operon mobility within gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Costa, Rodrigo; van Aarle, Ingrid M; Mendes, Rodrigo; van Elsas, Jan Dirk

    2009-01-01

    Pyrrolnitrin (PRN) is a tryptophan-derived secondary metabolite produced by a narrow range of gram-negative bacteria. The PRN biosynthesis by rhizobacteria presumably has a key role in their life strategies and in the biocontrol of plant diseases. The biosynthetic operon that encodes the pathway that converts tryptophan to PRN is composed of four genes, prnA through D, whose diversity, genomic context and spread over bacterial genomes are poorly understood. Therefore, we launched an endeavour aimed at retrieving, by in vitro and in silico means, diverse bacteria carrying the prnABCD biosynthetic loci in their genomes. Analysis of polymorphisms of the prnD gene sequences revealed a high level of conservation between Burkholderia, Pseudomonas and Serratia spp. derived sequences. Whole-operon- and prnD-based phylogeny resulted in tree topologies that are incongruent with the taxonomic status of the evaluated strains as predicted by 16S rRNA gene phylogeny. The genomic composition of c. 20 kb DNA fragments containing the PRN operon varied in different strains. Highly conserved and distinct transposase-encoding genes surrounding the PRN biosynthetic operons of Burkholderia pseudomallei strains were found. A prnABCD-deprived genomic region in B. pseudomallei strain K96243 contained the same gene composition as, and shared high homology with, the flanking regions of the PRN operon in B. pseudomallei strains 668, 1106a and 1710b. Our results strongly suggest that the PRN biosynthetic operon is mobile. The extent, frequency and promiscuity of this mobility remain to be understood. PMID:18793314

  20. Elastic properties and heterogeneous stiffness of the phi29 motor connector channel.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rajendra; Grubmüller, Helmut

    2014-03-18

    The DNA packaging motor of the bacteriophage ϕ29, comprising head-tail connector, ATPase, and pRNA, transports the viral DNA inside the procapsid against pressure differences of up to ∼60 atm during replication. Several models for the DNA packaging mechanism have been proposed, which attribute different roles to the connector, and require specific mechanical properties of the connector. To characterize these properties at the atomic level, and to understand how the connector withstands this large pressure, we have carried out molecular dynamics simulations of the whole connector both in equilibrium and under mechanical stress. The simulations revealed a quite heterogeneous distribution of stiff and soft regions, resembling that of typical composite materials that are also optimized to resist mechanical stress. In particular, the conserved middle α-helical region is found to be remarkably stiff, similar only to structural proteins forming viral shell, silk, or collagen. In contrast, large parts of the peripheral interface to the ϕ29 procapsid turned out to be rather soft. Force probe and umbrella sampling simulations showed that large connector deformations are remarkably reversible, and served to calculate the free energies required for these deformations. In particular, for an untwisting deformation by 12°, as postulated by the untwist-twist model, more than four times' larger energy is required than is available from hydrolysis of one ATP molecule. Combined with previous experiments, this result is incompatible with the untwist-twist model. In contrast, our simulations support the recently proposed one-way revolution model and suggest in structural terms how the connector blocks DNA leakage. In particular, conserved loops at the rim of the central channel, which are in direct contact with the DNA, are found to be rather flexible and tightly anchored to the rigid central region. These findings suggest a check-valve mechanism, with the flexible loops

  1. Hormonal Regulation of α-Amylase Gene Transcription in Wild Oat (Avena fatua L.) Aleurone Protoplasts

    PubMed Central

    Zwar, John A.; Hooley, Richard

    1986-01-01

    The time of appearance and relative amounts of α-amylase mRNA in wild oat (Avena fatua L.) aleurone protoplasts incubated with 1 micromolar gibberellin A4 (GA4) were closely correlated with the amounts of α-amylase enzyme secreted by the protoplasts. In the absence of GA4, or when protoplasts were incubated with 25 micromolar abscisic acid (ABA) together with 1 micromolar GA4 no α-amylase mRNA was detected and only very low levels of α-amylase were secreted. Nuclei were isolated in high yields (65-71%) from aleurone protoplasts and in an in vitro transcription system displayed characteristics of a faithful DNA-dependent RNA synthesizing system. The time course of incorporation of [3H]-UTP suggested that the RNA synthesized was mainly `run off' transcription and therefore that the transcripts produced in vitro were those being synthesized in the protoplasts at the times when the nuclei were isolated. By hybridizing in vitro synthesized [32P]RNA to barley α-amylase cDNA and control filters we have estimated that 90 ± 10 ppm of the transcripts synthesized by nuclei isolated from GA4 treated protoplasts can be attributed to α-amylase sequences and that statistically insignificant amounts of these transcripts are obtained from control and GA4 plus ABA treatments. The results suggest that GA4 and ABA influence the transcription of α-amylase genes in aleurone protoplasts of wild oat. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:16664643

  2. The sub-nucleolar localization of PHF6 defines its role in rDNA transcription and early processing events

    PubMed Central

    Todd, Matthew A M; Huh, Michael S; Picketts, David J

    2016-01-01

    Ribosomal RNA synthesis occurs in the nucleolus and is a tightly regulated process that is targeted in some developmental diseases and hyperactivated in multiple cancers. Subcellular localization and immunoprecipitation coupled mass spectrometry demonstrated that a proportion of plant homeodomain (PHD) finger protein 6 (PHF6) protein is localized within the nucleolus and interacts with proteins involved in ribosomal processing. PHF6 sequence variants cause Börjeson–Forssman–Lehmann syndrome (BFLS, MIM#301900) and are also associated with a female-specific phenotype overlapping with Coffin–Siris syndrome (MIM#135900), T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (MIM#613065), and acute myeloid leukemia (MIM#601626); however, very little is known about its cellular function, including its nucleolar role. HEK 293T cells were treated with RNase A, DNase I, actinomycin D, or 5,6-dichloro-β-D-ribofuranosylbenzimadole, followed by immunocytochemistry to determine PHF6 sub-nucleolar localization. We observed RNA-dependent localization of PHF6 to the sub-nucleolar fibrillar center (FC) and dense fibrillar component (DFC), at whose interface rRNA transcription occurs. Subsequent ChIP-qPCR analysis revealed strong enrichment of PHF6 across the entire rDNA-coding sequence but not along the intergenic spacer (IGS) region. When rRNA levels were quantified in a PHF6 gain-of-function model, we observed an overall decrease in rRNA transcription, accompanied by a modest increase in repressive promoter-associated RNA (pRNA) and a significant increase in the expression levels of the non-coding IGS36RNA and IGS39RNA transcripts. Collectively, our results demonstrate a role for PHF6 in carefully mediating the overall levels of ribosome biogenesis within a cell. PMID:27165002

  3. Systemic Delivery of Anti-miRNA for Suppression of Triple Negative Breast Cancer Utilizing RNA Nanotechnology.

    PubMed

    Shu, Dan; Li, Hui; Shu, Yi; Xiong, Gaofeng; Carson, William E; Haque, Farzin; Xu, Ren; Guo, Peixuan

    2015-10-27

    MicroRNAs play important roles in regulating the gene expression and life cycle of cancer cells. In particular, miR-21, an oncogenic miRNA is a major player involved in tumor initiation, progression, invasion and metastasis in several cancers, including triple negative breast cancer (TNBC). However, delivery of therapeutic miRNA or anti-miRNA specifically into cancer cells in vivo without collateral damage to healthy cells remains challenging. We report here the application of RNA nanotechnology for specific and efficient delivery of anti-miR-21 to block the growth of TNBC in orthotopic mouse models. The 15 nm therapeutic RNA nanoparticles contains the 58-nucleotide (nt) phi29 pRNA-3WJ as a core, a 8-nt sequence complementary to the seed region of miR-21, and a 39-nt epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) targeting aptamer for internalizing RNA nanoparticles into cancer cells via receptor mediated endocytosis. The RNase resistant and thermodynamically stable RNA nanoparticles remained intact after systemic injection into mice and strongly bound to tumors with little or no accumulation in healthy organs 8 h postinjection, and subsequently repressed tumor growth at low doses. The observed specific cancer targeting and tumor regression is a result of several key attributes of RNA nanoparticles: anionic charge which disallows nonspecific passage across negatively charged cell membrane; "active" targeting using RNA aptamers which increases the homing of RNA nanoparticles to cancer cells; nanoscale size and shape which avoids rapid renal clearance and engulfment by lung macrophages and liver Kupffer cells; favorable biodistribution profiles with little accumulation in healthy organs, which minimizes nonspecific side effects; and favorable pharmacokinetic profiles with extended in vivo half-life. The results demonstrate the clinical potentials of RNA nanotechnology based platform to deliver miRNA based therapeutics for cancer treatment.

  4. Systemic Delivery of Anti-miRNA for Suppression of Triple Negative Breast Cancer Utilizing RNA Nanotechnology

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs play important roles in regulating the gene expression and life cycle of cancer cells. In particular, miR-21, an oncogenic miRNA is a major player involved in tumor initiation, progression, invasion and metastasis in several cancers, including triple negative breast cancer (TNBC). However, delivery of therapeutic miRNA or anti-miRNA specifically into cancer cells in vivo without collateral damage to healthy cells remains challenging. We report here the application of RNA nanotechnology for specific and efficient delivery of anti-miR-21 to block the growth of TNBC in orthotopic mouse models. The 15 nm therapeutic RNA nanoparticles contains the 58-nucleotide (nt) phi29 pRNA-3WJ as a core, a 8-nt sequence complementary to the seed region of miR-21, and a 39-nt epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) targeting aptamer for internalizing RNA nanoparticles into cancer cells via receptor mediated endocytosis. The RNase resistant and thermodynamically stable RNA nanoparticles remained intact after systemic injection into mice and strongly bound to tumors with little or no accumulation in healthy organs 8 h postinjection, and subsequently repressed tumor growth at low doses. The observed specific cancer targeting and tumor regression is a result of several key attributes of RNA nanoparticles: anionic charge which disallows nonspecific passage across negatively charged cell membrane; “active” targeting using RNA aptamers which increases the homing of RNA nanoparticles to cancer cells; nanoscale size and shape which avoids rapid renal clearance and engulfment by lung macrophages and liver Kupffer cells; favorable biodistribution profiles with little accumulation in healthy organs, which minimizes nonspecific side effects; and favorable pharmacokinetic profiles with extended in vivo half-life. The results demonstrate the clinical potentials of RNA nanotechnology based platform to deliver miRNA based therapeutics for cancer treatment. PMID:26387848

  5. Skeletal muscle plasticity induced by seasonal acclimatization in carp involves differential expression of rRNA and molecules that epigenetically regulate its synthesis.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Eduardo N; Zuloaga, Rodrigo; Nardocci, Gino; Fernandez de la Reguera, Catalina; Simonet, Nicolas; Fumeron, Robinson; Valdes, Juan Antonio; Molina, Alfredo; Alvarez, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Ribosomal biogenesis controls cellular growth in living organisms, with the rate-limiting step of this process being the transcription of ribosomal DNA (rDNA). Considering that epigenetic mechanisms allow an organism to respond to environmental changes, the expression in muscle of several molecules that regulate epigenetic rRNA synthesis, as well as rDNA transcription, were evaluated during the seasonal acclimatization of the carp. First, the nucleotide sequences encoding the components forming the NoRC (ttf-I, tip5) and eNoSC (sirt1, nml, suv39h1), two chromatin remodeling complexes that silence rRNA synthesis, as well as the sequence of ubf1, a key regulator of rDNA transcription, were obtained. Subsequently the transcriptional regulation of the aforementioned molecules, and other key molecules involved in rRNA synthesis (mh2a1, mh2a2, h2a.z, h2a.z.7, nuc, p80), was assessed. The carp sequences for TTF-I, TIP5, SIRT1, NML, SUV39H1, and UBF1 showed a high conservation of domains and key amino acids in comparison with other fish and higher vertebrates. The mRNA contents in muscle for ttf-I, tip5, sirt1, nml, suv39h1, mh2a1, mh2a.z, and nuc were up-regulated during winter in comparison with summer, whereas the mRNA levels of mh2a2, ubf1, and p80 were down-regulated. Also, the contents of molecules involved in processing the rRNA (snoRNAs) and pRNA, a stabilizer of NoRC complex, were analyzed, finding that these non-coding RNAs were not affected by seasonal acclimatization. These results suggest that variations in the expression of rRNA and the molecules that epigenetically regulate its synthesis are contributing to the muscle plasticity induced by seasonal acclimatization in carp.

  6. Skeletal muscle plasticity induced by seasonal acclimatization in carp involves differential expression of rRNA and molecules that epigenetically regulate its synthesis.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Eduardo N; Zuloaga, Rodrigo; Nardocci, Gino; Fernandez de la Reguera, Catalina; Simonet, Nicolas; Fumeron, Robinson; Valdes, Juan Antonio; Molina, Alfredo; Alvarez, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Ribosomal biogenesis controls cellular growth in living organisms, with the rate-limiting step of this process being the transcription of ribosomal DNA (rDNA). Considering that epigenetic mechanisms allow an organism to respond to environmental changes, the expression in muscle of several molecules that regulate epigenetic rRNA synthesis, as well as rDNA transcription, were evaluated during the seasonal acclimatization of the carp. First, the nucleotide sequences encoding the components forming the NoRC (ttf-I, tip5) and eNoSC (sirt1, nml, suv39h1), two chromatin remodeling complexes that silence rRNA synthesis, as well as the sequence of ubf1, a key regulator of rDNA transcription, were obtained. Subsequently the transcriptional regulation of the aforementioned molecules, and other key molecules involved in rRNA synthesis (mh2a1, mh2a2, h2a.z, h2a.z.7, nuc, p80), was assessed. The carp sequences for TTF-I, TIP5, SIRT1, NML, SUV39H1, and UBF1 showed a high conservation of domains and key amino acids in comparison with other fish and higher vertebrates. The mRNA contents in muscle for ttf-I, tip5, sirt1, nml, suv39h1, mh2a1, mh2a.z, and nuc were up-regulated during winter in comparison with summer, whereas the mRNA levels of mh2a2, ubf1, and p80 were down-regulated. Also, the contents of molecules involved in processing the rRNA (snoRNAs) and pRNA, a stabilizer of NoRC complex, were analyzed, finding that these non-coding RNAs were not affected by seasonal acclimatization. These results suggest that variations in the expression of rRNA and the molecules that epigenetically regulate its synthesis are contributing to the muscle plasticity induced by seasonal acclimatization in carp. PMID:24769445

  7. RNA nanotechnology: engineering, assembly and applications in detection, gene delivery and therapy.

    PubMed

    Guo, Peixuan

    2005-12-01

    Biological macromolecules including DNA, RNA, and proteins, have intrinsic features that make them potential building blocks for the bottom-up fabrication of nanodevices. RNA is unique in nanoscale fabrication due to its amazing diversity of function and structure. RNA molecules can be designed and manipulated with a level of simplicity characteristic of DNA while possessing versatility in structure and function similar to that of proteins. RNA molecules typically contain a large variety of single stranded loops suitable for inter- and intra-molecular interaction. These loops can serve as mounting dovetails obviating the need for external linking dowels in fabrication and assembly. The self-assembly of nanoparticles from RNA involves cooperative interaction of individual RNA molecules that spontaneously assemble in a predefined manner to form a larger two- or three-dimensional structure. Within the realm of self-assembly there are two main categories, namely template and non-template. Template assembly involves interaction of RNA molecules under the influence of specific external sequence, forces, or spatial constraints such as RNA transcription, hybridization, replication, annealing, molding, or replicas. In contrast, non-template assembly involves formation of a larger structure by individual components without the influence of external forces. Examples of non-template assembly are ligation, chemical conjugation, covalent linkage, and loop/loop interaction of RNA, especially the formation of RNA multimeric complexes. The best characterized RNA multiplier and the first to be described in RNA nanotechnological application is the motor pRNA of bacteriophage phi29 which form dimers, trimers, and hexamers, via hand-in-hand interaction. phi29 pRNA can be redesigned to form a variety of structures and shapes including twins, tetramers, rods, triangles, and 3D arrays several microns in size via interaction of programmed helical regions and loops. 3D RNA array formation

  8. Structure and Function Study of Phi29 DNA packaging motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Huaming

    A powerful nanomotor is employed by the tailed dsDNA virus to package the genome into a preformed protein shell during the process of replication. The bacteriophage phi29 is an excellent model for investigating the viral DNA packaging mechanism. The phi29 DNA packaging motor is composed of three ring structures: the dodecameric connector ring, the hexameric pRNA ring and the hexameric ATPase gp16 ring. The connector is the central hub for the DNA to enter and to exit. There are four positively charged lysine rings scattered inside the highly negatively charged connector channel. It is speculated that these positive charged lysine rings may play active roles during DNA packaging in many models. To test this prevalent view, the basic lysine residues were mutated to neutral alanines and the pH environment was altered. Amazingly, the results were beyond expectation. Neither the DNA translocation nor the one-way traffic property of the channel were measurably influenced by the alteration of the charge of lysine residues when the basic lysine residues mutated to neutral alanines or the pH environment changed to acid or basic. The ATPase or the terminase is the central part of the viral DNA packaging motor. The phi29 ATPase is highly hydrophobic and tends to aggregate in solution. A green fluorescent protein tag (eGFP) fused to the N-terminus of gp16 enhanced its solubility and stability. The eGFP-gp16 showed similar activity to wild type gp16 and was easily detected by fluorescent instruments. The interaction between eGFP-gp16 and DNA in the various conditions were investigated by electrophoretic mobility shift assay, FRET and sucrose gradient. gamma-S-ATP dramatically increased gp16 binding affinity to DNA and ATP, ADP, phosphate could release gp16 from gp16-DNA-gamma-S-ATP complex. The sliding of gp16 out of the gp16-DNA-gamma-S-ATP complex could be blocked by addition of Steptavidin to ends of dsDNA which is conjugated with biotins. Also, we found that six eGFP-gp16