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Sample records for ku80 carboxy terminus

  1. Carboxy-terminus of CXCR7 Regulates Receptor Localization and Function

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Paramita; Mihalko, Laura Anne; Coggins, Nathaniel L.; Moudgil, Pranav; Ehrlich, Anna; Luker, Kathryn E.; Luker, Gary D.

    2012-01-01

    Chemokine receptor CXCR7 is essential for normal development, and this receptor promotes initiation and progression of diseases including cancer and autoimmunity. To understand normal and pathologic functions of CXCR7 and advance development of therapeutic agents, there is a need to define structural domains that regulate this receptor. We generated mutants of CXCR7 with deletion of different lengths of the predicted intracellular tail and analyzed effects on CXCR7 signaling and function in cell-based assays. While wild-type CXCR7 predominantly localized to intracellular vesicles, progressive deletion of the carboxy terminus redistributed the receptor to the plasma membrane. Truncating the intracellular tail of CXCR7 did not alter binding to CXCL12, but mutant receptors had reduced scavenging of this chemokine. Using a firefly luciferase complementation system, we established that deletions of the carboxy terminus decreased basal interactions and eliminated ligand-dependent recruitment of the scaffolding protein β-arrestin 2 to receptors. Deleting the carboxy terminus of CXCR7 impaired constitutive internalization of the receptor and reduced activation of ERK1/2 by CXCL12-CXCR7. Inhibiting dynamin, a molecule required for internalization of CXCR7, increased ligand-dependent association of the receptor with β-arrestin 2 and enhanced activation of ERK1/2. These studies establish mechanisms of action for CXCR7 and establish the intracellular tail of CXCR7 as a critical determinant of receptor trafficking, chemokine scavenging, and signaling. PMID:22300987

  2. Identification of peroxisomal targeting signals located at the carboxy terminus of four peroxisomal proteins

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    As part of an effort to understand how proteins are imported into the peroxisome, we have sought to identify the peroxisomal targeting signals in four unrelated peroxisomal proteins: human catalase, rat hydratase:dehydrogenase, pig D-amino acid oxidase, and rat acyl-CoA oxidase. Using gene fusion experiments, we have identified a region of each protein that can direct heterologous proteins to peroxisomes. In each case, the peroxisomal targeting signal is contained at or near the carboxy terminus of the protein. For catalase, the peroxisomal targeting signal is located within the COOH-terminal 27 amino acids of the protein. For hydratase:dehydrogenase, D-amino acid oxidase, and acyl-CoA oxidase, the targeting signals are located within the carboxy- terminal 15, 14, and 15 amino acids, respectively. A tripeptide of the sequence Ser-Lys/His-Leu is present in each of these targeting signals as well as in the peroxisomal targeting signal identified in firefly luciferase (Gould, S.J., G.-A. Keller, and S. Subramani. 1987. J. Cell Biol. 105:2923-2931). When the peroxisomal targeting signal of the hydratase:dehydrogenase is mutated so that the Ser-Lys-Leu tripeptide is converted to Ser-Asn-Leu, it can no longer direct proteins to peroxisomes. We suggest that this tripeptide is an essential element of at least one class of peroxisomal targeting signals. PMID:2901422

  3. Mutation of the 4F2 heavy-chain carboxy terminus causes y+ LAT2 light-chain dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Chubb, Sarah; Kingsland, Alice L; Bröer, Angelika; Bröer, Stefan

    2006-01-01

    Heteromeric amino acid transporters are composed of two subunits--a multipass membrane protein called the 'light chain'--and a single pass glycoprotein called the 'heavy chain'. The light chain contains the transport pore, while the heavy chain appears to be necessary for trafficking the light chain to the plasma membrane. In this study, the role of the 4F2hc heavy chain in the function of the y+ LAT2 light chain was investigated. Carboxy terminal truncations and site specific mutants of 4F2hc were co-expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes with the y+ LAT2 light chain, and the oocytes were analysed for transport activity and surface expression. Truncations of the 4F2hc carboxy terminus ranging between 15 and 404 residues caused a complete loss of light chain function, although all heterodimers were expressed at the cell surface. This indicated that the 15 carboxy-terminal residues of 4F2hc are required for the transport function of the heterodimer. Mutation of the conserved residue leucine 523 to glutamine in the carboxy terminus reduced the Vmax of arginine and leucine uptake. The affinity of the transporter for both arginine and leucine remained unaltered, but the Km-value of Na+, being cotransported with leucine, increased about three-fold. The change of the Na+ Km caused a specific defect of leucine efflux, whereas uptake of leucine at high extracellular NaCl concentration was unaffected.

  4. Role of the Carboxy Terminus of Escherichia coli FtsA in Self-Interaction and Cell Division

    PubMed Central

    Yim, Lucía; Vandenbussche, Guy; Mingorance, Jesús; Rueda, Sonsoles; Casanova, Mercedes; Ruysschaert, Jean-Marie; Vicente, Miguel

    2000-01-01

    The role of the carboxy terminus of the Escherichia coli cell division protein FtsA in bacterial division has been studied by making a series of short sequential deletions spanning from residue 394 to 420. Deletions as short as 5 residues destroy the biological function of the protein. Residue W415 is essential for the localization of the protein into septal rings. Overexpression of the ftsA alleles harboring these deletions caused a coiled cell phenotype previously described for another carboxy-terminal mutation (Gayda et al., J. Bacteriol. 174:5362–5370, 1992), suggesting that an interaction of FtsA with itself might play a role in its function. The existence of such an interaction was demonstrated using the yeast two-hybrid system and a protein overlay assay. Even these short deletions are sufficient for impairing the interaction of the truncated FtsA forms with the wild-type protein in the yeast two-hybrid system. The existence of additional interactions between FtsA molecules, involving other domains, can be postulated from the interaction properties shown by the FtsA deletion mutant forms, because although unable to interact with the wild-type and with FtsAΔ1, they can interact with themselves and cross-interact with each other. The secondary structures of an extensive deletion, FtsAΔ27, and the wild-type protein are indistinguishable when analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and moreover, FtsAΔ27 retains the ability to bind ATP. These results indicate that deletion of the carboxy-terminal 27 residues does not alter substantially the structure of the protein and suggest that the loss of biological function of the carboxy-terminal deletion mutants might be related to the modification of their interacting properties. PMID:11053380

  5. Multiple regulatory roles of the carboxy terminus of Ste2p a yeast GPCR.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyeong-Man; Lee, Yong-Hun; Akal-Strader, Ayca; Uddin, M Seraj; Hauser, Melinda; Naider, Fred; Becker, Jeffrey M

    2012-01-01

    Signaling and internalization of Ste2p, a model G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, are reported to be regulated by phosphorylation status of serine (S) and threonine (T) residues located in the cytoplasmic C-terminus. Although the functional roles of S/T residues located in certain C-terminus regions are relatively well characterized, systemic analyses have not been conducted for all the S/T residues that are spread throughout the C-terminus. A point mutation to alanine was introduced into the S/T residues located within three intracellular loops and the C-terminus individually or in combination. A series of functional assays such as internalization, FUS1-lacZ induction, and growth arrest were conducted in comparison between WT- and mutant Ste2p. The Ste2p in which all S/T residues in the C-terminus were mutated to alanine was more sensitive to α-factor, suggesting that phosphorylation in the C-terminus exerts negative regulatory activities on the Ste2p signaling. C-terminal S/T residues proximal to the seventh transmembrane domain were important for ligand-induced G protein coupling but not for receptor internalization. Sites on the central region of the C-terminus regulated both constitutive and ligand-induced internalization. Residues on the distal part were important for constitutive desensitization and modulated the G protein signaling mediated through the proximal part of the C-terminus. This study demonstrated that the C-terminus contains multiple functional domains with differential and interdependent roles in regulating Ste2p function in which the S/T residues located in each domain play critical roles.

  6. The carboxy-terminus of p63 links cell cycle control and the proliferative potential of epidermal progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Daisuke; Sahu, Raju; Leu, N. Adrian; Senoo, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor p63 (Trp63) plays a key role in homeostasis and regeneration of the skin. The p63 gene is transcribed from dual promoters, generating TAp63 isoforms with growth suppressive functions and dominant-negative ΔNp63 isoforms with opposing properties. p63 also encodes multiple carboxy (C)-terminal variants. Although mutations of C-terminal variants have been linked to the pathogenesis of p63-associated ectodermal disorders, the physiological role of the p63 C-terminus is poorly understood. We report here that deletion of the p63 C-terminus in mice leads to ectodermal malformation and hypoplasia, accompanied by a reduced proliferative capacity of epidermal progenitor cells. Notably, unlike the p63-null condition, we find that p63 C-terminus deficiency promotes expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21Waf1/Cip1 (Cdkn1a), a factor associated with reduced proliferative capacity of both hematopoietic and neuronal stem cells. These data suggest that the p63 C-terminus plays a key role in the cell cycle progression required to maintain the proliferative potential of stem cells of many different lineages. Mechanistically, we show that loss of Cα, the predominant C-terminal p63 variant in epithelia, promotes the transcriptional activity of TAp63 and also impairs the dominant-negative activity of ΔNp63, thereby controlling p21Waf1/Cip1 expression. We propose that the p63 C-terminus links cell cycle control and the proliferative potential of epidermal progenitor cells via mechanisms that equilibrate TAp63 and ΔNp63 isoform function. PMID:25503409

  7. Ku80-deletion suppresses spontaneous tumors and induces a p53-mediated DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    Holcomb, Valerie B.; Rodier, Francis; Choi, Yong Jun; Busuttil, Rita A.; Vogel, Hannes; Vijg, Jan; Campisi, Judith; Hasty, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Ku80 facilitates DNA repair and therefore should suppress cancer. However, ku80−/− mice exhibit reduced cancer, although they age prematurely and have a shortened life span. We tested the hypothesis that Ku80 deletion suppresses cancer by enhancing cellular tumor suppressive responses to inefficiently repaired DNA damage. In support of this hypothesis, Ku80 deletion ameliorated tumor burden in APCMIN mice, and increased a p53-mediated DNA damage response, DNA lesions, and chromosomal rearrangements. Thus, contrary to its assumed role as a caretaker tumor suppressor, Ku80 facilitates tumor growth most likely by dampening baseline cellular DNA damage responses. PMID:19010925

  8. Accumulation of Ku80 proteins at DNA double-strand breaks in living cells

    SciTech Connect

    Koike, Manabu Koike, Aki

    2008-03-10

    Ku plays a key role in multiple nuclear processes, e.g., DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. The regulation mechanism of the localizations of Ku70 and Ku80 plays a key role in regulating the multiple functions of Ku. Although numerous biochemical studies in vitro have elucidated the DNA binding mechanism of Ku, no accumulation mechanisms of Ku70 and Ku80 at DSBs have been clarified in detail in vivo. In this study, we examined the accumulation mechanism of Ku80 at DSBs in living cells. EGFP-Ku80 accumulation at DSBs began immediately after irradiation. On the other hand, our data show that Ku70 alone, which has DNA binding activity independent of Ku80, cannot accumulate at the DSBs, whereas Ku70 bound to Ku80 can. The deletion of the C-terminal DNA-PKcs-binding domain and the mutation at the SUMOylation site of Ku80 had no effect on Ku80 accumulation. Unexpectedly, N-terminal deletion mutants of Ku80 fully lost their accumulation activity, although the mutants retained their Ku70 binding activity. Altogether, these data demonstrate that Ku80 is essential for Ku70 accumulation at DSBs. Furthermore, three domains of Ku80, i.e., the N-terminal {alpha}/{beta}, the DNA-binding, and Ku70-binding domains, seem to necessary for the accumulation at or recognition of DSBs in the early stage after irradiation.

  9. Calcium influx-mediated translocation of m-calpain induces Ku80 cleavage and enhances the Ku80-related DNA repair pathway

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Kyung Hye; Yu, Han Vit; Kim, Eosu; Na, Younghwa; Kwon, Youngjoo

    2016-01-01

    Proteomic analysis of ionomycin-treated and untreated mammary epithelial MCF10A cells elucidated differences in Ku80 cleavage. Ku80, a subunit of the Ku protein complex, is an initiator of the non-homologous, end-joining (NHEJ), double-strand breaks (DSBs) repair pathway. The nuclear Ku80 was cleaved in a calcium concentration-dependent manner by m-calpain but not by m-calpain. The cleavage of nuclear Ku80 at its α/β domain was validated by Western blotting analysis using flag-tagged expression vectors of truncated versions of Ku80 and a flag antibody and was confirmed in m-calpain knock-down cells and in vitro cell-free evaluation with recombinant proteins of calpains, Ku70, and Ku80. In addition, the cleaved Ku80 still formed a Ku heterodimer and promoted DNA DSB repair activity. Taken together, these findings indicate that translocated m-calpain enhances the NHEJ pathway through the cleavage of Ku80. Based on the present study, m-calpain in DNA repair pathways might be a novel anticancer drug target, or its mechanism might be a possible route for resistance acquisition of DNA damage-inducing chemotherapeutics. PMID:27121057

  10. The Carboxy Terminus of YCF1 Contains a Motif Conserved throughout >500 Myr of Streptophyte Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Archibald, John M.; Gould, Sven B.

    2017-01-01

    Plastids evolved from cyanobacteria by endosymbiosis. During the course of evolution, the coding capacity of plastid genomes shrinks due to gene loss or transfer to the nucleus. In the green lineage, however, there were apparent gene gains including that of ycf1. Although its function is still debated, YCF1 has proven to be a useful marker for plastid evolution. YCF1 sequence and predicted structural features unite the plastid genomes of land plants with those of their closest algal relatives, the higher streptophyte algae; YCF1 appears to have undergone pronounced changes during the course of streptophyte algal evolution. Using new data, we show that YCF1 underwent divergent evolution in the common ancestor of higher streptophyte algae and Klebsormidiophycae. This divergence resulted in the origin of an extreme, klebsormidiophycean-specific YCF1 and the higher streptophyte Ste-YCF1. Most importantly, our analysis uncovers a conserved carboxy-terminal sequence stretch within YCF1 that is unique to higher streptophytes and hints at an important, yet unexplored function. PMID:28164224

  11. Enhanced gene replacements in Ku80 disruption mutants of the dermatophyte, Trichophyton mentagrophytes.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Tsuyoshi; Makimura, Koichi; Hisajima, Tatsuya; Ishihara, Yumiko; Umeda, Yoshiko; Abe, Shigeru

    2009-09-01

    The frequency of targeted gene disruption via homologous recombination is low in the clinically important dermatophyte, Trichophyton mentagrophytes. The Ku genes, Ku70 and Ku80, encode key components of the nonhomologous end-joining pathway involved in DNA double-strand break repair. Their deletion increases the homologous recombination frequency, facilitating targeted gene disruption. To improve the homologous recombination frequency in T. mentagrophytes, the Ku80 ortholog was inactivated. The nucleotide sequence of the Ku80 locus containing a 2788-bp ORF encoding a predicted product of 728 amino acids was identified, and designated as TmKu80. The predicted TmKu80 product showed a high degree of amino acid sequence similarity to known fungal Ku80 proteins. Ku80 disruption mutant strains of T. mentagrophytes were constructed by Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated genetic transformation. The average homologous recombination frequency was 73.3 +/- 25.2% for the areA/nit-2-like nitrogen regulatory gene (tnr) in Ku80(-) mutants, about 33-fold higher than that in wild-type controls. A high frequency (c. 67%) was also obtained for the Tri m4 gene encoding a putative serine protease. Ku80(-) mutant strains will be useful for large-scale reverse genetics studies of dermatophytes, including T. mentagrophytes, providing valuable information on the basic mechanisms of host invasion.

  12. Ku80 cooperates with CBP to promote COX-2 expression and tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Yu; Xuan, Yang; Jia, Yunlu; Hu, Wenxian; Yu, Wendan; Dai, Meng; Li, Zhenglin; Yi, Canhui; Zhao, Shilei; Li, Mei; Du, Sha; Cheng, Wei; Xiao, Xiangsheng; Chen, Yiming; Wu, Taihua; Meng, Songshu; Yuan, Yuhui; Liu, Quentin; Huang, Wenlin; Guo, Wei; Wang, Shusen; Deng, Wuguo

    2015-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) plays an important role in lung cancer development and progression. Using streptavidin-agarose pulldown and proteomics assay, we identified and validated Ku80, a dimer of Ku participating in the repair of broken DNA double strands, as a new binding protein of the COX-2 gene promoter. Overexpression of Ku80 up-regulated COX-2 promoter activation and COX-2 expression in lung cancer cells. Silencing of Ku80 by siRNA down-regulated COX-2 expression and inhibited tumor cell growth in vitro and in a xenograft mouse model. Ku80 knockdown suppressed phosphorylation of ERK, resulting in an inactivation of the MAPK pathway. Moreover, CBP, a transcription co-activator, interacted with and acetylated Ku80 to co-regulate the activation of COX-2 promoter. Overexpression of CBP increased Ku80 acetylation, thereby promoting COX-2 expression and cell growth. Suppression of CBP by a CBP-specific inhibitor or siRNA inhibited COX-2 expression as well as tumor cell growth. Tissue microarray immunohistochemical analysis of lung adenocarcinomas revealed a strong positive correlation between levels of Ku80 and COX-2 and clinicopathologic variables. Overexpression of Ku80 was associated with poor prognosis in patients with lung cancers. We conclude that Ku80 promotes COX-2 expression and tumor growth and is a potential therapeutic target in lung cancer. PMID:25797267

  13. Carboxy-Terminus Recruitment Induced by Substrate Binding in Eukaryotic Fructose Bis-phosphate Aldolases

    SciTech Connect

    Lafrance-Vanasse,J.; Sygusch, J.

    2007-01-01

    The crystal structures of Leishmania mexicana fructose-1,6-bis(phosphate) aldolase in complex with substrate and competitive inhibitor, mannitol-1,6-bis(phosphate), were solved to 2.2 {angstrom} resolution. Crystallographic analysis revealed a Schiff base intermediate trapped in the native structure complexed with substrate while the inhibitor was trapped in a conformation mimicking the carbinolamine intermediate. Binding modes corroborated previous structures reported for rabbit muscle aldolase. Amino acid substitution of Gly-312 to Ala, adjacent to the P{sub 1}-phosphate binding site and unique to trypanosomatids, did not perturb ligand binding in the active site. Ligand attachment ordered amino acid residues 359-367 of the C-terminal region (353-373) that was disordered beyond Asp-358 in the unbound structure, revealing a novel recruitment mechanism of this region by aldolases. C-Terminal peptide ordering is triggered by P{sub 1}-phosphate binding that induces conformational changes whereby C-terminal Leu-364 contacts P{sub 1}-phosphate binding residue Arg-313. C-Terminal region capture synergizes additional interactions with subunit surface residues, not perturbed by P1-phosphate binding, and stabilizes C-terminal attachment. Amino acid residues that participate in the capturing interaction are conserved among class I aldolases, indicating a general recruitment mechanism whereby C-terminal capture facilitates active site interactions in subsequent catalytic steps. Recruitment accelerates the enzymatic reaction by using binding energy to reduce configurational entropy during catalysis thereby localizing the conserved C-terminus tyrosine, which mediates proton transfer, proximal to the active site enamine.

  14. KU80, a key factor for non-homologous end-joining, retards geminivirus multiplication.

    PubMed

    Richter, Kathrin S; Jeske, Holger

    2015-09-01

    KU80 is well-known as a key component of the non-homologous end-joining pathway used to repair DNA double-strand breaks. In addition, the KU80-containing DNA-dependent protein kinase complex in mammals can act as a cytoplasmic sensor for viral DNA to activate innate immune response. We have now, to our knowledge for the first time, demonstrated that the speed of a systemic infection with a plant DNA geminivirus in Arabidopsis thaliana is KU80-dependent. The early emergence of Euphorbia yellow mosaic virus DNA was significantly increased in ku80 knockout mutants compared with wild-type sibling controls. The possible impact of KU80 on geminivirus multiplication by generating non-productive viral DNAs or its role as a pattern-recognition receptor against DNA virus infection is discussed.

  15. Ku80 Counters Oxidative Stress-Induced DNA Damage and Cataract Formation in the Human Lens.

    PubMed

    Smith, Andrew John Oliver; Ball, Simon Sidney Robert; Manzar, Kamal; Bowater, Richard Peter; Wormstone, Ian Michael

    2015-12-01

    Oxidative stress in the human lens leads to a wide range of damage including DNA strand breaks, which are likely to contribute to cataract formation. The protein Ku80 is a fundamental component of the nonhomologous end-joining pathway that repairs DNA double strand breaks. This study investigates the putative impact of Ku80 in cataract prevention in the human lens. The present study used the human lens epithelial cell line FHL124 and whole human lens organ culture. Targeted siRNA was used to deplete Ku80, with Western blot and immunocytochemistry employed to assess Ku80 expression levels. Oxidative stress was induced with hydrogen peroxide and DNA strand breaks measured by alkaline comet assay and γH2AX foci counts. Visual quality of whole human lenses was measured with image analysis software. Expression of Ku80 was predominately found in the cell nucleus of both FHL124 cells and native human lens epithelium. Treatment of FHL124 cells and whole lens cultures with siRNA targeted against Ku80 resulted in a significant knockdown at the protein level. Application of oxidative stress (30 μM H2O2) created more DNA strand breaks when added to Ku80 knockdown cells than in scrambled siRNA control cells as determined by the alkaline comet assay and the number of γH2AX foci. In whole lens cultures, exposure to 1 mM H2O2 resulted in more lens opacity in Ku80 knockdown lenses than match-paired controls. Depletion of Ku80 in the lens through acute change or a consequence of aging is likely to increase levels of DNA strand breaks, which could negatively influence physiological function and promote lens opacity. It is therefore feasible that Ku80 plays a role in retarding cataract formation.

  16. Carboxy terminus of heat shock protein (HSP) 70-interacting protein (CHIP) inhibits HSP70 in the heart.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Bijun; Sun, Guocheng; Feng, Guanli; Duan, Weixun; Zhu, Xiaoling; Chen, Shaoyang; Hou, Lichao; Jin, Zhenxiao; Yi, Dinghua

    2012-12-01

    Heat shock protein (HSP) 70 plays a critical role in protecting the heart from various stressor-induced cell injuries; the mechanism remains to be further understood. The present study aims to elucidate the effect of a probiotics-derived protein, LGG-derived protein p75 (LGP), in alleviating the ischemia/reperfusion (I/R)-induced heart injury. We treated rats with the I/R with or without preadministration with LGP. The levels of HSP70 and carboxy terminus of HSP70-interacting protein (CHIP) in the heart tissue were assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and Western blotting. The effect of CHIP on suppression of HSP70 and the effect of LGP on suppression of CHIP were investigated with an I/R rat model and a cell culture model. The results showed that I/R-induced infarction in the heart could be alleviated by pretreatment with LGP. HSP70 was detected in naïve rat heart tissue extracts. I/R treatment significantly suppressed the level of HSP70 and increased the levels of CHIP in the heart. A complex of CHIP/HSP70 was detected in heart tissue extracts. The addition of recombinant CHIP to culture inhibited HSP70 in heart cells. LGP was bound CHIP in heart cells and prevented the CHIP from binding HSP70. In summary, I/R can suppress HSP70 and increase CHIP in heart cells. CHIP can suppress HSP70 that can be prevented by pretreatment with LGP. The results imply that CHIP may be a potential target in the prevention of I/R-induced heart cell injury.

  17. DNA repair protein Ku80 suppresses chromosomal aberrations and malignant transformation

    PubMed Central

    Difilippantonio, Michael J.; Zhu, Jie; Chen, Hua Tang; Meffre, Eric; Nussenzweig, Michel C.; Max, Edward E.; Ried, Thomas; Nussenzweig, André

    2016-01-01

    Cancer susceptibility genes have been classified into two groups: gatekeepers and caretakers1. Gatekeepers are genes that control cell proliferation and death, whereas caretakers are DNA repair genes whose inactivation leads to genetic instability. Abrogation of both caretaker and gatekeeper function markedly increases cancer susceptibility. Although the importance of Ku80 in DNA double-strand break repair is well established, neither Ku80 nor other components of the non-homologous end-joining pathway are known to have a caretaker role in maintaining genomic stability. Here we show that mouse cells deficient for Ku80 display a marked increase in chromosomal aberrations, including breakage, translocations and aneuploidy. Despite the observed chromosome instabilities, Ku80−/− mice have only a slightly earlier onset of cancer2,3. Loss of p53 synergizes with Ku80 to promote tumorigenesis such that all Ku80−/−p53−/− mice succumb to disseminated pro-B-cell lymphoma before three months of age. Tumours result from a specific set of chromosomal translocations and gene amplifications involving IgH and c-Myc, reminiscent of Burkitt's lymphoma. We conclude that Ku80 is a caretaker gene that maintains the integrity of the genome by a mechanism involving the suppression of chromosomal rearrangements. PMID:10761921

  18. Hyperthermia Induces Apoptosis of 786-O Cells through Suppressing Ku80 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Defeng; Hu, Yuan; Li, Jinhui; Peng, Tao; Su, Jialin; He, Yun; Ji, Weidong

    2015-01-01

    Hyperthermia as an anticancer method has been paid increasing attention in recent years. Several studies have shown that hyperthermia can kill tumor cells by inducing apoptosis. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of hyperthermia-induced apoptosis are largely unknown. To investigate the effects and molecular mechanism of hyperthermia on the apoptosis in renal carcinoma 786-O cells, we firstly examined apoptosis and Ku expression in 786-O cell line treated with heat exposure (42°C for 0-4 h). The results showed that hyperthermia induced apoptosis of 786-O cells, and suppressed significantly Ku80 expression, but not Ku70 expression. Next, we knock-down Ku80 in 786-O cells, generating stable cell line 786-O-shKu80, and detected apoptosis, cell survival and cell cycle distribution. Our data showed higher apoptotic rate and lower surviving fraction in the stable cell line 786-O-shKu80 compared with those in control cells, exposed to the same heat stress (42°C for 0-4 h). Moreover, the results also showed suppression of Ku80 led to G2/M phase arrest in the stable cell line 786-O-shKu80 following heat treatment. Together, these findings indicate that Ku80 may play an important role in hyperthermia-induced apoptosis and heat-sensitivity of renal carcinoma cells through influencing the cell cycle distribution. PMID:25902193

  19. Lethality in PARP-1/Ku80 double mutant mice reveals physiologicalsynergy during early embryogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Henrie, Melinda S.; Kurimasa, Akihiro; Burma, Sandeep; Menissier-de Murcia, Josiane; de Murcia, Gilbert; Li, Gloria C.; Chen,David J.

    2002-09-24

    Ku is an abundant heterodimeric nuclear protein, consisting of 70-kDa and 86-kDa tightly associated subunits that comprise the DNA binding component of DNA-dependent protein kinase. Poly(ADP)ribose polymerase-1 (PARP-1) is a 113-kDa protein that catalyzes the synthesis of poly(ADP-ribose) on target proteins. Both Ku and PARP-1 recognize and bind to DNA ends. Ku functions in the non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) repair pathway whereas PARP-1 functions in the single strand break repair and base excision repair (BER) pathways. Recent studies have revealed that PARP-1 and Ku80 interact in vitro. To determine whether the association of PARP-1 and Ku80 has any physiological significance or synergistic function in vivo, mice lacking both PARP-1 and Ku80 were generated. The resulting offspring died during embryonic development displaying abnormalities around the gastrulation stage. In addition, PARP-1-/-Ku80-/- cultured blastocysts had an increased level of apoptosis. These data suggest that the functions of both Ku80 and PARP-1 are essential for normal embryogenesis and that a loss of genomic integrity leading to cell death through apoptosis is likely the cause of the embryonic lethality observed in these mice.

  20. Carboxy terminus of GATA4 transcription factor is required for its cardiogenic activity and interaction with CDK4

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, Joseph M.; Yamak, Abir; Kirilenko, Pavel; Black, Sarah; Bochtler, Matthias; Lefebvre, Chantal; Nemer, Mona; Latinkić, Branko V.

    2014-01-01

    GATA4-6 transcription factors regulate numerous aspects of development and homeostasis in multiple tissues of mesodermal and endodermal origin. In the heart, the best studied of these factors, GATA4, has multiple distinct roles in cardiac specification, differentiation, morphogenesis, hypertrophy and survival. To improve understanding of how GATA4 achieves its numerous roles in the heart, here we have focused on the carboxy-terminal domain and the residues required for interaction with cofactors FOG2 and Tbx5. We present evidence that the carboxy terminal region composed of amino acids 362–400 is essential for mediating cardiogenesis in Xenopus pluripotent explants and embryos. In contrast, the same region is not required for endoderm-inducing activity of GATA4. Further evidence is presented that the carboxy terminal cardiogenic region of GATA4 does not operate as a generic transcriptional activator. Potential mechanism of action of the carboxy terminal end of GATA4 is provided by the results showing physical and functional interaction with CDK4, including the enhancement of cardiogenic activity of GATA4 by CDK4. These results establish CDK4 as a GATA4 partner in cardiogenesis. The interactions of GATA4 with its other well described cofactors Tbx5 and FOG2 are known to be involved in heart morphogenesis, but their requirement for cardiac differentiation is unknown. We report that the mutations that disrupt interactions of GATA4 with Tbx5 and FOG2, G295S and V217G, respectively, do not impair cardiogenic activity of GATA4. These findings add support to the view that distinct roles of GATA4 in the heart are mediated by different determinants of the protein. Finally, we show that the rat GATA4 likely induces cardiogenesis cell autonomously or directly as it does not require activity of endodermal transcription factor Sox17, a GATA4 target gene that induces cardiogenesis non-cell autonomously. PMID:25241353

  1. Differential expression of DNA nonhomologous end-joining proteins Ku70 and Ku80 in melanoma progression.

    PubMed

    Korabiowska, Monika; Tscherny, Michael; Stachura, Jerzy; Berger, Hermann; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Brinck, Ulrich

    2002-04-01

    Ku70 and Ku80 heterodimers function as regulatory subunits of the DNA-dependent protein kinase and play a very important role in the repairing of DNA double-strand breaks. Although Ku70 is proposed as a candidate for a tumor suppressor gene, not many data are available on Ku70 and Ku80 expression in human tumors. The main aim of this study was to investigate the expression of Ku70 and Ku80 in the ultraviolet-induced lesions-nevus cell nevi, lentigos maligna, and malignant melanomas. Nineteen nevus cell nevi, 23 lentigos maligna, 76 primary melanomas, and 31 melanoma metastases were stained immunohistochemically for the presence of Ku70 and Ku80 proteins. Ku70 and Ku80 expression was preserved in about 80% of nevi, 26% of lentigo maligna, 45% of primary melanomas, and 67% of melanoma metastases. Highly significant differences in Ku70 and Ku80 expression were found between nevi, lentigo maligna, and melanomas. In Cox regression, Ku70 and Ku80 were shown to be highly significant influences on patients' prognosis. Significant correlations between Ku70 and Ku80 expressions were found in nevi, lentigo maligna, and primary melanomas. These correlations were not more present in melanoma metastases. To summarize, earlier phases of melanoma progression seem to be connected with the loss of expression of Ku proteins. Metastatic spread is related to dysregulation of the Ku70 and Ku80 axis.

  2. A synthetic peptide corresponding to the carboxy terminus of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 transmembrane glycoprotein induces alterations in the ionic permeability of Xenopus laevis oocytes.

    PubMed

    Comardelle, A M; Norris, C H; Plymale, D R; Gatti, P J; Choi, B; Fermin, C D; Haislip, A M; Tencza, S B; Mietzner, T A; Montelaro, R C; Garry, R F

    1997-11-20

    The carboxy-terminal 29 amino acids of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 transmembrane glycoprotein (HIV-1 TM) are referred to as lentivirus lytic peptide 1 (LLP-1). Synthetic peptides corresponding to LLP-1 have been shown to induce cytolysis and to alter the permeability of cultured cells to various small molecules. To address the mechanisms by which LLP-1 induces cytolysis and membrane permeability changes, various concentrations of LLP-1 were incubated with Xenopus laevis oocytes, and two-electrode, voltage-clamp recording measurements were performed. LLP-1 at concentrations of 75 nM and above induced dramatic alterations in the resting membrane potential and ionic permeability of Xenopus oocytes. These concentrations of LLP-1 appeared to induce a major disruption of plasma membrane electrophysiological integrity. In contrast, concentrations of LLP-1 of 20-50 nM induced changes in membrane ionic permeability that mimic changes induced by compounds, such as the bee venom peptide melittin, that are known to form channel-like structures in biological membranes at sublytic concentrations. An analog of LLP-1 with greatly reduced cytolytic activity failed to alter the electrophysiological properties of Xenopus oocytes. Thus, by altering plasma membrane ionic permeability, the carboxy terminus of TM may contribute to cytolysis of HIV-1-infected CD4+ cells.

  3. Mutations in the ExbB Cytoplasmic Carboxy Terminus Prevent Energy-Dependent Interaction between the TonB and ExbD Periplasmic Domains▿

    PubMed Central

    Jana, Bimal; Manning, Marta; Postle, Kathleen

    2011-01-01

    The TonB system of Gram-negative bacteria provides passage across the outer membrane (OM) diffusion barrier that otherwise limits access to large, scarce, or important nutrients. In Escherichia coli, the integral cytoplasmic membrane (CM) proteins TonB, ExbB, and ExbD couple the CM proton motive force (PMF) to active transport of iron-siderophore complexes and vitamin B12 across the OM through high-affinity transporters. ExbB is an integral CM protein with three transmembrane domains. The majority of ExbB occupies the cytoplasm. Here, the importance of the cytoplasmic ExbB carboxy terminus (residues 195 to 244) was evaluated by cysteine scanning mutagenesis. D211C and some of the substitutions nearest the carboxy terminus spontaneously formed disulfide cross-links, even though the cytoplasm is a reducing environment. ExbB N196C and D211C substitutions were converted to Ala substitutions to stabilize them. Only N196A, D211A, A228C, and G244C substitutions significantly decreased ExbB activity. With the exception of ExbB(G244C), all of the substituted forms were dominant. Like wild-type ExbB, they all formed a formaldehyde cross-linked tetramer, as well as a tetramer cross-linked to an unidentified protein(s). In addition, they could be formaldehyde cross-linked to ExbD and TonB. Taken together, the data suggested that they assembled normally. Three of four ExbB mutants were defective in supporting both the PMF-dependent formaldehyde cross-link between the periplasmic domains of TonB and ExbD and the proteinase K-resistant conformation of TonB. Thus, mutations in a cytoplasmic region of ExbB prevented a periplasmic event and constituted evidence for signal transduction from cytoplasm to periplasm in the TonB system. PMID:21840979

  4. Mutations in the ExbB cytoplasmic carboxy terminus prevent energy-dependent interaction between the TonB and ExbD periplasmic domains.

    PubMed

    Jana, Bimal; Manning, Marta; Postle, Kathleen

    2011-10-01

    The TonB system of Gram-negative bacteria provides passage across the outer membrane (OM) diffusion barrier that otherwise limits access to large, scarce, or important nutrients. In Escherichia coli, the integral cytoplasmic membrane (CM) proteins TonB, ExbB, and ExbD couple the CM proton motive force (PMF) to active transport of iron-siderophore complexes and vitamin B(12) across the OM through high-affinity transporters. ExbB is an integral CM protein with three transmembrane domains. The majority of ExbB occupies the cytoplasm. Here, the importance of the cytoplasmic ExbB carboxy terminus (residues 195 to 244) was evaluated by cysteine scanning mutagenesis. D211C and some of the substitutions nearest the carboxy terminus spontaneously formed disulfide cross-links, even though the cytoplasm is a reducing environment. ExbB N196C and D211C substitutions were converted to Ala substitutions to stabilize them. Only N196A, D211A, A228C, and G244C substitutions significantly decreased ExbB activity. With the exception of ExbB(G244C), all of the substituted forms were dominant. Like wild-type ExbB, they all formed a formaldehyde cross-linked tetramer, as well as a tetramer cross-linked to an unidentified protein(s). In addition, they could be formaldehyde cross-linked to ExbD and TonB. Taken together, the data suggested that they assembled normally. Three of four ExbB mutants were defective in supporting both the PMF-dependent formaldehyde cross-link between the periplasmic domains of TonB and ExbD and the proteinase K-resistant conformation of TonB. Thus, mutations in a cytoplasmic region of ExbB prevented a periplasmic event and constituted evidence for signal transduction from cytoplasm to periplasm in the TonB system.

  5. Genetic manipulation in Δku80 strains for functional genomic analysis of Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Rommereim, Leah M; Hortua Triana, Miryam A; Falla, Alejandra; Sanders, Kiah L; Guevara, Rebekah B; Bzik, David J; Fox, Barbara A

    2013-07-12

    Targeted genetic manipulation using homologous recombination is the method of choice for functional genomic analysis to obtain a detailed view of gene function and phenotype(s). The development of mutant strains with targeted gene deletions, targeted mutations, complemented gene function, and/or tagged genes provides powerful strategies to address gene function, particularly if these genetic manipulations can be efficiently targeted to the gene locus of interest using integration mediated by double cross over homologous recombination. Due to very high rates of nonhomologous recombination, functional genomic analysis of Toxoplasma gondii has been previously limited by the absence of efficient methods for targeting gene deletions and gene replacements to specific genetic loci. Recently, we abolished the major pathway of nonhomologous recombination in type I and type II strains of T. gondii by deleting the gene encoding the KU80 protein(1,2). The Δku80 strains behave normally during tachyzoite (acute) and bradyzoite (chronic) stages in vitro and in vivo and exhibit essentially a 100% frequency of homologous recombination. The Δku80 strains make functional genomic studies feasible on the single gene as well as on the genome scale(1-4). Here, we report methods for using type I and type II Δku80Δhxgprt strains to advance gene targeting approaches in T. gondii. We outline efficient methods for generating gene deletions, gene replacements, and tagged genes by targeted insertion or deletion of the hypoxanthine-xanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HXGPRT) selectable marker. The described gene targeting protocol can be used in a variety of ways in Δku80 strains to advance functional analysis of the parasite genome and to develop single strains that carry multiple targeted genetic manipulations. The application of this genetic method and subsequent phenotypic assays will reveal fundamental and unique aspects of the biology of T. gondii and related significant human

  6. Overexpression of Ku80 correlates with aggressive clinicopathological features and adverse prognosis in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    WANG, SHUAI; WANG, ZHOU; YANG, YU; SHI, MO; SUN, ZHENGUO

    2015-01-01

    Ku80, a subunit of the heterodymeric Ku protein, is clearly implicated in nonhomologous end joining DNA repair, chemoresistance and radioresistance in malignant tumors. In the present study, the clinicopathological significance of Ku80 in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) was investigated. The expression levels of Ku80 were determined by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry in ESCC specimens and normal esophageal mucosa. The mRNA and protein levels of Ku80 were significantly higher in ESCC tissues than in normal esophageal mucosa, and were significantly associated with tumor differentiation, local invasion, lymph node metastasis and tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) stage. However, overexpression of Ku80 mRNA and protein levels were not significantly correlated with age, gender, tumor site or tumor size. Cox proportional hazards regression model demonstrated that tumor local invasion, lymph node metastasis, TNM stage and Ku80 mRNA and protein levels were independent risk factors indicating the overall survival of patients with ESCC. The present study demonstrated that aberrant Ku80 overexpression is observed in ESCC. In addition, high expression levels of Ku80 are associated with adverse clinicopathological features and unfavorable prognosis in ESCC patients. PMID:26722230

  7. Specificity and direction of depolymerization of beta-poly(L-malate) catalysed by polymalatase from Physarum polycephalum--fluorescence labeling at the carboxy-terminus of beta-poly(L-malate).

    PubMed

    Gasslmaier, B; Holler, E

    1997-12-01

    Beta-poly(L-malate), a major constituent of nuclei in plasmodia of Physarum polycephalum, is enzymatically degraded to L-malate after secretion into the culture medium. This depolymerization is specifically catalysed by an endogenous polymalatase. The mode of action and the specificity criteria have been investigated by employing various chemical derivatives of beta-poly(L-malate), including substitution at the hydroxy-terminus and carboxy-terminus of the polymer, esterification of the pending alpha-carboxylate, and beta-poly(DL-malate). The results of the investigation were summarized in a specificity model that involved recognition of the hydroxy-terminus and of the alpha-carboxylate as substituents of the asymmetric carbon in the malic acid unit. Depolymerization proceeded from the hydroxy-terminus towards the carboxy-terminus, thereby degrading the polymer to L-malate. When the terminal beta-carboxylate had been amidated with the fluorescent N-(1-naphthyl)ethylenediamine, degradation was normal but was arrested at the level of the terminal beta-carboxy-substituted dimer. It should be possible to employ polymalatase as a tool for the detection of branching and other modifications of beta-poly(L-malate).

  8. A novel fragile X syndrome mutation reveals a conserved role for the carboxy-terminus in FMRP localization and function.

    PubMed

    Okray, Zeynep; de Esch, Celine E F; Van Esch, Hilde; Devriendt, Koen; Claeys, Annelies; Yan, Jiekun; Verbeeck, Jelle; Froyen, Guy; Willemsen, Rob; de Vrij, Femke M S; Hassan, Bassem A

    2015-04-01

    Loss of function of the FMR1 gene leads to fragile X syndrome (FXS), the most common form of intellectual disability. The loss of FMR1 function is usually caused by epigenetic silencing of the FMR1 promoter leading to expansion and subsequent methylation of a CGG repeat in the 5' untranslated region. Very few coding sequence variations have been experimentally characterized and shown to be causal to the disease. Here, we describe a novel FMR1 mutation and reveal an unexpected nuclear export function for the C-terminus of FMRP. We screened a cohort of patients with typical FXS symptoms who tested negative for CGG repeat expansion in the FMR1 locus. In one patient, we identified a guanine insertion in FMR1 exon 15. This mutation alters the open reading frame creating a short novel C-terminal sequence, followed by a stop codon. We find that this novel peptide encodes a functional nuclear localization signal (NLS) targeting the patient FMRP to the nucleolus in human cells. We also reveal an evolutionarily conserved nuclear export function associated with the endogenous C-terminus of FMRP. In vivo analyses in Drosophila demonstrate that a patient-mimetic mutation alters the localization and function of Dfmrp in neurons, leading to neomorphic neuronal phenotypes.

  9. Decreased expression of Ku70/Ku80 proteins in malignant melanomas of the oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Korabiowska, Monika; Tscherny, Michael; Grohmann, Ulrike; Hönig, Johannes F; Bartkowski, Stanislaw B; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Brinck, Ulrich

    2002-01-01

    Ku70/80 are genes responsible for the repairing of DNA double-strand breaks and they function as a regulatory subunit of the DNA-dependent protein kinase. Their expression has not yet been investigated in malignant melanomas of the oral cavity. These tumours are characterized by very poor prognosis and etiology independent of UV-radiation. We investigated 29 malignant melanomas of the oral cavity for the expression of Ku70/80 proteins. Ku70 expression was preserved in 21 out of 29 tumours and the percentage of Ku70-positive cells did not exceed 76%. Ku80 was found in 19 out of 29 tumours and the percentage of Ku80-positive cells peaked at 62%. Correlations between Ku70 and Ku80 expression were lost (p>0.05). We conclude that decreased Ku70/80 expression in malignant melanomas of the oral cavity and loss of correlation between these markers may influence progression of oral melanomas.

  10. DNA damage response and Ku80 function in the vertebrate embryo

    PubMed Central

    Bladen, Catherine L.; Lam, Wai K.; Dynan, William S.; Kozlowski, David J.

    2005-01-01

    Cellular responses to DNA damage reflect the dynamic integration of cell cycle control, cell–cell interactions and tissue-specific patterns of gene regulation that occurs in vivo but is not recapitulated in cell culture models. Here we describe use of the zebrafish embryo as a model system to identify determinants of the in vivo response to ionizing radiation-induced DNA damage. To demonstrate the utility of the model we cloned and characterized the embryonic function of the XRCC5 gene, which encodes Ku80, an essential component of the nonhomologous end joining pathway of DNA repair. After the onset of zygotic transcription, Ku80 mRNA accumulates in a tissue-specific pattern, which includes proliferative zones of the retina and central nervous system. In the absence of genotoxic stress, zebrafish embryos with reduced Ku80 function develop normally. However, low dose irradiation of these embryos during gastrulation leads to marked apoptosis throughout the developing central nervous system. Apoptosis is p53 dependent, indicating that it is a downstream consequence of unrepaired DNA damage. Results suggest that nonhomologous end joining components mediate DNA repair to promote survival of irradiated cells during embryogenesis. PMID:15914672

  11. The DNA Repair Protein yKu80 Regulates the Function of Recombination Enhancer during Yeast Mating Type Switching†

    PubMed Central

    Ruan, Chun; Workman, Jerry L.; Simpson, Robert T.

    2005-01-01

    Recombination enhancer (RE) is essential for regulating donor preference during yeast mating type switching. In this study, by using minichromosome affinity purification (MAP) and mass spectrometry, we found that yeast Ku80p is associated with RE in MATa cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays confirmed its occupancy in vivo. Deletion of YKU80 results in altered chromatin structure in the RE region and more importantly causes a dramatic decrease of HML usage in MATa cells. We also detect directional movement of yKu80p from the RE towards HML during switching. These results indicate a novel function of yeast Ku80p in regulating mating type switching. PMID:16166630

  12. Carboxy terminus of secreted phosphoprotein-24 kDa (spp24) is essential for full inhibition of BMP-2 activity.

    PubMed

    Brochmann, Elsa J; Simon, Robert J; Jawien, Janusz; Behnam, Keyvan; Sintuu, Chananit; Wang, Jeffrey C; Murray, Samuel S

    2010-09-01

    Secreted phosphoprotein-24 kDa (spp24) is a bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-binding protein isolated from bone. It exists in a number of size forms and is hypothesized to function as a BMP latency protein and/or a "slow release" mechanism for BMPs involved in bone turnover and repair. We have examined the hypothesis that proteolytic modification of the C-terminus of spp24 affects its BMP-2-binding properties and bioactivity in the BMP-2-stimulated ectopic bone forming bioassay. Three different size forms of recombinant spp24 that correspond to predicted 18.1 kDa, 16.0 kDa, and 14.5 kDa proteolytic products were compared to full-length (fl) spp24. One of these forms (spp18.1) we hypothesize to be the protein which Urist initially, but apparently inaccurately, called "BMP." Only full-length spp24 completely inhibited BMP-2-induced bone formation. The 18.1 kDa truncated isoform of spp24 which we hypothesize to be Urist's protein did not. The inhibitory capacity of the proteins was correlated with their kinetic constants, assessed by surface plasmon resonance. At the highest, inhibitory, dose of spp24 and its derivatives, k(d) ("stability") best predicted the extent of ectopic bone formation whereas at the lowest dose, which was not inhibitory, k(a) ("recognition") best predicted the extent of ectopic bone formation. We conclude that proteolytic processing of spp24 affects the interaction of this protein with BMP-2 and this affects the function of the protein. (c) 2010 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Mass spectrometric identification of pEGFYSQRYamide: a crustacean peptide hormone possessing a vertebrate neuropeptide Y (NPY)-like carboxy-terminus

    PubMed Central

    Stemmler, Elizabeth A.; Bruns, Emily A.; Gardner, Noah P.; Dickinson, Patsy S.; Christie, Andrew E.

    2007-01-01

    In invertebrates, peptides possessing the carboxy (C)-terminal motif -RXRFamide have been proposed as the homologs of vertebrate neuropeptide Y (NPY). Using matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry, in combination with sustained off-resonance irradiation collision-induced dissociation and chemical and enzymatic reactions, we have identified the peptide pEGFYSQRYamide from the neuroendocrine pericardial organ (PO) of the crab Pugettia producta. This peptide is likely the same as that previously reported, but misidentified, as PAFYSQRYamide in several earlier reports (e.g. Li et al. [2003] J. Neurochem. 87,642–656; Fu et al. [2005] J. Comp. Neurol. 493,607–626). The -QRYamide motif contained in pEGFYSQRYamide is identical to that present in many vertebrate members of the NPY superfamily. Mass spectrometric analysis conducted on the POs of several other decapods showed that pEGFYSQRYamide is present in three other brachyurans (Cancer borealis, Cancer irroratus and Cancer productus) as well as in one species from another decapod infraorder (Lithodes maja, an anomuran). Thus, our findings show that at least some invertebrates possess NPY-like peptides in addition to those exhibiting an -RXRFamide C-terminus, and raise the question as to whether the invertebrate -QRYamides are functionally and/or evolutionarily related to the NPY superfamily. PMID:17420018

  14. EAF2 regulates DNA repair through Ku70/Ku80 in the prostate.

    PubMed

    Ai, J; Pascal, L E; Wei, L; Zang, Y; Zhou, Y; Yu, X; Gong, Y; Nakajima, S; Nelson, J B; Levine, A S; Lan, L; Wang, Z

    2016-10-10

    Androgens are known to protect prostate cancer cells from DNA damage. Recent studies showed regulation of DNA repair genes by androgen receptor signaling in prostate cancers. ELL-associated factor 2 (EAF2) is an androgen-regulated tumor suppressor and its intracellular localization can be modulated by ultraviolet light, suggesting a potential role for EAF2 in androgen regulation of DNA repair in prostate cancer cells. Here we show that knockdown of EAF2 or its homolog EAF1 sensitized prostate cancer cells to DNA damage and the sensitization did not require p53. EAF2 knockout mouse prostate was also sensitized to γ-irradiation. Furthermore, EAF2 knockdown blocked androgen repression of LNCaP or C4-2 cells from doxorubicin induction of γH2ax, a DNA damage marker. In human prostate cancer specimens, EAF2 expression was inversely correlated with the level of γH2ax. Further analysis showed that EAF2 and EAF1 are required for the recruitment and retention of Ku70/Ku80 to DNA damage sites and play a functional role in nonhomologous end-joining DNA repair. These findings provide evidence for EAF2 as a key factor mediating androgen protection of DNA damage via Ku70/Ku80 in prostate cancer cells.Oncogene advance online publication, 10 October 2016; doi:10.1038/onc.2016.373.

  15. EAF2 regulates DNA repair through Ku70/Ku80 in the prostate

    PubMed Central

    Ai, Junkui; Pascal, Laura E.; Wei, Leizhen; Zang, Yachen; Zhou, Yibin; Yu, Xinpei; Gong, Yanqing; Nakajima, Satoshi; Nelson, Joel B.; Levine, Arthur S.; Lan, Li; Wang, Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Androgens are known to protect prostate cancer cells from DNA damage. Recent studies showed regulation of DNA repair genes by androgen receptor (AR) signaling in prostate cancers. ELL-associated factor 2 (EAF2) is an androgen-regulated tumor suppressor and its intracellular localization can be modulated by UV light, suggesting a potential role for EAF2 in androgen regulation of DNA repair in prostate cancer cells. Here we show that knockdown of EAF2 or its homolog EAF1 sensitized prostate cancer cells to DNA damage and the sensitization did not require p53. EAF2 knockout mouse prostate was also sensitized to γ-irradiation. Furthermore, EAF2 knockdown blocked androgen repression of LNCaP or C4-2 cells from the doxorubicin-induction of γH2ax, a DNA damage marker. In human prostate cancer specimens, EAF2 expression was inversely correlated with the level of γH2ax. Further analysis showed that EAF2 and EAF1 are required for the recruitment and retention of Ku70/Ku80 to DNA damage sites and play a functional role in non-homologous end-joining DNA repair. These findings provide evidence for EAF2 as a key factor mediating androgen protection of DNA damage via Ku70/Ku80 in prostate cancer cells. PMID:27721405

  16. Mass spectrometric identification of pEGFYSQRYamide: a crustacean peptide hormone possessing a vertebrate neuropeptide Y (NPY)-like carboxy-terminus.

    PubMed

    Stemmler, Elizabeth A; Bruns, Emily A; Gardner, Noah P; Dickinson, Patsy S; Christie, Andrew E

    2007-05-15

    In invertebrates, peptides possessing the carboxy (C)-terminal motif -RXRFamide have been proposed as the homologs of vertebrate neuropeptide Y (NPY). Using matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry, in combination with sustained off-resonance irradiation collision-induced dissociation and chemical and enzymatic reactions, we have identified the peptide pEGFYSQRYamide from the neuroendocrine pericardial organ (PO) of the crab Pugettia producta. This peptide is likely the same as that previously reported, but misidentified, as PAFYSQRYamide in several earlier reports (e.g. [Li, L., Kelley, W.P., Billimoria, C.P., Christie, A.E., Pulver, S.R., Sweedler, J.V., Marder, E. 2003. Mass spectrometric investigation of the neuropeptide complement and release in the pericardial organs of the crab, Cancer borealis. J. Neurochem. 87, 642-656; Fu, Q., Kutz, K.K., Schmidt, J.J., Hsu, Y.W., Messinger, D.I., Cain, S.D., de la Iglesia, H.O., Christie, A.E., Li, L. 2005. Hormone complement of the Cancer productus sinus gland and pericardial organ: an anatomical and mass spectrometric investigation. J. Comp. Neurol. 493, 607-626.]). The -QRYamide motif contained in pEGFYSQRYamide is identical to that present in many vertebrate members of the NPY superfamily. Mass spectrometric analysis conducted on the POs of several other decapods showed that pEGFYSQRYamide is present in three other brachyurans (Cancer borealis, Cancer irroratus and Cancer productus) as well as in one species from another decapod infraorder (Lithodes maja, an anomuran). Thus, our findings show that at least some invertebrates possess NPY-like peptides in addition to those exhibiting an -RXRFamide C-terminus, and raise the question as to whether the invertebrate -QRYamides are functionally and/or evolutionarily related to the NPY superfamily.

  17. Ku70 and ku80 null mutants improve the gene targeting frequency in Monascus ruber M7.

    PubMed

    He, Yi; Liu, Qingpei; Shao, Yanchun; Chen, Fusheng

    2013-06-01

    Normally, gene targeting by homologous recombination occurs rarely during a transformation process since non-homologous recombination is predominant in filamentous fungi. In our previous researches, the average gene replacement frequency (GRF) in Monascus ruber M7 was as low as 15 %. To develop a highly efficient gene targeting system for M. ruber M7, two M. ruber M7 null mutants of ku70 (MrΔku70) and ku80 (MrΔku80) were constructed which had no apparent defects in the development including vegetative growth, colony phenotype, microscopic morphology and spore yield compared with M. ruber M7. In addition, the production of some significant secondary metabolites such as pigments and citrinin had no differences between the two disruptants and the wild-type strain. Further results revealed that the GRFs of triA (encoding a putative acetyltransferase) were 42.2 % and 61.5 % in the MrΔku70 and MrΔku80 strains, respectively, while it was only about 20 % in M. ruber M7. Furthermore, GRFs of these two disruptants at other loci (the pigE, fmdS genes in MrΔku70 and the ku70 gene in MrΔku80) were investigated, and the results indicated that GRFs in the MrΔku70 strain and the MrΔku80 strain were doubled and tripled compared with that in M. ruber M7, respectively. Therefore, the ku70 and ku80 null mutants of M. ruber M7, especially the ku80-deleted strain, will be excellent hosts for efficient gene targeting.

  18. Ubiquitylation of Ku80 by RNF126 Promotes Completion of Nonhomologous End Joining-Mediated DNA Repair.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Noriko; Nakagawa, Tadashi; Iemura, Shun-Ichiro; Yasui, Akira; Shima, Hiroki; Katoh, Yasutake; Nagasawa, Yuko; Natsume, Toru; Igarashi, Kazuhiko; Nakayama, Keiko

    2017-02-15

    Repair of damaged DNA is critical for maintenance of genetic information. In eukaryotes, DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are recognized by the Ku70-Ku80 heterodimer, which then recruits proteins that mediate repair by nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ). Prolonged retention of Ku70/80 at DSBs prevents completion of repair, however, with ubiquitylation of Ku80 having been implicated in Ku70/80 dissociation from DNA. Here, we identify RNF126 as a ubiquitin ligase that is recruited to DSBs and ubiquitylates Ku80, with UBE2D3 serving as an E2 enzyme. Knockdown of RNF126 prevented Ku70/80 dissociation from DSBs and inhibited break repair. Attenuation of Ku80 ubiquitylation by replacement of ubiquitylation site lysines with arginine residues delayed Ku70/80 release from chromatin after DSB induction by genotoxic insults. Together, our data indicate that RNF126 is a novel regulator of NHEJ that promotes completion of DNA repair by ubiquitylating Ku80 and releasing Ku70/80 from damaged DNA. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  19. Expression and heterodimer‐binding activity of Ku70 and Ku80 in human non‐melanoma skin cancer

    PubMed Central

    Parrella, P; Mazzarelli, P; Signori, E; Perrone, G; Marangi, G F; Rabitti, C; Delfino, M; Prencipe, M; Gallo, A P; Rinaldi, M; Fabbrocini, G; Delfino, S; Persichetti, P; Fazio, V M

    2006-01-01

    Background Experimental data suggest that exposure to ultraviolet radiation may indirectly induce DNA double‐strand breaks. Aim To investigate the contribution of the non‐homologous end‐joining repair pathway in basal and squamous cell carcinomas. Methods Levels of Ku70 and Ku80 proteins were determined by immunohistochemical analysis and Ku70–Ku80 heterodimer‐binding activity by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Matched pathological normal margins and skin from healthy people were used as controls. Results A significant increase in Ku70 and Ku80 protein levels was found for both tumour types as compared with normal skin (p<0.001). Squamous cell carcinoma showed increased immunostaining as compared with basal cell tumours (p<0.02). A direct correlation was found between Ku70 and Ku80 protein levels and expression of the proliferation markers Ki‐67/MIB‐1 (p<0.02 and p<0.002, respectively) in basal cell carcinoma. DNA binding activity was increased in basal cell carcinoma samples as compared with matched skin histopathologically negative for cancer (p<0.006). In squamous cell carcinomas, however, the difference was significant only with normal skin (p<0.02) and not with matched pathologically normal margins. Conclusions Overall, an up regulation of the Ku70 and Ku80 protein levels seems to correlate only with tumour proliferation rate. As non‐homologous end joining is an error‐prone mechanism, its up regulation may ultimately increase genomic instability, contributing to tumour progression. PMID:16497868

  20. Suppression of OsKu80 results in defects in developmental growth and increased telomere length in rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Byun, Mi Young; Cui, Li Hua; Kim, Woo Taek

    2015-12-25

    The Ku70-Ku80 heterodimer plays a critical role in the maintenance of genomic stability in humans and yeasts. In this report, we identified and characterized OsKu80 in rice, a model monocot crop. OsKu80 forms a heterodimer with OsKu70 in yeast and plant cells, as demonstrated by yeast two-hybrid, in vivo co-immunoprecipitation, and bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays. RNAi-mediated knock-down T3 transgenic rice plants (Ubi:RNAi-OsKu80) displayed a retarded growth phenotype at the post-germination stage. In addition, the Ubi:RNAi-OsKu80 knock-down progeny exhibited noticeably increased telomere length as compared to wild-type rice. These results are discussed with the idea that OsKu80 plays a role in developmental growth and telomere length regulation in rice plants. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Genome stability of Arabidopsis atm, ku80 and rad51b mutants: somatic and transgenerational responses to stress.

    PubMed

    Yao, Youli; Bilichak, Andriy; Titov, Viktor; Golubov, Andrey; Kovalchuk, Igor

    2013-06-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) can be repaired via two main mechanisms: non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR). Our previous work showed that exposure to abiotic stresses resulted in an increase in point mutation frequency (PMF) and homologous recombination frequency (HRF), and these changes were heritable. We hypothesized that mutants impaired in DSB recognition and repair would also be deficient in somatic and transgenerational changes in PMF and HRF. To test this hypothesis, we analyzed the genome stability of the Arabidopsis thaliana mutants deficient in ATM (communication between DNA strand break recognition and the repair machinery), KU80 (deficient in NHEJ) and RAD51B (deficient in HR repair) genes. We found that all three mutants exhibited higher levels of DSBs. Plants impaired in ATM had a lower spontaneous PMF and HRF, whereas ku80 plants had higher frequencies. Plants impaired in RAD51B had a lower HRF. HRF in wild-type, atm and rad51b plants increased in response to several abiotic stressors, whereas it did not increase in ku80 plants. The progeny of stressed wild-type and ku80 plants exhibited an increase in HRF in response to all stresses, and the increase was higher in ku80 plants. The progeny of atm plants showed an increase in HRF only when the parental generation was exposed to cold or flood, whereas the progeny of rad51b plants completely lacked a transgenerational increase in HRF. Our experiments showed that mutants impaired in the recognition and repair of DSBs exhibited changes in the efficiency of DNA repair as reflected by changes in strand breaks, point mutation and HRF. They also showed that the HR RAD51B protein and the protein ATM that recognized damaged DNA might play an important role in transgenerational changes in HRF.

  2. DNA Repair Biomarker Profiling of Head & Neck Cancer: Ku80 Expression Predicts Locoregional Failure and Death Following Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Moeller, Benjamin J.; Yordy, John S.; Williams, Michelle D.; Giri, Uma; Raju, Uma; Molkentine, David P.; Byers, Lauren A.; Heymach, John V.; Story, Michael D.; Lee, J. Jack; Sturgis, Erich M.; Weber, Randal S.; Garden, Adam S.; Ang, K. Kian; Schwartz, David L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Radiotherapy plays an integral role in the treatment of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Although proteins involved in DNA repair may predict HNSCC response to radiotherapy, none has been validated in this context. We examined whether differential expression of double-strand DNA break (DSB) repair proteins in HNSCC, the chief mediators of DNA repair following irradiation, predict for treatment outcomes. Experimental Design Archival HNSCC tumor specimens (n = 89) were assembled onto a tissue microarray and stained with antibodies raised against 38 biomarkers. The biomarker set was enriched for proteins involved in DSB repair, in addition to established mechanistic markers of radioresistance. Staining was correlated with treatment response and survival alongside established clinical and pathologic covariates. Results were validated in an independent intramural cohort (n = 34). Results Ku80, a key mediator of DSB repair, correlated most closely with clinical outcomes. Ku80 was overexpressed in half of all tumors, and its expression was independent of all other covariates examined. Ku80 overexpression was an independent predictor for both locoregional failure and mortality following radiotherapy (P < 0.01). The predictive power of Ku80 overexpression was confined largely to HPV-negative HNSCC, where it conferred a 9-fold greater risk of death at 2 years. Conclusions Ku80 overexpression is a common feature of HNSCC, and is a candidate DNA repair-related biomarker for radiation treatment failure and death, particularly in patients with high-risk HPV-negative disease. It is a promising, mechanistically rational biomarker to select individual HPV-negative HNSCC patients for strategies to intensify treatment. PMID:21349997

  3. KARP-1 works as a heterodimer with Ku70, but the function of KARP-1 cannot perfectly replace that of Ku80 in DSB repair

    SciTech Connect

    Koike, Manabu; Yutoku, Yasutomo; Koike, Aki

    2011-10-01

    Ku, the heterodimer of Ku70 and Ku80, plays an essential role in the DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair pathway, i.e., non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ). Two isoforms of Ku80 encoded by the same genes, namely, Ku80 and KARP-1 are expressed and function in primate cells, but not in rodent cells. Ku80 works as a heterodimer with Ku70. However, it is not yet clear whether KARP-1 forms a heterodimer with Ku70 and works as a heterodimer. Although KARP-1 appears to work in NHEJ, its physiological role remains unclear. In this study, we established and characterized EGFP-KARP-1-expressing xrs-6 cell lines, EGFP-KARP-1/xrs-6. We found that nuclear localization signal (NLS) of KARP-1 is localized in the C-terminal region. Our data showed that KARP-1 localizes within the nucleus in NLS-dependent and NLS-independent manner and forms a heterodimer with Ku70, and stabilizes Ku70. On the other hand, EGFP-KARP-1 could not perfectly complement the radiosensitivity and DSB repair activity of Ku80-deficient xrs-6 cells. Furthermore, KARP-1 could not accumulate at DSBs faster than Ku80, although EGFP-KARP-1 accumulates at DSBs. Our data demonstrate that the function of KARP-1 could not perfectly replace that of Ku80 in DSB repair, although KARP-1 has some biochemical properties, which resemble those of Ku80, and works as a heterodimer with Ku70. On the other hand, the number of EGFP-KARP-1-expressing xrs-6 cells showing pan-nuclear {gamma}-H2AX staining significantly increases following X-irradiation, suggesting that KARP-1 may have a novel role in DSB response.

  4. KARP-1 works as a heterodimer with Ku70, but the function of KARP-1 cannot perfectly replace that of Ku80 in DSB repair.

    PubMed

    Koike, Manabu; Yutoku, Yasutomo; Koike, Aki

    2011-10-01

    Ku, the heterodimer of Ku70 and Ku80, plays an essential role in the DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair pathway, i.e., non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ). Two isoforms of Ku80 encoded by the same genes, namely, Ku80 and KARP-1 are expressed and function in primate cells, but not in rodent cells. Ku80 works as a heterodimer with Ku70. However, it is not yet clear whether KARP-1 forms a heterodimer with Ku70 and works as a heterodimer. Although KARP-1 appears to work in NHEJ, its physiological role remains unclear. In this study, we established and characterized EGFP-KARP-1-expressing xrs-6 cell lines, EGFP-KARP-1/xrs-6. We found that nuclear localization signal (NLS) of KARP-1 is localized in the C-terminal region. Our data showed that KARP-1 localizes within the nucleus in NLS-dependent and NLS-independent manner and forms a heterodimer with Ku70, and stabilizes Ku70. On the other hand, EGFP-KARP-1 could not perfectly complement the radiosensitivity and DSB repair activity of Ku80-deficient xrs-6 cells. Furthermore, KARP-1 could not accumulate at DSBs faster than Ku80, although EGFP-KARP-1 accumulates at DSBs. Our data demonstrate that the function of KARP-1 could not perfectly replace that of Ku80 in DSB repair, although KARP-1 has some biochemical properties, which resemble those of Ku80, and works as a heterodimer with Ku70. On the other hand, the number of EGFP-KARP-1-expressing xrs-6 cells showing pan-nuclear γ-H2AX staining significantly increases following X-irradiation, suggesting that KARP-1 may have a novel role in DSB response. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Relation between Ku80 and microRNA-99a expression and late rectal bleeding after radiotherapy for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Someya, Masanori; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Nojima, Masanori; Hori, Masakazu; Tateoka, Kunihiko; Nakata, Kensei; Takagi, Masaru; Saito, Masato; Hirokawa, Naoki; Tokino, Takashi; Sakata, Koh-Ichi

    2015-05-01

    Late rectal bleeding is one of the severe adverse events after radiotherapy for prostate cancer. New biomarkers are needed to allow a personalized treatment. Four patients each with grade 0-1 or grade 2-3 rectal bleeding were randomly selected for miRNA array to examine miRNA expression in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs). Based on results of miRNA array, 1 of 348 miRNAs was selected for microRNA assays. Then, expression of DNA-dependent protein kinase mRNA and miR-99a was analyzed in the PBLs of 97 patients. PBLs were exposed to 4Gy of X-ray ex-vivo. In the discovery cohort, grade 2-3 rectal bleeding was significantly higher in the Ku80 <1.09 expression group compared with ⩾1.09 group (P=0.011). In radiation-induced expression of miR-99a, grade 2-3 rectal bleeding was significantly higher in the miR-99a IR(+)/IR(-) >0.93 group compared with ⩽0.93 group (P=0.013). Most patients with grade 2-3 rectal bleeding were in the group with low Ku80 and high miR-99a expression. In the validation cohort, similar results were obtained. A combination of low Ku80 expression and highly-induced miR-99a expression could be a promising marker for predicting rectal bleeding after radiotherapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Human T-cell leukemia virus type 2 Rex carboxy terminus is an inhibitory/stability domain that regulates Rex functional activity and viral replication.

    PubMed

    Xie, Li; Kesic, Matthew; Yamamoto, Brenda; Li, Min; Younis, Ihab; Lairmore, Michael D; Green, Patrick L

    2009-05-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus (HTLV) regulatory protein, Rex, functions to increase the expression of the viral structural and enzymatic gene products. The phosphorylation of two serine residues (S151 and S153) at the C terminus is important for the function of HTLV-2 Rex (Rex-2). The Rex-2 phosphomimetic double mutant (S151D, S153D) is locked in a functionally active conformation. Since rex and tax genes overlap, Rex S151D and S153D mutants were found to alter the Tax oncoprotein coding sequence and transactivation activities. Therefore, additional Rex-2 mutants including P152D, A157D, S151Term, and S158Term were generated and characterized ("Term" indicates termination codon). All Rex-2 mutants and wild-type (wt) Rex-2 localized predominantly to the nucleus/nucleolus, but in contrast to the detection of phosphorylated and unphosphorylated forms of wt Rex-2 (p26 and p24), mutant proteins were detected as a single phosphoprotein species. We found that Rex P152D, A157D, and S158Term mutants are more functionally active than wt Rex-2 and that the Rex-2 C terminus and its specific phosphorylation state are required for stability and optimal expression. In the context of the provirus, the more active Rex mutants (A157D or S158Term) promoted increased viral protein production, increased viral infectious spread, and enhanced HTLV-2-mediated cellular proliferation. Moreover, these Rex mutant viruses replicated and persisted in inoculated rabbits despite higher antiviral antibody responses. Thus, we identified in Rex-2 a novel C-terminal inhibitory domain that regulates functional activity and is positively regulated through phosphorylation. The ability of this domain to modulate viral replication likely plays a key role in the infectious spread of the virus and in virus-induced cellular proliferation.

  7. Human T-Cell Leukemia Virus Type 2 Rex Carboxy Terminus Is an Inhibitory/Stability Domain That Regulates Rex Functional Activity and Viral Replication▿

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Li; Kesic, Matthew; Yamamoto, Brenda; Li, Min; Younis, Ihab; Lairmore, Michael D.; Green, Patrick L.

    2009-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus (HTLV) regulatory protein, Rex, functions to increase the expression of the viral structural and enzymatic gene products. The phosphorylation of two serine residues (S151 and S153) at the C terminus is important for the function of HTLV-2 Rex (Rex-2). The Rex-2 phosphomimetic double mutant (S151D, S153D) is locked in a functionally active conformation. Since rex and tax genes overlap, Rex S151D and S153D mutants were found to alter the Tax oncoprotein coding sequence and transactivation activities. Therefore, additional Rex-2 mutants including P152D, A157D, S151Term, and S158Term were generated and characterized (“Term” indicates termination codon). All Rex-2 mutants and wild-type (wt) Rex-2 localized predominantly to the nucleus/nucleolus, but in contrast to the detection of phosphorylated and unphosphorylated forms of wt Rex-2 (p26 and p24), mutant proteins were detected as a single phosphoprotein species. We found that Rex P152D, A157D, and S158Term mutants are more functionally active than wt Rex-2 and that the Rex-2 C terminus and its specific phosphorylation state are required for stability and optimal expression. In the context of the provirus, the more active Rex mutants (A157D or S158Term) promoted increased viral protein production, increased viral infectious spread, and enhanced HTLV-2-mediated cellular proliferation. Moreover, these Rex mutant viruses replicated and persisted in inoculated rabbits despite higher antiviral antibody responses. Thus, we identified in Rex-2 a novel C-terminal inhibitory domain that regulates functional activity and is positively regulated through phosphorylation. The ability of this domain to modulate viral replication likely plays a key role in the infectious spread of the virus and in virus-induced cellular proliferation. PMID:19279097

  8. CHIP, a carboxy terminus HSP-70 interacting protein, prevents cell death induced by endoplasmic reticulum stress in the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Cabral Miranda, Felipe; Adão-Novaes, Juliana; Hauswirth, William W; Linden, Rafael; Petrs-Silva, Hilda; Chiarini, Luciana B

    2014-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and protein misfolding are associated with various neurodegenerative diseases. ER stress activates unfolded protein response (UPR), an adaptative response. However, severe ER stress can induce cell death. Here we show that the E3 ubiquitin ligase and co-chaperone Carboxyl Terminus HSP70/90 Interacting Protein (CHIP) prevents neuron death in the hippocampus induced by severe ER stress. Organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHSCs) were exposed to Tunicamycin, a pharmacological ER stress inducer, to trigger cell death. Overexpression of CHIP was achieved with a recombinant adeno-associated viral vector (rAAV) and significantly diminished ER stress-induced cell death, as shown by analysis of propidium iodide (PI) uptake, condensed chromatin, TUNEL and cleaved caspase 3 in the CA1 region of OHSCs. In addition, overexpression of CHIP prevented upregulation of both CHOP and p53 both pro-apoptotic pathways induced by ER stress. We also detected an attenuation of eIF2a phosphorylation promoted by ER stress. However, CHIP did not prevent upregulation of BiP/GRP78 induced by UPR. These data indicate that overexpression of CHIP attenuates ER-stress death response while maintain ER stress adaptative response in the central nervous system. These results indicate a neuroprotective role for CHIP upon UPR signaling. CHIP emerge as a candidate for clinical intervention in neurodegenerative diseases associated with ER stress.

  9. CHIP, a carboxy terminus HSP-70 interacting protein, prevents cell death induced by endoplasmic reticulum stress in the central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Cabral Miranda, Felipe; Adão-Novaes, Juliana; Hauswirth, William W.; Linden, Rafael; Petrs-Silva, Hilda; Chiarini, Luciana B.

    2015-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and protein misfolding are associated with various neurodegenerative diseases. ER stress activates unfolded protein response (UPR), an adaptative response. However, severe ER stress can induce cell death. Here we show that the E3 ubiquitin ligase and co-chaperone Carboxyl Terminus HSP70/90 Interacting Protein (CHIP) prevents neuron death in the hippocampus induced by severe ER stress. Organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHSCs) were exposed to Tunicamycin, a pharmacological ER stress inducer, to trigger cell death. Overexpression of CHIP was achieved with a recombinant adeno-associated viral vector (rAAV) and significantly diminished ER stress-induced cell death, as shown by analysis of propidium iodide (PI) uptake, condensed chromatin, TUNEL and cleaved caspase 3 in the CA1 region of OHSCs. In addition, overexpression of CHIP prevented upregulation of both CHOP and p53 both pro-apoptotic pathways induced by ER stress. We also detected an attenuation of eIF2a phosphorylation promoted by ER stress. However, CHIP did not prevent upregulation of BiP/GRP78 induced by UPR. These data indicate that overexpression of CHIP attenuates ER-stress death response while maintain ER stress adaptative response in the central nervous system. These results indicate a neuroprotective role for CHIP upon UPR signaling. CHIP emerge as a candidate for clinical intervention in neurodegenerative diseases associated with ER stress. PMID:25620910

  10. Role of the Carboxy Terminus of SecA in Iron Acquisition, Protein Translocation, and Virulence of the Bacterial Pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Fiester, Steven E.; Nwugo, Chika C.; Penwell, William F.; Neary, John M.; Beckett, Amber C.; Arivett, Brock A.; Schmidt, Robert E.; Geiger, Sarah C.; Connerly, Pamela L.; Menke, Sharon M.; Tomaras, Andrew P.

    2015-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a Gram-negative opportunistic nosocomial pathogen that causes pneumonia and soft tissue and systemic infections. Screening of a transposon insertion library of A. baumannii ATCC 19606T resulted in the identification of the 2010 derivative, which, although capable of growing well in iron-rich media, failed to prosper under iron chelation. Genetic, molecular, and functional assays showed that 2010's iron utilization-deficient phenotype is due to an insertion within the 3′ end of secA, which results in the production of a C-terminally truncated derivative of SecA. SecA plays a critical role in protein translocation through the SecYEG membrane channel. Accordingly, the secA mutation resulted in undetectable amounts of the ferric acinetobactin outer membrane receptor protein BauA while not affecting the production of other acinetobactin membrane protein transport components, such as BauB and BauE, or the secretion of acinetobactin by 2010 cells cultured in the presence of subinhibitory concentrations of the synthetic iron chelator 2,2′-dipyridyl. Outer membrane proteins involved in nutrient transport, adherence, and biofilm formation were also reduced in 2010. The SecA truncation also increased production of 30 different proteins, including proteins involved in adaptation/tolerance responses. Although some of these protein changes could negatively affect the pathobiology of the 2010 derivative, its virulence defect is mainly due to its inability to acquire iron via the acinetobactin-mediated system. These results together indicate that although the C terminus of the A. baumannii ATCC 19606T SecA is not essential for viability, it plays a critical role in the production and translocation of different proteins and virulence. PMID:25605767

  11. Inactivation of ku80 in the mushroom-forming fungus Schizophyllum commune increases the relative incidence of homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Jan F; Ohm, Robin A; de Bekker, Charissa; Wösten, Han A B; Lugones, Luis G

    2010-09-01

    Schizophyllum commune is the only mushroom-forming fungus in which targeted gene deletions by homologous recombination have been reported. However, these deletions occur with a low frequency. To overcome this, the ku80 gene of S. commune was deleted. This gene is involved in the nonhomologous end-joining system for DNA repair. The Deltaku80 strain was not affected in growth and development. However, the transformation efficiency was reduced up to 100-fold. This was accompanied by a strong increase in the relative number of transformants with a homologous integration of a knockout construct. Genes sc15, jmj3 and pri2 were deleted in the Deltaku80 strain. In total, seven out of 10 transformants showed a gene deletion. This frequency will facilitate a systematic analysis of gene function in S. commune.

  12. Preclinical evaluation of (111)In-DTPA-INCA-X anti-Ku70/Ku80 monoclonal antibody in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Evans-Axelsson, Susan; Vilhelmsson Timmermand, Oskar; Welinder, Charlotte; Borrebaeck, Carl Ak; Strand, Sven-Erik; Tran, Thuy A; Jansson, Bo; Bjartell, Anders

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to assess the Ku70/Ku80 complex as a potential target for antibody imaging of prostate cancer. We evaluated the in vivo and ex vivo tumor targeting and biodistribution of the (111)In-labeled human internalizing antibody, INCA-X ((111)In-DTPA-INCA-X antibody), in NMRI-nude mice bearing human PC-3, PC-3M-Lu2 or DU145 xenografts. DTPA-conjugated, non-labeled antibody was pre-administered at different time-points followed by a single intravenous injection of (111)In-DTPA-INCA-X. At 48, 72 and 96 h post-injection, tissues were harvested, and the antibody distribution was determined by measuring radioactivity. Preclinical SPECT/CT imaging of mice with and without the predose was performed at 48 hours post-injection of labeled DTPA-INCA-X. Biodistribution of the labeled antibody showed enriched activity in tumor, spleen and liver. Animals pre-administered with DTPA-INCA-X showed increased tumor uptake and blood content of (111)In-DTPA-INCA-X with reduced splenic and liver uptake. The in vitro and in vivo data presented show that the (111)In-labeled INCA-X antibody is internalized into prostate cancer cells and by pre-administering non-labeled DTPA-INCA-X, we were able to significantly reduce the off target binding and increase the (111)In-DTPA-INCA-X mAb uptake in PC-3, PC-3M-Lu2 and DU145 xenografts. The results are encouraging and identifying the Ku70/Ku80 antigen as a target is worth further investigation for functional imaging of prostate cancer.

  13. Preclinical evaluation of 111In-DTPA-INCA-X anti-Ku70/Ku80 monoclonal antibody in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Evans-Axelsson, Susan; Vilhelmsson Timmermand, Oskar; Welinder, Charlotte; Borrebaeck, Carl AK; Strand, Sven-Erik; Tran, Thuy A; Jansson, Bo; Bjartell, Anders

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to assess the Ku70/Ku80 complex as a potential target for antibody imaging of prostate cancer. We evaluated the in vivo and ex vivo tumor targeting and biodistribution of the 111In-labeled human internalizing antibody, INCA-X (111In-DTPA-INCA-X antibody), in NMRI-nude mice bearing human PC-3, PC-3M-Lu2 or DU145 xenografts. DTPA-conjugated, non-labeled antibody was pre-administered at different time-points followed by a single intravenous injection of 111In-DTPA-INCA-X. At 48, 72 and 96 h post-injection, tissues were harvested, and the antibody distribution was determined by measuring radioactivity. Preclinical SPECT/CT imaging of mice with and without the predose was performed at 48 hours post-injection of labeled DTPA-INCA-X. Biodistribution of the labeled antibody showed enriched activity in tumor, spleen and liver. Animals pre-administered with DTPA-INCA-X showed increased tumor uptake and blood content of 111In-DTPA-INCA-X with reduced splenic and liver uptake. The in vitro and in vivo data presented show that the 111In-labeled INCA-X antibody is internalized into prostate cancer cells and by pre-administering non-labeled DTPA-INCA-X, we were able to significantly reduce the off target binding and increase the 111In-DTPA-INCA-X mAb uptake in PC-3, PC-3M-Lu2 and DU145 xenografts. The results are encouraging and identifying the Ku70/Ku80 antigen as a target is worth further investigation for functional imaging of prostate cancer. PMID:24982817

  14. Application of new in situ hybridization probes for Ku70 and Ku80 in tissue microarrays of paraffin-embedded malignant melanomas: correlation with immunohistochemical analysis.

    PubMed

    Korabiowska, Monika; Bauer, Hanne; Quentin, Tomas; Stachura, Jerzy; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Brinck, Ulrich

    2004-02-01

    Ku70 and Ku80 proteins are responsible for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks and function as a regulatory subunit of the DNA-dependent protein kinase. In this study we analyzed expression of both genes in malignant melanoma tissue arrays applying in situ hybridization probes produced by our research group and using immunohistochemical analysis. Expression of both genes was down-regulated as melanoma progressed. In situ hybridization demonstrated more Ku70- and Ku80-positive cells than immunohistochemical methods, but the correlation between the two methods was highly significant (P <0.01). We conclude that the in situ hybridization assay for the detection of Ku70 and Ku80 expression used in this study is also suitable for tissue microarray analysis of paraffin-embedded melanoma samples. The laboratory procedure is much more complicated than the immunohistochemical method, however.

  15. FlbD has a DNA-binding activity near its carboxy terminus that recognizes ftr sequences involved in positive and negative regulation of flagellar gene transcription in Caulobacter crescentus.

    PubMed Central

    Mullin, D A; Van Way, S M; Blankenship, C A; Mullin, A H

    1994-01-01

    G. Our results demonstrate that FlbD contains a sequence-specific DNA-binding activity within the 87 amino acids at its carboxy terminus, and the results suggest that FlbD exerts its effect as a positive and negative regulator of C. crescentus flagellar genes by binding to ftr sequences. Images PMID:7928958

  16. Effect of Ku80 Deficiency on Mutation Frequencies and Spectra at a LacZ Reporter Locus in Mouse Tissues and Cells

    PubMed Central

    Busuttil, Rita A.; Muñoz, Denise P.; Garcia, Ana Maria; Rodier, Francis; Kim, Woo Ho; Suh, Yousin; Hasty, Paul; Campisi, Judith; Vijg, Jan

    2008-01-01

    Non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) is thought to be an important mechanism for preventing the adverse effects of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) and its absence has been associated with premature aging. To investigate the effect of inactivated NHEJ on spontaneous mutation frequencies and spectra in vivo and in cultured cells, we crossed a Ku80-deficient mouse with mice harboring a lacZ-plasmid-based mutation reporter. We analyzed various organs and tissues, as well as cultured embryonic fibroblasts, for mutations at the lacZ locus. When comparing mutant with wild-type mice, we observed a significantly higher number of genome rearrangements in liver and spleen and a significantly lower number of point mutations in liver and brain. The reduced point mutation frequency was not due to a decrease in small deletion mutations thought to be a hallmark of NHEJ, but could be a consequence of increased cellular responses to unrepaired DSBs. Indeed, we found a substantial increase in persistent 53BP1 and γH2AX DNA damage foci in Ku80−/− as compared to wild-type liver. Treatment of cultured Ku80-deficient or wild-type embryonic fibroblasts, either proliferating or quiescent, with hydrogen peroxide or bleomycin showed no differences in the number or type of induced genome rearrangements. However, after such treatment, Ku80-deficient cells did show an increased number of persistent DNA damage foci. These results indicate that Ku80-dependent repair of DNA damage is predominantly error-free with the effect of alternative more error-prone pathways creating genome rearrangements only detectable after extended periods of time, i.e., in young adult animals. The observed premature aging likely results from a combination of increased cellular senescence and an increased load of stable, genome rearrangements. PMID:18941635

  17. yKu70/yKu80 and Rif1 Regulate Silencing Differentially at Telomeres in Candida glabrata▿ ‡

    PubMed Central

    Rosas-Hernández, Lluvia L.; Juárez-Reyes, Alejandro; Arroyo-Helguera, Omar E.; De Las Peñas, Alejandro; Pan, Shih-Jung; Cormack, Brendan P.; Castaño, Irene

    2008-01-01

    Candida glabrata, a common opportunistic fungal pathogen, adheres efficiently to mammalian epithelial cells in culture. This interaction in vitro depends mainly on the adhesin Epa1, one of a large family of cell wall proteins. Most of the EPA genes are located in subtelomeric regions, where they are transcriptionally repressed by silencing. In order to better characterize the transcriptional regulation of the EPA family, we have assessed the importance of C. glabrata orthologues of known regulators of subtelomeric silencing in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. To this end, we used a series of strains containing insertions of the reporter URA3 gene within different intergenic regions throughout four telomeres of C. glabrata. Using these reporter strains, we have assessed the roles of SIR2, SIR3, SIR4, HDF1 (yKu70), HDF2 (yKu80), and RIF1 in mediating silencing at four C. glabrata telomeres. We found that, whereas the SIR proteins are absolutely required for silencing of the reporter genes and the native subtelomeric EPA genes, the Rif1 and the Ku proteins regulate silencing at only a subset of the analyzed telomeres. We also mapped a cis element adjacent to the EPA3 locus that can silence a reporter gene when placed at a distance of 31 kb from the telomere. Our data show that silencing of the C. glabrata telomeres varies from telomere to telomere. In addition, recruitment of silencing proteins to the subtelomeres is likely, for certain telomeres, to depend both on the telomeric repeats and on particular discrete silencing elements. PMID:18836091

  18. K14-EGFP-miR-31 transgenic mice have high susceptibility to chemical-induced squamous cell tumorigenesis that is associating with Ku80 repression.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Ssu-Hsueh; Yang, Cheng-Chieh; Yu, En-Hao; Chang, Christine; Lee, Yong-Syu; Liu, Chung-Ji; Chang, Kuo-Wei; Lin, Shu-Chun

    2015-03-15

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) occurring in the head and neck region and the esophagus causes tremendous cancer mortality around the world. miR-31 is among the most eminently upregulated MicroRNAs in SCC, when it occurs in the head and neck region and the esophagus. We established miR-31 transgenic mouse lines, in which miR-31 is under the control of the K14 promoter. 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide (4NQO) is a mutagen that causes double strand breaks. The transgenic mice exhibited a higher potential for tumor induction than wild-type (Wt) mice of the tongue and esophagus after 4NQO treatment. After 4NQO treatment or irradiation, p-γH2AX expression in squamous epithelium of transgenic mice was increased more than in Wt mice. Exogenous expression of miR-31 was also found to be associated with the higher p-γH2AX expression induced by 4NQO in human oral SCC (OSCC) cell lines. The repair genes PARP1 and Ku80 were validated as new targets of miR-31 in human OSCC cell lines, and were found to be downregulated in the squamous epithelium of the tongue in transgenic mice. However, only the downregulation of Ku80 was essential for maintaining the high level of p-γH2AX induced by 4NQO in OSCC cells. Inverse expression profiles for miR-31 and Ku80 were noted in human OSCC tissue. Our study identifies the high sensitivity of K14-EGFP-miR-31 transgenic mice to chemical carcinogen-induced squamous cell tumorigenesis and shows that this seems to be associated with the downregulation of Ku80 and an impairment of repair activity in squamous cells, which are mediated by miR-31.

  19. DNA requirements for interaction of the C-terminal region of Ku80 with the DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs).

    PubMed

    Radhakrishnan, Sarvan Kumar; Lees-Miller, Susan P

    2017-09-01

    Non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) is the major pathway for the repair of ionizing radiation induced DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) in human cells. Critical to NHEJ is the DNA-dependent interaction of the Ku70/80 heterodimer with the DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) to form the DNA-PK holoenzyme. However, precisely how Ku recruits DNA-PKcs to DSBs ends to enhance its kinase activity has remained enigmatic, with contradictory findings reported in the literature. Here we address the role of the Ku80 C-terminal region (CTR) in the DNA-dependent interaction of Ku70/80 with DNA-PKcs using purified components and defined DNA structures. Our results show that the Ku80 CTR is required for interaction with DNA-PKcs on short segments of blunt ended 25bp dsDNA or 25bp dsDNA with a 15-base poly dA single stranded (ss) DNA extension, but this requirement is less stringent on longer dsDNA molecules (35bp blunt ended dsDNA) or 25bp duplex DNA with either a 15-base poly dT or poly dC ssDNA extension. Moreover, the DNA-PKcs-Ku complex preferentially forms on 25 bp DNA with a poly-pyrimidine ssDNA extension.Our work clarifies the role of the Ku80 CTR and dsDNA ends on the interaction of DNA-PKcs with Ku and provides key information to guide assembly and biology of NHEJ complexes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Functional analysis of the new barley gene HvKu80 indicates that it plays a key role in double-strand DNA break repair and telomere length regulation.

    PubMed

    Stolarek, Magdalena; Gruszka, Damian; Braszewska-Zalewska, Agnieszka; Maluszynski, Mirosław

    2015-11-01

    Genotoxic stress causes a reduced stability of the plant genome and has a detrimental effect on plant growth and productivity. Double-strand breaks (DSBs) are the most harmful of all DNA lesions because they cause the loss of genetic information on both strands of the DNA helix. In the presented study the coding and genomic sequences of the HvKu80 gene were determined. A mutational analysis of two fragments of HvKu80 using TILLING (Targeting Induced Local Lesions IN Genomes) allowed 12 mutations to be detected, which resulted in identification of 11 alleles. Multidirectional analyses demonstrated that the HvKu80 gene is involved in the elimination of DSBs in Hordeum vulgare. The barley mutants carrying the identified ku80.c and ku80.j alleles accumulated bleomycin-induced DSBs to a much greater extent than the parent cultivar 'Sebastian'. The altered reaction of the mutants to DSB-inducing agent and the kinetics of DNA repair in these genotypes are associated with a lower expression level of the mutated gene. The study also demonstrated the significant role of the HvKu80 gene in the regulation of telomere length in barley.

  1. BRCA1-Ku80 Protein Interaction Enhances End-joining Fidelity of Chromosomal Double-strand Breaks in the G1 Phase of the Cell Cycle*

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Guochun; Plo, Isabelle; Wang, Tong; Rahman, Mohammad; Cho, Ju Hwan; Yang, Eddy; Lopez, Bernard S.; Xia, Fen

    2013-01-01

    Quality control of DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair is vital in preventing mutagenesis. Non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ), a repair process predominant in the G1 phase of the cell cycle, rejoins DSBs either accurately or with errors, but the mechanisms controlling its fidelity are poorly understood. Here we show that BRCA1, a tumor suppressor, enhances the fidelity of NHEJ-mediated DSB repair and prevents mutagenic deletional end-joining through interaction with canonical NHEJ machinery during G1. BRCA1 binds and stabilizes Ku80 at DSBs through its N-terminal region, promotes precise DSB rejoining, and increases cellular resistance to radiation-induced DNA damage in a G1 phase-specific manner. These results suggest that BRCA1, as a central player in genome integrity maintenance, ensures high fidelity repair of DSBs by not only promoting homologous recombination repair in G2/M phase but also facilitating fidelity of Ku80-dependent NHEJ repair, thus preventing deletional end-joining of chromosomal DSBs during G1. PMID:23344954

  2. Regulation of pairing between broken DNA-containing chromatin regions by Ku80, DNA-PKcs, ATM, and 53BP1

    PubMed Central

    Yamauchi, Motohiro; Shibata, Atsushi; Suzuki, Keiji; Suzuki, Masatoshi; Niimi, Atsuko; Kondo, Hisayoshi; Miura, Miwa; Hirakawa, Miyako; Tsujita, Keiko; Yamashita, Shunichi; Matsuda, Naoki

    2017-01-01

    Chromosome rearrangement is clinically and physiologically important because it can produce oncogenic fusion genes. Chromosome rearrangement requires DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) at two genomic locations and misrejoining between the DSBs. Before DSB misrejoining, two DSB-containing chromatin regions move and pair with each other; however, the molecular mechanism underlying this process is largely unknown. We performed a spatiotemporal analysis of ionizing radiation-induced foci of p53-binding protein 1 (53BP1), a marker for DSB-containing chromatin. We found that some 53BP1 foci were paired, indicating that the two damaged chromatin regions neighboured one another. We searched for factors regulating the foci pairing and found that the number of paired foci increased when Ku80, DNA-PKcs, or ATM was absent. In contrast, 53BP1 depletion reduced the number of paired foci and dicentric chromosomes—an interchromosomal rearrangement. Foci were paired more frequently in heterochromatin than in euchromatin in control cells. Additionally, the reduced foci pairing in 53BP1-depleted cells was rescued by concomitant depletion of a heterochromatin building factor such as Krüppel-associated box-associated protein 1 or chromodomain helicase DNA-binding protein 3. These findings indicate that pairing between DSB-containing chromatin regions was suppressed by Ku80, DNA-PKcs, and ATM, and this pairing was promoted by 53BP1 through chromatin relaxation. PMID:28155885

  3. Activation of Membrane Fusion by Murine Leukemia Viruses Is Controlled in cis or in trans by Interactions between the Receptor-Binding Domain and a Conserved Disulfide Loop of the Carboxy Terminus of the Surface Glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Lavillette, Dimitri; Boson, Bertrand; Russell, Stephen J.; Cosset, François-Loïc

    2001-01-01

    Cell entry of retroviruses is initiated by the recognition of cellular receptors and the subsequent membrane fusion between viral and cellular membranes. These two steps are mediated by the surface (SU) and transmembrane (TM) subunits of the retroviral envelope glycoprotein (Env), respectively. Determinants regulating membrane fusion have been described throughout SU and TM, but the processes coupling receptor recognition to fusion are still elusive. Here we establish that a critical interaction is formed between the receptor-binding domain (RBD) and the major disulfide loop of the carboxy-terminal domain (C domain) of the murine leukemia virus SU. Receptor binding causes an alteration of this interaction and, in turn, promotes further events of Env fusion activation. We characterize mutations which, by lowering this interaction and reducing the compatibility between the RBD and C domains of Env glycoprotein chimeras, affect both Env fusogenicity and sensitivity to receptor interference. Additionally, we demonstrate that suboptimal interactions in such mutant Env proteins can be compensated in trans by soluble RBDs in a manner that depends on their compatibility with the C domain. Our results therefore indicate that RBD/C domain interactions may occur in cis, via the proper RBD of the viral Env itself, or in trans, via a distinct RBD expressed by virion-free Env glycoproteins expressed endogenously by the infected cells or provided by neighboring Env trimers. PMID:11264358

  4. Carboxy-terminal domain mediates assembly of the voltage-gated rat ether-à-go-go potassium channel.

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, J; Owen, D; Pongs, O

    1997-01-01

    The specific assembly of subunits to oligomers is an important prerequisite for producing functional potassium channels. We have studied the assembly of voltage-gated rat ether-à-go-go (r-eag) potassium channels with two complementary assays. In protein overlay binding experiments it was shown that a 41-amino-acid domain, close to the r-eag subunit carboxy-terminus, is important for r-eag subunit interaction. In an in vitro expression system it was demonstrated that r-eag subunits lacking this assembly domain cannot form functional potassium channels. Also, a approximately 10-fold molar excess of the r-eag carboxy-terminus inhibited in co-expression experiments the formation of functional r-eag channels. When the r-eag carboxy-terminal assembly domain had been mutated, the dominant-negative effect of the r-eag carboxy-terminus on r-eag channel expression was abolished. The results demonstrate that a carboxy-terminal assembly domain is essential for functional r-eag potassium channel expression, in contrast to the one of Shaker-related potassium channels, which is directed by an amino-terminal assembly domain. PMID:9400421

  5. Identification of kinesin-C, a calmodulin-binding carboxy-terminal kinesin in animal (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus) cells.

    PubMed

    Rogers, G C; Hart, C L; Wedaman, K P; Scholey, J M

    1999-11-19

    Several novel members of the kinesin superfamily, until now identified only in plants, are unique in their ability to bind calmodulin in the presence of Ca(2+). Here, we identify the first such kinesin in an animal system. Sequence analysis of this new motor, called kinesin-C, predicts that it is a large carboxy-terminal kinesin, 1624 amino acid residues in length, with a predicted molecular mass of 181 kDa. Kinesin-C is predicted to contain a kinesin motor domain at its carboxy terminus, linked to a segment of alpha-helical coiled-coil 950 amino acid residues long, ending with an amino-terminal proline-rich tail domain. A putative calmodulin-binding domain resides at the extreme carboxy terminus of the motor polypeptide, and recombinant kinesin-C binds to a calmodulin-affinity column in a Ca(2+)-dependent fashion. The presence of this novel calmodulin-binding motor in sea urchin embryos suggests that it plays a critical role in Ca(2+)-dependent events during early sea urchin development.

  6. Carboxy-terminal deletion analysis of oat phytochrome A reveals the presence of separate domains required for structure and biological activity.

    PubMed Central

    Cherry, J R; Hondred, D; Walker, J M; Keller, J M; Hershey, H P; Vierstra, R D

    1993-01-01

    A series of seven carboxy-terminal deletion mutants of oat phytochrome A were stably expressed in transgenic tobacco to localize phytochrome domains involved in chromophore attachment, spectral integrity, photoreversibility between the red light (Pr)- and far-red light (Pfr)-absorbing forms, dimerization, and biological activity. Amino acids necessary for chromophore attachment in vivo were localized to the amino-terminal 398 residues because mutant proteins this small had covalently bound chromophore. Deletion mutants from the carboxy terminus to residue 653 were spectrally indistinguishable from the full-length chromoprotein. In contrast, further truncation to residue 399 resulted in a chromoprotein with a bleached Pfr absorbance spectrum, Pr and Pfr absorbance maxima shifted toward shorter wavelengths, and reduced Pfr to Pr phototransformation efficiency. Thus, residues between 399 ad 652 are required for spectral integrity but are not essential for chromophore attachment. The sequence(s) between residues 919 and 1093 appears to be necessary for dimerization. Carboxy-terminal mutants containing this region behaved as dimers under nondenaturing conditions in vitro, whereas truncations without this region behaved as monomers. None of the plants expressing high levels of deletion mutants lacking the 35 carboxy-terminal amino acids displayed the light-exaggerated phenotype characteristic of plants expressing biologically active phytochrome A, even when the truncated phytochromes were expressed at levels 6- to 15-fold greater than that effective for the full-length chromoprotein. Collectively, these data show that the phytochrome protein contains several separable carboxy-terminal domains required for structure/function and identify a domain within 35 residues of the carboxy terminus that is critical for the biological activity of the photoreceptor in vivo. PMID:8518556

  7. Automated carboxy-terminal sequence analysis of peptides.

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, J. M.; Shenoy, N. R.; Ronk, M.; Shively, J. E.

    1992-01-01

    Proteins and peptides can be sequenced from the carboxy-terminus with isothiocyanate reagents to produce amino acid thiohydantoin derivatives. Previous studies in our laboratory have focused on solution phase conditions for formation of the peptidylthiohydantoins with trimethylsilylisothiocyanate (TMS-ITC) and for hydrolysis of these peptidylthiohydantoins into an amino acid thiohydantoin derivative and a new shortened peptide capable of continued degradation (Bailey, J. M. & Shively, J. E., 1990, Biochemistry 29, 3145-3156). The current study is a continuation of this work and describes the construction of an instrument for automated C-terminal sequencing, the application of the thiocyanate chemistry to peptides covalently coupled to a novel polyethylene solid support (Shenoy, N. R., Bailey, J. M., & Shively, J. E., 1992, Protein Sci. I, 58-67), the use of sodium trimethylsilanolate as a novel reagent for the specific cleavage of the derivatized C-terminal amino acid, and the development of methodology to sequence through the difficult amino acid, aspartate. Automated programs are described for the C-terminal sequencing of peptides covalently attached to carboxylic acid-modified polyethylene. The chemistry involves activation with acetic anhydride, derivatization with TMS-ITC, and cleavage of the derivatized C-terminal amino acid with sodium trimethylsilanolate. The thiohydantoin amino acid is identified by on-line high performance liquid chromatography using a Phenomenex Ultracarb 5 ODS(30) column and a triethylamine/phosphoric acid buffer system containing pentanesulfonic acid. The generality of our automated C-terminal sequencing methodology was examined by sequencing model peptides containing all 20 of the common amino acids. All of the amino acids were found to sequence in high yield (90% or greater) except for asparagine and aspartate, which could be only partially removed, and proline, which was found not be capable of derivatization. In spite of these

  8. Natural and engineered carboxy-terminal variants: decreased secretion and gain-of-function result in asymptomatic coagulation factor VII deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Branchini, Alessio; Rizzotto, Lara; Mariani, Guglielmo; Napolitano, Mariasanta; Lapecorella, Mario; Giansily-Blaizot, Muriel; Mari, Rosella; Canella, Alessandro; Pinotti, Mirko; Bernardi, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    We report 2 asymptomatic homozygotes for the nonsense p.R462X mutation affecting the carboxy-terminus of coagulation factor VII (FVII, 466 aminoacids). FVII levels of 3–5% and 2.7±0.4% were found in prothrombin time-based and activated factor X (FXa) generation assays with human thromboplastins. Noticeably, FVII antigen levels were barely detectable (0.7±0.2%) which suggested a gain-of-function effect. This effect was more pronounced with bovine thromboplastin (4.8±0.9%) and disappeared with rabbit thromboplastin (0.7±0.2%). This suggests that the mutation influences tissue factor/FVII interactions. Whereas the recombinant rFVII-462X variant confirmed an increase in specific activity (~400%), a panel of nonsense (p.P466X, p.F465X, p.P464X, p.A463X) and missense (p.R462A, p.R462Q, p.R462W) mutations of the FVII carboxy-terminus resulted in reduced secretion but normal specific activity. These data provide evidence for counteracting pleiotropic effects of the p.R462X mutation, which explains the asymptomatic FVII deficiency, and contributes to our understanding of the role of the highly variable carboxy-terminus of coagulation serine proteases. PMID:22180436

  9. Electrogenic Na/HCO3 Cotransporter (NBCe1) Variants Expressed in Xenopus Oocytes: Functional Comparison and Roles of the Amino and Carboxy Termini

    PubMed Central

    McAlear, Suzanne D.; Liu, Xiaofen; Williams, Jennifer B.; McNicholas-Bevensee, Carmel M.; Bevensee, Mark O.

    2006-01-01

    Using pH- and voltage-sensitive microelectrodes, as well as the two-electrode voltage-clamp and macropatch techniques, we compared the functional properties of the three NBCe1 variants (NBCe1-A, -B, and -C) with different amino and/or carboxy termini expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Oocytes expressing rat brain NBCe1-B and exposed to a CO2/HCO3− solution displayed all the hallmarks of an electrogenic Na+/HCO3− cotransporter: (a) a DIDS-sensitive pHi recovery following the initial CO2-induced acidification, (b) an instantaneous hyperpolarization, and (c) an instantaneous Na+-dependent outward current under voltage-clamp conditions (−60 mV). All three variants had similar external HCO3− dependencies (apparent KM of 4–6 mM) and external Na+ dependencies (apparent KM of 21–36 mM), as well as similar voltage dependencies. However, voltage-clamped oocytes (−60 mV) expressing NBCe1-A exhibited peak HCO3−-stimulated NBC currents that were 4.3-fold larger than the currents seen in oocytes expressing the most dissimilar C variant. Larger NBCe1-A currents were also observed in current–voltage relationships. Plasma membrane expression levels as assessed by single oocyte chemiluminescence with hemagglutinin-tagged NBCs were similar for the three variants. In whole-cell experiments (Vm = −60 mV), removing the unique amino terminus of NBCe1-A reduced the mean HCO3−-induced NBC current 55%, whereas removing the different amino terminus of NBCe1-C increased the mean NBC current 2.7-fold. A similar pattern was observed in macropatch experiments. Thus, the unique amino terminus of NBCe1-A stimulates transporter activity, whereas the different amino terminus of the B and C variants inhibits activity. One or more cytosolic factors may also contribute to NBCe1 activity based on discrepancies between macropatch and whole-cell currents. While the amino termini influence transporter function, the carboxy termini influence plasma membrane expression. Removing the

  10. Carboxy-terminal mutations of bile acid CoA:N-acyltransferase alter activity and substrate specificity.

    PubMed

    Styles, Nathan A; Shonsey, Erin M; Falany, Josie L; Guidry, Amber L; Barnes, Stephen; Falany, Charles N

    2016-07-01

    Bile acid CoA:amino acid N-acyltransferase (BAAT) is the terminal enzyme in the synthesis of bile salts from cholesterol and catalyzes the conjugation of taurine or glycine to bile acid CoA thioesters to form bile acid N-acylamidates. BAAT has a dual localization to the cytosol and peroxisomes, possibly due to an inefficient carboxy-terminal peroxisomal targeting signal (PTS), -serine-glutamine-leucine (-SQL). Mutational analysis was used to define the role of the carboxy terminus in peroxisomal localization and kinetic activity. Amidation activity of BAAT and BAAT lacking the final two amino acids (AAs) (BAAT-S) were similar, whereas the activity of BAAT with a canonical PTS sequence (BAAT-SKL) was increased >2.5-fold. Kinetic analysis of BAAT and BAAT-SKL showed that BAAT-SKL had a lower Km for taurine and glycine as well as a greater Vmax There was no difference in the affinity for cholyl-CoA. In contrast to BAAT, BAAT-SKL forms bile acid N-acylamidates with β-alanine. BAAT-S immunoprecipitated when incubated with peroxisomal biogenesis factor 5 (Pex5) and rabbit anti-Pex5 antibodies; however, deleting the final 12 AAs prevented coimmunoprecipitation with Pex5, indicating the Pex5 interaction involves more than the -SQL sequence. These results indicate that even small changes in the carboxy terminus of BAAT can have significant effects on activity and substrate specificity. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. Measuring APP carboxy-terminal fragments.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Luke A

    2011-01-01

    The accumulation of the amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide in the form of insoluble fibrillar deposits and soluble oligomeric aggregates is widely believed to play a causal role in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Proteolytic cleavage of APP by the β-site APP cleaving enzyme (BACE1) near the C-terminus results in the formation of the APP C-terminal fragment (CTF) C99, a substrate for subsequent cleavage by γ-secretase to generate Aβ. Alternatively, APP cleavage by α-secretase to generate the APP CTF C83 occurs within the Aβ region, precluding its formation. Therefore, modulation of β- and/or γ-secretase activity represents important therapeutic targets. Transgenic mice overexpressing human APP generate detectable levels of APP CTFs and Aβ. We have shown that highly sensitive and specific methods for determining levels of APP CTFs and Aβ are useful for understanding how genetic manipulation of APP processing impacts Aβ generation and accumulation.

  12. The carboxy-terminal tail or the intracellular loop 3 is required for β-arrestin-dependent internalization of a mammalian type II GnRH receptor.

    PubMed

    Madziva, Michael T; Mkhize, Nonhlanhla N; Flanagan, Colleen A; Katz, Arieh A

    2015-08-15

    The type II GnRH receptor (GnRH-R2) in contrast to mammalian type I GnRH receptor (GnRH-R1) has a cytosolic carboxy-terminal tail. We investigated the role of β-arrestin 1 in GnRH-R2-mediated signalling and mapped the regions in GnRH-R2 required for recruitment of β-arrestin, employing internalization assays. We show that GnRH-R2 activation of ERK is dependent on β-arrestin and protein kinase C. Appending the tail of GnRH-R2 to GnRH-R1 enabled GRK- and β-arrestin-dependent internalization of the chimaeric receptor. Surprisingly, carboxy-terminally truncated GnRH-R2 retained β-arrestin and GRK-dependent internalization, suggesting that β-arrestin interacts with additional elements of GnRH-R2. Mutating serine and threonine or basic residues of intracellular loop 3 did not abolish β-arrestin 1-dependent internalization but a receptor lacking these basic residues and the carboxy-terminus showed no β-arrestin 1-dependent internalization. Our results suggest that basic residues at the amino-terminal end of intracellular loop 3 or the carboxy-terminal tail are required for β-arrestin dependent internalization.

  13. Tidewater terminus tug-of-war

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartholomaus, T. C.; Larsen, C. F.; O'Neel, S.; West, M. E.

    2012-12-01

    When a glacier terminus recedes, not only does the glacier lose the ice between the former and present terminus, but the terminal reach of the glacier can steepen, causing ice flow out of the glacier interior increases. The increased flow will continue, thinning the glacier, until the glacier geometry and ice flow reach a new equilibrium. Yahtse Glacier is an advancing tidewater glacier on the Gulf of Alaska coast. To better understand the controls on its terminus position, we use a suite of seismic, geodetic and oceanographic data. Both calving and submarine melt contribute to frontal ablation, however, at Yahtse Glacier the ice is too fractured to support undercutting below the water line, nor does a persistent submarine toe develop. Thus the terminus retreats as fast as subaerial calving occurs. Previous work at Yahtse Glacier demonstrated that locally recorded seismic events between 1 and 5 Hz are predominantly the result of subaerial iceberg calving. Therefore, we use seismicity as a proxy for the frontal ablation rate. We measure the near-terminus glacier velocity with oblique photogrammetry, calibrated with ~10 day intervals of surveyed ice velocity. These methods reveal an annually-averaged terminus velocity of 6.9 km/yr. The frontal ablation rate and the terminus ice velocity are nearly in phase and reach maximum values twice per year: in the spring and fall. Integrating the difference between frontal ablation rate and terminus ice velocity reveals a pattern of terminus positions with a single annual cycle, quite similar to that which we observe in the field. GPS measurements 10 km from the terminus indicate that ice velocities peak in May and decrease through the summer. Oceanographic measurements show that near-shore surface water temperatures in the Gulf of Alaska are greatest in the fall. We suggest that the spring peak in terminus velocity is set by higher rates of ice delivery from up-glacier; calving rate increases in a compensatory way, to nearly

  14. The Carboxy-terminus of BAK1 regulates kinase activity and is required for normal growth of Arabidopsis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In brassinosteroid (BR) signaling, binding of brassinolide to the BRI1 receptor kinase promotes interaction with its co-receptor, BAK1. Juxtaposition of the kinase domains that occurs then allows reciprocal transphosphorylation and activation of both kinases, but details of that process are not enti...

  15. Immunoreactivity of polyclonal antibodies generated against the carboxy terminus of the predicted amino acid sequence of the Huntington disease gene

    SciTech Connect

    Alkatib, G.; Graham, R.; Pelmear-Telenius, A.

    1994-09-01

    A cDNA fragment spanning the 3{prime}-end of the Huntington disease gene (from 8052 to 9252) was cloned into a prokaryotic expression vector containing the E. Coli lac promoter and a portion of the coding sequence for {beta}-galactosidase. The truncated {beta}-galactosidase gene was cleaved with BamHl and fused in frame to the BamHl fragment of the Huntington disease gene 3{prime}-end. Expression analysis of proteins made in E. Coli revealed that 20-30% of the total cellular proteins was represented by the {beta}-galactosidase-huntingtin fusion protein. The identity of the Huntington disease protein amino acid sequences was confirmed by protein sequence analysis. Affinity chromatography was used to purify large quantities of the fusion protein from bacterial cell lysates. Affinity-purified proteins were used to immunize New Zealand white rabbits for antibody production. The generated polyclonal antibodies were used to immunoprecipitate the Huntington disease gene product expressed in a neuroblastoma cell line. In this cell line the antibodies precipitated two protein bands of apparent gel migrations of 200 and 150 kd which together, correspond to the calculated molecular weight of the Huntington disease gene product (350 kd). Immunoblotting experiments revealed the presence of a large precursor protein in the range of 350-750 kd which is in agreement with the predicted molecular weight of the protein without post-translational modifications. These results indicate that the huntingtin protein is cleaved into two subunits in this neuroblastoma cell line and implicate that cleavage of a large precursor protein may contribute to its biological activity. Experiments are ongoing to determine the precursor-product relationship and to examine the synthesis of the huntingtin protein in freshly isolated rat brains, and to determine cellular and subcellular distribution of the gene product.

  16. Carboxy-terminal processing of the large subunit of [Fe] hydrogenase from Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ATCC 7757.

    PubMed

    Hatchikian, E C; Magro, V; Forget, N; Nicolet, Y; Fontecilla-Camps, J C

    1999-05-01

    hydA and hydB, the genes encoding the large (46-kDa) and small (13. 5-kDa) subunits of the periplasmic [Fe] hydrogenase from Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ATCC 7757, have been cloned and sequenced. The deduced amino acid sequence of the genes product showed complete identity to the sequence of the well-characterized [Fe] hydrogenase from the closely related species Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough (G. Voordouw and S. Brenner, Eur. J. Biochem. 148:515-520, 1985). The data show that in addition to the well-known signal peptide preceding the NH2 terminus of the mature small subunit, the large subunit undergoes a carboxy-terminal processing involving the cleavage of a peptide of 24 residues, in agreement with the recently reported data on the three-dimensional structure of the enzyme (Y. Nicolet, C. Piras, P. Legrand, E. C. Hatchikian, and J. C. Fontecilla-Camps, Structure 7:13-23, 1999). We suggest that this C-terminal processing is involved in the export of the protein to the periplasm.

  17. The CB1 cannabinoid receptor C-terminus regulates receptor desensitization in autaptic hippocampal neurones.

    PubMed

    Straiker, Alex; Wager-Miller, Jim; Mackie, Ken

    2012-04-01

    The cannabinoid CB(1) receptor is the chief mediator of the CNS effects of cannabinoids. In cell culture model systems, CB(1) receptors both desensitize and internalize on activation. Previous work suggests that the extreme carboxy-terminus of this receptor regulates internalization via phosphorylation of residues clustered within this region. Mutational analysis of the carboxy-terminus of CB(1) receptors has demonstrated that the last six serine/threonine residues are necessary for agonist-induced internalization. However, the structural determinants of CB(1) receptor internalization are also dependent on the local cellular environment. The importance of cell context on CB(1) receptor function calls for an investigation of the functional roles of these residues in neurones. To determine the structural requirements of CB(1) internalization in neurones, we evaluated the signalling properties of carboxy-terminal mutated CB(1) receptors expressed in cultured autaptic hippocampal neurones, using electrophysiological methods. CB(1) receptors transfected into CB(1) knockout neurones signalled and desensitized as did wild-type neurones, allowing us to test specific CB(1) receptor mutations. Deletion of the last 13 residues yielded a CB(1) receptor that inhibited excitatory postsynaptic currents but did not desensitize. Furthermore, mutation of the final six serine and threonine residues to alanines resulted in a non-desensitizing receptor. In contrast, CB(1) receptors lacking residues 419-460, leaving the last 14 residues intact, did desensitize. The distal thirteen residues of CB(1) receptors are crucial for their desensitization in cultured neurones. Furthermore, this desensitization is likely to follow phosphorylation of serines and threonines within this region. This article is part of a themed section on Cannabinoids in Biology and Medicine. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2012.165.issue-8. To view Part I of Cannabinoids

  18. Picosecond transient absorption study of photodissociated carboxy hemoglobin and myoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Janes, S.M.; Dalickas, G.A.; Eaton, W.A.; Hochstrasser, R.M.

    1988-09-01

    The optical transient absorption spectra at 30 ps and 6.5 ns after photolysis are compared for both carboxy hemoglobin (HbCO) and carboxy myoglobin (MbCO). Both 355- and 532-nm excitation pulses were used. In all cases the shapes of the optical difference spectra thus generated are stationary over the complete time-scale studied. The photolysis spectra for MbCO are not significantly different from the equilibrium difference spectra generated on the same picosecond spectrometer when measured to an accuracy of +/- 0.5 nm. In addition, spectral parameters for delegated HbCO generated on the same spectrometer but detected by two different techniques, either by a Vidicon detector or point by point with photomultiplier tubes, are reported; the results are different from some of the previously reported picosecond experiments.

  19. Anthropomorphic Telemanipulation System in Terminus Control Mode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jau, Bruno M.; Lewis, M. Anthony; Bejczy, Antal K.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes a prototype anthropomorphic kinesthetic telepresence system that is being developed at JPL. It utilizes dexterous terminus devices in the form of an exoskeleton force-sensing master glove worn by the operator and a replica four finger anthropomorphic slave hand. The newly developed master glove is integrated with our previously developed non-anthropomorphic six degree of freedom (DOF) universal force-reflecting hand controller (FRHC). The mechanical hand and forearm are mounted to an industrial robot (PUMA 560), replacing its standard forearm. The notion of 'terminus control mode' refers to the fact that only the terminus devices (glove and robot hand) are of anthropomorphic nature, and the master and slave arms are non-anthropomorphic. The system is currently being evaluated, focusing on tool handling and astronaut equivalent task executions. The evaluation revealed the system's potential for tool handling but it also became evident that hand tool manipulations and space operations require a dual arm robot. This paper describes the system's principal components, its control and computing architecture, discusses findings of the tool handling evaluation, and explains why common tool handling and EVA space tasks require dual arm robots.

  20. Anthropomorphic Telemanipulation System in Terminus Control Mode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jau, Bruno M.; Lewis, M. Anthony; Bejczy, Antal K.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes a prototype anthropomorphic kinesthetic telepresence system that is being developed at JPL. It utilizes dexterous terminus devices in the form of an exoskeleton force-sensing master glove worn by the operator and a replica four finger anthropomorphic slave hand. The newly developed master glove is integrated with our previously developed non-anthropomorphic six degree of freedom (DOF) universal force-reflecting hand controller (FRHC). The mechanical hand and forearm are mounted to an industrial robot (PUMA 560), replacing its standard forearm. The notion of 'terminus control mode' refers to the fact that only the terminus devices (glove and robot hand) are of anthropomorphic nature, and the master and slave arms are non-anthropomorphic. The system is currently being evaluated, focusing on tool handling and astronaut equivalent task executions. The evaluation revealed the system's potential for tool handling but it also became evident that hand tool manipulations and space operations require a dual arm robot. This paper describes the system's principal components, its control and computing architecture, discusses findings of the tool handling evaluation, and explains why common tool handling and EVA space tasks require dual arm robots.

  1. Automated carboxy-terminal sequence analysis of peptides and proteins using diphenyl phosphoroisothiocyanatidate.

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, J. M.; Nikfarjam, F.; Shenoy, N. R.; Shively, J. E.

    1992-01-01

    Proteins and peptides can be sequenced from the carboxy-terminus with isothiocyanate reagents to produce amino acid thiohydantoin derivatives. Previous studies in our laboratory have focused on the automation of the thiocyanate chemistry using acetic anhydride and trimethylsilylisothiocyanate (TMS-ITC) to derivatize the C-terminal amino acid to a thiohydantoin and sodium trimethylsilanolate for specific hydrolysis of the derivatized C-terminal amino acid (Bailey, J.M., Shenoy, N.R., Ronk, M., & Shively, J.E., 1992, Protein Sci. 1, 68-80). A major limitation of this approach was the need to activate the C-terminus with acetic anhydride. We now describe the use of a new reagent, diphenyl phosphoroisothiocyanatidate (DPP-ITC) and pyridine, which combines the activation and derivatization steps to produce peptidylthiohydantoins. Previous work by Kenner et al. (Kenner, G.W., Khorana, H.G., & Stedman, R.J., 1953, Chem. Soc. J., 673-678) with this reagent demonstrated slow kinetics. Several days were required for complete reaction. We show here that the inclusion of pyridine was found to promote the formation of C-terminal thiohydantoins by DPP-ITC resulting in complete conversion of the C-terminal amino acid to a thiohydantoin in less than 1 h. Reagents such as imidazole, triazine, and tetrazole were also found to promote the reaction with DPP-ITC as effectively as pyridine. General base catalysts, such as triethylamine, do not promote the reaction, but are required to convert the C-terminal carboxylic acid to a salt prior to the reaction with DPP-ITC and pyridine. By introducing the DPP-ITC reagent and pyridine in separate steps in an automated sequencer, we observed improved sequencing yields for amino acids normally found difficult to derivatize with acetic anhydride/TMS-ITC. This was particularly true for aspartic acid, which now can be sequenced in yields comparable to most of the other amino acids. Automated programs are described for the C-terminal sequencing of

  2. Hepatitis C virus NS4B carboxy terminal domain is a membrane binding domain.

    PubMed

    Liefhebber, Jolanda M P; Brandt, Bernd W; Broer, Rene; Spaan, Willy J M; van Leeuwen, Hans C

    2009-05-25

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) induces membrane rearrangements during replication. All HCV proteins are associated to membranes, pointing out the importance of membranes for HCV. Non structural protein 4B (NS4B) has been reported to induce cellular membrane alterations like the membranous web. Four transmembrane segments in the middle of the protein anchor NS4B to membranes. An amphipatic helix at the amino-terminus attaches to membranes as well. The carboxy-terminal domain (CTD) of NS4B is highly conserved in Hepaciviruses, though its function remains unknown. A cytosolic localization is predicted for the NS4B-CTD. However, using membrane floatation assays and immunofluorescence, we now show targeting of the NS4B-CTD to membranes. Furthermore, a profile-profile search, with an HCV NS4B-CTD multiple sequence alignment, indicates sequence similarity to the membrane binding domain of prokaryotic D-lactate dehydrogenase (d-LDH). The crystal structure of E. coli d-LDH suggests that the region similar to NS4B-CTD is located in the membrane binding domain (MBD) of d-LDH, implying analogy in membrane association. Targeting of d-LDH to membranes occurs via electrostatic interactions of positive residues on the outside of the protein with negative head groups of lipids. To verify that anchorage of d-LDH MBD and NS4B-CTD is analogous, NS4B-CTD mutants were designed to disrupt these electrostatic interactions. Membrane association was confirmed by swopping the membrane contacting helix of d-LDH with the corresponding domain of the 4B-CTD. Furthermore, the functionality of these residues was tested in the HCV replicon system. Together these data show that NS4B-CTD is associated to membranes, similar to the prokaryotic d-LDH MBD, and is important for replication.

  3. The impact of carboxy nitroxide antioxidants on irradiated ataxia telangiectasia cells.

    PubMed

    Hosokawa, Kazuyuki; Chen, Philip; Lavin, F Martin; Bottle, E Steven

    2004-10-01

    Three water-soluble carboxy nitroxide antioxidants, 5-carboxy-1,1,3,3-tetramethylisoindolin-2-yloxyl, 4-carboxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidin-1-yloxyl, and 3-carboxy-2,2,5,5-tetramethylpyrrolidin-1-yloxyl, show significant impact on the postirradiation survival rates of ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) cells compared to normal cells, an assay which represents a model for understanding the impact of ROS damage on the A-T phenotype. The effects of these antioxidants are much more significant than those of vitamin E or Trolox (a water-soluble vitamin E analog), studied using the same cell survival model.

  4. Carboxy-terminal deletion of the HDL receptor reduces receptor levels in liver and steroidogenic tissues, induces hypercholesterolemia, and causes fatal heart disease.

    PubMed

    Pal, Rinku; Ke, Qingen; Pihan, German A; Yesilaltay, Ayce; Penman, Marsha L; Wang, Li; Chitraju, Chandramohan; Kang, Peter M; Krieger, Monty; Kocher, Olivier

    2016-12-01

    The HDL receptor SR-BI mediates the transfer of cholesteryl esters from HDL to cells and controls HDL abundance and structure. Depending on the genetic background, loss of SR-BI causes hypercholesterolemia, anemia, reticulocytosis, splenomegaly, thrombocytopenia, female infertility, and fatal coronary heart disease (CHD). The carboxy terminus of SR-BI ((505)QEAKL(509)) must bind to the cytoplasmic adaptor PDZK1 for normal hepatic-but not steroidogenic cell-expression of SR-BI protein. To determine whether SR-BI's carboxy terminus is also required for normal protein levels in steroidogenic cells, we introduced into SR-BI's gene a (507)Ala/STOP mutation that produces a truncated receptor (SR-BIΔCT). As expected, the dramatic reduction of hepatic receptor protein in SR-BIΔCT mice was similar to that in PDZK1 knockout (KO) mice. Unlike SR-BI KO females, SR-BIΔCT females were fertile. The severity of SR-BIΔCT mice's hypercholesterolemia was intermediate between those of SR-BI KO and PDZK1 KO mice. Substantially reduced levels of the receptor in adrenal cortical cells, ovarian cells, and testicular Leydig cells in SR-BIΔCT mice suggested that steroidogenic cells have an adaptor(s) functionally analogous to hepatic PDZK1. When SR-BIΔCT mice were crossed with apolipoprotein E KO mice (SR-BIΔCT/apoE KO), pathologies including hypercholesterolemia, macrocytic anemia, hepatic and splenic extramedullary hematopoiesis, massive splenomegaly, reticulocytosis, thrombocytopenia, and rapid-onset and fatal occlusive coronary arterial atherosclerosis and CHD (median age of death: 9 wk) were observed. These results provide new insights into the control of SR-BI in steroidogenic cells and establish SR-BIΔCT/apoE KO mice as a new animal model for the study of CHD. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  5. The Respiratory Syncytial Virus Phosphoprotein, Matrix Protein, and Fusion Protein Carboxy-Terminal Domain Drive Efficient Filamentous Virus-Like Particle Formation.

    PubMed

    Meshram, Chetan D; Baviskar, Pradyumna S; Ognibene, Cherie M; Oomens, Antonius G P

    2016-12-01

    Virus-like particles (VLPs) are attractive as a vaccine concept. For human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV), VLP assembly is poorly understood and appears inefficient. Hence, hRSV antigens are often incorporated into foreign VLP systems to generate anti-RSV vaccine candidates. To better understand the assembly, and ultimately to enable efficient production, of authentic hRSV VLPs, we examined the associated requirements and mechanisms. In a previous analysis in HEp-2 cells, the nucleoprotein (N), phosphoprotein (P), matrix protein (M), and fusion protein (F) were required for formation of filamentous VLPs, which, similar to those of wild-type virus, were associated with the cell surface. Using fluorescence and electron microscopy combined with immunogold labeling, we examined the surfaces of transfected HEp-2 cells and further dissected the process of filamentous VLP formation. Our results show that N is not required. Coexpression of P plus M plus F, but not P plus M, M plus F, or P plus F, induced both viral protein coalescence and formation of filamentous VLPs that resembled wild-type virions. Despite suboptimal coalescence in the absence of P, the M and F proteins, when coexpressed, formed cell surface-associated filaments with abnormal morphology, appearing longer and thinner than wild-type virions. For F, only the carboxy terminus (Fstem) was required, and addition of foreign protein sequences to Fstem allowed incorporation into VLPs. Together, the data show that P, M, and the F carboxy terminus are sufficient for robust viral protein coalescence and filamentous VLP formation and suggest that M-F interaction drives viral filament formation, with P acting as a type of cofactor facilitating the process and exerting control over particle morphology.

  6. Sequence specific 1H-NMR assignments and secondary structure of a carboxy-terminal functional fragment of apolipoprotein CII.

    PubMed

    Lycksell, P O; Ohman, A; Bengtsson-Olivecrona, G; Johansson, L B; Wijmenga, S S; Wernic, D; Gräslund, A

    1992-04-01

    The structural properties of a synthetic fragment of human apolipoprotein CII (apoCII) has been studied by circular dichroism and proton nuclear magnetic resonance. The fragment corresponds to the carboxy-terminal 30 amino acid residues and retains the ability of apoCII to activate lipoprotein lipase. Like native apoCII, the fragment has a tendency to self-associate in pure aqueous solution. Addition of 1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoro-2-isopropanol to aqueous solvent dissolves the aggregates and leads to an increase in the alpha-helical content of the peptide, probably by stabilizing transient helical structures. The resonances in the 1H-NMR spectrum of the fragment in 35% (CF3)2CHOH were assigned through standard procedures from nuclear Overhauser enhancement spectroscopy, correlated spectroscopy and total correlated spectroscopy experiments. The NMR data indicates the formation of a stable alpha helix spanning Ile66-Gly77. Another alpha helical turn may be formed between Lys55 and Ala59 and possibly span even further towards the carboxyl terminus. These structural elements are different from those previously predicted for this part of the sequence of apoCII.

  7. SKELETAL MUSCLE MITOCHONDRIAL ALTERATIONS IN CARBOXYL TERMINUS OF HSC70 INTERACTING PROTEIN (CHIP) -/- MICE.

    PubMed

    Schisler, Jonathan C; Patterson, Cam; Willis, Monte S

    2016-04-01

    Hereditary ataxias are characterized by a slowly progressive loss of gait, hand, speech, and eye coordination and cerebellar atrophy. A subset of these, including hypogonadism, are inherited as autosomal recessive traits involving coding mutations of genes involved in ubiquitination including RNF216, OTUD4, and STUB1. Cerebellar CHIPopathy (MIM 615768) is a form of autosomal recessive spinocerebellar ataxia (SCAR16) and when accompanied with hypogonadism, clinically resembles the Gordon Holmes Syndrome (GHS). A causal missense mutation in the gene that encodes the carboxy terminus of HSP-70 interacting protein (CHIP) protein was reported for the first time in 2014. CHIP-/- mice were found to phenocopy the motor deficiencies and some aspects of the hypogonadism observed in patients with STUB1 mutations. However, mechanisms responsible for these deficits are not known. In a survey of skeletal muscle by transmission electron microscopy. CHIP-/- mice at 6 months of age were found to have morphological changes consistent with increased sarcoplasmic reticulum compartments in quadriceps muscle and gastrocnemius (toxic oligomers and tubular aggregates), but not in soleus. Since CHIP has been implicated in ER stress in non-muscle cells, these findings illustrate potential parallel roles of CHIP in the muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum, a hypothesis that may be clinically relevant in a variety of common muscular and cardiac diseases.

  8. SPT5, an essential gene important for normal transcription in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, encodes an acidic nuclear protein with a carboxy-terminal repeat.

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, M S; Malone, E A; Winston, F

    1991-01-01

    Mutations in the SPT5 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae were isolated previously as suppressors of delta insertion mutations at HIS4 and LYS2. In this study we have shown that spt5 mutations suppress the his4-912 delta and lys2-128 delta alleles by altering transcription. We cloned the SPT5 gene and found that either an increase or a decrease in the copy number of the wild-type SPT5 gene caused an Spt- phenotype. Construction and analysis of an spt5 null mutation demonstrated that SPT5 is essential for growth, suggesting that SPT5 may be required for normal transcription of a large number of genes. The SPT5 DNA sequence was determined; it predicted a 116-kDa protein with an extremely acidic amino terminus and a novel six-amino-acid repeat at the carboxy terminus (consensus = S-T/A-W-G-G-A/Q). By indirect immunofluorescence microscopy we showed that a bifunctional SPT5-beta-galactosidase protein was located in the yeast nucleus. This molecular analysis of the SPT5 gene revealed a number of interesting similarities to the previously characterized SPT6 gene of S. cerevisiae. These results suggest that SPT5 and SPT6 act in a related fashion to influence essential transcriptional processes in S. cerevisiae. Images PMID:1840633

  9. The penultimate arginine of the carboxy terminus determines slow desensitisation in a P2X receptor from the cattle tick Boophilus microplus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    P2X ion channels have been functionally characterised from a range of eukaryotes. Whilst these receptors can be broadly classified into fast and slow desensitising, the molecular mechanisms underlying current desensitisation are not fully understood. Here we describe the characterisation of a P2X ch...

  10. Protein–Protein Interactions Modulate the Docking-Dependent E3-Ubiquitin Ligase Activity of Carboxy-Terminus of Hsc70-Interacting Protein (CHIP)*

    PubMed Central

    Narayan, Vikram; Landré, Vivien; Ning, Jia; Hernychova, Lenka; Muller, Petr; Verma, Chandra; Walkinshaw, Malcolm D.; Blackburn, Elizabeth A.; Ball, Kathryn L.

    2015-01-01

    CHIP is a tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domain protein that functions as an E3-ubiquitin ligase. As well as linking the molecular chaperones to the ubiquitin proteasome system, CHIP also has a docking-dependent mode where it ubiquitinates native substrates, thereby regulating their steady state levels and/or function. Here we explore the effect of Hsp70 on the docking-dependent E3-ligase activity of CHIP. The TPR-domain is revealed as a binding site for allosteric modulators involved in determining CHIP's dynamic conformation and activity. Biochemical, biophysical and modeling evidence demonstrate that Hsp70-binding to the TPR, or Hsp70-mimetic mutations, regulate CHIP-mediated ubiquitination of p53 and IRF-1 through effects on U-box activity and substrate binding. HDX-MS was used to establish that conformational-inhibition-signals extended from the TPR-domain to the U-box. This underscores inter-domain allosteric regulation of CHIP by the core molecular chaperones. Defining the chaperone-associated TPR-domain of CHIP as a manager of inter-domain communication highlights the potential for scaffolding modules to regulate, as well as assemble, complexes that are fundamental to protein homeostatic control. PMID:26330542

  11. Biochemical characterization of peptides from herpes simplex virus glycoprotein gC: loss of CNBr fragments from the carboxy terminus of truncated, secreted gC molecules.

    PubMed Central

    Kikuchi, G E; Coligan, J E; Holland, T C; Levine, M; Glorioso, J C; Nairn, R

    1984-01-01

    A biochemical characterization of peptides from herpes simplex virus type 1 glycoprotein gC was carried out. We utilized simple micromethods, based on immunological isolation of biosynthetically radiolabeled gC, to obtain gC in pure form for biochemical study. CNBr fragments of gC were prepared, isolated, and characterized. These CNBr fragments were resolved into six peaks by chromatography on Sephacryl S-200 in 6 M guanidine hydrochloride. Only three of the CNBr fragments contained carbohydrate side chains, as judged from the incorporation of [14C]glucosamine. Radiochemical microsequence analyses were carried out on the gC molecule and on each of the CNBr fragments of gC. A comparison of this amino acid sequence data with the amino acid sequence predicted from the DNA sequence of the gC gene showed that the first 25 residues of the predicted sequence are not present in the gC molecule isolated from infected cells and allowed alignment of the CNBr fragments in the gC molecule. Glycoprotein gC was also examined from three gC mutants, synLD70, gC-8, and gC-49. These mutants lack an immunoreactive envelope form of gC but produce a secreted, truncated gC gene product. Glycoprotein gC from cells infected with any of these gC- mutants was shown to have lost more than one CNBr fragment present in the wild-type gC molecule. The missing fragments included the one containing the putative transmembrane anchor sequence. Glycoprotein gC from the gC-8 mutant was also shown, by tryptic peptide map analysis, to have lost more than five major arginine-labeled tryptic peptides arginine-labeled tryptic peptides present in the wild-type gC molecule and to have gained a lysine-labeled tryptic peptide not present in wild-type gC. Images PMID:6092712

  12. Rapid elimination of Carboxy-THC in a cohort of chronic cannabis users.

    PubMed

    Lewis, John; Molnar, Anna; Allsop, David; Copeland, Jan; Fu, Shanlin

    2016-01-01

    Urinary 11-nor-Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid (Carboxy-THC) concentrations, normalised to creatinine output, have been demonstrated to be a useful tool in the interpretation of the results of a series of urine tests for cannabis. These tests, often termed historical data, can be used to identify potential chronic cannabis users who may present occupational health and safety risks within the workplace. Conversely, the data can also be used to support employee claims of previous regular, rather than recent, cannabis use. This study aimed at examining the mean elimination of Carboxy-THC in 37 chronic users undergoing voluntary abstinence over a 2-week period. Urine specimens were collected prior to the study and after 1 and 2 weeks of abstinence. Carboxy-THC levels in urine were measured by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) following alkaline hydrolysis, organic solvent extraction and derivatisation to form its pentafluoropropionic derivative. The creatinine-normalised Carboxy-THC concentrations declined rapidly over the 2 weeks of abstinence period and the majority of chronic cannabis users (73%) reduced their urinary Carboxy-THC levels to below the 15-μg/L confirmatory cutoff within that time. The study further highlights the value of historical urinary Carboxy-THC data as a means of identifying potential occupational health and safety risks among chronic cannabis users.

  13. 32. VIEW OF TERMINUS OF GRAND CANAL, SHOWING TURNOUT GATES, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. VIEW OF TERMINUS OF GRAND CANAL, SHOWING TURNOUT GATES, LOOKING SOUTHWEST. WASTE WATER IS TURNED INTO THE BED OF NEW RIVER. Photographer: Mark Durben, April 1989 - Grand Canal, North side of Salt River, Tempe, Maricopa County, AZ

  14. 2. View of hydraulic gates at terminus of pipes to ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. View of hydraulic gates at terminus of pipes to feeder canal. The Siphon-Breaker Building is to the right, looking south. - Columbia Basin Project, Grand Coulee Siphon Breaker Building, Grand Coulee, Grant County, WA

  15. Changes in Carboxy Methylation and Tyrosine Phosphorylation of Protein Phosphatase PP2A Are Associated with Epididymal Sperm Maturation and Motility

    PubMed Central

    Dudiki, Tejasvi; Kadunganattil, Suraj; Ferrara, John K.; Kline, Douglas W.; Vijayaraghavan, Srinivasan

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian sperm contain the serine/threonine phosphatases PP1γ2 and PP2A. The role of sperm PP1γ2 is relatively well studied. Here we confirm the presence of PP2A in sperm and show that it undergoes marked changes in methylation (leucine 309), tyrosine phosphorylation (tyrosine 307) and catalytic activity during epididymal sperm maturation. Spermatozoa isolated from proximal caput, distal caput and caudal regions of the epididymis contain equal immuno-reactive amounts of PP2A. Using demethyl sensitive antibodies we show that PP2A is methylated at its carboxy terminus in sperm from the distal caput and caudal regions but not in sperm from the proximal caput region of the epididymis. The methylation status of PP2A was confirmed by isolation of PP2A with microcystin agarose followed by alkali treatment, which causes hydrolysis of protein carboxy methyl esters. Tyrosine phosphorylation of sperm PP2A varied inversely with methylation. That is, PP2A was tyrosine phosphorylated when it was demethylated but not when methylated. PP2A demethylation and its reciprocal tyrosine phosphorylation were also affected by treatment of sperm with L-homocysteine and adenosine, which are known to elevate intracellular S-adenosylhomocysteine, a feedback inhibitor of methyltransferases. Catalytic activity of PP2A declined during epididymal sperm maturation. Inhibition of PP2A by okadaic acid or by incubation of caudal epididymal spermatozoa with L-homocysteine and adenosine resulted in increase of sperm motility parameters including percent motility, velocity, and lateral head amplitude. Demethylation or pharmacological inhibition of PP2A also leads to an increase in phosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3). Our results show for the first time that changes in PP2A activity due to methylation and tyrosine phosphorylation occur in sperm and that these changes may play an important role in the regulation of sperm function. PMID:26569399

  16. Neutral iridium catalysts with chiral phosphine-carboxy ligands for asymmetric hydrogenation of unsaturated carboxylic acids.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shuang; Che, Wen; Wu, Hui-Ling; Zhu, Shou-Fei; Zhou, Qi-Lin

    2017-03-01

    We developed neutral iridium catalysts with chiral spiro phosphine-carboxy ligands (SpiroCAP) for asymmetric hydrogenation of unsaturated carboxylic acids. Different from the cationic Crabtree-type catalysts, the iridium catalysts with chiral spiro phosphine-carboxy ligands are neutral and do not require the use of a tetrakis[3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]borate (BArF(-)) counterion, which is necessary for stabilizing cationic Crabtree-type catalysts. Another advantage of the neutral iridium catalysts is that they have high stability and have a long lifetime in air. The new iridium catalysts with chiral spiro phosphine-carboxy ligands exhibit unprecedented high enantioselectivity (up to 99.4% ee) in the asymmetric hydrogenations of various unsaturated carboxylic acids, particularly for 3-alkyl-3-methylenepropionic acids, which are challenging substrates for other chiral catalysts.

  17. 23. TERMINUS, NORTH BRANCH PRAIRIE CITY DITCH. DITCH COMES FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. TERMINUS, NORTH BRANCH PRAIRIE CITY DITCH. DITCH COMES FROM ISOLATED GROUP OF TREES IN MIDDLE DISTANCE, AND ENDS AT CENTER RIGHT. WATER THEN PROCEEDED DOWN SWALE, INTO TREES AT LEFT. VIEW TO NORTH. - Natomas Ditch System, Rhodes Ditch, West of Bidwell Street, north of U.S. Highway 50, Folsom, Sacramento County, CA

  18. 207. Oconaluffee River Bridge is the southern terminus of the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    207. Oconaluffee River Bridge is the southern terminus of the Blue Ride Parkway. It is a concrete girder bridge completed in 1957. It is the only concrete girder bridge with stone-faced piers. Looking east-southeast. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

  19. Rpb3 promotes hepatocellular carcinoma through its N-terminus.

    PubMed

    Fang, Zhe-Ping; Jiang, Bei-Ge; Zhang, Fa-Biao; Wang, Ai-Dong; Ji, Yi-Ming; Xu, Yong-Fu; Li, Ji-Cheng; Zhou, Wei-Ping; Zhou, Wei-Jie; Han, Hai-Xiong

    2014-10-15

    The expression of RNA polymerase II subunit 3 (Rpb3) was found frequent up-regulation in Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) tumors. Significant associations could also be drawn between increased expressions of Rpb3 and advance HCC staging and shorter disease-free survival of patients. Overexpression of Rpb3 increased HCC cell proliferation, migratory rate and tumor growth in nude mice, whereas suppression of Rpb3 using shRNA inhibited these effects. For mechanism study, we found that Rpb3 bound directly to Snail, downregulated E-cadherin, induced HCC cells epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). In particular, N-terminus of Rpb3 blocked Rpb3 binding to Snail, inhibited Rpb3-high-expression HCC cells proliferation, migration, tumor growth in nude mice, and also inhibited DEN-induced liver tumorigenesis. Furthermore, N-terminus of Rpb3 did not inhibit normal liver cells or Rpb3-low-expression HCC cells proliferation. These findings suggest that N-terminus of Rpb3 selectively inhibits Rpb3-high-expression HCC cells proliferation. N-terminus of Rpb3 may be useful in treating patients diagnosed with Rpb3-high-expression HCC.

  20. Channel Catfish, Ictalurus punctatus, ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase L5 cDNA

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The ubiquitin-proteasome cycle is a complex, non-lysosomal biochemical process for intracellular protein degradation. This process involves many enzymes. One of them is ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase (UCT). In this report, we cloned, sequenced and characterized the channel catfish UCT L5 cDNA....

  1. Role of the synaptobrevin C terminus in fusion pore formation

    PubMed Central

    Ngatchou, Annita N.; Kisler, Kassandra; Fang, Qinghua; Walter, Alexander M.; Zhao, Ying; Bruns, Dieter; Sørensen, Jakob B.; Lindau, Manfred

    2010-01-01

    Neurotransmitter release is mediated by the SNARE proteins synaptobrevin II (sybII, also known as VAMP2), syntaxin, and SNAP-25, generating a force transfer to the membranes and inducing fusion pore formation. However, the molecular mechanism by which this force leads to opening of a fusion pore remains elusive. Here we show that the ability of sybII to support exocytosis is inhibited by addition of one or two residues to the sybII C terminus depending on their energy of transfer from water to the membrane interface, following a Boltzmann distribution. These results suggest that following stimulation, the SNARE complex pulls the C terminus of sybII deeper into the vesicle membrane. We propose that this movement disrupts the vesicular membrane continuity leading to fusion pore formation. In contrast to current models, the experiments suggest that fusion pore formation begins with molecular rearrangements at the intravesicular membrane leaflet and not between the apposed cytoplasmic leaflets. PMID:20937897

  2. Phosphorylation-induced modulation of pNBC1 function: distinct roles for the amino- and carboxy-termini

    PubMed Central

    Gross, E; Fedotoff, O; Pushkin, A; Abuladze, N; Newman, D; Kurtz, I

    2003-01-01

    The human NBC1 (SLC4A4) gene encodes the electrogenic sodium bicarbonate cotransporters kNBC1 and pNBC1, which are highly expressed in the kidney and pancreas, respectively. The HCO3−:Na+ stoichiometry of these cotransporters is an important determinant of the direction of ion flux. Recently we showed in a mouse proximal tubule (mPCT) cell line expressing kNBC1, that 8-Br-cAMP shifts the stoichiometry of the cotransporter from 3:1 to 2:1 via protein kinase A (PKA)-dependent phosphorylation of Ser982. pNBC1 has the identical carboxy-terminal consensus phosphorylation PKA site (KKGS1026), and an additional site in its amino-terminus (KRKT49). In this study we determined the potential role of these sites in regulating the function of pNBC1. The results demonstrated that in mPCT cells expressing pNBC1, PKA-dependent phosphorylation of Ser1026 following 8-Br-cAMP treatment shifted the stoichiometry from 3:1 to 2:1. The effect was electrostatic in nature as replacing Ser1026 with Asp resulted in a similar stoichiometry shift. In addition to shifting the stoichiometry, 8-Br-cAMP caused a significant increase in the 4,4′-dinitrostilbene-2,2′-disulfonic acid (DNDS)-sensitive basolateral membrane conductance (GDS) of cells expressing pNBC1, but not kNBC1. Although, the effect did not involve phosphorylation of Thr49, which was endogenously phosphorylated, replacing this residue with Asp or Ala abolished the 8-Br-cAMP-induced increase in GDS. In the mPEC pancreatic duct cell line, where endogenous pNBC1 functions with a HCO3−:Na+ stoichiometry of 2:1, 8-Br-cAMP increased GDS by ∼90 % without altering the stoichiometry or inducing phosphorylation of the cotransporter. The results demonstrate that phosphorylation of Ser1026 mediates the cAMP-dependent shift in the stoichiometry of pNBC1, whereas Thr49 plays an essential role in the cAMP-induced increase in GDS. PMID:12730338

  3. Nascent Aneurysm Formation at the Basilar Terminus Induced by Hemodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Ling; Hoi, Yiemeng; Swartz, Daniel D.; Kolega, John; Siddiqui, Adnan; Meng, Hui

    2008-01-01

    Background and Purpose Hemodynamic insults at arterial bifurcations are hypothesized to play a key role in intracranial aneurysm formation. This study investigates aneurysm-initiating vascular responses at the rabbit basilar terminus subsequent to common carotid artery ligation. Methods Nine adult female New Zealand white rabbits were subjected to sham, unilateral, or bilateral common carotid artery ligation to produce varying degrees of compensatory basilar artery flow increase. Basilar artery flow velocity and geometry were monitored by transcranial Doppler and rotational angiography, respectively, for 12 weeks after surgery. Bifurcation tissues were harvested at 12 weeks and examined histologically. From the histological sections, we quantified the destructive structural changes at the basilar terminus and correlated them with the basilar artery flow rate increase. Results Subsequent to common carotid artery ligation, basilar artery flow rate increased by 105% to 900% at the maximum. All common carotid artery-ligated rabbits presented nascent aneurysm formation characterized by a bulge with thinned media and absent internal elastic lamina near the basilar terminus. We defined a nascent aneurysm index based on a multiplicative combination of the local destructive remodeling lengths measured at the nascent aneurysm. The nascent aneurysm index strongly correlated with the increase in basilar artery flow rate with R2=0.91. Conclusion Without other known predisposition, flow increase alone at the basilar bifurcation can lead to a nascent aneurysm. This nascent aneurysm formation is dose-dependent on basilar artery flow increase. PMID:18451348

  4. Oceanic forcing and terminus retreat at east Greenland's tidewater glaciers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowton, Tom; Sole, Andrew; Nienow, Peter; Slater, Donald; Wilton, David; Hanna, Edward

    2017-04-01

    The role of oceanic forcing in the retreat of Greenland's tidewater outlet glaciers remains equivocal, in part due to the difficulty of quantifying how this forcing varies over time and between glaciers. Using plume modelling, we demonstrate that the strength of buoyancy-driven circulation in fjords is highly sensitive to the glacier grounding line depth and runoff discharge, allowing a simple parameterisation for oceanic forcing based on up-fjord oceanic heat transport. In conjunction with time series of glacier runoff and shelf water temperature, we use this parameterisation to elucidate controls on the terminus position of 10 outlet glaciers in east Greenland over a 20-year period. We find that up to 70 % of terminus position variability is explained by modelled oceanic forcing, while comparably strong correlations are also obtained between glacier length and runoff and shelf water temperature. Our findings indicate that despite the complexity of tidewater glacier behaviour and current limitations in understanding of calving front processes, over multi-year time scales a significant proportion of terminus position change can be explained as a simple function of key environmental variables.

  5. Sensor system for non-invasive optical carboxy-and methemoglobin determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timm, Ulrich; Gewiss, Helge; Kraitl, Jens; Brock, Beate; Ewald, Hartmut

    2017-02-01

    The pulse oximetry is a non-invasive method to monitor the oxygen saturation and is clinically used for many years. However this technology has some limitations. In case of the presence of dysfunctional hemoglobin derivatives as carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) or methemoglobin (MetHb) the readings of the pulse oximeter are distorted. This erroneous diagnosis of the patient's status can result in a life threatening situation. This paper will describe a sensor system for noninvasive determination of carboxy- and methemoglobin.

  6. Alterations in the carboxy-terminal half of cloacin destabilize the protein and prevent its export by Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    van Putten, A J; Stegehuis, F; van Bergen en Henegouwen, P M; De Graaf, F K; Oudega, B

    1988-09-01

    Several overlapping carboxy-terminal and internal deletions were constructed in the cloacin structural gene. The expression, the binding of the cloacin DF13 immunity protein and the release into the culture medium of the mutant cloacin polypeptides were studied by immunoblotting and ELISAs. Minor alterations at the carboxy-terminal end of the cloacin did not affect protein expression, stability or release to a large extent, but larger carboxy-terminal deletions strongly destabilized the protein and no release was observed. The removal of a particular region within the carboxy-terminal portion of cloacin strongly destabilized the polypeptide and made it a target for proteolytic degradation. Binding of immunity protein did not affect stability and release of the mutant polypeptides. By using immunoelectron microscopy, the polypeptides that were not exported were located in the cytoplasm of producing cells. Large aggregates of these mutant polypeptides were not observed in the cytoplasm: the polypeptides were present in a soluble form.

  7. Poly[triaquabis-(μ(2)-3-carboxy-pyrazine-2-carboxyl-ato)dilithium(I)].

    PubMed

    Tombul, Mustafa; Güven, Kutalmış; Büyükgüngör, Orhan

    2008-02-20

    In the title compound, [Li(2)(C(6)H(3)N(2)O(4))(2)(H(2)O)(3)](n), the coordination number for both independent Li(+) cations is five. One of the Li(+) ions has a distorted trigonal-bipyramidal geometry, coordinated by one of the carboxyl O atoms of a 3-carboxy-pyrazine-2-carboxyl-ate ligand, two O atoms from two water mol-ecules, and an N and a carboxyl-ate O atom of a second 3-carboxy-pyrazine-2-carboxyl-ate ligand. The other Li(+) ion also has a distorted trigonal-bipyramidal geometry, coordinated by one water mol-ecule and two 3-carboxy-pyrazine-2-carboxyl-ate ligands through an N and a carboxyl-ate O atom from each. One of the carboxyl groups of the two ligands takes part in an intra-molecular O-H⋯O hydrogen bond. The stabilization of the crystal structure is further assisted by O-H⋯O, O-H⋯N and C-H⋯O hydrogen-bonding inter-actions involving the water mol-ecules and carboxyl-ate O atoms.

  8. Helical conformations of hexapeptides containing N-terminus diproline segments.

    PubMed

    Raghothama, Srinivasarao; Aravinda, Subrayashastry; Shamala, Narayanaswamy; Balaram, Padmanabhan

    2010-01-01

    The role of N-terminus diproline segments in facilitating helical folding in short peptides has been investigated in a set of model hexapeptides of the type Piv-Xxx-Yyy-Aib-Leu-Aib-Phe-OMe (Piv, pivaloyl). Nine sequences have been investigated with the following N-terminus dipeptide segments: (D)Pro-Ala (4) and Pro-PsiPro (5, Psi, pseudoproline), Ala-Ala (6), Ala-Pro (7), Pro-Ala (8), Aib-Ala (9), Ala-Aib (10). The analog sequences Piv-Pro-Pro-Ala-Leu-Aib-Phe-OMe (2) and Piv-Pro-Pro-Ala-Aib-Ala-Aib-OMe (3) have also been studied. Solid state conformations have been determined by X-ray crystallography for peptides 4, 6, and 8 and compared with the previously determined crystal structure of peptide 1 (Boc-Pro-Pro-Aib-Leu-Aib-Val-OMe); (Rai et al., JACS 2006, 128, 7916-7928). Peptides 1 and 6 adopt almost identical helical conformations with unfolding of the helix at the N-terminus Pro (1) residue. Peptide 4 reveals the anticipated (D)Pro-Ala type II' beta-turn, followed by a stretch of 3(10)-helix. Peptide 8 adopts a folded conformation stabilized by four successive 4-->1 intramolecular hydrogen bonds. Ala (2) adopts an alpha(L) conformation, resulting in a type II beta-turn conformation followed by a stretch of 3(10)-helix. Conformational properties in solution were probed using solvent perturbation of NH chemical shifts which permit delineation of hydrogen bonded NH groups and nuclear Overhauser effects (NOEs) between backbone protons, which are diagnostic of local residue conformations. The results suggest that, continuous helical conformations are indeed significantly populated for peptides 2 and 3. Comparison of the results for peptides 1 and 2, suggest that there is a significant influence of the residue that follows diproline segments in influencing backbone folding. (c) 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Marine Geophysical Surveying Along the Hubbard Glacier Terminus, Southeast Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goff, J. A.; Davis, M.; Gulick, S. P.; Lawson, D. E.; Willems, B. A.

    2010-12-01

    Tidewater glaciers are a challenging environment for marine investigations, owing to the dangers associated with calving and restrictions on operations due to dense floating ice. We report here on recent efforts to conduct marine geophysical surveys proximal to the ice face of Hubbard Glacier, in Disenchantment Bay, Alaska. Hubbard is an advancing tidewater glacier that has twice recently (1986 and 2002) impinged on Gilbert Point, which separates Russell Fiord from Disenchantment Bay, thereby temporarily creating a glacially-dammed Russell Lake. Continued advance will likely form a more permanent dam, rerouting brackish outflow waters into the Situk River, near Yakutat, Alaska. Our primary interest is in studying the development and motion of the morainal bank which, for an advancing tidewater glacier, stabilizes it against rapid retreat. For survey work, we operated with a small, fast, aluminum-hulled vessel and a captain experienced in operating in ice-bound conditions, providing a high margin of safety and maneuverability. Differencing of multibeam bathymetric data acquired in different years can identify and quantify areas of deposition and erosion on the morainal bank front and in Disenchantment Bay proper, where accumulation rates are typically > 1 m/yr within 1 km of the glacier terminus. The advance or retreat rate of the morainal bank can be determined by changes in the bed elevation through time; we document advance rates that average > 30 m/yr in Disenchantment Bay, but which vary substantially over different time periods and at different positions along the ice face. Georeferencing of available satellite imagery allows us to directly compare the position of the glacial terminus with the position of the morainal bank. From 1978 to 1999, and then to 2006, the advances in terminus and morainal bank positions were closely synchronized along the length of the glacier face. In the shallower Russell Fiord side of the terminus, a sediment ridge was mapped both

  10. The amino terminus of Cdk2 binds p21.

    PubMed

    Moskowitz, N K; Borao, F J; Dardashti, O; Cohen, H D; Germino, F J

    1996-01-01

    The cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) inhibitor known as p21, which is transcriptionally regulated by p53, can induce G1 arrest when overexpressed and inhibit the kinase activity of a wide variety of cyclin-Cdk complexes. Previous studies have demonstrated that a portion of the conserved region of p21 (amino acids 46-78), which is homologous to similar regions in the related Cdk inhibitors p27 and p57, can bind to Cdk2, and that this region is essential for kinase inhibition. However, the site(s) on Cdk2 that are involved in p21 binding have not been identified. We therefore created mutant Cdk2 molecules with various N-terminal and C-terminal deletions and tested each for their ability to bind to p21 by the yeast two-hybrid and the double-tagging assays. None of the deletion mutants tested bound to p21 by either assay. We next tested whether p21 could bind to Cdk7, a component of the cyclin-activating kinase complex. By both the double-tagging and yeast two-hybrid assays, p21 failed to bind to this protein, consistent with previous reports. However, hybrid molecules consisting of the amino-terminal half of Cdk2 and the carboxy-terminal half of Cdk7 (Cdk2/Cdk7) could bind to p21 by both assays, whereas the Cdk7/Cdk2 hybrids could not. Furthermore, the yeast Cdc28 protein, which is 65% identical with Cdk2, failed to bind to p21 by both the yeast two-hybrid and double-tagging assays. Cdk2/Cdc28 hybrids but not Cdc28/Cdk2 hybrids could bind to p21. These results suggest that the amino-terminal half of Cdk2 is important for p21 binding, consistent with the recently published crystal-lographic data. Our data also suggest that the three-dimensional structure of Cdk2 is likely altered by creating deletion mutants from either the amino- or carboxy-terminal end of the protein. Finally, we have mutated the Cdc28/Cdk2 hybrid protein and isolated several mutants, which are able to bind to p21. This approach may be useful for identifying residues in Cdk2 and Cdc28 that affect their

  11. Change in plasma immunoreactive N-terminus, C-terminus, and 4,000-dalton midportion of atrial natriuretic factor prohormone with hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Winters, C J; Vesely, D L

    1991-01-01

    Plasma concentrations of the immunoreactive N-terminus, C-terminus and 4,000-dalton midportion of the N-terminus of the atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) prohormone were measured before and after hemodialysis in 13 patients with end-stage renal disease. There was a significant (p less than 0.001) fall in the mean plasma concentration of the C-terminus (i.e. ANF, amino acids 99-126 of the prohormone) from 123 +/- 25 to 80 +/- 22 fmol/ml (mean +/- SEM) with dialysis. The whole N-terminus, on the other hand, increased from 9,336 +/- 2,011 to 11,021 +/- 2,134 fmol/ml after dialysis (p less than 0.002). Pro ANF 31-67 (i.e. amino acids 31-67 of the prohormone) increased postdialysis from 27,775 +/- 4,300 to 31,040 +/- 4,840 fmol/ml (p less than 0.003). Only 1.5% of pro ANF 1-98 and pro ANF 31-67 were cleared by the dialyzer membrane while 15% of ANF crossed the membrane. Thus, with hemodialysis the C-terminus decreases while the N-terminus and pro ANF 31-67 from the midportion of the N-terminus of the ANF prohormone increase in plasma which is partially explained by their respective abilities to cross the dialyzer membrane.

  12. Interpreting Terminus Fluctuations at Helheim Glacier, Southeast Greenland, through Modeling and Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kehrl, L. M.; Joughin, I. R.; Shapero, D.

    2014-12-01

    Marine-terminating outlet glaciers are highly sensitive to changes at the ice-ocean boundary. Changes at the ice-ocean boundary (calving events, submarine melting) can alter the terminus position and thereby the stress balance. If the terminus retreats into deeper water, more of the driving stress must then be balanced by longitudinal stress gradients, which cause the glacier to speed up. This study combines satellite observations and modeling (Elmer/Ice) to investigate the relationship between glacier dynamics and terminus position at Helheim Glacier, southeast Greenland, from 2000-2014. Helheim Glacier retreated about 7 km from 2001-2005 as warm ocean water entered the nearby fjord. From 2005-2006, the glacier re-advanced by 3 km as a floating or near-floating ice tongue formed over the basal overdeepening in front of the glacier terminus. Since then, Helheim's terminus position has remained relatively stable, with terminus fluctuations of < 2 km. Our model experiments consider both large terminus fluctuations (> 2 km) associated with rapid retreat and small terminus fluctuations (< 500 m) associated with individual calving events. We run the model simulations with both a flowline and three-dimensional model to better constrain our uncertainties. Our results show that Helheim Glacier responds rapidly to changes in terminus position of more than a few hundred meters. Small terminus fluctuations can cause velocity variations that extend up to 30 km inland, which roughly corresponds with the spatial extent of the weak bed (20-40 kPa) underneath Helheim Glacier.

  13. Metabolism of radioiodinated carboxy-terminal fragments of bovine parathyroid hormone in normal and anephric rats

    SciTech Connect

    D'Amour, P.; Lazure, C.

    1985-07-01

    (/sup 125/I)Carboxy-terminal fragments were produced by incubating (/sup 125/I)bovine PTH(1-84) with plasma membranes from the rat renal cortex. After purification by gel chromatography and characterization by sequence analysis, these fragments, mainly (/sup 125/I)bovine PTH(41-84), were injected into normal and acutely nephrectomized rats during two different experiments. In each case, blood was obtained from five rats at various time points (2, 4, 6, 8, 12, 24, 48, and 96 min); tissue was taken after they had been killed (4, 8, 24, and 96 min). Plasma and weighted aliquots of tissues were counted. Plasma at each time point and the extract of various tissues at the 8-min mark were further analyzed by gel chromatography. Each radioactivity peak on each profile was identified and quantitated planimetrically. (/sup 125/I)Carboxy-terminal fragments were extracted from serum biexponentially: the first exponential had a half-life of 2.3 min and the second 27.2 min in normal rats. These values increased to 3.2 min (X 1.4) and 74.0 min (X 2.7) in nephrectomized rats. In normal rats, /sup 125/I-extraction was 33.4% (kidney), 15.9% (muscle), 6.9% (bone), less than 2.7% (liver), and under 1% in other tissues. In nephrectomized rats, these values were significantly (P less than 0.005) increased to 24.6% (muscle), 10% (bone), and 6.8% (liver) with less than 1% in other tissues. Most of the /sup 125/I-radioactivity present in these tissues at the 8-min time point migrated in the same manner as injected fragments or smaller degradation products generated in situ. Tissues which play a secondary role in circulating carboxy-terminal fragment extraction in normal rats can therefore increase this activity in anephric animals.

  14. Carboxy-THC in Washed Hair: Still the Reliable Indicator of Marijuana Ingestion.

    PubMed

    Hill, Virginia A; Schaffer, Michael I; Stowe, G Neil

    2016-06-01

    The presence of the metabolite 11-nor-9-carboxy-delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (C-THC) in hair is generally accepted as the definitive proof of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) ingestion. During hair analysis, the removal of any potential C-THC external contamination that could result from marijuana smoke or close personal contact via a wash procedure is critical. Here, we performed a series of experiments to demonstrate that C-THC is the reliable indicator of marijuana ingestion when paired with the correct washing procedure to remove potential external contamination.

  15. Carboxy derivatised Ir(III) complexes: synthesis, electrochemistry, photophysical properties and photocatalytic hydrogen generation.

    PubMed

    Paul, Avishek; Das, Nivedita; Halpin, Yvonne; Vos, Johannes G; Pryce, Mary T

    2015-06-14

    In this contribution the synthesis and characterisation of a series of novel mixed ligand iridium(iii) complexes, functionalised with a carboxy ester or phosphonate groups are reported. These groupings are introduced on the 4-position of either the phenyl pyridine or the 2,2'-bipyridyl ligands. A low temperature high yield synthesis for the precursor [Ir(ppy-COOEt)2(μ-Cl)]2 was developed. The photophysical and electrochemical properties of these compounds are also described, together with their behaviour as photosensitisers for the generation of hydrogen from water.

  16. The code and beyond: transcription regulation by the RNA polymerase II carboxy-terminal domain.

    PubMed

    Harlen, Kevin M; Churchman, L Stirling

    2017-04-01

    The carboxy-terminal domain (CTD) extends from the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) as a long, repetitive and largely unstructured polypeptide chain. Throughout the transcription process, the CTD is dynamically modified by post-translational modifications, many of which facilitate or hinder the recruitment of key regulatory factors of Pol II that collectively constitute the 'CTD code'. Recent studies have revealed how the physicochemical properties of the CTD promote phase separation in the presence of other low-complexity domains. Here, we discuss the intricacies of the CTD code and how the newly characterized physicochemical properties of the CTD expand the function of the CTD beyond the code.

  17. Sumoylation of SAE2 C terminus regulates SAE nuclear localization.

    PubMed

    Truong, Khue; Lee, Terry D; Li, Baozong; Chen, Yuan

    2012-12-14

    SUMOylation occurs predominantly in the nucleus, but non-nuclear proteins can also be SUMOylated. It is unclear how intracellular trafficking of the SUMOylation enzymes is regulated to catalyze SUMOylation in different cellular compartments. Here we report that the SAE2 subunit of human SUMO activation enzyme (SAE) underwent rapid nucleocytoplasmic shuttling and its nuclear accumulation depended on SUMO modification at the C terminus. The SUMOylation sites included three Lys residues on the bipartite nuclear localization sequence (NLS) and two Lys residues outside of but adjacent to the NLS, and their SUMOylation was catalyzed by Ubc9. Because SAE2 forms a tight heterodimer with SAE1 and it controls the trafficking of the heterodimer, this study has identified the mechanism used to localize SAE to the nucleus. Similar mechanisms are likely to exist for other proteins that depend on SUMOylation for nuclear localization.

  18. A carboxy-terminal fragment of protein mu 1/mu 1C is present in infectious subvirion particles of mammalian reoviruses and is proposed to have a role in penetration.

    PubMed

    Nibert, M L; Fields, B N

    1992-11-01

    Penetration of a cell membrane as an early event in infection of cells by mammalian reoviruses appears to require a particular type of viral particle, the infectious subvirion particle (ISVP), which is generated from an intact virion by proteolytic cleavage of the outer capsid proteins sigma 3 and mu 1/mu 1C. Characterizations of the structural components and properties of ISVPs are thus relevant to attempts to understand the mechanism of penetration by reoviruses. In this study, a novel, approximately 13-kDa carboxy-terminal fragment (given the name phi) was found to be generated from protein mu 1/mu 1C during in vitro treatments of virions with trypsin or chymotrypsin to yield ISVPs. With trypsin treatment, both the carboxy-terminal fragment phi and the amino-terminal fragment mu 1 delta/delta were shown to be generated and to remain attached to ISVPs in stoichiometric quantities. Sites of protease cleavage were identified in the deduced amino acid sequence of mu 1 by determining the amino-terminal sequences of phi proteins: trypsin cleaves between arginine 584 and isoleucine 585, and chymotrypsin cleaves between tyrosine 581 and glycine 582. Findings in this study indicate that sequences in the phi portion of mu 1/mu 1C may participate in the unique functions attributed to ISVPs. Notably, the delta-phi cleavage junction was predicted to be flanked by a pair of long amphipathic alpha-helices. These amphipathic alpha-helices, together with the myristoyl group at the extreme amino terminus of mu 1/mu 1N, are proposed to interact directly with the lipid bilayer of a cell membrane during penetration by mammalian reoviruses.

  19. Novel archaeal adhesion pilins with a conserved N terminus.

    PubMed

    Esquivel, Rianne N; Xu, Rachel; Pohlschroder, Mechthild

    2013-09-01

    Type IV pili play important roles in a wide array of processes, including surface adhesion and twitching motility. Although archaeal genomes encode a diverse set of type IV pilus subunits, the functions for most remain unknown. We have now characterized six Haloferax volcanii pilins, PilA[1-6], each containing an identical 30-amino-acid N-terminal hydrophobic motif that is part of a larger highly conserved domain of unknown function (Duf1628). Deletion mutants lacking up to five of the six pilin genes display no significant adhesion defects; however, H. volcanii lacking all six pilins (ΔpilA[1-6]) does not adhere to glass or plastic. Consistent with these results, the expression of any one of these pilins in trans is sufficient to produce functional pili in the ΔpilA[1-6] strain. PilA1His and PilA2His only partially rescue this phenotype, whereas ΔpilA[1-6] strains expressing PilA3His or PilA4His adhere even more strongly than the parental strain. Most surprisingly, expressing either PilA5His or PilA6His in the ΔpilA[1-6] strain results in microcolony formation. A hybrid protein in which the conserved N terminus of the mature PilA1His is replaced with the corresponding N domain of FlgA1 is processed by the prepilin peptidase, but it does not assemble functional pili, leading us to conclude that Duf1628 can be annotated as the N terminus of archaeal PilA adhesion pilins. Finally, the pilin prediction program, FlaFind, which was trained primarily on archaeal flagellin sequences, was successfully refined to more accurately predict pilins based on the in vivo verification of PilA[1-6].

  20. 7-Carboxy-7-deazaguanine Synthase: A Radical S-Adenosyl-l-methionine Enzyme with Polar Tendencies

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Radical S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM) enzymes are widely distributed and catalyze diverse reactions. SAM binds to the unique iron atom of a site-differentiated [4Fe-4S] cluster and is reductively cleaved to generate a 5′-deoxyadenosyl radical, which initiates turnover. 7-Carboxy-7-deazaguanine (CDG) synthase (QueE) catalyzes a key step in the biosynthesis of 7-deazapurine containing natural products. 6-Carboxypterin (6-CP), an oxidized analogue of the natural substrate 6-carboxy-5,6,7,8-tetrahydropterin (CPH4), is shown to be an alternate substrate for CDG synthase. Under reducing conditions that would promote the reductive cleavage of SAM, 6-CP is turned over to 6-deoxyadenosylpterin (6-dAP), presumably by radical addition of the 5′-deoxyadenosine followed by oxidative decarboxylation to the product. By contrast, in the absence of the strong reductant, dithionite, the carboxylate of 6-CP is esterified to generate 6-carboxypterin-5′-deoxyadenosyl ester (6-CP-dAdo ester). Structural studies with 6-CP and SAM also reveal electron density consistent with the ester product being formed in crystallo. The differential reactivity of 6-CP under reducing and nonreducing conditions highlights the ability of radical SAM enzymes to carry out both polar and radical transformations in the same active site. PMID:28045519

  1. 5-Carboxy-8-hydroxyquinoline is a Broad Spectrum 2-Oxoglutarate Oxygenase Inhibitor which Causes Iron Translocation

    PubMed Central

    Aik, WeiShen; Che, Ka Hing; Li, Xuan Shirley; Kristensen, Jan B. L.; King, Oliver N. F.; Chan, Mun Chiang; Yeoh, Kar Kheng; Choi, Hwanho; Walport, Louise J.; Thinnes, Cyrille C.; Bush, Jacob T.; Lejeune, Clarisse; Rydzik, Anna M.; Rose, Nathan R.; Bagg, Eleanor A.; McDonough, Michael A.; Krojer, Tobias; Yue, Wyatt W.; Ng, Stanley S.; Olsen, Lars; Brennan, Paul E.; Oppermann, Udo; Muller-Knapp, Susanne; Klose, Robert J.; Ratcliffe, Peter J.; Schofield, Christopher J.; Kawamura, Akane

    2015-01-01

    2-Oxoglutarate and iron dependent oxygenases are therapeutic targets for human diseases. Using a representative 2OG oxygenase panel, we compare the inhibitory activities of 5-carboxy-8-hydroxyquinoline (IOX1) and 4-carboxy-8-hydroxyquinoline (4C8HQ) with that of two other commonly used 2OG oxygenase inhibitors, N-oxalylglycine (NOG) and 2,4-pyridinedicarboxylic acid (2,4-PDCA). The results reveal that IOX1 has a broad spectrum of activity, as demonstrated by the inhibition of transcription factor hydroxylases, representatives of all 2OG dependent histone demethylase subfamilies, nucleic acid demethylases and γ-butyrobetaine hydroxylase. Cellular assays show that, unlike NOG and 2,4-PDCA, IOX1 is active against both cytosolic and nuclear 2OG oxygenases without ester derivatisation. Unexpectedly, crystallographic studies on these oxygenases demonstrate that IOX1, but not 4C8HQ, can cause translocation of the active site metal, revealing a rare example of protein ligand-induced metal movement PMID:26682036

  2. pH response of carboxy-terminated colorimetric polydiacetylene vesicles.

    PubMed

    Kew, Simon J; Hall, Elizabeth A H

    2006-04-01

    Carboxy-terminated polydiacetylene vesicles are known to undergo dramatic color transitions in response to exposure to external stimuli such as pH, temperature, and receptor-ligand binding. FTIR spectroscopy was used to identify the breakdown in the interfacial hydrogen-bonding interactions of the carboxylic acid headgroups of polymerized 10,12-tricosadiynoic acid (TRCDA) vesicles in aqueous solution during pH chromic transition. The headgroup structure was monitored as the chromic transition takes place and the dissociation dependence of the pKa was determined. Due to the attenuated acidity of the interfacially confined carboxy groups, which exhibit pKa values in the range 9.5-9.9, it was found that the deprotonation-triggered blue-red chromic transition occurred in the pH range 9.0-10.1 and that the mechanism of the transition required interaction with the surface carboxyl group, which is of importance in the design of a biochromic mechanism using PDA assemblies. Transmission electron microscopy and FTIR spectroscopy revealed that the surface ionization and the pH-induced chromogenic transition was also accompanied by a dramatic vesicle-planar morphological transition alongside subtle changes to the alkyl chain conformation and packing. A two-step mechanism was implicated as causing the chromic transition that first involves surface deprotonation and then specific cation binding, which can aid the design of sensitive surface-ligand chemistry for new PDA structures.

  3. Katanin Severing and Binding Microtubules Are Inhibited by Tubulin Carboxy Tails

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Megan E.; Sackett, Dan L.; Ross, Jennifer L.

    2015-01-01

    Microtubule dynamics in cells are regulated by associated proteins that can be either stabilizers or destabilizers. A class of destabilizers that is important in a large number of cellular activities is the microtubule-severing enzymes, yet little is known about how they function. Katanin p60 was the first ATPase associated with microtubule severing. Here, we investigate the activity of katanin severing using a GFP-labeled human version. We quantify the effect of katanin concentration on katanin binding and severing activity. We find that free tubulin can inhibit severing activity by interfering with katanin binding to microtubules. The inhibition is mediated by the sequence of the tubulin and specifically depends on the carboxy-terminal tails. We directly investigate the inhibition effect of tubulin carboxy-terminal tails using peptide sequences of α-, β-, or detyrosinated α-tubulin tails that have been covalently linked to bovine serum albumin. Our results show that β-tubulin tails are the most effective at inhibiting severing, and that detyrosinated α-tubulin tails are the least effective. These results are distinct from those for other severing enzymes and suggest a scheme for regulation of katanin activity in cells dependent on free tubulin concentration and the modification state of the tubulin. PMID:26682813

  4. Clinical and serological associations of autoantibodies to the Ku70/Ku80 heterodimer determined by a novel chemiluminescent immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Mahler, M; Swart, A; Wu, J; Szmyrka-Kaczmarek, M; Senécal, J-L; Troyanov, Y; Hanly, J G; Fritzler, M J

    2016-07-01

    Autoantibodies targeting Ku, an abundant nuclear protein with DNA helicase activity, have been reported in patients with systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases. Little is known about the clinical associations of anti-Ku antibodies, especially when novel diagnostic technologies are used. The objective of the present study was to analyse the prevalence of anti-Ku antibodies in different medical conditions using a novel chemiluminescent immunoassay. Serum samples from adult patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, n=305), systemic sclerosis (SSc, n=70) and autoimmune myositis patients (AIM, n=109) were the primary focus of the study. Results were compared with disease controls (rheumatoid arthritis, RA, n=30; infectious diseases, n=17) and healthy individuals (n=167). In addition, samples submitted for routine autoantibody testing from patients referred to a rheumatology clinic (n=1078) were studied. All samples were tested for anti-Ku antibodies by QUANTA Flash Ku chemiluminescent immunoassay (research use only, Inova Diagnostics, San Diego, USA) using full length recombinant human Ku. SLE patient samples were also tested for other autoantibodies. Clinical data of anti-Ku antibody positive patients (high titres) were obtained by retrospective chart review. In the disease cohorts, 30/305 (9.8%) SLE, 3/70 (4.3%) systemic sclerosis and 4/109 (3.7%) autoimmune myositis (AIM) patients were positive, respectively. The four positive AIM patients had an overlap myositis syndrome that included two patients with SLE. The three systemic sclerosis (SSc) positive samples had diagnoses of SSc/SLE overlap, diffuse cutaneous SSc, and early edematous phase SSc. In the control cohorts, 2/170 (1.2%) healthy individuals (all low titre), 0/30 (0.0%) (RA) and 0/17 (0.0%) infectious disease patients were positive. The area under the curve values were: 0.75 for SLE vs. controls, 0.68 for SSc vs. controls and 0.37 for AIM vs. In the rheumatology clinic referral cohort, 12/1078 (1.1%) were positive for anti-Ku antibodies, nine showing low and three high titres. The diagnoses of the three high positive anti-Ku positive patients were: probable SLE, mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) and ANA positive RA. Anti-Ku antibodies detected by chemiluminescent immunoassay are most prevalent in SLE. When found in AIM and SSc, they were associated with overlap syndrome and early SSc. © The Author(s) 2016.

  5. Regulation of ROCKII membrane localization through its C-terminus.

    PubMed

    Kher, Swapnil S; Worthylake, Rebecca A

    2011-12-10

    RhoA activated kinases (ROCKs) are potent effectors of RhoA signaling for regulation of the cytoskeleton. ROCKs have been shown to be localized to several different subcellular locations, suggesting that its localization is context specific and regulated. However, the signaling mechanisms that control ROCK localization have not been clearly described. In this study we measured ROCKII localization following stimulation with the chemokine CXCL12 or adhesion to collagen 1. Strikingly, each of these extracellular signals targeted ROCKII to membrane protrusions. We further determined that both RhoA and PI3-kinase signaling are required for these stimuli to induce efficient membrane localization. Furthermore, we used a mutational approach to show that two separate domains predicted to respond to these localization signals, the Rho Binding Domain (RBD) and the Pleckstrin Homology domain (PH). Unexpectedly, we found that these two domains work synergistically to lead to membrane localization. This suggests a novel mechanism for controlling ROCKII localization at the membrane, in which the ROCKII C-terminus acts as a coincidence detector for spatial regulatory signals. In other words, efficient membrane targeting requires the ROCKII RBD to receive the RhoA signal and the PH domain to receive the phospholipid signal. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Confirmation of a blocked amino terminus of sulfhydryl oxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Janolino, V.G.; Morrison-Rowe, S.J.; Swaisgood, H.E. )

    1990-09-01

    The isolation of sulfhydryl oxidase from bovine milk in a suitably pure form for sequencing was carried out by transient covalent affinity chromatography of diafiltered whey using cysteinylsuccinamidopropyl-glass as matrix. The glutathione-eluted proteins were separated by SDS-PAGE. By radiolabeling the affinity chromatography-purified enzyme with ({sup 14}C)iodoacetate before subjecting to SDS-PAGE, the sulfhydryl oxidase band was identified, because sulfhydryl oxidase is known to be inactivated by alkylation of one sulfhydryl group per mole. The results confirmed that sulfhydryl oxidase corresponds to the 85 ({plus minus} 5)-kDa band observed on SDS-PAGE. The protein band corresponding to radiolabeled sulfhydryl oxidase was recovered from SDS-PAGE gels by electrophoretic elution and by electroblotting on polyvinylidene difluoride membrane and subjected to gas phase sequencing. Precautions were taken during electrophoretic elution to prevent reactions that result in N-terminal blocking. Both methods of protein recovery yielded negative results when subjected to sequence analysis indicating that the N-terminus of sulfhydryl oxidase is blocked.

  7. On the computational ability of the RNA polymerase II carboxy terminal domain

    PubMed Central

    Karagiannis, Jim

    2014-01-01

    The RNA polymerase II carboxy terminal domain has long been known to play an important role in the control of eukaryotic transcription. This role is mediated, at least in part, through complex post-translational modifications that take place on specific residues within the heptad repeats of the domain. In this addendum, a speculative, but formal mathematical conceptualization of this biological phenomenon (in the form of a semi-Thue string rewriting system) is presented. Since the semi-Thue formalism is known to be Turing complete, this raises the possibility that the CTD – in association with the regulatory pathways controlling its post-translational modification – functions as a biological incarnation of a universal computing machine. PMID:25371772

  8. Excess α-synuclein worsens disease in mice lacking ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase L1.

    PubMed

    Shimshek, Derya R; Schweizer, Tatjana; Schmid, Peter; van der Putten, P Herman

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in α-synuclein (αSN) and ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase L1 (UCH-L1) have been linked to familial Parkinson's disease (PD). Physical and functional interactions between these two proteins have been described. Whether they act additively in vivo to influence disease has remained controversial. αSN is a presynaptic protein and the major constituent of Lewy inclusions, histopathological hallmarks of PD. UCH-L1 regulates ubiquitin stability in the nervous system and its loss results in neurodegeneration in peripheral and central neurons. Here, we used genetics to show that UCH-L1-deficiency together with excess αSN worsen disease. Double mutant mice show earlier-onset motor deficits, a shorter lifespan and forebrain astrogliosis but the additive disease-worsening effects of UCH-L1-deficiency and excess αSN are not accompanied by microgliosis, ubiquitin pathology or changes in pathological αSN protein levels and species.

  9. E. coli QueD is a 6-carboxy-5,6,7,8-tetrahydropterin synthase†

    PubMed Central

    McCarty, Reid M.; Somogyi, Árpád; Bandarian, Vahe

    2009-01-01

    To elucidate the early steps required during biosynthesis of a broad class of 7-deazapurine containing natural products, we have studied the reaction catalyzed by Escherichia coli QueD, a 6-pyruvoyl-5,6,7,8-tetrahydropterin synthase (PTPS) homolog possibly involved in queuosine biosynthesis. While mammalian PTPS homologs convert 7,8-dihydroneopterin triphosphate (H2NTP) to 6-pyruvoyltetrahydropterin (PPH4) in biopterin biosynthesis, E. coli QueD catalyzes the conversion of H2NTP to 6-carboxy-5,6,7,8-tetrahydropterin (CPH4). E. coli QueD can also convert PPH4 and sepiapterin to CPH4, allowing a mechanism to be proposed. PMID:19231875

  10. Crystal structure of 2-carboxy- N,N,N- trimethylethanaminium bromide monohydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiao-Ming; Mak, Thomas C. W.

    1991-05-01

    A new betaine derivative, 2-carboxy- N,N,N-trimethylethanaminium bromide monohydrate, (Me 3NCH 2CH 2COOH)Br·H 2O, I, has been synthesized and characterized by X-ray crystallography. Compound I crystallizes in space group Pnma (no. 62), with a=10.452(2), b=6.855(2), c=13.737(2)Å, and Z=4. The structure ( RF=0.047 for 881 observed (⋎ FO⋎&>;6⋎ FO⋎) Mo Kα data) features a hydrogen-bonded (BR -·H 2O) ∞zigzag chain running parallel to the a axis. The quaternary ammonium ions, each attaining Cs molecular symmetry, are laterally attached by donor hydrogen bonds to the exposed water molecules of the zigzag chain. The crystal structure consists of layers each having a zipper-like arrangement of the quaternary ammonium "side-chains".

  11. Investigation of a recently detected 11-nor-9-carboxy-Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol isomer: Studies on the degradation of 11-nor-9-carboxy-Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol glucuronide.

    PubMed

    Hanisch, Stephanie; Paulke, Alexander; Toennes, Stefan W

    2016-09-10

    An isomer of the tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) metabolite 11-nor-9-carboxy-Δ(9)-THC (THCCOOH) had been detected in blood of cannabis users. The present study was initiated to elucidate whether the labile metabolite THCCOOH-glucuronide could be the precursor. THCCOOH-glucuronide was incubated in human serum and albumin (HSA) solution at various temperatures (-18, 4.5, 22 and 37°C) and pH values (pH 7.4 and 8.3) for seven days in the presence or absence of the esterase inhibitor sodium fluoride. Analysis of incubation samples was performed using LC-MS/MS. Marked degradation of THCCOOH-glucuronide was observed at 37°C. It was found that not only THCCOOH, but also the isomer is a degradation product of THCCOOH-glucuronide and its in-vivo production is assumed. Degradation to THCCOOH and the isomer occurred at alkaline pH, in the presence of fluoride-sensitive esterases and of HSA alone. To inhibit isomer formation during sample storage, refrigeration and controlling of the pH are recommended. However, THCCOOH and the isomer exhibit similar properties during incubations in serum, but differ in their interaction with HSA. The present study confirmed the nature of the isomer as degradation product of the abundant THC metabolite THCCOOH-glucuronide. Serum albumin and esterases are obviously involved. The isomer is formed not only during storage, but also under physiological conditions, suggesting that it can be considered an in-vivo metabolite. However, the chemical structure of the isomer remains unknown and further research is necessary.

  12. Conserved gene regulatory function of the carboxy-terminal domain of dictyostelid C-module-binding factor.

    PubMed

    Schmith, Anika; Groth, Marco; Ratka, Josephine; Gatz, Sara; Spaller, Thomas; Siol, Oliver; Glöckner, Gernot; Winckler, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    C-module-binding factor A (CbfA) is a jumonji-type transcription regulator that is important for maintaining the expression and mobility of the retrotransposable element TRE5-A in the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum. CbfA-deficient cells have lost TRE5-A retrotransposition, are impaired in the ability to feed on bacteria, and do not enter multicellular development because of a block in cell aggregation. In this study, we performed Illumina RNA-seq of growing CbfA mutant cells to obtain a list of CbfA-regulated genes. We demonstrate that the carboxy-terminal domain of CbfA alone is sufficient to mediate most CbfA-dependent gene expression. The carboxy-terminal domain of CbfA from the distantly related social amoeba Polysphondylium pallidum restored the expression of CbfA-dependent genes in the D. discoideum CbfA mutant, indicating a deep conservation in the gene regulatory function of this domain in the dictyostelid clade. The CbfA-like protein CbfB displays ∼25% sequence identity with CbfA in the amino-terminal region, which contains a JmjC domain and two zinc finger regions and is thought to mediate chromatin-remodeling activity. In contrast to CbfA proteins, where the carboxy-terminal domains are strictly conserved in all dictyostelids, CbfB proteins have completely unrelated carboxy-terminal domains. Outside the dictyostelid clade, CbfA-like proteins with the CbfA-archetypical JmjC/zinc finger arrangement and individual carboxy-terminal domains are prominent in filamentous fungi but are not found in yeasts, plants, and metazoans. Our data suggest that two functional regions of the CbfA-like proteins evolved at different rates to allow the occurrence of species-specific adaptation processes during genome evolution.

  13. Conserved Gene Regulatory Function of the Carboxy-Terminal Domain of Dictyostelid C-Module-Binding Factor

    PubMed Central

    Schmith, Anika; Groth, Marco; Ratka, Josephine; Gatz, Sara; Spaller, Thomas; Siol, Oliver; Glöckner, Gernot

    2013-01-01

    C-module-binding factor A (CbfA) is a jumonji-type transcription regulator that is important for maintaining the expression and mobility of the retrotransposable element TRE5-A in the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum. CbfA-deficient cells have lost TRE5-A retrotransposition, are impaired in the ability to feed on bacteria, and do not enter multicellular development because of a block in cell aggregation. In this study, we performed Illumina RNA-seq of growing CbfA mutant cells to obtain a list of CbfA-regulated genes. We demonstrate that the carboxy-terminal domain of CbfA alone is sufficient to mediate most CbfA-dependent gene expression. The carboxy-terminal domain of CbfA from the distantly related social amoeba Polysphondylium pallidum restored the expression of CbfA-dependent genes in the D. discoideum CbfA mutant, indicating a deep conservation in the gene regulatory function of this domain in the dictyostelid clade. The CbfA-like protein CbfB displays ∼25% sequence identity with CbfA in the amino-terminal region, which contains a JmjC domain and two zinc finger regions and is thought to mediate chromatin-remodeling activity. In contrast to CbfA proteins, where the carboxy-terminal domains are strictly conserved in all dictyostelids, CbfB proteins have completely unrelated carboxy-terminal domains. Outside the dictyostelid clade, CbfA-like proteins with the CbfA-archetypical JmjC/zinc finger arrangement and individual carboxy-terminal domains are prominent in filamentous fungi but are not found in yeasts, plants, and metazoans. Our data suggest that two functional regions of the CbfA-like proteins evolved at different rates to allow the occurrence of species-specific adaptation processes during genome evolution. PMID:23355006

  14. Francis Bacon's Valerius Terminus and the Voyage to the "Great Instauration".

    PubMed

    Serjeantson, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Francis Bacon's earliest surviving natural philosophical treatise (composed circa 1603) bears the title Valerius Terminus of the Interpretation of Nature. This study, resting on fresh attention to the surviving authorial manuscript, has three goals. It begins by identifying a lost precursor work apparently entitled "Of Active Knowledge." It then examines the significance of the pseudonyms Bacon chose to introduce his ideas, considering especially his invocation of Erasmus's emblem, the Roman deity Terminus. Finally, it shows how the Valerius Terminus's global vision of contemporary knowledge ultimately helped shape the iconography of Bacon's published Instauratio magna.

  15. Identification of a novel linear B-cell epitope using a monoclonal antibody against the carboxy terminus of the canine distemper virus nucleoprotein and sequence analysis of the identified epitope in different CDV isolates.

    PubMed

    Yi, Li; Cao, Zhigang; Tong, Mingwei; Cheng, Yuening; Yang, Yong; Li, Shuang; Wang, Jianke; Lin, Peng; Sun, Yaru; Zhang, Miao; Cheng, Shipeng

    2017-09-29

    The Nucleoprotein (NP) is the most abundant and highly immunogenic protein in canine distemper virus (CDV), playing an important role in CDV viral replication and assembly. In this study, a specific monoclonal antibody, named C8, was produced against the NP protein C terminal (amino acids 401-523). A linear N protein epitope was identified by subjecting a series of partially overlapping synthesized peptides to enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) analysis.The results indicated that (444)GDKYPIHFNDER(455) was the minimal linear epitope that could be recognized by mAb C8. Sequence alignments demonstrated that this linear epitope is less conserved among three CDV genotypes. We next analyzed the level of conservation of the defined epitope in19 Chinese CDV clinical isolates, and it has one site variation in amino acid among these CDV isolations. 2 isolates have the amino acid mutations F451L, while one has P448Ssubstitution.Phylogenetic analysis showed the two isolates with F451Lsubstitution had a closer relationship in a virulent strain ZJ-7, so the epitope may be a significant tag associated with virus virulence. This collection of mAb along with defined linear epitope may provide useful reagents for investigations of NP protein function and the development of CDV specific diagnostics.

  16. Metal-Sulfate Induced Generation of ROS in Human Brain Cells: Detection Using an Isomeric Mixture of 5- and 6-Carboxy-2′,7′-Dichlorofluorescein Diacetate (Carboxy-DCFDA) as a Cell Permeant Tracer

    PubMed Central

    Pogue, Aileen I.; Jones, Brandon M.; Bhattacharjee, Surjyadipta; Percy, Maire E.; Zhao, Yuhai; Lukiw, Walter J.

    2012-01-01

    Evolution of reactive oxygen species (ROS), generated during the patho-physiological stress of nervous tissue, has been implicated in the etiology of several progressive human neurological disorders including Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and amylotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). In this brief communication we used mixed isomers of 5-(and-6)-carboxy-2′,7′-dichlorofluorescein diacetate (carboxy-DCFDA; C25H14Cl2O9; MW 529.3), a novel fluorescent indicator, to assess ROS generation within human neuronal-glial (HNG) cells in primary co-culture. We introduced pathological stress using the sulfates of 12 environmentally-, industrially- and agriculturally-relevant divalent and trivalent metals including Al, Cd, Cu, Fe, Hg, Ga, Mg, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sn and Zn. In this experimental test system, of all the metal sulfates analyzed, aluminum sulfate showed by far the greatest ability to induce intracellular ROS. These studies indicate the utility of using isomeric mixtures of carboxy-H2DCFDA diacetates as novel and highly sensitive, long-lasting, cell-permeant, fluorescein-based tracers for quantifying ROS generation in intact, metabolizing human brain cells, and in analyzing the potential epigenetic contribution of different metal sulfates to ROS-generation and ROS-mediated neurological dysfunction. PMID:22949820

  17. The ClpP N-Terminus Coordinates Substrate Access with Protease Active Site Reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Jennings, L.; Bohon, J; Chance, M; Licht, S

    2008-01-01

    Energy-dependent protein degradation machines, such as the Escherichia coli protease ClpAP, require regulated interactions between the ATPase component (ClpA) and the protease component (ClpP) for function. Recent studies indicate that the ClpP N-terminus is essential in these interactions, yet the dynamics of this region remain unclear. Here, we use synchrotron hydroxyl radical footprinting and kinetic studies to characterize functionally important conformational changes of the ClpP N-terminus. Footprinting experiments show that the ClpP N-terminus becomes more solvent-exposed upon interaction with ClpA. In the absence of ClpA, deletion of the ClpP N-terminus increases the initial degradation rate of large peptide substrates 5-15-fold. Unlike ClpAP, ClpP?N exhibits a distinct slow phase of product formation that is eliminated by the addition of hydroxylamine, suggesting that truncation of the N-terminus leads to stabilization of the acyl-enzyme intermediate. These results indicate that (1) the ClpP N-terminus acts as a 'gate' controlling substrate access to the active sites, (2) binding of ClpA opens this 'gate', allowing substrate entry and formation of the acyl-enzyme intermediate, and (3) closing of the N-terminal 'gate' stimulates acyl-enzyme hydrolysis.

  18. A biophysical model of how α-tubulin carboxy-terminal tails tune kinesin-1 processivity along microtubule.

    PubMed

    Sataric, Miljko V; Sekulic, Dalibor L; Zdravkovic, Slobodan; Ralevic, Nebojsa M

    2017-03-12

    It appears that so-called post-translational modifications of tubulin heterodimers are mostly focussed at positions of amino acid sequences of carboxy-terminal tails. These changes have very profound effects on microtubule functions especially in connection with cellular traffic in terms of motor proteins. In this study, we elaborated the biophysical model aimed to explain the strategy governing these subtle interplays between structural and functional properties of microtubules. We relied onto Langevin equations including fluctuation-dissipation processes. In that context we found out that small interaction between a charged motor neck domain and oppositely charged carboxy-terminal tail of the α-tubulin plays the decisive role in tuning kinesin-1 motor processivity along microtubules.

  19. Urinary Elimination of 11-Nor-9-carboxy- 9-tetrahydrocannnabinol in Cannabis Users During Continuously Monitored Abstinence*

    PubMed Central

    Goodwin, Robert S.; Darwin, William D.; Chiang, C. Nora; Shih, Ming; Li, Shou-Hua; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2008-01-01

    The time course of 11-nor-9-carboxy-Δ9-tetrahydrocannnabinol (THCCOOH) elimination in urine was characterized in 60 cannabis users during 24 h monitored abstinence on a closed research unit for up to 30 days. 6158 individual urine specimens were screened by immunoassay with values ≥50 ng/mL classified as positive. Urine specimens were confirmed for THCCOOH by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry following base hydrolysis and liquid-liquid or solid phase extraction. In 60%, the maximum creatinine normalized concentration occurred in the first urine specimen; in 40%, peaks occurred as long as 2.9 days after admission. Data were divided into three groups, 0 – 50, 51 – 150, and >150 ng/mg, based on the creatinine corrected initial THCCOOH concentration. There were statistically significant correlations between groups and number of days until first negative and last positive urine specimens; mean number of days were 0.6 and 4.3, 3.2 and 9.7, and 4.7 and 15.4 days respectively, for the three groups. These data provide guidelines for interpreting urine cannabinoid test results and suggest appropriate detection windows for differentiating new cannabis use from residual drug excretion. PMID:19007504

  20. SERCaMP: a carboxy-terminal protein modification that enables monitoring of ER calcium homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Mark J.; Wires, Emily S.; Trychta, Kathleen A.; Richie, Christopher T.; Harvey, Brandon K.

    2014-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) calcium homeostasis is disrupted in diverse pathologies, including neurodegeneration, cardiovascular diseases, and diabetes. Temporally defining calcium dysregulation during disease progression, however, has been challenging. Here we describe secreted ER calcium-monitoring proteins (SERCaMPs), which allow for longitudinal monitoring of ER calcium homeostasis. We identified a carboxy-terminal modification that is sufficient to confer release of a protein specifically in response to ER calcium depletion. A Gaussia luciferase (GLuc)–based SERCaMP provides a simple and sensitive method to monitor ER calcium homeostasis in vitro or in vivo by analyzing culture medium or blood. GLuc-SERCaMPs revealed ER calcium depletion in rat primary neurons exposed to various ER stressors. In vivo, ER calcium disruption in rat liver was monitored over several days by repeated sampling of blood. Our results suggest that SERCaMPs will have broad applications for the long-term monitoring of ER calcium homeostasis and the development of therapeutic approaches to counteract ER calcium dysregulation. PMID:25031430

  1. tRNase Z Catalysis and Conserved Residues on the Carboxy Side of the His Cluster

    PubMed Central

    Karkashon, Shay; Hopkinson, Angela; Levinger, Louis

    2008-01-01

    tRNAs are transcribed as precursors and processed in a series of required reactions leading to aminoacylation and translation. The 3′ end trailer can be removed by the pre-tRNA processing endonuclease tRNase Z, an ancient, conserved member of the β-lactamase superfamily of metal-dependent hydrolases. The signature sequence of this family, the His domain (HxHxDH, Motif II), and histidines in Motifs III and V and aspartate in Motif IV contribute seven side chains for coordination of two divalent metal ions. We previously investigated the effects on catalysis of substitutions in Motif II, and in the PxKxRN loop and Motif I on the amino side of Motif II. Herein we present the effects of substitutions on the carboxy side of Motif II within Motifs III, IV, the HEAT and HST loops and Motif V. Substitution of the Motif IV aspartate reduces catalytic efficiency more than 10,000-fold. Histidines in Motif III, V and the HST loop are also functionally important. Strikingly, replacement of Glu in the HEAT loop with Ala reducesefficiency by ~1000-fold. Proximity and orientation of this Glu side chain relative to His in the HST loop and the importance of both residues for catalysis suggest that they function as a duo in a proton transfer at the final stage of reaction, characteristic of the tRNase Z class of RNA endonucleases. PMID:17655328

  2. Carboxy alkyl esters of Uncaria tomentosa augment recovery of sensorineural functions following noise injury.

    PubMed

    Guthrie, O'neil W; Gearhart, Caroline A; Fulton, Sherry; Fechter, Laurence D

    2011-08-17

    This study tested the hypothesis that hydrophilic chemotypes of the medicinal vine Uncaria tomentosa (UT) would facilitate recovery of sensorineural functions following exposure to a damaging level of noise. The particular chemotypes investigated were carboxy alkyl esters (CAE) which are known to exhibit multifunctional cytoprotective properties that include: enhanced cellular DNA repair, antioxidation and anti-inflammation. Long-Evans rats were divided into four treatment groups: vehicle-control, noise-only, CAE-only and CAE+noise. The noise exposure was an 8kHz octave band of noise at 105dB SPL for 4h. Outer hair cell (OHC) function was measured with the cubic 2f(1)-f(2) distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAE) at the start of the study (baseline) and at time-points that corresponded to 1day, 1week and 4weeks post-noise exposure to determine within-group effects. Compound action potentials to puretone stimuli were recorded from the VIIIth craniofacial nerve at 4weeks post-noise exposure to determine between-group effects. Additionally, cytocochleograms were constructed for each row of OHCs from each group. Noise exposure produced significant sensorineural impairments. However, CAE treatment facilitated almost complete recovery of OHC function and limited the magnitude of cell loss. The loss of neural sensitivity to puretone stimuli was inhibited with CAE treatment. Therefore, it appears that the multifunctional cytoprotective capacity of CAE from UT may generalize to otoprotection from acoustic over-exposure. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. The structural basis of androgen receptor activation: intramolecular and intermolecular amino-carboxy interactions.

    PubMed

    Schaufele, Fred; Carbonell, Xavier; Guerbadot, Martin; Borngraeber, Sabine; Chapman, Mark S; Ma, Aye Aye K; Miner, Jeffrey N; Diamond, Marc I

    2005-07-12

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) are ligand-regulated transcription factors important in human physiology and disease. In certain NRs, including the androgen receptor (AR), ligand binding to the carboxy-terminal domain (LBD) regulates transcriptional activation functions in the LBD and amino-terminal domain (NTD). The basis for NTD-LBD communication is unknown but may involve NTD-LBD interactions either within a single receptor or between different members of an AR dimer. Here, measurement of FRET between fluorophores attached to the NTD and LBD of the AR established that agonist binding initiated an intramolecular NTD-LBD interaction in the nucleus and cytoplasm. This intramolecular folding was followed by AR self-association, which occurred preferentially in the nucleus. Rapid, ligand-induced intramolecular folding and delayed association also were observed for estrogen receptor-alpha but not for peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-gamma2. An antagonist ligand, hydroxyflutamide, blocked the NTD-LBD association within AR. NTD-LBD association also closely correlated with the transcriptional activation by heterologous ligands of AR mutants isolated from hormone-refractory prostate tumors. Intramolecular folding, but not AR-AR affinity, was disrupted by mutation of an alpha-helical ((23)FQNLF(27)) motif in the AR NTD previously described to interact with the AR LBD in vitro. This work establishes an intramolecular NTD-LBD conformational change as an initial component of ligand-regulated NR function.

  4. Structural and Mechanistic Studies on Klebsiella pneumoniae 2-Oxo-4-hydroxy-4-carboxy-5-ureidoimidazoline Decarboxylase

    SciTech Connect

    French, Jarrod B.; Ealick, Steven E.

    2010-11-12

    The stereospecific oxidative degradation of uric acid to (S)-allantoin was recently shown to proceed via three enzymatic steps. The final conversion is a decarboxylation of the unstable intermediate 2-oxo-4-hydroxy-4-carboxy-5-ureidoimidazoline (OHCU) and is catalyzed by OHCU decarboxylase. Here we present the structures of Klebsiella pneumoniae OHCU decarboxylase in unliganded form and with bound allantoin. These structures provide evidence that ligand binding organizes the active site residues for catalysis. Modeling of the substrate and intermediates provides additional support for this hypothesis. In addition we characterize the steady state kinetics of this enzyme and report the first OHCU decarboxylase inhibitor, allopurinol, a structural isomer of hypoxanthine. This molecule is a competitive inhibitor of K. pneumoniae OHCU decarboxylase with a K{sub i} of 30 {+-} 2 {micro}m. Circular dichroism measurements confirm structural observations that this inhibitor disrupts the necessary organization of the active site. Our structural and biochemical studies also provide further insights into the mechanism of catalysis of OHCU decarboxylation.

  5. A Naturally Occurring HER2 Carboxy-Terminal Fragment Promotes Mammary Tumor Growth and Metastasis▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Kim; Angelini, Pier-Davide; Laos, Sirle; Bach-Faig, Alba; Cunningham, Matthew P.; Ferrer-Ramón, Cristina; Luque-García, Antonio; García-Castillo, Jesús; Parra-Palau, Josep Lluis; Scaltriti, Maurizio; y Cajal, Santiago Ramón; Baselga, José; Arribas, Joaquín

    2009-01-01

    HER2 is a tyrosine kinase receptor causally involved in cancer. A subgroup of breast cancer patients with particularly poor clinical outcomes expresses a heterogeneous collection of HER2 carboxy-terminal fragments (CTFs). However, since the CTFs lack the extracellular domain that drives dimerization and subsequent activation of full-length HER2, they are in principle expected to be inactive. Here we show that at low expression levels one of these fragments, 611-CTF, activated multiple signaling pathways because of its unanticipated ability to constitutively homodimerize. A transcriptomic analysis revealed that 611-CTF specifically controlled the expression of genes that we found to be correlated with poor prognosis in breast cancer. Among the 611-CTF-regulated genes were several that have previously been linked to metastasis, including those for MET, EPHA2, matrix metalloproteinase 1, interleukin 11, angiopoietin-like 4, and different integrins. It is thought that transgenic mice overexpressing HER2 in the mammary glands develop tumors only after acquisition of activating mutations in the transgene. In contrast, we show that expression of 611-CTF led to development of aggressive and invasive mammary tumors without the need for mutations. These results demonstrate that 611-CTF is a potent oncogene capable of promoting mammary tumor progression and metastasis. PMID:19364815

  6. Structure-guided discovery of the metabolite carboxy-SAM that modulates tRNA function.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jungwook; Xiao, Hui; Bonanno, Jeffrey B; Kalyanaraman, Chakrapani; Brown, Shoshana; Tang, Xiangying; Al-Obaidi, Nawar F; Patskovsky, Yury; Babbitt, Patricia C; Jacobson, Matthew P; Lee, Young-Sam; Almo, Steven C

    2013-06-06

    The identification of novel metabolites and the characterization of their biological functions are major challenges in biology. X-ray crystallography can reveal unanticipated ligands that persist through purification and crystallization. These adventitious protein-ligand complexes provide insights into new activities, pathways and regulatory mechanisms. We describe a new metabolite, carboxy-S-adenosyl-l-methionine (Cx-SAM), its biosynthetic pathway and its role in transfer RNA modification. The structure of CmoA, a member of the SAM-dependent methyltransferase superfamily, revealed a ligand consistent with Cx-SAM in the catalytic site. Mechanistic analyses showed an unprecedented role for prephenate as the carboxyl donor and the involvement of a unique ylide intermediate as the carboxyl acceptor in the CmoA-mediated conversion of SAM to Cx-SAM. A second member of the SAM-dependent methyltransferase superfamily, CmoB, recognizes Cx-SAM and acts as a carboxymethyltransferase to convert 5-hydroxyuridine into 5-oxyacetyl uridine at the wobble position of multiple tRNAs in Gram-negative bacteria, resulting in expanded codon-recognition properties. CmoA and CmoB represent the first documented synthase and transferase for Cx-SAM. These findings reveal new functional diversity in the SAM-dependent methyltransferase superfamily and expand the metabolic and biological contributions of SAM-based biochemistry. These discoveries highlight the value of structural genomics approaches in identifying ligands within the context of their physiologically relevant macromolecular binding partners, and in revealing their functions.

  7. Mutagenesis of the carboxy terminal protease CtpA decreases desiccation tolerance in Rhizobium leguminosarum.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Kerrigan B; Vanderlinde, Elizabeth M; Yost, Christopher K

    2007-07-01

    To better understand the role of proteases in Rhizobium leguminosarum biovar viciae, a gene with homology to the carboxy-terminal protease (CtpA), which belongs to a novel group of serine proteases, was studied. The ctpA gene was cloned and mutated using allelic exchange and a gusA reporter gene was used to study ctpA expression. Mutational analysis shows that ctpA is critical for the viability of R. leguminosarum when cells are grown on complex semi-solid media but is dispensable when cells are grown in complex liquid media and that this is likely due to an increase in susceptibility to desiccation on semi-solid media. The ctpA mutant also displayed an increased sensitivity to detergents, indicating an alteration in the permeability of the cell envelope. This is the first characterization of a ctpA gene within the Rhizobiaceae and the first report of a ctpA mutant that exhibits an increased sensitivity to desiccation.

  8. Conformational Analysis of the Carboxy-Terminal Tails of Human β-Tubulin Isotypes

    PubMed Central

    Luchko, Tyler; Huzil, J. Torin; Stepanova, Maria; Tuszynski, Jack

    2008-01-01

    Several isotypes of the structural protein tubulin have been characterized. Their expression offers a plausible explanation for differences regarding microtubule function. Although sequence variation between tubulin isotypes occurs throughout the entire protein, it is the extreme carboxy-terminal tails (CTTs) that exhibit the greatest concentration of differences. In humans, the CTTs range in length from 9 to 25 residues and because of a considerable number of glutamic acid residues, contain over 1/3 of tubulin's total electrostatic charge. The CTTs are believed to be highly disordered and their precise function has yet to be determined. However, their absence has been shown to result in altered microtubule stability and a reduction in the interaction with several microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs). To characterize the role that CTTs play in microtubule function, we examined the global conformational differences within a set of nine human β-tubulin isotypes using replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations. Through the analysis of the resulting configuration ensembles, we quantified differences such as the CTTs sequence influence on overall flexibility and average secondary structure. Although only minor variations between each CTT were observed, we suggest that these differences may be significant enough to affect interactions with MAPs, thereby influencing important properties such as microtubule assembly and stability. PMID:17993481

  9. The negatively charged carboxy-terminal tail of β-tubulin promotes proper chromosome segregation.

    PubMed

    Fees, Colby P; Aiken, Jayne; O'Toole, Eileen T; Giddings, Thomas H; Moore, Jeffrey K

    2016-06-01

    Despite the broadly conserved role of microtubules in chromosome segregation, we have a limited understanding of how molecular features of tubulin proteins contribute to the underlying mechanisms. Here we investigate the negatively charged carboxy-terminal tail domains (CTTs) of α- and β-tubulins, using a series of mutants that alter or ablate CTTs in budding yeast. We find that ablating β-CTT causes elevated rates of chromosome loss and cell cycle delay. Complementary live-cell imaging and electron tomography show that β-CTT is necessary to properly position kinetochores and organize microtubules within the assembling spindle. We identify a minimal region of negatively charged amino acids that is necessary and sufficient for proper chromosome segregation and provide evidence that this function may be conserved across species. Our results provide the first in vivo evidence of a specific role for tubulin CTTs in chromosome segregation. We propose that β-CTT promotes the ordered segregation of chromosomes by stabilizing the spindle and contributing to forces that move chromosomes toward the spindle poles. © 2016 Fees et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  10. The negatively charged carboxy-terminal tail of β-tubulin promotes proper chromosome segregation

    PubMed Central

    Fees, Colby P.; Aiken, Jayne; O’Toole, Eileen T.; Giddings, Thomas H.; Moore, Jeffrey K.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the broadly conserved role of microtubules in chromosome segregation, we have a limited understanding of how molecular features of tubulin proteins contribute to the underlying mechanisms. Here we investigate the negatively charged carboxy-terminal tail domains (CTTs) of α- and β-tubulins, using a series of mutants that alter or ablate CTTs in budding yeast. We find that ablating β-CTT causes elevated rates of chromosome loss and cell cycle delay. Complementary live-cell imaging and electron tomography show that β-CTT is necessary to properly position kinetochores and organize microtubules within the assembling spindle. We identify a minimal region of negatively charged amino acids that is necessary and sufficient for proper chromosome segregation and provide evidence that this function may be conserved across species. Our results provide the first in vivo evidence of a specific role for tubulin CTTs in chromosome segregation. We propose that β-CTT promotes the ordered segregation of chromosomes by stabilizing the spindle and contributing to forces that move chromosomes toward the spindle poles. PMID:27053662

  11. Conformational analysis of the carboxy-terminal tails of human beta-tubulin isotypes.

    PubMed

    Luchko, Tyler; Huzil, J Torin; Stepanova, Maria; Tuszynski, Jack

    2008-03-15

    Several isotypes of the structural protein tubulin have been characterized. Their expression offers a plausible explanation for differences regarding microtubule function. Although sequence variation between tubulin isotypes occurs throughout the entire protein, it is the extreme carboxy-terminal tails (CTTs) that exhibit the greatest concentration of differences. In humans, the CTTs range in length from 9 to 25 residues and because of a considerable number of glutamic acid residues, contain over 1/3 of tubulin's total electrostatic charge. The CTTs are believed to be highly disordered and their precise function has yet to be determined. However, their absence has been shown to result in altered microtubule stability and a reduction in the interaction with several microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs). To characterize the role that CTTs play in microtubule function, we examined the global conformational differences within a set of nine human beta-tubulin isotypes using replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations. Through the analysis of the resulting configuration ensembles, we quantified differences such as the CTTs sequence influence on overall flexibility and average secondary structure. Although only minor variations between each CTT were observed, we suggest that these differences may be significant enough to affect interactions with MAPs, thereby influencing important properties such as microtubule assembly and stability.

  12. Genome-wide Analysis Reveals Novel and Discrete Functions for Tubulin Carboxy-terminal Tails

    PubMed Central

    Aiken, Jayne; Sept, David; Costanzo, Michael; Boone, Charles; Cooper, John A.; Moore, Jeffrey K.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Microtubules (MTs) support diverse transport and force generation processes in cells. Both α- and β-tubulin proteins possess carboxy-terminal tail regions (CTTs) that are negatively charged, intrinsically disordered, and project from the MT surface where they interact with motors and other proteins. Although CTTs are presumed to play important roles in MT networks, these roles have not been determined in vivo. Results We examined the function of CTTs in vivo using a systematic collection of mutants in budding yeast. We find that CTTs are not essential; however, loss of either α- or β-CTT sensitizes cells to MT destabilizing drugs. β-CTT, but not α-CTT, regulates MT dynamics by increasing frequencies of catastrophe and rescue events. In addition, β-CTT is critical for the assembly of the mitotic spindle and its elongation during anaphase. We use genome-wide genetic interaction screens to identify roles for α- and β-CTTs, including a specific role for β-CTT in supporting kinesin-5/Cin8. Our genetic screens also identified novel interactions with pathways not related to canonical MT functions. Conclusions We conclude that α- and β-CTTs play important and largely discrete roles in MT networks. β-CTT promotes MT dynamics. β-CTT also regulates force generation in the mitotic spindle by supporting kinesin-5/Cin8 and dampening dynein. Our genetic screens identify links between α- and β-CTT and additional cellular pathways, and suggest novel functions. PMID:24835459

  13. Poly[triaquabis­(μ2-3-carboxy­pyrazine-2-carboxyl­ato)dilithium(I)

    PubMed Central

    Tombul, Mustafa; Güven, Kutalmış; Büyükgüngör, Orhan

    2008-01-01

    In the title compound, [Li2(C6H3N2O4)2(H2O)3]n, the coordination number for both independent Li+ cations is five. One of the Li+ ions has a distorted trigonal–bipyramidal geometry, coordinated by one of the carboxyl O atoms of a 3-carboxy­pyrazine-2-carboxyl­ate ligand, two O atoms from two water mol­ecules, and an N and a carboxyl­ate O atom of a second 3-carboxy­pyrazine-2-carboxyl­ate ligand. The other Li+ ion also has a distorted trigonal–bipyramidal geometry, coordinated by one water mol­ecule and two 3-carboxy­pyrazine-2-carboxyl­ate ligands through an N and a carboxyl­ate O atom from each. One of the carboxyl groups of the two ligands takes part in an intra­molecular O—H⋯O hydrogen bond. The stabilization of the crystal structure is further assisted by O—H⋯O, O—H⋯N and C—H⋯O hydrogen-bonding inter­actions involving the water mol­ecules and carboxyl­ate O atoms. PMID:21201874

  14. Carboxy-directed asymmetric hydrogenation of α-alkyl-α-aryl terminal olefins: highly enantioselective and chemoselective access to a chiral benzylmethyl center.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shuang; Zhu, Shou-Fei; Guo, Na; Song, Song; Zhou, Qi-Lin

    2014-04-07

    A carboxy-directed asymmetric hydrogenation of α-alkyl-α-aryl terminal olefins was developed by using a chiral spiro iridium catalyst, providing a highly efficient approach to the compounds with a chiral benzylmethyl center. The carboxy-directed hydrogenation prohibited the isomerization of the terminal olefins, and realized the chemoselective hydrogenation of various dienes. The concise enantioselective syntheses of (S)-curcudiol and (S)-curcumene were achieved by using this catalytic asymmetric hydrogenation as a key step.

  15. Oxidation of the antiviral drug acyclovir and its biodegradation product carboxy-acyclovir with ozone: kinetics and identification of oxidation products.

    PubMed

    Prasse, Carsten; Wagner, Manfred; Schulz, Ralf; Ternes, Thomas A

    2012-02-21

    The oxidation of the antiviral drug acyclovir (ACV) and its main biotransformation product carboxy-acyclovir (carboxy-ACV) by ozone was investigated. Both compounds have recently been detected in surface water, and carboxy-ACV has also been detected in drinking water. The experiments revealed a strong pH dependence of the oxidation of ACV and carboxy-ACV with reaction rate constants increasing by 4 orders of magnitude between the protonated, positively charged form (k(ox,PH(+)), ∼2.5 × 10(2) M(-1) s(-1)) and the deprotonated, negatively charged form (k(ox,P(-)), 3.4 × 10(6) M(-1) s(-1)). At pH 8 a single oxidation product was formed which was identified via LC-LTQ-Orbitrap MS and NMR as N-(4-carbamoyl-2-imino-5-oxoimidazolidin)formamido-N-methoxyacetic acid (COFA). Using Vibrio fischeri , an acute bacterial toxicity was found for COFA while carboxy-ACV revealed no toxic effects. Ozonation experiments with guanine and guanosine at pH 8 led to the formation of the respective 2-imino-5-oxoimidazolidines, confirming that guanine derivatives such as carboxy-ACV are undergoing the same reactions during ozonation. Furthermore, COFA was detected in finished drinking water of a German waterworks after ozonation and subsequent activated carbon treatment.

  16. Regulatory Role of the N Terminus of the Vacuolar Calcium-ATPase in Cauliflower1

    PubMed Central

    Malmström, Susanna; Åkerlund, Hans-Erik; Askerlund, Per

    2000-01-01

    The vacuolar calmodulin (CaM)-stimulated Ca2+-ATPase, BCA1p, in cauliflower (Brassica oleracea) has an extended N terminus, which was suggested to contain a CaM-binding domain (S. Malmström, P. Askerlund, M.G. Palmgren [1997] FEBS Lett 400: 324–328). The goal of the present study was to determine the role of the N terminus in regulating BCA1p. Western analysis using three different antisera showed that the N terminus of BCA1p is cleaved off by trypsin and that the N terminus contains the CaM-binding domain. Furthermore, the expressed N terminus binds CaM in a Ca2+-dependent manner. A synthetic peptide corresponding to the CaM-binding domain of BCA1p (Ala-19 to Leu-43) strongly inhibited ATP-dependent Ca2+ pumping by BCA1p in cauliflower low-density membranes, indicating that the CaM-binding region of BCA1p also has an autoinhibitory function. The expressed N terminus of BCA1p and a synthetic peptide (Ala-19 to Met-39) were good substrates for phosphorylation by protein kinase C. Sequencing of the phosphorylated fusion protein and peptide suggested serine-16 and/or serine-28 as likely targets for phosphorylation. Phosphorylation of serine-28 had no effect on CaM binding to the alanine-19 to methionine-39 peptide. Our results demonstrate the regulatory importance of the N terminus of BCA1p as a target for CaM binding, trypsin cleavage, and phosphorylation, as well as its importance as an autoinhibitory domain. PMID:10677444

  17. Functional study of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Nha1p C-terminus.

    PubMed

    Kinclová, O; Ramos, J; Potier, S; Sychrová, H

    2001-05-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells possess an alkali metal cation antiporter encoded by the NHA1 gene. Nha1p is unique in the family of yeast Na+/H+ antiporters on account of its broad substrate specificity (Na+, Li+, K+) and its long C-terminus (56% of the whole protein). In order to study the role of the C-terminus in Nha1p function, we constructed a series of 13 truncated NHA1 versions ranging from the complete one (2958 nucleotides, 985 amino acids) down to the shortest version (1416 nucleotides, 472 amino acids), with only 41 amino acid residues after the last putative transmembrane domain. Truncated NHA1 versions were expressed in an S. cerevisiae alkali metal cation-sensitive strain (B31; ena1-4Delta nha1Delta). We found that the entire Nha1p C-terminus domain is not necessary for either the proper localization of the antiporter in the plasma membrane or the transport of all four substrates (we identified rubidium as the fourth Nha1p substrate). Partial truncation of the C-terminus of about 70 terminal amino acids improves the tolerance of cells to Na+, Li+ and Rb+ compared with cells expressing the complete Nha1p. The presence of the neighbouring part of the C-terminus (amino acids 883-928), rich in aspartate and glutamate residues, is necessary for the maintenance of maximum Nha1p activity towards sodium and lithium. In the case of potassium, the participation of the long C-terminus in the regulation of intracellular potassium content is demonstrated. We also present evidence that the Nha1p C-terminus is involved in the cell response to sudden changes in environmental osmolarity.

  18. Distribution of 11-nor-9-carboxy-Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol in traffic fatality cases.

    PubMed

    Lin, Dong-Liang; Lin, Reng-Lang

    2005-01-01

    11-nor-9-carboxy-Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC-COOH) distributions in postmortem specimens are rarely reported. Fifty New Jersey State Medical Examiner's cases in which automobile accident deaths suspected of involving marijuana intake were studied for the distributions of THC-COOH in postmortem urine, blood, vitreous humor, and bile specimens. Cases were selected based on immunoassay (TDx) urine test results. If the preliminary urine test indicated the presence of THC-COOH (apparent THC-COOH concentration > or = 20 ng/mL), urine, heart blood, vitreous humor, and bile specimens from the case were analyzed for THC-COOH concentrations by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The mean, standard deviation, and range of THC-COOH in heart blood, urine, and bile found in these 50 cases were 0.081, 0.082, and 0.016-0.33 microg/mL; 0.314, 0.415, and 0.044-2.33 microg/mL; and 12.9, 11.4, and 1.03-43.7 microg/mL, respectively. THC-COOH was absent (detection limit, 1 ng/mL) or at low concentration (< 10 ng/mL) in vitreous humor specimens. The mean, standard deviation, and range of the bile-to-blood and urine-to-blood ratios were 242, 196, and 17.2-888 and 4.70, 4.05, and 1.14-19.2, respectively. The highest concentrations of THC-COOH were found in bile and the lowest in vitreous humor. These findings are consistent with the high hydrophobicity nature of THC-COOH and further suggest that bile is the specimen of choice for detecting low level of THC-COOH in postmortem cases.

  19. Contribution of active-site glutamine to rate enhancement in ubiquitin carboxy terminal hydrolases

    PubMed Central

    Boudreaux, David; Chaney, Joseph; Maiti, Tushar K.; Das, Chittaranjan

    2012-01-01

    Ubiquitin carboxy terminal hydrolases (UCHs) are cysteine proteases featuring a classical cysteine-histidine-aspartate catalytic triad, also a highly conserved glutamine thought to be a part of the oxyanion hole. However, the contribution of this side chain to the catalysis by UCH enzymes is not known. Herein, we demonstrate that the glutamine side chain contributes to rate enhancement in UCHL1, UCHL3 and UCHL5. Mutation of the glutamine to alanine in these enzymes impairs the catalytic efficiency mainly due to a 16 to 30-fold reduction in kcat, which is consistent with a loss of approximately 2 kcal/mol in transition-state stabilization. However, the contribution to transition-state stabilization observed here is rather modest for the side chain’s role in oxyanion stabilization. Interestingly, we discovered that the carbonyl oxygen of this side chain is engaged in a C—H•••O hydrogen-bonding contact with the CεH group of the catalytic histidine. Upon further analysis, we found that this interaction is a common active-site structural feature in most cysteine proteases, including papain, belonging to families with the QCH(N/D) type of active-site configuration. It is possible that removal of the glutamine side chain might have abolished the C—H•••O interaction, which typically accounts for 2 kcal/mol of stabilization, leading to the effect on catalysis observed here. Additional studies performed on UCHL3 by mutating the glutamine to glutamate (strong C—H•••O acceptor but oxyanion destabilizer) and to lysine (strong oxyanion stabilizer but lacking C—H•••O hydrogen-bonding property) suggest that the C—H•••O hydrogen bond could contribute to catalysis. PMID:22284438

  20. Novel Monoclonal Antibodies against the Proximal (Carboxy-Terminal) Portions of MUC16

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Thapi Dharma; Park, Kay J.; Smith-Jones, Peter; Iasonos, Alexia; Linkov, Irina; Soslow, Robert A.; Spriggs, David R.

    2013-01-01

    The CA125 antigen, recognized by the OC125 antibody, is a tissue-specific, circulating antigen expressed in ovarian cancer. The CA125 antigen is encoded by the MUC16 gene, cloned by Lloyd and Yin. The full-length gene describes a complex tethered mucin protein present primarily in a variety of gynecologic tissues, especially neoplasms. OC125 and other related antibodies react with glycosylation-dependent antigens present exclusively in the cleaved portion of the molecule. These antibodies are not useful as screening tools, nor can they detect the proximal residual MUC16 protein fragment after cleavage. This has limited its diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Using synthetic peptides we raised novel-specific antibodies to the carboxy-terminal portion of MUC16, retained by the cell, proximal to the putative cleavage site. These antibodies were characterized using fluorescence-activated cell-sorting analysis, enzyme-linked immunoassay, Western blot analysis, and immunohistochemistry. Each of the selected monoclonal antibodies was reactive against recombinant GST-ΔMUC16c114 protein and the MUC16 transfected SKOV3 cell line. Three antibodies, 4H11, 9C9, and 4A5 antibodies demonstrated high affinities by Western blot analysis and saturation-binding studies of transfected SKOV3 cells, and displayed antibody internalization. Immunohistochemical positivity with novel antibody 4H11 was similar to OC125, but with important differences, including diffuse positivity in lobular breast cancer and a small percentage of OC125-negative ovarian carcinomas that showed intense and diffuse 4H11. Development of such antibodies may be useful for the characterization of MUC16 biology and allow for future studies in targeted therapy and diagnostics. PMID:20453816

  1. A carboxy methyl tamarind polysaccharide matrix for adhesion and growth of osteoclast-precursor cells.

    PubMed

    Sanyasi, Sridhar; Kumar, Ashutosh; Goswami, Chandan; Bandyopadhyay, Abhijit; Goswami, Luna

    2014-01-30

    Remodeling of bone by tissue engineering is a realistic option for treating several bone-related pathophysiological ailments such as osteoporosis, bone tumor, bone cancer or abnormal bone development. But, these possibilities are hindered due to lack of proper natural and biodegradable surface on which bone precursor cells can adhere efficiently and grow further. Here we describe the synthesis and characterization of a new hydrogel as an effective surface which can acts as a material for bone tissue engineering. This hydrogel has been prepared by chemically grafting a semi-synthetic polymer with a synthetic monomer, namely hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA). Carboxy methyl tamarind (CMT) was selected as the semi-synthetic polymer. The hydrogel was prepared at different mole ratios and at the ratio of 1:10 (CMT:HEMA) yielded the best hydrogel as characterized by several physico-chemical analysis such as UV spectroscopy, FT-IR spectroscopy and swelling properties. We further demonstrate that this material is suitable for effective adhesion, growth and further clustering of bone precursor cells (RAW 264.7). This material is also compatible for growing other sensitive cells such as neuronal cells (Neuro2a) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) demonstrating that this surface does not possess any cytotoxicity and is compatible for primary human cells too. We conclude that the hydrogel made of CMT:HEMA at a ratio of 1:10 can be suitable for bone tissue engineering and thus may have clinical as well as commercial application in future. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Dynamic features of carboxy cytoglobin distal mutants investigated by molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Cong; Du, Weihong

    2016-04-01

    Cytoglobin (Cgb) is a member of hemoprotein family with roles in NO metabolism, fibrosis, and tumourigenesis. Similar to other hemoproteins, Cgb structure and functions are markedly influenced by distal key residues. The sixth ligand His(81) (E7) is crucial to exogenous ligand binding, heme pocket conformation, and physiological roles of this protein. However, the effects of other key residues on heme pocket and protein biological functions are not well known. In this work, a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation study of two single mutants in CO-ligated Cgb (L46FCgbCO and L46VCgbCO) and two double mutants (L46FH81QCgbCO and L46VH81QCgbCO) was conducted to explore the effects of the key distal residues Leu(46)(B10) and His(81)(E7) on Cgb structure and functions. Results indicated that the distal mutation of B10 and E7 affected CgbCO dynamic properties on loop region fluctuation, internal cavity rearrangement, and heme motion. The distal conformation change was reflected by the distal key residues Gln(62) (CD3) and Arg(84)(E10). The hydrogen bond between heme propionates with CD3 or E10 residues were evidently influenced by B10/E7 mutation. Furthermore, heme pocket rearrangement was also observed based on the distal pocket volume and occurrence rate of inner cavities. The mutual effects of B10 and E7 residues on protein conformational rearrangement and other dynamic features were expressed in current MD studies of CgbCO and its distal mutants, suggesting their crucial role in heme pocket stabilization, ligand binding, and Cgb biological functions. The mutation of distal B10 and E7 residues affects the dynamic features of carboxy cytoglobin.

  3. A Systematic Review of Des-γ-Carboxy Prothrombin for the Diagnosis of Primary Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    De, Ji; Shen, Yi; Qin, Jinyu; Feng, Li; Wang, Yiping; Yang, Li

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Determining the serum des-γ-carboxy-prothrombin (DCP) level is of great importance for the diagnosis of primary hepatocellular carcinoma (PHC). Although several studies have investigated the accuracy of diagnostic DCP tests for PHC, the results have been inconsistent. The aim of this study was to systematically evaluate DCP as a diagnostic standard for PHC. Several databases, including PubMed, EMBASE, MEDLINE (Ovid), the Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), the VIP Database for Chinese Technical Periodicals (VIP), WanFang Data, and the China Biological Medicine Database (CBM), were searched from the date of database inception until July 1, 2015 to collect published international and domestic studies of DCP in the diagnosis of PHC. Two investigators screened the literature according to the inclusion and exclusion criteria, extracted the data, and assessed the methodological quality of the included studies. A total of 38 studies involving 11,124 cases were included (5298 cases in the PHC group and 5826 cases in the control group). A meta-analysis was then performed using Meta-Disc 1.4 and RevMan 5.2 software. The overall sensitivity, specificity, positive likelihood ratio (+LR), and negative likelihood ratio (−LR) of DCP for the detection of PHC were 0.66 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.65–0.68), 0.88 (95% CI: 0.87–0.90), 7.13 (95% CI: 5.73–8.87), and 0.33 (95% CI: 0.29–0.38), respectively. The area under the curve (AUC) of the summary receiver-operating characteristic curve (SROC) was 0.9002. In conclusion, DCP has moderate diagnostic utility for PHC. Owing to the heterogeneity and limitations of the included studies, the above conclusion requires further support from additional high-quality studies. PMID:27124038

  4. Genome-wide analysis reveals novel and discrete functions for tubulin carboxy-terminal tails.

    PubMed

    Aiken, Jayne; Sept, David; Costanzo, Michael; Boone, Charles; Cooper, John A; Moore, Jeffrey K

    2014-06-16

    Microtubules (MTs) support diverse transport and force generation processes in cells. Both α- and β-tubulin proteins possess carboxy-terminal tail regions (CTTs) that are negatively charged, intrinsically disordered, and project from the MT surface where they interact with motors and other proteins. Although CTTs are presumed to play important roles in MT networks, these roles have not been determined in vivo. We examined the function of CTTs in vivo by using a systematic collection of mutants in budding yeast. We find that CTTs are not essential; however, loss of either α- or β-CTT sensitizes cells to MT-destabilizing drugs. β-CTT, but not α-CTT, regulates MT dynamics by increasing frequencies of catastrophe and rescue events. In addition, β-CTT is critical for the assembly of the mitotic spindle and its elongation during anaphase. We use genome-wide genetic interaction screens to identify roles for α- and β-CTTs, including a specific role for β-CTT in supporting kinesin-5/Cin8. Our genetic screens also identified novel interactions with pathways not related to canonical MT functions. We conclude that α- and β-CTTs play important and largely discrete roles in MT networks. β-CTT promotes MT dynamics. β-CTT also regulates force generation in the mitotic spindle by supporting kinesin-5/Cin8 and dampening dynein. Our genetic screens identify links between α- and β-CTT and additional cellular pathways and suggest novel functions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The Microtubule Binding Properties of CENP-E’s C-terminus and CENP-F

    PubMed Central

    Musinipally, Vivek; Howes, Stuart; Alushin, Gregory M.; Nogales, Eva

    2013-01-01

    CENP-E (Centromere Protein E) and CENP-F, also known as mitosin, are large, multi-functional proteins associated with the outer kinetochore. CENP-E features a well-characterized kinesin motor domain at its N-terminus and a second microtubule-binding domain at its C-terminus of unknown function. CENP-F is important for the formation of proper kinetochore-microtubule attachment and, like CENP-E, contains two microtubule-binding domains at its termini. While the importance of these proteins is known, the details of their interactions with microtubules have not yet been investigated. We have biochemically and structurally characterized the microtubule-binding properties of the amino- and carboxyl-terminal domains of CENP-F as well as the carboxyl-terminal (non-kinesin) domain of CENP-E. CENP-E’s C-terminus and CENP-F’s N-terminus bind microtubules with similar affinity to the well-characterized Ndc80 complex, while CENP-F’s C-terminus shows much lower affinity. Electron microscopy analysis reveals that all of these domains engage the microtubule surface in a disordered manner, suggesting that these factors have no favored binding geometry and may allow for initial side-on attachments early in mitosis. PMID:23892111

  6. Conformation of the Bax C-terminus regulates subcellular location and cell death.

    PubMed Central

    Nechushtan, A; Smith, C L; Hsu, Y T; Youle, R J

    1999-01-01

    Bax, a pro-apoptotic member of the Bcl-2 family, translocates from the cytosol to the mitochondria during programmed cell death. We report here that both gain-of-function and loss-of-function mutations can be achieved by altering a single amino acid in the Bax hydrophobic C-terminus. The properly mutated C-terminus of Bax can target a non-relevant protein to the mitochondria, showing that specific conformations of this domain alone allow mitochondrial docking. These data along with N-terminus epitope exposure experiments suggest that the C- and the N-termini interact and that upon triggering of apoptosis, Bax changes conformation, exposing these two domains to insert into the mitochondria and regulate the cell death machinery. PMID:10228148

  7. Ultralow-Fouling Behavior of Biorecognition Coatings Based on Carboxy-Functional Brushes of Zwitterionic Homo- and Co-polymers in Blood Plasma: Functionalization Matters.

    PubMed

    Lísalová, Hana; Brynda, Eduard; Houska, Milan; Víšová, Ivana; Mrkvová, Kateřina; Song, Xue Chadtová; Gedeonová, Erika; Surman, František; Riedel, Tomáš; Pop-Georgievski, Ognen; Homola, Jiri

    2017-02-24

    Fouling from complex biological fluids such as blood plasma to biorecognition element (BRE)-functionalized coatings hampers the use of affinity biosensor technologies in medical diagnostics. Here we report the effects the molecular mechanisms involved in functionalization of low-fouling carboxy-functional coatings have on the BRE capacity and resistance to fouling from blood plasma. The specific mechanisms of EDC/NHS activation of carboxy-groups, BREs' attachment, and deactivation of residual activated groups on recently developed ultralow-fouling carboxybetaine polymer and copolymer brushes (pCB) as well as conventional carboxy-terminated oligo(ethylene glycol)-based alkanethiolate self-assembled monolayers (OEG-SAMs) are studied using the PM-IRRAS, XPS, and SPR methods. It is shown that the fouling resistance of BRE-functionalized pCB coatings is strongly influenced by a deactivation method affecting the ultralow-fouling molecular structure of the brush and the surface charges. It is revealed that, in contrast to free carboxy-group-terminated OEG-SAMs, only a partial deactivation of EDC/NHS-activated zwitterionic carboxy-groups by spontaneous hydrolysis is possible in the pCB brushes. The fouling resistance of activated/BRE-functionalized pCB is shown to be recovered only by covalent attachment of amino acid deactivation agents to residual activated carboxy-groups of pCB. The developed deactivation procedure is further combined with ultralow-fouling brushes of random copolymer carboxybetaine methacrylamide (CBMAA) and N-(2-hydroxypropyl) methacrylamide (HPMAA) with optimized CBMAA content (15%) providing a BRE-functionalized coating with superior fouling resistance over various carboxy-functional low-fouling coatings including homopolymer pCB brushes and OEG-SAMs. The biorecognition capabilities of pHPMAA-CBMAA(15%) are demonstrated via the sensitive label-free detection of a microRNA cancer biomarker (miR-16) in blood plasma.

  8. Role of the C terminus of Lassa virus L protein in viral mRNA synthesis.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Maria; Pahlmann, Meike; Jérôme, Hanna; Busch, Carola; Lelke, Michaela; Günther, Stephan

    2014-08-01

    The N terminus of arenavirus L protein contains an endonuclease presumably involved in "cap snatching." Here, we employed the Lassa virus replicon system to map other L protein sites that might be involved in this mechanism. Residues Phe-1979, Arg-2018, Phe-2071, Asp-2106, Trp-2173, Tyr-2179, Arg-2200, and Arg-2204 were important for viral mRNA synthesis but dispensable for genome replication. Thus, the C terminus of L protein is involved in the mRNA synthesis process, potentially by mediating cap binding.

  9. A short carboxy-terminal domain of polycystin-1 reorganizes the microtubular network and the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Gao, Hongyu; Sellin, Lorenz K; Pütz, Michael; Nickel, Christian; Imgrund, Michael; Gerke, Peter; Nitschke, Roland; Walz, Gerd; Kramer-Zucker, Albrecht G

    2009-04-15

    Mutations of PKD1 cause autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), a syndrome characterized by kidney cysts and progressive renal failure. Polycystin-1, the protein encoded by PKD1, is a large integral membrane protein with a short carboxy-terminal cytoplasmic domain that appears to initiate multiple cellular programs. We report now that this polycystin-1 domain contains a novel motif responsible for rearrangements of intermediate filaments, microtubules and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). This motif reveals homology to CLIMP-63, a microtubule-binding protein that rearranges the ER. Our findings suggest that polycystin-1 influences the shape and localization of both the microtubular network and the ER.

  10. Positioning of Two Alpha Subunit Carboxy-Terminal Domains of RNA Polymerase at Promoters by Two Transcription Factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Katsuhiko; Owens, Jeffrey T.; Belyaeva, Tamara A.; Meares, Claude F.; Busby, Stephen J. W.; Ishihama, Akira

    1997-10-01

    Interactions between the cAMP receptor protein (CRP) and the carboxy-terminal regulatory domain (CTD) of Escherichia coli RNA polymerase α subunit were analyzed at promoters carrying tandem DNA sites for CRP binding using a chemical nuclease covalently attached to α . Each CRP dimer was found to direct the positioning of one of the two α subunit CTDs. Thus, the function of RNA polymerase may be subject to regulation through protein-protein interactions between the two α subunits and two different species of transcription factors.

  11. Fibrinogen {alpha} genes: Conservation of bipartite transcripts and carboxy-terminal-extended {alpha} subunits in vertebrates

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Y.; Cao, Y.; Hertzberg, K.M.; Grieninger, G.

    1995-11-01

    All three well-studied subunits of the clotting protein fibrinogen ({alpha}, {beta}, {gamma}) share N-terminal structural homologies, but until recently only the {beta} and {gamma} chains were recognized as having similar globular C-termini. With the discovery of an extra exon in the human fibrinogen {alpha} gene (exon VI), a minor form of the {alpha} subunit ({alpha}{sub E}) with an extended {beta}- and {gamma}-like C-terminus has been identified. In the present study, the polymerase chain reaction has been used to identify sequences that encode counterparts to {alpha}{sub E} in chicken, rabbit, rat, and baboon. The basic six-exon structure of the fibrinogen {alpha} genes is shown to be conserved among mammals and birds, as are the intron positions. Bipartite transcripts - still bearing an intron prior to the last exon - are found among the products of the various vertebrate fibrinogen {alpha} genes. The last exon represents the largest conserved segment of the gene and, in each species examined, encodes exactly 236 amino acids. The C-termini of these {alpha}{sub E} chains align without a single gap and are between 76 and 99% identical. Since the exon VI-encoded domain of {alpha}{sub E} is as well conserved as the corresponding regions of the {beta} and {gamma} chains, it follows that it is equally important and that {alpha}{sub E}-fibrinogen plays a vital, if as-yet unrecognized physiological role. 21 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Drosophila Raf's N Terminus Contains a Novel Conserved Region and Can Contribute to Torso RTK Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Jian; Tchaicheeyan, Oren; Ambrosio, Linda

    2010-01-01

    Drosophila Raf (DRaf) contains an extended N terminus, in addition to three conserved regions (CR1–CR3); however, the function(s) of this N-terminal segment remains elusive. In this article, a novel region within Draf's N terminus that is conserved in BRaf proteins of vertebrates was identified and termed conserved region N-terminal (CRN). We show that the N-terminal segment can play a positive role(s) in the Torso receptor tyrosine kinase pathway in vivo, and its contribution to signaling appears to be dependent on the activity of Torso receptor, suggesting this N-terminal segment can function in signal transmission. Circular dichroism analysis indicates that DRaf's N terminus (amino acids 1–117) including CRN (amino acids 19–77) is folded in vitro and has a high content of helical secondary structure as predicted by proteomics tools. In yeast two-hybrid assays, stronger interactions between DRaf's Ras binding domain (RBD) and the small GTPase Ras1, as well as Rap1, were observed when CRN and RBD sequences were linked. Together, our studies suggest that DRaf's extended N terminus may assist in its association with the upstream activators (Ras1 and Rap1) through a CRN-mediated mechanism(s) in vivo. PMID:20008569

  13. Effect of myristoylated N-terminus of Arf1 on the bending rigidity of phospholipid membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burrola Gabilondo, Beatriz; Zhou, Hernan; Randazzo, Paul A.; Losert, Wolfgang

    2010-03-01

    The protein Arf1 is part of the COPI vesicle transport process from the Golgi to the ER. It binds to membranes via a myristoylated N-terminus and it has been shown to tubulate Large Unilamellar Vesicles. The effect of the N-terminus of Arf1 on physical properties of membranes has not been studied, with the exception of curvature. We previously found that the myristoylated N-terminus increases the packing of the lipid molecules, but has no effect on the lateral mobility. We tested the hypothesis that myristoylated peptides affect the bending rigidity of phospholipid Giant Unilamellar Vesicles (GUV). We use optical tweezers to pull tethers from GUV and measure the force of pulling the tether, as well as the retraction speed of the tether once it is released. We also used flicker spectroscopy to estimate the values of the mechanical properties of GUV. We will present results of the force and tether retraction measurements, as well as mechanical properties estimates from flicker, for GUV in the presence of varying concentrations of myristoylated and non-myristoylated N-terminus of Arf1, and compare these with measurements for GUV in the absence of peptide.

  14. Glaciological and marine geological controls on terminus dynamics of Hubbard Glacier, southeast Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stearns, Leigh A.; Hamilton, Gordon S.; van der Veen, C. J.; Finnegan, D. C.; O'Neel, Shad; Scheick, J. B.; Lawson, D. E.

    2015-01-01

    Hubbard Glacier, located in southeast Alaska, is the world's largest non-polar tidewater glacier. It has been steadily advancing since it was first mapped in 1895; occasionally, the advance creates an ice or sediment dam that blocks a tributary fjord (Russell Fiord). The sustained advance raises the probability of long-term closure in the near-future, which will strongly impact the ecosystem of Russell Fiord and the nearby community of Yakutat. Here, we examine a 43-year record of flow speeds and terminus position to understand the large-scale dynamics of Hubbard Glacier. Our long-term record shows that the rate of terminus advance has increased slightly since 1895, with the exception of a slowed advance between approximately 1972 and 1984. The short-lived closure events in 1986 and 2002 were not initiated by perturbations in ice velocity or environmental forcings, but were likely due to fluctuations in sedimentation patterns at the terminus. This study points to the significance of a coupled system where short-term velocity fluctuations and morainal shoal development control tidewater glacier terminus position.

  15. The C-terminus of Kv7 channels: a multifunctional module.

    PubMed

    Haitin, Yoni; Attali, Bernard

    2008-04-01

    Kv7 channels (KCNQ) represent a family of voltage-gated K(+) channels which plays a prominent role in brain and cardiac excitability. Their physiological importance is underscored by the existence of mutations in human Kv7 genes, leading to severe cardiovascular and neurological disorders such as the cardiac long QT syndrome and neonatal epilepsy. Kv7 channels exhibit some structural and functional features that are distinct from other Kv channels. Notably, the Kv7 C-terminus is long compared to other K(+) channels and is endowed with characteristic structural domains, including coiled-coils, amphipatic alpha helices containing calmodulin-binding motifs and basic amino acid clusters. Here we provide a brief overview of current insights and as yet unsettled issues about the structural and functional attributes of the C-terminus of Kv7 channels. Recent data indicate that the proximal half of the Kv7 C-terminus associates with one calmodulin constitutively bound to each subunit. Epilepsy and long QT mutations located in this proximal region impair calmodulin binding and can affect channel gating, folding and trafficking. The distal half of the Kv7 C-terminus directs tetramerization, employing tandem coiled-coils. Together, the data indicate that the Kv7 C-terminal domain is a multimodular structure playing a crucial role in channel gating, assembly and trafficking as well as in scaffolding the channel complex with signalling proteins.

  16. Modifications of the C terminus Affect Functionality and Stability of Yeast Triacylglycerol Lipase Tgl3p*

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Barbara; Schmidt, Claudia; Ploier, Birgit; Daum, Günther

    2014-01-01

    Lipid droplets are specific organelles for the storage of triacylglycerols and steryl esters. They are surrounded by a phospholipid monolayer with a small but specific set of proteins embedded. Assembly and insertion of proteins into this surface membrane is an intriguing question of lipid droplet biology. To address this question we studied the topology of Tgl3p, the major triacylglycerol lipase of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, on lipid droplets. Employing the method of limited proteolysis of lipid droplet surface proteins, we found that the C terminus of Tgl3p faces the inside of the organelle, whereas the N terminus is exposed at the cytosolic side of lipid droplets. Detailed analysis of the C terminus revealed a stretch of seven amino acids that are critical for protein stability and functionality. The negative charge of two aspartate residues within this stretch is crucial for lipase activity of Tgl3p. A portion of Tgl3p, which is located to the endoplasmic reticulum, exhibits a different topology. In the phospholipid bilayer of the endoplasmic reticulum the C terminus faces the cytosol, which results in instability of the protein. Thus, the topology of Tgl3p is important for its function and strongly dependent on the membrane environment. PMID:24847060

  17. 29 CFR Appendix C to Subpart R of... - Illustrations of Bridging Terminus Points: Non-mandatory

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Illustrations of Bridging Terminus Points: Non-mandatory C Appendix C to Subpart R of Part 1926 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY... CONSTRUCTION Steel Erection Pt. 1926, Subpt. R, App. C Appendix C to Subpart R of Part 1926—Illustrations...

  18. N-terminus regulation of VMAT2 mediates methamphetamine-stimulated efflux.

    PubMed

    Torres, B; Ruoho, A E

    2014-02-14

    The 20 amino acid (AA) N-terminus of the vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) was examined as a regulator of VMAT2 function. Removal of the first 16 or 19 AAs of the N-terminus resulted in a molecule with reduced ability to sequester [(3)H]-5HT. A glutathione-S-transferase-construct of the N-terminus underwent phosphorylation in the presence of PKC at serines 15 and 18. These putative phosphorylation sites were examined for effects on function. Phospho-mimetic substitution of serines 15 and 18 with aspartate in the full-length VMAT2 resulted in reduced [(3)H]-5HT sequestration and reduced methamphetamine (METH)-stimulated efflux of preloaded [(3)H]-5HT. In contrast, mutation of serines 15 and 18 to alanines maintained intact net substrate sequestration but eliminated METH-stimulated efflux of pre-accumulated [(3)H]-5HT. In summary, these data suggest a model in which the VMAT2 N-terminus regulates monoamine sequestration.

  19. The COOH terminus of the amelogenin, LRAP, is oriented next to the hydroxyapatite surface

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, Wendy J.; Campbell, Allison A.; Paine, Michael L.; Snead, Malcolm

    2004-09-24

    The organic matrix in forming enamel consists largely of the amelogenin protein, self-assembled into nanospheres that are necessary to guide the formation of the unusually long and highly ordered hydroxyapatite (HAP) crystallites that constitute enamel. Despite its ability to direct crystal growth, the interaction of the amelogenin protein with HAP is unknown, though the charged C-terminus is often implicated in this function. To elucidate if the C-terminus is important in the binding and orientation of amelogenin with HAP, we used solid state NMR to determine the orientation of the C-terminus of an amelogenin splice variant, LRAP, which contains the charged C-terminus of the full protein, on the HAP surface. These experiments demonstrate that the sidechain methyl labeled residue, A46, is 8 Å from the HAP surface, under hydrated conditions, for the protein with and without phosphorylation. Modeling results are consistent with experimental measurements, resulting in an average 13Cala46-31P distance of 7.62 ± 1.8 Å for LRAP orientation onto the 100 face of HAP. The computational model also reveals that with 13Cala46 at this distance, the negatively charged residues are energetically favored to align themselves with the Ca2+ in the HAP lattice. The experimental results and supporting computational models provide direct evidence orienting the charged C-terminal region of the amelogenin protein on the HAP surface, optimized to exert control on developing enamel crystals.

  20. The N-terminus of TDP-43 promotes its oligomerization and enhances DNA binding affinity

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Chung-ke; Wu, Tzong-Huah; Wu, Chu-Ya; Chiang, Ming-hui; Toh, Elsie Khai-Woon; Hsu, Yin-Chih; Lin, Ku-Feng; Liao, Yu-heng; Huang, Tai-huang; Huang, Joseph Jen-Tse

    2012-08-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The N-terminus of TDP-43 contains an independently folded structural domain (NTD). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The structural domains of TDP-43 are arranged in a beads-on-a-string fashion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The NTD promotes TDP-43 oligomerization in a concentration-dependent manner. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The NTD may assist nucleic acid-binding activity of TDP-43. -- Abstract: TDP-43 is a DNA/RNA-binding protein associated with different neurodegenerative diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD-U). Here, the structural and physical properties of the N-terminus on TDP-43 have been carefully characterized through a combination of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), circular dichroism (CD) and fluorescence anisotropy studies. We demonstrate for the first time the importance of the N-terminus in promoting TDP-43 oligomerization and enhancing its DNA-binding affinity. An unidentified structural domain in the N-terminus is also disclosed. Our findings provide insights into the N-terminal domain function of TDP-43.

  1. 29 CFR Appendix C to Subpart R of... - Illustrations of Bridging Terminus Points: Non-mandatory

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Illustrations of Bridging Terminus Points: Non-mandatory C Appendix C to Subpart R of Part 1926 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY... CONSTRUCTION Steel Erection Pt. 1926, Subpt. R, App. C Appendix C to Subpart R of Part 1926—Illustrations of...

  2. 29 CFR Appendix C to Subpart R of... - Illustrations of Bridging Terminus Points: Non-mandatory

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Illustrations of Bridging Terminus Points: Non-mandatory C Appendix C to Subpart R of Part 1926 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY... CONSTRUCTION Steel Erection Pt. 1926, Subpt. R, App. C Appendix C to Subpart R of Part 1926—Illustrations of...

  3. 29 CFR Appendix C to Subpart R of... - Illustrations of Bridging Terminus Points: Non-mandatory

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Illustrations of Bridging Terminus Points: Non-mandatory C Appendix C to Subpart R of Part 1926 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY... CONSTRUCTION Steel Erection Pt. 1926, Subpt. R, App. C Appendix C to Subpart R of Part 1926—Illustrations of...

  4. The luminal N-terminus of yeast Nvj1 is an inner nuclear membrane anchor

    PubMed Central

    Millen, Jonathan I.; Pierson, Jason; Kvam, Erik; Olsen, Lars J.; Goldfarb, David S.

    2010-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in S. cerevisae is largely divided between perinuclear and cortical compartments. Yeast Nvj1 localizes exclusively to small patches on the perinuclear ER, where it interacts with Vac8 in the vacuole membrane to form nucleus-vacuole (NV) junctions. Three regions of Nvj1 mediate the biogenesis of NV junctions. A membrane-spanning domain targets the protein to the ER. The C-terminus binds Vac8 in the vacuole membrane, which induces the clustering of both proteins into NV junctions. The luminal N-terminus is required for strict perinuclear localization. 3D cryo-electron tomography reveals that Nvj1 clamps the separation between the two nuclear membranes to half the width of bulk nuclear envelope. The N-terminus contains a hydrophobic sequence bracketed by basic residues that resembles outer mitochondrial membrane signal-anchors. The hydrophobic sequence can be scrambled or reversed without affecting function. Mutations that reduce the hydrophobicity of the core sequence, or affect the distribution of basic residues, cause mislocalization to the cortical ER. We conclude that the N-terminus of Nvj1 is a retention sequence that bridges the perinuclear lumen and inserts into the inner nuclear membrane. PMID:18694438

  5. Characterization of the branching patterns of glycogen branching enzyme truncated on the N-terminus.

    PubMed

    Devillers, Claire H; Piper, Mary E; Ballicora, Miguel A; Preiss, Jack

    2003-10-01

    Truncation of 112 amino acids at the N-terminus (Nd(1-112)) changes the chain transfer pattern of the Escherichia coli glycogen branching enzyme (GBE) [Arch. Biochem. Biophys. 397 (2002) 279]. We investigated further the role of the N-terminus by engineering other truncated GBEs and analyzing the branching pattern by high-performance anion-exchange chromatography. The wild type GBE transfers mainly chains with a degree of polymerization (d.p.) of 8-14, the Nd(1-112) enzyme transfers a greater proportion of chains with higher d.p. 15-20, whereas the 63- and 83-amino acid deleted enzymes had an intermediate pattern of transferred chains (d.p. 10-20). These data showed that a progressive shortening of the N-terminus leads to a gradual increase in the length of the transferred chains, suggesting that the N-terminus provides a support for the glucan substrate during the processes of cleavage and transfer of the alpha-(1-4) glucan chains.

  6. Subaqueous terminus evolution at Tasman Glacier, New Zealand, as determined by remote-controlled survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purdie, Heather; Bealing, Paul; Tidey, Emily; Harrison, Justin

    2016-04-01

    The presence of subaqueous ice ramps at the terminus of calving glaciers result from a combination of subaerial and subaqueous processes. These ice ramps eventually buoyantly calve, an event that can be hazardous to companies operating boat tours on proglacial lakes. However our knowledge of ice ramp forming processes, and feedbacks associated with their evolution, is sparse. We are using a remote controlled jet boat to survey bathymetry at an active calving margin. This vessel, mounted with both depth and side-scan sonar, can map subaqueous portions of the terminus right up to the active calving face at no risk to the operators. Surveys at the Tasman Glacier terminus over three consecutive years have revealed that subaqueous ice ramps are ephemeral features. In 2015 multiple ice ramps extended out into the lake from the terminus by 100-200 m, with the ramp surface being as much as 60 m below the water line at its outer perimeter. The maximum depth of the Tasman Lake at this time was 240 m. Within one month of the survey taking place, the largest of these ice ramps had calved and disintegrated. The consistent location of ice ramps between surveys indicates that other factors, like subglacial hydrology, may influence ice ramp evolution.

  7. GLUT-4 NH2 terminus contains a phenylalanine-based targeting motif that regulates intracellular sequestration.

    PubMed

    Piper, R C; Tai, C; Kulesza, P; Pang, S; Warnock, D; Baenziger, J; Slot, J W; Geuze, H J; Puri, C; James, D E

    1993-06-01

    Expression of chimeras, composed of portions of two different glucose transporter isoforms (GLUT-1 and GLUT-4), in CHO cells had indicated that the cytoplasmic NH2 terminus of GLUT-4 contains important targeting information that mediates intracellular sequestration of this isoform (Piper, R. C., C. Tai, J. W. Slot, C. S. Hahn, C. M. Rice, H. Huang, D. E. James. 1992. J. Cell Biol. 117:729-743). In the present studies, the amino acid constituents of the GLUT-4 NH2-terminal targeting domain have been identified. GLUT-4 constructs containing NH2-terminal deletions or alanine substitutions within the NH2 terminus were expressed in CHO cells using a Sindbis virus expression system. Deletion of eight amino acids from the GLUT-4 NH2 terminus or substituting alanine for phenylalanine at position 5 in GLUT-4 resulted in a marked accumulation of the transporter at the plasma membrane. Mutations at other amino acids surrounding Phe5 also caused increased cell surface expression of GLUT-4 but not to the same extent as the Phe5 mutation. GLUT-4 was also localized to clathrin lattices and this colocalization was abolished when either the first 13 amino acids were deleted or when Phe5 was changed to alanine. To ascertain whether the targeting information within the GLUT-4 NH2-terminal targeting domain could function independently of the glucose transporter structure this domain was inserted into the cytoplasmic tail of the H1 subunit of the asialoglycoprotein receptor. H1 with the GLUT-4 NH2 terminus was predominantly localized to an intracellular compartment similar to GLUT-4 and was sequestered more from the cell surface than was the wild-type H1 protein. It is concluded that the NH2 terminus of GLUT-4 contains a phenylalanine-based targeting motif that mediates intracellular sequestration at least in part by facilitating interaction of the transporter with endocytic machinery located at the cell surface.

  8. The N Terminus Specifies the Switch between Transport Modes of the Human Serotonin Transporter*

    PubMed Central

    Kern, Carina; Erdem, Fatma Asli; El-Kasaby, Ali; Sandtner, Walter; Freissmuth, Michael; Sucic, Sonja

    2017-01-01

    The serotonin transporter (SERT) and other monoamine transporters operate in either a forward transport mode where the transporter undergoes a full transport cycle or an exchange mode where the transporter seesaws through half-cycles. Amphetamines trigger the exchange mode, leading to substrate efflux. This efflux was proposed to rely on the N terminus, which was suggested to adopt different conformations in the inward facing, outward facing and amphetamine-bound states. This prediction was verified by tryptic digestion of SERT-expressing membranes: in the absence of Na+, the N terminus was rapidly digested. Amphetamine conferred protection against cleavage, suggesting a relay between the conformational states of the hydrophobic core and the N terminus. We searched for a candidate segment that supported the conformational switch by serial truncation removing 22 (ΔN22), 32 (ΔN32), or 42 (ΔN42) N-terminal residues. This did not affect surface expression, inhibitor binding, and substrate influx. However, amphetamine-induced efflux by SERT-ΔN32 or SERT-ΔN42 (but not by SERT-ΔN22) was markedly diminished. We examined the individual steps in the transport cycle by recording transporter-associated currents: the recovery rate of capacitive peak, but not of steady state, currents was significantly lower for SERT-ΔN32 than that of wild type SERT and SERT-ΔN22. Thus, the exchange mode of SERT-ΔN32 was selectively impaired. Our observations show that the N terminus affords the switch between transport modes. The findings are consistent with a model where the N terminus acts as a lever to support amphetamine-induced efflux by SERT. PMID:28104804

  9. Individual substitution mutations in the AID C terminus that ablate IgH class switch recombination.

    PubMed

    Kadungure, Tatenda; Ucher, Anna J; Linehan, Erin K; Schrader, Carol E; Stavnezer, Janet

    2015-01-01

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is essential for class switch recombination (CSR) and somatic hypermutation (SHM) of Ig genes. The C terminus of AID is required for CSR but not for SHM, but the reason for this is not entirely clear. By retroviral transduction of mutant AID proteins into aid-/- mouse splenic B cells, we show that 4 amino acids within the C terminus of mouse AID, when individually mutated to specific amino acids (R190K, A192K, L196S, F198S), reduce CSR about as much or more than deletion of the entire C terminal 10 amino acids. Similar to ΔAID, the substitutions reduce binding of UNG to Ig Sμ regions and some reduce binding of Msh2, both of which are important for introducing S region DNA breaks. Junctions between the IgH donor switch (S)μ and acceptor Sα regions from cells expressing ΔAID or the L196S mutant show increased microhomology compared to junctions in cells expressing wild-type AID, consistent with problems during CSR and the use of alternative end-joining, rather than non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ). Unlike deletion of the AID C terminus, 3 of the substitution mutants reduce DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) detected within the Sμ region in splenic B cells undergoing CSR. Cells expressing these 3 substitution mutants also have greatly reduced mutations within unrearranged Sμ regions, and they decrease with time after activation. These results might be explained by increased error-free repair, but as the C terminus has been shown to be important for recruitment of NHEJ proteins, this appears unlikely. We hypothesize that Sμ DNA breaks in cells expressing these C terminus substitution mutants are poorly repaired, resulting in destruction of Sμ segments that are deaminated by these mutants. This could explain why these mutants cannot undergo CSR.

  10. Activity of mutant sigma F proteins truncated near the C terminus.

    PubMed Central

    Min, K T; Yudkin, M D

    1992-01-01

    sigma F, the product of the spoIIAC gene of Bacillus subtilis, is homologous in amino acid sequence throughout most of its length with several other sigma factors of B. subtilis and Escherichia coli. However, 8 residues from the C terminus the homology abruptly breaks down, suggesting that the C-terminal tail of the protein may be dispensable. It is known that an amber mutation at the 11th codon (wild-type glutamine 245) from the C terminus abolishes the function of the sigma factor. We have now placed chain-terminating codons at the ninth codon (wild-type lysine 247), the eighth codon (wild-type valine 248), or the seventh codon (wild-type glutamine 249) from the C terminus. We have tested the resulting mutants for their capacity to sporulate and for their ability to transcribe from a promoter (spoIIIG) that is normally read by RNA polymerase bound to sigma F (E sigma F). The results indicate that a mutant sigma F lacking the terminal 7 residues functions almost normally, which suggests that glutamine 249 is dispensable. By contrast, lysine 247 is crucial for the activity of sigma F: deletion of the 9 C-terminal residues totally inactivates the protein. When the terminal 8 residues were deleted, placing lysine 247 at the C terminus, the transcriptional activity of the factor is reduced by about 80%: we attribute this effect to neutralization of the positive charge of lysine 247 by formation of a salt bridge with the -COO- terminus. Images PMID:1429437

  11. Arabidopsis thaliana FLA4 functions as a glycan-stabilized soluble factor via its carboxy-proximal Fasciclin 1 domain.

    PubMed

    Xue, Hui; Veit, Christiane; Abas, Lindy; Tryfona, Theodora; Maresch, Daniel; Ricardi, Martiniano M; Estevez, José Manuel; Strasser, Richard; Seifert, Georg J

    2017-08-01

    Fasciclin-like arabinogalactan proteins (FLAs) are involved in numerous important functions in plants but the relevance of their complex structure to physiological function and cellular fate is unresolved. Using a fully functional fluorescent version of Arabidopsis thaliana FLA4 we show that this protein is localized at the plasma membrane as well as in endosomes and soluble in the apoplast. FLA4 is likely to be GPI-anchored, is highly N-glycosylated and carries two O-glycan epitopes previously associated with arabinogalactan proteins. The activity of FLA4 was resistant against deletion of the amino-proximal fasciclin 1 domain and was unaffected by removal of the GPI-modification signal, a highly conserved N-glycan or the deletion of predicted O-glycosylation sites. Nonetheless these structural changes dramatically decreased endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-exit and plasma membrane localization of FLA4, with N-glycosylation acting at the level of ER-exit and O-glycosylation influencing post-secretory fate. We show that FLA4 acts predominantly by molecular interactions involving its carboxy-proximal fasciclin 1 domain and that its amino-proximal fasciclin 1 domain is required for stabilization of plasma membrane localization. FLA4 functions as a soluble glycoprotein via its carboxy-proximal Fas1 domain and its normal cellular trafficking depends on N- and O-glycosylation. © 2017 The Authors. The Plant Journal published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Experimental Biology.

  12. A Carboxy-Terminal Trimerization Domain Stabilizes Conformational Epitopes on the Stalk Domain of Soluble Recombinant Hemagglutinin Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Krammer, Florian; Margine, Irina; Tan, Gene S.; Pica, Natalie; Krause, Jens C.; Palese, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Recently, a new class of broadly neutralizing anti-influenza virus antibodies that target the stalk domain of the viral hemagglutinin was discovered. As such, induction, isolation, characterization, and quantification of these novel antibodies has become an area of intense research and great interest. Since most of these antibodies bind to conformational epitopes, the structural integrity of hemagglutinin substrates for the detection and quantification of these antibodies is of high importance. Here we evaluate the binding of these antibodies to soluble, secreted hemagglutinins with or without a carboxy-terminal trimerization domain based on the natural trimerization domain of T4 phage fibritin. The lack of such a domain completely abolishes binding to group 1 hemagglutinins and also affects binding to group 2 hemagglutinins. Additionally, the presence of a trimerization domain positively influences soluble hemagglutinin stability during expression and purification. Our findings suggest that a carboxy-terminal trimerization domain is a necessary requirement for the structural integrity of stalk epitopes on recombinant soluble influenza virus hemagglutinin. PMID:22928001

  13. Importance of the GluN2B carboxy-terminal domain for enhancement of social memories

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Stephanie; Wei, Wei; Wang, Deheng

    2015-01-01

    The N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor is known to be necessary for many forms of learning and memory, including social recognition memory. Additionally, the GluN2 subunits are known to modulate multiple forms of memory, with a high GluN2A:GluN2B ratio leading to impairments in long-term memory, while a low GluN2A:GluN2B ratio enhances some forms of long-term memory. Here, we investigate the molecular motif responsible for the differences in social recognition memory and olfactory memory in the forebrain-specific transgenic GluN2A overexpression mice and the forebrain-specific transgenic GluN2B overexpression mice by using two transgenic mouse lines that overexpress chimeric GluN2 subunits. The transgenic chimeric GluN2 subunit mice were tested for their ability to learn and remember fruit scents, male juveniles of the same strain, females of the same strain, male juveniles of another strain, and rodents of another species. The data presented here demonstrate that the GluN2B carboxy-terminal domain is necessary for enhanced social recognition memory in GluN2B transgenic overexpression mice. Furthermore, the GluN2A carboxy-terminal domain is responsible for the impaired long-term olfactory and social memory observed in the GluN2A overexpression mice. PMID:26179233

  14. Efficient and Scalable Synthesis of 4-Carboxy-Pennsylvania Green Methyl Ester: A Hydrophobic Building Block for Fluorescent Molecular Probes.

    PubMed

    Woydziak, Zachary R; Fu, Liqiang; Peterson, Blake R

    2014-01-01

    Fluorinated fluorophores are valuable tools for studies of biological systems. However, amine-reactive single-isomer derivatives of these compounds are often very expensive. To provide an inexpensive alternative, we report a practical synthesis of 4-carboxy-Pennsylvania Green methyl ester. Derivatives of this hydrophobic fluorinated fluorophore, a hybrid of the dyes Oregon Green and Tokyo Green, are often cell permeable, enabling labeling of intracellular targets and components. Moreover, the low pKa of Pennsylvania Green (4.8) confers bright fluorescence in acidic cellular compartments such as endosomes, enhancing its utility for chemical biology investigations. To improve access to the key intermediate 2,7-difluoro-3,6-dihydroxyxanthen-9-one, we subjected bis-(2,4,5-trifluorophenyl)methanone to iterative nucleophilic aromatic substitution by hydroxide on scales of > 40 g. This intermediate was used to prepare over 15 grams of pure 4-carboxy-Pennsylvania Green methyl ester in 28% overall yield without requiring chromatography. This compound can be converted into the amine reactive N-hydroxysuccinimidyl ester in essentially quantitative yield for the synthesis of a wide variety of fluorescent molecular probes.

  15. The carboxy-terminal domains of erbB-2 and epidermal growth factor receptor exert different regulatory effects on intrinsic receptor tyrosine kinase function and transforming activity.

    PubMed Central

    Di Fiore, P P; Segatto, O; Lonardo, F; Fazioli, F; Pierce, J H; Aaronson, S A

    1990-01-01

    The erbB-2 gene product, gp185erbB-2, displays a potent transforming effect when overexpressed in NIH 3T3 cells. In addition, it possesses constitutively high levels of tyrosine kinase activity in the absence of exogenously added ligand. In this study, we demonstrate that its carboxy-terminal domain exerts an enhancing effect on erbB-2 kinase and transforming activities. A premature termination mutant of the erbB-2 protein, lacking the entire carboxy-terminal domain (erbB-2 delta 1050), showed a 40-fold reduction in transforming ability and a lowered in vivo kinase activity for intracellular substrates. When the carboxy-terminal domain of erbB-2 was substituted for its analogous region in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) (EGFR/erbB-2COOH chimera), it conferred erbB-2-like properties to the EGFR, including transforming ability in the absence of epidermal growth factor, elevated constitutive autokinase activity in vivo and in vitro, and constitutive ability to phosphorylate phospholipase C-gamma. Conversely, a chimeric erbB-2 molecule bearing an EGFR carboxy-terminal domain (erbB-2/EGFRCOOH chimera) showed reduced transforming and kinase activity with respect to the wild-type erbB-2 and was only slightly more efficient than the erbB-2 delta 1050 mutant. Thus, we conclude that the carboxy-terminal domains of erbB-2 and EGFR exert different regulatory effects on receptor kinase function and biological activity. The up regulation of gp185erbB-2 enzymatic activity exerted by its carboxy-terminal domain can explain, at least in part, its constitutive level of kinase activity. Images PMID:2188097

  16. Synthesis of stable carboxy-terminated NaYF4: Yb3+, Er3+@SiO2 nanoparticles with ultrathin shell for biolabeling applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fuyao; Zhao, Qi; You, Hongpeng; Wang, Zhenxin

    2013-01-01

    Here, a two-step method has been developed for synthesizing carboxy-terminated NaYF4: Yb3+, Er3+@SiO2 core@shell nanoparticles (UCNP@SiO2) with ultrathin shell (1.5 nm). First, the NaYF4: Yb3+, Er3+ upconverting nanoparticles (UCNPs) were prepared using solvothermal technology; then, silica shells (SiO2) were deposited on the nanocrystals to form core-shell structures by the hydrolysis of tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS). The ultrathin SiO2 shell was obtained by increasing surfactant amount and decreasing TEOS amount in the reaction mixture. Carboxyethylsilanetriol (CTES) was used to generate the carboxy group on the particle surface. The carboxy-terminated UCNP@SiO2 are ideally suited for biolabeling and bioimaging applications because the as-prepared nanoparticles have extreme colloidal and optical stabilities, and the carboxy groups on the particle surface easily react with amino residues of biomolecules. As an example, we reported on the interactions of Ricinus Communis Agglutinin (RCA 120) conjugated UCNP@SiO2 with HeLa cells. The excellent performance of the RCA 120 conjugated UCNP@SiO2 in cellular fluorescence imaging was demonstrated.Here, a two-step method has been developed for synthesizing carboxy-terminated NaYF4: Yb3+, Er3+@SiO2 core@shell nanoparticles (UCNP@SiO2) with ultrathin shell (1.5 nm). First, the NaYF4: Yb3+, Er3+ upconverting nanoparticles (UCNPs) were prepared using solvothermal technology; then, silica shells (SiO2) were deposited on the nanocrystals to form core-shell structures by the hydrolysis of tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS). The ultrathin SiO2 shell was obtained by increasing surfactant amount and decreasing TEOS amount in the reaction mixture. Carboxyethylsilanetriol (CTES) was used to generate the carboxy group on the particle surface. The carboxy-terminated UCNP@SiO2 are ideally suited for biolabeling and bioimaging applications because the as-prepared nanoparticles have extreme colloidal and optical stabilities, and the carboxy

  17. Structure of the human MLH1 N-terminus: implications for predisposition to Lynch syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Hong; Zeng, Hong; Lam, Robert; Tempel, Wolfram; Kerr, Iain D.; Min, Jinrong

    2015-07-28

    The crystal structure of the human MLH1 N-terminus is reported at 2.30 Å resolution. The overall structure is described along with an analysis of two clinically important mutations. Mismatch repair prevents the accumulation of erroneous insertions/deletions and non-Watson–Crick base pairs in the genome. Pathogenic mutations in the MLH1 gene are associated with a predisposition to Lynch and Turcot’s syndromes. Although genetic testing for these mutations is available, robust classification of variants requires strong clinical and functional support. Here, the first structure of the N-terminus of human MLH1, determined by X-ray crystallography, is described. The structure shares a high degree of similarity with previously determined prokaryotic MLH1 homologs; however, this structure affords a more accurate platform for the classification of MLH1 variants.

  18. Follistatin N terminus differentially regulates muscle size and fat in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hui; Qiao, Chunping; Tang, Ruhang; Li, Jianbin; Bulaklak, Karen; Huang, Zhenhua; Zhao, Chunxia; Dai, Yi; Li, Juan; Xiao, Xiao

    2017-09-15

    Delivery of follistatin (FST) represents a promising strategy for both muscular dystrophies and diabetes, as FST is a robust antagonist of myostatin and activin, which are critical regulators of skeletal muscle and adipose tissues. FST is a multi-domain protein, and deciphering the function of different domains will facilitate novel designs for FST-based therapy. Our study aims to investigate the role of the N-terminal domain (ND) of FST in regulating muscle and fat mass in vivo. Different FST constructs were created and packaged into the adeno-associated viral vector (AAV). Overexpression of wild-type FST in normal mice greatly increased muscle mass while decreasing fat accumulation, whereas overexpression of an N terminus mutant or N terminus-deleted FST had no effect on muscle mass but moderately decreased fat mass. In contrast, FST-I-I containing the complete N terminus and double domain I without domain II and III had no effect on fat but increased skeletal muscle mass. The effects of different constructs on differentiated C2C12 myotubes were consistent with the in vivo finding. We hypothesized that ND was critical for myostatin blockade, mediating the increase in muscle mass, and was less pivotal for activin binding, which accounts for the decrease in the fat tissue. An in vitro TGF-beta1-responsive reporter assay revealed that FST-I-I and N terminus-mutated or -deleted FST showed differential responses to blockade of activin and myostatin. Our study provided direct in vivo evidence for a role of the ND of FST, shedding light on future potential molecular designs for FST-based gene therapy.

  19. GIPC, a PDZ domain containing protein, interacts specifically with the C terminus of RGS-GAIP

    PubMed Central

    De Vries, Luc; Lou, Xiaojing; Zhao, Grace; Zheng, Bin; Farquhar, Marilyn Gist

    1998-01-01

    We have identified a mammalian protein called GIPC (for GAIP interacting protein, C terminus), which has a central PDZ domain and a C-terminal acyl carrier protein (ACP) domain. The PDZ domain of GIPC specifically interacts with RGS-GAIP, a GTPase-activating protein (GAP) for Gαi subunits recently localized on clathrin-coated vesicles. Analysis of deletion mutants indicated that the PDZ domain of GIPC specifically interacts with the C terminus of GAIP (11 amino acids) in the yeast two-hybrid system and glutathione S-transferase (GST)-GIPC pull-down assays, but GIPC does not interact with other members of the RGS (regulators of G protein signaling) family tested. This finding is in keeping with the fact that the C terminus of GAIP is unique and possesses a modified C-terminal PDZ-binding motif (SEA). By immunoblotting of membrane fractions prepared from HeLa cells, we found that there are two pools of GIPC–a soluble or cytosolic pool (70%) and a membrane-associated pool (30%). By immunofluorescence, endogenous and GFP-tagged GIPC show both a diffuse and punctate cytoplasmic distribution in HeLa cells reflecting, respectively, the existence of soluble and membrane-associated pools. By immunoelectron microscopy the membrane pool of GIPC is associated with clusters of vesicles located near the plasma membrane. These data provide direct evidence that the C terminus of a RGS protein is involved in interactions specific for a given RGS protein and implicates GAIP in regulation of additional functions besides its GAP activity. The location of GIPC together with its binding to GAIP suggest that GAIP and GIPC may be components of a G protein-coupled signaling complex involved in the regulation of vesicular trafficking. The presence of an ACP domain suggests a putative function for GIPC in the acylation of vesicle-bound proteins. PMID:9770488

  20. GIPC, a PDZ domain containing protein, interacts specifically with the C terminus of RGS-GAIP.

    PubMed

    De Vries, L; Lou, X; Zhao, G; Zheng, B; Farquhar, M G

    1998-10-13

    We have identified a mammalian protein called GIPC (for GAIP interacting protein, C terminus), which has a central PDZ domain and a C-terminal acyl carrier protein (ACP) domain. The PDZ domain of GIPC specifically interacts with RGS-GAIP, a GTPase-activating protein (GAP) for Galphai subunits recently localized on clathrin-coated vesicles. Analysis of deletion mutants indicated that the PDZ domain of GIPC specifically interacts with the C terminus of GAIP (11 amino acids) in the yeast two-hybrid system and glutathione S-transferase (GST)-GIPC pull-down assays, but GIPC does not interact with other members of the RGS (regulators of G protein signaling) family tested. This finding is in keeping with the fact that the C terminus of GAIP is unique and possesses a modified C-terminal PDZ-binding motif (SEA). By immunoblotting of membrane fractions prepared from HeLa cells, we found that there are two pools of GIPC-a soluble or cytosolic pool (70%) and a membrane-associated pool (30%). By immunofluorescence, endogenous and GFP-tagged GIPC show both a diffuse and punctate cytoplasmic distribution in HeLa cells reflecting, respectively, the existence of soluble and membrane-associated pools. By immunoelectron microscopy the membrane pool of GIPC is associated with clusters of vesicles located near the plasma membrane. These data provide direct evidence that the C terminus of a RGS protein is involved in interactions specific for a given RGS protein and implicates GAIP in regulation of additional functions besides its GAP activity. The location of GIPC together with its binding to GAIP suggest that GAIP and GIPC may be components of a G protein-coupled signaling complex involved in the regulation of vesicular trafficking. The presence of an ACP domain suggests a putative function for GIPC in the acylation of vesicle-bound proteins.

  1. The N terminus of monoamine transporters is a lever required for the action of amphetamines.

    PubMed

    Sucic, Sonja; Dallinger, Stefan; Zdrazil, Barbara; Weissensteiner, René; Jørgensen, Trine N; Holy, Marion; Kudlacek, Oliver; Seidel, Stefan; Cha, Joo Hwan; Gether, Ulrik; Newman, Amy H; Ecker, Gerhard F; Freissmuth, Michael; Sitte, Harald H

    2010-04-02

    The serotonin transporter (SERT) terminates neurotransmission by removing serotonin from the synaptic cleft. In addition, it is the site of action of antidepressants (which block the transporter) and of amphetamines (which induce substrate efflux). We explored the functional importance of the N terminus in mediating the action of amphetamines by focusing initially on the highly conserved threonine residue at position 81, a candidate site for phosphorylation by protein kinase C. Molecular dynamics simulations of the wild type SERT, compared with its mutations SERT(T81A) and SERT(T81D), suggested structural changes in the inner vestibule indicative of an opening of the inner vestibule. Predictions from this model (e.g. the preferential accumulation of SERT(T81A) in the inward conformation, its reduced turnover number, and a larger distance between its N and C termini) were verified. Most importantly, SERT(T81A) (and the homologous mutations in noradrenaline and dopamine) failed to support amphetamine-induced efflux, and this was not remedied by aspartate at this position. Amphetamine-induced currents through SERT(T81A) were comparable with those through the wild type transporter. Both abundant Na(+) entry and accumulation of SERT(T81A) in the inward facing conformation ought to favor amphetamine-induced efflux. Thus, we surmised that the N terminus must play a direct role in driving the transporter into a state that supports amphetamine-induced efflux. This hypothesis was verified by truncating the first 64 amino acids and by tethering the N terminus to an additional transmembrane helix. Either modification abolished amphetamine-induced efflux. We therefore conclude that the N terminus of monoamine transporters acts as a lever that sustains reverse transport.

  2. The N Terminus of Monoamine Transporters Is a Lever Required for the Action of Amphetamines*

    PubMed Central

    Sucic, Sonja; Dallinger, Stefan; Zdrazil, Barbara; Weissensteiner, René; Jørgensen, Trine N.; Holy, Marion; Kudlacek, Oliver; Seidel, Stefan; Cha, Joo Hwan; Gether, Ulrik; Newman, Amy H.; Ecker, Gerhard F.; Freissmuth, Michael; Sitte, Harald H.

    2010-01-01

    The serotonin transporter (SERT) terminates neurotransmission by removing serotonin from the synaptic cleft. In addition, it is the site of action of antidepressants (which block the transporter) and of amphetamines (which induce substrate efflux). We explored the functional importance of the N terminus in mediating the action of amphetamines by focusing initially on the highly conserved threonine residue at position 81, a candidate site for phosphorylation by protein kinase C. Molecular dynamics simulations of the wild type SERT, compared with its mutations SERTT81A and SERTT81D, suggested structural changes in the inner vestibule indicative of an opening of the inner vestibule. Predictions from this model (e.g. the preferential accumulation of SERTT81A in the inward conformation, its reduced turnover number, and a larger distance between its N and C termini) were verified. Most importantly, SERTT81A (and the homologous mutations in noradrenaline and dopamine) failed to support amphetamine-induced efflux, and this was not remedied by aspartate at this position. Amphetamine-induced currents through SERTT81A were comparable with those through the wild type transporter. Both abundant Na+ entry and accumulation of SERTT81A in the inward facing conformation ought to favor amphetamine-induced efflux. Thus, we surmised that the N terminus must play a direct role in driving the transporter into a state that supports amphetamine-induced efflux. This hypothesis was verified by truncating the first 64 amino acids and by tethering the N terminus to an additional transmembrane helix. Either modification abolished amphetamine-induced efflux. We therefore conclude that the N terminus of monoamine transporters acts as a lever that sustains reverse transport. PMID:20118234

  3. Paired dating of pith and outer edge (terminus) samples from prehispanic Caribbean wooden sculptures

    Treesearch

    Fiona Brock; Joanna Ostapkowicz; Christopher Bronk Ramsey; Alex Wiedenhoeft; Caroline. Cartwright

    2012-01-01

    Radiocarbon dating of historical and archaeological wood can be complicated, sometimes involving issues of “inbuilt” age in slow-growing woods, and/or the possibility of reuse or long delays between felling and use of the wood. Terminus dates can be provided by dating the sapwood, or the outermost edge of heartwood, while a date from the pith can give an indication of...

  4. Structural and Functional Insights into the N-Terminus of Schizosaccharomyces pombe Cdc5

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The spliceosome is a dynamic macromolecular machine composed of five small nuclear ribonucleoparticles (snRNPs), the NineTeen Complex (NTC), and other proteins that catalyze the removal of introns mature to form the mature message. The NTC, named after its founding member Saccharomyces cerevisiae Prp19, is a conserved spliceosome subcomplex composed of at least nine proteins. During spliceosome assembly, the transition to an active spliceosome correlates with stable binding of the NTC, although the mechanism of NTC function is not understood. Schizosaccharomyces pombe Cdc5, a core subunit of the NTC, is an essential protein required for pre-mRNA splicing. The highly conserved Cdc5 N-terminus contains two canonical Myb (myeloblastosis) repeats (R1 and R2) and a third domain (D3) that was previously classified as a Myb-like repeat. Although the N-terminus of Cdc5 is required for its function, how R1, R2, and D3 each contribute to functionality is unclear. Using a combination of yeast genetics, structural approaches, and RNA binding assays, we show that R1, R2, and D3 are all required for the function of Cdc5 in cells. We also show that the N-terminus of Cdc5 binds RNA in vitro. Structural and functional analyses of Cdc5-D3 show that, while this domain does not adopt a Myb fold, Cdc5-D3 preferentially binds double-stranded RNA. Our data suggest that the Cdc5 N-terminus interacts with RNA structures proposed to be near the catalytic core of the spliceosome. PMID:25263959

  5. The N Terminus of FliM Is Essential To Promote Flagellar Rotation in Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    PubMed Central

    Poggio, Sebastian; Osorio, Aurora; Corkidi, Gabriel; Dreyfus, Georges; Camarena, Laura

    2001-01-01

    FliM is part of the flagellar switch complex. Interaction of this protein with phospho-CheY (CheY-P) through its N terminus constitutes the main information relay point between the chemotactic system and the flagellum. In this work, we evaluated the role of the N terminus of FliM in the swimming behavior of Rhodobacter sphaeroides. Strains expressing the FliM protein with substitutions in residues previously reported in Escherichia coli as being important for interaction with CheY showed an increased stop frequency compared with wild-type cells. In accordance, we observed that R. sphaeroides cells expressing FliM lacking either the first 13 or 20 amino acids from the N terminus showed a stopped phenotype. We show evidence that FliMΔ13 and FliMΔ20 are stable proteins and that cells expressing them allow flagellin export at levels indistinguishable from those detected for the wild-type strain. These results suggest that the N-terminal region of FliM is required to promote swimming in this bacterium. The role of CheY in controlling flagellar rotation in this organism is discussed. PMID:11325943

  6. Characterization of Critical Hemodynamics Contributing to Aneurysmal Remodeling at the Basilar Terminus in a Rabbit Model

    PubMed Central

    Metaxa, Eleni; Tremmel, Markus; Natarajan, Sabareesh K; Xiang, Jianping; Paluch, Rocco A.; Mandelbaum, Max; Siddiqui, Adnan H.; Kolega, John; Mocco, J; Meng, Hui

    2010-01-01

    Background and Purpose Hemodynamic insult by bilateral common carotid artery (CCA) ligation has been shown to induce aneurysmal remodeling at the basilar terminus in a rabbit model. To characterize critical hemodynamics that initiate this remodeling, we applied a novel hemodynamics-histology co-mapping technique. Methods Eight rabbits received bilateral CCA ligation to increase basilar artery flow. Three underwent sham operations. Hemodynamic insult at the basilar terminus was assessed by computational fluid dynamics. Bifurcation tissue was harvested on day 5; histology was co-mapped with initial postligation hemodynamic fields of wall shear stress (WSS) and WSS gradient (WSSG). Results All bifurcations showed internal elastic lamina (IEL) loss in periapical regions exposed to accelerating flow with high WSS and positive WSSG. IEL damage happened 100% of the time at locations where WSS>122 Pa and WSSG>530 Pa/mm. The degree of destructive remodeling accounting for IEL loss, medial thinning, and luminal bulging correlated with the magnitude of the hemodynamic insult. Conclusions Aneurysmal remodeling initiates when local hemodynamic forces exceed specific limits at the rabbit basilar terminus. A combination of high WSS and positive WSSG represents “dangerous” hemodynamics likely to induce aneurysmal remodeling. PMID:20595660

  7. N-terminus of the protein kinase CLK1 induces SR protein hyperphosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Aubol, Brandon E; Plocinik, Ryan M; Keshwani, Malik M; McGlone, Maria L; Hagopian, Jonathan C; Ghosh, Gourisankar; Fu, Xiang-Dong; Adams, Joseph A

    2014-08-15

    SR proteins are essential splicing factors that are regulated through multisite phosphorylation of their RS (arginine/serine-rich) domains by two major families of protein kinases. The SRPKs (SR-specific protein kinases) efficiently phosphorylate the arginine/serine dipeptides in the RS domain using a conserved docking groove in the kinase domain. In contrast, CLKs (Cdc2-like kinases) lack a docking groove and phosphorylate both arginine/serine and serine-proline dipeptides, modifications that generate a hyperphosphorylated state important for unique SR protein-dependent splicing activities. All CLKs contain long flexible N-terminal extensions (140-300 residues) that resemble the RS domains present in their substrate SR proteins. We showed that the N-terminus in CLK1 contacts both the kinase domain and the RS domain of the SR protein SRSF1 (SR protein splicing factor 1). This interaction not only is essential for facilitating hyperphosphorylation, but also induces co-operative binding of SRSF1 to RNA. The N-terminus of CLK1 enhances the total phosphoryl contents of a panel of physiological substrates including SRSF1, SRSF2, SRSF5 and Tra2β1 (transformer 2β1) by 2-3-fold. These findings suggest that CLK1-dependent hyperphosphorylation is the result of a general mechanism in which the N-terminus acts as a bridge connecting the kinase domain and the RS domain of the SR protein.

  8. N-Terminus of the Protein Kinase CLK1 Induces SR Protein Hyper-Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Aubol, Brandon E.; Plocinik, Ryan M.; Keshwani, Malik M.; McGlone, Maria L.; Hagopian, Jonathan C.; Ghosh, Gourisankar; Fu, Xiang-Dong; Adams, Joseph A.

    2016-01-01

    SR proteins are essential splicing factors that are regulated through multisite phosphorylation of their RS (arginine-serine-rich) domains by two major families of protein kinases. The SRPKs efficiently phosphorylate the arginine-serine dipeptides in the RS domain using a conserved docking groove in the kinase domain. In contrast, CLKs lack a docking groove and phosphorylate both arginine-serine and serine-proline dipeptides, modifications that generate a hyper-phosphorylated state important for unique SR protein-dependent splicing activities. All CLKs contain long, flexible N-terminal extensions (140-300 residues) that resemble the RS domains present in their substrate SR proteins. We showed that the N-terminus in CLK1 contacts both the kinase domain and the RS domain of the SR protein SRSF1. This interaction not only is essential for facilitating hyper-phosphorylation but also induces cooperative binding of SRSF1 to RNA. The N-terminus of CLK1 enhances the total phosphoryl contents of a panel of physiological substrates including SRSF1, SRSF2, SRSF5 and Tra2β1 by 2–3-fold. These findings suggest that CLK1-dependent hyper-phosphorylation is the result of a general mechanism in which the N-terminus acts as a bridge connecting the kinase domain and the RS domain of the SR protein. PMID:24869919

  9. Isolation of S-[2-carboxy-1-(1H-imidazol-4-yl)ethyl]cysteine from human urine.

    PubMed Central

    Kinuta, M; Ubuka, T; Yao, K; Futani, S; Fujiwara, M; Kurozumi, Y

    1992-01-01

    S-[2-Carboxy-1-(1H-imidazol-4-yl)ethyl]cysteine (I), a proposed precursor of 3-[(carboxymethyl)thio]-3-(1H-imidazol-4-yl)propanoic acid [Kinuta, Yao, Masuoka, Ohta, Teraoka & Ubuka (1991) Biochem. J. 275, 617-721], was isolated from healthy human urine by using ion-exchange column chromatography. Identification of the isolated compound with compound (I) was performed by physicochemical analyses involving i.r., m.s. and n.m.r. spectrometries as well as high-voltage paper electrophoresis, t.l.c. and paper chromatography. Compound (I) was synthesized in 80% yield by incubation of a reaction mixture containing trans-urocanic acid and 3-fold excess of cysteine at 70-75 degrees C. From these results we suggest that natural thiol compounds such as cysteine and GSH participate in the metabolism of urocanic acid, a key metabolite of L-histidine. PMID:1567378

  10. The Med proteins of yeast and their function through the RNA polymerase II carboxy-terminal domain.

    PubMed

    Myers, L C; Gustafsson, C M; Bushnell, D A; Lui, M; Erdjument-Bromage, H; Tempst, P; Kornberg, R D

    1998-01-01

    Mediator was resolved from yeast as a multiprotein complex on the basis of its requirement for transcriptional activation in a fully defined system. Three groups of mediator polypeptides could be distinguished: the products of five SRB genes, identified as suppressors of carboxy-terminal domain (CTD)-truncation mutants; products of four genes identified as global repressors; and six members of a new protein family, termed Med, thought to be primarily responsible for transcriptional activation. Notably absent from the purified mediator were Srbs 8, 9, 10, and 11, as well as members of the SWI/SNF complex. The CTD was required for function of mediator in vitro, in keeping with previous indications of involvement of the CTD in transcriptional activation in vivo. Evidence for human homologs of several mediator proteins, including Med7, points to similar mechanisms in higher cells.

  11. Crystallization of the carboxy-terminal region of the bacteriophage T4 proximal long tail fibre protein gp34.

    PubMed

    Granell, Meritxell; Namura, Mikiyoshi; Alvira, Sara; Garcia-Doval, Carmela; Singh, Abhimanyu K; Gutsche, Irina; van Raaij, Mark J; Kanamaru, Shuji

    2014-07-01

    The phage-proximal part of the long tail fibres of bacteriophage T4 consists of a trimer of the 1289 amino-acid gene product 34 (gp34). Different carboxy-terminal parts of gp34 have been produced and crystallized. Crystals of gp34(726-1289) diffracting X-rays to 2.9 Å resolution, crystals of gp34(781-1289) diffracting to 1.9 Å resolution and crystals of gp34(894-1289) diffracting to 3.0 and 2.0 Å resolution and belonging to different crystal forms were obtained. Native data were collected for gp34(726-1289) and gp34(894-1289), while single-wavelength anomalous diffraction data were collected for selenomethionine-containing gp34(781-1289) and gp34(894-1289). For the latter, high-quality anomalous signal was obtained.

  12. Design and synthesis of α-carboxy nucleoside phosphonate analogues and evaluation as HIV-1 reverse transcriptase-targeting agents.

    PubMed

    Keane, Sarah J; Ford, Alan; Mullins, Nicholas D; Maguire, Nuala M; Legigan, Thibaut; Balzarini, Jan; Maguire, Anita R

    2015-03-06

    The synthesis of the first series of a new class of nucleoside phosphonate analogues is described. Addition of a carboxyl group at the α position of carbocyclic nucleoside phosphonate analogues leads to a novel class of potent HIV reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors, α-carboxy nucleoside phosphonates (α-CNPs). Key steps in the synthesis of the compounds are Rh-catalyzed O-H insertion and Pd-catalyzed allylation reactions. In cell-free assays, the final products are markedly inhibitory against HIV RT and do not require phosphorylation to exhibit anti-RT activity, which indicates that the α-carboxyphosphonate function is efficiently recognized by HIV RT as a triphosphate entity, an unprecedented property of nucleoside monophosph(on)ates.

  13. NMR resonance assignments for the tetramethylrhodamine binding RNA aptamer 3 in complex with the ligand 5-carboxy-tetramethylrhodamine.

    PubMed

    Duchardt-Ferner, Elke; Juen, Michael; Kreutz, Christoph; Wöhnert, Jens

    2017-04-01

    RNA aptamers are used in a wide range of biotechnological or biomedical applications. In many cases the high resolution structures of these aptamers in their ligand-complexes have revealed fundamental aspects of RNA folding and RNA small molecule interactions. Fluorescent RNA-ligand complexes in particular find applications as optical sensors or as endogenous fluorescent tags for RNA tracking in vivo. Structures of RNA aptamers and aptamer ligand complexes constitute the starting point for rational function directed optimization approaches. Here, we present the NMR resonance assignment of an RNA aptamer binding to the fluorescent ligand tetramethylrhodamine (TMR) in complex with the ligand 5-carboxy-tetramethylrhodamine (5-TAMRA) as a starting point for a high-resolution structure determination using NMR spectroscopy in solution.

  14. The first contribution of capillary electrophoresis to the study of abiotic origins of homochirality: investigation of the enantioselective adsorption of 3-carboxy adipic acid on minerals.

    PubMed

    Castro-Puyana, María; Salgado, Antonio; Hazen, Robert M; Crego, Antonio L; Alegre, María Luisa Marina

    2008-04-01

    CE with UV detection was used for the first time to determine the enantioselective adsorption of the short-chain tricarboxylic acid, 3-carboxy adipic acid, on minerals as a mean of investigating plausible mechanisms for the origin of biochemical homochirality on Earth. The use of vancomycine as chiral selector in the separation buffer using the partial filling technique enabled the separation of the two enantiomers of this organic acid in about 12 min. Taking into account that this compound has a low absorption of the UV light, and in order to achieve the sensitivity needed to determine the enantiomeric excess of samples of 3-carboxy adipic acid adsorbed on minerals, we applied a strategy consisting of a field-amplified sample stacking together with the use of a bubble capillary and detection at low wavelength (192 nm). This combination enabled an LOD of about 10(-7) M and the determination of the enantiomeric excess of 3-carboxy adipic acid adsorbed on calcite and feldspar mineral samples at subnanomol levels of this acid. Results showed that an enantioselective adsorption of the enantiomers of 3-carboxy adipic acid on minerals took place.

  15. General approach for the stereocontrolled construction of the beta-lactam ring in amino acid-derived 4-alkyl-4-carboxy-2-azetidinones.

    PubMed

    Gerona-Navarro, Guillermo; García-López, M Teresa; González-Muñiz, Rosario

    2002-05-31

    The first general approach toward the asymmetric synthesis of 4-alkyl-4-carboxy-2-azetidinones derived from amino acids is described. The stereoselective construction of the beta-lactam ring was achieved through base-mediated intramolecular cyclization of the corresponding N(alpha)-chloroacetyl derivatives bearing (+)- or (-)-10-(N,N-dicyclohexylsulfamoyl)isoborneol as chiral auxiliary (ee up to 82%).

  16. Function of the cytosolic N-terminus of sucrose transporter AtSUT2 in substrate affinity.

    PubMed

    Schulze, W; Weise, A; Frommer, W B; Ward, J M

    2000-11-24

    AtSUT2 was found to be a low-affinity sucrose transporter (K(M)=11.7 mM at pH 4). Chimeric proteins between AtSUT2 and the high-affinity StSUT1 were constructed in which the extended N-terminus and central loop of AtSUT2 were exchanged with those domains of StSUT1 and vice versa. Chimeras containing the N-terminus of AtSUT2 showed significantly lower affinity for sucrose compared to chimeras containing the N-terminus of StSUT1. The results indicate a significant function of the N-terminus but not the central cytoplasmic loop in determining substrate affinity. Expression of AtSUT2 in major veins of source leaves and in flowers is compatible with a role as a second low-affinity sucrose transporter or as a sucrose sensor.

  17. Location of the Bacteriophage P22 Coat Protein C-terminus Provides Opportunities for the Design of Capsid Based Materials

    PubMed Central

    Servid, Amy; Jordan, Paul; O’Neil, Alison; Prevelige, Peter; Douglas, Trevor

    2013-01-01

    Rational design of modifications to the interior and exterior surfaces of virus-like particles (VLPs) for future therapeutic and materials applications is based on structural information about the capsid. Existing cryo-electron microscopy based models suggest that the C-terminus of the bacteriophage P22 coat protein (CP) extends towards the capsid exterior. Our biochemical analysis through genetic manipulations of the C-terminus supports the model where the CP C-terminus is exposed on the exterior of the P22 capsid. Capsids displaying a 6xHis tag appended to the CP C-terminus bind to a Ni affinity column, and the addition of positively or negatively charged coiled coil peptides to the capsid results in association of these capsids upon mixing. Additionally, a single cysteine appended to the CP C-terminus results in the formation of intercapsid disulfide bonds and can serve as a site for chemical modifications. Thus, the C-terminus is a powerful location for multivalent display of peptides that facilitate nanoscale assembly and capsid modification. PMID:23957641

  18. Prediction of bone mass in renal hyperparathyroidism by newly developed bone metabolic markers: evaluation of serum levels of carboxy-terminal pyridinoline cross-linked telopeptide of type I collagen and carboxy-terminal propeptide of type I procollagen.

    PubMed

    Katagiri, M; Fukunaga, M; Ohtawa, T; Harada, T

    1996-09-01

    Serum levels of the carboxy-terminal pyridinoline cross-linked telopeptide of type I collagen (ICTP) and the carboxy-terminal propeptide of type I procollagen (PICP) were measured in 95 patients with renal hyperparathyroidism who had undergone a total parathyroidectomy and autotransplantation of a small portion of the resected gland. The results were compared with the serum levels of other bone metabolic markers and bone mineral densities in the distal radius (R-BMD) and lumbar vertebrae (L-BMD), which were measured by dual energy x-ray absorptiometry and converted to the percentage of the mean value of sex- and age-matched healthy controls. The preoperative mean values of ICTP and PICP were 142.4 ng/ml and 187.8 ng/ml, respectively. Although the serum levels of PICP levels exceeded the normal range in 42.1% of the patients, those of ICTP exceeded it in all of them. The serum levels of ICTP correlated positively not only with those of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRACP), total alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and osteocalcin but also negatively with the values of %R-BMD and %L-BMD and seemed to manifest specifically the disturbance of bone metabolism. On the other hand, the serum levels of PICP correlated with those of ALP and TRACP but not with values of %BMDs. After surgery, the serum levels of ICTP decreased gradually, but those of PICP increased immediately up to peak values at 7 days and then decreased gradually after 14 days, reaching the normal range at 3 months. These changes in the bone metabolic markers seemed to reflect the change in bone metabolism that was converting from bone resorption to bone formation. The percent change in the PICP/ICTP ratio at 7 days correlated significantly with the percent change in R-BMD at 12 months, and it was suggested that postoperative bone gain might be predicted using a combination of postoperative changes in PICP and ICTP.

  19. The structure and orientation of the C-terminus of LRAP

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, Wendy J.; Ferris, Kim F.; Tarasevich, Barbara J.; Larson, Jenna L.

    2008-04-15

    Amelogenin is the predominant protein found during enamel development. The formation of amelogenin into nanosphere quaternary structures is thought to control the unique elongated hydroxyapatite crystals that constitute enamel. Consequently, the secondary structure of the protein will be important in the formation of the nanosphere, as well as in the interaction with hydroxyapatite, by revealing or concealing critical amino acids. Unfortunately, very little data is available on the structure or the orientation of the protein, either in solution or bound to hydroxyapatite. Here, we used solid state NMR techniques to investigate the structure and orientation of the C-terminus of LRAP, a naturally occurring splice variant of full length amelogenin. The structure of the C-terminus showed a largely random coil or extended structure, both on the surface of hydroxyapatite as well as lyophilized from solution. The orientation of the C-terminal region with respect to HAP was investigated for 2 alanine residues (Ala46 and Ala49) and one lysine residue (Lys52). The sidechain terminal methyl or amine group of the residues examined were found to be 7, 6 and 6 Å from the surface of hydroxyapatite, for Ala46 Ala49 and Lys52 respectively, providing direct evidence that the charged C-terminus is interacting closely with hydroxyapatite. However, the C-terminal region was also found to have medium to large frequency and amplitude dynamics, both in the sidechains and in the backbone, suggesting that this region alone is not responsible for binding. The data is discussed in terms of a binding mechanism. This work was supported by NIH-NIDCR Grant DE-015347 and was performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, operated by Battelle for the US-DOE.

  20. Discovery of pyrazole as C-terminus of selective BACE1 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yiquan; Xu, Lei; Chen, Wuyan; Zhu, Yiping; Chen, Tiantian; Fu, Yan; Li, Li; Ma, Lanping; Xiong, Bing; Wang, Xin; Li, Jian; He, Jianhua; Zhang, Haiyan; Xu, Yechun; Li, Jia; Shen, Jingkang

    2013-10-01

    We recently discovered and reported dual inhibitor 5 of AChE and BACE1 with N-benzylpiperidine ethyl as C-terminus. Compound 5 showed potent inhibitory activities for BACE1, and could reduce endogenous Aβ1-40 production in APP transgenic mice. In present work, we rapidly identified substituted triazole as the C-terminus of compound 5 by replacing the benzylpiperidine ethyl group with click chemistry and tested these synthesized compounds by in situ screening assay. As revealed by the crystal structures of BACE1 in complex with our triazole compound 12, we found that Pro70 and Thr72 located in the flap region were the critical components for binding with these inhibitors. With the aid of the crystal structure, a new series of five-membered heterocyclic compounds was prepared in order to explore the structure-activity relationship (SAR) of this class of molecules. From these efforts, pyrazole was discovered as a novel C-terminus of BACE1 inhibitors. After further modification of pyrazole with variable substituents, compound 37 exhibited good potency in enzyme inhibition assay (IC50=0.025 μM) and compound 33 showed moderate inhibition effects on Aβ production of APP transfected HEK293 cells. Moreover, these pyrazole derivatives demonstrated good selectivity versus cathepsin D. Our results indicated that the vicinity of Pro70 and Thr72 might be utilized as a subsite, and the discovered pyrazole derivatives might provide useful hints for developing novel BACE1 inhibitors as anti-AD drugs.

  1. Role of the N-terminus in the structure and stability of chicken annexin V.

    PubMed

    Arboledas, D; Olmo, N; Lizarbe, M A; Turnay, J

    1997-10-20

    The role of the short N-terminal region of chicken annexin V in the maintenance of the protein structure and its influence in the conformation of the calcium binding regions was analyzed. The N-terminal domain is not essential for protein folding, wild-type and dnt-annexin V showing almost identical secondary structures. However, the partial truncation of the N-terminus significantly decreases the melting temperature of the protein and induces the partial exposure of Trp187 which is normally located in a hydrophobic pocket of the calcium binding region of domain 3 of annexin V in the Ca2+-free form.

  2. The precursor strategy: terminus methoxyoxalamido modifiers for single and multiple functionalization of oligodeoxyribonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Polushin, Nikolai N.

    2000-01-01

    Synthesis of new terminus modifiers, bearing, along with a phosphoramidite moiety, one, two or four methoxyoxalamido (MOX) precursor groups, is described. These modifiers are introduced onto the 5′-end of a synthetic oligodeoxyribonucleotide as the last step of an automated synthesis to form the MOX precursor oligonucleotide. The MOX groups are then post-synthetically derivatized with an appropriate primary amine to construct a 5′-modified oligonucleotide. The efficiency and simplicity of the novel modifying strategy were demonstrated in the synthesis of a number of 5′-functionalized oligonucleotides. PMID:10931928

  3. Human Foamy Virus Capsid Formation Requires an Interaction Domain in the N Terminus of Gag

    PubMed Central

    Tobaly-Tapiero, Joelle; Bittoun, Patricia; Giron, Marie-Lou; Neves, Manuel; Koken, Marcel; Saïb, Ali; de Thé, Hugues

    2001-01-01

    Retroviral Gag expression is sufficient for capsid assembly, which occurs through interaction between distinct Gag domains. Human foamy virus (HFV) capsids assemble within the cytoplasm, although their budding, which mainly occurs in the endoplasmic reticulum, requires the presence of homologous Env. Yet little is known about the molecular basis of HFV Gag precursor assembly. Using fusions between HFV Gag and a nuclear reporter protein, we have identified a strong interaction domain in the N terminus of HFV Gag which is predicted to contain a conserved coiled-coil motif. Deletion within this region in an HFV provirus abolishes viral production through inhibition of capsid assembly. PMID:11287585

  4. Tool for Insertion of a Fiber-Optic Terminus in a Connector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Wes; Domonoske, Donald J.; Krier, John; White, John

    2004-01-01

    A tool has been developed for the special purpose of inserting the terminus of an optical fiber in a cable connector that conforms to NASA Specification SSQ- 21635. What prompted the development of the tool was the observation that because of some aspects of the designs of fiber-optic termini and of springs, sealing rings, and a grommet inside the shell of such a connector, there is a tendency for the grommet to become damaged and detached from the sealing rings during installation. It is necessary to ensure the integrity of the grommet for proper sealing and proper functioning of the connector. The special-purpose tool provides the needed protection for the grommet. The grommet-protection tool resembles a funnel into which an axial slit has been cut (see figure). Prior to insertion, the grommet-protection tool is rolled so that one side of the slit overlaps the other side. The rolled-up grommet-protection tool is inserted in one of the connector holes that accommodate the fiber-optic termini and is pushed in until the flange (the wider of the two conical portions) of the tool becomes seated on the connector grommet. Then a special-purpose installation tool is inserted in the flange of the grommet-protection tool and pressed in until it becomes seated in the flange. This operation expands the narrower of the two conical portions of the grommet-protection tool. The installation tool is removed and the grommet-protection tool remains expanded due to the flat surfaces on the axial slit. By use of a standard contact-insertion tool, a fiber-optic terminus is inserted, through the grommet-protection tool, into the connector cavity. By use of a pair of forceps or needle-nose pliers, the grommet-protection tool is then pulled out of the cavity. Finally, the grommet-protection tool is removed from around the installed fiber-optic cable by pulling the cable through the axial slit. Unlike in some prior procedures for installing the fiber-optic termini in the connector, the

  5. Structure of the human MLH1 N-terminus: implications for predisposition to Lynch syndrome

    DOE PAGES

    Wu, Hong; Zeng, Hong; Lam, Robert; ...

    2015-08-01

    Mismatch repair prevents the accumulation of erroneous insertions/deletions and non-Watson–Crick base pairs in the genome. Pathogenic mutations in theMLH1gene are associated with a predisposition to Lynch and Turcot's syndromes. Although genetic testing for these mutations is available, robust classification of variants requires strong clinical and functional support. Here, the first structure of the N-terminus of human MLH1, determined by X-ray crystallography, is described. Lastly, the structure shares a high degree of similarity with previously determined prokaryoticMLH1homologs; however, this structure affords a more accurate platform for the classification ofMLH1variants.

  6. The role of the Cx43 C-terminus in GJ plaque formation and internalization

    SciTech Connect

    Wayakanon, Praween; Bhattacharjee, Rajib; Nakahama, Ken-ichi; Morita, Ikuo

    2012-04-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cx43-GFP or -DsRed fusion proteins were expressed in HeLa cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Roles of C-terminus were examined using various mutants. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Gap junction plaque size was dependent on the length of C-terminus. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer C-terminus dependent gap junction plaque internalization was observed. -- Abstract: Connexin 43 (Cx43) is a major gap junction (GJ) protein found in many mammalian cell types. The C-terminal (CT) domain of Cx43 has unique characteristics in terms of amino acid (aa) sequence and its length differs from other connexins. This CT domain can be associated with protein partners to regulate GJ assembly and degradation, which results in the direct control of gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC). However, the essential roles of the CT regions involved in these mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. In this study, we aimed to investigate the specific regions of Cx43CT involved in GJ formation and internalization. Wild type Cx43{sub (382aa)} and 10 CT truncated mutants were stably expressed in HeLa cells as GFP or DsRed tagged proteins. First, we found that the deletion of 235-382aa from Cx43 resulted in failure to make GJ and establish GJIC. Second, the Cx43 with 242-382aa CT deletion could form functional GJs and be internalized as annular gap junctions (AGJs). However, the plaques consisting of Cx43 with CT deletions ({Delta}242-382aa to {Delta}271-382aa) were longer than the plaques consisting of Cx43 with CT deletions ({Delta}302-382aa). Third, co-culture experiments of cells expressing wild type Cx43{sub (382)} with cells expressing Cx43CT mutants revealed that the directions of GJ internalization were dependent on the length of the respective CT. Moreover, a specific region, 325-342aa residues of Cx43, played an important role in the direction of GJ internalization. These results showed the important roles of the Cx43 C-terminus in GJ

  7. The conformational flexibility of the carboxy terminal residues 105–114 is a key modulator of the catalytic activity and stability of Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor (MIF)†

    PubMed Central

    El-Turk, Farah; Cascella, Michele; Ouertatani-Sakouhi, Hajer; Narayanan, Raghavendran Lakshmi; Leng, Lin; Bucala, Richard; Hweckstetter, Markus; Rothlisberger, Ursula; Lashuel, Hilal A.

    2013-01-01

    carboxy terminus of a neighbouring monomer, play critical roles in modulating tertiary structure stabilization, enzymatic activity, and thermodynamic stability of MIF, but not its oligomerization state and receptor binding properties. Our results suggest that targeting the C-terminal region could provide new strategies for allosteric modulation of MIF enzymatic activity and the development of novel inhibitors of MIF tautomerase activity. PMID:18795803

  8. Comparison of the functional differences for the homologous residues within the carboxy phosphate and carbamate domains of carbamoyl phosphate synthetase.

    PubMed

    Javid-Majd, F; Stapleton, M A; Harmon, M F; Hanks, B A; Mullins, L S; Raushel, F M

    1996-11-12

    Carbamoyl phosphate synthetase (CPS) from Escherichia coli catalyzes the formation of carbamoyl phosphate from two molecules of MgATP, bicarbonate, and glutamine. It has been previously shown that the amino- and carboxy-terminal halves of the large subunit of this protein are homologous. A working model for the active site structure of the carboxy-terminal domain of the large subunit of CPS was constructed based upon amino acid sequence alignments and the previously determined three-dimensional structures of two mechanistically related proteins, biotin carboxylase and D-alanine:D-alanine ligase. The model was tested by mutation of ten amino acid residues predicted to be important for binding and/or catalysis. The mutated residues were as follows: R571, R675, R715, D753, E761, N827, Q829, E841, N843, and R845. The mutant proteins were expressed, purified to homogeneity and the catalytic properties determined for a variety of assay formats. The mutants E761A, E841Q, N843D, and R845Q were diminished in their ability to synthesize carbamoyl phosphate. The R715A, Q829A, and R675A mutants displayed elevated Michaelis constants for MgADP in the partial back reaction. The mutants E761A, N827A, E841Q, N843D, and R845Q showed significant increases in the Michaelis constants for either bicarbonate or carbamoyl phosphate. No significant alterations were noted upon mutation of either R571 or D753 to an alanine residue and thus these amino acids do not appear essential for structure or catalytic activity. These results have been utilized to further support the proposal that the C-terminal half of the large subunit of CPS is primarily responsible for the phosphorylation of the carbamate intermediate during the final formation of carbamoyl phosphate. The measured effects on the catalyic activities displayed by these mutations were found to be comparable to the previously determined effects after mutation of the homologous residues located on the N-terminal half of CPS and also for

  9. Effects of carboxy methyl cellulose and thymol + carvacrol on performance, digesta viscosity and some blood metabolites of broilers.

    PubMed

    Hashemipour, H; Kermanshahi, H; Golian, A; Khaksar, V

    2014-08-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of thymol + carvacrol as plant essential oils on performance, digesta viscosity and some blood metabolites of broilers fed diets supplemented with carboxy methyl cellulose (CMC) and/or thymol+carvacrol. In a completely randomized design with a 2 × 3 factorial arrangement, two levels of CMC (0% and 2%) and three levels of thymol+carvacrol (0, 100 and 200 mg/kg) were used. Each of the six dietary treatments was fed to five replicate pens of 12 birds each from 0 to 42 days of age. Body weight gain (BWG), feed intake, feed conversion ratio (FCR), intestinal digesta viscosity and pH, plasma lipids and some blood metabolites were recorded. The inclusion of 2% CMC decreased (p < 0.05) BWG by 2.2% and increased FCR by 2.3% at 42 days of age. Carboxy methyl cellulose significantly increased the digesta viscosity and decreased serum total cholesterol, but had no significant effect on triglyceride, pH, HDL, LDL and other blood metabolites measured in this experiment. Thymol+carvacrol had no effect on feed intake, but significantly increased (p < 0.05) BWG from 1 to 42 days of age and improved FCR (p < 0.05) by the addition of 100 and 200 mg/kg thymol+carvacrol respectively. Inclusion of thymol+carvacrol at levels of 100 and 200 mg/kg in the diets decreased digesta viscosity and serum total cholesterol (p < 0.05) and also increased AST at a 200 mg/kg thymol+carvacrol without any effect on creatine kinase (CK). Thymol+carvacrol significantly increased total protein (TP), albumin and globulin (p < 0.05). In conclusion, CMC at an inclusion level of 2% of diet increased digesta viscosity and reduced growth performance. However, thymol+carvacrol decreased digesta viscosity and consequently improved the performance of broilers fed the CMC-based diet. Therefore, thymol+carvacrol addition to viscose-based diets might be helpful to alleviate the negative effects of viscous compounds in poultry diets.

  10. Structural and Functional Properties of Peptides Based on the N-terminus of HIV-1 gp41 and the C-terminus of the Amyloid-Beta Protein

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Larry M.; Nisthal, Alex; Lee, Andy B.; Eskandari, Sepehr; Ruchala, Piotr; Jung, Chun-Ling; Waring, Alan J.; Mobley, Patrick W.

    2008-01-01

    Given their high alanine and glycine levels, plaque formation, α-helix to β-sheet interconversion and fusogenicity, FP (i.e., the N-terminal fusion peptide of HIV-1 gp41; 23 residues) and amyloids were proposed as belonging to the same protein superfamily. Here, we further test whether FP may exhibit ‘amyloid-like’ characteristics, by contrasting its structural and functional properties with those of Aβ(26–42), a 17-residue peptide from the C-terminus of the amyloid-beta protein responsible for Alzheimer’s. FTIR spectroscopy, electron microscopy, light scattering and predicted amyloid structure aggregation (PASTA) indicated that aqueous FP and Aβ(26–42) formed similar networked β-sheet fibrils, although the FP fibril interactions were weaker. FP and Aβ(26–42) both lysed and aggregated human erythrocytes, with the hemolysis-onsets correlated with the conversion of α-helix to β-sheet for each peptide in liposomes. Congo red (CR), a marker of amyloid plaques in situ, similarly inhibited either FP- or Aβ(26–42)-induced hemolysis, and surface plasmon resonance indicated that this may be due to direct CR-peptide binding. These findings suggest that membrane-bound β-sheets of FP may contribute to the cytopathicity of HIV in vivo through an amyloid-type mechanism, and support the classification of HIV-1 FP as an ‘amyloid homolog’ (or ‘amylog’). PMID:18515070

  11. Conserved arginine residues in the carboxyl terminus of the equine arteritis virus E protein may play a role in heparin binding but may not affect viral infectivity in equine endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhengchun; Sarkar, Sanjay; Zhang, Jianqiang; Balasuriya, Udeni B R

    2016-04-01

    Equine arteritis virus (EAV), the causative agent of equine viral arteritis, has relatively broad cell tropism in vitro. In horses, EAV primarily replicates in macrophages and endothelial cells of small blood vessels. Until now, neither the cellular receptor(s) nor the mechanism(s) of virus attachment and entry have been determined for this virus. In this study, we investigated the effect of heparin on EAV infection in equine endothelial cells (EECs). Heparin, but not other glycosaminoglycans, could reduce EAV infection up to 93 %. Sequence analysis of the EAV E minor envelope protein revealed a conserved amino acid sequence (52 RSLVARCSRGARYR 65) at the carboxy terminus of the E protein, which was predicted to be the heparin-binding domain. The basic arginine (R) amino acid residues were subsequently mutated to glycine by site-directed mutagenesis of ORF2a in an E protein expression vector and an infectious cDNA clone of EAV. Two single mutations in E (R52G and R57G) did not affect the heparin-binding capability, whereas the E double mutation (R52,60G) completely eliminated the interaction between the E protein and heparin. Although the mutant R52,60G EAV did not bind heparin, the mutations did not completely abolish infectivity, indicating that heparin is not the only critical factor for EAV infection. This also suggested that other viral envelope protein(s) might be involved in attachment through heparin or other cell-surface molecules, and this warrants further investigation.

  12. Both carboxy-terminal tails of alpha- and beta-tubulin are essential, but either one will suffice.

    PubMed

    Duan, Jianming; Gorovsky, Martin A

    2002-02-19

    Microtubules (MTs) are organized into distinct systems essential for cell shape, movement, intracellular transport, and division. Electron crystallographic analyses provide little information about how MTs produce diverse structures and functions, perhaps because they failed to visualize the last 10 residues of the alpha- and the last 18 of the beta-tubulin C-terminal tails (CTTs), which likely play a role in MT diversity. CTTs define conserved, nonallelic isotypes in mammals, are major sites of posttranslational modifications (PTMs), are binding sites for microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs), and determine MT motor processivity. Using mutagenesis and homologous gene replacement in Tetrahymena thermophila, we analyzed mutations, deletions, tail switches, and tail duplications of alpha- and beta-tubulin CTTs. We demonstrate that a tail is required for the essential function of both alpha- and beta-tubulin. However, the two tails are interchangeable, and cells grow normally with either an alpha or a beta tail on both tubulins. In addition, an alpha gene containing a duplicated alpha C terminus rescues a lethal mutant lacking all known posttranslational modification sites on the beta C terminus but cannot rescue deletion of the beta tail. Thus, tubulin tails have a second essential function that is not associated with posttranslational modification.

  13. Glacier terminus fluctuations on Mt. Baker, Washington, USA, 1940-1990, and climatic variations

    SciTech Connect

    Harper, J.T. )

    1993-11-01

    The terminus positions of six glaciers located on Mount Baker, Washington, were mapped by photogrammetric techniques at 2- to 7-yr intervals for the period 1940-1990. Although the timing varied slightly, each of the glaciers experienced a similar fluctuation sequence consisting of three phases: (1) rapid retreat, beginning prior to 1940 and lasting through the late 1940s to early 1950s; (2) approximately 30 yr of advance, ending in the late 1970s to early 1980s; (3) retreat though 1990. Terminus positions changed by up to 750 m during phases, with the advance phase increasing the lengths of glaciers by 13 to 24%. These fluctuations are well explained by variations in a smoothed time-series of accumulation-season precipitation and ablation-season mean temperature. The study glaciers appear to respond to interannual scale changes in climate within 20 yr or less. The glaciers on Mount Baker have a maritime location and a large percentage of area at high elevation, which may make their termini undergo greater fluctuations in response to climatic changes, especially precipitation variations, than most other glaciers in the North Cascades region. 40 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Chemo-spectroscopic sensor for carboxyl terminus overexpressed in carcinoma cell membrane.

    PubMed

    Stanca, Sarmiza E; Matthäus, Christian; Neugebauer, Ute; Nietzsche, Sandor; Fritzsche, Wolfgang; Dellith, Jan; Heintzmann, Rainer; Weber, Karina; Deckert, Volker; Krafft, Christoph; Popp, Jürgen

    2015-10-01

    Certain carboxyl groups of the plasma membrane are involved in tumorgenesis processes. A gold core-hydroxyapatite shell (AuHA) nanocomposite is introduced as chemo-spectroscopic sensor to monitor these carboxyl groups of the cell membrane. Hydroxyapatite (HA) plays the role both of a chemical detector and of a biocompatible Raman marker. The principle of detection is based on chemical interaction between the hydroxyl groups of the HA and the carboxyl terminus of the proteins. The AuHA exhibits a surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) signal at 954 cm(-1) which can be used for its localization. The bio-sensing capacity of AuHA towards human skin epidermoid carcinoma (A431) and Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell lines is investigated using Raman microspectroscopic imaging. The localization of AuHA on cells is correlated with scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and structured illumination fluorescence microscopy. This qualitative approach is a step towards a quantitative study of the proteins terminus. This method would enable further studies on the molecular profiling of the plasma membrane, in an attempt to provide accurate cell identification. Using a gold core-hydroxyapatite shell (AuHA) nanocomposite, the authors in this paper showed the feasibility of detecting and differentiating cell surface molecules by surface enhanced Raman scattering. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Subcellular localization of RNAs in transfected cells: role of sequences at the 5' terminus.

    PubMed Central

    Alfonso-Pizarro, A; Carlson, D P; Ross, J

    1984-01-01

    We have investigated the intracellular location of RNAs transcribed from transfected DNA. COS cells transfected with a clone containing the human adult beta globin gene contain three classes of globin RNAs. Their 3' termini and splice sites are indistinguishable from those of mature reticulocyte beta globin mRNA, and they are polyadenylated. However, as determined by S1 mapping, their 5' sequences are different. The 5' terminus of one is the same as that of mature beta globin mRNA (+1, cap site). The presumed 5' terminus of the second is located 30 nucleotides downstream from the cap site (+30). The third class contains additional nucleotides transcribed from sequences located 5' to the cap site (5' upstream RNA). The 5' upstream RNA molecules are restricted to the nucleus and are more stable than heterogeneous nuclear RNA. The +30 and +1 RNAs are located primarily in the cytoplasm. The data support the notion that nucleotide sequences and/or secondary modifications in the 5' region determine if an RNA is to be transported. Images PMID:6209612

  16. The C-terminus of IGFBP-5 suppresses tumor growth by inhibiting angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jae Ryoung; Cho, Young-Jae; Lee, Yoonna; Park, Youngmee; Han, Hee Dong; Ahn, Hyung Jun; Lee, Je-Ho; Lee, Jeong-Won

    2016-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 5 (IGFBP-5) plays a role in cell growth, differentiation, and apoptosis. In this study, we found that IGFBP5 was markedly downregulated in ovarian cancer tissue. We investigated the functional significance of IGFBP-5 as a tumor suppressor. To determine functional regions of IGFBP-5, truncation mutants were prepared and were studied the effect on tumor growth. Expression of C-terminal region of IGFBP-5 significantly decreased tumor growth in an ovarian cancer xenograft. A peptide derived from the C-terminus of IGFBP-5 (BP5-C) was synthesized to evaluate the minimal amino acid motif that retained anti-tumorigenic activity and its effect on angiogenesis was studied. BP5-C peptide decreased the expression of VEGF-A and MMP-9, phosphorylation of Akt and ERK, and NF-kB activity, and inhibited angiogenesis in in vitro and ex vivo systems. Furthermore, BP5-C peptide significantly decreased tumor weight and angiogenesis in both ovarian cancer orthotopic xenograft and patient-derived xenograft mice. These results suggest that the C-terminus of IGFBP-5 exerts anti-cancer activity by inhibiting angiogenesis via regulation of the Akt/ERK and NF-kB–VEGF/MMP-9 signaling pathway, and might be considered as a novel angiogenesis inhibitor for the treatment of ovarian cancer. PMID:28008951

  17. Capping of the N-terminus of PSD-95 by calmodulin triggers its postsynaptic release

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yonghong; Matt, Lucas; Patriarchi, Tommaso; Malik, Zulfiqar A; Chowdhury, Dhrubajyoti; Park, Deborah K; Renieri, Alessandra; Ames, James B; Hell, Johannes W

    2014-01-01

    Postsynaptic density protein-95 (PSD-95) is a central element of the postsynaptic architecture of glutamatergic synapses. PSD-95 mediates postsynaptic localization of AMPA receptors and NMDA receptors and plays an important role in synaptic plasticity. PSD-95 is released from postsynaptic membranes in response to Ca2+ influx via NMDA receptors. Here, we show that Ca2+/calmodulin (CaM) binds at the N-terminus of PSD-95. Our NMR structure reveals that both lobes of CaM collapse onto a helical structure of PSD-95 formed at its N-terminus (residues 1–16). This N-terminal capping of PSD-95 by CaM blocks palmitoylation of C3 and C5, which is required for postsynaptic PSD-95 targeting and the binding of CDKL5, a kinase important for synapse stability. CaM forms extensive hydrophobic contacts with Y12 of PSD-95. The PSD-95 mutant Y12E strongly impairs binding to CaM and Ca2+-induced release of PSD-95 from the postsynaptic membrane in dendritic spines. Our data indicate that CaM binding to PSD-95 serves to block palmitoylation of PSD-95, which in turn promotes Ca2+-induced dissociation of PSD-95 from the postsynaptic membrane. PMID:24705785

  18. Visible Light Responsive Photocatalyst Induces Progressive and Apical-Terminus Preferential Damages on Escherichia coli Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Liou, Je-Wen; Gu, Ming-Hui; Chen, Yen-Kai; Chen, Wen-Yi; Chen, Yi-Cheng; Tseng, Yao-Hsuan; Hung, Yu-Jiun; Chang, Hsin-Hou

    2011-01-01

    Background Recent research shows that visible-light responsive photocatalysts have potential usage in antimicrobial applications. However, the dynamic changes in the damage to photocatalyzed bacteria remain unclear. Methodology/Principal Findings Facilitated by atomic force microscopy, this study analyzes the visible-light driven photocatalyst-mediated damage of Escherichia coli. Results show that antibacterial properties are associated with the appearance of hole-like structures on the bacteria surfaces. Unexpectedly, these hole-like structures were preferentially induced at the apical terminus of rod shaped E. coli cells. Differentiating the damages into various levels and analyzing the percentage of damage to the cells showed that photocatalysis was likely to elicit sequential damages in E. coli cells. The process began with changing the surface properties on bacterial cells, as indicated in surface roughness measurements using atomic force microscopy, and holes then formed at the apical terminus of the cells. The holes were then subsequently enlarged until the cells were totally transformed into a flattened shape. Parallel experiments indicated that photocatalysis-induced bacterial protein leakage is associated with the progression of hole-like damages, further suggesting pore formation. Control experiments using ultraviolet light responsive titanium-dioxide substrates also obtained similar observations, suggesting that this is a general phenomenon of E. coli in response to photocatalysis. Conclusion/Significance The photocatalysis-mediated localization-preferential damage to E. coli cells reveals the weak points of the bacteria. This might facilitate the investigation of antibacterial mechanism of the photocatalysis. PMID:21589873

  19. Capping of the N-terminus of PSD-95 by calmodulin triggers its postsynaptic release.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yonghong; Matt, Lucas; Patriarchi, Tommaso; Malik, Zulfiqar A; Chowdhury, Dhrubajyoti; Park, Deborah K; Renieri, Alessandra; Ames, James B; Hell, Johannes W

    2014-06-17

    Postsynaptic density protein-95 (PSD-95) is a central element of the postsynaptic architecture of glutamatergic synapses. PSD-95 mediates postsynaptic localization of AMPA receptors and NMDA receptors and plays an important role in synaptic plasticity. PSD-95 is released from postsynaptic membranes in response to Ca(2+) influx via NMDA receptors. Here, we show that Ca(2+)/calmodulin (CaM) binds at the N-terminus of PSD-95. Our NMR structure reveals that both lobes of CaM collapse onto a helical structure of PSD-95 formed at its N-terminus (residues 1-16). This N-terminal capping of PSD-95 by CaM blocks palmitoylation of C3 and C5, which is required for postsynaptic PSD-95 targeting and the binding of CDKL5, a kinase important for synapse stability. CaM forms extensive hydrophobic contacts with Y12 of PSD-95. The PSD-95 mutant Y12E strongly impairs binding to CaM and Ca(2+)-induced release of PSD-95 from the postsynaptic membrane in dendritic spines. Our data indicate that CaM binding to PSD-95 serves to block palmitoylation of PSD-95, which in turn promotes Ca(2+)-induced dissociation of PSD-95 from the postsynaptic membrane. © 2014 The Authors.

  20. Calmodulin and S100A1 protein interact with N terminus of TRPM3 channel.

    PubMed

    Holakovska, Blanka; Grycova, Lenka; Jirku, Michaela; Sulc, Miroslav; Bumba, Ladislav; Teisinger, Jan

    2012-05-11

    Transient receptor potential melastatin 3 ion channel (TRPM3) belongs to the TRP family of cation-permeable ion channels involved in many important biological functions such as pain transduction, thermosensation, and mechanoregulation. The channel was reported to play an important role in Ca(2+) homeostasis, but its gating mechanisms, functions, and regulation are still under research. Utilizing biophysical and biochemical methods, we characterized two independent domains, Ala-35-Lys-124 and His-291-Gly-382, on the TRPM3 N terminus, responsible for interactions with the Ca(2+)-binding proteins calmodulin (CaM) and S100A1. We identified several positively charged residues within these domains as having a crucial impact on CaM/S100A1 binding. The data also suggest that the interaction is calcium-dependent. We also performed competition assays, which suggested that CaM and S100A1 are able to compete for the same binding sites within the TRPM3 N terminus. This is the first time that such an interaction has been shown for TRP family members.

  1. The midregion, nuclear localization sequence, and C terminus of PTHrP regulate skeletal development, hematopoiesis, and survival in mice

    PubMed Central

    Toribio, Ramiro E.; Brown, Holly A.; Novince, Chad M.; Marlow, Brandlyn; Hernon, Krista; Lanigan, Lisa G.; Hildreth, Blake E.; Werbeck, Jillian L.; Shu, Sherry T.; Lorch, Gwendolen; Carlton, Michelle; Foley, John; Boyaka, Prosper; McCauley, Laurie K.; Rosol, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    The functions of parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) on morphogenesis, cell proliferation, apoptosis, and calcium homeostasis have been attributed to its N terminus. Evidence suggests that many of these effects are not mediated by the N terminus but by the midregion, a nuclear localization sequence (NLS), and C terminus of the protein. A knock-in mouse lacking the midregion, NLS, and C terminus of PTHrP (PthrpΔ/Δ) was developed. PthrpΔ/Δ mice had craniofacial dysplasia, chondrodysplasia, and kyphosis, with most mice dying by d 5 of age. In bone, there were fewer chondrocytes and osteoblasts per area, bone mass was decreased, and the marrow was less cellular, with erythroid hypoplasia. Cellular proliferation was impaired, and apoptosis was increased. Runx2, Ocn, Sox9, Crtl1, β-catenin, Runx1, ephrin B2, cyclin D1, and Gata1 were underexpressed while P16/Ink4a, P21, GSK-3β, Il-6, Ffg3, and Ihh were overexpressed. Mammary gland development was aberrant, and energy metabolism was deregulated. These results establish that the midregion, NLS, and C terminus of PTHrP are crucial for the commitment of osteogenic and hematopoietic precursors to their lineages, and for survival, and many of the effects of PTHrP on development are not mediated by its N terminus. The down-regulation of Runx1, Runx2, and Sox9 indicates that PTHrP is a modulator of transcriptional activation during stem cell commitment. Toribio, R. E., Brown, H. A., Novince, C. M., Marlow, B. Hernon, K., Lanigan, L. G., Hildreth III, B. E., Werbeck, J. L., Shu, S. T., Lorch, G., Carlton, M., Foley, J., Boyaka, P., McCauley, L. K., Rosol, T. J. The midregion, nuclear localization sequence, and C terminus of PTHrP regulate skeletal development, hematopoiesis, and survival in mice. PMID:20145205

  2. Numerical Modeling of Climatic Change from the Terminus Record of Lewis Glacier, Mount Kenya.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruss, Phillip Donald

    Over the last 100 years, the glaciers and lakes of East Africa have undergone dramatic change in response to climatic forcing. However, the available conventional meterological series have not proven sufficient to explain these environmental events. The secular climatic change at Lewis Glacier, Mount Kenya (0(DEGREES)9'S, 37(DEGREES)19'E), is reconstructed from its terminus record documented since 1893. The short-time-step numerical model developed for this study consists of climate and ice dynamics segments. The climate segment directly computes the effect on the net balance of change in the four forcings: precipitation, albedo, cloudiness, and temperature. The flow segment calculates the dynamic glacier response to net balance variation. Climatic change occurs over a wide range of time scales. Each glacier responds in a unique fashion to this spectrum of climatic forcings. The response of the Lewis terminus extent to repeated sinusoidal fluctuation in the net balance is calculated. The net balance versus elevation profile is separately translated along the orthogonal balance and elevation axes. Net balance amplitudes of 0.1 to 0.5 m a('-1) of ice and 10 to 50 m elevation, respectively, and periods ranging from 20 to 1000 years are covered. Consideration of the Lewis response is perspective with similar results for Hintereisferner, Storglaciaren, and Berendon and South Cascade Glaciers identifies general characteristics of the time lag and amplitude of the terminus response. The magnitude and timing of the change in only one of the climatic forcings precipitation, albedo, cloudiness, or temperature necessary to produce the retreat of the Lewis terminus from its late 19th century maximum are computed. Equivalent changes for two scenarios of simultaneous variation, namely precipitation/albedo/cloudiness and temperature/albedo, are also estimated. These numerical results are interpreted in the light of long-term lake level, river flow, and instrumental information. A

  3. Triclinic modification of diaqua-bis-(5-carb-oxy-1H-imidazole-4-carboxyl-ato-κ(2)N(3),O(4))iron(II).

    PubMed

    Ohshima, Eriko; Yoshida, Kazuki; Sugiyama, Kazumasa; Uekusa, Hidehiro

    2012-08-01

    The title compound, [Fe(C(5)H(3)N(2)O(4))(2)(H(2)O)(2)], is a triclinic modification of a monoclinic form recently reported by Du et al. [Acta Cryst. (2011) ▶, E67, m997]. The Fe(II) ion lies at an inversion center and is coordinated by two N and two O atoms from two 5-carb-oxy-1H-imidazole-4-carboxyl-ate ligands in trans positions, together with two water mol-ecules, completing a slightly distorted octahedral coordination. Inter-molecular N-H⋯O hydrogen bonding between the N-H group of the imidazole ring and the deprotonated carboxyl-ate group builds a chain of 5-carb-oxy-1H-imidazole-4-carboxyl-ate anions along the [101] direction. The water molecules form intermolecular hydrogen bonds to O-C and O=C sites of the carboxylate group in adjacent layers.

  4. Diaqua-bis-(4-carb-oxy-2-ethyl-1H-imidazole-5-carboxyl-ato-κN,O)zinc N,N-dimethyl-formamide disolvate.

    PubMed

    Hao, Cheng-Jun; Xie, Hui

    2011-05-01

    In the title compound, [Zn(C(7)H(7)N(2)O(4))(2)(H(2)O)(2)]·2C(3)H(7)NO, the Zn(II) ion, which lies on a center of inversion, is coordinated by two O atoms and two N atoms from two 4-carboxy-2-ethyl-1H-imid-azole-5-carboxyl-ato anions and two water O atoms in an octa-hedral environment, Each 4-carboxy-2-ethyl-1H-imid-azole-5-carboxyl-ato ligand adopts a bidentate chelating mode to the Zn(II) ion, forming two five-membered metalla rings. In the crystal, a two-dimensional framework parallel to (010) is formed by N-H⋯O and O-H⋯O hydrogen bonds.

  5. Pharmacokinetics of 11-nor-9-carboxy-Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (CTHC) after intravenous administration of CTHC in healthy human subjects.

    PubMed

    Glaz-Sandberg, A; Dietz, L; Nguyen, H; Oberwittler, H; Aderjan, Rolf; Mikus, Gerd

    2007-07-01

    After cannabis consumption there is only limited knowledge about the pharmacokinetic (PK) and metabolic properties of 11-nor-9-carboxy-Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (CTHC), which is formed by oxidative breakdown from Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). Despite widely-varying concentrations observed in smoking studies, attempts have been made to interpret consumption behavior with special regard to a cumulated or decreasing concentration of CTHC in serum. Ten healthy nonsmoking white male individuals received 5 mg CTHC intravenously over 10 min. Highest serum concentrations of CTHC were observed at the end of the infusion (336.8+/-61.7 microg/l) followed by a quick decline. CTHC concentration could be quantified up to 96 h after administration, with a terminal elimination half-life of 17.6+/-5.5 h. Total clearance was low (91.2+/-24.0 ml/min), with renal clearance having only a minor contribution (0.136+/-0.094 ml/min). This first metabolite-based kinetic approach will allow an advanced understanding of CTHC PKs data obtained in previous studies with THC.

  6. Nucleation kinetics, growth, crystalline perfection, mechanical, thermal, optical and electrical characterization of brucinium 2-carboxy-6-nitrophthalate dihydrate single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, P.; Gayathri, K.; Sivakumar, N.; Gunasekaran, S.; Anbalagan, G.

    2014-06-01

    Single crystals of brucinium 2-carboxy-6-nitrophthalate dihydrate (B2C6ND) have been grown by the slow evaporation solution technique at room temperature using water-ethanol (1:1) mixed solvent. The metastable zone width and induction period have been experimentally determined for the growth conditions. Nucleation kinetics and fundamental growth parameters such as surface free energy, critical radius and critical free energy change are also evaluated according to the experimental data. The crystal system and the lattice parameters have been confirmed by single crystal X-ray diffraction. The crystalline perfection of the grown B2C6ND crystals has been characterized by HRXRD method. Optical band gap and Urbach tail width of the sample have been studied employing UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy. The Vickers microhardness number (Hv), yield strength (σv) and stiffness constant (C11) of the grown crystal have been evaluated. The dielectric permittivity and dielectric loss of the grown B2C6ND crystal have been investigated as a function of frequency in the temperature range 313-353 K. The laser damage threshold value of B2C6ND crystal was estimated to be 2.8 GW/cm2 using a Nd:YAG laser.

  7. Role of glutathione in intracellular amyloid-alpha precursor protein/carboxy-terminal fragment aggregation and associated cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Woltjer, Randall L; Nghiem, William; Maezawa, Izumi; Milatovic, Dejan; Vaisar, Tomas; Montine, Kathleen S; Montine, Thomas J

    2005-05-01

    Abstract Alterations in glutathione (GSH) metabolism are associated with neurodegeneration in Alzheimer's disease (AD), and GSH depletion follows application of exogenous fibrillar amyloid beta (Abeta) peptides in experimental systems; these results are commonly cited as evidence of oxidative damage in AD. We used MC65 human neuroblastoma cells that conditionally express carboxy-terminal fragments of the Abeta precursor protein (Abeta/CTFs) to directly test the hypothesis that GSH is part of the cellular response to stressors associated with Abeta/CTF accumulation and not simply a marker of oxidative damage. Our data showed that Abeta/CTFs accumulated by post-translational processes and were associated with progressive increases in oxidative damage and cytotoxicity. Ethycrinic acid (EA) or diethyl maleate (DEM), reagents that deplete GSH through non-specific thiol adduction, gave rise to dose-dependent cytotoxicity that was independent of Abeta/CTF expression and minimally responsive to alpha-tocopherol (AT). In contrast, buthionine sulfoximine (BSO), a selective inhibitor of GSH synthase, not only augmented Abeta/CTF-associated cell death but unexpectedly potentiated Abeta/CTF accumulation; both outcomes were completely suppressed by AT. These data suggest that antioxidants may serve as 'Abeta targeting' therapies that suppress toxic protein aggregation rather than simply acting as downstream radical scavengers.

  8. Growth, spectral, optical, thermal, and mechanical behaviour of an organic single crystal: Quinolinium 2-carboxy 6-nitrophthalate monohydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohana, J.; Ahila, G.; Bharathi, M. Divya; Anbalagan, G.

    2016-09-01

    Organic single crystals of quinolinium 2-carboxy 6-nitrophthalate monohydrate (QN) were grown by slow evaporation solution growth technique using ethanol and water as a mixed solvent. X-ray powder diffraction analysis revealed that the crystal belongs to the monoclinic crystal system with space group of P21/c. The functional groups present in the crystallized material confirmed its molecular structure. The optical transparency range and the lower cutoff wavelength were identified from the UV-vis spectrum. The optical constants were determined by UV-visible transmission spectrum at normal incidence, measured over the 200-700 nm spectral range. The dispersion of the refractive index was discussed in terms of the single-oscillator Wemple and DiDomenico model. The calculated HOMO and LUMO energies show that the charge transfer occur within the molecule. Electronic excitation properties were discussed within the framework of two level model on the basis of an orbital analysis. The nonlinear optical absorption coefficient (β) and nonlinear refraction (n2) of QN was measured by Z-scan technique and reported here. Thermal stability of QN was determined using TGA/DSC curves. Vicker's microhardness studies were carried out on the (1 1 ̅0) plane to understand the mechanical properties of the grown crystal. The microhardness measurements showed a Vickers hardness value as 18.4 kg/mm2 which is comparable to well-known organic crystal, urea.

  9. The Carboxy-Terminal Domain of Erb1 Is a Seven-Bladed ß-Propeller that Binds RNA

    PubMed Central

    Marcin, Wegrecki; Neira, Jose Luis; Bravo, Jeronimo

    2015-01-01

    Erb1 (Eukaryotic Ribosome Biogenesis 1) protein is essential for the maturation of the ribosomal 60S subunit. Functional studies in yeast and mammalian cells showed that altogether with Nop7 and Ytm1 it forms a stable subcomplex called PeBoW that is crucial for a correct rRNA processing. The exact function of the protein within the process remains unknown. The N-terminal region of the protein includes a well conserved region shown to be involved in PeBoW complex formation whereas the carboxy-terminal half was predicted to contain seven WD40 repeats. This first structural report on Erb1 from yeast describes the architecture of a seven-bladed β-propeller domain that revealed a characteristic extra motif formed by two α-helices and a β-strand that insert within the second WD repeat. We performed analysis of molecular surface and crystal packing, together with multiple sequence alignment and comparison of the structure with other β-propellers, in order to identify areas that are more likely to mediate protein-protein interactions. The abundance of many positively charged residues on the surface of the domain led us to investigate whether the propeller of Erb1 might be involved in RNA binding. Three independent assays confirmed that the protein interacted in vitro with polyuridilic acid (polyU), thus suggesting a possible role of the domain in rRNA rearrangement during ribosome biogenesis. PMID:25880847

  10. The carboxy-terminal domain of Erb1 is a seven-bladed ß-propeller that binds RNA.

    PubMed

    Wegrecki, Marcin; Marcin, Wegrecki; Neira, Jose Luis; Bravo, Jeronimo

    2015-01-01

    Erb1 (Eukaryotic Ribosome Biogenesis 1) protein is essential for the maturation of the ribosomal 60S subunit. Functional studies in yeast and mammalian cells showed that altogether with Nop7 and Ytm1 it forms a stable subcomplex called PeBoW that is crucial for a correct rRNA processing. The exact function of the protein within the process remains unknown. The N-terminal region of the protein includes a well conserved region shown to be involved in PeBoW complex formation whereas the carboxy-terminal half was predicted to contain seven WD40 repeats. This first structural report on Erb1 from yeast describes the architecture of a seven-bladed β-propeller domain that revealed a characteristic extra motif formed by two α-helices and a β-strand that insert within the second WD repeat. We performed analysis of molecular surface and crystal packing, together with multiple sequence alignment and comparison of the structure with other β-propellers, in order to identify areas that are more likely to mediate protein-protein interactions. The abundance of many positively charged residues on the surface of the domain led us to investigate whether the propeller of Erb1 might be involved in RNA binding. Three independent assays confirmed that the protein interacted in vitro with polyuridilic acid (polyU), thus suggesting a possible role of the domain in rRNA rearrangement during ribosome biogenesis.

  11. 2-Carboxy-D-arabinitol 1-phosphate (CA1P) phosphatase: evidence for a wider role in plant Rubisco regulation.

    PubMed

    Andralojc, Paul John; Madgwick, Pippa J; Tao, Yong; Keys, Alfred; Ward, Jane L; Beale, Michael H; Loveland, Jane E; Jackson, Phil J; Willis, Antony C; Gutteridge, Steven; Parry, Martin A J

    2012-03-15

    The genes for CA1Pase (2-carboxy-D-arabinitol-1-bisphosphate phosphatase) from French bean, wheat, Arabidopsis and tobacco were identified and cloned. The deduced protein sequence included an N-terminal motif identical with the PGM (phosphoglycerate mutase) active site sequence [LIVM]-x-R-H-G-[EQ]-x-x-[WN]. The corresponding gene from wheat coded for an enzyme with the properties published for CA1Pase. The expressed protein lacked PGM activity but rapidly dephosphorylated 2,3-DPG (2,3-diphosphoglycerate) to 2-phosphoglycerate. DTT (dithiothreitol) activation and GSSG inactivation of this enzyme was pH-sensitive, the greatest difference being apparent at pH 8. The presence of the expressed protein during in vitro measurement of Rubisco (ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase) activity prevented a progressive decline in Rubisco turnover. This was due to the removal of an inhibitory bisphosphate that was present in the RuBP (ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate) preparation, and was found to be PDBP (D-glycero-2,3-pentodiulose-1,5-bisphosphate). The substrate specificity of the expressed protein indicates a role for CA1Pase in the removal of 'misfire' products of Rubisco.

  12. Differential expression of ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase L1 in breast carcinoma and its biological significance.

    PubMed

    Lien, Huang-Chun; Wang, Chung-Chieh; Lin, Ching-Hung; Lu, Yen-Shen; Huang, Chiun-Sheng; Hsiao, Li-Ping; Yao, Yu-Tung

    2013-09-01

    Ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase L1 (UCHL1) is a deubiquitinating enzyme that hydrolyzes ubiquitin. Previous reports have shown both tumorigenic and antitumorigenic roles for UCHL1. However, the expression patterns of UCHL1 protein, an area that is critical for validating its clinicopathologic roles among subtypes of breast cancer, is still lacking. Here we examined the expression of UCHL1 by immunohistochemistry in 243 breast carcinomas of various subtypes. We found expression of UCHL1 in 8.3% of invasive ductal carcinomas but not in other carcinoma subtypes, except for metaplastic carcinomas of the breast, which showed UCHL1 staining in 61.9% of cases, with the sarcomatous components being more intensely stained. UCHL1 expression in invasive ductal carcinomas significantly correlated with a high histologic grade (P = .001), the triple-negative phenotype (P = .02), and the basal-like phenotype (P <.001); furthermore, it was associated with poorer overall survival by univariate and multivariate analyses. Knockdown of UCHL1 in an invasive Snail variant-transfected MCF7 cells with high endogenous UCHL1 protein level significantly reduced invasion and anchorage-independent growth. Conclusively, our results demonstrate a role for UCHL1 in aggressive phenotypes in breast carcinoma. The high expression of UCHL1 in metaplastic carcinomas of the breast, which is pathogenically related to epithelial-mesenchymal transition, may implicate an association between UCHL1 expression and the epithelial-mesenchymal transition in breast cancer.

  13. Urinary elimination of 11-nor-9-carboxy-delta9-tetrahydrocannnabinol in cannabis users during continuously monitored abstinence.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, Robert S; Darwin, William D; Chiang, C Nora; Shih, Ming; Li, Shou-Hua; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2008-10-01

    The time course of 11-nor-9-carboxy-Delta9-tetrahydrocannnabinol (THCCOOH) elimination in urine was characterized in 60 cannabis users during 24 h monitored abstinence on a closed research unit for up to 30 days. Six thousand, one hundred fifty-eight individual urine specimens were screened by immunoassay with values > or = 50 ng/mL classified as positive. Urine specimens were confirmed for THCCOOH by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry following base hydrolysis and liquid-liquid or solid-phase extraction. In 60%, the maximum creatinine normalized concentration occurred in the first urine specimen; in 40%, peaks occurred as long as 2.9 days after admission. Data were divided into three groups, 0-50, 51-150, and > 150 ng/mg, based on the creatinine corrected initial THCCOOH concentration. There were statistically significant correlations between groups and number of days until first negative and last positive urine specimens; mean number of days were 0.6 and 4.3, 3.2 and 9.7, and 4.7 and 15.4 days, respectively, for the three groups. These data provide guidelines for interpreting urine cannabinoid test results and suggest appropriate detection windows for differentiating new cannabis use from residual drug excretion.

  14. Crystal Structure of the Carboxy-Terminal Region of the Bacteriophage T4 Proximal Long Tail Fiber Protein Gp34

    PubMed Central

    Granell, Meritxell; Namura, Mikiyoshi; Alvira, Sara

    2017-01-01

    Long tail fibers of bacteriophage T4 are formed by proteins gp34, gp35, gp36, and gp37, with gp34 located at the phage-proximal end and gp37 at the phage-distal, receptor-binding end. We have solved the structure of the carboxy-terminal region of gp34, consisting of amino acids 894–1289, by single-wavelength anomalous diffraction and extended the structure to amino acids 744–1289 using data collected from crystals containing longer gp34-fragments. The structure reveals three repeats of a mixed α-β fibrous domain in residues 744 to 877. A triple-helical neck connects to an extended triple β-helix domain (amino acids 900–1127) punctuated by two β-prism domains. Next, a β-prism domain decorated with short helices and extended β-helices is present (residues 1146–1238), while the C-terminal end is capped with another short β-helical region and three β-hairpins. The structure provides insight into the stability of the fibrous gp34 protein. PMID:28665339

  15. Crystallization of the carboxy-terminal region of the bacteriophage T4 proximal long tail fibre protein gp34

    PubMed Central

    Granell, Meritxell; Namura, Mikiyoshi; Alvira, Sara; Garcia-Doval, Carmela; Singh, Abhimanyu K.; Gutsche, Irina; van Raaij, Mark J.; Kanamaru, Shuji

    2014-01-01

    The phage-proximal part of the long tail fibres of bacteriophage T4 consists of a trimer of the 1289 amino-acid gene product 34 (gp34). Different carboxy-terminal parts of gp34 have been produced and crystallized. Crystals of gp34(726–1289) diffracting X-rays to 2.9 Å resolution, crystals of gp34(781–1289) diffracting to 1.9 Å resolution and crystals of gp34(894–1289) diffracting to 3.0 and 2.0 Å resolution and belonging to different crystal forms were obtained. Native data were collected for gp34(726–1289) and gp34(894–1289), while single-wavelength anomalous diffraction data were collected for selenomethionine-containing gp34(781–1289) and gp34(894–1289). For the latter, high-quality anomalous signal was obtained. PMID:25005101

  16. The carboxy-terminal fragment of inhibitor-2 of protein phosphatase-2A induces Alzheimer disease pathology and cognitive impairment

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaochuan; Blanchard, Julie; Kohlbrenner, Erik; Clement, Nathalie; Linden, R. Michael; Radu, Aurelian; Grundke-Iqbal, Inge; Iqbal, Khalid

    2010-01-01

    Development of rational therapeutic treatments of Alzheimer disease (AD) requires the elucidation of the etiopathogenic mechanisms of neurofibrillary degeneration and β-amyloidosis, the two hallmarks of this disease. Here we show, employing an adeno-associated virus serotype 1 (AAV1)-induced expression of the C-terminal fragment (I2CTF) of I2PP2A, also called SET, in rat brain, decrease in protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) activity, abnormal hyperphosphorylation of tau, and neurodegeneration; littermates treated identically but with vector only, i.e., AAV1-enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP), served as a control. Furthermore, there was an increase in the level of activated glycogen synthase kinase-3β and enhanced expression of intraneuronal Aβ in AAV1-I2CTF animals. Morris water maze behavioral test revealed that infection with AAV1-I2CTF induced spatial reference memory and memory consolidation deficits and a decrease in the brain level of pSer133-CREB. These findings suggest a novel etiopathogenic mechanism of AD, which is initiated by the cleavage of I2PP2A, producing I2CTF, and describe a novel disease-relevant nontransgenic animal model of AD.—Wang, X., Blanchard, J., Kohlbrenner, E., Clement, N., Linden, R. M., Radu, A., Grundke-Iqbal, I., Iqbal, K. The carboxy-terminal fragment of inhibitor-2 of protein phosphatase-2A induces Alzheimer disease pathology and cognitive impairment. PMID:20651003

  17. Pharmacokinetic and milk penetration of a difloxacin long-acting poloxamer gel formulation with carboxy-methylcellulose in lactating goats.

    PubMed

    Escudero, Elisa; Marín, Pedro; Cárceles, Carlos M; Ramírez, María J; Fernández-Varón, Emilio

    2011-04-01

    The single-dose disposition kinetics of difloxacin were determined in clinically normal lactating goats (n=6) after subcutaneous administration of a long-acting poloxamer 407 gel formulation with carboxy-methylcellulose (P407-CMC). Difloxacin concentrations were determined by high performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection. The concentration-time data were analysed by non-compartmental kinetic methods. Plasma and milk elimination half-lives after P407-CMC dosing were 35.19 h and 33.93 h, respectively. With this formulation, difloxacin achieved maximum plasma concentrations of 2.67±0.34 mg/L at 2.92±1.20 h and maximum milk concentrations of 2.31±0.35 mg/L at 4.00±0.00 h. The area under the curve (AUC) ratio AUC(milk)/AUC(plasma) was 0.89 after P407-CMC administration. It was concluded that a 15 mg/kg dose of difloxacin within P407-CMC would be effective against mastitis pathogens with a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC)≤0.12 mg/L.

  18. Structural Organization of Pregenomic RNA and the Carboxy-Terminal Domain of the Capsid Protein of Hepatitis B Virus

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Joseph C.-Y.; Dhason, Mary S.; Zlotnick, Adam

    2012-01-01

    The Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) double-stranded DNA genome is reverse transcribed from its RNA pregenome (pgRNA) within the virus core (or capsid). Phosphorylation of the arginine-rich carboxy-terminal domain (CTD) of the HBV capsid protein (Cp183) is essential for pgRNA encapsidation and reverse transcription. However, the structure of the CTD remains poorly defined. Here we report sub-nanometer resolution cryo-EM structures of in vitro assembled empty and pgRNA-filled Cp183 capsids in unphosphorylated and phosphorylation-mimic states. In empty capsids, we found unexpected evidence of surface accessible CTD density partially occluding pores in the capsid surface. We also observed that CTD organization changed substantively as a function of phosphorylation. In RNA-filled capsids, unphosphorylated CTDs favored thick ropes of RNA, while the phosphorylation-mimic favored a mesh of thin, high-density strands suggestive of single stranded RNA. These results demonstrate that the CTD can regulate nucleic acid structure, supporting the hypothesis that the HBV capsid has a functional role as a nucleic acid chaperone. PMID:23028319

  19. Crystal Structure of the Carboxy-Terminal Region of the Bacteriophage T4 Proximal Long Tail Fiber Protein Gp34.

    PubMed

    Granell, Meritxell; Namura, Mikiyoshi; Alvira, Sara; Kanamaru, Shuji; van Raaij, Mark J

    2017-06-30

    Long tail fibers of bacteriophage T4 are formed by proteins gp34, gp35, gp36, and gp37, with gp34 located at the phage-proximal end and gp37 at the phage-distal, receptor-binding end. We have solved the structure of the carboxy-terminal region of gp34, consisting of amino acids 894-1289, by single-wavelength anomalous diffraction and extended the structure to amino acids 744-1289 using data collected from crystals containing longer gp34-fragments. The structure reveals three repeats of a mixed α-β fibrous domain in residues 744 to 877. A triple-helical neck connects to an extended triple β-helix domain (amino acids 900-1127) punctuated by two β-prism domains. Next, a β-prism domain decorated with short helices and extended β-helices is present (residues 1146-1238), while the C-terminal end is capped with another short β-helical region and three β-hairpins. The structure provides insight into the stability of the fibrous gp34 protein.

  20. Role of Ubiquitin Carboxy Terminal Hydrolase-L1 in Neural Cell Apoptosis Induced by Ischemic Retinal Injury in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Harada, Takayuki; Harada, Chikako; Wang, Yu-Lai; Osaka, Hitoshi; Amanai, Kazuhito; Tanaka, Kohichi; Takizawa, Shuichi; Setsuie, Rieko; Sakurai, Mikako; Sato, Yae; Noda, Mami; Wada, Keiji

    2004-01-01

    Ubiquitin is thought to be a stress protein that plays an important role in protecting cells under stress conditions; however, its precise role is unclear. Ubiquitin expression level is controlled by the balance of ubiquitinating and deubiquitinating enzymes. To investigate the function of deubiquitinating enzymes on ischemia-induced neural cell apoptosis in vivo, we analyzed gracile axonal dystrophy (gad) mice with an exon deletion for ubiquitin carboxy terminal hydrolase-L1 (UCH-L1), a neuron-specific deubiquitinating enzyme. In wild-type mouse retina, light stimuli and ischemic retinal injury induced strong ubiquitin expression in the inner retina, and its expression pattern was similar to that of UCH-L1. On the other hand, gad mice showed reduced ubiquitin induction after light stimuli and ischemia, whereas expression levels of antiapoptotic (Bcl-2 and XIAP) and prosurvival (brain-derived neurotrophic factor) proteins that are normally degraded by an ubiquitin-proteasome pathway were significantly higher. Consistently, ischemia-induced caspase activity and neural cell apoptosis were suppressed ∼70% in gad mice. These results demonstrate that UCH-L1 is involved in ubiquitin expression after stress stimuli, but excessive ubiquitin induction following ischemic injury may rather lead to neural cell apoptosis in vivo. PMID:14695319

  1. Further characterization of functional domains of PerA, role of amino and carboxy terminal domains in DNA binding.

    PubMed

    Ibarra, J Antonio; García-Zacarias, Claudia M; Lara-Ochoa, Cristina; Carabarin-Lima, Alejandro; Tecpanecatl-Xihuitl, J Sergio; Perez-Rueda, Ernesto; Martínez-Laguna, Ygnacio; Puente, José L

    2013-01-01

    PerA is a key regulator of virulence genes in enteropathogenic E. coli. PerA is a member of the AraC/XylS family of transcriptional regulators that directly regulates the expression of the bfp and per operons in response to different environmental cues. Here, we characterized mutants in both the amino (NTD) and carboxy (CTD) terminal domains of PerA that affect its ability to activate the expression of the bfp and per promoters. Mutants at residues predicted to be important for DNA binding within the CTD had a significant defect in their ability to bind to the regulatory regions of the bfp and per operons and, consequently, in transcriptional activation. Notably, mutants in specific NTD residues were also impaired to bind to DNA suggesting that this domain is involved in structuring the protein for correct DNA recognition. Mutations in residues E116 and D168, located in the vicinity of the putative linker region, significantly affected the activation of the perA promoter, without affecting PerA binding to the per or bfp regulatory sequences. Overall these results provide additional evidence of the importance of the N-terminal domain in PerA activity and suggest that the activation of these promoters involves differential interactions with the transcriptional machinery. This study further contributes to the characterization of the functional domains of PerA by identifying critical residues involved in DNA binding, differential promoter activation and, potentially, in the possible response to environmental cues.

  2. Mucosal Antibodies to the C Terminus of Toxin A Prevent Colonization of Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Hong, Huynh A; Hitri, Krisztina; Hosseini, Siamand; Kotowicz, Natalia; Bryan, Donna; Mawas, Fatme; Wilkinson, Anthony J; van Broekhoven, Annie; Kearsey, Jonathan; Cutting, Simon M

    2017-04-01

    Mucosal immunity is considered important for protection against Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). We show that in hamsters immunized with Bacillus subtilis spores expressing a carboxy-terminal segment (TcdA26-39) of C. difficile toxin A, no colonization occurs in protected animals when challenged with C. difficile strain 630. In contrast, animals immunized with toxoids showed no protection and remained fully colonized. Along with neutralizing toxins, antibodies to TcdA26-39 (but not to toxoids), whether raised to the recombinant protein or to TcdA26-39 expressed on the B. subtilis spore surface, cross-react with a number of seemingly unrelated proteins expressed on the vegetative cell surface or spore coat of C. difficile These include two dehydrogenases, AdhE1 and LdhA, as well as the CdeC protein that is present on the spore. Anti-TcdA26-39 mucosal antibodies obtained following immunization with recombinant B. subtilis spores were able to reduce the adhesion of C. difficile to mucus-producing intestinal cells. This cross-reaction is intriguing yet important since it illustrates the importance of mucosal immunity for complete protection against CDI.

  3. A Pleiotrophin C-terminus peptide induces anti-cancer effects through RPTPβ/ζ.

    PubMed

    Diamantopoulou, Zoi; Bermek, Oya; Polykratis, Apostolos; Hamma-Kourbali, Yamina; Delbé, Jean; Courty, José; Katsoris, Panagiotis

    2010-08-25

    Pleiotrophin, also known as HARP (Heparin Affin Regulatory Peptide) is a growth factor expressed in various tissues and cell lines. Pleiotrophin participates in multiple biological actions including the induction of cellular proliferation, migration and angiogenesis, and is involved in carcinogenesis. Recently, we identified and characterized several pleiotrophin proteolytic fragments with biological activities similar or opposite to that of pleiotrophin. Here, we investigated the biological actions of P(122-131), a synthetic peptide corresponding to the carboxy terminal region of this growth factor. Our results show that P(122-131) inhibits in vitro adhesion, anchorage-independent proliferation, and migration of DU145 and LNCaP cells, which express pleiotrophin and its receptor RPTPβ/ζ. In addition, P(122-131) inhibits angiogenesis in vivo, as determined by the chicken embryo CAM assay. Investigation of the transduction mechanisms revealed that P(122-131) reduces the phosphorylation levels of Src, Pten, Fak, and Erk1/2. Finally, P(122-131) not only interacts with RPTPβ/ζ, but also interferes with other pleiotrophin receptors, as demonstrated by selective knockdown of pleiotrophin or RPTPβ/ζ expression with the RNAi technology. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that P(122-131) inhibits biological activities that are related to the induction of a transformed phenotype in PCa cells, by interacing with RPTPβ/ζ and interfering with other pleiotrophin receptors. Cumulatively, these results indicate that P(122-131) may be a potential anticancer agent, and they warrant further study of this peptide.

  4. Poly[diaqua-bis(μ(2)-5-carb-oxy-2-propyl-1H-imidazole-4-carboxyl-ato-κN,O:O)lead(II)].

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiang; Liu, Hai-Cheng

    2010-04-21

    In the title complex, [Pb(C(8)H(9)N(2)O(4))(2)(H(2)O)(2)](n), the eight-coordinate Pb(II) atom lies on a twofold rotation axis and adopts a slightly distorted square-anti-prismatic N(2)O(6) coordination geometry. The ligand donor atoms are the tertiary N atoms of the imidazole rings and the carboxyl-ate O atoms of two chelating 5-carb-oxy-2-propyl-1H-imidazole-4-carboxyl-ate ligands, the carb-oxy O atoms of two additional imidazole ligands and two water O atoms. The carb-oxy O and the N,O-chelate systems also link adjacent Pb(II) atoms, forming a two-dimensional layer structure, with four individual Pb(II) atoms located at the corners of a square. These layers are further inter-connected by an extensive array of O-H⋯O and N-H⋯O hydrogen bonds into a three-dimensional network.

  5. Amino- and carboxy-terminal domains of the yeast Rab escort protein are both required for binding of Ypt small G proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, B E; Lorenzetti, S; Miaczynska, M; Bui, D M; Schweyen, R J; Ragnini, A

    1996-01-01

    The Rab escort protein (REP) is an essential component of the heterotrimeric enzyme Rab geranylgeranyl transferase that modifies the carboxy-terminal cysteines of the Ras-like small G proteins belonging to the Rab/Ypt family. Deletions in the human CHM locus, encoding one of the two REPs known in humans, result in a retinal degenerative syndrome called choroideremia. The only known yeast homologue of the choroideremia gene product is encoded by an essential gene called MRS6. Besides three structurally conserved regions (SCRs) previously detected in the amino-terminal half of REPs and RabGDIs, three other regions in the carboxy-terminal domain (RCR 1-3) are here identified as being characteristic of REPs alone. We have performed the first mutational analysis of a REP protein to experimentally define the regions functionally important for Rab/Ypt protein binding, making use of the genetic system of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This analysis has shown that the SCRs are necessary but not sufficient for Ypt1p binding by the yeast REP, the carboxy-terminal region also being required. Images PMID:8898359

  6. Properties of GluR3 receptors tagged with GFP at the amino or carboxyl terminus

    PubMed Central

    Limon, Agenor; Reyes-Ruiz, Jorge Mauricio; Eusebi, Fabrizio; Miledi, Ricardo

    2007-01-01

    Anatomical visualization of neurotransmitter receptor localization is facilitated by tagging receptors, but this process can alter their functional properties. We have evaluated the distribution and properties of WT glutamate receptor 3 (GluR3) α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA) receptors (WT GluR3) and two receptors in which GFP was tagged to the amino terminus (GFP-GluR3) or to the carboxyl terminus (GluR3-GFP). Although the fluorescence in Xenopus oocytes was stronger in the vegetal hemisphere because of localization of internal structures (probable sites of production, storage or recycling of receptors), the insertion of receptors into the plasma membrane was polarized to the animal hemisphere. The fluorescence intensity of oocytes injected with GluR3-GFP RNA was approximately double that of oocytes injected with GFP-GluR3 RNA. Accordingly, GluR3-GFP oocytes generated larger kainate-induced currents than GFP-GluR3 oocytes, with similar EC50 values. Currents elicited by glutamate, or AMPA coapplied with cyclothiazide, were also larger in GluR3-GFP oocytes. The glutamate- to kainate-current amplitude ratios differed, with GluR3-GFP being activated more efficiently by glutamate than the WT or GFP-GluR3 receptors. This pattern correlates with the slower decay of glutamate-induced currents generated by GluR3-GFP receptors. These changes were not observed when GFP was tagged to the amino terminus, and these receptors behaved like the WT. The antagonistic effects of 6-nitro-7-sulfamoylbenzo[f]quinoxaline-2,3-dione (NBQX) and 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX) were not altered in any of the tagged receptors. We conclude that GFP is a useful and convenient tag for visualizing these proteins. However, the effects of different sites of tag insertion on receptor characteristics must be taken into account in assessing the roles played by these receptor proteins. PMID:17881566

  7. Phosphorylation and Ionic Strength Alter the LRAP-HAP Interface in the N-terminus

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Junxia; Xu, Yimin; Shaw, Wendy J.

    2013-04-02

    The conditions present during enamel crystallite development change dramatically as a function of time, including the pH, protein concentration, surface type and ionic strength. In this work, we investigate the role that two of these changing conditions, pH and ionic strength, have in modulating the interaction of amelogenin, LRAP, with hydroxyapatite (HAP). Using solid state NMR dipolar recoupling and chemical shift data, we investigate the structure, orientation and dynamics of three regions in the N-terminus of the protein, L15 to V19, V19 to L23 and K24 to S28. These regions are also near the only phosphorylated residue in the protein, pS16, therefore, changes in the LRAP-HAP interaction as a function of phosphorylation (LRAP(-P) vs. LRAP(+P)) were also investigated. All of the regions and conditions studies for the surface immobilized proteins showed restricted motion, with more mobility under all conditions for L15(+P) and K24(-P). The structure and orientation of the LRAP-HAP interaction in the N-terminus of the phosphorylated protein is very stable to changing solution conditions. From REDOR dipolar recoupling data, the structure and orientation in the region L15V19(+P) did not change significantly as a function of pH or ionic strength. The structure and orientation of the region V19L23(+P) were also stable to changes in pH, with the only significant change observed at high ionic strength, where the region becomes extended, suggesting this may be an important region in regulating mineral development. Chemical shift studies also suggest minimal changes in all three regions studied for both LRAP(-P) and LRAP(+P) as a function of pH or ionic strength. Phosphorylation also alters the LRAP-HAP interface. All of the three residues investigated (L15, V19, and K24) are closer to the surface in LRAP(+P), but K24S28 also changes structure as a result of phosphorylation, from a random coil to a largely helical structure, and V19L23 becomes more extended at high ionic

  8. The N Terminus of Pro-endothelial Monocyte-activating Polypeptide II (EMAP II) Regulates Its Binding with the C Terminus, Arginyl-tRNA Synthetase, and Neurofilament Light Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Haiming; Malinin, Nikolay L.; Awasthi, Niranjan; Schwarz, Roderich E.; Schwarz, Margaret A.

    2015-01-01

    Pro-endothelial monocyte-activating polypeptide II (EMAP II), one component of the multi-aminoacyl tRNA synthetase complex, plays multiple roles in physiological and pathological processes of protein translation, signal transduction, immunity, lung development, and tumor growth. Recent studies have determined that pro-EMAP II has an essential role in maintaining axon integrity in central and peripheral neural systems where deletion of the C terminus of pro-EMAP II has been reported in a consanguineous Israeli Bedouin kindred suffering from Pelizaeus-Merzbacher-like disease. We hypothesized that the N terminus of pro-EMAP II has an important role in the regulation of protein-protein interactions. Using a GFP reporter system, we defined a putative leucine zipper in the N terminus of human pro-EMAP II protein (amino acid residues 1–70) that can form specific strip-like punctate structures. Through GFP punctum analysis, we uncovered that the pro-EMAP II C terminus (amino acids 147–312) can repress GFP punctum formation. Pulldown assays confirmed that the binding between the pro-EMAP II N terminus and its C terminus is mediated by a putative leucine zipper. Furthermore, the pro-EMAP II 1–70 amino acid region was identified as the binding partner of arginyl-tRNA synthetase, a polypeptide of the multi-aminoacyl tRNA synthetase complex. We also determined that the punctate GFP pro-EMAP II 1–70 amino acid aggregate colocalizes and binds to the neurofilament light subunit protein that is associated with pathologic neurofilament network disorganization and degeneration of motor neurons. These findings indicate the structure and binding interaction of pro-EMAP II protein and suggest a role of this protein in pathological neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:25724651

  9. Telomerase RNA stem terminus element affects template boundary element function, telomere sequence, and shelterin binding.

    PubMed

    Webb, Christopher J; Zakian, Virginia A

    2015-09-08

    The stem terminus element (STE), which was discovered 13 y ago in human telomerase RNA, is required for telomerase activity, yet its mode of action is unknown. We report that the Schizosaccharomyces pombe telomerase RNA, TER1 (telomerase RNA 1), also contains a STE, which is essential for telomere maintenance. Cells expressing a partial loss-of-function TER1 STE allele maintained short stable telomeres by a recombination-independent mechanism. Remarkably, the mutant telomere sequence was different from that of wild-type cells. Generation of the altered sequence is explained by reverse transcription into the template boundary element, demonstrating that the STE helps maintain template boundary element function. The altered telomeres bound less Pot1 (protection of telomeres 1) and Taz1 (telomere-associated in Schizosaccharomyces pombe 1) in vivo. Thus, the S. pombe STE, although distant from the template, ensures proper telomere sequence, which in turn promotes proper assembly of the shelterin complex.

  10. Mutant calreticulin requires both its mutant C-terminus and the thrombopoietin receptor for oncogenic transformation

    PubMed Central

    Elf, Shannon; Abdelfattah, Nouran S.; Chen, Edwin; Perales-Patón, Javier; Rosen, Emily A.; Ko, Amy; Peisker, Fabian; Florescu, Natalie; Giannini, Silvia; Wolach, Ofir; Morgan, Elizabeth A.; Tothova, Zuzana; Losman, Julie-Aurore; Schneider, Rebekka K.; Al-Shahrour, Fatima; Mullally, Ann

    2016-01-01

    Somatic mutations in calreticulin (CALR) are present in approximately 40% of patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) but the mechanism by which mutant CALR is oncogenic remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate that expression of mutant CALR alone is sufficient to engender MPN in mice and recapitulates the disease phenotype of CALR-mutant MPN patients. We further show that the thrombopoietin receptor, MPL is required for mutant CALR-driven transformation through JAK-STAT pathway activation, thus rendering mutant CALR-transformed hematopoietic cells sensitive to JAK2 inhibition. Finally, we demonstrate that the oncogenicity of mutant CALR is dependent on the positive electrostatic charge of the C-terminus of the mutant protein, which is necessary for physical interaction between mutant CALR and MPL. Together, our findings elucidate a novel paradigm of cancer pathogenesis and reveal how CALR mutations induce MPN. PMID:26951227

  11. Decorating the lanthanide terminus of self-assembled heterodinuclear lanthanum(III)/gallium(III) helicates.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Markus; Latorre, Irene; Mehmeti, Gent; Hengst, Konstantin; Oppel, Iris M

    2011-12-07

    Arylacylhydrazones of 2,3-dihydroxybenzaldehyde are appropriate ligands for the preparation of heterodinuclear triple-stranded helicates involving high coordinated lanthanide(III) ions. In the present study, three different kinds of substituents are introduced at the ligands in order to modify the organic periphery of the coordination compounds: (1) alkoxy groups are attached to the terminal phenyl groups, (2) NH protons of the hydrazones are substituted by phenyl moieties and (3) amino acid bearing units are attached to the terminus of the ligand. The new ligands nicely form the desired triple-stranded gallium(III)-lanthanum(III) complexes [(5a-c,7,12,15)(3)GaLa] of which the highly phenylated derivative was crystallized and studied by X-ray diffraction.

  12. Structure of the human MLH1 N-terminus: implications for predisposition to Lynch syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Hong; Zeng, Hong; Lam, Robert; Tempel, Wolfram; Kerr, Iain D.; Min, Jinrong

    2015-08-01

    Mismatch repair prevents the accumulation of erroneous insertions/deletions and non-Watson–Crick base pairs in the genome. Pathogenic mutations in theMLH1gene are associated with a predisposition to Lynch and Turcot's syndromes. Although genetic testing for these mutations is available, robust classification of variants requires strong clinical and functional support. Here, the first structure of the N-terminus of human MLH1, determined by X-ray crystallography, is described. Lastly, the structure shares a high degree of similarity with previously determined prokaryoticMLH1homologs; however, this structure affords a more accurate platform for the classification ofMLH1variants.

  13. Isocitrate lyase of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is inhibited by quercetin through binding at N-terminus.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Harish; Kumar, Vikash; Singh, Amit Kumar; Rastogi, Shivangi; Khan, Shaheb Raj; Siddiqi, Mohammad Imran; Krishnan, Manju Yasoda; Akhtar, Md Sohail

    2015-01-01

    Combating tuberculosis requires new therapeutic strategies that not only target the actively dividing bacilli but also the dormant bacilli during persistent infection. Isocitrate lyase (ICL) is a key enzyme of the glyoxylate shunt, crucial for the survival of bacteria in macrophages and mice. MtbICL is considered as one of the potential and attractive drug targets against persistent infection. We report the inhibition of MtbICL by quercetin with IC50 of 3.57 μM. In addition, quercetin strongly inhibited the growth of Mtb H37Rv utilizing acetate, rather than glucose as the sole carbon source, suggesting the inhibition of glyoxylate shunt. Quercetin binds at the N-terminus of MtbICL (Kd - 6.68 μM). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Comparison of the carboxy-terminal DP-repeat region in the co-chaperones Hop and Hip.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Gregory M; Huffman, Holly; Smith, David F

    2003-01-01

    Functional steroid receptor complexes are assembled and maintained by an ordered pathway of interactions involving multiple components of the cellular chaperone machinery. Two of these components, Hop and Hip, serve as co-chaperones to the major heat shock proteins (Hsps), Hsp70 and Hsp90, and participate in intermediate stages of receptor assembly. In an effort to better understand the functions of Hop and Hip in the assembly process, we focused on a region of similarity located near the C-terminus of each co-chaperone. Contained within this region is a repeated sequence motif we have termed the DP repeat. Earlier mutagenesis studies implicated the DP repeat of either Hop or Hip in Hsp70 binding and in normal assembly of the co-chaperones with progesterone receptor (PR) complexes. We report here that the DP repeat lies within a protease-resistant domain that extends to or is near the C-terminus of both co-chaperones. Point mutations in the DP repeats render the C-terminal regions hypersensitive to proteolysis. In addition, a Hop DP mutant displays altered proteolytic digestion patterns, which suggest that the DP-repeat region influences the folding of other Hop domains. Although the respective DP regions of Hop and Hip share sequence and structural similarities, they are not functionally interchangeable. Moreover, a double-point mutation within the second DP-repeat unit of Hop that converts this to the sequence found in Hip disrupts Hop function; however, the corresponding mutation in Hip does not alter its function. We conclude that the DP repeats are important structural elements within a C-terminal domain, which is important for Hop and Hip function.

  15. Localization of the Intracellular Activity Domain of Pasteurella multocida Toxin to the N Terminus

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Brenda A.; Ponferrada, Virgilio G.; Vallance, Jefferson E.; Ho, Mengfei

    1999-01-01

    We have shown that Pasteurella multocida toxin (PMT) directly causes transient activation of Gqα protein that is coupled to phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase Cβ1 in Xenopus oocytes (B. A. Wilson, X. Zhu, M. Ho, and L. Lu, J. Biol. Chem. 272:1268–1275, 1997). We found that antibodies directed against an N-terminal peptide of PMT inhibited the toxin-induced response in Xenopus oocytes, but antibodies against a C-terminal peptide did not. To test whether the intracellular activity domain of PMT is localized to the N terminus, we conducted a deletion mutational analysis of the PMT protein, using the Xenopus oocyte system as a means of screening for toxin activity. Using PCR and conventional cloning techniques, we cloned from a toxinogenic strain of P. multocida the entire toxA gene, encoding the 1,285-amino-acid PMT protein, and expressed the recombinant toxin as a His-tagged fusion protein in Escherichia coli. We subsequently generated a series of N-terminal and C-terminal deletion mutants and expressed the His-tagged PMT fragments in E. coli. These proteins were screened for cytotoxic activity on cultured Vero cells and for intracellular activity in the Xenopus oocyte system. Only the full-length protein without the His tag exhibited activity on Vero cells. The full-length PMT and N-terminal fragments containing the first 500 residues elicited responses in oocytes, but the C-terminal 780 amino acid fragment did not. Our results confirm that the intracellular activity domain of PMT is localized to the N-terminal 500 amino acids of the protein and that the C terminus is required for entry into cells. PMID:9864199

  16. Binding between a Distal C-Terminus Fragment of Cannabinoid Receptor 1 and Arrestin-2

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Shubhadra; Bakshi, Kunal; Mercier, Richard W.; Makriyannis, Alexandros; Pavlopoulos, Spiro

    2011-01-01

    Internalization of G-protein coupled receptors is mediated by phosphorylation of the C-terminus, followed by binding with the cytosolic protein arrestin. To explore structural factors that may play a role in internalization of cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1), we utilize a phosphorylated peptide derived from the distal C-terminus of CB1 (CB15P454-473). Complexes formed between the peptide and human arrestin-2 (wt-arr21-418) were compared to those formed with a truncated arrestin-2 mutant (tr-arr21-382) using isothermal titration calorimetry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The penta-phosphopeptide CB15P454-473 adopts a helix-loop conformation, whether binding to full-length arrestin-2 or its truncated mutant. This structure is similar to that of a hepta-phosphopeptide, mimicking the distal segment of the rhodopsin C-tail (Rh7P330-348), binding to visual arrestin, suggesting that this adopted structure bears functional significance. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) experiments show that the CB15P454-473 peptide binds to tr-arr21-382 with higher affinity than to the full-length wt-arr21-418. As the observed structure of the bound peptides is similar in either case, we attribute the increased affinity to a more exposed binding site on the N-domain of the truncated arrestin construct. The transferred nOe data from the bound phosphopeptides are used to predict a model describing the interaction with arrestin, using the data driven HADDOCK docking program. The truncation of arrestin-2 provides scope for positively charged residues in the polar core of the protein to interact with phosphates present in the loop of the CB15P454-473 peptide. PMID:21306178

  17. The myristoylated amino terminus of ADP-ribosylation factor 1 is a phospholipid- and GTP-sensitive switch.

    PubMed

    Randazzo, P A; Terui, T; Sturch, S; Fales, H M; Ferrige, A G; Kahn, R A

    1995-06-16

    ADP-ribosylation factor 1 (Arf1) is an essential N-myristoylated 21-kDa GTP-binding protein with activities that include the regulation of membrane traffic and phospholipase D activity. Both the N terminus of the protein and the N-myristate bound to glycine 2 have previously been shown to be essential to the function of Arf in cells. We show that the bound nucleotide affects the conformation of either the N terminus or residues of Arf1 that are in direct contact with the N terminus. This was demonstrated by examining the effects of mutations in this N-terminal domain on guanosine 5'-O-(3-thio)triphosphate (GTP gamma S) and GDP binding and dissociation kinetics. Arf1 mutants, lacking 13 or 17 residues from the N terminus or mutated at residues 3-7, had a greater affinity for GTP gamma S and a lower affinity for GDP than did the wild-type protein. As the N terminus is required for interactions with target proteins, we conclude that the N terminus of Arf1 is a GTP-sensitive effector domain. When Arf1 was acylated, the GTP-dependent conformational changes were codependent on added phospholipids. In the absence of phospholipids, myristoylated Arf1 has a lower affinity for GTP gamma S than for GDP, and in the presence of phospholipids, the myristoylated protein has a greater affinity for GTP gamma S than for GDP. Thus, N-myristoylation is a critical component in the construction of this phospholipid- and GTP-dependent switch.

  18. High-fructose intake as risk factor for neurodegeneration: Key role for carboxy methyllysine accumulation in mice hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Mastrocola, Raffaella; Nigro, Debora; Cento, Alessia S; Chiazza, Fausto; Collino, Massimo; Aragno, Manuela

    2016-05-01

    Several studies indicate the involvement of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) in neurodegenerative diseases. Moreover, the rising consumption of fructose in industrialized countries has been related to cognitive impairment, but the impact of fructose-derived AGEs on hippocampus has never been investigated. The present study aimed to evaluate in the hippocampus of C57Bl/6 mice fed a standard (SD) or a 60% fructose (HFRT) diet for 12 weeks the production of the most studied AGEs, carboxy methyllysine (CML), focusing on the role of the glutathione-dependent enzyme glyoxalase (Glo-1), the main AGEs-detoxifying system, in relation to early signs of neuronal impairment. HFRT diet evoked CML accumulation in the cell body of pyramidal neurons, followed by RAGE/NFkB signaling activation. A widespread reactive gliosis and altered mitochondrial respiratory complexes activity have been evidenced in HFRT hippocampi, paralleled by oxidative stress increase due to impaired activity of Nrf2 signaling. In addition, a translocation of Glo-1 from axons toward cell body of pyramidal neurons has been observed in HFRT mice, in relation to CML accumulation. Despite increased expression of dimeric Glo-1, its enzymatic activity was not upregulated in HFRT hippocampi, due to reduced glutathione availability, thus failing to prevent CML accumulation. The prevention of CML production by administration of the specific inhibitor pyridoxamine was able to prevent all the fructose-induced hippocampal alterations. In conclusion, a high-fructose consumption, through CML accumulation and Glo-1 impairment, induces in the hippocampus the same molecular and metabolic alterations observed in early phases of neurodegenerative diseases, and can thus represent a risk factor for their onset. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Quantitative determination of 11-nor-9-carboxy-tetrahydrocannabinol in hair by column switching LC-ESI-MS(3).

    PubMed

    Park, Meejung; Kim, Jihyun; Park, Yuran; In, Sanghwan; Kim, Eunmi; Park, Yonghoon

    2014-02-01

    Hair analysis has been regarded as an alternative method to urine analysis in forensic and criminal cases. Cannabis (marijuana) is one of the most widely used drugs in the world and it has been controlled in South Korea since 1976. Identification of 11-nor-9-carboxy-tetrahydrocannabinol (THCCOOH) in hair can be an important proof of cannabis use because it can exclude the possibility of passive cannabis smoke exposure. In this study, we described a quantitative method of THCCOOH in hair using simple liquid-liquid extraction (LLE), selective column switching liquid chromatography with electrospray ionization (ESI)-MS(3). For the column switching system three columns (precolumn, trap column and analytical column) were used. Valve switch from the precolumn to the trap column was set from 3.0 to 4.0 min because THCCOOH appeared around 3.5 min with this precolumn. After 4.0 min the valve was switched to the original position and the analytes in the trap column were eluted onto the analytical column. Resolution occurred in this column and eluted into the ESI-MS(3) system. The internal standard was THCCOOH-d3. We used ESI-negative-MS(3) transition of ions at m/z 343 to 299 to 245 (343/299/245) and m/z 346 to 302 to 248 (346/302/248) for quantification of THCCOOH and THCCOOH-d3, respectively. The validation results of selectivity, matrix effect, recovery, linearity, precision and accuracy, and processed sample stability were satisfactory. The limit of detection (LOD) was 0.05 pg/mg and the limit of quantification (LOQ) was 0.10 pg/mg. The range of concentration of THCCOOH from 98 authentic human hair was 0.13-15.75 pg/mg. This method was successfully applied in the analysis of authentic human hair samples. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. 11-Nor-9-carboxy-Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol quantification in human oral fluid by liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Scheidweiler, Karl B.; Himes, Sarah K.; Chen, Xiaohong; Liu, Hua-Fen

    2013-01-01

    Currently, Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is the analyte quantified for oral fluid cannabinoid monitoring. The potential for false-positive oral fluid cannabinoid results from passive exposure to THC-laden cannabis smoke raises concerns for this promising new monitoring technology. Oral fluid 11-nor-9-carboxy-Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THCCOOH) is proposed as a marker of cannabis intake since it is not present in cannabis smoke and was not measureable in oral fluid collected from subjects passively exposed to cannabis. THCCOOH concentrations are in the picogram per milliliter range in oral fluid and pose considerable analytical challenges. A liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry (LCMSMS) method was developed and validated for quantifying THCCOOH in 1 mL Quantisal-collected oral fluid. After solid phase extraction, chromatography was performed on a Kinetex C18 column with a gradient of 0.01 % acetic acid in water and 0.01 % acetic acid in methanol with a 0.5-mL/min flow rate. THCCOOH was monitored in negative mode electrospray ionization and multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry. The THCCOOH linear range was 12–1,020 pg/mL (R2>0.995). Mean extraction efficiencies and matrix effects evaluated at low and high quality control (QC) concentrations were 40.8–65.1 and −2.4–11.5 %, respectively (n=10). Analytical recoveries (bias) and total imprecision at low, mid, and high QCs were 85.0–113.3 and 6.6–8.4 % coefficient of variation, respectively (n=20). This is the first oral fluid THCCOOH LCMSMS triple quadrupole method not requiring derivatization to achieve a <15 pg/mL limit of quantification. The assay is applicable for the workplace, driving under the influence of drugs, drug treatment, and pain management testing. PMID:23681203

  1. Structure and Sialyllactose Binding of the Carboxy-Terminal Head Domain of the Fibre from a Siadenovirus, Turkey Adenovirus 3

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Abhimanyu K.; Berbís, M. Álvaro; Ballmann, Mónika Z.; Kilcoyne, Michelle; Menéndez, Margarita; Nguyen, Thanh H.; Joshi, Lokesh; Cañada, F. Javier; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús; Benkő, Mária; Harrach, Balázs; van Raaij, Mark J.

    2015-01-01

    The virulent form of turkey adenovirus 3 (TAdV-3), also known as turkey hemorrhagic enteritis virus (THEV), is an economically important poultry pathogen, while the avirulent form is used as a vaccine. TAdV-3 belongs to the genus Siadenovirus. The carboxy-terminal region of its fibre does not have significant sequence similarity to any other adenovirus fibre heads of known structure. Two amino acid sequence differences between virulent and avirulent TAdV-3 map on the fibre head: where virulent TAdV-3 contains Ile354 and Thr376, avirulent TAdV-3 contains Met354 and Met376. We determined the crystal structures of the trimeric virulent and avirulent TAdV-3 fibre head domains at 2.2 Å resolution. Each monomer contains a beta-sandwich, which, surprisingly, resembles reovirus fibre head more than other adenovirus fibres, although the ABCJ-GHID topology is conserved in all. A beta-hairpin insertion in the C-strand of each trimer subunit embraces its neighbouring monomer. The avirulent and virulent TAdV-3 fibre heads are identical apart from the exact orientation of the beta-hairpin insertion. In vitro, sialyllactose was identified as a ligand by glycan microarray analysis, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and crystallography. Its dissociation constant was measured to be in the mM range by isothermal titration calorimetry. The ligand binds to the side of the fibre head, involving amino acids Glu392, Thr419, Val420, Lys421, Asn422, and Gly423 binding to the sialic acid group. It binds slightly more strongly to the avirulent form. We propose that, in vivo, the TAdV-3 fibre may bind a sialic acid-containing cell surface component. PMID:26418008

  2. Ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase L1 may be involved in the development of mammary phyllodes tumors.

    PubMed

    Lien, Huang-Chun; Wang, Chung-Chieh; Huang, Chiun-Sheng; Yang, Ya-Wen; Kuo, Wen-Hung; Yao, Yu-Tung

    2013-02-01

    Phyllodes tumors (PTs) are characterized by co-proliferation of the stroma and epithelium, with the stroma being the neoplastic element. Ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase L1 (UCHL1) is a deubiquitinating enzyme that was originally considered to be a neuronal-specific marker, but later reports have shown both tumorigenic and antitumorigenic roles for UCHL1. Although a role for UCHL1 has been explored in many cancers, a study on PTs has never been reported. We assessed UCHL1 expression in 49 cases of PTs and 16 fibroadenomas using immunohistochemistry and examined associations with clinicopathological features. In normal breast, strong staining for UCHL1 was consistently observed in the nerve bundles, if present, in breast stroma. Scattered stromal cells showed negative to weak staining. The ductal and lobular units, in contrast, showed no staining. In contrast to the 16 fibroadenomas, of which only 3 showed mild staining, UCHL1 expression was consistently observed in all 49 PTs. There was a significantly increasing trend of UCHL1 expression with increasing PT grade (P < 0.001); strong staining was observed in 24 % of benign PTs, but was present in 56 and 90 % of borderline and malignant PTs, respectively. Consistently, UCHL1 was focally positive in regions of benign to borderline malignancy, but strongly and diffusely immunoreactive in regions of malignancy in cases of malignant PTs. In addition to PT grade, UCHL1 expression correlated with increasing stromal atypia (P = 0.01), but not with other clinicopathological parameters. In conclusion, the consistent expression of UCHL1 in PTs and an increasing trend of UCHL1 expression with an increasing PT grade suggest a role for UCHL1 in the pathogenesis and malignant progression of PTs.

  3. A carboxy-terminal affinity tag for the purification and mass spectrometric characterization of integral membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Wong, Julie P; Reboul, Emmanuelle; Molday, Robert S; Kast, Juergen

    2009-05-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and other structurally and functionally related membrane proteins represent particularly attractive targets for drug discovery. Integral membrane proteins are often difficult to purify from native contexts, and lack of sufficient quantities hampers subsequent structural and functional proteomic studies. We describe here an optimized enrichment strategy involving a membrane protein-compatible 1D4 affinity tag that is derived from the carboxy-terminal nine amino residues of bovine rhodopsin, and its corresponding tag-specific, high-affinity monoclonal antibody. When two GPCRs as well as two related ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters are expressed in their functional forms in human cell lines, we have shown that a single detergent and wash condition can be employed for the purification of all said membrane proteins. Subsequent in-gel digestion with trypsin and mass spectrometric peptide analysis resulted in high sequence coverage for the ABC transporters ABCA1-1D4 and ABCA4-1D4. In contrast, digestion by various enzymatic combinations was necessary to obtain the best sequence coverage for affinity-enriched GPCRs CXCR4-1D4 and CCR5-1D4 as compared against other entries in an annotated spectrum library. Furthermore, specific enzyme combinations were necessary to produce suitable peptides for deducing N-glycosylation sites on CXCR4. Our results demonstrate that the 1D4-tag enrichment strategy is a versatile tool for the characterization of integral membrane proteins that can be employed for functional proteomic studies.

  4. Trichomonas vaginalis initiator binding protein (IBP39) and RNA polymerase II large subunit carboxy terminal domain interaction.

    PubMed

    Lau, Audrey O T; Smith, Alias J; Brown, Mark T; Johnson, Patricia J

    2006-11-01

    The core promoter that directs RNA polymerase to the start of transcription in the protist Trichomonas vaginalis is an initiator (Inr) element recognized by the Inr Binding Protein, IBP39. This nuclear protein is composed of two domains: a 14.5 kDa amino (N-terminal) and a 25 kDa carboxy terminal domain (C-domain). Here we describe the identification of an IBP39-interacting protein by screening a T. vaginalis expression library using a two-hybrid system with the IBP39 C-domain as bait. The CTD of the large subunit of RNAP II was found to specifically interact with the C-domain. The specificity and nature of the interaction between the CTD of RNAP II and the C-domain of IBP39 was validated by three independent biochemical methods: co-immunoprecipitation with epitope-tagged proteins, affinity chromatography and enzyme linked ligand sorbent (ELLSA) assays. Binding was shown to involve hydrophobic bonds and to have a disassociation constant (K(d)) of 690 nM (+/-55). These results confirm and extend our previous binding studies using a peptide composed of the last nine amino acids of RNAP II CTD [Schumacher MA, Lau AOT, Johnson PJ. Structural basis of core promoter recognition in a primitive eukaryote. Cell 2003;115:413-24] that predicted an interaction between the CTD and IBP39. These data further demonstrate that IBP39 minimally possesses two functional domains: a N-terminal DNA binding domain (that recognizes the Inr) [Liston DR, Johnson PJ. Analysis of a ubiquitous promoter element in a primitive eukaryote: early evolution of the initiator element. Mol Cell Biol 1999;19:2380-8] and a C-terminal protein binding domain that recognizes the RNAP II CTD, an interaction that may be critical for recruiting RNAP II for initiation of transcription.

  5. 11-Nor-9-carboxy-∆9-tetrahydrocannabinol quantification in human oral fluid by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Scheidweiler, Karl B; Himes, Sarah K; Chen, Xiaohong; Liu, Hua-Fen; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2013-07-01

    Currently, ∆9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is the analyte quantified for oral fluid cannabinoid monitoring. The potential for false-positive oral fluid cannabinoid results from passive exposure to THC-laden cannabis smoke raises concerns for this promising new monitoring technology. Oral fluid 11-nor-9-carboxy-∆9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THCCOOH) is proposed as a marker of cannabis intake since it is not present in cannabis smoke and was not measureable in oral fluid collected from subjects passively exposed to cannabis. THCCOOH concentrations are in the picogram per milliliter range in oral fluid and pose considerable analytical challenges. A liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LCMSMS) method was developed and validated for quantifying THCCOOH in 1 mL Quantisal-collected oral fluid. After solid phase extraction, chromatography was performed on a Kinetex C18 column with a gradient of 0.01% acetic acid in water and 0.01% acetic acid in methanol with a 0.5-mL/min flow rate. THCCOOH was monitored in negative mode electrospray ionization and multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry. The THCCOOH linear range was 12-1,020 pg/mL (R(2) > 0.995). Mean extraction efficiencies and matrix effects evaluated at low and high quality control (QC) concentrations were 40.8-65.1 and -2.4-11.5%, respectively (n = 10). Analytical recoveries (bias) and total imprecision at low, mid, and high QCs were 85.0-113.3 and 6.6-8.4% coefficient of variation, respectively (n = 20). This is the first oral fluid THCCOOH LCMSMS triple quadrupole method not requiring derivatization to achieve a <15 pg/mL limit of quantification. The assay is applicable for the workplace, driving under the influence of drugs, drug treatment, and pain management testing.

  6. Structure and Sialyllactose Binding of the Carboxy-Terminal Head Domain of the Fibre from a Siadenovirus, Turkey Adenovirus 3.

    PubMed

    Singh, Abhimanyu K; Berbís, M Álvaro; Ballmann, Mónika Z; Kilcoyne, Michelle; Menéndez, Margarita; Nguyen, Thanh H; Joshi, Lokesh; Cañada, F Javier; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús; Benkő, Mária; Harrach, Balázs; van Raaij, Mark J

    2015-01-01

    The virulent form of turkey adenovirus 3 (TAdV-3), also known as turkey hemorrhagic enteritis virus (THEV), is an economically important poultry pathogen, while the avirulent form is used as a vaccine. TAdV-3 belongs to the genus Siadenovirus. The carboxy-terminal region of its fibre does not have significant sequence similarity to any other adenovirus fibre heads of known structure. Two amino acid sequence differences between virulent and avirulent TAdV-3 map on the fibre head: where virulent TAdV-3 contains Ile354 and Thr376, avirulent TAdV-3 contains Met354 and Met376. We determined the crystal structures of the trimeric virulent and avirulent TAdV-3 fibre head domains at 2.2 Å resolution. Each monomer contains a beta-sandwich, which, surprisingly, resembles reovirus fibre head more than other adenovirus fibres, although the ABCJ-GHID topology is conserved in all. A beta-hairpin insertion in the C-strand of each trimer subunit embraces its neighbouring monomer. The avirulent and virulent TAdV-3 fibre heads are identical apart from the exact orientation of the beta-hairpin insertion. In vitro, sialyllactose was identified as a ligand by glycan microarray analysis, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and crystallography. Its dissociation constant was measured to be in the mM range by isothermal titration calorimetry. The ligand binds to the side of the fibre head, involving amino acids Glu392, Thr419, Val420, Lys421, Asn422, and Gly423 binding to the sialic acid group. It binds slightly more strongly to the avirulent form. We propose that, in vivo, the TAdV-3 fibre may bind a sialic acid-containing cell surface component.

  7. Des-gamma-carboxy Prothrombin and Alpha fetoprotein as Biomarkers for the Early Detection of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lok, Anna S.; Sterling, Richard K.; Everhart, James E.; Wright, Elizabeth C.; Hoefs, John C.; Di Bisceglie, Adrian M.; Morgan, Timothy R.; Kim, Hae-Young; Lee, William M.; Bonkovsky, Herbert L.; Dienstag, Jules L.

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims: The outcome of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remains poor because of late diagnosis. The aim of this study was to compare the accuracy of alpha fetoprotein (AFP) and des-gamma-carboxy prothrombin (DCP) in the early diagnosis of HCC. Methods: Among 1031 patients randomized in the Hepatitis C Antiviral Long-Term Treatment against Cirrhosis (HALT-C) Trial, a nested case-control study of 39 HCC cases (24 early stage) and 77 matched controls was conducted to compare the performance of AFP and DCP. Testing was performed on sera from 12 months prior (month −12) to the time of HCC diagnosis (month 0). Results: The sensitivity and specificity of DCP at month 0 was 74% and 86% at a cutoff of 40 mAU/mL and 43% and 100% at a cutoff of 150 mAU/mL. The sensitivity and specificity of AFP at month 0 was 61% and 81% at a cutoff of 20 ng/mL and 22% and 100% at a cutoff of 200 ng/mL. At month −12, the sensitivity and specificity at the low cutoff was 43% and 94% for DCP and 47% and 75% for AFP. Combining both markers increased the sensitivity to 91% at month 0 and 73% at month 12 but the specificity decreased to 74% and 71%. Diagnosis of early HCC was triggered by surveillance ultrasound in 14, doubling of AFP in 5 and combination of tests in 5 patients. Conclusions: Biomarkers are needed to complement ultrasound in the detection of early HCC but neither DCP nor AFP is optimal. PMID:19852963

  8. Carboxy-terminal domain phosphatase 1 silencing results in the inhibition of tumor formation ability in gastric cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    FU, HONGBING; YANG, DEJUN; WANG, CHANGMING; XU, JIAPENG; WANG, WEIMIN; YAN, RONGLIN; CAI, QINGPING

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer (GC), one of the most malignant types of cancer, is the second greatest cause of cancer-associated mortality worldwide. Novel therapeutic targets for GC treatment are therefore urgently required. Carboxy-terminal domain phosphatase 1 (CTDP1) has a crucial role in the regulation of gene expression. However, to the best of our knowledge, the role of CTDP1 in GC has not previously been explored. In the present study, reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis was used to detect CTDP1 messenger RNA expression in various GC cell lines. CTDP1 was subsequently silenced in GC cells by lentivirus-mediated small interfering RNA (siRNA) infection, and the effects of CTDP1 inhibition on cell proliferation were evaluated by cell number counting, cell cycle analysis with propidium iodide staining and fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) analysis, apoptotic rate with Annexin V staining and FACS analysis, as well as colony formation assay in GC cells. The results revealed that CTDP1 was highly expressed in certain GC cell lines and lentivirus-mediated siRNA infection was able to effectively silence CTDP1 expression in GC cells. CTDP1 inhibition decreased cell proliferation, arrested the cell cycle at G0/G1 phase and increased cell apoptosis in GC cells. Furthermore, the colony formation ability of GC cells was also suppressed by silencing CTDP1. Taken together these results indicated that CTDP1 has a significant role in the tumor formation ability of GC cells and is a novel and promising therapeutic target for the treatment of GC. PMID:26722269

  9. A Pleiotrophin C-terminus peptide induces anti-cancer effects through RPTPβ/ζ

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Pleiotrophin, also known as HARP (Heparin Affin Regulatory Peptide) is a growth factor expressed in various tissues and cell lines. Pleiotrophin participates in multiple biological actions including the induction of cellular proliferation, migration and angiogenesis, and is involved in carcinogenesis. Recently, we identified and characterized several pleiotrophin proteolytic fragments with biological activities similar or opposite to that of pleiotrophin. Here, we investigated the biological actions of P(122-131), a synthetic peptide corresponding to the carboxy terminal region of this growth factor. Results Our results show that P(122-131) inhibits in vitro adhesion, anchorage-independent proliferation, and migration of DU145 and LNCaP cells, which express pleiotrophin and its receptor RPTPβ/ζ. In addition, P(122-131) inhibits angiogenesis in vivo, as determined by the chicken embryo CAM assay. Investigation of the transduction mechanisms revealed that P(122-131) reduces the phosphorylation levels of Src, Pten, Fak, and Erk1/2. Finally, P(122-131) not only interacts with RPTPβ/ζ, but also interferes with other pleiotrophin receptors, as demonstrated by selective knockdown of pleiotrophin or RPTPβ/ζ expression with the RNAi technology. Conclusions In conclusion, our results demonstrate that P(122-131) inhibits biological activities that are related to the induction of a transformed phenotype in PCa cells, by interacing with RPTPβ/ζ and interfering with other pleiotrophin receptors. Cumulatively, these results indicate that P(122-131) may be a potential anticancer agent, and they warrant further study of this peptide. PMID:20738847

  10. Unprecedented large inverted repeats at the replication terminus of circular bacterial chromosomes suggest a novel mode of chromosome rescue

    PubMed Central

    El Kafsi, Hela; Loux, Valentin; Mariadassou, Mahendra; Blin, Camille; Chiapello, Hélène; Abraham, Anne-Laure; Maguin, Emmanuelle; van de Guchte, Maarten

    2017-01-01

    The first Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus genome sequence revealed the presence of a very large inverted repeat (IR), a DNA sequence arrangement which thus far seemed inconceivable in a non-manipulated circular bacterial chromosome, at the replication terminus. This intriguing observation prompted us to investigate if similar IRs could be found in other bacteria. IRs with sizes varying from 38 to 76 kbp were found at the replication terminus of all 5 L. delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus chromosomes analysed, but in none of 1373 other chromosomes. They represent the first naturally occurring very large IRs detected in circular bacterial genomes. A comparison of the L. bulgaricus replication terminus regions and the corresponding regions without IR in 5 L. delbrueckii ssp. lactis genomes leads us to propose a model for the formation and evolution of the IRs. The DNA sequence data are consistent with a novel model of chromosome rescue after premature replication termination or irreversible chromosome damage near the replication terminus, involving mechanisms analogous to those proposed in the formation of very large IRs in human cancer cells. We postulate that the L. delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus-specific IRs in different strains derive from a single ancestral IR of at least 93 kbp. PMID:28281695

  11. Tectonics of a K⁺ channel: The importance of the N-terminus for channel gating.

    PubMed

    Hoffgaard, F; Kast, S M; Moroni, A; Thiel, G; Hamacher, K

    2015-12-01

    The small K⁺ channel Kcv represents the pore module of complex potassium channels. It was found that its gating can be modified by sensor domains, which are N-terminally coupled to the pore. This implies that the short N-terminus of the channel can transmit conformational changes from upstream sensors to the channel gates. To understand the functional role of the N-terminus in the context of the entire channel protein, we apply combinatorial screening of the mechanical coupling and long-range interactions in the Kcv potassium channel by reduced molecular models. The dynamics and mechanical connections in the channel complex show that the N-terminus is indeed mechanically connected to the pore domain. This includes a long rang coupling to the pore and the inner and outer transmembrane domains. Since the latter domains host the two gates of the channel, the data support the hypothesis that mechanical perturbation of the N-terminus can be transmitted to the channel gates. This effect is solely determined by the topology of the channel; sequence details only have an implicit effect on the coarse-grained dynamics via the fold and not through biochemical details at a smaller scale. This observation has important implications for engineering of synthetic channels on the basis of a K⁺ channel pore. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of N-terminus modifications on the conformation and permeation activities of the synthetic peptide L1A.

    PubMed

    Zanin, Luciana Puia Moro; de Araujo, Alexandre Suman; Juliano, Maria Aparecida; Casella, Tiago; Nogueira, Mara Correa Lelles; Ruggiero Neto, João

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the effect of the N-terminus modification of the L1A, a synthetic octadecapeptide, on its helical content, affinity and lytic action in model membranes and on its hemolytic and antibacterial activities. L1A and its acetylated analog displayed a selective antibacterial activity to Gram-negative bacteria without being hemolytic. The covalently linked 2-aminobezoic acid to the N-terminus impaired the antibacterial efficacy and increased hemolysis. Despite their lower net charge (+2), N-terminus modifications resulted in enhanced affinity and improved lytic efficiency in anionic vesicles. The analogs also showed higher helical content and consequently higher amphipathicity in these vesicles. The conformational analysis by molecular dynamics simulations in 30 % of TFE/water showed that the hydrophobic faces of the peptides are in close contact with CF3 groups of TFE while the hydrophilic faces with water molecules. Due to the loss of the amino charge, the N-termini of the analogs are buried in TFE molecules. The analysis of the pair distribution functions, obtained for the center of mass of the charged groups, has evidenced that the state of the N-terminus has influenced the possibility of different ion-pairing. The higher complexity of the bacterial cells compared with anionic vesicles hampers to establish correlations structure-function for the analogs.

  13. The G protein-coupled receptor N-terminus and receptor signalling: N-tering a new era.

    PubMed

    Coleman, James L J; Ngo, Tony; Smith, Nicola J

    2017-05-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are a vast family of membrane-traversing proteins, essential to the ability of eukaryotic life to detect, and mount an intracellular response to, a diverse range of extracellular stimuli. GPCRs have evolved with archetypal features including an extracellular N-terminus and intracellular C-terminus that flank a transmembrane structure of seven sequential helices joined by intracellular and extracellular loops. These structural domains contribute to the ability of a GPCR to be correctly synthesised and inserted into the cell membrane, to interact with its cognate ligand(s) and to couple with signal-transducing heterotrimeric G proteins, allowing the activated receptor to selectively modulate a number of signalling cascades. Whilst well known for its importance in receptor translation and trafficking, the GPCR N-terminus is underexplored as a participant in receptor signalling. This review aims to discuss and integrate recent advances in knowledge of the vital roles of the GPCR N-terminus in receptor signalling.

  14. Unprecedented large inverted repeats at the replication terminus of circular bacterial chromosomes suggest a novel mode of chromosome rescue.

    PubMed

    El Kafsi, Hela; Loux, Valentin; Mariadassou, Mahendra; Blin, Camille; Chiapello, Hélène; Abraham, Anne-Laure; Maguin, Emmanuelle; van de Guchte, Maarten

    2017-03-10

    The first Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus genome sequence revealed the presence of a very large inverted repeat (IR), a DNA sequence arrangement which thus far seemed inconceivable in a non-manipulated circular bacterial chromosome, at the replication terminus. This intriguing observation prompted us to investigate if similar IRs could be found in other bacteria. IRs with sizes varying from 38 to 76 kbp were found at the replication terminus of all 5 L. delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus chromosomes analysed, but in none of 1373 other chromosomes. They represent the first naturally occurring very large IRs detected in circular bacterial genomes. A comparison of the L. bulgaricus replication terminus regions and the corresponding regions without IR in 5 L. delbrueckii ssp. lactis genomes leads us to propose a model for the formation and evolution of the IRs. The DNA sequence data are consistent with a novel model of chromosome rescue after premature replication termination or irreversible chromosome damage near the replication terminus, involving mechanisms analogous to those proposed in the formation of very large IRs in human cancer cells. We postulate that the L. delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus-specific IRs in different strains derive from a single ancestral IR of at least 93 kbp.

  15. Modifications to the N-terminus but not the C-terminus of calcitonin gene-related peptide(8-37) produce antagonists with increased affinity.

    PubMed

    Smith, D David; Saha, Shankar; Fang, Guoyong; Schaffert, Courtney; Waugh, David J J; Zeng, Wanyun; Toth, Geza; Hulce, Martin; Abel, Peter W

    2003-06-05

    carbon of the imidazole ring of His(10). Radioligand binding experiments showed that derivatizing the N-termini substantially increased binding affinities at CGRP receptors. The benzoylated and dibenzylated derivatives had the highest affinities, which were approximately 50-fold greater than those of h-alpha-CGRP(8-37). Functional experiments confirmed that the N-terminally derivatized analogues of h-alpha-CGRP(8-37) are antagonists that are more potent than h-alpha-CGRP(8-37). In conclusion, these studies underscore the importance of Phe(37) of h-alpha-CGRP(8-37) for binding to CGRP receptors and have identified the N-terminus and His(10) as two positions that can be used for the design of antagonists with increased affinity for CGRP receptors.

  16. Amyloid fibril formation of peptides derived from the C-terminus of CETP modulated by lipids

    SciTech Connect

    García-González, Victor; Mas-Oliva, Jaime

    2013-04-26

    Highlights: •The secondary structure of a C-terminal peptide derived from CETP was studied. •Lipids modulate secondary structure changes of a C-terminal peptide derived from CETP. •Lysophosphatidic acid maintains a functional α-helix and prevents fibril formation. •Transfer of lipids by CETP is related to the presence of an α-helix at its C-end. -- Abstract: Cholesteryl-ester transfer protein (CETP) is a plasmatic protein involved in neutral lipid transfer between lipoproteins. Focusing on the last 12 C-terminus residues we have previously shown that mutation D{sub 470}N promotes a conformational change towards a β-secondary structure. In turn, this modification leads to the formation of oligomers and fibrillar structures, which cause cytotoxic effects similar to the ones provoked by amyloid peptides. In this study, we evaluated the role of specific lipid arrangements on the structure of peptide helix-Z (D{sub 470}N) through the use of thioflavin T fluorescence, peptide bond absorbance, circular dichroism and electron microscopy. The results indicate that the use of micelles formed with lysophosphatidylcholine and lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) under neutral pH induce a conformational transition of peptide helix-Z containing a β-sheet conformation to a native α-helix structure, therefore avoiding the formation of amyloid fibrils. In contrast, incubation with phosphatidic acid does not change the profile for the β-sheet conformation. When the electrostatic charge at the surface of micelles or vesicles is regulated through the use of lipids such as phospholipid and LPA, minimal changes and the presence of β-structures were recorded. Mixtures with a positive net charge diminished the percentage of β-structure and the amount of amyloid fibrils. Our results suggest that the degree of solvation determined by the presence of a free hydroxyl group on lipids such as LPA is a key condition that can modulate the secondary structure and the consequent formation of

  17. Signatures of Host mRNA 5′ Terminus for Efficient Hantavirus Cap Snatching

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Erdong

    2012-01-01

    Hantaviruses, similarly to other negative-strand segmented RNA viruses, initiate the synthesis of translation-competent capped mRNAs by a unique cap-snatching mechanism. Hantavirus nucleocapsid protein (N) binds to host mRNA caps and requires four nucleotides adjacent to the 5′ cap for high-affinity binding. N protects the 5′ caps of cellular transcripts from degradation by the cellular decapping machinery. The rescued 5′ capped mRNA fragments are stored in cellular P bodies by N, which are later efficiently used as primers by the hantaviral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) for transcription initiation. We showed that N also protects the host mRNA caps in P-body-deficient cells. However, the rescued caps were not effectively used by the hantavirus RdRp during transcription initiation, suggesting that caps stored in cellular P bodies by N are preferred for cap snatching. We examined the characteristics of the 5′ terminus of a capped test mRNA to delineate the minimum requirements for a capped transcript to serve as an efficient cap donor during hantavirus cap snatching. We showed that hantavirus RdRp preferentially snatches caps from the nonsense mRNAs compared to mRNAs engaged in translation. Hantavirus RdRp preferentially cleaves the cap donor mRNA at a G residue located 14 nucleotides downstream of the 5′ cap. The sequence complementarity between the 3′ terminus of viral genomic RNA and the nucleotides located in the vicinity of the cleavage site of the cap donor mRNA favors cap snatching. Our results show that hantavirus RdRp snatches caps from viral mRNAs. However, the negligible cap-donating efficiency of wild-type mRNAs in comparison to nonsense mRNAs suggests that viral mRNAs will not be efficiently used for cap snatching during viral infection due to their continuous engagement in protein synthesis. Our results suggest that efficiency of an mRNA to donate caps for viral mRNA synthesis is primarily regulated at the translational level. PMID

  18. Structural and dynamic evolution of the amphipathic N-terminus diversifies enzyme thermostability in the glycoside hydrolase family 12.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xukai; Chen, Guanjun; Wang, Lushan

    2016-08-21

    Understanding the molecular mechanism underlying protein thermostability is central to the process of efficiently engineering thermostable cellulases, which can provide potential advantages in accelerating the conversion of biomass into clean biofuels. Here, we explored the general factors that diversify enzyme thermostability in the glycoside hydrolase family 12 (GH12) using comparative molecular dynamics (MD) simulations coupled to a bioinformatics approach. The results indicated that protein stability is not equally distributed over the whole structure: the N-terminus is the most thermal-sensitive region of the enzymes with a β-sandwich architecture and it tends to lose its secondary structure during the course of protein unfolding. Furthermore, we found that the total interaction energy within the N-terminus is appreciably correlated with enzyme thermostability. Interestingly, the internal interactions within the N-terminus are organized in a special amphipathic pattern in which a hydrophobic packing cluster and a hydrogen bonding cluster lie at the two ends of the N-terminus. Finally, bioinformatics analysis demonstrated that the amphipathic pattern is highly conserved in GH12 and besides that, the evolution of the amino acids in the N-terminal region is an inherent mechanism underlying the diversity of enzyme thermostability. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the N-terminus is generally the structure that determines enzyme thermostability in GH12, and thereby it is also an ideal engineering target. The dynameomics study of a protein family can give a general view of protein functions, which will offer a wide range of applications in future protein engineering.

  19. Regulatory activation is accompanied by movement in the C terminus of the Na-K-Cl cotransporter (NKCC1).

    PubMed

    Monette, Michelle Y; Forbush, Biff

    2012-01-13

    The Na-K-Cl cotransporter (NKCC1) is expressed in most vertebrate cells and is crucial in the regulation of cell volume and intracellular chloride concentration. To study the structure and function of NKCC1, we tagged the transporter with cyan (CFP) and yellow (YFP) fluorescent proteins at two sites within the C terminus and measured fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) in stably expressing human embryonic kidney cell lines. Both singly and doubly tagged NKCC1s were appropriately produced, trafficked to the plasma membrane, and exhibited (86)Rb transport activity. When both fluorescent probes were placed within the same C terminus of an NKCC1 transporter, we recorded an 11% FRET decrease upon activation of the transporter. This result clearly demonstrates movement of the C terminus during the regulatory response to phosphorylation of the N terminus. When we introduced CFP and YFP separately in different NKCC1 constructs and cotransfected these in HEK cells, we observed FRET between dimer pairs, and the fractional FRET decrease upon transporter activation was 46%. Quantitatively, this indicates that the largest FRET-signaled movement is between dimer pairs, an observation supported by further experiments in which the doubly tagged construct was cotransfectionally diluted with untagged NKCC1. Our results demonstrate that regulation of NKCC1 is accompanied by a large movement between two positions in the C termini of a dimeric cotransporter. We suggest that the NKCC1 C terminus is involved in transport regulation and that dimerization may play a key structural role in the regulatory process. It is anticipated that when combined with structural information, our findings will provide a model for understanding the conformational changes that bring about NKCC1 regulation.

  20. Archaeal ribosomal stalk protein interacts with translation factors in a nucleotide-independent manner via its conserved C terminus

    PubMed Central

    Nomura, Naoko; Honda, Takayoshi; Baba, Kentaro; Naganuma, Takao; Tanzawa, Takehito; Arisaka, Fumio; Noda, Masanori; Uchiyama, Susumu; Tanaka, Isao; Yao, Min; Uchiumi, Toshio

    2012-01-01

    Protein synthesis on the ribosome requires translational GTPase factors to bind to the ribosome in the GTP-bound form, take individual actions that are coupled with GTP hydrolysis, and dissociate, usually in the GDP-bound form. The multiple copies of the flexible ribosomal stalk protein play an important role in these processes. Using biochemical approaches and the stalk protein from a hyperthermophilic archaeon, Pyrococcus horikoshii, we here provide evidence that the conserved C terminus of the stalk protein aP1 binds directly to domain I of the elongation factor aEF-2, irrespective of whether aEF-2 is bound to GTP or GDP. Site-directed mutagenesis revealed that four hydrophobic amino acids at the C terminus of aP1, Leu-100, 103, 106, and Phe-107, are crucial for the direct binding. P1 was also found to bind to the initiation factor aIF5B, as well as aEF-1α, but not aIF2γ, via its C terminus. Moreover, analytical ultracentrifugation and gel mobility shift analyses showed that a heptameric complex of aP1 and aP0, aP0(aP1)2(aP1)2(aP1)2, can bind multiple aEF-2 molecules simultaneously, which suggests that individual copies of the stalk protein are accessible to the factor. The functional significance of the C terminus of the stalk protein was also shown using the eukaryotic proteins P1/P2 and P0. It is likely that the conserved C terminus of the stalk proteins of archaea and eukaryotes can bind to translation factors both before and after GTP hydrolysis. This consistent binding ability of the stalk protein may contribute to maintaining high concentrations of translation factors around the ribosome, thus promoting translational efficiency. PMID:22355137

  1. Urinary pharmacokinetics of 11-nor-9-carboxy-delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol after controlled oral delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol administration.

    PubMed

    Gustafson, Richard A; Kim, Insook; Stout, Peter R; Klette, Kevin L; George, M P; Moolchan, Eric T; Levine, Barry; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2004-04-01

    Understanding the pharmacokinetics of orally administered cannabinoids is vitally important for optimizing therapeutic usage and to determine the impact of positive tests on drug detection programs. In this study, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (limit of quantitation = 2.5 ng/mL) was used to monitor the excretion of total 11-nor-9-carboxy-Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THCCOOH) in 4381 urine voids collected from seven participants throughout a controlled clinical study of multiple oral doses of THC. The National Institute on Drug Abuse Institutional Review Board approved the study and each participant provided informed consent. Seven participants received 0, 0.39, 0.47, 7.5, and 14.8 mg THC/day for five days in this double blind, placebo-controlled, randomized protocol conducted on a closed research ward. No significant differences (P /= 15 ng/mL. An average of only 2.9 +/- 1.6%, 2.5 +/- 2.7%, 1.5 +/- 1.4%, and 0.6 +/- 0.5% of the THC in the 0.39, 0.47, 7.5, and 14.8 mg/day doses, respectively, was excreted as THCCOOH in the urine over each 14-day dosing session. This study demonstrated that the terminal urinary elimination t(1/2) of THCCOOH following oral administration was approximately two to three days for doses ranging from 0.39 to 14.8 mg/d. These data also demonstrate that the apparent urinary elimination t(1/2) of THCCOOH prior to reaching a 15 ng/mL concentration is significantly shorter than the terminal urinary elimination t(1/2). These controlled drug administration data

  2. Tetra-aqua-bis-{3-carb-oxy-5-[(4-carb-oxy-phen-yl)diazen-yl]benzoato-κO}cobalt(II) dihydrate.

    PubMed

    Bai, Liang; Zhao, Jun

    2011-12-01

    In the title complex, [Co(C(15)H(9)N(2)O(6))(2)(H(2)O)(4)]·2H(2)O, the Co(II) ion is located on an inversion center and is coordinated by two monodentate 3-carb-oxy-5-[(4-carb-oxy-phen-yl)diazen-yl]benzo-ate ligands and four water mol-ecules in a distorted octa-hedral geometry. In the crystal, inter-molecular O-H⋯O hydrogen bonds link the mol-ecules into a three-dimensional supra-molecular network.

  3. Crystal structure of 2-amino-4-methyl-pyridin-1-ium (2R,3R)-3-carb-oxy-2,3-di-hydroxy-propano-ate monohydrate.

    PubMed

    Jovita, J V; Sathya, S; Usha, G; Vasanthi, R; Ramanand, A

    2014-09-01

    The title mol-ecular salt, C6H9N2 (+)·C4H5O6 (-)·H2O, crystallized with two 2-amino-4-methyl-pyridin-1-ium cations, two l-(+)-tartaric acid monoanions [systematic name: (2R,3R)-3-carb-oxy-2,3-di-hydroxy-propano-ate] and two water mol-ecules in the asymmetric unit. In the crystal, the cations, anions and water mol-ecules are linked via a number of O-H⋯O and N-H⋯O hydrogen bonds, and a C-H⋯O hydrogen bond, forming a three-dimensional structure.

  4. Analysis of 11-nor-9-carboxy-delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol in biological samples by gas chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (GC/MS-MS).

    PubMed

    Chiarotti, M; Costamagna, L

    2000-10-09

    Gas chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (GC/MS-MS) analysis of 11-nor-carboxy-delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta(9)-THC-COOH), the major metabolite of delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, in biological samples is reported. The proposed method, using deuterated delta(9)-THC-COOH as an internal standard, is able to detect the major metabolite of cannabis derivatives at very low levels (picograms/millilitre) with high specificity. These characteristics render the proposed analytical procedure suitable for confirmatory analysis in drug testing for cannabis use.

  5. The SUPERMAN protein is an active repressor whose carboxy-terminal repression domain is required for the development of normal flowers.

    PubMed

    Hiratsu, Keiichiro; Ohta, Masaru; Matsui, Kyoko; Ohme-Takagi, Masaru

    2002-03-13

    SUPERMAN was identified as a putative regulator of transcription that acts in floral development, but its function remains to be clarified. We demonstrate here that SUPERMAN is an active repressor whose repression domain is located in the carboxy-terminal region. Ectopic expression of SUPERMAN that lacked the repression domain resulted in a phenotype similar to that of superman mutants, demonstrating that the repression activity of SUPERMAN is essential for the development of normal flowers. Constitutive expression of SUPERMAN resulted in a severe dwarfism but did not affect cell size, indicating that SUPERMAN might regulate genes that are involved in cell division.

  6. Eight new crystal structures of 5-(hydroxymethyl)uracil, 5-carboxyuracil and 5-carboxy-2-thiouracil: insights into the hydrogen-bonded networks and the predominant conformations of the C5-bound residues.

    PubMed

    Seiler, Vanessa Kristina; Hützler, Wilhelm Maximilian; Bolte, Michael

    2016-05-01

    In order to examine the preferred hydrogen-bonding pattern of various uracil derivatives, namely 5-(hydroxymethyl)uracil, 5-carboxyuracil and 5-carboxy-2-thiouracil, and for a conformational study, crystallization experiments yielded eight different structures: 5-(hydroxymethyl)uracil, C5H6N2O3, (I), 5-carboxyuracil-N,N-dimethylformamide (1/1), C5H4N2O4·C3H7NO, (II), 5-carboxyuracil-dimethyl sulfoxide (1/1), C5H4N2O4·C2H6OS, (III), 5-carboxyuracil-N,N-dimethylacetamide (1/1), C5H4N2O4·C4H9NO, (IV), 5-carboxy-2-thiouracil-N,N-dimethylformamide (1/1), C5H4N2O3S·C3H7NO, (V), 5-carboxy-2-thiouracil-dimethyl sulfoxide (1/1), C5H4N2O3S·C2H6OS, (VI), 5-carboxy-2-thiouracil-1,4-dioxane (2/3), 2C5H4N2O3S·3C6H12O3, (VII), and 5-carboxy-2-thiouracil, C10H8N4O6S2, (VIII). While the six solvated structures, i.e. (II)-(VII), contain intramolecular S(6) O-H...O hydrogen-bond motifs between the carboxy and carbonyl groups, the usually favoured R2(2)(8) pattern between two carboxy groups is formed in the solvent-free structure, i.e. (VIII). Further R2(2)(8) hydrogen-bond motifs involving either two N-H...O or two N-H...S hydrogen bonds were observed in three crystal structures, namely (I), (IV) and (VIII). In all eight structures, the residue at the ring 5-position shows a coplanar arrangement with respect to the pyrimidine ring which is in agreement with a search of the Cambridge Structural Database for six-membered cyclic compounds containing a carboxy group. The search confirmed that coplanarity between the carboxy group and the cyclic residue is strongly favoured.

  7. Re-designed N-terminus enhances expression, solubility and crystallizability of mitochondrial protein.

    PubMed

    Gaudry, Agnès; Lorber, Bernard; Neuenfeldt, Anne; Sauter, Claude; Florentz, Catherine; Sissler, Marie

    2012-09-01

    Mitochondrial aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases are key enzymes in translation. They are encoded by the nuclear genome, synthesized as precursors in the cytosol and imported. Most are matured by cleavage of their N-terminal targeting sequence. The poor expression of mature proteins in prokaryotic systems, along with their low solubility and stability after purification are major obstacles for biophysical and crystallographic studies. The purpose of the present work was to analyze the influence of additives on a slightly soluble aspartyl-tRNA synthetase and of the N-terminal sequence of the protein on its expression and solubility. On the one hand, the solubility of the enzyme was augmented to some extent in the presence of a chemical analog of the intermediary product aspartyl-adenylate, 5'-O-[N-(L aspartyl) sulfamoyl] adenosine. On the other hand, expression was enhanced by extending the N-terminus by seven natural amino acids from the predicted targeting sequence. The re-designed enzyme was active, monodisperse, more soluble and yielded crystals that are suitable for structure determination. This result underlines the importance of the N-terminal residue sequence for solubility. It suggests that additional criteria should be taken into account for the prediction of cleavage sites in mitochondrial targeting sequences.

  8. Evolution of Ice Mélange Motion During Periods of Terminus Quiescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassotto, R.; Amundson, J. M.; Fahnestock, M. A.; Truffer, M.; Burton, J. C.; Kuo, C. C.; Dennin, M.; Boettcher, M. S.

    2016-12-01

    Variations in the strength of ice mélange, a dense matrix of icebergs and sea ice retained in many proglacial fjords, has been proposed as a key process influencing the stability of tidewater glaciers in Greenland [Straneo et al., 2013]. Several observational studies have shown that variations in ice mélange characteristics often precede changes in speed and calving rates along glacier termini. A full understanding of the resistance provided by ice mélange, and therefore its impact on glacier stability, requires knowledge of its granular rheology. Toward this goal, we present unique terrestrial radar interferometry (TRI) observations of the ice mélange at Jakobshavn Isbræ, Greenland that was acquired at very high spatial (meters) and temporal (minutes) resolution during summer 2012. Data was collected over a 15-day period, during which several large calving events occurred. Previous work [Peters et al., 2015] described the dynamic jamming of the ice mélange that was observed during calving events. Here, we focus on the more gradual evolution of the ice mélange during periods of terminus quiescence. We look at variations in velocity and strain rate and consider how glacier motion, ocean currents, tides, and wind affect motion of the ice mélange. Our aim is to provide the most comprehensive study of ice mélange rheology to date.

  9. Glacier-terminus fluctuations in the Wrangell and Chugach mountains resulting from non-climate controls

    SciTech Connect

    Sturm, M.; Hall, D.K.; Benson, C.S.; Field, W.O.

    1992-03-01

    Non-climatically controlled fluctuations of glacier termini were studied in two regions in Alaska. In the Wrangell Mountains, eight glaciers on Mt. Wrangell, an active volcano, have been monitored over the past 30 years using terrestrial surveys, aerial photogrammetry and digitally registered satellite images. Results, which are consistent between different methods of measurement, indicate that the termini of most glaciers were stationary or had retreated slightly. However, the termini of the 30-km-long Ahtna Glacier and the smaller Center and South MacKeith glaciers began to advance in the early 1960s and have advanced steadily at rates between 5 and 18 m yr-1 since then. These three glaciers flow from the summit caldera of ML Wrangell near the active North Crater, where increased volcanic heating since 1964 has melted over 7 x 107 M3 of ice. The authors suspect that volcanic meltwater has changed the basal conditions for the glaciers, resulting in their advance. In College Fjord, Prince William Sound, the terminus fluctuations of two tidewater glaciers have been monitored since 1931 by terrestrial surveying, photogrammetry, and most recently, from satellite imagery. Harvard Glacier, a 40-kmlong tidewater glacier, has been advancing steadily at nearly 20 m yr-1 since 1931, while the adjacent Yale Glacier has retreated at approximately 50 m yr-1 during the same period, though for short periods, both rates have been much higher.

  10. Mitotic Phosphorylation of TREX1 C Terminus Disrupts TREX1 Regulation of the Oligosaccharyltransferase Complex.

    PubMed

    Kucej, Martin; Fermaintt, Charles S; Yang, Kun; Irizarry-Caro, Ricardo A; Yan, Nan

    2017-03-14

    TREX1 mutations are associated with several autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. The N-terminal DNase domain of TREX1 is important for preventing self-DNA from activating the interferon response. The C terminus of TREX1 is required for ER localization and regulation of oligosacchariyltransferase (OST) activity. Here, we show that during mitosis TREX1 is predominately phosphorylated at the C-terminal Serine-261 by Cyclin B/CDK1. TREX1 is dephosphorylated quickly at mitotic exit, likely by PP1/PP2-type serine/threonine phosphatase. Mitotic phosphorylation does not affect TREX1 DNase activity. Phosphomimetic mutations of mitotic phosphorylation sites in TREX1 disrupted the interaction with the OST subunit RPN1. RNA-seq analysis of Trex1(-/-) mouse embryonic fibroblasts expressing TREX1 wild-type or phosphor-mutants revealed a glycol-gene signature that is elevated when TREX1 mitotic phosphorylation sites are disrupted. Thus, the cell-cycle-dependent post-translation modification of TREX1 regulates its interaction with OST, which may have important implications for immune disease associated with the DNase-independent function of TREX1.

  11. C terminus of RGS-GAIP-interacting protein conveys neuropilin-1-mediated signaling during angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ling; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata; Xu, Xiaolei

    2006-07-01

    Initially, it was thought that there was no intracellular signaling mediated by NRP-1 alone in response to its ligands. However, the emerging data from our group as well as others suggest that the signaling through NRP-1 actually promotes angiogenesis and is mediated through its C-terminal domain and downstream molecules such as phosphoinositide 3-kinase. Hence, understanding the signal transduction pathways mediated by NRP-1 and identification of its downstream molecules are of importance. By using both in vivo zebrafish model and in vitro tissue culture system, we have shown that the C-terminal three amino acids of NRP-1 (SEA-COOH) are required for NRP-1-mediated angiogenesis. Furthermore, knocking down of RGS-GAIP-interacting protein C terminus (GIPC) in zebrafish, which is associated with C-terminal domain of NRP-1, exhibits similar vasculature phenotypes to those from NRP-1 null. Specific and effective silencing of GIPC in vascular endothelium results in inhibition of NRP-1-mediated migration. In both cases as described, PDZ domain of GIPC is responsible for its function. Taken together, our data suggest a novel role of GIPC in angiogenesis and vessel formation and also support our hypothesis that NRP-1 can facilitate downstream signaling to promote angiogenesis through GIPC.

  12. Landing at the terminus of Sabrina Vallis: A potential 2020 Mars rover landing site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platz, T.; Hauber, E.; Le Deit, L.; Van Gasselt, S.; Kinch, K.; Madsen, M. B.; Rosenberg, H.

    2014-04-01

    For the upcoming 2020 Mars rover mission we selected a potential landing site that meets all geological criteria including the presence of Noachian/Early Hesperian aqueous sediments and associated hydrous mineral phases and access to unaltered igneous rocks. Our proposed landing site is located at the terminus of Sabrina Vallis in Magong crater. The 25 km × 20 km landing ellipse is centred at 11.990°N, 313.425°E. This site features deltaic sediments and distal lacustrine sediments. In central delta cliff sections weak signatures of Fe/Mg-bearing phyllosilicates are detected. Lacustrine sediments are cut by a partially exhumed igneous dyke. On the crater floor of Magong crater, remnants of an approximately 1 m thick dark deposit are observed, which is interpreted to be a tephra layer sourced from the adjacent volcanic field within Lederberg crater. Detailed terrain analysis of the landing site shows that engineering constraints are met with respect to slope and relief.

  13. Masking autoprocessing of Clostridium difficile toxin A by the C-terminus combined repetitive oligo peptides

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yongrong; Hamza, Therwa; Gao, Si; Feng, Hanping

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile toxin A and B (TcdA and TcdB) are the major virulence factors of the bacterium, both of which consist of two enzymatic domains: an effector glucosyltransferase domain (GTD) and a cysteine protease domain (CPD) responsible for autocleavage and release of GTD. Although the CPDs from both toxins share a similar structure and mechanism of hexakisphosphate (InsP6) -induced activation, TcdA is substantially less sensitive to the autocleavage as compared with TcdB. In this study, we provided evidence of inter-domain regulation of CPD activity of TcdA and its autoprocessing. The C-terminus combined repetitive oligo peptides (CROPs) of TcdA reduced the accessibility of TcdB CPD to its substrate in a chimeric toxin TxB-Ar, consequently blocking autoprocessing. Moreover, interference of antibodies with the CROPs of full-length TcdA efficiently enhanced its GTD release. In conclusion, by utilizing chimeric toxins and specific antibodies, we identified that the CROPs of TcdA plays a crucial role in controlling the InsP6-mediated activation of CPD and autocleavage of GTD. Our data provides insights on the molecular mode of action of the C. difficile toxins. PMID:25725153

  14. Localization of the N-terminus of minor coat protein IIIa in the adenovirus capsid

    PubMed Central

    San Martín, Carmen; Glasgow, Joel N.; Borovjagin, Anton; Beatty, Matthew S.; Kashentseva, Elena A.; T. Curiel, David; Marabini, Roberto; Dmitriev, Igor P.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Minor coat protein IIIa is conserved in all adenoviruses and required for correct viral assembly, but its precise function in capsid organization is unknown. The latest adenovirus capsid model proposes that IIIa is located underneath the vertex region. To obtain experimental evidence on the location of IIIa and further define its role, we engineered the IIIa gene to encode heterologous N-terminal peptide extensions. Recombinant adenovirus variants with IIIa encoding six-histidine tag (6-His), 6-His and FLAG peptides, or 6-His linked to FLAG with a (Gly4Ser)3 linker were rescued and analyzed for virus yield, capsid incorporation of heterologous peptides, and capsid stability. Longer extensions could not be rescued. Western blot analysis confirmed that the modified IIIa proteins were expressed in infected cells and incorporated into virions. In the adenovirus encoding the 6-His-linker-FLAG-IIIa gene, the 6-His tag was present in light particles but not in mature virions. Immuno-electron microscopy of this virus showed that the FLAG epitope is not accessible to antibodies on the viral particles. Three-dimensional electron microscopy (3DEM) and difference mapping located the IIIa N-terminal extension beneath the vertex complex, wedged at the interface between penton base and the peripentonal hexons, therefore supporting the latest proposed model. The position of the IIIa N-terminus and its low tolerance for modification provide new clues for understanding the role of this minor coat protein in adenovirus capsid assembly and disassembly. PMID:18786542

  15. c-Jun targets amino terminus of androgen receptor in regulating androgen-responsive transcription.

    PubMed

    Bubulya, A; Zhou, X F; Shen, X Q; Fisher, C J; Shemshedini, L

    2000-08-01

    The human androgen receptor (hAR) is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily and functions as a ligand-inducible transcription factor. We have previously proposed that c-Jun mediates the transcriptional activity of this receptor. The modular nature of hAR was used in this study to generate several fusions with the heterologous DNA-binding domain of the yeast transcription factor GAL4 in an attempt to identify the c-Jun-responsive domains within the receptor. Our results suggest that the target of c-Jun action is the amino terminus (AB region) of the receptor and that hAR amino acids 502-521 are critical for the c-Jun response. Additionally, amino acids 503-555 were shown to harbor an autonomous transactivation that is stimulated by c-Jun. Furthermore, we demonstrated that transcription intermediary factor-2 (TIF-2), a coactivator that acts on the activation function-2, stimulates the full-length hAR. These results suggest that c-Jun and TIF-2 can work together as coactivators on the hAR by targeting distinct portions of the receptor.

  16. The N-terminus of IntDOT Forms Hydrophobic Interactions During Holliday Junction Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Kolakowski, Adam J.; Gardner, Jeffrey F.

    2016-01-01

    DOT Integrase (IntDOT) is a member of the tyrosine recombinase family. It catalyzes the integration and excision reactions of an integrative and conjugative element (ICE) called CTnDOT. Like other tyrosine recombinases, the integration reaction proceeds by two sets of strand exchanges between the attDOT site on CTnDOT and an attB site in the host chromosome. The strand exchanges occur seven bases apart and define an overlap region. After the first strand exchanges a Holliday Junction (HJ) intermediate is formed. Previous work showed that a valine (V95) in a predicted alpha helix in the N-terminus of IntDOT is required for resolution of HJs to substrates and products. We have identified two additional hydrophobic residues in the helix (A92 and F99) that are involved in resolution of HJs. IntDOT proteins with substitutions at these residues form aberrant complexes in an electrophoretic mobility shift assay. We propose that these three residues participate in hydrophobic interactions that are involved in forming higher-order complexes and resolution of HJs. PMID:27422335

  17. The N-terminus of IntDOT forms hydrophobic interactions during Holliday Junction resolution.

    PubMed

    Kolakowski, Adam J; Gardner, Jeffrey F

    DOT Integrase (IntDOT) is a member of the tyrosine recombinase family. It catalyzes the integration and excision reactions of an integrative and conjugative element (ICE) called CTnDOT. Like other tyrosine recombinases, the integration reaction proceeds by two sets of strand exchanges between the attDOT site on CTnDOT and an attB site in the host chromosome. The strand exchanges occur seven bases apart and define an overlap region. After the first strand exchanges a Holliday Junction (HJ) intermediate is formed. Previous work showed that a valine (V95) in a predicted alpha helix in the N-terminus of IntDOT is required for resolution of HJs to substrates and products. We have identified two additional hydrophobic residues in the helix (A92 and F99) that are involved in resolution of HJs. IntDOT proteins with substitutions at these residues form aberrant complexes in an electrophoretic mobility shift assay. We propose that these three residues participate in hydrophobic interactions that are involved in forming higher-order complexes and resolution of HJs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. A Gyrase Mutant with Low Activity Disrupts Supercoiling at the Replication Terminus

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Zhenhua; Chen, Ray; Manna, Dipankar; Higgins, N. Patrick

    2005-01-01

    When a mutation in an essential gene shows a temperature-sensitive phenotype, one usually assumes that the protein is inactive at nonpermissive temperature. DNA gyrase is an essential bacterial enzyme composed of two subunits, GyrA and GyrB. The gyrB652 mutation results from a single base change that substitutes a serine residue for arginine 436 (R436-S) in the GyrB protein. At 42°C, strains with the gyrB652 allele stop DNA replication, and at 37°C, such strains grow but have RecA-dependent SOS induction and show constitutive RecBCD-dependent DNA degradation. Surprisingly, the GyrB652 protein is not inactive at 42°C in vivo or in vitro and it doesn't directly produce breaks in chromosomal DNA. Rather, this mutant has a low kcat compared to wild-type GyrB subunit. With more than twice the normal mean number of supercoil domains, this gyrase hypomorph is prone to fork collapse and topological chaos near the terminus of DNA replication. PMID:16267301

  19. The c-terminus of GRK3 indicates rapid dissociation of G protein heterotrimers

    PubMed Central

    Hollins, Bettye; Kuravi, Sudhakiranmayi; Digby, Gregory J.; Lambert, Nevin A.

    2009-01-01

    Signals mediated by heterotrimeric G proteins often develop over the course of tens of milliseconds, and could require either conformational rearrangement or complete physical dissociation of Gα βγ heterotrimers. Although it is known that some active heterotrimers are dissociated (into Gα and Gβγ) at steady-state, it is not clear that dissociation occurs quickly enough to participate in rapid signaling. Here we show that fusion proteins containing the c-terminus of GPCR kinase 3 (GRK3ct) and either the fluorescent protein cerulean or Renilla luciferase bind to venus-labeled Gβγ dimers (Gβγ-V), resulting in Förster or bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (FRET or BRET). GRK3ct fusion proteins are freely-diffusible, and do not form preassembled complexes with G proteins. GRK3ct fusion proteins bind to free Gβγ-V dimers but not to rearranged heterotrimers, and thus can report G protein dissociation with high temporal resolution. We find that heterotrimer dissociation can occur in living cells in less than 100 milliseconds. Under the conditions of these experiments diffusion and collision of masGRK3ct fusion proteins and Gβγ-V were not rate-limiting. These results indicate that G protein heterotrimers can dissociate quickly enough to participate in rapid signaling. PMID:19258039

  20. Oxidative stress induces nuclear translocation of C-terminus of {alpha}-synuclein in dopaminergic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Shengli; Zhou Ming; Yu Shun; Cai Yanning; Zhang Alex; Ueda, Kenji; Chan Piu . E-mail: pbchan@bjsap.org

    2006-03-31

    Growing evidence suggests that oxidative stress is involved in the neuronal degeneration and can promote the aggregation of {alpha}-synuclein. However, the role of {alpha}-synuclein under physiological and pathological conditions remains poorly understood. In the present study, we examined the possible interaction between the {alpha}-synuclein and oxidative stress. In a dopaminergic cell line MES23.5, we have found that the 200 {mu}M H{sub 2}O{sub 2} treatment induced the translocation of {alpha}-synuclein from cytoplasm to nuclei at 30 min post-treatment. The immunoactivity of {alpha}-synuclein became highly intensive in the nuclei after 2 h treatment. The protein translocated to nucleus was a 10 kDa fragment of C-terminus region of {alpha}-synuclein, while full-length {alpha}-synuclein remained in cytoplasm. Thioflavine-S staining suggested that the C-terminal fragment in the nuclei has no {beta}-sheet structures. Our present results indicated that 200 {mu}M H{sub 2}O{sub 2} treatment induces the intranuclear accumulation of the C-terminal fragment of {alpha}-synuclein in dopaminergic neurons, whose role remains to be investigated.

  1. Improved radioimmunoassay for thymosin. cap alpha. 1 recognizes the N-14 amino terminus

    SciTech Connect

    Naylor, P.H.; Goldstein, A.L.

    1986-03-01

    Thymosin ..cap alpha../sub 1/(T..cap alpha../sub 1/) is a biologically active thymic peptide currently undergoing trials as an immunomodulator in cancer patients and patients with immunodeficiencies. Abnormally elevated levels of T..cap alpha../sub 1/ have been found in the serum of individuals with or at risk for AIDS, with T-cell leukemias, and chronic progressive multiple sclerosis. Absorption of the current antibody with a synthetic C-14 fragment of T..cap alpha../sub 1/ results in an antisera specific for the N-14 amino terminus of T..cap alpha../sub 1/, which measures significantly higher levels of T..cap alpha../sub 1/ in serum from normal individuals and significantly increases the sensitivity of the assay. Ongoing studies indicate that this new RIA for T..cap alpha../sub 1/ will be useful in monitoring changes of immunoreactive T..cap alpha../sub 1/ in serum with age and in patients with known or suspected T-cell abnormalities.

  2. Gremlin-1 C-Terminus Regulates Function of Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor (MIF).

    PubMed

    Beck, Sandra; Simmet, Thomas; Müller, Iris; Lang, Florian; Gawaz, Meinrad

    2016-01-01

    The counterbalance of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) and Gremlin-1 is a useful tool to predict the acuity of coronary artery disease (CAD) and plaque stability. Gremlin1 is an endogenous antagonist of MIF and therefore influences plaque vulnerability. This study was designed to elucidate the mechanistic basis determining the biophysical binding of Gremlin-1 to MIF. An in silico model suggested that several charged C-terminal amino acids are crucial in mediating Gremlin-1/MIF-binding. We produced several single amino acid exchange mutants of Gremlin-1 by site-directed mutagenesis. These Gremlin-1 mutants were tested for their ability to reduce MIF effects on monocytes. We observed that the critical element of the Gremlin-1 molecule for regulating MIF-induced chemotactic activity lies at the C-terminal region. A single amino acid exchange of an arginine to an alanine residue is sufficient to abolish the antagonistic effect of Gremlin-1 on MIF. Therefore, the Gremlin-1 mutant R172A failed to reduce MIF-induced monocyte differentiation into macrophages. Gremlin-1 C-terminus is essential for antagonizing MIF effects. Our results could offer a novel strategy utilizing Gremlin-1 to target pro-inflammatory effects of MIF in various diseases. © 2016 The Author(s) Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Isolation of S-[2-carboxy-1-(1H-imidazol-4-yl)ethyl]-3-thiolactic acid, a new metabolite of histidine, from normal human urine and its formation from S-[2-carboxy-1-(1H-imidazol-4-yl)ethyl]cysteine.

    PubMed Central

    Kinuta, M; Ubuka, T; Yao, W B; Zhao, Y Q; Shimizu, H

    1994-01-01

    S-[2-Carboxy-1-(1H-imidazol-4-yl)ethyl]-3-thiolactic acid (CIE-TL), a novel imidazole compound with a sulphur-containing side chain, was isolated from normal human urine by ion-exchange column chromatography, and characterized by physicochemical analyses involving m.s., i.r. spectrophotometry, high-voltage paper electrophoresis and elemental analysis as well as chemical synthesis. CIE-TL was synthesized by the reaction of S-[2-carboxy-1-(1H-imidazol-4-yl)ethyl]cysteine (CIE-Cys) with NaNO2 in HCl. CIE-TL was also formed during enzymic degradation of CIE-Cys by rat liver or kidney homogenate in a phosphate buffer, possibly via the metabolic intermediate S-[2-carboxy-1-(1H-imidazol-4-yl)ethyl]-3-thiopyruvic acid, and this was accompanied by the formation of 3-[(carboxymethyl)thio]-3-(1H-imidazol-4-yl)propanoic acid, a compound previously found in human urine [Kinuta, Yao, Masuoka, Ohta, Teraoka and Ubuka (1991) Biochem. J. 275, 617-621]. These results suggest that CIE-Cys [Kinuta, Ubuka, Yao, Futani, Fujiwara and Kurozumi (1992) Biochem. J. 283, 39-40] is a physiological precursor of the urinary compounds and that L-histidine is metabolized in part via an alternative pathway initiated by the adduction of natural thiol compounds such as cysteine and GSH to urocanic acid, the first catabolite of histidine. PMID:8110184

  4. Characterization of the native form and the carboxy-terminally truncated halotolerant form of α-amylases from Bacillus subtilis strain FP-133.

    PubMed

    Takenaka, Shinji; Miyatake, Ayaka; Tanaka, Kosei; Kuntiya, Ampin; Techapun, Charin; Leksawasdi, Noppol; Seesuriyachan, Phisit; Chaiyaso, Thanongsak; Watanabe, Masanori; Yoshida, Ken-ichi

    2015-06-01

    Two amylases, amylase I and amylase II from Bacillus subtilis strain FP-133, were purified to homogeneity and characterized. Their stabilities toward temperature, pH, and organic solvents, and their substrate specificities toward polysaccharides and oligosaccharides were similar. Under moderately high salt conditions, both amylases were more stable than commercial B. licheniformis amylase, and amylase I retained higher amylase activity than amylase II. The N-terminal amino acid sequence, genomic southern blot analysis, and MALDI-TOFF-MS analysis indicated that the halotolerant amylase I was produced by limited carboxy-terminal truncation of the amylase II peptide. The deduced amino acid sequence of amylase II was >95% identical to that of previously reported B. subtilis α-amylases, but their carboxy-terminal truncation points differed. Three recombinant amylases--full-length amylase corresponding to amylase II, an artificially truncated amylase corresponding to amylase I, and an amylase with a larger artificial C-terminal truncation--were expressed in B. subtilis. The artificially truncated recombinant amylases had the same high amylase activity as amylase I under moderately high salt conditions. Sequence comparisons indicated that an increased ratio of Asp/Glu residues in the enzyme may be one factor responsible for increasing halotolerance. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. The isolated carboxy-terminal domain of human mitochondrial leucyl-tRNA synthetase rescues the pathological phenotype of mitochondrial tRNA mutations in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Perli, Elena; Giordano, Carla; Pisano, Annalinda; Montanari, Arianna; Campese, Antonio F; Reyes, Aurelio; Ghezzi, Daniele; Nasca, Alessia; Tuppen, Helen A; Orlandi, Maurizia; Di Micco, Patrizio; Poser, Elena; Taylor, Robert W; Colotti, Gianni; Francisci, Silvia; Morea, Veronica; Frontali, Laura; Zeviani, Massimo; d'Amati, Giulia

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial (mt) diseases are multisystem disorders due to mutations in nuclear or mtDNA genes. Among the latter, more than 50% are located in transfer RNA (tRNA) genes and are responsible for a wide range of syndromes, for which no effective treatment is available at present. We show that three human mt aminoacyl-tRNA syntethases, namely leucyl-, valyl-, and isoleucyl-tRNA synthetase are able to improve both viability and bioenergetic proficiency of human transmitochondrial cybrid cells carrying pathogenic mutations in the mt-tRNAIle gene. Importantly, we further demonstrate that the carboxy-terminal domain of human mt leucyl-tRNA synthetase is both necessary and sufficient to improve the pathologic phenotype associated either with these “mild” mutations or with the “severe” m.3243A>G mutation in the mt-tRNALeu(UUR) gene. Furthermore, we provide evidence that this small, non-catalytic domain is able to directly and specifically interact in vitro with human mt-tRNALeu(UUR) with high affinity and stability and, with lower affinity, with mt-tRNAIle. Taken together, our results sustain the hypothesis that the carboxy-terminal domain of human mt leucyl-tRNA synthetase can be used to correct mt dysfunctions caused by mt-tRNA mutations. PMID:24413190

  6. Activation of Src in human breast tumor cell lines: elevated levels of phosphotyrosine phosphatase activity that preferentially recognizes the Src carboxy terminal negative regulatory tyrosine 530.

    PubMed

    Egan, C; Pang, A; Durda, D; Cheng, H C; Wang, J H; Fujita, D J

    1999-02-04

    Elevated levels of Src kinase activity have been reported in a number of human cancers, including colon and breast cancer. We have analysed four human breast tumor cell lines that exhibit high levels of Src kinase activity, and have determined that these cell lines also exhibit a high level of a phosphotyrosine phosphatase activity that recognizes the Src carboxy-terminal P-Tyr530 negative regulatory site. Total Src kinase activity in these cell lines is elevated as much as 30-fold over activity in normal control cells and specific activity is elevated as much as 5.6-fold. When the breast tumor cells were grown in the presence of the tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor vanadate, Src kinase activity was reduced in all four breast tumor cell lines, suggesting that Src was being activated by a phosphatase which could recognize the Tyr530 negative regulatory site. In fractionated cell extracts from the breast tumor cells, we found elevated levels of a membrane associated tyrosine phosphatase activity that preferentially dephosphorylated a Src family carboxy-terminal phosphopeptide containing the regulatory tyrosine 530 site. Src was hypophosphorylated in vivo at tyrosine 530 in at least two of the tumor cell lines, further suggesting that Src was being activated by a phosphatase in these cells. In preliminary immunoprecipitation and antibody depletion experiments, we were unable to correlate the major portion of this phosphatase activity with several known phosphatases.

  7. Deconstructing honeybee vitellogenin: novel 40 kDa fragment assigned to its N terminus

    PubMed Central

    Havukainen, Heli; Halskau, Øyvind; Skjaerven, Lars; Smedal, Bente; Amdam, Gro V.

    2011-01-01

    Vitellogenin, an egg-yolk protein precursor common to oviparous animals, is found abundantly in honeybee workers – a caste of helpers that do not usually lay eggs. Instead, honeybee vitellogenin (180 kDa) participates in processes other than reproduction: it influences hormone signaling, food-related behavior, immunity, stress resistance and longevity. The molecular basis of these functions is largely unknown. Here, we establish and compare the molecular properties of vitellogenin from honeybee hemolymph (blood) and abdominal fat body, two compartments that are linked to vitellogenin functions. Our results reveal a novel 40 kDa vitellogenin fragment in abdominal fat body tissue, the main site for vitellogenin synthesis and storage. Using MALDI-TOF combined with MS/MS mass-spectroscopy, we assign the 40 kDa fragment to the N terminus of vitellogenin, whereas a previously observed 150 kDa fragment corresponded to the remainder of the protein. We show that both protein units are N glycosylated and phosphorylated. Focusing on the novel 40 kDa fragment, we present a homology model based on the structure of lamprey lipovitellin that includes a conserved β-barrel-like shape, with a lipophilic cavity in the interior and two insect-specific loops that have not been described before. Our data indicate that the honeybee fat body vitellogenin experiences cleavage unlike hemolymph vitellogenin, a pattern that can suggest a tissue-specific role. Our experiments advance the molecular understanding of vitellogenin, of which the multiple physiological and behavioral effects in honeybees are well established. PMID:21270306

  8. Surges of tidewater glaciers initiated at the terminus: observations and mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sevestre, Heidi; Benn, Douglas; Luckman, Adrian; Nuth, Chris; Kohler, Jack; Lindback, Katrin; Pettersson, Rickard

    2017-04-01

    There have been numerous reports that surges of tidewater glaciers in Svalbard were initiated at the terminus and propagated up-glacier, in contrast with downglacier-propagating surges of land-terminating glaciers. Most of the tidewater glacier surges were poorly documented, however, and the cause of this anomalous behavior was unknown. In this study we present detailed data on the recent surges of Aavatsmarkbreen and Wahlenbergbreen, two tidewater glaciers in western Spitsbergen. High-resolution time-series of glacier velocities and evolution of surface crevasse patterns clearly show that both surges propagated up-glacier in a series of abrupt steps. Prior to the surges, the glaciers underwent strong retreat and significant steepening of their terminal zones, and in the case of Aavatsmarkbreen this can be shown to have caused a doubling of driving stress between 1990 and surge onset in 2013. We conclude that the surges developed in response to two distinct processes. 1) During the late quiescent phase, the terminal zones underwent gradual acceleration due to steepening and increasing driving stress. 2) Acceleration of the glacier termini caused surface crevasses to propagate up-glacier, allowing surface melt- and rain-water to access the bed. Upward migration of the surge velocities coincided with stepwise the expansion of the crevasse field. Despite a short-lived reactivation in the summer of 2015, the surge of Aavatsmarkbreen terminated gradually, which we interpret as the result of gradual leakage of stored water. The behavior of these glaciers can be understood in terms of the enthalpy cycle model.

  9. Molecular Basis for Membrane Pore Formation by Bax Protein Carboxyl Terminus

    PubMed Central

    Tatulian, Suren A.; Garg, Pranav; Nemec, Kathleen N.; Chen, Bo; Khaled, Annette R.

    2015-01-01

    Bax protein plays a key role in mitochondrial membrane permeabilization and cytochrome c release upon apoptosis. Our recent data have indicated that the 20-residue C-terminal peptide of Bax (BaxC-KK; VTIFVAGVL-TASLTIWKKMG), when expressed intracellularly, translocates to the mitochondria and exerts lethal effect on cancer cells. Moreover, the BaxC-KK peptide, as well as two mutants where the two lysines are replaced with glutamate (BaxC-EE) or leucine (BaxC-LL), have been shown to form relatively large pores in lipid membranes, composed of up to eight peptide molecules per pore. Here the pore structure is analyzed by polarized Fourier transform infrared, circular dichroism, and fluorescence experiments on the peptides reconstituted in phospholipid membranes. The peptides assume an α/β-type secondary structure within membranes. Both β-strands and α-helices are significantly (by 30–60 deg) tilted relative to the membrane normal. The tryptophan residue embeds into zwitterionic membranes at 8–9 Å from the membrane center. The membrane anionic charge causes a deeper insertion of tryptophan for BaxC-KK and BaxC-LL but not for BaxC-EE. Combined with the pore stoichiometry determined earlier, these structural constraints allow construction of a model of the pore where eight peptide molecules form an “α/β-ring” structure within the membrane. These results identify a strong membranotropic activity of Bax C-terminus and propose a new mechanism by which peptides can efficiently perforate cell membranes. Knowledge on the pore forming mechanism of the peptide may facilitate development of peptide-based therapies to kill cancer or other detrimental cells such as bacteria or fungi. PMID:23110300

  10. Conformational Changes in the Orai1 C-Terminus Evoked by STIM1 Binding

    PubMed Central

    Tirado-Lee, Leidamarie; Yamashita, Megumi; Prakriya, Murali

    2015-01-01

    Store-operated CRAC channels regulate a wide range of cellular functions including gene expression, chemotaxis, and proliferation. CRAC channels consist of two components: the Orai proteins (Orai1-3), which form the ion-selective pore, and STIM proteins (STIM1-2), which form the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca2+ sensors. Activation of CRAC channels is initiated by the migration of STIM1 to the ER-plasma membrane (PM) junctions, where it directly interacts with Orai1 to open the Ca2+-selective pores of the CRAC channels. The recent elucidation of the Drosophila Orai structure revealed a hexameric channel wherein the C-terminal helices of adjacent Orai subunits associate in an anti-parallel orientation. This association is maintained by hydrophobic interactions between the Drosophila equivalents of human Orai1 residues L273 and L276. Here, we used mutagenesis and chemical cross-linking to assess the nature and extent of conformational changes in the self-associated Orai1 C-termini during STIM1 binding. We find that linking the anti-parallel coiled-coils of the adjacent Orai1 C-termini through disulfide cross-links diminishes STIM1-Orai1 interaction, as assessed by FRET. Conversely, prior binding of STIM1 to the Orai1 C-terminus impairs cross-linking of the Orai1 C-termini. Mutational analysis indicated that a bend of the Orai1 helix located upstream of the self-associated coils (formed by the amino acid sequence SHK) establishes an appropriate orientation of the Orai1 C-termini that is required for STIM1 binding. Together, our results support a model wherein the self-associated Orai1 C-termini rearrange modestly to accommodate STIM1 binding. PMID:26035642

  11. Transport of Iron Particles in the Silica Aquifers: Effect of Water Chemistry and Carboxy-Methyl Cellulose Polymer Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pensini, E.; Sleep, B. E.; Yip, C.

    2011-12-01

    Zero-valent iron particles are employed to remediate subsurface areas contaminated by chlorinated compounds, degrading them into less harmful substances. An aspect of major importance when assessing the viability of the technology is the ability of the particles to migrate in the subsurface reaching the contaminant source zone. Particle transport is influenced by particle adhesion onto geological substrates, since in the presence of strong adhesion particles are retained and their transport is hindered. Iron particles are generally coated with polymeric materials to prevent their rapid aggregation, and such coatings are expected to affect the surface properties and thus iron particle transport. This study investigates the forces of interaction between bare and carboxy-methyl cellulose CMC coated iron particles and silica (SiO2), to assess the influence of CMC coatings on iron particle adhesion. Atomic force spectroscopy experiments were conducted to measure the interactions between uncoated iron particles and silica in ultra pure water, NaCl and CaCl2 solutions at concentrations of 100 mM, as well as in solutions buffered with acetate and NaHCO3 (pH= 4 and 8 respectively). At pH values below 8 attractive interactions were observed, suggesting that silica could effectively retain the particles due to electrostatic attraction between negatively charged silica and positively charged iron particles. In contrast, at pH values of 8 the forces of interactions were repulsive, possibly because at this pH the positive charge on the iron surface is neutralized and repulsive hydration forces dominate. The interactions between SiO2 and CMC coated iron particles were repulsive in ultra pure water, as well as in solutions buffered with acetate or NaHCO3, and neutral in 100 mM NaCl solutions. In 100 mM CaCl2 solutions the forces of interaction were either neutral or attractive, suggesting that the presence of Ca2+ ions favors attachment of CMC to SiO2. Similar observations were

  12. Solvent migration from the C- to the N-terminus of amino acid in photoionization of phenylglycine-water complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyung Min; Han, Kyu Young; Park, Juyeon; Kim, Gap-Sue; Kim, Seong Keun

    2008-01-01

    Photo-oxidation of amino acids is known to generate reactive protein radicals that lead to lethal disorders. We investigated photoionization of hydrated phenylglycine complexes in the gas phase and found that the excess internal energy from photoionization drives decarboxylation in competition with dehydration. We also found that, in decarboxylation, the solvent migrates a large distance from the C terminus of the neutral amino acid to the N terminus of the newly formed radical cation upon ionization, prior to the departure of the carboxyl group. It is noted that a solvent does not just act as a passive medium bound to the solute molecule but actively pursues its own course of action upon external perturbation that changes its chemical environment.

  13. The Myristate Moiety and Amino Terminus of Vaccinia Virus L1 Constitute a Bipartite Functional Region Needed for Entry

    PubMed Central

    Whitbeck, J. Charles; Ponce-de-León, Manuel; Saw, Wan Ting; Cohen, Gary H.; Eisenberg, Roselyn J.

    2012-01-01

    Vaccinia virus (VACV) L1 is a myristoylated envelope protein which is required for cell entry and the fusion of infected cells. L1 associates with members of the entry-fusion complex (EFC), but its specific role in entry has not been delineated. We recently demonstrated (Foo CH, et al., Virology 385:368–382, 2009) that soluble L1 binds to cells and blocks entry, suggesting that L1 serves as the receptor-binding protein for entry. Our goal is to identify the structural domains of L1 which are essential for its functions in VACV entry. We hypothesized that the myristate and the conserved residues at the N terminus of L1 are critical for entry. To test our hypothesis, we generated mutants in the N terminus of L1 and used a complementation assay to evaluate their ability to rescue infectivity. We also assessed the myristoylation efficiency of the mutants and their ability to interact with the EFC. We found that the N terminus of L1 constitutes a region that is critical for the infectivity of VACV and for myristoylation. At the same time, the nonmyristoylated mutants were incorporated into mature virions, suggesting that the myristate is not required for the association of L1 with the viral membrane. Although some of the mutants exhibited altered structural conformations, two mutants with impaired infectivity were similar in conformation to wild-type L1. Importantly, these two mutants, with changes at A4 and A5, undergo myristoylation. Overall, our results imply dual differential roles for myristate and the amino acids at the N terminus of L1. We propose a myristoyl switch model to describe how L1 functions. PMID:22398293

  14. The extreme N-terminus of TDP-43 mediates the cytoplasmic aggregation of TDP-43 and associated toxicity in vivo.

    PubMed

    Sasaguri, Hiroki; Chew, Jeannie; Xu, Ya-Fei; Gendron, Tania F; Garrett, Aliesha; Lee, Chris W; Jansen-West, Karen; Bauer, Peter O; Perkerson, Emilie A; Tong, Jimei; Stetler, Caroline; Zhang, Yong-Jie

    2016-09-15

    Inclusions of Tar DNA- binding protein 43 (TDP-43) are a pathological hallmark of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration with TDP-43-positive inclusions (FTLD-TDP). Pathological TDP-43 exhibits the disease-specific biochemical signatures, which include its ubiquitination, phosphorylation and truncation. Recently, we demonstrated that the extreme N-terminus of TDP-43 regulates formation of abnormal cytoplasmic TDP-43 aggregation in cultured cells and primary neurons. However, it remained unclear whether this N-terminal domain mediates TDP-43 aggregation and the associated toxicity in vivo. To investigate this, we expressed a GFP-tagged TDP-43 with a nuclear localization signal mutation (GFP-TDP-43NLSm) and a truncated form without the extreme N-terminus (GFP-TDP-4310-414-NLSm) by adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors in mouse primary cortical neurons and murine central nervous system. Compared to neurons containing GFP alone, expression of GFP-TDP-43NLSm resulted in the formation of ubiquitin-positive cytoplasmic inclusions and activation of caspase-3, an indicator of cell death. Moreover, mice expressing GFP-TDP-43NLSm proteins show reactive gliosis and develop neurological abnormalities. However, by deletion of TDP-43's extreme N-terminus, these pathological alterations can be abrogated. Together, our study provides further evidence confirming the critical role of the extreme N-terminus of TDP-43 in regulating protein structure as well as mediating toxicity associated with its aggregation. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI:RNA Metabolism in Disease. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Enhancement of the direct antimicrobial activity of Lysep3 against Escherichia coli by inserting cationic peptides into its C terminus.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qiang; Guo, Zhimin; Gao, Chencheng; Zhu, Rining; Wang, Shuang; Yu, Ling; Qin, Wanhai; Xia, Xiaojing; Gu, Jingmin; Yan, Guangmou; Lei, Liancheng

    2017-03-01

    Phage lysins are considered promising antimicrobials against resistant bacterial infections. Some lysins have been reported for the prevention and treatment of Gram-positive bacterial infection. Gram-negative bacterial phage lysins, however, can only destroy the bacterial cell wall from inside because of the obstruction of the bacterial outer membrane that prevents direct hydrolysis of the bacterial wall peptidoglycan from the outside, severely restricting the development of lysins against Gram-negative bacteria. In this study, genetic engineering techniques were used to fuse a 5 cationic amino acid polypeptide (KRKRK), a 10 cationic amino acid polypeptide (KRKRKRKRKR), a 15 cationic amino acid polypeptide (KRKRKRKRKRKRKRK), and a polypeptide including both cationic and hydrophobic amino acids (KRKRKFFVAIIP) to the C-terminus of the Escherichia coli phage lysin Lysep3 to obtain four fusion lysins (5aa, 10aa, 15aa, Mix). The bactericidal effects of those four lysins on E. coli were then compared in vitro. Our results showed that the fusion of hydrophobic and positively charged amino acids, Mix, can kill E. coli effectively; the fusion of positively charged amino acids alone at the C-terminus (5aa, 10aa, 15aa) also showed bactericidal activity against E. coli from the outside, with the bactericidal activity gradually increasing with the positive charge at the C-terminus of the lysin. Collectively, improving the positive charge at the C-terminus of E. coli bacteriophage lysin Lysep3 increases its bactericidal ability from outside E. coli, providing a new practical method for the development of anti-Gram-negative bacterial lysins.

  16. A tail of two signals: the C terminus of the A(2A)-adenosine receptor recruits alternative signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Gsandtner, Ingrid; Freissmuth, Michael

    2006-08-01

    G protein-coupled receptors are endowed with carboxyl termini that vary greatly in length and sequence. In most instances, the distal portion of the C terminus is dispensable for G protein coupling. This is also true for the A(2A)-adenosine receptor, where the last 100 amino acids are of very modest relevance to G(s) coupling. The C terminus was originally viewed mainly as the docking site for regulatory proteins of the beta-arrestin family. These beta-arrestins bind to residues that have been phosphorylated by specialized kinases (G protein-coupled receptor kinases) and thereby initiate receptor desensitization and endocytosis. More recently, it has become clear that many additional "accessory" proteins bind to C termini of G protein-coupled receptors. The article by Sun et al. in the current issue of Molecular Pharmacology identifies translin-associated protein-X as yet another interaction partner of the A(2A) receptor; translin-associated protein allows the A(2A) receptor to impinge on the signaling mechanisms by which p53 regulates neuronal differentiation, but the underlying signaling pathways are uncharted territory. With a list of five known interaction partners, the C terminus of the A(2A) receptor becomes a crowded place. Hence, there must be rules that regulate the interaction. This allows the C terminus to act as coincidence detector and as signal integrator. Despite our ignorance about the precise mechanisms, the article has exciting implications: the gene encoding for translin-associated protein-X maps to a locus implicated in some forms of schizophrenia; A(2A) receptor agonists are candidate drugs for the treatment of schizophrenic symptoms. It is of obvious interest to explore a possible link.

  17. A peptide with a ProGln C terminus in the human saliva peptidome exerts bactericidal activity against Propionibacterium acnes.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chun-Ming; Torpey, Justin W; Liu, Yu-Tseung; Chen, Yun-Ru; Williams, Katherine E; Komives, Elizabeth A; Gallo, Richard L

    2008-05-01

    Nine proline-rich peptides ending with a proline-glutamine C terminus in a salivary peptidome were sequenced by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight time of flight tandem mass spectrometry. A GPPPQGGRPQ peptide binds gram-positive Propionibacterium acnes and considerably inhibits bacterial growth. The peptide exhibiting innate immunity may be applied for treatment of various P. acnes-associated human diseases.

  18. Apparent lack of physical or functional interaction between CaV1.1 and its distal C terminus

    PubMed Central

    Ohrtman, Joshua D.; Romberg, Christin F.; Moua, Ong; Bannister, Roger A.; Levinson, S. Rock

    2015-01-01

    CaV1.1 acts as both the voltage sensor that triggers excitation–contraction coupling in skeletal muscle and as an L-type Ca2+ channel. It has been proposed that, after its posttranslational cleavage, the distal C terminus of CaV1.1 remains noncovalently associated with proximal CaV1.1, and that tethering of protein kinase A to the distal C terminus is required for depolarization-induced potentiation of L-type Ca2+ current in skeletal muscle. Here, we report that association of the distal C terminus with proximal CaV1.1 cannot be detected by either immunoprecipitation of mouse skeletal muscle or by colocalized fluorescence after expression in adult skeletal muscle fibers of a CaV1.1 construct labeled with yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) and cyan fluorescent protein on the N and C termini, respectively. We found that L-type Ca2+ channel activity was similar after expression of constructs that either did (YFP-CaV1.11860) or did not (YFP-CaV1.11666) contain coding sequence for the distal C-terminal domain in dysgenic myotubes null for endogenous CaV1.1. Furthermore, in response to strong (up to 90 mV) or long-lasting prepulses (up to 200 ms), tail current amplitudes and decay times were equally increased in dysgenic myotubes expressing either YFP-CaV1.11860 or YFP-CaV1.11666, suggesting that the distal C-terminal domain was not required for depolarization-induced potentiation. Thus, our experiments do not support the existence of either biochemical or functional interactions between proximal CaV1.1 and the distal C terminus. PMID:25779869

  19. Transcriptional transactivation functions localized to the glucocorticoid receptor N terminus are necessary for steroid induction of lymphocyte apoptosis.

    PubMed Central

    Dieken, E S; Miesfeld, R L

    1992-01-01

    Genetic studies have suggested that transcriptional regulation of specific target genes (by either induction or repression) is the molecular basis of glucocorticoid-mediated lymphocyte apoptosis. To examine the role of transcriptional regulation more directly, we developed a complementation assay utilizing stable transfection of wild-type (wt) and mutant (nti) glucocorticoid receptor (GR) cDNA constructs into a GR-deficient S49 murine cell line (7r). Our data confirm that the level of functional GR is rate limiting for S49 apoptosis and moreover that the GR amino terminus (N terminus), which as been deleted from the nti GR, is absolutely required for complementation in this system. Surprisingly, we found that at physiological levels of receptor, expression of the nti GR in cells containing wt GR results in enhanced dexamethasone sensitivity rather than a dominant negative phenotype. One interpretation of these data is that DNA binding by wt-nti heterodimers may be functionally similar to that of wt-wt homodimers, indicating that GRE occupancy by at least one transactivation domain may be sufficient to induce the hormonal response. To determine whether acidic activating sequences such as those localized to the GR N terminus are important in the induction of lymphocyte apoptosis, we tested the activity of a chimeric receptor in which we replaced the entire GR N terminus with sequences from the herpes simplex virus VP16 protein. Our results demonstrate that 7r cells expressing VP-GR fusions are indeed steroid sensitive, strongly supporting the idea that S49 apoptosis is dependent on transcriptional regulation of specific genes which respond to acidic activating domains, implying that induction, rather than repression, may be the critical initiating event. Images PMID:1310148

  20. Importance of the carboxyl terminus in the folding and function of alpha-hemolysin of Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Sangha, N; Kaur, S; Sharma, V; Krishnasastry, M V

    1999-04-02

    The physical state of two model mutants of alpha-hemolysin (alphaHL), alphaHL(1-289), a carboxyl-terminal deletion mutant (CDM), and alphaHL(1-331), a carboxyl-terminal extension mutant (CEM), were examined in detail to identify the role of the carboxyl terminus in the folding and function of native alphaHL. Denatured alphaHL can be refolded efficiently with nearly total recovery of its activity upon restoration of nondenaturing conditions. Various biophysical and biochemical studies on the three proteins have revealed the importance of an intact carboxyl terminus in the folding of alphaHL. The CDM exhibits a marked increase in susceptibility to proteases as compared with alphaHL. alphaHL and CEM exhibit similar fluorescence emission maxima, and that of the CDM is red-shifted by 9 nm, which indicates a greater solvent exposure of the tryptophan residues of the CDM. In addition, the CDM binds 8-anilino-1-naphthalene sulfonic acid (ANS) and increases its fluorescence intensity significantly unlike alphaHL and CEM, which show marginal binding. The circular dichroism studies point that the CDM possesses significant secondary structure, but its tertiary structure is greatly diminished as compared with alphaHL. These data show that the CDM has several of the features that characterize a molten globule state. Experiments with freshly translated mutants, using coupled in vitro transcription and translation, have further supported our observations that deletion at the carboxyl terminus leads to major structural perturbations in the water-soluble form of alphaHL. The studies demonstrate a critical role of the carboxyl terminus of alphaHL in attaining the native folded state.

  1. Novel structure of the N terminus in yeast Fis1 correlates with a specialized function in mitochondrial fission.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Motoshi; Neutzner, Albert; Tjandra, Nico; Youle, Richard J

    2005-06-03

    Mitochondrial fission is facilitated by a multiprotein complex assembled at the division site. The required components of the fission machinery in Saccharomyces cerevisiae include Dnm1, Fis1, and Mdv1. In the present study, we determined the protein structure of yeast Fis1 using NMR spectroscopy. Although the six alpha-helices, as well as their folding, in the yeast Fis1 structure are similar to those of the tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domains of the human Fis1 structure, the two structures differ in their N termini. The N-terminal tail of human Fis1 is flexible and unstructured, whereas a major segment of the longer N terminus of yeast Fis1 is fixed to the concave face formed by the six alpha-helices in the TPR domains. To investigate the role of the fixed N terminus, exogenous Fis1 was expressed in yeast lacking the endogenous protein. Expression of yeast Fis1 protein rescued mitochondrial fission in delta fis1 yeast only when the N-terminal TPR binding segment was left intact. The presence of this segment is also correlated to the recruitment of Mdv1 to mitochondria. The conformation of the N-terminal segment embedded in the TPR pocket indicates an intra-molecular regulation of Fis1 bioactivity. Although the TPR-like helix bundle of Fis1 mediates the interaction with Dnm1 and Mdv1, the N terminus of Fis1 is a prerequisite to recruit Mdv1 to facilitate mitochondrial fission.

  2. Structure of the Tuberous Sclerosis Complex 2 (TSC2) N Terminus Provides Insight into Complex Assembly and Tuberous Sclerosis Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zech, Reinhard; Kiontke, Stephan; Mueller, Uwe; Oeckinghaus, Andrea; Kümmel, Daniel

    2016-09-16

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is caused by mutations in the TSC1 and TSC2 tumor suppressor genes. The gene products hamartin and tuberin form the TSC complex that acts as GTPase-activating protein for Rheb and negatively regulates the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1). Tuberin contains a RapGAP homology domain responsible for inactivation of Rheb, but functions of other protein domains remain elusive. Here we show that the TSC2 N terminus interacts with the TSC1 C terminus to mediate complex formation. The structure of the TSC2 N-terminal domain from Chaetomium thermophilum and a homology model of the human tuberin N terminus are presented. We characterize the molecular requirements for TSC1-TSC2 interactions and analyze pathological point mutations in tuberin. Many mutations are structural and produce improperly folded protein, explaining their effect in pathology, but we identify one point mutant that abrogates complex formation without affecting protein structure. We provide the first structural information on TSC2/tuberin with novel insight into the molecular function. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. The membrane proximal region of the cannabinoid receptor CB1 N-terminus can allosterically modulate ligand affinity.

    PubMed

    Fay, Jonathan F; Farrens, David L

    2013-11-19

    The human cannabinoid receptor, CB1, a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), contains a relatively long (∼110 a.a.) amino terminus, whose function is still not defined. Here we explore a potential role for the CB1 N-terminus in modulating ligand binding to the receptor. Although most of the CB1 N-terminus is not necessary for ligand binding, previous studies have found that mutations introduced into its conserved membrane proximal region (MPR) do impair the receptors ability to bind ligand. Moreover, within the highly conserved MPR (∼ residues 90-110) lie two cysteine residues that are invariant in all CB1 receptors. We find these two cysteines (C98 and C107) form a disulfide in heterologously expressed human CB1, and this C98-C107 disulfide is much more accessible to reducing agents than the previously known disulfide in extracellular loop 2 (EL2). Interestingly, the presence of the C98-C107 disulfide modulates ligand binding to the receptor in a way that can be quantitatively analyzed by an allosteric model. The C98-C107 disulfide also alters the effects of allosteric ligands for CB1, Org 27569 and PSNCBAM-1. Together, these results provide new insights into how the N-terminal MPR and EL2 act together to influence the high-affinity orthosteric ligand binding site in CB1 and suggest that the CB1 N-terminal MPR may be an area through which allosteric modulators can act.

  4. Macromolecular substrate affinity for free factor VIIa is independent of a buried protease domain N-terminus.

    PubMed

    Persson, Egon

    2006-03-03

    The initial recognition and binding of macromolecular substrates by factor VIIa (FVIIa) in complex with tissue factor has been shown to be mediated by areas distinct from the active site (so-called exosites). The present aim was to shed light on whether the N-terminal tail of the protease domain of FVIIa influences factor X (FX) binding, and whether the zymogen-like conformation of free FVIIa has a decreased affinity for FX compared to the active conformation. Two derivatives of FVIIa, one (FFR-FVIIa) with a stably buried N-terminus representing the active conformation of FVIIa and one (V154G-FVIIa) with a fully exposed N-terminus representing the zymogen-like conformation, were used as inhibitors of FVIIa-catalyzed FX activation. Their inhibitory capacities were very similar, with K(i) values not significantly different from the K(m) for FX. This indicates that the conformational state of the N-terminus does not affect FX binding or, alternatively, that the activation domain including the N-terminal insertion site is easily shifted to the stable conformation ensuing FX docking to the zymogen-like conformation. The net outcome is that FX binding to the zymogen-like form of FVIIa does not appear to be impaired.

  5. The N-terminus of vaccinia virus host range protein C7L is essential for function

    PubMed Central

    Terajima, Masanori; Urban, Stina L.; Leporati, Anita M.

    2012-01-01

    Vaccinia virus (VACV), a member of the Poxviridae family of large double-stranded DNA viruses, is being used as a smallpox vaccine as well as an expression vector for immunization against other infectious diseases and cancer. The host range of wild type VACV is very broad among mammalian cells. C7L is a host range gene identified in VACV and is well conserved in mammalian poxviruses except for parapoxviruses and molluscum contagiosum virus. The molecular mechanisms by which the C7L gene exerts host range function are not well understood. The C7L protein does not have any known conserved domains or show sequence similarity to cellular proteins or viral proteins other than the C7L homologues in mammalian poxviruses. We generated recombinant vaccinia viruses carrying deletion mutants of the C7L gene using NYVAC as a parental strain and found that the N-terminus is essential for host range function of C7L, which is consistent with a previous report that showed homology among C7L homologues are greater near the N-terminus than the C-terminus. PMID:23001690

  6. Conformational changes in the C terminus of Shaker K+ channel bound to the rat Kvβ2-subunit

    PubMed Central

    Sokolova, Olga; Accardi, Alessio; Gutierrez, David; Lau, Adrian; Rigney, Mike; Grigorieff, Nikolaus

    2003-01-01

    We studied the structure of the C terminus of the Shaker potassium channel. The 3D structures of the full-length and a C-terminal deletion (ΔC) mutant of Shaker were determined by electron microscopy and single-particle analysis. The difference map between the full-length and the truncated channels clearly shows a compact density, located on the sides of the T1 domain, that corresponds to a large part of the C terminus. We also expressed and purified both WT and ΔC Shaker, assembled with the rat Kvβ2-subunit. By using a difference map between the full-length and truncated Shaker α–β complexes, a conformational change was identified that shifts a large part of the C terminus away from the membrane domain and into close contact with the β-subunit. This conformational change, induced by the binding of the Kvβ2-subunit, suggests a possible mechanism for the modulation of the K+ voltage-gated channel function by its β-subunit. PMID:14569011

  7. Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor-Interacting Protein (AIP) N-Terminus Gene Mutations Identified in Pituitary Adenoma Patients Alter Protein Stability and Function.

    PubMed

    Formosa, Robert; Vassallo, Josanne

    2017-03-02

    Mutations spanning the entire aryl hydrocarbon receptor-interacting protein (AIP) gene have been found in isolated familial cases of pituitary adenomas (PA). Missense mutations located in the N-terminus of the gene have been identified in several patients. However, the functional significance of these mutations remains a matter of controversy. In most studies, the N-terminus of AIP has been shown to regulate protein stability and subcellular localization of the AIP-AHR-HSP90 complex but not to be involved in protein-protein interactions. Other studies found that the N-terminal domain interacts directly with other proteins. The aim of this study was to analyze whether specific N-terminus AIP mutations identified in PA patients would be functionally different from wild-type (WT) AIP. In vitro analyses were used to assess the role of known N-terminus variants, a locally identified mutant, R9Q, and three other commonly genotyped N-terminus mutations R16H, V49M and K103R are found in PA patients. Given the functional effect of WT AIP on cAMP signalling alterations caused by N-terminus mutants on this pathway were also analyzed in GH3 cells. Results indicate that N-terminus mutations lead to de-regulation of the effect of WT AIP on cAMP signalling and increased cAMP thresholds in GH3 cells resulting in increased growth hormone (GH) secretion. Cycloheximide chase analysis identified a variation in protein degradation patterns between WT and N-terminus variants. Therefore, both functional and structural studies reveal that N-terminus mutations in the AIP gene alter protein behaviour significantly and hence can truly be pathogenic in nature.

  8. Syntaxin 1A binds to the cytoplasmic C terminus of Kv2.1 to regulate channel gating and trafficking.

    PubMed

    Leung, Yuk M; Kang, Youhou; Gao, Xiaodong; Xia, Fuzhen; Xie, Huanli; Sheu, Laura; Tsuk, Sharon; Lotan, Ilana; Tsushima, Robert G; Gaisano, Herbert Y

    2003-05-09

    Voltage-gated K(+) (Kv) 2.1 is the dominant Kv channel that controls membrane repolarization in rat islet beta-cells and downstream insulin exocytosis. We recently showed that exocytotic SNARE protein SNAP-25 directly binds and modulates rat islet beta-cell Kv 2.1 channel protein at the cytoplasmic N terminus. We now show that SNARE protein syntaxin 1A (Syn-1A) binds and modulates rat islet beta-cell Kv2.1 at its cytoplasmic C terminus (Kv2.1C). In HEK293 cells overexpressing Kv2.1, we observed identical effects of channel inhibition by dialyzed GST-Syn-1A, which could be blocked by Kv2.1C domain proteins (C1: amino acids 412-633, C2: amino acids 634-853), but not the Kv2.1 cytoplasmic N terminus (amino acids 1-182). This was confirmed by direct binding of GST-Syn-1A to the Kv2.1C1 and C2 domains proteins. These findings are in contrast to our recent report showing that Syn-1A binds and modulates the cytoplasmic N terminus of neuronal Kv1.1 and not by its C terminus. Co-expression of Syn-1A in Kv2.1-expressing HEK293 cells inhibited Kv2.1 surfacing, which caused a reduction of Kv2.1 current density. In addition, Syn-1A caused a slowing of Kv2.1 current activation and reduction in the slope factor of steady-state inactivation, but had no affect on inactivation kinetics or voltage dependence of activation. Taken together, SNAP-25 and Syn-1A mediate secretion not only through its participation in the exocytotic SNARE complex, but also by regulating membrane potential and calcium entry through their interaction with Kv and Ca(2+) channels. In contrast to Ca(2+) channels, where these SNARE proteins act on a common synprint site, the SNARE proteins act not only on distinct sites within a Kv channel, but also on distinct sites between different Kv channel families.

  9. Hierarchical Organization of Multi-Site Phosphorylation at the CXCR4 C Terminus

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Wiebke; Schütz, Dagmar; Nagel, Falko; Schulz, Stefan; Stumm, Ralf

    2013-01-01

    The chemokine receptor CXCR4 regulates cell migration during ontogenesis and disease states including cancer and inflammation. Upon stimulation by the endogenous ligand CXCL12, CXCR4 becomes phosphorylated at multiple sites in its C-terminal domain. Mutations in the CXCR4 gene affecting C-terminal phosphorylation sites are a hallmark of WHIM syndrome, a genetic disorder characterized by a gain-of-CXCR4-function. To better understand how multi-site phosphorylation of CXCR4 is organized and how perturbed phosphorylation might affect CXCR4 function, we developed novel phosphosite-specific CXCR4 antibodies and studied the differential regulation and interaction of three C-terminal phosphorylation sites in human embryonic kidney cells (HEK293). CXCL12 promoted a robust phosphorylation at S346/347 which preceded phosphorylation at S324/325 and S338/339. After CXCL12 washout, the phosphosites S338/339 and S324/325 were rapidly dephosphorylated whereas phosphorylation at S346/347 was long-lasting. CXCL12-induced phosphorylation at S346/347 was staurosporine-insensitive and mediated by GRK2/3. WHIM syndrome-associated CXCR4 truncation mutants lacking the S346/347 phosphosite and the recently identified E343K WHIM mutant displayed strongly impaired phosphorylation at S324/325 and S338/339 as well as reduced CXCL12-induced receptor internalization. Relevance of the S346-S348 site was confirmed by a S346-348A mutant showing strongly impaired CXCL12-promoted phosphorylation at S324/325 and S338/339, defective internalization, gain of calcium mobilization, and reduced desensitization. Thus, the triple serine motif S346-S348 contains a major initial CXCR4 phosphorylation site and is required for efficient subsequent multi-site phosphorylation and receptor regulation. Hierarchical organization of CXCR4 phosphorylation explains why small deletions at the extreme CXCR4 C terminus typically associated with WHIM syndrome severely alter CXCR4 function. PMID:23734232

  10. Diffuse Crustal Accretion at the Southern Terminus of the Malaguana-Gadao Ridge, Mariana Trough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sleeper, J. D.; Martinez, F.; Fryer, P. B.

    2014-12-01

    The mode of extension and crustal accretion in backarc basins is strongly affected by proximity to the arc volcanic front. The factor that likely has the strongest control on these processes is mantle water content. At Mid-Ocean Ridges, the small amount of water in the mantle is efficiently extracted into the melt, dehydrating the residual material and increasing the viscosity and strength of the lithosphere. This may aid in focusing melt generated over a broad (~200+ km wide) zone in the mantle toward a narrow zone of crustal accretion ~1-2 km wide. In the near-arc setting, the continuous flux of water into the mantle wedge should oppose lithospheric dehydration and inhibit strengthening of the lithosphere, which may allow deformation, volcanism, and crustal accretion to occur over a broad area instead of along a narrow axis. A possible example of this process can be observed at the southern terminus of the Malaguana-Gadao Ridge, a backarc spreading center in the Southern Mariana Trough, at the southern end of the Izu-Bonin-Mariana convergent margin. The spreading axis, which forms an axial high in this area, abruptly terminates at 143˚20'E, 12˚37'N and is replaced by a broad zone of active volcanism and tectonism characterized by short volcanic ridges, volcanic cones, and low-relief grabens. This study uses deep-towed and ship multibeam sonar, gravity, and magnetics data collected during an early 2012 cruise on R/V Thomas G. Thompson (TN273) along with available geophysical and geochemical data in the Southern Mariana Trough to gain insight into the nature of the diffuse crustal accretion process. Evidence of a similar transition from organized to "disorganized" spreading can also be observed at Valu Fa Ridge in the southern Lau basin and other backarc spreading centers. This suggests that this process is not unique to the Southern Mariana Trough, and may be an important mode of crustal accretion in a variety of backarc settings where there is extension in

  11. STIM1 carboxyl-terminus activates native SOC, I(crac) and TRPC1 channels.

    PubMed

    Huang, Guo N; Zeng, Weizhong; Kim, Joo Young; Yuan, Joseph P; Han, Linhuang; Muallem, Shmuel; Worley, Paul F

    2006-09-01

    Receptor-evoked Ca2+ signalling involves Ca2+ release from the endoplasmic reticulum, followed by Ca2+ influx across the plasma membrane. Ca2+ influx is essential for many cellular functions, from secretion to transcription, and is mediated by Ca2+-release activated Ca2+ (I(crac)) channels and store-operated calcium entry (SOC) channels. Although the molecular identity and regulation of I(crac) and SOC channels have not been precisely determined, notable recent findings are the identification of STIM1, which has been indicated to regulate SOC and I(crac) channels by functioning as an endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ sensor, and ORAI1 (ref. 7) or CRACM1 (ref. 8)--both of which may function as I(crac) channels or as an I(crac) subunit. How STIM1 activates the Ca2+ influx channels and whether STIM1 contributes to the channel pore remains unknown. Here, we identify the structural features that are essential for STIM1-dependent activation of SOC and I(crac) channels, and demonstrate that they are identical to those involved in the binding and activation of TRPC1. Notably, the cytosolic carboxyl terminus of STIM1 is sufficient to activate SOC, I(crac) and TRPC1 channels even when native STIM1 is depleted by small interfering RNA. Activity of STIM1 requires an ERM domain, which mediates the selective binding of STIM1 to TRPC1, 2 and 4, but not to TRPC3, 6 or 7, and a cationic lysine-rich region, which is essential for gating of TRPC1. Deletion of either region in the constitutively active STIM1(D76A) yields dominant-negative mutants that block native SOC channels, expressed TRPC1 in HEK293 cells and I(crac) in Jurkat cells. These observations implicate STIM1 as a key regulator of activity rather than a channel component, and reveal similar regulation of SOC, I(crac) and TRPC channel activation by STIM1.

  12. Functional analysis of the N- and C-terminus of mammalian G9a histone H3 methyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Estève, Pierre-Olivier; Patnaik, Debasis; Chin, Hang Gyeong; Benner, Jack; Teitell, Michael A; Pradhan, Sriharsa

    2005-01-01

    Methylation of lysine 9 (K9) in the N-terminus tail of histone H3 (H3) in chromatin is associated with transcriptionally silenced genes and is mediated by histone methyltransferases. Murine G9a is a 1263 amino acid H3-K9 methyltransferase that possesses characteristic SET domain and ANK repeats. In this paper, we have used a series of green fluorescent protein-tagged deletion constructs to identify two nuclear localization signals (NLS), the first NLS embedded between amino acids 24 and 109 and the second between amino acids 394 and 401 of murine G9a. Our data show that both long and short G9a isoforms were capable of entering the nucleus to methylate chromatin. Full-length or N-terminus-deleted G9a isoforms were also catalytically active enzymes that methylated recombinant H3 or synthetic peptides representing the N-terminus tail of H3. In vitro methylation reactions using N-terminus tail peptides resulted in tri-methylation of K9 that remained processive, even in G9a enzymes that lacked an N-terminus region by deletion. Co-expression of G9a and H3 resulted in di- and tri-methylation of H3-K9, while siRNA-mediated knockdown of G9a in HeLa cells resulted in reduction of global H3-K9 di- and tri-methylation. A recombinant deletion mutant enzyme fused with maltose-binding protein (MBP-G9aDelta634) was used for steady-state kinetic analysis with various substrates and was compared with full-length G9a (G9aFL). Turnover numbers of MBP-G9aDelta634 for various substrates was approximately 3-fold less compared with G9aFL, while their Michaelis constants (K(m)) for recombinant H3 were similar. The K(AdoMet)m for MBP-G9aDelta634 was approximately 2.3-2.65 microM with various substrates. Catalytic efficiencies (kcat/K(m)) for both MBP-G9aDelta634 and G9aFL were similar, suggesting that the N-terminus is not essential for catalysis. Furthermore, mutation of conserved amino acids R1097A, W1103A, Y1120A, Y1138A and R1162A, or the metal binding C1168A in the catalytic region

  13. An in vitro experiment on the interaction of charcoal or wheat bran with 11-nor-9-carboxy-Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol and its glucuronide.

    PubMed

    Skopp, Gisela; Mikus, Gerd

    2013-11-01

    The rather long yet variable terminal half-lives and detection times since last use of urinary cannabinoids may partly be attributed to their enterohepatic circulation which generally can be interrupted or restricted by chemical adsorbents. Therefore, an in vitro experiment was performed to study the adsorption/binding of 11-nor-9-carboxy-Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC-COOH) and its glucuronide to activated charcoal and wheat bran; remaining concentrations were determined by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. Adsorption/binding of 1,000 ng/mL of free or conjugated THC-COOH was complete using as little as 5 mg of charcoal whereas adsorption/binding to wheat bran increased with increasing amounts. Taking of remedies affecting enterohepatic recycling of THC-COOH and its glucuronide may challenge interpretation of cannabinoid concentrations used to detect or assess frequency of drug use or the time since last drug consumption.

  14. Studies on the growth, structural, spectral and third-order nonlinear optical properties of Ammonium 3-carboxy-4-hydroxy benzenesulfonate monohydrate single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silambarasan, A.; Krishna Kumar, M.; Thirunavukkarasu, A.; Mohan Kumar, R.; Umarani, P. R.

    2015-01-01

    An organic nonlinear optical bulk single crystal, Ammonium 3-carboxy-4-hydroxy benzenesulfonate monohydrate (ACHBS) was successfully grown by solution growth technique. Single crystal X-ray diffraction study confirms that, the grown crystal belongs to P21/c space group. Powder X-ray diffraction and high resolution X-ray diffraction analyses revealed the crystallinity of the grown crystal. Infrared spectral analysis showed the vibrational behavior of chemical bonds and its functional groups. The thermal stability and decomposition stages of the grown crystal were studied by TG-DTA analysis. UV-Visible transmittance studies showed the transparency region and cut-off wavelength of the grown crystal. The third-order nonlinear optical susceptibility of the grown crystal was estimated by Z-scan technique using Hesbnd Ne laser source. The mechanical property of the grown crystal was studied by using Vicker's microhardness test.

  15. Bis(tetra-methyl-amonium) bis-(2,4,5-carboxy-benzoate)-benzene-1,2,4,5-tetra-carboxylic acid (1/1).

    PubMed

    Cunha-Silva, Luís; Girginova, Penka I; Trindade, Tito; Rocha, João; Klinowski, Jacek; Almeida Paz, Filipe A

    2007-12-06

    The asymmetric unit of the title compound, 2C(4)H(12)N(+)·2C(10)H(5)O(8) (-)·C(10)H(6)O(8), consists of a tetra-methyl-amonium cation, an anion derived from the singly deprotonated pyromellitic acid anion, 2,4,5-carboxy-benzoate (H(3)bta(-)), and one-half of a benzene-1,2,4,5-tetra-carboxylic acid (H(4)bta) mol-ecule, which has the centroid of the aromatic ring positioned at a crystallographic centre of inversion. The H(4)bta and H(3)bta(-) residues are involved in an extensive inter-molecular O-H⋯O hydrogen-bonding network, which leads to a three-dimensional supra-molecular structure containing one-dimensional channels running parallel to the [001] crystallographic direction. These channels house the tetra-methyl-amonium cations.

  16. Expression of ubiquitin-related enzymes in the suprachiasmatic nucleus with special reference to ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase UchL1.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xin; Yagita, Kazuhiro; Zhang, Jing; Okamura, Hitoshi

    2005-04-01

    There is growing evidence that ubiquitin-proteasome system plays an important role for the generation of circadian rhythms in mice as in Drosophila. Here we examined the expression of ubiquitin-related enzymes (Ubce5, UbcM4, Ube2v, Ube2d2, UchL1, UchL3, Ubp41, UfdlL, beta-TrCP) in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). At mRNA level, the-expression of these enzymes were faint to moderate except ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase L1 (UchL1), a dominant deubiquitinating salvaging enzyme. Although strongly expressed in the SCN, UchL1 mRNA did not show the rhythm in the SCN in both light-dark and constant dark conditions.

  17. Regional differences of type II collagen synthesis in the human temporomandibular joint disc: immunolocalization study of carboxy-terminal type II procollagen peptide (chondrocalcin).

    PubMed

    Kondoh, Toshirou; Hamada, Yoshiki; Iino, Mitsuyoshi; Takahashi, Tetsu; Kikuchi, Toshiyuki; Fujikawa, Kyousuke; Seto, Kannichi

    2003-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the regional differences of distribution of the carboxy-terminal type II procollagen peptide (pCOL-II-C; chondrocalcin) as markers of cartilaginous expression in the human temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disc. Twelve human TMJ discs without morphologic abnormalities were obtained from 12 fresh cadavers. All specimens were analysed for pCOL-II-C expression using polyclonal rabbit anti-human pCOL-II-C antibody in avidin-biotin-peroxidase complex staining. The results were demonstrated that the percentage of pCOL-II-C immunoreactive disc cells was significantly higher in the outer part (the articular surfaces) than in the inner part (the deep central areas) of the disc. These findings suggest that the tissue heterogeneity of cartilaginous expression reflects the functional demands of the remodelling process in the human TMJ disc.

  18. A carboxy-methyl cellulose coated humidity sensor based on Mach-Zehnder interferometer with waist-enlarged bi-tapers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Qifei; Ni, Kai; Huang, Ran

    2017-01-01

    A fiber-optic Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI) humidity sensor is proposed, comprising a pair of waist-enlarged bi-tapers and carboxy-methyl cellulose (CMC) coating. The MZI utilizes intermodal interference between the core mode and cladding modes for the measurement of the effective refractive index (RI) of the CMC film that varies with surrounding humidity, through change in the sensor's interference pattern. The proposed sensor is linearly responsive to relative humidity (RH) within the humidity range from 70% RH to 85% RH, with maximum sensitivity of -0.8578 dB/% RH. The advantages of this sensor are its compact size and a facile fabrication process. More importantly, humidity sensitivity can be improved by changing the thickness of the CMC film, which makes this structure a highly promising for real-time, practical RH monitoring application.

  19. Solid-phase spectrophotometric determination of trace amounts of vanadium using 2,3-dichloro-6(3-carboxy-2- hydroxynaphthylazo)quinoxaline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amin, Alaa S.

    2003-03-01

    Solid-phase spectrophotometry (SPS) has been applied to analysis for trace amounts of vanadium in several environmental water (potable and polluted), biological samples (human blood and urine), and soil samples. Vanadium was sorbed in a styrene-divinylbenzene-type anion-exchanger Dowex 1-X8 as a vanadium—2,3-dichloro-6(3-carboxy -2-hydroxynaphthylazo)quinoxaline. Resin phase absorbances at 606 and 800 nm were measured directly which allowed the determination of vanadium in the range 0.03-2.2 ng ml -1 with a relative standard deviation (R.S.D.) of 1.4%. The comparison of the SPS method and the gallic acid persulphate method shows that the linearity, analytical sensitivity, and precision were better for the SPS method, and that the latter method has lower detection and quantification limits compared with the gallic acid persulphate method.

  20. Identification of Protein Instability Determinants in the Carboxy-Terminal Region of c-Myb Removed as a Result of Retroviral Integration in Murine Monocytic Leukemias

    PubMed Central

    Bies, Juraj; Nazarov, Viktor; Wolff, Linda

    1999-01-01

    The c-myb oncogene has been a target of retroviral insertional mutagenesis in murine monocytic leukemias. One mechanism by which c-myb can be activated is through the integration of a retroviral provirus into the central portion of the locus, causing premature termination of c-myb transcription and translation. We had previously shown that a leukemia-specific c-Myb protein, truncated at the site of proviral integration by 248 amino acids, had approximately a fourfold-increased half-life compared to the normal c-Myb protein, due to its ability to escape rapid degradation by the ubiquitin-26S proteasome pathway. Here we provide evidence for the existence of more than one instability determinant in the carboxy-terminal region of the wild-type protein, which appear to act independently of each other. The data were derived from examination of premature termination mutants and deletion mutants of the normal protein, as well as analysis of another carboxy-terminally truncated protein expressed in leukemia. Evidence is provided that one instability determinant is located in the terminal 87 amino acids of the protein and another is located in the vicinity of the internal region that has leucine zipper homology. In leukemias, different degrees of protein stability are attained following proviral integration depending upon how many determinants are removed. Interestingly, although PEST sequences (rich in proline, glutamine, serine, and threonine), often associated with degradation, are found in c-Myb, deletion of PEST-containing regions had no effect on protein turnover. This study provides further insight into how inappropriate expression of c-Myb may contribute to leukemogenesis. In addition, it will facilitate further studies aimed at characterizing the specific role of individual regions of the normal protein in targeting to the 26S proteasome. PMID:9971784

  1. 29 CFR Appendix C to Subpart R of... - Illustrations of Bridging Terminus Points: Non-mandatory Guidelines for Complying With §§ 1926...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Illustrations of Bridging Terminus Points: Non-mandatory Guidelines for Complying With §§ 1926.757(a)(10) and § 1926.757(c)(5) C Appendix C to Subpart R of Part.... R, App. C Appendix C to Subpart R of Part 1926—Illustrations of Bridging Terminus Points: Non...

  2. Respiratory syncytial virus fusion glycoprotein: nucleotide sequence of mRNA, identification of cleavage activation site and amino acid sequence of N-terminus of F1 subunit.

    PubMed Central

    Elango, N; Satake, M; Coligan, J E; Norrby, E; Camargo, E; Venkatesan, S

    1985-01-01

    The amino acid sequence of respiratory syncytial virus fusion protein (Fo) was deduced from the sequence of a partial cDNA clone of mRNA and from the 5' mRNA sequence obtained by primer extension and dideoxysequencing. The encoded protein of 574 amino acids is extremely hydrophobic and has a molecular weight of 63371 daltons. The site of proteolytic cleavage within this protein was accurately mapped by determining a partial amino acid sequence of the N-terminus of the larger subunit (F1) purified by radioimmunoprecipitation using monoclonal antibodies. Alignment of the N-terminus of the F1 subunit within the deduced amino acid sequence of Fo permitted us to identify a sequence of lys-lys-arg-lys-arg-arg at the C-terminus of the smaller N-terminal F2 subunit that appears to represent the cleavage/activation domain. Five potential sites of glycosylation, four within the F2 subunit, were also identified. Three extremely hydrophobic domains are present in the protein; a) the N-terminal signal sequence, b) the N-terminus of the F1 subunit that is analogous to the N-terminus of the paramyxovirus F1 subunit and the HA2 subunit of influenza virus hemagglutinin, and c) the putative membrane anchorage domain near the C-terminus of F1. Images PMID:2987829

  3. Specificity of the interaction of amino- and carboxy-terminal fragments of the mitochondrial precursor protein apocytochrome c with negatively charged phospholipids. A spin-label electron spin resonance study.

    PubMed

    Jordi, W; de Kruijff, B; Marsh, D

    1989-11-14

    The contribution of the various regions of the mitochondrial precursor protein apocytochrome c to the interaction of the protein with phosphatidylserine dispersions has been studied with chemically and enzymatically prepared fragments of horse heart apocytochrome c and phospholipids spin-labeled at different positions of the sn-2 chain. Three amino-terminal heme-less peptides, two heme-containing amino-terminal fragments, one central fragment, and three carboxy-terminal fragments were studied. The electron spin resonance spectra of phospholipids spin-labeled at the C5 position of the fatty acid chain indicate that both amino-terminal and carboxy-terminal fragments of the apocytochrome c molecule cause a restriction of motion of the lipids, whereas the heme-containing peptides and protein have less effect. In addition, a second motionally more restricted lipid component, which is observed for apocytochrome c interacting with phosphatidylserine dispersions containing lipids spin-labeled at the C12 or C14 position [Görrissen, H., Marsh, D., Rietveld, A., & de Kruijff, B. (1986) Biochemistry 25, 2904-2910], was observed both on binding the carboxy-terminal fragments and on binding of the amino-terminal fragments of the precursor protein. Interestingly, even a small water-soluble peptide consisting of the 24 carboxy-terminal residues gave rise to a two-component spectrum, with an outer hyperfine splitting of the restricted lipid component of 59 G, indicating a considerable restriction of the chain motion. This suggests that both the carboxy- and amino-terminal parts of the protein penetrate into the center of the bilayer and cause a strong perturbation of the fatty acyl chain motion. The implications of these findings for the mechanism of apocytochrome c translocation across membranes are discussed.

  4. Rem GTPase Interacts with the Proximal Cav1.2 C-terminus and Modulates Calcium-dependent Channel Inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Chunyan; Crump, Shawn M.; Jin, Ling; Correll, Robert N.; Finlin, Brian S.; Satin, Jonathan; Andres, Douglas A.

    2011-01-01

    The Rem, Rem2, Rad, and Gem/Kir (RGK) GTPases, comprise a subfamily of small Ras-related GTP-binding proteins, and have been shown to potently inhibit high voltage-activated Ca2+ channel current following overexpression. Although the molecular mechanisms underlying RGK-mediated Ca2+ channel regulation remains controversial, recent studies suggest that RGK proteins inhibit Ca2+ channel currents at the plasma membrane in part by interactions with accessory channel β subunits. In this paper, we extend our understanding of the molecular determinants required for RGK-mediated channel regulation by demonstrating a direct interaction between Rem and the proximal C-terminus of CaV1.2 (PCT), including the CB/IQ domain known to contribute to Ca2+/calmodulin (CaM)-mediated channel regulation. The Rem2 and Rad GTPases display similar patterns of PCT binding, suggesting that the CaV1.2 C-terminus represents a common binding partner for all RGK proteins. In vitro Rem:PCT binding is disrupted by Ca2+/CaM, and this effect is not due to Ca2+/CaM binding to the Rem C-terminus. In addition, co-overexpression of CaM partially relieves Rem-mediated L-type Ca2+ channel inhibition and slows the kinetics of Ca2+-dependent channel inactivation. Taken together, these results suggest that the association of Rem with the PCT represents a crucial molecular determinant in RGK-mediated Ca2+ channel regulation and that the physiological function of the RGK GTPases must be reevaluated. Rather than serving as endogenous inhibitors of Ca2+ channel activity, these studies indicate that RGK proteins may play a more nuanced role, regulating Ca2+ currents via modulation of Ca2+/CaM-mediated channel inactivation kinetics. PMID:20458179

  5. The effects of the carboxyl-terminus amino acids of the Shiga toxin B-subunit on retrograde transport.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dan; Fan, Yuying; Li, Jie; Gao, Xiaoge; Hao, Miao; Xue, Huiting; Tai, Guihua

    2012-07-01

    The Shiga toxin B-subunit (STxB), from the enteric pathogen, Shigella dysenteriae, is responsible for the attachment of its receptor, globotriaosylceramide (Gb3), and navigates the retrograde pathway from the plasma membrane to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). In this study, in order to demonstrate the role of carboxyl-terminus (C-terminus/al) amino acids of the B-fragment on the retrograde transport speed and the retrograde transport pathway, STxB was modified by site-directed mutagenesis and by the addition of an amino acid tail. The results showed that when the C-terminal amino acid, arginine [Arg (R)], was mutated to serine [Ser (S)], the speed of the B-fragment transportation into the ER at 37 ˚C was slower. When an acidic amino acid tail 'glutamine (Glu)-Ser' (ES) was added to the C-terminal amino acid 'R', the B-fragment transporting speed slowed down and remained in the Golgi apparatus. Further experiments showed that the effects induced by mutations of the amino acid tail resulted in STxB-EEEES ≥-EEES>-EES>-ES, demonstrating that the retardation effect on the tail was increased and the length of the acidic amino acid was augmented. The effect was possibly produced by an acidic amino acid tail, not only by the amino acid 'E'. The significant inhibitory effect on the speed of B-fragment retrograde transport was observed only when the mutations of the acidic amino acid tail were linked near to the C-terminus. These results may provide important insights for the study of transport mechanisms and for the development of STxB serial proteins as vectors for drug delivery.

  6. Palmitoylation on the carboxyl terminus tail is required for the selective regulation of dopamine D2 versus D3 receptors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaowei; Le, Hang Thi; Zhang, Xiaohan; Zheng, Mei; Choi, Bo-Gil; Kim, Kyeong-Man

    2016-09-01

    Dopamine D2 receptor (D2R) and D3 receptor (D3R) possess highly conserved amino acid sequences but this study showed that D3R was more extensively palmitoylated than D2R. Based on this finding, the molecular basis of this selective palmitoylation of D3R was determined and the roles of palmitoylation in the regulation of D3R functions were investigated. D3R was palmitoylated on the cysteine residue on its carboxyl terminus tail, the last amino acid residue of D3R, and an exchange of the carboxyl terminus tail between D2R and D3R (D2R-D3C and D3R-D2C) resulted in the switching of the palmitoylation phenotype. When the consensus site for palmitoylation was mutated or the palmitoylation of D3R was inhibited by treatment with 2-bromopalmitate (2BP), a palmitoylation blocker, cell-surface expression, PKC-mediated endocytosis, agonist affinity, and agonist-induced tolerance of D3R were all inhibited. However, these changes were not observed when D3R palmitoylation was inhibited by replacing its carboxyl tail with that of D2R (D3R-D2C) or when the palmitoylation of D2R-D3C was inhibited by treatment with 2BP. Overall, this study shows that D3R is palmitoylated more extensively than D2R even though the carboxyl terminus tails of D2R and D3R are highly homologous, and thus provides a new clue regarding the consensus sequence for palmitoylation. This study also shows that palmitoylation controls various functionalities of D3R only when the receptor is in the intact D3R configuration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Post-translational incorporation of the antiproliferative agent azatyrosine into the C-terminus of alpha-tubulin.

    PubMed Central

    Purro, Silvia A; Bisig, C Gastón; Contin, María A; Barra, Héctor S; Arce, Carlos A

    2003-01-01

    Detyrosination/tyrosination of tubulin is a post-translational modification that occurs at the C-terminus of the alpha-subunit, giving rise to microtubules rich in either tyrosinated or detyrosinated tubulin which coexist in the cell. We hereby report that the tyrosine analogue, azatyrosine, can be incorporated into the C-terminus of alpha-tubulin instead of tyrosine. Azatyrosine is structurally identical to tyrosine except that a nitrogen atom replaces carbon-2 of the phenolic group. Azatyrosine competitively excluded incorporation of [14C]tyrosine into tubulin of soluble brain extract. A newly developed rabbit antibody specific to C-terminal azatyrosine was used to study incorporation of azatyrosine in cultured cells. When added to the culture medium (Ham's F12K), azatyrosine was incorporated into tubulin of glioma-derived C6 cells. This incorporation was reversible, i.e. after withdrawal of azatyrosine, tubulin lost azatyrosine and reincorporated tyrosine. Azatyrosinated tubulin self-assembled into microtubules to a similar degree as total tubulin both in vitro and in vivo. Studies by other groups have shown that treatment of certain types of cultured cancer cells with azatyrosine leads to reversion of phenotype to normal, and that administration of azatyrosine into animals harbouring human proto-oncogenic c-Ha- ras prevents tumour formation. These interesting observations led us to study this phenomenon in relation to tubulin status. Under conditions in which tubulin was mostly azatyrosinated, C6 cells remained viable but did not proliferate. After 7-10 days under these conditions, morphology changed from a fused, elongated shape to a rounded soma with thin processes. Incorporation of azatyrosine into the C-terminus of alpha-tubulin is proposed as one possible cause of reversion of the malignant phenotype. PMID:12852782

  8. Role of the Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 5 (TRPV5) Protein N Terminus in Channel Activity, Tetramerization, and Trafficking*

    PubMed Central

    de Groot, Theun; van der Hagen, Eline A. E.; Verkaart, Sjoerd; te Boekhorst, Veronika A. M.; Bindels, René J. M.; Hoenderop, Joost G. J.

    2011-01-01

    The epithelial Ca2+ channel transient receptor potential vanilloid 5 (TRPV5) constitutes the apical entry site for active Ca2+ reabsorption in the kidney. The TRPV5 channel is a member of the TRP family of cation channels, which are composed of four subunits together forming a central pore. Regulation of channel activity is tightly controlled by the intracellular N and C termini. The TRPV5 C terminus regulates channel activity by various mechanisms, but knowledge regarding the role of the N terminus remains scarce. To study the role of the N terminus in TRPV5 regulation, we generated different N-terminal deletion constructs. We found that deletion of the first 32 residues did not affect TRPV5-mediated 45Ca2+ uptake, whereas deletion up to residue 34 and 75 abolished channel function. Immunocytochemistry demonstrated that these mutant channels were retained in the endoplasmic reticulum and in contrast to wild-type TRPV5 did not reach the Golgi apparatus, explaining the lack of complex glycosylation of the mutants. A limited amount of mutant channels escaped the endoplasmic reticulum and reached the plasma membrane, as shown by cell surface biotinylation. These channels did not internalize, explaining the reduced but significant amount of these mutant channels at the plasma membrane. Wild-type TRPV5 channels, despite significant plasma membrane internalization, showed higher plasma membrane levels compared with the mutant channels. The assembly into tetramers was not affected by the N-terminal deletions. Thus, the N-terminal residues 34–75 are critical in the formation of a functional TRPV5 channel because the deletion mutants were present at the plasma membrane as tetramers, but lacked channel activity. PMID:21795703

  9. Rapid advance and retreat of a major Greenland tidewater glacier: demonstrating extreme sensitivity of terminus stability to climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lea, J.; Mair, D. W.; Rea, B. R.; Schofield, J.; Kamenos, N.; Pearce, D.; Schoenrock, K. M.; Stachnik, L.; Vad, J.

    2016-12-01

    Here we present the first record of an advance and retreat cycle of a major Greenlandic tidewater glacier, providing evidence for advance rates occurring at a similar magnitude to contemporary retreat rates. Previous records of ice sheet outlet behaviour used for model validation are often limited to satellite/aerial photo observations, with the Little Ice Age (LIA) readvance curtailing the length of records by destroying geomorphological and sedimentological evidence of the advance dynamics. This temporally limits most records to the 20th century, where they are dominated by thinning/retreat behaviour. Their utility for providing a range of behaviour for effective model validation is therefore reduced. By reconstructing the advance and retreat of Kangiata Nunaata Sermia (KNS), SW Greenland, over the last 1000 years the dataset presented here overcomes these shortfalls. The topographic setting of KNS has allowed preservation of sediments recording the advance and upstream thickening of the glacier prior to its LIA maximum being achieved c.250 years ago. Subsequent to this, the glacier has the longest observationally based reconstruction of behaviour anywhere in Greenland, extending back to 1761 (Lea et al., 2014a; 2014b). By combining these records, a complete reconstruction of the advance and retreat cycle of this major outlet glacier from c. AD 1000 to present has been achieved. In combination with well-constrained boundary conditions, this provides an unparalleled dataset allowing the testing and validation of ice flow models that seek to simulate outlet glacier dynamics. The reconstruction itself indicates that KNS rapidly advanced by 17 km between c. AD 1100-1250, coincident with a rapid cooling in air temperature. It is notable that the terminus response corresponds to a mean advance rate of 110 m a-1, which is of a similar magnitude to present-day terminus retreat rates. A further advance of 5 km occurred subsequently, taking the terminus to its LIA maximum

  10. Nonpolar substitution at C-terminus of the prion protein, a mimic of GPI anchor, partially impairs amyloid fibrils formation

    PubMed Central

    Breydo, Leonid; Sun, Ying; Makarava, Natallia; Lee, Cheng-I; Novitskaia, Vera; Bocharova, Olga; Kao, Joseph P.Y.; Baskakov, Ilia V.

    2008-01-01

    In contrast to most amyloidogenic proteins or peptides that do not contain any significant post-translational modifications, the prion protein (PrP) is modified with either one or two polysaccharides and a GPI anchor which attaches PrP to the plasma membrane. Like other amyloidogenic proteins, however, PrP adopts a fibrillar shape when converted to a disease-specific conformation. Therefore, PrP polymerization offers a unique opportunity to examine the effects of biologically relevant non-peptidic modifications on conversion to the amyloid conformation. To test the extent to which a long hydrophobic chain at the C-terminus affects the intrinsic amyloidogenic propensity of PrP, we modified recombinant PrP with a N-myristoylamido-maleimidyl group, which can serve as a membrane anchor. We show that while this modification increases the affinity of PrP for the cell membrane, it does not alter the structure of the protein. Myristoylation of PrP affected amyloid formation in two ways: (i) it substantially decreased the extent of fibrillation, presumably due to off-pathway aggregation, and (ii) it prohibited assembly of filaments into higher-order fibrils by preventing their lateral association. The negative effect on lateral association was abolished if the myristoylated moiety at the C-terminus was replaced by a polar group of similar size or by a hydrophobic group of smaller size. When preformed PrP fibrils were provided as seeds, myristoylated PrP supported fibril elongation and formation of higher-order fibrils composed of several filaments. Our studies illustrate that, despite a bulky hydrophobic moiety at C-terminus, myristoylated PrP can still incorporate into fibrillar structure, and that the C-terminal hydrophobic substitution does not affect the size of the proteinase K resistant core, but controls the mode of lateral assembly of filaments into higher-order fibrils. PMID:17223707

  11. Aminoacylase 3 binds to and cleaves the N-terminus of the hepatitis C virus core protein.

    PubMed

    Tsirulnikov, Kirill; Abuladze, Natalia; Vahi, Ritu; Hasnain, Huma; Phillips, Martin; Ryan, Christopher M; Atanasov, Ivo; Faull, Kym F; Kurtz, Ira; Pushkin, Alexander

    2012-11-02

    Aminoacylase 3 (AA3) mediates deacetylation of N-acetyl aromatic amino acids and mercapturic acids. Deacetylation of mercapturic acids of exo- and endobiotics are likely involved in their toxicity. AA3 is predominantly expressed in kidney, and to a lesser extent in liver, brain, and blood. AA3 has been recently reported to interact with the hepatitis C virus core protein (HCVCP) in the yeast two-hybrid system. Here we demonstrate that AA3 directly binds to HCVCP (K(d) ~10 μM) that may by implicated in HCV pathogenesis. AA3 also revealed a weak endopeptidase activity towards the N-terminus of HCVCP.

  12. Aminoacylase 3 binds to and cleaves the N-terminus of the hepatitis C virus core protein

    PubMed Central

    Tsirulnikov, Kirill; Abuladze, Natalia; Vahi, Ritu; Hasnain, Huma; Phillips, Martin; Ryan, Christopher M.; Atanasov, Ivo; Faull, Kym F.; Kurtz, Ira; Pushkin, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Aminoacylase 3 (AA3) mediates deacetylation of N-acetyl aromatic amino acids and mercapturic acids. Deacetylation of mercapturic acids of exo- and endobiotics are likely involved in their toxicity. AA3 is predominantly expressed in kidney, and to a lesser extent in liver, brain, and blood. AA3 has been recently reported to interact with the hepatitis C virus core protein (HCVCP) in the yeast two-hybrid system. Here we demonstrate that AA3 directly binds to HCVCP (Kd~10 μM) that may by implicated in HCV pathogenesis. AA3 also revealed a weak endopeptidase activity towards the N-terminus of HCVCP. PMID:23010594

  13. Salt, phosphate and the Bohr effect at the hemoglobin beta chain C terminus studied by hydrogen exchange.

    PubMed

    Louie, G; Englander, J J; Englander, S W

    1988-06-20

    Hydrogen exchange experiments using functional labeling and fragment separation methods were performed to study interactions at the C terminus of the hemoglobin beta subunit that contribute to the phosphate effect and the Bohr effect. The results show that the H-exchange behavior of several peptide NH at the beta chain C terminus is determined by a transient, concerted unfolding reaction involving five or more residues, from the C-terminal His146 beta through at least Ala142 beta, and that H-exchange rate can be used to measure the stabilization free energy of interactions, both individually and collectively, at this locus. In deoxy hemoglobin at pH 7.4 and 0 degrees C, the removal of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (DPG) or pyrophosphate (loss of a salt to His143 beta) speeds the exchange of the beta chain C-terminal peptide NH protons by 2.5-fold (at high salt), indicating a destabilization of the C-terminal segment by 0.5 kcal of free energy. Loss of the His146 beta 1 to Asp94 beta 1 salt link speeds all these protons by 6.3-fold, indicating a bond stabilization free energy of 1.0 kcal. When both these salt links are removed together, the effect is found to be strictly additive; all the protons exchange faster by 16-fold indicating a loss of 1.5 kcal in stabilization free energy. Added salt is slightly destabilizing when DPG is present but provides some increased stability, in the 0.2 kcal range, when DPG is absent. The total allosteric stabilization energy at each beta chain C terminus in deoxy hemoglobin under these conditions is measured to be 3.8 kcal (pH 7.4, 0 degrees C, with DPG). In oxy hemoglobin at pH 7.4 and 0 degrees C, stability at the beta chain C terminus is essentially independent of salt concentration, and the NES modification, which in deoxy hemoglobin blocks the His146 beta to Asp94 beta salt link, has no destabilizing effect, either at high or low salt. These results appear to show that the His146 beta salt link, which participates importantly in the

  14. Rescue microsurgery with bypass and stent removal following Pipeline treatment of a giant internal carotid artery terminus aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Bowers, Christian A; Taussky, Philip; Park, Min S; Neil, Jayson A; Couldwell, William T

    2015-12-01

    We report the microsurgical rescue and removal of a Pipeline stent embolization of a giant internal carotid artery terminus aneurysm. After the initial placement of a Pipeline Embolization Device (PED), it migrated proximally to the cavernous carotid with the distal end free in the middle of the aneurysm, resulting in only partial aneurysm neck coverage. The patient underwent microsurgical rescue with trapping, bypass, and opening of the aneurysm with PED removal. The vessel remained patent in the proximal segment previously covered by the Pipeline stent. Microsurgical rescue for definitive aneurysm treatment with PED removal can be safe and effective for aneurysms unsuccessfully treated with PED.

  15. A Reduced Risk of Infection with Plasmodium vivax and Clinical Protection against Malaria Are Associated with Antibodies against the N Terminus but Not the C Terminus of Merozoite Surface Protein 1†

    PubMed Central

    Nogueira, Paulo Afonso; Piovesan Alves, Fabiana; Fernandez-Becerra, Carmen; Pein, Oliver; Rodrigues Santos, Neida; Pereira da Silva, Luiz Hildebrando; Plessman Camargo, Erney; del Portillo, Hernando A.

    2006-01-01

    Progress towards the development of a malaria vaccine against Plasmodium vivax, the most widely distributed human malaria parasite, will require a better understanding of the immune responses that confer clinical protection to patients in regions where malaria is endemic. The occurrence of clinical protection in P. vivax malaria in Brazil was first reported among residents of the riverine community of Portuchuelo, in Rondônia, western Amazon. We thus analyzed immune sera from this same human population to determine if naturally acquired humoral immune responses against the merozoite surface protein 1 of P. vivax, PvMSP1, could be associated with reduced risk of infection and/or clinical protection. Our results demonstrated that this association could be established with anti-PvMSP1 antibodies predominantly of the immunoglobulin G3 subclass directed against the N terminus but not against the C terminus, in spite of the latter being more immunogenic and capable of natural boosting. This is the first report of a prospective study of P. vivax malaria demonstrating an association of reduced risk of infection and clinical protection with antibodies against an antigen of this parasite. PMID:16622209

  16. Whole chromosome elimination and chromosome terminus elimination both contribute to somatic differentiation in Taiwanese hagfish Paramyxine sheni.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Noriko F; Kojima, Kenji K; Kobayakawa, Shuichi; Higashide, Naoki; Hamanaka, Chiemi; Nitta, Ayumi; Koeda, Ikuyo; Yamaguchi, Toru; Shichiri, Motoharu; Kohno, Sei-ichi; Kubota, Souichirou

    2010-04-01

    Chromosome elimination is a process in which some chromatins are discarded from the presumptive somatic cells during early embryogenesis. Eliminated chromatins in hagfish generally consist of repetitive sequences, and they are highly heterochromatinized in germ cells. In this study, we characterized four novel eliminated DNA families, EEPs1-4, from the Taiwanese hagfish Paramyxine sheni. Sequences of these four elements occupied 20-27% of eliminated DNA in total, and each family was arranged mainly in tandem in the germline genome with high copy numbers. Although most of these elements were eliminated, a minor fraction remained in somatic cells. Some eliminated DNA families are shared as eliminated sequences between Eptatretidae and Myxinidae. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) of these elements showed that not only heterochromatic chromosomes but also both ends of euchromatic chromosomes in germ cells are absent in somatic cells of P. sheni. It strongly suggests that chromosome terminus elimination, in addition to whole chromosome elimination, contributes to somatic chromosome differentiation. Telomere-FISH further showed that chromosome fragmentation and the subsequent de novo addition of telomeric repeats are the likely mechanisms underlying chromosome terminus elimination. These characteristics make it indispensable to study the evolution and mechanisms underlying chromosome elimination in hagfish.

  17. Aphid transmission of a potyvirus depends on suitability of the helper component and the N terminus of the coat protein.

    PubMed

    Dombrovsky, A; Huet, H; Chejanovsky, N; Raccah, B

    2005-02-01

    The present study investigates the specificity of potyviruses for aphid species. Two potyviruses differing in their host range were used: Zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV) mainly infecting cucurbits and Turnip mosaic virus (TuMV) mainly infecting crucifers. Two sets of aphids species were used as vectors, one polyphagous (Myzus persicae and Aphis gossypii) and the other from crucifers (Brevicoryne brassicae and Lipaphis erysimi). Evidence is provided that the specificity between a vector and a potyvirus depends either on the affinity between the aphid species and the helper component (HC) protein used or on the affinity between the HC and the virions. The difference between the two potyviruses cannot be attributed to the DAG domain which is unaltered in both N termini of the CP. Therefore, a ZYMV full length clone served to exchange a fragment encoding for the N terminus of the ZYMV CP by that of TuMV. This partial exchange in the ZYMV CP, allowed the TuMV HC to transmit the chimeric virus but not the wild type ZYMV. The significance of the N terminus context of the CP in the specificity for the HC is discussed.

  18. Distinct regions at the N-terminus of the Cucumber necrosis virus coat protein target chloroplasts and mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Hui, Elizabeth; Xiang, Yu; Rochon, D'Ann

    2010-10-01

    Cucumber necrosis virus (CNV) is a spherical virus consisting of 180 identical coat protein (CP) subunits. The N-terminus of the CP subunit contains a 58aa RNA binding (R) domain and a 34aa arm that connects the R domain to the shell. These regions are known to play critical roles in virus assembly and disassembly. It has recently been shown that a region encompassing the arm can function as a chloroplast transit peptide (TP) in infected plants and that targeting may represent a means for virus particle disassembly. In this study, we further delineate the TP region and show that a 22aa sequence at the N-terminus of the shell enhances chloroplast targeting. We also demonstrate that R domain specifically co-localizes with mitochondria in agroinfiltrated plants. Deletion analyses show that the N-terminal 39 amino acids of the R domain are sufficient for mitochondrial targeting and that this region contains features typical of mitochondrial presequences. The R/arm region is found to be dually targeted to mitochondria and chloroplasts suggesting that this region of the CP plays a critical role in determining the fate of CP during the infection process. (c) 2010. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. N-terminus conservation in the anchor polypeptide of a prokaryotic and eukaryotic alga. [Nostoc; Porphydium cruentum

    SciTech Connect

    Gantt, E.; Lipschultz, C.A.; Cunningham, F.X. Jr.; Mimuro, M.

    1987-04-01

    Energy flow between the extrinsic phycobilisomes and the photosystems within thylakoids, is probably mediated by a blue anchor polypeptide. Polypeptides in the 94 kD range, purified by LiDS-PAGE from phycobilisomes of Nostoc and Porphyrdium cruentum, crossreacted with anti-Nostoc-94 (although weakly with the latter). Though rich in ASP and GLU, the polypeptides were very hydrophobic, and low in MET, CYS, and HIS. Partial sequence of the N-terminus shows considerable homology 1 - 5 - 10 - 15 - 20 N: (S)-V-K-A-S-G-G-S-S-V-A-(R)-P-Q-L-Y-Q-(G)-L-(A)-V- P: V-()-K-A-S-G-G-S-P-V-V-K-P-Q-L-Y-(K)-()-A-(S)- between the species. There is a lack of homology when compared with ..cap alpha.. and ..beta.. polypeptides of allophycocyanin with rod linkers of phycobilisomes and other phycobiliproteins. Polypeptides of 94 and 92 kD from thylakoids of Nostoc, also immunoreactive with anti-94, were blocked at the N-terminus.

  20. NMR spectroscopic and bioinformatic analyses of the LTBP1 C-terminus reveal a highly dynamic domain organisation.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Ian B; Handford, Penny A; Redfield, Christina

    2014-01-01

    Proteins from the LTBP/fibrillin family perform key structural and functional roles in connective tissues. LTBP1 forms the large latent complex with TGFβ and its propeptide LAP, and sequesters the latent growth factor to the extracellular matrix. Bioinformatics studies suggest the main structural features of the LTBP1 C-terminus are conserved through evolution. NMR studies were carried out on three overlapping C-terminal fragments of LTBP1, comprising four domains with characterised homologues, cbEGF14, TB3, EGF3 and cbEGF15, and three regions with no homology to known structures. The NMR data reveal that the four domains adopt canonical folds, but largely lack the interdomain interactions observed with homologous fibrillin domains; the exception is the EGF3-cbEGF15 domain pair which has a well-defined interdomain interface. (15)N relaxation studies further demonstrate that the three interdomain regions act as flexible linkers, allowing a wide range of motion between the well-structured domains. This work is consistent with the LTBP1 C-terminus adopting a flexible "knotted rope" structure, which may facilitate cell matrix interactions, and the accessibility to proteases or other factors that could contribute to TGFβ activation.

  1. Design, synthesis, and antifolate activity of new analogues of piritrexim and other diaminopyrimidine dihydrofolate reductase inhibitors with omega-carboxyalkoxy or omega-carboxy-1-alkynyl substitution in the side chain.

    PubMed

    Chan, David C M; Fu, Hongning; Forsch, Ronald A; Queener, Sherry F; Rosowsky, Andre

    2005-06-30

    As part of a search for dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) inhibitors combining the high potency of piritrexim (PTX) with the high antiparasitic vs mammalian selectivity of trimethoprim (TMP), the heretofore undescribed 2,4-diamino-6-(2',5'-disubstituted benzyl)pyrido[2,3-d]pyrimidines 6-14 with O-(omega-carboxyalkyl) or omega-carboxy-1-alkynyl groups on the benzyl moiety were synthesized and tested against Pneumocystis carinii, Toxoplasma gondii, and Mycobacterium avium DHFR vs rat DHFR. Three N-(2,4-diaminopteridin-6-yl)methyl)-2'-(omega-carboxy-1-alkynyl)dibenz[b,f]azepines (19-21) were also synthesized and tested. The pyridopyrimidine with the best combination of potency and selectivity was 2,4-diamino-5-methyl-6-[2'-(5-carboxy-1-butynyl)-5'-methoxy]benzyl]pyrimidine (13), with an IC(50) value of 0.65 nM against P. carinii DHFR, 0.57 nM against M. avium DHFR, and 55 nM against rat DHFR. The potency of 13 against P. carinii DHFR was 20-fold greater than that of PTX (IC(50) = 13 nM), and its selectivity index (SI) relative to rat DHFR was 85, whereas PTX was nonselective. The activity of 13 against P. carinii DHFR was 20 000 times greater than that of TMP, with an SI of 96, whereas that of TMP was only 14. However 13 was no more potent than PTX against M. avium DHFR, and its SI was no better than that of TMP. Molecular modeling dynamics studies using compounds 10 and 13 indicated a slight binding preference for the latter, in qualitative agreement with the IC(50) data. Among the pteridines, the most potent against P. carinii DHFR and M. avium DHFR was the 2'-(5-carboxy-1-butynyl)dibenz[b,f]azepinyl derivative 20 (IC(50) = 2.9 nM), whereas the most selective was the 2'-(5-carboxy-1-pentynyl) analogue 21, with SI values of >100 against both P. carinii and M. avium DHFR relative to rat DHFR. The final compound, 2,4-diamino-5-[3'-(4-carboxy-1-butynyl)-4'-bromo-5'-methoxybenzyl]pyrimidine (22), was both potent and selective against M. avium DHFR (IC(50) = 0.47 nM, SI

  2. Naturally occurring core immune-escape and carboxy-terminal mutations\\truncations in patients with e antigen negative chronic hepatitis B.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Ranjit; Sarin, Shiv K; Kumar, Manoj; Bhattacharjee, Jayashree

    2012-10-01

    Hepatocellular injury is often progressive in patients with hepatitis B e antigen negative chronic hepatitis B (HBeAg -ve CHB). There is scant data on association of core mutations occurring in patients with HBeAg -ve CHB with severity of liver disease. Hundred and eighteen patients with chronic infection who were HBeAg negative, anti-HBe, and HBV DNA positive were enrolled. Precore and core regions were amplified, sequenced, and analyzed for precore, T helper, cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs), B-cell epitope, and core carboxy-terminal region mutations. Majority of patients were infected with HBV genotype D: 96 (81%) [D1: 16, D2: 55 and D5: 25] followed by genotype A1: 15 (13%) and genotype C: 7 (6%) [C1: 5 and unidentified subgenotype C: 2]. Classical (A1896) as well as nonclassical precore region mutations were detected in 30 (25%) and in 9 (7.6%) patients, respectively. Core immune escape, core carboxy-terminal mutations and truncations were detected in 61 (52%), 11 (9.3%), and 14 (12%) patients, respectively. Three core immune escape mutations were significantly higher in patients with coexisting precore stop codon compared with patients without precore stop codon mutation, cT12S (43 vs. 8%, p < 0.001), cS21T (16 vs. 3.4%, p < 0.026), and cE77D (30 vs. 4.5%, p < 0.002). When frequency of core immune escape mutations was compared among CHB and decompensated patients, and cT12S: (27 vs. 10%, p < 0.05), cS21T (16 vs. 1.35%, p < 0.01), cT67P/N: (20 vs. 4%, p < 0.001), cE113D (11.37 vs. 1.35%, p < 0.05), and cP130T/Q (7 vs. 0%, p < 0.001) mutations were found to be significantly higher in decompensated patients. Core immune-escape mutations cT12S, cS21T, cT67P, cE113D, and cP130T/Q are significantly higher in decompensated liver disease patients and could influence the severity of liver disease in HBeAg -ve CHB patients.

  3. Divergent effects of α- and β-myosin heavy chain isoforms on the N terminus of rat cardiac troponin T

    PubMed Central

    Mamidi, Ranganath

    2013-01-01

    Divergent effects of α– and β–myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoforms on contractile behavior arise mainly because of their impact on thin filament cooperativity. The N terminus of cardiac troponin T (cTnT) also modulates thin filament cooperativity. Our hypothesis is that the impact of the N terminus of cTnT on thin filament activation is modulated by a shift from α- to β-MHC isoform. We engineered two recombinant proteins by deleting residues 1–43 and 44–73 in rat cTnT (RcTnT): RcTnT1–43Δ and RcTnT44–73Δ, respectively. Dynamic and steady-state contractile parameters were measured at sarcomere length of 2.3 µm after reconstituting proteins into detergent-skinned muscle fibers from normal (α-MHC) and propylthiouracil-treated (β-MHC) rat hearts. α-MHC attenuated Ca2+-activated maximal tension (∼46%) in RcTnT1–43Δ fibers. In contrast, β-MHC decreased tension only by 19% in RcTnT1–43Δ fibers. Both α- and β-MHC did not affect tension in RcTnT44–73Δ fibers. The instantaneous muscle fiber stiffness measurements corroborated the divergent impact of α- and β-MHC on tension in RcTnT1–43Δ fibers. pCa50 (-log of [Ca2+]free required for half-maximal activation) decreased significantly by 0.13 pCa units in α-MHC + RcTnT1–43Δ fibers but remained unaltered in β-MHC + RcTnT1–43Δ fibers, demonstrating that β-MHC counteracted the attenuating effect of RcTnT1–43Δ on myofilament Ca2+ sensitivity. β-MHC did not alter the sudden stretch–mediated recruitment of new cross-bridges (ER) in RcTnT1–43Δ fibers, but α-MHC attenuated ER by 36% in RcTnT1–43Δ fibers. The divergent impact of α- and β-MHC on how the N terminus of cTnT modulates contractile dynamics has implications for heart disease; alterations in cTnT and MHC are known to occur via changes in isoform expression or mutations. PMID:24043862

  4. Synthesis of [13C4]-labeled ∆9-tetrahydrocannabinol and 11-nor-9-carboxy-∆9-tetrahydrocannabinol as internal standards for reducing ion suppressing/alteration effects in LC/MS-MS quantification.

    PubMed

    Karlsen, Morten; Liu, Huiling; Johansen, Jon Eigill; Hoff, Bård Helge

    2014-09-01

    (-)-∆9-Tetrahydrocannabinol is the principal psychoactive component of the cannabis plant and also the active ingredient in some prescribed drugs. To detect and control misuse and monitor administration in clinical settings, reference samples of the native drugs and their metabolites are needed. The accuracy of liquid chromatography/mass spectrometric quantification of drugs in biological samples depends among others on ion suppressing/alteration effects. Especially, 13C-labeled drug analogues are useful for minimzing such interferences. Thus, to provide internal standards for more accurate quantification and for identification purpose, synthesis of [13C4]-∆9-tetrahydro-cannabinol and [13C4]-11-nor-9-carboxy-∆9-tetrahydrocannabinol was developed via [13C4]-olivetol. Starting from [13C4]-olivetol the synthesis of [13C4]-11-nor-9-carboxy-∆9-tetrahydrocannabinol was shortened from three to two steps by employing nitromethane as a co-solvent in condensation with (+)-apoverbenone.

  5. L-delta-(alpha-Aminoadipoyl)-L-cysteine-D-valine synthetase: production of dipeptides containing valine residue at its C-terminus.

    PubMed

    Shiau, Chia-Yang; Liu, Yu-Tien

    2002-04-12

    L-delta-(alpha-Aminoadipoyl)-L-cysteine-D-valine synthetase (ACVS) has been recently studied as a model enzyme for peptide synthetases. It was found that in the absence of alpha-aminoadipic acid but in the presence of several cysteine analogues it was incorporated into several analogue dipeptides upon incubation of the potential cysteine analogues with ACVS. [(14)C]Cysteine was incorporated into the[(14)C]cysteinyl-valine analogue dipeptides. Notably, [(14)C]valine incorporation in the presence of N-acylated cysteine analogues was observed. The alpha-aminoadipic acid activation site is influential, inhibitory or promotive, on the production of these putative dipeptide products. The production of dipeptide analogues, containing valine or analogues at the C-terminus, leads to the speculation that the biosynthetic direction of ACV could be from the C-terminus to the N-terminus.

  6. Pan–ice-sheet glacier terminus change in East Antarctica reveals sensitivity of Wilkes Land to sea-ice changes

    PubMed Central

    Miles, Bertie W. J.; Stokes, Chris R.; Jamieson, Stewart S. R.

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of ocean-terminating outlet glaciers are an important component of ice-sheet mass balance. Using satellite imagery for the past 40 years, we compile an approximately decadal record of outlet-glacier terminus position change around the entire East Antarctic Ice Sheet (EAIS) marine margin. We find that most outlet glaciers retreated during the period 1974–1990, before switching to advance in every drainage basin during the two most recent periods, 1990–2000 and 2000–2012. The only exception to this trend was in Wilkes Land, where the majority of glaciers (74%) retreated between 2000 and 2012. We hypothesize that this anomalous retreat is linked to a reduction in sea ice and associated impacts on ocean stratification, which increases the incursion of warm deep water toward glacier termini. Because Wilkes Land overlies a large marine basin, it raises the possibility of a future sea level contribution from this sector of East Antarctica. PMID:27386519

  7. A conformational transition at the N terminus of the prion protein features in formation of the scrapie isoform.

    PubMed

    Peretz, D; Williamson, R A; Matsunaga, Y; Serban, H; Pinilla, C; Bastidas, R B; Rozenshteyn, R; James, T L; Houghten, R A; Cohen, F E; Prusiner, S B; Burton, D R

    1997-10-31

    The scrapie prion protein (PrPSc) is formed from the cellular isoform (PrPC) by a post-translational process that involves a profound conformational change. Linear epitopes for recombinant antibody Fab fragments (Fabs) on PrPC and on the protease-resistant core of PrPSc, designated PrP 27-30, were identified using ELISA and immunoprecipitation. An epitope region at the C terminus was accessible in both PrPC and PrP 27-30; in contrast, epitopes towards the N-terminal region (residues 90 to 120) were accessible in PrPC but largely cryptic in PrP 27-30. Denaturation of PrP 27-30 exposed the epitopes of the N-terminal domain. We argue from our findings that the major conformational change underlying PrPSc formation occurs within the N-terminal segment of PrP 27-30.

  8. Pan-ice-sheet glacier terminus change in East Antarctica reveals sensitivity of Wilkes Land to sea-ice changes.

    PubMed

    Miles, Bertie W J; Stokes, Chris R; Jamieson, Stewart S R

    2016-05-01

    The dynamics of ocean-terminating outlet glaciers are an important component of ice-sheet mass balance. Using satellite imagery for the past 40 years, we compile an approximately decadal record of outlet-glacier terminus position change around the entire East Antarctic Ice Sheet (EAIS) marine margin. We find that most outlet glaciers retreated during the period 1974-1990, before switching to advance in every drainage basin during the two most recent periods, 1990-2000 and 2000-2012. The only exception to this trend was in Wilkes Land, where the majority of glaciers (74%) retreated between 2000 and 2012. We hypothesize that this anomalous retreat is linked to a reduction in sea ice and associated impacts on ocean stratification, which increases the incursion of warm deep water toward glacier termini. Because Wilkes Land overlies a large marine basin, it raises the possibility of a future sea level contribution from this sector of East Antarctica.

  9. Control of high affinity interactions in the talin C terminus: how talin domains coordinate protein dynamics in cell adhesions.

    PubMed

    Himmel, Mirko; Ritter, Anett; Rothemund, Sven; Pauling, Björg V; Rottner, Klemens; Gingras, Alexandre R; Ziegler, Wolfgang H

    2009-05-15

    In cell-extracellular matrix junctions (focal adhesions), the cytoskeletal protein talin is central to the connection of integrins to the actin cytoskeleton. Talin is thought to mediate this connection via its two integrin, (at least) three actin, and several vinculin binding sites. The binding sites are cryptic in the head-to-rod autoinhibited cytoplasmic form of the protein and require (stepwise) conformational activation. This activation process, however, remains poorly understood, and there are contradictory models with respect to the determinants of adhesion site localization. Here, we report turnover rates and protein-protein interactions in a range of talin rod domain constructs varying in helix bundle structure. We conclude that several bundles of the C terminus cooperate to regulate targeting and concomitantly tailor high affinity interactions of the talin rod in cell adhesions. Intrinsic control of ligand binding activities is essential for the coordination of adhesion site function of talin.

  10. Short communication: Urinary excretion of 11-nor-9-carboxy-Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol in a pregnant woman following heavy, chronic cannabis use.

    PubMed

    Westin, Andreas A; Huestis, Marilyn A; Aarstad, Kjell; Spigset, Olav

    2009-01-01

    Differentiating new intake of drugs-of-abuse from residual drug excretion may be difficult, especially following chronic drug usage and for drugs with long elimination half-lives such as cannabis. In the present case, cannabis was found in the urine of a young pregnant woman following heavy and chronic cannabis use. She was warned that if she continued using cannabis while pregnant she would be forced to be hospitalized. She was subjected to serial urine testing with 2-7-day intervals. Urinary 11-nor-9-carboxy-Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THCCOOH) concentrations, measured by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, declined from 348 to 3.9 ng/mL over a surprisingly long period of 12 weeks (84 days). Several algorithms for detecting new drug intake were applied during this time course; most indicated that the woman continued to smoke cannabis following the first urine test. The woman denied any use after the first specimen collection. In retrospect, her THCCOOH excretion profile supports her story. Algorithms for detecting new drug intake have been validated for occasional cannabis users only. We advise caution when interpreting urine test results from heavy, chronic cannabis users, especially when serious consequences are involved.

  11. Investigation of the transformation of 11-nor-9-carboxy-Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol during water chlorination by liquid chromatography-quadrupole-time-of-flight-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    González-Mariño, Iria; Rodríguez, Isaac; Quintana, José Benito; Cela, Rafael

    2013-10-15

    The stability of the main metabolite of cannabis, (±)-11-nor-9-carboxy-Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THCCOOH), during water chlorination has been investigated. THCCOOH was degraded in few seconds following a pseudo-first order kinetics. Sample pH turned out to be a significant factor, decreasing THCCOOH half-life with an increase in its values. Seven by-products could be positively identified from accurate mass measurements: three compounds resulted from electrophilic substitutions of hydrogen per chlorine (or bromine) in the aromatic ring, whereas the formation of the remaining four involved additional reactions in the C-C double bond (hydration and halogenation). The software predicted toxicity of these products towards Daphnia magna indicates that they are expected to have toxicity values similar or higher than its precursor compound. Experiments conducted with diluted urine showed that THCCOOH was stable in this matrix, probably due to a rapid and complete reaction between chlorine and other organic constituents already present in the samples. In real surface waters, the extent of the reaction was also affected by the organic matter content, and so THCCOOH was rapidly degraded in samples scarcely affected by human activities, being more stable in waters with a higher level of pollution.

  12. Quantification of 11-Carboxy-Delta-9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC-COOH) in Meconium Using Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry (GC/MS).

    PubMed

    Peat, Judy; Davis, Brehon; Frazee, Clint; Garg, Uttam

    2016-01-01

    Maternal substance abuse is an ongoing concern and detecting drug use during pregnancy is an important component of neonatal care when drug abuse is suspected. Meconium is the preferred specimen for drug testing because it is easier to collect than neonatal urine and it provides a much broader time frame of drug exposure. We describe a method for quantifying 11-carboxy-delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC-COOH) in meconium. After adding a labeled internal standard (THC-COOH D9) and acetonitrile, samples are sonicated to release both free and conjugated THC-COOH. The acetonitrile/aqueous layer is removed and mixed with a strong base to hydrolyze the conjugated THC-COOH. The samples are then extracted with an organic solvent mixture as part of a sample "cleanup." The organic solvent layer is discarded and the remaining aqueous sample is acidified. Following extraction with a second organic mixture, the organic layer is removed and concentrated to dryness. The resulting residue is converted to a trimethylsilyl (TMS) derivative and analyzed using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) in selective ion monitoring (SIM) mode.

  13. Serum carboxy-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen levels are associated with carotid atherosclerosis in patients with cardiovascular risk factors.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Takeshi; Endo, Itsuro; Aihara, Ken-Ichi; Onishi, Yukiyo; Dong, Bingzi; Ohguro, Yukari; Kurahashi, Kiyoe; Yoshida, Sumiko; Fujinaka, Yuichi; Kuroda, Akio; Matsuhisa, Munehide; Fukumoto, Seiji; Matsumoto, Toshio; Abe, Masahiro

    2016-04-25

    Carboxy-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (ICTP) is generated through matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-dependent type I collagen digestion, and has been widely utilized as a biomarker for bone turnover. The fact that atherosclerotic lesions are rich in both type I collagen and MMP-producing macrophages led to the hypothesis that serum ICTP concentrations may serve as a non-invasive clinical biomarker for atherosclerosis. Therefore, the association of serum ICTP concentrations with the maximum intima-media thickness (IMT) of carotid arteries, a surrogate index of systemic atherosclerosis, or brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) in patients with atherosclerotic risk factors was evaluated. A total of 52 male and 65 female (mean age: 62.8 yrs) patients without renal failure, malignancies or bone diseases known to affect serum ICTP concentrations were recruited. Patients with max IMTs ≥1.1 mm showed significantly higher serum ICTP concentrations compared with patients with max IMTs <1.1 mm (3.33 ± 0.97 vs 2.82 ± 0.65 ng/mL, p<0.05). Serum ICTP concentration was also positively correlated with max IMT (p<0.001) or baPWV values (p<0.05). Multivariate analyses also revealed that serum ICTP concentrations were correlated with max IMT (p<0.001; 95% CI 0.200 to 0.454). These results suggest that serum ICTP concentrations can be used as a non-invasive biomarker for systemic atherosclerosis.

  14. Galangin induces apoptosis in gastric cancer cells via regulation of ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase isozyme L1 and glutathione S-transferase P.

    PubMed

    Kim, Deuk Ae; Jeon, Young Keul; Nam, Myeong Jin

    2012-03-01

    Galangin has been shown to have anti-cancer property against several types of cancer cells. Many studies have described the anti-oxidant and apoptotic effects of galangin. However, the mechanism of galangin-induced apoptosis has not yet been studied for human gastric cancer cells. We investigated galangin-induced apoptosis of human gastric cancer SNU-484 cells. Galangin inhibited proliferation of SNU-484 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The results showed that galangin significantly decreased the viability of SNU-484 cells at 50-200 μM for 24 h and 48 h. Galangin-induced cell death was characterized with the changes in cell morphology, DNA fragmentation, cell cycle, activation of caspase-3/-9, poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) cleavage, and expression of MAP kinase such as ERK1/2 and JNK. For identification of proteins potentially involved in apoptosis, a two-dimensional electrophoresis was employed. Proteomic analysis showed that several proteins were associated with anti-cancer properties of galangin. Of particular interest, these proteins included ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase isozyme L1 (Uch-L1) and glutathione S-transferase P (GSTP), which are involved in apoptosis of SNU-484 cells. Western blot analysis confirmed up-regulation of Uch-L1 and down-regulation of GSTP following galangin treatment. Our results suggest that Uch-L1 and GSTP be involved in galangin-induced apoptosis in human gastric cancer SNU-484 cells.

  15. Distribution of ∆(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol and 11-Nor-9-Carboxy-∆(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol Acid in Postmortem Biological Fluids and Tissues From Pilots Fatally Injured in Aviation Accidents.

    PubMed

    Kemp, Philip M; Cardona, Patrick S; Chaturvedi, Arvind K; Soper, John W

    2015-07-01

    Little is known of the postmortem distribution of ∆(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and its major metabolite, 11-nor-9-carboxy-∆(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THCCOOH). Data from 55 pilots involved in fatal aviation accidents are presented in this study. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis obtained mean THC concentrations in blood from multiple sites, liver, lung, and kidney of 15.6 ng/mL, 92.4 ng/g, 766.0 ng/g, 44.1 ng/g and mean THCCOOH concentrations of 35.9 ng/mL, 322.4 ng/g, 42.6 ng/g, 138.5 ng/g, respectively. Heart THC concentrations (two cases) were 184.4 and 759.3 ng/g, and corresponding THCCOOH measured 11.0 and 95.9 ng/g, respectively. Muscle concentrations for THC (two cases) were 16.6 and 2.5 ng/g; corresponding THCCOOH, "confirmed positive" and 1.4 ng/g. The only brain tested in this study showed no THC detected and 2.9 ng/g THCCOOH, low concentrations that correlated with low values in other specimens from this case. This research emphasizes the need for postmortem cannabinoid testing and demonstrates the usefulness of a number of tissues, most notably lung, for these analyses. Published 2015. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  16. Quantification of 11-Nor-9-Carboxy-Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol in Human Oral Fluid by Gas Chromatography–Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Allan J.; Scheidweiler, Karl B.; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2015-01-01

    A sensitive and specific method for the quantification of 11-nor-9-carboxy-Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THCCOOH) in oral fluid collected with the Quantisal and Oral-Eze devices was developed and fully validated. Extracted analytes were derivatized with hexafluoroisopropanol and trifluoroacetic anhydride and quantified by gas chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry with negative chemical ionization. Standard curves, using linear least-squares regression with 1/x2 weighting were linear from 10 to 1000 ng/L with coefficients of determination >0.998 for both collection devices. Bias was 89.2%–112.6%, total imprecision 4.0%–5.1% coefficient of variation, and extraction efficiency >79.8% across the linear range for Quantisal-collected specimens. Bias was 84.6%–109.3%, total imprecision 3.6%–7.3% coefficient of variation, and extraction efficiency >92.6% for specimens collected with the Oral-Eze device at all 3 quality control concentrations (10, 120, and 750 ng/L). This effective high-throughput method reduces analysis time by 9 minutes per sample compared with our current 2-dimensional gas chromatography–mass spectrometry method and extends the capability of quantifying this important oral fluid analyte to gas chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry. This method was applied to the analysis of oral fluid specimens collected from individuals participating in controlled cannabis studies and will be effective for distinguishing passive environmental contamination from active cannabis smoking. PMID:24622724

  17. Simultaneous determination of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol and 11-nor-9-carboxy-Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol in oral fluid using isotope dilution liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lee, Pin Duo; Chang, Yuan-Jhe; Lin, Keh-Liang; Chang, Yan-Zin

    2012-01-01

    The detection and confirmation of cannabinoids in oral fluid are important in forensic toxicology. Currently, the presence of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is used for the detection of cannabis in oral fluid. A low concentration of 11-nor-9-carboxy-Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC-COOH) is found in oral fluid, which suggested a convenient and low-sensitivity confirmation assay can be used in a routine forensic laboratory. In this study, a highly sensitive isotope dilution liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method following dansylation was successfully developed for simultaneous determination of THC and THC-COOH in oral fluid. The dansylated derivatives dramatically demonstrated and enhanced the sensitivity of THC and THC-COOH. To avoid signal influenced by the matrix, a 5-min liquid chromatography gradient program was evaluated and optimized, which reduced the sample diffusion and caused sharp peaks (less than 12 s) and thus helped to achieve detection at a low level. The sensitivity, accuracy, and precision were also evaluated, and high quantitative accuracy and precision were obtained. The limit of quantitation of this approach was 25 pg/mL for THC and 10 pg/mL for THC-COOH in oral fluid. Finally, the method was successfully applied to eight suspected cannabis users. Among them, in six oral fluid samples THC-COOH was determined at a concentration from 13.1 to 47.2 pg/mL.

  18. Quantitative analysis of 11-nor-9-carboxy-tetrahydrocannbinol (THC-COOH) in urine by LC-MS/MS following a simple filtration.

    PubMed

    Rumpler, Marc J

    2014-04-15

    Quantification methods utilizing liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) are common in clinical and forensic toxicology laboratories and the efficiency and rapidity of such methods continues to evolve. In most cases, urine drug confirmation does not require a drug extraction and can quickly and easily be accomplished with a dilution followed by sample filtration. The report describes the validation of a simple confirmation method for 11-nor-9-carboxy-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC-COOH) and compared two types of filter extraction columns for sample clean-up. The method achieved a linear range of 10-3000ng/mL, acceptable bias (-4.7-2.6%) and precision (0.9-6.9%) and autosampler stability up to 72h. Universal filter columns offered less variable recovery over the linear range and fewer matrix interferences compared to THC-COOH specific filter columns. Authentic specimens testing positive for THC-COOH by LC-MS/MS were in good agreement with typically used GC-MS methods.

  19. Silica stationary phase functionalized by 4-carboxy-benzoboroxole with enhanced boronate affinity nature for selective capture and separation of cis-diol compounds.

    PubMed

    Li, Hengye; Zhang, Xuemeng; Zhang, Lin; Cheng, Weihua; Kong, Fenying; Fan, Dahe; Li, Lei; Wang, Wei

    2017-09-08

    4-Carboxy-benzoboroxole was designed and synthesized. It was then combined with the modification effect of polyethyleneimine (PEI) for the preparation of boronate affinity silica stationary phase. The stationary phase showed improved binding strength with dissociation constant (Kd) towards xanthosine as low as 2.48 × 10(-4) M. The column showed excellent selectivity, high binding capacities (88.3 μmol adenosine g(-1), pH 7.0) and the lowest binding pH (4.0 for cytidine and as low as 2.24 for xanthosine). These binding properties were superior to the existing boronate affinity materials, facilitating the selective extraction of trace cis-diol compounds in complex samples and greatly expanding the application scope of boronate affinity chromatography. In addition, the column showed secondary separation capability under acidic conditions and this secondary separation capability was investigated thoroughly. It was found that the separation was pH-dependent and mainly determined by binding strength with the possibility of involvement of other interaction, providing alternative strategy for the separation of cis-diol compounds. The feasibility and practicability were demonstrated through the selective enrichment of nucleosides in urine samples and the results indicated the excellent performance and great potential for the extraction of trace cis-diol compounds in complex samples. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Serum carboxy-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (I-CTP) is predictive of clinical outcome in peripheral artery disease patients following endovascular therapy.

    PubMed

    Otaki, Yoichiro; Watanabe, Tetsu; Takahashi, Hiroki; Yamaura, Gensai; Nishiyama, Satoshi; Arimoto, Takanori; Shishido, Tetsuro; Miyamoto, Takuya; Kubota, Isao

    2017-02-01

    Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is a risk factor for the development of heart failure and mortality. The serum levels of carboxy-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (I-CTP), a marker for collagen degradation derived from the extracellular matrix of vascular and myocardial tissue, is reportedly a useful marker for cardiac events in patients with heart disease. However, it remains unclear whether I-CTP can predict poor clinical outcome in patients with PAD. Serum I-CTP was measured in 246 consecutive PAD patients who underwent endovascular therapy. Patients were prospectively followed during a median follow-up period of 887 days with the end points of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE). I-CTP was significantly higher in patients with critical limb ischemia than those without. A multivariate Cox proportional hazard analysis revealed that I-CTP was an independent predictor of MACE after adjusting for confounding factors. Patients were stratified into three groups based on I-CTP level tertile, and those with third tertile had higher levels of brain natriuretic peptide levels and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein compared to the other two groups. Kaplan-Meier analysis demonstrated that patients in the highest tertile of I-CTP also had the greatest risk of MACE. The net reclassification index significantly improved with the addition of I-CTP to basic predictors. I-CTP is a reliable marker and indicator for MACE in patients with PAD.

  1. Synthesis and application of a N-1' fluorescent biotinyl derivative inducing the specific carboxy-terminal dual labeling of a novel RhoB-selective scFv.

    PubMed

    Chaisemartin, L; Chinestra, P; Favre, G; Blonski, C; Faye, J C

    2009-05-20

    The fluorescent site-specific labeling of protein would provide a new, easy-to-use alternative to biochemical and immunochemical methods. We used an intein-mediated strategy for covalent labeling of the carboxy-terminal amino acid of a RhoB-selective scFv previously isolated from a phage display library (a human synthetic V(H) + V(L) scFv phage library). The scFv fused to the Mxe intein was produced in E. coli and purified and was then labeled with a newly synthesized fluorescent biotinyl cysteine derivative capable of inducing scFv-Mxe intein splicing. In this study, we investigated the splicing and labeling properties of various amino acids in the hinge domain between scFv and Mxe under thiol activation. In this dual labeling system, the fluorescein is used for antibody detection and biotin is used for purification, resulting in a high specific activity for fluorescence. We then checked that the purified biotinylated fluorescent scFv retained its selectivity for RhoB without modification of its affinity.

  2. New gastroprotective labdeneamides from (4S,9R,10R) methyl 18-carboxy-labda-8,13(E)-diene-15-oate.

    PubMed

    Olate, Verónica Rachel; Pertino, Mariano Walter; Theoduloz, Cristina; Yesilada, Erdem; Monsalve, Francisco; González, Paulo; Droguett, Daniel; Richomme, Pascal; Hadi, A Hamid; Schmeda-Hirschmann, Guillermo

    2012-03-01

    Starting from the diterpene (4S,9R,10R) methyl 18-carboxy-labda-8,13(E)-dien-15-oate (PMD) and its 8(9)-en isomer [PMD 8(9)-en], 11 amides were prepared and assessed for a gastroprotective effect in the ethanol/HCl-induced gastric lesions model in mice. Basal cytotoxicity of the compounds was determined on the following human cell lines: normal lung fibroblasts (MRC-5), gastric epithelial adenocarcinoma (AGS), and hepatocellular carcinoma (Hep G2). All compounds are described for the first time. At the single oral dose of 0.1 mg/kg, compounds 1, 10, and 11 presented a strong gastroprotective effect, at least comparable with that of the reference compound lansoprazole at 1 mg/kg, reducing gastric lesions by 76.7, 67.7, and 77.2 %, respectively. The leucyl amide methyl ester 3, tryptophanyl amide methyl ester 5, and benzyl amide 6 of PMD presented a selective basal cytotoxicity on Hep G2 cells with IC₅₀ values of 136.8, 105.3, and 94.2 µM, respectively, while the IC₅₀ values towards AGS cells were 439.5, 928.0, and 937.3 µM, respectively. The three compounds did not affect fibroblast viability with IC₅₀ values > 1000 µM. Compounds 7, 8, 10, and 11 showed no toxic effect against the three selected cell lines.

  3. Phosphoserines of the carboxy terminal domain of RNA polymerase II are involved in the interaction with transcription-associated proteins (TAPs).

    PubMed

    Vidyalakshmi, Subramanian; Ramamurthy, Viraraghavan

    2013-03-01

    Generation of productive transcripts of protein coding genes in eukaryotes is a complex, multistep process centrally controlled by the RNA polymerase II (Pol II) complex. The carboxy terminal domain (CTD) of the largest subunit of the enzyme is designed to be modified by differential phosphorylation, and plays a key role in orchestrating the multiple events of the process by interacting with a host of transcription-associated proteins (TAPs) at different stages. We analyzed, in silico, the role of serine phosphorylation of CTD in relation to molecular interaction between different TAPs and a representative part of the CTD repeat structure. Using molecular docking, we investigated eight different proteins involved in capping, elongation, splicing, 3' end cleavage, or polyadenylation functions during the transcription process. Among the different phosphorylated forms of CTD, the form found to have the most affinity for a particular protein was also the form that is predominant during that process, the only exception being the equally high affinity of S2PCTD to Spt4, although S5PCTD is the known active form during elongation. The unique phosphoserine of the CTD forms associated with the TAPs was an important participant in the association between both the molecules. These studies have also identified other residues of TAPs interacting with CTD which in previous studies have not been recognized as being functionally significant. These findings add to an emerging body of literature on the regulatory aspects of genomics and proteomics and thus, might catalyze future applications for discovery and translational omics science.

  4. Studies on the growth, spectral, structural, electrical, optical and mechanical properties of Uronium 3-carboxy-4-hydroxybenzenesulfonate single crystal for third-order nonlinear optical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silambarasan, A.; Krishna Kumar, M.; Thirunavukkarasu, A.; Md Zahid, I.; Mohan Kumar, R.; Umarani, P. R.

    2015-05-01

    Organic Uronium 3-carboxy-4-hydroxybenzenesulfonate (UCHBS) nonlinear optical single crystal was grown by solution growth technique. The solubility and nucleation studies were performed for UCHBS at different temperatures 30, 35, 40, 45, 50 and 55 °C. The crystal structure of UCHBS was elucidated from single crystal X-ray diffraction study. High resolution X-ray diffraction technique was employed to study the perfection and internal defects of UCHBS crystal. Infrared and Raman spectra were recorded to analyze the vibrational behavior of chemical bonds and its functional groups. The physico-chemical changes, stability and decomposition stages of the UCHBS compound were established by TG-DTA studies. The dielectric phenomenon of UCHBS crystal was studied at different temperatures with respect to frequency. Linear optical properties of transmittance, cut-off wavelength, band gap of UCHBS were found from UV-visible spectral studies. Third-order nonlinear optical susceptibility, nonlinear refractive index, nonlinear optical absorption coefficient values were measured by Z-scan technique. The mechanical properties of UCHBS crystal was studied by using Vicker's microhardness test. The growth features of UCHBS crystal were analyzed from etching studies.

  5. Synthesis, growth, characterisation and laser damage threshold studies of N,N-dimethylanilinium-3-carboxy-4-hydroxybenzenesulphonate crystal: An efficient SHG material for electro-optic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajkumar, M.; Chandramohan, A.

    2017-04-01

    An NLO active organic proton transfer complex salt, N,N-Dimethylanilinium-3-carboxy-4-hydroxybenzenesulphonate has been synthesized and single crystals grown by slow solvent evaporation solution growth technique at ambient temperature. The synthesized salt was characterized by Uv-visible absorption, UV-vis-NIR transmission spectral studies and elemental analysis. The formation of the salt and the crystal structure have been confirmed by single crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis and the title crystal belongs to monoclinic crystal system with the non-centrosymmetric space group, Pc. The FT-IR spectrum was recorded to confirm the presence of various functional groups in the grown crystal. The molecular structure of the crystal was further confirmed by 1H and 13C NMR spectra. The TG/DTA analyses were carried out to establish the thermal stability of the title crystal. The dielectric constant and dielectric loss have been studied as a function of frequency at different temperatures. The presence of SHG and its conversion efficiency was measured by employing the modified Kurtz and Perry powder technique. The laser damage threshold value of the title crystal was determined using a Nd:YAG laser with the wavelength of 1064 nm.

  6. MicroRNA-922 promotes tau phosphorylation by downregulating ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase L1 (UCHL1) expression in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Z-B; Wu, L; Xiong, R; Wang, L-L; Zhang, B; Wang, C; Li, H; Liang, L; Chen, S-D

    2014-09-05

    Decreased levels of soluble ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase L1 (UCHL1) have been reported in the brains of sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients, and the introduction of UCHL1 rescued the synaptic and cognitive function of AD model mice. Obviously, a reduction in the levels of UCHL1 may play a role in the pathogenesis of AD. However, the mechanisms underlying the regulation of UCHL1 levels in AD have not been fully elucidated. MicroRNAs (miRs) have been shown to participate in the process of AD. In our study, we discovered that microRNA-922 decreased the levels of UCHL1. Neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) mainly consisting of the hyperphosphorylated microtubule-associated protein tau are the defining pathological features of AD. In the present study, we found the levels of UCHL1 affected the levels of phosphorylated tau: the phosphorylated tau levels increased after knockdown of UCHL1 expression, and the phosphorylated tau levels decreased when UCHL1 was overexpressed. Furthermore, overexpression of microRNA-922 increased the phosphorylated tau levels. In conclusion, miR-922 increasing the levels of phosphorylated tau by regulating UCHL1 levels contributed to the pathogenesis of AD. Our study partly explained one of the mechanisms underlying the downregulation of UCHL1 levels in AD patients and could enrich the content of tau pathology in the pathogenesis of AD.

  7. Association of ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase-L1 in cerebrospinal fluid with clinical severity in a cohort of patients with Guillain-Barré syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nagamine, Satoshi; Fujiwara, Yuuki; Shimizu, Toshio; Kawata, Akihiro; Wada, Keiji; Isozaki, Eiji; Kabuta, Tomohiro

    2015-06-01

    Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) is an acute immune-mediated polyneuropathy. Although its pathogenic mechanism has been revealed and various therapeutic trials have been performed, a proportion of patients experience the severe sequelae associated with GBS. In this paper, we investigated whether the amount of the neuron-specific protein, ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase-L1 (UCH-L1), in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with GBS was correlated with the clinical course of the disease. UCH-L1 protein levels were greater in patients with GBS than in controls. The patients with GBS whose UCH-L1 protein levels were higher than those of the controls presented with more severe symptoms at peak. UCH-L1 protein levels tended to become elevated as the total protein levels were increased; however, elevated UCH-L1 without an increase in total protein might be correlated with severe disease course (bedridden or ventilator supported). These results suggest that UCH-L1 could be a biomarker associated with the severity of the disease at the acute phase of GBS.

  8. Transcription-Independent RNA Polymerase II Dephosphorylation by the FCP1 Carboxy-Terminal Domain Phosphatase in Xenopus laevis Early Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Palancade, Benoît; Dubois, Marie Françoise; Dahmus, Michael E.; Bensaude, Olivier

    2001-01-01

    The phosphorylation of the RNA polymerase II (RNAP II) carboxy-terminal domain (CTD) plays a key role in mRNA metabolism. The relative ratio of hyperphosphorylated RNAP II to hypophosphorylated RNAP II is determined by a dynamic equilibrium between CTD kinases and CTD phosphatase(s). The CTD is heavily phosphorylated in meiotic Xenopus laevis oocytes. In this report we show that the CTD undergoes fast and massive dephosphorylation upon fertilization. A cDNA was cloned and shown to code for a full-length xFCP1, the Xenopus orthologue of the FCP1 CTD phosphatases in humans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Two critical residues in the catalytic site were identified. CTD phosphatase activity was observed in extracts prepared from Xenopus eggs and cells and was shown to be entirely attributable to xFCP1. The CTD dephosphorylation triggered by fertilization was reproduced upon calcium activation of cytostatic factor-arrested egg extracts. Using immunodepleted extracts, we showed that this dephosphorylation is due to xFCP1. Although transcription does not occur at this stage, phosphorylation appears as a highly dynamic process involving the antagonist action of Xp42 mitogen-activated protein kinase and FCP1 phosphatase. This is the first report that free RNAP II is a substrate for FCP1 in vivo, independent from a transcription cycle. PMID:11533226

  9. Estimation of perimortal percent carboxy-heme in nonstandard postmortem specimens using analysis of carbon monoxide by GC/MS and iron by flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    Middleberg, R A; Easterling, D E; Zelonis, S F; Rieders, F; Rieders, M F

    1993-01-01

    In decomposed, formalin-fixed, embalmed, exhumed, and some fire-dried cases in which normal blood is unavailable, the usual methods for determination of carboxyhemoglobin saturation frequently fail. To address these specimens, a method utilizing both gas chromatography/mass spectrometric (GC/MS) determination of carbon monoxide (CO) and flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry (FAAS) determination of iron (Fe), in the same specimen, was developed. The method is reported here, along with its application to seven pertinent forsensic death investigations. The CO analytical methodology involves acid liberation of the gas from the specimen aliquot in a headspace vial. After heating and equilibrating, a sample of the headspace vapor is injected into the GC/MS system with a gastight syringe. Quantitation is achieved by standard addition comparison utilizing the ideal gas law equation. Iron is quantified by FAAS analysis of the same aliquot used for the CO determination, following nitric acid digestion. The concentration is determined by comparison to a standard curve. A formula for determining the minimum percent carboxy-heme saturation was derived by using the ratio of the amount of CO to the amount of Fe in the aliquot analyzed. Tissue types analyzed include spleen, liver, muscle, dried blood, and unspecified decomposed tissue.

  10. Investigation into the Mode of Phosphate Activation in the 4-Hydroxy-4-Methyl-2-Oxoglutarate/4-Carboxy-4-Hydroxy-2-Oxoadipate Aldolase from Pseudomonas putida F1

    PubMed Central

    Mazurkewich, Scott; Seah, Stephen Y. K.

    2016-01-01

    The 4-hydroxy-4-methyl-2-oxoglutarate (HMG)/4-carboxy-4-hydroxy-2-oxoadipate (CHA) aldolase is the last enzyme of both the gallate and protocatechuate 4,5-cleavage pathways which links aromatic catabolism to central cellular metabolism. The enzyme is a class II, divalent metal dependent, aldolase which is activated in the presence of inorganic phosphate (Pi), increasing its turnover rate >10-fold. This phosphate activation is unique for a class II aldolase. The aldolase pyruvate methyl proton exchange rate, a probe of the general acid half reaction, was increased 300-fold in the presence of 1 mM Pi and the rate enhancement followed saturation kinetics giving rise to a KM of 397 ± 30 μM. Docking studies revealed a potential Pi binding site close to, or overlapping with, the proposed general acid water site. Putative Pi binding residues were substituted by site-directed mutagenesis which resulted in reductions of Pi activation. Significantly, the active site residue Arg-123, known to be critical for the catalytic mechanism of the enzyme, was also implicated in supporting Pi mediated activation. PMID:27741265

  11. A triclinic crystal structure of the carboxy-terminal domain of HIV-1 capsid protein with four molecules in the asymmetric unit reveals a novel packing interface

    PubMed Central

    Lampel, Ayala; Yaniv, Oren; Berger, Or; Bacharach, Eran; Gazit, Ehud; Frolow, Felix

    2013-01-01

    The Gag precursor is the major structural protein of the virion of human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1). Capsid protein (CA), a cleavage product of Gag, plays an essential role in virus assembly both in Gag-precursor multimerization and in capsid core formation. The carboxy-terminal domain (CTD) of CA contains 20 residues that are highly conserved across retroviruses and constitute the major homology region (MHR). Genetic evidence implies a role for the MHR in interactions between Gag precursors during the assembly of the virus, but the structural basis for this role remains elusive. This paper describes a novel triclinic structure of the HIV-1 CA CTD at 1.6 Å resolution with two canonical dimers of CA CTD in the asymmetric unit. The canonical dimers form a newly identified packing interface where interactions of four conserved MHR residues take place. This is the first structural indication that these MHR residues participate in the putative CTD–CTD interactions. These findings suggest that the molecules forming this novel interface resemble an intermediate structure that participates in the early steps of HIV-1 assembly. This interface may therefore provide a novel target for antiviral drugs. PMID:23722834

  12. Studies on the growth aspects, structural and third-order nonlinear optical properties of Piperidinium 3-carboxy-4-hydroxy benzenesulfonate single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalaiyarasi, S.; Zahid, I. MD; Devi, S. Reena; Kumar, R. Mohan

    2017-02-01

    Organic nonlinear optical material Piperidinium 3-carboxy-4-hydroxy benzenesulfonate (PBS) single crystal was successfully grown by solution growth method. Single crystal X-ray diffraction study confirms that, the grown crystal belongs to P21/n space group. The crystalline quality of PBS was ascertained by HRXRD studies. Infrared spectral analysis showed the vibrational behaviour of chemical bonds and presence of its functional groups. TG/DTA studies were used to study the thermal stability and decomposition stages of the compound. UV-visible transmittance studies showed the transparency region, cut-off wavelength and band gap of the grown crystal. Photoluminescence emission study was carried out for the grown crystal to show its electronic properties. By using Nd:YAG laser, the laser damage threshold was estimated for the grown crystal. The third-order nonlinear optical parameters of the grown crystal were estimated by Z-scan technique using He-Ne laser source. The mechanical property of the PBS crystal was studied by using Vicker's microhardness measurement.

  13. Quantitation of total 11-nor-9-carboxy-delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol in urine and blood using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS).

    PubMed

    Frazee, C Clinton; Kiscoan, Michael; Garg, Uttam

    2010-01-01

    Marijuana, which is made from crushing the leaves, flowers, and sometimes the stems of the plant Cannabis sativa, contains more than 30 cannabinoids. The major psychoactive cannabinoid is delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). The major metabolite of THC, 11-nor-delta 9-carboxy-tetrahydrocannabionol (THC-COOH), is excreted in the urine primarily as a glucuronide conjugate and is commonly analyzed in biological specimens for detecting marijuana usage. The procedure described here involves the addition of deuterated internal standard THC-COOH-d9 into the sample followed by hydrolysis of conjugated THC-COOH by alkali. THC-COOH is extracted from urine or blood using liquid-liquid extraction followed by preparation of its trimethylsilyl derivatives. The analysis of derivatized THC-COOH is performed using gas-chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Quantification of the drug in a sample is achieved by comparing the responses of the unknown sample to the responses of the calibrators using selected ion monitoring.

  14. Endothelin-1 (ET-1) stimulates carboxy terminal Smad2 phosphorylation in vascular endothelial cells by a mechanism dependent on ET receptors and de novo protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Sharifat, Narges; Mohammad Zadeh, Ghorban; Ghaffari, Mohammad-Ali; Dayati, Parisa; Kamato, Danielle; Little, Peter J; Babaahmadi-Rezaei, Hossein

    2017-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) agonists through their receptors can transactivate protein tyrosine kinase receptors such as epidermal growth factor receptor and serine/threonine kinase receptors most notably transforming growth factor (TGF)-β receptor (TβRI). This signalling mechanism represents a major expansion in the cellular outcomes attributable to GPCR signalling. This study addressed the role and mechanisms involved in GPCR agonist, endothelin-1 (ET-1)-mediated transactivation of the TβRI in bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAECs). The in-vitro model used BAECs. Signalling intermediate phospho-Smad2 in the carboxy terminal was detected and quantified by Western blotting. ET-1 treatment of BAECs resulted in a time and concentration-dependent increase in pSmad2C. Peak phosphorylation was evident with 100 nm treatment of ET-1 at 4-6 h. TβRI antagonist, SB431542 inhibited ET-1-mediated pSmad2C. In the presence of bosentan, a mixed ETA and ETB receptor antagonist ET-1-mediated pSmad2C levels were inhibited. The ET-mediated pSmad2C was blocked by the protein synthesis inhibitor, cycloheximide. In BAECs, ET-1 via the ETB receptor is involved in transactivation of the TβRI. The transactivation-dependent response is dependent upon de novo protein synthesis. © 2016 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  15. (2,2′-Bipyridine)bis­(3-carboxy­pyrazine-2-carboxyl­ato)copper(II) dihydrate

    PubMed Central

    Aghabozorg, Hossein; Parvizi, Mahdieh; Sadrkhanlou, Elahe

    2008-01-01

    The title six-coordinated distorted octa­hedral complex, [Cu(C6H3N2O4)2(C10H8N2)]·2H2O, consists of two 3-carboxy­pyrazine-2-carboxyl­ate anions and one 2,2′-bipyridine ligand. There is a twofold rotation axis positioned at the CuII center. The N atoms of the pyrazine ring occupy the axial positions and two proton-transferred O atoms of tbe acid together with the two N atoms of the 2,2′-bipyridine ligand complete the equatorial plane. The inter­actions existing in the crystal structure are inter­molecular O—H⋯O hydrogen bonds, and C—H⋯O and C—O⋯π inter­actions (O⋯π =3.145 Å, C—O⋯π = 149.75°). PMID:21203048

  16. Assessing the potential of a "color effect" for hair analysis of 11-nor-9-carboxy-delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol: analysis of a large sample of hair specimens.

    PubMed

    Mieczkowski, Tom

    2003-12-12

    It has been hypothesized that hair color may play a role in the concentration of various drugs of abuse in hair. Several studies have shown that melanin in hair appears to play a binding role for at least some commonly abused drugs. However, these studies have been limited by a number of factors when assessing the clinical significance of a hypothesized melanin or color effect. This study evaluates the possible effect of hair color on the concentration of 11-nor-9-carboxy-Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (c-THC) in human hair. The analysis is based on 3886 positive c-THC hair specimens drawn from a universe of approximately 80000 specimens of scalp hair harvested from the posterior vertex of the head. Analysis of variance of color categorization by c-THC concentration shows that c-THC concentration does not have a significant association with hair color (Hair Color F = 1.148, p =.332) and therefore does not have a demonstrable "color effect".

  17. A triclinic crystal structure of the carboxy-terminal domain of HIV-1 capsid protein with four molecules in the asymmetric unit reveals a novel packing interface.

    PubMed

    Lampel, Ayala; Yaniv, Oren; Berger, Or; Bacharach, Eran; Gazit, Ehud; Frolow, Felix

    2013-06-01

    The Gag precursor is the major structural protein of the virion of human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1). Capsid protein (CA), a cleavage product of Gag, plays an essential role in virus assembly both in Gag-precursor multimerization and in capsid core formation. The carboxy-terminal domain (CTD) of CA contains 20 residues that are highly conserved across retroviruses and constitute the major homology region (MHR). Genetic evidence implies a role for the MHR in interactions between Gag precursors during the assembly of the virus, but the structural basis for this role remains elusive. This paper describes a novel triclinic structure of the HIV-1 CA CTD at 1.6 Å resolution with two canonical dimers of CA CTD in the asymmetric unit. The canonical dimers form a newly identified packing interface where interactions of four conserved MHR residues take place. This is the first structural indication that these MHR residues participate in the putative CTD-CTD interactions. These findings suggest that the molecules forming this novel interface resemble an intermediate structure that participates in the early steps of HIV-1 assembly. This interface may therefore provide a novel target for antiviral drugs.

  18. Fast and Efficient Separation and Determination of UV-absorbing Amino Acids, Nucleobases, and Creatinine Using a Carboxy-functionalized Cation-exchange Column.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Yukio; Fujishima, Takeru; Kurota, Kazuki

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a new HPLC technique for the determination of biogenic cations such as amino acids and nucleobases, using a weak-acid cation-exchange column. Fourteen analytes, five amino acids and seven bases in addition to creatinine and creatine, were separated in 12 min by means of a two-liquid gradient elution with UV detection. The newly released column packed with a carboxy-functionalized polymethacrylate resin could give excellent selectivity to the organic cations of interest, although such a column is in general suitable for the separation of inorganic common cations. The chromatographic intra-day repeatability was very good with RSDs less than 0.4%, and the quantitation precision based on peak area intensities was also good with RSDs less than 5% for all analytes. The linear calibration lines for quantitation ranged between 5 and 500 μM on 20-μL injections with R(2) more than 0.9990. Since the method could provide concentration data of urinary creatinine and some metabolites simultaneously, for example, the urinary phenylalanine/creatinine ratios for phenylketonuria of inborn errors of metabolism were simply determined through one chromatographic run. The ratios for patients were significantly higher than those for controls. We found that the new weak-acid cation-exchange column was suitable for the separation of organic cations as well as inorganic cations.

  19. A conserved carboxy-terminal domain in the major tegument structural protein VP22 facilitates virion packaging of a chimeric protein during productive herpes simplex virus 1 infection

    SciTech Connect

    Schlegel, Elisabeth F.M.; Blaho, John A.

    2009-05-10

    Recombinant virus HSV-1(RF177) was previously generated to examine tegument protein VP22 function by inserting the GFP gene into the gene encoding VP22. During a detailed analysis of this virus, we discovered that RF177 produces a novel fusion protein between the last 15 amino acids of VP22 and GFP, termed GCT-VP22. Thus, the VP22 carboxy-terminal specific antibody 22-3 and two anti-GFP antibodies reacted with an approximately 28 kDa protein from RF177-infected Vero cells. GCT-VP22 was detected at 1 and 3 hpi. Examination of purified virions indicated that GCT-VP22 was incorporated into RF177 virus particles. These observations imply that at least a portion of the information required for virion targeting is located in this domain of VP22. Indirect immunofluorescence analyses showed that GCT-VP22 also localized to areas of marginalized chromatin during RF177 infection. These results indicate that the last fifteen amino acids of VP22 participate in virion targeting during HSV-1 infection.

  20. Cytoplasmic methionyl-tRNA synthetase from Bakers' yeast. A monomer with a post-translationally modified N terminus.

    PubMed

    Fasiolo, F; Gibson, B W; Walter, P; Chatton, B; Biemann, K; Boulanger, Y

    1985-12-15

    Methionyl-tRNA synthetase has been purified from a yeast strain carrying the MES1 structural gene on a high copy number plasmid (pFL1). The purified enzyme is a monomer of Mr = 85,000 in contrast to its counterpart from Escherichia coli which is a dimer made up of identical subunits (Mr = 76,000; Dardel, F., Fayat, G., and Blanquet, S. (1984) J. Bacteriol. 160, 1115-1122). The yeast enzyme was not amenable to Edman's degradation indicating a blocked NH2 terminus. Its primary structure as derived from the DNA sequence (Walter, P., Gangloff, J., Bonnet, J., Boulanger, Y., Ebel, J.P., and Fasiolo, F. (1983) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 80, 2437-2441) has been confirmed using the fast atom bombardment-mass spectrometric method. This method was applied to tryptic digests of the carboxymethylated enzyme and the corresponding data provided extensive coverage of the translated DNA sequence, thus confirming its correctness. The ambiguity concerning which of the three NH2-terminally located methionine codons is the initiation codon was easily resolved from peptides identified in this region. It was possible to show that the first methionine had been removed and that the new NH2 terminus, serine, had been acetylated. A comparison between the yeast and E. coli sequences shows that the former has an N-terminal extension of about 200 residues as compared to the latter. It also lacks the C-terminal domain which is responsible for the dimerization of the E. coli methionyl-tRNA synthetase.

  1. Spinal or supraspinal phosphorylation deficiency at the MOR C-terminus does not affect morphine tolerance in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kibaly, Cherkaouia; Lin, Hong-Yiou; Loh, Horace H; Law, Ping-Yee

    2017-05-01

    The development of tolerance to morphine, one of the most potent analgesics, in the management of chronic pain is a significant clinical problem and its mechanisms are poorly understood. Morphine exerts its pharmacological effects via the μ-opioid receptor (MOR). Tolerance is highly connected to G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) phosphorylation and desensitization increase. Because morphine desensitization previously has been shown to be MOR phosphorylation- and ß-arrestin2-independent (in contrast to agonists such as fentanyl), we examined the contribution of phosphorylation of the entire C-terminus to the development of antinociceptive tolerance to the partial (morphine) and full (fentanyl) MOR agonists in vivo. In MOR knockout (MORKO) mice, we delivered via lentivirus the genes encoding the wild-type MOR (WTMOR) or a phosphorylation-deficient MOR (Cterm(-S/T)MOR) in which all of the serine and threonine residues were mutated to alanine into the ventrolateral periaqueductal grey matter (vlPAG) or lumbar spinal cord (SC), structures that are involved in nociception. We compared the analgesic ED50 in WTMOR- and Cterm(-S/T)MOR-expressing MORKO mice before and after morphine or fentanyl tolerance was induced. Morphine acute antinociception was partially restored in WTMOR- or Cterm(-S/T)MOR-transferred MORKO mice. Fentanyl acute antinociception was observed only in MORKO mice with the transgenes expressed in the SC. Morphine antinociceptive tolerance was not affected by expressing Cterm(-S/T)MOR in the vlPAG or SC of MORKO mice. Fentanyl-induced tolerance in MORKO mice expressing WTMOR or Cterm(-S/T)MOR, is greater than morphine-induced tolerance. Thus, MOR C-terminus phosphorylation does not appear to be critical for morphine tolerance in vivo. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Ferritin Structure from Mycobacterium tuberculosis: Comparative Study with Homologues Identifies Extended C-Terminus Involved in Ferroxidase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Khare, Garima; Gupta, Vibha; Nangpal, Prachi; Gupta, Rakesh K.; Sauter, Nicholas K.; Tyagi, Anil K.

    2011-01-01

    Ferritins are recognized as key players in the iron storage and detoxification processes. Iron acquisition in the case of pathogenic bacteria has long been established as an important virulence mechanism. Here, we report a 3.0 Å crystal structure of a ferritin, annotated as Bacterioferritin B (BfrB), from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), the causative agent of tuberculosis that continues to be one of the world's deadliest diseases. Similar to the other members of ferritin family, the Mtb BfrB subunit exhibits the characteristic fold of a four-helical bundle that possesses the ferroxidase catalytic centre. We compare the structure of Mtb BfrB with representatives of the ferritin family belonging to the archaea, eubacteria and eukarya. Unlike most other ferritins, Mtb BfrB has an extended C-terminus. To dissect the role of this extended C-terminus, truncated Mtb BfrB was purified and biochemical studies implicate this region in ferroxidase activity and iron release in addition to providing stability to the protein. Functionally important regions in a protein of known 3D-structure can be determined by estimating the degree of conservation of the amino-acid sites with its close homologues. Based on the comparative studies, we identify the slowly evolving conserved sites as well as the rapidly evolving variable sites and analyze their role in relation to structure and function of Mtb BfrB. Further, electrostatic computations demonstrate that although the electrostatic environment of catalytic residues is preserved within the family, extensive variability is exhibited by residues defining the channels and pores, in all likelihood keeping up with the diverse functions executed by these ferritins in varied environments. PMID:21494619

  3. Phosphorylation and cellular function of the human Rpa2 N-terminus in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Ghospurkar, Padmaja L; Wilson, Timothy M; Liu, Shengqin; Herauf, Anna; Steffes, Jenna; Mueller, Erica N; Oakley, Gregory G; Haring, Stuart J

    2015-02-01

    Maintenance of genome integrity is critical for proper cell growth. This occurs through accurate DNA replication and repair of DNA lesions. A key factor involved in both DNA replication and the DNA damage response is the heterotrimeric single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) binding complex Replication Protein A (RPA). Although the RPA complex appears to be structurally conserved throughout eukaryotes, the primary amino acid sequence of each subunit can vary considerably. Examination of sequence differences along with the functional interchangeability of orthologous RPA subunits or regions could provide insight into important regions and their functions. This might also allow for study in simpler systems. We determined that substitution of yeast Replication Factor A (RFA) with human RPA does not support yeast cell viability. Exchange of a single yeast RFA subunit with the corresponding human RPA subunit does not function due to lack of inter-species subunit interactions. Substitution of yeast Rfa2 with domains/regions of human Rpa2 important for Rpa2 function (i.e., the N-terminus and the loop 3-4 region) supports viability in yeast cells, and hybrid proteins containing human Rpa2 N-terminal phospho-mutations result in similar DNA damage phenotypes to analogous yeast Rfa2 N-terminal phospho-mutants. Finally, the human Rpa2 N-terminus (NT) fused to yeast Rfa2 is phosphorylated in a manner similar to human Rpa2 in human cells, indicating that conserved kinases recognize the human domain in yeast. The implication is that budding yeast represents a potential model system for studying not only human Rpa2 N-terminal phosphorylation, but also phosphorylation of Rpa2 N-termini from other eukaryotic organisms. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. C Terminus of Nucleotide Binding Domain 1 Contains Critical Features for Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Trafficking and Activation*

    PubMed Central

    Billet, Arnaud; Melin, Patricia; Jollivet, Mathilde; Mornon, Jean-Paul; Callebaut, Isabelle; Becq, Frédéric

    2010-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a Cl− channel physiologically important in fluid-transporting epithelia and pathologically relevant in several human diseases. Here, we show that mutations in the C terminus of the first nucleotide binding domain comprising the latest β strands (βc5 and βc6) influence the trafficking, channel activity, and pharmacology of CFTR. We mutated CFTR amino acids located in the βc5-βc6 hairpin, within the βc5 strand (H620Q), within the β-turn linking the two β strands (E621G, G622D), as well as within (S623A, S624A) and at the extremity (G628R) of the βc6 strand. Functional analysis reveals that the current density was largely reduced for G622D and G628R channels compared with wt CFTR, similar for E621G and S624A, but increased for H620Q and S623A. For G622D and G628R, the abnormal activity is likely due to a defective maturation process, as assessed by the augmented activity and mature C-band observed in the presence of the trafficking corrector miglustat. In addition, in presence of the CFTR activator benzo[c]quinolizinium, the CFTR current density compared with that of wt CFTR was abolished for G622D and G628R channels, but similar for H620Q, S623A, and S624A or slightly increased for E621G. Finally, G622D and G628R were activated by the CFTR agonists genistein, RP-107, and isobutylmethylxanthine. Our results identify the C terminus of the CFTR first nucleotide binding domain as an important molecular site for the trafficking of CFTR protein, for the control of CFTR channel gating, and for the pharmacological effect of a dual activity agent. PMID:20435887

  5. The N Terminus of the Prion Protein Mediates Functional Interactions with the Neuronal Cell Adhesion Molecule (NCAM) Fibronectin Domain.

    PubMed

    Slapšak, Urška; Salzano, Giulia; Amin, Ladan; Abskharon, Romany N N; Ilc, Gregor; Zupančič, Blaž; Biljan, Ivana; Plavec, Janez; Giachin, Gabriele; Legname, Giuseppe

    2016-10-14

    The cellular form of the prion protein (PrP(C)) is a highly conserved glycoprotein mostly expressed in the central and peripheral nervous systems by different cell types in mammals. A misfolded, pathogenic isoform, denoted as prion, is related to a class of neurodegenerative diseases known as transmissible spongiform encephalopathy. PrP(C) function has not been unequivocally clarified, and it is rather defined as a pleiotropic protein likely acting as a dynamic cell surface scaffolding protein for the assembly of different signaling modules. Among the variety of PrP(C) protein interactors, the neuronal cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) has been studied in vivo, but the structural basis of this functional interaction is still a matter of debate. Here we focused on the structural determinants responsible for human PrP(C) (HuPrP) and NCAM interaction using stimulated emission depletion (STED) nanoscopy, SPR, and NMR spectroscopy approaches. PrP(C) co-localizes with NCAM in mouse hippocampal neurons, and this interaction is mainly mediated by the intrinsically disordered PrP(C) N-terminal tail, which binds with high affinity to the NCAM fibronectin type-3 domain. NMR structural investigations revealed surface-interacting epitopes governing the interaction between HuPrP N terminus and the second module of the NCAM fibronectin type-3 domain. Our data provided molecular details about the interaction between HuPrP and the NCAM fibronectin domain, and revealed a new role of PrP(C) N terminus as a dynamic and functional element responsible for protein-protein interaction.

  6. Structure and interactions of the carboxyl terminus of striated muscle alpha-tropomyosin: it is important to be flexible.

    PubMed Central

    Greenfield, Norma J; Palm, Thomas; Hitchcock-DeGregori, Sarah E

    2002-01-01

    Tropomyosin (TM) binds to and regulates the actin filament. We used circular dichroism and heteronuclear NMR to investigate the secondary structure and interactions of the C terminus of striated muscle alpha-TM, a major functional determinant, using a model peptide, TM9a(251-284). The (1)H(alpha) and (13)C(alpha) chemical shift displacements show that residues 252 to 277 are alpha-helical but residues 278 to 284 are nonhelical and mobile. The (1)H(N) and (13)C' displacements suggest that residues 257 to 269 form a coiled coil. Formation of an "overlap" binary complex with a 33-residue N-terminal chimeric peptide containing residues 1 to 14 of alpha-TM perturbs the (1)H(N) and (15)N resonances of residues 274 to 284. Addition of a fragment of troponin T, TnT(70-170), to the binary complex perturbs most of the (1)H(N)-(15)N cross-peaks. In addition, there are many new cross-peaks, showing that the binding is asymmetric. Q263, in a proposed troponin T binding site, shows two sets of side-chain (15)N-(1)H cross-peaks, indicating conformational flexibility. The conformational equilibrium of the side chain changes upon formation of the binary and ternary complexes. Replacing Q263 with leucine greatly increases the stability of TM9a(251-284) and reduces its ability to form the binary and ternary complexes, showing that conformational flexibility is crucial for the binding functions of the C terminus. PMID:12414708

  7. The C-terminus of cardiac troponin I stabilizes the Ca2+-activated state of tropomyosin on actin filaments

    PubMed Central

    Galińska, Agnieszka; Hatch, Victoria; Craig, Roger; Murphy, Anne M.; Van Eyk, Jennifer E.; Wang, C.-L. Albert; Lehman, William; Foster, D. Brian

    2010-01-01

    Rationale Ca2+ control of troponin-tropomyosin position on actin regulates cardiac muscle contraction. The inhibitory subunit of troponin, cardiac troponin I (cTnI) is primarily responsible for maintaining a tropomyosin conformation that prevents crossbridge cycling. Despite extensive characterization of cTnI, the precise role of its C-terminal domain (residues 193–210) is unclear. Mutations within this region are associated with restrictive cardiomyopathy, and C-terminal deletion of cTnI, in some species, has been associated with myocardial stunning. Objective We sought to investigate the effect of a cTnI deletion -removal of 17 amino acids from the C-terminus- on the structure of troponin-regulated tropomyosin bound to actin. Methods and Results A truncated form of human cTnI (cTnI1–192) was expressed and reconstituted with Troponin C and Troponin T to form a mutant troponin. Using electron microscopy and 3D-image reconstruction, we show that the mutant troponin perturbs the positional equilibrium dynamics of tropomyosin in the presence of Ca2+. Specifically, it biases tropomyosin position toward an “enhanced Cstate” that exposes more of the myosin-binding site on actin than found with wild-type troponin. Conclusions In addition to its well-established role of promoting the so-called “blocked-state” or “B-state”, cTnI participates in proper stabilization of tropomyosin in the “Ca2+-activated state” or “C-state”. The last 17 amino acids fulfill this stabilizing role. The data are consistent with a “fly-casting” model in which the mobile C-terminus of cTnI ensures proper conformational switching of troponin-tropomyosin. Loss of actin-sensing function within this domain, by pathological proteolysis or cardiomyopathic mutation, may be sufficient to perturb tropomyosin conformation. PMID:20035081

  8. The C Terminus of the Catalytic Domain of Type A Botulinum Neurotoxin May Facilitate Product Release from the Active Site*

    PubMed Central

    Mizanur, Rahman M.; Frasca, Verna; Swaminathan, Subramanyam; Bavari, Sina; Webb, Robert; Smith, Leonard A.; Ahmed, S. Ashraf

    2013-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins are the most toxic of all compounds. The toxicity is related to a poor zinc endopeptidase activity located in a 50-kDa domain known as light chain (Lc) of the toxin. The C-terminal tail of Lc is not visible in any of the currently available x-ray structures, and it has no known function but undergoes autocatalytic truncations during purification and storage. By synthesizing C-terminal peptides of various lengths, in this study, we have shown that these peptides competitively inhibit the normal catalytic activity of Lc of serotype A (LcA) and have defined the length of the mature LcA to consist of the first 444 residues. Two catalytically inactive mutants also inhibited LcA activity. Our results suggested that the C terminus of LcA might interact at or near its own active site. By using synthetic C-terminal peptides from LcB, LcC1, LcD, LcE, and LcF and their respective substrate peptides, we have shown that the inhibition of activity is specific only for LcA. Although a potent inhibitor with a Ki of 4.5 μm, the largest of our LcA C-terminal peptides stimulated LcA activity when added at near-stoichiometric concentration to three versions of LcA differing in their C-terminal lengths. The result suggested a product removal role of the LcA C terminus. This suggestion is supported by a weak but specific interaction determined by isothermal titration calorimetry between an LcA C-terminal peptide and N-terminal product from a peptide substrate of LcA. Our results also underscore the importance of using a mature LcA as an inhibitor screening target. PMID:23779108

  9. The Amino-Terminus of Nitric Oxide Sensitive Guanylyl Cyclase α1 Does Not Affect Dimerization but Influences Subcellular Localization

    PubMed Central

    Kraehling, Jan R.; Busker, Mareike; Haase, Tobias; Haase, Nadine; Koglin, Markus; Linnenbaum, Monika; Behrends, Soenke

    2011-01-01

    Background Nitric oxide sensitive guanylyl cyclase (NOsGC) is a heterodimeric enzyme formed by an α- and a β1-subunit. A splice variant (C-α1) of the α1-subunit, lacking at least the first 236 amino acids has been described by Sharina et al. 2008 and has been shown to be expressed in differentiating human embryonic cells. Wagner et al. 2005 have shown that the amino acids 61–128 of the α1-subunit are mandatory for quantitative heterodimerization implying that the C-α1-splice variant should lose its capacity to dimerize quantitatively. Methodology/Principal Findings In the current study we demonstrate preserved quantitative dimerization of the C-α1-splice by co-purification with the β1-subunit. In addition we used fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) based on fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) using fusion proteins of the β1-subunit and the α1-subunit or the C-α1 variant with ECFP or EYFP. Analysis of the respective combinations in HEK-293 cells showed that the fluorescence lifetime was significantly shorter (≈0.3 ns) for α1/β1 and C-α1/β1 than the negative control. In addition we show that lack of the amino-terminus in the α1 splice variant directs it to a more oxidized subcellular compartment. Conclusions/Significance We conclude that the amino-terminus of the α1-subunit is dispensable for dimerization in-vivo and ex-vivo, but influences the subcellular trafficking. PMID:21984946

  10. Phosphorylation of serine residues in the N-terminus modulates the activity of ACA8, a plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase of Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Giacometti, Sonia; Marrano, Claudia Adriana; Bonza, Maria Cristina; Luoni, Laura; Limonta, Margherita; De Michelis, Maria Ida

    2012-01-01

    ACA8 is a plasma membrane-localized isoform of calmodulin (CaM)-regulated Ca2+-ATPase of Arabidopsis thaliana. Several phosphopeptides corresponding to portions of the regulatory N-terminus of ACA8 have been identified in phospho-proteomic studies. To mimic phosphorylation of the ACA8 N-terminus, each of the serines found to be phosphorylated in those studies (Ser19, Ser22, Ser27, Ser29, Ser57, and Ser99) has been mutated to aspartate. Mutants have been expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and characterized: mutants S19D and S57D—and to a lesser extent also mutants S22D and S27D—are deregulated, as shown by their low activation by CaM and by tryptic cleavage of the N-terminus. The His-tagged N-termini of wild-type and mutant ACA8 (6His-1M-I116) were expressed in Escherichia coli, affinity-purified, and used to analyse the kinetics of CaM binding by surface plasmon resonance. All the analysed mutations affect the kinetics of interaction with CaM to some extent: in most cases, the altered kinetics result in marginal changes in affinity, with the exception of mutants S57D (KD ∼10-fold higher than wild-type ACA8) and S99D (KD about half that of wild-type ACA8). The ACA8 N-terminus is phosphorylated in vitro by two isoforms of A. thaliana calcium-dependent protein kinase (CPK1 and CPK16); phosphorylation of mutant 6His-1M-I116 peptides shows that CPK16 is able to phosphorylate the ACA8 N-terminus at Ser19 and at Ser22. The possible physiological implications of the subtle modulation of ACA8 activity by phosphorylation of its N-terminus are discussed. PMID:22090438

  11. Phosphorylation of serine residues in the N-terminus modulates the activity of ACA8, a plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Giacometti, Sonia; Marrano, Claudia Adriana; Bonza, Maria Cristina; Luoni, Laura; Limonta, Margherita; De Michelis, Maria Ida

    2012-02-01

    ACA8 is a plasma membrane-localized isoform of calmodulin (CaM)-regulated Ca(2+)-ATPase of Arabidopsis thaliana. Several phosphopeptides corresponding to portions of the regulatory N-terminus of ACA8 have been identified in phospho-proteomic studies. To mimic phosphorylation of the ACA8 N-terminus, each of the serines found to be phosphorylated in those studies (Ser19, Ser22, Ser27, Ser29, Ser57, and Ser99) has been mutated to aspartate. Mutants have been expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and characterized: mutants S19D and S57D--and to a lesser extent also mutants S22D and S27D--are deregulated, as shown by their low activation by CaM and by tryptic cleavage of the N-terminus. The His-tagged N-termini of wild-type and mutant ACA8 (6His-(1)M-I(116)) were expressed in Escherichia coli, affinity-purified, and used to analyse the kinetics of CaM binding by surface plasmon resonance. All the analysed mutations affect the kinetics of interaction with CaM to some extent: in most cases, the altered kinetics result in marginal changes in affinity, with the exception of mutants S57D (K(D) ≈ 10-fold higher than wild-type ACA8) and S99D (K(D) about half that of wild-type ACA8). The ACA8 N-terminus is phosphorylated in vitro by two isoforms of A. thaliana calcium-dependent protein kinase (CPK1 and CPK16); phosphorylation of mutant 6His-(1)M-I(116) peptides shows that CPK16 is able to phosphorylate the ACA8 N-terminus at Ser19 and at Ser22. The possible physiological implications of the subtle modulation of ACA8 activity by phosphorylation of its N-terminus are discussed.

  12. Structural characterization of two tetra-chlorido-zincate salts of 4-carb-oxy-1H-imidazol-3-ium: a salt hydrate and a co-crystal salt hydrate.

    PubMed

    Martens, Sean J; Geiger, David K

    2017-02-01

    Imidazole-containing compounds exhibit a myriad of pharmacological activities. Two tetra-chlorido-zincate salts of 4-carb-oxy-1H-imidazol-3-ium, ImHCO2H(+), are reported. Bis(4-carb-oxy-1H-imidazol-3-ium) tetra-chlorido-zincate monohydrate, (C4H5N2O2)2[ZnCl4]·H2O, (I), crystallizes as a monohydrate salt, while bis-(4-carb-oxy-1H-imidazol-3-ium) tetra-chlorido-zincate bis-(1H-imidazol-3-ium-4-carboxyl-ato) monohydrate, (C4H5N2O2)2[ZnCl4]·2C4H4N2O2·H2O, (II), is a co-crystal salt with six residues: two ImHCO2H(+) cations, two formula units of the zwitterionic 1H-imidazol-3-ium-4-carboxyl-ate, ImHCO2, one tetra-chlorido-zincate anion and one water mol-ecule disordered over two sites in a 0.60 (4):0.40 (4) ratio. The geometric parameters of the ImHCO2H(+) and the ImHCO2 moieties are the same within the standard uncertainties of the measurements. Both compounds exhibit extensive hydrogen bonding, including involvement of the tetra-chlorido-zincate anion, resulting in inter-connected chains of anions joined by water mol-ecules.

  13. Activation of the Lbc Rho Exchange Factor Proto-Oncogene by Truncation of an Extended C Terminus That Regulates Transformation and Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Sterpetti, Paola; Hack, Andrew A.; Bashar, Mariam P.; Park, Brian; Cheng, Sou-De; Knoll, Joan H. M.; Urano, Takeshi; Feig, Larry A.; Toksoz, Deniz

    1999-01-01

    The human lbc oncogene product is a guanine nucleotide exchange factor that specifically activates the Rho small GTP binding protein, thus resulting in biologically active, GTP-bound Rho, which in turn mediates actin cytoskeletal reorganization, gene transcription, and entry into the mitotic S phase. In order to elucidate the mechanism of onco-Lbc transformation, here we report that while proto- and onco-lbc cDNAs encode identical N-terminal dbl oncogene homology (DH) and pleckstrin homology (PH) domains, proto-Lbc encodes a novel C terminus absent in the oncoprotein that includes a predicted α-helical region homologous to cyto-matrix proteins, followed by a proline-rich region. The lbc proto-oncogene maps to chromosome 15, and onco-lbc represents a fusion of the lbc proto-oncogene N terminus with a short, unrelated C-terminal sequence from chromosome 7. Both onco- and proto-Lbc can promote formation of GTP-bound Rho in vivo. Proto-Lbc transforming activity is much reduced compared to that of onco-Lbc, and a significant increase in transforming activity requires truncation of both the α-helical and proline-rich regions in the proto-Lbc C terminus. Deletion of the chromosome 7-derived C terminus of onco-Lbc does not destroy transforming activity, demonstrating that it is loss of the proto-Lbc C terminus, rather than gain of an unrelated C-terminus by onco-Lbc, that confers transforming activity. Mutations of onco-Lbc DH and PH domains demonstrate that both domains are necessary for full transforming activity. The proto-Lbc product localizes to the particulate (membrane) fraction, while the majority of the onco-Lbc product is cytosolic, and mutations of the PH domain do not affect this localization. The proto-Lbc C-terminus alone localizes predominantly to the particulate fraction, indicating that the C terminus may play a major role in the correct subcellular localization of proto-Lbc, thus providing a mechanism for regulating Lbc oncogenic potential. PMID:9891067

  14. Hormonogenic donor Tyr2522 of bovine thyroglobulin. Insight into preferential T3 formation at thyroglobulin carboxyl terminus at low iodination level

    SciTech Connect

    Cetrangolo, Giovanni Paolo; Arcaro, Alessia; Lepore, Alessio; Graf, Maria; Mamone, Gianfranco; Ferranti, Pasquale; Palumbo, Giuseppe; Gentile, Fabrizio

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • A carboxy-terminal fragment (residues 2515–2750) was isolated from a low-iodine bTg. • Post-translational status of 8 tyrosines in bTg region 2515–2750 was assessed by MS. • Tyr2522 of bovine Tg is an interspecifically conserved hormonogenic donor site. • Propensities of Tyr residues to mono or diiodination optimize T3 yield from Tyr2748. - Abstract: A tryptic fragment (b5{sub TR,NR}), encompassing residues 2515–2750, was isolated from a low-iodine (0.26% by mass) bovine thyroglobulin, by limited proteolysis with trypsin and preparative, continuous-elution SDS–PAGE. The fragment was digested with Asp-N endoproteinase and analyzed by reverse-phase HPLC electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry, revealing the formation of: 3-monoiodotyrosine and dehydroalanine from Tyr2522; 3-monoiodotyrosine from Tyr2555 and Tyr2569; 3-monoiodotyrosine and 3,5-diiodotyrosine from Tyr2748. The data presented document, by direct mass spectrometric identifications, efficient iodophenoxyl ring transfer from monoiodinated hormonogenic donor Tyr2522 and efficient mono- and diiodination of hormonogenic acceptor Tyr2748, under conditions which permitted only limited iodination of Tyr2555 and Tyr2569, in low-iodine bovine thyroglobulin. The present study thereby provides: (1) a rationale for the preferential synthesis of T3 at the carboxy-terminal end of thyroglobulin, at low iodination level; (2) confirmation for the presence of an interspecifically conserved hormonogenic donor site in the carboxy-terminal domain of thyroglobulin; (3) solution for a previous uncertainty, concerning the precise location of such donor site in bovine thyroglobulin.

  15. Carboxy-terminally truncated Dengue 4 virus envelope glycoprotein expressed in Pichia pastoris induced neutralizing antibodies and resistance to Dengue 4 virus challenge in mice.

    PubMed

    Muné, M; Rodríguez, R; Ramírez, R; Soto, Y; Sierra, B; Rodríguez Roche, R; Marquez, G; Garcia, J; Guillén, G; Guzmán, M G

    2003-11-01

    We have expressed a recombinant Dengue 4 virus envelope glycoprotein (E4rec), truncated at its C-terminus by 53 amino acids, in Pichia pastoris. The presence of E4rec was confirmed by Western-blot using anti-DEN 4 hyper immune mouse ascitic fluid. E4rec migrated during SDS-PAGE as a 64 kDa protein. Treatment with endoglycosidases showed that the E protein was modified by the addition of short mannose chains and the absence of hyperglycosylation. When administered to BALB-C mice, E4rec elicited a DEN 4 neutralizing antibody response haemagglutination inhibition antibodies and specific memory T cell response. Mice immunized were also significantly protected against lethal DEN 4 virus challenge (86.6%, p < 0.001).

  16. Membrane-bound fatty acid desaturases are inserted co-translationally into the ER and contain different ER retrieval motifs at their carboxy termini.

    PubMed

    McCartney, Andrew W; Dyer, John M; Dhanoa, Preetinder K; Kim, Peter K; Andrews, David W; McNew, James A; Mullen, Robert T

    2004-01-01

    Fatty acid desaturases (FADs) play a prominent role in plant lipid metabolism and are located in various subcellular compartments, including the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). To investigate the biogenesis of ER-localized membrane-bound FADs, we characterized the mechanisms responsible for insertion of Arabidopsis FAD2 and Brassica FAD3 into ER membranes and determined the molecular signals that maintain their ER residency. Using in vitro transcription/translation reactions with ER-derived microsomes, we show that both FAD2 and FAD3 are efficiently integrated into membranes by a co-translational, translocon-mediated pathway. We also demonstrate that while the C-terminus of FAD3 (-KSKIN) contains a functional prototypic dilysine ER retrieval motif, FAD2 contains a novel C-terminal aromatic amino acid-containing sequence (-YNNKL) that is both necessary and sufficient for maintaining localization in the ER. Co-expression of a membrane-bound reporter protein containing the FAD2 C-terminus with a dominant-negative mutant of ADP-ribosylation factor (Arf)1 abolished transient localization of the reporter protein in the Golgi, indicating that the FAD2 peptide signal acts as an ER retrieval motif. Mutational analysis of the FAD2 ER retrieval signal revealed a sequence-specific motif consisting of Phi-X-X-K/R/D/E-Phi-COOH, where -Phi- are large hydrophobic amino acid residues. Interestingly, this aromatic motif was present in a variety of other known and putative ER membrane proteins, including cytochrome P450 and the peroxisomal biogenesis factor Pex10p. Taken together, these data describe the insertion and retrieval mechanisms of FADs and define a new ER localization signal in plants that is responsible for the retrieval of escaped membrane proteins back to the ER.

  17. A d-Amino Acid at the N-Terminus of a Protein Abrogates Its Degradation by the N-End Rule Pathway

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotes have evolved the ubiquitin (Ub)/proteasome system to degrade polypeptides. The Ub/proteasome system is one way that cells regulate cytosolic protein and amino acids levels through the recognition and ubiquitination of a protein’s N-terminus via E1, E2, and E3 enzymes. The process by which the N-terminus stimulates intracellular protein degradation is referred to as the N-end rule. Characterization of the N-end rule has been limited to only the natural l-amino acids. Using a cytosolic delivery platform derived from anthrax lethal toxin, we probed the stability of mixed chirality proteins, containing one d-amino acid on the N-terminus of otherwise all l-proteins. In all cases, we observed that one N-terminal d-amino acid stabilized the cargo protein to proteasomal degradation with respect to the N-end rule. We found that since the mixed chirality proteins were not polyubiquitinated, they evaded N-end-mediated proteasomal degradation. Evidently, a subtle change on the N-terminus of a natural protein can enhance its intracellular lifetime. PMID:26807441

  18. Enhancing the Predictive Power of Mutations in the C-Terminus of the KCNQ1-Encoded Kv7.1 Voltage-Gated Potassium Channel

    PubMed Central

    Kapplinger, Jamie D.; Tseng, Andrew S.; Salisbury, Benjamin A.; Tester, David J.; Callis, Thomas E.; Alders, Marielle; Wilde, Arthur A.M.; Ackerman, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the overrepresentation of Kv7.1 mutations among patients with a robust diagnosis of LQTS, a background rate of innocuous Kv7.1 missense variants observed in healthy controls creates ambiguity in the interpretation of LQTS genetic test results. A recent study showed the probability of pathogenicity for rare missense mutations depends in part on the topological location of the variant in Kv7.1’s various structure-function domains. Since the Kv7.1 C-terminus accounts for nearly 50% of the overall protein and nearly 50% of the overall background rate of rare variants falls within the C-terminus, further enhancement in mutation calling may provide guidance in distinguishing pathogenic LQT1-causing mutations from non-disease causing rare variants in Kv7.1’s C-terminus. Therefore, we have used conservation analysis and a large case/control study to generate topology-based estimative predictive values to aid in interpretation; identifying three regions of high conservation within the Kv7.1 C-terminus which have a high probability of LQT1 pathogenicity. PMID:25854863

  19. Induction of conformational changes at the N-terminus of herpes simplex virus glycoprotein D upon binding to HVEM and nectin-1

    PubMed Central

    Lazear, Eric; Whitbeck, J. Charles; Zuo, Yi; Carfí, Andrea; Cohen, Gary H.; Eisenberg, Roselyn J.; Krummenacher, Claude

    2013-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus entry is initiated by glycoprotein D (gD) binding to a cellular receptor, such as HVEM or nectin-1. gD is activated by receptor-induced displacement of the C-terminus from the core of the glycoprotein. Binding of HVEM requires the formation of an N-terminal hairpin loop of gD; once formed this loop masks the nectin-1 binding site on the core of gD. We found that HVEM and nectin-1 exhibit non-reciprocal competition for binding to gD. The N-terminus of gD does not spontaneously form a stable hairpin in the absence of receptor and HVEM does not appear to rely on a pre-existing hairpin for binding to gD(3C-38C) mutants. However, HVEM function is affected by mutations that impair optimal hairpin formation. Furthermore, nectin-1 induces a new conformation of the N-terminus of gD. We conclude that the conformation of the N-terminus of gD is actively modified by the direct action of both receptors. PMID:24314649

  20. A Unique Primer with an Inosine Chain at the 5′-Terminus Improves the Reliability of SNP Analysis Using the PCR-Amplified Product Length Polymorphism Method

    PubMed Central

    Shojo, Hideki; Tanaka, Mayumi; Takahashi, Ryohei; Kakuda, Tsuneo; Adachi, Noboru

    2015-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction-amplified product length polymorphism (PCR-APLP) is one of the most convenient and reliable methods for single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis. This method is based on PCR, but uses allele-specific primers containing SNP sites at the 3′-terminus of each primer. To use this method at least two allele-specific primers and one “counter-primer”, which serves as a common forward or reverse primer of the allele-specific primers, are required. The allele-specific primers have SNP sites at the 3′-terminus, and another primer should have a few non-complementary flaps at the 5′-terminus to detect SNPs by determining the difference of amplicon length by PCR and subsequent electrophoresis. A major disadvantage of the addition of a non-complementary flap is the non-specific annealing of the primer with non-complementary flaps. However, a design principle for avoiding this undesired annealing has not been fully established, therefore, it is often difficult to design effective APLP primers. Here, we report allele-specific primers with an inosine chain at the 5′-terminus for PCR-APLP analysis. This unique design improves the competitiveness of allele-specific primers and the reliability of SNP analysis when using the PCR-APLP method. PMID:26381262

  1. A Unique Primer with an Inosine Chain at the 5'-Terminus Improves the Reliability of SNP Analysis Using the PCR-Amplified Product Length Polymorphism Method.

    PubMed

    Shojo, Hideki; Tanaka, Mayumi; Takahashi, Ryohei; Kakuda, Tsuneo; Adachi, Noboru

    2015-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction-amplified product length polymorphism (PCR-APLP) is one of the most convenient and reliable methods for single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis. This method is based on PCR, but uses allele-specific primers containing SNP sites at the 3'-terminus of each primer. To use this method at least two allele-specific primers and one "counter-primer", which serves as a common forward or reverse primer of the allele-specific primers, are required. The allele-specific primers have SNP sites at the 3'-terminus, and another primer should have a few non-complementary flaps at the 5'-terminus to detect SNPs by determining the difference of amplicon length by PCR and subsequent electrophoresis. A major disadvantage of the addition of a non-complementary flap is the non-specific annealing of the primer with non-complementary flaps. However, a design principle for avoiding this undesired annealing has not been fully established, therefore, it is often difficult to design effective APLP primers. Here, we report allele-specific primers with an inosine chain at the 5'-terminus for PCR-APLP analysis. This unique design improves the competitiveness of allele-specific primers and the reliability of SNP analysis when using the PCR-APLP method.

  2. Posttranslational modification at the N terminus of the human adenovirus type 12 E1A 235R tumor antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Lucher, L A; Brackmann, K H; Symington, J S; Green, M

    1986-01-01

    The adenovirus E1A transforming region, which encodes immortalization, partial cell transformation, and gene activation functions, expresses two early mRNAs, 13S and 12S. Multiple-T antigen species with different electrophoretic mobilities are formed from each mRNA, presumably by unknown posttranslational modifications. The adenovirus type 12 (Ad12) 13S and 12S mRNAs encode E1A T antigens of 266 and 235 amino acid residues (266R and 235R), respectively. To study possible posttranslational processing at the N and C termini and to distinguish between the Ad12 266R and 235R T antigens, we prepared antibodies targeted to synthetic peptides encoded at the common C (peptide 204) and N (peptide 202) termini of the 266R and 235R T antigens and at the unique internal domain of the 266R T antigen (peptide 206). The specificity of each anti-peptide antibody was confirmed by immunoprecipitation of the 266R and 235R T antigens produced in Escherichia coli. Immunoprecipitation analysis of the E1A T antigens synthesized in Ad12-infected KB cells revealed the following. Antibody to the common C terminus recognized three T antigens with apparent Mrs of 43,000, 42,000, and 39,000 (43K, 42K, and 39K). All three forms were phosphorylated and were present in both the nucleus and the cytoplasm. The 43K and 42K T antigens were rapidly synthesized during a 10-min pulse with [35S]methionine in Ad12-infected cells. The 43K T antigen had a half-life of 20 min, the 42K T antigen had a longer half-life of about 40 min, and the 39K T antigen became the predominant E1A T antigen. Antibodies to the unique region immunoprecipitated the 43K T antigen but not the 42K and 39K T antigens. Antibody to the N terminus immunoprecipitated the 43K and 42K T antigens but not the 39K T antigen, suggesting that the 39K T antigen possessed a modified N terminus. Partial N-terminal amino acid sequence analysis showed that the 43K and 42K T antigens contain methionine at residues 1 and 5, as predicted from the

  3. Simultaneous analysis of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol and 11-nor-9-carboxy-tetrahydrocannabinol in hair without different sample preparation and derivatization by gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Han, Eunyoung; Park, Yonghoon; Kim, Eunmi; In, Sangwhan; Yang, Wonkyung; Lee, Sooyeun; Choi, Hwakyung; Lee, Sangki; Chung, Heesun; Song, Joon Myong

    2011-07-15

    The present study describes a gas chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry-negative ion chemical ionization assay (GC/MS/MS-NCI) for simultaneous analysis of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and 11-nor-9-carboxy-tetrahydrocannabinol (THCCOOH) in hair. Each hair sample, of approximately 20mg, was weighed and the sample was dissolved in 1ml of 1M sodium hydroxide (30min at 85°C) in the presence of THC-d(3) and THCCOOH-d(3). For the analysis of THC, hair samples were extracted with n-hexane:ethyl acetate (9:1) two times; acetic acid and sodium acetate buffer were added for the analysis of THCCOOH, and hair samples were re-extracted with n-hexane:ethyl acetate (9:1) two times. The extracts were then derivatized with pentafluoropropionic anhydride (PFPA) and pentafluoropropanol (PFPOH). This method allowed the analysis of THC and THCCOOH using the GC/MS/MS-NCI assay. This method was also fully validated and applied to hair specimens (n=54) collected from known cannabis users whose urine test results were positive. The concentrations of THC and THCCOOH in hair ranged from 7.52 to 60.41ng/mg and from 0.10 to 11.68pg/mg, respectively. In this paper, we simultaneously measured THC and THCCOOH in human hair using GC/MS/MS-NCI without requiring different sample preparation and derivatization procedures. The analytical sensitivity for THCCOOH in hair was good, while that for THC in hair needs to be improved in further study.

  4. Simplified analysis of 11-hydroxy-delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol and 11-carboxy-delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol in human meconium: method development and validation.

    PubMed

    Tynon, Marykathryn; Porto, Marcellino; Logan, Barry K

    2015-01-01

    We describe the development of a sensitive analytical method for the analysis of 11-hydroxy-delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (11-OH-THC) and 11-carboxy-delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THCC) in meconium using a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) platform. The method was validated according to protocols, which included assessment of accuracy, precision, robustness, stability in meconium and in-process stability, interference and sensitivity and specificity. The method consists of a solid phase extraction with alkaline hydrolysis and derivatization of the analytes with N, O-Bis(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacteamide, followed by GC/MS analysis using selected ion monitoring. The method uses deuterated internal standards for both analytes. Calibration curves had r(2) values >0.998, and extraction efficiency was determined to be 84.7% for THCC and 78.6% for 11-OH-THC. The detection limit for both analytes was 5 ng/g. This confirmatory method was successfully applied to 183 meconium samples that had screened positive by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and 67.2% were confirmed for THCC, and 2.2% were confirmed positive for 11-OH-THC. The mean (SD) and median (range) THCC (n = 123) concentrations detected were 55.0 ng/g (±59.0) and 33.75 ng/g (5-265 ng/g), while the mean and median (range) for 11-OH-THC (n = 4) concentrations were 8.25 ng/g (±4.71) and 6.5 ng/g (5-15 ng/g).

  5. Spectrophotometric studies on the complexation equilibria of Ni and Pb with 2-carboxy-2-hydroxy-5'-sulfo-formazylbenzene. Simultaneous determination of trace amounts of Ni and Pb.

    PubMed

    Hashem, Elham Y; Abu-Bakr, Mohamed S; Hussain, Sawsan M

    2004-01-01

    Spectrophotometric studies have been made to investigate the reaction of Nickel and Lead with 2-carboxy-2'-hydroxy-5'-sulfoformazyl-benzene (zincon) in 50%(v/v) ethanol-water at 25 degrees C and an ionic strength of 0.1 M NaClO4. A complete picture of the complexation equilibria in the pH range (4.2-12.0) for nickel and (1.9-11.5) for lead are presented. Simple, rapid, selective and sensitive methods for the spectro-photometric determination of nickel and lead has been developed based on the color reaction of their complexes with zincon. The methods allow the determination of 4.69 microg mL(-1) of nickel at pH = 6.3 (lambdamax = 665 nm) and 10.3 microg ml(-1) of lead at pH = 5.6 (lambdamax = 610 nm). The apparent molar absorptivities were epsilon = 1.3 x 10(4) L mol(-1) cm(-1) for nickel and epsilon = 0.6 x 10(4) L mol(-1) cm(-1) for lead. The interference of a large number of foreign ions and complexing agents has been studied. Thiosulphate, as masking agent allows the simultaneous determination of nickel and lead in the presence of high concentrations of copper. Ascorbic acid, sodium cyanide and or sodium fluoride provide the elimination of many other interferences. The methods have been applied successfully to the simultaneous determination of nickel and lead in an aluminium and non-ferrous alloy.

  6. Crystal structure of activated tobacco rubisco complexed with the reaction-intermediate analogue 2-carboxy-arabinitol 1,5-bisphosphate.

    PubMed Central

    Schreuder, H. A.; Knight, S.; Curmi, P. M.; Andersson, I.; Cascio, D.; Sweet, R. M.; Brändén, C. I.; Eisenberg, D.

    1993-01-01

    The crystal structure of activated tobacco rubisco, complexed with the reaction-intermediate analogue 2-carboxy-arabinitol 1,5-bisphosphate (CABP) has been determined by molecular replacement, using the structure of activated spinach rubisco (Knight, S., Andersson, I., & Brändén, C.-I., 1990, J. Mol. Biol. 215, 113-160) as a model. The R-factor after refinement is 21.0% for 57,855 reflections between 9.0 and 2.7 A resolution. The local fourfold axis of the rubisco hexadecamer coincides with a crystallographic twofold axis. The result is that the asymmetric unit of the crystals contains half of the L8S8 complex (molecular mass 280 kDa in the asymmetric unit). The activated form of tobacco rubisco is very similar to the activated form of spinach rubisco. The root mean square difference is 0.4 A for 587 equivalent C alpha atoms. Analysis of mutations between tobacco and spinach rubisco revealed that the vast majority of mutations concerned exposed residues. Only 7 buried residues were found to be mutated versus 54 residues at or near the surface of the protein. The crystal structure suggests that the Cys 247-Cys 247 and Cys 449-Cys 459 pairs are linked via disulfide bridges. This pattern of disulfide links differ from the pattern of disulfide links observed in crystals of unactivated tobacco rubisco (Curmi, P.M.G., et al., 1992, J. Biol. Chem. 267, 16980-16989) and is similar to the pattern observed for activated spinach tobacco. PMID:8358296

  7. Identification of critical amino acid residues of Saccharomyces cerevisiae carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase: definition of the ATP site involved in carboxy-phosphate formation.

    PubMed

    Zheng, W; Lim, A L; Powers-Lee, S G

    1997-08-15

    Carbamoyl-phosphate synthetases (CPSases) utilize two molecules of ATP at two homologous domains, B and C, with ATP(B) used to form the enzyme-bound intermediate carboxy-phosphate and ATP(C) used to phosphorylate the carbamate intermediate. To further define the role of one CPSase peptide suggested by affinity labeling studies to be near the ATP(B) site, we have carried out site-directed mutagenic analysis of peptide 234-242 of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae arginine-specific CPSase. Mutants E234A, E234D, E236A, E236D and E238A were unable to complement the CPSase-deficient yeast strain LPL26 whereas mutants Y237A, E238D, R241K, R241E and R241P supported LPL26 growth as well as wild-type CPSase. Kinetic analysis of E234A and Y237A indicated impaired utilization of ATP(B) but not of ATP(C). D242A, a temperature-sensitive mutant, retained no detectable activity when assayed in vitro. These findings, together with the affinity labeling data and primary sequence analysis, strongly suggest that the yeast CPSase peptide 234-242 is located at the ATP(B) site and that some of its residues are important for functioning of the enzyme. D242 appears to occupy a critical structural position and E234, E236 and E238 appear to be critical for function, with the spatial arrangement of the carboxyl side chain also critical for E234 and E236.

  8. Guanine α-carboxy nucleoside phosphonate (G-α-CNP) shows a different inhibitory kinetic profile against the DNA polymerases of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and herpes viruses.

    PubMed

    Balzarini, Jan; Menni, Michael; Das, Kalyan; van Berckelaer, Lizette; Ford, Alan; Maguire, Nuala M; Liekens, Sandra; Boehmer, Paul E; Arnold, Eddy; Götte, Matthias; Maguire, Anita R

    2017-07-15

    α-Carboxy nucleoside phosphonates (α-CNPs) are modified nucleotides that represent a novel class of nucleotide-competing reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors (NcRTIs). They were designed to act directly against HIV-1 RT without the need for prior activation (phosphorylation). In this respect, they differ from the nucleoside or nucleotide RTIs [N(t)RTIs] that require conversion to their triphosphate forms before being inhibitory to HIV-1 RT. The guanine derivative (G-α-CNP) has now been synthesized and investigated for the first time. The (L)-(+)-enantiomer of G-α-CNP directly and competitively inhibits HIV-1 RT by interacting with the substrate active site of the enzyme. The (D)-(-)-enantiomer proved inactive against HIV-1 RT. In contrast, the (+)- and (-)-enantiomers of G-α-CNP inhibited herpes (i.e. HSV-1, HCMV) DNA polymerases in a non- or uncompetitive manner, strongly indicating interaction of the (L)-(+)- and the (D)-(-)-G-α-CNPs at a location different from the polymerase substrate active site of the herpes enzymes. Such entirely different inhibition profile of viral polymerases is unprecedented for a single antiviral drug molecule. Moreover, within the class of α-CNPs, subtle differences in their sensitivity to mutant HIV-1 RT enzymes were observed depending on the nature of the nucleobase in the α-CNP molecules. The unique properties of the α-CNPs make this class of compounds, including G-α-CNP, direct acting inhibitors of multiple viral DNA polymerases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), 11-Hydroxy-THC, and 11-Nor-9-carboxy-THC Plasma Pharmacokinetics during and after Continuous High-Dose Oral THC

    PubMed Central

    Schwilke, Eugene W.; Schwope, David M.; Karschner, Erin L.; Lowe, Ross H.; Darwin, William D.; Kelly, Deanna L.; Goodwin, Robert S.; Gorelick, David A.; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is the primary psychoactive constituent of cannabis and an active cannabinoid pharmacotherapy component. No plasma pharmacokinetic data after repeated oral THC administration are available. METHODS Six adult male daily cannabis smokers resided on a closed clinical research unit. Oral THC capsules (20 mg) were administered every 4–8 h in escalating total daily doses (40–120 mg) for 7 days. Free and glucuronidated plasma THC, 11-hydroxy-THC (11-OH-THC), and 11-nor-9-carboxy-THC (THC COOH) were quantified by 2-dimensional GC-MS during and after dosing. RESULTS Free plasma THC, 11-OH-THC, and THCCOOH concentrations 19.5 h after admission (before controlled oral THC dosing) were mean 4.3 (SE 1.1), 1.3 (0.5), and 34.0 (8.4) μg/L, respectively. During oral dosing, free 11-OH-THC and THCCOOH increased steadily, whereas THC did not. Mean peak plasma free THC, 11-OH-THC, and THCCOOH concentrations were 3.8 (0.5), 3.0 (0.7), and 196.9 (39.9) μg/L, respectively, 22.5 h after the last dose. Escherichia coli β-glucuronidase hydrolysis of 264 cannabinoid specimens yielded statistically significant increases in THC, 11-OH-THC, and THCCOOH concentrations (P < 0.001), but conjugated concentrations were underestimated owing to incomplete enzymatic hydrolysis. CONCLUSIONS Plasma THC concentrations remained >1 μg/L for at least 1 day after daily cannabis smoking and also after cessation of multiple oral THC doses. We report for the first time free plasma THC concentrations after multiple high-dose oral THC throughout the day and night, and after Escherichia coli β-glucuronidase hydrolysis. These data will aid in the interpretation of plasma THC concentrations after multiple oral doses. PMID:19833841

  10. Ubiquitin Carboxy-Terminal Hydrolase-L1 as a Serum Neurotrauma Biomarker for Exposure to Occupational Low-Level Blast

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Walter; Yarnell, Angela M.; Ong, Ricardo; Walilko, Timothy; Kamimori, Gary H.; da Silva, Uade; McCarron, Richard M.; LoPresti, Matthew L.

    2015-01-01

    Repeated exposure to low-level blast is a characteristic of a few select occupations and there is concern that such occupational exposures present risk for traumatic brain injury. These occupations include specialized military and law enforcement units that employ controlled detonation of explosive charges for the purpose of tactical entry into secured structures. The concern for negative effects from blast exposure is based on rates of operator self-reported headache, sleep disturbance, working memory impairment, and other concussion-like symptoms. A challenge in research on this topic has been the need for improved assessment tools to empirically evaluate the risk associated with repeated exposure to blast overpressure levels commonly considered to be too low in magnitude to cause acute injury. Evaluation of serum-based neurotrauma biomarkers provides an objective measure that is logistically feasible for use in field training environments. Among candidate biomarkers, ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase-L1 (UCH-L1) has some empirical support and was evaluated in this study. We used daily blood draws to examine acute change in UCH-L1 among 108 healthy military personnel who were exposed to repeated low-level blast across a 2-week period. These research volunteers also wore pressure sensors to record blast exposures, wrist actigraphs to monitor sleep patterns, and completed daily behavioral assessments of symptomology, postural stability, and neurocognitive function. UCH-L1 levels were elevated as a function of participating in the 2-week training with explosives, but the correlation of UCH-L1 elevation and blast magnitude was weak and inconsistent. Also, UCH-L1 elevations did not correlate with deficits in behavioral measures. These results provide some support for including UCH-L1 as a measure of central nervous system effects from exposure to low-level blast. However, the weak relation observed suggests that additional indicators of blast effect are needed

  11. Structure of the Receptor-Binding Carboxy-Terminal Domain of the Bacteriophage T5 L-Shaped Tail Fibre with and without Its Intra-Molecular Chaperone

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Doval, Carmela; Castón, José R.; Luque, Daniel; Granell, Meritxell; Otero, José M.; Llamas-Saiz, Antonio L.; Renouard, Madalena; Boulanger, Pascale; van Raaij, Mark J.

    2015-01-01

    Bacteriophage T5, a Siphovirus belonging to the order Caudovirales, has a flexible, three-fold symmetric tail, to which three L-shaped fibres are attached. These fibres recognize oligo-mannose units on the bacterial cell surface prior to infection and are composed of homotrimers of the pb1 protein. Pb1 has 1396 amino acids, of which the carboxy-terminal 133 residues form a trimeric intra-molecular chaperone that is auto-proteolyzed after correct folding. The structure of a trimer of residues 970–1263 was determined by single anomalous dispersion phasing using incorporated selenomethionine residues and refined at 2.3 Å resolution using crystals grown from native, methionine-containing, protein. The protein inhibits phage infection by competition. The phage-distal receptor-binding domain resembles a bullet, with the walls formed by partially intertwined beta-sheets, conferring stability to the structure. The fold of the domain is novel and the topology unique to the pb1 structure. A site-directed mutant (Ser1264 to Ala), in which auto-proteolysis is impeded, was also produced, crystallized and its 2.5 Å structure solved by molecular replacement. The additional chaperone domain (residues 1263–1396) consists of a central trimeric alpha-helical coiled-coil flanked by a mixed alpha-beta domain. Three long beta-hairpin tentacles, one from each chaperone monomer, extend into long curved grooves of the bullet-shaped domain. The chaperone-containing mutant did not inhibit infection by competition. PMID:26670244

  12. DFT and experimental study of N, N'-bis(3'-carboxy,4'-aminophenyl)-1,4-quinonediimine, a carboxyl substituted aniline trimer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sein, Lawrence T., Jr.; Lashua, Amanda F.

    2010-08-01

    Density functional calculations were performed on N, N'-bis(3'-carboxy,4'-aminophenyl)-1,4-quinonediimine, a carboxylic acid substituted aniline trimer. Results of the calculations were compared to experimental properties of the herein synthesized trimer, as well as to the properties of the anthranilic acid/aniline co-polymer reported in the literature. The calculated LUMO levels for isomers of the title compound range from -4.45 to -5.05 eV. The calculated electron affinities range from 75.93 kcal mol -1 to 89.04 kcal mol -1 (3.29-3.86 eV). Both the LUMO levels and electron affinities are greatest in magnitude for the anti, syn isomer. The HOMO levels, on the other hand, range from -5.32 eV (for the trans, trans isomer) to -5.36 eV (syn, syn inner). In acetonitrile solvent, the zwitterionic form is calculated to be energetically preferred to the non-zwitterion. Experimental UV-vis and near-IR studies in acetonitrile and ethanol show little evidence for zwitterion formation, but those in water show strong evidence. The predicted electronic transitions for the non-zwitterion in acetonitrile solvent correspond closely to those seen at 533 and 416 nm. The zwitterion present in solvent corresponds to a trimer with the capability to "self-dope", suggesting that the trimer would be effective at corrosion inhibition in the emeraldine base form, unlike other trimers which are only effective in the emeraldine salt form. This effectiveness in the emeraldine base form would enable the material to be utilized in corrosion inhibition applications in alkaline environments where standard oligo- and polyanilines fail.

  13. Development of a direct ELISA based on carboxy-terminal of penicillin-binding protein BlaR for the detection of β-lactam antibiotics in foods.

    PubMed

    Peng, Juan; Cheng, Guyue; Huang, Lingli; Wang, Yulian; Hao, Haihong; Peng, Dapeng; Liu, Zhenli; Yuan, Zonghui

    2013-11-01

    β-Lactam antibiotics, including penicillins and cephalosporins, are commonly used in veterinary medicine. Illegal use and abuse of β-lactams could cause allergy and selected bacterial resistance. BlaR-CTD, the carboxy-terminal of penicillin-recognizing protein BlaR from Bacillus licheniformis ATCC 14580, was utilized in this study to develop a receptor-based ELISA for detection and determination of β-lactam antibiotics in milk, beef, and chicken. This assay was based on directly competitive inhibition of binding of horseradish peroxidase-labeled ampicillin to the immobilized BlaR-CTD by β-lactams. The assay was developed as screening test with the option as semiquantitative assay, when the identity of a single type of residual β-lactam was known. The IC50 values of 15 β-lactam antibiotics, including benzylpenicillin, ampicillin, amoxicillin, dicloxacillin, oxacillin, nafcillin, cefapirin, cefoperazone, cefalotin, cefazolin, cefquinome, ceftriaxone, cefotaxime, cefalexin, ceftiofur and its metabolite desfuroylceftiofur were evaluated and ranged from 0.18 to 170.81 μg L(-1). Simple sample extraction method was carried out with only phosphate-buffered saline, and the recoveries of selected β-lactam antibiotics in milk, beef, and chicken were in the range of 53.27 to 128.29 %, most ranging from 60 to 120 %. The inter-assay variability was below 30 %. Limits of detection in milk, beef, and chicken muscles with cefquinome matrix calibration were 2.10, 30.68, and 31.13 μg kg(-1), respectively. This study firstly established a rapid, simple, and accurate method for simultaneous detection of 15 β-lactams in edible tissues, among which 11 β-lactams controlled by European Union could be detected below maximum residue limits.

  14. In Vitro and in Vivo Characterization of MOD-4023, a Long-Acting Carboxy-Terminal Peptide (CTP)-Modified Human Growth Hormone.

    PubMed

    Hershkovitz, Oren; Bar-Ilan, Ahuva; Guy, Rachel; Felikman, Yana; Moschcovich, Laura; Hwa, Vivian; Rosenfeld, Ron G; Fima, Eyal; Hart, Gili

    2016-02-01

    MOD-4023 is a novel long-acting version of human growth hormone (hGH), containing the carboxy-terminal peptide (CTP) of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG). MOD-4023 is being developed as a treatment for adults and children with growth hormone deficiency (GHD), which would require fewer injections than currently available GH formulations and thus reduce patient discomfort and increase compliance. This study characterizes MOD-4023's binding affinities for the growth hormone receptor, as well as the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamics, toxicology, and safety profiles of repeated dosing of MOD-4023 in Sprague-Dawley rats and Rhesus monkeys. Although MOD-4023 exhibited reduced in vitro potency and lower affinity to the GH receptor than recombinant hGH (rhGH), administration of MOD-4023 every 5 days in rats and monkeys resulted in exposure comparable to daily rhGH, and the serum half-life of MOD-4023 was significantly longer. Repeated administration of MOD-4023 led to elevated levels of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), and twice-weekly injections of MOD-4023 resulted in larger increase in weight gain with fewer injections and a lower accumulative hGH dose. Thus, the increased half-life of MOD-4023 in comparison to hGH may increase the frequency of protein-receptor interactions and compensate for its decreased in vitro potency. MOD-4023 was found to be well-tolerated in rats and monkeys, with minimal adverse events, suggesting an acceptable safety profile. These results provide a basis for the continued clinical development of MOD-4023 as a novel treatment of GHD in children and adults.

  15. Association between ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase-L1 S18Y variant and risk of Parkinson's disease: the impact of ethnicity and onset age.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Chen, Yan-Yan; Liu, Hui; Yao, Ci-Jiang; Zhu, Xiao-Xia; Chen, Dao-Jun; Yang, Jin; Lu, You-Jin; Cao, Ji-Yu

    2015-02-01

    The Ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase-L1 (UCHL1) is a candidate risk gene for Parkinson' disease (PD), and a function SNP (rs5030732) in the coding region of this gene has been studied for the association with the disease extensively among worldwide populations, but the results were inconsistent and controversial. Here, to estimate the association between UCHL1 S18Y polymorphism and risk of PD in general population, we conducted a systematic meta-analysis by combining all available case-control subjects in Asian, European, and American populations, with a total of 7742 PD cases and 8850 healthy controls, and the pooled odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) for UCHL1 S18Y polymorphism and PD were calculated using the Mantel-Haenszel method with a fixed- or random-effects model. Subgroup analysis was also performed in different onset age-matched groups. Among high-quality studies, UCHL1 S18Y polymorphism was moderately associated with the risk of PD (allele contrasts, OR = 1.063, 95% CI 1.008-1.122; p = 0.024; regressive genetic model, OR = 1.078, 95% CI 1.005-1.157; p = 0.035). When stratifying for ethnicity, none association were observed in subgroups. Analysis of early-onset PD (EOPD) and late-onset PD (LOPD) revealed that the polymorphism was not associated with the risk of PD. In conclusion, our meta-analysis suggests that UCHL1 S18Y polymorphism is moderately associated with susceptibility to PD, and more studies are needed to confirm our conclusion.

  16. Postmortem redistribution of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), 11-hydroxy-THC (11-OH-THC), and 11-nor-9-carboxy-THC (THCCOOH)

    PubMed Central

    Holland, Michael G.; Schwope, David M.; Stoppacher, Robert; Gillen, Shane B.; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Postmortem redistribution (PMR), a well-described phenomenon in forensic toxicology for certain drugs, can result in increased central blood concentrations relative to peripheral blood concentrations. Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the primary psychoactive component in cannabis or marijuana, is the illicit substance most commonly implicated in driving under the influence of drugs (DUID) cases and fatally-injured drivers. No investigation of PMR of THC in human blood has been reported to date. Methods Matched heart and iliac postmortem blood specimens were collected from 19 medical examiner cases (16 Males, 3 Females) with positive cannabinoid urine immunoassay screens. THC, its equipotent metabolite 11-hydroxy-THC (11-OH-THC) and non-psychoactive metabolite 11-nor-9-carboxy-THC (THCCOOH) were quantified by two-dimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with cryofocusing, with 0.5 ng/mL limits of quantification (LOQ) for all analytes. Results 10 cases had quantifiable THC and 11-OH-THC; THCCOOH was present in all 19. Median (range) heart:iliac blood ratios were 1.5 for THC (range: 0.3–3.1); 1.6 for 11-OH-THC (range: 0.3–2.7); and 1.8 for THCCOOH (range: 0.5–3.0). Discussion Cannabinoids, in general, exhibited a mean and median central: peripheral (C: P) concentration ratio of less than 2 following death. A trend was observed for greater PMR with increasing postmortem interval between death and sampling. To our knowledge, these are the first data on THC PMR in humans, providing important scientific data to aid in the interpretation of postmortem cannabinoid concentrations in medico-legal investigations. PMID:21764230

  17. Targeting of promoters for trans activation by a carboxy-terminal domain of the NS-1 protein of the parvovirus minute virus of mice.

    PubMed Central

    Legendre, D; Rommelaere, J

    1994-01-01

    The NS-1 gene of the parvovirus minute virus of mice (MVM) (prototype strain, MVMp) was fused in phase with the sequence coding for the DNA-binding domain of the bacterial LexA repressor. The resulting chimeric protein, LexNS-1, was tested for its transcriptional activity by using various target promoters in which multiple LexA operator sequences had been introduced. Under these conditions, NS-1 was shown to stimulate gene expression driven by the modified long terminal repeat promoters (from the retroviruses mouse mammary tumor virus and Rous sarcoma virus) and P38 promoter (from MVMp), indicating that the NS-1 protein is a potent transcriptional activator. It is noteworthy that in the absence of LexA operator-mediated targeting, the genuine mouse mammary tumor virus and Rous sarcoma virus promoters were inhibited by NS-1. Together these data strongly suggest that NS-1 contains an activating region able to induce promoters with which this protein interacts but also to repress transcription from nonrecognized promoters by a squelching mechanism similar to that described for other activators. Deletion mutant analysis led to the identification of an NS-1 domain that exhibited an activating potential comparable to that of the whole polypeptide when fused to the DNA-binding region of LexA. This domain is localized in the carboxy-terminal part of NS-1 and corresponds to one of the two regions previously found to be responsible for toxicity. These results argue for the involvement of the regulatory functions of NS-1 in the cytopathic effect of this parvovirus product. Images PMID:7966588

  18. Ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase-l1 as a serum neurotrauma biomarker for exposure to occupational low-level blast.

    PubMed

    Carr, Walter; Yarnell, Angela M; Ong, Ricardo; Walilko, Timothy; Kamimori, Gary H; da Silva, Uade; McCarron, Richard M; LoPresti, Matthew L

    2015-01-01

    Repeated exposure to low-level blast is a characteristic of a few select occupations and there is concern that such occupational exposures present risk for traumatic brain injury. These occupations include specialized military and law enforcement units that employ controlled detonation of explosive charges for the purpose of tactical entry into secured structures. The concern for negative effects from blast exposure is based on rates of operator self-reported headache, sleep disturbance, working memory impairment, and other concussion-like symptoms. A challenge in research on this topic has been the need for improved assessment tools to empirically evaluate the risk associated with repeated exposure to blast overpressure levels commonly considered to be too low in magnitude to cause acute injury. Evaluation of serum-based neurotrauma biomarkers provides an objective measure that is logistically feasible for use in field training environments. Among candidate biomarkers, ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase-L1 (UCH-L1) has some empirical support and was evaluated in this study. We used daily blood draws to examine acute change in UCH-L1 among 108 healthy military personnel who were exposed to repeated low-level blast across a 2-week period. These research volunteers also wore pressure sensors to record blast exposures, wrist actigraphs to monitor sleep patterns, and completed daily behavioral assessments of symptomology, postural stability, and neurocognitive function. UCH-L1 levels were elevated as a function of participating in the 2-week training with explosives, but the correlation of UCH-L1 elevation and blast magnitude was weak and inconsistent. Also, UCH-L1 elevations did not correlate with deficits in behavioral measures. These results provide some support for including UCH-L1 as a measure of central nervous system effects from exposure to low-level blast. However, the weak relation observed suggests that additional indicators of blast effect are needed.

  19. Proteomic identification of oxidatively modified proteins in Alzheimer's disease brain. Part I: creatine kinase BB, glutamine synthase, and ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase L-1.

    PubMed

    Castegna, Alessandra; Aksenov, Michael; Aksenova, Marina; Thongboonkerd, Visith; Klein, Jon B; Pierce, William M; Booze, Rosemarie; Markesbery, William R; Butterfield, D Allan

    2002-08-15

    Oxidative alterations of proteins by reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated in the progression of aging and age-related neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). Protein carbonyls, a marker of protein oxidation, are increased in AD brain, indicating that oxidative modification of proteins is relevant in AD. Oxidative damage can lead to several events such as loss in specific protein function, abnormal protein clearance, depletion of the cellular redox-balance and interference with the cell cycle, and, ultimately, to neuronal death. Identification of specific targets of protein oxidation represents a crucial step in establishing a relationship between oxidative modification and neuronal death in AD, and was partially achieved previously in our laboratory through immunochemical detection of creatine kinase BB and beta-actin as specifically oxidized proteins in AD brain versus control brain. However, this process is laborious, requires the availability of specific antibodies, and, most importantly, requires a reasonable guess as to the identity of the protein in the first place. In this study, we present the first proteomics approach to identify specifically oxidized proteins in AD, by coupling 2D fingerprinting with immunological detection of carbonyls and identification of proteins by mass spectrometry. The powerful techniques, emerging from application of proteomics to neurodegenerative disease, reveal the presence of specific targets of protein oxidation in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain: creatine kinase BB, glutamine synthase, and ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase L-1. These results are discussed with reference to potential involvement of these oxidatively modified proteins in neurodegeneration in AD brain. Proteomics offers a rapid means of identifying oxidatively modified proteins in aging and age-related neurodegenerative disorders without the limitations of the immunochemical detection method.

  20. Structure of the Receptor-Binding Carboxy-Terminal Domain of the Bacteriophage T5 L-Shaped Tail Fibre with and without Its Intra-Molecular Chaperone.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Doval, Carmela; Castón, José R; Luque, Daniel; Granell, Meritxell; Otero, José M; Llamas-Saiz, Antonio L; Renouard, Madalena; Boulanger, Pascale; van Raaij, Mark J

    2015-12-08

    Bacteriophage T5, a Siphovirus belonging to the order Caudovirales, has a flexible, three-fold symmetric tail, to which three L-shaped fibres are attached. These fibres recognize oligo-mannose units on the bacterial cell surface prior to infection and are composed of homotrimers of the pb1 protein. Pb1 has 1396 amino acids, of which the carboxy-terminal 133 residues form a trimeric intra-molecular chaperone that is auto-proteolyzed after correct folding. The structure of a trimer of residues 970-1263 was determined by single anomalous dispersion phasing using incorporated selenomethionine residues and refined at 2.3 Å resolution using crystals grown from native, methionine-containing, protein. The protein inhibits phage infection by competition. The phage-distal receptor-binding domain resembles a bullet, with the walls formed by partially intertwined beta-sheets, conferring stability to the structure. The fold of the domain is novel and the topology unique to the pb1 structure. A site-directed mutant (Ser1264 to Ala), in which auto-proteolysis is impeded, was also produced, crystallized and its 2.5 Å structure solved by molecular replacement. The additional chaperone domain (residues 1263-1396) consists of a central trimeric alpha-helical coiled-coil flanked by a mixed alpha-beta domain. Three long beta-hairpin tentacles, one from each chaperone monomer, extend into long curved grooves of the bullet-shaped domain. The chaperone-containing mutant did not inhibit infection by competition.

  1. Evaluation of serum beta-carboxy-terminal cross-linking telopeptide of type I collagen as marker of bone resorption in chronic hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Reichel, Helmut; Roth, Heinz-Jürgen; Schmidt-Gayk, Heinrich

    2004-01-01

    The carboxy-terminal cross-linking telopeptide of type I collagen (beta-CrossLaps, beta-CTX) is released into the circulation during degradation of type I collagen and serves as a marker of bone resorption. beta-CTX is known to undergo a diurnal rhythm in normal individuals and to accumulate in chronic renal failure. beta-CTX has a potential role in noninvasive diagnosis of renal bone disease. Serum beta-CTX was compared to parathyroid hormone (PTH) and other biochemical bone markers in 90 unselected hemodialysis patients. Mean beta-CTX was elevated above the normal range (1.72 +/- 0.93 microg/l); there were large individual variations. Serum beta-CTX was significantly correlated with various PTH assays (r >0.56) and with tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b (TRACP 5b, r = 0.629), bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (r = 0.404) and osteocalcin (r = 0.534, all correlations p < 0.001). The correlation between beta-CTX and PTH was significantly higher than the correlation between TRACP 5b and PTH. Several factors which could confound interpretation of serum beta-CTX were assessed in further studies: (i) There was no recognizable influence of the time of blood sampling (morning dialysis shift versus afternoon dialysis shift) on serum beta-CTX. (ii) Serum beta-CTX was not significantly related to residual diuresis of patients. We found a high association between beta-CTX and other established markers of bone and calcium metabolism demonstrating the potential utility of beta-CTX as marker of bone resorption in renal bone disease. However, further studies employing bone histology are still warranted to exactly define the influence of glomerular retention on serum beta-CTX in end-stage renal disease. Copyright 2004 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Identification of A-type allatostatins possessing -YXFGI/Vamide carboxy-termini from the nervous system of the copepod crustacean Calanus finmarchicus.

    PubMed

    Christie, Andrew E; Sousa, Gregory L; Rus, Szymon; Smith, Christine M; Towle, David W; Hartline, Daniel K; Dickinson, Patsy S

    2008-02-01

    The copepod crustacean Calanus finmarchicus plays a critical role in the ecology of the Gulf of Maine and other regions of the North Atlantic. To increase our understanding of the physiology of this species, a normalized, whole organism cDNA library was constructed, and expressed sequence tags (ESTs) of the clones were generated. Among these ESTs was one with homology to known cDNAs encoding prepro-A-type allatostatins (A-type ASTs), a well-known family of arthropod peptides that regulate juvenile hormone production in insects. Sequence analysis of the clone from which the EST was generated, with subsequent translation of its open reading frame, showed it to encode five novel A-type ASTs, whose mature structures were predicted to be APYGFGIamide, pE/EPYGFGIamide, ALYGFGIamide, pE/EPYNFGIamide, and pQ/QPYNFGVamide. Each of the peptides is present as a single copy within the prepro-hormone with the exception of APYGFGIamide, which is present in three copies. Surprisingly, the organization of the Calanus prepro-A-type AST, specifically the number of encoded A-type peptides, is more similar to those of insects than it is to the known decapod crustacean prepro-hormones. Moreover, the Calanus A-type ASTs possess isoleucine or valine residues at their carboxy (C)-termini rather than leucine, which is present in most other family members. Wholemount immunohistochemistry suggests that six pairs of somata produce the native Calanus A-type ASTs: five in the protocerebrum and one in the suboesophageal region. To the best of our knowledge, our report is the first characterization of a neuropeptidergic system in a copepod, the first identification of A-type ASTs from a non-decapod crustacean, the first report of crustacean A-type ASTs possessing isoleucine C-terminal residues, and the first report from any species of an A-type peptide possessing a valine C-terminal residue.

  3. Carboxy-terminal modulator protein attenuated extracellular matrix deposit by inhibiting phospho-Akt, TGF-β1 and α-SMA in kidneys of diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ning; Hao, Jun; Li, Lisha; Li, Fan; Liu, Shuxia; Duan, Huijun

    2016-06-10

    Glomerulosclerosis and tubular interstitial extracellular matrix deposit and fibrosis are the main features of diabetic nephropathy, which are mediated by activation of PI3K/Akt signal pathway. Carboxy-terminal modulator protein (CTMP) is known as a negative regulator of PI3K/Akt pathway. Whether CTMP regulates renal extracellular matrix metabolism of diabetic nephropathy is still not known. Here, renal decreased CTMP, enhanced phospho-Akt (Ser 473), TGF-β1, α-SMA and extracellular matrix deposit are found in diabetic mice. Furthermore, high glucose decreases CTMP expression accompanied by enhanced phospho-Akt (Ser 473), TGF-β1 and α-SMA in cultured human renal proximal tubular epithelial cells (HKC), which are effectively prevented by transfection of pYr-ads-4-musCTMP vector. Moreover, delivery of pYr-ads-4-musCTMP vector into kidneys via tail vein of diabetic mice increases CTMP expression by 8.84 times followed by 60.00%, 76.50% and 24.37% decreases of phospho-Akt (Ser 473), TGF-β1 and α-SMA compared with diabetic mice receiving pYr-adshuttle-4 vector. Again, increased renal extracellular matrix accumulation of diabetic mice is also inhibited with delivery of pYr-ads-4-musCTMP vector. Our results indicate that CTMP attenuates renal extracellular matrix deposit by regulating the phosphorylation of Akt, TGF-β1 and α-SMA expression in diabetic mice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. PA28, an activator of the 20 S proteasome, is inactivated by proteolytic modification at its carboxyl terminus.

    PubMed

    Ma, C P; Willy, P J; Slaughter, C A; DeMartino, G N

    1993-10-25

    , suggesting that the carboxyl terminus of PA28 is required for binding to the proteasome. These results indicate the importance of the carboxyl terminus of PA28 for proteasome activation.

  5. The N-Terminus of the Floral Arabidopsis TGA Transcription Factor PERIANTHIA Mediates Redox-Sensitive DNA-Binding

    PubMed Central

    Gutsche, Nora; Zachgo, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    The Arabidopsis TGA transcription factor (TF) PERIANTHIA (PAN) regulates the formation of the floral organ primordia as revealed by the pan mutant forming an abnormal pentamerous arrangement of the outer three floral whorls. The Arabidopsis TGA bZIP TF family comprises 10 members, of which PAN and TGA9/10 control flower developmental processes and TGA1/2/5/6 participate in stress-responses. For the TGA1 protein it was shown that several cysteines can be redox-dependently modified. TGA proteins interact in the nucleus with land plant-specific glutaredoxins, which may alter their activities posttranslationally. Here, we investigated the DNA-binding of PAN to the AAGAAT motif under different redox-conditions. The AAGAAT motif is localized in the second intron of the floral homeotic regulator AGAMOUS (AG), which controls stamen and carpel development as well as floral determinacy. Whereas PAN protein binds to this regulatory cis-element under reducing conditions, the interaction is strongly reduced under oxidizing conditions in EMSA studies. The redox-sensitive DNA-binding is mediated via a special PAN N-terminus, which is not present in other Arabidopsis TGA TFs and comprises five cysteines. Two N-terminal PAN cysteines, Cys68 and Cys87, were shown to form a disulfide bridge and Cys340, localized in a C-ter