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Sample records for ku80 carboxy terminus

  1. Identification of peroxisomal targeting signals located at the carboxy terminus of four peroxisomal proteins

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    As part of an effort to understand how proteins are imported into the peroxisome, we have sought to identify the peroxisomal targeting signals in four unrelated peroxisomal proteins: human catalase, rat hydratase:dehydrogenase, pig D-amino acid oxidase, and rat acyl-CoA oxidase. Using gene fusion experiments, we have identified a region of each protein that can direct heterologous proteins to peroxisomes. In each case, the peroxisomal targeting signal is contained at or near the carboxy terminus of the protein. For catalase, the peroxisomal targeting signal is located within the COOH-terminal 27 amino acids of the protein. For hydratase:dehydrogenase, D-amino acid oxidase, and acyl-CoA oxidase, the targeting signals are located within the carboxy- terminal 15, 14, and 15 amino acids, respectively. A tripeptide of the sequence Ser-Lys/His-Leu is present in each of these targeting signals as well as in the peroxisomal targeting signal identified in firefly luciferase (Gould, S.J., G.-A. Keller, and S. Subramani. 1987. J. Cell Biol. 105:2923-2931). When the peroxisomal targeting signal of the hydratase:dehydrogenase is mutated so that the Ser-Lys-Leu tripeptide is converted to Ser-Asn-Leu, it can no longer direct proteins to peroxisomes. We suggest that this tripeptide is an essential element of at least one class of peroxisomal targeting signals. PMID:2901422

  2. Multiple regulatory roles of the carboxy terminus of Ste2p a yeast GPCR.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyeong-Man; Lee, Yong-Hun; Akal-Strader, Ayca; Uddin, M Seraj; Hauser, Melinda; Naider, Fred; Becker, Jeffrey M

    2012-01-01

    Signaling and internalization of Ste2p, a model G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, are reported to be regulated by phosphorylation status of serine (S) and threonine (T) residues located in the cytoplasmic C-terminus. Although the functional roles of S/T residues located in certain C-terminus regions are relatively well characterized, systemic analyses have not been conducted for all the S/T residues that are spread throughout the C-terminus. A point mutation to alanine was introduced into the S/T residues located within three intracellular loops and the C-terminus individually or in combination. A series of functional assays such as internalization, FUS1-lacZ induction, and growth arrest were conducted in comparison between WT- and mutant Ste2p. The Ste2p in which all S/T residues in the C-terminus were mutated to alanine was more sensitive to α-factor, suggesting that phosphorylation in the C-terminus exerts negative regulatory activities on the Ste2p signaling. C-terminal S/T residues proximal to the seventh transmembrane domain were important for ligand-induced G protein coupling but not for receptor internalization. Sites on the central region of the C-terminus regulated both constitutive and ligand-induced internalization. Residues on the distal part were important for constitutive desensitization and modulated the G protein signaling mediated through the proximal part of the C-terminus. This study demonstrated that the C-terminus contains multiple functional domains with differential and interdependent roles in regulating Ste2p function in which the S/T residues located in each domain play critical roles.

  3. The carboxy-terminus of p63 links cell cycle control and the proliferative potential of epidermal progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Daisuke; Sahu, Raju; Leu, N. Adrian; Senoo, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor p63 (Trp63) plays a key role in homeostasis and regeneration of the skin. The p63 gene is transcribed from dual promoters, generating TAp63 isoforms with growth suppressive functions and dominant-negative ΔNp63 isoforms with opposing properties. p63 also encodes multiple carboxy (C)-terminal variants. Although mutations of C-terminal variants have been linked to the pathogenesis of p63-associated ectodermal disorders, the physiological role of the p63 C-terminus is poorly understood. We report here that deletion of the p63 C-terminus in mice leads to ectodermal malformation and hypoplasia, accompanied by a reduced proliferative capacity of epidermal progenitor cells. Notably, unlike the p63-null condition, we find that p63 C-terminus deficiency promotes expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21Waf1/Cip1 (Cdkn1a), a factor associated with reduced proliferative capacity of both hematopoietic and neuronal stem cells. These data suggest that the p63 C-terminus plays a key role in the cell cycle progression required to maintain the proliferative potential of stem cells of many different lineages. Mechanistically, we show that loss of Cα, the predominant C-terminal p63 variant in epithelia, promotes the transcriptional activity of TAp63 and also impairs the dominant-negative activity of ΔNp63, thereby controlling p21Waf1/Cip1 expression. We propose that the p63 C-terminus links cell cycle control and the proliferative potential of epidermal progenitor cells via mechanisms that equilibrate TAp63 and ΔNp63 isoform function. PMID:25503409

  4. Ku80-deletion suppresses spontaneous tumors and induces a p53-mediated DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    Holcomb, Valerie B.; Rodier, Francis; Choi, Yong Jun; Busuttil, Rita A.; Vogel, Hannes; Vijg, Jan; Campisi, Judith; Hasty, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Ku80 facilitates DNA repair and therefore should suppress cancer. However, ku80−/− mice exhibit reduced cancer, although they age prematurely and have a shortened life span. We tested the hypothesis that Ku80 deletion suppresses cancer by enhancing cellular tumor suppressive responses to inefficiently repaired DNA damage. In support of this hypothesis, Ku80 deletion ameliorated tumor burden in APCMIN mice, and increased a p53-mediated DNA damage response, DNA lesions, and chromosomal rearrangements. Thus, contrary to its assumed role as a caretaker tumor suppressor, Ku80 facilitates tumor growth most likely by dampening baseline cellular DNA damage responses. PMID:19010925

  5. Accumulation of Ku80 proteins at DNA double-strand breaks in living cells

    SciTech Connect

    Koike, Manabu Koike, Aki

    2008-03-10

    Ku plays a key role in multiple nuclear processes, e.g., DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. The regulation mechanism of the localizations of Ku70 and Ku80 plays a key role in regulating the multiple functions of Ku. Although numerous biochemical studies in vitro have elucidated the DNA binding mechanism of Ku, no accumulation mechanisms of Ku70 and Ku80 at DSBs have been clarified in detail in vivo. In this study, we examined the accumulation mechanism of Ku80 at DSBs in living cells. EGFP-Ku80 accumulation at DSBs began immediately after irradiation. On the other hand, our data show that Ku70 alone, which has DNA binding activity independent of Ku80, cannot accumulate at the DSBs, whereas Ku70 bound to Ku80 can. The deletion of the C-terminal DNA-PKcs-binding domain and the mutation at the SUMOylation site of Ku80 had no effect on Ku80 accumulation. Unexpectedly, N-terminal deletion mutants of Ku80 fully lost their accumulation activity, although the mutants retained their Ku70 binding activity. Altogether, these data demonstrate that Ku80 is essential for Ku70 accumulation at DSBs. Furthermore, three domains of Ku80, i.e., the N-terminal {alpha}/{beta}, the DNA-binding, and Ku70-binding domains, seem to necessary for the accumulation at or recognition of DSBs in the early stage after irradiation.

  6. Calcium influx-mediated translocation of m-calpain induces Ku80 cleavage and enhances the Ku80-related DNA repair pathway

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Kyung Hye; Yu, Han Vit; Kim, Eosu; Na, Younghwa; Kwon, Youngjoo

    2016-01-01

    Proteomic analysis of ionomycin-treated and untreated mammary epithelial MCF10A cells elucidated differences in Ku80 cleavage. Ku80, a subunit of the Ku protein complex, is an initiator of the non-homologous, end-joining (NHEJ), double-strand breaks (DSBs) repair pathway. The nuclear Ku80 was cleaved in a calcium concentration-dependent manner by m-calpain but not by m-calpain. The cleavage of nuclear Ku80 at its α/β domain was validated by Western blotting analysis using flag-tagged expression vectors of truncated versions of Ku80 and a flag antibody and was confirmed in m-calpain knock-down cells and in vitro cell-free evaluation with recombinant proteins of calpains, Ku70, and Ku80. In addition, the cleaved Ku80 still formed a Ku heterodimer and promoted DNA DSB repair activity. Taken together, these findings indicate that translocated m-calpain enhances the NHEJ pathway through the cleavage of Ku80. Based on the present study, m-calpain in DNA repair pathways might be a novel anticancer drug target, or its mechanism might be a possible route for resistance acquisition of DNA damage-inducing chemotherapeutics. PMID:27121057

  7. The Carboxy Terminus of YCF1 Contains a Motif Conserved throughout >500 Myr of Streptophyte Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Archibald, John M.; Gould, Sven B.

    2017-01-01

    Plastids evolved from cyanobacteria by endosymbiosis. During the course of evolution, the coding capacity of plastid genomes shrinks due to gene loss or transfer to the nucleus. In the green lineage, however, there were apparent gene gains including that of ycf1. Although its function is still debated, YCF1 has proven to be a useful marker for plastid evolution. YCF1 sequence and predicted structural features unite the plastid genomes of land plants with those of their closest algal relatives, the higher streptophyte algae; YCF1 appears to have undergone pronounced changes during the course of streptophyte algal evolution. Using new data, we show that YCF1 underwent divergent evolution in the common ancestor of higher streptophyte algae and Klebsormidiophycae. This divergence resulted in the origin of an extreme, klebsormidiophycean-specific YCF1 and the higher streptophyte Ste-YCF1. Most importantly, our analysis uncovers a conserved carboxy-terminal sequence stretch within YCF1 that is unique to higher streptophytes and hints at an important, yet unexplored function. PMID:28164224

  8. Enhanced gene replacements in Ku80 disruption mutants of the dermatophyte, Trichophyton mentagrophytes.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Tsuyoshi; Makimura, Koichi; Hisajima, Tatsuya; Ishihara, Yumiko; Umeda, Yoshiko; Abe, Shigeru

    2009-09-01

    The frequency of targeted gene disruption via homologous recombination is low in the clinically important dermatophyte, Trichophyton mentagrophytes. The Ku genes, Ku70 and Ku80, encode key components of the nonhomologous end-joining pathway involved in DNA double-strand break repair. Their deletion increases the homologous recombination frequency, facilitating targeted gene disruption. To improve the homologous recombination frequency in T. mentagrophytes, the Ku80 ortholog was inactivated. The nucleotide sequence of the Ku80 locus containing a 2788-bp ORF encoding a predicted product of 728 amino acids was identified, and designated as TmKu80. The predicted TmKu80 product showed a high degree of amino acid sequence similarity to known fungal Ku80 proteins. Ku80 disruption mutant strains of T. mentagrophytes were constructed by Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated genetic transformation. The average homologous recombination frequency was 73.3 +/- 25.2% for the areA/nit-2-like nitrogen regulatory gene (tnr) in Ku80(-) mutants, about 33-fold higher than that in wild-type controls. A high frequency (c. 67%) was also obtained for the Tri m4 gene encoding a putative serine protease. Ku80(-) mutant strains will be useful for large-scale reverse genetics studies of dermatophytes, including T. mentagrophytes, providing valuable information on the basic mechanisms of host invasion.

  9. Ku80 cooperates with CBP to promote COX-2 expression and tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Yu; Xuan, Yang; Jia, Yunlu; Hu, Wenxian; Yu, Wendan; Dai, Meng; Li, Zhenglin; Yi, Canhui; Zhao, Shilei; Li, Mei; Du, Sha; Cheng, Wei; Xiao, Xiangsheng; Chen, Yiming; Wu, Taihua; Meng, Songshu; Yuan, Yuhui; Liu, Quentin; Huang, Wenlin; Guo, Wei; Wang, Shusen; Deng, Wuguo

    2015-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) plays an important role in lung cancer development and progression. Using streptavidin-agarose pulldown and proteomics assay, we identified and validated Ku80, a dimer of Ku participating in the repair of broken DNA double strands, as a new binding protein of the COX-2 gene promoter. Overexpression of Ku80 up-regulated COX-2 promoter activation and COX-2 expression in lung cancer cells. Silencing of Ku80 by siRNA down-regulated COX-2 expression and inhibited tumor cell growth in vitro and in a xenograft mouse model. Ku80 knockdown suppressed phosphorylation of ERK, resulting in an inactivation of the MAPK pathway. Moreover, CBP, a transcription co-activator, interacted with and acetylated Ku80 to co-regulate the activation of COX-2 promoter. Overexpression of CBP increased Ku80 acetylation, thereby promoting COX-2 expression and cell growth. Suppression of CBP by a CBP-specific inhibitor or siRNA inhibited COX-2 expression as well as tumor cell growth. Tissue microarray immunohistochemical analysis of lung adenocarcinomas revealed a strong positive correlation between levels of Ku80 and COX-2 and clinicopathologic variables. Overexpression of Ku80 was associated with poor prognosis in patients with lung cancers. We conclude that Ku80 promotes COX-2 expression and tumor growth and is a potential therapeutic target in lung cancer. PMID:25797267

  10. Hyperthermia Induces Apoptosis of 786-O Cells through Suppressing Ku80 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Defeng; Hu, Yuan; Li, Jinhui; Peng, Tao; Su, Jialin; He, Yun; Ji, Weidong

    2015-01-01

    Hyperthermia as an anticancer method has been paid increasing attention in recent years. Several studies have shown that hyperthermia can kill tumor cells by inducing apoptosis. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of hyperthermia-induced apoptosis are largely unknown. To investigate the effects and molecular mechanism of hyperthermia on the apoptosis in renal carcinoma 786-O cells, we firstly examined apoptosis and Ku expression in 786-O cell line treated with heat exposure (42°C for 0-4 h). The results showed that hyperthermia induced apoptosis of 786-O cells, and suppressed significantly Ku80 expression, but not Ku70 expression. Next, we knock-down Ku80 in 786-O cells, generating stable cell line 786-O-shKu80, and detected apoptosis, cell survival and cell cycle distribution. Our data showed higher apoptotic rate and lower surviving fraction in the stable cell line 786-O-shKu80 compared with those in control cells, exposed to the same heat stress (42°C for 0-4 h). Moreover, the results also showed suppression of Ku80 led to G2/M phase arrest in the stable cell line 786-O-shKu80 following heat treatment. Together, these findings indicate that Ku80 may play an important role in hyperthermia-induced apoptosis and heat-sensitivity of renal carcinoma cells through influencing the cell cycle distribution. PMID:25902193

  11. DNA repair protein Ku80 suppresses chromosomal aberrations and malignant transformation

    PubMed Central

    Difilippantonio, Michael J.; Zhu, Jie; Chen, Hua Tang; Meffre, Eric; Nussenzweig, Michel C.; Max, Edward E.; Ried, Thomas; Nussenzweig, André

    2016-01-01

    Cancer susceptibility genes have been classified into two groups: gatekeepers and caretakers1. Gatekeepers are genes that control cell proliferation and death, whereas caretakers are DNA repair genes whose inactivation leads to genetic instability. Abrogation of both caretaker and gatekeeper function markedly increases cancer susceptibility. Although the importance of Ku80 in DNA double-strand break repair is well established, neither Ku80 nor other components of the non-homologous end-joining pathway are known to have a caretaker role in maintaining genomic stability. Here we show that mouse cells deficient for Ku80 display a marked increase in chromosomal aberrations, including breakage, translocations and aneuploidy. Despite the observed chromosome instabilities, Ku80−/− mice have only a slightly earlier onset of cancer2,3. Loss of p53 synergizes with Ku80 to promote tumorigenesis such that all Ku80−/−p53−/− mice succumb to disseminated pro-B-cell lymphoma before three months of age. Tumours result from a specific set of chromosomal translocations and gene amplifications involving IgH and c-Myc, reminiscent of Burkitt's lymphoma. We conclude that Ku80 is a caretaker gene that maintains the integrity of the genome by a mechanism involving the suppression of chromosomal rearrangements. PMID:10761921

  12. Carboxy terminus of GATA4 transcription factor is required for its cardiogenic activity and interaction with CDK4

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, Joseph M.; Yamak, Abir; Kirilenko, Pavel; Black, Sarah; Bochtler, Matthias; Lefebvre, Chantal; Nemer, Mona; Latinkić, Branko V.

    2014-01-01

    GATA4-6 transcription factors regulate numerous aspects of development and homeostasis in multiple tissues of mesodermal and endodermal origin. In the heart, the best studied of these factors, GATA4, has multiple distinct roles in cardiac specification, differentiation, morphogenesis, hypertrophy and survival. To improve understanding of how GATA4 achieves its numerous roles in the heart, here we have focused on the carboxy-terminal domain and the residues required for interaction with cofactors FOG2 and Tbx5. We present evidence that the carboxy terminal region composed of amino acids 362–400 is essential for mediating cardiogenesis in Xenopus pluripotent explants and embryos. In contrast, the same region is not required for endoderm-inducing activity of GATA4. Further evidence is presented that the carboxy terminal cardiogenic region of GATA4 does not operate as a generic transcriptional activator. Potential mechanism of action of the carboxy terminal end of GATA4 is provided by the results showing physical and functional interaction with CDK4, including the enhancement of cardiogenic activity of GATA4 by CDK4. These results establish CDK4 as a GATA4 partner in cardiogenesis. The interactions of GATA4 with its other well described cofactors Tbx5 and FOG2 are known to be involved in heart morphogenesis, but their requirement for cardiac differentiation is unknown. We report that the mutations that disrupt interactions of GATA4 with Tbx5 and FOG2, G295S and V217G, respectively, do not impair cardiogenic activity of GATA4. These findings add support to the view that distinct roles of GATA4 in the heart are mediated by different determinants of the protein. Finally, we show that the rat GATA4 likely induces cardiogenesis cell autonomously or directly as it does not require activity of endodermal transcription factor Sox17, a GATA4 target gene that induces cardiogenesis non-cell autonomously. PMID:25241353

  13. Lethality in PARP-1/Ku80 double mutant mice reveals physiologicalsynergy during early embryogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Henrie, Melinda S.; Kurimasa, Akihiro; Burma, Sandeep; Menissier-de Murcia, Josiane; de Murcia, Gilbert; Li, Gloria C.; Chen,David J.

    2002-09-24

    Ku is an abundant heterodimeric nuclear protein, consisting of 70-kDa and 86-kDa tightly associated subunits that comprise the DNA binding component of DNA-dependent protein kinase. Poly(ADP)ribose polymerase-1 (PARP-1) is a 113-kDa protein that catalyzes the synthesis of poly(ADP-ribose) on target proteins. Both Ku and PARP-1 recognize and bind to DNA ends. Ku functions in the non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) repair pathway whereas PARP-1 functions in the single strand break repair and base excision repair (BER) pathways. Recent studies have revealed that PARP-1 and Ku80 interact in vitro. To determine whether the association of PARP-1 and Ku80 has any physiological significance or synergistic function in vivo, mice lacking both PARP-1 and Ku80 were generated. The resulting offspring died during embryonic development displaying abnormalities around the gastrulation stage. In addition, PARP-1-/-Ku80-/- cultured blastocysts had an increased level of apoptosis. These data suggest that the functions of both Ku80 and PARP-1 are essential for normal embryogenesis and that a loss of genomic integrity leading to cell death through apoptosis is likely the cause of the embryonic lethality observed in these mice.

  14. Differential expression of DNA nonhomologous end-joining proteins Ku70 and Ku80 in melanoma progression.

    PubMed

    Korabiowska, Monika; Tscherny, Michael; Stachura, Jerzy; Berger, Hermann; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Brinck, Ulrich

    2002-04-01

    Ku70 and Ku80 heterodimers function as regulatory subunits of the DNA-dependent protein kinase and play a very important role in the repairing of DNA double-strand breaks. Although Ku70 is proposed as a candidate for a tumor suppressor gene, not many data are available on Ku70 and Ku80 expression in human tumors. The main aim of this study was to investigate the expression of Ku70 and Ku80 in the ultraviolet-induced lesions-nevus cell nevi, lentigos maligna, and malignant melanomas. Nineteen nevus cell nevi, 23 lentigos maligna, 76 primary melanomas, and 31 melanoma metastases were stained immunohistochemically for the presence of Ku70 and Ku80 proteins. Ku70 and Ku80 expression was preserved in about 80% of nevi, 26% of lentigo maligna, 45% of primary melanomas, and 67% of melanoma metastases. Highly significant differences in Ku70 and Ku80 expression were found between nevi, lentigo maligna, and melanomas. In Cox regression, Ku70 and Ku80 were shown to be highly significant influences on patients' prognosis. Significant correlations between Ku70 and Ku80 expressions were found in nevi, lentigo maligna, and primary melanomas. These correlations were not more present in melanoma metastases. To summarize, earlier phases of melanoma progression seem to be connected with the loss of expression of Ku proteins. Metastatic spread is related to dysregulation of the Ku70 and Ku80 axis.

  15. Specificity and direction of depolymerization of beta-poly(L-malate) catalysed by polymalatase from Physarum polycephalum--fluorescence labeling at the carboxy-terminus of beta-poly(L-malate).

    PubMed

    Gasslmaier, B; Holler, E

    1997-12-01

    Beta-poly(L-malate), a major constituent of nuclei in plasmodia of Physarum polycephalum, is enzymatically degraded to L-malate after secretion into the culture medium. This depolymerization is specifically catalysed by an endogenous polymalatase. The mode of action and the specificity criteria have been investigated by employing various chemical derivatives of beta-poly(L-malate), including substitution at the hydroxy-terminus and carboxy-terminus of the polymer, esterification of the pending alpha-carboxylate, and beta-poly(DL-malate). The results of the investigation were summarized in a specificity model that involved recognition of the hydroxy-terminus and of the alpha-carboxylate as substituents of the asymmetric carbon in the malic acid unit. Depolymerization proceeded from the hydroxy-terminus towards the carboxy-terminus, thereby degrading the polymer to L-malate. When the terminal beta-carboxylate had been amidated with the fluorescent N-(1-naphthyl)ethylenediamine, degradation was normal but was arrested at the level of the terminal beta-carboxy-substituted dimer. It should be possible to employ polymalatase as a tool for the detection of branching and other modifications of beta-poly(L-malate).

  16. A novel fragile X syndrome mutation reveals a conserved role for the carboxy-terminus in FMRP localization and function.

    PubMed

    Okray, Zeynep; de Esch, Celine E F; Van Esch, Hilde; Devriendt, Koen; Claeys, Annelies; Yan, Jiekun; Verbeeck, Jelle; Froyen, Guy; Willemsen, Rob; de Vrij, Femke M S; Hassan, Bassem A

    2015-04-01

    Loss of function of the FMR1 gene leads to fragile X syndrome (FXS), the most common form of intellectual disability. The loss of FMR1 function is usually caused by epigenetic silencing of the FMR1 promoter leading to expansion and subsequent methylation of a CGG repeat in the 5' untranslated region. Very few coding sequence variations have been experimentally characterized and shown to be causal to the disease. Here, we describe a novel FMR1 mutation and reveal an unexpected nuclear export function for the C-terminus of FMRP. We screened a cohort of patients with typical FXS symptoms who tested negative for CGG repeat expansion in the FMR1 locus. In one patient, we identified a guanine insertion in FMR1 exon 15. This mutation alters the open reading frame creating a short novel C-terminal sequence, followed by a stop codon. We find that this novel peptide encodes a functional nuclear localization signal (NLS) targeting the patient FMRP to the nucleolus in human cells. We also reveal an evolutionarily conserved nuclear export function associated with the endogenous C-terminus of FMRP. In vivo analyses in Drosophila demonstrate that a patient-mimetic mutation alters the localization and function of Dfmrp in neurons, leading to neomorphic neuronal phenotypes.

  17. Genetic manipulation in Δku80 strains for functional genomic analysis of Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Rommereim, Leah M; Hortua Triana, Miryam A; Falla, Alejandra; Sanders, Kiah L; Guevara, Rebekah B; Bzik, David J; Fox, Barbara A

    2013-07-12

    Targeted genetic manipulation using homologous recombination is the method of choice for functional genomic analysis to obtain a detailed view of gene function and phenotype(s). The development of mutant strains with targeted gene deletions, targeted mutations, complemented gene function, and/or tagged genes provides powerful strategies to address gene function, particularly if these genetic manipulations can be efficiently targeted to the gene locus of interest using integration mediated by double cross over homologous recombination. Due to very high rates of nonhomologous recombination, functional genomic analysis of Toxoplasma gondii has been previously limited by the absence of efficient methods for targeting gene deletions and gene replacements to specific genetic loci. Recently, we abolished the major pathway of nonhomologous recombination in type I and type II strains of T. gondii by deleting the gene encoding the KU80 protein(1,2). The Δku80 strains behave normally during tachyzoite (acute) and bradyzoite (chronic) stages in vitro and in vivo and exhibit essentially a 100% frequency of homologous recombination. The Δku80 strains make functional genomic studies feasible on the single gene as well as on the genome scale(1-4). Here, we report methods for using type I and type II Δku80Δhxgprt strains to advance gene targeting approaches in T. gondii. We outline efficient methods for generating gene deletions, gene replacements, and tagged genes by targeted insertion or deletion of the hypoxanthine-xanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HXGPRT) selectable marker. The described gene targeting protocol can be used in a variety of ways in Δku80 strains to advance functional analysis of the parasite genome and to develop single strains that carry multiple targeted genetic manipulations. The application of this genetic method and subsequent phenotypic assays will reveal fundamental and unique aspects of the biology of T. gondii and related significant human

  18. Overexpression of Ku80 correlates with aggressive clinicopathological features and adverse prognosis in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    WANG, SHUAI; WANG, ZHOU; YANG, YU; SHI, MO; SUN, ZHENGUO

    2015-01-01

    Ku80, a subunit of the heterodymeric Ku protein, is clearly implicated in nonhomologous end joining DNA repair, chemoresistance and radioresistance in malignant tumors. In the present study, the clinicopathological significance of Ku80 in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) was investigated. The expression levels of Ku80 were determined by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry in ESCC specimens and normal esophageal mucosa. The mRNA and protein levels of Ku80 were significantly higher in ESCC tissues than in normal esophageal mucosa, and were significantly associated with tumor differentiation, local invasion, lymph node metastasis and tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) stage. However, overexpression of Ku80 mRNA and protein levels were not significantly correlated with age, gender, tumor site or tumor size. Cox proportional hazards regression model demonstrated that tumor local invasion, lymph node metastasis, TNM stage and Ku80 mRNA and protein levels were independent risk factors indicating the overall survival of patients with ESCC. The present study demonstrated that aberrant Ku80 overexpression is observed in ESCC. In addition, high expression levels of Ku80 are associated with adverse clinicopathological features and unfavorable prognosis in ESCC patients. PMID:26722230

  19. Decreased expression of Ku70/Ku80 proteins in malignant melanomas of the oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Korabiowska, Monika; Tscherny, Michael; Grohmann, Ulrike; Hönig, Johannes F; Bartkowski, Stanislaw B; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Brinck, Ulrich

    2002-01-01

    Ku70/80 are genes responsible for the repairing of DNA double-strand breaks and they function as a regulatory subunit of the DNA-dependent protein kinase. Their expression has not yet been investigated in malignant melanomas of the oral cavity. These tumours are characterized by very poor prognosis and etiology independent of UV-radiation. We investigated 29 malignant melanomas of the oral cavity for the expression of Ku70/80 proteins. Ku70 expression was preserved in 21 out of 29 tumours and the percentage of Ku70-positive cells did not exceed 76%. Ku80 was found in 19 out of 29 tumours and the percentage of Ku80-positive cells peaked at 62%. Correlations between Ku70 and Ku80 expression were lost (p>0.05). We conclude that decreased Ku70/80 expression in malignant melanomas of the oral cavity and loss of correlation between these markers may influence progression of oral melanomas.

  20. DNA damage response and Ku80 function in the vertebrate embryo

    PubMed Central

    Bladen, Catherine L.; Lam, Wai K.; Dynan, William S.; Kozlowski, David J.

    2005-01-01

    Cellular responses to DNA damage reflect the dynamic integration of cell cycle control, cell–cell interactions and tissue-specific patterns of gene regulation that occurs in vivo but is not recapitulated in cell culture models. Here we describe use of the zebrafish embryo as a model system to identify determinants of the in vivo response to ionizing radiation-induced DNA damage. To demonstrate the utility of the model we cloned and characterized the embryonic function of the XRCC5 gene, which encodes Ku80, an essential component of the nonhomologous end joining pathway of DNA repair. After the onset of zygotic transcription, Ku80 mRNA accumulates in a tissue-specific pattern, which includes proliferative zones of the retina and central nervous system. In the absence of genotoxic stress, zebrafish embryos with reduced Ku80 function develop normally. However, low dose irradiation of these embryos during gastrulation leads to marked apoptosis throughout the developing central nervous system. Apoptosis is p53 dependent, indicating that it is a downstream consequence of unrepaired DNA damage. Results suggest that nonhomologous end joining components mediate DNA repair to promote survival of irradiated cells during embryogenesis. PMID:15914672

  1. The DNA Repair Protein yKu80 Regulates the Function of Recombination Enhancer during Yeast Mating Type Switching†

    PubMed Central

    Ruan, Chun; Workman, Jerry L.; Simpson, Robert T.

    2005-01-01

    Recombination enhancer (RE) is essential for regulating donor preference during yeast mating type switching. In this study, by using minichromosome affinity purification (MAP) and mass spectrometry, we found that yeast Ku80p is associated with RE in MATa cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays confirmed its occupancy in vivo. Deletion of YKU80 results in altered chromatin structure in the RE region and more importantly causes a dramatic decrease of HML usage in MATa cells. We also detect directional movement of yKu80p from the RE towards HML during switching. These results indicate a novel function of yeast Ku80p in regulating mating type switching. PMID:16166630

  2. EAF2 regulates DNA repair through Ku70/Ku80 in the prostate

    PubMed Central

    Ai, Junkui; Pascal, Laura E.; Wei, Leizhen; Zang, Yachen; Zhou, Yibin; Yu, Xinpei; Gong, Yanqing; Nakajima, Satoshi; Nelson, Joel B.; Levine, Arthur S.; Lan, Li; Wang, Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Androgens are known to protect prostate cancer cells from DNA damage. Recent studies showed regulation of DNA repair genes by androgen receptor (AR) signaling in prostate cancers. ELL-associated factor 2 (EAF2) is an androgen-regulated tumor suppressor and its intracellular localization can be modulated by UV light, suggesting a potential role for EAF2 in androgen regulation of DNA repair in prostate cancer cells. Here we show that knockdown of EAF2 or its homolog EAF1 sensitized prostate cancer cells to DNA damage and the sensitization did not require p53. EAF2 knockout mouse prostate was also sensitized to γ-irradiation. Furthermore, EAF2 knockdown blocked androgen repression of LNCaP or C4-2 cells from the doxorubicin-induction of γH2ax, a DNA damage marker. In human prostate cancer specimens, EAF2 expression was inversely correlated with the level of γH2ax. Further analysis showed that EAF2 and EAF1 are required for the recruitment and retention of Ku70/Ku80 to DNA damage sites and play a functional role in non-homologous end-joining DNA repair. These findings provide evidence for EAF2 as a key factor mediating androgen protection of DNA damage via Ku70/Ku80 in prostate cancer cells. PMID:27721405

  3. EAF2 regulates DNA repair through Ku70/Ku80 in the prostate.

    PubMed

    Ai, J; Pascal, L E; Wei, L; Zang, Y; Zhou, Y; Yu, X; Gong, Y; Nakajima, S; Nelson, J B; Levine, A S; Lan, L; Wang, Z

    2016-10-10

    Androgens are known to protect prostate cancer cells from DNA damage. Recent studies showed regulation of DNA repair genes by androgen receptor signaling in prostate cancers. ELL-associated factor 2 (EAF2) is an androgen-regulated tumor suppressor and its intracellular localization can be modulated by ultraviolet light, suggesting a potential role for EAF2 in androgen regulation of DNA repair in prostate cancer cells. Here we show that knockdown of EAF2 or its homolog EAF1 sensitized prostate cancer cells to DNA damage and the sensitization did not require p53. EAF2 knockout mouse prostate was also sensitized to γ-irradiation. Furthermore, EAF2 knockdown blocked androgen repression of LNCaP or C4-2 cells from doxorubicin induction of γH2ax, a DNA damage marker. In human prostate cancer specimens, EAF2 expression was inversely correlated with the level of γH2ax. Further analysis showed that EAF2 and EAF1 are required for the recruitment and retention of Ku70/Ku80 to DNA damage sites and play a functional role in nonhomologous end-joining DNA repair. These findings provide evidence for EAF2 as a key factor mediating androgen protection of DNA damage via Ku70/Ku80 in prostate cancer cells.Oncogene advance online publication, 10 October 2016; doi:10.1038/onc.2016.373.

  4. Ku70 and ku80 null mutants improve the gene targeting frequency in Monascus ruber M7.

    PubMed

    He, Yi; Liu, Qingpei; Shao, Yanchun; Chen, Fusheng

    2013-06-01

    Normally, gene targeting by homologous recombination occurs rarely during a transformation process since non-homologous recombination is predominant in filamentous fungi. In our previous researches, the average gene replacement frequency (GRF) in Monascus ruber M7 was as low as 15 %. To develop a highly efficient gene targeting system for M. ruber M7, two M. ruber M7 null mutants of ku70 (MrΔku70) and ku80 (MrΔku80) were constructed which had no apparent defects in the development including vegetative growth, colony phenotype, microscopic morphology and spore yield compared with M. ruber M7. In addition, the production of some significant secondary metabolites such as pigments and citrinin had no differences between the two disruptants and the wild-type strain. Further results revealed that the GRFs of triA (encoding a putative acetyltransferase) were 42.2 % and 61.5 % in the MrΔku70 and MrΔku80 strains, respectively, while it was only about 20 % in M. ruber M7. Furthermore, GRFs of these two disruptants at other loci (the pigE, fmdS genes in MrΔku70 and the ku70 gene in MrΔku80) were investigated, and the results indicated that GRFs in the MrΔku70 strain and the MrΔku80 strain were doubled and tripled compared with that in M. ruber M7, respectively. Therefore, the ku70 and ku80 null mutants of M. ruber M7, especially the ku80-deleted strain, will be excellent hosts for efficient gene targeting.

  5. Expression and heterodimer‐binding activity of Ku70 and Ku80 in human non‐melanoma skin cancer

    PubMed Central

    Parrella, P; Mazzarelli, P; Signori, E; Perrone, G; Marangi, G F; Rabitti, C; Delfino, M; Prencipe, M; Gallo, A P; Rinaldi, M; Fabbrocini, G; Delfino, S; Persichetti, P; Fazio, V M

    2006-01-01

    Background Experimental data suggest that exposure to ultraviolet radiation may indirectly induce DNA double‐strand breaks. Aim To investigate the contribution of the non‐homologous end‐joining repair pathway in basal and squamous cell carcinomas. Methods Levels of Ku70 and Ku80 proteins were determined by immunohistochemical analysis and Ku70–Ku80 heterodimer‐binding activity by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Matched pathological normal margins and skin from healthy people were used as controls. Results A significant increase in Ku70 and Ku80 protein levels was found for both tumour types as compared with normal skin (p<0.001). Squamous cell carcinoma showed increased immunostaining as compared with basal cell tumours (p<0.02). A direct correlation was found between Ku70 and Ku80 protein levels and expression of the proliferation markers Ki‐67/MIB‐1 (p<0.02 and p<0.002, respectively) in basal cell carcinoma. DNA binding activity was increased in basal cell carcinoma samples as compared with matched skin histopathologically negative for cancer (p<0.006). In squamous cell carcinomas, however, the difference was significant only with normal skin (p<0.02) and not with matched pathologically normal margins. Conclusions Overall, an up regulation of the Ku70 and Ku80 protein levels seems to correlate only with tumour proliferation rate. As non‐homologous end joining is an error‐prone mechanism, its up regulation may ultimately increase genomic instability, contributing to tumour progression. PMID:16497868

  6. Suppression of OsKu80 results in defects in developmental growth and increased telomere length in rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Byun, Mi Young; Cui, Li Hua; Kim, Woo Taek

    2015-12-25

    The Ku70-Ku80 heterodimer plays a critical role in the maintenance of genomic stability in humans and yeasts. In this report, we identified and characterized OsKu80 in rice, a model monocot crop. OsKu80 forms a heterodimer with OsKu70 in yeast and plant cells, as demonstrated by yeast two-hybrid, in vivo co-immunoprecipitation, and bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays. RNAi-mediated knock-down T3 transgenic rice plants (Ubi:RNAi-OsKu80) displayed a retarded growth phenotype at the post-germination stage. In addition, the Ubi:RNAi-OsKu80 knock-down progeny exhibited noticeably increased telomere length as compared to wild-type rice. These results are discussed with the idea that OsKu80 plays a role in developmental growth and telomere length regulation in rice plants.

  7. Genome stability of Arabidopsis atm, ku80 and rad51b mutants: somatic and transgenerational responses to stress.

    PubMed

    Yao, Youli; Bilichak, Andriy; Titov, Viktor; Golubov, Andrey; Kovalchuk, Igor

    2013-06-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) can be repaired via two main mechanisms: non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR). Our previous work showed that exposure to abiotic stresses resulted in an increase in point mutation frequency (PMF) and homologous recombination frequency (HRF), and these changes were heritable. We hypothesized that mutants impaired in DSB recognition and repair would also be deficient in somatic and transgenerational changes in PMF and HRF. To test this hypothesis, we analyzed the genome stability of the Arabidopsis thaliana mutants deficient in ATM (communication between DNA strand break recognition and the repair machinery), KU80 (deficient in NHEJ) and RAD51B (deficient in HR repair) genes. We found that all three mutants exhibited higher levels of DSBs. Plants impaired in ATM had a lower spontaneous PMF and HRF, whereas ku80 plants had higher frequencies. Plants impaired in RAD51B had a lower HRF. HRF in wild-type, atm and rad51b plants increased in response to several abiotic stressors, whereas it did not increase in ku80 plants. The progeny of stressed wild-type and ku80 plants exhibited an increase in HRF in response to all stresses, and the increase was higher in ku80 plants. The progeny of atm plants showed an increase in HRF only when the parental generation was exposed to cold or flood, whereas the progeny of rad51b plants completely lacked a transgenerational increase in HRF. Our experiments showed that mutants impaired in the recognition and repair of DSBs exhibited changes in the efficiency of DNA repair as reflected by changes in strand breaks, point mutation and HRF. They also showed that the HR RAD51B protein and the protein ATM that recognized damaged DNA might play an important role in transgenerational changes in HRF.

  8. DNA Repair Biomarker Profiling of Head & Neck Cancer: Ku80 Expression Predicts Locoregional Failure and Death Following Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Moeller, Benjamin J.; Yordy, John S.; Williams, Michelle D.; Giri, Uma; Raju, Uma; Molkentine, David P.; Byers, Lauren A.; Heymach, John V.; Story, Michael D.; Lee, J. Jack; Sturgis, Erich M.; Weber, Randal S.; Garden, Adam S.; Ang, K. Kian; Schwartz, David L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Radiotherapy plays an integral role in the treatment of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Although proteins involved in DNA repair may predict HNSCC response to radiotherapy, none has been validated in this context. We examined whether differential expression of double-strand DNA break (DSB) repair proteins in HNSCC, the chief mediators of DNA repair following irradiation, predict for treatment outcomes. Experimental Design Archival HNSCC tumor specimens (n = 89) were assembled onto a tissue microarray and stained with antibodies raised against 38 biomarkers. The biomarker set was enriched for proteins involved in DSB repair, in addition to established mechanistic markers of radioresistance. Staining was correlated with treatment response and survival alongside established clinical and pathologic covariates. Results were validated in an independent intramural cohort (n = 34). Results Ku80, a key mediator of DSB repair, correlated most closely with clinical outcomes. Ku80 was overexpressed in half of all tumors, and its expression was independent of all other covariates examined. Ku80 overexpression was an independent predictor for both locoregional failure and mortality following radiotherapy (P < 0.01). The predictive power of Ku80 overexpression was confined largely to HPV-negative HNSCC, where it conferred a 9-fold greater risk of death at 2 years. Conclusions Ku80 overexpression is a common feature of HNSCC, and is a candidate DNA repair-related biomarker for radiation treatment failure and death, particularly in patients with high-risk HPV-negative disease. It is a promising, mechanistically rational biomarker to select individual HPV-negative HNSCC patients for strategies to intensify treatment. PMID:21349997

  9. Human T-cell leukemia virus type 2 Rex carboxy terminus is an inhibitory/stability domain that regulates Rex functional activity and viral replication.

    PubMed

    Xie, Li; Kesic, Matthew; Yamamoto, Brenda; Li, Min; Younis, Ihab; Lairmore, Michael D; Green, Patrick L

    2009-05-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus (HTLV) regulatory protein, Rex, functions to increase the expression of the viral structural and enzymatic gene products. The phosphorylation of two serine residues (S151 and S153) at the C terminus is important for the function of HTLV-2 Rex (Rex-2). The Rex-2 phosphomimetic double mutant (S151D, S153D) is locked in a functionally active conformation. Since rex and tax genes overlap, Rex S151D and S153D mutants were found to alter the Tax oncoprotein coding sequence and transactivation activities. Therefore, additional Rex-2 mutants including P152D, A157D, S151Term, and S158Term were generated and characterized ("Term" indicates termination codon). All Rex-2 mutants and wild-type (wt) Rex-2 localized predominantly to the nucleus/nucleolus, but in contrast to the detection of phosphorylated and unphosphorylated forms of wt Rex-2 (p26 and p24), mutant proteins were detected as a single phosphoprotein species. We found that Rex P152D, A157D, and S158Term mutants are more functionally active than wt Rex-2 and that the Rex-2 C terminus and its specific phosphorylation state are required for stability and optimal expression. In the context of the provirus, the more active Rex mutants (A157D or S158Term) promoted increased viral protein production, increased viral infectious spread, and enhanced HTLV-2-mediated cellular proliferation. Moreover, these Rex mutant viruses replicated and persisted in inoculated rabbits despite higher antiviral antibody responses. Thus, we identified in Rex-2 a novel C-terminal inhibitory domain that regulates functional activity and is positively regulated through phosphorylation. The ability of this domain to modulate viral replication likely plays a key role in the infectious spread of the virus and in virus-induced cellular proliferation.

  10. KARP-1 works as a heterodimer with Ku70, but the function of KARP-1 cannot perfectly replace that of Ku80 in DSB repair.

    PubMed

    Koike, Manabu; Yutoku, Yasutomo; Koike, Aki

    2011-10-01

    Ku, the heterodimer of Ku70 and Ku80, plays an essential role in the DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair pathway, i.e., non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ). Two isoforms of Ku80 encoded by the same genes, namely, Ku80 and KARP-1 are expressed and function in primate cells, but not in rodent cells. Ku80 works as a heterodimer with Ku70. However, it is not yet clear whether KARP-1 forms a heterodimer with Ku70 and works as a heterodimer. Although KARP-1 appears to work in NHEJ, its physiological role remains unclear. In this study, we established and characterized EGFP-KARP-1-expressing xrs-6 cell lines, EGFP-KARP-1/xrs-6. We found that nuclear localization signal (NLS) of KARP-1 is localized in the C-terminal region. Our data showed that KARP-1 localizes within the nucleus in NLS-dependent and NLS-independent manner and forms a heterodimer with Ku70, and stabilizes Ku70. On the other hand, EGFP-KARP-1 could not perfectly complement the radiosensitivity and DSB repair activity of Ku80-deficient xrs-6 cells. Furthermore, KARP-1 could not accumulate at DSBs faster than Ku80, although EGFP-KARP-1 accumulates at DSBs. Our data demonstrate that the function of KARP-1 could not perfectly replace that of Ku80 in DSB repair, although KARP-1 has some biochemical properties, which resemble those of Ku80, and works as a heterodimer with Ku70. On the other hand, the number of EGFP-KARP-1-expressing xrs-6 cells showing pan-nuclear γ-H2AX staining significantly increases following X-irradiation, suggesting that KARP-1 may have a novel role in DSB response.

  11. KARP-1 works as a heterodimer with Ku70, but the function of KARP-1 cannot perfectly replace that of Ku80 in DSB repair

    SciTech Connect

    Koike, Manabu; Yutoku, Yasutomo; Koike, Aki

    2011-10-01

    Ku, the heterodimer of Ku70 and Ku80, plays an essential role in the DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair pathway, i.e., non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ). Two isoforms of Ku80 encoded by the same genes, namely, Ku80 and KARP-1 are expressed and function in primate cells, but not in rodent cells. Ku80 works as a heterodimer with Ku70. However, it is not yet clear whether KARP-1 forms a heterodimer with Ku70 and works as a heterodimer. Although KARP-1 appears to work in NHEJ, its physiological role remains unclear. In this study, we established and characterized EGFP-KARP-1-expressing xrs-6 cell lines, EGFP-KARP-1/xrs-6. We found that nuclear localization signal (NLS) of KARP-1 is localized in the C-terminal region. Our data showed that KARP-1 localizes within the nucleus in NLS-dependent and NLS-independent manner and forms a heterodimer with Ku70, and stabilizes Ku70. On the other hand, EGFP-KARP-1 could not perfectly complement the radiosensitivity and DSB repair activity of Ku80-deficient xrs-6 cells. Furthermore, KARP-1 could not accumulate at DSBs faster than Ku80, although EGFP-KARP-1 accumulates at DSBs. Our data demonstrate that the function of KARP-1 could not perfectly replace that of Ku80 in DSB repair, although KARP-1 has some biochemical properties, which resemble those of Ku80, and works as a heterodimer with Ku70. On the other hand, the number of EGFP-KARP-1-expressing xrs-6 cells showing pan-nuclear {gamma}-H2AX staining significantly increases following X-irradiation, suggesting that KARP-1 may have a novel role in DSB response.

  12. Role of the Carboxy Terminus of SecA in Iron Acquisition, Protein Translocation, and Virulence of the Bacterial Pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Fiester, Steven E.; Nwugo, Chika C.; Penwell, William F.; Neary, John M.; Beckett, Amber C.; Arivett, Brock A.; Schmidt, Robert E.; Geiger, Sarah C.; Connerly, Pamela L.; Menke, Sharon M.; Tomaras, Andrew P.

    2015-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a Gram-negative opportunistic nosocomial pathogen that causes pneumonia and soft tissue and systemic infections. Screening of a transposon insertion library of A. baumannii ATCC 19606T resulted in the identification of the 2010 derivative, which, although capable of growing well in iron-rich media, failed to prosper under iron chelation. Genetic, molecular, and functional assays showed that 2010's iron utilization-deficient phenotype is due to an insertion within the 3′ end of secA, which results in the production of a C-terminally truncated derivative of SecA. SecA plays a critical role in protein translocation through the SecYEG membrane channel. Accordingly, the secA mutation resulted in undetectable amounts of the ferric acinetobactin outer membrane receptor protein BauA while not affecting the production of other acinetobactin membrane protein transport components, such as BauB and BauE, or the secretion of acinetobactin by 2010 cells cultured in the presence of subinhibitory concentrations of the synthetic iron chelator 2,2′-dipyridyl. Outer membrane proteins involved in nutrient transport, adherence, and biofilm formation were also reduced in 2010. The SecA truncation also increased production of 30 different proteins, including proteins involved in adaptation/tolerance responses. Although some of these protein changes could negatively affect the pathobiology of the 2010 derivative, its virulence defect is mainly due to its inability to acquire iron via the acinetobactin-mediated system. These results together indicate that although the C terminus of the A. baumannii ATCC 19606T SecA is not essential for viability, it plays a critical role in the production and translocation of different proteins and virulence. PMID:25605767

  13. FlbD has a DNA-binding activity near its carboxy terminus that recognizes ftr sequences involved in positive and negative regulation of flagellar gene transcription in Caulobacter crescentus.

    PubMed Central

    Mullin, D A; Van Way, S M; Blankenship, C A; Mullin, A H

    1994-01-01

    G. Our results demonstrate that FlbD contains a sequence-specific DNA-binding activity within the 87 amino acids at its carboxy terminus, and the results suggest that FlbD exerts its effect as a positive and negative regulator of C. crescentus flagellar genes by binding to ftr sequences. Images PMID:7928958

  14. Inactivation of ku80 in the mushroom-forming fungus Schizophyllum commune increases the relative incidence of homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Jan F; Ohm, Robin A; de Bekker, Charissa; Wösten, Han A B; Lugones, Luis G

    2010-09-01

    Schizophyllum commune is the only mushroom-forming fungus in which targeted gene deletions by homologous recombination have been reported. However, these deletions occur with a low frequency. To overcome this, the ku80 gene of S. commune was deleted. This gene is involved in the nonhomologous end-joining system for DNA repair. The Deltaku80 strain was not affected in growth and development. However, the transformation efficiency was reduced up to 100-fold. This was accompanied by a strong increase in the relative number of transformants with a homologous integration of a knockout construct. Genes sc15, jmj3 and pri2 were deleted in the Deltaku80 strain. In total, seven out of 10 transformants showed a gene deletion. This frequency will facilitate a systematic analysis of gene function in S. commune.

  15. Application of new in situ hybridization probes for Ku70 and Ku80 in tissue microarrays of paraffin-embedded malignant melanomas: correlation with immunohistochemical analysis.

    PubMed

    Korabiowska, Monika; Bauer, Hanne; Quentin, Tomas; Stachura, Jerzy; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Brinck, Ulrich

    2004-02-01

    Ku70 and Ku80 proteins are responsible for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks and function as a regulatory subunit of the DNA-dependent protein kinase. In this study we analyzed expression of both genes in malignant melanoma tissue arrays applying in situ hybridization probes produced by our research group and using immunohistochemical analysis. Expression of both genes was down-regulated as melanoma progressed. In situ hybridization demonstrated more Ku70- and Ku80-positive cells than immunohistochemical methods, but the correlation between the two methods was highly significant (P <0.01). We conclude that the in situ hybridization assay for the detection of Ku70 and Ku80 expression used in this study is also suitable for tissue microarray analysis of paraffin-embedded melanoma samples. The laboratory procedure is much more complicated than the immunohistochemical method, however.

  16. Preclinical evaluation of (111)In-DTPA-INCA-X anti-Ku70/Ku80 monoclonal antibody in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Evans-Axelsson, Susan; Vilhelmsson Timmermand, Oskar; Welinder, Charlotte; Borrebaeck, Carl Ak; Strand, Sven-Erik; Tran, Thuy A; Jansson, Bo; Bjartell, Anders

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to assess the Ku70/Ku80 complex as a potential target for antibody imaging of prostate cancer. We evaluated the in vivo and ex vivo tumor targeting and biodistribution of the (111)In-labeled human internalizing antibody, INCA-X ((111)In-DTPA-INCA-X antibody), in NMRI-nude mice bearing human PC-3, PC-3M-Lu2 or DU145 xenografts. DTPA-conjugated, non-labeled antibody was pre-administered at different time-points followed by a single intravenous injection of (111)In-DTPA-INCA-X. At 48, 72 and 96 h post-injection, tissues were harvested, and the antibody distribution was determined by measuring radioactivity. Preclinical SPECT/CT imaging of mice with and without the predose was performed at 48 hours post-injection of labeled DTPA-INCA-X. Biodistribution of the labeled antibody showed enriched activity in tumor, spleen and liver. Animals pre-administered with DTPA-INCA-X showed increased tumor uptake and blood content of (111)In-DTPA-INCA-X with reduced splenic and liver uptake. The in vitro and in vivo data presented show that the (111)In-labeled INCA-X antibody is internalized into prostate cancer cells and by pre-administering non-labeled DTPA-INCA-X, we were able to significantly reduce the off target binding and increase the (111)In-DTPA-INCA-X mAb uptake in PC-3, PC-3M-Lu2 and DU145 xenografts. The results are encouraging and identifying the Ku70/Ku80 antigen as a target is worth further investigation for functional imaging of prostate cancer.

  17. Effect of Ku80 Deficiency on Mutation Frequencies and Spectra at a LacZ Reporter Locus in Mouse Tissues and Cells

    PubMed Central

    Busuttil, Rita A.; Muñoz, Denise P.; Garcia, Ana Maria; Rodier, Francis; Kim, Woo Ho; Suh, Yousin; Hasty, Paul; Campisi, Judith; Vijg, Jan

    2008-01-01

    Non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) is thought to be an important mechanism for preventing the adverse effects of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) and its absence has been associated with premature aging. To investigate the effect of inactivated NHEJ on spontaneous mutation frequencies and spectra in vivo and in cultured cells, we crossed a Ku80-deficient mouse with mice harboring a lacZ-plasmid-based mutation reporter. We analyzed various organs and tissues, as well as cultured embryonic fibroblasts, for mutations at the lacZ locus. When comparing mutant with wild-type mice, we observed a significantly higher number of genome rearrangements in liver and spleen and a significantly lower number of point mutations in liver and brain. The reduced point mutation frequency was not due to a decrease in small deletion mutations thought to be a hallmark of NHEJ, but could be a consequence of increased cellular responses to unrepaired DSBs. Indeed, we found a substantial increase in persistent 53BP1 and γH2AX DNA damage foci in Ku80−/− as compared to wild-type liver. Treatment of cultured Ku80-deficient or wild-type embryonic fibroblasts, either proliferating or quiescent, with hydrogen peroxide or bleomycin showed no differences in the number or type of induced genome rearrangements. However, after such treatment, Ku80-deficient cells did show an increased number of persistent DNA damage foci. These results indicate that Ku80-dependent repair of DNA damage is predominantly error-free with the effect of alternative more error-prone pathways creating genome rearrangements only detectable after extended periods of time, i.e., in young adult animals. The observed premature aging likely results from a combination of increased cellular senescence and an increased load of stable, genome rearrangements. PMID:18941635

  18. K14-EGFP-miR-31 transgenic mice have high susceptibility to chemical-induced squamous cell tumorigenesis that is associating with Ku80 repression.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Ssu-Hsueh; Yang, Cheng-Chieh; Yu, En-Hao; Chang, Christine; Lee, Yong-Syu; Liu, Chung-Ji; Chang, Kuo-Wei; Lin, Shu-Chun

    2015-03-15

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) occurring in the head and neck region and the esophagus causes tremendous cancer mortality around the world. miR-31 is among the most eminently upregulated MicroRNAs in SCC, when it occurs in the head and neck region and the esophagus. We established miR-31 transgenic mouse lines, in which miR-31 is under the control of the K14 promoter. 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide (4NQO) is a mutagen that causes double strand breaks. The transgenic mice exhibited a higher potential for tumor induction than wild-type (Wt) mice of the tongue and esophagus after 4NQO treatment. After 4NQO treatment or irradiation, p-γH2AX expression in squamous epithelium of transgenic mice was increased more than in Wt mice. Exogenous expression of miR-31 was also found to be associated with the higher p-γH2AX expression induced by 4NQO in human oral SCC (OSCC) cell lines. The repair genes PARP1 and Ku80 were validated as new targets of miR-31 in human OSCC cell lines, and were found to be downregulated in the squamous epithelium of the tongue in transgenic mice. However, only the downregulation of Ku80 was essential for maintaining the high level of p-γH2AX induced by 4NQO in OSCC cells. Inverse expression profiles for miR-31 and Ku80 were noted in human OSCC tissue. Our study identifies the high sensitivity of K14-EGFP-miR-31 transgenic mice to chemical carcinogen-induced squamous cell tumorigenesis and shows that this seems to be associated with the downregulation of Ku80 and an impairment of repair activity in squamous cells, which are mediated by miR-31.

  19. Functional analysis of the new barley gene HvKu80 indicates that it plays a key role in double-strand DNA break repair and telomere length regulation.

    PubMed

    Stolarek, Magdalena; Gruszka, Damian; Braszewska-Zalewska, Agnieszka; Maluszynski, Mirosław

    2015-11-01

    Genotoxic stress causes a reduced stability of the plant genome and has a detrimental effect on plant growth and productivity. Double-strand breaks (DSBs) are the most harmful of all DNA lesions because they cause the loss of genetic information on both strands of the DNA helix. In the presented study the coding and genomic sequences of the HvKu80 gene were determined. A mutational analysis of two fragments of HvKu80 using TILLING (Targeting Induced Local Lesions IN Genomes) allowed 12 mutations to be detected, which resulted in identification of 11 alleles. Multidirectional analyses demonstrated that the HvKu80 gene is involved in the elimination of DSBs in Hordeum vulgare. The barley mutants carrying the identified ku80.c and ku80.j alleles accumulated bleomycin-induced DSBs to a much greater extent than the parent cultivar 'Sebastian'. The altered reaction of the mutants to DSB-inducing agent and the kinetics of DNA repair in these genotypes are associated with a lower expression level of the mutated gene. The study also demonstrated the significant role of the HvKu80 gene in the regulation of telomere length in barley.

  20. Regulation of pairing between broken DNA-containing chromatin regions by Ku80, DNA-PKcs, ATM, and 53BP1

    PubMed Central

    Yamauchi, Motohiro; Shibata, Atsushi; Suzuki, Keiji; Suzuki, Masatoshi; Niimi, Atsuko; Kondo, Hisayoshi; Miura, Miwa; Hirakawa, Miyako; Tsujita, Keiko; Yamashita, Shunichi; Matsuda, Naoki

    2017-01-01

    Chromosome rearrangement is clinically and physiologically important because it can produce oncogenic fusion genes. Chromosome rearrangement requires DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) at two genomic locations and misrejoining between the DSBs. Before DSB misrejoining, two DSB-containing chromatin regions move and pair with each other; however, the molecular mechanism underlying this process is largely unknown. We performed a spatiotemporal analysis of ionizing radiation-induced foci of p53-binding protein 1 (53BP1), a marker for DSB-containing chromatin. We found that some 53BP1 foci were paired, indicating that the two damaged chromatin regions neighboured one another. We searched for factors regulating the foci pairing and found that the number of paired foci increased when Ku80, DNA-PKcs, or ATM was absent. In contrast, 53BP1 depletion reduced the number of paired foci and dicentric chromosomes—an interchromosomal rearrangement. Foci were paired more frequently in heterochromatin than in euchromatin in control cells. Additionally, the reduced foci pairing in 53BP1-depleted cells was rescued by concomitant depletion of a heterochromatin building factor such as Krüppel-associated box-associated protein 1 or chromodomain helicase DNA-binding protein 3. These findings indicate that pairing between DSB-containing chromatin regions was suppressed by Ku80, DNA-PKcs, and ATM, and this pairing was promoted by 53BP1 through chromatin relaxation. PMID:28155885

  1. Activation of Membrane Fusion by Murine Leukemia Viruses Is Controlled in cis or in trans by Interactions between the Receptor-Binding Domain and a Conserved Disulfide Loop of the Carboxy Terminus of the Surface Glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Lavillette, Dimitri; Boson, Bertrand; Russell, Stephen J.; Cosset, François-Loïc

    2001-01-01

    Cell entry of retroviruses is initiated by the recognition of cellular receptors and the subsequent membrane fusion between viral and cellular membranes. These two steps are mediated by the surface (SU) and transmembrane (TM) subunits of the retroviral envelope glycoprotein (Env), respectively. Determinants regulating membrane fusion have been described throughout SU and TM, but the processes coupling receptor recognition to fusion are still elusive. Here we establish that a critical interaction is formed between the receptor-binding domain (RBD) and the major disulfide loop of the carboxy-terminal domain (C domain) of the murine leukemia virus SU. Receptor binding causes an alteration of this interaction and, in turn, promotes further events of Env fusion activation. We characterize mutations which, by lowering this interaction and reducing the compatibility between the RBD and C domains of Env glycoprotein chimeras, affect both Env fusogenicity and sensitivity to receptor interference. Additionally, we demonstrate that suboptimal interactions in such mutant Env proteins can be compensated in trans by soluble RBDs in a manner that depends on their compatibility with the C domain. Our results therefore indicate that RBD/C domain interactions may occur in cis, via the proper RBD of the viral Env itself, or in trans, via a distinct RBD expressed by virion-free Env glycoproteins expressed endogenously by the infected cells or provided by neighboring Env trimers. PMID:11264358

  2. Carboxy-terminal domain mediates assembly of the voltage-gated rat ether-à-go-go potassium channel.

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, J; Owen, D; Pongs, O

    1997-01-01

    The specific assembly of subunits to oligomers is an important prerequisite for producing functional potassium channels. We have studied the assembly of voltage-gated rat ether-à-go-go (r-eag) potassium channels with two complementary assays. In protein overlay binding experiments it was shown that a 41-amino-acid domain, close to the r-eag subunit carboxy-terminus, is important for r-eag subunit interaction. In an in vitro expression system it was demonstrated that r-eag subunits lacking this assembly domain cannot form functional potassium channels. Also, a approximately 10-fold molar excess of the r-eag carboxy-terminus inhibited in co-expression experiments the formation of functional r-eag channels. When the r-eag carboxy-terminal assembly domain had been mutated, the dominant-negative effect of the r-eag carboxy-terminus on r-eag channel expression was abolished. The results demonstrate that a carboxy-terminal assembly domain is essential for functional r-eag potassium channel expression, in contrast to the one of Shaker-related potassium channels, which is directed by an amino-terminal assembly domain. PMID:9400421

  3. Identification of kinesin-C, a calmodulin-binding carboxy-terminal kinesin in animal (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus) cells.

    PubMed

    Rogers, G C; Hart, C L; Wedaman, K P; Scholey, J M

    1999-11-19

    Several novel members of the kinesin superfamily, until now identified only in plants, are unique in their ability to bind calmodulin in the presence of Ca(2+). Here, we identify the first such kinesin in an animal system. Sequence analysis of this new motor, called kinesin-C, predicts that it is a large carboxy-terminal kinesin, 1624 amino acid residues in length, with a predicted molecular mass of 181 kDa. Kinesin-C is predicted to contain a kinesin motor domain at its carboxy terminus, linked to a segment of alpha-helical coiled-coil 950 amino acid residues long, ending with an amino-terminal proline-rich tail domain. A putative calmodulin-binding domain resides at the extreme carboxy terminus of the motor polypeptide, and recombinant kinesin-C binds to a calmodulin-affinity column in a Ca(2+)-dependent fashion. The presence of this novel calmodulin-binding motor in sea urchin embryos suggests that it plays a critical role in Ca(2+)-dependent events during early sea urchin development.

  4. Automated carboxy-terminal sequence analysis of peptides.

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, J. M.; Shenoy, N. R.; Ronk, M.; Shively, J. E.

    1992-01-01

    Proteins and peptides can be sequenced from the carboxy-terminus with isothiocyanate reagents to produce amino acid thiohydantoin derivatives. Previous studies in our laboratory have focused on solution phase conditions for formation of the peptidylthiohydantoins with trimethylsilylisothiocyanate (TMS-ITC) and for hydrolysis of these peptidylthiohydantoins into an amino acid thiohydantoin derivative and a new shortened peptide capable of continued degradation (Bailey, J. M. & Shively, J. E., 1990, Biochemistry 29, 3145-3156). The current study is a continuation of this work and describes the construction of an instrument for automated C-terminal sequencing, the application of the thiocyanate chemistry to peptides covalently coupled to a novel polyethylene solid support (Shenoy, N. R., Bailey, J. M., & Shively, J. E., 1992, Protein Sci. I, 58-67), the use of sodium trimethylsilanolate as a novel reagent for the specific cleavage of the derivatized C-terminal amino acid, and the development of methodology to sequence through the difficult amino acid, aspartate. Automated programs are described for the C-terminal sequencing of peptides covalently attached to carboxylic acid-modified polyethylene. The chemistry involves activation with acetic anhydride, derivatization with TMS-ITC, and cleavage of the derivatized C-terminal amino acid with sodium trimethylsilanolate. The thiohydantoin amino acid is identified by on-line high performance liquid chromatography using a Phenomenex Ultracarb 5 ODS(30) column and a triethylamine/phosphoric acid buffer system containing pentanesulfonic acid. The generality of our automated C-terminal sequencing methodology was examined by sequencing model peptides containing all 20 of the common amino acids. All of the amino acids were found to sequence in high yield (90% or greater) except for asparagine and aspartate, which could be only partially removed, and proline, which was found not be capable of derivatization. In spite of these

  5. Electrogenic Na/HCO3 Cotransporter (NBCe1) Variants Expressed in Xenopus Oocytes: Functional Comparison and Roles of the Amino and Carboxy Termini

    PubMed Central

    McAlear, Suzanne D.; Liu, Xiaofen; Williams, Jennifer B.; McNicholas-Bevensee, Carmel M.; Bevensee, Mark O.

    2006-01-01

    Using pH- and voltage-sensitive microelectrodes, as well as the two-electrode voltage-clamp and macropatch techniques, we compared the functional properties of the three NBCe1 variants (NBCe1-A, -B, and -C) with different amino and/or carboxy termini expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Oocytes expressing rat brain NBCe1-B and exposed to a CO2/HCO3− solution displayed all the hallmarks of an electrogenic Na+/HCO3− cotransporter: (a) a DIDS-sensitive pHi recovery following the initial CO2-induced acidification, (b) an instantaneous hyperpolarization, and (c) an instantaneous Na+-dependent outward current under voltage-clamp conditions (−60 mV). All three variants had similar external HCO3− dependencies (apparent KM of 4–6 mM) and external Na+ dependencies (apparent KM of 21–36 mM), as well as similar voltage dependencies. However, voltage-clamped oocytes (−60 mV) expressing NBCe1-A exhibited peak HCO3−-stimulated NBC currents that were 4.3-fold larger than the currents seen in oocytes expressing the most dissimilar C variant. Larger NBCe1-A currents were also observed in current–voltage relationships. Plasma membrane expression levels as assessed by single oocyte chemiluminescence with hemagglutinin-tagged NBCs were similar for the three variants. In whole-cell experiments (Vm = −60 mV), removing the unique amino terminus of NBCe1-A reduced the mean HCO3−-induced NBC current 55%, whereas removing the different amino terminus of NBCe1-C increased the mean NBC current 2.7-fold. A similar pattern was observed in macropatch experiments. Thus, the unique amino terminus of NBCe1-A stimulates transporter activity, whereas the different amino terminus of the B and C variants inhibits activity. One or more cytosolic factors may also contribute to NBCe1 activity based on discrepancies between macropatch and whole-cell currents. While the amino termini influence transporter function, the carboxy termini influence plasma membrane expression. Removing the

  6. Tidewater terminus tug-of-war

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartholomaus, T. C.; Larsen, C. F.; O'Neel, S.; West, M. E.

    2012-12-01

    When a glacier terminus recedes, not only does the glacier lose the ice between the former and present terminus, but the terminal reach of the glacier can steepen, causing ice flow out of the glacier interior increases. The increased flow will continue, thinning the glacier, until the glacier geometry and ice flow reach a new equilibrium. Yahtse Glacier is an advancing tidewater glacier on the Gulf of Alaska coast. To better understand the controls on its terminus position, we use a suite of seismic, geodetic and oceanographic data. Both calving and submarine melt contribute to frontal ablation, however, at Yahtse Glacier the ice is too fractured to support undercutting below the water line, nor does a persistent submarine toe develop. Thus the terminus retreats as fast as subaerial calving occurs. Previous work at Yahtse Glacier demonstrated that locally recorded seismic events between 1 and 5 Hz are predominantly the result of subaerial iceberg calving. Therefore, we use seismicity as a proxy for the frontal ablation rate. We measure the near-terminus glacier velocity with oblique photogrammetry, calibrated with ~10 day intervals of surveyed ice velocity. These methods reveal an annually-averaged terminus velocity of 6.9 km/yr. The frontal ablation rate and the terminus ice velocity are nearly in phase and reach maximum values twice per year: in the spring and fall. Integrating the difference between frontal ablation rate and terminus ice velocity reveals a pattern of terminus positions with a single annual cycle, quite similar to that which we observe in the field. GPS measurements 10 km from the terminus indicate that ice velocities peak in May and decrease through the summer. Oceanographic measurements show that near-shore surface water temperatures in the Gulf of Alaska are greatest in the fall. We suggest that the spring peak in terminus velocity is set by higher rates of ice delivery from up-glacier; calving rate increases in a compensatory way, to nearly

  7. The carboxy-terminal tail or the intracellular loop 3 is required for β-arrestin-dependent internalization of a mammalian type II GnRH receptor.

    PubMed

    Madziva, Michael T; Mkhize, Nonhlanhla N; Flanagan, Colleen A; Katz, Arieh A

    2015-08-15

    The type II GnRH receptor (GnRH-R2) in contrast to mammalian type I GnRH receptor (GnRH-R1) has a cytosolic carboxy-terminal tail. We investigated the role of β-arrestin 1 in GnRH-R2-mediated signalling and mapped the regions in GnRH-R2 required for recruitment of β-arrestin, employing internalization assays. We show that GnRH-R2 activation of ERK is dependent on β-arrestin and protein kinase C. Appending the tail of GnRH-R2 to GnRH-R1 enabled GRK- and β-arrestin-dependent internalization of the chimaeric receptor. Surprisingly, carboxy-terminally truncated GnRH-R2 retained β-arrestin and GRK-dependent internalization, suggesting that β-arrestin interacts with additional elements of GnRH-R2. Mutating serine and threonine or basic residues of intracellular loop 3 did not abolish β-arrestin 1-dependent internalization but a receptor lacking these basic residues and the carboxy-terminus showed no β-arrestin 1-dependent internalization. Our results suggest that basic residues at the amino-terminal end of intracellular loop 3 or the carboxy-terminal tail are required for β-arrestin dependent internalization.

  8. Immunoreactivity of polyclonal antibodies generated against the carboxy terminus of the predicted amino acid sequence of the Huntington disease gene

    SciTech Connect

    Alkatib, G.; Graham, R.; Pelmear-Telenius, A.

    1994-09-01

    A cDNA fragment spanning the 3{prime}-end of the Huntington disease gene (from 8052 to 9252) was cloned into a prokaryotic expression vector containing the E. Coli lac promoter and a portion of the coding sequence for {beta}-galactosidase. The truncated {beta}-galactosidase gene was cleaved with BamHl and fused in frame to the BamHl fragment of the Huntington disease gene 3{prime}-end. Expression analysis of proteins made in E. Coli revealed that 20-30% of the total cellular proteins was represented by the {beta}-galactosidase-huntingtin fusion protein. The identity of the Huntington disease protein amino acid sequences was confirmed by protein sequence analysis. Affinity chromatography was used to purify large quantities of the fusion protein from bacterial cell lysates. Affinity-purified proteins were used to immunize New Zealand white rabbits for antibody production. The generated polyclonal antibodies were used to immunoprecipitate the Huntington disease gene product expressed in a neuroblastoma cell line. In this cell line the antibodies precipitated two protein bands of apparent gel migrations of 200 and 150 kd which together, correspond to the calculated molecular weight of the Huntington disease gene product (350 kd). Immunoblotting experiments revealed the presence of a large precursor protein in the range of 350-750 kd which is in agreement with the predicted molecular weight of the protein without post-translational modifications. These results indicate that the huntingtin protein is cleaved into two subunits in this neuroblastoma cell line and implicate that cleavage of a large precursor protein may contribute to its biological activity. Experiments are ongoing to determine the precursor-product relationship and to examine the synthesis of the huntingtin protein in freshly isolated rat brains, and to determine cellular and subcellular distribution of the gene product.

  9. The Carboxy-terminus of BAK1 regulates kinase activity and is required for normal growth of Arabidopsis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In brassinosteroid (BR) signaling, binding of brassinolide to the BRI1 receptor kinase promotes interaction with its co-receptor, BAK1. Juxtaposition of the kinase domains that occurs then allows reciprocal transphosphorylation and activation of both kinases, but details of that process are not enti...

  10. Picosecond transient absorption study of photodissociated carboxy hemoglobin and myoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Janes, S.M.; Dalickas, G.A.; Eaton, W.A.; Hochstrasser, R.M.

    1988-09-01

    The optical transient absorption spectra at 30 ps and 6.5 ns after photolysis are compared for both carboxy hemoglobin (HbCO) and carboxy myoglobin (MbCO). Both 355- and 532-nm excitation pulses were used. In all cases the shapes of the optical difference spectra thus generated are stationary over the complete time-scale studied. The photolysis spectra for MbCO are not significantly different from the equilibrium difference spectra generated on the same picosecond spectrometer when measured to an accuracy of +/- 0.5 nm. In addition, spectral parameters for delegated HbCO generated on the same spectrometer but detected by two different techniques, either by a Vidicon detector or point by point with photomultiplier tubes, are reported; the results are different from some of the previously reported picosecond experiments.

  11. Anthropomorphic Telemanipulation System in Terminus Control Mode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jau, Bruno M.; Lewis, M. Anthony; Bejczy, Antal K.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes a prototype anthropomorphic kinesthetic telepresence system that is being developed at JPL. It utilizes dexterous terminus devices in the form of an exoskeleton force-sensing master glove worn by the operator and a replica four finger anthropomorphic slave hand. The newly developed master glove is integrated with our previously developed non-anthropomorphic six degree of freedom (DOF) universal force-reflecting hand controller (FRHC). The mechanical hand and forearm are mounted to an industrial robot (PUMA 560), replacing its standard forearm. The notion of 'terminus control mode' refers to the fact that only the terminus devices (glove and robot hand) are of anthropomorphic nature, and the master and slave arms are non-anthropomorphic. The system is currently being evaluated, focusing on tool handling and astronaut equivalent task executions. The evaluation revealed the system's potential for tool handling but it also became evident that hand tool manipulations and space operations require a dual arm robot. This paper describes the system's principal components, its control and computing architecture, discusses findings of the tool handling evaluation, and explains why common tool handling and EVA space tasks require dual arm robots.

  12. Automated carboxy-terminal sequence analysis of peptides and proteins using diphenyl phosphoroisothiocyanatidate.

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, J. M.; Nikfarjam, F.; Shenoy, N. R.; Shively, J. E.

    1992-01-01

    Proteins and peptides can be sequenced from the carboxy-terminus with isothiocyanate reagents to produce amino acid thiohydantoin derivatives. Previous studies in our laboratory have focused on the automation of the thiocyanate chemistry using acetic anhydride and trimethylsilylisothiocyanate (TMS-ITC) to derivatize the C-terminal amino acid to a thiohydantoin and sodium trimethylsilanolate for specific hydrolysis of the derivatized C-terminal amino acid (Bailey, J.M., Shenoy, N.R., Ronk, M., & Shively, J.E., 1992, Protein Sci. 1, 68-80). A major limitation of this approach was the need to activate the C-terminus with acetic anhydride. We now describe the use of a new reagent, diphenyl phosphoroisothiocyanatidate (DPP-ITC) and pyridine, which combines the activation and derivatization steps to produce peptidylthiohydantoins. Previous work by Kenner et al. (Kenner, G.W., Khorana, H.G., & Stedman, R.J., 1953, Chem. Soc. J., 673-678) with this reagent demonstrated slow kinetics. Several days were required for complete reaction. We show here that the inclusion of pyridine was found to promote the formation of C-terminal thiohydantoins by DPP-ITC resulting in complete conversion of the C-terminal amino acid to a thiohydantoin in less than 1 h. Reagents such as imidazole, triazine, and tetrazole were also found to promote the reaction with DPP-ITC as effectively as pyridine. General base catalysts, such as triethylamine, do not promote the reaction, but are required to convert the C-terminal carboxylic acid to a salt prior to the reaction with DPP-ITC and pyridine. By introducing the DPP-ITC reagent and pyridine in separate steps in an automated sequencer, we observed improved sequencing yields for amino acids normally found difficult to derivatize with acetic anhydride/TMS-ITC. This was particularly true for aspartic acid, which now can be sequenced in yields comparable to most of the other amino acids. Automated programs are described for the C-terminal sequencing of

  13. The impact of carboxy nitroxide antioxidants on irradiated ataxia telangiectasia cells.

    PubMed

    Hosokawa, Kazuyuki; Chen, Philip; Lavin, F Martin; Bottle, E Steven

    2004-10-01

    Three water-soluble carboxy nitroxide antioxidants, 5-carboxy-1,1,3,3-tetramethylisoindolin-2-yloxyl, 4-carboxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidin-1-yloxyl, and 3-carboxy-2,2,5,5-tetramethylpyrrolidin-1-yloxyl, show significant impact on the postirradiation survival rates of ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) cells compared to normal cells, an assay which represents a model for understanding the impact of ROS damage on the A-T phenotype. The effects of these antioxidants are much more significant than those of vitamin E or Trolox (a water-soluble vitamin E analog), studied using the same cell survival model.

  14. The Respiratory Syncytial Virus Phosphoprotein, Matrix Protein, and Fusion Protein Carboxy-Terminal Domain Drive Efficient Filamentous Virus-Like Particle Formation.

    PubMed

    Meshram, Chetan D; Baviskar, Pradyumna S; Ognibene, Cherie M; Oomens, Antonius G P

    2016-12-01

    Virus-like particles (VLPs) are attractive as a vaccine concept. For human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV), VLP assembly is poorly understood and appears inefficient. Hence, hRSV antigens are often incorporated into foreign VLP systems to generate anti-RSV vaccine candidates. To better understand the assembly, and ultimately to enable efficient production, of authentic hRSV VLPs, we examined the associated requirements and mechanisms. In a previous analysis in HEp-2 cells, the nucleoprotein (N), phosphoprotein (P), matrix protein (M), and fusion protein (F) were required for formation of filamentous VLPs, which, similar to those of wild-type virus, were associated with the cell surface. Using fluorescence and electron microscopy combined with immunogold labeling, we examined the surfaces of transfected HEp-2 cells and further dissected the process of filamentous VLP formation. Our results show that N is not required. Coexpression of P plus M plus F, but not P plus M, M plus F, or P plus F, induced both viral protein coalescence and formation of filamentous VLPs that resembled wild-type virions. Despite suboptimal coalescence in the absence of P, the M and F proteins, when coexpressed, formed cell surface-associated filaments with abnormal morphology, appearing longer and thinner than wild-type virions. For F, only the carboxy terminus (Fstem) was required, and addition of foreign protein sequences to Fstem allowed incorporation into VLPs. Together, the data show that P, M, and the F carboxy terminus are sufficient for robust viral protein coalescence and filamentous VLP formation and suggest that M-F interaction drives viral filament formation, with P acting as a type of cofactor facilitating the process and exerting control over particle morphology.

  15. SPT5, an essential gene important for normal transcription in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, encodes an acidic nuclear protein with a carboxy-terminal repeat.

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, M S; Malone, E A; Winston, F

    1991-01-01

    Mutations in the SPT5 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae were isolated previously as suppressors of delta insertion mutations at HIS4 and LYS2. In this study we have shown that spt5 mutations suppress the his4-912 delta and lys2-128 delta alleles by altering transcription. We cloned the SPT5 gene and found that either an increase or a decrease in the copy number of the wild-type SPT5 gene caused an Spt- phenotype. Construction and analysis of an spt5 null mutation demonstrated that SPT5 is essential for growth, suggesting that SPT5 may be required for normal transcription of a large number of genes. The SPT5 DNA sequence was determined; it predicted a 116-kDa protein with an extremely acidic amino terminus and a novel six-amino-acid repeat at the carboxy terminus (consensus = S-T/A-W-G-G-A/Q). By indirect immunofluorescence microscopy we showed that a bifunctional SPT5-beta-galactosidase protein was located in the yeast nucleus. This molecular analysis of the SPT5 gene revealed a number of interesting similarities to the previously characterized SPT6 gene of S. cerevisiae. These results suggest that SPT5 and SPT6 act in a related fashion to influence essential transcriptional processes in S. cerevisiae. Images PMID:1840633

  16. Biochemical characterization of peptides from herpes simplex virus glycoprotein gC: loss of CNBr fragments from the carboxy terminus of truncated, secreted gC molecules.

    PubMed Central

    Kikuchi, G E; Coligan, J E; Holland, T C; Levine, M; Glorioso, J C; Nairn, R

    1984-01-01

    A biochemical characterization of peptides from herpes simplex virus type 1 glycoprotein gC was carried out. We utilized simple micromethods, based on immunological isolation of biosynthetically radiolabeled gC, to obtain gC in pure form for biochemical study. CNBr fragments of gC were prepared, isolated, and characterized. These CNBr fragments were resolved into six peaks by chromatography on Sephacryl S-200 in 6 M guanidine hydrochloride. Only three of the CNBr fragments contained carbohydrate side chains, as judged from the incorporation of [14C]glucosamine. Radiochemical microsequence analyses were carried out on the gC molecule and on each of the CNBr fragments of gC. A comparison of this amino acid sequence data with the amino acid sequence predicted from the DNA sequence of the gC gene showed that the first 25 residues of the predicted sequence are not present in the gC molecule isolated from infected cells and allowed alignment of the CNBr fragments in the gC molecule. Glycoprotein gC was also examined from three gC mutants, synLD70, gC-8, and gC-49. These mutants lack an immunoreactive envelope form of gC but produce a secreted, truncated gC gene product. Glycoprotein gC from cells infected with any of these gC- mutants was shown to have lost more than one CNBr fragment present in the wild-type gC molecule. The missing fragments included the one containing the putative transmembrane anchor sequence. Glycoprotein gC from the gC-8 mutant was also shown, by tryptic peptide map analysis, to have lost more than five major arginine-labeled tryptic peptides arginine-labeled tryptic peptides present in the wild-type gC molecule and to have gained a lysine-labeled tryptic peptide not present in wild-type gC. Images PMID:6092712

  17. Protein–Protein Interactions Modulate the Docking-Dependent E3-Ubiquitin Ligase Activity of Carboxy-Terminus of Hsc70-Interacting Protein (CHIP)*

    PubMed Central

    Narayan, Vikram; Landré, Vivien; Ning, Jia; Hernychova, Lenka; Muller, Petr; Verma, Chandra; Walkinshaw, Malcolm D.; Blackburn, Elizabeth A.; Ball, Kathryn L.

    2015-01-01

    CHIP is a tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domain protein that functions as an E3-ubiquitin ligase. As well as linking the molecular chaperones to the ubiquitin proteasome system, CHIP also has a docking-dependent mode where it ubiquitinates native substrates, thereby regulating their steady state levels and/or function. Here we explore the effect of Hsp70 on the docking-dependent E3-ligase activity of CHIP. The TPR-domain is revealed as a binding site for allosteric modulators involved in determining CHIP's dynamic conformation and activity. Biochemical, biophysical and modeling evidence demonstrate that Hsp70-binding to the TPR, or Hsp70-mimetic mutations, regulate CHIP-mediated ubiquitination of p53 and IRF-1 through effects on U-box activity and substrate binding. HDX-MS was used to establish that conformational-inhibition-signals extended from the TPR-domain to the U-box. This underscores inter-domain allosteric regulation of CHIP by the core molecular chaperones. Defining the chaperone-associated TPR-domain of CHIP as a manager of inter-domain communication highlights the potential for scaffolding modules to regulate, as well as assemble, complexes that are fundamental to protein homeostatic control. PMID:26330542

  18. The penultimate arginine of the carboxy terminus determines slow desensitisation in a P2X receptor from the cattle tick Boophilus microplus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    P2X ion channels have been functionally characterised from a range of eukaryotes. Whilst these receptors can be broadly classified into fast and slow desensitising, the molecular mechanisms underlying current desensitisation are not fully understood. Here we describe the characterisation of a P2X ch...

  19. Rapid elimination of Carboxy-THC in a cohort of chronic cannabis users.

    PubMed

    Lewis, John; Molnar, Anna; Allsop, David; Copeland, Jan; Fu, Shanlin

    2016-01-01

    Urinary 11-nor-Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid (Carboxy-THC) concentrations, normalised to creatinine output, have been demonstrated to be a useful tool in the interpretation of the results of a series of urine tests for cannabis. These tests, often termed historical data, can be used to identify potential chronic cannabis users who may present occupational health and safety risks within the workplace. Conversely, the data can also be used to support employee claims of previous regular, rather than recent, cannabis use. This study aimed at examining the mean elimination of Carboxy-THC in 37 chronic users undergoing voluntary abstinence over a 2-week period. Urine specimens were collected prior to the study and after 1 and 2 weeks of abstinence. Carboxy-THC levels in urine were measured by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) following alkaline hydrolysis, organic solvent extraction and derivatisation to form its pentafluoropropionic derivative. The creatinine-normalised Carboxy-THC concentrations declined rapidly over the 2 weeks of abstinence period and the majority of chronic cannabis users (73%) reduced their urinary Carboxy-THC levels to below the 15-μg/L confirmatory cutoff within that time. The study further highlights the value of historical urinary Carboxy-THC data as a means of identifying potential occupational health and safety risks among chronic cannabis users.

  20. 2. View of hydraulic gates at terminus of pipes to ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. View of hydraulic gates at terminus of pipes to feeder canal. The Siphon-Breaker Building is to the right, looking south. - Columbia Basin Project, Grand Coulee Siphon Breaker Building, Grand Coulee, Grant County, WA

  1. 32. VIEW OF TERMINUS OF GRAND CANAL, SHOWING TURNOUT GATES, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. VIEW OF TERMINUS OF GRAND CANAL, SHOWING TURNOUT GATES, LOOKING SOUTHWEST. WASTE WATER IS TURNED INTO THE BED OF NEW RIVER. Photographer: Mark Durben, April 1989 - Grand Canal, North side of Salt River, Tempe, Maricopa County, AZ

  2. Changes in Carboxy Methylation and Tyrosine Phosphorylation of Protein Phosphatase PP2A Are Associated with Epididymal Sperm Maturation and Motility

    PubMed Central

    Dudiki, Tejasvi; Kadunganattil, Suraj; Ferrara, John K.; Kline, Douglas W.; Vijayaraghavan, Srinivasan

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian sperm contain the serine/threonine phosphatases PP1γ2 and PP2A. The role of sperm PP1γ2 is relatively well studied. Here we confirm the presence of PP2A in sperm and show that it undergoes marked changes in methylation (leucine 309), tyrosine phosphorylation (tyrosine 307) and catalytic activity during epididymal sperm maturation. Spermatozoa isolated from proximal caput, distal caput and caudal regions of the epididymis contain equal immuno-reactive amounts of PP2A. Using demethyl sensitive antibodies we show that PP2A is methylated at its carboxy terminus in sperm from the distal caput and caudal regions but not in sperm from the proximal caput region of the epididymis. The methylation status of PP2A was confirmed by isolation of PP2A with microcystin agarose followed by alkali treatment, which causes hydrolysis of protein carboxy methyl esters. Tyrosine phosphorylation of sperm PP2A varied inversely with methylation. That is, PP2A was tyrosine phosphorylated when it was demethylated but not when methylated. PP2A demethylation and its reciprocal tyrosine phosphorylation were also affected by treatment of sperm with L-homocysteine and adenosine, which are known to elevate intracellular S-adenosylhomocysteine, a feedback inhibitor of methyltransferases. Catalytic activity of PP2A declined during epididymal sperm maturation. Inhibition of PP2A by okadaic acid or by incubation of caudal epididymal spermatozoa with L-homocysteine and adenosine resulted in increase of sperm motility parameters including percent motility, velocity, and lateral head amplitude. Demethylation or pharmacological inhibition of PP2A also leads to an increase in phosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3). Our results show for the first time that changes in PP2A activity due to methylation and tyrosine phosphorylation occur in sperm and that these changes may play an important role in the regulation of sperm function. PMID:26569399

  3. 207. Oconaluffee River Bridge is the southern terminus of the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    207. Oconaluffee River Bridge is the southern terminus of the Blue Ride Parkway. It is a concrete girder bridge completed in 1957. It is the only concrete girder bridge with stone-faced piers. Looking east-southeast. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

  4. 23. TERMINUS, NORTH BRANCH PRAIRIE CITY DITCH. DITCH COMES FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. TERMINUS, NORTH BRANCH PRAIRIE CITY DITCH. DITCH COMES FROM ISOLATED GROUP OF TREES IN MIDDLE DISTANCE, AND ENDS AT CENTER RIGHT. WATER THEN PROCEEDED DOWN SWALE, INTO TREES AT LEFT. VIEW TO NORTH. - Natomas Ditch System, Rhodes Ditch, West of Bidwell Street, north of U.S. Highway 50, Folsom, Sacramento County, CA

  5. Role of the synaptobrevin C terminus in fusion pore formation

    PubMed Central

    Ngatchou, Annita N.; Kisler, Kassandra; Fang, Qinghua; Walter, Alexander M.; Zhao, Ying; Bruns, Dieter; Sørensen, Jakob B.; Lindau, Manfred

    2010-01-01

    Neurotransmitter release is mediated by the SNARE proteins synaptobrevin II (sybII, also known as VAMP2), syntaxin, and SNAP-25, generating a force transfer to the membranes and inducing fusion pore formation. However, the molecular mechanism by which this force leads to opening of a fusion pore remains elusive. Here we show that the ability of sybII to support exocytosis is inhibited by addition of one or two residues to the sybII C terminus depending on their energy of transfer from water to the membrane interface, following a Boltzmann distribution. These results suggest that following stimulation, the SNARE complex pulls the C terminus of sybII deeper into the vesicle membrane. We propose that this movement disrupts the vesicular membrane continuity leading to fusion pore formation. In contrast to current models, the experiments suggest that fusion pore formation begins with molecular rearrangements at the intravesicular membrane leaflet and not between the apposed cytoplasmic leaflets. PMID:20937897

  6. Alterations in the carboxy-terminal half of cloacin destabilize the protein and prevent its export by Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    van Putten, A J; Stegehuis, F; van Bergen en Henegouwen, P M; De Graaf, F K; Oudega, B

    1988-09-01

    Several overlapping carboxy-terminal and internal deletions were constructed in the cloacin structural gene. The expression, the binding of the cloacin DF13 immunity protein and the release into the culture medium of the mutant cloacin polypeptides were studied by immunoblotting and ELISAs. Minor alterations at the carboxy-terminal end of the cloacin did not affect protein expression, stability or release to a large extent, but larger carboxy-terminal deletions strongly destabilized the protein and no release was observed. The removal of a particular region within the carboxy-terminal portion of cloacin strongly destabilized the polypeptide and made it a target for proteolytic degradation. Binding of immunity protein did not affect stability and release of the mutant polypeptides. By using immunoelectron microscopy, the polypeptides that were not exported were located in the cytoplasm of producing cells. Large aggregates of these mutant polypeptides were not observed in the cytoplasm: the polypeptides were present in a soluble form.

  7. Poly[triaquabis-(μ(2)-3-carboxy-pyrazine-2-carboxyl-ato)dilithium(I)].

    PubMed

    Tombul, Mustafa; Güven, Kutalmış; Büyükgüngör, Orhan

    2008-02-20

    In the title compound, [Li(2)(C(6)H(3)N(2)O(4))(2)(H(2)O)(3)](n), the coordination number for both independent Li(+) cations is five. One of the Li(+) ions has a distorted trigonal-bipyramidal geometry, coordinated by one of the carboxyl O atoms of a 3-carboxy-pyrazine-2-carboxyl-ate ligand, two O atoms from two water mol-ecules, and an N and a carboxyl-ate O atom of a second 3-carboxy-pyrazine-2-carboxyl-ate ligand. The other Li(+) ion also has a distorted trigonal-bipyramidal geometry, coordinated by one water mol-ecule and two 3-carboxy-pyrazine-2-carboxyl-ate ligands through an N and a carboxyl-ate O atom from each. One of the carboxyl groups of the two ligands takes part in an intra-molecular O-H⋯O hydrogen bond. The stabilization of the crystal structure is further assisted by O-H⋯O, O-H⋯N and C-H⋯O hydrogen-bonding inter-actions involving the water mol-ecules and carboxyl-ate O atoms.

  8. Marine Geophysical Surveying Along the Hubbard Glacier Terminus, Southeast Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goff, J. A.; Davis, M.; Gulick, S. P.; Lawson, D. E.; Willems, B. A.

    2010-12-01

    Tidewater glaciers are a challenging environment for marine investigations, owing to the dangers associated with calving and restrictions on operations due to dense floating ice. We report here on recent efforts to conduct marine geophysical surveys proximal to the ice face of Hubbard Glacier, in Disenchantment Bay, Alaska. Hubbard is an advancing tidewater glacier that has twice recently (1986 and 2002) impinged on Gilbert Point, which separates Russell Fiord from Disenchantment Bay, thereby temporarily creating a glacially-dammed Russell Lake. Continued advance will likely form a more permanent dam, rerouting brackish outflow waters into the Situk River, near Yakutat, Alaska. Our primary interest is in studying the development and motion of the morainal bank which, for an advancing tidewater glacier, stabilizes it against rapid retreat. For survey work, we operated with a small, fast, aluminum-hulled vessel and a captain experienced in operating in ice-bound conditions, providing a high margin of safety and maneuverability. Differencing of multibeam bathymetric data acquired in different years can identify and quantify areas of deposition and erosion on the morainal bank front and in Disenchantment Bay proper, where accumulation rates are typically > 1 m/yr within 1 km of the glacier terminus. The advance or retreat rate of the morainal bank can be determined by changes in the bed elevation through time; we document advance rates that average > 30 m/yr in Disenchantment Bay, but which vary substantially over different time periods and at different positions along the ice face. Georeferencing of available satellite imagery allows us to directly compare the position of the glacial terminus with the position of the morainal bank. From 1978 to 1999, and then to 2006, the advances in terminus and morainal bank positions were closely synchronized along the length of the glacier face. In the shallower Russell Fiord side of the terminus, a sediment ridge was mapped both

  9. Interpreting Terminus Fluctuations at Helheim Glacier, Southeast Greenland, through Modeling and Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kehrl, L. M.; Joughin, I. R.; Shapero, D.

    2014-12-01

    Marine-terminating outlet glaciers are highly sensitive to changes at the ice-ocean boundary. Changes at the ice-ocean boundary (calving events, submarine melting) can alter the terminus position and thereby the stress balance. If the terminus retreats into deeper water, more of the driving stress must then be balanced by longitudinal stress gradients, which cause the glacier to speed up. This study combines satellite observations and modeling (Elmer/Ice) to investigate the relationship between glacier dynamics and terminus position at Helheim Glacier, southeast Greenland, from 2000-2014. Helheim Glacier retreated about 7 km from 2001-2005 as warm ocean water entered the nearby fjord. From 2005-2006, the glacier re-advanced by 3 km as a floating or near-floating ice tongue formed over the basal overdeepening in front of the glacier terminus. Since then, Helheim's terminus position has remained relatively stable, with terminus fluctuations of < 2 km. Our model experiments consider both large terminus fluctuations (> 2 km) associated with rapid retreat and small terminus fluctuations (< 500 m) associated with individual calving events. We run the model simulations with both a flowline and three-dimensional model to better constrain our uncertainties. Our results show that Helheim Glacier responds rapidly to changes in terminus position of more than a few hundred meters. Small terminus fluctuations can cause velocity variations that extend up to 30 km inland, which roughly corresponds with the spatial extent of the weak bed (20-40 kPa) underneath Helheim Glacier.

  10. Metabolism of radioiodinated carboxy-terminal fragments of bovine parathyroid hormone in normal and anephric rats

    SciTech Connect

    D'Amour, P.; Lazure, C.

    1985-07-01

    (/sup 125/I)Carboxy-terminal fragments were produced by incubating (/sup 125/I)bovine PTH(1-84) with plasma membranes from the rat renal cortex. After purification by gel chromatography and characterization by sequence analysis, these fragments, mainly (/sup 125/I)bovine PTH(41-84), were injected into normal and acutely nephrectomized rats during two different experiments. In each case, blood was obtained from five rats at various time points (2, 4, 6, 8, 12, 24, 48, and 96 min); tissue was taken after they had been killed (4, 8, 24, and 96 min). Plasma and weighted aliquots of tissues were counted. Plasma at each time point and the extract of various tissues at the 8-min mark were further analyzed by gel chromatography. Each radioactivity peak on each profile was identified and quantitated planimetrically. (/sup 125/I)Carboxy-terminal fragments were extracted from serum biexponentially: the first exponential had a half-life of 2.3 min and the second 27.2 min in normal rats. These values increased to 3.2 min (X 1.4) and 74.0 min (X 2.7) in nephrectomized rats. In normal rats, /sup 125/I-extraction was 33.4% (kidney), 15.9% (muscle), 6.9% (bone), less than 2.7% (liver), and under 1% in other tissues. In nephrectomized rats, these values were significantly (P less than 0.005) increased to 24.6% (muscle), 10% (bone), and 6.8% (liver) with less than 1% in other tissues. Most of the /sup 125/I-radioactivity present in these tissues at the 8-min time point migrated in the same manner as injected fragments or smaller degradation products generated in situ. Tissues which play a secondary role in circulating carboxy-terminal fragment extraction in normal rats can therefore increase this activity in anephric animals.

  11. Sumoylation of SAE2 C terminus regulates SAE nuclear localization.

    PubMed

    Truong, Khue; Lee, Terry D; Li, Baozong; Chen, Yuan

    2012-12-14

    SUMOylation occurs predominantly in the nucleus, but non-nuclear proteins can also be SUMOylated. It is unclear how intracellular trafficking of the SUMOylation enzymes is regulated to catalyze SUMOylation in different cellular compartments. Here we report that the SAE2 subunit of human SUMO activation enzyme (SAE) underwent rapid nucleocytoplasmic shuttling and its nuclear accumulation depended on SUMO modification at the C terminus. The SUMOylation sites included three Lys residues on the bipartite nuclear localization sequence (NLS) and two Lys residues outside of but adjacent to the NLS, and their SUMOylation was catalyzed by Ubc9. Because SAE2 forms a tight heterodimer with SAE1 and it controls the trafficking of the heterodimer, this study has identified the mechanism used to localize SAE to the nucleus. Similar mechanisms are likely to exist for other proteins that depend on SUMOylation for nuclear localization.

  12. The code and beyond: transcription regulation by the RNA polymerase II carboxy-terminal domain.

    PubMed

    Harlen, Kevin M; Churchman, L Stirling

    2017-04-01

    The carboxy-terminal domain (CTD) extends from the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) as a long, repetitive and largely unstructured polypeptide chain. Throughout the transcription process, the CTD is dynamically modified by post-translational modifications, many of which facilitate or hinder the recruitment of key regulatory factors of Pol II that collectively constitute the 'CTD code'. Recent studies have revealed how the physicochemical properties of the CTD promote phase separation in the presence of other low-complexity domains. Here, we discuss the intricacies of the CTD code and how the newly characterized physicochemical properties of the CTD expand the function of the CTD beyond the code.

  13. Carboxy-THC in Washed Hair: Still the Reliable Indicator of Marijuana Ingestion.

    PubMed

    Hill, Virginia A; Schaffer, Michael I; Stowe, G Neil

    2016-06-01

    The presence of the metabolite 11-nor-9-carboxy-delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (C-THC) in hair is generally accepted as the definitive proof of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) ingestion. During hair analysis, the removal of any potential C-THC external contamination that could result from marijuana smoke or close personal contact via a wash procedure is critical. Here, we performed a series of experiments to demonstrate that C-THC is the reliable indicator of marijuana ingestion when paired with the correct washing procedure to remove potential external contamination.

  14. Novel archaeal adhesion pilins with a conserved N terminus.

    PubMed

    Esquivel, Rianne N; Xu, Rachel; Pohlschroder, Mechthild

    2013-09-01

    Type IV pili play important roles in a wide array of processes, including surface adhesion and twitching motility. Although archaeal genomes encode a diverse set of type IV pilus subunits, the functions for most remain unknown. We have now characterized six Haloferax volcanii pilins, PilA[1-6], each containing an identical 30-amino-acid N-terminal hydrophobic motif that is part of a larger highly conserved domain of unknown function (Duf1628). Deletion mutants lacking up to five of the six pilin genes display no significant adhesion defects; however, H. volcanii lacking all six pilins (ΔpilA[1-6]) does not adhere to glass or plastic. Consistent with these results, the expression of any one of these pilins in trans is sufficient to produce functional pili in the ΔpilA[1-6] strain. PilA1His and PilA2His only partially rescue this phenotype, whereas ΔpilA[1-6] strains expressing PilA3His or PilA4His adhere even more strongly than the parental strain. Most surprisingly, expressing either PilA5His or PilA6His in the ΔpilA[1-6] strain results in microcolony formation. A hybrid protein in which the conserved N terminus of the mature PilA1His is replaced with the corresponding N domain of FlgA1 is processed by the prepilin peptidase, but it does not assemble functional pili, leading us to conclude that Duf1628 can be annotated as the N terminus of archaeal PilA adhesion pilins. Finally, the pilin prediction program, FlaFind, which was trained primarily on archaeal flagellin sequences, was successfully refined to more accurately predict pilins based on the in vivo verification of PilA[1-6].

  15. Katanin Severing and Binding Microtubules Are Inhibited by Tubulin Carboxy Tails

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Megan E.; Sackett, Dan L.; Ross, Jennifer L.

    2015-01-01

    Microtubule dynamics in cells are regulated by associated proteins that can be either stabilizers or destabilizers. A class of destabilizers that is important in a large number of cellular activities is the microtubule-severing enzymes, yet little is known about how they function. Katanin p60 was the first ATPase associated with microtubule severing. Here, we investigate the activity of katanin severing using a GFP-labeled human version. We quantify the effect of katanin concentration on katanin binding and severing activity. We find that free tubulin can inhibit severing activity by interfering with katanin binding to microtubules. The inhibition is mediated by the sequence of the tubulin and specifically depends on the carboxy-terminal tails. We directly investigate the inhibition effect of tubulin carboxy-terminal tails using peptide sequences of α-, β-, or detyrosinated α-tubulin tails that have been covalently linked to bovine serum albumin. Our results show that β-tubulin tails are the most effective at inhibiting severing, and that detyrosinated α-tubulin tails are the least effective. These results are distinct from those for other severing enzymes and suggest a scheme for regulation of katanin activity in cells dependent on free tubulin concentration and the modification state of the tubulin. PMID:26682813

  16. pH response of carboxy-terminated colorimetric polydiacetylene vesicles.

    PubMed

    Kew, Simon J; Hall, Elizabeth A H

    2006-04-01

    Carboxy-terminated polydiacetylene vesicles are known to undergo dramatic color transitions in response to exposure to external stimuli such as pH, temperature, and receptor-ligand binding. FTIR spectroscopy was used to identify the breakdown in the interfacial hydrogen-bonding interactions of the carboxylic acid headgroups of polymerized 10,12-tricosadiynoic acid (TRCDA) vesicles in aqueous solution during pH chromic transition. The headgroup structure was monitored as the chromic transition takes place and the dissociation dependence of the pKa was determined. Due to the attenuated acidity of the interfacially confined carboxy groups, which exhibit pKa values in the range 9.5-9.9, it was found that the deprotonation-triggered blue-red chromic transition occurred in the pH range 9.0-10.1 and that the mechanism of the transition required interaction with the surface carboxyl group, which is of importance in the design of a biochromic mechanism using PDA assemblies. Transmission electron microscopy and FTIR spectroscopy revealed that the surface ionization and the pH-induced chromogenic transition was also accompanied by a dramatic vesicle-planar morphological transition alongside subtle changes to the alkyl chain conformation and packing. A two-step mechanism was implicated as causing the chromic transition that first involves surface deprotonation and then specific cation binding, which can aid the design of sensitive surface-ligand chemistry for new PDA structures.

  17. 7-Carboxy-7-deazaguanine Synthase: A Radical S-Adenosyl-l-methionine Enzyme with Polar Tendencies

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Radical S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM) enzymes are widely distributed and catalyze diverse reactions. SAM binds to the unique iron atom of a site-differentiated [4Fe-4S] cluster and is reductively cleaved to generate a 5′-deoxyadenosyl radical, which initiates turnover. 7-Carboxy-7-deazaguanine (CDG) synthase (QueE) catalyzes a key step in the biosynthesis of 7-deazapurine containing natural products. 6-Carboxypterin (6-CP), an oxidized analogue of the natural substrate 6-carboxy-5,6,7,8-tetrahydropterin (CPH4), is shown to be an alternate substrate for CDG synthase. Under reducing conditions that would promote the reductive cleavage of SAM, 6-CP is turned over to 6-deoxyadenosylpterin (6-dAP), presumably by radical addition of the 5′-deoxyadenosine followed by oxidative decarboxylation to the product. By contrast, in the absence of the strong reductant, dithionite, the carboxylate of 6-CP is esterified to generate 6-carboxypterin-5′-deoxyadenosyl ester (6-CP-dAdo ester). Structural studies with 6-CP and SAM also reveal electron density consistent with the ester product being formed in crystallo. The differential reactivity of 6-CP under reducing and nonreducing conditions highlights the ability of radical SAM enzymes to carry out both polar and radical transformations in the same active site. PMID:28045519

  18. 5-Carboxy-8-hydroxyquinoline is a Broad Spectrum 2-Oxoglutarate Oxygenase Inhibitor which Causes Iron Translocation

    PubMed Central

    Aik, WeiShen; Che, Ka Hing; Li, Xuan Shirley; Kristensen, Jan B. L.; King, Oliver N. F.; Chan, Mun Chiang; Yeoh, Kar Kheng; Choi, Hwanho; Walport, Louise J.; Thinnes, Cyrille C.; Bush, Jacob T.; Lejeune, Clarisse; Rydzik, Anna M.; Rose, Nathan R.; Bagg, Eleanor A.; McDonough, Michael A.; Krojer, Tobias; Yue, Wyatt W.; Ng, Stanley S.; Olsen, Lars; Brennan, Paul E.; Oppermann, Udo; Muller-Knapp, Susanne; Klose, Robert J.; Ratcliffe, Peter J.; Schofield, Christopher J.; Kawamura, Akane

    2015-01-01

    2-Oxoglutarate and iron dependent oxygenases are therapeutic targets for human diseases. Using a representative 2OG oxygenase panel, we compare the inhibitory activities of 5-carboxy-8-hydroxyquinoline (IOX1) and 4-carboxy-8-hydroxyquinoline (4C8HQ) with that of two other commonly used 2OG oxygenase inhibitors, N-oxalylglycine (NOG) and 2,4-pyridinedicarboxylic acid (2,4-PDCA). The results reveal that IOX1 has a broad spectrum of activity, as demonstrated by the inhibition of transcription factor hydroxylases, representatives of all 2OG dependent histone demethylase subfamilies, nucleic acid demethylases and γ-butyrobetaine hydroxylase. Cellular assays show that, unlike NOG and 2,4-PDCA, IOX1 is active against both cytosolic and nuclear 2OG oxygenases without ester derivatisation. Unexpectedly, crystallographic studies on these oxygenases demonstrate that IOX1, but not 4C8HQ, can cause translocation of the active site metal, revealing a rare example of protein ligand-induced metal movement PMID:26682036

  19. Confirmation of a blocked amino terminus of sulfhydryl oxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Janolino, V.G.; Morrison-Rowe, S.J.; Swaisgood, H.E. )

    1990-09-01

    The isolation of sulfhydryl oxidase from bovine milk in a suitably pure form for sequencing was carried out by transient covalent affinity chromatography of diafiltered whey using cysteinylsuccinamidopropyl-glass as matrix. The glutathione-eluted proteins were separated by SDS-PAGE. By radiolabeling the affinity chromatography-purified enzyme with ({sup 14}C)iodoacetate before subjecting to SDS-PAGE, the sulfhydryl oxidase band was identified, because sulfhydryl oxidase is known to be inactivated by alkylation of one sulfhydryl group per mole. The results confirmed that sulfhydryl oxidase corresponds to the 85 ({plus minus} 5)-kDa band observed on SDS-PAGE. The protein band corresponding to radiolabeled sulfhydryl oxidase was recovered from SDS-PAGE gels by electrophoretic elution and by electroblotting on polyvinylidene difluoride membrane and subjected to gas phase sequencing. Precautions were taken during electrophoretic elution to prevent reactions that result in N-terminal blocking. Both methods of protein recovery yielded negative results when subjected to sequence analysis indicating that the N-terminus of sulfhydryl oxidase is blocked.

  20. Crystal structure of 2-carboxy- N,N,N- trimethylethanaminium bromide monohydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiao-Ming; Mak, Thomas C. W.

    1991-05-01

    A new betaine derivative, 2-carboxy- N,N,N-trimethylethanaminium bromide monohydrate, (Me 3NCH 2CH 2COOH)Br·H 2O, I, has been synthesized and characterized by X-ray crystallography. Compound I crystallizes in space group Pnma (no. 62), with a=10.452(2), b=6.855(2), c=13.737(2)Å, and Z=4. The structure ( RF=0.047 for 881 observed (⋎ FO⋎&>;6⋎ FO⋎) Mo Kα data) features a hydrogen-bonded (BR -·H 2O) ∞zigzag chain running parallel to the a axis. The quaternary ammonium ions, each attaining Cs molecular symmetry, are laterally attached by donor hydrogen bonds to the exposed water molecules of the zigzag chain. The crystal structure consists of layers each having a zipper-like arrangement of the quaternary ammonium "side-chains".

  1. Excess α-synuclein worsens disease in mice lacking ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase L1.

    PubMed

    Shimshek, Derya R; Schweizer, Tatjana; Schmid, Peter; van der Putten, P Herman

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in α-synuclein (αSN) and ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase L1 (UCH-L1) have been linked to familial Parkinson's disease (PD). Physical and functional interactions between these two proteins have been described. Whether they act additively in vivo to influence disease has remained controversial. αSN is a presynaptic protein and the major constituent of Lewy inclusions, histopathological hallmarks of PD. UCH-L1 regulates ubiquitin stability in the nervous system and its loss results in neurodegeneration in peripheral and central neurons. Here, we used genetics to show that UCH-L1-deficiency together with excess αSN worsen disease. Double mutant mice show earlier-onset motor deficits, a shorter lifespan and forebrain astrogliosis but the additive disease-worsening effects of UCH-L1-deficiency and excess αSN are not accompanied by microgliosis, ubiquitin pathology or changes in pathological αSN protein levels and species.

  2. Investigation of a recently detected 11-nor-9-carboxy-Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol isomer: Studies on the degradation of 11-nor-9-carboxy-Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol glucuronide.

    PubMed

    Hanisch, Stephanie; Paulke, Alexander; Toennes, Stefan W

    2016-09-10

    An isomer of the tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) metabolite 11-nor-9-carboxy-Δ(9)-THC (THCCOOH) had been detected in blood of cannabis users. The present study was initiated to elucidate whether the labile metabolite THCCOOH-glucuronide could be the precursor. THCCOOH-glucuronide was incubated in human serum and albumin (HSA) solution at various temperatures (-18, 4.5, 22 and 37°C) and pH values (pH 7.4 and 8.3) for seven days in the presence or absence of the esterase inhibitor sodium fluoride. Analysis of incubation samples was performed using LC-MS/MS. Marked degradation of THCCOOH-glucuronide was observed at 37°C. It was found that not only THCCOOH, but also the isomer is a degradation product of THCCOOH-glucuronide and its in-vivo production is assumed. Degradation to THCCOOH and the isomer occurred at alkaline pH, in the presence of fluoride-sensitive esterases and of HSA alone. To inhibit isomer formation during sample storage, refrigeration and controlling of the pH are recommended. However, THCCOOH and the isomer exhibit similar properties during incubations in serum, but differ in their interaction with HSA. The present study confirmed the nature of the isomer as degradation product of the abundant THC metabolite THCCOOH-glucuronide. Serum albumin and esterases are obviously involved. The isomer is formed not only during storage, but also under physiological conditions, suggesting that it can be considered an in-vivo metabolite. However, the chemical structure of the isomer remains unknown and further research is necessary.

  3. Conserved Gene Regulatory Function of the Carboxy-Terminal Domain of Dictyostelid C-Module-Binding Factor

    PubMed Central

    Schmith, Anika; Groth, Marco; Ratka, Josephine; Gatz, Sara; Spaller, Thomas; Siol, Oliver; Glöckner, Gernot

    2013-01-01

    C-module-binding factor A (CbfA) is a jumonji-type transcription regulator that is important for maintaining the expression and mobility of the retrotransposable element TRE5-A in the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum. CbfA-deficient cells have lost TRE5-A retrotransposition, are impaired in the ability to feed on bacteria, and do not enter multicellular development because of a block in cell aggregation. In this study, we performed Illumina RNA-seq of growing CbfA mutant cells to obtain a list of CbfA-regulated genes. We demonstrate that the carboxy-terminal domain of CbfA alone is sufficient to mediate most CbfA-dependent gene expression. The carboxy-terminal domain of CbfA from the distantly related social amoeba Polysphondylium pallidum restored the expression of CbfA-dependent genes in the D. discoideum CbfA mutant, indicating a deep conservation in the gene regulatory function of this domain in the dictyostelid clade. The CbfA-like protein CbfB displays ∼25% sequence identity with CbfA in the amino-terminal region, which contains a JmjC domain and two zinc finger regions and is thought to mediate chromatin-remodeling activity. In contrast to CbfA proteins, where the carboxy-terminal domains are strictly conserved in all dictyostelids, CbfB proteins have completely unrelated carboxy-terminal domains. Outside the dictyostelid clade, CbfA-like proteins with the CbfA-archetypical JmjC/zinc finger arrangement and individual carboxy-terminal domains are prominent in filamentous fungi but are not found in yeasts, plants, and metazoans. Our data suggest that two functional regions of the CbfA-like proteins evolved at different rates to allow the occurrence of species-specific adaptation processes during genome evolution. PMID:23355006

  4. The ClpP N-Terminus Coordinates Substrate Access with Protease Active Site Reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Jennings, L.; Bohon, J; Chance, M; Licht, S

    2008-01-01

    Energy-dependent protein degradation machines, such as the Escherichia coli protease ClpAP, require regulated interactions between the ATPase component (ClpA) and the protease component (ClpP) for function. Recent studies indicate that the ClpP N-terminus is essential in these interactions, yet the dynamics of this region remain unclear. Here, we use synchrotron hydroxyl radical footprinting and kinetic studies to characterize functionally important conformational changes of the ClpP N-terminus. Footprinting experiments show that the ClpP N-terminus becomes more solvent-exposed upon interaction with ClpA. In the absence of ClpA, deletion of the ClpP N-terminus increases the initial degradation rate of large peptide substrates 5-15-fold. Unlike ClpAP, ClpP?N exhibits a distinct slow phase of product formation that is eliminated by the addition of hydroxylamine, suggesting that truncation of the N-terminus leads to stabilization of the acyl-enzyme intermediate. These results indicate that (1) the ClpP N-terminus acts as a 'gate' controlling substrate access to the active sites, (2) binding of ClpA opens this 'gate', allowing substrate entry and formation of the acyl-enzyme intermediate, and (3) closing of the N-terminal 'gate' stimulates acyl-enzyme hydrolysis.

  5. A biophysical model of how α-tubulin carboxy-terminal tails tune kinesin-1 processivity along microtubule.

    PubMed

    Sataric, Miljko V; Sekulic, Dalibor L; Zdravkovic, Slobodan; Ralevic, Nebojsa M

    2017-03-12

    It appears that so-called post-translational modifications of tubulin heterodimers are mostly focussed at positions of amino acid sequences of carboxy-terminal tails. These changes have very profound effects on microtubule functions especially in connection with cellular traffic in terms of motor proteins. In this study, we elaborated the biophysical model aimed to explain the strategy governing these subtle interplays between structural and functional properties of microtubules. We relied onto Langevin equations including fluctuation-dissipation processes. In that context we found out that small interaction between a charged motor neck domain and oppositely charged carboxy-terminal tail of the α-tubulin plays the decisive role in tuning kinesin-1 motor processivity along microtubules.

  6. Structural and Mechanistic Studies on Klebsiella pneumoniae 2-Oxo-4-hydroxy-4-carboxy-5-ureidoimidazoline Decarboxylase

    SciTech Connect

    French, Jarrod B.; Ealick, Steven E.

    2010-11-12

    The stereospecific oxidative degradation of uric acid to (S)-allantoin was recently shown to proceed via three enzymatic steps. The final conversion is a decarboxylation of the unstable intermediate 2-oxo-4-hydroxy-4-carboxy-5-ureidoimidazoline (OHCU) and is catalyzed by OHCU decarboxylase. Here we present the structures of Klebsiella pneumoniae OHCU decarboxylase in unliganded form and with bound allantoin. These structures provide evidence that ligand binding organizes the active site residues for catalysis. Modeling of the substrate and intermediates provides additional support for this hypothesis. In addition we characterize the steady state kinetics of this enzyme and report the first OHCU decarboxylase inhibitor, allopurinol, a structural isomer of hypoxanthine. This molecule is a competitive inhibitor of K. pneumoniae OHCU decarboxylase with a K{sub i} of 30 {+-} 2 {micro}m. Circular dichroism measurements confirm structural observations that this inhibitor disrupts the necessary organization of the active site. Our structural and biochemical studies also provide further insights into the mechanism of catalysis of OHCU decarboxylation.

  7. The negatively charged carboxy-terminal tail of β-tubulin promotes proper chromosome segregation

    PubMed Central

    Fees, Colby P.; Aiken, Jayne; O’Toole, Eileen T.; Giddings, Thomas H.; Moore, Jeffrey K.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the broadly conserved role of microtubules in chromosome segregation, we have a limited understanding of how molecular features of tubulin proteins contribute to the underlying mechanisms. Here we investigate the negatively charged carboxy-terminal tail domains (CTTs) of α- and β-tubulins, using a series of mutants that alter or ablate CTTs in budding yeast. We find that ablating β-CTT causes elevated rates of chromosome loss and cell cycle delay. Complementary live-cell imaging and electron tomography show that β-CTT is necessary to properly position kinetochores and organize microtubules within the assembling spindle. We identify a minimal region of negatively charged amino acids that is necessary and sufficient for proper chromosome segregation and provide evidence that this function may be conserved across species. Our results provide the first in vivo evidence of a specific role for tubulin CTTs in chromosome segregation. We propose that β-CTT promotes the ordered segregation of chromosomes by stabilizing the spindle and contributing to forces that move chromosomes toward the spindle poles. PMID:27053662

  8. SERCaMP: a carboxy-terminal protein modification that enables monitoring of ER calcium homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Mark J.; Wires, Emily S.; Trychta, Kathleen A.; Richie, Christopher T.; Harvey, Brandon K.

    2014-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) calcium homeostasis is disrupted in diverse pathologies, including neurodegeneration, cardiovascular diseases, and diabetes. Temporally defining calcium dysregulation during disease progression, however, has been challenging. Here we describe secreted ER calcium-monitoring proteins (SERCaMPs), which allow for longitudinal monitoring of ER calcium homeostasis. We identified a carboxy-terminal modification that is sufficient to confer release of a protein specifically in response to ER calcium depletion. A Gaussia luciferase (GLuc)–based SERCaMP provides a simple and sensitive method to monitor ER calcium homeostasis in vitro or in vivo by analyzing culture medium or blood. GLuc-SERCaMPs revealed ER calcium depletion in rat primary neurons exposed to various ER stressors. In vivo, ER calcium disruption in rat liver was monitored over several days by repeated sampling of blood. Our results suggest that SERCaMPs will have broad applications for the long-term monitoring of ER calcium homeostasis and the development of therapeutic approaches to counteract ER calcium dysregulation. PMID:25031430

  9. tRNase Z Catalysis and Conserved Residues on the Carboxy Side of the His Cluster

    PubMed Central

    Karkashon, Shay; Hopkinson, Angela; Levinger, Louis

    2008-01-01

    tRNAs are transcribed as precursors and processed in a series of required reactions leading to aminoacylation and translation. The 3′ end trailer can be removed by the pre-tRNA processing endonuclease tRNase Z, an ancient, conserved member of the β-lactamase superfamily of metal-dependent hydrolases. The signature sequence of this family, the His domain (HxHxDH, Motif II), and histidines in Motifs III and V and aspartate in Motif IV contribute seven side chains for coordination of two divalent metal ions. We previously investigated the effects on catalysis of substitutions in Motif II, and in the PxKxRN loop and Motif I on the amino side of Motif II. Herein we present the effects of substitutions on the carboxy side of Motif II within Motifs III, IV, the HEAT and HST loops and Motif V. Substitution of the Motif IV aspartate reduces catalytic efficiency more than 10,000-fold. Histidines in Motif III, V and the HST loop are also functionally important. Strikingly, replacement of Glu in the HEAT loop with Ala reducesefficiency by ~1000-fold. Proximity and orientation of this Glu side chain relative to His in the HST loop and the importance of both residues for catalysis suggest that they function as a duo in a proton transfer at the final stage of reaction, characteristic of the tRNase Z class of RNA endonucleases. PMID:17655328

  10. A Naturally Occurring HER2 Carboxy-Terminal Fragment Promotes Mammary Tumor Growth and Metastasis▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Kim; Angelini, Pier-Davide; Laos, Sirle; Bach-Faig, Alba; Cunningham, Matthew P.; Ferrer-Ramón, Cristina; Luque-García, Antonio; García-Castillo, Jesús; Parra-Palau, Josep Lluis; Scaltriti, Maurizio; y Cajal, Santiago Ramón; Baselga, José; Arribas, Joaquín

    2009-01-01

    HER2 is a tyrosine kinase receptor causally involved in cancer. A subgroup of breast cancer patients with particularly poor clinical outcomes expresses a heterogeneous collection of HER2 carboxy-terminal fragments (CTFs). However, since the CTFs lack the extracellular domain that drives dimerization and subsequent activation of full-length HER2, they are in principle expected to be inactive. Here we show that at low expression levels one of these fragments, 611-CTF, activated multiple signaling pathways because of its unanticipated ability to constitutively homodimerize. A transcriptomic analysis revealed that 611-CTF specifically controlled the expression of genes that we found to be correlated with poor prognosis in breast cancer. Among the 611-CTF-regulated genes were several that have previously been linked to metastasis, including those for MET, EPHA2, matrix metalloproteinase 1, interleukin 11, angiopoietin-like 4, and different integrins. It is thought that transgenic mice overexpressing HER2 in the mammary glands develop tumors only after acquisition of activating mutations in the transgene. In contrast, we show that expression of 611-CTF led to development of aggressive and invasive mammary tumors without the need for mutations. These results demonstrate that 611-CTF is a potent oncogene capable of promoting mammary tumor progression and metastasis. PMID:19364815

  11. Urinary Elimination of 11-Nor-9-carboxy- 9-tetrahydrocannnabinol in Cannabis Users During Continuously Monitored Abstinence*

    PubMed Central

    Goodwin, Robert S.; Darwin, William D.; Chiang, C. Nora; Shih, Ming; Li, Shou-Hua; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2008-01-01

    The time course of 11-nor-9-carboxy-Δ9-tetrahydrocannnabinol (THCCOOH) elimination in urine was characterized in 60 cannabis users during 24 h monitored abstinence on a closed research unit for up to 30 days. 6158 individual urine specimens were screened by immunoassay with values ≥50 ng/mL classified as positive. Urine specimens were confirmed for THCCOOH by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry following base hydrolysis and liquid-liquid or solid phase extraction. In 60%, the maximum creatinine normalized concentration occurred in the first urine specimen; in 40%, peaks occurred as long as 2.9 days after admission. Data were divided into three groups, 0 – 50, 51 – 150, and >150 ng/mg, based on the creatinine corrected initial THCCOOH concentration. There were statistically significant correlations between groups and number of days until first negative and last positive urine specimens; mean number of days were 0.6 and 4.3, 3.2 and 9.7, and 4.7 and 15.4 days respectively, for the three groups. These data provide guidelines for interpreting urine cannabinoid test results and suggest appropriate detection windows for differentiating new cannabis use from residual drug excretion. PMID:19007504

  12. Poly[triaquabis­(μ2-3-carboxy­pyrazine-2-carboxyl­ato)dilithium(I)

    PubMed Central

    Tombul, Mustafa; Güven, Kutalmış; Büyükgüngör, Orhan

    2008-01-01

    In the title compound, [Li2(C6H3N2O4)2(H2O)3]n, the coordination number for both independent Li+ cations is five. One of the Li+ ions has a distorted trigonal–bipyramidal geometry, coordinated by one of the carboxyl O atoms of a 3-carboxy­pyrazine-2-carboxyl­ate ligand, two O atoms from two water mol­ecules, and an N and a carboxyl­ate O atom of a second 3-carboxy­pyrazine-2-carboxyl­ate ligand. The other Li+ ion also has a distorted trigonal–bipyramidal geometry, coordinated by one water mol­ecule and two 3-carboxy­pyrazine-2-carboxyl­ate ligands through an N and a carboxyl­ate O atom from each. One of the carboxyl groups of the two ligands takes part in an intra­molecular O—H⋯O hydrogen bond. The stabilization of the crystal structure is further assisted by O—H⋯O, O—H⋯N and C—H⋯O hydrogen-bonding inter­actions involving the water mol­ecules and carboxyl­ate O atoms. PMID:21201874

  13. Carboxy-directed asymmetric hydrogenation of α-alkyl-α-aryl terminal olefins: highly enantioselective and chemoselective access to a chiral benzylmethyl center.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shuang; Zhu, Shou-Fei; Guo, Na; Song, Song; Zhou, Qi-Lin

    2014-04-07

    A carboxy-directed asymmetric hydrogenation of α-alkyl-α-aryl terminal olefins was developed by using a chiral spiro iridium catalyst, providing a highly efficient approach to the compounds with a chiral benzylmethyl center. The carboxy-directed hydrogenation prohibited the isomerization of the terminal olefins, and realized the chemoselective hydrogenation of various dienes. The concise enantioselective syntheses of (S)-curcudiol and (S)-curcumene were achieved by using this catalytic asymmetric hydrogenation as a key step.

  14. Oxidation of the antiviral drug acyclovir and its biodegradation product carboxy-acyclovir with ozone: kinetics and identification of oxidation products.

    PubMed

    Prasse, Carsten; Wagner, Manfred; Schulz, Ralf; Ternes, Thomas A

    2012-02-21

    The oxidation of the antiviral drug acyclovir (ACV) and its main biotransformation product carboxy-acyclovir (carboxy-ACV) by ozone was investigated. Both compounds have recently been detected in surface water, and carboxy-ACV has also been detected in drinking water. The experiments revealed a strong pH dependence of the oxidation of ACV and carboxy-ACV with reaction rate constants increasing by 4 orders of magnitude between the protonated, positively charged form (k(ox,PH(+)), ∼2.5 × 10(2) M(-1) s(-1)) and the deprotonated, negatively charged form (k(ox,P(-)), 3.4 × 10(6) M(-1) s(-1)). At pH 8 a single oxidation product was formed which was identified via LC-LTQ-Orbitrap MS and NMR as N-(4-carbamoyl-2-imino-5-oxoimidazolidin)formamido-N-methoxyacetic acid (COFA). Using Vibrio fischeri , an acute bacterial toxicity was found for COFA while carboxy-ACV revealed no toxic effects. Ozonation experiments with guanine and guanosine at pH 8 led to the formation of the respective 2-imino-5-oxoimidazolidines, confirming that guanine derivatives such as carboxy-ACV are undergoing the same reactions during ozonation. Furthermore, COFA was detected in finished drinking water of a German waterworks after ozonation and subsequent activated carbon treatment.

  15. The Microtubule Binding Properties of CENP-E’s C-terminus and CENP-F

    PubMed Central

    Musinipally, Vivek; Howes, Stuart; Alushin, Gregory M.; Nogales, Eva

    2013-01-01

    CENP-E (Centromere Protein E) and CENP-F, also known as mitosin, are large, multi-functional proteins associated with the outer kinetochore. CENP-E features a well-characterized kinesin motor domain at its N-terminus and a second microtubule-binding domain at its C-terminus of unknown function. CENP-F is important for the formation of proper kinetochore-microtubule attachment and, like CENP-E, contains two microtubule-binding domains at its termini. While the importance of these proteins is known, the details of their interactions with microtubules have not yet been investigated. We have biochemically and structurally characterized the microtubule-binding properties of the amino- and carboxyl-terminal domains of CENP-F as well as the carboxyl-terminal (non-kinesin) domain of CENP-E. CENP-E’s C-terminus and CENP-F’s N-terminus bind microtubules with similar affinity to the well-characterized Ndc80 complex, while CENP-F’s C-terminus shows much lower affinity. Electron microscopy analysis reveals that all of these domains engage the microtubule surface in a disordered manner, suggesting that these factors have no favored binding geometry and may allow for initial side-on attachments early in mitosis. PMID:23892111

  16. A Systematic Review of Des-γ-Carboxy Prothrombin for the Diagnosis of Primary Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    De, Ji; Shen, Yi; Qin, Jinyu; Feng, Li; Wang, Yiping; Yang, Li

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Determining the serum des-γ-carboxy-prothrombin (DCP) level is of great importance for the diagnosis of primary hepatocellular carcinoma (PHC). Although several studies have investigated the accuracy of diagnostic DCP tests for PHC, the results have been inconsistent. The aim of this study was to systematically evaluate DCP as a diagnostic standard for PHC. Several databases, including PubMed, EMBASE, MEDLINE (Ovid), the Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), the VIP Database for Chinese Technical Periodicals (VIP), WanFang Data, and the China Biological Medicine Database (CBM), were searched from the date of database inception until July 1, 2015 to collect published international and domestic studies of DCP in the diagnosis of PHC. Two investigators screened the literature according to the inclusion and exclusion criteria, extracted the data, and assessed the methodological quality of the included studies. A total of 38 studies involving 11,124 cases were included (5298 cases in the PHC group and 5826 cases in the control group). A meta-analysis was then performed using Meta-Disc 1.4 and RevMan 5.2 software. The overall sensitivity, specificity, positive likelihood ratio (+LR), and negative likelihood ratio (−LR) of DCP for the detection of PHC were 0.66 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.65–0.68), 0.88 (95% CI: 0.87–0.90), 7.13 (95% CI: 5.73–8.87), and 0.33 (95% CI: 0.29–0.38), respectively. The area under the curve (AUC) of the summary receiver-operating characteristic curve (SROC) was 0.9002. In conclusion, DCP has moderate diagnostic utility for PHC. Owing to the heterogeneity and limitations of the included studies, the above conclusion requires further support from additional high-quality studies. PMID:27124038

  17. Contribution of active-site glutamine to rate enhancement in ubiquitin carboxy terminal hydrolases

    PubMed Central

    Boudreaux, David; Chaney, Joseph; Maiti, Tushar K.; Das, Chittaranjan

    2012-01-01

    Ubiquitin carboxy terminal hydrolases (UCHs) are cysteine proteases featuring a classical cysteine-histidine-aspartate catalytic triad, also a highly conserved glutamine thought to be a part of the oxyanion hole. However, the contribution of this side chain to the catalysis by UCH enzymes is not known. Herein, we demonstrate that the glutamine side chain contributes to rate enhancement in UCHL1, UCHL3 and UCHL5. Mutation of the glutamine to alanine in these enzymes impairs the catalytic efficiency mainly due to a 16 to 30-fold reduction in kcat, which is consistent with a loss of approximately 2 kcal/mol in transition-state stabilization. However, the contribution to transition-state stabilization observed here is rather modest for the side chain’s role in oxyanion stabilization. Interestingly, we discovered that the carbonyl oxygen of this side chain is engaged in a C—H•••O hydrogen-bonding contact with the CεH group of the catalytic histidine. Upon further analysis, we found that this interaction is a common active-site structural feature in most cysteine proteases, including papain, belonging to families with the QCH(N/D) type of active-site configuration. It is possible that removal of the glutamine side chain might have abolished the C—H•••O interaction, which typically accounts for 2 kcal/mol of stabilization, leading to the effect on catalysis observed here. Additional studies performed on UCHL3 by mutating the glutamine to glutamate (strong C—H•••O acceptor but oxyanion destabilizer) and to lysine (strong oxyanion stabilizer but lacking C—H•••O hydrogen-bonding property) suggest that the C—H•••O hydrogen bond could contribute to catalysis. PMID:22284438

  18. Distribution of 11-nor-9-carboxy-Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol in traffic fatality cases.

    PubMed

    Lin, Dong-Liang; Lin, Reng-Lang

    2005-01-01

    11-nor-9-carboxy-Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC-COOH) distributions in postmortem specimens are rarely reported. Fifty New Jersey State Medical Examiner's cases in which automobile accident deaths suspected of involving marijuana intake were studied for the distributions of THC-COOH in postmortem urine, blood, vitreous humor, and bile specimens. Cases were selected based on immunoassay (TDx) urine test results. If the preliminary urine test indicated the presence of THC-COOH (apparent THC-COOH concentration > or = 20 ng/mL), urine, heart blood, vitreous humor, and bile specimens from the case were analyzed for THC-COOH concentrations by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The mean, standard deviation, and range of THC-COOH in heart blood, urine, and bile found in these 50 cases were 0.081, 0.082, and 0.016-0.33 microg/mL; 0.314, 0.415, and 0.044-2.33 microg/mL; and 12.9, 11.4, and 1.03-43.7 microg/mL, respectively. THC-COOH was absent (detection limit, 1 ng/mL) or at low concentration (< 10 ng/mL) in vitreous humor specimens. The mean, standard deviation, and range of the bile-to-blood and urine-to-blood ratios were 242, 196, and 17.2-888 and 4.70, 4.05, and 1.14-19.2, respectively. The highest concentrations of THC-COOH were found in bile and the lowest in vitreous humor. These findings are consistent with the high hydrophobicity nature of THC-COOH and further suggest that bile is the specimen of choice for detecting low level of THC-COOH in postmortem cases.

  19. Conformation of the Bax C-terminus regulates subcellular location and cell death.

    PubMed Central

    Nechushtan, A; Smith, C L; Hsu, Y T; Youle, R J

    1999-01-01

    Bax, a pro-apoptotic member of the Bcl-2 family, translocates from the cytosol to the mitochondria during programmed cell death. We report here that both gain-of-function and loss-of-function mutations can be achieved by altering a single amino acid in the Bax hydrophobic C-terminus. The properly mutated C-terminus of Bax can target a non-relevant protein to the mitochondria, showing that specific conformations of this domain alone allow mitochondrial docking. These data along with N-terminus epitope exposure experiments suggest that the C- and the N-termini interact and that upon triggering of apoptosis, Bax changes conformation, exposing these two domains to insert into the mitochondria and regulate the cell death machinery. PMID:10228148

  20. Role of the C terminus of Lassa virus L protein in viral mRNA synthesis.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Maria; Pahlmann, Meike; Jérôme, Hanna; Busch, Carola; Lelke, Michaela; Günther, Stephan

    2014-08-01

    The N terminus of arenavirus L protein contains an endonuclease presumably involved in "cap snatching." Here, we employed the Lassa virus replicon system to map other L protein sites that might be involved in this mechanism. Residues Phe-1979, Arg-2018, Phe-2071, Asp-2106, Trp-2173, Tyr-2179, Arg-2200, and Arg-2204 were important for viral mRNA synthesis but dispensable for genome replication. Thus, the C terminus of L protein is involved in the mRNA synthesis process, potentially by mediating cap binding.

  1. Ultralow-Fouling Behavior of Biorecognition Coatings Based on Carboxy-Functional Brushes of Zwitterionic Homo- and Co-polymers in Blood Plasma: Functionalization Matters.

    PubMed

    Lísalová, Hana; Brynda, Eduard; Houska, Milan; Víšová, Ivana; Mrkvová, Kateřina; Song, Xue Chadtová; Gedeonová, Erika; Surman, František; Riedel, Tomáš; Pop-Georgievski, Ognen; Homola, Jiri

    2017-02-24

    Fouling from complex biological fluids such as blood plasma to biorecognition element (BRE)-functionalized coatings hampers the use of affinity biosensor technologies in medical diagnostics. Here we report the effects the molecular mechanisms involved in functionalization of low-fouling carboxy-functional coatings have on the BRE capacity and resistance to fouling from blood plasma. The specific mechanisms of EDC/NHS activation of carboxy-groups, BREs' attachment, and deactivation of residual activated groups on recently developed ultralow-fouling carboxybetaine polymer and copolymer brushes (pCB) as well as conventional carboxy-terminated oligo(ethylene glycol)-based alkanethiolate self-assembled monolayers (OEG-SAMs) are studied using the PM-IRRAS, XPS, and SPR methods. It is shown that the fouling resistance of BRE-functionalized pCB coatings is strongly influenced by a deactivation method affecting the ultralow-fouling molecular structure of the brush and the surface charges. It is revealed that, in contrast to free carboxy-group-terminated OEG-SAMs, only a partial deactivation of EDC/NHS-activated zwitterionic carboxy-groups by spontaneous hydrolysis is possible in the pCB brushes. The fouling resistance of activated/BRE-functionalized pCB is shown to be recovered only by covalent attachment of amino acid deactivation agents to residual activated carboxy-groups of pCB. The developed deactivation procedure is further combined with ultralow-fouling brushes of random copolymer carboxybetaine methacrylamide (CBMAA) and N-(2-hydroxypropyl) methacrylamide (HPMAA) with optimized CBMAA content (15%) providing a BRE-functionalized coating with superior fouling resistance over various carboxy-functional low-fouling coatings including homopolymer pCB brushes and OEG-SAMs. The biorecognition capabilities of pHPMAA-CBMAA(15%) are demonstrated via the sensitive label-free detection of a microRNA cancer biomarker (miR-16) in blood plasma.

  2. Fibrinogen {alpha} genes: Conservation of bipartite transcripts and carboxy-terminal-extended {alpha} subunits in vertebrates

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Y.; Cao, Y.; Hertzberg, K.M.; Grieninger, G.

    1995-11-01

    All three well-studied subunits of the clotting protein fibrinogen ({alpha}, {beta}, {gamma}) share N-terminal structural homologies, but until recently only the {beta} and {gamma} chains were recognized as having similar globular C-termini. With the discovery of an extra exon in the human fibrinogen {alpha} gene (exon VI), a minor form of the {alpha} subunit ({alpha}{sub E}) with an extended {beta}- and {gamma}-like C-terminus has been identified. In the present study, the polymerase chain reaction has been used to identify sequences that encode counterparts to {alpha}{sub E} in chicken, rabbit, rat, and baboon. The basic six-exon structure of the fibrinogen {alpha} genes is shown to be conserved among mammals and birds, as are the intron positions. Bipartite transcripts - still bearing an intron prior to the last exon - are found among the products of the various vertebrate fibrinogen {alpha} genes. The last exon represents the largest conserved segment of the gene and, in each species examined, encodes exactly 236 amino acids. The C-termini of these {alpha}{sub E} chains align without a single gap and are between 76 and 99% identical. Since the exon VI-encoded domain of {alpha}{sub E} is as well conserved as the corresponding regions of the {beta} and {gamma} chains, it follows that it is equally important and that {alpha}{sub E}-fibrinogen plays a vital, if as-yet unrecognized physiological role. 21 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Glaciological and marine geological controls on terminus dynamics of Hubbard Glacier, southeast Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stearns, Leigh A.; Hamilton, Gordon S.; van der Veen, C. J.; Finnegan, D. C.; O'Neel, Shad; Scheick, J. B.; Lawson, D. E.

    2015-01-01

    Hubbard Glacier, located in southeast Alaska, is the world's largest non-polar tidewater glacier. It has been steadily advancing since it was first mapped in 1895; occasionally, the advance creates an ice or sediment dam that blocks a tributary fjord (Russell Fiord). The sustained advance raises the probability of long-term closure in the near-future, which will strongly impact the ecosystem of Russell Fiord and the nearby community of Yakutat. Here, we examine a 43-year record of flow speeds and terminus position to understand the large-scale dynamics of Hubbard Glacier. Our long-term record shows that the rate of terminus advance has increased slightly since 1895, with the exception of a slowed advance between approximately 1972 and 1984. The short-lived closure events in 1986 and 2002 were not initiated by perturbations in ice velocity or environmental forcings, but were likely due to fluctuations in sedimentation patterns at the terminus. This study points to the significance of a coupled system where short-term velocity fluctuations and morainal shoal development control tidewater glacier terminus position.

  4. 29 CFR Appendix C to Subpart R of... - Illustrations of Bridging Terminus Points: Non-mandatory

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Illustrations of Bridging Terminus Points: Non-mandatory C Appendix C to Subpart R of Part 1926 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY... CONSTRUCTION Steel Erection Pt. 1926, Subpt. R, App. C Appendix C to Subpart R of Part 1926—Illustrations...

  5. 29 CFR Appendix C to Subpart R of... - Illustrations of Bridging Terminus Points: Non-mandatory

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Illustrations of Bridging Terminus Points: Non-mandatory C Appendix C to Subpart R of Part 1926 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY... CONSTRUCTION Steel Erection Pt. 1926, Subpt. R, App. C Appendix C to Subpart R of Part 1926—Illustrations...

  6. 29 CFR Appendix C to Subpart R of... - Illustrations of Bridging Terminus Points: Non-mandatory

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Illustrations of Bridging Terminus Points: Non-mandatory C Appendix C to Subpart R of Part 1926 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY... CONSTRUCTION Steel Erection Pt. 1926, Subpt. R, App. C Appendix C to Subpart R of Part 1926—Illustrations...

  7. The COOH terminus of the amelogenin, LRAP, is oriented next to the hydroxyapatite surface

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, Wendy J.; Campbell, Allison A.; Paine, Michael L.; Snead, Malcolm

    2004-09-24

    The organic matrix in forming enamel consists largely of the amelogenin protein, self-assembled into nanospheres that are necessary to guide the formation of the unusually long and highly ordered hydroxyapatite (HAP) crystallites that constitute enamel. Despite its ability to direct crystal growth, the interaction of the amelogenin protein with HAP is unknown, though the charged C-terminus is often implicated in this function. To elucidate if the C-terminus is important in the binding and orientation of amelogenin with HAP, we used solid state NMR to determine the orientation of the C-terminus of an amelogenin splice variant, LRAP, which contains the charged C-terminus of the full protein, on the HAP surface. These experiments demonstrate that the sidechain methyl labeled residue, A46, is 8 Å from the HAP surface, under hydrated conditions, for the protein with and without phosphorylation. Modeling results are consistent with experimental measurements, resulting in an average 13Cala46-31P distance of 7.62 ± 1.8 Å for LRAP orientation onto the 100 face of HAP. The computational model also reveals that with 13Cala46 at this distance, the negatively charged residues are energetically favored to align themselves with the Ca2+ in the HAP lattice. The experimental results and supporting computational models provide direct evidence orienting the charged C-terminal region of the amelogenin protein on the HAP surface, optimized to exert control on developing enamel crystals.

  8. N-terminus regulation of VMAT2 mediates methamphetamine-stimulated efflux.

    PubMed

    Torres, B; Ruoho, A E

    2014-02-14

    The 20 amino acid (AA) N-terminus of the vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) was examined as a regulator of VMAT2 function. Removal of the first 16 or 19 AAs of the N-terminus resulted in a molecule with reduced ability to sequester [(3)H]-5HT. A glutathione-S-transferase-construct of the N-terminus underwent phosphorylation in the presence of PKC at serines 15 and 18. These putative phosphorylation sites were examined for effects on function. Phospho-mimetic substitution of serines 15 and 18 with aspartate in the full-length VMAT2 resulted in reduced [(3)H]-5HT sequestration and reduced methamphetamine (METH)-stimulated efflux of preloaded [(3)H]-5HT. In contrast, mutation of serines 15 and 18 to alanines maintained intact net substrate sequestration but eliminated METH-stimulated efflux of pre-accumulated [(3)H]-5HT. In summary, these data suggest a model in which the VMAT2 N-terminus regulates monoamine sequestration.

  9. The luminal N-terminus of yeast Nvj1 is an inner nuclear membrane anchor

    PubMed Central

    Millen, Jonathan I.; Pierson, Jason; Kvam, Erik; Olsen, Lars J.; Goldfarb, David S.

    2010-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in S. cerevisae is largely divided between perinuclear and cortical compartments. Yeast Nvj1 localizes exclusively to small patches on the perinuclear ER, where it interacts with Vac8 in the vacuole membrane to form nucleus-vacuole (NV) junctions. Three regions of Nvj1 mediate the biogenesis of NV junctions. A membrane-spanning domain targets the protein to the ER. The C-terminus binds Vac8 in the vacuole membrane, which induces the clustering of both proteins into NV junctions. The luminal N-terminus is required for strict perinuclear localization. 3D cryo-electron tomography reveals that Nvj1 clamps the separation between the two nuclear membranes to half the width of bulk nuclear envelope. The N-terminus contains a hydrophobic sequence bracketed by basic residues that resembles outer mitochondrial membrane signal-anchors. The hydrophobic sequence can be scrambled or reversed without affecting function. Mutations that reduce the hydrophobicity of the core sequence, or affect the distribution of basic residues, cause mislocalization to the cortical ER. We conclude that the N-terminus of Nvj1 is a retention sequence that bridges the perinuclear lumen and inserts into the inner nuclear membrane. PMID:18694438

  10. The N-terminus of TDP-43 promotes its oligomerization and enhances DNA binding affinity

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Chung-ke; Wu, Tzong-Huah; Wu, Chu-Ya; Chiang, Ming-hui; Toh, Elsie Khai-Woon; Hsu, Yin-Chih; Lin, Ku-Feng; Liao, Yu-heng; Huang, Tai-huang; Huang, Joseph Jen-Tse

    2012-08-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The N-terminus of TDP-43 contains an independently folded structural domain (NTD). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The structural domains of TDP-43 are arranged in a beads-on-a-string fashion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The NTD promotes TDP-43 oligomerization in a concentration-dependent manner. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The NTD may assist nucleic acid-binding activity of TDP-43. -- Abstract: TDP-43 is a DNA/RNA-binding protein associated with different neurodegenerative diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD-U). Here, the structural and physical properties of the N-terminus on TDP-43 have been carefully characterized through a combination of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), circular dichroism (CD) and fluorescence anisotropy studies. We demonstrate for the first time the importance of the N-terminus in promoting TDP-43 oligomerization and enhancing its DNA-binding affinity. An unidentified structural domain in the N-terminus is also disclosed. Our findings provide insights into the N-terminal domain function of TDP-43.

  11. The C-terminus of Kv7 channels: a multifunctional module.

    PubMed

    Haitin, Yoni; Attali, Bernard

    2008-04-01

    Kv7 channels (KCNQ) represent a family of voltage-gated K(+) channels which plays a prominent role in brain and cardiac excitability. Their physiological importance is underscored by the existence of mutations in human Kv7 genes, leading to severe cardiovascular and neurological disorders such as the cardiac long QT syndrome and neonatal epilepsy. Kv7 channels exhibit some structural and functional features that are distinct from other Kv channels. Notably, the Kv7 C-terminus is long compared to other K(+) channels and is endowed with characteristic structural domains, including coiled-coils, amphipatic alpha helices containing calmodulin-binding motifs and basic amino acid clusters. Here we provide a brief overview of current insights and as yet unsettled issues about the structural and functional attributes of the C-terminus of Kv7 channels. Recent data indicate that the proximal half of the Kv7 C-terminus associates with one calmodulin constitutively bound to each subunit. Epilepsy and long QT mutations located in this proximal region impair calmodulin binding and can affect channel gating, folding and trafficking. The distal half of the Kv7 C-terminus directs tetramerization, employing tandem coiled-coils. Together, the data indicate that the Kv7 C-terminal domain is a multimodular structure playing a crucial role in channel gating, assembly and trafficking as well as in scaffolding the channel complex with signalling proteins.

  12. Modifications of the C terminus Affect Functionality and Stability of Yeast Triacylglycerol Lipase Tgl3p*

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Barbara; Schmidt, Claudia; Ploier, Birgit; Daum, Günther

    2014-01-01

    Lipid droplets are specific organelles for the storage of triacylglycerols and steryl esters. They are surrounded by a phospholipid monolayer with a small but specific set of proteins embedded. Assembly and insertion of proteins into this surface membrane is an intriguing question of lipid droplet biology. To address this question we studied the topology of Tgl3p, the major triacylglycerol lipase of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, on lipid droplets. Employing the method of limited proteolysis of lipid droplet surface proteins, we found that the C terminus of Tgl3p faces the inside of the organelle, whereas the N terminus is exposed at the cytosolic side of lipid droplets. Detailed analysis of the C terminus revealed a stretch of seven amino acids that are critical for protein stability and functionality. The negative charge of two aspartate residues within this stretch is crucial for lipase activity of Tgl3p. A portion of Tgl3p, which is located to the endoplasmic reticulum, exhibits a different topology. In the phospholipid bilayer of the endoplasmic reticulum the C terminus faces the cytosol, which results in instability of the protein. Thus, the topology of Tgl3p is important for its function and strongly dependent on the membrane environment. PMID:24847060

  13. 29 CFR Appendix C to Subpart R of... - Illustrations of Bridging Terminus Points: Non-mandatory

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Illustrations of Bridging Terminus Points: Non-mandatory C Appendix C to Subpart R of Part 1926 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY... CONSTRUCTION Steel Erection Pt. 1926, Subpt. R, App. C Appendix C to Subpart R of Part 1926—Illustrations...

  14. Effect of myristoylated N-terminus of Arf1 on the bending rigidity of phospholipid membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burrola Gabilondo, Beatriz; Zhou, Hernan; Randazzo, Paul A.; Losert, Wolfgang

    2010-03-01

    The protein Arf1 is part of the COPI vesicle transport process from the Golgi to the ER. It binds to membranes via a myristoylated N-terminus and it has been shown to tubulate Large Unilamellar Vesicles. The effect of the N-terminus of Arf1 on physical properties of membranes has not been studied, with the exception of curvature. We previously found that the myristoylated N-terminus increases the packing of the lipid molecules, but has no effect on the lateral mobility. We tested the hypothesis that myristoylated peptides affect the bending rigidity of phospholipid Giant Unilamellar Vesicles (GUV). We use optical tweezers to pull tethers from GUV and measure the force of pulling the tether, as well as the retraction speed of the tether once it is released. We also used flicker spectroscopy to estimate the values of the mechanical properties of GUV. We will present results of the force and tether retraction measurements, as well as mechanical properties estimates from flicker, for GUV in the presence of varying concentrations of myristoylated and non-myristoylated N-terminus of Arf1, and compare these with measurements for GUV in the absence of peptide.

  15. Characterization of the branching patterns of glycogen branching enzyme truncated on the N-terminus.

    PubMed

    Devillers, Claire H; Piper, Mary E; Ballicora, Miguel A; Preiss, Jack

    2003-10-01

    Truncation of 112 amino acids at the N-terminus (Nd(1-112)) changes the chain transfer pattern of the Escherichia coli glycogen branching enzyme (GBE) [Arch. Biochem. Biophys. 397 (2002) 279]. We investigated further the role of the N-terminus by engineering other truncated GBEs and analyzing the branching pattern by high-performance anion-exchange chromatography. The wild type GBE transfers mainly chains with a degree of polymerization (d.p.) of 8-14, the Nd(1-112) enzyme transfers a greater proportion of chains with higher d.p. 15-20, whereas the 63- and 83-amino acid deleted enzymes had an intermediate pattern of transferred chains (d.p. 10-20). These data showed that a progressive shortening of the N-terminus leads to a gradual increase in the length of the transferred chains, suggesting that the N-terminus provides a support for the glucan substrate during the processes of cleavage and transfer of the alpha-(1-4) glucan chains.

  16. Subaqueous terminus evolution at Tasman Glacier, New Zealand, as determined by remote-controlled survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purdie, Heather; Bealing, Paul; Tidey, Emily; Harrison, Justin

    2016-04-01

    The presence of subaqueous ice ramps at the terminus of calving glaciers result from a combination of subaerial and subaqueous processes. These ice ramps eventually buoyantly calve, an event that can be hazardous to companies operating boat tours on proglacial lakes. However our knowledge of ice ramp forming processes, and feedbacks associated with their evolution, is sparse. We are using a remote controlled jet boat to survey bathymetry at an active calving margin. This vessel, mounted with both depth and side-scan sonar, can map subaqueous portions of the terminus right up to the active calving face at no risk to the operators. Surveys at the Tasman Glacier terminus over three consecutive years have revealed that subaqueous ice ramps are ephemeral features. In 2015 multiple ice ramps extended out into the lake from the terminus by 100-200 m, with the ramp surface being as much as 60 m below the water line at its outer perimeter. The maximum depth of the Tasman Lake at this time was 240 m. Within one month of the survey taking place, the largest of these ice ramps had calved and disintegrated. The consistent location of ice ramps between surveys indicates that other factors, like subglacial hydrology, may influence ice ramp evolution.

  17. Controls on interannual and seasonal terminus velocity and position of Yahtse Glacier in SE Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durkin, W. J., IV; Melkonian, A. K.; Pritchard, M. E.; Willis, M. J.; Bartholomaus, T.

    2015-12-01

    We construct a 30 year velocity time-series for comparison with recent studies on the submarine melt rate (Bartholomaus et al., 2013), calving rate (Bartholomaus et al., 2013b), velocities (McNabb et al., 2014), and subglacial discharge (Bartholomaus et al., 2015) of Yahtse Glacier in southeast Alaska. Velocities are constructed from feature tracking on Landsat, ALOS, and ASTER satellite imagery spanning 1985-2015. Yahtse is undergoing an interannual advance of ~82 m yr-1 that is concurrent with deceleration between 1996 and 2015 of -0.55 m day-1yr-1 measured 2.5km down-glacier from the icefall. We estimate that up to 35% of the slowdown is due to divergence associated with thickening near the terminus of ~7 m yr-1measured by differencing WorldView and SRTM DEMs. Much of the remaining deceleration may be due to greater basal and lateral drag as ongoing advance increases the contact area between the terminus and bedrock. We observe a seasonal cycle in centerline terminus speeds superimposed on the interannual deceleration. Terminus speeds climb from a minimum in October to a maximum in May, then decline until October. The timing of this cycle is in phase with the seasonality of subglacial discharge at the front of Yahtse and salinity levels measured in the Gulf of Alaska, which agrees with models of subglacial channel development proposed for many glaciers. Seasonal speed changes measured 1 km up-glacier from the front are associated with terminus advance and retreat. The terminus is in a retracted position following the deceleration to a minimum speed in October and elevated submarine melt rates in summer and early autumn. The front holds this position from November through February as speeds there accelerate to their seasonal maximum and submarine melt is reduced. Yahtse Glacier then advances between 200 and 500 m during the spring as frontal speeds decrease by ~10% from their highest level. This slowdown may be caused by a decrease in buoyancy due to the terminus

  18. Individual substitution mutations in the AID C terminus that ablate IgH class switch recombination.

    PubMed

    Kadungure, Tatenda; Ucher, Anna J; Linehan, Erin K; Schrader, Carol E; Stavnezer, Janet

    2015-01-01

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is essential for class switch recombination (CSR) and somatic hypermutation (SHM) of Ig genes. The C terminus of AID is required for CSR but not for SHM, but the reason for this is not entirely clear. By retroviral transduction of mutant AID proteins into aid-/- mouse splenic B cells, we show that 4 amino acids within the C terminus of mouse AID, when individually mutated to specific amino acids (R190K, A192K, L196S, F198S), reduce CSR about as much or more than deletion of the entire C terminal 10 amino acids. Similar to ΔAID, the substitutions reduce binding of UNG to Ig Sμ regions and some reduce binding of Msh2, both of which are important for introducing S region DNA breaks. Junctions between the IgH donor switch (S)μ and acceptor Sα regions from cells expressing ΔAID or the L196S mutant show increased microhomology compared to junctions in cells expressing wild-type AID, consistent with problems during CSR and the use of alternative end-joining, rather than non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ). Unlike deletion of the AID C terminus, 3 of the substitution mutants reduce DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) detected within the Sμ region in splenic B cells undergoing CSR. Cells expressing these 3 substitution mutants also have greatly reduced mutations within unrearranged Sμ regions, and they decrease with time after activation. These results might be explained by increased error-free repair, but as the C terminus has been shown to be important for recruitment of NHEJ proteins, this appears unlikely. We hypothesize that Sμ DNA breaks in cells expressing these C terminus substitution mutants are poorly repaired, resulting in destruction of Sμ segments that are deaminated by these mutants. This could explain why these mutants cannot undergo CSR.

  19. Activity of mutant sigma F proteins truncated near the C terminus.

    PubMed Central

    Min, K T; Yudkin, M D

    1992-01-01

    sigma F, the product of the spoIIAC gene of Bacillus subtilis, is homologous in amino acid sequence throughout most of its length with several other sigma factors of B. subtilis and Escherichia coli. However, 8 residues from the C terminus the homology abruptly breaks down, suggesting that the C-terminal tail of the protein may be dispensable. It is known that an amber mutation at the 11th codon (wild-type glutamine 245) from the C terminus abolishes the function of the sigma factor. We have now placed chain-terminating codons at the ninth codon (wild-type lysine 247), the eighth codon (wild-type valine 248), or the seventh codon (wild-type glutamine 249) from the C terminus. We have tested the resulting mutants for their capacity to sporulate and for their ability to transcribe from a promoter (spoIIIG) that is normally read by RNA polymerase bound to sigma F (E sigma F). The results indicate that a mutant sigma F lacking the terminal 7 residues functions almost normally, which suggests that glutamine 249 is dispensable. By contrast, lysine 247 is crucial for the activity of sigma F: deletion of the 9 C-terminal residues totally inactivates the protein. When the terminal 8 residues were deleted, placing lysine 247 at the C terminus, the transcriptional activity of the factor is reduced by about 80%: we attribute this effect to neutralization of the positive charge of lysine 247 by formation of a salt bridge with the -COO- terminus. Images PMID:1429437

  20. The N Terminus Specifies the Switch between Transport Modes of the Human Serotonin Transporter*

    PubMed Central

    Kern, Carina; Erdem, Fatma Asli; El-Kasaby, Ali; Sandtner, Walter; Freissmuth, Michael; Sucic, Sonja

    2017-01-01

    The serotonin transporter (SERT) and other monoamine transporters operate in either a forward transport mode where the transporter undergoes a full transport cycle or an exchange mode where the transporter seesaws through half-cycles. Amphetamines trigger the exchange mode, leading to substrate efflux. This efflux was proposed to rely on the N terminus, which was suggested to adopt different conformations in the inward facing, outward facing and amphetamine-bound states. This prediction was verified by tryptic digestion of SERT-expressing membranes: in the absence of Na+, the N terminus was rapidly digested. Amphetamine conferred protection against cleavage, suggesting a relay between the conformational states of the hydrophobic core and the N terminus. We searched for a candidate segment that supported the conformational switch by serial truncation removing 22 (ΔN22), 32 (ΔN32), or 42 (ΔN42) N-terminal residues. This did not affect surface expression, inhibitor binding, and substrate influx. However, amphetamine-induced efflux by SERT-ΔN32 or SERT-ΔN42 (but not by SERT-ΔN22) was markedly diminished. We examined the individual steps in the transport cycle by recording transporter-associated currents: the recovery rate of capacitive peak, but not of steady state, currents was significantly lower for SERT-ΔN32 than that of wild type SERT and SERT-ΔN22. Thus, the exchange mode of SERT-ΔN32 was selectively impaired. Our observations show that the N terminus affords the switch between transport modes. The findings are consistent with a model where the N terminus acts as a lever to support amphetamine-induced efflux by SERT. PMID:28104804

  1. A Carboxy-Terminal Trimerization Domain Stabilizes Conformational Epitopes on the Stalk Domain of Soluble Recombinant Hemagglutinin Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Krammer, Florian; Margine, Irina; Tan, Gene S.; Pica, Natalie; Krause, Jens C.; Palese, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Recently, a new class of broadly neutralizing anti-influenza virus antibodies that target the stalk domain of the viral hemagglutinin was discovered. As such, induction, isolation, characterization, and quantification of these novel antibodies has become an area of intense research and great interest. Since most of these antibodies bind to conformational epitopes, the structural integrity of hemagglutinin substrates for the detection and quantification of these antibodies is of high importance. Here we evaluate the binding of these antibodies to soluble, secreted hemagglutinins with or without a carboxy-terminal trimerization domain based on the natural trimerization domain of T4 phage fibritin. The lack of such a domain completely abolishes binding to group 1 hemagglutinins and also affects binding to group 2 hemagglutinins. Additionally, the presence of a trimerization domain positively influences soluble hemagglutinin stability during expression and purification. Our findings suggest that a carboxy-terminal trimerization domain is a necessary requirement for the structural integrity of stalk epitopes on recombinant soluble influenza virus hemagglutinin. PMID:22928001

  2. Efficient and Scalable Synthesis of 4-Carboxy-Pennsylvania Green Methyl Ester: A Hydrophobic Building Block for Fluorescent Molecular Probes.

    PubMed

    Woydziak, Zachary R; Fu, Liqiang; Peterson, Blake R

    2014-01-01

    Fluorinated fluorophores are valuable tools for studies of biological systems. However, amine-reactive single-isomer derivatives of these compounds are often very expensive. To provide an inexpensive alternative, we report a practical synthesis of 4-carboxy-Pennsylvania Green methyl ester. Derivatives of this hydrophobic fluorinated fluorophore, a hybrid of the dyes Oregon Green and Tokyo Green, are often cell permeable, enabling labeling of intracellular targets and components. Moreover, the low pKa of Pennsylvania Green (4.8) confers bright fluorescence in acidic cellular compartments such as endosomes, enhancing its utility for chemical biology investigations. To improve access to the key intermediate 2,7-difluoro-3,6-dihydroxyxanthen-9-one, we subjected bis-(2,4,5-trifluorophenyl)methanone to iterative nucleophilic aromatic substitution by hydroxide on scales of > 40 g. This intermediate was used to prepare over 15 grams of pure 4-carboxy-Pennsylvania Green methyl ester in 28% overall yield without requiring chromatography. This compound can be converted into the amine reactive N-hydroxysuccinimidyl ester in essentially quantitative yield for the synthesis of a wide variety of fluorescent molecular probes.

  3. The carboxy-terminal domains of erbB-2 and epidermal growth factor receptor exert different regulatory effects on intrinsic receptor tyrosine kinase function and transforming activity.

    PubMed Central

    Di Fiore, P P; Segatto, O; Lonardo, F; Fazioli, F; Pierce, J H; Aaronson, S A

    1990-01-01

    The erbB-2 gene product, gp185erbB-2, displays a potent transforming effect when overexpressed in NIH 3T3 cells. In addition, it possesses constitutively high levels of tyrosine kinase activity in the absence of exogenously added ligand. In this study, we demonstrate that its carboxy-terminal domain exerts an enhancing effect on erbB-2 kinase and transforming activities. A premature termination mutant of the erbB-2 protein, lacking the entire carboxy-terminal domain (erbB-2 delta 1050), showed a 40-fold reduction in transforming ability and a lowered in vivo kinase activity for intracellular substrates. When the carboxy-terminal domain of erbB-2 was substituted for its analogous region in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) (EGFR/erbB-2COOH chimera), it conferred erbB-2-like properties to the EGFR, including transforming ability in the absence of epidermal growth factor, elevated constitutive autokinase activity in vivo and in vitro, and constitutive ability to phosphorylate phospholipase C-gamma. Conversely, a chimeric erbB-2 molecule bearing an EGFR carboxy-terminal domain (erbB-2/EGFRCOOH chimera) showed reduced transforming and kinase activity with respect to the wild-type erbB-2 and was only slightly more efficient than the erbB-2 delta 1050 mutant. Thus, we conclude that the carboxy-terminal domains of erbB-2 and EGFR exert different regulatory effects on receptor kinase function and biological activity. The up regulation of gp185erbB-2 enzymatic activity exerted by its carboxy-terminal domain can explain, at least in part, its constitutive level of kinase activity. Images PMID:2188097

  4. Synthesis of stable carboxy-terminated NaYF4: Yb3+, Er3+@SiO2 nanoparticles with ultrathin shell for biolabeling applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fuyao; Zhao, Qi; You, Hongpeng; Wang, Zhenxin

    2013-01-01

    Here, a two-step method has been developed for synthesizing carboxy-terminated NaYF4: Yb3+, Er3+@SiO2 core@shell nanoparticles (UCNP@SiO2) with ultrathin shell (1.5 nm). First, the NaYF4: Yb3+, Er3+ upconverting nanoparticles (UCNPs) were prepared using solvothermal technology; then, silica shells (SiO2) were deposited on the nanocrystals to form core-shell structures by the hydrolysis of tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS). The ultrathin SiO2 shell was obtained by increasing surfactant amount and decreasing TEOS amount in the reaction mixture. Carboxyethylsilanetriol (CTES) was used to generate the carboxy group on the particle surface. The carboxy-terminated UCNP@SiO2 are ideally suited for biolabeling and bioimaging applications because the as-prepared nanoparticles have extreme colloidal and optical stabilities, and the carboxy groups on the particle surface easily react with amino residues of biomolecules. As an example, we reported on the interactions of Ricinus Communis Agglutinin (RCA 120) conjugated UCNP@SiO2 with HeLa cells. The excellent performance of the RCA 120 conjugated UCNP@SiO2 in cellular fluorescence imaging was demonstrated.Here, a two-step method has been developed for synthesizing carboxy-terminated NaYF4: Yb3+, Er3+@SiO2 core@shell nanoparticles (UCNP@SiO2) with ultrathin shell (1.5 nm). First, the NaYF4: Yb3+, Er3+ upconverting nanoparticles (UCNPs) were prepared using solvothermal technology; then, silica shells (SiO2) were deposited on the nanocrystals to form core-shell structures by the hydrolysis of tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS). The ultrathin SiO2 shell was obtained by increasing surfactant amount and decreasing TEOS amount in the reaction mixture. Carboxyethylsilanetriol (CTES) was used to generate the carboxy group on the particle surface. The carboxy-terminated UCNP@SiO2 are ideally suited for biolabeling and bioimaging applications because the as-prepared nanoparticles have extreme colloidal and optical stabilities, and the carboxy

  5. Structure of the human MLH1 N-terminus: implications for predisposition to Lynch syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Hong; Zeng, Hong; Lam, Robert; Tempel, Wolfram; Kerr, Iain D.; Min, Jinrong

    2015-07-28

    The crystal structure of the human MLH1 N-terminus is reported at 2.30 Å resolution. The overall structure is described along with an analysis of two clinically important mutations. Mismatch repair prevents the accumulation of erroneous insertions/deletions and non-Watson–Crick base pairs in the genome. Pathogenic mutations in the MLH1 gene are associated with a predisposition to Lynch and Turcot’s syndromes. Although genetic testing for these mutations is available, robust classification of variants requires strong clinical and functional support. Here, the first structure of the N-terminus of human MLH1, determined by X-ray crystallography, is described. The structure shares a high degree of similarity with previously determined prokaryotic MLH1 homologs; however, this structure affords a more accurate platform for the classification of MLH1 variants.

  6. The N terminus of monoamine transporters is a lever required for the action of amphetamines.

    PubMed

    Sucic, Sonja; Dallinger, Stefan; Zdrazil, Barbara; Weissensteiner, René; Jørgensen, Trine N; Holy, Marion; Kudlacek, Oliver; Seidel, Stefan; Cha, Joo Hwan; Gether, Ulrik; Newman, Amy H; Ecker, Gerhard F; Freissmuth, Michael; Sitte, Harald H

    2010-04-02

    The serotonin transporter (SERT) terminates neurotransmission by removing serotonin from the synaptic cleft. In addition, it is the site of action of antidepressants (which block the transporter) and of amphetamines (which induce substrate efflux). We explored the functional importance of the N terminus in mediating the action of amphetamines by focusing initially on the highly conserved threonine residue at position 81, a candidate site for phosphorylation by protein kinase C. Molecular dynamics simulations of the wild type SERT, compared with its mutations SERT(T81A) and SERT(T81D), suggested structural changes in the inner vestibule indicative of an opening of the inner vestibule. Predictions from this model (e.g. the preferential accumulation of SERT(T81A) in the inward conformation, its reduced turnover number, and a larger distance between its N and C termini) were verified. Most importantly, SERT(T81A) (and the homologous mutations in noradrenaline and dopamine) failed to support amphetamine-induced efflux, and this was not remedied by aspartate at this position. Amphetamine-induced currents through SERT(T81A) were comparable with those through the wild type transporter. Both abundant Na(+) entry and accumulation of SERT(T81A) in the inward facing conformation ought to favor amphetamine-induced efflux. Thus, we surmised that the N terminus must play a direct role in driving the transporter into a state that supports amphetamine-induced efflux. This hypothesis was verified by truncating the first 64 amino acids and by tethering the N terminus to an additional transmembrane helix. Either modification abolished amphetamine-induced efflux. We therefore conclude that the N terminus of monoamine transporters acts as a lever that sustains reverse transport.

  7. NMR resonance assignments for the tetramethylrhodamine binding RNA aptamer 3 in complex with the ligand 5-carboxy-tetramethylrhodamine.

    PubMed

    Duchardt-Ferner, Elke; Juen, Michael; Kreutz, Christoph; Wöhnert, Jens

    2017-04-01

    RNA aptamers are used in a wide range of biotechnological or biomedical applications. In many cases the high resolution structures of these aptamers in their ligand-complexes have revealed fundamental aspects of RNA folding and RNA small molecule interactions. Fluorescent RNA-ligand complexes in particular find applications as optical sensors or as endogenous fluorescent tags for RNA tracking in vivo. Structures of RNA aptamers and aptamer ligand complexes constitute the starting point for rational function directed optimization approaches. Here, we present the NMR resonance assignment of an RNA aptamer binding to the fluorescent ligand tetramethylrhodamine (TMR) in complex with the ligand 5-carboxy-tetramethylrhodamine (5-TAMRA) as a starting point for a high-resolution structure determination using NMR spectroscopy in solution.

  8. The first contribution of capillary electrophoresis to the study of abiotic origins of homochirality: investigation of the enantioselective adsorption of 3-carboxy adipic acid on minerals.

    PubMed

    Castro-Puyana, María; Salgado, Antonio; Hazen, Robert M; Crego, Antonio L; Alegre, María Luisa Marina

    2008-04-01

    CE with UV detection was used for the first time to determine the enantioselective adsorption of the short-chain tricarboxylic acid, 3-carboxy adipic acid, on minerals as a mean of investigating plausible mechanisms for the origin of biochemical homochirality on Earth. The use of vancomycine as chiral selector in the separation buffer using the partial filling technique enabled the separation of the two enantiomers of this organic acid in about 12 min. Taking into account that this compound has a low absorption of the UV light, and in order to achieve the sensitivity needed to determine the enantiomeric excess of samples of 3-carboxy adipic acid adsorbed on minerals, we applied a strategy consisting of a field-amplified sample stacking together with the use of a bubble capillary and detection at low wavelength (192 nm). This combination enabled an LOD of about 10(-7) M and the determination of the enantiomeric excess of 3-carboxy adipic acid adsorbed on calcite and feldspar mineral samples at subnanomol levels of this acid. Results showed that an enantioselective adsorption of the enantiomers of 3-carboxy adipic acid on minerals took place.

  9. General approach for the stereocontrolled construction of the beta-lactam ring in amino acid-derived 4-alkyl-4-carboxy-2-azetidinones.

    PubMed

    Gerona-Navarro, Guillermo; García-López, M Teresa; González-Muñiz, Rosario

    2002-05-31

    The first general approach toward the asymmetric synthesis of 4-alkyl-4-carboxy-2-azetidinones derived from amino acids is described. The stereoselective construction of the beta-lactam ring was achieved through base-mediated intramolecular cyclization of the corresponding N(alpha)-chloroacetyl derivatives bearing (+)- or (-)-10-(N,N-dicyclohexylsulfamoyl)isoborneol as chiral auxiliary (ee up to 82%).

  10. Location of the Bacteriophage P22 Coat Protein C-terminus Provides Opportunities for the Design of Capsid Based Materials

    PubMed Central

    Servid, Amy; Jordan, Paul; O’Neil, Alison; Prevelige, Peter; Douglas, Trevor

    2013-01-01

    Rational design of modifications to the interior and exterior surfaces of virus-like particles (VLPs) for future therapeutic and materials applications is based on structural information about the capsid. Existing cryo-electron microscopy based models suggest that the C-terminus of the bacteriophage P22 coat protein (CP) extends towards the capsid exterior. Our biochemical analysis through genetic manipulations of the C-terminus supports the model where the CP C-terminus is exposed on the exterior of the P22 capsid. Capsids displaying a 6xHis tag appended to the CP C-terminus bind to a Ni affinity column, and the addition of positively or negatively charged coiled coil peptides to the capsid results in association of these capsids upon mixing. Additionally, a single cysteine appended to the CP C-terminus results in the formation of intercapsid disulfide bonds and can serve as a site for chemical modifications. Thus, the C-terminus is a powerful location for multivalent display of peptides that facilitate nanoscale assembly and capsid modification. PMID:23957641

  11. The structure and orientation of the C-terminus of LRAP

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, Wendy J.; Ferris, Kim F.; Tarasevich, Barbara J.; Larson, Jenna L.

    2008-04-15

    Amelogenin is the predominant protein found during enamel development. The formation of amelogenin into nanosphere quaternary structures is thought to control the unique elongated hydroxyapatite crystals that constitute enamel. Consequently, the secondary structure of the protein will be important in the formation of the nanosphere, as well as in the interaction with hydroxyapatite, by revealing or concealing critical amino acids. Unfortunately, very little data is available on the structure or the orientation of the protein, either in solution or bound to hydroxyapatite. Here, we used solid state NMR techniques to investigate the structure and orientation of the C-terminus of LRAP, a naturally occurring splice variant of full length amelogenin. The structure of the C-terminus showed a largely random coil or extended structure, both on the surface of hydroxyapatite as well as lyophilized from solution. The orientation of the C-terminal region with respect to HAP was investigated for 2 alanine residues (Ala46 and Ala49) and one lysine residue (Lys52). The sidechain terminal methyl or amine group of the residues examined were found to be 7, 6 and 6 Å from the surface of hydroxyapatite, for Ala46 Ala49 and Lys52 respectively, providing direct evidence that the charged C-terminus is interacting closely with hydroxyapatite. However, the C-terminal region was also found to have medium to large frequency and amplitude dynamics, both in the sidechains and in the backbone, suggesting that this region alone is not responsible for binding. The data is discussed in terms of a binding mechanism. This work was supported by NIH-NIDCR Grant DE-015347 and was performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, operated by Battelle for the US-DOE.

  12. Discovery of pyrazole as C-terminus of selective BACE1 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yiquan; Xu, Lei; Chen, Wuyan; Zhu, Yiping; Chen, Tiantian; Fu, Yan; Li, Li; Ma, Lanping; Xiong, Bing; Wang, Xin; Li, Jian; He, Jianhua; Zhang, Haiyan; Xu, Yechun; Li, Jia; Shen, Jingkang

    2013-10-01

    We recently discovered and reported dual inhibitor 5 of AChE and BACE1 with N-benzylpiperidine ethyl as C-terminus. Compound 5 showed potent inhibitory activities for BACE1, and could reduce endogenous Aβ1-40 production in APP transgenic mice. In present work, we rapidly identified substituted triazole as the C-terminus of compound 5 by replacing the benzylpiperidine ethyl group with click chemistry and tested these synthesized compounds by in situ screening assay. As revealed by the crystal structures of BACE1 in complex with our triazole compound 12, we found that Pro70 and Thr72 located in the flap region were the critical components for binding with these inhibitors. With the aid of the crystal structure, a new series of five-membered heterocyclic compounds was prepared in order to explore the structure-activity relationship (SAR) of this class of molecules. From these efforts, pyrazole was discovered as a novel C-terminus of BACE1 inhibitors. After further modification of pyrazole with variable substituents, compound 37 exhibited good potency in enzyme inhibition assay (IC50=0.025 μM) and compound 33 showed moderate inhibition effects on Aβ production of APP transfected HEK293 cells. Moreover, these pyrazole derivatives demonstrated good selectivity versus cathepsin D. Our results indicated that the vicinity of Pro70 and Thr72 might be utilized as a subsite, and the discovered pyrazole derivatives might provide useful hints for developing novel BACE1 inhibitors as anti-AD drugs.

  13. The precursor strategy: terminus methoxyoxalamido modifiers for single and multiple functionalization of oligodeoxyribonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Polushin, Nikolai N.

    2000-01-01

    Synthesis of new terminus modifiers, bearing, along with a phosphoramidite moiety, one, two or four methoxyoxalamido (MOX) precursor groups, is described. These modifiers are introduced onto the 5′-end of a synthetic oligodeoxyribonucleotide as the last step of an automated synthesis to form the MOX precursor oligonucleotide. The MOX groups are then post-synthetically derivatized with an appropriate primary amine to construct a 5′-modified oligonucleotide. The efficiency and simplicity of the novel modifying strategy were demonstrated in the synthesis of a number of 5′-functionalized oligonucleotides. PMID:10931928

  14. Tool for Insertion of a Fiber-Optic Terminus in a Connector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Wes; Domonoske, Donald J.; Krier, John; White, John

    2004-01-01

    A tool has been developed for the special purpose of inserting the terminus of an optical fiber in a cable connector that conforms to NASA Specification SSQ- 21635. What prompted the development of the tool was the observation that because of some aspects of the designs of fiber-optic termini and of springs, sealing rings, and a grommet inside the shell of such a connector, there is a tendency for the grommet to become damaged and detached from the sealing rings during installation. It is necessary to ensure the integrity of the grommet for proper sealing and proper functioning of the connector. The special-purpose tool provides the needed protection for the grommet. The grommet-protection tool resembles a funnel into which an axial slit has been cut (see figure). Prior to insertion, the grommet-protection tool is rolled so that one side of the slit overlaps the other side. The rolled-up grommet-protection tool is inserted in one of the connector holes that accommodate the fiber-optic termini and is pushed in until the flange (the wider of the two conical portions) of the tool becomes seated on the connector grommet. Then a special-purpose installation tool is inserted in the flange of the grommet-protection tool and pressed in until it becomes seated in the flange. This operation expands the narrower of the two conical portions of the grommet-protection tool. The installation tool is removed and the grommet-protection tool remains expanded due to the flat surfaces on the axial slit. By use of a standard contact-insertion tool, a fiber-optic terminus is inserted, through the grommet-protection tool, into the connector cavity. By use of a pair of forceps or needle-nose pliers, the grommet-protection tool is then pulled out of the cavity. Finally, the grommet-protection tool is removed from around the installed fiber-optic cable by pulling the cable through the axial slit. Unlike in some prior procedures for installing the fiber-optic termini in the connector, the

  15. Role of the N-terminus in the structure and stability of chicken annexin V.

    PubMed

    Arboledas, D; Olmo, N; Lizarbe, M A; Turnay, J

    1997-10-20

    The role of the short N-terminal region of chicken annexin V in the maintenance of the protein structure and its influence in the conformation of the calcium binding regions was analyzed. The N-terminal domain is not essential for protein folding, wild-type and dnt-annexin V showing almost identical secondary structures. However, the partial truncation of the N-terminus significantly decreases the melting temperature of the protein and induces the partial exposure of Trp187 which is normally located in a hydrophobic pocket of the calcium binding region of domain 3 of annexin V in the Ca2+-free form.

  16. The role of the Cx43 C-terminus in GJ plaque formation and internalization

    SciTech Connect

    Wayakanon, Praween; Bhattacharjee, Rajib; Nakahama, Ken-ichi; Morita, Ikuo

    2012-04-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cx43-GFP or -DsRed fusion proteins were expressed in HeLa cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Roles of C-terminus were examined using various mutants. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Gap junction plaque size was dependent on the length of C-terminus. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer C-terminus dependent gap junction plaque internalization was observed. -- Abstract: Connexin 43 (Cx43) is a major gap junction (GJ) protein found in many mammalian cell types. The C-terminal (CT) domain of Cx43 has unique characteristics in terms of amino acid (aa) sequence and its length differs from other connexins. This CT domain can be associated with protein partners to regulate GJ assembly and degradation, which results in the direct control of gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC). However, the essential roles of the CT regions involved in these mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. In this study, we aimed to investigate the specific regions of Cx43CT involved in GJ formation and internalization. Wild type Cx43{sub (382aa)} and 10 CT truncated mutants were stably expressed in HeLa cells as GFP or DsRed tagged proteins. First, we found that the deletion of 235-382aa from Cx43 resulted in failure to make GJ and establish GJIC. Second, the Cx43 with 242-382aa CT deletion could form functional GJs and be internalized as annular gap junctions (AGJs). However, the plaques consisting of Cx43 with CT deletions ({Delta}242-382aa to {Delta}271-382aa) were longer than the plaques consisting of Cx43 with CT deletions ({Delta}302-382aa). Third, co-culture experiments of cells expressing wild type Cx43{sub (382)} with cells expressing Cx43CT mutants revealed that the directions of GJ internalization were dependent on the length of the respective CT. Moreover, a specific region, 325-342aa residues of Cx43, played an important role in the direction of GJ internalization. These results showed the important roles of the Cx43 C-terminus in GJ

  17. Structural and Functional Properties of Peptides Based on the N-terminus of HIV-1 gp41 and the C-terminus of the Amyloid-Beta Protein

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Larry M.; Nisthal, Alex; Lee, Andy B.; Eskandari, Sepehr; Ruchala, Piotr; Jung, Chun-Ling; Waring, Alan J.; Mobley, Patrick W.

    2008-01-01

    Given their high alanine and glycine levels, plaque formation, α-helix to β-sheet interconversion and fusogenicity, FP (i.e., the N-terminal fusion peptide of HIV-1 gp41; 23 residues) and amyloids were proposed as belonging to the same protein superfamily. Here, we further test whether FP may exhibit ‘amyloid-like’ characteristics, by contrasting its structural and functional properties with those of Aβ(26–42), a 17-residue peptide from the C-terminus of the amyloid-beta protein responsible for Alzheimer’s. FTIR spectroscopy, electron microscopy, light scattering and predicted amyloid structure aggregation (PASTA) indicated that aqueous FP and Aβ(26–42) formed similar networked β-sheet fibrils, although the FP fibril interactions were weaker. FP and Aβ(26–42) both lysed and aggregated human erythrocytes, with the hemolysis-onsets correlated with the conversion of α-helix to β-sheet for each peptide in liposomes. Congo red (CR), a marker of amyloid plaques in situ, similarly inhibited either FP- or Aβ(26–42)-induced hemolysis, and surface plasmon resonance indicated that this may be due to direct CR-peptide binding. These findings suggest that membrane-bound β-sheets of FP may contribute to the cytopathicity of HIV in vivo through an amyloid-type mechanism, and support the classification of HIV-1 FP as an ‘amyloid homolog’ (or ‘amylog’). PMID:18515070

  18. Effects of carboxy methyl cellulose and thymol + carvacrol on performance, digesta viscosity and some blood metabolites of broilers.

    PubMed

    Hashemipour, H; Kermanshahi, H; Golian, A; Khaksar, V

    2014-08-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of thymol + carvacrol as plant essential oils on performance, digesta viscosity and some blood metabolites of broilers fed diets supplemented with carboxy methyl cellulose (CMC) and/or thymol+carvacrol. In a completely randomized design with a 2 × 3 factorial arrangement, two levels of CMC (0% and 2%) and three levels of thymol+carvacrol (0, 100 and 200 mg/kg) were used. Each of the six dietary treatments was fed to five replicate pens of 12 birds each from 0 to 42 days of age. Body weight gain (BWG), feed intake, feed conversion ratio (FCR), intestinal digesta viscosity and pH, plasma lipids and some blood metabolites were recorded. The inclusion of 2% CMC decreased (p < 0.05) BWG by 2.2% and increased FCR by 2.3% at 42 days of age. Carboxy methyl cellulose significantly increased the digesta viscosity and decreased serum total cholesterol, but had no significant effect on triglyceride, pH, HDL, LDL and other blood metabolites measured in this experiment. Thymol+carvacrol had no effect on feed intake, but significantly increased (p < 0.05) BWG from 1 to 42 days of age and improved FCR (p < 0.05) by the addition of 100 and 200 mg/kg thymol+carvacrol respectively. Inclusion of thymol+carvacrol at levels of 100 and 200 mg/kg in the diets decreased digesta viscosity and serum total cholesterol (p < 0.05) and also increased AST at a 200 mg/kg thymol+carvacrol without any effect on creatine kinase (CK). Thymol+carvacrol significantly increased total protein (TP), albumin and globulin (p < 0.05). In conclusion, CMC at an inclusion level of 2% of diet increased digesta viscosity and reduced growth performance. However, thymol+carvacrol decreased digesta viscosity and consequently improved the performance of broilers fed the CMC-based diet. Therefore, thymol+carvacrol addition to viscose-based diets might be helpful to alleviate the negative effects of viscous compounds in poultry diets.

  19. Conserved arginine residues in the carboxyl terminus of the equine arteritis virus E protein may play a role in heparin binding but may not affect viral infectivity in equine endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhengchun; Sarkar, Sanjay; Zhang, Jianqiang; Balasuriya, Udeni B R

    2016-04-01

    Equine arteritis virus (EAV), the causative agent of equine viral arteritis, has relatively broad cell tropism in vitro. In horses, EAV primarily replicates in macrophages and endothelial cells of small blood vessels. Until now, neither the cellular receptor(s) nor the mechanism(s) of virus attachment and entry have been determined for this virus. In this study, we investigated the effect of heparin on EAV infection in equine endothelial cells (EECs). Heparin, but not other glycosaminoglycans, could reduce EAV infection up to 93 %. Sequence analysis of the EAV E minor envelope protein revealed a conserved amino acid sequence (52 RSLVARCSRGARYR 65) at the carboxy terminus of the E protein, which was predicted to be the heparin-binding domain. The basic arginine (R) amino acid residues were subsequently mutated to glycine by site-directed mutagenesis of ORF2a in an E protein expression vector and an infectious cDNA clone of EAV. Two single mutations in E (R52G and R57G) did not affect the heparin-binding capability, whereas the E double mutation (R52,60G) completely eliminated the interaction between the E protein and heparin. Although the mutant R52,60G EAV did not bind heparin, the mutations did not completely abolish infectivity, indicating that heparin is not the only critical factor for EAV infection. This also suggested that other viral envelope protein(s) might be involved in attachment through heparin or other cell-surface molecules, and this warrants further investigation.

  20. Calmodulin and S100A1 protein interact with N terminus of TRPM3 channel.

    PubMed

    Holakovska, Blanka; Grycova, Lenka; Jirku, Michaela; Sulc, Miroslav; Bumba, Ladislav; Teisinger, Jan

    2012-05-11

    Transient receptor potential melastatin 3 ion channel (TRPM3) belongs to the TRP family of cation-permeable ion channels involved in many important biological functions such as pain transduction, thermosensation, and mechanoregulation. The channel was reported to play an important role in Ca(2+) homeostasis, but its gating mechanisms, functions, and regulation are still under research. Utilizing biophysical and biochemical methods, we characterized two independent domains, Ala-35-Lys-124 and His-291-Gly-382, on the TRPM3 N terminus, responsible for interactions with the Ca(2+)-binding proteins calmodulin (CaM) and S100A1. We identified several positively charged residues within these domains as having a crucial impact on CaM/S100A1 binding. The data also suggest that the interaction is calcium-dependent. We also performed competition assays, which suggested that CaM and S100A1 are able to compete for the same binding sites within the TRPM3 N terminus. This is the first time that such an interaction has been shown for TRP family members.

  1. Glacier terminus fluctuations on Mt. Baker, Washington, USA, 1940-1990, and climatic variations

    SciTech Connect

    Harper, J.T. )

    1993-11-01

    The terminus positions of six glaciers located on Mount Baker, Washington, were mapped by photogrammetric techniques at 2- to 7-yr intervals for the period 1940-1990. Although the timing varied slightly, each of the glaciers experienced a similar fluctuation sequence consisting of three phases: (1) rapid retreat, beginning prior to 1940 and lasting through the late 1940s to early 1950s; (2) approximately 30 yr of advance, ending in the late 1970s to early 1980s; (3) retreat though 1990. Terminus positions changed by up to 750 m during phases, with the advance phase increasing the lengths of glaciers by 13 to 24%. These fluctuations are well explained by variations in a smoothed time-series of accumulation-season precipitation and ablation-season mean temperature. The study glaciers appear to respond to interannual scale changes in climate within 20 yr or less. The glaciers on Mount Baker have a maritime location and a large percentage of area at high elevation, which may make their termini undergo greater fluctuations in response to climatic changes, especially precipitation variations, than most other glaciers in the North Cascades region. 40 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Subcellular localization of RNAs in transfected cells: role of sequences at the 5' terminus.

    PubMed Central

    Alfonso-Pizarro, A; Carlson, D P; Ross, J

    1984-01-01

    We have investigated the intracellular location of RNAs transcribed from transfected DNA. COS cells transfected with a clone containing the human adult beta globin gene contain three classes of globin RNAs. Their 3' termini and splice sites are indistinguishable from those of mature reticulocyte beta globin mRNA, and they are polyadenylated. However, as determined by S1 mapping, their 5' sequences are different. The 5' terminus of one is the same as that of mature beta globin mRNA (+1, cap site). The presumed 5' terminus of the second is located 30 nucleotides downstream from the cap site (+30). The third class contains additional nucleotides transcribed from sequences located 5' to the cap site (5' upstream RNA). The 5' upstream RNA molecules are restricted to the nucleus and are more stable than heterogeneous nuclear RNA. The +30 and +1 RNAs are located primarily in the cytoplasm. The data support the notion that nucleotide sequences and/or secondary modifications in the 5' region determine if an RNA is to be transported. Images PMID:6209612

  3. Capping of the N-terminus of PSD-95 by calmodulin triggers its postsynaptic release.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yonghong; Matt, Lucas; Patriarchi, Tommaso; Malik, Zulfiqar A; Chowdhury, Dhrubajyoti; Park, Deborah K; Renieri, Alessandra; Ames, James B; Hell, Johannes W

    2014-06-17

    Postsynaptic density protein-95 (PSD-95) is a central element of the postsynaptic architecture of glutamatergic synapses. PSD-95 mediates postsynaptic localization of AMPA receptors and NMDA receptors and plays an important role in synaptic plasticity. PSD-95 is released from postsynaptic membranes in response to Ca(2+) influx via NMDA receptors. Here, we show that Ca(2+)/calmodulin (CaM) binds at the N-terminus of PSD-95. Our NMR structure reveals that both lobes of CaM collapse onto a helical structure of PSD-95 formed at its N-terminus (residues 1-16). This N-terminal capping of PSD-95 by CaM blocks palmitoylation of C3 and C5, which is required for postsynaptic PSD-95 targeting and the binding of CDKL5, a kinase important for synapse stability. CaM forms extensive hydrophobic contacts with Y12 of PSD-95. The PSD-95 mutant Y12E strongly impairs binding to CaM and Ca(2+)-induced release of PSD-95 from the postsynaptic membrane in dendritic spines. Our data indicate that CaM binding to PSD-95 serves to block palmitoylation of PSD-95, which in turn promotes Ca(2+)-induced dissociation of PSD-95 from the postsynaptic membrane.

  4. The C-terminus of IGFBP-5 suppresses tumor growth by inhibiting angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jae Ryoung; Cho, Young-Jae; Lee, Yoonna; Park, Youngmee; Han, Hee Dong; Ahn, Hyung Jun; Lee, Je-Ho; Lee, Jeong-Won

    2016-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 5 (IGFBP-5) plays a role in cell growth, differentiation, and apoptosis. In this study, we found that IGFBP5 was markedly downregulated in ovarian cancer tissue. We investigated the functional significance of IGFBP-5 as a tumor suppressor. To determine functional regions of IGFBP-5, truncation mutants were prepared and were studied the effect on tumor growth. Expression of C-terminal region of IGFBP-5 significantly decreased tumor growth in an ovarian cancer xenograft. A peptide derived from the C-terminus of IGFBP-5 (BP5-C) was synthesized to evaluate the minimal amino acid motif that retained anti-tumorigenic activity and its effect on angiogenesis was studied. BP5-C peptide decreased the expression of VEGF-A and MMP-9, phosphorylation of Akt and ERK, and NF-kB activity, and inhibited angiogenesis in in vitro and ex vivo systems. Furthermore, BP5-C peptide significantly decreased tumor weight and angiogenesis in both ovarian cancer orthotopic xenograft and patient-derived xenograft mice. These results suggest that the C-terminus of IGFBP-5 exerts anti-cancer activity by inhibiting angiogenesis via regulation of the Akt/ERK and NF-kB–VEGF/MMP-9 signaling pathway, and might be considered as a novel angiogenesis inhibitor for the treatment of ovarian cancer. PMID:28008951

  5. Numerical Modeling of Climatic Change from the Terminus Record of Lewis Glacier, Mount Kenya.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruss, Phillip Donald

    Over the last 100 years, the glaciers and lakes of East Africa have undergone dramatic change in response to climatic forcing. However, the available conventional meterological series have not proven sufficient to explain these environmental events. The secular climatic change at Lewis Glacier, Mount Kenya (0(DEGREES)9'S, 37(DEGREES)19'E), is reconstructed from its terminus record documented since 1893. The short-time-step numerical model developed for this study consists of climate and ice dynamics segments. The climate segment directly computes the effect on the net balance of change in the four forcings: precipitation, albedo, cloudiness, and temperature. The flow segment calculates the dynamic glacier response to net balance variation. Climatic change occurs over a wide range of time scales. Each glacier responds in a unique fashion to this spectrum of climatic forcings. The response of the Lewis terminus extent to repeated sinusoidal fluctuation in the net balance is calculated. The net balance versus elevation profile is separately translated along the orthogonal balance and elevation axes. Net balance amplitudes of 0.1 to 0.5 m a('-1) of ice and 10 to 50 m elevation, respectively, and periods ranging from 20 to 1000 years are covered. Consideration of the Lewis response is perspective with similar results for Hintereisferner, Storglaciaren, and Berendon and South Cascade Glaciers identifies general characteristics of the time lag and amplitude of the terminus response. The magnitude and timing of the change in only one of the climatic forcings precipitation, albedo, cloudiness, or temperature necessary to produce the retreat of the Lewis terminus from its late 19th century maximum are computed. Equivalent changes for two scenarios of simultaneous variation, namely precipitation/albedo/cloudiness and temperature/albedo, are also estimated. These numerical results are interpreted in the light of long-term lake level, river flow, and instrumental information. A

  6. Mucosal Antibodies to the C Terminus of Toxin A Prevent Colonization of Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Hong, Huynh A; Hitri, Krisztina; Hosseini, Siamand; Kotowicz, Natalia; Bryan, Donna; Mawas, Fatme; Wilkinson, Anthony J; van Broekhoven, Annie; Kearsey, Jonathan; Cutting, Simon M

    2017-04-01

    Mucosal immunity is considered important for protection against Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). We show that in hamsters immunized with Bacillus subtilis spores expressing a carboxy-terminal segment (TcdA26-39) of C. difficile toxin A, no colonization occurs in protected animals when challenged with C. difficile strain 630. In contrast, animals immunized with toxoids showed no protection and remained fully colonized. Along with neutralizing toxins, antibodies to TcdA26-39 (but not to toxoids), whether raised to the recombinant protein or to TcdA26-39 expressed on the B. subtilis spore surface, cross-react with a number of seemingly unrelated proteins expressed on the vegetative cell surface or spore coat of C. difficile These include two dehydrogenases, AdhE1 and LdhA, as well as the CdeC protein that is present on the spore. Anti-TcdA26-39 mucosal antibodies obtained following immunization with recombinant B. subtilis spores were able to reduce the adhesion of C. difficile to mucus-producing intestinal cells. This cross-reaction is intriguing yet important since it illustrates the importance of mucosal immunity for complete protection against CDI.

  7. Triclinic modification of diaqua-bis-(5-carb-oxy-1H-imidazole-4-carboxyl-ato-κ(2)N(3),O(4))iron(II).

    PubMed

    Ohshima, Eriko; Yoshida, Kazuki; Sugiyama, Kazumasa; Uekusa, Hidehiro

    2012-08-01

    The title compound, [Fe(C(5)H(3)N(2)O(4))(2)(H(2)O)(2)], is a triclinic modification of a monoclinic form recently reported by Du et al. [Acta Cryst. (2011) ▶, E67, m997]. The Fe(II) ion lies at an inversion center and is coordinated by two N and two O atoms from two 5-carb-oxy-1H-imidazole-4-carboxyl-ate ligands in trans positions, together with two water mol-ecules, completing a slightly distorted octahedral coordination. Inter-molecular N-H⋯O hydrogen bonding between the N-H group of the imidazole ring and the deprotonated carboxyl-ate group builds a chain of 5-carb-oxy-1H-imidazole-4-carboxyl-ate anions along the [101] direction. The water molecules form intermolecular hydrogen bonds to O-C and O=C sites of the carboxylate group in adjacent layers.

  8. Urinary elimination of 11-nor-9-carboxy-delta9-tetrahydrocannnabinol in cannabis users during continuously monitored abstinence.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, Robert S; Darwin, William D; Chiang, C Nora; Shih, Ming; Li, Shou-Hua; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2008-10-01

    The time course of 11-nor-9-carboxy-Delta9-tetrahydrocannnabinol (THCCOOH) elimination in urine was characterized in 60 cannabis users during 24 h monitored abstinence on a closed research unit for up to 30 days. Six thousand, one hundred fifty-eight individual urine specimens were screened by immunoassay with values > or = 50 ng/mL classified as positive. Urine specimens were confirmed for THCCOOH by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry following base hydrolysis and liquid-liquid or solid-phase extraction. In 60%, the maximum creatinine normalized concentration occurred in the first urine specimen; in 40%, peaks occurred as long as 2.9 days after admission. Data were divided into three groups, 0-50, 51-150, and > 150 ng/mg, based on the creatinine corrected initial THCCOOH concentration. There were statistically significant correlations between groups and number of days until first negative and last positive urine specimens; mean number of days were 0.6 and 4.3, 3.2 and 9.7, and 4.7 and 15.4 days, respectively, for the three groups. These data provide guidelines for interpreting urine cannabinoid test results and suggest appropriate detection windows for differentiating new cannabis use from residual drug excretion.

  9. Pharmacokinetic and milk penetration of a difloxacin long-acting poloxamer gel formulation with carboxy-methylcellulose in lactating goats.

    PubMed

    Escudero, Elisa; Marín, Pedro; Cárceles, Carlos M; Ramírez, María J; Fernández-Varón, Emilio

    2011-04-01

    The single-dose disposition kinetics of difloxacin were determined in clinically normal lactating goats (n=6) after subcutaneous administration of a long-acting poloxamer 407 gel formulation with carboxy-methylcellulose (P407-CMC). Difloxacin concentrations were determined by high performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection. The concentration-time data were analysed by non-compartmental kinetic methods. Plasma and milk elimination half-lives after P407-CMC dosing were 35.19 h and 33.93 h, respectively. With this formulation, difloxacin achieved maximum plasma concentrations of 2.67±0.34 mg/L at 2.92±1.20 h and maximum milk concentrations of 2.31±0.35 mg/L at 4.00±0.00 h. The area under the curve (AUC) ratio AUC(milk)/AUC(plasma) was 0.89 after P407-CMC administration. It was concluded that a 15 mg/kg dose of difloxacin within P407-CMC would be effective against mastitis pathogens with a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC)≤0.12 mg/L.

  10. Sulfation pattern of citrus pectin and its carboxy-reduced derivatives: influence on anticoagulant and antithrombotic effects.

    PubMed

    Maas, Nadiezda C; Gracher, Ana Helena P; Sassaki, Guilherme L; Gorin, Philip A J; Iacomini, Marcello; Cipriani, Thales R

    2012-08-01

    Citrus pectin (CP), a polysaccharide composed of [→4)-α-D-GalpA-(1→]n, was submitted to one or four carboxy-reduction cycles, resulting in CP-CR1 and CP-CR4, which had 40% and 2% of GalpA units, respectively. The polysaccharides were chemically sulfated and their anticoagulant and antithrombotic effects determined. Sulfated polysaccharides (CP-S, CP-CR1S and CP-CR4S) had different anticoagulant activities, doubling APTT at concentrations of 28.7, 13.2, and 4.9 μg/ml respectively. CP-CR1S and CP-CR4S also showed antithrombotic activity in vivo with ED50 of 3.01 and 1.70 mg/kg, respectively. Like heparin, they inhibited thrombin by a mechanism dependent on AT and HCII. Their hemorrhagic potential was also similar to that of heparin. According to methylation analysis, 91.1% and 50.2% of 6-O-position in CP-CR4S and CP-CR1S were sulfated, respectively. Therefore, substitution of carboxyl groups by sulfate esters in these polysaccharides increases the anticoagulant and antithrombotic effects.

  11. The Carboxy-Terminal Domain of Erb1 Is a Seven-Bladed ß-Propeller that Binds RNA

    PubMed Central

    Marcin, Wegrecki; Neira, Jose Luis; Bravo, Jeronimo

    2015-01-01

    Erb1 (Eukaryotic Ribosome Biogenesis 1) protein is essential for the maturation of the ribosomal 60S subunit. Functional studies in yeast and mammalian cells showed that altogether with Nop7 and Ytm1 it forms a stable subcomplex called PeBoW that is crucial for a correct rRNA processing. The exact function of the protein within the process remains unknown. The N-terminal region of the protein includes a well conserved region shown to be involved in PeBoW complex formation whereas the carboxy-terminal half was predicted to contain seven WD40 repeats. This first structural report on Erb1 from yeast describes the architecture of a seven-bladed β-propeller domain that revealed a characteristic extra motif formed by two α-helices and a β-strand that insert within the second WD repeat. We performed analysis of molecular surface and crystal packing, together with multiple sequence alignment and comparison of the structure with other β-propellers, in order to identify areas that are more likely to mediate protein-protein interactions. The abundance of many positively charged residues on the surface of the domain led us to investigate whether the propeller of Erb1 might be involved in RNA binding. Three independent assays confirmed that the protein interacted in vitro with polyuridilic acid (polyU), thus suggesting a possible role of the domain in rRNA rearrangement during ribosome biogenesis. PMID:25880847

  12. The carboxy-terminal domain of Erb1 is a seven-bladed ß-propeller that binds RNA.

    PubMed

    Wegrecki, Marcin; Marcin, Wegrecki; Neira, Jose Luis; Bravo, Jeronimo

    2015-01-01

    Erb1 (Eukaryotic Ribosome Biogenesis 1) protein is essential for the maturation of the ribosomal 60S subunit. Functional studies in yeast and mammalian cells showed that altogether with Nop7 and Ytm1 it forms a stable subcomplex called PeBoW that is crucial for a correct rRNA processing. The exact function of the protein within the process remains unknown. The N-terminal region of the protein includes a well conserved region shown to be involved in PeBoW complex formation whereas the carboxy-terminal half was predicted to contain seven WD40 repeats. This first structural report on Erb1 from yeast describes the architecture of a seven-bladed β-propeller domain that revealed a characteristic extra motif formed by two α-helices and a β-strand that insert within the second WD repeat. We performed analysis of molecular surface and crystal packing, together with multiple sequence alignment and comparison of the structure with other β-propellers, in order to identify areas that are more likely to mediate protein-protein interactions. The abundance of many positively charged residues on the surface of the domain led us to investigate whether the propeller of Erb1 might be involved in RNA binding. Three independent assays confirmed that the protein interacted in vitro with polyuridilic acid (polyU), thus suggesting a possible role of the domain in rRNA rearrangement during ribosome biogenesis.

  13. Pharmacokinetics of 11-nor-9-carboxy-Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (CTHC) after intravenous administration of CTHC in healthy human subjects.

    PubMed

    Glaz-Sandberg, A; Dietz, L; Nguyen, H; Oberwittler, H; Aderjan, Rolf; Mikus, Gerd

    2007-07-01

    After cannabis consumption there is only limited knowledge about the pharmacokinetic (PK) and metabolic properties of 11-nor-9-carboxy-Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (CTHC), which is formed by oxidative breakdown from Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). Despite widely-varying concentrations observed in smoking studies, attempts have been made to interpret consumption behavior with special regard to a cumulated or decreasing concentration of CTHC in serum. Ten healthy nonsmoking white male individuals received 5 mg CTHC intravenously over 10 min. Highest serum concentrations of CTHC were observed at the end of the infusion (336.8+/-61.7 microg/l) followed by a quick decline. CTHC concentration could be quantified up to 96 h after administration, with a terminal elimination half-life of 17.6+/-5.5 h. Total clearance was low (91.2+/-24.0 ml/min), with renal clearance having only a minor contribution (0.136+/-0.094 ml/min). This first metabolite-based kinetic approach will allow an advanced understanding of CTHC PKs data obtained in previous studies with THC.

  14. Growth, spectral, optical, thermal, and mechanical behaviour of an organic single crystal: Quinolinium 2-carboxy 6-nitrophthalate monohydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohana, J.; Ahila, G.; Bharathi, M. Divya; Anbalagan, G.

    2016-09-01

    Organic single crystals of quinolinium 2-carboxy 6-nitrophthalate monohydrate (QN) were grown by slow evaporation solution growth technique using ethanol and water as a mixed solvent. X-ray powder diffraction analysis revealed that the crystal belongs to the monoclinic crystal system with space group of P21/c. The functional groups present in the crystallized material confirmed its molecular structure. The optical transparency range and the lower cutoff wavelength were identified from the UV-vis spectrum. The optical constants were determined by UV-visible transmission spectrum at normal incidence, measured over the 200-700 nm spectral range. The dispersion of the refractive index was discussed in terms of the single-oscillator Wemple and DiDomenico model. The calculated HOMO and LUMO energies show that the charge transfer occur within the molecule. Electronic excitation properties were discussed within the framework of two level model on the basis of an orbital analysis. The nonlinear optical absorption coefficient (β) and nonlinear refraction (n2) of QN was measured by Z-scan technique and reported here. Thermal stability of QN was determined using TGA/DSC curves. Vicker's microhardness studies were carried out on the (1 1 ̅0) plane to understand the mechanical properties of the grown crystal. The microhardness measurements showed a Vickers hardness value as 18.4 kg/mm2 which is comparable to well-known organic crystal, urea.

  15. Differential expression of ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase L1 in breast carcinoma and its biological significance.

    PubMed

    Lien, Huang-Chun; Wang, Chung-Chieh; Lin, Ching-Hung; Lu, Yen-Shen; Huang, Chiun-Sheng; Hsiao, Li-Ping; Yao, Yu-Tung

    2013-09-01

    Ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase L1 (UCHL1) is a deubiquitinating enzyme that hydrolyzes ubiquitin. Previous reports have shown both tumorigenic and antitumorigenic roles for UCHL1. However, the expression patterns of UCHL1 protein, an area that is critical for validating its clinicopathologic roles among subtypes of breast cancer, is still lacking. Here we examined the expression of UCHL1 by immunohistochemistry in 243 breast carcinomas of various subtypes. We found expression of UCHL1 in 8.3% of invasive ductal carcinomas but not in other carcinoma subtypes, except for metaplastic carcinomas of the breast, which showed UCHL1 staining in 61.9% of cases, with the sarcomatous components being more intensely stained. UCHL1 expression in invasive ductal carcinomas significantly correlated with a high histologic grade (P = .001), the triple-negative phenotype (P = .02), and the basal-like phenotype (P <.001); furthermore, it was associated with poorer overall survival by univariate and multivariate analyses. Knockdown of UCHL1 in an invasive Snail variant-transfected MCF7 cells with high endogenous UCHL1 protein level significantly reduced invasion and anchorage-independent growth. Conclusively, our results demonstrate a role for UCHL1 in aggressive phenotypes in breast carcinoma. The high expression of UCHL1 in metaplastic carcinomas of the breast, which is pathogenically related to epithelial-mesenchymal transition, may implicate an association between UCHL1 expression and the epithelial-mesenchymal transition in breast cancer.

  16. 2-Carboxy-D-arabinitol 1-phosphate (CA1P) phosphatase: evidence for a wider role in plant Rubisco regulation.

    PubMed

    Andralojc, Paul John; Madgwick, Pippa J; Tao, Yong; Keys, Alfred; Ward, Jane L; Beale, Michael H; Loveland, Jane E; Jackson, Phil J; Willis, Antony C; Gutteridge, Steven; Parry, Martin A J

    2012-03-15

    The genes for CA1Pase (2-carboxy-D-arabinitol-1-bisphosphate phosphatase) from French bean, wheat, Arabidopsis and tobacco were identified and cloned. The deduced protein sequence included an N-terminal motif identical with the PGM (phosphoglycerate mutase) active site sequence [LIVM]-x-R-H-G-[EQ]-x-x-[WN]. The corresponding gene from wheat coded for an enzyme with the properties published for CA1Pase. The expressed protein lacked PGM activity but rapidly dephosphorylated 2,3-DPG (2,3-diphosphoglycerate) to 2-phosphoglycerate. DTT (dithiothreitol) activation and GSSG inactivation of this enzyme was pH-sensitive, the greatest difference being apparent at pH 8. The presence of the expressed protein during in vitro measurement of Rubisco (ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase) activity prevented a progressive decline in Rubisco turnover. This was due to the removal of an inhibitory bisphosphate that was present in the RuBP (ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate) preparation, and was found to be PDBP (D-glycero-2,3-pentodiulose-1,5-bisphosphate). The substrate specificity of the expressed protein indicates a role for CA1Pase in the removal of 'misfire' products of Rubisco.

  17. Further characterization of functional domains of PerA, role of amino and carboxy terminal domains in DNA binding.

    PubMed

    Ibarra, J Antonio; García-Zacarias, Claudia M; Lara-Ochoa, Cristina; Carabarin-Lima, Alejandro; Tecpanecatl-Xihuitl, J Sergio; Perez-Rueda, Ernesto; Martínez-Laguna, Ygnacio; Puente, José L

    2013-01-01

    PerA is a key regulator of virulence genes in enteropathogenic E. coli. PerA is a member of the AraC/XylS family of transcriptional regulators that directly regulates the expression of the bfp and per operons in response to different environmental cues. Here, we characterized mutants in both the amino (NTD) and carboxy (CTD) terminal domains of PerA that affect its ability to activate the expression of the bfp and per promoters. Mutants at residues predicted to be important for DNA binding within the CTD had a significant defect in their ability to bind to the regulatory regions of the bfp and per operons and, consequently, in transcriptional activation. Notably, mutants in specific NTD residues were also impaired to bind to DNA suggesting that this domain is involved in structuring the protein for correct DNA recognition. Mutations in residues E116 and D168, located in the vicinity of the putative linker region, significantly affected the activation of the perA promoter, without affecting PerA binding to the per or bfp regulatory sequences. Overall these results provide additional evidence of the importance of the N-terminal domain in PerA activity and suggest that the activation of these promoters involves differential interactions with the transcriptional machinery. This study further contributes to the characterization of the functional domains of PerA by identifying critical residues involved in DNA binding, differential promoter activation and, potentially, in the possible response to environmental cues.

  18. Amino- and carboxy-terminal domains of the yeast Rab escort protein are both required for binding of Ypt small G proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, B E; Lorenzetti, S; Miaczynska, M; Bui, D M; Schweyen, R J; Ragnini, A

    1996-01-01

    The Rab escort protein (REP) is an essential component of the heterotrimeric enzyme Rab geranylgeranyl transferase that modifies the carboxy-terminal cysteines of the Ras-like small G proteins belonging to the Rab/Ypt family. Deletions in the human CHM locus, encoding one of the two REPs known in humans, result in a retinal degenerative syndrome called choroideremia. The only known yeast homologue of the choroideremia gene product is encoded by an essential gene called MRS6. Besides three structurally conserved regions (SCRs) previously detected in the amino-terminal half of REPs and RabGDIs, three other regions in the carboxy-terminal domain (RCR 1-3) are here identified as being characteristic of REPs alone. We have performed the first mutational analysis of a REP protein to experimentally define the regions functionally important for Rab/Ypt protein binding, making use of the genetic system of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This analysis has shown that the SCRs are necessary but not sufficient for Ypt1p binding by the yeast REP, the carboxy-terminal region also being required. Images PMID:8898359

  19. Phosphorylation and Ionic Strength Alter the LRAP-HAP Interface in the N-terminus

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Junxia; Xu, Yimin; Shaw, Wendy J.

    2013-04-02

    The conditions present during enamel crystallite development change dramatically as a function of time, including the pH, protein concentration, surface type and ionic strength. In this work, we investigate the role that two of these changing conditions, pH and ionic strength, have in modulating the interaction of amelogenin, LRAP, with hydroxyapatite (HAP). Using solid state NMR dipolar recoupling and chemical shift data, we investigate the structure, orientation and dynamics of three regions in the N-terminus of the protein, L15 to V19, V19 to L23 and K24 to S28. These regions are also near the only phosphorylated residue in the protein, pS16, therefore, changes in the LRAP-HAP interaction as a function of phosphorylation (LRAP(-P) vs. LRAP(+P)) were also investigated. All of the regions and conditions studies for the surface immobilized proteins showed restricted motion, with more mobility under all conditions for L15(+P) and K24(-P). The structure and orientation of the LRAP-HAP interaction in the N-terminus of the phosphorylated protein is very stable to changing solution conditions. From REDOR dipolar recoupling data, the structure and orientation in the region L15V19(+P) did not change significantly as a function of pH or ionic strength. The structure and orientation of the region V19L23(+P) were also stable to changes in pH, with the only significant change observed at high ionic strength, where the region becomes extended, suggesting this may be an important region in regulating mineral development. Chemical shift studies also suggest minimal changes in all three regions studied for both LRAP(-P) and LRAP(+P) as a function of pH or ionic strength. Phosphorylation also alters the LRAP-HAP interface. All of the three residues investigated (L15, V19, and K24) are closer to the surface in LRAP(+P), but K24S28 also changes structure as a result of phosphorylation, from a random coil to a largely helical structure, and V19L23 becomes more extended at high ionic

  20. Properties of GluR3 receptors tagged with GFP at the amino or carboxyl terminus

    PubMed Central

    Limon, Agenor; Reyes-Ruiz, Jorge Mauricio; Eusebi, Fabrizio; Miledi, Ricardo

    2007-01-01

    Anatomical visualization of neurotransmitter receptor localization is facilitated by tagging receptors, but this process can alter their functional properties. We have evaluated the distribution and properties of WT glutamate receptor 3 (GluR3) α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA) receptors (WT GluR3) and two receptors in which GFP was tagged to the amino terminus (GFP-GluR3) or to the carboxyl terminus (GluR3-GFP). Although the fluorescence in Xenopus oocytes was stronger in the vegetal hemisphere because of localization of internal structures (probable sites of production, storage or recycling of receptors), the insertion of receptors into the plasma membrane was polarized to the animal hemisphere. The fluorescence intensity of oocytes injected with GluR3-GFP RNA was approximately double that of oocytes injected with GFP-GluR3 RNA. Accordingly, GluR3-GFP oocytes generated larger kainate-induced currents than GFP-GluR3 oocytes, with similar EC50 values. Currents elicited by glutamate, or AMPA coapplied with cyclothiazide, were also larger in GluR3-GFP oocytes. The glutamate- to kainate-current amplitude ratios differed, with GluR3-GFP being activated more efficiently by glutamate than the WT or GFP-GluR3 receptors. This pattern correlates with the slower decay of glutamate-induced currents generated by GluR3-GFP receptors. These changes were not observed when GFP was tagged to the amino terminus, and these receptors behaved like the WT. The antagonistic effects of 6-nitro-7-sulfamoylbenzo[f]quinoxaline-2,3-dione (NBQX) and 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX) were not altered in any of the tagged receptors. We conclude that GFP is a useful and convenient tag for visualizing these proteins. However, the effects of different sites of tag insertion on receptor characteristics must be taken into account in assessing the roles played by these receptor proteins. PMID:17881566

  1. Decorating the lanthanide terminus of self-assembled heterodinuclear lanthanum(III)/gallium(III) helicates.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Markus; Latorre, Irene; Mehmeti, Gent; Hengst, Konstantin; Oppel, Iris M

    2011-12-07

    Arylacylhydrazones of 2,3-dihydroxybenzaldehyde are appropriate ligands for the preparation of heterodinuclear triple-stranded helicates involving high coordinated lanthanide(III) ions. In the present study, three different kinds of substituents are introduced at the ligands in order to modify the organic periphery of the coordination compounds: (1) alkoxy groups are attached to the terminal phenyl groups, (2) NH protons of the hydrazones are substituted by phenyl moieties and (3) amino acid bearing units are attached to the terminus of the ligand. The new ligands nicely form the desired triple-stranded gallium(III)-lanthanum(III) complexes [(5a-c,7,12,15)(3)GaLa] of which the highly phenylated derivative was crystallized and studied by X-ray diffraction.

  2. Telomerase RNA stem terminus element affects template boundary element function, telomere sequence, and shelterin binding.

    PubMed

    Webb, Christopher J; Zakian, Virginia A

    2015-09-08

    The stem terminus element (STE), which was discovered 13 y ago in human telomerase RNA, is required for telomerase activity, yet its mode of action is unknown. We report that the Schizosaccharomyces pombe telomerase RNA, TER1 (telomerase RNA 1), also contains a STE, which is essential for telomere maintenance. Cells expressing a partial loss-of-function TER1 STE allele maintained short stable telomeres by a recombination-independent mechanism. Remarkably, the mutant telomere sequence was different from that of wild-type cells. Generation of the altered sequence is explained by reverse transcription into the template boundary element, demonstrating that the STE helps maintain template boundary element function. The altered telomeres bound less Pot1 (protection of telomeres 1) and Taz1 (telomere-associated in Schizosaccharomyces pombe 1) in vivo. Thus, the S. pombe STE, although distant from the template, ensures proper telomere sequence, which in turn promotes proper assembly of the shelterin complex.

  3. Mutant calreticulin requires both its mutant C-terminus and the thrombopoietin receptor for oncogenic transformation

    PubMed Central

    Elf, Shannon; Abdelfattah, Nouran S.; Chen, Edwin; Perales-Patón, Javier; Rosen, Emily A.; Ko, Amy; Peisker, Fabian; Florescu, Natalie; Giannini, Silvia; Wolach, Ofir; Morgan, Elizabeth A.; Tothova, Zuzana; Losman, Julie-Aurore; Schneider, Rebekka K.; Al-Shahrour, Fatima; Mullally, Ann

    2016-01-01

    Somatic mutations in calreticulin (CALR) are present in approximately 40% of patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) but the mechanism by which mutant CALR is oncogenic remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate that expression of mutant CALR alone is sufficient to engender MPN in mice and recapitulates the disease phenotype of CALR-mutant MPN patients. We further show that the thrombopoietin receptor, MPL is required for mutant CALR-driven transformation through JAK-STAT pathway activation, thus rendering mutant CALR-transformed hematopoietic cells sensitive to JAK2 inhibition. Finally, we demonstrate that the oncogenicity of mutant CALR is dependent on the positive electrostatic charge of the C-terminus of the mutant protein, which is necessary for physical interaction between mutant CALR and MPL. Together, our findings elucidate a novel paradigm of cancer pathogenesis and reveal how CALR mutations induce MPN. PMID:26951227

  4. Localization of the Intracellular Activity Domain of Pasteurella multocida Toxin to the N Terminus

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Brenda A.; Ponferrada, Virgilio G.; Vallance, Jefferson E.; Ho, Mengfei

    1999-01-01

    We have shown that Pasteurella multocida toxin (PMT) directly causes transient activation of Gqα protein that is coupled to phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase Cβ1 in Xenopus oocytes (B. A. Wilson, X. Zhu, M. Ho, and L. Lu, J. Biol. Chem. 272:1268–1275, 1997). We found that antibodies directed against an N-terminal peptide of PMT inhibited the toxin-induced response in Xenopus oocytes, but antibodies against a C-terminal peptide did not. To test whether the intracellular activity domain of PMT is localized to the N terminus, we conducted a deletion mutational analysis of the PMT protein, using the Xenopus oocyte system as a means of screening for toxin activity. Using PCR and conventional cloning techniques, we cloned from a toxinogenic strain of P. multocida the entire toxA gene, encoding the 1,285-amino-acid PMT protein, and expressed the recombinant toxin as a His-tagged fusion protein in Escherichia coli. We subsequently generated a series of N-terminal and C-terminal deletion mutants and expressed the His-tagged PMT fragments in E. coli. These proteins were screened for cytotoxic activity on cultured Vero cells and for intracellular activity in the Xenopus oocyte system. Only the full-length protein without the His tag exhibited activity on Vero cells. The full-length PMT and N-terminal fragments containing the first 500 residues elicited responses in oocytes, but the C-terminal 780 amino acid fragment did not. Our results confirm that the intracellular activity domain of PMT is localized to the N-terminal 500 amino acids of the protein and that the C terminus is required for entry into cells. PMID:9864199

  5. The myristoylated amino terminus of ADP-ribosylation factor 1 is a phospholipid- and GTP-sensitive switch.

    PubMed

    Randazzo, P A; Terui, T; Sturch, S; Fales, H M; Ferrige, A G; Kahn, R A

    1995-06-16

    ADP-ribosylation factor 1 (Arf1) is an essential N-myristoylated 21-kDa GTP-binding protein with activities that include the regulation of membrane traffic and phospholipase D activity. Both the N terminus of the protein and the N-myristate bound to glycine 2 have previously been shown to be essential to the function of Arf in cells. We show that the bound nucleotide affects the conformation of either the N terminus or residues of Arf1 that are in direct contact with the N terminus. This was demonstrated by examining the effects of mutations in this N-terminal domain on guanosine 5'-O-(3-thio)triphosphate (GTP gamma S) and GDP binding and dissociation kinetics. Arf1 mutants, lacking 13 or 17 residues from the N terminus or mutated at residues 3-7, had a greater affinity for GTP gamma S and a lower affinity for GDP than did the wild-type protein. As the N terminus is required for interactions with target proteins, we conclude that the N terminus of Arf1 is a GTP-sensitive effector domain. When Arf1 was acylated, the GTP-dependent conformational changes were codependent on added phospholipids. In the absence of phospholipids, myristoylated Arf1 has a lower affinity for GTP gamma S than for GDP, and in the presence of phospholipids, the myristoylated protein has a greater affinity for GTP gamma S than for GDP. Thus, N-myristoylation is a critical component in the construction of this phospholipid- and GTP-dependent switch.

  6. Comparison of the carboxy-terminal DP-repeat region in the co-chaperones Hop and Hip.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Gregory M; Huffman, Holly; Smith, David F

    2003-01-01

    Functional steroid receptor complexes are assembled and maintained by an ordered pathway of interactions involving multiple components of the cellular chaperone machinery. Two of these components, Hop and Hip, serve as co-chaperones to the major heat shock proteins (Hsps), Hsp70 and Hsp90, and participate in intermediate stages of receptor assembly. In an effort to better understand the functions of Hop and Hip in the assembly process, we focused on a region of similarity located near the C-terminus of each co-chaperone. Contained within this region is a repeated sequence motif we have termed the DP repeat. Earlier mutagenesis studies implicated the DP repeat of either Hop or Hip in Hsp70 binding and in normal assembly of the co-chaperones with progesterone receptor (PR) complexes. We report here that the DP repeat lies within a protease-resistant domain that extends to or is near the C-terminus of both co-chaperones. Point mutations in the DP repeats render the C-terminal regions hypersensitive to proteolysis. In addition, a Hop DP mutant displays altered proteolytic digestion patterns, which suggest that the DP-repeat region influences the folding of other Hop domains. Although the respective DP regions of Hop and Hip share sequence and structural similarities, they are not functionally interchangeable. Moreover, a double-point mutation within the second DP-repeat unit of Hop that converts this to the sequence found in Hip disrupts Hop function; however, the corresponding mutation in Hip does not alter its function. We conclude that the DP repeats are important structural elements within a C-terminal domain, which is important for Hop and Hip function.

  7. Quantitative determination of 11-nor-9-carboxy-tetrahydrocannabinol in hair by column switching LC-ESI-MS(3).

    PubMed

    Park, Meejung; Kim, Jihyun; Park, Yuran; In, Sanghwan; Kim, Eunmi; Park, Yonghoon

    2014-02-01

    Hair analysis has been regarded as an alternative method to urine analysis in forensic and criminal cases. Cannabis (marijuana) is one of the most widely used drugs in the world and it has been controlled in South Korea since 1976. Identification of 11-nor-9-carboxy-tetrahydrocannabinol (THCCOOH) in hair can be an important proof of cannabis use because it can exclude the possibility of passive cannabis smoke exposure. In this study, we described a quantitative method of THCCOOH in hair using simple liquid-liquid extraction (LLE), selective column switching liquid chromatography with electrospray ionization (ESI)-MS(3). For the column switching system three columns (precolumn, trap column and analytical column) were used. Valve switch from the precolumn to the trap column was set from 3.0 to 4.0 min because THCCOOH appeared around 3.5 min with this precolumn. After 4.0 min the valve was switched to the original position and the analytes in the trap column were eluted onto the analytical column. Resolution occurred in this column and eluted into the ESI-MS(3) system. The internal standard was THCCOOH-d3. We used ESI-negative-MS(3) transition of ions at m/z 343 to 299 to 245 (343/299/245) and m/z 346 to 302 to 248 (346/302/248) for quantification of THCCOOH and THCCOOH-d3, respectively. The validation results of selectivity, matrix effect, recovery, linearity, precision and accuracy, and processed sample stability were satisfactory. The limit of detection (LOD) was 0.05 pg/mg and the limit of quantification (LOQ) was 0.10 pg/mg. The range of concentration of THCCOOH from 98 authentic human hair was 0.13-15.75 pg/mg. This method was successfully applied in the analysis of authentic human hair samples.

  8. 11-Nor-9-carboxy-∆9-tetrahydrocannabinol quantification in human oral fluid by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Scheidweiler, Karl B; Himes, Sarah K; Chen, Xiaohong; Liu, Hua-Fen; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2013-07-01

    Currently, ∆9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is the analyte quantified for oral fluid cannabinoid monitoring. The potential for false-positive oral fluid cannabinoid results from passive exposure to THC-laden cannabis smoke raises concerns for this promising new monitoring technology. Oral fluid 11-nor-9-carboxy-∆9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THCCOOH) is proposed as a marker of cannabis intake since it is not present in cannabis smoke and was not measureable in oral fluid collected from subjects passively exposed to cannabis. THCCOOH concentrations are in the picogram per milliliter range in oral fluid and pose considerable analytical challenges. A liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LCMSMS) method was developed and validated for quantifying THCCOOH in 1 mL Quantisal-collected oral fluid. After solid phase extraction, chromatography was performed on a Kinetex C18 column with a gradient of 0.01% acetic acid in water and 0.01% acetic acid in methanol with a 0.5-mL/min flow rate. THCCOOH was monitored in negative mode electrospray ionization and multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry. The THCCOOH linear range was 12-1,020 pg/mL (R(2) > 0.995). Mean extraction efficiencies and matrix effects evaluated at low and high quality control (QC) concentrations were 40.8-65.1 and -2.4-11.5%, respectively (n = 10). Analytical recoveries (bias) and total imprecision at low, mid, and high QCs were 85.0-113.3 and 6.6-8.4% coefficient of variation, respectively (n = 20). This is the first oral fluid THCCOOH LCMSMS triple quadrupole method not requiring derivatization to achieve a <15 pg/mL limit of quantification. The assay is applicable for the workplace, driving under the influence of drugs, drug treatment, and pain management testing.

  9. Structure and Sialyllactose Binding of the Carboxy-Terminal Head Domain of the Fibre from a Siadenovirus, Turkey Adenovirus 3

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Abhimanyu K.; Berbís, M. Álvaro; Ballmann, Mónika Z.; Kilcoyne, Michelle; Menéndez, Margarita; Nguyen, Thanh H.; Joshi, Lokesh; Cañada, F. Javier; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús; Benkő, Mária; Harrach, Balázs; van Raaij, Mark J.

    2015-01-01

    The virulent form of turkey adenovirus 3 (TAdV-3), also known as turkey hemorrhagic enteritis virus (THEV), is an economically important poultry pathogen, while the avirulent form is used as a vaccine. TAdV-3 belongs to the genus Siadenovirus. The carboxy-terminal region of its fibre does not have significant sequence similarity to any other adenovirus fibre heads of known structure. Two amino acid sequence differences between virulent and avirulent TAdV-3 map on the fibre head: where virulent TAdV-3 contains Ile354 and Thr376, avirulent TAdV-3 contains Met354 and Met376. We determined the crystal structures of the trimeric virulent and avirulent TAdV-3 fibre head domains at 2.2 Å resolution. Each monomer contains a beta-sandwich, which, surprisingly, resembles reovirus fibre head more than other adenovirus fibres, although the ABCJ-GHID topology is conserved in all. A beta-hairpin insertion in the C-strand of each trimer subunit embraces its neighbouring monomer. The avirulent and virulent TAdV-3 fibre heads are identical apart from the exact orientation of the beta-hairpin insertion. In vitro, sialyllactose was identified as a ligand by glycan microarray analysis, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and crystallography. Its dissociation constant was measured to be in the mM range by isothermal titration calorimetry. The ligand binds to the side of the fibre head, involving amino acids Glu392, Thr419, Val420, Lys421, Asn422, and Gly423 binding to the sialic acid group. It binds slightly more strongly to the avirulent form. We propose that, in vivo, the TAdV-3 fibre may bind a sialic acid-containing cell surface component. PMID:26418008

  10. A carboxy-terminal affinity tag for the purification and mass spectrometric characterization of integral membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Wong, Julie P; Reboul, Emmanuelle; Molday, Robert S; Kast, Juergen

    2009-05-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and other structurally and functionally related membrane proteins represent particularly attractive targets for drug discovery. Integral membrane proteins are often difficult to purify from native contexts, and lack of sufficient quantities hampers subsequent structural and functional proteomic studies. We describe here an optimized enrichment strategy involving a membrane protein-compatible 1D4 affinity tag that is derived from the carboxy-terminal nine amino residues of bovine rhodopsin, and its corresponding tag-specific, high-affinity monoclonal antibody. When two GPCRs as well as two related ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters are expressed in their functional forms in human cell lines, we have shown that a single detergent and wash condition can be employed for the purification of all said membrane proteins. Subsequent in-gel digestion with trypsin and mass spectrometric peptide analysis resulted in high sequence coverage for the ABC transporters ABCA1-1D4 and ABCA4-1D4. In contrast, digestion by various enzymatic combinations was necessary to obtain the best sequence coverage for affinity-enriched GPCRs CXCR4-1D4 and CCR5-1D4 as compared against other entries in an annotated spectrum library. Furthermore, specific enzyme combinations were necessary to produce suitable peptides for deducing N-glycosylation sites on CXCR4. Our results demonstrate that the 1D4-tag enrichment strategy is a versatile tool for the characterization of integral membrane proteins that can be employed for functional proteomic studies.

  11. Carboxy-terminal domain phosphatase 1 silencing results in the inhibition of tumor formation ability in gastric cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    FU, HONGBING; YANG, DEJUN; WANG, CHANGMING; XU, JIAPENG; WANG, WEIMIN; YAN, RONGLIN; CAI, QINGPING

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer (GC), one of the most malignant types of cancer, is the second greatest cause of cancer-associated mortality worldwide. Novel therapeutic targets for GC treatment are therefore urgently required. Carboxy-terminal domain phosphatase 1 (CTDP1) has a crucial role in the regulation of gene expression. However, to the best of our knowledge, the role of CTDP1 in GC has not previously been explored. In the present study, reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis was used to detect CTDP1 messenger RNA expression in various GC cell lines. CTDP1 was subsequently silenced in GC cells by lentivirus-mediated small interfering RNA (siRNA) infection, and the effects of CTDP1 inhibition on cell proliferation were evaluated by cell number counting, cell cycle analysis with propidium iodide staining and fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) analysis, apoptotic rate with Annexin V staining and FACS analysis, as well as colony formation assay in GC cells. The results revealed that CTDP1 was highly expressed in certain GC cell lines and lentivirus-mediated siRNA infection was able to effectively silence CTDP1 expression in GC cells. CTDP1 inhibition decreased cell proliferation, arrested the cell cycle at G0/G1 phase and increased cell apoptosis in GC cells. Furthermore, the colony formation ability of GC cells was also suppressed by silencing CTDP1. Taken together these results indicated that CTDP1 has a significant role in the tumor formation ability of GC cells and is a novel and promising therapeutic target for the treatment of GC. PMID:26722269

  12. 11-Nor-9-carboxy-Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol quantification in human oral fluid by liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Scheidweiler, Karl B.; Himes, Sarah K.; Chen, Xiaohong; Liu, Hua-Fen

    2013-01-01

    Currently, Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is the analyte quantified for oral fluid cannabinoid monitoring. The potential for false-positive oral fluid cannabinoid results from passive exposure to THC-laden cannabis smoke raises concerns for this promising new monitoring technology. Oral fluid 11-nor-9-carboxy-Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THCCOOH) is proposed as a marker of cannabis intake since it is not present in cannabis smoke and was not measureable in oral fluid collected from subjects passively exposed to cannabis. THCCOOH concentrations are in the picogram per milliliter range in oral fluid and pose considerable analytical challenges. A liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry (LCMSMS) method was developed and validated for quantifying THCCOOH in 1 mL Quantisal-collected oral fluid. After solid phase extraction, chromatography was performed on a Kinetex C18 column with a gradient of 0.01 % acetic acid in water and 0.01 % acetic acid in methanol with a 0.5-mL/min flow rate. THCCOOH was monitored in negative mode electrospray ionization and multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry. The THCCOOH linear range was 12–1,020 pg/mL (R2>0.995). Mean extraction efficiencies and matrix effects evaluated at low and high quality control (QC) concentrations were 40.8–65.1 and −2.4–11.5 %, respectively (n=10). Analytical recoveries (bias) and total imprecision at low, mid, and high QCs were 85.0–113.3 and 6.6–8.4 % coefficient of variation, respectively (n=20). This is the first oral fluid THCCOOH LCMSMS triple quadrupole method not requiring derivatization to achieve a <15 pg/mL limit of quantification. The assay is applicable for the workplace, driving under the influence of drugs, drug treatment, and pain management testing. PMID:23681203

  13. Ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase L1 may be involved in the development of mammary phyllodes tumors.

    PubMed

    Lien, Huang-Chun; Wang, Chung-Chieh; Huang, Chiun-Sheng; Yang, Ya-Wen; Kuo, Wen-Hung; Yao, Yu-Tung

    2013-02-01

    Phyllodes tumors (PTs) are characterized by co-proliferation of the stroma and epithelium, with the stroma being the neoplastic element. Ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase L1 (UCHL1) is a deubiquitinating enzyme that was originally considered to be a neuronal-specific marker, but later reports have shown both tumorigenic and antitumorigenic roles for UCHL1. Although a role for UCHL1 has been explored in many cancers, a study on PTs has never been reported. We assessed UCHL1 expression in 49 cases of PTs and 16 fibroadenomas using immunohistochemistry and examined associations with clinicopathological features. In normal breast, strong staining for UCHL1 was consistently observed in the nerve bundles, if present, in breast stroma. Scattered stromal cells showed negative to weak staining. The ductal and lobular units, in contrast, showed no staining. In contrast to the 16 fibroadenomas, of which only 3 showed mild staining, UCHL1 expression was consistently observed in all 49 PTs. There was a significantly increasing trend of UCHL1 expression with increasing PT grade (P < 0.001); strong staining was observed in 24 % of benign PTs, but was present in 56 and 90 % of borderline and malignant PTs, respectively. Consistently, UCHL1 was focally positive in regions of benign to borderline malignancy, but strongly and diffusely immunoreactive in regions of malignancy in cases of malignant PTs. In addition to PT grade, UCHL1 expression correlated with increasing stromal atypia (P = 0.01), but not with other clinicopathological parameters. In conclusion, the consistent expression of UCHL1 in PTs and an increasing trend of UCHL1 expression with an increasing PT grade suggest a role for UCHL1 in the pathogenesis and malignant progression of PTs.

  14. Des-gamma-carboxy Prothrombin and Alpha fetoprotein as Biomarkers for the Early Detection of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lok, Anna S.; Sterling, Richard K.; Everhart, James E.; Wright, Elizabeth C.; Hoefs, John C.; Di Bisceglie, Adrian M.; Morgan, Timothy R.; Kim, Hae-Young; Lee, William M.; Bonkovsky, Herbert L.; Dienstag, Jules L.

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims: The outcome of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remains poor because of late diagnosis. The aim of this study was to compare the accuracy of alpha fetoprotein (AFP) and des-gamma-carboxy prothrombin (DCP) in the early diagnosis of HCC. Methods: Among 1031 patients randomized in the Hepatitis C Antiviral Long-Term Treatment against Cirrhosis (HALT-C) Trial, a nested case-control study of 39 HCC cases (24 early stage) and 77 matched controls was conducted to compare the performance of AFP and DCP. Testing was performed on sera from 12 months prior (month −12) to the time of HCC diagnosis (month 0). Results: The sensitivity and specificity of DCP at month 0 was 74% and 86% at a cutoff of 40 mAU/mL and 43% and 100% at a cutoff of 150 mAU/mL. The sensitivity and specificity of AFP at month 0 was 61% and 81% at a cutoff of 20 ng/mL and 22% and 100% at a cutoff of 200 ng/mL. At month −12, the sensitivity and specificity at the low cutoff was 43% and 94% for DCP and 47% and 75% for AFP. Combining both markers increased the sensitivity to 91% at month 0 and 73% at month 12 but the specificity decreased to 74% and 71%. Diagnosis of early HCC was triggered by surveillance ultrasound in 14, doubling of AFP in 5 and combination of tests in 5 patients. Conclusions: Biomarkers are needed to complement ultrasound in the detection of early HCC but neither DCP nor AFP is optimal. PMID:19852963

  15. Unprecedented large inverted repeats at the replication terminus of circular bacterial chromosomes suggest a novel mode of chromosome rescue

    PubMed Central

    El Kafsi, Hela; Loux, Valentin; Mariadassou, Mahendra; Blin, Camille; Chiapello, Hélène; Abraham, Anne-Laure; Maguin, Emmanuelle; van de Guchte, Maarten

    2017-01-01

    The first Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus genome sequence revealed the presence of a very large inverted repeat (IR), a DNA sequence arrangement which thus far seemed inconceivable in a non-manipulated circular bacterial chromosome, at the replication terminus. This intriguing observation prompted us to investigate if similar IRs could be found in other bacteria. IRs with sizes varying from 38 to 76 kbp were found at the replication terminus of all 5 L. delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus chromosomes analysed, but in none of 1373 other chromosomes. They represent the first naturally occurring very large IRs detected in circular bacterial genomes. A comparison of the L. bulgaricus replication terminus regions and the corresponding regions without IR in 5 L. delbrueckii ssp. lactis genomes leads us to propose a model for the formation and evolution of the IRs. The DNA sequence data are consistent with a novel model of chromosome rescue after premature replication termination or irreversible chromosome damage near the replication terminus, involving mechanisms analogous to those proposed in the formation of very large IRs in human cancer cells. We postulate that the L. delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus-specific IRs in different strains derive from a single ancestral IR of at least 93 kbp. PMID:28281695

  16. The G protein-coupled receptor N-terminus and receptor signalling: N-tering a new era.

    PubMed

    Coleman, James L J; Ngo, Tony; Smith, Nicola J

    2017-05-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are a vast family of membrane-traversing proteins, essential to the ability of eukaryotic life to detect, and mount an intracellular response to, a diverse range of extracellular stimuli. GPCRs have evolved with archetypal features including an extracellular N-terminus and intracellular C-terminus that flank a transmembrane structure of seven sequential helices joined by intracellular and extracellular loops. These structural domains contribute to the ability of a GPCR to be correctly synthesised and inserted into the cell membrane, to interact with its cognate ligand(s) and to couple with signal-transducing heterotrimeric G proteins, allowing the activated receptor to selectively modulate a number of signalling cascades. Whilst well known for its importance in receptor translation and trafficking, the GPCR N-terminus is underexplored as a participant in receptor signalling. This review aims to discuss and integrate recent advances in knowledge of the vital roles of the GPCR N-terminus in receptor signalling.

  17. Tectonics of a K⁺ channel: The importance of the N-terminus for channel gating.

    PubMed

    Hoffgaard, F; Kast, S M; Moroni, A; Thiel, G; Hamacher, K

    2015-12-01

    The small K⁺ channel Kcv represents the pore module of complex potassium channels. It was found that its gating can be modified by sensor domains, which are N-terminally coupled to the pore. This implies that the short N-terminus of the channel can transmit conformational changes from upstream sensors to the channel gates. To understand the functional role of the N-terminus in the context of the entire channel protein, we apply combinatorial screening of the mechanical coupling and long-range interactions in the Kcv potassium channel by reduced molecular models. The dynamics and mechanical connections in the channel complex show that the N-terminus is indeed mechanically connected to the pore domain. This includes a long rang coupling to the pore and the inner and outer transmembrane domains. Since the latter domains host the two gates of the channel, the data support the hypothesis that mechanical perturbation of the N-terminus can be transmitted to the channel gates. This effect is solely determined by the topology of the channel; sequence details only have an implicit effect on the coarse-grained dynamics via the fold and not through biochemical details at a smaller scale. This observation has important implications for engineering of synthetic channels on the basis of a K⁺ channel pore.

  18. Unprecedented large inverted repeats at the replication terminus of circular bacterial chromosomes suggest a novel mode of chromosome rescue.

    PubMed

    El Kafsi, Hela; Loux, Valentin; Mariadassou, Mahendra; Blin, Camille; Chiapello, Hélène; Abraham, Anne-Laure; Maguin, Emmanuelle; van de Guchte, Maarten

    2017-03-10

    The first Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus genome sequence revealed the presence of a very large inverted repeat (IR), a DNA sequence arrangement which thus far seemed inconceivable in a non-manipulated circular bacterial chromosome, at the replication terminus. This intriguing observation prompted us to investigate if similar IRs could be found in other bacteria. IRs with sizes varying from 38 to 76 kbp were found at the replication terminus of all 5 L. delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus chromosomes analysed, but in none of 1373 other chromosomes. They represent the first naturally occurring very large IRs detected in circular bacterial genomes. A comparison of the L. bulgaricus replication terminus regions and the corresponding regions without IR in 5 L. delbrueckii ssp. lactis genomes leads us to propose a model for the formation and evolution of the IRs. The DNA sequence data are consistent with a novel model of chromosome rescue after premature replication termination or irreversible chromosome damage near the replication terminus, involving mechanisms analogous to those proposed in the formation of very large IRs in human cancer cells. We postulate that the L. delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus-specific IRs in different strains derive from a single ancestral IR of at least 93 kbp.

  19. Amyloid fibril formation of peptides derived from the C-terminus of CETP modulated by lipids

    SciTech Connect

    García-González, Victor; Mas-Oliva, Jaime

    2013-04-26

    Highlights: •The secondary structure of a C-terminal peptide derived from CETP was studied. •Lipids modulate secondary structure changes of a C-terminal peptide derived from CETP. •Lysophosphatidic acid maintains a functional α-helix and prevents fibril formation. •Transfer of lipids by CETP is related to the presence of an α-helix at its C-end. -- Abstract: Cholesteryl-ester transfer protein (CETP) is a plasmatic protein involved in neutral lipid transfer between lipoproteins. Focusing on the last 12 C-terminus residues we have previously shown that mutation D{sub 470}N promotes a conformational change towards a β-secondary structure. In turn, this modification leads to the formation of oligomers and fibrillar structures, which cause cytotoxic effects similar to the ones provoked by amyloid peptides. In this study, we evaluated the role of specific lipid arrangements on the structure of peptide helix-Z (D{sub 470}N) through the use of thioflavin T fluorescence, peptide bond absorbance, circular dichroism and electron microscopy. The results indicate that the use of micelles formed with lysophosphatidylcholine and lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) under neutral pH induce a conformational transition of peptide helix-Z containing a β-sheet conformation to a native α-helix structure, therefore avoiding the formation of amyloid fibrils. In contrast, incubation with phosphatidic acid does not change the profile for the β-sheet conformation. When the electrostatic charge at the surface of micelles or vesicles is regulated through the use of lipids such as phospholipid and LPA, minimal changes and the presence of β-structures were recorded. Mixtures with a positive net charge diminished the percentage of β-structure and the amount of amyloid fibrils. Our results suggest that the degree of solvation determined by the presence of a free hydroxyl group on lipids such as LPA is a key condition that can modulate the secondary structure and the consequent formation of

  20. Regulatory activation is accompanied by movement in the C terminus of the Na-K-Cl cotransporter (NKCC1).

    PubMed

    Monette, Michelle Y; Forbush, Biff

    2012-01-13

    The Na-K-Cl cotransporter (NKCC1) is expressed in most vertebrate cells and is crucial in the regulation of cell volume and intracellular chloride concentration. To study the structure and function of NKCC1, we tagged the transporter with cyan (CFP) and yellow (YFP) fluorescent proteins at two sites within the C terminus and measured fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) in stably expressing human embryonic kidney cell lines. Both singly and doubly tagged NKCC1s were appropriately produced, trafficked to the plasma membrane, and exhibited (86)Rb transport activity. When both fluorescent probes were placed within the same C terminus of an NKCC1 transporter, we recorded an 11% FRET decrease upon activation of the transporter. This result clearly demonstrates movement of the C terminus during the regulatory response to phosphorylation of the N terminus. When we introduced CFP and YFP separately in different NKCC1 constructs and cotransfected these in HEK cells, we observed FRET between dimer pairs, and the fractional FRET decrease upon transporter activation was 46%. Quantitatively, this indicates that the largest FRET-signaled movement is between dimer pairs, an observation supported by further experiments in which the doubly tagged construct was cotransfectionally diluted with untagged NKCC1. Our results demonstrate that regulation of NKCC1 is accompanied by a large movement between two positions in the C termini of a dimeric cotransporter. We suggest that the NKCC1 C terminus is involved in transport regulation and that dimerization may play a key structural role in the regulatory process. It is anticipated that when combined with structural information, our findings will provide a model for understanding the conformational changes that bring about NKCC1 regulation.

  1. Archaeal ribosomal stalk protein interacts with translation factors in a nucleotide-independent manner via its conserved C terminus

    PubMed Central

    Nomura, Naoko; Honda, Takayoshi; Baba, Kentaro; Naganuma, Takao; Tanzawa, Takehito; Arisaka, Fumio; Noda, Masanori; Uchiyama, Susumu; Tanaka, Isao; Yao, Min; Uchiumi, Toshio

    2012-01-01

    Protein synthesis on the ribosome requires translational GTPase factors to bind to the ribosome in the GTP-bound form, take individual actions that are coupled with GTP hydrolysis, and dissociate, usually in the GDP-bound form. The multiple copies of the flexible ribosomal stalk protein play an important role in these processes. Using biochemical approaches and the stalk protein from a hyperthermophilic archaeon, Pyrococcus horikoshii, we here provide evidence that the conserved C terminus of the stalk protein aP1 binds directly to domain I of the elongation factor aEF-2, irrespective of whether aEF-2 is bound to GTP or GDP. Site-directed mutagenesis revealed that four hydrophobic amino acids at the C terminus of aP1, Leu-100, 103, 106, and Phe-107, are crucial for the direct binding. P1 was also found to bind to the initiation factor aIF5B, as well as aEF-1α, but not aIF2γ, via its C terminus. Moreover, analytical ultracentrifugation and gel mobility shift analyses showed that a heptameric complex of aP1 and aP0, aP0(aP1)2(aP1)2(aP1)2, can bind multiple aEF-2 molecules simultaneously, which suggests that individual copies of the stalk protein are accessible to the factor. The functional significance of the C terminus of the stalk protein was also shown using the eukaryotic proteins P1/P2 and P0. It is likely that the conserved C terminus of the stalk proteins of archaea and eukaryotes can bind to translation factors both before and after GTP hydrolysis. This consistent binding ability of the stalk protein may contribute to maintaining high concentrations of translation factors around the ribosome, thus promoting translational efficiency. PMID:22355137

  2. Urinary pharmacokinetics of 11-nor-9-carboxy-delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol after controlled oral delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol administration.

    PubMed

    Gustafson, Richard A; Kim, Insook; Stout, Peter R; Klette, Kevin L; George, M P; Moolchan, Eric T; Levine, Barry; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2004-04-01

    Understanding the pharmacokinetics of orally administered cannabinoids is vitally important for optimizing therapeutic usage and to determine the impact of positive tests on drug detection programs. In this study, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (limit of quantitation = 2.5 ng/mL) was used to monitor the excretion of total 11-nor-9-carboxy-Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THCCOOH) in 4381 urine voids collected from seven participants throughout a controlled clinical study of multiple oral doses of THC. The National Institute on Drug Abuse Institutional Review Board approved the study and each participant provided informed consent. Seven participants received 0, 0.39, 0.47, 7.5, and 14.8 mg THC/day for five days in this double blind, placebo-controlled, randomized protocol conducted on a closed research ward. No significant differences (P /= 15 ng/mL. An average of only 2.9 +/- 1.6%, 2.5 +/- 2.7%, 1.5 +/- 1.4%, and 0.6 +/- 0.5% of the THC in the 0.39, 0.47, 7.5, and 14.8 mg/day doses, respectively, was excreted as THCCOOH in the urine over each 14-day dosing session. This study demonstrated that the terminal urinary elimination t(1/2) of THCCOOH following oral administration was approximately two to three days for doses ranging from 0.39 to 14.8 mg/d. These data also demonstrate that the apparent urinary elimination t(1/2) of THCCOOH prior to reaching a 15 ng/mL concentration is significantly shorter than the terminal urinary elimination t(1/2). These controlled drug administration data

  3. Glacier-terminus fluctuations in the Wrangell and Chugach mountains resulting from non-climate controls

    SciTech Connect

    Sturm, M.; Hall, D.K.; Benson, C.S.; Field, W.O.

    1992-03-01

    Non-climatically controlled fluctuations of glacier termini were studied in two regions in Alaska. In the Wrangell Mountains, eight glaciers on Mt. Wrangell, an active volcano, have been monitored over the past 30 years using terrestrial surveys, aerial photogrammetry and digitally registered satellite images. Results, which are consistent between different methods of measurement, indicate that the termini of most glaciers were stationary or had retreated slightly. However, the termini of the 30-km-long Ahtna Glacier and the smaller Center and South MacKeith glaciers began to advance in the early 1960s and have advanced steadily at rates between 5 and 18 m yr-1 since then. These three glaciers flow from the summit caldera of ML Wrangell near the active North Crater, where increased volcanic heating since 1964 has melted over 7 x 107 M3 of ice. The authors suspect that volcanic meltwater has changed the basal conditions for the glaciers, resulting in their advance. In College Fjord, Prince William Sound, the terminus fluctuations of two tidewater glaciers have been monitored since 1931 by terrestrial surveying, photogrammetry, and most recently, from satellite imagery. Harvard Glacier, a 40-kmlong tidewater glacier, has been advancing steadily at nearly 20 m yr-1 since 1931, while the adjacent Yale Glacier has retreated at approximately 50 m yr-1 during the same period, though for short periods, both rates have been much higher.

  4. Localization of the N-terminus of minor coat protein IIIa in the adenovirus capsid

    PubMed Central

    San Martín, Carmen; Glasgow, Joel N.; Borovjagin, Anton; Beatty, Matthew S.; Kashentseva, Elena A.; T. Curiel, David; Marabini, Roberto; Dmitriev, Igor P.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Minor coat protein IIIa is conserved in all adenoviruses and required for correct viral assembly, but its precise function in capsid organization is unknown. The latest adenovirus capsid model proposes that IIIa is located underneath the vertex region. To obtain experimental evidence on the location of IIIa and further define its role, we engineered the IIIa gene to encode heterologous N-terminal peptide extensions. Recombinant adenovirus variants with IIIa encoding six-histidine tag (6-His), 6-His and FLAG peptides, or 6-His linked to FLAG with a (Gly4Ser)3 linker were rescued and analyzed for virus yield, capsid incorporation of heterologous peptides, and capsid stability. Longer extensions could not be rescued. Western blot analysis confirmed that the modified IIIa proteins were expressed in infected cells and incorporated into virions. In the adenovirus encoding the 6-His-linker-FLAG-IIIa gene, the 6-His tag was present in light particles but not in mature virions. Immuno-electron microscopy of this virus showed that the FLAG epitope is not accessible to antibodies on the viral particles. Three-dimensional electron microscopy (3DEM) and difference mapping located the IIIa N-terminal extension beneath the vertex complex, wedged at the interface between penton base and the peripentonal hexons, therefore supporting the latest proposed model. The position of the IIIa N-terminus and its low tolerance for modification provide new clues for understanding the role of this minor coat protein in adenovirus capsid assembly and disassembly. PMID:18786542

  5. Improved radioimmunoassay for thymosin. cap alpha. 1 recognizes the N-14 amino terminus

    SciTech Connect

    Naylor, P.H.; Goldstein, A.L.

    1986-03-01

    Thymosin ..cap alpha../sub 1/(T..cap alpha../sub 1/) is a biologically active thymic peptide currently undergoing trials as an immunomodulator in cancer patients and patients with immunodeficiencies. Abnormally elevated levels of T..cap alpha../sub 1/ have been found in the serum of individuals with or at risk for AIDS, with T-cell leukemias, and chronic progressive multiple sclerosis. Absorption of the current antibody with a synthetic C-14 fragment of T..cap alpha../sub 1/ results in an antisera specific for the N-14 amino terminus of T..cap alpha../sub 1/, which measures significantly higher levels of T..cap alpha../sub 1/ in serum from normal individuals and significantly increases the sensitivity of the assay. Ongoing studies indicate that this new RIA for T..cap alpha../sub 1/ will be useful in monitoring changes of immunoreactive T..cap alpha../sub 1/ in serum with age and in patients with known or suspected T-cell abnormalities.

  6. Landing at the terminus of Sabrina Vallis: A potential 2020 Mars rover landing site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platz, T.; Hauber, E.; Le Deit, L.; Van Gasselt, S.; Kinch, K.; Madsen, M. B.; Rosenberg, H.

    2014-04-01

    For the upcoming 2020 Mars rover mission we selected a potential landing site that meets all geological criteria including the presence of Noachian/Early Hesperian aqueous sediments and associated hydrous mineral phases and access to unaltered igneous rocks. Our proposed landing site is located at the terminus of Sabrina Vallis in Magong crater. The 25 km × 20 km landing ellipse is centred at 11.990°N, 313.425°E. This site features deltaic sediments and distal lacustrine sediments. In central delta cliff sections weak signatures of Fe/Mg-bearing phyllosilicates are detected. Lacustrine sediments are cut by a partially exhumed igneous dyke. On the crater floor of Magong crater, remnants of an approximately 1 m thick dark deposit are observed, which is interpreted to be a tephra layer sourced from the adjacent volcanic field within Lederberg crater. Detailed terrain analysis of the landing site shows that engineering constraints are met with respect to slope and relief.

  7. Masking autoprocessing of Clostridium difficile toxin A by the C-terminus combined repetitive oligo peptides

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yongrong; Hamza, Therwa; Gao, Si; Feng, Hanping

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile toxin A and B (TcdA and TcdB) are the major virulence factors of the bacterium, both of which consist of two enzymatic domains: an effector glucosyltransferase domain (GTD) and a cysteine protease domain (CPD) responsible for autocleavage and release of GTD. Although the CPDs from both toxins share a similar structure and mechanism of hexakisphosphate (InsP6) -induced activation, TcdA is substantially less sensitive to the autocleavage as compared with TcdB. In this study, we provided evidence of inter-domain regulation of CPD activity of TcdA and its autoprocessing. The C-terminus combined repetitive oligo peptides (CROPs) of TcdA reduced the accessibility of TcdB CPD to its substrate in a chimeric toxin TxB-Ar, consequently blocking autoprocessing. Moreover, interference of antibodies with the CROPs of full-length TcdA efficiently enhanced its GTD release. In conclusion, by utilizing chimeric toxins and specific antibodies, we identified that the CROPs of TcdA plays a crucial role in controlling the InsP6-mediated activation of CPD and autocleavage of GTD. Our data provides insights on the molecular mode of action of the C. difficile toxins. PMID:25725153

  8. Mitotic Phosphorylation of TREX1 C Terminus Disrupts TREX1 Regulation of the Oligosaccharyltransferase Complex.

    PubMed

    Kucej, Martin; Fermaintt, Charles S; Yang, Kun; Irizarry-Caro, Ricardo A; Yan, Nan

    2017-03-14

    TREX1 mutations are associated with several autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. The N-terminal DNase domain of TREX1 is important for preventing self-DNA from activating the interferon response. The C terminus of TREX1 is required for ER localization and regulation of oligosacchariyltransferase (OST) activity. Here, we show that during mitosis TREX1 is predominately phosphorylated at the C-terminal Serine-261 by Cyclin B/CDK1. TREX1 is dephosphorylated quickly at mitotic exit, likely by PP1/PP2-type serine/threonine phosphatase. Mitotic phosphorylation does not affect TREX1 DNase activity. Phosphomimetic mutations of mitotic phosphorylation sites in TREX1 disrupted the interaction with the OST subunit RPN1. RNA-seq analysis of Trex1(-/-) mouse embryonic fibroblasts expressing TREX1 wild-type or phosphor-mutants revealed a glycol-gene signature that is elevated when TREX1 mitotic phosphorylation sites are disrupted. Thus, the cell-cycle-dependent post-translation modification of TREX1 regulates its interaction with OST, which may have important implications for immune disease associated with the DNase-independent function of TREX1.

  9. The c-terminus of GRK3 indicates rapid dissociation of G protein heterotrimers

    PubMed Central

    Hollins, Bettye; Kuravi, Sudhakiranmayi; Digby, Gregory J.; Lambert, Nevin A.

    2009-01-01

    Signals mediated by heterotrimeric G proteins often develop over the course of tens of milliseconds, and could require either conformational rearrangement or complete physical dissociation of Gα βγ heterotrimers. Although it is known that some active heterotrimers are dissociated (into Gα and Gβγ) at steady-state, it is not clear that dissociation occurs quickly enough to participate in rapid signaling. Here we show that fusion proteins containing the c-terminus of GPCR kinase 3 (GRK3ct) and either the fluorescent protein cerulean or Renilla luciferase bind to venus-labeled Gβγ dimers (Gβγ-V), resulting in Förster or bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (FRET or BRET). GRK3ct fusion proteins are freely-diffusible, and do not form preassembled complexes with G proteins. GRK3ct fusion proteins bind to free Gβγ-V dimers but not to rearranged heterotrimers, and thus can report G protein dissociation with high temporal resolution. We find that heterotrimer dissociation can occur in living cells in less than 100 milliseconds. Under the conditions of these experiments diffusion and collision of masGRK3ct fusion proteins and Gβγ-V were not rate-limiting. These results indicate that G protein heterotrimers can dissociate quickly enough to participate in rapid signaling. PMID:19258039

  10. Analysis of 11-nor-9-carboxy-delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol in biological samples by gas chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (GC/MS-MS).

    PubMed

    Chiarotti, M; Costamagna, L

    2000-10-09

    Gas chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (GC/MS-MS) analysis of 11-nor-carboxy-delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta(9)-THC-COOH), the major metabolite of delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, in biological samples is reported. The proposed method, using deuterated delta(9)-THC-COOH as an internal standard, is able to detect the major metabolite of cannabis derivatives at very low levels (picograms/millilitre) with high specificity. These characteristics render the proposed analytical procedure suitable for confirmatory analysis in drug testing for cannabis use.

  11. Eight new crystal structures of 5-(hydroxymethyl)uracil, 5-carboxyuracil and 5-carboxy-2-thiouracil: insights into the hydrogen-bonded networks and the predominant conformations of the C5-bound residues.

    PubMed

    Seiler, Vanessa Kristina; Hützler, Wilhelm Maximilian; Bolte, Michael

    2016-05-01

    In order to examine the preferred hydrogen-bonding pattern of various uracil derivatives, namely 5-(hydroxymethyl)uracil, 5-carboxyuracil and 5-carboxy-2-thiouracil, and for a conformational study, crystallization experiments yielded eight different structures: 5-(hydroxymethyl)uracil, C5H6N2O3, (I), 5-carboxyuracil-N,N-dimethylformamide (1/1), C5H4N2O4·C3H7NO, (II), 5-carboxyuracil-dimethyl sulfoxide (1/1), C5H4N2O4·C2H6OS, (III), 5-carboxyuracil-N,N-dimethylacetamide (1/1), C5H4N2O4·C4H9NO, (IV), 5-carboxy-2-thiouracil-N,N-dimethylformamide (1/1), C5H4N2O3S·C3H7NO, (V), 5-carboxy-2-thiouracil-dimethyl sulfoxide (1/1), C5H4N2O3S·C2H6OS, (VI), 5-carboxy-2-thiouracil-1,4-dioxane (2/3), 2C5H4N2O3S·3C6H12O3, (VII), and 5-carboxy-2-thiouracil, C10H8N4O6S2, (VIII). While the six solvated structures, i.e. (II)-(VII), contain intramolecular S(6) O-H...O hydrogen-bond motifs between the carboxy and carbonyl groups, the usually favoured R2(2)(8) pattern between two carboxy groups is formed in the solvent-free structure, i.e. (VIII). Further R2(2)(8) hydrogen-bond motifs involving either two N-H...O or two N-H...S hydrogen bonds were observed in three crystal structures, namely (I), (IV) and (VIII). In all eight structures, the residue at the ring 5-position shows a coplanar arrangement with respect to the pyrimidine ring which is in agreement with a search of the Cambridge Structural Database for six-membered cyclic compounds containing a carboxy group. The search confirmed that coplanarity between the carboxy group and the cyclic residue is strongly favoured.

  12. Characterization of the native form and the carboxy-terminally truncated halotolerant form of α-amylases from Bacillus subtilis strain FP-133.

    PubMed

    Takenaka, Shinji; Miyatake, Ayaka; Tanaka, Kosei; Kuntiya, Ampin; Techapun, Charin; Leksawasdi, Noppol; Seesuriyachan, Phisit; Chaiyaso, Thanongsak; Watanabe, Masanori; Yoshida, Ken-ichi

    2015-06-01

    Two amylases, amylase I and amylase II from Bacillus subtilis strain FP-133, were purified to homogeneity and characterized. Their stabilities toward temperature, pH, and organic solvents, and their substrate specificities toward polysaccharides and oligosaccharides were similar. Under moderately high salt conditions, both amylases were more stable than commercial B. licheniformis amylase, and amylase I retained higher amylase activity than amylase II. The N-terminal amino acid sequence, genomic southern blot analysis, and MALDI-TOFF-MS analysis indicated that the halotolerant amylase I was produced by limited carboxy-terminal truncation of the amylase II peptide. The deduced amino acid sequence of amylase II was >95% identical to that of previously reported B. subtilis α-amylases, but their carboxy-terminal truncation points differed. Three recombinant amylases--full-length amylase corresponding to amylase II, an artificially truncated amylase corresponding to amylase I, and an amylase with a larger artificial C-terminal truncation--were expressed in B. subtilis. The artificially truncated recombinant amylases had the same high amylase activity as amylase I under moderately high salt conditions. Sequence comparisons indicated that an increased ratio of Asp/Glu residues in the enzyme may be one factor responsible for increasing halotolerance.

  13. The isolated carboxy-terminal domain of human mitochondrial leucyl-tRNA synthetase rescues the pathological phenotype of mitochondrial tRNA mutations in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Perli, Elena; Giordano, Carla; Pisano, Annalinda; Montanari, Arianna; Campese, Antonio F; Reyes, Aurelio; Ghezzi, Daniele; Nasca, Alessia; Tuppen, Helen A; Orlandi, Maurizia; Di Micco, Patrizio; Poser, Elena; Taylor, Robert W; Colotti, Gianni; Francisci, Silvia; Morea, Veronica; Frontali, Laura; Zeviani, Massimo; d'Amati, Giulia

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial (mt) diseases are multisystem disorders due to mutations in nuclear or mtDNA genes. Among the latter, more than 50% are located in transfer RNA (tRNA) genes and are responsible for a wide range of syndromes, for which no effective treatment is available at present. We show that three human mt aminoacyl-tRNA syntethases, namely leucyl-, valyl-, and isoleucyl-tRNA synthetase are able to improve both viability and bioenergetic proficiency of human transmitochondrial cybrid cells carrying pathogenic mutations in the mt-tRNAIle gene. Importantly, we further demonstrate that the carboxy-terminal domain of human mt leucyl-tRNA synthetase is both necessary and sufficient to improve the pathologic phenotype associated either with these “mild” mutations or with the “severe” m.3243A>G mutation in the mt-tRNALeu(UUR) gene. Furthermore, we provide evidence that this small, non-catalytic domain is able to directly and specifically interact in vitro with human mt-tRNALeu(UUR) with high affinity and stability and, with lower affinity, with mt-tRNAIle. Taken together, our results sustain the hypothesis that the carboxy-terminal domain of human mt leucyl-tRNA synthetase can be used to correct mt dysfunctions caused by mt-tRNA mutations. PMID:24413190

  14. Conformational Changes in the Orai1 C-Terminus Evoked by STIM1 Binding

    PubMed Central

    Tirado-Lee, Leidamarie; Yamashita, Megumi; Prakriya, Murali

    2015-01-01

    Store-operated CRAC channels regulate a wide range of cellular functions including gene expression, chemotaxis, and proliferation. CRAC channels consist of two components: the Orai proteins (Orai1-3), which form the ion-selective pore, and STIM proteins (STIM1-2), which form the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca2+ sensors. Activation of CRAC channels is initiated by the migration of STIM1 to the ER-plasma membrane (PM) junctions, where it directly interacts with Orai1 to open the Ca2+-selective pores of the CRAC channels. The recent elucidation of the Drosophila Orai structure revealed a hexameric channel wherein the C-terminal helices of adjacent Orai subunits associate in an anti-parallel orientation. This association is maintained by hydrophobic interactions between the Drosophila equivalents of human Orai1 residues L273 and L276. Here, we used mutagenesis and chemical cross-linking to assess the nature and extent of conformational changes in the self-associated Orai1 C-termini during STIM1 binding. We find that linking the anti-parallel coiled-coils of the adjacent Orai1 C-termini through disulfide cross-links diminishes STIM1-Orai1 interaction, as assessed by FRET. Conversely, prior binding of STIM1 to the Orai1 C-terminus impairs cross-linking of the Orai1 C-termini. Mutational analysis indicated that a bend of the Orai1 helix located upstream of the self-associated coils (formed by the amino acid sequence SHK) establishes an appropriate orientation of the Orai1 C-termini that is required for STIM1 binding. Together, our results support a model wherein the self-associated Orai1 C-termini rearrange modestly to accommodate STIM1 binding. PMID:26035642

  15. Enhancement of the direct antimicrobial activity of Lysep3 against Escherichia coli by inserting cationic peptides into its C terminus.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qiang; Guo, Zhimin; Gao, Chencheng; Zhu, Rining; Wang, Shuang; Yu, Ling; Qin, Wanhai; Xia, Xiaojing; Gu, Jingmin; Yan, Guangmou; Lei, Liancheng

    2017-03-01

    Phage lysins are considered promising antimicrobials against resistant bacterial infections. Some lysins have been reported for the prevention and treatment of Gram-positive bacterial infection. Gram-negative bacterial phage lysins, however, can only destroy the bacterial cell wall from inside because of the obstruction of the bacterial outer membrane that prevents direct hydrolysis of the bacterial wall peptidoglycan from the outside, severely restricting the development of lysins against Gram-negative bacteria. In this study, genetic engineering techniques were used to fuse a 5 cationic amino acid polypeptide (KRKRK), a 10 cationic amino acid polypeptide (KRKRKRKRKR), a 15 cationic amino acid polypeptide (KRKRKRKRKRKRKRK), and a polypeptide including both cationic and hydrophobic amino acids (KRKRKFFVAIIP) to the C-terminus of the Escherichia coli phage lysin Lysep3 to obtain four fusion lysins (5aa, 10aa, 15aa, Mix). The bactericidal effects of those four lysins on E. coli were then compared in vitro. Our results showed that the fusion of hydrophobic and positively charged amino acids, Mix, can kill E. coli effectively; the fusion of positively charged amino acids alone at the C-terminus (5aa, 10aa, 15aa) also showed bactericidal activity against E. coli from the outside, with the bactericidal activity gradually increasing with the positive charge at the C-terminus of the lysin. Collectively, improving the positive charge at the C-terminus of E. coli bacteriophage lysin Lysep3 increases its bactericidal ability from outside E. coli, providing a new practical method for the development of anti-Gram-negative bacterial lysins.

  16. Transcriptional transactivation functions localized to the glucocorticoid receptor N terminus are necessary for steroid induction of lymphocyte apoptosis.

    PubMed Central

    Dieken, E S; Miesfeld, R L

    1992-01-01

    Genetic studies have suggested that transcriptional regulation of specific target genes (by either induction or repression) is the molecular basis of glucocorticoid-mediated lymphocyte apoptosis. To examine the role of transcriptional regulation more directly, we developed a complementation assay utilizing stable transfection of wild-type (wt) and mutant (nti) glucocorticoid receptor (GR) cDNA constructs into a GR-deficient S49 murine cell line (7r). Our data confirm that the level of functional GR is rate limiting for S49 apoptosis and moreover that the GR amino terminus (N terminus), which as been deleted from the nti GR, is absolutely required for complementation in this system. Surprisingly, we found that at physiological levels of receptor, expression of the nti GR in cells containing wt GR results in enhanced dexamethasone sensitivity rather than a dominant negative phenotype. One interpretation of these data is that DNA binding by wt-nti heterodimers may be functionally similar to that of wt-wt homodimers, indicating that GRE occupancy by at least one transactivation domain may be sufficient to induce the hormonal response. To determine whether acidic activating sequences such as those localized to the GR N terminus are important in the induction of lymphocyte apoptosis, we tested the activity of a chimeric receptor in which we replaced the entire GR N terminus with sequences from the herpes simplex virus VP16 protein. Our results demonstrate that 7r cells expressing VP-GR fusions are indeed steroid sensitive, strongly supporting the idea that S49 apoptosis is dependent on transcriptional regulation of specific genes which respond to acidic activating domains, implying that induction, rather than repression, may be the critical initiating event. Images PMID:1310148

  17. A tail of two signals: the C terminus of the A(2A)-adenosine receptor recruits alternative signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Gsandtner, Ingrid; Freissmuth, Michael

    2006-08-01

    G protein-coupled receptors are endowed with carboxyl termini that vary greatly in length and sequence. In most instances, the distal portion of the C terminus is dispensable for G protein coupling. This is also true for the A(2A)-adenosine receptor, where the last 100 amino acids are of very modest relevance to G(s) coupling. The C terminus was originally viewed mainly as the docking site for regulatory proteins of the beta-arrestin family. These beta-arrestins bind to residues that have been phosphorylated by specialized kinases (G protein-coupled receptor kinases) and thereby initiate receptor desensitization and endocytosis. More recently, it has become clear that many additional "accessory" proteins bind to C termini of G protein-coupled receptors. The article by Sun et al. in the current issue of Molecular Pharmacology identifies translin-associated protein-X as yet another interaction partner of the A(2A) receptor; translin-associated protein allows the A(2A) receptor to impinge on the signaling mechanisms by which p53 regulates neuronal differentiation, but the underlying signaling pathways are uncharted territory. With a list of five known interaction partners, the C terminus of the A(2A) receptor becomes a crowded place. Hence, there must be rules that regulate the interaction. This allows the C terminus to act as coincidence detector and as signal integrator. Despite our ignorance about the precise mechanisms, the article has exciting implications: the gene encoding for translin-associated protein-X maps to a locus implicated in some forms of schizophrenia; A(2A) receptor agonists are candidate drugs for the treatment of schizophrenic symptoms. It is of obvious interest to explore a possible link.

  18. The Myristate Moiety and Amino Terminus of Vaccinia Virus L1 Constitute a Bipartite Functional Region Needed for Entry

    PubMed Central

    Whitbeck, J. Charles; Ponce-de-León, Manuel; Saw, Wan Ting; Cohen, Gary H.; Eisenberg, Roselyn J.

    2012-01-01

    Vaccinia virus (VACV) L1 is a myristoylated envelope protein which is required for cell entry and the fusion of infected cells. L1 associates with members of the entry-fusion complex (EFC), but its specific role in entry has not been delineated. We recently demonstrated (Foo CH, et al., Virology 385:368–382, 2009) that soluble L1 binds to cells and blocks entry, suggesting that L1 serves as the receptor-binding protein for entry. Our goal is to identify the structural domains of L1 which are essential for its functions in VACV entry. We hypothesized that the myristate and the conserved residues at the N terminus of L1 are critical for entry. To test our hypothesis, we generated mutants in the N terminus of L1 and used a complementation assay to evaluate their ability to rescue infectivity. We also assessed the myristoylation efficiency of the mutants and their ability to interact with the EFC. We found that the N terminus of L1 constitutes a region that is critical for the infectivity of VACV and for myristoylation. At the same time, the nonmyristoylated mutants were incorporated into mature virions, suggesting that the myristate is not required for the association of L1 with the viral membrane. Although some of the mutants exhibited altered structural conformations, two mutants with impaired infectivity were similar in conformation to wild-type L1. Importantly, these two mutants, with changes at A4 and A5, undergo myristoylation. Overall, our results imply dual differential roles for myristate and the amino acids at the N terminus of L1. We propose a myristoyl switch model to describe how L1 functions. PMID:22398293

  19. Importance of the carboxyl terminus in the folding and function of alpha-hemolysin of Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Sangha, N; Kaur, S; Sharma, V; Krishnasastry, M V

    1999-04-02

    The physical state of two model mutants of alpha-hemolysin (alphaHL), alphaHL(1-289), a carboxyl-terminal deletion mutant (CDM), and alphaHL(1-331), a carboxyl-terminal extension mutant (CEM), were examined in detail to identify the role of the carboxyl terminus in the folding and function of native alphaHL. Denatured alphaHL can be refolded efficiently with nearly total recovery of its activity upon restoration of nondenaturing conditions. Various biophysical and biochemical studies on the three proteins have revealed the importance of an intact carboxyl terminus in the folding of alphaHL. The CDM exhibits a marked increase in susceptibility to proteases as compared with alphaHL. alphaHL and CEM exhibit similar fluorescence emission maxima, and that of the CDM is red-shifted by 9 nm, which indicates a greater solvent exposure of the tryptophan residues of the CDM. In addition, the CDM binds 8-anilino-1-naphthalene sulfonic acid (ANS) and increases its fluorescence intensity significantly unlike alphaHL and CEM, which show marginal binding. The circular dichroism studies point that the CDM possesses significant secondary structure, but its tertiary structure is greatly diminished as compared with alphaHL. These data show that the CDM has several of the features that characterize a molten globule state. Experiments with freshly translated mutants, using coupled in vitro transcription and translation, have further supported our observations that deletion at the carboxyl terminus leads to major structural perturbations in the water-soluble form of alphaHL. The studies demonstrate a critical role of the carboxyl terminus of alphaHL in attaining the native folded state.

  20. Transport of Iron Particles in the Silica Aquifers: Effect of Water Chemistry and Carboxy-Methyl Cellulose Polymer Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pensini, E.; Sleep, B. E.; Yip, C.

    2011-12-01

    Zero-valent iron particles are employed to remediate subsurface areas contaminated by chlorinated compounds, degrading them into less harmful substances. An aspect of major importance when assessing the viability of the technology is the ability of the particles to migrate in the subsurface reaching the contaminant source zone. Particle transport is influenced by particle adhesion onto geological substrates, since in the presence of strong adhesion particles are retained and their transport is hindered. Iron particles are generally coated with polymeric materials to prevent their rapid aggregation, and such coatings are expected to affect the surface properties and thus iron particle transport. This study investigates the forces of interaction between bare and carboxy-methyl cellulose CMC coated iron particles and silica (SiO2), to assess the influence of CMC coatings on iron particle adhesion. Atomic force spectroscopy experiments were conducted to measure the interactions between uncoated iron particles and silica in ultra pure water, NaCl and CaCl2 solutions at concentrations of 100 mM, as well as in solutions buffered with acetate and NaHCO3 (pH= 4 and 8 respectively). At pH values below 8 attractive interactions were observed, suggesting that silica could effectively retain the particles due to electrostatic attraction between negatively charged silica and positively charged iron particles. In contrast, at pH values of 8 the forces of interactions were repulsive, possibly because at this pH the positive charge on the iron surface is neutralized and repulsive hydration forces dominate. The interactions between SiO2 and CMC coated iron particles were repulsive in ultra pure water, as well as in solutions buffered with acetate or NaHCO3, and neutral in 100 mM NaCl solutions. In 100 mM CaCl2 solutions the forces of interaction were either neutral or attractive, suggesting that the presence of Ca2+ ions favors attachment of CMC to SiO2. Similar observations were

  1. Macromolecular substrate affinity for free factor VIIa is independent of a buried protease domain N-terminus.

    PubMed

    Persson, Egon

    2006-03-03

    The initial recognition and binding of macromolecular substrates by factor VIIa (FVIIa) in complex with tissue factor has been shown to be mediated by areas distinct from the active site (so-called exosites). The present aim was to shed light on whether the N-terminal tail of the protease domain of FVIIa influences factor X (FX) binding, and whether the zymogen-like conformation of free FVIIa has a decreased affinity for FX compared to the active conformation. Two derivatives of FVIIa, one (FFR-FVIIa) with a stably buried N-terminus representing the active conformation of FVIIa and one (V154G-FVIIa) with a fully exposed N-terminus representing the zymogen-like conformation, were used as inhibitors of FVIIa-catalyzed FX activation. Their inhibitory capacities were very similar, with K(i) values not significantly different from the K(m) for FX. This indicates that the conformational state of the N-terminus does not affect FX binding or, alternatively, that the activation domain including the N-terminal insertion site is easily shifted to the stable conformation ensuing FX docking to the zymogen-like conformation. The net outcome is that FX binding to the zymogen-like form of FVIIa does not appear to be impaired.

  2. Conformational changes in the C terminus of Shaker K+ channel bound to the rat Kvβ2-subunit

    PubMed Central

    Sokolova, Olga; Accardi, Alessio; Gutierrez, David; Lau, Adrian; Rigney, Mike; Grigorieff, Nikolaus

    2003-01-01

    We studied the structure of the C terminus of the Shaker potassium channel. The 3D structures of the full-length and a C-terminal deletion (ΔC) mutant of Shaker were determined by electron microscopy and single-particle analysis. The difference map between the full-length and the truncated channels clearly shows a compact density, located on the sides of the T1 domain, that corresponds to a large part of the C terminus. We also expressed and purified both WT and ΔC Shaker, assembled with the rat Kvβ2-subunit. By using a difference map between the full-length and truncated Shaker α–β complexes, a conformational change was identified that shifts a large part of the C terminus away from the membrane domain and into close contact with the β-subunit. This conformational change, induced by the binding of the Kvβ2-subunit, suggests a possible mechanism for the modulation of the K+ voltage-gated channel function by its β-subunit. PMID:14569011

  3. The N-terminus of vaccinia virus host range protein C7L is essential for function

    PubMed Central

    Terajima, Masanori; Urban, Stina L.; Leporati, Anita M.

    2012-01-01

    Vaccinia virus (VACV), a member of the Poxviridae family of large double-stranded DNA viruses, is being used as a smallpox vaccine as well as an expression vector for immunization against other infectious diseases and cancer. The host range of wild type VACV is very broad among mammalian cells. C7L is a host range gene identified in VACV and is well conserved in mammalian poxviruses except for parapoxviruses and molluscum contagiosum virus. The molecular mechanisms by which the C7L gene exerts host range function are not well understood. The C7L protein does not have any known conserved domains or show sequence similarity to cellular proteins or viral proteins other than the C7L homologues in mammalian poxviruses. We generated recombinant vaccinia viruses carrying deletion mutants of the C7L gene using NYVAC as a parental strain and found that the N-terminus is essential for host range function of C7L, which is consistent with a previous report that showed homology among C7L homologues are greater near the N-terminus than the C-terminus. PMID:23001690

  4. The membrane proximal region of the cannabinoid receptor CB1 N-terminus can allosterically modulate ligand affinity.

    PubMed

    Fay, Jonathan F; Farrens, David L

    2013-11-19

    The human cannabinoid receptor, CB1, a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), contains a relatively long (∼110 a.a.) amino terminus, whose function is still not defined. Here we explore a potential role for the CB1 N-terminus in modulating ligand binding to the receptor. Although most of the CB1 N-terminus is not necessary for ligand binding, previous studies have found that mutations introduced into its conserved membrane proximal region (MPR) do impair the receptors ability to bind ligand. Moreover, within the highly conserved MPR (∼ residues 90-110) lie two cysteine residues that are invariant in all CB1 receptors. We find these two cysteines (C98 and C107) form a disulfide in heterologously expressed human CB1, and this C98-C107 disulfide is much more accessible to reducing agents than the previously known disulfide in extracellular loop 2 (EL2). Interestingly, the presence of the C98-C107 disulfide modulates ligand binding to the receptor in a way that can be quantitatively analyzed by an allosteric model. The C98-C107 disulfide also alters the effects of allosteric ligands for CB1, Org 27569 and PSNCBAM-1. Together, these results provide new insights into how the N-terminal MPR and EL2 act together to influence the high-affinity orthosteric ligand binding site in CB1 and suggest that the CB1 N-terminal MPR may be an area through which allosteric modulators can act.

  5. Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor-Interacting Protein (AIP) N-Terminus Gene Mutations Identified in Pituitary Adenoma Patients Alter Protein Stability and Function.

    PubMed

    Formosa, Robert; Vassallo, Josanne

    2017-03-02

    Mutations spanning the entire aryl hydrocarbon receptor-interacting protein (AIP) gene have been found in isolated familial cases of pituitary adenomas (PA). Missense mutations located in the N-terminus of the gene have been identified in several patients. However, the functional significance of these mutations remains a matter of controversy. In most studies, the N-terminus of AIP has been shown to regulate protein stability and subcellular localization of the AIP-AHR-HSP90 complex but not to be involved in protein-protein interactions. Other studies found that the N-terminal domain interacts directly with other proteins. The aim of this study was to analyze whether specific N-terminus AIP mutations identified in PA patients would be functionally different from wild-type (WT) AIP. In vitro analyses were used to assess the role of known N-terminus variants, a locally identified mutant, R9Q, and three other commonly genotyped N-terminus mutations R16H, V49M and K103R are found in PA patients. Given the functional effect of WT AIP on cAMP signalling alterations caused by N-terminus mutants on this pathway were also analyzed in GH3 cells. Results indicate that N-terminus mutations lead to de-regulation of the effect of WT AIP on cAMP signalling and increased cAMP thresholds in GH3 cells resulting in increased growth hormone (GH) secretion. Cycloheximide chase analysis identified a variation in protein degradation patterns between WT and N-terminus variants. Therefore, both functional and structural studies reveal that N-terminus mutations in the AIP gene alter protein behaviour significantly and hence can truly be pathogenic in nature.

  6. Syntaxin 1A binds to the cytoplasmic C terminus of Kv2.1 to regulate channel gating and trafficking.

    PubMed

    Leung, Yuk M; Kang, Youhou; Gao, Xiaodong; Xia, Fuzhen; Xie, Huanli; Sheu, Laura; Tsuk, Sharon; Lotan, Ilana; Tsushima, Robert G; Gaisano, Herbert Y

    2003-05-09

    Voltage-gated K(+) (Kv) 2.1 is the dominant Kv channel that controls membrane repolarization in rat islet beta-cells and downstream insulin exocytosis. We recently showed that exocytotic SNARE protein SNAP-25 directly binds and modulates rat islet beta-cell Kv 2.1 channel protein at the cytoplasmic N terminus. We now show that SNARE protein syntaxin 1A (Syn-1A) binds and modulates rat islet beta-cell Kv2.1 at its cytoplasmic C terminus (Kv2.1C). In HEK293 cells overexpressing Kv2.1, we observed identical effects of channel inhibition by dialyzed GST-Syn-1A, which could be blocked by Kv2.1C domain proteins (C1: amino acids 412-633, C2: amino acids 634-853), but not the Kv2.1 cytoplasmic N terminus (amino acids 1-182). This was confirmed by direct binding of GST-Syn-1A to the Kv2.1C1 and C2 domains proteins. These findings are in contrast to our recent report showing that Syn-1A binds and modulates the cytoplasmic N terminus of neuronal Kv1.1 and not by its C terminus. Co-expression of Syn-1A in Kv2.1-expressing HEK293 cells inhibited Kv2.1 surfacing, which caused a reduction of Kv2.1 current density. In addition, Syn-1A caused a slowing of Kv2.1 current activation and reduction in the slope factor of steady-state inactivation, but had no affect on inactivation kinetics or voltage dependence of activation. Taken together, SNAP-25 and Syn-1A mediate secretion not only through its participation in the exocytotic SNARE complex, but also by regulating membrane potential and calcium entry through their interaction with Kv and Ca(2+) channels. In contrast to Ca(2+) channels, where these SNARE proteins act on a common synprint site, the SNARE proteins act not only on distinct sites within a Kv channel, but also on distinct sites between different Kv channel families.

  7. Diffuse Crustal Accretion at the Southern Terminus of the Malaguana-Gadao Ridge, Mariana Trough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sleeper, J. D.; Martinez, F.; Fryer, P. B.

    2014-12-01

    The mode of extension and crustal accretion in backarc basins is strongly affected by proximity to the arc volcanic front. The factor that likely has the strongest control on these processes is mantle water content. At Mid-Ocean Ridges, the small amount of water in the mantle is efficiently extracted into the melt, dehydrating the residual material and increasing the viscosity and strength of the lithosphere. This may aid in focusing melt generated over a broad (~200+ km wide) zone in the mantle toward a narrow zone of crustal accretion ~1-2 km wide. In the near-arc setting, the continuous flux of water into the mantle wedge should oppose lithospheric dehydration and inhibit strengthening of the lithosphere, which may allow deformation, volcanism, and crustal accretion to occur over a broad area instead of along a narrow axis. A possible example of this process can be observed at the southern terminus of the Malaguana-Gadao Ridge, a backarc spreading center in the Southern Mariana Trough, at the southern end of the Izu-Bonin-Mariana convergent margin. The spreading axis, which forms an axial high in this area, abruptly terminates at 143˚20'E, 12˚37'N and is replaced by a broad zone of active volcanism and tectonism characterized by short volcanic ridges, volcanic cones, and low-relief grabens. This study uses deep-towed and ship multibeam sonar, gravity, and magnetics data collected during an early 2012 cruise on R/V Thomas G. Thompson (TN273) along with available geophysical and geochemical data in the Southern Mariana Trough to gain insight into the nature of the diffuse crustal accretion process. Evidence of a similar transition from organized to "disorganized" spreading can also be observed at Valu Fa Ridge in the southern Lau basin and other backarc spreading centers. This suggests that this process is not unique to the Southern Mariana Trough, and may be an important mode of crustal accretion in a variety of backarc settings where there is extension in

  8. STIM1 carboxyl-terminus activates native SOC, I(crac) and TRPC1 channels.

    PubMed

    Huang, Guo N; Zeng, Weizhong; Kim, Joo Young; Yuan, Joseph P; Han, Linhuang; Muallem, Shmuel; Worley, Paul F

    2006-09-01

    Receptor-evoked Ca2+ signalling involves Ca2+ release from the endoplasmic reticulum, followed by Ca2+ influx across the plasma membrane. Ca2+ influx is essential for many cellular functions, from secretion to transcription, and is mediated by Ca2+-release activated Ca2+ (I(crac)) channels and store-operated calcium entry (SOC) channels. Although the molecular identity and regulation of I(crac) and SOC channels have not been precisely determined, notable recent findings are the identification of STIM1, which has been indicated to regulate SOC and I(crac) channels by functioning as an endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ sensor, and ORAI1 (ref. 7) or CRACM1 (ref. 8)--both of which may function as I(crac) channels or as an I(crac) subunit. How STIM1 activates the Ca2+ influx channels and whether STIM1 contributes to the channel pore remains unknown. Here, we identify the structural features that are essential for STIM1-dependent activation of SOC and I(crac) channels, and demonstrate that they are identical to those involved in the binding and activation of TRPC1. Notably, the cytosolic carboxyl terminus of STIM1 is sufficient to activate SOC, I(crac) and TRPC1 channels even when native STIM1 is depleted by small interfering RNA. Activity of STIM1 requires an ERM domain, which mediates the selective binding of STIM1 to TRPC1, 2 and 4, but not to TRPC3, 6 or 7, and a cationic lysine-rich region, which is essential for gating of TRPC1. Deletion of either region in the constitutively active STIM1(D76A) yields dominant-negative mutants that block native SOC channels, expressed TRPC1 in HEK293 cells and I(crac) in Jurkat cells. These observations implicate STIM1 as a key regulator of activity rather than a channel component, and reveal similar regulation of SOC, I(crac) and TRPC channel activation by STIM1.

  9. Functional analysis of the N- and C-terminus of mammalian G9a histone H3 methyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Estève, Pierre-Olivier; Patnaik, Debasis; Chin, Hang Gyeong; Benner, Jack; Teitell, Michael A; Pradhan, Sriharsa

    2005-01-01

    Methylation of lysine 9 (K9) in the N-terminus tail of histone H3 (H3) in chromatin is associated with transcriptionally silenced genes and is mediated by histone methyltransferases. Murine G9a is a 1263 amino acid H3-K9 methyltransferase that possesses characteristic SET domain and ANK repeats. In this paper, we have used a series of green fluorescent protein-tagged deletion constructs to identify two nuclear localization signals (NLS), the first NLS embedded between amino acids 24 and 109 and the second between amino acids 394 and 401 of murine G9a. Our data show that both long and short G9a isoforms were capable of entering the nucleus to methylate chromatin. Full-length or N-terminus-deleted G9a isoforms were also catalytically active enzymes that methylated recombinant H3 or synthetic peptides representing the N-terminus tail of H3. In vitro methylation reactions using N-terminus tail peptides resulted in tri-methylation of K9 that remained processive, even in G9a enzymes that lacked an N-terminus region by deletion. Co-expression of G9a and H3 resulted in di- and tri-methylation of H3-K9, while siRNA-mediated knockdown of G9a in HeLa cells resulted in reduction of global H3-K9 di- and tri-methylation. A recombinant deletion mutant enzyme fused with maltose-binding protein (MBP-G9aDelta634) was used for steady-state kinetic analysis with various substrates and was compared with full-length G9a (G9aFL). Turnover numbers of MBP-G9aDelta634 for various substrates was approximately 3-fold less compared with G9aFL, while their Michaelis constants (K(m)) for recombinant H3 were similar. The K(AdoMet)m for MBP-G9aDelta634 was approximately 2.3-2.65 microM with various substrates. Catalytic efficiencies (kcat/K(m)) for both MBP-G9aDelta634 and G9aFL were similar, suggesting that the N-terminus is not essential for catalysis. Furthermore, mutation of conserved amino acids R1097A, W1103A, Y1120A, Y1138A and R1162A, or the metal binding C1168A in the catalytic region

  10. 29 CFR Appendix C to Subpart R of... - Illustrations of Bridging Terminus Points: Non-mandatory Guidelines for Complying With §§ 1926...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Illustrations of Bridging Terminus Points: Non-mandatory Guidelines for Complying With §§ 1926.757(a)(10) and § 1926.757(c)(5) C Appendix C to Subpart R of Part.... R, App. C Appendix C to Subpart R of Part 1926—Illustrations of Bridging Terminus Points:...

  11. Solid-phase spectrophotometric determination of trace amounts of vanadium using 2,3-dichloro-6(3-carboxy-2- hydroxynaphthylazo)quinoxaline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amin, Alaa S.

    2003-03-01

    Solid-phase spectrophotometry (SPS) has been applied to analysis for trace amounts of vanadium in several environmental water (potable and polluted), biological samples (human blood and urine), and soil samples. Vanadium was sorbed in a styrene-divinylbenzene-type anion-exchanger Dowex 1-X8 as a vanadium—2,3-dichloro-6(3-carboxy -2-hydroxynaphthylazo)quinoxaline. Resin phase absorbances at 606 and 800 nm were measured directly which allowed the determination of vanadium in the range 0.03-2.2 ng ml -1 with a relative standard deviation (R.S.D.) of 1.4%. The comparison of the SPS method and the gallic acid persulphate method shows that the linearity, analytical sensitivity, and precision were better for the SPS method, and that the latter method has lower detection and quantification limits compared with the gallic acid persulphate method.

  12. Bis(tetra-methyl-amonium) bis-(2,4,5-carboxy-benzoate)-benzene-1,2,4,5-tetra-carboxylic acid (1/1).

    PubMed

    Cunha-Silva, Luís; Girginova, Penka I; Trindade, Tito; Rocha, João; Klinowski, Jacek; Almeida Paz, Filipe A

    2007-12-06

    The asymmetric unit of the title compound, 2C(4)H(12)N(+)·2C(10)H(5)O(8) (-)·C(10)H(6)O(8), consists of a tetra-methyl-amonium cation, an anion derived from the singly deprotonated pyromellitic acid anion, 2,4,5-carboxy-benzoate (H(3)bta(-)), and one-half of a benzene-1,2,4,5-tetra-carboxylic acid (H(4)bta) mol-ecule, which has the centroid of the aromatic ring positioned at a crystallographic centre of inversion. The H(4)bta and H(3)bta(-) residues are involved in an extensive inter-molecular O-H⋯O hydrogen-bonding network, which leads to a three-dimensional supra-molecular structure containing one-dimensional channels running parallel to the [001] crystallographic direction. These channels house the tetra-methyl-amonium cations.

  13. Studies on the growth, structural, spectral and third-order nonlinear optical properties of Ammonium 3-carboxy-4-hydroxy benzenesulfonate monohydrate single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silambarasan, A.; Krishna Kumar, M.; Thirunavukkarasu, A.; Mohan Kumar, R.; Umarani, P. R.

    2015-01-01

    An organic nonlinear optical bulk single crystal, Ammonium 3-carboxy-4-hydroxy benzenesulfonate monohydrate (ACHBS) was successfully grown by solution growth technique. Single crystal X-ray diffraction study confirms that, the grown crystal belongs to P21/c space group. Powder X-ray diffraction and high resolution X-ray diffraction analyses revealed the crystallinity of the grown crystal. Infrared spectral analysis showed the vibrational behavior of chemical bonds and its functional groups. The thermal stability and decomposition stages of the grown crystal were studied by TG-DTA analysis. UV-Visible transmittance studies showed the transparency region and cut-off wavelength of the grown crystal. The third-order nonlinear optical susceptibility of the grown crystal was estimated by Z-scan technique using Hesbnd Ne laser source. The mechanical property of the grown crystal was studied by using Vicker's microhardness test.

  14. Regional differences of type II collagen synthesis in the human temporomandibular joint disc: immunolocalization study of carboxy-terminal type II procollagen peptide (chondrocalcin).

    PubMed

    Kondoh, Toshirou; Hamada, Yoshiki; Iino, Mitsuyoshi; Takahashi, Tetsu; Kikuchi, Toshiyuki; Fujikawa, Kyousuke; Seto, Kannichi

    2003-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the regional differences of distribution of the carboxy-terminal type II procollagen peptide (pCOL-II-C; chondrocalcin) as markers of cartilaginous expression in the human temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disc. Twelve human TMJ discs without morphologic abnormalities were obtained from 12 fresh cadavers. All specimens were analysed for pCOL-II-C expression using polyclonal rabbit anti-human pCOL-II-C antibody in avidin-biotin-peroxidase complex staining. The results were demonstrated that the percentage of pCOL-II-C immunoreactive disc cells was significantly higher in the outer part (the articular surfaces) than in the inner part (the deep central areas) of the disc. These findings suggest that the tissue heterogeneity of cartilaginous expression reflects the functional demands of the remodelling process in the human TMJ disc.

  15. An in vitro experiment on the interaction of charcoal or wheat bran with 11-nor-9-carboxy-Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol and its glucuronide.

    PubMed

    Skopp, Gisela; Mikus, Gerd

    2013-11-01

    The rather long yet variable terminal half-lives and detection times since last use of urinary cannabinoids may partly be attributed to their enterohepatic circulation which generally can be interrupted or restricted by chemical adsorbents. Therefore, an in vitro experiment was performed to study the adsorption/binding of 11-nor-9-carboxy-Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC-COOH) and its glucuronide to activated charcoal and wheat bran; remaining concentrations were determined by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. Adsorption/binding of 1,000 ng/mL of free or conjugated THC-COOH was complete using as little as 5 mg of charcoal whereas adsorption/binding to wheat bran increased with increasing amounts. Taking of remedies affecting enterohepatic recycling of THC-COOH and its glucuronide may challenge interpretation of cannabinoid concentrations used to detect or assess frequency of drug use or the time since last drug consumption.

  16. Expression of ubiquitin-related enzymes in the suprachiasmatic nucleus with special reference to ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase UchL1.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xin; Yagita, Kazuhiro; Zhang, Jing; Okamura, Hitoshi

    2005-04-01

    There is growing evidence that ubiquitin-proteasome system plays an important role for the generation of circadian rhythms in mice as in Drosophila. Here we examined the expression of ubiquitin-related enzymes (Ubce5, UbcM4, Ube2v, Ube2d2, UchL1, UchL3, Ubp41, UfdlL, beta-TrCP) in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). At mRNA level, the-expression of these enzymes were faint to moderate except ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase L1 (UchL1), a dominant deubiquitinating salvaging enzyme. Although strongly expressed in the SCN, UchL1 mRNA did not show the rhythm in the SCN in both light-dark and constant dark conditions.

  17. A carboxy-methyl cellulose coated humidity sensor based on Mach-Zehnder interferometer with waist-enlarged bi-tapers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Qifei; Ni, Kai; Huang, Ran

    2017-01-01

    A fiber-optic Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI) humidity sensor is proposed, comprising a pair of waist-enlarged bi-tapers and carboxy-methyl cellulose (CMC) coating. The MZI utilizes intermodal interference between the core mode and cladding modes for the measurement of the effective refractive index (RI) of the CMC film that varies with surrounding humidity, through change in the sensor's interference pattern. The proposed sensor is linearly responsive to relative humidity (RH) within the humidity range from 70% RH to 85% RH, with maximum sensitivity of -0.8578 dB/% RH. The advantages of this sensor are its compact size and a facile fabrication process. More importantly, humidity sensitivity can be improved by changing the thickness of the CMC film, which makes this structure a highly promising for real-time, practical RH monitoring application.

  18. Respiratory syncytial virus fusion glycoprotein: nucleotide sequence of mRNA, identification of cleavage activation site and amino acid sequence of N-terminus of F1 subunit.

    PubMed Central

    Elango, N; Satake, M; Coligan, J E; Norrby, E; Camargo, E; Venkatesan, S

    1985-01-01

    The amino acid sequence of respiratory syncytial virus fusion protein (Fo) was deduced from the sequence of a partial cDNA clone of mRNA and from the 5' mRNA sequence obtained by primer extension and dideoxysequencing. The encoded protein of 574 amino acids is extremely hydrophobic and has a molecular weight of 63371 daltons. The site of proteolytic cleavage within this protein was accurately mapped by determining a partial amino acid sequence of the N-terminus of the larger subunit (F1) purified by radioimmunoprecipitation using monoclonal antibodies. Alignment of the N-terminus of the F1 subunit within the deduced amino acid sequence of Fo permitted us to identify a sequence of lys-lys-arg-lys-arg-arg at the C-terminus of the smaller N-terminal F2 subunit that appears to represent the cleavage/activation domain. Five potential sites of glycosylation, four within the F2 subunit, were also identified. Three extremely hydrophobic domains are present in the protein; a) the N-terminal signal sequence, b) the N-terminus of the F1 subunit that is analogous to the N-terminus of the paramyxovirus F1 subunit and the HA2 subunit of influenza virus hemagglutinin, and c) the putative membrane anchorage domain near the C-terminus of F1. Images PMID:2987829

  19. The effects of the carboxyl-terminus amino acids of the Shiga toxin B-subunit on retrograde transport.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dan; Fan, Yuying; Li, Jie; Gao, Xiaoge; Hao, Miao; Xue, Huiting; Tai, Guihua

    2012-07-01

    The Shiga toxin B-subunit (STxB), from the enteric pathogen, Shigella dysenteriae, is responsible for the attachment of its receptor, globotriaosylceramide (Gb3), and navigates the retrograde pathway from the plasma membrane to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). In this study, in order to demonstrate the role of carboxyl-terminus (C-terminus/al) amino acids of the B-fragment on the retrograde transport speed and the retrograde transport pathway, STxB was modified by site-directed mutagenesis and by the addition of an amino acid tail. The results showed that when the C-terminal amino acid, arginine [Arg (R)], was mutated to serine [Ser (S)], the speed of the B-fragment transportation into the ER at 37 ˚C was slower. When an acidic amino acid tail 'glutamine (Glu)-Ser' (ES) was added to the C-terminal amino acid 'R', the B-fragment transporting speed slowed down and remained in the Golgi apparatus. Further experiments showed that the effects induced by mutations of the amino acid tail resulted in STxB-EEEES ≥-EEES>-EES>-ES, demonstrating that the retardation effect on the tail was increased and the length of the acidic amino acid was augmented. The effect was possibly produced by an acidic amino acid tail, not only by the amino acid 'E'. The significant inhibitory effect on the speed of B-fragment retrograde transport was observed only when the mutations of the acidic amino acid tail were linked near to the C-terminus. These results may provide important insights for the study of transport mechanisms and for the development of STxB serial proteins as vectors for drug delivery.

  20. Nonpolar substitution at C-terminus of the prion protein, a mimic of GPI anchor, partially impairs amyloid fibrils formation

    PubMed Central

    Breydo, Leonid; Sun, Ying; Makarava, Natallia; Lee, Cheng-I; Novitskaia, Vera; Bocharova, Olga; Kao, Joseph P.Y.; Baskakov, Ilia V.

    2008-01-01

    In contrast to most amyloidogenic proteins or peptides that do not contain any significant post-translational modifications, the prion protein (PrP) is modified with either one or two polysaccharides and a GPI anchor which attaches PrP to the plasma membrane. Like other amyloidogenic proteins, however, PrP adopts a fibrillar shape when converted to a disease-specific conformation. Therefore, PrP polymerization offers a unique opportunity to examine the effects of biologically relevant non-peptidic modifications on conversion to the amyloid conformation. To test the extent to which a long hydrophobic chain at the C-terminus affects the intrinsic amyloidogenic propensity of PrP, we modified recombinant PrP with a N-myristoylamido-maleimidyl group, which can serve as a membrane anchor. We show that while this modification increases the affinity of PrP for the cell membrane, it does not alter the structure of the protein. Myristoylation of PrP affected amyloid formation in two ways: (i) it substantially decreased the extent of fibrillation, presumably due to off-pathway aggregation, and (ii) it prohibited assembly of filaments into higher-order fibrils by preventing their lateral association. The negative effect on lateral association was abolished if the myristoylated moiety at the C-terminus was replaced by a polar group of similar size or by a hydrophobic group of smaller size. When preformed PrP fibrils were provided as seeds, myristoylated PrP supported fibril elongation and formation of higher-order fibrils composed of several filaments. Our studies illustrate that, despite a bulky hydrophobic moiety at C-terminus, myristoylated PrP can still incorporate into fibrillar structure, and that the C-terminal hydrophobic substitution does not affect the size of the proteinase K resistant core, but controls the mode of lateral assembly of filaments into higher-order fibrils. PMID:17223707

  1. Aminoacylase 3 binds to and cleaves the N-terminus of the hepatitis C virus core protein.

    PubMed

    Tsirulnikov, Kirill; Abuladze, Natalia; Vahi, Ritu; Hasnain, Huma; Phillips, Martin; Ryan, Christopher M; Atanasov, Ivo; Faull, Kym F; Kurtz, Ira; Pushkin, Alexander

    2012-11-02

    Aminoacylase 3 (AA3) mediates deacetylation of N-acetyl aromatic amino acids and mercapturic acids. Deacetylation of mercapturic acids of exo- and endobiotics are likely involved in their toxicity. AA3 is predominantly expressed in kidney, and to a lesser extent in liver, brain, and blood. AA3 has been recently reported to interact with the hepatitis C virus core protein (HCVCP) in the yeast two-hybrid system. Here we demonstrate that AA3 directly binds to HCVCP (K(d) ~10 μM) that may by implicated in HCV pathogenesis. AA3 also revealed a weak endopeptidase activity towards the N-terminus of HCVCP.

  2. Aminoacylase 3 binds to and cleaves the N-terminus of the hepatitis C virus core protein

    PubMed Central

    Tsirulnikov, Kirill; Abuladze, Natalia; Vahi, Ritu; Hasnain, Huma; Phillips, Martin; Ryan, Christopher M.; Atanasov, Ivo; Faull, Kym F.; Kurtz, Ira; Pushkin, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Aminoacylase 3 (AA3) mediates deacetylation of N-acetyl aromatic amino acids and mercapturic acids. Deacetylation of mercapturic acids of exo- and endobiotics are likely involved in their toxicity. AA3 is predominantly expressed in kidney, and to a lesser extent in liver, brain, and blood. AA3 has been recently reported to interact with the hepatitis C virus core protein (HCVCP) in the yeast two-hybrid system. Here we demonstrate that AA3 directly binds to HCVCP (Kd~10 μM) that may by implicated in HCV pathogenesis. AA3 also revealed a weak endopeptidase activity towards the N-terminus of HCVCP. PMID:23010594

  3. Salt, phosphate and the Bohr effect at the hemoglobin beta chain C terminus studied by hydrogen exchange.

    PubMed

    Louie, G; Englander, J J; Englander, S W

    1988-06-20

    Hydrogen exchange experiments using functional labeling and fragment separation methods were performed to study interactions at the C terminus of the hemoglobin beta subunit that contribute to the phosphate effect and the Bohr effect. The results show that the H-exchange behavior of several peptide NH at the beta chain C terminus is determined by a transient, concerted unfolding reaction involving five or more residues, from the C-terminal His146 beta through at least Ala142 beta, and that H-exchange rate can be used to measure the stabilization free energy of interactions, both individually and collectively, at this locus. In deoxy hemoglobin at pH 7.4 and 0 degrees C, the removal of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (DPG) or pyrophosphate (loss of a salt to His143 beta) speeds the exchange of the beta chain C-terminal peptide NH protons by 2.5-fold (at high salt), indicating a destabilization of the C-terminal segment by 0.5 kcal of free energy. Loss of the His146 beta 1 to Asp94 beta 1 salt link speeds all these protons by 6.3-fold, indicating a bond stabilization free energy of 1.0 kcal. When both these salt links are removed together, the effect is found to be strictly additive; all the protons exchange faster by 16-fold indicating a loss of 1.5 kcal in stabilization free energy. Added salt is slightly destabilizing when DPG is present but provides some increased stability, in the 0.2 kcal range, when DPG is absent. The total allosteric stabilization energy at each beta chain C terminus in deoxy hemoglobin under these conditions is measured to be 3.8 kcal (pH 7.4, 0 degrees C, with DPG). In oxy hemoglobin at pH 7.4 and 0 degrees C, stability at the beta chain C terminus is essentially independent of salt concentration, and the NES modification, which in deoxy hemoglobin blocks the His146 beta to Asp94 beta salt link, has no destabilizing effect, either at high or low salt. These results appear to show that the His146 beta salt link, which participates importantly in the

  4. Rescue microsurgery with bypass and stent removal following Pipeline treatment of a giant internal carotid artery terminus aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Bowers, Christian A; Taussky, Philip; Park, Min S; Neil, Jayson A; Couldwell, William T

    2015-12-01

    We report the microsurgical rescue and removal of a Pipeline stent embolization of a giant internal carotid artery terminus aneurysm. After the initial placement of a Pipeline Embolization Device (PED), it migrated proximally to the cavernous carotid with the distal end free in the middle of the aneurysm, resulting in only partial aneurysm neck coverage. The patient underwent microsurgical rescue with trapping, bypass, and opening of the aneurysm with PED removal. The vessel remained patent in the proximal segment previously covered by the Pipeline stent. Microsurgical rescue for definitive aneurysm treatment with PED removal can be safe and effective for aneurysms unsuccessfully treated with PED.

  5. N-terminus conservation in the anchor polypeptide of a prokaryotic and eukaryotic alga. [Nostoc; Porphydium cruentum

    SciTech Connect

    Gantt, E.; Lipschultz, C.A.; Cunningham, F.X. Jr.; Mimuro, M.

    1987-04-01

    Energy flow between the extrinsic phycobilisomes and the photosystems within thylakoids, is probably mediated by a blue anchor polypeptide. Polypeptides in the 94 kD range, purified by LiDS-PAGE from phycobilisomes of Nostoc and Porphyrdium cruentum, crossreacted with anti-Nostoc-94 (although weakly with the latter). Though rich in ASP and GLU, the polypeptides were very hydrophobic, and low in MET, CYS, and HIS. Partial sequence of the N-terminus shows considerable homology 1 - 5 - 10 - 15 - 20 N: (S)-V-K-A-S-G-G-S-S-V-A-(R)-P-Q-L-Y-Q-(G)-L-(A)-V- P: V-()-K-A-S-G-G-S-P-V-V-K-P-Q-L-Y-(K)-()-A-(S)- between the species. There is a lack of homology when compared with ..cap alpha.. and ..beta.. polypeptides of allophycocyanin with rod linkers of phycobilisomes and other phycobiliproteins. Polypeptides of 94 and 92 kD from thylakoids of Nostoc, also immunoreactive with anti-94, were blocked at the N-terminus.

  6. Aphid transmission of a potyvirus depends on suitability of the helper component and the N terminus of the coat protein.

    PubMed

    Dombrovsky, A; Huet, H; Chejanovsky, N; Raccah, B

    2005-02-01

    The present study investigates the specificity of potyviruses for aphid species. Two potyviruses differing in their host range were used: Zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV) mainly infecting cucurbits and Turnip mosaic virus (TuMV) mainly infecting crucifers. Two sets of aphids species were used as vectors, one polyphagous (Myzus persicae and Aphis gossypii) and the other from crucifers (Brevicoryne brassicae and Lipaphis erysimi). Evidence is provided that the specificity between a vector and a potyvirus depends either on the affinity between the aphid species and the helper component (HC) protein used or on the affinity between the HC and the virions. The difference between the two potyviruses cannot be attributed to the DAG domain which is unaltered in both N termini of the CP. Therefore, a ZYMV full length clone served to exchange a fragment encoding for the N terminus of the ZYMV CP by that of TuMV. This partial exchange in the ZYMV CP, allowed the TuMV HC to transmit the chimeric virus but not the wild type ZYMV. The significance of the N terminus context of the CP in the specificity for the HC is discussed.

  7. L-delta-(alpha-Aminoadipoyl)-L-cysteine-D-valine synthetase: production of dipeptides containing valine residue at its C-terminus.

    PubMed

    Shiau, Chia-Yang; Liu, Yu-Tien

    2002-04-12

    L-delta-(alpha-Aminoadipoyl)-L-cysteine-D-valine synthetase (ACVS) has been recently studied as a model enzyme for peptide synthetases. It was found that in the absence of alpha-aminoadipic acid but in the presence of several cysteine analogues it was incorporated into several analogue dipeptides upon incubation of the potential cysteine analogues with ACVS. [(14)C]Cysteine was incorporated into the[(14)C]cysteinyl-valine analogue dipeptides. Notably, [(14)C]valine incorporation in the presence of N-acylated cysteine analogues was observed. The alpha-aminoadipic acid activation site is influential, inhibitory or promotive, on the production of these putative dipeptide products. The production of dipeptide analogues, containing valine or analogues at the C-terminus, leads to the speculation that the biosynthetic direction of ACV could be from the C-terminus to the N-terminus.

  8. A conformational transition at the N terminus of the prion protein features in formation of the scrapie isoform.

    PubMed

    Peretz, D; Williamson, R A; Matsunaga, Y; Serban, H; Pinilla, C; Bastidas, R B; Rozenshteyn, R; James, T L; Houghten, R A; Cohen, F E; Prusiner, S B; Burton, D R

    1997-10-31

    The scrapie prion protein (PrPSc) is formed from the cellular isoform (PrPC) by a post-translational process that involves a profound conformational change. Linear epitopes for recombinant antibody Fab fragments (Fabs) on PrPC and on the protease-resistant core of PrPSc, designated PrP 27-30, were identified using ELISA and immunoprecipitation. An epitope region at the C terminus was accessible in both PrPC and PrP 27-30; in contrast, epitopes towards the N-terminal region (residues 90 to 120) were accessible in PrPC but largely cryptic in PrP 27-30. Denaturation of PrP 27-30 exposed the epitopes of the N-terminal domain. We argue from our findings that the major conformational change underlying PrPSc formation occurs within the N-terminal segment of PrP 27-30.

  9. Pan–ice-sheet glacier terminus change in East Antarctica reveals sensitivity of Wilkes Land to sea-ice changes

    PubMed Central

    Miles, Bertie W. J.; Stokes, Chris R.; Jamieson, Stewart S. R.

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of ocean-terminating outlet glaciers are an important component of ice-sheet mass balance. Using satellite imagery for the past 40 years, we compile an approximately decadal record of outlet-glacier terminus position change around the entire East Antarctic Ice Sheet (EAIS) marine margin. We find that most outlet glaciers retreated during the period 1974–1990, before switching to advance in every drainage basin during the two most recent periods, 1990–2000 and 2000–2012. The only exception to this trend was in Wilkes Land, where the majority of glaciers (74%) retreated between 2000 and 2012. We hypothesize that this anomalous retreat is linked to a reduction in sea ice and associated impacts on ocean stratification, which increases the incursion of warm deep water toward glacier termini. Because Wilkes Land overlies a large marine basin, it raises the possibility of a future sea level contribution from this sector of East Antarctica. PMID:27386519

  10. Pan-ice-sheet glacier terminus change in East Antarctica reveals sensitivity of Wilkes Land to sea-ice changes.

    PubMed

    Miles, Bertie W J; Stokes, Chris R; Jamieson, Stewart S R

    2016-05-01

    The dynamics of ocean-terminating outlet glaciers are an important component of ice-sheet mass balance. Using satellite imagery for the past 40 years, we compile an approximately decadal record of outlet-glacier terminus position change around the entire East Antarctic Ice Sheet (EAIS) marine margin. We find that most outlet glaciers retreated during the period 1974-1990, before switching to advance in every drainage basin during the two most recent periods, 1990-2000 and 2000-2012. The only exception to this trend was in Wilkes Land, where the majority of glaciers (74%) retreated between 2000 and 2012. We hypothesize that this anomalous retreat is linked to a reduction in sea ice and associated impacts on ocean stratification, which increases the incursion of warm deep water toward glacier termini. Because Wilkes Land overlies a large marine basin, it raises the possibility of a future sea level contribution from this sector of East Antarctica.

  11. Control of high affinity interactions in the talin C terminus: how talin domains coordinate protein dynamics in cell adhesions.

    PubMed

    Himmel, Mirko; Ritter, Anett; Rothemund, Sven; Pauling, Björg V; Rottner, Klemens; Gingras, Alexandre R; Ziegler, Wolfgang H

    2009-05-15

    In cell-extracellular matrix junctions (focal adhesions), the cytoskeletal protein talin is central to the connection of integrins to the actin cytoskeleton. Talin is thought to mediate this connection via its two integrin, (at least) three actin, and several vinculin binding sites. The binding sites are cryptic in the head-to-rod autoinhibited cytoplasmic form of the protein and require (stepwise) conformational activation. This activation process, however, remains poorly understood, and there are contradictory models with respect to the determinants of adhesion site localization. Here, we report turnover rates and protein-protein interactions in a range of talin rod domain constructs varying in helix bundle structure. We conclude that several bundles of the C terminus cooperate to regulate targeting and concomitantly tailor high affinity interactions of the talin rod in cell adhesions. Intrinsic control of ligand binding activities is essential for the coordination of adhesion site function of talin.

  12. Structure and interactions of the carboxyl terminus of striated muscle alpha-tropomyosin: it is important to be flexible.

    PubMed Central

    Greenfield, Norma J; Palm, Thomas; Hitchcock-DeGregori, Sarah E

    2002-01-01

    Tropomyosin (TM) binds to and regulates the actin filament. We used circular dichroism and heteronuclear NMR to investigate the secondary structure and interactions of the C terminus of striated muscle alpha-TM, a major functional determinant, using a model peptide, TM9a(251-284). The (1)H(alpha) and (13)C(alpha) chemical shift displacements show that residues 252 to 277 are alpha-helical but residues 278 to 284 are nonhelical and mobile. The (1)H(N) and (13)C' displacements suggest that residues 257 to 269 form a coiled coil. Formation of an "overlap" binary complex with a 33-residue N-terminal chimeric peptide containing residues 1 to 14 of alpha-TM perturbs the (1)H(N) and (15)N resonances of residues 274 to 284. Addition of a fragment of troponin T, TnT(70-170), to the binary complex perturbs most of the (1)H(N)-(15)N cross-peaks. In addition, there are many new cross-peaks, showing that the binding is asymmetric. Q263, in a proposed troponin T binding site, shows two sets of side-chain (15)N-(1)H cross-peaks, indicating conformational flexibility. The conformational equilibrium of the side chain changes upon formation of the binary and ternary complexes. Replacing Q263 with leucine greatly increases the stability of TM9a(251-284) and reduces its ability to form the binary and ternary complexes, showing that conformational flexibility is crucial for the binding functions of the C terminus. PMID:12414708

  13. The N Terminus of the Prion Protein Mediates Functional Interactions with the Neuronal Cell Adhesion Molecule (NCAM) Fibronectin Domain.

    PubMed

    Slapšak, Urška; Salzano, Giulia; Amin, Ladan; Abskharon, Romany N N; Ilc, Gregor; Zupančič, Blaž; Biljan, Ivana; Plavec, Janez; Giachin, Gabriele; Legname, Giuseppe

    2016-10-14

    The cellular form of the prion protein (PrP(C)) is a highly conserved glycoprotein mostly expressed in the central and peripheral nervous systems by different cell types in mammals. A misfolded, pathogenic isoform, denoted as prion, is related to a class of neurodegenerative diseases known as transmissible spongiform encephalopathy. PrP(C) function has not been unequivocally clarified, and it is rather defined as a pleiotropic protein likely acting as a dynamic cell surface scaffolding protein for the assembly of different signaling modules. Among the variety of PrP(C) protein interactors, the neuronal cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) has been studied in vivo, but the structural basis of this functional interaction is still a matter of debate. Here we focused on the structural determinants responsible for human PrP(C) (HuPrP) and NCAM interaction using stimulated emission depletion (STED) nanoscopy, SPR, and NMR spectroscopy approaches. PrP(C) co-localizes with NCAM in mouse hippocampal neurons, and this interaction is mainly mediated by the intrinsically disordered PrP(C) N-terminal tail, which binds with high affinity to the NCAM fibronectin type-3 domain. NMR structural investigations revealed surface-interacting epitopes governing the interaction between HuPrP N terminus and the second module of the NCAM fibronectin type-3 domain. Our data provided molecular details about the interaction between HuPrP and the NCAM fibronectin domain, and revealed a new role of PrP(C) N terminus as a dynamic and functional element responsible for protein-protein interaction.

  14. Cytoplasmic methionyl-tRNA synthetase from Bakers' yeast. A monomer with a post-translationally modified N terminus.

    PubMed

    Fasiolo, F; Gibson, B W; Walter, P; Chatton, B; Biemann, K; Boulanger, Y

    1985-12-15

    Methionyl-tRNA synthetase has been purified from a yeast strain carrying the MES1 structural gene on a high copy number plasmid (pFL1). The purified enzyme is a monomer of Mr = 85,000 in contrast to its counterpart from Escherichia coli which is a dimer made up of identical subunits (Mr = 76,000; Dardel, F., Fayat, G., and Blanquet, S. (1984) J. Bacteriol. 160, 1115-1122). The yeast enzyme was not amenable to Edman's degradation indicating a blocked NH2 terminus. Its primary structure as derived from the DNA sequence (Walter, P., Gangloff, J., Bonnet, J., Boulanger, Y., Ebel, J.P., and Fasiolo, F. (1983) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 80, 2437-2441) has been confirmed using the fast atom bombardment-mass spectrometric method. This method was applied to tryptic digests of the carboxymethylated enzyme and the corresponding data provided extensive coverage of the translated DNA sequence, thus confirming its correctness. The ambiguity concerning which of the three NH2-terminally located methionine codons is the initiation codon was easily resolved from peptides identified in this region. It was possible to show that the first methionine had been removed and that the new NH2 terminus, serine, had been acetylated. A comparison between the yeast and E. coli sequences shows that the former has an N-terminal extension of about 200 residues as compared to the latter. It also lacks the C-terminal domain which is responsible for the dimerization of the E. coli methionyl-tRNA synthetase.

  15. Synthesis of [13C4]-labeled ∆9-tetrahydrocannabinol and 11-nor-9-carboxy-∆9-tetrahydrocannabinol as internal standards for reducing ion suppressing/alteration effects in LC/MS-MS quantification.

    PubMed

    Karlsen, Morten; Liu, Huiling; Johansen, Jon Eigill; Hoff, Bård Helge

    2014-09-01

    (-)-∆9-Tetrahydrocannabinol is the principal psychoactive component of the cannabis plant and also the active ingredient in some prescribed drugs. To detect and control misuse and monitor administration in clinical settings, reference samples of the native drugs and their metabolites are needed. The accuracy of liquid chromatography/mass spectrometric quantification of drugs in biological samples depends among others on ion suppressing/alteration effects. Especially, 13C-labeled drug analogues are useful for minimzing such interferences. Thus, to provide internal standards for more accurate quantification and for identification purpose, synthesis of [13C4]-∆9-tetrahydro-cannabinol and [13C4]-11-nor-9-carboxy-∆9-tetrahydrocannabinol was developed via [13C4]-olivetol. Starting from [13C4]-olivetol the synthesis of [13C4]-11-nor-9-carboxy-∆9-tetrahydrocannabinol was shortened from three to two steps by employing nitromethane as a co-solvent in condensation with (+)-apoverbenone.

  16. Phosphorylation of serine residues in the N-terminus modulates the activity of ACA8, a plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase of Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Giacometti, Sonia; Marrano, Claudia Adriana; Bonza, Maria Cristina; Luoni, Laura; Limonta, Margherita; De Michelis, Maria Ida

    2012-01-01

    ACA8 is a plasma membrane-localized isoform of calmodulin (CaM)-regulated Ca2+-ATPase of Arabidopsis thaliana. Several phosphopeptides corresponding to portions of the regulatory N-terminus of ACA8 have been identified in phospho-proteomic studies. To mimic phosphorylation of the ACA8 N-terminus, each of the serines found to be phosphorylated in those studies (Ser19, Ser22, Ser27, Ser29, Ser57, and Ser99) has been mutated to aspartate. Mutants have been expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and characterized: mutants S19D and S57D—and to a lesser extent also mutants S22D and S27D—are deregulated, as shown by their low activation by CaM and by tryptic cleavage of the N-terminus. The His-tagged N-termini of wild-type and mutant ACA8 (6His-1M-I116) were expressed in Escherichia coli, affinity-purified, and used to analyse the kinetics of CaM binding by surface plasmon resonance. All the analysed mutations affect the kinetics of interaction with CaM to some extent: in most cases, the altered kinetics result in marginal changes in affinity, with the exception of mutants S57D (KD ∼10-fold higher than wild-type ACA8) and S99D (KD about half that of wild-type ACA8). The ACA8 N-terminus is phosphorylated in vitro by two isoforms of A. thaliana calcium-dependent protein kinase (CPK1 and CPK16); phosphorylation of mutant 6His-1M-I116 peptides shows that CPK16 is able to phosphorylate the ACA8 N-terminus at Ser19 and at Ser22. The possible physiological implications of the subtle modulation of ACA8 activity by phosphorylation of its N-terminus are discussed. PMID:22090438

  17. Phosphorylation of serine residues in the N-terminus modulates the activity of ACA8, a plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Giacometti, Sonia; Marrano, Claudia Adriana; Bonza, Maria Cristina; Luoni, Laura; Limonta, Margherita; De Michelis, Maria Ida

    2012-02-01

    ACA8 is a plasma membrane-localized isoform of calmodulin (CaM)-regulated Ca(2+)-ATPase of Arabidopsis thaliana. Several phosphopeptides corresponding to portions of the regulatory N-terminus of ACA8 have been identified in phospho-proteomic studies. To mimic phosphorylation of the ACA8 N-terminus, each of the serines found to be phosphorylated in those studies (Ser19, Ser22, Ser27, Ser29, Ser57, and Ser99) has been mutated to aspartate. Mutants have been expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and characterized: mutants S19D and S57D--and to a lesser extent also mutants S22D and S27D--are deregulated, as shown by their low activation by CaM and by tryptic cleavage of the N-terminus. The His-tagged N-termini of wild-type and mutant ACA8 (6His-(1)M-I(116)) were expressed in Escherichia coli, affinity-purified, and used to analyse the kinetics of CaM binding by surface plasmon resonance. All the analysed mutations affect the kinetics of interaction with CaM to some extent: in most cases, the altered kinetics result in marginal changes in affinity, with the exception of mutants S57D (K(D) ≈ 10-fold higher than wild-type ACA8) and S99D (K(D) about half that of wild-type ACA8). The ACA8 N-terminus is phosphorylated in vitro by two isoforms of A. thaliana calcium-dependent protein kinase (CPK1 and CPK16); phosphorylation of mutant 6His-(1)M-I(116) peptides shows that CPK16 is able to phosphorylate the ACA8 N-terminus at Ser19 and at Ser22. The possible physiological implications of the subtle modulation of ACA8 activity by phosphorylation of its N-terminus are discussed.

  18. A triclinic crystal structure of the carboxy-terminal domain of HIV-1 capsid protein with four molecules in the asymmetric unit reveals a novel packing interface.

    PubMed

    Lampel, Ayala; Yaniv, Oren; Berger, Or; Bacharach, Eran; Gazit, Ehud; Frolow, Felix

    2013-06-01

    The Gag precursor is the major structural protein of the virion of human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1). Capsid protein (CA), a cleavage product of Gag, plays an essential role in virus assembly both in Gag-precursor multimerization and in capsid core formation. The carboxy-terminal domain (CTD) of CA contains 20 residues that are highly conserved across retroviruses and constitute the major homology region (MHR). Genetic evidence implies a role for the MHR in interactions between Gag precursors during the assembly of the virus, but the structural basis for this role remains elusive. This paper describes a novel triclinic structure of the HIV-1 CA CTD at 1.6 Å resolution with two canonical dimers of CA CTD in the asymmetric unit. The canonical dimers form a newly identified packing interface where interactions of four conserved MHR residues take place. This is the first structural indication that these MHR residues participate in the putative CTD-CTD interactions. These findings suggest that the molecules forming this novel interface resemble an intermediate structure that participates in the early steps of HIV-1 assembly. This interface may therefore provide a novel target for antiviral drugs.

  19. Quantitation of total 11-nor-9-carboxy-delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol in urine and blood using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS).

    PubMed

    Frazee, C Clinton; Kiscoan, Michael; Garg, Uttam

    2010-01-01

    Marijuana, which is made from crushing the leaves, flowers, and sometimes the stems of the plant Cannabis sativa, contains more than 30 cannabinoids. The major psychoactive cannabinoid is delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). The major metabolite of THC, 11-nor-delta 9-carboxy-tetrahydrocannabionol (THC-COOH), is excreted in the urine primarily as a glucuronide conjugate and is commonly analyzed in biological specimens for detecting marijuana usage. The procedure described here involves the addition of deuterated internal standard THC-COOH-d9 into the sample followed by hydrolysis of conjugated THC-COOH by alkali. THC-COOH is extracted from urine or blood using liquid-liquid extraction followed by preparation of its trimethylsilyl derivatives. The analysis of derivatized THC-COOH is performed using gas-chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Quantification of the drug in a sample is achieved by comparing the responses of the unknown sample to the responses of the calibrators using selected ion monitoring.

  20. Transcription-Independent RNA Polymerase II Dephosphorylation by the FCP1 Carboxy-Terminal Domain Phosphatase in Xenopus laevis Early Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Palancade, Benoît; Dubois, Marie Françoise; Dahmus, Michael E.; Bensaude, Olivier

    2001-01-01

    The phosphorylation of the RNA polymerase II (RNAP II) carboxy-terminal domain (CTD) plays a key role in mRNA metabolism. The relative ratio of hyperphosphorylated RNAP II to hypophosphorylated RNAP II is determined by a dynamic equilibrium between CTD kinases and CTD phosphatase(s). The CTD is heavily phosphorylated in meiotic Xenopus laevis oocytes. In this report we show that the CTD undergoes fast and massive dephosphorylation upon fertilization. A cDNA was cloned and shown to code for a full-length xFCP1, the Xenopus orthologue of the FCP1 CTD phosphatases in humans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Two critical residues in the catalytic site were identified. CTD phosphatase activity was observed in extracts prepared from Xenopus eggs and cells and was shown to be entirely attributable to xFCP1. The CTD dephosphorylation triggered by fertilization was reproduced upon calcium activation of cytostatic factor-arrested egg extracts. Using immunodepleted extracts, we showed that this dephosphorylation is due to xFCP1. Although transcription does not occur at this stage, phosphorylation appears as a highly dynamic process involving the antagonist action of Xp42 mitogen-activated protein kinase and FCP1 phosphatase. This is the first report that free RNAP II is a substrate for FCP1 in vivo, independent from a transcription cycle. PMID:11533226

  1. Studies on the growth, spectral, structural, electrical, optical and mechanical properties of Uronium 3-carboxy-4-hydroxybenzenesulfonate single crystal for third-order nonlinear optical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silambarasan, A.; Krishna Kumar, M.; Thirunavukkarasu, A.; Md Zahid, I.; Mohan Kumar, R.; Umarani, P. R.

    2015-05-01

    Organic Uronium 3-carboxy-4-hydroxybenzenesulfonate (UCHBS) nonlinear optical single crystal was grown by solution growth technique. The solubility and nucleation studies were performed for UCHBS at different temperatures 30, 35, 40, 45, 50 and 55 °C. The crystal structure of UCHBS was elucidated from single crystal X-ray diffraction study. High resolution X-ray diffraction technique was employed to study the perfection and internal defects of UCHBS crystal. Infrared and Raman spectra were recorded to analyze the vibrational behavior of chemical bonds and its functional groups. The physico-chemical changes, stability and decomposition stages of the UCHBS compound were established by TG-DTA studies. The dielectric phenomenon of UCHBS crystal was studied at different temperatures with respect to frequency. Linear optical properties of transmittance, cut-off wavelength, band gap of UCHBS were found from UV-visible spectral studies. Third-order nonlinear optical susceptibility, nonlinear refractive index, nonlinear optical absorption coefficient values were measured by Z-scan technique. The mechanical properties of UCHBS crystal was studied by using Vicker's microhardness test. The growth features of UCHBS crystal were analyzed from etching studies.

  2. (2,2′-Bipyridine)bis­(3-carboxy­pyrazine-2-carboxyl­ato)copper(II) dihydrate

    PubMed Central

    Aghabozorg, Hossein; Parvizi, Mahdieh; Sadrkhanlou, Elahe

    2008-01-01

    The title six-coordinated distorted octa­hedral complex, [Cu(C6H3N2O4)2(C10H8N2)]·2H2O, consists of two 3-carboxy­pyrazine-2-carboxyl­ate anions and one 2,2′-bipyridine ligand. There is a twofold rotation axis positioned at the CuII center. The N atoms of the pyrazine ring occupy the axial positions and two proton-transferred O atoms of tbe acid together with the two N atoms of the 2,2′-bipyridine ligand complete the equatorial plane. The inter­actions existing in the crystal structure are inter­molecular O—H⋯O hydrogen bonds, and C—H⋯O and C—O⋯π inter­actions (O⋯π =3.145 Å, C—O⋯π = 149.75°). PMID:21203048

  3. Assessing the potential of a "color effect" for hair analysis of 11-nor-9-carboxy-delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol: analysis of a large sample of hair specimens.

    PubMed

    Mieczkowski, Tom

    2003-12-12

    It has been hypothesized that hair color may play a role in the concentration of various drugs of abuse in hair. Several studies have shown that melanin in hair appears to play a binding role for at least some commonly abused drugs. However, these studies have been limited by a number of factors when assessing the clinical significance of a hypothesized melanin or color effect. This study evaluates the possible effect of hair color on the concentration of 11-nor-9-carboxy-Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (c-THC) in human hair. The analysis is based on 3886 positive c-THC hair specimens drawn from a universe of approximately 80000 specimens of scalp hair harvested from the posterior vertex of the head. Analysis of variance of color categorization by c-THC concentration shows that c-THC concentration does not have a significant association with hair color (Hair Color F = 1.148, p =.332) and therefore does not have a demonstrable "color effect".

  4. Synthesis, growth, characterisation and laser damage threshold studies of N,N-dimethylanilinium-3-carboxy-4-hydroxybenzenesulphonate crystal: An efficient SHG material for electro-optic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajkumar, M.; Chandramohan, A.

    2017-04-01

    An NLO active organic proton transfer complex salt, N,N-Dimethylanilinium-3-carboxy-4-hydroxybenzenesulphonate has been synthesized and single crystals grown by slow solvent evaporation solution growth technique at ambient temperature. The synthesized salt was characterized by Uv-visible absorption, UV-vis-NIR transmission spectral studies and elemental analysis. The formation of the salt and the crystal structure have been confirmed by single crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis and the title crystal belongs to monoclinic crystal system with the non-centrosymmetric space group, Pc. The FT-IR spectrum was recorded to confirm the presence of various functional groups in the grown crystal. The molecular structure of the crystal was further confirmed by 1H and 13C NMR spectra. The TG/DTA analyses were carried out to establish the thermal stability of the title crystal. The dielectric constant and dielectric loss have been studied as a function of frequency at different temperatures. The presence of SHG and its conversion efficiency was measured by employing the modified Kurtz and Perry powder technique. The laser damage threshold value of the title crystal was determined using a Nd:YAG laser with the wavelength of 1064 nm.

  5. Synthesis and application of a N-1' fluorescent biotinyl derivative inducing the specific carboxy-terminal dual labeling of a novel RhoB-selective scFv.

    PubMed

    Chaisemartin, L; Chinestra, P; Favre, G; Blonski, C; Faye, J C

    2009-05-20

    The fluorescent site-specific labeling of protein would provide a new, easy-to-use alternative to biochemical and immunochemical methods. We used an intein-mediated strategy for covalent labeling of the carboxy-terminal amino acid of a RhoB-selective scFv previously isolated from a phage display library (a human synthetic V(H) + V(L) scFv phage library). The scFv fused to the Mxe intein was produced in E. coli and purified and was then labeled with a newly synthesized fluorescent biotinyl cysteine derivative capable of inducing scFv-Mxe intein splicing. In this study, we investigated the splicing and labeling properties of various amino acids in the hinge domain between scFv and Mxe under thiol activation. In this dual labeling system, the fluorescein is used for antibody detection and biotin is used for purification, resulting in a high specific activity for fluorescence. We then checked that the purified biotinylated fluorescent scFv retained its selectivity for RhoB without modification of its affinity.

  6. Serum carboxy-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (I-CTP) is predictive of clinical outcome in peripheral artery disease patients following endovascular therapy.

    PubMed

    Otaki, Yoichiro; Watanabe, Tetsu; Takahashi, Hiroki; Yamaura, Gensai; Nishiyama, Satoshi; Arimoto, Takanori; Shishido, Tetsuro; Miyamoto, Takuya; Kubota, Isao

    2017-02-01

    Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is a risk factor for the development of heart failure and mortality. The serum levels of carboxy-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (I-CTP), a marker for collagen degradation derived from the extracellular matrix of vascular and myocardial tissue, is reportedly a useful marker for cardiac events in patients with heart disease. However, it remains unclear whether I-CTP can predict poor clinical outcome in patients with PAD. Serum I-CTP was measured in 246 consecutive PAD patients who underwent endovascular therapy. Patients were prospectively followed during a median follow-up period of 887 days with the end points of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE). I-CTP was significantly higher in patients with critical limb ischemia than those without. A multivariate Cox proportional hazard analysis revealed that I-CTP was an independent predictor of MACE after adjusting for confounding factors. Patients were stratified into three groups based on I-CTP level tertile, and those with third tertile had higher levels of brain natriuretic peptide levels and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein compared to the other two groups. Kaplan-Meier analysis demonstrated that patients in the highest tertile of I-CTP also had the greatest risk of MACE. The net reclassification index significantly improved with the addition of I-CTP to basic predictors. I-CTP is a reliable marker and indicator for MACE in patients with PAD.

  7. Investigation into the Mode of Phosphate Activation in the 4-Hydroxy-4-Methyl-2-Oxoglutarate/4-Carboxy-4-Hydroxy-2-Oxoadipate Aldolase from Pseudomonas putida F1

    PubMed Central

    Mazurkewich, Scott; Seah, Stephen Y. K.

    2016-01-01

    The 4-hydroxy-4-methyl-2-oxoglutarate (HMG)/4-carboxy-4-hydroxy-2-oxoadipate (CHA) aldolase is the last enzyme of both the gallate and protocatechuate 4,5-cleavage pathways which links aromatic catabolism to central cellular metabolism. The enzyme is a class II, divalent metal dependent, aldolase which is activated in the presence of inorganic phosphate (Pi), increasing its turnover rate >10-fold. This phosphate activation is unique for a class II aldolase. The aldolase pyruvate methyl proton exchange rate, a probe of the general acid half reaction, was increased 300-fold in the presence of 1 mM Pi and the rate enhancement followed saturation kinetics giving rise to a KM of 397 ± 30 μM. Docking studies revealed a potential Pi binding site close to, or overlapping with, the proposed general acid water site. Putative Pi binding residues were substituted by site-directed mutagenesis which resulted in reductions of Pi activation. Significantly, the active site residue Arg-123, known to be critical for the catalytic mechanism of the enzyme, was also implicated in supporting Pi mediated activation. PMID:27741265

  8. Carboxy-terminal modulator protein attenuated extracellular matrix deposit by inhibiting phospho-Akt, TGF-β1 and α-SMA in kidneys of diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ning; Hao, Jun; Li, Lisha; Li, Fan; Liu, Shuxia; Duan, Huijun

    2016-06-10

    Glomerulosclerosis and tubular interstitial extracellular matrix deposit and fibrosis are the main features of diabetic nephropathy, which are mediated by activation of PI3K/Akt signal pathway. Carboxy-terminal modulator protein (CTMP) is known as a negative regulator of PI3K/Akt pathway. Whether CTMP regulates renal extracellular matrix metabolism of diabetic nephropathy is still not known. Here, renal decreased CTMP, enhanced phospho-Akt (Ser 473), TGF-β1, α-SMA and extracellular matrix deposit are found in diabetic mice. Furthermore, high glucose decreases CTMP expression accompanied by enhanced phospho-Akt (Ser 473), TGF-β1 and α-SMA in cultured human renal proximal tubular epithelial cells (HKC), which are effectively prevented by transfection of pYr-ads-4-musCTMP vector. Moreover, delivery of pYr-ads-4-musCTMP vector into kidneys via tail vein of diabetic mice increases CTMP expression by 8.84 times followed by 60.00%, 76.50% and 24.37% decreases of phospho-Akt (Ser 473), TGF-β1 and α-SMA compared with diabetic mice receiving pYr-adshuttle-4 vector. Again, increased renal extracellular matrix accumulation of diabetic mice is also inhibited with delivery of pYr-ads-4-musCTMP vector. Our results indicate that CTMP attenuates renal extracellular matrix deposit by regulating the phosphorylation of Akt, TGF-β1 and α-SMA expression in diabetic mice.

  9. Distribution of ∆(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol and 11-Nor-9-Carboxy-∆(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol Acid in Postmortem Biological Fluids and Tissues From Pilots Fatally Injured in Aviation Accidents.

    PubMed

    Kemp, Philip M; Cardona, Patrick S; Chaturvedi, Arvind K; Soper, John W

    2015-07-01

    Little is known of the postmortem distribution of ∆(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and its major metabolite, 11-nor-9-carboxy-∆(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THCCOOH). Data from 55 pilots involved in fatal aviation accidents are presented in this study. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis obtained mean THC concentrations in blood from multiple sites, liver, lung, and kidney of 15.6 ng/mL, 92.4 ng/g, 766.0 ng/g, 44.1 ng/g and mean THCCOOH concentrations of 35.9 ng/mL, 322.4 ng/g, 42.6 ng/g, 138.5 ng/g, respectively. Heart THC concentrations (two cases) were 184.4 and 759.3 ng/g, and corresponding THCCOOH measured 11.0 and 95.9 ng/g, respectively. Muscle concentrations for THC (two cases) were 16.6 and 2.5 ng/g; corresponding THCCOOH, "confirmed positive" and 1.4 ng/g. The only brain tested in this study showed no THC detected and 2.9 ng/g THCCOOH, low concentrations that correlated with low values in other specimens from this case. This research emphasizes the need for postmortem cannabinoid testing and demonstrates the usefulness of a number of tissues, most notably lung, for these analyses.

  10. Short communication: Urinary excretion of 11-nor-9-carboxy-Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol in a pregnant woman following heavy, chronic cannabis use.

    PubMed

    Westin, Andreas A; Huestis, Marilyn A; Aarstad, Kjell; Spigset, Olav

    2009-01-01

    Differentiating new intake of drugs-of-abuse from residual drug excretion may be difficult, especially following chronic drug usage and for drugs with long elimination half-lives such as cannabis. In the present case, cannabis was found in the urine of a young pregnant woman following heavy and chronic cannabis use. She was warned that if she continued using cannabis while pregnant she would be forced to be hospitalized. She was subjected to serial urine testing with 2-7-day intervals. Urinary 11-nor-9-carboxy-Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THCCOOH) concentrations, measured by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, declined from 348 to 3.9 ng/mL over a surprisingly long period of 12 weeks (84 days). Several algorithms for detecting new drug intake were applied during this time course; most indicated that the woman continued to smoke cannabis following the first urine test. The woman denied any use after the first specimen collection. In retrospect, her THCCOOH excretion profile supports her story. Algorithms for detecting new drug intake have been validated for occasional cannabis users only. We advise caution when interpreting urine test results from heavy, chronic cannabis users, especially when serious consequences are involved.

  11. Investigation of the transformation of 11-nor-9-carboxy-Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol during water chlorination by liquid chromatography-quadrupole-time-of-flight-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    González-Mariño, Iria; Rodríguez, Isaac; Quintana, José Benito; Cela, Rafael

    2013-10-15

    The stability of the main metabolite of cannabis, (±)-11-nor-9-carboxy-Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THCCOOH), during water chlorination has been investigated. THCCOOH was degraded in few seconds following a pseudo-first order kinetics. Sample pH turned out to be a significant factor, decreasing THCCOOH half-life with an increase in its values. Seven by-products could be positively identified from accurate mass measurements: three compounds resulted from electrophilic substitutions of hydrogen per chlorine (or bromine) in the aromatic ring, whereas the formation of the remaining four involved additional reactions in the C-C double bond (hydration and halogenation). The software predicted toxicity of these products towards Daphnia magna indicates that they are expected to have toxicity values similar or higher than its precursor compound. Experiments conducted with diluted urine showed that THCCOOH was stable in this matrix, probably due to a rapid and complete reaction between chlorine and other organic constituents already present in the samples. In real surface waters, the extent of the reaction was also affected by the organic matter content, and so THCCOOH was rapidly degraded in samples scarcely affected by human activities, being more stable in waters with a higher level of pollution.

  12. Phosphoserines of the carboxy terminal domain of RNA polymerase II are involved in the interaction with transcription-associated proteins (TAPs).

    PubMed

    Vidyalakshmi, Subramanian; Ramamurthy, Viraraghavan

    2013-03-01

    Generation of productive transcripts of protein coding genes in eukaryotes is a complex, multistep process centrally controlled by the RNA polymerase II (Pol II) complex. The carboxy terminal domain (CTD) of the largest subunit of the enzyme is designed to be modified by differential phosphorylation, and plays a key role in orchestrating the multiple events of the process by interacting with a host of transcription-associated proteins (TAPs) at different stages. We analyzed, in silico, the role of serine phosphorylation of CTD in relation to molecular interaction between different TAPs and a representative part of the CTD repeat structure. Using molecular docking, we investigated eight different proteins involved in capping, elongation, splicing, 3' end cleavage, or polyadenylation functions during the transcription process. Among the different phosphorylated forms of CTD, the form found to have the most affinity for a particular protein was also the form that is predominant during that process, the only exception being the equally high affinity of S2PCTD to Spt4, although S5PCTD is the known active form during elongation. The unique phosphoserine of the CTD forms associated with the TAPs was an important participant in the association between both the molecules. These studies have also identified other residues of TAPs interacting with CTD which in previous studies have not been recognized as being functionally significant. These findings add to an emerging body of literature on the regulatory aspects of genomics and proteomics and thus, might catalyze future applications for discovery and translational omics science.

  13. New gastroprotective labdeneamides from (4S,9R,10R) methyl 18-carboxy-labda-8,13(E)-diene-15-oate.

    PubMed

    Olate, Verónica Rachel; Pertino, Mariano Walter; Theoduloz, Cristina; Yesilada, Erdem; Monsalve, Francisco; González, Paulo; Droguett, Daniel; Richomme, Pascal; Hadi, A Hamid; Schmeda-Hirschmann, Guillermo

    2012-03-01

    Starting from the diterpene (4S,9R,10R) methyl 18-carboxy-labda-8,13(E)-dien-15-oate (PMD) and its 8(9)-en isomer [PMD 8(9)-en], 11 amides were prepared and assessed for a gastroprotective effect in the ethanol/HCl-induced gastric lesions model in mice. Basal cytotoxicity of the compounds was determined on the following human cell lines: normal lung fibroblasts (MRC-5), gastric epithelial adenocarcinoma (AGS), and hepatocellular carcinoma (Hep G2). All compounds are described for the first time. At the single oral dose of 0.1 mg/kg, compounds 1, 10, and 11 presented a strong gastroprotective effect, at least comparable with that of the reference compound lansoprazole at 1 mg/kg, reducing gastric lesions by 76.7, 67.7, and 77.2 %, respectively. The leucyl amide methyl ester 3, tryptophanyl amide methyl ester 5, and benzyl amide 6 of PMD presented a selective basal cytotoxicity on Hep G2 cells with IC₅₀ values of 136.8, 105.3, and 94.2 µM, respectively, while the IC₅₀ values towards AGS cells were 439.5, 928.0, and 937.3 µM, respectively. The three compounds did not affect fibroblast viability with IC₅₀ values > 1000 µM. Compounds 7, 8, 10, and 11 showed no toxic effect against the three selected cell lines.

  14. Studies on the growth aspects, structural and third-order nonlinear optical properties of Piperidinium 3-carboxy-4-hydroxy benzenesulfonate single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalaiyarasi, S.; Zahid, I. MD; Devi, S. Reena; Kumar, R. Mohan

    2017-02-01

    Organic nonlinear optical material Piperidinium 3-carboxy-4-hydroxy benzenesulfonate (PBS) single crystal was successfully grown by solution growth method. Single crystal X-ray diffraction study confirms that, the grown crystal belongs to P21/n space group. The crystalline quality of PBS was ascertained by HRXRD studies. Infrared spectral analysis showed the vibrational behaviour of chemical bonds and presence of its functional groups. TG/DTA studies were used to study the thermal stability and decomposition stages of the compound. UV-visible transmittance studies showed the transparency region, cut-off wavelength and band gap of the grown crystal. Photoluminescence emission study was carried out for the grown crystal to show its electronic properties. By using Nd:YAG laser, the laser damage threshold was estimated for the grown crystal. The third-order nonlinear optical parameters of the grown crystal were estimated by Z-scan technique using He-Ne laser source. The mechanical property of the PBS crystal was studied by using Vicker's microhardness measurement.

  15. Galangin induces apoptosis in gastric cancer cells via regulation of ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase isozyme L1 and glutathione S-transferase P.

    PubMed

    Kim, Deuk Ae; Jeon, Young Keul; Nam, Myeong Jin

    2012-03-01

    Galangin has been shown to have anti-cancer property against several types of cancer cells. Many studies have described the anti-oxidant and apoptotic effects of galangin. However, the mechanism of galangin-induced apoptosis has not yet been studied for human gastric cancer cells. We investigated galangin-induced apoptosis of human gastric cancer SNU-484 cells. Galangin inhibited proliferation of SNU-484 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The results showed that galangin significantly decreased the viability of SNU-484 cells at 50-200 μM for 24 h and 48 h. Galangin-induced cell death was characterized with the changes in cell morphology, DNA fragmentation, cell cycle, activation of caspase-3/-9, poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) cleavage, and expression of MAP kinase such as ERK1/2 and JNK. For identification of proteins potentially involved in apoptosis, a two-dimensional electrophoresis was employed. Proteomic analysis showed that several proteins were associated with anti-cancer properties of galangin. Of particular interest, these proteins included ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase isozyme L1 (Uch-L1) and glutathione S-transferase P (GSTP), which are involved in apoptosis of SNU-484 cells. Western blot analysis confirmed up-regulation of Uch-L1 and down-regulation of GSTP following galangin treatment. Our results suggest that Uch-L1 and GSTP be involved in galangin-induced apoptosis in human gastric cancer SNU-484 cells.

  16. MicroRNA-922 promotes tau phosphorylation by downregulating ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase L1 (UCHL1) expression in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Z-B; Wu, L; Xiong, R; Wang, L-L; Zhang, B; Wang, C; Li, H; Liang, L; Chen, S-D

    2014-09-05

    Decreased levels of soluble ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase L1 (UCHL1) have been reported in the brains of sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients, and the introduction of UCHL1 rescued the synaptic and cognitive function of AD model mice. Obviously, a reduction in the levels of UCHL1 may play a role in the pathogenesis of AD. However, the mechanisms underlying the regulation of UCHL1 levels in AD have not been fully elucidated. MicroRNAs (miRs) have been shown to participate in the process of AD. In our study, we discovered that microRNA-922 decreased the levels of UCHL1. Neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) mainly consisting of the hyperphosphorylated microtubule-associated protein tau are the defining pathological features of AD. In the present study, we found the levels of UCHL1 affected the levels of phosphorylated tau: the phosphorylated tau levels increased after knockdown of UCHL1 expression, and the phosphorylated tau levels decreased when UCHL1 was overexpressed. Furthermore, overexpression of microRNA-922 increased the phosphorylated tau levels. In conclusion, miR-922 increasing the levels of phosphorylated tau by regulating UCHL1 levels contributed to the pathogenesis of AD. Our study partly explained one of the mechanisms underlying the downregulation of UCHL1 levels in AD patients and could enrich the content of tau pathology in the pathogenesis of AD.

  17. Association of ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase-L1 in cerebrospinal fluid with clinical severity in a cohort of patients with Guillain-Barré syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nagamine, Satoshi; Fujiwara, Yuuki; Shimizu, Toshio; Kawata, Akihiro; Wada, Keiji; Isozaki, Eiji; Kabuta, Tomohiro

    2015-06-01

    Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) is an acute immune-mediated polyneuropathy. Although its pathogenic mechanism has been revealed and various therapeutic trials have been performed, a proportion of patients experience the severe sequelae associated with GBS. In this paper, we investigated whether the amount of the neuron-specific protein, ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase-L1 (UCH-L1), in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with GBS was correlated with the clinical course of the disease. UCH-L1 protein levels were greater in patients with GBS than in controls. The patients with GBS whose UCH-L1 protein levels were higher than those of the controls presented with more severe symptoms at peak. UCH-L1 protein levels tended to become elevated as the total protein levels were increased; however, elevated UCH-L1 without an increase in total protein might be correlated with severe disease course (bedridden or ventilator supported). These results suggest that UCH-L1 could be a biomarker associated with the severity of the disease at the acute phase of GBS.

  18. Quantification of 11-Carboxy-Delta-9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC-COOH) in Meconium Using Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry (GC/MS).

    PubMed

    Peat, Judy; Davis, Brehon; Frazee, Clint; Garg, Uttam

    2016-01-01

    Maternal substance abuse is an ongoing concern and detecting drug use during pregnancy is an important component of neonatal care when drug abuse is suspected. Meconium is the preferred specimen for drug testing because it is easier to collect than neonatal urine and it provides a much broader time frame of drug exposure. We describe a method for quantifying 11-carboxy-delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC-COOH) in meconium. After adding a labeled internal standard (THC-COOH D9) and acetonitrile, samples are sonicated to release both free and conjugated THC-COOH. The acetonitrile/aqueous layer is removed and mixed with a strong base to hydrolyze the conjugated THC-COOH. The samples are then extracted with an organic solvent mixture as part of a sample "cleanup." The organic solvent layer is discarded and the remaining aqueous sample is acidified. Following extraction with a second organic mixture, the organic layer is removed and concentrated to dryness. The resulting residue is converted to a trimethylsilyl (TMS) derivative and analyzed using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) in selective ion monitoring (SIM) mode.

  19. Simultaneous determination of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol and 11-nor-9-carboxy-Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol in oral fluid using isotope dilution liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lee, Pin Duo; Chang, Yuan-Jhe; Lin, Keh-Liang; Chang, Yan-Zin

    2012-01-01

    The detection and confirmation of cannabinoids in oral fluid are important in forensic toxicology. Currently, the presence of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is used for the detection of cannabis in oral fluid. A low concentration of 11-nor-9-carboxy-Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC-COOH) is found in oral fluid, which suggested a convenient and low-sensitivity confirmation assay can be used in a routine forensic laboratory. In this study, a highly sensitive isotope dilution liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method following dansylation was successfully developed for simultaneous determination of THC and THC-COOH in oral fluid. The dansylated derivatives dramatically demonstrated and enhanced the sensitivity of THC and THC-COOH. To avoid signal influenced by the matrix, a 5-min liquid chromatography gradient program was evaluated and optimized, which reduced the sample diffusion and caused sharp peaks (less than 12 s) and thus helped to achieve detection at a low level. The sensitivity, accuracy, and precision were also evaluated, and high quantitative accuracy and precision were obtained. The limit of quantitation of this approach was 25 pg/mL for THC and 10 pg/mL for THC-COOH in oral fluid. Finally, the method was successfully applied to eight suspected cannabis users. Among them, in six oral fluid samples THC-COOH was determined at a concentration from 13.1 to 47.2 pg/mL.

  20. Quantitative analysis of 11-nor-9-carboxy-tetrahydrocannbinol (THC-COOH) in urine by LC-MS/MS following a simple filtration.

    PubMed

    Rumpler, Marc J

    2014-04-15

    Quantification methods utilizing liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) are common in clinical and forensic toxicology laboratories and the efficiency and rapidity of such methods continues to evolve. In most cases, urine drug confirmation does not require a drug extraction and can quickly and easily be accomplished with a dilution followed by sample filtration. The report describes the validation of a simple confirmation method for 11-nor-9-carboxy-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC-COOH) and compared two types of filter extraction columns for sample clean-up. The method achieved a linear range of 10-3000ng/mL, acceptable bias (-4.7-2.6%) and precision (0.9-6.9%) and autosampler stability up to 72h. Universal filter columns offered less variable recovery over the linear range and fewer matrix interferences compared to THC-COOH specific filter columns. Authentic specimens testing positive for THC-COOH by LC-MS/MS were in good agreement with typically used GC-MS methods.

  1. Quantification of 11-Nor-9-Carboxy-Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol in Human Oral Fluid by Gas Chromatography–Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Allan J.; Scheidweiler, Karl B.; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2015-01-01

    A sensitive and specific method for the quantification of 11-nor-9-carboxy-Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THCCOOH) in oral fluid collected with the Quantisal and Oral-Eze devices was developed and fully validated. Extracted analytes were derivatized with hexafluoroisopropanol and trifluoroacetic anhydride and quantified by gas chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry with negative chemical ionization. Standard curves, using linear least-squares regression with 1/x2 weighting were linear from 10 to 1000 ng/L with coefficients of determination >0.998 for both collection devices. Bias was 89.2%–112.6%, total imprecision 4.0%–5.1% coefficient of variation, and extraction efficiency >79.8% across the linear range for Quantisal-collected specimens. Bias was 84.6%–109.3%, total imprecision 3.6%–7.3% coefficient of variation, and extraction efficiency >92.6% for specimens collected with the Oral-Eze device at all 3 quality control concentrations (10, 120, and 750 ng/L). This effective high-throughput method reduces analysis time by 9 minutes per sample compared with our current 2-dimensional gas chromatography–mass spectrometry method and extends the capability of quantifying this important oral fluid analyte to gas chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry. This method was applied to the analysis of oral fluid specimens collected from individuals participating in controlled cannabis studies and will be effective for distinguishing passive environmental contamination from active cannabis smoking. PMID:24622724

  2. Fast and Efficient Separation and Determination of UV-absorbing Amino Acids, Nucleobases, and Creatinine Using a Carboxy-functionalized Cation-exchange Column.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Yukio; Fujishima, Takeru; Kurota, Kazuki

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a new HPLC technique for the determination of biogenic cations such as amino acids and nucleobases, using a weak-acid cation-exchange column. Fourteen analytes, five amino acids and seven bases in addition to creatinine and creatine, were separated in 12 min by means of a two-liquid gradient elution with UV detection. The newly released column packed with a carboxy-functionalized polymethacrylate resin could give excellent selectivity to the organic cations of interest, although such a column is in general suitable for the separation of inorganic common cations. The chromatographic intra-day repeatability was very good with RSDs less than 0.4%, and the quantitation precision based on peak area intensities was also good with RSDs less than 5% for all analytes. The linear calibration lines for quantitation ranged between 5 and 500 μM on 20-μL injections with R(2) more than 0.9990. Since the method could provide concentration data of urinary creatinine and some metabolites simultaneously, for example, the urinary phenylalanine/creatinine ratios for phenylketonuria of inborn errors of metabolism were simply determined through one chromatographic run. The ratios for patients were significantly higher than those for controls. We found that the new weak-acid cation-exchange column was suitable for the separation of organic cations as well as inorganic cations.

  3. A conserved carboxy-terminal domain in the major tegument structural protein VP22 facilitates virion packaging of a chimeric protein during productive herpes simplex virus 1 infection

    SciTech Connect

    Schlegel, Elisabeth F.M.; Blaho, John A.

    2009-05-10

    Recombinant virus HSV-1(RF177) was previously generated to examine tegument protein VP22 function by inserting the GFP gene into the gene encoding VP22. During a detailed analysis of this virus, we discovered that RF177 produces a novel fusion protein between the last 15 amino acids of VP22 and GFP, termed GCT-VP22. Thus, the VP22 carboxy-terminal specific antibody 22-3 and two anti-GFP antibodies reacted with an approximately 28 kDa protein from RF177-infected Vero cells. GCT-VP22 was detected at 1 and 3 hpi. Examination of purified virions indicated that GCT-VP22 was incorporated into RF177 virus particles. These observations imply that at least a portion of the information required for virion targeting is located in this domain of VP22. Indirect immunofluorescence analyses showed that GCT-VP22 also localized to areas of marginalized chromatin during RF177 infection. These results indicate that the last fifteen amino acids of VP22 participate in virion targeting during HSV-1 infection.

  4. Structural characterization of two tetra-chlorido-zincate salts of 4-carb-oxy-1H-imidazol-3-ium: a salt hydrate and a co-crystal salt hydrate.

    PubMed

    Martens, Sean J; Geiger, David K

    2017-02-01

    Imidazole-containing compounds exhibit a myriad of pharmacological activities. Two tetra-chlorido-zincate salts of 4-carb-oxy-1H-imidazol-3-ium, ImHCO2H(+), are reported. Bis(4-carb-oxy-1H-imidazol-3-ium) tetra-chlorido-zincate monohydrate, (C4H5N2O2)2[ZnCl4]·H2O, (I), crystallizes as a monohydrate salt, while bis-(4-carb-oxy-1H-imidazol-3-ium) tetra-chlorido-zincate bis-(1H-imidazol-3-ium-4-carboxyl-ato) monohydrate, (C4H5N2O2)2[ZnCl4]·2C4H4N2O2·H2O, (II), is a co-crystal salt with six residues: two ImHCO2H(+) cations, two formula units of the zwitterionic 1H-imidazol-3-ium-4-carboxyl-ate, ImHCO2, one tetra-chlorido-zincate anion and one water mol-ecule disordered over two sites in a 0.60 (4):0.40 (4) ratio. The geometric parameters of the ImHCO2H(+) and the ImHCO2 moieties are the same within the standard uncertainties of the measurements. Both compounds exhibit extensive hydrogen bonding, including involvement of the tetra-chlorido-zincate anion, resulting in inter-connected chains of anions joined by water mol-ecules.

  5. Hormonogenic donor Tyr2522 of bovine thyroglobulin. Insight into preferential T3 formation at thyroglobulin carboxyl terminus at low iodination level

    SciTech Connect

    Cetrangolo, Giovanni Paolo; Arcaro, Alessia; Lepore, Alessio; Graf, Maria; Mamone, Gianfranco; Ferranti, Pasquale; Palumbo, Giuseppe; Gentile, Fabrizio

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • A carboxy-terminal fragment (residues 2515–2750) was isolated from a low-iodine bTg. • Post-translational status of 8 tyrosines in bTg region 2515–2750 was assessed by MS. • Tyr2522 of bovine Tg is an interspecifically conserved hormonogenic donor site. • Propensities of Tyr residues to mono or diiodination optimize T3 yield from Tyr2748. - Abstract: A tryptic fragment (b5{sub TR,NR}), encompassing residues 2515–2750, was isolated from a low-iodine (0.26% by mass) bovine thyroglobulin, by limited proteolysis with trypsin and preparative, continuous-elution SDS–PAGE. The fragment was digested with Asp-N endoproteinase and analyzed by reverse-phase HPLC electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry, revealing the formation of: 3-monoiodotyrosine and dehydroalanine from Tyr2522; 3-monoiodotyrosine from Tyr2555 and Tyr2569; 3-monoiodotyrosine and 3,5-diiodotyrosine from Tyr2748. The data presented document, by direct mass spectrometric identifications, efficient iodophenoxyl ring transfer from monoiodinated hormonogenic donor Tyr2522 and efficient mono- and diiodination of hormonogenic acceptor Tyr2748, under conditions which permitted only limited iodination of Tyr2555 and Tyr2569, in low-iodine bovine thyroglobulin. The present study thereby provides: (1) a rationale for the preferential synthesis of T3 at the carboxy-terminal end of thyroglobulin, at low iodination level; (2) confirmation for the presence of an interspecifically conserved hormonogenic donor site in the carboxy-terminal domain of thyroglobulin; (3) solution for a previous uncertainty, concerning the precise location of such donor site in bovine thyroglobulin.

  6. Carboxy-terminally truncated Dengue 4 virus envelope glycoprotein expressed in Pichia pastoris induced neutralizing antibodies and resistance to Dengue 4 virus challenge in mice.

    PubMed

    Muné, M; Rodríguez, R; Ramírez, R; Soto, Y; Sierra, B; Rodríguez Roche, R; Marquez, G; Garcia, J; Guillén, G; Guzmán, M G

    2003-11-01

    We have expressed a recombinant Dengue 4 virus envelope glycoprotein (E4rec), truncated at its C-terminus by 53 amino acids, in Pichia pastoris. The presence of E4rec was confirmed by Western-blot using anti-DEN 4 hyper immune mouse ascitic fluid. E4rec migrated during SDS-PAGE as a 64 kDa protein. Treatment with endoglycosidases showed that the E protein was modified by the addition of short mannose chains and the absence of hyperglycosylation. When administered to BALB-C mice, E4rec elicited a DEN 4 neutralizing antibody response haemagglutination inhibition antibodies and specific memory T cell response. Mice immunized were also significantly protected against lethal DEN 4 virus challenge (86.6%, p < 0.001).

  7. A d-Amino Acid at the N-Terminus of a Protein Abrogates Its Degradation by the N-End Rule Pathway

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotes have evolved the ubiquitin (Ub)/proteasome system to degrade polypeptides. The Ub/proteasome system is one way that cells regulate cytosolic protein and amino acids levels through the recognition and ubiquitination of a protein’s N-terminus via E1, E2, and E3 enzymes. The process by which the N-terminus stimulates intracellular protein degradation is referred to as the N-end rule. Characterization of the N-end rule has been limited to only the natural l-amino acids. Using a cytosolic delivery platform derived from anthrax lethal toxin, we probed the stability of mixed chirality proteins, containing one d-amino acid on the N-terminus of otherwise all l-proteins. In all cases, we observed that one N-terminal d-amino acid stabilized the cargo protein to proteasomal degradation with respect to the N-end rule. We found that since the mixed chirality proteins were not polyubiquitinated, they evaded N-end-mediated proteasomal degradation. Evidently, a subtle change on the N-terminus of a natural protein can enhance its intracellular lifetime. PMID:26807441

  8. A Unique Primer with an Inosine Chain at the 5'-Terminus Improves the Reliability of SNP Analysis Using the PCR-Amplified Product Length Polymorphism Method.

    PubMed

    Shojo, Hideki; Tanaka, Mayumi; Takahashi, Ryohei; Kakuda, Tsuneo; Adachi, Noboru

    2015-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction-amplified product length polymorphism (PCR-APLP) is one of the most convenient and reliable methods for single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis. This method is based on PCR, but uses allele-specific primers containing SNP sites at the 3'-terminus of each primer. To use this method at least two allele-specific primers and one "counter-primer", which serves as a common forward or reverse primer of the allele-specific primers, are required. The allele-specific primers have SNP sites at the 3'-terminus, and another primer should have a few non-complementary flaps at the 5'-terminus to detect SNPs by determining the difference of amplicon length by PCR and subsequent electrophoresis. A major disadvantage of the addition of a non-complementary flap is the non-specific annealing of the primer with non-complementary flaps. However, a design principle for avoiding this undesired annealing has not been fully established, therefore, it is often difficult to design effective APLP primers. Here, we report allele-specific primers with an inosine chain at the 5'-terminus for PCR-APLP analysis. This unique design improves the competitiveness of allele-specific primers and the reliability of SNP analysis when using the PCR-APLP method.

  9. Membrane-bound fatty acid desaturases are inserted co-translationally into the ER and contain different ER retrieval motifs at their carboxy termini.

    PubMed

    McCartney, Andrew W; Dyer, John M; Dhanoa, Preetinder K; Kim, Peter K; Andrews, David W; McNew, James A; Mullen, Robert T

    2004-01-01

    Fatty acid desaturases (FADs) play a prominent role in plant lipid metabolism and are located in various subcellular compartments, including the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). To investigate the biogenesis of ER-localized membrane-bound FADs, we characterized the mechanisms responsible for insertion of Arabidopsis FAD2 and Brassica FAD3 into ER membranes and determined the molecular signals that maintain their ER residency. Using in vitro transcription/translation reactions with ER-derived microsomes, we show that both FAD2 and FAD3 are efficiently integrated into membranes by a co-translational, translocon-mediated pathway. We also demonstrate that while the C-terminus of FAD3 (-KSKIN) contains a functional prototypic dilysine ER retrieval motif, FAD2 contains a novel C-terminal aromatic amino acid-containing sequence (-YNNKL) that is both necessary and sufficient for maintaining localization in the ER. Co-expression of a membrane-bound reporter protein containing the FAD2 C-terminus with a dominant-negative mutant of ADP-ribosylation factor (Arf)1 abolished transient localization of the reporter protein in the Golgi, indicating that the FAD2 peptide signal acts as an ER retrieval motif. Mutational analysis of the FAD2 ER retrieval signal revealed a sequence-specific motif consisting of Phi-X-X-K/R/D/E-Phi-COOH, where -Phi- are large hydrophobic amino acid residues. Interestingly, this aromatic motif was present in a variety of other known and putative ER membrane proteins, including cytochrome P450 and the peroxisomal biogenesis factor Pex10p. Taken together, these data describe the insertion and retrieval mechanisms of FADs and define a new ER localization signal in plants that is responsible for the retrieval of escaped membrane proteins back to the ER.

  10. Posttranslational modification at the N terminus of the human adenovirus type 12 E1A 235R tumor antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Lucher, L A; Brackmann, K H; Symington, J S; Green, M

    1986-01-01

    The adenovirus E1A transforming region, which encodes immortalization, partial cell transformation, and gene activation functions, expresses two early mRNAs, 13S and 12S. Multiple-T antigen species with different electrophoretic mobilities are formed from each mRNA, presumably by unknown posttranslational modifications. The adenovirus type 12 (Ad12) 13S and 12S mRNAs encode E1A T antigens of 266 and 235 amino acid residues (266R and 235R), respectively. To study possible posttranslational processing at the N and C termini and to distinguish between the Ad12 266R and 235R T antigens, we prepared antibodies targeted to synthetic peptides encoded at the common C (peptide 204) and N (peptide 202) termini of the 266R and 235R T antigens and at the unique internal domain of the 266R T antigen (peptide 206). The specificity of each anti-peptide antibody was confirmed by immunoprecipitation of the 266R and 235R T antigens produced in Escherichia coli. Immunoprecipitation analysis of the E1A T antigens synthesized in Ad12-infected KB cells revealed the following. Antibody to the common C terminus recognized three T antigens with apparent Mrs of 43,000, 42,000, and 39,000 (43K, 42K, and 39K). All three forms were phosphorylated and were present in both the nucleus and the cytoplasm. The 43K and 42K T antigens were rapidly synthesized during a 10-min pulse with [35S]methionine in Ad12-infected cells. The 43K T antigen had a half-life of 20 min, the 42K T antigen had a longer half-life of about 40 min, and the 39K T antigen became the predominant E1A T antigen. Antibodies to the unique region immunoprecipitated the 43K T antigen but not the 42K and 39K T antigens. Antibody to the N terminus immunoprecipitated the 43K and 42K T antigens but not the 39K T antigen, suggesting that the 39K T antigen possessed a modified N terminus. Partial N-terminal amino acid sequence analysis showed that the 43K and 42K T antigens contain methionine at residues 1 and 5, as predicted from the

  11. Involvement of the n-terminus of Kir6.2 in coupling to the sulphonylurea receptor.

    PubMed

    Reimann, F; Tucker, S J; Proks, P; Ashcroft, F M

    1999-07-15

    1. ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels are composed of pore-forming Kir6.2 and regulatory SUR subunits. ATP inhibits the channel by interacting with Kir6.2, while sulphonylureas block channel activity by interaction with a high-affinity site on SUR1 and a low-affinity site on Kir6.2. MgADP and diazoxide interact with SUR1 to promote channel activity. 2. We examined the effect of N-terminal deletions of Kir6.2 on the channel open probability, ATP sensitivity and sulphonylurea sensitivity by recording macroscopic currents in membrane patches excised from Xenopus oocytes expressing wild-type or mutant Kir6.2/SUR1. 3. A 14 amino acid N-terminal deletion (DeltaN14) did not affect the gating, ATP sensitivity or tolbutamide block of a truncated isoform of Kir6.2, Kir6.2DeltaC26, expressed in the absence of SUR1. Thus, the N-terminal deletion does not alter the intrinsic properties of Kir6.2. 4. When Kir6.2DeltaN14 was coexpressed with SUR1, the resulting KATP channels had a higher open probability (Po = 0.7) and a lower ATP sensitivity (Ki = 196 microM) than wild-type (Kir6.2/SUR1) channels (Po = 0.32, Ki = 28 microM). High-affinity tolbutamide block was also abolished. 5. Truncation of five or nine amino acids from the N-terminus of Kir6.2 also enhanced the open probability, and reduced both the ATP sensitivity and the fraction of high-affinity tolbutamide block, although to a lesser extent than for the DeltaN14 deletion. Site-directed mutagenesis suggests that hydrophobic residues in Kir6. 2 may be involved in this effect. 6. The reduced ATP sensitivity of Kir6.2DeltaN14 may be explained by the increased Po. However, when the Po was decreased (by ATP), tolbutamide was unable to block Kir6. 2DeltaN14/SUR1-K719A,K1385M currents, despite the fact that the drug inhibited Kir6.2-C166S/SUR1-K719A,K1385M currents (which in the absence of ATP have a Po of > 0.8 and are not blocked by tolbutamide). Thus the N-terminus of Kir6.2 may be involved in coupling sulphonylurea

  12. The N-Terminus of the Floral Arabidopsis TGA Transcription Factor PERIANTHIA Mediates Redox-Sensitive DNA-Binding

    PubMed Central

    Gutsche, Nora; Zachgo, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    The Arabidopsis TGA transcription factor (TF) PERIANTHIA (PAN) regulates the formation of the floral organ primordia as revealed by the pan mutant forming an abnormal pentamerous arrangement of the outer three floral whorls. The Arabidopsis TGA bZIP TF family comprises 10 members, of which PAN and TGA9/10 control flower developmental processes and TGA1/2/5/6 participate in stress-responses. For the TGA1 protein it was shown that several cysteines can be redox-dependently modified. TGA proteins interact in the nucleus with land plant-specific glutaredoxins, which may alter their activities posttranslationally. Here, we investigated the DNA-binding of PAN to the AAGAAT motif under different redox-conditions. The AAGAAT motif is localized in the second intron of the floral homeotic regulator AGAMOUS (AG), which controls stamen and carpel development as well as floral determinacy. Whereas PAN protein binds to this regulatory cis-element under reducing conditions, the interaction is strongly reduced under oxidizing conditions in EMSA studies. The redox-sensitive DNA-binding is mediated via a special PAN N-terminus, which is not present in other Arabidopsis TGA TFs and comprises five cysteines. Two N-terminal PAN cysteines, Cys68 and Cys87, were shown to form a disulfide bridge and Cys340, localized in a C-terminal putative transactivation domain, can be S-glutathionylated. Comparative land plant analyses revealed that the AAGAAT motif exists in asterid and rosid plant species. TGA TFs with N-terminal extensions of variable length were identified in all analyzed seed plants. However, a PAN-like N-terminus exists only in the rosids and exclusively Brassicaceae homologs comprise four to five of the PAN N-terminal cysteines. Redox-dependent modifications of TGA cysteines are known to regulate the activity of stress-related TGA TFs. Here, we show that the N-terminal PAN cysteines participate in a redox-dependent control of the PAN interaction with a highly conserved

  13. PA28, an activator of the 20 S proteasome, is inactivated by proteolytic modification at its carboxyl terminus.

    PubMed

    Ma, C P; Willy, P J; Slaughter, C A; DeMartino, G N

    1993-10-25

    , suggesting that the carboxyl terminus of PA28 is required for binding to the proteasome. These results indicate the importance of the carboxyl terminus of PA28 for proteasome activation.

  14. Postmortem redistribution of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), 11-hydroxy-THC (11-OH-THC), and 11-nor-9-carboxy-THC (THCCOOH)

    PubMed Central

    Holland, Michael G.; Schwope, David M.; Stoppacher, Robert; Gillen, Shane B.; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Postmortem redistribution (PMR), a well-described phenomenon in forensic toxicology for certain drugs, can result in increased central blood concentrations relative to peripheral blood concentrations. Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the primary psychoactive component in cannabis or marijuana, is the illicit substance most commonly implicated in driving under the influence of drugs (DUID) cases and fatally-injured drivers. No investigation of PMR of THC in human blood has been reported to date. Methods Matched heart and iliac postmortem blood specimens were collected from 19 medical examiner cases (16 Males, 3 Females) with positive cannabinoid urine immunoassay screens. THC, its equipotent metabolite 11-hydroxy-THC (11-OH-THC) and non-psychoactive metabolite 11-nor-9-carboxy-THC (THCCOOH) were quantified by two-dimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with cryofocusing, with 0.5 ng/mL limits of quantification (LOQ) for all analytes. Results 10 cases had quantifiable THC and 11-OH-THC; THCCOOH was present in all 19. Median (range) heart:iliac blood ratios were 1.5 for THC (range: 0.3–3.1); 1.6 for 11-OH-THC (range: 0.3–2.7); and 1.8 for THCCOOH (range: 0.5–3.0). Discussion Cannabinoids, in general, exhibited a mean and median central: peripheral (C: P) concentration ratio of less than 2 following death. A trend was observed for greater PMR with increasing postmortem interval between death and sampling. To our knowledge, these are the first data on THC PMR in humans, providing important scientific data to aid in the interpretation of postmortem cannabinoid concentrations in medico-legal investigations. PMID:21764230

  15. Identification of A-type allatostatins possessing -YXFGI/Vamide carboxy-termini from the nervous system of the copepod crustacean Calanus finmarchicus.

    PubMed

    Christie, Andrew E; Sousa, Gregory L; Rus, Szymon; Smith, Christine M; Towle, David W; Hartline, Daniel K; Dickinson, Patsy S

    2008-02-01

    The copepod crustacean Calanus finmarchicus plays a critical role in the ecology of the Gulf of Maine and other regions of the North Atlantic. To increase our understanding of the physiology of this species, a normalized, whole organism cDNA library was constructed, and expressed sequence tags (ESTs) of the clones were generated. Among these ESTs was one with homology to known cDNAs encoding prepro-A-type allatostatins (A-type ASTs), a well-known family of arthropod peptides that regulate juvenile hormone production in insects. Sequence analysis of the clone from which the EST was generated, with subsequent translation of its open reading frame, showed it to encode five novel A-type ASTs, whose mature structures were predicted to be APYGFGIamide, pE/EPYGFGIamide, ALYGFGIamide, pE/EPYNFGIamide, and pQ/QPYNFGVamide. Each of the peptides is present as a single copy within the prepro-hormone with the exception of APYGFGIamide, which is present in three copies. Surprisingly, the organization of the Calanus prepro-A-type AST, specifically the number of encoded A-type peptides, is more similar to those of insects than it is to the known decapod crustacean prepro-hormones. Moreover, the Calanus A-type ASTs possess isoleucine or valine residues at their carboxy (C)-termini rather than leucine, which is present in most other family members. Wholemount immunohistochemistry suggests that six pairs of somata produce the native Calanus A-type ASTs: five in the protocerebrum and one in the suboesophageal region. To the best of our knowledge, our report is the first characterization of a neuropeptidergic system in a copepod, the first identification of A-type ASTs from a non-decapod crustacean, the first report of crustacean A-type ASTs possessing isoleucine C-terminal residues, and the first report from any species of an A-type peptide possessing a valine C-terminal residue.

  16. Ubiquitin Carboxy-Terminal Hydrolase-L1 as a Serum Neurotrauma Biomarker for Exposure to Occupational Low-Level Blast

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Walter; Yarnell, Angela M.; Ong, Ricardo; Walilko, Timothy; Kamimori, Gary H.; da Silva, Uade; McCarron, Richard M.; LoPresti, Matthew L.

    2015-01-01

    Repeated exposure to low-level blast is a characteristic of a few select occupations and there is concern that such occupational exposures present risk for traumatic brain injury. These occupations include specialized military and law enforcement units that employ controlled detonation of explosive charges for the purpose of tactical entry into secured structures. The concern for negative effects from blast exposure is based on rates of operator self-reported headache, sleep disturbance, working memory impairment, and other concussion-like symptoms. A challenge in research on this topic has been the need for improved assessment tools to empirically evaluate the risk associated with repeated exposure to blast overpressure levels commonly considered to be too low in magnitude to cause acute injury. Evaluation of serum-based neurotrauma biomarkers provides an objective measure that is logistically feasible for use in field training environments. Among candidate biomarkers, ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase-L1 (UCH-L1) has some empirical support and was evaluated in this study. We used daily blood draws to examine acute change in UCH-L1 among 108 healthy military personnel who were exposed to repeated low-level blast across a 2-week period. These research volunteers also wore pressure sensors to record blast exposures, wrist actigraphs to monitor sleep patterns, and completed daily behavioral assessments of symptomology, postural stability, and neurocognitive function. UCH-L1 levels were elevated as a function of participating in the 2-week training with explosives, but the correlation of UCH-L1 elevation and blast magnitude was weak and inconsistent. Also, UCH-L1 elevations did not correlate with deficits in behavioral measures. These results provide some support for including UCH-L1 as a measure of central nervous system effects from exposure to low-level blast. However, the weak relation observed suggests that additional indicators of blast effect are needed

  17. Ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase-l1 as a serum neurotrauma biomarker for exposure to occupational low-level blast.

    PubMed

    Carr, Walter; Yarnell, Angela M; Ong, Ricardo; Walilko, Timothy; Kamimori, Gary H; da Silva, Uade; McCarron, Richard M; LoPresti, Matthew L

    2015-01-01

    Repeated exposure to low-level blast is a characteristic of a few select occupations and there is concern that such occupational exposures present risk for traumatic brain injury. These occupations include specialized military and law enforcement units that employ controlled detonation of explosive charges for the purpose of tactical entry into secured structures. The concern for negative effects from blast exposure is based on rates of operator self-reported headache, sleep disturbance, working memory impairment, and other concussion-like symptoms. A challenge in research on this topic has been the need for improved assessment tools to empirically evaluate the risk associated with repeated exposure to blast overpressure levels commonly considered to be too low in magnitude to cause acute injury. Evaluation of serum-based neurotrauma biomarkers provides an objective measure that is logistically feasible for use in field training environments. Among candidate biomarkers, ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase-L1 (UCH-L1) has some empirical support and was evaluated in this study. We used daily blood draws to examine acute change in UCH-L1 among 108 healthy military personnel who were exposed to repeated low-level blast across a 2-week period. These research volunteers also wore pressure sensors to record blast exposures, wrist actigraphs to monitor sleep patterns, and completed daily behavioral assessments of symptomology, postural stability, and neurocognitive function. UCH-L1 levels were elevated as a function of participating in the 2-week training with explosives, but the correlation of UCH-L1 elevation and blast magnitude was weak and inconsistent. Also, UCH-L1 elevations did not correlate with deficits in behavioral measures. These results provide some support for including UCH-L1 as a measure of central nervous system effects from exposure to low-level blast. However, the weak relation observed suggests that additional indicators of blast effect are needed.

  18. Identification of critical amino acid residues of Saccharomyces cerevisiae carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase: definition of the ATP site involved in carboxy-phosphate formation.

    PubMed

    Zheng, W; Lim, A L; Powers-Lee, S G

    1997-08-15

    Carbamoyl-phosphate synthetases (CPSases) utilize two molecules of ATP at two homologous domains, B and C, with ATP(B) used to form the enzyme-bound intermediate carboxy-phosphate and ATP(C) used to phosphorylate the carbamate intermediate. To further define the role of one CPSase peptide suggested by affinity labeling studies to be near the ATP(B) site, we have carried out site-directed mutagenic analysis of peptide 234-242 of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae arginine-specific CPSase. Mutants E234A, E234D, E236A, E236D and E238A were unable to complement the CPSase-deficient yeast strain LPL26 whereas mutants Y237A, E238D, R241K, R241E and R241P supported LPL26 growth as well as wild-type CPSase. Kinetic analysis of E234A and Y237A indicated impaired utilization of ATP(B) but not of ATP(C). D242A, a temperature-sensitive mutant, retained no detectable activity when assayed in vitro. These findings, together with the affinity labeling data and primary sequence analysis, strongly suggest that the yeast CPSase peptide 234-242 is located at the ATP(B) site and that some of its residues are important for functioning of the enzyme. D242 appears to occupy a critical structural position and E234, E236 and E238 appear to be critical for function, with the spatial arrangement of the carboxyl side chain also critical for E234 and E236.

  19. DFT and experimental study of N, N'-bis(3'-carboxy,4'-aminophenyl)-1,4-quinonediimine, a carboxyl substituted aniline trimer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sein, Lawrence T., Jr.; Lashua, Amanda F.

    2010-08-01

    Density functional calculations were performed on N, N'-bis(3'-carboxy,4'-aminophenyl)-1,4-quinonediimine, a carboxylic acid substituted aniline trimer. Results of the calculations were compared to experimental properties of the herein synthesized trimer, as well as to the properties of the anthranilic acid/aniline co-polymer reported in the literature. The calculated LUMO levels for isomers of the title compound range from -4.45 to -5.05 eV. The calculated electron affinities range from 75.93 kcal mol -1 to 89.04 kcal mol -1 (3.29-3.86 eV). Both the LUMO levels and electron affinities are greatest in magnitude for the anti, syn isomer. The HOMO levels, on the other hand, range from -5.32 eV (for the trans, trans isomer) to -5.36 eV (syn, syn inner). In acetonitrile solvent, the zwitterionic form is calculated to be energetically preferred to the non-zwitterion. Experimental UV-vis and near-IR studies in acetonitrile and ethanol show little evidence for zwitterion formation, but those in water show strong evidence. The predicted electronic transitions for the non-zwitterion in acetonitrile solvent correspond closely to those seen at 533 and 416 nm. The zwitterion present in solvent corresponds to a trimer with the capability to "self-dope", suggesting that the trimer would be effective at corrosion inhibition in the emeraldine base form, unlike other trimers which are only effective in the emeraldine salt form. This effectiveness in the emeraldine base form would enable the material to be utilized in corrosion inhibition applications in alkaline environments where standard oligo- and polyanilines fail.

  20. Simultaneous analysis of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol and 11-nor-9-carboxy-tetrahydrocannabinol in hair without different sample preparation and derivatization by gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Han, Eunyoung; Park, Yonghoon; Kim, Eunmi; In, Sangwhan; Yang, Wonkyung; Lee, Sooyeun; Choi, Hwakyung; Lee, Sangki; Chung, Heesun; Song, Joon Myong

    2011-07-15

    The present study describes a gas chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry-negative ion chemical ionization assay (GC/MS/MS-NCI) for simultaneous analysis of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and 11-nor-9-carboxy-tetrahydrocannabinol (THCCOOH) in hair. Each hair sample, of approximately 20mg, was weighed and the sample was dissolved in 1ml of 1M sodium hydroxide (30min at 85°C) in the presence of THC-d(3) and THCCOOH-d(3). For the analysis of THC, hair samples were extracted with n-hexane:ethyl acetate (9:1) two times; acetic acid and sodium acetate buffer were added for the analysis of THCCOOH, and hair samples were re-extracted with n-hexane:ethyl acetate (9:1) two times. The extracts were then derivatized with pentafluoropropionic anhydride (PFPA) and pentafluoropropanol (PFPOH). This method allowed the analysis of THC and THCCOOH using the GC/MS/MS-NCI assay. This method was also fully validated and applied to hair specimens (n=54) collected from known cannabis users whose urine test results were positive. The concentrations of THC and THCCOOH in hair ranged from 7.52 to 60.41ng/mg and from 0.10 to 11.68pg/mg, respectively. In this paper, we simultaneously measured THC and THCCOOH in human hair using GC/MS/MS-NCI without requiring different sample preparation and derivatization procedures. The analytical sensitivity for THCCOOH in hair was good, while that for THC in hair needs to be improved in further study.

  1. Simplified analysis of 11-hydroxy-delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol and 11-carboxy-delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol in human meconium: method development and validation.

    PubMed

    Tynon, Marykathryn; Porto, Marcellino; Logan, Barry K

    2015-01-01

    We describe the development of a sensitive analytical method for the analysis of 11-hydroxy-delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (11-OH-THC) and 11-carboxy-delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THCC) in meconium using a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) platform. The method was validated according to protocols, which included assessment of accuracy, precision, robustness, stability in meconium and in-process stability, interference and sensitivity and specificity. The method consists of a solid phase extraction with alkaline hydrolysis and derivatization of the analytes with N, O-Bis(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacteamide, followed by GC/MS analysis using selected ion monitoring. The method uses deuterated internal standards for both analytes. Calibration curves had r(2) values >0.998, and extraction efficiency was determined to be 84.7% for THCC and 78.6% for 11-OH-THC. The detection limit for both analytes was 5 ng/g. This confirmatory method was successfully applied to 183 meconium samples that had screened positive by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and 67.2% were confirmed for THCC, and 2.2% were confirmed positive for 11-OH-THC. The mean (SD) and median (range) THCC (n = 123) concentrations detected were 55.0 ng/g (±59.0) and 33.75 ng/g (5-265 ng/g), while the mean and median (range) for 11-OH-THC (n = 4) concentrations were 8.25 ng/g (±4.71) and 6.5 ng/g (5-15 ng/g).

  2. Structure of the Receptor-Binding Carboxy-Terminal Domain of the Bacteriophage T5 L-Shaped Tail Fibre with and without Its Intra-Molecular Chaperone

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Doval, Carmela; Castón, José R.; Luque, Daniel; Granell, Meritxell; Otero, José M.; Llamas-Saiz, Antonio L.; Renouard, Madalena; Boulanger, Pascale; van Raaij, Mark J.

    2015-01-01

    Bacteriophage T5, a Siphovirus belonging to the order Caudovirales, has a flexible, three-fold symmetric tail, to which three L-shaped fibres are attached. These fibres recognize oligo-mannose units on the bacterial cell surface prior to infection and are composed of homotrimers of the pb1 protein. Pb1 has 1396 amino acids, of which the carboxy-terminal 133 residues form a trimeric intra-molecular chaperone that is auto-proteolyzed after correct folding. The structure of a trimer of residues 970–1263 was determined by single anomalous dispersion phasing using incorporated selenomethionine residues and refined at 2.3 Å resolution using crystals grown from native, methionine-containing, protein. The protein inhibits phage infection by competition. The phage-distal receptor-binding domain resembles a bullet, with the walls formed by partially intertwined beta-sheets, conferring stability to the structure. The fold of the domain is novel and the topology unique to the pb1 structure. A site-directed mutant (Ser1264 to Ala), in which auto-proteolysis is impeded, was also produced, crystallized and its 2.5 Å structure solved by molecular replacement. The additional chaperone domain (residues 1263–1396) consists of a central trimeric alpha-helical coiled-coil flanked by a mixed alpha-beta domain. Three long beta-hairpin tentacles, one from each chaperone monomer, extend into long curved grooves of the bullet-shaped domain. The chaperone-containing mutant did not inhibit infection by competition. PMID:26670244

  3. In Vitro and in Vivo Characterization of MOD-4023, a Long-Acting Carboxy-Terminal Peptide (CTP)-Modified Human Growth Hormone.

    PubMed

    Hershkovitz, Oren; Bar-Ilan, Ahuva; Guy, Rachel; Felikman, Yana; Moschcovich, Laura; Hwa, Vivian; Rosenfeld, Ron G; Fima, Eyal; Hart, Gili

    2016-02-01

    MOD-4023 is a novel long-acting version of human growth hormone (hGH), containing the carboxy-terminal peptide (CTP) of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG). MOD-4023 is being developed as a treatment for adults and children with growth hormone deficiency (GHD), which would require fewer injections than currently available GH formulations and thus reduce patient discomfort and increase compliance. This study characterizes MOD-4023's binding affinities for the growth hormone receptor, as well as the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamics, toxicology, and safety profiles of repeated dosing of MOD-4023 in Sprague-Dawley rats and Rhesus monkeys. Although MOD-4023 exhibited reduced in vitro potency and lower affinity to the GH receptor than recombinant hGH (rhGH), administration of MOD-4023 every 5 days in rats and monkeys resulted in exposure comparable to daily rhGH, and the serum half-life of MOD-4023 was significantly longer. Repeated administration of MOD-4023 led to elevated levels of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), and twice-weekly injections of MOD-4023 resulted in larger increase in weight gain with fewer injections and a lower accumulative hGH dose. Thus, the increased half-life of MOD-4023 in comparison to hGH may increase the frequency of protein-receptor interactions and compensate for its decreased in vitro potency. MOD-4023 was found to be well-tolerated in rats and monkeys, with minimal adverse events, suggesting an acceptable safety profile. These results provide a basis for the continued clinical development of MOD-4023 as a novel treatment of GHD in children and adults.

  4. Association between ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase-L1 S18Y variant and risk of Parkinson's disease: the impact of ethnicity and onset age.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Chen, Yan-Yan; Liu, Hui; Yao, Ci-Jiang; Zhu, Xiao-Xia; Chen, Dao-Jun; Yang, Jin; Lu, You-Jin; Cao, Ji-Yu

    2015-02-01

    The Ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase-L1 (UCHL1) is a candidate risk gene for Parkinson' disease (PD), and a function SNP (rs5030732) in the coding region of this gene has been studied for the association with the disease extensively among worldwide populations, but the results were inconsistent and controversial. Here, to estimate the association between UCHL1 S18Y polymorphism and risk of PD in general population, we conducted a systematic meta-analysis by combining all available case-control subjects in Asian, European, and American populations, with a total of 7742 PD cases and 8850 healthy controls, and the pooled odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) for UCHL1 S18Y polymorphism and PD were calculated using the Mantel-Haenszel method with a fixed- or random-effects model. Subgroup analysis was also performed in different onset age-matched groups. Among high-quality studies, UCHL1 S18Y polymorphism was moderately associated with the risk of PD (allele contrasts, OR = 1.063, 95% CI 1.008-1.122; p = 0.024; regressive genetic model, OR = 1.078, 95% CI 1.005-1.157; p = 0.035). When stratifying for ethnicity, none association were observed in subgroups. Analysis of early-onset PD (EOPD) and late-onset PD (LOPD) revealed that the polymorphism was not associated with the risk of PD. In conclusion, our meta-analysis suggests that UCHL1 S18Y polymorphism is moderately associated with susceptibility to PD, and more studies are needed to confirm our conclusion.

  5. Development of a direct ELISA based on carboxy-terminal of penicillin-binding protein BlaR for the detection of β-lactam antibiotics in foods.

    PubMed

    Peng, Juan; Cheng, Guyue; Huang, Lingli; Wang, Yulian; Hao, Haihong; Peng, Dapeng; Liu, Zhenli; Yuan, Zonghui

    2013-11-01

    β-Lactam antibiotics, including penicillins and cephalosporins, are commonly used in veterinary medicine. Illegal use and abuse of β-lactams could cause allergy and selected bacterial resistance. BlaR-CTD, the carboxy-terminal of penicillin-recognizing protein BlaR from Bacillus licheniformis ATCC 14580, was utilized in this study to develop a receptor-based ELISA for detection and determination of β-lactam antibiotics in milk, beef, and chicken. This assay was based on directly competitive inhibition of binding of horseradish peroxidase-labeled ampicillin to the immobilized BlaR-CTD by β-lactams. The assay was developed as screening test with the option as semiquantitative assay, when the identity of a single type of residual β-lactam was known. The IC50 values of 15 β-lactam antibiotics, including benzylpenicillin, ampicillin, amoxicillin, dicloxacillin, oxacillin, nafcillin, cefapirin, cefoperazone, cefalotin, cefazolin, cefquinome, ceftriaxone, cefotaxime, cefalexin, ceftiofur and its metabolite desfuroylceftiofur were evaluated and ranged from 0.18 to 170.81 μg L(-1). Simple sample extraction method was carried out with only phosphate-buffered saline, and the recoveries of selected β-lactam antibiotics in milk, beef, and chicken were in the range of 53.27 to 128.29 %, most ranging from 60 to 120 %. The inter-assay variability was below 30 %. Limits of detection in milk, beef, and chicken muscles with cefquinome matrix calibration were 2.10, 30.68, and 31.13 μg kg(-1), respectively. This study firstly established a rapid, simple, and accurate method for simultaneous detection of 15 β-lactams in edible tissues, among which 11 β-lactams controlled by European Union could be detected below maximum residue limits.

  6. Crystal structure of activated tobacco rubisco complexed with the reaction-intermediate analogue 2-carboxy-arabinitol 1,5-bisphosphate.

    PubMed Central

    Schreuder, H. A.; Knight, S.; Curmi, P. M.; Andersson, I.; Cascio, D.; Sweet, R. M.; Brändén, C. I.; Eisenberg, D.

    1993-01-01

    The crystal structure of activated tobacco rubisco, complexed with the reaction-intermediate analogue 2-carboxy-arabinitol 1,5-bisphosphate (CABP) has been determined by molecular replacement, using the structure of activated spinach rubisco (Knight, S., Andersson, I., & Brändén, C.-I., 1990, J. Mol. Biol. 215, 113-160) as a model. The R-factor after refinement is 21.0% for 57,855 reflections between 9.0 and 2.7 A resolution. The local fourfold axis of the rubisco hexadecamer coincides with a crystallographic twofold axis. The result is that the asymmetric unit of the crystals contains half of the L8S8 complex (molecular mass 280 kDa in the asymmetric unit). The activated form of tobacco rubisco is very similar to the activated form of spinach rubisco. The root mean square difference is 0.4 A for 587 equivalent C alpha atoms. Analysis of mutations between tobacco and spinach rubisco revealed that the vast majority of mutations concerned exposed residues. Only 7 buried residues were found to be mutated versus 54 residues at or near the surface of the protein. The crystal structure suggests that the Cys 247-Cys 247 and Cys 449-Cys 459 pairs are linked via disulfide bridges. This pattern of disulfide links differ from the pattern of disulfide links observed in crystals of unactivated tobacco rubisco (Curmi, P.M.G., et al., 1992, J. Biol. Chem. 267, 16980-16989) and is similar to the pattern observed for activated spinach tobacco. PMID:8358296

  7. Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), 11-Hydroxy-THC, and 11-Nor-9-carboxy-THC Plasma Pharmacokinetics during and after Continuous High-Dose Oral THC

    PubMed Central

    Schwilke, Eugene W.; Schwope, David M.; Karschner, Erin L.; Lowe, Ross H.; Darwin, William D.; Kelly, Deanna L.; Goodwin, Robert S.; Gorelick, David A.; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is the primary psychoactive constituent of cannabis and an active cannabinoid pharmacotherapy component. No plasma pharmacokinetic data after repeated oral THC administration are available. METHODS Six adult male daily cannabis smokers resided on a closed clinical research unit. Oral THC capsules (20 mg) were administered every 4–8 h in escalating total daily doses (40–120 mg) for 7 days. Free and glucuronidated plasma THC, 11-hydroxy-THC (11-OH-THC), and 11-nor-9-carboxy-THC (THC COOH) were quantified by 2-dimensional GC-MS during and after dosing. RESULTS Free plasma THC, 11-OH-THC, and THCCOOH concentrations 19.5 h after admission (before controlled oral THC dosing) were mean 4.3 (SE 1.1), 1.3 (0.5), and 34.0 (8.4) μg/L, respectively. During oral dosing, free 11-OH-THC and THCCOOH increased steadily, whereas THC did not. Mean peak plasma free THC, 11-OH-THC, and THCCOOH concentrations were 3.8 (0.5), 3.0 (0.7), and 196.9 (39.9) μg/L, respectively, 22.5 h after the last dose. Escherichia coli β-glucuronidase hydrolysis of 264 cannabinoid specimens yielded statistically significant increases in THC, 11-OH-THC, and THCCOOH concentrations (P < 0.001), but conjugated concentrations were underestimated owing to incomplete enzymatic hydrolysis. CONCLUSIONS Plasma THC concentrations remained >1 μg/L for at least 1 day after daily cannabis smoking and also after cessation of multiple oral THC doses. We report for the first time free plasma THC concentrations after multiple high-dose oral THC throughout the day and night, and after Escherichia coli β-glucuronidase hydrolysis. These data will aid in the interpretation of plasma THC concentrations after multiple oral doses. PMID:19833841

  8. The C-terminus of the B-chain of human insulin-like peptide 5 is critical for cognate RXFP4 receptor activity.

    PubMed

    Patil, Nitin A; Bathgate, Ross A D; Kocan, Martina; Ang, Sheng Yu; Tailhades, Julien; Separovic, Frances; Summers, Roger; Grosse, Johannes; Hughes, Richard A; Wade, John D; Hossain, Mohammed Akhter

    2016-04-01

    Insulin-like peptide 5 (INSL5) is an orexigenic peptide hormone belonging to the relaxin family of peptides. It is expressed primarily in the L-cells of the colon and has a postulated key role in regulating food intake. Its G protein-coupled receptor, RXFP4, is a potential drug target for treating obesity and anorexia. We studied the effect of modification of the C-terminus of the A and B-chains of human INSL5 on RXFP4 binding and activation. Three variants of human INSL5 were prepared using solid phase peptide synthesis and subsequent sequential regioselective disulfide bond formation. The peptides were synthesized as C-terminal acids (both A- and B-chains with free C-termini, i.e., the native form), amides (both chains as the C-terminal amide) and one analog with the C-terminus of its A-chain as the amide and the C-terminus of the B-chain as the acid. The results showed that C-terminus of the B-chain is more important than that of the A-chain for RXFP4 binding and activity. Amidation of the A-chain C-terminus does not have any effect on the INSL5 activity. The difference in RXFP4 binding and activation between the three peptides is believed to be due to electrostatic interaction of the free carboxylate of INSL5 with a positively charged residue (s), either situated within the INSL5 molecule itself or in the receptor extracellular loops.

  9. Effect of adding amino acids residues in N- and C-terminus of Vip3Aa16 (L121I) toxin.

    PubMed

    Sellami, Sameh; Cherif, Marwa; Jamoussi, Kaïs

    2016-06-01

    To study the importance of N- and C-terminus of Bacillus thuringiensis Vip3Aa16 (L121I) toxin (88 kDa), a number of mutants were generated. The addition of two (2R: RS) or eleven (11R: RSRPGHHHHHH) amino acid residues at the Vip3Aa16 (L121I) C-terminus allowed to an unappropriated folding illustrated by the abundant presence of the 62 kDa proteolytic form. The produced Vip3Aa16 (L121I) full length form was less detected when increasing the number of amino acids residues in the C-terminus. Bioassays demonstrated that the growth of the lepidopteran Ephestia kuehniella was slightly affected by Vip3Aa16 (L121I)-2R and not affected by Vip3Aa16 (L121I)-11R. Additionally, the fusion at the Vip3Aa16 (L121I) N-terminus of 39 amino acids harboring the E. coli OmpA leader peptide and the His-tag sequence allowed to the increase of protease sensitivity of Vip3Aa16 (L121I) full length form, as only the 62 kDa proteolysis form was detected. Remarkably, this fused protein produced in Escherichia coli (E. coli) was biologically inactive toward Ephestia kuehniella larvae. Thus, the N-terminus of the protein is required to the accomplishment of the insecticidal activity of Vip3 proteins. This report serves as guideline for the study of Vip3Aa16 (L121I) protein stability and activity.

  10. Hormonogenic donor Tyr2522 of bovine thyroglobulin. Insight into preferential T3 formation at thyroglobulin carboxyl terminus at low iodination level.

    PubMed

    Cetrangolo, Giovanni Paolo; Arcaro, Alessia; Lepore, Alessio; Graf, Maria; Mamone, Gianfranco; Ferranti, Pasquale; Palumbo, Giuseppe; Gentile, Fabrizio

    2014-07-18

    A tryptic fragment (b5TR,NR), encompassing residues 2515-2750, was isolated from a low-iodine (0.26% by mass) bovine thyroglobulin, by limited proteolysis with trypsin and preparative, continuous-elution SDS-PAGE. The fragment was digested with Asp-N endoproteinase and analyzed by reverse-phase HPLC electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry, revealing the formation of: 3-monoiodotyrosine and dehydroalanine from Tyr2522; 3-monoiodotyrosine from Tyr2555 and Tyr2569; 3-monoiodotyrosine and 3,5-diiodotyrosine from Tyr2748. The data presented document, by direct mass spectrometric identifications, efficient iodophenoxyl ring transfer from monoiodinated hormonogenic donor Tyr2522 and efficient mono- and diiodination of hormonogenic acceptor Tyr2748, under conditions which permitted only limited iodination of Tyr2555 and Tyr2569, in low-iodine bovine thyroglobulin. The present study thereby provides: (1) a rationale for the preferential synthesis of T3 at the carboxy-terminal end of thyroglobulin, at low iodination level; (2) confirmation for the presence of an interspecifically conserved hormonogenic donor site in the carboxy-terminal domain of thyroglobulin; (3) solution for a previous uncertainty, concerning the precise location of such donor site in bovine thyroglobulin.

  11. C-Terminus of Heat Shock Cognate 70 Interacting Protein Increases Following Stroke and Impairs Survival Against Acute Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Stankowski, Jeannette N.; Zeiger, Stephanie L.H.; Cohen, Evan L.; DeFranco, Donald B.; Cai, Jiyang

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The decision to remove or refold oxidized, denatured, or misfolded proteins by heat shock protein 70 and its binding partners is critical to determine cell fate under pathophysiological conditions. Overexpression of the ubiquitin ligase C-terminus of HSC70 interacting protein (CHIP) can compensate for failure of other ubiquitin ligases and enhance protein turnover and survival under chronic neurological stress. The ability of CHIP to alter cell fate after acute neurological injury has not been assessed. Using postmortem human tissue samples, we provide the first evidence that cortical CHIP expression is increased after ischemic stroke. Oxygen glucose deprivation in vitro led to rapid protein oxidation, antioxidant depletion, proteasome dysfunction, and a significant increase in CHIP expression. To determine if CHIP upregulation enhances neural survival, we overexpressed CHIP in vitro and evaluated cell fate 24 h after acute oxidative stress. Surprisingly, CHIP overexpressing cells fared worse against oxidative injury, accumulated more ubiquitinated and oxidized proteins, and experienced decreased proteasome activity. Conversely, using small interfering RNA to decrease CHIP expression in primary neuronal cultures improved survival after oxidative stress, suggesting that increases in CHIP observed after stroke like injuries are likely correlated with diminished survival and may negatively impact the neuroprotective potential of heat shock protein 70. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 14, 1787–1801. PMID:20677910

  12. Cloning and characterization of carboxyl terminus of heat shock cognate 70-interacting protein gene from the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Ohsawa, Takeshi; Fujimoto, Shota; Tsunakawa, Akane; Shibano, Yuka; Kawasaki, Hideki; Iwanaga, Masashi

    2016-11-01

    Carboxyl terminus of heat shock cognate 70-interacting protein (CHIP) is an evolutionarily conserved E3 ubiquitin ligase across different eukaryotic species and is known to play a key role in protein quality control. CHIP has two distinct functional domains, an N-terminal tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) and a C-terminal U-box domain, which are required for the ubiquitination of numerous labile client proteins that are chaperoned by heat shock proteins (HSPs) and heat shock cognate proteins (HSCs). During our screen for CHIP-like proteins in the Bombyx mori databases, we found a novel silkworm gene, Bombyx mori CHIP. Phylogenetic analysis showed that BmCHIP belongs to Lepidopteran lineages. Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR analysis indicated that BmCHIP was relatively highly expressed in the gonad and fat body. A pull-down experiment and auto-ubiquitination assay showed that BmCHIP interacted with BmHSC70 and had E3 ligase activity. Additionally, immunohistochemical analysis revealed that BmCHIP was partially co-localized with ubiquitin in BmN4 cells. These data support that BmCHIP plays an important role in the ubiquitin proteasome system as an E3 ubiquitin ligase in B. mori.

  13. Phenylalanine-780 near the C-terminus of the mouse glucocorticoid receptor is important for ligand binding affinity and specificity.

    PubMed

    Chen, D; Kohli, K; Zhang, S; Danielsen, M; Stallcup, M R

    1994-04-01

    Site-directed mutagenesis was employed to make two single amino acid substitutions for highly conserved amino acid residues near the C-terminus of the 783-amino acid mouse glucocorticoid receptor. Substitution of leucine for histidine-781 caused little or no change in the concentration of dexamethasone required for half-maximal activation of a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter gene expressed from a mouse mammary tumor virus promoter. However, when phenylalanine-780 was changed to alanine, the half-maximal concentrations of various agonists were increased as follows, compared with the wild-type glucocorticoid receptor: triamcinolone acetonide by 7-fold, dexamethasone by 25-fold, and hydrocortisone and deoxycorticosterone by more than 150-fold. Binding of labeled steroids by the mutant receptor in vitro and in vivo was also decreased. In contrast, this mutation caused a small decrease in the concentration of RU486 required for antagonist or partial agonist activity. Thus, the phenyl group of phenylalanine-780 of the mouse glucocorticoid receptor is an important determinant of ligand binding affinity and specificity.

  14. The human ACC2 CT-domain C-terminus is required for full functionality and has a novel twist

    PubMed Central

    Madauss, Kevin P.; Burkhart, William A.; Consler, Thomas G.; Cowan, David J.; Gottschalk, William K.; Miller, Aaron B.; Short, Steven A.; Tran, Thuy B.; Williams, Shawn P.

    2009-01-01

    Inhibition of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) may prevent lipid-induced insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes, making the enzyme an attractive pharmaceutical target. Although the enzyme is highly conserved amongst animals, only the yeast enzyme structure is available for rational drug design. The use of biophysical assays has permitted the identification of a specific C-terminal truncation of the 826-residue human ACC2 carboxyl transferase (CT) domain that is both functionally competent to bind inhibitors and crystallizes in their presence. This C-terminal truncation led to the determination of the human ACC2 CT domain–CP-640186 complex crystal structure, which revealed distinctions from the yeast-enzyme complex. The human ACC2 CT-domain C-terminus is com­prised of three intertwined α-helices that extend outwards from the enzyme on the opposite side to the ligand-binding site. Differences in the observed inhibitor conformation between the yeast and human structures are caused by differing residues in the binding pocket. PMID:19390150

  15. The amino terminus and the third extracellular loop of CX3CR1 contain determinants critical for distinct receptor functions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yiming; Green, Simone R; Almazan, Felicidad; Quehenberger, Oswald

    2006-03-01

    The G protein-coupled receptor CX3CR1 is a specific receptor for the CX3C chemokine fractalkine (CX3CL1 according to the new chemokine nomenclature). The aim of this study was to identify receptor elements that contribute independently to agonist binding and receptor activation. Targeted mutation of selected acidic amino acid residues demonstrated that the binding activity of CX3CR1 was critically dependent on the two negatively charged residues Asp25 and Glu254 located on the N-terminal domain and third extracellular loop, respectively. In addition, mutation of the uncharged polar residue Tyr14 in the amino terminus caused a reduction in the ligand binding affinity. In contrast, the three acidic residues Glu13, Asp16, and Asp266 did not contribute to ligand binding but were crucial for receptor activation. The mutant receptors E13A, D16A, and D266A bound fractalkine with high affinity but were unable to induce signaling events necessary to support chemotaxis. These acidic residues may engage in electrostatic interactions with basic residues on fractalkine that are necessary for receptor function but not for binding. Our data are consistent with a model of chemokine receptor activation consisting of a multi-step mechanism. Step one mediates the high-affinity fractalkine binding involving Tyr14, Asp25, and Glu254. The initial interaction then triggers the engagement of Glu13, Asp16, and Asp266, which are necessary for CX3CR1 activation.

  16. The unique N terminus of the herpes simplex virus type 1 large subunit is not required for ribonucleotide reductase activity.

    PubMed

    Conner, J; Macfarlane, J; Lankinen, H; Marsden, H

    1992-01-01

    Using purified bacterially expressed herpes simplex virus type 1 ribonucleotide reductase large subunit (R1) and the proteolytic enzymes chymotrypsin and trypsin, we have generated stable N-terminal truncations. Chymotrypsin removes 246 amino acids from the amino terminus to produce a fragment (dN246R1) which retains full enzymic activity and affinity for the small subunit (R2). Treatment of R1 with trypsin produces a 120K protein and a cleavage at amino acid residue 305 to produce a fragment (dN305R1) which remains associated with a 33K N-terminal polypeptide. Although this 33K-dN305R1 complex retains full binding affinity for R2 its reductase activity is reduced by approximately 50%. Increasing the concentration of trypsin removes the 33K N-terminal polypeptide resulting in dN305R1 which, when bound to R2, has full ribonucleotide reductase activity. Like R1, dN246R1 and dN305R1 each exist as dimers showing that the first 305 amino acids of R1 are not necessary for dimer formation. These results indicate that, in structural studies of subunit interaction, dN246R1 or dN305R1 can be considered as suitable replacements for intact R1.

  17. Further studies on the effect of lysine at the C-terminus of the Dmt-Tic opioid pharmacophore.

    PubMed

    Balboni, Gianfranco; Onnis, Valentina; Congiu, Cenzo; Zotti, Margherita; Sasaki, Yusuke; Ambo, Akihiro; Bryant, Sharon D; Jinsmaa, Yunden; Lazarus, Lawrence H; Lazzari, Ilaria; Trapella, Claudio; Salvadori, Severo

    2007-05-01

    A wide range of activities are induced by Lys when introduced at C-terminus of the delta-opioid Dmt-Tic pharmacophore through the alpha-amine group, including: improved delta-antagonism, mu-agonism and mu-antagonism. Here we report the synthesis of a new series of compounds with the general formula H-Dmt-Tic-NH-(CH(2))(4)-CH(R)-R' (R=-NH(2), -NH-Ac, -NH-Z; R'=CO-NH-Ph, -CO-NH-CH(2)-Ph, -Bid) in which Lys is linked to Dmt-Tic through its side-chain amine group. All new compounds (1-9) displayed potent and selective delta-antagonism (MVD, pA(2)=7.81-8.27), which was independent of the functionalized alpha-amine and carboxylic groups of C-terminal Lys. This behaviour suggests a direct application as a prototype intermediate, such as Boc-Dmt-Tic-epsilon-Lys(Z)-OMe, which could be successfully applied in the synthesis (after Z or methyl ester removal) of unique designed multiple ligands containing the pharmacophore of the quintessential delta-antagonist Dmt-Tic and another opioid or biologically active non-opioid ligand.

  18. Localized remodeling of the Escherichia coli chromosome: the patchwork of segments refractory and tolerant to inversion near the replication terminus.

    PubMed Central

    Guijo, M I; Patte, J; del Mar Campos, M; Louarn, J M; Rebollo, J E

    2001-01-01

    The behavior of chromosomal inversions in Escherichia coli depends upon the region they affect. Regions flanking the replication terminus have been termed nondivisible zones (NDZ) because inversions ending in the region were either deleterious or not feasible. This regional phenomenon is further analyzed here. Thirty segments distributed between 23 and 29 min on the chromosome map have been submitted to an inversion test. Twenty-five segments either became deleterious when inverted or were noninvertible, but five segments tolerated inversion. The involvement of polar replication pause sites in this distribution was investigated. The results suggest that the Tus/pause site system may forbid some inversion events, but that other constraints to inversion, unrelated to this system, exist. Our current model for deleterious inversions is that the segments involved carry polar sequences acting in concert with other polar sequences located outside the segments. The observed patchwork of refractory and tolerant segments supports the existence of several NDZs in the 23- to 29-min region. Microscopic observations revealed that deleterious inversions are associated with high frequencies of abnormal nucleoid structure and distribution. Combined with other information, the data suggest that NDZs participate in the organization of the terminal domain of the nucleoid. PMID:11290700

  19. C-Terminus of Botulinum A Protease Has Profound and Unanticipated Kinetic Consequences upon the Catalytic Cleft

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are among the most deadly poisons known, though ironically, they also are of great therapeutic utility. A number of research programs have been initiated to discover small molecule inhibitors of BoNTs metalloprotease activity. Many, though not all, of these programs have screened against a truncated and more stable form of the enzyme, that possesses comparable catalytic properties to the full length enzyme. Interestingly, several classes of inhibitors, notably the hydroxamates, display a large shift in potency between the two enzyme forms. In this report we compare the kinetics of active-site, α-exosite and β-exosite inhibitors versus truncated and full length enzyme. Molecular dynamics simulations conducted with the truncated and homology models of the full length BoNT LC/A indicate the flexibility of the C-terminus of the full length enzyme is responsible for the potency shifts of active-site proximally binding inhibitors while distal binding (α-exosite) inhibitors remain equipotent. PMID:23565325

  20. Further Studies on the Effect of Lysine at the C-Terminus of the Dmt-Tic Opioid Pharmacophore

    PubMed Central

    Balboni, Gianfranco; Onnis, Valentina; Congiu, Cenzo; Zotti, Margherita; Sasaki, Yusuke; Ambo, Akihiro; Bryant, Sharon D.; Jinsmaa, Yunden; Lazarus, Lawrence H.; Lazzari, Ilaria; Trapella, Claudio; Salvadori, Severo

    2008-01-01

    A wide range of bioactivities are induced by Lys when introduced at the C-terminus of the δ-opioid Dmt-Tic pharmacophore through the α-amine group, such as improved δ-antagonism, and presence of μ-agonism and μ-antagonism. We report the synthesis of a new series of compounds with the general formula H-Dmt-Tic-NH-(CH2)4-CH(R)-R’ (R = -NH2, -NH-Ac, -NH-Z; R’ = CO-NH-Ph, -CO-NH-CH2-Ph, -Bid) in which Lys is linked to Dmt-Tic through its amine group side chain. The compounds (1-9) displayed a potent and selective δ-antagonism (pA2 = 7.81-8.27) independent of the functionalized α-amine and carboxylic groups of the C-terminal Lys. This suggests direct application as a prototype intermediate, such as Boc-Dmt-Tic-ε-Lys(Z)-OMe, which could be applied in the synthesis (after Z or methyl ester removal) of unique “designed multiple ligands” containing the pharmacophore of the quintessential δ-antagonist Dmt-Tic and another opioid or biologically active non-opioid ligand. PMID:17339114

  1. GAIP interacting protein C-terminus regulates autophagy and exosome biogenesis of pancreatic cancer through metabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Santanu; Pal, Krishnendu; Sharma, Anil K; Dutta, Shamit K; Lau, Julie S; Yan, Irene K; Wang, Enfeng; Elkhanany, Ahmed; Alkharfy, Khalid M; Sanyal, Arunik; Patel, Tushar C; Chari, Suresh T; Spaller, Mark R; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata

    2014-01-01

    GAIP interacting protein C terminus (GIPC) is known to play an important role in a variety of physiological and disease states. In the present study, we have identified a novel role for GIPC as a master regulator of autophagy and the exocytotic pathways in cancer. We show that depletion of GIPC-induced autophagy in pancreatic cancer cells, as evident from the upregulation of the autophagy marker LC3II. We further report that GIPC regulates cellular trafficking pathways by modulating the secretion, biogenesis, and molecular composition of exosomes. We also identified the involvement of GIPC on metabolic stress pathways regulating autophagy and microvesicular shedding, and observed that GIPC status determines the loading of cellular cargo in the exosome. Furthermore, we have shown the overexpression of the drug resistance gene ABCG2 in exosomes from GIPC-depleted pancreatic cancer cells. We also demonstrated that depletion of GIPC from cancer cells sensitized them to gemcitabine treatment, an avenue that can be explored as a potential therapeutic strategy to overcome drug resistance in cancer.

  2. Purification method for recombinant proteins based on a fusion between the target protein and the C-terminus of calmodulin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schauer-Vukasinovic, Vesna; Deo, Sapna K.; Daunert, Sylvia

    2002-01-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) was used as an affinity tail to facilitate the purification of the green fluorescent protein (GFP), which was used as a model target protein. The protein GFP was fused to the C-terminus of CaM, and a factor Xa cleavage site was introduced between the two proteins. A CaM-GFP fusion protein was expressed in E. coli and purified on a phenothiazine-derivatized silica column. CaM binds to the phenothiazine on the column in a Ca(2+)-dependent fashion and it was, therefore, used as an affinity tail for the purification of GFP. The fusion protein bound to the affinity column was then subjected to a proteolytic digestion with factor Xa. Pure GFP was eluted with a Ca(2+)-containing buffer, while CaM was eluted later with a buffer containing the Ca(2+)-chelating agent EGTA. The purity of the isolated GFP was verified by SDS-PAGE, and the fluorescence properties of the purified GFP were characterized.

  3. Phosphorylation of the BNIP3 C-Terminus Inhibits Mitochondrial Damage and Cell Death without Blocking Autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Katherine E.; Frazier, William A.

    2015-01-01

    BNIP3 is a dual function protein, able to activate autophagy and induce cell death. Upon expression of BNIP3, which is upregulated by hypoxia, the protein induces mitochondrial dysfunction, often leading to cell death. However, some highly respiring cells and cancer cells tolerate BNIP3 expression, suggesting that a yet unknown mechanism exists to restrain the lethal effects of BNIP3 on mitochondria. Here we present evidence that BNIP3 undergoes several phosphorylation events at its C-terminus, adjacent to the transmembrane domain. Phosphorylation at these residues inhibits BNIP3-induced mitochondrial damage, preventing a loss of mitochondrial mass and mitochondrial membrane potential, as well as preventing an increase in reactive oxygen species. This decrease in mitochondrial damage, as well as the reduction of cell death upon C-terminal BNIP3 phosphorylation, can be explained by a diminished interaction between BNIP3 and OPA1, a key regulator of mitochondrial fusion and mitochondrial inner membrane structure. Importantly, phosphorylation of these C-terminal BNIP3 residues blocks cell death without preventing autophagy, providing evidence that the two functional roles of BNIP3 can be regulated independently. These findings establish phosphorylation as a switch to determine the pro-survival and pro-death effects of the protein. Our findings also suggest a novel target for the regulation of these activities in transformed cells where BNIP3 is often highly expressed. PMID:26102349

  4. Synaptotagmin I delays the fast inactivation of Kv1.4 channel through interaction with its N-terminus

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The voltage-gated potassium channel Kv1.4 is an important A-type potassium channel and modulates the excitability of neurons in central nervous system. Analysis of the interaction between Kv1.4 and its interacting proteins is helpful to elucidate the function and mechanism of the channel. Results In the present research, synaptotagmin I was for the first time demonstrated to be an interacting protein of Kv1.4 and its interaction with Kv1.4 channel did not require the mediation of other synaptic proteins. Using patch-clamp technique, synaptotagmin I was found to delay the inactivation of Kv1.4 in HEK293T cells in a Ca2+-dependent manner, and this interaction was proven to have specificity. Mutagenesis experiments indicated that synaptotagmin I interacted with the N-terminus of Kv1.4 and thus delayed its N-type fast inactivation. Conclusion These data suggest that synaptotagmin I is an interacting protein of Kv1.4 channel and, as a negative modulator, may play an important role in regulating neuronal excitability and synaptic efficacy. PMID:24423395

  5. The human ACC2 CT-domain C-terminus is required for full functionality and has a novel twist

    SciTech Connect

    Madauss, Kevin P.; Burkhart, William A.; Consler, Thomas G.; Cowan, David J.; Gottschalk, William K.; Miller, Aaron B.; Short, Steven A.; Tran, Thuy B.; Williams, Shawn P.

    2009-05-01

    The use of biophysical assays permitted the identification of a specific human ACC2 carboxyl transferase (CT) domain mutant that binds inhibitors and crystallizes in their presence. This mutant led to determination of the human ACC2 CT domain–CP-640186 complex crystal structure, which revealed differences in the inhibitor conformation from the yeast protein complex that are caused by differing residues in the binding pocket. Inhibition of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) may prevent lipid-induced insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes, making the enzyme an attractive pharmaceutical target. Although the enzyme is highly conserved amongst animals, only the yeast enzyme structure is available for rational drug design. The use of biophysical assays has permitted the identification of a specific C-terminal truncation of the 826-residue human ACC2 carboxyl transferase (CT) domain that is both functionally competent to bind inhibitors and crystallizes in their presence. This C-terminal truncation led to the determination of the human ACC2 CT domain–CP-640186 complex crystal structure, which revealed distinctions from the yeast-enzyme complex. The human ACC2 CT-domain C-terminus is comprised of three intertwined α-helices that extend outwards from the enzyme on the opposite side to the ligand-binding site. Differences in the observed inhibitor conformation between the yeast and human structures are caused by differing residues in the binding pocket.

  6. The human ACC2 CT-domain C-terminus is required for full functionality and has a novel twist

    SciTech Connect

    Madauss, Kevin P.; Burkhart, William A.; Consler, Thomas G.; Cowan, David J.; Gottschalk, William K.; Miller, Aaron B; Short, Steven A.; Tran, Thuy B.; Williams, Shawn P.

    2009-06-15

    Inhibition of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) may prevent lipid-induced insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes, making the enzyme an attractive pharmaceutical target. Although the enzyme is highly conserved amongst animals, only the yeast enzyme structure is available for rational drug design. The use of biophysical assays has permitted the identification of a specific C-terminal truncation of the 826-residue human ACC2 carboxyl transferase (CT) domain that is both functionally competent to bind inhibitors and crystallizes in their presence. This C-terminal truncation led to the determination of the human ACC2 CT domain-CP-640186 complex crystal structure, which revealed distinctions from the yeast-enzyme complex. The human ACC2 CT-domain C-terminus is comprised of three intertwined -helices that extend outwards from the enzyme on the opposite side to the ligand-binding site. Differences in the observed inhibitor conformation between the yeast and human structures are caused by differing residues in the binding pocket.

  7. Novel P2 promoter-derived HNF4{alpha} isoforms with different N-terminus generated by alternate exon insertion

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Jianmin; Levitsky, Lynne L.; Rhoads, David B.

    2009-04-15

    Hepatocyte nuclear factor 4{alpha} (HNF4{alpha}) is a critical transcription factor for pancreas and liver development and functions in islet {beta} cells to maintain glucose homeostasis. Mutations in the human HNF4A gene lead to maturity onset diabetes of the young (MODY1) and polymorphisms are associated with increased risk for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Expression of six HNF4{alpha} variants, three each from two developmentally regulated promoters, has been firmly established. We have now detected a new set of HNF4{alpha} variants designated HNF4{alpha}10-12 expressed from distal promoter P2. These variants, generated by inclusion of previously undetected exon 1E (human = 222 nt, rodent = 136 nt) following exon 1D have an altered N-terminus but identical remaining reading frame. HNF4{alpha}10-{alpha}12 are expressed in pancreatic islets (and liver) and exhibit transactivation potentials similar to the corresponding {alpha}7-{alpha}9 isoforms. DNA-binding analyses implied much higher protein levels of HNF4{alpha}10-{alpha}12 in liver than expected from the RT-PCR data. Our results provide evidence for a more complex expression pattern of HNF4{alpha} than previously appreciated. We recommend inclusion of exon 1E and nearby DNA sequences in screening for HNF4{alpha} mutations and polymorphisms in genetic analyses of MODY1 and T2DM.

  8. The RXR{alpha} C-terminus T462 is a NMR sensor for coactivator peptide binding

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Jianyun Chen Minghe; DeKoster, Gregory T.; Cistola, David P.; Li, Ellen

    2008-02-22

    The C-terminal activation function-2 (AF-2) helix plays a crucial role in retinoid X receptor alpha (RXR{alpha})-mediated gene expression. Here, we report a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) study of the RXR{alpha} ligand-binding domain complexed with 9-cis-retinoic acid and a glucocorticoid receptor-interacting protein 1 peptide. The AF-2 helix and most of the C-terminal residues were undetectable due to a severe line-broadening effect. Due to its outstanding signal-to-noise ratio, the C-terminus residue, threonine 462 (T462) exhibited two distinct crosspeaks during peptide titration, suggesting that peptide binding was in a slow exchange regime on the chemical shift timescale. Consistently, the K{sub d} derived from T462 intensity decay agreed with that derived from isothermal titration calorimetry. Furthermore, the exchange contribution to the {sup 15}N transverse relaxation rate was measurable in either T462 or the bound peptide. These results suggest that T462 is a sensor for coactivator binding and is a potential probe for AF-2 helix mobility.

  9. The Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) Uses its C-Terminus to Regulate the A2B Adenosine Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Michael J.; Lee, Shernita L.; Marklew, Abigail J.; Gilmore, Rodney C.; Gentzsch, Martina; Sassano, Maria F.; Gray, Michael A.; Tarran, Robert

    2016-01-01

    CFTR is an apical membrane anion channel that regulates fluid homeostasis in many organs including the airways, colon, pancreas and sweat glands. In cystic fibrosis, CFTR dysfunction causes significant morbidity/mortality. Whilst CFTR’s function as an ion channel has been well described, its ability to regulate other proteins is less understood. We have previously shown that plasma membrane CFTR increases the surface density of the adenosine 2B receptor (A2BR), but not of the β2 adrenergic receptor (β2AR), leading to an enhanced, adenosine-induced cAMP response in the presence of CFTR. In this study, we have found that the C-terminal PDZ-domain of both A2BR and CFTR were crucial for this interaction, and that replacing the C-terminus of A2BR with that of β2AR removed this CFTR-dependency. This observation extended to intact epithelia and disruption of the actin cytoskeleton prevented A2BR-induced but not β2AR-induced airway surface liquid (ASL) secretion. We also found that CFTR expression altered the organization of the actin cytoskeleton and PDZ-binding proteins in both HEK293T cells and in well-differentiated human bronchial epithelia. Furthermore, removal of CFTR’s PDZ binding motif (ΔTRL) prevented actin rearrangement, suggesting that CFTR insertion in the plasma membrane results in local reorganization of actin, PDZ binding proteins and certain GPCRs. PMID:27278076

  10. Leucine-rich repeats and carboxyl terminus are required for interaction of yeast adenylate cyclase with RAS proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, N; Choe, H R; Nishida, Y; Yamawaki-Kataoka, Y; Ohnishi, S; Tamaoki, T; Kataoka, T

    1990-01-01

    A Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene encoding adenylate cyclase has been analyzed by deletion and insertion mutagenesis to localize regions required for activation by the Sa. cerevisiae RAS2 protein. The NH2-terminal 657 amino acids were found to be dispensable for the activation. However, almost all 2-amino acid insertions in the middle 600 residues comprising leucine-rich repeats and deletions in the COOH-terminal 66 residues completely abolished activation by the RAS2 protein, whereas insertion mutations in the other regions generally had no effect. Chimeric adenylate cyclases were constructed by swapping the upstream and downstream portions surrounding the catalytic domains between the Sa. cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe adenylate cyclases and examined for activation by the RAS2 protein. We found that the fusion containing both the NH2-terminal 1600 residues and the COOH-terminal 66 residues of the Sa. cerevisiae cyclase rendered the catalytic domain of the Sc. pombe cyclase, which otherwise did not respond to RAS proteins, activatable by the RAS2 protein. Thus the leucine-rich repeats and the COOH terminus of the Sa. cerevisiae adenylate cyclase appear to be required for interaction with RAS proteins. Images PMID:2247439

  11. The Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) Uses its C-Terminus to Regulate the A2B Adenosine Receptor.

    PubMed

    Watson, Michael J; Lee, Shernita L; Marklew, Abigail J; Gilmore, Rodney C; Gentzsch, Martina; Sassano, Maria F; Gray, Michael A; Tarran, Robert

    2016-06-09

    CFTR is an apical membrane anion channel that regulates fluid homeostasis in many organs including the airways, colon, pancreas and sweat glands. In cystic fibrosis, CFTR dysfunction causes significant morbidity/mortality. Whilst CFTR's function as an ion channel has been well described, its ability to regulate other proteins is less understood. We have previously shown that plasma membrane CFTR increases the surface density of the adenosine 2B receptor (A2BR), but not of the β2 adrenergic receptor (β2AR), leading to an enhanced, adenosine-induced cAMP response in the presence of CFTR. In this study, we have found that the C-terminal PDZ-domain of both A2BR and CFTR were crucial for this interaction, and that replacing the C-terminus of A2BR with that of β2AR removed this CFTR-dependency. This observation extended to intact epithelia and disruption of the actin cytoskeleton prevented A2BR-induced but not β2AR-induced airway surface liquid (ASL) secretion. We also found that CFTR expression altered the organization of the actin cytoskeleton and PDZ-binding proteins in both HEK293T cells and in well-differentiated human bronchial epithelia. Furthermore, removal of CFTR's PDZ binding motif (ΔTRL) prevented actin rearrangement, suggesting that CFTR insertion in the plasma membrane results in local reorganization of actin, PDZ binding proteins and certain GPCRs.

  12. Identification of an axonal determinant in the C-terminus of the sodium channel Na(v)1.2.

    PubMed

    Garrido, J J; Fernandes, F; Giraud, P; Mouret, I; Pasqualini, E; Fache, M P; Jullien, F; Dargent, B

    2001-11-01

    To obtain a better understanding of how hippocampal neurons selectively target proteins to axons, we assessed whether any of the large cytoplasmic regions of neuronal sodium channel Na(v)1.2 contain sufficient information for axonal compartmentalization. We show that addition of the cytoplasmic C-terminal region of Na(v)1.2 restricted the distribution of a dendritic-axonal reporter protein to axons. The analysis of mutants revealed that a critical segment of nine amino acids encompassing a di-leucine-based motif mediates axonal compartmentalization of chimera. In addition, the Na(v)1.2 C-terminus is recognized by the clathrin endocytic pathway both in non-neuronal cells and the somatodendritic domain of hippocampal neurons. The mutation of the di-leucine motif located within the nine amino acid sequence to alanines resulted in the loss of chimera compartmentalization in axons and of internalization. These data suggest that selective elimination by endocytosis in dendrites may account for the compartmentalized distribution of some proteins in axons.

  13. Highly sensitive quantification of unconjugated 11-nor-9-carboxy-Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol in a cannabis user's hair using micropulverized extraction.

    PubMed

    Kuwayama, Kenji; Miyaguchi, Hajime; Yamamuro, Tadashi; Tsujikawa, Kenji; Kanamori, Tatsuyuki; Iwata, Yuko T; Inoue, Hiroyuki

    2016-05-01

    We previously developed a simple and highly sensitive analytical method for 11-nor-9-carboxy-Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC-COOH) in spiked hair using micropulverized extraction (MPE) and liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS). Using this method, we were able to quantify THC-COOH at 0.2pg/mg, which is the cut-off level recommended by the Society of Hair Testing. However, it was impossible to prove the validity of the method and the presence of THC-COOH conjugated with glucuronide in hair because we did not have authentic hair containing THC-COOH at the cut-off levels at that time. In this study, the previously developed method was verified using recently obtained hair from a cannabis user. The concentrations of THC-COOH quantified using the method were 0.36±0.01pg/mg without hydrolyzation for glucuronide and 0.49±0.05pg/mg with hydrolyzation after MPE, whereas the concentration quantified using the conventional alkaline dissolution and gas chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry with negative ion chemical ionization was 0.50±0.02pg/mg. The results proved that THC-COOH could be extracted completely from authentic hair containing THC-COOH at the recommended cut-off level using MPE. In addition, MPE with and without hydrolyzation, unlike alkaline dissolution of hair, enabled the measurement of the percentage of the conjugate form in total THC-COOH. The percentage of conjugated THC-COOH in hair measured using the MPE was approximately 26%, which was greatly different from previously reported data (>75%). The discrimination between conjugated and unconjugated compounds in hair is important to understand the mechanism of drug uptakes into hair. More data obtained with our simple and highly sensitive method from the hair of cannabis users would help to understand the relationship of concentrations between THC-COOH and its conjugate in hair.

  14. A disruption of ctpA encoding carboxy-terminal protease attenuates Burkholderia mallei and induces partial protection in CD1 mice.

    PubMed

    Bandara, Aloka B; DeShazer, David; Inzana, Thomas J; Sriranganathan, Nammalwar; Schurig, Gerhardt G; Boyle, Stephen M

    2008-09-01

    Burkholderia mallei is the etiologic agent of glanders in solipeds (horses, mules and donkeys), and incidentally in carnivores and humans. Little is known about the molecular mechanisms of B. mallei pathogenesis. The putative carboxy-terminal processing protease (CtpA) of B. mallei is a member of a novel family of endoproteases involved in the maturation of proteins destined for the cell envelope. All species and isolates of Burkholderia carry a highly conserved copy of ctpA. We studied the involvement of CtpA on growth, cell morphology, persistence, and pathogenicity of B. mallei. A sucrose-resistant strain of B. mallei was constructed by deleting a major portion of the sacB gene of the wild type strain ATCC 23344 by gene replacement, and designated as strain 23344DeltasacB. A portion of the ctpA gene (encoding CtpA) of strain 23344DeltasacB was deleted by gene replacement to generate strain 23344DeltasacBDeltactpA. In contrast to the wild type ATCC 23344 or the sacB mutant 23344DeltasacB, the ctpA mutant 23344DeltasacBDeltactpA displayed altered cell morphologies with partially or fully disintegrated cell envelopes. Furthermore, relative to the wild type, the ctpA mutant displayed slower growth in vitro and less ability to survive in J774.2 murine macrophages. The expression of mRNA of adtA, the gene downstream of ctpA was similar among the three strains suggesting that disruption of ctpA did not induce any polar effects. As with the wild type or the sacB mutant, the ctpA mutant exhibited a dose-dependent lethality when inoculated intraperitoneally into CD1 mice. The CD1 mice inoculated with a non-lethal dose of the ctpA mutant produced specific serum immunoglobulins IgG1 and IgG2a and were partially protected against challenge with wild type B. mallei ATCC 23344. These findings suggest that CtpA regulates in vitro growth, cell morphology and intracellular survival of B. mallei, and a ctpA mutant protects CD1 mice against glanders.

  15. (2S)-2-(3-(1-Carboxy-5-(4-211At-Astatobenzamido)Pentyl)Ureido)-Pentanedioic Acid for PSMA-Targeted α-Particle Radiopharmaceutical Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kiess, Ana P.; Minn, Il; Vaidyanathan, Ganesan; Hobbs, Robert F.; Josefsson, Anders; Shen, Colette; Brummet, Mary; Chen, Ying; Choi, Jaeyeon; Koumarianou, Eftychia; Baidoo, Kwamena; Brechbiel, Martin W.; Mease, Ronnie C.; Sgouros, George; Zalutsky, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    Alpha-particle emitters have a high linear energy transfer and short range, offering the potential for treating micrometastases while sparing normal tissues. We developed a urea-based, 211At-labeled small molecule targeting prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) for the treatment of micrometastases due to prostate cancer (PC). Methods: PSMA-targeted (2S)-2-(3-(1-carboxy-5-(4-211At-astatobenzamido)pentyl)ureido)-pentanedioic acid (211At-6) was synthesized. Cellular uptake and clonogenic survival were tested in PSMA-positive (PSMA+) PC3 PIP and PSMA-negative (PSMA−) PC3 flu human PC cells after 211At-6 treatment. The antitumor efficacy of 211At-6 was evaluated in mice bearing PSMA+ PC3 PIP and PSMA– PC3 flu flank xenografts at a 740-kBq dose and in mice bearing PSMA+, luciferase-expressing PC3-ML micrometastases. Biodistribution was determined in mice bearing PSMA+ PC3 PIP and PSMA– PC3 flu flank xenografts. Suborgan distribution was evaluated using α-camera images, and microscale dosimetry was modeled. Long-term toxicity was assessed in mice for 12 mo. Results: 211At-6 treatment resulted in PSMA-specific cellular uptake and decreased clonogenic survival in PSMA+ PC3 PIP cells and caused significant tumor growth delay in PSMA+ PC3 PIP flank tumors. Significantly improved survival was achieved in the newly developed PSMA+ micrometastatic PC model. Biodistribution showed uptake of 211At-6 in PSMA+ PC3 PIP tumors and in kidneys. Microscale kidney dosimetry based on α-camera images and a nephron model revealed hot spots in the proximal renal tubules. Long-term toxicity studies confirmed that the dose-limiting toxicity was late radiation nephropathy. Conclusion: PSMA-targeted 211At-6 α-particle radiotherapy yielded significantly improved survival in mice bearing PC micrometastases after systemic administration. 211At-6 also showed uptake in renal proximal tubules resulting in late nephrotoxicity, highlighting the importance of long-term toxicity studies and

  16. Simultaneous quantification of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, 11-nor-9-carboxy-tetrahydrocannabinol, cannabidiol and cannabinol in oral fluid by microflow-liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Concheiro, Marta; Lee, Dayong; Lendoiro, Elena; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2013-07-05

    Δ(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is the primary target in oral fluid (OF) for detecting cannabis intake. However, additional biomarkers are needed to solve interpretation issues, such as the possibility of passive inhalation by identifying 11-nor-9-carboxy-THC (THCCOOH), and determining recent cannabis smoking by identifying cannabidiol (CBD) and/or cannabinol (CBN). We developed and comprehensively validated a microflow liquid chromatography (LC)-high resolution mass spectrometry method for simultaneous quantification of THC, THCCOOH, CBD and CBN in OF collected with the Oral-Eze(®) and Quantisal™ devices. One milliliter OF-buffer solution (0.25mL OF and 0.5mL of Oral-Eze buffer, 1:3 dilution, or 0.75mL Quantisal buffer, 1:4 dilution) had proteins precipitated, and the supernatant subjected to CEREX™ Polycrom™ THC solid-phase extraction (SPE). Microflow LC reverse-phase separation was achieved with a gradient mobile phase of 10mM ammonium acetate pH 6 and acetonitrile over 10min. We employed a Q Exactive high resolution mass spectrometer, with compounds identified and quantified by targeted-MSMS experiments. The assay was linear 0.5-50ng/mL for THC, CBD and CBN, and 15-500pg/mL for THCCOOH. Intra- and inter-day and total imprecision were <10.8%CV and bias 86.5-104.9%. Extraction efficiency was 52.4-109.2%, process efficiency 12.2-88.9% and matrix effect ranged from -86 to -6.9%. All analytes were stable for 24h at 5°C on the autosampler. The method was applied to authentic OF specimens collected with Quantisal and Oral-Eze devices. This method provides a rapid simultaneous quantification of THCCOOH and THC, CBD, CBN, with good selectivity and sensitivity, providing the opportunity to improve interpretation of cannabinoid OF results by eliminating the possibility of passive inhalation and providing markers of recent cannabis smoking.

  17. Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, 11-hydroxy-delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol and 11-nor-9-carboxy-delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol in human plasma after controlled oral administration of cannabinoids.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, Robert S; Gustafson, Richard A; Barnes, Allan; Nebro, Wesenyalsh; Moolchan, Eric T; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2006-08-01

    A clinical study to investigate the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of oral tetrahydrocannabinol was performed. This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, within-subject, inpatient study compared the effects of THC-containing hemp oils in liquid and capsule form to dronabinol (synthetic THC) in doses used for appetite stimulation. The National Institute on Drug Abuse Institutional Review Board approved the protocol and each participant provided informed consent. Detection times and concentrations of THC, 11-hydroxy-Delta-tetrahydrocannabinol (11-OH-THC), and 11-nor-9-carboxy-Delta-tetrahydrocannabinol (THCCOOH) in plasma were determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry [limits of quantification (LOQ)=0.5, 0.5, and 1.0 ng/mL, respectively] after oral THC administration. Six volunteers ingested liquid hemp oil (0.39 and 14.8 mg THC/d), hemp oil in capsules (0.47 mg THC/d), dronabinol capsules (7.5 mg THC/d), and placebo. Plasma specimens were collected during and after each dosing condition. THC and 11-OH-THC concentrations were low and never exceeded 6.1 ng/mL. Analytes were detectable 1.5 hour after initiating dosing with the 7.5 mg THC/d regimen and 4.5 hour after starting the 14.8 mg THC/d sessions. THCCOOH was detected 1.5 hour after the first dose, except for the 0.47 mg THC/d session, which required 4.5 hour for concentrations to reach the LOQ. THCCOOH concentrations peaked at 3.1 ng/mL during dosing with the low-dose hemp oils. Plasma THC and 11-OH-THC concentrations were negative for all participants at all doses within 15.5 hours after the last THC dose. Plasma THCCOOH persisted for at least 39.5 hours after the end of dosing and at much higher concentrations (up to 43.0 ng/mL). This study demonstrated that subjects who used high THC content hemp oil (347 mug/mL) as a dietary supplement had THC and metabolites in plasma in quantities comparable to those of patients using dronabinol for appetite stimulation. There was a significant

  18. Determination of ∆-9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), 11-hydroxy-THC, 11-nor-9-carboxy-THC and Cannabidiol in Human Plasma using Gas Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Andrenyak, David M; Moody, David E; Slawson, Matthew H; O'Leary, Daniel S; Haney, Margaret

    2017-01-08

    Two marijuana compounds of particular medical interest are delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD). A gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS-MS) method was developed to test for CBD, THC, hydroxy-THC (OH-THC) and carboxy-THC (COOH-THC) in human plasma. Calibrators (THC and OH-THC, 0.1 to 100; CBD, 0.25 to 100; COOH-THC, 0.5-500 ng/mL) and controls (0.3, 5 and 80 ng/mL, except COOH-THC at 1.5, 25 and 400 ng/mL) were prepared in blank matrix. Deuterated (d3) internal standards were added to 1-mL samples. Preparation involved acetonitrile precipitation, liquid-liquid extraction (hexane:ethyl acetate, 9:1), and MSTFA derivatization. An Agilent 7890 A GC was interfaced with an Agilent 7000 MS Triple Quadrupole. Selected reaction monitoring was employed. Blood samples were provided from a marijuana smoking study (two participants) and a CBD ingestion study (eight participants). Three analytes with the same transitions (THC, OH-THC and COOH-THC) were chromatographically separated. Matrix selectivity studies showed endogenous chromatographic peak area ratios (PAR) at the analyte retention times were <20% of the analyte limit of quantitation PAR. The intra-assay accuracy ranged from 83.5% to 118% of target and the intra-run imprecision ranged from 2.0% to 19.1%. The inter-assay accuracy ranged from 90.3% to 104% of target and the inter-run imprecision ranged from 6.5% to 12.0%. Stability was established for 25 hours at room temperature, 207 days at -20°C, after three freeze-thaw cycles and for 26 days for rederivatized processed samples. After smoking marijuana predictable concentrations of THC, OH-THC and COOH-THC were seen; low concentrations of CBD were detected at early time points. In moderate users who had not smoked for at least 9 hours before ingesting an 800 mg oral dose of CBD, the method was sensitive enough to follow residual concentrations of THC and OH-THC; sustained COOH-THC concentrations over 50 ng/mL validated its higher

  19. RGD-independent cell adhesion to the carboxy-terminal heparin-binding fragment of fibronectin involves heparin-dependent and -independent activities

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    Cell adhesion to extracellular matrix components such as fibronectin has a complex basis, involving multiple determinants on the molecule that react with discrete cell surface macromolecules. Our previous results have demonstrated that normal and transformed cells adhere and spread on a 33-kD heparin binding fragment that originates from the carboxy-terminal end of particular isoforms (A-chains) of human fibronectin. This fragment promotes melanoma adhesion and spreading in an arginyl-glycyl-aspartyl-serine (RGDS) independent manner, suggesting that cell adhesion to this region of fibronectin is independent of the typical RGD/integrin-mediated binding. Two synthetic peptides from this region of fibronectin were recently identified that bound [3H]heparin in a solid-phase assay and promoted the adhesion and spreading of melanoma cells (McCarthy, J. B., M. K. Chelberg, D. J. Mickelson, and L. T. Furcht. 1988. Biochemistry. 27:1380-1388). The current studies further define the cell adhesion and heparin binding properties of one of these synthetic peptides. This peptide, termed peptide I, has the sequence YEKPGSP-PREVVPRPRPGV and represents residues 1906-1924 of human plasma fibronectin. In addition to promoting RGD-independent melanoma adhesion and spreading in a concentration-dependent manner, this peptide significantly inhibited cell adhesion to the 33-kD fragment or intact fibronectin. Polyclonal antibodies generated against peptide I also significantly inhibited cell adhesion to the peptide, to the 33-kD fragment, but had minimal effect on melanoma adhesion to fibronectin. Anti-peptide I antibodies also partially inhibited [3H]heparin binding to fibronectin, suggesting that peptide I represents a major heparin binding domain on the intact molecule. The cell adhesion activity of another peptide from the 33-kD fragment, termed CS1 (Humphries, M. J., A. Komoriya, S. K. Akiyama, K. Olden, and K. M. Yamada. 1987. J. Biol. Chem., 262:6886-6892) was contrasted with

  20. Antioxidant protection of NO-induced relaxations of the mouse anococcygeus against inhibition by superoxide anions, hydroquinone and carboxy-PTIO.

    PubMed

    Lilley, E; Gibson, A

    1996-09-01

    1. The potential protective effect of several antioxidants [Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (Cu/Zn SOD), ascorbate, reduced glutathione (GSH), and alpha-tocopherol (alpha-TOC)] on relaxations of the mouse anococcygeus muscle to nitric oxide (NO; 15 microM) and, where appropriate, nitrergic field stimulation (10 Hz; 10 s trains) was investigated. 2. The superoxide anion generating drug duroquinone (100 microM) reduced relaxations to exogenous NO by 54 +/- 6%; this inhibition was partially reversed by Cu/Zn SOD (250 u ml-1), and by ascorbate (500 microM). Following inhibition of endogenous Cu/Zn SOD activity with diethyldithiocarbamate (DETCA), duroquinone (50 microM) also reduced relaxations to nitrergic field stimulation (by 53 +/- 6%) and this effect was again reversed by Cu/Zn SOD and by ascorbate. Neither GSH (500 microM) nor alpha-TOC (400 microM) afforded any protection against duroquinone. 3. Xanthine (20 mu ml-1); xanthine oxidase (100 microM) inhibited NO-induced relaxations by 73 +/- 14%, but had no effect on those to nitrergic field stimulation, even after DETCA treatment. The inhibition of exogenous NO was reduced by Cu/Zn SOD (250 u ml-1) and ascorbate (400 microM), but was unaffected by GSH or alpha-TOC (both 400 microM). 4. Hydroquinone (100 microM) also inhibited relaxations to NO (by 52 +/- 10%), but not nitrergic stimulation. In this case, however, the inhibition was reversed by GSH (5-100 microM) and ascorbate (100-400 microM), although Cu/Zn SOD and alpha-TOC were ineffective. 5. 2-(4-Carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (carboxy-PTIO, 50 microM) inhibited NO-induced relaxations by 50 +/- 4%, but had no effect on nitrergic responses; the inhibition was reduced by ascorbate (2-200 microM) and alpha-TOC (10-200 microM), but not by Cu/Zn SOD or GSH. 6. Hydroxocobalamin (5-100 microM) inhibited, equally, relaxations to both NO (-logIC40 3.14 +/- 0.33) and nitrergic stimulation (-logIC40 3.17 +/- 0.22). 7. Thus, a number of

  1. Identification of a Novel Coregulator, SH3YL1, That Interacts With the Androgen Receptor N-Terminus

    PubMed Central

    Blessing, Alicia M.; Ganesan, Sathya; Rajapakshe, Kimal; Ying Sung, Ying; Reddy Bollu, Lakshmi; Shi, Yan; Cheung, Edwin; Coarfa, Cristian; Chang, Jeffrey T.; McDonnell, Donald P.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear receptor (NR)-mediated transcriptional activity is a dynamic process that is regulated by the binding of ligands that induce distinct conformational changes in the NR. These structural alterations lead to the differential recruitment of coregulators (coactivators or corepressors) that control the expression of NR-regulated genes. Here, we show that a stretch of proline residues located within the N-terminus of androgen receptor (AR) is a bona fide coregulator binding surface, the disruption of which reduces the androgen-dependent proliferation and migration of prostate cancer (PCa) cells. Using T7 phage display, we identified a novel AR-interacting protein, Src homology 3 (SH3)-domain containing, Ysc84-like 1 (SH3YL1), whose interaction with the receptor is dependent upon this polyproline domain. As with mutations within the AR polyproline domain, knockdown of SH3YL1 attenuated androgen-mediated cell growth and migration. RNA expression analysis revealed that SH3YL1 was required for the induction of a subset of AR-modulated genes. Notable was the observation that ubinuclein 1 (UBN1), a key member of a histone H3.3 chaperone complex, was a transcriptional target of the AR/SH3YL1 complex, correlated with aggressive PCa in patients, and was necessary for the maximal androgen-mediated proliferation and migration of PCa cells. Collectively, these data highlight the importance of an amino-terminal activation domain, its associated coregulator, and downstream transcriptional targets in regulating cellular processes of pathological importance in PCa. PMID:26305679

  2. C-terminus Methionene Specifically Involved in Binding Corn Odorants to Odorant Binding Protein4 in Macrocentrus cingulum

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Tofael; Zhang, Tiantao; Wang, Zhenying; He, Kanglai; Bai, Shuxiong

    2017-01-01

    The soluble carrier proteins, OBPs carry odor components through sensilium lymph to specific receptors within the antennal sensilla to trigger behavioral responses. Herein, McinOBP4 was characterized from the Macrocentrus cingulum, which is the specialist parasitic insect of Ostrinia furnacalis for better understanding of olfactory recognition mechanism of this wasp. The classical odorant binding protein McinOBP4 showed good binding affinity to corn green leaf volatiles. RT-qPCR results showed that the McinOBP4 was primarily expressed in male and female wasp antennae, with transcripts levels differing by sex. Fluorescence assays indicate that, McinOBP4 binds corn green leaf volatiles including terpenoides and aliphatic alcohols as well as aldehydes with good affinity. We have also conducted series of binding assay with first mutant (M1), which lacked the last 8 residues and a second mutant (M2), with Met119 replaced by Leucine (Leu119). In the acidic conditions, affinity N-phenylnaphthylamine (1-NPN) to McinOBP4 and M1 were substantially decreased, but increase in basic condition with no significant differences. The lack of C-terminus showed reduced affinity to terpenoides and aliphatic alcohols as well as aldehydes compounds of corn odorants. The mutant M2 with Met119 showed significant reduction in binding affinity to tested odorants, it indicating that Met119 forming hydrophobic chain with the odorants functional group to binding. This finding provides detailed insight of chemosensory function of McinOBP4 in M. cingulum and help to develop low release agents that attract of this wasp to improve ecologically-friendly pest management strategy. PMID:28228732

  3. Atomic Structure and Biochemical Characterization of an RNA Endonuclease in the N Terminus of Andes Virus L Protein

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-García, Yaiza; Reguera, Juan; Busch, Carola; Witte, Gregor; Sánchez-Ramos, Oliberto; Betzel, Christian; Cusack, Stephen; Günther, Stephan; Reindl, Sophia

    2016-01-01

    Andes virus (ANDV) is a human-pathogenic hantavirus. Hantaviruses presumably initiate their mRNA synthesis by using cap structures derived from host cell mRNAs, a mechanism called cap-snatching. A signature for a cap-snatching endonuclease is present in the N terminus of hantavirus L proteins. In this study, we aimed to solve the atomic structure of the ANDV endonuclease and characterize its biochemical features. However, the wild-type protein was refractory to expression in Escherichia coli, presumably due to toxic enzyme activity. To circumvent this problem, we introduced attenuating mutations in the domain that were previously shown to enhance L protein expression in mammalian cells. Using this approach, 13 mutant proteins encompassing ANDV L protein residues 1–200 were successfully expressed and purified. Protein stability and nuclease activity of the mutants was analyzed and the crystal structure of one mutant was solved to a resolution of 2.4 Å. Shape in solution was determined by small angle X-ray scattering. The ANDV endonuclease showed structural similarities to related enzymes of orthobunya-, arena-, and orthomyxoviruses, but also differences such as elongated shape and positively charged patches surrounding the active site. The enzyme was dependent on manganese, which is bound to the active site, most efficiently cleaved single-stranded RNA substrates, did not cleave DNA, and could be inhibited by known endonuclease inhibitors. The atomic structure in conjunction with stability and activity data for the 13 mutant enzymes facilitated inference of structure–function relationships in the protein. In conclusion, we solved the structure of a hantavirus cap-snatching endonuclease, elucidated its catalytic properties, and present a highly active mutant form, which allows for inhibitor screening. PMID:27300328

  4. Human SAS-6 C-Terminus Nucleates and Promotes Microtubule Assembly in Vitro by Binding to Microtubules.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Hindol; Badarudeen, Binshad; George, Athira; Thomas, Geethu Emily; Gireesh, K K; Manna, Tapas K

    2015-10-20

    Centrioles are essential components of the animal centrosome and play crucial roles in the formation of cilia and flagella. They are cylindrical structures composed of nine triplet microtubules organized around a central cartwheel. Recent studies have identified spindle assembly abnormal protein SAS-6 as a critical component necessary for formation of the cartwheel. However, the molecular details of how the cartwheel participates in centriolar microtubule assembly have not been clearly understood. In this report, we show that the C-terminal tail (residues 470-657) of human SAS-6, HsSAS-6 C, the region that has been shown to extend toward the centriolar wall where the microtubule triplets are organized, nucleated and induced microtubule polymerization in vitro. The N-terminus (residues 1-166) of HsSAS-6, the domain known to be involved in formation of the central hub of the cartwheel, did not, however, exert any effect on microtubule polymerization. HsSAS-6 C bound to the microtubules and localized along the lengths of the microtubules in vitro. Microtubule pull-down and coimmunoprecipitation (Co-IP) experiments with S-phase synchronized HeLa cell lysates showed that the endogenous HsSAS-6 coprecipitated with the microtubules, and it mediated interaction with tubulin. Isothermal calorimetry titration and size exclusion chromatography showed that HsSAS-6 C bound to the αβ-tubulin dimer in vitro. The results demonstrate that HsSAS-6 possesses an intrinsic microtubule assembly promoting activity and further implicate that its outer exposed C-terminal tail may play critical roles in microtubule assembly and stabilizing microtubule attachment with the centriolar cartwheel.

  5. Tyrosine residues at the carboxyl terminus of Vav1 play an important role in regulation of its biological activity.

    PubMed

    Lazer, Galit; Pe'er, Liron; Farago, Marganit; Machida, Kazuya; Mayer, Bruce J; Katzav, Shulamit

    2010-07-23

    The guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) Vav1 is an essential signal transducer protein in the hematopoietic system, where it is expressed physiologically. It is also involved in several human malignancies. Tyrosine phosphorylation at the Vav1 amino terminus plays a central role in regulating its activity; however, the role of carboxyl terminal tyrosine residues is unknown. We found that mutation of either Tyr-826 (Y826F) or Tyr-841 (Y841F) to phenylalanine led to loss of Vav1 GEF activity. When these Vav1 mutants were ectopically expressed in pancreatic cancer cells lacking Vav1, they failed to induce growth in agar, indicating loss of transforming potential. Furthermore, although Y841F had no effect on Vav1-stimulated nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) activity, Y826F doubled NFAT activity when compared with Vav1, suggesting that Tyr-826 mediates an autoinhibitory effect on NFAT activity. SH2 profiling revealed that Shc, Csk, Abl, and Sap associate with Tyr-826, whereas SH2-B, Src, Brk, GTPase-activating protein, and phospholipase C-gamma associate with Tyr-841. Although the mutations in the Tyr-826 and Tyr-841 did not affect the binding of the carboxyl SH3 of Vav1 to other proteins, binding to several of the proteins identified by the SH2 profiling was lost. Of interest is Csk, which associates with wild-type Vav1 and Y841F, yet it fails to associate with Y826F, suggesting that loss of binding between Y826F and Csk might relieve an autoinhibitory effect, leading to increased NFAT. Our data indicate that GEF activity is critical for the function of Vav1 as a transforming protein but not for NFAT stimulation. The association of Vav1 with other proteins, detected by SH2 profiling, might affect other Vav1-dependent activities, such as NFAT stimulation.

  6. C-terminus Methionene Specifically Involved in Binding Corn Odorants to Odorant Binding Protein4 in Macrocentrus cingulum.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Tofael; Zhang, Tiantao; Wang, Zhenying; He, Kanglai; Bai, Shuxiong

    2017-01-01

    The soluble carrier proteins, OBPs carry odor components through sensilium lymph to specific receptors within the antennal sensilla to trigger behavioral responses. Herein, McinOBP4 was characterized from the Macrocentrus cingulum, which is the specialist parasitic insect of Ostrinia furnacalis for better understanding of olfactory recognition mechanism of this wasp. The classical odorant binding protein McinOBP4 showed good binding affinity to corn green leaf volatiles. RT-qPCR results showed that the McinOBP4 was primarily expressed in male and female wasp antennae, with transcripts levels differing by sex. Fluorescence assays indicate that, McinOBP4 binds corn green leaf volatiles including terpenoides and aliphatic alcohols as well as aldehydes with good affinity. We have also conducted series of binding assay with first mutant (M1), which lacked the last 8 residues and a second mutant (M2), with Met119 replaced by Leucine (Leu119). In the acidic conditions, affinity N-phenylnaphthylamine (1-NPN) to McinOBP4 and M1 were substantially decreased, but increase in basic condition with no significant differences. The lack of C-terminus showed reduced affinity to terpenoides and aliphatic alcohols as well as aldehydes compounds of corn odorants. The mutant M2 with Met119 showed significant reduction in binding affinity to tested odorants, it indicating that Met119 forming hydrophobic chain with the odorants functional group to binding. This finding provides detailed insight of chemosensory function of McinOBP4 in M. cingulum and help to develop low release agents that attract of this wasp to improve ecologically-friendly pest management strategy.

  7. Immunogenicity of novel nanoparticle-coated MSP-1 C-terminus malaria DNA vaccine using different routes of administration.

    PubMed

    Cherif, Mahamoud Sama; Shuaibu, Mohammed Nasir; Kurosaki, Tomoaki; Helegbe, Gideon Kofi; Kikuchi, Mihoko; Yanagi, Tetsuo; Tsuboi, Takafumi; Sasaki, Hitoshi; Hirayama, Kenji

    2011-11-08

    An important aspect in optimizing DNA vaccination is antigen delivery to the site of action. In this way, any alternative delivery system having higher transfection efficiency and eventual superior antibody production needs to be further explored. The novel nanoparticle, pDNA/PEI/γ-PGA complex, is one of a promising delivery system, which is taken up by cells and is shown to have high transfection efficiency. The immunostimulatory effect of this novel nanoparticle (NP) coated plasmid encoding Plasmodium yoelii MSP1-C-terminus was examined. Groups of C57BL/6 mice were immunized either with NP-coated MSP-1 plasmid, naked plasmid or NP-coated blank plasmid, by three different routes of administration; intravenous (i.v.), intraperitoneal (i.p.) and subcutaneous (s.c). Mice were primed and boosted twice at 3-week intervals, then challenged 2 weeks after; and 100%, 100% and 50% mean of survival was observed in immunized mice with coated DNA vaccine by i.p., i.v. and s.c., respectively. Coated DNA vaccine showed significant immunogenicity and elicited protective levels of antigen specific IgG and its subclass antibody, an increased proportion of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells and INF-γ and IL-12 levels in the serum and cultured splenocyte supernatant, as well as INF-γ producing cells in the spleen. We demonstrate that, NP-coated MSP-1 DNA-based vaccine confers protection against lethal P. yoelii challenge in murine model across the various route of administration and may therefore, be considered a promising delivery system for vaccination.

  8. Structural Studies of the Nedd4 WW Domains and Their Selectivity for the Connexin43 (Cx43) Carboxyl Terminus.

    PubMed

    Spagnol, Gaelle; Kieken, Fabien; Kopanic, Jennifer L; Li, Hanjun; Zach, Sydney; Stauch, Kelly L; Grosely, Rosslyn; Sorgen, Paul L

    2016-04-01

    Neuronal precursor cell-expressed developmentally down-regulated 4 (Nedd4) was the first ubiquitin protein ligase identified to interact with connexin43 (Cx43), and its suppressed expression results in accumulation of gap junction plaques at the plasma membrane. Nedd4-mediated ubiquitination of Cx43 is required to recruit Eps15 and target Cx43 to the endocytic pathway. Although the Cx43 residues that undergo ubiquitination are still unknown, in this study we address other unresolved questions pertaining to the molecular mechanisms mediating the direct interaction between Nedd4 (WW1-3 domains) and Cx43 (carboxyl terminus (CT)). All three WW domains display a similar three antiparallel β-strand structure and interact with the same Cx43CT(283)PPXY(286)sequence. Although Tyr(286)is essential for the interaction, MAPK phosphorylation of the preceding serine residues (Ser(P)(279)and Ser(P)(282)) increases the binding affinity by 2-fold for the WW domains (WW2 > WW3 ≫ WW1). The structure of the WW2·Cx43CT(276-289)(Ser(P)(279), Ser(P)(282)) complex reveals that coordination of Ser(P)(282)with the end of β-strand 3 enables Ser(P)(279)to interact with the back face of β-strand 3 (Tyr(286)is on the front face) and loop 2, forming a horseshoe-shaped arrangement. The close sequence identity of WW2 with WW1 and WW3 residues that interact with the Cx43CT PPXY motif and Ser(P)(279)/Ser(P)(282)strongly suggests that the significantly lower binding affinity of WW1 is the result of a more rigid structure. This study presents the first structure illustrating how phosphorylation of the Cx43CT domain helps mediate the interaction with a molecular partner involved in gap junction regulation.

  9. The syntaxin 4 N terminus regulates its basolateral targeting by munc18c-dependent and -independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Torres, Jacqueline; Funk, Holly M; Zegers, Mirjam M P; ter Beest, Martin B A

    2011-03-25

    To generate and maintain epithelial cell polarity, specific sorting of proteins into vesicles destined for the apical and basolateral domain is required. Syntaxin 3 and 4 are apical and basolateral SNARE proteins important for the specificity of vesicle fusion at the apical and basolateral plasma membrane domains, respectively, but how these proteins are specifically targeted to these domains themselves is unclear. Munc18/SM proteins are potential regulators of this process. Like syntaxins, they are crucial for exocytosis and vesicle fusion. However, how munc18c and syntaxin 4 regulate the function of each other is unclear. Here, we investigated the requirement of syntaxin 4 in the delivery of basolateral membrane and secretory proteins, the basolateral targeting of syntaxin 4, and the role of munc18c in this targeting. Depletion of syntaxin 4 resulted in significant reduction of basolateral targeting, suggesting no compensation by other syntaxin forms. Mutational analysis identified amino acids Leu-25 and to a lesser extent Val-26 as essential for correct localization of syntaxin 4. Recently, it was shown that the N-terminal peptide of syntaxin 4 is involved in binding to munc18c. A mutation in this region that affects munc18c binding shows that munc18c binding is required for stabilization of syntaxin 4 at the plasma membrane but not for its correct targeting. We conclude that the N terminus serves two functions in membrane targeting. First, it harbors the sorting motif, which targets syntaxin 4 basolaterally in a munc18c-independent manner and second, it allows for munc18c binding, which stabilizes the protein in a munc18c-dependent manner.

  10. NF90 Binds the Dengue Virus RNA 3′ Terminus and Is a Positive Regulator of Dengue Virus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Gehrke, Lee

    2011-01-01

    Background Viral RNA translation and replication are regulated by sequence and structural elements in the 5′ and 3′ untranslated regions (UTR) and by host cell and/or viral proteins that bind them. Dengue virus has a single-stranded RNA genome with positive polarity, a 5′ m7GpppG cap, and a conserved 3′-terminal stem loop (SL) that is linked to proposed functions in viral RNA transcription and translation. Mechanisms explaining the contributions of host proteins to viral RNA translation and replication are poorly defined, yet understanding host protein-viral RNA interactions may identify new targets for therapeutic intervention. This study was directed at identifying functionally significant host proteins that bind the conserved dengue virus RNA 3′ terminus. Methodology/Principal Findings Proteins eluted from a dengue 3′ SL RNA affinity column at increasing ionic strength included two with double-strand RNA binding motifs (NF90/DRBP76 and DEAH box polypeptide 9/RNA helicase A (RHA)), in addition to NF45, which forms a heterodimer with NF90. Although detectable NF90 and RHA proteins localized to the nucleus of uninfected cells, immunofluorescence revealed cytoplasmic NF90 in dengue virus-infected cells, leading us to hypothesize that NF90 has a functional role(s) in dengue infections. Cells depleted of NF90 were used to quantify viral RNA transcript levels and production of infectious dengue virus. NF90 depletion was accompanied by a 50%-70% decrease in dengue RNA levels and in production of infectious viral progeny. Conclusions/Significance The results indicate that NF90 interacts with the 3′ SL structure of the dengue RNA and is a positive regulator of dengue virus replication. NF90 depletion diminished the production of infectious dengue virus by more than 50%, which may have important significance for identifying therapeutic targets to limit a virus that threatens more than a billion people worldwide. PMID:21386893

  11. Atomic Structure and Biochemical Characterization of an RNA Endonuclease in the N Terminus of Andes Virus L Protein.

    PubMed

    Fernández-García, Yaiza; Reguera, Juan; Busch, Carola; Witte, Gregor; Sánchez-Ramos, Oliberto; Betzel, Christian; Cusack, Stephen; Günther, Stephan; Reindl, Sophia

    2016-06-01

    Andes virus (ANDV) is a human-pathogenic hantavirus. Hantaviruses presumably initiate their mRNA synthesis by using cap structures derived from host cell mRNAs, a mechanism called cap-snatching. A signature for a cap-snatching endonuclease is present in the N terminus of hantavirus L proteins. In this study, we aimed to solve the atomic structure of the ANDV endonuclease and characterize its biochemical features. However, the wild-type protein was refractory to expression in Escherichia coli, presumably due to toxic enzyme activity. To circumvent this problem, we introduced attenuating mutations in the domain that were previously shown to enhance L protein expression in mammalian cells. Using this approach, 13 mutant proteins encompassing ANDV L protein residues 1-200 were successfully expressed and purified. Protein stability and nuclease activity of the mutants was analyzed and the crystal structure of one mutant was solved to a resolution of 2.4 Å. Shape in solution was determined by small angle X-ray scattering. The ANDV endonuclease showed structural similarities to related enzymes of orthobunya-, arena-, and orthomyxoviruses, but also differences such as elongated shape and positively charged patches surrounding the active site. The enzyme was dependent on manganese, which is bound to the active site, most efficiently cleaved single-stranded RNA substrates, did not cleave DNA, and could be inhibited by known endonuclease inhibitors. The atomic structure in conjunction with stability and activity data for the 13 mutant enzymes facilitated inference of structure-function relationships in the protein. In conclusion, we solved the structure of a hantavirus cap-snatching endonuclease, elucidated its catalytic properties, and present a highly active mutant form, which allows for inhibitor screening.

  12. A sequence upstream of canonical PDZ-binding motif within CFTR COOH-terminus enhances NHERF1 interaction.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Neeraj; LaRusch, Jessica; Sosnay, Patrick R; Gottschalk, Laura B; Lopez, Andrea P; Pellicore, Matthew J; Evans, Taylor; Davis, Emily; Atalar, Melis; Na, Chan-Hyun; Rosson, Gedge D; Belchis, Deborah; Milewski, Michal; Pandey, Akhilesh; Cutting, Garry R

    2016-12-01

    The development of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) targeted therapy for cystic fibrosis has generated interest in maximizing membrane residence of mutant forms of CFTR by manipulating interactions with scaffold proteins, such as sodium/hydrogen exchange regulatory factor-1 (NHERF1). In this study, we explored whether COOH-terminal sequences in CFTR beyond the PDZ-binding motif influence its interaction with NHERF1. NHERF1 displayed minimal self-association in blot overlays (NHERF1, Kd = 1,382 ± 61.1 nM) at concentrations well above physiological levels, estimated at 240 nM from RNA-sequencing and 260 nM by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry in sweat gland, a key site of CFTR function in vivo. However, NHERF1 oligomerized at considerably lower concentrations (10 nM) in the presence of the last 111 amino acids of CFTR (20 nM) in blot overlays and cross-linking assays and in coimmunoprecipitations using differently tagged versions of NHERF1. Deletion and alanine mutagenesis revealed that a six-amino acid sequence (1417)EENKVR(1422) and the terminal (1478)TRL(1480) (PDZ-binding motif) in the COOH-terminus were essential for the enhanced oligomerization of NHERF1. Full-length CFTR stably expressed in Madin-Darby canine kidney epithelial cells fostered NHERF1 oligomerization that was substantially reduced (∼5-fold) on alanine substitution of EEN, KVR, or EENKVR residues or deletion of the TRL motif. Confocal fluorescent microscopy revealed that the EENKVR and TRL sequences contribute to preferential localization of CFTR to the apical membrane. Together, these results indicate that COOH-terminal sequences mediate enhanced NHERF1 interaction and facilitate the localization of CFTR, a property that could be manipulated to stabilize mutant forms of CFTR at the apical surface to maximize the effect of CFTR-targeted therapeutics.

  13. beta-2,2-Amino Acid N-Carboxy Anhydrides Relying on Sequential Enantioselective C(4)-Functionalization of Pyrrolidin-2,3-diones and Regioselective Baeyer-Villiger Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Palomo, Claudio; Mielgo, Antonia; Olaizola, Iurre; Vázquez, Ana; Badiola, Eider; Vera, Silvia

    2017-02-28

    A catalytic enantioselective entry to beta-2,2-amino acids enabling their direct coupling with nucleophiles is described. The approach is based upon an effective bifunctional Brønsted base catalyzed construction of a quaternary carbon stereocenter at C4 position of pyrrolidin-2,3-diones. Subsequent regioselective Baeyer-Villiger oxidation of the resultant adducts gives beta-2,2-amino acid N-carboxy anhydrides as the reactive species, which can further react with nucleophiles. Following this strategy both, 2,2-amino acid derivatives with different functionalities at the newly created stereocenter, and spirocyclic structures can be efficiently prepared.

  14. Mutations in the catalytic core or the C-terminus of murine leukemia virus (MLV) integrase disrupt virion infectivity and exert diverse effects on reverse transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Steinrigl, Adolf; Nosek, Dagmara; Ertl, Reinhard; Guenzburg, Walter H.; Salmons, Brian; Klein, Dieter . E-mail: dieter.klein@vu-wien.ac.at

    2007-05-25

    Understanding of the structures and functions of the retroviral integrase (IN), a key enzyme in the viral replication cycle, is essential for developing antiretroviral treatments and facilitating the development of safer gene therapy vehicles. Thus, four MLV IN-mutants were constructed in the context of a retroviral vector system, harbouring either a substitution in the catalytic centre, deletions in the C-terminus, or combinations of both modifications. IN-mutants were tested for their performance in different stages of the viral replication cycle: RNA-packaging; RT-activity; transient and stable infection efficiency; dynamics of reverse transcription and nuclear entry. All mutant vectors packaged viral RNA with wild-type efficiencies and displayed only slight reductions in RT-activity. Deletion of either the IN C-terminus alone, or in addition to part of the catalytic domain exerted contrasting effects on intracellular viral DNA levels, implying that IN influences reverse transcription in more than one direction.

  15. Interaction of a peptide derived from C-terminus of human TRPA1 channel with model membranes mimicking the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Witschas, Katja; Jobin, Marie-Lise; Korkut, Dursun Nizam; Vladan, Maria Magdalena; Salgado, Gilmar; Lecomte, Sophie; Vlachova, Viktorie; Alves, Isabel D

    2015-05-01

    The transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 channel (TRPA1) belongs to the TRP cation channel superfamily that responds to a panoply of stimuli such as changes in temperature, calcium levels, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species and lipid mediators among others. The TRP superfamily has been implicated in diverse pathological states including neurodegenerative disorders, kidney diseases, inflammation, pain and cancer. The intracellular C-terminus is an important regulator of TRP channel activity. Studies with this and other TRP superfamily members have shown that the C-terminus association with lipid bilayer alters channel sensitivity and activation, especially interactions occurring through basic residues. Nevertheless, it is not yet clear how this process takes place and which regions in the C-terminus would be responsible for such membrane recognition. With that in mind, herein the first putative membrane interacting region of the C-terminus of human TRPA1, (corresponding to a 29 residue peptide, IAEVQKHASLKRIAMQVELHTSLEKKLPL) named H1 due to its potential helical character was chosen for studies of membrane interaction. The affinity of H1 to lipid membranes, H1 structural changes occurring upon this interaction as well as effects of this interaction in lipid organization and integrity were investigated using a biophysical approach. Lipid models systems composed of zwitterionic and anionic lipids, namely those present in the lipid membrane inner leaflet, where H1 is prone to interact, where used. The study reveals a strong interaction and affinity of H1 as well as peptide structuration especially with membranes containing anionic lipids. Moreover, the interactions and peptide structure adoption are headgroup specific.

  16. The N terminus of type III secretion needle protein YscF from Yersinia pestis functions to modulate innate immune responses.

    PubMed

    Osei-Owusu, Patrick; Jessen Condry, Danielle L; Toosky, Melody; Roughead, William; Bradley, David S; Nilles, Matthew L

    2015-04-01

    The type III secretion system is employed by many pathogens, including the genera Yersinia, Shigella, Pseudomonas, and Salmonella, to deliver effector proteins into eukaryotic cells. The injectisome needle is formed by the polymerization of a single protein, e.g., YscF (Yersinia pestis), PscF (Pseudomonas aeruginosa), PrgI (Salmonella enterica SPI-1), SsaG (Salmonella enterica SPI-2), or MxiH (Shigella flexneri). In this study, we demonstrated that the N termini of some needle proteins, particularly the N terminus of YscF from Yersinia pestis, influences host immune responses. The N termini of several needle proteins were truncated and tested for the ability to induce inflammatory responses in a human monocytic cell line (THP-1 cells). Truncated needle proteins induced proinflammatory cytokines to different magnitudes than the corresponding wild-type proteins, except SsaG. Notably, N-terminally truncated YscF induced significantly higher activation of NF-κB and/or AP-1 and higher induction of proinflammatory cytokines, suggesting that a function of the N terminus of YscF is interference with host sensing of YscF, consistent with Y. pestis pathogenesis. To directly test the ability of the N terminus of YscF to suppress cytokine induction, a YscF-SsaG chimera with 15 N-terminal amino acids from YscF added to SsaG was constructed. The chimeric YscF-SsaG induced lower levels of cytokines than wild-type SsaG. However, the addition of 15 random amino acids to SsaG had no effect on NF-κB/AP-1 activation. These results suggest that the N terminus of YscF can function to decrease cytokine induction, perhaps contributing to a favorable immune environment leading to survival of Y. pestis within the eukaryotic host.

  17. The N Terminus of Type III Secretion Needle Protein YscF from Yersinia pestis Functions To Modulate Innate Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Osei-Owusu, Patrick; Jessen Condry, Danielle L.; Toosky, Melody; Roughead, William; Bradley, David S.

    2015-01-01

    The type III secretion system is employed by many pathogens, including the genera Yersinia, Shigella, Pseudomonas, and Salmonella, to deliver effector proteins into eukaryotic cells. The injectisome needle is formed by the polymerization of a single protein, e.g., YscF (Yersinia pestis), PscF (Pseudomonas aeruginosa), PrgI (Salmonella enterica SPI-1), SsaG (Salmonella enterica SPI-2), or MxiH (Shigella flexneri). In this study, we demonstrated that the N termini of some needle proteins, particularly the N terminus of YscF from Yersinia pestis, influences host immune responses. The N termini of several needle proteins were truncated and tested for the ability to induce inflammatory responses in a human monocytic cell line (THP-1 cells). Truncated needle proteins induced proinflammatory cytokines to different magnitudes than the corresponding wild-type proteins, except SsaG. Notably, N-terminally truncated YscF induced significantly higher activation of NF-κB and/or AP-1 and higher induction of proinflammatory cytokines, suggesting that a function of the N terminus of YscF is interference with host sensing of YscF, consistent with Y. pestis pathogenesis. To directly test the ability of the N terminus of YscF to suppress cytokine induction, a YscF-SsaG chimera with 15 N-terminal amino acids from YscF added to SsaG was constructed. The chimeric YscF-SsaG induced lower levels of cytokines than wild-type SsaG. However, the addition of 15 random amino acids to SsaG had no effect on NF-κB/AP-1 activation. These results suggest that the N terminus of YscF can function to decrease cytokine induction, perhaps contributing to a favorable immune environment leading to survival of Y. pestis within the eukaryotic host. PMID:25644012

  18. PtdIns(4,5)P2 interacts with CaM binding domains on TRPM3 N-terminus.

    PubMed

    Holendova, Blanka; Grycova, Lenka; Jirku, Michaela; Teisinger, Jan

    2012-01-01

    TRPM3 has been reported to play an important role in Ca(2+) homeostasis, but its gating mechanisms and regulation via Ca(2+) are unknown. Ca(2+) binding proteins such as calmodulin (CaM) could be probable modulators of this ion channel. We have shown that this protein binds to two independent domains, A35-K124 and H291-G382 on the TRPM3 N-terminus, which contain conserved hydrophobic as well as positively charged residues in specific positions, and that these residues have a crucial impact on its binding. We also showed that the other Ca(2+) binding protein, S100A1, is able to bind to these regions and that CaM and S100A1 compete for these binding sites on the TRPM3 N-terminus. Moreover, our results suggest that another very important TRP channel activity modulator, PtdIns(4,5)P(2), interacts with the CaM/S100A1 binding sites on the TRPM3 N-terminus with high affinity.

  19. Importance of two consecutive methionines at the N-terminus of a cellulose synthase (PtdCesA8A) for normal wood cellulose synthesis in aspen.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yunxia; Xu, Fuyu; Gou, Jiqing; Al-Haddad, Jameel; Telewski, Frank W; Bae, Hyeun-Jong; Joshi, Chandrashekhar P

    2012-11-01

    All known orthologs of a secondary wall-associated cellulose synthase (CesA) gene from Arabidopsis, AtCesA8, encode CesA proteins with two consecutive methionines at their N-termini (MM or 2M). Here, we report that these 2Ms in an aspen ortholog of AtCesA8, PtdCesA8A, are important for maintaining normal wood cellulose biosynthesis in aspen trees. Overexpression of an altered PtdCesA8A cDNA encoding a PtdCesA8A protein missing one methionine at the N-terminus (1M) in aspen resulted in substantial decrease in cellulose content and caused negative effects on wood strength, suggesting that both methionines are essential for proper CesA expression and function in developing xylem tissues. Transcripts from a pair of paralogous native PtdCesA8 genes, as well as introduced PtdCesA8A:1M transgenes were significantly reduced in developing xylem tissues of transgenic aspen plants, suggestive of a co-suppression event. Overexpression of a native PtdCesA8A cDNA encoding a CesA protein with 2Ms at the N-terminus did not cause any such phenotypic changes. These results suggest the importance of 2Ms present at the N-terminus of PtdCesA8A protein during cellulose synthesis in aspen.

  20. The extreme carboxyl terminus of the equine herpesvirus 1 homolog of herpes simplex virus VP16 is essential for immediate-early gene activation.

    PubMed

    Elliott, G D

    1994-08-01

    Gene 12 of equine herpesvirus 1 (EHV-1), the homolog of herpes simplex virus (HSV) VP16 (alpha TIF, Vmw65), was cloned into a eukaryotic expression vector by PCR and used in transactivation studies of both the EHV-1 and HSV-1 IE1 promoters. Results demonstrated that the product of gene 12 is a potent transactivator of immediate-early gene expression of both viruses, which requires sequences in the upstream HSV-1 promoter for activity. Mutational analysis of the gene 12 open reading frame indicated that removal of the C-terminal 7 amino acids, which contain a short region of homology with the extreme C terminus of VP16, inactivated the protein. Within this region, only a single methionine residue appeared to be essential for activity, implying that gene 12 may have a modular array of organization similar to that of VP16. However, fusion of the gene 12 C terminus to a truncated form of VP16, which contained the complex formation domain, did not restore activity to the HSV-1 protein. These data demonstrate that the EHV-1 immediate-early transactivator may not be functionally colinear with VP16, with transactivation requiring both the C terminus and another region(s) present within the N-terminal portion.

  1. Conserved amino acids within the N-terminus of the West Nile virus NS4A protein contribute to virus replication, protein stability and membrane proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Ambrose, R.L.; Mackenzie, J.M.

    2015-07-15

    The West Nile virus strain Kunjin virus (WNV{sub KUN}) NS4A protein is a multifunctional protein involved in many aspects of the virus life-cycle and is a major component of the WNV{sub KUN} replication complex (RC). Previously we identified a conserved region in the C-terminus of NS4A regulating proteolytic processing and RC assembly, and now investigate key conserved residues in the N-terminus of NS4A and their contribution to WNV{sub KUN} replication. Mutation of P13 completely ablated replication, whereas, mutation of P48 and D49, near the first transmembrane helix, and G66 within the helix, showed variable defects in replication, virion secretion and membrane proliferation. Intriguingly, the P48 and G66 NS4A mutants resulted in specific proteasome depletion of NS4A that could in part be rescued with a proteasome inhibitor. Our results suggest that the N-terminus of NS4A contributes to correct folding and stability, essential for facilitating the essential roles of NS4A during replication. - Highlights: • Mutation of Proline13 of the WNV NS4A protein is lethal to replication. • 1st TMB helix of NS4A contributes to protein stability and membrane remodelling. • Unstable mutants of NS4A can be rescued with a proteasome inhibitor. • This study (and of others) contributes to a functional mapping of the NS4A protein.

  2. The N-terminus of the Montano virus nucleocapsid protein possesses broadly cross-reactive conformation-dependent epitopes conserved in rodent-borne hantaviruses.

    PubMed

    Saasa, Ngonda; Yoshida, Haruka; Shimizu, Kenta; Sánchez-Hernández, Cornelio; Romero-Almaraz, María de Lourdes; Koma, Takaaki; Sanada, Takahiro; Seto, Takahiro; Yoshii, Kentaro; Ramos, Celso; Yoshimatsu, Kumiko; Arikawa, Jiro; Takashima, Ikuo; Kariwa, Hiroaki

    2012-06-20

    The hantavirus nucleocapsid (N) protein is an important immunogen that stimulates a strong and cross-reactive immune response in humans and rodents. A large proportion of the response to N protein has been found to target its N-terminus. However, the exact nature of this bias towards the N-terminus is not yet fully understood. We characterized six monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against the N protein of Montano virus (MTNV), a Mexican hantavirus. Five of these mAbs recognized eight American hantaviruses and six European and Asian hantaviruses, but not the Soricomorpha-borne Thottapalayam hantavirus. The N protein-reactive binding regions of the five mAbs were mapped to discontinuous epitopes within the N-terminal 13-51 amino acid residues, while a single serotype-specific mAb was mapped to residues 1-25 and 49-75. Our findings suggest that discontinuous epitopes at the N-terminus are conserved, at least in rodent-borne hantaviruses, and that they contribute considerably to N protein cross-reactivity.

  3. Revisiting Mitochondrial pH with an Improved Algorithm for Calibration of the Ratiometric 5(6)-carboxy-SNARF-1 Probe Reveals Anticooperative Reaction with H+ Ions and Warrants Further Studies of Organellar pH

    PubMed Central

    Żurawik, Tomasz Michał; Pomorski, Adam; Belczyk-Ciesielska, Agnieszka; Goch, Grażyna; Niedźwiedzka, Katarzyna; Kucharczyk, Róża; Krężel, Artur; Bal, Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence measurements of pH and other analytes in the cell rely on accurate calibrations, but these have routinely used algorithms that inadequately describe the properties of indicators. Here, we have established a more accurate method for calibrating and analyzing data obtained using the ratiometric probe 5(6)-carboxy-SNARF-1. We tested the implications of novel approach to measurements of pH in yeast mitochondria, a compartment containing a small number of free H+ ions. Our findings demonstrate that 5(6)-carboxy-SNARF-1 interacts with H+ ions inside the mitochondria in an anticooperative manner (Hill coefficient n of 0.5) and the apparent pH inside the mitochondria is ~0.5 unit lower than had been generally assumed. This result, at odds with the current consensus on the mechanism of energy generation in the mitochondria, is in better agreement with theoretical considerations and warrants further studies of organellar pH. PMID:27557123

  4. The membrane insertion of helical antimicrobial peptides from the N-terminus of Helicobacter pylori ribosomal protein L1.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tzong-Hsien; Hall, Kristopher N; Swann, Marcus J; Popplewell, Jonathan F; Unabia, Sharon; Park, Yoonkyung; Hahm, Kyung-Soo; Aguilar, Marie-Isabel

    2010-03-01

    The interaction of two helical antimicrobial peptides, HPA3 and HPA3P with planar supported lipid membranes was quantitatively analysed using two complementary optical biosensors. The peptides are analogues of Hp(2-20) derived from the N-terminus of Helicobacter pylori ribosomal protein L1 (RpL1). The binding of these two peptide analogues to zwitterionic dimyristoyl-phosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and negatively charged membranes composed of DMPC/dimyristoylphosphatidylglycerol (DMPG) (4:1) was determined using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and dual polarisation interferometry (DPI). Using SPR analysis, it was shown that the proline substitution in HPA3P resulted in much lower binding for both zwitterionic and anionic membranes than HPA3. Structural changes in the planar DMPC and DMPC/DMPG (4:1) bilayers induced by the binding of both Hp(2-20) analogues were then resolved in real-time with DPI. The overall process of peptide-induced changes in membrane structure was analysed by the real-time changes in bound peptide mass as a function of bilayer birefringence. The insertion of both HPA3 and HPA3P into the supported lipid bilayers resulted in a decrease in birefringence with increasing amounts of bound peptide which reflects a decrease in the order of the bilayer. The binding of HPA3 to each membrane was associated with a higher level of bound peptide and greater membrane lipid disordering and a faster and higher degree of insertion into the membrane than HPA3P. Furthermore, the binding of both HPA3 and HPA3P to negatively charged DMPC/DMPG bilayers also leads to a greater disruption of the lipid ordering. These results demonstrate the geometrical changes in the membrane upon peptide insertion and the extent of membrane structural changes can be obtained quantitatively. Moreover, monitoring the effect of peptides on a structurally characterised bilayer has provided further insight into the role of membrane structure changes in the molecular basis of peptide

  5. Seismicity of the diffusive Iberian/African plate boundary at the eastern terminus of the Azores-Gibraltar Transform fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange, D.; Grevemeyer, I.; Matias, L. M.

    2014-12-01

    The plate boundary at the eastern terminus of the Azores-Gibraltar transform fault between Africa and Iberia is poorly defined. The deformation in the area is forced by the slow NW-SE convergence of 4 mm/yr between the oceanic domains of Iberia/Eurasia and Africa and is accommodated over a 200 km broad tectonically-active deformation zone. The region, however, is also characterized by large earthquakes, such as the 1969 Mw=7.9 Horseshoe event and the November 1, 1755 Great Lisbon earthquake with an estimated magnitude of Mw~8.5. The exact location of the source of the 1755 Lisbon earthquake is still unknown. Recent work may suggest that the event occurred in the vicinity of the Horseshoe fault, an oblique thrust fault. However, estimates of tsunami arrival times suggested a source near the Gorringe Bank, a ~180 km-long and ~70 km-wide ridge that has a relieve of ~5000 m. Deep Sea Drilling (DSDP) and rock samples indicated that the bank is mainly composed of serpentinized peridotites with gabbroic intrusions, perhaps being created by overthrusting of the Horseshoe Abyssal Plain onto the Tagus Abyssal Plain in NW direction. Further, the Horseshoe Abyssal Plain is marked by the presence of compressive structures with a roughly NE-SW orientation and E-W trending, segmented, crustal-scale, strike slip faults that extend from the Gorringe Bank to the Gibraltar Arc in the eastern Gulf of Cadiz, which were called "South West Iberian Margin" or SWIM faults. The fault system may mark a developing Eurasia-Africa plate boundary. Two local seismic networks were operated in the area. First, a network of 14 ocean-bottom seismometers (OBS) was operated between April and October 2012 in the vicinity of the Horseshoe fault between 10°W to 11°W, and 35°50'N to 36°10'N. From October 2013 to March 2014 a second network of 15 OBS monitored seismicity at the Gorringe Bank. Both networks benefitted from seismic stations operated in Portugal. The first network provided in the order of

  6. Potentiation of Neuronal Nicotinic Receptors by 17β-Estradiol: Roles of the Carboxy-Terminal and the Amino-Terminal Extracellular Domains

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xiaochun; Steinbach, Joe Henry

    2015-01-01

    The endogenous steroid 17β-estradiol (βEST) potentiates activation of neuronal nicotinic receptors containing α4 subunits. Previous work has shown that the final 4 residues of the α4 subunit are required for potentiation. However, receptors containing the α2 subunit are not potentiated although it has these 4 residues, and only one amino acid difference in the C-terminal tail (FLAGMI vs. WLAGMI). Previous work had indicated that the tryptophan residue was involved in binding an analog of βEST, but not in potentiation by βEST. To determine the structural basis for the loss of potentiation we analyzed data from chimeric subunits, which indicated that the major factor underlying the difference between α2 and α4 is the tryptophan/phenylalanine difference, while the N-terminal extracellular domain is a less significant factor. When the tryptophan in α4 was mutated, both phenylalanine and tyrosine conferred lower potentiation while lysine and leucine did not. The reduction reflected a reduced maximal magnitude of potentiation, indicating that the tryptophan is involved in transduction of steroid effects. The regions of the α4 N-terminal extracellular domain involved in potentiation lie near the agonist-binding pocket, rather than close to the membrane or the C-terminal tail, and appear to be involved in transduction rather than binding. These observations indicate that the C-terminal region is involved in both steroid binding (AGMI residues) and transduction (W). The role of the N-terminus appears to be independent of the C-terminal tryptophan and likely reflects an influence on conformational changes caused during channel activation by agonist and potentiation by estradiol. PMID:26684647

  7. Urinary excretion profiles of 11-nor-9-carboxy-delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol and 11-hydroxy-delta9-THC: cannabinoid metabolites to creatinine ratio study IV.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Albert D; Worth, David

    2004-07-16

    The objective of this study was to compare urinary excretion patterns of two cannabinoid metabolites in subjects with a history of chronic marijuana use. The first metabolite analyzed was nor-9-carboxy-delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta9-THC-COOH), the major urinary cannabinoid metabolite that is pharmacologically inactive. The second metabolite 11-OH-delta9-THC is an active cannabinoid metabolite and is not routinely measured. Urine specimens were collected from four subjects on 12-20 occasions > or = 96 h apart in an uncontrolled clinical setting. Creatinine was analyzed in each urine specimen by the colorimetric modified Jaffé reaction on a SYVA 30R biochemical analyzer. All urine specimens analyzed for 11-OH-delta9-THC had screened positive for cannabinoids with the EMIT II Plus cannabinoids assay (cut-off 50 ng/mL) on a SYVA 30R analyzer and submitted for delta9-THC-COOH confirmation by GC-MS (cut-off concentration 15 ng/mL). Eleven-OH-delta9-THC was measured by GC-MS with a cut-off concentration of 3 ng/mL. Both GC-MS methods for cannabinoid metabolites used deuterated internal standards for quantitative analysis. The mean (range) of urinary delta9-THC-COOH concentration was 1153 ng/mL (78.7-2634) with a cut-off of 15 ng/mL. The mean (range) of delta9-THC-COOH/creatinine ratios (ng/mL delta9-THC-COOH/mmol/L creatinine) was 84.1 (8.1-122.1). The mean (range) urinary of 11-OH-delta9-THC concentration was 387.6 ng/mL (11.9-783) with a cut-off of 3 ng/mL, and the mean (range) of 11-OH-delta9-THC/creatinine ratio (ng/mL 11-OH-delta9-THC/mmol/L creatinine) was 29.7 (1.2-40.7). Of the 63 urine specimens submitted for delta9-THC-COOH confirmation by GC-MS, 59/63 urine specimens (94%) were positive for delta9 -THC-COOH and 51/63 (81%) were positive for 11-OH-delta9-THC. Overall, the concentrations of 11-OH-delta9-THC in urine specimens collected > or = 96 h apart were lower than delta9-THC-COOH concentrations in 50/51 of the urine specimens in this population

  8. Investigating the Cause of the 2012 Acceleration of Jakobshavn Isbræ, Greenland Using High Resolution Observations of the Glacier Terminus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassotto, R.; Fahnestock, M. A.; Boettcher, M. S.; Amundson, J. M.; Truffer, M.

    2014-12-01

    After decades of relative stability, Jakobshavn Isbræ, a tidewater glacier in West Greenland, started to destabilize at the turn of the century. The glacier thinned, the perennial tongue disintegrated, velocities doubled, and the terminus retreated. The glacier evolved over the next several years as it showed large seasonal variations in speed and a progressive kilometer-scale retreat of its calving front. Then, during the 2012 summer, Jakobshavn set a new record when its speed increased to rates more than four times the 1990s values, and consequently became the fastest glacier recorded by satellite yet. A 2-week field study was conducted along the terminus at that time; ground portable radar interferometers (GPRI), time-lapse cameras, GPS, and a tide gauge were deployed to characterize glacier dynamics along the ice-ocean boundary. We use >10,000 interferograms recorded with the terrestrial interferometers to probe the cause of this acceleration. We observe a 33% increase in glacier speed and a 250% increase in the amplitude of response to tidal forcing during our study period. We explore how the location of the terminus along the reverse bed slope contributed to the observed speedup, and we compare our findings with the long-term record of satellite observations. Our data show that understanding tidewater glacier dynamics requires knowledge of short-term variations along glacier termini that is currently not available from satellites. This study provides insight into such short-term dynamics on spatial scales comparable to satellite InSAR but with temporal resolution similar to GPS.

  9. The cytosolic C-terminus of the glucose transporter GLUT4 contains an acidic cluster endosomal targeting motif distal to the dileucine signal.

    PubMed Central

    Shewan, A M; Marsh, B J; Melvin, D R; Martin, S; Gould, G W; James, D E

    2000-01-01

    The insulin-responsive glucose transporter GLUT4 is targeted to a post-endocytic compartment in adipocytes, from where it moves to the cell surface in response to insulin. Previous studies have identified two cytosolic targeting motifs that regulate the intracellular sequestration of this protein: FQQI(5-8) in the N-terminus and LL(489,490) (one-letter amino acid notation) in the C-terminus. In the present study we show that a GLUT4 chimaera in which the C-terminal 12 amino acids in GLUT4 have been replaced with the same region from human GLUT3 is constitutively targeted to the plasma membrane when expressed in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. To further dissect this domain it was divided into three regions, each of which was mutated en bloc to alanine residues. Analysis of these constructs revealed that the targeting information is contained within the residues TELEYLGP(498-505). Using the transferrin-horseradish peroxidase endosomal ablation technique in 3T3-L1 adipocytes, we show that mutants in which this C-terminal domain has been disrupted are more sensitive to chemical ablation than wild-type GLUT4. These data indicate that GLUT4 contains a targeting signal in its C-terminus, distal to the dileucine motif, that regulates its sorting into a post-endosomal compartment. Similar membrane-distal, acidic-cluster-based motifs are found in the cytosolic tails of the insulin-responsive aminopeptidase IRAP (insulin-regulated aminopeptidase) and the proprotein convertase PC6B, indicating that this type of motif may play an important role in the endosomal sequestration of a number of different proteins. PMID:10926832

  10. The long N-terminus of the human monocarboxylate transporter 8 is a target of ubiquitin-dependent proteasomal degradation which regulates protein expression and oligomerization capacity.

    PubMed

    Zwanziger, Denise; Schmidt, Mathias; Fischer, Jana; Kleinau, Gunnar; Braun, Doreen; Schweizer, Ulrich; Moeller, Lars Christian; Biebermann, Heike; Fuehrer, Dagmar

    2016-10-15

    Monocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8) equilibrates thyroid hormones between the extra- and the intracellular sides. MCT8 exists either with a short or a long N-terminus, but potential functional differences between both variants are yet not known. We, therefore, generated MCT8 constructs which are different in N-terminal length: MCT8(1-613), MCT8(25-613), MCT8(49-613) and MCT8(75-613). The M75G substitution prevents translation of MCT8(75-613) and ensures expression of full-length MCT8 protein. The K56G substitution was made to prevent ubiquitinylation. Cell-surface expression, localization and proteasomal degradation were investigated using C-terminally GFP-tagged MCT8 constructs (HEK293 and MDCK1 cells) and oligomerization capacity was determined using N-terminally HA- and C-terminally FLAG-tagged MCT8 constructs (COS7 cells). MCT8(1-613)-GFP showed a lower protein expression than the shorter MCT8(75-613)-GFP protein. The proteasome inhibitor lactacystin increased MCT8(1-613)-GFP protein amount, suggesting proteasomal degradation of MCT8 with the long N-terminus. Ubiquitin conjugation of MCT8(1-613)-GFP was found by immuno-precipitation. A diminished ubiquitin conjugation caused by K56G substitution resulted in increased MCT8(1-613)-GFP protein expression. Sandwich ELISA was performed to investigate if the bands at higher molecular weight observed in Western blot analysis are due to MCT8 oligomerization, which was indeed shown. Our data imply a role of the long N-terminus of MCT8 as target of ubiquitin-dependent proteasomal degradation affecting MCT8 amount and subsequently oligomerization capacity.

  11. Fusing the vegetative insecticidal protein Vip3Aa7 and the N terminus of Cry9Ca improves toxicity against Plutella xylostella larvae.

    PubMed

    Dong, Fang; Shi, Ruiping; Zhang, Shanshan; Zhan, Tao; Wu, Gaobing; Shen, Jie; Liu, Ziduo

    2012-11-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis insecticidal crystal proteins (ICPs) and vegetative insecticidal proteins (VIPs) have been widely used as a kind of safe bio-insecticides. A problem that has been of concern worldwide is how to improve their insecticidal activities. In this study, to determine the synergism between VIPs and ICPs effect on insecticidal activity, a construct that produces a chimeric protein of the Vip3Aa7 and the N terminus ofCry9Ca, named V3AC9C, was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 cells. In additional experiments, the V3AC9C chimeric protein, the single Vip3Aa7, and the single N terminus of Cry9Ca were treated with trypsin. SDS-PAGE showed that the V3AC9C could be processed into two single toxins. Bioassays tested on third instar larvae of Plutella xylostella showed that the toxicity of the chimeric protein was markedly better than either of the single toxins. Interestingly, the toxicity of the chimeric protein was 3.2-fold higher than a mixture of the Vip3Aa7 and Cry9Ca toxins (mass ratio of 1:1). The synergism factor (SF) of chimeric protein containing Vip3Aa7 and Cry9Ca was calculated to be 4.79. The SF in mixture of toxins is only 1.46. Hence, the effect was more than the sum of the Vip3Aa7 and Cry9C activities. Analysis of the protein's solubility showed that the Vip3Aa7 helped the N terminus of Cry9Ca to dissolve in an alkaline buffer. It was concluded that the increase in the toxicity of the V3AC9C chimeric protein over the constituent proteins mainly resulted from this increase in solubility. These results lay a foundation for the development of a new generation of bio-insecticides and multi-gene transgenic plants.

  12. Molecular characterization of partial fusion gene and C-terminus extension length of haemagglutinin-neuraminidase gene of recently isolated Newcastle disease virus isolates in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Newcastle disease (ND), caused by Newcastle disease virus (NDV), is a highly contagious disease of birds and has been one of the major causes of economic losses in the poultry industry. Despite routine vaccination programs, sporadic cases have occasionally occurred in the country and remain a constant threat to commercial poultry. Hence, the present study was aimed to characterize NDV isolates obtained from clinical cases in various locations of Malaysia between 2004 and 2007 based on sequence and phylogenetic analysis of partial F gene and C-terminus extension length of HN gene. Results The coding region of eleven NDV isolates fusion (F) gene and carboxyl terminal region of haemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) gene including extensions were amplified by reverse transcriptase PCR and directly sequenced. All the isolates have shown to have non-synonymous to synonymous base substitution rate ranging between 0.081 - 0.264 demonstrating presence of negative selection. Analysis based on F gene showed the characterized isolates possess three different types of protease cleavage site motifs; namely 112RRQKRF117, 112RRRKRF117 and 112GRQGRL117 and appear to show maximum identities with isolates in the region such as cockatoo/14698/90 (Indonesia), Ch/2000 (China), local isolate AF2240 indicating the high similarity of isolates circulating in the South East Asian countries. Meanwhile, one of the isolates resembles commonly used lentogenic vaccine strains. On further characterization of the HN gene, Malaysian isolates had C-terminus extensions of 0, 6 and 11 amino acids. Analysis of the phylogenetic tree revealed that the existence of three genetic groups; namely, genotype II, VII and VIII. Conclusions The study concluded that the occurrence of three types of NDV genotypes and presence of varied carboxyl terminus extension lengths among Malaysian isolates incriminated for sporadic cases. PMID:20691110

  13. Characterization of the banana streak virus capsid protein and mapping of the immunodominant continuous B-cell epitopes to the surface-exposed N terminus.

    PubMed

    Vo, Jenny N; Campbell, Paul R; Mahfuz, Nur N; Ramli, Ras; Pagendam, Daniel; Barnard, Ross; Geering, Andrew D W

    2016-12-01

    This study identified the structural proteins of two badnavirus species, Banana streak MY virus (BSMYV) and Banana streak OL virus (BSOLV), and mapped the distribution of continuous B-cell epitopes. Two different capsid protein (CP) isoforms of about 44 and 40 kDa (CP1 and CP2) and the virion-associated protein (VAP) were consistently associated with purified virions. For both viral species, the N terminus of CP2 was successfully sequenced by Edman degradation but that of CP1 was chemically blocked. De novo peptide sequencing of tryptic digests suggested that CP1 and CP2 derive from the same region of the P3 polyprotein but differ in the length of either the N or the C terminus. A three-dimensional model of the BSMYV-CP was constructed, which showed that the CP is a multi-domain structure, containing homologues of the retroviral capsid and nucleocapsid proteins, as well as a third, intrinsically disordered protein region at the N terminus, henceforth called the NID domain. Using the Pepscan approach, the immunodominant continuous epitopes were mapped to the NID domain for five different species of banana streak virus. Anti-peptide antibodies raised against these epitopes in BSMYV were successfully used for detection of native virions and denatured CPs in serological assays. Immunoelectron microscopy analysis of the virion surface using the anti-peptide antibodies confirmed that the NID domain is exposed on the surface of virions, and that the difference in mass of the two CP isoforms is due to variation in length of the NID domain.

  14. Crystal Structure of the Conserved Amino Terminus of the Extracellular Domain of Matrix Protein 2 of Influenza A Virus Gripped by an Antibody.

    PubMed

    Cho, Ki Joon; Schepens, Bert; Moonens, Kristof; Deng, Lei; Fiers, Walter; Remaut, Han; Saelens, Xavier

    2015-10-14

    We report the crystal structure of the M2 ectodomain (M2e) in complex with a monoclonal antibody that binds the amino terminus of M2. M2e extends into the antibody binding site to form an N-terminal β-turn near the bottom of the paratope. This M2e folding differs significantly from that of M2e in complex with an antibody that binds another part of M2e. This suggests that M2e can adopt at least two conformations that can elicit protective antibodies.

  15. The detection of Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and 11-nor-9-carboxy-Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THCA) in whole blood using two-dimensional gas chromatography and EI-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Scurlock, Rodger D; Ohlson, Greg B; Worthen, David K

    2006-05-01

    A method is described for the simultaneous analysis of Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and its carboxylic acid metabolite, 11-nor-9-carboxy-Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THCA) as their trimethylsiyl derivatives using 2-dimensional chromatography and electron ionization-mass spectrometric detection. The addition of a Deans switch to a standard GC oven allows the use of two chromatographic columns of differing stationary phase to greatly reduce matrix interference. The analytes are extracted from 1 mL of whole blood by first precipitating the blood proteins with the addition of acetonitrile followed by solid-phase extraction. The limit of quantitation for both THC and THCA was determined to be 1.0 ng/mL. The between-run precision at 1.0 ng/mL (N = 30) was 7.7% and 7.4% for THC and THCA, respectively. The method is linear from 1 to 100 ng/mL.

  16. A simple hydrated salt with a complex hydrogen-bonding network: tetrakis(5-amino-3-carboxy-4H-1,2,4-triazol-1-ium) hexachloridocadmate(II) tetrahydrate.

    PubMed

    Bouchene, Rafika; Bouacida, Sofiane; Berrah, Fadila; Roisnel, Thierry

    2014-07-01

    In the title cadmium chloride salt, (C3H5N4O2)4[CdCl6]·4H2O, the asymmetric unit comprises two N-protonated 5-amino-3-carboxy-4H-1,2,4-triazol-1-ium cations, half a [CdCl6](4-) anion and two molecules of water. The Cd(2+) cation is located on a centre of inversion and is coordinated by six chloride anions, forming a distorted octahedron. In the crystal structure, alternating layers of cations and anions are arranged along the [101] direction, forming a three-dimensional supramolecular network via a combination of hydrogen-bonding and aromatic stacking interactions.

  17. Inhibition of the tyrosine kinase activity of v-src, v-fgr, and v-yes gene products by a monoclonal antibody which binds both amino and carboxy peptide fragments of pp60v-src.

    PubMed Central

    McCarley, D J; Parsons, J T; Benjamin, D C; Parsons, S J

    1987-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody, R2D2, raised to the src gene product of Rous sarcoma virus was found to inhibit the tyrosine protein kinase activity of pp60v-src in autophosphorylation reactions and in reactions involving exogenously added substrates, such as casein and histone. R2D2 also inhibited the enzymatic activity of two related viral transforming proteins, pp70gag-fgr and pp90gag-yes. The inhibitory ability of R2D2 was dependent upon immunoglobulin concentration and could be demonstrated in both immune complexes formed directly with R2D2 and preformed immune complexes to which R2D2 was added. Binding sites in both the amino-terminal 110 amino acid residues and the carboxy-terminal 240 amino acids of pp60v-src were identified for R2D2. These results indicate that at least part of the epitope recognized by R2D2 resides within a region of the src protein which is required for protein kinase activity. The localization of the R2D2 epitope to the amino- as well as to the carboxy-terminal portions of pp60v-src, together with results of studies analyzing the relative binding efficiencies of R2D2 to the intact protein and to V-8 proteolytic fragments of pp60v-src, are consistent with the view that the R2D2 epitope is conformational in nature and that it is assembled from residues contained within both N-terminal and C-terminal regions of the molecule. Images PMID:2437325

  18. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of the Escherichia coli outer membrane cobalamin transporter BtuB in complex with the carboxy-terminal domain of TonB

    SciTech Connect

    Shultis, David D.; Purdy, Michael D.; Banchs, Christian N.; Wiener, Michael C.

    2006-07-01

    Crystals of a complex of the E. coli proteins BtuB (outer membrane cobalamin transporter) and TonB (carboxy-terminal domain) diffracting to 2.1 Å resolution have been obtained. The energy-dependent uptake of organometallic compounds and other micronutrients across the outer membranes of Gram-negative bacteria is carried out by outer membrane active-transport proteins that utilize the proton-motive force of the inner membrane via coupling to the TonB protein. The Escherichia coli outer membrane cobalamin transporter BtuB and a carboxy-terminal domain of the TonB protein, residues 147–239 of the wild-type protein, were expressed and purified individually. A complex of BtuB and TonB{sup 147–239} was formed in the presence of the substrate cyanocobalamin (CN-Cbl; vitamin B{sub 12}) and calcium and was crystallized. BtuB was purified in the detergent LDAO (n-dodecyl-N,N-dimethylamine-N-oxide) and the complex was formed in a detergent mixture of LDAO and C{sub 8}E{sub 4} (tetraethylene glycol monooctylether). Crystals were obtained by sitting-drop vapor diffusion, with the reservoir containing 30%(v/v) polyethylene glycol (PEG 300) and 100 mM sodium acetate pH 5.2. The crystals belong to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1} (unit-cell parameters a = 74.3, b = 82.4, c = 122.6 Å). The asymmetric unit consists of a single BtuB–TonB complex. Data sets have been collected to 2.1 Å resolution at a synchrotron beamline (APS SER-CAT 22-ID)

  19. Substrate evokes translocation of both domains in the mitochondrial processing peptidase alpha-subunit during which the C-terminus acts as a stabilizing element.

    PubMed

    Janata, Jirí; Holá, Klára; Kubala, Martin; Gakh, Oleksandr; Parkhomenko, Natalya; Matusková, Anna; Kutejová, Eva; Amler, Evzen

    2004-03-26

    All three tryptophan residues in alpha-subunit of mitochondrial processing peptidase (MPP) were subsequently substituted. While substitutions of Trp223 led to misfolded non-functional protein, mutations of Trp147 and/or Trp481 did not affect the enzyme processing activity. Thus, fluorescence properties of the mutants with fewer tryptophans were used for observation of both alpha-MPP domain translocation and visualization of conformational changes in the interdomain linker evoked by substrate. We found that in the presence of substrate the C-terminal penultimate Trp481 was approaching Trp223, which is localized at the border of N-terminal domain and interdomain linker. Also, excision of the alpha-MPP C-terminal 30 amino acid residues (DeltaC30) led to a complete loss of protein function. Even shorter deletions of the alpha-MPP C-terminus destabilized the protein slightly (DeltaC2) or dramatically (DeltaC17). It suggests that the extreme C-terminus of alpha-MPP provides mechanical support to the C-terminal domain during its extensive conformational change accompanying the substrate recognition process.

  20. Septal localization by membrane targeting sequences and a conserved sequence essential for activity at the COOH-terminus of Bacillus subtilis cardiolipin synthase.

    PubMed

    Kusaka, Jin; Shuto, Satoshi; Imai, Yukiko; Ishikawa, Kazuki; Saito, Tomo; Natori, Kohei; Matsuoka, Satoshi; Hara, Hiroshi; Matsumoto, Kouji

    2016-04-01

    The acidic phospholipid cardiolipin (CL) is localized on polar and septal membranes and plays an important physiological role in Bacillus subtilis cells. ClsA, the enzyme responsible for CL synthesis, is also localized on septal membranes. We found that GFP fusion proteins of the enzyme with NH2-terminal and internal deletions retained septal localization. However, derivatives with deletions starting from the COOH-terminus (Leu482) ceased to localize to the septum once the deletion passed the Ile residue at 448, indicating that the sequence responsible for septal localization is confined within a short distance from the COOH-terminus. Two sequences, Ile436-Leu450 and Leu466-Leu478, are predicted to individually form an amphipathic α-helix. This configuration is known as a membrane targeting sequence (MTS) and we therefore refer to them as MTS2 and MTS1, respectively. Either one has the ability to affect septal localization, and each of these sequences by itself localizes to the septum. Membrane association of the constructs of this enzyme containing the MTSs was verified by subcellular fractionation of the cells. CL synthesis, in contrast, was abolished after deleting just the last residue, Leu482, in the COOH-terminal four amino acid residue sequence, Ser-Pro-Ile-Leu, which is highly conserved among bacterial CL synthases.

  1. NMR structure and functional characteristics of the hydrophilic N terminus of the potassium channel beta-subunit Kvbeta1.1.

    PubMed

    Wissmann, R; Baukrowitz, T; Kalbacher, H; Kalbitzer, H R; Ruppersberg, J P; Pongs, O; Antz, C; Fakler, B

    1999-12-10

    Rapid N-type inactivation of voltage-dependent potassium (Kv) channels controls membrane excitability and signal propagation in central neurons and is mediated by protein domains (inactivation gates) occluding the open channel pore from the cytoplasmic side. Inactivation domains (ID) are donated either by the pore-forming alpha-subunit or certain auxiliary beta-subunits. Upon coexpression, Kvbeta1.1 was found to endow non-inactivating members of the Kv1alpha family with fast inactivation via its unique N terminus. Here we investigated structure and functional properties of the Kvbeta1.1 N terminus (amino acids 1-62, betaN-(1-62)) using NMR spectroscopy and patch clamp recordings. betaN-(1-62) showed all hallmarks of N-type inactivation: it inactivated non-inactivating Kv1.1 channels when applied to the cytoplasmic side as a synthetic peptide, and its interaction with the alpha-subunit was competed with tetraethylammonium and displayed an affinity in the lower micromolar range. In aequous and physiological salt solution, betaN-(1-62) showed no well defined three-dimensional structure, it rather existed in a fast equilibrium of multiple weakly structured states. These structural and functional properties of betaN-(1-62) closely resemble those of the "unstructured" ID from Shaker B, but differ markedly from those of the compactly folded ID of the Kv3.4 alpha-subunit.

  2. The carboxyl terminus of the chemokine receptor CCR3 contains distinct domains which regulate chemotactic signaling and receptor down-regulation in a ligand-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Sabroe, Ian; Jorritsma, Annelies; Stubbs, Victoria E L; Xanthou, Georgina; Jopling, Louise A; Ponath, Paul D; Williams, Timothy J; Murphy, Philip M; Pease, James E

    2005-04-01

    The chemokine receptor CCR3 regulates the chemotaxis of leukocytes implicated in allergic disease, such as eosinophils. Incubation of eosinophils with CCL11, CCL13 or CCL5 resulted in a rapid decrease of cell-surface CCR3 which was replicated using CCR3 transfectants. Progressive truncation of the CCR3 C terminus by 15 amino acids produced three constructs, Delta340, Delta325 and Delta310. Delta340 and Delta325 were able to bind CCL11 with affinities similar to wild-type CCR3. Delta340 transfectants exhibited enhanced migration and reduced receptor down-regulation in response to CCL11 and CCL13. Delta325 transfectants displayed chemotactic responses to CCL11 and CCL13 similar to wild-type CCR3, and had impaired down-regulation when stimulated with CCL13 but not CCL11. In contrast, neither the Delta325 nor Delta340 truncation affected chemotaxis or receptor down-regulation induced by CCL5. Delta310 transfectants bound CCL11 poorly and were biologically inactive. Inhibitors of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and PI3-kinase antagonized eosinophil shape change responses and chemotaxis of transfectants to CCL11 and CCL13. In contrast, shape change but not chemotaxis was sensitive to inhibition of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase kinase pathway suggesting differential regulation of the two responses. Thus, the CCR3 C terminus contains distinct domains responsible for the regulation of receptor desensitization and for coupling to chemotactic responses.

  3. The carboxyl terminus of FANCE recruits FANCD2 to the Fanconi Anemia (FA) E3 ligase complex to promote the FA DNA repair pathway.

    PubMed

    Polito, David; Cukras, Scott; Wang, Xiaozhe; Spence, Paige; Moreau, Lisa; D'Andrea, Alan D; Kee, Younghoon

    2014-03-07

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a genome instability syndrome characterized by bone marrow failure and cellular hypersensitivity to DNA cross-linking agents. In response to DNA damage, the FA pathway is activated through the cooperation of 16 FA proteins. A central player in the pathway is a multisubunit E3 ubiquitin ligase complex or the FA core complex, which monoubiquitinates its substrates FANCD2 and FANCI. FANCE, a subunit of the FA core complex, plays an essential role by promoting the integrity of the complex and by directly recognizing FANCD2. To delineate its role in substrate ubiquitination from the core complex assembly, we analyzed a series of mutations within FANCE. We report that a phenylalanine located at the highly conserved extreme C terminus, referred to as Phe-522, is a critical residue for mediating the monoubiquitination of the FANCD2-FANCI complex. Using the FANCE mutant that specifically disrupts the FANCE-FANCD2 interaction as a tool, we found that the interaction-deficient mutant conferred cellular sensitivity in reconstituted FANCE-deficient cells to a similar degree as FANCE null cells, suggesting the significance of the FANCE-FANCD2 interaction in promoting cisplatin resistance. Intriguingly, ectopic expression of the FANCE C terminus fragment alone in FA normal cells disrupts DNA repair, consolidating the importance of the FANCE-FANCD2 interaction in the DNA cross-link repair.

  4. Allosteric coupling between proximal C-terminus and selectivity filter is facilitated by the movement of transmembrane segment 4 in TREK-2 channel

    PubMed Central

    Zhuo, Ren-Gong; Peng, Peng; Liu, Xiao-Yan; Yan, Hai-Tao; Xu, Jiang-Ping; Zheng, Jian-Quan; Wei, Xiao-Li; Ma, Xiao-Yun

    2016-01-01

    TREK-2, a member of two-pore-domain potassium channel family, regulates cellular excitability in response to diverse stimuli. However, how such stimuli control channel function remains unclear. Here, by characterizing the responses of cytosolic proximal C-terminus deletant (ΔpCt) and transmembrane segment 4 (M4)-glycine hinge mutant (G312A) to 2-Aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB), an activator of TREK-2, we show that the transduction initiated from pCt domain is allosterically coupled with the conformation of selectivity filter (SF) via the movements of M4, without depending on the original status of SF. Moreover, ΔpCt and G312A also exhibited blunted responses to extracellular alkalization, a model to induce SF conformational transition. These results suggest that the coupling between pCt domain and SF is bidirectional, and M4 movements are involved in both processes. Further mechanistic exploration reveals that the function of Phe316, a residue close to the C-terminus of M4, is associated with such communications. However, unlike TREK-2, M4-hinge of TREK-1 only controls the transmission from pCt to SF, rather than SF conformational changes triggered by pHo changes. Together, our findings uncover the unique gating properties of TREK-2, and elucidate the mechanisms for how the extracellular and intracellular stimuli harness the pore gating allosterically. PMID:26879043

  5. A potyvirus vector efficiently targets recombinant proteins to chloroplasts, mitochondria and nuclei in plant cells when expressed at the amino terminus of the polyprotein.

    PubMed

    Majer, Eszter; Navarro, José-Antonio; Daròs, José-Antonio

    2015-09-01

    Plant virus-based expression systems allow quick and efficient production of recombinant proteins in plant biofactories. Among them, a system derived from tobacco etch virus (TEV; genus potyvirus) permits coexpression of equimolar amounts of several recombinant proteins. This work analyzed how to target recombinant proteins to different subcellular localizations in the plant cell using this system. We constructed TEV clones in which green fluorescent protein (GFP), with a chloroplast transit peptide (cTP), a nuclear localization signal (NLS) or a mitochondrial targeting peptide (mTP) was expressed either as the most amino-terminal product or embedded in the viral polyprotein. Results showed that cTP and mTP mediated efficient translocation of GFP to the corresponding organelle only when present at the amino terminus of the viral polyprotein. In contrast, the NLS worked efficiently at both positions. Viruses expressing GFP in the amino terminus of the viral polyprotein produced milder symptoms. Untagged GFPs and cTP and NLS tagged amino-terminal GFPs accumulated to higher amounts in infected tissues. Finally, viral progeny from clones with internal GFPs maintained the extra gene better. These observations will help in the design of potyvirus-based vectors able to coexpress several proteins while targeting different subcellular localizations, as required in plant metabolic engineering.

  6. Targeting of Arabidopsis KNL2 to Centromeres Depends on the Conserved CENPC-k Motif in Its C Terminus[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Talbert, Paul; Demidov, Dmitri

    2017-01-01

    KINETOCHORE NULL2 (KNL2) is involved in recognition of centromeres and in centromeric localization of the centromere-specific histone cenH3. Our study revealed a cenH3 nucleosome binding CENPC-k motif at the C terminus of Arabidopsis thaliana KNL2, which is conserved among a wide spectrum of eukaryotes. Centromeric localization of KNL2 is abolished by deletion of the CENPC-k motif and by mutating single conserved amino acids, but can be restored by insertion of the corresponding motif of Arabidopsis CENP-C. We showed by electrophoretic mobility shift assay that the C terminus of KNL2 binds DNA sequence-independently and interacts with the centromeric transcripts in vitro. Chromatin immunoprecipitation with anti-KNL2 antibodies indicated that in vivo KNL2 is preferentially associated with the centromeric repeat pAL1. Complete deletion of the CENPC-k motif did not influence its ability to interact with DNA in vitro. Therefore, we suggest that KNL2 recognizes centromeric nucleosomes, similar to CENP-C, via the CENPC-k motif and binds adjoining DNA. PMID:28062749

  7. A C-terminal Hydrophobic, Solvent-protected Core and a Flexible N-terminus are Potentially Required for Human Papillomavirus 18 E7 Protein Functionality

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, S.; Tian, Y; Greenaway, F; Sun, M

    2010-01-01

    The oncogenic potential of the high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) relies on the expression of genes specifying the E7 and E6 proteins. To investigate further the variation in oligomeric structure that has been reported for different E7 proteins, an HPV-18 E7 cloned from a Hispanic woman with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia was purified to homogeneity most probably as a stable monomeric protein in aqueous solution. We determined that one zinc ion is present per HPV-18 E7 monomer by amino acid and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy analysis. Intrinsic fluorescence and circular dichroism spectroscopic results indicate that the zinc ion is important for the correct folding and thermal stability of HPV-18 E7. Hydroxyl radical mediated protein footprinting coupled to mass spectrometry and other biochemical and biophysical data indicate that near the C-terminus, the four cysteines of the two Cys-X{sub 2}-Cys motifs that are coordinated to the zinc ion form a solvent inaccessible core. The N-terminal LXCXE pRb binding motif region is hydroxyl radical accessible and conformationally flexible. Both factors, the relative flexibility of the pRb binding motif at the N-terminus and the C-terminal metal-binding hydrophobic solvent-protected core, combine together and facilitate the biological functions of HPV-18 E7.

  8. Positively charged amino acids at the SNAP-25 C terminus determine fusion rates, fusion pore properties, and energetics of tight SNARE complex zippering.

    PubMed

    Fang, Qinghua; Zhao, Ying; Herbst, Adam Drew; Kim, Brian N; Lindau, Manfred

    2015-02-18

    SNAP-25 is a Q-SNARE protein mediating exocytosis of neurosecretory vesicles including chromaffin granules. Previous results with a SNAP-25 construct lacking the nine C terminal residues (SNAP-25Δ9) showed changed fusion pore properties (Fang et al., 2008), suggesting a model for fusion pore mechanics that couple C terminal zipping of the SNARE complex to the opening of the fusion pore. The deleted fragment contains the positively charged residues R198 and K201, adjacent to layers 7 and 8 of the SNARE complex. To determine how fusion pore conductance and dynamics depend on these residues, single exocytotic events in bovine chromaffin cells expressing R198Q, R198E, K201Q, or K201E mutants were investigated by carbon fiber amperometry and cell-attached patch capacitance measurements. Coarse grain molecular dynamics simulations revealed spontaneous transitions between a loose and tightly zippered state at the SNARE complex C terminus. The SNAP-25 K201Q mutant showed no changes compared with SNAP-25 wild-type. However, K201E, R198Q, and R198E displayed reduced release frequencies, slower release kinetics, and prolonged fusion pore duration that were correlated with reduced probability to engage in the tightly zippered state. The results show that the positively charged amino acids at the SNAP-25 C terminus promote tight SNARE complex zippering and are required for high release frequency and rapid release in individual fusion events.

  9. Enhanced Polysaccharide Binding and Activity on Linear β-Glucans through Addition of Carbohydrate-Binding Modules to Either Terminus of a Glucooligosaccharide Oxidase.

    PubMed

    Foumani, Maryam; Vuong, Thu V; MacCormick, Benjamin; Master, Emma R

    2015-01-01

    The gluco-oligosaccharide oxidase from Sarocladium strictum CBS 346.70 (GOOX) is a single domain flavoenzyme that favourably oxidizes gluco- and xylo- oligosaccharides. In the present study, GOOX was shown to also oxidize plant polysaccharides, including cellulose, glucomannan, β-(1→3,1→4)-glucan, and xyloglucan, albeit to a lesser extent than oligomeric substrates. To improve GOOX activity on polymeric substrates, three carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs) from Clostridium thermocellum, namely CtCBM3 (type A), CtCBM11 (type B), and CtCBM44 (type B), were separately appended to the amino and carboxy termini of the enzyme, generating six fusion proteins. With the exception of GOOX-CtCBM3 and GOOX-CtCBM44, fusion of the selected CBMs increased the catalytic activity of the enzyme (kcat) on cellotetraose by up to 50%. All CBM fusions selectively enhanced GOOX binding to soluble and insoluble polysaccharides, and the immobilized enzyme on a solid cellulose surface remained stable and active. In addition, the CBM fusions increased the activity of GOOX on soluble glucomannan by up to 30% and on insoluble crystalline as well as amorphous cellulose by over 50%.

  10. Enhanced Polysaccharide Binding and Activity on Linear β-Glucans through Addition of Carbohydrate-Binding Modules to Either Terminus of a Glucooligosaccharide Oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Foumani, Maryam; Vuong, Thu V.; MacCormick, Benjamin; Master, Emma R.

    2015-01-01

    The gluco-oligosaccharide oxidase from Sarocladium strictum CBS 346.70 (GOOX) is a single domain flavoenzyme that favourably oxidizes gluco- and xylo- oligosaccharides. In the present study, GOOX was shown to also oxidize plant polysaccharides, including cellulose, glucomannan, β-(1→3,1→4)-glucan, and xyloglucan, albeit to a lesser extent than oligomeric substrates. To improve GOOX activity on polymeric substrates, three carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs) from Clostridium thermocellum, namely CtCBM3 (type A), CtCBM11 (type B), and CtCBM44 (type B), were separately appended to the amino and carboxy termini of the enzyme, generating six fusion proteins. With the exception of GOOX-CtCBM3 and GOOX-CtCBM44, fusion of the selected CBMs increased the catalytic activity of the enzyme (kcat) on cellotetraose by up to 50%. All CBM fusions selectively enhanced GOOX binding to soluble and insoluble polysaccharides, and the immobilized enzyme on a solid cellulose surface remained stable and active. In addition, the CBM fusions increased the activity of GOOX on soluble glucomannan by up to 30 % and on insoluble crystalline as well as amorphous cellulose by over 50 %. PMID:25932926

  11. The C-terminus of the {gamma}2 chain but not of the {beta}3 chain of laminin-332 is indirectly but indispensably necessary for integrin-mediated cell reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Navdaev, Alexei; Heitmann, Vanessa; Santana Evangelista, Karla de; Moergelin, Matthias; Wegener, Joachim; Eble, Johannes A.

    2008-02-01

    Using a recombinant mini-laminin-332, we showed that truncation of the three C-terminal amino acids of the {gamma}2 chain, but not of the C-terminal amino acid of the {beta}3 chain, completely abolished {alpha}3{beta}1 integrin binding and its cellular functions, such as attachment and spreading. However, a synthetic peptide mimicking the {gamma}2 chain C-terminus did not interfere with {alpha}3{beta}1 integrin binding or cell adhesion and spreading on laminin-332 as measured by protein interaction assays and electric cell-substrate impedance sensing. Nor was the soluble peptide able to restore the loss of integrin-mediated cell adhesiveness to mini-laminin-332 after deletion of the {gamma}2 chain C-terminus. These findings spoke against the hypothesis that the {gamma}2 chain C-terminus of laminin-332 is a part of the {alpha}3{beta}1 integrin interaction site. In addition, structural studies with electron microscopy showed that truncation of the {gamma}2 chain C-terminus opened up the compact supradomain structure of LG1-3 domains. Thus, by inducing or stabilizing an integrin binding-competent conformation or array of the LG1-3 domains, the {gamma}2 chain C-terminus plays an indirect but essential role in laminin-332 recognition by {alpha}3{beta}1 integrin and, hence, its cellular functions.

  12. A Novel CaV1.2 N Terminus Expressed in Smooth Muscle Cells of Resistance Size Arteries Modifies Channel Regulation by Auxiliary Subunits*S

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xiaoyang; Liu, Jianxi; Asuncion-Chin, Maria; Blaskova, Eva; Bannister, John P.; Dopico, Alejandro M.; Jaggar, Jonathan H.

    2008-01-01

    Voltage-dependent L-type Ca2+ (CaV1.2) channels are the principal Ca2+ entry pathway in arterial myocytes. CaV1.2 channels regulate multiple vascular functions and are implicated in the pathogenesis of human disease, including hypertension. However, the molecular identity of CaV1.2 channels expressed in myocytes of myogenic arteries that regulate vascular pressure and blood flow is unknown. Here, we cloned CaV1.2 subunits from resistance size cerebral arteries and demonstrate that myocytes contain a novel, cysteine rich N terminus that is derived from exon 1 (termed “exon 1c”), which is located within CACNA1C, the CaV1.2 gene. Quantitative PCR revealed that exon 1c was predominant in arterial myocytes, but rare in cardiac myocytes, where exon 1a prevailed. When co-expressed with α2δ subunits, CaV1.2 channels containing the novel exon 1c-derived N terminus exhibited: 1) smaller whole cell current density, 2) more negative voltages of half activation (V1/2,act) and half-inactivation (V1/2,inact), and 3) reduced plasma membrane insertion, when compared with channels containing exon 1b. β1b and β2a subunits caused negative shifts in the V1/2,act and V1/2,inact of exon 1b-containing CaV1.2α1/α2δ currents that were larger than those in exon 1c-containing CaV1.2α1/α2δ currents. In contrast, β3 similarly shifted V1/2,act and V1/2,inact of currents generated by exon 1b- and exon 1c-containing channels. β subunits isoform-dependent differences in current inactivation rates were also detected between N-terminal variants. Data indicate that through novel alternative splicing at exon 1, the CaV1.2 N terminus modifies regulation by auxiliary subunits. The novel exon 1c should generate distinct voltage-dependent Ca2+ entry in arterial myocytes, resulting in tissue-specific Ca2+ signaling. PMID:17699517

  13. The C-Terminus of Glutathione S-Transferase A1-1 Is Required for Entropically-Driven Ligand Binding†

    PubMed Central

    Nieslanik, Brenda S.; Ibarra, Catherine; Atkins, William M.

    2007-01-01

    Binding of a hydrophobic glutathione product conjugate to rGST A1-1 proceeds via a two-step mechanism, including rapid ligand docking, followed by a slow isomerization to the final [GST·ligand] complex, which involves the localization of the flexible C-terminal helix. These kinetically resolved steps have been observed previously by stopped-flow fluorescence with the wild-type rGST A1-1, which contains a native Trp-21 approximately 20 Å from the ligand binding site at the intrasubunit domain–domain interface. To confirm this binding mechanism, as well as elucidate the effects of truncation of the C-terminus, we have further characterized the binding and dissociation of the glutathione–ethacrynic acid product conjugate (GS-EA) to wild-type, F222W:W21F, and Δ209–222 rGST A1-1 and wild-type hGST A1-1. Although modest kinetic differences were observed between the hGST A1-1 and rGST A1-1, stopped-flow binding studies with GS-EA verified that the two-step mechanism of ligand binding is not unique to the GST A1-1 isoform from rat. An F222W:W21F rGST A1-1 double mutant provides a direct fluorescence probe of changes in the environment of the C-terminal residue. The observation of two relaxation times during ligand binding and dissociation to F222W:W21F suggests that the C-terminus has an intermediate conformation following ligand docking, which is distinct from its conformation in the apoenzyme or localized helical state. For the wild-type, Δ209–222, and F222W:W21F proteins, variable-temperature stopped-flow experiments were performed and activation parameters calculated for the individual steps of the binding reaction. Activation parameters for the binding reaction coordinate illustrate that the C-terminus provides a significant entropic contribution to ligand binding, which is completely realized within the initial docking step of the binding mechanism. In contrast, the slow isomerization step is enthalpically driven. The partitioning of entropic and

  14. Role of Cysteine Residues in the Carboxyl-Terminus of the Follicle-Stimulating Hormone Receptor in Intracellular Traffic and Postendocytic Processing

    PubMed Central

    Melo-Nava, Brenda; Casas-González, Patricia; Pérez-Solís, Marco A.; Castillo-Badillo, Jean; Maravillas-Montero, José L.; Jardón-Valadez, Eduardo; Zariñán, Teresa; Aguilar-Rojas, Arturo; Gallay, Nathalie; Reiter, Eric; Ulloa-Aguirre, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Posttranslational modifications occurring during the biosynthesis of G protein-coupled receptors include glycosylation and palmitoylation at conserved cysteine residues located in the carboxyl-terminus of the receptor. In a number of these receptors, these modifications play an important role in receptor function and particularly, in intracellular trafficking. In the present study, the three cysteine residues present in the carboxyl-terminus of the human FSHR were replaced with glycine by site-directed mutagenesis. Wild-type and mutant (Cys627/629/655Gly) FSHRs were then transiently expressed in HEK-293 cells and analyzed for cell-surface plasma membrane expression, agonist-stimulated signaling and internalization, and postendocytic processing in the absence and presence of lysosome and/or proteasome inhibitors. Compared with the wild-type FSHR, the triple mutant FSHR exhibited ~70% reduction in plasma membrane expression as well as a profound attenuation in agonist-stimulated cAMP production and ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Incubation of HEK-293 cells expressing the wild-type FSHR with 2-bromopalmitate (palmitoylation inhibitor) for 6 h, decreased plasma membrane expression of the receptor by ~30%. The internalization kinetics and β-arrestin 1 and 2 recruitment were similar between the wild-type and triple mutant FSHR as disclosed by assays performed in non-equilibrium binding conditions and by confocal microscopy. Cells expressing the mutant FSHR recycled the internalized FSHR back to the plasma membrane less efficiently than those expressing the wild-type FSHR, an effect that was counteracted by proteasome but not by lysosome inhibition. These results indicate that replacement of the cysteine residues present in the carboxyl-terminus of the FSHR, impairs receptor trafficking from the endoplasmic reticulum/Golgi apparatus to the plasma membrane and its recycling from endosomes back to the cell surface following agonist-induced internalization. Since in the FSHR these

  15. The phosphorylated C-terminus of cAR1 plays a role in cell-type-specific gene expression and STATa tyrosine phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Briscoe, C; Moniakis, J; Kim, J Y; Brown, J M; Hereld, D; Devreotes, P N; Firtel, R A

    2001-05-01

    cAMP receptors mediate some signaling pathways via coupled heterotrimeric G proteins, while others are G-protein-independent. This latter class includes the activation of the transcription factors GBF and STATa. Within the cellular mounds formed by aggregation of Dictyostelium, micromolar levels of cAMP activate GBF function, thereby inducing the transcription of postaggregative genes and initiating multicellular differentiation. Activation of STATa, a regulator of culmination and ecmB expression, results from cAMP receptor-dependent tyrosine phosphorylation and nuclear localization, also in mound-stage cells. During mound development, the cAMP receptor cAR1 is in a low-affinity state and is phosphorylated on multiple serine residues in its C-terminus. This paper addresses possible roles of cAMP receptor phosphorylation in the cAMP-mediated stimulation of GBF activity, STATa tyrosine phosphorylation, and cell-type-specific gene expression. To accomplish this, we have expressed cAR1 mutants in a strain in which the endogenous cAMP receptors that mediate postaggregative gene expression in vivo are deleted. We then examined the ability of these cells to undergo morphogenesis and induce postaggregative and cell-type-specific gene expression and STATa tyrosine phosphorylation. Analysis of cAR1 mutants in which the C-terminal tail is deleted or the ligand-mediated phosphorylation sites are mutated suggests that the cAR1 C-terminus is not essential for GBF-mediated postaggregative gene expression or STATa tyrosine phosphorylation, but may play a role in regulating cell-type-specific gene expression and morphogenesis. A mutant receptor, in which the C-terminal tail is constitutively phosphorylated, exhibits constitutive activation of STATa tyrosine phosphorylation in pulsed cells in suspension and a significantly impaired ability to induce cell-type-specific gene expression. The constitutively phosphorylated receptor also exerts a partial dominant negative effect on

  16. Atomistic Simulations of Complex DNA DSBs and the Interactions with Ku70/80 Heterodimer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Shaowen; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2011-01-01

    Compared to DNA with simple DSBs, the complex lesions can enhance the hydrogen bonds opening rate at the DNA terminus, and increase the mobility of the whole duplex. Binding of Ku drastically reduces the structural disruption and flexibility caused by the complex lesions. In all complex DSBs systems, the binding of DSB terminus with Ku70 is softened while the binding of the middle duplex with Ku80 is tightened. Binding of Ku promotes the rigidity of DNA duplexes, due to the clamp structure of the inner surface of the rings of Ku70/80.

  17. ATP-dependent unwinding of U4/U6 snRNAs by the Brr2 helicase requires the C terminus of Prp8.

    PubMed

    Maeder, Corina; Kutach, Alan K; Guthrie, Christine

    2009-01-01

    The spliceosome is a highly dynamic machine requiring multiple RNA-dependent ATPases of the DExD/H-box family. A fundamental unanswered question is how their activities are regulated. Brr2 function is necessary for unwinding the U4/U6 duplex, a step essential for catalytic activation of the spliceosome. Here we show that Brr2-dependent dissociation of U4/U6 snRNAs in vitro is activated by a fragment from the C terminus of the U5 snRNP protein Prp8. In contrast to its helicase-stimulating activity, this fragment inhibits Brr2 U4/U6-dependent ATPase activity. Notably, U4/U6 unwinding activity is not stimulated by fragments carrying alleles of prp8 that in humans confers an autosomal dominant form of retinitis pigmentosa. Because Brr2 activity must be restricted to prevent premature catalytic activation, our results have important implications for fidelity maintenance in the spliceosome.

  18. Extended C-terminus and length of the linker connecting the G-domains are species-specific variations in the EngA family of GTPases.

    PubMed

    Tomar, Sushil Kumar; Kumar, Prashant; Majumdar, Soneya; Bhaskar, Varun; Dutta, Prasun; Prakash, Balaji

    2012-01-01

    EngA is an essential protein involved in ribosome biogenesis. It is an unique GTPase, possessing two consecutive G-domains. Using sequence and phylogenetic analysis, we found two intriguing variants among EngA homologues - one with a shorter linker joining the G-domains and another with a longer linker, which additionally possesses an extended C-terminus. Interestingly, while the former variant is mainly restricted to firmicutes, the latter is found in nonfirmicutes. Chimeric proteins with interchanged linkers and extensions were generated to gauge the importance of these elements. Ribosome interaction experiments employing the chimeric proteins suggest that a precise combination of the linker and C-terminal extension are important features regulating EngA ribosome interactions in a variant-specific manner.

  19. Evolution of seismicity near the southernmost terminus of the San Andreas Fault: Implications of recent earthquake clusters for earthquake risk in southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauksson, Egill; Meier, Men-Andrin; Ross, Zachary E.; Jones, Lucile M.

    2017-02-01

    Three earthquake clusters that occurred in the direct vicinity of the southern terminus of the San Andreas Fault (SAF) in 2001, 2009, and 2016 raised significant concern regarding possible triggering of a major earthquake on the southern SAF, which has not ruptured in more than 320 years. These clusters of small and moderate earthquakes with M ≤ 4.8 added to an increase in seismicity rate in the northern Brawley seismic zone that began after the 1979 Mw 6.5 Imperial Valley earthquake, in contrast to the quiet from 1932 to 1979. The clusters so far triggered neither small nor large events on the SAF. The mostly negative Coulomb stress changes they imparted on the SAF may have reduced the likelihood that the events would initiate rupture on the SAF, although large magnitude earthquake triggering is poorly understood. The relatively rapid spatial and temporal migration rates within the clusters imply aseismic creep as a possible driver rather than fluid migration.

  20. Characterization of a nuclear localization signal in the C-terminus of the adeno-associated virus Rep68/78 proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Cassell, Geoffrey D.; Weitzman, Matthew D. . E-mail: weitzman@salk.edu

    2004-10-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) replicates in the nucleus of infected cells, and therefore multiple nuclear import events are required for productive infection. We analyzed nuclear import of the viral Rep proteins and characterized a nuclear localization signal (NLS) in the C-terminus. We demonstrate that basic residues in this region constitute an NLS that is transferable and mediates interaction with the nuclear import receptor importin {alpha} in vitro. Mutant Rep proteins are predominantly cytoplasmic and are severely compromised for interactions with importin {alpha}, but retain their enzymatic functions in vitro. Interestingly, mutations of the NLS had significantly less effect on importin {alpha} interaction and replication in the context of Rep78 than when incorporated into the Rep68 protein. Together, our results demonstrate that a bipartite NLS exists in the shared part of Rep68 and Rep78, and suggest that an alternate entry mechanism may also contribute to nuclear localization of the Rep78 protein.

  1. Stent-Assisted Coil Embolization of a Wide-Neck Aneurysm at the Vertebral Artery Terminus Using a Contralateral Approach: A Technical Report

    PubMed Central

    Ibeh, Chinwe; Shah, Qaisar A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Aneurysms of the vertebrobasilar junction (VBJ) are especially uncommon but carry a significant risk of hemorrhage and historically have been difficult to treat. In recent years, however, advancements in stent-assisted embolization have allowed better access and stabilization of complicated posterior circulation aneurysms. Methods We describe a novel approach in the treatment of a wide-neck aneurysm at the terminus of the left vertebral artery by a contralateral approach in a patient with ipsilateral subclavian artery occlusion. Results A complex, wide-neck aneurysm at the verterbrobasilar junction hindered by ipsilateral subclavian occlusion can successfully be treated with stent-assisted coil embolization using a contralateral approach. Conclusion Contralateral U-shaped stenting offers a viable endovascular option for patients with complex aneurysms of the vertebral basilar junction but should be reserved for appropriate cases with favorable anatomy when the ipsilateral approach from the subclavian artery is unobtainable. PMID:26060520

  2. Fine-mapping of the B-cell epitope domain at the N-terminus of the preS2 region of the hepatitis B surface antigen.

    PubMed

    Sominskaya, Irina; Paulij, Wilma; Jansons, Juris; Sobotta, Dirk; Dreilina, Dzidra; Sunnen, Cecile; Meisel, Helga; Gerlich, Wolfram H; Pumpens, Paul

    2002-02-01

    In this study, we report the exact localization and substitutional characterization of a B-cell epitope domain at the N-terminus of the preS2 region of the hepatitis B surface antigen. A set of deletion variants containing preS2 sequences of different length was generated on the basis of frCP as a carrier. It was found after Western blot analysis that three monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) (2-11B1, 3-11C2, HB.OT10) recognized the linear preS2 sequence within the amino acid (aa) stretch 3-WNSTTFHQTLQDP-13. The importance of each aa residue of the epitope was proved by comparison of antibody binding to alanine-substituted peptides in both free-peptide and Pepscan variants.

  3. The effect of structural differences in the reducing terminus of sugars on the binding affinity of carbohydrates and proteins analyzed using photoaffinity labeling.

    PubMed

    Ohtsuka, Isao; Sadakane, Yutaka; Higuchi, Mari; Hada, Noriyasu; Hada, Junko; Kakiuchi, Nobuko; Sakushima, Akiyo

    2011-01-15

    Because carbohydrates and proteins bind with such low affinity, the nature of their interactions is not clear. Photoaffinity labeling with diazirin groups is useful for elucidating the roles of carbohydrates in these binding processes. However, when carbohydrate probes are synthesized according to this conventional method, the reducing terminus of the sugar is opened to provide an acyclic structure. Because greater elucidation of carbohydrate-protein interactions requires a closed-ring carbohydrate in addition to the photoreactive group, we synthesized new molecular tools. The carbohydrate ligands were synthesized in three steps (glycosylation with allyl alcohol, deprotection, and ozonolysis). Specific binding proteins for carbohydrate ligands were obtained by photoaffinity labeling. Closed ring-type carbohydrate ligands, in which the reducing sugar is closed, bound to lectins more strongly than open ring-type sugars. Carbohydrate to protein binding was observed using AFM.

  4. Aspartic acid-484 of nascent placental alkaline phosphatase condenses with a phosphatidylinositol glycan to become the carboxyl terminus of the mature enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    Micanovic, R; Bailey, C A; Brink, L; Gerber, L; Pan, Y C; Hulmes, J D; Udenfriend, S

    1988-01-01

    A carboxyl-terminal chymotryptic peptide from mature human placental alkaline phosphatase was purified by HPLC and monitored by a specific RIA. Sequencing and amino acid assay showed that the carboxyl terminus of the peptide was aspartic acid, representing residue 484 of the proenzyme as deduced from the corresponding cDNA. Further analysis of the peptide showed it to be a peptidoglycan containing one residue of ethanolamine, one residue of glucosamine, and two residues of neutral hexose. The inositol glycan is apparently linked to the alpha carboxyl group of the aspartic acid through the ethanolamine. Location of the inositol glycan on Asp-484 of the proenzyme indicates that a 29-residue peptide is cleaved from the nascent protein during the post-translational condensation with the phosphatidylinositol-glycan. PMID:3422741

  5. The C terminus of HspA--a potential target for native Ni(II) and Bi(III) anti-ulcer drugs.

    PubMed

    Rowinska-Zyrek, Magdalena; Witkowska, Danuta; Valensin, Daniela; Kamysz, Wojciech; Kozlowski, Henryk

    2010-07-07

    HspA, a protein crucial for nickel homeostasis in Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), has a unique histidine- and cysteine-rich domain at the C terminus. In this work, we compared the coordination of nickel (the natural co-factor) and bismuth (inhibitor) to this domain (Ac-ACCHDHKKH-NH(2)) and to a reference peptide (Ac-CHCH-NH(2)). Potentiometric, CD, UV-Vis spectroscopic and NMR methods have shown that bismuth binds incomparably stronger than nickel; the same data shows the impact of histidines on such a binding. Our results are in good agreement with earlier biological data and suggest that HspA can be a potential target of the bismuth anti-ulcer drug against H. pylori.

  6. C-terminus of HSC70-Interacting Protein (CHIP) Inhibits Adipocyte Differentiation via Ubiquitin- and Proteasome-Mediated Degradation of PPARγ

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung-Hoon; Shin, Soyeon; Seo, Jinho; Lee, Eun-Woo; Jeong, Manhyung; Lee, Min-sik; Han, Hyun-Ji; Song, Jaewhan

    2017-01-01

    PPARγ (Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ) is a nuclear receptor involved in lipid homeostasis and related metabolic diseases. Acting as a transcription factor, PPARγ is a master regulator for adipocyte differentiation. Here, we reveal that CHIP (C-terminus of HSC70-interacting protein) suppresses adipocyte differentiation by functioning as an E3 ligase of PPARγ. CHIP directly binds to and induces ubiquitylation of the PPARγ protein, leading to proteasome-dependent degradation. Stable overexpression or knockdown of CHIP inhibited or promoted adipogenesis, respectively, in 3T3-L1 cells. On the other hand, a CHIP mutant defective in E3 ligase could neither regulate PPARγ protein levels nor suppress adipogenesis, indicating the importance of CHIP-mediated ubiquitylation of PPARγ in adipocyte differentiation. Lastly, a CHIP null embryo fibroblast exhibited augmented adipocyte differentiation with increases in PPARγ and its target protein levels. In conclusion, CHIP acts as an E3 ligase of PPARγ, suppressing PPARγ-mediated adipogenesis. PMID:28059128

  7. Removing the Vertebrate-Specific TBP N Terminus Disrupts Placental β2m-Dependent Interactions with the Maternal Immune System

    PubMed Central

    Hobbs, Nicole K.; Bondareva, Alla A.; Barnett, Sheila; Capecchi, Mario R.; Schmidt, Edward E.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Mammalian TBP consists of a 180 amino acid core that is common to all eukaryotes, fused to a vertebrate-specific N-terminal domain. We generated mice having a modified tbp allele, tbpΔN, that produces a version of TBP lacking 111 of the 135 vertebrate-specific amino acids. Most tbpΔN/ΔN fetuses (>90%) died in mid gestation from an apparent defect in the placenta. tbpΔN/ΔN fetuses could be rescued by supplying them with a wild-type tetraploid placenta. Mutants also could be rescued by rearing them in immunocom-promised mothers. In immune-competent mothers, survival of tbpΔN/ΔN fetuses increased when fetal/pla cental β2m expression was genetically disrupted. These results suggest that the TBP N terminus functions in transcriptional regulation of a placental β2m- dependent process that favors maternal immunotolerance of pregnancy. PMID:12150996

  8. Crystal Structure of Acivicin-Inhibited [gamma]-Glutamyltranspeptidase Reveals Critical Roles for Its C-Terminus in Autoprocessing and Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Kristin; Cullati, Sierra; Sand, Aaron; Biterova, Ekaterina I.; Barycki, Joseph J.

    2009-03-27

    Helicobacter pylori {gamma}-glutamyltranspeptidase (HpGT) is a general {gamma}-glutamyl hydrolase and a demonstrated virulence factor. The enzyme confers a growth advantage to the bacterium, providing essential amino acid precursors by initiating the degradation of extracellular glutathione and glutamine. HpGT is a member of the N-terminal nucleophile (Ntn) hydrolase superfamily and undergoes autoprocessing to generate the active form of the enzyme. Acivicin is a widely used {gamma}-glutamyltranspeptidase inhibitor that covalently modifies the enzyme, but its precise mechanism of action remains unclear. The time-dependent inactivation of HpGT exhibits a hyperbolic dependence on acivicin concentration with k{sub max} = 0.033 {+-} 0.006 s{sup -1} and K{sub I} = 19.7 {+-} 7.2 {micro}M. Structure determination of acivicin-modified HpGT (1.7 {angstrom}; R{sub factor} = 17.9%; R{sub free} = 20.8%) demonstrates that acivicin is accommodated within the {gamma}-glutamyl binding pocket of the enzyme. The hydroxyl group of Thr 380, the catalytic nucleophile in the autoprocessing and enzymatic reactions, displaces chloride from the acivicin ring to form the covalently linked complex. Within the acivicin-modified HpGT structure, the C-terminus of the protein becomes ordered with Phe 567 positioned over the active site. Substitution or deletion of Phe 567 leads to a >10-fold reduction in enzymatic activity, underscoring its importance in catalysis. The mobile C-terminus is positioned by several electrostatic interactions within the C-terminal region, most notably a salt bridge between Arg 475 and Glu 566. Mutational analysis reveals that Arg 475 is critical for the proper placement of the C-terminal region, the Tyr 433 containing loop, and the proposed oxyanion hole.

  9. The Solvent-Exposed C-Terminus of the Cytolysin A Pore-Forming Toxin Directs Pore Formation and Channel Function in Membranes.

    PubMed

    Sathyanarayana, Pradeep; Desikan, Rajat; Ayappa, K Ganapathy; Visweswariah, Sandhya S

    2016-10-13

    Pore-forming toxins (PFTs) bind to cell membranes and form nanoscale pores that allow leakage of cellular components, resulting in cell death. The water-soluble, monomeric form of these toxins shows a dramatic conformational change during pore formation, as exemplified by crystal structures of the monomer and functional pore of cytolysin A (ClyA). The solvent-exposed, C-terminal residues of the protein are essential for activity, but the mechanism by which this region regulates pore formation remains unknown. We show here that deletion of the C-terminus of ClyA did not alter its ability to bind to the membrane or oligomerize in detergent. However, the truncated toxin lysed erythrocytes poorly, was more susceptible to proteolysis and thermal unfolding, and showed low calcein leakage from small unilamellar vesicles. Using fully atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we find that deletion of C-terminal residues from the ClyA monomer significantly altered stability and unfolding trajectories in the transmembrane N-terminal helix, a region that is pivotal in maintaining the structural integrity of the helical bundle. MD simulations of pores with or without the C-terminus showed minor differences, implying that if oligomerization could be induced prior to the addition to vesicles, then an active pore could be generated. Via generation of oligomers in a detergent prior to the addition to vesicles, the truncated toxin could induce calcein leakage from vesicles, albeit to a lower extent. Therefore, regions of pore-forming toxins, not directly involved in the pore structure, are not passive players but have important roles in undergoing the transition through intermediary steps leading to successful pore formation in a membrane environment.

  10. PP2B-mediated Dephosphorylation of c-Jun C Terminus Regulates Phorbol Ester-induced c-Jun/Sp1 Interaction in A431 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ben-Kuen; Huang, Chi-Chen; Chang, Wei-Chiao; Chen, Yun-Ju; Kikkawa, Ushio; Nakahama, Ken-ichi; Morita, Ikuo

    2007-01-01

    The c-Jun/Sp1 interaction is essential for growth factor- and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-induced genes expression, including human 12(S)-lipoxygenase, keratin 16, cytosolic phospholipase A2, p21WAF1/CIP1, and neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor β4. Here, we examined the mechanism underlying the PMA-induced regulation on the interaction between c-Jun and Sp1. We found that treatment of cells with PMA induced a dephosphorylation at the C terminus of c-Jun at Ser-243 and a concomitant inhibition of PP2B by using PP2B small interfering RNA, resulting in reduction of PMA-induced gene expression as well as the c-Jun/Sp1 interaction. The c-Jun mutant TAM-67-3A, which contains three substitute alanines at Thr-231, Ser-243, and Ser-249 compared with TAM-67, binds more efficaciously with Sp1 and is about twice as efficacious as TAM-67 in inhibiting the PMA-induced activation of the 12(S)-lipoxygenase promoter. Importantly, PP2B not only dephosphorylates the c-Jun at Ser-243 but also interacts with c-Jun in PMA-treated cells. PMA stimulates the association of the PP2B/c-Jun/Sp1 complex with the promoter. These findings indicate the dephosphorylation of c-Jun C terminus is required for the c-Jun/Sp1 interaction and reveal that PP2B plays an important role in regulating c-Jun/Sp1 interaction in PMA-induced gene expression. PMID:17215518

  11. Phosphorylation of the C Terminus of RHD3 Has a Critical Role in Homotypic ER Membrane Fusion in Arabidopsis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Ueda, Haruko; Yokota, Etsuo; Kuwata, Keiko; Kutsuna, Natsumaro; Mano, Shoji; Shimada, Tomoo; Tamura, Kentaro; Fukao, Yoichiro; Brandizzi, Federica; Shimmen, Teruo; Nishimura, Mikio

    2016-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) consists of dynamically changing tubules and cisternae. In animals and yeast, homotypic ER membrane fusion is mediated by fusogens (atlastin and Sey1p, respectively) that are membrane-associated dynamin-like GTPases. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), another dynamin-like GTPase, ROOT HAIR DEFECTIVE3 (RHD3), has been proposed as an ER membrane fusogen, but direct evidence is lacking. Here, we show that RHD3 has an ER membrane fusion activity that is enhanced by phosphorylation of its C terminus. The ER network was RHD3-dependently reconstituted from the cytosol and microsome fraction of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) cultured cells by exogenously adding GTP, ATP, and F-actin. We next established an in vitro assay system of ER tubule formation with Arabidopsis ER vesicles, in which addition of GTP caused ER sac formation from the ER vesicles. Subsequent application of a shearing force to this system triggered the formation of tubules from the ER sacs in an RHD-dependent manner. Unexpectedly, in the absence of a shearing force, Ser/Thr kinase treatment triggered RHD3-dependent tubule formation. Mass spectrometry showed that RHD3 was phosphorylated at multiple Ser and Thr residues in the C terminus. An antibody against the RHD3 C-terminal peptide abolished kinase-triggered tubule formation. When the Ser cluster was deleted or when the Ser residues were replaced with Ala residues, kinase treatment had no effect on tubule formation. Kinase treatment induced the oligomerization of RHD3. Neither phosphorylation-dependent modulation of membrane fusion nor oligomerization has been reported for atlastin or Sey1p. Taken together, we propose that phosphorylation-stimulated oligomerization of RHD3 enhances ER membrane fusion to form the ER network. PMID:26684656

  12. Moesin-ezrin-radixin-like protein (merlin) mediates protein interacting with the carboxyl terminus-1 (PICT-1)-induced growth inhibition of glioblastoma cells in the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hongbo; Mei, Lin; Zhou, Lanzhen; Zhang, Xudong; Guo, Caiping; Li, Junchang; Wang, Huixia; Zhu, Yongqiang; Zheng, Yi; Huang, Laiqiang

    2011-04-01

    Moesin-ezrin-radixin-like protein (merlin) has long been considered a unique tumour suppressor that inhibits mitogenic signalling only at the membrane-cytoskeleton interface. However, the nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of merlin in a cell cycle-dependent manner has recently been observed, indicating that merlin may also exert its tumour-suppressive activity by interacting with specific nuclear protein partners. We have identified protein interacting with carboxyl terminus 1 (PICT-1) as a novel merlin-binding partner. Although the detailed mechanisms are not fully understood, several lines of evidence have previously implicated PICT-1 as a candidate tumour suppressor, including its phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN)-dependent growth-suppression and cell-killing activities. We show here that PICT-1 is localised to the nucleolus, and Ser518-dephosphorylated merlin (the growth-inhibitory form of merlin) can interact with PICT-1 in the nucleolus. Ectopic expression of PICT-1, both in PTEN-positive HeLa cells and in PTEN-deficient U251 cells, effectively represses cyclin D1 expression, arrests the cell cycle at G0/G1, and promotes cell apoptosis. PICT-1 (1-356), a carboxyl-terminus truncated mutant that has lost the ability to bind merlin, has a markedly reduced inhibitory effect on the cell cycle and proliferation. Knockdown of merlin expression by siRNA attenuates the inhibitory effects induced by PICT-1 over-expression. We propose that merlin mediates PICT-1-induced growth inhibition by translocating to the nucleolus and binding PICT-1.

  13. Tandem phosphorylation of Ser-911 and Thr-912 at the C terminus of yeast plasma membrane H+-ATPase leads to glucose-dependent activation.

    PubMed

    Lecchi, Silvia; Nelson, Clark J; Allen, Kenneth E; Swaney, Danielle L; Thompson, Katie L; Coon, Joshua J; Sussman, Michael R; Slayman, Carolyn W

    2007-12-07

    In recent years there has been growing interest in the post-translational regulation of P-type ATPases by protein kinase-mediated phosphorylation. Pma1 H(+)-ATPase, which is responsible for H(+)-dependent nutrient uptake in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), is one such example, displaying a rapid 5-10-fold increase in activity when carbon-starved cells are exposed to glucose. Activation has been linked to Ser/Thr phosphorylation in the C-terminal tail of the ATPase, but the specific phosphorylation sites have not previously been mapped. The present study has used nanoflow high pressure liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray electron transfer dissociation tandem mass spectrometry to identify Ser-911 and Thr-912 as two major phosphorylation sites that are clearly related to glucose activation. In carbon-starved cells with low Pma1 activity, peptide 896-918, which was derived from the C terminus upon Lys-C proteolysis, was found to be singly phosphorylated at Thr-912, whereas in glucose-metabolizing cells with high ATPase activity, the same peptide was doubly phosphorylated at Ser-911 and Thr-912. Reciprocal (14)N/(15)N metabolic labeling of cells was used to measure the relative phosphorylation levels at the two sites. The addition of glucose to carbon-starved cells led to a 3-fold reduction in the singly phosphorylated form and an 11-fold increase in the doubly phosphorylated form. These results point to a mechanism in which the stepwise phosphorylation of two tandemly positioned residues near the C terminus mediates glucose-dependent activation of the H(+)-ATPase.

  14. A Conserved Tripeptide Sequence at the C Terminus of the Poxvirus DNA Processivity Factor D4 Is Essential for Protein Integrity and Function.

    PubMed

    Nuth, Manunya; Guan, Hancheng; Ricciardi, Robert P

    2016-12-30

    Vaccinia virus (VACV) is a poxvirus, and the VACV D4 protein serves both as a uracil-DNA glycosylase and as an essential component required for processive DNA synthesis. The VACV A20 protein has no known catalytic function itself but associates with D4 to form the D4-A20 heterodimer that functions as the poxvirus DNA processivity factor. The heterodimer enables the DNA polymerase to efficiently synthesize extended strands of DNA. Upon characterizing the interaction between D4 and A20, we observed that the C terminus of D4 is susceptible to perturbation. Further analysis demonstrated that a conserved hexapeptide stretch at the extreme C terminus of D4 is essential for maintaining protein integrity, as assessed by its requirement for the production of soluble recombinant protein that is functional in processive DNA synthesis. From the known crystal structures of D4, the C-terminal hexapeptide is shown to make intramolecular contact with residues spanning the inner core of the protein. Our mutational analysis revealed that a tripeptide motif ((215)GFI(217)) within the hexapeptide comprises apparent residues necessary for the contact. Prediction of protein disorder identified the hexapeptide and several regions upstream of Gly(215) that comprise residues of the interface surfaces of the D4-A20 heterodimer. Our study suggests that (215)GFI(217) anchors these potentially dynamic upstream regions of the protein to maintain protein integrity. Unlike uracil-DNA glycosylases from diverse sources, where the C termini are disordered and do not form comparable intramolecular contacts, this feature may be unique to orthopoxviruses.

  15. Mass balance, meteorology, area altitude distribution, glacier-surface altitude, ice motion, terminus position, and runoff at Gulkana Glacier, Alaska, 1996 balance year

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    March, Rod S.

    2003-01-01

    The 1996 measured winter snow, maximum winter snow, net, and annual balances in the Gulkana Glacier Basin were evaluated on the basis of meteorological, hydrological, and glaciological data. Averaged over the glacier, the measured winter snow balance was 0.87 meter on April 18, 1996, 1.1 standard deviation below the long-term average; the maximum winter snow balance, 1.06 meters, was reached on May 28, 1996; and the net balance (from August 30, 1995, to August 24, 1996) was -0.53 meter, 0.53 standard deviation below the long-term average. The annual balance (October 1, 1995, to September 30, 1996) was -0.37 meter. Area-averaged balances were reported using both the 1967 and 1993 area altitude distributions (the numbers previously given in this abstract use the 1993 area altitude distribution). Net balance was about 25 percent less negative using the 1993 area altitude distribution than the 1967 distribution. Annual average air temperature was 0.9 degree Celsius warmer than that recorded with the analog sensor used since 1966. Total precipitation catch for the year was 0.78 meter, 0.8 standard deviations below normal. The annual average wind speed was 3.5 meters per second in the first year of measuring wind speed. Annual runoff averaged 1.50 meters over the basin, 1.0 standard deviation below the long-term average. Glacier-surface altitude and ice-motion changes measured at three index sites document seasonal ice-speed and glacier-thickness changes. Both showed a continuation of a slowing and thinning trend present in the 1990s. The glacier terminus and lower ablation area were defined for 1996 with a handheld Global Positioning System survey of 126 locations spread out over about 4 kilometers on the lower glacier margin. From 1949 to 1996, the terminus retreated about 1,650 meters for an average retreat rate of 35 meters per year.

  16. A mutation deleting sequences encoding the amino terminus of human cytomegalovirus UL84 impairs interaction with UL44 and capsid localization.

    PubMed

    Strang, Blair L; Bender, Brian J; Sharma, Mayuri; Pesola, Jean M; Sanders, Rebecca L; Spector, Deborah H; Coen, Donald M

    2012-10-01

    Protein-protein interactions are required for many biological functions. Previous work has demonstrated an interaction between the human cytomegalovirus DNA polymerase subunit UL44 and the viral replication factor UL84. In this study, glutathione S-transferase pulldown assays indicated that residues 1 to 68 of UL84 are both necessary and sufficient for efficient interaction of UL84 with UL44 in vitro. We created a mutant virus in which sequences encoding these residues were deleted. This mutant displayed decreased virus replication compared to wild-type virus. Immunoprecipitation assays showed that the mutation decreased but did not abrogate association of UL84 with UL44 in infected cell lysate, suggesting that the association in the infected cell can involve other protein-protein interactions. Further immunoprecipitation assays indicated that IRS1, TRS1, and nucleolin are candidates for such interactions in infected cells. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis of viral DNA indicated that the absence of the UL84 amino terminus does not notably affect viral DNA synthesis. Western blotting experiments and pulse labeling of infected cells with [(35)S]methionine demonstrated a rather modest downregulation of levels of multiple proteins and particularly decreased levels of the minor capsid protein UL85. Electron microscopy demonstrated that viral capsids assemble but are mislocalized in nuclei of cells infected with the mutant virus, with fewer cytoplasmic capsids detected. In sum, deletion of the sequences encoding the amino terminus of UL84 affects interaction with UL44 and virus replication unexpectedly, not viral DNA synthesis. Mislocalization of viral capsids in infected cell nuclei likely contributes to the observed decrease in virus replication.

  17. Addition of positively charged tripeptide to N-terminus of the Fos basic region leucine zipper domain: implications on DNA bending, affinity, and specificity.

    PubMed

    Mahmoudi, T; Sarkar, B

    1999-09-01

    GKH-Fos(139-211)/Jun(248-334) (GKH: glycine-lysine-histidine) is a modified Fos/Jun heterodimer designed to contain a metal binding motif in the form of a GKH tripeptide at the amino terminus of Fos bZIP domain dimerized with the Jun basic region leucine zipper (bZIP) domain. We examined the effect of the addition of positively charged GKH motif to the N-terminus of Fos(139-211) on the DNA binding characteristics of the Fos(139-211)/Jun(248-334) heterodimer. Binding studies indicate that while the nonspecific DNA binding affinity of the GKH modified heterodimer increases 4-fold, it specifically binds the activating protein-1 (AP-1) site 6-fold less tightly than the control unmodified counterpart. Furthermore, helical phasing analysis indicates that GKH-Fos(139-211)/Jun(248-334) and control Fos(139-211)/Jun(248-334) both bend the DNA at the AP-1 site toward the minor groove. However, due to the presence of the positively charged GKH motif on Fos, the degree of the induced bend by GKH- Fos(139-211)/Jun(248-334) is greater than that induced by the unmodified Fos/Jun heterodimer. Our results suggest that the unfavorable energetic cost of the increased DNA bending by GKH-Fos(139-211)/Jun(248-334) results in a decrease in both specificity and affinity of binding of the heterodimer to the AP-1 site. These findings may have important implications in protein design as well in our understanding of DNA bending and factors responsible for the functional specificity of different members of the bZIP family of transcription factors.

  18. N terminus is essential for tropomyosin functions: N-terminal modification disrupts stress fiber organization and abolishes anti-oncogenic effects of tropomyosin-1.

    PubMed

    Bharadwaj, Shantaram; Hitchcock-DeGregori, Sarah; Thorburn, Andrew; Prasad, G L

    2004-04-02

    Down-regulation of several key actin-binding proteins, such as alpha-actinin, vinculin, gelsolin, and tropomyosins (TMs), is considered to contribute to the disorganized cytoskeleton present in many neoplastic cells. TMs stabilize actin filaments against the gel severing actions of proteins such as cofilin. Among multiple TMs expressed in non-muscle cells, tropomyosin-1 (TM1) isoform induces stress fibers and functions as a suppressor of malignant transformation. However, the molecular mechanisms of TM1-mediated cytoskeletal effects and tumor suppression remain poorly understood. We have hypothesized that the ability of TM1 to stabilize microfilaments is crucial for tumor suppression. In this study, by employing a variant TM1, which contains an N-terminal hemagglutinin epitope tag, we demonstrate that the N terminus is a key determinant of tropomyosin-1 function. Unlike the wild type TM1, the modified protein fails to restore stress fibers and inhibit anchorage-independent growth in transformed cells. Furthermore, the N-terminal modification of TM1 disorganizes the cytoskeleton and delays cytokinesis in normal cells, abolishes binding to F-actin, and disrupts the dimeric associations in vivo. The functionally defective TM1 allows the association of cofilin to stress fibers and disorganizes the microfilaments, whereas wild type TM1 appears to restrict the binding of cofilin to stress fibers. TM1-induced cytoskeletal reorganization appears to be mediated through preventing cofilin interaction with microfilaments. Our studies provide in vivo functional evidence that the N terminus is a critical determinant of TM1 functions, which in turn determines the organization of stress fibers.

  19. 1H NMR study of the influence of mutation on the interaction of the C-terminus with the active site in heme oxygenase from Neisseria meningitidis: implications for product release.

    PubMed

    Peng, Dungeng; Ma, Li-Hua; Ogura, Hiroshi; Yang, En-Che; Zhang, Xuhong; Yoshida, Tadashi; La Mar, Gerd N

    2010-07-20

    The HO from the pathogenic bacterium Neisseria meningitidis, NmHO, possesses C-terminal His207, Arg208, and His209 residues that are undetected in crystal structures. NMR found the C-terminus ordered and interacting with the active site and shown to undergo a spontaneous cleavage of the C-terminal Arg208-His209 bond that affects the product off rate. A preliminary model for the interaction based on the wild-type (WT) NmHO complexes has been presented [Liu, Y., Ma, L.-H., Satterlee, J. D., Zhang, X., Yoshida, T., and La Mar, G. N. (2006) Biochemistry 45, 3875-3886]. Two-dimensional (1)H NMR data of resting-state, azide-inhibited substrate complexes of the three C-terminal truncation mutants (Des-His209-, Des-Arg208His209-, and Des-His207Arg208His209-NmHO) confirm the previous proposed roles for His207 and Arg208 and reveal important additional salt bridges involving the His209 carboxylate and the side chains of both Lys126 and Arg208. Deletion of His209 leads to a qualitatively retained C-terminal geometry, but with increased separation between the C-terminus and active site. Moreover, replacing vinyls with methyls on the substrate leads to a decrease in the separation between the C-terminus and the active site. The expanded model for the C-terminus reveals a less stable His207-Arg208 cis peptide bond, providing a rationalization for its spontaneous cleavage. The rate of this spontaneous cleavage is shown to correlate with the proximity of the C-terminus to the active site, suggesting that the closer interaction leads to increased strain on the already weak His207-Arg208 peptide bond. The relevance of the C-terminus structure for in vitro studies, and the physiological function of product release, is discussed.

  20. Defective cancellous bone structure and abnormal response to PTH in cortical bone of mice lacking Cx43 cytoplasmic C-terminus domain.

    PubMed

    Pacheco-Costa, Rafael; Davis, Hannah M; Sorenson, Chad; Hon, Mary C; Hassan, Iraj; Reginato, Rejane D; Allen, Matthew R; Bellido, Teresita; Plotkin, Lilian I

    2015-12-01

    Connexin 43 (Cx43) forms gap junction channels and hemichannels that allow the communication among osteocytes, osteoblasts, and osteoclasts. Cx43 carboxy-terminal (CT) domain regulates channel opening and intracellular signaling by acting as a scaffold for structural and signaling proteins. To determine the role of Cx43 CT domain in bone, mice in which one allele of full length Cx43 was replaced by a mutant lacking the CT domain (Cx43(ΔCT/fl)) were studied. Cx43(ΔCT/fl) mice exhibit lower cancellous bone volume but higher cortical thickness than Cx43(fl/fl) controls, indicating that the CT domain is involved in normal cancellous bone gain but opposes cortical bone acquisition. Further, Cx43(ΔCT) is able to exert the functions of full length osteocytic Cx43 on cortical bone geometry and mechanical properties, demonstrating that domains other than the CT are responsible for Cx43 function in cortical bone. In addition, parathyroid hormone (PTH) failed to increase endocortical bone formation or energy to failure, a mechanical property that indicates resistance to fracture, in cortical bone in Cx43(ΔCT) mice with or without osteocytic full length Cx43. On the other hand, bone mass and bone formation markers were increased by the hormone in all mouse models, regardless of whether full length or Cx43(ΔCT) were or not expressed. We conclude that Cx43 CT domain is involved in proper bone acquisition; and that Cx43 expression in osteocytes is dispensable for some but not all PTH anabolic actions.

  1. The Carboxy-Terminal Region of apoA-I is Required for the ABCA1-Dependent Formation of α-HDL but not preβ-HDL Particles In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Chroni, Angeliki; Koukos, Georgios; Duka, Adelina; Zannis, Vassilis I.

    2008-01-01

    ABCA1-mediated lipid efflux to lipid poor apoA-I results in the gradual lipidation of apoA-I. This leads to the formation of discoidal HDL which are subsequently converted to spherical HDL by the action of LCAT. We have investigated the effect of point mutations and deletions in the carboxy-terminal region of apoA-I on the biogenesis of HDL using adenovirus-mediated gene transfer in apoA-I deficient mice. It was found that the plasma HDL levels were greatly reduced in mice expressing the carboxy-terminal deletion mutants apoA-I[Δ(185-243)] and apoA-I[Δ(220-243)], shown previously to diminish the ABCA1-mediated lipid efflux. The HDL levels were normal in mice expressing the WT apoA-I, the apoA-I[Δ(232-243)] deletion mutant or the apoA-I[E191A/H193A/K195A] point mutant, which promote normal ABCA1-mediated lipid efflux. Electron microscopy and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis showed that the apoA-I[Δ(185-243)] and apoA-I[Δ(220-243)] mutants formed mainly preβ-HDL particles and few spherical particles enriched in apoE, while WT apoA-I, apoA-I[Δ(232-243)] and apoA-I[E191A/H193A/K195A] formed spherical α-HDL particles. The findings establish that a) deletions that eliminate the 220-231 region of apoA-I prevent the synthesis of α-HDL, but allow the synthesis of preβ-HDL particles in vivo, b) the amino-terminal segment 1-184 of apoA-I can promote synthesis of preβ-HDL type particles in an ABCA1-independent process and c) the charged residues in the 191-195 region of apoA-I do not influence the biogenesis of HDL. PMID:17447731

  2. Ultrasensitive peroxynitrite-based luminescence with L-012 as a screening system for antioxidative/antinitrating substances, e.g. Tylenol (acetaminophen), 4-OH tempol, quercetin and carboxy-PTIO.

    PubMed

    Van Dyke, Knox; Ghareeb, Erica; Van Dyke, Mark; Van Thiel, David H

    2007-01-01

    Previously our group developed a water-soluble antioxidant screening system using the luminescence of the reaction of peroxynitrite and luminol. In the present study we replaced luminol with the luminol-like compound L-012. This increases the production of luminescence approximately 100-fold and therefore, with a higher signal:noise ratio, this new system can detect antioxidation and antinitration effects at lower doses of the inhibitor. We studied acetaminophen (Tylenol) and its metabolite 3-nitroacetaminophen, tyrosine and nitrotyrosine and all these substances were inhibitory in a dose-responsive manner and below micromolar amounts. In addition quercetin, a polyphenol, was highly active (below micromolar amounts) as an antioxidant and antinitrating compound. 4-OH tempol, the stable free radical, superoxide dismutase (SOD) mimetic, was inhibitory in a dose-responsive manner and below micromolar amounts. Carboxy-PTIO was inhibitory at 10 times micromolar amount but not below that dose, which may be related to colour quenching, since the drug is deeply blue, or possibly it is an inhibitor with a slow kinetic profile. Finally, the amino acid tyrosine has been found to be inhibitory in micromolar amounts, similar to acetaminophen. This indicates that tyrosine can act as an antioxidant and antinitration target alone or conjugated in protein, e.g. insulin.

  3. Development and validation of a LC/MS method for the determination of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol and 11-carboxy-Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol in the larvae of the blowfly Lucilia sericata: Forensic applications.

    PubMed

    Karampela, Sevasti; Pistos, Constantinos; Moraitis, Konstantinos; Stoukas, Vasilios; Papoutsis, Ioannis; Zorba, Eleni; Koupparis, Michalis; Spiliopoulou, Chara; Athanaselis, Sotiris

    2015-12-01

    In a number of forensic toxicological cases, Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and its metabolite 11-carboxy-delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THCA) are frequently considered as contributor factors to the event. To that, a liquid chromatographic mass spectrometric method is described for the identification and quantitation of THC and its metabolite THCA in the forensically important larvae of L. sericata. Larvae of Lucilia sericata were fortified with varying concentrations of THC and THCA covering the calibration range between 10 and 500pg/mg. For the isolation of the analytes from larvae, several extraction techniques were evaluated and finally liquid-liquid extraction under acidic pH was selected using hexane-ethyl acetate (50:50, v/v) as extraction solvent. For the chromatographic separation, a Waters Symmetry® C18 analytical column was used while the mobile phase was acetonitrile-ammonium acetate (2mM) (30:70, v/v). The detection was performed using electrospray ionization source in negative mode (ESI-) and the selected ions monitored were m/z 313 for THC and m/z 343 for THCA. The proposed method which is simple and sufficiently sensitive for the detection of THC and THCA even in a single larva sampling, assisted the investigation of a forensic case.

  4. A novel type of highly negatively charged lipooligosaccharide from Pseudomonas stutzeri OX1 possessing two 4,6-O-(1-carboxy)-ethylidene residues in the outer core region.

    PubMed

    Leone, Serena; Izzo, Viviana; Silipo, Alba; Sturiale, Luisa; Garozzo, Domenico; Lanzetta, Rosa; Parrilli, Michelangelo; Molinaro, Antonio; Di Donato, Alberto

    2004-07-01

    Pseudomonas stutzeri OXI is a Gram-negative microorganism able to grow in media containing aromatic hydrocarbons. A novel lipo-oligosaccharide from P. stutzeri OX1 was isolated and characterized. For the first time, the presence of two moieties of 4,6-O-(1-carboxy)-ethylidene residues (pyruvic acid) was identified in a core region; these two residues were found to possess different absolute configuration. The structure of the oligosaccharide backbone was determined using either alkaline or acid hydrolysis. Alkaline treatment, aimed at recovering the complete carbohydrate backbone, was carried out by mild hydrazinolysis (de-O-acylation) followed by de-N-acylation using hot KOH. The lipo-oligosaccharide was also analyzed after acid treatment, attained by mild hydrolysis with acetic acid, to obtain information on the nature of the phosphate and acyl groups. The two resulting oligosaccharides were isolated by gel permeation chromatography, and investigated by compositional and methylation analyses, by MALDI mass spectrometry, and by 1H-, 31P- and 13C-NMR spectroscopy. These experiments led to the identification of the major oligosaccharide structure representative of core region-lipid A. All sugars are D-pyranoses and alpha-linked, if not stated otherwise. Based on the structure found, the hypothesis can be advanced that pyruvate residues are used to block elongation of the oligosaccharide chain. This would lead to a less hydrophilic cellular surface, indicating an adaptive response of P. sutzeri OX1 to a hydrocarbon-containing environment.

  5. Fast confirmation of 11-nor-9-carboxy-Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC-COOH) in urine by LC/MS/MS using negative atmospheric-pressure chemical ionisation (APCI).

    PubMed

    Weinmann, W; Goerner, M; Vogt, S; Goerke, R; Pollak, S

    2001-09-15

    A fast method using automated solid-phase extraction (SPE) and short-column liquid-chromatography coupled to tandem mass-spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) with negative atmospheric-pressure chemical ionisation (APCI) has been developed for the confirmation of 11-nor-9-carboxy-Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC-COOH) in urine samples. This highly specific method which combines chromatographic separation and MS/MS-analysis can be used for the confirmation of positive immunoassay results with a NIDA cut-off of 15ng/ml. The conjugates of THC-COOH were hydrolysed prior to SPE, and a standard SPE was performed using C18-SPE columns. No derivatisation of the extracts was needed as in GC/MS analysis, and the LC run-time was 6.5min by gradient elution with a retention time of 2.4min. Linearity of calibration was obtained in the range between 0 and 500ng/ml (correlation coefficient R(2)=0.998). Using linear regression (0-50ng/ml) the limit of detection (LOD) was 2.0ng/ml and the limit of quantitation (LOQ) was 5.1ng/ml; day-to-day reproducibility and precision were tested at 15 and 250ng/ml and were 13.4ng/ml+/-3.3% and 255.8ng/ml+/-4.5%, respectively.

  6. Deletion of a Predicted β-Sheet Domain within the Amino Terminus of Herpes Simplex Virus Glycoprotein K Conserved among Alphaherpesviruses Prevents Virus Entry into Neuronal Axons

    PubMed Central

    Jambunathan, Nithya; Charles, Anu-Susan; Subramanian, Ramesh; Saied, Ahmad A.; Naderi, Misagh; Rider, Paul; Brylinski, Michal; Chouljenko, Vladimir N.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT We have shown previously that herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) lacking expression of the entire glycoprotein K (gK) or expressing gK with a 38-amino-acid deletion (gKΔ31–68 mutation) failed to infect ganglionic neurons after ocular infection of mice. We constructed a new model for the predicted three-dimensional structure of gK, revealing that the gKΔ31–68 mutation spans a well-defined β-sheet structure within the amino terminus of gK, which is conserved among alphaherpesviruses. The HSV-1(McKrae) gKΔ31–68 virus was tested for the ability to enter into ganglionic neuronal axons in cell culture of explanted rat ganglia using a novel virus entry proximity ligation assay (VEPLA). In this assay, cell surface-bound virions were detected by the colocalization of gD and its cognate receptor nectin-1 on infected neuronal surfaces. Capsids that have entered into the cytoplasm were detected by the colocalization of the virion tegument protein UL37, with dynein required for loading of virion capsids onto microtubules for retrograde transport to the nucleus. HSV-1(McKrae) gKΔ31–68 attached to cell surfaces of Vero cells and ganglionic axons in cell culture as efficiently as wild-type HSV-1(McKrae). However, unlike the wild-type virus, the mutant virus failed to enter into the axoplasm of ganglionic neurons. This work suggests that the amino terminus of gK is a critical determinant for entry into neuronal axons and may serve similar conserved functions for other alphaherpesviruses. IMPORTANCE Alphaherpesviruses, unlike beta- and gammaherpesviruses, have the unique ability to infect and establish latency in neurons. Glycoprotein K (gK) and the membrane protein UL20 are conserved among all alphaherpesviruses. We show here that a predicted β-sheet domain, which is conserved among alphaherpesviruses, functions in HSV-1 entry into neuronal axons, suggesting that it may serve similar functions for other herpesviruses. These results are in agreement with our

  7. Modifying the N-terminus of polyamides: PyImPyIm has improved sequence specificity over f-ImPyIm.

    PubMed

    Brown, Toni; Mackay, Hilary; Turlington, Mark; Sutterfield, Arden; Smith, Traci; Sielaff, Alan; Westrate, Laura; Bruce, Chrystal; Kluza, Jerome; O'Hare, Caroline; Nguyen, Binh; Wilson, W David; Hartley, John A; Lee, Moses

    2008-05-01

    Seven N-terminus modified derivatives of a previously published minor-groove binding polyamide (f-ImPyIm, 1) were synthesized and the biochemical and biophysical chemistry evaluated. These compounds were synthesized with the aim of attaining a higher level of sequence selectivity over f-ImPyIm (1), a previously published strong minor-groove binder. Two compounds possessing a furan or a benzofuran moiety at the N-terminus showed a footprint of 0.5microM at the cognate ACGCGT site (determined by DNase I footprinting); however, the specificity of these compounds was not improved. In contrast, PyImPyIm (4) produced a footprint of 0.5microM but showed a superior specificity using the same technique. When evaluated by thermal melting experiments and circular dichroism using ACGCGT and the non-cognate AAATTT sequence, all compounds were shown to bind in the minor-groove of DNA and stabilize the cognate sequence much better than the non-cognate (except for the non-amido-compound that did not bind either sequence, as expected). PyImPyIm (4) was interesting as the DeltaT(m) for this compound was only 4 degrees C but the footprint was very selective. No binding was observed for this compound with a third DNA (non-cognate, ACCGGT). ITC studies on compound 4 showed exothermic binding with ACGCGT and no heat change was observed for titrating the compound to the other two DNA sequences. The heat capacity (DeltaC(p)) of the PIPI/ACGCGT complex calculated from the hydrophobic interactions and SASA calculations was comparable to the experimental value obtained from ITC (-146calmol(-1)K(-1)). SPR results provided confirmation of the sequence specificity of PyImPyIm (4), with a K(eq) value determined to be 7.1x10(6) M(-1) for the cognate sequence and no observable binding to AAATTT and ACCGGT. Molecular dynamic simulations affirmed that PyImPyIm (4) binds as a dimer in an overlapped conformation, and it fits snugly in the minor-groove of the ACGCGT oligonucleotide. PyImPyIm (4) is an

  8. Assignment of functional domains involved in ADP-ribosylation and B-oligomer binding within the carboxyl terminus of the S1 subunit of pertussis toxin.

    PubMed Central

    Krueger, K M; Barbieri, J T

    1994-01-01

    The roles of the carboxyl terminus of the S1 subunit (composed of 235 amino acids) of pertussis toxin in the ADP-ribosylation of transducin (Gt) and in B-oligomer binding were defined by analysis of two carboxyl-terminal deletion mutants of the recombinant S1 (rS1) subunit: C204, which is composed of amino acids 1 through 204 of S1, and C219, which is composed of amino acids 1 through 219 of S1. C204 was expressed in Escherichia coli as a stable, soluble peptide that had an apparent molecular mass of 23.4 kDa. In a linear velocity assay, the specific activity of C180 was 2% and that of C204 was 80% of the activity displayed by rS1 in catalyzing the ADP-ribosylation of Gt. In addition, C204 possessed catalytic efficiencies (kcat/Km) that were 110% at variable Gt concentrations and 40% at variable NAD concentrations of those reported for rS1. These data showed that the catalytic activity of C204 approached the activity of S1. C204 and C219 were unable to associate with the B oligomer under conditions which promoted association of rS1 with the B oligomer. Consistent with these results, mixtures of C204 or C219 with the B oligomer did not elicit a clustering phenotype in CHO cells, whereas rS1 which had associated with the B oligomer was as cytotoxic as native pertussis toxin. These data indicate that residues between 219 and 235 are important in the association of the S1 subunit with the B oligomer. These data allow the assignment of functional regions to the carboxyl terminus of S1. Residues 195 to 204 are required for optimal ADP-ribosyltransferase activity, residues 205 to 219 link the catalytic region of S1 and a B-oligomer-binding region of S1, and residues 220 to 235 are required for association of S1 with the B oligomer. Images PMID:8168972

  9. Crystal structure of the karyopherin Kap121p bound to the extreme C-terminus of the protein phosphatase Cdc14p

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Junya; Hirano, Hidemi; Matsuura, Yoshiyuki

    2015-07-31

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the protein phosphatase Cdc14p is an antagonist of mitotic cyclin-dependent kinases and is a key regulator of late mitotic events such as chromosome segregation, spindle disassembly and cytokinesis. The activity of Cdc14p is controlled by cell-cycle dependent changes in its association with its competitive inhibitor Net1p (also known as Cfi1p) in the nucleolus. For most of the cell cycle up to metaphase, Cdc14p is sequestered in the nucleolus in an inactive state. During anaphase, Cdc14p is released from Net1p, spreads into the nucleus and cytoplasm, and dephosphorylates key mitotic targets. Although regulated nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of Cdc14p has been suggested to be important for exit from mitosis, the mechanism underlying Cdc14p nuclear trafficking remains poorly understood. Here we show that the C-terminal region (residues 517–551) of Cdc14p can function as a nuclear localization signal (NLS) in vivo and also binds to Kap121p (also known as Pse1p), an essential nuclear import carrier in yeast, in a Gsp1p-GTP-dependent manner in vitro. Moreover we report a crystal structure, at 2.4 Å resolution, of Kap121p bound to the C-terminal region of Cdc14p. The structure and structure-based mutational analyses suggest that either the last five residues at the extreme C-terminus of Cdc14p (residues 547–551; Gly-Ser-Ile-Lys-Lys) or adjacent residues with similar sequence (residues 540–544; Gly-Gly-Ile-Arg-Lys) can bind to the NLS-binding site of Kap121p, with two residues (Ile in the middle and Lys at the end of the five residues) of Cdc14p making key contributions to the binding specificity. Based on comparison with other structures of Kap121p-ligand complexes, we propose “IK-NLS” as an appropriate term to refer to the Kap121p-specific NLS. - Highlights: • The C-terminus of Cdc14p binds to Kap121p in a Gsp1p-GTP-dependent manner. • The crystal structure of Kap121p-Cdc14p complex is determined. • The structure reveals how

  10. Application of protein N-terminal amidase in enzymatic synthesis of dipeptides containing acidic amino acids specifically at the N-terminus.

    PubMed

    Arai, Toshinobu; Noguchi, Atsushi; Takano, Eriko; Kino, Kuniki

    2013-04-01

    Dipeptides exhibit unique physiological functions and physical properties, e.g., l-aspartyl-l-phenylalanine-methyl ester (Asp-Phe-OMe, aspartame) as an artificial sweetener, and functional studies of peptides have been carried out in various fields. Therefore, to establish a manufacturing process for the useful dipeptides, we investigated its enzymatic synthesis by utilizing an l-amino acid ligase (Lal), which catalyzes dipeptide synthesis in an ATP-dependent manner. Many Lals were obtained, but the Lals recognizing acidic amino acids as N-terminal substrates have not been identified. To increase the variety of dipeptides that are enzymatically synthesized, we proposed a two-step synthesis: Asn-Xaa and Gln-Xaa (Asn, l-asparagine; Gln, l-glutamine; and Xaa, arbitrary amino acids) synthesized by Lals were continuously deamidated by a novel amidase, yielding Asp-Xaa and Glu-Xaa (Asp, l-aspartic acid; and Glu, l-glutamic acid). We searched for amidases that specifically deamidate the N-terminus of Asn or Gln in dipeptides since none have been previously reported. We focused on the protein N-terminal amidase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (NTA1), and assayed its activity toward dipeptides. Our findings showed that NTA1 deamidated l-asparaginyl-l-valine (Asn-Val) and l-glutaminyl-glycine (Gln-Gly), but did not deamidate l-valyl-l-asparagine and l-alanyl-l-glutamine, suggesting that this deamidation activity is N-terminus specific. The specific activity toward Asn-Val and Gln-Gly were 190 ± 30 nmol min(-1) mg(-1)·protein and 136 ± 6 nmol min(-1) mg(-1)·protein. Additionally, we examined some characteristics of NTA1. Acidic dipeptide synthesis was examined by a combination of Lals and NTA1, resulting in the synthesis of 12 kinds of Asp-Xaa, including Asp-Phe, a precursor of aspartame, and 11 kinds of Glu-Xaa.

  11. Conformational studies of a peptide corresponding to a region of the C-terminus of ribonuclease A: implications as a potential chain-folding initiation site.

    PubMed

    Beals, J M; Haas, E; Krausz, S; Scheraga, H A

    1991-08-06

    Conformational properties of the OT-16 peptide, the C-terminal 20 amino acids of RNase A, were examined by nonradiative energy transfer. A modified OT-16 peptide was prepared by solid-phase synthesis with the inclusion of diaminobutyric acid (DABA) at the C-terminus. The OT-16-DABA peptide was labeled with a fluorescent 1,5-dimethylaminonaphthalene sulfonyl (dansyl, DNS) acceptor at the N-terminal amine and a fluorescent naphthoxyacetic acid (NAA) donor at the gamma-amine of the DABA located at the C-terminus of the peptide by using an orthogonal protection scheme. Energy transfer was monitored in DNS-OT-16-DABA-NAA by using both fluorescence intensity (sensitized emission) and lifetime (donor quenching) experiments. The lifetime data indicate that the peptide system is a dynamic, flexible one. A detailed analysis, based on a dynamic model that includes a skewed Gaussian function to model the equilibrium distribution of interprobe distances and a mutual diffusion coefficient between the two probes to model conformational dynamics in the peptide [Beechem & Haas (1989) Biophys. J. 55, 1225.], identified the existence of a partially ordered structure (relatively narrow distribution of interprobe distances) at temperatures greater than or equal to 20 degrees C in the absence of denaturant. The width and the position of the average of the distributions decrease with increasing temperature, in this range; this suggests that the structure is stabilized by hydrophobic interactions. In addition, the peptide undergoes cold denaturation at around 1.5 degrees C as indicated by broadening of the distance distribution. The addition of 6 M guanidine hydrochloride (Gdn-HCl) also broadens the distance distribution significantly, presumably by eliminating the hydrophobic interactions and unfolding the peptide. The results of the analysis of the distance distribution demonstrate that (1) nonradiative energy transfer can be used to study the conformational dynamics of peptides on the

  12. Processing time-series point clouds to reveal strain conditions of the Helheim Glacier terminus and its adjacent mélange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byers, L. C.; Stearns, L. A.; Finnegan, D. C.; LeWinter, A. L.; Gadomski, P. J.; Hamilton, G. S.

    2014-12-01

    Flow near the termini of tidewater glaciers varies over short time-scales due to mechanisms that are poorly understood. Repeat observations with high temporal and spatial resolution, recorded around the terminus, are required to better understand the processes that control flow variability. Progress in light detection and ranging (LiDAR) technology permit such observations of the near-terminus and the pro-glacial ice mélange, though standard workflows for quantifying deformation from point clouds currently do not exist. Here, we test and develop methods for processing displacements from LiDAR data of complexly deforming bodies. We use data collected at 30-minute intervals over three-days in August 2013 at Helheim Glacier, Greenland by a long-range (6-10 km), 1064 nm wavelength Terrestrial LiDAR Scanner (TLS). The total area of coverage was ~25 km2. Distributed shear in glaciers prevents a simple transformation for aligning repeat point clouds, but within small regions (~100 m2) strain is assumed to be minor between scans. Registering a large number of these individual regions, subset from the full point-cloud, results in reduced alignment errors. By subsetting in a regular grid, rasters of velocities between scans are created. However, using data-dependent properties such as point density causes the generation of unevenly spaced velocity estimations, which can locally improve resolution or decrease registration errors. The choice of subsets therefore controls the output product's resolution and accuracy. We test how the spatial segmentation scheme affects the displacement results and alignment errors, finding that displacements can be quantified with limited assumption of the true value of displacement for the subset, barring great morphological changes. By identifying areas that do not deform over the temporal domain of the dataset, and using these as the subsets to align, it should be possible to deduce which structures are accommodating strain. This allows for

  13. The C Terminus of the Core β-Ladder Domain in Japanese Encephalitis Virus Nonstructural Protein 1 Is Flexible for Accommodation of Heterologous Epitope Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Yen, Li-Chen; Liao, Jia-Teh; Lee, Hwei-Jen; Chou, Wei-Yuan; Chen, Chun-Wei; Lin, Yi-Ling

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT NS1 is the only nonstructural protein that enters the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), where NS1 is glycosylated, forms a dimer, and is subsequently secreted during flavivirus replication as dimers or hexamers, which appear to be highly immunogenic to the infected host, as protective immunity can be elicited against homologous flavivirus infections. Here, by using a trans-complementation assay, we identified the C-terminal end of NS1 derived from Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), which was more flexible than other regions in terms of housing foreign epitopes without a significant impact on virus replication. This mapped flexible region is located in the conserved tip of the core β-ladder domain of the multimeric NS1 structure and is also known to contain certain linear epitopes, readily triggering specific antibody responses from the host. Despite becoming attenuated, recombinant JEV with insertion of a neutralizing epitope derived from enterovirus 71 (EV71) into the C-terminal end of NS1 not only could be normally released from infected cells, but also induced dual protective immunity for the host to counteract lethal challenge with either JEV or EV71 in neonatal mice. These results indicated that the secreted multimeric NS1 of flaviviruses may serve as a natural protein carrier to render epitopes of interest more immunogenic in the C terminus of the core β-ladder domain. IMPORTANCE The positive-sense RNA genomes of mosquito-borne flaviviruses appear to be flexible in terms of accommodating extra insertions of short heterologous antigens into their virus genes. Here, we illustrate that the newly identified C terminus of the core β-ladder domain in NS1 could be readily inserted into entities such as EV71 epitopes, and the resulting NS1-epitope fusion proteins appeared to maintain normal virus replication, secretion ability, and multimeric formation from infected cells. Nonetheless, such an insertion attenuated the recombinant JEV in mice

  14. Cleavage of arginyl-arginine and lysyl-arginine from the C-terminus of pro-hormone peptides by human germinal angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) and the C-domain of human somatic ACE.

    PubMed Central

    Isaac, R E; Williams, T A; Sajid, M; Corvol, P; Coates, D

    1997-01-01

    Mammalian germinal angiotensin I-converting enzyme (gACE) is a single-domain dipeptidyl carboxypeptidase found exclusively in male germ cells, which has almost identical sequence and enzymic properties with the C-domain of the two-domain somatic ACE. Mutant mice that do not express gACE are infertile, suggesting a role for the enzyme in the processing of undefined peptides involved in fertilization. A number of spermatid peptides [e.g. cholecystokinin (CCK) and gastrin] are processed from pro-hormones by endo- and exo-proteolytic cleavages which might generate substrates for gACE. We have shown that peptide hormone intermediates with Lys/Arg-Arg at the C-terminus are high-affinity substrates for human gACE. gACE from human sperm cleaved Arg-Arg from the C-terminus of the CCK5-GRR (GWMDFGRR), a peptide corresponding to the C-terminus of a CCK-gastrin prohormone intermediate. Hydrolysis of CCK5-GRR by recombinant human C-domain ACE was Cl- dependent, with maximal activity achieved in 5-10 mM NaCl at pH 6.4. C-Domain ACE cleaved Lys/Arg-Arg from the C-terminus of dynorphin-(1-7), a pro-TRH peptide KRQHPGKR, and two insect peptides FSPRLGKR and FSPRLGRR. C-Domain ACE displayed high affinity towards all these substrates with Vmax/Km values between 14 and 113 times greater than the Vmax/Km for the conversion of the best known ACE substrate, angiotensin I, into angiotensin II. In conclusion, we have identified a new class of substrates for human gACE, and we suggest that gACE might be an alternative to carboxypeptidase E for the trimming of basic dipeptides from the C-terminus of intermediates generated from pro-hormones by subtilisin-like convertases in human male germ cells. PMID:9371719

  15. Identification of two functional regions in Fis: the N-terminus is required to promote Hin-mediated DNA inversion but not lambda excision.

    PubMed Central

    Osuna, R; Finkel, S E; Johnson, R C

    1991-01-01

    The Fis protein of E. coli binds to a recombinational enhancer sequence that is required to stimulate Hin-mediated DNA inversion. Fis is also required for efficient lambda prophase excision in vivo. The properties of mutant Fis proteins were examined in vivo and in vitro with respect to their stimulatory effects on these two different site-specific DNA recombination reactions. Both recombination reactions are dramatically affected by mutations altering a helix-turn-helix DNA binding motif located near the Fis C-terminus (residues 74-93). These mutations invariably decrease DNA binding affinity and some cause reduced DNA bending. Mutations in the Fis N-terminal region reduce or abolish the stimulation of Hin-mediated DNA recombination by Fis, but have little or no effect on DNA binding or lambda excision. We conclude that there are at least two functionally distinct domains in Fis: a C-terminal DNA binding region that is required for promoting both DNA recombination reactions and an N-terminal region that is uniquely required for Hin-mediated inversion. Images PMID:1851089

  16. Novel analogues of degarelix incorporating hydroxy-, methoxy- and pegylated-urea moieties at positions 3, 5, 6 and the N-terminus

    PubMed Central

    Samant, Manoj P.; Hong, Doley J.; Croston, Glenn; Rivier, Catherine; Rivier, Jean

    2008-01-01

    Novel degarelix (Fe200486) analogues were screened for antagonism of GnRH-induced response (IC50) in a reporter gene assay. Inhibition of luteinizing hormone release over time was measured in the castrated male rat. Nω-hydroxy- and Nω-methoxy-carbamoylation of Dab and Dap at position 3 (3-6), and Nω-hydroxy-, Nω-methoxy-carbamoylation and pegylation of 4Aph at positions 5 and 6 (7-10, 15-17, 22-25) were carried out. Modulation of hydrophobicity was achieved using different acylating groups at the N-terminus (11-14, 18-21, 26-28). Analogues 8, 15-17, 22 and 23 were equipotent to acyline (IC50 = 0.69 nM) and degarelix (IC50 = 0.58 nM) in vitro. Analogues 7, 17 and 23 were shorter acting than acyline, when 9, 11, 13, 15, 16 and 22 were longer acting. Only 9 and 14 were inactive at releasing histamine. No analogue exhibited a duration of action comparable to that of degarelix. Analogues with shorter and longer retention times on HPLC (a measure of hydrophilicity) than degarelix were identified. PMID:16759096

  17. Post-Translational Incorporation of L-Phenylalanine into the C-Terminus of α-Tubulin as a Possible Cause of Neuronal Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Ditamo, Yanina; Dentesano, Yanela M.; Purro, Silvia A.; Arce, Carlos A.; Bisig, C. Gastón

    2016-01-01

    α-Tubulin C-terminus undergoes post-translational, cyclic tyrosination/detyrosination, and L-Phenylalanine (Phe) can be incorporated in place of tyrosine. Using cultured mouse brain-derived cells and an antibody specific to Phe-tubulin, we showed that: (i) Phe incorporation into tubulin is reversible; (ii) such incorporation is not due to de novo synthesis; (iii) the proportion of modified tubulin is significant; (iv) Phe incorporation reduces cell proliferation without affecting cell viability; (v) the rate of neurite retraction declines as level of C-terminal Phe incorporation increases; (vi) this inhibitory effect of Phe on neurite retraction is blocked by the co-presence of tyrosine; (vii) microtubule dynamics is reduced when Phe-tubulin level in cells is high as a result of exogenous Phe addition and returns to normal values when Phe is removed; moreover, microtubule dynamics is also reduced when Phe-tubulin is expressed (plasmid transfection). It is known that Phe levels are greatly elevated in blood of phenylketonuria (PKU) patients. The molecular mechanism underlying the brain dysfunction characteristic of PKU is unknown. Beyond the differences between human and mouse cells, it is conceivable the possibility that Phe incorporation into tubulin is the first event (or among the initial events) in the molecular pathways leading to brain dysfunctions that characterize PKU. PMID:27905536

  18. Improvement of retroviral retargeting by using amino acid spacers between an additional binding domain and the N terminus of Moloney murine leukemia virus SU.

    PubMed Central

    Valsesia-Wittmann, S; Morling, F J; Nilson, B H; Takeuchi, Y; Russell, S J; Cosset, F L

    1996-01-01

    We previously reported a strategy to redirect the retroviral host range by expressing single-chain antibodies (S. J. Russell, R. E. Hawkins, and G. Winter, Nucleic Acids Res. 21:1081-1085, 1993) or ligands (F.-L. Cosset, F. J Morling, Y. Takeuchi, R. A. Weiss, M. K. L. Collins, and S. J. Russell, J. Virol. 69:6314-6322, 1995) at the N terminus of Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoMLV) surface proteins (SU). Although such chimeric envelopes were able to bind the new receptors, the transduction efficiency of retargeted viruses was generally low. We hypothesized that conformational rearrangements of envelope glycoproteins were not optimally triggered following binding, and to overcome these postbinding blocks, we have generated here a set of chimeric MoMLV-derived envelopes targeted to the Ram-1 phosphate transporter in which we have varied the spacing between the Ram-1-binding domain and the MoMLV SU. All of the recombinant envelopes were correctly expressed on virions, and all bound efficiently to Ram-1. However, the interdomain spacing greatly affected the efficiency of gene transfer by retroviral vectors that had bound to Ram-1 via their chimeric envelopes. Optimal interdomain spacing allowed a 100-fold-increased viral transduction via Ram-1 compared to our previous results. PMID:8627737

  19. Model Peptide Studies Reveal a Mixed Histidine-Methionine Cu(I) Binding Site at the N-Terminus of Human Copper Transporter 1.

    PubMed

    Pushie, M Jake; Shaw, Katharine; Franz, Katherine J; Shearer, Jason; Haas, Kathryn L

    2015-09-08

    Copper is a vital metal cofactor in enzymes that are essential to myriad biological processes. Cellular acquisition of copper is primarily accomplished through the Ctr family of plasma membrane copper transport proteins. Model peptide studies indicate that the human Ctr1 N-terminus binds to Cu(II) with high affinity through an amino terminal Cu(II), Ni(II) (ATCUN) binding site. Unlike typical ATCUN-type peptides, the Ctr1 peptide facilitates the ascorbate-dependent reduction of Cu(II) bound in its ATCUN site by virtue of an adjacent HH (bis-His) sequence in the peptide. It is likely that the Cu(I) coordination environment influences the redox behavior of Cu bound to this peptide; however, the identity and coordination geometry of the Cu(I) site has not been elucidated from previous work. Here, we show data from NMR, XAS, and structural modeling that sheds light on the identity of the Cu(I) binding site of a Ctr1 model peptide. The Cu(I) site includes the same bis-His site identified in previous work to facilitate ascorbate-dependent Cu(II) reduction. The data presented here are consistent with a rational mechanism by which Ctr1 provides coordination environments that facilitate Cu(II) reduction prior to Cu(I) transport.

  20. In vivo reconstitution of a homodimeric cytochrome b559 like structure: The role of the N-terminus α-subunit from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    PubMed

    Luján, María A; Martínez, Jesús I; Alonso, Pablo J; Torrado, Alejandro; Roncel, Mercedes; Ortega, José M; Sancho, Javier; Picorel, Rafael

    2015-11-01

    The cytochrome b559 is a heme-bridged heterodimeric protein with two subunits, α and β. Both subunits from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 have previously been cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli and in vivo reconstitution experiments have been carried out. The formation of homodimers in the bacterial membrane with endogenous heme was only observed in the case of the β-subunit (β/β) but not with the full length α-subunit. In the present work, reconstitution of a homodimer (α/α) cytochrome b559 like structure was possible using a chimeric N-terminus α-subunit truncated before the amino acid isoleucine 17, eliminating completely a short amphipathic α-helix that lays on the surface of the membrane. Overexpression and in vivo reconstitution in the bacteria was clearly demonstrated by the brownish color of the culture pellet and the use of a commercial monoclonal antibody against the fusion protein carrier, the maltoside binding protein, and polyclonal antibodies against a synthetic peptide of the α-subunit from Thermosynechococcus elongatus. Moreover, a simple partial purification after membrane solubilization with Triton X-100 confirmed that the overexpressed protein complex corresponded with the maltoside binding protein-chimeric α-subunit cytochrome b559 like structure. The features of the new structure were determined by UV-Vis, electron paramagnetic resonance and redox potentiometric techniques. Ribbon representations of all possible structures are also shown to better understand the mechanism of the cytochrome b559 maturation in the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane.

  1. Modular elements of the TPR domain in the Mps1 N terminus differentially target Mps1 to the centrosome and kinetochore

    PubMed Central

    Marquardt, Joseph R.; Perkins, Jennifer L.; Beuoy, Kyle J.; Fisk, Harold A.

    2016-01-01

    Faithful segregation of chromosomes to two daughter cells is regulated by the formation of a bipolar mitotic spindle and the spindle assembly checkpoint, ensuring proper spindle function. Here we show that the proper localization of the kinase Mps1 (monopolar spindle 1) is critical to both these processes. Separate elements in the Mps1 N-terminal extension (NTE) and tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domains govern localization to either the kinetochore or the centrosome. The third TPR (TPR3) and the TPR-capping helix (C-helix) are each sufficient to target Mps1 to the centrosome. TPR3 binds to voltage-dependent anion channel 3, but although this is sufficient for centrosome targeting of Mps1, it is not necessary because of the presence of the C-helix. A version of Mps1 lacking both elements cannot localize to or function at the centrosome, but maintains kinetochore localization and spindle assembly checkpoint function, indicating that TPR3 and the C-helix define a bipartite localization determinant that is both necessary and sufficient to target Mps1 to the centrosome but dispensable for kinetochore targeting. In contrast, elements required for kinetochore targeting (the NTE and first two TPRs) are dispensable for centrosomal localization and function. These data are consistent with a separation of Mps1 function based on localization determinants within the N terminus. PMID:27339139

  2. Evidence for auto-inhibition by the N terminus of hADAR2 and activation by dsRNA binding.

    PubMed

    Macbeth, Mark R; Lingam, Arunth T; Bass, Brenda L

    2004-10-01

    Adenosine deaminases that act on RNA (ADARs) catalyze adenosine to inosine conversion in RNA that is largely double stranded. Human ADAR2 (hADAR2) contains two double-stranded RNA binding motifs (dsRBMs), separated by a 90-amino acid linker, and these are followed by the C-terminal catalytic domain. We assayed enzymatic activity of N-terminal deletion constructs of hADAR2 to determine the role of the dsRBMs and the intervening linker peptide. We found that a truncated protein consisting of one dsRBM and the deaminase domain was capable of deaminating a short 15-bp substrate. In contrast, full-length hADAR2 was inactive on this short substrate. In addition, we observed that the N terminus, which was deleted from the truncated protein, inhibits editing activity when added in trans. We propose that the N-terminal domain of hADAR2 contains sequences that cause auto-inhibition of the enzyme. Our results suggest activation requires binding to an RNA substrate long enough to accommodate interactions with both dsRBMs.

  3. Synthesis and properties of peptide nucleic acid labeled at the N-terminus with HiLyte Fluor 488 fluorescent dye.

    PubMed

    Hnedzko, Dziyana; McGee, Dennis W; Rozners, Eriks

    2016-09-15

    Fluorescently labeled peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) are important tools in fundamental research and biomedical applications. However, synthesis of labeled PNAs, especially using modern and expensive dyes, is less explored than similar preparations of oligonucleotide dye conjugates. Herein, we present a simple procedure for labeling of the PNA N-terminus with HiLyte Fluor 488 as the last step of solid phase PNA synthesis. A minimum excess of 1.25equiv of activated carboxylic acid achieved labeling yields close to 90% providing a good compromise between the price of dye and the yield of product and significant improvement over previous literature procedures. The HiLyte Fluor 488-labeled PNAs retained the RNA binding ability and in live cell fluorescence microscopy experiments were brighter and significantly more photostable than PNA labeled with carboxyfluorescein. In contrast to fluorescein-labeled PNA, the fluorescence of PNAs labeled with HiLyte Fluor 488 was independent of pH in the biologically relevant range of 5-8. The potential of HiLyte Fluor 488-labeling for studies of PNA cellular uptake and distribution was demonstrated in several cell lines.

  4. Solvent effect and time-dependent behavior of C-terminus-cysteine-modified cecropin P1 chemically immobilized on a polymer surface.

    PubMed

    Han, Xiaofeng; Soblosky, Lauren; Slutsky, Morris; Mello, Charlene M; Chen, Zhan

    2011-06-07

    Sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy has been applied to the investigation of peptide immobilization on a polymer surface as a function of time and peptide conformation. Surface immobilization of biological molecules is important in many applications such as biosensors, antimicrobial materials, biobased fuel cells, nanofabrication, and multifunctional materials. Using C-terminus-cysteine-modified cecropin P1 (CP1c) as a model, we investigated the time-dependent immobilization behavior in situ in real time. In addition, potassium phosphate buffer (PB) and mixtures of PB and trifluoroethanol were utilized to examine the effect of peptide secondary structure on CP1c immobilization to polystyrene maleimide (PS-MA). The orientation of immobilized CP1c on PS-MA was determined using polarized SFG spectra. It was found that the peptide solution concentration, solvent composition, and assembly state (monomer vs dimer) prior to immobilization all influence the orientation of CP1c on a PS-MA surface. The detailed relationship between the interfacial peptide orientation and these immobilization conditions is discussed.

  5. The relationship between truncation and phosphorylation at the C-terminus of tau protein in the paired helical filaments of Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Flores-Rodríguez, Paola; Ontiveros-Torres, Miguel A.; Cárdenas-Aguayo, María C.; Luna-Arias, Juan P.; Meraz-Ríos, Marco A.; Viramontes-Pintos, Amparo; Harrington, Charles R.; Wischik, Claude M.; Mena, Raúl; Florán-Garduño, Benjamin; Luna-Muñoz, José

    2015-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that, in the early stages of tau processing in Alzheimer's disease, the N-terminal part of the molecule undergoes a characteristic cascade of phosphorylation and progressive misfolding of the proteins resulting in a structural conformation detected by Alz-50. In this immunohistochemical study of AD brain tissue, we have found that C-terminal truncation of tau at Asp-421 was an early event in tau aggregation and analyzed the relationship between phospho-dependent tau epitopes located at the C-terminus with truncation at Glu-391. The aim of this study was to determine whether C-terminal truncation may trigger events leading to the assembly of insoluble PHFs from soluble tau aggregates present in pre-tangle cells. Our findings suggest that there is a complex interaction between phosphorylated and truncated tau species. A model is presented here in which truncated tau protein represents an early neurotoxic species while phosphorylated tau species may provide a neuroprotective role in Alzheimer's disease. PMID:25717290

  6. EPR Studies of Functionally Active, Nitroxide Spin-Labeled Peptide Analogs of the C-terminus of a G-Protein Alpha Subunit

    PubMed Central

    Van Eps, Ned; Anderson, Lori L.; Kisselev, Oleg G.; Baranski, Thomas J.; Hubbell, Wayne L.; Marshall, Garland R.

    2010-01-01

    The C-terminal tail of the transducin alpha subunit, Gtα(340–350), is known to bind and stabilize the active conformation of rhodopsin upon photoactivation (R*). Five spin-labeled analogs of Gtα(340–350) demonstrated native-like activity in their ability to bind and stabilize R*. The spin label 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl-4-amino-4-carboxylic acid (TOAC) was employed at interior sites within the peptide, whereas a Proxyl (3-carboxyl-2,2,5,5-tetramethyl-pyrrolidinyloxy) spin label was employed at the amino terminus of the peptide. Upon binding to R*, the electron paramagnetic resonance spectrum of TOAC343-Gtα(340–350) revealed greater immobilization of the nitroxide when compared to that of the N-terminal modified Proxyl-Gtα(340–350) analog. A double-labeled Proxyl/TOAC348-Gtα(340–350) was examined by DEER spectroscopy to determine the distribution of distances between the two nitroxides in the peptides when in solution and when bound to R*. TOAC and Proxyl spin labels in this GPCR-G-protein α-peptide system provide unique biophysical probes that can be used to explore the structure and conformational changes at the rhodopsin-G-protein interface. PMID:20695526

  7. The N-terminus of histone H2B, but not that of histone H3 or its phosphorylation, is essential for chromosome condensation

    PubMed Central

    de la Barre, Anne-Elisabeth; Angelov, Dimitri; Molla, Annie; Dimitrov, Stefan

    2001-01-01

    We have studied the role of individual histone N-termini and the phosphorylation of histone H3 in chromosome condensation. Nucleosomes, reconstituted with histone octamers containing different combinations of recombinant full-length and tailless histones, were used as competitors for chromosome assembly in Xenopus egg extracts. Nucleosomes reconstituted with intact octamers inhibited chromosome condensation as efficiently as the native ones, while tailless nucleosomes were unable to affect this process. Importantly, the addition to the extract of particles containing only intact histone H2B strongly interfered with chromosome formation while such an effect was not observed with particles lacking the N-terminal tail of H2B. This demonstrates that the inhibition effect observed in the presence of competitor nucleosomes is mainly due to the N-terminus of this histone, which, therefore, is essential for chromosome condensation. Nucleosomes in which all histones but H3 were tailless did not impede chromosome formation. In addition, when competitor nucleosome particles were reconstituted with full-length H2A, H2B and H4 and histone H3 mutated at the phosphorylable serine 10 or serine 28, their inhibiting efficiency was identical to that of the native particles. Hence, the tail of H3, whether intact or phosphorylated, is not important for chromosome condensation. A novel hypothesis, termed ‘the ready production label’ was suggested to explain the role of histone H3 phosphorylation during cell division. PMID:11707409

  8. PAK6 targets to cell–cell adhesions through its N-terminus in a Cdc42-dependent manner to drive epithelial colony escape

    PubMed Central

    Morse, Elizabeth M.; Sun, Xiaowen; Olberding, Jordan R.; Ha, Byung Hak; Boggon, Titus J.; Calderwood, David A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The six serine/threonine kinases in the p21-activated kinase (PAK) family are important regulators of cell adhesion, motility and survival. PAK6, which is overexpressed in prostate cancer, was recently reported to localize to cell–cell adhesions and to drive epithelial cell colony escape. Here we report that PAK6 targeting to cell–cell adhesions occurs through its N-terminus, requiring both its Cdc42/Rac interactive binding (CRIB) domain and an adjacent polybasic region for maximal targeting efficiency. We find PAK6 localization to cell–cell adhesions is Cdc42-dependent, as Cdc42 knockdown inhibits PAK6 targeting to cell–cell adhesions. We further find the ability of PAK6 to drive epithelial cell colony escape requires kinase activity and is disrupted by mutations that perturb PAK6 cell–cell adhesion targeting. Finally, we demonstrate that all type II PAKs (PAK4, PAK5 and PAK6) target to cell–cell adhesions, albeit to differing extents, but PAK1 (a type I PAK) does not. Notably, the ability of a PAK isoform to drive epithelial colony escape correlates with its targeting to cell–cell adhesions. We conclude that PAKs have a broader role in the regulation of cell–cell adhesions than previously appreciated. PMID:26598554

  9. Conserved structural motifs at the C-terminus of baculovirus protein IE0 are important for its functions in transactivation and supporting hr5-mediated DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Luria, Neta; Lu, Liqun; Chejanovsky, Nor

    2012-05-01

    IE0 and IE1 are transactivator proteins of the most studied baculovirus, the Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV). IE0 is a 72.6 kDa protein identical to IE1 with the exception of its 54 N-terminal amino acid residues. To gain some insight about important structural motifs of IE0, we expressed the protein and C‑terminal mutants of it under the control of the Drosophila heat shock promoter and studied the transactivation and replication functions of the transiently expressed proteins. IE0 was able to promote replication of a plasmid bearing the hr5 origin of replication of AcMNPV in transient transfections with a battery of eight plasmids expressing the AcMNPV genes dnapol, helicase, lef-1, lef-2, lef-3, p35, ie-2 and lef-7. IE0 transactivated expression of the baculovirus 39K promoter. Both functions of replication and transactivation were lost after introduction of selected mutations at the basic domain II and helix-loop-helix conserved structural motifs in the C-terminus of the protein. These IE0 mutants were unable to translocate to the cell nucleus. Our results point out the important role of some structural conserved motifs to the proper functioning of IE0.

  10. The C-Terminus of Human Copper Importer Ctr1 Acts as a Binding Site and Transfers Copper to Atox1

    PubMed Central

    Kahra, Dana; Kovermann, Michael; Wittung-Stafshede, Pernilla

    2016-01-01

    Uptake of copper (Cu) ions into human cells is mediated by the plasma membrane protein Ctr1 and is followed by Cu transfer to cytoplasmic Cu chaperones for delivery to Cu-dependent enzymes. The C-terminal cytoplasmic tail of Ctr1 is a 13-residue peptide harboring an HCH motif that is thought to interact with Cu. We here employ biophysical experiments under anaerobic conditions in peptide models of the Ctr1 C-terminus to deduce Cu-binding residues, Cu affinity, and the ability to release Cu to the cytoplasmic Cu chaperone Atox1. Based on NMR assignments and bicinchoninic acid competition experiments, we demonstrate that Cu interacts in a 1:1 stoichiometry with the HCH motif with an affinity, KD, of ∼10−14 M. Removing either the Cys residue or the two His residues lowers the Cu-peptide affinity, but site specificity is retained. The C-terminal peptide and Atox1 do not interact in solution in the absence of Cu. However, as directly demonstrated at the residue level via NMR spectroscopy, Atox1 readily acquires Cu from the Cu-loaded peptide. We propose that Cu binding to the Ctr1 C-terminal tail regulates Cu transport into the cytoplasm such that the metal ion is only released to high-affinity Cu chaperones. PMID:26745413

  11. Specific Sites in the C Terminus of CTCF Interact with the SA2 Subunit of the Cohesin Complex and Are Required for Cohesin-Dependent Insulation Activity ▿

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Tiaojiang; Wallace, Julie; Felsenfeld, Gary

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that the protein CTCF, which plays an important role in insulation and in large-scale organization of chromatin within the eukaryotic nucleus, depends for both activities on recruitment of the cohesin complex. We show here that the interaction of CTCF with the cohesin complex involves direct contacts between the cohesin subunit SA2 and specific regions of the C-terminal tail of CTCF. All other cohesin components are recruited through their interaction with SA2. Expression in vivo of CTCF mutants lacking the C-terminal domain, or with mutations at sites within it required for SA2 binding, disrupts the normal expression profile of the imprinted genes IGF2-H19 and also results in a loss of insulation activity. Taken together, our results demonstrate that specific sites on the C terminus of CTCF are essential for cohesin binding and insulator function. The only direct interaction between CTCF and cohesin involves contact with SA2, which is external to the cohesin ring. This suggests that in recruiting cohesin to CTCF, SA2 could bind first and the ring could assemble subsequently. PMID:21444719

  12. Evidence for the binding of phosphate ion to the C-terminus region in Abeta1-40 using heteronuclear NMR analyses.

    PubMed

    Nagata-Uchiyama, Makiko; Abe, Yoshito; Monji, Akira; Kanba, Shigenobu; Ueda, Tadashi

    2010-02-01

    Amyloid fibril formation of amyloid beta peptide 1-40 (Abeta 1-40) was reported to be retarded in the presence of 150mM phosphate buffer at pH 7 [Monji, Ustumi, Ueda, Imoto, Yoshida, Hashioka, Tashiro and Tashiro, J. Neurochemistry, 77, 1425-1432 (2007)]. In order to elucidate the reason why phosphate ion retards the amyloid fibril formation, we examined the preferential binding sites of phosphate ion to Abeta 1-40 using chemical shift perturbation analysis of heteronuclear NMR. In titration analysis of (15)N-labeled Abeta1-40 in the presence of 150 mM phosphate ion or 150 mM chloride ion, we identified the residues affected by these ions in Abeta 1-40. As a result, we found the tendency that phosphate ion preferentially bound to some residues located on the C-terminus region where the region was reported to be the potential beta-strand region in Abeta1-40. Therefore, we suggested that phosphate ions interacted with the potential beta-strand region in Abeta1-40 to be hard to form beta-sheet in Abeta 1-40, resulting in retardation of the amyloid fibril formation.

  13. Vaccination of Cattle with the N Terminus of LppQ of Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides Results in Type III Immune Complex Disease upon Experimental Infection

    PubMed Central

    Frey, Joachim; Smith, Ken; Schnier, Christian; Wesonga, Hezron; Naessens, Jan; McKeever, Declan

    2015-01-01

    Contagious bovine pleuropneumonia (CBPP) is a serious respiratory disease of cattle caused by Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides. Current vaccines against CBPP induce short-lived immunity and can cause severe postvaccine reactions. Previous studies have identified the N terminus of the transmembrane lipoprotein Q (LppQ-N′) of M. mycoides subsp. mycoides as the major antigen and a possible virulence factor. We therefore immunized cattle with purified recombinant LppQ-N′ formulated in Freund's adjuvant and challenged them with M. mycoides subsp. mycoides. Vaccinated animals showed a strong seroconversion to LppQ, but they exhibited significantly enhanced postchallenge glomerulonephritis compared to the placebo group (P = 0.021). Glomerulonephritis was characterized by features that suggested the development of antigen-antibody immune complexes. Clinical signs and gross pathological scores did not significantly differ between vaccinated and placebo groups. These findings reveal for the first time the pathogenesis of enhanced disease as a result of antibodies against LppQ during challenge and also argue against inclusion of LppQ-N′ in a future subunit vaccine for CBPP. PMID:25733516

  14. Direct identification of residues of the epidermal growth factor receptor in close proximity to the amino terminus of bound epidermal growth factor.

    PubMed Central

    Woltjer, R L; Lukas, T J; Staros, J V

    1992-01-01

    We have recently developed a kinetically controlled, step-wise affinity cross-linking technique for specific, high-yield, covalent linkage of murine epidermal growth factor (mEGF) via its N terminus to the EGF receptor. EGF receptor from A431 cells was cross-linked to radiolabeled mEGF (125I-mEGF) by this technique and the 125I-mEGF-receptor complex was purified and denatured. Tryptic digestion of this preparation gave rise to a unique radiolabeled peptide that did not comigrate with trypsin-treated 125I-mEGF in SDS/Tricine gels but that could be immunoprecipitated with antibodies to mEGF. The immunoprecipitated peptide was isolated by electrophoresis in SDS/Tricine gels, eluted, and sequenced. The sequence was found to correspond to that of a tryptic peptide of the EGF receptor beginning with Gly-85, which is in domain I, a region N terminal to the first cysteine-rich region of the receptor. Selective loss of signal in the 17th sequencing cycle suggests that the point of attachment of N-terminally modified 125I-mEGF to the receptor is Tyr-101. The data presented here provide identification by direct protein microsequencing of a site of interaction of EGF and the EGF receptor. Images PMID:1380167

  15. Biosynthesis of bacteriochlorophyll c derivatives possessing chlorine and bromine atoms at the terminus of esterifying chains in the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobaculum tepidum.

    PubMed

    Saga, Yoshitaka; Hayashi, Keisuke; Mizoguchi, Tadashi; Tamiaki, Hitoshi

    2014-07-01

    The green sulfur photosynthetic bacterium Chlorobaculum tepidum newly produced BChl c derivatives possessing a chlorine or bromine atom at the terminus of the esterifying chain in the 17-propionate residue by cultivation with exogenous ω-halo-1-alkanols. The relative ratios of BChl c derivatives esterified with 8-chloro-1-octanol and 10-chloro-1-decanol were estimated to be 26.5% and 33.3% by cultivation with these ω-chloro-1-alkanols at the final concentrations of 300 and 150 μM, respectively. In contrast, smaller amounts of unnatural BChls c esterified with ω-bromo-1-alkanols were biosynthesized than those esterified with ω-chloro-1-alkanols: the ratios of BChl c derivatives esterified with 8-bromo-1-octanol and 10-bromo-1-decanol were 11.3% and 12.2% at the concentrations of 300 and 150 μM, respectively. These indicate that ω-chloro-1-alkanols can be incorporated into bacteriochlorophyllide c more than ω-bromo-1-alkanols in the BChl c biosynthetic pathway. The homolog compositions of the novel BChl c derivatives possessing a halogen atom were analogous to those of coexisting natural BChl c esterified with farnesol. These results demonstrate unique properties of BChl c synthase, BchK, which can utilize unnatural substrates containing halogen in the BChl c biosynthesis of Cba. tepidum.

  16. Sequential truncation of the lactose permease over a three-amino acid sequence near the carboxyl terminus leads to progressive loss of activity and stability

    SciTech Connect

    McKenna, E.; Hardy, D.; Pastore, J.C.; Kaback, H.R. )

    1991-04-15

    Previous experiments are consistent with the notion that residues 396-401 (...SVFTLS...) at the carboxyl terminus of the last putative transmembrane helix of the lactose (lac) permease of Escherichia coli are important for protection against proteolytic degradation and suggest that this region of the permease may be necessary for proper folding. Stop codons (TAA) have now been substituted sequentially for amino acid codons 396-401 in the lacY gene, and the termination mutants were expressed from the plasmid pT7-5. With respect to transport, permease truncated at residue 396-or 397 is completely defective, while molecules truncated at residues 398, 399, 400, and 401, respectively, exhibit 15-25%, 30-40%, 40-45%, and 70-100% of wild-type activity. As judged by pulse-chase experiments with ({sup 35}S)methionine, wild-type permease or permease truncated at residue 401 is stable, while permease molecules truncated at position 400, 399, 398, 397, or 396 are degraded at increasingly rapid rates. The findings indicate that either the last turn of putative helix XII or the region immediately distal to helix XII is important for proper folding and protection against proteolytic degradation.

  17. The Drosophila mus101 gene, which links DNA repair, replication and condensation of heterochromatin in mitosis, encodes a protein with seven BRCA1 C-terminus domains.

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, R R; Axton, J M; Yamamoto, Y; Saunders, R D; Glover, D M; Henderson, D S

    2000-01-01

    The mutagen-sensitive-101 (mus101) gene of Drosophila melanogaster was first identified 25 years ago through mutations conferring larval hypersensitivity to DNA-damaging agents. Other alleles of mus101 causing different phenotypes were later isolated: a female sterile allele results in a defect in a tissue-specific form of DNA synthesis (chorion gene amplification) and lethal alleles cause mitotic chromosome instability that can be observed genetically and cytologically. The latter phenotype presents as a striking failure of mitotic chromosomes of larval neuroblasts to undergo condensation of pericentric heterochromatic regions, as we show for a newly described mutant carrying lethal allele mus101(lcd). To gain further insight into the function of the Mus101 protein we have molecularly cloned the gene using a positional cloning strategy. We report here that mus101 encodes a member of the BRCT (BRCA1 C terminus) domain superfamily of proteins implicated in DNA repair and cell cycle checkpoint control. Mus101, which contains seven BRCT domains distributed throughout its length, is most similar to human TopBP1, a protein identified through its in vitro association with DNA topoisomerase IIbeta. Mus101 also shares sequence similarity with the fission yeast Rad4/Cut5 protein required for repair, replication, and checkpoint control, suggesting that the two proteins may be functional homologs. PMID:11014818

  18. Public service user terminus study compendium of terminus equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    General descriptions and specifications are given for equipments which facilitate satellite and terrestrial communications delivery by acting as interfaces between a human, mechanical, or electrical information generator (or source) and the communication system. Manufactures and suppliers are given as well as the purchase, service, or lease costs of various products listed under the following cateories: voice/telephony/facsimile equipment; data/graphics terminals; full motion and processes video equipment; and multiple access equipment.

  19. Role of N–epsilon- carboxy methyl lysine, advanced glycation end products and reactive oxygen species for the development of nonproliferative and proliferative retinopathy in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Choudhuri, Subhadip; Dutta, Deep; Sen, Aditi; Chowdhury, Imran Hussain; Mitra, Bhaskar; Mondal, Lakshmi Kanta; Saha, Avijit; Bhadhuri, Gautam

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The aim of the present study was to evaluate the collective role of N-epsilon–carboxy methyl lysine (Nε-CML), advanced glycation end-products (AGEs), and reactive oxygen species (ROS) for the development of retinopathy among type 2 diabetic subjects. Methods Seventy type 2 diabetic subjects with nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR), 105 subjects with proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR), and 102 patients with diabetes but without retinopathy (DNR) were enrolled in this study. In addition, 95 normal individuals without diabetes were enrolled as healthy controls in this study. Serum and vitreous Nε-CML and AGEs were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) ROS level was measured by flow cytometric analysis. Serum and PBMC total thiols were measured by spectrophotometry. Results Serum AGEs and Nε-CML levels were significantly elevated in subjects with PDR (p<0.0001) and NPDR (p=0.0297 and p<0.0001, respectively) compared to DNR subjects. Further vitreous AGEs and Nε-CML levels were found to be significantly high among PDR subjects compared to the control group (p<0.0001). PBMC ROS production was found to be strikingly high among NPDR (p<0.0001) and PDR (p<0.0001) subjects as compared to the DNR group. Serum and PBMC total thiol levels were remarkably decreased in NPDR (p<0.0001 and p=0.0043, respectively) and PDR (p=0.0108 and p=0.0332 respectively) subjects than those were considered as DNR. Conclusions Our findings suggest that Nε-CML and ROS are the key modulators for the development of nonproliferative retinopathy among poorly controlled type 2 diabetic subjects. Furthermore, AGEs under persistent oxidative stress and the deprived antioxidant state might instigate the pathogenic process of retinopathy from the nonproliferative to the proliferative state. PMID:23378723

  20. Villain's fractal growth of poly[1-[4-(3-carboxy-4-hydroxyphenylazo) benzenesulfonamido]-1,2-ethanediyl, sodium salt] J-aggregates onto layer-by-layer films and its effect on film absorbance spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Quirina; António Ribeiro, Paulo; Raposo, Maria

    2013-06-01

    Morphology of poly(allylamine hydrochloride) and poly[1-[4-(3-carboxy-4-hydroxyphenylazo) benzenesulfonamido]-1,2-ethanediyl, sodium salt] (PAZO) layer-by-layer (LBL) films is shown to influence the orientation of PAZO chromophores with respect to solid support surface, which in turn is related with observed red-shifts changes of the chromophore absorbance peak position relative to that of solution spectrum, as the bilayers are being deposited. For the first bilayers, an increase of red shift values is observed, while roughness and grain radius are kept practically constant; after the 5th bilayer, the red-shift values decrease, while grain sizes increase and the number of grains decreases. This behavior is consistent with adsorption of coiled PAZO molecules, treated as pseudo-particles, with the chromophores head-to-head oriented-J aggregates. These aggregates adsorb perpendicularly to the substrate surface for the first layers and, as roughness and grain radius increase, the adsorption of the J aggregates takes place parallel to the solid support surface, which gives rise to a decrease in the red shift value. Moreover, the adsorption of these pseudo-particles follows a fractal growth characterized by a scaling exponent of α = 0.80 ± 0.02 and a temporal growth exponent of β = 0.17 ± 0.02. These values suggest a layer growth according with Villain model, which accounts for the interactions between deposited particles and the surface. This is in accordance with the electrostatic forces driving LbL film formation and accounts for the observed morphology behavior for the different number of layers.

  1. Validation of a two-dimensional gas chromatography mass spectrometry method for the simultaneous quantification of cannabidiol, Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), 11-hydroxy-THC, and 11-nor-9-carboxy-THC in plasma.

    PubMed

    Karschner, Erin L; Barnes, Allan J; Lowe, Ross H; Scheidweiler, Karl B; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2010-05-01

    A sensitive analytical method for simultaneous quantification of sub-nanogram concentrations of cannabidiol (CBD), Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), 11-hydroxy-THC (11-OH-THC), and 11-nor-9-carboxy-THC (THCCOOH) in plasma is presented for monitoring cannabinoid pharmacotherapy and illicit cannabis use. Analytes were extracted from 1 mL plasma by solid-phase extraction, derivatized with N,O-bis(trimethylsilyl) trifluoroacetamide with 1% trimethylchlorosilane, and analyzed by two-dimensional gas chromatography mass spectrometry (2D-GCMS) with cryofocusing. The lower calibration curve was linear from 0.25-25 ng/mL for CBD and THC, 0.125-25 ng/mL for 11-OH-THC and 0.25-50 ng/mL for THCCOOH. A second higher linear range from 5-100 ng/mL, achieved through modification of injection parameters, was validated for THC, 11-OH-THC, and THCCOOH and was only implemented if concentrations exceeded the lower curve upper limit of linearity. This procedure prevented laborious re-extraction by allowing the same specimen to be re-injected for quantification on the high calibration curve. Intra- and inter-assay imprecision, determined at four quality control concentrations, were or=72.9% for all analytes. Analytes were stable when stored at 22 degrees C for 16 h, 4 degrees C for 48 h, after three freeze-thaw cycles at -20 degrees C and when stored on the autosampler for 48 h. This sensitive and specific 2D-GCMS assay provides a new means of simultaneously quantifying CBD, THC and metabolite biomarkers in clinical medicine, forensic toxicology, workplace drug testing, and driving under the influence of drugs programs.

  2. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of THC, 11-hydroxy-THC and 11-nor-9-carboxy-THC in whole blood by ultra-performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Simões, Susana Sadler; Ajenjo, Antonio Castañera; Dias, Mário João

    2011-09-30

    A qualitative and quantitative analytical method was developed for the simultaneous determination of Δ(9) -tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), 11-hydroxy-Δ(9) -tetrahydrocannabinol (11-OH-THC) and l1-nor-9-carboxy-Δ(9) -tetrahydrocannabinol (THC-COOH) in whole blood. The samples were prepared by solid-phase extraction followed by ultra-performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC/MS/MS) analysis using positive ion electrospray ionization and multiple reaction monitoring. The chromatographic separation was performed with an Acquity UPLC® HSS T3 (50 × 2.1 mm i.d., 1.8 µm) reversed-phase column using a methanol/2 mM ammonium formate (formic acid 0.1%) gradient in a total run time of 9.5 min. MS/MS detection was achieved with two precursor-product ion transitions per substance. The method was fully validated, including selectivity and capacity of identification, according to the identification criteria (two transitions per substance, signal-to-noise ratio, relative retention time and ion ratio) without the presence of interferences, limit of detection (0.2 µg/L for THC and 0.5 µg/L for 11-OH-THC and THC-COOH), limit of quantitation (0.5 µg/L for all cannabinoids), recovery (53-115%), carryover, matrix effect (34-43%), linearity (0.5-100 µg/L), intra-assay precision (CV < 10% for the relative peak area ratios and <0.1% for the relative retention time), inter-assay accuracy (mean relative error <10%) and precision (CV <11%). The method has already been successfully used in proficiency tests and subsequently applied to authentic samples in routine forensic analysis.

  3. Simultaneous determination of Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol, 11-hydroxy-Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol and 11-nor-9-carboxy- Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol in human plasma by high-performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Maralikova, Barbora; Weinmann, Wolfgang

    2004-05-01

    A rapid and sensitive method for the simultaneous confirmatory analysis of three forensic most relevant cannabinoids, Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), 11-hydroxy-Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (11-OH-THC) and 11-nor-9-carboxy-Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC-COOH), by means of high-performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) in human plasma was developed and fully validated. Sample clean-up was performed by automated silica-based solid-phase extraction and the separation was carried out using a PhenylHexyl column (50 x 2 mm i.d., 3 micro m) and acetonitrile-5 mM ammonium acetate gradient elution. Data were acquired with an API 3000 LC/MS/MS system equipped with a turboionspray interface and triple quadrupole mass analyzer using positive electrospray ionization and multiple reaction monitoring. Two MS/MS transitions for each substance were monitored and deuterated analogues of analytes were used as internal standards for quantitation. The limit of quantitation was 0.8 ng ml(-1) for THC, 0.8 ng ml(-1) for 11-OH-THC and 4.3 ng ml(-1) for THC-COOH and linearity with a correlation coefficient r(2) = 0.999 was achieved up to 100 ng ml(-1) for THC and 11-OH-THC and 500 ng ml(-1) for THC-COOH. The limits of detection were 0.2 ng ml(-1) for THC, 0.2 ng ml(-1) for 11-OH-THC and 1.6 ng ml(-1) for THC-COOH. The developed LC/MS/MS method was also successfully used for the determination of THC-COOH-glucuronide, the phase II metabolite of THC-COOH.

  4. Characterization of Nuclear Localization Signal in the N Terminus of CUL4B and Its Essential Role in Cyclin E Degradation and Cell Cycle Progression*

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Yongxin; Mi, Jun; Cui, Jinpeng; Lu, Defen; Zhang, Xiyu; Guo, Chenhong; Gao, Guimin; Liu, Qiji; Chen, Bingxi; Shao, Changshun; Gong, Yaoqin

    2009-01-01

    CUL4A and CUL4B, which are derived from the same ancestor, CUL4, encode scaffold proteins that organize cullin-RING ubiquitin ligase (E3) complexes. Recent genetic studies have shown that germ line mutation in CUL4B can cause mental retardation, short stature, and other abnormalities in humans. CUL4A was observed to be overexpressed in breast and hepatocellular cancers, although no germ line mutation in human CUL4A has been reported. Although CUL4A has been known to be involved in a number of cellular processes, including DNA repair and cell cycle regulation, little is known about whether CUL4B has similar functions. In this report, we tested the functional importance of CUL4B in cell proliferation and characterized the nuclear localization signal (NLS) that is essential for its function. We found that RNA interference silencing of CUL4B led to an inhibition of cell proliferation and a prolonged S phase, due to the overaccumulation of cyclin E, a substrate targeted by CUL4B for ubiquitination. We showed that, unlike CUL4A and other cullins that carry their NLS in their C termini, NLS in CUL4B is located in its N terminus, between amino acid 37 and 40, KKRK. This NLS could bind to importin α1, α3, and α5. NLS-deleted CUL4B was distributed in cytoplasm and failed to promote cell proliferation. Therefore, the nuclear localization of CUL4B mediated by NLS is critical for its normal function in cell proliferation. PMID:19801544

  5. The Role of the Carboxyl Terminus Helix C-D Linker in Regulating KCNQ3 K+ Current Amplitudes by Controlling Channel Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Choveau, Frank S.; Zhang, Jie; Bierbower, Sonya M.; Sharma, Ramaswamy; Shapiro, Mark S.

    2015-01-01

    In the central and peripheral nervous system, the assembly of KCNQ3 with KCNQ2 as mostly heteromers, but also homomers, underlies “M-type” currents, a slowly-activating voltage-gated K+ current that plays a dominant role in neuronal excitability. KCNQ3 homomers yield much smaller currents compared to KCNQ2 or KCNQ4 homomers and KCNQ2/3 heteromers. This smaller current has been suggested to result either from divergent channel surface expression or from a pore that is more unstable in KCNQ3. Channel surface expression has been shown to be governed by the distal part of the C-terminus in which helices C and D are critical for channel trafficking and assembly. A sequence alignment of this region in KCNQ channels shows that KCNQ3 possesses a longer linker between helix C and D compared to the other KCNQ subunits. Here, we investigate the role of the extra residues of this linker on KCNQ channel expression. Deletion of these residues increased KCNQ3 current amplitudes. Total internal reflection fluorescence imaging and plasma membrane protein assays suggest that the increase in current is due to a higher surface expression of the channels. Conversely, introduction of the extra residues into the linker between helices C and D of KCNQ4 reduced current amplitudes by decreasing the number of KCNQ4 channels at the plasma membrane. Confocal imaging suggests a higher fraction of channels, which possess the extra residues of helix C-D linker, were retained within the endoplasmic reticulum. Such retention does not appear to lead to protein accumulation and activation of the unfolded protein response that regulates protein folding and maintains endoplasmic reticulum homeostasis. Taken together, we conclude that extra helix C-D linker residues play a role in KCNQ3 current amplitudes by controlling the exit of the channel from the endoplasmic reticulum. PMID:26692086

  6. The C-terminus of H-Ras as a target for the covalent binding of reactive compounds modulating Ras-dependent pathways.

    PubMed

    Oeste, Clara L; Díez-Dacal, Beatriz; Bray, Francesca; García de Lacoba, Mario; de la Torre, Beatriz G; Andreu, David; Ruiz-Sánchez, Antonio J; Pérez-Inestrosa, Ezequiel; García-Domínguez, Carlota A; Rojas, José M; Pérez-Sala, Dolores

    2011-01-06

    Ras proteins are crucial players in differentiation and oncogenesis and constitute important drug targets. The localization and activity of Ras proteins are highly dependent on posttranslational modifications at their C-termini. In addition to an isoprenylated cysteine, H-Ras, but not other Ras proteins, possesses two cysteine residues (C181 and C184) in the C-terminal hypervariable domain that act as palmitoylation sites in cells. Cyclopentenone prostaglandins (cyPG) are reactive lipidic mediators that covalently bind to H-Ras and activate H-Ras dependent pathways. Dienone cyPG, such as 15-deoxy-Δ(12,14)-PGJ(2) (15d-PGJ(2)) and Δ(12)-PGJ(2) selectively bind to the H-Ras hypervariable domain. Here we show that these cyPG bind simultaneously C181 and C184 of H-Ras, thus potentially altering the conformational tendencies of the hypervariable domain. Based on these results, we have explored the capacity of several bifunctional cysteine reactive small molecules to bind to the hypervariable domain of H-Ras proteins. Interestingly, phenylarsine oxide (PAO), a widely used tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor, and dibromobimane, a cross-linking agent used for cysteine mapping, effectively bind H-Ras hypervariable domain. The interaction of PAO with H-Ras takes place in vitro and in cells and blocks modification of H-Ras by 15d-PGJ(2). Moreover, PAO treatment selectively alters H-Ras membrane partition and the pattern of H-Ras activation in cells, from the plasma membrane to endomembranes. These results identify H-Ras as a novel target for PAO. More importantly, these observations reveal that small molecules or reactive intermediates interacting with spatially vicinal cysteines induce intramolecular cross-linking of H-Ras C-terminus potentially contributing to the modulation of Ras-dependent pathways.

  7. A hydrophobic amino acid cluster inserted into the C-terminus of a recycling cell surface receptor functions as an endosomal sorting signal.

    PubMed

    Amano, Yuji; Yoshino, Kazuhisa; Kojima, Katsuhiko; Takeshita, Toshikazu

    2013-11-08

    Cell surface receptors ubiquitylated after ligand stimulation are internalized and delivered to the lysosomal pathway for degradation. Ubiquitylated receptors are captured by ESCRT protein complexes that sort them to the lysosomal pathway. Hepatocyte growth factor-regulated tyrosine kinase substrate (Hrs) is a component of endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRT)-0 that recognizes ubiquitin attached to receptors, indicating that it functions as a key molecule for ubiquitin-dependent endosomal sorting. In a previous study on interleukin (IL)-2 receptor β (IL-2Rβ) and IL-4 receptor α (IL-4Rα), which are constitutively internalized without ligand stimulation, we revealed that Hrs bound to IL-2Rβ and IL-4Rα in a ubiquitin-independent manner, and identified a hydrophobic amino acid cluster in the cytoplasmic region of IL-2Rβ and IL-4Rα as the Hrs-interacting domain. However, a chimeric receptor containing the hydrophobic amino acid cluster inserted into the C-terminal of IL-2Rα was not delivered to late endosomes, but recycled back to the plasma membrane. In the present study, we explored the functional domain related to endosomal sorting in IL-2Rβ together with the hydrophobic amino acid cluster, and discovered the importance of an approximately 30-amino acid stretch following the C-terminus of the hydrophobic amino acid cluster in IL-2Rβ. Even though the amino acid stretch following the hydrophobic amino acid cluster was composed of arbitrary amino acids, such a stretch was also permissive for the sorting ability, suggesting that the hydrophobic amino acid cluster functions as an endosomal sorting signal. These findings clarify part of the molecular mechanism underlying the ubiquitin-independent endosomal sorting of cytokine receptors that are constitutively internalized without ligand stimulation.

  8. Cross-talk between the octarepeat domain and the fifth binding site of prion protein driven by the interaction of copper(II) with the N-terminus.

    PubMed

    Di Natale, Giuseppe; Turi, Ildikó; Pappalardo, Giuseppe; Sóvágó, Imre; Rizzarelli, Enrico

    2015-03-02

    Prion diseases are a group of neurodegenerative diseases based on the conformational conversion of the normal form of the prion protein (PrP(C)) to the disease-related scrapie isoform (PrP(Sc)). Copper(II) coordination to PrP(C) has attracted considerable interest for almost 20 years, mainly due to the possibility that such an interaction would be an important event for the physiological function of PrP(C). In this work, we report the copper(II) coordination features of the peptide fragment Ac(PEG11)3PrP(60-114) [Ac = acetyl] as a model for the whole N-terminus of the PrP(C) metal-binding domain. We studied the complexation properties of the peptide by means of potentiometric, UV/Vis, circular dichroism and electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry techniques. The results revealed that the preferred histidyl binding sites largely depend on the pH and copper(II)/peptide ratio. Formation of macrochelate species occurs up to a 2:1 metal/peptide ratio in the physiological pH range and simultaneously involves the histidyl residues present both inside and outside the octarepeat domain. However, at increased copper(II)/peptide ratios amide-bound species form, especially within the octarepeat domain. On the contrary, at basic pH the amide-bound species predominate at any copper/peptide ratio and are formed preferably with the binding sites of His96 and His111, which is similar to the metal-binding-affinity order observed in our previous studies.

  9. The C-terminus of murine S100A9 protein inhibits hyperalgesia induced by the agonist peptide of protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2)

    PubMed Central

    Dale, C S; Cenac, N; Britto, L R G; Juliano, M A; Juliano, L; Vergnolle, N; Giorgi, R

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: S100A9 protein induces anti-nociception in rodents, in different experimental models of inflammatory pain. Herein, we investigated the effects of a fragment of the C-terminus of S100A9 (mS100A9p), on the hyperalgesia induced by serine proteases, through the activation of protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR2). Experimental approach: Mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia induced by PAR2 agonists (SLIGRL-NH2 and trypsin) was measured in rats submitted to the paw pressure or plantar tests, and Egr-1 expression was determined by immunohistochemistry in rat spinal cord dorsal horn. Calcium flux in human embryonic kidney cells (HEK), which naturally express PAR2, in Kirsten virus-transformed kidney cells, transfected (KNRK-PAR2) or not (KNRK) with PAR2, and in mouse dorsal root ganglia neurons (DRG) was measured by fluorimetric methods. Key results: mS100A9p inhibited mechanical hyperalgesia induced by trypsin, without modifying its enzymatic activity. Mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia induced by SLIGRL-NH2 were inhibited by mS100A9p. SLIGRL-NH2 enhanced Egr-1 expression, a marker of nociceptor activation, and this effect was inhibited by concomitant treatment with mS100A9p. mS100A9p inhibited calcium mobilization in DRG neurons in response to the PAR2 agonists trypsin and SLIGRL-NH2, but also in response to capsaicin and bradykinin, suggesting a direct effect of mS100A9 on sensory neurons. No effect on the calcium flux induced by trypsin or SLIGRL in HEK cells or KNRK-PAR2 cells was observed. Conclusions and implications: These data demonstrate that mS100A9p interferes with mechanisms involved in nociception and hyperalgesia and modulates, possibly directly on sensory neurons, the PAR2-induced nociceptive signal. PMID:16967049

  10. NMR structures of anti-HIV D-peptides derived from the N-terminus of viral chemokine vMIP-II

    SciTech Connect

    Mori, Mayuko; Liu Dongxiang; Kumar, Santosh; Huang Ziwei; E-mail: ziweihuang@burnham.org

    2005-09-30

    The viral macrophage inflammatory protein-II (vMIP-II) encoded by Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus has unique biological activities in that it blocks the cell entry by several different human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) strains via chemokine receptors including CXCR4 and CCR5. In this paper, we report the solution structure of all-D-amino acid peptides derived from the N-terminus of vMIP-II, which have been shown to have strong CXCR4 binding activity and potently inhibit HIV-1 entry via CXCR4, by using long mixing time two-dimensional nuclear Overhauser enhancement spectroscopy experiments. Both of all-D-peptides vMIP-II (1-10) and vMIP-II (1-21), which are designated as DV3 and DV1, respectively, have higher CXCR4 binding ability than their L-peptide counterparts. They are partially structured in aqueous solution, displaying a turn-like structure over residues 5-8. The small temperature coefficients of His-6 amide proton for both peptides also suggest the formation of a small hydrophobic pocket centered on His-6. The structural features of DV3 are very similar to the reported solution structure of all-L-peptide vMIP-II (1-10) [M.P. Crump, E. Elisseeva, J. Gong, I. Clark-Lewis, B.D. Sykes, Structure/function of human herpesvirus-8 MIP-II (1-71) and the antagonist N-terminal segment (1-10), FEBS Lett. 489 (2001) 171], which is consistent with the notion that D- and L-enantiomeric peptides can adopt mirror image conformations. The NMR structures of the D-peptides provide a structural basis to understand their mechanism of action and design new peptidomimetic analogs to further explore the structure-activity relationship of D-peptide ligand binding to CXCR4.

  11. The C-terminus of the kinase-defective neuregulin receptor ErbB-3 confers mitogenic superiority and dictates endocytic routing.

    PubMed Central

    Waterman, H; Alroy, I; Strano, S; Seger, R; Yarden, Y

    1999-01-01

    Signaling by the epidermal growth factor (EGF) family and the neuregulin group of ligands is mediated by four ErbB receptor tyrosine kinases, that form homo- and heterodimeric complexes. Paradoxically, the neuregulin receptor ErbB-3 is devoid of catalytic activity, but its heterodimerization with other ErbBs, particularly the ligand-less ErbB-2 oncoprotein of carcinomas, reconstitutes superior mitogenic and transforming activities. To understand the underlying mechanism we constructed a chimeric EGF-receptor (ErbB-1) whose autophosphorylation C-terminal domain was replaced by the corresponding portion of ErbB-3. Consistent with the possibility that this domain recruits a relatively potent signaling pathway(s), the mitogenic signals generated by the recombinant fusion protein were superior to those generated by ErbB-1 homodimers and comparable to the proliferative activity of ErbB-2/ErbB-3 heterodimers. Upon ligand binding, the chimeric receptor recruited an ErbB-3-specific repertoire of signaling proteins, including Shc and the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, but excluding the ErbB-1-specific substrate, phospholipase Cgamma1. Unlike ErbB-1, which is destined to lysosomal degradation through a mechanism that includes recruitment of c-Cbl and receptor poly-ubiquitination, the C-terminal tail of ErbB-3 shunted the chimeric protein to the ErbB-3-characteristic recycling pathway. These observations attribute the mitogenic superiority of ErbB-3 to its C-terminal tail and imply that the flanking kinase domain has lost catalytic activity in order to restrain the relatively potent signaling capability of the C-terminus. PMID:10369675

  12. A lipopolysaccharide-binding domain of the Campylobacter fetus S-layer protein resides within the conserved N terminus of a family of silent and divergent homologs.

    PubMed Central

    Dworkin, J; Tummuru, M K; Blaser, M J

    1995-01-01

    Campylobacter fetus cells can produce multiple S-layer proteins ranging from 97 to 149 kDa, with a single form predominating in cultured cells. We have cloned, sequenced, and expressed in Escherichia coli a sapA homolog, sapA2, which encodes a full-length 1,109-amino-acid (112-kDa) S-layer protein. Comparison with the two previously cloned sapA homologs has demonstrated two regions of identity, approximately 70 bp before the open reading frame (ORF) and proceeding 550 bp into the ORF and immediately downstream of the ORF. The entire genome contains eight copies of each of these conserved regions. Southern analyses has demonstrated that sapA2 existed as a complete copy within the genome in all strains examined, although Northern (RNA) analysis has demonstrated that sapA2 was not expressed in the C. fetus strain from which it was cloned. Further Southern analyses revealed increasing sapA diversity as probes increasingly 3' within the ORF were used. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and then Southern blotting with the conserved N-terminal region of the sapA homologs as a probe showed that these genes were tightly clustered on the chromosome. Deletion mutagenesis revealed that the S-layer protein bound serospecifically to the C. fetus lipopolysaccharide via its conserved N-terminal region. These data indicated that the S-layer proteins shared functional activity in the conserved N terminus but diverged in a semiconservative manner for the remainder of the molecule. Variation in S-layer protein expression may involve rearrangement of complete gene copies from a single large locus containing multiple sapA homologs. PMID:7896695

  13. C-terminus of human BKca channel alpha subunit enhances the permeability of the brain endothelial cells by interacting with caveolin-1 and triggering caveolin-1 intracellular trafficking.

    PubMed

    Song, Yang; Wang, Ping; Ma, Jun; Xue, Yixue

    2014-06-01

    The blood-tumor barrier (BTB) significantly limits the delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs to brain tumors. In this study, we found a significant increase in the permeability of BTB by mediating the association of the C-terminus of alpha subunit of human large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels (hSlo1c) with caveolin-1 (Cav-1). We present evidence for the first time that hSlo1c associates with Cav-1 in human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMECs). A 57-amino acid (966-1022) fragment in hSlo1c was identified to be critical for hSlo1c/Cav-1 interaction. Activation of HBMECs transfected with fusion plasmids of pCMV-hSlo1c containing aa966-1022 by NS1619 selectively enhanced BTB permeability in a BTB model from the co-culture of HBMECs and U87 MG cells but not if the fusion plasmid lacks this fragment. This effect was attenuated by filipin, an agent disrupting caveolae or deletion of the potential interaction fragment, suggesting hSlo1c/Cav-1 association is crucial for regulating the permeability of BTB. Furthermore, we found that hSlo1c/Cav-1 association boosted Cav-1 transferring from the cell membrane to the cytoplasm of HBMECs. Our study indicates that cytoplasmic hSlo1c not only associates with Cav-1 but also has functional consequences on the permeability of BTB by triggering the intracellular trafficking of its interacting protein partner, Cav-1.

  14. An unrecognised Holocene palaeo-lake at the terminus of the Murray-Darling Basin: a palaeo-discharge record and implications for current climate reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Carli, E.; Hubble, T.; Penny, D.; Petley, D. N.; Clarke, S. L.; Hamilton, R. J.; Gadd, P.; Brand, H.

    2015-12-01

    The 1.073 million km2 Murray-Darling River Basin (MDB) drains 14% of Australia's landmass, incorporates Australia's most economically important agricultural region, and presents one of Australia's most important and contentious water security challenges. The twin Murray and Darling catchments extend from the sub-tropics to the mid latitudes, with catchment precipitation driven by synoptic-scale oceanic-atmospheric processes that include the Australian Monsoon, SAM, IPO, PDO, IOD and ENSO. In this study we report the discovery of a hitherto unrecognised terminal palaeo-lake system 'Lake Mannum' that existed during the middle to late Holocene, as evidenced by an extensive sequence of laminated muds. The deposit contains gray laminae enriched in smectite and Nd/Ti, diagnostic of palaeo-discharges originating from the Darling catchment. These gray laminae are set within olive-black background muds enriched in illite, K and Rb, diagnostic of palaeo-discharges originating from the Murray Catchment. The deposit reflects the hydrological regime of the MDB, representing the first in-situ palaeo-discharge record for the MDB and a proxy record for south-eastern Australia's precipitation and hydroclimate. Given the strong influence of major oceanic-atmospheric synoptic circulation over the river system, variability in MDB discharge and delivery of suspended sediment flux to the continental shelf have been used as proxy indicators for south-eastern Australia's palaeo-climate during the Holocene. The existence of palaeo-lake Mannum at the terminus of the MDB suggests that discharge of terrigenous sediment to the Southern Ocean was strongly suppressed during this time, meaning that Holocene climate reconstructions which rely on the marine sediment record require re-evaluation.

  15. The voltage-dependent L-type Ca2+ (CaV1.2) channel C-terminus fragment is a bi-modal vasodilator.

    PubMed

    Bannister, John P; Leo, Marie Dennis; Narayanan, Damodaran; Jangsangthong, Wanchana; Nair, Anitha; Evanson, Kirk W; Pachuau, Judith; Gabrick, Kyle S; Boop, Frederick A; Jaggar, Jonathan H

    2013-06-15

    Voltage-dependent L-type Ca(2+) channels (CaV1.2) are the primary Ca(2+) entry pathway in vascular smooth muscle cells (myocytes). CaV1.2 channels control systemic blood pressure and organ blood flow and are pathologically altered in vascular diseases, which modifies vessel contractility. The CaV1.2 distal C-terminus is susceptible to proteolytic cleavage, which yields a truncated CaV1.2 subunit and a cleaved C-terminal fragment (CCt). Previous studies in cardiac myocytes and neurons have identified CCt as both a transcription factor and CaV1.2 channel inhibitor, with different signalling mechanisms proposed to underlie some of these effects. CCt existence and physiological functions in arterial myocytes are unclear, but important to study given the functional significance of CaV1.2 channels. Here, we show that CCt exists in myocytes of both rat and human resistance-size cerebral arteries, where it locates to both the nucleus and plasma membrane. Recombinant CCt expression in arterial myocytes inhibited CaV1.2 transcription and reduced CaV1.2 protein. CCt induced a depolarizing shift in the voltage dependence of both CaV1.2 current activation and inactivation, and reduced non-inactivating current in myocytes. Recombinant truncated CCt lacking a putative nuclear localization sequence (92CCt) did not locate to the nucleus and had no effect on arterial CaV1.2 transcription or protein. However, 92CCt shifted the voltage dependence of CaV1.2 activation and inactivation similarly to CCt. CCt and 92CCt both inhibited pressure- and depolarization-induced vasoconstriction, although CCt was a far more effective vasodilator. These data demonstrate that endogenous CCt exists and reduces both CaV1.2 channel expression and voltage sensitivity in arterial myocytes. Thus, CCt is a bi-modal vasodilator.

  16. The Mammalian Neuronal Sodium Channel Blocker μ-Conotoxin BuIIIB has a Structured N-terminus that Influences Potency

    PubMed Central

    Kuang, Zhihe; Zhang, Min-Min; Gupta, Kallol; Gajewiak, Joanna; Gulyas, Jozsef; Balaram, Padmanabhan; Rivier, Jean E.; Olivera, Baldomero M.; Yoshikami, Doju; Bulaj, Grzegorz; Norton, Raymond S.

    2014-01-01

    Among the μ-conotoxins that block vertebrate voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs), some have been shown to be potent analgesics following systemic administration in mice. We have determined the solution structure of a new representative of this family, μ-BuIIIB, and established its disulfide connectivities by direct mass spectrometric collision induced dissociation fragmentation of the peptide with disulfides intact. The major oxidative folding product adopts a 1-4/2-5/3-6 pattern with the following disulfide bridges: Cys5-Cys17, Cys6-Cys23 and Cys13-Cys24. The solution structure reveals that the unique N-terminal extension in μ-BuIIIB, which is also present in μ-BuIIIA and μ-BuIIIC but absent in other μ-conotoxins, forms part of a short α-helix encompassing Glu3 to Asn8. This helix is packed against the rest of the toxin and stabilized by the Cys5-Cys17 and Cys6-Cys23 disulfide bonds. As such, the side chain of Val1 is located close to the aromatic rings of Trp16 and His20, which are located on the canonical helix that displays several residues found to be essential for VGSC blockade in related μ-conotoxins. Mutations of residues 2 and 3 in the N-terminal extension enhanced the potency of μ-BuIIIB for NaV1.3. One analog, [d-Ala2]BuIIIB, showed a 40-fold increase, making it the most potent peptide blocker of this channel characterized to date and thus a useful new tool with which to characterize this channel. Based on previous results for related μ-conotoxins, the dramatic effects of mutations at the N-terminus were unanticipated, and suggest that further gains in potency might be achieved by additional modifications of this region. PMID:23557677

  17. Obliteration of a giant fusiform carotid terminus-M1 aneurysm after distal clip application and extracranial-intracranial bypass. Case report.

    PubMed

    Ferroli, P; Ciceri, E; Parati, E; Minati, L; Broggi, G

    2007-06-01

    Giant intracranial aneurysms may not be amenable to direct surgical clipping or endovascular coiling because of three critical factors: 1) lack of clear aneurysmal neck; 2) giant size; 3) involvement with critical perforating or branch vessels. Techniques of flow redirection, however, may offer an alternative treatment strategy for these difficult lesions. In this paper, we report on the use of this alternative strategy in the successful treatment of a left giant fusiform carotid terminus-M1 aneurysm in a 16 year-old boy suffering from Ehler-Danlos disease. This patient was admitted to our Institution because his aneurysm was continuing to be increasing in size, despite a previous ligation of his left cervical ICA which was performed at another institution 2 years earlier after the patient had experienced a hemorrhagic stroke. Upon admission, a neurological examination revealed a slight motor aphasia with mild right hemiparesis, remnant of the ancient stroke. Because of its size and the involvement with M1 perforating arteries, a direct aneurysm attack was deemed inadvisable. After an initial ECA-ICA high flow bypass which spontaneously thrombosed, we performed a repeated high flow bypass with the application of a single clip on M1, right distal to the fusiform dilatation. After an uneventful postoperative course, we were unable to observe any new neurological deficits after surgery. A CT scan on postoperative day 1 revealed that the aneurysm had undergone a spontaneous thrombosis which was completely obliterated at the time of a 6-month follow-up angiogram. At that time, the ECA-ICA bypass was found to be patent. In conclusion the alternative of flow alteration strategies can be successfully used in the treatment of aneurysms that cannot be safely trapped or occluded by traditional neurosurgical methods.

  18. At-ACA8 Encodes a Plasma Membrane-Localized Calcium-ATPase of Arabidopsis with a Calmodulin-Binding Domain at the N Terminus1

    PubMed Central

    Bonza, Maria Cristina; Morandini, Piero; Luoni, Laura; Geisler, Markus; Palmgren, Michael Gjedde; De Michelis, Maria Ida

    2000-01-01

    A Ca2+-ATPase was purified from plasma membranes (PM) isolated from Arabidopsis cultured cells by calmodulin (CaM)-affinity chromatography. Three tryptic fragments from the protein were microsequenced and the corresponding cDNA was amplified by polymerase chain reaction using primers designed from the microsequences of the tryptic fragments. At-ACA8 (Arabidopsis-autoinhibited Ca2+-ATPase, isoform 8, accession no. AJ249352) encodes a 1,074 amino acid protein with 10 putative transmembrane domains, which contains all of the characteristic motifs of Ca2+-transporting P-type Ca2+-ATPases. The identity of At-ACA8p as the PM Ca2+-ATPase was confirmed by immunodetection with an antiserum raised against a sequence (valine-17 through threonine-31) that is not found in other plant CaM-stimulated Ca2+-ATPases. Confocal fluorescence microscopy of protoplasts immunodecorated with the same antiserum confirmed the PM localization of At-ACA8. At-ACA8 is the first plant PM localized Ca2+-ATPase to be cloned and is clearly distinct from animal PM Ca2+-ATPases due to the localization of its CaM-binding domain. CaM overlay assays localized the CaM-binding domain of At-ACA8p to a region of the N terminus of the enzyme around tryptophan-47, in contrast to a C-terminal localization for its animal counterparts. Comparison between the sequence of At-ACA8p and those of endomembrane-localized type IIB Ca2+-ATPases of plants suggests that At-ACA8 is a representative of a new subfamily of plant type IIB Ca2+-ATPases. PMID:10938365

  19. A nonviral peptide can replace the entire N terminus of zucchini yellow mosaic potyvirus coat protein and permits viral systemic infection.

    PubMed

    Arazi, T; Shiboleth, Y M; Gal-On, A

    2001-07-01

    Systematic deletion and peptide tagging of the amino-terminal domain (NT, ~43 amino acids) of an attenuated zucchini yellow mosaic potyvirus (ZYMV-AGII) coat protein (CP) were used to elucidate its role in viral systemic infection. Deletion mutants truncated by 8, 13, and 33 amino acid residues from the CP-NT 5' end were systemically infectious and produced symptoms similar to those of the AGII virus. Tagging these deletion mutants with either human c-Myc (Myc) or hexahistidine peptides maintained viral infectivity. Similarly, addition of these peptides to the intact AGII CP-NT did not affect viral life cycle. To determine which parts, if any, of the CP-NT are essential for viral systemic infection, a series of Myc-tagged mutants with 8 to 43 amino acids removed from the CP-NT were constructed. All Myc-tagged CP-NT deletion mutants, including those from which virtually all the viral CP-NT had been eliminated, were able to encapsidate and cause systemic infection. Furthermore, chimeric viruses with deletions of up to 33 amino acids from CP-NT produced symptoms indistinguishable from those caused by the parental AGII virus. In contrast to CP-NT Myc fusion, addition of the foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) immunogenic epitope to AGII CP-NT did not permit systemic infection. However, fusion of the Myc peptide to the N terminus of the FMDV peptide restored the capability of the virus to spread systemically. We have demonstrated that all CP-NT fused peptides were exposed on the virion surface, masking natural CP immunogenic determinants. Our findings demonstrate that CP-NT is not essential for ZYMV spread and that it can be replaced by an appropriate foreign peptide while maintaining systemic infectivity.

  20. The cytoplasmic C-terminus of polycystin-1 increases cell proliferation in kidney epithelial cells through serum-activated and Ca{sup 2+}-dependent pathway(s)

    SciTech Connect

    Manzati, Elisa; Aguiari, Gianluca; Banzi, Manuela; Manzati, Michele; Selvatici, Rita; Falzarano, Sofia; Maestri, Iva; Pinton, Paolo; Rizzuto, Rosario; Senno, Laura del . E-mail: sen@unife.it

    2005-04-01

    Polycystin-1 (PC1) is a large transmembrane protein important in renal differentiation and defective in most cases of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), a common cause of renal failure in adults. Although the genetic basis of ADPKD has been elucidated, molecular and cellular mechanisms responsible for the dysregulation of epithelial cell growth in ADPKD cysts are still not well defined. We approached this issue by investigating the role of the carboxyl cytoplasmic domain of PC1 involved in signal transduction on the control of kidney cell proliferation. Therefore, we generated human HEK293 cells stably expressing the PC1 cytoplasmic tail as a membrane targeted TrkA-PC1 chimeric receptor protein (TrkPC1). We found that TrkPC1 increased cell proliferation through an increase in cytoplasmic Ca{sup 2+} levels and activation of PKC{alpha}, thereby upregulating D1 and D3 cyclin, downregulating p21{sup waf1} and p27{sup kip1} cyclin inhibitors, and thus inducing cell cycle progression from G0/G1 to the S phase. Interestingly, TrkPC1-dependent Ca{sup 2+} increase and PKC{alpha} activation are not constitutive, but require serum factor(s) as parallel component. In agreement with this observation, a significant increase in ERK1/2 phosphorylation was observed. Consistently, inhibitors specifically blocking either PKC{alpha} or ERK1/2 prevented the TrkPC1-dependent proliferation increase. NGF, the TrkA ligand, blocked this increase. We propose that in kidney epithelial cells the overexpression of PC1 C-terminus upregulates serum-evoked intracellular Ca{sup 2+} by counteracting the growth-suppression activity of endogenous PC1 and leading to an increase in cell proliferation.

  1. Effects of the N terminus of mouse DNA polymerase κ on the bypass of a guanine-benzo[a]pyrenyl adduct

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Guo, Caixia

    2016-01-01

    DNA polymerase κ (Polκ), one of the typical member of the Y-family DNA polymerases, has been demonstrated to bypass the 10S (+)-trans-anti-benzo[a]pyrene diol epoxide-N2-deoxyguanine adducts (BPDE-dG) efficiently and accurately. A large structural gap between the core and little finger as well as an N-clasp domain are essential to its unique translesion capability. However, whether the extreme N-terminus of Polκ is required for its activity is unclear. In this work, we constructed two mouse Polκ deletions, which have either a catalytic core (mPolκ1-516) or a core without the first 21-residues (mPolκ22-516), and tested their activities in the replication of normal and BPDE-DNA. These two Polκ deletions are nearly as efficient as the full length protein (Polκ1-852) in normal DNA synthesis. However, steady-state kinetics reveals a significant reduction in efficiency of dCTP incorporation opposite the lesion by Polκ22-516, along with increased frequencies for misinsertion compared with Polκ1-852. The next nucleotide insertion opposite the template C immediately following the BPDE-dG was also examined, and the bypass differences induced by deletions were highlighted in both insertion and extension step. We conclude that the extreme N-terminal part of Polκ is required for the processivity and fidelity of Polκ during translesion synthesis of BPDE-dG lesions. PMID:26634445

  2. Regulation of fragile X mental retardation 1 protein by C-terminus of Hsc70-interacting protein depends on its phosphorylation status.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ye Na; Jeong, Dar Heum; Lee, Ji Sun; Yoo, Soon Ji

    2014-10-10

    The fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1) protein binds mRNA and acts as a negative regulator of translation. Lack of FMR1 causes the most common neurological disorder, fragile X syndrome, while its overexpression is associated with metastasis of breast cancer. Its activity has been well-studied in nervous tissue, but recent evidence as well as its role in cancer indicates that it also acts in other tissues. We have investigated the expression of FMR1 in brain and other tissues of mouse and examined its regulation. We detected expression of FMR1 in liver and heart tissues of mice as well as in brain tissue, supporting other contentions that it acts in non-nervous tissue. Expression of FMR1 inversely correlated with expression of the C-terminus of Hsc70-interacting protein (CHIP) and, based on the known activity of CHIP in protein homeostasis, we suggest that CHIP regulates expression of FMR1. CHIP ubiquitinated FMR1 for proteasomal degradation in a molecular chaperone-independent manner. FMR1 expression was reduced following treatment with okadaic acid, a phosphatase inhibitor, but not in CHIP-depleted cells. Also, a non-phospho FMR1 mutant was much less efficiently ubiquitinated by CHIP and had a longer half-life compared to either wild-type FMR or a phospho-mimic mutant. Taken together, our results demonstrate that CHIP regulates the levels of FMR1 as an E3 ubiquitin ligase in phosphorylation-dependent manner, suggesting that CHIP regulates FMR1-mediated translational repression by regulating the levels of FMR1.

  3. Mucopolysaccharidosis type I in 21 Czech and Slovak patients: Mutation analysis suggests a functional importance of C-terminus of the IDUA protein

    PubMed Central

    Vazna, Alzbeta; Beesley, Clare; Berna, Linda; Stolnaja, Larisa; Myskova, Helena; Bouckova, Michaela; Vlaskova, Hana; Poupetova, Helena; Zeman, Jiri; Magner, Martin; Hlavata, Anna; Winchester, Bryan; Hrebicek, Martin; Dvorakova, Lenka

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Mucopolysaccharidosis type I (MPS I) is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder that is caused by a deficiency of the enzyme α-l-iduronidase (IDUA). Of the 21 Czech and Slovak patients who have been diagnosed with MPS I in the last 30 years, 16 have a severe clinical presentation (Hurler syndrome), 2 less severe manifestations (Scheie syndrome), and 3 an intermediate severity (Hurler/Scheie phenotype). Mutation analysis was performed in 20 MPS I patients and 39 mutant alleles were identified. There was a high prevalence of the null mutations p.W402X (12 alleles) and p.Q70X (7 alleles) in this cohort. Four of the 13 different mutations were novel: p.V620F (3 alleles), p.W626X (1 allele), c.1727 + 2T > G (1 allele) and c.1918_1927del (2 alleles). The pathogenicity of the novel mutations was verified by transient expression studies in Chinese hamster ovary cells. Seven haplotypes were observed in the patient alleles using 13 intragenic polymorphisms. One of the two haplotypes associated with the mutation p.Q70X was not found in any of the controls. Haplotype analysis showed, that mutations p.Q70X, p.V620F, and p.D315Y probably have more than one ancestor. Missense mutations localized predominantly in the hydrophobic core of the enzyme are associated with the severe phenotype, whereas missense mutations localized to the surface of the enzyme are usually associated with the attenuated phenotypes. Mutations in the 130 C-terminal amino acids lead to clinical manifestations, which indicates a functional importance of the C-terminus of the IDUA protein. © 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:19396826

  4. Identification of a di-leucine motif within the C terminus domain of the Menkes disease protein that mediates endocytosis from the plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Francis, M J; Jones, E E; Levy, E R; Martin, R L; Ponnambalam, S; Monaco, A P

    1999-06-01

    The protein encoded by the Menkes disease gene (MNK) is localised to the Golgi apparatus and cycles between the trans-Golgi network and the plasma membrane in cultured cells on addition and removal of copper to the growth medium. This suggests that MNK protein contains active signals that are involved in the retention of the protein to the trans-Golgi network and retrieval of the protein from the plasma membrane. Previous studies have identified a signal involved in Golgi retention within transmembrane domain 3 of MNK. To identify a motif sufficient for retrieval of MNK from the plasma membrane, we analysed the cytoplasmic domain, downstream of transmembrane domain 7 and 8. Chimeric constructs containing this cytoplasmic domain fused to the reporter molecule CD8 localised the retrieval signal(s) to 62 amino acids at the C terminus. Further studies were performed on putative internalisation motifs, using site-directed mutagenesis, protein expression, chemical treatment and immunofluorescence. We observed that a di-leucine motif (L1487L1488) was essential for rapid internalisation of chimeric CD8 proteins and the full-length Menkes cDNA from the plasma membrane. We suggest that this motif mediates the retrieval of MNK from the plasma membrane into the endocytic pathway, via the recycling endosomes, but is not sufficient on its own to return the protein to the Golgi apparatus. These studies provide a basis with which to identify other motifs important in the sorting and delivery of MNK from the plasma membrane to the Golgi apparatus.

  5. Structure and interactions of the helical and U-box domains of CHIP, the C terminus of HSP70 interacting protein.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhen; Devlin, Karl I; Ford, Michael G; Nix, Jay C; Qin, Jun; Misra, Saurav

    2006-04-18

    The heat-shock proteins Hsp70 and Hsp90 play a crucial role in regulating protein quality control both by refolding and by preventing the aggregation of misfolded proteins. It has recently been shown that Hsp70 and Hsp90 act not only in protein refolding but also cooperate with the C terminus of Hsp70 interacting protein (CHIP), a multidomain ubiquitin ligase, to mediate the degradation of unfolded proteins. We present the crystal structure of the helical linker domain and U-box domain of zebrafish CHIP (DrCHIP-HU). The structure of DrCHIP-HU shows a symmetric homodimer. The conformation of the helical linker domains and the relative positions of the helical and U-box domains differ substantially in DrCHIP-HU from those in a recently published structure of an asymmetric dimer of mammalian (mouse) CHIP. We used an in vitro ubiquitination assay to identify residues, located on two long loops and a central alpha helix of the CHIP U-box domain, that are important for interacting with the ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme UbcH5b. In addition, we used NMR spectroscopy to define a complementary interaction surface located on the N-terminal alpha helix and the L4 and L7 loops of UbcH5b. Our results provide insights into conformational variability in the domain arrangement of CHIP and into U-box-mediated recruitment of UbcH5b for the ubiquitination of Hsp70 and Hsp90 substrates.

  6. A human centromere protein, CENP-B, has a DNA binding domain containing four potential alpha helices at the NH2 terminus, which is separable from dimerizing activity

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    The alphoid DNA-CENP-B (centromere protein B) complex is the first sequence-specific DNA/protein complex detected in the centromeric region of human chromosomes. In the reaction, CENP-B recognizes a 17-bp sequence (CENP-B box) and assembles two alphoid DNA molecules into a complex, which is designated complex A (Muro, Y., H. Masumoto, K. Yoda, N. Nozaki, M. Ohashi, and T. Okazaki. 1992. J. Cell Biol. 116:585-596). Since CENP-B gene is conserved in mammalian species and CENP-B boxes are found also in mouse centromere satellite DNA (minor satellite), this sequence-specific DNA-protein interaction may be important for some kind of common centromere function. In this study we have characterized the structure of CENP-B and CENP-B-alphoid DNA complex. We have shown by chemical cross-linking that CENP-B formed a dimer, and have estimated by molecular weight determination the composition of complex A to be a CENP-B dimer and two molecules of alphoid DNA. The DNA binding domain has been delimited within the NH2-terminal 125-amino acid region containing four potential alpha-helices using truncated CENP-B made in Escherichia coli cells. We have shown that CENP-B had sites highly sensitive to proteases and that the DNA binding domain was separable from the dimerizing activity by the proteolytic cleavage at 20 kD from the COOH terminus of the molecule. Thus, CENP-B may organize a higher order structure in the centromere by juxtaposing two CENP-B boxes in the alphoid DNA repeat through both the DNA-protein and protein-protein interactions. PMID:1469042

  7. An in vitro peptide complementation assay for CYT-18-dependent group I intron splicing reveals a new role for the N-terminus.

    PubMed

    Geng, Chun; Paukstelis, Paul J

    2014-03-04

    The mitochondrial tyrosyl tRNA synthetase from Neurospora crassa (CYT-18 protein) is a bifunctional group I intron splicing cofactor. CYT-18 is capable of splicing multiple group I introns from a wide variety of sources by stabilizing the catalytically active intron structures. CYT-18 and mt TyrRSs from related fungal species have evolved to assist in group I intron splicing in part by the accumulation of three N-terminal domain insertions. Biochemical and structural analysis indicate that the N-terminal insertions serve primarily to create a structure-stabilizing scaffold for critical tertiary interactions between the two major RNA domains of group I introns. Previous studies concluded that the primarily α-helical N-terminal insertion, H0, contributes to protein stability and is necessary for splicing the N. crassa ND1 intron but is dispensable for splicing the N. crassa mitochondrial LSU intron. Here, we show that CYT-18 with a complete H0 deletion retains residual ND1 intron splicing activity and that addition of the missing N-terminus in trans is capable of restoring a significant portion of its splicing activity. The development of this peptide complementation assay has allowed us to explore important characteristics of the CYT-18/group I intron interaction including the stoichiometry of H0 in intron splicing and the importance of specific H0 residues. Evaluation of truncated H0 peptides in this assay and a re-examination of the CYT-18 crystal structure suggest a previously unknown structural role of the first five N-terminal residues of CYT-18. These residues interact directly with another splicing insertion, making H0 a central structural element responsible for connecting all three N-terminal splicing insertions.

  8. Structure-activity study on the spatial arrangement of the third aromatic ring of endomorphins 1 and 2 using an atypical constrained C terminus.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ye; Shao, Xuan; Cui, Yun; Liu, Hong-mei; Wang, Chang-ling; Fan, Ying-zhe; Liu, Jing; Dong, Shou-liang; Cui, Yu-xing; Wang, Rui

    2007-03-01

    The discovery of endomorphins (EMs) has opened the possibility of searching for new analgesics. However, the design of peptide analgesics has proven to be very difficult as a result of their conformational flexibility and a lack of clarity in structure-activity relationships (SAR). In EMs, the amino acid side chains exhibit considerable conformational flexibility, especially in the third aromatic ring, which is free to adopt a bioactive conformation. To resolve these problems, a series of C terminus EM analogues, [Xaa(4)-R]EMs, modified through the substitution of Phe(4) with nonaromatic residues and termination with benzyl groups, were designed to generate conformational constrains of the third aromatic ring by amide bond and torsion angles (phi(4) and psi(4)) of Xaa(4). Introduction of (S)-alpha-methyl or (S)/(R)-alpha-carboxamide on the methylene unit of the benzyl group was designed to produce an atypical topographical constraint (phi(5)) of the third aromatic ring rotation. Interestingly, some EM derivatives, with elimination of the C-terminal carboxamide group and significant changes in the address sequence (Phe(4)-NH(2)), still exhibited higher mu-opioid receptor (MOR) affinity than unmodified EMs. In contrast, some analogues with incorrectly constrained C termini displayed very low affinity and pharmacological activities. Thus, our results indicate that these EM analogues, with atypical constrained C termini, provide model compounds with potent MOR agonism. They also give evidence that the proper spatial orientation and conformational restriction of the third aromatic ring are crucial for the interaction of EMs with MOR.

  9. Involvement of the N Terminus of Ribosomal Protein L11 in Regulation of the RelA Protein of Escherichia coli†

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaoming; Ishiguro, Edward E.

    2001-01-01

    Amino acid-deprived rplK (previously known as relC) mutants of Escherichia coli cannot activate (p)ppGpp synthetase I (RelA) and consequently exhibit relaxed phenotypes. The rplK gene encodes ribosomal protein L11, suggesting that L11 is involved in regulating the activity of RelA. To investigate the role of L11 in the stringent response, a derivative of rplK encoding L11 lacking the N-terminal 36 amino acids (designated ′L11) was constructed. Bacteria overexpressing ′L11 exhibited a relaxed phenotype, and this was associated with an inhibition of RelA-dependent (p)ppGpp synthesis during amino acid deprivation. In contrast, bacteria overexpressing normal L11 exhibited a typical stringent response. The overexpressed ′L11 was incorporated into ribosomes and had no effect on the ribosome-binding activity of RelA. By several methods (yeast two-hybrid, affinity blotting, and copurification), no direct interaction was observed between the C-terminal ribosome-binding domain of RelA and L11. To determine whether the proline-rich helix of L11 was involved in RelA regulation, the Pro-22 residue was replaced with Leu by site-directed mutagenesis. The overexpression of the Leu-22 mutant derivative of L11 resulted in a relaxed phenotype. These results indicate that the proline-rich helix in the N terminus of L11 is involved in regulating the activity of RelA. PMID:11673421

  10. GTP-blot analysis of small GTP-binding proteins. The C-terminus is involved in renaturation of blotted proteins.

    PubMed

    Klinz, F J

    1994-10-01

    Recombinant c-Ha-ras, ralA and rap2, but not rap1A or rap1B proteins retained their ability to bind [alpha-32P]GTP after SDS/PAGE and transfer to nitrocellulose. Recombinant c-Has-ras missing the C-terminal 23 amino acid residues failed to bind [alpha-32P]GTP after the blot, and the ability of recombinant ralA missing the C-terminal 28 amino acid residues to bind [alpha-32P]GTP was decreased many-fold. The presence of nonionic detergents of the polyoxyethylene type such as Tween 20, Triton X-100, Nonidet P40 or Lubrol PX in the incubation buffer was necessary to induce renaturation of blotted recombinant c-Ha-ras protein, whereas other types of detergents were ineffective. We propose that detergents of the polyoxyethylene type induce the refolding of some types of blotted small GTP-binding proteins and that the C-terminus is involved in the refolding process. Membranes from NIH3T3 fibroblasts overexpressing c-Ha-ras protein showed much weaker binding of [alpha-32P]GTP as expected from the level of ras immunoreactivity. Treatment of fibroblasts with lovastatin, an inhibitor of hydroxymethylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase, caused the accumulation of the unfarnesylated form of c-Ha-ras in the cytosol. Examination of [alpha-32P]GTP-binding and immunoreactivity for cytosolic and membrane-bound c-Ha-ras revealed that binding of [alpha-32P]GTP to unprocessed c-Ha-ras was increased about threefold compared to the same amount of processed c-Ha-ras. Our results demonstrate that detection and quantification of small GTP-binding proteins in eukaryotic cells by GTP-blot analysis is hampered by the fact that these proteins differ strongly in their ability to renature after blotting to nitrocellulose.

  11. Integrated Ground-Based LiDAR and Global Fiducials Program Satellite Imagery Time Series Analysis of the Terminus of Bering Glacier, Alaska During the 2008-2011 Surge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bawden, G. W.; Molnia, B. F.; Howle, J.; Bond, S.; Angeli, K.; Shuchman, R. A.

    2012-12-01

    Satellite imagery from the Global Fiducials Program (GFP: classified satellite imagery released to the general public for science use: http://gfl.usgs.gov) tracked the 2008-2011 surge of the Bering Glacier, the largest and longest glacier in North America. The terminus displacement began in late 2010, with maximum velocities of greater than 20 meters per day by late January 2011, as measured using feature tracking with GFP imagery. By July, the velocities had decreased to less than 10 m/d. We used the GFP imagery to locate three helicopter accessible targets on the terminus of the Bering Glacier to collect high-resolution (0.5-4 cm spot spacing) 4D time-series tripod/terrestrial LiDAR (T-LiDAR) data. During the week of July 24, 2011 we collected hourly and daily T-LiDAR data to resolve spatially and temporally varied advancement rates at each of the sites. The first site was located on the west side of Tashalich arm on the western side of the Bering Lobe terminus proximal to the region where the maximum GFP velocities had previously been measured. Using the T-LiDAR data, we found that the terminus advanced 5.4 m over 76 hours of observation. The hourly advancement rates for the same location are a very consistent 4.2 cm/h during our daylight hours of observation (0900-1800 local) and when daily rate are extrapolated to the full 76 hours, we should have measured 3.2 m of horizontal displacement: this is a discrepancy between the total and hourly measured displacements of an additional 2.2 m of motion during the night and early morning hours (1800-0900 local). The additional motion may be explained by accelerated terminus velocity associated with daily thermal heating and resulting melt. Motion may also be explained by rain on the second day of the survey that "lubricated" the glacier bed thereby allowing it to advance at a faster velocity. The second site was on Arrowhead Island, located on the eastern side of the terminus where the vertical relieve of the glacier

  12. C-terminal truncation and histidine-tagging of cytochrome c oxidase subunit II reveals the native processing site, shows involvement of the C-terminus in cytochrome c binding, and improves the assay for proton pumping.

    PubMed

    Hiser, C; Mills, D A; Schall, M; Ferguson-Miller, S

    2001-02-13

    To enable metal affinity purification of cytochrome c oxidase reconstituted into phospholipid vesicles, a histidine-tag was engineered onto the C-terminal end of the Rhodobacter sphaeroides cytochrome c oxidase subunit II. Characterization of the natively processed wildtype oxidase and artificially processed forms (truncated with and without a his-tag) reveals Km values for cytochrome c that are 6-14-fold higher for the truncated and his-tagged forms than for the wildtype. This lowered ability to bind cytochrome c indicates a previously undetected role for the C-terminus in cytochrome c binding and is mimicked by reduced affinity for an FPLC anion exchange column. The elution profiles and kinetics indicate that the removal of 16 amino acids from the C-terminus, predicted from the known processing site of the Paracoccus denitrificans oxidase, does not produce the same enzyme as the native processing reaction. MALDI-TOF MS data show the true C-terminus of subunit II is at serine 290, three amino acids longer than expected. When the his-tagged form is reconstituted into lipid vesicles and further purified by metal affinity chromatography, significant improvement is observed in proton pumping analysis by the stopped-flow method. The improved kinetic results are attributed to a homogeneous, correctly oriented vesicle population with higher activity and less buffering from extraneous lipids.

  13. A novel interaction partner for the C-terminus of Arabidopsis thaliana plasma membrane H+-ATPase (AHA1 isoform): site and mechanism of action on H+-ATPase activity differ from those of 14-3-3 proteins.

    PubMed

    Morandini, Piero; Valera, Marco; Albumi, Cristina; Bonza, Maria Cristina; Giacometti, Sonia; Ravera, Giuseppe; Murgia, Irene; Soave, Carlo; De Michelis, Maria Ida

    2002-08-01

    Using the two-hybrid technique we identified a novel protein whose N-terminal 88 amino acids (aa) interact with the C-terminal regulatory domain of the plasma membrane (PM) H+-ATPase from Arabidopsis thaliana (aa 847-949 of isoform AHA1). The corresponding gene has been named Ppi1 for Proton pump interactor 1. The encoded protein is 612 aa long and rich in charged and polar residues, except for the extreme C-terminus, where it presents a hydrophobic stretch of 24 aa. Several genes in the A. thaliana genome and many ESTs from different plant species share significant similarity (50-70% at the aa level over stretches of 200-600 aa) to Ppi1. The PPI1 N-terminus, expressed in bacteria as a fusion protein with either GST or a His-tag, binds the PM H+-ATPase in overlay experiments. The same fusion proteins and the entire coding region fused to GST stimulate H+-ATPase activity. The effect of the His-tagged peptide is synergistic with that of fusicoccin (FC) and of tryptic removal of a C-terminal 10 kDa fragment. The His-tagged peptide binds also the trypsinised H+-ATPase. Altogether these results indicate that PPI1 N-terminus is able to modulate the PM H+-ATPase activity by binding to a site different from the 14-3-3 binding site and is located upstream of the trypsin cleavage site.

  14. Evolution of the Twist Subfamily Vertebrate Proteins: Discovery of a Signature Motif and Origin of the Twist1 Glycine-Rich Motifs in the Amino-Terminus Disordered Domain

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Yacidzohara; Gonzalez-Mendez, Ricardo R.

    2016-01-01

    Twist proteins belong to the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) family of multifunctional transcriptional factors. These factors are known to use domains other than the common bHLH in protein-protein interactions. There has been much work characterizing the bHLH domain and the C-terminus in protein-protein interactions but despite a few attempts more focus is needed at the N-terminus. Since the region of highest diversity in Twist proteins is the N-terminus, we analyzed the conservation of this region in different vertebrate Twist proteins and study the sequence differences between Twist1 and Twist2 with emphasis on the glycine-rich regions found in Twist1. We found a highly conserved sequence motif in all Twist1 (SSSPVSPADDSLSNSEEE) and Twist2 (SSSPVSPVDSLGTSEEE) mammalian species with unknown function. Through sequence comparison we demonstrate that the Twist protein family ancestor was “Twist2-like” and the two glycine-rich regions found in Twist1 sequences were acquired late in evolution, apparently not at the same time. The second glycine-rich region started developing first in the fish vertebrate group, while the first glycine region arose afterwards within the reptiles. Disordered domain and secondary structure predictions showed that the amino acid sequence and disorder feature found at the N-terminus is highly evolutionary conserved and could be a functional site that interacts with other proteins. Detailed examination of the glycine-rich regions in the N-terminus of Twist1 demonstrate that the first region is completely aliphatic while the second region contains some polar residues that could be subject to post-translational modification. Phylogenetic and sequence space analysis showed that the Twist1 subfamily is the result of a gene duplication during Twist2 vertebrate fish evolution, and has undergone more evolutionary drift than Twist2. We identified a new signature motif that is characteristic of each Twist paralog and identified important residues

  15. Plasma and urine profiles of Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol and its metabolites 11-hydroxy-Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol and 11-nor-9-carboxy-Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol after cannabis smoking by male volunteers to estimate recent consumption by athletes.

    PubMed

    Brenneisen, Rudolf; Meyer, Pascale; Chtioui, Haithem; Saugy, Martial; Kamber, Matthias

    2010-04-01

    Since 2004, cannabis has been prohibited by the World Anti-Doping Agency for all sports competitions. In the years since then, about half of all positive doping cases in Switzerland have been related to cannabis consumption. In doping urine analysis, the target analyte is 11-nor-9-carboxy-Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC-COOH), the cutoff being 15 ng/mL. However, the wide urinary detection window of the long-term metabolite of Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) does not allow a conclusion to be drawn regarding the time of consumption or the impact on the physical performance. The purpose of the present study on light cannabis smokers was to evaluate target analytes with shorter urinary excretion times. Twelve male volunteers smoked a cannabis cigarette standardized to 70 mg THC per cigarette. Plasma and urine were collected up to 8 h and 11 days, respectively. Total THC, 11-hydroxy-Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC-OH), and THC-COOH were determined after hydrolysis followed by solid-phase extraction and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The limits of quantitation were 0.1-1.0 ng/mL. Eight puffs delivered a mean THC dose of 45 mg. Plasma levels of total THC, THC-OH, and THC-COOH were measured in the ranges 0.2-59.1, 0.1-3.9, and 0.4-16.4 ng/mL, respectively. Peak concentrations were observed at 5, 5-20, and 20-180 min. Urine levels were measured in the ranges 0.1-1.3, 0.1-14.4, and 0.5-38.2 ng/mL, peaking at 2, 2, and 6-24 h, respectively. The times of the last detectable levels were 2-8, 6-96, and 48-120 h. Besides high to very high THC-COOH levels (245 +/- 1,111 ng/mL), THC (3 +/- 8 ng/mL) and THC-OH (51 +/- 246 ng/mL) were found in 65 and 98% of cannabis-positive athletes' urine samples, respectively. In conclusion, in addition to THC-COOH, the pharmacologically active THC and THC-OH should be used as target analytes for doping urine analysis. In the case of light cannabis use, this may allow the estimation of more recent consumption, probably influencing

  16. Simultaneous Quantification of Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol, 11-nor-9-carboxy-Tetrahydrocannabinol, Cannabidiol and Cannabinol in Oral Fluid by MicroFlow-Liquid Chromatography-High Resolution Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Concheiro, Marta; Lee, Dayong; Lendoiro, Elena; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2014-01-01

    Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is the primary target in oral fluid (OF) for detecting cannabis intake. However, additional biomarkers are needed to solve interpretation issues, such as the possibility of passive inhalation by identifying 11-nor-9-carboxy-THC (THCCOOH), and determining recent cannabis smoking by identifying cannabidiol (CBD) and/or cannabinol (CBN). We developed and comprehensively validated a microflow liquid chromatography (LC)–high resolution mass spectrometry method for simultaneous quantification of THC, THCCOOH, CBD and CBN in OF collected with the Oral-Eze® and Quantisal™ devices. One mL OF-buffer solution (0.25mL OF and 0.5mL of Oral-Eze buffer,1:3 dilution, or 0.75mL Quantisal buffer, 1:4 dilution) had proteins precipitated, and the supernatant subjected to CEREX™ Polycrom™ THC solid-phase extraction (SPE). Microflow LC reverse-phase separation was achieved with a gradient mobile phase of 10mM ammonium acetate pH 6 and acetonitrile over 10 min. We employed a Q Exactive high resolution mass spectrometer, with compounds identified and quantified by targeted-MSMS experiments. The assay was linear 0.5–50 ng/mL for THC, CBD and CBN, and 15–500 pg/mL for THCCOOH. Intra- and inter-day and total imprecision were <10.8%CV and bias 86.5–104.9%. Extraction efficiency was 52.4–109.2%, process efficiency 12.2– 88.9% and matrix effect ranged from −86 to −6.9%. All analytes were stable for 24h at 5°C on the autosampler. The method was applied to authentic OF specimens collected with Quantisal and Oral-Eze devices. This method provides a rapid simultaneous quantification of THCCOOH and THC, CBD, CBN, with good selectivity and sensitivity, providing the opportunity to improve interpretation of cannabinoid OF results by eliminating the possibility of passive inhalation and providing markers of recent cannabis smoking. PMID:23726246

  17. Nuclear translocation of the cardiac L-type calcium channel C-terminus is regulated by sex and 17β-estradiol.

    PubMed

    Mahmoodzadeh, S; Haase, H; Sporbert, A; Rharass, T; Panáková, D; Morano, I

    2016-08-01

    The cardiac voltage gated l-type Ca(2+) channel (Cav1.2) constitutes the main entrance gate for Ca(2+) that triggers cardiac contraction. Several studies showed that the distal C-terminus fragment of Cav1.2 α1C subunit (α1C-dCT) is proteolytically cleaved and shuttles between the plasma membrane and the nucleus, which is regulated both developmentally and by Ca(2+). However, the effects of sex and sex hormone 17β-estradiol (E2, estrogen) on α1C-dCT nuclear translocation are still unexplored. To investigate the sexual disparity in the α1C-dCT nuclear translocation, we first generated an antibody directed against a synthetic peptide (GRRASFHLE) located in α1C-dCT, and used it to probe ventricular myocytes from adult female and male mice. Immunocytochemistry of isolated mouse primary adult ventricular myocytes revealed both nuclear staining and cytosolic punctuate staining around the T-tubules. The ratio of nuclear to cytosolic intensity (Inuc/Icyt) was significantly higher in isolated female cardiomyocytes (1.42±0.05) compared to male cardiomyocytes (1.05±0.02). Western blot analysis of nuclear fraction confirmed these data. Furthermore, we found a significant decrease in nuclear staining intensity of α1C-dCT in both female and male cardiomyocytes upon serum withdrawal for 18h (Inuc/Icyt 1.05±0.02 and 0.89±0.02, respectively). Interestingly, subsequent E2 treatment (10(-8)M) for 8h normalized the intracellu