Science.gov

Sample records for ku80 carboxy terminus

  1. Identification of a peroxisomal targeting signal at the carboxy terminus of firefly luciferase.

    PubMed

    Gould, S G; Keller, G A; Subramani, S

    1987-12-01

    Translocation of proteins across membranes of the endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondrion, and chloroplast has been shown to be mediated by targeting signals present in the transported proteins. To test whether the transport of proteins into peroxisomes is also mediated by a peptide targeting signal, we have studied the firefly luciferase gene that encodes a protein transported to peroxisomes in both insect and mammalian cells. We have identified two regions of luciferase which are necessary for transport of this protein into peroxisomes. We demonstrate that one of these, region II, represents a peroxisomal targeting signal because it is both necessary and sufficient for directing cytosolic proteins to peroxisomes. The signal is no more than twelve amino acids long and is located at the extreme carboxy-terminus of luciferase. The location of the targeting signal for translocation across the peroxisomal membrane therefore differs from the predominantly amino-terminal location of signals responsible for transport across the membranes of the endoplasmic reticulum, chloroplast, or mitochondrion.

  2. Functional assessment of the carboxy-terminus of the Wilson disease copper-transporting ATPase, ATP7B.

    PubMed

    Hsi, Gloria; Cullen, Lara M; Moira Glerum, D; Cox, Diane W

    2004-03-01

    The carboxy-terminus of ATP7B, the protein defective in the copper-transport disorder Wilson disease, was investigated with respect to its role in copper delivery to the ferroxidase ceruloplasmin. We use yeast as a model system to assess the functional capabilities of ATP7B variants. The yeast ferroxidase, Fet3p, acquires copper from Ccc2p and cannot function if Ccc2p is impaired; expression of wild-type ATP7B in ccc2 yeast complements the iron-deficient phenotype. Our results demonstrate that the C-terminus of ATP7B is necessary for protein stability, as removal of the nonmembranous terminus leads to reduced protein levels and cessation of growth in iron-limited medium. Growth is partially restored when an additional three amino acids are present and is near wild-type levels when only one-third of the C-terminus is present. Measurement of ferroxidase activity is a more sensitive indicator of copper transport function and allowed identification of impaired variants not detected with the growth assay. PMID:14962673

  3. Assembly of the bacteriophage T4 replication machine requires the acidic carboxy terminus of gene 32 protein.

    PubMed

    Hurley, J M; Chervitz, S A; Jarvis, T C; Singer, B S; Gold, L

    1993-01-20

    The acidic carboxy-terminal 89-amino acid fragment of bacteriophage T4 gene 32 protein was expressed in Escherichia coli to high levels from an inducible plasmid construct. Infection of induced cells by wild-type T4 phage results in impaired phage DNA synthesis. The time at which DNA synthesis begins and the diminution in DNA synthesis rates correlate with the amount of carboxy-terminal peptide that accumulates intracellularly prior to infection. Correspondingly, when induced cells are infected with viable phage containing a small deletion near the carboxy-terminus of 32 protein (delta PR201), the inhibition of phage DNA synthesis was much more severe. The mutant 32 protein competes less well against overproduced wild-type acid peptide than does wild-type 32 protein. The purified acid peptide, when used as the attached ligand for affinity chromatography, binds several T4 proteins from phage-infected cells, including 43 protein (T4 DNA polymerase), Dda protein (a DNA helicase), and UvsX protein (a Rec-like recombination protein). Furthermore, at 50- to 100-fold molar excess of acid peptide over intact 32 protein, phage DNA synthesis was specifically inhibited at the initiation step in an in vitro 5-protein DNA replication experiment. We propose that one or more phage replication proteins are titrated as non-productive protein-protein complexes at a site away from the DNA template. This implies that the carboxy-terminal domain of 32 protein is involved in an obligate step of replication machine assembly when the protein is properly attached to ssDNA in the vicinity of a primer-template junction. The assembly defect we observe is strikingly similar to the repression, or "squelching", of the activity of certain eukaryotic transcriptional activators. PMID:8429554

  4. Multiple regulatory roles of the carboxy terminus of Ste2p a yeast GPCR.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyeong-Man; Lee, Yong-Hun; Akal-Strader, Ayca; Uddin, M Seraj; Hauser, Melinda; Naider, Fred; Becker, Jeffrey M

    2012-01-01

    Signaling and internalization of Ste2p, a model G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, are reported to be regulated by phosphorylation status of serine (S) and threonine (T) residues located in the cytoplasmic C-terminus. Although the functional roles of S/T residues located in certain C-terminus regions are relatively well characterized, systemic analyses have not been conducted for all the S/T residues that are spread throughout the C-terminus. A point mutation to alanine was introduced into the S/T residues located within three intracellular loops and the C-terminus individually or in combination. A series of functional assays such as internalization, FUS1-lacZ induction, and growth arrest were conducted in comparison between WT- and mutant Ste2p. The Ste2p in which all S/T residues in the C-terminus were mutated to alanine was more sensitive to α-factor, suggesting that phosphorylation in the C-terminus exerts negative regulatory activities on the Ste2p signaling. C-terminal S/T residues proximal to the seventh transmembrane domain were important for ligand-induced G protein coupling but not for receptor internalization. Sites on the central region of the C-terminus regulated both constitutive and ligand-induced internalization. Residues on the distal part were important for constitutive desensitization and modulated the G protein signaling mediated through the proximal part of the C-terminus. This study demonstrated that the C-terminus contains multiple functional domains with differential and interdependent roles in regulating Ste2p function in which the S/T residues located in each domain play critical roles. PMID:22100461

  5. The carboxy-terminus of p63 links cell cycle control and the proliferative potential of epidermal progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Daisuke; Sahu, Raju; Leu, N. Adrian; Senoo, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor p63 (Trp63) plays a key role in homeostasis and regeneration of the skin. The p63 gene is transcribed from dual promoters, generating TAp63 isoforms with growth suppressive functions and dominant-negative ΔNp63 isoforms with opposing properties. p63 also encodes multiple carboxy (C)-terminal variants. Although mutations of C-terminal variants have been linked to the pathogenesis of p63-associated ectodermal disorders, the physiological role of the p63 C-terminus is poorly understood. We report here that deletion of the p63 C-terminus in mice leads to ectodermal malformation and hypoplasia, accompanied by a reduced proliferative capacity of epidermal progenitor cells. Notably, unlike the p63-null condition, we find that p63 C-terminus deficiency promotes expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21Waf1/Cip1 (Cdkn1a), a factor associated with reduced proliferative capacity of both hematopoietic and neuronal stem cells. These data suggest that the p63 C-terminus plays a key role in the cell cycle progression required to maintain the proliferative potential of stem cells of many different lineages. Mechanistically, we show that loss of Cα, the predominant C-terminal p63 variant in epithelia, promotes the transcriptional activity of TAp63 and also impairs the dominant-negative activity of ΔNp63, thereby controlling p21Waf1/Cip1 expression. We propose that the p63 C-terminus links cell cycle control and the proliferative potential of epidermal progenitor cells via mechanisms that equilibrate TAp63 and ΔNp63 isoform function. PMID:25503409

  6. Phosphorylation at the carboxy terminus of the 55-kilodalton adenovirus type 5 E1B protein regulates transforming activity.

    PubMed Central

    Teodoro, J G; Halliday, T; Whalen, S G; Takayesu, D; Graham, F L; Branton, P E

    1994-01-01

    The 55-kDa product of early region 1B (E1B) of human adenoviruses is required for viral replication and participates in cell transformation through complex formation with and inactivation of the cellular tumor suppressor p53. We have used both biochemical and genetic approaches to show that this 496-residue (496R) protein of adenovirus type 5 is phosphorylated at serine and threonine residues near the carboxy terminus within sequences characteristic of substrates of casein kinase II. Mutations which converted serines 490 and 491 to alanine residues decreased viral replication and greatly reduced the efficiency of transformation of primary baby rat kidney cells. Such mutant 496R proteins interacted with p53 at efficiencies similar to those of wild-type 496R but only partially inhibited p53 transactivation activity. These results indicated that phosphorylation at these carboxy-terminal sites either regulates the inhibition of p53 or regulates some other 496R function required for cell transformation. Images PMID:8289381

  7. Calcium influx-mediated translocation of m-calpain induces Ku80 cleavage and enhances the Ku80-related DNA repair pathway

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Kyung Hye; Yu, Han Vit; Kim, Eosu; Na, Younghwa; Kwon, Youngjoo

    2016-01-01

    Proteomic analysis of ionomycin-treated and untreated mammary epithelial MCF10A cells elucidated differences in Ku80 cleavage. Ku80, a subunit of the Ku protein complex, is an initiator of the non-homologous, end-joining (NHEJ), double-strand breaks (DSBs) repair pathway. The nuclear Ku80 was cleaved in a calcium concentration-dependent manner by m-calpain but not by m-calpain. The cleavage of nuclear Ku80 at its α/β domain was validated by Western blotting analysis using flag-tagged expression vectors of truncated versions of Ku80 and a flag antibody and was confirmed in m-calpain knock-down cells and in vitro cell-free evaluation with recombinant proteins of calpains, Ku70, and Ku80. In addition, the cleaved Ku80 still formed a Ku heterodimer and promoted DNA DSB repair activity. Taken together, these findings indicate that translocated m-calpain enhances the NHEJ pathway through the cleavage of Ku80. Based on the present study, m-calpain in DNA repair pathways might be a novel anticancer drug target, or its mechanism might be a possible route for resistance acquisition of DNA damage-inducing chemotherapeutics. PMID:27121057

  8. The progeroid phenotype of Ku80 deficiency is dominant over DNA-PKCS deficiency.

    PubMed

    Reiling, Erwin; Dollé, Martijn E T; Youssef, Sameh A; Lee, Moonsook; Nagarajah, Bhawani; Roodbergen, Marianne; de With, Piet; de Bruin, Alain; Hoeijmakers, Jan H; Vijg, Jan; van Steeg, Harry; Hasty, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Ku80 and DNA-PKCS are both involved in the repair of double strand DNA breaks via the nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) pathway. While ku80-/- mice exhibit a severely reduced lifespan and size, this phenotype is less pronounced in dna-pkcs-/- mice. However, these observations are based on independent studies with varying genetic backgrounds. Here, we generated ku80-/-, dna-pkcs-/- and double knock out mice in a C57Bl6/J*FVB F1 hybrid background and compared their lifespan, end of life pathology and mutation frequency in liver and spleen using a lacZ reporter. Our data confirm that inactivation of Ku80 and DNA-PKCS causes reduced lifespan and bodyweights, which is most severe in ku80-/- mice. All mutant mice exhibited a strong increase in lymphoma incidence as well as other aging-related pathology (skin epidermal and adnexal atrophy, trabacular bone reduction, kidney tubular anisokaryosis, and cortical and medullar atrophy) and severe lymphoid depletion. LacZ mutation frequency analysis did not show strong differences in mutation frequencies between knock out and wild type mice. The ku80-/- mice had the most severe phenotype and the Ku80-mutation was dominant over the DNA-PKCS-mutation. Presumably, the more severe degenerative effect of Ku80 inactivation on lifespan compared to DNA-PKCS inactivation is caused by additional functions of Ku80 or activity of free Ku70 since both Ku80 and DNA-PKCS are essential for NHEJ.

  9. Carboxy-Terminus Recruitment Induced by Substrate Binding in Eukaryotic Fructose Bis-phosphate Aldolases

    SciTech Connect

    Lafrance-Vanasse,J.; Sygusch, J.

    2007-01-01

    The crystal structures of Leishmania mexicana fructose-1,6-bis(phosphate) aldolase in complex with substrate and competitive inhibitor, mannitol-1,6-bis(phosphate), were solved to 2.2 {angstrom} resolution. Crystallographic analysis revealed a Schiff base intermediate trapped in the native structure complexed with substrate while the inhibitor was trapped in a conformation mimicking the carbinolamine intermediate. Binding modes corroborated previous structures reported for rabbit muscle aldolase. Amino acid substitution of Gly-312 to Ala, adjacent to the P{sub 1}-phosphate binding site and unique to trypanosomatids, did not perturb ligand binding in the active site. Ligand attachment ordered amino acid residues 359-367 of the C-terminal region (353-373) that was disordered beyond Asp-358 in the unbound structure, revealing a novel recruitment mechanism of this region by aldolases. C-Terminal peptide ordering is triggered by P{sub 1}-phosphate binding that induces conformational changes whereby C-terminal Leu-364 contacts P{sub 1}-phosphate binding residue Arg-313. C-Terminal region capture synergizes additional interactions with subunit surface residues, not perturbed by P1-phosphate binding, and stabilizes C-terminal attachment. Amino acid residues that participate in the capturing interaction are conserved among class I aldolases, indicating a general recruitment mechanism whereby C-terminal capture facilitates active site interactions in subsequent catalytic steps. Recruitment accelerates the enzymatic reaction by using binding energy to reduce configurational entropy during catalysis thereby localizing the conserved C-terminus tyrosine, which mediates proton transfer, proximal to the active site enamine.

  10. The cardiac L-type calcium channel distal carboxy terminus autoinhibition is regulated by calcium.

    PubMed

    Crump, Shawn M; Andres, Douglas A; Sievert, Gail; Satin, Jonathan

    2013-02-01

    The L-type calcium channel (LTCC) provides trigger Ca(2+) for sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca-release, and LTCC function is influenced by interacting proteins including the LTCC distal COOH terminus (DCT) and calmodulin. DCT is proteolytically cleaved and reassociates with the LTCC complex to regulate calcium channel function. DCT reduces LTCC barium current (I(Ba,L)) in reconstituted channel complexes, yet the contribution of DCT to LTCC Ca(2+) current (I(Ca,L)) in cardiomyocyte systems is unexplored. This study tests the hypothesis that DCT attenuates cardiomyocyte I(Ca,L). We measured LTCC current and Ca(2+) transients with DCT coexpressed in murine cardiomyocytes. We also heterologously coexpressed DCT and Ca(V)1.2 constructs with truncations corresponding to the predicted proteolytic cleavage site, Ca(V)1.2Δ1801, and a shorter deletion corresponding to well-studied construct, Ca(V)1.2Δ1733. DCT inhibited I(Ba,L) in cardiomyocytes, and in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells expressing Ca(V)1.2Δ1801 and Ca(V)1.2Δ1733. Ca(2+)-CaM relieved DCT block in cardiomyocytes and HEK cells. The selective block of I(Ba,L) combined with Ca(2+)-CaM effects suggested that DCT-mediated blockade may be relieved under conditions of elevated Ca(2+). We therefore tested the hypothesis that DCT block is dynamic, increasing under relatively low Ca(2+), and show that DCT reduced diastolic Ca(2+) at low stimulation frequencies but spared high frequency Ca(2+) entry. DCT reduction of diastolic Ca(2+) and relief of block at high pacing frequencies and under conditions of supraphysiological bath Ca(2+) suggests that a physiological function of DCT is to increase the dynamic range of Ca(2+) transients in response to elevated pacing frequencies. Our data motivate the new hypothesis that DCT is a native reverse use-dependent inhibitor of LTCC current.

  11. Molecular and biochemical characterization of xrs mutants defective in Ku80.

    PubMed Central

    Singleton, B K; Priestley, A; Steingrimsdottir, H; Gell, D; Blunt, T; Jackson, S P; Lehmann, A R; Jeggo, P A

    1997-01-01

    The gene product defective in radiosensitive CHO mutants belonging to ionizing radiation complementation group 5, which includes the extensively studied xrs mutants, has recently been identified as Ku80, a subunit of the Ku protein and a component of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK). Several group 5 mutants, including xrs-5 and -6, lack double-stranded DNA end-binding and DNA-PK activities. In this study, we examined additional xrs mutants at the molecular and biochemical levels. All mutants examined have low or undetectable levels of Ku70 and Ku80 protein, end-binding, and DNA-PK activities. Only one mutant, xrs-6, has Ku80 transcript levels detectable by Northern hybridization, but Ku80 mRNA was detectable by reverse transcription-PCR in most other mutants. Two mutants, xrs-4 and -6, have altered Ku80 transcripts resulting from mutational changes in the genomic Ku80 sequence affecting RNA splicing, indicating that the defects in these mutants lie in the Ku80 gene rather than a gene controlling its expression. Neither of these two mutants has detectable wild-type Ku80 transcript. Since the mutation in both xrs-4 and xrs-6 cells results in severely truncated Ku80 protein, both are likely candidates to be null mutants. Azacytidine-induced revertants of xrs-4 and -6 carried both wild-type and mutant transcripts. The results with these revertants strongly support our model proposed earlier, that CHO-K1 cells carry a copy of the Ku80 gene (XRCC5) silenced by hypermethylation. Site-directed mutagenesis studies indicate that previously proposed ATP-binding and phosphorylation sites are not required for Ku80 activity, whereas N-terminal deletions of more than the first seven amino acids result in severe loss of activities. PMID:9032253

  12. Hyperthermia Induces Apoptosis of 786-O Cells through Suppressing Ku80 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Defeng; Hu, Yuan; Li, Jinhui; Peng, Tao; Su, Jialin; He, Yun; Ji, Weidong

    2015-01-01

    Hyperthermia as an anticancer method has been paid increasing attention in recent years. Several studies have shown that hyperthermia can kill tumor cells by inducing apoptosis. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of hyperthermia-induced apoptosis are largely unknown. To investigate the effects and molecular mechanism of hyperthermia on the apoptosis in renal carcinoma 786-O cells, we firstly examined apoptosis and Ku expression in 786-O cell line treated with heat exposure (42°C for 0-4 h). The results showed that hyperthermia induced apoptosis of 786-O cells, and suppressed significantly Ku80 expression, but not Ku70 expression. Next, we knock-down Ku80 in 786-O cells, generating stable cell line 786-O-shKu80, and detected apoptosis, cell survival and cell cycle distribution. Our data showed higher apoptotic rate and lower surviving fraction in the stable cell line 786-O-shKu80 compared with those in control cells, exposed to the same heat stress (42°C for 0-4 h). Moreover, the results also showed suppression of Ku80 led to G2/M phase arrest in the stable cell line 786-O-shKu80 following heat treatment. Together, these findings indicate that Ku80 may play an important role in hyperthermia-induced apoptosis and heat-sensitivity of renal carcinoma cells through influencing the cell cycle distribution. PMID:25902193

  13. Structural basis of importin-α-mediated nuclear transport for Ku70 and Ku80.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Agnes A S; de Barros, Andrea C; Chang, Chiung-Wen; Kobe, Boštjan; Fontes, Marcos R M

    2011-09-16

    Ku70 and Ku80 form a heterodimeric complex involved in multiple nuclear processes. This complex plays a key role in DNA repair due to its ability to bind DNA double-strand breaks and facilitate repair by the nonhomologous end-joining pathway. Ku70 and Ku80 have been proposed to contain bipartite and monopartite nuclear localization sequences (NLSs), respectively, that allow them to be translocated to the nucleus independently of each other via the classical importin-α (Impα)/importin-β-mediated nuclear import pathway. To determine the structural basis of the recognition of Ku70 and Ku80 proteins by Impα, we solved the crystal structures of the complexes of Impα with the peptides corresponding to the Ku70 and Ku80 NLSs. Our structural studies confirm the binding of the Ku80 NLS as a classical monopartite NLS but reveal an unexpected binding mode for Ku70 NLS with only one basic cluster bound to the receptor. Both Ku70 and Ku80 therefore contain monopartite NLSs, and sequences outside the basic cluster make favorable interactions with Impα, suggesting that this may be a general feature in monopartite NLSs. We show that the Ku70 NLS has a higher affinity for Impα than the Ku80 NLS, consistent with more extensive interactions in its N-terminal region. The prospect of nuclear import of Ku70 and Ku80 independently of each other provides a powerful regulatory mechanism for the function of the Ku70/Ku80 heterodimer and independent functions of the two proteins.

  14. Ku80 binds to human replication origins prior to the assembly of the ORC complex.

    PubMed

    Sibani, Sahar; Price, Gerald B; Zannis-Hadjopoulos, Maria

    2005-05-31

    The Ku heterodimer, an abundant nuclear protein, binds DNA replication origins in a sequence-specific manner and promotes initiation. In this study, using HCT116 Ku80+/- haplo-insufficient and Orc2(delta/-) hypomorphic cells, the order of binding of Ku and the human origin recognition complex (HsORC) was determined. The nuclear expression of Ku80 was found to be decreased by 60% in Ku80+/- cells, while its general association with chromatin was decreased by 33%. Coimmunoprecipitation studies indicated that the Ku heterodimer associates specifically with the human HsOrc-2, -3, -4, and -6 subunits. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) experiments, using cells synchronized to late G1, showed that the association of Ku80 with the lamin B2, beta-globin, and c-myc origins in vivo was decreased by 1.5-, 2.3-, and 2.5-fold, respectively, in Ku80+/- cells. The association of HsOrc-3, -4, and -6 was consistently decreased in all three origins examined in Ku80+/- cells, while that of HsOrc-2 showed no significant variation, indicating that the HsOrc-3, -4, and -6 subunits bind to the origins after Ku80. In Orc2(delta/-) cells, the association of HsOrc-2 with the lamin B2, beta-globin, and c-myc origins was decreased by 2.8-, 4.9-, and 2.8-fold, respectively, relative to wild-type HCT116 cells. Furthermore, nascent strand abundance at these three origins was decreased by 4.5-, 2.3-, and 2.6-fold in Orc2(delta/-) relative to HCT116 cells, respectively. Interestingly, the association of Ku80 with these origins was not affected in this hypomorphic cell line, indicating that Ku and HsOrc-2 bind to origins independently of each other.

  15. Enhancement of Zta-activated lytic transcription of Epstein-Barr virus by Ku80.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chien-Chang; Yang, Ya-Chun; Wang, Wen-Hung; Chen, Chien-Sin; Chang, Li-Kwan

    2011-03-01

    Zta, encoded by the BZLF1 gene of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), is a transcription factor that is expressed during the immediate-early stage of the lytic cycle. The expression of Zta is crucial to viral lytic development. Earlier studies showed that Ku80 is a binding partner of Zta in ZKO-293 cells and is co-purified with Zta. This study verifies the interaction between Ku80 and Zta by using glutathione S-transferase-pull-down and co-immunoprecipitation assays, and also by indirect immunofluorescence analysis. This investigation also reveals that Ku80 binds to Zta on Zta-response elements in the BHLF1 promoter, enhancing the promoter activity. This study also reveals that the interaction between Zta and Ku80 involves the C-terminal region of Zta and the 425 aa N-terminal region of Ku80. The interaction between these two proteins and the enhancement of transcription that is activated by Zta suggest that Ku80 is important to EBV lytic development. PMID:21123545

  16. The Energetics of Streptococcal Enolase Octamer Formation: The Quantitative Contributions of the Last Eight Amino Acids at the Carboxy-Terminus

    PubMed Central

    Kornblatt, Jack A.; Quiros, Veronica; Kornblatt, M. Judith

    2015-01-01

    The enolase produced by Streptococcus pyogenes is a homo-octamer whose overall shape resembles that of a donut. The octamer is best described as a tetramer of dimers. As such, it contains two types of interfaces. The first is common to almost all enolases as most enolases that have been studied are dimers. The second is unique to the octamers and includes residues near the carboxy-terminus. The primary sequence of the enolase contains 435 residues with an added 19 as an N-terminal hexahistine tag. We have systematically truncated the carboxy-terminus, individually removing the first 8 residues. This gave rise to a series of eight structures containing respectively, 435, 434, 433, 432, 431, 430, 429 and 427 residues. The truncations cause the protein to gradually dissociate from octamers to enzymatically inactive monomers with very small amounts of intermediate tetramers and dimers. We have evaluated the contributions of the missing residues to the monomer/octamer equilibrium using a combination of analytical ultracentrifugation and activity assays. For the dissociation reaction, octamer ⇐⇒ 8 monomer truncation of all eight C-terminal residues resulted in a diminution in the standard Gibbs energy of dissociation of about 59 kJ/mole of octamer relative to the full length protein. Considering that this change is spread over eight subunits, this translates to a change in standard Gibbs interaction energy of less than 8 kJ/mole of monomer distributed over the eight monomers. The resulting proteins, containing 434, 433, 432, 431, 430, 429 and 427 residues per monomer, showed intermediate free energies of dissociation. Finally, three other mutations were introduced into our reference protein to establish how they influenced the equilibrium. The main importance of this work is it shows that for homo-multimeric proteins a small change in the standard Gibbs interaction energy between subunits can have major physiological effects. PMID:26287818

  17. Lethality in PARP-1/Ku80 double mutant mice reveals physiologicalsynergy during early embryogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Henrie, Melinda S.; Kurimasa, Akihiro; Burma, Sandeep; Menissier-de Murcia, Josiane; de Murcia, Gilbert; Li, Gloria C.; Chen,David J.

    2002-09-24

    Ku is an abundant heterodimeric nuclear protein, consisting of 70-kDa and 86-kDa tightly associated subunits that comprise the DNA binding component of DNA-dependent protein kinase. Poly(ADP)ribose polymerase-1 (PARP-1) is a 113-kDa protein that catalyzes the synthesis of poly(ADP-ribose) on target proteins. Both Ku and PARP-1 recognize and bind to DNA ends. Ku functions in the non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) repair pathway whereas PARP-1 functions in the single strand break repair and base excision repair (BER) pathways. Recent studies have revealed that PARP-1 and Ku80 interact in vitro. To determine whether the association of PARP-1 and Ku80 has any physiological significance or synergistic function in vivo, mice lacking both PARP-1 and Ku80 were generated. The resulting offspring died during embryonic development displaying abnormalities around the gastrulation stage. In addition, PARP-1-/-Ku80-/- cultured blastocysts had an increased level of apoptosis. These data suggest that the functions of both Ku80 and PARP-1 are essential for normal embryogenesis and that a loss of genomic integrity leading to cell death through apoptosis is likely the cause of the embryonic lethality observed in these mice.

  18. A novel fragile X syndrome mutation reveals a conserved role for the carboxy-terminus in FMRP localization and function.

    PubMed

    Okray, Zeynep; de Esch, Celine E F; Van Esch, Hilde; Devriendt, Koen; Claeys, Annelies; Yan, Jiekun; Verbeeck, Jelle; Froyen, Guy; Willemsen, Rob; de Vrij, Femke M S; Hassan, Bassem A

    2015-02-17

    Loss of function of the FMR1 gene leads to fragile X syndrome (FXS), the most common form of intellectual disability. The loss of FMR1 function is usually caused by epigenetic silencing of the FMR1 promoter leading to expansion and subsequent methylation of a CGG repeat in the 5' untranslated region. Very few coding sequence variations have been experimentally characterized and shown to be causal to the disease. Here, we describe a novel FMR1 mutation and reveal an unexpected nuclear export function for the C-terminus of FMRP. We screened a cohort of patients with typical FXS symptoms who tested negative for CGG repeat expansion in the FMR1 locus. In one patient, we identified a guanine insertion in FMR1 exon 15. This mutation alters the open reading frame creating a short novel C-terminal sequence, followed by a stop codon. We find that this novel peptide encodes a functional nuclear localization signal (NLS) targeting the patient FMRP to the nucleolus in human cells. We also reveal an evolutionarily conserved nuclear export function associated with the endogenous C-terminus of FMRP. In vivo analyses in Drosophila demonstrate that a patient-mimetic mutation alters the localization and function of Dfmrp in neurons, leading to neomorphic neuronal phenotypes.

  19. A novel fragile X syndrome mutation reveals a conserved role for the carboxy-terminus in FMRP localization and function

    PubMed Central

    Okray, Zeynep; de Esch, Celine EF; Van Esch, Hilde; Devriendt, Koen; Claeys, Annelies; Yan, Jiekun; Verbeeck, Jelle; Froyen, Guy; Willemsen, Rob; de Vrij, Femke MS; Hassan, Bassem A

    2015-01-01

    Loss of function of the FMR1 gene leads to fragile X syndrome (FXS), the most common form of intellectual disability. The loss of FMR1 function is usually caused by epigenetic silencing of the FMR1 promoter leading to expansion and subsequent methylation of a CGG repeat in the 5′ untranslated region. Very few coding sequence variations have been experimentally characterized and shown to be causal to the disease. Here, we describe a novel FMR1 mutation and reveal an unexpected nuclear export function for the C-terminus of FMRP. We screened a cohort of patients with typical FXS symptoms who tested negative for CGG repeat expansion in the FMR1 locus. In one patient, we identified a guanine insertion in FMR1 exon 15. This mutation alters the open reading frame creating a short novel C-terminal sequence, followed by a stop codon. We find that this novel peptide encodes a functional nuclear localization signal (NLS) targeting the patient FMRP to the nucleolus in human cells. We also reveal an evolutionarily conserved nuclear export function associated with the endogenous C-terminus of FMRP. In vivo analyses in Drosophila demonstrate that a patient-mimetic mutation alters the localization and function of Dfmrp in neurons, leading to neomorphic neuronal phenotypes. PMID:25693964

  20. Radiosensitisation of bladder cancer cells by panobinostat is modulated by Ku80 expression☆

    PubMed Central

    Groselj, Blaz; Kerr, Martin; Kiltie, Anne E.

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose In muscle-invasive bladder cancer there is an urgent need to identify relatively non-toxic radiosensitising agents for use in elderly patients. Histone deacetylase inhibitors radiosensitise tumour cells but not normal cells in vitro and variously downregulate DNA damage signalling, homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) repair proteins. We investigated panobinostat (PAN) as a potential radiosensitiser in bladder cancer cells. Materials and methods Clonogenic assays were performed in RT112 bladder cancer cells, and RT112 cells stably knocked down for RAD51 or Ku80 by shRNAi. Resolution of γH2AX foci was determined by immunofluorescence confocal microscopy, cell cycle progression by FACS analysis and protein expression by western blotting. Results PAN had a greater radiosensitising effect in Ku80KD than RT112 or RAD51KD cells; enhancement ratios 1.35 for Ku80KD at 10 nM (IC20 for Ku80KD) and 1.31 for RT112 and RAD51KD at 25 nM (IC40 for both). PAN downregulated MRE11, NBS1 and RAD51, but not Ku70 and Ku80, increased γH2AX foci formation in a dose-dependent manner and delayed γH2AX foci repair after ionising radiation. Conclusions PAN acts as a radiosensitiser in bladder cancer cell lines, and appears to target HR rather than NHEJ. As muscle-invasive bladder tumours have reduced Ku-DNA binding, PAN could be particularly useful as a radiosensitiser in bladder cancer. PMID:23932191

  1. Suppression of OsKu80 results in defects in developmental growth and increased telomere length in rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Byun, Mi Young; Cui, Li Hua; Kim, Woo Taek

    2015-12-25

    The Ku70-Ku80 heterodimer plays a critical role in the maintenance of genomic stability in humans and yeasts. In this report, we identified and characterized OsKu80 in rice, a model monocot crop. OsKu80 forms a heterodimer with OsKu70 in yeast and plant cells, as demonstrated by yeast two-hybrid, in vivo co-immunoprecipitation, and bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays. RNAi-mediated knock-down T3 transgenic rice plants (Ubi:RNAi-OsKu80) displayed a retarded growth phenotype at the post-germination stage. In addition, the Ubi:RNAi-OsKu80 knock-down progeny exhibited noticeably increased telomere length as compared to wild-type rice. These results are discussed with the idea that OsKu80 plays a role in developmental growth and telomere length regulation in rice plants.

  2. Type II Toxoplasma gondii KU80 knockout strains enable functional analysis of genes required for cyst development and latent infection.

    PubMed

    Fox, Barbara A; Falla, Alejandra; Rommereim, Leah M; Tomita, Tadakimi; Gigley, Jason P; Mercier, Corinne; Cesbron-Delauw, Marie-France; Weiss, Louis M; Bzik, David J

    2011-09-01

    Type II Toxoplasma gondii KU80 knockouts (Δku80) deficient in nonhomologous end joining were developed to delete the dominant pathway mediating random integration of targeting episomes. Gene targeting frequency in the type II Δku80 Δhxgprt strain measured at the orotate (OPRT) and the uracil (UPRT) phosphoribosyltransferase loci was highly efficient. To assess the potential of the type II Δku80 Δhxgprt strain to examine gene function affecting cyst biology and latent stages of infection, we targeted the deletion of four parasite antigen genes (GRA4, GRA6, ROP7, and tgd057) that encode characterized CD8(+) T cell epitopes that elicit corresponding antigen-specific CD8(+) T cell populations associated with control of infection. Cyst development in these type II mutant strains was not found to be strictly dependent on antigen-specific CD8(+) T cell host responses. In contrast, a significant biological role was revealed for the dense granule proteins GRA4 and GRA6 in cyst development since brain tissue cyst burdens were drastically reduced specifically in mutant strains with GRA4 and/or GRA6 deleted. Complementation of the Δgra4 and Δgra6 mutant strains using a functional allele of the deleted GRA coding region placed under the control of the endogenous UPRT locus was found to significantly restore brain cyst burdens. These results reveal that GRA proteins play a functional role in establishing cyst burdens and latent infection. Collectively, our results suggest that a type II Δku80 Δhxgprt genetic background enables a higher-throughput functional analysis of the parasite genome to reveal fundamental aspects of parasite biology controlling virulence, pathogenesis, and transmission.

  3. Both carboxy-terminus NES motif and mutated tryptophan(s) are crucial for aberrant nuclear export of nucleophosmin leukemic mutants in NPMc+ AML.

    PubMed

    Falini, Brunangelo; Bolli, Niccolò; Shan, Jing; Martelli, Maria Paola; Liso, Arcangelo; Pucciarini, Alessandra; Bigerna, Barbara; Pasqualucci, Laura; Mannucci, Roberta; Rosati, Roberto; Gorello, Paolo; Diverio, Daniela; Roti, Giovanni; Tiacci, Enrico; Cazzaniga, Giovanni; Biondi, Andrea; Schnittger, Suzanne; Haferlach, Torsten; Hiddemann, Wolfgang; Martelli, Massimo F; Gu, Wei; Mecucci, Cristina; Nicoletti, Ildo

    2006-06-01

    We recently identified aberrant cytoplasmic expression of nucleophosmin (NPM) as the immunohistochemical marker of a large subgroup of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) (about one-third of adult AML) that is characterized by normal karyotype and mutations occurring at the exon-12 of the NPM gene. In this paper, we have elucidated the molecular mechanism underlying the abnormal cytoplasmic localization of NPM. All 29 AML-associated mutated NPM alleles so far identified encode abnormal proteins which have acquired at the C-terminus a nuclear export signal (NES) motif and lost both tryptophan residues 288 and 290 (or only the residue 290) which determine nucleolar localization. We show for the first time that both alterations are crucial for NPM mutant export from nucleus to cytoplasm. In fact, the cytoplasmic accumulation of NPM is blocked by leptomycin-B and ratjadones, specific exportin-1/Crm1-inhibitors, and by reinsertion of tryptophan residues 288 and 290, which respectively relocate NPM mutants in the nucleoplasm and nucleoli. NPM leukemic mutants in turn recruit the wild-type NPM from nucleoli to nucleoplasm and cytoplasm. These findings indicate that potential therapeutic strategies aimed to retarget NPM to its physiological sites will have to overcome 2 obstacles, the new NES motif and the mutated tryptophan(s) at the NPM mutant C-terminus.

  4. KARP-1 works as a heterodimer with Ku70, but the function of KARP-1 cannot perfectly replace that of Ku80 in DSB repair.

    PubMed

    Koike, Manabu; Yutoku, Yasutomo; Koike, Aki

    2011-10-01

    Ku, the heterodimer of Ku70 and Ku80, plays an essential role in the DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair pathway, i.e., non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ). Two isoforms of Ku80 encoded by the same genes, namely, Ku80 and KARP-1 are expressed and function in primate cells, but not in rodent cells. Ku80 works as a heterodimer with Ku70. However, it is not yet clear whether KARP-1 forms a heterodimer with Ku70 and works as a heterodimer. Although KARP-1 appears to work in NHEJ, its physiological role remains unclear. In this study, we established and characterized EGFP-KARP-1-expressing xrs-6 cell lines, EGFP-KARP-1/xrs-6. We found that nuclear localization signal (NLS) of KARP-1 is localized in the C-terminal region. Our data showed that KARP-1 localizes within the nucleus in NLS-dependent and NLS-independent manner and forms a heterodimer with Ku70, and stabilizes Ku70. On the other hand, EGFP-KARP-1 could not perfectly complement the radiosensitivity and DSB repair activity of Ku80-deficient xrs-6 cells. Furthermore, KARP-1 could not accumulate at DSBs faster than Ku80, although EGFP-KARP-1 accumulates at DSBs. Our data demonstrate that the function of KARP-1 could not perfectly replace that of Ku80 in DSB repair, although KARP-1 has some biochemical properties, which resemble those of Ku80, and works as a heterodimer with Ku70. On the other hand, the number of EGFP-KARP-1-expressing xrs-6 cells showing pan-nuclear γ-H2AX staining significantly increases following X-irradiation, suggesting that KARP-1 may have a novel role in DSB response.

  5. KARP-1 works as a heterodimer with Ku70, but the function of KARP-1 cannot perfectly replace that of Ku80 in DSB repair

    SciTech Connect

    Koike, Manabu; Yutoku, Yasutomo; Koike, Aki

    2011-10-01

    Ku, the heterodimer of Ku70 and Ku80, plays an essential role in the DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair pathway, i.e., non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ). Two isoforms of Ku80 encoded by the same genes, namely, Ku80 and KARP-1 are expressed and function in primate cells, but not in rodent cells. Ku80 works as a heterodimer with Ku70. However, it is not yet clear whether KARP-1 forms a heterodimer with Ku70 and works as a heterodimer. Although KARP-1 appears to work in NHEJ, its physiological role remains unclear. In this study, we established and characterized EGFP-KARP-1-expressing xrs-6 cell lines, EGFP-KARP-1/xrs-6. We found that nuclear localization signal (NLS) of KARP-1 is localized in the C-terminal region. Our data showed that KARP-1 localizes within the nucleus in NLS-dependent and NLS-independent manner and forms a heterodimer with Ku70, and stabilizes Ku70. On the other hand, EGFP-KARP-1 could not perfectly complement the radiosensitivity and DSB repair activity of Ku80-deficient xrs-6 cells. Furthermore, KARP-1 could not accumulate at DSBs faster than Ku80, although EGFP-KARP-1 accumulates at DSBs. Our data demonstrate that the function of KARP-1 could not perfectly replace that of Ku80 in DSB repair, although KARP-1 has some biochemical properties, which resemble those of Ku80, and works as a heterodimer with Ku70. On the other hand, the number of EGFP-KARP-1-expressing xrs-6 cells showing pan-nuclear {gamma}-H2AX staining significantly increases following X-irradiation, suggesting that KARP-1 may have a novel role in DSB response.

  6. CHIP, a carboxy terminus HSP-70 interacting protein, prevents cell death induced by endoplasmic reticulum stress in the central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Cabral Miranda, Felipe; Adão-Novaes, Juliana; Hauswirth, William W.; Linden, Rafael; Petrs-Silva, Hilda; Chiarini, Luciana B.

    2015-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and protein misfolding are associated with various neurodegenerative diseases. ER stress activates unfolded protein response (UPR), an adaptative response. However, severe ER stress can induce cell death. Here we show that the E3 ubiquitin ligase and co-chaperone Carboxyl Terminus HSP70/90 Interacting Protein (CHIP) prevents neuron death in the hippocampus induced by severe ER stress. Organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHSCs) were exposed to Tunicamycin, a pharmacological ER stress inducer, to trigger cell death. Overexpression of CHIP was achieved with a recombinant adeno-associated viral vector (rAAV) and significantly diminished ER stress-induced cell death, as shown by analysis of propidium iodide (PI) uptake, condensed chromatin, TUNEL and cleaved caspase 3 in the CA1 region of OHSCs. In addition, overexpression of CHIP prevented upregulation of both CHOP and p53 both pro-apoptotic pathways induced by ER stress. We also detected an attenuation of eIF2a phosphorylation promoted by ER stress. However, CHIP did not prevent upregulation of BiP/GRP78 induced by UPR. These data indicate that overexpression of CHIP attenuates ER-stress death response while maintain ER stress adaptative response in the central nervous system. These results indicate a neuroprotective role for CHIP upon UPR signaling. CHIP emerge as a candidate for clinical intervention in neurodegenerative diseases associated with ER stress. PMID:25620910

  7. CHIP, a carboxy terminus HSP-70 interacting protein, prevents cell death induced by endoplasmic reticulum stress in the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Cabral Miranda, Felipe; Adão-Novaes, Juliana; Hauswirth, William W; Linden, Rafael; Petrs-Silva, Hilda; Chiarini, Luciana B

    2014-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and protein misfolding are associated with various neurodegenerative diseases. ER stress activates unfolded protein response (UPR), an adaptative response. However, severe ER stress can induce cell death. Here we show that the E3 ubiquitin ligase and co-chaperone Carboxyl Terminus HSP70/90 Interacting Protein (CHIP) prevents neuron death in the hippocampus induced by severe ER stress. Organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHSCs) were exposed to Tunicamycin, a pharmacological ER stress inducer, to trigger cell death. Overexpression of CHIP was achieved with a recombinant adeno-associated viral vector (rAAV) and significantly diminished ER stress-induced cell death, as shown by analysis of propidium iodide (PI) uptake, condensed chromatin, TUNEL and cleaved caspase 3 in the CA1 region of OHSCs. In addition, overexpression of CHIP prevented upregulation of both CHOP and p53 both pro-apoptotic pathways induced by ER stress. We also detected an attenuation of eIF2a phosphorylation promoted by ER stress. However, CHIP did not prevent upregulation of BiP/GRP78 induced by UPR. These data indicate that overexpression of CHIP attenuates ER-stress death response while maintain ER stress adaptative response in the central nervous system. These results indicate a neuroprotective role for CHIP upon UPR signaling. CHIP emerge as a candidate for clinical intervention in neurodegenerative diseases associated with ER stress.

  8. Role of the Carboxy Terminus of SecA in Iron Acquisition, Protein Translocation, and Virulence of the Bacterial Pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Fiester, Steven E.; Nwugo, Chika C.; Penwell, William F.; Neary, John M.; Beckett, Amber C.; Arivett, Brock A.; Schmidt, Robert E.; Geiger, Sarah C.; Connerly, Pamela L.; Menke, Sharon M.; Tomaras, Andrew P.

    2015-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a Gram-negative opportunistic nosocomial pathogen that causes pneumonia and soft tissue and systemic infections. Screening of a transposon insertion library of A. baumannii ATCC 19606T resulted in the identification of the 2010 derivative, which, although capable of growing well in iron-rich media, failed to prosper under iron chelation. Genetic, molecular, and functional assays showed that 2010's iron utilization-deficient phenotype is due to an insertion within the 3′ end of secA, which results in the production of a C-terminally truncated derivative of SecA. SecA plays a critical role in protein translocation through the SecYEG membrane channel. Accordingly, the secA mutation resulted in undetectable amounts of the ferric acinetobactin outer membrane receptor protein BauA while not affecting the production of other acinetobactin membrane protein transport components, such as BauB and BauE, or the secretion of acinetobactin by 2010 cells cultured in the presence of subinhibitory concentrations of the synthetic iron chelator 2,2′-dipyridyl. Outer membrane proteins involved in nutrient transport, adherence, and biofilm formation were also reduced in 2010. The SecA truncation also increased production of 30 different proteins, including proteins involved in adaptation/tolerance responses. Although some of these protein changes could negatively affect the pathobiology of the 2010 derivative, its virulence defect is mainly due to its inability to acquire iron via the acinetobactin-mediated system. These results together indicate that although the C terminus of the A. baumannii ATCC 19606T SecA is not essential for viability, it plays a critical role in the production and translocation of different proteins and virulence. PMID:25605767

  9. Type II Toxoplasma gondii KU80 Knockout Strains Enable Functional Analysis of Genes Required for Cyst Development and Latent Infection ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Barbara A.; Falla, Alejandra; Rommereim, Leah M.; Tomita, Tadakimi; Gigley, Jason P.; Mercier, Corinne; Cesbron-Delauw, Marie-France; Weiss, Louis M.; Bzik, David J.

    2011-01-01

    Type II Toxoplasma gondii KU80 knockouts (Δku80) deficient in nonhomologous end joining were developed to delete the dominant pathway mediating random integration of targeting episomes. Gene targeting frequency in the type II Δku80 Δhxgprt strain measured at the orotate (OPRT) and the uracil (UPRT) phosphoribosyltransferase loci was highly efficient. To assess the potential of the type II Δku80 Δhxgprt strain to examine gene function affecting cyst biology and latent stages of infection, we targeted the deletion of four parasite antigen genes (GRA4, GRA6, ROP7, and tgd057) that encode characterized CD8+ T cell epitopes that elicit corresponding antigen-specific CD8+ T cell populations associated with control of infection. Cyst development in these type II mutant strains was not found to be strictly dependent on antigen-specific CD8+ T cell host responses. In contrast, a significant biological role was revealed for the dense granule proteins GRA4 and GRA6 in cyst development since brain tissue cyst burdens were drastically reduced specifically in mutant strains with GRA4 and/or GRA6 deleted. Complementation of the Δgra4 and Δgra6 mutant strains using a functional allele of the deleted GRA coding region placed under the control of the endogenous UPRT locus was found to significantly restore brain cyst burdens. These results reveal that GRA proteins play a functional role in establishing cyst burdens and latent infection. Collectively, our results suggest that a type II Δku80 Δhxgprt genetic background enables a higher-throughput functional analysis of the parasite genome to reveal fundamental aspects of parasite biology controlling virulence, pathogenesis, and transmission. PMID:21531875

  10. Ku80 as a novel receptor for thymosin beta4 that mediates its intracellular activity different from G-actin sequestering.

    PubMed

    Bednarek, Radoslaw; Boncela, Joanna; Smolarczyk, Katarzyna; Cierniewska-Cieslak, Aleksandra; Wyroba, Elzbieta; Cierniewski, Czeslaw S

    2008-01-18

    Our data demonstrate that increased intracellular expression of thymosin beta4(Tbeta4) is necessary and sufficient to induce plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) gene expression in endothelial cells. To describe the mechanism of this effect, we produced Tbeta4 mutants with impaired functional motifs and tested their intracellular location and activity. Cytoplasmic distributions of Tbeta4((AcSDKPT/4A)), Tbeta4((KLKKTET/7A)), and Tbeta4((K16A)) mutants fused with green fluorescent protein did not differ significantly from those of wild-type Tbeta4. Overexpression of Tbeta4, Tbeta4((AcSDKPT/4A)), and Tbeta4((K16A)) affected intracellular formation of actin filaments. As expected, Tbeta4((K16A)) uptake by nuclei was impaired. On the other hand, overexpression of Tbeta4((KLKKTET/7A)) resulted in developing the actin filament network typical of adhering cells, indicating that the mutant lacked the actin binding site. The mechanism by which intracellular Tbeta4 induced the PAI-1 gene did not depend upon the N-terminal tetrapeptide AcSDKP and depended only partially on its ability to bind G-actin or enter the nucleus. Both Tbeta4 and Tbeta4((AcSDKPT/4A)) induced the PAI-1 gene to the same extent, whereas mutants Tbeta4((KLKKTET/7A)) and Tbeta4((K16A)) retained about 60% of the original activity. By proteomic analysis, the Ku80 subunit of ATP-dependent DNA helicase II was found to be associated with Tbeta4. Ku80 and Tbeta4 consistently co-immunoprecipitated in a complex from endothelial cells. Co-transfection of endothelial cells with the Ku80 deletion mutants and Tbeta4 showed that the C-terminal arm domain of Ku80 is directly involved in this interaction. Furthermore, down-regulation of Ku80 by specific short interference RNA resulted in dramatic reduction in PAI-1 expression at the level of both mRNA and protein synthesis. These data suggest that Ku80 functions as a novel receptor for Tbeta4 and mediates its intracellular activity.

  11. A YAC contig encompassing the XRCC5 (Ku80) DNA repair gene and complementation of defective cells by YAC protoplast fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Blunt, T.; Priestley, A.; Hafezparast, M.; McMillan, T.

    1995-11-20

    The Chinese hamster ovary xrs mutants are sensitive to ionizing radiation, defective in DNA double-strand break rejoining, and unable to carry out V(D)J recombination effectively. Recently, the gene defective in these mutants, XRCC5, has been shown to encode Ku80, a component of the Ku protein and DNA-dependent protein kinase. We present here a YAC contig involving 25 YACs mapping to the region 2q33-q34, which encompasses the XRCC5 gene. Eight new markers for this region of chromosome 2 are identified. YACs encoding the Ku80 gene were transferred to xrs cells by protoplast fusion, and complementation of all the defective phenotypes has been obtained with two YACs. We discuss the advantages and disadvantages of this approach as a strategy for cloning human genes complementing defective rodent cell lines. 44 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  12. Ku70 or Ku80 deficiencies in the fungus Botrytis cinerea facilitate targeting of genes that are hard to knock out in a wild-type context.

    PubMed

    Choquer, Mathias; Robin, Guillaume; Le Pêcheur, Pascal; Giraud, Corinne; Levis, Caroline; Viaud, Muriel

    2008-12-01

    The filamentous ascomycete Botrytis cinerea is one of the most studied models for understanding the necrotrophic behaviour of phytopathogenic fungi. The genomes of two strains of B. cinerea have been sequenced (B05.10 and T4), which may contribute to elucidating the virulence polymorphism in this fungus. In this study, both strains were genetically modified in order to construct recipient strains designed to target genes that are hard to knock out. Deletions of BcKu70 gene in B05.10 strain and BcKu80 gene in T4 strain both affected the nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) DNA repair mechanism. NHEJ is responsible for the ectopic integration of gene replacement cassettes during fungal transformation and leads to a lower frequency of homologous recombination (HR). Ku deficiencies in B. cinerea did not disturb in vitro or in planta growth, but clearly improved HR efficiency for the putative sesquiterpene cyclase-encoding gene Cnd15, which was hard to knock out in a wild-type strain.

  13. 4. AERIAL VIEW OF MT. VERNON TERMINUS, SOUTHERN TERMINUS OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. AERIAL VIEW OF MT. VERNON TERMINUS, SOUTHERN TERMINUS OF GEORGE WASHINGTON MEMORIAL PARKWAY (GWMP), LOOKING SOUTHEAST. - George Washington Memorial Parkway, Along Potomac River from McLean to Mount Vernon, VA, Mount Vernon, Fairfax County, VA

  14. Cleavage of the angiotensin II type 1 receptor and nuclear accumulation of the cytoplasmic carboxy-terminal fragment.

    PubMed

    Cook, Julia L; Mills, Sarah J; Naquin, Ryan T; Alam, Jawed; Re, Richard N

    2007-04-01

    Our published studies show that the distribution of the ANG II type 1 (AT(1)) receptor (AT(1)R), expressed as a enhanced yellow fluorescent fusion (YFP) protein (AT(1)R/EYFP), is altered upon cellular treatment with ANG II or coexpression with intracellular ANG II. AT(1)R accumulates in nuclei of cells only in the presence of ANG II. Several transmembrane receptors are known to accumulate in nuclei, some as holoreceptors and others as cleaved receptor products. The present study was designed to determine whether the AT(1)R is cleaved before nuclear transport. A plasmid encoding a rat AT(1)R labeled at the amino terminus with enhanced cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) and at the carboxy terminus with EYFP was employed. Image analyses of this protein in COS-7 cells, CCF-STTG1 glial cells, and A10 vascular smooth muscle cells show the two fluorescent moieties to be largely spatially colocalized in untreated cells. ANG II treatment, however, leads to a separation of the fluorescent moieties with yellow fluorescence accumulating in more than 30% of cellular nuclei. Immunoblot analyses of extracts and conditioned media from transfected cells indicate that the CFP domain fused to the extracellular amino-terminal AT(1)R domain is cleaved from the membrane and that the YFP domain, together with the intracellular cytoplasmic carboxy terminus of the AT(1)R, is also cleaved from the membrane-bound receptor. The carboxy terminus of the AT(1)R is essential for cleavage; cleavage does not occur in protein deleted with respect to this region. Overexpressed native AT(1)R (nonfusion) is also cleaved; the intracellular 6-kDa cytoplasmic domain product accumulates to a significantly higher level with ANG II treatment.

  15. Carboxy-terminal mutations of bile acid CoA:N-acyltransferase alter activity and substrate specificity.

    PubMed

    Styles, Nathan A; Shonsey, Erin M; Falany, Josie L; Guidry, Amber L; Barnes, Stephen; Falany, Charles N

    2016-07-01

    Bile acid CoA:amino acid N-acyltransferase (BAAT) is the terminal enzyme in the synthesis of bile salts from cholesterol and catalyzes the conjugation of taurine or glycine to bile acid CoA thioesters to form bile acid N-acylamidates. BAAT has a dual localization to the cytosol and peroxisomes, possibly due to an inefficient carboxy-terminal peroxisomal targeting signal (PTS), -serine-glutamine-leucine (-SQL). Mutational analysis was used to define the role of the carboxy terminus in peroxisomal localization and kinetic activity. Amidation activity of BAAT and BAAT lacking the final two amino acids (AAs) (BAAT-S) were similar, whereas the activity of BAAT with a canonical PTS sequence (BAAT-SKL) was increased >2.5-fold. Kinetic analysis of BAAT and BAAT-SKL showed that BAAT-SKL had a lower Km for taurine and glycine as well as a greater Vmax There was no difference in the affinity for cholyl-CoA. In contrast to BAAT, BAAT-SKL forms bile acid N-acylamidates with β-alanine. BAAT-S immunoprecipitated when incubated with peroxisomal biogenesis factor 5 (Pex5) and rabbit anti-Pex5 antibodies; however, deleting the final 12 AAs prevented coimmunoprecipitation with Pex5, indicating the Pex5 interaction involves more than the -SQL sequence. These results indicate that even small changes in the carboxy terminus of BAAT can have significant effects on activity and substrate specificity. PMID:27230263

  16. Carboxy-terminal mutations of bile acid CoA:N-acyltransferase alter activity and substrate specificity.

    PubMed

    Styles, Nathan A; Shonsey, Erin M; Falany, Josie L; Guidry, Amber L; Barnes, Stephen; Falany, Charles N

    2016-07-01

    Bile acid CoA:amino acid N-acyltransferase (BAAT) is the terminal enzyme in the synthesis of bile salts from cholesterol and catalyzes the conjugation of taurine or glycine to bile acid CoA thioesters to form bile acid N-acylamidates. BAAT has a dual localization to the cytosol and peroxisomes, possibly due to an inefficient carboxy-terminal peroxisomal targeting signal (PTS), -serine-glutamine-leucine (-SQL). Mutational analysis was used to define the role of the carboxy terminus in peroxisomal localization and kinetic activity. Amidation activity of BAAT and BAAT lacking the final two amino acids (AAs) (BAAT-S) were similar, whereas the activity of BAAT with a canonical PTS sequence (BAAT-SKL) was increased >2.5-fold. Kinetic analysis of BAAT and BAAT-SKL showed that BAAT-SKL had a lower Km for taurine and glycine as well as a greater Vmax There was no difference in the affinity for cholyl-CoA. In contrast to BAAT, BAAT-SKL forms bile acid N-acylamidates with β-alanine. BAAT-S immunoprecipitated when incubated with peroxisomal biogenesis factor 5 (Pex5) and rabbit anti-Pex5 antibodies; however, deleting the final 12 AAs prevented coimmunoprecipitation with Pex5, indicating the Pex5 interaction involves more than the -SQL sequence. These results indicate that even small changes in the carboxy terminus of BAAT can have significant effects on activity and substrate specificity.

  17. Novel carboxy functionalized sol-gel precursors

    SciTech Connect

    Wolter, H.; Storch, W.; Gellermann, C.

    1996-12-31

    A novel family of inorganic-organic copolymers (ORMOCER`s) derived from urethane- and thioether(meth)acrylate alkoxysilanes has been successfully exploited for a variety of diverse applications. In order to widen the range of applications an additional functionality (carboxy group) has been incorporated int his silane type. Conventional sol-gel processing facilitates the formation of an inorganic Si-O-Si-network via hydrolysis and polycondensation reactions of alkoxysilyl moieties and in addition, the (meth)acrylate groups are available for radically induced polymerization to obtain a complementary organic polymer structure. The presence of a carboxy group would appear to have great potential for a range of diverse areas of application, such as an internal catalyst for the sol-gel process, complexation of elements such as Zr and Ti, increasing the adhesion to various substrates and modification of solubility. A number of novel silanes and their syntheses will be described in this paper.

  18. Carboxy-terminal truncations of epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor affect diverse EGF-induced cellular responses.

    PubMed

    Li, W; Hack, N; Margolis, B; Ullrich, A; Skorecki, K; Schlessinger, J

    1991-08-01

    The binding of epidermal growth factor (EGF) to its receptor induces tyrosine phosphorylation of phospholipase C gamma (PLC gamma), which appears to be necessary for its activation leading to phosphatidyl inositol (PI) hydrolysis. Moreover, EGF-receptor (EGF-R) activation and autophosphorylation results in binding of PLC gamma to the tyrosine phosphorylated carboxy-terminus of the receptor. To gain further insights into the mechanisms and interactions regulating these processes, we have analyzed transfected NIH-3T3 cells expressing two EGF-R carboxy-terminal deletion mutants (CD63 and CD126) with reduced capacity to stimulate PI hydrolysis, Ca2+ rises, and DNA synthesis. In fact, the CD126 mutant lacking 126 carboxy-terminal amino acids, including four tyrosine autophosphorylation sites, was unable to stimulate PI hydrolysis or Ca2+ rise in response to EGF. Surprisingly, EGF binding to the cell lines expressing CD63 or CD126 mutants was followed by similar stimulation of tyrosine phosphorylation of PLC gamma. Our results suggest that although necessary, tyrosine phosphorylation of PLC gamma may not be sufficient for stimulation and PI hydrolysis. It is clear, however, that the carboxy-terminal region of EGF-R is involved in regulation of interactions with cellular targets and therefore plays a crucial role in postreceptor signaling pathways.

  19. A major determinant for membrane protein interaction localizes to the carboxy-terminal domain of the mouse coronavirus nucleocapsid protein.

    PubMed

    Hurst, Kelley R; Kuo, Lili; Koetzner, Cheri A; Ye, Rong; Hsue, Bilan; Masters, Paul S

    2005-11-01

    The two major constituents of coronavirus virions are the membrane (M) and nucleocapsid (N) proteins. The M protein is anchored in the viral envelope by three transmembrane segments flanked by a short amino-terminal ectodomain and a large carboxy-terminal endodomain. The M endodomain interacts with the viral nucleocapsid, which consists of the positive-strand RNA genome helically encapsidated by N protein monomers. In previous work with the coronavirus mouse hepatitis virus (MHV), a highly defective M protein mutant, MDelta2, was constructed. This mutant contained a 2-amino-acid carboxy-terminal truncation of the M protein. Analysis of second-site revertants of MDelta2 revealed mutations in the carboxy-terminal region of the N protein that compensated for the defect in the M protein. To seek further genetic evidence corroborating this interaction, we generated a comprehensive set of clustered charged-to-alanine mutants in the carboxy-terminal domain 3 of N protein. One of these mutants, CCA4, had a highly defective phenotype similar to that of MDelta2. Transfer of the CCA4 mutation into a partially diploid MHV genome showed that CCA4 was a loss-of-function mutation rather than a dominant-negative mutation. Analysis of multiple second-site revertants of CCA4 revealed mutations in both the M protein and the N protein that could compensate for the original lesion in N. These data more precisely define the region of the N protein that interacts with the M protein. Further, we found that fusion of domain 3 of the N protein to the carboxy terminus of a heterologous protein caused it to be incorporated into MHV virions.

  20. Frizzled-4 C-terminus Distal to KTXXXW Motif is Essential for Normal Dishevelled Recruitment and Norrin-stimulated Activation of Lef/Tcf-dependent Transcriptional Activation

    PubMed Central

    Pau, Milly S.; Gao, Shujuan; Malbon, Craig C.; Wang, Hsien-yu

    2016-01-01

    The carboxy (C)-termini of G protein coupled receptors (GPCR) dictate essential functions. The KTXXXW motif C-terminus of Frizzleds (FZD) has been implicated in recruitment of Dishevelled (DVL). Through study of FZD4 and its associated ligand Norrin, we report that a minimum of three residues distal to the KTXXXW motif in the C-terminal tail of Frizzled-4 are essential for DVL recruitment and robust Lef/Tcf-dependent transcriptional activation in response to Norrin. PMID:27096005

  1. Frizzled-4 C-terminus Distal to KTXXXW Motif is Essential for Normal Dishevelled Recruitment and Norrin-stimulated Activation of Lef/Tcf-dependent Transcriptional Activation.

    PubMed

    Bertalovitz, Alexander C; Pau, Milly S; Gao, Shujuan; Malbon, Craig C; Wang, Hsien-Yu

    2016-01-01

    The carboxy (C)-termini of G protein coupled receptors (GPCR) dictate essential functions. The KTXXXW motif C-terminus of Frizzleds (FZD) has been implicated in recruitment of Dishevelled (DVL). Through study of FZD4 and its associated ligand Norrin, we report that a minimum of three residues distal to the KTXXXW motif in the C-terminal tail of Frizzled-4 are essential for DVL recruitment and robust Lef/Tcf-dependent transcriptional activation in response to Norrin. PMID:27096005

  2. Tidewater terminus tug-of-war

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartholomaus, T. C.; Larsen, C. F.; O'Neel, S.; West, M. E.

    2012-12-01

    When a glacier terminus recedes, not only does the glacier lose the ice between the former and present terminus, but the terminal reach of the glacier can steepen, causing ice flow out of the glacier interior increases. The increased flow will continue, thinning the glacier, until the glacier geometry and ice flow reach a new equilibrium. Yahtse Glacier is an advancing tidewater glacier on the Gulf of Alaska coast. To better understand the controls on its terminus position, we use a suite of seismic, geodetic and oceanographic data. Both calving and submarine melt contribute to frontal ablation, however, at Yahtse Glacier the ice is too fractured to support undercutting below the water line, nor does a persistent submarine toe develop. Thus the terminus retreats as fast as subaerial calving occurs. Previous work at Yahtse Glacier demonstrated that locally recorded seismic events between 1 and 5 Hz are predominantly the result of subaerial iceberg calving. Therefore, we use seismicity as a proxy for the frontal ablation rate. We measure the near-terminus glacier velocity with oblique photogrammetry, calibrated with ~10 day intervals of surveyed ice velocity. These methods reveal an annually-averaged terminus velocity of 6.9 km/yr. The frontal ablation rate and the terminus ice velocity are nearly in phase and reach maximum values twice per year: in the spring and fall. Integrating the difference between frontal ablation rate and terminus ice velocity reveals a pattern of terminus positions with a single annual cycle, quite similar to that which we observe in the field. GPS measurements 10 km from the terminus indicate that ice velocities peak in May and decrease through the summer. Oceanographic measurements show that near-shore surface water temperatures in the Gulf of Alaska are greatest in the fall. We suggest that the spring peak in terminus velocity is set by higher rates of ice delivery from up-glacier; calving rate increases in a compensatory way, to nearly

  3. Immunoreactivity of polyclonal antibodies generated against the carboxy terminus of the predicted amino acid sequence of the Huntington disease gene

    SciTech Connect

    Alkatib, G.; Graham, R.; Pelmear-Telenius, A.

    1994-09-01

    A cDNA fragment spanning the 3{prime}-end of the Huntington disease gene (from 8052 to 9252) was cloned into a prokaryotic expression vector containing the E. Coli lac promoter and a portion of the coding sequence for {beta}-galactosidase. The truncated {beta}-galactosidase gene was cleaved with BamHl and fused in frame to the BamHl fragment of the Huntington disease gene 3{prime}-end. Expression analysis of proteins made in E. Coli revealed that 20-30% of the total cellular proteins was represented by the {beta}-galactosidase-huntingtin fusion protein. The identity of the Huntington disease protein amino acid sequences was confirmed by protein sequence analysis. Affinity chromatography was used to purify large quantities of the fusion protein from bacterial cell lysates. Affinity-purified proteins were used to immunize New Zealand white rabbits for antibody production. The generated polyclonal antibodies were used to immunoprecipitate the Huntington disease gene product expressed in a neuroblastoma cell line. In this cell line the antibodies precipitated two protein bands of apparent gel migrations of 200 and 150 kd which together, correspond to the calculated molecular weight of the Huntington disease gene product (350 kd). Immunoblotting experiments revealed the presence of a large precursor protein in the range of 350-750 kd which is in agreement with the predicted molecular weight of the protein without post-translational modifications. These results indicate that the huntingtin protein is cleaved into two subunits in this neuroblastoma cell line and implicate that cleavage of a large precursor protein may contribute to its biological activity. Experiments are ongoing to determine the precursor-product relationship and to examine the synthesis of the huntingtin protein in freshly isolated rat brains, and to determine cellular and subcellular distribution of the gene product.

  4. The amino terminus of the vaccinia virus E3 protein is necessary to inhibit the interferon response.

    PubMed

    White, Stacy D; Jacobs, Bertram L

    2012-05-01

    Vaccinia virus (VACV) encodes a multifunctional protein, E3L, that is necessary for interferon (IFN) resistance in cells in culture. Interferon resistance has been mapped to the well-characterized carboxy terminus of E3L, which contains a conserved double-stranded RNA binding domain. The amino terminus of E3L has a Z-form nucleic acid binding domain, which has been shown to be dispensable for replication and IFN resistance in HeLa and RK13 cells; however, a virus expressing E3L deleted of the amino terminus has reduced pathogenicity in an animal model. In this study, we demonstrate that the pathogenicity of a virus expressing E3L deleted of the amino terminus was fully rescued in type I IFN receptor knockout (IFN-α/βR(-/-)) mice. Furthermore, this virus was IFN sensitive in primary mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs). This virus induced the phosphorylation of the α subunit of eukaryotic initiation factor 2 (eIF2α) in MEFs in an IFN-dependent manner. The depletion of double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR) from these MEFs restored the IFN resistance of this virus. Furthermore, the virus expressing E3L deleted of the amino terminus was also IFN resistant in PKR(-/-) MEFs. Thus, our data demonstrate that the amino terminus of E3L is necessary to inhibit the type I IFN response both in mice and in MEFs and that in MEFs, the amino terminus of E3L functions to inhibit the PKR pathway.

  5. Reaction of alpha-tubulin with iodotyrosines catalyzed by tubulin:tyrosine ligase: carboxy-terminal labeling of tubulin with ( sup 125 I)monoiodotyrosine

    SciTech Connect

    Joniau, M.; Coudijzer, K.; De Cuyper, M. )

    1990-02-01

    We have studied the capacity of different iodinated derivatives of phenylalanine and tyrosine to inhibit the incorporation of (3H)tyrosine into tubulin catalyzed by tubulin:tyrosine ligase. In contrast to thyronine and its iodinated derivatives, iodotyrosines were efficient inhibitors. That they also functioned as substrates of the enzyme was shown by the effective incorporation of (125I)mono- and diiodotyrosine into tubulin. The label was shown to be located at the carboxy terminus. Labeling by this method conserves the polymerization capacity of tubulin in contrast with classical radioiodination methods involving oxidation.

  6. A motif shared by TFIIF and TFIIB mediates their interaction with the RNA polymerase II carboxy-terminal domain phosphatase Fcp1p in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kobor, M S; Simon, L D; Omichinski, J; Zhong, G; Archambault, J; Greenblatt, J

    2000-10-01

    Transcription by RNA polymerase II is accompanied by cyclic phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of the carboxy-terminal heptapeptide repeat domain (CTD) of its largest subunit. We have used deletion and point mutations in Fcp1p, a TFIIF-interacting CTD phosphatase, to show that the integrity of its BRCT domain, like that of its catalytic domain, is important for cell viability, mRNA synthesis, and CTD dephosphorylation in vivo. Although regions of Fcp1p carboxy terminal to its BRCT domain and at its amino terminus were not essential for viability, deletion of either of these regions affected the phosphorylation state of the CTD. Two portions of this carboxy-terminal region of Fcp1p bound directly to the first cyclin-like repeat in the core domain of the general transcription factor TFIIB, as well as to the RAP74 subunit of TFIIF. These regulatory interactions with Fcp1p involved closely related amino acid sequence motifs in TFIIB and RAP74. Mutating the Fcp1p-binding motif KEFGK in the RAP74 (Tfg1p) subunit of TFIIF to EEFGE led to both synthetic phenotypes in certain fcp1 tfg1 double mutants and a reduced ability of Fcp1p to activate transcription when it is artificially tethered to a promoter. These results suggest strongly that this KEFGK motif in RAP74 mediates its interaction with Fcp1p in vivo. PMID:11003641

  7. A Motif Shared by TFIIF and TFIIB Mediates Their Interaction with the RNA Polymerase II Carboxy-Terminal Domain Phosphatase Fcp1p in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Kobor, Michael S.; Simon, Lisa D.; Omichinski, Jim; Zhong, Guoqing; Archambault, Jacques; Greenblatt, Jack

    2000-01-01

    Transcription by RNA polymerase II is accompanied by cyclic phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of the carboxy-terminal heptapeptide repeat domain (CTD) of its largest subunit. We have used deletion and point mutations in Fcp1p, a TFIIF-interacting CTD phosphatase, to show that the integrity of its BRCT domain, like that of its catalytic domain, is important for cell viability, mRNA synthesis, and CTD dephosphorylation in vivo. Although regions of Fcp1p carboxy terminal to its BRCT domain and at its amino terminus were not essential for viability, deletion of either of these regions affected the phosphorylation state of the CTD. Two portions of this carboxy-terminal region of Fcp1p bound directly to the first cyclin-like repeat in the core domain of the general transcription factor TFIIB, as well as to the RAP74 subunit of TFIIF. These regulatory interactions with Fcp1p involved closely related amino acid sequence motifs in TFIIB and RAP74. Mutating the Fcp1p-binding motif KEFGK in the RAP74 (Tfg1p) subunit of TFIIF to EEFGE led to both synthetic phenotypes in certain fcp1 tfg1 double mutants and a reduced ability of Fcp1p to activate transcription when it is artificially tethered to a promoter. These results suggest strongly that this KEFGK motif in RAP74 mediates its interaction with Fcp1p in vivo. PMID:11003641

  8. Anthropomorphic Telemanipulation System in Terminus Control Mode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jau, Bruno M.; Lewis, M. Anthony; Bejczy, Antal K.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes a prototype anthropomorphic kinesthetic telepresence system that is being developed at JPL. It utilizes dexterous terminus devices in the form of an exoskeleton force-sensing master glove worn by the operator and a replica four finger anthropomorphic slave hand. The newly developed master glove is integrated with our previously developed non-anthropomorphic six degree of freedom (DOF) universal force-reflecting hand controller (FRHC). The mechanical hand and forearm are mounted to an industrial robot (PUMA 560), replacing its standard forearm. The notion of 'terminus control mode' refers to the fact that only the terminus devices (glove and robot hand) are of anthropomorphic nature, and the master and slave arms are non-anthropomorphic. The system is currently being evaluated, focusing on tool handling and astronaut equivalent task executions. The evaluation revealed the system's potential for tool handling but it also became evident that hand tool manipulations and space operations require a dual arm robot. This paper describes the system's principal components, its control and computing architecture, discusses findings of the tool handling evaluation, and explains why common tool handling and EVA space tasks require dual arm robots.

  9. Automated carboxy-terminal sequence analysis of peptides and proteins using diphenyl phosphoroisothiocyanatidate.

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, J. M.; Nikfarjam, F.; Shenoy, N. R.; Shively, J. E.

    1992-01-01

    Proteins and peptides can be sequenced from the carboxy-terminus with isothiocyanate reagents to produce amino acid thiohydantoin derivatives. Previous studies in our laboratory have focused on the automation of the thiocyanate chemistry using acetic anhydride and trimethylsilylisothiocyanate (TMS-ITC) to derivatize the C-terminal amino acid to a thiohydantoin and sodium trimethylsilanolate for specific hydrolysis of the derivatized C-terminal amino acid (Bailey, J.M., Shenoy, N.R., Ronk, M., & Shively, J.E., 1992, Protein Sci. 1, 68-80). A major limitation of this approach was the need to activate the C-terminus with acetic anhydride. We now describe the use of a new reagent, diphenyl phosphoroisothiocyanatidate (DPP-ITC) and pyridine, which combines the activation and derivatization steps to produce peptidylthiohydantoins. Previous work by Kenner et al. (Kenner, G.W., Khorana, H.G., & Stedman, R.J., 1953, Chem. Soc. J., 673-678) with this reagent demonstrated slow kinetics. Several days were required for complete reaction. We show here that the inclusion of pyridine was found to promote the formation of C-terminal thiohydantoins by DPP-ITC resulting in complete conversion of the C-terminal amino acid to a thiohydantoin in less than 1 h. Reagents such as imidazole, triazine, and tetrazole were also found to promote the reaction with DPP-ITC as effectively as pyridine. General base catalysts, such as triethylamine, do not promote the reaction, but are required to convert the C-terminal carboxylic acid to a salt prior to the reaction with DPP-ITC and pyridine. By introducing the DPP-ITC reagent and pyridine in separate steps in an automated sequencer, we observed improved sequencing yields for amino acids normally found difficult to derivatize with acetic anhydride/TMS-ITC. This was particularly true for aspartic acid, which now can be sequenced in yields comparable to most of the other amino acids. Automated programs are described for the C-terminal sequencing of

  10. Identification of human adenovirus early region 1 products by using antisera against synthetic peptides corresponding to the predicted carboxy termini.

    PubMed Central

    Yee, S P; Rowe, D T; Tremblay, M L; McDermott, M; Branton, P E

    1983-01-01

    Synthetic peptides were prepared which corresponded to the carboxy termini of the human adenovirus type 5 early region 1B (E1B) 58,000-molecular-weight (58K) protein (Tyr-Ser-Asp-Glu-Asp-Thr-Asp) and of the E1A gene products (Tyr-Gly-Lys-Arg-Pro-Arg-Pro). Antisera raised against these peptides precipitated polypeptides from adenovirus type 5-infected KB cells; serum raised against the 58K carboxy terminus was active against the E1B 58K phosphoprotein, whereas serum raised against the E1A peptide immunoprecipitated four major and at least two minor polypeptides. These latter proteins migrated with apparent molecular weights of 52K, 50K, 48.5K, 45K, 37.5K, and 35K, and all were phosphoproteins. By using tryptic phosphopeptide analysis, the four major species (52K, 50K, 48.5K, and 45K) were found to be related, as would be expected if all were products of the E1A region. The ability of the antipeptide sera to precipitate these viral proteins thus confirmed that the previously proposed sequence of E1 DNA and mRNA and the reading frame of the mRNA are correct. Immunofluorescent-antibody staining with the antipeptide sera indicated that the 58K E1B protein was localized both in the nucleus and in the cytoplasm, especially in the perinuclear region. The E1A-specific serum also stained both discrete patches in the nucleus and diffuse areas of the cytoplasm. These data suggest that both the 58K protein and the E1A proteins may function in or around the nucleus. These highly specific antipeptide sera should allow for a more complete identification and characterization of these important viral proteins. Images PMID:6343626

  11. 4-Carboxy­pyridazin-1-ium chloride

    PubMed Central

    Starosta, Wojciech; Leciejewicz, Janusz

    2008-01-01

    The structure of the title compound, C5H5N2O2 +·Cl−, is composed of chloride anions and 4-carboxy­pyridazin-1-ium cations. Chloride anions bridge the cations via O—H⋯Cl and N—H⋯Cl hydrogen bonds to form ribbons. The latter, linked by van der Waals forces with lengths in the range 3.254 (2)–3.497 (2) Å, form coplanar layers. Very weak inter­actions operate also between adjacent layers, as indicated by their spacing of 3.339 (1) Å. PMID:21203256

  12. The C-terminus hot spot region helps in the fibril formation of bacteriophage-associated hyaluronate lyase (HylP2)

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Harish; Singh, Sudhir Kumar; Singh, Amit Kumar; Mitra, Kalyan; Akhtar, Md. Sohail

    2015-01-01

    The bacteriophage encoded hyaluronate lyases (HylP and HylP2) degrade hyaluronan and other glycosaminoglycans. HylP2 forms a functional fibril under acidic conditions in which its N-terminus is proposed to form the fibrillar core, leading to nucleation and acceleration of fibril formation. Here we report the presence of a hot spot region (A144GVVVY149) towards the carboxy terminus of HylP2, essential for the acceleration of fibril formation. The ‘hot spot’ is observed to be inherently mutated for valines (A178AMVMY183) in case of HylP. The N- terminal swapped chimeras between these phage HLs (NHylP2CHylP and NHylPCHylP2) or HylP did not form fibrils at acidic pH. However, seeding of prefibrils of HylP2 recompensed nucleation and led to fibrillation in NHylPCHylP2. The V147A mutation in the ‘hot spot’ region abolished fibril formation in HylP2. The M179V and M181V double mutations in the ‘hot spot’ region of HylP led to fibrillation with the seeding of prefibrils. It appears that fibrillation in HylP2 even though is initiated by the N-terminus, is accelerated by the conserved ‘hot spot’ region in the C-terminus. A collagenous (Gly-X-Y)10 motif in the N-terminus and a mutated ‘hot spot’ region in the C-terminus of HylP affect fibrillar nucleation and acceleration respectively. PMID:26395159

  13. Alpha-carboxy nucleoside phosphonates as universal nucleoside triphosphate mimics.

    PubMed

    Balzarini, Jan; Das, Kalyan; Bernatchez, Jean A; Martinez, Sergio E; Ngure, Marianne; Keane, Sarah; Ford, Alan; Maguire, Nuala; Mullins, Niki; John, Jubi; Kim, Youngju; Dehaen, Wim; Vande Voorde, Johan; Liekens, Sandra; Naesens, Lieve; Götte, Matthias; Maguire, Anita R; Arnold, Eddy

    2015-03-17

    Polymerases have a structurally highly conserved negatively charged amino acid motif that is strictly required for Mg(2+) cation-dependent catalytic incorporation of (d)NTP nucleotides into nucleic acids. Based on these characteristics, a nucleoside monophosphonate scaffold, α-carboxy nucleoside phosphonate (α-CNP), was designed that is recognized by a variety of polymerases. Kinetic, biochemical, and crystallographic studies with HIV-1 reverse transcriptase revealed that α-CNPs mimic the dNTP binding through a carboxylate oxygen, two phosphonate oxygens, and base-pairing with the template. In particular, the carboxyl oxygen of the α-CNP acts as the potential equivalent of the α-phosphate oxygen of dNTPs and two oxygens of the phosphonate group of the α-CNP chelate Mg(2+), mimicking the chelation by the β- and γ-phosphate oxygens of dNTPs. α-CNPs (i) do not require metabolic activation (phosphorylation), (ii) bind directly to the substrate-binding site, (iii) chelate one of the two active site Mg(2+) ions, and (iv) reversibly inhibit the polymerase catalytic activity without being incorporated into nucleic acids. In addition, α-CNPs were also found to selectively interact with regulatory (i.e., allosteric) Mg(2+)-dNTP-binding sites of nucleos(t)ide-metabolizing enzymes susceptible to metabolic regulation. α-CNPs represent an entirely novel and broad technological platform for the development of specific substrate active- or regulatory-site inhibitors with therapeutic potential. PMID:25733891

  14. Protein-Protein Interactions Modulate the Docking-Dependent E3-Ubiquitin Ligase Activity of Carboxy-Terminus of Hsc70-Interacting Protein (CHIP).

    PubMed

    Narayan, Vikram; Landré, Vivien; Ning, Jia; Hernychova, Lenka; Muller, Petr; Verma, Chandra; Walkinshaw, Malcolm D; Blackburn, Elizabeth A; Ball, Kathryn L

    2015-11-01

    CHIP is a tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domain protein that functions as an E3-ubiquitin ligase. As well as linking the molecular chaperones to the ubiquitin proteasome system, CHIP also has a docking-dependent mode where it ubiquitinates native substrates, thereby regulating their steady state levels and/or function. Here we explore the effect of Hsp70 on the docking-dependent E3-ligase activity of CHIP. The TPR-domain is revealed as a binding site for allosteric modulators involved in determining CHIP's dynamic conformation and activity. Biochemical, biophysical and modeling evidence demonstrate that Hsp70-binding to the TPR, or Hsp70-mimetic mutations, regulate CHIP-mediated ubiquitination of p53 and IRF-1 through effects on U-box activity and substrate binding. HDX-MS was used to establish that conformational-inhibition-signals extended from the TPR-domain to the U-box. This underscores inter-domain allosteric regulation of CHIP by the core molecular chaperones. Defining the chaperone-associated TPR-domain of CHIP as a manager of inter-domain communication highlights the potential for scaffolding modules to regulate, as well as assemble, complexes that are fundamental to protein homeostatic control. PMID:26330542

  15. The penultimate arginine of the carboxy terminus determines slow desensitisation in a P2X receptor from the cattle tick Boophilus microplus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    P2X ion channels have been functionally characterised from a range of eukaryotes. Whilst these receptors can be broadly classified into fast and slow desensitising, the molecular mechanisms underlying current desensitisation are not fully understood. Here we describe the characterisation of a P2X ch...

  16. Rapid elimination of Carboxy-THC in a cohort of chronic cannabis users.

    PubMed

    Lewis, John; Molnar, Anna; Allsop, David; Copeland, Jan; Fu, Shanlin

    2016-01-01

    Urinary 11-nor-Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid (Carboxy-THC) concentrations, normalised to creatinine output, have been demonstrated to be a useful tool in the interpretation of the results of a series of urine tests for cannabis. These tests, often termed historical data, can be used to identify potential chronic cannabis users who may present occupational health and safety risks within the workplace. Conversely, the data can also be used to support employee claims of previous regular, rather than recent, cannabis use. This study aimed at examining the mean elimination of Carboxy-THC in 37 chronic users undergoing voluntary abstinence over a 2-week period. Urine specimens were collected prior to the study and after 1 and 2 weeks of abstinence. Carboxy-THC levels in urine were measured by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) following alkaline hydrolysis, organic solvent extraction and derivatisation to form its pentafluoropropionic derivative. The creatinine-normalised Carboxy-THC concentrations declined rapidly over the 2 weeks of abstinence period and the majority of chronic cannabis users (73%) reduced their urinary Carboxy-THC levels to below the 15-μg/L confirmatory cutoff within that time. The study further highlights the value of historical urinary Carboxy-THC data as a means of identifying potential occupational health and safety risks among chronic cannabis users.

  17. 2. View of hydraulic gates at terminus of pipes to ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. View of hydraulic gates at terminus of pipes to feeder canal. The Siphon-Breaker Building is to the right, looking south. - Columbia Basin Project, Grand Coulee Siphon Breaker Building, Grand Coulee, Grant County, WA

  18. 36. View of southern terminus of the Blue Ridge Parkway ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    36. View of southern terminus of the Blue Ridge Parkway looking SW. - Great Smoky Mountains National Park Roads & Bridges, Newfound Gap Road, Between Gatlinburg, TN & Cherokee, NC, Gatlinburg, Sevier County, TN

  19. 32. VIEW OF TERMINUS OF GRAND CANAL, SHOWING TURNOUT GATES, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. VIEW OF TERMINUS OF GRAND CANAL, SHOWING TURNOUT GATES, LOOKING SOUTHWEST. WASTE WATER IS TURNED INTO THE BED OF NEW RIVER. Photographer: Mark Durben, April 1989 - Grand Canal, North side of Salt River, Tempe, Maricopa County, AZ

  20. Cell-cycle-regulated activation of Akt kinase by phosphorylation at its carboxyl terminus

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Pengda; Begley, Michael; Michowski, Wojciech; Inuzuka, Hiroyuki; Ginzberg, Miriam; Gao, Daming; Tsou, Peiling; Gan, Wenjian; Papa, Antonella; Kim, Byeong Mo; Wan, Lixin; Singh, Amrik; Zhai, Bo; Yuan, Min; Wang, Zhiwei; Gygi, Steven P.; Lee, Tae Ho; Lu, Kun-Ping; Toker, Alex; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo; Asara, John M.; Kirschner, Marc W.; Sicinski, Piotr; Cantley, Lewis; Wei, Wenyi

    2014-01-01

    Akt, also known as protein kinase B, plays key roles in cell proliferation, survival and metabolism. Akt hyperactivation contributes to many pathophysiological conditions, including human cancers1–3, and is closely associated with poor prognosis and chemo- or radio-therapeutic resistance4. Phosphorylation of Akt at S473 (ref. 5) and T308 (ref. 6) activates Akt. However, it remains unclear whether further mechanisms account for full Akt activation, and whether Akt hyperactivation is linked to misregulated cell cycle progression, another cancer hallmark7. Here we report that Akt activity fluctuates across the cell cycle, mirroring cyclin A expression. Mechanistically, phosphorylation of S477 and T479 at the Akt extreme carboxy terminus by cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (Cdk2)/cyclin A or mTORC2, under distinct physiological conditions, promotes Akt activation through facilitating, or functionally compensating for, S473 phosphorylation. Furthermore, deletion of the cyclin A2 allele in the mouse olfactory bulb leads to reduced S477/T479 phosphorylation and elevated cellular apoptosis. Notably, cyclin A2-deletion-induced cellular apoptosis in mouse embryonic stem cells is partly rescued by S477D/T479E-Akt1, supporting a physiological role for cyclin A2 in governing Akt activation. Together, the results of our study show Akt S477/T479 phosphorylation to be an essential layer of the Akt activation mechanism to regulate its physiological functions, thereby providing a new mechanistic link between aberrant cell cycle progression and Akt hyperactivation in cancer. PMID:24670654

  1. Changes in Carboxy Methylation and Tyrosine Phosphorylation of Protein Phosphatase PP2A Are Associated with Epididymal Sperm Maturation and Motility.

    PubMed

    Dudiki, Tejasvi; Kadunganattil, Suraj; Ferrara, John K; Kline, Douglas W; Vijayaraghavan, Srinivasan

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian sperm contain the serine/threonine phosphatases PP1γ2 and PP2A. The role of sperm PP1γ2 is relatively well studied. Here we confirm the presence of PP2A in sperm and show that it undergoes marked changes in methylation (leucine 309), tyrosine phosphorylation (tyrosine 307) and catalytic activity during epididymal sperm maturation. Spermatozoa isolated from proximal caput, distal caput and caudal regions of the epididymis contain equal immuno-reactive amounts of PP2A. Using demethyl sensitive antibodies we show that PP2A is methylated at its carboxy terminus in sperm from the distal caput and caudal regions but not in sperm from the proximal caput region of the epididymis. The methylation status of PP2A was confirmed by isolation of PP2A with microcystin agarose followed by alkali treatment, which causes hydrolysis of protein carboxy methyl esters. Tyrosine phosphorylation of sperm PP2A varied inversely with methylation. That is, PP2A was tyrosine phosphorylated when it was demethylated but not when methylated. PP2A demethylation and its reciprocal tyrosine phosphorylation were also affected by treatment of sperm with L-homocysteine and adenosine, which are known to elevate intracellular S-adenosylhomocysteine, a feedback inhibitor of methyltransferases. Catalytic activity of PP2A declined during epididymal sperm maturation. Inhibition of PP2A by okadaic acid or by incubation of caudal epididymal spermatozoa with L-homocysteine and adenosine resulted in increase of sperm motility parameters including percent motility, velocity, and lateral head amplitude. Demethylation or pharmacological inhibition of PP2A also leads to an increase in phosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3). Our results show for the first time that changes in PP2A activity due to methylation and tyrosine phosphorylation occur in sperm and that these changes may play an important role in the regulation of sperm function. PMID:26569399

  2. 23. TERMINUS, NORTH BRANCH PRAIRIE CITY DITCH. DITCH COMES FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. TERMINUS, NORTH BRANCH PRAIRIE CITY DITCH. DITCH COMES FROM ISOLATED GROUP OF TREES IN MIDDLE DISTANCE, AND ENDS AT CENTER RIGHT. WATER THEN PROCEEDED DOWN SWALE, INTO TREES AT LEFT. VIEW TO NORTH. - Natomas Ditch System, Rhodes Ditch, West of Bidwell Street, north of U.S. Highway 50, Folsom, Sacramento County, CA

  3. 51. FRED TEICHMAN'S ROTATING SCREEN AT TERMINUS OF THE POWER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    51. FRED TEICHMAN'S ROTATING SCREEN AT TERMINUS OF THE POWER CANAL. SETTLING BASIN IS LOCATED IN BOTTOM LEFT OF PHOTO. UPSTREAM SIDE OF ROOSEVELT DAM IS VISIBLE Photographer: Mark Durben, 1984 - Roosevelt Power Canal & Diversion Dam, Parallels Salt River, Roosevelt, Gila County, AZ

  4. 207. Oconaluffee River Bridge is the southern terminus of the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    207. Oconaluffee River Bridge is the southern terminus of the Blue Ride Parkway. It is a concrete girder bridge completed in 1957. It is the only concrete girder bridge with stone-faced piers. Looking east-southeast. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

  5. Molecular dissection of radixin: distinct and interdependent functions of the amino- and carboxy-terminal domains

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    The ERM proteins--ezrin, radixin, and moesin--occur in particular cortical cytoskeletal structures. Several lines of evidence suggest that they interact with both cytoskeletal elements and plasma membrane components. Here we described the properties of full-length and truncated radixin polypeptides expressed in transfected cells. In stable transfectants, exogenous full-length radixin behaves much like endogenous ERM proteins, localizing to the same cortical structures. However, the presence of full-length radixin or its carboxy-terminal domain in cortical structures correlates with greatly diminished staining of endogenous moesin in those structures, suggesting that radixin and moesin compete for a limiting factor required for normal associations in the cell. The results also reveal distinct roles for the amino- and carboxy-terminal domains. At low levels relative to endogenous radixin, the carboxy-terminal polypeptide is associated with most of the correct cortical targets except cleavage furrows. In contrast, the amino-terminal polypeptide is diffusely localized throughout the cell. Low level expression of full-length radixin or either of the truncated polypeptides has no detectable effect on cell physiology. However, high level expression of the carboxy-terminal domain dramatically disrupts normal cytoskeletal structures and functions. At these high levels, the amino-terminal polypeptide does localize to cortical structures, but does not affect the cells. We conclude that the behavior of radixin in cells depends upon activities contributed by separate domains of the protein, but also requires modulating interactions between those domains. PMID:7744951

  6. The E. coli NusA carboxy-terminal domains are structurally similar and show specific RNAP- and lambdaN interaction.

    PubMed

    Eisenmann, Anke; Schwarz, Sabine; Prasch, Stefan; Schweimer, Kristian; Rösch, Paul

    2005-08-01

    The carboxy-terminal domain of the transcription factor Escherichia coli NusA, NusACTD, interacts with the protein N of bacteriophage lambda, lambdaN, and the carboxyl terminus of the E. coli RNA polymerase alpha subunit, alphaCTD. We solved the solution structure of the unbound NusACTD with high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Additionally, we investigated the binding sites of lambdaN and alphaCTD on NusACTD using NMR titrations. The solution structure of NusACTD shows two structurally similar subdomains, NusA(353-416) and NusA(431-490), matching approximately two homologous acidic sequence repeats. Further characterization of NusACTD with 15N NMR relaxation data suggests that the interdomain region is only weakly structured and that the subdomains are not interacting. Both subdomains adopt an (HhH)2 fold. These folds are normally involved in DNA-protein and protein-protein interactions. NMR titration experiments show clear differences of the interactions of these two domains with alphaCTD and lambdaN, in spite of their structural similarity.

  7. Proliferation-associated nuclear antigen Ki-S1 is identical with topoisomerase II alpha. Delineation of a carboxy-terminal epitope with peptide antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Boege, F.; Andersen, A.; Jensen, S.; Zeidler, R.; Kreipe, H.

    1995-01-01

    Proliferation-linked expression of the nuclear Ki-S1 antigen is a significant prognostic indicator in mammary carcinomas. Here, we show staining of a protein of 170 kd by Ki-S1 antibody in immunoblots of Saccharomyces cerevisiae expressing human topoisomerase II alpha but not in the parental strain. In HL-60 cells containing both isoforms of human topoisomerase II, Ki-S1 antibody binds selectively to the 170-kd isoenzyme in a similar fashion as peptide-antibodies directed against amino acid residues 1 to 15 or 1512 to 1530 of human topoisomerase II alpha. Conversely, antibodies directed against carboxyl-terminal sequences of human topoisomerase II beta selectively stain a 180-kd protein. The immunoreactive pattern of V8 endoproteinase restriction digests of human topoisomerase II alpha was identical for Ki-S1-antibody and peptide-antibodies directed against residues 1512 to 1530 but different for peptide-antibodies directed against residues 1 to 15. The Rf values of the smallest fragment commonly recognized by Ki-S1 antibody and the carboxy terminus-specific peptide-antibody place the Ki-S1 epitope within the last 495 carboxyl-terminal amino acid residues of topoisomerase II alpha. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:7539979

  8. The E. coli NusA carboxy-terminal domains are structurally similar and show specific RNAP- and lambdaN interaction.

    PubMed

    Eisenmann, Anke; Schwarz, Sabine; Prasch, Stefan; Schweimer, Kristian; Rösch, Paul

    2005-08-01

    The carboxy-terminal domain of the transcription factor Escherichia coli NusA, NusACTD, interacts with the protein N of bacteriophage lambda, lambdaN, and the carboxyl terminus of the E. coli RNA polymerase alpha subunit, alphaCTD. We solved the solution structure of the unbound NusACTD with high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Additionally, we investigated the binding sites of lambdaN and alphaCTD on NusACTD using NMR titrations. The solution structure of NusACTD shows two structurally similar subdomains, NusA(353-416) and NusA(431-490), matching approximately two homologous acidic sequence repeats. Further characterization of NusACTD with 15N NMR relaxation data suggests that the interdomain region is only weakly structured and that the subdomains are not interacting. Both subdomains adopt an (HhH)2 fold. These folds are normally involved in DNA-protein and protein-protein interactions. NMR titration experiments show clear differences of the interactions of these two domains with alphaCTD and lambdaN, in spite of their structural similarity. PMID:15987884

  9. Discovery of thiochroman derivatives bearing a carboxy-containing side chain as orally active pure antiestrogens.

    PubMed

    Kanbe, Yoshitake; Kim, Myung-Hwa; Nishimoto, Masahiro; Ohtake, Yoshihito; Tsunenari, Toshiaki; Taniguchi, Kenji; Ohizumi, Iwao; Kaiho, Shin-ichi; Nabuchi, Yoshiaki; Kawata, Setsu; Morikawa, Kazumi; Jo, Jae-Chon; Kwon, Hee-An; Lim, Hyun-Suk; Kim, Hak-Yeop

    2006-08-01

    In order to search for alternatives to the sulfoxide moiety in the long side chain of pure antiestrogens, several molecules that may interact with water in a fashion similar to ICI164,384 were designed and it was found that compounds with the carboxy, the sulfamide, or the sulfonamide instead of the sulfoxide moiety also functioned as pure antiestrogens. Interestingly, the compound possessing the carboxy moiety showed superior antiestrogen activity compared to ICI182,780 when dosed orally. Results of the pharmacokinetic evaluation indicated that the potent antiestrogen activity at oral dosing attributed to both the improved absorption from the intestinal wall and the metabolic stability of the compound in liver. PMID:16709454

  10. Air-persistent monomeric (amino)(carboxy) radicals derived from cyclic (alkyl)(amino) carbenes.

    PubMed

    Mahoney, Janell K; Martin, David; Thomas, Fabrice; Moore, Curtis E; Rheingold, Arnold L; Bertrand, Guy

    2015-06-17

    A series of monomeric (amino)(carboxy) radicals featuring carbonyl substituents with increasing electron-withdrawing properties (3a, phenyl; 3b, 3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)phenyl; 3c, perfluorophenyl; 3d, heptafluoropropyl; 3e, 2H-pyrroliumyl) were synthesized in two or three steps from stable cyclic (alky)(amino)carbenes (CAACs). Although (amino)(carboxy) radicals had been previously considered as highly air-sensitive, some of these compounds feature half-lives of hours (3d), and even days (3c and 3e) in well-aerated solutions. DFT calculations show that (amino)(carboxy) radicals evolve from C-centered radical to ambidentate C,O-radicals when increasing the electron-withdrawing properties of the carbonyl substituent. This is paralleled with a destabilization of the peroxide resulting from the addition of dioxygen to the radical. This latter reaction is even predicted to be endothermic for substituents with Hammett constant σp > 0.2. PMID:26011769

  11. Brr2p carboxy-terminal Sec63 domain modulates Prp16 splicing RNA helicase

    PubMed Central

    Cordin, Olivier; Hahn, Daniela; Alexander, Ross; Gautam, Amit; Saveanu, Cosmin; Barrass, J. David; Beggs, Jean D.

    2014-01-01

    RNA helicases are essential for virtually all cellular processes, however, their regulation is poorly understood. The activities of eight RNA helicases are required for pre-mRNA splicing. Amongst these, Brr2p is unusual in having two helicase modules, of which only the amino-terminal helicase domain appears to be catalytically active. Using genetic and biochemical approaches, we investigated interaction of the carboxy-terminal helicase module, in particular the carboxy-terminal Sec63-2 domain, with the splicing RNA helicase Prp16p. Combining mutations in BRR2 and PRP16 suppresses or enhances physical interaction and growth defects in an allele-specific manner, signifying functional interactions. Notably, we show that Brr2p Sec63-2 domain can modulate the ATPase activity of Prp16p in vitro by interfering with its ability to bind RNA. We therefore propose that the carboxy-terminal helicase module of Brr2p acquired a regulatory function that allows Brr2p to modulate the ATPase activity of Prp16p in the spliceosome by controlling access to its RNA substrate/cofactor. PMID:25428373

  12. Marine Geophysical Surveying Along the Hubbard Glacier Terminus, Southeast Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goff, J. A.; Davis, M.; Gulick, S. P.; Lawson, D. E.; Willems, B. A.

    2010-12-01

    Tidewater glaciers are a challenging environment for marine investigations, owing to the dangers associated with calving and restrictions on operations due to dense floating ice. We report here on recent efforts to conduct marine geophysical surveys proximal to the ice face of Hubbard Glacier, in Disenchantment Bay, Alaska. Hubbard is an advancing tidewater glacier that has twice recently (1986 and 2002) impinged on Gilbert Point, which separates Russell Fiord from Disenchantment Bay, thereby temporarily creating a glacially-dammed Russell Lake. Continued advance will likely form a more permanent dam, rerouting brackish outflow waters into the Situk River, near Yakutat, Alaska. Our primary interest is in studying the development and motion of the morainal bank which, for an advancing tidewater glacier, stabilizes it against rapid retreat. For survey work, we operated with a small, fast, aluminum-hulled vessel and a captain experienced in operating in ice-bound conditions, providing a high margin of safety and maneuverability. Differencing of multibeam bathymetric data acquired in different years can identify and quantify areas of deposition and erosion on the morainal bank front and in Disenchantment Bay proper, where accumulation rates are typically > 1 m/yr within 1 km of the glacier terminus. The advance or retreat rate of the morainal bank can be determined by changes in the bed elevation through time; we document advance rates that average > 30 m/yr in Disenchantment Bay, but which vary substantially over different time periods and at different positions along the ice face. Georeferencing of available satellite imagery allows us to directly compare the position of the glacial terminus with the position of the morainal bank. From 1978 to 1999, and then to 2006, the advances in terminus and morainal bank positions were closely synchronized along the length of the glacier face. In the shallower Russell Fiord side of the terminus, a sediment ridge was mapped both

  13. Change in plasma immunoreactive N-terminus, C-terminus, and 4,000-dalton midportion of atrial natriuretic factor prohormone with hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Winters, C J; Vesely, D L

    1991-01-01

    Plasma concentrations of the immunoreactive N-terminus, C-terminus and 4,000-dalton midportion of the N-terminus of the atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) prohormone were measured before and after hemodialysis in 13 patients with end-stage renal disease. There was a significant (p less than 0.001) fall in the mean plasma concentration of the C-terminus (i.e. ANF, amino acids 99-126 of the prohormone) from 123 +/- 25 to 80 +/- 22 fmol/ml (mean +/- SEM) with dialysis. The whole N-terminus, on the other hand, increased from 9,336 +/- 2,011 to 11,021 +/- 2,134 fmol/ml after dialysis (p less than 0.002). Pro ANF 31-67 (i.e. amino acids 31-67 of the prohormone) increased postdialysis from 27,775 +/- 4,300 to 31,040 +/- 4,840 fmol/ml (p less than 0.003). Only 1.5% of pro ANF 1-98 and pro ANF 31-67 were cleared by the dialyzer membrane while 15% of ANF crossed the membrane. Thus, with hemodialysis the C-terminus decreases while the N-terminus and pro ANF 31-67 from the midportion of the N-terminus of the ANF prohormone increase in plasma which is partially explained by their respective abilities to cross the dialyzer membrane.

  14. Sumoylation of SAE2 C terminus regulates SAE nuclear localization.

    PubMed

    Truong, Khue; Lee, Terry D; Li, Baozong; Chen, Yuan

    2012-12-14

    SUMOylation occurs predominantly in the nucleus, but non-nuclear proteins can also be SUMOylated. It is unclear how intracellular trafficking of the SUMOylation enzymes is regulated to catalyze SUMOylation in different cellular compartments. Here we report that the SAE2 subunit of human SUMO activation enzyme (SAE) underwent rapid nucleocytoplasmic shuttling and its nuclear accumulation depended on SUMO modification at the C terminus. The SUMOylation sites included three Lys residues on the bipartite nuclear localization sequence (NLS) and two Lys residues outside of but adjacent to the NLS, and their SUMOylation was catalyzed by Ubc9. Because SAE2 forms a tight heterodimer with SAE1 and it controls the trafficking of the heterodimer, this study has identified the mechanism used to localize SAE to the nucleus. Similar mechanisms are likely to exist for other proteins that depend on SUMOylation for nuclear localization.

  15. α-Synuclein amino terminus regulates mitochondrial membrane permeability.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jiamei; Du, Tingting; Wang, Xue; Duan, Chunli; Gao, Ge; Zhang, Jianliang; Lu, Lingling; Yang, Hui

    2014-12-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a common neurodegenerative movement disorder affecting an increasing number of elderly. Various studies have shown that mitochondrial dysfunction and abnormal protein aggregation are two major contributors to the progression of PD. The N terminus of α-synuclein (α-Syn/N), which adopts an α-helical conformation upon lipid binding, is essential for membrane interaction; yet its role in mitochondria remains poorly defined. A functional characterization of the α-Syn N-terminal domain and investigation of its effect on mitochondrial membrane permeability were undertaken in this study. α-Syn/N and α-Syn/delN (amino acids 1-65 and 61-140, respectively) constructs were overexpressed in dopaminergic MN9D cells and primary cortical neurons. A decrease in cell viability was observed in cells transfected with α-Syn/N but not α-Syn/delN. In addition, an α-Syn/N-induced increase in the level of intracellular reactive oxygen species, alteration in mitochondrial morphology, and decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential were accompanied by the activation of mitochondrial permeability transition pores (mPTP). These changes were also associated with a decline in mitochondrial cardiolipin content and interaction with the voltage-dependent anion channel and adenine nucleotide translocator in the mitochondrial membrane. The activation of mPTPs and reduction in cell viability were partially reversed by bongkrekic acid, an inhibitor of adenine nucleotide translocator (ANT), suggesting that the interaction between α-Syn and ANT promoted mPTP activation and was toxic to cells. BKA treatment reduced interaction of α-Syn/N with ANT and VDAC. These results suggest that the N terminus of α-Syn is essential for the regulation of mitochondrial membrane permeability and is a likely factor in the neurodegeneration associated with PD.

  16. 3-Carboxy-pyrazolinalanine as a new scaffold for developing potent and selective NMDA receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Tamborini, Lucia; Pinto, Andrea; Mastronardi, Federica; Iannuzzi, Maria C; Cullia, Gregorio; Nielsen, Birgitte; De Micheli, Carlo; Conti, Paola

    2013-10-01

    A synthetic method for the preparation of suitably protected 3-carboxy-Δ2-pyrazolin-5-yl-alanine was developed. This scaffold is amenable to further decoration at the N1 position and was used to generate novel NMDA receptor ligands. Although weaker than the previously reported N1-Ph derivatives, the new ligands retain the ability to selectively bind to NMDA receptor with micromolar to submicromolar affinity. Considering the relevance of the N-functionalization for the biological activity, the results presented in this communication are preliminary to a full SAR study of this novel class of NMDA receptor antagonists. PMID:23954238

  17. Bis[3-(2-carboxy­ethen­yl)pyridinium-1-acetato]dichloridozinc(II)

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Xue-Hui; Sun, Wei-Wei; Gao, En-Qing

    2009-01-01

    In the title complex, [ZnCl2(C10H9NO4)2], the ZnII ion lies on a twofold rotation axis and is four-coordinated by two carboxyl­ate O atoms from two 3-(2-carboxy­ethen­yl)pyridinium-1-acetate ligands in a monodentate mode and two Cl atoms in a distorted tetra­hedral geometry. In the crystal structure, inter­molecular O—H⋯O hydrogen bonds link the mol­ecules into a double-chain structure extending parallel to [101]. PMID:21578626

  18. Negatively-charged residues in the polar carboxy-terminal region in FSP27 are indispensable for expanding lipid droplets.

    PubMed

    Tamori, Yoshikazu; Tateya, Sanshiro; Ijuin, Takeshi; Nishimoto, Yuki; Nakajima, Shinsuke; Ogawa, Wataru

    2016-03-01

    FSP27 has an important role in large lipid droplet (LD) formation because it exchanges lipids at the contact site between LDs. In the present study, we clarify that the amino-terminal domain of FSP27 (amino acids 1-130) is dispensable for LD enlargement, although it accelerates LD growth. LD expansion depends on the carboxy-terminal domain of FSP27 (amino acids 131-239). Especially, the negative charge of the acidic residues (D215, E218, E219 and E220) in the polar carboxy-terminal region (amino acids 202-239) is essential for the enlargement of LD. We propose that the carboxy-terminal domain of FSP27 has a crucial role in LD expansion, whereas the amino-terminal domain only has a supportive role. PMID:26921608

  19. Katanin Severing and Binding Microtubules Are Inhibited by Tubulin Carboxy Tails.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Megan E; Sackett, Dan L; Ross, Jennifer L

    2015-12-15

    Microtubule dynamics in cells are regulated by associated proteins that can be either stabilizers or destabilizers. A class of destabilizers that is important in a large number of cellular activities is the microtubule-severing enzymes, yet little is known about how they function. Katanin p60 was the first ATPase associated with microtubule severing. Here, we investigate the activity of katanin severing using a GFP-labeled human version. We quantify the effect of katanin concentration on katanin binding and severing activity. We find that free tubulin can inhibit severing activity by interfering with katanin binding to microtubules. The inhibition is mediated by the sequence of the tubulin and specifically depends on the carboxy-terminal tails. We directly investigate the inhibition effect of tubulin carboxy-terminal tails using peptide sequences of α-, β-, or detyrosinated α-tubulin tails that have been covalently linked to bovine serum albumin. Our results show that β-tubulin tails are the most effective at inhibiting severing, and that detyrosinated α-tubulin tails are the least effective. These results are distinct from those for other severing enzymes and suggest a scheme for regulation of katanin activity in cells dependent on free tubulin concentration and the modification state of the tubulin.

  20. Synthesis and characterization of pH sensitive carboxySNARF-1 nanoreactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yen-Chi; Ostafin, Agnes; Mizukami, Hiroshi

    2010-05-01

    A rapid response dual wavelength emission pH sensor consisting of carboxySNARF-1 nanoreactors has been synthesized and shown to provide accurate pH measurements even in complex biological media, where the unprotected pH responsive dyes have failed. The carboxySNARF-1 nanoreactor is made of a calcium phosphate shell covering phosphatidylcholine liposomes filled with the dye. Its mean diameter is 150 nm with dynamic light scattering, the shell thickness is 5-7 nm with TEM, and it contains about 10 dyes/particle. The nanoreactor's response time to pH change nearly equals that of the dye in solution. Its pH titration curves at two different wavelengths are equivalent to those of the dye in solution and fluorescence intensity ratio dependent pH analysis is possible using the modified Henderson-Hasselbalch equation. However, the pH dependent fluorescence ratios of the dye in solution in the presence of plasma and albumin are distorted, and application of the Henderson-Hasselbalch equation is not possible. We have found that the distortions may be restored using cSNARF-1 nanoreactors and the pKa of the dye in the nanoreactor then equals that in solution. These results suggest that the interference to the dye for the pH analyses with the environmental molecules may be reduced or prohibited by usage of cSNARF-1 nanoreactors.

  1. Synthesis and characterization of pH sensitive carboxySNARF-1 nanoreactors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yen-Chi; Ostafin, Agnes; Mizukami, Hiroshi

    2010-05-28

    A rapid response dual wavelength emission pH sensor consisting of carboxySNARF-1 nanoreactors has been synthesized and shown to provide accurate pH measurements even in complex biological media, where the unprotected pH responsive dyes have failed. The carboxySNARF-1 nanoreactor is made of a calcium phosphate shell covering phosphatidylcholine liposomes filled with the dye. Its mean diameter is 150 nm with dynamic light scattering, the shell thickness is 5-7 nm with TEM, and it contains about 10 dyes/particle. The nanoreactor's response time to pH change nearly equals that of the dye in solution. Its pH titration curves at two different wavelengths are equivalent to those of the dye in solution and fluorescence intensity ratio dependent pH analysis is possible using the modified Henderson-Hasselbalch equation. However, the pH dependent fluorescence ratios of the dye in solution in the presence of plasma and albumin are distorted, and application of the Henderson-Hasselbalch equation is not possible. We have found that the distortions may be restored using cSNARF-1 nanoreactors and the pK(a) of the dye in the nanoreactor then equals that in solution. These results suggest that the interference to the dye for the pH analyses with the environmental molecules may be reduced or prohibited by usage of cSNARF-1 nanoreactors.

  2. Confirmation of a blocked amino terminus of sulfhydryl oxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Janolino, V.G.; Morrison-Rowe, S.J.; Swaisgood, H.E. )

    1990-09-01

    The isolation of sulfhydryl oxidase from bovine milk in a suitably pure form for sequencing was carried out by transient covalent affinity chromatography of diafiltered whey using cysteinylsuccinamidopropyl-glass as matrix. The glutathione-eluted proteins were separated by SDS-PAGE. By radiolabeling the affinity chromatography-purified enzyme with ({sup 14}C)iodoacetate before subjecting to SDS-PAGE, the sulfhydryl oxidase band was identified, because sulfhydryl oxidase is known to be inactivated by alkylation of one sulfhydryl group per mole. The results confirmed that sulfhydryl oxidase corresponds to the 85 ({plus minus} 5)-kDa band observed on SDS-PAGE. The protein band corresponding to radiolabeled sulfhydryl oxidase was recovered from SDS-PAGE gels by electrophoretic elution and by electroblotting on polyvinylidene difluoride membrane and subjected to gas phase sequencing. Precautions were taken during electrophoretic elution to prevent reactions that result in N-terminal blocking. Both methods of protein recovery yielded negative results when subjected to sequence analysis indicating that the N-terminus of sulfhydryl oxidase is blocked.

  3. Study on selective separation of uranium(VI) by new N,N-dialkyl carboxy-amides

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Shinichi; Sugo, Yumi; Kimura, Takaumi; Yaita, Tsuyoshi

    2007-07-01

    The Feasibility study (FS) on commercialized FR cycle systems has been carried out in Japan. In this Feasibility study, 'Advanced Aqueous' reprocessing was designed as a new reprocessing concept to enhance nuclear non-proliferation by recycling U, Pu and minor actinides (MA) with some fission products (FP). The crystallization and U(VI)/TRU(transuranics) co-extraction technique have been selected as candidate technique in the 'Advanced Aqueous' reprocessing. In JAEA, the result of Feasibility study was received and Fast Reactor Cycle Technology Development Project (FaCT) was started. In the nuclear spent fuel reprocessing, FBR spent fuels will coexist with LWR spent fuels for several decades until FBR cycle begins to operate. For the treatment of LWR spent fuels, high decontamination factor for FP was required for U(VI) storage, and solvent extraction technique was selected in the nuclear fuel treatment. In our laboratory, N,N-di-alkyl carboxy-amides have been developed as extractant based on solvent extraction technique for one of a back-up technology of 'Advanced Aqueous' reprocessing in FBR spent fuel treatments. N,N-di-alkyl carboxy-amides were noted as one of the alternative extractant of tri-butylphosphate (TBP) in the field of nuclear fuel reprocessing. Extraction behavior of U(VI) and Pu(IV) with N,N-di-alkyl carboxy-amides was almost similar to those with TBP. N,N-di-alkyl carboxy-amides have some advantages, namely, their complete incinerability (CHON principle) and high stability for hydrolysis and radiolysis. Their main degradation products are carboxylic acids and secondary amines which hardly affect the separation of U(VI) and Pu(IV) from fission products. Further, the synthesis of N,N-di-alkyl carboxy-amides was relatively easy with reaction of carboxylic chloride and secondary amine. The main purpose of this solvent extraction technique using N,N-di-alkyl carboxy-amides is selective separation of Uranium(VI) with branched N,N-di-alkyl carboxy

  4. Amino and carboxy functionalized modified nucleosides: a potential class of inhibitors for angiogenin.

    PubMed

    Debnath, Joy; Dasgupta, Swagata; Pathak, Tanmaya

    2014-02-01

    The 3'-amino and carboxy functionalize thymidines execute their ribonucleolytic inhibition activity for angiogenin. These modified nucleosidic molecules inhibit the ribonucleolytic activity of angiogenin in a competitive manner like the other conventional nucleotidic inhibitors, which have been confirmed from kinetic experiments. The improved inhibition constant (Ki) values 427 ± 7, 775 ± 6 μM clearly indicate modified nucleosides are an obvious option for the designing of inhibitors of angiogenesis process. The chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay qualitatively suggests that amino functionalized nucleosides have an effective potency to inhibited angiogenin-induced angiogenesis. Docking studies further demonstrate the interaction of their polar amino group with the P1 site residues of angiogenin, i.e., His-13 and His-114 residues.

  5. On the computational ability of the RNA polymerase II carboxy terminal domain

    PubMed Central

    Karagiannis, Jim

    2014-01-01

    The RNA polymerase II carboxy terminal domain has long been known to play an important role in the control of eukaryotic transcription. This role is mediated, at least in part, through complex post-translational modifications that take place on specific residues within the heptad repeats of the domain. In this addendum, a speculative, but formal mathematical conceptualization of this biological phenomenon (in the form of a semi-Thue string rewriting system) is presented. Since the semi-Thue formalism is known to be Turing complete, this raises the possibility that the CTD – in association with the regulatory pathways controlling its post-translational modification – functions as a biological incarnation of a universal computing machine. PMID:25371772

  6. Investigation of a recently detected 11-nor-9-carboxy-Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol isomer: Studies on the degradation of 11-nor-9-carboxy-Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol glucuronide.

    PubMed

    Hanisch, Stephanie; Paulke, Alexander; Toennes, Stefan W

    2016-09-10

    An isomer of the tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) metabolite 11-nor-9-carboxy-Δ(9)-THC (THCCOOH) had been detected in blood of cannabis users. The present study was initiated to elucidate whether the labile metabolite THCCOOH-glucuronide could be the precursor. THCCOOH-glucuronide was incubated in human serum and albumin (HSA) solution at various temperatures (-18, 4.5, 22 and 37°C) and pH values (pH 7.4 and 8.3) for seven days in the presence or absence of the esterase inhibitor sodium fluoride. Analysis of incubation samples was performed using LC-MS/MS. Marked degradation of THCCOOH-glucuronide was observed at 37°C. It was found that not only THCCOOH, but also the isomer is a degradation product of THCCOOH-glucuronide and its in-vivo production is assumed. Degradation to THCCOOH and the isomer occurred at alkaline pH, in the presence of fluoride-sensitive esterases and of HSA alone. To inhibit isomer formation during sample storage, refrigeration and controlling of the pH are recommended. However, THCCOOH and the isomer exhibit similar properties during incubations in serum, but differ in their interaction with HSA. The present study confirmed the nature of the isomer as degradation product of the abundant THC metabolite THCCOOH-glucuronide. Serum albumin and esterases are obviously involved. The isomer is formed not only during storage, but also under physiological conditions, suggesting that it can be considered an in-vivo metabolite. However, the chemical structure of the isomer remains unknown and further research is necessary.

  7. Investigation of a recently detected 11-nor-9-carboxy-Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol isomer: Studies on the degradation of 11-nor-9-carboxy-Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol glucuronide.

    PubMed

    Hanisch, Stephanie; Paulke, Alexander; Toennes, Stefan W

    2016-09-10

    An isomer of the tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) metabolite 11-nor-9-carboxy-Δ(9)-THC (THCCOOH) had been detected in blood of cannabis users. The present study was initiated to elucidate whether the labile metabolite THCCOOH-glucuronide could be the precursor. THCCOOH-glucuronide was incubated in human serum and albumin (HSA) solution at various temperatures (-18, 4.5, 22 and 37°C) and pH values (pH 7.4 and 8.3) for seven days in the presence or absence of the esterase inhibitor sodium fluoride. Analysis of incubation samples was performed using LC-MS/MS. Marked degradation of THCCOOH-glucuronide was observed at 37°C. It was found that not only THCCOOH, but also the isomer is a degradation product of THCCOOH-glucuronide and its in-vivo production is assumed. Degradation to THCCOOH and the isomer occurred at alkaline pH, in the presence of fluoride-sensitive esterases and of HSA alone. To inhibit isomer formation during sample storage, refrigeration and controlling of the pH are recommended. However, THCCOOH and the isomer exhibit similar properties during incubations in serum, but differ in their interaction with HSA. The present study confirmed the nature of the isomer as degradation product of the abundant THC metabolite THCCOOH-glucuronide. Serum albumin and esterases are obviously involved. The isomer is formed not only during storage, but also under physiological conditions, suggesting that it can be considered an in-vivo metabolite. However, the chemical structure of the isomer remains unknown and further research is necessary. PMID:27448313

  8. High CO2-capture ability of a porous organic polymer bifunctionalized with carboxy and triazole groups.

    PubMed

    Xie, Lin-Hua; Suh, Myunghyun Paik

    2013-08-26

    A new porous organic polymer, SNU-C1, incorporating two different CO2 -attracting groups, namely, carboxy and triazole groups, has been synthesized. By activating SNU-C1 with two different methods, vacuum drying and supercritical-CO2 treatment, the guest-free phases, SNU-C1-va and SNU-C1-sca, respectively, were obtained. Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface areas of SNU-C1-va and SNU-C1-sca are 595 and 830 m(2) g(-1), respectively, as estimated by the N2-adsorption isotherms at 77 K. At 298 K and 1 atm, SNU-C1-va and SNU-C1-sca show high CO2 uptakes, 2.31 mmol  g(-1) and 3.14 mmol  g(-1), respectively, the high level being due to the presence of abundant polar groups (carboxy and triazole) exposed on the pore surfaces. Five separation parameters for flue gas and landfill gas in vacuum-swing adsorption were calculated from single-component gas-sorption isotherms by using the ideal adsorbed solution theory (IAST). The data reveal excellent CO2-separation abilities of SNU-C1-va and SNU-C1-sca, namely high CO2-uptake capacity, high selectivity, and high regenerability. The gas-cycling experiments for the materials and the water-treated samples, experiments that involved treating the samples with a CO2-N2 gas mixture (15:85, v/v) followed by a pure N2 purge, further verified the high regenerability and water stability. The results suggest that these materials have great potential applications in CO2 separation.

  9. Conserved Gene Regulatory Function of the Carboxy-Terminal Domain of Dictyostelid C-Module-Binding Factor

    PubMed Central

    Schmith, Anika; Groth, Marco; Ratka, Josephine; Gatz, Sara; Spaller, Thomas; Siol, Oliver; Glöckner, Gernot

    2013-01-01

    C-module-binding factor A (CbfA) is a jumonji-type transcription regulator that is important for maintaining the expression and mobility of the retrotransposable element TRE5-A in the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum. CbfA-deficient cells have lost TRE5-A retrotransposition, are impaired in the ability to feed on bacteria, and do not enter multicellular development because of a block in cell aggregation. In this study, we performed Illumina RNA-seq of growing CbfA mutant cells to obtain a list of CbfA-regulated genes. We demonstrate that the carboxy-terminal domain of CbfA alone is sufficient to mediate most CbfA-dependent gene expression. The carboxy-terminal domain of CbfA from the distantly related social amoeba Polysphondylium pallidum restored the expression of CbfA-dependent genes in the D. discoideum CbfA mutant, indicating a deep conservation in the gene regulatory function of this domain in the dictyostelid clade. The CbfA-like protein CbfB displays ∼25% sequence identity with CbfA in the amino-terminal region, which contains a JmjC domain and two zinc finger regions and is thought to mediate chromatin-remodeling activity. In contrast to CbfA proteins, where the carboxy-terminal domains are strictly conserved in all dictyostelids, CbfB proteins have completely unrelated carboxy-terminal domains. Outside the dictyostelid clade, CbfA-like proteins with the CbfA-archetypical JmjC/zinc finger arrangement and individual carboxy-terminal domains are prominent in filamentous fungi but are not found in yeasts, plants, and metazoans. Our data suggest that two functional regions of the CbfA-like proteins evolved at different rates to allow the occurrence of species-specific adaptation processes during genome evolution. PMID:23355006

  10. Regulation of Nuclear Positioning and Dynamics of the Silent Mating Type Loci by the Yeast Ku70/Ku80 Complex▿

    PubMed Central

    Bystricky, Kerstin; Van Attikum, Haico; Montiel, Maria-Dolores; Dion, Vincent; Gehlen, Lutz; Gasser, Susan M.

    2009-01-01

    We have examined the hypothesis that the highly selective recombination of an active mating type locus (MAT) with either HMLα or HMRa is facilitated by the spatial positioning of relevant sequences within the budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) nucleus. However, both position relative to the nuclear envelope (NE) and the subnuclear mobility of fluorescently tagged MAT, HML, or HMR loci are largely identical in haploid a and α cells. Irrespective of mating type, the expressed MAT locus is highly mobile within the nuclear lumen, while silent loci move less and are found preferentially near the NE. The perinuclear positions of HMR and HML are strongly compromised in strains lacking the Silent information regulator, Sir4. However, HMLα, unlike HMRa and most telomeres, shows increased NE association in a strain lacking yeast Ku70 (yKu70). Intriguingly, we find that the yKu complex is associated with HML and HMR sequences in a mating-type-specific manner. Its abundance decreases at the HMLα donor locus and increases transiently at MATa following DSB induction. Our data suggest that mating-type-specific binding of yKu to HMLα creates a local chromatin structure competent for recombination, which cooperates with the recombination enhancer to direct donor choice for gene conversion of the MATa locus. PMID:19047366

  11. The carboxy-terminus of VirE2 from Agrobacterium tumefaciens is required for its transport to host cells by the virB-encoded type IV transport system.

    PubMed

    Simone, M; McCullen, C A; Stahl, L E; Binns, A N

    2001-09-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens transfers DNA from the resident 'tumour-inducing' (Ti) plasmid into plant cells, where it can be stably integrated into the plant genome, ultimately resulting in crown gall tumour formation. The mobilized DNA molecule is a single-stranded intermediate with VirD2 covalently bound to its 5' end. Successful transport of the transferred DNA (T-DNA) and integration of the DNA into the genome requires that additional proteins be transported to the plant as well, including the single-stranded (ss)DNA-binding protein, VirE2. The transport of these two different substrates occurs as a result of the activities of a type IV secretion system encoded by the virB operon. Although the substrates have been identified, the mechanism of their transport remains unknown. In the experiments described here, a region in one of these substrates, VirE2, necessary for transport is identified. The addition of a C-terminal FLAG epitope tag to VirE2, or the deletion of its C-terminal 18 amino acids, renders it non-functional in A. tumefaciens. However, transgenic plants expressing either of these virE2 genes respond to virE2 mutants of A. tumefaciens by forming wild-type tumours. These results indicate that this region of VirE2 is necessary for the protein to be transported into the plant cells, but is not necessary for its function within the plant. Additionally, these studies demonstrate that mutant forms of VirE2 lacking this region do not disrupt the activities of the VirB transporter and support the hypothesis that VirE2 and the VirD2 T-strand are transported independently, even when they co-exist in the same cell. PMID:11580834

  12. COMMD1 interacts with the COOH terminus of NKCC1 in Calu-3 airway epithelial cells to modulate NKCC1 ubiquitination

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Laura; Litman, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Mice deficient in Na-K-2Cl cotransporter (NKCC1) have been generated by targeted disruption of the gene encoding NKCC1 involving the carboxy terminus (CT-NKCC1) but not the amino terminus. We hypothesize that the resulting physiological defects are due to loss of proteins interacting with CT-NKCC1. Using a yeast two-hybrid approach, adaptor protein COMMD1 was found to bind to CT-NKCC1 (aa 1,040–1,212). Binding was verified in a yeast-independent system using GST-COMMD1 and myc-CT-NKCC1. Truncated COMMD1 and CT-NKCC1 peptides were used in binding assays to identify the site of interaction. The results demonstrate concentration-dependent binding of COMMD1 (aa 1–47) to CT-NKCC1 (aa 1,040–1,134). Endogenous COMMD1 was detected in pull downs using recombinant FLAG-CT-NKCC1; this co-pull down was blocked by COMMD1 (aa 1–47). CT-NKCC1 (aa 1,040–1,137) decreased basolateral membrane expression of NKCC1, and COMMD1 (aa 1–47) increased NKCC1 membrane expression. Downregulation of COMMD1 using silencing (si)RNA led to a transient loss of endogenous COMMD1 but did not affect activation of NKCC1 by hyperosmotic sucrose. Hyperosmolarity caused a transient increase in NKCC1 membrane expression, indicating regulated trafficking of NKCC1; downregulation of COMMD1 using siRNA reduced baseline (unstimulated) NKCC1 expression and blunted a transient elevation in NKCC1 membrane expression caused by hyperosmolarity. Constitutive downregulation of COMMD1 in HT29 engineered cells exhibited loss of COMMD1 and decreased NKCC1 membrane expression with no effect on activation of NKCC1. Loss of COMMD1 in Calu-3 cells and in HT29 cells led to reduced ubiquitinated NKCC1. The results indicate a role for COMMD1 in the regulation of NKCC1 membrane expression and ubiquitination. PMID:23515529

  13. In vivo potential antidiabetic activity of a novel zinc coordination compound based on 3-carboxy-pyrazole.

    PubMed

    López-Viseras, Marta E; Fernández, Belén; Hilfiker, Sabine; González, Cristina Sánchez; González, Juan Llopis; Calahorro, Antonio J; Colacio, Enrique; Rodríguez-Diéguez, Antonio

    2014-02-01

    A novel Zn mononuclear complex with 3-carboxy-pyrazole ligand has been prepared using conventional routes and characterized by X-ray diffraction. The structure consists of discrete neutral [Zn(C6H3N2O2)2(H2O)2] molecules held together by hydrogen interactions. This compound exhibits a potential in vivo antidiabetic activity and the in vitro toxicity can be considered negligible. PMID:24252384

  14. Carboxy alkyl esters of Uncaria tomentosa augment recovery of sensorineural functions following noise injury.

    PubMed

    Guthrie, O'neil W; Gearhart, Caroline A; Fulton, Sherry; Fechter, Laurence D

    2011-08-17

    This study tested the hypothesis that hydrophilic chemotypes of the medicinal vine Uncaria tomentosa (UT) would facilitate recovery of sensorineural functions following exposure to a damaging level of noise. The particular chemotypes investigated were carboxy alkyl esters (CAE) which are known to exhibit multifunctional cytoprotective properties that include: enhanced cellular DNA repair, antioxidation and anti-inflammation. Long-Evans rats were divided into four treatment groups: vehicle-control, noise-only, CAE-only and CAE+noise. The noise exposure was an 8kHz octave band of noise at 105dB SPL for 4h. Outer hair cell (OHC) function was measured with the cubic 2f(1)-f(2) distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAE) at the start of the study (baseline) and at time-points that corresponded to 1day, 1week and 4weeks post-noise exposure to determine within-group effects. Compound action potentials to puretone stimuli were recorded from the VIIIth craniofacial nerve at 4weeks post-noise exposure to determine between-group effects. Additionally, cytocochleograms were constructed for each row of OHCs from each group. Noise exposure produced significant sensorineural impairments. However, CAE treatment facilitated almost complete recovery of OHC function and limited the magnitude of cell loss. The loss of neural sensitivity to puretone stimuli was inhibited with CAE treatment. Therefore, it appears that the multifunctional cytoprotective capacity of CAE from UT may generalize to otoprotection from acoustic over-exposure.

  15. SERCaMP: a carboxy-terminal protein modification that enables monitoring of ER calcium homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Mark J.; Wires, Emily S.; Trychta, Kathleen A.; Richie, Christopher T.; Harvey, Brandon K.

    2014-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) calcium homeostasis is disrupted in diverse pathologies, including neurodegeneration, cardiovascular diseases, and diabetes. Temporally defining calcium dysregulation during disease progression, however, has been challenging. Here we describe secreted ER calcium-monitoring proteins (SERCaMPs), which allow for longitudinal monitoring of ER calcium homeostasis. We identified a carboxy-terminal modification that is sufficient to confer release of a protein specifically in response to ER calcium depletion. A Gaussia luciferase (GLuc)–based SERCaMP provides a simple and sensitive method to monitor ER calcium homeostasis in vitro or in vivo by analyzing culture medium or blood. GLuc-SERCaMPs revealed ER calcium depletion in rat primary neurons exposed to various ER stressors. In vivo, ER calcium disruption in rat liver was monitored over several days by repeated sampling of blood. Our results suggest that SERCaMPs will have broad applications for the long-term monitoring of ER calcium homeostasis and the development of therapeutic approaches to counteract ER calcium dysregulation. PMID:25031430

  16. Structural and Mechanistic Studies on Klebsiella pneumoniae 2-Oxo-4-hydroxy-4-carboxy-5-ureidoimidazoline Decarboxylase

    SciTech Connect

    French, Jarrod B.; Ealick, Steven E.

    2010-11-12

    The stereospecific oxidative degradation of uric acid to (S)-allantoin was recently shown to proceed via three enzymatic steps. The final conversion is a decarboxylation of the unstable intermediate 2-oxo-4-hydroxy-4-carboxy-5-ureidoimidazoline (OHCU) and is catalyzed by OHCU decarboxylase. Here we present the structures of Klebsiella pneumoniae OHCU decarboxylase in unliganded form and with bound allantoin. These structures provide evidence that ligand binding organizes the active site residues for catalysis. Modeling of the substrate and intermediates provides additional support for this hypothesis. In addition we characterize the steady state kinetics of this enzyme and report the first OHCU decarboxylase inhibitor, allopurinol, a structural isomer of hypoxanthine. This molecule is a competitive inhibitor of K. pneumoniae OHCU decarboxylase with a K{sub i} of 30 {+-} 2 {micro}m. Circular dichroism measurements confirm structural observations that this inhibitor disrupts the necessary organization of the active site. Our structural and biochemical studies also provide further insights into the mechanism of catalysis of OHCU decarboxylation.

  17. The negatively charged carboxy-terminal tail of β-tubulin promotes proper chromosome segregation

    PubMed Central

    Fees, Colby P.; Aiken, Jayne; O’Toole, Eileen T.; Giddings, Thomas H.; Moore, Jeffrey K.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the broadly conserved role of microtubules in chromosome segregation, we have a limited understanding of how molecular features of tubulin proteins contribute to the underlying mechanisms. Here we investigate the negatively charged carboxy-terminal tail domains (CTTs) of α- and β-tubulins, using a series of mutants that alter or ablate CTTs in budding yeast. We find that ablating β-CTT causes elevated rates of chromosome loss and cell cycle delay. Complementary live-cell imaging and electron tomography show that β-CTT is necessary to properly position kinetochores and organize microtubules within the assembling spindle. We identify a minimal region of negatively charged amino acids that is necessary and sufficient for proper chromosome segregation and provide evidence that this function may be conserved across species. Our results provide the first in vivo evidence of a specific role for tubulin CTTs in chromosome segregation. We propose that β-CTT promotes the ordered segregation of chromosomes by stabilizing the spindle and contributing to forces that move chromosomes toward the spindle poles. PMID:27053662

  18. Immunomagnetic Reduction Assay on Des-Gamma-Carboxy Prothrombin for Screening of Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Chieh, Jen-Jie; Huang, K W; Chuang, C P; Wei, W C; Dong, J J; Lee, Y Y

    2016-08-01

    The accredited biomarker alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) offers limited sensitivity and specificity in the early detection of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). To improve the screening performance, des-gamma-carboxy prothrombin (DCP) has been identified as another promising biomarker of HCC, combined with AFP biomarkers. The results of the commercial optical enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kit easily have the interference problem due to the optical methodology. The immunomagnetic reduction (IMR) assay based on the magnetic measurement was utilized to assay DCP biomarkers without the excellent antiinterference performances. A DCP magnetic reagent, composed of iron-oxide (Fe3O4 ) magnetic nanoparticles coated with anti-DCP antibodies solved in phosphoryl-buffer solution, was synthesized and characterized. In the test of standard DCP antigens, superior antiinterference and sensitivity than optical ELISA were proved. In the animal test, the results indicate good agreement between the IMR assay findings and the tumor sizes of HCC rats at all time points after the HCC implantation. The feasibility of the developed DCP magnetic reagent with the IMR for the detection of DCP is verified, and demonstrates the high potential for future clinical applications.

  19. [False positive serum des-gamma-carboxy prothrombin after resection of hepatocellular carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Hiramatsu, Kumiko; Tanaka, Yasuhito; Takagi, Kazumi; Iida, Takayasu; Takasaka, Yoshimitsu; Mizokami, Masashi

    2007-04-01

    Measurements of serum concentrations of des-gamma-carboxy-prothrombin (PIVKA-II) are widely used for diagnosing hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Recently, when we evaluated the correlation of PIVKA-II between two commercially available PIVKA-II immunoassay kits (Lumipulse f vs. Picolumi) to introduce it in our hospital, false high values of PIVKA-II were observed in Lumipulse assay. Four(4%) of 100 serum samples showed false high values, and all of them were obtained from patients less than 2 month after curative resection of HCC. Examining additional 7 patients with HCC resection, serum samples from the 5 patients had the same trend. To elucidate the non-specific reaction by Lumipulse assay which utilized alkaline phosphatase (ALP) enzymatic reaction, inhibition assays by various absorbents such as inactive ALP and IgM antibodies were performed. Excess of inactive ALP reduced the high values of PIVKA-II. Note that anti-bleeding sheets (fibrinogen combined drug), which included bovine thrombin, were directly attached on liver of all patients with HCC resection in this study. As the sheets also contaminate ALP and probably produce IgM antibodies to ALP, the IgM may cross-react with anti-PIVKA-II antibodies directly. Taken together, it was suggested that produced antibodies against ALP derived from anti-bleeding sheets led false high values of PIVKA-II in the patients with HCC resection.

  20. Evidence for histidyl and carboxy groups at the active site of the human placental Na+-H+ exchanger.

    PubMed Central

    Ganapathy, V; Balkovetz, D F; Ganapathy, M E; Mahesh, V B; Devoe, L D; Leibach, F H

    1987-01-01

    The Na+-H+ exchanger of the human placental brush-border membrane was inhibited by pretreatment of the membrane vesicles with a histidyl-group-specific reagent, diethyl pyrocarbonate and with a carboxy-group-specific reagent, N-ethoxycarbonyl-2-ethoxy-1,2-dihydroquinoline. In both cases the inhibition was irreversible and non-competitive in nature. But, if the membrane vesicles were treated with these reagents in the presence of amiloride, cimetidine or clonidine, there was no inhibition. Since amiloride, cimetidine and clonidine all interact with the active site of the exchanger in a mutually exclusive manner, the findings provide evidence for the presence of essential histidyl and carboxy groups at or near the active site of the human placental Na+-H+ exchanger. This conclusion was further substantiated by the findings that Rose Bengal-catalysed photo-oxidation of histidine residues as well as covalent modification of carboxy residues with NN'-dicyclohexylcarbodi-imide irreversibly inhibited the Na+-H+ exchanger and that amiloride protected the exchanger from inhibition caused by NN'-dicyclohexylcarbodi-imide. PMID:2822022

  1. A dynamic physical characterization of the receding Mendenhall Glacier lake front terminus Juneau, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connor, C. L.; Fatland, D. R.; Heavner, M.; Korzen, N.; Galbraith, J.; Sauer, D.; Hood, E. W.

    2009-12-01

    Extrapolation of 2000-2009 GPS results from terminus position surveys of the Mendenhall Glacier near Juneau, Alaska suggests that the lake front glacier terminus will no longer be in contact with proglacial Mendenhall Lake by July 2011. Meteorologic stations located near the glacier terminus at 44m asl, on the glacier surface at 430m (Northstar Camp), and at 1569m near the Mendenhall-Taku Glacier ice divide, provide data from rainfall events and temperature variation which contribute to glacier velocity and ultimately ice mass transfer to the lower glacier. Mendenhall weather data in combination with wind direction, wind velocity, and lake water temperature profiles (0-40m) and bathymetric surveys in 2009 provide detailed information about the physical conditions of the glacier and lake which are also captured visually by hourly and 30 second image records of the glacier terminus. Cameras are located at 500m from the terminus on bedrock and at ~2km from the terminus at the USFS Mendenhall Glacier Visitor Center roof. Ice berg motions and their changing positions in Mendenhall Lake can be used to create a gyre model for lake circulation. Summer 2009 lake water column temperature profiles collected at 15 minute intervals can also be linked with met station data, and USGS discharge data for the Mendenhall River to identify subglacial meltwater discharge events into the lake. We present here a synthetic view of these sensor data to evaluate what can be inferred and what remains mysterious concerning Mendenhall Glacier recession. Webcam photo Mendenhall Glacier Terminus 01-Sept-2009 10:02 am http://seamonster.jun.alaska.edu/webcam/Mendterm

  2. The Apical Sorting Signal for human GLUT9b resides in the N-terminus

    PubMed Central

    Bibee, Kristin P.; Augustin, Robert; Gazit, Vered; Moley, Kelle H.

    2016-01-01

    The two splice variants of human glucose transporter 9 (hGLUT9) are targeted to different polarized membranes. hGLUT9a traffics to the basolateral membrane, whereas hGLUT9b traffics to the apical region. This study examines the sorting mechanism of these variants, which differ only in their N-terminal domain. Mutating a di-leucine motif unique to GLUT9a did not affect targeting. Chimeric proteins were made using GLUT1, a basolaterally targeted transporter, and GLUT3, an apically targeted protein whose signal lies in the C-terminus. Overexpression of the chimeric proteins in polarized cells demonstrates that the N-terminus of hGLUT9b contains a signal capable of redirecting GLUT1 to the apical membrane. The N-terminus of hGLUT9a, however, does not contain a basolateral signal sufficient enough to redirect GLUT3. Portions of the GLUT9a N-terminus were substituted with corresponding portions of the GLUT9b N-terminus to determine the motif responsible for apical targeting. The first 16 amino acids were not found to be a sufficient apical signal. The last ten amino acids of the N-termini differ only in amino acid class at one location. In the B-form, leucine, a hydrophobic residue, is substituted for lysine, a basic residue, found in the A-form. However, mutation of the leucine in hGLUT9b to a lysine resulted in retention of the apical signal. We therefore believe the apical signal exists as an interplay between the final ten amino acids of the N-terminus and another motif within the protein such as the intracellular loop or other motifs within the N-terminus. PMID:23361362

  3. Oxidation of the antiviral drug acyclovir and its biodegradation product carboxy-acyclovir with ozone: kinetics and identification of oxidation products.

    PubMed

    Prasse, Carsten; Wagner, Manfred; Schulz, Ralf; Ternes, Thomas A

    2012-02-21

    The oxidation of the antiviral drug acyclovir (ACV) and its main biotransformation product carboxy-acyclovir (carboxy-ACV) by ozone was investigated. Both compounds have recently been detected in surface water, and carboxy-ACV has also been detected in drinking water. The experiments revealed a strong pH dependence of the oxidation of ACV and carboxy-ACV with reaction rate constants increasing by 4 orders of magnitude between the protonated, positively charged form (k(ox,PH(+)), ∼2.5 × 10(2) M(-1) s(-1)) and the deprotonated, negatively charged form (k(ox,P(-)), 3.4 × 10(6) M(-1) s(-1)). At pH 8 a single oxidation product was formed which was identified via LC-LTQ-Orbitrap MS and NMR as N-(4-carbamoyl-2-imino-5-oxoimidazolidin)formamido-N-methoxyacetic acid (COFA). Using Vibrio fischeri , an acute bacterial toxicity was found for COFA while carboxy-ACV revealed no toxic effects. Ozonation experiments with guanine and guanosine at pH 8 led to the formation of the respective 2-imino-5-oxoimidazolidines, confirming that guanine derivatives such as carboxy-ACV are undergoing the same reactions during ozonation. Furthermore, COFA was detected in finished drinking water of a German waterworks after ozonation and subsequent activated carbon treatment.

  4. The Microtubule Binding Properties of CENP-E’s C-terminus and CENP-F

    PubMed Central

    Musinipally, Vivek; Howes, Stuart; Alushin, Gregory M.; Nogales, Eva

    2013-01-01

    CENP-E (Centromere Protein E) and CENP-F, also known as mitosin, are large, multi-functional proteins associated with the outer kinetochore. CENP-E features a well-characterized kinesin motor domain at its N-terminus and a second microtubule-binding domain at its C-terminus of unknown function. CENP-F is important for the formation of proper kinetochore-microtubule attachment and, like CENP-E, contains two microtubule-binding domains at its termini. While the importance of these proteins is known, the details of their interactions with microtubules have not yet been investigated. We have biochemically and structurally characterized the microtubule-binding properties of the amino- and carboxyl-terminal domains of CENP-F as well as the carboxyl-terminal (non-kinesin) domain of CENP-E. CENP-E’s C-terminus and CENP-F’s N-terminus bind microtubules with similar affinity to the well-characterized Ndc80 complex, while CENP-F’s C-terminus shows much lower affinity. Electron microscopy analysis reveals that all of these domains engage the microtubule surface in a disordered manner, suggesting that these factors have no favored binding geometry and may allow for initial side-on attachments early in mitosis. PMID:23892111

  5. A Systematic Review of Des-γ-Carboxy Prothrombin for the Diagnosis of Primary Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    De, Ji; Shen, Yi; Qin, Jinyu; Feng, Li; Wang, Yiping; Yang, Li

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Determining the serum des-γ-carboxy-prothrombin (DCP) level is of great importance for the diagnosis of primary hepatocellular carcinoma (PHC). Although several studies have investigated the accuracy of diagnostic DCP tests for PHC, the results have been inconsistent. The aim of this study was to systematically evaluate DCP as a diagnostic standard for PHC. Several databases, including PubMed, EMBASE, MEDLINE (Ovid), the Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), the VIP Database for Chinese Technical Periodicals (VIP), WanFang Data, and the China Biological Medicine Database (CBM), were searched from the date of database inception until July 1, 2015 to collect published international and domestic studies of DCP in the diagnosis of PHC. Two investigators screened the literature according to the inclusion and exclusion criteria, extracted the data, and assessed the methodological quality of the included studies. A total of 38 studies involving 11,124 cases were included (5298 cases in the PHC group and 5826 cases in the control group). A meta-analysis was then performed using Meta-Disc 1.4 and RevMan 5.2 software. The overall sensitivity, specificity, positive likelihood ratio (+LR), and negative likelihood ratio (−LR) of DCP for the detection of PHC were 0.66 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.65–0.68), 0.88 (95% CI: 0.87–0.90), 7.13 (95% CI: 5.73–8.87), and 0.33 (95% CI: 0.29–0.38), respectively. The area under the curve (AUC) of the summary receiver-operating characteristic curve (SROC) was 0.9002. In conclusion, DCP has moderate diagnostic utility for PHC. Owing to the heterogeneity and limitations of the included studies, the above conclusion requires further support from additional high-quality studies. PMID:27124038

  6. Contribution of active-site glutamine to rate enhancement in ubiquitin carboxy terminal hydrolases

    PubMed Central

    Boudreaux, David; Chaney, Joseph; Maiti, Tushar K.; Das, Chittaranjan

    2012-01-01

    Ubiquitin carboxy terminal hydrolases (UCHs) are cysteine proteases featuring a classical cysteine-histidine-aspartate catalytic triad, also a highly conserved glutamine thought to be a part of the oxyanion hole. However, the contribution of this side chain to the catalysis by UCH enzymes is not known. Herein, we demonstrate that the glutamine side chain contributes to rate enhancement in UCHL1, UCHL3 and UCHL5. Mutation of the glutamine to alanine in these enzymes impairs the catalytic efficiency mainly due to a 16 to 30-fold reduction in kcat, which is consistent with a loss of approximately 2 kcal/mol in transition-state stabilization. However, the contribution to transition-state stabilization observed here is rather modest for the side chain’s role in oxyanion stabilization. Interestingly, we discovered that the carbonyl oxygen of this side chain is engaged in a C—H•••O hydrogen-bonding contact with the CεH group of the catalytic histidine. Upon further analysis, we found that this interaction is a common active-site structural feature in most cysteine proteases, including papain, belonging to families with the QCH(N/D) type of active-site configuration. It is possible that removal of the glutamine side chain might have abolished the C—H•••O interaction, which typically accounts for 2 kcal/mol of stabilization, leading to the effect on catalysis observed here. Additional studies performed on UCHL3 by mutating the glutamine to glutamate (strong C—H•••O acceptor but oxyanion destabilizer) and to lysine (strong oxyanion stabilizer but lacking C—H•••O hydrogen-bonding property) suggest that the C—H•••O hydrogen bond could contribute to catalysis. PMID:22284438

  7. A Systematic Review of Des-γ-Carboxy Prothrombin for the Diagnosis of Primary Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    De, Ji; Shen, Yi; Qin, Jinyu; Feng, Li; Wang, Yiping; Yang, Li

    2016-04-01

    Determining the serum des-γ-carboxy-prothrombin (DCP) level is of great importance for the diagnosis of primary hepatocellular carcinoma (PHC). Although several studies have investigated the accuracy of diagnostic DCP tests for PHC, the results have been inconsistent.The aim of this study was to systematically evaluate DCP as a diagnostic standard for PHC.Several databases, including PubMed, EMBASE, MEDLINE (Ovid), the Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), the VIP Database for Chinese Technical Periodicals (VIP), WanFang Data, and the China Biological Medicine Database (CBM), were searched from the date of database inception until July 1, 2015 to collect published international and domestic studies of DCP in the diagnosis of PHC. Two investigators screened the literature according to the inclusion and exclusion criteria, extracted the data, and assessed the methodological quality of the included studies.A total of 38 studies involving 11,124 cases were included (5298 cases in the PHC group and 5826 cases in the control group). A meta-analysis was then performed using Meta-Disc 1.4 and RevMan 5.2 software. The overall sensitivity, specificity, positive likelihood ratio (+LR), and negative likelihood ratio (-LR) of DCP for the detection of PHC were 0.66 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.65-0.68), 0.88 (95% CI: 0.87-0.90), 7.13 (95% CI: 5.73-8.87), and 0.33 (95% CI: 0.29-0.38), respectively. The area under the curve (AUC) of the summary receiver-operating characteristic curve (SROC) was 0.9002. In conclusion, DCP has moderate diagnostic utility for PHC. Owing to the heterogeneity and limitations of the included studies, the above conclusion requires further support from additional high-quality studies.

  8. The carboxy-terminal tail of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 2 is required for the kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Klyuyeva, Alla; Tuganova, Alina; Popov, Kirill M

    2005-10-18

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 2 (PDK2) is a prototypical mitochondrial protein kinase that regulates the activity of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex. Recent structural studies have established that PDK2 consists of a catalytic core built of the B and K domains and the relatively long amino and carboxyl tails of unknown function. Here, we show that the carboxy-terminal truncation variants of PDK2 display a greatly diminished capacity for phosphorylation of holo-PDC. This effect is due largely to the inability of the transacetylase component of PDC to promote the phosphorylation reaction catalyzed by the truncated PDK2 variants. Furthermore, the truncated forms of PDK2 bind poorly to the lipoyl-bearing domain(s) provided by the transacetylase component. Taken together, these data strongly suggest that the carboxyl tails of PDK isozymes contribute to the lipoyl-bearing domain-binding site of the kinase molecule. We also show that the carboxyl tails derived from isozymes PDK1, PDK3, and PDK4 are capable of supporting the kinase activity of the kinase core derived from PDK2 as well as binding of the respective PDK2 chimeras to the lipoyl-bearing domain. Furthermore, the chimera carrying the carboxyl tail of PDK3 displays a stronger response to the addition of the transacetylase component along with a better binding to the lipoyl-bearing domain, suggesting that, at least in part, the differences in the amino acid sequences of the carboxyl tails account for the differences between PDK isozymes. PMID:16216081

  9. A Systematic Review of Des-γ-Carboxy Prothrombin for the Diagnosis of Primary Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    De, Ji; Shen, Yi; Qin, Jinyu; Feng, Li; Wang, Yiping; Yang, Li

    2016-04-01

    Determining the serum des-γ-carboxy-prothrombin (DCP) level is of great importance for the diagnosis of primary hepatocellular carcinoma (PHC). Although several studies have investigated the accuracy of diagnostic DCP tests for PHC, the results have been inconsistent.The aim of this study was to systematically evaluate DCP as a diagnostic standard for PHC.Several databases, including PubMed, EMBASE, MEDLINE (Ovid), the Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), the VIP Database for Chinese Technical Periodicals (VIP), WanFang Data, and the China Biological Medicine Database (CBM), were searched from the date of database inception until July 1, 2015 to collect published international and domestic studies of DCP in the diagnosis of PHC. Two investigators screened the literature according to the inclusion and exclusion criteria, extracted the data, and assessed the methodological quality of the included studies.A total of 38 studies involving 11,124 cases were included (5298 cases in the PHC group and 5826 cases in the control group). A meta-analysis was then performed using Meta-Disc 1.4 and RevMan 5.2 software. The overall sensitivity, specificity, positive likelihood ratio (+LR), and negative likelihood ratio (-LR) of DCP for the detection of PHC were 0.66 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.65-0.68), 0.88 (95% CI: 0.87-0.90), 7.13 (95% CI: 5.73-8.87), and 0.33 (95% CI: 0.29-0.38), respectively. The area under the curve (AUC) of the summary receiver-operating characteristic curve (SROC) was 0.9002. In conclusion, DCP has moderate diagnostic utility for PHC. Owing to the heterogeneity and limitations of the included studies, the above conclusion requires further support from additional high-quality studies. PMID:27124038

  10. The conserved carboxy-terminal domain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae TFIID is sufficient to support normal cell growth.

    PubMed Central

    Poon, D; Schroeder, S; Wang, C K; Yamamoto, T; Horikoshi, M; Roeder, R G; Weil, P A

    1991-01-01

    We have examined the structure-function relationships of TFIID through in vivo complementation tests. A yeast strain was constructed which lacked the chromosomal copy of SPT15, the gene encoding TFIID, and was therefore dependent on a functional plasmid-borne wild-type copy of this gene for viability. By using the plasmid shuffle technique, the plasmid-borne wild-type TFIID gene was replaced with a family of plasmids containing a series of systematically mutated TFIID genes. These various forms of TFIID were expressed from three different promoter contexts of different strengths, and the ability of each mutant form of TFIID to complement our chromosomal TFIID null allele was assessed. We found that the first 61 amino acid residues of TFIID are totally dispensable for vegetative cell growth, since yeast strains containing this deleted form of TFIID grow at wild-type rates. Amino-terminally deleted TFIID was further shown to be able to function normally in vivo by virtue of its ability both to promote accurate transcription initiation from a large number of different genes and to interact efficiently with the Gal4 protein to activate transcription of GAL1 with essentially wild-type kinetics. Any deletion removing sequences from within the conserved carboxy-terminal region of S. cerevisiae TFIID was lethal. Further, the exact sequence of the conserved carboxy-terminal portion of the molecule is critical for function, since of several heterologous TFIID homologs tested, only the highly related Schizosaccharomyces pombe gene could complement our S. cerevisiae TFIID null mutant. Taken together, these data indicate that all important functional domains of TFIID appear to lie in its carboxy-terminal 179 amino acid residues. The significance of these findings regarding TFIID function are discussed. Images PMID:1922021

  11. Two-step biocatalytic route to biobased functional polyesters from omega-carboxy fatty acids and diols.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yixin; Lu, Wenhua; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Xie, Wenchun; Cai, Minmin; Gross, Richard A

    2010-01-11

    Biobased omega-carboxy fatty acid monomers 1,18-cis-9-octadecenedioic, 1,22-cis-9-docosenedioic, and 1,18-cis-9,10-epoxy-octadecanedioic acids were synthesized in high conversion yields from oleic, erucic and epoxy stearic acids by whole-cell biotransformations catalyzed by C. tropicalis ATCC20962. Maximum volumetric yields in shake-flasks were 17.3, 14.2, and 19.1 g/L after 48 h conversion for oleic acid and 72 h conversions for erucic and epoxy stearic acids, respectively. Studies in fermentor with better control of pH and glucose feeding revealed that conversion of oleic acid to 1,18-cis-9-octadecenedioic acid by C. tropicalis ATCC20962 occurred with productivities up to 0.5 g/L/h. The conversion of omega-carboxy fatty acid monomers to polyesters was then studied using immobilized Candida antarctica Lipase B (N435) as catalyst. Polycondensations with diols were performed in bulk as well as in diphenyl ether. The retension of functionality from fatty acid, to omega-carboxy fatty acid monomer and to corresponding polyesters resulted in polymers with with unsaturated and epoxidized repeat units and M(w) values ranging from 25000 to 57000 g/mol. These functional groups along chains disrupted crystallization giving materials that are low melting (23-40 degrees C). In contrast, saturated polyesters prepared from 1,18-octadecanedioic acid and 1,8-octanediol have correspondingly higher melting transitions (88 degrees C). TGA results indicated that all synthesized polyesters showed high thermal stabilities. Thus, the preparation of functional monomers from C. tropicalis omega-oxidation of fatty acids provides a wide range of new monomer building blocks to construct functional polymers. PMID:20000460

  12. Hydrazine-1,2-diium bis-(3-carb-oxy-4-hy-droxy-benzene-sulfonate) tetra-hydrate.

    PubMed

    Selvaraju, Devipriya; Venkatesh, Ranjithkumar; Sundararajan, Vairam

    2011-05-01

    Reaction of 5-sulfosalicylic acid with hydrazine hydrate at pH = 1 results in the formation of the title hydrated salt, 0.5N(2)H(6) (2+)·C(7)H(5)O(6)S(-)·2H(2)O. The hydrazinium dications lie on centres of inversion. They are located between 3-carb-oxy-4-hy-droxy-benzene-sulfonate anions, forming inter-molecular N-H⋯O hydrogen bonds with sulfonate ions and water mol-ecules of crystallisation. Further intra- and inter-molecular O-H⋯O hydrogen bonds are observed in the crystal structure. PMID:21754532

  13. The N-terminus of TDP-43 promotes its oligomerization and enhances DNA binding affinity

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Chung-ke; Wu, Tzong-Huah; Wu, Chu-Ya; Chiang, Ming-hui; Toh, Elsie Khai-Woon; Hsu, Yin-Chih; Lin, Ku-Feng; Liao, Yu-heng; Huang, Tai-huang; Huang, Joseph Jen-Tse

    2012-08-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The N-terminus of TDP-43 contains an independently folded structural domain (NTD). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The structural domains of TDP-43 are arranged in a beads-on-a-string fashion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The NTD promotes TDP-43 oligomerization in a concentration-dependent manner. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The NTD may assist nucleic acid-binding activity of TDP-43. -- Abstract: TDP-43 is a DNA/RNA-binding protein associated with different neurodegenerative diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD-U). Here, the structural and physical properties of the N-terminus on TDP-43 have been carefully characterized through a combination of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), circular dichroism (CD) and fluorescence anisotropy studies. We demonstrate for the first time the importance of the N-terminus in promoting TDP-43 oligomerization and enhancing its DNA-binding affinity. An unidentified structural domain in the N-terminus is also disclosed. Our findings provide insights into the N-terminal domain function of TDP-43.

  14. 29 CFR Appendix C to Subpart R of... - Illustrations of Bridging Terminus Points: Non-mandatory

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Illustrations of Bridging Terminus Points: Non-mandatory C Appendix C to Subpart R of Part 1926 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY... CONSTRUCTION Steel Erection Pt. 1926, Subpt. R, App. C Appendix C to Subpart R of Part 1926—Illustrations...

  15. 29 CFR Appendix C to Subpart R of... - Illustrations of Bridging Terminus Points: Non-mandatory

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Illustrations of Bridging Terminus Points: Non-mandatory C Appendix C to Subpart R of Part 1926 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY... CONSTRUCTION Steel Erection Pt. 1926, Subpt. R, App. C Appendix C to Subpart R of Part 1926—Illustrations...

  16. 29 CFR Appendix C to Subpart R of... - Illustrations of Bridging Terminus Points: Non-mandatory

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Illustrations of Bridging Terminus Points: Non-mandatory C Appendix C to Subpart R of Part 1926 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY... CONSTRUCTION Steel Erection Pt. 1926, Subpt. R, App. C Appendix C to Subpart R of Part 1926—Illustrations...

  17. 29 CFR Appendix C to Subpart R of... - Illustrations of Bridging Terminus Points: Non-mandatory

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Illustrations of Bridging Terminus Points: Non-mandatory C Appendix C to Subpart R of Part 1926 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY... CONSTRUCTION Steel Erection Pt. 1926, Subpt. R, App. C Appendix C to Subpart R of Part 1926—Illustrations...

  18. The C-terminus of Kv7 channels: a multifunctional module

    PubMed Central

    Haitin, Yoni; Attali, Bernard

    2008-01-01

    Kv7 channels (KCNQ) represent a family of voltage-gated K+ channels which plays a prominent role in brain and cardiac excitability. Their physiological importance is underscored by the existence of mutations in human Kv7 genes, leading to severe cardiovascular and neurological disorders such as the cardiac long QT syndrome and neonatal epilepsy. Kv7 channels exhibit some structural and functional features that are distinct from other Kv channels. Notably, the Kv7 C-terminus is long compared to other K+ channels and is endowed with characteristic structural domains, including coiled-coils, amphipatic α helices containing calmodulin-binding motifs and basic amino acid clusters. Here we provide a brief overview of current insights and as yet unsettled issues about the structural and functional attributes of the C-terminus of Kv7 channels. Recent data indicate that the proximal half of the Kv7 C-terminus associates with one calmodulin constitutively bound to each subunit. Epilepsy and long QT mutations located in this proximal region impair calmodulin binding and can affect channel gating, folding and trafficking. The distal half of the Kv7 C-terminus directs tetramerization, employing tandem coiled-coils. Together, the data indicate that the Kv7 C-terminal domain is a multimodular structure playing a crucial role in channel gating, assembly and trafficking as well as in scaffolding the channel complex with signalling proteins. PMID:18218681

  19. Glaciological and marine geological controls on terminus dynamics of Hubbard Glacier, southeast Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stearns, Leigh A.; Hamilton, Gordon S.; van der Veen, C. J.; Finnegan, D. C.; O'Neel, Shad; Scheick, J. B.; Lawson, D. E.

    2015-01-01

    Hubbard Glacier, located in southeast Alaska, is the world's largest non-polar tidewater glacier. It has been steadily advancing since it was first mapped in 1895; occasionally, the advance creates an ice or sediment dam that blocks a tributary fjord (Russell Fiord). The sustained advance raises the probability of long-term closure in the near-future, which will strongly impact the ecosystem of Russell Fiord and the nearby community of Yakutat. Here, we examine a 43-year record of flow speeds and terminus position to understand the large-scale dynamics of Hubbard Glacier. Our long-term record shows that the rate of terminus advance has increased slightly since 1895, with the exception of a slowed advance between approximately 1972 and 1984. The short-lived closure events in 1986 and 2002 were not initiated by perturbations in ice velocity or environmental forcings, but were likely due to fluctuations in sedimentation patterns at the terminus. This study points to the significance of a coupled system where short-term velocity fluctuations and morainal shoal development control tidewater glacier terminus position.

  20. Subaqueous terminus evolution at Tasman Glacier, New Zealand, as determined by remote-controlled survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purdie, Heather; Bealing, Paul; Tidey, Emily; Harrison, Justin

    2016-04-01

    The presence of subaqueous ice ramps at the terminus of calving glaciers result from a combination of subaerial and subaqueous processes. These ice ramps eventually buoyantly calve, an event that can be hazardous to companies operating boat tours on proglacial lakes. However our knowledge of ice ramp forming processes, and feedbacks associated with their evolution, is sparse. We are using a remote controlled jet boat to survey bathymetry at an active calving margin. This vessel, mounted with both depth and side-scan sonar, can map subaqueous portions of the terminus right up to the active calving face at no risk to the operators. Surveys at the Tasman Glacier terminus over three consecutive years have revealed that subaqueous ice ramps are ephemeral features. In 2015 multiple ice ramps extended out into the lake from the terminus by 100-200 m, with the ramp surface being as much as 60 m below the water line at its outer perimeter. The maximum depth of the Tasman Lake at this time was 240 m. Within one month of the survey taking place, the largest of these ice ramps had calved and disintegrated. The consistent location of ice ramps between surveys indicates that other factors, like subglacial hydrology, may influence ice ramp evolution.

  1. Controls on interannual and seasonal terminus velocity and position of Yahtse Glacier in SE Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durkin, W. J., IV; Melkonian, A. K.; Pritchard, M. E.; Willis, M. J.; Bartholomaus, T.

    2015-12-01

    We construct a 30 year velocity time-series for comparison with recent studies on the submarine melt rate (Bartholomaus et al., 2013), calving rate (Bartholomaus et al., 2013b), velocities (McNabb et al., 2014), and subglacial discharge (Bartholomaus et al., 2015) of Yahtse Glacier in southeast Alaska. Velocities are constructed from feature tracking on Landsat, ALOS, and ASTER satellite imagery spanning 1985-2015. Yahtse is undergoing an interannual advance of ~82 m yr-1 that is concurrent with deceleration between 1996 and 2015 of -0.55 m day-1yr-1 measured 2.5km down-glacier from the icefall. We estimate that up to 35% of the slowdown is due to divergence associated with thickening near the terminus of ~7 m yr-1measured by differencing WorldView and SRTM DEMs. Much of the remaining deceleration may be due to greater basal and lateral drag as ongoing advance increases the contact area between the terminus and bedrock. We observe a seasonal cycle in centerline terminus speeds superimposed on the interannual deceleration. Terminus speeds climb from a minimum in October to a maximum in May, then decline until October. The timing of this cycle is in phase with the seasonality of subglacial discharge at the front of Yahtse and salinity levels measured in the Gulf of Alaska, which agrees with models of subglacial channel development proposed for many glaciers. Seasonal speed changes measured 1 km up-glacier from the front are associated with terminus advance and retreat. The terminus is in a retracted position following the deceleration to a minimum speed in October and elevated submarine melt rates in summer and early autumn. The front holds this position from November through February as speeds there accelerate to their seasonal maximum and submarine melt is reduced. Yahtse Glacier then advances between 200 and 500 m during the spring as frontal speeds decrease by ~10% from their highest level. This slowdown may be caused by a decrease in buoyancy due to the terminus

  2. Fibrinogen {alpha} genes: Conservation of bipartite transcripts and carboxy-terminal-extended {alpha} subunits in vertebrates

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Y.; Cao, Y.; Hertzberg, K.M.; Grieninger, G.

    1995-11-01

    All three well-studied subunits of the clotting protein fibrinogen ({alpha}, {beta}, {gamma}) share N-terminal structural homologies, but until recently only the {beta} and {gamma} chains were recognized as having similar globular C-termini. With the discovery of an extra exon in the human fibrinogen {alpha} gene (exon VI), a minor form of the {alpha} subunit ({alpha}{sub E}) with an extended {beta}- and {gamma}-like C-terminus has been identified. In the present study, the polymerase chain reaction has been used to identify sequences that encode counterparts to {alpha}{sub E} in chicken, rabbit, rat, and baboon. The basic six-exon structure of the fibrinogen {alpha} genes is shown to be conserved among mammals and birds, as are the intron positions. Bipartite transcripts - still bearing an intron prior to the last exon - are found among the products of the various vertebrate fibrinogen {alpha} genes. The last exon represents the largest conserved segment of the gene and, in each species examined, encodes exactly 236 amino acids. The C-termini of these {alpha}{sub E} chains align without a single gap and are between 76 and 99% identical. Since the exon VI-encoded domain of {alpha}{sub E} is as well conserved as the corresponding regions of the {beta} and {gamma} chains, it follows that it is equally important and that {alpha}{sub E}-fibrinogen plays a vital, if as-yet unrecognized physiological role. 21 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Regioselective Syntheses of [13C]4-Labelled Sodium 1-Carboxy-2-(2-ethylhexyloxycarbonyl)ethanesulfonate and Sodium 2-Carboxy-1-(2-ethylhexyloxycarbonyl)ethanesulfonate from [13C]4-Maleic Anhydride

    PubMed Central

    Barsamian, Adam L.; Perkins, Matt J.; Field, Jennifer A.; Blakemore, Paul R.

    2014-01-01

    The entitled monohydrolysis products, also known as α- and β-ethylhexyl sulfosuccinate ('EHSS'), of the surfactant diisooctyl sulfosuccinate ('DOSS') were synthesized in stable isotope labelled form from [13C]4-maleic anhydride. Sodium [13C]4-1-carboxy-2-(2-ethylhexyloxycarbonyl)ethanesulfonate (α-EHSS) was prepared by the method of Larpent by reaction of 2-ethylhexan-1-ol with [13C]4-maleic anhydride followed by regioselective conjugate addition of sodium bisulfite to the resulting monoester (38% overall yield). The regiochemical outcome of bisulfite addition was confirmed by a combination of 13C/13C (INADEQUATE) and 1H/13C (HMBC) NMR spectral correlation experiments. Sodium [13C]4-2-carboxy-1-(2-ethylhexyloxycarbonyl)ethanesulfonate (β-EHSS) was prepared in four steps by reaction of 4-methoxybenzyl alcohol (PMBOH) with [13C]4-maleic anhydride, regioselective sodium bisulfite addition, DCC mediated esterification with 2-ethylhexan-1-ol, and PMB ester deprotection with trifluoroacetic acid (13% overall yield). The regiochemical outcome of the second synthesis was confirmed by a combination of 1JCC scalar coupling constant analysis and 1H/13C (HMBC) NMR spectral correlation. The materials prepared are required as internal standards for the LC-MS/MS trace analysis of the degradation products of DOSS, the anionic surfactant found in Corexit, the oil dispersant used during emergency response efforts connected to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill of April 2010. PMID:24700711

  4. Misfolding of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase due to carboxy-terminal truncation can be corrected by second-site mutations.

    PubMed

    Van der Schueren, J; Robben, J; Volckaert, G

    1998-12-01

    Folding of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) in Escherichia coli is hampered by deletion of the carboxy-terminal tail including the last residue of the carboxy-terminal alpha-helix. Such truncated CAT polypeptides quantitatively aggregate into cytoplasmic inclusion bodies, which results in absence of a chloramphenicol-resistant phenotype for the producing host. In this paper, a genetic approach is presented to examine this aggregation process in more detail. Random mutagenesis of inactive CAT followed by direct phenotypic selection for revertants with restored chloramphenicol resistance was used to isolate second-site suppressors of inactive truncation mutants of CAT. Two random mutagenesis procedures, independently of each other, yielded a unique substitution of Phe for Leu at amino acid position 145. This second-site mutation does not drastically affect the proteins' stability under normal growth conditions of E. coli. Hence, the introduction of Phe at amino acid position 145 improves the ability of the protein to fold into a soluble, enzymatically active conformation. The conservative character of the Leu145Phe replacement indicates that limited changes at crucial positions can have important effects on protein folding in vivo.

  5. Importance of the GluN2B carboxy-terminal domain for enhancement of social memories

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Stephanie; Wei, Wei; Wang, Deheng

    2015-01-01

    The N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor is known to be necessary for many forms of learning and memory, including social recognition memory. Additionally, the GluN2 subunits are known to modulate multiple forms of memory, with a high GluN2A:GluN2B ratio leading to impairments in long-term memory, while a low GluN2A:GluN2B ratio enhances some forms of long-term memory. Here, we investigate the molecular motif responsible for the differences in social recognition memory and olfactory memory in the forebrain-specific transgenic GluN2A overexpression mice and the forebrain-specific transgenic GluN2B overexpression mice by using two transgenic mouse lines that overexpress chimeric GluN2 subunits. The transgenic chimeric GluN2 subunit mice were tested for their ability to learn and remember fruit scents, male juveniles of the same strain, females of the same strain, male juveniles of another strain, and rodents of another species. The data presented here demonstrate that the GluN2B carboxy-terminal domain is necessary for enhanced social recognition memory in GluN2B transgenic overexpression mice. Furthermore, the GluN2A carboxy-terminal domain is responsible for the impaired long-term olfactory and social memory observed in the GluN2A overexpression mice. PMID:26179233

  6. Synthesis of stable carboxy-terminated NaYF4: Yb3+, Er3+@SiO2 nanoparticles with ultrathin shell for biolabeling applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fuyao; Zhao, Qi; You, Hongpeng; Wang, Zhenxin

    2013-01-01

    Here, a two-step method has been developed for synthesizing carboxy-terminated NaYF4: Yb3+, Er3+@SiO2 core@shell nanoparticles (UCNP@SiO2) with ultrathin shell (1.5 nm). First, the NaYF4: Yb3+, Er3+ upconverting nanoparticles (UCNPs) were prepared using solvothermal technology; then, silica shells (SiO2) were deposited on the nanocrystals to form core-shell structures by the hydrolysis of tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS). The ultrathin SiO2 shell was obtained by increasing surfactant amount and decreasing TEOS amount in the reaction mixture. Carboxyethylsilanetriol (CTES) was used to generate the carboxy group on the particle surface. The carboxy-terminated UCNP@SiO2 are ideally suited for biolabeling and bioimaging applications because the as-prepared nanoparticles have extreme colloidal and optical stabilities, and the carboxy groups on the particle surface easily react with amino residues of biomolecules. As an example, we reported on the interactions of Ricinus Communis Agglutinin (RCA 120) conjugated UCNP@SiO2 with HeLa cells. The excellent performance of the RCA 120 conjugated UCNP@SiO2 in cellular fluorescence imaging was demonstrated.Here, a two-step method has been developed for synthesizing carboxy-terminated NaYF4: Yb3+, Er3+@SiO2 core@shell nanoparticles (UCNP@SiO2) with ultrathin shell (1.5 nm). First, the NaYF4: Yb3+, Er3+ upconverting nanoparticles (UCNPs) were prepared using solvothermal technology; then, silica shells (SiO2) were deposited on the nanocrystals to form core-shell structures by the hydrolysis of tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS). The ultrathin SiO2 shell was obtained by increasing surfactant amount and decreasing TEOS amount in the reaction mixture. Carboxyethylsilanetriol (CTES) was used to generate the carboxy group on the particle surface. The carboxy-terminated UCNP@SiO2 are ideally suited for biolabeling and bioimaging applications because the as-prepared nanoparticles have extreme colloidal and optical stabilities, and the carboxy

  7. Structure and function of the 3-carboxy-cis,cis-muconate lactonizing enzyme from the protocatechuate degradative pathway of Agrobacterium radiobacter S2.

    PubMed

    Halak, Sad; Lehtiö, Lari; Basta, Tamara; Bürger, Sibylle; Contzen, Matthias; Stolz, Andreas; Goldman, Adrian

    2006-11-01

    3-carboxy-cis,cis-muconate lactonizing enzymes participate in the protocatechuate branch of the 3-oxoadipate pathway of various aerobic bacteria. The gene encoding a 3-carboxy-cis,cis-muconate lactonizing enzyme (pcaB1S2) was cloned from a gene cluster involved in protocatechuate degradation by Agrobacterium radiobacter strain S2. This gene encoded for a 3-carboxy-cis,cis-muconate lactonizing enzyme of 353 amino acids - significantly smaller than all previously studied 3-carboxy-cis,cis-muconate lactonizing enzymes. This enzyme, ArCMLE1, was produced in Escherichia coli and shown to convert not only 3-carboxy-cis,cis-muconate but also 3-sulfomuconate. ArCMLE1 was purified as a His-tagged enzyme variant, and the basic catalytic constants for the conversion of 3-carboxy-cis,cis-muconate and 3-sulfomuconate were determined. In contrast, Agrobacterium tumefaciens 3-carboxy-cis,cis-muconate lactonizing enzyme 1 could not, despite 87% sequence identity to ArCMLE1, use 3-sulfomuconate as substrate. The crystal structure of ArCMLE1 was determined at 2.2 A resolution. Consistent with the sequence, it showed that the C-terminal domain, present in all other members of the fumarase II family, is missing in ArCMLE1. Nonetheless, both the tertiary and quaternary structures, and the structure of the active site, are similar to those of Pseudomonas putida 3-carboxy-cis,cis-muconate lactonizing enzyme. One principal difference is that ArCMLE1 contains an Arg, as opposed to a Trp, in the active site. This indicates that activation of the carboxylic nucleophile by a hydrophobic environment is not required for lactonization, unlike earlier proposals [Yang J, Wang Y, Woolridge EM, Arora V, Petsko GA, Kozarich JW & Ringe D (2004) Biochemistry43, 10424-10434]. We identified citrate and isocitrate as noncompetitive inhibitors of ArCMLE1, and found a potential binding pocket for them on the enzyme outside the active site.

  8. LARP1 specifically recognizes the 3' terminus of poly(A) mRNA.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Kazuma; Adachi, Shungo; Homoto, Masae; Kusano, Hideo; Koike, Katsuyuki; Natsume, Tohru

    2013-07-11

    A poly(A) tail functions in mRNA turnover and in facilitating translation as a ribonucleoprotein complex with poly(A) binding proteins (PABPs). However, factors that associate with the poly(A) tail other than PABPs have not been described. Using proteomics, we identified candidate proteins that interact to the 3' terminus of the poly(A) tail. Among these proteins, we focused on La motif-related protein 1 (LARP1) and found that LARP1 specifically recognizes the 3' termini of normal poly(A) tails. We also reveal that LARP1 stabilizes multiple mRNAs carrying 5' terminal oligopyrimidine tract (5'TOP). Our findings suggest that LARP1 may be involved in the post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression, at least in several 5'TOP mRNAs, through the binding to 3' terminus of the poly(A) tail.

  9. Structure of the human MLH1 N-terminus: implications for predisposition to Lynch syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Hong; Zeng, Hong; Lam, Robert; Tempel, Wolfram; Kerr, Iain D.; Min, Jinrong

    2015-07-28

    The crystal structure of the human MLH1 N-terminus is reported at 2.30 Å resolution. The overall structure is described along with an analysis of two clinically important mutations. Mismatch repair prevents the accumulation of erroneous insertions/deletions and non-Watson–Crick base pairs in the genome. Pathogenic mutations in the MLH1 gene are associated with a predisposition to Lynch and Turcot’s syndromes. Although genetic testing for these mutations is available, robust classification of variants requires strong clinical and functional support. Here, the first structure of the N-terminus of human MLH1, determined by X-ray crystallography, is described. The structure shares a high degree of similarity with previously determined prokaryotic MLH1 homologs; however, this structure affords a more accurate platform for the classification of MLH1 variants.

  10. Role of amino terminus in voltage gating and junctional rectification of Shaking B innexins.

    PubMed

    Marks, William D; Skerrett, I Martha

    2014-03-01

    Rectifying electrical synapses are rare gap junctions that favor transmission of signals in one direction. Such synapses have been identified in neural systems, including those mediating rapid escape responses of arthropods. In the Drosophila giant fiber system, adjacent cells express and contribute different transcript variants of the innexin Shaking B, resulting in heterotypic gap junctions with rectifying properties. When expressed exogenously, variants Shaking B Lethal (ShakBL) and Shaking B neural + 16 (ShakBN16) form heterotypic junctions that gate asymmetrically in response to transjunctional voltage. To determine whether the amino terminus confers properties of gating and rectification, amino-terminal domains were exchanged between ShakBL and ShakBN16, creating chimeric proteins SBL NTN16 and SBN16 NTL. The properties were analyzed in paired Xenopus oocytes. Our results suggest that the amino terminus plays an important role in establishing rectifying properties inherent to heterotypic junctions composed of ShakBL and ShakBN16. ShakBL/SBL NTN16 junctions behaved similarly to ShakBL/ShakBN16 junctions, gating in response to transjunctional voltage of one polarity and inducing a highly asymmetric conductance-voltage relationship. However, the amino terminus did not act independently to confer sensitivity to transjunctional voltage. The complementary pairing ShakBN16/SBN16 NTL displayed little sensitivity to voltage of either polarity, and in homotypic pairings SBL NTN16 was strongly gated by transjunctional voltage. We propose a model in which the amino terminus induces gating only when matched with an accommodating innexin body.

  11. Structural and functional insights into the N-terminus of Schizosaccharomyces pombe Cdc5.

    PubMed

    Collier, Scott E; Voehler, Markus; Peng, Dungeng; Ohi, Ryoma; Gould, Kathleen L; Reiter, Nicholas J; Ohi, Melanie D

    2014-10-21

    The spliceosome is a dynamic macromolecular machine composed of five small nuclear ribonucleoparticles (snRNPs), the NineTeen Complex (NTC), and other proteins that catalyze the removal of introns mature to form the mature message. The NTC, named after its founding member Saccharomyces cerevisiae Prp19, is a conserved spliceosome subcomplex composed of at least nine proteins. During spliceosome assembly, the transition to an active spliceosome correlates with stable binding of the NTC, although the mechanism of NTC function is not understood. Schizosaccharomyces pombe Cdc5, a core subunit of the NTC, is an essential protein required for pre-mRNA splicing. The highly conserved Cdc5 N-terminus contains two canonical Myb (myeloblastosis) repeats (R1 and R2) and a third domain (D3) that was previously classified as a Myb-like repeat. Although the N-terminus of Cdc5 is required for its function, how R1, R2, and D3 each contribute to functionality is unclear. Using a combination of yeast genetics, structural approaches, and RNA binding assays, we show that R1, R2, and D3 are all required for the function of Cdc5 in cells. We also show that the N-terminus of Cdc5 binds RNA in vitro. Structural and functional analyses of Cdc5-D3 show that, while this domain does not adopt a Myb fold, Cdc5-D3 preferentially binds double-stranded RNA. Our data suggest that the Cdc5 N-terminus interacts with RNA structures proposed to be near the catalytic core of the spliceosome.

  12. C-Terminus of the B-Chain of Relaxin-3 Is Important for Receptor Activity

    PubMed Central

    Shabanpoor, Fazel; Bathgate, Ross A. D.

    2013-01-01

    Human relaxin-3 is a neuropeptide that is structurally similar to human insulin with two chains (A and B) connected by three disulfide bonds. It is expressed primarily in the brain and has modulatory roles in stress and anxiety, feeding and metabolism, and arousal and behavioural activation. Structure-activity relationship studies have shown that relaxin-3 interacts with its cognate receptor RXFP3 primarily through its B-chain and that its A-chain does not have any functional role. In this study, we have investigated the effect of modification of the B-chain C-terminus on the binding and activity of the peptide. We have chemically synthesised and characterized H3 relaxin as C-termini acid (both A and B chains having free C-termini; native form) and amide forms (both chains’ C-termini were amidated). We have confirmed that the acid form of the peptide is more potent than its amide form at both RXFP3 and RXFP4 receptors. We further investigated the effects of amidation at the C-terminus of individual chains. We report here for the first time that amidation at the C-terminus of the B-chain of H3 relaxin leads to significant drop in the binding and activity of the peptide at RXFP3/RXFP4 receptors. However, modification of the A-chain C-terminus does not have any effect on the activity. We have confirmed using circular dichroism spectroscopy that there is no secondary structural change between the acid and amide form of the peptide, and it is likely that it is the local C-terminal carboxyl group orientation that is crucial for interacting with the receptors. PMID:24349312

  13. MATE1 has an external COOH terminus, consistent with a 13-helix topology.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaohong; Wright, Stephen H

    2009-08-01

    The mammalian members of the Multidrug And Toxin Extruder family, i.e., MATE1 and MATE2-K, are suspected of mediating the luminal step in renal secretion of organic cations. The 1,000+ prokaryotic/fungal/plant MATE family members are predicted to have 12 transmembrane helices (TMHs), whereas MATE1/2-K appear to have an additional (13th) COOH-terminal helix. Here, we determined whether rabbit MATE1 has an external COOH terminus, consistent with the presence of 13 TMHs. A V5 epitope tag at the COOH terminus of MATE1 was freely accessible to external V5 antibody, whereas tags at the NH(2) terminus, or at sites of truncation within the long cytoplasmic loop between predicted TMHs 12 and 13, were only accessible to the V5 antibody following permeabilization of the membrane. The truncated mutants that lacked TMH13 still retained transport activity, indicating that the terminal helix was not necessary for transport function. Cells that expressed a mutant lacking only TMH13 displayed similar K(t) and J(max) values to those of the full-length protein, although when normalized to protein expressed at the plasma membrane, the transport rate of the mutant was <10% that of full-length MATE1. An effectively cysteine-less MATE1 mutant (Delta13Cys) was functional and refractory to reaction with the impermeant marker of accessible cysteine residues, maleimide-PEO(2)-biotin. Delta13Cys mutants with an added cysteine residue at the truncation sites within the terminal cytoplasmic loop reacted with maleimide biotin only after permeabilization of the membrane, whereas a mutant with a cysteine residue at the COOH terminus was freely accessible to maleimide biotin. These data are consistent with a mammalian MATE topology that includes 13 TMHs and indicate that the terminal TMH, although not necessary for transport function, may influence the turnover characteristics of the transporter.

  14. Toxicity Analysis of N- and C-Terminus-Deleted Vegetative Insecticidal Protein from Bacillus thuringiensis

    PubMed Central

    Selvapandiyan, A.; Arora, N.; Rajagopal, R.; Jalali, S. K.; Venkatesan, T.; Singh, S. P.; Bhatnagar, Raj K.

    2001-01-01

    A vegetative insecticidal protein (VIP)-encoding gene from a local isolate of Bacillus thuringiensis has been cloned, sequenced, and expressed in Escherichia coli. The expressed protein shows insecticidal activity against several lepidopteran pests but is ineffective against Agrotis ipsilon. Comparison of the amino acid sequence with those of reported VIPs revealed a few differences. Analysis of insecticidal activity with N- and C-terminus deletion mutants suggests a differential mode of action of VIP against different pests. PMID:11722946

  15. N-Terminus of the Protein Kinase CLK1 Induces SR Protein Hyper-Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Aubol, Brandon E.; Plocinik, Ryan M.; Keshwani, Malik M.; McGlone, Maria L.; Hagopian, Jonathan C.; Ghosh, Gourisankar; Fu, Xiang-Dong; Adams, Joseph A.

    2016-01-01

    SR proteins are essential splicing factors that are regulated through multisite phosphorylation of their RS (arginine-serine-rich) domains by two major families of protein kinases. The SRPKs efficiently phosphorylate the arginine-serine dipeptides in the RS domain using a conserved docking groove in the kinase domain. In contrast, CLKs lack a docking groove and phosphorylate both arginine-serine and serine-proline dipeptides, modifications that generate a hyper-phosphorylated state important for unique SR protein-dependent splicing activities. All CLKs contain long, flexible N-terminal extensions (140-300 residues) that resemble the RS domains present in their substrate SR proteins. We showed that the N-terminus in CLK1 contacts both the kinase domain and the RS domain of the SR protein SRSF1. This interaction not only is essential for facilitating hyper-phosphorylation but also induces cooperative binding of SRSF1 to RNA. The N-terminus of CLK1 enhances the total phosphoryl contents of a panel of physiological substrates including SRSF1, SRSF2, SRSF5 and Tra2β1 by 2–3-fold. These findings suggest that CLK1-dependent hyper-phosphorylation is the result of a general mechanism in which the N-terminus acts as a bridge connecting the kinase domain and the RS domain of the SR protein. PMID:24869919

  16. The cannabinoid type-1 receptor carboxyl-terminus, more than just a tail.

    PubMed

    Stadel, Rebecca; Ahn, Kwang H; Kendall, Debra A

    2011-04-01

    The cannabinoid type-1 (CB(1)) receptor is a G protein-coupled receptor that binds the main active ingredient of marijuana, Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, and has been implicated in several disease states, including drug addiction, anxiety, depression, obesity, and chronic pain. In the two decades since the discovery of CB(1), studies at the molecular level have centered on the transmembrane core. This interest has now expanded as we discover that other regions of CB(1), including the CB(1) carboxyl-terminus, have critical structures that are important for CB(1) activity and regulation. Following the recent description of the three dimensional structure of the full-length CB(1) carboxyl-terminal tail [Biopolymers (2009) vol. 91, pp. 565-573], several residues and structural motifs including two α-helices (termed H8 and H9) have been postulated to interact with common G protein-coupled receptor accessory proteins, such as G-proteins and β-arrestins. This discourse will focus on the CB(1) carboxyl-terminus; our current understanding of the structural features of this region, evidence for its interaction with proteins, and the impact of structure on the binding and regulatory function of CB(1) accessory proteins. The involvement of the carboxyl-terminus in the receptor life cycle including activation, desensitization, and internalization will be highlighted.

  17. Independent mutations at the amino terminus of a protein act as surrogate signals for mitochondrial import.

    PubMed Central

    Vassarotti, A; Stroud, R; Douglas, M

    1987-01-01

    Intracellular delivery of the mitochondrial F1-ATPase beta-subunit precursor from the cytoplasm into the matrix of mitochondria is prevented by deletion of its mitochondrial import signal, a basic amphipathic alpha-helix at its amino terminus. Using a complementation assay, we have selected spontaneous mutations which restore the correct in vivo localization of the protein containing the import signal deletion. Analysis of these mutations revealed that different functional surrogate mitochondrial targeting signals formed within a narrow region of the extreme amino terminus of the import signal deleted beta-subunit. These modifications specifically replace different acidic residues with neutral or basic residues to generate a less acidic amphipathic helix within a region of the protein which is accessible for interaction with the membrane surface. The observations of this study confirm the requirement for amphipathicity as part of the mitochondrial import signal and suggest how mitochondrial targeting signals may have evolved within the extreme amino terminus of mitochondrial proteins. Images Fig. 5. PMID:2884105

  18. General approach for the stereocontrolled construction of the beta-lactam ring in amino acid-derived 4-alkyl-4-carboxy-2-azetidinones.

    PubMed

    Gerona-Navarro, Guillermo; García-López, M Teresa; González-Muñiz, Rosario

    2002-05-31

    The first general approach toward the asymmetric synthesis of 4-alkyl-4-carboxy-2-azetidinones derived from amino acids is described. The stereoselective construction of the beta-lactam ring was achieved through base-mediated intramolecular cyclization of the corresponding N(alpha)-chloroacetyl derivatives bearing (+)- or (-)-10-(N,N-dicyclohexylsulfamoyl)isoborneol as chiral auxiliary (ee up to 82%).

  19. Des-gamma-carboxy prothrombin (PIVKA-II)-producing mediastinal embryonal carcinoma with features of hepatoid differentiation.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Yasuyuki; Tomita, Katsuyuki; Hashimoto, Kiyoshi; Shigeoka, Yasushi; Watanabe, Masanari; Yamasaki, Akira; Shimizu, Eiji

    2005-01-01

    The case of a 48-year-old man with primary nonseminomatous embryonal carcinoma at the posterior mediastinum is described. The patient displayed extremely high plasma levels of Des-gamma-carboxy prothrombin (PIVKA-II) (4040 mAU/ml). Ultrasonography and dynamic computed tomography ruled out hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) or liver metastasis. After preoperative systemic chemotherapy, total tumor resection was performed. Postoperatively, the plasma levels of PIVKA-II returned to within the normal range (24 mAU/ml). An immnohistochemical study using anti-PIVKA-II monoclonal antibody revealed the cytoplasmic expression of PIVK4-II in the carcinoma cells. These results indicate that tumor cells, which are manifested as hepatoid differentiation, may produce PIVKA-II. This case seems to be the first case reported in which PIVKA-II was produced by nonseminomatous mediastinal embryonal carcinoma without HCC or liver metastasis.

  20. Crystallization of the carboxy-terminal region of the bacteriophage T4 proximal long tail fibre protein gp34.

    PubMed

    Granell, Meritxell; Namura, Mikiyoshi; Alvira, Sara; Garcia-Doval, Carmela; Singh, Abhimanyu K; Gutsche, Irina; van Raaij, Mark J; Kanamaru, Shuji

    2014-07-01

    The phage-proximal part of the long tail fibres of bacteriophage T4 consists of a trimer of the 1289 amino-acid gene product 34 (gp34). Different carboxy-terminal parts of gp34 have been produced and crystallized. Crystals of gp34(726-1289) diffracting X-rays to 2.9 Å resolution, crystals of gp34(781-1289) diffracting to 1.9 Å resolution and crystals of gp34(894-1289) diffracting to 3.0 and 2.0 Å resolution and belonging to different crystal forms were obtained. Native data were collected for gp34(726-1289) and gp34(894-1289), while single-wavelength anomalous diffraction data were collected for selenomethionine-containing gp34(781-1289) and gp34(894-1289). For the latter, high-quality anomalous signal was obtained.

  1. A key role for the carboxy-terminal tail of the murine coronavirus nucleocapsid protein in coordination of genome packaging.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Lili; Koetzner, Cheri A; Masters, Paul S

    2016-07-01

    The prototype coronavirus mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) exhibits highly selective packaging of its genomic positive-stranded RNA into assembled virions, despite the presence in infected cells of a large excess of subgenomic viral mRNAs. One component of this selectivity is the MHV packaging signal (PS), an RNA structure found only in genomic RNA and not in subgenomic RNAs. It was previously shown that a major determinant of PS recognition is the second of the two RNA-binding domains of the viral nucleocapsid (N) protein. We have now found that PS recognition additionally depends upon a segment of the carboxy-terminal tail (domain N3) of the N protein. Since domain N3 is also the region of N protein that interacts with the membrane (M) protein, this finding suggests a mechanism by which selective genome packaging is accomplished, through the coupling of genome encapsidation to virion assembly.

  2. Upregulation of des-gamma-carboxy-prothrombin after portal vein embolization in a cirrhotic patient with hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Sohda, Tetsuro; Iwata, Kaoru; Anan, Akira; Kunimoto, Hideo; Yotsumoto, Kaoru; Yokoyama, Keiji; Morihara, Daisuke; Takeyama, Yasuaki; Shakado, Satoshi; Osame, Akinobu; Kora, Shinichi; Ohishi, Jun; Yamauchi, Yasushi; Noritomi, Tomoaki; Yoshimitsu, Kengo; Yamashita, Yuichi; Sakisaka, Shotaro

    2015-10-01

    A 73-year-old female with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) received percutaneous transhepatic portal vein embolization (PTPE) before extensive right lobe hepatectomy. Serum levels of des-gamma-carboxy-prothrombin (DCP) were increased and remained at a high level until hepatectomy. Immunohistochemical examination revealed that an increased expression of DCP was demonstrated not only in HCC tissues, but also in the non-cancerous liver of the right lobe, where portal blood flow was blocked off as a result of PTPE. The serum level of DCP is known to be greatly increased in patients with HCC accompanied by portal vein invasion. We speculate that this increased DCP level is caused by both increased DCP production in HCC tissue and the surrounding non-cancerous liver, where portal flow is blocked off as a result of portal invasion by HCC. PMID:26374567

  3. Optimization of 6-carboxy-X-rhodamine concentration for real-time polymerase chain reaction using molecular beacon chemistry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gehua; Becker, Erin; Mesa, Christine

    2007-03-01

    The optimal 6-carboxy-X-rhodamine (ROX) concentration, which is used as a passive reference dye for real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with molecular beacon chemistry, was determined with the Mx4000 Multiplex Quantitative PCR System. Additionally, the effects of changing ROX concentrations on PCR reproducibility, Ct values, and efficiency were investigated with this system by using the PCR data obtained from amplification of the Escherichia coli shiga toxin 2 (stx2) gene and the Campylobacter jejuni luxS gene. This study indicated that different ROX concentrations influence many aspects of the real-time PCR reaction. ROX concentration variation could have consequences in the analysis of quantitative data and may lead to erroneous results. This study further indicated that the optimal ROX concentration is 60 nmol/L for real-time PCR, using molecular beacon chemistry for PCR assay of luxS and stx2 genes.

  4. Identification of functionally important negatively charged residues in the carboxy end of mouse hepatitis coronavirus A59 nucleocapsid protein.

    PubMed

    Verma, Sandhya; Bednar, Valerie; Blount, Andrew; Hogue, Brenda G

    2006-05-01

    The coronavirus nucleocapsid (N) protein is a multifunctional viral gene product that encapsidates the RNA genome and also plays some as yet not fully defined role in viral RNA replication and/or transcription. A number of conserved negatively charged amino acids are located within domain III in the carboxy end of all coronavirus N proteins. Previous studies suggested that the negatively charged residues are involved in virus assembly by mediating interaction between the membrane (M) protein carboxy tail and nucleocapsids. To determine the importance of these negatively charged residues, a series of alanine and other charged-residue substitutions were introduced in place of those in the N gene within a mouse hepatitis coronavirus A59 infectious clone. Aspartic acid residues 440 and 441 were identified as functionally important. Viruses could not be isolated when both residues were replaced by positively charged amino acids. When either amino acid was replaced by a positively charged residue or both were changed to alanine, viruses were recovered that contained second-site changes within N, but not in the M or envelope protein. The compensatory role of the new changes was confirmed by the construction of new viruses. A few viruses were recovered that retained the D441-to-arginine change and no compensatory changes. These viruses exhibited a small-plaque phenotype and produced significantly less virus. Overall, results from our analysis of a large panel of plaque-purified recovered viruses indicate that the negatively charged residues at positions 440 and 441 are key residues that appear to be involved in virus assembly. PMID:16611893

  5. Arthrobacter D-xylose isomerase: chemical modification of carboxy groups and protein engineering of pH optimum.

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, K S; Loviny-Anderton, T; Rangarajan, M; Hartley, B S

    1993-01-01

    To try to lower the pH optimum, the carboxy groups of Arthrobacter D-xylose isomerase were coupled to glycinamide using a water-soluble carbodi-imide. In conditions that substituted all of the 59 carboxy groups in the denatured monomer, a maximum of 30 groups/monomer reacted in the native enzyme, whether in presence or absence of ligands, and the enzyme remained fully active and tetrameric throughout the coupling reaction. Purification by f.p.l.c. ion-exchange chromatography gave broad symmetrical peaks with increased pI, suggesting that the modified enzymes are essentially homogeneous. However, they are less stable than native enzyme in 8 M urea or on heating ('melting points' of 59 degrees versus 73 degrees C for the apoenzymes and 67 degrees versus 81.5 degrees C for the Mg(2+)-enzymes). Kinetic studies of the D-fructose isomerase activity at 30 degrees C showed that the glycinamidylated enzyme had unaltered activation constant for Mg2+, and Km was also similar to that of the native enzyme at pH 7.3, but increased rapidly at higher pH rather than remaining constant. Vmax. was constant from pH 6.2 to 8.0, suggesting a reduced pKa for His-219, which controls Vmax. in the native enzyme (normally 6.0). Three mutants were constructed by protein engineering with a view to reducing the pH optimum of enzyme activity. Two of these, Glu140-->Lys and Asp189-->Lys, could be detected in crude extracts of Escherichia coli by SDS/PAGE, but could not be purified, whereas mutant Trp136-->Glu was produced as a tetramer in amounts similar to the wild-type enzyme. However, it did not show any enzyme activity and was less stable in 0-9 M urea gradient PAGE. Images Figure 2 Figure 6 PMID:7904154

  6. Glycosylation efficiency of Asn-Xaa-Thr sequons is independent of distance from the C-terminus in membrane dipeptidase.

    PubMed

    Walmsley, Adrian R; Hooper, Nigel M

    2003-09-01

    In vitro transcription/translation studies with model proteins have shown that glycosylation of Asn-Xaa-Thr sequons is reduced when the sequon is within 60 residues of the C-terminus of the protein. We have previously shown that in living cells N-glycosylation of the prion protein (PrP) is also abolished when its Asn-Ile-Thr and Asn-Phe-Thr sequons are less than 60 residues from the C-terminus (Walmsley and Hooper [2003] Biochemical Journal, 370, 351-355). To investigate whether sequon distance to the C-terminus is a general determinant of N-glycosylation in living cells, Asn-Ile/Phe-Thr sequons were introduced into another glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchored protein, membrane dipeptidase (MDP), at similar distances from the C-terminus as those in PrP. When expressed in the human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cell line, the introduced sequons were fully N-glycosylated even when they were less than 60 residues from the C-terminus in both GPI-anchored and secreted forms of MDP. These data demonstrate that the utilization of sequons in some proteins is independent of their distance from the C-terminus.

  7. C-Terminus Glycans with Critical Functional Role in the Maturation of Secretory Glycoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Petrescu, Andrei-Jose; Petrescu, Stefana M.

    2011-01-01

    The N-glycans of membrane glycoproteins are mainly exposed to the extracellular space. Human tyrosinase is a transmembrane glycoprotein with six or seven bulky N-glycans exposed towards the lumen of subcellular organelles. The central active site region of human tyrosinase is modeled here within less than 2.5 Å accuracy starting from Streptomyces castaneoglobisporus tyrosinase. The model accounts for the last five C-terminus glycosylation sites of which four are occupied and indicates that these cluster in two pairs - one in close vicinity to the active site and the other on the opposite side. We have analyzed and compared the roles of all tyrosinase N-glycans during tyrosinase processing with a special focus on the proximal to the active site N-glycans, s6:N337 and s7:N371, versus s3:N161 and s4:N230 which decorate the opposite side of the domain. To this end, we have constructed mutants of human tyrosinase in which its seven N-glycosylation sites were deleted. Ablation of the s6:N337 and s7:N371 sites arrests the post-translational productive folding process resulting in terminally misfolded mutants subjected to degradation through the mannosidase driven ERAD pathway. In contrast, single mutants of the other five N-glycans located either opposite to the active site or into the N-terminus Cys1 extension of tyrosinase are temperature-sensitive mutants and recover enzymatic activity at the permissive temperature of 31°C. Sites s3 and s4 display selective calreticulin binding properties. The C-terminus sites s7 and s6 are critical for the endoplasmic reticulum retention and intracellular disposal. Results herein suggest that individual N-glycan location is critical for the stability, regional folding control and secretion of human tyrosinase and explains some tyrosinase gene missense mutations associated with oculocutaneous albinism type I. PMID:21625599

  8. Requirement of the Carboxyl Terminus of a Bacterial Chemoreceptor for Its Targeted Proteolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alley, M. R. K.; Maddock, Janine R.; Shapiro, Lucille

    1993-03-01

    The bacterium Caulobacter crescentus yields two different progeny at each cell division; a chemotactically competent swarmer cell and a sessile stalked cell. The chemotaxis proteins are synthesized in the predivisional cell and then partition only to the swarmer cell upon division. The chemoreceptors that were newly synthesized were located at the nascent swarmer pole of the predivisional cell, an indication that asymmetry was established prior to cell division. When the swarmer cell differentiated into a stalked cell, the chemoreceptor was specifically degraded by virtue of an amino acid sequence located at its carboxyl terminus. Thus, a temporally and spatially restricted proteolytic event was a component of this differentiation process.

  9. The role of the Cx43 C-terminus in GJ plaque formation and internalization

    SciTech Connect

    Wayakanon, Praween; Bhattacharjee, Rajib; Nakahama, Ken-ichi; Morita, Ikuo

    2012-04-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cx43-GFP or -DsRed fusion proteins were expressed in HeLa cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Roles of C-terminus were examined using various mutants. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Gap junction plaque size was dependent on the length of C-terminus. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer C-terminus dependent gap junction plaque internalization was observed. -- Abstract: Connexin 43 (Cx43) is a major gap junction (GJ) protein found in many mammalian cell types. The C-terminal (CT) domain of Cx43 has unique characteristics in terms of amino acid (aa) sequence and its length differs from other connexins. This CT domain can be associated with protein partners to regulate GJ assembly and degradation, which results in the direct control of gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC). However, the essential roles of the CT regions involved in these mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. In this study, we aimed to investigate the specific regions of Cx43CT involved in GJ formation and internalization. Wild type Cx43{sub (382aa)} and 10 CT truncated mutants were stably expressed in HeLa cells as GFP or DsRed tagged proteins. First, we found that the deletion of 235-382aa from Cx43 resulted in failure to make GJ and establish GJIC. Second, the Cx43 with 242-382aa CT deletion could form functional GJs and be internalized as annular gap junctions (AGJs). However, the plaques consisting of Cx43 with CT deletions ({Delta}242-382aa to {Delta}271-382aa) were longer than the plaques consisting of Cx43 with CT deletions ({Delta}302-382aa). Third, co-culture experiments of cells expressing wild type Cx43{sub (382)} with cells expressing Cx43CT mutants revealed that the directions of GJ internalization were dependent on the length of the respective CT. Moreover, a specific region, 325-342aa residues of Cx43, played an important role in the direction of GJ internalization. These results showed the important roles of the Cx43 C-terminus in GJ

  10. Conserved arginine residues in the carboxyl terminus of the equine arteritis virus E protein may play a role in heparin binding but may not affect viral infectivity in equine endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhengchun; Sarkar, Sanjay; Zhang, Jianqiang; Balasuriya, Udeni B R

    2016-04-01

    Equine arteritis virus (EAV), the causative agent of equine viral arteritis, has relatively broad cell tropism in vitro. In horses, EAV primarily replicates in macrophages and endothelial cells of small blood vessels. Until now, neither the cellular receptor(s) nor the mechanism(s) of virus attachment and entry have been determined for this virus. In this study, we investigated the effect of heparin on EAV infection in equine endothelial cells (EECs). Heparin, but not other glycosaminoglycans, could reduce EAV infection up to 93 %. Sequence analysis of the EAV E minor envelope protein revealed a conserved amino acid sequence (52 RSLVARCSRGARYR 65) at the carboxy terminus of the E protein, which was predicted to be the heparin-binding domain. The basic arginine (R) amino acid residues were subsequently mutated to glycine by site-directed mutagenesis of ORF2a in an E protein expression vector and an infectious cDNA clone of EAV. Two single mutations in E (R52G and R57G) did not affect the heparin-binding capability, whereas the E double mutation (R52,60G) completely eliminated the interaction between the E protein and heparin. Although the mutant R52,60G EAV did not bind heparin, the mutations did not completely abolish infectivity, indicating that heparin is not the only critical factor for EAV infection. This also suggested that other viral envelope protein(s) might be involved in attachment through heparin or other cell-surface molecules, and this warrants further investigation.

  11. Ras complements the carboxyl terminus of v-Abl protein in lymphoid transformation.

    PubMed Central

    Parmar, K; Rosenberg, N

    1996-01-01

    Abelson murine leukemia virus (Ab-MLV) mutants expressing v-Abl proteins lacking the carboxyl terminus are compromised in the ability to transform lymphoid but not NIH 3T3 cells. This feature correlates with the presence of low levels of phosphotyrosine in lymphoid cells infected with carboxyl-terminal truncation mutants. In contrast, high levels of phosphotyrosine are observed in NIH 3T3 cells infected with wild-type and mutant Ab-MLV. Two downstream targets affected in lymphoid transformants are the GTPase-activating protein and GTPase-activating protein-associated protein p62, molecules which are heavily tyrosine phosphorylated in lymphoid cells transformed by wild-type Ab-MLV but not carboxyl-terminal truncation mutants of Ab-MLV. This difference suggested that signaling mediated via the Ras pathway may be compromised in lymphoid cells expressing the carboxyl-terminal truncation mutants. Consistent with this idea, expression of v-Ha-ras complemented these mutants in primary bone marrow transformation assays and increased transformation frequencies obtained with the Ab-MLV mutants 8- to 20-fold. These data suggest that a biologically important link exists between the carboxyl terminus of v-Abl protein and the Ras pathway. Signals transmitted via this connection may enhance those mediated via other regions of the v-Abl protein and facilitate transformation of primary, nonimmortalized cells such as pre-B lymphocytes. PMID:8551558

  12. Insulin-degrading enzyme is activated by the C-terminus of α-synuclein.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sandeep K; Chorell, Erik; Wittung-Stafshede, Pernilla

    2015-10-16

    The insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) plays a key role in type-2 diabetes and typically degrades small peptides such as insulin, amyloid β and islet amyloid polypeptide. We recently reported a novel non-proteolytical interaction in vitro between IDE and the Parkinson's disease 140-residue protein α-synuclein that resulted in dual effects: arrested α-synuclein oligomers and, simultaneously, increased IDE proteolysis activity. Here we demonstrate that these outcomes arise due to IDE interactions with the C-terminus of α-synuclein. Whereas a peptide containing the first 97 residues of α-synuclein did not improve IDE activity and its aggregation was not blocked by IDE, a peptide with the C-terminal 44 residues of α-synuclein increased IDE proteolysis to the same degree as full-length α-synuclein. Because the α-synuclein C-terminus is acidic, the interaction appears to involve electrostatic attraction with IDE's basic exosite, known to be involved in activation.

  13. The N-terminus of survivin is a mitochondrial-targeting sequence and Src regulator

    PubMed Central

    Dunajová, Lucia; Cash, Emily; Markus, Robert; Rochette, Sophie; Townley, Amelia R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Survivin (also known as BIRC5) is a cancer-associated protein that exists in several locations in the cell. Its cytoplasmic residence in interphase cells is governed by CRM1 (also known as XPO1)-mediated nuclear exportation, and its localisation during mitosis to the centromeres and midzone microtubules is that of a canonical chromosomal passenger protein. In addition to these well-established locations, survivin is also a mitochondrial protein, but how it gets there and its function therein is presently unclear. Here, we show that the first ten amino acids at the N-terminus of survivin are sufficient to target GFP to the mitochondria in vivo, and ectopic expression of this decapeptide decreases cell adhesion and accelerates proliferation. The data support a signalling mechanism in which this decapeptide regulates the tyrosine kinase Src, leading to reduced focal adhesion plaques and disruption of F-actin organisation. This strongly suggests that the N-terminus of survivin is a mitochondrial-targeting sequence that regulates Src, and that survivin acts in concert with Src to promote tumorigenesis. PMID:27246243

  14. The far C-terminus of MCAK regulates its conformation and spindle pole focusing

    PubMed Central

    Zong, Hailing; Carnes, Stephanie K.; Moe, Christina; Walczak, Claire E.; Ems-McClung, Stephanie C.

    2016-01-01

    To ensure proper spindle assembly, microtubule (MT) dynamics needs to be spatially regulated within the cell. The kinesin-13 MCAK is a potent MT depolymerase with a complex subcellular localization, yet how MCAK spatial regulation contributes to spindle assembly is not understood. Here we show that the far C-terminus of MCAK plays a critical role in regulating MCAK conformation, subspindle localization, and spindle assembly in Xenopus egg extracts. Alteration of MCAK conformation by the point mutation E715A/E716A in the far C-terminus increased MCAK targeting to the poles and reduced MT lifetimes, which induced spindles with unfocused poles. These effects were phenocopied by the Aurora A phosphomimetic mutation, S719E. Furthermore, addition of the kinesin-14 XCTK2 to spindle assembly reactions rescued the unfocused-pole phenotype. Collectively our work shows how the regional targeting of MCAK regulates MT dynamics, highlighting the idea that multiple phosphorylation pathways of MCAK cooperate to spatially control MT dynamics to maintain spindle architecture. PMID:26941326

  15. Capping of the N-terminus of PSD-95 by calmodulin triggers its postsynaptic release.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yonghong; Matt, Lucas; Patriarchi, Tommaso; Malik, Zulfiqar A; Chowdhury, Dhrubajyoti; Park, Deborah K; Renieri, Alessandra; Ames, James B; Hell, Johannes W

    2014-06-17

    Postsynaptic density protein-95 (PSD-95) is a central element of the postsynaptic architecture of glutamatergic synapses. PSD-95 mediates postsynaptic localization of AMPA receptors and NMDA receptors and plays an important role in synaptic plasticity. PSD-95 is released from postsynaptic membranes in response to Ca(2+) influx via NMDA receptors. Here, we show that Ca(2+)/calmodulin (CaM) binds at the N-terminus of PSD-95. Our NMR structure reveals that both lobes of CaM collapse onto a helical structure of PSD-95 formed at its N-terminus (residues 1-16). This N-terminal capping of PSD-95 by CaM blocks palmitoylation of C3 and C5, which is required for postsynaptic PSD-95 targeting and the binding of CDKL5, a kinase important for synapse stability. CaM forms extensive hydrophobic contacts with Y12 of PSD-95. The PSD-95 mutant Y12E strongly impairs binding to CaM and Ca(2+)-induced release of PSD-95 from the postsynaptic membrane in dendritic spines. Our data indicate that CaM binding to PSD-95 serves to block palmitoylation of PSD-95, which in turn promotes Ca(2+)-induced dissociation of PSD-95 from the postsynaptic membrane.

  16. Glacier terminus fluctuations on Mt. Baker, Washington, USA, 1940-1990, and climatic variations

    SciTech Connect

    Harper, J.T. )

    1993-11-01

    The terminus positions of six glaciers located on Mount Baker, Washington, were mapped by photogrammetric techniques at 2- to 7-yr intervals for the period 1940-1990. Although the timing varied slightly, each of the glaciers experienced a similar fluctuation sequence consisting of three phases: (1) rapid retreat, beginning prior to 1940 and lasting through the late 1940s to early 1950s; (2) approximately 30 yr of advance, ending in the late 1970s to early 1980s; (3) retreat though 1990. Terminus positions changed by up to 750 m during phases, with the advance phase increasing the lengths of glaciers by 13 to 24%. These fluctuations are well explained by variations in a smoothed time-series of accumulation-season precipitation and ablation-season mean temperature. The study glaciers appear to respond to interannual scale changes in climate within 20 yr or less. The glaciers on Mount Baker have a maritime location and a large percentage of area at high elevation, which may make their termini undergo greater fluctuations in response to climatic changes, especially precipitation variations, than most other glaciers in the North Cascades region. 40 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Synthesis of 3-amino-1-carboxy-o-carborane and an improved, general method for the synthesis of all three C-amino-C-carboxycarboranes

    SciTech Connect

    Kasar, R.A.; Knudsen, G.M.; Kahl, S.B.

    1999-06-14

    Amino acids of the polyhedral carboranes have potential applications in boron neutron capture therapy and in other areas of bioorganic chemistry, but simple, general methods for their synthesis are nonexistent. A general method for synthesis of C-amino-C-carboxy derivatives of o-, m-, and p-carborane is reported, starting from their respective monoacids and proceeding through nucleophilic attack by an alcohol on the intermediate C-isocyanates. Deprotection of the resulting carbamates provides a simple method for access to the C-amines. Alternatively, the C-isocyanates can be isolated for further reactions. Carbonylation of the carbamates at the remaining carboranyl CH results in high-yield production of the carbamate-protected amino acid. Another related method for the high yield preparation of the isomeric 3-amino-1-carboxy-o-carborane is also described which makes available for the first time all four reasonably accessible members of the series.

  18. The Adipophilin C Terminus Is a Self-folding Membrane-binding Domain That Is Important for Milk Lipid Secretion*

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Brandi M.; Russell, Tanya D.; Schaack, Jerome; Orlicky, David J.; Reigan, Philip; Ladinsky, Mark; McManaman, James L.

    2011-01-01

    Cytoplasmic lipid droplets (CLD) in mammary epithelial cells undergo secretion by a unique membrane envelopment process to produce milk lipids. Adipophilin (ADPH/Plin2), a member of the perilipin/PAT family of lipid droplet-associated proteins, is hypothesized to mediate CLD secretion through interactions with apical plasma membrane elements. We found that the secretion of CLD coated by truncated ADPH lacking the C-terminal region encoding a putative four-helix bundle structure was impaired relative to that of CLD coated by full-length ADPH. We used homology modeling and analyses of the solution and membrane binding properties of purified recombinant ADPH C terminus to understand how this region possibly mediates CLD secretion. Homology modeling supports the concept that the ADPH C terminus forms a four-helix bundle motif and suggests that this structure can form stable membrane bilayer interactions. Circular dichroism and protease mapping studies confirmed that the ADPH C terminus is an independently folding α-helical structure that is relatively resistant to urea denaturation. Liposome binding studies showed that the purified C terminus binds to phospholipid membranes through electrostatic dependent interactions, and cell culture studies documented that it localizes to the plasma membrane. Collectively, these data provide direct evidence that the ADPH C terminus forms a stable membrane binding helical structure that is important for CLD secretion. We speculate that interactions between the four-helix bundle of ADPH and membrane phospholipids may be an initial step in milk lipid secretion. PMID:21383012

  19. Growth, spectral, optical, thermal, and mechanical behaviour of an organic single crystal: Quinolinium 2-carboxy 6-nitrophthalate monohydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohana, J.; Ahila, G.; Bharathi, M. Divya; Anbalagan, G.

    2016-09-01

    Organic single crystals of quinolinium 2-carboxy 6-nitrophthalate monohydrate (QN) were grown by slow evaporation solution growth technique using ethanol and water as a mixed solvent. X-ray powder diffraction analysis revealed that the crystal belongs to the monoclinic crystal system with space group of P21/c. The functional groups present in the crystallized material confirmed its molecular structure. The optical transparency range and the lower cutoff wavelength were identified from the UV-vis spectrum. The optical constants were determined by UV-visible transmission spectrum at normal incidence, measured over the 200-700 nm spectral range. The dispersion of the refractive index was discussed in terms of the single-oscillator Wemple and DiDomenico model. The calculated HOMO and LUMO energies show that the charge transfer occur within the molecule. Electronic excitation properties were discussed within the framework of two level model on the basis of an orbital analysis. The nonlinear optical absorption coefficient (β) and nonlinear refraction (n2) of QN was measured by Z-scan technique and reported here. Thermal stability of QN was determined using TGA/DSC curves. Vicker's microhardness studies were carried out on the (1 1 ̅0) plane to understand the mechanical properties of the grown crystal. The microhardness measurements showed a Vickers hardness value as 18.4 kg/mm2 which is comparable to well-known organic crystal, urea.

  20. Neurofilament architecture combines structural principles of intermediate filaments with carboxy-terminal extensions increasing in size between triplet proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Geisler, N; Kaufmann, E; Fischer, S; Plessmann, U; Weber, K

    1983-01-01

    Mammalian neurofilament triplet proteins (68 K, 160 K and 200 K) have been correlated by a biochemical, immunological and protein chemical study. The 160 K and 200 K triplet proteins are intermediate filament proteins in their own right, since they reveal the alpha-helical coiled-coil rod domain analyzed in detail for the 68 K protein. Triplet proteins display two distinct arrays. Their amino-terminal region built analogously to non-neuronal intermediate filament proteins should allow a co-polymerization process via the interaction of coiled-coil domains. The extra mass of all triplet proteins is allocated to carboxy-terminally located extensions of increasing size and unique amino acid sequences. These may provide highly charged scaffolds suitable for interactions with other neuronal components. Such a domain of 68 K reveals, in sequence analysis, 47 glutamic acids within 106 residues. The epitope recognized by a monoclonal antibody reacting probably with all intermediate filament proteins has been mapped. It is located within the last 20 residues of the rods, where six distinct intermediate filament proteins point to a consensus sequence. Images Fig. 1. PMID:10872323

  1. Crystallization of the carboxy-terminal region of the bacteriophage T4 proximal long tail fibre protein gp34

    PubMed Central

    Granell, Meritxell; Namura, Mikiyoshi; Alvira, Sara; Garcia-Doval, Carmela; Singh, Abhimanyu K.; Gutsche, Irina; van Raaij, Mark J.; Kanamaru, Shuji

    2014-01-01

    The phage-proximal part of the long tail fibres of bacteriophage T4 consists of a trimer of the 1289 amino-acid gene product 34 (gp34). Different carboxy-terminal parts of gp34 have been produced and crystallized. Crystals of gp34(726–1289) diffracting X-rays to 2.9 Å resolution, crystals of gp34(781–1289) diffracting to 1.9 Å resolution and crystals of gp34(894–1289) diffracting to 3.0 and 2.0 Å resolution and belonging to different crystal forms were obtained. Native data were collected for gp34(726–1289) and gp34(894–1289), while single-wavelength anomalous diffraction data were collected for selenomethionine-containing gp34(781–1289) and gp34(894–1289). For the latter, high-quality anomalous signal was obtained. PMID:25005101

  2. The action of glycosylases on dopachrome (2-carboxy-2,3-dihydroindole-5,6-quinone) tautomerase.

    PubMed Central

    Aroca, P; Martinez-Liarte, J H; Solano, F; García-Borrón, J C; Lozano, J A

    1992-01-01

    It is shown that dopachrome (2-carboxy-2,3-dihydroindole-5,6-quinone) tautomerase (DCT) is a glycoprotein containing N-linked oligosaccharides. The enzymic activity can be stimulated by partial deglycosylation with a number of glycosylases such as neuraminidase, beta-mannosidase and beta-galactosidase. However, the stability of the enzyme after the hydrolytic treatment becomes lower. Thus total deglycosylation with peptide N-glycosidase F directly provokes an inactivation of DCT. The native enzyme also shows a strong affinity for concanavalin A-Sepharose. This affinity decreases after treatment with neuraminidase and/or beta-mannosidase. The DCT associated with coated vesicles seems to be mostly glycosylated, since the action of glycosylases on the enzyme obtained from these vesicles produced a similar stimulation to that with the melanosomal enzyme. Treatment of cultured melanocytes with tunicamycin elicited a decrease in the amount of active DCT inside the cells. All data suggest that the structure of the carbohydrate moiety of DCT should be very similar to, if not identical with, the structure proposed for tyrosinase by Ohkura, Yamashita, Mishima & Kobata (1984) Arch. Biochem. Biophys. 235, 63-77. Images Fig. 1. PMID:1599391

  3. Des-γ-carboxy prothrombin (DCP) as a potential autologous growth factor for the development of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu-Sheng; Chu, Jia-Hui; Cui, Shu-Xiang; Song, Zhi-Yu; Qu, Xian-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Des-γ-carboxy prothrombin (DCP) is a prothrombin precursor produced in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Because of deficiency of vitamin K or γ-glutamyl carboxylase in HCC cells, the 10 glutamic acid (Glu) residues in prothrombin precursor did not completely carboxylate to γ-carboxylated glutamic acid (Gla) residues, leaving some Glu residues remained in N-terminal domain. These prothrombin precursors with Glu residues are called DCPs. DCP displays insufficient coagulation activity. Since Liebman reported an elevated plasma DCP in patients with HCC, DCP has been used in the diagnosis of HCC. Recently, its biological malignant potential has been specified to describe DCP as an autologous growth factor to stimulate HCC growth and a paracrine factor to integrate HCC with vascular endothelial cells. DCP was found to stimulate HCC growth through activation of the DCP-Met-JAK1-STAT3 signaling pathway. DCP might increase HCC invasion and metastasis through activation of matrix metalloproteinase (MMPs) and the ERK1/2 MAPK signaling pathway. DCP has also been found to play a crucial role in the formation of angiogenesis. DCP could increase the angiogenic factors released from HCC and vascular endothelial cells. These effects of DCP in angiogenesis might be related to activation of the DCP-KDR-PLC-γ-MAPK signaling pathway. In this article, we summarized recent studies on DCP in biological roles related to cancer progression and angiogenesis in HCC.

  4. Diagnostic performance of des-γ-carboxy prothrombin (DCP) for hepatocellular carcinoma: a bivariate meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Gao, P; Li, M; Tian, Q B; Liu, Dian-Wu

    2012-01-01

    Serum markers are needed to be developed to specifically diagnose Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Des-γ-carboxy prothrombin (DCP) is a promising tool with limited expense and widely accessibility, but the reported results have been controversial. In order to review the performance of DCP for the diagnosis of HCC, the meta-analysis was performed. After a systematic review of relevant studies, the sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative likelihood ratios (PLR and NLR, respectively) were pooled using a bivariate meta-analysis. Potential between-study heterogeneity was explored by meta-regression model. The post-test probability and the likelihood ratio scattergram to evaluate clinical usefulness were calculated. Based on literature review of 20 publications, the overall sensitivity, specificity, PLR and NLR of DCP for the detection of HCC were 67% (95%CI, 58%-74%), 92% (95%CI, 88%-94%), 7.9 (95%CI, 5.6-11.2) and 0.36 (95%CI, 0.29-0.46), respectively. The area under the bivariate summary receiving operating characteristics curve was 0.89 (95%CI, 0.85-0.92). Significant heterogeneity was present. In conclusion, the major role of DCP is the moderate confirmation of HCC. More prospective studies of DCP are needed in future.

  5. Des-γ-carboxy prothrombin (DCP) as a potential autologous growth factor for the development of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu-Sheng; Chu, Jia-Hui; Cui, Shu-Xiang; Song, Zhi-Yu; Qu, Xian-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Des-γ-carboxy prothrombin (DCP) is a prothrombin precursor produced in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Because of deficiency of vitamin K or γ-glutamyl carboxylase in HCC cells, the 10 glutamic acid (Glu) residues in prothrombin precursor did not completely carboxylate to γ-carboxylated glutamic acid (Gla) residues, leaving some Glu residues remained in N-terminal domain. These prothrombin precursors with Glu residues are called DCPs. DCP displays insufficient coagulation activity. Since Liebman reported an elevated plasma DCP in patients with HCC, DCP has been used in the diagnosis of HCC. Recently, its biological malignant potential has been specified to describe DCP as an autologous growth factor to stimulate HCC growth and a paracrine factor to integrate HCC with vascular endothelial cells. DCP was found to stimulate HCC growth through activation of the DCP-Met-JAK1-STAT3 signaling pathway. DCP might increase HCC invasion and metastasis through activation of matrix metalloproteinase (MMPs) and the ERK1/2 MAPK signaling pathway. DCP has also been found to play a crucial role in the formation of angiogenesis. DCP could increase the angiogenic factors released from HCC and vascular endothelial cells. These effects of DCP in angiogenesis might be related to activation of the DCP-KDR-PLC-γ-MAPK signaling pathway. In this article, we summarized recent studies on DCP in biological roles related to cancer progression and angiogenesis in HCC. PMID:25200250

  6. Differential expression of ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase L1 in breast carcinoma and its biological significance.

    PubMed

    Lien, Huang-Chun; Wang, Chung-Chieh; Lin, Ching-Hung; Lu, Yen-Shen; Huang, Chiun-Sheng; Hsiao, Li-Ping; Yao, Yu-Tung

    2013-09-01

    Ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase L1 (UCHL1) is a deubiquitinating enzyme that hydrolyzes ubiquitin. Previous reports have shown both tumorigenic and antitumorigenic roles for UCHL1. However, the expression patterns of UCHL1 protein, an area that is critical for validating its clinicopathologic roles among subtypes of breast cancer, is still lacking. Here we examined the expression of UCHL1 by immunohistochemistry in 243 breast carcinomas of various subtypes. We found expression of UCHL1 in 8.3% of invasive ductal carcinomas but not in other carcinoma subtypes, except for metaplastic carcinomas of the breast, which showed UCHL1 staining in 61.9% of cases, with the sarcomatous components being more intensely stained. UCHL1 expression in invasive ductal carcinomas significantly correlated with a high histologic grade (P = .001), the triple-negative phenotype (P = .02), and the basal-like phenotype (P <.001); furthermore, it was associated with poorer overall survival by univariate and multivariate analyses. Knockdown of UCHL1 in an invasive Snail variant-transfected MCF7 cells with high endogenous UCHL1 protein level significantly reduced invasion and anchorage-independent growth. Conclusively, our results demonstrate a role for UCHL1 in aggressive phenotypes in breast carcinoma. The high expression of UCHL1 in metaplastic carcinomas of the breast, which is pathogenically related to epithelial-mesenchymal transition, may implicate an association between UCHL1 expression and the epithelial-mesenchymal transition in breast cancer.

  7. Structural Organization of Pregenomic RNA and the Carboxy-Terminal Domain of the Capsid Protein of Hepatitis B Virus

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Joseph C.-Y.; Dhason, Mary S.; Zlotnick, Adam

    2012-01-01

    The Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) double-stranded DNA genome is reverse transcribed from its RNA pregenome (pgRNA) within the virus core (or capsid). Phosphorylation of the arginine-rich carboxy-terminal domain (CTD) of the HBV capsid protein (Cp183) is essential for pgRNA encapsidation and reverse transcription. However, the structure of the CTD remains poorly defined. Here we report sub-nanometer resolution cryo-EM structures of in vitro assembled empty and pgRNA-filled Cp183 capsids in unphosphorylated and phosphorylation-mimic states. In empty capsids, we found unexpected evidence of surface accessible CTD density partially occluding pores in the capsid surface. We also observed that CTD organization changed substantively as a function of phosphorylation. In RNA-filled capsids, unphosphorylated CTDs favored thick ropes of RNA, while the phosphorylation-mimic favored a mesh of thin, high-density strands suggestive of single stranded RNA. These results demonstrate that the CTD can regulate nucleic acid structure, supporting the hypothesis that the HBV capsid has a functional role as a nucleic acid chaperone. PMID:23028319

  8. Phosphorylation and Ionic Strength Alter the LRAP-HAP Interface in the N-terminus

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Junxia; Xu, Yimin; Shaw, Wendy J.

    2013-04-02

    The conditions present during enamel crystallite development change dramatically as a function of time, including the pH, protein concentration, surface type and ionic strength. In this work, we investigate the role that two of these changing conditions, pH and ionic strength, have in modulating the interaction of amelogenin, LRAP, with hydroxyapatite (HAP). Using solid state NMR dipolar recoupling and chemical shift data, we investigate the structure, orientation and dynamics of three regions in the N-terminus of the protein, L15 to V19, V19 to L23 and K24 to S28. These regions are also near the only phosphorylated residue in the protein, pS16, therefore, changes in the LRAP-HAP interaction as a function of phosphorylation (LRAP(-P) vs. LRAP(+P)) were also investigated. All of the regions and conditions studies for the surface immobilized proteins showed restricted motion, with more mobility under all conditions for L15(+P) and K24(-P). The structure and orientation of the LRAP-HAP interaction in the N-terminus of the phosphorylated protein is very stable to changing solution conditions. From REDOR dipolar recoupling data, the structure and orientation in the region L15V19(+P) did not change significantly as a function of pH or ionic strength. The structure and orientation of the region V19L23(+P) were also stable to changes in pH, with the only significant change observed at high ionic strength, where the region becomes extended, suggesting this may be an important region in regulating mineral development. Chemical shift studies also suggest minimal changes in all three regions studied for both LRAP(-P) and LRAP(+P) as a function of pH or ionic strength. Phosphorylation also alters the LRAP-HAP interface. All of the three residues investigated (L15, V19, and K24) are closer to the surface in LRAP(+P), but K24S28 also changes structure as a result of phosphorylation, from a random coil to a largely helical structure, and V19L23 becomes more extended at high ionic

  9. The N Terminus of Pro-endothelial Monocyte-activating Polypeptide II (EMAP II) Regulates Its Binding with the C Terminus, Arginyl-tRNA Synthetase, and Neurofilament Light Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Haiming; Malinin, Nikolay L.; Awasthi, Niranjan; Schwarz, Roderich E.; Schwarz, Margaret A.

    2015-01-01

    Pro-endothelial monocyte-activating polypeptide II (EMAP II), one component of the multi-aminoacyl tRNA synthetase complex, plays multiple roles in physiological and pathological processes of protein translation, signal transduction, immunity, lung development, and tumor growth. Recent studies have determined that pro-EMAP II has an essential role in maintaining axon integrity in central and peripheral neural systems where deletion of the C terminus of pro-EMAP II has been reported in a consanguineous Israeli Bedouin kindred suffering from Pelizaeus-Merzbacher-like disease. We hypothesized that the N terminus of pro-EMAP II has an important role in the regulation of protein-protein interactions. Using a GFP reporter system, we defined a putative leucine zipper in the N terminus of human pro-EMAP II protein (amino acid residues 1–70) that can form specific strip-like punctate structures. Through GFP punctum analysis, we uncovered that the pro-EMAP II C terminus (amino acids 147–312) can repress GFP punctum formation. Pulldown assays confirmed that the binding between the pro-EMAP II N terminus and its C terminus is mediated by a putative leucine zipper. Furthermore, the pro-EMAP II 1–70 amino acid region was identified as the binding partner of arginyl-tRNA synthetase, a polypeptide of the multi-aminoacyl tRNA synthetase complex. We also determined that the punctate GFP pro-EMAP II 1–70 amino acid aggregate colocalizes and binds to the neurofilament light subunit protein that is associated with pathologic neurofilament network disorganization and degeneration of motor neurons. These findings indicate the structure and binding interaction of pro-EMAP II protein and suggest a role of this protein in pathological neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:25724651

  10. Transferring the C-terminus of the chemokine CCL21 to CCL19 confers enhanced heparin binding.

    PubMed

    Barmore, Austin J; Castex, Sally M; Gouletas, Brittany A; Griffith, Alex J; Metz, Slater W; Muelder, Nicolas G; Populin, Michael J; Sackett, David M; Schuster, Abigail M; Veldkamp, Christopher T

    2016-09-01

    Chemokines direct the migration of cells during various immune processes and are involved in many disease states. For example, CCL19 and CCL21, through activation of the CCR7 receptor, recruit dendritic cells and naïve T-cells to the secondary lymphoid organs aiding in balancing immune response and tolerance. However, CCL19 and CCL21 can also direct the metastasis of CCR7 expressing cancers. Chemokine binding to glycosaminoglycans, such as heparin, is as important to chemokine function as receptor activation. CCL21 is unique in that it contains an extended C-terminus not found in other chemokines like CCL19. Deletion of this extended C-terminus reduces CCL21's affinity for heparin and transferring the CCL21 C-terminus to CCL19 enhances heparin binding mainly through non-specific, electrostatic interactions. PMID:27338641

  11. Telomerase RNA stem terminus element affects template boundary element function, telomere sequence, and shelterin binding.

    PubMed

    Webb, Christopher J; Zakian, Virginia A

    2015-09-01

    The stem terminus element (STE), which was discovered 13 y ago in human telomerase RNA, is required for telomerase activity, yet its mode of action is unknown. We report that the Schizosaccharomyces pombe telomerase RNA, TER1 (telomerase RNA 1), also contains a STE, which is essential for telomere maintenance. Cells expressing a partial loss-of-function TER1 STE allele maintained short stable telomeres by a recombination-independent mechanism. Remarkably, the mutant telomere sequence was different from that of wild-type cells. Generation of the altered sequence is explained by reverse transcription into the template boundary element, demonstrating that the STE helps maintain template boundary element function. The altered telomeres bound less Pot1 (protection of telomeres 1) and Taz1 (telomere-associated in Schizosaccharomyces pombe 1) in vivo. Thus, the S. pombe STE, although distant from the template, ensures proper telomere sequence, which in turn promotes proper assembly of the shelterin complex.

  12. Alamethicin biosynthesis: acetylation of the amino terminus and attachment of phenylalaninol.

    PubMed

    Mohr, H; Kleinkauf, H

    1978-10-12

    Alamethicin synthetase was extracted from the fungus Trichoderma viride at the end of its exponential growth phase. It is multienzyme complex with a molecular weight of approx. 480 000. The biosynthesis of alamethicin is initiated on the synthetase by acetylation of thiolester-bound aminoisobutyric acid, which remains enzyme bound. Acetyl-CoA serves as the acetate donor. Of the alamethicin constituents, glycine, alanine and valine are also acetylated when incubated alone. This acetylation is prevented by added aminoisobutyric acid, which indicates that the site on alamethicin synthetase catalyzing the acetylation has a preference for aminoisobutyric acid. Alamethicin formation on the synthetase is terminated by linkage of phenylalaninol to the carboxyl terminus of the peptide. It is unlikely that the amino alcohol is a degradation product of alamethicin or that it had been split off from the synthetase complex. Thus it is probably the reaction product of a separate enzyme system. PMID:568941

  13. The protein kinase D1 COOH terminus: marker or regulator of enzyme activity?

    PubMed

    Qiu, Weihua; Zhang, Fan; Steinberg, Susan F

    2014-10-01

    Protein kinase D1 (PKD1) is a Ser/Thr kinase implicated in a wide variety of cellular responses. PKD1 activation is generally attributed to a PKC-dependent pathway that leads to phosphorylation of the activation loop at Ser(744)/Ser(748). This modification increases catalytic activity, including that toward an autophosphorylation site (Ser(916)) in a postsynaptic density-95/disks large/zonula occludens-1 (PDZ)-binding motif at the extreme COOH terminus. However, there is growing evidence that PKD1 activation can also result from a PKC-independent autocatalytic reaction at Ser(744)/Ser(748) and that certain stimuli increase in PKD1 phosphorylation at Ser(744)/S(748) without an increase in autophosphorylation at Ser(916). This study exposes a mechanism that results in a discrepancy between PKD1 COOH-terminal autocatalytic activity and activity toward other substrates. We show that PKD1 constructs harboring COOH-terminal epitope tags display high levels of in vitro activation loop autocatalytic activity and activity toward syntide-2 (a peptide substrate), but no Ser(916) autocatalytic activity. Cell-based studies show that the COOH-terminal tag, adjacent to PKD1's PDZ1-binding motif, does not grossly influence PKD1 partitioning between soluble and particulate fractions in resting cells or PKD1 translocation to the particulate fraction following treatment with PMA. However, a COOH-terminal tag that confers a high level of activation loop autocatalytic activity decreases the PKC requirement for agonist-dependent PKD1 activation in cells. The recognition that COOH-terminal tags alter PKD1's pharmacological profile is important from a technical standpoint. The altered dynamics and activation mechanisms for COOH-terminal-tagged PKD1 enzymes also could model the signaling properties of localized pools of enzyme anchored through the COOH terminus to PDZ domain-containing scaffolding proteins.

  14. Localization of the Intracellular Activity Domain of Pasteurella multocida Toxin to the N Terminus

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Brenda A.; Ponferrada, Virgilio G.; Vallance, Jefferson E.; Ho, Mengfei

    1999-01-01

    We have shown that Pasteurella multocida toxin (PMT) directly causes transient activation of Gqα protein that is coupled to phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase Cβ1 in Xenopus oocytes (B. A. Wilson, X. Zhu, M. Ho, and L. Lu, J. Biol. Chem. 272:1268–1275, 1997). We found that antibodies directed against an N-terminal peptide of PMT inhibited the toxin-induced response in Xenopus oocytes, but antibodies against a C-terminal peptide did not. To test whether the intracellular activity domain of PMT is localized to the N terminus, we conducted a deletion mutational analysis of the PMT protein, using the Xenopus oocyte system as a means of screening for toxin activity. Using PCR and conventional cloning techniques, we cloned from a toxinogenic strain of P. multocida the entire toxA gene, encoding the 1,285-amino-acid PMT protein, and expressed the recombinant toxin as a His-tagged fusion protein in Escherichia coli. We subsequently generated a series of N-terminal and C-terminal deletion mutants and expressed the His-tagged PMT fragments in E. coli. These proteins were screened for cytotoxic activity on cultured Vero cells and for intracellular activity in the Xenopus oocyte system. Only the full-length protein without the His tag exhibited activity on Vero cells. The full-length PMT and N-terminal fragments containing the first 500 residues elicited responses in oocytes, but the C-terminal 780 amino acid fragment did not. Our results confirm that the intracellular activity domain of PMT is localized to the N-terminal 500 amino acids of the protein and that the C terminus is required for entry into cells. PMID:9864199

  15. Comparison of the carboxy-terminal DP-repeat region in the co-chaperones Hop and Hip.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Gregory M; Huffman, Holly; Smith, David F

    2003-01-01

    Functional steroid receptor complexes are assembled and maintained by an ordered pathway of interactions involving multiple components of the cellular chaperone machinery. Two of these components, Hop and Hip, serve as co-chaperones to the major heat shock proteins (Hsps), Hsp70 and Hsp90, and participate in intermediate stages of receptor assembly. In an effort to better understand the functions of Hop and Hip in the assembly process, we focused on a region of similarity located near the C-terminus of each co-chaperone. Contained within this region is a repeated sequence motif we have termed the DP repeat. Earlier mutagenesis studies implicated the DP repeat of either Hop or Hip in Hsp70 binding and in normal assembly of the co-chaperones with progesterone receptor (PR) complexes. We report here that the DP repeat lies within a protease-resistant domain that extends to or is near the C-terminus of both co-chaperones. Point mutations in the DP repeats render the C-terminal regions hypersensitive to proteolysis. In addition, a Hop DP mutant displays altered proteolytic digestion patterns, which suggest that the DP-repeat region influences the folding of other Hop domains. Although the respective DP regions of Hop and Hip share sequence and structural similarities, they are not functionally interchangeable. Moreover, a double-point mutation within the second DP-repeat unit of Hop that converts this to the sequence found in Hip disrupts Hop function; however, the corresponding mutation in Hip does not alter its function. We conclude that the DP repeats are important structural elements within a C-terminal domain, which is important for Hop and Hip function.

  16. 11-Nor-9-carboxy-Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol quantification in human oral fluid by liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Scheidweiler, Karl B.; Himes, Sarah K.; Chen, Xiaohong; Liu, Hua-Fen

    2013-01-01

    Currently, Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is the analyte quantified for oral fluid cannabinoid monitoring. The potential for false-positive oral fluid cannabinoid results from passive exposure to THC-laden cannabis smoke raises concerns for this promising new monitoring technology. Oral fluid 11-nor-9-carboxy-Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THCCOOH) is proposed as a marker of cannabis intake since it is not present in cannabis smoke and was not measureable in oral fluid collected from subjects passively exposed to cannabis. THCCOOH concentrations are in the picogram per milliliter range in oral fluid and pose considerable analytical challenges. A liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry (LCMSMS) method was developed and validated for quantifying THCCOOH in 1 mL Quantisal-collected oral fluid. After solid phase extraction, chromatography was performed on a Kinetex C18 column with a gradient of 0.01 % acetic acid in water and 0.01 % acetic acid in methanol with a 0.5-mL/min flow rate. THCCOOH was monitored in negative mode electrospray ionization and multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry. The THCCOOH linear range was 12–1,020 pg/mL (R2>0.995). Mean extraction efficiencies and matrix effects evaluated at low and high quality control (QC) concentrations were 40.8–65.1 and −2.4–11.5 %, respectively (n=10). Analytical recoveries (bias) and total imprecision at low, mid, and high QCs were 85.0–113.3 and 6.6–8.4 % coefficient of variation, respectively (n=20). This is the first oral fluid THCCOOH LCMSMS triple quadrupole method not requiring derivatization to achieve a <15 pg/mL limit of quantification. The assay is applicable for the workplace, driving under the influence of drugs, drug treatment, and pain management testing. PMID:23681203

  17. Structure and Sialyllactose Binding of the Carboxy-Terminal Head Domain of the Fibre from a Siadenovirus, Turkey Adenovirus 3.

    PubMed

    Singh, Abhimanyu K; Berbís, M Álvaro; Ballmann, Mónika Z; Kilcoyne, Michelle; Menéndez, Margarita; Nguyen, Thanh H; Joshi, Lokesh; Cañada, F Javier; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús; Benkő, Mária; Harrach, Balázs; van Raaij, Mark J

    2015-01-01

    The virulent form of turkey adenovirus 3 (TAdV-3), also known as turkey hemorrhagic enteritis virus (THEV), is an economically important poultry pathogen, while the avirulent form is used as a vaccine. TAdV-3 belongs to the genus Siadenovirus. The carboxy-terminal region of its fibre does not have significant sequence similarity to any other adenovirus fibre heads of known structure. Two amino acid sequence differences between virulent and avirulent TAdV-3 map on the fibre head: where virulent TAdV-3 contains Ile354 and Thr376, avirulent TAdV-3 contains Met354 and Met376. We determined the crystal structures of the trimeric virulent and avirulent TAdV-3 fibre head domains at 2.2 Å resolution. Each monomer contains a beta-sandwich, which, surprisingly, resembles reovirus fibre head more than other adenovirus fibres, although the ABCJ-GHID topology is conserved in all. A beta-hairpin insertion in the C-strand of each trimer subunit embraces its neighbouring monomer. The avirulent and virulent TAdV-3 fibre heads are identical apart from the exact orientation of the beta-hairpin insertion. In vitro, sialyllactose was identified as a ligand by glycan microarray analysis, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and crystallography. Its dissociation constant was measured to be in the mM range by isothermal titration calorimetry. The ligand binds to the side of the fibre head, involving amino acids Glu392, Thr419, Val420, Lys421, Asn422, and Gly423 binding to the sialic acid group. It binds slightly more strongly to the avirulent form. We propose that, in vivo, the TAdV-3 fibre may bind a sialic acid-containing cell surface component.

  18. Structure and Sialyllactose Binding of the Carboxy-Terminal Head Domain of the Fibre from a Siadenovirus, Turkey Adenovirus 3

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Abhimanyu K.; Berbís, M. Álvaro; Ballmann, Mónika Z.; Kilcoyne, Michelle; Menéndez, Margarita; Nguyen, Thanh H.; Joshi, Lokesh; Cañada, F. Javier; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús; Benkő, Mária; Harrach, Balázs; van Raaij, Mark J.

    2015-01-01

    The virulent form of turkey adenovirus 3 (TAdV-3), also known as turkey hemorrhagic enteritis virus (THEV), is an economically important poultry pathogen, while the avirulent form is used as a vaccine. TAdV-3 belongs to the genus Siadenovirus. The carboxy-terminal region of its fibre does not have significant sequence similarity to any other adenovirus fibre heads of known structure. Two amino acid sequence differences between virulent and avirulent TAdV-3 map on the fibre head: where virulent TAdV-3 contains Ile354 and Thr376, avirulent TAdV-3 contains Met354 and Met376. We determined the crystal structures of the trimeric virulent and avirulent TAdV-3 fibre head domains at 2.2 Å resolution. Each monomer contains a beta-sandwich, which, surprisingly, resembles reovirus fibre head more than other adenovirus fibres, although the ABCJ-GHID topology is conserved in all. A beta-hairpin insertion in the C-strand of each trimer subunit embraces its neighbouring monomer. The avirulent and virulent TAdV-3 fibre heads are identical apart from the exact orientation of the beta-hairpin insertion. In vitro, sialyllactose was identified as a ligand by glycan microarray analysis, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and crystallography. Its dissociation constant was measured to be in the mM range by isothermal titration calorimetry. The ligand binds to the side of the fibre head, involving amino acids Glu392, Thr419, Val420, Lys421, Asn422, and Gly423 binding to the sialic acid group. It binds slightly more strongly to the avirulent form. We propose that, in vivo, the TAdV-3 fibre may bind a sialic acid-containing cell surface component. PMID:26418008

  19. Structure-guided discovery of carboxy-SAM as a novel metabolite modulating tRNA function

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jungwook; Xiao, Hui; Bonanno, Jeffrey B.; Kalyanaraman, Chakrapani; Brown, Shoshana; Tang, Xiangying; Al-Obaidi, Nawar F.; Patskovsky, Yury; Babbitt, Patricia C.; Jacobson, Matthew P.; Lee, Young-Sam; Almo, Steven C.

    2014-01-01

    Identifying novel metabolites and characterizing their biological functions are major challenges of the post-genomic era. X-ray crystallography can reveal unanticipated ligands which persist through purification and crystallization. These adventitious protein:ligand complexes provide insights into new activities, pathways and regulatory mechanisms. We describe a new metabolite, carboxy-S-adenosylmethionine (Cx-SAM), its biosynthetic pathway and its role in tRNA modification. The structure of CmoA, a member of the SAM-dependent methyltransferase superfamily, revealed a ligand in the catalytic site consistent with Cx-SAM. Mechanistic analyses demonstrated an unprecedented role for prephenate as the carboxyl donor and the involvement of a unique ylide intermediate as the carboxyl acceptor in the CmoA-mediated conversion of SAM to Cx-SAM. A second member of the SAM-dependent methyltransferase superfamily, CmoB, recognizes Cx-SAM and acts as a carboxymethyltransferase to convert 5-hydroxyuridine (ho5U) into 5-oxyacetyl uridine (cmo5U) at the wobble position of multiple tRNAs in Gram negative bacteria1, resulting in expanded codon-recognition properties2,3. CmoA and CmoB represent the first documented synthase and transferase for Cx-SAM. These findings reveal new functional diversity in the SAM-dependent methyltransferase superfamily and expand the metabolic and biological contributions of SAM-based biochemistry. These discoveries highlight the value of structural genomics approaches for identifying ligands in the context of their physiologically relevant macromolecular binding partners and for aiding in functional assignment. PMID:23676670

  20. Structure and Sialyllactose Binding of the Carboxy-Terminal Head Domain of the Fibre from a Siadenovirus, Turkey Adenovirus 3.

    PubMed

    Singh, Abhimanyu K; Berbís, M Álvaro; Ballmann, Mónika Z; Kilcoyne, Michelle; Menéndez, Margarita; Nguyen, Thanh H; Joshi, Lokesh; Cañada, F Javier; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús; Benkő, Mária; Harrach, Balázs; van Raaij, Mark J

    2015-01-01

    The virulent form of turkey adenovirus 3 (TAdV-3), also known as turkey hemorrhagic enteritis virus (THEV), is an economically important poultry pathogen, while the avirulent form is used as a vaccine. TAdV-3 belongs to the genus Siadenovirus. The carboxy-terminal region of its fibre does not have significant sequence similarity to any other adenovirus fibre heads of known structure. Two amino acid sequence differences between virulent and avirulent TAdV-3 map on the fibre head: where virulent TAdV-3 contains Ile354 and Thr376, avirulent TAdV-3 contains Met354 and Met376. We determined the crystal structures of the trimeric virulent and avirulent TAdV-3 fibre head domains at 2.2 Å resolution. Each monomer contains a beta-sandwich, which, surprisingly, resembles reovirus fibre head more than other adenovirus fibres, although the ABCJ-GHID topology is conserved in all. A beta-hairpin insertion in the C-strand of each trimer subunit embraces its neighbouring monomer. The avirulent and virulent TAdV-3 fibre heads are identical apart from the exact orientation of the beta-hairpin insertion. In vitro, sialyllactose was identified as a ligand by glycan microarray analysis, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and crystallography. Its dissociation constant was measured to be in the mM range by isothermal titration calorimetry. The ligand binds to the side of the fibre head, involving amino acids Glu392, Thr419, Val420, Lys421, Asn422, and Gly423 binding to the sialic acid group. It binds slightly more strongly to the avirulent form. We propose that, in vivo, the TAdV-3 fibre may bind a sialic acid-containing cell surface component. PMID:26418008

  1. The importance of the N-terminus of T7 endonuclease I in the interaction with DNA junctions.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Alasdair D J; Déclais, Anne-Cécile; Lilley, David M J

    2013-01-23

    T7 endonuclease I is a dimeric nuclease that is selective for four-way DNA junctions. Previous crystallographic studies have found that the N-terminal 16 amino acids are not visible, neither in the presence nor in the absence of DNA. We have now investigated the effect of deleting the N-terminus completely or partially. N-terminal deleted enzyme binds more tightly to DNA junctions but cleaves them more slowly. While deletion of the N-terminus does not measurably affect the global structure of the complex, the presence of the peptide is required to generate a local opening at the center of the DNA junction that is observed by 2-aminopurine fluorescence. Complete deletion of the peptide leads to a cleavage rate that is 3 orders of magnitude slower and an activation enthalpy that is 3-fold higher, suggesting that the most important interaction of the peptide is with the reaction transition state. Taken together, these data point to an important role of the N-terminus in generating a central opening of the junction that is required for the cleavage reaction to proceed properly. In the absence of this, we find that a cruciform junction is no longer subject to bilateral cleavage, but instead, just one strand is cleaved. Thus, the N-terminus is required for a productive resolution of the junction.

  2. Sequence requirements for maturation of the 5' terminus of human 18 S rRNA in vitro.

    PubMed

    Yu, Y T; Nilsen, T W

    1992-05-01

    Creation of the mature 5' terminus of human 18 S rRNA in vitro occurs via a two-step processing reaction. In the first step, an endonucleolytic activity found in HeLa cell nucleolar extract cleaves an rRNA precursor spanning the external transcribed spacer-18 S boundary at a position 3 bases upstream from the mature 18 S terminus leaving 2',3'-cyclic phosphate, 5' hydroxyl termini. In the second step, a nucleolytic activity(s) found in HeLa cell cytoplasmic extract removes the 3 extra bases and creates the authentic 5'-phosphorylated terminus of 18 S rRNA. Here we have examined the sequence requirements for the trimming reaction. The trimming activity(s), in addition to requiring a 5' hydroxyl terminus, prefers the naturally occurring adenosine as the 5'-terminal base. By a combination of deletion, site-directed mutagenesis, and chemical modification interference approaches we have also identified a region of 18 S rRNA spanning bases +6 to +25 (with respect to the mature 5' end) which comprises a critical recognition sequence for the trimming activity(s). PMID:1577760

  3. Signatures of Host mRNA 5′ Terminus for Efficient Hantavirus Cap Snatching

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Erdong

    2012-01-01

    Hantaviruses, similarly to other negative-strand segmented RNA viruses, initiate the synthesis of translation-competent capped mRNAs by a unique cap-snatching mechanism. Hantavirus nucleocapsid protein (N) binds to host mRNA caps and requires four nucleotides adjacent to the 5′ cap for high-affinity binding. N protects the 5′ caps of cellular transcripts from degradation by the cellular decapping machinery. The rescued 5′ capped mRNA fragments are stored in cellular P bodies by N, which are later efficiently used as primers by the hantaviral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) for transcription initiation. We showed that N also protects the host mRNA caps in P-body-deficient cells. However, the rescued caps were not effectively used by the hantavirus RdRp during transcription initiation, suggesting that caps stored in cellular P bodies by N are preferred for cap snatching. We examined the characteristics of the 5′ terminus of a capped test mRNA to delineate the minimum requirements for a capped transcript to serve as an efficient cap donor during hantavirus cap snatching. We showed that hantavirus RdRp preferentially snatches caps from the nonsense mRNAs compared to mRNAs engaged in translation. Hantavirus RdRp preferentially cleaves the cap donor mRNA at a G residue located 14 nucleotides downstream of the 5′ cap. The sequence complementarity between the 3′ terminus of viral genomic RNA and the nucleotides located in the vicinity of the cleavage site of the cap donor mRNA favors cap snatching. Our results show that hantavirus RdRp snatches caps from viral mRNAs. However, the negligible cap-donating efficiency of wild-type mRNAs in comparison to nonsense mRNAs suggests that viral mRNAs will not be efficiently used for cap snatching during viral infection due to their continuous engagement in protein synthesis. Our results suggest that efficiency of an mRNA to donate caps for viral mRNA synthesis is primarily regulated at the translational level. PMID

  4. Structural characterization of the HIV-1 Vpr N terminus: evidence of cis/trans-proline isomerism.

    PubMed

    Bruns, Karsten; Fossen, Torgils; Wray, Victor; Henklein, Peter; Tessmer, Uwe; Schubert, Ulrich

    2003-10-31

    The 96-residue human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) accessory protein Vpr serves manifold functions in the retroviral life cycle including augmentation of viral replication in non-dividing host cells, induction of G2 cell cycle arrest, and modulation of HIV-induced apoptosis. Using a combination of dynamic light scattering, circular dichroism, and NMR spectroscopy the N terminus of Vpr is shown to be a unique domain of the molecule that behaves differently from the C-terminal domain in terms of self-association and secondary structure folding. Interestingly, the four highly conserved proline residues in the N terminus are predicted to have a high propensity for cis/trans isomerism. Thus the high resolution structure and folding of a synthetic N-terminal peptide (Vpr1-40) and smaller fragments thereof have been investigated. 1H NMR data indicate Vpr1-40 possesses helical structure between residues 17-32, and for the first time, this helix, which is bound by proline residues, was observed even in aqueous solution devoid of any detergent supplements. In addition, NMR data revealed that all of the proline residues undergo a cis/ trans isomerism to such an extent that approximately 40% of all Vpr molecules possess at least one proline in a cis conformation. This phenomenon of cis/trans isomerism, which is unprecedented for HIV-1 Vpr, not only provides an explanation for the molecular heterogeneity observed in the full-length molecule but also indicates that in vivo the folding and function of Vpr should depend on a cis/trans-proline isomerase activity, particularly as two of the proline residues in positions 14 and 35 show considerable amounts of cis isomers. This prediction correlates well with our recent observation (Zander, K., Sherman, M. P., Tessmer, U., Bruns, K., Wray, V., Prechtel, A. T., Schubert, E., Henklein, P., Luban, J., Neidleman, J., Greene, W. C., and Schubert, U. (2003) J. Biol. Chem. 278, 43170-43181) of a functional interaction between the major

  5. Amyloid fibril formation of peptides derived from the C-terminus of CETP modulated by lipids

    SciTech Connect

    García-González, Victor; Mas-Oliva, Jaime

    2013-04-26

    Highlights: •The secondary structure of a C-terminal peptide derived from CETP was studied. •Lipids modulate secondary structure changes of a C-terminal peptide derived from CETP. •Lysophosphatidic acid maintains a functional α-helix and prevents fibril formation. •Transfer of lipids by CETP is related to the presence of an α-helix at its C-end. -- Abstract: Cholesteryl-ester transfer protein (CETP) is a plasmatic protein involved in neutral lipid transfer between lipoproteins. Focusing on the last 12 C-terminus residues we have previously shown that mutation D{sub 470}N promotes a conformational change towards a β-secondary structure. In turn, this modification leads to the formation of oligomers and fibrillar structures, which cause cytotoxic effects similar to the ones provoked by amyloid peptides. In this study, we evaluated the role of specific lipid arrangements on the structure of peptide helix-Z (D{sub 470}N) through the use of thioflavin T fluorescence, peptide bond absorbance, circular dichroism and electron microscopy. The results indicate that the use of micelles formed with lysophosphatidylcholine and lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) under neutral pH induce a conformational transition of peptide helix-Z containing a β-sheet conformation to a native α-helix structure, therefore avoiding the formation of amyloid fibrils. In contrast, incubation with phosphatidic acid does not change the profile for the β-sheet conformation. When the electrostatic charge at the surface of micelles or vesicles is regulated through the use of lipids such as phospholipid and LPA, minimal changes and the presence of β-structures were recorded. Mixtures with a positive net charge diminished the percentage of β-structure and the amount of amyloid fibrils. Our results suggest that the degree of solvation determined by the presence of a free hydroxyl group on lipids such as LPA is a key condition that can modulate the secondary structure and the consequent formation of

  6. Structural and dynamic evolution of the amphipathic N-terminus diversifies enzyme thermostability in the glycoside hydrolase family 12.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xukai; Chen, Guanjun; Wang, Lushan

    2016-08-21

    Understanding the molecular mechanism underlying protein thermostability is central to the process of efficiently engineering thermostable cellulases, which can provide potential advantages in accelerating the conversion of biomass into clean biofuels. Here, we explored the general factors that diversify enzyme thermostability in the glycoside hydrolase family 12 (GH12) using comparative molecular dynamics (MD) simulations coupled to a bioinformatics approach. The results indicated that protein stability is not equally distributed over the whole structure: the N-terminus is the most thermal-sensitive region of the enzymes with a β-sandwich architecture and it tends to lose its secondary structure during the course of protein unfolding. Furthermore, we found that the total interaction energy within the N-terminus is appreciably correlated with enzyme thermostability. Interestingly, the internal interactions within the N-terminus are organized in a special amphipathic pattern in which a hydrophobic packing cluster and a hydrogen bonding cluster lie at the two ends of the N-terminus. Finally, bioinformatics analysis demonstrated that the amphipathic pattern is highly conserved in GH12 and besides that, the evolution of the amino acids in the N-terminal region is an inherent mechanism underlying the diversity of enzyme thermostability. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the N-terminus is generally the structure that determines enzyme thermostability in GH12, and thereby it is also an ideal engineering target. The dynameomics study of a protein family can give a general view of protein functions, which will offer a wide range of applications in future protein engineering. PMID:27425569

  7. Regulatory activation is accompanied by movement in the C terminus of the Na-K-Cl cotransporter (NKCC1).

    PubMed

    Monette, Michelle Y; Forbush, Biff

    2012-01-13

    The Na-K-Cl cotransporter (NKCC1) is expressed in most vertebrate cells and is crucial in the regulation of cell volume and intracellular chloride concentration. To study the structure and function of NKCC1, we tagged the transporter with cyan (CFP) and yellow (YFP) fluorescent proteins at two sites within the C terminus and measured fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) in stably expressing human embryonic kidney cell lines. Both singly and doubly tagged NKCC1s were appropriately produced, trafficked to the plasma membrane, and exhibited (86)Rb transport activity. When both fluorescent probes were placed within the same C terminus of an NKCC1 transporter, we recorded an 11% FRET decrease upon activation of the transporter. This result clearly demonstrates movement of the C terminus during the regulatory response to phosphorylation of the N terminus. When we introduced CFP and YFP separately in different NKCC1 constructs and cotransfected these in HEK cells, we observed FRET between dimer pairs, and the fractional FRET decrease upon transporter activation was 46%. Quantitatively, this indicates that the largest FRET-signaled movement is between dimer pairs, an observation supported by further experiments in which the doubly tagged construct was cotransfectionally diluted with untagged NKCC1. Our results demonstrate that regulation of NKCC1 is accompanied by a large movement between two positions in the C termini of a dimeric cotransporter. We suggest that the NKCC1 C terminus is involved in transport regulation and that dimerization may play a key structural role in the regulatory process. It is anticipated that when combined with structural information, our findings will provide a model for understanding the conformational changes that bring about NKCC1 regulation.

  8. The N-terminus of the norepinephrine transporter regulates the magnitude and selectivity of the transporter-associated leak current.

    PubMed

    Binda, Francesca; Lute, Brandon J; Dipace, Concetta; Blakely, Randy D; Galli, Aurelio

    2006-03-01

    The norepinephrine (NE) transporter (NET) mediates the removal of NE from synaptic spaces and is a major target for antidepressants, amphetamine and cocaine. Previously, we have shown that syntaxin 1A (SYN 1A) supports human NET (hNET) cell surface expression, that hNET/SYN 1A interactions are direct and mediated by the hNET N-terminus, and that the hNET/SYN 1A association limits substrate-induced hNET-associated currents [Sung, U., Apparsundaram, S., Galli, A., Kahlig, K.M., Savchenko, V., Schroeter, S., Quick, M.W., Blakely, R.D., 2003. A regulated interaction of syntaxin 1A with the antidepressant-sensitive norepinephrine transporter establishes catecholamine clearance capacity. J. Neurosci. 23, 1697-1709]. These data raise the possibility that the hNET N-terminus, and potentially its interaction with SYN 1A, might regulate other hNET conductance states, including the hNET-mediated leak current. Importantly for monoamine transporters, the leak conductance has been shown to play a critical role in regulating cell membrane potential and possibly neuronal excitability [Quick, M.W., 2003. Regulating the conducting states of a mammalian serotonin transporter. Neuron 40, 537-549]. Here we demonstrate that deletion of the binding domain for SYN 1A in the NET N-terminus robustly enhances the NET-mediated leak current as well as its selectivity for Cl- permeation under particular intracellular ionic compositions. In addition, we show that the NET N-terminus coordinates the ability of intracellular Na+ and Cl- to regulate the leak conductance. These data suggest that the NET N-terminus regulates and defines the ionic specificity of the NET-mediated leak current.

  9. Mapping of protein-protein interactions within the DNA-dependent protein kinase complex.

    PubMed Central

    Gell, D; Jackson, S P

    1999-01-01

    In mammalian cells, the Ku and DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) proteins are required for the correct and efficient repair of DNA double-strand breaks. Ku comprises two tightly-associated subunits of approximately 69 and approximately 83 kDa, which are termed Ku70 and Ku80 (or Ku86), respectively. Previously, a number of regions of both Ku subunits have been demonstrated to be involved in their interaction, but the molecular mechanism of this interaction remains unknown. We have identified a region in Ku70 (amino acid residues 449-578) and a region in Ku80 (residues 439-592) that participate in Ku subunit interaction. Sequence analysis reveals that these interaction regions share sequence homology and suggests that the Ku subunits are structurally related. On binding to a DNA double-strand break, Ku is able to interact with DNA-PKcs, but how this interaction is mediated has not been defined. We show that the extreme C-terminus of Ku80, specifically the final 12 amino acid residues, mediates a highly specific interaction with DNA-PKcs. Strikingly, these residues appear to be conserved only in Ku80 sequences from vertebrate organisms. These data suggest that Ku has evolved to become part of the DNA-PK holo-enzyme by acquisition of a protein-protein interaction motif at the C-terminus of Ku80. PMID:10446239

  10. Hpa1 harpin needs nitroxyl terminus to promote vegetative growth and leaf photosynthesis in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaojie; Han, Liping; Zhao, Yanying; You, Zhenzhen; Dong, Hansong; Zhang, Chunling

    2014-03-01

    Hpa1 is a harpin protein produced by Xanthomonas oryzae, an important bacterial pathogen of rice, and has the growth-promoting activity in plants. To understand the molecular basis for the function of Hpa1, we generated an inactive variant protein, Hpa1 delta NT, by deleting the nitroxyl-terminal region of the Hpa1 sequence and compared Hpa1 delta NT with the full-length protein in terms of the effects on vegetative growth and related physiological responses in Arabidopsis. When Hpa1 was applied to plants, it acted to enhance the vegetative growth but did not affect the floral development. Enhanced plant growth was accompanied by induced expression of growth-promoting genes in plant leaves. The growth-promoting activity of Hpa1 was further correlated with a physiological consequence shown as promoted leaf photosynthesis as a result of facilitated CO2 conduction through leaf stomata and mesophyll cells. On the contrary, plant growth, growth-promoting gene expression, and the physiological consequence changed little in response to the Hpa1 delta NT treatment. These analyses suggest that Hpa1 requires the nitroxyl-terminus to facilitate CO2 transport inside leaf cells and promote leaf photosynthesis and vegetative growth of the plant.

  11. Improved radioimmunoassay for thymosin. cap alpha. 1 recognizes the N-14 amino terminus

    SciTech Connect

    Naylor, P.H.; Goldstein, A.L.

    1986-03-01

    Thymosin ..cap alpha../sub 1/(T..cap alpha../sub 1/) is a biologically active thymic peptide currently undergoing trials as an immunomodulator in cancer patients and patients with immunodeficiencies. Abnormally elevated levels of T..cap alpha../sub 1/ have been found in the serum of individuals with or at risk for AIDS, with T-cell leukemias, and chronic progressive multiple sclerosis. Absorption of the current antibody with a synthetic C-14 fragment of T..cap alpha../sub 1/ results in an antisera specific for the N-14 amino terminus of T..cap alpha../sub 1/, which measures significantly higher levels of T..cap alpha../sub 1/ in serum from normal individuals and significantly increases the sensitivity of the assay. Ongoing studies indicate that this new RIA for T..cap alpha../sub 1/ will be useful in monitoring changes of immunoreactive T..cap alpha../sub 1/ in serum with age and in patients with known or suspected T-cell abnormalities.

  12. Masking autoprocessing of Clostridium difficile toxin A by the C-terminus combined repetitive oligo peptides.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongrong; Hamza, Therwa; Gao, Si; Feng, Hanping

    2015-04-01

    Clostridium difficile toxin A and B (TcdA and TcdB) are the major virulence factors of the bacterium, both of which consist of two enzymatic domains: an effector glucosyltransferase domain (GTD) and a cysteine protease domain (CPD) responsible for autocleavage and release of GTD. Although the CPDs from both toxins share a similar structure and mechanism of hexakisphosphate (InsP6)-induced activation, TcdA is substantially less sensitive to the autocleavage as compared with TcdB. In this study, we provided evidence of inter-domain regulation of CPD activity of TcdA and its autoprocessing. The C-terminus combined repetitive oligo peptides (CROPs) of TcdA reduced the accessibility of TcdB CPD to its substrate in a chimeric toxin TxB-Ar, consequently blocking autoprocessing. Moreover, interference of antibodies with the CROPs of full-length TcdA efficiently enhanced its GTD release. In conclusion, by utilizing chimeric toxins and specific antibodies, we identified that the CROPs of TcdA plays a crucial role in controlling the InsP6-mediated activation of CPD and autocleavage of GTD. Our data provides insights on the molecular mode of action of the C. difficile toxins.

  13. Addition of oligonucleotides to the 5'-terminus of DNA by T4 RNA ligase.

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, N P; Geballe, A P; Cozzarelli, N R

    1979-01-01

    Bacteriophage T4-induced RNA ligase catalyzes the controlled template-independent addition of RNA to the 5'-phosphoryl end of large DNA molecules. Restriction enzyme-generated fragments of Co1E1 DNA with completely basepaired or cohesive ends and linear single-stranded øX174 viral DNA were all good substrates. DNA molecules from 10 to 6000 nucleotides long were quantitatively joined in an hour to a number of different RNA homopolymers. The most efficient of these was A(pA)5; I(pI)5 and C(pC)5 were also utilized while U(pU)5 was not. The optimum ribohomopolymer length was six nucleotides. Joining of ribohomopolymers between 10 and 20 nucleotides long occurred at approximately 1/2 the maximal rate and a trimer was the shortest substrate. Thus RNA ligase provides a method for generating extensions of predetermined length and base composition at the 5'-end of large DNA molecules that complements the available procedures for extending the 3'-hydroxyl terminus of DNA. Images PMID:375192

  14. Antibody evasion by the N terminus of murid herpesvirus-4 glycoprotein B

    PubMed Central

    Gillet, Laurent; Stevenson, Philip G

    2007-01-01

    Herpesviruses characteristically transmit infection from immune hosts. Although their success in escaping neutralization by pre-formed antibody is indisputable, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain largely unknown. Glycoprotein B (gB) is the most conserved component of the herpesvirus entry machinery and its N terminus (gB-NT) is a common neutralization target. We used murid herpesvirus-4 to determine how gB-NT contributes to the virus–antibody interaction. Deleting gB-NT had no obvious impact on virus replication, but paradoxically increased virion neutralization by immune sera. This reflected greater antibody access to neutralization epitopes on gH/gL, with which gB was associated. gB-NT itself was variably protected against antibody by O-linked glycans; on virions from epithelial cells it was protected almost completely. gB-NT therefore provides a protective and largely protected cover for a vulnerable part of gH/gL. The conservation of predicted glycosylation sites in other mammalian herpesvirus gB-NTs suggests that this evasion mechanism is widespread. Interestingly, the gB-NT glycans that blocked antibody binding could be targeted for neutralization instead by a lectin, suggesting a means of therapeutic counterattack. PMID:18034158

  15. Glacier-terminus fluctuations in the Wrangell and Chugach mountains resulting from non-climate controls

    SciTech Connect

    Sturm, M.; Hall, D.K.; Benson, C.S.; Field, W.O.

    1992-03-01

    Non-climatically controlled fluctuations of glacier termini were studied in two regions in Alaska. In the Wrangell Mountains, eight glaciers on Mt. Wrangell, an active volcano, have been monitored over the past 30 years using terrestrial surveys, aerial photogrammetry and digitally registered satellite images. Results, which are consistent between different methods of measurement, indicate that the termini of most glaciers were stationary or had retreated slightly. However, the termini of the 30-km-long Ahtna Glacier and the smaller Center and South MacKeith glaciers began to advance in the early 1960s and have advanced steadily at rates between 5 and 18 m yr-1 since then. These three glaciers flow from the summit caldera of ML Wrangell near the active North Crater, where increased volcanic heating since 1964 has melted over 7 x 107 M3 of ice. The authors suspect that volcanic meltwater has changed the basal conditions for the glaciers, resulting in their advance. In College Fjord, Prince William Sound, the terminus fluctuations of two tidewater glaciers have been monitored since 1931 by terrestrial surveying, photogrammetry, and most recently, from satellite imagery. Harvard Glacier, a 40-kmlong tidewater glacier, has been advancing steadily at nearly 20 m yr-1 since 1931, while the adjacent Yale Glacier has retreated at approximately 50 m yr-1 during the same period, though for short periods, both rates have been much higher.

  16. Landing at the terminus of Sabrina Vallis: A potential 2020 Mars rover landing site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platz, T.; Hauber, E.; Le Deit, L.; Van Gasselt, S.; Kinch, K.; Madsen, M. B.; Rosenberg, H.

    2014-04-01

    For the upcoming 2020 Mars rover mission we selected a potential landing site that meets all geological criteria including the presence of Noachian/Early Hesperian aqueous sediments and associated hydrous mineral phases and access to unaltered igneous rocks. Our proposed landing site is located at the terminus of Sabrina Vallis in Magong crater. The 25 km × 20 km landing ellipse is centred at 11.990°N, 313.425°E. This site features deltaic sediments and distal lacustrine sediments. In central delta cliff sections weak signatures of Fe/Mg-bearing phyllosilicates are detected. Lacustrine sediments are cut by a partially exhumed igneous dyke. On the crater floor of Magong crater, remnants of an approximately 1 m thick dark deposit are observed, which is interpreted to be a tephra layer sourced from the adjacent volcanic field within Lederberg crater. Detailed terrain analysis of the landing site shows that engineering constraints are met with respect to slope and relief.

  17. The carboxy-terminal half of nonstructural protein 3A is not essential for foot-and-mouth disease virus replication in cultured cell lines.

    PubMed

    Behura, Mrutyunjay; Mohapatra, Jajati K; Pandey, Laxmi K; Das, Biswajit; Bhatt, Mukesh; Subramaniam, Saravanan; Pattnaik, Bramhadev

    2016-05-01

    In foot-and-mouth disease (FMD)-endemic parts of the globe, control is mainly implemented by preventive vaccination with an inactivated purified vaccine. ELISAs detecting antibodies to the viral nonstructural proteins (NSP) distinguish FMD virus (FMDV)-infected animals in the vaccinated population (DIVA). However, residual NSPs present in the vaccines are suspected to be a cause of occasional false positive results, and therefore, an epitope-deleted negative marker vaccine strategy is considered a more logical option. In this study, employing a serotype Asia 1 FMDV infectious cDNA clone, it is demonstrated that while large deletions differing in size and location in the carboxy-terminal half of 3A downstream of the putative hydrophobic membrane-binding domain (deletion of residues 86-110, 101-149, 81-149 and 81-153) are tolerated by the virus without affecting its infectivity in cultured cell lines, deletions in the amino-terminal half (residues 5-54, 21-50, 21-80, 55-80 and 5-149) containing the dimerization and the transmembrane domains are deleterious to its multiplication. Most importantly, the virus could dispense with the entire carboxy-terminal half of 3A (residues 81-153) including the residues involved in the formation of the 3A-3B1 cleavage junction. The rescue of a replication-competent FMDV variant carrying the largest deletion ever in 3A (residues 81-153) and the fact that the deleted region contains a series of linear B-cell epitopes inspired us to devise an indirect ELISA based on a recombinant 3A carboxy-terminal fragment and to evaluate its potential to serve as a companion diagnostic assay for differential serosurveillance if the 3A-truncated virus is used as a marker vaccine. PMID:26935917

  18. The carboxy-terminal half of nonstructural protein 3A is not essential for foot-and-mouth disease virus replication in cultured cell lines.

    PubMed

    Behura, Mrutyunjay; Mohapatra, Jajati K; Pandey, Laxmi K; Das, Biswajit; Bhatt, Mukesh; Subramaniam, Saravanan; Pattnaik, Bramhadev

    2016-05-01

    In foot-and-mouth disease (FMD)-endemic parts of the globe, control is mainly implemented by preventive vaccination with an inactivated purified vaccine. ELISAs detecting antibodies to the viral nonstructural proteins (NSP) distinguish FMD virus (FMDV)-infected animals in the vaccinated population (DIVA). However, residual NSPs present in the vaccines are suspected to be a cause of occasional false positive results, and therefore, an epitope-deleted negative marker vaccine strategy is considered a more logical option. In this study, employing a serotype Asia 1 FMDV infectious cDNA clone, it is demonstrated that while large deletions differing in size and location in the carboxy-terminal half of 3A downstream of the putative hydrophobic membrane-binding domain (deletion of residues 86-110, 101-149, 81-149 and 81-153) are tolerated by the virus without affecting its infectivity in cultured cell lines, deletions in the amino-terminal half (residues 5-54, 21-50, 21-80, 55-80 and 5-149) containing the dimerization and the transmembrane domains are deleterious to its multiplication. Most importantly, the virus could dispense with the entire carboxy-terminal half of 3A (residues 81-153) including the residues involved in the formation of the 3A-3B1 cleavage junction. The rescue of a replication-competent FMDV variant carrying the largest deletion ever in 3A (residues 81-153) and the fact that the deleted region contains a series of linear B-cell epitopes inspired us to devise an indirect ELISA based on a recombinant 3A carboxy-terminal fragment and to evaluate its potential to serve as a companion diagnostic assay for differential serosurveillance if the 3A-truncated virus is used as a marker vaccine.

  19. Eight new crystal structures of 5-(hydroxymethyl)uracil, 5-carboxyuracil and 5-carboxy-2-thiouracil: insights into the hydrogen-bonded networks and the predominant conformations of the C5-bound residues.

    PubMed

    Seiler, Vanessa Kristina; Hützler, Wilhelm Maximilian; Bolte, Michael

    2016-05-01

    In order to examine the preferred hydrogen-bonding pattern of various uracil derivatives, namely 5-(hydroxymethyl)uracil, 5-carboxyuracil and 5-carboxy-2-thiouracil, and for a conformational study, crystallization experiments yielded eight different structures: 5-(hydroxymethyl)uracil, C5H6N2O3, (I), 5-carboxyuracil-N,N-dimethylformamide (1/1), C5H4N2O4·C3H7NO, (II), 5-carboxyuracil-dimethyl sulfoxide (1/1), C5H4N2O4·C2H6OS, (III), 5-carboxyuracil-N,N-dimethylacetamide (1/1), C5H4N2O4·C4H9NO, (IV), 5-carboxy-2-thiouracil-N,N-dimethylformamide (1/1), C5H4N2O3S·C3H7NO, (V), 5-carboxy-2-thiouracil-dimethyl sulfoxide (1/1), C5H4N2O3S·C2H6OS, (VI), 5-carboxy-2-thiouracil-1,4-dioxane (2/3), 2C5H4N2O3S·3C6H12O3, (VII), and 5-carboxy-2-thiouracil, C10H8N4O6S2, (VIII). While the six solvated structures, i.e. (II)-(VII), contain intramolecular S(6) O-H...O hydrogen-bond motifs between the carboxy and carbonyl groups, the usually favoured R2(2)(8) pattern between two carboxy groups is formed in the solvent-free structure, i.e. (VIII). Further R2(2)(8) hydrogen-bond motifs involving either two N-H...O or two N-H...S hydrogen bonds were observed in three crystal structures, namely (I), (IV) and (VIII). In all eight structures, the residue at the ring 5-position shows a coplanar arrangement with respect to the pyrimidine ring which is in agreement with a search of the Cambridge Structural Database for six-membered cyclic compounds containing a carboxy group. The search confirmed that coplanarity between the carboxy group and the cyclic residue is strongly favoured. PMID:27146565

  20. WHIM syndrome caused by a single amino acid substitution in the carboxy-tail of chemokine receptor CXCR4

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qian; Chen, Haoqian; Ojode, Teresa; Gao, Xiangxi; Anaya-O'Brien, Sandra; Turner, Nicholas A.; Ulrick, Jean; DeCastro, Rosamma; Kelly, Corin; Cardones, Adela R.; Gold, Stuart H.; Hwang, Eugene I.; Wechsler, Daniel S.; Malech, Harry L.; Murphy, Philip M.

    2012-01-01

    WHIM syndrome is a rare, autosomal dominant, immunodeficiency disorder so-named because it is characterized by warts, hypogammaglobulinemia, infections, and myelokathexis (defective neutrophil egress from the BM). Gain-of-function mutations that truncate the C-terminus of the chemokine receptor CXCR4 by 10-19 amino acids cause WHIM syndrome. We have identified a family with autosomal dominant inheritance of WHIM syndrome that is caused by a missense mutation in CXCR4, E343K (1027G → A). This mutation is also located in the C-terminal domain, a region responsible for negative regulation of the receptor. Accordingly, like CXCR4R334X, the most common truncation mutation in WHIM syndrome, CXCR4E343K mediated approximately 2-fold increased signaling in calcium flux and chemotaxis assays relative to wild-type CXCR4; however, CXCR4E343K had a reduced effect on blocking normal receptor down-regulation from the cell surface. Therefore, in addition to truncating mutations in the C-terminal domain of CXCR4, WHIM syndrome may be caused by a single charge-changing amino acid substitution in this domain, E343K, that results in increased receptor signaling. PMID:22596258

  1. Computational analysis of the CB1 carboxyl-terminus in the receptor-G protein complex.

    PubMed

    Shim, Joong-Youn; Khurana, Leepakshi; Kendall, Debra A

    2016-04-01

    Despite the important role of the carboxyl-terminus (Ct) of the activated brain cannabinoid receptor one (CB1) in the regulation of G protein signaling, a structural understanding of interactions with G proteins is lacking. This is largely due to the highly flexible nature of the CB1 Ct that dynamically adapts its conformation to the presence of G proteins. In the present study, we explored how the CB1 Ct can interact with the G protein by building on our prior modeling of the CB1-Gi complex (Shim, Ahn, and Kendall, The Journal of Biological Chemistry 2013;288:32449-32465) to incorporate a complete CB1 Ct (Glu416(Ct)-Leu472(Ct)). Based on the structural constraints from NMR studies, we employed ROSETTA to predict tertiary folds, ZDOCK to predict docking orientation, and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to obtain two distinct plausible models of CB1 Ct in the CB1-Gi complex. The resulting models were consistent with the NMR-determined helical structure (H9) in the middle region of the CB1 Ct. The CB1 Ct directly interacted with both Gα and Gβ and stabilized the receptor at the Gi interface. The results of site-directed mutagenesis studies of Glu416(Ct), Asp423(Ct), Asp428(Ct), and Arg444(Ct) of CB1 Ct suggested that the CB1 Ct can influence receptor-G protein coupling by stabilizing the receptor at the Gi interface. This research provided, for the first time, models of the CB1 Ct in contact with the G protein. PMID:26994549

  2. Computational analysis of the CB1 carboxyl-terminus in the receptor-G protein complex.

    PubMed

    Shim, Joong-Youn; Khurana, Leepakshi; Kendall, Debra A

    2016-04-01

    Despite the important role of the carboxyl-terminus (Ct) of the activated brain cannabinoid receptor one (CB1) in the regulation of G protein signaling, a structural understanding of interactions with G proteins is lacking. This is largely due to the highly flexible nature of the CB1 Ct that dynamically adapts its conformation to the presence of G proteins. In the present study, we explored how the CB1 Ct can interact with the G protein by building on our prior modeling of the CB1-Gi complex (Shim, Ahn, and Kendall, The Journal of Biological Chemistry 2013;288:32449-32465) to incorporate a complete CB1 Ct (Glu416(Ct)-Leu472(Ct)). Based on the structural constraints from NMR studies, we employed ROSETTA to predict tertiary folds, ZDOCK to predict docking orientation, and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to obtain two distinct plausible models of CB1 Ct in the CB1-Gi complex. The resulting models were consistent with the NMR-determined helical structure (H9) in the middle region of the CB1 Ct. The CB1 Ct directly interacted with both Gα and Gβ and stabilized the receptor at the Gi interface. The results of site-directed mutagenesis studies of Glu416(Ct), Asp423(Ct), Asp428(Ct), and Arg444(Ct) of CB1 Ct suggested that the CB1 Ct can influence receptor-G protein coupling by stabilizing the receptor at the Gi interface. This research provided, for the first time, models of the CB1 Ct in contact with the G protein.

  3. N-terminus-modified Hec1 suppresses tumour growth by interfering with kinetochore-microtubule dynamics.

    PubMed

    Orticello, M; Fiore, M; Totta, P; Desideri, M; Barisic, M; Passeri, D; Lenzi, J; Rosa, A; Orlandi, A; Maiato, H; Del Bufalo, D; Degrassi, F

    2015-06-01

    Mitotic proteins are attractive targets to develop molecular cancer therapeutics due to the intimate interdependence between cell proliferation and mitosis. In this work, we have explored the therapeutic potential of the kinetochore (KT) protein Hec1 (Highly Expressed in Cancer protein 1) as a molecular target to produce massive chromosome missegregation and cell death in cancer cells. Hec1 is a constituent of the Ndc80 complex, which mediates KT-microtubule (MT) attachments at mitosis and is upregulated in various cancer types. We expressed Hec1 fused with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) at its N-terminus MT-interaction domain in HeLa cells and showed that expression of this modified Hec1, which localized at KTs, blocked cell proliferation and promoted apoptosis in tumour cells. EGFP-Hec1 was extremely potent in tumour cell killing and more efficient than siRNA-induced Hec1 depletion. In striking contrast, normal cells showed no apparent cell proliferation defects or cell death following EGFP-Hec1 expression. Live-cell imaging demonstrated that cancer cell death was associated with massive chromosome missegregation within multipolar spindles after a prolonged mitotic arrest. Moreover, EGFP-Hec1 expression was found to increase KT-MT attachment stability, providing a molecular explanation for the abnormal spindle architecture and the cytotoxic activity of this modified protein. Consistent with cell culture data, EGFP-Hec1 expression was found to strongly inhibit tumour growth in a mouse xenograft model by disrupting mitosis and inducing multipolar spindles. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that stimulation of massive chromosome segregation defects can be used as an anti-cancer strategy through the activation of mitotic catastrophe after a multipolar mitosis. Importantly, this study represents a clear proof of concept that targeting KT proteins required for proper KT-MT attachment dynamics constitutes a powerful approach in cancer therapy.

  4. Differential Management of the Replication Terminus Regions of the Two Vibrio cholerae Chromosomes during Cell Division

    PubMed Central

    Demarre, Gaëlle; Galli, Elisa; Muresan, Leila; Paly, Evelyne; David, Ariane; Possoz, Christophe; Barre, François-Xavier

    2014-01-01

    The replication terminus region (Ter) of the unique chromosome of most bacteria locates at mid-cell at the time of cell division. In several species, this localization participates in the necessary coordination between chromosome segregation and cell division, notably for the selection of the division site, the licensing of the division machinery assembly and the correct alignment of chromosome dimer resolution sites. The genome of Vibrio cholerae, the agent of the deadly human disease cholera, is divided into two chromosomes, chrI and chrII. Previous fluorescent microscopy observations suggested that although the Ter regions of chrI and chrII replicate at the same time, chrII sister termini separated before cell division whereas chrI sister termini were maintained together at mid-cell, which raised questions on the management of the two chromosomes during cell division. Here, we simultaneously visualized the location of the dimer resolution locus of each of the two chromosomes. Our results confirm the late and early separation of chrI and chrII Ter sisters, respectively. They further suggest that the MatP/matS macrodomain organization system specifically delays chrI Ter sister separation. However, TerI loci remain in the vicinity of the cell centre in the absence of MatP and a genetic assay specifically designed to monitor the relative frequency of sister chromatid contacts during constriction suggest that they keep colliding together until the very end of cell division. In contrast, we found that even though it is not able to impede the separation of chrII Ter sisters before septation, the MatP/matS macrodomain organization system restricts their movement within the cell and permits their frequent interaction during septum constriction. PMID:25255436

  5. The 5′ RNA Terminus of Spleen Necrosis Virus Stimulates Translation of Nonviral mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Tiffiney M.; Boris-Lawrie, Kathleen

    2000-01-01

    The RU5 region at the 5′ RNA terminus of spleen necrosis virus (SNV) has been shown to facilitate expression of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV) unspliced RNA independently of the Rev-responsive element (RRE) and Rev. The SNV sequences act as a distinct posttranscriptional control element to stimulate gag RNA nuclear export and association with polyribosomes. Here we sought to determine whether RU5 functions to neutralize the cis-acting inhibitory sequences (INSs) in HIV RNA that confer RRE/Rev dependence or functions as an independent stimulatory sequence. Experiments with HIV gag reporter plasmids that contain inactivated INS-1 indicated that neutralization of INSs does not account for RU5 function. Results with luciferase reporter gene (luc) plasmids further indicated that RU5 stimulates expression of a nonretroviral RNA that lacks INSs. Northern blot and RT-PCR analyses indicated that RU5 does not increase the steady-state levels or nuclear export of the luc transcript but rather that the U5 region facilitates efficient polyribosomal association of the mRNA. RU5 does not function as an internal ribosome entry site in bicistronic reporter plasmids, and it requires the 5′-proximal position for efficient function. Our results indicate that RU5 contains stimulatory sequences that function in a 5′-proximal position to enhance initiation of translation of a nonretroviral reporter gene RNA. We speculate that RU5 evolved to overcome the translation-inhibitory effect of the highly structured encapsidation signal and other replication motifs in the 5′ untranslated region of the retroviral RNA. PMID:10933721

  6. Positive regulation of phenolic catabolism in Agrobacterium tumefaciens by the pcaQ gene in response to beta-carboxy-cis,cis-muconate.

    PubMed Central

    Parke, D

    1993-01-01

    An Escherichia coli system for generating a commercially unavailable catabolite in vivo was developed and was used to facilitate molecular genetic studies of phenolic catabolism. Introduction of the plasmid-borne Acinetobacter pcaHG genes, encoding the 3,4-dioxygenase which acts on protocatechuate, into E. coli resulted in bioconversion of exogenously supplied protocatechuate into beta-carboxy-cis,cis-muconate. This compound has been shown to be an inducer of the protocatechuate (pca) genes required for catabolism of protocatechuate to tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates in Rhizobium leguminosarum biovar trifolii. The E. coli bioconversion system was used to explore regulation of the pca genes in a related bacterium, Agrobacterium tumefaciens. The pcaD gene, which encodes beta-ketoadipate enol-lactone hydrolase, from A. tumefaciens A348 was cloned and was shown to be adjacent to a regulatory region which responds strongly to beta-carboxy-cis,cis-muconate in E. coli. Site-specific insertional mutagenesis of the regulatory region eliminated expression of the pcaD gene in E. coli. When the mutation was incorporated into the A. tumefaciens chromosome, it eliminated expression of the pcaD gene and at least three other pca genes as well. The regulatory region was shown to activate gene expression in trans. The novel regulatory gene was termed pcaQ to differentiate it from pca regulatory genes identified in other microbes, which bind different metabolites. PMID:8501056

  7. Characterization of the native form and the carboxy-terminally truncated halotolerant form of α-amylases from Bacillus subtilis strain FP-133.

    PubMed

    Takenaka, Shinji; Miyatake, Ayaka; Tanaka, Kosei; Kuntiya, Ampin; Techapun, Charin; Leksawasdi, Noppol; Seesuriyachan, Phisit; Chaiyaso, Thanongsak; Watanabe, Masanori; Yoshida, Ken-ichi

    2015-06-01

    Two amylases, amylase I and amylase II from Bacillus subtilis strain FP-133, were purified to homogeneity and characterized. Their stabilities toward temperature, pH, and organic solvents, and their substrate specificities toward polysaccharides and oligosaccharides were similar. Under moderately high salt conditions, both amylases were more stable than commercial B. licheniformis amylase, and amylase I retained higher amylase activity than amylase II. The N-terminal amino acid sequence, genomic southern blot analysis, and MALDI-TOFF-MS analysis indicated that the halotolerant amylase I was produced by limited carboxy-terminal truncation of the amylase II peptide. The deduced amino acid sequence of amylase II was >95% identical to that of previously reported B. subtilis α-amylases, but their carboxy-terminal truncation points differed. Three recombinant amylases--full-length amylase corresponding to amylase II, an artificially truncated amylase corresponding to amylase I, and an amylase with a larger artificial C-terminal truncation--were expressed in B. subtilis. The artificially truncated recombinant amylases had the same high amylase activity as amylase I under moderately high salt conditions. Sequence comparisons indicated that an increased ratio of Asp/Glu residues in the enzyme may be one factor responsible for increasing halotolerance.

  8. Kar3Vik1 Mechanochemistry Is Inhibited by Mutation or Deletion of the C Terminus of the Vik1 Subunit*

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Monika; Duan, Da; Drew, Doran; Jia, Zhimeng; Davis, Darlene; Campbell, Robert L.; Allingham, John S.

    2013-01-01

    Force production by kinesins has been linked to structural rearrangements of the N and C termini of their motor domain upon nucleotide binding. In recent crystal structures, the Kar3-associated protein Vik1 shows unexpected homology to these conformational states even though it lacks a nucleotide-binding site. This conservation infers a degree of commonality in the function of the N- and C-terminal regions during the mechanochemical cycle of all kinesins and kinesin-related proteins. We tested this inference by examining the functional effects on Kar3Vik1 of mutating or deleting residues in Vik1 that are involved in stabilizing the C terminus against the core and N terminus of the Vik1 motor homology domain (MHD). Point mutations at two moderately conserved residues near the Vik1 C terminus impaired microtubule gliding and microtubule-stimulated ATP turnover by Kar3Vik1. Deletion of the seven C-terminal residues inhibited Kar3Vik1 motility much more drastically. Interestingly, none of the point mutants seemed to perturb the ability of Kar3Vik1 to bind microtubules, whereas the C-terminal truncation mutant did. Molecular dynamics simulations of these C-terminal mutants showed distinct root mean square fluctuations in the N-terminal region of the Vik1 MHD that connects it to Kar3. Here, the degree of motion in the N-terminal portion of Vik1 highly correlated with that in the C terminus. These observations suggest that the N and C termini of the Vik1 MHD form a discrete folding motif that is part of a communication pathway to the nucleotide-binding site of Kar3. PMID:24240171

  9. DUX4 recruits p300/CBP through its C-terminus and induces global H3K27 acetylation changes.

    PubMed

    Choi, Si Ho; Gearhart, Micah D; Cui, Ziyou; Bosnakovski, Darko; Kim, Minjee; Schennum, Natalie; Kyba, Michael

    2016-06-20

    Ectopic expression of the double homeodomain transcription factor DUX4 causes facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD). Mechanisms of action of DUX4 are currently unknown. Using immortalized human myoblasts with a titratable DUX4 transgene, we identify by mass spectrometry an interaction between the DUX4 C-terminus and the histone acetyltransferases p300/CBP. Chromatin immunoprecipitation shows that DUX4 recruits p300 to its target gene, ZSCAN4, displaces histone H3 from the center of its binding site, and induces H3K27Ac in its vicinity, but C-terminal deleted DUX4 does not. We show that a DUX4 minigene, bearing only the homeodomains and C-terminus, is transcriptionally functional and cytotoxic, and that overexpression of a nuclear targeted C-terminus impairs the ability of WT DUX4 to interact with p300 and to regulate target genes. Genomic profiling of DUX4, histone H3, and H3 modifications reveals that DUX4 binds two classes of loci: DNase accessible H3K27Ac-rich chromatin and inaccessible H3K27Ac-depleted MaLR-enriched chromatin. At this latter class, it acts as a pioneer factor, recruiting H3K27 acetyltransferase activity and opening the locus for transcription. In concert with local increased H3K27Ac, the strong H3K27Ac peaks at distant sites are significantly depleted of H3K27Ac, thus DUX4 uses its C-terminus to induce a global reorganization of H3K27 acetylation. PMID:26951377

  10. DUX4 recruits p300/CBP through its C-terminus and induces global H3K27 acetylation changes

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Si Ho; Gearhart, Micah D.; Cui, Ziyou; Bosnakovski, Darko; Kim, Minjee; Schennum, Natalie; Kyba, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Ectopic expression of the double homeodomain transcription factor DUX4 causes facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD). Mechanisms of action of DUX4 are currently unknown. Using immortalized human myoblasts with a titratable DUX4 transgene, we identify by mass spectrometry an interaction between the DUX4 C-terminus and the histone acetyltransferases p300/CBP. Chromatin immunoprecipitation shows that DUX4 recruits p300 to its target gene, ZSCAN4, displaces histone H3 from the center of its binding site, and induces H3K27Ac in its vicinity, but C-terminal deleted DUX4 does not. We show that a DUX4 minigene, bearing only the homeodomains and C-terminus, is transcriptionally functional and cytotoxic, and that overexpression of a nuclear targeted C-terminus impairs the ability of WT DUX4 to interact with p300 and to regulate target genes. Genomic profiling of DUX4, histone H3, and H3 modifications reveals that DUX4 binds two classes of loci: DNase accessible H3K27Ac-rich chromatin and inaccessible H3K27Ac-depleted MaLR-enriched chromatin. At this latter class, it acts as a pioneer factor, recruiting H3K27 acetyltransferase activity and opening the locus for transcription. In concert with local increased H3K27Ac, the strong H3K27Ac peaks at distant sites are significantly depleted of H3K27Ac, thus DUX4 uses its C-terminus to induce a global reorganization of H3K27 acetylation. PMID:26951377

  11. The carboxyl terminus of the Galpha-subunit is the latch for triggered activation of heterotrimeric G proteins.

    PubMed

    Nanoff, Christian; Koppensteiner, Romana; Yang, Qiong; Fuerst, Elisabeth; Ahorn, Horst; Freissmuth, Michael

    2006-01-01

    The receptor-mimetic peptide D2N, derived from the cytoplasmic domain of the D(2) dopamine receptor, activates G protein alpha-subunits (G(i) and G(o)) directly. Using D2N, we tested the current hypotheses on the mechanism of receptor-mediated G protein activation, which differ by the role assigned to the Gbetagamma-subunit: 1) a receptor-prompted movement of Gbetagamma is needed to open up the nucleotide exit pathway ("gear-shift" and "lever-arm" model) or 2) the receptor first engages Gbetagamma and then triggers GDP release by interacting with the carboxyl (C) terminus of Galpha (the "sequential-fit" model). Our results with D2N were compatible with the latter hypothesis. D2N bound to the extreme C terminus of the alpha-subunit and caused a conformational change that was transmitted to the switch regions. Hence, D2N led to a decline in the intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence, increased the guanine nucleotide exchange rate, and modulated the Mg(2+) control of nucleotide binding. A structural alteration in the outer portion of helix alpha5 (substitution of an isoleucine by proline) blunted the stimulatory action of D2N. This confirms that helix alpha5 links the guanine nucleotide binding pocket to the receptor contact site on the G protein. However, neither the alpha-subunit amino terminus (as a lever-arm) nor Gbetagamma was required for D2N-mediated activation; conversely, assembly of the Galphabetagamma heterotrimer stabilized the GDP-bound species and required an increased D2N concentration for activation. We propose that the receptor can engage the C terminus of the alpha-subunit to destabilize nucleotide binding from the "back side" of the nucleotide binding pocket.

  12. Structure of the Tuberous Sclerosis Complex 2 (TSC2) N Terminus Provides Insight into Complex Assembly and Tuberous Sclerosis Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zech, Reinhard; Kiontke, Stephan; Mueller, Uwe; Oeckinghaus, Andrea; Kümmel, Daniel

    2016-09-16

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is caused by mutations in the TSC1 and TSC2 tumor suppressor genes. The gene products hamartin and tuberin form the TSC complex that acts as GTPase-activating protein for Rheb and negatively regulates the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1). Tuberin contains a RapGAP homology domain responsible for inactivation of Rheb, but functions of other protein domains remain elusive. Here we show that the TSC2 N terminus interacts with the TSC1 C terminus to mediate complex formation. The structure of the TSC2 N-terminal domain from Chaetomium thermophilum and a homology model of the human tuberin N terminus are presented. We characterize the molecular requirements for TSC1-TSC2 interactions and analyze pathological point mutations in tuberin. Many mutations are structural and produce improperly folded protein, explaining their effect in pathology, but we identify one point mutant that abrogates complex formation without affecting protein structure. We provide the first structural information on TSC2/tuberin with novel insight into the molecular function.

  13. The N-terminus of classical swine fever virus (CSFV) nonstructural protein 2 modulates viral genome RNA replication.

    PubMed

    Li, Ling; Wu, Rui; Zheng, Fengwei; Zhao, Cheng; Pan, Zishu

    2015-12-01

    Pestivirus nonstructural protein 2 (NS2) is a multifunctional, hydrophobic protein with an important but poorly understood role in viral RNA replication and infectious virus production. In the present study, based on sequence analysis, we mutated several representative conserved residues within the N-terminus of NS2 of classical swine fever virus (CSFV) and investigated how these mutations affected viral RNA replication and infectious virus production. Our results demonstrated that the mutation of two aspartic acids, NS2/D60A or NS2/D60K and NS2/D78K, in the N-terminus of NS2 abolished infectious virus production and that the substitution of arginine for alanine at position 100 (NS2/R100A) resulted in significantly decreased viral titer. The serial passage of cells containing viral genomic RNA molecules generated the revertants NS2/A60D, NS2/K60D and NS2/K78D, leading to the recovery of infectious virus. In the context of the NS2/R100A mutant, the NS2/I90L mutation compensated for infectious virus production. The regulatory roles of the indicated amino acid residues were identified to occur at the viral RNA replication level. These results revealed a novel function for the NS2 N-terminus of CSFV in modulating viral RNA replication. PMID:26232654

  14. Binding of heparin by type III domains and peptides from the carboxy terminal hep-2 region of fibronectin.

    PubMed

    Ingham, K C; Brew, S A; Migliorini, M M; Busby, T F

    1993-11-23

    The major sites of heparin binding by fibronectin are located in fragments of 30 or 40 kDa that contain type III modules 12 through 14 or 15. Various proteolytic or recombinant subfragments and several synthetic peptides derived from this region have been compared with respect to their binding to fluorescein-labeled heparin in solution. Binding was monitored by the change in fluorescence anisotropy at 25 degrees C and pH 7.4 in 0.02 M Tris buffer, alone (TB) or with 0.15M NaCl (TBS). A 23-kDa fragment containing III13 and III14 but lacking III12 had Kd values of 0.3 and 1.8 microM in TB, and TBS, respectively, indistinguishable from the 30-kDa parent. Fragments containing only module III13 bound 2-3-fold weaker than the parent while those containing only III14 bound 6-50-fold weaker depending on the ionic strength. Fragments containing only III12 or III15 failed to bind at all in TBS. A cationic peptide derived from the amino terminus of III13 and containing the Arg-Arg-Ala-Arg consensus sequence, whose integrity was shown by Barkalow and Schwarzbauer [Barkalow, F. J., & Schwarzbauer, J. E. (1991) J. Biol. Chem. 266, 7812-7818] to be critical, failed to bind in TBS but bound weakly in TB. Two additional cationic peptides derived from the middle and C-terminal regions of III14 showed similar behavior. Thus while the major determinant(s) of heparin binding are located in III13, those determinants are only active when part of a properly folded structure. Furthermore, module III13 when isolated had a slightly lower affinity than fragments containing both III13 and III14.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8241146

  15. Role of the C-terminus in the activity, conformation, and stability of interleukin-6.

    PubMed Central

    Ward, L. D.; Hammacher, A.; Zhang, J. G.; Weinstock, J.; Yasukawa, K.; Morton, C. J.; Norton, R. S.; Simpson, R. J.

    1993-01-01

    Two murine interleukin-6 (mIL-6) variants were constructed using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), one lacking the last five residues (183-187) at the C-terminus (pMC5) and another with the last five residues of mIL-6 substituted by the corresponding residues of human IL-6 (pMC5H). The growth stimulatory activity of pMC5 on the mouse hybridoma cell line 7TD1 was < 0.05% of mIL-6, whereas pMC5H and mIL-6 were equipotent. The loss of biological activity of pMC5 correlated with its negligible receptor binding affinity on 7TD1 cells, while the binding of pMC5H was comparable to that of mIL-6. Both pMC5 and pMC5H, like mIL-6, failed to interact with recombinant soluble human IL-6 receptor when assayed by surface plasmon resonance-based biosensor analysis. These studies suggest that the C-terminal seven amino acids of human IL-6, alone, do not define species specificity for receptor binding. A variety of biophysical techniques, as well as the binding of a conformational-specific monoclonal antibody, indicated that the global fold of the mIL-6 variants was similar to that of mIL-6, although small changes in the NMR spectra, particularly for pMC5, were observed. Some of these changes involved residues widely separated in the primary structure. For instance, interactions involving Tyr-22 were influenced by the C-terminal amino acids suggesting that the N- and C-termini of mIL-6 are in close proximity. Equilibrium unfolding experiments indicated that pMC5 was 0.8 kcal/mol less stable than mIL-6, whereas pMC5H was 1.4 kcal/mol more stable. These studies emphasize the structural importance of the C-terminal amino acids of IL-6 and suggest that truncation or mutation of this region could lead to small but significant alterations in other regions of the molecule. PMID:8401231

  16. Diffuse Crustal Accretion at the Southern Terminus of the Malaguana-Gadao Ridge, Mariana Trough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sleeper, J. D.; Martinez, F.; Fryer, P. B.

    2014-12-01

    The mode of extension and crustal accretion in backarc basins is strongly affected by proximity to the arc volcanic front. The factor that likely has the strongest control on these processes is mantle water content. At Mid-Ocean Ridges, the small amount of water in the mantle is efficiently extracted into the melt, dehydrating the residual material and increasing the viscosity and strength of the lithosphere. This may aid in focusing melt generated over a broad (~200+ km wide) zone in the mantle toward a narrow zone of crustal accretion ~1-2 km wide. In the near-arc setting, the continuous flux of water into the mantle wedge should oppose lithospheric dehydration and inhibit strengthening of the lithosphere, which may allow deformation, volcanism, and crustal accretion to occur over a broad area instead of along a narrow axis. A possible example of this process can be observed at the southern terminus of the Malaguana-Gadao Ridge, a backarc spreading center in the Southern Mariana Trough, at the southern end of the Izu-Bonin-Mariana convergent margin. The spreading axis, which forms an axial high in this area, abruptly terminates at 143˚20'E, 12˚37'N and is replaced by a broad zone of active volcanism and tectonism characterized by short volcanic ridges, volcanic cones, and low-relief grabens. This study uses deep-towed and ship multibeam sonar, gravity, and magnetics data collected during an early 2012 cruise on R/V Thomas G. Thompson (TN273) along with available geophysical and geochemical data in the Southern Mariana Trough to gain insight into the nature of the diffuse crustal accretion process. Evidence of a similar transition from organized to "disorganized" spreading can also be observed at Valu Fa Ridge in the southern Lau basin and other backarc spreading centers. This suggests that this process is not unique to the Southern Mariana Trough, and may be an important mode of crustal accretion in a variety of backarc settings where there is extension in

  17. 29 CFR Appendix C to Subpart R of... - Illustrations of Bridging Terminus Points: Non-mandatory Guidelines for Complying With §§ 1926...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Illustrations of Bridging Terminus Points: Non-mandatory Guidelines for Complying With §§ 1926.757(a)(10) and § 1926.757(c)(5) C Appendix C to Subpart R of Part.... R, App. C Appendix C to Subpart R of Part 1926—Illustrations of Bridging Terminus Points:...

  18. Membrane binding and endoplasmic reticulum retention sequences of rotavirus VP7 are distinct: role of carboxy-terminal and other residues in membrane binding.

    PubMed

    Clarke, M L; Lockett, L J; Both, G W

    1995-10-01

    The sequences responsible for binding rotavirus glycoprotein VP7 to the membrane of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) have not been identified. Here we show that the sequences which promote membrane binding in vitro are distinct from the N-terminal sequences which promote retention of VP7 in the ER in vivo. The role of the C-terminal region in membrane binding was also examined by using truncation mutants. Membrane binding in vitro was reduced but not abolished by removing up to 102 residues from the C terminus. The data suggest that the last 36 residues of VP7 may be present in the membrane or translocation pore, possibly with the C terminus protruding into the cytoplasm, since these residues contribute to, but do not account for, membrane binding. Surprisingly, modified forms of VP7 which are secreted from transfected cells showed the same membrane-binding properties in vitro as the protein retained in the ER membrane. Thus, secreted VP7 may not be present as a soluble polypeptide in the ER. A model to explain these results is presented. Previously published data are consistent with the idea that the highly conserved C terminus of nascent VP7 could have a cytoplasmic orientation which is important for assembly of mature virus particles. PMID:7666548

  19. Location of the bacteriophage P22 coat protein C-terminus provides opportunities for the design of capsid-based materials.

    PubMed

    Servid, Amy; Jordan, Paul; O'Neil, Alison; Prevelige, Peter; Douglas, Trevor

    2013-09-01

    Rational design of modifications to the interior and exterior surfaces of virus-like particles (VLPs) for future therapeutic and materials applications is based on structural information about the capsid. Existing cryo-electron microscopy-based models suggest that the C-terminus of the bacteriophage P22 coat protein (CP) extends toward the capsid exterior. Our biochemical analysis through genetic manipulations of the C-terminus supports the model where the CP C-terminus is exposed on the exterior of the P22 capsid. Capsids displaying a 6xHis tag appended to the CP C-terminus bind to a Ni affinity column, and the addition of positively or negatively charged coiled coil peptides to the capsid results in association of these capsids upon mixing. Additionally, a single cysteine appended to the CP C-terminus results in the formation of intercapsid disulfide bonds and can serve as a site for chemical modifications. Thus, the C-terminus is a powerful location for multivalent display of peptides that facilitate nanoscale assembly and capsid modification.

  20. Studies on the growth, structural, spectral and third-order nonlinear optical properties of Ammonium 3-carboxy-4-hydroxy benzenesulfonate monohydrate single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silambarasan, A.; Krishna Kumar, M.; Thirunavukkarasu, A.; Mohan Kumar, R.; Umarani, P. R.

    2015-01-01

    An organic nonlinear optical bulk single crystal, Ammonium 3-carboxy-4-hydroxy benzenesulfonate monohydrate (ACHBS) was successfully grown by solution growth technique. Single crystal X-ray diffraction study confirms that, the grown crystal belongs to P21/c space group. Powder X-ray diffraction and high resolution X-ray diffraction analyses revealed the crystallinity of the grown crystal. Infrared spectral analysis showed the vibrational behavior of chemical bonds and its functional groups. The thermal stability and decomposition stages of the grown crystal were studied by TG-DTA analysis. UV-Visible transmittance studies showed the transparency region and cut-off wavelength of the grown crystal. The third-order nonlinear optical susceptibility of the grown crystal was estimated by Z-scan technique using Hesbnd Ne laser source. The mechanical property of the grown crystal was studied by using Vicker's microhardness test.

  1. Solid-phase spectrophotometric determination of trace amounts of vanadium using 2,3-dichloro-6(3-carboxy-2- hydroxynaphthylazo)quinoxaline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amin, Alaa S.

    2003-03-01

    Solid-phase spectrophotometry (SPS) has been applied to analysis for trace amounts of vanadium in several environmental water (potable and polluted), biological samples (human blood and urine), and soil samples. Vanadium was sorbed in a styrene-divinylbenzene-type anion-exchanger Dowex 1-X8 as a vanadium—2,3-dichloro-6(3-carboxy -2-hydroxynaphthylazo)quinoxaline. Resin phase absorbances at 606 and 800 nm were measured directly which allowed the determination of vanadium in the range 0.03-2.2 ng ml -1 with a relative standard deviation (R.S.D.) of 1.4%. The comparison of the SPS method and the gallic acid persulphate method shows that the linearity, analytical sensitivity, and precision were better for the SPS method, and that the latter method has lower detection and quantification limits compared with the gallic acid persulphate method.

  2. An in vitro experiment on the interaction of charcoal or wheat bran with 11-nor-9-carboxy-Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol and its glucuronide.

    PubMed

    Skopp, Gisela; Mikus, Gerd

    2013-11-01

    The rather long yet variable terminal half-lives and detection times since last use of urinary cannabinoids may partly be attributed to their enterohepatic circulation which generally can be interrupted or restricted by chemical adsorbents. Therefore, an in vitro experiment was performed to study the adsorption/binding of 11-nor-9-carboxy-Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC-COOH) and its glucuronide to activated charcoal and wheat bran; remaining concentrations were determined by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. Adsorption/binding of 1,000 ng/mL of free or conjugated THC-COOH was complete using as little as 5 mg of charcoal whereas adsorption/binding to wheat bran increased with increasing amounts. Taking of remedies affecting enterohepatic recycling of THC-COOH and its glucuronide may challenge interpretation of cannabinoid concentrations used to detect or assess frequency of drug use or the time since last drug consumption. PMID:24077855

  3. Protein-chemical characterization of NF-H, the largest mammalian neurofilament component; intermediate filament-type sequences followed by a unique carboxy-terminal extension

    PubMed Central

    Geisler, N.; Fischer, S.; Vandekerckhove, J.; Damme, J. Van; Plessmann, U.; Weber, K.

    1985-01-01

    NF-H has the highest mol. wt. of the three mammalian neurofilament components (NF-L, NF-M, NF-H). In spite of its unusually large mol. wt., estimated to be 200 K by gel electrophoresis, NF-H contains sequences which identify it as an integral intermediate filament (IF) protein in its amino-terminal region. We have isolated and partially characterized a basic, non-α-helical segment located at the amino-terminal end with properties similar to headpieces of other non-epithelial IF proteins. The highly α-helical 40-K fragment excised by chymotrypsin is now identified by the amino acid sequence of a 17-K fragment. This sequence can be unambiguously aligned with the rod region of other IF proteins and covers about half of the presumptive coiled-coil arrays. NF-H and NF-M show 45% sequence identity in this region. The extra mass of NF-H in comparison with most other IF proteins arises from a carboxy-terminal extension thought to be responsible for inter-neurofilament cross-bridges in axons. This autonomous domain has a unique amino acid composition characterized by a high content of proline, alanine and particularly of lysine and glutamic acid. The NF-H tailpiece extension also carries a large number of serine phosphates, which are not evenly distributed, but are restricted to the amino-terminal part. Having now delineated the intermediate filament-type sequences for all three neurofilament proteins it seems very likely that the three components interact via coiled-coil interactions. They all carry unique carboxy-terminal extensions which increase in length from NF-L to NF-H and seem to extend from the filament wall. ImagesFig. 1. PMID:16453600

  4. The carboxy-terminal extension of the collagen binding domain of fibronectin mediates interaction with a 165 kDa membrane protein involved in odontoblast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Lesot, H; Fausser, J L; Akiyama, S K; Staub, A; Black, D; Kubler, M D; Ruch, J V

    1992-03-01

    Terminal differentiation of the odontoblast is characterized by an elongation and a polarization of the cell. The change in the cell shape and the reorganization of the cytoplasm involve the microfilament system. An immunological approach has previously implicated a transmembrane interaction between fibronectin and vinculin in the control of odontoblast differentiation. A 165 kDa protein localized on the cell-surface of odontoblasts mediated this interaction. In order to define the nature of the interaction of the 165 kDa protein with fibronectin, peptides were prepared by proteolytic cleavage of fibronectin with alpha-chymotrypsin. The results indicate that the 165 kDa protein interacted with a 62 kDa peptide located towards the amino-terminal extremity of fibronectin, but not with a 47 kDa related fragment. Both these 62 kDa and 47 kDa peptides included the collagen-binding domain and were retarded on a heparin-Ultrogel column. Microsequences demonstrated that the 62 kDa and 47 kDa fragments had the same amino-terminal extremity and that the larger fragment was extended in the carboxy-terminal direction. This carboxy-terminal extension of the collagen binding domain of fibronectin is implicated in the interaction of this molecule with the 165 kDa protein. On the other hand, odontoblasts differentiated normally when tooth germs were cultured in the presence of GRGDS synthetic peptide, suggesting that RGD-dependent integrins were not involved in odontoblast differentiation. Staining of dental mesenchymal cells in primary culture and of differentiated odontoblasts in situ with antibodies directed against the beta 1-subunit of integrins confirmed previous observations and showed that although beta 1 integrins are involved in the attachment of cultured dental cells, they are not implicated in the process of odontoblast differentiation. PMID:1597256

  5. Pannexin-1 Is Blocked by Its C-Terminus through a Delocalized Non-Specific Interaction Surface

    PubMed Central

    Dourado, Michelle; Wong, Evera; Hackos, David H.

    2014-01-01

    The Pannexin-1 (Panx1) channel is known to become activated under a variety of physiological conditions resulting in the release of medium-sized molecules such as ATP and amino acids from the cell. The detailed molecular mechanism of activation of the channel resulting in the opening of the Pannexin pore is poorly understood. The best-studied gating mechanism is caspase-3/7-mediated cleavage and truncation of the c-terminus. In the absence of caspase-cleavage, the c-terminal peptide maintains the channel in the closed state, possibly by directly plugging the pore from the intracellular side. We sought to understand in detail the part of the c-terminus necessary for this interaction by alanine-scanning and truncation mutagenesis of the c-terminal gating peptide. These experiments demonstrate that no single amino acid side-chain is necessary for this interaction. In fact, replacing blocks of 10–12 amino acids in different parts of the c-terminal peptide with alanines fails to disrupt the ability of the c-terminus to keep the channel closed. Surprisingly, even replacing the entire c-terminal gating peptide with a scrambled peptide of the same length maintains the interaction in some cases. Further analysis revealed that the interaction surface, while delocalized, is located within the amino-terminal two-thirds of the c-terminal peptide. Such a delocalized and potentially low-affinity interaction surface is allowed due to the high effective concentration of the c-terminal peptide near the inner vestibule of the pore and likely explains why this region is poorly conserved between species. This type of weak interaction with a tethered gating peptide may be required to maintain high-sensitivity to caspase-dependent activation. PMID:24911976

  6. Rescue microsurgery with bypass and stent removal following Pipeline treatment of a giant internal carotid artery terminus aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Bowers, Christian A; Taussky, Philip; Park, Min S; Neil, Jayson A; Couldwell, William T

    2015-12-01

    We report the microsurgical rescue and removal of a Pipeline stent embolization of a giant internal carotid artery terminus aneurysm. After the initial placement of a Pipeline Embolization Device (PED), it migrated proximally to the cavernous carotid with the distal end free in the middle of the aneurysm, resulting in only partial aneurysm neck coverage. The patient underwent microsurgical rescue with trapping, bypass, and opening of the aneurysm with PED removal. The vessel remained patent in the proximal segment previously covered by the Pipeline stent. Microsurgical rescue for definitive aneurysm treatment with PED removal can be safe and effective for aneurysms unsuccessfully treated with PED.

  7. Pathological conformations involving the amino terminus of tau occur early in Alzheimer's disease and are differentially detected by monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Combs, Benjamin; Hamel, Chelsey; Kanaan, Nicholas M

    2016-10-01

    Conformational changes involving the amino terminus of the tau protein are among the earliest alterations associated with tau pathology in Alzheimer's disease and other tauopathies. This region of tau contains a phosphatase-activating domain (PAD) that is aberrantly exposed in pathological forms of the protein, an event that is associated with disruptions in anterograde fast axonal transport. We utilized four antibodies that recognize the amino terminus of tau, TNT1, TNT2 (a novel antibody), Tau12, and Tau13, to further study this important region. Using scanning alanine mutations in recombinant tau proteins, we refined the epitopes of each antibody. We examined the antibodies' relative abilities to specifically label pathological tau in non-denaturing and denaturing assays to gain insight into some of the mechanistic details of PAD exposure. We then determined the pattern of tau pathology labeled by each antibody in human hippocampal sections at various disease stages in order to characterize PAD exposure in the context of disease progression. The characteristics of reactivity for the antibodies fell into two groups. TNT1 and TNT2 recognized epitopes within amino acids 7-12 and specifically identified recombinant tau aggregates and pathological tau from Alzheimer's disease brains in a conformation-dependent manner. These antibodies labeled early pre-tangle pathology from neurons in early Braak stages and colocalized with thiazine red, a marker of fibrillar pathology, in classic neurofibrillary tangles. However, late tangles were negative for TNT1 and TNT2 indicating a loss of the epitope in later stages of tangle evolution. In contrast, Tau12 and Tau13 both identified discontinuous epitopes in the amino terminus and were unable to differentiate between normal and pathological tau in biochemical and tissue immunohistological assays. Despite the close proximity of these epitopes, the antibodies demonstrated remarkably different abilities to identify pathological

  8. Autographa californica Multiple Nucleopolyhedrovirus DNA Polymerase C Terminus Is Required for Nuclear Localization and Viral DNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Guozhong

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The DNA polymerase (DNApol) of the baculovirus Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) is essential for viral DNA replication. The DNApol exonuclease and polymerase domains are highly conserved and are considered functional in DNA replication. However, the role of the DNApol C terminus has not yet been characterized. To identify whether only the exonuclease and polymerase domains are sufficient for viral DNA replication, several DNApol C-terminal truncations were cloned into a dnapol-null AcMNPV bacmid with a green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter. Surprisingly, most of the truncation constructs, despite containing both exonuclease and polymerase domains, could not rescue viral DNA replication and viral production in bacmid-transfected Sf21 cells. Moreover, GFP fusions of these same truncations failed to localize to the nucleus. Truncation of the C-terminal amino acids 950 to 984 showed nuclear localization but allowed for only limited and delayed viral spread. The C terminus contains a typical bipartite nuclear localization signal (NLS) motif at residues 804 to 827 and a monopartite NLS motif at residues 939 to 948. Each NLS, as a GFP fusion peptide, localized to the nucleus, but both NLSs were required for nuclear localization of DNApol. Alanine substitutions in a highly conserved baculovirus DNApol sequence at AcMNPV DNApol amino acids 972 to 981 demonstrated its importance for virus production and DNA replication. Collectively, the data indicated that the C terminus of AcMNPV DNApol contains two NLSs and a conserved motif, all of which are required for nuclear localization of DNApol, viral DNA synthesis, and virus production. IMPORTANCE The baculovirus DNA polymerase (DNApol) is a highly specific polymerase that allows viral DNA synthesis and hence virus replication in infected insect cells. We demonstrated that the exonuclease and polymerase domains of Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) alone are

  9. Aminoacylase 3 binds to and cleaves the N-terminus of the hepatitis C virus core protein

    PubMed Central

    Tsirulnikov, Kirill; Abuladze, Natalia; Vahi, Ritu; Hasnain, Huma; Phillips, Martin; Ryan, Christopher M.; Atanasov, Ivo; Faull, Kym F.; Kurtz, Ira; Pushkin, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Aminoacylase 3 (AA3) mediates deacetylation of N-acetyl aromatic amino acids and mercapturic acids. Deacetylation of mercapturic acids of exo- and endobiotics are likely involved in their toxicity. AA3 is predominantly expressed in kidney, and to a lesser extent in liver, brain, and blood. AA3 has been recently reported to interact with the hepatitis C virus core protein (HCVCP) in the yeast two-hybrid system. Here we demonstrate that AA3 directly binds to HCVCP (Kd~10 μM) that may by implicated in HCV pathogenesis. AA3 also revealed a weak endopeptidase activity towards the N-terminus of HCVCP. PMID:23010594

  10. Role of the N terminus in enzyme activity, stability and specificity in thermophilic esterases belonging to the HSL family.

    PubMed

    Mandrich, Luigi; Merone, Luigia; Pezzullo, Margherita; Cipolla, Laura; Nicotra, Francesco; Rossi, Mosè; Manco, Giuseppe

    2005-01-21

    A superposition between the structures of Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius esterase 2 (EST2) and Burkholderia cepacia lipase, the latter complexed with a phosphonate inhibitor, allowed us to hypothesize for the EST2 N terminus a role in restricting the access to the active site and therefore in modulating substrate specificity. In order to test this hypothesis we generated by site-directed mutagenesis some truncated versions of EST2 and its double mutant M211S/R215L (S/L) at the N terminus. In parallel, an analysis of the Sulfolobus solfataricus P2 genome allowed us to identify a gene coding for a putative esterase of the HSL family having a natural deletion of the corresponding region. The product of this gene and the above-mentioned EST2 mutants were expressed in Escherichia coli, purified and characterised. These studies support the notion that the N terminus affects substrate specificity other than several other enzyme parameters. Although the deletions afforded a tenfold and 550-fold decrease in catalytic efficiency towards the best substrate pNP-hexanoate at 50 degrees C for EST2 and S/L, respectively, the analysis of the specific activities with different triacylglycerols with respect to pNP-hexanoate showed that their ratios were higher for deleted versus non-deleted enzymes, on all tested substrates. In particular, the above ratios for glyceryl tridecanoate were 30-fold and 14-fold higher in S/L and EST2 deleted forms, respectively, compared with their full-length versions. This behaviour was confirmed by the analysis of the S.solfataricus esterase, which showed similar specific activities on pNP-hexanoate and triacylglycerols; in addition, higher activities on the latter substrates were observed in comparison with EST2, S/L and their deleted forms. Finally, a dramatic effect on thermophilicity and thermostability in the EST2 deleted forms was observed. This is the first report highlighting the importance of the "cap" domain in the HSL family, since the N

  11. Pathological conformations involving the amino terminus of tau occur early in Alzheimer's disease and are differentially detected by monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Combs, Benjamin; Hamel, Chelsey; Kanaan, Nicholas M

    2016-10-01

    Conformational changes involving the amino terminus of the tau protein are among the earliest alterations associated with tau pathology in Alzheimer's disease and other tauopathies. This region of tau contains a phosphatase-activating domain (PAD) that is aberrantly exposed in pathological forms of the protein, an event that is associated with disruptions in anterograde fast axonal transport. We utilized four antibodies that recognize the amino terminus of tau, TNT1, TNT2 (a novel antibody), Tau12, and Tau13, to further study this important region. Using scanning alanine mutations in recombinant tau proteins, we refined the epitopes of each antibody. We examined the antibodies' relative abilities to specifically label pathological tau in non-denaturing and denaturing assays to gain insight into some of the mechanistic details of PAD exposure. We then determined the pattern of tau pathology labeled by each antibody in human hippocampal sections at various disease stages in order to characterize PAD exposure in the context of disease progression. The characteristics of reactivity for the antibodies fell into two groups. TNT1 and TNT2 recognized epitopes within amino acids 7-12 and specifically identified recombinant tau aggregates and pathological tau from Alzheimer's disease brains in a conformation-dependent manner. These antibodies labeled early pre-tangle pathology from neurons in early Braak stages and colocalized with thiazine red, a marker of fibrillar pathology, in classic neurofibrillary tangles. However, late tangles were negative for TNT1 and TNT2 indicating a loss of the epitope in later stages of tangle evolution. In contrast, Tau12 and Tau13 both identified discontinuous epitopes in the amino terminus and were unable to differentiate between normal and pathological tau in biochemical and tissue immunohistological assays. Despite the close proximity of these epitopes, the antibodies demonstrated remarkably different abilities to identify pathological

  12. A Reduced Risk of Infection with Plasmodium vivax and Clinical Protection against Malaria Are Associated with Antibodies against the N Terminus but Not the C Terminus of Merozoite Surface Protein 1†

    PubMed Central

    Nogueira, Paulo Afonso; Piovesan Alves, Fabiana; Fernandez-Becerra, Carmen; Pein, Oliver; Rodrigues Santos, Neida; Pereira da Silva, Luiz Hildebrando; Plessman Camargo, Erney; del Portillo, Hernando A.

    2006-01-01

    Progress towards the development of a malaria vaccine against Plasmodium vivax, the most widely distributed human malaria parasite, will require a better understanding of the immune responses that confer clinical protection to patients in regions where malaria is endemic. The occurrence of clinical protection in P. vivax malaria in Brazil was first reported among residents of the riverine community of Portuchuelo, in Rondônia, western Amazon. We thus analyzed immune sera from this same human population to determine if naturally acquired humoral immune responses against the merozoite surface protein 1 of P. vivax, PvMSP1, could be associated with reduced risk of infection and/or clinical protection. Our results demonstrated that this association could be established with anti-PvMSP1 antibodies predominantly of the immunoglobulin G3 subclass directed against the N terminus but not against the C terminus, in spite of the latter being more immunogenic and capable of natural boosting. This is the first report of a prospective study of P. vivax malaria demonstrating an association of reduced risk of infection and clinical protection with antibodies against an antigen of this parasite. PMID:16622209

  13. Tight junction protein Par6 interacts with an evolutionarily conserved region in the amino terminus of PALS1/stardust.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qian; Hurd, Toby W; Margolis, Ben

    2004-07-16

    Tight junctions are the structures in mammalian epithelial cells that separate the apical and basolateral membranes and may also be important in the establishment of cell polarity. Two evolutionarily conserved multiprotein complexes, Crumbs-PALS1 (Stardust)-PATJ and Cdc42-Par6-Par3-atypical protein kinase C, have been implicated in the assembly of tight junctions and in polarization of Drosophila melanogaster epithelia. These two complexes have been linked physically and functionally by an interaction between PALS1 and Par6. Here we identify an evolutionarily conserved region in the amino terminus of PALS1 as the Par6 binding site and identify valine and aspartic acid residues in this region as essential for interacting with the PDZ domain of Par6. We have also characterized, in more detail, the amino terminus of Drosophila Stardust and demonstrate that the interaction mechanism between Stardust and Drosophila Par6 is evolutionarily conserved. Par6 interferes with PATJ in binding PALS1, and these two interactions do not appear to function synergistically. Taken together, these results define the molecular mechanisms linking two conserved polarity complexes.

  14. A functional dissection of PTEN N-terminus: implications in PTEN subcellular targeting and tumor suppressor activity.

    PubMed

    Gil, Anabel; Rodríguez-Escudero, Isabel; Stumpf, Miriam; Molina, María; Cid, Víctor J; Pulido, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Spatial regulation of the tumor suppressor PTEN is exerted through alternative plasma membrane, cytoplasmic, and nuclear subcellular locations. The N-terminal region of PTEN is important for the control of PTEN subcellular localization and function. It contains both an active nuclear localization signal (NLS) and an overlapping PIP2-binding motif (PBM) involved in plasma membrane targeting. We report a comprehensive mutational and functional analysis of the PTEN N-terminus, including a panel of tumor-related mutations at this region. Nuclear/cytoplasmic partitioning in mammalian cells and PIP3 phosphatase assays in reconstituted S. cerevisiae defined categories of PTEN N-terminal mutations with distinct PIP3 phosphatase and nuclear accumulation properties. Noticeably, most tumor-related mutations that lost PIP3 phosphatase activity also displayed impaired nuclear localization. Cell proliferation and soft-agar colony formation analysis in mammalian cells of mutations with distinctive nuclear accumulation and catalytic activity patterns suggested a contribution of both properties to PTEN tumor suppressor activity. Our functional dissection of the PTEN N-terminus provides the basis for a systematic analysis of tumor-related and experimentally engineered PTEN mutations.

  15. A Functional Dissection of PTEN N-Terminus: Implications in PTEN Subcellular Targeting and Tumor Suppressor Activity

    PubMed Central

    Gil, Anabel; Rodríguez-Escudero, Isabel; Stumpf, Miriam; Molina, María; Cid, Víctor J.; Pulido, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Spatial regulation of the tumor suppressor PTEN is exerted through alternative plasma membrane, cytoplasmic, and nuclear subcellular locations. The N-terminal region of PTEN is important for the control of PTEN subcellular localization and function. It contains both an active nuclear localization signal (NLS) and an overlapping PIP2-binding motif (PBM) involved in plasma membrane targeting. We report a comprehensive mutational and functional analysis of the PTEN N-terminus, including a panel of tumor-related mutations at this region. Nuclear/cytoplasmic partitioning in mammalian cells and PIP3 phosphatase assays in reconstituted S. cerevisiae defined categories of PTEN N-terminal mutations with distinct PIP3 phosphatase and nuclear accumulation properties. Noticeably, most tumor-related mutations that lost PIP3 phosphatase activity also displayed impaired nuclear localization. Cell proliferation and soft-agar colony formation analysis in mammalian cells of mutations with distinctive nuclear accumulation and catalytic activity patterns suggested a contribution of both properties to PTEN tumor suppressor activity. Our functional dissection of the PTEN N-terminus provides the basis for a systematic analysis of tumor-related and experimentally engineered PTEN mutations. PMID:25875300

  16. The cell-bound fructosyltransferase of Streptococcus salivarius: the carboxyl terminus specifies attachment in a Streptococcus gordonii model system.

    PubMed Central

    Rathsam, C; Giffard, P M; Jacques, N A

    1993-01-01

    The ftf gene, coding for the cell-bound beta-D-fructosyltransferase (FTF) of Streptococcus salivarius ATCC 25975, has been analyzed, and its deduced amino acid sequence has been compared with that of the secreted FTF of Streptococcus mutans and the levansucrases (SacBs) of Bacillus species. A unique proline-rich region detected at the C terminus of the FTF of S. salivarius preceded a hydrophobic terminal domain. This proline-rich region was shown to possess strong homology to the product of the prgC gene from pCF10 in Enterococcus faecalis, which encodes a pheromone-responsive protein of unknown function, as well as homology to the human proline-rich salivary protein PRP-4. A series of 3'-OH deletions of the S. salivarius ftf gene expressed in Streptococcus gordonii Challis LGR2 showed that the C terminus was required for cell surface attachment in this heterologous organism, as only the complete gene product was cell bound. This cell-bound activity was released in the presence of sucrose, suggesting that the mode of attachment and release of the S. salivarius FTF in S. gordonii was similar to that in its native host. PMID:8331080

  17. N-terminus conservation in the anchor polypeptide of a prokaryotic and eukaryotic alga. [Nostoc; Porphydium cruentum

    SciTech Connect

    Gantt, E.; Lipschultz, C.A.; Cunningham, F.X. Jr.; Mimuro, M.

    1987-04-01

    Energy flow between the extrinsic phycobilisomes and the photosystems within thylakoids, is probably mediated by a blue anchor polypeptide. Polypeptides in the 94 kD range, purified by LiDS-PAGE from phycobilisomes of Nostoc and Porphyrdium cruentum, crossreacted with anti-Nostoc-94 (although weakly with the latter). Though rich in ASP and GLU, the polypeptides were very hydrophobic, and low in MET, CYS, and HIS. Partial sequence of the N-terminus shows considerable homology 1 - 5 - 10 - 15 - 20 N: (S)-V-K-A-S-G-G-S-S-V-A-(R)-P-Q-L-Y-Q-(G)-L-(A)-V- P: V-()-K-A-S-G-G-S-P-V-V-K-P-Q-L-Y-(K)-()-A-(S)- between the species. There is a lack of homology when compared with ..cap alpha.. and ..beta.. polypeptides of allophycocyanin with rod linkers of phycobilisomes and other phycobiliproteins. Polypeptides of 94 and 92 kD from thylakoids of Nostoc, also immunoreactive with anti-94, were blocked at the N-terminus.

  18. A novel motif in the NaTrxh N-terminus promotes its secretion, whereas the C-terminus participates in its interaction with S-RNase in vitro

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background NaTrxh, a thioredoxin type h, shows differential expression between self-incompatible and self-compatible Nicotiana species. NaTrxh interacts in vitro with S-RNase and co-localizes with it in the extracellular matrix of the stylar transmitting tissue. NaTrxh contains N- and C-terminal extensions, a feature shared by thioredoxin h proteins of subgroup 2. To ascertain the function of these extensions in NaTrxh secretion and protein-protein interaction, we performed a deletion analysis on NaTrxh and fused the resulting variants to GFP. Results We found an internal domain in the N-terminal extension, called Nβ, that is essential for NaTrxh secretion but is not hydrophobic, a canonical feature of a signal peptide. The lack of hydrophobicity as well as the location of the secretion signal within the NaTrxh primary structure, suggest an unorthodox secretion route for NaTrxh. Notably, we found that the fusion protein NaTrxh-GFP(KDEL) is retained in the endoplasmic reticulum and that treatment of NaTrxh-GFP-expressing cells with Brefeldin A leads to its retention in the Golgi, which indicates that NaTrxh uses, to some extent, the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus for secretion. Furthermore, we found that Nβ contributes to NaTrxh tertiary structure stabilization and that the C-terminus functions in the protein-protein interaction with S-RNase. Conclusions The extensions contained in NaTrxh sequence have specific functions on the protein. While the C-terminus directly participates in protein-protein interaction, particularly on its interaction with S-RNase in vitro; the N-terminal extension contains two structurally different motifs: Nα and Nβ. Nβ, the inner domain (Ala-17 to Pro-27), is essential and enough to target NaTrxh towards the apoplast. Interestingly, when it was fused to GFP, this protein was also found in the cell wall of the onion cells. Although the biochemical features of the N-terminus suggested a non-classical secretion pathway, our

  19. Design, synthesis, and antifolate activity of new analogues of piritrexim and other diaminopyrimidine dihydrofolate reductase inhibitors with omega-carboxyalkoxy or omega-carboxy-1-alkynyl substitution in the side chain.

    PubMed

    Chan, David C M; Fu, Hongning; Forsch, Ronald A; Queener, Sherry F; Rosowsky, Andre

    2005-06-30

    As part of a search for dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) inhibitors combining the high potency of piritrexim (PTX) with the high antiparasitic vs mammalian selectivity of trimethoprim (TMP), the heretofore undescribed 2,4-diamino-6-(2',5'-disubstituted benzyl)pyrido[2,3-d]pyrimidines 6-14 with O-(omega-carboxyalkyl) or omega-carboxy-1-alkynyl groups on the benzyl moiety were synthesized and tested against Pneumocystis carinii, Toxoplasma gondii, and Mycobacterium avium DHFR vs rat DHFR. Three N-(2,4-diaminopteridin-6-yl)methyl)-2'-(omega-carboxy-1-alkynyl)dibenz[b,f]azepines (19-21) were also synthesized and tested. The pyridopyrimidine with the best combination of potency and selectivity was 2,4-diamino-5-methyl-6-[2'-(5-carboxy-1-butynyl)-5'-methoxy]benzyl]pyrimidine (13), with an IC(50) value of 0.65 nM against P. carinii DHFR, 0.57 nM against M. avium DHFR, and 55 nM against rat DHFR. The potency of 13 against P. carinii DHFR was 20-fold greater than that of PTX (IC(50) = 13 nM), and its selectivity index (SI) relative to rat DHFR was 85, whereas PTX was nonselective. The activity of 13 against P. carinii DHFR was 20 000 times greater than that of TMP, with an SI of 96, whereas that of TMP was only 14. However 13 was no more potent than PTX against M. avium DHFR, and its SI was no better than that of TMP. Molecular modeling dynamics studies using compounds 10 and 13 indicated a slight binding preference for the latter, in qualitative agreement with the IC(50) data. Among the pteridines, the most potent against P. carinii DHFR and M. avium DHFR was the 2'-(5-carboxy-1-butynyl)dibenz[b,f]azepinyl derivative 20 (IC(50) = 2.9 nM), whereas the most selective was the 2'-(5-carboxy-1-pentynyl) analogue 21, with SI values of >100 against both P. carinii and M. avium DHFR relative to rat DHFR. The final compound, 2,4-diamino-5-[3'-(4-carboxy-1-butynyl)-4'-bromo-5'-methoxybenzyl]pyrimidine (22), was both potent and selective against M. avium DHFR (IC(50) = 0.47 nM, SI

  20. Characterization of the genes encoding the 3-carboxy-cis,cis-muconate-lactonizing enzymes from the 4-sulfocatechol degradative pathways of Hydrogenophaga intermedia S1 and Agrobacterium radiobacter S2.

    PubMed

    Halak, Sad; Basta, Tamara; Bürger, Sibylle; Contzen, Matthias; Stolz, Andreas

    2006-11-01

    Hydrogenophaga intermedia strain S1 and Agrobacterium radiobacter strain S2 form a mixed bacterial culture which degrades sulfanilate (4-aminobenzenesulfonate) by a novel variation of the beta-ketoadipate pathway via 4-sulfocatechol and 3-sulfomuconate. It was previously proposed that the further metabolism of 3-sulfomuconate is catalysed by modified 3-carboxy-cis,cis-muconate-lactonizing enzymes (CMLEs) and that these 'type 2' enzymes were different from the conventional CMLEs ('type 1') from the protocatechuate pathway in their ability to convert 3-sulfomuconate in addition to 3-carboxy-cis,cis-muconate. In the present study the genes for two CMLEs (pcaB2S1 and pcaB2S2) were cloned from H. intermedia S1 and A. radiobacter S2, respectively. In both strains, these genes were located close to the previously identified genes encoding the 4-sulfocatechol-converting enzymes. The gene products of pcaB2S1 and pcaB2S2 were therefore tentatively identified as type 2 enzymes involved in the metabolism of 3-sulfomuconate. The genes were functionally expressed and the gene products were shown to convert 3-carboxy-cis,cis-muconate and 3-sulfomuconate. 4-Carboxymethylene-4-sulfo-but-2-en-olide (4-sulfomuconolactone) was identified by HPLC-MS as the product, which was enzymically formed from 3-sulfomuconate. His-tagged variants of both CMLEs were purified and compared with the CMLE from the protocatechuate pathway of Pseudomonas putida PRS2000 for the conversion of 3-carboxy-cis,cis-muconate and 3-sulfomuconate. The CMLEs from the 4-sulfocatechol pathway converted 3-sulfomuconate with considerably higher activities than 3-carboxy-cis,cis-muconate. Also the CMLE from P. putida converted 3-sulfomuconate, but this enzyme demonstrated a clear preference for 3-carboxy-cis,cis-muconate as substrate. Thus it was demonstrated that in the 4-sulfocatechol pathway, distinct CMLEs are formed, which are specifically adapted for the preferred conversion of sulfonated substrates.

  1. Characterization of the 4-Carboxy-4-Hydroxy-2-Oxoadipate Aldolase Gene and Operon Structure of the Protocatechuate 4,5-Cleavage Pathway Genes in Sphingomonas paucimobilis SYK-6

    PubMed Central

    Hara, Hirofumi; Masai, Eiji; Miyauchi, Keisuke; Katayama, Yoshihiro; Fukuda, Masao

    2003-01-01

    The protocatechuate (PCA) 4,5-cleavage pathway is the essential metabolic route for degradation of low-molecular-weight products derived from lignin by Sphingomonas paucimobilis SYK-6. In the 10.5-kb EcoRI fragment carrying the genes for PCA 4,5-dioxygenase (ligAB), 2-pyrone-4,6-dicarboxylate hydrolase (ligI), 4-oxalomesaconate hydratase (ligJ), and a part of 4-carboxy-2-hydroxymuconate-6-semialdehyde dehydrogenase (ligC), we found the ligK gene, which encodes 4-carboxy-4-hydroxy-2-oxoadipate (CHA) aldolase. The ligK gene was located 1,183 bp upstream of ligI and transcribed in the same direction as ligI. We also found the ligR gene encoding a LysR-type transcriptional activator, which was located 174 bp upstream of ligK. The ligK gene consists of a 684-bp open reading frame encoding a polypeptide with a molecular mass of 24,131 Da. The deduced amino acid sequence of ligK showed 57 to 88% identity with those of the corresponding genes recently reported in Sphingomonas sp. strain LB126, Comamonas testosteroni BR6020, Arthrobacter keyseri 12B, and Pseudomonas ochraceae NGJ1. The ligK gene was expressed in Escherichia coli, and the gene product (LigK) was purified to near homogeneity. Electrospray-ionization mass spectrometry indicated that LigK catalyzes not only the conversion of CHA to pyruvate and oxaloacetate but also that of oxaloacetate to pyruvate and CO2. LigK is a hexamer, and its isoelectric point is 5.1. The Km for CHA and oxaloacetate are 11.2 and 136 μM, respectively. Inactivation of ligK in S. paucimobilis SYK-6 resulted in the growth deficiency of vanillate and syringate, indicating that ligK encodes the essential CHA aldolase for catabolism of these compounds. Reverse transcription-PCR analysis revealed that the PCA 4,5-cleavage pathway genes of S. paucimobilis SYK-6 consisted of four transcriptional units, including the ligK-orf1-ligI-lsdA cluster, the ligJAB cluster, and the monocistronic ligR and ligC genes. PMID:12486039

  2. Characterization of the 4-carboxy-4-hydroxy-2-oxoadipate aldolase gene and operon structure of the protocatechuate 4,5-cleavage pathway genes in Sphingomonas paucimobilis SYK-6.

    PubMed

    Hara, Hirofumi; Masai, Eiji; Miyauchi, Keisuke; Katayama, Yoshihiro; Fukuda, Masao

    2003-01-01

    The protocatechuate (PCA) 4,5-cleavage pathway is the essential metabolic route for degradation of low-molecular-weight products derived from lignin by Sphingomonas paucimobilis SYK-6. In the 10.5-kb EcoRI fragment carrying the genes for PCA 4,5-dioxygenase (ligAB), 2-pyrone-4,6-dicarboxylate hydrolase (ligI), 4-oxalomesaconate hydratase (ligJ), and a part of 4-carboxy-2-hydroxymuconate-6-semialdehyde dehydrogenase (ligC), we found the ligK gene, which encodes 4-carboxy-4-hydroxy-2-oxoadipate (CHA) aldolase. The ligK gene was located 1,183 bp upstream of ligI and transcribed in the same direction as ligI. We also found the ligR gene encoding a LysR-type transcriptional activator, which was located 174 bp upstream of ligK. The ligK gene consists of a 684-bp open reading frame encoding a polypeptide with a molecular mass of 24,131 Da. The deduced amino acid sequence of ligK showed 57 to 88% identity with those of the corresponding genes recently reported in Sphingomonas sp. strain LB126, Comamonas testosteroni BR6020, Arthrobacter keyseri 12B, and Pseudomonas ochraceae NGJ1. The ligK gene was expressed in Escherichia coli, and the gene product (LigK) was purified to near homogeneity. Electrospray-ionization mass spectrometry indicated that LigK catalyzes not only the conversion of CHA to pyruvate and oxaloacetate but also that of oxaloacetate to pyruvate and CO(2). LigK is a hexamer, and its isoelectric point is 5.1. The K(m) for CHA and oxaloacetate are 11.2 and 136 micro M, respectively. Inactivation of ligK in S. paucimobilis SYK-6 resulted in the growth deficiency of vanillate and syringate, indicating that ligK encodes the essential CHA aldolase for catabolism of these compounds. Reverse transcription-PCR analysis revealed that the PCA 4,5-cleavage pathway genes of S. paucimobilis SYK-6 consisted of four transcriptional units, including the ligK-orf1-ligI-lsdA cluster, the ligJAB cluster, and the monocistronic ligR and ligC genes.

  3. Pan–ice-sheet glacier terminus change in East Antarctica reveals sensitivity of Wilkes Land to sea-ice changes

    PubMed Central

    Miles, Bertie W. J.; Stokes, Chris R.; Jamieson, Stewart S. R.

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of ocean-terminating outlet glaciers are an important component of ice-sheet mass balance. Using satellite imagery for the past 40 years, we compile an approximately decadal record of outlet-glacier terminus position change around the entire East Antarctic Ice Sheet (EAIS) marine margin. We find that most outlet glaciers retreated during the period 1974–1990, before switching to advance in every drainage basin during the two most recent periods, 1990–2000 and 2000–2012. The only exception to this trend was in Wilkes Land, where the majority of glaciers (74%) retreated between 2000 and 2012. We hypothesize that this anomalous retreat is linked to a reduction in sea ice and associated impacts on ocean stratification, which increases the incursion of warm deep water toward glacier termini. Because Wilkes Land overlies a large marine basin, it raises the possibility of a future sea level contribution from this sector of East Antarctica. PMID:27386519

  4. Pan-ice-sheet glacier terminus change in East Antarctica reveals sensitivity of Wilkes Land to sea-ice changes.

    PubMed

    Miles, Bertie W J; Stokes, Chris R; Jamieson, Stewart S R

    2016-05-01

    The dynamics of ocean-terminating outlet glaciers are an important component of ice-sheet mass balance. Using satellite imagery for the past 40 years, we compile an approximately decadal record of outlet-glacier terminus position change around the entire East Antarctic Ice Sheet (EAIS) marine margin. We find that most outlet glaciers retreated during the period 1974-1990, before switching to advance in every drainage basin during the two most recent periods, 1990-2000 and 2000-2012. The only exception to this trend was in Wilkes Land, where the majority of glaciers (74%) retreated between 2000 and 2012. We hypothesize that this anomalous retreat is linked to a reduction in sea ice and associated impacts on ocean stratification, which increases the incursion of warm deep water toward glacier termini. Because Wilkes Land overlies a large marine basin, it raises the possibility of a future sea level contribution from this sector of East Antarctica.

  5. N-terminus of seed caleosins is essential for lipid droplet sorting but not for lipid accumulation.

    PubMed

    Purkrtová, Zita; Chardot, Thierry; Froissard, Marine

    2015-08-01

    Caleosin, a calcium-binding protein associated with plant lipid droplets, stimulates lipid accumulation when heterologously expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Accumulated lipids are stored in cytoplasmic lipid droplets that are stabilised by incorporated caleosin. We designed a set of mutants affecting putative crucial sites for caleosin function and association with lipid droplets, i.e. the N-terminus, the EF-hand motif and the proline-knot motif. We investigated the effect of introduced mutations on caleosin capacity to initiate lipid accumulation and on caleosin sorting within cell as well as on its association with lipid droplets. Our results strongly suggest that the N-terminal domain is essential for proper protein sorting and targeting to lipid droplets but not for enhancing lipid accumulation. PMID:26032334

  6. Cutting Edge: Novel Tmem173 Allele Reveals Importance of STING N Terminus in Trafficking and Type I IFN Production.

    PubMed

    Surpris, Guy; Chan, Jennie; Thompson, Mikayla; Ilyukha, Vladimir; Liu, Beiyun C; Atianand, Maninjay; Sharma, Shruti; Volkova, Tatyana; Smirnova, Irina; Fitzgerald, Katherine A; Poltorak, Alexander

    2016-01-15

    With the stimulator of IFN genes (STING) C terminus being extensively studied, the role of the N-terminal domain (NTD) of STING remains an important subject of investigation. In this article, we identify novel mutations in NTD of Sting of the MOLF strain in response to HSV and Listeria monocytogenes both in vitro and in vivo. These mutations are responsible for low levels of IFN-β caused by failure of MOLF STING to translocate from the endoplasmic reticulum. These data provide evidence that the NTD of STING affects DNA responses via control of trafficking. They also show that the genetic diversity of wild-derived mice resembles the diversity observed in humans. Several human alleles of STING confer attenuated IFN-I production similar to what we observe with the MOLF Sting allele, a crucial functional difference not apparent in classical inbred mice. Thus, understanding the functional significance of polymorphisms in MOLF STING can provide basic mechanistic insights relevant to humans.

  7. Pan-ice-sheet glacier terminus change in East Antarctica reveals sensitivity of Wilkes Land to sea-ice changes.

    PubMed

    Miles, Bertie W J; Stokes, Chris R; Jamieson, Stewart S R

    2016-05-01

    The dynamics of ocean-terminating outlet glaciers are an important component of ice-sheet mass balance. Using satellite imagery for the past 40 years, we compile an approximately decadal record of outlet-glacier terminus position change around the entire East Antarctic Ice Sheet (EAIS) marine margin. We find that most outlet glaciers retreated during the period 1974-1990, before switching to advance in every drainage basin during the two most recent periods, 1990-2000 and 2000-2012. The only exception to this trend was in Wilkes Land, where the majority of glaciers (74%) retreated between 2000 and 2012. We hypothesize that this anomalous retreat is linked to a reduction in sea ice and associated impacts on ocean stratification, which increases the incursion of warm deep water toward glacier termini. Because Wilkes Land overlies a large marine basin, it raises the possibility of a future sea level contribution from this sector of East Antarctica. PMID:27386519

  8. The carboxyl terminus of human cytomegalovirus-encoded 7 transmembrane receptor US28 camouflages agonism by mediating constitutive endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Waldhoer, Maria; Casarosa, Paola; Rosenkilde, Mette M; Smit, Martine J; Leurs, Rob; Whistler, Jennifer L; Schwartz, Thue W

    2003-05-23

    US28 is one of four 7 transmembrane (7TM) chemokine receptors encoded by human cytomegalovirus and has been shown to both signal and endocytose in a ligand-independent, constitutively active manner. Here we show that the constitutive activity and constitutive endocytosis properties of US28 are separable entities in this viral chemokine receptor. We generated chimeric and mutant US28 proteins that were altered in either their constitutive endocytic (US28 Delta 300, US28 Delta 317, US28-NK1-ctail, and US28-ORF74-ctail) or signaling properties (US28R129A). By using this series of mutants, we show that the cytoplasmic tail domain of US28 per se regulates receptor endocytosis, independent of the signaling ability of the core domain of US28. The constitutive endocytic property of the US28 c-tail was transposable to other 7TM receptors, the herpes virus 8-encoded ORF74 and the tachykinin NK1 receptor (ORF74-US28-ctail and NK1-US28-ctail). Deletion of the US28 C terminus resulted in reduced constitutive endocytosis and consequently enhanced signaling capacity of all receptors tested as assessed by inositol phosphate turnover, NF-kappa B, and cAMP-responsive element-binding protein transcription assays. We further show that the constitutive endocytic property of US28 affects the action of its chemokine ligand fractalkine/CX3CL1 and show that in the absence of the US28 C terminus, fractalkine/CX3CL1 acts as an agonist on US28. This demonstrates for the first time that the endocytic properties of a 7TM receptor can camouflage the agonist properties of a ligand.

  9. Phosphorylation and cellular function of the human Rpa2 N-terminus in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Ghospurkar, Padmaja L; Wilson, Timothy M; Liu, Shengqin; Herauf, Anna; Steffes, Jenna; Mueller, Erica N; Oakley, Gregory G; Haring, Stuart J

    2015-02-01

    Maintenance of genome integrity is critical for proper cell growth. This occurs through accurate DNA replication and repair of DNA lesions. A key factor involved in both DNA replication and the DNA damage response is the heterotrimeric single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) binding complex Replication Protein A (RPA). Although the RPA complex appears to be structurally conserved throughout eukaryotes, the primary amino acid sequence of each subunit can vary considerably. Examination of sequence differences along with the functional interchangeability of orthologous RPA subunits or regions could provide insight into important regions and their functions. This might also allow for study in simpler systems. We determined that substitution of yeast Replication Factor A (RFA) with human RPA does not support yeast cell viability. Exchange of a single yeast RFA subunit with the corresponding human RPA subunit does not function due to lack of inter-species subunit interactions. Substitution of yeast Rfa2 with domains/regions of human Rpa2 important for Rpa2 function (i.e., the N-terminus and the loop 3-4 region) supports viability in yeast cells, and hybrid proteins containing human Rpa2 N-terminal phospho-mutations result in similar DNA damage phenotypes to analogous yeast Rfa2 N-terminal phospho-mutants. Finally, the human Rpa2 N-terminus (NT) fused to yeast Rfa2 is phosphorylated in a manner similar to human Rpa2 in human cells, indicating that conserved kinases recognize the human domain in yeast. The implication is that budding yeast represents a potential model system for studying not only human Rpa2 N-terminal phosphorylation, but also phosphorylation of Rpa2 N-termini from other eukaryotic organisms.

  10. Synthesis of [13C4]-labeled ∆9-tetrahydrocannabinol and 11-nor-9-carboxy-∆9-tetrahydrocannabinol as internal standards for reducing ion suppressing/alteration effects in LC/MS-MS quantification.

    PubMed

    Karlsen, Morten; Liu, Huiling; Johansen, Jon Eigill; Hoff, Bård Helge

    2014-09-01

    (-)-∆9-Tetrahydrocannabinol is the principal psychoactive component of the cannabis plant and also the active ingredient in some prescribed drugs. To detect and control misuse and monitor administration in clinical settings, reference samples of the native drugs and their metabolites are needed. The accuracy of liquid chromatography/mass spectrometric quantification of drugs in biological samples depends among others on ion suppressing/alteration effects. Especially, 13C-labeled drug analogues are useful for minimzing such interferences. Thus, to provide internal standards for more accurate quantification and for identification purpose, synthesis of [13C4]-∆9-tetrahydro-cannabinol and [13C4]-11-nor-9-carboxy-∆9-tetrahydrocannabinol was developed via [13C4]-olivetol. Starting from [13C4]-olivetol the synthesis of [13C4]-11-nor-9-carboxy-∆9-tetrahydrocannabinol was shortened from three to two steps by employing nitromethane as a co-solvent in condensation with (+)-apoverbenone.

  11. Activation of the Lbc Rho exchange factor proto-oncogene by truncation of an extended C terminus that regulates transformation and targeting.

    PubMed

    Sterpetti, P; Hack, A A; Bashar, M P; Park, B; Cheng, S D; Knoll, J H; Urano, T; Feig, L A; Toksoz, D

    1999-02-01

    The human lbc oncogene product is a guanine nucleotide exchange factor that specifically activates the Rho small GTP binding protein, thus resulting in biologically active, GTP-bound Rho, which in turn mediates actin cytoskeletal reorganization, gene transcription, and entry into the mitotic S phase. In order to elucidate the mechanism of onco-Lbc transformation, here we report that while proto- and onco-lbc cDNAs encode identical N-terminal dbl oncogene homology (DH) and pleckstrin homology (PH) domains, proto-Lbc encodes a novel C terminus absent in the oncoprotein that includes a predicted alpha-helical region homologous to cyto-matrix proteins, followed by a proline-rich region. The lbc proto-oncogene maps to chromosome 15, and onco-lbc represents a fusion of the lbc proto-oncogene N terminus with a short, unrelated C-terminal sequence from chromosome 7. Both onco- and proto-Lbc can promote formation of GTP-bound Rho in vivo. Proto-Lbc transforming activity is much reduced compared to that of onco-Lbc, and a significant increase in transforming activity requires truncation of both the alpha-helical and proline-rich regions in the proto-Lbc C terminus. Deletion of the chromosome 7-derived C terminus of onco-Lbc does not destroy transforming activity, demonstrating that it is loss of the proto-Lbc C terminus, rather than gain of an unrelated C-terminus by onco-Lbc, that confers transforming activity. Mutations of onco-Lbc DH and PH domains demonstrate that both domains are necessary for full transforming activity. The proto-Lbc product localizes to the particulate (membrane) fraction, while the majority of the onco-Lbc product is cytosolic, and mutations of the PH domain do not affect this localization. The proto-Lbc C-terminus alone localizes predominantly to the particulate fraction, indicating that the C terminus may play a major role in the correct subcellular localization of proto-Lbc, thus providing a mechanism for regulating Lbc oncogenic potential.

  12. Quantification of 11-Nor-9-Carboxy-Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol in Human Oral Fluid by Gas Chromatography–Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Allan J.; Scheidweiler, Karl B.; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2015-01-01

    A sensitive and specific method for the quantification of 11-nor-9-carboxy-Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THCCOOH) in oral fluid collected with the Quantisal and Oral-Eze devices was developed and fully validated. Extracted analytes were derivatized with hexafluoroisopropanol and trifluoroacetic anhydride and quantified by gas chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry with negative chemical ionization. Standard curves, using linear least-squares regression with 1/x2 weighting were linear from 10 to 1000 ng/L with coefficients of determination >0.998 for both collection devices. Bias was 89.2%–112.6%, total imprecision 4.0%–5.1% coefficient of variation, and extraction efficiency >79.8% across the linear range for Quantisal-collected specimens. Bias was 84.6%–109.3%, total imprecision 3.6%–7.3% coefficient of variation, and extraction efficiency >92.6% for specimens collected with the Oral-Eze device at all 3 quality control concentrations (10, 120, and 750 ng/L). This effective high-throughput method reduces analysis time by 9 minutes per sample compared with our current 2-dimensional gas chromatography–mass spectrometry method and extends the capability of quantifying this important oral fluid analyte to gas chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry. This method was applied to the analysis of oral fluid specimens collected from individuals participating in controlled cannabis studies and will be effective for distinguishing passive environmental contamination from active cannabis smoking. PMID:24622724

  13. Distribution of ∆(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol and 11-Nor-9-Carboxy-∆(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol Acid in Postmortem Biological Fluids and Tissues From Pilots Fatally Injured in Aviation Accidents.

    PubMed

    Kemp, Philip M; Cardona, Patrick S; Chaturvedi, Arvind K; Soper, John W

    2015-07-01

    Little is known of the postmortem distribution of ∆(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and its major metabolite, 11-nor-9-carboxy-∆(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THCCOOH). Data from 55 pilots involved in fatal aviation accidents are presented in this study. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis obtained mean THC concentrations in blood from multiple sites, liver, lung, and kidney of 15.6 ng/mL, 92.4 ng/g, 766.0 ng/g, 44.1 ng/g and mean THCCOOH concentrations of 35.9 ng/mL, 322.4 ng/g, 42.6 ng/g, 138.5 ng/g, respectively. Heart THC concentrations (two cases) were 184.4 and 759.3 ng/g, and corresponding THCCOOH measured 11.0 and 95.9 ng/g, respectively. Muscle concentrations for THC (two cases) were 16.6 and 2.5 ng/g; corresponding THCCOOH, "confirmed positive" and 1.4 ng/g. The only brain tested in this study showed no THC detected and 2.9 ng/g THCCOOH, low concentrations that correlated with low values in other specimens from this case. This research emphasizes the need for postmortem cannabinoid testing and demonstrates the usefulness of a number of tissues, most notably lung, for these analyses.

  14. Studies on the growth, spectral, structural, electrical, optical and mechanical properties of Uronium 3-carboxy-4-hydroxybenzenesulfonate single crystal for third-order nonlinear optical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silambarasan, A.; Krishna Kumar, M.; Thirunavukkarasu, A.; Md Zahid, I.; Mohan Kumar, R.; Umarani, P. R.

    2015-05-01

    Organic Uronium 3-carboxy-4-hydroxybenzenesulfonate (UCHBS) nonlinear optical single crystal was grown by solution growth technique. The solubility and nucleation studies were performed for UCHBS at different temperatures 30, 35, 40, 45, 50 and 55 °C. The crystal structure of UCHBS was elucidated from single crystal X-ray diffraction study. High resolution X-ray diffraction technique was employed to study the perfection and internal defects of UCHBS crystal. Infrared and Raman spectra were recorded to analyze the vibrational behavior of chemical bonds and its functional groups. The physico-chemical changes, stability and decomposition stages of the UCHBS compound were established by TG-DTA studies. The dielectric phenomenon of UCHBS crystal was studied at different temperatures with respect to frequency. Linear optical properties of transmittance, cut-off wavelength, band gap of UCHBS were found from UV-visible spectral studies. Third-order nonlinear optical susceptibility, nonlinear refractive index, nonlinear optical absorption coefficient values were measured by Z-scan technique. The mechanical properties of UCHBS crystal was studied by using Vicker's microhardness test. The growth features of UCHBS crystal were analyzed from etching studies.

  15. The Predictive Power of Serum α-Fetoprotein and Des-γ-Carboxy Prothrombin for Survival Varies by Tumor Size in Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Tsugawa, Daisuke; Fukumoto, Takumi; Kido, Masahiro; Takebe, Atsushi; Tanaka, Motofumi; Kuramitsu, Kaori; Matsumoto, Ippei; Ajiki, Tetsuo; Koyama, Tatsuki; Ku, Yonson

    2016-01-01

    Alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) and des-γ-carboxy prothrombin (DCP) are frequently used as tumor markers in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The authors hypothesized different patient populations with varying tumor sizes would influence the predictive power of tumor markers for survival in HCC patients. The authors investigated the influence of tumor size on predictive powers of AFP and DCP. 181 patients underwent hepatectomy for HCC from 2003 to 2008 at Kobe University Hospital. Tumor markers were measured before and at 1 month post-hepatectomy. The Cox proportional-hazards model revealed that preoperative serum AFP was associated with survival; its effects depended on tumor size. Hazard ratios (HRs) for preoperative AFP were maximum for medium-sized HCC, and for DCP, HRs were maximum in small-sized tumors. Post-hepatectomy, both tumor markers were associated with survival, revealing significant interactions with tumor size. HRs for postoperative AFP were greater than 1 for relatively wide range tumors (3-11 cm). HRs for postoperative DCP increased with tumor size, with a strong prognostic predictive power for tumors >5 cm. The predictive power of serum tumor markers varied by tumor size in HCC patients. By selecting the appropriate tumor marker, its predictive power can be improved. PMID:27363395

  16. Quantitative analysis of 11-nor-9-carboxy-tetrahydrocannbinol (THC-COOH) in urine by LC-MS/MS following a simple filtration.

    PubMed

    Rumpler, Marc J

    2014-04-15

    Quantification methods utilizing liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) are common in clinical and forensic toxicology laboratories and the efficiency and rapidity of such methods continues to evolve. In most cases, urine drug confirmation does not require a drug extraction and can quickly and easily be accomplished with a dilution followed by sample filtration. The report describes the validation of a simple confirmation method for 11-nor-9-carboxy-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC-COOH) and compared two types of filter extraction columns for sample clean-up. The method achieved a linear range of 10-3000ng/mL, acceptable bias (-4.7-2.6%) and precision (0.9-6.9%) and autosampler stability up to 72h. Universal filter columns offered less variable recovery over the linear range and fewer matrix interferences compared to THC-COOH specific filter columns. Authentic specimens testing positive for THC-COOH by LC-MS/MS were in good agreement with typically used GC-MS methods.

  17. Quantification of 11-Carboxy-Delta-9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC-COOH) in Meconium Using Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry (GC/MS).

    PubMed

    Peat, Judy; Davis, Brehon; Frazee, Clint; Garg, Uttam

    2016-01-01

    Maternal substance abuse is an ongoing concern and detecting drug use during pregnancy is an important component of neonatal care when drug abuse is suspected. Meconium is the preferred specimen for drug testing because it is easier to collect than neonatal urine and it provides a much broader time frame of drug exposure. We describe a method for quantifying 11-carboxy-delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC-COOH) in meconium. After adding a labeled internal standard (THC-COOH D9) and acetonitrile, samples are sonicated to release both free and conjugated THC-COOH. The acetonitrile/aqueous layer is removed and mixed with a strong base to hydrolyze the conjugated THC-COOH. The samples are then extracted with an organic solvent mixture as part of a sample "cleanup." The organic solvent layer is discarded and the remaining aqueous sample is acidified. Following extraction with a second organic mixture, the organic layer is removed and concentrated to dryness. The resulting residue is converted to a trimethylsilyl (TMS) derivative and analyzed using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) in selective ion monitoring (SIM) mode.

  18. Estimation of perimortal percent carboxy-heme in nonstandard postmortem specimens using analysis of carbon monoxide by GC/MS and iron by flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    Middleberg, R A; Easterling, D E; Zelonis, S F; Rieders, F; Rieders, M F

    1993-01-01

    In decomposed, formalin-fixed, embalmed, exhumed, and some fire-dried cases in which normal blood is unavailable, the usual methods for determination of carboxyhemoglobin saturation frequently fail. To address these specimens, a method utilizing both gas chromatography/mass spectrometric (GC/MS) determination of carbon monoxide (CO) and flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry (FAAS) determination of iron (Fe), in the same specimen, was developed. The method is reported here, along with its application to seven pertinent forsensic death investigations. The CO analytical methodology involves acid liberation of the gas from the specimen aliquot in a headspace vial. After heating and equilibrating, a sample of the headspace vapor is injected into the GC/MS system with a gastight syringe. Quantitation is achieved by standard addition comparison utilizing the ideal gas law equation. Iron is quantified by FAAS analysis of the same aliquot used for the CO determination, following nitric acid digestion. The concentration is determined by comparison to a standard curve. A formula for determining the minimum percent carboxy-heme saturation was derived by using the ratio of the amount of CO to the amount of Fe in the aliquot analyzed. Tissue types analyzed include spleen, liver, muscle, dried blood, and unspecified decomposed tissue.

  19. Hepatitis B Virus Nucleocapsids Formed by Carboxy-Terminally Mutated Core Proteins Contain Spliced Viral Genomes but Lack Full-Size DNA

    PubMed Central

    Köck, Josef; Nassal, Michael; Deres, Karl; Blum, Hubert E.; von Weizsäcker, Fritz

    2004-01-01

    The carboxy-terminal sequence of the hepatitis B virus (HBV) core protein constitutes a nucleic acid binding domain that is rich in arginine residues and contains three serine phosphorylation sites. While dispensable for capsid assembly, this domain is involved in viral replication, as demonstrated by the effects of mutations on RNA packaging and/or reverse transcription; however, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Here we tested a series of core protein mutants in which the three serine phosphorylation sites were replaced by glutamic acid, in parallel with a previously described deletion variant lacking the 19 C-terminal amino acid residues, for their ability to support viral replication in transfected hepatoma cells. Replacement of all serines and the deletion gave rise to nucleocapsids containing a smaller than wild-type DNA genome. Rather than a single-stranded DNA intermediate, as previously thought, this was a 2.0-kbp double-stranded DNA molecule derived from spliced pregenomic RNA (pgRNA). Interestingly, full-length pgRNA was associated with nucleocapsids but was found to be sensitive to nuclease digestion, while encapsidated spliced RNA and 3′ truncated RNA species were nuclease resistant. These findings suggest that HBV pgRNA encapsidation is directional and that a packaging limit is determined by the C-terminal portion of the core protein. PMID:15564489

  20. Quantification of 11-nor-9-carboxy-δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol in human oral fluid by gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Allan J; Scheidweiler, Karl B; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2014-04-01

    A sensitive and specific method for the quantification of 11-nor-9-carboxy-Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THCCOOH) in oral fluid collected with the Quantisal and Oral-Eze devices was developed and fully validated. Extracted analytes were derivatized with hexafluoroisopropanol and trifluoroacetic anhydride and quantified by gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry with negative chemical ionization. Standard curves, using linear least-squares regression with 1/x weighting were linear from 10 to 1000 ng/L with coefficients of determination >0.998 for both collection devices. Bias was 89.2%-112.6%, total imprecision 4.0%-5.1% coefficient of variation, and extraction efficiency >79.8% across the linear range for Quantisal-collected specimens. Bias was 84.6%-109.3%, total imprecision 3.6%-7.3% coefficient of variation, and extraction efficiency >92.6% for specimens collected with the Oral-Eze device at all 3 quality control concentrations (10, 120, and 750 ng/L). This effective high-throughput method reduces analysis time by 9 minutes per sample compared with our current 2-dimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method and extends the capability of quantifying this important oral fluid analyte to gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. This method was applied to the analysis of oral fluid specimens collected from individuals participating in controlled cannabis studies and will be effective for distinguishing passive environmental contamination from active cannabis smoking. PMID:24622724

  1. Investigation of the transformation of 11-nor-9-carboxy-Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol during water chlorination by liquid chromatography-quadrupole-time-of-flight-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    González-Mariño, Iria; Rodríguez, Isaac; Quintana, José Benito; Cela, Rafael

    2013-10-15

    The stability of the main metabolite of cannabis, (±)-11-nor-9-carboxy-Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THCCOOH), during water chlorination has been investigated. THCCOOH was degraded in few seconds following a pseudo-first order kinetics. Sample pH turned out to be a significant factor, decreasing THCCOOH half-life with an increase in its values. Seven by-products could be positively identified from accurate mass measurements: three compounds resulted from electrophilic substitutions of hydrogen per chlorine (or bromine) in the aromatic ring, whereas the formation of the remaining four involved additional reactions in the C-C double bond (hydration and halogenation). The software predicted toxicity of these products towards Daphnia magna indicates that they are expected to have toxicity values similar or higher than its precursor compound. Experiments conducted with diluted urine showed that THCCOOH was stable in this matrix, probably due to a rapid and complete reaction between chlorine and other organic constituents already present in the samples. In real surface waters, the extent of the reaction was also affected by the organic matter content, and so THCCOOH was rapidly degraded in samples scarcely affected by human activities, being more stable in waters with a higher level of pollution. PMID:23995559

  2. A conserved carboxy-terminal domain in the major tegument structural protein VP22 facilitates virion packaging of a chimeric protein during productive herpes simplex virus 1 infection

    SciTech Connect

    Schlegel, Elisabeth F.M.; Blaho, John A.

    2009-05-10

    Recombinant virus HSV-1(RF177) was previously generated to examine tegument protein VP22 function by inserting the GFP gene into the gene encoding VP22. During a detailed analysis of this virus, we discovered that RF177 produces a novel fusion protein between the last 15 amino acids of VP22 and GFP, termed GCT-VP22. Thus, the VP22 carboxy-terminal specific antibody 22-3 and two anti-GFP antibodies reacted with an approximately 28 kDa protein from RF177-infected Vero cells. GCT-VP22 was detected at 1 and 3 hpi. Examination of purified virions indicated that GCT-VP22 was incorporated into RF177 virus particles. These observations imply that at least a portion of the information required for virion targeting is located in this domain of VP22. Indirect immunofluorescence analyses showed that GCT-VP22 also localized to areas of marginalized chromatin during RF177 infection. These results indicate that the last fifteen amino acids of VP22 participate in virion targeting during HSV-1 infection.

  3. Estimation of perimortal percent carboxy-heme in nonstandard postmortem specimens using analysis of carbon monoxide by GC/MS and iron by flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    Middleberg, R A; Easterling, D E; Zelonis, S F; Rieders, F; Rieders, M F

    1993-01-01

    In decomposed, formalin-fixed, embalmed, exhumed, and some fire-dried cases in which normal blood is unavailable, the usual methods for determination of carboxyhemoglobin saturation frequently fail. To address these specimens, a method utilizing both gas chromatography/mass spectrometric (GC/MS) determination of carbon monoxide (CO) and flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry (FAAS) determination of iron (Fe), in the same specimen, was developed. The method is reported here, along with its application to seven pertinent forsensic death investigations. The CO analytical methodology involves acid liberation of the gas from the specimen aliquot in a headspace vial. After heating and equilibrating, a sample of the headspace vapor is injected into the GC/MS system with a gastight syringe. Quantitation is achieved by standard addition comparison utilizing the ideal gas law equation. Iron is quantified by FAAS analysis of the same aliquot used for the CO determination, following nitric acid digestion. The concentration is determined by comparison to a standard curve. A formula for determining the minimum percent carboxy-heme saturation was derived by using the ratio of the amount of CO to the amount of Fe in the aliquot analyzed. Tissue types analyzed include spleen, liver, muscle, dried blood, and unspecified decomposed tissue. PMID:8429619

  4. Distribution of ∆(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol and 11-Nor-9-Carboxy-∆(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol Acid in Postmortem Biological Fluids and Tissues From Pilots Fatally Injured in Aviation Accidents.

    PubMed

    Kemp, Philip M; Cardona, Patrick S; Chaturvedi, Arvind K; Soper, John W

    2015-07-01

    Little is known of the postmortem distribution of ∆(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and its major metabolite, 11-nor-9-carboxy-∆(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THCCOOH). Data from 55 pilots involved in fatal aviation accidents are presented in this study. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis obtained mean THC concentrations in blood from multiple sites, liver, lung, and kidney of 15.6 ng/mL, 92.4 ng/g, 766.0 ng/g, 44.1 ng/g and mean THCCOOH concentrations of 35.9 ng/mL, 322.4 ng/g, 42.6 ng/g, 138.5 ng/g, respectively. Heart THC concentrations (two cases) were 184.4 and 759.3 ng/g, and corresponding THCCOOH measured 11.0 and 95.9 ng/g, respectively. Muscle concentrations for THC (two cases) were 16.6 and 2.5 ng/g; corresponding THCCOOH, "confirmed positive" and 1.4 ng/g. The only brain tested in this study showed no THC detected and 2.9 ng/g THCCOOH, low concentrations that correlated with low values in other specimens from this case. This research emphasizes the need for postmortem cannabinoid testing and demonstrates the usefulness of a number of tissues, most notably lung, for these analyses. PMID:25800046

  5. Investigation into the Mode of Phosphate Activation in the 4-Hydroxy-4-Methyl-2-Oxoglutarate/4-Carboxy-4-Hydroxy-2-Oxoadipate Aldolase from Pseudomonas putida F1

    PubMed Central

    Mazurkewich, Scott; Seah, Stephen Y. K.

    2016-01-01

    The 4-hydroxy-4-methyl-2-oxoglutarate (HMG)/4-carboxy-4-hydroxy-2-oxoadipate (CHA) aldolase is the last enzyme of both the gallate and protocatechuate 4,5-cleavage pathways which links aromatic catabolism to central cellular metabolism. The enzyme is a class II, divalent metal dependent, aldolase which is activated in the presence of inorganic phosphate (Pi), increasing its turnover rate >10-fold. This phosphate activation is unique for a class II aldolase. The aldolase pyruvate methyl proton exchange rate, a probe of the general acid half reaction, was increased 300-fold in the presence of 1 mM Pi and the rate enhancement followed saturation kinetics giving rise to a KM of 397 ± 30 μM. Docking studies revealed a potential Pi binding site close to, or overlapping with, the proposed general acid water site. Putative Pi binding residues were substituted by site-directed mutagenesis which resulted in reductions of Pi activation. Significantly, the active site residue Arg-123, known to be critical for the catalytic mechanism of the enzyme, was also implicated in supporting Pi mediated activation. PMID:27741265

  6. Structure of human glycolate oxidase in complex with the inhibitor 4-carboxy-5-[(4-chlorophenyl)sulfanyl]-1,2,3-thiadiazole

    PubMed Central

    Bourhis, Jean-Marie; Vignaud, Caroline; Pietrancosta, Nicolas; Guéritte, Françoise; Guénard, Daniel; Lederer, Florence; Lindqvist, Ylva

    2009-01-01

    Glycolate oxidase, a peroxisomal flavoenzyme, generates glyoxylate at the expense of oxygen. When the normal metabolism of glyoxylate is impaired by the mutations that are responsible for the genetic diseases hyperoxaluria types 1 and 2, glyoxylate yields oxalate, which forms insoluble calcium deposits, particularly in the kidneys. Glycolate oxidase could thus be an interesting therapeutic target. The crystal structure of human glycolate oxidase (hGOX) in complex with 4-carboxy-5-[(4-chlorophenyl)sulfanyl]-1,2,3-thiadiazole (CCPST) has been determined at 2.8 Å resolution. The inhibitor heteroatoms interact with five active-site residues that have been implicated in catalysis in homologous flavodehydrogenases of l-2-hydroxy acids. In addition, the chlorophenyl substituent is surrounded by nonconserved hydrophobic residues. The present study highlights the role of mobility in ligand binding by glycolate oxidase. In addition, it pinpoints several structural differences between members of the highly conserved family of flavodehydrogenases of l-2-hydroxy acids. PMID:20054120

  7. The effects of vitamin K on the generation of des-gamma-carboxy prothrombin (PIVKA-II) in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Sakon, M; Monden, M; Gotoh, M; Kobayashi, K; Kanai, T; Umeshita, K; Endoh, W; Mori, T

    1991-03-01

    The clinical significance of des-gamma-carboxy prothrombin (PIVKA-II) in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) was investigated in 112 patients with and without vitamin K administration. The positivity rate of PIVKA-II was significantly decreased in patients receiving vitamin K (28.5%), compared with those without vitamin K administration (54.5%, p less than 0.05). The plasma levels of vitamin K derivatives [phylloquinone (VK1), menaquinone-4 (MK4), and menaquinone-7 (MK7)] measured were not decreased in patients with HCC, but were significantly increased in MK4 and VK1 + MK4 + MK7. The amount of PIVKA-II in plasma did not correlate with the plasma levels of vitamin K derivatives. However, PIVKA-II was decreased by the administration of vitamin K, and all of the six patients with more than 5.0 ng/ml of VK1 + MK4 + MK7 were within normal limits, whereas half of 32 patients with less than that had abnormal levels of PIVKA-II. Thus, it was suggested that PIVKA-II was not elevated due to vitamin K deficiency, but might result from the impaired metabolism or availability of vitamin K in the tumor. Therefore, PIVKA-II should be measured without vitamin K administration.

  8. Hormonogenic donor Tyr2522 of bovine thyroglobulin. Insight into preferential T3 formation at thyroglobulin carboxyl terminus at low iodination level

    SciTech Connect

    Cetrangolo, Giovanni Paolo; Arcaro, Alessia; Lepore, Alessio; Graf, Maria; Mamone, Gianfranco; Ferranti, Pasquale; Palumbo, Giuseppe; Gentile, Fabrizio

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • A carboxy-terminal fragment (residues 2515–2750) was isolated from a low-iodine bTg. • Post-translational status of 8 tyrosines in bTg region 2515–2750 was assessed by MS. • Tyr2522 of bovine Tg is an interspecifically conserved hormonogenic donor site. • Propensities of Tyr residues to mono or diiodination optimize T3 yield from Tyr2748. - Abstract: A tryptic fragment (b5{sub TR,NR}), encompassing residues 2515–2750, was isolated from a low-iodine (0.26% by mass) bovine thyroglobulin, by limited proteolysis with trypsin and preparative, continuous-elution SDS–PAGE. The fragment was digested with Asp-N endoproteinase and analyzed by reverse-phase HPLC electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry, revealing the formation of: 3-monoiodotyrosine and dehydroalanine from Tyr2522; 3-monoiodotyrosine from Tyr2555 and Tyr2569; 3-monoiodotyrosine and 3,5-diiodotyrosine from Tyr2748. The data presented document, by direct mass spectrometric identifications, efficient iodophenoxyl ring transfer from monoiodinated hormonogenic donor Tyr2522 and efficient mono- and diiodination of hormonogenic acceptor Tyr2748, under conditions which permitted only limited iodination of Tyr2555 and Tyr2569, in low-iodine bovine thyroglobulin. The present study thereby provides: (1) a rationale for the preferential synthesis of T3 at the carboxy-terminal end of thyroglobulin, at low iodination level; (2) confirmation for the presence of an interspecifically conserved hormonogenic donor site in the carboxy-terminal domain of thyroglobulin; (3) solution for a previous uncertainty, concerning the precise location of such donor site in bovine thyroglobulin.

  9. A d-Amino Acid at the N-Terminus of a Protein Abrogates Its Degradation by the N-End Rule Pathway

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotes have evolved the ubiquitin (Ub)/proteasome system to degrade polypeptides. The Ub/proteasome system is one way that cells regulate cytosolic protein and amino acids levels through the recognition and ubiquitination of a protein’s N-terminus via E1, E2, and E3 enzymes. The process by which the N-terminus stimulates intracellular protein degradation is referred to as the N-end rule. Characterization of the N-end rule has been limited to only the natural l-amino acids. Using a cytosolic delivery platform derived from anthrax lethal toxin, we probed the stability of mixed chirality proteins, containing one d-amino acid on the N-terminus of otherwise all l-proteins. In all cases, we observed that one N-terminal d-amino acid stabilized the cargo protein to proteasomal degradation with respect to the N-end rule. We found that since the mixed chirality proteins were not polyubiquitinated, they evaded N-end-mediated proteasomal degradation. Evidently, a subtle change on the N-terminus of a natural protein can enhance its intracellular lifetime. PMID:26807441

  10. The myristoylated amino terminus of Galpha(i)(1) plays a critical role in the structure and function of Galpha(i)(1) subunits in solution.

    PubMed

    Preininger, Anita M; Van Eps, Ned; Yu, Nan-Jun; Medkova, Martina; Hubbell, Wayne L; Hamm, Heidi E

    2003-07-01

    To determine the role of the myristoylated amino terminus of Galpha in G protein activation, nine individual cysteine mutations along the myristoylated amino terminus of Galpha(i) were expressed in a functionally Cys-less background. Thiol reactive EPR and fluorescent probes were attached to each site as local reporters of mobility and conformational changes upon activation of Galpha(i)GDP by AlF(4)(-), as well as binding to Gbetagamma. EPR and steady state fluorescence anisotropy are consistent with a high degree of immobility for labeled residues in solution all along the amino terminus of myristoylated Galpha(i). This is in contrast to the high mobility of this region in nonmyristoylated Galpha(i) [Medkova, M., et al. (2002) Biochemistry 41, 9962-9972]. Steady state fluorescence measurements revealed pronounced increases in fluorescence upon activation for residues 14-17 and 21 located midway through the 30-amino acid stretch comprising the amino-terminal region. Collectively, the data suggest that myristoylation is an important structural determinant of the amino terminus of Galpha(i) proteins. PMID:12834345

  11. Enhancing the Predictive Power of Mutations in the C-Terminus of the KCNQ1-Encoded Kv7.1 Voltage-Gated Potassium Channel

    PubMed Central

    Kapplinger, Jamie D.; Tseng, Andrew S.; Salisbury, Benjamin A.; Tester, David J.; Callis, Thomas E.; Alders, Marielle; Wilde, Arthur A.M.; Ackerman, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the overrepresentation of Kv7.1 mutations among patients with a robust diagnosis of LQTS, a background rate of innocuous Kv7.1 missense variants observed in healthy controls creates ambiguity in the interpretation of LQTS genetic test results. A recent study showed the probability of pathogenicity for rare missense mutations depends in part on the topological location of the variant in Kv7.1’s various structure-function domains. Since the Kv7.1 C-terminus accounts for nearly 50% of the overall protein and nearly 50% of the overall background rate of rare variants falls within the C-terminus, further enhancement in mutation calling may provide guidance in distinguishing pathogenic LQT1-causing mutations from non-disease causing rare variants in Kv7.1’s C-terminus. Therefore, we have used conservation analysis and a large case/control study to generate topology-based estimative predictive values to aid in interpretation; identifying three regions of high conservation within the Kv7.1 C-terminus which have a high probability of LQT1 pathogenicity. PMID:25854863

  12. Posttranslational modification at the N terminus of the human adenovirus type 12 E1A 235R tumor antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Lucher, L A; Brackmann, K H; Symington, J S; Green, M

    1986-01-01

    The adenovirus E1A transforming region, which encodes immortalization, partial cell transformation, and gene activation functions, expresses two early mRNAs, 13S and 12S. Multiple-T antigen species with different electrophoretic mobilities are formed from each mRNA, presumably by unknown posttranslational modifications. The adenovirus type 12 (Ad12) 13S and 12S mRNAs encode E1A T antigens of 266 and 235 amino acid residues (266R and 235R), respectively. To study possible posttranslational processing at the N and C termini and to distinguish between the Ad12 266R and 235R T antigens, we prepared antibodies targeted to synthetic peptides encoded at the common C (peptide 204) and N (peptide 202) termini of the 266R and 235R T antigens and at the unique internal domain of the 266R T antigen (peptide 206). The specificity of each anti-peptide antibody was confirmed by immunoprecipitation of the 266R and 235R T antigens produced in Escherichia coli. Immunoprecipitation analysis of the E1A T antigens synthesized in Ad12-infected KB cells revealed the following. Antibody to the common C terminus recognized three T antigens with apparent Mrs of 43,000, 42,000, and 39,000 (43K, 42K, and 39K). All three forms were phosphorylated and were present in both the nucleus and the cytoplasm. The 43K and 42K T antigens were rapidly synthesized during a 10-min pulse with [35S]methionine in Ad12-infected cells. The 43K T antigen had a half-life of 20 min, the 42K T antigen had a longer half-life of about 40 min, and the 39K T antigen became the predominant E1A T antigen. Antibodies to the unique region immunoprecipitated the 43K T antigen but not the 42K and 39K T antigens. Antibody to the N terminus immunoprecipitated the 43K and 42K T antigens but not the 39K T antigen, suggesting that the 39K T antigen possessed a modified N terminus. Partial N-terminal amino acid sequence analysis showed that the 43K and 42K T antigens contain methionine at residues 1 and 5, as predicted from the

  13. Arg333 and Arg334 in the COOH terminus of the human P2Y1 receptor are crucial for Gq coupling.

    PubMed

    Ding, Zhongren; Tuluc, Florin; Bandivadekar, Kavita R; Zhang, Lili; Jin, Jianguo; Kunapuli, Satya P

    2005-03-01

    The P2Y(1) ADP receptor activates G(q) and causes increases in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration through stimulation of PLC. In this study, we investigated the role of the amino acid residues in the COOH terminus of the human P2Y(1) receptor in G(q) activation. Stimulation of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1) cells stably expressing the wild-type human P2Y(1) receptor (P2Y(1)-WT cells), P2Y(1)-DeltaR340-L373, or P2Y(1)-DeltaD356-L373 with 2-methylthio-ADP (2-MeSADP) caused inositol phosphate production. In contrast, cells expressing P2Y(1)-DeltaT330-L373, a mutant lacking the entire COOH terminus, completely lost their response to 2-MeSADP. Similar data were obtained by using these cell lines and measuring Ca(2+) mobilization upon stimulation with 2-MeSADP, indicating that the 10 amino acids (330TFRRRLSRAT339) in the COOH terminus of the human P2Y(1) receptor are essential for G(q) coupling. Radioligand binding demonstrated that both the P2Y(1)-WT and P2Y(1)-DeltaT330-L373-expressing cells have almost equal binding of [(3)H]MRS2279, a P2Y(1) receptor antagonist, indicating that COOH-terminal truncation did not drastically affect the conformation of the receptor. CHO-K1 cells expressing a chimeric P2Y(12) receptor with the P2Y(1) COOH terminus failed to elicit G(q) functional responses, indicating that the P2Y(1) COOH terminus is essential but not sufficient for G(q) activation. Finally, cells expressing a double-mutant P2Y(1) receptor (R333A/R334A) in the conserved BBXXB region of the COOH terminus of the G(q)-activating P2Y receptors completely lost their functional ability to activate G(q). We conclude that the two arginine residues (R333R334) in the COOH terminus of the human P2Y(1) receptor are essential for G(q) coupling.

  14. Protein kinase A regulation of P2X(4) receptors: requirement for a specific motif in the C-terminus.

    PubMed

    Brown, David A; Yule, David I

    2010-02-01

    The P2X purinergic receptor sub-family of ligand-gated ion channels are subject to protein kinase modulation. We have previously demonstrated that P2X(4)R signaling can be positively regulated by increasing intracellular cAMP levels. The molecular mechanism underlying this effect was, however, unknown. The present study initially addressed whether protein kinase A (PKA) activation was required. Subsequently a mutational approach was utilized to determine which region of the receptor was required for this potentiation. In both DT-40 3KO and HEK-293 cells transiently expressing P2X(4)R, forskolin treatment enhanced ATP-mediated signaling. Specific PKA inhibitors prevented the forskolin-induced enhancement of ATP-mediated inward currents in P2X(4)R expressing HEK-293 cells. To define which region of the P2X(4)R was required for the potentiation, mutations were generated in the cytoplasmic C-terminal tail. It was determined that a limited region of the C-terminus, consisting of a non-canonical tyrosine based sorting motif, was required for the effects of PKA. Of note, this region does not harbor any recognizable PKA phosphorylation motifs, and no direct phosphorylation of P2X(4)R was detected, suggesting that PKA phosphorylation of an accessory protein interacts with the endocytosis motif in the C-terminus of the P2X(4)R. In support of this notion, using Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Microscopy (TIRF)\\ P2X(4)-EGFP was shown to accumulate at/near the plasma membrane following forskolin treatment. In addition, disrupting the endocytosis machinery using a dominant-negative dynamin construct also prevented the PKA-mediated enhancement of ATP-stimulated Ca(2+) signals. Our results are consistent with a novel mechanism of P2XR regulation, whereby PKA activity, without directly phosphorylating P2X(4)R, markedly enhances ATP-stimulated P2X(4)R currents and hence cytosolic Ca(2+) signals. This may occur at least in part, by altering the trafficking of a population of

  15. A highly conserved motif at the COOH terminus dictates endoplasmic reticulum exit and cell surface expression of NKCC2.

    PubMed

    Zaarour, Nancy; Demaretz, Sylvie; Defontaine, Nadia; Mordasini, David; Laghmani, Kamel

    2009-08-01

    Mutations in the apically located Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) co-transporter, NKCC2, lead to type I Bartter syndrome, a life-threatening kidney disorder, yet the mechanisms underlying the regulation of mutated NKCC2 proteins in renal cells have not been investigated. Here, we identified a trihydrophobic motif in the distal COOH terminus of NKCC2 that was required for endoplasmic reticulum (ER) exit and surface expression of the co-transporter. Indeed, microscopic confocal imaging showed that a naturally occurring mutation depriving NKCC2 of its distal COOH-terminal region results in the absence of cell surface expression. Biotinylation assays revealed that lack of cell surface expression was associated with abolition of mature complex-glycosylated NKCC2. Pulse-chase analysis demonstrated that the absence of mature protein was not caused by reduced synthesis or increased rates of degradation of mutant co-transporters. Co-immunolocalization experiments revealed that these mutants co-localized with the ER marker protein-disulfide isomerase, demonstrating that they are retained in the ER. Cell treatment with proteasome or lysosome inhibitors failed to restore the loss of complex-glycosylated NKCC2, further eliminating the possibility that mutant co-transporters were processed by the Golgi apparatus. Serial truncation of the NKCC2 COOH terminus, followed by site-directed mutagenesis, identified hydrophobic residues (1081)LLV(1083) as an ER exit signal necessary for maturation of NKCC2. Mutation of (1081)LLV(1083) to AAA within the context of the full-length protein prevented NKCC2 ER exit independently of the expression system. This trihydrophobic motif is highly conserved in the COOH-terminal tails of all members of the cation-chloride co-transporter family, and thus may function as a common motif mediating their transport from the ER to the cell surface. Taken together, these data are consistent with a model whereby naturally occurring premature terminations that interfere with

  16. Three families with autosomal dominant nephrogenic diabetes insipidus caused by aquaporin-2 mutations in the C-terminus.

    PubMed

    Kuwahara, M; Iwai, K; Ooeda, T; Igarashi, T; Ogawa, E; Katsushima, Y; Shinbo, I; Uchida, S; Terada, Y; Arthus, M F; Lonergan, M; Fujiwara, T M; Bichet, D G; Marumo, F; Sasaki, S

    2001-10-01

    The vasopressin-regulated water channel aquaporin-2 (AQP2) is known to tetramerize in the apical membrane of the renal tubular cells and contributes to urine concentration. We identified three novel mutations, each in a single allele of exon 4 of the AQP2 gene, in three families showing autosomal dominant nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI). These mutations were found in the C-terminus of AQP2: a deletion of G at nucleotide 721 (721 delG), a deletion of 10 nucleotides starting at nucleotide 763 (763-772del), and a deletion of 7 nucleotides starting at nucleotide 812 (812-818del). The wild-type AQP2 is predicted to be a 271-amino acid protein, whereas these mutant genes are predicted to encode proteins that are 330-333 amino acids in length, because of the frameshift mutations. Interestingly, these three mutant AQP2s shared the same C-terminal tail of 61 amino acids. In Xenopus oocytes injected with mutant AQP2 cRNAs, the osmotic water permeability (Pf) was much smaller than that of oocytes with the AQP2 wild-type (14%-17%). Immunoblot analysis of the lysates of the oocytes expressing the mutant AQP2s detected a band at 34 kD, whereas the immunoblot of the plasma-membrane fractions of the oocytes and immunocytochemistry failed to show a significant surface expression, suggesting a defect in trafficking of these mutant proteins. Furthermore, coinjection of wild-type cRNAs with mutant cRNAs markedly decreased the oocyte Pf in parallel with the surface expression of the wild-type AQP2. Immunoprecipitation with antibodies against wild-type and mutant AQP2 indicated the formation of mixed oligomers composed of wild-type and mutant AQP2 monomers. Our results suggest that the trafficking of mutant AQP2 is impaired because of elongation of the C-terminal tail, and the dominant-negative effect is attributed to oligomerization of the wild-type and mutant AQP2s. Segregation of the mutations in the C-terminus of AQP2 with dominant-type NDI underlies the importance of this

  17. The N-Terminus of the Floral Arabidopsis TGA Transcription Factor PERIANTHIA Mediates Redox-Sensitive DNA-Binding

    PubMed Central

    Gutsche, Nora; Zachgo, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    The Arabidopsis TGA transcription factor (TF) PERIANTHIA (PAN) regulates the formation of the floral organ primordia as revealed by the pan mutant forming an abnormal pentamerous arrangement of the outer three floral whorls. The Arabidopsis TGA bZIP TF family comprises 10 members, of which PAN and TGA9/10 control flower developmental processes and TGA1/2/5/6 participate in stress-responses. For the TGA1 protein it was shown that several cysteines can be redox-dependently modified. TGA proteins interact in the nucleus with land plant-specific glutaredoxins, which may alter their activities posttranslationally. Here, we investigated the DNA-binding of PAN to the AAGAAT motif under different redox-conditions. The AAGAAT motif is localized in the second intron of the floral homeotic regulator AGAMOUS (AG), which controls stamen and carpel development as well as floral determinacy. Whereas PAN protein binds to this regulatory cis-element under reducing conditions, the interaction is strongly reduced under oxidizing conditions in EMSA studies. The redox-sensitive DNA-binding is mediated via a special PAN N-terminus, which is not present in other Arabidopsis TGA TFs and comprises five cysteines. Two N-terminal PAN cysteines, Cys68 and Cys87, were shown to form a disulfide bridge and Cys340, localized in a C-terminal putative transactivation domain, can be S-glutathionylated. Comparative land plant analyses revealed that the AAGAAT motif exists in asterid and rosid plant species. TGA TFs with N-terminal extensions of variable length were identified in all analyzed seed plants. However, a PAN-like N-terminus exists only in the rosids and exclusively Brassicaceae homologs comprise four to five of the PAN N-terminal cysteines. Redox-dependent modifications of TGA cysteines are known to regulate the activity of stress-related TGA TFs. Here, we show that the N-terminal PAN cysteines participate in a redox-dependent control of the PAN interaction with a highly conserved

  18. Interaction of the N-terminus of sterol carrier protein 2 with membranes: role of membrane curvature.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, H; Ball, J M; Billheimer, J T; Schroeder, F

    1999-01-01

    Although neither the physiological function nor the mechanism of action of sterol carrier protein 2 (SCP(2)) is yet completely clear, it is thought that SCP(2) interacts with membranes to elicit its biological effects. The results presented here show that the SCP(2) N-terminus, composed of two amphipathic alpha-helices, interacted preferentially with highly curved but not lower-curvature membranes containing anionic phospholipid. CD spectra of SCP(2) showed up to 1. 2-fold increased alpha-helical content, on the interaction of SCP(2) with small unilamellar vesicles (SUV) (median radius 10-14 nm) but less with large unilamellar vesicles (LUV) (median radius 52-60 nm). Although enhanced interaction with the SUV membranes was due in part to the radius of curvature and to the greater exposure of acidic phospholipid in the outer leaflet of the bilayer, simply increasing the molar percentage of acidic phospholipid in the LUV membranes had much less effect on SCP(2) binding. A similar preferential interaction was observed with highly curved SUV as opposed to LUV for the SCP(2) N-terminal peptide (1-32)SCP(2) as well as structurally modified peptides in the order (1-32)SCP(2)=(10-32)SCP(2)>(1-24)SCP(2)>>(1-E20-32)SCP(2). The CD results were confirmed with an independent filtration binding assay, which showed that SCP(2) bound 5-fold more to SUV than LUV, whereas its N-terminal peptides bound up to 4-fold better in the order (1-32)SCP(2)=(10-32)SCP(2)>(1-24)SCP(2)>(1-E20-32)SCP(2). Finally, cholesterol potentiated the binding of SCP(2) and N-terminal peptides to anionic-phospholipid-containing SUV but not LUV. These findings were consistent with the SCP(2) N-terminus being a membrane-binding domain that was highly dependent on membrane surface curvature as well as on lipid composition. PMID:10567245

  19. The N-Terminus of the Floral Arabidopsis TGA Transcription Factor PERIANTHIA Mediates Redox-Sensitive DNA-Binding.

    PubMed

    Gutsche, Nora; Zachgo, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    The Arabidopsis TGA transcription factor (TF) PERIANTHIA (PAN) regulates the formation of the floral organ primordia as revealed by the pan mutant forming an abnormal pentamerous arrangement of the outer three floral whorls. The Arabidopsis TGA bZIP TF family comprises 10 members, of which PAN and TGA9/10 control flower developmental processes and TGA1/2/5/6 participate in stress-responses. For the TGA1 protein it was shown that several cysteines can be redox-dependently modified. TGA proteins interact in the nucleus with land plant-specific glutaredoxins, which may alter their activities posttranslationally. Here, we investigated the DNA-binding of PAN to the AAGAAT motif under different redox-conditions. The AAGAAT motif is localized in the second intron of the floral homeotic regulator AGAMOUS (AG), which controls stamen and carpel development as well as floral determinacy. Whereas PAN protein binds to this regulatory cis-element under reducing conditions, the interaction is strongly reduced under oxidizing conditions in EMSA studies. The redox-sensitive DNA-binding is mediated via a special PAN N-terminus, which is not present in other Arabidopsis TGA TFs and comprises five cysteines. Two N-terminal PAN cysteines, Cys68 and Cys87, were shown to form a disulfide bridge and Cys340, localized in a C-terminal putative transactivation domain, can be S-glutathionylated. Comparative land plant analyses revealed that the AAGAAT motif exists in asterid and rosid plant species. TGA TFs with N-terminal extensions of variable length were identified in all analyzed seed plants. However, a PAN-like N-terminus exists only in the rosids and exclusively Brassicaceae homologs comprise four to five of the PAN N-terminal cysteines. Redox-dependent modifications of TGA cysteines are known to regulate the activity of stress-related TGA TFs. Here, we show that the N-terminal PAN cysteines participate in a redox-dependent control of the PAN interaction with a highly conserved

  20. Serratia ATP-binding cassette protein exporter, Lip, recognizes a protein region upstream of the C terminus for specific secretion.

    PubMed

    Omori, K; Idei, A; Akatsuka, H

    2001-07-20

    Serratia marcescens ATP-binding cassette (ABC) exporter, the Lip system, secretes lipase (LipA(SM)), metalloproteases, and a cell surface layer protein homologue but not a heme acquisition protein, HasA (HasA(SM)). Secretion of HasA(SM) is limited to the Has(SM) system. However, HasA proteins from Pseudomonas fluorescens (HasA(PF)) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were exported through the Lip and Has(SM) systems. To investigate the specificity in Lip exporter-mediated secretion, secretion analysis was performed using chimeras containing the HasA(PF) and HasA(SM) sequences. The segment Val-Ala-Leu (designated R1 to R3 sites), which is present close to the C terminus of HasA(PF) but not HasA(SM), was revealed to be involved in the substrate specificity of the Lip exporter. Introduction of amino acid substitutions into the R1-R5 region demonstrated that R1, R3, R4, and R5 sites require some specific amino acid residues for Lip-mediated secretion. The amino acid sequence of the region was conserved considerably among the proteins secreted by the Lip exporter. On the contrary, the region was not related to HasA secretion through the Has(SM) system. Interestingly, a typical C-terminal motif, so far regarded as a secretion signal, was not necessary for secretion through either the Lip or the Has(SM) exporter. In LipA(SM) secretion via the Lip system, the typical C-terminal motif was not essential either, but the presence of a sequence similar to Val-Ala-Leu and its location from the C terminus greatly affect the secretion level. Secretion analyses using hybrid exporters and competitors exhibited that the R1-R5 region was recognized by an ABC protein of the Lip exporter, LipB, and that the mutations aborting Lip-mediated secretion in the region resulted in a loss of the affinity to LipB. Thus, a determinant within the secretory protein for Lip-mediated secretion was fully defined.

  1. The DNA Damage Response and Checkpoint Adaptation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Distinct Roles for the Replication Protein A2 (Rfa2) N-Terminus

    PubMed Central

    Ghospurkar, Padmaja L.; Wilson, Timothy M.; Severson, Amber L.; Klein, Sarah J.; Khaku, Sakina K.; Walther, André P.; Haring, Stuart J.

    2015-01-01

    In response to DNA damage, two general but fundamental processes occur in the cell: (1) a DNA lesion is recognized and repaired, and (2) concomitantly, the cell halts the cell cycle to provide a window of opportunity for repair to occur. An essential factor for a proper DNA-damage response is the heterotrimeric protein complex Replication Protein A (RPA). Of particular interest is hyperphosphorylation of the 32-kDa subunit, called RPA2, on its serine/threonine-rich amino (N) terminus following DNA damage in human cells. The unstructured N-terminus is often referred to as the phosphorylation domain and is conserved among eukaryotic RPA2 subunits, including Rfa2 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. An aspartic acid/alanine-scanning and genetic interaction approach was utilized to delineate the importance of this domain in budding yeast. It was determined that the Rfa2 N-terminus is important for a proper DNA-damage response in yeast, although its phosphorylation is not required. Subregions of the Rfa2 N-terminus important for the DNA-damage response were also identified. Finally, an Rfa2 N-terminal hyperphosphorylation-mimetic mutant behaves similarly to another Rfa1 mutant (rfa1-t11) with respect to genetic interactions, DNA-damage sensitivity, and checkpoint adaptation. Our data indicate that post-translational modification of the Rfa2 N-terminus is not required for cells to deal with “repairable” DNA damage; however, post-translational modification of this domain might influence whether cells proceed into M-phase in the continued presence of unrepaired DNA lesions as a “last-resort” mechanism for cell survival. PMID:25595672

  2. Structure of the Receptor-Binding Carboxy-Terminal Domain of the Bacteriophage T5 L-Shaped Tail Fibre with and without Its Intra-Molecular Chaperone

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Doval, Carmela; Castón, José R.; Luque, Daniel; Granell, Meritxell; Otero, José M.; Llamas-Saiz, Antonio L.; Renouard, Madalena; Boulanger, Pascale; van Raaij, Mark J.

    2015-01-01

    Bacteriophage T5, a Siphovirus belonging to the order Caudovirales, has a flexible, three-fold symmetric tail, to which three L-shaped fibres are attached. These fibres recognize oligo-mannose units on the bacterial cell surface prior to infection and are composed of homotrimers of the pb1 protein. Pb1 has 1396 amino acids, of which the carboxy-terminal 133 residues form a trimeric intra-molecular chaperone that is auto-proteolyzed after correct folding. The structure of a trimer of residues 970–1263 was determined by single anomalous dispersion phasing using incorporated selenomethionine residues and refined at 2.3 Å resolution using crystals grown from native, methionine-containing, protein. The protein inhibits phage infection by competition. The phage-distal receptor-binding domain resembles a bullet, with the walls formed by partially intertwined beta-sheets, conferring stability to the structure. The fold of the domain is novel and the topology unique to the pb1 structure. A site-directed mutant (Ser1264 to Ala), in which auto-proteolysis is impeded, was also produced, crystallized and its 2.5 Å structure solved by molecular replacement. The additional chaperone domain (residues 1263–1396) consists of a central trimeric alpha-helical coiled-coil flanked by a mixed alpha-beta domain. Three long beta-hairpin tentacles, one from each chaperone monomer, extend into long curved grooves of the bullet-shaped domain. The chaperone-containing mutant did not inhibit infection by competition. PMID:26670244

  3. Ubiquitin Carboxy-Terminal Hydrolase-L1 as a Serum Neurotrauma Biomarker for Exposure to Occupational Low-Level Blast

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Walter; Yarnell, Angela M.; Ong, Ricardo; Walilko, Timothy; Kamimori, Gary H.; da Silva, Uade; McCarron, Richard M.; LoPresti, Matthew L.

    2015-01-01

    Repeated exposure to low-level blast is a characteristic of a few select occupations and there is concern that such occupational exposures present risk for traumatic brain injury. These occupations include specialized military and law enforcement units that employ controlled detonation of explosive charges for the purpose of tactical entry into secured structures. The concern for negative effects from blast exposure is based on rates of operator self-reported headache, sleep disturbance, working memory impairment, and other concussion-like symptoms. A challenge in research on this topic has been the need for improved assessment tools to empirically evaluate the risk associated with repeated exposure to blast overpressure levels commonly considered to be too low in magnitude to cause acute injury. Evaluation of serum-based neurotrauma biomarkers provides an objective measure that is logistically feasible for use in field training environments. Among candidate biomarkers, ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase-L1 (UCH-L1) has some empirical support and was evaluated in this study. We used daily blood draws to examine acute change in UCH-L1 among 108 healthy military personnel who were exposed to repeated low-level blast across a 2-week period. These research volunteers also wore pressure sensors to record blast exposures, wrist actigraphs to monitor sleep patterns, and completed daily behavioral assessments of symptomology, postural stability, and neurocognitive function. UCH-L1 levels were elevated as a function of participating in the 2-week training with explosives, but the correlation of UCH-L1 elevation and blast magnitude was weak and inconsistent. Also, UCH-L1 elevations did not correlate with deficits in behavioral measures. These results provide some support for including UCH-L1 as a measure of central nervous system effects from exposure to low-level blast. However, the weak relation observed suggests that additional indicators of blast effect are needed

  4. Simplified analysis of 11-hydroxy-delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol and 11-carboxy-delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol in human meconium: method development and validation.

    PubMed

    Tynon, Marykathryn; Porto, Marcellino; Logan, Barry K

    2015-01-01

    We describe the development of a sensitive analytical method for the analysis of 11-hydroxy-delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (11-OH-THC) and 11-carboxy-delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THCC) in meconium using a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) platform. The method was validated according to protocols, which included assessment of accuracy, precision, robustness, stability in meconium and in-process stability, interference and sensitivity and specificity. The method consists of a solid phase extraction with alkaline hydrolysis and derivatization of the analytes with N, O-Bis(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacteamide, followed by GC/MS analysis using selected ion monitoring. The method uses deuterated internal standards for both analytes. Calibration curves had r(2) values >0.998, and extraction efficiency was determined to be 84.7% for THCC and 78.6% for 11-OH-THC. The detection limit for both analytes was 5 ng/g. This confirmatory method was successfully applied to 183 meconium samples that had screened positive by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and 67.2% were confirmed for THCC, and 2.2% were confirmed positive for 11-OH-THC. The mean (SD) and median (range) THCC (n = 123) concentrations detected were 55.0 ng/g (±59.0) and 33.75 ng/g (5-265 ng/g), while the mean and median (range) for 11-OH-THC (n = 4) concentrations were 8.25 ng/g (±4.71) and 6.5 ng/g (5-15 ng/g). PMID:25315472

  5. Simplified analysis of 11-hydroxy-delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol and 11-carboxy-delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol in human meconium: method development and validation.

    PubMed

    Tynon, Marykathryn; Porto, Marcellino; Logan, Barry K

    2015-01-01

    We describe the development of a sensitive analytical method for the analysis of 11-hydroxy-delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (11-OH-THC) and 11-carboxy-delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THCC) in meconium using a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) platform. The method was validated according to protocols, which included assessment of accuracy, precision, robustness, stability in meconium and in-process stability, interference and sensitivity and specificity. The method consists of a solid phase extraction with alkaline hydrolysis and derivatization of the analytes with N, O-Bis(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacteamide, followed by GC/MS analysis using selected ion monitoring. The method uses deuterated internal standards for both analytes. Calibration curves had r(2) values >0.998, and extraction efficiency was determined to be 84.7% for THCC and 78.6% for 11-OH-THC. The detection limit for both analytes was 5 ng/g. This confirmatory method was successfully applied to 183 meconium samples that had screened positive by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and 67.2% were confirmed for THCC, and 2.2% were confirmed positive for 11-OH-THC. The mean (SD) and median (range) THCC (n = 123) concentrations detected were 55.0 ng/g (±59.0) and 33.75 ng/g (5-265 ng/g), while the mean and median (range) for 11-OH-THC (n = 4) concentrations were 8.25 ng/g (±4.71) and 6.5 ng/g (5-15 ng/g).

  6. Diagnostic Evaluation of Des-Gamma-Carboxy Prothrombin versus α-Fetoprotein for Hepatitis B Virus-Related Hepatocellular Carcinoma in China: A Large-Scale, Multicentre Study

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Lei; Yin, Yuepeng; Zou, Zhenzhen; Zhou, Feiguo; Zhou, Weiping; Shen, Feng; Gao, Chunfang

    2016-01-01

    An efficient serum marker for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is currently lacking and requires intensive exploration. We aimed to evaluate the performance of des-gamma-carboxy prothrombin (DCP) for identifying hepatitis B virus-related HCC in a large, multicentre study in China. A total of 1034 subjects in three cohorts (A, B, and C) including HCC and various non-HCC controls were enrolled from 4 academic medical centers in China from January 2011 to February 2014. Blind parallel detections were conducted for DCP and AFP. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) was used to evaluate the diagnostic efficacies. In cohort A, which comprised 521 subjects, including patients with HCC, liver metastasis, liver cirrhosis (LC), and liver hemangiomas as well as healthy controls (HCs), the accuracy of DCP for distinguishing HCC from various controls was 6.2–9.7% higher than that of AFP. In cohort B, which comprised 447 subjects, including patients with HCC, LC, and chronic hepatitis B as well as HC, the accuracy of DCP was further elevated (12.3–20.67% higher than that of AFP). The superiority of DCP to AFP was more profound in the surveillance of early HCC [AUC 0.837 (95% CI: 0.771–0.903) vs. 0.650 (0.555–0.745)] and AFP-negative HCC [AUC: 0.856 (0.798–0.914)] and in discriminating HCC from LC (accuracy: 92.9% vs.64.71%). Higher DCP levels were associated with worse clinical behaviors and shorter disease-free survival. DCP not only is complementary to AFP in identifying AFP-negative HCC and in excluding AFP-positive non-HCC (liver cirrhosis), but also demonstrates improved performance in HCC surveillance, early diagnosis, treatment response and recurrence monitoring in the HBV-related population. PMID:27070780

  7. The Contributions of the Amino and Carboxy Terminal Domains of Flightin to the Biomechanical Properties of Drosophila Flight Muscle Thick Filaments.

    PubMed

    Gasek, Nathan S; Nyland, Lori R; Vigoreaux, Jim O

    2016-01-01

    Flightin is a myosin binding protein present in Pancrustacea. In Drosophila, flightin is expressed in the indirect flight muscles (IFM), where it is required for the flexural rigidity, structural integrity, and length determination of thick filaments. Comparison of flightin sequences from multiple Drosophila species revealed a tripartite organization indicative of three functional domains subject to different evolutionary constraints. We use atomic force microscopy to investigate the functional roles of the N-terminal domain and the C-terminal domain that show different patterns of sequence conservation. Thick filaments containing a C-terminal domain truncated flightin (fln(ΔC44)) are significantly shorter (2.68 ± 0.06 μm; p < 0.005) than thick filaments containing a full length flightin (fln⁺; 3.21 ± 0.05 μm) and thick filaments containing an N-terminal domain truncated flightin (fln(ΔN62); 3.21 ± 0.06 μm). Persistence length was significantly reduced in fln(ΔN62) (418 ± 72 μm; p < 0.005) compared to fln⁺ (1386 ± 196μm) and fln(ΔC44)(1128 ± 193 μm). Statistical polymer chain analysis revealed that the C-terminal domain fulfills a secondary role in thick filament bending propensity. Our results indicate that the flightin amino and carboxy terminal domains make distinct contributions to thick filament biomechanics. We propose these distinct roles arise from the interplay between natural selection and sexual selection given IFM's dual role in flight and courtship behaviors.

  8. IRES-mediated translation of the carboxy-terminal domain of the horizontal cell specific connexin Cx55.5 in vivo and in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Ul-Hussain, Mahboob; Zoidl, Georg; Klooster, Jan; Kamermans, Maarten; Dermietzel, Rolf

    2008-01-01

    Background Changes of the interneuronal coupling mediated by electrical synapse proteins in response to light adaptation and receptive field shaping are a paramount feature in the photoreceptor/horizontal cell/bipolar cell (PRC/HC/BPC) complex of the outer retina. The regulation of these processes is not fully understood at the molecular level but they may require information transfer to the nucleus by locally generated messengers. Electrical synapse proteins may comprise a feasible molecular determinant in such an information-laden signalling pathway. Results Connexin55.5 (Cx55.5) is a connexin with horizontal cell-restricted expression in zebrafish accumulating at dendritic sites within the PRC/HC/BPC complex in form of hemichannels where light-dependent plasticity occurs. Here we provide evidence for the generation of a carboxy-terminal domain of Cx55.5. The protein product is translated from the Cx55.5 mRNA by internal translation initiation from an in-frame ATG codon involving a putative internal ribosome entry site (IRES) element localized in the coding region of Cx55.5. This protein product resembling an 11 kDa domain of Cx55.5 is partially located in the nucleus in vivo and in vitro. Conclusion Our results demonstrate the generation of a second protein from the coding region of Cx55.5 by an IRES mediated process. The nuclear occurrence of a fraction of this protein provides first evidence that this electrical synapse protein may participate in a putative cytoplasmic to nuclear signal transfer. This suggests that Cx55.5 could be involved in gene regulation making structural plasticity at the PRC/HC/BPC complex feasible. PMID:18505575

  9. Hybrid character of a large neurofilament protein (NF-M): intermediate filament type sequence followed by a long and acidic carboxy-terminal extension.

    PubMed Central

    Geisler, N; Fischer, S; Vandekerckhove, J; Plessmann, U; Weber, K

    1984-01-01

    The sequence of the amino-terminal 436 residues of porcine neurofilament component NF-M (apparent mol. wt. in gel electrophoresis 160 kd), one of the two high mol. wt. components of mammalian neurofilaments, reveals the typical structural organization of an intermediate filament (IF) protein of the non-epithelial type. A non-alpha-helical arginine-rich headpiece with multiple beta-turns (residues 1-98) precedes a highly alpha-helical rod domain able to form double-stranded coiled-coils (residues 99-412) and a non-alpha-helical tailpiece array starting at residue 413. All extra mass of NF-M forms, as a carboxy-terminal tailpiece extension of approximately 500 residues, an autonomous domain of unique composition. Limited sequence data in the amino-terminal region of this domain document a lysine- and particularly glutamic acid-rich array somewhat reminiscent of the much shorter tailpiece extension of NF-L (apparent mol. wt. 68 kd), the major neurofilament protein. NF-M is therefore a true intermediate filament protein co-polymerized with NF-L via presumptive coiled-coil type interactions and not a peripherally bound associated protein of a filament backbone built exclusively from NF-L. Along the structurally conserved coiled-coil domains the two neurofilament proteins show only approximately 65% sequence identity, a value similar to that seen when NF-L and NF-M are compared with mesenchymal vimentin. The highly charged and acidic tailpiece extensions of all triplet proteins particularly rich in glutamic acid seem unique to the neurofilament type of IFs. They could form extra-filamentous scaffolds suitable for interactions with other neuronal components.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:6439558

  10. Structural and Kinetic Characterization of the 4-Carboxy-2-hydroxymuconate Hydratase from the Gallate and Protocatechuate 4,5-Cleavage Pathways of Pseudomonas putida KT2440.

    PubMed

    Mazurkewich, Scott; Brott, Ashley S; Kimber, Matthew S; Seah, Stephen Y K

    2016-04-01

    The bacterial catabolism of lignin and its breakdown products is of interest for applications in industrial processing of ligno-biomass. The gallate degradation pathway ofPseudomonas putidaKT2440 requires a 4-carboxy-2-hydroxymuconate (CHM) hydratase (GalB), which has a 12% sequence identity to a previously identified CHM hydratase (LigJ) fromSphingomonassp. SYK-6. The structure of GalB was determined and found to be a member of the PIG-LN-acetylglucosamine deacetylase family; GalB is structurally distinct from the amidohydrolase fold of LigJ. LigJ has the same stereospecificity as GalB, providing an example of convergent evolution for catalytic conversion of a common metabolite in bacterial aromatic degradation pathways. Purified GalB contains a bound Zn(2+)cofactor; however the enzyme is capable of using Fe(2+)and Co(2+)with similar efficiency. The general base aspartate in the PIG-L deacetylases is an alanine in GalB; replacement of the alanine with aspartate decreased the GalB catalytic efficiency for CHM by 9.5 × 10(4)-fold, and the variant enzyme did not have any detectable hydrolase activity. Kinetic analyses and pH dependence studies of the wild type and variant enzymes suggested roles for Glu-48 and His-164 in the catalytic mechanism. A comparison with the PIG-L deacetylases led to a proposed mechanism for GalB wherein Glu-48 positions and activates the metal-ligated water for the hydration reaction and His-164 acts as a catalytic acid. PMID:26867578

  11. DFT and experimental study of N, N'-bis(3'-carboxy,4'-aminophenyl)-1,4-quinonediimine, a carboxyl substituted aniline trimer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sein, Lawrence T., Jr.; Lashua, Amanda F.

    2010-08-01

    Density functional calculations were performed on N, N'-bis(3'-carboxy,4'-aminophenyl)-1,4-quinonediimine, a carboxylic acid substituted aniline trimer. Results of the calculations were compared to experimental properties of the herein synthesized trimer, as well as to the properties of the anthranilic acid/aniline co-polymer reported in the literature. The calculated LUMO levels for isomers of the title compound range from -4.45 to -5.05 eV. The calculated electron affinities range from 75.93 kcal mol -1 to 89.04 kcal mol -1 (3.29-3.86 eV). Both the LUMO levels and electron affinities are greatest in magnitude for the anti, syn isomer. The HOMO levels, on the other hand, range from -5.32 eV (for the trans, trans isomer) to -5.36 eV (syn, syn inner). In acetonitrile solvent, the zwitterionic form is calculated to be energetically preferred to the non-zwitterion. Experimental UV-vis and near-IR studies in acetonitrile and ethanol show little evidence for zwitterion formation, but those in water show strong evidence. The predicted electronic transitions for the non-zwitterion in acetonitrile solvent correspond closely to those seen at 533 and 416 nm. The zwitterion present in solvent corresponds to a trimer with the capability to "self-dope", suggesting that the trimer would be effective at corrosion inhibition in the emeraldine base form, unlike other trimers which are only effective in the emeraldine salt form. This effectiveness in the emeraldine base form would enable the material to be utilized in corrosion inhibition applications in alkaline environments where standard oligo- and polyanilines fail.

  12. The Contributions of the Amino and Carboxy Terminal Domains of Flightin to the Biomechanical Properties of Drosophila Flight Muscle Thick Filaments

    PubMed Central

    Gasek, Nathan S.; Nyland, Lori R.; Vigoreaux, Jim O.

    2016-01-01

    Flightin is a myosin binding protein present in Pancrustacea. In Drosophila, flightin is expressed in the indirect flight muscles (IFM), where it is required for the flexural rigidity, structural integrity, and length determination of thick filaments. Comparison of flightin sequences from multiple Drosophila species revealed a tripartite organization indicative of three functional domains subject to different evolutionary constraints. We use atomic force microscopy to investigate the functional roles of the N-terminal domain and the C-terminal domain that show different patterns of sequence conservation. Thick filaments containing a C-terminal domain truncated flightin (flnΔC44) are significantly shorter (2.68 ± 0.06 μm; p < 0.005) than thick filaments containing a full length flightin (fln+; 3.21 ± 0.05 μm) and thick filaments containing an N-terminal domain truncated flightin (flnΔN62; 3.21 ± 0.06 μm). Persistence length was significantly reduced in flnΔN62 (418 ± 72 μm; p < 0.005) compared to fln+ (1386 ± 196μm) and flnΔC44(1128 ± 193 μm). Statistical polymer chain analysis revealed that the C-terminal domain fulfills a secondary role in thick filament bending propensity. Our results indicate that the flightin amino and carboxy terminal domains make distinct contributions to thick filament biomechanics. We propose these distinct roles arise from the interplay between natural selection and sexual selection given IFM’s dual role in flight and courtship behaviors. PMID:27128952

  13. Structural analysis of the carboxy terminal PH domain of pleckstrin bound to D-myo-inositol 1,2,3,5,6-pentakisphosphate

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Sean G; Zhang, Yi; Haslam, Richard J; Junop, Murray S

    2007-01-01

    Background Pleckstrin homology (PH) domains are one of the most prevalent domains in the human proteome and represent the major phosphoinositide-binding module. These domains are often found in signaling proteins and function predominately by targeting their host proteins to the cell membrane. Inositol phosphates, which are structurally similar to phosphoinositides, are not only known to play a role as signaling molecules but are also capable of being bound by PH domains. Results In the work presented here it is shown that the addition of commercial myo-inositol hexakisphosphate (IP6) inhibited the binding of the carboxy terminal PH domain of pleckstrin (C-PH) to phosphatidylinositol 3,4-bisphosphate with an IC50 of 7.5 μM. In an attempt to characterize this binding structurally, C-PH was crystallized in the presence of IP6 and the structure was determined to 1.35 Å. Examination of the resulting electron density unexpectedly revealed the bound ligand to be D-myo-inositol 1,2,3,5,6-pentakisphosphate. Conclusion The discovery of D-myo-inositol 1,2,3,5,6-pentakisphosphate in the crystal structure suggests that the inhibitory effects observed in the binding studies may be due to this ligand rather than IP6. Analysis of the protein-ligand interaction demonstrated that this myo-inositol pentakisphosphate isomer interacts specifically with protein residues known to be involved in phosphoinositide binding. In addition to this, a structural alignment of other PH domains bound to inositol phosphates containing either four or five phosphate groups revealed that the majority of phosphate groups occupy conserved locations in the binding pockets of PH domains. These findings, taken together with other recently reported studies suggest that myo-inositol pentakisphosphates could act to regulate PH domain-phosphoinositide interactions by directly competing for binding, thus playing an important role as signaling molecules. PMID:18034889

  14. Diagnostic Evaluation of Des-Gamma-Carboxy Prothrombin versus α-Fetoprotein for Hepatitis B Virus-Related Hepatocellular Carcinoma in China: A Large-Scale, Multicentre Study.

    PubMed

    Ji, Jun; Wang, Hao; Li, Yan; Zheng, Lei; Yin, Yuepeng; Zou, Zhenzhen; Zhou, Feiguo; Zhou, Weiping; Shen, Feng; Gao, Chunfang

    2016-01-01

    An efficient serum marker for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is currently lacking and requires intensive exploration. We aimed to evaluate the performance of des-gamma-carboxy prothrombin (DCP) for identifying hepatitis B virus-related HCC in a large, multicentre study in China. A total of 1034 subjects in three cohorts (A, B, and C) including HCC and various non-HCC controls were enrolled from 4 academic medical centers in China from January 2011 to February 2014. Blind parallel detections were conducted for DCP and AFP. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) was used to evaluate the diagnostic efficacies. In cohort A, which comprised 521 subjects, including patients with HCC, liver metastasis, liver cirrhosis (LC), and liver hemangiomas as well as healthy controls (HCs), the accuracy of DCP for distinguishing HCC from various controls was 6.2-9.7% higher than that of AFP. In cohort B, which comprised 447 subjects, including patients with HCC, LC, and chronic hepatitis B as well as HC, the accuracy of DCP was further elevated (12.3-20.67% higher than that of AFP). The superiority of DCP to AFP was more profound in the surveillance of early HCC [AUC 0.837 (95% CI: 0.771-0.903) vs. 0.650 (0.555-0.745)] and AFP-negative HCC [AUC: 0.856 (0.798-0.914)] and in discriminating HCC from LC (accuracy: 92.9% vs.64.71%). Higher DCP levels were associated with worse clinical behaviors and shorter disease-free survival. DCP not only is complementary to AFP in identifying AFP-negative HCC and in excluding AFP-positive non-HCC (liver cirrhosis), but also demonstrates improved performance in HCC surveillance, early diagnosis, treatment response and recurrence monitoring in the HBV-related population. PMID:27070780

  15. Diagnostic Evaluation of Des-Gamma-Carboxy Prothrombin versus α-Fetoprotein for Hepatitis B Virus-Related Hepatocellular Carcinoma in China: A Large-Scale, Multicentre Study.

    PubMed

    Ji, Jun; Wang, Hao; Li, Yan; Zheng, Lei; Yin, Yuepeng; Zou, Zhenzhen; Zhou, Feiguo; Zhou, Weiping; Shen, Feng; Gao, Chunfang

    2016-01-01

    An efficient serum marker for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is currently lacking and requires intensive exploration. We aimed to evaluate the performance of des-gamma-carboxy prothrombin (DCP) for identifying hepatitis B virus-related HCC in a large, multicentre study in China. A total of 1034 subjects in three cohorts (A, B, and C) including HCC and various non-HCC controls were enrolled from 4 academic medical centers in China from January 2011 to February 2014. Blind parallel detections were conducted for DCP and AFP. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) was used to evaluate the diagnostic efficacies. In cohort A, which comprised 521 subjects, including patients with HCC, liver metastasis, liver cirrhosis (LC), and liver hemangiomas as well as healthy controls (HCs), the accuracy of DCP for distinguishing HCC from various controls was 6.2-9.7% higher than that of AFP. In cohort B, which comprised 447 subjects, including patients with HCC, LC, and chronic hepatitis B as well as HC, the accuracy of DCP was further elevated (12.3-20.67% higher than that of AFP). The superiority of DCP to AFP was more profound in the surveillance of early HCC [AUC 0.837 (95% CI: 0.771-0.903) vs. 0.650 (0.555-0.745)] and AFP-negative HCC [AUC: 0.856 (0.798-0.914)] and in discriminating HCC from LC (accuracy: 92.9% vs.64.71%). Higher DCP levels were associated with worse clinical behaviors and shorter disease-free survival. DCP not only is complementary to AFP in identifying AFP-negative HCC and in excluding AFP-positive non-HCC (liver cirrhosis), but also demonstrates improved performance in HCC surveillance, early diagnosis, treatment response and recurrence monitoring in the HBV-related population.

  16. Rapid and early α-fetoprotein and des-γ-carboxy prothrombin responses to initial arterial infusion chemotherapy predict treatment outcomes of advanced hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    OYAMA, KENJI; KODA, MASAHIKO; SUGIHARA, TAKAAKI; KISHINA, MANABU; MIYOSHI, KENICHI; OKAMOTO, TOSHIAKI; HODOTSUKA, MASANORI; FUJISE, YUKI; MATONO, TOMOMITSU; TOKUNAGA, SHIHO; OKAMOTO, KINYA; HOSHO, KEIKO; OKANO, JUNICHI; MURAWAKI, YOSHIKAZU

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to predict the effects of transarterial infusion (TAI) chemotherapy based on early changes in α-fetoprotein (AFP) and des-γ-carboxy prothrombin (DCP) in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Seventy-four patients who underwent TAI with cisplatin, 5-fluorouracil, mitomycin C and epirubicin for advanced HCC were enrolled. Antitumor responses were evaluated 6 months after TAI. Rapid and early responses were defined as the ratio of AFP or DCP after 1 week and 1 month compared to baseline. A total of 5, 10, 17 and 42 patients had complete response (CR), partial response (PR), stable disease (SD) or progressive disease (PD), respectively. Early AFP response was significantly lower in the CR+PR compared to the SD+PD groups (P<0.01). The early DCP response was significantly lower in the CR+PR compared to the SD+PD. The sensitivity and specificity of rapid and early AFP responses in the CR+PR were 0.78 and 0.72, and 0.80 and 0.73, respectively, and those of rapid and early DCP responses were 0.67 and 0.65, and 0.77 and 0.71, respectively. The combination of AFP and DCP responses had higher specificity compared to AFP or DCP alone responses. Patients were divided into responder and non-responder groups to evaluate the prediction of survival outcome. Early responders of AFP, DCP and AFP+DCP, who were divided based on the cut-off values of CR+PR survived significantly longer than the non-responders (P<0.05). In conclusion, rapid or early responses of AFP and/or DCP levels 1 and 4 weeks after TAI chemotherapy helped to predict the treatment effects. PMID:26137283

  17. Epithelial cell ADAM17 activation by Helicobacter pylori: role of ADAM17 C-terminus and Threonine-735 phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    McClurg, Urszula L; Danjo, Kazuma; King, Harry O; Scott, Gina B; Robinson, Philip A; Crabtree, Jean E

    2015-03-01

    Helicobacter pylori transactivates the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) on gastric epithelial cells via a signalling cascade involving a disintegrin and metalloprotease 17 (ADAM17) cleavage of membrane bound heparin binding-epidermal growth factor (HB-EGF). The effects of H. pylori on ADAM17 C-terminus in epithelial cells have been examined. Total cellular ADAM17 and surface expression of ADAM17 were significantly increased by H. pylori in AGS gastric epithelial cells. These changes were associated with ADAM17 C-terminal phosphorylation at T375 and S791. AGS cells lacking the ADAM17 C-terminal domain induced significantly attenuated cleavage of HB-EGF and were also unable to upregulate HB-EGF and EGFR transcripts to the same extent as cells expressing full length ADAM17. In mitotic unstimulated AGS and ADAM17 over-expressing AGS cells, ADAM17 was highly T735 phosphorylated indicating ADAM17 T735 phosphorylation is modified during the cell cycle. In conclusion, H. pylori induced ADAM17 C-terminal T735 and/or S791 phosphorylation in gastric epithelial cells are likely to be an important trigger inducing ADAM17 activation and shedding of HB-EGF leading to EGFR transactivation. ADAM17 over-expression in gastric cancer represents a potential target for therapeutic intervention.

  18. Further studies on the effect of lysine at the C-terminus of the Dmt-Tic opioid pharmacophore.

    PubMed

    Balboni, Gianfranco; Onnis, Valentina; Congiu, Cenzo; Zotti, Margherita; Sasaki, Yusuke; Ambo, Akihiro; Bryant, Sharon D; Jinsmaa, Yunden; Lazarus, Lawrence H; Lazzari, Ilaria; Trapella, Claudio; Salvadori, Severo

    2007-05-01

    A wide range of activities are induced by Lys when introduced at C-terminus of the delta-opioid Dmt-Tic pharmacophore through the alpha-amine group, including: improved delta-antagonism, mu-agonism and mu-antagonism. Here we report the synthesis of a new series of compounds with the general formula H-Dmt-Tic-NH-(CH(2))(4)-CH(R)-R' (R=-NH(2), -NH-Ac, -NH-Z; R'=CO-NH-Ph, -CO-NH-CH(2)-Ph, -Bid) in which Lys is linked to Dmt-Tic through its side-chain amine group. All new compounds (1-9) displayed potent and selective delta-antagonism (MVD, pA(2)=7.81-8.27), which was independent of the functionalized alpha-amine and carboxylic groups of C-terminal Lys. This behaviour suggests a direct application as a prototype intermediate, such as Boc-Dmt-Tic-epsilon-Lys(Z)-OMe, which could be successfully applied in the synthesis (after Z or methyl ester removal) of unique designed multiple ligands containing the pharmacophore of the quintessential delta-antagonist Dmt-Tic and another opioid or biologically active non-opioid ligand.

  19. Characterization of replication defects induced by mutations in the basic domain and C-terminus of HIV-1 matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatia, Ajay K.; Campbell, Nancy; Panganiban, Antonito; Ratner, Lee

    2007-12-05

    Extensive mutagenesis has defined distinct functional domains in the HIV-1 matrix domain (MA). In an attempt to more clearly define functions of regions of MA which affect viral entry, we analyzed mutations in the N-terminal basic and the C-terminal helical domains. Deletions of 8-10 amino acid residues of the C-terminal fifth helix of MA resulted in viruses that were only mildly defective in infectivity and fusion. The defect exhibited by these mutations could largely be attributed to a reduction in levels of viral envelope incorporated into mature virions. Truncation of the gp41 cytoplasmic tail (gp41CT) could rescue the phenotype of one of these mutants. In contrast, mutations of multiple basic residues in the N-terminus of MA were severely defective in both infectivity and fusion. While these mutations induce severe envelope incorporation defects, they also result in virus crippled at a post-entry step, since truncation of the gp41CT could not rescue the infectivity defect.

  20. The Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) Uses its C-Terminus to Regulate the A2B Adenosine Receptor.

    PubMed

    Watson, Michael J; Lee, Shernita L; Marklew, Abigail J; Gilmore, Rodney C; Gentzsch, Martina; Sassano, Maria F; Gray, Michael A; Tarran, Robert

    2016-01-01

    CFTR is an apical membrane anion channel that regulates fluid homeostasis in many organs including the airways, colon, pancreas and sweat glands. In cystic fibrosis, CFTR dysfunction causes significant morbidity/mortality. Whilst CFTR's function as an ion channel has been well described, its ability to regulate other proteins is less understood. We have previously shown that plasma membrane CFTR increases the surface density of the adenosine 2B receptor (A2BR), but not of the β2 adrenergic receptor (β2AR), leading to an enhanced, adenosine-induced cAMP response in the presence of CFTR. In this study, we have found that the C-terminal PDZ-domain of both A2BR and CFTR were crucial for this interaction, and that replacing the C-terminus of A2BR with that of β2AR removed this CFTR-dependency. This observation extended to intact epithelia and disruption of the actin cytoskeleton prevented A2BR-induced but not β2AR-induced airway surface liquid (ASL) secretion. We also found that CFTR expression altered the organization of the actin cytoskeleton and PDZ-binding proteins in both HEK293T cells and in well-differentiated human bronchial epithelia. Furthermore, removal of CFTR's PDZ binding motif (ΔTRL) prevented actin rearrangement, suggesting that CFTR insertion in the plasma membrane results in local reorganization of actin, PDZ binding proteins and certain GPCRs. PMID:27278076

  1. The RAG2 C-terminus and ATM protect genome integrity by controlling antigen receptor gene cleavage.

    PubMed

    Chaumeil, Julie; Micsinai, Mariann; Ntziachristos, Panagiotis; Roth, David B; Aifantis, Iannis; Kluger, Yuval; Deriano, Ludovic; Skok, Jane A

    2013-01-01

    Tight control of antigen-receptor gene rearrangement is required to preserve genome integrity and prevent the occurrence of leukaemia and lymphoma. Nonetheless, mistakes can happen, leading to the generation of aberrant rearrangements, such as Tcra/d-Igh inter-locus translocations that are a hallmark of ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) deficiency. Current evidence indicates that these translocations arise from the persistence of unrepaired breaks converging at different stages of thymocyte differentiation. Here we show that a defect in feedback control of RAG2 activity gives rise to bi-locus breaks and damage on Tcra/d and Igh in the same T cell at the same developmental stage, which provides a direct mechanism for generating these inter-locus rearrangements. Both the RAG2 C-terminus and ATM prevent bi-locus RAG-mediated cleavage through modulation of three-dimensional conformation (higher-order loops) and nuclear organization of the two loci. This limits the number of potential substrates for translocation and provides an important mechanism for protecting genome stability. PMID:23900513

  2. The RXR{alpha} C-terminus T462 is a NMR sensor for coactivator peptide binding

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Jianyun Chen Minghe; DeKoster, Gregory T.; Cistola, David P.; Li, Ellen

    2008-02-22

    The C-terminal activation function-2 (AF-2) helix plays a crucial role in retinoid X receptor alpha (RXR{alpha})-mediated gene expression. Here, we report a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) study of the RXR{alpha} ligand-binding domain complexed with 9-cis-retinoic acid and a glucocorticoid receptor-interacting protein 1 peptide. The AF-2 helix and most of the C-terminal residues were undetectable due to a severe line-broadening effect. Due to its outstanding signal-to-noise ratio, the C-terminus residue, threonine 462 (T462) exhibited two distinct crosspeaks during peptide titration, suggesting that peptide binding was in a slow exchange regime on the chemical shift timescale. Consistently, the K{sub d} derived from T462 intensity decay agreed with that derived from isothermal titration calorimetry. Furthermore, the exchange contribution to the {sup 15}N transverse relaxation rate was measurable in either T462 or the bound peptide. These results suggest that T462 is a sensor for coactivator binding and is a potential probe for AF-2 helix mobility.

  3. Reciprocal and nonreciprocal recombination in diploid clones from Bacillus subtilis protoplast fusion: Association with the replication origin and terminus

    PubMed Central

    Gabor, Magda H.; Hotchkiss, Rollin D.

    1983-01-01

    The primary heterodiploid bacteria regenerated after Bacillus subtilis fusion, although generally noncomplementing diploids, behave in pedigree analysis as multipotential systems. Individual diploid colonies yielding complete reciprocal recombinant (RR) progeny—often accompanied by one or both parents—constitute 10-30% of the total recombinant-forming units. The RR (reciprocal for 8-11 genes) usually occur in equivalent numbers both among and within individual colonies. Novel for bacteria, they demonstrate that entire parental genomes brought together within a diploid protoplast are retained as two independent replicons able to undergo classical recombination characteristic of eukaryotic gametogenesis. Parental or recombinant genomes are also subject to multiple rounds of recombination without obligate segregation and often not reciprocal. Diploid recombinant clones, sharing streptomycin resistance but reciprocal for auxotrophic markers, have displayed a partial ability to make a facultative shift in chromosome expression. They have also produced two types of prototrophs: a stable one (presumably haploid and recombinant) and an unstable one, (diploid and temporarily complementing at low frequency). It follows that chromosome extinction may affect both parental and recombinant chromosomes and does not interfere with recombination. Analysis of the number and chromosomal distribution of crossovers in all recombinants and those from single diploid clones shows increased frequency of exchange in the regions of the replication origin and terminus, possibly a result of the association of these sites with the cell wall or membrane. PMID:16593292

  4. Interaction with the BRCA2 C terminus protects RAD51-DNA filaments from disassembly by BRC repeats.

    PubMed

    Davies, Owen Richard; Pellegrini, Luca

    2007-06-01

    BRCA2 has an essential function in DNA repair by homologous recombination, interacting with RAD51 via short motifs in the middle and at the C terminus of BRCA2. Here, we report that a conserved 36-residue sequence of human BRCA2 encoded by exon 27 (BRCA2Exon27) interacts with RAD51 through the specific recognition of oligomerized RAD51 ATPase domains. BRCA2Exon27 binding stabilizes the RAD51 nucleoprotein filament against disassembly by BRC repeat 4. The protection is specific for RAD51 filaments formed on single-stranded DNA and is lost when BRCA2Exon27 is phosphorylated on Ser3291. We propose that productive recombination results from the functional balance between the different RAD51-binding modes [corrected] of the BRC repeat and exon 27 regions of BRCA2. Our results further suggest a mechanism in which CDK phosphorylation of BRCA2Exon27 at the G2-M transition alters the balance in favor of RAD51 filament disassembly, thus terminating recombination.

  5. Localized remodeling of the Escherichia coli chromosome: the patchwork of segments refractory and tolerant to inversion near the replication terminus.

    PubMed

    Guijo, M I; Patte, J; del Mar Campos, M; Louarn, J M; Rebollo, J E

    2001-04-01

    The behavior of chromosomal inversions in Escherichia coli depends upon the region they affect. Regions flanking the replication terminus have been termed nondivisible zones (NDZ) because inversions ending in the region were either deleterious or not feasible. This regional phenomenon is further analyzed here. Thirty segments distributed between 23 and 29 min on the chromosome map have been submitted to an inversion test. Twenty-five segments either became deleterious when inverted or were noninvertible, but five segments tolerated inversion. The involvement of polar replication pause sites in this distribution was investigated. The results suggest that the Tus/pause site system may forbid some inversion events, but that other constraints to inversion, unrelated to this system, exist. Our current model for deleterious inversions is that the segments involved carry polar sequences acting in concert with other polar sequences located outside the segments. The observed patchwork of refractory and tolerant segments supports the existence of several NDZs in the 23- to 29-min region. Microscopic observations revealed that deleterious inversions are associated with high frequencies of abnormal nucleoid structure and distribution. Combined with other information, the data suggest that NDZs participate in the organization of the terminal domain of the nucleoid.

  6. Carboxyl terminus of Hsp70-interacting protein (CHIP) is required to modulate cardiac hypertrophy and attenuate autophagy during exercise.

    PubMed

    Willis, Monte S; Min, Jin-Na; Wang, Shaobin; McDonough, Holly; Lockyer, Pamela; Wadosky, Kristine M; Patterson, Cam

    2013-12-01

    The carboxyl terminus of Hsp70-interacting protein (CHIP) is a ubiquitin ligase/cochaperone critical for the maintenance of cardiac function. Mice lacking CHIP (CHIP-/-) suffer decreased survival, enhanced myocardial injury and increased arrhythmias compared with wild-type controls following challenge with cardiac ischaemia reperfusion injury. Recent evidence implicates a role for CHIP in chaperone-assisted selective autophagy, a process that is associated with exercise-induced cardioprotection. To determine whether CHIP is involved in cardiac autophagy, we challenged CHIP-/- mice with voluntary exercise. CHIP-/- mice respond to exercise with an enhanced autophagic response that is associated with an exaggerated cardiac hypertrophy phenotype. No impairment of function was identified in the CHIP-/- mice by serial echocardiography over the 5 weeks of running, indicating that the cardiac hypertrophy was physiologic not pathologic in nature. It was further determined that CHIP plays a role in inhibiting Akt signalling and autophagy determined by autophagic flux in cardiomyocytes and in the intact heart. Taken together, cardiac CHIP appears to play a role in regulating autophagy during the development of cardiac hypertrophy, possibly by its role in supporting Akt signalling, induced by voluntary running in vivo.

  7. Novel P2 promoter-derived HNF4{alpha} isoforms with different N-terminus generated by alternate exon insertion

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Jianmin; Levitsky, Lynne L.; Rhoads, David B.

    2009-04-15

    Hepatocyte nuclear factor 4{alpha} (HNF4{alpha}) is a critical transcription factor for pancreas and liver development and functions in islet {beta} cells to maintain glucose homeostasis. Mutations in the human HNF4A gene lead to maturity onset diabetes of the young (MODY1) and polymorphisms are associated with increased risk for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Expression of six HNF4{alpha} variants, three each from two developmentally regulated promoters, has been firmly established. We have now detected a new set of HNF4{alpha} variants designated HNF4{alpha}10-12 expressed from distal promoter P2. These variants, generated by inclusion of previously undetected exon 1E (human = 222 nt, rodent = 136 nt) following exon 1D have an altered N-terminus but identical remaining reading frame. HNF4{alpha}10-{alpha}12 are expressed in pancreatic islets (and liver) and exhibit transactivation potentials similar to the corresponding {alpha}7-{alpha}9 isoforms. DNA-binding analyses implied much higher protein levels of HNF4{alpha}10-{alpha}12 in liver than expected from the RT-PCR data. Our results provide evidence for a more complex expression pattern of HNF4{alpha} than previously appreciated. We recommend inclusion of exon 1E and nearby DNA sequences in screening for HNF4{alpha} mutations and polymorphisms in genetic analyses of MODY1 and T2DM.

  8. The human ACC2 CT-domain C-terminus is required for full functionality and has a novel twist

    SciTech Connect

    Madauss, Kevin P.; Burkhart, William A.; Consler, Thomas G.; Cowan, David J.; Gottschalk, William K.; Miller, Aaron B; Short, Steven A.; Tran, Thuy B.; Williams, Shawn P.

    2009-06-15

    Inhibition of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) may prevent lipid-induced insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes, making the enzyme an attractive pharmaceutical target. Although the enzyme is highly conserved amongst animals, only the yeast enzyme structure is available for rational drug design. The use of biophysical assays has permitted the identification of a specific C-terminal truncation of the 826-residue human ACC2 carboxyl transferase (CT) domain that is both functionally competent to bind inhibitors and crystallizes in their presence. This C-terminal truncation led to the determination of the human ACC2 CT domain-CP-640186 complex crystal structure, which revealed distinctions from the yeast-enzyme complex. The human ACC2 CT-domain C-terminus is comprised of three intertwined -helices that extend outwards from the enzyme on the opposite side to the ligand-binding site. Differences in the observed inhibitor conformation between the yeast and human structures are caused by differing residues in the binding pocket.

  9. The Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) Uses its C-Terminus to Regulate the A2B Adenosine Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Michael J.; Lee, Shernita L.; Marklew, Abigail J.; Gilmore, Rodney C.; Gentzsch, Martina; Sassano, Maria F.; Gray, Michael A.; Tarran, Robert

    2016-01-01

    CFTR is an apical membrane anion channel that regulates fluid homeostasis in many organs including the airways, colon, pancreas and sweat glands. In cystic fibrosis, CFTR dysfunction causes significant morbidity/mortality. Whilst CFTR’s function as an ion channel has been well described, its ability to regulate other proteins is less understood. We have previously shown that plasma membrane CFTR increases the surface density of the adenosine 2B receptor (A2BR), but not of the β2 adrenergic receptor (β2AR), leading to an enhanced, adenosine-induced cAMP response in the presence of CFTR. In this study, we have found that the C-terminal PDZ-domain of both A2BR and CFTR were crucial for this interaction, and that replacing the C-terminus of A2BR with that of β2AR removed this CFTR-dependency. This observation extended to intact epithelia and disruption of the actin cytoskeleton prevented A2BR-induced but not β2AR-induced airway surface liquid (ASL) secretion. We also found that CFTR expression altered the organization of the actin cytoskeleton and PDZ-binding proteins in both HEK293T cells and in well-differentiated human bronchial epithelia. Furthermore, removal of CFTR’s PDZ binding motif (ΔTRL) prevented actin rearrangement, suggesting that CFTR insertion in the plasma membrane results in local reorganization of actin, PDZ binding proteins and certain GPCRs. PMID:27278076

  10. The myristoylated amino-terminus of an Arabidopsis calcium-dependent protein kinase mediates plasma membrane localization.

    PubMed

    Lu, Sheen X; Hrabak, Estelle M

    2013-06-01

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPK) are a major group of calcium-stimulated kinases found in plants and some protists. Many CDPKs are membrane-associated, presumably because of lipid modifications at their amino termini. We investigated the subcellular location and myristoylation of AtCPK5, a member of the Arabidopsis CDPK family. Most AtCPK5 was associated with the plasma membrane as demonstrated by two-phase fractionation of plant microsomes and by in vivo detection of AtCPK5-GFP fusion proteins. AtCPK5 was a substrate for plant N-myristoyltransferase and myristoylation was prevented by converting the glycine at the proposed site of myristate attachment to alanine (G2A). In transgenic plants, a G2A mutation completely abolished AtCPK5 membrane association, indicating that myristoylation was essential for membrane binding. The first sixteen amino acids of AtCPK5 were sufficient to direct plasma membrane localization. In addition, differentially phosphorylated forms of AtCPK5 were detected both in planta and after expression of AtCPK5 in a cell-free plant extract. Our results demonstrate that AtCPK5 is myristoylated at its amino terminus and that myristoylation is required for membrane binding.

  11. GAIP Interacting Protein C-Terminus Regulates Autophagy and Exosome Biogenesis of Pancreatic Cancer through Metabolic Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Santanu; Pal, Krishnendu; Sharma, Anil K.; Dutta, Shamit K.; Lau, Julie S.; Yan, Irene K.; Wang, Enfeng; Elkhanany, Ahmed; Alkharfy, Khalid M.; Sanyal, Arunik; Patel, Tushar C.; Chari, Suresh T.; Spaller, Mark R.; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata

    2014-01-01

    GAIP interacting protein C terminus (GIPC) is known to play an important role in a variety of physiological and disease states. In the present study, we have identified a novel role for GIPC as a master regulator of autophagy and the exocytotic pathways in cancer. We show that depletion of GIPC-induced autophagy in pancreatic cancer cells, as evident from the upregulation of the autophagy marker LC3II. We further report that GIPC regulates cellular trafficking pathways by modulating the secretion, biogenesis, and molecular composition of exosomes. We also identified the involvement of GIPC on metabolic stress pathways regulating autophagy and microvesicular shedding, and observed that GIPC status determines the loading of cellular cargo in the exosome. Furthermore, we have shown the overexpression of the drug resistance gene ABCG2 in exosomes from GIPC-depleted pancreatic cancer cells. We also demonstrated that depletion of GIPC from cancer cells sensitized them to gemcitabine treatment, an avenue that can be explored as a potential therapeutic strategy to overcome drug resistance in cancer. PMID:25469510

  12. Purification method for recombinant proteins based on a fusion between the target protein and the C-terminus of calmodulin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schauer-Vukasinovic, Vesna; Deo, Sapna K.; Daunert, Sylvia

    2002-01-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) was used as an affinity tail to facilitate the purification of the green fluorescent protein (GFP), which was used as a model target protein. The protein GFP was fused to the C-terminus of CaM, and a factor Xa cleavage site was introduced between the two proteins. A CaM-GFP fusion protein was expressed in E. coli and purified on a phenothiazine-derivatized silica column. CaM binds to the phenothiazine on the column in a Ca(2+)-dependent fashion and it was, therefore, used as an affinity tail for the purification of GFP. The fusion protein bound to the affinity column was then subjected to a proteolytic digestion with factor Xa. Pure GFP was eluted with a Ca(2+)-containing buffer, while CaM was eluted later with a buffer containing the Ca(2+)-chelating agent EGTA. The purity of the isolated GFP was verified by SDS-PAGE, and the fluorescence properties of the purified GFP were characterized.

  13. GAIP interacting protein C-terminus regulates autophagy and exosome biogenesis of pancreatic cancer through metabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Santanu; Pal, Krishnendu; Sharma, Anil K; Dutta, Shamit K; Lau, Julie S; Yan, Irene K; Wang, Enfeng; Elkhanany, Ahmed; Alkharfy, Khalid M; Sanyal, Arunik; Patel, Tushar C; Chari, Suresh T; Spaller, Mark R; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata

    2014-01-01

    GAIP interacting protein C terminus (GIPC) is known to play an important role in a variety of physiological and disease states. In the present study, we have identified a novel role for GIPC as a master regulator of autophagy and the exocytotic pathways in cancer. We show that depletion of GIPC-induced autophagy in pancreatic cancer cells, as evident from the upregulation of the autophagy marker LC3II. We further report that GIPC regulates cellular trafficking pathways by modulating the secretion, biogenesis, and molecular composition of exosomes. We also identified the involvement of GIPC on metabolic stress pathways regulating autophagy and microvesicular shedding, and observed that GIPC status determines the loading of cellular cargo in the exosome. Furthermore, we have shown the overexpression of the drug resistance gene ABCG2 in exosomes from GIPC-depleted pancreatic cancer cells. We also demonstrated that depletion of GIPC from cancer cells sensitized them to gemcitabine treatment, an avenue that can be explored as a potential therapeutic strategy to overcome drug resistance in cancer.

  14. The characterization of a novel S100A1 binding site in the N-terminus of TRPM1.

    PubMed

    Jirku, Michaela; Lansky, Zdenek; Bednarova, Lucie; Sulc, Miroslav; Monincova, Lenka; Majer, Pavel; Vyklicky, Ladislav; Vondrasek, Jiri; Teisinger, Jan; Bousova, Kristyna

    2016-09-01

    Transient receptor potential melastatin-1 channel (TRPM1) is an important mediator of calcium influx into the cell that is expressed in melanoma and ON-bipolar cells. Similar to other members of the TRP channel family, the intracellular N- and C- terminal domains of TRPM1 are expected to play important roles in the modulation of TRPM1 receptor function. Among the most commonly occurring modulators of TRP channels are the cytoplasmically expressed calcium binding proteins calmodulin and S100 calcium-binding protein A1 (S100A1), but the interaction of TRPM1 with S100A1 has not been described yet. Here, using a combination of biophysical and bioinformatics methods, we have determined that the N-terminal L242-E344 region of TRPM1 is a S100A1 binding domain. We show that formation of the TRPM1/S100A1 complex is calcium-dependent. Moreover, our structural model of the complex explained data obtained from fluorescence spectroscopy measurements revealing that the complex formation is facilitated through interactions of clusters positively charged (K271A, R273A, R274A) and hydrophobic (L263A, V270A, L276A) residues at the N-terminus of TRPM1. Taken together, our data suggest a molecular mechanism for the potential regulation of TRPM1 by S100A1. PMID:27435061

  15. Kinetics of the Interactions between Copper and Amyloid-β with FAD Mutations and Phosphorylation at the N terminus.

    PubMed

    Girvan, Paul; Miyake, Toru; Teng, Xiangyu; Branch, Thomas; Ying, Liming

    2016-09-15

    Mutations and post-translational modifications of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide in its N terminus have been shown to increase fibril formation, yet the molecular mechanism is not clear. Here we investigated the kinetics of the interactions of copper with two Aβ peptides containing Familial Alzheimer's disease (FAD) mutations (English (H6R) and Tottori (D7N)), as well as with Aβ peptide phosphorylated at serine 8 (pS8). All three peptides bind to copper with a similar rate as the wild-type (wt). The dissociation rates follow the order pS8>H6R>wt>D7N; the interconversion between the two coordinating species occurs 50 % faster for H6R and pS8, whereas D7N had only a negligible effect. Interestingly, the rate of ternary complex (copper-bridged heterodimer) formation for the modified peptides was significantly faster than that for wt, thus leading us to propose that FAD and sporadic AD might share a kinetic origin for the enhanced oligomerisation of Aβ. PMID:27356100

  16. Role of the C-terminus of Saccharomyces cerevisiae ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme (Rad6) in substrate and ubiquitin-protein-ligase (E3-R) interactions.

    PubMed

    Raboy, B; Kulka, R G

    1994-04-01

    The product of the RAD6 (UBC2) gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme (Rad6) which is implicated in DNA repair, induced mutagenesis, retrotransposition, sporulation and the degradation of proteins with destabilizing N-terminal amino acid residues. Deletion of the 23-residue acidic C-terminus of Rad6 impairs sporulation and N-end rule protein degradation in vivo but does not affect other functions such as DNA repair and induced mutagenesis. We have investigated the role of the C-terminus of Rad6 in in vitro interactions with various substrates and with a putative ubiquitin-protein ligase, E3-R. The removal of the Rad6 C-terminus had significant different effects on enzyme activity for individual substrates. Although the 23-residue truncated Rad6-149 protein had markedly impaired activity for histone H2B and micrococcal nuclease, the activity for cytochrome c was the same as that of the intact Rad6 protein. Similarly, truncation of Rad6 had no effect on its activity for several poor substrates, namely, beta-casein, beta-lactoglobulin and oxidized RNase. E3-R stimulated the activities of both Rad6 and Rad6-149 for the latter three substrates to similar degrees. E3-R appears to act by enhancing the low intrinsic affinity of Rad6 and Rad6-149 for these substrates. Thus Rad6 can act in three different modes in vitro depending on the substrate, namely unassisted C-terminus-dependent, unassisted C-terminus-independent and E3-R-assisted C-terminus-independent modes. We also examined the results of removing the C-terminal acidic region of Cdc34 (Ubc3), a ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme closely related to Rad6. Truncation of Cdc34 like that of Rad6 had no effect on activity for beta-casein, beta-lactoglobulin or oxidized RNase in the presence or absence of E3-R.

  17. Human SAS-6 C-Terminus Nucleates and Promotes Microtubule Assembly in Vitro by Binding to Microtubules.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Hindol; Badarudeen, Binshad; George, Athira; Thomas, Geethu Emily; Gireesh, K K; Manna, Tapas K

    2015-10-20

    Centrioles are essential components of the animal centrosome and play crucial roles in the formation of cilia and flagella. They are cylindrical structures composed of nine triplet microtubules organized around a central cartwheel. Recent studies have identified spindle assembly abnormal protein SAS-6 as a critical component necessary for formation of the cartwheel. However, the molecular details of how the cartwheel participates in centriolar microtubule assembly have not been clearly understood. In this report, we show that the C-terminal tail (residues 470-657) of human SAS-6, HsSAS-6 C, the region that has been shown to extend toward the centriolar wall where the microtubule triplets are organized, nucleated and induced microtubule polymerization in vitro. The N-terminus (residues 1-166) of HsSAS-6, the domain known to be involved in formation of the central hub of the cartwheel, did not, however, exert any effect on microtubule polymerization. HsSAS-6 C bound to the microtubules and localized along the lengths of the microtubules in vitro. Microtubule pull-down and coimmunoprecipitation (Co-IP) experiments with S-phase synchronized HeLa cell lysates showed that the endogenous HsSAS-6 coprecipitated with the microtubules, and it mediated interaction with tubulin. Isothermal calorimetry titration and size exclusion chromatography showed that HsSAS-6 C bound to the αβ-tubulin dimer in vitro. The results demonstrate that HsSAS-6 possesses an intrinsic microtubule assembly promoting activity and further implicate that its outer exposed C-terminal tail may play critical roles in microtubule assembly and stabilizing microtubule attachment with the centriolar cartwheel.

  18. Interactions of the C-terminus of lung surfactant protein B with lipid bilayers are modulated by acyl chain saturation.

    PubMed

    Antharam, Vijay C; Farver, R Suzanne; Kuznetsova, Anna; Sippel, Katherine H; Mills, Frank D; Elliott, Douglas W; Sternin, Edward; Long, Joanna R

    2008-11-01

    Lung surfactant protein B (SP-B) is critical to minimizing surface tension in the alveoli. The C-terminus of SP-B, residues 59-80, has much of the surface activity of the full protein and serves as a template for the development of synthetic surfactant replacements. The molecular mechanisms responsible for its ability to restore lung compliance were investigated with circular dichroism, differential scanning calorimetry, and (31)P and (2)H solid-state NMR spectroscopy. SP-B(59-80) forms an amphipathic helix which alters lipid organization and acyl chain dynamics in fluid lamellar phase 4:1 DPPC:POPG and 3:1 POPC:POPG MLVs. At higher levels of SP-B(59-80) in the POPC:POPG lipid system a transition to a nonlamellar phase is observed while DPPC:POPG mixtures remain in a lamellar phase. Deuterium NMR shows an increase in acyl chain order in DPPC:POPG MLVs on addition of SP-B(59-80); in POPC:POPG MLVs, acyl chain order parameters decrease. Our results indicate SP-B(59-80) penetrates deeply into DPPC:POPG bilayers and binds more peripherally to POPC:POPG bilayers. Similar behavior has been observed for KL(4), a peptide mimetic of SP-B which was originally designed using SP-B(59-80) as a template and has been clinically demonstrated to be successful in treating respiratory distress syndrome. The ability of these helical peptides to differentially partition into lipid lamellae based on their degree of monounsaturation and subsequent changes in lipid dynamics suggest a mechanism for lipid organization and trafficking within the dynamic lung environment. PMID:18694722

  19. Mutational analysis of the N-terminus in Schistocerca gregaria ion-transport peptide expressed in Drosophila Kc1 cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Y; Meredith, J; Brock, H W; Phillips, J E

    2005-01-01

    The functions of the 6-7 amino acid N-terminal domain conserved in insect and crustacean members of the hyperglycemic hormone (CHH) family were assayed by site-directed mutagenesis of Schistocerca gregaria ion-transport peptide (SchgrITP). Mutant peptides were expressed in Drosophila Kc1 cells and tested in a biological assay measuring stimulation of active Cl(-) transport across the locust ileum. We exchanged the N-terminal domain of SchgrITP with that of the shrimp Penaeus japonicus hyperglycemic hormone leaving the remainder of SchgrITP intact. The chimeric peptide was completely inactive in the ileal bioassay, showing that the N-terminus of SchgrITP is essential and that the 2 amino acids (phenylalanine-3 and aspartate-4) conserved in the shrimp and locust peptides are not sufficient for function. We made all possible alanine substitutions in the SchgrITP N-terminal domain. Only phenylalanines 2 and 3 were essential for function in the locust ileal bioassay. All N-terminal mutations were cleaved correctly from the prepropeptide, and expressed in similar concentrations as wild-type ITP suggesting the specific amino acids are not essential for these functions. Post-translational modification may explain a minor ITP isomorph observed in Drosophila Kc1 cell expression. Alanine substitution at position 2 produced a weak ITP antagonist. These structure-function studies, the first for any member of the CHH family, show that both conserved and unconserved amino acids contribute to SchgrITP ion-transport function and that the conserved aspartate in position 4 is required for a yet uncharacterized function.

  20. The N-Terminus of Murine Leukaemia Virus p12 Protein Is Required for Mature Core Stability

    PubMed Central

    Wight, Darren J.; Boucherit, Virginie C.; Wanaguru, Madushi; Elis, Efrat; Hirst, Elizabeth M. A.; Li, Wilson; Ehrlich, Marcelo; Bacharach, Eran; Bishop, Kate N.

    2014-01-01

    The murine leukaemia virus (MLV) gag gene encodes a small protein called p12 that is essential for the early steps of viral replication. The N- and C-terminal regions of p12 are sequentially acting domains, both required for p12 function. Defects in the C-terminal domain can be overcome by introducing a chromatin binding motif into the protein. However, the function of the N-terminal domain remains unknown. Here, we undertook a detailed analysis of the effects of p12 mutation on incoming viral cores. We found that both reverse transcription complexes and isolated mature cores from N-terminal p12 mutants have altered capsid complexes compared to wild type virions. Electron microscopy revealed that mature N-terminal p12 mutant cores have different morphologies, although immature cores appear normal. Moreover, in immunofluorescent studies, both p12 and capsid proteins were lost rapidly from N-terminal p12 mutant viral cores after entry into target cells. Importantly, we determined that p12 binds directly to the MLV capsid lattice. However, we could not detect binding of an N-terminally altered p12 to capsid. Altogether, our data imply that p12 stabilises the mature MLV core, preventing premature loss of capsid, and that this is mediated by direct binding of p12 to the capsid shell. In this manner, p12 is also retained in the pre-integration complex where it facilitates tethering to mitotic chromosomes. These data also explain our previous observations that modifications to the N-terminus of p12 alter the ability of particles to abrogate restriction by TRIM5alpha and Fv1, factors that recognise viral capsid lattices. PMID:25356837

  1. Biomedical scientist training officers' evaluation of integrated (co-terminus) Applied Biomedical Science BSc programmes: a multicentre study.

    PubMed

    Pitt, S J; Cunningham, J M

    2011-01-01

    The introduction of the Institute of Biomedical Science (IBMS) portfolio for pre-registration training in 2003 allowed universities to develop integrated (co-terminus) biomedical science BSc programmes. Students undertake structured placements within clinical pathology laboratories as part of their degree. The clinical training and professional development of students is undertaken by training officers (TOs), who are experienced Health Professions Council (HPC)-registered biomedical scientists and usually also members of the IBMS. This study aims to evaluate TOs' perceptions of these integrated degrees as a means of delivering pre-registration training for biomedical scientists. A questionnaire to collect quantitative data and be completed anonymously was sent to TOs, via staff at participating universities. Items considered TOs' perceptions in four categories: how well students fitted into the laboratory team, their professional and scientific development, the impact of delivering integrated degrees on service delivery, and the commitment to training students. Surveys took place in 2007, 2008 and 2009 and involved TOs taking students from 10, 14 and 17 universities each year, respectively. The response rates to the survey were 60% in 2007, 34% in 2008 and 12% in 2009. Participants were representative in terms of age, gender and pathology discipline and had a broad range of experience with students. The overall mean score for TOs perceptions was 3.38 in 2007 which increased significantly to 3.99 in 2009 (Kruskall Wallis test chi2 = 21.13, P<0.01). Mean scores in three of the four categories were positive in 2007, although the impact on service delivery was perceived negatively. In all areas, means were significantly greater in 2009. The results indicate that TOs view the integrated degrees favourably and are happy with the scientific and professional development of students. Although designing training sessions suitable for undergraduates took extra work initially

  2. Structural and Functional Studies of the Rap1 C-Terminus Reveal Novel Separation-of-Function Mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Feeser, Elizabeth A.; Wolberger, Cynthia

    2010-02-19

    The yeast Rap1 protein plays an important role in transcriptional silencing and in telomere length homeostasis. Rap1 mediates silencing at the HM loci and at telomeres by recruiting the Sir3 and Sir4 proteins to chromatin via a Rap1 C-terminal domain, which also recruits the telomere length regulators, Rif1 and Rif2. We report the 1.85 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of the Rap1 C-terminus, which adopts an all-helical fold with no structural homologues. The structure was used to engineer surface mutations in Rap1, and the effects of these mutations on silencing and telomere length regulation were assayed in vivo. Our surprising finding was that there is no overlap between mutations affecting mating-type and telomeric silencing, suggesting that Rap1 plays distinct roles in silencing at the silent mating-type loci and telomeres. We also found novel Rap1 phenotypes and new separation-of-function mutants, which provide new tools for studying Rap1 function. Yeast two-hybrid studies were used to determine how specific mutations affect recruitment of Sir3, Rif1, and Rif2. A comparison of the yeast two-hybrid and functional data reveals patterns of protein interactions that correlate with each Rap1 phenotype. We find that Sir3 interactions are important for telomeric silencing, but not mating type silencing, and that Rif1 and Rif2 interactions are important in different subsets of telomeric length mutants. Our results show that the role of Rap1 in silencing differs between the HM loci and the telomeres and offer insight into the interplay between HM silencing, telomeric silencing, and telomere length regulation. These findings suggest a model in which competition and multiple recruitment events modulate silencing and telomere length regulation.

  3. NF90 Binds the Dengue Virus RNA 3′ Terminus and Is a Positive Regulator of Dengue Virus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Gehrke, Lee

    2011-01-01

    Background Viral RNA translation and replication are regulated by sequence and structural elements in the 5′ and 3′ untranslated regions (UTR) and by host cell and/or viral proteins that bind them. Dengue virus has a single-stranded RNA genome with positive polarity, a 5′ m7GpppG cap, and a conserved 3′-terminal stem loop (SL) that is linked to proposed functions in viral RNA transcription and translation. Mechanisms explaining the contributions of host proteins to viral RNA translation and replication are poorly defined, yet understanding host protein-viral RNA interactions may identify new targets for therapeutic intervention. This study was directed at identifying functionally significant host proteins that bind the conserved dengue virus RNA 3′ terminus. Methodology/Principal Findings Proteins eluted from a dengue 3′ SL RNA affinity column at increasing ionic strength included two with double-strand RNA binding motifs (NF90/DRBP76 and DEAH box polypeptide 9/RNA helicase A (RHA)), in addition to NF45, which forms a heterodimer with NF90. Although detectable NF90 and RHA proteins localized to the nucleus of uninfected cells, immunofluorescence revealed cytoplasmic NF90 in dengue virus-infected cells, leading us to hypothesize that NF90 has a functional role(s) in dengue infections. Cells depleted of NF90 were used to quantify viral RNA transcript levels and production of infectious dengue virus. NF90 depletion was accompanied by a 50%-70% decrease in dengue RNA levels and in production of infectious viral progeny. Conclusions/Significance The results indicate that NF90 interacts with the 3′ SL structure of the dengue RNA and is a positive regulator of dengue virus replication. NF90 depletion diminished the production of infectious dengue virus by more than 50%, which may have important significance for identifying therapeutic targets to limit a virus that threatens more than a billion people worldwide. PMID:21386893

  4. Role of the ρ1 GABA(C) receptor N-terminus in assembly, trafficking and function.

    PubMed

    Wong, Lik-Wei; Tae, Han-Shen; Cromer, Brett A

    2014-12-17

    The GABAC receptor and closely related GABAA receptor are members of the pentameric ligand-gated ion channels (pLGICs) superfamily and mediate inhibitory fast synaptic transmission in the nervous system. Each pLGIC subunit comprises an N-terminal extracellular agonist-binding domain followed by a channel domain and a variable intracellular domain. Available structural information shows that the core of the agonist-binding domain is a β sandwich of ten β-strands, which form the agonist-binding pocket at the subunit interface. This β-sandwich is preceded by an N-terminal α-helix in eukaryotic structures but not in prokaryotic structures. The N-terminal α-helix has been shown to be functionally essential in α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. Sequence analysis of GABAC and GABAA receptors predicts an α-helix in a similar position but preceded by 8 to 46 additional residues, of unknown function, which we term the N-terminal extension. To test the functional role of both the N-terminal extension and the putative N-terminal α-helix in the ρ1 GABAC receptor, we created a series of deletions from the N-terminus. The N-terminal extension was not functionally essential, but its removal did reduce both cell surface expression and cooperativity of agonist-gated channel function. Further deletion of the putative N-terminal α-helix abolished receptor function by preventing cell-surface expression. Our results further demonstrate the essential role of the N-terminal α-helix in the assembly and trafficking of eukaryotic pLGICs. They also provide evidence that the N-terminal extension, although not essential, contributes to receptor assembly, trafficking and conformational changes associated with ligand gating.

  5. Age-dependent neuronal and synaptic degeneration in mice transgenic for the C terminus of the amyloid precursor protein.

    PubMed

    Oster-Granite, M L; McPhie, D L; Greenan, J; Neve, R L

    1996-11-01

    The molecular basis for the degeneration of neurons and the deposition of amyloid in plaques and in the cerebrovasculature in Alzheimer's disease (AD) is incompletely understood. We have proposed that one molecule common to these abnormal processes is a fragment of the Alzheimer amyloid precursor protein (APP) comprising the C-terminal 100 amino acids of this molecule (APP-C100). We tested this hypothesis by creating transgenic mice expressing APP-C100 in the brain. We report here that aging (18-28 month) APP-C100 transgenic mice exhibit profound degeneration of neurons and synapses in Ammon's horn and the dentate gyrus of the hippocampal formation. Of the 106 transgenic mice between 8 and 28 months of age that were examined, all of those older than 18 months displayed severe hippocampal degeneration. The numerous degenerating axonal profiles contained increased numbers of neurofilaments, whorls of membrane, and accumulations of debris resembling secondary lysosomes near the cell body. The dendrites of degenerating granule and pyramidal cells contained disorganized, wavy microtubules. Cerebral blood vessels had thickened refractile basal laminae, and microglia laden with debris lay adjacent to larger venous vessels. Mice transgenic for Flag-APP-C100 (in which the hydrophilic Flag tag was fused to the N terminus of APP-C100) showed a similar degree of neurodegeneration in the hippocampal formation as early as 12 months of age. The 45 control mice displayed only occasional necrotic cells and no extensive cell degeneration in the same brain regions. These findings show that APP-C100 is capable of causing some of the neuropathological features of AD. PMID:8824314

  6. Atomic Structure and Biochemical Characterization of an RNA Endonuclease in the N Terminus of Andes Virus L Protein

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-García, Yaiza; Reguera, Juan; Busch, Carola; Witte, Gregor; Sánchez-Ramos, Oliberto; Betzel, Christian; Cusack, Stephen; Günther, Stephan; Reindl, Sophia

    2016-01-01

    Andes virus (ANDV) is a human-pathogenic hantavirus. Hantaviruses presumably initiate their mRNA synthesis by using cap structures derived from host cell mRNAs, a mechanism called cap-snatching. A signature for a cap-snatching endonuclease is present in the N terminus of hantavirus L proteins. In this study, we aimed to solve the atomic structure of the ANDV endonuclease and characterize its biochemical features. However, the wild-type protein was refractory to expression in Escherichia coli, presumably due to toxic enzyme activity. To circumvent this problem, we introduced attenuating mutations in the domain that were previously shown to enhance L protein expression in mammalian cells. Using this approach, 13 mutant proteins encompassing ANDV L protein residues 1–200 were successfully expressed and purified. Protein stability and nuclease activity of the mutants was analyzed and the crystal structure of one mutant was solved to a resolution of 2.4 Å. Shape in solution was determined by small angle X-ray scattering. The ANDV endonuclease showed structural similarities to related enzymes of orthobunya-, arena-, and orthomyxoviruses, but also differences such as elongated shape and positively charged patches surrounding the active site. The enzyme was dependent on manganese, which is bound to the active site, most efficiently cleaved single-stranded RNA substrates, did not cleave DNA, and could be inhibited by known endonuclease inhibitors. The atomic structure in conjunction with stability and activity data for the 13 mutant enzymes facilitated inference of structure–function relationships in the protein. In conclusion, we solved the structure of a hantavirus cap-snatching endonuclease, elucidated its catalytic properties, and present a highly active mutant form, which allows for inhibitor screening. PMID:27300328

  7. Computational modeling of the N-terminus of the human dopamine transporter and its interaction with PIP2-containing membranes

    PubMed Central

    Khelashvili, George; Doktorova, Milka; Sahai, Michelle A.; Johner, Niklaus; Shi, Lei; Weinstein, Harel

    2015-01-01

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) is a transmembrane protein belonging to the family of Neurotransmitter:Sodium Symporters (NSS). Members of the NSS are responsible for the clearance of neurotransmitters from the synaptic cleft, and for their translocation back into the presynaptic nerve terminal. The DAT contains long intracellular N- and C-terminal domains that are strongly implicated in the transporter function. The N-terminus (N-term), in particular, regulates the reverse transport (efflux) of the substrate through DAT. Currently, the molecular mechanisms of the efflux remain elusive in large part due to lack of structural information on the N-terminal segment. Here we report a computational model of the N-term of the human DAT (hDAT), obtained through an ab initio structure prediction, in combination with extensive atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in the context of a lipid membrane. Our analysis reveals that whereas the N-term is a highly dynamic domain, it contains secondary structure elements that remain stable in the long MD trajectories of interactions with the bilayer (totaling >2.2 µs). Combining MD simulations with continuum mean-field modeling we found that the N-term engages with lipid membranes through electrostatic interactions with the charged lipids PIP2 (phosphatidylinositol 4,5-Biphosphate) or PS (phosphatidylserine) that are present in these bilayers. We identify specific motifs along the N-term implicated in such interactions and show that differential modes of N-term/membrane association result in differential positioning of the structured segments on the membrane surface. These results will inform future structure-based studies that will elucidate the mechanistic role of the N-term in DAT function. PMID:25739722

  8. A variant in the carboxyl-terminus of connexin 40 alters GAP junctions and increases risk for tetralogy of Fallot

    PubMed Central

    Guida, Valentina; Ferese, Rosangela; Rocchetti, Marcella; Bonetti, Monica; Sarkozy, Anna; Cecchetti, Serena; Gelmetti, Vania; Lepri, Francesca; Copetti, Massimiliano; Lamorte, Giuseppe; Cristina Digilio, Maria; Marino, Bruno; Zaza, Antonio; den Hertog, Jeroen; Dallapiccola, Bruno; De Luca, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    GJA5 gene (MIM no. 121013), localized at 1q21.1, encodes for the cardiac gap junction protein connexin 40. In humans, copy number variants of chromosome 1q21.1 have been associated with variable phenotypes comprising congenital heart disease (CHD), including isolated TOF. In mice, the deletion of Gja5 can cause a variety of complex CHDs, in particular of the cardiac outflow tract, corresponding to TOF in many cases. In the present study, we screened for mutations in the GJA5 gene 178 unrelated probands with isolated TOF. A heterozygous nucleotide change (c.793C>T) in exon 2 of the gene leading to the p.Pro265Ser variant at the carboxyl-terminus of the protein was found in two unrelated sporadic patients, one with classic anatomy and one with pulmonary atresia. This GJA5 missense substitution was not observed in 1568 ethnically-matched control chromosomes. Immunofluorescent staining and confocal microscopy revealed that cells expressing the mutant protein form sparse or no visible gap-junction plaques in the region of cell–cell contact. Moreover, analysis of the transfer of the gap junction permanent tracer lucifer yellow showed that cells expressing the mutant protein have a reduced rate of dye transfer compared with wild-type cells. Finally, use of a zebrafish model revealed that microinjection of the GJA5-p.Pro265Ser mutant disrupts overall morphology of the heart tube in the 37% (22/60) of embryos, compared with the 6% (4/66) of the GJA5 wild-type-injected embryos. These findings implicate GJA5 gene as a novel susceptibility gene for TOF. PMID:22713807

  9. Atomic Structure and Biochemical Characterization of an RNA Endonuclease in the N Terminus of Andes Virus L Protein.

    PubMed

    Fernández-García, Yaiza; Reguera, Juan; Busch, Carola; Witte, Gregor; Sánchez-Ramos, Oliberto; Betzel, Christian; Cusack, Stephen; Günther, Stephan; Reindl, Sophia

    2016-06-01

    Andes virus (ANDV) is a human-pathogenic hantavirus. Hantaviruses presumably initiate their mRNA synthesis by using cap structures derived from host cell mRNAs, a mechanism called cap-snatching. A signature for a cap-snatching endonuclease is present in the N terminus of hantavirus L proteins. In this study, we aimed to solve the atomic structure of the ANDV endonuclease and characterize its biochemical features. However, the wild-type protein was refractory to expression in Escherichia coli, presumably due to toxic enzyme activity. To circumvent this problem, we introduced attenuating mutations in the domain that were previously shown to enhance L protein expression in mammalian cells. Using this approach, 13 mutant proteins encompassing ANDV L protein residues 1-200 were successfully expressed and purified. Protein stability and nuclease activity of the mutants was analyzed and the crystal structure of one mutant was solved to a resolution of 2.4 Å. Shape in solution was determined by small angle X-ray scattering. The ANDV endonuclease showed structural similarities to related enzymes of orthobunya-, arena-, and orthomyxoviruses, but also differences such as elongated shape and positively charged patches surrounding the active site. The enzyme was dependent on manganese, which is bound to the active site, most efficiently cleaved single-stranded RNA substrates, did not cleave DNA, and could be inhibited by known endonuclease inhibitors. The atomic structure in conjunction with stability and activity data for the 13 mutant enzymes facilitated inference of structure-function relationships in the protein. In conclusion, we solved the structure of a hantavirus cap-snatching endonuclease, elucidated its catalytic properties, and present a highly active mutant form, which allows for inhibitor screening.

  10. Atomic Structure and Biochemical Characterization of an RNA Endonuclease in the N Terminus of Andes Virus L Protein.

    PubMed

    Fernández-García, Yaiza; Reguera, Juan; Busch, Carola; Witte, Gregor; Sánchez-Ramos, Oliberto; Betzel, Christian; Cusack, Stephen; Günther, Stephan; Reindl, Sophia

    2016-06-01

    Andes virus (ANDV) is a human-pathogenic hantavirus. Hantaviruses presumably initiate their mRNA synthesis by using cap structures derived from host cell mRNAs, a mechanism called cap-snatching. A signature for a cap-snatching endonuclease is present in the N terminus of hantavirus L proteins. In this study, we aimed to solve the atomic structure of the ANDV endonuclease and characterize its biochemical features. However, the wild-type protein was refractory to expression in Escherichia coli, presumably due to toxic enzyme activity. To circumvent this problem, we introduced attenuating mutations in the domain that were previously shown to enhance L protein expression in mammalian cells. Using this approach, 13 mutant proteins encompassing ANDV L protein residues 1-200 were successfully expressed and purified. Protein stability and nuclease activity of the mutants was analyzed and the crystal structure of one mutant was solved to a resolution of 2.4 Å. Shape in solution was determined by small angle X-ray scattering. The ANDV endonuclease showed structural similarities to related enzymes of orthobunya-, arena-, and orthomyxoviruses, but also differences such as elongated shape and positively charged patches surrounding the active site. The enzyme was dependent on manganese, which is bound to the active site, most efficiently cleaved single-stranded RNA substrates, did not cleave DNA, and could be inhibited by known endonuclease inhibitors. The atomic structure in conjunction with stability and activity data for the 13 mutant enzymes facilitated inference of structure-function relationships in the protein. In conclusion, we solved the structure of a hantavirus cap-snatching endonuclease, elucidated its catalytic properties, and present a highly active mutant form, which allows for inhibitor screening. PMID:27300328

  11. Genetic Ablation of the CDP/Cux Protein C Terminus Results in Hair Cycle Defects and Reduced Male Fertility

    PubMed Central

    Luong, Mai X.; van der Meijden, Caroline M.; Xing, DongXia; Hesselton, Ruth; Monuki, Edwin S.; Jones, Stephen N.; Lian, Jane B.; Stein, Janet L.; Stein, Gary S.; Neufeld, Ellis J.; van Wijnen, Andre J.

    2002-01-01

    Murine CDP/Cux, a homologue of the Drosophila Cut homeoprotein, modulates the promoter activity of cell cycle-related and cell-type-specific genes. CDP/Cux interacts with histone gene promoters as the DNA binding subunit of a large nuclear complex (HiNF-D). CDP/Cux is a ubiquitous protein containing four conserved DNA binding domains: three Cut repeats and a homeodomain. In this study, we analyzed genetically targeted mice (Cutl1tm2Ejn, referred to as ΔC) that express a mutant CDP/Cux protein with a deletion of the C terminus, including the homeodomain. In comparison to the wild-type protein, indirect immunofluorescence showed that the mutant protein exhibited significantly reduced nuclear localization. Consistent with these data, DNA binding activity of HiNF-D was lost in nuclear extracts derived from mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) or adult tissues of homozygous mutant (ΔC−/−) mice, indicating the functional loss of CDP/Cux protein in the nucleus. No significant difference in growth characteristics or total histone H4 mRNA levels was observed between wild-type and ΔC−/− MEFs in culture. However, specific histone genes (H4.1 and H1) containing CDP/Cux binding sites have reduced expression levels in homozygous mutant MEFs. Stringent control of growth and differentiation appears to be compromised in vivo. Homozygous mutant mice have stunted growth (20 to 50% weight reduction), a high postnatal death rate of 60 to 70%, sparse abnormal coat hair, and severely reduced fertility. The deregulated hair cycle and severely diminished fertility in Cutl1tm2Ejn/tm2Ejn mice suggest that CDP/Cux is required for the developmental control of dermal and reproductive functions. PMID:11839809

  12. The functional domain of GCS1-based gamete fusion resides in the amino terminus in plant and parasite species.

    PubMed

    Mori, Toshiyuki; Hirai, Makoto; Kuroiwa, Tsuneyoshi; Miyagishima, Shin-ya

    2010-01-01

    Fertilization is one of the most important processes in all organisms utilizing sexual reproduction. In a previous study, we succeeded in identifying a novel male gametic transmembrane protein GCS1 (GENERATIVE CELL SPECIFIC 1), also called HAP2 (HAPLESS 2) in the male-sterile Arabidopsis thaliana mutants, as a factor critical to gamete fusion in flowering plants. Interestingly, GCS1 is highly conserved among various eukaryotes covering plants, protists and invertebrates. Of these organisms, Chlamydomonas (green alga) and Plasmodium (malaria parasite) GCS1s similarly show male gametic expression and gamete fusion function. Since it is generally believed that protein factors controlling gamete fusion have rapidly evolved and different organisms utilize species-specific gamete fusion factors, GCS1 may be an ancient fertilization factor derived from the common ancestor of those organisms above. And therefore, its molecular structure and function are important to understanding the common molecular mechanics of eukaryotic fertilization. In this study, we tried to detect the central functional domain(s) of GCS1, using complementation assay of Arabidopsis GCS1 mutant lines expressing modified GCS1. As a result, the positively-charged C-terminal sequence of this protein is dispensable for gamete fusion, while the highly conserved N-terminal domain is critical to GCS1 function. In addition, in vitro fertilization assay of Plasmodium berghei (mouse malaria parasite) knock-in lines expressing partly truncated GCS1 showed similar results. Those findings above indicate that the extracellular N-terminus alone is sufficient for GCS1-based gamete fusion.

  13. Identification of a Novel Coregulator, SH3YL1, That Interacts With the Androgen Receptor N-Terminus

    PubMed Central

    Blessing, Alicia M.; Ganesan, Sathya; Rajapakshe, Kimal; Ying Sung, Ying; Reddy Bollu, Lakshmi; Shi, Yan; Cheung, Edwin; Coarfa, Cristian; Chang, Jeffrey T.; McDonnell, Donald P.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear receptor (NR)-mediated transcriptional activity is a dynamic process that is regulated by the binding of ligands that induce distinct conformational changes in the NR. These structural alterations lead to the differential recruitment of coregulators (coactivators or corepressors) that control the expression of NR-regulated genes. Here, we show that a stretch of proline residues located within the N-terminus of androgen receptor (AR) is a bona fide coregulator binding surface, the disruption of which reduces the androgen-dependent proliferation and migration of prostate cancer (PCa) cells. Using T7 phage display, we identified a novel AR-interacting protein, Src homology 3 (SH3)-domain containing, Ysc84-like 1 (SH3YL1), whose interaction with the receptor is dependent upon this polyproline domain. As with mutations within the AR polyproline domain, knockdown of SH3YL1 attenuated androgen-mediated cell growth and migration. RNA expression analysis revealed that SH3YL1 was required for the induction of a subset of AR-modulated genes. Notable was the observation that ubinuclein 1 (UBN1), a key member of a histone H3.3 chaperone complex, was a transcriptional target of the AR/SH3YL1 complex, correlated with aggressive PCa in patients, and was necessary for the maximal androgen-mediated proliferation and migration of PCa cells. Collectively, these data highlight the importance of an amino-terminal activation domain, its associated coregulator, and downstream transcriptional targets in regulating cellular processes of pathological importance in PCa. PMID:26305679

  14. Mutations in the catalytic core or the C-terminus of murine leukemia virus (MLV) integrase disrupt virion infectivity and exert diverse effects on reverse transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Steinrigl, Adolf; Nosek, Dagmara; Ertl, Reinhard; Guenzburg, Walter H.; Salmons, Brian; Klein, Dieter . E-mail: dieter.klein@vu-wien.ac.at

    2007-05-25

    Understanding of the structures and functions of the retroviral integrase (IN), a key enzyme in the viral replication cycle, is essential for developing antiretroviral treatments and facilitating the development of safer gene therapy vehicles. Thus, four MLV IN-mutants were constructed in the context of a retroviral vector system, harbouring either a substitution in the catalytic centre, deletions in the C-terminus, or combinations of both modifications. IN-mutants were tested for their performance in different stages of the viral replication cycle: RNA-packaging; RT-activity; transient and stable infection efficiency; dynamics of reverse transcription and nuclear entry. All mutant vectors packaged viral RNA with wild-type efficiencies and displayed only slight reductions in RT-activity. Deletion of either the IN C-terminus alone, or in addition to part of the catalytic domain exerted contrasting effects on intracellular viral DNA levels, implying that IN influences reverse transcription in more than one direction.

  15. Evidence for a role of the (alpha)-tubulin C terminus in the regulation of cyclin B synthesis in developing oocytes.

    PubMed

    Vée, S; Lafanechère, L; Fisher, D; Wehland, J; Job, D; Picard, A

    2001-03-01

    Microinjected mAb YL1/2, an (alpha)-tubulin antibody specific for the tyrosinated form of the protein, blocks the cell cycle in developing oocytes. Here, we have investigated the mechanism involved in the mAb effect. Both developing starfish and Xenopus oocytes were injected with two different (alpha)-tubulin C terminus antibodies. The injected antibodies blocked cell entry into mitosis through specific inhibition of cyclin B synthesis. The antibody effect was independent of the presence or absence of polymerized microtubules and was mimicked by injected synthetic peptides corresponding to the tyrosinated (alpha)-tubulin C terminus, whereas peptides lacking the terminal tyrosine were ineffective. These results indicate that tyrosinated (alpha)-tubulin, or another protein sharing the same C-terminal epitope, is involved in specific regulation of cyclin B synthesis in developing oocytes.

  16. "Horseshoe cord terminus" sans filum around a bone spur: a rare composite of faulty gastrulation with agenesis of secondary neurulation: case report.

    PubMed

    Dhandapani, Sivashanmugam; Mehta, Veer S; Sharma, Bhavani S

    2013-10-01

    Split cord malformation (SCM) is classified based on the presence of a bone spur and double dural sac. The authors report on a 6-year-old child with primary enuresis in whom MRI findings were suggestive of Type I SCM, and who had unique intraoperative findings of a horseshoe-shaped split cord terminus anchored by a bone spur without the normally tapering conus and filum. The typical appearance of cauda equina was absent, with all the roots arising from the horseshoe cord terminus. This composite anomaly is probably due to the rare combination of faulty gastrulation with abnormal persistence of endomesenchymal tract causing SCM, with concurrent agenesis of secondary neurulation in turn causing absence of filum.

  17. H(N), N, C(α), C(β) and C' assignments of the intrinsically disordered C-terminus of human adenosine A2A receptor.

    PubMed

    Tossavainen, Helena; Hellman, Maarit; Piirainen, Henni; Jaakola, Veli-Pekka; Permi, Perttu

    2015-10-01

    The C-terminus of the human adenosine A2A receptor differs from the other human adenosine receptors by its exceptional length and lack of a canonical cysteine residue. We have previously structurally characterized this C-terminal domain and its interaction with calmodulin. It was shown to be structurally disordered and flexible, and to bind calmodulin with high affinity in a calcium-dependent manner. Interaction with calmodulin takes place at the N-terminal end of the A2A C-terminal domain without major conformational changes in the latter. NMR was one of the biophysical methods used in the study. Here we present the H(N), N, C(α), C(β) and C' chemical shift assignments of the free form of the C-terminus residues 293-412, used in the NMR spectroscopic characterization of the domain.

  18. Functional polarization of the Escherichia coli chromosome terminus: the dif site acts in chromosome dimer resolution only when located between long stretches of opposite polarity.

    PubMed

    Pérals, K; Cornet, F; Merlet, Y; Delon, I; Louarn, J M

    2000-04-01

    In Escherichia coli, chromosome dimers are generated by recombination between circular sister chromosomes. Dimers are lethal unless resolved by a system that involves the XerC, XerD and FtsK proteins acting at a site (dif) in the terminus region. Resolution fails if dif is moved from its normal position. To analyse this positional requirement, dif was transplaced to a variety of positions, and deletions and inversions of portions of the dif region were constructed. Resolution occurs only when dif is located at the convergence of multiple, oppositely polarized DNA sequence elements, inferred to lie in the terminus region. These polar elements may position dif at the cell septum and be general features of chromosome organization with a role in nucleoid dynamics.

  19. Highly sensitive quantification of unconjugated 11-nor-9-carboxy-Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol in a cannabis user's hair using micropulverized extraction.

    PubMed

    Kuwayama, Kenji; Miyaguchi, Hajime; Yamamuro, Tadashi; Tsujikawa, Kenji; Kanamori, Tatsuyuki; Iwata, Yuko T; Inoue, Hiroyuki

    2016-05-01

    We previously developed a simple and highly sensitive analytical method for 11-nor-9-carboxy-Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC-COOH) in spiked hair using micropulverized extraction (MPE) and liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS). Using this method, we were able to quantify THC-COOH at 0.2pg/mg, which is the cut-off level recommended by the Society of Hair Testing. However, it was impossible to prove the validity of the method and the presence of THC-COOH conjugated with glucuronide in hair because we did not have authentic hair containing THC-COOH at the cut-off levels at that time. In this study, the previously developed method was verified using recently obtained hair from a cannabis user. The concentrations of THC-COOH quantified using the method were 0.36±0.01pg/mg without hydrolyzation for glucuronide and 0.49±0.05pg/mg with hydrolyzation after MPE, whereas the concentration quantified using the conventional alkaline dissolution and gas chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry with negative ion chemical ionization was 0.50±0.02pg/mg. The results proved that THC-COOH could be extracted completely from authentic hair containing THC-COOH at the recommended cut-off level using MPE. In addition, MPE with and without hydrolyzation, unlike alkaline dissolution of hair, enabled the measurement of the percentage of the conjugate form in total THC-COOH. The percentage of conjugated THC-COOH in hair measured using the MPE was approximately 26%, which was greatly different from previously reported data (>75%). The discrimination between conjugated and unconjugated compounds in hair is important to understand the mechanism of drug uptakes into hair. More data obtained with our simple and highly sensitive method from the hair of cannabis users would help to understand the relationship of concentrations between THC-COOH and its conjugate in hair.

  20. Antioxidant protection of NO-induced relaxations of the mouse anococcygeus against inhibition by superoxide anions, hydroquinone and carboxy-PTIO.

    PubMed

    Lilley, E; Gibson, A

    1996-09-01

    1. The potential protective effect of several antioxidants [Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (Cu/Zn SOD), ascorbate, reduced glutathione (GSH), and alpha-tocopherol (alpha-TOC)] on relaxations of the mouse anococcygeus muscle to nitric oxide (NO; 15 microM) and, where appropriate, nitrergic field stimulation (10 Hz; 10 s trains) was investigated. 2. The superoxide anion generating drug duroquinone (100 microM) reduced relaxations to exogenous NO by 54 +/- 6%; this inhibition was partially reversed by Cu/Zn SOD (250 u ml-1), and by ascorbate (500 microM). Following inhibition of endogenous Cu/Zn SOD activity with diethyldithiocarbamate (DETCA), duroquinone (50 microM) also reduced relaxations to nitrergic field stimulation (by 53 +/- 6%) and this effect was again reversed by Cu/Zn SOD and by ascorbate. Neither GSH (500 microM) nor alpha-TOC (400 microM) afforded any protection against duroquinone. 3. Xanthine (20 mu ml-1); xanthine oxidase (100 microM) inhibited NO-induced relaxations by 73 +/- 14%, but had no effect on those to nitrergic field stimulation, even after DETCA treatment. The inhibition of exogenous NO was reduced by Cu/Zn SOD (250 u ml-1) and ascorbate (400 microM), but was unaffected by GSH or alpha-TOC (both 400 microM). 4. Hydroquinone (100 microM) also inhibited relaxations to NO (by 52 +/- 10%), but not nitrergic stimulation. In this case, however, the inhibition was reversed by GSH (5-100 microM) and ascorbate (100-400 microM), although Cu/Zn SOD and alpha-TOC were ineffective. 5. 2-(4-Carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (carboxy-PTIO, 50 microM) inhibited NO-induced relaxations by 50 +/- 4%, but had no effect on nitrergic responses; the inhibition was reduced by ascorbate (2-200 microM) and alpha-TOC (10-200 microM), but not by Cu/Zn SOD or GSH. 6. Hydroxocobalamin (5-100 microM) inhibited, equally, relaxations to both NO (-logIC40 3.14 +/- 0.33) and nitrergic stimulation (-logIC40 3.17 +/- 0.22). 7. Thus, a number of

  1. Simultaneous quantification of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, 11-nor-9-carboxy-tetrahydrocannabinol, cannabidiol and cannabinol in oral fluid by microflow-liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Concheiro, Marta; Lee, Dayong; Lendoiro, Elena; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2013-07-01

    Δ(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is the primary target in oral fluid (OF) for detecting cannabis intake. However, additional biomarkers are needed to solve interpretation issues, such as the possibility of passive inhalation by identifying 11-nor-9-carboxy-THC (THCCOOH), and determining recent cannabis smoking by identifying cannabidiol (CBD) and/or cannabinol (CBN). We developed and comprehensively validated a microflow liquid chromatography (LC)-high resolution mass spectrometry method for simultaneous quantification of THC, THCCOOH, CBD and CBN in OF collected with the Oral-Eze(®) and Quantisal™ devices. One milliliter OF-buffer solution (0.25mL OF and 0.5mL of Oral-Eze buffer, 1:3 dilution, or 0.75mL Quantisal buffer, 1:4 dilution) had proteins precipitated, and the supernatant subjected to CEREX™ Polycrom™ THC solid-phase extraction (SPE). Microflow LC reverse-phase separation was achieved with a gradient mobile phase of 10mM ammonium acetate pH 6 and acetonitrile over 10min. We employed a Q Exactive high resolution mass spectrometer, with compounds identified and quantified by targeted-MSMS experiments. The assay was linear 0.5-50ng/mL for THC, CBD and CBN, and 15-500pg/mL for THCCOOH. Intra- and inter-day and total imprecision were <10.8%CV and bias 86.5-104.9%. Extraction efficiency was 52.4-109.2%, process efficiency 12.2-88.9% and matrix effect ranged from -86 to -6.9%. All analytes were stable for 24h at 5°C on the autosampler. The method was applied to authentic OF specimens collected with Quantisal and Oral-Eze devices. This method provides a rapid simultaneous quantification of THCCOOH and THC, CBD, CBN, with good selectivity and sensitivity, providing the opportunity to improve interpretation of cannabinoid OF results by eliminating the possibility of passive inhalation and providing markers of recent cannabis smoking.

  2. Highly sensitive quantification of unconjugated 11-nor-9-carboxy-Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol in a cannabis user's hair using micropulverized extraction.

    PubMed

    Kuwayama, Kenji; Miyaguchi, Hajime; Yamamuro, Tadashi; Tsujikawa, Kenji; Kanamori, Tatsuyuki; Iwata, Yuko T; Inoue, Hiroyuki

    2016-05-01

    We previously developed a simple and highly sensitive analytical method for 11-nor-9-carboxy-Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC-COOH) in spiked hair using micropulverized extraction (MPE) and liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS). Using this method, we were able to quantify THC-COOH at 0.2pg/mg, which is the cut-off level recommended by the Society of Hair Testing. However, it was impossible to prove the validity of the method and the presence of THC-COOH conjugated with glucuronide in hair because we did not have authentic hair containing THC-COOH at the cut-off levels at that time. In this study, the previously developed method was verified using recently obtained hair from a cannabis user. The concentrations of THC-COOH quantified using the method were 0.36±0.01pg/mg without hydrolyzation for glucuronide and 0.49±0.05pg/mg with hydrolyzation after MPE, whereas the concentration quantified using the conventional alkaline dissolution and gas chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry with negative ion chemical ionization was 0.50±0.02pg/mg. The results proved that THC-COOH could be extracted completely from authentic hair containing THC-COOH at the recommended cut-off level using MPE. In addition, MPE with and without hydrolyzation, unlike alkaline dissolution of hair, enabled the measurement of the percentage of the conjugate form in total THC-COOH. The percentage of conjugated THC-COOH in hair measured using the MPE was approximately 26%, which was greatly different from previously reported data (>75%). The discrimination between conjugated and unconjugated compounds in hair is important to understand the mechanism of drug uptakes into hair. More data obtained with our simple and highly sensitive method from the hair of cannabis users would help to understand the relationship of concentrations between THC-COOH and its conjugate in hair. PMID:27020617

  3. Critical roles for the COOH terminus of the Cu-ATPase ATP7B in protein stability, trans-Golgi network retention, copper sensing, and retrograde trafficking.

    PubMed

    Braiterman, L; Nyasae, L; Leves, F; Hubbard, A L

    2011-07-01

    ATP7A and ATP7B are copper-transporting P-type ATPases that are essential to eukaryotic copper homeostasis and must traffic between intracellular compartments to carry out their functions. Previously, we identified a nine-amino acid sequence (F37-E45) in the NH(2) terminus of ATP7B that is required to retain the protein in the Golgi when copper levels are low and target it apically in polarized hepatic cells when copper levels rise. To understand further the mechanisms regulating the intracellular dynamics of ATP7B, using multiple functional assays, we characterized the protein phenotypes of 10 engineered and Wilson disease-associated mutations in the ATP7B COOH terminus in polarized hepatic cells and fibroblasts. We also examined the behavior of a chimera between ATP7B and ATP7A. Our results clearly demonstrate the importance of the COOH terminus of ATP7B in the protein's copper-responsive apical trafficking. L1373 at the end of transmembrane domain 8 is required for protein stability and Golgi retention in low copper, the trileucine motif (L1454-L1456) is required for retrograde trafficking, and the COOH terminus of ATP7B exhibits a higher sensitivity to copper than does ATP7A. Importantly, our results demonstrating that four Wilson disease-associated missense mutations behaved in a wild-type manner in all our assays, together with current information in the literature, raise the possibility that several may not be disease-causing mutations.

  4. Interaction of a peptide derived from C-terminus of human TRPA1 channel with model membranes mimicking the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Witschas, Katja; Jobin, Marie-Lise; Korkut, Dursun Nizam; Vladan, Maria Magdalena; Salgado, Gilmar; Lecomte, Sophie; Vlachova, Viktorie; Alves, Isabel D

    2015-05-01

    The transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 channel (TRPA1) belongs to the TRP cation channel superfamily that responds to a panoply of stimuli such as changes in temperature, calcium levels, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species and lipid mediators among others. The TRP superfamily has been implicated in diverse pathological states including neurodegenerative disorders, kidney diseases, inflammation, pain and cancer. The intracellular C-terminus is an important regulator of TRP channel activity. Studies with this and other TRP superfamily members have shown that the C-terminus association with lipid bilayer alters channel sensitivity and activation, especially interactions occurring through basic residues. Nevertheless, it is not yet clear how this process takes place and which regions in the C-terminus would be responsible for such membrane recognition. With that in mind, herein the first putative membrane interacting region of the C-terminus of human TRPA1, (corresponding to a 29 residue peptide, IAEVQKHASLKRIAMQVELHTSLEKKLPL) named H1 due to its potential helical character was chosen for studies of membrane interaction. The affinity of H1 to lipid membranes, H1 structural changes occurring upon this interaction as well as effects of this interaction in lipid organization and integrity were investigated using a biophysical approach. Lipid models systems composed of zwitterionic and anionic lipids, namely those present in the lipid membrane inner leaflet, where H1 is prone to interact, where used. The study reveals a strong interaction and affinity of H1 as well as peptide structuration especially with membranes containing anionic lipids. Moreover, the interactions and peptide structure adoption are headgroup specific.

  5. The N Terminus of Type III Secretion Needle Protein YscF from Yersinia pestis Functions To Modulate Innate Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Osei-Owusu, Patrick; Jessen Condry, Danielle L.; Toosky, Melody; Roughead, William; Bradley, David S.

    2015-01-01

    The type III secretion system is employed by many pathogens, including the genera Yersinia, Shigella, Pseudomonas, and Salmonella, to deliver effector proteins into eukaryotic cells. The injectisome needle is formed by the polymerization of a single protein, e.g., YscF (Yersinia pestis), PscF (Pseudomonas aeruginosa), PrgI (Salmonella enterica SPI-1), SsaG (Salmonella enterica SPI-2), or MxiH (Shigella flexneri). In this study, we demonstrated that the N termini of some needle proteins, particularly the N terminus of YscF from Yersinia pestis, influences host immune responses. The N termini of several needle proteins were truncated and tested for the ability to induce inflammatory responses in a human monocytic cell line (THP-1 cells). Truncated needle proteins induced proinflammatory cytokines to different magnitudes than the corresponding wild-type proteins, except SsaG. Notably, N-terminally truncated YscF induced significantly higher activation of NF-κB and/or AP-1 and higher induction of proinflammatory cytokines, suggesting that a function of the N terminus of YscF is interference with host sensing of YscF, consistent with Y. pestis pathogenesis. To directly test the ability of the N terminus of YscF to suppress cytokine induction, a YscF-SsaG chimera with 15 N-terminal amino acids from YscF added to SsaG was constructed. The chimeric YscF-SsaG induced lower levels of cytokines than wild-type SsaG. However, the addition of 15 random amino acids to SsaG had no effect on NF-κB/AP-1 activation. These results suggest that the N terminus of YscF can function to decrease cytokine induction, perhaps contributing to a favorable immune environment leading to survival of Y. pestis within the eukaryotic host. PMID:25644012

  6. Conserved amino acids within the N-terminus of the West Nile virus NS4A protein contribute to virus replication, protein stability and membrane proliferation.

    PubMed

    Ambrose, R L; Mackenzie, J M

    2015-07-01

    The West Nile virus strain Kunjin virus (WNVKUN) NS4A protein is a multifunctional protein involved in many aspects of the virus life-cycle and is a major component of the WNVKUN replication complex (RC). Previously we identified a conserved region in the C-terminus of NS4A regulating proteolytic processing and RC assembly, and now investigate key conserved residues in the N-terminus of NS4A and their contribution to WNVKUN replication. Mutation of P13 completely ablated replication, whereas, mutation of P48 and D49, near the first transmembrane helix, and G66 within the helix, showed variable defects in replication, virion secretion and membrane proliferation. Intriguingly, the P48 and G66 NS4A mutants resulted in specific proteasome depletion of NS4A that could in part be rescued with a proteasome inhibitor. Our results suggest that the N-terminus of NS4A contributes to correct folding and stability, essential for facilitating the essential roles of NS4A during replication.

  7. Importance of two consecutive methionines at the N-terminus of a cellulose synthase (PtdCesA8A) for normal wood cellulose synthesis in aspen.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yunxia; Xu, Fuyu; Gou, Jiqing; Al-Haddad, Jameel; Telewski, Frank W; Bae, Hyeun-Jong; Joshi, Chandrashekhar P

    2012-11-01

    All known orthologs of a secondary wall-associated cellulose synthase (CesA) gene from Arabidopsis, AtCesA8, encode CesA proteins with two consecutive methionines at their N-termini (MM or 2M). Here, we report that these 2Ms in an aspen ortholog of AtCesA8, PtdCesA8A, are important for maintaining normal wood cellulose biosynthesis in aspen trees. Overexpression of an altered PtdCesA8A cDNA encoding a PtdCesA8A protein missing one methionine at the N-terminus (1M) in aspen resulted in substantial decrease in cellulose content and caused negative effects on wood strength, suggesting that both methionines are essential for proper CesA expression and function in developing xylem tissues. Transcripts from a pair of paralogous native PtdCesA8 genes, as well as introduced PtdCesA8A:1M transgenes were significantly reduced in developing xylem tissues of transgenic aspen plants, suggestive of a co-suppression event. Overexpression of a native PtdCesA8A cDNA encoding a CesA protein with 2Ms at the N-terminus did not cause any such phenotypic changes. These results suggest the importance of 2Ms present at the N-terminus of PtdCesA8A protein during cellulose synthesis in aspen.

  8. The N-terminus of the Montano virus nucleocapsid protein possesses broadly cross-reactive conformation-dependent epitopes conserved in rodent-borne hantaviruses.

    PubMed

    Saasa, Ngonda; Yoshida, Haruka; Shimizu, Kenta; Sánchez-Hernández, Cornelio; Romero-Almaraz, María de Lourdes; Koma, Takaaki; Sanada, Takahiro; Seto, Takahiro; Yoshii, Kentaro; Ramos, Celso; Yoshimatsu, Kumiko; Arikawa, Jiro; Takashima, Ikuo; Kariwa, Hiroaki

    2012-06-20

    The hantavirus nucleocapsid (N) protein is an important immunogen that stimulates a strong and cross-reactive immune response in humans and rodents. A large proportion of the response to N protein has been found to target its N-terminus. However, the exact nature of this bias towards the N-terminus is not yet fully understood. We characterized six monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against the N protein of Montano virus (MTNV), a Mexican hantavirus. Five of these mAbs recognized eight American hantaviruses and six European and Asian hantaviruses, but not the Soricomorpha-borne Thottapalayam hantavirus. The N protein-reactive binding regions of the five mAbs were mapped to discontinuous epitopes within the N-terminal 13-51 amino acid residues, while a single serotype-specific mAb was mapped to residues 1-25 and 49-75. Our findings suggest that discontinuous epitopes at the N-terminus are conserved, at least in rodent-borne hantaviruses, and that they contribute considerably to N protein cross-reactivity.

  9. The C terminus of fragile X mental retardation protein interacts with the multi-domain Ran-binding protein in the microtubule-organising centre.

    PubMed

    Menon, Rajesh P; Gibson, Toby J; Pastore, Annalisa

    2004-10-01

    Absence of the fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) causes fragile X syndrome, the most common form of hereditary mental retardation. FMRP is a mainly cytoplasmic protein thought to be involved in repression of translation, through a complex network of protein-protein and protein-RNA interactions. Most of the currently known protein partners of FMRP recognise the conserved N terminus of the protein. No interaction has yet been mapped to the highly charged, poorly conserved C terminus, so far thought to be involved in RNA recognition through an RGG motif. In the present study, we show that a two-hybrid bait containing residues 419-632 of human FMRP fishes out a protein that spans the sequence of the Ran-binding protein in the microtubule-organising centre (RanBPM/RanBP9). Specific interaction of RanBPM with FMRP was confirmed by in vivo and in vitro assays. In brain tissue sections, RanBPM is highly expressed in the neurons of cerebral cortex and the cerebellar purkinje cells, in a pattern similar to that described for FMRP. Sequence analysis shows that RanBPM is a multi-domain protein. The interaction with FMRP was mapped in a newly identified CRA motif present in the RanBPM C terminus. Our results suggest that the functional role of RanBPM binding is modulation of the RNA-binding properties of FMRP.

  10. The role of the C-terminus of the human hydroxycarboxylic acid receptors 2 and 3 in G protein activation using Gα-engineered yeast cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rongfang; van Veldhoven, Jacobus P D; IJzerman, Adriaan P

    2016-01-01

    In the present study we focused our attention on the family of hydroxycarboxylic acid (HCA) receptors, a GPCR family of three members, of which the HCA2 and HCA3 receptors share 95% high sequence identity but differ considerably in C-terminus length with HCA3 having the longest tail. The two receptors were expressed and analysed for their activation profile in Saccharomyces cerevisiae MMY yeast strains that have different G protein Gα subunits. The hHCA2 receptor was promiscuous in its G protein coupling preference. In the presence of nicotinic acid the hHCA2 receptor activated almost all G protein pathways except Gαq (MMY14). However, the Gα protein coupling profile of the hHCA3 receptor was less promiscuous, as the receptor only activated Gαi1 (MMY23) and Gαi3 (MMY24) pathways. We then constructed two mutant receptors by 'swapping' the short (HCA2) and long (HCA3) C-terminus. The differences in HCA2 and HCA3 receptor activation and G protein selectivity were not controlled, however, by their C-terminal tails, as we observed only minor differences between mutant and corresponding wild-type receptor. This study provides new insights into the G protein coupling profiles of the HCA receptors and the function of the receptor's C terminus, which may be extended to other GPCRs.

  11. The carboxyl terminus of the alpha-subunit of the amiloride-sensitive epithelial sodium channel binds to F-actin.

    PubMed

    Mazzochi, Christopher; Bubien, James K; Smith, Peter R; Benos, Dale J

    2006-03-10

    The activity of the amiloride-sensitive epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) is modulated by F-actin. However, it is unknown if there is a direct interaction between alpha-ENaC and actin. We have investigated the hypothesis that the actin cytoskeleton directly binds to the carboxyl terminus of alpha-ENaC using a combination of confocal microscopy, co-immunoprecipitation, and protein binding studies. Confocal microscopy of Madin-Darby canine kidney cell monolayers stably transfected with wild type, rat isoforms of alpha-, beta-, and gamma-ENaC revealed co-localization of alpha-ENaC with the cortical F-actin cytoskeleton both at the apical membrane and within the subapical cytoplasm. F-actin was found to co-immunoprecipitate with alpha-ENaC from whole cell lysates of this cell line. Gel overlay assays demonstrated that F-actin specifically binds to the carboxyl terminus of alpha-ENaC. A direct interaction between F-actin and the COOH terminus of alpha-ENaC was further corroborated by F-actin co-sedimentation studies. This is the first study to report a direct and specific biochemical interaction between F-actin and ENaC. PMID:16356937

  12. Conserved amino acids within the N-terminus of the West Nile virus NS4A protein contribute to virus replication, protein stability and membrane proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Ambrose, R.L.; Mackenzie, J.M.

    2015-07-15

    The West Nile virus strain Kunjin virus (WNV{sub KUN}) NS4A protein is a multifunctional protein involved in many aspects of the virus life-cycle and is a major component of the WNV{sub KUN} replication complex (RC). Previously we identified a conserved region in the C-terminus of NS4A regulating proteolytic processing and RC assembly, and now investigate key conserved residues in the N-terminus of NS4A and their contribution to WNV{sub KUN} replication. Mutation of P13 completely ablated replication, whereas, mutation of P48 and D49, near the first transmembrane helix, and G66 within the helix, showed variable defects in replication, virion secretion and membrane proliferation. Intriguingly, the P48 and G66 NS4A mutants resulted in specific proteasome depletion of NS4A that could in part be rescued with a proteasome inhibitor. Our results suggest that the N-terminus of NS4A contributes to correct folding and stability, essential for facilitating the essential roles of NS4A during replication. - Highlights: • Mutation of Proline13 of the WNV NS4A protein is lethal to replication. • 1st TMB helix of NS4A contributes to protein stability and membrane remodelling. • Unstable mutants of NS4A can be rescued with a proteasome inhibitor. • This study (and of others) contributes to a functional mapping of the NS4A protein.

  13. Revisiting Mitochondrial pH with an Improved Algorithm for Calibration of the Ratiometric 5(6)-carboxy-SNARF-1 Probe Reveals Anticooperative Reaction with H+ Ions and Warrants Further Studies of Organellar pH.

    PubMed

    Żurawik, Tomasz Michał; Pomorski, Adam; Belczyk-Ciesielska, Agnieszka; Goch, Grażyna; Niedźwiedzka, Katarzyna; Kucharczyk, Róża; Krężel, Artur; Bal, Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence measurements of pH and other analytes in the cell rely on accurate calibrations, but these have routinely used algorithms that inadequately describe the properties of indicators. Here, we have established a more accurate method for calibrating and analyzing data obtained using the ratiometric probe 5(6)-carboxy-SNARF-1. We tested the implications of novel approach to measurements of pH in yeast mitochondria, a compartment containing a small number of free H+ ions. Our findings demonstrate that 5(6)-carboxy-SNARF-1 interacts with H+ ions inside the mitochondria in an anticooperative manner (Hill coefficient n of 0.5) and the apparent pH inside the mitochondria is ~0.5 unit lower than had been generally assumed. This result, at odds with the current consensus on the mechanism of energy generation in the mitochondria, is in better agreement with theoretical considerations and warrants further studies of organellar pH. PMID:27557123

  14. Revisiting Mitochondrial pH with an Improved Algorithm for Calibration of the Ratiometric 5(6)-carboxy-SNARF-1 Probe Reveals Anticooperative Reaction with H+ Ions and Warrants Further Studies of Organellar pH

    PubMed Central

    Żurawik, Tomasz Michał; Pomorski, Adam; Belczyk-Ciesielska, Agnieszka; Goch, Grażyna; Niedźwiedzka, Katarzyna; Kucharczyk, Róża; Krężel, Artur; Bal, Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence measurements of pH and other analytes in the cell rely on accurate calibrations, but these have routinely used algorithms that inadequately describe the properties of indicators. Here, we have established a more accurate method for calibrating and analyzing data obtained using the ratiometric probe 5(6)-carboxy-SNARF-1. We tested the implications of novel approach to measurements of pH in yeast mitochondria, a compartment containing a small number of free H+ ions. Our findings demonstrate that 5(6)-carboxy-SNARF-1 interacts with H+ ions inside the mitochondria in an anticooperative manner (Hill coefficient n of 0.5) and the apparent pH inside the mitochondria is ~0.5 unit lower than had been generally assumed. This result, at odds with the current consensus on the mechanism of energy generation in the mitochondria, is in better agreement with theoretical considerations and warrants further studies of organellar pH. PMID:27557123

  15. Potentiation of Neuronal Nicotinic Receptors by 17β-Estradiol: Roles of the Carboxy-Terminal and the Amino-Terminal Extracellular Domains

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xiaochun; Steinbach, Joe Henry

    2015-01-01

    The endogenous steroid 17β-estradiol (βEST) potentiates activation of neuronal nicotinic receptors containing α4 subunits. Previous work has shown that the final 4 residues of the α4 subunit are required for potentiation. However, receptors containing the α2 subunit are not potentiated although it has these 4 residues, and only one amino acid difference in the C-terminal tail (FLAGMI vs. WLAGMI). Previous work had indicated that the tryptophan residue was involved in binding an analog of βEST, but not in potentiation by βEST. To determine the structural basis for the loss of potentiation we analyzed data from chimeric subunits, which indicated that the major factor underlying the difference between α2 and α4 is the tryptophan/phenylalanine difference, while the N-terminal extracellular domain is a less significant factor. When the tryptophan in α4 was mutated, both phenylalanine and tyrosine conferred lower potentiation while lysine and leucine did not. The reduction reflected a reduced maximal magnitude of potentiation, indicating that the tryptophan is involved in transduction of steroid effects. The regions of the α4 N-terminal extracellular domain involved in potentiation lie near the agonist-binding pocket, rather than close to the membrane or the C-terminal tail, and appear to be involved in transduction rather than binding. These observations indicate that the C-terminal region is involved in both steroid binding (AGMI residues) and transduction (W). The role of the N-terminus appears to be independent of the C-terminal tryptophan and likely reflects an influence on conformational changes caused during channel activation by agonist and potentiation by estradiol. PMID:26684647

  16. Carboxy-terminally truncated dengue virus envelope glycoproteins expressed on the cell surface and secreted extracellularly exhibit increased immunogenicity in mice.

    PubMed

    Men, R H; Bray, M; Lai, C J

    1991-03-01

    Recombinant vaccinia viruses expressing C-terminally truncated E's that ranged in length from 9 to 99% of the N-terminal sequence were constructed. The overall antigenicity of the E products was analyzed by radioimmunoprecipitation, using dengue virus hyperimmune mouse ascitic fluid (HMAF) or an anti-E peptide serum. Truncated E that was 79% or less in length did not bind HMAF efficiently, whereas E constructs greater than 79% were able to bind HMAF with high efficiency. The first 392 amino acids of the dengue type 4 virus E sequence, including the Arg-392 following the 79% E C terminus, appeared to be critical for proper antigenic structure required for efficient binding by HMAF. Truncated E's ranging from 59 to 81% in length were secreted extracellularly, whereas smaller or larger E's were retained intracellularly. Secreted E's contained carbohydrate side chains that were resistant to endoglycosidase H digestion, suggesting that the transport of E occurs via a pathway from the rough endoplasmic reticulum through the Golgi complex. 79% E-RKG (which possessed the three additional amino acids immediately downstream of 79% E) was expressed at a high concentration on the surface of recombinant virus-infected cells presumably being inserted into the plasma membrane by a hydrophobic C-terminal membrane anchor. Evaluation in mice of the protective efficacy of the various vaccinia virus E recombinants indicated that only truncated E's that were recognized efficiently by HMAF induced a high level of resistance to dengue virus encephalitis. 79% E-RKG which is expressed at a high concentration on the surface of infected cells was highly immunogenic when tested for induction of an E antibody response. This suggests that cell surface expression of 79% E-RKG was responsible for its enhanced immunogenicity. Finally, passive immunization studies indicated that serum antibodies to E played a major role in the complete or nearly complete resistance to dengue virus challenge induced

  17. The cytosolic C-terminus of the glucose transporter GLUT4 contains an acidic cluster endosomal targeting motif distal to the dileucine signal.

    PubMed Central

    Shewan, A M; Marsh, B J; Melvin, D R; Martin, S; Gould, G W; James, D E

    2000-01-01

    The insulin-responsive glucose transporter GLUT4 is targeted to a post-endocytic compartment in adipocytes, from where it moves to the cell surface in response to insulin. Previous studies have identified two cytosolic targeting motifs that regulate the intracellular sequestration of this protein: FQQI(5-8) in the N-terminus and LL(489,490) (one-letter amino acid notation) in the C-terminus. In the present study we show that a GLUT4 chimaera in which the C-terminal 12 amino acids in GLUT4 have been replaced with the same region from human GLUT3 is constitutively targeted to the plasma membrane when expressed in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. To further dissect this domain it was divided into three regions, each of which was mutated en bloc to alanine residues. Analysis of these constructs revealed that the targeting information is contained within the residues TELEYLGP(498-505). Using the transferrin-horseradish peroxidase endosomal ablation technique in 3T3-L1 adipocytes, we show that mutants in which this C-terminal domain has been disrupted are more sensitive to chemical ablation than wild-type GLUT4. These data indicate that GLUT4 contains a targeting signal in its C-terminus, distal to the dileucine motif, that regulates its sorting into a post-endosomal compartment. Similar membrane-distal, acidic-cluster-based motifs are found in the cytosolic tails of the insulin-responsive aminopeptidase IRAP (insulin-regulated aminopeptidase) and the proprotein convertase PC6B, indicating that this type of motif may play an important role in the endosomal sequestration of a number of different proteins. PMID:10926832

  18. Identification of adenovirus type 2 early region 1B proteins that share the same amino terminus as do the 495R and 155R proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, J B; Anderson, C W

    1987-01-01

    Adenovirus type 2 early region 1B (E1B) proteins synthesized in vitro were fractionated chromatographically and characterized by peptide and sequence analysis and by reaction with peptide-specific antisera targeted to either the N or C terminus of either of two overlapping E1B reading frames (175 or 495 codons). In addition to the previously identified E1B-495R, E1B-175R, and E1B-155R species, two other E1B proteins of similar electrophoretic mobility to the 175R protein were identified. E1B-82R is an abundant product in vitro and in vivo that has the same N terminus as that of the 495R and 155R proteins but a different C terminus. The structure of 82R is predicted by the structure of the abundant 13S (1.02-kilobase) E1B mRNA. E1B-168R is a novel minor species consisting of the 24 amino-terminal residues of the 495R protein fused to the entire polypeptide IX sequence. An additional, minor 16,000-molecular-weight polypeptide was detected that may correspond to a predicted 92R E1B protein, but definitive identification was not possible. These observations establish that the leftmost portion (78 codons) of the 495-codon reading frame, which overlaps the right half of the 175-codon reading frame, is expressed as an abundant protein that does not contain other 495R sequences. This region, which may participate in the regulation of region E1A expression, may thus constitute a functional domain distinct from the rightward portion of the 495R protein. Images PMID:2960832

  19. Three-dimensional reconstruction of a co-complex of F-actin with antibody Fab fragments to actin's NH2 terminus.

    PubMed Central

    Orlova, A; Yu, X; Egelman, E H

    1994-01-01

    We have decorated F-actin with Fab fragments of antibodies to actin residues 1-7. These antibody fragments do not strongly affect the rigor binding of myosin S-1 to actin, but do affect the binding of S-1 to actin in the presence of nucleotide (DasGupta, G., and E. Reisler, 1989. J. Mol. Biol. 207:833-836; 1991. Biochemistry. 30:9961-9966; 1992. Biochemistry. 31:1836-1841). Although the binding constant is rather low, we estimate that we have achieved about 85% occupancy of the actin sites. Three-dimensional reconstructions from electron micrographs of both negatively stained and frozen-hydrated filaments show that the Fab fragment is bound at the location of the NH2 terminus in the model of Holmes et al. (Holmes, K.C., D. Popp, W. Gebhard, and W. Kabsch. 1990. Nature. 347:37-44) for F-actin, excluding very different orientations of the actin subunit in the filament. Most of the mass of the antibody is not visualized, which is due to the large mobility of the NH2 terminus in F-actin, differences in binding angle within the polyclonal antibody population, or a combination of both of these possibilities. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 10 PMID:8161679

  20. The importance of subfragment 2 and C-terminus of myosin heavy chain for thick filament assembly in skeletal muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Ojima, Koichi; Oe, Mika; Nakajima, Ikuyo; Shibata, Masahiro; Muroya, Susumu; Chikuni, Koichi; Hattori, Akihito; Nishimura, Takanori

    2015-04-01

    In skeletal muscle cells, myofibrillar proteins are highly organized into sarcomeres in which thick filaments interdigitate with thin filaments to generate contractile force. The size of thick filaments, which consist mainly of myosin molecules, is strictly controlled. However, little is known about the mechanisms by which myosin molecules assemble into thick filaments. Here, we assessed the ability of each domain of myosin heavy chain (Myh) to form thick filaments. We showed that exogenously expressed subfragment 2 (S2) + light meromyosin (LMM) of Myh was efficiently incorporated into thick filaments in muscle cells, although neither solely expressed S2 nor LMM targeted to thick filaments properly. In nonmuscle COS7 cells, S2+LMM formed more enlarged filaments/speckles than LMM. These results suggest that Myh filament formation is induced by S2 accompanying LMM. We further examined the effects of Myh C-terminus on thick filament assembly. C-terminal deletion mutants were incorporated not into entire thick filaments but rather into restricted regions of thick filaments. Our findings suggest that the elongation of myosin filaments to form thick filaments is regulated by S2 as well as C-terminus of LMM.

  1. The Unique N-terminus of the UbcH10 E2 Enzyme Controls the Threshold for APC Activation and Enhances Checkpoint Regulation of the APC

    PubMed Central

    Summers, Matthew K.; Pan, Borlan; Mukhyala, Kiran; Jackson, Peter K.

    2008-01-01

    Summary In vitro, the Anaphase Promoting Complex (APC) E3 ligase functions with E2 ubiquitin conjugating enzymes of the E2–C and Ubc4/5 families to ubiquitinate substrates. However, only the use of the E2–C family, notably UbcH10, is genetically well validated. Here, we biochemically demonstrate preferential use of UbcH10 by the APC, specified by the E2 core domain. Importantly, an additional E2–E3 interaction mediated by the N-terminal extension of UbcH10 regulates APC activity. Mutating the highly conserved N-terminus increases substrate ubiquitination, the number of substrate lysines targeted, allows ubiquitination of APC substrates lacking their destruction-boxes, increases resistance to the APC inhibitors Emi1 and BubR1 in vitro, and bypasses the spindle checkpoint in vivo. Fusion of the UbcH10 N-terminus to UbcH5 restricts ubiquitination activity, but does not direct specific interactions with the APC. Thus, UbcH10 combines a specific E2–E3 interface and regulation via its N-terminal extension to limit APC activity for substrate selection and checkpoint control. PMID:18722180

  2. Positively charged amino acids at the SNAP-25 C terminus determine fusion rates, fusion pore properties, and energetics of tight SNARE complex zippering.

    PubMed

    Fang, Qinghua; Zhao, Ying; Herbst, Adam Drew; Kim, Brian N; Lindau, Manfred

    2015-02-18

    SNAP-25 is a Q-SNARE protein mediating exocytosis of neurosecretory vesicles including chromaffin granules. Previous results with a SNAP-25 construct lacking the nine C terminal residues (SNAP-25Δ9) showed changed fusion pore properties (Fang et al., 2008), suggesting a model for fusion pore mechanics that couple C terminal zipping of the SNARE complex to the opening of the fusion pore. The deleted fragment contains the positively charged residues R198 and K201, adjacent to layers 7 and 8 of the SNARE complex. To determine how fusion pore conductance and dynamics depend on these residues, single exocytotic events in bovine chromaffin cells expressing R198Q, R198E, K201Q, or K201E mutants were investigated by carbon fiber amperometry and cell-attached patch capacitance measurements. Coarse grain molecular dynamics simulations revealed spontaneous transitions between a loose and tightly zippered state at the SNARE complex C terminus. The SNAP-25 K201Q mutant showed no changes compared with SNAP-25 wild-type. However, K201E, R198Q, and R198E displayed reduced release frequencies, slower release kinetics, and prolonged fusion pore duration that were correlated with reduced probability to engage in the tightly zippered state. The results show that the positively charged amino acids at the SNAP-25 C terminus promote tight SNARE complex zippering and are required for high release frequency and rapid release in individual fusion events.

  3. Septal localization by membrane targeting sequences and a conserved sequence essential for activity at the COOH-terminus of Bacillus subtilis cardiolipin synthase.

    PubMed

    Kusaka, Jin; Shuto, Satoshi; Imai, Yukiko; Ishikawa, Kazuki; Saito, Tomo; Natori, Kohei; Matsuoka, Satoshi; Hara, Hiroshi; Matsumoto, Kouji

    2016-04-01

    The acidic phospholipid cardiolipin (CL) is localized on polar and septal membranes and plays an important physiological role in Bacillus subtilis cells. ClsA, the enzyme responsible for CL synthesis, is also localized on septal membranes. We found that GFP fusion proteins of the enzyme with NH2-terminal and internal deletions retained septal localization. However, derivatives with deletions starting from the COOH-terminus (Leu482) ceased to localize to the septum once the deletion passed the Ile residue at 448, indicating that the sequence responsible for septal localization is confined within a short distance from the COOH-terminus. Two sequences, Ile436-Leu450 and Leu466-Leu478, are predicted to individually form an amphipathic α-helix. This configuration is known as a membrane targeting sequence (MTS) and we therefore refer to them as MTS2 and MTS1, respectively. Either one has the ability to affect septal localization, and each of these sequences by itself localizes to the septum. Membrane association of the constructs of this enzyme containing the MTSs was verified by subcellular fractionation of the cells. CL synthesis, in contrast, was abolished after deleting just the last residue, Leu482, in the COOH-terminal four amino acid residue sequence, Ser-Pro-Ile-Leu, which is highly conserved among bacterial CL synthases.

  4. Targeted deletion of the C-terminus of the mouse adenomatous polyposis coli tumor suppressor results in neurologic phenotypes related to schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Loss of adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene function results in constitutive activation of the canonical Wnt pathway and represents the main initiating and rate-limiting event in colorectal tumorigenesis. APC is likely to participate in a wide spectrum of biological functions via its different functional domains and is abundantly expressed in the brain as well as in peripheral tissues. However, the neuronal function of APC is poorly understood. To investigate the functional role of Apc in the central nervous system, we analyzed the neurological phenotypes of Apc1638T/1638T mice, which carry a targeted deletion of the 3′ terminal third of Apc that does not affect Wnt signaling. Results A series of behavioral tests revealed a working memory deficit, increased locomotor activity, reduced anxiety-related behavior, and mildly decreased social interaction in Apc1638T/1638T mice. Apc1638T/1638T mice showed abnormal morphology of the dendritic spines and impaired long-term potentiation of synaptic transmission in the hippocampal CA1 region. Moreover, Apc1638T/1638T mice showed abnormal dopamine and serotonin distribution in the brain. Some of these behavioral and neuronal phenotypes are related to symptoms and endophenotypes of schizophrenia. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that the C-terminus of the Apc tumor suppressor plays a critical role in cognitive and neuropsychiatric functioning. This finding suggests a potential functional link between the C-terminus of APC and pathologies of the central nervous system. PMID:24678719

  5. Chondroitin sulfate B exerts its inhibitory effect on secondary lymphoid tissue chemokine (SLC) by binding to the C-terminus of SLC.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Jun; Kawashima, Hiroto; Swope Willis, Melissa; Springer, Timothy A; Hasegawa, Hitoshi; Yoshie, Osamu; Miyasaka, Masayuki

    2002-07-01

    We previously reported that certain glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) bind secondary lymphoid tissue chemokine (SLC, CCL21) and that the SLC-binding GAGs, including chondroitin sulfate B (CS B), negatively modulate the function of SLC, although the mechanism remains unknown [J. Biol. Chem. 276 (2001) 5228]. To gain insight into the mechanism of inhibition, we used a C-terminally truncated SLC (SLC-T) that lacked clusters of basic amino acid residues that have been implicated in GAG binding. While SLC-T failed to bind any GAGs, it induced prominent intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization in CC chemokine receptor (CCR) 7-expressing cells, as did wild-type SLC. However, the SLC-T-induced Ca(2+) influx was not inhibited by CS B, unlike the SLC-induced Ca(2+) influx. These results demonstrate the requirement of the C-terminus of SLC for the inhibition of chemokine responses by CS B; that is, CS B exerts its inhibitory effect by binding to the C-terminus of SLC, thus defining the mode of action of CS B on certain chemokines.

  6. Allosteric coupling between proximal C-terminus and selectivity filter is facilitated by the movement of transmembrane segment 4 in TREK-2 channel

    PubMed Central

    Zhuo, Ren-Gong; Peng, Peng; Liu, Xiao-Yan; Yan, Hai-Tao; Xu, Jiang-Ping; Zheng, Jian-Quan; Wei, Xiao-Li; Ma, Xiao-Yun

    2016-01-01

    TREK-2, a member of two-pore-domain potassium channel family, regulates cellular excitability in response to diverse stimuli. However, how such stimuli control channel function remains unclear. Here, by characterizing the responses of cytosolic proximal C-terminus deletant (ΔpCt) and transmembrane segment 4 (M4)-glycine hinge mutant (G312A) to 2-Aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB), an activator of TREK-2, we show that the transduction initiated from pCt domain is allosterically coupled with the conformation of selectivity filter (SF) via the movements of M4, without depending on the original status of SF. Moreover, ΔpCt and G312A also exhibited blunted responses to extracellular alkalization, a model to induce SF conformational transition. These results suggest that the coupling between pCt domain and SF is bidirectional, and M4 movements are involved in both processes. Further mechanistic exploration reveals that the function of Phe316, a residue close to the C-terminus of M4, is associated with such communications. However, unlike TREK-2, M4-hinge of TREK-1 only controls the transmission from pCt to SF, rather than SF conformational changes triggered by pHo changes. Together, our findings uncover the unique gating properties of TREK-2, and elucidate the mechanisms for how the extracellular and intracellular stimuli harness the pore gating allosterically. PMID:26879043

  7. Substrate evokes translocation of both domains in the mitochondrial processing peptidase alpha-subunit during which the C-terminus acts as a stabilizing element.

    PubMed

    Janata, Jirí; Holá, Klára; Kubala, Martin; Gakh, Oleksandr; Parkhomenko, Natalya; Matusková, Anna; Kutejová, Eva; Amler, Evzen

    2004-03-26

    All three tryptophan residues in alpha-subunit of mitochondrial processing peptidase (MPP) were subsequently substituted. While substitutions of Trp223 led to misfolded non-functional protein, mutations of Trp147 and/or Trp481 did not affect the enzyme processing activity. Thus, fluorescence properties of the mutants with fewer tryptophans were used for observation of both alpha-MPP domain translocation and visualization of conformational changes in the interdomain linker evoked by substrate. We found that in the presence of substrate the C-terminal penultimate Trp481 was approaching Trp223, which is localized at the border of N-terminal domain and interdomain linker. Also, excision of the alpha-MPP C-terminal 30 amino acid residues (DeltaC30) led to a complete loss of protein function. Even shorter deletions of the alpha-MPP C-terminus destabilized the protein slightly (DeltaC2) or dramatically (DeltaC17). It suggests that the extreme C-terminus of alpha-MPP provides mechanical support to the C-terminal domain during its extensive conformational change accompanying the substrate recognition process.

  8. Exploring the structure of the 100 amino-acid residue long N-terminus of the plant antenna protein CP29.

    PubMed

    Shabestari, Maryam Hashemi; Wolfs, Cor J A M; Spruijt, Ruud B; van Amerongen, Herbert; Huber, Martina

    2014-03-18

    The structure of the unusually long (∼100 amino-acid residues) N-terminal domain of the light-harvesting protein CP29 of plants is not defined in the crystal structure of this membrane protein. We studied the N-terminus using two electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) approaches: the rotational diffusion of spin labels at 55 residues with continuous-wave EPR, and three sets of distances with a pulsed EPR method. The N-terminus is relatively structured. Five regions that differ considerably in their dynamics are identified. Two regions have low rotational diffusion, one of which shows α-helical character suggesting contact with the protein surface. This immobile part is flanked by two highly dynamic, unstructured regions (loops) that cover residues 10-22 and 82-91. These loops may be important for the interaction with other light-harvesting proteins. The region around residue 4 also has low rotational diffusion, presumably because it attaches noncovalently to the protein. This section is close to a phosphorylation site (Thr-6) in related proteins, such as those encoded by the Lhcb4.2 gene. Phosphorylation might influence the interaction with other antenna complexes, thereby regulating the supramolecular organization in the thylakoid membrane.

  9. A C-terminal Hydrophobic, Solvent-protected Core and a Flexible N-terminus are Potentially Required for Human Papillomavirus 18 E7 Protein Functionality

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, S.; Tian, Y; Greenaway, F; Sun, M

    2010-01-01

    The oncogenic potential of the high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) relies on the expression of genes specifying the E7 and E6 proteins. To investigate further the variation in oligomeric structure that has been reported for different E7 proteins, an HPV-18 E7 cloned from a Hispanic woman with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia was purified to homogeneity most probably as a stable monomeric protein in aqueous solution. We determined that one zinc ion is present per HPV-18 E7 monomer by amino acid and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy analysis. Intrinsic fluorescence and circular dichroism spectroscopic results indicate that the zinc ion is important for the correct folding and thermal stability of HPV-18 E7. Hydroxyl radical mediated protein footprinting coupled to mass spectrometry and other biochemical and biophysical data indicate that near the C-terminus, the four cysteines of the two Cys-X{sub 2}-Cys motifs that are coordinated to the zinc ion form a solvent inaccessible core. The N-terminal LXCXE pRb binding motif region is hydroxyl radical accessible and conformationally flexible. Both factors, the relative flexibility of the pRb binding motif at the N-terminus and the C-terminal metal-binding hydrophobic solvent-protected core, combine together and facilitate the biological functions of HPV-18 E7.

  10. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of the Escherichia coli outer membrane cobalamin transporter BtuB in complex with the carboxy-terminal domain of TonB

    SciTech Connect

    Shultis, David D.; Purdy, Michael D.; Banchs, Christian N.; Wiener, Michael C.

    2006-07-01

    Crystals of a complex of the E. coli proteins BtuB (outer membrane cobalamin transporter) and TonB (carboxy-terminal domain) diffracting to 2.1 Å resolution have been obtained. The energy-dependent uptake of organometallic compounds and other micronutrients across the outer membranes of Gram-negative bacteria is carried out by outer membrane active-transport proteins that utilize the proton-motive force of the inner membrane via coupling to the TonB protein. The Escherichia coli outer membrane cobalamin transporter BtuB and a carboxy-terminal domain of the TonB protein, residues 147–239 of the wild-type protein, were expressed and purified individually. A complex of BtuB and TonB{sup 147–239} was formed in the presence of the substrate cyanocobalamin (CN-Cbl; vitamin B{sub 12}) and calcium and was crystallized. BtuB was purified in the detergent LDAO (n-dodecyl-N,N-dimethylamine-N-oxide) and the complex was formed in a detergent mixture of LDAO and C{sub 8}E{sub 4} (tetraethylene glycol monooctylether). Crystals were obtained by sitting-drop vapor diffusion, with the reservoir containing 30%(v/v) polyethylene glycol (PEG 300) and 100 mM sodium acetate pH 5.2. The crystals belong to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1} (unit-cell parameters a = 74.3, b = 82.4, c = 122.6 Å). The asymmetric unit consists of a single BtuB–TonB complex. Data sets have been collected to 2.1 Å resolution at a synchrotron beamline (APS SER-CAT 22-ID)

  11. Enhanced Polysaccharide Binding and Activity on Linear β-Glucans through Addition of Carbohydrate-Binding Modules to Either Terminus of a Glucooligosaccharide Oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Foumani, Maryam; Vuong, Thu V.; MacCormick, Benjamin; Master, Emma R.

    2015-01-01

    The gluco-oligosaccharide oxidase from Sarocladium strictum CBS 346.70 (GOOX) is a single domain flavoenzyme that favourably oxidizes gluco- and xylo- oligosaccharides. In the present study, GOOX was shown to also oxidize plant polysaccharides, including cellulose, glucomannan, β-(1→3,1→4)-glucan, and xyloglucan, albeit to a lesser extent than oligomeric substrates. To improve GOOX activity on polymeric substrates, three carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs) from Clostridium thermocellum, namely CtCBM3 (type A), CtCBM11 (type B), and CtCBM44 (type B), were separately appended to the amino and carboxy termini of the enzyme, generating six fusion proteins. With the exception of GOOX-CtCBM3 and GOOX-CtCBM44, fusion of the selected CBMs increased the catalytic activity of the enzyme (kcat) on cellotetraose by up to 50%. All CBM fusions selectively enhanced GOOX binding to soluble and insoluble polysaccharides, and the immobilized enzyme on a solid cellulose surface remained stable and active. In addition, the CBM fusions increased the activity of GOOX on soluble glucomannan by up to 30 % and on insoluble crystalline as well as amorphous cellulose by over 50 %. PMID:25932926

  12. The C-terminus of the {gamma}2 chain but not of the {beta}3 chain of laminin-332 is indirectly but indispensably necessary for integrin-mediated cell reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Navdaev, Alexei; Heitmann, Vanessa; Santana Evangelista, Karla de; Moergelin, Matthias; Wegener, Joachim; Eble, Johannes A.

    2008-02-01

    Using a recombinant mini-laminin-332, we showed that truncation of the three C-terminal amino acids of the {gamma}2 chain, but not of the C-terminal amino acid of the {beta}3 chain, completely abolished {alpha}3{beta}1 integrin binding and its cellular functions, such as attachment and spreading. However, a synthetic peptide mimicking the {gamma}2 chain C-terminus did not interfere with {alpha}3{beta}1 integrin binding or cell adhesion and spreading on laminin-332 as measured by protein interaction assays and electric cell-substrate impedance sensing. Nor was the soluble peptide able to restore the loss of integrin-mediated cell adhesiveness to mini-laminin-332 after deletion of the {gamma}2 chain C-terminus. These findings spoke against the hypothesis that the {gamma}2 chain C-terminus of laminin-332 is a part of the {alpha}3{beta}1 integrin interaction site. In addition, structural studies with electron microscopy showed that truncation of the {gamma}2 chain C-terminus opened up the compact supradomain structure of LG1-3 domains. Thus, by inducing or stabilizing an integrin binding-competent conformation or array of the LG1-3 domains, the {gamma}2 chain C-terminus plays an indirect but essential role in laminin-332 recognition by {alpha}3{beta}1 integrin and, hence, its cellular functions.

  13. Role of Cysteine Residues in the Carboxyl-Terminus of the Follicle-Stimulating Hormone Receptor in Intracellular Traffic and Postendocytic Processing.

    PubMed

    Melo-Nava, Brenda; Casas-González, Patricia; Pérez-Solís, Marco A; Castillo-Badillo, Jean; Maravillas-Montero, José L; Jardón-Valadez, Eduardo; Zariñán, Teresa; Aguilar-Rojas, Arturo; Gallay, Nathalie; Reiter, Eric; Ulloa-Aguirre, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Posttranslational modifications occurring during the biosynthesis of G protein-coupled receptors include glycosylation and palmitoylation at conserved cysteine residues located in the carboxyl-terminus of the receptor. In a number of these receptors, these modifications play an important role in receptor function and particularly, in intracellular trafficking. In the present study, the three cysteine residues present in the carboxyl-terminus of the human FSHR were replaced with glycine by site-directed mutagenesis. Wild-type and mutant (Cys627/629/655Gly) FSHRs were then transiently expressed in HEK-293 cells and analyzed for cell-surface plasma membrane expression, agonist-stimulated signaling and internalization, and postendocytic processing in the absence and presence of lysosome and/or proteasome inhibitors. Compared with the wild-type FSHR, the triple mutant FSHR exhibited ~70% reduction in plasma membrane expression as well as a profound attenuation in agonist-stimulated cAMP production and ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Incubation of HEK-293 cells expressing the wild-type FSHR with 2-bromopalmitate (palmitoylation inhibitor) for 6 h, decreased plasma membrane expression of the receptor by ~30%. The internalization kinetics and β-arrestin 1 and 2 recruitment were similar between the wild-type and triple mutant FSHR as disclosed by assays performed in non-equilibrium binding conditions and by confocal microscopy. Cells expressing the mutant FSHR recycled the internalized FSHR back to the plasma membrane less efficiently than those expressing the wild-type FSHR, an effect that was counteracted by proteasome but not by lysosome inhibition. These results indicate that replacement of the cysteine residues present in the carboxyl-terminus of the FSHR, impairs receptor trafficking from the endoplasmic reticulum/Golgi apparatus to the plasma membrane and its recycling from endosomes back to the cell surface following agonist-induced internalization. Since in the FSHR these

  14. Role of Cysteine Residues in the Carboxyl-Terminus of the Follicle-Stimulating Hormone Receptor in Intracellular Traffic and Postendocytic Processing

    PubMed Central

    Melo-Nava, Brenda; Casas-González, Patricia; Pérez-Solís, Marco A.; Castillo-Badillo, Jean; Maravillas-Montero, José L.; Jardón-Valadez, Eduardo; Zariñán, Teresa; Aguilar-Rojas, Arturo; Gallay, Nathalie; Reiter, Eric; Ulloa-Aguirre, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Posttranslational modifications occurring during the biosynthesis of G protein-coupled receptors include glycosylation and palmitoylation at conserved cysteine residues located in the carboxyl-terminus of the receptor. In a number of these receptors, these modifications play an important role in receptor function and particularly, in intracellular trafficking. In the present study, the three cysteine residues present in the carboxyl-terminus of the human FSHR were replaced with glycine by site-directed mutagenesis. Wild-type and mutant (Cys627/629/655Gly) FSHRs were then transiently expressed in HEK-293 cells and analyzed for cell-surface plasma membrane expression, agonist-stimulated signaling and internalization, and postendocytic processing in the absence and presence of lysosome and/or proteasome inhibitors. Compared with the wild-type FSHR, the triple mutant FSHR exhibited ~70% reduction in plasma membrane expression as well as a profound attenuation in agonist-stimulated cAMP production and ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Incubation of HEK-293 cells expressing the wild-type FSHR with 2-bromopalmitate (palmitoylation inhibitor) for 6 h, decreased plasma membrane expression of the receptor by ~30%. The internalization kinetics and β-arrestin 1 and 2 recruitment were similar between the wild-type and triple mutant FSHR as disclosed by assays performed in non-equilibrium binding conditions and by confocal microscopy. Cells expressing the mutant FSHR recycled the internalized FSHR back to the plasma membrane less efficiently than those expressing the wild-type FSHR, an effect that was counteracted by proteasome but not by lysosome inhibition. These results indicate that replacement of the cysteine residues present in the carboxyl-terminus of the FSHR, impairs receptor trafficking from the endoplasmic reticulum/Golgi apparatus to the plasma membrane and its recycling from endosomes back to the cell surface following agonist-induced internalization. Since in the FSHR these

  15. The phosphorylated C-terminus of cAR1 plays a role in cell-type-specific gene expression and STATa tyrosine phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Briscoe, C; Moniakis, J; Kim, J Y; Brown, J M; Hereld, D; Devreotes, P N; Firtel, R A

    2001-05-01

    cAMP receptors mediate some signaling pathways via coupled heterotrimeric G proteins, while others are G-protein-independent. This latter class includes the activation of the transcription factors GBF and STATa. Within the cellular mounds formed by aggregation of Dictyostelium, micromolar levels of cAMP activate GBF function, thereby inducing the transcription of postaggregative genes and initiating multicellular differentiation. Activation of STATa, a regulator of culmination and ecmB expression, results from cAMP receptor-dependent tyrosine phosphorylation and nuclear localization, also in mound-stage cells. During mound development, the cAMP receptor cAR1 is in a low-affinity state and is phosphorylated on multiple serine residues in its C-terminus. This paper addresses possible roles of cAMP receptor phosphorylation in the cAMP-mediated stimulation of GBF activity, STATa tyrosine phosphorylation, and cell-type-specific gene expression. To accomplish this, we have expressed cAR1 mutants in a strain in which the endogenous cAMP receptors that mediate postaggregative gene expression in vivo are deleted. We then examined the ability of these cells to undergo morphogenesis and induce postaggregative and cell-type-specific gene expression and STATa tyrosine phosphorylation. Analysis of cAR1 mutants in which the C-terminal tail is deleted or the ligand-mediated phosphorylation sites are mutated suggests that the cAR1 C-terminus is not essential for GBF-mediated postaggregative gene expression or STATa tyrosine phosphorylation, but may play a role in regulating cell-type-specific gene expression and morphogenesis. A mutant receptor, in which the C-terminal tail is constitutively phosphorylated, exhibits constitutive activation of STATa tyrosine phosphorylation in pulsed cells in suspension and a significantly impaired ability to induce cell-type-specific gene expression. The constitutively phosphorylated receptor also exerts a partial dominant negative effect on

  16. Atomistic Simulations of Complex DNA DSBs and the Interactions with Ku70/80 Heterodimer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Shaowen; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2011-01-01

    Compared to DNA with simple DSBs, the complex lesions can enhance the hydrogen bonds opening rate at the DNA terminus, and increase the mobility of the whole duplex. Binding of Ku drastically reduces the structural disruption and flexibility caused by the complex lesions. In all complex DSBs systems, the binding of DSB terminus with Ku70 is softened while the binding of the middle duplex with Ku80 is tightened. Binding of Ku promotes the rigidity of DNA duplexes, due to the clamp structure of the inner surface of the rings of Ku70/80.

  17. Influence of the C terminus of the small protein subunit of bean pod mottle virus on the antigenicity of the virus determined using monoclonal antibodies and anti-peptide antiserum.

    PubMed

    Joisson, C; Van Regenmortel, M H

    1991-09-01

    Middle component particles of bean pod mottle virus (BPMV) containing small protein subunits with a cleaved C terminus were used to produce monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). All MAbs were specific for cryptotopes, i.e. epitopes present only on dissociated BPMV protein. The MAbs reacted more strongly with virus protein preparations containing the cleaved form of the small subunit than with preparations containing only the uncleaved form. It seems that the presence of additional residues at the C terminus of the intact small subunit interferes with antibody binding. Antibodies raised against synthetic peptides corresponding to the C terminus of the uncleaved small subunit reacted with both intact virions and dissociated subunits. This C-terminal region seems to play a dominant role in the antigenicity of the virus.

  18. Molecular modeling and molecular dynamics simulation study of the human Rab9 and RhoBTB3 C-terminus complex

    PubMed Central

    Junaid, Muhammad; Muhseen, Ziyad Tariq; Ullah, Ata; Wadood, Abdul; Liu, Junjun; Zhang, Houjin

    2014-01-01

    Rab9 is required for the transport of mannose 6-phosphate receptors to the trans-Golgi network from late endosomes through the interaction with its effector: RhoBTB3. Earlier research indicates the C-terminus of RhoBTB3 (Rho_Cterm) is used for the interaction with Rab9. We used the homology modeling along with the molecular dynamics (MD) simulation to study the binding pattern of Rho_Cterm and Rab9 at atomic level. Both modeled structures, Rab9 and Rho_Cterm, are of high quality as suggested by the Ramachandran plot and ProCheck. The complex of Rab9-Rho_Cterm was generated by unrestrained pairwise docking using ZDOCK server. The interface of complex is consistent with the previous experimental data. The results of MD simulation indicate that the binding interface is stable along the simulation process. PMID:25670879

  19. The Radical S-Adenosyl-l-methionine Enzyme MftC Catalyzes an Oxidative Decarboxylation of the C-Terminus of the MftA Peptide.

    PubMed

    Bruender, Nathan A; Bandarian, Vahe

    2016-05-24

    Ribosomally synthesized post-translationally modified peptides (RiPPs) are encoded in the genomes of a wide variety of microorganisms, in the proximity of open reading frames that encode enzymes that conduct extensive modifications, many of which are novel. Recently, members of the radical S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM) superfamily have been identified in these biosynthetic clusters. Herein, we demonstrate the putative radical SAM enzyme, MftC, oxidatively decarboxylates the C-terminus of the MftA peptide in the presence of the accessory protein MftB. The reaction catalyzed by MftC expands the repertoire of peptide-based radical SAM chemistry beyond the intramolecular cross-links. PMID:27158836

  20. Regulation of light harvesting in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii: the C-terminus of LHCSR is the knob of a dimmer switch.

    PubMed

    Liguori, Nicoletta; Roy, Laura M; Opacic, Milena; Durand, Grégory; Croce, Roberta

    2013-12-11

    Feedback mechanisms that dissipate excess photoexcitations in light-harvesting complexes (LHCs) are necessary to avoid detrimental oxidative stress in most photosynthetic eukaryotes. Here we demonstrate the unique ability of LHCSR, a stress-related LHC from the model organism Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, to sense pH variations, reversibly tuning its conformation from a light-harvesting state to a dissipative one. This conformational change is induced exclusively by the acidification of the environment, and the magnitude of quenching is correlated to the degree of acidification of the environment. We show that this ability to respond to different pH values is missing in the related major LHCII, despite high structural homology. Via mutagenesis and spectroscopic characterization, we show that LHCSR's uniqueness relies on its peculiar C-terminus subdomain, which acts as a sensor of the lumenal pH, able to tune the quenching level of the complex.

  1. Characterization of a nuclear localization signal in the C-terminus of the adeno-associated virus Rep68/78 proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Cassell, Geoffrey D.; Weitzman, Matthew D. . E-mail: weitzman@salk.edu

    2004-10-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) replicates in the nucleus of infected cells, and therefore multiple nuclear import events are required for productive infection. We analyzed nuclear import of the viral Rep proteins and characterized a nuclear localization signal (NLS) in the C-terminus. We demonstrate that basic residues in this region constitute an NLS that is transferable and mediates interaction with the nuclear import receptor importin {alpha} in vitro. Mutant Rep proteins are predominantly cytoplasmic and are severely compromised for interactions with importin {alpha}, but retain their enzymatic functions in vitro. Interestingly, mutations of the NLS had significantly less effect on importin {alpha} interaction and replication in the context of Rep78 than when incorporated into the Rep68 protein. Together, our results demonstrate that a bipartite NLS exists in the shared part of Rep68 and Rep78, and suggest that an alternate entry mechanism may also contribute to nuclear localization of the Rep78 protein.

  2. Structural Characterization of the Loop at the Alpha-Subunit C-Terminus of the Mixed Lineage Leukemia Protein Activating Protease Taspase1.

    PubMed

    van den Boom, Johannes; Trusch, Franziska; Hoppstock, Lukas; Beuck, Christine; Bayer, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 asparaginases, a subfamily of N-terminal nucleophile (Ntn) hydrolases, are activated by limited proteolysis. This activation yields a heterodimer and a loop region at the C-terminus of the α-subunit is released. Since this region is unresolved in all type 2 asparaginase crystal structures but is close to the active site residues, we explored this loop region in six members of the type 2 asparaginase family using homology modeling. As the loop model for the childhood cancer-relevant protease Taspase1 differed from the other members, Taspase1 activation as well as the conformation and dynamics of the 56 amino acids loop were investigated by CD and NMR spectroscopy. We propose a helix-turn-helix motif, which can be exploited as novel anticancer target to inhibit Taspase1 proteolytic activity. PMID:26974973

  3. Aspartic acid-484 of nascent placental alkaline phosphatase condenses with a phosphatidylinositol glycan to become the carboxyl terminus of the mature enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    Micanovic, R; Bailey, C A; Brink, L; Gerber, L; Pan, Y C; Hulmes, J D; Udenfriend, S

    1988-01-01

    A carboxyl-terminal chymotryptic peptide from mature human placental alkaline phosphatase was purified by HPLC and monitored by a specific RIA. Sequencing and amino acid assay showed that the carboxyl terminus of the peptide was aspartic acid, representing residue 484 of the proenzyme as deduced from the corresponding cDNA. Further analysis of the peptide showed it to be a peptidoglycan containing one residue of ethanolamine, one residue of glucosamine, and two residues of neutral hexose. The inositol glycan is apparently linked to the alpha carboxyl group of the aspartic acid through the ethanolamine. Location of the inositol glycan on Asp-484 of the proenzyme indicates that a 29-residue peptide is cleaved from the nascent protein during the post-translational condensation with the phosphatidylinositol-glycan. PMID:3422741

  4. Structural Characterization of the Loop at the Alpha-Subunit C-Terminus of the Mixed Lineage Leukemia Protein Activating Protease Taspase1

    PubMed Central

    van den Boom, Johannes; Trusch, Franziska; Hoppstock, Lukas; Beuck, Christine; Bayer, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 asparaginases, a subfamily of N-terminal nucleophile (Ntn) hydrolases, are activated by limited proteolysis. This activation yields a heterodimer and a loop region at the C-terminus of the α-subunit is released. Since this region is unresolved in all type 2 asparaginase crystal structures but is close to the active site residues, we explored this loop region in six members of the type 2 asparaginase family using homology modeling. As the loop model for the childhood cancer-relevant protease Taspase1 differed from the other members, Taspase1 activation as well as the conformation and dynamics of the 56 amino acids loop were investigated by CD and NMR spectroscopy. We propose a helix-turn-helix motif, which can be exploited as novel anticancer target to inhibit Taspase1 proteolytic activity. PMID:26974973

  5. Ipomoelin, a Jacalin-Related Lectin with a Compact Tetrameric Association and Versatile Carbohydrate Binding Properties Regulated by Its N Terminus

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Wei-Chieh; Liu, Kai-Lun; Hsu, Fang-Ciao; Jeng, Shih-Tong; Cheng, Yi-Sheng

    2012-01-01

    Many proteins are induced in the plant defense response to biotic stress or mechanical wounding. One group is lectins. Ipomoelin (IPO) is one of the wound-inducible proteins of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas cv. Tainung 57) and is a Jacalin-related lectin (JRL). In this study, we resolved the crystal structures of IPO in its apo form and in complex with carbohydrates such as methyl α-D-mannopyranoside (Me-Man), methyl α-D-glucopyranoside (Me-Glc), and methyl α-D-galactopyranoside (Me-Gal) in different space groups. The packing diagrams indicated that IPO might represent a compact tetrameric association in the JRL family. The protomer of IPO showed a canonical β-prism fold with 12 strands of β-sheets but with 2 additional short β-strands at the N terminus. A truncated IPO (ΔN10IPO) by removing the 2 short β-strands of the N terminus was used to reveal its role in a tetrameric association. Gel filtration chromatography confirmed IPO as a tetrameric form in solution. Isothermal titration calorimetry determined the binding constants (KA) of IPO and ΔN10IPO against various carbohydrates. IPO could bind to Me-Man, Me-Glc, and Me-Gal with similar binding constants. In contrast, ΔN10IPO showed high binding ability to Me-Man and Me-Glc but could not bind to Me-Gal. Our structural and functional analysis of IPO revealed that its compact tetrameric association and carbohydrate binding polyspecificity could be regulated by the 2 additional N-terminal β-strands. The versatile carbohydrate binding properties of IPO might play a role in plant defense. PMID:22808208

  6. Multisite tyrosine phosphorylation of the N-terminus of Mint1/X11α by Src kinase regulates the trafficking of amyloid precursor protein.

    PubMed

    Dunning, Christopher J R; Black, Hannah L; Andrews, Katie L; Davenport, Elizabeth C; Conboy, Michael; Chawla, Sangeeta; Dowle, Adam A; Ashford, David; Thomas, Jerry R; Evans, Gareth J O

    2016-05-01

    Mint/X11 is one of the four neuronal trafficking adaptors that interact with amyloid precursor protein (APP) and are linked with its cleavage to generate β-amyloid peptide, a key player in the pathology of Alzheimer's disease. How APP switches between adaptors at different stages of the secretory pathway is poorly understood. Here, we show that tyrosine phosphorylation of Mint1 regulates the destination of APP. A canonical SH2-binding motif ((202) YEEI) was identified in the N-terminus of Mint1 that is phosphorylated on tyrosine by C-Src and recruits the active kinase for sequential phosphorylation of further tyrosines (Y191 and Y187). A single Y202F mutation in the Mint1 N-terminus inhibits C-Src binding and tyrosine phosphorylation. Previous studies observed that co-expression of wild-type Mint1 and APP causes accumulation of APP in the trans-Golgi. Unphosphorylatable Mint1 (Y202F) or pharmacological inhibition of Src reduced the accumulation of APP in the trans-Golgi of heterologous cells. A similar result was observed in cultured rat hippocampal neurons where Mint1(Y202F) permitted the trafficking of APP to more distal neurites than the wild-type protein. These data underline the importance of the tyrosine phosphorylation of Mint1 as a critical switch for determining the destination of APP. The regulation of amyloid precursor protein (APP) trafficking is poorly understood. We have discovered that the APP adapter, Mint1, is phosphorylated by C-Src kinase. Mint1 causes APP accumulation in the trans-Golgi network, whereas inhibition of Src or mutation of Mint1-Y202 permits APP recycling. The phosphorylation status of Mint1 could impact on the pathological trafficking of APP in Alzheimer's disease. PMID:26865271

  7. Crystal structure of acivicin-inhibited γ-glutamyltranspeptidase reveals critical roles for its C-terminus in autoprocessing and catalysis.*

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Kristin; Cullati, Sierra; Sand, Aaron; Biterova, Ekaterina I.; Barycki, Joseph J.

    2009-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori γ-glutamyltranspeptidase (HpGT) is a general γ-glutamyl hydrolase and a demonstrated virulence factor. The enzyme confers a growth advantage to the bacterium, providing essential amino acid precursors by initiating the degradation of extracellular glutathione and glutamine. HpGT is a member of the N-terminal nucleophile (Ntn) hydrolase superfamily and undergoes autoprocessing to generate the active form of the enzyme. Acivicin is a widely used γ-glutamyltranspeptidase inhibitor that covalently modifies the enzyme, but its precise mechanism of action remains unclear. The time-dependent inactivation of HpGT exhibits a hyperbolic dependence on acivicin concentration with kmax = 0.033 ± 0.006 sec−1 and KI = 19.7 ± 7.2 μM. Structure determination of acivicin-modified HpGT (1.7 Å; Rfactor=17.9%; Rfree=20.8%) demonstrates that acivicin is accommodated within the γ-glutamyl binding pocket of the enzyme. The hydroxyl group of Thr 380, the catalytic nucleophile in the autoprocessing and enzymatic reactions, displaces chloride from the acivicin ring to form the covalently linked complex. Within the acivicin-modified HpGT structure, the C-terminus of the protein becomes ordered with Phe 567 positioned over the active site. Substitution or deletion of Phe 567 leads to a >10-fold reduction in enzymatic activity, underscoring its importance in catalysis. The mobile C-terminus is positioned by several electrostatic interactions within the C-terminal region, most notably a salt bridge between Arg 475 and Glu 566. Mutational analysis reveals that Arg 475 is critical for the proper placement of the C-terminal region, the Tyr 433 containing loop, and the proposed oxyanion hole. PMID:19256527

  8. Phosphorylation of the C Terminus of RHD3 Has a Critical Role in Homotypic ER Membrane Fusion in Arabidopsis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Ueda, Haruko; Yokota, Etsuo; Kuwata, Keiko; Kutsuna, Natsumaro; Mano, Shoji; Shimada, Tomoo; Tamura, Kentaro; Fukao, Yoichiro; Brandizzi, Federica; Shimmen, Teruo; Nishimura, Mikio

    2016-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) consists of dynamically changing tubules and cisternae. In animals and yeast, homotypic ER membrane fusion is mediated by fusogens (atlastin and Sey1p, respectively) that are membrane-associated dynamin-like GTPases. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), another dynamin-like GTPase, ROOT HAIR DEFECTIVE3 (RHD3), has been proposed as an ER membrane fusogen, but direct evidence is lacking. Here, we show that RHD3 has an ER membrane fusion activity that is enhanced by phosphorylation of its C terminus. The ER network was RHD3-dependently reconstituted from the cytosol and microsome fraction of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) cultured cells by exogenously adding GTP, ATP, and F-actin. We next established an in vitro assay system of ER tubule formation with Arabidopsis ER vesicles, in which addition of GTP caused ER sac formation from the ER vesicles. Subsequent application of a shearing force to this system triggered the formation of tubules from the ER sacs in an RHD-dependent manner. Unexpectedly, in the absence of a shearing force, Ser/Thr kinase treatment triggered RHD3-dependent tubule formation. Mass spectrometry showed that RHD3 was phosphorylated at multiple Ser and Thr residues in the C terminus. An antibody against the RHD3 C-terminal peptide abolished kinase-triggered tubule formation. When the Ser cluster was deleted or when the Ser residues were replaced with Ala residues, kinase treatment had no effect on tubule formation. Kinase treatment induced the oligomerization of RHD3. Neither phosphorylation-dependent modulation of membrane fusion nor oligomerization has been reported for atlastin or Sey1p. Taken together, we propose that phosphorylation-stimulated oligomerization of RHD3 enhances ER membrane fusion to form the ER network. PMID:26684656

  9. Mass balance, meteorology, area altitude distribution, glacier-surface altitude, ice motion, terminus position, and runoff at Gulkana Glacier, Alaska, 1996 balance year

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    March, Rod S.

    2003-01-01

    The 1996 measured winter snow, maximum winter snow, net, and annual balances in the Gulkana Glacier Basin were evaluated on the basis of meteorological, hydrological, and glaciological data. Averaged over the glacier, the measured winter snow balance was 0.87 meter on April 18, 1996, 1.1 standard deviation below the long-term average; the maximum winter snow balance, 1.06 meters, was reached on May 28, 1996; and the net balance (from August 30, 1995, to August 24, 1996) was -0.53 meter, 0.53 standard deviation below the long-term average. The annual balance (October 1, 1995, to September 30, 1996) was -0.37 meter. Area-averaged balances were reported using both the 1967 and 1993 area altitude distributions (the numbers previously given in this abstract use the 1993 area altitude distribution). Net balance was about 25 percent less negative using the 1993 area altitude distribution than the 1967 distribution. Annual average air temperature was 0.9 degree Celsius warmer than that recorded with the analog sensor used since 1966. Total precipitation catch for the year was 0.78 meter, 0.8 standard deviations below normal. The annual average wind speed was 3.5 meters per second in the first year of measuring wind speed. Annual runoff averaged 1.50 meters over the basin, 1.0 standard deviation below the long-term average. Glacier-surface altitude and ice-motion changes measured at three index sites document seasonal ice-speed and glacier-thickness changes. Both showed a continuation of a slowing and thinning trend present in the 1990s. The glacier terminus and lower ablation area were defined for 1996 with a handheld Global Positioning System survey of 126 locations spread out over about 4 kilometers on the lower glacier margin. From 1949 to 1996, the terminus retreated about 1,650 meters for an average retreat rate of 35 meters per year.

  10. Thimet oligopeptidase specificity: evidence of preferential cleavage near the C-terminus and product inhibition from kinetic analysis of peptide hydrolysis.

    PubMed Central

    Knight, C G; Dando, P M; Barrett, A J

    1995-01-01

    The substrate-size specificity of human thimet oligopeptidase (EC 3.4.24.15) was investigated with oligomers of glycyl-prolyl-leucine (GPL)n where n = 2, 3, 4 and 5. These peptides were cleaved only at Leu-Gly bonds to give GPL as the single final product. Hydrolysis was most rapid with (GPL)3 and slowest with (GPL)5. The more water-soluble oligomers of Gly-Hyp-Leu showed the same trend. (Gly-Hyp-Leu)6 was not hydrolysed, consistent with the previous finding that substrates larger than 17 amino acids are not cleaved by thimet oligopeptidase. The cleavage of (GPL)3 to GPL fitted a sequential first-order model. First-order kinetics were unexpected as the initial substrate concentration was greater than Km. The anomaly was also seen during the cleavage of bradykinin and neurotensin, and in these cases first-order behaviour was due to potent competitive inhibition by the C-terminal product. The sequential mechanism for (GPL)3 breakdown by thimet oligopeptidase does not discriminate between initial cleavages towards the N- or C-terminus. As isoleucine is an unfavourable residue in P1, substrates were made in which selected leucine residues were replaced by isoleucine. GPL--GPI--GPL (where--represents the bond between the tripeptide units) was resistant to hydrolysis and GPI--GPL--GPL was cleaved only at the -Leu-Gly- bond. Experiments with isoleucine-containing analogues of (Gly-Hyp-Leu)4 showed that thimet oligopeptidase preferred to cleave these peptides near the C-terminus. PMID:7755557

  11. Crystal Structure of Acivicin-Inhibited [gamma]-Glutamyltranspeptidase Reveals Critical Roles for Its C-Terminus in Autoprocessing and Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Kristin; Cullati, Sierra; Sand, Aaron; Biterova, Ekaterina I.; Barycki, Joseph J.

    2009-03-27

    Helicobacter pylori {gamma}-glutamyltranspeptidase (HpGT) is a general {gamma}-glutamyl hydrolase and a demonstrated virulence factor. The enzyme confers a growth advantage to the bacterium, providing essential amino acid precursors by initiating the degradation of extracellular glutathione and glutamine. HpGT is a member of the N-terminal nucleophile (Ntn) hydrolase superfamily and undergoes autoprocessing to generate the active form of the enzyme. Acivicin is a widely used {gamma}-glutamyltranspeptidase inhibitor that covalently modifies the enzyme, but its precise mechanism of action remains unclear. The time-dependent inactivation of HpGT exhibits a hyperbolic dependence on acivicin concentration with k{sub max} = 0.033 {+-} 0.006 s{sup -1} and K{sub I} = 19.7 {+-} 7.2 {micro}M. Structure determination of acivicin-modified HpGT (1.7 {angstrom}; R{sub factor} = 17.9%; R{sub free} = 20.8%) demonstrates that acivicin is accommodated within the {gamma}-glutamyl binding pocket of the enzyme. The hydroxyl group of Thr 380, the catalytic nucleophile in the autoprocessing and enzymatic reactions, displaces chloride from the acivicin ring to form the covalently linked complex. Within the acivicin-modified HpGT structure, the C-terminus of the protein becomes ordered with Phe 567 positioned over the active site. Substitution or deletion of Phe 567 leads to a >10-fold reduction in enzymatic activity, underscoring its importance in catalysis. The mobile C-terminus is positioned by several electrostatic interactions within the C-terminal region, most notably a salt bridge between Arg 475 and Glu 566. Mutational analysis reveals that Arg 475 is critical for the proper placement of the C-terminal region, the Tyr 433 containing loop, and the proposed oxyanion hole.

  12. Comparative functional analysis of Jembrana disease virus Tat protein on lentivirus long terminal repeat promoters: evidence for flexibility at its N-terminus

    PubMed Central

    Su, Yang; Deng, Gang; Gai, Yuanming; Li, Yue; Gao, Yang; Du, Jiansen; Geng, Yunqi; Chen, Qimin; Qiao, Wentao

    2009-01-01

    Background Jembrana disease virus (JDV) encodes a potent regulatory protein Tat that strongly stimulates viral expression by transactivating the long terminal repeat (LTR) promoter. JDV Tat (jTat) promotes the transcription from its own LTR as well as non-cognate LTRs, by recruiting host transcription factors and facilitating transcriptional elongation. Here, we compared the sequence requirements of jTat for transactivation of JDV, bovine immunodeficiency virus (BIV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) LTRs. Results In this study, we identified the minimal protein sequence for LTR activation using jTat truncation mutants. We found that jTat N-terminal residues were indispensable for transactivating the HIV LTR. In contrast, transactivation of BIV and JDV LTRs depended largely on an arginine-rich motif and some flanking residues. Competitive inhibition assay and knockdown analysis showed that P-TEFb was required for jTat-mediated LTR transactivation, and a mammalian two-hybrid assay revealed the robust interaction of jTat with cyclin T1. In addition, HIV LTR transactivation was largely affected by fusion protein at the jTat N-terminus despite the fact that the cyclin T1-binding affinity was not altered. Furthermore, the jTat N-terminal sequence enabled HIV Tat to transactivate BIV and JDV LTRs, suggesting the flexibility at the jTat N-terminus. Conclusion This study showed the distinct sequence requirements of jTat for HIV, BIV and JDV LTR activation. Residues responsible for interaction with cyclin T1 and transactivation response element are the key determinants for transactivation of its cognate LTR. N-terminal residues in jTat may compensate for transactivation of the HIV LTR, based on the flexibility. PMID:19860923

  13. KCNE variants reveal a critical role of the β subunit carboxyl terminus in PKA-dependent regulation of the IKs potassium channel

    PubMed Central

    Kurokawa, Junko; Bankston, John R.; Kaihara, Asami; Chen, Lei; Furukawa, Tetsushi; Kass, Robert S.

    2009-01-01

    Co-assembly of KCNQ1 with different accessory, or beta, subunits that are members of the KCNE family results in potassium (K+) channels that conduct functionally distinct currents. The alpha subunit KCNQ1 conducts a slowly activated delayed rectifier K+ current (IKs), a major contributor to cardiac repolarization, when co-assembled with KCNE1 and channels that favor the open state when co-assembled with either KCNE2 or KCNE3. In the heart, stimulation of the sympathetic nervous system enhances IKs. A macromolecular signaling complex of the IKs channel including the targeting protein Yotiao coordinates up or downregulation of channel activity by protein kinase A (PKA) phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of molecules in the complex. β-adrenergic receptor mediated IKs upregulation, a functional consequence of PKA phosphorylation of the KCNQ1 amino terminus (N-T), requires co-expression of KCNQ1/Yotiao with KCNE1. Here, we report that co-expression of KCNE2, like KCNE1, confers a functional channel response to KCNQ1 phosphorylation, but co-expression of KCNE3 does not. Amino acid sequence comparison among the KCNE peptides, and KCNE1 truncation experiments, reveal a segment of the predicted intracellular KCNE1 carboxyl terminus (C-T) that is necessary for functional transduction of PKA phosphorylated KCNQ1. Moreover, chimera analysis reveals a region of KCNE1 sufficient to confer cAMP-dependent functional regulation upon the KCNQ1_ KCNE3_Yotiao channel. The property of specific beta subunits to transduce post-translational regulation of alpha subunits of ion channels adds another dimension to our understanding molecular mechanisms underlying the diversity of regulation of native K+ channels. PMID:19077539

  14. The Carboxy-Terminal Region of apoA-I is Required for the ABCA1-Dependent Formation of α-HDL but not preβ-HDL Particles In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Chroni, Angeliki; Koukos, Georgios; Duka, Adelina; Zannis, Vassilis I.

    2008-01-01

    ABCA1-mediated lipid efflux to lipid poor apoA-I results in the gradual lipidation of apoA-I. This leads to the formation of discoidal HDL which are subsequently converted to spherical HDL by the action of LCAT. We have investigated the effect of point mutations and deletions in the carboxy-terminal region of apoA-I on the biogenesis of HDL using adenovirus-mediated gene transfer in apoA-I deficient mice. It was found that the plasma HDL levels were greatly reduced in mice expressing the carboxy-terminal deletion mutants apoA-I[Δ(185-243)] and apoA-I[Δ(220-243)], shown previously to diminish the ABCA1-mediated lipid efflux. The HDL levels were normal in mice expressing the WT apoA-I, the apoA-I[Δ(232-243)] deletion mutant or the apoA-I[E191A/H193A/K195A] point mutant, which promote normal ABCA1-mediated lipid efflux. Electron microscopy and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis showed that the apoA-I[Δ(185-243)] and apoA-I[Δ(220-243)] mutants formed mainly preβ-HDL particles and few spherical particles enriched in apoE, while WT apoA-I, apoA-I[Δ(232-243)] and apoA-I[E191A/H193A/K195A] formed spherical α-HDL particles. The findings establish that a) deletions that eliminate the 220-231 region of apoA-I prevent the synthesis of α-HDL, but allow the synthesis of preβ-HDL particles in vivo, b) the amino-terminal segment 1-184 of apoA-I can promote synthesis of preβ-HDL type particles in an ABCA1-independent process and c) the charged residues in the 191-195 region of apoA-I do not influence the biogenesis of HDL. PMID:17447731

  15. Endopeptidase 3.4.24.11 converts N-1-(R,S)carboxy-3-phenylpropyl-Ala-Ala-Phe-p-carboxyanilide into a potent inhibitor of angiotensin-converting enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, C H; Yamamoto, T; Walsh, D M; Allsop, D

    1993-01-01

    It was reported recently that N-1-(R,S)carboxy-3-phenylpropyl-Ala-Ala-Phe-p-carboxyanilide (CPP-A-A-F-pAB), an inhibitor of endopeptidase 3.4.24.15 (E-24.15), also inhibits angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) from rabbit lung. We have found that this compound is without effect on ACE purified from pig kidney, at a concentration some 1000-fold greater than the Ki reported for inhibition of the enzyme from lung. However, preincubation of CPP-A-A-F-pAB with neutral endopeptidase 3.4.24.11 (E-24.11) does result in potent inhibitory effects on ACE. We have shown this to be due to formation of a fragment, CPP-A-A, the structure of which is closely related to ACE inhibitors such as enalaprilat. CPP-A-A was found to be a potent inhibitor of pig ACE. Under the conditions used it had an IC50 value of 1.6 x 10(-8) M, compared with the value obtained for captopril of 7.5 x 10(-10) M. These results have important implications for studies of E-24.15 when using CPP-A-A-F-pAB in vivo or in crude tissue extracts where E-24.11 might also be present. PMID:8379924

  16. Development and validation of a LC/MS method for the determination of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol and 11-carboxy-Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol in the larvae of the blowfly Lucilia sericata: Forensic applications.

    PubMed

    Karampela, Sevasti; Pistos, Constantinos; Moraitis, Konstantinos; Stoukas, Vasilios; Papoutsis, Ioannis; Zorba, Eleni; Koupparis, Michalis; Spiliopoulou, Chara; Athanaselis, Sotiris

    2015-12-01

    In a number of forensic toxicological cases, Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and its metabolite 11-carboxy-delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THCA) are frequently considered as contributor factors to the event. To that, a liquid chromatographic mass spectrometric method is described for the identification and quantitation of THC and its metabolite THCA in the forensically important larvae of L. sericata. Larvae of Lucilia sericata were fortified with varying concentrations of THC and THCA covering the calibration range between 10 and 500pg/mg. For the isolation of the analytes from larvae, several extraction techniques were evaluated and finally liquid-liquid extraction under acidic pH was selected using hexane-ethyl acetate (50:50, v/v) as extraction solvent. For the chromatographic separation, a Waters Symmetry® C18 analytical column was used while the mobile phase was acetonitrile-ammonium acetate (2mM) (30:70, v/v). The detection was performed using electrospray ionization source in negative mode (ESI-) and the selected ions monitored were m/z 313 for THC and m/z 343 for THCA. The proposed method which is simple and sufficiently sensitive for the detection of THC and THCA even in a single larva sampling, assisted the investigation of a forensic case. PMID:26654083

  17. Development and validation of a LC/MS method for the determination of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol and 11-carboxy-Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol in the larvae of the blowfly Lucilia sericata: Forensic applications.

    PubMed

    Karampela, Sevasti; Pistos, Constantinos; Moraitis, Konstantinos; Stoukas, Vasilios; Papoutsis, Ioannis; Zorba, Eleni; Koupparis, Michalis; Spiliopoulou, Chara; Athanaselis, Sotiris

    2015-12-01

    In a number of forensic toxicological cases, Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and its metabolite 11-carboxy-delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THCA) are frequently considered as contributor factors to the event. To that, a liquid chromatographic mass spectrometric method is described for the identification and quantitation of THC and its metabolite THCA in the forensically important larvae of L. sericata. Larvae of Lucilia sericata were fortified with varying concentrations of THC and THCA covering the calibration range between 10 and 500pg/mg. For the isolation of the analytes from larvae, several extraction techniques were evaluated and finally liquid-liquid extraction under acidic pH was selected using hexane-ethyl acetate (50:50, v/v) as extraction solvent. For the chromatographic separation, a Waters Symmetry® C18 analytical column was used while the mobile phase was acetonitrile-ammonium acetate (2mM) (30:70, v/v). The detection was performed using electrospray ionization source in negative mode (ESI-) and the selected ions monitored were m/z 313 for THC and m/z 343 for THCA. The proposed method which is simple and sufficiently sensitive for the detection of THC and THCA even in a single larva sampling, assisted the investigation of a forensic case.

  18. Synthesis and properties of radiopaque polymer hydrogels II: copolymers of 2,4,6-triiodophenyl- or N-(3-carboxy-2,4,6-triiodophenyl)- acrylamide and p-styrene sulfonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamura, Masahiko; Yamanobe, Takeshi; Arai, Tomohiro; Uehara, Hiroki; Komoto, Tadashi; Hosoi, Seiichi; Kumazaki, Tatsuo

    2002-01-01

    In order to pursue a possibility of application of radiopaque polymer hydrogels to vascular embolization, studies were made on synthesis of iodine containing copolyanions and properties of their hydrogels with polycation via formation of polyion complexes (PIC). Acrylamide derivatives having triiodophenyl groups were synthesized and copolymerized with sodium styrene sulfonate (SS) under several conditions. It was found that N-(3-carboxy-2,4,6-triiodophenyl)-acrylamide (CIPA) and 2,4,6-triiodophenylacrylamide (TIPA) monomers are effectively copolymerized with SS, while N-allyl-2,3,5-triiodobenzamide (ATIBA) are hardly copolymerized. Hydrogels were prepared by mixing aqueous solutions of polyanions, i.e. the copolymers (PCIPA and PTIPA) and polyallylamine (PAAn). 13C NMR spectra of PCIPA/PAAn and PTIPA/PAAn hydrogels gave peaks for both polyanion and polycation. This means that there remained free anionic and cationic monomer units, which did not form ion pairs because of spatial hindrance. Time dependence of 1H T2 showed quick increment and plateau for PSS/PAAn and gradual increments for PCIPA/PAAn. Therefore, PIC containing the radiopaque copolymer retains the hydrogel state for a long time. Embolization was examined by injection of PCIPA/PAAn hydrogels into the vein of a removed porcine kidney as a preliminary test for transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE). X-ray radiograms of the embolized organ were reasonably explained based on the structure and mobility of hydrogels.

  19. Blood cannabinoids. II. Models for the prediction of time of marijuana exposure from plasma concentrations of delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and 11-nor-9-carboxy-delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THCCOOH)

    PubMed

    Huestis, M A; Henningfield, J E; Cone, E J

    1992-01-01

    Two mathematical models are described for the prediction of time of marijuana use from the analysis of a single plasma sample for cannabinoids. The models were derived from cannabinoid data obtained from a controlled clinical study of acute marijuana smoking. Model I was based on plasma delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) concentrations and Model II was based on the ratio of 11-nor-9-carboxy-delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THCCOOH) to THC in plasma. The two models were validated with cannabinoid data from nine published and unpublished clinical studies. The data included plasma samples obtained from infrequent and frequent marijuana smokers and after oral marijuana administration. Cannabinoid plasma concentrations had been determined by a variety of analytical methods. The accuracy of model prediction was evaluated by comparison of the predicted time of prior drug use to the actual time of exposure. Predictions of time of exposure were generally accurate but tended to overestimate time immediately after smoking and tended to underestimate later times. A second assessment of the validity of the models was made by determining if actual time of use was within the 95% confidence interval. Model I correctly predicted the time of exposure within the 95% confidence interval for 235 of 261 samples (90.0%), and Model II was correct in 232 of 260 samples (89.2%). These prediction models may be beneficial to forensic scientists in the interpretation of cannabinoid plasma levels.

  20. VgrG C terminus confers the type VI effector transport specificity and is required for binding with PAAR and adaptor–effector complex

    PubMed Central

    Bondage, Devanand D.; Lin, Jer-Sheng; Ma, Lay-Sun; Kuo, Chih-Horng; Lai, Erh-Min

    2016-01-01

    Type VI secretion system (T6SS) is a macromolecular machine used by many Gram-negative bacteria to inject effectors/toxins into eukaryotic hosts or prokaryotic competitors for survival and fitness. To date, our knowledge of the molecular determinants and mechanisms underlying the transport of these effectors remains limited. Here, we report that two T6SS encoded valine-glycine repeat protein G (VgrG) paralogs in Agrobacterium tumefaciens C58 specifically control the secretion and interbacterial competition activity of the type VI DNase toxins Tde1 and Tde2. Deletion and domain-swapping analysis identified that the C-terminal extension of VgrG1 specifically confers Tde1 secretion and Tde1-dependent interbacterial competition activity in planta, and the C-terminal variable region of VgrG2 governs this specificity for Tde2. Functional studies of VgrG1 and VgrG2 variants with stepwise deletion of the C terminus revealed that the C-terminal 31 aa (C31) of VgrG1 and 8 aa (C8) of VgrG2 are the molecular determinants specifically required for delivery of each cognate Tde toxin. Further in-depth studies on Tde toxin delivery mechanisms revealed that VgrG1 interacts with the adaptor/chaperone–effector complex (Tap-1–Tde1) in the absence of proline-alanine-alanine-arginine (PAAR) and the VgrG1–PAAR complex forms independent of Tap-1 and Tde1. Importantly, we identified the regions involved in these interactions. Although the entire C31 segment is required for binding with the Tap-1–Tde1 complex, only the first 15 aa of this region are necessary for PAAR binding. These results suggest that the VgrG1 C terminus interacts sequentially or simultaneously with the Tap-1–Tde1 complex and PAAR to govern Tde1 translocation across bacterial membranes and delivery into target cells for antibacterial activity. PMID:27313214

  1. Avulsion processes at the terminus of low-gradient semi-arid fluvial systems: Lessons from the Río Colorado, Altiplano endorheic basin, Bolivia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donselaar, M. E.; Cuevas Gozalo, M. C.; Moyano, S.

    2013-01-01

    The Río Colorado dryland river system in the southeast of the endorheic Altiplano Basin (Bolivia) terminates on a very flat coastal plain at the edge of the Salar de Uyuni, the world's largest salt pan with an area of ca. 12,500 km2. Since the Pleistocene the basin has experienced several lake expansion and contraction cycles in response to wetter and drier climate periods, respectively. At present the basin is in a dry climate period which results in a lake level lowstand and progradation of fluvial systems such as the Río Colorado onto the former lake bottom. The present field study of the terminus of the Río Colorado shows that the river experiences a gradual downstream decrease of bankfull width and depth. This bankfull decrease is caused by the combined effects of: (1) extremely low gradient of the lake bottom and, hence, loss of flow energy, and (2) downstream transmission losses due to high evaporation potential and river water percolation through the channel floor. Peak water discharge in seasonal, short-duration rain periods causes massive overbank flooding and floodplain inundation. On satellite images the morphology of the river terminus has a divergent pattern and resembles a network of coeval sinuous distributary channels. However, field observations show that only one channel is active at low flow stage, and at high-flow stage an abandoned, partially infilled channel may be active as well. The active channel at its termination splits into narrow and shallow anastomosing streams before its demise on the lacustrine coastal plain. The rest of the channels which form the divergent network are older sediment-filled abandoned sinuous river courses with multiple random avulsion points. These channel deposits, together with extensive amalgamated crevasse-splay deposits, form an intricate network of fluvial sand deposits. Successive stages of progressively deeper crevasse-channel incision into the floodplain are the result of waning-stage return flow of

  2. VgrG C terminus confers the type VI effector transport specificity and is required for binding with PAAR and adaptor-effector complex.

    PubMed

    Bondage, Devanand D; Lin, Jer-Sheng; Ma, Lay-Sun; Kuo, Chih-Horng; Lai, Erh-Min

    2016-07-01

    Type VI secretion system (T6SS) is a macromolecular machine used by many Gram-negative bacteria to inject effectors/toxins into eukaryotic hosts or prokaryotic competitors for survival and fitness. To date, our knowledge of the molecular determinants and mechanisms underlying the transport of these effectors remains limited. Here, we report that two T6SS encoded valine-glycine repeat protein G (VgrG) paralogs in Agrobacterium tumefaciens C58 specifically control the secretion and interbacterial competition activity of the type VI DNase toxins Tde1 and Tde2. Deletion and domain-swapping analysis identified that the C-terminal extension of VgrG1 specifically confers Tde1 secretion and Tde1-dependent interbacterial competition activity in planta, and the C-terminal variable region of VgrG2 governs this specificity for Tde2. Functional studies of VgrG1 and VgrG2 variants with stepwise deletion of the C terminus revealed that the C-terminal 31 aa (C31) of VgrG1 and 8 aa (C8) of VgrG2 are the molecular determinants specifically required for delivery of each cognate Tde toxin. Further in-depth studies on Tde toxin delivery mechanisms revealed that VgrG1 interacts with the adaptor/chaperone-effector complex (Tap-1-Tde1) in the absence of proline-alanine-alanine-arginine (PAAR) and the VgrG1-PAAR complex forms independent of Tap-1 and Tde1. Importantly, we identified the regions involved in these interactions. Although the entire C31 segment is required for binding with the Tap-1-Tde1 complex, only the first 15 aa of this region are necessary for PAAR binding. These results suggest that the VgrG1 C terminus interacts sequentially or simultaneously with the Tap-1-Tde1 complex and PAAR to govern Tde1 translocation across bacterial membranes and delivery into target cells for antibacterial activity. PMID:27313214

  3. Crystal structure of the karyopherin Kap121p bound to the extreme C-terminus of the protein phosphatase Cdc14p

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Junya; Hirano, Hidemi; Matsuura, Yoshiyuki

    2015-07-31

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the protein phosphatase Cdc14p is an antagonist of mitotic cyclin-dependent kinases and is a key regulator of late mitotic events such as chromosome segregation, spindle disassembly and cytokinesis. The activity of Cdc14p is controlled by cell-cycle dependent changes in its association with its competitive inhibitor Net1p (also known as Cfi1p) in the nucleolus. For most of the cell cycle up to metaphase, Cdc14p is sequestered in the nucleolus in an inactive state. During anaphase, Cdc14p is released from Net1p, spreads into the nucleus and cytoplasm, and dephosphorylates key mitotic targets. Although regulated nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of Cdc14p has been suggested to be important for exit from mitosis, the mechanism underlying Cdc14p nuclear trafficking remains poorly understood. Here we show that the C-terminal region (residues 517–551) of Cdc14p can function as a nuclear localization signal (NLS) in vivo and also binds to Kap121p (also known as Pse1p), an essential nuclear import carrier in yeast, in a Gsp1p-GTP-dependent manner in vitro. Moreover we report a crystal structure, at 2.4 Å resolution, of Kap121p bound to the C-terminal region of Cdc14p. The structure and structure-based mutational analyses suggest that either the last five residues at the extreme C-terminus of Cdc14p (residues 547–551; Gly-Ser-Ile-Lys-Lys) or adjacent residues with similar sequence (residues 540–544; Gly-Gly-Ile-Arg-Lys) can bind to the NLS-binding site of Kap121p, with two residues (Ile in the middle and Lys at the end of the five residues) of Cdc14p making key contributions to the binding specificity. Based on comparison with other structures of Kap121p-ligand complexes, we propose “IK-NLS” as an appropriate term to refer to the Kap121p-specific NLS. - Highlights: • The C-terminus of Cdc14p binds to Kap121p in a Gsp1p-GTP-dependent manner. • The crystal structure of Kap121p-Cdc14p complex is determined. • The structure reveals how

  4. Deletion of a Predicted β-Sheet Domain within the Amino Terminus of Herpes Simplex Virus Glycoprotein K Conserved among Alphaherpesviruses Prevents Virus Entry into Neuronal Axons

    PubMed Central

    Jambunathan, Nithya; Charles, Anu-Susan; Subramanian, Ramesh; Saied, Ahmad A.; Naderi, Misagh; Rider, Paul; Brylinski, Michal; Chouljenko, Vladimir N.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT We have shown previously that herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) lacking expression of the entire glycoprotein K (gK) or expressing gK with a 38-amino-acid deletion (gKΔ31–68 mutation) failed to infect ganglionic neurons after ocular infection of mice. We constructed a new model for the predicted three-dimensional structure of gK, revealing that the gKΔ31–68 mutation spans a well-defined β-sheet structure within the amino terminus of gK, which is conserved among alphaherpesviruses. The HSV-1(McKrae) gKΔ31–68 virus was tested for the ability to enter into ganglionic neuronal axons in cell culture of explanted rat ganglia using a novel virus entry proximity ligation assay (VEPLA). In this assay, cell surface-bound virions were detected by the colocalization of gD and its cognate receptor nectin-1 on infected neuronal surfaces. Capsids that have entered into the cytoplasm were detected by the colocalization of the virion tegument protein UL37, with dynein required for loading of virion capsids onto microtubules for retrograde transport to the nucleus. HSV-1(McKrae) gKΔ31–68 attached to cell surfaces of Vero cells and ganglionic axons in cell culture as efficiently as wild-type HSV-1(McKrae). However, unlike the wild-type virus, the mutant virus failed to enter into the axoplasm of ganglionic neurons. This work suggests that the amino terminus of gK is a critical determinant for entry into neuronal axons and may serve similar conserved functions for other alphaherpesviruses. IMPORTANCE Alphaherpesviruses, unlike beta- and gammaherpesviruses, have the unique ability to infect and establish latency in neurons. Glycoprotein K (gK) and the membrane protein UL20 are conserved among all alphaherpesviruses. We show here that a predicted β-sheet domain, which is conserved among alphaherpesviruses, functions in HSV-1 entry into neuronal axons, suggesting that it may serve similar functions for other herpesviruses. These results are in agreement with our

  5. The C Terminus of the Core β-Ladder Domain in Japanese Encephalitis Virus Nonstructural Protein 1 Is Flexible for Accommodation of Heterologous Epitope Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Yen, Li-Chen; Liao, Jia-Teh; Lee, Hwei-Jen; Chou, Wei-Yuan; Chen, Chun-Wei; Lin, Yi-Ling

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT NS1 is the only nonstructural protein that enters the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), where NS1 is glycosylated, forms a dimer, and is subsequently secreted during flavivirus replication as dimers or hexamers, which appear to be highly immunogenic to the infected host, as protective immunity can be elicited against homologous flavivirus infections. Here, by using a trans-complementation assay, we identified the C-terminal end of NS1 derived from Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), which was more flexible than other regions in terms of housing foreign epitopes without a significant impact on virus replication. This mapped flexible region is located in the conserved tip of the core β-ladder domain of the multimeric NS1 structure and is also known to contain certain linear epitopes, readily triggering specific antibody responses from the host. Despite becoming attenuated, recombinant JEV with insertion of a neutralizing epitope derived from enterovirus 71 (EV71) into the C-terminal end of NS1 not only could be normally released from infected cells, but also induced dual protective immunity for the host to counteract lethal challenge with either JEV or EV71 in neonatal mice. These results indicated that the secreted multimeric NS1 of flaviviruses may serve as a natural protein carrier to render epitopes of interest more immunogenic in the C terminus of the core β-ladder domain. IMPORTANCE The positive-sense RNA genomes of mosquito-borne flaviviruses appear to be flexible in terms of accommodating extra insertions of short heterologous antigens into their virus genes. Here, we illustrate that the newly identified C terminus of the core β-ladder domain in NS1 could be readily inserted into entities such as EV71 epitopes, and the resulting NS1-epitope fusion proteins appeared to maintain normal virus replication, secretion ability, and multimeric formation from infected cells. Nonetheless, such an insertion attenuated the recombinant JEV in mice

  6. Application of protein N-terminal amidase in enzymatic synthesis of dipeptides containing acidic amino acids specifically at the N-terminus.

    PubMed

    Arai, Toshinobu; Noguchi, Atsushi; Takano, Eriko; Kino, Kuniki

    2013-04-01

    Dipeptides exhibit unique physiological functions and physical properties, e.g., l-aspartyl-l-phenylalanine-methyl ester (Asp-Phe-OMe, aspartame) as an artificial sweetener, and functional studies of peptides have been carried out in various fields. Therefore, to establish a manufacturing process for the useful dipeptides, we investigated its enzymatic synthesis by utilizing an l-amino acid ligase (Lal), which catalyzes dipeptide synthesis in an ATP-dependent manner. Many Lals were obtained, but the Lals recognizing acidic amino acids as N-terminal substrates have not been identified. To increase the variety of dipeptides that are enzymatically synthesized, we proposed a two-step synthesis: Asn-Xaa and Gln-Xaa (Asn, l-asparagine; Gln, l-glutamine; and Xaa, arbitrary amino acids) synthesized by Lals were continuously deamidated by a novel amidase, yielding Asp-Xaa and Glu-Xaa (Asp, l-aspartic acid; and Glu, l-glutamic acid). We searched for amidases that specifically deamidate the N-terminus of Asn or Gln in dipeptides since none have been previously reported. We focused on the protein N-terminal amidase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (NTA1), and assayed its activity toward dipeptides. Our findings showed that NTA1 deamidated l-asparaginyl-l-valine (Asn-Val) and l-glutaminyl-glycine (Gln-Gly), but did not deamidate l-valyl-l-asparagine and l-alanyl-l-glutamine, suggesting that this deamidation activity is N-terminus specific. The specific activity toward Asn-Val and Gln-Gly were 190 ± 30 nmol min(-1) mg(-1)·protein and 136 ± 6 nmol min(-1) mg(-1)·protein. Additionally, we examined some characteristics of NTA1. Acidic dipeptide synthesis was examined by a combination of Lals and NTA1, resulting in the synthesis of 12 kinds of Asp-Xaa, including Asp-Phe, a precursor of aspartame, and 11 kinds of Glu-Xaa.

  7. Alternative splicing in the C-terminus of CaV2.2 controls expression and gating of N-type calcium channels

    PubMed Central

    Castiglioni, Andrew J; Raingo, Jesica; Lipscombe, Diane

    2006-01-01

    N-type CaV2.2 calcium channels localize to presynaptic nerve terminals of nociceptors where they control neurotransmitter release. Nociceptive neurons express a unique set of ion channels and receptors important for optimizing their role in transmission of noxious stimuli. Included among these is a structurally and functionally distinct N-type calcium channel splice isoform, CaV2.2e[37a], expressed in a subset of nociceptors and with limited expression in other parts of the nervous system. CaV2.2[e37a] arises from the mutually exclusive replacement of e37a for e37b in the C-terminus of CaV2.2 mRNA. N-type current densities in nociceptors that express a combination of CaV2.2e[37a] and CaV2.2e[37b] mRNAs are significantly larger compared to cells that express only CaV2.2e[37b]. Here we show that e37a supports increased expression of functional N-type channels and an increase in channel open time as compared to CaV2.2 channels that contain e37b. To understand how e37a affects N-type currents we compared macroscopic and single-channel ionic currents as well as gating currents in tsA201 cells expressing CaV2.2e[37a] and CaV2.2e[37b]. When activated, CaV2.2e[37a] channels remain open for longer and are expressed at higher density than CaV2.2e[37b] channels. These unique features of the CaV2.2e[37a] isoform combine to augment substantially the amount of calcium that enters cells in response to action potentials. Our studies of the e37a/e37b splice site reveal a multifunctional domain in the C-terminus of CaV2.2 that regulates the overall activity of N-type calcium channels in nociceptors. PMID:16857708

  8. ERβ Binds N-CoR in the Presence of Estrogens via an LXXLL-like Motif in the N-CoR C-terminus

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Paul; Valentine, Cathleen; Nguyen, Phuong; Price, Richard H; Marimuthu, Adhirai; West, Brian L; Baxter, John D; Kushner, Peter J

    2003-01-01

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) usually bind the corepressors N-CoR and SMRT in the absence of ligand or in the presence of antagonists. Agonist binding leads to corepressor release and recruitment of coactivators. Here, we report that estrogen receptor β (ERβ) binds N-CoR and SMRT in the presence of agonists, but not antagonists, in vitro and in vivo. This ligand preference differs from that of ERα interactions with corepressors, which are inhibited by estradiol, and resembles that of ERβ interactions with coactivators. ERβ /N-CoR interactions involve ERβ AF-2, which also mediates coactivator recognition. Moreover, ERβ recognizes a sequence (PLTIRML) in the N-CoR C-terminus that resembles coactivator LXXLL motifs. Inhibition of histone deacetylase activity specifically potentiates ERβ LBD activity, suggesting that corepressors restrict the activity of AF-2. We conclude that the ER isoforms show completely distinct modes of interaction with a physiologically important corepressor and discuss our results in terms of ER isoform specificity in vivo. PMID:12904255

  9. The Helicobacter pylori cag Pathogenicity Island Protein CagN Is a Bacterial Membrane-Associated Protein That Is Processed at Its C Terminus

    PubMed Central

    Bourzac, Kevin M.; Satkamp, Laura A.; Guillemin, Karen

    2006-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infects nearly half the world's population and is associated with a spectrum of gastric maladies. Infections with cytotoxin-associated gene pathogenicity island (cag PAI)-containing strains are associated with an increased risk for gastric cancer. The cag PAI contains genes encoding a type IV secretion system (T4SS) and a delivered effector, CagA, that becomes tyrosine phosphorylated upon delivery into host cells and initiates changes in cell signaling. Although some cag PAI genes have been shown to be required for CagA delivery, a subset of which are homologues of T4SS genes from Agrobacterium tumefaciens, the majority have no known function or homologues. We have performed a detailed investigation of one such cag PAI protein, CagN, which is encoded by the gene HP0538. Our results show that CagN is not delivered into host cells and instead is associated with the bacterial membrane. We demonstrate that CagN is cleaved at its C terminus by a mechanism that is independent of other cag PAI proteins. Finally, we show that a ΔcagN mutant is not impaired in its ability to deliver CagA to gastric epithelial cells and initiate cell elongation. PMID:16622188

  10. The Helicobacter pylori cag pathogenicity island protein CagN is a bacterial membrane-associated protein that is processed at its C terminus.

    PubMed

    Bourzac, Kevin M; Satkamp, Laura A; Guillemin, Karen

    2006-05-01

    Helicobacter pylori infects nearly half the world's population and is associated with a spectrum of gastric maladies. Infections with cytotoxin-associated gene pathogenicity island (cag PAI)-containing strains are associated with an increased risk for gastric cancer. The cag PAI contains genes encoding a type IV secretion system (T4SS) and a delivered effector, CagA, that becomes tyrosine phosphorylated upon delivery into host cells and initiates changes in cell signaling. Although some cag PAI genes have been shown to be required for CagA delivery, a subset of which are homologues of T4SS genes from Agrobacterium tumefaciens, the majority have no known function or homologues. We have performed a detailed investigation of one such cag PAI protein, CagN, which is encoded by the gene HP0538. Our results show that CagN is not delivered into host cells and instead is associated with the bacterial membrane. We demonstrate that CagN is cleaved at its C terminus by a mechanism that is independent of other cag PAI proteins. Finally, we show that a delta cagN mutant is not impaired in its ability to deliver CagA to gastric epithelial cells and initiate cell elongation. PMID:16622188

  11. A Proline-Rich Domain in the Genotype 4 Hepatitis E Virus ORF3 C-Terminus Is Crucial for Downstream V105DLP108 Immunoactivity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Heng; Ji, Fangxiao; Liang, Huanbin; Gu, Honglang; Ning, Zhangyong; Liu, Rongchang; Zhang, Guihong

    2015-01-01

    The hepatitis E virus (HEV) is responsible for serious viral hepatitis worldwide. Animals are considered a reservoir of HEV, particularly pigs. While HEV infection in pigs and dogs is always asymptomatic, the virus causes high death rates in patients with pre-existing chronic liver disease and pregnant women in developing countries. HEV open reading frame 2 (ORF2) has been used as a diagnostic target to detect specific antibodies against HEV in serum samples. Recent research has additionally supported the potential utility of the ORF3 protein as a target in serum anti-HEV detection. However, the epitope distribution of ORF3 protein remains ambiguous. In the current study, we showed that continuous amino acid motif, VDLP, at the C-terminus of genotype 4 HEV ORF3 is a core sequence of the ORF3 protein epitope. Moreover, cooperative interaction with upstream elements is essential for its immunoactivity. Three proline residues (P99, P102 and P103) in the upstream proline-rich domain exerted significant effects on the immunocompetence of VDLP. ELISA results revealed that SAPPLPPVVDLP and SAPPLPPVVDLPQLGL peptides containing the identified VDLP epitope display weaker reactions with anti-HEV serum than the commercial ELISA kit. Our collective findings provide valuable information on the epitope distribution characteristics of HEV ORF3 and improve our understanding of the influence of the proline-rich domain on the immunoactivity of downstream amino acids in the C-terminal region. PMID:26177202

  12. Efficient amidation of C-peptide deleted NPY precursors by non-endocrine cells is affected by the presence of Lys-Arg at the C-terminus.

    PubMed

    Wulff, B S; Catipovic, B; Okamoto, H; Gether, U; Schwartz, T W; Johansen, T E

    1993-02-01

    Post-translational processing of peptide precursors producing amidated, biologically active peptides generally occurs in specially differentiated endocrine or neural cells. However, we have previously shown that a C-peptide-deleted precursor of neuropeptide Y (NPY1-39) in which the precursor terminates in the sequence Gly-Lys-Arg was partially amidated by the non-endocrine cell line, CHO. In the present study we show that two other non-endocrine cell lines, NIH 3T3 and BHK, also possess amidating activities and that the NPY1-39 precursor was completely converted to NPY1-36 amide by the NIH 3T3 cell line. The role of the two basic residues (Lys-Arg) in the C-terminus was studied by transfection of a construct encoding a NPY precursor terminating with glycine alone. Both the CHO and NIH 3T3 cell lines, transfected with this construct, secreted a significantly smaller fraction of NPY reactive material as amidated NPY compared to the fraction of amidated NPY secreted by the cells transfected with the NPY1-39 precursor. It is concluded that the capacity to perform C-terminal amidation appears to be a universal feature of eukaryotic cells and that the carboxypeptidase E-like enzyme influences the amidation process, beyond its known ability to remove the C-terminal basic residues.

  13. The C-terminus of nisin is important for the ABC transporter NisFEG to confer immunity in Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    AlKhatib, Zainab; Lagedroste, Marcel; Zaschke, Julia; Wagner, Manuel; Abts, André; Fey, Iris; Kleinschrodt, Diana; Smits, Sander H J

    2014-10-01

    The lantibiotic nisin is a small 3.4 kDa antimicrobial peptide, which acts against Gram-positive bacteria in the nmol/L range. Nisin is produced and secreted by several Lactococcus lactis strains to ensure advantages against other bacteria in their habitat. Nisin contains five specific lanthionine rings of which the first two are important for Lipid II binding and the last two are crucial for the pore formation in the membrane. To gain immunity against nisin, the producing strain is expressing an ABC transporter called NisFEG, which expels nisin from the membrane. As a result six to eightfold more nisin is needed to affect the cells. The hydrolysis of ATP by NisFEG is required for this immunity as shown by a mutant, where the ATP hydrolysis is disrupted (NisFH181A EG). Furthermore, NisFEG recognizes the C-terminus of nisin, since deletion of the last six amino acids as well as of the last ring lowered the fold of immunity displayed by NisFEG. PMID:25176038

  14. In vivo reconstitution of a homodimeric cytochrome b559 like structure: The role of the N-terminus α-subunit from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    PubMed

    Luján, María A; Martínez, Jesús I; Alonso, Pablo J; Torrado, Alejandro; Roncel, Mercedes; Ortega, José M; Sancho, Javier; Picorel, Rafael

    2015-11-01

    The cytochrome b559 is a heme-bridged heterodimeric protein with two subunits, α and β. Both subunits from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 have previously been cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli and in vivo reconstitution experiments have been carried out. The formation of homodimers in the bacterial membrane with endogenous heme was only observed in the case of the β-subunit (β/β) but not with the full length α-subunit. In the present work, reconstitution of a homodimer (α/α) cytochrome b559 like structure was possible using a chimeric N-terminus α-subunit truncated before the amino acid isoleucine 17, eliminating completely a short amphipathic α-helix that lays on the surface of the membrane. Overexpression and in vivo reconstitution in the bacteria was clearly demonstrated by the brownish color of the culture pellet and the use of a commercial monoclonal antibody against the fusion protein carrier, the maltoside binding protein, and polyclonal antibodies against a synthetic peptide of the α-subunit from Thermosynechococcus elongatus. Moreover, a simple partial purification after membrane solubilization with Triton X-100 confirmed that the overexpressed protein complex corresponded with the maltoside binding protein-chimeric α-subunit cytochrome b559 like structure. The features of the new structure were determined by UV-Vis, electron paramagnetic resonance and redox potentiometric techniques. Ribbon representations of all possible structures are also shown to better understand the mechanism of the cytochrome b559 maturation in the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane.

  15. The C terminus of NS1 protein of influenza A/WSN/1933(H1N1) virus modulates antiviral responses in infected human macrophages and mice.

    PubMed

    Anastasina, Maria; Schepens, Bert; Söderholm, Sandra; Nyman, Tuula A; Matikainen, Sampsa; Saksela, Kalle; Saelens, Xavier; Kainov, Denis E

    2015-08-01

    Non-structural protein NS1 of influenza A viruses interacts with cellular factors through its N-terminal RNA-binding, middle effector and C-terminal non-structured domains. NS1 attenuates antiviral responses in infected cells and thereby secures efficient virus replication. Some influenza strains express C-terminally truncated NS1 proteins due to nonsense mutations in the NS1 gene. To understand the role of the NS1 C-terminal region in regulation of antiviral responses, we engineered influenza viruses expressing C-terminally truncated NS1 proteins using A/WSN/33(H1N1) reverse genetics and tested them in human macrophages and in mice. We showed that a WSN virus expressing NS1 with a 28 aa deletion from its C terminus is a more powerful inducer of antiviral responses than the virus expressing full-length NS1, or one with a 10 aa truncation of NS1 in vitro. Thus, our findings suggest that the C-terminal region of NS1 is essential for regulation of antiviral responses. Moreover, viruses expressing truncated NS1 proteins could be good vaccine candidates.

  16. Sequential truncation of the lactose permease over a three-amino acid sequence near the carboxyl terminus leads to progressive loss of activity and stability

    SciTech Connect

    McKenna, E.; Hardy, D.; Pastore, J.C.; Kaback, H.R. )

    1991-04-15

    Previous experiments are consistent with the notion that residues 396-401 (...SVFTLS...) at the carboxyl terminus of the last putative transmembrane helix of the lactose (lac) permease of Escherichia coli are important for protection against proteolytic degradation and suggest that this region of the permease may be necessary for proper folding. Stop codons (TAA) have now been substituted sequentially for amino acid codons 396-401 in the lacY gene, and the termination mutants were expressed from the plasmid pT7-5. With respect to transport, permease truncated at residue 396-or 397 is completely defective, while molecules truncated at residues 398, 399, 400, and 401, respectively, exhibit 15-25%, 30-40%, 40-45%, and 70-100% of wild-type activity. As judged by pulse-chase experiments with ({sup 35}S)methionine, wild-type permease or permease truncated at residue 401 is stable, while permease molecules truncated at position 400, 399, 398, 397, or 396 are degraded at increasingly rapid rates. The findings indicate that either the last turn of putative helix XII or the region immediately distal to helix XII is important for proper folding and protection against proteolytic degradation.

  17. Evidence for auto-inhibition by the N terminus of hADAR2 and activation by dsRNA binding.

    PubMed

    Macbeth, Mark R; Lingam, Arunth T; Bass, Brenda L

    2004-10-01

    Adenosine deaminases that act on RNA (ADARs) catalyze adenosine to inosine conversion in RNA that is largely double stranded. Human ADAR2 (hADAR2) contains two double-stranded RNA binding motifs (dsRBMs), separated by a 90-amino acid linker, and these are followed by the C-terminal catalytic domain. We assayed enzymatic activity of N-terminal deletion constructs of hADAR2 to determine the role of the dsRBMs and the intervening linker peptide. We found that a truncated protein consisting of one dsRBM and the deaminase domain was capable of deaminating a short 15-bp substrate. In contrast, full-length hADAR2 was inactive on this short substrate. In addition, we observed that the N terminus, which was deleted from the truncated protein, inhibits editing activity when added in trans. We propose that the N-terminal domain of hADAR2 contains sequences that cause auto-inhibition of the enzyme. Our results suggest activation requires binding to an RNA substrate long enough to accommodate interactions with both dsRBMs.

  18. A Proline-Rich Domain in the Genotype 4 Hepatitis E Virus ORF3 C-Terminus Is Crucial for Downstream V105DLP108 Immunoactivity

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Honglang; Ning, Zhangyong; Liu, Rongchang; Zhang, Guihong

    2015-01-01

    The hepatitis E virus (HEV) is responsible for serious viral hepatitis worldwide. Animals are considered a reservoir of HEV, particularly pigs. While HEV infection in pigs and dogs is always asymptomatic, the virus causes high death rates in patients with pre-existing chronic liver disease and pregnant women in developing countries. HEV open reading frame 2 (ORF2) has been used as a diagnostic target to detect specific antibodies against HEV in serum samples. Recent research has additionally supported the potential utility of the ORF3 protein as a target in serum anti-HEV detection. However, the epitope distribution of ORF3 protein remains ambiguous. In the current study, we showed that continuous amino acid motif, VDLP, at the C-terminus of genotype 4 HEV ORF3 is a core sequence of the ORF3 protein epitope. Moreover, cooperative interaction with upstream elements is essential for its immunoactivity. Three proline residues (P99, P102 and P103) in the upstream proline-rich domain exerted significant effects on the immunocompetence of VDLP. ELISA results revealed that SAPPLPPVVDLP and SAPPLPPVVDLPQLGL peptides containing the identified VDLP epitope display weaker reactions with anti-HEV serum than the commercial ELISA kit. Our collective findings provide valuable information on the epitope distribution characteristics of HEV ORF3 and improve our understanding of the influence of the proline-rich domain on the immunoactivity of downstream amino acids in the C-terminal region. PMID:26177202

  19. The C-terminus of nisin is important for the ABC transporter NisFEG to confer immunity in Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    AlKhatib, Zainab; Lagedroste, Marcel; Zaschke, Julia; Wagner, Manuel; Abts, André; Fey, Iris; Kleinschrodt, Diana; Smits, Sander H J

    2014-10-01

    The lantibiotic nisin is a small 3.4 kDa antimicrobial peptide, which acts against Gram-positive bacteria in the nmol/L range. Nisin is produced and secreted by several Lactococcus lactis strains to ensure advantages against other bacteria in their habitat. Nisin contains five specific lanthionine rings of which the first two are important for Lipid II binding and the last two are crucial for the pore formation in the membrane. To gain immunity against nisin, the producing strain is expressing an ABC transporter called NisFEG, which expels nisin from the membrane. As a result six to eightfold more nisin is needed to affect the cells. The hydrolysis of ATP by NisFEG is required for this immunity as shown by a mutant, where the ATP hydrolysis is disrupted (NisFH181A EG). Furthermore, NisFEG recognizes the C-terminus of nisin, since deletion of the last six amino acids as well as of the last ring lowered the fold of immunity displayed by NisFEG.

  20. The C-terminus of nisin is important for the ABC transporter NisFEG to confer immunity in Lactococcus lactis

    PubMed Central

    AlKhatib, Zainab; Lagedroste, Marcel; Zaschke, Julia; Wagner, Manuel; Abts, André; Fey, Iris; Kleinschrodt, Diana; Smits, Sander H J

    2014-01-01

    The lantibiotic nisin is a small 3.4 kDa antimicrobial peptide, which acts against Gram-positive bacteria in the nmol/L range. Nisin is produced and secreted by several Lactococcus lactis strains to ensure advantages against other bacteria in their habitat. Nisin contains five specific lanthionine rings of which the first two are important for Lipid II binding and the last two are crucial for the pore formation in the membrane. To gain immunity against nisin, the producing strain is expressing an ABC transporter called NisFEG, which expels nisin from the membrane. As a result six to eightfold more nisin is needed to affect the cells. The hydrolysis of ATP by NisFEG is required for this immunity as shown by a mutant, where the ATP hydrolysis is disrupted (NisFH181AEG). Furthermore, NisFEG recognizes the C-terminus of nisin, since deletion of the last six amino acids as well as of the last ring lowered the fold of immunity displayed by NisFEG. PMID:25176038

  1. Modular elements of the TPR domain in the Mps1 N terminus differentially target Mps1 to the centrosome and kinetochore.

    PubMed

    Marquardt, Joseph R; Perkins, Jennifer L; Beuoy, Kyle J; Fisk, Harold A

    2016-07-12

    Faithful segregation of chromosomes to two daughter cells is regulated by the formation of a bipolar mitotic spindle and the spindle assembly checkpoint, ensuring proper spindle function. Here we show that the proper localization of the kinase Mps1 (monopolar spindle 1) is critical to both these processes. Separate elements in the Mps1 N-terminal extension (NTE) and tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domains govern localization to either the kinetochore or the centrosome. The third TPR (TPR3) and the TPR-capping helix (C-helix) are each sufficient to target Mps1 to the centrosome. TPR3 binds to voltage-dependent anion channel 3, but although this is sufficient for centrosome targeting of Mps1, it is not necessary because of the presence of the C-helix. A version of Mps1 lacking both elements cannot localize to or function at the centrosome, but maintains kinetochore localization and spindle assembly checkpoint function, indicating that TPR3 and the C-helix define a bipartite localization determinant that is both necessary and sufficient to target Mps1 to the centrosome but dispensable for kinetochore targeting. In contrast, elements required for kinetochore targeting (the NTE and first two TPRs) are dispensable for centrosomal localization and function. These data are consistent with a separation of Mps1 function based on localization determinants within the N terminus.

  2. The C-Terminus of Human Copper Importer Ctr1 Acts as a Binding Site and Transfers Copper to Atox1.

    PubMed

    Kahra, Dana; Kovermann, Michael; Wittung-Stafshede, Pernilla

    2016-01-01

    Uptake of copper (Cu) ions into human cells is mediated by the plasma membrane protein Ctr1 and is followed by Cu transfer to cytoplasmic Cu chaperones for delivery to Cu-dependent enzymes. The C-terminal cytoplasmic tail of Ctr1 is a 13-residue peptide harboring an HCH motif that is thought to interact with Cu. We here employ biophysical experiments under anaerobic conditions in peptide models of the Ctr1 C-terminus to deduce Cu-binding residues, Cu affinity, and the ability to release Cu to the cytoplasmic Cu chaperone Atox1. Based on NMR assignments and bicinchoninic acid competition experiments, we demonstrate that Cu interacts in a 1:1 stoichiometry with the HCH motif with an affinity, KD, of ∼10(-14) M. Removing either the Cys residue or the two His residues lowers the Cu-peptide affinity, but site specificity is retained. The C-terminal peptide and Atox1 do not interact in solution in the absence of Cu. However, as directly demonstrated at the residue level via NMR spectroscopy, Atox1 readily acquires Cu from the Cu-loaded peptide. We propose that Cu binding to the Ctr1 C-terminal tail regulates Cu transport into the cytoplasm such that the metal ion is only released to high-affinity Cu chaperones.

  3. The N-terminus of histone H2B, but not that of histone H3 or its phosphorylation, is essential for chromosome condensation

    PubMed Central

    de la Barre, Anne-Elisabeth; Angelov, Dimitri; Molla, Annie; Dimitrov, Stefan

    2001-01-01

    We have studied the role of individual histone N-termini and the phosphorylation of histone H3 in chromosome condensation. Nucleosomes, reconstituted with histone octamers containing different combinations of recombinant full-length and tailless histones, were used as competitors for chromosome assembly in Xenopus egg extracts. Nucleosomes reconstituted with intact octamers inhibited chromosome condensation as efficiently as the native ones, while tailless nucleosomes were unable to affect this process. Importantly, the addition to the extract of particles containing only intact histone H2B strongly interfered with chromosome formation while such an effect was not observed with particles lacking the N-terminal tail of H2B. This demonstrates that the inhibition effect observed in the presence of competitor nucleosomes is mainly due to the N-terminus of this histone, which, therefore, is essential for chromosome condensation. Nucleosomes in which all histones but H3 were tailless did not impede chromosome formation. In addition, when competitor nucleosome particles were reconstituted with full-length H2A, H2B and H4 and histone H3 mutated at the phosphorylable serine 10 or serine 28, their inhibiting efficiency was identical to that of the native particles. Hence, the tail of H3, whether intact or phosphorylated, is not important for chromosome condensation. A novel hypothesis, termed ‘the ready production label’ was suggested to explain the role of histone H3 phosphorylation during cell division. PMID:11707409

  4. EPR Studies of Functionally Active, Nitroxide Spin-Labeled Peptide Analogs of the C-terminus of a G-Protein Alpha Subunit

    PubMed Central

    Van Eps, Ned; Anderson, Lori L.; Kisselev, Oleg G.; Baranski, Thomas J.; Hubbell, Wayne L.; Marshall, Garland R.

    2010-01-01

    The C-terminal tail of the transducin alpha subunit, Gtα(340–350), is known to bind and stabilize the active conformation of rhodopsin upon photoactivation (R*). Five spin-labeled analogs of Gtα(340–350) demonstrated native-like activity in their ability to bind and stabilize R*. The spin label 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl-4-amino-4-carboxylic acid (TOAC) was employed at interior sites within the peptide, whereas a Proxyl (3-carboxyl-2,2,5,5-tetramethyl-pyrrolidinyloxy) spin label was employed at the amino terminus of the peptide. Upon binding to R*, the electron paramagnetic resonance spectrum of TOAC343-Gtα(340–350) revealed greater immobilization of the nitroxide when compared to that of the N-terminal modified Proxyl-Gtα(340–350) analog. A double-labeled Proxyl/TOAC348-Gtα(340–350) was examined by DEER spectroscopy to determine the distribution of distances between the two nitroxides in the peptides when in solution and when bound to R*. TOAC and Proxyl spin labels in this GPCR-G-protein α-peptide system provide unique biophysical probes that can be used to explore the structure and conformational changes at the rhodopsin-G-protein interface. PMID:20695526

  5. Specific Sites in the C Terminus of CTCF Interact with the SA2 Subunit of the Cohesin Complex and Are Required for Cohesin-Dependent Insulation Activity ▿

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Tiaojiang; Wallace, Julie; Felsenfeld, Gary

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that the protein CTCF, which plays an important role in insulation and in large-scale organization of chromatin within the eukaryotic nucleus, depends for both activities on recruitment of the cohesin complex. We show here that the interaction of CTCF with the cohesin complex involves direct contacts between the cohesin subunit SA2 and specific regions of the C-terminal tail of CTCF. All other cohesin components are recruited through their interaction with SA2. Expression in vivo of CTCF mutants lacking the C-terminal domain, or with mutations at sites within it required for SA2 binding, disrupts the normal expression profile of the imprinted genes IGF2-H19 and also results in a loss of insulation activity. Taken together, our results demonstrate that specific sites on the C terminus of CTCF are essential for cohesin binding and insulator function. The only direct interaction between CTCF and cohesin involves contact with SA2, which is external to the cohesin ring. This suggests that in recruiting cohesin to CTCF, SA2 could bind first and the ring could assemble subsequently. PMID:21444719

  6. N terminus determinants of MinC from Neisseria gonorrhoeae mediate interaction with FtsZ but do not affect interaction with MinD or homodimerization.

    PubMed

    Greco-Stewart, V; Ramirez-Arcos, S; Liao, M; Dillon, J R

    2007-06-01

    While bacterial cell division has been widely studied in rod-shaped bacteria, the mechanism of cell division in round (coccal) bacteria remains largely enigmatic. In the present study, interaction between the cell division inhibitor MinC from Neisseria gonorrhoeae (MinC(Ng)) and the gonococcal cell division proteins MinD(Ng) and FtsZ(Ng) are demonstrated. Protein truncation and site-directed mutagenic approaches determined which N-terminal residues were essential for cell division inhibition by MinC(Ng) using cell morphology as an indicator of protein functionality. Truncation from or mutation at the 13th amino acid of the N terminus of MinC(Ng) resulted in loss of protein function. Bioinformatic analyses predicted that point mutations of L35P and L68P would affect the alpha-helical conformation of the protein and we experimentally showed that these mutations alter the functionality of MinC(Ng). The bacterial two-hybrid system showed that interaction of MinC(Ng) with FtsZ(Ng) is abrogated upon truncation of 13 N-terminal residues while MinC(Ng)-MinD(Ng) interaction or MinC(Ng) homodimerization is unaffected. These data confirm interactions among gonococcal cell division proteins and determine the necessity of the 13th amino acid for MinC(Ng) function. PMID:17287984

  7. Identification of a novel domain at the N terminus of caveolin-1 that controls rear polarization of the protein and caveolae formation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xing-Hui; Flynn, Daniel C; Castranova, Vincent; Millecchia, Lyndell L; Beardsley, Andrew R; Liu, Jun

    2007-03-01

    When cells are migrating, caveolin-1, the principal protein component of caveolae, is excluded from the leading edge and polarized at the cell rear. The dynamic feature depends on a specific sequence motif that directs intracellular trafficking of the protein. Deletion mutation analysis revealed a putative polarization domain at the N terminus of caveolin-1, between amino acids 32-60. Alanine substitution identified a minimal sequence of 10 residues ((46)TKEIDLVNRD(55)) necessary for caveolin-1 rear polarization. Interestingly, deletion of amino acids 1-60 did not prevent the polarization of caveolin-1 in human umbilical vein endothelial cells or wild-type mouse embryonic fibroblasts because of an interaction of Cav(61-178) mutant with endogenous caveolin-1. Surprisingly, expression of the depolarization mutant in caveolin-1 null cells dramatically impeded caveolae formation. Furthermore, knockdown of caveolae formation by methyl-beta-cyclodextrin failed to prevent wild-type caveolin-1 rear polarization. Importantly, genetic depletion of caveolin-1 led to disoriented migration, which can be rescued by full-length caveolin-1 but not the depolarization mutant, indicating a role of caveolin-1 polarity in chemotaxis. Thus, we have identified a sequence motif that is essential for caveolin-1 rear polarization and caveolae formation. PMID:17213184

  8. Twenty amino acids at the C-terminus of PA-X are associated with increased influenza A virus replication and pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Gao, Huijie; Sun, Honglei; Hu, Jiao; Qi, Lu; Wang, Jinliang; Xiong, Xin; Wang, Yu; He, Qiming; Lin, Yang; Kong, Weili; Seng, Lai-Giea; Pu, Juan; Chang, Kin-Chow; Liu, Xiufan; Liu, Jinhua; Sun, Yipeng

    2015-08-01

    The PA-X protein, arising from ribosomal frameshift during PA translation, was recently discovered in influenza A virus (IAV). The C-terminal domain 'X' of PA-X proteins in IAVs can be classified as full-length (61 aa) or truncated (41 aa). In the main, avian influenza viruses express full-length PA-X proteins, whilst 2009 pandemic H1N1 (pH1N1) influenza viruses harbour truncated PA proteins. The truncated form lacks aa 232-252 of the full-length PA-X protein. The significance of PA-X length in virus function remains unclear. To address this issue, we constructed a set of contemporary influenza viruses (pH1N1, avian H5N1 and H9N2) with full and truncated PA-X by reverse genetics to compare their replication and host pathogenicity. All full-length PA-X viruses in human A549 cells conferred 10- to 100-fold increase in viral replication and 5-8% increase in apoptosis relative to corresponding truncated PA-X viruses. Full-length PA-X viruses were more virulent and caused more severe inflammatory responses in mice. Furthermore, aa 233-252 at the C terminus of PA-X strongly suppressed co-transfected gene expression by ∼ 50%, suggesting that these terminal 20 aa could play a role in enhancing viral replication and contribute to virulence.

  9. The relationship between truncation and phosphorylation at the C-terminus of tau protein in the paired helical filaments of Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Flores-Rodríguez, Paola; Ontiveros-Torres, Miguel A.; Cárdenas-Aguayo, María C.; Luna-Arias, Juan P.; Meraz-Ríos, Marco A.; Viramontes-Pintos, Amparo; Harrington, Charles R.; Wischik, Claude M.; Mena, Raúl; Florán-Garduño, Benjamin; Luna-Muñoz, José

    2015-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that, in the early stages of tau processing in Alzheimer's disease, the N-terminal part of the molecule undergoes a characteristic cascade of phosphorylation and progressive misfolding of the proteins resulting in a structural conformation detected by Alz-50. In this immunohistochemical study of AD brain tissue, we have found that C-terminal truncation of tau at Asp-421 was an early event in tau aggregation and analyzed the relationship between phospho-dependent tau epitopes located at the C-terminus with truncation at Glu-391. The aim of this study was to determine whether C-terminal truncation may trigger events leading to the assembly of insoluble PHFs from soluble tau aggregates present in pre-tangle cells. Our findings suggest that there is a complex interaction between phosphorylated and truncated tau species. A model is presented here in which truncated tau protein represents an early neurotoxic species while phosphorylated tau species may provide a neuroprotective role in Alzheimer's disease. PMID:25717290

  10. Biosynthesis of bacteriochlorophyll c derivatives possessing chlorine and bromine atoms at the terminus of esterifying chains in the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobaculum tepidum.

    PubMed

    Saga, Yoshitaka; Hayashi, Keisuke; Mizoguchi, Tadashi; Tamiaki, Hitoshi

    2014-07-01

    The green sulfur photosynthetic bacterium Chlorobaculum tepidum newly produced BChl c derivatives possessing a chlorine or bromine atom at the terminus of the esterifying chain in the 17-propionate residue by cultivation with exogenous ω-halo-1-alkanols. The relative ratios of BChl c derivatives esterified with 8-chloro-1-octanol and 10-chloro-1-decanol were estimated to be 26.5% and 33.3% by cultivation with these ω-chloro-1-alkanols at the final concentrations of 300 and 150 μM, respectively. In contrast, smaller amounts of unnatural BChls c esterified with ω-bromo-1-alkanols were biosynthesized than those esterified with ω-chloro-1-alkanols: the ratios of BChl c derivatives esterified with 8-bromo-1-octanol and 10-bromo-1-decanol were 11.3% and 12.2% at the concentrations of 300 and 150 μM, respectively. These indicate that ω-chloro-1-alkanols can be incorporated into bacteriochlorophyllide c more than ω-bromo-1-alkanols in the BChl c biosynthetic pathway. The homolog compositions of the novel BChl c derivatives possessing a halogen atom were analogous to those of coexisting natural BChl c esterified with farnesol. These results demonstrate unique properties of BChl c synthase, BchK, which can utilize unnatural substrates containing halogen in the BChl c biosynthesis of Cba. tepidum.

  11. Turnip yellow mosaic virus forms infectious particles without the native beta-annulus structure and flexible coat protein N-terminus.

    PubMed

    Powell, Joshua D; Barbar, Elisar; Dreher, Theo W

    2012-01-20

    Structural studies have implicated the TYMV N-terminal amino acids of the coat protein (CP) in both static (virion stabilization) and dynamic (RNA encapsidation and disencapsidation) roles. We have deleted residues 2-5, 2-10 and 2-26 from the N-terminus and expressed the mutant CPs in E. coli to assess assembly in the absence of genomic RNA and in plant infections to assess infectivity and virion properties. In E. coli, the deletion constructs formed virus-like particles, but in decreased yield. All mutants were infectious in Chinese cabbage, producing normal symptoms but with a slight delay and decreased viral yields. Virions were progressively less stable with increasing deletion size and also more accessible to small molecules. These results show that the N-terminal 26 amino acids are not essential for viral processes in vivo, although removal of these residues decreases stability and increases porosity, both important factors for virion integrity and survival outside the host. PMID:22078163

  12. Protection against doxorubicin-induced myocardial dysfunction in mice by cardiac-specific expression of carboxyl terminus of hsp70-interacting protein

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lei; Zhang, Tian-Peng; Zhang, Yuan; Bi, Hai-Lian; Guan, Xu-Min; Wang, Hong-Xia; Wang, Xia; Du, Jie; Xia, Yun-Long; Li, Hui-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Carboxyl terminus of Hsp70-interacting protein (CHIP) is a critical ubiquitin ligase/cochaperone to reduce cardiac oxidative stress, inflammation, cardiomyocyte apoptosis and autophage etc. However, it is unclear whether overexpression of CHIP in the heart would exert protective effects against DOX-induced cardiomyopathy. Cardiac-specific CHIP transgenic (CHIP-TG) mice and the wild-type (WT) littermates were treated with DOX or saline. DOX-induced cardiac atrophy, dysfunction, inflammation, oxidative stress and cardiomyocyte apoptosis were significantly attenuated in CHIP-TG mice. CHIP-TG mice also showed higher survival rate than that of WT mice (40% versus 10%) after 10-day administration of DOX. In contrast, knockdown of CHIP by siRNA in vitro further enhanced DOX-induced cardiotoxic effects. Global gene microarray assay revealed that after DOX-treatment, differentially expressed genes between WT and CHIP-TG mice were mainly involved in apoptosis, atrophy, immune/inflammation and oxidative stress. Mechanistically, CHIP directly promotes ubiquitin-mediated degradation of p53 and SHP-1, which results in activation of ERK1/2 and STAT3 pathways thereby ameliorating DOX-induced cardiac toxicity. PMID:27323684

  13. The N-terminus of Mcm10 is important for interaction with the 9-1-1 clamp and in resistance to DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Alver, Robert C.; Zhang, Tianji; Josephrajan, Ajeetha; Fultz, Brandy L.; Hendrix, Chance J.; Das-Bradoo, Sapna; Bielinsky, Anja-Katrin

    2014-01-01

    Accurate replication of the genome requires the evolutionarily conserved minichromosome maintenance protein, Mcm10. Although the details of the precise role of Mcm10 in DNA replication are still debated, it interacts with the Mcm2-7 core helicase, the lagging strand polymerase, DNA polymerase-α and the replication clamp, proliferating cell nuclear antigen. Loss of these interactions caused by the depletion of Mcm10 leads to chromosome breakage and cell cycle checkpoint activation. However, whether Mcm10 has an active role in DNA damage prevention is unknown. Here, we present data that establish a novel role of the N-terminus of Mcm10 in resisting DNA damage. We show that Mcm10 interacts with the Mec3 subunit of the 9-1-1 clamp in response to replication stress evoked by UV irradiation or nucleotide shortage. We map the interaction domain with Mec3 within the N-terminal region of Mcm10 and demonstrate that its truncation causes UV light sensitivity. This sensitivity is not further enhanced by a deletion of MEC3, arguing that MCM10 and MEC3 operate in the same pathway. Since Rad53 phosphorylation in response to UV light appears to be normal in N-terminally truncated mcm10 mutants, we propose that Mcm10 may have a role in replication fork restart or DNA repair. PMID:24972833

  14. The acidic C-terminus of vaccinia virus I3 single-strand binding protein promotes proper assembly of DNA-protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Melissa L; Desaulniers, Megan A; Noyce, Ryan S; Evans, David H

    2016-02-01

    The vaccinia virus I3L gene encodes a single-stranded DNA binding protein (SSB) that is essential for virus DNA replication and is conserved in all Chordopoxviruses. The I3 protein contains a negatively charged C-terminal tail that is a common feature of SSBs. Such acidic tails are critical for SSB-dependent replication, recombination and repair. We cloned and purified variants of the I3 protein, along with a homolog from molluscum contagiosum virus, and tested how the acidic tail affected DNA-protein interactions. Deleting the C terminus of I3 enhanced the affinity for single-stranded DNA cellulose and gel shift analyses showed that it also altered the migration of I3-DNA complexes in agarose gels. Microinjecting an antibody against I3 into vaccinia-infected cells also selectively inhibited virus replication. We suggest that this domain promotes cooperative binding of I3 to DNA in a way that would maintain an open DNA configuration around a replication site.

  15. Synthesis and properties of peptide nucleic acid labeled at the N-terminus with HiLyte Fluor 488 fluorescent dye.

    PubMed

    Hnedzko, Dziyana; McGee, Dennis W; Rozners, Eriks

    2016-09-15

    Fluorescently labeled peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) are important tools in fundamental research and biomedical applications. However, synthesis of labeled PNAs, especially using modern and expensive dyes, is less explored than similar preparations of oligonucleotide dye conjugates. Herein, we present a simple procedure for labeling of the PNA N-terminus with HiLyte Fluor 488 as the last step of solid phase PNA synthesis. A minimum excess of 1.25equiv of activated carboxylic acid achieved labeling yields close to 90% providing a good compromise between the price of dye and the yield of product and significant improvement over previous literature procedures. The HiLyte Fluor 488-labeled PNAs retained the RNA binding ability and in live cell fluorescence microscopy experiments were brighter and significantly more photostable than PNA labeled with carboxyfluorescein. In contrast to fluorescein-labeled PNA, the fluorescence of PNAs labeled with HiLyte Fluor 488 was independent of pH in the biologically relevant range of 5-8. The potential of HiLyte Fluor 488-labeling for studies of PNA cellular uptake and distribution was demonstrated in several cell lines.

  16. Synthesis and properties of peptide nucleic acid labeled at the N-terminus with HiLyte Fluor 488 fluorescent dye.

    PubMed

    Hnedzko, Dziyana; McGee, Dennis W; Rozners, Eriks

    2016-09-15

    Fluorescently labeled peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) are important tools in fundamental research and biomedical applications. However, synthesis of labeled PNAs, especially using modern and expensive dyes, is less explored than similar preparations of oligonucleotide dye conjugates. Herein, we present a simple procedure for labeling of the PNA N-terminus with HiLyte Fluor 488 as the last step of solid phase PNA synthesis. A minimum excess of 1.25equiv of activated carboxylic acid achieved labeling yields close to 90% providing a good compromise between the price of dye and the yield of product and significant improvement over previous literature procedures. The HiLyte Fluor 488-labeled PNAs retained the RNA binding ability and in live cell fluorescence microscopy experiments were brighter and significantly more photostable than PNA labeled with carboxyfluorescein. In contrast to fluorescein-labeled PNA, the fluorescence of PNAs labeled with HiLyte Fluor 488 was independent of pH in the biologically relevant range of 5-8. The potential of HiLyte Fluor 488-labeling for studies of PNA cellular uptake and distribution was demonstrated in several cell lines. PMID:27430566

  17. Public service user terminus study compendium of terminus equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    General descriptions and specifications are given for equipments which facilitate satellite and terrestrial communications delivery by acting as interfaces between a human, mechanical, or electrical information generator (or source) and the communication system. Manufactures and suppliers are given as well as the purchase, service, or lease costs of various products listed under the following cateories: voice/telephony/facsimile equipment; data/graphics terminals; full motion and processes video equipment; and multiple access equipment.

  18. Early Decreases in α-Fetoprotein and Des-γ-carboxy Prothrombin Predict the Antitumor Effects of Hepatic Transarterial Infusion Chemotherapy with Cisplatin (CDDP) Powder in Patients with Advanced Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hatanaka, Takeshi; Kakizaki, Satoru; Shimada, Yasushi; Takizawa, Daichi; Katakai, Kenji; Yamazaki, Yuichi; Sato, Ken; Kusano, Motoyasu; Yamada, Masanobu

    2016-01-01

    Objective We retrospectively investigated the relationship between the tumor response and serial changes in α-fetoprotein (AFP) and des-γ-carboxy prothrombin (DCP) during hepatic arterial infusion of a cisplatin powder formulation (CDDP powder) in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Methods Seventy-six advanced HCC patients were analyzed. All HCC patients received high-concentration cisplatin (1.43 mg/mL) via the haptic artery at a dose of 65 mg/m(2). AFP and DCP were measured at baseline and four to eight weeks after treatment, and the antitumor responses were evaluated according to the response evaluation criteria in solid tumours (RECIST) criteria after one or two courses of treatment. The patients were classified into two groups, a decreased group and a non-decreased group, according to the change in the serum levels of AFP and DCP at four to eight weeks compared to baseline. Results The response to treatment of the decreased group (n=16) and non-decreased group (n=60) was complete response/partial response/stable disease/progressive disease (CR/PR/SD/PD) in 4/4/5/3 and 1/11/8/40 patients, respectively. The response rate and disease control rate of the decreased group were significantly higher than those of the non-decreased group (p=0.016 and p<0.001, respectively). The median survival time (MST) of the decreased/non-decreased groups were 25.9/10.6 months, respectively. The cumulative survival rates for the decreased group were significantly higher than those of the non-decreased group (p=0.042). In the multivariate analysis, vascular invasion and the decreased group were significant factors that affected the therapeutic efficacy. Conclusion A decrease in the levels of AFP and DCP after the first treatment with CDDP powder is a good predictor for the antitumor effect and the prognosis. PMID:27522991

  19. Quantitation of N2-[1-(1-carboxy)ethyl]folic acid, a nonenzymatic glycation product of folic acid, in fortified foods and model cookies by a Stable isotope dilution assay.

    PubMed

    Rychlik, Michael; Mayr, Anja

    2005-06-29

    A stable isotope dilution assay (SIDA) for the quantitation of N(2)-[1-(carboxy)ethyl]folic acid (CEF) has been developed by using [(2)H(4)]CEF as the internal standard. After sample cleanup by anion exchange chromatography, the three-dimensional specifity of liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry enabled unequivocal determination of the nonenzymatic glycation product of folic acid (FA). When CEF was added to cornstarch, the detection limit for CEF was found to be 0.4 microg/100 g, and a recovery of 98.5% was determined. In analyses of cookies, the intra-assay coefficient of variation was 8.0% (n = 5). Application of the SIDA to commercial cookies produced from wheat flour fortified with FA revealed CEF contents of up to 7.1 microg/100 g, which accounted for approximately 10-20% of the cookies' FA content. In baby foods, multivitamin juices, and multivitamin sweets, however, CEF was not detectable. Further studies on CEF formation during baking of cookies made from fortified flour and different carbohydrates revealed that fructose was most effective in generating CEF followed by glucose, lactose, and sucrose with 12.5, 3.9, 2.5, and 2.5 microg/100 g of dry mass, respectively. During baking, approximately 50% of FA was retained for both monosaccharides fructose and glucose, and 77% as well as 85% of its initial content was retained for the disaccharides lactose and sucrose, respectively. Of the degraded amount of FA, CEF comprised 28% for fructose as well as 18, 12, and 8% for sucrose, lactose, and glucose, respectively. Therefore, CEF can be considered an important degradation product of FA in baked foods made from fructose. To retain a maximum amount of FA, products should rather be baked with sucrose than with reducing carbohydrates.

  20. Clinical utility of simultaneous measurement of alpha-fetoprotein and des-γ-carboxy prothrombin for diagnosis of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma in China: A multi-center case-controlled study of 1,153 subjects.

    PubMed

    Song, Peipei; Feng, Xiaobin; Inagaki, Yoshinori; Song, Tianqiang; Zhang, Keming; Wang, Zhigang; Zheng, Shuguo; Ma, Kuansheng; Li, Qiang; Kong, Dalu; Wu, Qiang; Zhang, Ti; Zhao, Xin; Hasegawa, Kiyoshi; Sugawara, Yasuhiko; Kokudo, Norihiro; Tang, Wei

    2014-10-01

    This study aimed to investigate the clinical utility of simultaneous measurement of alphafetoprotein (AFP) and des-γ-carboxy prothrombin (DCP) for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) diagnosis in Chinese patients predominantly caused by hepatitis B virus infection by a multi-center case-controlled study. Subjects were 1,153 individuals from three major hospitals in China, including 550 cases in HCC group, 164 in Malignant disease group, 182 in Benign disease group, 85 in Chronic liver disease group, and 173 in Normal group. Serum levels of AFP and DCP were measured and clinicopathological features were determined for all subjects. Results showed that the levels of DCP and AFP were significantly higher in HCC group (550 patients, 74.18% with HBV infection) than that in other four groups (P < 0.001). Receiver operating curves (ROC) indicated the optimal cut-off value was 86 mAU/mL for DCP with a sensitivity of 71.50% and specificity of 86.30%, and 21 ng/mL for AFP with a sensitivity of 68.00% and specificity of 93.20%. The area under ROC curve was 0.846 for DCP, 0.832 for AFP, and 0.890 for the combination of DCP and AFP. The combination of DCP and AFP resulted in a higher Youden index and a sensitivity of approximately 90%, even for small tumors. The simultaneous measurement of AFP and DCP could achieve a better sensitivity in diagnosing Chinese HCC patients, even for small tumors. PMID:25382443

  1. An in vitro peptide complementation assay for CYT-18-dependent group I intron splicing reveals a new role for the N-terminus.

    PubMed

    Geng, Chun; Paukstelis, Paul J

    2014-03-01

    The mitochondrial tyrosyl tRNA synthetase from Neurospora crassa (CYT-18 protein) is a bifunctional group I intron splicing cofactor. CYT-18 is capable of splicing multiple group I introns from a wide variety of sources by stabilizing the catalytically active intron structures. CYT-18 and mt TyrRSs from related fungal species have evolved to assist in group I intron splicing in part by the accumulation of three N-terminal domain insertions. Biochemical and structural analysis indicate that the N-terminal insertions serve primarily to create a structure-stabilizing scaffold for critical tertiary interactions between the two major RNA domains of group I introns. Previous studies concluded that the primarily α-helical N-terminal insertion, H0, contributes to protein stability and is necessary for splicing the N. crassa ND1 intron but is dispensable for splicing the N. crassa mitochondrial LSU intron. Here, we show that CYT-18 with a complete H0 deletion retains residual ND1 intron splicing activity and that addition of the missing N-terminus in trans is capable of restoring a significant portion of its splicing activity. The development of this peptide complementation assay has allowed us to explore important characteristics of the CYT-18/group I intron interaction including the stoichiometry of H0 in intron splicing and the importance of specific H0 residues. Evaluation of truncated H0 peptides in this assay and a re-examination of the CYT-18 crystal structure suggest a previously unknown structural role of the first five N-terminal residues of CYT-18. These residues interact directly with another splicing insertion, making H0 a central structural element responsible for connecting all three N-terminal splicing insertions.

  2. NMR structures of anti-HIV D-peptides derived from the N-terminus of viral chemokine vMIP-II

    SciTech Connect

    Mori, Mayuko; Liu Dongxiang; Kumar, Santosh; Huang Ziwei; E-mail: ziweihuang@burnham.org

    2005-09-30

    The viral macrophage inflammatory protein-II (vMIP-II) encoded by Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus has unique biological activities in that it blocks the cell entry by several different human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) strains via chemokine receptors including CXCR4 and CCR5. In this paper, we report the solution structure of all-D-amino acid peptides derived from the N-terminus of vMIP-II, which have been shown to have strong CXCR4 binding activity and potently inhibit HIV-1 entry via CXCR4, by using long mixing time two-dimensional nuclear Overhauser enhancement spectroscopy experiments. Both of all-D-peptides vMIP-II (1-10) and vMIP-II (1-21), which are designated as DV3 and DV1, respectively, have higher CXCR4 binding ability than their L-peptide counterparts. They are partially structured in aqueous solution, displaying a turn-like structure over residues 5-8. The small temperature coefficients of His-6 amide proton for both peptides also suggest the formation of a small hydrophobic pocket centered on His-6. The structural features of DV3 are very similar to the reported solution structure of all-L-peptide vMIP-II (1-10) [M.P. Crump, E. Elisseeva, J. Gong, I. Clark-Lewis, B.D. Sykes, Structure/function of human herpesvirus-8 MIP-II (1-71) and the antagonist N-terminal segment (1-10), FEBS Lett. 489 (2001) 171], which is consistent with the notion that D- and L-enantiomeric peptides can adopt mirror image conformations. The NMR structures of the D-peptides provide a structural basis to understand their mechanism of action and design new peptidomimetic analogs to further explore the structure-activity relationship of D-peptide ligand binding to CXCR4.

  3. The penultimate arginine of the carboxyl terminus determines slow desensitization in a P2X receptor from the cattle tick Boophilus microplus.

    PubMed

    Bavan, Selvan; Farmer, Louise; Singh, Shire K; Straub, Volko A; Guerrero, Felix D; Ennion, Steven J

    2011-04-01

    P2X ion channels have been functionally characterized from a range of eukaryotes. Although these receptors can be broadly classified into fast and slow desensitizing, the molecular mechanisms underlying current desensitization are not fully understood. Here, we describe the characterization of a P2X receptor from the cattle tick Boophilus microplus (BmP2X) displaying extremely slow current kinetics, little desensitization during ATP application, and marked rundown in current amplitude between sequential responses. ATP (EC(50), 67.1 μM) evoked concentration-dependent currents at BmP2X that were antagonized by suramin (IC(50), 4.8 μM) and potentiated by the antiparasitic drug amitraz. Ivermectin did not potentiate BmP2X currents, but the mutation M362L conferred ivermectin sensitivity. To investigate the mechanisms underlying slow desensitization we generated intracellular domain chimeras between BmP2X and the rapidly desensitizing P2X receptor from Hypsibius dujardini. Exchange of N or C termini between these fast- and slow-desensitizing receptors altered the rate of current desensitization toward that of the donor channel. Truncation of the BmP2X C terminus identified the penultimate residue (Arg413) as important for slow desensitization. Removal of positive charge at this position in the mutant R413A resulted in significantly faster desensitization, which was further accentuated by the negatively charged substitution R413D. R413A and R413D, however, still displayed current rundown to sequential ATP application. Mutation to a positive charge (R413K) reconstituted the wild-type phenotype. This study identifies a new determinant of P2X desensitization where positive charge at the end of the C terminal regulates current flow and further demonstrates that rundown and desensitization are governed by distinct mechanisms. PMID:21212138

  4. Interaction of modified tail-anchored proteins with liposomes: effect of extensions of hydrophilic segment at the COOH-terminus of holo-cytochromes b₅.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Yoichi; Miura, Masahiro; Takeuchi, Fusako; Park, Sam-Yong; Tsubaki, Motonari

    2012-03-01

    A group of membrane proteins having a single COOH-terminal hydrophobic domain capable of post-translational insertion into lipid bilayer is known as tail-anchored (TA) proteins. To clarify the insertion mechanism of the TA-domain of human cytochrome b(5) (Hcytb5) into ER membranes, we produced and purified various membrane-bound forms of Hcytb5 with their heme b-bound, in which various truncated forms of NH(2)-terminal bovine opsin sequence were appended at the COOH-terminus of the native form. We analyzed the integration of the TA-domains of these forms onto protein-free liposomes. The integration occurred efficiently even in the presence of a small amount of sodium cholate and, once incorporated, such proteoliposomes were very stable. The mode of the integration was further analyzed by treatment of the proteoliposomes with trypsin either on the extravesicular side or on the luminal side. LC-MS analyses of the trypsin digests obtained from the proteoliposomes indicated that most of the C-terminal hydrophilic segment of the native Hcytb5 were exposed towards the lumen of the vesicles and, further, a significant part of the population of the extended C-terminal hydrophilic segments of the modified Hcytb5 were exposed in the lumen as well, suggesting efficient translocation ability of the TA-domain without any assistance from other protein factors. Present results opened a route for the use of the C-terminal TA-domain as a convenient tool for the transport of proteins as well as short peptides into artificial liposomes.

  5. The cytoplasmic C-terminus of polycystin-1 increases cell proliferation in kidney epithelial cells through serum-activated and Ca{sup 2+}-dependent pathway(s)

    SciTech Connect

    Manzati, Elisa; Aguiari, Gianluca; Banzi, Manuela; Manzati, Michele; Selvatici, Rita; Falzarano, Sofia; Maestri, Iva; Pinton, Paolo; Rizzuto, Rosario; Senno, Laura del . E-mail: sen@unife.it

    2005-04-01

    Polycystin-1 (PC1) is a large transmembrane protein important in renal differentiation and defective in most cases of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), a common cause of renal failure in adults. Although the genetic basis of ADPKD has been elucidated, molecular and cellular mechanisms responsible for the dysregulation of epithelial cell growth in ADPKD cysts are still not well defined. We approached this issue by investigating the role of the carboxyl cytoplasmic domain of PC1 involved in signal transduction on the control of kidney cell proliferation. Therefore, we generated human HEK293 cells stably expressing the PC1 cytoplasmic tail as a membrane targeted TrkA-PC1 chimeric receptor protein (TrkPC1). We found that TrkPC1 increased cell proliferation through an increase in cytoplasmic Ca{sup 2+} levels and activation of PKC{alpha}, thereby upregulating D1 and D3 cyclin, downregulating p21{sup waf1} and p27{sup kip1} cyclin inhibitors, and thus inducing cell cycle progression from G0/G1 to the S phase. Interestingly, TrkPC1-dependent Ca{sup 2+} increase and PKC{alpha} activation are not constitutive, but require serum factor(s) as parallel component. In agreement with this observation, a significant increase in ERK1/2 phosphorylation was observed. Consistently, inhibitors specifically blocking either PKC{alpha} or ERK1/2 prevented the TrkPC1-dependent proliferation increase. NGF, the TrkA ligand, blocked this increase. We propose that in kidney epithelial cells the overexpression of PC1 C-terminus upregulates serum-evoked intracellular Ca{sup 2+} by counteracting the growth-suppression activity of endogenous PC1 and leading to an increase in cell proliferation.

  6. Engineering the Expression and Characterization of Two Novel Laccase Isoenzymes from Coprinus comatus in Pichia pastoris by Fusing an Additional Ten Amino Acids Tag at N-Terminus

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Chunjuan; Zheng, Fei; Long, Liangkun; Wang, Jing; Ding, Shaojun

    2014-01-01

    The detail understanding of physiological/biochemical characteristics of individual laccase isoenzymes in fungi is necessary for fundamental and application purposes, but our knowledge is still limited for most of fungi due to difficult to express laccases heterologously. In this study, two novel laccase genes, named lac3 and lac4, encoding proteins of 547 and 532-amino acids preceded by 28 and 16-residue signal peptides, respectively, were cloned from the edible basidiomycete Coprinus comatus. They showed 70% identity but much lower homology with other fungal laccases at protein level (less than 58%). Two novel laccase isoenzymes were successfully expressed in Pichia pastoris by fusing an additional 10 amino acids (Thr-Pro-Phe-Pro-Pro-Phe-Asn-Thr-Asn-Ser) tag at N-terminus, and the volumetric activities could be dramatically enhanced from undetectable level to 689 and 1465 IU/l for Lac3 and Lac4, respectively. Both laccases possessed the lowest Km and highest kcat/Km value towards syringaldazine, followed by ABTS, guaiacol and 2,6-dimethylphenol similar as the low redox potential laccases from other microorganisms. Lac3 and Lac4 showed resistant to SDS, and retained 31.86% and 43.08% activity in the presence of 100 mM SDS, respectively. Lac3 exhibited higher decolorization efficiency than Lac4 for eleven out of thirteen different dyes, which may attribute to the relatively higher catalytic efficiency of Lac3 than Lac4 (in terms of kcat/Km) towards syringaldazine and ABTS. The mild synergistic decolorization by two laccases was observed for triphenylmethane dyes but not for anthraquinone and azo dyes. PMID:24710109

  7. Human RNase H1 uses one tryptophan and two lysines to position the enzyme at the 3'-DNA/5'-RNA terminus of the heteroduplex substrate.

    PubMed

    Lima, Walt F; Wu, Hongjiang; Nichols, Josh G; Prakash, Thazha P; Ravikumar, Vasulinga; Crooke, Stanley T

    2003-12-12

    In a previous study, we showed that the RNA-binding domain of human RNase H1 is responsible for the positional preference for cleavage exhibited by the enzyme (Wu, H., Lima, W. F., and Crooke, S. T. (2001) J. Biol. Chem. 276, 23547-23553). Here, we identify the substituents on the heteroduplex substrate and the amino acid residues within the RNA-binding domain of human RNase H1 involved in positioning of the enzyme. The human RNase H1 cleavage patterns observed for heteroduplexes with various 3'-DNA/5'-RNA and 5'-DNA/3'-RNA termini indicate that the 5'-most cleavage site on the oligoribonucleotide is positioned 7 bp from the first 3'-DNA/5'-RNA base pair. The presence or absence of phosphate or hydroxyl groups at either the 3'-DNA or 5'-RNA terminus had no effect on the human RNase H1 cleavage pattern. Substitution of the 3'-deoxynucleotide with a ribonucleotide, 2'-methoxyethyl nucleotide, or mismatched deoxyribonucleotide resulted in the ablation of the 5'-most cleavage site on the oligoribonucleotide. Mutants in which Trp43 and Lys59-Lys60 of the RNA-binding domain were substituted with alanine showed a loss of the positional preference for cleavage. Comparison of the kcat, Km, and Kd for the alanine-substituted mutants with those for human RNase H1 suggests that Lys59 and Lys60 are involved in binding to the heteroduplex and that Trp43 is responsible for properly positioning the enzyme on the substrate for catalysis. These data suggest that Trp43, Lys59, and Lys60 constitute an extended nucleic binding surface for the RNA-binding domain of human RNase H1, with the entire interaction taking place at the 3'-DNA/5'-RNA pole of the heteroduplex. These results offer further insights into the interaction between human RNase H1 and the heteroduplex substrate as well as approaches to enhance the design of effective antisense oligonucleotides. PMID:14506260

  8. Carboxyl terminus of HSC70-interacting protein (CHIP) down-regulates NF-κB-inducing kinase (NIK) and suppresses NIK-induced liver injury.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Bijie; Shen, Hong; Chen, Zheng; Yin, Lei; Zan, Linsen; Rui, Liangyou

    2015-05-01

    Ser/Thr kinase NIK (NF-κB-inducing kinase) mediates the activation of the noncanonical NF-κB2 pathway, and it plays an important role in regulating immune cell development and liver homeostasis. NIK levels are extremely low in quiescent cells due to ubiquitin/proteasome-mediated degradation, and cytokines stimulate NIK activation through increasing NIK stability; however, regulation of NIK stability is not fully understood. Here we identified CHIP (carboxyl terminus of HSC70-interacting protein) as a new negative regulator of NIK. CHIP contains three N-terminal tetratricopeptide repeats (TPRs), a middle dimerization domain, and a C-terminal U-box. The U-box domain contains ubiquitin E3 ligase activity that promotes ubiquitination of CHIP-bound partners. We observed that CHIP bound to NIK via its TPR domain. In both HEK293 and primary hepatocytes, overexpression of CHIP markedly decreased NIK levels at least in part through increasing ubiquitination and degradation of NIK. Accordingly, CHIP suppressed NIK-induced activation of the noncanonical NF-κB2 pathway. CHIP also bound to TRAF3, and CHIP and TRAF3 acted coordinately to efficiently promote NIK degradation. The TPR but not the U-box domain was required for CHIP to promote NIK degradation. In mice, hepatocyte-specific overexpression of NIK resulted in liver inflammation and injury, leading to death, and liver-specific expression of CHIP reversed the detrimental effects of hepatic NIK. Our data suggest that CHIP/TRAF3/NIK interactions recruit NIK to E3 ligase complexes for ubiquitination and degradation, thus maintaining NIK at low levels. Defects in CHIP regulation of NIK may result in aberrant NIK activation in the liver, contributing to live injury, inflammation, and disease.

  9. Gβγ Binds to the Extreme C Terminus of SNAP25 to Mediate the Action of Gi/o-Coupled G Protein-Coupled Receptors.

    PubMed

    Zurawski, Zack; Rodriguez, Shelagh; Hyde, Karren; Alford, Simon; Hamm, Heidi E

    2016-01-01

    Gi/o-coupled G protein-coupled receptors can exert an inhibitory effect on vesicle release through several G protein-driven mechanisms, more than one of which may be concurrently present in individual presynaptic terminals. The synaptosomal-associated protein of 25 kDa (SNAP25) is a key downstream effector of Gβγ subunits. It has previously been shown that proteolytic cleavage of SNAP25 by botulinum toxin A reduces the ability of Gβγ to compete with the calcium sensor synaptotagmin 1 (Syt1) for binding to SNAP25 in a calcium-dependent manner. These truncated SNAP25 proteins sustain a low level of exocytosis but are unable to support serotonin-mediated inhibition of exocytosis in lamprey spinal neurons. Here, we generate a SNAP25 extreme C-terminal mutant that is deficient in its ability to bind Gβγ while retaining normal calcium-dependent Syt1 binding to soluble N-ethylmaleimide attachment protein receptor (SNARE) and vesicle release. The SNAP25Δ3 mutant, in which residue G204 is replaced by a stop codon, features a partial reduction in Gβ1γ2 binding in vitro as well as a partial reduction in the ability of the lamprey 5-hydroxytryptamine1b-type serotonin receptor to reduce excitatory postsynaptic current amplitudes, an effect previously shown to be mediated through the interaction of Gβγ with SNAP25. Syt1 calcium-dependent binding to SNAP25Δ3 was reduced by a small extent compared with the wild type. We conclude that the extreme C terminus of SNAP25 is a critical region for the Gβγ-SNARE interaction.

  10. The amino terminus of GLUT4 functions as an internalization motif but not an intracellular retention signal when substituted for the transferrin receptor cytoplasmic domain

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the amino-terminal cytoplasmic domain of GLUT4 contains a phenylalanine-based targeting motif that determines its steady state distribution between the surface and the interior of cells (Piper, R. C., C. Tai, P. Kuleza, S. Pang, D. Warnock, J. Baenziger, J. W. Slot, H. J. Geuze, C. Puri, and D. E. James. 1993. J. Cell Biol. 121:1221). To directly measure the effect that the GLUT4 amino terminus has on internalization and subsequent recycling back to the cell surface, we constructed chimeras in which this sequence was substituted for the amino-terminal cytoplasmic domain of the human transferrin receptor. The chimeras were stably transfected into Chinese hamster ovary cells and their endocytic behavior characterized. The GLUT4-transferrin receptor chimera was recycled back to the cell surface with a rate similar to the transferrin receptor, indicating that the GLUT4 sequence was not promoting intracellular retention of the chimera. The GLUT4-transferrin receptor chimera was internalized at half the rate of the transferrin receptor. Substitution of an alanine for phenylalanine at position 5 slowed internalization of the chimera by twofold, to a level characteristic of bulk membrane internalization. However, substitution of a tyrosine increased the rate of internalization to the level of the transferrin receptor. Neither of these substitutions significantly altered the rate at which the chimeras were recycled back to the cell surface. These results demonstrate that the major function of the GLUT4 amino-terminal domain is to promote the effective internalization of the protein from the cell surface, via a functional phenylalanine-based internalization motif, rather than retention of the transporter within intracellular structures. PMID:8120093

  11. Mechanism for pH-dependent gene regulation by amino-terminus-mediated homooligomerization of Bacillus subtilis anti-trp RNA-binding attenuation protein.

    PubMed

    Sachleben, Joseph R; McElroy, Craig A; Gollnick, Paul; Foster, Mark P

    2010-08-31

    Anti-TRAP (AT) is a small zinc-binding protein that regulates tryptophan biosynthesis in Bacillus subtilis by binding to tryptophan-bound trp RNA-binding attenuation protein (TRAP), thereby preventing it from binding RNA, and allowing transcription and translation of the trpEDCFBA operon. Crystallographic and sedimentation studies have shown that AT can homooligomerize to form a dodecamer, AT(12), composed of a tetramer of trimers, AT(3). Structural and biochemical studies suggest that only trimeric AT is active for binding to TRAP. Our chromatographic and spectroscopic data revealed that a large fraction of recombinantly overexpressed AT retains the N-formyl group (fAT), presumably due to incomplete N-formyl-methionine processing by peptide deformylase. Hydrodynamic parameters from NMR relaxation and diffusion measurements showed that fAT is exclusively trimeric (AT(3)), while (deformylated) AT exhibits slow exchange between both trimeric and dodecameric forms. We examined this equilibrium using NMR spectroscopy and found that oligomerization of active AT(3) to form inactive AT(12) is linked to protonation of the amino terminus. Global analysis of the pH dependence of the trimer-dodecamer equilibrium revealed a near physiological pK(a) for the N-terminal amine of AT and yielded a pH-dependent oligomerization equilibrium constant. Estimates of excluded volume effects due to molecular crowding suggest the oligomerization equilibrium may be physiologically important. Because deprotonation favors "active" trimeric AT and protonation favors "inactive" dodecameric AT, our findings illuminate a possible mechanism for sensing and responding to changes in cellular pH. PMID:20713740

  12. Twenty amino acids at the C-terminus of PA-X are associated with increased influenza A virus replication and pathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Huijie; Sun, Honglei; Hu, Jiao; Qi, Lu; Wang, Jinliang; Xiong, Xin; Wang, Yu; He, Qiming; Lin, Yang; Kong, Weili; Seng, Lai-Giea; Pu, Juan; Chang, Kin-Chow; Liu, Xiufan; Liu, Jinhua

    2015-01-01

    The PA-X protein, arising from ribosomal frameshift during PA translation, was recently discovered in influenza A virus (IAV). The C-terminal domain ‘X’ of PA-X proteins in IAVs can be classified as full-length (61 aa) or truncated (41 aa). In the main, avian influenza viruses express full-length PA-X proteins, whilst 2009 pandemic H1N1 (pH1N1) influenza viruses harbour truncated PA proteins. The truncated form lacks aa 232–252 of the full-length PA-X protein. The significance of PA-X length in virus function remains unclear. To address this issue, we constructed a set of contemporary influenza viruses (pH1N1, avian H5N1 and H9N2) with full and truncated PA-X by reverse genetics to compare their replication and host pathogenicity. All full-length PA-X viruses in human A549 cells conferred 10- to 100-fold increase in viral replication and 5–8 % increase in apoptosis relative to corresponding truncated PA-X viruses. Full-length PA-X viruses were more virulent and caused more severe inflammatory responses in mice. Furthermore, aa 233–252 at the C terminus of PA-X strongly suppressed co-transfected gene expression by ∼50 %, suggesting that these terminal 20 aa could play a role in enhancing viral replication and contribute to virulence. PMID:25877935

  13. Phosphorylation of Thr-948 at the C terminus of the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase creates a binding site for the regulatory 14-3-3 protein.

    PubMed Central

    Svennelid, F; Olsson, A; Piotrowski, M; Rosenquist, M; Ottman, C; Larsson, C; Oecking, C; Sommarin, M

    1999-01-01

    The plant plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase is activated by the binding of 14-3-3 protein to the C-terminal region of the enzyme, thus forming an H(+)-ATPase-14-3-3 complex that can be stabilized by the fungal toxin fusicoccin. A novel 14-3-3 binding motif, QQXYpT(948)V, at the C terminus of the H(+)-ATPase is identified and characterized, and the protein kinase activity in the plasma membrane fraction that phosphorylates this threonine residue in the H(+)-ATPase is identified. A synthetic peptide that corresponds to the C-terminal 16 amino acids of the H(+)-ATPase and that is phosphorylated on Thr-948 prevents the in vitro activation of the H(+)-ATPase that is obtained in the presence of recombinant 14-3-3 and fusicoccin. Furthermore, binding of 14-3-3 to the H(+)-ATPase in the absence of fusicoccin is absolutely dependent on the phosphorylation of Thr-948, whereas binding of 14-3-3 in the presence of fusicoccin occurs independently of phosphorylation but still involves the C-terminal motif YTV. Finally, by complementing yeast that lacks its endogenous H(+)-ATPase with wild-type and mutant forms of the Nicotiana plumbaginifolia H(+)-ATPase isoform PMA2, we provide physiological evidence for the importance of the phosphothreonine motif in 14-3-3 binding and, hence, in the activation of the H(+)-ATPase in vivo. Indeed, replacing Thr-948 in the plant H(+)-ATPase with alanine is lethal because this mutant fails to functionally replace the yeast H(+)-ATPase. Considering the importance of the motif QQXYpTV for 14-3-3 binding and yeast growth, this motif should be of vital importance for regulating H(+)-ATPase activity in the plant and thus for plant growth. PMID:10590165

  14. Phosphorylation of serine 4,642 in the C-terminus of plectin by MNK2 and PKA modulates its interaction with intermediate filaments.

    PubMed

    Bouameur, Jamal-Eddine; Schneider, Yann; Begré, Nadja; Hobbs, Ryan P; Lingasamy, Prakash; Fontao, Lionel; Green, Kathleen J; Favre, Bertrand; Borradori, Luca

    2013-09-15

    Plectin is a versatile cytolinker of the plakin family conferring cell resilience to mechanical stress in stratified epithelia and muscles. It acts as a critical organizer of the cytoskeletal system by tethering various intermediate filament (IF) networks through its C-terminal IF-binding domain (IFBD). Mutations affecting the IFBD cause devastating human diseases. Here, we show that serine 4642, which is located in the extreme C-terminus of plectin, is phosphorylated in different cell lines. Phosphorylation of S4642 decreased the ability of plectin IFBD to associate with various IFs, as assessed by immunofluorescence microscopy and cell fractionation studies, as well as in yeast two-hybrid assays. Plectin phosphorylated at S4642 was reduced at sites of IF network anchorage along cell-substrate contacts in both skin and cultured keratinocytes. Treatment of SK-MEL-2 and HeLa cells with okadaic acid increased plectin S4642 phosphorylation, suggesting that protein phosphatase 2A dephosphorylates this residue. Moreover, plectin S4642 phosphorylation was enhanced after cell treatment with EGF, phorbol ester, sorbitol and 8-bromo-cyclic AMP, as well as during wound healing and protease-mediated cell detachment. Using selective protein kinase inhibitors, we identified two different kinases that modulate the phosphorylation of plectin S4642 in HeLa cells: MNK2, which is downstream of the ERK1/2-dependent MAPK cascade, and PKA. Our study indicates that phosphorylation of S4642 has an important regulatory role in the interaction of plectin with IFs and identifies a novel link between MNK2 and the cytoskeleton.

  15. An unrecognised Holocene palaeo-lake at the terminus of the Murray-Darling Basin: a palaeo-discharge record and implications for current climate reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Carli, E.; Hubble, T.; Penny, D.; Petley, D. N.; Clarke, S. L.; Hamilton, R. J.; Gadd, P.; Brand, H.

    2015-12-01

    The 1.073 million km2 Murray-Darling River Basin (MDB) drains 14% of Australia's landmass, incorporates Australia's most economically important agricultural region, and presents one of Australia's most important and contentious water security challenges. The twin Murray and Darling catchments extend from the sub-tropics to the mid latitudes, with catchment precipitation driven by synoptic-scale oceanic-atmospheric processes that include the Australian Monsoon, SAM, IPO, PDO, IOD and ENSO. In this study we report the discovery of a hitherto unrecognised terminal palaeo-lake system 'Lake Mannum' that existed during the middle to late Holocene, as evidenced by an extensive sequence of laminated muds. The deposit contains gray laminae enriched in smectite and Nd/Ti, diagnostic of palaeo-discharges originating from the Darling catchment. These gray laminae are set within olive-black background muds enriched in illite, K and Rb, diagnostic of palaeo-discharges originating from the Murray Catchment. The deposit reflects the hydrological regime of the MDB, representing the first in-situ palaeo-discharge record for the MDB and a proxy record for south-eastern Australia's precipitation and hydroclimate. Given the strong influence of major oceanic-atmospheric synoptic circulation over the river system, variability in MDB discharge and delivery of suspended sediment flux to the continental shelf have been used as proxy indicators for south-eastern Australia's palaeo-climate during the Holocene. The existence of palaeo-lake Mannum at the terminus of the MDB suggests that discharge of terrigenous sediment to the Southern Ocean was strongly suppressed during this time, meaning that Holocene climate reconstructions which rely on the marine sediment record require re-evaluation.

  16. Distinct Roles of Ser-764 and Lys-773 at the N Terminus of von Willebrand Factor in Complex Assembly with Coagulation Factor VIII*

    PubMed Central

    Castro-Núñez, Lydia; Bloem, Esther; Boon-Spijker, Mariëtte G.; van der Zwaan, Carmen; van den Biggelaar, Maartje; Mertens, Koen; Meijer, Alexander B.

    2013-01-01

    Complex formation between coagulation factor VIII (FVIII) and von Willebrand factor (VWF) is of critical importance to protect FVIII from rapid in vivo clearance and degradation. We have now employed a chemical footprinting approach to identify regions on VWF involved in FVIII binding. To this end, lysine amino acid residues of VWF were chemically modified in the presence of FVIII or activated FVIII, which does not bind VWF. Nano-LC-MS analysis showed that the lysine residues of almost all identified VWF peptides were not differentially modified upon incubation of VWF with FVIII or activated FVIII. However, Lys-773 of peptide Ser-766–Leu-774 was protected from chemical modification in the presence of FVIII. In addition, peptide Ser-764–Arg-782, which comprises the first 19 amino acid residues of mature VWF, showed a differential modification of both Lys-773 and the α-amino group of Ser-764. To verify the role of Lys-773 and the N-terminal Ser-764 in FVIII binding, we employed VWF variants in which either Lys-773 or Ser-764 was replaced with Ala. Surface plasmon resonance analysis and competition studies revealed that VWF(K773A) exhibited reduced binding to FVIII and the FVIII light chain, which harbors the VWF-binding site. In contrast, VWF(S764A) revealed more effective binding to FVIII and the FVIII light chain compared with WT VWF. The results of our study show that the N terminus of VWF is critical for the interaction with FVIII and that Ser-764 and Lys-773 have opposite roles in the binding mechanism. PMID:23168412

  17. Distinct roles of Ser-764 and Lys-773 at the N terminus of von Willebrand factor in complex assembly with coagulation factor VIII.

    PubMed

    Castro-Núñez, Lydia; Bloem, Esther; Boon-Spijker, Mariëtte G; van der Zwaan, Carmen; van den Biggelaar, Maartje; Mertens, Koen; Meijer, Alexander B

    2013-01-01

    Complex formation between coagulation factor VIII (FVIII) and von Willebrand factor (VWF) is of critical importance to protect FVIII from rapid in vivo clearance and degradation. We have now employed a chemical footprinting approach to identify regions on VWF involved in FVIII binding. To this end, lysine amino acid residues of VWF were chemically modified in the presence of FVIII or activated FVIII, which does not bind VWF. Nano-LC-MS analysis showed that the lysine residues of almost all identified VWF peptides were not differentially modified upon incubation of VWF with FVIII or activated FVIII. However, Lys-773 of peptide Ser-766-Leu-774 was protected from chemical modification in the presence of FVIII. In addition, peptide Ser-764-Arg-782, which comprises the first 19 amino acid residues of mature VWF, showed a differential modification of both Lys-773 and the α-amino group of Ser-764. To verify the role of Lys-773 and the N-terminal Ser-764 in FVIII binding, we employed VWF variants in which either Lys-773 or Ser-764 was replaced with Ala. Surface plasmon resonance analysis and competition studies revealed that VWF(K773A) exhibited reduced binding to FVIII and the FVIII light chain, which harbors the VWF-binding site. In contrast, VWF(S764A) revealed more effective binding to FVIII and the FVIII light chain compared with WT VWF. The results of our study show that the N terminus of VWF is critical for the interaction with FVIII and that Ser-764 and Lys-773 have opposite roles in the binding mechanism. PMID:23168412

  18. Successive phosphorylation of p27(KIP1) protein at serine-10 and C terminus crucially controls its potency to inactivate Cdk2.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Atish R; Kan, Qiuming; Srivastava, Saumya; Uranbileg, Baasanjav; Arakawa-Takeuchi, Shiho; Fujita, Naoya; Okayama, Hiroto

    2012-06-22

    During the G(1)-S transition, the activity of Cdk2 is regulated by its association with p27(KIP1), which in rodent fibroblasts undergoes phosphorylation mainly at serine 10, threonine 187, and C-terminal threonine 197 by KIS, Cdk2, and Pim or ROCK, respectively. Recently Cdc6 the AAA+ ATPase, identified initially to assemble pre-replicative complexes on origins of replication and later to activate p21(CIP1)-inactivated Cdk2, was found also to activate p27-bound Cdk2 but only after the bound p27 is C-terminally phosphorylated. On the other hand, the biological significance of the serine 10 phosphorylation remains elusive aside from its involvement in the stability of p27 itself. We report here that serine 10 phosphorylation is required for efficient C-terminal phosphorylation of its own by PIM and ROCK kinases and critically controls the potency of p27 as a Cdk2 inhibitor. In vitro, PIM1 and active ROCK1 efficiently phosphorylated free as well as Cdk2-bound p27 but only when the p27 was phosphorylated at Ser-10 in advance. Consistently, a Ser-10 nonphosphorylatable mutant p27 protein was not phosphorylated at the C terminus in vivo. Furthermore, when double-phosphorylated, free p27 was no longer a potent inhibitor of Cdk2, and Cdk2-bound p27 could be removed by Cdc6 to reactivate the Cdk2. Thus, phosphorylation at these two sites crucially controls the potency of this CDK inhibitor in two distinct modes.

  19. In vivo reconstitution of a homodimeric cytochrome b559 like structure: The role of the N-terminus α-subunit from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    PubMed

    Luján, María A; Martínez, Jesús I; Alonso, Pablo J; Torrado, Alejandro; Roncel, Mercedes; Ortega, José M; Sancho, Javier; Picorel, Rafael

    2015-11-01

    The cytochrome b559 is a heme-bridged heterodimeric protein with two subunits, α and β. Both subunits from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 have previously been cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli and in vivo reconstitution experiments have been carried out. The formation of homodimers in the bacterial membrane with endogenous heme was only observed in the case of the β-subunit (β/β) but not with the full length α-subunit. In the present work, reconstitution of a homodimer (α/α) cytochrome b559 like structure was possible using a chimeric N-terminus α-subunit truncated before the amino acid isoleucine 17, eliminating completely a short amphipathic α-helix that lays on the surface of the membrane. Overexpression and in vivo reconstitution in the bacteria was clearly demonstrated by the brownish color of the culture pellet and the use of a commercial monoclonal antibody against the fusion protein carrier, the maltoside binding protein, and polyclonal antibodies against a synthetic peptide of the α-subunit from Thermosynechococcus elongatus. Moreover, a simple partial purification after membrane solubilization with Triton X-100 confirmed that the overexpressed protein complex corresponded with the maltoside binding protein-chimeric α-subunit cytochrome b559 like structure. The features of the new structure were determined by UV-Vis, electron paramagnetic resonance and redox potentiometric techniques. Ribbon representations of all possible structures are also shown to better understand the mechanism of the cytochrome b559 maturation in the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane. PMID:26183783

  20. Functional effects of mutations at F35 in the NH2-terminus of Kir6.2 (KCNJ11), causing neonatal diabetes, and response to sulfonylurea therapy.

    PubMed

    Proks, Peter; Girard, Christophe; Baevre, Halvor; Njølstad, Pål R; Ashcroft, Frances M

    2006-06-01

    Heterozygous mutations in the human Kir6.2 gene (KCNJ11), the pore-forming subunit of the ATP-sensitive K(+) channel (K(ATP) channel), cause neonatal diabetes. To date, all mutations increase whole-cell K(ATP) channel currents by reducing channel inhibition by MgATP. Here, we provide functional characterization of two mutations (F35L and F35V) at residue F35 of Kir6.2, which lies within the NH(2)-terminus. We further show that the F35V patient can be successfully transferred from insulin to sulfonylurea therapy. The patient has been off insulin for 24 months and shows improved metabolic control (mean HbA(1c) 7.58 before and 6.18% after sulfonylurea treatment; P < 0.007). Wild-type and mutant Kir6.2 were heterologously coexpressed with SUR1 in Xenopus oocytes. Whole-cell K(ATP) channel currents through homomeric and heterozygous F35V and F35L channels were increased due to a reduced sensitivity to inhibition by MgATP. The mutation also increased the open probability (P(O)) of homomeric F35 mutant channels in the absence of ATP. These effects on P(O) and ATP sensitivity were abolished in the absence of SUR1. Our results suggest that mutations at F35 cause permanent neonatal diabetes by affecting K(ATP) channel gating and thereby, indirectly, ATP inhibition. Heterozygous F35V channels were markedly inhibited by the sulfonylurea tolbutamide, accounting for the efficacy of sulfonylurea therapy in the patient.

  1. Cross-talk between the octarepeat domain and the fifth binding site of prion protein driven by the interaction of copper(II) with the N-terminus.

    PubMed

    Di Natale, Giuseppe; Turi, Ildikó; Pappalardo, Giuseppe; Sóvágó, Imre; Rizzarelli, Enrico

    2015-03-01

    Prion diseases are a group of neurodegenerative diseases based on the conformational conversion of the normal form of the prion protein (PrP(C)) to the disease-related scrapie isoform (PrP(Sc)). Copper(II) coordination to PrP(C) has attracted considerable interest for almost 20 years, mainly due to the possibility that such an interaction would be an important event for the physiological function of PrP(C). In this work, we report the copper(II) coordination features of the peptide fragment Ac(PEG11)3PrP(60-114) [Ac = acetyl] as a model for the whole N-terminus of the PrP(C) metal-binding domain. We studied the complexation properties of the peptide by means of potentiometric, UV/Vis, circular dichroism and electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry techniques. The results revealed that the preferred histidyl binding sites largely depend on the pH and copper(II)/peptide ratio. Formation of macrochelate species occurs up to a 2:1 metal/peptide ratio in the physiological pH range and simultaneously involves the histidyl residues present both inside and outside the octarepeat domain. However, at increased copper(II)/peptide ratios amide-bound species form, especially within the octarepeat domain. On the contrary, at basic pH the amide-bound species predominate at any copper/peptide ratio and are formed preferably with the binding sites of His96 and His111, which is similar to the metal-binding-affinity order observed in our previous studies. PMID:25649151

  2. Characterization of a functional C-terminus of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis MtrA responsible for both DNA binding and interaction with its two-component partner protein, MtrB.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuqing; Zeng, Jumei; He, Zheng-Guo

    2010-11-01

    Virulence in pathogenic bacteria is due in part to the action of two-component systems. However, in the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the molecular mechanisms underlying these systems are as yet unclear. In this study, MtrA was shown to contain a functional C-terminus and also to have Ca(2+) as its preferred cofactor for DNA binding. Further mutation experiments demonstrated that the C-terminus of MtrA was responsible for specific interactions with the target DNA motif and also with its partner protein, MtrB. The physical interaction between MtrA and MtrB inhibited DNA binding by MtrA. These findings yield critical information about the unique regulatory mechanisms of the essential MtrAB two-component system in this pathogen.

  3. Demonstration of physical proximity between the N terminus and the S4-S5 linker of the human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG) potassium channel.

    PubMed

    de la Peña, Pilar; Alonso-Ron, Carlos; Machín, Angeles; Fernández-Trillo, Jorge; Carretero, Luis; Domínguez, Pedro; Barros, Francisco

    2011-05-27

    Potassium channels encoded by the human ether-à-go-go-related gene (hERG) contribute to cardiac repolarization as a result of their characteristic gating properties. The hERG channel N terminus acts as a crucial determinant in gating. It is also known that the S4-S5 linker couples the voltage-sensing machinery to the channel gate. Moreover, this linker has been repeatedly proposed as an interaction site for the distal portion of the N terminus controlling channel gating, but direct evidence for such an interaction is still lacking. In this study, we used disulfide bond formation between pairs of engineered cysteines to demonstrate the close proximity between the beginning of the N terminus and the S4-S5 linker. Currents from channels with introduced cysteines were rapidly and strongly attenuated by an oxidizing agent, this effect being maximal for cysteine pairs located around amino acids 3 and 542 of the hERG sequence. The state-dependent modification of the double-mutant channels, but not the single-cysteine mutants, and the ability to readily reverse modification with the reducing agent dithiothreitol indicate that a disulfide bond is formed under oxidizing conditions, locking the channels in a non-conducting state. We conclude that physical interactions between the N-terminal-most segment of the N terminus and the S4-S5 linker constitute an essential component of the hERG gating machinery, thus providing a molecular basis for previous data and indicating an important contribution of these cytoplasmic domains in controlling its unusual gating and hence determining its physiological role in setting the electrical behavior of cardiac and other cell types.

  4. Evolution of the Twist Subfamily Vertebrate Proteins: Discovery of a Signature Motif and Origin of the Twist1 Glycine-Rich Motifs in the Amino-Terminus Disordered Domain

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Yacidzohara; Gonzalez-Mendez, Ricardo R.

    2016-01-01

    Twist proteins belong to the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) family of multifunctional transcriptional factors. These factors are known to use domains other than the common bHLH in protein-protein interactions. There has been much work characterizing the bHLH domain and the C-terminus in protein-protein interactions but despite a few attempts more focus is needed at the N-terminus. Since the region of highest diversity in Twist proteins is the N-terminus, we analyzed the conservation of this region in different vertebrate Twist proteins and study the sequence differences between Twist1 and Twist2 with emphasis on the glycine-rich regions found in Twist1. We found a highly conserved sequence motif in all Twist1 (SSSPVSPADDSLSNSEEE) and Twist2 (SSSPVSPVDSLGTSEEE) mammalian species with unknown function. Through sequence comparison we demonstrate that the Twist protein family ancestor was “Twist2-like” and the two glycine-rich regions found in Twist1 sequences were acquired late in evolution, apparently not at the same time. The second glycine-rich region started developing first in the fish vertebrate group, while the first glycine region arose afterwards within the reptiles. Disordered domain and secondary structure predictions showed that the amino acid sequence and disorder feature found at the N-terminus is highly evolutionary conserved and could be a functional site that interacts with other proteins. Detailed examination of the glycine-rich regions in the N-terminus of Twist1 demonstrate that the first region is completely aliphatic while the second region contains some polar residues that could be subject to post-translational modification. Phylogenetic and sequence space analysis showed that the Twist1 subfamily is the result of a gene duplication during Twist2 vertebrate fish evolution, and has undergone more evolutionary drift than Twist2. We identified a new signature motif that is characteristic of each Twist paralog and identified important residues

  5. Evolution of the Twist Subfamily Vertebrate Proteins: Discovery of a Signature Motif and Origin of the Twist1 Glycine-Rich Motifs in the Amino-Terminus Disordered Domain.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Yacidzohara; Gonzalez-Mendez, Ricardo R; Cadilla, Carmen L

    2016-01-01

    Twist proteins belong to the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) family of multifunctional transcriptional factors. These factors are known to use domains other than the common bHLH in protein-protein interactions. There has been much work characterizing the bHLH domain and the C-terminus in protein-protein interactions but despite a few attempts more focus is needed at the N-terminus. Since the region of highest diversity in Twist proteins is the N-terminus, we analyzed the conservation of this region in different vertebrate Twist proteins and study the sequence differences between Twist1 and Twist2 with emphasis on the glycine-rich regions found in Twist1. We found a highly conserved sequence motif in all Twist1 (SSSPVSPADDSLSNSEEE) and Twist2 (SSSPVSPVDSLGTSEEE) mammalian species with unknown function. Through sequence comparison we demonstrate that the Twist protein family ancestor was "Twist2-like" and the two glycine-rich regions found in Twist1 sequences were acquired late in evolution, apparently not at the same time. The second glycine-rich region started developing first in the fish vertebrate group, while the first glycine region arose afterwards within the reptiles. Disordered domain and secondary structure predictions showed that the amino acid sequence and disorder feature found at the N-terminus is highly evolutionary conserved and could be a functional site that interacts with other proteins. Detailed examination of the glycine-rich regions in the N-terminus of Twist1 demonstrate that the first region is completely aliphatic while the second region contains some polar residues that could be subject to post-translational modification. Phylogenetic and sequence space analysis showed that the Twist1 subfamily is the result of a gene duplication during Twist2 vertebrate fish evolution, and has undergone more evolutionary drift than Twist2. We identified a new signature motif that is characteristic of each Twist paralog and identified important residues within

  6. Recruitment of Gβγ controls the basal activity of G-protein coupled inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK) channels: crucial role of distal C terminus of GIRK1.

    PubMed

    Kahanovitch, Uri; Tsemakhovich, Vladimir; Berlin, Shai; Rubinstein, Moran; Styr, Boaz; Castel, Ruth; Peleg, Sagit; Tabak, Galit; Dessauer, Carmen W; Ivanina, Tatiana; Dascal, Nathan

    2014-12-15

    The G-protein coupled inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK, or Kir3) channels are important mediators of inhibitory neurotransmission via activation of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). GIRK channels are tetramers comprising combinations of subunits (GIRK1-4), activated by direct binding of the Gβγ subunit of Gi/o proteins. Heterologously expressed GIRK1/2 exhibit high, Gβγ-dependent basal currents (Ibasal) and a modest activation by GPCR or coexpressed Gβγ. Inversely, the GIRK2 homotetramers exhibit low Ibasal and strong activation by Gβγ. The high Ibasal of GIRK1 seems to be associated with its unique distal C terminus (G1-dCT), which is not present in the other subunits. We investigated the role of G1-dCT using electrophysiological and fluorescence assays in Xenopus laevis oocytes and protein interaction assays. We show that expression of GIRK1/2 increases the plasma membrane level of coexpressed Gβγ (a phenomenon we term 'Gβγ recruitment') but not of coexpressed Gαi3. All GIRK1-containing channels, but not GIRK2 homomers, recruited Gβγ to the plasma membrane. In biochemical assays, truncation of G1-dCT reduces the binding between the cytosolic parts of GIRK1 and Gβγ, but not Gαi3. Nevertheless, the truncation of G1-dCT does not impair activation by Gβγ. In fluorescently labelled homotetrameric GIRK1 channels and in the heterotetrameric GIRK1/2 channel, the truncation of G1-dCT abolishes Gβγ recruitment and decreases Ibasal. Thus, we conclude that G1-dCT carries an essential role in Gβγ recruitment by GIRK1 and, consequently, in determining its high basal activity. Our results indicate that G1-dCT is a crucial part of a Gβγ anchoring site of GIRK1-containing channels, spatially and functionally distinct from the site of channel activation by Gβγ.

  7. Two phenylalanines in the C-terminus of Epstein-Barr virus Rta protein reciprocally modulate its DNA binding and transactivation function

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, L.-W.; Raghavan, Vineetha; Chang, Pey-Jium; Shedd, Duane; Heston, Lee; Delecluse, Henri-Jacques; Miller, George

    2009-04-10

    The Rta (R transactivator) protein plays an essential role in the Epstein-Barr viral (EBV) lytic cascade. Rta activates viral gene expression by several mechanisms including direct and indirect binding to target viral promoters, synergy with EBV ZEBRA protein, and stimulation of cellular signaling pathways. We previously found that Rta proteins with C-terminal truncations of 30 aa were markedly enhanced in their capacity to bind DNA (Chen, L.W., Chang, P.J., Delecluse, H.J., and Miller, G., (2005). Marked variation in response of consensus binding elements for the Rta protein of Epstein-Barr virus. J. Virol. 79(15), 9635-9650.). Here we show that two phenylalanines (F600 and F605) in the C-terminus of Rta play a crucial role in mediating this DNA binding inhibitory function. Amino acids 555 to 605 of Rta constitute a functional DNA binding inhibitory sequence (DBIS) that markedly decreased DNA binding when transferred to a minimal DNA binding domain of Rta (aa 1-350). Alanine substitution mutants, F600A/F605A, abolished activity of the DBIS. F600 and F605 are located in the transcriptional activation domain of Rta. Alanine substitutions, F600A/F605A, decreased transcriptional activation by Rta protein, whereas aromatic substitutions, such as F600Y/F605Y or F600W/F605W, partially restored transcriptional activation. Full-length Rta protein with F600A/F605A mutations were enhanced in DNA binding compared to wild-type, whereas Rta proteins with F600Y/F605Y or F600W/F605W substitutions were, like wild-type Rta, relatively poor DNA binders. GAL4 (1-147)/Rta (416-605) fusion proteins with F600A/F605A mutations were diminished in transcriptional activation, relative to GAL4/Rta chimeras without such mutations. The results suggest that, in the context of a larger DBIS, F600 and F605 play a role in the reciprocal regulation of DNA binding and transcriptional activation by Rta. Regulation of DNA binding by Rta is likely to be important in controlling its different modes of

  8. An intramolecular transport metabolon: fusion of carbonic anhydrase II to the COOH terminus of the Cl(-)/HCO(3)(-)exchanger, AE1.

    PubMed

    Sowah, Daniel; Casey, Joseph R

    2011-08-01

    Anion exchanger 1 (AE1) is the plasma membrane Cl(-)/HCO(3)(-) exchanger of erythrocytes. Carbonic anhydrases (CA) provide substrate for AE1 by catalyzing the reaction, H(2)O + CO(2) ↔ HCO(3)(-) + H(+). The physical complex of CAII with AE1 has been proposed to maximize anion exchange activity. To examine the effect of CAII catalysis on AE1 transport rate, we fused either CAII-wild type or catalytically inactive CAII-V143Y to the cytoplasmic COOH terminus of AE1 to form AE1.CAII and AE1.CAII-V143Y, respectively. When expressed in transfected human embryonic kidney 293 cells, AE1.CAII had a similar Cl(-)/HCO(3)(-) exchange activity to AE1 alone, as assessed by the flux of H(+) equivalents (87 ± 4% vs. AE1) or rate of change of intracellular Cl(-) concentration (93 ± 4% vs. AE1), suggesting that CAII does not activate AE1. In contrast, AE1.CAII-V143Y displayed transport rates for H(+) equivalents and Cl(-) of 55 ± 2% and of 40 ± 2%, versus AE1. Fusion of CAII to AE1 therefore reduces anion transport activity, but this reduction is compensated for during Cl(-)/HCO(3)(-) exchange by the presence of catalytically active CAII. Overexpression of free CAII-V143Y acts in a dominant negative manner to reduce AE1-mediated HCO(3)(-) transport by displacement of endogenous CAII-wild type from its binding site on AE1. To examine whether AE1.CAII bound endogenous CAII, we coexpressed CAII-V143Y along with AE1 or AE1.CAII. The bicarbonate transport activity of AE1 was inhibited by CAII-V143Y, whereas the activity of AE1.CAII was unaffected by CAII-V143Y, suggesting impaired transport activity upon displacement of functional CAII from AE1 but not AE1.CAII. Taken together, these data suggest that association of functional CAII with AE1 increases Cl(-)/HCO(3)(-) exchange activity, consistent with the HCO(3)(-) transport metabolon model.

  9. Recruitment of Gβγ controls the basal activity of G-protein coupled inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK) channels: crucial role of distal C terminus of GIRK1

    PubMed Central

    Kahanovitch, Uri; Tsemakhovich, Vladimir; Berlin, Shai; Rubinstein, Moran; Styr, Boaz; Castel, Ruth; Peleg, Sagit; Tabak, Galit; Dessauer, Carmen W; Ivanina, Tatiana; Dascal, Nathan

    2014-01-01

    The G-protein coupled inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK, or Kir3) channels are important mediators of inhibitory neurotransmission via activation of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). GIRK channels are tetramers comprising combinations of subunits (GIRK1–4), activated by direct binding of the Gβγ subunit of Gi/o proteins. Heterologously expressed GIRK1/2 exhibit high, Gβγ-dependent basal currents (Ibasal) and a modest activation by GPCR or coexpressed Gβγ. Inversely, the GIRK2 homotetramers exhibit low Ibasal and strong activation by Gβγ. The high Ibasal of GIRK1 seems to be associated with its unique distal C terminus (G1-dCT), which is not present in the other subunits. We investigated the role of G1-dCT using electrophysiological and fluorescence assays in Xenopus laevis oocytes and protein interaction assays. We show that expression of GIRK1/2 increases the plasma membrane level of coexpressed Gβγ (a phenomenon we term ‘Gβγ recruitment’) but not of coexpressed Gαi3. All GIRK1-containing channels, but not GIRK2 homomers, recruited Gβγ to the plasma membrane. In biochemical assays, truncation of G1-dCT reduces the binding between the cytosolic parts of GIRK1 and Gβγ, but not Gαi3. Nevertheless, the truncation of G1-dCT does not impair activation by Gβγ. In fluorescently labelled homotetrameric GIRK1 channels and in the heterotetrameric GIRK1/2 channel, the truncation of G1-dCT abolishes Gβγ recruitment and decreases Ibasal. Thus, we conclude that G1-dCT carries an essential role in Gβγ recruitment by GIRK1 and, consequently, in determining its high basal activity. Our results indicate that G1-dCT is a crucial part of a Gβγ anchoring site of GIRK1-containing channels, spatially and functionally distinct from the site of channel activation by Gβγ. PMID:25384780

  10. Identification of structural variations in the carboxyl terminus of Alzheimer's disease-associated βA4[1–42] amyloid using a monoclonal antibody

    PubMed Central

    Jayasena, U L H R; Gribble, S K; Mckenzie, A; Beyreuther, K; Masters, C L; Underwood, J R

    2001-01-01

    The accumulation of amyloid plaques and amyloid congophilic angiopathy (ACA) in the brains of affected individuals is one of the main pathological features of Alzheimer's disease. Within these deposits, the βA4 (Aß) polypeptide represents a major component with the C-terminal 39–43 amino acid variants being most abundant. Using a mouse IgG1 MoAb produced by hybridoma βA4[35–43]-95.2 3B9, which reacts with the epitope is defined by the amino acid residues βA438[GVV]40, this study has identified a unique conformation within the carboxyl terminus of human βA4[1–42]. Although the βA438[GVV]40 sequence is present within the C-termini of human βA4[1–40] and βA4[1–43] and the βA4-containing region of human APP, the βA4[35–43]-95.2 3B9 MoAb (designated MoAb 3B9) does not bind these polypeptides, demonstrating a high degree of specificity for the βA438[GVV]40 epitope as presented within the βA4[1–42] sequence. The βA4[1–42] epitope bound by MoAb 3B9 is sensitive to heating (100°C for 5 min) and is denatured by SDS but not by oxidative radio-iodination of βA4 or by adsorption to plastic surfaces or nitrocellulose. The recognition of βA4 plaque deposits and ACA by MoAb 3B9 within formalin-fixed sections of human AD brain demonstrates the potential of these antibodies for investigating the role of the unique βA4[1–42] conformation in the development of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:11422208

  11. The C-Terminus of Human Nucleotide Receptor P2X7 Is Critical for Receptor Oligomerization and N-Linked Glycosylation

    PubMed Central

    Wickert, Lisa E.; Blanchette, Joshua B.; Waldschmidt, Noelle V.; Bertics, Paul J.; Denu, John M.; Denlinger, Loren C.; Lenertz, Lisa Y.

    2013-01-01

    Background The P2X7 receptor binds extracellular ATP to mediate numerous inflammatory responses and is considered a potential biomarker and therapeutic target for diverse inflammatory and neurological diseases. P2X7 contains many single nucleotide polymorphisms, including several mutations located within its intracellular C-terminal trafficking domain. Mutations within the trafficking domain result in attenuated receptor activity and cell surface presentation, but the mechanisms by which amino acid changes within this region promote altered P2X7 function have not been elucidated. Methods and Results We analyzed the amino acid sequence of P2X7 for any potential trafficking signals and found that P2X7 contains putative Arg-X-Arg ER retention sequences. Alanine substitutions near or within these sequences were constructed, and we determined that single mutation of R574 and R578 but not R576 or K579 attenuates P2X7-stimulated activation of ERK1/2 and induction of the transcription factors FosB and ΔFosB. We found that mutation of R578 within the trafficking domain to the naturally occurring Gln substitution disrupts P2X7 localization at the plasma membrane and results in R578Q displaying a higher apparent molecular weight in comparison to wild-type receptor. We used the glycosidase endoglycosidase H to determine that this difference in mass is due in part to the R578Q mutant possessing a larger mass of oligosaccharides, indicative of improper N-linked glycosylation addition and/or trimming. Chemical cross-linking experiments were also performed and suggest that the R578Q variant also does not form trimers as well as wild-type receptor, a function required for its full activity. Conclusions These data demonstrate the distal C-terminus of P2X7 is important for oligomerization and post-translational modification of the receptor, providing a mechanism by which mutations in the trafficking domain disrupt P2X7 activity and localization at the plasma membrane. PMID:23691096

  12. B- and C-RAF display essential differences in their binding to Ras: the isotype-specific N terminus of B-RAF facilitates Ras binding.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Andreas; Hekman, Mirko; Kuhlmann, Jürgen; Rubio, Ignacio; Wiese, Stefan; Rapp, Ulf R

    2007-09-01

    Recruitment of RAF kinases to the plasma membrane was initially proposed to be mediated by Ras proteins via interaction with the RAF Ras binding domain (RBD). Data reporting that RAF kinases possess high affinities for particular membrane lipids support a new model in which Ras-RAF interactions may be spatially restricted to the plane of the membrane. Although the coupling features of Ras binding to the isolated RAF RBD were investigated in great detail, little is known about the interactions of the processed Ras with the functional and full-length RAF kinases. Here we present a quantitative analysis of the binding properties of farnesylated and nonfarnesylated H-Ras to both full-length B- and C-RAF in the presence and absence of lipid environment. Although isolated RBD fragments associate with high affinity to both farnesylated and nonfarnesylated H-Ras, the full-length RAF kinases revealed fundamental differences with respect to Ras binding. In contrast to C-RAF that requires farnesylated H-Ras, cytosolic B-RAF associates effectively and with significantly higher affinity with both farnesylated and nonfarnesylated H-Ras. To investigate the potential farnesyl binding site(s) we prepared several N-terminal fragments of C-RAF and found that in the presence of cysteine-rich domain only the farnesylated form of H-Ras binds with high association rates. The extreme N terminus of B-RAF turned out to be responsible for the facilitation of lipid independent Ras binding to B-RAF, since truncation of this region resulted in a protein that changed its kinase properties and resembles C-RAF. In vivo studies using PC12 and COS7 cells support in vitro results. Co-localization measurements using labeled Ras and RAF documented essential differences between B- and C-RAF with respect to association with Ras. Taken together, these data suggest that the activation of B-RAF, in contrast to C-RAF, may take place both at the plasma membrane and in the cytosolic environment.

  13. Nuclear translocation of the cardiac L-type calcium channel C-terminus is regulated by sex and 17β-estradiol.

    PubMed

    Mahmoodzadeh, S; Haase, H; Sporbert, A; Rharass, T; Panáková, D; Morano, I

    2016-08-01

    Th