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Sample records for kupffer cell blockade

  1. Kupffer cell blockade prevents induction of portal venous tolerance in rat cardiac allograft transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Kamei, T.; Callery, M.P.; Flye, M.W. )

    1990-05-01

    Pretransplant portal venous (pv) administration of donor antigen induces allospecific partial tolerance. Although the involved mechanism has not been defined, antigen presentation by Kupffer cells (KC) in the liver is considered to be critical. We evaluated the effect of KC blockade on this pv tolerance induction in Buffalo (RT1b) rats receiving Lewis (RT1(1)) cardiac heterotopic allografts. Control rats received no treatment, while experimental animals received 25 X 10(6) ultraviolet B-irradiated (12,000 J/m2) donor spleen cells via either the iv (systemic intravenous) or the pv routes 7 days before transplantation. Gadolinium chloride (GdCl3), a rare earth metal known to inhibit KC phagocytosis, was given (7 mg/kg) 1 and 2 days before pv preimmunization. Cardiac graft prolongation was obtained by pv (MST = 13.3 +/- 1.9 days, n = 6, vs control = 7.3 +/- 0.5 days, n = 6; P less than 0.001) but not by iv preimmunization (7.7 +/- 0.7 days, n = 6, NS vs control). KC blockade abolished the pv tolerance, as indicated by abrogation of graft prolongation (PV + GdCl3 = 8.0 +/- 0.8 days, n = 6, NS vs control). These findings suggest that effective alloantigen uptake by KC in the liver is essential for the induction of pv tolerance in rat cardiac transplantation.

  2. Kupffer cell blockade improves the endotoxin-induced microcirculatory inflammatory response in obstructive jaundice.

    PubMed

    Abrahám, Szabolcs; Szabó, Andrea; Kaszaki, József; Varga, Renáta; Eder, Katalin; Duda, Erno; Lázár, György; Tiszlavicz, László; Boros, Mihály; Lázár, György

    2008-07-01

    Cholestasis predisposes to hypersensitivity to LPS, leading to potential septic complications. We set out to characterize the involvement of Kupffer cell (KC) activation in the hepatic microcirculatory and structural consequences of obstructive jaundice in the presence and absence of acute endotoxemia. The hepatic microcirculatory consequences of 3-day extrahepatic bile duct ligation (BDL) were assessed in rats. The contributions of changes in hepatic perfusion, leukocyte influx, and proinflammatory cytokine release to the development of hepatic structural damage were also determined. Furthermore, the corresponding consequences of BDL in combination with acute (2-h) endotoxemia (1 mg kg(-1) LPS, i.v.) were compared with those observed after LPS alone. In a second series, the same protocols were applied in identical groups of rats where the KC function was inhibited with 24-h gadolinium chloride pretreatment (10 mg kg(-1), i.v.). Bile duct ligation induced minor inflammatory reactions but caused a marked reduction in hepatic sinusoidal perfusion and severe histological damage. LPS treatment, however, elicited an approximately 5-fold increase in leukocyte adherence in the central venules and pronounced IL-6 and TNF-alpha release, but without significant structural damage. The combination of BDL with LPS enhanced the perfusion failure, leukocyte sticking/deposition, and proinflammatory cytokine release; most of these changes can be effectively ameliorated by gadolinium chloride. In conclusion, when obstructive jaundice is followed by a second hit of LPS, perfusion failure, liver inflammation, and structural damage are enhanced, the KCs playing a decisive role in this scenario. Therapeutic strategies aimed at KC blockade can potentially reduce the risk of inflammatory complications in cholestasis. PMID:18562926

  3. Amphibia Kupffer cells.

    PubMed

    Sichel, Giovanni; Scalia, Marina; Corsaro, Concetta

    2002-06-15

    Amphibia Kupffer cells (i.e., liver resident macrophages) show many common characteristics when compared with Mammalia Kupffer cells: filopodia, microvillous-like structures, lamellipodia, fuzzy coat, coated vesicles, bristled vacuoles, nonspecific esterase activity, and pinocytotic and phagocytic activity are present both in Amphibia and Mammalia Kupffer cells. On the other hand, some differences are present between Kupffer cells of both zoological classes: phagocytosed red cells and their derivatives, iron-protein complexes, and lipofuscin bodies are normally present in Amphibia Kupffer cells, but absent in the same cells of healthy mammals. Worm-like structures are not seen in Amphibia and endogenous peroxidase activity is very weak in these animals compared with Mammalia. The most important difference lies in the ability of Amphibia Kupffer cells to produce melanins: in fact the tyrosinase gene is expressed, "melanosome centers" are present, and dopa oxidase activity is demonstrable.

  4. Kupffer Cell Metabolism and Function

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen-Lefebvre, Anh Thu; Horuzsko, Anatolij

    2015-01-01

    Kupffer cells are resident liver macrophages and play a critical role in maintaining liver functions. Under physiological conditions, they are the first innate immune cells and protect the liver from bacterial infections. Under pathological conditions, they are activated by different components and can differentiate into M1-like (classical) or M2-like (alternative) macrophages. The metabolism of classical or alternative activated Kupffer cells will determine their functions in liver damage. Special functions and metabolism of Kupffer cells suggest that they are an attractive target for therapy of liver inflammation and related diseases, including cancer and infectious diseases. Here we review the different types of Kupffer cells and their metabolism and functions in physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:26937490

  5. Selective depletion or blockade of Kupffer cells leads to enhanced and prolonged hepatic transgene expression using high-capacity adenoviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Schiedner, Gudrun; Hertel, Sabine; Johnston, Marion; Dries, Volker; van Rooijen, Nico; Kochanek, Stefan

    2003-01-01

    Tissue macrophages, in particular hepatic Kupffer cells (KCs), contribute to early inflammatory responses following adenoviral vector administration. This study evaluates the effect of selective and transient (3 days) depletion of KCs by a single injection of clodronate liposomes on the in vivo performance of high-capacity adenoviral (HC-Ad) vectors. In KC-depleted C57BL/6 and C3H mice increased and stabilized hAAT levels were observed following intravenous injection of HC-Ad vectors expressing human alpha-1 anti-trypsin (hAAT) either from the hAAT promoter or from the human cytomegalovirus promoter. Comparable increases in hAAT levels were obtained in mice preinjected with a transcriptionally silent HC-Ad vector. Interestingly, in the majority of animals of both strains depletion of KCs was sufficient to prevent the generation of anti-hAAT antibodies, resulting in prolonged transgene expression. Thus, short-term and selective depletion of hepatic macrophages at the same time significantly increased hepatic transgene expression and reduced the humoral immune response to the transgenic protein.

  6. High-affinity binding of fibronectin to cultured Kupffer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cardarelli, P.M.; Blumenstock, F.A.; McKeown-Longo, P.J.; Saba, T.M.; Mazurkiewicz, J.E.; Dias, J.A. )

    1990-11-01

    Hepatic Kupffer cells are a major component of the reticuloendothelial or macrophage system. They were the first phagocytic cell type whose phagocytosis was shown to be influenced by plasma fibronectin, a dimeric opsonic glycoprotein. In the current study, the binding of soluble radioiodinated fibronectin purified from rat serum to isolated rat hepatic Kupffer cells was investigated using a cultured Kupffer cell monolayer technique. Binding was specific, since unlabeled purified fibronectin competed in a dose-dependent manner with the 125I-fibronectin for binding to the Kupffer cells. Addition of gelatin enhanced the binding of 125I-fibronectin to Kupffer cells. The phagocytosis of gelatinized-coated red cells by Kupffer cells was increased either by preopsonizing the target particles with purified fibronectin or by the addition of purified fibronectin to the culture medium. In contrast, exposure of the Kupffer cells to medium containing purified fibronectin followed by wash-removal of the fibronectin did not increase the uptake of gelatin-coated red blood cells, even though fibronectin was detected on the surface of the Kupffer cells by immunofluorescence. Trypsinized monolayers expressed decreased capacity to bind 125I-fibronectin as well as fibronectin-coated sheep erythrocytes. The binding of 125I-fibronectin-gelatin complexes was inhibited by excess unlabeled fibronectin. We calculated that specific high-affinity (Kd = 7.46 x 10(-9) M) binding sites for fibronectin exist on Kupffer cells. There are approximately 2,800-3,500 binding sites or putative fibronectin receptors per Kupffer cell. These sites appear to mediate the enhanced phagocytosis of gelatin-coated particles opsonized by fibronectin.

  7. Perfluorochemical emulsions decrease Kupffer cell phagocytosis

    SciTech Connect

    Bottalico, L.A.; Betensky, H.T.; Min, Y.B.; Weinstock, S.B. )

    1991-07-01

    One drawback to using perfluorochemical emulsions as blood substitutes is that perfluorochemical particles are cleared from the blood by the reticuloendothelial system, primarily liver and spleen. The authors measured the impact of two perfluorochemical emulsions on clearance of colloidal carbon (less than 1 microns) and 51Cr-sheep red blood cells (about 8 microns) by the reticuloendothelial system in vivo and in the isolated perfused liver. Male rats were injected with 2 ml/100 gm body wt of Fluosol-DA or Oxypherol-ET for 4 consecutive days. Carbon (1 ml/100 gm body wt) or sheep red blood cells (0.05 ml of 5% vol/vol/100 gm body wt) were then injected intravenously (in vivo) or added to perfusate. Samples were taken at several time points for 1 hr. In the isolated perfused liver, carbon clearance was depressed by 25% 1 day after treatment. Rates returned to control levels by 12 days in Fluosol-DA-treated rats but remained depressed by 67% in Oxypherol-ET-treated rats. Sheep red blood cell (8 microns) clearance was two to five times slower than carbon clearance and depressed by 40% in livers from Fluosol-DA rats 1 day and 12 days after treatment. Added serum did not improve phagocytosis. In vivo carbon clearance remained normal in Fluosol-DA-treated rats but decreased by 74% in Oxypherol-ET-treated rats 1 day after treatment, returning to normal by 12 days. Clearance rates were similar in control rats in vivo and in the perfused liver. They conclude that the isolated perfused liver is a good model to measure liver clearance function. Although low doses of perfluorochemical emulsions may depress Kupffer cell phagocytosis, general reticuloendothelial system function is not significantly compromised.

  8. Malaria circumsporozoite protein inhibits the respiratory burst in Kupffer cells.

    PubMed

    Usynin, Ivan; Klotz, Christian; Frevert, Ute

    2007-11-01

    After transmission by infected mosquitoes, malaria sporozoites rapidly travel to the liver. To infect hepatocytes, sporozoites traverse Kupffer cells, but surprisingly, the parasites are not killed by these resident macrophages of the liver. Here we show that Plasmodium sporozoites and recombinant circumsporozoite protein (CSP) suppress the respiratory burst in Kupffer cells. Sporozoites and CSP increased the intracellular concentration of cyclic adenosyl mono-phosphate (cAMP) and inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate in Kupffer cells, but not in hepatocytes or liver endothelia. Preincubation with cAMP analogues or inhibition of phosphodiesterase also inhibited the respiratory burst. By contrast, adenylyl cyclase inhibition abrogated the suppressive effect of sporozoites. Selective protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitors failed to reverse the CSP-mediated blockage and stimulation of the exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (EPAC), but not PKA inhibited the respiratory burst. Both blockage of the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP-1) with receptor-associated protein and elimination of cell surface proteoglycans inhibited the cAMP increase in Kupffer cells. We propose that by binding of CSP to LRP-1 and cell surface proteoglycans, malaria sporozoites induce a cAMP/EPAC-dependent, but PKA-independent signal transduction pathway that suppresses defence mechanisms in Kupffer cells. This allows the sporozoites to safely pass through these professional phagocytes and to develop inside neighbouring hepatocytes.

  9. Kupffer cell structure in the juvenile Nile crocodile, Crocodylus niloticus.

    PubMed

    van Wilpe, Erna; Groenewald, Hermanus Bernardus

    2014-01-01

    The morphology of Kupffer cells was examined in the liver of the juvenile Nile crocodile using light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Pleomorphic Kupffer cells were located in the sinusoids, in the space of Disse, in the hepatic parenchyma and often connected adjacent sinusoids. The cell surfaces were irregular due to the presence of filopodia and lamelliapodia with phagocytosis of white blood cells, red blood cells and thrombocytes being evident. The cells were in close contact with endothelial cells and pit cells in the sinusoidal lumen and with stellate cells in the space of Disse. The cytoplasm contained large phagosomes comprising a combination of ceroid pigment, melanosomes and siderosomes. The nuclei were often indented and eccentrically placed due to the presence of the phagosomes. Conspicuous clusters of membrane-bound tubular organelles with a filamentous or crystalline interior were observed in the cytoplasm. The clusters were sometimes separated into smaller groups around phagosomes. A clear zone existed between the limiting membrane and the interior of these tubular organelles with the electron-dense interior profiles being, respectively, circular, angular or divided. The tubular organelles have not previously been described in Kupffer cells and possibly represent lysosomes with specialized functions. Mitochondria, microtubules, Golgi profiles, granular and smooth endoplasmic reticulum, and a few cytoplasmic lipid droplets were also present. The presence of the tubular organelles and the occurrence of the Kupffer cells in different locations in the liver of the juvenile Nile crocodile are indicative of particularly active and mobile cells.

  10. Alcoholic hepatitis: The pivotal role of Kupffer cells

    PubMed Central

    Suraweera, Duminda B; Weeratunga, Ashley N; Hu, Robert W; Pandol, Stephen J; Hu, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Kupffer cells play a central role in the pathogenesis of alcoholic hepatitis (AH). It is believed that alcohol increases the gut permeability that results in raised levels of serum endotoxins containing lipopolysaccharides (LPS). LPS binds to LPS-binding proteins and presents it to a membrane glycoprotein called CD14, which then activates Kupffer cells via a receptor called toll-like receptor 4. This endotoxin mediated activation of Kupffer cells plays an important role in the inflammatory process resulting in alcoholic hepatitis. There is no effective treatment for AH, although notable progress has been made over the last decade in understanding the underlying mechanism of alcoholic hepatitis. We specifically review the current research on the role of Kupffer cells in the pathogenesis of AH and the treatment strategies. We suggest that the imbalance between the pro-inflammatory and the anti-inflammatory process as well as the increased production of reactive oxygen species eventually lead to hepatocyte injury, the final event of alcoholic hepatitis. PMID:26600966

  11. In vivo assessment of phagocytic properties of Kupffer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Reske, S.N.; Vyska, K.; Feinendegen, L.E.

    1981-05-01

    Three-compartment analysis was used to assess the kinetics of phagocytosis of Tc-99m-labeled human serum albumin microparticles (Tc-99m HSA-MM) in human Kupffer cells in vivo. The tracer turnover in these phagocytic cells could be described by a monoexponential accumulation with a two-stage elimination phase. Three-compartment analysis of the Tc-99m HSA-MM kinetics allowed us to quantify tracer attachment, phagocytosis, and degradation in Kupffer cells. The calculated time course of phagocytosis in ten control subjects proved to be identical to that of phagocytosis of various test substances in mouse macrophage monolayers (1). In addition, an impairment of particle turnover at the macrophage membrane, a significantly diminished (p less than 0.01) phagocytosis rate of the tracer, was observed in ten patients with various tumors.

  12. In vivo assessment of phagocytic properties of Kupffer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Reske, S.N.; Vyska, K.; Feinendegen, L.E.

    1981-05-01

    Three-compartment analysis was used to assess the kinetics of phagocytosis of Tc-99m-labeled human serum albumin microparticles (Tc-99m HSA-MM) in human Kupffer cells in vivo. The tracer turnover in these phagocytic cells could be described by a monoexponential accumulation with a two-stage elimination phase. Three-compartment analysis of the Tc-99m HSA-MM kinetics allowed us to quantify tracer attachment, phagocytosis, and degradation in Kupffer cells. The calculated time course of phagocytosis in ten control subjects proved to be identicl to that of phagocytosis of various test substances in mouse macrophage monolayers. In addition, an impairment of particle turnover at the macrophage membrane, a significantly diminished phagocytosis rate of the tracer, was observed in ten patients with various tumors.

  13. THE FATE OF VACCINIA VIRUS ON CULTIVATION IN VITRO WITH KUPFFER CELLS (RETICULO-ENDOTHELIAL CELLS)

    PubMed Central

    Beard, Joseph W.; Rous, Peyton

    1938-01-01

    The pathogenic activity of vaccinia virus is in large part suppressed when it is mixed with living Kupffer cells or clasmatocytes in the test-tube and injected intradermally. Vaccinia increases in quantity when introduced into cultures of Kupffer cells in vitro, and survives in immediate association with these elements. No antiviral principle is elaborated by them under such conditions. PMID:19870763

  14. Kinetics of liver macrophages (Kupffer cells) in SIV-infected macaques

    SciTech Connect

    Ahsan, Muhammad H.; Gill, Amy F.; Alvarez, Xavier; Lackner, Andrew A.; Veazey, Ronald S.

    2013-11-15

    Since the liver drains antigens from the intestinal tract, and since the intestinal tract is a major site of viral replication, we examined the dynamics of liver macrophages (Kupffer cells) throughout SIV infection. Absolute numbers of Kupffer cells increased in the livers in acute infection, and in animals with AIDS. Significantly higher percentages of proliferating (BrdU+) Kupffer cells were detected in acute infection and in AIDS with similar trends in blood monocytes. Significantly higher percentages of apoptotic (AC3+) Kupffer cells were also found in acute and AIDS stages. However, productively infected cells were not detected in liver of 41/42 animals examined, despite abundant infected cells in gut and lymph nodes of all animals. Increased rates of Kupffer cell proliferation resulting in an increase in Kupffer cells without productive infection indicate SIV infection affects Kupffer cells, but the liver does not appear to be a major site of productive viral replication. - Highlights: • Kupffer cells increase in the liver of SIV-infected macaques. • Increased proliferation and apoptosis of Kupffer cells occurs in SIV infection. • Productively infected cells are rarely detected in the liver. • The liver is not a major site for SIV replication.

  15. Biphasic control of polymorphonuclear cell migration by Kupffer cells. Effect of exposure to metabolic products of ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Fainsilber, Z.; Feinman, L.; Shaw, S.; Lieber, C.S.

    1988-01-01

    In order to investigate the role of the Kupffer cells in the regulation of the inflammatory reaction seen in alcoholic hepatitis, rat liver Kupffer cells were cultured and exposed to products of ethanol metabolism. The resultant supernatants were tested to study their ability to stimulate or inhibit polymorphonuclear cell chemotaxis. Kupffer cells produced increased chemokinetic activity for human polymorphonuclear leukocytes; when incubated with soluble products of microsomal peroxidation, the Kupffer cells engendered more chemokinetic activity than that produced by untreated Kupffer cells. When Kupffer cells were incubated with acetaldehyde, the chemokinetic activity that appeared in the supernatant did not differ from control. Chemotaxis of polymorphonuclear cells was not observed when the Kupffer cell supernatants were tested by checkerboard analysis.

  16. EFFECTOR CELL BLOCKADE

    PubMed Central

    Schrader, John W.; Nossal, G. J. V.

    1974-01-01

    of PFC. Consistent with this suggestion was the observation that the degree of inhibition of plaque formation could be increased by decreasing the sensitivity of the assay so that only AFC secreting at high rates were detected. A micromanipulation study, where single PFC were subjected to inhibition, and were then tested for the rate at which they could cause hemolysis, showed a 68% inhibition of mean secretory rate. Micromanipulation studies were performed to test the amount of cell surface-associated Ig on control and preinhibited PFC. For this, single PFC were held with [125I]antiglobulin and quantitative radioautography was performed. No significant difference emerged, suggesting that retention of secreted Ig on cell-attached antigen was not the cause of inhibition. The results are discussed in the framework of tolerance models and blocking effects at the T-cell level by antigen-antibody complexes. The name effector cell blockade is suggested in the belief that the phenomenon may be a general one applying to both T and B cells. PMID:4133616

  17. PEGylated IL-10 Activates Kupffer Cells to Control Hypercholesterolemia

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Ivan H.; Van Hoof, Dennis; Abramova, Marina; Bilardello, Melissa; Mar, Elliot; Jorgensen, Brett; McCauley, Scott; Bal, Harminder; Oft, Martin; Van Vlasselaer, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin-10 (IL-10) is a multifunctional cytokine that exerts potent context specific immunostimulatory and immunosuppressive effects. We have investigated the mechanism by which PEGylated rIL-10 regulates plasma cholesterol in mice and humans. In agreement with previous work on rIL-10, we report that PEGylated rIL-10 harnesses the myeloid immune system to control total plasma cholesterol levels. We have discovered that PEG-rMuIL-10’s dramatic lowering of plasma cholesterol is dependent on phagocytotic cells. In particular, PEG-rHuIL-10 enhances cholesterol uptake by Kupffer cells. In addition, removal of phagocytotic cells dramatically increases plasma cholesterol levels, suggesting for the first time that immunological cells are implicitly involved in regulating total cholesterol levels. These data suggest that treatment with PEG-rIL-10 potentiates endogenous cholesterol regulating cell populations not currently targeted by standard of care therapeutics. Furthermore, we show that IL-10’s increase of Kupffer cell cholesterol phagocytosis is concomitant with decreases in liver cholesterol and triglycerides. This leads to the reversal of early periportal liver fibrosis and facilitates the restoration of liver health. These data recommend PEG-rIL-10 for evaluation in the treatment of fatty liver disease and preventing its progression to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. In direct confirmation of our in vivo findings in the treatment of hypercholesterolemic mice with PEG-rMuIL-10, we report that treatment of hypercholesterolemic cancer patients with PEG-rHuIL-10 lowers total plasma cholesterol by up to 50%. Taken together these data suggest that PEG-rIL-10’s cholesterol regulating biology is consistent between mice and humans. PMID:27299860

  18. Hepatic Tumor Metastases Cause Enhanced PEGylated Liposome Uptake by Kupffer Cells.

    PubMed

    Ukawa, Masami; Fujiwara, Yukako; Ando, Hidenori; Shimizu, Taro; Ishida, Tatsuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Kupffer cells in livers bearing tumor metastases were found to have promoted tumor invasion and exacerbated the metastasis. This implies that the function of Kupffer cells might differ between animals bearing hepatic metastases and those that are healthy. Kupffer cells are considered responsible for the accumulation of liposomes in the liver. In this study, we hypothesized that the alteration in the function of Kupffer cells by hepatic metastasis would also affect the biodistribution of liposomes following intravenous administration. The hepatic accumulation and the blood concentration of PEGylated liposomes were compared between healthy mice and tumor-bearing mice. We noted that hepatic accumulation and elimination from the blood were significantly accelerated in tumor-bearing mice, indicating that our hypothesis was correct. In the tumor-bearing mice, the proportion of Kupffer cells taking up liposomes was significantly increased. Intravenous injection of oxaliplatin (l-OHP) containing PEGylated liposomes decreased the fraction of Kupffer cells, but this administration caused no injury to the hepatocytes. These results suggest that PEGylated liposomes containing l-OHP may have the potential to treat metastatic hepatic cancer-not only via the direct killing of the cancer cells but also via a reduction in tumor-supportive Kupffer cells. PMID:26830481

  19. Importance of Kupffer Cells in the Development of Acute Liver Injuries in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tsutsui, Hiroko; Nishiguchi, Shuhei

    2014-01-01

    Kupffer cells reside within the liver sinusoid and serve as gatekeepers. They produce pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines and other biologically important molecules upon the engagement of pattern recognition receptors such as Toll-like receptors. Kupffer cell-ablated mice established by in vivo treatment with clodronate liposomes have revealed many important features of Kupffer cells. In this paper, we review the importance of Kupffer cells in murine acute liver injuries and focus on the following two models: lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced liver injury, which is induced by priming with Propionibacterium acnes and subsequent challenge with LPS, and hypercoagulability-mediated acute liver failure such as that in concanavalin A (Con A)-induced hepatitis. Kupffer cells are required for LPS sensitization induced by P. acnes and are a major cellular source of interleukin-18, which induces acute liver injury following LPS challenge. Kupffer cells contribute to Con A-induced acute liver failure by initiating pathogenic, intrasinusoidal thrombosis in collaboration with sinusoidal endothelial cells. The mechanisms underlying these models may shed light on human liver injuries induced by various etiologies such as viral infection and/or abnormal metabolism. PMID:24802875

  20. Triglycerides potentiate the inflammatory response in rat Kupffer cells.

    PubMed

    Budick-Harmelin, Noga; Dudas, Jozsef; Demuth, Julia; Madar, Zecharia; Ramadori, Giuliano; Tirosh, Oren

    2008-12-01

    Accumulation of fat in the liver, also known as steatosis, may lead to inflammation and tissue damage. Kupffer cells (KCs) are the resident macrophages of the liver and have an important role in inflammatory reactions. The inflammatory response of isolated rat KCs to endotoxin in the presence of lipids was investigated in this study. KCs were treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and triglycerides (TGs) alone or in combination. TGs had no effect on the expression of pro-inflammatory mediators, but adding TGs to LPS enhanced the induction of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), compared with LPS treatment alone. Increased DNA binding of NF-kappaB transcription factor was seen on simultaneous exposure of the cells to TGs and LPS, which was accompanied by decreased intracellular ROS production and increased GSH levels. The inflammation-potentiating effect of TGs on iNOS expression was abolished on NF-kappaB inhibition. This enhanced inflammatory response might indicate a contribution of lipids to the inflammatory conditions in the fatty liver by increased activation of KCs. PMID:18710323

  1. Triglycerides potentiate the inflammatory response in rat Kupffer cells.

    PubMed

    Budick-Harmelin, Noga; Dudas, Jozsef; Demuth, Julia; Madar, Zecharia; Ramadori, Giuliano; Tirosh, Oren

    2008-12-01

    Accumulation of fat in the liver, also known as steatosis, may lead to inflammation and tissue damage. Kupffer cells (KCs) are the resident macrophages of the liver and have an important role in inflammatory reactions. The inflammatory response of isolated rat KCs to endotoxin in the presence of lipids was investigated in this study. KCs were treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and triglycerides (TGs) alone or in combination. TGs had no effect on the expression of pro-inflammatory mediators, but adding TGs to LPS enhanced the induction of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), compared with LPS treatment alone. Increased DNA binding of NF-kappaB transcription factor was seen on simultaneous exposure of the cells to TGs and LPS, which was accompanied by decreased intracellular ROS production and increased GSH levels. The inflammation-potentiating effect of TGs on iNOS expression was abolished on NF-kappaB inhibition. This enhanced inflammatory response might indicate a contribution of lipids to the inflammatory conditions in the fatty liver by increased activation of KCs.

  2. Endocytosis of heat-denatured albumin by cultured rat Kupffer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Brouwer, A.; Knook, D.L.

    1982-10-01

    Purified Kupffer cells were obtained by centrifugal elutriation of sinusoidal cells isolated by pronase treatment of the rat liver. The endocytosis of radioactively labeled heat-aggregated colloidal albumin (CA /sup 125/I) was investigated in maintenance cultures of the purified Kupffer cells. The endocytic capacity of the cells was studied during 4 days of culture. Maximum uptake was observed after 24 hr of culture, with a gradual decline during the following days. When the uptake was measured after incubation with increasing concentrations of CA /sup 125/I, a saturation effect was observed. This finding and the observed high rate of uptake are strong indications that receptor sites on the cell membrane are involved in the mechanism of endocytosis. The uptake of CA /sup 125/I by Kupffer cells was inhibited by the metabolic inhibitors fluoride and antimycin A, indicating that endocytosis of CA /sup 125/I is dependent on energy derived from both glycolysis and mitochondrial respiration. The mechanism of internalization may also require the action of microfilaments as well as intact microtubules, since both cytochalasin B and colchicine inhibited the uptake of CA /sup 125/I. The intracellular degradation of CA /sup 125/I by Kupffer cells was strongly inhibited by chloroquine but not by colchicine. The degradation of ingested CA /sup 125/I occurred within the Kupffer cell lysosomes.

  3. Liver injury in hypervitaminosis A: Evidence for activation of Kupffer cell function

    SciTech Connect

    Sim, W.L.W.

    1988-01-01

    The most important and novel finding of this work was enhanced liver Kupffer cell phagocytic and metabolic function by hypervitaminosis A. An animal model of hypervitaminosis A was developed in male Sprague-Dawley rats gavaged with 250,000 I.U. retinol/kg body weight/day for 3 weeks. Presence of hypervitaminosis A was indicated by characteristic changes in the fur coat, presence of brittle bones and spontaneous fractures and a significant increase in plasma and liver concentrations of retinyl palmitate while retinol levels remained the same as in controls. Hypervitaminosis A did not cause severe liver abnormalities as reflected by normal plasma glutamate pyruvate transaminase activity and bilirubin. The main change was a marked increase in size of the fat or Vitamin A storing cells. Measurement of clearance from blood of indocyanine green and {sup 99m}Tc-disofenin indicated this hepatocyte function was normal. Kupffer cell phagocytic function was enhanced in hypervitaminosis A as determined by clearance from blood of {sup 99m}Tc-sulfur colloid. In vitro, there was also evidence that treatment with high doses of Vitamin A activated or enhanced Kupffer cell function. Kupffer cells from control and Vitamin A treated rats were isolated by enzymatic dispersion, purified by centrifugal elutriation, and placed in culture. Activation was indicated by (1) increased phagocytosis of {sup 51}Cr-labeled opsonized sheep red blood cells (2) enhanced release of superoxide anion and (3) enhanced production of tumor cytolytic factor by Kupffer cells from Vitamin A treated rats.

  4. Interactions between macrophage/Kupffer cells and hepatocytes in surgical sepsis

    SciTech Connect

    West, M.A.

    1988-01-01

    Experiments were performed to investigate the role of Kupffer cell/macrophage interactions with hepatocytes in modulating liver function during infections using direct in vitro cocultivation of rat macrophages or Kupffer cells with rat hepatocytes. Protein synthesis was assayed as a sensitive indicator of integrated hepatocellular function by measuring {sup 3}H-leucine incorporation into hepatocyte protein. Septic stimuli such as lipoploysaccharide and killed bacteria were added to cocultures of hepatocytes and macrophages or Kupffer cells and the responses compared to hepatocytes alone. Information about the types of proteins synthesized by hepatocytes under various culture conditions was determined using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and autoradiography. These experiments showed that septic stimuli alter the amount and type of protein synthesized by hepatocytes and had no direct effect on hepatocytes in the absence of macrophages or Kupffer cells. The mediator(s) appears to be a heat labile, soluble monokine(s) which is distinct from interleukin-1 or tumor necrosis factor. The important role of Kupffer cells/macrophages in mediating alterations in hepatocellular function in sepsis may ultimately improve patient care.

  5. Binding kinetics of monomeric and aggregated IgG to Kupffer cells and hepatocytes of mice.

    PubMed Central

    Sancho, J; González, E; Escanero, J F; Egido, J

    1984-01-01

    The binding kinetics of human monomeric IgG and stable heat-aggregated IgG (A-IgG) to Fc receptors of hepatocytes and Kupffer cells isolated from mice was studied. After injection of radiolabelled proteins the 60-70% of hepatic uptake was recovered in parenchymal cells (hepatocytes). In experiments in vitro the A-IgG bound in larger amounts to hepatocytes and Kupffer cells than monomeric IgG. The association rate constants of aggregates were somewhat higher for Kupffer cells than for hepatocytes whereas the percentage uptake of aggregates by Kupffer cells was only 5-15% of that of hepatocytes. The equilibrium constants of aggregates binding to both cells amounted to 0.4-1 X 10(8) M-1 for A-IgG compared with an equilibrium constant for monomeric IgG of 1-2 X 10(7)M-1. The maximum number of IgG and A-IgG molecules bound per cell was higher on hepatocytes (mean 14 X 10(6)) than on Kupffer cells (mean 2 X 10(5)) which is in agreement with the higher binding capacity of hepatocytes for these proteins observed in vivo and in vitro experiments. The ability to compete for receptor binding seemed to reside exclusively in the Fc portion of IgG since F(ab')2 fragments of IgG failed to inhibit labelled monomeric IgG or A-IgG. The receptor seems to be specific for IgG since unlabelled monomeric IgA demonstrated no binding inhibition of labelled IgG or A-IgG on hepatocytes and Kupffer cells. The overall results further suggest that hepatocytes might through Fc receptors play a collaborative role with the mononuclear phagocytic system in the clearance of circulating immune complexes. PMID:6237982

  6. [Isolation and purification of primary Kupffer cells from mouse liver].

    PubMed

    Sun, Chao; Luo, Qingbo; Lu, Xiuxian; Zheng, Daofeng; He, Diao; Wu, Zhongjun

    2016-08-01

    Objective To isolate and purify Kupffer cells (KCs) from BALB/c mice by an efficient method of low-speed centrifugation and rapid adherence. Methods The mouse liver tissue was perfused in situ and digested with 0.5 g/L collagenase type IV in vitro by water bath. Then, through the low-speed centrifugation, KCs were separated from the mixed hepatocytes, and purified by rapid adherent characteristics. Finally, the production and activity of KCs obtained by this modified method were compared with those isolated by Percoll density gradient centrifugation. We used F4/80 antibody immunofluorescence technique to observe morphological features of KCs, flow cytometry (FCM) to detect the expression of F4/80 antibody and the ink uptake test to observe the phagocytic activity. Moreover, using FCM, we evaluated the expressions of molecules associated with antigen presentation, including major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II), CD40, CD86 and CD68 on the surface of KCs subjected to hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R) modeling. And, ELISA was conducted to measure tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) production of the cultured KCs following H/R. Results The yield of KCs was (5.83±0.54)×10(6) per mouse liver and the survival rate of KCs was up to 92% by low-speed centrifugation and rapid adherent method. Compared with Percoll density gradient centrifugation [the yield of KCs was (2.19±0.43)×10(6) per liver], this new method significantly improved the yield of KCs. F4/80 immunofluorescence showed typical morphologic features of KCs such as spindle or polygon shapes and FCM identified nearly 90% F4/80 positive cells. The phagocytic assay showed that lots of ink particles were phagocytosed into the isolated cells. KC H/R models expressed more MHC II, CD40 and CD86 and produced more TNF-α participating in inflammation. Conclusion The efficient method to isolate and purify KCs from BALB /c mice has been successfully established. PMID:27412929

  7. [Isolation and purification of primary Kupffer cells from mouse liver].

    PubMed

    Sun, Chao; Luo, Qingbo; Lu, Xiuxian; Zheng, Daofeng; He, Diao; Wu, Zhongjun

    2016-08-01

    Objective To isolate and purify Kupffer cells (KCs) from BALB/c mice by an efficient method of low-speed centrifugation and rapid adherence. Methods The mouse liver tissue was perfused in situ and digested with 0.5 g/L collagenase type IV in vitro by water bath. Then, through the low-speed centrifugation, KCs were separated from the mixed hepatocytes, and purified by rapid adherent characteristics. Finally, the production and activity of KCs obtained by this modified method were compared with those isolated by Percoll density gradient centrifugation. We used F4/80 antibody immunofluorescence technique to observe morphological features of KCs, flow cytometry (FCM) to detect the expression of F4/80 antibody and the ink uptake test to observe the phagocytic activity. Moreover, using FCM, we evaluated the expressions of molecules associated with antigen presentation, including major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II), CD40, CD86 and CD68 on the surface of KCs subjected to hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R) modeling. And, ELISA was conducted to measure tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) production of the cultured KCs following H/R. Results The yield of KCs was (5.83±0.54)×10(6) per mouse liver and the survival rate of KCs was up to 92% by low-speed centrifugation and rapid adherent method. Compared with Percoll density gradient centrifugation [the yield of KCs was (2.19±0.43)×10(6) per liver], this new method significantly improved the yield of KCs. F4/80 immunofluorescence showed typical morphologic features of KCs such as spindle or polygon shapes and FCM identified nearly 90% F4/80 positive cells. The phagocytic assay showed that lots of ink particles were phagocytosed into the isolated cells. KC H/R models expressed more MHC II, CD40 and CD86 and produced more TNF-α participating in inflammation. Conclusion The efficient method to isolate and purify KCs from BALB /c mice has been successfully established.

  8. Local proliferation and extrahepatic recruitment of liver macrophages (Kupffer cells) in partial-body irradiated rats

    SciTech Connect

    Bouwens, L.; Knook, D.L.; Wisse, E.

    1986-06-01

    The relative significance of local proliferation and extrahepatic recruitment of Kupffer cells was investigated by partial-body irradiation before the induction of macrophage hyperplasia by zymosan. There was no difference in growth of the Kupffer cells population between nonirradiated rats and rats irradiated with the liver shielded, whereas irradiation of the liver with the rest of the body (bone marrow) shielded resulted in strong inhibition of growth (-61%). Splenectomy combined with bone marrow irradiation inhibited growth to a lesser extent as compared to liver irradiation (-38%). Monocyte and other leukocyte numbers were strongly reduced in peripheral blood and their accumulation in the liver was completely prevented by bone marrow irradiation. Our results demonstrate that local proliferation of resident Kupffer cells represents the predominant source for their increased number during hyperplasia.

  9. Prolactin inhibits the increased cytokine gene expression in Kupffer cells following haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Zhu, X H; Zellweger, R; Ayala, A; Chaudry, I H

    1996-02-01

    Kupffer cells are an important source of proinflammatory cytokines and contribute to the systemic inflammatory response observed following haemorrhagic shock. The systemic release of cytokines, such as TNF-alpha, IL-1 beta, IL-6, etc., has been associated with the decreased host immune and organ dysfunction following hypotension. Studies indicate that anterior pituitary hormone prolactin (PRL) plays an important role in the regulation of lymphocyte proliferation and macrophage function in vivo, as well as in vitro. However, it is not known what effects PRL administration has on Kupffer cells proinflammatory mediator release following haemorrhage. Therefore, it was the aim of this study to determine the effect of in vivo PRL administration on cytokine gene expression in Kupffer cells after haemorrhage. To study this, C3H/HeN male mice were bled to and maintained at a mean arterial pressure of 35 mmHg for 60 minutes, then resuscitated with shed blood, and segregated into two groups: one group was treated with PRL (100 micrograms/25 g body weight subcutaneously) while the other group received saline-vehicles. This was followed with lactated Ringer's solution (2 x the volume of shed blood). Two hours thereafter, the animals were sacrificed, Kupffer cells were isolated and stimulated with or without 10 micrograms/ml LPS for 1 hour. Total RNA was extracted and cytokine mRNA was detected by semi-quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The results demonstrated that haemorrhage markedly increased the level of mRNA for IL-1 beta, IL-6, TGF-beta and TNF-beta in Kupffer cells. However, in vivo PRL treatment significantly decreased the cytokine gene expression in Kupffer cells following haemorrhage. This indicates that PRL may be useful in blunting the systemic inflammatory response associated with cell and organ depression following shock.

  10. Th2-Associated Alternative Kupffer Cell Activation Promotes Liver Fibrosis without Inducing Local Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    López-Navarrete, Giuliana; Ramos-Martínez, Espiridión; Suárez-Álvarez, Karina; Aguirre-García, Jesús; Ledezma-Soto, Yadira; León-Cabrera, Sonia; Gudiño-Zayas, Marco; Guzmán, Carolina; Gutiérrez-Reyes, Gabriela; Hernández-Ruíz, Joselín; Camacho-Arroyo, Ignacio; Robles-Díaz, Guillermo; Kershenobich, David; Terrazas, Luis I.; Escobedo, Galileo

    2011-01-01

    Cirrhosis is the final outcome of liver fibrosis. Kupffer cell-mediated hepatic inflammation is considered to aggravate liver injury and fibrosis. Alternatively-activated macrophages are able to control chronic inflammatory events and trigger wound healing processes. Nevertheless, the role of alternative Kupffer cell activation in liver harm is largely unclear. Thus, we evaluated the participation of alternatively-activated Kupffer cells during liver inflammation and fibrosis in the murine model of carbon tetrachloride-induced hepatic damage. To stimulate alternative activation in Kupffer cells, 20 Taenia crassiceps (Tc) larvae were inoculated into BALBc/AnN female mice. Six weeks post-inoculation, carbon tetrachloride or olive oil were orally administered to Tc-inoculated and non-inoculated mice twice per week during other six weeks. The initial exposure of animals to T. crassiceps resulted in high serum concentrations of IL-4 accompanied by a significant increase in the hepatic mRNA levels of Ym-1, with no alteration in iNOS expression. In response to carbon tetrachloride, recruitment of inflammatory cell populations into the hepatic parenchyma was 5-fold higher in non-inoculated animals than Tc-inoculated mice. In contrast, carbon tetrachloride-induced liver fibrosis was significantly less in non-inoculated animals than in the Tc-inoculated group. The latter showed elevated IL-4 serum levels and low IFN-γ concentrations during the whole experiment, associated with hepatic expression of IL-4, TGF-β, desmin and α-sma, as well as increased mRNA levels of Arg-1, Ym-1, FIZZ-1 and MMR in Kupffer cells. These results suggest that alternative Kupffer cell activation is favored in a Th2 microenvironment, whereby such liver resident macrophages could exhibit a dichotomic role during chronic hepatic damage, being involved in attenuation of the inflammatory response but at the same time exacerbation of liver fibrosis. PMID:22110380

  11. The Kupffer Cell Number Affects the Outcome of Living Donor Liver Transplantation from Elderly Donors

    PubMed Central

    Hidaka, Masaaki; Eguchi, Susumu; Takatsuki, Mitsuhisa; Soyama, Akihiko; Ono, Shinichiro; Adachi, Tomohiko; Natsuda, Koji; Kugiyama, Tota; Hara, Takanobu; Okada, Satomi; Imamura, Hajime; Miuma, Satoshi; Miyaaki, Hisamitsu

    2016-01-01

    Background There have been no previous reports how Kupffer cells affect the outcome of living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) with an elderly donor. The aim of this study was to elucidate the influence of Kupffer cells on LDLT. Methods A total of 161 adult recipients underwent LDLT. The graft survival, prognostic factors for survival, and graft failure after LDLT were examined between cases with a young donor (<50, n = 112) and an elderly donor (≥50, N = 49). The Kupffer cells, represented by CD68-positive cell in the graft, were examined in the young and elderly donors. Results In a multivariable analysis, a donor older than 50 years, sepsis, and diabetes mellitus were significant predictors of graft failure after LDLT. The CD68 in younger donors was significantly more expressed than that in elderly donors. The group with a less number of CD68-positive cells in the graft had a significantly poor survival in the elderly donor group and prognostic factor for graft failure. Conclusions The worse outcome of LDLT with elderly donors might be related to the lower number of Kupffer cells in the graft, which can lead to impaired recovery of the liver function and may predispose patients to infectious diseases after LDLT.

  12. Kupffer cells suppress hepatocarcinogenesis and metastasis in tumor orthotopic implanted Kunming mice.

    PubMed

    Li, X Y; Wang, M Y; Zhang, J Y; Li, J Z; Gong, J P; Zhang, Wei

    2013-01-01

    In this research, we used GdCl3 (gadolinium chloride) to restrain the function of Kupffer cells and assessed effects on hepatocarcinogenesis and metastasis in the Kunming mouse. A 0.25% GdCl3 solution (10 mg/kg b.w.) was infused via the vena caudalis of each mouse 1 week before inoculation of H22 cells and was continued once per three days. Then we observed the follow indexes 3 weeks after injection of H22 cells: tumor weight, histologic characteristics of tumor tissue by light microscopy, ultramicrostructure of Kupffer cells under the electron microscope, distribution and number of Kupffer cells by histochemical staining, and TNF-α and IFN-γ levels in blood-serum and liver tissue by ELISA and RT-PCR. MMP-2 protein expression was tested by immunohistochemistry. The GdCl3 pretreatment had no effect on the quantity of Kupffer cells, but clearly restrained their functions, with decrease of TNF-α and IFN-γ levels and elevation of MMP2. Tumor immunity functions were markedly suppressed and tumor growth was accelerated with appearance of metastasis. Furthermore, survival time of trial mice was shortened.

  13. Effect of allyl alcohol on hepatic transporter expression: Zonal patterns of expression and role of Kupffer cell function

    SciTech Connect

    Campion, Sarah N.; Tatis-Rios, Cristina; Augustine, Lisa M.; Goedken, Michael J.; Rooijen, Nico van; Cherrington, Nathan J.; Manautou, Jose E.

    2009-04-01

    During APAP toxicity, activation of Kupffer cells is critical for protection from hepatotoxicity and up-regulation of multidrug resistance-associated protein 4 (Mrp4) in centrilobular hepatocytes. The present study was performed to determine the expression profile of uptake and efflux transporters in mouse liver following treatment with allyl alcohol (AlOH), a periportal hepatotoxicant. This study also investigated the role of Kupffer cells in AlOH hepatotoxicity, and whether changes in transport protein expression by AlOH are dependent on the presence of Kupffer cells. C57BL/6J mice received 0.1 ml clodronate liposomes to deplete Kupffer cells or empty liposomes 48 h prior to dosing with 60 mg/kg AlOH, i.p. Hepatotoxicity was assessed by plasma ALT and histopathology. Hepatic transporter mRNA and protein expression were determined by branched DNA signal amplification assay and Western blotting, respectively. Depletion of Kupffer cells by liposomal clodronate treatment resulted in heightened susceptibility to AlOH toxicity. Exposure to AlOH increased mRNA levels of several Mrp genes, while decreasing organic anion transporting polypeptides (Oatps) mRNA expression. Protein analysis mirrored many of these mRNA changes. The presence of Kupffer cells was not required for the observed changes in uptake and efflux transporters induced by AlOH. Immunofluorescent analysis revealed enhanced Mrp4 staining exclusively in centrilobular hepatocytes of AlOH treated mice. These findings demonstrate that Kupffer cells are protective from AlOH toxicity and that induction of Mrp4 occurs in liver regions away from areas of AlOH damage independent of Kupffer cell function. These results suggest that Kupffer cell mediators do not play a role in mediating centrilobular Mrp4 induction in response to periportal damage by AlOH.

  14. Effects of glycine on phagocytosis and secretion by Kupffer cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hui-Wen; Yun, Ke-Ming; Han, De-Wu; Xu, Rui-Ling; Zhao, Yuan-Chang

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects and mechanisms of action of glycine on phagocytosis and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α secretion by Kupffer cells in vitro. METHODS: Kupffer cells were isolated from normal rats by collagenase digestion and Percoll density gradient differential centrifugation. After culture for 24 h, Kupffer cells were incubated in fresh Dulbecco's Modification of Eagle’s Medium containing glycine (G1: 1 mmol/L, G2: 10 mmol/L, G3: 100 mmol/L and G4: 300 mmol/L) for 3 h, then used to measure phagocytosis by a bead test, TNF-α secretion after lipopolysaccharide stimulation by radioactive immunoassay, and microfilament and microtubule expression by staining with phalloidin-fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) or a monoclonal anti-α tubulin-FITC antibody, respectively, and evaluated under a ultraviolet fluorescence microscope. RESULTS: Glycine decreased the phagocytosis of Kupffer cells at both 30 min and 60 min (P < 0.01, P < 0.05). The numbers of beads phagocytosed by Kupffer cells in 30 min were 16.9 ± 4.0 (control), 9.6 ± 4.1 (G1), 12.1 ± 5.7 (G2), 8.1 ± 3.2 (G3) and 7.5 ± 2.0 (G4), and were 22.5 ± 7.9 (control), 20.1 ± 5.8 (G1), 19.3 ± 4.8 (G2), 13.5 ± 4.7 (G3) and 9.2 ± 3.1 (G4) after 60 min. TNF-α secretion by Kupffer cells in G1 (0.19 ± 0.03), G2 (0.16 ± 0.04), G3 (0.14 ± 0.03) and G4 (0.13 ± 0.05) was significantly less than that in controls (0.26 ± 0.03, P < 0.01), and the decrease in secretion was dose-dependent (P < 0.05). Microfilaments of Kupffer cells in G2, G3 and G4 groups were arranged in a disorderly manner. The fluorescence densities of microtubules in G1 (53.4 ± 10.5), G2 (54.1 ± 14.6), G3 (64.9 ± 12.1) and G4 (52.1 ± 14.2) were all lower than those in the controls (102.2 ± 23.7, P < 0.01), but the decrease in microtubule fluorescence density was not dose-dependant. CONCLUSION: Glycine can decrease the phagocytosis and secretion by Kupffer cells in vitro, which may be related to the changes in the expression of

  15. Effects of zinc oxide nanoparticles on Kupffer cell phagosomal motility, bacterial clearance, and liver function

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Christa Y; Molina, Ramon M; Louzada, Andressa; Murdaugh, Kimberly M; Donaghey, Thomas C; Brain, Joseph D

    2015-01-01

    Background Zinc oxide engineered nanoparticles (ZnO ENPs) have potential as nanomedicines due to their inherent properties. Studies have described their pulmonary impact, but less is known about the consequences of ZnO ENP interactions with the liver. This study was designed to describe the effects of ZnO ENPs on the liver and Kupffer cells after intravenous (IV) administration. Materials and methods First, pharmacokinetic studies were conducted to determine the tissue distribution of neutron-activated 65ZnO ENPs post-IV injection in Wistar Han rats. Then, a noninvasive in vivo method to assess Kupffer cell phagosomal motility was employed using ferromagnetic iron particles and magnetometry. We also examined whether prior IV injection of ZnO ENPs altered Kupffer cell bactericidal activity on circulating Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Serum and liver tissues were collected to assess liver-injury biomarkers and histological changes, respectively. Results We found that the liver was the major site of initial uptake of 65ZnO ENPs. There was a time-dependent decrease in tissue levels of 65Zn in all organs examined, refecting particle dissolution. In vivo magnetometry showed a time-dependent and transient reduction in Kupffer cell phagosomal motility. Animals challenged with P. aeruginosa 24 hours post-ZnO ENP injection showed an initial (30 minutes) delay in vascular bacterial clearance. However, by 4 hours, IV-injected bacteria were cleared from the blood, liver, spleen, lungs, and kidneys. Seven days post-ZnO ENP injection, creatine phosphokinase and aspartate aminotransferase levels in serum were significantly increased. Histological evidence of hepatocyte damage and marginated neutrophils were observed in the liver. Conclusion Administration of ZnO ENPs transiently inhibited Kupffer cell phagosomal motility and later induced hepatocyte injury, but did not alter bacterial clearance from the blood or killing in the liver, spleen, lungs, or kidneys. Our data show that

  16. Influence of Kupffer cell inactivation on cycloheximide-induced hepatic injury.

    PubMed

    Kumagai, Kazuyoshi; Kiyosawa, Naoki; Ito, Kazumi; Yamoto, Takashi; Teranishi, Munehiro; Nakayama, Hiroyuki; Manabe, Sunao

    2007-11-30

    In our previous study, we found that cycloheximide (CHX) induces hepatocellular necrosis as well as hepatocellular apoptosis. This article evaluates the role of Kupffer cells on cycloheximide-induced hepatic injury using gadolinium chloride (GdCl(3)) for the inhibition of Kupffer cells. One group of rats was treated with CHX (CHX group), and another was treated with GdCl(3) before being treated with the same dose of CHX (GdCl(3)/CHX group). The necrotic change in the GdCl(3)/CHX group was exacerbated under the induction of hepatocellular apoptosis by the CHX treatment. A substantial diminution of the number of ED1- or ED2-positive cells was demonstrated in the GdCl(3)/CHX group compared to the CHX group. In addition, the degree of decrease in ED2-positive cells was more apparent than that in ED1-positive cells. Increases in the mRNA levels of IL-10 and Stat3 were observed in the CHX group, but not in the GdCl(3)/CHX group. On the other hand, the hepatic mRNA levels of chemokines and adhesion molecules such as Ccl20, LOX-1, and E-selectin were significantly increased only in the GdCl(3)/CHX group. Thus, Kupffer cell inactivation by the GdCl(3) treatment leads to a loss of the capacity to produce IL-10, supposedly resulting in the enhancement of pro-inflammatory cytokine activities such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF) signaling. These events are suggested to be a factor of the inflammatory exacerbation in the livers of the GdCl(3)/CHX group. In conclusion, Kupffer cells may play a role in protecting hepatic necroinflammatory changes by releasing anti-inflammatory cytokines following the hepatocellular apoptosis resulting from CHX treatment. PMID:17900782

  17. CD18/ICAM-1-dependent oxidative NF-kappaB activation leading to nitric oxide production in rat Kupffer cells cocultured with syngeneic hepatoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Kurose, I; Saito, H; Miura, S; Ebinuma, H; Higuchi, H; Watanabe, N; Zeki, S; Nakamura, T; Takaishi, M; Ishii, H

    1997-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated that nitric oxide (NO) released from Kupffer cells modulates biological viability of cocultured hepatoma cells. This study was designed to evaluate the mechanisms by which Kupffer cells synthesize and release NO in reponse to cocultured hepatoma cells. Kupffer cells isolated from male Wistar rats were cocultured with rat hepatoma cell line, AH70 cells. The sum of nitrite and nitrate levels increased in the culture medium of Kupffer cells with AH70 cells as compared with those of Kupffer cells or AH70 cells alone. Increased expressions of iNOS and iNOS mRNA in Kupffer cells cocultured with AH70 cells were detected by an immunofluorescence staining and a fluorescence in situ hybridization study, respectively. A fluorescence in situ DNA-protein binding assay revealed that NF-kappaB activation occurs in Kupffer cells and activated NF-kappaB moved into the nuclei preceding to an increased production of NO. Oxidative stress indicated by dichlorofluorescein fluorescence was observed in Kupffer cells cocultured with AH70 cells. An increased calcium mobilization indicated as increased fluo-3-associated fluorescence was also induced in Kupffer cells after coculture with AH70 cells. Monoclonal antibodies directed against rat CD18 and ICAM-1, as well as TMB-8, a calcium inhibitor, prevented the calcium mobilization, active oxygen production, and NF-kappaB activation in addition to the increased production of NO. Pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate, an inhibitor of oxidative NF-kappaB activation, diphenylene iodonium, an NADPH oxidase inhibitor, and quinacrine, a phospholipase A2 inhibitor, significantly attenuated the increase in dichlorofluorescein fluorescence, NF-kappaB activation, and NO production. Therefore, this study suggests that CD18/ICAM-1-dependent cell-to-cell interaction with hepatoma cells causes calcium mobilization and oxidative activation of NF-kappaB, which may lead to the increased production of NO in Kupffer cells. PMID:9062344

  18. Diminished organelle motion in murine Kupffer cells during the erythrocytic stage of malaria

    PubMed Central

    Bellows, Charles F.; Molina, Ramon M.; Brain, Joseph D.

    2011-01-01

    Parasitized erythrocytes are ingested by murine hepatic macrophages during malaria infection. We non-invasively monitored how this altered the motion of intracellular phagosomes in Kupffer cells using magnetometry. Submicrometric γFe2O3 particles were injected prior to malaria infection. They were cleared from the blood, primarily by Kupffer cells, and retained within their phagosomes. The mice were periodically magnetized. After removing this external magnet, the aligned iron particles created a remnant magnetic field (RMF) which then decayed (relaxation), reflecting the motion of particle-containing phagosomes. After baseline measurements of relaxation, the mice were injected intravenously with Plasmodium chabaudi-parasitized or normal murine red blood cells (RBCs). During the next 15 days, relaxation measurements, parasitaemia and haematocrit values were monitored. At 6 days post injection with 3 × 107 parasitized RBCs, relaxation rates had decreased. At this time, all mice had parasitaemias greater than 58 per cent and haematocrits less than 20 per cent. At day 7, while the parasitaemias were declining, the rate of relaxation continued to decrease. Throughout the experiment, relaxation remained constant in animals injected with normal RBCs. Electron microscopy revealed Kupffer cells filled with damaged and parasitized erythrocytes, and haemoglobin degradation pigment. We conclude that ingestion and metabolism of parasitized erythrocytes by liver macrophages during malaria infection decreases their organelle motion with likely consequences of compromised host defences. PMID:21068031

  19. Inactivation of Kupffer Cells by Gadolinium Chloride Protects Murine Liver From Radiation-Induced Apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Du Shisuo; Qiang Min; Zeng Zhaochong; Ke Aiwu; Ji Yuan; Zhang Zhengyu; Zeng Haiying; Liu Zhongshan

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: To determine whether the inhibition of Kupffer cells before radiotherapy (RT) would protect hepatocytes from radiation-induced apoptosis. Materials and Methods: A single 30-Gy fraction was administered to the upper abdomen of Sprague-Dawley rats. The Kupffer cell inhibitor gadolinium chloride (GdCl3; 10 mg/kg body weight) was intravenously injected 24 h before RT. The rats were divided into four groups: group 1, sham RT plus saline (control group); group 2, sham RT plus GdCl3; group 3, RT plus saline; and group 4, RT plus GdCl3. Liver tissue was collected for measurement of apoptotic cytokine expression and evaluation of radiation-induced liver toxicity by analysis of liver enzyme activities, hepatocyte micronucleus formation, apoptosis, and histologic staining. Results: The expression of interleukin-1beta, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha was significantly attenuated in group 4 compared with group 3 at 2, 6, 24, and 48 h after injection (p <0.05). At early points after RT, the rats in group 4 exhibited significantly lower levels of liver enzyme activity, apoptotic response, and hepatocyte micronucleus formation compared with those in group 3. Conclusion: Selective inactivation of Kupffer cells with GdCl3 reduced radiation-induced cytokine production and protected the liver against acute radiation-induced damage.

  20. Purinergic signaling via P2Y receptors up-mediates IL-6 production by liver macrophages/Kupffer cells.

    PubMed

    Ishimaru, Makiko; Yusuke, Negishi; Tsukimoto, Mitsutoshi; Harada, Hitoshi; Takenouchi, Takato; Kitani, Hiroshi; Kojima, Shuji

    2014-06-01

    Resident macrophages in the liver (Kupffer cells) produce various cytokines and chemokines, and have important roles in hepatitis and liver fibrosis. The cells are activated by various factors, for example lipopolysaccharide (LPS), which is an endotoxin and is high in the blood of patients with liver cirrhosis. Involvement of P2 receptors in the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines from Kupffer cells is little. In this study, we investigated purinergic signaling in the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-6 and TNF-α, from liver Kupffer cells of C57BL/6 mice (KUP5 cells). KUP5cells were isolated from C57BL/6 mice and cultivated with Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium. The cells were stimulated with LPS. LPS-induced IL-6 production by KUP5 cells was suppressed significantly by pretreatments with non-selective P2 antagonist suramin, P2Y13antagonist MRS2211, and ecto-nucleotidase, whereas P2Y receptor agonists, significantly increased the IL-6 production. P2Y13knockdown reduced LPS-induced IL-6 production, but by less than 50%. These results would suggest that P2Y receptors including P2Y13and others, may involves in LPS-induced IL-6 production in Kupffer cells, leading to the liver inflammation. Therefore, we first showed the importance of purinergic signaling via P2Y receptors in the activation of Kupffer cells and liver injury, which is worthwhile in drug development for liver diseases. PMID:24849676

  1. Cell collectivity regulation within migrating cell cluster during Kupffer's vesicle formation in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Matsui, Takaaki; Ishikawa, Hiroshi; Bessho, Yasumasa

    2015-01-01

    Although cell adhesion is thought to fasten cells tightly, cells that adhere to each other can migrate directionally. This group behavior, called “collective cell migration,” is observed during normal development, wound healing, and cancer invasion. Loss-of-function of cell adhesion molecules in several model systems of collective cell migration results in delay or inhibition of migration of cell groups but does not lead to dissociation of the cell groups, suggesting that mechanisms of cells staying assembled as a single cell cluster, termed as “cell collectivity,” remain largely unknown. During the formation of Kupffer's vesicle (KV, an organ of laterality in zebrafish), KV progenitors form a cluster and migrate together toward the vegetal pole. Importantly, in this model system of collective cell migration, knockdown of cell adhesion molecules or signal components leads to failure of cell collectivity. In this review, we summarize recent findings in cell collectivity regulation during collective migration of KV progenitor cells and describe our current understanding of how cell collectivity is regulated during collective cell migration. PMID:26000276

  2. Kupffer cell proliferation and glucan-induced granuloma formation in mice depleted of blood monocytes by strontium-89

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, M.; Naito, M.; Takahashi, K. )

    1990-03-01

    In mice with prolonged severe monocytopenia induced by selective irradiation of the bone marrow with the bone-seeking isotope 89Sr, the proliferative capacity of Kupffer cells was studied by immunohistochemistry with an anti-mouse macrophage monoclonal antibody, F4/80, ultrastructural peroxidase (PO) cytochemistry, and tritiated thymidine (3HTdR) autoradiography. The number and 3HTdR uptake of Kupffer cells were significantly increased in the splenectomized mice after severe monocytopenia had continued for more than 4 wk, and almost all the Kupffer cells showed a localization pattern of PO activity similar to that of resident macrophages in the liver of normal mice. In the glucan-induced granuloma formation in similar monocytopenic mice, Kupffer cells proliferated, conglomerated, and transformed into epithelioid cells, which fused together to become multinuclear giant cells. These results suggest that Kupffer cells are a self-renewing population by their own cell division and can participate actively in granulomatous inflammations in severely monocytopenic and intact mice.

  3. Kupffer cells induce Notch-mediated hepatocyte conversion in a common mouse model of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Terada, Maiko; Horisawa, Kenichi; Miura, Shizuka; Takashima, Yasuo; Ohkawa, Yasuyuki; Sekiya, Sayaka; Matsuda-Ito, Kanae; Suzuki, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC) is a malignant epithelial neoplasm composed of cells resembling cholangiocytes that line the intrahepatic bile ducts in portal areas of the hepatic lobule. Although ICC has been defined as a tumor arising from cholangiocyte transformation, recent evidence from genetic lineage-tracing experiments has indicated that hepatocytes can be a cellular origin of ICC by directly changing their fate to that of biliary lineage cells. Notch signaling has been identified as an essential factor for hepatocyte conversion into biliary lineage cells at the onset of ICC. However, the mechanisms underlying Notch signal activation in hepatocytes remain unclear. Here, using a mouse model of ICC, we found that hepatic macrophages called Kupffer cells transiently congregate around the central veins in the liver and express the Notch ligand Jagged-1 coincident with Notch activation in pericentral hepatocytes. Depletion of Kupffer cells prevents the Notch-mediated cell-fate conversion of hepatocytes to biliary lineage cells, inducing hepatocyte apoptosis and increasing mortality in mice. These findings will be useful for uncovering the pathogenic mechanism of ICC and developing prevenient and therapeutic strategies for this refractory disease. PMID:27698452

  4. Interactions between isolated hepatocytes and Kupffer cells in iron metabolism: a possible role for ferritin as an iron carrier protein.

    PubMed

    Sibille, J C; Kondo, H; Aisen, P

    1988-01-01

    Like the rat peritoneal macrophage, the isolated Kupffer cell is capable of processing and releasing iron acquired by phagocytosis of immunosensitized homologous red blood cells. When erythrophagocytosis is restrained to levels which do not affect cell viability, about one red cell per macrophage, close to 50% of iron acquired from red cells is released within 24 hr in the form of ferritin. Immunoradiometric assay of the extracellular medium indicates that 160 ng ferritin are released by 10(6) Kupffer cells after 24-hr incubation at 37 degrees C. Iron release is temperature-dependent, the rate at 37 degrees C being nearly 5-fold greater than at 4 degrees C. As estimated by sucrose-gradient ultracentrifugation, ferritin released by the erythrophagocytosing Kupffer cell averages 2,400 iron atoms per molecule. When reincubated with isolated hepatocytes, this released ferritin is rapidly taken up by the cells. Via this process, hepatocytes may accumulate more than 160,000 iron atoms per cell per min. Such accumulation is not impeded by the presence of iron-loaded transferrin in the culture medium, but is markedly depressed by rat liver ferritin. In contrast to the conservation of transferrin during its interaction with hepatocytes, the protein shell of the ferritin molecule is rapidly degraded into trichloroacetic acid-soluble fragments. Ferritin-mediated transfer of iron from Kupffer cells to hepatocytes may help explain the resistance of the liver to iron deficiency as well as the liver's susceptibility to iron overload. PMID:3356411

  5. Establishment of c-myc-immortalized Kupffer cell line from a C57BL/6 mouse strain.

    PubMed

    Kitani, Hiroshi; Sakuma, Chisato; Takenouchi, Takato; Sato, Mitsuru; Yoshioka, Miyako; Yamanaka, Noriko

    2014-01-01

    We recently demonstrated in several mammalian species, a novel procedure to obtain liver-macrophages (Kupffer cells) in sufficient numbers and purity using a mixed primary culture of hepatocytes. In this study, we applied this method to the C57BL/6 mouse liver and established an immortalized Kupffer cell line from this mouse strain. The hepatocytes from the C57BL/6 adult mouse liver were isolated by a two-step collagenase perfusion method and cultured in T25 culture flasks. Similar to our previous studies, the mouse hepatocytes progressively changed their morphology into a fibroblastic appearance after a few days of culture. After 7-10 days of culture, Kupffer-like cells, which were contaminants in the hepatocyte fraction at the start of the culture, actively proliferated on the mixed fibroblastic cell sheet. At this stage, a retroviral vector containing the human c-myc oncogene and neomycin resistance gene was introduced into the mixed culture. Gentle shaking of the culture flask, followed by the transfer and brief incubation of the culture supernatant, resulted in a quick and selective adhesion of Kupffer cells to a plastic dish surface. After selection with G418 and cloning by limiting dilutions, a clonal cell line (KUP5) was established. KUP5 cells displayed typical macrophage morphology and were stably passaged at 4-5 days intervals for more than 5 months, with a population doubling time of 19 h. KUP5 cells are immunocytochemically positive for mouse macrophage markers, such as Mac-1, F4/80. KUP5 cells exhibited substantial phagocytosis of polystyrene microbeads and the release of inflammatory cytokines upon lipopolysaccharide stimulation. Taken together, KUP5 cells provide a useful means to study the function of Kupffer cells in vitro. PMID:25379377

  6. Accessory function of Kupffer cells in the antigen-specific blastogenic response of an L3T4+ T-lymphocyte clone to Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, S H; Wing, E J

    1990-01-01

    The function of Kupffer cells in the development of protective immunity to infection by Listeria monocytogenes is controversial. To determine their role in antilisterial host defenses, Kupffer cells were separated from other nonparenchymal cells of the liver by centrifugation on a metrizamide gradient followed by adherence to glass or plastic. The resultant highly enriched Kupffer cell population supported the antigen-specific blastogenic response [( 3H]thymidine incorporation) of cloned L3T4+ T lymphocytes to L. monocytogenes in vitro. Blastogenesis was dependent upon the duration of the incubation period, the concentration of the antigen, and the number of Kupffer cells in culture. Maximum reactivity was greater than that observed when the same T-cell population was incubated with adherent peritoneal exudate cells and antigen under optimal conditions. The addition of antibodies specific for murine interleukin-1 beta to cocultures of Kupffer cells and T lymphocytes eliminated the antigen-stimulated incorporation of [3H]thymidine, indicating a requirement for interleukin-1. Analysis of the culture supernatants demonstrated that, in addition to interleukin-1, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, interleukin-6, and gamma interferon were elaborated in cocultures containing cloned T lymphocytes, Kupffer cells, and antigen. These results suggest that Kupffer cells may serve a critical role in the development of immunity to infection by L. monocytogenes in vivo. Images PMID:2114361

  7. Cytochrome P4502E1 inhibitor, chlormethiazole, decreases lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation in rat Kupffer cells with ethanol treatment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To investigate the role of Cytochrome P4502E1 in sensitizing Kupffer cells to lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-mediated inflammation after ethanol induction. Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a liquid ethanol diet, control diet or ethanol diet supplemented with CYP2E1 inhibitor, chlormethiazole (CMZ), for 4'week...

  8. Hexokinase II binding to mitochondria is necessary for Kupffer cell activation and is potentiated by ethanol exposure.

    PubMed

    Shulga, Nataly; Pastorino, John G

    2014-09-19

    Ethanol exposure promotes the development of steatohepatitis, which can progress to end stage liver disease. Kupffer cells have been documented to play a key role in the genesis and progression of alcoholic liver disease with ethanol exposure enhancing Kupffer cell activation. In the present study, we identified the binding of hexokinase II to the mitochondria as a requirement for LPS-induced activation of Kupffer cells and its potentiation by ethanol. LPS and ethanol exposure induced a reduction in sirtuin-3 activity. In turn, the decline of sirtuin-3 activity led to the activation of cyclophilin-D, which mediated an increased binding of hexokinase II to the mitochondria. Suppression of cyclophilin-D expression or enforced detachment of hexokinase II from the mitochondria abrogated the LPS- and ethanol-induced stimulation of Kupffer cells, preventing NADPH oxidase and inflammasome activation. Moreover, activation of AMP-activated protein kinase restored sirtuin-3 activity, thereby preventing LPS and ethanol from stimulating the binding of hexokinase II to the mitochondria and precluding NADPH oxidase and inflammasome activation.

  9. Effect of praseodymium nitrate on hepatocytes and Kupffer cells in the rat.

    PubMed

    Tuchweber, B; Trost, R; Salas, M; Sieck, W

    1976-12-01

    Intravenous administration of the rare earth metal salt, praseodymium nitrate, induced hepatic damage in the rat, as assessed by morphologic examination (light and electron microscopy) and biochemical parameters (serum glutamic-pyruvic transaminase (EC 2.6.1.2) and glutamic-oxalacetic transaminase (EC 2.6.1.1) activity as well as hepatic triglyceride content). Praseodymium hepatotoxicity was only attained with lower doses (10, 20, or 40 mg/kg), whereas a larger dose (80 mg/kg) was inactive in this respect. As detected by electron microscopy, lower doses of the metal salt caused hepatocytic alterations consisting of degranulation and dilatation of rough endoplasmic reticulum, accumulation of smooth endoplasmic reticulum as well as numerous lipid droplets. No abnormalities were detected in the cell organelles following administration of a large dose of the metal salt; however, vacuoles containing markedly electron-dense material were seen in the cytoplasm of the hepatocytes and the sinusoidal Kupffer cells.

  10. Bone marrow-derived monocytes give rise to self-renewing and fully differentiated Kupffer cells

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Charlotte L.; Zheng, Fang; De Baetselier, Patrick; Martens, Liesbet; Saeys, Yvan; De Prijck, Sofie; Lippens, Saskia; Abels, Chloé; Schoonooghe, Steve; Raes, Geert; Devoogdt, Nick; Lambrecht, Bart N.; Beschin, Alain; Guilliams, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Self-renewing tissue-resident macrophages are thought to be exclusively derived from embryonic progenitors. However, whether circulating monocytes can also give rise to such macrophages has not been formally investigated. Here we use a new model of diphtheria toxin-mediated depletion of liver-resident Kupffer cells to generate niche availability and show that circulating monocytes engraft in the liver, gradually adopt the transcriptional profile of their depleted counterparts and become long-lived self-renewing cells. Underlining the physiological relevance of our findings, circulating monocytes also contribute to the expanding pool of macrophages in the liver shortly after birth, when macrophage niches become available during normal organ growth. Thus, like embryonic precursors, monocytes can and do give rise to self-renewing tissue-resident macrophages if the niche is available to them. PMID:26813785

  11. Iron-dependent activation of NF-kappaB in Kupffer cells: a priming mechanism for alcoholic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Shigang; She, Hongyun; Sung, Chin K; Tsukamoto, Hidekazu

    2003-06-01

    Alcoholic liver disease is associated with hepatic iron accumulation, and iron supplementation exacerbates alcoholic liver disease, suggesting the pathogenic role of iron in alcoholic liver disease. We have tested a hypothesis that iron plays a signaling role in activation of redox-sensitive nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappaB) and that increased iron content results in heightened expression of proinflammatory cytokines in Kupffer cells because of this signaling. In cultured Kupffer cells isolated from normal rats, treatment with a lipophilic iron chelator, 1,2-dimethyl-3-hydroxypyrid-4-one (L1), markedly reduced lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced NF-kappaB activation and expression of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-6. Kupffer cells, isolated from rats with experimentally induced alcoholic liver disease, had significant increases in nonheme iron content, NF-kappaB binding, and mRNA expression for TNF-alpha and macrophage inflammatory protein-1. Ex vivo L1 treatment normalized all these parameters. Addition of ferrous iron to cultured normal rat Kupffer cells increased I-kappa B kinase (IKK) activity at 15 min and NF-kappaB binding at 30 min. L1 pretreatment completely abrogated both effects. Moreover, the iron treatment increased TNF-alpha release and TNF-alpha promoter activity in a NF-kappaB-dependent manner. Ferrous iron also transiently decreased cytoplasmic I-kappa B-alpha (IkappaB-alpha), with concomitant increases in nuclear p65 protein and DNA binding of p65/p50. Taken together, these results support the existence of iron-dependent signaling for activation of IKK/NF-kappaB in Kupffer cells, and this iron signaling serves as a target for a potential priming effect for the pathogenesis of experimental alcoholic liver disease.

  12. Critical Role of Kupffer Cell CD89 Expression in Experimental IgA Nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lijun; Li, Bingyu; Huang, Mengwen; Xie, Kun; Li, Dong; Li, You; Gu, Hua; Fang, Jianmin

    2016-01-01

    Although IgA nephropathy (IgAN) is the most common primary glomerulonephritis worldwide, its etiology remains only partly understood. It is clear that the pathogenesis of IgAN involves the formation of macromolecular IgA1 complexes and increased levels of serum IgA1 and IgA1-immune complexes(IC), due to defective IgA1 clearance. Previous studies suggest that the blood and tissue myeloid cell-expressed IgA Fc receptor (FcαR/CD89) mediates IgA-IC clearance and its dysfunction, via decreased activity or excessive levels of soluble FcαR/sCD89 induces IgAN. Such a mechanism requires robust stimulation of IgAN levels via forced expression of CD89. In the absence of unequivocal evidence supporting such a mechanism to date, we attempted to test the extent of CD89-evoked IgAN by generating a transgenic mouse strain expressing human CD89 under the control of murine CD14 promotor. No deposition of IgA-CD89 complexes or glomerulonephritis was detected, however. Further studies showed that elimination of murine IgA was mediated by Kupffer cells. In patients, however, CD89/IgA complexes were detected, and injection of patient IgA induced IgAN-like features in CD89 Tg mice. In transgenic mice, IgAN pathogenesis involves impaired clearance of abnormal IgA via CD89, primarily by the Kupffer cells. Conditional IgAN progression in CD89 transgenic mice thus reveals important aspects of IgAN pathogenesis.

  13. Critical Role of Kupffer Cell CD89 Expression in Experimental IgA Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Lijun; Li, Bingyu; Huang, Mengwen; Xie, Kun; Li, Dong; Li, You; Gu, Hua; Fang, Jianmin

    2016-01-01

    Although IgA nephropathy (IgAN) is the most common primary glomerulonephritis worldwide, its etiology remains only partly understood. It is clear that the pathogenesis of IgAN involves the formation of macromolecular IgA1 complexes and increased levels of serum IgA1 and IgA1-immune complexes(IC), due to defective IgA1 clearance. Previous studies suggest that the blood and tissue myeloid cell-expressed IgA Fc receptor (FcαR/CD89) mediates IgA-IC clearance and its dysfunction, via decreased activity or excessive levels of soluble FcαR/sCD89 induces IgAN. Such a mechanism requires robust stimulation of IgAN levels via forced expression of CD89. In the absence of unequivocal evidence supporting such a mechanism to date, we attempted to test the extent of CD89-evoked IgAN by generating a transgenic mouse strain expressing human CD89 under the control of murine CD14 promotor. No deposition of IgA-CD89 complexes or glomerulonephritis was detected, however. Further studies showed that elimination of murine IgA was mediated by Kupffer cells. In patients, however, CD89/IgA complexes were detected, and injection of patient IgA induced IgAN-like features in CD89 Tg mice. In transgenic mice, IgAN pathogenesis involves impaired clearance of abnormal IgA via CD89, primarily by the Kupffer cells. Conditional IgAN progression in CD89 transgenic mice thus reveals important aspects of IgAN pathogenesis. PMID:27437939

  14. Rat liver endothelial and Kupffer cell-mediated mutagenicity and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and aflatoxin B sub 1

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, P.; Schlemper, B.; Molitor, E.; Platt, K.L.; Seidel, A.; Oesch, F. )

    1990-08-01

    The ability of isolated rat liver endothelial and Kupffer cells to activate benzo(a)pyrene (BP), trans-7,8-dihydroxy-7,8-dihydrobenzo(a)pyrene (DDBP), trans-1,2-dihydroxy-1,2-dihydrochrysene (DDCH), and aflatoxin B{sub 1} (AFB{sub 1}) to mutagenic metabolites was assessed by means of a cell-mediated bacterial mutagenicity assay and compared with the ability of parenchymal cells to activate these compounds. Endothelial and Kupffer cells from untreated rats were able to activate AFB{sub 1} and DDBP; DDBP was activated even in the absence of an NADPH-generating system. Pretreating the animals with Aroclor 1254 strongly enhanced the mutagenicity of the dihydrodiol, whereas the mutagenicity of AFB{sub 1} showed a slight increase. BP and DDCH were only activated by endothelial and Kupffer cells isolated from Aroclor 1254-pretreated rats. Parenchymal cells form untreated animals activated all four carcinogens tested; Aroclor 1254 enhanced the parenchymal cell-mediated mutagenicity of BP and DDCH but did not affect that of DDBP and clearly reduced that of AFB{sub 1}. The reduced mutagenicity of AFB{sub 1} correlates with the decrease in the amount of 2{alpha}-hydroxytestosterone formed when testosterone was incubated with parenchymal cell microsomes from Aroclor 1254-pretreated rats (compared with microsomes from untreated animals): the formation of 2{alpha}-hydroxytestosterone is specifically catalyzed by cytochrome P-450h, a hemoprotein thought to be involved in the activation of AFB{sub 1}. These results show that not only rat liver parenchymal cells, but also endothelial and Kupffer cells, activated several carcinogens to mutagenic metabolites.

  15. Graptopetalum Paraguayense Ameliorates Chemical-Induced Rat Hepatic Fibrosis In Vivo and Inactivates Stellate Cells and Kupffer Cells In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Su, Li-Jen; Chang, Chia-Chuan; Yang, Chih-Hsueh; Hsieh, Shur-Jong; Wu, Yi-Chin; Lai, Jin-Mei; Tseng, Tzu-Ling; Huang, Chi-Ying F.; Hsu, Shih-Lan

    2013-01-01

    Background Graptopetalum paraguayense (GP) is a folk herbal medicine with hepatoprotective effects that is used in Taiwan. The aim of this study was to evaluate the hepatoprotective and antifibrotic effects of GP on experimental hepatic fibrosis in both dimethylnitrosamine (DMN)- and carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced liver injury rats. Methods Hepatic fibrosis-induced rats were fed with the methanolic extract of GP (MGP) by oral administration every day. Immunohistochemistry, biochemical assays, and Western blot analysis were performed. The effects of MGP on the expression of fibrotic markers and cytokines in the primary cultured hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) and Kupffer cells, respectively, were evaluated. Results Oral administration of MGP significantly alleviated DMN- or CCl4-induced liver inflammation and fibrosis. High levels of alanine transaminase, aspartate transaminase, bilirubin, prothrombin activity and mortality rates also decreased in rats treated with MGP. There were significantly decreased hydroxyproline levels in therapeutic rats compared with those of the liver-damaged rats. Collagen I and alpha smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) expression were all reduced by incubation with MGP in primary cultured rat HSCs. Furthermore, MGP induced apoptotic cell death in activated HSCs. MGP also suppressed lipopolysaccharide-stimulated rat Kupffer cell activation by decreasing nitric oxide, tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 production, and increasing interleukin-10 expression. Conclusions The results show that the administration of MGP attenuated toxin-induced hepatic damage and fibrosis in vivo and inhibited HSC and Kupffer cell activation in vitro, suggesting that MGP might be a promising complementary or alternative therapeutic agent for liver inflammation and fibrosis. PMID:23335984

  16. LXRα represses LPS-induced inflammatory responses by competing with IRF3 for GRIP1 in Kupffer cells.

    PubMed

    Miao, Chun-Mu; He, Kun; Li, Pei-Zhi; Liu, Zuo-Jin; Zhu, Xi-Wen; Ou, Zhi-Bing; Ruan, Xiong-Zhong; Gong, Jian-Ping; Liu, Chang-An

    2016-06-01

    Liver X receptors (LXRs) in the nucleus play important roles in lipid metabolism and inflammation. The mechanism of LXR regulation of the LPS-induced Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) inflammatory signaling pathway remains to be elucidated. C57/BL6 mice were randomly divided into four groups: control, T0901317 (a LXRs agonist), LPS and T0901317+LPS. Additionally, Kupffer cells isolated from male C57/BL6 mice were divided into the same four groups. A decreased amount of inflammatory cells infiltrated the portal areas and the hepatic sinusoids in the livers of mice in the T0901317+LPS group than in those of mice in the LPS group. In the T0901317+LPS group, the serum levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) were lower, while the serum level of interleukin-10 (IL-10) was higher. In vitro, Kupffer cells pretreated with T0901317 for 24h presented reduced TNF-α, interferon-beta (IFN-β) and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) levels, while the IL-10 level increased; however, the mRNA and protein expression levels of interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) and glucocorticoid receptor-interacting protein 1 (GRIP1) were not significantly reduced. The co-IP data illustrated that LXRα bound to GRIP1 specifically in the T0901317+LPS group, while less IRF3 was bound to GRIP1 in the T0901317+LPS group than in the LPS group. Furthermore, the DNA-binding activity of NF-κB was decreased by pretreating Kupffer cells with T0901317 for 24h. These results suggest that activated LXRα competes with IRF3 for GRIP1 binding, thus repressing IRF3 and NF-κB transcriptional activity and inhibiting the inflammatory response initiated by LPS in Kupffer cells. PMID:27085678

  17. Advanced glycation end products are eliminated by scavenger-receptor-mediated endocytosis in hepatic sinusoidal Kupffer and endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Smedsrød, B; Melkko, J; Araki, N; Sano, H; Horiuchi, S

    1997-01-01

    Long-term incubation of proteins with glucose leads to the formation of advanced glycation end products (AGE). Physiological aspects of the catabolism of non-enzymically glycated proteins were studied in vivo and in vitro. AGE-modified BSA (AGE-BSA) was a mixture of high-Mr (cross-linked), monomeric and low-Mr (fragmented) AGE-BSA. After intravenous administration in rat, all three fractions of AGE-BSA accumulated extremely rapidly and almost exclusively in liver. Uptake in liver endothelial, Kupffer and parenchymal cells accounted for approx. 60%, 25% and 10-15% respectively of hepatic elimination. Both cross-linked and monomeric AGE-BSA were efficiently taken up and degraded in cultures of purified liver endothelial and Kupffer cells. Endocytosis of AGE-BSA by these cells was inhibited by several ligands for the scavenger receptor. Although 125I-Hb was not endocytosed in vitro, 125I-AGE-Hb was effectively endocytosed by a mechanism that was subject to inhibition by AGE-BSA. Endocytosis of N-terminal propeptide of type I procollagen, a physiological ligand for the scavenger receptor, was effectively inhibited by AGE-Hb and AGE-BSA. We conclude that AGE-modification renders macromolecules susceptible for elimination via the scavenger receptor of both liver endothelial and Kupffer cells. PMID:9065778

  18. Fatty acid binding protein 7 regulates phagocytosis and cytokine production in Kupffer cells during liver injury.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Hirofumi; Sawada, Tomoo; Kiyohira, Miwa; Yu, Zhiqian; Nakamura, Keiji; Yasumoto, Yuki; Kagawa, Yoshiteru; Ebrahimi, Majid; Islam, Ariful; Sharifi, Kazem; Kawamura, Saki; Kodama, Takanori; Yamamoto, Yui; Adachi, Yasuhiro; Tokuda, Nobuko; Terai, Shuji; Sakaida, Isao; Ishikawa, Toshizo; Owada, Yuji

    2014-09-01

    Kupffer cells (KCs) are involved in the progression of liver diseases such as hepatitis and liver cancer. Several members of the fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs) are expressed by tissue macrophages, and FABP7 is localized only in KCs. To clarify the role of FABP7 in the regulation of KC function, we evaluated pathological changes of Fabp7 knockout mice during carbon tetrachloride-induced liver injury. During liver injury in Fabp7 knockout mice, serum liver enzymes were increased, cytokine expression (tumor necrosis factor-α, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, and transforming growth factor-β) was decreased in the liver, and the number of KCs in the liver necrotic area was significantly decreased. Interestingly, in the FABP7-deficient KCs, phagocytosis of apoptotic cells was impaired, and expression of the scavenger receptor CD36 was markedly decreased. In chronic liver injury, Fabp7 knockout mice showed less fibrogenic response to carbon tetrachloride compared with wild-type mice. Taken together, FABP7 is involved in the liver injury process through its regulation of KC phagocytic activity and cytokine production. Such modulation of KC function by FABP7 may provide a novel therapeutic approach to the treatment of liver diseases.

  19. The activity of mouse Kupffer cells following intravenous injection of T4 bacteriophage

    PubMed Central

    Inchley, C. J.

    1969-01-01

    The response of macrophages from the livers and spleens of mice given a single immunizing dose of T4 bacteriophage has been studied. Following their rapid removal from the circulation, phage particles were found to be concentrated in the liver to a level twelve times that for the spleen. Investigation of the fate of ingested phage showed that it was disposed of more rapidly in the liver than in the spleen, as measured by the disappearance of viable T4 particles and by the loss of radioactive label following injection of [131I]T4. It was also found that antigen-containing Kupffer cells could elicit little or no antibody synthesis on transfer into normal syngeneic recipients, or on incubation with lymphoid cells in vitro. It is suggested that these macrophages differ from other components of the reticulo-endothelial system in their treatment of T4 antigen, and may be concerned mainly with its breakdown and disposal rather than with providing a stimulus for the initiation of antibody synthesis. PMID:5370053

  20. Kupffer cells modulate hepatic fatty acid oxidation during infection with PR8 influenza.

    PubMed

    Tarasenko, Tatyana N; Singh, Larry N; Chatterji-Len, Milani; Zerfas, Patricia M; Cusmano-Ozog, Kristina; McGuire, Peter J

    2015-11-01

    In response to infection, patients with inborn errors of metabolism may develop a functional deterioration termed metabolic decompensation. The biochemical hallmarks of this disruption of metabolic homeostasis are disease specific and may include acidosis, hyperammonemia or hypoglycemia. In a model system previously published by our group, we noted that during influenza infection, mice displayed a depression in hepatic mitochondrial enzymes involved in nitrogen metabolism. Based on these findings, we hypothesized that this normal adaptation may extend to other metabolic pathways, and as such, may impact various inborn errors of metabolism. Since the liver is a critical organ in inborn errors of metabolism, we carried out untargeted metabolomic profiling of livers using mass spectrometry in C57Bl/6 mice infected with influenza to characterize metabolic adaptation. Pathway analysis of metabolomic data revealed reductions in CoA synthesis, and long chain fatty acyl CoA and carnitine species. These metabolic adaptations coincided with a depression in hepatic long chain β-oxidation mRNA and protein. To our surprise, the metabolic changes observed occurred in conjunction with a hepatic innate immune response, as demonstrated by transcriptional profiling and flow cytometry. By employing an immunomodulation strategy to deplete Kupffer cells, we were able to improve the expression of multiple genes involved in β-oxidation. Based on these findings, we are the first to suggest that the role of the liver as an immunologic organ is central in the pathophysiology of hepatic metabolic decompensation in inborn errors of metabolism due to respiratory viral infection.

  1. Soluble CLEC2 Extracellular Domain Improves Glucose and Lipid Homeostasis by Regulating Liver Kupffer Cell Polarization

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xinle; Zhang, Jun; Ge, Hongfei; Gupte, Jamila; Baribault, Helene; Lee, Ki Jeong; Lemon, Bryan; Coberly, Suzanne; Gong, Yan; Pan, Zheng; Rulifson, Ingrid C.; Gardner, Jonitha; Richards, William G.; Li, Yang

    2015-01-01

    The polarization of tissue resident macrophages toward the alternatively activated, anti-inflammatory M2 phenotype is believed to positively impact obesity and insulin resistance. Here we show that the soluble form of the extracellular domain (ECD) of C-type lectin-like receptor 2, CLEC2, regulates Kupffer cell polarization in the liver and improves glucose and lipid parameters in diabetic animal models. Over-expression of Fc-CLEC2(ECD) in mice via in vivo gene delivery, or injection of recombinant Fc-CLEC2(ECD) protein, results in a reduction of blood glucose and liver triglyceride levels and improves glucose tolerance. Furthermore, Fc-CLEC2(ECD) treatment improves cytokine profiles and increases both the M2 macrophage population and the genes involved in the oxidation of lipid metabolism in the liver. These data reveal a previously unidentified role for CLEC2 as a regulator of macrophage polarity, and establish CLEC2 as a promising therapeutic target for treatment of diabetes and liver disease. PMID:26151067

  2. Cell-surface arylsulfatase A and B on sinusoidal endothelial cells, hepatocytes, and Kupffer cells in mammalian livers.

    PubMed

    Mitsunaga-Nakatsubo, Keiko; Kusunoki, Shinichiro; Kawakami, Hayato; Akasaka, Koji; Akimoto, Yoshihiro

    2009-06-01

    Arylsulfatase A (ARSA) and B (ARSB) have been regarded as lysosomal enzymes because of their hydrolytic activity on synthetic aromatic substrates and the lysosomal localization of their enzymatic activity. Using sea urchin embryos, we previously demonstrated that the bulk of ARS is located on the cell surface of the epithelium, colocalizing with sulfated polysaccharides, and that it does not exhibit enzymatic activity. To examine whether ARSA and ARSB exist on the cell surface in mammalian tissues, we raised antibodies against ARSA and ARSB and examined immunohistochemically their localization in the liver using light and electron microscopy. Here we show that mammalian ARSA and ARSB exist on the cell surface of sinusoidal endothelial cells, hepatocytes, and sinusoidal macrophages (Kupffer cells), as well as in the lysosome. They are also colocalized with heparan sulfate proteoglycan. These results suggest that ARSA and ARSB also may function in the cell surface of mammals. This is the first report to show cell-surface localization of ARS in mammalian somatic cells. The extracellular localization of ARS will provide new insight for human ARS deficiency disorders, such as metachromatic leukodystrophy and mucopolysaccharidosis VI.

  3. Origin and kinetics of Kupffer cells during an acute inflammatory response

    PubMed Central

    Dulk, M. M. C. Diesselhoff-Den; Crofton, R. W.; Van Furth, R.

    1979-01-01

    The course of the increased number of liver macrophages and the origin of these cells were studied after intravenous stimulation by zymosan, stilboestrol, or corynebacterium. The macrophages were isolated by digestion of the liver with pronase and DNAase. Zymosan doubled the number of liver macrophages per gram of liver and led to a four- to five-fold increase in the number of blood monocytes, whereas stilboestrol induced a four-fold increase of liver macrophages and a two-fold increase of blood monocytes. Corynebacterium administration gave a two-fold rise in the number of liver macrophages and a six-fold increase of blood monocytes. The in vitro labelling index of the liver macrophages showed a transient but marked increase after the administration of zymosan or stilboestrol, but returned to approximately normal values 4 days after the stimulus. Hydrocortisone given 48 h before zymosan prevented this increase in the in vitro labelling index of liver macrophages, thus demonstrating that the mononuclear phagocytes labelled in vitro had recently been recruited from the bone marrow to the liver. Stimulation by stilboestrol or zymosan of mice labelled with [3H]-thymidine caused an increase in the number of labelled liver macrophages and blood monocytes as compared with the numerical course of the labelled Kupffer cells and monocytes in untreated mice. It may be concluded that this increase is attributable to the increased influx into the circulation of labelled monocytes from the bone marrow, which in turn migrate to the liver in larger numbers than are seen in the normal steady state. Local proliferation could not have been responsible for the increased number of labelled liver macrophages, because free [3H]-thymidine was no longer available when the stimulus was applied. Evidence supporting the bone marrow origin of the increased number of monocytes and liver macrophages after intravenous stimulation was provided by the course of the number of monocytes and liver

  4. Anti-inflammatory effects of propofol on lipopolysaccharides-treated rat hepatic Kupffer cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Sen; Wang, Chun-xia; Liu, Nai-Zheng; Liu, Ping

    2015-03-01

    This study is set to explore the role of commonly used intravenous anesthetic propofol on the inflammatory response of rat liver Kupffer cells (KCs) induced by lipopolysaccharides (LPS). The isolated KCs were cultured at the density of 1 × 10(5)/ml, divided into five groups randomly after 48 h culture: group C, control group; group L, KCs were treated with 1 μg/ml LPS for 24 h; groups P1, P2, P3, KCs were pretreated with propofol at low (25 μM), medium (50 μM), high (100 μM) concentration for 2 h, respectively, and then were stimulated with 1 μg/ml LPS for 24 h. The expressions of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) mRNA and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) mRNA of every group were measured by RT-PCR. Nuclear NF-ΚB p65 was determined by Western blot. The concentrations of IL-1β and TNF-α in supernatant were measured by ELISA. Compared with the group C, TNF-α mRNA and IL-1β mRNA in group L were significantly up-regulated and NF-ΚB p65 was significantly up-regulated after LPS treatment (P < 0.05). Meanwhile, TNF-α and IL-1β were also significantly increased (P < 0.05). With propofol the mRNA expressions of aforementioned inflammatory mediators were significantly down-regulated and NF-ΚB p65 was significantly inhibited in group P2 and P3 (P < 0.05), compared with group L. However, low propofol concentration did not exhibit any effect (group P1, P > 0.05). Propofol at medium and high concentration can counteract the LPS-induced inflammatory response in KCs by regulating NF-ΚB p65 protein expression. PMID:25296958

  5. Kupffer cells are associated with apoptosis, inflammation and fibrotic effects in hepatic fibrosis in rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cheng; Tao, Qing; Sun, Mingyu; Wu, Jim Z; Yang, Wengang; Jian, Ping; Peng, Jinghua; Hu, Yiyang; Liu, Chenghai; Liu, Ping

    2010-12-01

    Hepatocellular apoptosis, hepatic inflammation, and fibrosis are prominent features in chronic liver diseases. However, the linkage among these processes remains mechanistically unclear. In this study, we examined the apoptosis and activation of Kupffer cells (KCs) as well as their pathophysiological involvement in liver fibrosis process. Hepatic fibrosis was induced in rats by dimethylnitrosamine (DMN) or carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) treatment. KCs were isolated from normal rats and incubated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or from fibrotic rats. The KCs were stained immunohistochemically with anti-CD68 antibody, a biomarker for KC. The level of expression of CD68 was analyzed by western blot and real-time PCR methods. The apoptosis and pathophysiological involvement of KCs in the formation of liver fibrosis were studied using confocal microscopy. The mRNA and protein expression of CD68 were significantly increased in DMN- and CCL4-treated rats. Confocal microscopy analysis showed that CD68-positive KCs, but not α-smooth muscle actin (SMA)-positive cells, underwent apoptosis in the liver of DMN- and CCL4-treated rats. It was also revealed that the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling and CD68-double-positive apoptotic KCs located in the portal or fibrotic septa area were situated next to hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and KC co-localized in the liver in the neighbor of HSCs. The double α-SMA- and collagen type I-positive cells predominantly existed in fibrotic septa, and those cells were co-localized clearly with CD68-positive cells. Interestingly, some CD68 and Col (1) double positive, but completely negative for α-SMA, were found in the portal areas and hepatic sinusoids; this phenomenon was also validated in primary isolated KCs after 6 h LPS exposure or fibrotic rats in vitro. These results show that KCs are associated with hepatocellular apoptosis, inflammation, and fibrosis process in a liver

  6. Vanillin suppresses Kupffer cell-related colloidal carbon-induced respiratory burst activity in isolated perfused rat liver: anti-inflammatory implications.

    PubMed

    Galgani, José E; Núñez, Bárbara; Videla, Luis A

    2012-12-01

    The inhibition of NADPH oxidase has become a potential therapeutic target for oxidative stress-related diseases. We investigated whether vanillin modifies hepatic O(2) consumption associated with Kupffer cell functioning. The influence of vanillin on Kupffer cell functioning was studied in isolated perfused rat liver by colloidal carbon (CC) infusion (0.5 mg ml(-1)), concomitantly with sinusoidal efflux of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) as an organ viability parameter. CC infusion increased the rate of O(2) consumption of the liver above basal values, an effect that represents the respiratory burst activity of Kupffer cells. However, CC-dependent respiratory burst activity was suppressed by previous infusion of 2 mM vanillin. Vanillin did not affect the liver CC uptake rate and liver sinusoidal efflux of LDH efflux. These findings, elicited by vanillin, were reproduced by the well-established NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin. In conclusion, vanillin suppresses the respiratory burst activity of Kupffer cells as assessed in intact liver, which may be associated with the inhibition of macrophage NADPH oxidase activity. Such a finding may have relevance in conditions underlying Kupffer cell-dependent up-regulation of the expression and release of pro-inflammatory mediators by redox-dependent mechanisms.

  7. Development of a cytokine-producing immortalized murine Kupffer cell line.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zheng-Yu; Burlak, Christopher; Klaunig, James E; Kamendulis, Lisa M

    2014-12-01

    Kupffer cells (KC) play a critical role in both liver physiology and the pathogenesis of various liver diseases. Isolated primary KC have a limited lifespan in culture, and due to the relatively low number obtained, limit their study in vitro. Here, a cytokine-producing immortalized KC (ImKC) line was established from transgenic mice that express the thermolabile mutant tsA58 of the Simian virus 40 large T antigen under the control of the H-2k(b) promoter. Primary KC were obtained using a three step procedure: liver perfusion, centrifugal elutriation, and sorting for F4/80⁺ cells. ImKC were identified within the small-intermediate population of KC that maintained stable expression of F4/80, and the surface antigens CD11b, CD14 and TLR4. ImKC grow at IFNγ-independent manner at 37°C and exhibited a doubling time of ∼24 h when cultured in RPMI 1640 with 5% FBS. Our observations indicate that both activation of telomerase and expression of P53 are markedly increased, suggesting that enhanced telomerase activity and P53 expression may contribute to the immortalization of this cell population. ImKC cells maintained a high capacity to phagocytose FITC-latex beads, and bind/phagocytose erythrocytes. In addition, similar to primary KC, ImKC responded to stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS: 0.1-1μg/ml) by upregulating mRNA levels of TNFα (23-fold), IL-6 (28-fold), and IL-1β (1459-fold), as measured by qRT-PCR. Protein levels of TNFα and IL-6 were also increased, 10-fold and 12-fold, respectively. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) production were significantly enhanced in ImKC following an LPS challenge. Furthermore, LPS elicited a marked increase in mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) phospho-(ERK1/2, JNK) and NF-κB p50 with decreased IκBα in ImKC, as assessed by Western blot. Collectively, these results demonstrate that the ImKC line retains critical characteristics of primary KC, and thus provides a useful tool to assess the role of

  8. Silibinin protects OTA-mediated TNF-alpha release from perfused rat livers and isolated rat Kupffer cells.

    PubMed

    Al-Anati, Lauy; Essid, Ebtisam; Reinehr, Roland; Petzinger, Ernst

    2009-04-01

    We studied the inhibitory effect of silibinin on ochratoxin A (OTA) and LPS-mediated tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) release and the leakage of cytotoxic markers glutamate dehydrogenase (GLDH) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), from isolated blood-free perfused rat livers, and from isolated pure rat Kupffer cells. In the recirculation perfusion model at the end point 90 min, 2.5 micromol/L OTA released 2600 pg/mL TNF-alpha without effects on liver vitality. LPS at 0.1 microg/mL induced 3000 pg TNF-alpha/mL with slight leakage of GLDH and LDH. Under similar experimental conditions, the addition of silibinin 10 min prior to OTA and LPS showed dose-dependent protection against OTA or LPS-induced hepatic TNF-alpha release. High-dose of silibinin (12.5 microg/mL) also completely restored GLDH and LDH levels in the perfusate. Pretreatment of isolated Kupffer cells with 0.02, 0.1, 0.5, 2.5, and 12.5 microg silibinin/mL 30 min prior to OTA reduced OTA-induced TNF-alpha levels to 90, 70, 25, 25, and 25% at 4 h, respectively, and abrogated any TNF-alpha release at 24 h. Similarly, in the presence of silibinin LPS-induced TNF-alpha levels decreased at 4 h to 71, 57, 18, 22, and 18%, respectively. However, after 24 h of LPS exposition the protection by silibinin vanished and TNF-alpha partially recurred into the incubation medium under LPS. In summary, silibinin had hepatoprotective effects against OTA- or LPS-mediated TNF-alpha release and also reduced the cytotoxicity of both toxins. Isolated Kupffer cells were even more sensitive to the protective effect than perfused livers and responded to very low concentrations of silibinin with a strong inhibition of toxins-mediated TNF-alpha release. PMID:19156713

  9. Activation of Kupffer Cells Is Associated with a Specific Dysbiosis Induced by Fructose or High Fat Diet in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ferrere, Gladys; Leroux, Anne; Wrzosek, Laura; Puchois, Virginie; Gaudin, Françoise; Ciocan, Dragos; Renoud, Marie-Laure; Naveau, Sylvie; Perlemuter, Gabriel; Cassard, Anne-Marie

    2016-01-01

    The increase consumption of fructose in diet is associated with liver inflammation. As a specific fructan substrate, fructose may modify the gut microbiota which is involved in obesity-induced liver disease. Here, we aimed to assess whether fructose-induced liver damage was associated with a specific dysbiosis, especially in mice fed a high fat diet (HFD). To this end, four groups of mice were fed with normal and HFD added or not with fructose. Body weight and glucose sensitivity, liver inflammation, dysbiosis and the phenotype of Kupffer cells were determined after 16 weeks of diet. Food intake was increased in the two groups of mice fed with the HFD. Mice fed with HFD and fructose showed a higher infiltration of lymphocytes into the liver and a lower inflammatory profile of Kupffer cells than mice fed with the HFD without fructose. The dysbiosis associated with diets showed that fructose specifically prevented the decrease of Mouse intestinal bacteria in HFD fed mice and increased Erysipelotrichi in mice fed with fructose, independently of the amount of fat. In conclusion, fructose, used as a sweetener, induced a dysbiosis which is different in presence of fat in the diet. Consequently, the activation of Kupffer cells involved in mice model of HFD-induced liver inflammation was not observed in an HFD/fructose combined diet. These data highlight that the complexity of diet composition could highly impact the development of liver lesions during obesity. Specific dysbiosis associated with the diet could explain that the progressions of liver damage are different. PMID:26731543

  10. Activation of Kupffer Cells Is Associated with a Specific Dysbiosis Induced by Fructose or High Fat Diet in Mice.

    PubMed

    Ferrere, Gladys; Leroux, Anne; Wrzosek, Laura; Puchois, Virginie; Gaudin, Françoise; Ciocan, Dragos; Renoud, Marie-Laure; Naveau, Sylvie; Perlemuter, Gabriel; Cassard, Anne-Marie

    2016-01-01

    The increase consumption of fructose in diet is associated with liver inflammation. As a specific fructan substrate, fructose may modify the gut microbiota which is involved in obesity-induced liver disease. Here, we aimed to assess whether fructose-induced liver damage was associated with a specific dysbiosis, especially in mice fed a high fat diet (HFD). To this end, four groups of mice were fed with normal and HFD added or not with fructose. Body weight and glucose sensitivity, liver inflammation, dysbiosis and the phenotype of Kupffer cells were determined after 16 weeks of diet. Food intake was increased in the two groups of mice fed with the HFD. Mice fed with HFD and fructose showed a higher infiltration of lymphocytes into the liver and a lower inflammatory profile of Kupffer cells than mice fed with the HFD without fructose. The dysbiosis associated with diets showed that fructose specifically prevented the decrease of Mouse intestinal bacteria in HFD fed mice and increased Erysipelotrichi in mice fed with fructose, independently of the amount of fat. In conclusion, fructose, used as a sweetener, induced a dysbiosis which is different in presence of fat in the diet. Consequently, the activation of Kupffer cells involved in mice model of HFD-induced liver inflammation was not observed in an HFD/fructose combined diet. These data highlight that the complexity of diet composition could highly impact the development of liver lesions during obesity. Specific dysbiosis associated with the diet could explain that the progressions of liver damage are different.

  11. Kupffer cell-independent acute hepatocellular oxidative stress and decreased bile formation in post-cold-ischemic rat liver.

    PubMed

    Kumamoto, Y; Suematsu, M; Shimazu, M; Kato, Y; Sano, T; Makino, N; Hirano, K I; Naito, M; Wakabayashi, G; Ishimura, Y; Kitajima, M

    1999-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine distribution and time history of oxidative stress during the hyperacute period of reperfusion in the liver grafts undergoing cold ischemia and to investigate roles of Kupffer cells as a potential oxidant source. Rat livers were harvested at 4 degrees C in University of Wisconsin solution and followed by reperfusion with Krebs-Henseleit buffer under monitoring bile excretion. To investigate oxidative changes, laser-confocal microfluorography was performed in reperfused livers preloaded with dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester, a fluorescence precursor sensing intracellular hydroperoxide generation. Livers undergoing the 16-hour cold storage displayed an impaired recovery of bile acid-dependent bile output concurrent with a marked increase in hydroperoxide generation in hepatocytes, which occurred as early as 5 minutes after the onset of reperfusion, whereas the status of lobular perfusion was well maintained. Pretreatment with liposome-encapsulated dichloromethylene diphosphonate, a Kupffer cell-depleting reagent, did neither alter the reperfusion-induced periportal oxidative changes nor improve the recovery of bile output in the graft. On the other hand, EPCK, a hepatotropic antioxidant composed of vitamin E phosphate ester bound to vitamin C, not only diminished the oxidative changes but also improved the reduction of bile acid-dependent bile output. Furthermore, the reagent was capable of inhibiting H(2)O(2)-induced oxidative stress in cultured hepatocytes. These results suggest that hepatocytes constitute a major site of the oxidative insult triggered through Kupffer cell-independent mechanisms and serve as an important cellular component to be protected by antioxidant therapeutics.

  12. myo-Inositol is an osmolyte in rat liver macrophages (Kupffer cells) but not in RAW 264.7 mouse macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Warskulat, U; Weik, C; Häussinger, D

    1997-01-01

    The role of myo-inositol as an osmolyte was studied in cultured rat liver macrophages (Kupffer cells). Hyperosmotic exposure of Kupffer cells stimulated myo-inositol uptake and led to an increase in the mRNA levels for the sodium/myo-inositol cotransporter (SMIT). Conversely, hypo-osmotic (205 m-osM) exposure diminished myo-inositol uptake when compared with normo-osmotic (305 m-osM) control incubations. The hyperosmolarity-induced SMIT mRNA increase was counteracted by added myo-inositol or betaine. In contrast with Kupffer cells, there was only a slight hyperosmotic stimulation of myo-inositol uptake in RAW 264.7 mouse macrophages, and the myo-inositol transporter (SMIT) mRNA was not detectable. Further, a slight stimulation of taurine uptake and an increase in taurine transporter (TAUT) mRNA level by hyperosmolarity was observed in RAW 264.7 cells, whereas hypo-osmolarity led to a decrease in taurine uptake and TAUT mRNA level. When Kupffer cells were preloaded with myo-inositol, hypo-osmotic exposure led to a rapid efflux of myo-inositol from the cells. Myo-inositol efflux was also stimulated by phagocytosis of latex particles; however, latex was without effect on the hyperosmolarity-induced increase of SMIT mRNA levels. The results suggest a role of myo-inositol as an osmolyte in rat Kupffer cells but not in RAW 264.7 mouse macrophages. The functional relevance of this osmolyte strategy might lie in the maintenance of cell volume homeostasis during phagocytosis in Kupffer cells; however, the interplay with the other osmolytes betaine and taurine remains to be established. PMID:9337881

  13. A standardized aqueous extract of Anoectochilus formosanus ameliorated thioacetamide-induced liver fibrosis in mice: the role of Kupffer cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jin-Bin; Chuang, Hin-Ru; Yang, Li-Chan; Lin, Wen-Chuan

    2010-01-01

    Anoectochilus formosanus is used in traditional folk medicine as an hepatoprotective agent. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of a standardized aqueous extract of A. formosanus (SAEAF) on thioacetamide (TAA)-induced liver fibrosis. An in vitro study showed that the inhibitive effect of kinsenoside, a major component of SAEAF, on tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) secretion from Kupffer cells might be derived at least partly from downregulation of LPS-receptor Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling. Hepatic fibrosis was produced by TAA (200 mg/kg, i.p.) 3 times per week for 12 weeks. Mice in the three TAA groups were treated daily with distilled water and SAEAF (1.0, 0.2 g/kg) via gastrogavage throughout the experimental period. The mice that received the SAEAF treatment had significantly reduced plasma alanine aminotransferase activity, relative liver weights, and hepatic hydroxyproline contents. A histological examination also confirmed that SAEAF reduced the degree of fibrosis caused by TAA treatment. RT-PCR analysis showed that SAEAF treatment reduced mRNA expression of collagen (alpha1)(I), lipopolysaccharide-binding protein, CD14, TLR4, and TNF receptor 1. An immunohistochemical examination also indicated that SAEAF reduced the number of CD68-positive cells (macrophages). In conclusion, oral administration of SAEAF significantly reduced TAA-induced hepatic fibrosis in mice, probably through inhibition of hepatic Kupffer cell activation. PMID:20378990

  14. Kupffer Cells Undergo Fundamental Changes during the Development of Experimental NASH and Are Critical in Initiating Liver Damage and Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Reid, D T; Reyes, J L; McDonald, B A; Vo, T; Reimer, R A; Eksteen, B

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease has become the leading liver disease in North America and is associated with the progressive inflammatory liver disease non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Considerable effort has been made to understand the role of resident and recruited macrophage populations in NASH however numerous questions remain. Our goal was to characterize the dynamic changes in liver macrophages during the initiation of NASH in a murine model. Using the methionine-choline deficient diet we found that liver-resident macrophages, Kupffer cells were lost early in disease onset followed by a robust infiltration of Ly-6C+ monocyte-derived macrophages that retained a dynamic phenotype. Genetic profiling revealed distinct patterns of inflammatory gene expression between macrophage subsets. Only early depletion of liver macrophages using liposomal clodronate prevented the development of NASH in mice suggesting that Kupffer cells are critical for the orchestration of inflammation during experimental NASH. Increased understanding of these dynamics may allow us to target potentially harmful populations whilst promoting anti-inflammatory or restorative populations to ultimately guide the development of effective treatment strategies. PMID:27454866

  15. Kupffer Cells Undergo Fundamental Changes during the Development of Experimental NASH and Are Critical in Initiating Liver Damage and Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Reid, D T; Reyes, J L; McDonald, B A; Vo, T; Reimer, R A; Eksteen, B

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease has become the leading liver disease in North America and is associated with the progressive inflammatory liver disease non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Considerable effort has been made to understand the role of resident and recruited macrophage populations in NASH however numerous questions remain. Our goal was to characterize the dynamic changes in liver macrophages during the initiation of NASH in a murine model. Using the methionine-choline deficient diet we found that liver-resident macrophages, Kupffer cells were lost early in disease onset followed by a robust infiltration of Ly-6C+ monocyte-derived macrophages that retained a dynamic phenotype. Genetic profiling revealed distinct patterns of inflammatory gene expression between macrophage subsets. Only early depletion of liver macrophages using liposomal clodronate prevented the development of NASH in mice suggesting that Kupffer cells are critical for the orchestration of inflammation during experimental NASH. Increased understanding of these dynamics may allow us to target potentially harmful populations whilst promoting anti-inflammatory or restorative populations to ultimately guide the development of effective treatment strategies.

  16. Kupffer Cells Undergo Fundamental Changes during the Development of Experimental NASH and Are Critical in Initiating Liver Damage and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Reid, D. T.; Reyes, J. L.; McDonald, B. A.; Vo, T.; Reimer, R. A.; Eksteen, B.

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease has become the leading liver disease in North America and is associated with the progressive inflammatory liver disease non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Considerable effort has been made to understand the role of resident and recruited macrophage populations in NASH however numerous questions remain. Our goal was to characterize the dynamic changes in liver macrophages during the initiation of NASH in a murine model. Using the methionine-choline deficient diet we found that liver-resident macrophages, Kupffer cells were lost early in disease onset followed by a robust infiltration of Ly-6C+ monocyte-derived macrophages that retained a dynamic phenotype. Genetic profiling revealed distinct patterns of inflammatory gene expression between macrophage subsets. Only early depletion of liver macrophages using liposomal clodronate prevented the development of NASH in mice suggesting that Kupffer cells are critical for the orchestration of inflammation during experimental NASH. Increased understanding of these dynamics may allow us to target potentially harmful populations whilst promoting anti-inflammatory or restorative populations to ultimately guide the development of effective treatment strategies. PMID:27454866

  17. The role of intracellular high-mobility group box 1 in the early activation of Kupffer cells and the development of Con A-induced acute liver failure.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qiao; Liu, Yanning; Shi, Yu; Zheng, Min; He, Jiliang; Chen, Zhi

    2013-10-01

    Acute liver failure (ALF) is a highly complex syndrome characterized by devastating activation of early activation of Kupffer cells (KCs) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of ALF. However, the factors regulating KC early activation are virtually unexplored. The aim of present study was to determine the role of the intracellular high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) in modulating the early activation of KCs during ALF. The intravenous injection of Concanavalin A (Con A) was used to establish a mouse model of ALF. The dynamic pro-inflammatory properties and MHC II expression of KCs were measured by qRT-PCR and flow cytometry. HMGB1 expression in KCs was measured by qRT-PCR and Western blotting. The immunofluorescence was implemented to determine the relocation of HMGB1 in KCs, and the siRNA against HMGB1 was utilized to assess the impact of HMGB1 on KC pro-inflammatory properties. The peak of pro-inflammatory cytokines production and MHC II expression in KCs appeared at the early stage of ALF. The up-regulation of HMGB1 expression and the translocation of HMGB1 in KCs were in parallel with the early activation of KCs. The blockade of intracellular HMGB1 expression caused by siRNA significantly inhibited the production of KC-derived pro-inflammatory cytokines, and led to a down-regulation of MAP kinase activation in KCs. The self-derived HMGB1 is an "early alarmin" of KC activation during Con A-induced ALF. HMGB1 might be a potential target for cell-specific strategy in ALF.

  18. Activated Kupffer cells play an important role in intra-hepatic Th1-associated necro-inflammation in Concanavalin A-induced hepatic injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Morita, Atsuhiro; Itoh, Yoshito; Toyama, Tetsuya; Fujii, Hideki; Nishioji, Kenichi; Kirishima, Toshihiko; Makiyama, Akiko; Yamauchi, Norihito; Okanoue, Takeshi

    2003-10-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: To examine whether or not activated Kupffer cells play an important role in intra-hepatic Th1-associated necro-inflammation in Concanavalin A (Con A)-induced hepatic injury in mice. METHODS: Con A was administered to Balb/c mice pretreated with or without gadolinium chloride (GdCl(3)). Kupffer cell activation was evaluated by their ability to produce superoxide anions in situ under liver perfusion with nitro blue tetrazolium (NBT). Hepatic concentration of cytokines was measured by ELISA and the mRNA expression of CXC chemokine receptor 3 (CXCR3) was evaluated by RT-PCR. Immunohistochemical detection of CD4 positive lymphocytes in the liver was also performed. RESULTS: GdCl(3)-pretreatment significantly (P<0.01) reduced the serum levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) in Con A-treated mice. Formazan deposition in Kupffer cells, the hepatic concentration of tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interferon-gamma, the mRNA expression of CXCR3 and the CD4 positive lymphocytes in the liver were decreased in GdCl(3)-pretreated mice as compared with those without GdCl(3)-pretreatment (P<0.05, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: Activated Kupffer cells, which produce superoxide anions, are involved in Con A-induced hepatic necro-inflammation in mice possibly through the activation of Th1-associated immune response mediated by CD4 and/or CXCR3 positive cells recruited into the liver.

  19. Failure to demonstrate a major role for Kupffer cells and radiosensitive leukocytes in immunoglobulin-mediated elimination of Trypanosoma musculi

    SciTech Connect

    Kongshavn, P.A.; Shaw, K.; Ghadirian, E.; Ulczak, O. )

    1990-06-01

    Previous studies have indicated that elimination of parasitemia in Trypanosoma musculi infection is brought about by immunoglobulin G2a antibodies, C3, and an effector cell. Experiments were designed to identify the putative effector cell by using several approaches. Infected C5-deficient or C5-sufficient mice treated with silica particles or given 900 rads of radiation 3 days earlier effectively eliminated trypanosomes following administration of immune plasma (IP). Silica-treated, noninfected mice given T. musculi preincubated with IP also cleared the parasites. Radiolabeling studies revealed that uptake of the cleared trypanosomes by the liver in normal mice was relatively low and fell only slightly (19%) in silica-treated mice. In contrast, uptake of radiolabeled sheep erythrocytes by the liver was normally much higher and fell drastically (7%) in silica-treated mice. Mice were then immunocompromised by 900 rads of radiation, silica particles, and anti-platelet serum combined before IP-sensitized trypanosomes were given. Leukocyte and platelet counts were both reduced by 95% and sheep erythrocyte uptake by the liver fell from 77 to 5%; however, greater than 99% of the injected trypanosomes were cleared in these mice and uptake of radiolabeled trypanosomes by the liver was similar to that of normal mice. Lastly, in anesthetized mice in which Kupffer cells were excluded surgically from the circulation, greater than 99% of the IP-sensitized trypanosomes disappeared rapidly from the blood. Only 7% of the radiolabel was found in the liver versus 60% in sham-operated mice. The results are interpreted as showing that hepatic Kupffer cells play a minor role in the immune elimination of T. musculi. Likewise, radiosensitive leukocytes and platelets are unlikely to be sole candidates for the putative effector cell that mediates a cure of murine trypanosomiasis.

  20. Activation and increase of radio-sensitive CD11b+ recruited Kupffer cells/macrophages in diet-induced steatohepatitis in FGF5 deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Nakashima, Hiroyuki; Nakashima, Masahiro; Kinoshita, Manabu; Ikarashi, Masami; Miyazaki, Hiromi; Hanaka, Hiromi; Imaki, Junko; Seki, Shuhji

    2016-01-01

    We have recently reported that Kupffer cells consist of two subsets, radio-resistant resident CD68+ Kupffer cells and radio-sensitive recruited CD11b+ Kupffer cells/macrophages (Mφs). Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is characterized not only by hepatic steatosis but also chronic inflammation and fibrosis. In the present study, we investigated the immunological mechanism of diet-induced steatohepatitis in fibroblast growth factor 5 (FGF5) deficient mice. After consumption of a high fat diet (HFD) for 8 weeks, FGF5 null mice developed severe steatohepatitis and fibrosis resembling human NASH. F4/80+ Mφs which were both CD11b and CD68 positive accumulated in the liver. The production of TNF and FasL indicated that they are the pivotal effectors in this hepatitis. The weak phagocytic activity and lack of CRIg mRNA suggested that they were recruited Mφs. Intermittent exposure to 1 Gy irradiation markedly decreased these Mφs and dramatically inhibited liver inflammation without attenuating steatosis. However, depletion of the resident subset by clodronate liposome (c-lipo) treatment increased the Mφs and tended to exacerbate disease progression. Recruited CD11b+ CD68+ Kupffer cells/Mφs may play an essential role in steatohepatitis and fibrosis in FGF5 null mice fed with a HFD. Recruitment and activation of bone marrow derived Mφs is the key factor to develop steatohepatitis from simple steatosis. PMID:27708340

  1. Suppression of Kupffer cell function prevents cadmium induced hepatocellular necrosis in the male Sprague-Dawley rat.

    PubMed

    Sauer, J M; Waalkes, M P; Hooser, S B; Kuester, R K; McQueen, C A; Sipes, I G

    1997-08-15

    Exposure of humans to toxic metals and metalloids is a major environmental problem. Many metals, such as cadmium, can be hepatotoxic. However, the mechanisms by which metals cause acute hepatic injury are in many cases unknown. Previous reports suggest a major role for inflammation in acute cadmium induced hepatotoxicity. In initial experiments we found that a non-hepatotoxic dose of cadmium chloride (CdCl2; 2.0 mg/kg, i.v.) markedly increased the clearance rate of colloidal carbon from the blood, which is indicative of enhanced phagocytic activity by Kupffer cells (resident hepatic macrophages). Thus. the objective these studies was to determine the involvement of Kupffer cells in cadmium induced liver injury by inhibiting their function with gadolinium chloride (GdCl3). Male Sprague-Dawley rats were administered GdCl3 (10 mg/kg, i.v.) followed 24 h later by a single dose of CdCl2 (3.0 and 4.0 mg/kg, i.v.). Twenty four hours after CdCl2 administration animals were killed and the degree of liver toxicity was assessed using plasma alanine aminotransferase (ALT), as well as light microscopy. Cadmium chloride administration produced multifocal hepatocellular necrosis and increased plasma ALT activity. Pretreatment with GdCl3 significantly reduced both the morphological changes and hepatic ALT release caused by CdCl2. However, the protection was specific to the liver, and did not alter CdCl2 induced testicular injury, as determined by histopathological damage. In many cases, the inducible cadmium-binding protein, metallothionein (MT) is often an essential aspect of the acquisition of cadmium tolerance in the liver. Although cadmium caused a dramatic induction of hepatic MT (32-fold), GdCl3 caused only a minor increase (2-fold). Combined CdCl2 and GdCl3 treatment did not induce levels to an extent greater than CdCl2 alone. As expected, GdCl3 also caused a slight increase in the amount of cadmium associated with the liver. In cultured hepatocytes isolated from GdCl3

  2. Nucleation of platelets with blood-borne pathogens on Kupffer cells precedes other innate immunity and contributes to bacterial clearance.

    PubMed

    Wong, Connie H Y; Jenne, Craig N; Petri, Björn; Chrobok, Navina L; Kubes, Paul

    2013-08-01

    Through the use of intravital imaging of the liver, we demonstrate a collaborative role for platelets with Kupffer cells (KCs) in eradicating blood-borne bacterial infection. Under basal conditions, platelets, via the platelet-adhesion receptor GPIb, formed transient 'touch-and-go' interactions with von Willebrand factor (vWF) constitutively expressed on KCs. Bacteria such as Bacillus cereus and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) were rapidly caught by KCs and triggered platelets to switch from 'touch-and-go' adhesion to sustained GPIIb-mediated adhesion on the KC surface to encase the bacterium. Infected GPIbα-deficient mice had more endothelial and KC damage than did their wild-type counterparts, which led to more fluid leakage, substantial polycythemia and rapid mortality. Our study identifies a previously unknown surveillance mechanism by which platelets survey macrophages that rapidly converts to a critical host response to blood-borne bacteria.

  3. Puerarin ameliorates experimental alcoholic liver injury by inhibition of endotoxin gut leakage, Kupffer cell activation, and endotoxin receptors expression.

    PubMed

    Peng, Jing-Hua; Cui, Tuan; Huang, Fu; Chen, Liang; Zhao, Yu; Xu, Lin; Xu, Li-Li; Feng, Qin; Hu, Yi-Yang

    2013-03-01

    Puerarin, an isoflavone component extracted from Kudzu (Pueraria lobata), has been demonstrated to alleviate alcohol-related disorders. Our study examined whether puerarin ameliorates chronic alcoholic liver injury through inhibition of endotoxin gut leakage, the subsequent Kupffer cell activation, and endotoxin receptors expression. Rats were provided with the Liber-DeCarli liquid diet for 8 weeks. Puerarin (90 mg/kg or 180 mg/kg daily) was orally administered from the beginning of the third week until the end of the experiment. Chronic alcohol intake caused increased serum alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, hepatic gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase, and triglyceride levels as well as fatty liver and neutrophil infiltration in hepatic lobules as determined by biochemical and histologic assays. A significant increase of liver tumor necrosis factor α was detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. These pathologic effects correlated with increased endotoxin level in portal vein and upregulated protein expression of hepatic CD68, lipopolysaccharide-binding protein, CD14, Toll-like receptor 2, and Toll-like receptor 4. Meanwhile, the intestinal microvilli were observed to be sparse, shortened, and irregularity in distribution under the transmission electron microscope in conjunction with the downregulated intestinal zonula occludens-1 protein expression. These hepatic pathologic changes were significantly inhibited in puerarin-treated animals as were the endotoxin levels and hepatic CD68 and endotoxin receptors. Moreover, the pathologic changes in intestinal microvillus and the decreased intestinal zonula occludens-1 were also ameliorated with puerarin treatment. These results thus demonstrate that puerarin inhibition of endotoxin gut leakage, Kupffer cell activation, and endotoxin receptors expression is involved in the alleviation of chronic alcoholic liver injury in rats.

  4. Effect of CD16a, the surface receptor of Kupffer cells, on the growth of hepatocellular carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    LI, XIU-YUN; WU, LUN; LI, SHENG-WEI; ZHOU, WEN-BO; WANG, MENG-YUAN; ZUO, GUO-QING; LIU, CHANG-AN; DING, XIONG

    2016-01-01

    FcγRIIIa (CD16) is a low-affinity Fc receptor of IgG. As the idio-binding receptor of IgG Fc, it plays an important role in the antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity of natural killer cells. The aim of the present study was to investigate the distribution of Kupffer cells (KCs) and the expression of their surface receptor FcγRIIIa in hepatocellular carcinoma. Furthermore, we also aimed to observe the functional mechanism of FcγRIIIa. Immunohistochemical analysis was employed to study KCs and FcγRIIIa. In order to explore the role of FcγRIIIa in the growth of cancer cells, KCs and H22 tumor cells were co-cultured in different serum. The mRNA expression levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and FcγRIIIa were analyzed by RT-qPCR; the TNF-α and FcγRIIIa protein expression levels were examined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and western blot analysis, respectively. Our results showed that the number of Kuppfer cells in cancerous tissues (21.6±7.8) was lower than those in para-cancerous (68.8±9.1) tissues and adjacent normal hepatic tissues (62.0±1.9) (P<0.01); this decreased with the reduction in the differentiation degree of cancer (P<0.05). FcγRIIIa-positive cells were similar in morphology to KCs, and their distributive tendency was coincident (P<0.05). The increase in CD16a mRNA levels in the group treated with immune serum was 3.9-, 4.9- and 3.9-fold greater than that in the ordinary serum group at different time points, and CD16a protein expression also markedly increased (P<0.05). However, these effects were inhibited by the addition of anti-IgG Fc serum (P<0.05). The results of the present study suggested that FcγRIIIa resided in KCs, and it contributed to the inhibition of the growth of liver tumor cells. PMID:27082928

  5. Targeting Kupffer cells in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease/non-alcoholic steatohepatitis: Why and how?

    PubMed Central

    Lanthier, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Mechanisms for non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) development are under investigation in an era of increased prevalence of obesity and metabolic syndrome. Previous findings have pointed to the role of adipose tissue, adipose tissue macrophages and their secretory products in the development of a chronic inflammatory status inducing insulin resistance and a higher risk of liver steatosis called non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. The activation of resident macrophages [Kupffer cells (KC)] and the recruitment of blood derived monocytes/macrophages into the diseased liver have now been identified as key elements for disease initiation and progression. Those cells could be activated through gut flora modifications and an altered gut barrier function but also through the internalization of toxic lipid compounds in adjacent hepatocytes or in KC themselves. Due to the role of activated KC in insulin resistance, fibrosis development and inflammation amplification, they became a target in clinical trials. A shift towards an anti-inflammatory KC phenotype through peroxisome proliferator activator-receptorδ agonists, an inhibition of macrophage recruitment through anti-C-C chemokine receptor 2 action and a specific blocking of internalization of toxic lipoxidation or glycation compounds into KC by galectin-3 receptor inhibitors are now under investigation in human NASH. PMID:26380042

  6. Erythrophagocytosis by Liver Macrophages (Kupffer Cells) Promotes Oxidative Stress, Inflammation, and Fibrosis in a Rabbit Model of Steatohepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Otogawa, Kohji; Kinoshita, Kohji; Fujii, Hideki; Sakabe, Masahide; Shiga, Ryoko; Nakatani, Kazuki; Ikeda, Kazuo; Nakajima, Yuji; Ikura, Yoshihiro; Ueda, Makiko; Arakawa, Tetsuo; Hato, Fumihiko; Kawada, Norifumi

    2007-01-01

    Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is a progressive fibrotic disease, the pathogenesis of which has not been fully elucidated. Here, we report a molecular aspect of this disease elucidated using rabbits fed a cholesterol-rich high-fat diet and exhibiting insulin resistance. The liver in this model showed steatohepatitis with fibrosis and high mRNA expression for some cytokines, heme oxygenase-1, transforming growth factor-β1, and collagen α1(I). Erythrocytes isolated from the model showed marked fragility and the externalization of phosphatidylserine (PS) on the outer leaflet of the membrane and were frequently engulfed by Kupffer cells/macrophages in the hepatic sinusoids. Expression of milk fat globule-epidermal growth factor (EGF)-factor 8, a PS-binding protein, was augmented in the liver. In culture, RAW 264.7 cells engulfed erythrocytes oxidized by tert-butyl hydroperoxide, a process that was inhibited by anti-milk fat globule-EGF-factor 8 antibody. In addition, PS-positive erythrocytes appeared entrapped in the model liver in ex vivo perfusion experiments. Finally, in specimens from NASH patients, the aggregation of erythrocytes in inflammatory hepatic sinusoids was notable. These results indicate that the engulfment of PS-externalized, apoptotic signal-positive, erythrocytes by hepatic macrophages may lead to the deposition of iron derived from hemoglobin in the liver and be involved in the pathogenesis of steatohepatitis. PMID:17322381

  7. Characterization of a receptor for oxidized low-density lipoproteins on rat Kupffer cells: similarity to macrosialin.

    PubMed Central

    Van Velzen, A G; Da Silva, R P; Gordon, S; Van Berkel, T J

    1997-01-01

    Rat liver Kupffer cell membranes contain a protein that recognizes specifically oxidized low-density lipoproteins (oxLDL). Visualization after blotting under reducing conditions indicates that the receptor is a monomeric protein, with an estimated molecular mass of 115-120 kDa. N-Glycosidase F and endoglycosidase F treatment resulted in a fall in estimated molecular mass of 24 and 11 kDa respectively, whereas O-glycosidase was ineffective. No effect on the extent of interaction with oxLDL was noticed, suggesting that glycans are not essential for ligand recognition. Using a polyclonal antibody to mouse macrosialin, we visualized macrosialin on blot, and compared this glycoprotein with the oxLDL-binding protein. It appears that the two glycoproteins have a similar molecular mass and are comparably affected by treatment with the different glycosidases. Incubation with trypsin resulted in a reduction in the estimated molecular mass of about 25 kDa for both the oxLDL-binding protein and macrosialin. These results indicate that the oxLDL-binding protein and macrosialin are identical, suggesting a role for macrosialin in modified LDL catabolism. PMID:9065757

  8. Biofilm-Forming Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Survive in Kupffer Cells and Exhibit High Virulence in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Oyama, Takuto; Miyazaki, Motoyasu; Yoshimura, Michinobu; Takata, Tohru; Ohjimi, Hiroyuki; Jimi, Shiro

    2016-01-01

    Although Staphylococcus aureus is part of the normal body flora, heavy usage of antibiotics has resulted in the emergence of methicillin-resistant strains (MRSA). MRSA can form biofilms and cause indwelling foreign body infections, bacteremia, soft tissue infections, endocarditis, and osteomyelitis. Using an in vitro assay, we screened 173 clinical blood isolates of MRSA and selected 20 high-biofilm formers (H-BF) and low-biofilm formers (L-BF). These were intravenously administered to mice and the general condition of mice, the distribution of bacteria, and biofilm in the liver, lung, spleen, and kidney were investigated. MRSA count was the highest in the liver, especially within Kupffer cells, which were positive for acid polysaccharides that are associated with intracellular biofilm. After 24 h, the general condition of the mice worsened significantly in the H-BF group. In the liver, bacterial deposition and aggregation and the biofilm-forming spot number were all significantly greater for H-BF group than for L-BF. CFU analysis revealed that bacteria in the H-BF group survived for long periods in the liver. These results indicate that the biofilm-forming ability of MRSA is a crucial factor for intracellular persistence, which could lead to chronic infections. PMID:27376326

  9. Amphiphilic core–shell nanoparticles containing dense polyethyleneimine shells for efficient delivery of microRNA to Kupffer cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zuojin; Niu, Dechao; Zhang, Junyong; Zhang, Wenfeng; Yao, Yuan; Li, Pei; Gong, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    Efficient and targeted delivery approach to transfer exogenous genes into macrophages is still a great challenge. Current gene delivery methods often result in low cellular uptake efficiency in vivo in some types of cells, especially for the Kupffer cells (KCs). In this article, we demonstrate that amphiphilic core–shell nanoparticles (NPs) consisting of well-defined hydrophobic poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) cores and branched polyethyleneimine (PEI) shells (denoted as PEI@PMMA NPs) are efficient nanocarriers to deliver microRNA (miRNA)-loaded plasmid to the KCs. Average hydrodynamic diameter of PEI@ PMMA NPs was 279 nm with a narrow size distribution. The NPs also possessed positive surface charges up to +30 mV in water, thus enabling effective condensation of negatively charged plasmid DNA. Gel electrophoresis assay showed that the resultant PEI@PMMA NPs were able to completely condense miRNA plasmid at a weight ratio of 25:1 (N/P ratio equal to 45:1). The Cell Counting Kit-8 assay and flow cytometry results showed that the PEI@PMMA/miRNA NPs displayed low cytotoxicity and cell apoptosis activity against the KCs. The maximum cell transfection efficiency reached 34.7% after 48 hours, which is much higher than that obtained by using the commercial Lipofectamine™ 2000 (1.7%). Bio-transmission electron microscope observation revealed that the PEI@PMMA NPs were mainly distributed in the cytoplasm of the KCs. Furthermore, when compared to the control groups, the protein expression of target nuclear factor κB P65 was considerably inhibited (P<0.05) both in vitro and in vivo. These results demonstrate that the PEI@PMMA NPs with a unique amphiphilic core–shell nanostructure are promising nanocarriers for delivering miRNA plasmid to KCs. PMID:27366061

  10. Amphiphilic core-shell nanoparticles containing dense polyethyleneimine shells for efficient delivery of microRNA to Kupffer cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zuojin; Niu, Dechao; Zhang, Junyong; Zhang, Wenfeng; Yao, Yuan; Li, Pei; Gong, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    Efficient and targeted delivery approach to transfer exogenous genes into macrophages is still a great challenge. Current gene delivery methods often result in low cellular uptake efficiency in vivo in some types of cells, especially for the Kupffer cells (KCs). In this article, we demonstrate that amphiphilic core-shell nanoparticles (NPs) consisting of well-defined hydrophobic poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) cores and branched polyethyleneimine (PEI) shells (denoted as PEI@PMMA NPs) are efficient nanocarriers to deliver microRNA (miRNA)-loaded plasmid to the KCs. Average hydrodynamic diameter of PEI@ PMMA NPs was 279 nm with a narrow size distribution. The NPs also possessed positive surface charges up to +30 mV in water, thus enabling effective condensation of negatively charged plasmid DNA. Gel electrophoresis assay showed that the resultant PEI@PMMA NPs were able to completely condense miRNA plasmid at a weight ratio of 25:1 (N/P ratio equal to 45:1). The Cell Counting Kit-8 assay and flow cytometry results showed that the PEI@PMMA/miRNA NPs displayed low cytotoxicity and cell apoptosis activity against the KCs. The maximum cell transfection efficiency reached 34.7% after 48 hours, which is much higher than that obtained by using the commercial Lipofectamine™ 2000 (1.7%). Bio-transmission electron microscope observation revealed that the PEI@PMMA NPs were mainly distributed in the cytoplasm of the KCs. Furthermore, when compared to the control groups, the protein expression of target nuclear factor κB P65 was considerably inhibited (P<0.05) both in vitro and in vivo. These results demonstrate that the PEI@PMMA NPs with a unique amphiphilic core-shell nanostructure are promising nanocarriers for delivering miRNA plasmid to KCs.

  11. Interleukin-1 blockade in refractory giant cell arteritis.

    PubMed

    Ly, Kim-Heang; Stirnemann, Jérôme; Liozon, Eric; Michel, Marc; Fain, Olivier; Fauchais, Anne-Laure

    2014-01-01

    Giant cell arteritis is a primary large-vessel vasculitis characterized by an arterial wall inflammation associated with intimal hyperplasia leading to arterial occlusion. Glucocorticoids remain the mainstay of giant cell arteritis treatment. However, relapses and glucocorticoid-related complications are frequent and therapeutic options for refractory giant cell arteritis are quite limited. Like tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6, interleukin-1β is also highly expressed in inflamed arterial walls of patients with giant cell arteritis and may contribute in the pathogenesis of this disease. We report treatment of three cases of refractory giant cell arteritis successfully treated with anakinra, an interleukin-1 blockade therapy. Anakinra was effective for all patients, yielding improvement in their inflammation biomarkers and/or in their symptoms, as well as a disappearance of arterial inflammation in PET/CT for two of them.

  12. Depletion of Kupffer cells modulates ethanol-induced hepatocyte DNA synthesis in C57Bl/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Owumi, Solomon E; Corthals, Stacy M; Uwaifo, Anthony O; Kamendulis, Lisa M; Klaunig, James E

    2014-08-01

    Kupffer cells (KCs) are important in hepatic homeostasis and responses to xenobiotics. KCs are activated on interaction with endotoxin, releasing cytokines, and reactive oxygen species normally associated with increased gene expression, cellular growth, or hepatic injury. Ethanol-induced endotoxemia is one means of KC activation. We propose that KC depletion attenuates the effect of EtOH-induced endotoxemia to impact the hepatic growth response. Hepatic DNA synthesis was examined in KC competent (KC+) or KC-depleted (KC-) C57BL/6 mice fed EtOH-containing diet in the presence or absence of polyphenol-60 antioxidant. KC depletion was assessed by F4/80 antigen, and DNA synthesis was assessed by 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine incorporation. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) messenger RNA released was quantified by RT-PCR/electrophoresis. ERK1/2 phosphorylation was evaluated by Western blotting, and Nrf2 and CYP2E1protein were also assayed. Apoptosis and hepatic injury were examined by the Tunnel assay and hepatic transaminases in serum, respectively. Hepatic transaminases in serum (AST and ALT) were within normal range. Over 90% of KC was depleted by clodronate treatment. KC depletion decreased TNF-α mRNA release, ERK1/2 phosphorylation, and hepatocyte DNA synthesis. KC depletion is associated with increased numbers of apoptotic cells bodies in KC- mice. Antioxidant treatment decreased DNA synthesis, Nrf2, and CYP2E1 protein expression in EtOH-consuming mice. Our data indicate that upon ethanol exposure, KC participates in hepatic DNA synthesis and growth responses. Collectively, these observations suggest that KC depletion attenuates the downstream effect of ethanol-induced endotoxemia by reduced cytokine and reactive oxygen species production with its concomitant effect on MAPK-signaling pathway on hepatocyte DNA synthesis.

  13. Large-pore mesoporous silica nanospheres as vehicles for delivering TRAF3-shRNA plasmids to Kupffer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junyong; Guo, Shipeng; Zhang, Wenfeng; Niu, Dechao; Gong, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    The currently available techniques for transferring exogenous genes into macrophages, especially the targeted import of exogenous genes into Kupffer cells (KCs) in vivo, are inefficient and achieve only low targeting. Novel Large-Pore Mesoporous Silica Nanospheres (LPMSNs) may be a promising gene transfection agent for KCs because of their superior biodegradation and hypotoxic characteristics, as well as their ability to retain the biological function of KCs and the high loading-rate of exogenous plasmid. LPMSNs were able to completely adsorb shRNA-TRAF3 (tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor-3) plasmid at a mass ratio as low as 30:1, and exhibited a low cytotoxicity for KCs. LPMSNs were detected in KC cytoplasm in vitro, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed that they were present only in KCs in liver tissue in vivo. The max KC transfection efficiency with LPMSNs was 34.8± 0.07%, as evaluated using flow cytometry, and the protein and mRNA levels of TRAF3 were significantly inhibited (P < 0.05) by shRNA-TRAF3 plasmid transfection after 24 h in vitro and 48 h in vivo. In conclusion, KC targeted transfection was achieved successfully by LPMSNs carrying shRNA-TRAF3 plasmids in vitro and vivo. The protein and mRNA levels of TRAF3 were suppressed significantly. These results suggest that LPMSNs are a promising vehicle for delivering exogenous genes into KCs in vitro and vivo. PMID:26631959

  14. Role of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase in Kupffer cell secretion of the proinflammatory cytokines after burn trauma.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xu-Lin; Xia, Zhao-Fan; Wei, Duo; Han, Sheng; Ben, Dao-Feng; Wang, Guang-Qing

    2003-09-01

    This study was designed to investigate the role of p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase on Kupffer cells (KCs) secretion of proinflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and interleukin (IL)-1beta and hepatic injury following burn trauma. Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into four groups: (1) sham burn rats given vehicle, (2) sham burn rats given the p38 MAP kinase inhibitor SB203580 (10mg/kg i.v., 15min and 12h after sham burn), (3) rats given a 30% total body surface area (TBSA) full-thickness burn and fluid resuscitation plus vehicle, and (4) burn rats given injury and fluid resuscitation plus SB203580. Rats from each group were killed at 24h post-burn to examine plasma aspartate transaminase (AST) and alanine transaminase (ALT) and KCs were isolated. The KCs secretion of TNF-alpha and IL-1beta and p38 MAP kinase activity (by Western blot analysis) were also examined. These studies showed by more significant activation of p38 MAP kinase in KCs harvested from burn rats than from shams. Burn trauma resulted in hepatic dysfunction and promoted KCs secretion of TNF-alpha and IL-1beta. SB203580 inhibited p38 MAP kinase activity, reduced KCs secretion of proinflammatory cytokines, and alleviated burn-mediated hepatic dysfunction. These data suggest p38 MAP kinase activation is one important aspect of the signaling event that may mediate the KCs secretion of proinflammatory cytokines TNF-alpha and IL-1beta following burn trauma.

  15. Selective role for tumor necrosis factor-α, but not interleukin-1 or Kupffer cells, in down-regulation of CYP3A11 and CYP3A25 in livers of mice infected with a noninvasive intestinal pathogen.

    PubMed

    Kinloch, Ryan D; Lee, Choon-Myung; van Rooijen, Nico; Morgan, Edward T

    2011-08-01

    Hepatic cytochrome P450 (P450) gene and protein expression are modulated during inflammation and infection. Oral infection of C57BL/6 mice with Citrobacter rodentium produces mild clinical symptoms while selectively regulating hepatic P450 expression and elevating levels of proinflammatory cytokines. Here, we explored the role of cytokines in the regulation of hepatic P450 expression by orally infecting tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) receptor 1 null mice (TNFR1-/-), interleukin-1 (IL1) receptor null mice (IL1R1-/-), and Kupffer cell depleted mice with C. rodentium. CYP4A mRNA and protein levels and flavin monooxygenase (FMO)3 mRNA expression levels were down-regulated, while CYP2D9 and CYP4F18 mRNAs remained elevated during infection in wild-type, receptor knockout, and Kupffer cell depleted mice. CYPs 3A11 and 3A25 mRNA levels were down-regulated during infection in wild-type mice but not in TNFR1-/- mice. Consistent with this observation, CYPs 3A11 and 3A25 were potently down-regulated in mouse hepatocytes treated with TNFα. Oral infection of IL1R1-/- mice and studies with mouse hepatocytes indicated that IL1 does not directly regulate CYP3A11 or CYP3A25 expression. Uninfected mice injected with clodronate liposomes had a significantly reduced number of Kupffer cells in their livers. Infection increased the Kupffer cell count, which was attenuated by clodronate treatment. The P450 mRNA and cytokine levels in infected Kupffer cell depleted mice were comparable to those in infected mice receiving no clodronate. The results indicate that TNFα is involved in the regulation of CYPs 3A11 and 3A25, but IL1β and Kupffer cells may not be relevant to hepatic P450 regulation in oral C. rodentium infection.

  16. Selective Role for Tumor Necrosis Factor-α, but Not Interleukin-1 or Kupffer Cells, in Down-Regulation of CYP3A11 and CYP3A25 in Livers of Mice Infected with a Noninvasive Intestinal Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Kinloch, Ryan D.; Lee, Choon-Myung; van Rooijen, Nico; Morgan, Edward T.

    2011-01-01

    Hepatic cytochrome P450 (P450) gene and protein expression are modulated during inflammation and infection. Oral infection of C57BL/6 mice with Citrobacter rodentium produces mild clinical symptoms while selectively regulating hepatic P450 expression and elevating levels of proinflammatory cytokines. Here, we explored the role of cytokines in the regulation of hepatic P450 expression by orally infecting tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) receptor 1 null mice (TNFR1−/−), interleukin-1 (IL1) receptor null mice (IL1R−/−), and Kupffer cell depleted mice with C. rodentium. CYP4A mRNA and protein levels and flavin monooxygenase (FMO)3 mRNA expression levels were down-regulated, while CYP2D9 and CYP4F18 mRNAs remained elevated during infection in wild-type, receptor knockout, and Kupffer cell depleted mice. CYPs 3A11 and 3A25 mRNA levels were down-regulated during infection in wild-type mice but not in TNFR1−/− mice. Consistent with this observation, CYPs 3A11 and 3A25 were potently down-regulated in mouse hepatocytes treated with TNFα. Oral infection of IL1R−/− mice and studies with mouse hepatocytes indicated that IL1 does not directly regulate CYP3A11 or CYP3A25 expression. Uninfected mice injected with clodronate liposomes had a significantly reduced number of Kupffer cells in their livers. Infection increased the Kupffer cell count, which was attenuated by clodronate treatment. The P450 mRNA and cytokine levels in infected Kupffer cell depleted mice were comparable to those in infected mice receiving no clodronate. The results indicate that TNFα is involved in the regulation of CYPs 3A11 and 3A25, but IL1β and Kupffer cells may not be relevant to hepatic P450 regulation in oral C. rodentium infection. PMID:21570957

  17. Altered Endothelin-1 Signaling in Production of Thromboxane A2 in Kupffer Cells from Bile Duct Ligated Rats

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Andrew M; Zhang, Jian X

    2009-01-01

    Kupffer cells (KCs), the liver resident macrophages accounting for 80–90% of the total population of fixed tissue macrophages in the body, not only play a key role in host defense via removing particulate materials from the portal circulation, but may also contribute to the pathogenesis of various liver diseases. We have previously demonstrated that KCs play an important role in controlling portal hypertension and hepatocellular injury via releasing thromboxane A2 (TXA2) in early fibrosis induced by one-week bile duct ligation (BDL). Production of TXA2 is controlled by cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) that is activated by the interaction of entothelin-1 (ET-1) with its G-protein coupled ET receptor B (ETBR). However, the signaling pathways that contribute to the ET-1-induced activation of cPLA2 and production of TXA2 in KCs in the normal healthy or injured livers are not yet clear, which are investigated in the present study using isolated KCs from one-week BDL or sham rats. The pharmacological inhibition of cPLA2 or chelation of intracellular calcium abrogated the ET-1 induction of TXA2 from KCs. Compared to those from sham rats, KCs from BDL animals displayed a significantly enhanced responsiveness of p38 MAPK to ET-1, increased ETBR and Gαi subunit but decreased Gαq and Gα11 expression. Inhibition of ERK1/2 or Gq signaling abrogated significantly the ET-1 induction of TXA2 in sham KCs but only slightly in BDL KCs. In contrast, inhibition of p38 MAPK and Gi signaling markedly attenuated the ET-1 induction of TXA2 in BDL KCs but had no effect in sham KCs. Lastly, inhibition of PLC or PKC abrogated ET-1 induction of TXA2 in KCs from both sham and BDL groups. The hepatic stress (such as BDL) induces significant modifications in the receptor and intermediates of ET-1 signaling in KC and subsequently alters ET-1 signaling mechanisms, particularly a shift from Gq induced signaling to Gi induced signaling, in the activation of cPLA2 and production of TXA2 in

  18. Polaris and Polycystin-2 in dorsal forerunner cells and Kupffer's vesicle are required for specification of the zebrafish left-right axis.

    PubMed

    Bisgrove, Brent W; Snarr, Brian S; Emrazian, Anoush; Yost, H Joseph

    2005-11-15

    Recently, it has become clear that motile cilia play a central role in initiating a left-sided signaling cascade important in establishing the LR axis during mouse and zebrafish embryogenesis. Two genes proposed to be important in this cilia-mediated signaling cascade are polaris and polycystin-2 (pkd2). Polaris is involved in ciliary assembly, while Pkd2 is proposed to function as a Ca(2+)-permeable cation channel. We have cloned zebrafish homologues of polaris and pkd2. Both genes are expressed in dorsal forerunner cells (DFCs) from gastrulation to early somite stages when these cells form a ciliated Kupffer's vesicle (KV). Morpholino-mediated knockdown of Polaris or Pkd2 in zebrafish results in misexpression of left-side-specific genes, including southpaw, lefty1 and lefty2, and randomization of heart and gut looping. By targeting morpholinos to DFCs/KV, we show that polaris and pkd2 are required in DFCs/KV for normal LR development. Polaris morphants have defects in KV cilia, suggesting that the laterality phenotype is due to problems in cilia function per se. We further show that expression of polaris and pkd2 is dependent on the T-box transcription factors no tail and spadetail, respectively, suggesting that these genes have a previously unrecognized role in regulating ciliary structure and function. Our data suggest that the functions of polaris and pkd2 in LR patterning are conserved between zebrafish and mice and that Kupffer's vesicle functions as a ciliated organ of asymmetry. PMID:16216239

  19. Blockade of mast cell activation reduces cutaneous scar formation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lin; Schrementi, Megan E; Ranzer, Matthew J; Wilgus, Traci A; DiPietro, Luisa A

    2014-01-01

    Damage to the skin initiates a cascade of well-orchestrated events that ultimately leads to repair of the wound. The inflammatory response is key to wound healing both through preventing infection and stimulating proliferation and remodeling of the skin. Mast cells within the tissue are one of the first immune cells to respond to trauma, and upon activation they release pro-inflammatory molecules to initiate recruitment of leukocytes and promote a vascular response in the tissue. Additionally, mast cells stimulate collagen synthesis by dermal fibroblasts, suggesting they may also influence scar formation. To examine the contribution of mast cells in tissue repair, we determined the effects the mast cell inhibitor, disodium cromoglycate (DSCG), on several parameters of dermal repair including, inflammation, re-epithelialization, collagen fiber organization, collagen ultrastructure, scar width and wound breaking strength. Mice treated with DSCG had significantly reduced levels of the inflammatory cytokines IL-1α, IL-1β, and CXCL1. Although DSCG treatment reduced the production of inflammatory mediators, the rate of re-epithelialization was not affected. Compared to control, inhibition of mast cell activity caused a significant decrease in scar width along with accelerated collagen re-organization. Despite the reduced scar width, DSCG treatment did not affect the breaking strength of the healed tissue. Tryptase β1 exclusively produced by mast cells was found to increase significantly in the course of wound healing. However, DSCG treatment did not change its level in the wounds. These results indicate that blockade of mast cell activation reduces scar formation and inflammation without further weakening the healed wound.

  20. Salmonella choleraesuis and Salmonella typhimurium associated with liver cells after intravenous inoculation of rats are localized mainly in Kupffer cells and multiply intracellularly.

    PubMed

    Nnalue, N A; Shnyra, A; Hultenby, K; Lindberg, A A

    1992-07-01

    Male Sprague-Dawley rats were inoculated intravenously with Salmonella choleraesuis or Salmonella typhimurium and used over 3 consecutive days to produce highly enriched (greater than 95% homogenous) preparations of Kupffer and mononuclear cells (KC), liver endothelial cells (LEC), and hepatocytes. The methods involved collagenase perfusion of the liver in situ, differential centrifugation of liver cells over a Percoll gradient, and selective attachment of the cells to plastic or to culture dishes coated with collagen. The different cell preparations were then assayed for the number and location, intracellular or extracellular, of associated viable bacteria. Most of the viable bacteria recovered were associated with KC and were mainly intracellular. The intracellular bacteria in KC from rats infected with either bacterial strain increased about 20- to 50-fold over 2 days. Some of the bacteria associated with LEC and in some experiments with hepatocytes also survived treatment with gentamicin and increased in number with time. Intracellular bacteria were readily visualized in KC by light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. On rare occasions, bacteria were seen within LEC from rats infected with S. choleraesuis but not from those infected with S. typhimurium. Microcolonies of S. typhimurium but not of S. choleraesuis were occasionally found on the surface of some LEC. Bacteria were not seen within or on the surface of hepatocytes by transmission or scanning electron microscopy. The integration of microscopic and viability data suggested that most intracellular S. choleraesuis organisms in KC had been killed whereas most intracellular S. typhimurium organisms were viable.

  1. Kupffer cell stimulation with Corynebacterium parvum reduces some cytochrome P450-dependent activities and diminishes acetaminophen and carbon tetrachloride-induced liver injury in the rat.

    PubMed

    Raiford, D S; Thigpen, M C

    1994-11-01

    Chemical activation of Kupffer cells in vivo by vitamin A or latex beads is associated with a worsening of hepatic injury induced by the P450-dependent hepatotoxins acetaminophen (ACET) and carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) and by the P450-independent toxin galactosamine (GLN). Immunostimulants such as Corynebacterium parvum (CP) also activate Kupffer cells, but do so while prompting release of soluble mediators which depress microsomal oxidative activities in cultured hepatocytes. Therefore, we sought to characterize the effects of CP on hepatic injury in vivo due to ACET and CCl4 while employing GLN as a control. Hepatic microsomal oxidative activity and glutathione (GSH) disposition were examined since each influences susceptibility to injury from ACET or CCl4. Rats were given CP 28 mg/kg i.v. 5 days before challenge with hepatotoxicant. Hepatic injury was assessed 24 hr after hepatotoxicant administration by measurement of serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) activity and review of histological sections. Livers from parallel groups of rats were used to prepare microsomal and cytosolic fractions, to measure tissue GSH, or for perfusion to assess GSH efflux. Significant reductions in injury due to ACET or CCl4 were observed while injury due to GLN was potentiated. Serum ALT levels after ACET were 3000 +/- 620 in controls vs 170 +/- 45 IU/liter in the CP-treated group and ALT levels after CCl4 were 3100 +/- 500 in controls vs 1700 + 450 IU/liter in the CP-treated group. In contrast, serum ALT levels after GLN were 920 +/- 230 in controls vs 1700 +/- 370 in the CP-treated group. Patterns of hepatic injury observed on histological sections were those characteristic for each toxin and the severity of injury correlated well with alterations in serum ALT levels for each agent. Hepatic microsomal fractions from rats pretreated with CP showed significantly diminished total cytochrome P450 content as well as reduced activity for two P450IIE1 substrates, p-nitrophenol and 7

  2. Intrahepatic endothelial and Kupffer cells involved in immunosuppressive cytokines and natural killer (NK)/NK T cell disorders in viral acute hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Jacques, A; Bleau, C; Martin, J-P; Lamontagne, L

    2008-01-01

    During acute viral hepatitis, the intrahepatic tolerance sustained by immunosuppressive cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-4, IL-10, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), produced by Kupffer cells (KC), liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSEC), natural killer (NK) T cells and natural regulatory T cells may be disturbed. NK cells are recruited normally in the liver and produce interferon (IFN)-γ to control viral replication. The use of mouse hepatitis virus type 3 (MHV3) attenuated variants showing selected tropisms for KC or LSEC have allowed determining their roles in the disturbances of immune tolerance during viral hepatitis. Groups of C57BL/6 mice were infected with the pathogenic L2-MHV3 (KC+, LSEC+), low attenuated 51·6-MHV3 (KC+, LSEC−) or high attenuated CL12-MHV3 (KC−, LSEC−) variants for the first 3 days. Results showed that IL-10, TGF-β and PGE2 production in the liver decreased in L2-MHV3-infected mice and increased in 51·6-MHV3- and CL12-MHV3-infected mice. The ratio of IFN-γ/IL-4 in liver decreased in L2-MHV3-infected mice, while it was not (or low) altered in mice infected with the attenuated MHV3 variant mice. Phenotypic analysis of intrahepatic mononuclear cells revealed that apoptotic NK and NK T cells increased in mice infected with the L2-MHV3, but were minor in 51·6-MHV3- and CL12-MHV3-infected mice. The numbers of CD4+ forkhead box P3+ cells increased in the livers from low pathogenic CL12-MHV3 and YAC-MHV3-infected mice. These results indicate that viral permissivity of KC and LSEC is involved in the decrease of IL-10 and PGE2, while KC may play an additional role in the apoptosis of NK and NK T cells during acute viral hepatitis. PMID:18336588

  3. Transient Depletion of Kupffer Cells Leads to Enhanced Transgene Expression in Rat Liver Following Retrograde Intrabiliary Infusion of Plasmid DNA and DNA Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Hui; Jiang, Xuan; Leong, Kam W.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract In this report, we have demonstrated that by temporarily removing Kupffer cells (KCs), the transgene expression levels mediated by retrograde intrabiliary infusion (RII) of plasmid DNA, polyethylenimine-DNA, and chitosan nanoparticles were enhanced by 1,927-, 131-, and 23,450-fold, respectively, in comparison with the respective groups without KC removal. KC removal also led to significantly prolonged transgene expression in the liver that received all three carriers. This increased transgene expression was correlated with significantly reduced serum tumor necrosis factor-α level as an indicator for KC activation. These results suggest that KC activation is a significant contributing factor to the lowered transgene expression by polycation-DNA nanoparticles delivered by RII. More importantly, the combination of RII and transient removal of KCs may be adopted as an effective approach to achieving high and persistent transgene expression in the liver mediated by nonviral nanoparticles. PMID:21091274

  4. Kupffer cells potentiate liver sinusoidal endothelial cell injury in sepsis by ligating programmed cell death ligand-1

    PubMed Central

    Hutchins, Noelle A.; Wang, Fei; Wang, Yvonne; Chung, Chun-Shiang; Ayala, Alfred

    2013-01-01

    PD-1 and PD-L1 have been reported to provide peripheral tolerance by inhibiting TCR-mediated activation. We have reported that PD-L1−/− animals are protected from sepsis-induced mortality and immune suppression. Whereas studies indicate that LSECs normally express PD-L1, which is also thought to maintain local immune liver tolerance by ligating the receptor PD-1 on T lymphocytes, the role of PD-L1 in the septic liver remains unknown. Thus, we hypothesized initially that PD-L1 expression on LSECs protects them from sepsis-induced injury. We noted that the increased vascular permeability and pSTAT3 protein expression in whole liver from septic animals were attenuated in the absence of PD-L1. Isolated LSECs taken from septic animals, which exhibited increased cell death, declining cell numbers, reduced cellular proliferation, and VEGFR2 expression (an angiogenesis marker), also showed improved cell numbers, proliferation, and percent VEGFR2+ levels in the absence of PD-L1. We also observed that sepsis induced an increase of liver F4/80+PD-1+-expressing KCs and increased PD-L1 expression on LSECs. Interestingly, PD-L1 expression levels on LSECs decreased when PD-1+-expressing KCs were depleted with clodronate liposomes. Contrary to our original hypothesis, we document here that increased interactions between PD-1+ KCs and PD-L1+ LSECs appear to lead to the decline of normal endothelial function—essential to sustain vascular integrity and prevent ALF. Importantly, we uncover an underappreciated pathological aspect of PD-1:PD-L1 ligation during inflammation that is independent of its normal, immune-suppressive activity. PMID:23766529

  5. Mesenchymal stromal cell-dependent reprogramming of Kupffer cells is mediated by TNF-α and PGE2 and is crucial for liver transplant tolerance.

    PubMed

    You, Yu; Zhang, Jiqin; Gong, Jianping; Chen, Yupei; Li, Yue; Yang, Kang; Liu, Zuojin

    2015-07-01

    The role of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) in the modulation of liver transplant tolerance has attracted significant interest. However, the interaction between MSCs and Kupffer cells (KCs) has received little attention, and the effect of this interaction on liver transplant tolerance remains unclear. KCs were cultured in the presence and absence of MSCs. After 24 h, cells were treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), after which the production of cytokines and the expression of surface antigens were measured for cell function identification. Moreover, the effects of the KCs and the prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) levels produced by the MSCs were determined using an experimental rat liver transplantation model. Blood and liver samples were collected at three time points after transplantation for further analysis. After LPS treatment, when compared with the KC single cultures, the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, MHC-II, CD40, CD80, and CD86) in the coculture system was down-regulated, whereas the expression of anti-inflammatory cytokines (TGF-β, IL-4, PGE2, and IL-10) was markedly increased. These data indicate that MSCs can reprogram the phenotype of KCs. However, KCs treated with miR/TNF-α (tumor necrosis factor) plasmid prior to coculture to inhibit the production of TNF-α resulted in an inhibition of the reprogramming effect of MSCs. Moreover, overexpression of PGE2 in MSCs increased the effect of MSCs on KC reprogramming. After rat liver transplantation, allograft recipients that received MSCs showed better allograft tolerance when compared with rats in which KC function was inhibited. Furthermore, rats treated with MSCs overexpressing PGE2 demonstrated the best liver tolerance of all of the groups tested. MSCs reprogram the phenotype of KCs through TNF-α and PGE2, and this process is crucial for the immunomodulatory function of MSCs in liver transplantation. PMID:25982496

  6. Mesenchymal stromal cell-dependent reprogramming of Kupffer cells is mediated by TNF-α and PGE2 and is crucial for liver transplant tolerance.

    PubMed

    You, Yu; Zhang, Jiqin; Gong, Jianping; Chen, Yupei; Li, Yue; Yang, Kang; Liu, Zuojin

    2015-07-01

    The role of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) in the modulation of liver transplant tolerance has attracted significant interest. However, the interaction between MSCs and Kupffer cells (KCs) has received little attention, and the effect of this interaction on liver transplant tolerance remains unclear. KCs were cultured in the presence and absence of MSCs. After 24 h, cells were treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), after which the production of cytokines and the expression of surface antigens were measured for cell function identification. Moreover, the effects of the KCs and the prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) levels produced by the MSCs were determined using an experimental rat liver transplantation model. Blood and liver samples were collected at three time points after transplantation for further analysis. After LPS treatment, when compared with the KC single cultures, the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, MHC-II, CD40, CD80, and CD86) in the coculture system was down-regulated, whereas the expression of anti-inflammatory cytokines (TGF-β, IL-4, PGE2, and IL-10) was markedly increased. These data indicate that MSCs can reprogram the phenotype of KCs. However, KCs treated with miR/TNF-α (tumor necrosis factor) plasmid prior to coculture to inhibit the production of TNF-α resulted in an inhibition of the reprogramming effect of MSCs. Moreover, overexpression of PGE2 in MSCs increased the effect of MSCs on KC reprogramming. After rat liver transplantation, allograft recipients that received MSCs showed better allograft tolerance when compared with rats in which KC function was inhibited. Furthermore, rats treated with MSCs overexpressing PGE2 demonstrated the best liver tolerance of all of the groups tested. MSCs reprogram the phenotype of KCs through TNF-α and PGE2, and this process is crucial for the immunomodulatory function of MSCs in liver transplantation.

  7. Mononuclear cell complement receptor blockade in primary biliary cirrhosis.

    PubMed Central

    Al-Aghbar, M N; Neuberger, J; Williams, R; Eddleston, A L

    1985-01-01

    Peripheral blood monocyte and lymphocyte receptors for Fc and C3b fragments were examined in vitro in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis and other chronic liver diseases using sheep red blood cells coated with anti-SRBC IgG1 (to detect Fc receptors) and with anti-SRBC IgM and complement (to detect C3b receptors). The number of C3b receptors detected on 100 monocytes was significantly lower in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis (23.0 +/- 12.0, mean +/- 1 SD) compared with normal controls (57.4 +/- 16.9) and other chronic liver disease (HBsAg negative chronic active hepatitis 62.0 +/- 17.0, alcoholic cirrhosis 50.9 +/- 4.0), while the number of Fc receptors detected on 100 monocytes was not significantly different in all the groups (primary biliary cirrhosis 72.8 +/- 28.6, chronic active hepatitis 74.7 +/- 14.0, alcoholic cirrhosis 58.0 +/- 13.5 and normal controls 69.6 +/- 19.9). When mononuclear cells isolated from normal individuals were pre-incubated with serum from patients with primary biliary cirrhosis before testing their receptor function there was a significant reduction in the number of C3b receptors detected per 100 monocytes (27.6 +/- 10.8) compared with pre-incubation with normal serum (72.0 +/- 18.0). This reduction in C3b-receptor function was again observed when the serum used for pre-incubation was depleted of circulating immune complexes; but when complement was further depleted from these sera, the number of C3b-receptors detected after pre-incubation was similar to normal values (64.0 +/- 11.8). Lymphocyte receptors showed a similar pattern of results. This implies a specific C3b receptor blockade on monocytes and lymphocytes from patients with primary biliary cirrhosis which appears to be because of blocking by serum factor(s) including complement fragments. PMID:3155513

  8. Intravital imaging reveals improved Kupffer cell-mediated phagocytosis as a mode of action of glycoengineered anti-CD20 antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Grandjean, Capucine L.; Montalvao, Fabricio; Celli, Susanna; Michonneau, David; Breart, Beatrice; Garcia, Zacarias; Perro, Mario; Freytag, Olivier; Gerdes, Christian A.; Bousso, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) represent an effective treatment for a number of B cell malignancies and autoimmune disorders. Glycoengineering of anti-CD20mAb may contribute to increased anti-tumor efficacy through enhanced antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) and phagocytosis (ADP) as reported by in vitro studies. However, where and how glycoengineered Ab may potentiate therapeutic responses in vivo is yet to be elucidated. Here, we have performed mouse liver transplants to demonstrate that the liver is sufficient to mediate systemic B cells depletion after anti-CD20 treatment. Relying on intravital two-photon imaging of human CD20-expressing mice, we provide evidence that ADP by Kupffer cells (KC) is a major mechanism for rituximab-mediated B cell depletion. Notably, a glycoengineered anti-mouse CD20 Ab but not its wild-type counterpart triggered potent KC-mediated B cell depletion at low doses. Finally, distinct thresholds for KC phagocytosis were also observed for GA101 (obinutuzumab), a humanized glycoengineered type II anti-CD20 Ab and rituximab. Thus, we propose that enhanced phagocytosis of circulating B cells by KC represents an important in vivo mechanism underlying the improved activity of glycoengineered anti-CD20 mAbs. PMID:27698437

  9. Time course investigation of PPAR{alpha}- and Kupffer cell-dependent effects of WY-14,643 in mouse liver using microarray gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, Courtney G.; Kosyk, Oksana; Bradford, Blair U.; Ross, Pamela K.; Burns, Amanda M.; Cunningham, Michael L.; Qu Pingping; Ibrahim, Joseph G.; Rusyn, Ivan

    2007-12-15

    Administration of peroxisome proliferators to rodents causes proliferation of peroxisomes, induction of {beta}-oxidation enzymes, hepatocellular hypertrophy and hyperplasia, with chronic exposure ultimately leading to hepatocellular carcinomas. Many responses associated with peroxisome proliferators are nuclear receptor-mediated events involving peroxisome proliferators-activated receptor alpha (PPAR{alpha}). A role for nuclear receptor-independent events has also been shown, with evidence of Kupffer cell-mediated free radical production, presumably through NAPDH oxidase, induction of redox-sensitive transcription factors involved in cytokine production and cytokine-mediated cell replication following acute treatment with peroxisome proliferators in rodents. Recent studies have demonstrated, by using p47{sup phox}-null mice which are deficient in NADPH oxidase, that this enzyme is not related to the phenotypic events caused by prolonged administration of peroxisome proliferators. In an effort to determine the timing of the transition from Kupffer cell-to PPAR{alpha}-dependent modulation of peroxisome proliferator effects, gene expression was assessed in liver from Ppar{alpha}-null, p47{sup phox}-null and corresponding wild-type mice following treatment with 4-chloro-6-(2,3-xylidino)-pyrimidynylthioacetic acid (WY-14,643) for 8 h, 24 h, 72 h, 1 week or 4 weeks. WY-14,643-induced gene expression in p47{sup phox}-null mouse liver differed substantially from wild-type mice at acute doses and striking differences in baseline expression of immune related genes were evident. Pathway mapping of genes that respond to WY-14,643 in a time- and dose-dependent manner demonstrates suppression of immune response, cell death and signal transduction and promotion of lipid metabolism, cell cycle and DNA repair. Furthermore, these pathways were largely dependent on PPAR{alpha}, not NADPH oxidase demonstrating a temporal shift in response to peroxisome proliferators. Overall, this

  10. Dll4 Blockade in Stromal Cells Mediates Antitumor Effects in Preclinical Models of Ovarian Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kuhnert, Frank; Chen, Guoying; Coetzee, Sandra; Thambi, Nithya; Hickey, Carlos; Shan, Jing; Kovalenko, Pavel; Noguera-Troise, Irene; Smith, Eric; Fairhurst, Jeanette; Andreev, Julian; Kirshner, Jessica R; Papadopoulos, Nicholas; Thurston, Gavin

    2015-10-01

    The Notch ligand delta-like 4 (Dll4) has been identified as a promising target in tumor angiogenesis in preclinical studies, and Dll4 inhibitors have recently entered clinical trials for solid tumors, including ovarian cancers. In this study, we report the development of REGN421 (enoticumab), a fully human IgG1 monoclonal antibody that binds human Dll4 with sub-nanomolar affinity and inhibits Notch signaling. Administering REGN421 to immunodeficient mice engineered to express human Dll4 inhibited the growth of several human tumor xenografts in association with the formation of nonfunctional tumor blood vessels. In ovarian tumor xenograft models, Dll4 was expressed specifically by the tumor endothelium, and Dll4 blockade by human-specific or mouse-specific Dll4 antibodies exerted potent antitumor activity, which relied entirely on targeting Dll4 expressed by tumor stromal cells but not by the tumor cells themselves. However, Dll4 blockade reduced Notch signaling in both blood vessels and tumor cells surrounding the blood vessels, suggesting that endothelial-expressed Dll4 might induce Notch signaling in adjacent ovarian tumor cells. The antitumor effects of targeting Dll4 were augmented significantly by simultaneous inhibition of VEGF signaling, whereas this combined blockade reversed normal organ vascular changes induced by Dll4 blockade alone. Overall, our findings deepen the rationale for antibody-based strategies to target Dll4 in ovarian cancers, especially in combination with VEGF blockade.

  11. The cellular and proteomic response of primary and immortalized murine Kupffer cells following immune stimulation diverges from that of monocyte-derived macrophages.

    PubMed

    Tweedell, Rebecca; Tao, Dingyin; Dinglasan, Rhoel R

    2015-01-01

    Kupffer cells (KCs) are the first line of defense in the liver against pathogens, yet several microbes successfully target the liver, bypass immune surveillance, and effectively develop in this tissue. Our current, albeit poor, understanding of KC-pathogen interactions has been largely achieved through the study of primary cells, requiring isolation from large numbers of animals. To facilitate the study of KC biology, an immortalized rat KC line 1, RKC1, was developed. We performed a comparative global proteomic analysis of RKC1 and primary rat KCs (PRKC) to characterize their respective responses to lipopolysaccharide-mediated immune stimulation. We identified patent differences in the proteomic response profile of RKC1 and PRKC to lipopolysaccharide. We observed that PRKC upregulated more immune function pathways and exhibited marked changes in cellular morphology following stimulation. We consequently analyzed the cytoskeletal signaling pathways of these cells in light of the fact that macrophages are known to induce cytoskeletal changes in response to pathogens. Our findings suggest that KCs respond differently to inflammatory stimulus than do monocyte-derived macrophages, and such data may provide insight into how pathogens, such as the malaria parasite, may have evolved mechanisms of liver entry through KCs without detection.

  12. Metabolism of supplemental iron (Fe) by hepatocytes (HC), kupffer cells (KC) and endothelial cells (EC) in neonatal pig liver

    SciTech Connect

    Caperna, T.J.; Failla, M.L.

    1986-03-05

    Newborn pigs rapidly develop anemia unless treated with supplemental Fe. The authors have developed methods to isolate and culture the predominant cell types in porcine liver to investigate cellular distribution and metabolism of Fe supplements. One-day (d) old piglets were injected with Fe-dextran (50 mg Fe/kg) and liver cells were isolated from treated and age-matched control piglets 1, 5, and 10 d later. The concentration (..mu..g/mg cell protein) of Fe increased 62-, 54-, and 5-fold over controls in KC, EC, and HC, respectively, 1 d after Fe injection. Thereafter, accumulated Fe was mobilized from all 3 cell types. By 10 d HC mobilized > 85% of accumulated Fe, while Fe levels in KC and EC from treated pigs were at least 15-fold higher than control levels. In vitro studies confirmed the greater capacity of KC and EC to accumulate colloidal Fe compared to HC. The concentration of ferritin (Ft) to liver cells from control pigs was below 0.3 ..mu..g/mg cell protein. After treatment, Ft levels peaked in HC and KC on d 1 at 5.0 and 15.6 ..mu..g/mg cell protein, but in EC on d 5 at 13.3 ..mu..g/mg. Ferritin Fe represented 9% of total Fe in KC and EC at all times after treatment, but as much as 48% in HC at 1 d. Continued investigation of hepatic cellular metabolism of supplemental Fe provides a useful model for investigating the treatment of human neonatal anemia.

  13. Kupffer cell inactivation by carbon monoxide bound to red blood cells preserves hepatic cytochrome P450 via anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory effects exerted through the HMGB1/TLR-4 pathway during resuscitation from hemorrhagic shock.

    PubMed

    Ogaki, Shigeru; Taguchi, Kazuaki; Maeda, Hitoshi; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Ishima, Yu; Otagiri, Masaki; Maruyama, Toru

    2015-10-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) transfusions for controlling hemorrhaging induce systemic ischemia reperfusion, resulting in a decrease in hepatic cytochrome P450 (CYP) levels. Carbon monoxide (CO), when bound to red blood cells (CO-RBC) has the potential to protect the hepatic CYP protein to produce a resuscitative effect in a hemorrhagic shock rat model. The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanism by which CO-RBC resuscitation from a massive hemorrhage protects against a decrease in hepatic CYP. In the early phase (∼1h) after a hemorrhage and RBC resuscitation, hepatic CYP protein levels were significantly decreased with increasing hepatic free heme levels, but were maintained by a pre-treatment of gadolinium chloride (GdCl3), a Kupffer cell inhibitor, and Trolox, an anti-oxidant agent, as well as CO-RBC resuscitation. Under these conditions, the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) derived from activated Kupffer cells was increased, but this increase was suppressed by CO-RBC resuscitation. At a late phase (6∼24h), CYP mRNA levels decreased after hemorrhage and RBC resuscitation, but not in the case of CO-RBC resuscitation. The increases in plasma IL-6 and TNF-α levels were decreased by CO-RBC resuscitation via the suppression of the toll-like receptor-4 (TLR-4) and the expression of the high mobility group box-1 (HMGB-1). Hepatic CYP protection after a hemorrhage and CO-RBC resuscitation can be attributed to the inactivation of Kupffer cells, resulting in the suppression of ROS production in the early phase and the suppression of inflammatory cytokine production via the TLR-4/HMGB-1signal pathway in the late phase.

  14. CD47 Blockade Triggers T cell-mediated Destruction of Immunogenic Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaojuan; Pu, Yang; Cron, Kyle; Deng, Liufu; Kline, Justin; Frazier, William A.; Xu, Hairong; Peng, Hua; Fu, Yang-Xin; Xu, Meng Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Macrophage phagocytosis of tumor cells mediated by CD47-specific blocking antibodies has been proposed to be the major effector mechanism in xenograft models. Using syngeneic immunocompetent tumor models, we reveal that in the therapeutic effects of CD47 blockade depend on dendritic cell (DC) but not macrophage cross-priming of T cell responses in immunocompetent mice. The therapeutic effects of anti-CD47 antibody therapy were abrogated in T cell-deficient mice. In addition, the anti-tumor effects of CD47 blockade required expression of the cytosolic DNA sensor STING, but neither MyD88 nor TRIF, in CD11c+ cells, suggesting that cytosolic sensing of DNA from tumor cells is enhanced by anti-CD47 treatment, further bridging the innate and adaptive responses. Notably, the timing of administration of standard chemotherapy markedly impacted the induction of anti-tumor T cell responses by CD47 blockade. Together, our findings indicate that CD47 blockade drives T cell-mediated elimination of immunogenic tumors. PMID:26322579

  15. Chronic ethanol feeding modulates inflammatory mediators, activation of nuclear factor-κB, and responsiveness to endotoxin in murine Kupffer cells and circulating leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Maraslioglu, Miriam; Oppermann, Elsie; Blattner, Carolin; Weber, Roxane; Henrich, Dirk; Jobin, Christian; Schleucher, Elke; Marzi, Ingo; Lehnert, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Chronic ethanol abuse is known to increase susceptibility to infections after injury, in part, by modification of macrophage function. Several intracellular signalling mechanisms are involved in the initiation of inflammatory responses, including the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) pathway. In this study, we investigated the systemic and hepatic effect of chronic ethanol feeding on in vivo activation of NF-κB in NF-κB(EGFP) reporter gene mice. Specifically, the study focused on Kupffer cell proinflammatory cytokines IL-6 and TNF-α and activation of NF-κB after chronic ethanol feeding followed by in vitro stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We found that chronic ethanol upregulated NF-κB activation and increased hepatic and systemic proinflammatory cytokine levels. Similarly, LPS-stimulated IL-1 β release from whole blood was significantly enhanced in ethanol-fed mice. However, LPS significantly increased IL-6 and TNF-α levels. These results demonstrate that chronic ethanol feeding can improve the responsiveness of macrophage LPS-stimulated IL-6 and TNF-α production and indicate that this effect may result from ethanol-induced alterations in intracellular signalling through NF-κB. Furthermore, LPS and TNF-α stimulated the gene expression of different inflammatory mediators, in part, in a NF-κB-dependent manner. PMID:24623963

  16. Chronic ethanol feeding modulates inflammatory mediators, activation of nuclear factor-κB, and responsiveness to endotoxin in murine Kupffer cells and circulating leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Maraslioglu, Miriam; Oppermann, Elsie; Blattner, Carolin; Weber, Roxane; Henrich, Dirk; Jobin, Christian; Schleucher, Elke; Marzi, Ingo; Lehnert, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Chronic ethanol abuse is known to increase susceptibility to infections after injury, in part, by modification of macrophage function. Several intracellular signalling mechanisms are involved in the initiation of inflammatory responses, including the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) pathway. In this study, we investigated the systemic and hepatic effect of chronic ethanol feeding on in vivo activation of NF-κB in NF-κB(EGFP) reporter gene mice. Specifically, the study focused on Kupffer cell proinflammatory cytokines IL-6 and TNF-α and activation of NF-κB after chronic ethanol feeding followed by in vitro stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We found that chronic ethanol upregulated NF-κB activation and increased hepatic and systemic proinflammatory cytokine levels. Similarly, LPS-stimulated IL-1 β release from whole blood was significantly enhanced in ethanol-fed mice. However, LPS significantly increased IL-6 and TNF-α levels. These results demonstrate that chronic ethanol feeding can improve the responsiveness of macrophage LPS-stimulated IL-6 and TNF-α production and indicate that this effect may result from ethanol-induced alterations in intracellular signalling through NF-κB. Furthermore, LPS and TNF-α stimulated the gene expression of different inflammatory mediators, in part, in a NF-κB-dependent manner.

  17. Mercury-Selenium Relationships in Liver of Guiana Dolphin: The Possible Role of Kupffer Cells in the Detoxification Process by Tiemannite Formation

    PubMed Central

    Lailson-Brito, José; Dorneles, Paulo Renato; Andrade, Leonardo; Azevedo, Alexandre de Freitas; Fragoso, Ana Bernadete; Vidal, Lara Gama; Costa, Marianna Badini; Bisi, Tatiana Lemos; Almeida, Ronaldo; Carvalho, Dario Pires; Bastos, Wanderley Rodrigues; Malm, Olaf

    2012-01-01

    Top marine predators present high mercury concentrations in their tissues as consequence of biomagnification of the most toxic form of this metal, methylmercury (MeHg). The present study concerns mercury accumulation by Guiana dolphins (Sotalia guianensis), highlighting the selenium-mediated methylmercury detoxification process. Liver samples from 19 dolphins incidentally captured within Guanabara Bay (Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil) from 1994 to 2006 were analyzed for total mercury (THg), methylmercury (MeHg), total organic mercury (TOrgHg) and selenium (Se). X-ray microanalyses were also performed. The specimens, including from fetuses to 30-year-old dolphins, comprising 8 females and 11 males, presented high THg (0.53–132 µg/g wet wt.) and Se concentrations (0.17–74.8 µg/g wet wt.). Correlations between THg, MeHg, TOrgHg and Se were verified with age (p<0.05), as well as a high and positive correlation was observed between molar concentrations of Hg and Se (p<0.05). Negative correlations were observed between THg and the percentage of MeHg contribution to THg (p<0.05), which represents a consequence of the selenium-mediated methylmercury detoxification process. Accumulation of Se-Hg amorphous crystals in Kupffer Cells was demonstrated through ultra-structural analysis, which shows that Guiana dolphin is capable of carrying out the demethylation process via mercury selenide formation. PMID:22860072

  18. Down-Regulated Receptor Interacting Protein 140 Is Involved in Lipopolysaccharide-Preconditioning-Induced Inactivation of Kupffer Cells and Attenuation of Hepatic Ischemia Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Li; Jie, Xu; Yue, Li; Kang, Yang; Jianping, Gong; Zuojin, Liu

    2016-01-01

    Background Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) preconditioning is known to attenuate hepatic ischemia/reperfusion injury (I/RI); however, the precise mechanism remains unclear. This study investigated the role of receptor-interacting protein 140 (RIP140) on the protective effect of LPS preconditioning in hepatic I/RI involving Kupffer cells (KCs). Methods Sprague—Dawley rats underwent 70% hepatic ischemia for 90 minutes. LPS (100 μg/kg) was injected intraperitoneally 24 hours before ischemia. Hepatic injury was observed using serum and liver samples. The LPS/NF-κB (nuclear factor-κB) pathway and hepatic RIP140 expression in isolated KCs were investigated. Results LPS preconditioning significantly inhibited hepatic RIP140 expression, NF-κB activation, and serum proinflammatory cytokine expression after I/RI, with an observation of remarkably reduced serum enzyme levels and histopathologic scores. Our experiments showed that protection effects could be effectively induced in KCs by LPS preconditioning, but couldn’t when RIP140 was overexpressed in KCs. Conversely, even without LPS preconditioning, protective effects were found in KCs if RIP140 expression was suppressed with siRNA. Conclusions Down-regulated RIP140 is involved in LPS-induced inactivation of KCs and hepatic I/RI attenuation. PMID:27723769

  19. Gut Bacteria Drive Kupffer Cell Expansion via MAMP-Mediated ICAM-1 Induction on Sinusoidal Endothelium and Influence Preservation-Reperfusion Injury after Orthotopic Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Corbitt, Natasha; Kimura, Shoko; Isse, Kumiko; Specht, Susan; Chedwick, Lisa; Rosborough, Brian R.; Lunz, John G.; Murase, Noriko; Yokota, Shinichiro; Demetris, Anthony J.

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria in the gut microbiome shed microbial-associated molecule patterns (MAMPs) into the portal venous circulation, where they augment various aspects of systemic immunity via low-level stimulation. Because the liver is immediately downstream of the intestines, we proposed that gut-derived MAMPs shape liver immunity and affect Kupffer cell (KC) phenotype. Germ-free (GF), antibiotic-treated (AVMN), and conventional (CL) mice were used to study KC development, function, and response to the significant stress of cold storage, reperfusion, and orthotopic transplantation. We found that a cocktail of physiologically active MAMPs translocate into the portal circulation, with flagellin (Toll-like receptor 5 ligand) being the most plentiful and capable of promoting hepatic monocyte influx in GF mice. In MAMP-deficient GF or AVMN livers, KCs are lower in numbers, have higher phagocytic activity, and have lower major histocompatibility complex II expression. MAMP-containing CL livers harbor significantly increased KC numbers via induction of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 on liver sinusoidal endothelium. These CL KCs have a primed yet expected phenotype, with increased major histocompatibility complex class II and lower phagocytic activity that increases susceptibility to liver preservation/reperfusion injury after orthotopic transplantation. The KC number, functional activity, and maturational status are directly related to the concentration of gut-derived MAMPs and can be significantly reduced by broad-spectrum antibiotics, thereby affecting susceptibility to injury. PMID:23159949

  20. Chronic Ethanol Feeding Modulates Inflammatory Mediators, Activation of Nuclear Factor-κB, and Responsiveness to Endotoxin in Murine Kupffer Cells and Circulating Leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    Oppermann, Elsie; Jobin, Christian; Schleucher, Elke; Marzi, Ingo

    2014-01-01

    Chronic ethanol abuse is known to increase susceptibility to infections after injury, in part, by modification of macrophage function. Several intracellular signalling mechanisms are involved in the initiation of inflammatory responses, including the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) pathway. In this study, we investigated the systemic and hepatic effect of chronic ethanol feeding on in vivo activation of NF-κB in NF-κBEGFP reporter gene mice. Specifically, the study focused on Kupffer cell proinflammatory cytokines IL-6 and TNF-α and activation of NF-κB after chronic ethanol feeding followed by in vitro stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We found that chronic ethanol upregulated NF-κB activation and increased hepatic and systemic proinflammatory cytokine levels. Similarly, LPS-stimulated IL-1β release from whole blood was significantly enhanced in ethanol-fed mice. However, LPS significantly increased IL-6 and TNF-α levels. These results demonstrate that chronic ethanol feeding can improve the responsiveness of macrophage LPS-stimulated IL-6 and TNF-α production and indicate that this effect may result from ethanol-induced alterations in intracellular signalling through NF-κB. Furthermore, LPS and TNF-α stimulated the gene expression of different inflammatory mediators, in part, in a NF-κB-dependent manner. PMID:24623963

  1. Effects of the in vitro administered ethanol and lipopolysaccharide toxin on membrane properties, intracellular free calcium and phagocytic function of isolated rat kupffer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Victorov, A.; Smith, T.; Abril, E.; Hamlin, E.; Earnest, D. )

    1991-03-11

    Low concentrations of ethanol slightly stimulated phagocytosis of cultured Kupffer cells (KC), producing practically no effect on membrane microviscosity and cytosolic free (Ca{sup 2+}){sub i}. On the contrary, high concentrations of ethanol significantly suppressed phagocytic function, increased fluidity of membrane lipids and caused a sustained rise in (Ca{sup 2}){sub i}; above the resting level of 41-85 nM. Treatment of KC with colchicine and cytochalasin B dramatically destructurized the plasma membrane lipids. Short term preincubation of KC with high doses of alcohol stimulated the disordering effects of both drugs, suggesting direct interaction of ethanol with microtubule and microfilament structures. The authors hypothesize that ethanol impairs phagocytosis of KC by concerted actions on membrane lipid fluidity, cytosolic free Ca{sup 2+} and functioning of cytoskeleton. On the other hand, incubation of KC with low concentrations of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) produced no changes in (Ca{sup 2+}){sub i}; or plasma membrane fluidity but reduced by several fold the fluidizing effect of subsequently added ethanol. They suggested that low doses of LPS, by activating second messengers other than Ca{sup 2+}, alter the functioning of the cytoskeleton and cause reorganization of the plasma membrane thus making KC membranes more resistent to the fluidizing action of ethanol and partially restoring the phagocytic function.

  2. Alteration of Kupffer cell function and morphology by low melt point paraffin wax in female Fischer-344 but not Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Hoglen, N C; Regan, S P; Hensel, J L; Younis, H S; Sauer, J M; Steup, D R; Miller, M J; Waterman, S J; Twerdok, L E; Sipes, I G

    1998-11-01

    This study was conducted to compare the effects of 60-day dietary exposure (2%) to low melt point paraffin wax (LMPW) on both general liver morphology and Kupffer cell (KC) function and morphology in female F-344 and Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. Livers from only F-344 rats fed LMPW had granuloma formation/lymphoid cell aggregates with small areas of necrosis. Significant increases in serum alanine and aspartate aminotransferase as well as gamma-glutamyltransferase activities were detected only in treated F-344 rats. Additionally, detectable amounts of LMPW were present only in livers of treated F-344 rats. Because KC can be involved in granuloma formation, their morphology and function were examined. Electron microscopy revealed the presence of large, irregularly shaped, membrane-associated vacuoles in cells isolated from F-344 rats exposed to LMPW. These vacuoles were not seen in KC from control rats and rarely detected in KC isolated from LMPW-exposed SD rats. Moreover, indices of KC function including phagocytic activity and nitric oxide and superoxide anion production were significantly increased by KC isolated from F-344 rats exposed to LMPW (1.6-, 36-, and 2.2-fold increases, respectively) over untreated controls. In contrast, LPS-stimulated production of TNF and LTB4 was significantly decreased only in KC of LMPW-fed F-344 rats. No significant changes in these functions were observed in KC isolated from SD rats exposed to LMPW or from KC isolated from control F-344 or SD rats. These data provide evidence that dietary LMPW alters the morphology and functional capacity of KC of F-344 but not SD rats and these changes may ultimately lead to granuloma formation.

  3. CXCR1 blockade selectively targets human breast cancer stem cells in vitro and in xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Ginestier, Christophe; Liu, Suling; Diebel, Mark E.; Korkaya, Hasan; Luo, Ming; Brown, Marty; Wicinski, Julien; Cabaud, Olivier; Charafe-Jauffret, Emmanuelle; Birnbaum, Daniel; Guan, Jun-Lin; Dontu, Gabriela; Wicha, Max S.

    2010-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that breast cancer and other solid tumors possess a rare population of cells capable of extensive self-renewal that contribute to metastasis and treatment resistance. We report here the development of a strategy to target these breast cancer stem cells (CSCs) through blockade of the IL-8 receptor CXCR1. CXCR1 blockade using either a CXCR1-specific blocking antibody or repertaxin, a small-molecule CXCR1 inhibitor, selectively depleted the CSC population in 2 human breast cancer cell lines in vitro. Furthermore, this was followed by the induction of massive apoptosis in the bulk tumor population via FASL/FAS signaling. The effects of CXCR1 blockade on CSC viability and on FASL production were mediated by the FAK/AKT/FOXO3A pathway. In addition, repertaxin was able to specifically target the CSC population in human breast cancer xenografts, retarding tumor growth and reducing metastasis. Our data therefore suggest that CXCR1 blockade may provide a novel means of targeting and eliminating breast CSCs. PMID:20051626

  4. Chinese medicinal formula, Qinggan Huoxue Recipe protects rats from alcoholic liver disease via the lipopolysaccharide-Kupffer cell signal conduction pathway.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tao; Liu, Tao; Zhang, Li; Xing, Lian-Jun; Zheng, Pei-Yong; Ji, Guang

    2014-08-01

    The Chinese medicinal formula, Qinggan (QG) Huoxue (HX) Recipe (R) exerts a range of pharmacological effects, including reversible steatosis, decreased levels of inflammatory cytokines and lipid peroxidation resistance. The aim of the present study was to determine the specific mechanisms of QGHXR hepatoprotection through the lipopolysaccharide-Kupffer cell (LPS-KC) signal conduction pathway in rats with alcoholic liver disease (ALD). ALD rats were exposed to the compound factors, QGR and HXR. Hematoxylin and eosin staining was conducted to evaluate the pathological changes in the liver following QGHXR treatment and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was performed to measure the content of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in the plasma. Immunohistochemical staining was conducted to examine the expression of cell differentiation antigen (CD) 68 and 14. In addition, western blot analysis and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction were used to measure the expression of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), phosphorylated-extracellular regulated protein kinases (p-ERK), nuclear factor (NF)-κB, CD14 and TNF-α. Following stimulation with the compound factors, the rats exhibited increased alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) levels, as well as marked pathological changes. Furthermore, the related molecules in the LPS-KC pathway were upregulated and QGHXR was identified to be effective in the LPS-KC signal conduction pathway in the ALD rats. QGHXR was superior to QGR and HXR in reducing the serum ALT and AST levels, regulating CD14, TLR4, NF-κB, ERK and TNF-α as well as improving the pathological changes. The results indicated that QGHXR therapy may provide a novel strategy for treating ALD via regulation of the related molecules in the LPS-KC signaling pathway. PMID:25009584

  5. Chinese medicinal formula, Qinggan Huoxue Recipe protects rats from alcoholic liver disease via the lipopolysaccharide-Kupffer cell signal conduction pathway

    PubMed Central

    WU, TAO; LIU, TAO; ZHANG, LI; XING, LIAN-JUN; ZHENG, PEI-YONG; JI, GUANG

    2014-01-01

    The Chinese medicinal formula, Qinggan (QG) Huoxue (HX) Recipe (R) exerts a range of pharmacological effects, including reversible steatosis, decreased levels of inflammatory cytokines and lipid peroxidation resistance. The aim of the present study was to determine the specific mechanisms of QGHXR hepatoprotection through the lipopolysaccharide-Kupffer cell (LPS-KC) signal conduction pathway in rats with alcoholic liver disease (ALD). ALD rats were exposed to the compound factors, QGR and HXR. Hematoxylin and eosin staining was conducted to evaluate the pathological changes in the liver following QGHXR treatment and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was performed to measure the content of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in the plasma. Immunohistochemical staining was conducted to examine the expression of cell differentiation antigen (CD) 68 and 14. In addition, western blot analysis and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction were used to measure the expression of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), phosphorylated-extracellular regulated protein kinases (p-ERK), nuclear factor (NF)-κB, CD14 and TNF-α. Following stimulation with the compound factors, the rats exhibited increased alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) levels, as well as marked pathological changes. Furthermore, the related molecules in the LPS-KC pathway were upregulated and QGHXR was identified to be effective in the LPS-KC signal conduction pathway in the ALD rats. QGHXR was superior to QGR and HXR in reducing the serum ALT and AST levels, regulating CD14, TLR4, NF-κB, ERK and TNF-α as well as improving the pathological changes. The results indicated that QGHXR therapy may provide a novel strategy for treating ALD via regulation of the related molecules in the LPS-KC signaling pathway. PMID:25009584

  6. The UII/UT system mediates upregulation of proinflammatory cytokines through p38 MAPK and NF-κB pathways in LPS-stimulated Kupffer cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Liang Ming; Liang, Dong Yu; Ye, Chang Gen; Tu, Wen Juan; Zhu, Tong

    2015-01-01

    The urotensin II (UII)/UII receptor (UT) system is closely related to immune inflammation. In acute liver failure (ALF), the UII/UT system can promote the production and release of proinflammatory cytokines, inducing an inflammatory injury response in liver tissue. However, the mechanism by which the hepatic UII/UT system promotes proinflammatory cytokine production and release is not clear. To solve this problem, we used primary Kupffer cells (KCs) as the model system in the current study. The results showed that after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation, KCs showed significantly increased expression and release of UII/UT and proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) and interleukin 1β (IL-1β). Pretreatment with urantide, which is a UT receptor antagonist, significantly inhibited the LPS-stimulated expression and release of UII/UT, TNF-α, and IL-1β by KCs. In addition, LPS stimulation induced nuclear p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) protein phosphorylation and expression of the nuclear nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) p65 subunit in KCs and enhanced the binding activity of NF-κB to DNA molecules, whereas urantide pretreatment significantly inhibited the LPS-stimulated nuclear expression and activity of these molecules in KCs. Therefore, our conclusion is that the UII/UT system mediates LPS-stimulated production and release of proinflammatory cytokine by KCs, and this mediating effect at least partially relies on the inflammatory signaling pathway molecules p38 MAPK and NF-κB. PMID:25803040

  7. Kupffer-cell-expressed transmembrane TNF-α is a major contributor to lipopolysaccharide and D-galactosamine-induced liver injury.

    PubMed

    Yang, Peng; Zhou, Wenjing; Li, Chenxi; Zhang, Meng; Jiang, Yaping; Jiang, Rui; Ba, Hongping; Li, Cheng; Wang, Jing; Yin, Bingjiao; Gong, Feili; Li, Zhuoya

    2016-02-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α exists in two bioactive forms, a 26-kDa transmembrane form (tmTNF-α) and a 17-kDa soluble form (sTNF-α). sTNF-α has been recognized as a key regulator of hepatitis; however, serum sTNF-α disappears in mice during the development of severe liver injury, and high levels of serum sTNF-α do not necessarily result in liver damage. Interestingly, in a mouse model of acute hepatitis, we have found that tmTNF-α expression on Kupffer cells (KCs) significantly increases when mice develop severe liver injury caused by lipopolysaccharide (LPS)/D-galactosamine (D-gal), and the level of tmTNF-α expression is positively related to the activity of serum transaminases. Therefore, we hypothesized that KC-expressed tmTNF-α constitutes a pathomechanism in hepatitis and have explored the role of tmTNF-α in this disease model. Here, we have compared the impact of KCs(tmTNFlow) and KCs(tmTNFhigh) on acute hepatitis in vivo and ex vivo and have further demonstrated that KCs(tmTNFhigh), rather than KCs(tmTNFlow), not only exhibit an imbalance in secretion of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, favoring inflammatory response and exacerbating liver injury, but also induce hepatocellular apoptosis via tmTNF-α and the expression of another pro-apoptotic factor, Fas ligand. Our data suggest that KC(tmTNFhigh) is a major contributor to liver injury in LPS/D-gal-induced hepatitis. PMID:26267221

  8. Kupffer cell depletion protects against the steatosis, but not the liver damage, induced by marginal-copper, high-fructose diet in male rats.

    PubMed

    Song, Ming; Schuschke, Dale A; Zhou, Zhanxiang; Zhong, Wei; Zhang, Jiayuan; Zhang, Xiang; Wang, Yuhua; McClain, Craig J

    2015-06-01

    High-fructose feeding impairs copper status and leads to low copper availability, which is a novel mechanism in obesity-related fatty liver. Copper deficiency-associated hepatic iron overload likely plays an important role in fructose-induced liver injury. Excess iron in the liver is distributed throughout hepatocytes and Kupffer cells (KCs). The aim of this study was to examine the role of KCs in the pathogenesis of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease induced by a marginal-copper high-fructose diet (CuMF). Male weanling Sprague-Dawley rats were fed either a copper-adequate or a marginally copper-deficient diet for 4 wk. Deionized water or deionized water containing 30% fructose (wt/vol) was also given ad libitum. KCs were depleted by intravenous administration of gadolinium chloride (GdCl3) before and/or in the middle of the experimental period. Hepatic triglyceride accumulation was completely eliminated with KC depletion in CuMF consumption rats, which was associated with the normalization of elevated plasma monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and increased hepatic sterol regulatory element binding protein-1 expression. However, hepatic copper and iron content were not significantly affected by KC depletion. In addition, KC depletion reduced body weight and epididymal fat weight as well as adipocyte size. Plasma endotoxin and gut permeability were markedly increased in CuMF rats. Moreover, MCP-1 was robustly increased in the culture medium when isolated KCs from CuMF rats were treated with LPS. Our data suggest that KCs play a critical role in the development of hepatic steatosis induced by marginal-copper high-fructose diet.

  9. Kupffer cell depletion protects against the steatosis, but not the liver damage, induced by marginal-copper, high-fructose diet in male rats.

    PubMed

    Song, Ming; Schuschke, Dale A; Zhou, Zhanxiang; Zhong, Wei; Zhang, Jiayuan; Zhang, Xiang; Wang, Yuhua; McClain, Craig J

    2015-06-01

    High-fructose feeding impairs copper status and leads to low copper availability, which is a novel mechanism in obesity-related fatty liver. Copper deficiency-associated hepatic iron overload likely plays an important role in fructose-induced liver injury. Excess iron in the liver is distributed throughout hepatocytes and Kupffer cells (KCs). The aim of this study was to examine the role of KCs in the pathogenesis of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease induced by a marginal-copper high-fructose diet (CuMF). Male weanling Sprague-Dawley rats were fed either a copper-adequate or a marginally copper-deficient diet for 4 wk. Deionized water or deionized water containing 30% fructose (wt/vol) was also given ad libitum. KCs were depleted by intravenous administration of gadolinium chloride (GdCl3) before and/or in the middle of the experimental period. Hepatic triglyceride accumulation was completely eliminated with KC depletion in CuMF consumption rats, which was associated with the normalization of elevated plasma monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and increased hepatic sterol regulatory element binding protein-1 expression. However, hepatic copper and iron content were not significantly affected by KC depletion. In addition, KC depletion reduced body weight and epididymal fat weight as well as adipocyte size. Plasma endotoxin and gut permeability were markedly increased in CuMF rats. Moreover, MCP-1 was robustly increased in the culture medium when isolated KCs from CuMF rats were treated with LPS. Our data suggest that KCs play a critical role in the development of hepatic steatosis induced by marginal-copper high-fructose diet. PMID:25813056

  10. Blockade of maitotoxin-induced oncotic cell death reveals zeiosis

    PubMed Central

    Estacion, Mark; Schilling, William P

    2002-01-01

    Background Maitotoxin (MTX) initiates cell death by sequentially activating 1) Ca2+ influx via non-selective cation channels, 2) uptake of vital dyes via formation of large pores, and 3) release of lactate dehydrogenase, an indication of cell lysis. MTX also causes formation of membrane blebs, which dramatically dilate during the cytolysis phase. To determine the role of phospholipase C (PLC) in the cell death cascade, U73122, a specific inhibitor of PLC, and U73343, an inactive analog, were examined on MTX-induced responses in bovine aortic endothelial cells. Results Addition of either U73122 or U73343, prior to MTX, produced a concentration-dependent inhibition of the cell death cascade (IC50 ≈ 1.9 and 0.66 μM, respectively) suggesting that the effect of these agents was independent of PLC. Addition of U73343 shortly after MTX, prevented or attenuated the effects of the toxin, but addition at later times had little or no effect. Time-lapse videomicroscopy showed that U73343 dramatically altered the blebbing profile of MTX-treated cells. Specifically, U73343 blocked bleb dilation and converted the initial blebbing event into "zeiosis", a type of membrane blebbing commonly associated with apoptosis. Cells challenged with MTX and rescued by subsequent addition of U73343, showed enhanced caspase-3 activity 48 hr after the initial insult, consistent with activation of the apoptotic program. Conclusions Within minutes of MTX addition, endothelial cells die by oncosis. Rescue by addition of U73343 shortly after MTX showed that a small percentage of cells are destined to die by oncosis, but that a larger percentage survive; cells that survive the initial insult exhibit zeiosis and may ultimately die by apoptotic mechanisms. PMID:11825342

  11. Association between liver X receptor-α and neuron-derived orphan nuclear receptor-1 in Kupffer cells of C57BL/6 mice during inflammation.

    PubMed

    He, Kun; Dai, Zhuo-Ya; Li, Pei-Zhi; Zhu, Xi-Wen; Gong, Jian-Ping

    2015-10-01

    The liver X receptor (LXR) isoform LXR‑α has a significant role in lipid metabolism and innate immunity. Overexpression of neuron‑derived orphan nuclear receptor‑1 (NOR‑1) in macrophages reduces the synthesis of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. However, to date, the mechanisms via which NOR‑1 inhibits lipopolysaccharide (LPS)‑induced inflammation in Kupffer cells (KCs) via LXR‑α have not been elucidated. T0901317 is the most potent LXR‑α ligand, leading to its activation. In the present study, KCs were isolated from C57BL/6 mice and randomly divided into five groups: Control, T0901317, LPS, LPS + T0901317 and LPS + T0901317 + NOR‑1 small hairpin (sh)RNA groups. In order to investigate the role of NOR‑1 in inflammation, shRNA targeting NOR‑1 was used to specifically knock down NOR‑1 mRNA in KCs. The expression levels of LXR‑α and NOR‑1 in KCs were determined by reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analyses. The protein levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)‑α and interleukin (IL)‑10 in the supernatant of KCs were evaluated by ELISA. The results revealed that LXR‑α expression in the T0901317 group was higher than that in the control group; furthermore, LXR‑α expression was higher in KCs treated with LPS + T0901317 compared with that in KCs treated with LPS only. The expression levels of NOR‑1 in each group showed a similar trend. shRNA targeting of NOR‑1 suppressed the mRNA expression of NOR‑1, but had no influence on LXR‑α mRNA expression. NOR‑1 protein expression was augmented in the LPS + T0901317 group compared with that in the LPS + T09 + shRNA group. In the supernatant of KCs, the TNF‑α levels in the LPS + T0901317 group were lower than those in the LPS group, whereas the IL‑10 levels were higher in the LPS + T0901317 group compared with those in the LPS group. The results of the present study suggested that ligand T0901317 promotes LXR‑α expression

  12. Structure-activity relationship between carboxylic acids and T cell cycle blockade.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Kathleen M; DeLoose, Annick; Valentine, Jimmie L; Fifer, E Kim

    2006-04-01

    This study was designed to examine the potential structure-activity relationship between carboxylic acids, histone acetylation and T cell cycle blockade. Toward this goal a series of structural homologues of the short-chain carboxylic acid n-butyrate were studied for their ability to block the IL-2-stimulated proliferation of cloned CD4+ T cells. The carboxylic acids were also tested for their ability to inhibit histone deacetylation. In addition, Western blotting was used to examine the relative capacity of the carboxlic acids to upregulate the cyclin kinase-dependent inhibitor p21cip1 in T cells. As shown earlier n-butyrate effectively inhibited histone deacetylation. The increased acetylation induced by n-butyrate was associated with the upregulation of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21cip1 and the cell cycle blockade of CD4+ T cells. Of the other carboxylic acids studied, the short chain acids, C3-C5, without branching were the best inhibitors of histone deacetylase. This inhibition correlated with increased expression of the cell cycle blocker p21cip1, and the associated suppression of CD4+ T cell proliferation. The branched-chain carboxylic acids tested were ineffective in all the assays. These results underline the relationship between the ability of a carboxylic acid to inhibit histone deacetylation, and their ability to block T cell proliferation, and suggests that branching inhibits these effects.

  13. Checkpoint Blockade - a New Treatment Paradigm in Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Grünwald, Viktor

    2016-01-01

    Nivolumab is the first checkpoint inhibitor for the treatment of renal cell carcinoma (RCC), which is in line for approval in Europe. Despite its novelty in the treatment algorithm of RCC, it offers a whole new strategy of therapy management with safe applicability. The aim of this work was to review current data on checkpoint inhibitors in RCC and discuss future perspectives for this novel approach in RCC. A selective literature search was performed in the Pubmed database: Nivolumab is a first-in-class agent for the treatment of RCC, and its European label is anticipated for 2016. Contrary to many other agents, nivolumab was able to show a benefit in overall survival and health-related quality of life when compared to everolimus. Current trials focus on optimizing and expanding its use to metastatic RCC. In conclusion, nivolumab has already acquired a role in the treatment algorithm of RCC. However, which patient population derives the most benefit as well its optimal use in the treatment algorithm remain to be determined. A number of ongoing trials will provide novel insights and might help to untangle this novel network of therapy management for immunotherapies. PMID:27259695

  14. Human CAR T cells with cell-intrinsic PD-1 checkpoint blockade resist tumor-mediated inhibition.

    PubMed

    Cherkassky, Leonid; Morello, Aurore; Villena-Vargas, Jonathan; Feng, Yang; Dimitrov, Dimiter S; Jones, David R; Sadelain, Michel; Adusumilli, Prasad S

    2016-08-01

    Following immune attack, solid tumors upregulate coinhibitory ligands that bind to inhibitory receptors on T cells. This adaptive resistance compromises the efficacy of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapies, which redirect T cells to solid tumors. Here, we investigated whether programmed death-1-mediated (PD-1-mediated) T cell exhaustion affects mesothelin-targeted CAR T cells and explored cell-intrinsic strategies to overcome inhibition of CAR T cells. Using an orthotopic mouse model of pleural mesothelioma, we determined that relatively high doses of both CD28- and 4-1BB-based second-generation CAR T cells achieved tumor eradication. CAR-mediated CD28 and 4-1BB costimulation resulted in similar levels of T cell persistence in animals treated with low T cell doses; however, PD-1 upregulation within the tumor microenvironment inhibited T cell function. At lower doses, 4-1BB CAR T cells retained their cytotoxic and cytokine secretion functions longer than CD28 CAR T cells. The prolonged function of 4-1BB CAR T cells correlated with improved survival. PD-1/PD-1 ligand [PD-L1] pathway interference, through PD-1 antibody checkpoint blockade, cell-intrinsic PD-1 shRNA blockade, or a PD-1 dominant negative receptor, restored the effector function of CD28 CAR T cells. These findings provide mechanistic insights into human CAR T cell exhaustion in solid tumors and suggest that PD-1/PD-L1 blockade may be an effective strategy for improving the potency of CAR T cell therapies.

  15. Human CAR T cells with cell-intrinsic PD-1 checkpoint blockade resist tumor-mediated inhibition.

    PubMed

    Cherkassky, Leonid; Morello, Aurore; Villena-Vargas, Jonathan; Feng, Yang; Dimitrov, Dimiter S; Jones, David R; Sadelain, Michel; Adusumilli, Prasad S

    2016-08-01

    Following immune attack, solid tumors upregulate coinhibitory ligands that bind to inhibitory receptors on T cells. This adaptive resistance compromises the efficacy of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapies, which redirect T cells to solid tumors. Here, we investigated whether programmed death-1-mediated (PD-1-mediated) T cell exhaustion affects mesothelin-targeted CAR T cells and explored cell-intrinsic strategies to overcome inhibition of CAR T cells. Using an orthotopic mouse model of pleural mesothelioma, we determined that relatively high doses of both CD28- and 4-1BB-based second-generation CAR T cells achieved tumor eradication. CAR-mediated CD28 and 4-1BB costimulation resulted in similar levels of T cell persistence in animals treated with low T cell doses; however, PD-1 upregulation within the tumor microenvironment inhibited T cell function. At lower doses, 4-1BB CAR T cells retained their cytotoxic and cytokine secretion functions longer than CD28 CAR T cells. The prolonged function of 4-1BB CAR T cells correlated with improved survival. PD-1/PD-1 ligand [PD-L1] pathway interference, through PD-1 antibody checkpoint blockade, cell-intrinsic PD-1 shRNA blockade, or a PD-1 dominant negative receptor, restored the effector function of CD28 CAR T cells. These findings provide mechanistic insights into human CAR T cell exhaustion in solid tumors and suggest that PD-1/PD-L1 blockade may be an effective strategy for improving the potency of CAR T cell therapies. PMID:27454297

  16. Human CAR T cells with cell-intrinsic PD-1 checkpoint blockade resist tumor-mediated inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Cherkassky, Leonid; Morello, Aurore; Villena-Vargas, Jonathan; Feng, Yang; Dimitrov, Dimiter S.; Jones, David R.; Sadelain, Michel; Adusumilli, Prasad S.

    2016-01-01

    Following immune attack, solid tumors upregulate coinhibitory ligands that bind to inhibitory receptors on T cells. This adaptive resistance compromises the efficacy of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapies, which redirect T cells to solid tumors. Here, we investigated whether programmed death-1–mediated (PD-1–mediated) T cell exhaustion affects mesothelin-targeted CAR T cells and explored cell-intrinsic strategies to overcome inhibition of CAR T cells. Using an orthotopic mouse model of pleural mesothelioma, we determined that relatively high doses of both CD28- and 4-1BB–based second-generation CAR T cells achieved tumor eradication. CAR-mediated CD28 and 4-1BB costimulation resulted in similar levels of T cell persistence in animals treated with low T cell doses; however, PD-1 upregulation within the tumor microenvironment inhibited T cell function. At lower doses, 4-1BB CAR T cells retained their cytotoxic and cytokine secretion functions longer than CD28 CAR T cells. The prolonged function of 4-1BB CAR T cells correlated with improved survival. PD-1/PD-1 ligand [PD-L1] pathway interference, through PD-1 antibody checkpoint blockade, cell-intrinsic PD-1 shRNA blockade, or a PD-1 dominant negative receptor, restored the effector function of CD28 CAR T cells. These findings provide mechanistic insights into human CAR T cell exhaustion in solid tumors and suggest that PD-1/PD-L1 blockade may be an effective strategy for improving the potency of CAR T cell therapies. PMID:27454297

  17. Critical role of activation-inducible lymphocyte immunomediatory molecule/inducible costimulator in the effector function of human T cells: a comparative in vitro study of effects of its blockade and CD28 blockade in human beings and monkeys.

    PubMed

    Tajima, Nobuyuki; Tezuka, Katsunari; Tanaka, Masaru; Tanimoto, Minako; Miyai, Atsuko; Takeshima, Hiroaki; Watanabe, Yoshihiro

    2008-07-01

    Activation-inducible lymphocyte immunomediatory molecule (AILIM; also referred to as inducible costimulator, ICOS) is the third homolog of the "professional" costimulatory molecule, CD28. To date, the characteristics and role of AILIM/ICOS, especially in effector function of T cells, have been determined through numerous studies in vitro and in vivo using mice. Considering potential differences among species, whether the AILIM/ICOS blockade acts as an efficacious immunomodulator for human diseases remains to be elucidated. In the present study, ability of AILIM/ICOS blockade to modulate immune responses of human and monkey cells was investigated using a fully human antibody (JTA-009), comparing the effect of CD28 blockade. JTA-009 blocked the response of human and monkey T cells co-stimulated with anti-CD3 and AILIM/ICOS ligand, B7h. AILIM/ICOS and CD28 blockade both inhibited human mixed lymphocyte reaction in different fashions, as well as cytokine production in T helper (Th) 1-/Th2-type recall responses. In monkeys however, CD28 blockade by CTLA4-Ig effectively prevented mixed lymphocyte reaction to a greater extent than AILIM/ICOS blockade. These results suggest that AILIM/ICOS blockade is valuable for suppressing both primary allogenic response and recall responses of T cell in human beings, and that there are differences between human and monkey use preferences for costimulatory molecules.

  18. Blockade of immunosuppressive cytokines restores NK cell antiviral function in chronic hepatitis B virus infection.

    PubMed

    Peppa, Dimitra; Micco, Lorenzo; Javaid, Alia; Kennedy, Patrick T F; Schurich, Anna; Dunn, Claire; Pallant, Celeste; Ellis, Gidon; Khanna, Pooja; Dusheiko, Geoffrey; Gilson, Richard J; Maini, Mala K

    2010-01-01

    NK cells are enriched in the liver, constituting around a third of intrahepatic lymphocytes. We have previously demonstrated that they upregulate the death ligand TRAIL in patients with chronic hepatitis B virus infection (CHB), allowing them to kill hepatocytes bearing TRAIL receptors. In this study we investigated whether, in addition to their pathogenic role, NK cells have antiviral potential in CHB. We characterised NK cell subsets and effector function in 64 patients with CHB compared to 31 healthy controls. We found that, in contrast to their upregulated TRAIL expression and maintenance of cytolytic function, NK cells had a markedly impaired capacity to produce IFN-γ in CHB. This functional dichotomy of NK cells could be recapitulated in vitro by exposure to the immunosuppressive cytokine IL-10, which was induced in patients with active CHB. IL-10 selectively suppressed NK cell IFN-γ production without altering cytotoxicity or death ligand expression. Potent antiviral therapy reduced TRAIL-expressing CD56(bright) NK cells, consistent with the reduction in liver inflammation it induced; however, it was not able to normalise IL-10 levels or the capacity of NK cells to produce the antiviral cytokine IFN-γ. Blockade of IL-10 +/- TGF-β restored the capacity of NK cells from both the periphery and liver of patients with CHB to produce IFN-γ, thereby enhancing their non-cytolytic antiviral capacity. In conclusion, NK cells may be driven to a state of partial functional tolerance by the immunosuppressive cytokine environment in CHB. Their defective capacity to produce the antiviral cytokine IFN-γ persists in patients on antiviral therapy but can be corrected in vitro by IL-10+/- TGF-β blockade. PMID:21187913

  19. CXCR3 Blockade Inhibits T Cell Migration into the Skin and Prevents Development of Alopecia Areata.

    PubMed

    Dai, Zhenpeng; Xing, Luzhou; Cerise, Jane; Wang, Eddy Hsi Chun; Jabbari, Ali; de Jong, Annemieke; Petukhova, Lynn; Christiano, Angela M; Clynes, Raphael

    2016-08-15

    Alopecia areata (AA) is an autoimmune disease of the hair follicle that results in hair loss of varying severity. Recently, we showed that IFN-γ-producing NKG2D(+)CD8(+) T cells actively infiltrate the hair follicle and are responsible for its destruction in C3H/HeJ AA mice. Our transcriptional profiling of human and mouse alopecic skin showed that the IFN pathway is the dominant signaling pathway involved in AA. We showed that IFN-inducible chemokines (CXCL9/10/11) are markedly upregulated in the skin of AA lesions, and further, that the IFN-inducible chemokine receptor, CXCR3, is upregulated on alopecic effector T cells. To demonstrate whether CXCL9/10/11 chemokines were required for development of AA, we treated mice with blocking Abs to CXCR3, which prevented the development of AA in the graft model, inhibiting the accumulation of NKG2D(+)CD8(+) T cells in the skin and cutaneous lymph nodes. These data demonstrate proof of concept that interfering with the Tc1 response in AA via blockade of IFN-inducible chemokines can prevent the onset of AA. CXCR3 blockade could be approached clinically in human AA with either biologic or small-molecule inhibition, the latter being particularly intriguing as a topical therapeutic. PMID:27412416

  20. Immune Checkpoint Blockade to Improve Tumor Infiltrating Lymphocytes for Adoptive Cell Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kodumudi, Krithika N.; Siegel, Jessica; Weber, Amy M.; Scott, Ellen; Sarnaik, Amod A.; Pilon-Thomas, Shari

    2016-01-01

    Tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) has been associated with improved survival in cancer patients. Within the tumor microenvironment, regulatory cells and expression of co-inhibitory immune checkpoint molecules can lead to the inactivation of TIL. Hence, there is a need to develop strategies that disrupt these negative regulators to achieve robust anti-tumor immune responses. We evaluated the blockade of immune checkpoints and their effect on T cell infiltration and function. We examined the ability of TIL to induce tumor-specific immune responses in vitro and in vivo. TIL isolated from tumor bearing mice were tumor-specific and expressed co-inhibitory immune checkpoint molecules. Administration of monoclonal antibodies against immune checkpoints led to a significant delay in tumor growth. However, anti-PD-L1 antibody treated mice had a significant increase in T cell infiltration and IFN-γ production compared to other groups. Adoptive transfer of in vitro expanded TIL from tumors of anti-PD-L1 antibody treated mice led to a significant delay in tumor growth. Blockade of co-inhibitory immune checkpoints could be an effective strategy to improve TIL infiltration and function. PMID:27050669

  1. Cutting edge: identification of autoreactive CD4+ and CD8+ T cell subsets resistant to PD-1 pathway blockade.

    PubMed

    Pauken, Kristen E; Nelson, Christine E; Martinov, Tijana; Spanier, Justin A; Heffernan, James R; Sahli, Nathanael L; Quarnstrom, Clare F; Osum, Kevin C; Schenkel, Jason M; Jenkins, Marc K; Blazar, Bruce R; Vezys, Vaiva; Fife, Brian T

    2015-04-15

    Programmed death-1 (PD-1) promotes T cell tolerance. Despite therapeutically targeting this pathway for chronic infections and tumors, little is known about how different T cell subsets are affected during blockade. We examined PD-1/PD ligand 1 (PD-L1) regulation of self-antigen-specific CD4 and CD8 T cells in autoimmune-susceptible models. PD-L1 blockade increased insulin-specific effector CD4 T cells in type 1 diabetes. However, anergic islet-specific CD4 T cells were resistant to PD-L1 blockade. Additionally, PD-L1 was critical for induction, but not maintenance, of CD8 T cell intestinal tolerance. PD-L1 blockade enhanced functionality of effector T cells, whereas established tolerant or anergic T cells were not dependent on PD-1/PD-L1 signaling to remain unresponsive. This highlights the existence of Ag-experienced T cell subsets that do not rely on PD-1/PD-L1 regulation. These findings illustrate how positive treatment outcomes and autoimmunity development during PD-1/PD-L1 inhibition are linked to the differentiation state of a T cell.

  2. Blockade of LFA-1 augments in vitro differentiation of antigen-induced Foxp3+ Treg cells

    PubMed Central

    Verhagen, Johan; Wraith, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of antigen-specific, in vitro-induced Foxp3+ Treg (iTreg) cells protects against autoimmune disease. To generate antigen-specific iTreg cells at high purity, however, remains a challenge. Whereas polyclonal T cell stimulation with anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 antibody yields Foxp3+ iTreg cells at a purity of 90–95%, antigen-induced iTreg cells typically do not exceed a purity of 65–75%, even in a TCR-transgenic model. In a similar vein to thymic Treg cell selection, iTreg cell differentiation is influenced not only by antigen recognition and the availability of TGF-β but also by co-factors including costimulation and adhesion molecules. In this study, we demonstrate that blockade of the T cell integrin Leukocyte Function-associated Antigen-1 (LFA-1) during antigen-mediated iTreg cell differentiation augments Foxp3 induction, leading to approximately 90% purity of Foxp3+ iTreg cells. This increased efficacy not only boosts the yield of Foxp3+ iTreg cells, it also reduces contamination with activated effector T cells, thus improving the safety of adoptive transfer immunotherapy. PMID:25108241

  3. TNF-α blockade induces IL-10 expression in human CD4+ T cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Hayley G.; Roostalu, Urmas; Walter, Gina J.; Gullick, Nicola J.; Frederiksen, Klaus S.; Roberts, Ceri A.; Sumner, Jonathan; Baeten, Dominique L.; Gerwien, Jens G.; Cope, Andrew P.; Geissmann, Frederic; Kirkham, Bruce W.; Taams, Leonie S.

    2014-02-01

    IL-17+ CD4+ T (Th17) cells contribute to the pathogenesis of several human inflammatory diseases. Here we demonstrate that TNF inhibitor (TNFi) drugs induce the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 in CD4+ T cells including IL-17+ CD4+ T cells. TNFi-mediated induction of IL-10 in IL-17+ CD4+ T cells is Treg-/Foxp3-independent, requires IL-10 and is overcome by IL-1β. TNFi-exposed IL-17+ CD4+ T cells are molecularly and functionally distinct, with a unique gene signature characterized by expression of IL10 and IKZF3 (encoding Aiolos). We show that Aiolos binds conserved regions in the IL10 locus in IL-17+ CD4+ T cells. Furthermore, IKZF3 and IL10 expression levels correlate in primary CD4+ T cells and Aiolos overexpression is sufficient to drive IL10 in these cells. Our data demonstrate that TNF-α blockade induces IL-10 in CD4+ T cells including Th17 cells and suggest a role for the transcription factor Aiolos in the regulation of IL-10 in CD4+ T cells.

  4. Molecular Pathways: Activating T Cells after Cancer Cell Phagocytosis from Blockade of CD47 "Don't Eat Me" Signals.

    PubMed

    McCracken, Melissa N; Cha, Adriel C; Weissman, Irving L

    2015-08-15

    Recent advances with immunotherapy agents for the treatment of cancer have provided remarkable, and in some cases, curative results. Our laboratory has identified CD47 as an important "don't eat me" signal expressed on malignant cells. Blockade of the CD47:SIRP-α axis between tumor cells and innate immune cells (monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells) increases tumor cell phagocytosis in both solid tumors (including, but not limited to, bladder, breast, colon, lung, and pancreatic) and hematologic malignancies. These phagocytic innate cells are also professional antigen-presenting cells (APC), providing a link from innate to adaptive antitumor immunity. Preliminary studies have demonstrated that APCs present antigens from phagocytosed tumor cells, causing T-cell activation. Therefore, agents that block the CD47:SIRP-α engagement are attractive therapeutic targets as a monotherapy or in combination with additional immune-modulating agents for activating antitumor T cells in vivo.

  5. The multikinase inhibitor Sorafenib enhances glycolysis and synergizes with glycolysis blockade for cancer cell killing

    PubMed Central

    Tesori, Valentina; Piscaglia, Anna Chiara; Samengo, Daniela; Barba, Marta; Bernardini, Camilla; Scatena, Roberto; Pontoglio, Alessandro; Castellini, Laura; Spelbrink, Johannes N.; Maulucci, Giuseppe; Puglisi, Maria Ausiliatrice; Pani, Giovambattista; Gasbarrini, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Although the only effective drug against primary hepatocarcinoma, the multikinase inhibitor Sorafenib (SFB) usually fails to eradicate liver cancer. Since SFB targets mitochondria, cell metabolic reprogramming may underlie intrinsic tumor resistance. To characterize cancer cell metabolic response to SFB, we measured oxygen consumption, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and ATP content in rat LCSC (Liver Cancer Stem Cells) -2 cells exposed to the drug. Genome wide analysis of gene expression was performed by Affymetrix technology. SFB cytotoxicity was evaluated by multiple assays in the presence or absence of metabolic inhibitors, or in cells genetically depleted of mitochondria. We found that low concentrations (2.5–5 μM) of SFB had a relatively modest effect on LCSC-2 or 293 T cell growth, but damaged mitochondria and increased intracellular ROS. Gene expression profiling of SFB-treated cells was consistent with a shift toward aerobic glycolysis and, accordingly, SFB cytotoxicity was dramatically increased by glucose withdrawal or the glycolytic inhibitor 2-DG. Under metabolic stress, activation of the AMP dependent Protein Kinase (AMPK), but not ROS blockade, protected cells from death. We conclude that mitochondrial damage and ROS drive cell killing by SFB, while glycolytic cell reprogramming may represent a resistance strategy potentially targetable by combination therapies. PMID:25779766

  6. The multikinase inhibitor Sorafenib enhances glycolysis and synergizes with glycolysis blockade for cancer cell killing.

    PubMed

    Tesori, Valentina; Piscaglia, Anna Chiara; Samengo, Daniela; Barba, Marta; Bernardini, Camilla; Scatena, Roberto; Pontoglio, Alessandro; Castellini, Laura; Spelbrink, Johannes N; Maulucci, Giuseppe; Puglisi, Maria Ausiliatrice; Pani, Giovambattista; Gasbarrini, Antonio

    2015-03-17

    Although the only effective drug against primary hepatocarcinoma, the multikinase inhibitor Sorafenib (SFB) usually fails to eradicate liver cancer. Since SFB targets mitochondria, cell metabolic reprogramming may underlie intrinsic tumor resistance. To characterize cancer cell metabolic response to SFB, we measured oxygen consumption, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and ATP content in rat LCSC (Liver Cancer Stem Cells) -2 cells exposed to the drug. Genome wide analysis of gene expression was performed by Affymetrix technology. SFB cytotoxicity was evaluated by multiple assays in the presence or absence of metabolic inhibitors, or in cells genetically depleted of mitochondria. We found that low concentrations (2.5-5 μM) of SFB had a relatively modest effect on LCSC-2 or 293 T cell growth, but damaged mitochondria and increased intracellular ROS. Gene expression profiling of SFB-treated cells was consistent with a shift toward aerobic glycolysis and, accordingly, SFB cytotoxicity was dramatically increased by glucose withdrawal or the glycolytic inhibitor 2-DG. Under metabolic stress, activation of the AMP dependent Protein Kinase (AMPK), but not ROS blockade, protected cells from death. We conclude that mitochondrial damage and ROS drive cell killing by SFB, while glycolytic cell reprogramming may represent a resistance strategy potentially targetable by combination therapies.

  7. [THE EXCESS OF PALMITIC FATTY ACID IN FOOD AS MAIN CAUSE OF LIPOIDOSIS OF INSULIN-DEPENDENT CELLS: SKELETAL MYOCYTES, CARDIO-MYOCYTES, PERIPORTAL HEPATOCYTES, KUPFFER MACROPHAGES AND B-CELLS OF PANCREAS].

    PubMed

    Titov, V N

    2016-02-01

    In phylogenesis, becoming of biologicalfunctions and biological reactions proceeds with the purpose ofpermanent increasing of "kinetic perfection ". The main role belongs to factors ofphysical, chemical and biological kinetics, their evaluation using systemic approach technique under permanent effect of natural selection. The late-in-phylogenesis insulin, proceeded with, in development of biological function of locomotion, specialization of insulin-dependent cells: skeletal myocytes, syncytium of cardiomyocytes, subcutaneous adipocytes, periportal hepatocytes, Kupffer's macrophages and β-cells of islets of pancreas. The insulin initiated formation of new, late in phylogenesis, large pool of fatty cells-subcutaneous adipocytes that increased kinetic parameters of biological function of locomotion. In realization of biological function of locomotion only adipocytes absorb exogenous mono unsaturated and saturated fatty acids in the form of triglycerides in composition of oleic and palmitic lipoproteins of very low density using apoE/B-100 endocytosis. The rest of insulin-dependent cells absorb fatty acids in the form of unesterified fatty acids from associates with albumin and under effect of CD36 of translocase offatty acids. The insulin in all insulin-depended cells inhibits biological reaction of lipolysis enhancing contributing into development of lipoidosis. The insulin expresses transfer offatty acids in the form of unsaturated fatty acids from adipocytes into matrix of mitochondria. The insulin supplies insulin-dependent cells with substrates for acquiring energy subject to that in pool of unsaturated fatty acids in adipocytes prevails hydrophobic palmitic unsaturated fatiy acid that slowly passes into matrix through external membrane ofmitochondria; oxidases of mitochondria so slowly implement its β-oxidation that content of exogenous palmitic unsaturatedfatty acid can't be higher than phylogenetic, physiological level - 15% of all amount offatty acids

  8. Clonal neoantigens elicit T cell immunoreactivity and sensitivity to immune checkpoint blockade.

    PubMed

    McGranahan, Nicholas; Furness, Andrew J S; Rosenthal, Rachel; Ramskov, Sofie; Lyngaa, Rikke; Saini, Sunil Kumar; Jamal-Hanjani, Mariam; Wilson, Gareth A; Birkbak, Nicolai J; Hiley, Crispin T; Watkins, Thomas B K; Shafi, Seema; Murugaesu, Nirupa; Mitter, Richard; Akarca, Ayse U; Linares, Joseph; Marafioti, Teresa; Henry, Jake Y; Van Allen, Eliezer M; Miao, Diana; Schilling, Bastian; Schadendorf, Dirk; Garraway, Levi A; Makarov, Vladimir; Rizvi, Naiyer A; Snyder, Alexandra; Hellmann, Matthew D; Merghoub, Taha; Wolchok, Jedd D; Shukla, Sachet A; Wu, Catherine J; Peggs, Karl S; Chan, Timothy A; Hadrup, Sine R; Quezada, Sergio A; Swanton, Charles

    2016-03-25

    As tumors grow, they acquire mutations, some of which create neoantigens that influence the response of patients to immune checkpoint inhibitors. We explored the impact of neoantigen intratumor heterogeneity (ITH) on antitumor immunity. Through integrated analysis of ITH and neoantigen burden, we demonstrate a relationship between clonal neoantigen burden and overall survival in primary lung adenocarcinomas. CD8(+)tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes reactive to clonal neoantigens were identified in early-stage non-small cell lung cancer and expressed high levels of PD-1. Sensitivity to PD-1 and CTLA-4 blockade in patients with advanced NSCLC and melanoma was enhanced in tumors enriched for clonal neoantigens. T cells recognizing clonal neoantigens were detectable in patients with durable clinical benefit. Cytotoxic chemotherapy-induced subclonal neoantigens, contributing to an increased mutational load, were enriched in certain poor responders. These data suggest that neoantigen heterogeneity may influence immune surveillance and support therapeutic developments targeting clonal neoantigens. PMID:26940869

  9. Clonal neoantigens elicit T cell immunoreactivity and sensitivity to immune checkpoint blockade

    PubMed Central

    McGranahan, Nicholas; Furness, Andrew J. S.; Rosenthal, Rachel; Ramskov, Sofie; Lyngaa, Rikke; Saini, Sunil Kumar; Jamal-Hanjani, Mariam; Wilson, Gareth A.; Birkbak, Nicolai J.; Hiley, Crispin T.; Watkins, Thomas B. K.; Shafi, Seema; Murugaesu, Nirupa; Mitter, Richard; Akarca, Ayse U.; Linares, Joseph; Marafioti, Teresa; Henry, Jake Y.; Van Allen, Eliezer M.; Miao, Diana; Schilling, Bastian; Schadendorf, Dirk; Garraway, Levi A.; Makarov, Vladimir; Rizvi, Naiyer A.; Snyder, Alexandra; Hellmann, Matthew D.; Merghoub, Taha; Wolchok, Jedd D.; Shukla, Sachet A.; Wu, Catherine J.; Peggs, Karl S.; Chan, Timothy A.; Hadrup, Sine R.; Quezada, Sergio A.; Swanton, Charles

    2016-01-01

    As tumors grow, they acquire mutations, some of which create neoantigens that influence the response of patients to immune checkpoint inhibitors. We explored the impact of neoantigen intratumor heterogeneity (ITH) on antitumor immunity. Through integrated analysis of ITH and neoantigen burden, we demonstrate a relationship between clonal neoantigen burden and overall survival in primary lung adenocarcinomas. CD8+ tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes reactive to clonal neoantigens were identified in early-stage non–small cell lung cancer and expressed high levels of PD-1. Sensitivity to PD-1 and CTLA-4 blockade in patients with advanced NSCLC and melanoma was enhanced in tumors enriched for clonal neoantigens. T cells recognizing clonal neoantigens were detectable in patients with durable clinical benefit. Cytotoxic chemotherapy–induced subclonal neoantigens, contributing to an increased mutational load, were enriched in certain poor responders. These data suggest that neoantigen heterogeneity may influence immune surveillance and support therapeutic developments targeting clonal neoantigens. PMID:26940869

  10. Blockade of glucagon signaling prevents or reverses diabetes onset only if residual β-cells persist.

    PubMed

    Damond, Nicolas; Thorel, Fabrizio; Moyers, Julie S; Charron, Maureen J; Vuguin, Patricia M; Powers, Alvin C; Herrera, Pedro L

    2016-01-01

    Glucagon secretion dysregulation in diabetes fosters hyperglycemia. Recent studies report that mice lacking glucagon receptor (Gcgr(-/-)) do not develop diabetes following streptozotocin (STZ)-mediated ablation of insulin-producing β-cells. Here, we show that diabetes prevention in STZ-treated Gcgr(-/-) animals requires remnant insulin action originating from spared residual β-cells: these mice indeed became hyperglycemic after insulin receptor blockade. Accordingly, Gcgr(-/-) mice developed hyperglycemia after induction of a more complete, diphtheria toxin (DT)-induced β-cell loss, a situation of near-absolute insulin deficiency similar to type 1 diabetes. In addition, glucagon deficiency did not impair the natural capacity of α-cells to reprogram into insulin production after extreme β-cell loss. α-to-β-cell conversion was improved in Gcgr(-/-) mice as a consequence of α-cell hyperplasia. Collectively, these results indicate that glucagon antagonism could i) be a useful adjuvant therapy in diabetes only when residual insulin action persists, and ii) help devising future β-cell regeneration therapies relying upon α-cell reprogramming. PMID:27092792

  11. Blockade of glucagon signaling prevents or reverses diabetes onset only if residual β-cells persist

    PubMed Central

    Damond, Nicolas; Thorel, Fabrizio; Moyers, Julie S; Charron, Maureen J; Vuguin, Patricia M; Powers, Alvin C; Herrera, Pedro L

    2016-01-01

    Glucagon secretion dysregulation in diabetes fosters hyperglycemia. Recent studies report that mice lacking glucagon receptor (Gcgr-/-) do not develop diabetes following streptozotocin (STZ)-mediated ablation of insulin-producing β-cells. Here, we show that diabetes prevention in STZ-treated Gcgr-/- animals requires remnant insulin action originating from spared residual β-cells: these mice indeed became hyperglycemic after insulin receptor blockade. Accordingly, Gcgr-/- mice developed hyperglycemia after induction of a more complete, diphtheria toxin (DT)-induced β-cell loss, a situation of near-absolute insulin deficiency similar to type 1 diabetes. In addition, glucagon deficiency did not impair the natural capacity of α-cells to reprogram into insulin production after extreme β-cell loss. α-to-β-cell conversion was improved in Gcgr-/- mice as a consequence of α-cell hyperplasia. Collectively, these results indicate that glucagon antagonism could i) be a useful adjuvant therapy in diabetes only when residual insulin action persists, and ii) help devising future β-cell regeneration therapies relying upon α-cell reprogramming. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13828.001 PMID:27092792

  12. Postsynaptic blockade of inhibitory postsynaptic currents by plasmin in CA1 pyramidal cells of rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Mizutani, A; Tanaka, T; Saito, H; Matsuki, N

    1997-06-27

    We have shown previously that plasmin facilitated the generation of long-term potentiation (LTP) in CA1 and dentate region of rat hippocampus. In the present study, we investigated the effects of plasmin on postsynaptic currents in CA1 pyramidal neurons of rat hippocampal slices. Plasmin (100 nM) had no effect on NMDA nor on non-NMDA receptor-mediated excitatory postsynaptic currents. However, plasmin significantly decreased GABA(A) receptor-mediated inhibitory postsynaptic currents. This effect of plasmin disappeared when intracellular Ca2+ was strongly chelated with BAPTA. Furthermore, plasmin attenuated the GABA-induced currents in CA1 pyramidal cells. These results suggest that the STP-enhancing effect of plasmin is due to a blockade of postsynaptic GABA(A) responses and that an increase in intracellular Ca2+ by plasmin may be involved in its mechanism.

  13. Blockade of bovine PD-1 increases T cell function and inhibits bovine leukemia virus expression in B cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Programmed death-1 (PD-1) is a known immunoinhibitory receptor that contributes to immune evasion of various tumor cells and pathogens causing chronic infection, such as bovine leukemia virus (BLV) infection. First, in this study, to establish a method for the expression and functional analysis of bovine PD-1, hybridomas producing monoclonal antibodies (mAb) specific for bovine PD-1 were established. Treatment with these anti-PD-1 mAb enhanced interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) production of bovine peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Next, to examine whether PD-1 blockade by anti-PD-1 mAb could upregulate the immune reaction during chronic infection, the expression and functional analysis of PD-1 in PBMC isolated from BLV-infected cattle with or without lymphoma were performed using anti-PD-1 mAb. The frequencies of both PD-1+ CD4+ T cells in blood and lymph node and PD-1+ CD8+ T cells in lymph node were higher in BLV-infected cattle with lymphoma than those without lymphoma or control uninfected cattle. PD-1 blockade enhanced IFN-γ production and proliferation and reduced BLV-gp51 expression and B-cell activation in PBMC from BLV-infected cattle in response to BLV-gp51 peptide mixture. These data show that anti-bovine PD-1 mAb could provide a new therapy to control BLV infection via upregulation of immune response. PMID:23876077

  14. Blockade of voltage-gated sodium channels inhibits invasion of endocrine-resistant breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    MOHAMMED, FATIMA H.; KHAJAH, MAITHAM A.; YANG, MING; BRACKENBURY, WILLIAM J.; LUQMANI, YUNUS A.

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated Na+ channels (VGSCs) are membrane proteins which are normally expressed in excitable cells but have also been detected in cancer cells, where they are thought to be involved in malignancy progression. In this study we examined the ion current and expression profile of VGSC (Nav1.5) in estrogen receptor (ER)-positive (MCF-7) and silenced (pII) breast cancer cells and its possible influence on their proliferation, motility and invasion. VGSC currents were analysed by whole cell patch clamp recording. Nav1.5 expression and localization, in response to EGF stimulation, was examined by western blotting and immunofluorescence respectively. Cell invasion (under-agarose and Matrigel assays), motility (wound healing assay) and proliferation (MTT assay) were assessed in pII cells in response to VGSC blockers, phenytoin (PHT) and tetrodotoxin (TTX), or by siRNA knockdown of Nav1.5. The effect of PHT and TTX on modulating EGF-induced phosphorylation of Akt and ERK1/2 was determined by western blotting. Total matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) was determined using a fluorometric-based activity assay. The level of various human proteases was detected by using proteome profiler array kit. VGSC currents were detected in pII cells, but were absent in MCF-7. Nav1.5 showed cytoplasmic and perinuclear expression in both MCF-7 and pII cells, with enhanced expression upon EGF stimulation. Treatment of pII cells with PHT, TTX or siRNA significantly reduced invasion towards serum components and EGF, in part through reduction of P-ERK1/2 and proteases such as cathepsin E, kallikrein-10 and MMP-7, as well as total MMP activity. At high concentrations, PHT inhibited motility while TTX reduced cell proliferation. Pharmacological or genetic blockade of Nav1.5 may serve as a potential anti-metastatic therapy for breast cancer. PMID:26718772

  15. COX-2 blockade suppresses gliomagenesis by inhibiting myeloid-derived suppressor cells.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Mitsugu; Kohanbash, Gary; Fellows-Mayle, Wendy; Hamilton, Ronald L; Komohara, Yoshihiro; Decker, Stacy A; Ohlfest, John R; Okada, Hideho

    2011-04-01

    Epidemiologic studies have highlighted associations between the regular use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) and reduced glioma risks in humans. Most NSAIDs function as COX-2 inhibitors that prevent production of prostaglandin E₂ (PGE₂). Because PGE₂ induces expansion of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC), we hypothesized that COX-2 blockade would suppress gliomagenesis by inhibiting MDSC development and accumulation in the tumor microenvironment (TME). In mouse models of glioma, treatment with the COX-2 inhibitors acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) or celecoxib inhibited systemic PGE₂ production and delayed glioma development. ASA treatment also reduced the MDSC-attracting chemokine CCL2 (C-C motif ligand 2) in the TME along with numbers of CD11b(+)Ly6G(hi)Ly6C(lo) granulocytic MDSCs in both the bone marrow and the TME. In support of this evidence that COX-2 blockade blocked systemic development of MDSCs and their CCL2-mediated accumulation in the TME, there were defects in these processes in glioma-bearing Cox2-deficient and Ccl2-deficient mice. Conversely, these mice or ASA-treated wild-type mice displayed enhanced expression of CXCL10 (C-X-C motif chemokine 10) and infiltration of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) in the TME, consistent with a relief of MDSC-mediated immunosuppression. Antibody-mediated depletion of MDSCs delayed glioma growth in association with an increase in CXCL10 and CTLs in the TME, underscoring a critical role for MDSCs in glioma development. Finally, Cxcl10-deficient mice exhibited reduced CTL infiltration of tumors, establishing that CXCL10 limited this pathway of immunosuppression. Taken together, our findings show that the COX-2 pathway promotes gliomagenesis by directly supporting systemic development of MDSCs and their accumulation in the TME, where they limit CTL infiltration. PMID:21324923

  16. mGlu3 receptor blockade inhibits proliferation and promotes astrocytic phenotype in glioma stem cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Kun; Song, Yechun; Zhou, Wei; Zhang, Chunqing; Shu, Haifeng; Yang, Hui; Wang, Bin

    2014-04-01

    We have characterised, using both in vivo and in vitro methods, the effects of the metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 3 (mGlu3) antagonist (LY341495) and agonist (LY379268) on the proliferation and differentiation of glioma stem cells (GSC). For in vitro studies, a CCK-8 assay was used to determine the cell proliferation, flow cytometry was performed to determine cell cycle phases, and immunohistochemistry and laser confocal microscopy were employed to detect CD133 expression. For in vivo studies, GSCs were injected into nude mice treated with either LY379268 or LY341495 and the growth of the tumours was measured after 3 weeks. When compared with controls, the proliferation rates and proportion of cells in S phase within the LY341495 treated group decreased in a time-dependent manner. In the presence of differentiation medium containing LY341495, GSC differentiation was diverted into an astrocyte rather than neuronal phenotype. The growth rate and volume of tumours injected into nude mice was reduced in LY341495 treated mice compared with controls. Thus pharmacological blockade of mGlu3 receptor signalling pathway significantly inhibits the growth and proliferation of GSCs both in vitro and in vivo while promoting differentiation to astrocytes. These results further implicate mGlu3 in the biology of glioma and as a target for continued research. PMID:24482010

  17. CTLA4 blockade with ipilimumab to treat relapse of malignancy after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Bashey, Asad; Medina, Bridget; Corringham, Sue; Pasek, Mildred; Carrier, Ewa; Vrooman, Linda; Lowy, Israel; Solomon, Scott R; Morris, Lawrence E; Holland, H Kent; Mason, James R; Alyea, Edwin P; Soiffer, Robert J; Ball, Edward D

    2009-02-12

    Relapse of malignancy after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT) remains a therapeutic challenge. Blockade of the CTLA4 molecule can effectively augment antitumor immunity mediated by autologous effector T cells. We have assessed the safety and preliminary efficacy of a neutralizing, human anti-CTLA4 monoclonal antibody, ipilimumab, in stimulating the graft-versus-malignancy (GVM) effect after allo-HCT. Twenty-nine patients with malignancies that were recurrent or progressive after allo-HCT, received ipilimumab as a single infusion at dose cohorts between 0.1 and 3.0 mg/kg. Dose-limiting toxicity was not encountered, and ipilimumab did not induce graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) or graft rejection. Organ-specific immune adverse events (IAE) were seen in 4 patients (grade 3 arthritis, grade 2 hyperthyroidism, recurrent grade 4 pneumonitis). Three patients with lymphoid malignancy developed objective disease responses following ipilimumab: complete remission (CR) in 2 patients with Hodgkin disease and partial remission (PR) in a patient with refractory mantle cell lymphoma. At the 3.0 mg/kg dose, active serum concentrations of ipilimumab were maintained for more than 30 days after a single infusion. Ipilimumab, as administered in this clinical trial, does not induce or exacerbate clinical GVHD, but may cause organ-specific IAE and regression of malignancy. This study is registered at (http://clinicaltrials.gov) under NCI protocol ID P6082.

  18. Tetrandrine induces lipid accumulation through blockade of autophagy in a hepatic stellate cell line.

    PubMed

    Miyamae, Yusaku; Nishito, Yukina; Nakai, Naomi; Nagumo, Yoko; Usui, Takeo; Masuda, Seiji; Kambe, Taiho; Nagao, Masaya

    2016-08-12

    Macroautophagy, or autophagy, is a cellular response in which unnecessary cytoplasmic components, including lipids and organelles, are self-degraded. Recent studies closely related autophagy to activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), a process critical in the pathogenesis of liver fibrosis. During HSC activation, cytoplasmic lipid droplets (LDs) are degraded as autophagic cargo, and then cells express fibrogenic genes. Thus, inhibition of autophagy in HSCs is a potential therapeutic approach for attenuating liver fibrosis. We found that tetrandrine, a bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloid isolated from Stephania tetrandra, induced lipid accumulation, a phenotype associated with quiescent HSCs, through blockade of autophagy in the rat-derived HSC line HSC-T6. Tetrandrine inhibited autophagic flux without affecting lysosomal function. A phenotypic comparison using siRNA knockdown suggested that tetrandrine may target regulators, involved in fusion between autophagosomes and lysosomes (e.g., syntaxin 17). Moreover, perilipin 1, an LD-coated protein, co-localized specifically with LC3, a marker protein for autophagosomes, in tetrandrine-treated HSC-T6 cells. This suggests a potential role for perilipin 1 in autophagy-mediated LD degradation in HSCs. Our results identified tetrandrine as a potential tool for prevention and treatment of HSC activation. PMID:27270032

  19. Mechanisms of endothelial cell protection by blockade of the JAK2 pathway.

    PubMed

    Neria, Fernando; Caramelo, Carlos; Peinado, Héctor; González-Pacheco, Francisco R; Deudero, Juan J P; de Solis, Alain J; Fernández-Sánchez, Ruth; Peñate, Silvia; Cano, Amparo; Castilla, María Angeles

    2007-03-01

    Inhibition of the JAK2/STAT pathway has been implicated recently in cytoprotective mechanisms in both vascular smooth muscle cells and astrocytes. The advent of JAK2-specific inhibitors provides a practical tool for the study of this pathway in different cellular types. An interest in finding methods to improve endothelial cell (EC) resistance to injury led us to examine the effect of JAK2/STAT inhibition on EC protection. Furthermore, the signaling pathways involved in JAK2/STAT inhibition-related actions were examined. Our results reveal, for the first time, that blockade of JAK2 with the tyrosine kinase inhibitor AG490 strongly protects cultured EC against cell detachment-dependent death and serum deprivation and increases reseeding efficiency. Confirmation of the specificity of the effects of JAK2 inhibition was attained by finding protective effects on transfection with a dominant negative JAK2. Furthermore, AG490 blocked serum deprivation-induced phosphorylation of JAK2. In terms of mechanism, treatment with AG490 induces several relevant responses, both in monolayer and detached cells. These mechanisms include the following: 1) Increase and nuclear translocation of the active, dephosphorylated form of beta-catenin. In functional terms, this translocation is transcriptionally active, and its protective effect is further supported by the stimulation of EC cytoprotection by transfectionally induced excess of beta-catenin. 2) Increase of platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule (PECAM)/CD31 levels. 3) Increase in total and phosphorylated AKT. 4) Increase in phosphorylated glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)3alpha/beta. The present findings imply potential practical applications of JAK2 inhibition on EC. These applications affect not only EC in the monolayer but also circulating detached cells and involve mechanistic interactions not previously described. PMID:17035297

  20. Multipotent Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Synergize With Costimulation Blockade in the Inhibition of Immune Responses and the Induction of Foxp3+ Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tibell, Annika; Ljung, Karin; Saito, Yu; Gronlund, Anna; Osterholm, Cecilia; Holgersson, Jan; Lundgren, Torbjörn; Ericzon, Bo-Göran; Corbascio, Matthias; Kumagai-Braesch, Makiko

    2014-01-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC) therapy and costimulation blockade are two immunomodulatory strategies being developed concomitantly for the treatment of immunological diseases. Both of these strategies have the capacity to inhibit immune responses and induce regulatory T cells; however, their ability to synergize remains largely unexplored. In order to study this, MSCs from C57BL/6 (H2b) mice were infused together with fully major histocompatibility complex-mismatched Balb/c (H2d) allogeneic islets into the portal vein of diabetic C57BL/6 (H2b) mice, which were subsequently treated with costimulation blockade for the first 10 days after transplantation. Mice receiving both recipient-type MSCs, CTLA4Ig, and anti-CD40L demonstrated indefinite graft acceptance, just as did most of the recipients receiving MSCs and CTLA4Ig. Recipients of MSCs only rejected their grafts, and fewer than one half of the recipients treated with costimulation blockade alone achieved permanent engraftment. The livers of the recipients treated with MSCs plus costimulation blockade contained large numbers of islets surrounded by Foxp3+ regulatory T cells. These recipients showed reduced antidonor IgG levels and a glucose tolerance similar to that of naïve nondiabetic mice. Intrahepatic lymphocytes and splenocytes from these recipients displayed reduced proliferation and interferon-γ production when re-exposed to donor antigen. MSCs in the presence of costimulation blockade prevented dendritic cell maturation, inhibited T cell proliferation, increased Foxp3+ regulatory T cell numbers, and increased indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase activity. These results indicate that MSC infusion and costimulation blockade have complementary immune-modulating effects that can be used for a broad number of applications in transplantation, autoimmunity, and regenerative medicine. PMID:25313200

  1. Blockade of Retinol Metabolism Protects T Cell-Induced Hepatitis by Increasing Migration of Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Young-Sun; Yi, Hyon-Seung; Suh, Yang-Gun; Byun, Jin-Seok; Eun, Hyuk Soo; Kim, So Yeon; Seo, Wonhyo; Jeong, Jong-Min; Choi, Won-Mook; Kim, Myung-Ho; Kim, Ji Hoon; Park, Keun-Gyu; Jeong, Won-Il

    2015-01-01

    Retinols are metabolized into retinoic acids by alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and retinaldehyde dehydrogenase (Raldh). However, their roles have yet to be clarified in hepatitis despite enriched retinols in hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). Therefore, we investigated the effects of retinols on Concanavalin A (Con A)-mediated hepatitis. Con A was injected into wild type (WT), Raldh1 knock-out (Raldh1−/−), CCL2−/− and CCR2−/− mice. For migration study of regulatory T cells (Tregs), we used in vivo and ex vivo adoptive transfer systems. Blockade of retinol metabolism in mice given 4-methylpyrazole, an inhibitor of ADH, and ablated Raldh1 gene manifested increased migration of Tregs, eventually protected against Con A-mediated hepatitis by decreasing interferon-γ in T cells. Moreover, interferon-γ treatment increased the expression of ADH3 and Raldh1, but it suppressed that of CCL2 and IL-6 in HSCs. However, the expression of CCL2 and IL-6 was inversely increased upon the pharmacologic or genetic ablation of ADH3 and Raldh1 in HSCs. Indeed, IL-6 treatment increased CCR2 expression of Tregs. In migration assay, ablated CCR2 in Tregs showed reduced migration to HSCs. In adoptive transfer of Tregs in vivo and ex vivo, Raldh1-deficient mice showed more increased migration of Tregs than WT mice. Furthermore, inhibited retinol metabolism increased survival rate (75%) compared with that of the controls (25%) in Con A-induced hepatitis. These results suggest that blockade of retinol metabolism protects against acute liver injury by increased Treg migration, and it may represent a novel therapeutic strategy to control T cell-mediated acute hepatitis. PMID:26537191

  2. NOTCH Pathway Blockade Depletes CD133-Positive Glioblastoma Cells and Inhibits Growth of Tumor Neurospheres and Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Xing; Khaki, Leila; Zhu, Thant S.; Soules, Mary E.; Talsma, Caroline E.; Gul, Naheed; Koh, Cheryl; Zhang, Jiangyang; Li, Yue-Ming; Maciaczyk, Jarek; Nikkhah, Guido; DiMeco, Francesco; Piccirillo, Sara; Vescovi, Angelo L.; Eberhart, Charles G.

    2010-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are thought to be critical for the engraftment and long-term growth of many tumors, including glioblastoma (GBM). The cells are at least partially spared by traditional chemotherapies and radiation therapies, and finding new treatments that can target CSCs may be critical for improving patient survival. It has been shown that the NOTCH signaling pathway regulates normal stem cells in the brain, and that GBMs contain stem-like cells with higher NOTCH activity. We therefore used low-passage and established GBM-derived neurosphere cultures to examine the overall requirement for NOTCH activity, and also examined the effects on tumor cells expressing stem cell markers. NOTCH blockade by γ-secretase inhibitors (GSIs) reduced neurosphere growth and clonogenicity in vitro, whereas expression of an active form of NOTCH2 increased tumor growth. The putative CSC markers CD133, NESTIN, BMI1, and OLIG2 were reduced following NOTCH blockade. When equal numbers of viable cells pretreated with either vehicle (dimethyl sulfoxide) or GSI were injected subcutaneously into nude mice, the former always formed tumors, whereas the latter did not. In vivo delivery of GSI by implantation of drug-impregnated polymer beads also effectively blocked tumor growth, and significantly prolonged survival, albeit in a relatively small cohort of animals. We found that NOTCH pathway inhibition appears to deplete stem-like cancer cells through reduced proliferation and increased apoptosis associated with decreased AKT and STAT3 phosphorylation. In summary, we demonstrate that NOTCH pathway blockade depletes stem-like cells in GBMs, suggesting that GSIs may be useful as chemotherapeutic reagents to target CSCs in malignant gliomas. PMID:19904829

  3. Functional blockade of α5β1 integrin induces scattering and genomic landscape remodeling of hepatic progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Cell scattering is a physiological process executed by stem and progenitor cells during embryonic liver development and postnatal organ regeneration. Here, we investigated the genomic events occurring during this process induced by functional blockade of α5β1 integrin in liver progenitor cells. Results Cells treated with a specific antibody against α5β1 integrin exhibited cell spreading and scattering, over-expression of liver stem/progenitor cell markers and activation of the ERK1/2 and p38 MAPKs signaling cascades, in a similar manner to the process triggered by HGF/SF1 stimulation. Gene expression profiling revealed marked transcriptional changes of genes involved in cell adhesion and migration, as well as genes encoding chromatin remodeling factors. These responses were accompanied by conspicuous spatial reorganization of centromeres, while integrin genes conserved their spatial positioning in the interphase nucleus. Conclusion Collectively, our results demonstrate that α5β1 integrin functional blockade induces cell migration of hepatic progenitor cells, and that this involves a dramatic remodeling of the nuclear landscape. PMID:20958983

  4. Mechanism of effector-cell blockade. I. Antigen-induced suppression of Ig synthesis in a hybridoma cell line, and correlation with cell- associated antigen

    PubMed Central

    1980-01-01

    A mouse hybridoma cell line, FluIgM-1, which secretes IgM specific for the hapten fluorescein (FLU) was developed to allow detailed analysis of the effector-cell blockade (ECB) phenomenon, in which contact of antibody-forming cells (AFC) with specific antigen results in marked reduction of antibody secretion. Treatment of hybridoma cells with highly substituted FLU conjugates (e.g., Flu20gelatin) resulted in inhibition of plaque formation. The data indicated close parallels with the ECB of normal spleen AFC, both in speed of onset and the dose of antigen required. The inhibition of antibody secretion was confirmed with a biosynthetic-labeling procedure which demonstrated that this was a result of reduced Ig synthesis. The inhibitory effect appeared to be confined to antibody synthesis, in the total protein synthesis, DNA synthesis, and cell-doubling times were unaffected. The association of FLU conjugates with the cells during and following ECB was studied directly using fluorescence microscopy and the fluorescence-activated cell sorter. These experiments showed that FLU conjugates capable of causing blockade aggregated on the cell surface, that the clearance of cell-associated antigen correlated with recovery from ECB, and that at all times when cell associated antigen was detectable, a portion remained bound to the cell surface and was susceptible to enzymatic removal. The latter observations supported previous findings suggesting that ECB was mediated by extracellular antigen. The direct observation of aggregates of antigen on the surface of blockaded cells is consistent with a mechanism involving cross-linking of Ig receptors. Finally, Fc receptors were not present on hybridoma cells, excluding their involvement in induction of ECB. PMID:7381364

  5. CTLA-4 blockade enhances polyfunctional NY-ESO-1 specific T cell responses in metastatic melanoma patients with clinical benefit.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jianda; Gnjatic, Sacha; Li, Hao; Powel, Sarah; Gallardo, Humilidad F; Ritter, Erika; Ku, Geoffrey Y; Jungbluth, Achim A; Segal, Neil H; Rasalan, Teresa S; Manukian, Gregor; Xu, Yinyan; Roman, Ruth-Ann; Terzulli, Stephanie L; Heywood, Melanie; Pogoriler, Evelina; Ritter, Gerd; Old, Lloyd J; Allison, James P; Wolchok, Jedd D

    2008-12-23

    Blockade of inhibitory signals mediated by cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 (CTLA-4) has been shown to enhance T cell responses and induce durable clinical responses in patients with metastatic melanoma. The functional impact of anti-CTLA-4 therapy on human immune responses is still unclear. To explore this, we analyzed immune-related adverse events and immune responses in metastatic melanoma patients treated with ipilimumab, a fully human anti-CTLA-4 monoclonal antibody. Fifteen patients were selected on the basis of availability of suitable specimens for immunologic monitoring, and eight of these showed evidence of clinical benefit. Five of the eight patients with evidence of clinical benefit had NY-ESO-1 antibody, whereas none of seven clinical non-responders was seropositive for NY-ESO-1. All five NY-ESO-1 seropositive patients had clearly detectable CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells against NY-ESO-1 following treatment with ipilimumab. One NY-ESO-1 seronegative clinical responder also had a NY-ESO-1 CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell response, possibly related to prior vaccination with NY-ESO-1. Among five clinical non-responders analyzed, only one had a NY-ESO-1 CD4(+) T cell response and this patient did not have detectable anti-NY-ESO-1 antibody. Overall, NY-ESO-1-specific T cell responses increased in frequency and functionality during anti-CTLA-4 treatment, revealing a polyfunctional response pattern of IFN-gamma, MIP-1beta and TNF-alpha. We therefore suggest that CTLA-4 blockade enhanced NY-ESO-1 antigen-specific B cell and T cell immune responses in patients with durable objective clinical responses and stable disease. These data provide an immunologic rationale for the efficacy of anti-CTLA-4 therapy and call for immunotherapeutic designs that combine NY-ESO-1 vaccination with CTLA-4 blockade.

  6. Terminal Complement Blockade after Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Is Safe without Meningococcal Vaccination.

    PubMed

    Jodele, Sonata; Dandoy, Christopher E; Danziger-Isakov, Lara; Myers, Kasiani C; El-Bietar, Javier; Nelson, Adam; Wallace, Gregory; Teusink-Cross, Ashley; Davies, Stella M

    2016-07-01

    Eculizumab inhibits terminal complement-mediated intravascular hemolysis in patients with paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria and complement-mediated thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) in patients with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome and is now used as a first-line therapy in these diseases. Eculizumab is available only through a restricted program under a Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategy (REMS) because of an increased risk of meningococcal infections in persons without adequate functional complement. Administration of meningococcal vaccine is required at least 2 weeks before administering the first dose of eculizumab, and this advice is included in the product label. Eculizumab use for treatment of TMA in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) recipients brings a significant dilemma regarding REMS required meningococcal vaccination. TMA after HSCT usually occurs within the first 100 days after transplantation when patients are severely immunocompromised and are not able to mount a response to vaccines. We evaluated 30 HSCT recipients treated with eculizumab for high-risk TMA without meningococcal vaccine. All patients received antimicrobial prophylaxis adequate for Neisseria meningitides during eculizumab therapy and for 8 weeks after discontinuation of the drug. Median time to TMA diagnosis was 28 days after transplant (range, 13.8 to 48.5). Study subjects received a median of 14 eculizumab doses (range, 2 to 38 doses) for HSCT-associated TMA therapy. There were no incidences of meningococcal infections. The incidences of bacterial and fungal bloodstream infections were similar in patients treated with eculizumab (n = 30) as compared with those with HSCT-associated TMA who did not receive any complement blocking therapy (n = 39). Our data indicate that terminal complement blockade in the early post-transplant period can be performed without meningococcal vaccination while using appropriate antimicrobial prophylaxis until complement

  7. Combination of Id2 Knockdown Whole Tumor Cells and Checkpoint Blockade: A Potent Vaccine Strategy in a Mouse Neuroblastoma Model.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, Lina; Morgan, Clifford; Sandler, Anthony D

    2015-01-01

    Tumor vaccines have held much promise, but to date have demonstrated little clinical success. This lack of success is conceivably due to poor tumor antigen presentation combined with immuno-suppressive mechanisms exploited by the tumor itself. Knock down of Inhibitor of differentiation protein 2 (Id2-kd) in mouse neuroblastoma whole tumor cells rendered these cells immunogenic. Id2-kd neuroblastoma (Neuro2a) cells (Id2-kd N2a) failed to grow in most immune competent mice and these mice subsequently developed immunity against further wild-type Neuro2a tumor cell challenge. Id2-kd N2a cells grew aggressively in immune-compromised hosts, thereby establishing the immunogenicity of these cells. Therapeutic vaccination with Id2-kd N2a cells alone suppressed tumor growth even in established neuroblastoma tumors and when used in combination with immune checkpoint blockade eradicated large established tumors. Mechanistically, immune cell depletion studies demonstrated that while CD8+ T cells are critical for antitumor immunity, CD4+ T cells are also required to induce a sustained long-lasting helper effect. An increase in number of CD8+ T-cells and enhanced production of interferon gamma (IFNγ) was observed in tumor antigen stimulated splenocytes of vaccinated mice. More importantly, a massive influx of cytotoxic CD8+ T-cells infiltrated the shrinking tumor following combined immunotherapy. These findings show that down regulation of Id2 induced tumor cell immunity and in combination with checkpoint blockade produced a novel, potent, T-cell mediated tumor vaccine strategy.

  8. Combination of Id2 Knockdown Whole Tumor Cells and Checkpoint Blockade: A Potent Vaccine Strategy in a Mouse Neuroblastoma Model

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabarti, Lina; Morgan, Clifford; Sandler, Anthony D.

    2015-01-01

    Tumor vaccines have held much promise, but to date have demonstrated little clinical success. This lack of success is conceivably due to poor tumor antigen presentation combined with immuno-suppressive mechanisms exploited by the tumor itself. Knock down of Inhibitor of differentiation protein 2 (Id2-kd) in mouse neuroblastoma whole tumor cells rendered these cells immunogenic. Id2-kd neuroblastoma (Neuro2a) cells (Id2-kd N2a) failed to grow in most immune competent mice and these mice subsequently developed immunity against further wild-type Neuro2a tumor cell challenge. Id2-kd N2a cells grew aggressively in immune-compromised hosts, thereby establishing the immunogenicity of these cells. Therapeutic vaccination with Id2-kd N2a cells alone suppressed tumor growth even in established neuroblastoma tumors and when used in combination with immune checkpoint blockade eradicated large established tumors. Mechanistically, immune cell depletion studies demonstrated that while CD8+ T cells are critical for antitumor immunity, CD4+ T cells are also required to induce a sustained long-lasting helper effect. An increase in number of CD8+ T-cells and enhanced production of interferon gamma (IFNγ) was observed in tumor antigen stimulated splenocytes of vaccinated mice. More importantly, a massive influx of cytotoxic CD8+ T-cells infiltrated the shrinking tumor following combined immunotherapy. These findings show that down regulation of Id2 induced tumor cell immunity and in combination with checkpoint blockade produced a novel, potent, T-cell mediated tumor vaccine strategy. PMID:26079374

  9. TGF-β blockade depletes T regulatory cells from metastatic pancreatic tumors in a vaccine dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Kevin C.; Rucki, Agnieszka A.; Kim, Victoria; Foley, Kelly; Solt, Sara; Wolfgang, Christopher L.; Jaffee, Elizabeth M.; Zheng, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Our neoadjuvant clinical trial of a GM-CSF secreting allogeneic pancreas tumor vaccine (GVAX) revealed the development of tertiary lymphoid aggregates (TLAs) within the pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) tumor microenvironment 2 weeks after GVAX treatment. Microarray studies revealed that multiple components of the TGF-β pathway were suppressed in TLAs from patients who survived greater than 3 years and who demonstrated vaccine-enhanced mesothelin-specific T cell responses. We tested the hypothesis that combining GVAX with TGF-β inhibitors will improve the anti-tumor immune response of vaccine therapy. In a metastatic murine model of pancreatic cancer, combination therapy with GVAX vaccine and a TGF-β blocking antibody improved the cure rate of PDA-bearing mice. TGF-β blockade in combination with GVAX significantly increased the infiltration of effector CD8+ T lymphocytes, specifically anti-tumor-specific IFN-γ producing CD8+ T cells, when compared to monotherapy controls (all p < 0.05). TGF-β blockade alone did not deplete T regulatory cells (Tregs), but when give in combination with GVAX, GVAX induced intratumoral Tregs were depleted. Therefore, our PDA preclinical model demonstrates a survival advantage in mice treated with an anti-TGF-β antibody combined with GVAX therapy and provides strong rational for testing this combinational therapy in clinical trials. PMID:26515728

  10. Human prostate tumor antigen-specific CD8+ regulatory T cells are inhibited by CTLA-4 or IL-35 blockade.

    PubMed

    Olson, Brian M; Jankowska-Gan, Ewa; Becker, Jordan T; Vignali, Dario A A; Burlingham, William J; McNeel, Douglas G

    2012-12-15

    Regulatory T cells play important roles in cancer development and progression by limiting the generation of innate and adaptive anti-tumor immunity. We hypothesized that in addition to natural CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) and myeloid-derived suppressor cells, tumor Ag-specific Tregs interfere with the detection of anti-tumor immunity after immunotherapy. Using samples from prostate cancer patients immunized with a DNA vaccine encoding prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) and a trans-vivo delayed-type hypersensitivity (tvDTH) assay, we found that the detection of PAP-specific effector responses after immunization was prevented by the activity of PAP-specific regulatory cells. These regulatory cells were CD8(+)CTLA-4(+), and their suppression was relieved by blockade of CTLA-4, but not IL-10 or TGF-β. Moreover, Ag-specific CD8(+) Tregs were detected prior to immunization in the absence of PAP-specific effector responses. These PAP-specific CD8(+)CTLA-4(+) suppressor T cells expressed IL-35, which was decreased after blockade of CTLA-4, and inhibition of either CTLA-4 or IL-35 reversed PAP-specific suppression of tvDTH response. PAP-specific CD8(+)CTLA-4(+) T cells also suppressed T cell proliferation in an IL-35-dependent, contact-independent fashion. Taken together, these findings suggest a novel population of CD8(+)CTLA-4(+) IL-35-secreting tumor Ag-specific Tregs arise spontaneously in some prostate cancer patients, persist during immunization, and can prevent the detection of Ag-specific effector responses by an IL-35-dependent mechanism.

  11. Implication of combined PD-L1/PD-1 blockade with cytokine-induced killer cells as a synergistic immunotherapy for gastrointestinal cancer.

    PubMed

    Dai, Congqi; Lin, Fengjuan; Geng, Ruixuan; Ge, Xiaoxiao; Tang, Wenbo; Chang, Jinjia; Wu, Zheng; Liu, Xinyang; Lin, Ying; Zhang, Zhe; Li, Jin

    2016-03-01

    Cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells represent a realistic approach in cancer immunotherapy with confirmed survival benefits in the context of metastatic solid tumors. However, therapeutic effects are limited to a fraction of patients. In this study, immune-resistance elements and ideal combination therapies were explored. Initially, phenotypic analysis was performed to document CD3, CD56, NKG2D, DNAM-1, PD-L1, PD-1, CTLA-4, TIM-3, 2B4, and LAG-3 on CIK cells. Upon engagement of CIK cells with the tumor cells, expression of PD-1 on CIK cells and PD-L1 on both cells were up-regulated. Over-expression of PD-L1 levels on tumor cells via lentiviral transduction inhibited tumoricidal activity of CIK cells, and neutralizing of PD-L1/PD-1 signaling axis could enhance their tumor-killing effect. Conversely, blockade of NKG2D, a major activating receptor of CIK cells, largely caused dysfunction of CIK cells. Functional study showed an increase of NKG2D levels along with PD-L1/PD-1 blockade in the presence of other immune effector molecule secretion. Additionally, combined therapy of CIK infusion and PD-L1/PD-1 blockade caused a delay of in vivo tumor growth and exhibited a survival advantage over untreated mice. These results provide a preclinical proof-of-concept for simultaneous PD-L1/PD-1 pathways blockade along with CIK infusion as a novel immunotherapy for unresectable cancers.

  12. Monoclonal antibody that inhibits infection of HeLa and rhabdomyosarcoma cells by selected enteroviruses through receptor blockade

    SciTech Connect

    Crowell, R.L.; Field, A.K.; Schleif, W.A.; Long, W.L.; Colonno, R.J.; Mapoles, J.E.; Emini, E. A.

    1986-02-01

    BALB/c mice were immunized with HeLa cells, and their spleen cells were fused with myeloma cells to produce hybridomas. Initial screening of culture fluids from 800 fusion products in a cell protection assay against coxsackievirus B3 (CB3) and the CB3-RD virus variant yielded five presumptive monoclonal antibodies with three specificities: (i) protection against CB3 on HeLa, (ii) protection against CB3-RD on rhabdomyosarcoma (RD) cells, and (iii) protection against both viruses on the respective cells. Only one of the monoclonal antibodies (with dual specificity) survived two subclonings and was studied in detail. The antibody was determined to have an immunoglobulin G2a isotype and protected cells by blockade of cellular receptors, since attachment of (/sup 35/S)methionine-labeled CB3 was inhibited by greater than 90%. The monoclonal antibody protected HeLa cells against infection by CB1, CB3, CB5, echovirus 6, and coxsackievirus A21 and RD cells against CB1-RD, CB3-RD, and CB5-Rd virus variants. The monoclonal antibody did not protect either cell type against 16 other immunotypes of picornaviruses. The monoclonal antibody produced only positive fluorescence on those cells which were protected against infection, and /sup 125/I-labeled antibody confirmed the specific binding to HeLa and RD cells. The results suggest that this monoclonal antibody possesses some of the receptor specificity of the group B coxsackieviruses.

  13. Candida-Elicited Murine Th17 Cells Express High CTLA-4 Compared to Th1 Cells and Are Resistant to Costimulation Blockade

    PubMed Central

    Krummey, Scott M.; Floyd, Tamara L.; Liu, Danya; Wagener, Maylene E.; Song, Mingqing; Ford, Mandy L.

    2014-01-01

    Effector and memory T cells may cross-react with allogeneic antigens to mediate graft rejection. While the costimulation properties of Th1 cells are well studied, relatively little is known about the costimulation requirements of microbe elicited Th17 cells. The costimulation blocker CTLA-4 Ig has been ineffective in the treatment of several Th17 driven autoimmune diseases and is associated with severe acute rejection following renal transplantation, leading us to investigate whether Th17 cells play a role in CD28/CTLA-4 blockade resistant alloreactivity. We established an antigen-specific model in which Th1 and Th17 cells were elicited via Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.Tb) and Candida albicans (Candida) immunization, respectively. Candida immunization elicited a higher frequency of Th17 cells and conferred resistance to costimulation blockade following transplantation. Compared to the M.Tb group, Candida elicited Th17 cells contained a higher frequency of IL-17+IFN-γ+ producers and a lower frequency of IL-10+ and IL-10+IL-17+ cells. Importantly, Th17 cells differentially regulated the CD28/CTLA-4 pathway, expressing similarly high CD28 but significantly greater amounts of CTLA-4 compared to Th1 cells. Ex vivo blockade experiments demonstrated that Th17 cells are more sensitive to CTLA-4 coinhibition and therefore less susceptible to CTLA-4 Ig. These novel insights into the differential regulation of CTLA-4 coinhibition on CD4+ T cells have implications for the immunomodulation of pathologic T cell responses during transplantation and autoimmunity. PMID:24493820

  14. Reduced antigen concentration and costimulatory blockade increase IFN-gamma secretion in naive CD8+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Hall, Håkan T L; Petrovic, Jelena; Höglund, Petter

    2004-11-01

    CD8+ T cells are killer cells but also major producers of IFN-gamma. We have investigated the effects of peptide antigen titration and costimulatory blockade on IFN-gamma production and proliferation by naive CD8+ T cells. Mature dendritic cells (DC) pulsed with high amounts of agonist peptide triggered proliferation but little IFN-gamma secretion in individual T cells. In contrast, immature DC pulsed with similar amounts of peptide induced IFN-gamma secretion in a larger fraction of T cells but triggered less proliferation. Blocking B7.2 or lowering the amount of peptide on mature DC led to a response similar to that induced by immature DC, suggesting that differences in stimulatory strength were responsible for the different responses. Using splenic antigen-presenting cells (APC) we demonstrate that reducing the amount of peptide in combination with B7 blockage enhanced IFN-gamma secretion and decreased proliferation in naive CD8+ T cells in an additive way. Our data suggest that IFN-gamma secretion and proliferation are independently and inversely controlled by stimulatory strength in naive CD8+ T cells. This may enable CD8+ T cells to respond with IFN-gamma secretion to immature APC with few peptide ligands consistent with an early immunoregulatory role of CD8+ T cells.

  15. GD2-specific CAR T Cells Undergo Potent Activation and Deletion Following Antigen Encounter but can be Protected From Activation-induced Cell Death by PD-1 Blockade.

    PubMed

    Gargett, Tessa; Yu, Wenbo; Dotti, Gianpietro; Yvon, Eric S; Christo, Susan N; Hayball, John D; Lewis, Ian D; Brenner, Malcolm K; Brown, Michael P

    2016-06-01

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells have shown great promise in the treatment of hematologic malignancies but more variable results in the treatment of solid tumors and the persistence and expansion of CAR T cells within patients has been identified as a key correlate of antitumor efficacy. Lack of immunological "space", functional exhaustion, and deletion have all been proposed as mechanisms that hamper CAR T-cell persistence. Here we describe the events following activation of third-generation CAR T cells specific for GD2. CAR T cells had highly potent immediate effector functions without evidence of functional exhaustion in vitro, although reduced cytokine production reversible by PD-1 blockade was observed after longer-term culture. Significant activation-induced cell death (AICD) of CAR T cells was observed after repeated antigen stimulation, and PD-1 blockade enhanced both CAR T-cell survival and promoted killing of PD-L1(+) tumor cell lines. Finally, we assessed CAR T-cell persistence in patients enrolled in the CARPETS phase 1 clinical trial of GD2-specific CAR T cells in the treatment of metastatic melanoma. Together, these data suggest that deletion also occurs in vivo and that PD-1-targeted combination therapy approaches may be useful to augment CAR T-cell efficacy and persistence in patients.

  16. Enhanced T-cell immunity to osteosarcoma through antibody blockade of PD-1/PD-L1 interactions.

    PubMed

    Lussier, Danielle M; O'Neill, Lauren; Nieves, Lizbeth M; McAfee, Megan S; Holechek, Susan A; Collins, Andrea W; Dickman, Paul; Jacobsen, Jeffrey; Hingorani, Pooja; Blattman, Joseph N

    2015-04-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most common bone cancer in children and adolescents. Although 70% of patients with localized disease are cured with chemotherapy and surgical resection, patients with metastatic osteosarcoma are typically refractory to treatment. Numerous lines of evidence suggest that cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) limit the development of metastatic osteosarcoma. We have investigated the role of PD-1, an inhibitory TNFR family protein expressed on CTLs, in limiting the efficacy of immune-mediated control of metastatic osteosarcoma. We show that human metastatic, but not primary, osteosarcoma tumors express a ligand for PD-1 (PD-L1) and that tumor-infiltrating CTLs express PD-1, suggesting this pathway may limit CTLs control of metastatic osteosarcoma in patients. PD-L1 is also expressed on the K7M2 osteosarcoma tumor cell line that establishes metastases in mice, and PD-1 is expressed on tumor-infiltrating CTLs during disease progression. Blockade of PD-1/PD-L1 interactions dramatically improves the function of osteosarcoma-reactive CTLs in vitro and in vivo, and results in decreased tumor burden and increased survival in the K7M2 mouse model of metastatic osteosarcoma. Our results suggest that blockade of PD-1/PD-L1 interactions in patients with metastatic osteosarcoma should be pursued as a therapeutic strategy. PMID:25751499

  17. PLK1 blockade enhances therapeutic effects of radiation by inducing cell cycle arrest at the mitotic phase.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Minoru; Yoshimura, Michio; Kobayashi, Minoru; Morinibu, Akiyo; Itasaka, Satoshi; Hiraoka, Masahiro; Harada, Hiroshi

    2015-10-27

    The cytotoxicity of ionizing radiation depends on the cell cycle phase; therefore, its pharmacological manipulation, especially the induction of cell cycle arrest at the radiosensitive mitotic-phase (M-phase), has been attempted for effective radiation therapy. Polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) is a serine/threonine kinase that functions in mitotic progression, and is now recognized as a potential target for radiosensitization. We herein investigated whether PLK1 blockade enhanced the cytotoxic effects of radiation by modulating cell cycle phases of cancer cells using the novel small molecule inhibitor of PLK1, TAK-960. The TAK-960 treatment exhibited radiosensitizing effects in vitro, especially when it increased the proportion of M-phase cells. TAK-960 did not sensitize cancer cells to radiation when an insufficient amount of time was provided to induce mitotic arrest. The overexpression of a PLK1 mutant, PLK1-R136G&T210D, which was confirmed to cancel the TAK-960-mediated increase in the proportion of mitotic cells, abrogated the radiosensitizing effects of TAK-960. A tumor growth delay assay also demonstrated that the radiosensitizing effects of TAK-960 depended on an increase in the proportion of M-phase cells. These results provide a rational basis for targeting PLK1 for radiosensitization when considering the therapeutic time window for M-phase arrest as the best timing for radiation treatments.

  18. Blockade of CD26-mediated T cell costimulation with soluble caveolin-1-Ig fusion protein induces anergy in CD4{sup +}T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ohnuma, Kei; Uchiyama, Masahiko; Hatano, Ryo; Takasawa, Wataru; Endo, Yuko; Dang, Nam H.; Morimoto, Chikao

    2009-08-21

    CD26 binds to caveolin-1 in antigen-presenting cells (APC), and that ligation of CD26 by caveolin-1 induces T cell proliferation in a TCR/CD3-dependent manner. We report herein the effects of CD26-caveolin-1 costimulatory blockade by fusion protein caveolin-1-Ig (Cav-Ig). Soluble Cav-Ig inhibits T cell proliferation and cytokine production in response to recall antigen, or allogeneic APC. Our data hence suggest that blocking of CD26-associated signaling by soluble Cav-Ig may be an effective approach as immunosuppressive therapy.

  19. IL-1 Receptor Blockade Alleviates Graft-versus-Host Disease through Downregulation of an Interleukin-1β-Dependent Glycolytic Pathway in Th17 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Park, Min-Jung; Lee, Seung Hoon; Lee, Sung-Hee; Lee, Eun-Jung; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Choi, Jong Young; Cho, Mi-La

    2015-01-01

    T helper (Th) 17 cells are a subset of Th cells expressing interleukin- (IL-) 17 and initiating an inflammatory response in autoimmune diseases. Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is an immune inflammatory disease caused by interactions between the adaptive immunity of donor and recipient. The Th17 lineage exhibits proinflammatory activity and is believed to be a central player in GVHD. IL-1 performs a key function in immune responses and induces development of Th17 cells. Here, we show that blockade of IL-1 signaling suppresses Th17 cell differentiation and alleviates GVHD severity. We hypothesized that the IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) would suppress Th17 cell differentiation in vitro via inhibition of glycolysis-related genes. Blockade of IL-1 using IL-1Ra downregulated Th17 cell differentiation, an alloreactive T cell response, and expression of genes of the glycolysis pathway. Severity of GVHD was reduced in mice with a transplant of IL-Ra-treated cells, in comparison with control mice. To clarify the mechanisms via which IL-1Ra exerts the therapeutic effect, we demonstrated in vivo that IL-1Ra decreased the proportion of Th17 cells, increased the proportion of FoxP3-expressing T regulatory (Treg) cells, and inhibited expression of glycolysis-related genes and suppressed Th17 cell development and B-cell activation. These results suggest that blockade of IL-1 signaling ameliorates GVHD via suppression of excessive T cell-related inflammation. PMID:26798206

  20. Blockade of Hedgehog Signaling Synergistically Increases Sensitivity to Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xiao-Yan; Zhang, Xu-Chao; Yang, Su-Qing; An, She-Juan; Chen, Zhi-Hong; Su, Jian; Xie, Zhi; Gou, Lan-Ying; Wu, Yi-Long

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant activation of the hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway has been implicated in the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and cancer stem-like cell (CSC) maintenance; both processes can result in tumor progression and treatment resistance in several types of human cancer. Hh cooperates with the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling pathway in embryogenesis. We found that the Hh signaling pathway was silenced in EGFR-TKI-sensitive non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells, while it was inappropriately activated in EGFR-TKI-resistant NSCLC cells, accompanied by EMT induction and ABCG2 overexpression. Upregulation of Hh signaling through extrinsic SHH exposure downregulated E-cadherin expression and elevated Snail and ABCG2 expression, resulting in gefitinib tolerance (P < 0.001) in EGFR-TKI-sensitive cells. Blockade of the Hh signaling pathway using the SMO antagonist SANT-1 restored E-cadherin expression and downregulate Snail and ABCG2 in EGFR-TKI-resistant cells. A combination of SANT-1 and gefitinib markedly inhibited tumorigenesis and proliferation in EGFR-TKI-resistant cells (P < 0.001). These findings indicate that hyperactivity of Hh signaling resulted in EGFR-TKI resistance, by EMT introduction and ABCG2 upregulation, and blockade of Hh signaling synergistically increased sensitivity to EGFR-TKIs in primary and secondary resistant NSCLC cells. E-cadherin expression may be a potential biomarker of the suitability of the combined application of an Hh inhibitor and EGFR-TKIs in EGFR-TKI-resistant NSCLCs. PMID:26943330

  1. Protein kinases as targets for antimalarial intervention: Kinomics, structure-based design, transmission-blockade, and targeting host cell enzymes.

    PubMed

    Doerig, Christian; Billker, Oliver; Pratt, David; Endicott, Jane

    2005-12-30

    The surge of interest in protein kinases as targets for chemotherapeutic intervention in a number of diseases such as cancer and neurodegenerative disorders has stimulated research aimed at determining whether enzymes of this class might also be considered as targets in the context of diseases caused by parasitic protists. Here, we present an overview of recent developments in this field, concentrating (i) on the benefits gained from the availability of genomic databases for a number of parasitic protozoa, (ii) on the emerging field of structure-aided design of inhibitors targeting protein kinases of parasitic protists, (iii) on the concept known as transmission-blockade, whereby kinases implicated in the development of the parasite in their arthropod vector might be targeted to interfere with disease transmission, and (iv) on the possibility of controlling parasitic diseases through the inhibition of host cell protein kinases that are required for the establishment of infection by the parasites.

  2. Gefitinib induces lung cancer cell autophagy and apoptosis via blockade of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway

    PubMed Central

    ZHAO, ZHONG-QUAN; YU, ZHONG-YANG; LI, JIE; OUYANG, XUE-NONG

    2016-01-01

    Gefitinib is a selective inhibitor of the tyrosine kinase epidermal growth factor receptor, which inhibits tumor pathogenesis, metastasis and angiogenesis, as well as promoting apoptosis. Therefore, gefitinib presents an effective drug for the targeted therapy of lung cancer. However, the underlying mechanisms by which gefitinib induces lung cancer cell death remain unclear. To investigate the effects of gefitinib on lung cancer cells and the mechanism of such, the present study analyzed the effect of gefitinib on the autophagy, apoptosis and proliferation of the A549 and A549-gefitinib-resistant (GR) cell lines GR. The regulation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (AKT)/ mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway was also investigated. Acridine orange staining revealed that gefitinib induced autophagy of A549 cells but not A549-GR cells. In addition, gefitinib promoted apoptosis and inhibited proliferation of A549 cells but not A549-GR cells. Furthermore, western blot analysis demonstrated that gefitinib treatment led to the downregulation of PI3K, AKT, pAKT, mTOR and phosphorylated-mTOR protein expression in A549 cells but not A549-GR cells. LY294002 blocked the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway and induced autophagy and apoptosis of A549 cells, however, no synergistic effect was observed following combined treatment with gefitinib and LY294002. In conclusion, the results of the present study indicate that gefitinib promotes autophagy and apoptosis of lung cancer cells via blockade of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway, which leads to lung cancer cell death. PMID:27347100

  3. Exploring Kupffer's Vescicle Through Self Propelled Particle Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundy, Kassidy; Dasgupta, Agnik; Amack, Jeff; Manning, M. Lisa

    Early development is an important stage in the formation of functional, relatively healthy organisms. In zebrafish embryos, a transient organ in the tailbud called Kupffer's Vescicle (KV) is responsible for the initial left-right (L-R) asymmetry that results in asymmetric organ and tissue placement in the adult zebrafish. Originating as a collection of symmetrically organized monociliated cells, the KV experiences a shift in cell shapes over time that leaves more cells on the anterior or top side of the KV. This arrangement helps to generate a stronger counter-clockwise fluid flow across the anterior side of the organ, which is required for L-R asymmetry. In seeking to understand the source of the shape changes occurring within the KV, we simulate a Self Propelled Particle (SPP) model that includes parameters for cell polarization and speed. We model the KV as a large particle moving in a straight line with constant velocity to mimic the physical forces of the notochord acting on this organ, and we model the surrounding tailbud cells as smaller, slower active particles with an orientation that changes over time due to rotational noise. Our goal is to calculate the forces exerted on the KV by the surrounding tissue, to see if they are sufficient to explain the shape changes we observe in the KV that lead to L-R asymmetry.

  4. The Effect of Therapeutic Blockades of Dust Particles-Induced Ca2+ Signaling and Proinflammatory Cytokine IL-8 in Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Ju Hee; Jeong, Sung Hwan; Hong, Jeong Hee

    2015-01-01

    Bronchial epithelial cells are the first barrier of defense against respiratory pathogens. Dust particles as extracellular stimuli are associated with inflammatory reactions after inhalation. It has been reported that dust particles induce intracellular Ca2+ signal, which subsequently increases cytokines production such as interleukin- (IL-) 8. However, the study of therapeutic blockades of Ca2+ signaling induced by dust particles in human bronchial epithelial cells is poorly understood. We investigated how to modulate dust particles-induced Ca2+ signaling and proinflammatory cytokine IL-8 expression. Bronchial epithelial BEAS-2B cells were exposed to PM10 dust particles and subsequent mediated intracellular Ca2+ signaling and reactive oxygen species signal. Our results show that exposure to several inhibitors of Ca2+ pathway attenuated the PM10-induced Ca2+ response and subsequent IL-8 mRNA expression. PM10-mediated Ca2+ signal and IL-8 expression were attenuated by several pharmacological blockades such as antioxidants, IP3-PLC blockers, and TRPM2 inhibitors. Our results show that blockades of PLC or TRPM2 reduced both of PM10-mediated Ca2+ signal and IL-8 expression, suggesting that treatment with these blockades should be considered for potential therapeutic trials in pulmonary epithelium for inflammation caused by environmental events such as seasonal dust storm. PMID:26640326

  5. The Effect of Therapeutic Blockades of Dust Particles-Induced Ca²⁺ Signaling and Proinflammatory Cytokine IL-8 in Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Ju Hee; Jeong, Sung Hwan; Hong, Jeong Hee

    2015-01-01

    Bronchial epithelial cells are the first barrier of defense against respiratory pathogens. Dust particles as extracellular stimuli are associated with inflammatory reactions after inhalation. It has been reported that dust particles induce intracellular Ca(2+) signal, which subsequently increases cytokines production such as interleukin- (IL-) 8. However, the study of therapeutic blockades of Ca(2+) signaling induced by dust particles in human bronchial epithelial cells is poorly understood. We investigated how to modulate dust particles-induced Ca(2+) signaling and proinflammatory cytokine IL-8 expression. Bronchial epithelial BEAS-2B cells were exposed to PM10 dust particles and subsequent mediated intracellular Ca(2+) signaling and reactive oxygen species signal. Our results show that exposure to several inhibitors of Ca(2+) pathway attenuated the PM10-induced Ca(2+) response and subsequent IL-8 mRNA expression. PM10-mediated Ca(2+) signal and IL-8 expression were attenuated by several pharmacological blockades such as antioxidants, IP3-PLC blockers, and TRPM2 inhibitors. Our results show that blockades of PLC or TRPM2 reduced both of PM10-mediated Ca(2+) signal and IL-8 expression, suggesting that treatment with these blockades should be considered for potential therapeutic trials in pulmonary epithelium for inflammation caused by environmental events such as seasonal dust storm. PMID:26640326

  6. ZLM-7 exhibits anti-angiogenic effects via impaired endothelial cell function and blockade of VEGF/VEGFR-2 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Su, Min; Huang, Jingjia; Li, Jijia; Qin, Xiyuan; Tang, Xiaoning; Jin, Fang; Chen, Shali; Jiang, Chuanming; Zou, Zizheng; Peng, Kunjian; Nuruzzaman, Mohammed; Zhang, Jianting; Luo, Junli; Liu, Suyou; Luo, Zhiyong

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of angiogenesis is a promising therapeutic strategy against cancer. In this study, we reported that ZLM-7, a combretastain A-4 (CA-4) derivative, exhibited anti-angiogenic activity in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, ZLM-7 induced microtubule cytoskeletal disassembly. It decreased VEGF-induced proliferation, migration, invasion and tube formation in endothelial cells, which are critical steps in angiogenesis. In vivo, ZLM-7 significantly inhibited neovascularization in a chicken chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) model and reduced the microvessel density in tumor tissues of MCF-7 xenograft mouse model. ZLM-7 also displayed comparable antiangiogenic and anti-tumor activities associated with the lead compound CA-4, but exhibited lower toxicity compared with CA-4. The anti-angiogenic effect of ZLM-7 was exerted via blockade of VEGF/VEGFR-2 signaling. ZLM-7 treatment suppressed the expression and secretion of VEGF in endothelial cells and MCF-7 cells under hypoxia. Further, ZLM-7 suppressed the VEGF-induced phosphorylation of VEGFR-2 and its downstream signaling mediators including activated AKT, MEK and ERK in endothelial cells. Overall, these results demonstrate that ZLM-7 exhibits anti-angiogenic activities by impairing endothelial cell function and blocking VEGF/VEGFR-2 signaling, suggesting that ZLM-7 might be a potential angiogenesis inhibitor. PMID:26967559

  7. Improvement of Chicken Primordial Germ Cell Maintenance In Vitro by Blockade of the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Endogenous Activity.

    PubMed

    Pérez Sáez, Juan M; Bussmann, Leonardo E; Barañao, J Lino; Bussmann, Ursula A

    2016-06-01

    Primordial germ cells (PGCs) are the undifferentiated progenitors of gametes. Germline competent PGCs can be developed as a cell-based system for genetic modification in chickens, which provides a valuable tool for transgenic technology with both research and industrial applications. This implies manipulation of PGCs, which, in recent years, encouraged a lot of research focused on the study of PGCs and the way of improving their culture. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that besides mediating toxic responses to environmental contaminants plays pivotal physiological roles in various biological processes. Since a novel compound that acts as an antagonist of this receptor has been reported to promote expansion of hematopoietic stem cells, we conducted the present study with the aim of determining whether addition of an established AHR antagonist to the standard culture medium used nowadays for in vitro chicken PGCs culture improves ex vivo expansion. We have found that addition of α-naphthoflavone in culture medium promotes the amplification of undifferentiated cells and that this effect is exerted by the blockade of AHR action. Our results constitute the first report of the successful use of a readily available AHR antagonist to improve avian PGCs expansion, and they further extend the knowledge of the effects of AHR modulation in undifferentiated cells. PMID:27253627

  8. Blockade of PD-1 Signaling Enhances Th2 Cell Responses and Aggravates Liver Immunopathology in Mice with Schistosomiasis japonica

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Sha; Jin, Xin; Li, Yalin; Li, Wei; Chen, Xiaojun; Xu, Lei; Zhu, Jifeng; Xu, Zhipeng; Zhang, Yang; Liu, Feng; Su, Chuan

    2016-01-01

    Background More than 220 million people worldwide are chronically infected with schistosomes, causing severe disease or even death. The major pathological damage occurring in schistosomiasis is attributable to the granulomatous inflammatory response and liver fibrosis induced by schistosome eggs. The inflammatory response is tightly controlled and parallels immunosuppressive regulation, constantly maintaining immune homeostasis and limiting excessive immunopathologic damage in important host organs. It is well known that the activation of programmed death 1 (PD-1) signaling causes a significant suppression of T cell function. However, the roles of PD-1 signaling in modulating CD4+ T cell responses and immunopathology during schistosome infection, have yet to be defined. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we show that PD-1 is upregulated in CD4+ T cells in Schistosoma japonicum (S. japonicum)-infected patients. We also show the upregulation of PD-1 expression in CD4+ T cells in the spleens, mesenteric lymph nodes, and livers of mice with S. japonicum infection. Finally, we found that the blockade of PD-1 signaling enhanced CD4+ T helper 2 (Th2) cell responses and led to more severe liver immunopathology in mice with S. japonicum infection, without a reduction of egg production or deposition in the host liver. Conclusions/Significance Overall, our study suggests that PD-1 signaling is specifically induced to control Th2-associated inflammatory responses during schistosome infection and is beneficial to the development of PD-1-based control of liver immunopathology. PMID:27792733

  9. Improvement of Chicken Primordial Germ Cell Maintenance In Vitro by Blockade of the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Endogenous Activity.

    PubMed

    Pérez Sáez, Juan M; Bussmann, Leonardo E; Barañao, J Lino; Bussmann, Ursula A

    2016-06-01

    Primordial germ cells (PGCs) are the undifferentiated progenitors of gametes. Germline competent PGCs can be developed as a cell-based system for genetic modification in chickens, which provides a valuable tool for transgenic technology with both research and industrial applications. This implies manipulation of PGCs, which, in recent years, encouraged a lot of research focused on the study of PGCs and the way of improving their culture. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that besides mediating toxic responses to environmental contaminants plays pivotal physiological roles in various biological processes. Since a novel compound that acts as an antagonist of this receptor has been reported to promote expansion of hematopoietic stem cells, we conducted the present study with the aim of determining whether addition of an established AHR antagonist to the standard culture medium used nowadays for in vitro chicken PGCs culture improves ex vivo expansion. We have found that addition of α-naphthoflavone in culture medium promotes the amplification of undifferentiated cells and that this effect is exerted by the blockade of AHR action. Our results constitute the first report of the successful use of a readily available AHR antagonist to improve avian PGCs expansion, and they further extend the knowledge of the effects of AHR modulation in undifferentiated cells.

  10. Effect of Androgen Blockade on HER-2 and Matrix Metalloproteinase-2 Expression on Bone Marrow Micrometastasis and Stromal Cells in Men with Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Murray, N. P.; Reyes, E.; Badinez, L.; Orellana, N.; Fuentealba, C.; Olivares, R.; Porcell, J.; Dueñas, R.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. HER-2 has been associated with castrate resistant prostate cancer and matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) in the dissemination and invasion of tumor cells as well as activating angiogenesis. We present an immunocytochemical study of the effect of androgen blockade on the expression of HER-2 and MMP-2 in bone marrow micrometastasis and the surrounding stromal cells in men with prostate cancer. Methods and Patients. A cross-sectional study of men with prostate cancer. Touch preps were obtained from bone marrow biopsies of men with prostate cancer, before and after radical prostatectomy and during androgen blockade. Micrometastasis detected with anti-PSA immunocytochemistry underwent processing with anti-HER-2 and anti-MMP-2 immunocytochemistry. Patients were defined as HER-2 positive or negative, MMP-2 negative or an MMP-2 pattern described as border or central and stromal MMP-2 defined as positive or negative. The expression of the biomarkers was compared before and after primary treatment and during androgen blockade in relation to the serum PSA at the time of sampling and duration of androgen blockade. Results. 191 men participated, 35 men before surgery and 43 after surgery; there were no significant differences in HER-2 expression between groups, there was no MMP-2 expression centrally or stromal expression of MMP-2. In men with androgen blockade, HER-2 expression was significantly higher; there was a trend for increasing HER-2 expression up to 5 years; central MMP-2 expression significantly increased after 3 years, while stromal MMP-2 significantly increased after 6 years. MMP-2 expression both in micrometastasis and stroma was significantly associated with HER-2 expression. Expression of MMP-2 at the border of the micrometastasis was not associated with HER-2 expression and occurred in the absence of androgen blockade. Conclusions. Androgen blockade decreases serum PSA by eliminating HER-2 negative prostate cancer cells. However, there is early

  11. Increased Tim-3 expression in peripheral NK cells predicts a poorer prognosis and Tim-3 blockade improves NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity in human lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Xu, Liyun; Huang, Yanyan; Tan, Linlin; Yu, Wei; Chen, Dongdong; Lu, ChangChang; He, Jianying; Wu, Guoqing; Liu, Xiaoguang; Zhang, Yongkui

    2015-12-01

    T cell immunoglobulin- and mucin-domain-containing molecule-3 (Tim-3) has been shown to play an important role in mediating NK-cell function in human diseases. However, the relationship between Tim-3 expression in natural killer (NK) cells and human lung adenocarcinoma remains unclear. We therefore investigated the expression of Tim-3 in NK cells and explored the effect of Tim-3 blockade on NK cell-mediated activity in human lung adenocarcinoma. Upregulated expression of Tim-3 on CD3-CD56+ cells (P<0.05) and CD3-CD56(dim) cells (P<0.05) of patients with lung adenocarcinoma was detected by flow cytometry. Moreover, Tim-3 expression in CD3-CD56+ NK cells was higher in patients with lung adenocarcinoma with lymph node metastasis (LNM) (P<0.05) or with tumor stage T3-T4 (P<0.05). Tim-3 expression in CD56(dim) NK-cell subset was higher in patients with tumor size ≥3cm (P<0.05), or LNM (P<0.05) or with tumor stage T3-T4 (P<0.05). Further analysis showed that higher expressions of Tim-3 on both CD3-CD56+ NK cells and CD56(dim) NK-cell subset were independently correlated with shorter overall survival of patients with lung adenocarcinoma (log-rank test, P=0.0418, 0.0406, respectively). Importantly, blockade of Tim-3 signaling with anti-Tim-3 antibodies resulted in the increased cytotoxicity and IFN-γ production of peripheral NK cells from patients with lung adenocarcinoma. Our data indicate that Tim-3 expression in NK cells can function as a prognostic biomarker in human lung adenocarcinoma and support that Tim-3 could be a new target for an immunotherapeutic strategy.

  12. Dual blockade of PD-1 and CTLA-4 combined with tumor vaccine effectively restores T-cell rejection function in tumors.

    PubMed

    Duraiswamy, Jaikumar; Kaluza, Karen M; Freeman, Gordon J; Coukos, George

    2013-06-15

    Tumor progression is facilitated by regulatory T cells (Treg) and restricted by effector T cells. In this study, we document parallel regulation of CD8(+) T cells and Foxp3(+) Tregs by programmed death-1 (PD-1, PDCD1). In addition, we identify an additional role of CTL antigen-4 (CTLA-4) inhibitory receptor in further promoting dysfunction of CD8(+) T effector cells in tumor models (CT26 colon carcinoma and ID8-VEGF ovarian carcinoma). Two thirds of CD8(+) tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) expressed PD-1, whereas one third to half of CD8(+) TIL coexpressed PD-1 and CTLA-4. Double-positive (PD-1(+)CTLA-4(+)) CD8(+) TIL had characteristics of more severe dysfunction than single-positive (PD-1(+) or CTLA-4(+)) TIL, including an inability to proliferate and secrete effector cytokines. Blockade of both PD-1 and CTLA-4 resulted in reversal of CD8(+) TIL dysfunction and led to tumor rejection in two thirds of mice. Double blockade was associated with increased proliferation of antigen-specific effector CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells, antigen-specific cytokine release, inhibition of suppressive functions of Tregs, and upregulation of key signaling molecules critical for T-cell function. When used in combination with GVAX vaccination (consisting of granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor-expressing irradiated tumor cells), inhibitory pathway blockade induced rejection of CT26 tumors in 100% of mice and ID8-VEGF tumors in 75% of mice. Our study indicates that PD-1 signaling in tumors is required for both suppressing effector T cells and maintaining tumor Tregs, and that PD-1/PD-L1 pathway (CD274) blockade augments tumor inhibition by increasing effector T-cell activity, thereby attenuating Treg suppression.

  13. Discovery of YB-1 as a new immunological target in neuroblastoma by vaccination in the context of regulatory T cell blockade.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jin; Jing, Weiqing; Orentas, Rimas J

    2009-12-01

    Neuroblastoma is one of the most common solid tumors in infancy and early childhood. Using the A/J mouse and a syngeneic neuroblastoma cell line AGN2a, we induced a strong anti-neuroblastoma cellular immune response when AGN2a transfected to express costimulatory molecules (CD80/CD86/CD54/CD137L) was used as a vaccine in the context of regulatory T cell blockade. Strong humoral immunity was induced by AGN2a-4p immunization in the context with regulatory T cell blockade. Serum from treated mice was used to screen an AGN2a cDNA expression library that was constructed with lambda ZAP express vector in order to identify tumor-associated antigens by SEREX. Twenty one clones were identified by sequencing and comparative analysis of gene pools. Most transcripts play some roles in the neuronal differentiation, cell metabolism, or have previously been identified as transcripts that are over-expressed in other malignancies. The most commonly identified tumor-associated antigen, using serum from AGN2a-4p immunization with Treg blockade mice, was YB-1 protein that also induced a T cell response. These results indicated that potential neuroblastoma-associated antigens were found by the sera from mice immunized with tumor cells expressing costimulatory molecules with regulatory T cell function blockade. The identification of YB-1 as tumor-associated antigens capable of eliciting a T cell response validates our experimental approach and argues for the antigens we have identified here to be evaluated as targets of effector immunity and as vaccine candidates.

  14. Immunotherapy of Murine Retrovirus-Induced Acquired Immunodeficiency by CD4 T Regulatory Cell Depletion and PD-1 Blockade

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wen; Green, William R.

    2011-01-01

    LP-BM5 retrovirus induces a complex disease featuring an acquired immunodeficiency syndrome termed murine AIDS (MAIDS) in susceptible strains of mice, such as C57BL/6 (B6). CD4 T helper effector cells are required for MAIDS induction and progression of viral pathogenesis. CD8 T cells are not needed for viral pathogenesis, but rather, are essential for protection from disease in resistant strains, such as BALB/c. We have discovered an immunodominant cytolytic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitope encoded in a previously unrecognized LP-BM5 retroviral alternative (+1 nucleotide [nt]) gag translational open reading frame. CTLs specific for this cryptic gag epitope are the basis of protection from LP-BM5-induced immunodeficiency in BALB/c mice, and the inability of B6 mice to mount an anti-gag CTL response appears critical to the initiation and progression of LP-BM5-induced MAIDS. However, uninfected B6 mice primed by LP-BM5-induced tumors can generate CTL responses to an LP-BM5 retrovirus infection-associated epitope(s) that is especially prevalent on such MAIDS tumor cells, indicating the potential to mount a protective CD8 T-cell response. Here, we utilized this LP-BM5 retrovirus-induced disease system to test whether modulation of normal immune down-regulatory mechanisms can alter retroviral pathogenesis. Thus, following in vivo depletion of CD4 T regulatory (Treg) cells and/or selective interruption of PD-1 negative signaling in the CD8 T-cell compartment, retroviral pathogenesis was significantly decreased, with the combined treatment of CD4 Treg cell depletion and PD-1 blockade working in a synergistic fashion to substantially reduce the induction of MAIDS. PMID:21917983

  15. Short-term EGFR blockade enhances immune-mediated cytotoxicity of EGFR mutant lung cancer cells: rationale for combination therapies

    PubMed Central

    Dominguez, Charli; Tsang, Kwong-Yok; Palena, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor (EGFR-TKI) erlotinib has been approved for years as a first-line therapy for patients harboring EGFR-sensitizing mutations. With the promising implementation of immunotherapeutic strategies for the treatment of lung cancer, there is a growing interest in developing combinatorial therapies that could utilize immune approaches in the context of conventional or targeted therapies. Tumor cells are known to evade immune attack by multiple strategies, including undergoing phenotypic plasticity via a process designated as the epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT). As signaling through EGFR is a major inducer of EMT in epithelial cells, we have investigated the effect of EGFR inhibition with erlotinib on tumor phenotype and susceptibility to immune attack. Our data shows that short-term exposure of tumor cells to low-dose erlotinib modulates tumor plasticity and immune-mediated cytotoxicity in lung cancer cells harboring a sensitizing EGFR mutation, leading to a remarkable enhancement of tumor lysis mediated by innate NK cells and antigen-specific T cells. This effect positively correlated with the ability of short-term EGFR blockade to modulate tumor phenotype towards a more epithelial one, as well as to increase susceptibility to caspase-mediated apoptosis. The effect, however, was lost when erlotinib was utilized for long periods of time in vitro or in vivo, which resulted in gain of mesenchymal features and decreased (rather than increased) tumor lysis in response to immune effector mechanisms. Our data provides rationale for potential combinations of erlotinib and immunotherapies for the treatment of lung carcinomas in the early setting, before the establishment of tumor relapse with long-term EGFR inhibition. PMID:27685624

  16. Three-dimensional flow in Kupffer's Vesicle.

    PubMed

    Montenegro-Johnson, T D; Baker, D I; Smith, D J; Lopes, S S

    2016-09-01

    Whilst many vertebrates appear externally left-right symmetric, the arrangement of internal organs is asymmetric. In zebrafish, the breaking of left-right symmetry is organised by Kupffer's Vesicle (KV): an approximately spherical, fluid-filled structure that begins to form in the embryo 10 hours post fertilisation. A crucial component of zebrafish symmetry breaking is the establishment of a cilia-driven fluid flow within KV. However, it is still unclear (a) how dorsal, ventral and equatorial cilia contribute to the global vortical flow, and (b) if this flow breaks left-right symmetry through mechanical transduction or morphogen transport. Fully answering these questions requires knowledge of the three-dimensional flow patterns within KV, which have not been quantified in previous work. In this study, we calculate and analyse the three-dimensional flow in KV. We consider flow from both individual and groups of cilia, and (a) find anticlockwise flow can arise purely from excess of cilia on the dorsal roof over the ventral floor, showing how this vortical flow is stabilised by dorsal tilt of equatorial cilia, and (b) show that anterior clustering of dorsal cilia leads to around 40 % faster flow in the anterior over the posterior corner. We argue that these flow features are supportive of symmetry breaking through mechano-sensory cilia, and suggest a novel experiment to test this hypothesis. From our new understanding of the flow, we propose a further experiment to reverse the flow within KV to potentially induce situs inversus.

  17. The blockade of T-cell co-stimulation as a therapeutic stratagem for immunosuppression: Focus on belatacept.

    PubMed

    Snanoudj, Renaud; Frangié, Carlos; Deroure, Benjamin; François, Hélène; Créput, Caroline; Beaudreuil, Séverine; Dürrbach, Antoine; Charpentier, Bernard

    2007-09-01

    The development of immunosuppressive drugs has in recent years been focused on prevention of acute rejection. This has led to an increase in one-year allograft survival. However, these drugs have non-immune effects which contribute to the high incidence of late graft loss, as a consequence of chronic allograft nephropathy, and the death of patients. As an immune-specific alternative to conventional immunosuppressants, new biotechnology tools have been developed; they target the costimulation signal of T-cell activation, particularly by the "classical" B7/CD28 and CD40/CD40L pathways. Here, we review the limitations of current immunosuppressive protocols, the benefits of classical B7/CD28 costimulation blockade, and the first large-scale clinical application of this strategy to human transplantation with belatacept. We will also consider novel costimulatory molecules of the B7/CD28 and TNF/TNF-R families, which appear to be important for the functions of memory and effector T-cells. PMID:19707331

  18. Combined blockade of angiotensin II and prorenin receptors ameliorates podocytic apoptosis induced by IgA-activated mesangial cells.

    PubMed

    Leung, Joseph C K; Chan, Loretta Y Y; Saleem, M A; Mathieson, P W; Tang, Sydney C W; Lai, Kar Neng

    2015-07-01

    Glomerulo-podocytic communication plays an important role in the podocytic injury in IgA nephropathy (IgAN). In this study, we examine the role of podocytic angiotensin II receptor subtype 1 (AT1R) and prorenin receptor (PRR) in podocytic apoptosis in IgAN. Polymeric IgA (pIgA) was isolated from patients with IgAN and healthy controls. Conditioned media were prepared from growth arrested human mesangial cells (HMC) incubated with pIgA from patients with IgAN (IgA-HMC media) or healthy controls (Ctl-HMC media). A human podocyte cell line was used as a model to examine the regulation of the expression of AT1R, PRR, TNF-α and CTGF by IgA-HMC media. Podocytic nephrin expression, annexin V binding and caspase 3 activity were used as the functional readout of podocytic apoptosis. IgA-HMC media had no effect on AngII release by podocytes. IgA-HMC media significantly up-regulated the expression of AT1R and PRR, down-regulated nephrin expression and induced apoptosis in podocytes. Mono-blockade of AT1R, PRR, TNF-α or CTGF partially reduced podocytic apoptosis. IgA-HMC media activated NFκB, notch1 and HEY1 expression by podocytes and dual blockade of AT1R with PRR, or anti-TNF-α with anti-CTGF, effectively rescued the podocytic apoptosis induced by IgA-HMC media. Our data suggests that pIgA-activated HMC up-regulates the expression of AT1R and PRR expression by podocytes and the associated activation of NFκB and notch signalling pathways play an essential role in the podocytic apoptosis induced by glomerulo-podocytic communication in IgAN. Simultaneously targeting the AT1R and PRR could be a potential therapeutic option to reduce the podocytic injury in IgAN.

  19. Divalent cation permeability and blockade of Ca2+-permeant non-selective cation channels in rat adrenal zona glomerulosa cells

    PubMed Central

    Lotshaw, David P; Sheehan, Katherine A

    1999-01-01

    The effects of the divalent cations Ca2+, Mg2+ and Ni2+ on unitary Na+ currents through receptor-regulated non-selective cation channels were studied in inside-out and cell-attached patches from rat adrenal zona glomerulosa cells.External Ca2+ caused a concentration-dependent and voltage-independent inhibition of inward Na+ current, exhibiting an IC50 of 1.4 mm. The channel was also Ca2+ permeant and external Ca2+ shifted the reversal potential as expected for a channel exhibiting a constant Ca2+:Na+ permeability ratio near to 4.External and internal 2 mm Mg2+ caused voltage-dependent inhibition of inward and outward Na+ current, respectively. Modelling Mg2+ as an impermeant fast open channel blocker indicated that external Mg2+ blocked the pore at a single site exhibiting a zero voltage Kd of 5.1 mm for Mg2+ and located 19% of the distance through the transmembrane electric field from the external surface. Internal Mg2+ blocked the pore at a second site exhibiting a Kd of 1.7 mm for Mg2+ and located 36% of the distance through the transmembrane electric field from the cytosolic surface.External Ni2+ caused a voltage- and concentration-dependent slow blockade of inward Na+ current. Modelling Ni2+ as an impermeant slow open channel blocker indicated that Ni2+ blocked the pore at a single site exhibiting a Kd of 1.09 mm for Ni2+ and located 13.7% of the distance through the transmembrane electric field from the external surface.External 2 mm Mg2+ increased the Kd for external Ni2+ binding to 1.27 mm, consistent with competition for a single binding site. Changing ionic strength did not substantially affect Ni2+ blockade indicating the absence of surface potential under physiological ionic conditions.It is concluded that at least two divalent cation binding sites, separated by a high free energy barrier (the selectivity filter), are located in the pore and contribute to Ca2+ selectivity and permeability of the channel. PMID:9852322

  20. Blockade of PARP activity attenuates poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation but offers only partial neuroprotection against NMDA-induced cell death in the rat retina.

    PubMed

    Goebel, Dennis J; Winkler, Barry S

    2006-09-01

    Recent reports have linked neuronal cell death by necrosis to poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) hyperactivation. It is believed that under stress, the activity of this enzyme is up-regulated, resulting in extensive poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of nuclear proteins, using NAD(+) as its substrate, which, in turn, leads to the depletion of NAD(+). In efforts to restore the level of NAD(+), depletion of ATP occurs, resulting in the shutdown of ATP-dependent ionic pumps. This results in cell swelling and eventual loss of membrane selectivity, hallmarks of necrosis. Reports from in vitro and in vivo studies in the brain have shown that NMDA receptor activation stimulates PARP activity and that blockade of the enzyme provides substantial neuroprotection. The present study was undertaken to determine whether PARP activity is regulated by NMDA in the rat retina, and whether blockade of PARP activity provides protection against toxic effects of NMDA. Rat retinas exposed to intravitreal injections containing NMDA, with or without the PARP inhibitor N-(6-oxo-5, 6-dihydrophenanthridin-2-yl)-(N,-dimethylamino) acetamide hydrochloride (PJ-34), were assessed for changes in PARP-1 activity as evidenced by poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation (PAR), loss of membrane integrity, morphological indicators of apoptosis and necrosis, and ganglion cell loss. Results showed that: NMDA increased PAR formation in a concentration-dependent manner and caused a decline in retinal ATP levels; PJ-34 blockade attenuated the NMDA-induced formation of PAR and decline in ATP; NMDA induced the loss of membrane selectivity to ethidium bromide (EtBr) in inner retinal neurons, but loss of membrane selectivity was not prevented by blocking PARP activity; cells stained with EtBr, or reacted for TUNEL-labeling, displayed features characteristic of both apoptosis and necrosis. In the presence of PJ-34, greater numbers of cells exhibited apoptotic features; PJ-34 provided partial neuroprotection against NMDA-induced ganglion

  1. Blockade of MUC1 expression by glycerol guaiacolate inhibits proliferation of human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Smith, J S; Colon, J; Madero-Visbal, R; Isley, B; Konduri, S D; Baker, C H

    2010-10-01

    We sought to determine whether administration of glycerol guaiacolate at an optimal biological dose inhibits human breast cancer cell growth. Human breast cancer MCF-7 and ZR-75-1 cells were treated with glycerol guaiacolate and the therapeutic efficacy and biological activity of this drug was investigated on breast cancer cell growth. MCF-7 cells were injected into the mammary fat pad of overectamized female athymic nude mice. Ten days later, animals were treated with daily intraperitoneal injections of glycerol guaiacolate for six weeks. Tumor size and volume was monitored and immunohistochemistry analysis on MUC1, p21 and ki-67 was performed. Glycerol guaiacolate decreased breast cancer cell growth in a dose-dependent manner, decreased cell migration, and caused G1 cell cycle arrest. Our results demonstrate that glycerol guaiacolate inhibits MUC1 protein and mRNA expression levels and significantly increased p21 expression in human breast cancer cells as well as induced PARP cleavage. Similarly, glycerol guaiacolate inhibited breast tumor growth in vivo as well as enhanced p21 expression and decreased breast tumor cell proliferation (ki-67 expression). Collectively, our results demonstrate that glycerol guaiacolate decreased MUC1 expression and enhanced cell growth inhibition by inducing p21 expression in breast cancer cells. These findings suggest that glycerol guaiacolate may provide a novel and effective approach for the treatment of human breast cancer. PMID:21184665

  2. GnRH Episodic Secretion Is Altered by Pharmacological Blockade of Gap Junctions: Possible Involvement of Glial Cells.

    PubMed

    Pinet-Charvet, Caroline; Geller, Sarah; Desroziers, Elodie; Ottogalli, Monique; Lomet, Didier; Georgelin, Christine; Tillet, Yves; Franceschini, Isabelle; Vaudin, Pascal; Duittoz, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Episodic release of GnRH is essential for reproductive function. In vitro studies have established that this episodic release is an endogenous property of GnRH neurons and that GnRH secretory pulses are associated with synchronization of GnRH neuron activity. The cellular mechanisms by which GnRH neurons synchronize remain largely unknown. There is no clear evidence of physical coupling of GnRH neurons through gap junctions to explain episodic synchronization. However, coupling of glial cells through gap junctions has been shown to regulate neuron activity in their microenvironment. The present study investigated whether glial cell communication through gap junctions plays a role in GnRH neuron activity and secretion in the mouse. Our findings show that Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein-expressing glial cells located in the median eminence in close vicinity to GnRH fibers expressed Gja1 encoding connexin-43. To study the impact of glial-gap junction coupling on GnRH neuron activity, an in vitro model of primary cultures from mouse embryo nasal placodes was used. In this model, GnRH neurons possess a glial microenvironment and were able to release GnRH in an episodic manner. Our findings show that in vitro glial cells forming the microenvironment of GnRH neurons expressed connexin-43 and displayed functional gap junctions. Pharmacological blockade of the gap junctions with 50 μM 18-α-glycyrrhetinic acid decreased GnRH secretion by reducing pulse frequency and amplitude, suppressed neuronal synchronization and drastically reduced spontaneous electrical activity, all these effects were reversed upon 18-α-glycyrrhetinic acid washout.

  3. Blockade of MerTK Activation by AMPK Inhibits RPE Cell Phagocytosis.

    PubMed

    Qin, Suofu

    2016-01-01

    Timely removal of shed photoreceptor outer segments by retinal pigment epithelial cells (RPE) plays a key role in biological renewal of these highly peroxidizable structures and in maintenance of retina health. How environmental stress cause RPE cell dysfunction is undefined however. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a heterotrimer of a catalytic α subunit and regulatory β and γ subunits, maintains energy homeostasis by limiting energy utilization and/or promoting energy production when energy supply is compromised. Intriguingly, AMPK has been shown to be important in functions of RPE cells. In this mini-review, the role and mechanisms of AMPK in controlling RPE cell phagocytosis are discussed.

  4. CD28 family of receptors on T cells in chronic HBV infection: Expression characteristics, clinical significance and correlations with PD-1 blockade

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Zong-Sheng; Hao, You-Hua; Zhang, E-Juan; Xu, Chun-Li; Zhou, Yun; Zheng, Xin; Yang, Dong-Liang

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the overall clinical expression characteristics of the cluster of differentiation (CD)28 family receptors [CD28, inducible T-cell co-stimulator, programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1), cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated protein 4 and B- and T-lymphocyte attenuator] on T cells in patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB), analyze the correlations among these receptors and the clinical parameters, and to investigate the effects of PD-1 blockade on the receptor expression profiles, T-cell function and other biological effects. The expression characteristics of the CD28 family of receptors, the effects of PD-1 blockade on the receptor expression profiles and the levels of interferon (IFN)-γ were investigated in the T cells of patients with CHB. In addition, the transcription factor, T-box 21 (T-bet) and GATA binding protein 3 (GATA-3) mRNA expression levels were investigated in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of patients with CHB. The expression levels of the CD28 family receptors in the T cells of patients with CHB demonstrated distinct characteristics, for example levels of PD-1 and CTLA-4 on CD4 T cells and ICOS, PD-1, and BTLA on CD8 T cells were increased in cells from patients with CHB compared with those from the healthy individuals. A significant positive correlation was demonstrated among the serum HBV DNA titers and the levels of PD-1 on CD8+ T cells with the highest expression of PD-1 corresponding to viral levels >106 IU/ml. A significant positive correlation was observed between the serum HBV DNA titers and the expression levels of BTLA on CD8+ T cells with the highest expression of BTLA corresponding to viral levels >106 IU/ml. PD-1 blockade altered the expression profiles of CD28 family receptors in the T cells of patients with CHB, partly enhanced T cell function and increased the ratio of T-bet/GATA-3 mRNA in PBMCs. Thus, CD28 family receptors are potential clinical indicators for the rapid

  5. Angiotensin type 1 receptor resistance to blockade in the opossum proximal tubule cell due to variations in the binding pocket.

    PubMed

    Nistala, Ravi; Andresen, Bradley T; Pulakat, Lakshmi; Meuth, Alex; Sinak, Catherine; Mandavia, Chirag; Thekkumkara, Thomas; Speth, Robert C; Whaley-Connell, Adam; Sowers, James R

    2013-04-15

    Blockade of the angiotensin (ANG) II receptor type 1 (AT(1)R) with angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) is widely used in the treatment of hypertension. However, ARBs are variably effective in reducing blood pressure, likely due, in part, to polymorphisms in the ARB binding pocket of the AT(1)R. Therefore, we need a better understanding of variations/polymorphisms that alter binding of ARBs in heterogeneous patient populations. The opossum proximal tubule cell (OKP) line is commonly used in research to evaluate renal sodium handling and therefore blood pressure. Investigating this issue, we found natural sequence variations in the opossum AT(1)R paralleling those observed in the human AT(1)R. Therefore, we posited that these sequence variations may explain ARB resistance. We demonstrate that OKP cells express AT(1)R mRNA, bind (125)I-labeled ANG II, and exhibit ANG II-induced phosphorylation of Jak2. However, Jak2 phosphorylation is not inhibited by five different ARBs commonly used to treat hypertension. Additionally, nonradioactive ANG II competes (125)I-ANG II efficiently, whereas a 10-fold molar excess of olmesartan and the ANG II receptor type 2 blocker PD-123319 is unable to block (125)I-ANG II binding. In contrast, ANG II binding to OKP cells stably expressing rat AT(1A)Rs, which have a conserved AT(1)R-binding pocket with human AT(1)R, is efficiently inhibited by olmesartan. A novel observation was that resistance to ARB binding to opossum AT(1)Rs correlates with variations from the human receptor at positions 108, 163, 192, and 198 within the ARB-binding pocket. These observations highlight the potential utility of evaluating AT(1)R polymorphisms within the ARB-binding pocket in various hypertensive populations.

  6. Angiotensin type 1 receptor resistance to blockade in the opossum proximal tubule cell due to variations in the binding pocket

    PubMed Central

    Nistala, Ravi; Andresen, Bradley T.; Pulakat, Lakshmi; Meuth, Alex; Sinak, Catherine; Mandavia, Chirag; Thekkumkara, Thomas; Speth, Robert C.; Whaley-Connell, Adam

    2013-01-01

    Blockade of the angiotensin (ANG) II receptor type 1 (AT1R) with angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) is widely used in the treatment of hypertension. However, ARBs are variably effective in reducing blood pressure, likely due, in part, to polymorphisms in the ARB binding pocket of the AT1R. Therefore, we need a better understanding of variations/polymorphisms that alter binding of ARBs in heterogeneous patient populations. The opossum proximal tubule cell (OKP) line is commonly used in research to evaluate renal sodium handling and therefore blood pressure. Investigating this issue, we found natural sequence variations in the opossum AT1R paralleling those observed in the human AT1R. Therefore, we posited that these sequence variations may explain ARB resistance. We demonstrate that OKP cells express AT1R mRNA, bind 125I-labeled ANG II, and exhibit ANG II-induced phosphorylation of Jak2. However, Jak2 phosphorylation is not inhibited by five different ARBs commonly used to treat hypertension. Additionally, nonradioactive ANG II competes 125I-ANG II efficiently, whereas a 10-fold molar excess of olmesartan and the ANG II receptor type 2 blocker PD-123319 is unable to block 125I-ANG II binding. In contrast, ANG II binding to OKP cells stably expressing rat AT1ARs, which have a conserved AT1R-binding pocket with human AT1R, is efficiently inhibited by olmesartan. A novel observation was that resistance to ARB binding to opossum AT1Rs correlates with variations from the human receptor at positions 108, 163, 192, and 198 within the ARB-binding pocket. These observations highlight the potential utility of evaluating AT1R polymorphisms within the ARB-binding pocket in various hypertensive populations. PMID:23389452

  7. BK K+ channel blockade inhibits radiation-induced migration/brain infiltration of glioblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Klumpp, Lukas; Haehl, Erik; Schilbach, Karin; Lukowski, Robert; Kühnle, Matthias; Bernhardt, Günther; Buschauer, Armin; Zips, Daniel; Ruth, Peter; Huber, Stephan M.

    2016-01-01

    Infiltration of the brain by glioblastoma cells reportedly requires Ca2+ signals and BK K+ channels that program and drive glioblastoma cell migration, respectively. Ionizing radiation (IR) has been shown to induce expression of the chemokine SDF-1, to alter the Ca2+ signaling, and to stimulate cell migration of glioblastoma cells. Here, we quantified fractionated IR-induced migration/brain infiltration of human glioblastoma cells in vitro and in an orthotopic mouse model and analyzed the role of SDF-1/CXCR4 signaling and BK channels. To this end, the radiation-induced migratory phenotypes of human T98G and far-red fluorescent U-87MG-Katushka glioblastoma cells were characterized by mRNA and protein expression, fura-2 Ca2+ imaging, BK patch-clamp recording and transfilter migration assay. In addition, U-87MG-Katushka cells were grown to solid glioblastomas in the right hemispheres of immunocompromised mice, fractionated irradiated (6 MV photons) with 5 × 0 or 5 × 2 Gy, and SDF-1, CXCR4, and BK protein expression by the tumor as well as glioblastoma brain infiltration was analyzed in dependence on BK channel targeting by systemic paxilline application concomitant to IR. As a result, IR stimulated SDF-1 signaling and induced migration of glioblastoma cells in vitro and in vivo. Importantly, paxilline blocked IR-induced migration in vivo. Collectively, our data demonstrate that fractionated IR of glioblastoma stimulates and BK K+ channel targeting mitigates migration and brain infiltration of glioblastoma cells in vivo. This suggests that BK channel targeting might represent a novel approach to overcome radiation-induced spreading of malignant brain tumors during radiotherapy. PMID:26893360

  8. BK K+ channel blockade inhibits radiation-induced migration/brain infiltration of glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Edalat, Lena; Stegen, Benjamin; Klumpp, Lukas; Haehl, Erik; Schilbach, Karin; Lukowski, Robert; Kühnle, Matthias; Bernhardt, Günther; Buschauer, Armin; Zips, Daniel; Ruth, Peter; Huber, Stephan M

    2016-03-22

    Infiltration of the brain by glioblastoma cells reportedly requires Ca2+ signals and BK K+ channels that program and drive glioblastoma cell migration, respectively. Ionizing radiation (IR) has been shown to induce expression of the chemokine SDF-1, to alter the Ca2+ signaling, and to stimulate cell migration of glioblastoma cells. Here, we quantified fractionated IR-induced migration/brain infiltration of human glioblastoma cells in vitro and in an orthotopic mouse model and analyzed the role of SDF-1/CXCR4 signaling and BK channels. To this end, the radiation-induced migratory phenotypes of human T98G and far-red fluorescent U-87MG-Katushka glioblastoma cells were characterized by mRNA and protein expression, fura-2 Ca2+ imaging, BK patch-clamp recording and transfilter migration assay. In addition, U-87MG-Katushka cells were grown to solid glioblastomas in the right hemispheres of immunocompromised mice, fractionated irradiated (6 MV photons) with 5 × 0 or 5 × 2 Gy, and SDF-1, CXCR4, and BK protein expression by the tumor as well as glioblastoma brain infiltration was analyzed in dependence on BK channel targeting by systemic paxilline application concomitant to IR. As a result, IR stimulated SDF-1 signaling and induced migration of glioblastoma cells in vitro and in vivo. Importantly, paxilline blocked IR-induced migration in vivo. Collectively, our data demonstrate that fractionated IR of glioblastoma stimulates and BK K+ channel targeting mitigates migration and brain infiltration of glioblastoma cells in vivo. This suggests that BK channel targeting might represent a novel approach to overcome radiation-induced spreading of malignant brain tumors during radiotherapy. PMID:26893360

  9. BK K+ channel blockade inhibits radiation-induced migration/brain infiltration of glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Edalat, Lena; Stegen, Benjamin; Klumpp, Lukas; Haehl, Erik; Schilbach, Karin; Lukowski, Robert; Kühnle, Matthias; Bernhardt, Günther; Buschauer, Armin; Zips, Daniel; Ruth, Peter; Huber, Stephan M

    2016-03-22

    Infiltration of the brain by glioblastoma cells reportedly requires Ca2+ signals and BK K+ channels that program and drive glioblastoma cell migration, respectively. Ionizing radiation (IR) has been shown to induce expression of the chemokine SDF-1, to alter the Ca2+ signaling, and to stimulate cell migration of glioblastoma cells. Here, we quantified fractionated IR-induced migration/brain infiltration of human glioblastoma cells in vitro and in an orthotopic mouse model and analyzed the role of SDF-1/CXCR4 signaling and BK channels. To this end, the radiation-induced migratory phenotypes of human T98G and far-red fluorescent U-87MG-Katushka glioblastoma cells were characterized by mRNA and protein expression, fura-2 Ca2+ imaging, BK patch-clamp recording and transfilter migration assay. In addition, U-87MG-Katushka cells were grown to solid glioblastomas in the right hemispheres of immunocompromised mice, fractionated irradiated (6 MV photons) with 5 × 0 or 5 × 2 Gy, and SDF-1, CXCR4, and BK protein expression by the tumor as well as glioblastoma brain infiltration was analyzed in dependence on BK channel targeting by systemic paxilline application concomitant to IR. As a result, IR stimulated SDF-1 signaling and induced migration of glioblastoma cells in vitro and in vivo. Importantly, paxilline blocked IR-induced migration in vivo. Collectively, our data demonstrate that fractionated IR of glioblastoma stimulates and BK K+ channel targeting mitigates migration and brain infiltration of glioblastoma cells in vivo. This suggests that BK channel targeting might represent a novel approach to overcome radiation-induced spreading of malignant brain tumors during radiotherapy.

  10. Pharmacological blockade of group II metabotropic glutamate receptors reduces the growth of glioma cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Arcella, Antonietta; Carpinelli, Giulia; Battaglia, Giuseppe; D'Onofrio, Mara; Santoro, Filippo; Ngomba, Richard Teke; Bruno, Valeria; Casolini, Paola; Giangaspero, Felice; Nicoletti, Ferdinando

    2005-07-01

    U87MG human glioma cells in cultures expressed metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors mGlu2 and mGlu3. Addition of the mGlu2/3 receptor antagonist LY341495 to the cultures reduced cell growth, expression of cyclin D1/2, and activation of the MAP kinase and phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase pathways. This is in line with the evidence that activation of mGlu2/3 receptors sustains glioma cell proliferation. U87MG cells were either implanted under the skin (1x10(6) cells/0.5 ml) or infused into the caudate nucleus (0.5x10(6) cells/5 microl) of nude mice. Animals were treated for 28 days with mGlu receptor antagonists by means of subcutaneous osmotic minipumps. Treatments with LY341495 or (2S)-alpha-ethylglutamate (both infused at a rate of 1 mg/kg per day) reduced the size of tumors growing under the skin. Infusion of LY341495 (10 mg/kg per day) also reduced the growth of brain tumors, as assessed by magnetic resonance imaging analysis carried out every seven days. The effect of drug treatment was particularly evident during the exponential phase of tumor growth, that is, between the third and the fourth week following cell implantation. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that U87MG cells retained the expression of mGlu2/3 receptors when implanted into the brain of nude mice. These data suggest that mGlu2/3 receptor antagonists are of potential use in the experimental treatment of malignant gliomas. PMID:16053698

  11. Adenosine A2A receptor antagonists: blockade of adenosinergic effects and T regulatory cells

    PubMed Central

    Sitkovsky, M; Lukashev, D; Deaglio, S; Dwyer, K; Robson, S C; Ohta, A

    2008-01-01

    The intensity and duration of host responses are determined by protective mechanisms that control tissue injury by dampening down inflammation. Adenosine generation and consequent effects, mediated via A2A adenosine receptors (A2AR) on effector cells, play a critical role in the pathophysiological modulation of these responses in vivo. Adenosine is both released by hypoxic cells/tissues and is also generated from extracellular nucleotides by ecto-enzymes e.g. CD39 (ENTPD1) and CD73 that are expressed by the vasculature and immune cells, in particular by T regulatory cell. In general, these adenosinergic mechanisms minimize the extent of collateral damage to host tissues during the course of inflammatory reactions. However, induction of suppressive pathways might also cause escape of pathogens and permit dissemination. In addition, adenosinergic responses may inhibit immune responses while enhancing vascular angiogenic responses to malignant cells that promote tumor growth. Novel drugs that block A2AR-adenosinergic effects and/or adenosine generation have the potential to boost pathogen destruction and to selectively destroy malignant tissues. In the latter instance, future treatment modalities might include novel ‘anti-adenosinergic' approaches that augment immune clearance of malignant cells and block permissive angiogenesis. This review addresses several possible pharmacological modalities to block adenosinergic pathways and speculates on their future application together with impacts on human disease. PMID:18311159

  12. CTLA4 blockade expands FoxP3+ regulatory and activated effector CD4+ T cells in a dose-dependent fashion

    PubMed Central

    Kavanagh, Brian; O'Brien, Shaun; Lee, David; Hou, Yafei; Weinberg, Vivian; Rini, Brian; Allison, James P.; Small, Eric J.

    2008-01-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocyte–associated antigen 4 (CTLA4) delivers inhibitory signals to activated T cells. CTLA4 is constitutively expressed on regulatory CD4+ T cells (Tregs), but its role in these cells remains unclear. CTLA4 blockade has been shown to induce antitumor immunity. In this study, we examined the effects of anti-CTLA4 antibody on the endogenous CD4+ T cells in cancer patients. We show that CTLA4 blockade induces an increase not only in the number of activated effector CD4+ T cells, but also in the number of CD4+ FoxP3+ Tregs. Although the effects were dose-dependent, CD4+ FoxP3+ regulatory T cells could be expanded at lower antibody doses. In contrast, expansion of effector T cells was seen only at the highest dose level studied. Moreover, these expanded CD4+ FoxP3+ regulatory T cells are induced to proliferate with treatment and possess suppressor function. Our results demonstrate that treatment with anti-CTLA4 antibody does not deplete human CD4+ FoxP3+ Tregs in vivo, but rather may mediate its effects through the activation of effector T cells. Our results also suggest that CTLA4 may inhibit Treg proliferation similar to its role on effector T cells. This study is registered at http://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00064129, registry number NCT00064129. PMID:18523152

  13. Blockade of microglial KATP -channel abrogates suppression of inflammatory-mediated inhibition of neural precursor cells.

    PubMed

    Ortega, Francisco J; Vukovic, Jana; Rodríguez, Manuel J; Bartlett, Perry F

    2014-02-01

    Microglia positively affect neural progenitor cell physiology through the release of inflammatory mediators or trophic factors. We demonstrated previously that reactive microglia foster K(ATP) -channel expression and that blocking this channel using glibenclamide administration enhances striatal neurogenesis after stroke. In this study, we investigated whether the microglial K(ATP) -channel directly influences the activation of neural precursor cells (NPCs) from the subventricular zone using transgenic Csf1r-GFP mice. In vitro exposure of NPCs to lipopolysaccharide and interferon-gamma resulted in a significant decrease in precursor cell number. The complete removal of microglia from the culture or exposure to enriched microglia culture also decreased the precursor cell number. The addition of glibenclamide rescued the negative effects of enriched microglia on neurosphere formation and promoted a ∼20% improvement in precursor cell number. Similar results were found using microglial-conditioned media from isolated microglia. Using primary mixed glial and pure microglial cultures, glibenclamide specifically targeted reactive microglia to restore neurogenesis and increased the microglial production of the chemokine monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1). These findings provide the first direct evidence that the microglial K(ATP) -channel is a regulator of the proliferation of NPCs under inflammatory conditions.

  14. Combined blockade of signalling pathways shows marked anti-tumour potential in phaeochromocytoma cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Nölting, Svenja; Garcia, Edwin; Alusi, Ghassan; Giubellino, Alessio; Pacak, Karel; Korbonits, Márta; Grossman, Ashley B

    2016-01-01

    Currently, there is no completely effective therapy available for metastatic phaeochromocytomas (PCCs) and paragangliomas. In this study, we explore new molecular targeted therapies for these tumours, using one more benign (mouse phaeochromocytoma cell (MPC)) and one more malignant (mouse tumour tissue (MTT)) mouse PCC cell line –both generated from heterozygous neurofibromin 1 knockout mice. Several PCC-promoting gene mutations have been associated with aberrant activation of PI3K/AKT, mTORC1 and RAS/RAF/ERK signalling. We therefore investigated different agents that interfere specifically with these pathways, including antagonism of the IGF1 receptor by NVP-AEW541. We found that NVP-AEW541 significantly reduced MPC and MTT cell viability at relatively high doses but led to a compensatory up-regulation of ERK and mTORC1 signalling at suboptimal doses while PI3K/AKT inhibition remained stable. We subsequently investigated the effect of the dual PI3K/mTORC1/2 inhibitor NVP-BEZ235, which led to a significant decrease of MPC and MTT cell viability at doses down to 50 nM but again increased ERK signalling. Accordingly, we next examined the combination of NVP-BEZ235 with the established agent lovastatin, as this has been described to inhibit ERK signalling. Lovastatin alone significantly reduced MPC and MTT cell viability at therapeutically relevant doses and inhibited both ERK and AKT signalling, but increased mTORC1/p70S6K signalling. Combination treatment with NVP-BEZ235 and lovastatin showed a significant additive effect in MPC and MTT cells and resulted in inhibition of both AKT and mTORC1/p70S6K signalling without ERK up-regulation. Simultaneous inhibition of PI3K/AKT, mTORC1/2 and ERK signalling suggests a novel therapeutic approach for malignant PCCs. PMID:22715163

  15. Combined blockade of signalling pathways shows marked anti-tumour potential in phaeochromocytoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Nölting, Svenja; Garcia, Edwin; Alusi, Ghassan; Giubellino, Alessio; Pacak, Karel; Korbonits, Márta; Grossman, Ashley B

    2012-10-01

    Currently, there is no completely effective therapy available for metastatic phaeochromocytomas (PCCs) and paragangliomas. In this study, we explore new molecular targeted therapies for these tumours, using one more benign (mouse phaeochromocytoma cell (MPC)) and one more malignant (mouse tumour tissue (MTT)) mouse PCC cell line - both generated from heterozygous neurofibromin 1 knockout mice. Several PCC-promoting gene mutations have been associated with aberrant activation of PI3K/AKT, mTORC1 and RAS/RAF/ERK signalling. We therefore investigated different agents that interfere specifically with these pathways, including antagonism of the IGF1 receptor by NVP-AEW541. We found that NVP-AEW541 significantly reduced MPC and MTT cell viability at relatively high doses but led to a compensatory up-regulation of ERK and mTORC1 signalling at suboptimal doses while PI3K/AKT inhibition remained stable. We subsequently investigated the effect of the dual PI3K/mTORC1/2 inhibitor NVP-BEZ235, which led to a significant decrease of MPC and MTT cell viability at doses below 50 nM but again increased ERK signalling. Accordingly, we next examined the combination of NVP-BEZ235 with the established agent lovastatin, as this has been described to inhibit ERK signalling. Lovastatin alone significantly reduced MPC and MTT cell viability at therapeutically relevant doses and inhibited both ERK and AKT signalling, but increased mTORC1/p70S6K signalling. Combination treatment with NVP-BEZ235 and lovastatin showed a significant additive effect in MPC and MTT cells and resulted in inhibition of both AKT and mTORC1/p70S6K signalling without ERK up-regulation. Simultaneous inhibition of PI3K/AKT, mTORC1/2 and ERK signalling suggests a novel therapeutic approach for malignant PCCs.

  16. Sustained in vivo blockade of α₁-adrenergic receptors prevented some of stress-triggered effects on steroidogenic machinery in Leydig cells.

    PubMed

    Stojkov, Natasa J; Janjic, Marija M; Baburski, Aleksandar Z; Mihajlovic, Aleksandar I; Drljaca, Dragana M; Sokanovic, Srdjan J; Bjelic, Maja M; Kostic, Tatjana S; Andric, Silvana A

    2013-07-15

    This study was designed to systematically analyze and evaluate the effects of in vivo blockade of α₁-adrenergic receptors (α₁-ADRs) on the stress-induced disturbance of steroidogenic machinery in Leydig cells. Parameters followed 1) steroidogenic enzymes/proteins, transcription factors, and cAMP/testosterone production; 2) the main hallmarks of stress (epinephrine, glucocorticoids); and 3) transcription profiles of ADRs and oxidases with high affinity to inactivate glucocorticoids. Results showed that sustained blockade of α₁-ADRs prevented stress-induced 1) decrease of the transcripts/proteins for main steroidogenic CYPs (CYP11A1, CYP17A1); 2) decrease of Scarb1 and Hsd3b1 transcripts; 3) decrease of transcript for Nur77, one of the main activator of the steroidogenic expression; and 4) increase of Dax1 and Arr19, the main steroidogenic repressors in Leydig cells. In the same cells, the expression of steroidogenic stimulatory factor Creb1, StAR, and androgen receptor increased. In this signaling scenario, stress-induced stimulation of Adra1a/Adra1b/Adrbk1 and Hsd11b2 (the unidirectional oxidase with high affinity to inactivate glucocorticoids) was not changed. Blockade additionally stimulated stress-increased transcription of the most abundantly expressed ADRs Adra1d/Adrb1/Adrb2 in Leydig cells. In the same cells, stress-decreased testosterone production, the main marker of Leydig cells functionality, was completely prevented, while reduction of cAMP, the main regulator of androgenesis, was partially prevented. Accordingly, the presented data provide a new molecular/transcriptional base for "fight/adaptation" of steroidogenic cells and new molecular insights into the role of α₁-ADRs in stress-impaired Leydig cell steroidogenesis. The results are important in term of wide use of α₁-ADR selective antagonists, alone/in combination, to treat high blood pressure, nightmares associated with posttraumatic stress disorder, and disrupted sexual health.

  17. Dendritic Cell Vaccination Combined with CTLA4 Blockade in Patients with Metastatic Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Ribas, Antoni; Comin-Anduix, Begoña; Chmielowski, Bartosz; Jalil, Jason; de la Rocha, Pilar; McCannel, Tara A.; Ochoa, Maria Teresa; Seja, Elizabeth; Villanueva, Arturo; Oseguera, Denise K.; Straatsma, Bradley R.; Cochran, Alistair J.; Glaspy, John A.; Hui, Liu; Marincola, Francesco M.; Wang, Ena; Economou, James S.; Gomez-Navarro, Jesus

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Tumor antigen-loaded dendritic cells (DC) are believed to activate antitumor immunity by stimulating T cells, and cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 (CTLA4)-blocking antibodies should release a key negative regulatory pathway on T cells. The combination was tested in a phase 1 clinical trial in patients with advanced melanoma. Experimental Design Autologous DC were pulsed with MART-126-35 peptide and administered with a dose escalation of the CTLA4 blocking antibody tremelimumab. Sixteen patients were accrued to 5 dose levels. Primary endpoints were safety and immune effects; clinical efficacy was a secondary endpoint. Results Dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) of grade 3 diarrhea and grade 2 hypophysitis developed in 2 out of 3 patients receiving tremelimumab at 10 mg/kg monthly. Four patients had an objective tumor response, two partial responses (PR) and two complete responses (CR), all melanoma-free between 2 and 4 years after study initiation. There was no difference in immune monitoring results between patients with an objective tumor response and those without a response. Exploratory gene expression analysis suggested that immune-related gene signatures, in particular for B cell function, may be important in predicting response. Conclusion The combination of MART-1 peptide-pulsed DC and tremelimumab results in objective and durable tumor responses at the higher range of the expected response rate with either agent alone. PMID:19789309

  18. PD-1 blockade therapy in renal cell carcinoma: current studies and future promises.

    PubMed

    Massari, F; Santoni, M; Ciccarese, C; Santini, D; Alfieri, S; Martignoni, G; Brunelli, M; Piva, F; Berardi, R; Montironi, R; Porta, C; Cascinu, S; Tortora, G

    2015-02-01

    RCC is considered an immunogenic tumor with a prominent dysfunctional immune cell infiltrate, unable to control tumor growth. Evasion of immune surveillance, a process defined immune-editing, leads to malignant progression. The striking improvement of knowledge in immunology has led to the identification of immune checkpoints (such as CTLA-4 and PD-1), whose blockage enhances the antitumor immunity. The interaction between PD-1, an inducible inhibitory receptor expressed on lymphocytes and DCs, and PD-L1 ligand, expressed by tumor cells, results in a down-regulation of the T-cell response. Therefore, the PD-1/PD-L1 axis inhibition by targeted-antibodies, increasing the T-cell proliferation and cytotoxicity, represents a promising mechanism to stimulate the anti-tumor activity of the immune system, improving the outcomes of cancer patients. Several PD-1 and PD-L1 inhibitors have been evaluated in different tumor types, showing promising results. The interesting correlation between lymphocytes PD-1 expression and RCC advanced stage, grade and prognosis, as well as the selective PD-L1 expression by RCC tumor cells and its potential association with worse clinical outcomes, have led to the development of new anti PD-1/PD-L1 agents, alone or in combination with anti-angiogenic drugs or other immunotherapeutic approaches, for the treatment of RCC. In this review we discuss the role of PD-1/PD-L1 in RCC, focusing on the biological rationale, current clinical studies and promising therapeutic perspectives to target the PD-1 pathway.

  19. PD-1 Blockade with Pembrolizumab in Advanced Merkel-Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Nghiem, Paul T.; Bhatia, Shailender; Lipson, Evan J.; Kudchadkar, Ragini R.; Miller, Natalie J.; Annamalai, Lakshmanan; Berry, Sneha; Chartash, Elliot K.; Daud, Adil; Fling, Steven P.; Friedlander, Philip A.; Kluger, Harriet M.; Kohrt, Holbrook E.; Lundgren, Lisa; Margolin, Kim; Mitchell, Alan; Olencki, Thomas; Pardoll, Drew M.; Reddy, Sunil A.; Shantha, Erica M.; Sharfman, William H.; Sharon, Elad; Shemanski, Lynn R.; Shinohara, Michi M.; Sunshine, Joel C.; Taube, Janis M.; Thompson, John A.; Townson, Steven M.; Yearley, Jennifer H.; Topalian, Suzanne L.; Cheever, Martin A.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Merkel-cell carcinoma is an aggressive skin cancer that is linked to exposure to ultraviolet light and the Merkel-cell polyomavirus (MCPyV). Advanced Merkel-cell carcinoma often responds to chemotherapy, but responses are transient. Blocking the programmed death 1 (PD-1) immune inhibitory pathway is of interest, because these tumors often express PD-L1, and MCPyV-specific T cells express PD-1. METHODS In this multicenter, phase 2, noncontrolled study, we assigned adults with advanced Merkel-cell carcinoma who had received no previous systemic therapy to receive pembrolizumab (anti–PD-1) at a dose of 2 mg per kilogram of body weight every 3 weeks. The primary end point was the objective response rate according to Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors, version 1.1. Efficacy was correlated with tumor viral status, as assessed by serologic and immunohistochemical testing. RESULTS A total of 26 patients received at least one dose of pembrolizumab. The objective response rate among the 25 patients with at least one evaluation during treatment was 56% (95% confidence interval [CI], 35 to 76); 4 patients had a complete response, and 10 had a partial response. With a median follow-up of 33 weeks (range, 7 to 53), relapses occurred in 2 of the 14 patients who had had a response (14%). The response duration ranged from at least 2.2 months to at least 9.7 months. The rate of progression-free survival at 6 months was 67% (95% CI, 49 to 86). A total of 17 of the 26 patients (65%) had virus-positive tumors. The response rate was 62% among patients with MCPyV-positive tumors (10 of 16 patients) and 44% among those with virus-negative tumors (4 of 9 patients). Drug-related grade 3 or 4 adverse events occurred in 15% of the patients. CONCLUSIONS In this study, first-line therapy with pembrolizumab in patients with advanced Merkel-cell carcinoma was associated with an objective response rate of 56%. Responses were observed in patients with virus-positive tumors

  20. [The ajoene blockade of integrin-dependent processes in an HIV-infected cell system].

    PubMed

    Tatarintsev, A V; Vrzhets, P V; Ershov, D E; Shchegolev, A A; Turgiev, A S; Karamov, E V; Kornilaeva, G V; Makarova, T V; Fedorov, N A; Varfolomeev, S D

    1992-01-01

    Ajoene, (E,Z)-4,5,9-trithiadodeca-1,6,11-triene-9-oxide, isolated from extracts of garlic (Allium sativum) has been previously shown to inhibit platelet aggregation by inactivating allosterically the platelet integrin, GP IIb/IIIa. The structural and functional similarity of integrins led the authors to suggest that ajoene may also inhibit adhesive interactions and fusion of leukocytes. Synthetic stereoisomers of ajoene synthesized by the authors exhibited equal antiaggregatory activities (IC100 approximately 50 microM for platelets; IC100 approximately 10 microM for fMLP-stimulated neutrophils). Racemic ajoene inhibited the fusion of H9 cells with HIV-infected H9:RF cells (IC50 approximately 45 microM; 16 h of incubation) and also exhibited a degree of antiviral activity (IC50 approximately 5 microM as assessed by inhibition of HIV-1/CEM/Lav 1 Bru replication in CEM13 cells; m. o. i. 0.1; 72 h). A considerable increase in the latter became evident when the compound was administered in aliquots of 50 microM per 12 h of incubation (inhibition by 30%; total concentration 0.25 microM; 72 h).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Targeting myeloid-derived suppressor cells with colony stimulating factor-1 receptor blockade can reverse immune resistance to immunotherapy in indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase-expressing tumors

    PubMed Central

    Holmgaard, Rikke B.; Zamarin, Dmitriy; Lesokhin, Alexander; Merghoub, Taha; Wolchok, Jedd D.

    2016-01-01

    Tumor indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) promotes immunosuppression by direct action on effector T cells and Tregs and through recruitment, expansion and activation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). Targeting of MDSCs is clinically being explored as a therapeutic strategy, though optimal targeting strategies and biomarkers predictive of response are presently unknown. Maturation and tumor recruitment of MDSCs are dependent on signaling through the receptor tyrosine kinase CSF-1R on myeloid cells. Here, we show that MDSCs are the critical cell population in IDO-expressing B16 tumors in mediating accelerated tumor outgrowth and resistance to immunotherapy. Using a clinically relevant drug, we show that inhibition of CSF-1R signaling can functionally block tumor-infiltrating MDSCs and enhance anti-tumor T cell responses. Furthermore, inhibition of CSF-1R sensitizes IDO-expressing tumors to immunotherapy with T cell checkpoint blockade, and combination of CSF-1R blockade with IDO inhibitors potently elicits tumor regression. These findings provide evidence for a critical and functional role for MDSCs on the in vivo outcome of IDO-expressing tumors. PMID:27211548

  2. Targeting myeloid-derived suppressor cells with colony stimulating factor-1 receptor blockade can reverse immune resistance to immunotherapy in indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase-expressing tumors.

    PubMed

    Holmgaard, Rikke B; Zamarin, Dmitriy; Lesokhin, Alexander; Merghoub, Taha; Wolchok, Jedd D

    2016-04-01

    Tumor indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) promotes immunosuppression by direct action on effector T cells and Tregs and through recruitment, expansion and activation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). Targeting of MDSCs is clinically being explored as a therapeutic strategy, though optimal targeting strategies and biomarkers predictive of response are presently unknown. Maturation and tumor recruitment of MDSCs are dependent on signaling through the receptor tyrosine kinase CSF-1R on myeloid cells. Here, we show that MDSCs are the critical cell population in IDO-expressing B16 tumors in mediating accelerated tumor outgrowth and resistance to immunotherapy. Using a clinically relevant drug, we show that inhibition of CSF-1R signaling can functionally block tumor-infiltrating MDSCs and enhance anti-tumor T cell responses. Furthermore, inhibition of CSF-1R sensitizes IDO-expressing tumors to immunotherapy with T cell checkpoint blockade, and combination of CSF-1R blockade with IDO inhibitors potently elicits tumor regression. These findings provide evidence for a critical and functional role for MDSCs on the in vivo outcome of IDO-expressing tumors. PMID:27211548

  3. Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Co-stimulation Blockade Enhance Bone Marrow Engraftment and Induce Immunological Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Rajeshkumar, B.; Agrawal, P.; Rashighi, M.; Saidi, R. F.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Organ transplantation currently requires long-term immunosuppression. This is associated with multiple complications including infection, malignancy and other toxicities. Immunologic tolerance is considered the optimal solution to these limitations. Objective: To develop a simple and non-toxic regimen to induce mixed chimerism and tolerance using mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) in a murine model. Methods: Wild type C57BL6 (H2Dk) and Bal/C (H2Dd) mice were used as donors and recipients, respectively. We studied to achieve tolerance to skin grafts (SG) through mixed chimerism (MC) by simultaneous skin graft and non-myeloablative donor bone marrow transplantation (DBMT) +/– MSC. All recipients received rapamycin and CTLA-4 Ig without radiation. Results: DBMT+MSC combined with co-stimulation blockage and rapamycin led to stable mixed chimerism, expansion of Tregs population and donor-specific skin graft tolerance. The flow cytometry analysis revealed that recipient mice developed 15%–85% chimerism. The skin allografts survived for a long time. Elimination of MSC failed to induce mixed chimerism and tolerance. Conclusion: Our results demonstrate that donor-specific immune tolerance can be effectively induced by non-myeloablative DBMT-MSC combination without any additional cytoreductive treatment. This approach provides a promising and non-toxic allograft tolerance strategy. PMID:26082829

  4. Degron protease blockade sensor to image epigenetic histone protein methylation in cells and living animals.

    PubMed

    Sekar, Thillai V; Foygel, Kira; Devulapally, Rammohan; Paulmurugan, Ramasamy

    2015-01-16

    Lysine methylation of histone H3 and H4 has been identified as a promising therapeutic target in treating various cellular diseases. The availability of an in vivo assay that enables rapid screening and preclinical evaluation of drugs that potentially target this cellular process will significantly expedite the pace of drug development. This study is the first to report the development of a real-time molecular imaging biosensor (a fusion protein, [FLuc2]-[Suv39h1]-[(G4S)3]-[H3-K9]-[cODC]) that can detect and monitor the methylation status of a specific histone lysine methylation mark (H3-K9) in live animals. The sensitivity of this sensor was assessed in various cell lines, in response to down-regulation of methyltransferase EHMT2 by specific siRNA, and in nude mice with lysine replacement mutants. In vivo imaging in response to a combination of methyltransferase inhibitors BIX01294 and Chaetocin in mice reveals the potential of this sensor for preclinical drug evaluation. This biosensor thus has demonstrated its utility in the detection of H3-K9 methylations in vivo and potential value in preclinical drug development. PMID:25489787

  5. Expression of PD-L1 on Canine Tumor Cells and Enhancement of IFN-γ Production from Tumor-Infiltrating Cells by PD-L1 Blockade

    PubMed Central

    Maekawa, Naoya; Konnai, Satoru; Ikebuchi, Ryoyo; Okagawa, Tomohiro; Adachi, Mami; Takagi, Satoshi; Kagawa, Yumiko; Nakajima, Chie; Suzuki, Yasuhiko; Murata, Shiro; Ohashi, Kazuhiko

    2014-01-01

    Programmed death 1 (PD-1), an immunoinhibitory receptor, and programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1), its ligand, together induce the “exhausted” status in antigen-specific lymphocytes and are thus involved in the immune evasion of tumor cells. In this study, canine PD-1 and PD-L1 were molecularly characterized, and their potential as therapeutic targets for canine tumors was discussed. The canine PD-1 and PD-L1 genes were conserved among canine breeds. Based on the sequence information obtained, the recombinant canine PD-1 and PD-L1 proteins were constructed; they were confirmed to bind each other. Antibovine PD-L1 monoclonal antibody effectively blocked the binding of recombinant PD-1 with PD-L1–expressing cells in a dose-dependent manner. Canine melanoma, mastocytoma, renal cell carcinoma, and other types of tumors examined expressed PD-L1, whereas some did not. Interestingly, anti-PD-L1 antibody treatment enhanced IFN-γ production from tumor-infiltrating cells. These results showed that the canine PD-1/PD-L1 pathway is also associated with T-cell exhaustion in canine tumors and that its blockade with antibody could be a new therapeutic strategy for canine tumors. Further investigations are needed to confirm the ability of anti-PD-L1 antibody to reactivate canine antitumor immunity in vivo, and its therapeutic potential has to be further discussed. PMID:24915569

  6. CSF1/CSF1R blockade reprograms tumor-infiltrating macrophages and improves response to T-cell checkpoint immunotherapy in pancreatic cancer models.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yu; Knolhoff, Brett L; Meyer, Melissa A; Nywening, Timothy M; West, Brian L; Luo, Jingqin; Wang-Gillam, Andrea; Goedegebuure, S Peter; Linehan, David C; DeNardo, David G

    2014-09-15

    Cancer immunotherapy generally offers limited clinical benefit without coordinated strategies to mitigate the immunosuppressive nature of the tumor microenvironment. Critical drivers of immune escape in the tumor microenvironment include tumor-associated macrophages and myeloid-derived suppressor cells, which not only mediate immune suppression, but also promote metastatic dissemination and impart resistance to cytotoxic therapies. Thus, strategies to ablate the effects of these myeloid cell populations may offer great therapeutic potential. In this report, we demonstrate in a mouse model of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) that inhibiting signaling by the myeloid growth factor receptor CSF1R can functionally reprogram macrophage responses that enhance antigen presentation and productive antitumor T-cell responses. Investigations of this response revealed that CSF1R blockade also upregulated T-cell checkpoint molecules, including PDL1 and CTLA4, thereby restraining beneficial therapeutic effects. We found that PD1 and CTLA4 antagonists showed limited efficacy as single agents to restrain PDAC growth, but that combining these agents with CSF1R blockade potently elicited tumor regressions, even in larger established tumors. Taken together, our findings provide a rationale to reprogram immunosuppressive myeloid cell populations in the tumor microenvironment under conditions that can significantly empower the therapeutic effects of checkpoint-based immunotherapeutics.

  7. The mechanism of PDT-induced electrical blockade: the dependence of time-lapse localization of talaporfin sodium on the cell death phenotypes in rat cardiac myocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, A.; Matsuo, H.; Suenari, T.; Miyoshi, S.; Takatsuki, S.; Ogawa, S.; Arai, T.

    2009-02-01

    We have proposed a new type of atrial fibrillation treatment with the early state photodynamic therapy (PDT), in which the interval time between the photosensitizer injection and irradiation is shorter than that in conventional way. We had demonstrated the acute electrical blockade by the PDT with talaporfin sodium and a red (670 nm) diode laser in ex vivo and in vivo experiment using rat normal myocardial tissue. The previous study of intracellular Ca2+ concentration measurement in rat cardiac myocytes during the PDT indicated that Ca2+ influx induced by the plasma membrane damage might be the main cause of the acute reaction of myocardial tissue. We found that the cell damage of cardiac myocytes triggered by the PDT was mainly influenced by the site where the photosensitizer exists. In this study, we examined the relationship between the sites of talaporfin sodium existing and cell death phenotypes in response to the PDT, in order to clarify the mechanism of the acute electrical blockade induced by the PDT in myocardial tissue. The talaporfin sodium fluorescence was observed after the various incubation times to visualize the time-lapse intracellular photosensitizer localization. The distribution of the photosensitizer was dependent on the incubation time. The change in intracellular Ca2+ concentration during the PDT was examined with a fluorescent Ca2+ indicator by a high-speed Nipkow confocal laser microscope (CSU-X1, Yokogawa Electric Company). We obtained the Ca2+ dynamics during the PDT which can explain the PDT-induced cell death pathways. We concluded that the Ca2+ influx induced by plasma membrane damage is the possible mechanism of the electrical blockade by the early state PDT.

  8. Kinetics of Alloantigen-Specific Regulatory CD4 T Cell Development and Tissue Distribution After Donor-Specific Transfusion and Costimulatory Blockade

    PubMed Central

    Tomita, Yusuke; Satomi, Miwa; Baran, William Bracamonte; Gan, Ewa Jankowska; Workman, Andrea Szymczak; Workman, Creg J.; Vignali, Dario Angelo Alberto; Burlingham, William J.

    2016-01-01

    Background The influence of donor-side regulation toward recipient antigens on graft outcome is poorly understood. Methods Because this influence might be due in part to the accumulation of tissue-resident memory T cells in the donor organ, we used a standard murine tolerization model (donor-specific transfusion plus CD40L blockade) to determine the kinetics of development and peripheralization of allospecific regulatory T cell in lymphoid tissues and liver, a secondary lymphoid organ used in transplantation. Results We found that donor-specific transfusion and CD40L blockade leads to a progressive and sustained T regulatory allospecific response. The cytokines IL10, TGFβ, and IL35 all contributed to the regulatory phenomenon as determined by trans vivo delayed hypersensitivity assay. Unexpectedly, an early and transient self-specific regulatory response was found as well. Using double reporter mice (forkhead box p 3 [Foxp3]-yellow fluorescent protein, Epstein-Barr virus-induced gene 3 [Ebi3]-TdTomRed), we found an increase in Foxp3+CD25+ regulatory T (Treg) cells paralleling the regulatory response. The Ebi3+ CD4 T cells (IL35-producing) were mainly classic Treg cells (Foxp3+CD25+), whereas TGFβ+ CD4 T cells are mostly Foxp3-negative, suggesting 2 different CD4 Treg cell subsets. Liver-resident TGFβ+ CD4 T cells appeared more rapidly than Ebi3-producing T cells, whereas at later timepoints, the Ebi3 response predominated both in lymphoid tissues and liver. Conclusions The timing of appearance of donor organ resident Treg cell subsets should be considered in experiments testing the role of bidirectional regulation in transplant tolerance. PMID:27500263

  9. Blockade of GpIIb/IIIa inhibits the release of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) from tumor cell-activated platelets and experimental metastasis.

    PubMed

    Amirkhosravi, A; Amaya, M; Siddiqui, F; Biggerstaff, J P; Meyer, T V; Francis, J L

    1999-01-01

    Evidence that platelets play a role in tumor metastasis includes the observation of circulating tumor cell-platelet aggregates and the anti-metastatic effect of thrombocytopenia and anti-platelet drugs. Platelets have recently been shown to contain vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) which is released during clotting. We therefore studied the effects of (1) tumor cell-platelet adherence and tumor cell TF activity on platelet VEGF release; and (2) the effects of GpIIb/IIIa blockade on tumor cell-induced platelet VEGF release, tumor cell-induced thrombocytopenia and experimental metastasis. Adherent A375 human melanoma cells (TF+) and KG1 myeloid leukemia (TF-) cells were cultured in RPMI containing 10% fetal bovine serum. Platelet-rich plasma was obtained from normal citrated whole blood and the presence of VEGF (34 and 44 kDa isoforms) confirmed by immunoblotting. Platelet-rich plasma with or without anti-GpIIb/IIIa (Abciximab) was added to A375 monolayers and supernatant VEGF measured by ELISA. Tumor cell-induced platelet activation and release were determined by CD62P expression and serotonin release respectively. In vitro, tumor cell-platelet adherence was evaluated by flow cytometry. In vivo, thrombocytopenia and lung seeding were assessed 30 min and 18 days, respectively, after i.v. injection of Lewis Lung carcinoma (LL2) cells into control or murine 7E3 F(ab')(2) (6 mg/ kg) athymic rats. Maximal in vitro platelet activation (72% serotonin release) occurred 30 min after adding platelets to tumor cells. At this time, 87% of the A375 cells had adhered to platelets. Abciximab significantly (P<0.05) reduced platelet adherence to tumor cells as evidenced by flow cytometry. Incubation of A375 cells with platelets induced VEGF release in a time-dependent manner. This release was significantly inhibited by Abciximab (81% at 30 min; P<0.05). In the presence of fibrinogen and FII, VEGF release induced by A375 (TF+) cells was significantly higher than that induced

  10. Blockade of GpIIb/IIIa inhibits the release of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) from tumor cell-activated platelets and experimental metastasis.

    PubMed

    Amirkhosravi, A; Amaya, M; Siddiqui, F; Biggerstaff, J P; Meyer, T V; Francis, J L

    1999-01-01

    Evidence that platelets play a role in tumor metastasis includes the observation of circulating tumor cell-platelet aggregates and the anti-metastatic effect of thrombocytopenia and anti-platelet drugs. Platelets have recently been shown to contain vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) which is released during clotting. We therefore studied the effects of (1) tumor cell-platelet adherence and tumor cell TF activity on platelet VEGF release; and (2) the effects of GpIIb/IIIa blockade on tumor cell-induced platelet VEGF release, tumor cell-induced thrombocytopenia and experimental metastasis. Adherent A375 human melanoma cells (TF+) and KG1 myeloid leukemia (TF-) cells were cultured in RPMI containing 10% fetal bovine serum. Platelet-rich plasma was obtained from normal citrated whole blood and the presence of VEGF (34 and 44 kDa isoforms) confirmed by immunoblotting. Platelet-rich plasma with or without anti-GpIIb/IIIa (Abciximab) was added to A375 monolayers and supernatant VEGF measured by ELISA. Tumor cell-induced platelet activation and release were determined by CD62P expression and serotonin release respectively. In vitro, tumor cell-platelet adherence was evaluated by flow cytometry. In vivo, thrombocytopenia and lung seeding were assessed 30 min and 18 days, respectively, after i.v. injection of Lewis Lung carcinoma (LL2) cells into control or murine 7E3 F(ab')(2) (6 mg/ kg) athymic rats. Maximal in vitro platelet activation (72% serotonin release) occurred 30 min after adding platelets to tumor cells. At this time, 87% of the A375 cells had adhered to platelets. Abciximab significantly (P<0.05) reduced platelet adherence to tumor cells as evidenced by flow cytometry. Incubation of A375 cells with platelets induced VEGF release in a time-dependent manner. This release was significantly inhibited by Abciximab (81% at 30 min; P<0.05). In the presence of fibrinogen and FII, VEGF release induced by A375 (TF+) cells was significantly higher than that induced

  11. Immune checkpoint blockade reveals the stimulatory capacity of tumor-associated CD103(+) dendritic cells in late-stage ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Flies, Dallas B; Higuchi, Tomoe; Harris, Jaryse C; Jha, Vibha; Gimotty, Phyllis A; Adams, Sarah F

    2016-08-01

    Although immune infiltrates in ovarian cancer are associated with improved survival, the ovarian tumor environment has been characterized as immunosuppressive, due in part to functional shifts among dendritic cells with disease progression. We hypothesized that flux in dendritic cell subpopulations with cancer progression were responsible for observed differences in antitumor immune responses in early and late-stage disease. Here we identify three dendritic cell subsets with disparate functions in the ovarian tumor environment. CD11c+CD11b(-)CD103(+) dendritic cells are absent in the peritoneal cavity of healthy mice but comprise up to 40% of dendritic cells in tumor-bearing mice and retain T cell stimulatory capacity in advanced disease. Among CD11c+CD11b+ cells, Lair-1 expression distinguishes stimulatory and immunoregulatory DC subsets, which are also enriched in the tumor environment. Notably, PD-L1 is expressed by Lair-1(hi) immunoregulatory dendritic cells, and may contribute to local tumor antigen-specific T cell dysfunction. Using an adoptive transfer model, we find that PD-1 blockade enables tumor-associated CD103(+) dendritic cells to promote disease clearance. These data demonstrate that antitumor immune capacity is maintained among local dendritic cell subpopulations in the tumor environment with cancer progression. Similar dendritic cell subsets are present in malignant ascites from women with ovarian cancer, supporting the translational relevance of these results. PMID:27622059

  12. PD-L1 is a novel direct target of HIF-1α, and its blockade under hypoxia enhanced MDSC-mediated T cell activation.

    PubMed

    Noman, Muhammad Zaeem; Desantis, Giacomo; Janji, Bassam; Hasmim, Meriem; Karray, Saoussen; Dessen, Philippe; Bronte, Vincenzo; Chouaib, Salem

    2014-05-01

    Tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells such as myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) and tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) form an important component of the hypoxic tumor microenvironment. Here, we investigated the influence of hypoxia on immune checkpoint receptors (programmed death [PD]-1 and CTLA-4) and their respective ligands (PD-1 ligand 1 [PD-L1], PD-L2, CD80, and CD86) on MDSCs. We demonstrate that MDSCs at the tumor site show a differential expression of PD-L1 as compared with MDSCs from peripheral lymphoid organ (spleen). Hypoxia caused a rapid, dramatic, and selective up-regulation of PD-L1 on splenic MDSCs in tumor-bearing mice. This was not limited to MDSCs, as hypoxia also significantly increased the expression of PD-L1 on macrophages, dendritic cells, and tumor cells. Furthermore, PD-L1 up-regulation under hypoxia was dependent on hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) but not HIF-2α. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and luciferase reporter assay revealed direct binding of HIF-1α to a transcriptionally active hypoxia-response element (HRE) in the PD-L1 proximal promoter. Blockade of PD-L1 under hypoxia enhanced MDSC-mediated T cell activation and was accompanied by the down-regulation of MDSCs IL-6 and IL-10. Finally, neutralizing antibodies against IL-10 under hypoxia significantly abrogated the suppressive activity of MDSCs. Simultaneous blockade of PD-L1 along with inhibition of HIF-1α may thus represent a novel approach for cancer immunotherapy.

  13. Co-Stimulatory Blockade of the CD28/CD80-86/CTLA-4 Balance in Transplantation: Impact on Memory T Cells?

    PubMed Central

    Ville, Simon; Poirier, Nicolas; Blancho, Gilles; Vanhove, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    CD28 and CTLA-4 are prototypal co-stimulatory and co-inhibitory cell surface signaling molecules interacting with CD80/86, known to be critical for immune response initiation and regulation, respectively. Initial “bench-to-beside” translation, two decades ago, resulted in the development of CTLA4-Ig, a biologic that targets CD80/86 and prevents T-cell costimulation. In spite of its proven effectiveness in inhibiting allo-immune responses, particularly in murine models, clinical experience in kidney transplantation with belatacept (high-affinity CTLA4-Ig molecule) reveals a high incidence of acute, cell-mediated rejection. Originally, the etiology of belatacept-resistant graft rejection was thought to be heterologous immunity, i.e., the cross-reactivity of the pool of memory T cells from pathogen-specific immune responses with alloantigens. Recently, the standard view that memory T cells arise from effector cells after clonal contraction has been challenged by a “developmental” model, in which less differentiated memory T cells generate effector cells. This review delineates how this shift in paradigm, given the differences in co-stimulatory and co-inhibitory signal depending on the maturation stage, could profoundly affect our understanding of the CD28/CD80-86/CTLA-4 blockade and highlights the potential advantages of selectively targeting CD28, instead of CD80/86, to control post-transplant immune responses. PMID:26322044

  14. Tasquinimod modulates tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells and improves the antitumor immune response to PD-L1 blockade in bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nakhlé, Jessica; Pierron, Valérie; Bauchet, Anne-Laure; Plas, Pascale; Thiongane, Amath; Meyer-Losic, Florence; Schmidlin, Fabien

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The infiltration of myeloid cells helps tumors to overcome immune surveillance and imparts resistance to cancer immunotherapy. Thus, strategies to modulate the effects of these immune cells may offer a potential therapeutic benefit. We report here that tasquinimod, a novel immunotherapy which targets S100A9 signaling, reduces the immunosuppressive properties of myeloid cells in preclinical models of bladder cancer (BCa). As single anticancer agent, tasquinimod treatment was effective in preventing early stage tumor growth, but did not achieve a clear antitumor effect in advanced tumors. Investigations of this response revealed that tasquinimod induces an increase in the expression of a negative regulator of T cell activation, Programmed-death-ligand 1 (PD-L1). This markedly weakens its antitumor immunity, yet provokes an “inflamed” milieu rendering tumors more prone to T cell-mediated immune attack by PD-L1 blockade. Interestingly, the combination of tasquinimod with an Anti-PD-L1 antibody enhanced the antitumor immune response in bladder tumors. This combination synergistically modulated tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells, thereby strongly affecting proliferation and activation of effector T cells. Together, our data provide insight into the rational combination of therapies that activate both innate and adaptive immune system, such as the association of S100A9-targeting agents with immune checkpoints inhibitors, to improve the response to cancer immunotherapeutic agents in BCa. PMID:27471612

  15. Tuning of AKT-pathway by Nef and its blockade by protease inhibitors results in limited recovery in latently HIV infected T-cell line

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Amit; Abbas, Wasim; Colin, Laurence; Khan, Kashif Aziz; Bouchat, Sophie; Varin, Audrey; Larbi, Anis; Gatot, Jean-Stéphane; Kabeya, Kabamba; Vanhulle, Caroline; Delacourt, Nadège; Pasquereau, Sébastien; Coquard, Laurie; Borch, Alexandra; König, Renate; Clumeck, Nathan; De Wit, Stephane; Rohr, Olivier; Rouzioux, Christine; Fulop, Tamas; Van Lint, Carine; Herbein, Georges

    2016-01-01

    Akt signaling plays a central role in many biological processes, which are key players in human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) pathogenesis. We found that Akt interacts with HIV-1 Nef protein. In primary T cells treated with exogenous Nef or acutely infected with Nef-expressing HIV-1 in vitro, Akt became phosphorylated on serine473 and threonine308. In vitro, Akt activation mediated by Nef in T-cells was blocked by HIV protease inhibitors (PI), but not by reverse transcriptase inhibitors (RTI). Ex vivo, we found that the Akt pathway is hyperactivated in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) from cART naïve HIV-1-infected patients. PBLs isolated from PI-treated patients, but not from RTI-treated patients, exhibited decreased Akt activation, T-cell proliferation and IL-2 production. We found that PI but not RTI can block HIV-1 reactivation in latently infected J-Lat lymphoid cells stimulated with various stimuli. Using luciferase measurement, we further confirmed that Nef-mediated reactivation of HIV-1 from latency in 1G5 cells was blocked by PI parallel to decreased Akt activation. Our results indicate that PI-mediated blockade of Akt activation could impact the HIV-1 reservoir and support the need to further assess the therapeutic use of HIV-1 PI in order to curtail latently infected cells in HIV-1-infected patients. PMID:27076174

  16. Blockade of IL-33 ameliorates Con A-induced hepatic injury by reducing NKT cell activation and IFN-γ production in mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jie; Duan, Lihua; Xiong, Ali; Zhang, Hongwei; Zheng, Fang; Tan, Zheng; Gong, Feili; Fang, Min

    2012-12-01

    IL-33, a recently described member of the IL-1 family, has been identified as a cytokine endowed with pro-Th2 type functions. To date, there are only limited data on its role in physiological and pathological hepatic immune responses. In this study, we examined the role of IL-33 in immune-mediated liver injury by exploring the model of concanavalin A (Con A)-induced hepatitis. We observed that the level of IL-33 expression in the liver was dramatically increased at 12 h after Con A injection. Meanwhile, ST2L, the receptor of IL-33, was significantly up-regulated in lymphocytes including T and natural killer T (NKT) cells, especially in NKT cells. Moreover, administration of recombinant IL-33 exacerbated Con A-induced hepatitis, while pretreatment of IL-33-blocking antibody or psST2-Fc plasmids showed a protective effect probably by inhibiting the activation of late stage of T cells and NKT cells and also decreasing the production of the cytokine IFN-γ. Furthermore, depletion of NKT cells abolished the protective effect of IL-33-blocking antibody, and IL-33 failed to exacerbate Con A-induced hepatitis in IFN-γ(-/-) mice. These data suggested the critical roles of NKT cells and IFN-γ in the involvement of IL-33 in Con A-induced hepatitis. Blockade of IL-33 may represent a novel therapeutic strategy through IL-33/ST2L signal to prevent immune-mediated liver injury.

  17. In vivo blockade of α1-adrenergic receptors mitigates stress-disturbed cAMP and cGMP signaling in Leydig cells.

    PubMed

    Stojkov, Natasa J; Baburski, Aleksandar Z; Bjelic, Maja M; Sokanovic, Srdjan J; Mihajlovic, Aleksandar I; Drljaca, Dragana M; Janjic, Marija M; Kostic, Tatjana S; Andric, Silvana A

    2014-01-01

    The molecular mechanism of stress-associated reproductive dysfunction is complex and largely unknown. This study was designed to systematically analyze molecular effects of systemic in vivo blockade of α1-adrenergic receptors (α1-ADRs) on stress-induced disturbance of cAMP/cGMP signaling in testosterone-producing Leydig cells using the following parameters (i) level of circulating stress hormones, LH and testosterone; (ii) level of main molecular markers of Leydig cell functionality (testosterone, Insl3, cAMP); (iii) expression of cAMP signaling (cAMP 'producers'/'effectors'/'removers') and (iv) expression of NO-cGMP signaling (NO-cGMP 'producers'/'effectors'/'removers'). The results showed that oral administration of α1-ADR blocker before stress increased cGMP and diminished stress-reduced cAMP production in Leydig cells. In the same cells, stress-induced effects on cAMP/cGMP signaling pathways elements were changed. Sustained in vivo α1-ADR blockade completely abolished stress-increased transcription of most abundantly expressed phosphodiesterase that remove cAMP (Pde4b) and potentiated stress-increased expression of PRKA, the main stimulator of Leydig cell steroidogenesis. In the same Leydig cells, stress-decreased NOS3 expression was abolished, while stress-increased GUCY1 (cGMP 'producer') and PRKG1 (cGMP 'effector') were potentiated. It is possible that all molecules mentioned could contribute, at least in part, in recovery of Leydig cell testosterone production. Presented data provide new role of α1-ADRs in stress-triggered disturbance of cAMP/cGMP signaling, and new molecular insights into the relationship between stress and mammalian reproduction. Regardless of whether the effects of α1-blocker + stress are direct or indirect, the results are important in terms of human reproductive health and the wide use of α1-ADR antagonists, alone or in combination, to treat post-traumatic stress disorders, hypertension, benign prostatic hyperplasia symptoms and

  18. Effect of IL-17 monoclonal antibody Secukinumab combined with IL-35 blockade of Notch signaling pathway on the invasive capability of hepatoma cells.

    PubMed

    Li, H Ch; Zhang, Y X; Liu, Y; Wang, Q Sh

    2016-07-14

    We investigated the effect of the IL-17 monoclonal antibody Secukinumab combined with IL-35 in the blockade of the Notch signaling pathway on the invasive capability of hepatoma cells. We examined the effects of IL-17 antibody or IL-35 treatment alone or in combination on cell invasion and migration capabilities with Transwell chambers. The mRNA levels of Hes1, Hes5, and Hey1 were tested using quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The protein expression of N1ICD, Snail, and E-cadherin protein expressions were measured with western blot. The expression of Hes1, Hes5, Hey1 and N1ICD were all very high in hepatoma cell lines, and were positively correlated with the invasive migration capabilities of the cells. The combination of IL-17 monoclonal antibody Secukinumab with IL-35 could effectively inhibit the Notch signaling pathway, as well as the invasive migration of the cells. Snail and E-cadherin are involved in the migration of hepatoma cells, and it has been established that Snail can regulate the expression of E-cadherin. IL-17 monoclonal antibody Secukinumab combined with IL-35 can increase E-cadherin and decrease Snail expression, which are positively correlated with cell invasive migration capabilities. Overall, treatment with both IL-17 antibody and IL-35 is more effective than each treatment alone. Notch signaling is activated in hepatoma cell lines and increases with the enhancement of cell invasive migration capabilities. IL-17 monoclonal antibody Secukinumab combined with IL-35 can block the Notch signaling pathway, simultaneously reducing the invasive migration capability of hepatoma cells.

  19. Chemical and genetic blockade of HDACs enhances osteogenic differentiation of human adipose tissue-derived stem cells by oppositely affecting osteogenic and adipogenic transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Maroni, Paola; Brini, Anna Teresa; Arrigoni, Elena; de Girolamo, Laura; Niada, Stefania; Matteucci, Emanuela; Bendinelli, Paola; Desiderio, Maria Alfonsina

    2012-11-16

    The human adipose-tissue derived stem/stromal cells (hASCs) are an interesting source for bone-tissue engineering applications. Our aim was to clarify in hASCs the role of acetylation in the control of Runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2) and Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR) γ. These key osteogenic and adipogenic transcription factors are oppositely involved in osteo-differentiation. The hASCs, committed or not towards bone lineage with osteoinductive medium, were exposed to HDACs chemical blockade with Trichostatin A (TSA) or were genetically silenced for HDACs. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and collagen/calcium deposition, considered as early and late osteogenic markers, were evaluated concomitantly as index of osteo-differentiation. TSA pretreatment, useful experimental protocol to analyse pan-HDAC-chemical inhibition, and switch to osteogenic medium induced early-osteoblast maturation gene Runx2, while transiently decreased PPARγ and scarcely affected late-differentiation markers. Time-dependent effects were observed after knocking-down of HDAC1 and 3: Runx2 and ALP underwent early activation, followed by late-osteogenic markers increase and by PPARγ/ALP activity diminutions mostly after HDAC3 silencing. HDAC1 and 3 genetic blockade increased and decreased Runx2 and PPARγ target genes, respectively. Noteworthy, HDACs knocking-down favoured the commitment effect of osteogenic medium. Our results reveal a role for HDACs in orchestrating osteo-differentiation of hASCs at transcriptional level, and might provide new insights into the modulation of hASCs-based regenerative therapy. PMID:23085045

  20. NO-flurbiprofen reduces amyloid β, is neuroprotective in cell culture, and enhances cognition in response to cholinergic blockade

    PubMed Central

    Abdul-Hay, Samer O.; Luo, Jia; Ashghodom, Rezene T.; Thatcher, Gregory R.J.

    2009-01-01

    The nonsteroidal anti-inflamatory drug (NSAID) flurbiprofen is a selective amyloid lowering agent (SALA) which has been studied clinically in Alzheimer’s disease. HCT-1026 is an ester prodrug of flurbiprofen incorporating a nitrate carrier moiety that in vivo provides NO bioactivity and an improved safety profile. In vitro, HCT-1026 retained the COX inhibitory and NSAID activity of flurbiprofen, but at concentrations at which levels of Aβ1–42 were lowered by flurbiprofen, Aβ1–42 levels were elevated 200% by HCT-1026. Conversely, at lower concentrations, HCT-1026 behaved as a SALA with greater potency than flurbiprofen. The difference in concentration responses between flurbiprofen and HCT-1026 in vitro suggests different cellular targets; and in no case did a combination of nitrate drug with flurbiprofen provide similar actions. In vivo, HCT-1026 was observed to reverse cognitive deficits induced by scopolamine in two behavioral assays; activity that was also shown by a classical nitrate drug, but not by flurbiprofen. The ability to restore aversive memory and spatial working and reference memory after cholinergic blockade has been demonstrated by other agents that stimulate NO/cGMP signaling. These observations add positively to the preclinical profile of HCT-1026 and NO chimeras in Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:19702655

  1. NO-flurbiprofen reduces amyloid-beta, is neuroprotective in cell culture, and enhances cognition in response to cholinergic blockade.

    PubMed

    Abdul-Hay, Samer O; Luo, Jia; Ashghodom, Rezene T; Thatcher, Gregory R J

    2009-11-01

    The non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug flurbiprofen is a selective amyloid lowering agent which has been studied clinically in Alzheimer's disease. HCT-1026 is an ester prodrug of flurbiprofen incorporating a nitrate carrier moiety that in vivo provides NO bioactivity and an improved safety profile. In vitro, HCT-1026 retained the cyclooxygenase inhibitory and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug activity of flurbiprofen, but at concentrations at which levels of amyloid-beta 1-42 amino acid were lowered by flurbiprofen, amyloid-beta 1-42 amino acid levels were elevated 200% by HCT-1026. Conversely, at lower concentrations, HCT-1026 behaved as a selective amyloid lowering agent with greater potency than flurbiprofen. The difference in concentration-responses between flurbiprofen and HCT-1026 in vitro suggests different cellular targets; and in no case did a combination of nitrate drug with flurbiprofen provide similar actions. In vivo, HCT-1026 was observed to reverse cognitive deficits induced by scopolamine in two behavioral assays; activity that was also shown by a classical nitrate drug, but not by flurbiprofen. The ability to restore aversive memory and spatial working and reference memory after cholinergic blockade has been demonstrated by other agents that stimulate NO/cGMP signaling. These observations add positively to the preclinical profile of HCT-1026 and NO chimeras in Alzheimer's disease.

  2. Pharmacological blockade of either cannabinoid CB1 or CB2 receptors prevents both cocaine-induced conditioned locomotion and cocaine-induced reduction of cell proliferation in the hippocampus of adult male rat.

    PubMed

    Blanco-Calvo, Eduardo; Rivera, Patricia; Arrabal, Sergio; Vargas, Antonio; Pavón, Francisco Javier; Serrano, Antonia; Castilla-Ortega, Estela; Galeano, Pablo; Rubio, Leticia; Suárez, Juan; Rodriguez de Fonseca, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Addiction to major drugs of abuse, such as cocaine, has recently been linked to alterations in adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus. The endogenous cannabinoid system modulates this proliferative response as demonstrated by the finding that pharmacological activation/blockade of cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors not only modulates neurogenesis but also modulates cell death in the brain. In the present study, we evaluated whether the endogenous cannabinoid system affects cocaine-induced alterations in cell proliferation. To this end, we examined whether pharmacological blockade of either CB1 (Rimonabant, 3 mg/kg) or CB2 receptors (AM630, 3 mg/kg) would affect cell proliferation [the cells were labeled with 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU)] in the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the lateral ventricle and the dentate subgranular zone (SGZ). Additionally, we measured cell apoptosis (as monitored by the expression of cleaved caspase-3) and glial activation [by analyzing the expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and Iba-1] in the striatum and hippocampus during acute and repeated (4 days) cocaine administration (20 mg/kg). The results showed that acute cocaine exposure decreased the number of BrdU-immunoreactive (ir) cells in the SVZ and SGZ. In contrast, repeated cocaine exposure reduced the number of BrdU-ir cells only in the SVZ. Both acute and repeated cocaine exposure increased the number of cleaved caspase-3-, GFAP- and Iba1-ir cells in the hippocampus, and this effect was counteracted by AM630 or Rimonabant, which increased the number of BrdU-, GFAP-, and Iba1-ir cells in the hippocampus. These results indicate that the changes in neurogenic, apoptotic and gliotic processes that were produced by repeated cocaine administration were normalized by pharmacological blockade of CB1 and CB2. The restorative effects of cannabinoid receptor blockade on hippocampal cell proliferation were associated with the prevention of the induction of conditioned locomotion

  3. Blockade of the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis with a GnRH antagonist in the neonatal marmoset monkey: changes in Leydig cell ultrastructure.

    PubMed

    Prince, F P; Mann, D R; Fraser, H M

    1998-12-01

    Little is known of the cell biology of Leydig cells during the neonatal activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular (HPT) axis. The current study examined the effect of blockade of the HPT axis with a GnRH antagonist (antide) on the neonatal population of Leydig cells in the new world primate, the common marmoset. Three sets of twins, age 7 weeks, were studied: in each pair one twin was used as a control, while the other received treatment with GnRH antagonist from the day of birth to suppress pituitary gonadotrophin secretion. Leydig cells of treated animals were dramatically different from those of controls. The cells were atrophic and exhibited very irregular nuclei. The organelles involved in steroid synthesis were reduced to the extent to being barely evident. The smooth endoplasmic reticulum (SER) was greatly diminished in quantity and distribution. The usual form of the SER (anastomosing tubules) was not evident, but, instead, the SER was relatively unbranched. Peroxisomes, organelles involved in transfer of cholesterol to the mitochondria, were greatly reduced in number. Mitochondria were relatively sparse and exhibited a non-typical morphology, as tubular elements of the cristae were rarely evident. Thus, the central apparatus in steroid production, the SER, mitochondria and peroxisomes, was essentially shut down in the GnRH-antagonist-treated animals. Storage of cholesterol, the precursor of steroid biosynthesis, was also not in evidence, as lipid droplets were extremely rare. Two prominent features of control in neonatal marmoset Leydig cells, the membranofibrillar inclusion (MFI) and basal laminae, remain prominent in the Leydig cells of treated animals. Evidence of apoptosis was not observed. These results provide strong support that the gonadotrophic hormones are the primary regulator of neonatal Leydig cell development in primates, and also suggest cell regression, rather than apoptosis, being the mechanism of this inhibition.

  4. Selective immunosuppression by administration of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II-binding peptides. I. Evidence for in vivo MHC blockade preventing T cell activation

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Draining lymph node cells (LNC) from mice immunized with hen egg white lysozyme (HEL) display at their surface antigen-MHC complexes able to stimulate, in the absence of any further antigen addition, HEL peptide- specific, class II-restricted T cell hybridomas. Chloroquine addition to these LNC cultures fails to inhibit antigen presentation, indicating that antigenic complexes of class II molecules and HEL peptides are formed in vivo. MHC class II restriction of antigen presentation by LNC from HEL-primed mice was verified by the use of anti-class II monoclonal antibodies. Coinjection of HEL and the I-Ak-binding peptide HEL 112-129 in mice of H-2k haplotype inhibits the ability of LNC to stimulate I-Ak-restricted, HEL 46-61-specific T cell hybridomas. Similar results are obtained in mice coinjected with the HEL peptides 46-61 and 112-129. Inhibition of T hybridoma activation can also be observed using as antigen-presenting cells irradiated, T cell-depleted LNC from mice coinjected with HEL 46-61 and HEL 112-129, ruling out the possible role of either specific or nonspecific suppressor T cells. Inhibition of T cell proliferation is associated with MHC-specific inhibition of antigen presentation and with occupancy by the competitor of class II binding sites, as measured by activation of peptide- specific T cell hybridomas. These results demonstrate that administration of MHC class II binding peptide competitors selectively inhibits antigen presentation to class II-restricted T cells, indicating competitive blockade of class II molecules in vivo. PMID:1569402

  5. Selective blockade of CaMKII-alpha inhibits NMDA-induced caspase-3-dependent cell death but does not arrest PARP-1 activation or loss of plasma membrane selectivity in rat retinal neurons.

    PubMed

    Goebel, Dennis J

    2009-02-23

    Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II-alpha (CaMKII-alpha) has been implicated in a number of receptor mediated events in neurons. Pharmacological blockade of CaMKII-alpha has been shown to prevent phosphorylation of NMDA-R2A and R2B receptor subunits, suggesting that this enzyme may be linked to receptor trafficking of glutamate receptors and serve as a regulatory protein for neuronal cell death. In the retina, inhibition of CaMKII-alpha has been reported to be neuroprotective against NMDA-induced cell death by preventing the activation of the caspase-3 dependent pathway. However, the effects of CaMKII-alpha blockade on the caspase-3 independent, PARP-1 dependent and the non-programmed cell death pathways have not previously been investigated. In the present study, blockade of CaMKII-alpha with the highly specific antagonist myristoylated autocamtide-2-related inhibitory peptide (AIP) was used in a rat in vivo model of retinal toxicity to compare the effects of on NMDA-induced caspase-3-dependent, PARP-1 dependent and the non-programmed (necrosis) cell death pathways. Results confirmed that AIP fully attenuates caspase-3 activation for at least 8 h following NMDA insult and also significantly improves retinal ganglion cell survival. However, this blockade had little effect on reducing the loss of plasma membrane selectivity (LPMS, e.g. necrosis) in cells located in the ganglion cell and inner nuclear layers and did not alter NMDA-induced PARP-1 hyperactivation, or prevent TUNEL labeling following a moderate NMDA-insult. These findings support a specific role for CaMKII-alpha in mediating the caspase-3 dependent cell death pathway and provide evidence that it is not directly linked to the signaling of either the PARP-1 dependent or the non-programmed cell death pathways.

  6. Blockade of CCR7 leads to decreased dendritic cell migration to draining lymph nodes and promotes graft survival in low-risk corneal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Hos, D; Dörrie, J; Schaft, N; Bock, F; Notara, M; Kruse, F E; Krautwald, S; Cursiefen, C; Bachmann, B O

    2016-05-01

    The chemokine receptor CCR7 is essential for migration of mature dendritic cells (DCs) to the regional lymph nodes, and it has been shown that blocking of CCR7 improves graft survival after high-risk corneal transplantation in vascularized recipient corneas. However, it is so far unknown whether blocking of CCR7 reduces migration of DCs from the avascular cornea to the draining lymph nodes and whether this leads to improved graft survival also in the low-risk setting of corneal transplantation, which accounts for the majority of perforating transplantations performed. Therefore, in this study, pellets containing Freund's adjuvant and bovine serum albumin (BSA) conjugated to Alexa488 fluorescent dye were implanted into the corneal stroma of BALB/c mice to analyze antigen uptake by corneal DCs and their migration to the regional lymph nodes. After pellet implantation, mice were either treated by local administration of a CCR7 blocking fusion protein that consisted of CCL19 fused to the Fc part of human IgG1 or a control-IgG. In vivo fluorescence microscopy showed uptake of Alexa488-conjugated BSA by corneal DCs within 8 h. Furthermore, analysis of single cell suspensions of draining lymph nodes prepared after 48 h revealed that 2.1 ± 0.3% of CD11c(+) cells were also Alexa488(+). Importantly, DC migration was significantly reduced after topical administration of CCL19-IgG (1.2 ± 0.2%; p < 0.05). To test the effect of CCR7 blockade on graft rejection after allogeneic low-risk keratoplasty, corneal transplantations were performed using C57BL/6-mice as donors and BALB/c-mice as recipients. Treatment mice received two intraperitoneal loading doses of CCL19-IgG prior to transplantation, followed by local treatment with CCL19-IgG containing eye drops for the first two weeks after transplantation. Control mice received same amounts of control-IgG. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed that in the CCL19-IgG treated group, 76% of the grafts survived through the end

  7. Blockade of Jagged/Notch pathway abrogates transforming growth factor β2-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition in human retinal pigment epithelium cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, X; Xiao, W; Liu, X; Zeng, M; Luo, L; Wu, M; Ye, S; Liu, Y

    2014-05-01

    The epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells plays a key role in proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR) and proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR), which lead to the loss of vision. The Jagged/Notch pathway has been reported to be essential in EMT during embryonic development, fibrotic diseases and cancer metastasis. However, the function of Jagged/Notch signaling in EMT of RPE cells is unknown. Thus, we hypothesized that a crosstalk between Notch and transforming growth factor β2 (TGF-β2) signaling could induce EMT in RPE cells, which subsequently contributes to PVR and PDR. Here, we demonstrate that Jagged-1/Notch pathway is involved in the TGF-β2-mediated EMT of human RPE cells. Blockade of Notch pathway with DAPT (a specific inhibitor of Notch receptor cleavage) and knockdown of Jagged-1 expression inhibited TGF-β2-induced EMT through regulating the expression of Snail, Slug and ZEB1. Besides the canonical Smad signaling pathway, the noncanonical PI3K/Akt and MAPK pathway also contributed to TGF-β2-induced up-regulation of Jagged-1 in RPE cells. Overexpression of Jagged-1 could mimic TGF-β2 induce EMT. Our data suggest that the Jagged-1/Notch signaling pathway plays a critical role in TGF-β2-induced EMT in human RPE cells, and may contribute to the development of PVR and PDR. Inhibition of the Jagged/Notch signaling pathway, therefore, may have therapeutic value in the prevention and treatment of PVR and PDR.

  8. Loss of oxidative defense and potential blockade of satellite cell maturation in the skeletal muscle of patients with cancer but not in the healthy elderly

    PubMed Central

    Brzeszczyńska, Joanna; Johns, Neil; Schilb, Alain; Degen, Simone; Degen, Martin; Langen, Ramon; Schols, Annemie; Glass, David J; Roubenoff, Ronenn; Greig, Carolyn A.

    2016-01-01

    Muscle wasting in old age or cancer may result from failed myofiber regeneration and/or accelerated atrophy. This study aimed to determine from transcriptomic analysis of human muscle the integrity of the cellular stress response system in relation to satellite cell differentiation or apoptosis in patients with cancer (weight-stable (CWS) or weight-losing (CWL)) or healthy elderly (HE) when compared with healthy middle-aged controls (HMA). 28 patients with cancer (CWS: 18 and CWL: 10), HE: 21 and HMA: 20 underwent biopsy of quadriceps muscle. The expression of transcription factors for muscle regeneration (Pax3, Pax7 and MyoD) was increased in CWS and HE compared with HMA (p<0.001). In contrast, the expression of the late myogenic differentiation marker MyoG was reduced in CWS and CWL but increased in HE (p<0.0001). Bax was significantly increased in CWS, CWL and HE (P<0.0001). Expression of the oxidative defense genes SOD2, GCLM, and Nrf2 was decreased in CWS and CWL but increased in HE (p<0.0001). There is evidence for blockade of satellite cell maturation, upregulation of apoptosis and reduced oxidative defense in the muscle of cancer patients. In the healthy elderly the potential for differentiation and oxidative defense is maintained. PMID:27454226

  9. Testing chemotherapeutic agents in the feather follicle identifies a selective blockade of cell proliferation and a key role for sonic hedgehog signaling in chemotherapy-induced tissue damage.

    PubMed

    Xie, Guojiang; Wang, Hangwei; Yan, Zhipeng; Cai, Linyan; Zhou, Guixuan; He, Wanzhong; Paus, Ralf; Yue, Zhicao

    2015-03-01

    Chemotherapeutic agents induce complex tissue responses in vivo and damage normal organ functions. Here we use the feather follicle to investigate details of this damage response. We show that cyclophosphamide treatment, which causes chemotherapy-induced alopecia in mice and man, induces distinct defects in feather formation: feather branching is transiently and reversibly disrupted, thus leaving a morphological record of the impact of chemotherapeutic agents, whereas the rachis (feather axis) remains unperturbed. Similar defects are observed in feathers treated with 5-fluorouracil or taxol but not with doxorubicin or arabinofuranosyl cytidine (Ara-C). Selective blockade of cell proliferation was seen in the feather branching area, along with a downregulation of sonic hedgehog (Shh) transcription, but not in the equally proliferative rachis. Local delivery of the Shh inhibitor, cyclopamine, or Shh silencing both recapitulated this effect. In mouse hair follicles, those chemotherapeutic agents that disrupted feather formation also downregulated Shh gene expression and induced hair loss, whereas doxorubicin or Ara-C did not. Our results reveal a mechanism through which chemotherapeutic agents damage rapidly proliferating epithelial tissue, namely via the cell population-specific, Shh-dependent inhibition of proliferation. This mechanism may be targeted by future strategies to manage chemotherapy-induced tissue damage.

  10. Sprouty2 Suppresses Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition of Human Lens Epithelial Cells through Blockade of Smad2 and ERK1/2 Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chuan; Chen, Xiaoyun; Qin, Yingyan; Qu, Bo; Luo, Lixia; Lin, Haotian; Wu, Mingxing; Chen, Weirong; Liu, Yizhi

    2016-01-01

    Transforming growth factor β (TGFβ)-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of lens epithelial cells (LECs) plays a key role in the pathogenesis of anterior subcapsular cataract (ASC) and capsule opacification. In mouse lens, Sprouty2 (Spry2) has a negative regulatory role on TGFβ signaling. However, the regulation of Spry2 during ASC development and how Spry2 modulates TGFβ signaling pathway in human LECs have not been characterized. Here, we demonstrate that Spry2 expression level is decreased in anterior capsule LECs of ASC patients. Spry2 negatively regulates TGFβ2-induced EMT and migration of LECs through inhibition of Smad2 and ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Also, blockade of Smad2 or ERK1/2 activation suppresses EMT caused by Spry2 downregulation. Collectively, our results for the first time show in human LECs that Spry2 has an inhibitory role in TGFβ signaling pathway. Our findings in human lens tissue and epithelial cells suggest that Spry2 may become a novel therapeutic target for the prevention and treatment of ASC and capsule opacification. PMID:27415760

  11. Loss of oxidative defense and potential blockade of satellite cell maturation in the skeletal muscle of patients with cancer but not in the healthy elderly.

    PubMed

    Brzeszczyńska, Joanna; Johns, Neil; Schilb, Alain; Degen, Simone; Degen, Martin; Langen, Ramon; Schols, Annemie; Glass, David J; Roubenoff, Ronenn; Greig, Carolyn A; Jacobi, Carsten; Fearon, Kenneth Ch; Ross, James A

    2016-08-01

    Muscle wasting in old age or cancer may result from failed myofiber regeneration and/or accelerated atrophy. This study aimed to determine from transcriptomic analysis of human muscle the integrity of the cellular stress response system in relation to satellite cell differentiation or apoptosis in patients with cancer (weight-stable (CWS) or weight-losing (CWL)) or healthy elderly (HE) when compared with healthy middle-aged controls (HMA). 28 patients with cancer (CWS: 18 and CWL: 10), HE: 21 and HMA: 20 underwent biopsy of quadriceps muscle. The expression of transcription factors for muscle regeneration (Pax3, Pax7 and MyoD) was increased in CWS and HE compared with HMA (p≤0.001). In contrast, the expression of the late myogenic differentiation marker MyoG was reduced in CWS and CWL but increased in HE (p≤0.0001). Bax was significantly increased in CWS, CWL and HE (p≤0.0001). Expression of the oxidative defense genes SOD2, GCLM, and Nrf2 was decreased in CWS and CWL but increased in HE (p≤0.0001). There is evidence for blockade of satellite cell maturation, upregulation of apoptosis and reduced oxidative defense in the muscle of cancer patients. In the healthy elderly the potential for differentiation and oxidative defense is maintained. PMID:27454226

  12. [Cancer immunotherapy by immuno-checkpoint blockade].

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Yutaka

    2015-10-01

    As cancer immunotherapies utilizing anti-tumor T-cell responses, immuno-checkpoint blockade and adoptive T-cell immunotherapy have recently achieved durable responses even in advanced cancer patients with metastases. Administration of antibodies on the T-cell surface, CTLA-4 and PD-1 (or PD-1 ligand PD-L1), resulted in tumor regression of not only melanoma and renal cell cancer which were known to be relatively sensitive to immunotherapy, but also various malignancies including lung, bladder, ovarian, gastric, and head and neck cancers, as well as hematological malignancies such as Hodgkin and B-cell malignant lymphomas. These findings have changed the status of immunotherapy in the development of cancer treatments. Currently, development of combinations employing cancer immunotherapy with immuno-checkpoint blockade, as well as personalized cancer immunotherapy based on the evaluation of pretreatment immune status, are in progress.

  13. The Blockade of IL6 Counterparts the Osmolar Stress-Induced Apoptosis in Human Conjunctival Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Hee-Jung; Byun, Yong-Soo; Mok, Jee-Won

    2016-01-01

    To determine the effect of hyperosmolarity on cell survival/apoptosis of conjunctival epithelial cells and evaluate the possible role of IL6, Wong-Kilbourne derivative of Chang conjunctival cell line (WKD) was used in this study. Confluent cells were incubated under different osmolarity (290 mOsm and 500 mOsm) with or without neutralizing IL6 antibody (50 ng/mL). The expression of IL6 level was measured in the supernatant of each conditioned medium. Cell viability/apoptosis assay was performed using Annexin V/Propidium Iodide (PI) and Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8). Western blot was conducted to measure the abundance of apoptotic markers and IL6 related downstream signaling pathway. The concentration of IL6 showed time-dependent increase in cells treated with 500 mOsm. Although apoptosis of WKD cell is increased in treated 500 mOsm for 24 h, apoptosis reduced in WKD cell treated 500 mOsm with anti-IL6 for 24 h. Anti-IL6 inhibited the activation of JAK-STAT signaling pathway, which was induced by hyperosmolarity. Hyperosmolar condition induced apoptosis in conjunctival epithelial cells, along with increase of IL6 production. IL6 neutralizing antibody inhibited apoptosis and JAK-STAT signaling in hyperosmolar condition. These findings suggested that IL6 may be involved in apoptotic change and in hyperosmolarity. PMID:27555966

  14. Chemical and genetic blockade of HDACs enhances osteogenic differentiation of human adipose tissue-derived stem cells by oppositely affecting osteogenic and adipogenic transcription factors

    SciTech Connect

    Maroni, Paola; Brini, Anna Teresa; Arrigoni, Elena; Girolamo, Laura de; Niada, Stefania; Matteucci, Emanuela; Bendinelli, Paola; Desiderio, Maria Alfonsina

    2012-11-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Acetylation affected hASCs osteodifferentiation through Runx2-PPAR{gamma}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HDACs knocking-down favoured the commitment effect of osteogenic medium. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HDACs silencing early activated Runx2 and ALP. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PPAR{gamma} reduction and calcium/collagen deposition occurred later. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Runx2/PPAR{gamma} target genes were modulated in line with HDACs role in osteo-commitment. -- Abstract: The human adipose-tissue derived stem/stromal cells (hASCs) are an interesting source for bone-tissue engineering applications. Our aim was to clarify in hASCs the role of acetylation in the control of Runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2) and Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR) {gamma}. These key osteogenic and adipogenic transcription factors are oppositely involved in osteo-differentiation. The hASCs, committed or not towards bone lineage with osteoinductive medium, were exposed to HDACs chemical blockade with Trichostatin A (TSA) or were genetically silenced for HDACs. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and collagen/calcium deposition, considered as early and late osteogenic markers, were evaluated concomitantly as index of osteo-differentiation. TSA pretreatment, useful experimental protocol to analyse pan-HDAC-chemical inhibition, and switch to osteogenic medium induced early-osteoblast maturation gene Runx2, while transiently decreased PPAR{gamma} and scarcely affected late-differentiation markers. Time-dependent effects were observed after knocking-down of HDAC1 and 3: Runx2 and ALP underwent early activation, followed by late-osteogenic markers increase and by PPAR{gamma}/ALP activity diminutions mostly after HDAC3 silencing. HDAC1 and 3 genetic blockade increased and decreased Runx2 and PPAR{gamma} target genes, respectively. Noteworthy, HDACs knocking-down favoured the commitment effect of osteogenic medium. Our results reveal

  15. CXCL13 blockade disrupts B lymphocyte organization in tertiary lymphoid structures without altering B cell receptor bias or preventing diabetes in nonobese diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Henry, Rachel A; Kendall, Peggy L

    2010-08-01

    Lymphocytes that invade nonlymphoid tissues often organize into follicle-like structures known as tertiary lymphoid organs (TLOs). These structures resemble those found in spleen or lymph nodes, but their function is unknown. TLOs are recognized in many autoimmune diseases, including the NOD mouse model of type 1 diabetes. In some cases, TLOs have been associated with the B lymphocyte chemoattractant, CXCL13. Studies presented in this article show that CXCL13 is present in inflamed islets of NOD mice. Ab blockade of this chemokine unraveled B lymphocyte organization in islet TLOs, without reducing their proportion in the islets. These chaotic milieus contained B lymphocytes with the same distinct repertoire of B cell receptors as those found in mice with well-organized structures. Somatic hypermutation, associated with T-B interactions, was not impaired in these disorganized insulitis lesions. Finally, loss of B lymphocyte organization in islets did not provide disease protection. Thus, B lymphocytes infiltrating islets in NOD mice do not require the morphology of secondary lymphoid tissues to support their role in disease. PMID:20574003

  16. Tissue Distribution Dynamics of Human NK Cells Inferred from Peripheral Blood Depletion Kinetics after Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Receptor Blockade.

    PubMed

    Mehling, M; Burgener, A-V; Brinkmann, V; Bantug, G R; Dimeloe, S; Hoenger, G; Kappos, L; Hess, C

    2015-11-01

    Human natural killer (NK) cell subsets differentially distribute throughout the organism. While CD56(dim) and CD56(bright) NK cell subsets similarly reside in the bone marrow (BM), the CD56(dim) population predominantly accumulates in non-lymphoid tissues and the CD56(bright) counterpart in lymphoid tissue (LT). The dynamics with which these NK cell subsets redistribute to tissues remains unexplored. Here, we studied individuals newly exposed to fingolimod, a drug that efficiently blocks sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P)-directed lymphocyte - including NK cell - egress from tissue to blood. During an observation period of 6h peripheral blood depletion of CD56(bright) NK cells was observed 3 h after first dose of fingolimod, with 40-50% depletion after 6 h, while a decrease of the numbers of CD56(dim) NK cells did not reach the level of statistical significance. In vitro, CD56(bright) and CD56(dim) NK cells responded comparably to the BM-homing chemokine CXCL12, while CD56(bright) NK cells migrated more efficiently in gradients of the LT-homing chemokines CCL19 and CCL21. In conjuncture with these in vitro studies, the indirectly observed subset-specific depletion kinetics from blood are compatible with preferential and more rapid redistribution of CD56(bright) NK cells from blood to peripheral tissue such as LT and possibly also the inflamed central nervous system. These data shed light on an unexplored level at which access of NK cells to LT, and thus, for example antigen-presenting cells, is regulated.

  17. Ultrasound for neuraxial blockade.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Karthikeyan Kallidaikurichi; Lee, Peter John; Iohom, Gabriella

    2014-12-01

    Neuraxial blockade is still largely performed as a blind procedure. Despite of developments in the type of needles used and drugs administered, the process of locating the epidural or intra-thecal space is still limited to identification of landmarks by palpation and reliance on tactile feedback of the operator. Ultrasound has provided the long needed "eye" to the procedure and has already shown promise of improving the safety and efficacy or neuraxial blocks. This review focuses on understanding the sonoanatomy of the neuraxial space, performing a systematic pre-procedural ultrasound scan, and reviewing the available evidence. PMID:25463890

  18. GVHD after haploidentical transplantation: a novel, MHC-defined rhesus macaque model identifies CD28− CD8+ T cells as a reservoir of breakthrough T-cell proliferation during costimulation blockade and sirolimus-based immunosuppression

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Weston P.; Srinivasan, Swetha; Panoskaltsis-Mortari, Angela; Singh, Karnail; Sen, Sharon; Hamby, Kelly; Deane, Taylor; Stempora, Linda; Beus, Jonathan; Turner, Alexa; Wheeler, Caleb; Anderson, Daniel C.; Sharma, Prachi; Garcia, Anapatricia; Strobert, Elizabeth; Elder, Eric; Crocker, Ian; Crenshaw, Timothy; Penedo, M. Cecilia T.; Ward, Thea; Song, Mingqing; Horan, John; Larsen, Christian P.; Blazar, Bruce R.

    2010-01-01

    We have developed a major histocompatibility complex–defined primate model of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and have determined the effect that CD28/CD40-directed costimulation blockade and sirolimus have on this disease. Severe GVHD developed after haploidentical transplantation without prophylaxis, characterized by rapid clinical decline and widespread T-cell infiltration and organ damage. Mechanistic analysis showed activation and possible counter-regulation, with rapid T-cell expansion and accumulation of CD8+ and CD4+ granzyme B+ effector cells and FoxP3pos/CD27high/CD25pos/CD127low CD4+ T cells. CD8+ cells down-regulated CD127 and BCl-2 and up-regulated Ki-67, consistent with a highly activated, proliferative profile. A cytokine storm also occurred, with GVHD-specific secretion of interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra), IL-18, and CCL4. Costimulation Blockade and Sirolimus (CoBS) resulted in striking protection against GVHD. At the 30-day primary endpoint, CoBS-treated recipients showed 100% survival compared with no survival in untreated recipients. CoBS treatment resulted in survival, increasing from 11.6 to 62 days (P < .01) with blunting of T-cell expansion and activation. Some CoBS-treated animals did eventually develop GVHD, with both clinical and histopathologic evidence of smoldering disease. The reservoir of CoBS-resistant breakthrough immune activation included secretion of interferon-γ, IL-2, monocyte chemotactic protein-1, and IL-12/IL-23 and proliferation of cytotoxic T-lymphocyte–associated antigen 4 immunoglobulin-resistant CD28− CD8+ T cells, suggesting adjuvant treatments targeting this subpopulation will be needed for full disease control. PMID:20833977

  19. Activity blockade and GABAA receptor blockade produce synaptic scaling through chloride accumulation in embryonic spinal motoneurons and interneurons.

    PubMed

    Lindsly, Casie; Gonzalez-Islas, Carlos; Wenner, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Synaptic scaling represents a process whereby the distribution of a cell's synaptic strengths are altered by a multiplicative scaling factor. Scaling is thought to be a compensatory response that homeostatically controls spiking activity levels in the cell or network. Previously, we observed GABAergic synaptic scaling in embryonic spinal motoneurons following in vivo blockade of either spiking activity or GABAA receptors (GABAARs). We had determined that activity blockade triggered upward GABAergic scaling through chloride accumulation, thus increasing the driving force for these currents. To determine whether chloride accumulation also underlies GABAergic scaling following GABAAR blockade we have developed a new technique. We expressed a genetically encoded chloride-indicator, Clomeleon, in the embryonic chick spinal cord, which provides a non-invasive fast measure of intracellular chloride. Using this technique we now show that chloride accumulation underlies GABAergic scaling following blockade of either spiking activity or the GABAAR. The finding that GABAAR blockade and activity blockade trigger scaling via a common mechanism supports our hypothesis that activity blockade reduces GABAAR activation, which triggers synaptic scaling. In addition, Clomeleon imaging demonstrated the time course and widespread nature of GABAergic scaling through chloride accumulation, as it was also observed in spinal interneurons. This suggests that homeostatic scaling via chloride accumulation is a common feature in many neuronal classes within the embryonic spinal cord and opens the possibility that this process may occur throughout the nervous system at early stages of development.

  20. Embryonic GABA(B) receptor blockade alters cell migration, adult hypothalamic structure, and anxiety- and depression-like behaviors sex specifically in mice.

    PubMed

    Stratton, Matthew S; Staros, Michelle; Budefeld, Tomaz; Searcy, Brian T; Nash, Connor; Eitel, Chad; Carbone, David; Handa, Robert J; Majdic, Gregor; Tobet, Stuart A

    2014-01-01

    Neurons of the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) regulate the hypothalamic- pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and the autonomic nervous system. Females lacking functional GABA(B) receptors because of a genetic disruption of the R1 subunit have altered cellular characteristics in and around the PVN at birth. The genetic disruption precluded appropriate assessments of physiology or behavior in adulthood. The current study was conducted to test the long term impact of a temporally restricting pharmacological blockade of the GABA(B) receptor to a 7-day critical period (E11-E17) during embryonic development. Experiments tested the role of GABA(B) receptor signaling in fetal development of the PVN and later adult capacities for adult stress related behaviors and physiology. In organotypic slices containing fetal PVN, there was a female specific, 52% increase in cell movement speeds with GABA(B) receptor antagonist treatment that was consistent with a sex-dependent lateral displacement of cells in vivo following 7 days of fetal exposure to GABA(B) receptor antagonist. Anxiety-like and depression-like behaviors, open-field activity, and HPA mediated responses to restraint stress were measured in adult offspring of mothers treated with GABA(B) receptor antagonist. Embryonic exposure to GABA(B) receptor antagonist resulted in reduced HPA axis activation following restraint stress and reduced depression-like behaviors. There was also increased anxiety-like behavior selectively in females and hyperactivity in males. A sex dependent response to disruptions of GABA(B) receptor signaling was identified for PVN formation and key aspects of physiology and behavior. These changes correspond to sex specific prevalence in similar human disorders, namely anxiety disorders and hyperactivity.

  1. Embryonic GABAB Receptor Blockade Alters Cell Migration, Adult Hypothalamic Structure, and Anxiety- and Depression-Like Behaviors Sex Specifically in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Stratton, Matthew S.; Staros, Michelle; Budefeld, Tomaz; Searcy, Brian T.; Nash, Connor; Eitel, Chad; Carbone, David; Handa, Robert J.; Majdic, Gregor; Tobet, Stuart A.

    2014-01-01

    Neurons of the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) regulate the hypothalamic- pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and the autonomic nervous system. Females lacking functional GABAB receptors because of a genetic disruption of the R1 subunit have altered cellular characteristics in and around the PVN at birth. The genetic disruption precluded appropriate assessments of physiology or behavior in adulthood. The current study was conducted to test the long term impact of a temporally restricting pharmacological blockade of the GABAB receptor to a 7-day critical period (E11–E17) during embryonic development. Experiments tested the role of GABAB receptor signaling in fetal development of the PVN and later adult capacities for adult stress related behaviors and physiology. In organotypic slices containing fetal PVN, there was a female specific, 52% increase in cell movement speeds with GABAB receptor antagonist treatment that was consistent with a sex-dependent lateral displacement of cells in vivo following 7 days of fetal exposure to GABAB receptor antagonist. Anxiety-like and depression-like behaviors, open-field activity, and HPA mediated responses to restraint stress were measured in adult offspring of mothers treated with GABAB receptor antagonist. Embryonic exposure to GABAB receptor antagonist resulted in reduced HPA axis activation following restraint stress and reduced depression-like behaviors. There was also increased anxiety-like behavior selectively in females and hyperactivity in males. A sex dependent response to disruptions of GABAB receptor signaling was identified for PVN formation and key aspects of physiology and behavior. These changes correspond to sex specific prevalence in similar human disorders, namely anxiety disorders and hyperactivity. PMID:25162235

  2. Protection by imidazol(ine) drugs and agmatine of glutamate-induced neurotoxicity in cultured cerebellar granule cells through blockade of NMDA receptor

    PubMed Central

    Olmos, Gabriel; DeGregorio-Rocasolano, Nuria; Regalado, M Paz; Gasull, Teresa; Boronat, M Assumpció; Trullas, Ramón; Villarroel, Alvaro; Lerma, Juan; García-Sevilla, Jesús A

    1999-01-01

    neuroprotective against glutamate-induced necrotic neuronal cell death in vitro and that this effect is mediated through NMDA receptor blockade by interacting with a site located within the NMDA channel pore. PMID:10455281

  3. Early Blockade of Injured Primary Sensory Afferents Reduces Glial Cell Activation in Two Rat Neuropathic Pain Models

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Wenrui; Strong, Judith A.; Zhang, Jun-Ming

    2009-01-01

    Satellite glial cells in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG), like the better-studied glia cells in the spinal cord, react to peripheral nerve injury or inflammation by activation, proliferation, and release of messengers that contribute importantly to pathological pain. It is not known how information about nerve injury or peripheral inflammation is conveyed to the satellite glial cells. Abnormal spontaneous activity of sensory neurons, observed in the very early phase of many pain models, is one plausible mechanism by which injured sensory neurons could activate neighboring satellite glial cells. We tested effects of locally inhibiting sensory neuron activity with sodium channel blockers on satellite glial cell activation in a rat spinal nerve ligation (SNL) model. SNL caused extensive satellite glial cell activation (as defined by GFAP immunoreactivity) which peaked on day 1 and was still observed on day 10. Perfusion of the axotomized DRG with the Na channel blocker tetrodotoxin (TTX) significantly reduced this activation at all time points. Similar findings were made with a more distal injury (spared nerve injury model), using a different sodium channel blocker (bupivacaine depot) at the injury site. Local DRG perfusion with TTX also reduced levels of nerve growth factor (NGF) in the SNL model on day 3 (when activated glia are an important source of NGF), without affecting the initial drop of NGF on day 1 (which has been attributed to loss of transport from target tissues). Local perfusion in the SNL model also significantly reduced microglia activation (OX-42 immunoreactivity) on day 3 and astrocyte activation (GFAP immunoreactivity) on day 10 in the corresponding dorsal spinal cord. The results indicate that early spontaneous activity in injured sensory neurons may play important roles in glia activation and pathological pain. PMID:19303429

  4. Blockade of Ca2+-activated K+ channels inhibits proliferation of human endothelial cells induced by basic fibroblast growth factor.

    PubMed

    Wiecha, J; Münz, B; Wu, Y; Noll, T; Tillmanns, H; Waldecker, B

    1998-01-01

    Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) exerts angiogenic and mitogenic properties in human tissue. Since changes in ion currents modulate essential Ca2+-dependent intracellular pathways in endothelial cells, we have investigated a possible contribution of Ca2+-activated K+ channels (BKCa) on bFGF-induced endothelial cell proliferation. The patch-clamp technique was used to identify BKCa and to study their modulation by bFGF in cultured endothelial cells of human umbilical cord veins (HUVEC). Cell counts of HUVEC were carried out on different days to analyze bFGF-induced cell proliferation and its influence by the specific BKCa blocker iberiotoxin (IBX). Using single-channel recordings, we found characteristic BKCa with a single-channel slope conductance of 170.3 +/- 2.1 pS (n = 7), half-maximal activation at internal pCa = 5.7 (n = 5; test potential: 80 mV), and dose-dependent block by IBX (25-100 nmol/l). In cell-attached patches bFGF (50 ng/ml) caused a significant increase in the open-state probability (NPo) after 6 min at test potentials of 80 and 100 mV (n = 28; p < 0.001), respectively, which lasted up to 30 min. After preincubation with pertussis toxin (100 ng/ml; 4 h) bFGF superfusion did not cause a significant increase in BKCa activity until 25 min had passed (n = 20; p < 0.01). Addition of 100 nmol/l IBX to the pipette solution caused a total block of BKCa within 2 min in cell-attached patches, whereas bFGF (50 ng/ml) was not able to activate BKCa. When incubated with IBX (25-100 nmol/l) every 2 days, bFGF-induced proliferation of HUVEC was significantly decreased by 50 (-41%) and 100 nmol/l (-50%) IBX (n = 5; p < 0.001) after 7 days. We conclude that activation of BKCa by bFGF may play an important role in bFGF-induced proliferation of human endothelial cells and thus might be important in the process of angiogenesis and vascular remodelling.

  5. PTEN overexpression attenuates angiogenic processes of endothelial cells by blockade of endothelin-1/endothelin B receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Hsiao-Mei; Lin, Chun-Yao; Lam, Hing-Chung; Lin, Pey-Ru; Chan, Hoi-Hung; Tseng, Jui-Cheng; Sun, Cheuk-Kwan; Hsu, Te-Fa; Wu, Chia-Ching; Yang, Chao-Yuh; Hsu, Ching-Mei; Tai, Ming-Hong

    2012-04-01

    Arteriovenous (AV) graft is frequently used as vascular access in hemodialysis patients. However, clotting or thrombosis of AV grafts often occurs and requires surgical removal. At present, the molecular pathogenesis underlying thrombosis of AV graft is not clear. The PTEN/Akt signaling has been implicated in the pathogenesis of vascular diseases. In this study, elevated PTEN expression and concomitant Akt inactivation was observed in endothelium of atherosclerotic brachial arteries from hemodialysis patients. To investigate whether PTEN upregulation affects endothelial function, adenovirus-mediated PTEN (Ad-PTEN) overexpression was performed in aorta rings and cultured endothelial cells. It was found that PTEN overexpression potently inhibited the microvessel sprouting in aorta rings and the angiogenic activities of endothelial cells including migration and tube formation. On the contrary, PTEN knockdown by RNA interference promoted the endothelial migration and reversed the Ad-PTEN-induced inhibition of endothelial migration. Expression analysis showed that PTEN overexpression attenuated the expression of endothelin-1 (ET-1) and endothelin B receptor (ETBR) in endothelial cells at transcriptional levels. However, exogenous ET-1 supply only partially reversed the PTEN-induced inhibition of migration and tube formation. This was delineated due to that PTEN overexpression also perturbed endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activation and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) release. In summary, PTEN upregulation induces endothelial dysfunction by attenuating the availability and signaling of multiple angiogenic pathways in endothelial cells, thereby may contribute to thrombosis of AV graft.

  6. Kaempferol Inhibits Pancreatic Cancer Cell Growth and Migration through the Blockade of EGFR-Related Pathway In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jungwhoi; Kim, Jae Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most appalling cancers with a pessimistic prognosis. Despite many therapies, there has been no improvement of survival rates. In this study, we assessed the anti-cancer effects of kaempferol, a well known flavonoid having functional bio-activity against various malignant tumors. Kaempferol had anti-cancer effects on Miapaca-2, Panc-1, and SNU-213 human pancreatic cancer cells. In a dose-dependent manner, kaempferol decreased viability of these pancreatic cancer cells by increasing apoptosis. In particular, kaempferol effectively inhibited the migratory activity of human pancreatic cancer cells at relatively low dosages without any toxicity. The anti-cancer effect of kaempferol was mediated by inhibition of EGFR related Src, ERK1/2, and AKT pathways. These results collectively indicate that kaempferol, a phytochemical ingredient reported to have anti-viability and anti-oxidant properties, can act as a safety anti-migration reagent in human pancreatic cancer cells, which provide the rationale for further investigation of kaempferol as a strong candidate for the potential clinical trial of malignant pancreatic cancers. PMID:27175782

  7. CSF1R signaling blockade stanches tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells and improves the efficacy of radiotherapy in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jingying; Escamilla, Jemima; Mok, Stephen; David, John; Priceman, Saul; West, Brian; Bollag, Gideon; McBride, William; Wu, Lily

    2013-05-01

    Radiotherapy is used to treat many types of cancer, but many treated patients relapse with local tumor recurrence. Tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells (TIM), including CD11b (ITGAM)(+)F4/80 (EMR1)+ tumor-associated macrophages (TAM), and CD11b(+)Gr-1 (LY6G)+ myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC), respond to cancer-related stresses and play critical roles in promoting tumor angiogenesis, tissue remodeling, and immunosuppression. In this report, we used a prostate cancer model to investigate the effects of irradiation on TAMs and MDSCs in tumor-bearing animals. Unexpectedly, when primary tumor sites were irradiated, we observed a systemic increase of MDSCs in spleen, lung, lymph nodes, and peripheral blood. Cytokine analysis showed that the macrophage colony-stimulating factor CSF1 increased by two-fold in irradiated tumors. Enhanced macrophage migration induced by conditioned media from irradiated tumor cells was completely blocked by a selective inhibitor of CSF1R. These findings were confirmed in patients with prostate cancer, where serum levels of CSF1 increased after radiotherapy. Mechanistic investigations revealed the recruitment of the DNA damage-induced kinase ABL1 into cell nuclei where it bound the CSF1 gene promoter and enhanced CSF1 gene transcription. When added to radiotherapy, a selective inhibitor of CSF1R suppressed tumor growth more effectively than irradiation alone. Our results highlight the importance of CSF1/CSF1R signaling in the recruitment of TIMs that can limit the efficacy of radiotherapy. Furthermore, they suggest that CSF1 inhibitors should be evaluated in clinical trials in combination with radiotherapy as a strategy to improve outcomes.

  8. Blockade of BCL-2 proteins efficiently induces apoptosis in progenitor cells of high-risk myelodysplastic syndromes patients.

    PubMed

    Jilg, S; Reidel, V; Müller-Thomas, C; König, J; Schauwecker, J; Höckendorf, U; Huberle, C; Gorka, O; Schmidt, B; Burgkart, R; Ruland, J; Kolb, H-J; Peschel, C; Oostendorp, R A J; Götze, K S; Jost, P J

    2016-01-01

    Deregulated apoptosis is an identifying feature of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Whereas apoptosis is increased in the bone marrow (BM) of low-risk MDS patients, progression to high-risk MDS correlates with an acquired resistance to apoptosis and an aberrant expression of BCL-2 proteins. To overcome the acquired apoptotic resistance in high-risk MDS, we investigated the induction of apoptosis by inhibition of pro-survival BCL-2 proteins using the BCL-2/-XL/-W inhibitor ABT-737 or the BCL-2-selective inhibitor ABT-199. We characterized a cohort of 124 primary human BM samples from MDS/secondary acute myeloid leukemia (sAML) patients and 57 healthy, age-matched controls. Inhibition of anti-apoptotic BCL-2 proteins was specifically toxic for BM cells from high-risk MDS and sAML patients, whereas low-risk MDS or healthy controls remained unaffected. Notably, ABT-737 or ABT-199 treatment was capable of targeting the MDS stem/progenitor compartment in high-risk MDS/sAML samples as shown by the reduction in CD34(+) cells and the decreased colony-forming capacity. Elevated expression of MCL-1 conveyed resistance against both compounds. Protection by stromal cells only partially inhibited induction of apoptosis. Collectively, our data show that the apoptotic resistance observed in high-risk MDS/sAML cells can be overcome by the ABT-737 or ABT-199 treatment and implies that BH3 mimetics might delay disease progression in higher-risk MDS or sAML patients.

  9. Pharmacological blockade of either cannabinoid CB1 or CB2 receptors prevents both cocaine-induced conditioned locomotion and cocaine-induced reduction of cell proliferation in the hippocampus of adult male rat.

    PubMed

    Blanco-Calvo, Eduardo; Rivera, Patricia; Arrabal, Sergio; Vargas, Antonio; Pavón, Francisco Javier; Serrano, Antonia; Castilla-Ortega, Estela; Galeano, Pablo; Rubio, Leticia; Suárez, Juan; Rodriguez de Fonseca, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Addiction to major drugs of abuse, such as cocaine, has recently been linked to alterations in adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus. The endogenous cannabinoid system modulates this proliferative response as demonstrated by the finding that pharmacological activation/blockade of cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors not only modulates neurogenesis but also modulates cell death in the brain. In the present study, we evaluated whether the endogenous cannabinoid system affects cocaine-induced alterations in cell proliferation. To this end, we examined whether pharmacological blockade of either CB1 (Rimonabant, 3 mg/kg) or CB2 receptors (AM630, 3 mg/kg) would affect cell proliferation [the cells were labeled with 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU)] in the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the lateral ventricle and the dentate subgranular zone (SGZ). Additionally, we measured cell apoptosis (as monitored by the expression of cleaved caspase-3) and glial activation [by analyzing the expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and Iba-1] in the striatum and hippocampus during acute and repeated (4 days) cocaine administration (20 mg/kg). The results showed that acute cocaine exposure decreased the number of BrdU-immunoreactive (ir) cells in the SVZ and SGZ. In contrast, repeated cocaine exposure reduced the number of BrdU-ir cells only in the SVZ. Both acute and repeated cocaine exposure increased the number of cleaved caspase-3-, GFAP- and Iba1-ir cells in the hippocampus, and this effect was counteracted by AM630 or Rimonabant, which increased the number of BrdU-, GFAP-, and Iba1-ir cells in the hippocampus. These results indicate that the changes in neurogenic, apoptotic and gliotic processes that were produced by repeated cocaine administration were normalized by pharmacological blockade of CB1 and CB2. The restorative effects of cannabinoid receptor blockade on hippocampal cell proliferation were associated with the prevention of the induction of conditioned locomotion

  10. Pharmacological blockade of either cannabinoid CB1 or CB2 receptors prevents both cocaine-induced conditioned locomotion and cocaine-induced reduction of cell proliferation in the hippocampus of adult male rat

    PubMed Central

    Blanco-Calvo, Eduardo; Rivera, Patricia; Arrabal, Sergio; Vargas, Antonio; Pavón, Francisco Javier; Serrano, Antonia; Castilla-Ortega, Estela; Galeano, Pablo; Rubio, Leticia; Suárez, Juan; Rodriguez de Fonseca, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Addiction to major drugs of abuse, such as cocaine, has recently been linked to alterations in adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus. The endogenous cannabinoid system modulates this proliferative response as demonstrated by the finding that pharmacological activation/blockade of cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors not only modulates neurogenesis but also modulates cell death in the brain. In the present study, we evaluated whether the endogenous cannabinoid system affects cocaine-induced alterations in cell proliferation. To this end, we examined whether pharmacological blockade of either CB1 (Rimonabant, 3 mg/kg) or CB2 receptors (AM630, 3 mg/kg) would affect cell proliferation [the cells were labeled with 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU)] in the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the lateral ventricle and the dentate subgranular zone (SGZ). Additionally, we measured cell apoptosis (as monitored by the expression of cleaved caspase-3) and glial activation [by analyzing the expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and Iba-1] in the striatum and hippocampus during acute and repeated (4 days) cocaine administration (20 mg/kg). The results showed that acute cocaine exposure decreased the number of BrdU-immunoreactive (ir) cells in the SVZ and SGZ. In contrast, repeated cocaine exposure reduced the number of BrdU-ir cells only in the SVZ. Both acute and repeated cocaine exposure increased the number of cleaved caspase-3-, GFAP- and Iba1-ir cells in the hippocampus, and this effect was counteracted by AM630 or Rimonabant, which increased the number of BrdU-, GFAP-, and Iba1-ir cells in the hippocampus. These results indicate that the changes in neurogenic, apoptotic and gliotic processes that were produced by repeated cocaine administration were normalized by pharmacological blockade of CB1 and CB2. The restorative effects of cannabinoid receptor blockade on hippocampal cell proliferation were associated with the prevention of the induction of conditioned

  11. Differential blockade of agonist- and depolarization-induced sup 45 Ca2+ influx in smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wallnoefer, A.C.; Cauvin, C.; Lategan, T.W.; Rueegg, U.T. )

    1989-10-01

    ATP stimulated {sup 45}Ca2+ influx in rat aortic smooth muscle cells in a concentration-dependent manner (EC50 = 3.6 +/- 0.5 X 10(-7) M). ADP and GTP were less effective than ATP in stimulating {sup 45}Ca2+ influx; AMP was weakly active and the adenosine agonist 5'-(N-ethyl-carboxamido)-adenosine (NECA) had no effect. ATP gamma S was about equieffective with ATP, whereas alpha,beta-methylene-ATP (APCPP) did not induce {sup 45}Ca2+ influx. Stimulation of {sup 45}Ca2+ influx by ATP was not abolished by the dihydropyridine Ca2+ channel antagonist darodipine (PY 108-068), which completely blocked depolarization-induced {sup 45}Ca2+ influx. Inorganic cations (La3+, Cd2+, Co2+, Ni2+, Mn2+, and Mg2+) were able to inhibit both agonist- and depolarization-induced {sup 45}Ca2+ influx. Cd2+, however, was approximately 20 times more selective in blocking K+-stimulated than agonist-stimulated {sup 45}Ca2+ influx. These data indicate that ATP-stimulated Ca2+ influx in rat aortic smooth muscle cells is resistant to darodipine but is reduced by La3+, Cd2+, and other inorganic blockers of Ca2+ channels.

  12. Blockade of Ets-1 attenuates epidermal growth factor-dependent collagen loss in human carotid plaque smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Rao, Velidi H; Rai, Vikrant; Stoupa, Samantha; Agrawal, Devendra K

    2015-09-15

    Although degradation of extracellular matrix by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) is thought to be involved in symptomatic (S) carotid plaques in atherosclerosis, the mechanisms of MMP expression are poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that collagen loss in vascular smooth vessel cells (VSMCs) isolated from S plaques was induced by epidermal growth factor (EGF) through the activation of p38-MAPK and JNK-MAPK pathways. Inhibitors of p38-MAPK and JNK-MAPK signaling pathways downregulated the expression of MMP-1 and MMP-9. In addition, we examined whether v-ets erythroblastosis virus E26 oncogene homologue 1 (Ets-1), an important regulator of different genes, is involved in destabilizing S plaques in patients with carotid stenosis. We demonstrate that EGF induces Ets-1 expression and decreases interstitial and basement membrane collagen in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) from patients with carotid stenosis. Increased expression of MMP-1 and -9 and decreased collagen mRNA transcripts were also found in Ets-1-overexpressed VSMCs. Transfection with both dominant-negative form of Ets-1 and small interfering RNA blocked EGF-induced MMP-1 and -9 expressions and increased the mRNA transcripts for collagen I (α1) and collagen III (α1) in S compared with asymptomatic (AS) carotid plaques. Inhibitors of p38-MAPK (SB202190) and JNK-MAPK (SP600125) signaling pathways decreased the expression of Ets-1, MMP-1, and MMP-9 and increased collagen type I and III expression in EGF-treated VSMCs. This study provides a mechanistic insight into the role of Ets-1 in the plaque destabilization in patients with carotid stenosis involving p38-MAPK and JNK signaling pathways.

  13. Natural killer cell cytotoxicity, cytokine and neuroendocrine responses to opioid receptor blockade during prolonged restraint in pigs.

    PubMed

    Ciepielewski, Z M; Stojek, W; Borman, A; Myślińska, D; Glac, W; Kamyczek, M

    2013-12-01

    This study evaluated porcine natural killer cell cytotoxicity (NKCC), plasma cytokines including interleukin (IL) 1β, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12 and tumor necrosis factor-α and plasma stress-related hormones including prolactin (PRL), growth hormone (GH), β-endorphin (BEND), ACTH and cortisol (COR) during a 4h restraint and recovery phase after saline or naloxone (1mg/kg BW) administration. The restraint preceded with saline altered NKCC and IL-12 concentration (an early from 15 to 60 min increase followed by a decrease) and increased other measured cytokines and hormones concentrations. Naloxone pretreatment blocked the suppressive effects of the restraint on NKCC and IL-12 and altered IL-10, IL-6, TNF-α, PRL and ACTH concentrations. Furthermore, in naloxone-injected pigs, a positive correlation was found between NKCC and all measured cytokines (with the exception of IL-6) and BEND, ACTH and COR. Results suggest that naloxone-sensitive opioid pathways could influence the mechanisms underlying the immune system (including NKCC) response during stress. PMID:24148869

  14. Natural killer cell cytotoxicity, cytokine and neuroendocrine responses to opioid receptor blockade during prolonged restraint in pigs.

    PubMed

    Ciepielewski, Z M; Stojek, W; Borman, A; Myślińska, D; Glac, W; Kamyczek, M

    2013-12-01

    This study evaluated porcine natural killer cell cytotoxicity (NKCC), plasma cytokines including interleukin (IL) 1β, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12 and tumor necrosis factor-α and plasma stress-related hormones including prolactin (PRL), growth hormone (GH), β-endorphin (BEND), ACTH and cortisol (COR) during a 4h restraint and recovery phase after saline or naloxone (1mg/kg BW) administration. The restraint preceded with saline altered NKCC and IL-12 concentration (an early from 15 to 60 min increase followed by a decrease) and increased other measured cytokines and hormones concentrations. Naloxone pretreatment blocked the suppressive effects of the restraint on NKCC and IL-12 and altered IL-10, IL-6, TNF-α, PRL and ACTH concentrations. Furthermore, in naloxone-injected pigs, a positive correlation was found between NKCC and all measured cytokines (with the exception of IL-6) and BEND, ACTH and COR. Results suggest that naloxone-sensitive opioid pathways could influence the mechanisms underlying the immune system (including NKCC) response during stress.

  15. Organized chaos in Kupffer's vesicle: How a heterogeneous structure achieves consistent left-right patterning

    PubMed Central

    Smith, DJ; Montenegro-Johnson, TD; Lopes, SS

    2014-01-01

    Successful establishment of left-right asymmetry is crucial to healthy vertebrate development. In many species this process is initiated in a ciliated, enclosed cavity, for example Kupffer's vesicle (KV) in zebrafish. The microarchitecture of KV is more complex than that present in the left-right organizer of many other species. While swirling flow in KV is recognized as essential for left-right patterning, its generation, nature and conversion to asymmetric gene expression are only beginning to be fully understood. We recently [Sampaio, P et al. Dev Cell 29:716–728] combined imaging, genetics and fluid dynamics simulation to characterize normal and perturbed ciliary activity, and their correlation to asymmetric charon expression and embryonic organ fate. Randomness in cilia number and length have major implications for robust flow generation; even a modest change in mean cilia length has a major effect on flow speed to due to nonlinear scaling arising from fluid mechanics. Wildtype, and mutant embryos with normal liver laterality, exhibit stronger flow on the left prior to asymmetric inhibition of charon. Our discovery of immotile cilia, taken with data on morphant embryos with very few cilia, further support the role of mechanosensing in initiating and/or enhancing flow conversion into gene expression. PMID:25454897

  16. Organized chaos in Kupffer's vesicle: how a heterogeneous structure achieves consistent left-right patterning.

    PubMed

    Smith, D J; Montenegro-Johnson, T D; Lopes, S S

    2014-01-01

    Successful establishment of left-right asymmetry is crucial to healthy vertebrate development. In many species this process is initiated in a ciliated, enclosed cavity, for example Kupffer's vesicle (KV) in zebrafish. The microarchitecture of KV is more complex than that present in the left-right organizer of many other species. While swirling flow in KV is recognized as essential for left-right patterning, its generation, nature and conversion to asymmetric gene expression are only beginning to be fully understood. We recently [Sampaio, P et al. Dev Cell 29:716-728] combined imaging, genetics and fluid dynamics simulation to characterize normal and perturbed ciliary activity, and their correlation to asymmetric charon expression and embryonic organ fate. Randomness in cilia number and length have major implications for robust flow generation; even a modest change in mean cilia length has a major effect on flow speed to due to nonlinear scaling arising from fluid mechanics. Wildtype, and mutant embryos with normal liver laterality, exhibit stronger flow on the left prior to asymmetric inhibition of charon. Our discovery of immotile cilia, taken with data on morphant embryos with very few cilia, further support the role of mechanosensing in initiating and/or enhancing flow conversion into gene expression.

  17. Organized chaos in Kupffer's vesicle: how a heterogeneous structure achieves consistent left-right patterning.

    PubMed

    Smith, D J; Montenegro-Johnson, T D; Lopes, S S

    2014-01-01

    Successful establishment of left-right asymmetry is crucial to healthy vertebrate development. In many species this process is initiated in a ciliated, enclosed cavity, for example Kupffer's vesicle (KV) in zebrafish. The microarchitecture of KV is more complex than that present in the left-right organizer of many other species. While swirling flow in KV is recognized as essential for left-right patterning, its generation, nature and conversion to asymmetric gene expression are only beginning to be fully understood. We recently [Sampaio, P et al. Dev Cell 29:716-728] combined imaging, genetics and fluid dynamics simulation to characterize normal and perturbed ciliary activity, and their correlation to asymmetric charon expression and embryonic organ fate. Randomness in cilia number and length have major implications for robust flow generation; even a modest change in mean cilia length has a major effect on flow speed to due to nonlinear scaling arising from fluid mechanics. Wildtype, and mutant embryos with normal liver laterality, exhibit stronger flow on the left prior to asymmetric inhibition of charon. Our discovery of immotile cilia, taken with data on morphant embryos with very few cilia, further support the role of mechanosensing in initiating and/or enhancing flow conversion into gene expression. PMID:25454897

  18. Duration of opioid receptor blockade determines biotherapeutic response.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, Patricia J; Zagon, Ian S

    2015-10-01

    Historically, studies on endogenous and exogenous opioids and their receptors focused on the mediation of pain, with excess opiate consumption leading to addiction. Opioid antagonists such as naloxone and naltrexone blocked these interactions, and still are widely used to reverse drug and alcohol overdose. Although specific opioid antagonists have been designed for mu, delta, and kappa opioid receptors, the general antagonists remain the most effective. With the discovery of the opioid growth factor (OGF)-OGF receptor (OGFr) axis as a novel biological pathway involved in homeostasis of replicating cells and tissues, the role of opioid receptor antagonists was expanded. An intermittent OGFr blockade by low dosages of naltrexone resulted in depressed cell replication, whereas high (or sustained) dosages of naltrexone that conferred a continuous OGFr blockade resulted in enhanced growth. More than 3 decades of research have confirmed that the duration of opioid receptor blockade, not specifically the dosage, by general opioid antagonists determines the biotherapeutic outcome. Dysregulation of the OGF-OGFr pathway is apparent in a number of human disorders including diabetes, multiple sclerosis, and cancer, and thus opioid antagonist disruption of interaction prevails as a therapeutic intervention. We review evidence that the duration of opioid receptor blockade is correlated with the magnitude and direction of response, and discuss the potential therapeutic effectiveness of continuous receptor blockade for treatment of diabetic complications such as corneal defects and skin wounds, and of intermittent receptor blockade by low dosages of naltrexone for treatment of autoimmune diseases and cancer. PMID:26119823

  19. Blockade of dopamine D1-like receptor signalling protects mice against OVA-induced acute asthma by inhibiting B-cell activating transcription factor signalling and Th17 function.

    PubMed

    Gong, Subo; Li, Jinxiu; Ma, Libing; Li, Keng; Zhang, Li; Wang, Guyi; Liu, Yi; Ji, Xiaoying; Liu, Xiaokun; Chen, Ping; Ouyang, Ruoyun; Zhang, Shu; Zhou, Zhiguang; Wang, Cong-Yi; Xiang, Xudong; Yang, Yu

    2013-12-01

    Previous studies have consistently demonstrated that dopamine D1-like receptor (D1-like-R) signalling is implicated in the pathogenesis of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and type I diabetes. Given that allergic asthma shares certain disease aetiology similarities with autoimmune diseases, we conducted studies in OVA-induced mice aiming to address the impact of D1-like-R signalling on the pathogenesis of allergic asthma. It was noted that blockade of D1-like-R signalling provided protection for mice against OVA-induced acute asthma. Particularly, treatment of OVA-induced mice with SCH23390, a D1-like-R antagonist, significantly attenuated inflammatory infiltration in the airways along with repressed goblet cell hyperplasia and mucus production, as well as airway resistance. By contrast, administration of SKF83959, a D1-like-R agonist, displayed the opposite effect. Blockade of D1-like-R signalling impaired Th17 function, as manifested by a significant reduction of Th17 cells in the spleen and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Mechanistic studies revealed that D1-like-R signalling enhances B-cell activating transcription factor activity, which then transcribes the expression of RORγt, a Th17 transcription factor; accordingly, D1-like-R signalling regulates Th17 differentiation to promote the development of allergic asthma. Taken together, the data obtained in the present suggest that blockade of D1-like-R signalling could be an effective therapeutic strategy for the prevention and treatment of allergic asthma in clinical practice.

  20. Immune checkpoint blockade in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Somasundaram, Aswin; Socinski, Mark A; Villaruz, Liza C

    2016-08-01

    Immunotherapy has revolutionized the therapeutic landscape of advanced lung cancer. The adaptive immune system has developed a sophisticated method of tumor growth control, but T-cell activation is regulated by various checkpoints. Blockade of the immune checkpoints with therapies targeting the PD-1 pathway, such as nivolumab and pembrolizumab, has been validated as a therapeutic approach in non-small cell lung cancer. Newer therapies and novel combinations are also being evaluated, and the use of biomarkers in conjunction with these drugs is an area of active investigation. This review summarizes the current evidence for the efficacy and safety of the above approaches in the treatment of lung cancer. PMID:27585231

  1. Blockade by NNC 55-0396, mibefradil, and nickel of calcium and exocytotic signals in chromaffin cells: implications for the regulation of hypoxia-induced secretion at early life.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Morales, José C; Fernando Padín, J; Vestring, Stefan; Musial, Diego C; de Diego, Antonio-Miguel G; García, Antonio G

    2015-03-15

    Adrenal chromaffin cells (CCs) express high-voltage activated calcium channels (high-VACCs) of the L, N and PQ subtypes; in addition, T-type low-VACCs are also expressed during embryo and neonatal life. Effects of the more frequently used T channel blockers NNC 55-0396 (NNC), mibefradil, and Ni2+ on the whole-cell Ba2+ current (IBa), the K+-elicited [Ca2+]c transients and catecholamine secretion have been studied in adult bovine CCs (BCCs) and rat embryo CCs (RECCs). NNC, mibefradil, and Ni2+ blocked BCC IBa with IC50 of 1.8, 4.9 and 70 μM, while IC50 to block IBa in RECCs were 2.1, 4.4 and 41 μM. Pronounced blockade of K+-elicited [Ca2+]c transients and secretion was also elicited by the three agents. However, the hypoxia-induced secretion (HIS) of catecholamine in RECCs was blocked substantially (75%) with thresholds concentrations of NCC (IC20 to block IBa); this was not the case for mibefradil and Ni2+ that required higher concentrations to block the HIS response. Thus, out of the three compounds, NNC seemed to be an adequate pharmacological tool to discern the contribution of T channels to the HIS response, without a contamination with high-VACC blockade.

  2. Kupffer-phase findings of hepatic hemangiomas in contrast-enhanced ultrasound with sonazoid.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Katsutoshi; Moriyasu, Fuminori; Saito, Kazuhiro; Yoshiara, Hiroki; Imai, Yasuharu

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess quantitatively the Kupffer-phase enhancement patterns of hepatic hemangiomas in contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) with Sonazoid. A total of 46 patients with 46 hepatic hemangiomas (17.1 ± 6.2 mm in diameter, 34 typical type and 12 high-flow type) underwent CEUS in the Kupffer phase. The lesion-to-liver contrast ratio in the Kupffer phase was quantitatively assessed for both types of hemangioma. Most of the hepatic hemangiomas, whether or not they were the high-flow type, were iso- to hypo-echoic relative to the surrounding liver parenchyma. The contrast ratio was -5.33 ± 6.70 dB for the high-flow hemangiomas and -4.54 ± 6.28 dB for the typical hemangiomas. There was no significant difference in contrast ratio between the two types of lesions (p = 0.73). All of the hemangiomas, whether of typical or high-flow type, are iso- to hypo-echoic relative to the surrounding liver parenchyma on Kupffer-phase imaging.

  3. Ionic Coulomb Blockade in Nanopores

    PubMed Central

    Krems, Matt; Di Ventra, Massimiliano

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the dynamics of ions in nanopores is essential for applications ranging from single-molecule detection to DNA sequencing. We show both analytically and by means of molecular dynamics simulations that under specific conditions ion-ion interactions in nanopores lead to the phenomenon of ionic Coulomb blockade, namely the build-up of ions inside a nanopore with specific capacitance impeding the flow of additional ions due to Coulomb repulsion. This is the counterpart of electronic Coulomb blockade observed in mesoscopic systems. We discuss the analogies and differences with the electronic case as well as experimental situations in which this phenomenon could be detected. PMID:23307655

  4. Thyroid storm during beta blockade.

    PubMed

    Strube, P J

    1984-04-01

    A thyrotoxic patient who had received beta-adrenoceptor blockers pre-operatively suffered an episode of severe heart failure immediately following thyroidectomy and required artificial ventilation of the lungs for six hours. The possible causes are discussed and the likelihood of thyroid storm unmitigated by beta adrenergic blockade suggested.

  5. Sulforaphane induced cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase via the blockade of cyclin B1/CDC2 in human ovarian cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Malignant tumors are the single most common cause of death and the mortality rate of ovarian cancer is the highest among gynecological disorders. The excision of benign tumors is generally followed by complete recovery; however, the activity of cancer cells often results in rapid proliferation even after the tumor has been excised completely. Thus, clinical treatment must be supplemented by auxiliary chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Sulforaphane (SFN) is an extract from the mustard family recognized for its anti-oxidation abilities, phase 2 enzyme induction, and anti-tumor activity. Methods This study investigated the cell cycle arrest in G2/M by SFN and the expression of cyclin B1, Cdc2, and the cyclin B1/CDC2 complex in PA-1 cells using western blotting and co-IP western blotting. Results This study investigated the anticancer effects of dietary isothiocyanate SFN on ovarian cancer, using cancer cells line PA-1. SFN-treated cells accumulated in metaphase by CDC2 down-regulation and dissociation of the cyclin B1/CDC2 complex. Conclusion Our findings suggest that, in addition to the known effects on cancer prevention, SFN may also provide antitumor activity in established ovarian cancer. PMID:23799914

  6. PD-L1 blockade improves immune dysfunction of spleen dendritic cells and T-cells in zymosan-induced multiple organs dysfunction syndromes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qian; Lv, Yi; Zhao, Min; Jin, Yiduo; Lu, Jiangyang

    2015-01-01

    This research is to investigate the role of tolerant spleen dendritic cells (DC) in multiple organs dysfunction syndromes (MODS) at late stage. Tolerant DC and MODS were induced by intraperotineal injection of zymosan. The immunity of DC was determined by examining interleukin (IL)-10, IL-12, IL-2, major histocompatibility complex (MHC), CD86, programmed death (PD-1), programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1), paired immunoglobulin-like receptor B (PIR-B) or T-cell proliferation in serum, spleen homogenate, DC culture or DC/T-cell co-culture. The PD-L1/PD-1 pathway was blocked using PD-L1 antibody. The IL-12p70 in serum, spleen homogenate and DC culture supernatant were decreased at 5 d and 12 d after zymosan injection while the IL-12p40 and IL-10 were increased. The expression of MHC, cluster of differentiation 86 (CD86), PD-1 and PD-L1 in spleen DCs were increased at early stage after zymosan injection. At 5 d and 12 d, the expression of MHC and CD86 was reduced while the expression of PD-1, PD-L1 and PIR-B was increased, accompanied with decreased proliferation of T-cell and decrease of IL-2 in spleen and serum. Application of PD-L1 antibody improved the above changes. At late stage of MODS mice induced by zymosan, the expression of co-stimulators and inhibitors in spleen DCs was imbalanced to form tolerant DCs which reduced the activation of T-cells. PD-L1 antibody improved the immune tolerance of DCs through intervening PD-1/PD-L1 pathway, and attenuated the inhibition of T-cell activities by tolerant DCs and the immune inhibition.

  7. PD-L1 blockade improves immune dysfunction of spleen dendritic cells and T-cells in zymosan-induced multiple organs dysfunction syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qian; Lv, Yi; Zhao, Min; Jin, Yiduo; Lu, Jiangyang

    2015-01-01

    This research is to investigate the role of tolerant spleen dendritic cells (DC) in multiple organs dysfunction syndromes (MODS) at late stage. Tolerant DC and MODS were induced by intraperotineal injection of zymosan. The immunity of DC was determined by examining interleukin (IL)-10, IL-12, IL-2, major histocompatibility complex (MHC), CD86, programmed death (PD-1), programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1), paired immunoglobulin-like receptor B (PIR-B) or T-cell proliferation in serum, spleen homogenate, DC culture or DC/T-cell co-culture. The PD-L1/PD-1 pathway was blocked using PD-L1 antibody. The IL-12p70 in serum, spleen homogenate and DC culture supernatant were decreased at 5 d and 12 d after zymosan injection while the IL-12p40 and IL-10 were increased. The expression of MHC, cluster of differentiation 86 (CD86), PD-1 and PD-L1 in spleen DCs were increased at early stage after zymosan injection. At 5 d and 12 d, the expression of MHC and CD86 was reduced while the expression of PD-1, PD-L1 and PIR-B was increased, accompanied with decreased proliferation of T-cell and decrease of IL-2 in spleen and serum. Application of PD-L1 antibody improved the above changes. At late stage of MODS mice induced by zymosan, the expression of co-stimulators and inhibitors in spleen DCs was imbalanced to form tolerant DCs which reduced the activation of T-cells. PD-L1 antibody improved the immune tolerance of DCs through intervening PD-1/PD-L1 pathway, and attenuated the inhibition of T-cell activities by tolerant DCs and the immune inhibition. PMID:25973021

  8. Simultaneous blockade of the epidermal growth factor receptor/mammalian target of rapamycin pathway by epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors and rapamycin results in reduced cell growth and survival in biliary tract cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Herberger, Beata; Berger, Walter; Puhalla, Harald; Schmid, Katharina; Novak, Sabine; Brandstetter, Anita; Pirker, Christine; Gruenberger, Thomas; Filipits, Martin

    2009-06-01

    The prognosis of patients with biliary tract adenocarcinomas (BTA) is still poor due to lack of effective systemic treatment options. Knowledge of the molecular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of this disease is of importance for the development of new treatment strategies. We determined the expression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and activated mammalian target of rapamycin (p-mTOR) in paraffin-embedded surgical specimens of BTA (n = 89) by immunohistochemistry. Overall survival was analyzed with Cox models adjusted for clinical and pathologic factors. Combined EGFR/p-mTOR expression was significantly associated with relapse-free survival [adjusted hazard ratio for relapse, 2.20; 95% confidence interval (95% CI), 1.45-3.33; P < 0.001] and overall survival (adjusted hazard ratio for death, 2.32; 95% CI, 1.50-3.58; P < 0.001) of the patients. The effect of the EGFR inhibitors erlotinib or cetuximab and the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin on growth and survival of five BTA cell lines was tested in short-term 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assays and long-term colony formation assays. Simultaneous blockade of EGFR and mTOR in biliary tract cancer cell lines results in a synergistic inhibition of both phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways, leading to reduced cell growth and survival. These results suggest that combined targeted therapy with EGFR and mTOR inhibitors may potentially benefit patients with BTAs and should be further evaluated in clinical trials.

  9. Blockade of prostaglandin E2 signaling through EP1 and EP3 receptors attenuates Flt3L-dependent dendritic cell development from hematopoietic progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Pratibha; Hoggatt, Jonathan; Hu, Peirong; Speth, Jennifer M.; Fukuda, Seiji; Breyer, Richard M.

    2012-01-01

    Dendritic cell (DC) homeostasis, like all mature blood cells, is maintained via hierarchal generation from hematopoietic precursors; however, little is known about the regulatory mechanisms governing DC generation. Here, we show that prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is required for optimal Flt3 ligand–mediated DC development and regulates expression of the Flt3 receptor on DC-committed progenitor cells. Inhibition of PGE2 biosynthesis reduces Flt3-mediated activation of STAT3 and expression of the antiapoptotic protein survivin, resulting in increased apoptosis of DC-committed progenitor cells. Reduced DC development caused by diminished PGE2 signaling is reversed by overexpression of Flt3 or survivin in DC progenitors and conversely is mimicked by STAT3 inhibition. PGE2 regulation of DC generation is specifically mediated through the EP1 and EP3 G protein PGE2 receptors. These studies define a novel DC progenitor regulatory pathway in which PGE2 signaling through EP1/EP3 receptors regulates Flt3 expression and downstream STAT3 activation and survivin expression, required for optimal DC progenitor survival and DC development in vivo. PMID:22110249

  10. Sept6 is required for ciliogenesis in Kupffer's vesicle, the pronephros, and the neural tube during early embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Gang; Gu, Qilin; He, Jiangyan; Lou, Qiyong; Chen, Xiaowen; Jin, Xia; Bi, Erfei; Yin, Zhan

    2014-04-01

    Septins are conserved filament-forming GTP-binding proteins that act as cellular scaffolds or diffusion barriers in a number of cellular processes. However, the role of septins in vertebrate development remains relatively obscure. Here, we show that zebrafish septin 6 (sept6) is first expressed in the notochord and then in nearly all of the ciliary organs, including Kupffer's vesicle (KV), the pronephros, eye, olfactory bulb, and neural tube. Knockdown of sept6 in zebrafish embryos results in reduced numbers and length of cilia in KV. Consequently, cilium-related functions, such as the left-right patterning of internal organs and nodal/spaw signaling, are compromised. Knockdown of sept6 also results in aberrant cilium formation in the pronephros and neural tube, leading to cilium-related defects in pronephros development and Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling. We further demonstrate that SEPT6 associates with acetylated α-tubulin in vivo and localizes along the axoneme in the cilia of zebrafish pronephric duct cells as well as cultured ZF4 cells. Our study reveals a novel role of sept6 in ciliogenesis during early embryonic development in zebrafish.

  11. Endothelial cell phagocytosis of senescent neutrophils decreases procoagulant activity.

    PubMed

    Gao, Chunyan; Xie, Rui; Li, Wen; Zhou, Jin; Liu, Shuchuan; Cao, Fenglin; Liu, Yue; Ma, Ruishuang; Si, Yu; Liu, Yan; Bi, Yayan; Gilbert, Gary E; Shi, Jialan

    2013-06-01

    Abundant senescent neutrophils traverse the vascular compartment and may contribute to pathologic conditions. For example, they become procoagulant when undergoing apoptosis and may contribute to thrombosis or inflammation. Our previous studies demonstrated a dominant clearance pathway in which the neutrophils can be phagocytosed by liver macrophages. The aim of this study was to explore an alternate pathway of neutrophil clearance by endothelial cells. Phagocytosis of the neutrophils by endothelial cells was performed using various experimental approaches includingflow cytometry, confocal microscopy and electron microscopy assays in vitro and in vivo. Procoagulant activity of cultured neutrophils was evaluated by coagulation time, factor Xase and prothrombinase assays. Lactadherin functioned as a novel probe for the detection of phosphatidylserine on apoptotic cells, an opsonin (bridge) between apoptotic cell and phagocyte for promoting phagocytosis, and an efficient anticoagulant for inhibition of factor Xase and thrombin formation. When cultured, purified human neutrophils spontaneously entered apoptosis and developed procoagulant activity that was directly related to the degree of phosphatidylserine exposure. Co-culture of aged neutrophils and endothelial cells resulted in phagocytosis of the neutrophils and prolonged coagulation time. Lactadherin diminished the procoagulant activity and increased the rate of neutrophil clearance. In vivo, neutrophils were sequestered by endothelial cells after blockade of Kupffer cells, a process that was dependent upon both phosphatidylserine exposure and P-selectin expression. Thus, the ability of endothelial cells to clear senescent neutrophils may limit the procoagulant and/or inflammatory impact of these cells.

  12. Plasmon blockade in nanostructured graphene.

    PubMed

    Manjavacas, Alejandro; Nordlander, Peter; García de Abajo, F Javier

    2012-02-28

    Among the many extraordinary properties of graphene, its optical response allows one to easily tune its interaction with nearby molecules via electrostatic doping. The large confinement displayed by plasmons in graphene nanodisks makes it possible to reach the strong-coupling regime with a nearby quantum emitter, such as a quantum dot or a molecule. In this limit, the quantum emitter can introduce a significant plasmon-plasmon interaction, which gives rise to a plasmon blockade effect. This produces, in turn, strongly nonlinear absorption cross sections and modified statistics of the bosonic plasmon mode. We characterize these phenomena by studying the equal-time second-order correlation function g((2))(0), which plunges below a value of 1, thus revealing the existence of nonclassical plasmon states. The plasmon-emitter coupling, and therefore the plasmon blockade, can be efficiently controlled by tuning the doping level of the graphene nanodisks. The proposed system emerges as a new promising platform to realize quantum plasmonic devices capable of commuting optical signals at the single-photon/plasmon level.

  13. Depletion of regulatory T cells leads to an exacerbation of delayed-type hypersensitivity arthritis in C57BL/6 mice that can be counteracted by IL-17 blockade

    PubMed Central

    Atkinson, Sara Marie; Hoffmann, Ute; Hamann, Alf; Bach, Emil; Danneskiold-Samsøe, Niels Banhos; Kristiansen, Karsten; Serikawa, Kyle; Fox, Brian; Kruse, Kim; Haase, Claus; Skov, Søren; Nansen, Anneline

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Rodent models of arthritis have been extensively used in the elucidation of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) pathogenesis and are instrumental in the development of therapeutic strategies. Here we utilise delayed-type hypersensitivity arthritis (DTHA), a model in C57BL/6 mice affecting one paw with synchronised onset, 100% penetrance and low variation. We investigate the role of regulatory T cells (Tregs) in DTHA through selective depletion of Tregs and the role of IL-17 in connection with Treg depletion. Given the relevance of Tregs in RA, and the possibility of developing Treg-directed therapies, this approach could be relevant for advancing the understanding of Tregs in inflammatory arthritis. Selective depletion of Tregs was achieved using a Foxp3-DTR-eGFP mouse, which expresses the diphtheria toxin receptor (DTR) and enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) under control of the Foxp3 gene. Anti-IL-17 monoclonal antibody (mAb) was used for IL-17 blockade. Numbers and activation of Tregs increased in the paw and its draining lymph node in DTHA, and depletion of Tregs resulted in exacerbation of disease as shown by increased paw swelling, increased infiltration of inflammatory cells, increased bone remodelling and increased production of inflammatory mediators, as well as increased production of anti-citrullinated protein antibodies. Anti-IL-17 mAb treatment demonstrated that IL-17 is important for disease severity in both the presence and absence of Tregs, and that IL-17 blockade is able to rescue mice from the exacerbated disease caused by Treg depletion and caused a reduction in RANKL, IL-6 and the number of neutrophils. We show that Tregs are important for the containment of inflammation and bone remodelling in DTHA. To our knowledge, this is the first study using the Foxp3-DTR-eGFP mouse on a C57BL/6 background for Treg depletion in an arthritis model, and we here demonstrate the usefulness of the approach to study the role of Tregs and IL-17 in arthritis

  14. Dietary peptides from the non-digestible fraction of Phaseolus vulgaris L. decrease angiotensin II-dependent proliferation in HCT116 human colorectal cancer cells through the blockade of the renin-angiotensin system.

    PubMed

    Luna-Vital, Diego A; Liang, Katie; González de Mejía, Elvira; Loarca-Piña, Guadalupe

    2016-05-18

    This study aimed to determine the ability of peptides present in the non-digestible fraction (NDF) of common beans to decrease angiotensin II (AngII) through the blockade of RAS and its effect on the proliferation of HCT116 human colorectal cancer cells. Pure synthesized peptides GLTSK and GEGSGA and the peptide fractions (PF) of cultivars Azufrado Higuera and Bayo Madero were used. The cells were pretreated with pure peptides, PF or AGT at their IC50 or IC25 values, in comparison with the simultaneous treatment of peptides and AGT. For western blot and microscopy analysis, 100 μM and 0.5 mg mL(-1) were used for pure peptides and PF treatments, respectively. According to the ELISA tests, GLTSK and GEGSGA decreased (p < 0.05) the conversion rate of AGT to angiotensin I (AngI) by 38 and 28%, respectively. All the peptides tested reduced (p < 0.05) the conversion rate of AngI to AngII from 38 to 50%. When the cells were pretreated with both pure peptides and PF before exposure to AGT, the effectiveness inhibiting cell proliferation was higher than the simultaneous treatment suggesting their preventive effects. GLTSK and GEGSGA interacted with the catalytic site of renin, the angiotensin-I converting enzyme, and the AngII receptor, mainly through hydrogen bonds, polar, hydrophobic and cation-π interactions according to molecular docking. Through confocal microscopy, it was determined that GLTSK and GEGSGA caused the decrease (p < 0.05) of AngII-dependent STAT3 nuclear activation in HCT116 cells by 66 and 23%, respectively. The results suggest that peptides present in the common bean NDF could potentially ameliorate the effects of RAS overexpression in colorectal cancer. PMID:27156533

  15. Anticancer immunotherapy by CTLA-4 blockade relies on the gut microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Vétizou, Marie; Pitt, Jonathan M.; Daillère, Romain; Lepage, Patricia; Waldschmitt, Nadine; Flament, Caroline; Rusakiewicz, Sylvie; Routy, Bertrand; Roberti, Maria P.; Duong, Connie P. M.; Poirier-Colame, Vichnou; Roux, Antoine; Becharef, Sonia; Formenti, Silvia; Golden, Encouse; Cording, Sascha; Eberl, Gerard; Schlitzer, Andreas; Ginhoux, Florent; Mani, Sridhar; Yamazaki, Takahiro; Jacquelot, Nicolas; Enot, David P.; Bérard, Marion; Nigou, Jérôme; Opolon, Paule; Eggermont, Alexander; Woerther, Paul-Louis; Chachaty, Elisabeth; Chaput, Nathalie; Robert, Caroline; Mateus, Christina; Kroemer, Guido; Raoult, Didier; Boneca, Ivo Gomperts; Carbonnel, Franck; Chamaillard, Mathias; Zitvogel, Laurence

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies targeting CTLA-4 have been successfully used as cancer immunotherapy. We find that the antitumor effects of CTLA-4 blockade depend on distinct Bacteroides species. In mice and patients, T cell responses specific for B. thetaiotaomicron or B. fragilis were associated with the efficacy of CTLA-4 blockade. Tumors in antibiotic-treated or germ-free mice did not respond to CTLA blockade. This defect was overcome by gavage with B. fragilis, by immunization with B. fragilis polysaccharides, or by adoptive transfer of B. fragilis–specific T cells. Fecal microbial transplantation from humans to mice confirmed that treatment of melanoma patients with antibodies against CTLA-4 favored the outgrowth of B. fragilis with anticancer properties. This study reveals a key role for Bacteroidales in the immunostimulatory effects of CTLA-4 blockade. PMID:26541610

  16. Immunotherapeutic implications of IL-6 blockade for cytokine storm.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Toshio; Narazaki, Masashi; Kishimoto, Tadamitsu

    2016-07-01

    IL-6 contributes to host defense against infections and tissue injuries. However, exaggerated, excessive synthesis of IL-6 while fighting environmental stress leads to an acute severe systemic inflammatory response known as 'cytokine storm', since high levels of IL-6 can activate the coagulation pathway and vascular endothelial cells but inhibit myocardial function. Remarkable beneficial effects of IL-6 blockade therapy using a humanized anti-IL-6 receptor antibody, tocilizumab were recently observed in patients with cytokine release syndrome complicated by T-cell engaged therapy. In this review we propose the possibility that IL-6 blockade may constitute a novel therapeutic strategy for other types of cytokine storm, such as the systemic inflammatory response syndrome including sepsis, macrophage activation syndrome and hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis. PMID:27381687

  17. Immunotherapeutic implications of IL-6 blockade for cytokine storm.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Toshio; Narazaki, Masashi; Kishimoto, Tadamitsu

    2016-07-01

    IL-6 contributes to host defense against infections and tissue injuries. However, exaggerated, excessive synthesis of IL-6 while fighting environmental stress leads to an acute severe systemic inflammatory response known as 'cytokine storm', since high levels of IL-6 can activate the coagulation pathway and vascular endothelial cells but inhibit myocardial function. Remarkable beneficial effects of IL-6 blockade therapy using a humanized anti-IL-6 receptor antibody, tocilizumab were recently observed in patients with cytokine release syndrome complicated by T-cell engaged therapy. In this review we propose the possibility that IL-6 blockade may constitute a novel therapeutic strategy for other types of cytokine storm, such as the systemic inflammatory response syndrome including sepsis, macrophage activation syndrome and hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis.

  18. Combination OX40 agonism/CTLA-4 blockade with HER2 vaccination reverses T-cell anergy and promotes survival in tumor-bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Linch, Stefanie N; Kasiewicz, Melissa J; McNamara, Michael J; Hilgart-Martiszus, Ian F; Farhad, Mohammad; Redmond, William L

    2016-01-19

    Immunotherapy is gathering momentum as a primary therapy for cancer patients. However, monotherapies have limited efficacy in improving outcomes and benefit only a subset of patients. Combination therapies targeting multiple pathways can augment an immune response to improve survival further. Here, we demonstrate that dual aOX40 (anti-CD134)/aCTLA-4 (anti-cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated protein 4) immunotherapy generated a potent antigen-specific CD8 T-cell response, enhancing expansion, effector function, and memory T-cell persistence. Importantly, OX40 and CTLA-4 expression on CD8 T cells was critical for promoting their maximal expansion following combination therapy. Animals treated with combination therapy and vaccination using anti-DEC-205 (dendritic and epithelial cells, 205 kDa)-HER2 (human epidermal growth factor receptor 2) had significantly improved survival in a mammary carcinoma model. Vaccination with combination therapy uniquely restricted Th2-cytokine production by CD4 cells, relative to combination therapy alone, and enhanced IFNγ production by CD8 and CD4 cells. We observed an increase in MIP-1α (macrophage inflammatory protein-1α)/CCL3 [chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 3], MIP-1β/CCL4, RANTES (regulated on activation, normal T-cell expressed and excreted)/CCL5, and GM-CSF production by CD8 and CD4 T cells following treatment. Furthermore, this therapy was associated with extensive tumor destruction and T-cell infiltration into the tumor. Notably, in a spontaneous model of prostate adenocarcinoma, vaccination with combination therapy reversed anergy and enhanced the expansion and function of CD8 T cells recognizing a tumor-associated antigen. Collectively, these data demonstrate that the addition of a vaccine with combined aOX40/aCTLA-4 immunotherapy augmented antitumor CD8 T-cell function while limiting Th2 polarization in CD4 cells and improved overall survival.

  19. Combination OX40 agonism/CTLA-4 blockade with HER2 vaccination reverses T-cell anergy and promotes survival in tumor-bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Linch, Stefanie N; Kasiewicz, Melissa J; McNamara, Michael J; Hilgart-Martiszus, Ian F; Farhad, Mohammad; Redmond, William L

    2016-01-19

    Immunotherapy is gathering momentum as a primary therapy for cancer patients. However, monotherapies have limited efficacy in improving outcomes and benefit only a subset of patients. Combination therapies targeting multiple pathways can augment an immune response to improve survival further. Here, we demonstrate that dual aOX40 (anti-CD134)/aCTLA-4 (anti-cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated protein 4) immunotherapy generated a potent antigen-specific CD8 T-cell response, enhancing expansion, effector function, and memory T-cell persistence. Importantly, OX40 and CTLA-4 expression on CD8 T cells was critical for promoting their maximal expansion following combination therapy. Animals treated with combination therapy and vaccination using anti-DEC-205 (dendritic and epithelial cells, 205 kDa)-HER2 (human epidermal growth factor receptor 2) had significantly improved survival in a mammary carcinoma model. Vaccination with combination therapy uniquely restricted Th2-cytokine production by CD4 cells, relative to combination therapy alone, and enhanced IFNγ production by CD8 and CD4 cells. We observed an increase in MIP-1α (macrophage inflammatory protein-1α)/CCL3 [chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 3], MIP-1β/CCL4, RANTES (regulated on activation, normal T-cell expressed and excreted)/CCL5, and GM-CSF production by CD8 and CD4 T cells following treatment. Furthermore, this therapy was associated with extensive tumor destruction and T-cell infiltration into the tumor. Notably, in a spontaneous model of prostate adenocarcinoma, vaccination with combination therapy reversed anergy and enhanced the expansion and function of CD8 T cells recognizing a tumor-associated antigen. Collectively, these data demonstrate that the addition of a vaccine with combined aOX40/aCTLA-4 immunotherapy augmented antitumor CD8 T-cell function while limiting Th2 polarization in CD4 cells and improved overall survival. PMID:26729864

  20. Blockade of Apoptosis Signal-Regulating Kinase 1 Attenuates Matrix Metalloproteinase 9 Activity in Brain Endothelial Cells and the Subsequent Apoptosis in Neurons after Ischemic Injury

    PubMed Central

    Cheon, So Y.; Cho, Kyoung J.; Kim, So Y.; Kam, Eun H.; Lee, Jong E.; Koo, Bon-Nyeo

    2016-01-01

    Conditions of increased oxidative stress including cerebral ischemia can lead to blood–brain barrier dysfunction via matrix metalloproteinase (MMP). It is known that MMP-9 in particular is released from brain endothelial cells is involved in the neuronal cell death that occurs after cerebral ischemia. In the intracellular signaling network, apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1) is the main activator of the oxidative stress that is part of the pathogenesis of cerebral ischemia. ASK1 also promotes apoptotic cell death and brain infarction after ischemia and is associated with vascular permeability and the formation of brain edema. However, the relationship between ASK1 and MMP-9 after cerebral ischemia remains unknown. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to determine whether blocking ASK1 would affect MMP-9 activity in the ischemic brain and cultured brain endothelial cells. Our results showed that ASK1 inhibition efficiently reduced MMP-9 activity in vivo and in vitro. In endothelial cell cultures, ASK1 inhibition upregulated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt/nuclear factor erythroid 2 [NF-E2]-related factor 2/heme oxygenase-1 signals and downregulated cyclooxygenase-2 signals after hypoxia/reperfusion. Additionally, in neuronal cell cultures, cell death occurred when neurons were incubated with endothelial cell-conditioned medium (EC-CM) obtained from the hypoxia/reperfusion group. However, after incubation with EC-CM and following treatment with the ASK1 inhibitor NQDI-1, neuronal cell death was efficiently decreased. We conclude that suppressing ASK1 decreases MMP-9 activity in brain endothelial cells, and leads to decreased neuronal cell death after ischemic injury.

  1. Blockade of Apoptosis Signal-Regulating Kinase 1 Attenuates Matrix Metalloproteinase 9 Activity in Brain Endothelial Cells and the Subsequent Apoptosis in Neurons after Ischemic Injury.

    PubMed

    Cheon, So Y; Cho, Kyoung J; Kim, So Y; Kam, Eun H; Lee, Jong E; Koo, Bon-Nyeo

    2016-01-01

    Conditions of increased oxidative stress including cerebral ischemia can lead to blood-brain barrier dysfunction via matrix metalloproteinase (MMP). It is known that MMP-9 in particular is released from brain endothelial cells is involved in the neuronal cell death that occurs after cerebral ischemia. In the intracellular signaling network, apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1) is the main activator of the oxidative stress that is part of the pathogenesis of cerebral ischemia. ASK1 also promotes apoptotic cell death and brain infarction after ischemia and is associated with vascular permeability and the formation of brain edema. However, the relationship between ASK1 and MMP-9 after cerebral ischemia remains unknown. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to determine whether blocking ASK1 would affect MMP-9 activity in the ischemic brain and cultured brain endothelial cells. Our results showed that ASK1 inhibition efficiently reduced MMP-9 activity in vivo and in vitro. In endothelial cell cultures, ASK1 inhibition upregulated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt/nuclear factor erythroid 2 [NF-E2]-related factor 2/heme oxygenase-1 signals and downregulated cyclooxygenase-2 signals after hypoxia/reperfusion. Additionally, in neuronal cell cultures, cell death occurred when neurons were incubated with endothelial cell-conditioned medium (EC-CM) obtained from the hypoxia/reperfusion group. However, after incubation with EC-CM and following treatment with the ASK1 inhibitor NQDI-1, neuronal cell death was efficiently decreased. We conclude that suppressing ASK1 decreases MMP-9 activity in brain endothelial cells, and leads to decreased neuronal cell death after ischemic injury. PMID:27642277

  2. Blockade of Apoptosis Signal-Regulating Kinase 1 Attenuates Matrix Metalloproteinase 9 Activity in Brain Endothelial Cells and the Subsequent Apoptosis in Neurons after Ischemic Injury

    PubMed Central

    Cheon, So Y.; Cho, Kyoung J.; Kim, So Y.; Kam, Eun H.; Lee, Jong E.; Koo, Bon-Nyeo

    2016-01-01

    Conditions of increased oxidative stress including cerebral ischemia can lead to blood–brain barrier dysfunction via matrix metalloproteinase (MMP). It is known that MMP-9 in particular is released from brain endothelial cells is involved in the neuronal cell death that occurs after cerebral ischemia. In the intracellular signaling network, apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1) is the main activator of the oxidative stress that is part of the pathogenesis of cerebral ischemia. ASK1 also promotes apoptotic cell death and brain infarction after ischemia and is associated with vascular permeability and the formation of brain edema. However, the relationship between ASK1 and MMP-9 after cerebral ischemia remains unknown. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to determine whether blocking ASK1 would affect MMP-9 activity in the ischemic brain and cultured brain endothelial cells. Our results showed that ASK1 inhibition efficiently reduced MMP-9 activity in vivo and in vitro. In endothelial cell cultures, ASK1 inhibition upregulated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt/nuclear factor erythroid 2 [NF-E2]-related factor 2/heme oxygenase-1 signals and downregulated cyclooxygenase-2 signals after hypoxia/reperfusion. Additionally, in neuronal cell cultures, cell death occurred when neurons were incubated with endothelial cell-conditioned medium (EC-CM) obtained from the hypoxia/reperfusion group. However, after incubation with EC-CM and following treatment with the ASK1 inhibitor NQDI-1, neuronal cell death was efficiently decreased. We conclude that suppressing ASK1 decreases MMP-9 activity in brain endothelial cells, and leads to decreased neuronal cell death after ischemic injury. PMID:27642277

  3. Blockade of Inhibitors of Apoptosis Proteins in Combination with Conventional Chemotherapy Leads to Synergistic Antitumor Activity in Medulloblastoma and Cancer Stem-Like Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shu-Mei; Li, Ying-Ying; Tu, Chiao-Hui; Salazar, Nicole; Tseng, Yuan-Yun; Huang, Shiang-Fu

    2016-01-01

    Background Medulloblastoma (MB) is the most common pediatric primary malignant brain tumor. Approximately one-third of MB patients succumb to treatment failure and some survivors suffer detrimental side effects. Hence, the purpose of this study is to explore new therapeutic regimens to overcome chemotherapeutic agent resistance or reduce chemotherapy-induced toxicity. Methods We detected the expression of inhibitors of apoptosis proteins (IAPs) in MB and CD133+ MB cell lines and MB tissues using immunoblotting and immunohistochemical staining. The antitumor effects of inhibitors against IAPs on MB or CD133+ MB cells were evaluated by MTT assay, Annexin V/PI analysis, and caspase-3/7 activity. Autophagy was assessed by the conversion of light chain (LC) 3-I to LC3-II and Cyto-ID autophagy detection kit. Results MB cells showed higher expression of IAPs compared to normal astrocytes and normal brain tissues. Conventional chemotherapeutic agents combined with small-molecule IAP inhibitors (LCL161 or LBW242) showed a synergistic effect in MB cells. Combined treatments triggered apoptosis in MB cells through activation of caspase-3/7 and autophagic flux simultaneously. In addition, we found that CD133+ MB cells with features of cancer stem cells displayed higher levels of X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP) and cellular inhibitor of apoptosis 1/2 (cIAP1/2), and were hypersensitive to treatment with IAP inhibitors. Conclusions These results shed light on the biological effects of combination therapy on MB cells and illustrate that IAP inhibitors are more effective for CD133+ stem-like MB cells. PMID:27537345

  4. Valley blockade quantum switching in Silicon nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Prati, Enrico

    2011-10-01

    In analogy to the Coulomb and the Pauli spin blockade, based on the electrostatic repulsion and the Pauli exclusion principle respectively, the concept of valley blockade in Silicon nanostructures is explored. The valley parity operator is defined. Valley blockade is determined by the parity conservation of valley composition eigenvectors in quantum transport. A Silicon quantum changeover switch based on a triple of donor quantum dots capable to separate electrons having opposite valley parity by virtue of the valley parity conservation is proposed. The quantum changeover switch represents a novel kind of hybrid quantum based classical logic device.

  5. [Genetic Mutation Accumulation and Clinical Outcome of Immune Checkpoint Blockade Therapy].

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Masanobu

    2016-06-01

    Immune checkpoint blockade therapy has recently attracted great attention in the area of oncology. In Japan, since 2014, an anti-PD-1 antibody nivolumab and anti-CTLA-4 antibody ipilimumab have been available for the treatment of patients with malignant melanoma, and nivolumab has been available for patients with non-small cell lung cancer. Clinical trials using these drugs and other immune checkpoint inhibitors are currently in progress worldwide. The immune checkpoint blockade therapy is a promising new cancer therapy; however, not all patients with cancer can benefit from this therapy. Recent evidence shows that markers reflecting the extent of genetic mutation accumulation, including mutation burden, non-synonymous mutation that produces neoantigen, and microsatellite instability, possibly serve as promising marker to predict who can benefit from the immune checkpoint blockade therapy. Here, I introduce the recent evidence and discuss the correlation between genetic mutation accumulation and clinical outcome of immune checkpoint blockade therapy. PMID:27306805

  6. Blockade of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Production in CD4^+ T Cells by an Intracellular CD4 Expressed Under Control of the Viral Long Terminal Repeat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buonocore, Linda; Rose, John K.

    1993-04-01

    A retroviral vector was constructed in which a gene encoding a mutated soluble CD4 protein that is retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (sCD4-KDEL) is expressed under control of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) regulatory elements. HIV-1 infection of a human T-cell line transduced with this vector led to induction of sCD4-KDEL synthesis and a block in transport of the HIV envelope protein to the cell surface. There was a complete block to maturation of infectious HIV-1 in the transduced cells, no viral spread, and little or no syncytium formation. Infected cells gradually disappeared from the culture over a period of 2 months. This intracellular trap for HIV has potential application in gene therapy for AIDS.

  7. Blockade of excitatory synaptogenesis with proximal dendrites of dentate granule cells following rapamycin treatment in a mouse model of temporal lobe epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Yamawaki, Ruth; Thind, Khushdev; Buckmaster, Paul S.

    2014-01-01

    Inhibiting the mTOR signaling pathway with rapamycin blocks granule cell axon (mossy fiber) sprouting after epileptogenic injuries, including pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus. However, it remains unclear whether axons from other types of neurons sprout into the inner molecular layer and synapse with granule cell dendrites despite rapamycin treatment. If so, other aberrant positive-feedback networks might develop. To test this possibility stereological electron microscopy was used to estimate numbers of excitatory synapses in the inner molecular layer per hippocampus in pilocarpine-treated control mice, in mice 5 d after pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus, and after status epilepticus and daily treatment beginning 24 h later with rapamycin or vehicle for 2 months. The optical fractionator method was used to estimate numbers of granule cells in Nissl-stained sections so that numbers of excitatory synapses in the inner molecular layer per granule cell could be calculated. Control mice had an average of 2280 asymmetric synapses in the inner molecular layer per granule cell, which was reduced to 63% of controls 5 d after status epilepticus, recovered to 93% of controls in vehicle-treated mice 2 months after status epilepticus, but remained at only 63% of controls in rapamycin-treated mice. These findings reveal that rapamycin prevented excitatory axons from synapsing with proximal dendrites of granule cells and raise questions about the recurrent excitation hypothesis of temporal lobe epilepsy. PMID:25234294

  8. Blockade of oncogenic IκB kinase activity in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma by bromodomain and extraterminal domain protein inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ceribelli, Michele; Kelly, Priscilla N; Shaffer, Arthur L; Wright, George W; Xiao, Wenming; Yang, Yibin; Mathews Griner, Lesley A; Guha, Rajarshi; Shinn, Paul; Keller, Jonathan M; Liu, Dongbo; Patel, Paresma R; Ferrer, Marc; Joshi, Shivangi; Nerle, Sujata; Sandy, Peter; Normant, Emmanuel; Thomas, Craig J; Staudt, Louis M

    2014-08-01

    In the activated B-cell-like (ABC) subtype of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), NF-κB activity is essential for viability of the malignant cells and is sustained by constitutive activity of IκB kinase (IKK) in the cytoplasm. Here, we report an unexpected role for the bromodomain and extraterminal domain (BET) proteins BRD2 and BRD4 in maintaining oncogenic IKK activity in ABC DLBCL. IKK activity was reduced by small molecules targeting BET proteins as well as by genetic knockdown of BRD2 and BRD4 expression, thereby inhibiting downstream NF-κB-driven transcriptional programs and killing ABC DLBCL cells. Using a high-throughput platform to screen for drug-drug synergy, we observed that the BET inhibitor JQ1 combined favorably with multiple drugs targeting B-cell receptor signaling, one pathway that activates IKK in ABC DLBCL. The BTK kinase inhibitor ibrutinib, which is in clinical development for the treatment of ABC DLBCL, synergized strongly with BET inhibitors in killing ABC DLBCL cells in vitro and in a xenograft mouse model. These findings provide a mechanistic basis for the clinical development of BET protein inhibitors in ABC DLBCL, particularly in combination with other modulators of oncogenic IKK signaling.

  9. IGF1 induces cell proliferation in human pituitary tumors - functional blockade of IGF1 receptor as a novel therapeutic approach in non-functioning tumors.

    PubMed

    Rubinfeld, Hadara; Kammer, Adi; Cohen, Ortal; Gorshtein, Alexander; Cohen, Zvi R; Hadani, Moshe; Werner, Haim; Shimon, Ilan

    2014-06-01

    Insulin-like growth factor (IGF1) and its receptor display potent proliferative and antiapoptotic activities and are considered key players in malignancy. The objective of the study was to explore the role of IGF1 and its downstream pathways in the proliferation of non-functioning pituitary tumor cells and to develop a targeted therapeutic approach for the treatment of these tumors. Cultures of human non-functioning pituitary adenomas and the non-secreting immortalized rat pituitary tumor cell line MtT/E were incubated with IGF1, IGF1 receptor inhibitor or both, and cell viability, proliferation and signaling were examined. Our results show that IGF1 elevated cell proliferation and enhanced cell cycle progression as well as the expression of cyclins D1 and D3. IGF1 also induced the phosphorylation of ERK, Akt and p70S6K. On the other hand, the selective IGF1R inhibitor NVP-AEW541 abrogated IGF1-induced cell proliferation as well as IGF1 receptor phosphorylation and downstream signaling.

  10. Checkpoint Blockade Cancer Immunotherapy Targets Tumour-Specific Mutant Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Gubin, Matthew M.; Zhang, Xiuli; Schuster, Heiko; Caron, Etienne; Ward, Jeffrey P.; Noguchi, Takuro; Ivanova, Yulia; Hundal, Jasreet; Arthur, Cora D.; Krebber, Willem-Jan; Mulder, Gwenn E.; Toebes, Mireille; Vesely, Matthew D.; Lam, Samuel S.K.; Korman, Alan J.; Allison, James P.; Freeman, Gordon J.; Sharpe, Arlene H.; Pearce, Erika L.; Schumacher, Ton N.; Aebersold, Ruedi; Rammensee, Hans-Georg; Melief, Cornelis J. M.; Mardis, Elaine R.; Gillanders, William E.; Artyomov, Maxim N.; Schreiber, Robert D.

    2014-01-01

    The immune system plays key roles in determining the fate of developing cancers by not only functioning as a tumour promoter facilitating cellular transformation, promoting tumour growth and sculpting tumour cell immunogenicity1–6, but also as an extrinsic tumour suppressor that either destroys developing tumours or restrains their expansion1,2,7. Yet clinically apparent cancers still arise in immunocompetent individuals in part as a consequence of cancer induced immunosuppression. In many individuals, immunosuppression is mediated by Cytotoxic T-Lymphocyte Associated Antigen-4 (CTLA-4) and Programmed Death-1 (PD-1), two immunomodulatory receptors expressed on T cells8,9. Monoclonal antibody (mAb) based therapies targeting CTLA-4 and/or PD-1 (checkpoint blockade) have yielded significant clinical benefits—including durable responses—to patients with different malignancies10–13. However, little is known about the identity of the tumour antigens that function as the targets of T cells activated by checkpoint blockade immunotherapy and whether these antigens can be used to generate vaccines that are highly tumour-specific. Herein, we use genomics and bioinformatics approaches to identify tumour-specific mutant proteins as a major class of T cell rejection antigens following αPD-1 and/or αCTLA-4 therapy of mice bearing progressively growing sarcomas and show that therapeutic synthetic long peptide (SLP) vaccines incorporating these mutant epitopes induce tumour rejection comparably to checkpoint blockade immunotherapy. Whereas, mutant tumour antigen-specific T cells are present in progressively growing tumours, they are reactivated following treatment with αPD-1- and/or αCTLA-4 and display some overlapping but mostly treatment-specific transcriptional profiles rendering them capable of mediating tumour rejection. These results reveal that tumour-specific mutant antigens (TSMA) are not only important targets of checkpoint blockade therapy but also can be

  11. Molecular and pharmacological blockade of the EP4 receptor selectively inhibits both proliferation and invasion of human inflammatory breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Fredika M; Simeone, Ann-Marie; Mazumdar, Abhijit; Shah, Ashish H; McMurray, John S; Ghosh, Sukhen; Cristofanilli, Massimo

    2008-01-01

    Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is the most aggressive form of locally advanced breast cancer (LABC) characterized by rapid growth and aggressive invasion with no selective therapies developed to treat IBC. Cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2), which produces prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is known to be upregulated in primary IBC tumors and metastatic lesions, however the use of selective Cox-2 inhibitors has diminished due to cardiovascular side effects. One alternative approach to targeting Cox-2 enzyme activity is to block binding of the PGE2 ligand to its prostanoid (EP) receptors, which are designated as EP1, EP2, EP3, and EP4 and are members of a subfamily of G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). While SUM149 IBC tumor cells and MCF-7 non-IBC breast tumor cells produce both EP2 and EP4 receptors, the invasive MDA-MB-231 non-IBC breast tumor cells produced low but detectable levels of these receptors. PGE2 and the EP4 agonist, PGE2 alcohol, stimulated significantly increased (p < 0.05) levels of proliferation and invasion by SUM149 IBC tumor cells, with no effect on proliferation of either of the two non-IBC breast tumor cell lines. In contrast, the EP2 agonist butaprost had no effect on proliferation or invasion of any cell line examined. The selective EP4 antagonist, GW627368X, induced inhibition of proliferation and invasion of human SUM149 IBC tumor cells beginning at 0.1 microM, with inhibition of proliferation and invasion by MDA-MB-231 non-IBC cells at higher concentrations of GW627368X. Molecular knockdown of the EP4 receptor was accomplished by stable transfection of an EP4 short hairpin RNA (shRNA) construct, with a clonally derived cell line designated as SUM149/Clone 1 exhibiting significantly slowed proliferation and diminished invasion compared to SUM149/Vector 5 which contained a scrambled shRNA control vector. This is the first report using both a selective pharmacologic inhibitor and a molecular shRNA knockdown approach to demonstrate that EP4 is directly

  12. High Potency VEGFRs/MET/FMS Triple Blockade by TAS-115 Concomitantly Suppresses Tumor Progression and Bone Destruction in Tumor-Induced Bone Disease Model with Lung Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fujioka, Yayoi; Kataoka, Yuki; Tanaka, Kenji; Hashimoto, Akihiro; Suzuki, Takamasa; Ito, Kenjiro; Haruma, Tomonori; Yamamoto-Yokoi, Hiromi; Harada, Naomoto; Sakuragi, Motomu; Oda, Nobuyuki; Matsuo, Kenichi; Inada, Masaki; Yonekura, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 25–40% of patients with lung cancer show bone metastasis. Bone modifying agents reduce skeletal-related events (SREs), but they do not significantly improve overall survival. Therefore, novel therapeutic approaches are urgently required. In this study, we investigated the anti-tumor effect of TAS-115, a VEGFRs and HGF receptor (MET)-targeted kinase inhibitor, in a tumor-induced bone disease model. A549-Luc-BM1 cells, an osteo-tropic clone of luciferase-transfected A549 human lung adenocarcinoma cells (A549-Luc), produced aggressive bone destruction associated with tumor progression after intra-tibial (IT) implantation into mice. TAS-115 significantly reduced IT tumor growth and bone destruction. Histopathological analysis showed a decrease in tumor vessels after TAS-115 treatment, which might be mediated through VEGFRs inhibition. Furthermore, the number of osteoclasts surrounding the tumor was decreased after TAS-115 treatment. In vitro studies demonstrated that TAS-115 inhibited HGF-, VEGF-, and macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF)-induced signaling pathways in osteoclasts. Moreover, TAS-115 inhibited Feline McDonough Sarcoma oncogene (FMS) kinase, as well as M-CSF and receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclast differentiation. Thus, VEGFRs/MET/FMS-triple inhibition in osteoclasts might contribute to the potent efficacy of TAS-115. The fact that concomitant dosing of sunitinib (VEGFRs/FMS inhibition) with crizotinib (MET inhibition) exerted comparable inhibitory efficacy for bone destruction to TAS-115 also supports this notion. In conclusion, TAS-115 inhibited tumor growth via VEGFR-kinase blockade, and also suppressed bone destruction possibly through VEGFRs/MET/FMS-kinase inhibition, which resulted in potent efficacy of TAS-115 in an A549-Luc-BM1 bone disease model. Thus, TAS-115 shows promise as a novel therapy for lung cancer patients with bone metastasis. PMID:27736957

  13. Blockade of mast cell histamine secretion in response to neurotensin by SR 48692, a nonpeptide antagonist of the neurotensin brain receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, L A; Cochrane, D E; Carraway, R E; Feldberg, R S

    1995-01-01

    1. Pretreatment of rat isolated mast cells with SR 48692, a nonpeptide antagonist of the neurotensin (NT) receptor, prevented histamine secretion in response to NT. 2. This inhibition was rapid in onset (approximately 1 min) and dependent upon the concentration of SR 48692 (IC50 approximately 1-10 nM). 3. SR 48692 (1-1000 nM) did not inhibit histamine secretion elicited by substance P, bradykinin or compound 48/80, or by anti-IgE stimulation of sensitized mast cells. 4. When SR 48692 was injected intradermally (5 pmol in 50 microliters) into anaesthetized rats, 15 min before the intradermal injection of NT, it reduced the effect of NT on vascular permeability. 5. When injected intravenously, SR 48692 attenuated the effects of NT on haematocrit and blood stasis. 6. These results demonstrate that SR 48692 selectively antagonizes the actions of NT on rat isolated mast cells as well as mast cells in vivo. Given the demonstrated specific interaction of SR 48692 with receptors for NT in brain, our results suggest the presence of specific NT receptors on mast cells. PMID:7541694

  14. Pharmacological blockade of the DP2 receptor inhibits cigarette smoke-induced inflammation, mucus cell metaplasia, and epithelial hyperplasia in the mouse lung.

    PubMed

    Stebbins, Karin J; Broadhead, Alex R; Baccei, Christopher S; Scott, Jill M; Truong, Yen P; Coate, Heather; Stock, Nicholas S; Santini, Angelina M; Fagan, Patrick; Prodanovich, Patricia; Bain, Gretchen; Stearns, Brian A; King, Christopher D; Hutchinson, John H; Prasit, Peppi; Evans, Jilly F; Lorrain, Daniel S

    2010-03-01

    Prostaglandin D(2) (PGD(2)) is one of a family of biologically active lipids derived from arachidonic acid via the action of COX-1 and COX-2. PGD(2) is released from mast cells and binds primarily to two G protein-coupled receptors, namely DP1 and DP2, the latter also known as chemoattractant receptor-homologous molecule expressed on Th2 cells. DP2 is predominantly expressed on eosinophils, Th2 cells, and basophils, but it is also expressed to a lesser extent on monocytes, mast cells, and epithelial cells. Interaction of PGD(2) and its active metabolites with DP2 results in cellular chemotaxis, degranulation, up-regulation of adhesion molecules, and cytokine production. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a chronic progressive inflammatory disease characterized by elevated lung neutrophils, macrophages, and CD8+ T lymphocytes and mucus hypersecretion. Cigarette smoke contributes to the etiology of COPD and was used here as a provoking agent in a murine model of COPD. In an acute model, {2'-[(cyclopropanecarbonyl-ethyl-amino)-methyl]-6-methoxy-4'-trifluoro-methyl-biphenyl-3-yl}-acetic acid, sodium salt (AM156) and (5-{2-[(benzoyloxycarbonyl-ethyl-amino)-methyl]-4-trifluoromethyl-phenyl}-pyridin-3-yl)-acetic acid, sodium salt) (AM206), potent DP2 receptor antagonists, dose-dependently inhibited influx of neutrophils and lymphocytes to smoke-exposed airways. In a subchronic model, AM156 and AM206 inhibited neutrophil and lymphocyte trafficking to the airways. Furthermore, AM156 and AM206 treatment inhibited mucus cell metaplasia and prevented the thickening of the airway epithelial layer induced by cigarette smoke. These data suggest that DP2 receptor antagonism may represent a novel therapy for COPD or other conditions characterized by neutrophil influx, mucus hypersecretion, and airway remodeling.

  15. [Recent Development of Therapies for Melanoma Using Immune Checkpoint Blockades].

    PubMed

    Okuyama, Ryuhei

    2016-06-01

    Melanoma is a highly immune tumor, and tumor-specific T lymphocytes are occasionally induced. Recent progress in tumor immunology has made it possible to clinically develop new medicines targeting immune checkpoint molecules, such as cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen 4(CTLA-4), programmed cell death 1(PD-1), and programmed cell death 1 ligand 1(PD-L1). CTLA-4 is expressed on naïve T cells and regulatory T cells. Ipilimumab, an anti-CTLA-4 antibody, shows a distinct durable clinical benefit by inhibiting the immunosuppressive function of CTLA-4. PD-1, which is expressed on activated T cells, inhibits T cell responses against tumor cells. The antibodies against PD-1, nivolumab and pembrolizumab, produce anti-tumor responses in melanoma and other cancers due to T cell reactivation. Furthermore, clinical trials of combination therapies using immune checkpoint blockades with molecularly targeted therapies and other chemotherapeutic agents are being conducted. However, immune checkpoint blockades frequently cause immune-related adverse events. Targeted therapies to immune checkpoint molecules are expected to be promising strategies for treatment of melanoma and other cancers. PMID:27306802

  16. Blockade of Androgen Markers Using a Novel Betasitosterol, Thioctic Acid and Carnitine-containing Compound in Prostate and Hair Follicle Cell-based Assays.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li; Wang, Jiaolong; Mouser, Glen; Li, Yan Chun; Marcovici, Geno

    2016-06-01

    Androgenetic alopecia (AGA) affects approximately 70% of men and 40% of women in an age-dependent manner and is partially mediated by androgen hormones. Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) similarly affects 50% of the male population, rising by 10% each decade. Finasteride inhibits 5-alpha reductase (5AR) and is used to treat both disorders, despite offering limited clinical benefits accompanied by significant adverse side effects. Building on our previous work demonstrating the efficacy of naturally derived 5AR inhibitors (such as stigmasterol and beta sitosterol), we hypothesize that targeting 5AR as well as inflammatory pathways may yield improved efficacy in AGA and BPH. Here we address these dual pathomechanisms by examining the potency of a novel composition using in vitro assays of representative cell lines for AGA (hair follicle dermal papilla cells) and BPH (LNCaP prostate cells), respectively. Exposure of cells to the novel test composition down-regulated mRNA expression profiles characteristic of both disease processes, which outperformed finasteride. Changes in mRNA expression were corroborated at the protein level as assessed by western blotting. These studies provide proof of concept that novel, naturally derived compositions simultaneously targeting 5AR and inflammatory mediators may represent a rational approach to treating AGA and BPH. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26990224

  17. Blockade of Androgen Markers Using a Novel Betasitosterol, Thioctic Acid and Carnitine-containing Compound in Prostate and Hair Follicle Cell-based Assays.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li; Wang, Jiaolong; Mouser, Glen; Li, Yan Chun; Marcovici, Geno

    2016-06-01

    Androgenetic alopecia (AGA) affects approximately 70% of men and 40% of women in an age-dependent manner and is partially mediated by androgen hormones. Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) similarly affects 50% of the male population, rising by 10% each decade. Finasteride inhibits 5-alpha reductase (5AR) and is used to treat both disorders, despite offering limited clinical benefits accompanied by significant adverse side effects. Building on our previous work demonstrating the efficacy of naturally derived 5AR inhibitors (such as stigmasterol and beta sitosterol), we hypothesize that targeting 5AR as well as inflammatory pathways may yield improved efficacy in AGA and BPH. Here we address these dual pathomechanisms by examining the potency of a novel composition using in vitro assays of representative cell lines for AGA (hair follicle dermal papilla cells) and BPH (LNCaP prostate cells), respectively. Exposure of cells to the novel test composition down-regulated mRNA expression profiles characteristic of both disease processes, which outperformed finasteride. Changes in mRNA expression were corroborated at the protein level as assessed by western blotting. These studies provide proof of concept that novel, naturally derived compositions simultaneously targeting 5AR and inflammatory mediators may represent a rational approach to treating AGA and BPH. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Anti-metastatic Potential of Amide-linked Local Anesthetics: Inhibition of Lung Adenocarcinoma Cell Migration and Inflammatory Src Signaling Independent of Sodium Channel Blockade

    PubMed Central

    Piegeler, Tobias; Votta-Velis, E. Gina; Liu, Guoquan; Place, Aaron T.; Schwartz, David E.; Beck-Schimmer, Beatrice; Minshall, Richard D.; Borgeat, Alain

    2012-01-01

    Background Retrospective analysis of patients undergoing cancer surgery suggests the use of regional anesthesia may reduce cancer recurrence and improve survival. Amide-linked local anesthetics have anti-inflammatory properties, although the mechanism of action in this regard is unclear. As inflammatory processes involving Src tyrosine protein kinase and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 are important in tumor growth and metastasis, we hypothesized that amide-linked local anesthetics may inhibit inflammatory Src-signaling involved in migration of adenocarcinoma cells. Methods NCI-H838 lung cancer cells were incubated with Tumor Necrosis Factor-α in absence/presence of ropivacaine, lidocaine, or chloroprocaine (1nM-100μM). Cell migration and total cell lysate Src-activation and Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1 phosphorylation were assessed. The role of voltage-gated sodium-channels in the mechanism of local anesthetic effects was also evaluated. Results Ropivacaine treatment (100μM) of H838 cells for 20 minutes decreased basal Src activity by 62% (p=0.003), and both ropivacaine and lidocaine co-administered with Tumor Necrosis Factor-α statistically significantly decreased Src-activation and Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1 phosphorylation, whereas chloroprocaine had no such effect. Migration of these cells at 4 hours was inhibited by 26% (p=0.005) in presence of 1μM ropivacaine and 21% by 1μM lidocaine (p=0.004). These effects of ropivacaine and lidocaine were independent of voltage-gated sodium-channel inhibition. Conclusions This study indicates that amide-, but not ester-linked local anesthetics may provide beneficial anti-metastatic effects. The observed inhibition of NCI-H838 cell migration by lidocaine and ropivacaine was associated with the inhibition of Tumor Necrosis Factor-α-induced Src-activation and Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1 phosphorylation, providing the first evidence of a molecular mechanism which appears to be independent of their

  19. Augmented efficacy with the combination of blockade of the Notch-1 pathway, bortezomib and romidepsin in a murine MT-1 adult T-cell leukemia model.

    PubMed

    Yu, P; Petrus, M N; Ju, W; Zhang, M; Conlon, K C; Nakagawa, M; Maeda, M; Bamford, R N; Waldmann, T A

    2015-03-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) is an aggressive malignancy caused by human T-cell lymphotropic virus-1. There is no accepted curative therapy for ATL. We have reported that certain ATL patients have increased Notch-1 signaling along with constitutive activation of the nuclear factor-κB pathway. Physical and functional interaction between these two pathways provides the rationale to combine the γ-secretase inhibitor compound E with the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib. Moreover, romidepsin, a histone deacetylase inhibitor, has demonstrated major antitumor action in leukemia/lymphoma. In this study, we investigated the therapeutic efficacy of the single agents and the combination of these agents in a murine model of human ATL, the MT-1 model. Single and double agents inhibited tumor growth as monitored by tumor size (P<0.05), and prolonged survival of leukemia-bearing mice (P<0.05) compared with the control group. The combination of three agents significantly enhanced the antitumor efficacy as assessed by tumor size, tumor markers in the serum (human soluble interleukin-2 receptor-α and β2-microglobulin) and survival of the MT-1 tumor-bearing mice, compared with all other treatment groups (P<0.05). Improved therapeutic efficacy obtained by combining compound E, bortezomib and romidepsin supports a clinical trial of this combination in the treatment of ATL.

  20. Reduced availability of voltage-gated sodium channels by depolarization or blockade by tetrodotoxin boosts burst firing and catecholamine release in mouse chromaffin cells

    PubMed Central

    Vandael, David H F; Ottaviani, Matteo M; Legros, Christian; Lefort, Claudie; Guérineau, Nathalie C; Allio, Arianna; Carabelli, Valentina; Carbone, Emilio

    2015-01-01

    Action potential (AP) firing in mouse chromaffin cells (MCCs) is mainly sustained by Cav1.3 L-type channels that drive BK and SK currents and regulate the pacemaking cycle. As secretory units, CCs optimally recruit Ca2+ channels when stimulated, a process potentially dependent on the modulation of the AP waveform. Our previous work has shown that a critical determinant of AP shape is voltage-gated sodium channel (Nav) channel availability. Here, we studied the contribution of Nav channels to firing patterns and AP shapes at rest (−50 mV) and upon stimulation (−40 mV). Using quantitative RT-PCR and immunoblotting, we show that MCCs mainly express tetrodotoxin (TTX)-sensitive, fast-inactivating Nav1.3 and Nav1.7 channels that carry little or no Na+ current during slow ramp depolarizations. Time constants and the percentage of recovery from fast inactivation and slow entry into closed-state inactivation are similar to that of brain Nav1.3 and Nav1.7 channels. The fraction of available Nav channels is reduced by half after 10 mV depolarization from −50 to −40 mV. This leads to low amplitude spikes and a reduction in repolarizing K+ currents inverting the net current from outward to inward during the after-hyperpolarization. When Nav channel availability is reduced by up to 20% of total, either by TTX block or steady depolarization, a switch from tonic to burst firing is observed. The spontaneous occurrence of high frequency bursts is rare under control conditions (14% of cells) but leads to major Ca2+-entry and increased catecholamine release. Thus, Nav1.3/Nav1.7 channel availability sets the AP shape, burst-firing initiation and regulates catecholamine secretion in MCCs. Nav channel inactivation becomes important during periods of high activity, mimicking stress responses. PMID:25620605

  1. Adrenomedullin blockade induces regression of tumor neovessels through interference with vascular endothelial-cadherin signalling

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Sauze, Samantha; Berenguer-Daizé, Caroline; Sigaud, Romain; Delfino, Christine; Cayol, Mylène; Metellus, Philippe; Chinot, Olivier; Mabrouk, Kamel; Martin, Pierre-Marie; Ouafik, L'Houcine

    2015-01-01

    The cellular and molecular mechanisms by which adrenomedullin (AM) blockade suppresses tumor neovessels are not well defined. Herein, we show that AM blockade using anti-AM and anti-AM receptors antibodies targets vascular endothelial cells (ECs) and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), and induces regression of unstable nascent tumor neovessels. The underlying mechanism involved, and shown in vitro and in vivo in mice, is the disruption of the molecular engagement of the endothelial cell-specific junctional molecules vascular endothelial-cadherin (VE-cadherin)/β-catenin complex. AM blockade increases endothelial cell permeability by inhibiting cell-cell contacts predominantly through disruption of VE-cadherin/β-catenin/Akt signalling pathway, thereby leading to vascular collapse and regression of tumor neovessels. At a molecular level, we show that AM blockade induces tyrosine phosphorylation of VE-cadherin at a critical tyrosine, Tyr731, which is sufficient to prevent the binding of β-catenin to the cytoplasmic tail of VE-cadherin leading to the inhibition of cell barrier function. Furthermore, we demonstrate activation of Src kinase by phosphorylation on Tyr416, supporting a role of Src to phosphorylate Tyr731-VE-cadherin. In this model, Src inhibition impairs αAM and αAMR-induced Tyr731-VE-cadherin phosphorylation in a dose-dependent manner, indicating that Tyr731-VE-cadherin phosphorylation state is dependent on Src activation. We found that AM blockade induces β-catenin phosphorylation on Ser33/Ser37/Thr41 sites in both ECs and VSMCs both in vitro and in vivo in mice. These data suggest that AM blockade selectively induces regression of unstable tumor neovessels, through disruption of VE-cadherin signalling. Targeting AM system may present a novel therapeutic target to selectively disrupt assembly and induce regression of nascent tumor neovessels, without affecting normal stabilized vasculature. PMID:25924235

  2. Adrenomedullin blockade induces regression of tumor neovessels through interference with vascular endothelial-cadherin signalling.

    PubMed

    Khalfaoui-Bendriss, Ghizlane; Dussault, Nadège; Fernandez-Sauze, Samantha; Berenguer-Daizé, Caroline; Sigaud, Romain; Delfino, Christine; Cayol, Mylène; Metellus, Philippe; Chinot, Olivier; Mabrouk, Kamel; Martin, Pierre-Marie; Ouafik, L'Houcine

    2015-04-10

    The cellular and molecular mechanisms by which adrenomedullin (AM) blockade suppresses tumor neovessels are not well defined. Herein, we show that AM blockade using anti-AM and anti-AM receptors antibodies targets vascular endothelial cells (ECs) and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), and induces regression of unstable nascent tumor neovessels. The underlying mechanism involved, and shown in vitro and in vivo in mice, is the disruption of the molecular engagement of the endothelial cell-specific junctional molecules vascular endothelial-cadherin (VE-cadherin)/β-catenin complex. AM blockade increases endothelial cell permeability by inhibiting cell-cell contacts predominantly through disruption of VE-cadherin/β-catenin/Akt signalling pathway, thereby leading to vascular collapse and regression of tumor neovessels. At a molecular level, we show that AM blockade induces tyrosine phosphorylation of VE-cadherin at a critical tyrosine, Tyr731, which is sufficient to prevent the binding of β-catenin to the cytoplasmic tail of VE-cadherin leading to the inhibition of cell barrier function. Furthermore, we demonstrate activation of Src kinase by phosphorylation on Tyr416, supporting a role of Src to phosphorylate Tyr731-VE-cadherin. In this model, Src inhibition impairs αAM and αAMR-induced Tyr731-VE-cadherin phosphorylation in a dose-dependent manner, indicating that Tyr731-VE-cadherin phosphorylation state is dependent on Src activation. We found that AM blockade induces β-catenin phosphorylation on Ser33/Ser37/Thr41 sites in both ECs and VSMCs both in vitro and in vivo in mice. These data suggest that AM blockade selectively induces regression of unstable tumor neovessels, through disruption of VE-cadherin signalling. Targeting AM system may present a novel therapeutic target to selectively disrupt assembly and induce regression of nascent tumor neovessels, without affecting normal stabilized vasculature. PMID:25924235

  3. Inducible T-cell co-stimulator ligand (ICOSL) blockade leads to selective inhibition of anti-KLH IgG responses in subjects with systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, B A; Tsuji, W; Kivitz, A; Peng, J; Arnold, G E; Boedigheimer, M J; Chiu, K; Green, C L; Kaliyaperumal, A; Wang, C; Ferbas, J; Chung, J B

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) of single-dose and multiple-dose administration of AMG 557, a human anti-inducible T cell co-stimulator ligand (ICOSL) monoclonal antibody, in subjects with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Methods Patients with mild, stable SLE (n=112) were enrolled in two clinical trials to evaluate the effects of single (1.8–210 mg subcutaneous or 18 mg intravenous) and multiple (6 –210 mg subcutaneous every other week (Q2W)×7) doses of AMG 557. Subjects received two 1 mg intradermal injections 28 days apart of keyhole limpet haemocyanin (KLH), a neoantigen, to assess PD effects of AMG 557. Safety, PK, target occupancy, anti-KLH antibody responses, lymphocyte subset analyses and SLE-associated biomarkers and clinical outcomes were assessed. Results AMG 557 demonstrated an acceptable safety profile. The PK properties were consistent with an antibody directed against a cell surface target, with non-linear PK observed at lower concentrations and linear PK at higher concentrations. Target occupancy by AMG 557 was dose dependent and reversible, and maximal occupancy was achieved in the setting of this trial. Anti-AMG 557 antibodies were observed, but none were neutralising and without impact on drug levels. A significant reduction in the anti-KLH IgG response was observed with AMG 557 administration without discernible changes in the anti-KLH IgM response or on the overall IgG levels. No discernible changes were seen in lymphocyte subsets or in SLE-related biomarkers and clinical measures. Conclusions The selective reduction in anti-KLH IgG demonstrates a PD effect of AMG 557 in subjects with SLE consistent with the biology of the ICOS pathway and supports further studies of AMG 557 as a potential therapeutic for autoimmune diseases. Trial registration numbers NCT02391259 and NCT00774943. PMID:27099766

  4. Oryeongsan inhibits LPS-induced production of inflammatory mediators via blockade of the NF-kappaB, MAPK pathways and leads to HO-1 induction in macrophage cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Oryeongsan (OR) is an herbal medication used in east-Asian traditional medicine to treat dysuresia, such as urinary frequency, hematuria, and dysuria due to renal disease and chronic nephritis. Recent studies showed that protective effect against acute gastric mucosal injury and an inhibitory effect on the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone pathway of OR. However, its effect on inflammation still remains unknown. In this study, to provide insight into the biological effects of OR, we investigated their effects on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-mediated inflammation in the RAW 264.7 macrophage cells. Methods We investigated the pharmacological and biological effects of OR on the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, inflammatory mediators, and related products through Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot analysis. Also, we examined the activation and suppression of nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) pathways in LPS-stimulated macrophages via Western blot analysis in order to explore inhibitory mechanism of OR. Results OR had anti-inflammatory effects by inhibiting the production of nitric oxide (NO), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, interleukin (IL)-6, and IL-1beta. In addition, it strongly suppressed cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), NO synthesizing enzymes. It also induced heme oxygenase (HO)-1 expression and inhibited NF-kappaB signaling pathway activation and phosphorylation of MAPKs. Conclusions We further demonstrate the anti-inflammatory effects and inhibitory mechanism of OR in LPS-stimulated macrophages for the first time. OR contains strong anti-inflammatory activity and affects various mechanism pathways including NF-kappaB, MAPKs and HO-1. Our results suggest that OR has potential value to be developed as an inflammatory therapeutic agent from a natural substance. PMID:25023125

  5. Intra-articular nuclear factor-κB blockade ameliorates collagen-induced arthritis in mice by eliciting regulatory T cells and macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Min, S-Y; Yan, M; Du, Y; Wu, T; Khobahy, E; Kwon, S-R; Taneja, V; Bashmakov, A; Nukala, S; Ye, Y; Orme, J; Sajitharan, D; Kim, H-Y; Mohan, C

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear factor (NF)-κB is a transcription factor implicated in the pathogenesis of autoimmune disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Here we have examined the effect of intra-articular administration of the IKK inhibitor, NEMO-binding domain peptide (NBD), on the severity of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). NBD peptides were injected intra-articularly into the knee joints of DBA/1J mice after the onset of disease. Collagen-injected mice given a scrambled peptide served as controls. Arthritis severity was determined by visual examination of paws. Intra-articular NBD injection reduced the arthritis score and ameliorated morphological signs of bone destruction compared to the controls. Serum levels of type-II collagen-specific immunoglobulin (Ig)G2a antibodies were lower in NBD-treated mice versus the control mice, whereas the levels of type-II collagen-specific IgG1 antibodies were increased by NBD treatment. NBD treatment diminished the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-17 and interferon (IFN)-γ in serum, but increased the regulatory cytokine IL-10. NBD-treated CIA mice exhibited significantly higher percentages and numbers of forkhead box protein 3 (FoxP3+)CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells than controls. Immunofluorescence analysis of NBD-treated mice revealed that FoxP3 and Ym1, a marker of alternatively activated macrophages, were juxtaposed to each other within draining inguinal lymph nodes. Intra-articular administration of NBD peptide is effective as an experimental therapy in a murine model of RA. Nevertheless, the intra-articular treatment modality is still associated with systemic effects on the immune system. PMID:23574318

  6. Sugammadex: A Review of Neuromuscular Blockade Reversal.

    PubMed

    Keating, Gillian M

    2016-07-01

    Sugammadex (Bridion(®)) is a modified γ-cyclodextrin that reverses the effect of the steroidal nondepolarizing neuromuscular blocking agents rocuronium and vecuronium. Intravenous sugammadex resulted in rapid, predictable recovery from moderate and deep neuromuscular blockade in patients undergoing surgery who received rocuronium or vecuronium. Recovery from moderate neuromuscular blockade was significantly faster with sugammadex 2 mg/kg than with neostigmine, and recovery from deep neuromuscular blockade was significantly faster with sugammadex 4 mg/kg than with neostigmine or spontaneous recovery. In addition, recovery from neuromuscular blockade was significantly faster when sugammadex 16 mg/kg was administered 3 min after rocuronium than when patients spontaneously recovered from succinylcholine. Sugammadex also demonstrated efficacy in various special patient populations, including patients with pulmonary disease, cardiac disease, hepatic dysfunction or myasthenia gravis and morbidly obese patients. Intravenous sugammadex was generally well tolerated. In conclusion, sugammadex is an important option for the rapid reversal of rocuronium- or vecuronium-induced neuromuscular blockade. PMID:27324403

  7. CD40 Blockade Combines with CTLA4Ig and Sirolimus To Produce Mixed Chimerism in an MHC-defined Rhesus Macaque Transplant Model

    PubMed Central

    Page, Andrew; Srinivasan, Swetha; Singh, Karnail; Russell, Maria; Hamby, Kelly; Deane, Taylor; Sen, Sharon; Stempora, Linda; Leopardi, Frank; Price, Andrew A.; Strobert, Elizabeth; Reimann, Keith A.; Kirk, Allan D.; Larsen, Christian P.; Kean, Leslie S.

    2011-01-01

    In murine models, T-cell costimulation blockade of the CD28:B7 and CD154:CD40 pathways synergistically promotes immune tolerance after transplantation. While CD28 blockade has been successfully translated to the clinic, translation of blockade of the CD154:CD40 pathway has been less successful, in large part due to thromboembolic complications associated with anti-CD154 antibodies. Translation of CD40 blockade has also been slow, in part due to the fact that synergy between CD40 blockade and CD28 blockade had not yet been demonstrated in either primate models or humans. Here we show that a novel, non-depleting CD40 monoclonal antibody, 3A8, can combine with combined CTLA4Ig and sirolimus in a well-established primate bone marrow chimerism-induction model. Prolonged engraftment required the presence of all three agents during maintenance therapy, and resulted in graft acceptance for the duration of immunosuppressive treatment, with rejection resulting upon immunosuppression withdrawal. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that upregulation of CD95 expression on both CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells correlated with rejection, suggesting that CD95 may be a robust biomarker of graft loss. These results are the first to demonstrate prolonged chimerism in primates treated with CD28/mTOR blockade and non-depletional CD40 blockade, and support further investigation of combined costimulation blockade targeting the CD28 and CD40 pathways. PMID:21929643

  8. Blockade of central and peripheral luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) receptors in neonatal rats with a potent LHRH-antagonist inhibits the morphofunctional development of the thymus and maturation of the cell-mediated and humoral immune responses.

    PubMed

    Morale, M C; Batticane, N; Bartoloni, G; Guarcello, V; Farinella, Z; Galasso, M G; Marchetti, B

    1991-02-01

    The development of the thymus and the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis are linked by bidirectional hormonally mediated relationships. In the present study, the direct involvement of the neuropeptide LHRH in the maturation of the thymus and development of the cell-mediated and humoral immune responses were assessed after treatment of neonatal (from post-natal day 1-day 5) female rats with a potent LHRH-antagonist (LHRH-anta, p-Glu-D-Phe 2.6,Pro3-LHRH, 50 micrograms/rat), and the effects compared to those resulting from neonatal castration. Whereas in control animals the maturation of mitogenic potential in thymocyte cultures showed a progressive and age-dependent increase, reaching a maximal activity at 30 days of age and then decreasing after puberty onset, in LHRH-anta-treated rats, the thymocyte's proliferative response was completely blocked at 7 days of age and remained very low at each time interval studied, until 3 months of age. A similar effect of the LHRH-anta treatment on splenocyte cultures was measured. Moreover, a reduced percentage of the T-helper lymphocyte subpopulation followed LHRH-anta administration. By contrast, in neonatally castrated rats, blastogenic activity was significantly higher, compared to control cultures, at each stage studied. Treatment with LHRH-anta produced a significant decrease in thymus wt, an alteration of the maturational pattern characterized by a cellular monomorphism, reduced thymocyte volume, reduction of the cortical area, and depauperation of the epithelial microenvironment. Moreover, a morphometric analysis revealed a selective decrease in the large lymphoid cell population of the subcapsular cortex at 7 and 15 days. On the other hand, neonatal castration produced an opposite effect, leading to a marked hypertrophy of the cortical area, and counteracted the post-puberal thymus atrophy. When LHRH-anta-treated adult (3-month-old) rats were challenged with an antigenic stimulus (multiple sc injections of complete

  9. CD4-Blockade Can Induce Protection from Peanut-Induced Anaphylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Duarte, Joana; Caridade, Marta; Graca, Luis

    2011-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAb) have been shown effective in inducing immune tolerance in a range of animal models of autoimmunity, allergy, and transplantation. We investigated whether CD4-blockade, effective in inducing transplantation tolerance, could prevent systemic immune responses leading to anaphylaxis. We found that treatment with a non-depleting anti-CD4 mAb could prevent peanut-induced anaphylaxis following subsequent systemic exposure to crude peanut extract (CPE). Furthermore, the effect of CD4-blockade did not interfere with overall immune competence, as anti-CD4 treated mice remained fully competent to respond to unrelated antigens. Protection from anaphylaxis correlated with increased frequency of Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Treg), and was abrogated following Treg depletion. Taken together our data suggest that activation of T cells by CPE in presence of CD4-blockade leads to Treg expansion that can prevent peanut-induced anaphylaxis. PMID:22566846

  10. Observation of ionic Coulomb blockade in nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Jiandong; Liu, Ke; Graf, Michael; Dumcenco, Dumitru; Kis, Andras; di Ventra, Massimiliano; Radenovic, Aleksandra

    2016-08-01

    Emergent behaviour from electron-transport properties is routinely observed in systems with dimensions approaching the nanoscale. However, analogous mesoscopic behaviour resulting from ionic transport has so far not been observed, most probably because of bottlenecks in the controlled fabrication of subnanometre nanopores for use in nanofluidics. Here, we report measurements of ionic transport through a single subnanometre pore junction, and the observation of ionic Coulomb blockade: the ionic counterpart of the electronic Coulomb blockade observed for quantum dots. Our findings demonstrate that nanoscopic, atomically thin pores allow for the exploration of phenomena in ionic transport, and suggest that nanopores may also further our understanding of transport through biological ion channels.

  11. Atomic Fock state preparation using Rydberg blockade.

    PubMed

    Ebert, Matthew; Gill, Alexander; Gibbons, Michael; Zhang, Xianli; Saffman, Mark; Walker, Thad G

    2014-01-31

    We use coherent excitation of 3-16 atom ensembles to demonstrate collective Rabi flopping mediated by Rydberg blockade. Using calibrated atom number measurements, we quantitatively confirm the expected √N Rabi frequency enhancement to within 4%. The resulting atom number distributions are consistent with an essentially perfect blockade. We then use collective Rabi π pulses to produce N=1, 2 atom number Fock states with fidelities of 62% and 48%, respectively. The N=2 Fock state shows the collective Rabi frequency enhancement without corruption from atom number fluctuations.

  12. VEGF blockade inhibits angiogenesis and reepithelialization of endometrium

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Xiujun; Krieg, Sacha; Kuo, Calvin J.; Wiegand, Stanley J.; Rabinovitch, Marlene; Druzin, Maurice L.; Brenner, Robert M.; Giudice, Linda C.; Nayak, Nihar R.

    2008-01-01

    Despite extensive literature on vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression and regulation by steroid hormones, the lack of clear understanding of the mechanisms of angiogenesis in the endometrium is a major limitation for use of antiangiogenic therapy targeting endometrial vessels. In the current work, we used the rhesus macaque as a primate model and the decidualized mouse uterus as a murine model to examine angiogenesis during endometrial breakdown and regeneration. We found that blockade of VEGF action with VEGF Trap, a potent VEGF blocker, completely inhibited neovascularization during endometrial regeneration in both models but had no marked effect on preexisting or newly formed vessels, suggesting that VEGF is essential for neoangiogenesis but not survival of mature vessels in this vascular bed. Blockade of VEGF also blocked reepithelialization in both the postmenstrual endometrium and the mouse uterus after decidual breakdown, evidence that VEGF has pleiotropic effects in the endometrium. In vitro studies with a scratch wound assay showed that the migration of luminal epithelial cells during repair involved signaling through VEGF receptor 2–neuropilin 1 (VEGFR2-NP1) receptors on endometrial stromal cells. The leading front of tissue growth during endometrial repair was strongly hypoxic, and this hypoxia was the local stimulus for VEGF expression and angiogenesis in this tissue. In summary, we provide novel experimental data indicating that VEGF is essential for endometrial neoangiogenesis during postmenstrual/postpartum repair.—Fan, X., Krieg, S., Kuo, C. J., Wiegand, S. J., Rabinovitch, M., Druzin, M. L., Brenner, R. M., Giudice, L. C., Nayak, N. R. VEGF blockade inhibits angiogenesis and reepithelialization of endometrium. PMID:18606863

  13. Non-additive effects of delayed connexin hemichannel blockade and hypothermia after cerebral ischemia in near-term fetal sheep.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Joanne O; Rout, Alexandra L; Wassink, Guido; Yuill, Caroline A; Zhang, Frank G; Green, Colin R; Bennet, Laura; Gunn, Alistair J

    2015-12-01

    Hypothermia is partially neuroprotective after neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Blockade of connexin hemichannels can improve recovery of brain activity and cell survival after ischemia in near-term fetal sheep. In this study, we investigated whether combining delayed hypothermia with connexin hemichannel blockade with intracerebroventricular infusion of a mimetic peptide can further improve outcomes after cerebral ischemia. Fetal sheep (0.85 gestation) received 30 minutes of cerebral ischemia followed by a 3-hour recovery period before treatment was started. Fetuses were randomized to one of the following treatment groups: normothermia (n=8), hypothermia for 3 days (n=8), connexin hemichannel blockade (50 μmol/L intracerebroventricular over 1 hour followed by 50 μmol/L over 24 hours, n=8) or hypothermia plus hemichannel blockade (n=7). After 7 days recovery, hypothermia was associated with reduced seizure burden, improved electroencephalographic (EEG) power, and a significant increase in neuronal and oligodendrocyte survival and reduced induction of Iba1-positive microglia. In contrast, although hemichannel blockade reduced seizure burden, there was no effect on EEG power or histology (P<0.05). There was no further improvement in outcomes with combined hypothermia plus hemichannel blockade. In conclusion, these data show that there is no additive neuroprotection with combined hypothermia and hemichannel blockade after cerebral ischemia in near-term fetal sheep.

  14. Non-additive effects of delayed connexin hemichannel blockade and hypothermia after cerebral ischemia in near-term fetal sheep.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Joanne O; Rout, Alexandra L; Wassink, Guido; Yuill, Caroline A; Zhang, Frank G; Green, Colin R; Bennet, Laura; Gunn, Alistair J

    2015-12-01

    Hypothermia is partially neuroprotective after neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Blockade of connexin hemichannels can improve recovery of brain activity and cell survival after ischemia in near-term fetal sheep. In this study, we investigated whether combining delayed hypothermia with connexin hemichannel blockade with intracerebroventricular infusion of a mimetic peptide can further improve outcomes after cerebral ischemia. Fetal sheep (0.85 gestation) received 30 minutes of cerebral ischemia followed by a 3-hour recovery period before treatment was started. Fetuses were randomized to one of the following treatment groups: normothermia (n=8), hypothermia for 3 days (n=8), connexin hemichannel blockade (50 μmol/L intracerebroventricular over 1 hour followed by 50 μmol/L over 24 hours, n=8) or hypothermia plus hemichannel blockade (n=7). After 7 days recovery, hypothermia was associated with reduced seizure burden, improved electroencephalographic (EEG) power, and a significant increase in neuronal and oligodendrocyte survival and reduced induction of Iba1-positive microglia. In contrast, although hemichannel blockade reduced seizure burden, there was no effect on EEG power or histology (P<0.05). There was no further improvement in outcomes with combined hypothermia plus hemichannel blockade. In conclusion, these data show that there is no additive neuroprotection with combined hypothermia and hemichannel blockade after cerebral ischemia in near-term fetal sheep. PMID:26174327

  15. Neuromuscular blockade in the elderly patient

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Luis A; Athanassoglou, Vassilis; Pandit, Jaideep J

    2016-01-01

    Neuromuscular blockade is a desirable or even essential component of general anesthesia for major surgical operations. As the population continues to age, and more operations are conducted in the elderly, due consideration must be given to neuromuscular blockade in these patients to avoid possible complications. This review considers the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of neuromuscular blockade that may be altered in the elderly. Compartment distribution, metabolism, and excretion of drugs may vary due to age-related changes in physiology, altering the duration of action with a need for reduced dosage (eg, aminosteroids). Other drugs (atracurium, cisatracurium) have more reliable duration of action and should perhaps be considered for use in the elderly. The range of interpatient variability that neuromuscular blocking drugs may exhibit is then considered and drugs with a narrower range, such as cisatracurium, may produce more predictable, and inherently safer, outcomes. Ultimately, appropriate neuromuscular monitoring should be used to guide the administration of muscle relaxants so that the risk of residual neuromuscular blockade postoperatively can be minimized. The reliability of various monitoring is considered. This paper concludes with a review of the various reversal agents, namely, anticholinesterase drugs and sugammadex, and the alterations in dosing of these that should be considered for the elderly patient. PMID:27382330

  16. Nonequilibrium dephasing in Coulomb blockaded quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Altland, Alexander; Egger, Reinhold

    2009-01-16

    We present a theory of zero-bias anomalies and dephasing rates for a Coulomb-blockaded quantum dot, driven out of equilibrium by coupling to voltage biased source and drain leads. We interpret our results in terms of the statistics of voltage fluctuations in the system.

  17. PD-1 blockade during chronic SIV infection reduces hyperimmune activation and microbial translocation in rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Dyavar Shetty, Ravi; Velu, Vijayakumar; Titanji, Kehmia; Bosinger, Steven E; Freeman, Gordon J; Silvestri, Guido; Amara, Rama Rao

    2012-05-01

    Hyperimmune activation is a strong predictor of disease progression during pathogenic immunodeficiency virus infections and is mediated in part by sustained type I IFN signaling in response to adventitious microbial infection. The immune inhibitory receptor programmed death-1 (PD-1) regulates functional exhaustion of virus-specific CD8(+) T cells during chronic infections, and in vivo PD-1 blockade has been shown to improve viral control of SIV. Here, we show that PD-1 blockade during chronic SIV infection markedly reduced the expression of transcripts associated with type I IFN signaling in the blood and colorectal tissue of rhesus macaques (RMs). The effect of PD-1 blockade on type I IFN signaling was durable and persisted even under conditions of high viremia. Reduced type I IFN signaling was associated with enhanced expression of some of the junction-associated genes in colorectal tissue and with a profound decrease in plasma LPS levels, suggesting a possible repair of gut-associated junctions and decreased microbial translocation into the blood. PD-1 blockade enhanced immunity to gut-resident pathogenic bacteria, control of gut-associated opportunistic infections, and survival of SIV-infected RMs. Our results suggest PD-1 blockade as a potential novel therapeutic approach to enhance combination antiretroviral therapy by suppressing hyperimmune activation in HIV-infected individuals. PMID:22523065

  18. Right-elevated expression of charon is regulated by fluid flow in medaka Kupffer's vesicle.

    PubMed

    Hojo, Motoki; Takashima, Shigeo; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Sumeragi, Akira; Shimada, Atsuko; Tsukahara, Tatsuya; Yokoi, Hayato; Narita, Takanori; Jindo, Tomoko; Kage, Takahiro; Kitagawa, Tadao; Kimura, Tetsuaki; Sekimizu, Koshin; Miyake, Akimitsu; Setiamarga, Davin; Murakami, Ryohei; Tsuda, Sachiko; Ooki, Shinya; Kakihara, Ken; Naruse, Kiyoshi; Takeda, Hiroyuki

    2007-06-01

    Recent studies have revealed that a cilium-generated liquid flow in the node has a crucial role in the establishment of the left-right (LR) axis in the mouse. In fish, Kupffer's vesicle (KV), a teleost-specific spherical organ attached to the tail region, is known to have an equivalent role to the mouse node during LR axis formation. However, at present, there has been no report of an asymmetric gene expressed in KV under the control of fluid flow. Here we report the earliest asymmetric gene in teleost KV, medaka charon, and its regulation. Charon is a member of the Cerberus/DAN family of proteins, first identified in zebrafish. Although zebrafish charon was reported to be symmetrically expressed in KV, medaka charon displays asymmetric expression with more intense expression on the right side. This asymmetric expression was found to be regulated by KV flow because symmetric and up-regulated charon expression was observed in flow-defective embryos with immotile cilia or disrupted KV. Taken together, medaka charon is a reliable gene marker for LR asymmetry in KV and thus, will be useful for the analysis of the early steps downstream of the fluid flow.

  19. Effects of VLA-1 Blockade on Experimental Inflammation in Mice.

    PubMed

    Totsuka, Ryuichi; Kondo, Takaaki; Matsubara, Shigeki; Hirai, Midori; Kurebayashi, Yoichi

    2016-01-01

    VLA-1 (very late antigen-1) is implicated in recruitment, retention and activation of leukocytes and its blockade has been referred as a potential target of new drug discovery to address unmet medical needs in inflammatory disease area. In the present study, we investigate the effects of an anti-murine CD49a (integrin α subunit of VLA-1) monoclonal antibody (Ha31/8) on various experimental models of inflammatory diseases in mice. Pretreatment with Ha31/8 at an intraperitoneal dose of 250 µg significantly (P<0.01) reduced arthritic symptoms and joint tissue damage in mice with type II collagen-induced arthritis. In addition, Ha31/8 at an intraperitoneal dose of 100 µg significantly (P<0.01) inhibited airway inflammatory cell infiltration induced by repeated exposure to cigarette smoke. In contrast, Ha31/8 failed to inhibit oxazolone-induced chronic dermatitis and OVA-induced airway hyperresponsiveness at an intraperitoneal dose of 100 µg. These results show that VLA-1 is involved, at least partly, in the pathogenesis of type II collagen-induced arthritis and cigarette smoke-induced airway inflammatory cell infiltration in mice, indicating the therapeutic potential of VLA-1 blockade against rheumatoid arthritis and chronic occlusive pulmonary disease. PMID:27578034

  20. OX40L blockade protects against inflammation-driven fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Elhai, Muriel; Avouac, Jérôme; Hoffmann-Vold, Anna Maria; Ruzehaji, Nadira; Amiar, Olivia; Ruiz, Barbara; Brahiti, Hassina; Ponsoye, Matthieu; Fréchet, Maxime; Burgevin, Anne; Pezet, Sonia; Sadoine, Jérémy; Guilbert, Thomas; Nicco, Carole; Akiba, Hisaya; Heissmeyer, Vigo; Subramaniam, Arun; Resnick, Robert; Molberg, Øyvind; Kahan, André; Chiocchia, Gilles; Allanore, Yannick

    2016-07-01

    Treatment for fibrosis represents a critical unmet need, because fibrosis is the leading cause of death in industrialized countries, and there is no effective therapy to counteract the fibrotic process. The development of fibrosis relates to the interplay between vessel injury, immune cell activation, and fibroblast stimulation, which can occur in various tissues. Immunotherapies have provided a breakthrough in the treatment of immune diseases. The glycoprotein OX40-OX40 ligand (OX40L) axis offers the advantage of a targeted approach to costimulatory signals with limited impact on the whole immune response. Using systemic sclerosis (SSc) as a prototypic disease, we report compelling evidence that blockade of OX40L is a promising strategy for the treatment of inflammation-driven fibrosis. OX40L is overexpressed in the fibrotic skin and serum of patients with SSc, particularly in patients with diffuse cutaneous forms. Soluble OX40L was identified as a promising serum biomarker to predict the worsening of lung and skin fibrosis, highlighting the role of this pathway in fibrosis. In vivo, OX40L blockade prevents inflammation-driven skin, lung, and vessel fibrosis and induces the regression of established dermal fibrosis in different complementary mouse models. OX40L exerts potent profibrotic effects by promoting the infiltration of inflammatory cells into lesional tissues and therefore the release of proinflammatory mediators, thereafter leading to fibroblast activation.

  1. OX40L blockade protects against inflammation-driven fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Elhai, Muriel; Avouac, Jérôme; Hoffmann-Vold, Anna Maria; Ruzehaji, Nadira; Amiar, Olivia; Ruiz, Barbara; Brahiti, Hassina; Ponsoye, Matthieu; Fréchet, Maxime; Burgevin, Anne; Pezet, Sonia; Sadoine, Jérémy; Guilbert, Thomas; Nicco, Carole; Akiba, Hisaya; Heissmeyer, Vigo; Subramaniam, Arun; Resnick, Robert; Molberg, Øyvind; Kahan, André; Chiocchia, Gilles; Allanore, Yannick

    2016-07-01

    Treatment for fibrosis represents a critical unmet need, because fibrosis is the leading cause of death in industrialized countries, and there is no effective therapy to counteract the fibrotic process. The development of fibrosis relates to the interplay between vessel injury, immune cell activation, and fibroblast stimulation, which can occur in various tissues. Immunotherapies have provided a breakthrough in the treatment of immune diseases. The glycoprotein OX40-OX40 ligand (OX40L) axis offers the advantage of a targeted approach to costimulatory signals with limited impact on the whole immune response. Using systemic sclerosis (SSc) as a prototypic disease, we report compelling evidence that blockade of OX40L is a promising strategy for the treatment of inflammation-driven fibrosis. OX40L is overexpressed in the fibrotic skin and serum of patients with SSc, particularly in patients with diffuse cutaneous forms. Soluble OX40L was identified as a promising serum biomarker to predict the worsening of lung and skin fibrosis, highlighting the role of this pathway in fibrosis. In vivo, OX40L blockade prevents inflammation-driven skin, lung, and vessel fibrosis and induces the regression of established dermal fibrosis in different complementary mouse models. OX40L exerts potent profibrotic effects by promoting the infiltration of inflammatory cells into lesional tissues and therefore the release of proinflammatory mediators, thereafter leading to fibroblast activation. PMID:27298374

  2. The zebrafish Kupffer's vesicle as a model system for the molecular mechanisms by which the lack of Polycystin-2 leads to stimulation of CFTR

    PubMed Central

    Roxo-Rosa, Mónica; Jacinto, Raquel; Sampaio, Pedro; Lopes, Susana Santos

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT In autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), cyst inflation and continuous enlargement are associated with marked transepithelial ion and fluid secretion into the cyst lumen via cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). Indeed, the inhibition or degradation of CFTR prevents the fluid accumulation within cysts. The in vivo mechanisms by which the lack of Polycystin-2 leads to CFTR stimulation are an outstanding challenge in ADPKD research and may bring important biomarkers for the disease. However, hampering their study, the available ADPKD in vitro cellular models lack the three-dimensional architecture of renal cysts and the ADPKD mouse models offer limited access for live-imaging experiments in embryonic kidneys. Here, we tested the zebrafish Kupffer's vesicle (KV) as an alternative model-organ. KV is a fluid-filled vesicular organ, lined by epithelial cells that express both CFTR and Polycystin-2 endogenously, being each of them easily knocked-down. Our data on the intracellular distribution of Polycystin-2 support its involvement in the KV fluid-flow induced Ca2+-signalling. Mirroring kidney cysts, the KV lumen inflation is dependent on CFTR activity and, as we clearly show, the knockdown of Polycystin-2 results in larger KV lumens through overstimulation of CFTR. In conclusion, we propose the zebrafish KV as a model organ to study the renal cyst inflation. Favouring its use, KV volume can be easily determined by in vivo imaging offering a live readout for screening compounds and genes that may prevent cyst enlargement through CFTR inhibition. PMID:26432887

  3. Assessment of Methods for the Intracellular Blockade of GABAA Receptors.

    PubMed

    Atherton, Laura A; Burnell, Erica S; Mellor, Jack R

    2016-01-01

    Selective blockade of inhibitory synaptic transmission onto specific neurons is a useful tool for dissecting the excitatory and inhibitory synaptic components of ongoing network activity. To achieve this, intracellular recording with a patch solution capable of blocking GABAA receptors has advantages over other manipulations, such as pharmacological application of GABAergic antagonists or optogenetic inhibition of populations of interneurones, in that the majority of inhibitory transmission is unaffected and hence the remaining network activity preserved. Here, we assess three previously described methods to block inhibition: intracellular application of the molecules picrotoxin, 4,4'-dinitro-stilbene-2,2'-disulphonic acid (DNDS) and 4,4'-diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2'-disulphonic acid (DIDS). DNDS and picrotoxin were both found to be ineffective at blocking evoked, monosynaptic inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) onto mouse CA1 pyramidal cells. An intracellular solution containing DIDS and caesium fluoride, but lacking nucleotides ATP and GTP, was effective at decreasing the amplitude of IPSCs. However, this effect was found to be independent of DIDS, and the absence of intracellular nucleotides, and was instead due to the presence of fluoride ions in this intracellular solution, which also blocked spontaneously occurring IPSCs during hippocampal sharp waves. Critically, intracellular fluoride ions also caused a decrease in both spontaneous and evoked excitatory synaptic currents and precluded the inclusion of nucleotides in the intracellular solution. Therefore, of the methods tested, only fluoride ions were effective for intracellular blockade of IPSCs but this approach has additional cellular effects reducing its selectivity and utility. PMID:27501143

  4. Efficient Multiparticle Entanglement via Asymmetric Rydberg Blockade

    SciTech Connect

    Saffman, M.; Moelmer, K.

    2009-06-19

    We present an efficient method for producing N particle entangled states using Rydberg blockade interactions. Optical excitation of Rydberg states that interact weakly, yet have a strong coupling to a second control state is used to achieve state dependent qubit rotations in small ensembles. On the basis of quantitative calculations, we predict that an entangled quantum superposition state of eight atoms can be produced with a fidelity of 84% in cold Rb atoms.

  5. Costimulation Blockade in Autoimmunity and Transplantation: The CD28 Pathway.

    PubMed

    Adams, Andrew B; Ford, Mandy L; Larsen, Christian P

    2016-09-15

    T cell activation is a complex process that requires multiple cell signaling pathways, including a primary recognition signal and additional costimulatory signals. TCR signaling in the absence of costimulatory signals can lead to an abortive attempt at activation and subsequent anergy. One of the best-characterized costimulatory pathways includes the Ig superfamily members CD28 and CTLA-4 and their ligands CD80 and CD86. The development of the fusion protein CTLA-4-Ig as an experimental and subsequent therapeutic tool is one of the major success stories in modern immunology. Abatacept and belatacept are clinically approved agents for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and renal transplantation, respectively. Future interventions may include selective CD28 blockade to block the costimulatory potential of CD28 while exploiting the coinhibitory effects of CTLA-4. PMID:27591335

  6. Blockade of Rac1 activity induces G1 cell cycle arrest or apoptosis in breast cancer cells through downregulation of cyclin D1, survivin, and X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Tatsushi; Zhang, Yaqin; Rivera Rosado, Leslie A; Chen, Junjie; Khan, Tahira; Moon, Sun Young; Zhang, Baolin

    2010-06-01

    Rac1 GTPase regulates a variety of signaling pathways that are implicated in malignant phenotypes. Here, we show that selective inhibition of Rac1 activity by the pharmacologic inhibitor NSC23766 suppressed cell growth in a panel of human breast cancer cell lines, whereas it had little toxicity to normal mammary epithelial cells. NSC23766 elicits its cytotoxicity via two distinct mechanisms in a cell line-dependent manner: induction of G(1) cell cycle arrest in cell lines (MDA-MB-231, MCF7, and T47D) that express retinoblastoma (Rb) protein or apoptosis in Rb-deficient MDA-MB-468 cells. In MDA-MB-231 cells, Rac1 inhibition induced G(1) cell cycle arrest through downregulation of cyclin D1 and subsequent dephosphorylation/inactivation of Rb. By contrast, MDA-MB-468 cells underwent substantial apoptosis that was associated with loss of antiapoptotic proteins survivin and X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP). Rac1 knockdown by RNAi interference confirmed the specificity of NSC23766 and requirement for Rac1 in the regulation of cyclin D1, survivin, and XIAP in breast cancer cells. Further, NF-kappaB, but not c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase or p38 pathways, mediates the survival signal from Rac1. Overall, our results indicate that Rac1 plays a central role in breast cancer cell survival through regulation of NF-kappaB-dependent gene products.

  7. Phytosterols Promote Liver Injury and Kupffer Cell Activation in Parenteral Nutrition–Associated Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    El Kasmi, Karim C.; Anderson, Aimee L.; Devereaux, Michael W.; Vue, Padade M.; Zhang, Wujuan; Setchell, Kenneth D. R.; Karpen, Saul J.; Sokol, Ronald J.

    2014-01-01

    Parenteral nutrition–associated liver disease (PNALD) is a serious complication of PN in infants who do not tolerate enteral feedings, especially those with acquired or congenital intestinal diseases. Yet, the mechanisms underlying PNALD are poorly understood. It has been suggested that a component of soy oil (SO) lipid emulsions in PN solutions, such as plant sterols (phytosterols), may be responsible for PNALD, and that use of fish oil (FO)–based lipid emulsions may be protective. We used a mouse model of PNALD combining PN infusion with intestinal injury to demonstrate that SO-based PN solution causes liver damage and hepatic macrophage activation and that PN solutions that are FO-based or devoid of all lipids prevent these processes. We have furthermore demonstrated that a factor in the SO lipid emulsions, stigmasterol, promotes cholestasis, liver injury, and liver macrophage activation in this model and that this effect may be mediated through suppression of canalicular bile transporter expression (Abcb11/BSEP, Abcc2/MRP2) via antagonism of the nuclear receptors Fxr and Lxr, and failure of up-regulation of the hepatic sterol exporters (Abcg5/g8/ABCG5/8). This study provides experimental evidence that plant sterols in lipid emulsions are a major factor responsible for PNALD and that the absence or reduction of plant sterols is one of the mechanisms for hepatic protection in infants receiving FO-based PN or lipid minimization PN treatment. Modification of lipid constituents in PN solutions is thus a promising strategy to reduce incidence and severity of PNALD. PMID:24107776

  8. Coulomb blockade model of permeation and selectivity in biological ion channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufman, I. Kh; McClintock, P. V. E.; Eisenberg, R. S.

    2015-08-01

    Biological ion channels are protein nanotubes embedded in, and passing through, the bilipid membranes of cells. Physiologically, they are of crucial importance in that they allow ions to pass into and out of cells, fast and efficiently, though in a highly selective way. Here we show that the conduction and selectivity of calcium/sodium ion channels can be described in terms of ionic Coulomb blockade in a simplified electrostatic and Brownian dynamics model of the channel. The Coulomb blockade phenomenon arises from the discreteness of electrical charge, the strong electrostatic interaction, and an electrostatic exclusion principle. The model predicts a periodic pattern of Ca2+ conduction versus the fixed charge Qf at the selectivity filter (conduction bands) with a period equal to the ionic charge. It thus provides provisional explanations of some observed and modelled conduction and valence selectivity phenomena, including the anomalous mole fraction effect and the calcium conduction bands. Ionic Coulomb blockade and resonant conduction are similar to electronic Coulomb blockade and resonant tunnelling in quantum dots. The same considerations may also be applicable to other kinds of channel, as well as to charged artificial nanopores.

  9. SCIB2, an antibody DNA vaccine encoding NY-ESO-1 epitopes, induces potent antitumor immunity which is further enhanced by checkpoint blockade.

    PubMed

    Xue, Wei; Metheringham, Rachael L; Brentville, Victoria A; Gunn, Barbara; Symonds, Peter; Yagita, Hideo; Ramage, Judith M; Durrant, Lindy G

    2016-06-01

    Checkpoint blockade has demonstrated promising antitumor responses in approximately 10-40% of patients. However, the majority of patients do not make a productive immune response to their tumors and do not respond to checkpoint blockade. These patients may benefit from an effective vaccine that stimulates high-avidity T cell responses in combination with checkpoint blockade. We have previously shown that incorporating TRP-2 and gp100 epitopes into the CDR regions of a human IgG1 DNA (ImmunoBody®: IB) results in significant tumor regression both in animal models and patients. This vaccination strategy is superior to others as it targets antigen to antigen-presenting cells and stimulates high-avidity T cell responses. To broaden the application of this vaccination strategy, 16 NY-ESO-1 epitopes, covering over 80% of HLA phenotypes, were incorporated into the IB (SCIB2). They produced higher frequency and avidity T cell responses than peptide vaccination. These T cells were of sufficient avidity to kill NY-ESO-1-expressing tumor cells, and in vivo controlled the growth of established B16-NY-ESO-1 tumors, resulting in long-term survival (35%). When SCIB2 was given in combination with Treg depletion, CTLA-4 blockade or PD-1 blockade, long-term survival from established tumors was significantly enhanced to 56, 67 and 100%, respectively. Translating these responses into the clinic by using a combination of SCIB2 vaccination and checkpoint blockade can only further improve clinical responses.

  10. Photonic nonlinearities via quantum Zeno blockade.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yu-Zhu; Huang, Yu-Ping; Kumar, Prem

    2013-05-31

    Realizing optical-nonlinear effects at a single-photon level is a highly desirable but also extremely challenging task, because of both fundamental and practical difficulties. We present an avenue to surmounting these difficulties by exploiting quantum Zeno blockade in nonlinear optical systems. Considering specifically a lithium-niobate microresonator, we find that a deterministic phase gate can be realized between single photons with near-unity fidelity. Supported by established techniques for fabricating and operating such devices, our approach can provide an enabling tool for all-optical applications in both classical and quantum domains.

  11. Assessment of Methods for the Intracellular Blockade of GABAA Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Atherton, Laura A.; Burnell, Erica S.; Mellor, Jack R.

    2016-01-01

    Selective blockade of inhibitory synaptic transmission onto specific neurons is a useful tool for dissecting the excitatory and inhibitory synaptic components of ongoing network activity. To achieve this, intracellular recording with a patch solution capable of blocking GABAA receptors has advantages over other manipulations, such as pharmacological application of GABAergic antagonists or optogenetic inhibition of populations of interneurones, in that the majority of inhibitory transmission is unaffected and hence the remaining network activity preserved. Here, we assess three previously described methods to block inhibition: intracellular application of the molecules picrotoxin, 4,4’-dinitro-stilbene-2,2’-disulphonic acid (DNDS) and 4,4’-diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2’-disulphonic acid (DIDS). DNDS and picrotoxin were both found to be ineffective at blocking evoked, monosynaptic inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) onto mouse CA1 pyramidal cells. An intracellular solution containing DIDS and caesium fluoride, but lacking nucleotides ATP and GTP, was effective at decreasing the amplitude of IPSCs. However, this effect was found to be independent of DIDS, and the absence of intracellular nucleotides, and was instead due to the presence of fluoride ions in this intracellular solution, which also blocked spontaneously occurring IPSCs during hippocampal sharp waves. Critically, intracellular fluoride ions also caused a decrease in both spontaneous and evoked excitatory synaptic currents and precluded the inclusion of nucleotides in the intracellular solution. Therefore, of the methods tested, only fluoride ions were effective for intracellular blockade of IPSCs but this approach has additional cellular effects reducing its selectivity and utility. PMID:27501143

  12. Electromagnetically induced transparency and fluorescence in blockaded Rydberg atomic system

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Cheng; Zheng, Huaibin; Zhang, Zhaoyang; Yao, Xin; Zhang, Yunzhe; Zhang, Yiqi; Zhang, Yanpeng

    2013-10-28

    We investigate the interaction between dark states and Rydberg excitation blockade by using electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT), fluorescence, and four-wave mixing (FWM) signals both theoretically and experimentally. By scanning the frequency detunings of the probe and dressing fields, respectively, we first observe these signals (three coexisting EIT windows, two fluorescence signals, and two FWM signals) under Rydberg excitation blockade. Next, frequency detuning dependences of these signals are obtained, in which the modulated results are well explained by introducing the dressing effects (leading to the dark states) with the corrected factor of the Rydberg excitation blockade. In addition, the variations by changing the principal quantum number n of Rydberg state shown some interesting phenomena resulting from Rydberg blockade are observed. The unique nature of such blockaded signals can have potential application in the demonstration of quantum computing.

  13. CCR5 Blockade Suppresses Melanoma Development Through Inhibition of IL-6-Stat3 Pathway via Upregulation of SOCS3.

    PubMed

    Tang, Qiu; Jiang, Jun; Liu, Jian

    2015-12-01

    In order to understand how tumor cells can escape immune surveillance mechanisms and thus develop antitumor therapies, it is critically important to investigate the mechanisms by which the immune system interacts with the tumor microenvironment. In our current study, we found that chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) neutralization resulted in reduced melanoma tumor size, decreased percentage of CD11b+ Gr-1(+) myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), and increased proportion of cluster of differentiation (CD)3+ T cells in tumor tissues. Suppressive activity of MDSCs on CD4+ T cells and CD8+ T cell proliferation is significantly inhibited by anti-CCR5 antibody. CCR5 blockade also suppresses interleukin (IL)-6 induction, which in turn deactivates signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (Stat3) in tumors. Furthermore, the suppressed B16 tumor growth induced by CCR5 blockade is abolished with additional administration of recombinant IL-6. CCR5 blockade also induces suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3) upregulations, and anti-CCR5 antibody fails to suppress expression of phospho-Stat3 (p-Stat3), matrix metallopeptidase 9 (MMP9), and IL-6 in cells transfected with SOCS3 short-interfering RNA (SiRNA). All these data suggest that CCR5 blockade suppresses melanoma development through inhibition of IL-6-Stat3 pathway via upregulation of SOCS3.

  14. Transformation of the tumour microenvironment by a CD40 agonist antibody correlates with improved responses to PD-L1 blockade in a mouse orthotopic pancreatic tumour model

    PubMed Central

    Mullins, Stefanie; Sulikowski, Michal G.; Martin, Philip; Brown, Lee; Lewis, Arthur; Davies, Gareth; Morrow, Michelle; Wilkinson, Robert W.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the availability of recently developed chemotherapy regimens, survival times for pancreatic cancer patients remain poor. These patients also respond poorly to immune checkpoint blockade therapies (anti-CTLA-4, anti-PD-L1, anti-PD-1), which suggests the presence of additional immunosuppressive mechanisms in the pancreatic tumour microenvironment (TME). CD40 agonist antibodies (αCD40) promote antigen presenting cell (APC) maturation and enhance macrophage tumouricidal activity, and may therefore alter the pancreatic TME to increase sensitivity to immune checkpoint blockade. Here, we test whether αCD40 transforms the TME in a mouse syngeneic orthotopic model of pancreatic cancer, to increase sensitivity to PD-L1 blockade. We found that whilst mice bearing orthotopic Pan02 tumours responded poorly to PD-L1 blockade, αCD40 improved overall survival. αCD40 transformed the TME, upregulating Th1 chemokines, increasing cytotoxic T cell infiltration and promoting formation of an immune cell-rich capsule separating the tumour from the normal pancreas. Furthermore, αCD40 drove systemic APC maturation, memory T cell expansion, and upregulated tumour and systemic PD-L1 expression. Combining αCD40 with PD-L1 blockade enhanced anti-tumour immunity and improved overall survival versus either monotherapy. These data provide further support for the potential of combining αCD40 with immune checkpoint blockade to promote anti-tumour immunity in pancreatic cancer. PMID:26918344

  15. Inhibition of Dihydroorotate Dehydrogenase Overcomes Differentiation Blockade in Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Sykes, David B; Kfoury, Youmna S; Mercier, François E; Wawer, Mathias J; Law, Jason M; Haynes, Mark K; Lewis, Timothy A; Schajnovitz, Amir; Jain, Esha; Lee, Dongjun; Meyer, Hanna; Pierce, Kerry A; Tolliday, Nicola J; Waller, Anna; Ferrara, Steven J; Eheim, Ashley L; Stoeckigt, Detlef; Maxcy, Katrina L; Cobert, Julien M; Bachand, Jacqueline; Szekely, Brian A; Mukherjee, Siddhartha; Sklar, Larry A; Kotz, Joanne D; Clish, Clary B; Sadreyev, Ruslan I; Clemons, Paul A; Janzer, Andreas; Schreiber, Stuart L; Scadden, David T

    2016-09-22

    While acute myeloid leukemia (AML) comprises many disparate genetic subtypes, one shared hallmark is the arrest of leukemic myeloblasts at an immature and self-renewing stage of development. Therapies that overcome differentiation arrest represent a powerful treatment strategy. We leveraged the observation that the majority of AML, despite their genetically heterogeneity, share in the expression of HoxA9, a gene normally downregulated during myeloid differentiation. Using a conditional HoxA9 model system, we performed a high-throughput phenotypic screen and defined compounds that overcame differentiation blockade. Target identification led to the unanticipated discovery that inhibition of the enzyme dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH) enables myeloid differentiation in human and mouse AML models. In vivo, DHODH inhibitors reduced leukemic cell burden, decreased levels of leukemia-initiating cells, and improved survival. These data demonstrate the role of DHODH as a metabolic regulator of differentiation and point to its inhibition as a strategy for overcoming differentiation blockade in AML.

  16. Blockade of store-operated calcium entry alleviates ethanol-induced hepatotoxicity via inhibiting apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Ruibing; Yan, Lihui; Luo, Zheng; Guo, Xiaolan; Yan, Ming

    2015-08-15

    Extracellular Ca{sup 2+} influx has been suggested to play a role in ethanol-induced hepatocyte apoptosis and necrosis. Previous studies indicated that store-operated Ca{sup 2+} entry (SOCE) was involved in liver injury induced by ethanol in HepG2 cells. However, the mechanisms underlying liver injury caused by SOCE remain unclear. We aimed to investigate the effects and mechanism of SOCE inhibition on liver injury induced by ethanol in BRL cells and Sprague–Dawley rats. Our data demonstrated that ethanol (0–400 mM) dose-dependently increased hepatocyte injury and 100 mM ethanol significantly upregulated the mRNA and protein expression of SOC for at least 72 h in BRL cells. Blockade of SOCE by pharmacological inhibitors and sh-RNA knockdown of STIM1 and Orai1 attenuated intracellular Ca{sup 2+} overload, restored the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), decreased cytochrome C release and inhibited ethanol-induced apoptosis. STIM1 and Orai1 expression was greater in ethanol-treated than control rats, and the SOCE inhibitor corosolic acid ameliorated the histopathological findings and alanine transaminase and aspartate transaminase activity as well as decreased cytochrome C release and inhibited alcohol-induced cell apoptosis. These findings suggest that SOCE blockade could alleviate alcohol-induced hepatotoxicity via inhibiting apoptosis. SOCE might be a useful therapeutic target in alcoholic liver diseases. - Highlights: • Blockade of SOCE alleviated overload of Ca{sup 2+} and hepatotoxicity after ethanol application. • Blockade of SOCE inhibited mitochondrial apoptosis after ethanol application. • SOCE might be a useful therapeutic target in alcoholic liver diseases.

  17. Pleiotropic effects of extended blockade of CSF1R signaling in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Sauter, Kristin A; Pridans, Clare; Sehgal, Anuj; Tsai, Yi Ting; Bradford, Barry M; Raza, Sobia; Moffat, Lindsey; Gow, Deborah J; Beard, Philippa M; Mabbott, Neil A; Smith, Lee B; Hume, David A

    2014-08-01

    We investigated the role of CSF1R signaling in adult mice using prolonged treatment with anti-CSF1R antibody. Mutation of the CSF1 gene in the op/op mouse produces numerous developmental abnormalities. Mutation of the CSF1R has an even more penetrant phenotype, including perinatal lethality, because of the existence of a second ligand, IL-34. These effects on development provide limited insight into functions of CSF1R signaling in adult homeostasis. The carcass weight and weight of several organs (spleen, kidney, and liver) were reduced in the treated mice, but overall body weight gain was increased. Despite the complete loss of Kupffer cells, there was no effect on liver gene expression. The treatment ablated OCL, increased bone density and trabecular volume, and prevented the decline in bone mass seen in female mice with age. The op/op mouse has a deficiency in pancreatic β cells and in Paneth cells in the gut wall. Only the latter was reproduced by the antibody treatment and was associated with increased goblet cell number but no change in villus architecture. Male op/op mice are infertile as a result of testosterone insufficiency. Anti-CSF1R treatment ablated interstitial macrophages in the testis, but there was no sustained effect on testosterone or LH. The results indicate an ongoing requirement for CSF1R signaling in macrophage and OCL homeostasis but indicate that most effects of CSF1 and CSF1R mutations are due to effects on development.

  18. Pauli spin blockade in double molecular magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Płomińska, Anna; Weymann, Ireneusz

    2016-07-01

    The Pauli spin blockade effect in transport through two, coupled in series, single molecular magnets weakly attached to external leads is considered theoretically. By using the real-time diagrammatic technique in the lowest-order perturbation theory with respect to the coupling strength, the behavior of the current and the shot noise is studied in the nonlinear response regime. It is shown that the current suppression occurs due to the occupation of highest-weight spin states of the system. Moreover, transport properties are found to strongly depend on parameters of the double molecular magnet, such as the magnitude of spin, internal exchange interaction and the hopping between the molecules. It is also demonstrated that the current suppression may be accompanied by negative differential conductance and a large super-Poissonian shot noise. The mechanisms leading to those effects are discussed.

  19. Novel drug development for neuromuscular blockade

    PubMed Central

    Prabhakar, Amit; Kaye, Alan D; Wyche, Melville Q; Salinas, Orlando J; Mancuso, Kenneth; Urman, Richard D

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacological advances in anesthesia in recent decades have resulted in safer practice and better outcomes. These advances include improvement in anesthesia drugs with regard to efficacy and safety profiles. Although neuromuscular blockers were first introduced over a half century ago, few new neuromuscular blockers and reversal agents have come to market and even fewer have remained as common clinically employed medications. In recent years, newer agents have been studied and are presented in this review. With regard to nondepolarizer neuromuscular blocker agents, the enantiomers Gantacurium and CW002, which are olefinic isoquinolinium diester fumarates, have shown potential for clinical application. Advantages include ultra rapid reversal of neuromuscular blockade via cysteine adduction and minimal systemic hemodynamic effects with administration. PMID:27625489

  20. Novel drug development for neuromuscular blockade

    PubMed Central

    Prabhakar, Amit; Kaye, Alan D; Wyche, Melville Q; Salinas, Orlando J; Mancuso, Kenneth; Urman, Richard D

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacological advances in anesthesia in recent decades have resulted in safer practice and better outcomes. These advances include improvement in anesthesia drugs with regard to efficacy and safety profiles. Although neuromuscular blockers were first introduced over a half century ago, few new neuromuscular blockers and reversal agents have come to market and even fewer have remained as common clinically employed medications. In recent years, newer agents have been studied and are presented in this review. With regard to nondepolarizer neuromuscular blocker agents, the enantiomers Gantacurium and CW002, which are olefinic isoquinolinium diester fumarates, have shown potential for clinical application. Advantages include ultra rapid reversal of neuromuscular blockade via cysteine adduction and minimal systemic hemodynamic effects with administration.

  1. Novel drug development for neuromuscular blockade.

    PubMed

    Prabhakar, Amit; Kaye, Alan D; Wyche, Melville Q; Salinas, Orlando J; Mancuso, Kenneth; Urman, Richard D

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacological advances in anesthesia in recent decades have resulted in safer practice and better outcomes. These advances include improvement in anesthesia drugs with regard to efficacy and safety profiles. Although neuromuscular blockers were first introduced over a half century ago, few new neuromuscular blockers and reversal agents have come to market and even fewer have remained as common clinically employed medications. In recent years, newer agents have been studied and are presented in this review. With regard to nondepolarizer neuromuscular blocker agents, the enantiomers Gantacurium and CW002, which are olefinic isoquinolinium diester fumarates, have shown potential for clinical application. Advantages include ultra rapid reversal of neuromuscular blockade via cysteine adduction and minimal systemic hemodynamic effects with administration. PMID:27625489

  2. The spleen pigment cells in some amphibia.

    PubMed

    Scalia, Marina; Di Pietro, Cinzia; Poma, Mariangela; Ragusa, Marco; Sichel, Giovanni; Corsaro, Concetta

    2004-04-01

    It was demonstrated that the spleen pigment cells of Amphibia are macrophages: they show an ultrastructurally distinctive morphology, are able to phagocytose and react positively for non-specific esterases. These pigmented macrophages express mRNA for tyrosinase and also they show dopa oxidase activity; therefore they are able to synthesize melanins, as Kupffer cells do.

  3. Similarities and differences between selective and nonselective BAFF blockade in murine SLE

    PubMed Central

    Ramanujam, Meera; Wang, Xiaobo; Huang, Weiqing; Liu, Zheng; Schiffer, Lena; Tao, Haiou; Frank, Daniel; Rice, Jeffrey; Diamond, Betty; Yu, Karl O.A.; Porcelli, Steven; Davidson, Anne

    2006-01-01

    B cells have multiple roles in immune activation and inflammation separate from their capacity to produce antibodies. B cell depletion is currently under intense investigation as a therapeutic strategy for autoimmune diseases. The TNF family members B cell–activating factor of the TNF family (BAFF) and its homolog A proliferation-inducing ligand (APRIL) are B cell survival and differentiation factors and are therefore rational therapeutic targets. We compared the effects of BAFF receptor–Ig, which blocks only BAFF, with those of transmembrane activator and calcium modulator ligand interactor–Ig, which blocks both BAFF and APRIL, in a murine SLE model. Both reagents prolonged the life of NZB/W F1 mice when given either before or after disease onset. Many immunologic effects of the 2 reagents were similar, including B cell and B cell subset depletion and prevention of the progressive T cell activation and dendritic cell accumulation that occurs with age in NZB/W mice without substantial effects on the emergence of the IgG anti–double-stranded DNA response. Furthermore, both reagents inhibited the T cell–independent marginal zone B cell response to particulate antigen delivered i.v., but not the B1 B cell response to the same antigen delivered i.p. In contrast, blockade of both BAFF and APRIL, but not blockade of BAFF alone, reduced the serum levels of IgM antibodies, decreased the frequency of plasma cells in the spleen, and inhibited the IgM response to a T cell–dependent antigen. The differences between selective and nonselective BAFF blockade are relevant to the choice of a BAFF blocking agent for the treatment of autoimmune and malignant diseases. PMID:16485042

  4. PD-1 blockade enhances the vaccination-induced immune response in glioma

    PubMed Central

    Antonios, Joseph P.; Soto, Horacio; Everson, Richard G.; Moughon, Diana; Shin, Namjo; Sedighim, Shaina; Yong, William H.; Li, Gang; Cloughesy, Timothy F.; Liau, Linda M.; Prins, Robert M.

    2016-01-01

    DC vaccination with autologous tumor lysate has demonstrated promising results for the treatment of glioblastoma (GBM) in preclinical and clinical studies. While the vaccine appears capable of inducing T cell infiltration into tumors, the effectiveness of active vaccination in progressively growing tumors is less profound. In parallel, a number of studies have identified negative costimulatory pathways, such as programmed death 1/programmed death ligand 1 (PD-1/PD-L1), as relevant mediators of the intratumoral immune responses. Clinical responses to PD-1 pathway inhibition, however, have also been varied. To evaluate the relevance to established glioma, the effects of PD-1 blockade following DC vaccination were tested in intracranial (i.c.) glioma tumor–bearing mice. Treatment with both DC vaccination and PD-1 mAb blockade resulted in long-term survival, while neither agent alone induced a survival benefit in animals with larger, established tumors. This survival benefit was completely dependent on CD8+ T cells. Additionally, DC vaccine plus PD-1 mAb blockade resulted in the upregulation of integrin homing and immunologic memory markers on tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs). In clinical samples, DC vaccination in GBM patients was associated with upregulation of PD-1 expression in vivo, while ex vivo blockade of PD-1 on freshly isolated TILs dramatically enhanced autologous tumor cell cytolysis. These findings strongly suggest that the PD-1/PD-L1 pathway plays an important role in the adaptive immune resistance of established GBM in response to antitumor active vaccination and provide us with a rationale for the clinical translation of this combination therapy. PMID:27453950

  5. PD-1 blockade enhances the vaccination-induced immune response in glioma

    PubMed Central

    Antonios, Joseph P.; Soto, Horacio; Everson, Richard G.; Orpilla, Joey; Moughon, Diana; Shin, Namjo; Sedighim, Shaina; Yong, William H.; Li, Gang; Cloughesy, Timothy F.; Liau, Linda M.; Prins, Robert M.

    2016-01-01

    DC vaccination with autologous tumor lysate has demonstrated promising results for the treatment of glioblastoma (GBM) in preclinical and clinical studies. While the vaccine appears capable of inducing T cell infiltration into tumors, the effectiveness of active vaccination in progressively growing tumors is less profound. In parallel, a number of studies have identified negative costimulatory pathways, such as programmed death 1/programmed death ligand 1 (PD-1/PD-L1), as relevant mediators of the intratumoral immune responses. Clinical responses to PD-1 pathway inhibition, however, have also been varied. To evaluate the relevance to established glioma, the effects of PD-1 blockade following DC vaccination were tested in intracranial (i.c.) glioma tumor– bearing mice. Treatment with both DC vaccination and PD-1 mAb blockade resulted in long-term survival, while neither agent alone induced a survival benefit in animals with larger, established tumors. This survival benefit was completely dependent on CD8+ T cells. Additionally, DC vaccine plus PD-1 mAb blockade resulted in the upregulation of integrin homing and immunologic memory markers on tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs). In clinical samples, DC vaccination in GBM patients was associated with upregulation of PD-1 expression in vivo, while ex vivo blockade of PD-1 on freshly isolated TILs dramatically enhanced autologous tumor cell cytolysis. These findings strongly suggest that the PD-1/PD-L1 pathway plays an important role in the adaptive immune resistance of established GBM in response to antitumor active vaccination and provide us with a rationale for the clinical translation of this combination therapy. PMID:27453950

  6. Energy Gaps and Interaction Blockade in Confined Quantum Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Capelle, K.; Borgh, M.; Kaerkkaeinen, K.; Reimann, S. M.

    2007-07-06

    We investigate universal properties of strongly confined particles that turn out to be dramatically different from what is observed for electrons in atoms and molecules. For a large class of harmonically confined systems, such as small quantum dots and optically trapped atoms, many-body particle addition and removal energies, and energy gaps, are accurately obtained from single-particle eigenvalues. Transport blockade phenomena are related to the derivative discontinuity of the exchange-correlation functional. This implies that they occur very generally, with Coulomb blockade being a particular realization of a more general phenomenon. In particular, we predict a van der Waals blockade in cold atom gases in traps.

  7. Gastrin-releasing peptide blockade as a broad-spectrum anti-inflammatory therapy for asthma

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Shutang; Potts, Erin N.; Cuttitta, Frank; Foster, W. Michael; Sunday, Mary E.

    2011-01-01

    Gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) is synthesized by pulmonary neuroendocrine cells in inflammatory lung diseases, such as bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). Many BPD infants develop asthma, a serious disorder of intermittent airway obstruction. Despite extensive research, early mechanisms of asthma remain controversial. The incidence of asthma is growing, now affecting >300 million people worldwide. To test the hypothesis that GRP mediates asthma, we used two murine models: ozone exposure for air pollution-induced airway hyperreactivity (AHR), and ovalbumin (OVA)-induced allergic airway disease. BALB/c mice were given small molecule GRP blocking agent 77427, or GRP blocking antibody 2A11, before exposure to ozone or OVA challenge. In both models, GRP blockade abrogated AHR and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) macrophages and granulocytes, and decreased BAL cytokines implicated in asthma, including those typically derived from Th1 (e.g., IL-2, TNFα), Th2 (e.g., IL-5, IL-13), Th17 (IL-17), macrophages (e.g., MCP-1, IL-1), and neutrophils (KC = IL-8). Dexamethasone generally had smaller effects on all parameters. Macrophages, T cells, and neutrophils express GRP receptor (GRPR). GRP blockade diminished serine phosphorylation of GRPR with ozone or OVA. Thus, GRP mediates AHR and airway inflammation in mice, suggesting that GRP blockade is promising as a broad-spectrum therapeutic approach to treat and/or prevent asthma in humans. PMID:21252304

  8. α–blockade, apoptosis, and prostate shrinkage: how are they related?

    PubMed Central

    Chłosta, Piotr; Kaplan, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The α1–adrenoreceptor antagonists, such as terazosin and doxazosin, induce prostate programmed cell death (apoptosis) within prostate epithelial and stromal cells in vitro. This treatment should cause prostate volume decrease, However, this has never been observed in clinical conditions. The aim of this paper is to review the disconnect between these two processes. Methods PubMed and DOAJ were searched for papers related to prostate, apoptosis, and stem cell death. The following key words were used: prostate, benign prostate hyperplasia, programmed cell death, apoptosis, cell death, α1–adrenoreceptor antagonist, α–blockade, prostate epithelium, prostate stroma, stem cells, progenitors, and in vitro models. Results We have shown how discoveries related to stem cells can influence our understanding of α–blockade treatment for BPH patients. Prostate epithelial and mesenchymal compartments have stem (progenitors) and differentiating cells. These compartments are described in relation to experimental in vitro and in vivo settings. Conclusions Apoptosis is observed within prostate tissue, but this effect has no clinical significance and cannot lead to prostate shrinkage. In part, this is due to stem cells that are responsible for prostate tissue regeneration and are resistant to apoptosis triggered by α1–receptor antagonists. PMID:24579025

  9. Blockade involving high- n, n ~ 300 , strontium Rydberg atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Shuhei; Burgdörfer, Joachim; Zhang, Xinyue; Dunning, F. Barry

    2016-05-01

    The blockade of high- n strontium n1F3 Rydberg states contained in a hot atomic beam is investigated both theoretically and experimentally. One difficulty in such experiments is that, once created, Rydberg atoms move out of the excitation volume reducing blockade effects. While the effects of such motion are apparent, the data provide strong evidence of blockade, consistent with theoretical predictions. Because of their relatively high angular momentum (L = 3) , a pair of n1F3 Rydberg atoms have many degenerate states whose degeneracy is removed by Rydberg-Rydberg interactions yielding a high density of states near the target energy. To evaluate the effect of blockade not only the energy shifts but also the modification of the oscillator strengths for excitation have to be taken into account. The n-scaling of the interactions and the importance of high-order multipoles will also be discussed. Research supported by the NSF and Robert A. Welch Foundation.

  10. Ablation of type I hypersensitivity in experimental allergic conjunctivitis by eotaxin-1/CCR3 blockade

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Takao; Ohbayashi, Masaharu; Kuo, Chuan Hui; Komatsu, Naoki; Yakura, Keiko; Tominaga, Takeshi; Inoue, Yoshitsugu; Higashi, Hidemitsu; Murata, Meguru; Takeda, Shuzo; Fukushima, Atsuki; Liu, Fu-Tong; Rothenberg, Marc E.; Ono, Santa Jeremy

    2009-01-01

    The immune response is regulated, in part, by effector cells whose activation requires multiple signals. For example, T cells require signals emanating from the T cell antigen receptor and co-stimulatory molecules for full activation. Here, we present evidence indicating that IgE-mediated hypersensitivity reactions in vivo also require cognate signals to activate mast cells. Immediate hypersensitivity reactions in the conjunctiva are ablated in mice deficient in eotaxin-1, despite normal numbers of tissue mast cells and levels of IgE. To further define the co-stimulatory signals mediated by chemokine receptor 3 (CCR3), an eotaxin-1 receptor, effects of CCR3 blockade were tested with an allergic conjunctivitis model and in ex vivo isolated connective tissue-type mast cells. Our results show that CCR3 blockade significantly suppresses allergen-mediated hypersensitivity reactions as well as IgE-mediated mast cell degranulation. We propose that a co-stimulatory axis by CCR3, mainly stimulated by eotaxin-1, is pivotal in mast cell-mediated hypersensitivity reactions. PMID:19147836

  11. Valley-spin blockade and spin resonance in carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Pei, Fei; Laird, Edward A; Steele, Gary A; Kouwenhoven, Leo P

    2012-10-01

    The manipulation and readout of spin qubits in quantum dots have been successfully achieved using Pauli blockade, which forbids transitions between spin-triplet and spin-singlet states. Compared with spin qubits realized in III-V materials, group IV materials such as silicon and carbon are attractive for this application because of their low decoherence rates (nuclei with zero spins). However, valley degeneracies in the electronic band structure of these materials combined with Coulomb interactions reduce the energy difference between the blocked and unblocked states, significantly weakening the selection rules for Pauli blockade. Recent demonstrations of spin qubits in silicon devices have required strain and spatial confinement to lift the valley degeneracy. In carbon nanotubes, Pauli blockade can be observed by lifting valley degeneracy through disorder, but this makes the confinement potential difficult to control. To achieve Pauli blockade in low-disorder nanotubes, quantum dots have to be made ultrasmall, which is incompatible with conventional fabrication methods. Here, we exploit the bandgap of low-disorder nanotubes to demonstrate robust Pauli blockade based on both valley and spin selection rules. We use a novel stamping technique to create a bent nanotube, in which single-electron spin resonance is detected using the blockade. Our results indicate the feasibility of valley-spin qubits in carbon nanotubes.

  12. Transport Through a Coulomb Blockaded Majorana Nanowire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zazunov, Alex; Egger, Reinhold; Yeyati, Alfredo Levy; Hützen, Roland; Braunecker, Bernd

    In one-dimensional (1D) quantum wires with strong spin-orbit coupling and a Zeeman field, a superconducting substrate can induce zero-energy Majorana bound states located near the ends of the wire. We study electronic properties when such a wire is contacted by normal metallic or superconducting electrodes. A special attention is devoted to Coulomb blockade effects. We analyze the "Majorana single-charge transistor" (MSCT), i.e., a floating Majorana wire contacted by normal metallic source and drain contacts, where charging effects are important. We describe Coulomb oscillations in this system and predict that Majorana fermions could be unambiguously detected by the emergence of sideband peaks in the nonlinear differential conductance. We also study a superconducting variant of the MSCT setup with s-wave superconducting (instead of normal-conducting) leads. In the noninteracting case, we derive the exact current-phase relation (CPR) and find π-periodic behavior with negative critical current for weak tunnel couplings. Charging effects then cause the anomalous CPR I(\\varphi ) = Ic\\cos \\varphi, where the parity-sensitive critical current I c provides a signature for Majorana states.

  13. Interleukin-6 blockade in ocular inflammatory diseases

    PubMed Central

    Mesquida, M; Leszczynska, A; Llorenç, V; Adán, A

    2014-01-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is a key cytokine featuring redundancy and pleiotropic activity. It plays a central role in host defence against environmental stress such as infection and injury. Dysregulated, persistent interleukin (IL)-6 production has been implicated in the development of various autoimmune, chronic inflammatory diseases and even cancers. Significant elevation of IL-6 has been found in ocular fluids derived from refractory/chronic uveitis patients. In experimental autoimmune uveitis models with IL-6 knock-out mice, IL-6 has shown to be essential for inducing inflammation. IL-6 blockade can suppress acute T helper type 17 (Th17) responses via its differentiation and, importantly, can ameliorate chronic inflammation. Tocilizumab, a recombinant humanized anti-IL-6 receptor antibody, has been shown to be effective in several autoimmune diseases, including uveitis. Herein, we discuss the basic biology of IL-6 and its role in development of autoimmune conditions, focusing particularly on non-infectious uveitis. It also provides an overview of efficacy and safety of tocilizumab therapy for ocular inflammatory diseases. PMID:24528300

  14. Clonal evolution and resistance to EGFR blockade in the blood of colorectal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Siravegna, Giulia; Mussolin, Benedetta; Buscarino, Michela; Corti, Giorgio; Cassingena, Andrea; Crisafulli, Giovanni; Ponzetti, Agostino; Cremolini, Chiara; Amatu, Alessio; Lauricella, Calogero; Lamba, Simona; Hobor, Sebastijan; Avallone, Antonio; Valtorta, Emanuele; Rospo, Giuseppe; Medico, Enzo; Motta, Valentina; Antoniotti, Carlotta; Tatangelo, Fabiana; Bellosillo, Beatriz; Veronese, Silvio; Budillon, Alfredo; Montagut, Clara; Racca, Patrizia; Marsoni, Silvia; Falcone, Alfredo; Corcoran, Ryan B; Di Nicolantonio, Federica; Loupakis, Fotios; Siena, Salvatore; Sartore-Bianchi, Andrea; Bardelli, Alberto

    2015-07-01

    Colorectal cancers (CRCs) evolve by a reiterative process of genetic diversification and clonal evolution. The molecular profile of CRC is routinely assessed in surgical or bioptic samples. Genotyping of CRC tissue has inherent limitations; a tissue sample represents a single snapshot in time, and it is subjected to spatial selection bias owing to tumor heterogeneity. Repeated tissue samples are difficult to obtain and cannot be used for dynamic monitoring of disease progression and response to therapy. We exploited circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) to genotype colorectal tumors and track clonal evolution during treatment with the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-specific antibodies cetuximab or panitumumab. We identified alterations in ctDNA of patients with primary or acquired resistance to EGFR blockade in the following genes: KRAS, NRAS, MET, ERBB2, FLT3, EGFR and MAP2K1. Mutated KRAS clones, which emerge in blood during EGFR blockade, decline upon withdrawal of EGFR-specific antibodies, indicating that clonal evolution continues beyond clinical progression. Pharmacogenomic analysis of CRC cells that had acquired resistance to cetuximab reveals that upon antibody withdrawal KRAS clones decay, whereas the population regains drug sensitivity. ctDNA profiles of individuals who benefit from multiple challenges with anti-EGFR antibodies exhibit pulsatile levels of mutant KRAS. These results indicate that the CRC genome adapts dynamically to intermittent drug schedules and provide a molecular explanation for the efficacy of rechallenge therapies based on EGFR blockade.

  15. Nonintubated thoracoscopic lobectomy for lung cancer using epidural anesthesia and intercostal blockade: a retrospective cohort study of 238 cases.

    PubMed

    Hung, Ming-Hui; Chan, Kuang-Cheng; Liu, Ying-Ju; Hsu, Hsao-Hsun; Chen, Ke-Cheng; Cheng, Ya-Jung; Chen, Jin-Shing

    2015-04-01

    Intubated general anesthesia with single-lung ventilation has been considered mandatory for thoracoscopic lobectomy for nonsmall cell lung cancer. Few reports of thoracoscopic lobectomy without tracheal intubation are published, using either thoracic epidural anesthesia (TEA) or intercostal blockade. The comparisons of perioperative outcomes of nonintubated thoracoscopic lobectomy using epidural anesthesia and intercostal blockade are not reported previously. From September 2009 to August 2014, a total of 238 patients with lung cancer who underwent nonintubated thoracoscopic lobectomy were recruited from our prospectively maintained database of all patients undergoing nonintubated thoracoscopic surgery using TEA or intercostal blockade. A multiple regression analysis, adjusting for preoperative variables, was performed to compare the perioperative outcomes of the 2 anesthesia methods. Overall, 130 patients underwent nonintubated thoracoscopic lobectomy using epidural anesthesia whereas 108 had intercostal blockade. The 2 groups were similar in demographic data, except for sex, preoperative lung function, physical status classification, and history of smoking. After adjustment for the preoperative variables, nonintubated thoracoscopic lobectomy using intercostal blockade was associated with shorter durations of anesthetic induction and surgery (P < 0.001). Furthermore, hemodynamics were more stable with less use of vasoactive drugs (odds ratio: 0.53; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.27 to 1.04; P = 0.064) and less blood loss (mean difference: -55.2 mL; 95% CI, -93 to -17.3; P = 0.004). Postoperatively, the 2 groups had comparable incidences of complications. Patients in the intercostal blockade group had a shorter average duration of chest tube drainage (P = 0.064) but a similar average length of hospital stay (P = 0.569). Conversion to tracheal intubation was required in 13 patients (5.5%), and no in-hospital mortality occurred in either group

  16. Nonintubated thoracoscopic lobectomy for lung cancer using epidural anesthesia and intercostal blockade: a retrospective cohort study of 238 cases.

    PubMed

    Hung, Ming-Hui; Chan, Kuang-Cheng; Liu, Ying-Ju; Hsu, Hsao-Hsun; Chen, Ke-Cheng; Cheng, Ya-Jung; Chen, Jin-Shing

    2015-04-01

    Intubated general anesthesia with single-lung ventilation has been considered mandatory for thoracoscopic lobectomy for nonsmall cell lung cancer. Few reports of thoracoscopic lobectomy without tracheal intubation are published, using either thoracic epidural anesthesia (TEA) or intercostal blockade. The comparisons of perioperative outcomes of nonintubated thoracoscopic lobectomy using epidural anesthesia and intercostal blockade are not reported previously. From September 2009 to August 2014, a total of 238 patients with lung cancer who underwent nonintubated thoracoscopic lobectomy were recruited from our prospectively maintained database of all patients undergoing nonintubated thoracoscopic surgery using TEA or intercostal blockade. A multiple regression analysis, adjusting for preoperative variables, was performed to compare the perioperative outcomes of the 2 anesthesia methods. Overall, 130 patients underwent nonintubated thoracoscopic lobectomy using epidural anesthesia whereas 108 had intercostal blockade. The 2 groups were similar in demographic data, except for sex, preoperative lung function, physical status classification, and history of smoking. After adjustment for the preoperative variables, nonintubated thoracoscopic lobectomy using intercostal blockade was associated with shorter durations of anesthetic induction and surgery (P < 0.001). Furthermore, hemodynamics were more stable with less use of vasoactive drugs (odds ratio: 0.53; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.27 to 1.04; P = 0.064) and less blood loss (mean difference: -55.2 mL; 95% CI, -93 to -17.3; P = 0.004). Postoperatively, the 2 groups had comparable incidences of complications. Patients in the intercostal blockade group had a shorter average duration of chest tube drainage (P = 0.064) but a similar average length of hospital stay (P = 0.569). Conversion to tracheal intubation was required in 13 patients (5.5%), and no in-hospital mortality occurred in either group

  17. A light and electron microscope study on the origin of Foà-Kurloff cells.

    PubMed

    Kittas, C; Parsons, M A; Henry, L

    1979-06-01

    Numerous Foà-Kurloff (FK) cells have been found in the circulation, spleen, bone marrow, thymus and placenta of guinea pigs under endogenous or exogenous oestrogenic stimulation. The origin of these cells is obscure. In the present experiment, the distribution of FK cells in organs other than those stated above was studied following gonadectomy and hexoestrol administration in guinea pigs of both sexes for either 1 or 10 weeks. More FK cells than those expected from the vascularity of the organ were found in the liver and lungs of male and female animals. The number of FK cells in these organs was larger after the long-term treatment with hexoestrol and it was accompanied by a significant decrease in the number of Kupffer cells of the liver. The latter observation is in contrast to previous reports of increased numbers of Kupffer cells in the liver of oestrogen-receiving mice, a species not producing FK cells. These observations suggest a relation between the two types of cells. No transformation of mature Kupffer cells into FK cells was seen with the electron microscope. However, other findings suggest that both Kupffer cells and FK cells may well be derived from a common precursor of MPS in the bone marrow.

  18. Renin-angiotensin system blockade: Its contribution and controversy.

    PubMed

    Miyajima, Akira; Kosaka, Takeo; Kikuchi, Eiji; Oya, Mototsugu

    2015-08-01

    Angiotensin II is a key biological peptide in the renin-angiotensin system that regulates blood pressure and renal hemodynamics, and extensive experimental studies have shown that angiotensin II promotes diverse fibrotic changes and induces neovascularization in several inflammatory diseases. It is known that angiotensin II can be controlled using renin-angiotensin system blockade when angiotensin II is the main factor inducing a particular disease, and renin-angiotensin system blockade has assumed a central role in the treatment of inflammatory nephritis, cardiovascular disorders and retinopathy. In contrast, renin-angiotensin system blockade was found to have not only these effects but also other functions, such as inhibition of cancer growth, angiogenesis and metastasis. Numerous studies have sought to elucidate the mechanisms and support these antitumor effects. However, a recent meta-analysis showed that renin-angiotensin system blockade use might in fact increase the incidence of cancer, so renin-angiotensin system blockade use has become somewhat controversial. Although the renin-angiotensin system has most certainly made great contributions to experimental models and clinical practice, some issues still need to be resolved. The present review discusses the contribution and controversy surrounding the renin-angiotensin system up to the present time.

  19. SCIB2, an antibody DNA vaccine encoding NY-ESO-1 epitopes, induces potent antitumor immunity which is further enhanced by checkpoint blockade

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Wei; Metheringham, Rachael L.; Brentville, Victoria A.; Gunn, Barbara; Symonds, Peter; Yagita, Hideo; Ramage, Judith M.; Durrant, Lindy G.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Checkpoint blockade has demonstrated promising antitumor responses in approximately 10–40% of patients. However, the majority of patients do not make a productive immune response to their tumors and do not respond to checkpoint blockade. These patients may benefit from an effective vaccine that stimulates high-avidity T cell responses in combination with checkpoint blockade. We have previously shown that incorporating TRP-2 and gp100 epitopes into the CDR regions of a human IgG1 DNA (ImmunoBody®: IB) results in significant tumor regression both in animal models and patients. This vaccination strategy is superior to others as it targets antigen to antigen-presenting cells and stimulates high-avidity T cell responses. To broaden the application of this vaccination strategy, 16 NY-ESO-1 epitopes, covering over 80% of HLA phenotypes, were incorporated into the IB (SCIB2). They produced higher frequency and avidity T cell responses than peptide vaccination. These T cells were of sufficient avidity to kill NY-ESO-1-expressing tumor cells, and in vivo controlled the growth of established B16-NY-ESO-1 tumors, resulting in long-term survival (35%). When SCIB2 was given in combination with Treg depletion, CTLA-4 blockade or PD-1 blockade, long-term survival from established tumors was significantly enhanced to 56, 67 and 100%, respectively. Translating these responses into the clinic by using a combination of SCIB2 vaccination and checkpoint blockade can only further improve clinical responses. PMID:27471648

  20. Hepatic non-parenchymal cells and extracellular matrix participate in oval cell-mediated liver regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Chen, Xiao-Ping; Zhang, Wan-Guang; Zhang, Feng; Xiang, Shuai; Dong, Han-Hua; Zhang, Lei

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To elucidate the interaction between non-parenchymal cells, extracellular matrix and oval cells during the restituting process of liver injury induced by partial hepatectomy (PH). METHODS: We examined the localization of oval cells, non-parenchymal cells, and the extracellular matrix components using immunohistochemical and double immunofluorescent analysis during the proliferation and differentiation of oval cells in N-2-acetylaminofluorene (2-AAF)/PH rat model. RESULTS: By day 2 after PH, small oval cells began to proliferate around the portal area. Most of stellate cells and laminin were present along the hepatic sinusoids in the periportal area. Kupffer cells and fibronectin markedly increased in the whole hepatic lobule. From day 4 to 9, oval cells spread further into hepatic parenchyma, closely associated with stellate cells, fibronectin and laminin. Kupffer cells admixed with oval cells by day 6 and then decreased in the periportal zone. From day 12 to 15, most of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), laminin and fibronectin located around the small hepatocyte nodus, and minority of them appeared in the nodus. Kupffer cells were mainly limited in the pericentral sinusoids. After day 18, the normal liver lobule structures began to recover. CONCLUSION: Local hepatic microenvironment may participate in the oval cell-mediated liver regeneration through the cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. PMID:19195056

  1. [The micro-particles of blood plasma, micro-vesicles, exosomes, apoptotic bodies and Kupffer macrophage in liver: late in phylogenesis system of realization of biological function of endoecology].

    PubMed

    Titov, V N

    2014-07-01

    Probably, at early stages of phylogenesis and on the stage of first contacts of single cells in environment the mode of intercommunication was developed via formation of micro-vesicles. It is quite possible that this so complicated way was used during billions of years to develop the very early cenosises of functionally different cells. Later on, diffusion of humoral mediators within the framework of group of cells but without vesicles resulted in formation of very early regulated cenosises of various cells. In billions years, these paracrin regulated cenosises became structural and functional units of every organ. It is difficult to imagine that mode of early in phylogenesis humoral intercommunication of cells could preserve its significance in present conditions. At the same time, according to methodological approach of biological continuity in becoming of biological functions and biological reactions, micro-vesicles continue to function but with somehow different purposes. It is surmised that microparticles of blood plasma consist a heterogeneous population of micro-vesicles initially formed by cells, exosomes and apoptotic bodies. This population is a foundation of spontaneous, physical chemical formation of complexes in blood plasma on principles of absorption, hydrophobicity and ionic interaction of structural cells'components insoluble in water medium. It is assumed that presently formation of micro-particles in blood is functionally a kind of realization of phylogenetically late variant of biological function of endoecology, in inter-cellular medium, in local pool of intravascular blood plasma. This variant includes: a) microparticles, micro-vesicles, exosomes and apoptotic bodies as elements of biological reaction of support of "purity" of inter-cellular medium; b) in many respects highly specialized variant of phagocytosis of micro-particles by Kupffer macrophages in liver In the aggregate, this is a phylogenetically late medium of realization of

  2. Pleiotropic effects of extended blockade of CSF1R signaling in adult mice

    PubMed Central

    Sauter, Kristin A.; Pridans, Clare; Sehgal, Anuj; Tsai, Yi Ting; Bradford, Barry M.; Raza, Sobia; Moffat, Lindsey; Gow, Deborah J.; Beard, Philippa M.; Mabbott, Neil A.; Smith, Lee B.; Hume, David A.

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the role of CSF1R signaling in adult mice using prolonged treatment with anti-CSF1R antibody. Mutation of the CSF1 gene in the op/op mouse produces numerous developmental abnormalities. Mutation of the CSF1R has an even more penetrant phenotype, including perinatal lethality, because of the existence of a second ligand, IL-34. These effects on development provide limited insight into functions of CSF1R signaling in adult homeostasis. The carcass weight and weight of several organs (spleen, kidney, and liver) were reduced in the treated mice, but overall body weight gain was increased. Despite the complete loss of Kupffer cells, there was no effect on liver gene expression. The treatment ablated OCL, increased bone density and trabecular volume, and prevented the decline in bone mass seen in female mice with age. The op/op mouse has a deficiency in pancreatic β cells and in Paneth cells in the gut wall. Only the latter was reproduced by the antibody treatment and was associated with increased goblet cell number but no change in villus architecture. Male op/op mice are infertile as a result of testosterone insufficiency. Anti-CSF1R treatment ablated interstitial macrophages in the testis, but there was no sustained effect on testosterone or LH. The results indicate an ongoing requirement for CSF1R signaling in macrophage and OCL homeostasis but indicate that most effects of CSF1 and CSF1R mutations are due to effects on development. PMID:24652541

  3. Blockade of store-operated calcium entry alleviates ethanol-induced hepatotoxicity via inhibiting apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Cui, Ruibing; Yan, Lihui; Luo, Zheng; Guo, Xiaolan; Yan, Ming

    2015-08-15

    Extracellular Ca(2+) influx has been suggested to play a role in ethanol-induced hepatocyte apoptosis and necrosis. Previous studies indicated that store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE) was involved in liver injury induced by ethanol in HepG2 cells. However, the mechanisms underlying liver injury caused by SOCE remain unclear. We aimed to investigate the effects and mechanism of SOCE inhibition on liver injury induced by ethanol in BRL cells and Sprague-Dawley rats. Our data demonstrated that ethanol (0-400mM) dose-dependently increased hepatocyte injury and 100mM ethanol significantly upregulated the mRNA and protein expression of SOC for at least 72h in BRL cells. Blockade of SOCE by pharmacological inhibitors and sh-RNA knockdown of STIM1 and Orai1 attenuated intracellular Ca(2+) overload, restored the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), decreased cytochrome C release and inhibited ethanol-induced apoptosis. STIM1 and Orai1 expression was greater in ethanol-treated than control rats, and the SOCE inhibitor corosolic acid ameliorated the histopathological findings and alanine transaminase and aspartate transaminase activity as well as decreased cytochrome C release and inhibited alcohol-induced cell apoptosis. These findings suggest that SOCE blockade could alleviate alcohol-induced hepatotoxicity via inhibiting apoptosis. SOCE might be a useful therapeutic target in alcoholic liver diseases.

  4. The effect of adrenergic blockade on blushing and facial flushing.

    PubMed

    Drummond, P D

    1997-03-01

    The effect of adrenergic blockade on vascular responses in the forehead was assessed during stressful mental arithmetic, singing, and moderate exercise in 21 frequent blushers and 21 infrequent blushers. Adrenergic antagonists were introduced into a small site on the forehead by iontophoresis, and vascular responses were monitored bilaterally with laser Doppler flowmetry. Beta blockade prevented increases in blood flow in infrequent blushers during mental arithmetic and partially inhibited vasodilatation during singing, indicating minor participation of beta-adrenoceptors in blushing. Alpha blockade did not affect blushing but augmented vasodilatation during exercise. Despite higher ratings of self-consciousness in frequent than in infrequent blushers, vascular responses were similar in both groups. Thus, blushing propensity does not appear to be related to the density of alpha- or beta-adrenoceptors in facial vessels and may have a psychological basis. PMID:9090265

  5. A push-pull vaccine strategy using Toll-like receptor ligands, IL-15, and blockade of negative regulation to improve the quality and quantity of T cell immune responses.

    PubMed

    Berzofsky, Jay A

    2012-06-19

    We have developed a strategy to optimize the efficacy of vaccines to induce T-cell immunity against chronic viral infections and cancer based on a "push-pull" approach in which we first optimize the antigen structure by increasing the affinity of epitopes for major histocompatibility complex molecules ("epitope enhancement"), then push the response not only in magnitude but also in quality toward the desired response phenotype, using synergistic combinations of cytokines, Toll-like receptor ligands, and costimulatory molecules, and then pull the response by removing the brakes exerted by negative regulatory mechanisms, including regulatory cells, cell surface molecules, and cytokines. Components of this approach show promise in macaque models of AIDS virus infection and in murine models of cancer, and are being developed for human clinical trials.

  6. Reduction of metastasis, cell invasion, and adhesion in mouse osteosarcoma by YM529/ONO-5920-induced blockade of the Ras/MEK/ERK and Ras/PI3K/Akt pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Tsubaki, Masanobu; Satou, Takao; Itoh, Tatsuki; Imano, Motohiro; Ogaki, Mitsuhiko; Yanae, Masashi; Nishida, Shozo

    2012-03-15

    Osteosarcoma is one of the most common primary malignant bone tumors in children and adolescents. Some patients continue to have a poor prognosis, because of the metastatic disease. YM529/ONO-5920 is a nitrogen-containing bisphosphonate that has been used for the treatment of osteoporosis. YM529/ONO-5920 has recently been reported to induce apoptosis in various tumors including osteosarcoma. However, the mode of metastasis suppression in osteosarcoma by YM529/ONO-5920 is unclear. In the present study, we investigated whether YM529/ONO-5920 inhibited tumor cell migration, invasion, adhesion, or metastasis in the LM8 mouse osteosarcoma cell line. We found that YM529/ONO-5920 significantly inhibited metastasis, cell migration, invasion, and adhesion at concentrations that did not have antiproliferative effects on LM8 cells. YM529/ONO-5920 also inhibited the mRNA expression and protein activities of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). In addition, YM529/ONO-5920 suppressed phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and the serine/threonine protein kinase B (Akt) by the inhibition of Ras prenylation. Moreover, U0126, a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) 1/2 inhibitor, and LY294002, a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor, also inhibited LM8 cell migration, invasion, adhesion, and metastasis, as well as the mRNA expression and protein activities of MMP-1, MMP-2, MMP-9, and MT1-MMP. The results indicated that YM529/ONO-5920 suppressed the Ras/MEK/ERK and Ras/PI3K/Akt pathways, thereby inhibiting LM8 cell migration, invasion, adhesion, and metastasis. These findings suggest that YM529/ONO-5920 has potential clinical applications for the treatment of tumor cell metastasis in osteosarcoma. -- Highlights: ► We investigated whether YM529/ONO-5920 inhibited tumor metastasis in osteosarcoma. ► YM529/ONO-5920 inhibited metastasis, cell migration, invasion, and adhesion. ► YM529/ONO-5920 suppressed Ras signalings. ► YM529/ONO-5920

  7. Distinct clinical patterns and immune infiltrates are observed at time of progression on targeted therapy versus immune checkpoint blockade for melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Zachary A.; Reuben, Alexandre; Spencer, Christine N.; Prieto, Peter A.; Austin-Breneman, Jacob L.; Jiang, Hong; Haymaker, Cara; Gopalakrishnan, Vancheswaran; Tetzlaff, Michael T.; Frederick, Dennie T.; Sullivan, Ryan J.; Amaria, Rodabe N.; Patel, Sapna P.; Hwu, Patrick; Woodman, Scott E.; Glitza, Isabella C.; Diab, Adi; Vence, Luis M.; Rodriguez-Canales, Jaime; Parra, Edwin R.; Wistuba, Ignacio I.; Coussens, Lisa M.; Sharpe, Arlene H.; Flaherty, Keith T.; Gershenwald, Jeffrey E.; Chin, Lynda; Davies, Michael A.; Clise-Dwyer, Karen; Allison, James P.; Sharma, Padmanee; Wargo, Jennifer A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT We have made major advances in the treatment of melanoma through the use of targeted therapy and immune checkpoint blockade; however, clinicians are posed with therapeutic dilemmas regarding timing and sequence of therapy. There is a growing appreciation of the impact of antitumor immune responses to these therapies, and we performed studies to test the hypothesis that clinical patterns and immune infiltrates differ at progression on these treatments. We observed rapid clinical progression kinetics in patients on targeted therapy compared to immune checkpoint blockade. To gain insight into possible immune mechanisms behind these differences, we performed deep immune profiling in tumors of patients on therapy. We demonstrated low CD8+ T-cell infiltrate on targeted therapy and high CD8+ T-cell infiltrate on immune checkpoint blockade at clinical progression. These data have important implications, and suggest that antitumor immune responses should be assessed when considering therapeutic options for patients with melanoma. PMID:27141370

  8. Primary Thermometry in the Intermediate Coulomb Blockade Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feshchenko, A. V.; Meschke, M.; Gunnarsson, D.; Prunnila, M.; Roschier, L.; Penttilä, J. S.; Pekola, J. P.

    2013-10-01

    We investigate Coulomb blockade thermometers (CBT) in an intermediate temperature regime, where measurements with enhanced accuracy are possible due to the increased magnitude of the differential conductance dip. Previous theoretical results show that corrections to the half width and to the depth of the measured conductance dip of a sensor are needed, when leaving the regime of weak Coulomb blockade towards lower temperatures. In the present work, we demonstrate experimentally that the temperature range of a CBT sensor can be extended by employing these corrections without compromising the primary nature or the accuracy of the thermometer.

  9. Mechanical vibrations induced resonant breakdown of the Coulomb blockade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogosov, A. G.; Budantsev, M. V.; Shevyrin, A. A.; Plotnikov, A. E.; Bakarov, A. K.; Toropov, A. I.

    2011-12-01

    Influence of forced mechanical vibrations of a suspended single-electron transistor on electron tunneling through the quantum dot limited by the Coulomb blockade is investigated. It is shown that mechanical oscillations of the quantum dot lead to the Coulomb blockade breakdown, shown in sharp resonant peaks in the transistor conductance dependence on the excitation frequency at values corresponding to the mechanical oscillations eigen modes. The observed effect is presumably connected with oscillations of the mutual electrical capacitances between the quantum dot and surrounding electrodes.

  10. GHRH excess and blockade in X-LAG syndrome.

    PubMed

    Daly, Adrian F; Lysy, Philippe A; Desfilles, Céline; Rostomyan, Liliya; Mohamed, Amira; Caberg, Jean-Hubert; Raverot, Veronique; Castermans, Emilie; Marbaix, Etienne; Maiter, Dominique; Brunelle, Chloe; Trivellin, Giampaolo; Stratakis, Constantine A; Bours, Vincent; Raftopoulos, Christian; Beauloye, Veronique; Barlier, Anne; Beckers, Albert

    2016-03-01

    X-linked acrogigantism (X-LAG) syndrome is a newly described form of inheritable pituitary gigantism that begins in early childhood and is usually associated with markedly elevated GH and prolactin secretion by mixed pituitary adenomas/hyperplasia. Microduplications on chromosome Xq26.3 including the GPR101 gene cause X-LAG syndrome. In individual cases random GHRH levels have been elevated. We performed a series of hormonal profiles in a young female sporadic X-LAG syndrome patient and subsequently undertook in vitro studies of primary pituitary tumor culture following neurosurgical resection. The patient demonstrated consistently elevated circulating GHRH levels throughout preoperative testing, which was accompanied by marked GH and prolactin hypersecretion; GH demonstrated a paradoxical increase following TRH administration. In vitro, the pituitary cells showed baseline GH and prolactin release that was further stimulated by GHRH administration. Co-incubation with GHRH and the GHRH receptor antagonist, acetyl-(d-Arg(2))-GHRH (1-29) amide, blocked the GHRH-induced GH stimulation; the GHRH receptor antagonist alone significantly reduced GH release. Pasireotide, but not octreotide, inhibited GH secretion. A ghrelin receptor agonist and an inverse agonist led to modest, statistically significant increases and decreases in GH secretion, respectively. GHRH hypersecretion can accompany the pituitary abnormalities seen in X-LAG syndrome. These data suggest that the pathology of X-LAG syndrome may include hypothalamic dysregulation of GHRH secretion, which is in keeping with localization of GPR101 in the hypothalamus. Therapeutic blockade of GHRH secretion could represent a way to target the marked hormonal hypersecretion and overgrowth that characterizes X-LAG syndrome. PMID:26671997

  11. Blockade of EGFR and ErbB2 by the novel dual EGFR and ErbB2 tyrosine kinase inhibitor GW572016 sensitizes human colon carcinoma GEO cells to apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yunfei; Li, Song; Hu, Yi P; Wang, Jing; Hauser, Jennie; Conway, Alexis N; Vinci, Michelle A; Humphrey, Lisa; Zborowska, Elizabeth; Willson, James K V; Brattain, Michael G

    2006-01-01

    Coexpression of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) family receptors is found in a subset of colon cancers, which may cooperatively promote cancer cell growth and survival, as heterodimerization is known to provide for diversification of signal transduction. Recently, efforts have been made to develop novel 4-anilinoquinazoline and pyridopyrimidine derivatives to inhibit EGFR and ErbB2 kinases simultaneously. In this study, we tested the efficacy of a novel reversible dual inhibitor GW572016 compared with the selective EGFR and ErbB2 tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) AG1478 and AG879 and their combination, using the human colon adenocarcinoma GEO mode. GEO cells depend on multiple ErbB receptors for aberrant growth. A synergistic effect on inhibition of cell proliferation associated with induction of apoptosis was observed from the combination of AG1478 and AG879. Compared with AG1478 or AG879, the single TKI compound GW572016 was a more potent inhibitor of GEO cell proliferation and was able to induce apoptosis at lower concentrations. Western blot analysis revealed that AG1478 and AG879 were unable to suppress both EGFR and ErbB2 activation as well as the downstream mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and AKT pathways as single agents. In contrast, GW572016 suppressed the activation of EGFR, ErbB2, MAPK, and AKT in a concentration-dependent manner. Finally, in vivo studies showed that GW572016 treatment efficiently blocked GEO xenograft growth at a dose range of 30 to 200 mg/kg with a twice-daily schedule. In summary, our study indicates that targeting both EGFR and ErbB2 simultaneously could enhance therapy over that of single agents directed at EGFR or ErbB2 in cancers that can be identified as being primarily heterodimer-dependent.

  12. Activation of microglial cells triggers a release of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) inducing their proliferation in an adenosine A2A receptor-dependent manner: A2A receptor blockade prevents BDNF release and proliferation of microglia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been shown to control microglial responses in neuropathic pain. Since adenosine A2A receptors (A2ARs) control neuroinflammation, as well as the production and function of BDNF, we tested to see if A2AR controls the microglia-dependent secretion of BDNF and the proliferation of microglial cells, a crucial event in neuroinflammation. Methods Murine N9 microglial cells were challenged with lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 100 ng/mL) in the absence or in the presence of the A2AR antagonist, SCH58261 (50 nM), as well as other modulators of A2AR signaling. The BDNF cellular content and secretion were quantified by Western blotting and ELISA, A2AR density was probed by Western blotting and immunocytochemistry and cell proliferation was assessed by BrdU incorporation. Additionally, the A2AR modulation of LPS-driven cell proliferation was also tested in primary cultures of mouse microglia. Results LPS induced time-dependent changes of the intra- and extracellular levels of BDNF and increased microglial proliferation. The maximal LPS-induced BDNF release was time-coincident with an LPS-induced increase of the A2AR density. Notably, removing endogenous extracellular adenosine or blocking A2AR prevented the LPS-mediated increase of both BDNF secretion and proliferation, as well as exogenous BDNF-induced proliferation. Conclusions We conclude that A2AR activation plays a mandatory role controlling the release of BDNF from activated microglia, as well as the autocrine/paracrine proliferative role of BDNF. PMID:23363775

  13. Dvr1 transfers left-right asymmetric signals from Kupffer's vesicle to lateral plate mesoderm in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Annita G; Wang, Xinghao; Yost, H Joseph

    2013-10-01

    An early step in establishing left-right (LR) symmetry in zebrafish is the generation of asymmetric fluid flow by Kupffer's vesicle (KV). As a result of fluid flow, a signal is generated and propagated from the KV to the left lateral plate mesoderm, activating a transcriptional response of Nodal expression in the left lateral plate mesoderm (LPM). The mechanisms and molecules that aid in this transfer of information from the KV to the left LPM are still not clear. Here we provide several lines of evidence demonstrating a role for a member of the TGFβ family member, Dvr1, a zebrafish Vg1 ortholog. Dvr1 is expressed bilaterally between the KV and the LPM. Knockdown of Dvr1 by morpholino causes dramatically reduced or absent expression of southpaw (spaw, a Nodal homolog), in LPM, and corresponding loss of downstream Lefty (lft1 and lft) expression, and aberrant brain and heart LR patterning. Dvr1 morphant embryos have normal KV morphology and function, normal expression of southpaw (spaw) and charon (cha) in the peri-KV region and normal expression of a variety of LPM markers in LPM. Additionally, Dvr1 knockdown does not alter the capability of LPM to respond to signals that initiate and propagate spaw expression. Co-injection experiments in Xenopus and zebrafish indicate that Dvr1 and Spaw can enhance each other's ability to activate the Nodal response pathway and co-immunoprecipitation experiments reveal differential relationships among activators and inhibitors in this pathway. These results indicate that Dvr1 is responsible for enabling the transfer of a left-right signal from KV to the LPM. PMID:23791819

  14. Dvr1 transfers left-right asymmetric signals from Kupffer's vesicle to lateral plate mesoderm in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Annita G; Wang, Xinghao; Yost, H Joseph

    2013-10-01

    An early step in establishing left-right (LR) symmetry in zebrafish is the generation of asymmetric fluid flow by Kupffer's vesicle (KV). As a result of fluid flow, a signal is generated and propagated from the KV to the left lateral plate mesoderm, activating a transcriptional response of Nodal expression in the left lateral plate mesoderm (LPM). The mechanisms and molecules that aid in this transfer of information from the KV to the left LPM are still not clear. Here we provide several lines of evidence demonstrating a role for a member of the TGFβ family member, Dvr1, a zebrafish Vg1 ortholog. Dvr1 is expressed bilaterally between the KV and the LPM. Knockdown of Dvr1 by morpholino causes dramatically reduced or absent expression of southpaw (spaw, a Nodal homolog), in LPM, and corresponding loss of downstream Lefty (lft1 and lft) expression, and aberrant brain and heart LR patterning. Dvr1 morphant embryos have normal KV morphology and function, normal expression of southpaw (spaw) and charon (cha) in the peri-KV region and normal expression of a variety of LPM markers in LPM. Additionally, Dvr1 knockdown does not alter the capability of LPM to respond to signals that initiate and propagate spaw expression. Co-injection experiments in Xenopus and zebrafish indicate that Dvr1 and Spaw can enhance each other's ability to activate the Nodal response pathway and co-immunoprecipitation experiments reveal differential relationships among activators and inhibitors in this pathway. These results indicate that Dvr1 is responsible for enabling the transfer of a left-right signal from KV to the LPM.

  15. Adaptive resistance to therapeutic PD-1 blockade is associated with upregulation of alternative immune checkpoints.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Shohei; Akbay, Esra A; Li, Yvonne Y; Herter-Sprie, Grit S; Buczkowski, Kevin A; Richards, William G; Gandhi, Leena; Redig, Amanda J; Rodig, Scott J; Asahina, Hajime; Jones, Robert E; Kulkarni, Meghana M; Kuraguchi, Mari; Palakurthi, Sangeetha; Fecci, Peter E; Johnson, Bruce E; Janne, Pasi A; Engelman, Jeffrey A; Gangadharan, Sidharta P; Costa, Daniel B; Freeman, Gordon J; Bueno, Raphael; Hodi, F Stephen; Dranoff, Glenn; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Hammerman, Peter S

    2016-01-01

    Despite compelling antitumour activity of antibodies targeting the programmed death 1 (PD-1): programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1) immune checkpoint in lung cancer, resistance to these therapies has increasingly been observed. In this study, to elucidate mechanisms of adaptive resistance, we analyse the tumour immune microenvironment in the context of anti-PD-1 therapy in two fully immunocompetent mouse models of lung adenocarcinoma. In tumours progressing following response to anti-PD-1 therapy, we observe upregulation of alternative immune checkpoints, notably T-cell immunoglobulin mucin-3 (TIM-3), in PD-1 antibody bound T cells and demonstrate a survival advantage with addition of a TIM-3 blocking antibody following failure of PD-1 blockade. Two patients who developed adaptive resistance to anti-PD-1 treatment also show a similar TIM-3 upregulation in blocking antibody-bound T cells at treatment failure. These data suggest that upregulation of TIM-3 and other immune checkpoints may be targetable biomarkers associated with adaptive resistance to PD-1 blockade. PMID:26883990

  16. Adaptive resistance to therapeutic PD-1 blockade is associated with upregulation of alternative immune checkpoints

    PubMed Central

    Koyama, Shohei; Akbay, Esra A.; Li, Yvonne Y.; Herter-Sprie, Grit S.; Buczkowski, Kevin A.; Richards, William G.; Gandhi, Leena; Redig, Amanda J.; Rodig, Scott J.; Asahina, Hajime; Jones, Robert E.; Kulkarni, Meghana M.; Kuraguchi, Mari; Palakurthi, Sangeetha; Fecci, Peter E.; Johnson, Bruce E.; Janne, Pasi A.; Engelman, Jeffrey A.; Gangadharan, Sidharta P.; Costa, Daniel B.; Freeman, Gordon J.; Bueno, Raphael; Hodi, F. Stephen; Dranoff, Glenn; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Hammerman, Peter S.

    2016-01-01

    Despite compelling antitumour activity of antibodies targeting the programmed death 1 (PD-1): programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1) immune checkpoint in lung cancer, resistance to these therapies has increasingly been observed. In this study, to elucidate mechanisms of adaptive resistance, we analyse the tumour immune microenvironment in the context of anti-PD-1 therapy in two fully immunocompetent mouse models of lung adenocarcinoma. In tumours progressing following response to anti-PD-1 therapy, we observe upregulation of alternative immune checkpoints, notably T-cell immunoglobulin mucin-3 (TIM-3), in PD-1 antibody bound T cells and demonstrate a survival advantage with addition of a TIM-3 blocking antibody following failure of PD-1 blockade. Two patients who developed adaptive resistance to anti-PD-1 treatment also show a similar TIM-3 upregulation in blocking antibody-bound T cells at treatment failure. These data suggest that upregulation of TIM-3 and other immune checkpoints may be targetable biomarkers associated with adaptive resistance to PD-1 blockade. PMID:26883990

  17. [Alfa-blockade with doxazosin vs tamsulozin in combination of intermittent androgen blockade in patients with prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Muradian, A A

    2005-03-01

    We have studied the efficacy of Alfa-blockade with Doxazosin vs Tamsulozin in combination with Intermittent Androgen Blockade (IAB) in patients with low grade prostate cancer. Our clinical trial included: I group (n=15) of patients who received doxazosin with IAB and flutamide; II group (n=13) of patients who received tamsulozin in combination with IAB and flutamide and III (n=33) group with flutamid monotherapy alone. Our results have shown that the combination of doxasozin and IAB with the flutamide leads to the better improvement of uroflowmetry and IPSS parameters, whereas the tamsulozin and IAB with flutamide combination induce those improvements for the longer period during the disease remission.

  18. Trp-His, a vasorelaxant di-peptide, can inhibit extracellular Ca2+ entry to rat vascular smooth muscle cells through blockade of dihydropyridine-like L-type Ca2+ channels.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhengquan; Watanabe, Shimpei; Kobayashi, Yutaro; Tanaka, Mitsuru; Matsui, Toshiro

    2010-11-01

    Our previous findings regarding the biological activities of small peptides revealed that a di-peptide, Trp-His (WH), could play a role in the prevention of vascular lesions, including cell proliferation and atherosclerosis. Its vasoprotective effects could be associated with suppression of the vasocontraction signaling cascade, but the underlying mechanism(s) remains obscure. In this study, we attempted to elucidate the vasoprotective mechanism of WH, in opposing the proliferation of rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). In VSMCs from 8 week-old male Wistar rat thoracic aortae, WH evoked a significant dose-dependent anti-proliferation effect, without cytotoxicity. In mitogen-stimulated cell experiments, 300 μM WH inhibited cytosolic Ca(2+) elevation in VSMCs induced by 10 μM angiotensin II (Ang II). Furthermore, WH suppressed extracellular Ca(2+) entry into CaCl(2)-stimulated VSMCs. The biological capacity of WH as an intracellular Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)](i)) suppressor was also proven when 50 μM Bay K8644 was used to enhance Ca(2+) entry via a voltage-dependent l-type Ca(2+) channel (VDCC) and 300 μM WH elicited a 23% reduction in [Ca(2+)](i). The absence of a reduction of the [Ca(2+)](i) by the mixture of tryptophan and histidine revealed the importance of the peptide backbone in the [Ca(2+)](i) reduction effect. Furthermore, the WH-induced [Ca(2+)](i) reduction was abolished by verapamil, but not by nifedipine, indicating that WH likely binds to an extracellular site of the VDCC at a site similar to that of the dihydropyridine type-Ca(2+) channel blockers. PMID:20688122

  19. The Union Blockade and Demoralization of the South: Relative Prices in the Confederacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ekelund, Robert B., Jr.; Thornton, Mark

    1992-01-01

    Applies the economic concept of relative prices to the blockaded Confederacy during the U.S. Civil War. Describes how the Union blockade encouraged blockade runners to supply luxury items while soldiers lacked food, clothing, and ammunition. Contends that the resultant demoralization was a factor in the demise of the Confederacy. (CFR)

  20. The non-competitive blockade of GABAA receptors by an aqueous extract of water hemlock (Cicuta douglasii) tubers.

    PubMed

    Green, Benedict T; Goulart, Camila; Welch, Kevin D; Pfister, James A; McCollum, Isabelle; Gardner, Dale R

    2015-12-15

    Water hemlocks (Cicuta spp.) are acutely toxic members of the Umbellierae family; the toxicity is due to the presence of C17-polyacetylenes such as cicutoxin. There is only limited evidence of noncompetitive antagonism by C17-polyacetylenes at GABAA receptors. In this work with WSS-1 cells, we documented the noncompetitive blockade of GABAA receptors by an aqueous extract of water hemlock (Cicuta douglasii) and modulated the actions of the extract with a pretreatment of 10 μM midazolam. PMID:26415905

  1. Accurate Coulomb blockade thermometry up to 60 kelvin.

    PubMed

    Meschke, M; Kemppinen, A; Pekola, J P

    2016-03-28

    We demonstrate experimentally a precise realization of Coulomb blockade thermometry working at temperatures up to 60 K. Advances in nano-fabrication methods using electron beam lithography allow us to fabricate uniform arrays of sufficiently small tunnel junctions to guarantee an overall temperature reading precision of about 1%. PMID:26903107

  2. A new regime of Pauli-spin blockade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perron, Justin K.; Stewart, M. D.; Zimmerman, Neil M.

    2016-04-01

    Pauli-spin blockade (PSB) is a transport phenomenon in double quantum dots that allows for a type of spin to charge conversion often used to probe fundamental physics such as spin relaxation and singlet-triplet coupling. In this paper, we theoretically explore Pauli-spin blockade as a function of magnetic field B applied parallel to the substrate. In the well-studied low magnetic field regime, where PSB occurs in the forward (1, 1) → (0, 2) tunneling direction, we highlight some aspects of PSB that are not discussed in detail in existing literature, including the change in size of both bias triangles measured in the forward and reverse biasing directions as a function of B. At higher fields, we predict a crossover to "reverse PSB" in which current is blockaded in the reverse direction due to the occupation of a spin singlet as opposed to the traditional triplet blockade that occurs at low fields. The onset of reverse PSB coincides with the development of a tail like feature in the measured bias triangles and occurs when the Zeeman energy of the polarized triplet equals the exchange energy in the (0, 2) charge configuration. In Si quantum dots, these fields are experimentally accessible; thus, this work suggests a way to observe a crossover in magnetic field to qualitatively different behavior.

  3. Axillary Brachial Plexus Blockade for the Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ribbers, G. M.; Geurts, A. C. H.; Rijken, R. A. J.; Kerkkamp, H. E. M.

    1997-01-01

    Reflex sympathetic dystrophy syndrome (RSD) is a neurogenic pain syndrome characterized by pain, vasomotor and dystrophic changes, and often motor impairments. This study evaluated the effectiveness of brachial plexus blockade with local anaesthetic drugs as a treatment for this condition. Three patients responded well; three did not. (DB)

  4. Non-linear HRV indices under autonomic nervous system blockade.

    PubMed

    Bolea, Juan; Pueyo, Esther; Laguna, Pablo; Bailón, Raquel

    2014-01-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) has been studied as a non-invasive technique to characterize the autonomic nervous system (ANS) regulation of the heart. Non-linear methods based on chaos theory have been used during the last decades as markers for risk stratification. However, interpretation of these nonlinear methods in terms of sympathetic and parasympathetic activity is not fully established. In this work we study linear and non-linear HRV indices during ANS blockades in order to assess their relation with sympathetic and parasympathetic activities. Power spectral content in low frequency (0.04-0.15 Hz) and high frequency (0.15-0.4 Hz) bands of HRV, as well as correlation dimension, sample and approximate entropies were computed in a database of subjects during single and dual ANS blockade with atropine and/or propranolol. Parasympathetic blockade caused a significant decrease in the low and high frequency power of HRV, as well as in correlation dimension and sample and approximate entropies. Sympathetic blockade caused a significant increase in approximate entropy. Sympathetic activation due to postural change from supine to standing caused a significant decrease in all the investigated non-linear indices and a significant increase in the normalized power in the low frequency band. The other investigated linear indices did not show significant changes. Results suggest that parasympathetic activity has a direct relation with sample and approximate entropies.

  5. Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Rapidly Indicates Vessel Regression in Human Squamous Cell Carcinomas Grown in Nude Mice Caused by VEGF Receptor 2 Blockade with DC1011

    PubMed Central

    Kiessling, Fabian; Farhan, Nabeel; Lichy, Matthias P; Vosseler, Silvia; Heilmann, Melanie; Krix, Martin; Bohlen, Peter; Miller, Dan W; Mueller, Margareta M; Semmler, Wolfhard; Fusenig, Norbert E; Stefan, Delorme

    2004-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of our study was the investigation of early changes in tumor vascularization during antiangiogenic therapy with the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor 2 antibody (DC101) using dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE MRI). Subcutaneous heterotransplants of human skin squamous cell carcinomas in nude mice were treated with DC101. Animals were examined before and repeatedly during 2 weeks of antiangiogenic treatment using Gd-DTPA-enhanced dynamic T1-weighted MRI. With a two-compartment model, dynamic data were parameterized in “amplitude” (increase of signal intensity relative to precontrast value) and kep (exchange rate constant). Data obtained by MRI were validated by parallel examinations of histological sections immunostained for blood vessels (CD31). Already 2 days after the first DC101 application, a decrease of tumor vascularization was observed, which preceded a reduction of tumor volume. The difference between treated tumors and controls became prominent after 4 days, when amplitudes of treated tumors were decreased by 61% (P = .02). In line with change of microvessel density, the decrease in amplitudes was most pronounced in tumor centers. On day 7, the mean tumor volumes of treated (153 ± 843 mm3) and control animals (596 ± 384 mm3) were significantly different (P = .03). After 14 days, treated tumors showed further growth reduction (83 ± 93 mm3), whereas untreated tumors (1208 ± 822 mm3) continued to increase (P = .02). Our data underline the efficacy of DC101 as antiangiogenic treatment in human squamous cell carcinoma xenografts in nude mice and indicate DCE MRI as a valuable tool for early detection of treatment effects before changes in tumor volume become apparent. PMID:15153333

  6. Inhibition of Dihydroorotate Dehydrogenase Overcomes Differentiation Blockade in Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Sykes, David B; Kfoury, Youmna S; Mercier, François E; Wawer, Mathias J; Law, Jason M; Haynes, Mark K; Lewis, Timothy A; Schajnovitz, Amir; Jain, Esha; Lee, Dongjun; Meyer, Hanna; Pierce, Kerry A; Tolliday, Nicola J; Waller, Anna; Ferrara, Steven J; Eheim, Ashley L; Stoeckigt, Detlef; Maxcy, Katrina L; Cobert, Julien M; Bachand, Jacqueline; Szekely, Brian A; Mukherjee, Siddhartha; Sklar, Larry A; Kotz, Joanne D; Clish, Clary B; Sadreyev, Ruslan I; Clemons, Paul A; Janzer, Andreas; Schreiber, Stuart L; Scadden, David T

    2016-09-22

    While acute myeloid leukemia (AML) comprises many disparate genetic subtypes, one shared hallmark is the arrest of leukemic myeloblasts at an immature and self-renewing stage of development. Therapies that overcome differentiation arrest represent a powerful treatment strategy. We leveraged the observation that the majority of AML, despite their genetically heterogeneity, share in the expression of HoxA9, a gene normally downregulated during myeloid differentiation. Using a conditional HoxA9 model system, we performed a high-throughput phenotypic screen and defined compounds that overcame differentiation blockade. Target identification led to the unanticipated discovery that inhibition of the enzyme dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH) enables myeloid differentiation in human and mouse AML models. In vivo, DHODH inhibitors reduced leukemic cell burden, decreased levels of leukemia-initiating cells, and improved survival. These data demonstrate the role of DHODH as a metabolic regulator of differentiation and point to its inhibition as a strategy for overcoming differentiation blockade in AML. PMID:27641501

  7. Blockade of Vascular Adhesion Protein-1 Inhibits Lymphocyte Infiltration in Rat Liver Allograft Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Martelius, Timi; Salaspuro, Ville; Salmi, Marko; Krogerus, Leena; Höckerstedt, Krister; Jalkanen, Sirpa; Lautenschlager, Irmeli

    2004-01-01

    Vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1) has been shown to mediate lymphocyte adhesion to endothelia at sites of inflammation, but its functional role in vivo has not been tested in any rodent model. Here we report the effects of VAP-1 blockade on rat liver allograft rejection. BN recipients of PVG liver allografts (known to develop acute rejection by day 7) were treated with 2 mg/kg anti-VAP-1 (a new anti-rat VAP-1 mAb 174–5) or isotype-matched irrelevant antibody (NS1) every other day (n = 6/group) and one group with anti-VAP-1 2 mg/kg daily (n = 7). On day 7, samples were collected for transplant aspiration cytology, histology, and immunohistochemistry. Lymphocyte infiltration to the graft was clearly affected by VAP-blockade. The total inflammation, mainly the number of active lymphoid cells, in transplant aspiration cytology was significantly decreased in animals treated with anti-VAP-1 (4.7 ± 1.0 and 2.4 ± 1.0 corrected increment units, respectively) compared to control (6.6 ± 1.0) (P < 0.05). In histology, the intensity of portal inflammation was significantly decreased (P < 0.05). The amount of T cells expressing activation markers diminished. This is the first demonstration in any prolonged in vivo model that VAP-1 plays an important role in lymphocyte infiltration to sites of inflammation, and, in particular, liver allograft rejection. PMID:15579442

  8. Blockade of CD354 (TREM-1) Ameliorates Anti-GBM-Induced Nephritis.

    PubMed

    Du, Yong; Wu, Tianfu; Zhou, Xin J; Davis, Laurie S; Mohan, Chandra

    2016-06-01

    CD354, Triggering Receptor of Myeloid Cells-1 (TREM-1), is a potent amplifier of myeloid immune responses. Our goal was to determine the expression and function of TREM-1 in immune-mediated nephritis. An anti-glomerular basement membrane antibody (anti-GBM)-induced nephritis model was employed, where mice were sensitized with rabbit IgG followed by anti-GBM serum to induce disease. Anti-GBM-treated 129x1/svJ mice developed severe nephritis whereas C57BL/6 (B6) mice were resistant to disease. Anti-GBM disease resulted in elevated renal TREM-1 messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein levels and increased urine TREM-1 levels in 129x1/svJ. TREM-1 blockade with an inhibitory peptide, LP17, inhibited proteinuria and renal disease as measured by glomerulonephritis class, severity of tubulointerstitial disease, crescent formation, and inflammatory cell infiltrates. In sum, TREM-1 is upregulated in renal inflammation and plays a vital role in driving disease. Thus, TREM-1 blockade emerges as a potential therapeutic avenue for immune-mediated renal diseases such as lupus nephritis. PMID:27083877

  9. Blockade of PLD2 Ameliorates Intestinal Mucosal Inflammation of Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Guangxi; Yu, Lin; Yang, Wenjing; Wu, Wei; Fang, Leilei

    2016-01-01

    Background. Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), including Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), are chronically remittent and progressive inflammatory disorders. Phospholipase D2 (PLD2) is reported to be involved in the pathogenesis of several inflammatory diseases. However, the exact role of PLD2 in IBD is obscure. Methods. PLD2 expression was determined in peripheral blood cells and inflamed mucosa from patients with IBD by qRT-PCR. Colonic biopsies were also obtained from CD patients before and after infliximab (IFX) treatment to examine PLD2 expression. PLD2 selective inhibitor (CAY10594) was administrated daily by oral gavage in DSS-induced colitis mice. Bone marrow neutrophils from colitis mice were harvested to examine the migration using Transwell plate. Results. PLD2 was found to be significantly increased in peripheral blood cells and inflamed mucosa in patients with active IBD. Treatment with IFX could significantly decrease PLD2 expression in intestinal mucosa in patients with CD. Moreover, blockade of PLD2 with CAY10594 could markedly ameliorate DSS-induced colitis in mice and promote neutrophil migration. Conclusions. PLD2 plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of IBD. Blockade of PLD2 may serve as a new therapeutic approach for treatment of IBD. PMID:27721573

  10. Selective endothelin-A receptor blockade attenuates endotoxin-induced pulmonary hypertension and pulmonary vascular dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Endothelin-1 is a potent mediator of sepsis-induced pulmonary hypertension (PH). The pulmonary vascular effects of selective blockade of endothelin receptor subtype A (ETAR) during endotoxemia remain unknown. We hypothesized that selective ETAR antagonism attenuates endotoxin-induced PH and improves pulmonary artery (PA) vasoreactivity. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats (250–450 g) received lipopolysaccharide (LPS; Salmonella typhimurium; 20 mg/kg intraperitoneally) or vehicle 6 hours before hemodynamic assessment and tissue harvest. The selective ETAR antagonist sitaxsentan (10 or 20 mg/kg) or vehicle was injected intravenously 3 hours after receipt of LPS. Right ventricular systolic pressure, mean arterial pressure (MAP), cardiac output (CO), oxygenation (P/F ratio), and serum bicarbonate were measured. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cell differential and lung wet-to-dry ratios were obtained. Endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent vasorelaxations were determined in isolated PA rings. PA interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) messenger RNA (mRNA) were measured. LPS caused PH, decreased MAP, CO, and serum bicarbonate, and increased PA IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, and iNOS mRNA. Sitaxsentan attenuated sepsis-induced PH and increased MAP. The P/F ratio, CO, serum bicarbonate, and BAL neutrophilia were not affected by sitaxsentan. In isolated PA rings, while not affecting phenylephrine-induced vasocontraction or endothelium-dependent relaxation, sitaxsentan dose-dependently attenuated LPS-induced alterations in endothelium-independent relaxation. PA cytokine mRNA levels were not significantly attenuated by ETAR blockade. We conclude that ETAR blockade attenuates endotoxin-induced alterations in systemic and PA pressures without negatively affecting oxygenation. This protective effect appears to be mediated not by attenuation of sepsis-induced cardiac dysfunction, acidosis, or alveolar

  11. Immunotherapy of hematological cancers: PD-1 blockade for the treatment of Hodgkin's lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Kroemer, Guido; Galluzzi, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    The blockade of immunological checkpoints has been successfully employed for the treatment of various solid neoplasms including melanoma, mesothelioma, non-small cell lung carcinoma, and renal cell carcinoma. A recent study indicates that the vast majority of patients with advanced, heavily pretreated Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) also respond to a monoclonal antibody targeting programmed cell death 1 (PDCD1, best known as PD-1). Thus, checkpoint blockers may soon become part of our therapeutic armamentarium against hematological tumors. This would be particularly important as it would spare (at least some) patients the deleterious toxic effects of combinatorial chemotherapies and bone marrow transplantation. We anticipate that the realm of immunotherapy will eventually conquer vast portions of the territory that now belongs to hematological malignancies. PMID:26155425

  12. Fulminant Myocarditis with Combination Immune Checkpoint Blockade.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Douglas B; Balko, Justin M; Compton, Margaret L; Chalkias, Spyridon; Gorham, Joshua; Xu, Yaomin; Hicks, Mellissa; Puzanov, Igor; Alexander, Matthew R; Bloomer, Tyler L; Becker, Jason R; Slosky, David A; Phillips, Elizabeth J; Pilkinton, Mark A; Craig-Owens, Laura; Kola, Nina; Plautz, Gregory; Reshef, Daniel S; Deutsch, Jonathan S; Deering, Raquel P; Olenchock, Benjamin A; Lichtman, Andrew H; Roden, Dan M; Seidman, Christine E; Koralnik, Igor J; Seidman, Jonathan G; Hoffman, Robert D; Taube, Janis M; Diaz, Luis A; Anders, Robert A; Sosman, Jeffrey A; Moslehi, Javid J

    2016-11-01

    Immune checkpoint inhibitors have improved clinical outcomes associated with numerous cancers, but high-grade, immune-related adverse events can occur, particularly with combination immunotherapy. We report the cases of two patients with melanoma in whom fatal myocarditis developed after treatment with ipilimumab and nivolumab. In both patients, there was development of myositis with rhabdomyolysis, early progressive and refractory cardiac electrical instability, and myocarditis with a robust presence of T-cell and macrophage infiltrates. Selective clonal T-cell populations infiltrating the myocardium were identical to those present in tumors and skeletal muscle. Pharmacovigilance studies show that myocarditis occurred in 0.27% of patients treated with a combination of ipilimumab and nivolumab, which suggests that our patients were having a rare, potentially fatal, T-cell-driven drug reaction. (Funded by Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center Ambassadors and others.).

  13. Immunotherapies: The Blockade of Inhibitory Signals

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yan-Ling; Liang, Jing; Zhang, Wen; Tanaka, Yoshimasa; Sugiyama, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    T lymphocytes require signaling by the T cell receptor and by nonclonotypic cosignaling receptors. The costimulatory and inhibitory signals profoundly influence the course of immune responses by amplifying or reducing the transcriptional effects of T cell receptor triggering. The inhibitory receptors such as CTLA-4, PD-1, and BTLA have recently drawn much attention as potential targets for immunotherapies. This review focuses on the progress that has been made with the mentioned receptors in the field of immunotherapies for autoimmune diseases, malignancies, infectious diseases, and transplantation. PMID:23197939

  14. Differential effects of non-specific beta-blockade and calcium antagonism on blood-clotting mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Gleerup, G; Winther, K

    1989-04-17

    The effects of non-selective beta-blockade (timolol, 5 mg twice daily) and calcium antagonism (isradipine, 2.5 mg twice daily) on heart rate, blood pressure, platelet aggregation, fibrinolytic activity, and platelet cyclic adenosine monophosphate content were investigated in 10 patients with mild hypertension in a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind study. Each patient served as his or her own control, taking each drug in turn for two weeks. Both drugs lowered blood pressure to the same degree. During timolol treatment, however, platelet aggregation increased whereas isradipine resulted in a shortening of the euglobulin clot lysis time (p less than 0.05), indicating increased fibrinolytic activity. Platelet aggregation and fibrinolytic activity are modified by cyclic adenosine monophosphate. Since beta-adrenoceptors are present on platelets and endothelial cells, the differences in platelet behavior and fibrinolytic activity may reflect a decreased cyclic adenosine monophosphate production caused by non-selective beta-adrenoceptor blockade.

  15. Anti-LFA-1 or rapamycin overcome costimulation blockade-resistant rejection in sensitized bone marrow recipients.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, Haley; Pilat, Nina; Hock, Karin; Klaus, Christoph; Unger, Lukas; Schwarz, Christoph; Baranyi, Ulrike; Gattringer, Martina; Schwaiger, Elisabeth; Wrba, Fritz; Wekerle, Thomas

    2013-02-01

    While costimulation blockade-based mixed chimerism protocols work well for inducing tolerance in rodents, translation to preclinical large animal/nonhuman primate models has been less successful. One recognized cause for these difficulties is the high frequency of alloreactive memory T cells (Tmem) found in the (pre)clinical setting as opposed to laboratory mice. In the present study, we therefore developed a murine bone marrow transplantation (BMT) model employing recipients harboring polyclonal donor-reactive Tmem without concomitant humoral sensitization. This model was then used to identify strategies to overcome this additional immune barrier. We found that B6 recipients that were enriched with 3 × 10(7) T cells isolated from B6 mice that had been previously grafted with Balb/c skin, rejected Balb/c BM despite costimulation blockade with anti-CD40L and CTLA4Ig (while recipients not enriched developed chimerism). Adjunctive short-term treatment of sensitized BMT recipients with rapamycin or anti-LFA-1 mAb was demonstrated to be effective in controlling Tmem in this model, leading to long-term mixed chimerism and donor-specific tolerance. Thus, rapamycin and anti-LFA-1 mAb are effective in overcoming the potent barrier that donor-reactive Tmem pose to the induction of mixed chimerism and tolerance despite costimulation blockade.

  16. Current status and perspectives in translational biomarker research for PD-1/PD-L1 immune checkpoint blockade therapy.

    PubMed

    Ma, Weijie; Gilligan, Barbara M; Yuan, Jianda; Li, Tianhong

    2016-05-27

    Modulating immune inhibitory pathways has been a major recent breakthrough in cancer treatment. Checkpoint blockade antibodies targeting cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4) and programed cell-death protein 1 (PD-1) have demonstrated acceptable toxicity, promising clinical responses, durable disease control, and improved survival in some patients with advanced melanoma, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), and other tumor types. About 20 % of advanced NSCLC patients and 30 % of advanced melanoma patients experience tumor responses from checkpoint blockade monotherapy, with better clinical responses seen with the combination of anti-PD-1 and anti-CTLA-4 antibodies. Given the power of these new therapies, it is important to understand the complex and dynamic nature of host immune responses and the regulation of additional molecules in the tumor microenvironment and normal organs in response to the checkpoint blockade therapies. In this era of precision oncology, there remains a largely unmet need to identify the patients who are most likely to benefit from immunotherapy, to optimize the monitoring assays for tumor-specific immune responses, to develop strategies to improve clinical efficacy, and to identify biomarkers so that immune-related adverse events can be avoided. At this time, PD-L1 immunohistochemistry (IHC) staining using 22C3 antibody is the only FDA-approved companion diagnostic for patients with NSCLC-treated pembrolizumab, but more are expected to come to market. We here summarize the current knowledge, clinical efficacy, potential immune biomarkers, and associated assays for immune checkpoint blockade therapies in advanced solid tumors.

  17. Connexin Hemichannel Blockade Is Neuroprotective after Asphyxia in Preterm Fetal Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Joanne O.; Drury, Paul P.; Green, Colin R.; Nicholson, Louise F.; Bennet, Laura; Gunn, Alistair J.

    2014-01-01

    Asphyxia around the time of preterm birth is associated with neurodevelopmental disability. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that blockade of connexin hemichannels would improve recovery of brain activity and reduce cell loss after asphyxia in preterm fetal sheep. Asphyxia was induced by 25 min of complete umbilical cord occlusion in preterm fetal sheep (103–104 d gestational age). Connexin hemichannels were blocked by intracerebroventricular infusion of mimetic peptide starting 90 min after asphyxia at a concentration of 50 µM/h for one hour followed by 50 µM/24 hour for 24 hours (occlusion-peptide group, n = 6) or vehicle infusion for controls (occlusion-vehicle group, n = 7). Peptide infusion was associated with earlier recovery of electroencephalographic power after asphyxia compared to occlusion-vehicle (p<0.05), with reduced neuronal loss in the caudate and putamen (p<0.05), but not in the hippocampus. In the intragyral and periventricular white matter, peptide administration was associated with an increase in total oligodendrocyte numbers (p<0.05) and immature/mature oligodendrocytes compared to occlusion-vehicle (p<0.05), with a significant increase in proliferation (p<0.05). Connexin hemichannel blockade was neuroprotective and reduced oligodendrocyte death and improved recovery of oligodendrocyte maturation in preterm fetuses after asphyxia. PMID:24865217

  18. Galectin-3 blockade inhibits cardiac inflammation and fibrosis in experimental hyperaldosteronism and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Martínez, Ernesto; Calvier, Laurent; Fernández-Celis, Amaya; Rousseau, Elodie; Jurado-López, Raquel; Rossoni, Luciana V; Jaisser, Frederic; Zannad, Faiez; Rossignol, Patrick; Cachofeiro, Victoria; López-Andrés, Natalia

    2015-10-01

    Hypertensive cardiac remodeling is accompanied by molecular inflammation and fibrosis, 2 mechanisms that finally affect cardiac function. At cardiac level, aldosterone promotes inflammation and fibrosis, although the precise mechanisms are still unclear. Galectin-3 (Gal-3), a β-galactoside-binding lectin, is associated with inflammation and fibrosis in the cardiovascular system. We herein investigated whether Gal-3 inhibition could block aldosterone-induced cardiac inflammation and fibrosis and its potential role in cardiac damage associated with hypertension. Aldosterone-salt-treated rats presented hypertension, cardiac inflammation, and fibrosis that were prevented by the pharmacological inhibition of Gal-3 with modified citrus pectin. Cardiac inflammation and fibrosis presented in spontaneously hypertensive rats were prevented by modified citrus pectin treatment, whereas Gal-3 blockade did not modify blood pressure levels. In the absence of blood pressure modifications, Gal-3 knockout mice were resistant to aldosterone-induced cardiac inflammation. In human cardiac fibroblasts, aldosterone increased Gal-3 expression via its mineralocorticoid receptor. Gal-3 and aldosterone enhanced proinflammatory and profibrotic markers, as well as metalloproteinase activities in human cardiac fibroblasts, effects that were not observed in Gal-3-silenced cells treated with aldosterone. In experimental hyperaldosteronism, the increase in Gal-3 expression was associated with cardiac inflammation and fibrosis, alterations that were prevented by Gal-3 blockade independently of blood pressure levels. These data suggest that Gal-3 could be a new molecular mechanism linking cardiac inflammation and fibrosis in situations with high-aldosterone levels, such as hypertension.

  19. Photothermal therapy with immune-adjuvant nanoparticles together with checkpoint blockade for effective cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qian; Xu, Ligeng; Liang, Chao; Wang, Chao; Peng, Rui; Liu, Zhuang

    2016-01-01

    A therapeutic strategy that can eliminate primary tumours, inhibit metastases, and prevent tumour relapses is developed herein by combining adjuvant nanoparticle-based photothermal therapy with checkpoint-blockade immunotherapy. Indocyanine green (ICG), a photothermal agent, and imiquimod (R837), a Toll-like-receptor-7 agonist, are co-encapsulated by poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA). The formed PLGA-ICG-R837 nanoparticles composed purely by three clinically approved components can be used for near-infrared laser-triggered photothermal ablation of primary tumours, generating tumour-associated antigens, which in the presence of R837-containing nanoparticles as the adjuvant can show vaccine-like functions. In combination with the checkpoint-blockade using anti-cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA4), the generated immunological responses will be able to attack remaining tumour cells in mice, useful in metastasis inhibition, and may potentially be applicable for various types of tumour models. Furthermore, such strategy offers a strong immunological memory effect, which can provide protection against tumour rechallenging post elimination of their initial tumours. PMID:27767031

  20. Counting Atoms Using Interaction Blockade in an Optical Superlattice

    SciTech Connect

    Cheinet, P.; Trotzky, S.; Schnorrberger, U.; Moreno-Cardoner, M.; Foelling, S.; Bloch, I.; Feld, M.

    2008-08-29

    We report on the observation of an interaction blockade effect for ultracold atoms in optical lattices, analogous to the Coulomb blockade observed in mesoscopic solid state systems. When the lattice sites are converted into biased double wells, we detect a discrete set of steps in the well population for increasing bias potentials. These correspond to tunneling resonances where the atom number on each side of the barrier changes one by one. This allows us to count and control the number of atoms within a given well. By evaluating the amplitude of the different plateaus, we can fully determine the number distribution of the atoms in the lattice, which we demonstrate for the case of a superfluid and Mott insulating regime of {sup 87}Rb.

  1. Silicon-based Coulomb blockade thermometer with Schottky barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuboltsev, V.; Savin, A.; Rogozin, V. D.; Räisänen, J.

    2014-04-01

    A hybrid Coulomb blockade thermometer (CBT) in form of an array of intermittent aluminum and silicon islands connected in series via tunnel junctions was fabricated on a thin silicon-on-insulator (SOI) film. Tunnel barriers in the micrometer size junctions were formed by metal-semiconductor Schottky contacts between aluminium electrodes and heavily doped silicon. Differential conductance through the array vs. bias voltage was found to exhibit characteristic features of competing thermal and charging effects enabling absolute temperature measurements over the range of ˜65 to ˜500 mK. The CBT performance implying the primary nature of the thermometer demonstrated for rather trivial architecture attempted in this work paves a route for introduction of Coulomb blockade thermometry into well-developed contemporary SOI technology.

  2. Conductance of a proximitized nanowire in the Coulomb blockade regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Heck, B.; Lutchyn, R. M.; Glazman, L. I.

    2016-06-01

    We identify the leading processes of electron transport across finite-length segments of proximitized nanowires and build a quantitative theory of their two-terminal conductance. In the presence of spin-orbit interaction, a nanowire can be tuned across the topological transition point by an applied magnetic field. Due to a finite segment length, electron transport is controlled by the Coulomb blockade. Upon increasing of the field, the shape and magnitude of the Coulomb blockade peaks in the linear conductance are defined, respectively, by Andreev reflection, single-electron tunneling, and resonant tunneling through the Majorana modes emerging after the topological transition. Our theory provides the framework for the analysis of experiments with proximitized nanowires [such as reported in S. M. Albrecht et al., Nature (London) 531, 206 (2016), 10.1038/nature17162] and identifies the signatures of the topological transition in the two-terminal conductance.

  3. Touch Perception Altered by Chronic Pain and by Opioid Blockade.

    PubMed

    Case, Laura K; Čeko, Marta; Gracely, John L; Richards, Emily A; Olausson, Håkan; Bushnell, M Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Touch plays a significant role in human social behavior and social communication, and its rewarding nature has been suggested to involve opioids. Opioid blockade in monkeys leads to increased solicitation and receipt of grooming, suggesting heightened enjoyment of touch. We sought to study the role of endogenous opioids in perception of affective touch in healthy adults and in patients with fibromyalgia, a chronic pain condition shown to involve reduced opioid receptor availability. The pleasantness of touch has been linked to the activation of C-tactile fibers, which respond maximally to slow gentle touch and correlate with ratings of pleasantness. We administered naloxone to patients and healthy controls to directly observe the consequences of µ-opioid blockade on the perceived pleasantness and intensity of touch. We found that at baseline chronic pain patients showed a blunted distinction between slow and fast brushing for both intensity and pleasantness, suggesting reduced C-tactile touch processing. In addition, we found a differential effect of opioid blockade on touch perception in healthy subjects and pain patients. In healthy individuals, opioid blockade showed a trend toward increased ratings of touch pleasantness, while in chronic pain patients it significantly decreased ratings of touch intensity. Further, in healthy individuals, naloxone-induced increase in touch pleasantness was associated with naloxone-induced decreased preference for slow touch, suggesting a possible effect of opioid levels on processing of C-tactile fiber input. These findings suggest a role for endogenous opioids in touch processing, and provide further evidence for altered opioid functioning in chronic pain patients. PMID:27022625

  4. Deterministic entanglement of two neutral atoms via Rydberg blockade

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, X. L.; Isenhower, L.; Gill, A. T.; Walker, T. G.; Saffman, M.

    2010-09-15

    We demonstrate the deterministic entanglement of two individually addressed neutral atoms using a Rydberg blockade mediated controlled-not gate. Parity oscillation measurements reveal a Bell state fidelity of F=0.58{+-}0.04, which is above the entanglement threshold of F=0.5, without any correction for atom loss, and F=0.71{+-}0.05 after correcting for background collisional losses. The fidelity results are shown to be in good agreement with a detailed error model.

  5. Enhancement of paclitaxel and carboplatin therapies by CCL2 blockade in ovarian cancers.

    PubMed

    Moisan, Francois; Francisco, Edgar B; Brozovic, Anamaria; Duran, George E; Wang, Yan C; Chaturvedi, Shalini; Seetharam, Shobha; Snyder, Linda A; Doshi, Parul; Sikic, Branimir I

    2014-10-01

    Ovarian cancer is associated with a leukocyte infiltrate and high levels of chemokines such as CCL2. We tested the hypothesis that CCL2 inhibition can enhance chemotherapy with carboplatin and paclitaxel. Elevated CCL2 expression was found in three non-MDR paclitaxel resistant ovarian cancer lines ES-2/TP, MES-OV/TP and OVCAR-3/TP, compared to parental cells. Mice xenografted with these cells were treated with the anti-human CCL2 antibody CNTO 888 and the anti-mouse MCP-1 antibody C1142, with and without paclitaxel or carboplatin. Our results show an additive effect of CCL2 blockade on the efficacy of paclitaxel and carboplatin. This therapeutic effect was largely due to inhibition of mouse stromal CCL2. We show that inhibition of CCL2 can enhance paclitaxel and carboplatin therapy of ovarian cancer.

  6. Dynamical Coulomb blockade of tunnel junctions driven by alternating voltages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabert, Hermann

    2015-12-01

    The theory of the dynamical Coulomb blockade is extended to tunneling elements driven by a time-dependent voltage. It is shown that, for standard setups where an external voltage is applied to a tunnel junction via an impedance, time-dependent driving entails an excitation of the modes of the electromagnetic environment by the applied voltage. Previous approaches for ac driven circuits need to be extended to account for the driven bath modes. A unitary transformation involving also the variables of the electromagnetic environment is introduced which allows us to split off the time dependence from the Hamiltonian in the absence of tunneling. This greatly simplifies perturbation-theoretical calculations based on treating the tunneling Hamiltonian as a perturbation. In particular, the average current flowing in the leads of the tunnel junction is studied. Explicit results are given for the case of an applied voltage with a constant dc part and a sinusoidal ac part. The connection with standard dynamical Coulomb blockade theory for constant applied voltage is established. It is shown that an alternating voltage source reveals significant additional effects caused by the electromagnetic environment. The hallmark of the dynamical Coulomb blockade in ac driven devices is a suppression of higher harmonics of the current by the electromagnetic environment. The theory presented basically applies to all tunneling devices driven by alternating voltages.

  7. Intrathecal rimantadine induces motor, proprioceptive, and nociceptive blockades in rats.

    PubMed

    Tzeng, Jann-Inn; Wang, Jieh-Neng; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Chen, Yu-Wen; Hung, Ching-Hsia

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of the experiment was to evaluate the local anesthetic effect of rimantadine in spinal anesthesia. Rimantadine in a dose-dependent fashion was constructed after intrathecally injecting the rats with four different doses. The potency and duration of rimantadine were compared with that of the local anesthetic lidocaine at producing spinal motor, nociceptive, and proprioceptive blockades. We demonstrated that intrathecal rimantadine dose-dependently produced spinal motor, nociceptive, and proprioceptive blockades. On the 50% effective dose (ED50) basis, the ranks of potencies at inducing spinal motor, nociceptive, and proprioceptive blockades was lidocaine>rimantadine (P<0.01). Rimantadine exhibited more nociceptive block (ED50) than motor block (P<0.05). At equi-anesthetic doses (ED25, ED50, and ED75), the spinal block duration produced by rimantadine was longer than that produced by lidocaine (P<0.01). Furthermore, rimantadine (26.52μmol/kg) prolonged the nociceptive nerve block more than the motor block (P<0.001). Our preclinical data showed that rimantadine, with a more sensory-selective action over motor block, was less potent than lidocaine. Rimantadine produced longer duration in spinal anesthesia when compared with lidocaine.

  8. Sequential RAAS blockade: is it worth the risk?

    PubMed

    Persson, Frederik; Rossing, Peter

    2014-03-01

    Soon after the emergence of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) blocking treatment as the cornerstone of renoprotective treatment in the prevention and treatment of diabetic and nondiabetic CKD, it was investigated if a higher degree of achievable RAAS blockade by combining more than one compound is feasible and advantageous. Regardless of the benefits from using monotherapy for diabetic kidney disease, there is still much improvement to wish for in terms of kidney prognosis in these populations. A great deal of research has gone into evaluating combinations of the RAAS blocking treatments in different populations and with different drugs and doses. Studies have mostly been short-term and use surrogate endpoints such as albuminuria. Side effects have been well known and expected in terms of increasing potassium levels and hypotension, but to an acceptable extent. With recent disappointing results from major hard endpoint trials using dual RAAS blockade the concept is now under scrutiny. In this review we will discuss the pros and cons of dual RAAS blockade, with facts and findings from smaller studies, endpoint trials, and meta-analyses. PMID:24602465

  9. Shape-sensitive Pauli blockade in a bent carbon nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Széchenyi, Gábor; Pályi, András

    2015-01-01

    Motivated by a recent experiment [F. Pei et al., Nat. Nanotechnol. 7, 630 (2012), 10.1038/nnano.2012.160], we theoretically study the Pauli blockade transport effect in a double quantum dot embedded in a bent carbon nanotube. We establish a model for the Pauli blockade, taking into account the strong g -factor anisotropy that is linked to the local orientation of the nanotube axis in each quantum dot. We provide a set of conditions under which our model is approximately mapped to the spin-blockade model of Jouravlev and Nazarov [O. N. Jouravlev and Y. V. Nazarov, Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 176804 (2006), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.96.176804]. The results we obtain for the magnetic anisotropy of the leakage current, together with their qualitative geometrical explanation, provide a possible interpretation of previously unexplained experimental results. Furthermore, we find that in a certain parameter range, the leakage current becomes highly sensitive to the shape of the tube, and this sensitivity increases with increasing g -factor anisotropy. This mutual dependence of the electron transport and the tube shape allows for mechanical control of the leakage current, and for characterization of the tube shape via measuring the leakage current.

  10. Brain temperature responses to salient stimuli persist during dopamine receptor blockade despite a blockade of locomotor responses.

    PubMed

    Kiyatkin, Eugene A

    2008-12-01

    We examined how an acute dopamine (DA) receptor blockade affects locomotor and brain (nucleus accumbens or NAcc), muscle and skin temperature responses to three arousing stimuli (procedure of sc injection, tail-pinch and social interaction with another male rat) and intravenous cocaine (1 mg/kg). DA receptor blockade was induced by mixture of D1- (SCH23390) and D-2 selective (eticlopride) DA antagonists at 0.2 mg/kg doses. Each arousing stimulus and cocaine caused locomotor activation, prolonged increase in NAcc and muscle temperature (0.6-1.0 degrees C for 20-50 min) and transient skin hypothermia (-0.6 degrees C for 1-3 min) in drug-naive conditions. DA receptor blockade strongly decreased basal locomotor activity, but moderately increased brain, muscle and skin temperatures. Therefore, selective interruption of DA transmission does not inhibit the brain, making it more metabolically active and warmer despite skin vasodilatation and the enhanced heat loss to the body and the external environment. DA antagonists strongly decreased locomotor responses to all stimuli and cocaine, had no effects on acute skin vasoconstriction, but differentially affected stimuli- and drug-induced changes in NAcc and muscle temperatures. While brain and muscle temperatures induced by cocaine were fully blocked and both temperatures slightly decreased, temperature increases induced by tail-pinch and social interaction, despite a significant attenuation, persisted during DA receptor blockade. These data are discussed to define the role of the DA system in regulating the central activation processes and behavioral responsiveness to natural arousing and drug stimuli. PMID:18727935

  11. Blockade of Gap Junction Hemichannel Suppresses Disease Progression in Mouse Models of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Hideyuki; Mizoguchi, Hiroyuki; Doi, Yukiko; Jin, Shijie; Noda, Mariko; Liang, Jianfeng; Li, Hua; Zhou, Yan; Mori, Rarami; Yasuoka, Satoko; Li, Endong; Parajuli, Bijay; Kawanokuchi, Jun; Sonobe, Yoshifumi; Sato, Jun; Yamanaka, Koji; Sobue, Gen; Mizuno, Tetsuya; Suzumura, Akio

    2011-01-01

    Background Glutamate released by activated microglia induces excitotoxic neuronal death, which likely contributes to non-cell autonomous neuronal death in neurodegenerative diseases, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Alzheimer's disease. Although both blockade of glutamate receptors and inhibition of microglial activation are the therapeutic candidates for these neurodegenerative diseases, glutamate receptor blockers also perturbed physiological and essential glutamate signals, and inhibitors of microglial activation suppressed both neurotoxic/neuroprotective roles of microglia and hardly affected disease progression. We previously demonstrated that activated microglia release a large amount of glutamate specifically through gap junction hemichannel. Hence, blockade of gap junction hemichannel may be potentially beneficial in treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. Methods and Findings In this study, we generated a novel blood-brain barrier permeable gap junction hemichannel blocker based on glycyrrhetinic acid. We found that pharmacologic blockade of gap junction hemichannel inhibited excessive glutamate release from activated microglia in vitro and in vivo without producing notable toxicity. Blocking gap junction hemichannel significantly suppressed neuronal loss of the spinal cord and extended survival in transgenic mice carrying human superoxide dismutase 1 with G93A or G37R mutation as an amyotrophic lateral sclerosis mouse model. Moreover, blockade of gap junction hemichannel also significantly improved memory impairments without altering amyloid β deposition in double transgenic mice expressing human amyloid precursor protein with K595N and M596L mutations and presenilin 1 with A264E mutation as an Alzheimer's disease mouse model. Conclusions Our results suggest that gap junction hemichannel blockers may represent a new therapeutic strategy to target neurotoxic microglia specifically and prevent microglia-mediated neuronal death in various

  12. Blockade of EGFR and MEK intercepts heterogeneous mechanisms of acquired resistance to anti-EGFR therapies in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Misale, Sandra; Arena, Sabrina; Lamba, Simona; Siravegna, Giulia; Lallo, Alice; Hobor, Sebastijan; Russo, Mariangela; Buscarino, Michela; Lazzari, Luca; Sartore-Bianchi, Andrea; Bencardino, Katia; Amatu, Alessio; Lauricella, Calogero; Valtorta, Emanuele; Siena, Salvatore; Di Nicolantonio, Federica; Bardelli, Alberto

    2014-02-19

    Colorectal cancers (CRCs) that are sensitive to the anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) antibodies cetuximab or panitumumab almost always develop resistance within several months of initiating therapy. We report the emergence of polyclonal KRAS, NRAS, and BRAF mutations in CRC cells with acquired resistance to EGFR blockade. Regardless of the genetic alterations, resistant cells consistently displayed mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation, which persisted after EGFR blockade. Inhibition of MEK1/2 alone failed to impair the growth of resistant cells in vitro and in vivo. An RNA interference screen demonstrated that suppression of EGFR, together with silencing of MEK1/2, was required to hamper the proliferation of resistant cells. Indeed, concomitant pharmacological blockade of MEK and EGFR induced prolonged ERK inhibition and severely impaired the growth of resistant tumor cells. Heterogeneous and concomitant mutations in KRAS and NRAS were also detected in plasma samples from patients who developed resistance to anti-EGFR antibodies. A mouse xenotransplant from a CRC patient who responded and subsequently relapsed upon EGFR therapy showed exquisite sensitivity to combinatorial treatment with MEK and EGFR inhibitors. Collectively, these results identify genetically distinct mechanisms that mediate secondary resistance to anti-EGFR therapies, all of which reactivate ERK signaling. These observations provide a rational strategy to overcome the multifaceted clonal heterogeneity that emerges when tumors are treated with targeted agents. We propose that MEK inhibitors, in combination with cetuximab or panitumumab, should be tested in CRC patients who become refractory to anti-EGFR therapies.

  13. Response to BRAF inhibition in melanoma is enhanced when combined with immune checkpoint blockade.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Zachary A; Juneja, Vikram R; Sage, Peter T; Frederick, Dennie T; Piris, Adriano; Mitra, Devarati; Lo, Jennifer A; Hodi, F Stephen; Freeman, Gordon J; Bosenberg, Marcus W; McMahon, Martin; Flaherty, Keith T; Fisher, David E; Sharpe, Arlene H; Wargo, Jennifer A

    2014-07-01

    BRAF-targeted therapy results in objective responses in the majority of patients; however, the responses are short lived (∼6 months). In contrast, treatment with immune checkpoint inhibitors results in a lower response rate, but the responses tend to be more durable. BRAF inhibition results in a more favorable tumor microenvironment in patients, with an increase in CD8(+) T-cell infiltrate and a decrease in immunosuppressive cytokines. There is also increased expression of the immunomodulatory molecule PDL1, which may contribute to the resistance. On the basis of these findings, we hypothesized that BRAF-targeted therapy may synergize with the PD1 pathway blockade to enhance antitumor immunity. To test this hypothesis, we developed a BRAF(V600E)/Pten(-/-) syngeneic tumor graft immunocompetent mouse model in which BRAF inhibition leads to a significant increase in the intratumoral CD8(+) T-cell density and cytokine production, similar to the effects of BRAF inhibition in patients. In this model, CD8(+) T cells were found to play a critical role in the therapeutic effect of BRAF inhibition. Administration of anti-PD1 or anti-PDL1 together with a BRAF inhibitor led to an enhanced response, significantly prolonging survival and slowing tumor growth, as well as significantly increasing the number and activity of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes. These results demonstrate synergy between combined BRAF-targeted therapy and immune checkpoint blockade. Although clinical trials combining these two strategies are ongoing, important questions still remain unanswered. Further studies using this new melanoma mouse model may provide therapeutic insights, including optimal timing and sequence of therapy.

  14. PD-1/CTLA-4 Blockade Inhibits Epstein-Barr Virus-Induced Lymphoma Growth in a Cord Blood Humanized-Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Shi-Dong; Xu, Xuequn; Jones, Richard; Delecluse, Henri-Jacques; Zumwalde, Nicholas A.; Sharma, Akshat; Gumperz, Jenny E.; Kenney, Shannon C.

    2016-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection causes B cell lymphomas in humanized mouse models and contributes to a variety of different types of human lymphomas. T cells directed against viral antigens play a critical role in controlling EBV infection, and EBV-positive lymphomas are particularly common in immunocompromised hosts. We previously showed that EBV induces B cell lymphomas with high frequency in a cord blood-humanized mouse model in which EBV-infected human cord blood is injected intraperitoneally into NOD/LtSz-scid/IL2Rγnull (NSG) mice. Since our former studies showed that it is possible for T cells to control the tumors in another NSG mouse model engrafted with both human fetal CD34+ cells and human thymus and liver, here we investigated whether monoclonal antibodies that block the T cell inhibitory receptors, PD-1 and CTLA-4, enhance the ability of cord blood T cells to control the outgrowth of EBV-induced lymphomas in the cord-blood humanized mouse model. We demonstrate that EBV-infected lymphoma cells in this model express both the PD-L1 and PD-L2 inhibitory ligands for the PD-1 receptor, and that T cells express the PD-1 and CTLA-4 receptors. Furthermore, we show that the combination of CTLA-4 and PD-1 blockade strikingly reduces the size of lymphomas induced by a lytic EBV strain (M81) in this model, and that this anti-tumor effect requires T cells. PD-1/CTLA-4 blockade markedly increases EBV-specific T cell responses, and is associated with enhanced tumor infiltration by CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. In addition, PD-1/CTLA-4 blockade decreases the number of both latently, and lytically, EBV-infected B cells. These results indicate that PD-1/CTLA-4 blockade enhances the ability of cord blood T cells to control outgrowth of EBV-induced lymphomas, and suggest that PD-1/CTLA-4 blockade might be useful for treating certain EBV-induced diseases in humans. PMID:27186886

  15. Neuromuscular blockade: what was, is and will be.

    PubMed

    Schepens, Tom; Cammu, Guy

    2014-01-01

    Non-depolarizing neuromuscular blocking agents (NMBAs) produce neuromuscular blockade by competing with acetylcholine at the neuromuscular junction, whereas depolarizing NMBAs open receptor channels in a manner similar to that of acetylcholine. Problems with NMBAs include malignant hyperthermia caused by succinylcholine, anaphylaxis with the highest incidence for succinylcholine and rocuronium, and residual neuromuscular blockade. To reverse these blocks, anticholinesterases can act indirectly by increasing the amount of acetylcholine in the neuromuscular junction; sugammadex is the only selective relaxant binding agent (SRBA) in clinical use. At all levels of blockade, recovery after sugammadex is faster than after neostigmine. Sugammadex potentially also has some other advantages over neostigmine that are related to neostigmine's increase in the amount of acetylcholine and the necessity of co-administering anticholinergics. However, hypersensitivity reactions, including anaphylaxis, have occurred in some patients and healthy volunteers after sugammadex and remain an issue for the FDA. In the near future, we may see the emergence of new SRBAs and of easier-to-use technologies that can routinely monitor neuromuscular transmissions in daily practice. The nature of the effect of sugammadex on freeing nicotinic acetylcholine receptors located outside the neuromuscular junction from NMBAs is unknown. Moreover, it is uncertain whether the full removal of the competing antagonists (by SRBAs) at the neuromuscular junction impacts the efficiency of acetylcholine transmission. In a recent pilot study in healthy volunteers, we demonstrated increased electromyographic diaphragm activity after sugammadex, compared to neostigmine. Further research is needed to elucidate the role of NMBAs and their reversal agents in the central control of breathing, respiratory muscle activity, and respiratory outcomes. PMID:25622380

  16. Overcoming Barriers in Oncolytic Virotherapy with HDAC Inhibitors and Immune Checkpoint Blockade.

    PubMed

    Marchini, Antonio; Scott, Eleanor M; Rommelaere, Jean

    2016-01-06

    Oncolytic viruses (OVs) target and destroy cancer cells while sparing their normal counterparts. These viruses have been evaluated in numerous studies at both pre-clinical and clinical levels and the recent Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval of an oncolytic herpesvirus-based treatment raises optimism that OVs will become a therapeutic option for cancer patients. However, to improve clinical outcome, there is a need to increase OV efficacy. In addition to killing cancer cells directly through lysis, OVs can stimulate the induction of anti-tumour immune responses. The host immune system thus represents a "double-edged sword" for oncolytic virotherapy: on the one hand, a robust anti-viral response will limit OV replication and spread; on the other hand, the immune-mediated component of OV therapy may be its most important anti-cancer mechanism. Although the relative contribution of direct viral oncolysis and indirect, immune-mediated oncosuppression to overall OV efficacy is unclear, it is likely that an initial period of vigorous OV multiplication and lytic activity will most optimally set the stage for subsequent adaptive anti-tumour immunity. In this review, we consider the use of histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors as a means of boosting virus replication and lessening the negative impact of innate immunity on the direct oncolytic effect. We also discuss an alternative approach, aimed at potentiating OV-elicited anti-tumour immunity through the blockade of immune checkpoints. We conclude by proposing a two-phase combinatorial strategy in which initial OV replication and spread is maximised through transient HDAC inhibition, with anti-tumour immune responses subsequently enhanced by immune checkpoint blockade.

  17. Overcoming Barriers in Oncolytic Virotherapy with HDAC Inhibitors and Immune Checkpoint Blockade

    PubMed Central

    Marchini, Antonio; Scott, Eleanor M.; Rommelaere, Jean

    2016-01-01

    Oncolytic viruses (OVs) target and destroy cancer cells while sparing their normal counterparts. These viruses have been evaluated in numerous studies at both pre-clinical and clinical levels and the recent Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval of an oncolytic herpesvirus-based treatment raises optimism that OVs will become a therapeutic option for cancer patients. However, to improve clinical outcome, there is a need to increase OV efficacy. In addition to killing cancer cells directly through lysis, OVs can stimulate the induction of anti-tumour immune responses. The host immune system thus represents a “double-edged sword” for oncolytic virotherapy: on the one hand, a robust anti-viral response will limit OV replication and spread; on the other hand, the immune-mediated component of OV therapy may be its most important anti-cancer mechanism. Although the relative contribution of d