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Sample records for kupffer cell blockade

  1. Kupffer cell blockade prevents induction of portal venous tolerance in rat cardiac allograft transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Kamei, T.; Callery, M.P.; Flye, M.W. )

    1990-05-01

    Pretransplant portal venous (pv) administration of donor antigen induces allospecific partial tolerance. Although the involved mechanism has not been defined, antigen presentation by Kupffer cells (KC) in the liver is considered to be critical. We evaluated the effect of KC blockade on this pv tolerance induction in Buffalo (RT1b) rats receiving Lewis (RT1(1)) cardiac heterotopic allografts. Control rats received no treatment, while experimental animals received 25 X 10(6) ultraviolet B-irradiated (12,000 J/m2) donor spleen cells via either the iv (systemic intravenous) or the pv routes 7 days before transplantation. Gadolinium chloride (GdCl3), a rare earth metal known to inhibit KC phagocytosis, was given (7 mg/kg) 1 and 2 days before pv preimmunization. Cardiac graft prolongation was obtained by pv (MST = 13.3 +/- 1.9 days, n = 6, vs control = 7.3 +/- 0.5 days, n = 6; P less than 0.001) but not by iv preimmunization (7.7 +/- 0.7 days, n = 6, NS vs control). KC blockade abolished the pv tolerance, as indicated by abrogation of graft prolongation (PV + GdCl3 = 8.0 +/- 0.8 days, n = 6, NS vs control). These findings suggest that effective alloantigen uptake by KC in the liver is essential for the induction of pv tolerance in rat cardiac transplantation.

  2. Kupffer Cell Metabolism and Function

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen-Lefebvre, Anh Thu; Horuzsko, Anatolij

    2015-01-01

    Kupffer cells are resident liver macrophages and play a critical role in maintaining liver functions. Under physiological conditions, they are the first innate immune cells and protect the liver from bacterial infections. Under pathological conditions, they are activated by different components and can differentiate into M1-like (classical) or M2-like (alternative) macrophages. The metabolism of classical or alternative activated Kupffer cells will determine their functions in liver damage. Special functions and metabolism of Kupffer cells suggest that they are an attractive target for therapy of liver inflammation and related diseases, including cancer and infectious diseases. Here we review the different types of Kupffer cells and their metabolism and functions in physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:26937490

  3. High-affinity binding of fibronectin to cultured Kupffer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cardarelli, P.M.; Blumenstock, F.A.; McKeown-Longo, P.J.; Saba, T.M.; Mazurkiewicz, J.E.; Dias, J.A. )

    1990-11-01

    Hepatic Kupffer cells are a major component of the reticuloendothelial or macrophage system. They were the first phagocytic cell type whose phagocytosis was shown to be influenced by plasma fibronectin, a dimeric opsonic glycoprotein. In the current study, the binding of soluble radioiodinated fibronectin purified from rat serum to isolated rat hepatic Kupffer cells was investigated using a cultured Kupffer cell monolayer technique. Binding was specific, since unlabeled purified fibronectin competed in a dose-dependent manner with the 125I-fibronectin for binding to the Kupffer cells. Addition of gelatin enhanced the binding of 125I-fibronectin to Kupffer cells. The phagocytosis of gelatinized-coated red cells by Kupffer cells was increased either by preopsonizing the target particles with purified fibronectin or by the addition of purified fibronectin to the culture medium. In contrast, exposure of the Kupffer cells to medium containing purified fibronectin followed by wash-removal of the fibronectin did not increase the uptake of gelatin-coated red blood cells, even though fibronectin was detected on the surface of the Kupffer cells by immunofluorescence. Trypsinized monolayers expressed decreased capacity to bind 125I-fibronectin as well as fibronectin-coated sheep erythrocytes. The binding of 125I-fibronectin-gelatin complexes was inhibited by excess unlabeled fibronectin. We calculated that specific high-affinity (Kd = 7.46 x 10(-9) M) binding sites for fibronectin exist on Kupffer cells. There are approximately 2,800-3,500 binding sites or putative fibronectin receptors per Kupffer cell. These sites appear to mediate the enhanced phagocytosis of gelatin-coated particles opsonized by fibronectin.

  4. Characterization of Kupffer cells in livers of developing mice

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Kupffer cells are well known macrophages of the liver, however, the developmental characteristics of Kupffer cells in mice are not well understood. To clarify this matter, the characteristics of Kupffer macrophages in normal developing mouse liver were studied using light microscopy and immunocytochemistry. Methods Sections of liver tissue from early postnatal mice were prepared using immunocytochemical techniques. The Kupffer cells were identified by their immunoreactivity to the F4/80 antibody, whereas endothelial cells were labelled with the CD-34 antibody. In addition, Kupffer cells and endothelial cells were labelled by systemically injected fluorescently labelled latex microspheres. Tissue slices were examined by fluorescence microscopy. Results Intravenous or intraperitonal injections of microspheres yielded similar patterns of liver cell labelling. The F4/80 positive Kupffer cells were labelled with both large (0.2 μm) and small (0.02 μm) diameter microspheres, while endothelial cells were labelled only with the smaller diameter microspheres. Microsphere labelling of Kupffer cells appeared stable for at least 6 weeks. Cells immunoreactive for F4/80 were identified as early as postnatal day 0, and these cells also displayed uptake of microspheres. Numbers of F4/80 Kupffer cells, relative to numbers of albumin positive hepatocytes, did not show a significant trend over the first 2 postnatal weeks. Conclusions Kupffer cells of the developing mouse liver appear quite similar to those of other mammalian species, confirming that the mouse presents a useful animal model for studies of liver macrophage developmental structure and function. PMID:21749715

  5. Perfluorochemical emulsions decrease Kupffer cell phagocytosis

    SciTech Connect

    Bottalico, L.A.; Betensky, H.T.; Min, Y.B.; Weinstock, S.B. )

    1991-07-01

    One drawback to using perfluorochemical emulsions as blood substitutes is that perfluorochemical particles are cleared from the blood by the reticuloendothelial system, primarily liver and spleen. The authors measured the impact of two perfluorochemical emulsions on clearance of colloidal carbon (less than 1 microns) and 51Cr-sheep red blood cells (about 8 microns) by the reticuloendothelial system in vivo and in the isolated perfused liver. Male rats were injected with 2 ml/100 gm body wt of Fluosol-DA or Oxypherol-ET for 4 consecutive days. Carbon (1 ml/100 gm body wt) or sheep red blood cells (0.05 ml of 5% vol/vol/100 gm body wt) were then injected intravenously (in vivo) or added to perfusate. Samples were taken at several time points for 1 hr. In the isolated perfused liver, carbon clearance was depressed by 25% 1 day after treatment. Rates returned to control levels by 12 days in Fluosol-DA-treated rats but remained depressed by 67% in Oxypherol-ET-treated rats. Sheep red blood cell (8 microns) clearance was two to five times slower than carbon clearance and depressed by 40% in livers from Fluosol-DA rats 1 day and 12 days after treatment. Added serum did not improve phagocytosis. In vivo carbon clearance remained normal in Fluosol-DA-treated rats but decreased by 74% in Oxypherol-ET-treated rats 1 day after treatment, returning to normal by 12 days. Clearance rates were similar in control rats in vivo and in the perfused liver. They conclude that the isolated perfused liver is a good model to measure liver clearance function. Although low doses of perfluorochemical emulsions may depress Kupffer cell phagocytosis, general reticuloendothelial system function is not significantly compromised.

  6. Kupffer cell structure in the juvenile Nile crocodile, Crocodylus niloticus.

    PubMed

    van Wilpe, Erna; Groenewald, Hermanus Bernardus

    2014-01-01

    The morphology of Kupffer cells was examined in the liver of the juvenile Nile crocodile using light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Pleomorphic Kupffer cells were located in the sinusoids, in the space of Disse, in the hepatic parenchyma and often connected adjacent sinusoids. The cell surfaces were irregular due to the presence of filopodia and lamelliapodia with phagocytosis of white blood cells, red blood cells and thrombocytes being evident. The cells were in close contact with endothelial cells and pit cells in the sinusoidal lumen and with stellate cells in the space of Disse. The cytoplasm contained large phagosomes comprising a combination of ceroid pigment, melanosomes and siderosomes. The nuclei were often indented and eccentrically placed due to the presence of the phagosomes. Conspicuous clusters of membrane-bound tubular organelles with a filamentous or crystalline interior were observed in the cytoplasm. The clusters were sometimes separated into smaller groups around phagosomes. A clear zone existed between the limiting membrane and the interior of these tubular organelles with the electron-dense interior profiles being, respectively, circular, angular or divided. The tubular organelles have not previously been described in Kupffer cells and possibly represent lysosomes with specialized functions. Mitochondria, microtubules, Golgi profiles, granular and smooth endoplasmic reticulum, and a few cytoplasmic lipid droplets were also present. The presence of the tubular organelles and the occurrence of the Kupffer cells in different locations in the liver of the juvenile Nile crocodile are indicative of particularly active and mobile cells.

  7. Alcoholic hepatitis: The pivotal role of Kupffer cells

    PubMed Central

    Suraweera, Duminda B; Weeratunga, Ashley N; Hu, Robert W; Pandol, Stephen J; Hu, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Kupffer cells play a central role in the pathogenesis of alcoholic hepatitis (AH). It is believed that alcohol increases the gut permeability that results in raised levels of serum endotoxins containing lipopolysaccharides (LPS). LPS binds to LPS-binding proteins and presents it to a membrane glycoprotein called CD14, which then activates Kupffer cells via a receptor called toll-like receptor 4. This endotoxin mediated activation of Kupffer cells plays an important role in the inflammatory process resulting in alcoholic hepatitis. There is no effective treatment for AH, although notable progress has been made over the last decade in understanding the underlying mechanism of alcoholic hepatitis. We specifically review the current research on the role of Kupffer cells in the pathogenesis of AH and the treatment strategies. We suggest that the imbalance between the pro-inflammatory and the anti-inflammatory process as well as the increased production of reactive oxygen species eventually lead to hepatocyte injury, the final event of alcoholic hepatitis. PMID:26600966

  8. An intravascular immune response to Borrelia burgdorferi involves Kupffer cells and iNKT cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Woo-Yong; Moriarty, Tara J; Wong, Connie H Y; Zhou, Hong; Strieter, Robert M; van Rooijen, Nico; Chaconas, George; Kubes, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Here we investigate the dynamics of the hepatic intravascular immune response to a pathogen relevant to invariant natural killer T cells (iNKT cells). Immobilized Kupffer cells with highly ramified extended processes into multiple sinusoids could effectively capture blood-borne, disseminating Borrelia burgdorferi, creating a highly efficient surveillance and filtering system. After ingesting B. burgdorferi, Kupffer cells induced chemokine receptor CXCR3–dependent clustering of iNKT cells. Kupffer cells and iNKT cells formed stable contacts via the antigen-presenting molecule CD1d, which led to iNKT cell activation. An absence of iNKT cells caused B. burgdorferi to leave the blood and enter the joints more effectively. B. burgdorferi that escaped Kupffer cells entered the liver parenchyma and survived despite Ito cell responses. Kupffer cell–iNKT cell interactions induced a key intravascular immune response that diminished the dissemination of B. burgdorferi. PMID:20228796

  9. In vivo assessment of phagocytic properties of Kupffer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Reske, S.N.; Vyska, K.; Feinendegen, L.E.

    1981-05-01

    Three-compartment analysis was used to assess the kinetics of phagocytosis of Tc-99m-labeled human serum albumin microparticles (Tc-99m HSA-MM) in human Kupffer cells in vivo. The tracer turnover in these phagocytic cells could be described by a monoexponential accumulation with a two-stage elimination phase. Three-compartment analysis of the Tc-99m HSA-MM kinetics allowed us to quantify tracer attachment, phagocytosis, and degradation in Kupffer cells. The calculated time course of phagocytosis in ten control subjects proved to be identical to that of phagocytosis of various test substances in mouse macrophage monolayers (1). In addition, an impairment of particle turnover at the macrophage membrane, a significantly diminished (p less than 0.01) phagocytosis rate of the tracer, was observed in ten patients with various tumors.

  10. In vivo assessment of phagocytic properties of Kupffer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Reske, S.N.; Vyska, K.; Feinendegen, L.E.

    1981-05-01

    Three-compartment analysis was used to assess the kinetics of phagocytosis of Tc-99m-labeled human serum albumin microparticles (Tc-99m HSA-MM) in human Kupffer cells in vivo. The tracer turnover in these phagocytic cells could be described by a monoexponential accumulation with a two-stage elimination phase. Three-compartment analysis of the Tc-99m HSA-MM kinetics allowed us to quantify tracer attachment, phagocytosis, and degradation in Kupffer cells. The calculated time course of phagocytosis in ten control subjects proved to be identicl to that of phagocytosis of various test substances in mouse macrophage monolayers. In addition, an impairment of particle turnover at the macrophage membrane, a significantly diminished phagocytosis rate of the tracer, was observed in ten patients with various tumors.

  11. Kinetics of liver macrophages (Kupffer cells) in SIV-infected macaques

    SciTech Connect

    Ahsan, Muhammad H.; Gill, Amy F.; Alvarez, Xavier; Lackner, Andrew A.; Veazey, Ronald S.

    2013-11-15

    Since the liver drains antigens from the intestinal tract, and since the intestinal tract is a major site of viral replication, we examined the dynamics of liver macrophages (Kupffer cells) throughout SIV infection. Absolute numbers of Kupffer cells increased in the livers in acute infection, and in animals with AIDS. Significantly higher percentages of proliferating (BrdU+) Kupffer cells were detected in acute infection and in AIDS with similar trends in blood monocytes. Significantly higher percentages of apoptotic (AC3+) Kupffer cells were also found in acute and AIDS stages. However, productively infected cells were not detected in liver of 41/42 animals examined, despite abundant infected cells in gut and lymph nodes of all animals. Increased rates of Kupffer cell proliferation resulting in an increase in Kupffer cells without productive infection indicate SIV infection affects Kupffer cells, but the liver does not appear to be a major site of productive viral replication. - Highlights: • Kupffer cells increase in the liver of SIV-infected macaques. • Increased proliferation and apoptosis of Kupffer cells occurs in SIV infection. • Productively infected cells are rarely detected in the liver. • The liver is not a major site for SIV replication.

  12. Activation of human and mouse Kupffer cells by lipopolysaccharide is mediated by CD14.

    PubMed

    Su, Grace L; Goyert, Sanna M; Fan, Ming-Hui; Aminlari, Alireza; Gong, Ke Qin; Klein, Richard D; Myc, Andrzej; Alarcon, William H; Steinstraesser, Lars; Remick, Daniel G; Wang, Stewart C

    2002-09-01

    Upregulation of CD14 in Kupffer cells has been implicated in the pathogenesis of several forms of liver injury, including alcoholic liver disease. However, it remains unclear whether CD14 mediates lipopolysaccharide (LPS) signaling in this specialized liver macrophage population. In this series of experiments, we determined the role of CD14 in LPS activation of Kupffer cells by using several complementary approaches. First, we isolated Kupffer cells from human livers and studied the effects of anti-CD14 antibodies on LPS activation of these cells. Kupffer cells were incubated with increasing concentrations of LPS in the presence and absence of recombinant human LPS binding protein (LBP). With increasing concentrations of LPS, human Kupffer cell tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) production (a marker for Kupffer cell activation) increased in a dose-dependent manner in the presence and absence of LBP. In the presence of anti-human CD14 antibodies, the production of TNF-alpha was significantly diminished. Second, we compared LPS activation of Kupffer cells isolated from wild-type and CD14 knockout mice. Kupffer cells from CD14 knockout mice produced significantly less TNF-alpha in response to the same amount of LPS. Together, these data strongly support a critical role for CD14 in Kupffer cell responses to LPS.

  13. Tobacco and e-cigarette products initiate Kupffer cell inflammatory responses.

    PubMed

    Rubenstein, David A; Hom, Sarah; Ghebrehiwet, Berhane; Yin, Wei

    2015-10-01

    Kupffer cells are liver resident macrophages that are responsible for screening and clearing blood of pathogens and foreign particles. It has recently been shown that Kupffer cells interact with platelets, through an adhesion based mechanism, to aid in pathogen clearance and then these platelets re-enter the general systemic circulation. Thus, a mechanism has been identified that relates liver inflammation to possible changes in the systemic circulation. However, the role that Kupffer cells play in cardiovascular disease initiation/progression has not been elucidated. Thus, our objective was to determine whether or not Kupffer cells are responsive to a classical cardiovascular risk factor and if these changes can be transmitted into the general systemic circulation. If Kupffer cells initiate inflammatory responses after exposure to classical cardiovascular risk factors, then this provides a potential alternative/synergistic pathway for cardiovascular disease initiation. We aimed to elucidate the prevalence of this potential pathway. We hypothesized that Kupffer cells would initiate a robust inflammatory response after exposure to tobacco cigarette or e-cigarette products and that the inflammatory response would have the potential to antagonize other salient cells for cardiovascular disease progression. To test this, Kupffer cells were incubated with tobacco smoke extracts, e-cigarette vapor extracts or pure nicotine. Complement deposition onto Kupffer cells, Kupffer cell complement receptor expression, oxidative stress production, cytokine release and viability and density were assessed after the exposure. We observed a robust inflammatory response, oxidative stress production and cytokine release after Kupffer cells were exposed to tobacco or e-cigarette extracts. We also observed a marginal decrease in cell viability coupled with a significant decrease in cell density. In general, this was not a function of the extract formulation (e.g. tobacco vs. e

  14. Biphasic control of polymorphonuclear cell migration by Kupffer cells. Effect of exposure to metabolic products of ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Fainsilber, Z.; Feinman, L.; Shaw, S.; Lieber, C.S.

    1988-01-01

    In order to investigate the role of the Kupffer cells in the regulation of the inflammatory reaction seen in alcoholic hepatitis, rat liver Kupffer cells were cultured and exposed to products of ethanol metabolism. The resultant supernatants were tested to study their ability to stimulate or inhibit polymorphonuclear cell chemotaxis. Kupffer cells produced increased chemokinetic activity for human polymorphonuclear leukocytes; when incubated with soluble products of microsomal peroxidation, the Kupffer cells engendered more chemokinetic activity than that produced by untreated Kupffer cells. When Kupffer cells were incubated with acetaldehyde, the chemokinetic activity that appeared in the supernatant did not differ from control. Chemotaxis of polymorphonuclear cells was not observed when the Kupffer cell supernatants were tested by checkerboard analysis.

  15. Impact of myeloid-derived suppressor cell on Kupffer cells from mouse livers with hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lacotte, Stéphanie; Slits, Florence; Orci, Lorenzo A.; Meyer, Jeremy; Oldani, Graziano; Gonelle-Gispert, Carmen; Morel, Philippe; Toso, Christian

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Kupffer cells represent the first line of defense against tumor cells in the liver. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) have recently been observed in the liver parenchyma of tumor-bearing animals. The present study investigates the function of the MDSC subsets, and their impact on Kupffer cell phenotype and function. RIL-175 mouse hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells were injected into the median liver lobe of C57BL/6 mice. Three weeks later, the median lobe hosting the tumor nodule was removed, and Kupffer cells and MDSCs were sorted from the remaining liver. Mouse livers devoid of HCC served as control. Kupffer cells expressed less co-stimulatory CD86 and MHCII and more co-inhibitory CD274 molecules in HCC-bearing livers than in control livers. Corresponding to this phenotype, Kupffer cells from HCC-bearing mice were less efficient in their function as antigen-presenting cells. Three CD11b+ cell populations were identified and sorted from HCC-bearing mice. These cells had various phenotypes with different levels of MDSC-specific surface markers (Ly6Ghigh cells, Gr1high cells, and Ly6Clow cells), and may be considered as bonafide MDSCs given their suppression of antigen-specific T cell proliferation. Primary isolated Kupffer cells in co-culture with the three MDSC subsets showed a decrease in CCL2 and IL-18 secretion, and an increase in IL-10 and IL-1β secretion, and an increased expression of CD86, CD274, and MHCII. In conclusion, these data demonstrated the existence of three MDSC subsets in HCC-bearing animals. These cells altered Kupffer cell function and may decrease the migration and activation of anticancer effector cells in the liver. PMID:27999748

  16. Kupffer cells of cirrhotic rat livers sensitize colon cancer cells to Fas-mediated apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Song, E; Chen, J; Ouyang, N; Wang, M; Exton, M S; Heemann, U

    2001-05-04

    Metastasis of colorectal carcinomas rarely occurs in cirrhotic livers. Our study investigated the influence of activated Kupffer cells from cirrhotic rat livers on hepatic colonization and FasR-mediated apoptosis of colon cancer cells. A rat colon cancer cell line, RCN-9, was used to inoculate rat livers. Treatment with conditioned media of Kupffer cells isolated from CCl(4)-induced cirrhotic rat livers (cirrhotic KCM) significantly reduced the incidence of hepatic colonization of RCN-9 cells. In vitro cytotoxicity of Kupffer cells and tumour infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) on RCN-9 cells was evaluated using [(3)H]-release assay. RCN-9 cells were resistant to cytotoxicity mediated by cirrhotic Kupffer cells, but were sensitized to TIL-mediated killing after treatment with cirrhotic KCM. The specific killing induced by TILs was FasR-mediated, as it was inhibited by ZB4, an antagonistic anti-FasR antibody. In agreement, cirrhotic KCM increased recombinant Fas ligand-induced apoptosis of RCN-9 cells, and up-regulated FasR expression on RCN-9 cells as evaluated by RT-PCR and flow cytometry. These findings suggest that Kupffer cells in cirrhotic livers sensitize metastatic colon cancer cells to FasR-mediated apoptosis by up-regulating the receptors, which thus prepare them to be eliminated by infiltrating lymphocytes.

  17. Receptor-mediated endocytosis of carcinoembryonic antigen by rat liver Kupffer cells.

    PubMed

    Toth, C A; Thomas, P; Broitman, S A; Zamcheck, N

    1985-01-01

    In vivo, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) is removed from the circulation by the liver Kupffer cells. Immunologically identifiable CEA is transferred from these macrophages to the hepatocytes, where degradation is completed. Circulatory clearance of CEA is specific, rapid [t1/2 = 3.7 +/- 0.9 (S.D.) min], and saturable. In vitro, Kupffer cells take up CEA by a saturable process which is time/temperature dependent and colchicine sensitive. Isolated Kupffer cells endocytose CEA with an apparent Km of 6 X 10(-8) M. There are approximately 16,000 CEA binding sites per cell. Nonspecific cross-reacting antigen (NCA), a glycoprotein structurally similar to CEA, is recognized with lower affinity by the same receptor. Endocytosis is independent of the nonreducing terminal sugars on the molecule: CEA modified by Smith degradation inhibits Kupffer cell recognition of native CEA. Since performic acid oxidized CEA also inhibits endocytosis, receptor binding is similarly independent of intact protein conformation. Isolated Kupffer cells have mannose and/or N-acetyl glucosamine receptor activity but do not internalize CEA by that mechanism. Galactose-terminated glycoproteins impede CEA and NCA clearance in vivo but not Kupffer cell endocytosis in vitro. Radiolabeled CEA released from isolated Kupffer cells following endocytosis shows no apparent molecular weight change. However, the released CEA contains species with higher isoelectric points, suggesting that perhaps the removal of sialic acid and the resulting exposure of galactose residues mediate the subsequent transfer to the hepatocyte.

  18. Hepatic Tumor Metastases Cause Enhanced PEGylated Liposome Uptake by Kupffer Cells.

    PubMed

    Ukawa, Masami; Fujiwara, Yukako; Ando, Hidenori; Shimizu, Taro; Ishida, Tatsuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Kupffer cells in livers bearing tumor metastases were found to have promoted tumor invasion and exacerbated the metastasis. This implies that the function of Kupffer cells might differ between animals bearing hepatic metastases and those that are healthy. Kupffer cells are considered responsible for the accumulation of liposomes in the liver. In this study, we hypothesized that the alteration in the function of Kupffer cells by hepatic metastasis would also affect the biodistribution of liposomes following intravenous administration. The hepatic accumulation and the blood concentration of PEGylated liposomes were compared between healthy mice and tumor-bearing mice. We noted that hepatic accumulation and elimination from the blood were significantly accelerated in tumor-bearing mice, indicating that our hypothesis was correct. In the tumor-bearing mice, the proportion of Kupffer cells taking up liposomes was significantly increased. Intravenous injection of oxaliplatin (l-OHP) containing PEGylated liposomes decreased the fraction of Kupffer cells, but this administration caused no injury to the hepatocytes. These results suggest that PEGylated liposomes containing l-OHP may have the potential to treat metastatic hepatic cancer-not only via the direct killing of the cancer cells but also via a reduction in tumor-supportive Kupffer cells.

  19. Comparative studies of endotoxin uptake by isolated rat Kupffer and peritoneal cells.

    PubMed

    Fox, E S; Thomas, P; Broitman, S A

    1987-12-01

    The process of uptake of endotoxin by cells of the reticuloendothelial system is of current interest. Rabbit peritoneal macrophages have been used to study macrophage-endotoxin interactions and have suggested a receptor-mediated process. It is generally believed that the site of in vivo endotoxin clearance is the liver and that this clearance involves the Kupffer cell population. In the current report, the uptake characteristics of iodine-125-labeled Salmonella minnesota lipopolysaccharide (LPS) were compared in both isolated rat Kupffer cells and elicited rat peritoneal cells. Both types of cells were isolated from male Sprague-Dawley rats fed a semisynthetic AIN-76 5% saturated-fat diet either by peritoneal lavage for peritoneal cells or by collagenase perfusion followed by purification on a 17.5% metrizamide gradient for Kupffer cells. Hot phenol water-extracted S. minnesota LPS was labeled with iodine by the chloramine-T method following a reaction with methyl-p-hydroxybenzimidate. The in vitro uptake of [125I]LPS by Kupffer cells was unsaturable up to concentrations of 33.33 micrograms/ml, while peritoneal cells became saturated at between 16.67 and 25 micrograms of LPS per ml. Uptake by both types of cells could be inhibited by a 10-fold excess of unlabeled LPS. Kinetic experiments demonstrated that Kupffer cells were unsaturable after 60 min of incubation, while peritoneal cells were saturable after 40 min of incubation. Pretreatment with 75 mM colchicine inhibited uptake by peritoneal cells but not Kupffer cells, while pretreatment with 12 mM 2-deoxyglucose inhibited uptake by Kupffer cells but not peritoneal cells. These results are consistent with a process of receptor-mediated endocytosis for peritoneal cells, while Kupffer cells may internalize endotoxins by absorptive pinocytosis. These results suggest that studies of peritoneal cell-endotoxin interactions do not accurately describe the physiologic process within the liver, the major site for the

  20. Comparative studies of endotoxin uptake by isolated rat Kupffer and peritoneal cells.

    PubMed Central

    Fox, E S; Thomas, P; Broitman, S A

    1987-01-01

    The process of uptake of endotoxin by cells of the reticuloendothelial system is of current interest. Rabbit peritoneal macrophages have been used to study macrophage-endotoxin interactions and have suggested a receptor-mediated process. It is generally believed that the site of in vivo endotoxin clearance is the liver and that this clearance involves the Kupffer cell population. In the current report, the uptake characteristics of iodine-125-labeled Salmonella minnesota lipopolysaccharide (LPS) were compared in both isolated rat Kupffer cells and elicited rat peritoneal cells. Both types of cells were isolated from male Sprague-Dawley rats fed a semisynthetic AIN-76 5% saturated-fat diet either by peritoneal lavage for peritoneal cells or by collagenase perfusion followed by purification on a 17.5% metrizamide gradient for Kupffer cells. Hot phenol water-extracted S. minnesota LPS was labeled with iodine by the chloramine-T method following a reaction with methyl-p-hydroxybenzimidate. The in vitro uptake of [125I]LPS by Kupffer cells was unsaturable up to concentrations of 33.33 micrograms/ml, while peritoneal cells became saturated at between 16.67 and 25 micrograms of LPS per ml. Uptake by both types of cells could be inhibited by a 10-fold excess of unlabeled LPS. Kinetic experiments demonstrated that Kupffer cells were unsaturable after 60 min of incubation, while peritoneal cells were saturable after 40 min of incubation. Pretreatment with 75 mM colchicine inhibited uptake by peritoneal cells but not Kupffer cells, while pretreatment with 12 mM 2-deoxyglucose inhibited uptake by Kupffer cells but not peritoneal cells. These results are consistent with a process of receptor-mediated endocytosis for peritoneal cells, while Kupffer cells may internalize endotoxins by absorptive pinocytosis. These results suggest that studies of peritoneal cell-endotoxin interactions do not accurately describe the physiologic process within the liver, the major site for the

  1. Alternative (M2) activation of Kupffer cells by PPARδ ameliorates obesity-induced insulin resistance

    PubMed Central

    Odegaard, Justin I.; Ricardo-Gonzalez, Roberto R.; Eagle, Alex Red; Vats, Divya; Morel, Christine R.; Goforth, Matthew H.; Subramanian, Vidya; Mukundan, Lata; Ferrante, Anthony W.; Chawla, Ajay

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Macrophage infiltration and activation in metabolic tissues underlie obesity-induced insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. While inflammatory activation of resident hepatic macrophages potentiates insulin resistance, the functions of alternatively activated Kupffer cells in metabolic disease remain unknown. Here we show that, in response to the Th2 cytokine interleukin-4 (IL-4), peroxisome proliferator activated receptor δ (PPARδ) directs expression of the alternative phenotype in Kupffer cells and adipose tissue macrophages of lean mice. However, adoptive transfer of PPARδ null bone marrow into wild type mice only diminishes alternative activation of hepatic macrophages, causing hepatic dysfunction and systemic insulin resistance. Suppression of hepatic oxidative metabolism is recapitulated by treatment of primary hepatocytes with conditioned media from PPARδ null macrophages, indicating direct involvement of Kupffer cells in liver lipid metabolism. Taken together, these data suggest an unexpected beneficial role for alternatively activated Kupffer cells in metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. PMID:18522831

  2. Endocytosis of heat-denatured albumin by cultured rat Kupffer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Brouwer, A.; Knook, D.L.

    1982-10-01

    Purified Kupffer cells were obtained by centrifugal elutriation of sinusoidal cells isolated by pronase treatment of the rat liver. The endocytosis of radioactively labeled heat-aggregated colloidal albumin (CA /sup 125/I) was investigated in maintenance cultures of the purified Kupffer cells. The endocytic capacity of the cells was studied during 4 days of culture. Maximum uptake was observed after 24 hr of culture, with a gradual decline during the following days. When the uptake was measured after incubation with increasing concentrations of CA /sup 125/I, a saturation effect was observed. This finding and the observed high rate of uptake are strong indications that receptor sites on the cell membrane are involved in the mechanism of endocytosis. The uptake of CA /sup 125/I by Kupffer cells was inhibited by the metabolic inhibitors fluoride and antimycin A, indicating that endocytosis of CA /sup 125/I is dependent on energy derived from both glycolysis and mitochondrial respiration. The mechanism of internalization may also require the action of microfilaments as well as intact microtubules, since both cytochalasin B and colchicine inhibited the uptake of CA /sup 125/I. The intracellular degradation of CA /sup 125/I by Kupffer cells was strongly inhibited by chloroquine but not by colchicine. The degradation of ingested CA /sup 125/I occurred within the Kupffer cell lysosomes.

  3. SELECTION WITH THE MAGNET AND CULTIVATION OF RETICULO-ENDOTHELIAL CELLS (KUPFFER CELLS)

    PubMed Central

    Rous, Peyton; Beard, J. W.

    1934-01-01

    Methods and apparatus are described where with living Kupffer cells can be procured from the liver of the rabbit and the dog for study and cultivation in vitro. Almost none of these cells can be dislodged from the normal liver by forcible perfusion; but after they have taken up finely particulate matter (India ink, iron oxide), they come away in great numbers. When they have phagocyted ferromagnetic iron oxide they can be selected with a magnet from amongst the blood elements present in suspension with them; and they are obtainable in quantity by this means. They do poorly when plated in a thin plasma clot, failing to multiply or to assume their characteristic shape; but they flourish when allowed to attach themselves to strands of lens paper bathed in serum that is frequently changed. Bacterial infection of serum cultures of Kupffer cells from normal rabbits and dogs occurs only as the result of secondary contamination of the materials, whereas it regularly develops in cultures from animals with fever induced by the injection of nucleic acid or of killed B. prodigiosus. Kupffer cells obtained under such conditions are abnormally active, and some can be washed out of the liver of sick animals in the absence of any preliminary phagocytosis of particulate matter. The facts have a bearing both on the conditions conducing to blood invasion and on the response of the Kupffer cells in the emergency. The characters of the isolated Kupffer cells and the results of tests of their presumptive functions will be described in later papers. PMID:19870267

  4. Uptake and modification of 125I-lipopolysaccharide by isolated rat Kupffer cells.

    PubMed

    Fox, E S; Thomas, P; Broitman, S A

    1988-01-01

    While it is generally believed that hepatic clearance of lipopolysaccharide involves Kupffer cells, the mechanism involved has not been fully elucidated. This study assesses this phenomenon in terms of in vitro uptake and post-uptake modification experiments with an 125I-labeled Salmonella minnesota lipopolysaccharide. 125I-Lipopolysaccharide was added to Kupffer cells in suspension cultures under a variety of conditions. In vitro uptake of 125I-Lipopolysaccharide was not saturable up to concentrations of 33.33 micrograms per ml. Kinetics experiments performed at 16.67 micrograms per ml demonstrated that Kupffer cells were unsaturable after 60 min of incubation. The kinetics of uptake could be inhibited, however, by incubation in the presence of a 10-fold excess of unlabeled lipopolysaccharide, indicating that a component of the uptake process may be limited. Energy dependence in this process was demonstrated by incubation in the presence of 1 mM 2-deoxyglucose which inhibited 125I-lipopolysaccharide uptake by approximately 30%. Pretreatment with 7.5 x 10(-5) M colchicine had no effect on kinetics, implying no role for the cell cytoskeleton in lipopolysaccharide uptake. These results are inconsistent with a receptor-mediated process as previously suggested. Modification of internalized label has been demonstrated by changes in buoyant density in CsCl isopyknic density gradients following overnight incubation with Kupffer cells. These results indicate that Kupffer cells clear bacterial endotoxin in vitro and post-uptake degradation occurs within 20 hr of incubation.

  5. Inhibition of Kupffer Cell Autophagy Abrogates Nanoparticle-Induced Liver Injury.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shasha; Zhang, Jiqian; Zhang, Li; Ma, Wentao; Man, Na; Liu, Yiming; Zhou, Wei; Lin, Jun; Wei, Pengfei; Jin, Peipei; Zhang, Yunjiao; Hu, Yi; Gu, Erwei; Lu, Xianfu; Yang, Zhilai; Liu, Xuesheng; Bai, Li; Wen, Longping

    2017-02-24

    The possible adverse effects of engineered nanomaterials on human health raise increasing concern as our research on nanosafety intensifies. Upon entry into a human body, whether intended for a theranostic purpose or through unintended exposure, nanomaterials tend to accumulate in the liver, leading to hepatic damage. A variety of nanoparticles, including rare earth upconversion nanoparticles (UCNs), have been reported to elicit hepatotoxicity, in most cases through inducing immune response or activating reactive oxygen species. Many of these nanoparticles also induce autophagy, and autophagy inhibition has been shown to decrease UCN-induced liver damage. Herein, using UCNs as a model engineered nanomaterial, this study uncovers a critical role for Kupffer cells in nanomaterial-induced liver toxicity, as depletion of Kupffer cells significantly exacerbates UCN-induced liver injury. Furthermore, UCN-induced prodeath autophagy in Kupffer cells, and inhibition of autophagy with 3-MA, a well-established chemical inhibitor of autophagy, enhances Kupffer cell survival and further abrogates UCN-induced liver toxicity. The results reveal the critical importance of Kupffer cell autophagy for nanoparticle-induced liver damage, and inhibition of autophagy may constitute a novel strategy for abrogating nanomaterial-elicited liver toxicity.

  6. Characterization of rat and human Kupffer cells after cryopreservation.

    PubMed

    Walbrun, Peter; Hellerbrand, Claus; Weiss, Thomas S; Netter, Susanne; Neumaier, Daniel; Gaebele, Erwin; Wiest, Reiner; Schoelmerich, Juergen; Froh, Matthias

    2007-04-01

    Kupffer cells (KC) are the resident macrophages of the liver and represent about 80% of the total fixed macrophage population. They are involved in disease states such as endotoxin shock, alcoholic liver diseases and other toxic-induced liver injury. They release physiologically active substances such as eicosanoids and inflammatory cytokines (IL-1, IL-6, TNFalpha), and produce free radical species. Thus, KC are attractive targets for anti-inflammatory therapies and potential candidates responsible for differences in inflammation in liver disease seen between different individuals. However, to perform parallel in vitro experiments with KC from different donors a suitable method for conservation of KC would be necessary. Therefore, the present study evaluated, whether rat and human KC can be frozen, stored and recovered without losing their functional integrity. Rat and human KC were isolated and either cultured under standard conditions (fresh KC) or cryopreserved in special freezing medium (cryopreserved KC). At least 24 h later, cryopreserved KC were thawed, brought into suspension and seeded in the same density as fresh cells for subsequent experiments. Viability of cultured KC was analyzed by trypan blue exclusion. LPS (or PBS as control) stimulation was performed at different time points and cytokine release was analyzed with IL-6 and TNFalpha ELISAs, respectively. Phagocytic capacity was investigated by using a specific phagocytosis assay and FACS analysis. The recovery rate after thawing was around 57% for rat and around 65% for human cryopreserved KC. The results indicate, that KC can successfully be cryopreserved with an adequate recovery rate of viable cells. The properties of fresh and frozen KC can also be compared after thawing. Freshly isolated and cryopreserved cultured KC showed near-normal morphology and did not differ in the cultivation profiles over a period of 72 h. One to three days after seeding, frozen rat or human KC also retained inducible

  7. Central Insulin Action Activates Kupffer Cells by Suppressing Hepatic Vagal Activation via the Nicotinic Alpha 7 Acetylcholine Receptor.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Kumi; Tanida, Mamoru; Nagata, Naoto; Inaba, Yuka; Watanabe, Hitoshi; Nagashimada, Mayumi; Ota, Tsuguhito; Asahara, Shun-ichiro; Kido, Yoshiaki; Matsumoto, Michihiro; Toshinai, Koji; Nakazato, Masamitsu; Shibamoto, Toshishige; Kaneko, Shuichi; Kasuga, Masato; Inoue, Hiroshi

    2016-03-15

    Central insulin action activates hepatic IL-6/STAT3 signaling, which suppresses the gene expression of hepatic gluconeogenic enzymes. The vagus nerve plays an important role in this centrally mediated hepatic response; however, the precise mechanism underlying this brain-liver interaction is unclear. Here, we present our findings that the vagus nerve suppresses hepatic IL-6/STAT3 signaling via α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (α7-nAchR) on Kupffer cells, and that central insulin action activates hepatic IL-6/STAT3 signaling by suppressing vagal activity. Indeed, central insulin-mediated hepatic IL-6/STAT3 activation and gluconeogenic gene suppression were impeded in mice with hepatic vagotomy, pharmacological cholinergic blockade, or α7-nAchR deficiency. In high-fat diet-induced obese and insulin-resistant mice, control of the vagus nerve by central insulin action was disturbed, inducing a persistent increase of inflammatory cytokines. These findings suggest that dysregulation of the α7-nAchR-mediated control of Kupffer cells by central insulin action may affect the pathogenesis of chronic hepatic inflammation in obesity.

  8. Binding kinetics of monomeric and aggregated IgG to Kupffer cells and hepatocytes of mice.

    PubMed Central

    Sancho, J; González, E; Escanero, J F; Egido, J

    1984-01-01

    The binding kinetics of human monomeric IgG and stable heat-aggregated IgG (A-IgG) to Fc receptors of hepatocytes and Kupffer cells isolated from mice was studied. After injection of radiolabelled proteins the 60-70% of hepatic uptake was recovered in parenchymal cells (hepatocytes). In experiments in vitro the A-IgG bound in larger amounts to hepatocytes and Kupffer cells than monomeric IgG. The association rate constants of aggregates were somewhat higher for Kupffer cells than for hepatocytes whereas the percentage uptake of aggregates by Kupffer cells was only 5-15% of that of hepatocytes. The equilibrium constants of aggregates binding to both cells amounted to 0.4-1 X 10(8) M-1 for A-IgG compared with an equilibrium constant for monomeric IgG of 1-2 X 10(7)M-1. The maximum number of IgG and A-IgG molecules bound per cell was higher on hepatocytes (mean 14 X 10(6)) than on Kupffer cells (mean 2 X 10(5)) which is in agreement with the higher binding capacity of hepatocytes for these proteins observed in vivo and in vitro experiments. The ability to compete for receptor binding seemed to reside exclusively in the Fc portion of IgG since F(ab')2 fragments of IgG failed to inhibit labelled monomeric IgG or A-IgG. The receptor seems to be specific for IgG since unlabelled monomeric IgA demonstrated no binding inhibition of labelled IgG or A-IgG on hepatocytes and Kupffer cells. The overall results further suggest that hepatocytes might through Fc receptors play a collaborative role with the mononuclear phagocytic system in the clearance of circulating immune complexes. PMID:6237982

  9. Th2-Associated Alternative Kupffer Cell Activation Promotes Liver Fibrosis without Inducing Local Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    López-Navarrete, Giuliana; Ramos-Martínez, Espiridión; Suárez-Álvarez, Karina; Aguirre-García, Jesús; Ledezma-Soto, Yadira; León-Cabrera, Sonia; Gudiño-Zayas, Marco; Guzmán, Carolina; Gutiérrez-Reyes, Gabriela; Hernández-Ruíz, Joselín; Camacho-Arroyo, Ignacio; Robles-Díaz, Guillermo; Kershenobich, David; Terrazas, Luis I.; Escobedo, Galileo

    2011-01-01

    Cirrhosis is the final outcome of liver fibrosis. Kupffer cell-mediated hepatic inflammation is considered to aggravate liver injury and fibrosis. Alternatively-activated macrophages are able to control chronic inflammatory events and trigger wound healing processes. Nevertheless, the role of alternative Kupffer cell activation in liver harm is largely unclear. Thus, we evaluated the participation of alternatively-activated Kupffer cells during liver inflammation and fibrosis in the murine model of carbon tetrachloride-induced hepatic damage. To stimulate alternative activation in Kupffer cells, 20 Taenia crassiceps (Tc) larvae were inoculated into BALBc/AnN female mice. Six weeks post-inoculation, carbon tetrachloride or olive oil were orally administered to Tc-inoculated and non-inoculated mice twice per week during other six weeks. The initial exposure of animals to T. crassiceps resulted in high serum concentrations of IL-4 accompanied by a significant increase in the hepatic mRNA levels of Ym-1, with no alteration in iNOS expression. In response to carbon tetrachloride, recruitment of inflammatory cell populations into the hepatic parenchyma was 5-fold higher in non-inoculated animals than Tc-inoculated mice. In contrast, carbon tetrachloride-induced liver fibrosis was significantly less in non-inoculated animals than in the Tc-inoculated group. The latter showed elevated IL-4 serum levels and low IFN-γ concentrations during the whole experiment, associated with hepatic expression of IL-4, TGF-β, desmin and α-sma, as well as increased mRNA levels of Arg-1, Ym-1, FIZZ-1 and MMR in Kupffer cells. These results suggest that alternative Kupffer cell activation is favored in a Th2 microenvironment, whereby such liver resident macrophages could exhibit a dichotomic role during chronic hepatic damage, being involved in attenuation of the inflammatory response but at the same time exacerbation of liver fibrosis. PMID:22110380

  10. Kupffer cells-dependent inflammation in the injured liver increases recruitment of mesenchymal stem cells in aging mice

    PubMed Central

    Zong, Chen; Lai, Fobao; Zhu, Pengxi; Liu, Yu; Jiang, Jinghua; Yang, Yang; Gao, Lu; Ye, Fei; Zhao, Qiudong; Li, Rong; Han, Zhipeng; Wei, Lixin

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) repair tissue injury and may be used to treat immune associated diseases. In carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced liver injury murine model, we administered MSCs. When MSCs were transmitted to young and old mice with liver injury, more MSCs were recruited in old mice. In old mice, inflammation, characterized by TNF-α and IL-6, was increased due to hyper-activation and hyper-function of Kupffer cells. Blocking Kupffer cells decreased MSCs migration in old mice. In vitro, Kupffer cells isolated from old mice secreted more inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Thus, hyper-activation of Kupffer cells in old mice increased recruitment of MSCs after their therapeutic administration. PMID:26716516

  11. The Kupffer Cell Number Affects the Outcome of Living Donor Liver Transplantation from Elderly Donors

    PubMed Central

    Hidaka, Masaaki; Eguchi, Susumu; Takatsuki, Mitsuhisa; Soyama, Akihiko; Ono, Shinichiro; Adachi, Tomohiko; Natsuda, Koji; Kugiyama, Tota; Hara, Takanobu; Okada, Satomi; Imamura, Hajime; Miuma, Satoshi; Miyaaki, Hisamitsu

    2016-01-01

    Background There have been no previous reports how Kupffer cells affect the outcome of living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) with an elderly donor. The aim of this study was to elucidate the influence of Kupffer cells on LDLT. Methods A total of 161 adult recipients underwent LDLT. The graft survival, prognostic factors for survival, and graft failure after LDLT were examined between cases with a young donor (<50, n = 112) and an elderly donor (≥50, N = 49). The Kupffer cells, represented by CD68-positive cell in the graft, were examined in the young and elderly donors. Results In a multivariable analysis, a donor older than 50 years, sepsis, and diabetes mellitus were significant predictors of graft failure after LDLT. The CD68 in younger donors was significantly more expressed than that in elderly donors. The group with a less number of CD68-positive cells in the graft had a significantly poor survival in the elderly donor group and prognostic factor for graft failure. Conclusions The worse outcome of LDLT with elderly donors might be related to the lower number of Kupffer cells in the graft, which can lead to impaired recovery of the liver function and may predispose patients to infectious diseases after LDLT. PMID:27819035

  12. Effect of allyl alcohol on hepatic transporter expression: Zonal patterns of expression and role of Kupffer cell function

    SciTech Connect

    Campion, Sarah N.; Tatis-Rios, Cristina; Augustine, Lisa M.; Goedken, Michael J.; Rooijen, Nico van; Cherrington, Nathan J.; Manautou, Jose E.

    2009-04-01

    During APAP toxicity, activation of Kupffer cells is critical for protection from hepatotoxicity and up-regulation of multidrug resistance-associated protein 4 (Mrp4) in centrilobular hepatocytes. The present study was performed to determine the expression profile of uptake and efflux transporters in mouse liver following treatment with allyl alcohol (AlOH), a periportal hepatotoxicant. This study also investigated the role of Kupffer cells in AlOH hepatotoxicity, and whether changes in transport protein expression by AlOH are dependent on the presence of Kupffer cells. C57BL/6J mice received 0.1 ml clodronate liposomes to deplete Kupffer cells or empty liposomes 48 h prior to dosing with 60 mg/kg AlOH, i.p. Hepatotoxicity was assessed by plasma ALT and histopathology. Hepatic transporter mRNA and protein expression were determined by branched DNA signal amplification assay and Western blotting, respectively. Depletion of Kupffer cells by liposomal clodronate treatment resulted in heightened susceptibility to AlOH toxicity. Exposure to AlOH increased mRNA levels of several Mrp genes, while decreasing organic anion transporting polypeptides (Oatps) mRNA expression. Protein analysis mirrored many of these mRNA changes. The presence of Kupffer cells was not required for the observed changes in uptake and efflux transporters induced by AlOH. Immunofluorescent analysis revealed enhanced Mrp4 staining exclusively in centrilobular hepatocytes of AlOH treated mice. These findings demonstrate that Kupffer cells are protective from AlOH toxicity and that induction of Mrp4 occurs in liver regions away from areas of AlOH damage independent of Kupffer cell function. These results suggest that Kupffer cell mediators do not play a role in mediating centrilobular Mrp4 induction in response to periportal damage by AlOH.

  13. Effects of zinc oxide nanoparticles on Kupffer cell phagosomal motility, bacterial clearance, and liver function

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Christa Y; Molina, Ramon M; Louzada, Andressa; Murdaugh, Kimberly M; Donaghey, Thomas C; Brain, Joseph D

    2015-01-01

    Background Zinc oxide engineered nanoparticles (ZnO ENPs) have potential as nanomedicines due to their inherent properties. Studies have described their pulmonary impact, but less is known about the consequences of ZnO ENP interactions with the liver. This study was designed to describe the effects of ZnO ENPs on the liver and Kupffer cells after intravenous (IV) administration. Materials and methods First, pharmacokinetic studies were conducted to determine the tissue distribution of neutron-activated 65ZnO ENPs post-IV injection in Wistar Han rats. Then, a noninvasive in vivo method to assess Kupffer cell phagosomal motility was employed using ferromagnetic iron particles and magnetometry. We also examined whether prior IV injection of ZnO ENPs altered Kupffer cell bactericidal activity on circulating Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Serum and liver tissues were collected to assess liver-injury biomarkers and histological changes, respectively. Results We found that the liver was the major site of initial uptake of 65ZnO ENPs. There was a time-dependent decrease in tissue levels of 65Zn in all organs examined, refecting particle dissolution. In vivo magnetometry showed a time-dependent and transient reduction in Kupffer cell phagosomal motility. Animals challenged with P. aeruginosa 24 hours post-ZnO ENP injection showed an initial (30 minutes) delay in vascular bacterial clearance. However, by 4 hours, IV-injected bacteria were cleared from the blood, liver, spleen, lungs, and kidneys. Seven days post-ZnO ENP injection, creatine phosphokinase and aspartate aminotransferase levels in serum were significantly increased. Histological evidence of hepatocyte damage and marginated neutrophils were observed in the liver. Conclusion Administration of ZnO ENPs transiently inhibited Kupffer cell phagosomal motility and later induced hepatocyte injury, but did not alter bacterial clearance from the blood or killing in the liver, spleen, lungs, or kidneys. Our data show that

  14. Radioprotective effect of kupffer cell depletion on hepatic sinusoidal endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Xing; Zeng, Zhao-Chong; Sun, Jing; Zhang, Zhen-Yu; Zeng, Hai-Ying; Hu, Wei-Xu

    2015-05-01

    Radiation-induced liver injury remains a clinical problem and data suggest that sinusoidal endothelial cells (SECs) are an important target. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the inhibition of Kupffer cells before exposure would protect SECs from radiation-induced injury. Sprague-Dawley rats were intravenously injected 24 h before irradiation with Kupffer cell inhibitor gadolinium chloride (GdCl3) (10 mg/kg body weight). Three groups of animals were treated: 1. control group (saline and sham irradiation); 2. GdCl3 + 30 Gy radiation group and 3. 30 Gy radiation only group. Specimens were collected at 2, 6, 12, 24 and 48 h after completion of each treatment. Liver tissue was assessed for inflammatory cytokine expression and radiation-induced SEC injury based on serum hyaluronic acid (HA) level, apoptosis and ultrastructural and histological analyses. The results showed that radiation exposure caused apoptosis of SECs, but not hepatocytes. Inflammatory cytokine expression, including tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) expression, was significantly attenuated in the GdCl3 + 30 Gy radiation group, compared with the 30 Gy radiation-only group (P < 0.05). The GdCl3 + radiation-treated rats exhibited significantly lower levels of HA and SEC apoptosis than the radiation-treated only rats at early time points, and radiation-induced liver injury was also attenuated. In conclusion, we hypothesize that selective Kupffer cell inhibition by gadolinium chloride was shown to reduce apoptosis in SECs caused by irradiation of the live and protected the liver against radiation-induced injury.

  15. HGF Secreted by Activated Kupffer Cells Induces Apoptosis of Plasmodium-Infected Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Lígia Antunes; Rodo, Joana; Rodrigues-Duarte, Lurdes; de Moraes, Luciana Vieira; Penha-Gonçalves, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Malaria liver stage infection is an obligatory parasite development step and represents a population bottleneck in Plasmodium infections, providing an advantageous target for blocking parasite cycle progression. Parasite development inside hepatocytes implies a gross cellular insult evoking innate host responses to counteract intra-hepatocytic infection. Using primary hepatocyte cultures, we investigated the role of Kupffer cell-derived hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) in malaria liver stage infection. We found that Kupffer cells from Plasmodium-infected livers produced high levels of HGF, which trigger apoptosis of infected hepatocytes through a mitochondrial-independent apoptosis pathway. HGF action in infected hepatocyte primary cultures results in a potent reduction of parasite yield by specifically sensitizing hepatocytes carrying established parasite exo-erythrocytic forms to undergo apoptosis. This apoptosis mechanism is distinct from cell death that is spontaneously induced in infected cultures and is governed by Fas signaling modulation through a mitochondrial-dependent apoptosis pathway. This work indicates that HGF and Fas signaling pathways are part of an orchestrated host apoptosis response that occurs during malaria liver stage infection, decreasing the success of infection of individual hepatocytes. Our results raise the hypothesis that paracrine signals derived from Kupffer cell activation are implicated in directing death of hepatocytes infected with the malaria parasite. PMID:28220125

  16. Inactivation of Kupffer Cells by Gadolinium Chloride Protects Murine Liver From Radiation-Induced Apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Du Shisuo; Qiang Min; Zeng Zhaochong; Ke Aiwu; Ji Yuan; Zhang Zhengyu; Zeng Haiying; Liu Zhongshan

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: To determine whether the inhibition of Kupffer cells before radiotherapy (RT) would protect hepatocytes from radiation-induced apoptosis. Materials and Methods: A single 30-Gy fraction was administered to the upper abdomen of Sprague-Dawley rats. The Kupffer cell inhibitor gadolinium chloride (GdCl3; 10 mg/kg body weight) was intravenously injected 24 h before RT. The rats were divided into four groups: group 1, sham RT plus saline (control group); group 2, sham RT plus GdCl3; group 3, RT plus saline; and group 4, RT plus GdCl3. Liver tissue was collected for measurement of apoptotic cytokine expression and evaluation of radiation-induced liver toxicity by analysis of liver enzyme activities, hepatocyte micronucleus formation, apoptosis, and histologic staining. Results: The expression of interleukin-1beta, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha was significantly attenuated in group 4 compared with group 3 at 2, 6, 24, and 48 h after injection (p <0.05). At early points after RT, the rats in group 4 exhibited significantly lower levels of liver enzyme activity, apoptotic response, and hepatocyte micronucleus formation compared with those in group 3. Conclusion: Selective inactivation of Kupffer cells with GdCl3 reduced radiation-induced cytokine production and protected the liver against acute radiation-induced damage.

  17. Hyaline droplets in Kupffer cells: a novel diagnostic clue for autoimmune hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Suzanne M; Jonas, Maureen M; Perez-Atayde, Antonio R

    2015-06-01

    Pediatric autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is relatively common and has a characteristic but relatively nonspecific histopathology with a usually prominent lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate. Herein, we describe for the first time the presence of characteristic hyaline droplets in the cytoplasm of Kupffer cells on routine hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) sections in AIH. The medical records and pathologic material over a 20-year period (1992 to 2012) were reviewed from children with AIH (n=30), hepatitis B virus (n=30), and hepatitis C virus (n=30) from the pathology files at Boston Children's Hospital. All children had percutaneous needle liver biopsies. We reviewed sections stained with H&E, PAS, and PAS with diastase for the presence of hyaline droplets in all 90 biopsies. We also performed immunohistochemical analysis for IgG, IgA, and IgD in 6 biopsies with AIH. Hyaline droplets were identified in Kupffer cells throughout the lobules in 15 of 30 biopsies (easily found in 13 and rare in 2); conversely, no droplets were identified in 15. Droplets were identified in 10 AIH type 1 biopsies, 1 in AIH type 2, 3 in overlap syndrome, and 1 in unclassified. Serum IgG levels, when available, were correlated with biopsy findings. Seventeen patients had serum IgG levels available for review. The average IgG level in patients without droplets in their biopsies was 1364 mg/dL, in contrast to 3424 mg/dL in patients with droplets (P=0.021). Immunohistochemical analysis performed in 6 biopsies revealed that droplets were nearly always positive for IgG, occasionally for IgA, and rarely for IgD. None of the biopsies in patients with hepatitis C contained hyaline droplets. One biopsy of a patient with hepatitis B revealed hyaline droplets; this biopsy had an unusually prominent plasmacytic infiltrate, and the patient was found to have an elevated IgG serum level and antibodies to smooth muscle actin. As far as we are aware, hyaline droplets in Kupffer cells on routine H&E sections have never been

  18. Cell collectivity regulation within migrating cell cluster during Kupffer's vesicle formation in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Matsui, Takaaki; Ishikawa, Hiroshi; Bessho, Yasumasa

    2015-01-01

    Although cell adhesion is thought to fasten cells tightly, cells that adhere to each other can migrate directionally. This group behavior, called “collective cell migration,” is observed during normal development, wound healing, and cancer invasion. Loss-of-function of cell adhesion molecules in several model systems of collective cell migration results in delay or inhibition of migration of cell groups but does not lead to dissociation of the cell groups, suggesting that mechanisms of cells staying assembled as a single cell cluster, termed as “cell collectivity,” remain largely unknown. During the formation of Kupffer's vesicle (KV, an organ of laterality in zebrafish), KV progenitors form a cluster and migrate together toward the vegetal pole. Importantly, in this model system of collective cell migration, knockdown of cell adhesion molecules or signal components leads to failure of cell collectivity. In this review, we summarize recent findings in cell collectivity regulation during collective migration of KV progenitor cells and describe our current understanding of how cell collectivity is regulated during collective cell migration. PMID:26000276

  19. Kupffer cell proliferation and glucan-induced granuloma formation in mice depleted of blood monocytes by strontium-89

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, M.; Naito, M.; Takahashi, K. )

    1990-03-01

    In mice with prolonged severe monocytopenia induced by selective irradiation of the bone marrow with the bone-seeking isotope 89Sr, the proliferative capacity of Kupffer cells was studied by immunohistochemistry with an anti-mouse macrophage monoclonal antibody, F4/80, ultrastructural peroxidase (PO) cytochemistry, and tritiated thymidine (3HTdR) autoradiography. The number and 3HTdR uptake of Kupffer cells were significantly increased in the splenectomized mice after severe monocytopenia had continued for more than 4 wk, and almost all the Kupffer cells showed a localization pattern of PO activity similar to that of resident macrophages in the liver of normal mice. In the glucan-induced granuloma formation in similar monocytopenic mice, Kupffer cells proliferated, conglomerated, and transformed into epithelioid cells, which fused together to become multinuclear giant cells. These results suggest that Kupffer cells are a self-renewing population by their own cell division and can participate actively in granulomatous inflammations in severely monocytopenic and intact mice.

  20. Kupffer cells induce Notch-mediated hepatocyte conversion in a common mouse model of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Terada, Maiko; Horisawa, Kenichi; Miura, Shizuka; Takashima, Yasuo; Ohkawa, Yasuyuki; Sekiya, Sayaka; Matsuda-Ito, Kanae; Suzuki, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC) is a malignant epithelial neoplasm composed of cells resembling cholangiocytes that line the intrahepatic bile ducts in portal areas of the hepatic lobule. Although ICC has been defined as a tumor arising from cholangiocyte transformation, recent evidence from genetic lineage-tracing experiments has indicated that hepatocytes can be a cellular origin of ICC by directly changing their fate to that of biliary lineage cells. Notch signaling has been identified as an essential factor for hepatocyte conversion into biliary lineage cells at the onset of ICC. However, the mechanisms underlying Notch signal activation in hepatocytes remain unclear. Here, using a mouse model of ICC, we found that hepatic macrophages called Kupffer cells transiently congregate around the central veins in the liver and express the Notch ligand Jagged-1 coincident with Notch activation in pericentral hepatocytes. Depletion of Kupffer cells prevents the Notch-mediated cell-fate conversion of hepatocytes to biliary lineage cells, inducing hepatocyte apoptosis and increasing mortality in mice. These findings will be useful for uncovering the pathogenic mechanism of ICC and developing prevenient and therapeutic strategies for this refractory disease. PMID:27698452

  1. Accumulation and metabolism of iron-dextran by hepatocytes, Kupffer cells and endothelial cells in the neonatal pig liver.

    PubMed

    Caperna, T J; Failla, M L; Steele, N C; Richards, M P

    1987-02-01

    Treatment of newborn pigs with supplemental iron is a common procedure utilized to prevent neonatal anemia. The aim of this study was to investigate the hepatic distribution and intracellular metabolism of iron-dextran, a widely used colloidal-iron-carbohydrate preparation. Piglets were injected intramuscularly with iron-dextran (50 mg Fe/kg body wt) at 1 d of age. Hepatocytes and sinusoidal cells (Kupffer cells and endothelial cells) were isolated from iron-treated and control (uninjected) piglets at 2, 6 and 11 d of age. The concentrations of iron, copper and zinc in isolated cells were determined by atomic-absorption spectroscopy. In addition, the quantities of ferritin-protein and ferritin-iron were measured by immunoelectrophoresis and ion-exchange chromatography, respectively. At 2 d of age, the concentration (microgram/mg cell protein) of iron was 5-, 62- and 54-fold higher in hepatocytes, Kupffer cells and endothelial cells, respectively, isolated from iron-treated piglets than from control piglets. Hepatocytes, Kupffer cells and endothelial cells accumulated ferritin in response to iron-dextran treatment. Higher concentrations of ferritin-protein and ferritin-iron were present in Kupffer cells and endothelial cells than in hepatocytes at all times after treatment with iron-dextran. The percentage of cellular iron that was associated with ferritin, however, was greater in hepatocytes than in sinusoidal cells. Iron accumulated by all three liver cell types was mobilized to extrahepatic sites. Slight alterations in zinc and copper status of liver cells were evident at 11 d of age as a result of iron treatment.

  2. Susceptibility of chicken Kupffer cells to Chinese virulent infectious bursal disease virus.

    PubMed

    Ma, Haiyan; Zhao, Sufen; Ma, Yunfei; Guo, Xin; Han, Deping; Jia, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Weiwei; Teng, Kedao

    2013-06-28

    Infectious bursal disease (IBD) is an acute, highly contagious, and immunosuppressive avian disease caused by IBD virus (IBDV). Although the effects of IBDV on bursa of Fabricius in chickens have been well reported, the impacts of IBDV on liver after IBDV infection are still unclear. In the present study, specific pathogen free (SPF) chickens were experimentally inoculated with IBDV Chinese virulent strain BC6/85, and the cells in liver and bursa were examined by immunohistochemistry and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The congestion of liver tissue and fatty degeneration of hepatocytes were characteristics of microscopical changes in chicken liver at 3 days post infection (d.p.i.), whereas there were follicular lymphoid necrosis, apoptosis, depletion, as well as edema and congestion in bursa. In addition, the number of IBDV-positive cells peaked at 4 d.p.i. in bursa and at 3 d.p.i. in liver, respectively. With respect to ultrastructural pathological changes of hepatocytes, mitochondria swelled and nucleus deformed into an irregular shape or its chromatin peripherally condensed which indicated that the hepatocyte was at the early stage of apoptosis, and the electron-lucent lipid droplets in a variety of sizes were observed within cytoplasm. Kupffer cells became "swollen-like" and the electron-density of their cytoplasm was lower than that of cells in uninfected group. Liver glycogen deposits significantly declined from 2 to 5 d.p.i. and recovered strongly at 6 d.p.i. More importantly, KLU01 (macrophage marker) positive (KUL01(+)) cells were infiltrated in bursa and liver in IBDV-exposed chickens by immunoperoxidase staining. To demonstrate the correlation between IBDV and macrophages in bursa and liver, we further investigated the colocalization of viral antigens and macrophages by double immunofluorescence labeling. At 4 d.p.i., the percentage of double positive cells (IBDV positive and KUL01(+) cells) accounted for 26.5 percent of the total IBDV positive

  3. Inhibition of allogeneic T-cell response by Kupffer cells expressing indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Mao-Lin; Wang, Yao-Dong; Tian, Yi-Feng; Lai, Zhi-De; Yan, Lv-Nan

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To explore the possibility and mechanism of inhibiting allogeneic T-cell responses by Kupffer cells (KC) pretreated with interferon-γ (IFN-γ) in vitro. METHODS: The expressions of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) mRNA and FasL mRNA in KC pretreated with IFN-γ were studied with real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The catabolism of tryptophan by IDO from KC was analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography. Allogeneic T-cell response was used to confirm the inhibition of KC in vitro. The proliferation of lymphocytes was detected using [3H] thymidine incorporation. Cell cycle and lymphocyte apoptosis were evaluated by flow cytometric assay. RESULTS: Real-time PCR revealed IDO mRNA and FasL mRNA expressions in KC pretreated with IFN-γ, and IDO catabolic effect was confirmed by a decrease in tryptophan and increase in kynurenine concentration. KC expressing IDO and FasL in BABL/c mice acquired the ability to suppress the proliferation of T-cells from C57BL/6, which could be blocked by addition of 1-methyl-tryptophan and anti-FasL antibody. KC expressing IDO could induce allogeneic T-cell apoptosis. CONCLUSION: In addition to Fas/FasL pathway, IDO may be another mechanism for KC to induce immune tolerance. PMID:20128035

  4. Steric stabilization of microspheres with grafted polyethylene oxide reduces phagocytosis by rat Kupffer cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Harper, G R; Davies, M C; Davis, S S; Tadros, T F; Taylor, D C; Irving, M P; Waters, J A

    1991-09-01

    Sterically stabilized polyethylene oxide-polystyrene copolymer microspheres, (PS-PEO) and charge stabilized polystyrene (PS) microspheres of similar size (1 micron) were prepared in order to compare their uptake by cultured rat Kupffer cells isolated by centrifugal elutriation. The uptake of the sterically stabilized particles was found to be much less than that for the charge stabilized control. The uptake of microspheres stabilized with covalently grafted PEO was lower or equivalent to that of control microspheres stabilized by the adsorption of the non-ionic PEO-polypropylene oxide (PPO-PEO) surfactant Poloxamer 238 or Methoxy-PEO. Phagocytic uptake by Kupffer cells at low and body temperature (8 degrees C and 37 degrees C) demonstrated that PS-PEO particles showed both low adherence and low metabolic uptake. The adsorption of PEO, as Poloxamer 238, to particles with covalently attached or grafted PEO resulted in a synergistic reduction in uptake that was greater than the individual effects of grafting and adsorption alone (P less than or equal to 0.001). It is suggested that this combination produces a more effective steric barrier on the particle surface with the Poloxamer adsorbing to the surface between the grafted PEO chains. The relevance to drug targeting/carrier systems is discussed.

  5. Bone marrow-derived monocytes give rise to self-renewing and fully differentiated Kupffer cells

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Charlotte L.; Zheng, Fang; De Baetselier, Patrick; Martens, Liesbet; Saeys, Yvan; De Prijck, Sofie; Lippens, Saskia; Abels, Chloé; Schoonooghe, Steve; Raes, Geert; Devoogdt, Nick; Lambrecht, Bart N.; Beschin, Alain; Guilliams, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Self-renewing tissue-resident macrophages are thought to be exclusively derived from embryonic progenitors. However, whether circulating monocytes can also give rise to such macrophages has not been formally investigated. Here we use a new model of diphtheria toxin-mediated depletion of liver-resident Kupffer cells to generate niche availability and show that circulating monocytes engraft in the liver, gradually adopt the transcriptional profile of their depleted counterparts and become long-lived self-renewing cells. Underlining the physiological relevance of our findings, circulating monocytes also contribute to the expanding pool of macrophages in the liver shortly after birth, when macrophage niches become available during normal organ growth. Thus, like embryonic precursors, monocytes can and do give rise to self-renewing tissue-resident macrophages if the niche is available to them. PMID:26813785

  6. Critical Role of Kupffer Cell CD89 Expression in Experimental IgA Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Lijun; Li, Bingyu; Huang, Mengwen; Xie, Kun; Li, Dong; Li, You; Gu, Hua; Fang, Jianmin

    2016-01-01

    Although IgA nephropathy (IgAN) is the most common primary glomerulonephritis worldwide, its etiology remains only partly understood. It is clear that the pathogenesis of IgAN involves the formation of macromolecular IgA1 complexes and increased levels of serum IgA1 and IgA1-immune complexes(IC), due to defective IgA1 clearance. Previous studies suggest that the blood and tissue myeloid cell-expressed IgA Fc receptor (FcαR/CD89) mediates IgA-IC clearance and its dysfunction, via decreased activity or excessive levels of soluble FcαR/sCD89 induces IgAN. Such a mechanism requires robust stimulation of IgAN levels via forced expression of CD89. In the absence of unequivocal evidence supporting such a mechanism to date, we attempted to test the extent of CD89-evoked IgAN by generating a transgenic mouse strain expressing human CD89 under the control of murine CD14 promotor. No deposition of IgA-CD89 complexes or glomerulonephritis was detected, however. Further studies showed that elimination of murine IgA was mediated by Kupffer cells. In patients, however, CD89/IgA complexes were detected, and injection of patient IgA induced IgAN-like features in CD89 Tg mice. In transgenic mice, IgAN pathogenesis involves impaired clearance of abnormal IgA via CD89, primarily by the Kupffer cells. Conditional IgAN progression in CD89 transgenic mice thus reveals important aspects of IgAN pathogenesis. PMID:27437939

  7. Role of Kupffer cells in failure of fatty livers following liver transplantation and alcoholic liver injury.

    PubMed

    Thurman, R G; Gao, W; Connor, H D; Adachi, Y; Stachlewitz, R F; Zhong, Z; Knecht, K T; Bradford, B U; Mason, R P; Lemasters, J J

    1995-01-01

    Kupffer cells have been implicated in mechanisms of pathophysiology following liver transplantation. Recently, postoperative injury in ethanol-induced fatty liver has been evaluated because fatty livers often fail following transplantation. The low-flow, reflow liver perfusion model was used to study the role of Kupffer cells (KC) in reperfusion injury to fatty livers from rats fed a diet containing ethanol for 4-5 weeks. Treatment with GdCl3, which selectively destroys KC, decreased cell death significantly. Thus, destruction of KC minimized hepatic reperfusion injury, most likely by inhibiting free radical formation and improving microcirculation. Since it was demonstrated recently that destruction of KC prevented the hypermetabolic state observed with acute alcohol exposure, their involvement in events leading to alcohol-induced liver disease was investigated. In rats exposed to ethanol continuously via intragastric feeding for up to 4 weeks, GdCl3 treatment prevented elevation of aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and dramatically reduced the average hepatic pathological score. These results indicate that KC participate in the early phases of alcohol-induced liver injury. Endotoxaemia occurs in alcoholics and activates KC; therefore, we evaluated the effect of minimizing bacterial endotoxin by intestinal sterilization with the antibiotics polymyxin B and neomycin. Antibiotics diminished plasma endotoxin levels significantly and prevented ethanol-induced increases in AST values. These results indicate that endotoxin is involved in the mechanism of ethanol-induced liver injury. A six-line radical spectrum was detected with electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy in bile from alcohol-treated rats which was blocked by GdCl3. The free radical adducts had hyperfine coupling constants characteristic of lipid-derived free radical products. In conclusion, these studies demonstrate that KC are involved in reperfusion injury to ethanol-induced fatty livers and hepatic

  8. Biosynthesis of platelet-activating factor by cultured rat Kupffer cells stimulated with calcium ionophore A23187.

    PubMed Central

    Chao, W; Siafaka-Kapadai, A; Olson, M S; Hanahan, D J

    1989-01-01

    Cultured rat Kupffer cells synthesize and release platelet-activating factor (PAF) when stimulated with calcium ionophore A23187. The production of PAF is concentration- and time-dependent and, based upon [3H]serotonin release assays, approx. 1.0 pmol of PAF is formed per 8 x 10(6) cells during 10 min of ionophore stimulation. It is suggested that Kupffer cells are important cellular components which produce and release PAF in order to facilitate communication between hepatic sinusoidal and parenchymal cells. Further, it is suggested that such mediator production in response to reticulo-endothelial cell stimulation causes the hepatic glycogenolytic response previously in the isolated perfused rat liver. PMID:2494988

  9. Rat liver endothelial and Kupffer cell-mediated mutagenicity and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and aflatoxin B sub 1

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, P.; Schlemper, B.; Molitor, E.; Platt, K.L.; Seidel, A.; Oesch, F. )

    1990-08-01

    The ability of isolated rat liver endothelial and Kupffer cells to activate benzo(a)pyrene (BP), trans-7,8-dihydroxy-7,8-dihydrobenzo(a)pyrene (DDBP), trans-1,2-dihydroxy-1,2-dihydrochrysene (DDCH), and aflatoxin B{sub 1} (AFB{sub 1}) to mutagenic metabolites was assessed by means of a cell-mediated bacterial mutagenicity assay and compared with the ability of parenchymal cells to activate these compounds. Endothelial and Kupffer cells from untreated rats were able to activate AFB{sub 1} and DDBP; DDBP was activated even in the absence of an NADPH-generating system. Pretreating the animals with Aroclor 1254 strongly enhanced the mutagenicity of the dihydrodiol, whereas the mutagenicity of AFB{sub 1} showed a slight increase. BP and DDCH were only activated by endothelial and Kupffer cells isolated from Aroclor 1254-pretreated rats. Parenchymal cells form untreated animals activated all four carcinogens tested; Aroclor 1254 enhanced the parenchymal cell-mediated mutagenicity of BP and DDCH but did not affect that of DDBP and clearly reduced that of AFB{sub 1}. The reduced mutagenicity of AFB{sub 1} correlates with the decrease in the amount of 2{alpha}-hydroxytestosterone formed when testosterone was incubated with parenchymal cell microsomes from Aroclor 1254-pretreated rats (compared with microsomes from untreated animals): the formation of 2{alpha}-hydroxytestosterone is specifically catalyzed by cytochrome P-450h, a hemoprotein thought to be involved in the activation of AFB{sub 1}. These results show that not only rat liver parenchymal cells, but also endothelial and Kupffer cells, activated several carcinogens to mutagenic metabolites.

  10. Graptopetalum Paraguayense Ameliorates Chemical-Induced Rat Hepatic Fibrosis In Vivo and Inactivates Stellate Cells and Kupffer Cells In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Su, Li-Jen; Chang, Chia-Chuan; Yang, Chih-Hsueh; Hsieh, Shur-Jong; Wu, Yi-Chin; Lai, Jin-Mei; Tseng, Tzu-Ling; Huang, Chi-Ying F.; Hsu, Shih-Lan

    2013-01-01

    Background Graptopetalum paraguayense (GP) is a folk herbal medicine with hepatoprotective effects that is used in Taiwan. The aim of this study was to evaluate the hepatoprotective and antifibrotic effects of GP on experimental hepatic fibrosis in both dimethylnitrosamine (DMN)- and carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced liver injury rats. Methods Hepatic fibrosis-induced rats were fed with the methanolic extract of GP (MGP) by oral administration every day. Immunohistochemistry, biochemical assays, and Western blot analysis were performed. The effects of MGP on the expression of fibrotic markers and cytokines in the primary cultured hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) and Kupffer cells, respectively, were evaluated. Results Oral administration of MGP significantly alleviated DMN- or CCl4-induced liver inflammation and fibrosis. High levels of alanine transaminase, aspartate transaminase, bilirubin, prothrombin activity and mortality rates also decreased in rats treated with MGP. There were significantly decreased hydroxyproline levels in therapeutic rats compared with those of the liver-damaged rats. Collagen I and alpha smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) expression were all reduced by incubation with MGP in primary cultured rat HSCs. Furthermore, MGP induced apoptotic cell death in activated HSCs. MGP also suppressed lipopolysaccharide-stimulated rat Kupffer cell activation by decreasing nitric oxide, tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 production, and increasing interleukin-10 expression. Conclusions The results show that the administration of MGP attenuated toxin-induced hepatic damage and fibrosis in vivo and inhibited HSC and Kupffer cell activation in vitro, suggesting that MGP might be a promising complementary or alternative therapeutic agent for liver inflammation and fibrosis. PMID:23335984

  11. Inflammatory conditions induce gap junctional communication between rat Kupffer cells both in vivo and in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Eugenín, Eliseo A.; González, Hernán E.; Sánchez, Helmuth A.; Brañes, María C.; Sáez, Juan C.

    2007-01-01

    Connexin43 (Cx43), a gap junction protein subunit, has been previously detected in Kupffer cells (KCs) during liver inflammation, however, KCs phagocytose cell debris that may include Cx43 protein, which could explain the detection of Cx43 in KCs. We determined that KCs express Cx43 and form gap junctions both in vivo and in vitro. In liver sections of animals treated with LPS, Cx43 was detected at ED2+ cells interfaces, indicating formation of GJ between KCs in vivo. In vitro, unstimulated KCs cultures did not form functional GJs, and expressed low levels of Cx43 that showed a diffuse intracellular distribution. In contrast, KCs treated with LPS plus IFN-γ, expressed a greater amount of Cx43 at both the, protein and mRNA levels, and showed Cx43 at cell-cell contacts associated with higher dye coupling. In conclusion, activation of KCs in vivo or in vitro resulted in enhanced Cx43 expression levels and formation of GJ that might play relevant roles during liver inflammation. PMID:17900549

  12. Liver Monocytes and Kupffer Cells Remain Transcriptionally Distinct during Chronic Viral Infection

    PubMed Central

    van de Garde, Martijn D. B.; Movita, Dowty; van der Heide, Marieke; Herschke, Florence; De Jonghe, Sandra; Gama, Lucio; Boonstra, Andre

    2016-01-01

    Due to the scarcity of immunocompetent animal models for chronic viral hepatitis, little is known about the role of the innate intrahepatic immune system during viral replication in the liver. These insights are however fundamental for the understanding of the inappropriate adaptive immune responses during the chronic phase of the infection. We apply the Lymphocytic Choriomenigitis Virus (LCMV) clone 13 mouse model to examine chronic virus-host interactions of Kupffer cells (KC) and infiltrating monocytes (IM) in an infected liver. LCMV infection induced overt clinical hepatitis, with rise in ALT and serum cytokines, and increased intrahepatic F4/80 expression. Despite ongoing viral replication, whole liver transcriptome showed baseline expression levels of inflammatory cytokines, interferons, and interferon induced genes during the chronic infection phase. Transcriptome analyses of sorted KC and IMs using NanoString technology revealed two unique phenotypes with only minimal overlap. At the chronic viral infection phase, KC showed no increased transcription of activation markers Cd80 and Cd86, but an increased expression of genes related to antigen presentation, whereas monocytes were more activated and expressed higher levels of Tnf transcripts. Although both KCs and intrahepatic IM share the surface markers F4/80 and CD11b, their transcriptomes point towards distinctive roles during virus-induced chronic hepatitis. PMID:27812182

  13. A new Kupffer cell receptor mediating plasma clearance of carcinoembryonic antigen by the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Toth, C A; Thomas, P; Broitman, S A; Zamcheck, N

    1982-01-01

    Native human carcinoembryonic antigen is rapidly removed from the circulation by the rat liver Kupffer cell after intravenous injection. The molecule is subsequently transferred to the hepatocyte in an immunologically identifiable form. Carcinoembryonic antigen has a circulatory half-life of 3.7 (+/- 0.8) min, and cellular entry is by receptor-mediated endocytosis. Non-specific fluid pinocytosis and phagocytosis can be excluded as possible mechanisms by the kinetics of clearance and failure of colloidal carbon to inhibit uptake. Substances with known affinity for the hepatic receptors for mannose, N-acetylglucosamine, fucose and galactose all fail to inhibit carcinoembryonic antigen clearance. After two cycles of the Smith degradation, carcinoembryonic antigen is still able to inhibit clearance of the native molecule. Receptor specificity is apparently not dependent on those non-reducing terminal sugars of the native molecule. Performic acid-oxidized carcinoembryonic antigen also inhibits clearance of carcinoembryonic antigen in vivo. Receptor binding is not dependent on tertiary protein conformation. Non-specific cross-reacting antigen, a glycoprotein structurally similar to carcinoembryonic antigen, is cleared by the same mechanism. PMID:6896821

  14. A new Kupffer cell receptor mediating plasma clearance of carcinoembryonic antigen by the rat.

    PubMed

    Toth, C A; Thomas, P; Broitman, S A; Zamcheck, N

    1982-05-15

    Native human carcinoembryonic antigen is rapidly removed from the circulation by the rat liver Kupffer cell after intravenous injection. The molecule is subsequently transferred to the hepatocyte in an immunologically identifiable form. Carcinoembryonic antigen has a circulatory half-life of 3.7 (+/- 0.8) min, and cellular entry is by receptor-mediated endocytosis. Non-specific fluid pinocytosis and phagocytosis can be excluded as possible mechanisms by the kinetics of clearance and failure of colloidal carbon to inhibit uptake. Substances with known affinity for the hepatic receptors for mannose, N-acetylglucosamine, fucose and galactose all fail to inhibit carcinoembryonic antigen clearance. After two cycles of the Smith degradation, carcinoembryonic antigen is still able to inhibit clearance of the native molecule. Receptor specificity is apparently not dependent on those non-reducing terminal sugars of the native molecule. Performic acid-oxidized carcinoembryonic antigen also inhibits clearance of carcinoembryonic antigen in vivo. Receptor binding is not dependent on tertiary protein conformation. Non-specific cross-reacting antigen, a glycoprotein structurally similar to carcinoembryonic antigen, is cleared by the same mechanism.

  15. Targeting dexamethasone to Kupffer cells: effects on liver inflammation and fibrosis in rats.

    PubMed

    Melgert, B N; Olinga, P; Van Der Laan, J M; Weert, B; Cho, J; Schuppan, D; Groothuis, G M; Meijer, D K; Poelstra, K

    2001-10-01

    Kupffer cells (KC) play an important role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory liver diseases leading to fibrosis. Anti-inflammatory drugs are only effective when administered at high doses that may cause side effects. Therefore, dexamethasone coupled to mannosylated albumin (Dexa(5)-Man(10)-HSA) was designed by us to selectively deliver this anti-inflammatory drug to the KC. The effectiveness of Dexa(5)-Man(10)-HSA was studied both in organ cultures and fibrosis induced by bile duct ligation (BDL) in rats. Dexa(5)-Man(10)-HSA accumulated in livers of both healthy and fibrotic rats (67% +/- 5% and 70% +/- 9% of the dose, respectively) and uptake was found almost exclusively in KC. Active dexamethasone was liberated from its carrier, because Dexa(5)-Man(10)-HSA could effectively inhibit nitric oxide (NO) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) release in endotoxin-activated liver slices. In vivo, however, this was associated with increased collagen I and III depositions and enhanced tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1) mRNA expression. This was accompanied by a decreased influx of reactive oxygen species (ROS) producing cells in the livers of BDL animals treated with Dexa(5)-Man(10)-HSA as compared with untreated BDL rats. Dexa(5)-Man(10)-HSA treatment also replenished the depleted glycogen stores in hepatocytes of BDL livers. In conclusion, our studies showed selective delivery of dexamethasone to KC with Dexa(5)-Man(10)-HSA. This conjugate reduced intrahepatic ROS in vivo and TNF-alpha production in vitro and prevented glycogen depletion in vivo, indicating effective pharmacologic targeting. Dexa(5)-Man(10)-HSA, however, also accelerated fibrogenesis, which was paralleled by TIMP-1 mRNA induction. Targeting of dexamethasone to KC provides evidence for a dual role of this cell type in fibrogenesis of BDL rats.

  16. Fc receptor mediated endocytosis of small soluble immunoglobulin G immune complexes in Kupffer and endothelial cells from rat liver.

    PubMed

    Løvdal, T; Andersen, E; Brech, A; Berg, T

    2000-09-01

    Soluble circulating immunoglobulin G immune complexes are mainly eliminated by the liver, predominantly by uptake in the Kupffer cells, but also the liver endothelial cells seem to be of importance. In the present study we have followed the intracellular turnover of immune complexes after Fc(gamma) receptor mediated endocytosis in cultured rat liver endothelial cells and Kupffer cells by means of isopycnic centrifugation, DAB cross-linking and morphological techniques. For the biochemical experiments the antigen, dinitrophenylated bovine serum albumin (BSA), was labeled with radioiodinated tyramine cellobiose that cannot cross biological membranes and therefore traps labeled degradation products at the site of formation. The endocytic pathway followed by immune complexes was compared with that followed by scavenger receptor ligands, such as formaldehyde treated BSA and dinitrophenylated BSA, and the mannose receptor ligand ovalbumin. Both Kupffer cells and liver endothelial cells took up and degraded the immune complexes, but there was a clear delay in the degradation of immune complexes as compared to degradation of ligands taken up via scavenger receptors. The kinetics of the endocytosis of scavenger receptor ligand was unaffected by simultaneous uptake of immune complexes. Experiments using both biochemical and morphological techniques indicated that the delayed degradation was due to a late arrival of the immune complexes at the lysosomes, which partly was explained by retroendocytosis of immune complexes. Electron microscopy studies revealed that the immune complexes were retained in the early endosomes that remained accessible to other endocytic markers such as ovalbumin. In addition, the immune complexes were seen in multivesicular compartments apparently devoid of other endocytic markers. Finally, the immune complexes were degraded in the same lysosomes as the ligands of scavenger receptors. Thus, immune complexes seem to follow an endocytic pathway that is

  17. Vanillin suppresses Kupffer cell-related colloidal carbon-induced respiratory burst activity in isolated perfused rat liver: anti-inflammatory implications.

    PubMed

    Galgani, José E; Núñez, Bárbara; Videla, Luis A

    2012-12-01

    The inhibition of NADPH oxidase has become a potential therapeutic target for oxidative stress-related diseases. We investigated whether vanillin modifies hepatic O(2) consumption associated with Kupffer cell functioning. The influence of vanillin on Kupffer cell functioning was studied in isolated perfused rat liver by colloidal carbon (CC) infusion (0.5 mg ml(-1)), concomitantly with sinusoidal efflux of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) as an organ viability parameter. CC infusion increased the rate of O(2) consumption of the liver above basal values, an effect that represents the respiratory burst activity of Kupffer cells. However, CC-dependent respiratory burst activity was suppressed by previous infusion of 2 mM vanillin. Vanillin did not affect the liver CC uptake rate and liver sinusoidal efflux of LDH efflux. These findings, elicited by vanillin, were reproduced by the well-established NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin. In conclusion, vanillin suppresses the respiratory burst activity of Kupffer cells as assessed in intact liver, which may be associated with the inhibition of macrophage NADPH oxidase activity. Such a finding may have relevance in conditions underlying Kupffer cell-dependent up-regulation of the expression and release of pro-inflammatory mediators by redox-dependent mechanisms.

  18. Activation of Kupffer Cells Is Associated with a Specific Dysbiosis Induced by Fructose or High Fat Diet in Mice.

    PubMed

    Ferrere, Gladys; Leroux, Anne; Wrzosek, Laura; Puchois, Virginie; Gaudin, Françoise; Ciocan, Dragos; Renoud, Marie-Laure; Naveau, Sylvie; Perlemuter, Gabriel; Cassard, Anne-Marie

    2016-01-01

    The increase consumption of fructose in diet is associated with liver inflammation. As a specific fructan substrate, fructose may modify the gut microbiota which is involved in obesity-induced liver disease. Here, we aimed to assess whether fructose-induced liver damage was associated with a specific dysbiosis, especially in mice fed a high fat diet (HFD). To this end, four groups of mice were fed with normal and HFD added or not with fructose. Body weight and glucose sensitivity, liver inflammation, dysbiosis and the phenotype of Kupffer cells were determined after 16 weeks of diet. Food intake was increased in the two groups of mice fed with the HFD. Mice fed with HFD and fructose showed a higher infiltration of lymphocytes into the liver and a lower inflammatory profile of Kupffer cells than mice fed with the HFD without fructose. The dysbiosis associated with diets showed that fructose specifically prevented the decrease of Mouse intestinal bacteria in HFD fed mice and increased Erysipelotrichi in mice fed with fructose, independently of the amount of fat. In conclusion, fructose, used as a sweetener, induced a dysbiosis which is different in presence of fat in the diet. Consequently, the activation of Kupffer cells involved in mice model of HFD-induced liver inflammation was not observed in an HFD/fructose combined diet. These data highlight that the complexity of diet composition could highly impact the development of liver lesions during obesity. Specific dysbiosis associated with the diet could explain that the progressions of liver damage are different.

  19. Kupffer Cell Activation by Ambient Air Particulate Matter Exposure May Exacerbate Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Hui-Hui; Fiel, M. Isabel; Sun, Qinghua; Guo, Jinsheng; Gordon, Ronald E.; Chen, Lung-Chi; Friedman, Scott L.; Odin, Joseph A.; Allina, Jorge

    2009-01-01

    Due to increased obesity, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is now the most prevalent liver disease in the United States. NAFLD is considered a component of metabolic syndrome, a cluster of disorders that also includes diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, arteriosclerosis, and hypertension. Exposure to ambient air particulate matter with aerodynamic diameters < 2.5 µm (PM2.5) is a risk factor for arteriosclerosis as well as lung disease, but its effect on NAFLD is unknown. PM2.5 induces pulmonary dysfunction via toll-like receptor activation on alveolar macrophages. Toll-like receptor activation of Kupffer cells, resident hepatic macrophages, and subsequent pro-inflammatory cytokine production have been shown to play a key role in NAFLD progression. We hypothesized that PM2.5 exposure is a significant risk factor for progression of NAFLD. Thus, following exposure of male C57BL/6 mice fed high fat chow to concentrated air particulate matter (CAPs) or filtered air for 6 wk, progression of NAFLD was evaluated by standardized histological assessment of hepatic inflammation and fibrosis. In mice fed high fat chow, the hepatic inflammatory grade (3.00 ± 0.00 vs. 1.50 ± 0.71, p < 0.001) and fibrosis stage (1.00 ± 0.00 vs. 0.60 ± 0.52, p = 0.023) were both significantly higher in mice exposed to CAPs versus filtered air, respectively. Increased numbers of Kupffer cells contained PM in CAPs-exposed mice (2.00 ± 0.94 vs. 0.20 ± 0.42, respectively, p < 0.001). PM exposure increased IL-6 secretion up to seven fold in a dose-dependent manner by isolated wild-type but not TLR4−/− Kupffer cells (p < 0.050). Conclusion: Ambient PM2.5 exposure may be a significant risk factor for NAFLD progression. PMID:19908945

  20. Activation of Kupffer Cells Is Associated with a Specific Dysbiosis Induced by Fructose or High Fat Diet in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ferrere, Gladys; Leroux, Anne; Wrzosek, Laura; Puchois, Virginie; Gaudin, Françoise; Ciocan, Dragos; Renoud, Marie-Laure; Naveau, Sylvie; Perlemuter, Gabriel; Cassard, Anne-Marie

    2016-01-01

    The increase consumption of fructose in diet is associated with liver inflammation. As a specific fructan substrate, fructose may modify the gut microbiota which is involved in obesity-induced liver disease. Here, we aimed to assess whether fructose-induced liver damage was associated with a specific dysbiosis, especially in mice fed a high fat diet (HFD). To this end, four groups of mice were fed with normal and HFD added or not with fructose. Body weight and glucose sensitivity, liver inflammation, dysbiosis and the phenotype of Kupffer cells were determined after 16 weeks of diet. Food intake was increased in the two groups of mice fed with the HFD. Mice fed with HFD and fructose showed a higher infiltration of lymphocytes into the liver and a lower inflammatory profile of Kupffer cells than mice fed with the HFD without fructose. The dysbiosis associated with diets showed that fructose specifically prevented the decrease of Mouse intestinal bacteria in HFD fed mice and increased Erysipelotrichi in mice fed with fructose, independently of the amount of fat. In conclusion, fructose, used as a sweetener, induced a dysbiosis which is different in presence of fat in the diet. Consequently, the activation of Kupffer cells involved in mice model of HFD-induced liver inflammation was not observed in an HFD/fructose combined diet. These data highlight that the complexity of diet composition could highly impact the development of liver lesions during obesity. Specific dysbiosis associated with the diet could explain that the progressions of liver damage are different. PMID:26731543

  1. Thyroid Hormone-Induced Cytosol-to-Nuclear Translocation of Rat Liver Nrf2 Is Dependent on Kupffer Cell Functioning

    PubMed Central

    Videla, Luis A.; Cornejo, Pamela; Romanque, Pamela; Santibáñez, Catherine; Castillo, Iván; Vargas, Romina

    2012-01-01

    L-3,3′,5-triiodothyronine (T3) administration upregulates nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) in rat liver, which is redox-sensitive transcription factor mediating cytoprotection. In this work, we studied the role of Kupffer cell respiratory burst activity, a process related to reactive oxygen species generation and liver homeostasis, in Nrf2 activation using the macrophage inactivator gadolinium chloride (GdCl3; 10 mg/kg i.v. 72 h before T3 [0.1 mg/kg i.p.]) or NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin (1.5 mmol/L added to the drinking water for 7 days before T3), and determinations were performed 2 h after T3. T3 increased nuclear/cytosolic Nrf2 content ratio and levels of heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1), catalytic subunit of glutamate cysteine ligase, and thioredoxin (Western blot) over control values, proteins whose gene transcription is induced by Nrf2. These changes were suppressed by GdCl3 treatment prior to T3, an agent-eliciting Kupffer-cell depletion, inhibition of colloidal carbon phagocytosis, and the associated respiratory burst activity, with enhancement in nuclear inhibitor of Nrf2 kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1)/Nrf2 content ratios suggesting Nrf2 degradation. Under these conditions, T3-induced tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) response was eliminated by previous GdCl3 administration. Similar to GdCl3, apocynin given before T3 significantly reduced liver Nrf2 activation and HO-1 expression, a NADPH oxidase inhibitor eliciting abolishment of colloidal carbon-induced respiratory burst activity without altering carbon phagocytosis. It is concluded that Kupffer cell functioning is essential for upregulation of liver Nrf2-signaling pathway by T3. This contention is supported by suppression of the respiratory burst activity of Kupffer cells and the associated reactive oxygen species production by GdCl3 or apocynin given prior to T3, thus hindering Nrf2 activation. PMID:22649286

  2. The role of Kupffer cells in glucan-induced granuloma formation in the liver of mice depleted of blood monocytes by administration of strontium-89

    SciTech Connect

    Naito, M.; Takahashi, K. )

    1991-05-01

    In order to elucidate the role of Kupffer cells in granuloma formation in the liver of mice under a condition of severe monocytopenia induced by administration of strontium-89, granulomas were produced by particulate glucan injection and examined histopathologically, immunohistochemically, by ({sup 3}H)thymidine autoradiography, and in culture experiments. Hepatic granulomas were smaller, less numerous, and more irregularly shaped in the monocytopenic mice than in the control mice. The granulomas were composed of multinuclear giant cells, epithelioid cells, Kupffer cells, and T lymphocytes, but not monocytes or granulocytes. Kupffer cells were heavily labeled with ({sup 3}H)thymidine in the monocytopenic mice, particularly just before the stage of granuloma formation, and then clustered in the liver sinusoids. At 8 days, they formed granulomas, transformed into epithelioid cells, and transformed further into multinuclear giant cells. Although the culture of liver cell suspensions prepared from the livers of monocytopenic mice sustained diffuse proliferation of macrophages on a monolayer of mouse stromal cell line (ST2), no monocyte/macrophage colonies were formed. From these results, it is reasonable to conclude that Kupffer cells alone are activated in a condition without a supply of monocytes from peripheral blood; proliferate and cluster in the hepatic sinusoids; transform into peroxidase-negative macrophages, epithelioid cells, and multinuclear giant cells; and participate in granuloma formation in loco together with T lymphocytes.

  3. Effect of modulation of PPAR-γ activity on Kupffer cells M1/M2 polarization in the development of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Luo, Wenjing; Xu, Qinyu; Wang, Qi; Wu, Huimin; Hua, Jing

    2017-03-16

    Abnormal lipid-mediated hepatic inflammatory-immune dysfunction and chronic low grade inflammation play an important role in the pathogenesis of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Macrophage polarization is an important mechanism for the regulation of inflammatory response. Since PPAR-γ has emerged as a master regulator of macrophage polarization, we aimed to investigate the lipid-induced macrophage/Kupffer cell polarization in vivo and in vitro, and explore the association between PPAR-γ activity and macrophages M1/M2 polarization shifting. Here we showed that long-term high-fat diet increased Kupffer cells content with M1-predominant phenotype and increasing production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Saturated fatty acids polarized Kupffer cells/macrophages to an M1-predominant phenotype while n-3 PUFA polarized Kupffer cells/macrophages to an M2 phenotype, which was associated with activation of NF-κB signal pathway and PPAR-γ respectively. Furthermore, up-regulation of PPAR-γ shifted lipid-induced macrophages polarization from M1-predominant phenotype to M2 phenotype. Macrophages polarization switch was associated with the interaction between PPAR-γ and NF-κBp65 signal pathway. Rosiglitazone restored high-fat diet-induced imblance of Kupffer cells M1/M2 polarization and alleviated hepatic steatosis as well as local pro-inflammatory response. These findings suggest that manipulation of PPAR-γ activity has the potential to balance lipid-induced M1/M2 macrophage/Kupffer cell polarization, and leading to prevent the development of NAFLD.

  4. Effect of modulation of PPAR-γ activity on Kupffer cells M1/M2 polarization in the development of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Wenjing; Xu, Qinyu; Wang, Qi; Wu, Huimin; Hua, Jing

    2017-01-01

    Abnormal lipid-mediated hepatic inflammatory-immune dysfunction and chronic low grade inflammation play an important role in the pathogenesis of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Macrophage polarization is an important mechanism for the regulation of inflammatory response. Since PPAR-γ has emerged as a master regulator of macrophage polarization, we aimed to investigate the lipid-induced macrophage/Kupffer cell polarization in vivo and in vitro, and explore the association between PPAR-γ activity and macrophages M1/M2 polarization shifting. Here we showed that long-term high-fat diet increased Kupffer cells content with M1-predominant phenotype and increasing production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Saturated fatty acids polarized Kupffer cells/macrophages to an M1-predominant phenotype while n-3 PUFA polarized Kupffer cells/macrophages to an M2 phenotype, which was associated with activation of NF-κB signal pathway and PPAR-γ respectively. Furthermore, up-regulation of PPAR-γ shifted lipid-induced macrophages polarization from M1-predominant phenotype to M2 phenotype. Macrophages polarization switch was associated with the interaction between PPAR-γ and NF-κBp65 signal pathway. Rosiglitazone restored high-fat diet-induced imblance of Kupffer cells M1/M2 polarization and alleviated hepatic steatosis as well as local pro-inflammatory response. These findings suggest that manipulation of PPAR-γ activity has the potential to balance lipid-induced M1/M2 macrophage/Kupffer cell polarization, and leading to prevent the development of NAFLD. PMID:28300213

  5. Kupffer Cells Undergo Fundamental Changes during the Development of Experimental NASH and Are Critical in Initiating Liver Damage and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Reid, D. T.; Reyes, J. L.; McDonald, B. A.; Vo, T.; Reimer, R. A.; Eksteen, B.

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease has become the leading liver disease in North America and is associated with the progressive inflammatory liver disease non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Considerable effort has been made to understand the role of resident and recruited macrophage populations in NASH however numerous questions remain. Our goal was to characterize the dynamic changes in liver macrophages during the initiation of NASH in a murine model. Using the methionine-choline deficient diet we found that liver-resident macrophages, Kupffer cells were lost early in disease onset followed by a robust infiltration of Ly-6C+ monocyte-derived macrophages that retained a dynamic phenotype. Genetic profiling revealed distinct patterns of inflammatory gene expression between macrophage subsets. Only early depletion of liver macrophages using liposomal clodronate prevented the development of NASH in mice suggesting that Kupffer cells are critical for the orchestration of inflammation during experimental NASH. Increased understanding of these dynamics may allow us to target potentially harmful populations whilst promoting anti-inflammatory or restorative populations to ultimately guide the development of effective treatment strategies. PMID:27454866

  6. Activation and increase of radio-sensitive CD11b+ recruited Kupffer cells/macrophages in diet-induced steatohepatitis in FGF5 deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Nakashima, Hiroyuki; Nakashima, Masahiro; Kinoshita, Manabu; Ikarashi, Masami; Miyazaki, Hiromi; Hanaka, Hiromi; Imaki, Junko; Seki, Shuhji

    2016-01-01

    We have recently reported that Kupffer cells consist of two subsets, radio-resistant resident CD68+ Kupffer cells and radio-sensitive recruited CD11b+ Kupffer cells/macrophages (Mφs). Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is characterized not only by hepatic steatosis but also chronic inflammation and fibrosis. In the present study, we investigated the immunological mechanism of diet-induced steatohepatitis in fibroblast growth factor 5 (FGF5) deficient mice. After consumption of a high fat diet (HFD) for 8 weeks, FGF5 null mice developed severe steatohepatitis and fibrosis resembling human NASH. F4/80+ Mφs which were both CD11b and CD68 positive accumulated in the liver. The production of TNF and FasL indicated that they are the pivotal effectors in this hepatitis. The weak phagocytic activity and lack of CRIg mRNA suggested that they were recruited Mφs. Intermittent exposure to 1 Gy irradiation markedly decreased these Mφs and dramatically inhibited liver inflammation without attenuating steatosis. However, depletion of the resident subset by clodronate liposome (c-lipo) treatment increased the Mφs and tended to exacerbate disease progression. Recruited CD11b+ CD68+ Kupffer cells/Mφs may play an essential role in steatohepatitis and fibrosis in FGF5 null mice fed with a HFD. Recruitment and activation of bone marrow derived Mφs is the key factor to develop steatohepatitis from simple steatosis. PMID:27708340

  7. Failure to demonstrate a major role for Kupffer cells and radiosensitive leukocytes in immunoglobulin-mediated elimination of Trypanosoma musculi

    SciTech Connect

    Kongshavn, P.A.; Shaw, K.; Ghadirian, E.; Ulczak, O. )

    1990-06-01

    Previous studies have indicated that elimination of parasitemia in Trypanosoma musculi infection is brought about by immunoglobulin G2a antibodies, C3, and an effector cell. Experiments were designed to identify the putative effector cell by using several approaches. Infected C5-deficient or C5-sufficient mice treated with silica particles or given 900 rads of radiation 3 days earlier effectively eliminated trypanosomes following administration of immune plasma (IP). Silica-treated, noninfected mice given T. musculi preincubated with IP also cleared the parasites. Radiolabeling studies revealed that uptake of the cleared trypanosomes by the liver in normal mice was relatively low and fell only slightly (19%) in silica-treated mice. In contrast, uptake of radiolabeled sheep erythrocytes by the liver was normally much higher and fell drastically (7%) in silica-treated mice. Mice were then immunocompromised by 900 rads of radiation, silica particles, and anti-platelet serum combined before IP-sensitized trypanosomes were given. Leukocyte and platelet counts were both reduced by 95% and sheep erythrocyte uptake by the liver fell from 77 to 5%; however, greater than 99% of the injected trypanosomes were cleared in these mice and uptake of radiolabeled trypanosomes by the liver was similar to that of normal mice. Lastly, in anesthetized mice in which Kupffer cells were excluded surgically from the circulation, greater than 99% of the IP-sensitized trypanosomes disappeared rapidly from the blood. Only 7% of the radiolabel was found in the liver versus 60% in sham-operated mice. The results are interpreted as showing that hepatic Kupffer cells play a minor role in the immune elimination of T. musculi. Likewise, radiosensitive leukocytes and platelets are unlikely to be sole candidates for the putative effector cell that mediates a cure of murine trypanosomiasis.

  8. Differential Effects of Kupffer Cell Inactivation on Inflammation and The Liver Sieve Following Caecal-Ligation and Puncture-Induced Sepsis in Mice.

    PubMed

    Gaddam, Ravinder Reddy; Fraser, Robin; Badiei, Alireza; Chambers, Stephen; Cogger, Victoria C; Le Couteur, David G; Bhatia, Madhav

    2017-04-01

    Sepsis remains a common clinical problem with significant mortality. Activation of the Kupffer cells during sepsis is associated with systemic inflammatory response and multiple organ failure. Kupffer cell activation also leads to structural changes in the liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) during endotoxemia. However, these effects remain to be elucidated in caecal-ligation and puncture (CLP)-induced polymicrobial sepsis. To investigate the role of Kupffer cells on LSECs fenestrae and inflammation during CLP-induced sepsis, sepsis was induced by CLP and mice were treated with gadolinium chloride (GdCl3) before CLP-induced sepsis, to inactivate Kupffer cells. Mice were sacrificed after 8 h. Blood, liver, and lung tissues were collected and processed to measure LSECs fenestration, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, alanine transaminase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) activity, histological examination, and various cytokines/chemokines levels. LSECs fenestrae was studied using scanning electron micrographs of the LSECs. Strikingly, CLP mice treated with GdCl3 were protected against liver injury as evidenced by decreased LSECs defenestration and damage, MPO, ALT and AST activities, liver tissue damage, and inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β, and chemokines MCP-1 and MIP-2α. However, CLP mice treated with GdCl3 had no protection against increased lung MPO activity, tissue damage, inflammatory cytokines, and chemokines. Treatment with GdCl3 also had no effect on the systemic inflammatory response as shown by no change in the circulatory inflammatory cytokines and chemokines following CLP-induced sepsis. Collectively, these data suggest that inactivation of Kupffer cells by GdCl3 protects the liver but had no effect on lung injury or inflammation and systemic inflammatory response following CLP-induced sepsis.

  9. Nucleation of platelets with blood-borne pathogens on Kupffer cells precedes other innate immunity and contributes to bacterial clearance.

    PubMed

    Wong, Connie H Y; Jenne, Craig N; Petri, Björn; Chrobok, Navina L; Kubes, Paul

    2013-08-01

    Through the use of intravital imaging of the liver, we demonstrate a collaborative role for platelets with Kupffer cells (KCs) in eradicating blood-borne bacterial infection. Under basal conditions, platelets, via the platelet-adhesion receptor GPIb, formed transient 'touch-and-go' interactions with von Willebrand factor (vWF) constitutively expressed on KCs. Bacteria such as Bacillus cereus and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) were rapidly caught by KCs and triggered platelets to switch from 'touch-and-go' adhesion to sustained GPIIb-mediated adhesion on the KC surface to encase the bacterium. Infected GPIbα-deficient mice had more endothelial and KC damage than did their wild-type counterparts, which led to more fluid leakage, substantial polycythemia and rapid mortality. Our study identifies a previously unknown surveillance mechanism by which platelets survey macrophages that rapidly converts to a critical host response to blood-borne bacteria.

  10. Nucleation of platelets with bloodborne pathogens on Kupffer cell precedes other innate immunity and contributes to bacterial clearance

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Connie H. Y.; Jenne, Craig N.; Petri, Björn; Chrobok, Navina L.; Kubes, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Using intravital imaging of the liver, we unveil a collaborative role for platelets with Kupffer cells (KCs) in eradicating bloodborne bacterial infections. Under basal conditions, platelets via glycoprotein Ib (GPIb) formed transient “touch-and-go” interactions with von Willebrand factor (vWF) constitutively expressed on KCs. Bacteria, such as Bacillus cereus and Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), were rapidly caught by KCs and triggered platelets to switch from “touch-and-go” to sustained GPIIb-mediated adhesion on the KC surface to encase the bacterium. Infected GpIbα−/− mice demonstrated increased endothelial and KC damage, leading to increased fluid leakage, significant polycythemia and rapid mortality. This study identifies a novel surveillance mechanism of intravascular macrophage by platelets that rapidly converts to a critical host response against bloodborne bacteria. PMID:23770641

  11. Puerarin ameliorates experimental alcoholic liver injury by inhibition of endotoxin gut leakage, Kupffer cell activation, and endotoxin receptors expression.

    PubMed

    Peng, Jing-Hua; Cui, Tuan; Huang, Fu; Chen, Liang; Zhao, Yu; Xu, Lin; Xu, Li-Li; Feng, Qin; Hu, Yi-Yang

    2013-03-01

    Puerarin, an isoflavone component extracted from Kudzu (Pueraria lobata), has been demonstrated to alleviate alcohol-related disorders. Our study examined whether puerarin ameliorates chronic alcoholic liver injury through inhibition of endotoxin gut leakage, the subsequent Kupffer cell activation, and endotoxin receptors expression. Rats were provided with the Liber-DeCarli liquid diet for 8 weeks. Puerarin (90 mg/kg or 180 mg/kg daily) was orally administered from the beginning of the third week until the end of the experiment. Chronic alcohol intake caused increased serum alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, hepatic gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase, and triglyceride levels as well as fatty liver and neutrophil infiltration in hepatic lobules as determined by biochemical and histologic assays. A significant increase of liver tumor necrosis factor α was detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. These pathologic effects correlated with increased endotoxin level in portal vein and upregulated protein expression of hepatic CD68, lipopolysaccharide-binding protein, CD14, Toll-like receptor 2, and Toll-like receptor 4. Meanwhile, the intestinal microvilli were observed to be sparse, shortened, and irregularity in distribution under the transmission electron microscope in conjunction with the downregulated intestinal zonula occludens-1 protein expression. These hepatic pathologic changes were significantly inhibited in puerarin-treated animals as were the endotoxin levels and hepatic CD68 and endotoxin receptors. Moreover, the pathologic changes in intestinal microvillus and the decreased intestinal zonula occludens-1 were also ameliorated with puerarin treatment. These results thus demonstrate that puerarin inhibition of endotoxin gut leakage, Kupffer cell activation, and endotoxin receptors expression is involved in the alleviation of chronic alcoholic liver injury in rats.

  12. Effect of CD16a, the surface receptor of Kupffer cells, on the growth of hepatocellular carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    LI, XIU-YUN; WU, LUN; LI, SHENG-WEI; ZHOU, WEN-BO; WANG, MENG-YUAN; ZUO, GUO-QING; LIU, CHANG-AN; DING, XIONG

    2016-01-01

    FcγRIIIa (CD16) is a low-affinity Fc receptor of IgG. As the idio-binding receptor of IgG Fc, it plays an important role in the antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity of natural killer cells. The aim of the present study was to investigate the distribution of Kupffer cells (KCs) and the expression of their surface receptor FcγRIIIa in hepatocellular carcinoma. Furthermore, we also aimed to observe the functional mechanism of FcγRIIIa. Immunohistochemical analysis was employed to study KCs and FcγRIIIa. In order to explore the role of FcγRIIIa in the growth of cancer cells, KCs and H22 tumor cells were co-cultured in different serum. The mRNA expression levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and FcγRIIIa were analyzed by RT-qPCR; the TNF-α and FcγRIIIa protein expression levels were examined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and western blot analysis, respectively. Our results showed that the number of Kuppfer cells in cancerous tissues (21.6±7.8) was lower than those in para-cancerous (68.8±9.1) tissues and adjacent normal hepatic tissues (62.0±1.9) (P<0.01); this decreased with the reduction in the differentiation degree of cancer (P<0.05). FcγRIIIa-positive cells were similar in morphology to KCs, and their distributive tendency was coincident (P<0.05). The increase in CD16a mRNA levels in the group treated with immune serum was 3.9-, 4.9- and 3.9-fold greater than that in the ordinary serum group at different time points, and CD16a protein expression also markedly increased (P<0.05). However, these effects were inhibited by the addition of anti-IgG Fc serum (P<0.05). The results of the present study suggested that FcγRIIIa resided in KCs, and it contributed to the inhibition of the growth of liver tumor cells. PMID:27082928

  13. PD-1 blockade expands intratumoral T memory cells

    PubMed Central

    Ribas, Antoni; Shin, Daniel Sanghoon; Zaretsky, Jesse; Frederiksen, Juliet; Cornish, Andrew; Avramis, Earl; Seja, Elizabeth; Kivork, Christine; Siebert, Janet; Kaplan-Lefko, Paula; Wang, Xiaoyan; Chmielowski, Bartosz; Glaspy, John A.; Tumeh, Paul C.; Chodon, Thinle; Pe’er, Dana; Comin-Anduix, Begoña

    2016-01-01

    Tumor responses to PD-1 blockade therapy are mediated by T cells, which we characterized in 102 tumor biopsies obtained from 53 patients treated with pembrolizumab, an antibody to PD-1. Biopsies were dissociated and single cell infiltrates were analyzed by multicolor flow cytometry using two computational approaches to resolve the leukocyte phenotypes at the single cell level. There was a statistically significant increase in the frequency of T cells in patients who responded to therapy. The frequency of intratumoral B cells and monocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells (moMDSCs) significantly increased in patients’ biopsies taken on treatment. The percentage of cells with a T regulatory phenotype, monocytes, and NK cells did not change while on PD-1 blockade therapy. CD8+ T memory cells were the most prominent phenotype that expanded intratumorally on therapy. However, the frequency of CD4+ T effector memory cells significantly decreased on treatment, whereas CD4+ T effector cells significantly increased in nonresponding tumors on therapy. In peripheral blood, an unusual population of blood cells expressing CD56 were detected in two patients with regressing melanoma. In conclusion, PD-1 blockade increases the frequency of T cells, B cells, and MDSCs in tumors, with the CD8+ T effector memory subset being the major T-cell phenotype expanded in patients with a response to therapy. PMID:26787823

  14. No attenuation of ischemic and reperfusion injury in Kupffer cell-depleted, cold-preserved rat livers.

    PubMed

    Reinders, M E; van Wagensveld, B A; van Gulik, T M; Corssmit, N P; Frederiks, W M; Chamuleau, R A; van Rooijen, N; Obertop, H

    1997-02-15

    Activated Kupffer cells (KC) have been implicated in the damage sustained by preserved liver grafts during ischemia and reperfusion. The aim of this study was to compare ischemia/reperfusion injury in preserved, KC-depleted rat livers and preserved control livers, with special regard to sinusoidal endothelial cell (SEC) injury. Wistar rats were injected with liposome-encapsulated dichloromethylene diphosphonate, 48 hr before hepatectomy, to eliminate KC, or were withheld this pretreatment (controls). Livers were flushed with cold University of Wisconsin solution and after 0, 8, 16, or 24 hr of storage at 4 degrees C, were reperfused in a recirculation system with 200 ml of oxygenated Krebs-Henseleit solution at 37 degrees C for 90 min. Damage to SEC was measured by the uptake of hyaluronic acid (HA) from the perfusate and release of purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP). Perfusate samples were, furthermore, analyzed for aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha. Carbon particles were infused in the perfusate to determine the phagocytotic capacity of KC. Biopsies were taken for histological examination and sections were stained with ED2 monoclonal antibodies to confirm the absence of KC. After 90 min of reperfusion, immediately after cold flush (t0), the uptake of HA was 72.2+/-2.3% and 69.3+/-1.3% in KC-depleted livers and in control livers, respectively (n.s.). After 8 hr of storage, HA uptake was 21.6+/-4.5% and 34.6+/-8.0%, respectively (n.s.). After 16 and 24 hr of storage and reperfusion, no uptake of HA was found in either KC-depleted or control livers, indicating abolished SEC function. PNP activities in the perfusate were higher in control livers (after 8 and 24 hr of storage), presumably due to release from damaged KC. No difference was found in AST and no tumor necrosis factor-alpha was measured in the perfusates of normal and KC-depleted livers. Electron microscopic studies showed that after 8 and 24 hr of storage and reperfusion

  15. Protective effects of branched-chain amino acids on hepatic ischemia-reperfusion-induced liver injury in rats: a direct attenuation of Kupffer cell activation.

    PubMed

    Kitagawa, Tomomi; Yokoyama, Yukihiro; Kokuryo, Toshio; Nagino, Masato

    2013-02-15

    We determined whether there is a protective effect of branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) on hepatic ischemia-reperfusion (I/R)-induced acute liver injury. Wister rats were divided into the following four groups: simple laparotomy with vehicle; simple laparotomy with BCAA (1 g/kg body wt orally); I/R (30 min clamp) with vehicle; and I/R with BCAA. Serum liver function tests and the gene expression of adhesion molecules (intercellular adhesion molecule and vascular cell adhesion molecule) and vasoconstrictor-related genes (endothelin-1) in the liver were examined. In the in vivo study, portal venous pressure, leukocyte adhesion, and hepatic microcirculation were evaluated. Furthermore, Kupffer cells were isolated and cultured with various concentrations of BCAA in the presence or absence of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Increased levels of liver function tests following I/R were significantly attenuated by BCAA treatment. The increased expression of adhesion molecules and endothelin-1 was also significantly attenuated by BCAA treatment. Moreover, increased portal venous pressure, enhanced leukocyte adhesion, and deteriorated hepatic microcirculation following I/R were all improved by BCAA treatment. In the experiment using isolated Kupffer cells, the expression of interleukin-6, interleukin-1β, and endothelin-1 in response to LPS stimulation was attenuated by BCAA in a dose-dependent fashion. These results indicate that perioperative oral administration of BCAA has excellent therapeutic potential to reduce I/R-induced liver injury. These beneficial effects may result from the direct attenuation of Kupffer cell activation under stressful conditions.

  16. Co-culture of Hepatocytes and Kupffer Cells as an In Vitro Model of Inflammation and Drug-Induced Hepatotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Kelly A.; Holman, Natalie S.; Green, Angela M.; Andersen, Melvin E.; LeCluyse, Edward L.

    2017-01-01

    Immune-mediated drug-induced hepatotoxicity is often unrecognized as a potential mode of action due to the lack of appropriate in vitro models. We have established an in vitro rat donor-matched hepatocyte and Kupffer cell co-culture (HKCC) model to study immune-related responses to drug exposure. Optimal cell culture conditions were identified for the maintenance of co-cultures based on cell longevity, monolayer integrity, and cytokine response after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) exposure. Hepatocyte monocultures and HKCCs were then used to test a subset of compounds associated with hepatotoxic effects with or without LPS. Cytokine levels and metabolic activity (cytochrome P450 3A [Cyp3A]) were measured after a 48-h exposure to monitor endotoxin-induced changes in acute phase and functional end points. LPS-activated HKCCs, but not hepatocyte monocultures, treated with trovafloxacin or acetaminophen, compounds associated with immune-mediated hepatotoxicity, showed LPS-dependent decreases in interleukin-6 production with concomitant increases in Cyp3A activity. Differential endotoxinand model-dependent alterations were observed in cytokine profiles and Cyp3A activity levels that corresponded to specific compounds. These results indicate the utility of the HKCC model system to discern compound-specific effects that may lead to enhanced or mitigate hepatocellular injury due to innate or adaptive immune responses. PMID:26869439

  17. Murine Kupffer Cells Are Protective in Total Hepatic Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury with Bowel Congestion through IL-10

    PubMed Central

    Ellett, Justin D.; Atkinson, Carl; Evans, Zachary P.; Amani, Zainab; Balish, Edward; Schmidt, Michael G.; van Rooijen, Nico; Schnellmann, Rick G.; Chavin, Kenneth D.

    2010-01-01

    Kupffer cells (KCs) are thought to mediate hepatocyte injury via their production of proinflammatory cytokines and reactive oxygen species in response to stress. In this study, we depleted KCs from the liver to examine their role in total warm hepatic ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury with bowel congestion. We injected 8-wk-old C57BL/10J mice with liposome-encapsulated clodronate 48 h before 35 min of hepatic ischemia with bowel congestion, followed by 6 or 24 h of reperfusion. KC-depleted animals had a higher mortality rate than diluent-treated animals and a 10-fold elevation in transaminase levels that correlated with increases in centrilobular necrosis. There was extensive LPS binding to the endothelial cells, which correlated with an upregulation of endothelial adhesion molecules in the KC-depleted animals versus diluent-treated animals. There was an increase in the levels of proinflammatory cytokines in KC-depleted animals, and a concomitant decrease in IL-10 levels. When KC-depleted mice were treated with recombinant IL-10, their liver damage profile in response to I/R was similar to diluent-treated animals, and endothelial cell adhesion molecules and proinflammatory cytokine levels decreased. KCs are protective in the liver subjected to total I/R with associated bowel congestion and are not deleterious as previously thought. This protection appears to be due to KC secretion of the potent anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. PMID:20400698

  18. Huangqi decoction inhibits apoptosis and fibrosis, but promotes Kupffer cell activation in dimethylnitrosamine-induced rat liver fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Previously, Huangqi decoction (HQD) has been found to have a potential therapeutic effect on DMN-induced liver cirrhosis. Here, the mechanisms of HQD action against liver fibrosis were investigated in relation to hepatocyte apoptosis and hepatic inflammation regulation. Methods Liver fibrosis was induced by DMN administration for 2 or 4 weeks. Hepatocyte apoptosis and of Kupffer cells (KC) and hepatic stellate cells (HSC) interaction were investigated using confocal microscopy. The principle cytokines, fibrogenic proteins and apoptotic factors were investigated using western blot analysis. Results Compared with the DMN-water group, HQD showed decreased hepatocyte apoptosis and reduced expression of apoptotic effectors, cleaved-caspase-3, and fibrotic factors, such as smooth muscle α-actin (α-SMA), transforming growth factor beta-1 (TGF-β1). However, the KC marker CD68 increased significantly in DMN-HQD liver. Confocal microscopy demonstrated widespread adhesion of KCs to HSCs in DMN-water and DMN-HQD rats liver. Conclusions HQD exhibited positive protective effects against liver fibrosis; its mechanism of action was associated with protection from hepatocyte apoptosis and the promotion of CD68 expression in the devolopment of liver fibrosis to cirrhosis development. PMID:22531084

  19. Biofilm-Forming Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Survive in Kupffer Cells and Exhibit High Virulence in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Oyama, Takuto; Miyazaki, Motoyasu; Yoshimura, Michinobu; Takata, Tohru; Ohjimi, Hiroyuki; Jimi, Shiro

    2016-01-01

    Although Staphylococcus aureus is part of the normal body flora, heavy usage of antibiotics has resulted in the emergence of methicillin-resistant strains (MRSA). MRSA can form biofilms and cause indwelling foreign body infections, bacteremia, soft tissue infections, endocarditis, and osteomyelitis. Using an in vitro assay, we screened 173 clinical blood isolates of MRSA and selected 20 high-biofilm formers (H-BF) and low-biofilm formers (L-BF). These were intravenously administered to mice and the general condition of mice, the distribution of bacteria, and biofilm in the liver, lung, spleen, and kidney were investigated. MRSA count was the highest in the liver, especially within Kupffer cells, which were positive for acid polysaccharides that are associated with intracellular biofilm. After 24 h, the general condition of the mice worsened significantly in the H-BF group. In the liver, bacterial deposition and aggregation and the biofilm-forming spot number were all significantly greater for H-BF group than for L-BF. CFU analysis revealed that bacteria in the H-BF group survived for long periods in the liver. These results indicate that the biofilm-forming ability of MRSA is a crucial factor for intracellular persistence, which could lead to chronic infections. PMID:27376326

  20. Sympathetic nervous system promotes hepatocarcinogenesis by modulating inflammation through activation of alpha1-adrenergic receptors of Kupffer cells.

    PubMed

    Huan, Hong-Bo; Wen, Xu-Dong; Chen, Xue-Jiao; Wu, Lin; Wu, Li-Li; Zhang, Liang; Yang, Da-Peng; Zhang, Xia; Bie, Ping; Qian, Cheng; Xia, Feng

    2017-01-01

    The sympathetic nervous system (SNS) is known to play a significant role in tumor initiation and metastasis. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) frequently occurs in cirrhotic livers after chronic inflammation, and the SNS is hyperactive in advanced liver cirrhosis. However, it remains unclear whether the SNS promotes hepatocarcinogenesis by modulating chronic liver inflammation. In this study, a retrospective pathological analysis and quantification of sympathetic nerve fiber densities (tyrosine hydroxylase, TH(+)) in HCC patients, and diethylnitrosamine (DEN)-induced hepatocarcinogenesis in rats were performed. Our data showed that high density of sympathetic nerve fibers and α1-adrenergic receptors (ARs) of Kupffer cells (KCs) were associated with a poor prognosis of HCC. Sympathetic denervation or blocking of α1-ARs decreased DEN-induced HCC incidence and tumor development. In addition, synergistic effects of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) in hepatocarcinogenesis were observed. The suppression of the SNS reduced IL-6 and TGF-β expression, which suppressed hepatocarcinogenesis, and KCs play a key role in this process. After the ablation of KCs, IL-6 and TGF-β expression and the development of HCC were inhibited. This study demonstrates that sympathetic innervation is crucial for hepatocarcinogenesis and that the SNS promotes hepatocarcinogenesis by activating α1-ARs of KCs to boost the activation of KCs and to maintain the inflammatory microenvironment. These results indicate that sympathetic denervation or α1-ARs blockage may represent novel treatment approaches for HCC.

  1. Critical Roles of Kupffer Cells in the Pathogenesis of Alcoholic Liver Disease: From Basic Science to Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Tao; Zhang, Cui-Li; Xiao, Mo; Yang, Rui; Xie, Ke-Qin

    2016-01-01

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) encompasses a spectrum of liver injury ranging from steatosis to steatohepatitis, fibrosis, and finally cirrhosis. Accumulating evidences have demonstrated that Kupffer cells (KCs) play critical roles in the pathogenesis of both chronic and acute ALD. It has become clear that alcohol exposure can result in increased hepatic translocation of gut-sourced endotoxin/lipopolysaccharide, which is a strong M1 polarization inducer of KCs. The activated KCs then produce a large amount of reactive oxygen species (ROS), pro-inflammatory cytokines, and chemokines, which finally lead to liver injury. The critical roles of KCs and related inflammatory cascade in the pathogenesis of ALD make it a promising target in pharmaceutical drug developments for ALD treatment. Several drugs (such as rifaximin, pentoxifylline, and infliximab) have been evaluated or are under evaluation for ALD treatment in randomized clinical trials. Furthermore, screening pharmacological regulators for KCs toward M2 polarization may provide additional therapeutic agents. The combination of these potentially therapeutic drugs with hepatoprotective agents (such as zinc, melatonin, and silymarin) may bring encouraging results. PMID:27965666

  2. Amphiphilic core–shell nanoparticles containing dense polyethyleneimine shells for efficient delivery of microRNA to Kupffer cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zuojin; Niu, Dechao; Zhang, Junyong; Zhang, Wenfeng; Yao, Yuan; Li, Pei; Gong, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    Efficient and targeted delivery approach to transfer exogenous genes into macrophages is still a great challenge. Current gene delivery methods often result in low cellular uptake efficiency in vivo in some types of cells, especially for the Kupffer cells (KCs). In this article, we demonstrate that amphiphilic core–shell nanoparticles (NPs) consisting of well-defined hydrophobic poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) cores and branched polyethyleneimine (PEI) shells (denoted as PEI@PMMA NPs) are efficient nanocarriers to deliver microRNA (miRNA)-loaded plasmid to the KCs. Average hydrodynamic diameter of PEI@ PMMA NPs was 279 nm with a narrow size distribution. The NPs also possessed positive surface charges up to +30 mV in water, thus enabling effective condensation of negatively charged plasmid DNA. Gel electrophoresis assay showed that the resultant PEI@PMMA NPs were able to completely condense miRNA plasmid at a weight ratio of 25:1 (N/P ratio equal to 45:1). The Cell Counting Kit-8 assay and flow cytometry results showed that the PEI@PMMA/miRNA NPs displayed low cytotoxicity and cell apoptosis activity against the KCs. The maximum cell transfection efficiency reached 34.7% after 48 hours, which is much higher than that obtained by using the commercial Lipofectamine™ 2000 (1.7%). Bio-transmission electron microscope observation revealed that the PEI@PMMA NPs were mainly distributed in the cytoplasm of the KCs. Furthermore, when compared to the control groups, the protein expression of target nuclear factor κB P65 was considerably inhibited (P<0.05) both in vitro and in vivo. These results demonstrate that the PEI@PMMA NPs with a unique amphiphilic core–shell nanostructure are promising nanocarriers for delivering miRNA plasmid to KCs. PMID:27366061

  3. Long live the liver: immunohistochemical and stereological study of hepatocytes, liver sinusoidal endothelial cells, Kupffer cells and hepatic stellate cells of male and female rats throughout ageing.

    PubMed

    Marcos, Ricardo; Correia-Gomes, Carla

    2016-12-01

    Male/female differences in enzyme activity and gene expression in the liver are known to be attenuated with ageing. Nevertheless, the effect of ageing on liver structure and quantitative cell morphology remains unknown. Male and female Wistar rats aged 2, 6, 12 and 18 months were examined by means of stereological techniques and immunohistochemical tagging of hepatocytes (HEP), liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSEC), Kupffer cells (KC) and hepatic stellate cells (HSC) in order to assess the total number and number per gram of these cells throughout life. The mean cell volume of HEP and HSC, the lobular position and the collagen content of the liver were also evaluated with stereological techniques. The number per gram of HSC was similar for both genders and was maintained throughout ageing. The mean volume of HSC was also conserved but differences in the cell body and lobular location were observed. Statistically significant gender differences in HEP were noted in young rats (females had smaller and more binucleated HEP) but were attenuated with ageing. The same occurred for KC and LSEC, since the higher number per gram in young females disappeared in older animals. Liver collagen increased with ageing but only in males. Thus, the numbers of these four cell types are related throughout ageing, with well-defined cell ratios. The shape and lobular position of HSC change with ageing in both males and females. Gender dimorphism in HEP, KC and LSEC of young rat liver disappears with ageing.

  4. Depletion of Kupffer cells modulates ethanol-induced hepatocyte DNA synthesis in C57Bl/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Owumi, Solomon E; Corthals, Stacy M; Uwaifo, Anthony O; Kamendulis, Lisa M; Klaunig, James E

    2014-08-01

    Kupffer cells (KCs) are important in hepatic homeostasis and responses to xenobiotics. KCs are activated on interaction with endotoxin, releasing cytokines, and reactive oxygen species normally associated with increased gene expression, cellular growth, or hepatic injury. Ethanol-induced endotoxemia is one means of KC activation. We propose that KC depletion attenuates the effect of EtOH-induced endotoxemia to impact the hepatic growth response. Hepatic DNA synthesis was examined in KC competent (KC+) or KC-depleted (KC-) C57BL/6 mice fed EtOH-containing diet in the presence or absence of polyphenol-60 antioxidant. KC depletion was assessed by F4/80 antigen, and DNA synthesis was assessed by 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine incorporation. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) messenger RNA released was quantified by RT-PCR/electrophoresis. ERK1/2 phosphorylation was evaluated by Western blotting, and Nrf2 and CYP2E1protein were also assayed. Apoptosis and hepatic injury were examined by the Tunnel assay and hepatic transaminases in serum, respectively. Hepatic transaminases in serum (AST and ALT) were within normal range. Over 90% of KC was depleted by clodronate treatment. KC depletion decreased TNF-α mRNA release, ERK1/2 phosphorylation, and hepatocyte DNA synthesis. KC depletion is associated with increased numbers of apoptotic cells bodies in KC- mice. Antioxidant treatment decreased DNA synthesis, Nrf2, and CYP2E1 protein expression in EtOH-consuming mice. Our data indicate that upon ethanol exposure, KC participates in hepatic DNA synthesis and growth responses. Collectively, these observations suggest that KC depletion attenuates the downstream effect of ethanol-induced endotoxemia by reduced cytokine and reactive oxygen species production with its concomitant effect on MAPK-signaling pathway on hepatocyte DNA synthesis.

  5. CTLA4 blockade broadens the peripheral T cell receptor repertoire

    PubMed Central

    Robert, Lidia; Tsoi, Jennifer; Wang, Xiaoyan; Emerson, Ryan; Homet, Blanca; Chodon, Thinle; Mok, Stephen; Huang, Rong Rong; Cochran, Alistair J.; Comin-Anduix, Begonya; Koya, Richard C.; Graeber, Thomas G.; Robins, Harlan; Ribas, Antoni

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the immunomodulatory effects of CTLA-4 blockade with tremelimumab in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Experimental Design We used next generation sequencing to study the complementarity determining region 3 (CDR3) from the rearranged T cell receptor (TCR) variable beta (V-beta) in PBMC of 21 patients, at baseline and 30–60 days after receiving tremelimumab. Results After receiving tremelimumab there was a median of 30% increase in unique productive sequences of TCR V-beta CDR3 in 19 out of 21 patients, and a median decrease of 30% in only 2 out of 21 patients. These changes were significant for richness (p=0.01) and for Shannon index diversity (p=0.04). In comparison, serially collected PBMC from four healthy donors did not show a significant change in TCR V-beta CDR3 diversity over one year. There was a significant difference in the total unique productive TCR V-beta CDR3 sequences between patients experiencing toxicity with tremelimumab compared to patients without toxicity (p=0.05). No relevant differences were noted between clinical responders and non-responders. Conclusions CTLA4 blockade with tremelimumab diversifies the peripheral T cell pool, representing a pharmacodynamic effect of how this class of antibodies modulates the human immune system. PMID:24583799

  6. Curative Effects of Thiacremonone against Acetaminophen-Induced Acute Hepatic Failure via Inhibition of Proinflammatory Cytokines Production and Infiltration of Cytotoxic Immune Cells and Kupffer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yu Ri; Ban, Jung Ok; Yoo, Hwan Soo; Lee, Yong Moon; Yoon, Yeo Pyo; Eum, So Young; Jeong, Heon Sang; Yoon, Do-young; Han, Sang Bae; Hong, Jin Tae

    2013-01-01

    High doses of acetaminophen (APAP; N-acetyl-p-aminophenol) cause severe hepatotoxicity after metabolic activation by cytochrome P450 2E1. This study was undertaken to examine the preventive effects of thiacremonone, a compound extracted from garlic, on APAP-induced acute hepatic failure in male C57BL/6J. Mice received with 500 mg/kg APAP after a 7-day pretreatment with thiacremonone (10–50 mg/kg). Thiacremonone inhibited the APAP-induced serum ALT and AST levels in a dose-dependent manner, and markedly reduced the restricted area of necrosis and inflammation by administration of APAP. Thiacremonone also inhibited the APAP-induced depletion of intracellular GSH, induction of nitric oxide, and lipid peroxidation as well as expression of P450 2E1. After APAP injection, the numbers of Kupffer cells, natural killer cells, and cytotoxic T cells were elevated, but the elevated cell numbers in the liver were reduced in thiacremonone pretreated mice. The expression levels of I-309, M-CSF, MIG, MIP-1α, MIP-1β, IL-7, and IL-17 were increased by APAP treatment, which were inhibited in thiacremonone pretreated mice. These data indicate that thiacremonone could be a useful agent for the treatment of drug-induced hepatic failure and that the reduction of cytotoxic immune cells as well as proinflammatory cytokine production may be critical for the prevention of APAP-induced acute liver toxicity. PMID:23935693

  7. Transient Depletion of Kupffer Cells Leads to Enhanced Transgene Expression in Rat Liver Following Retrograde Intrabiliary Infusion of Plasmid DNA and DNA Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Hui; Jiang, Xuan; Leong, Kam W.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract In this report, we have demonstrated that by temporarily removing Kupffer cells (KCs), the transgene expression levels mediated by retrograde intrabiliary infusion (RII) of plasmid DNA, polyethylenimine-DNA, and chitosan nanoparticles were enhanced by 1,927-, 131-, and 23,450-fold, respectively, in comparison with the respective groups without KC removal. KC removal also led to significantly prolonged transgene expression in the liver that received all three carriers. This increased transgene expression was correlated with significantly reduced serum tumor necrosis factor-α level as an indicator for KC activation. These results suggest that KC activation is a significant contributing factor to the lowered transgene expression by polycation-DNA nanoparticles delivered by RII. More importantly, the combination of RII and transient removal of KCs may be adopted as an effective approach to achieving high and persistent transgene expression in the liver mediated by nonviral nanoparticles. PMID:21091274

  8. Intravital imaging reveals improved Kupffer cell-mediated phagocytosis as a mode of action of glycoengineered anti-CD20 antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Grandjean, Capucine L.; Montalvao, Fabricio; Celli, Susanna; Michonneau, David; Breart, Beatrice; Garcia, Zacarias; Perro, Mario; Freytag, Olivier; Gerdes, Christian A.; Bousso, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) represent an effective treatment for a number of B cell malignancies and autoimmune disorders. Glycoengineering of anti-CD20mAb may contribute to increased anti-tumor efficacy through enhanced antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) and phagocytosis (ADP) as reported by in vitro studies. However, where and how glycoengineered Ab may potentiate therapeutic responses in vivo is yet to be elucidated. Here, we have performed mouse liver transplants to demonstrate that the liver is sufficient to mediate systemic B cells depletion after anti-CD20 treatment. Relying on intravital two-photon imaging of human CD20-expressing mice, we provide evidence that ADP by Kupffer cells (KC) is a major mechanism for rituximab-mediated B cell depletion. Notably, a glycoengineered anti-mouse CD20 Ab but not its wild-type counterpart triggered potent KC-mediated B cell depletion at low doses. Finally, distinct thresholds for KC phagocytosis were also observed for GA101 (obinutuzumab), a humanized glycoengineered type II anti-CD20 Ab and rituximab. Thus, we propose that enhanced phagocytosis of circulating B cells by KC represents an important in vivo mechanism underlying the improved activity of glycoengineered anti-CD20 mAbs. PMID:27698437

  9. Intravital imaging reveals improved Kupffer cell-mediated phagocytosis as a mode of action of glycoengineered anti-CD20 antibodies.

    PubMed

    Grandjean, Capucine L; Montalvao, Fabricio; Celli, Susanna; Michonneau, David; Breart, Beatrice; Garcia, Zacarias; Perro, Mario; Freytag, Olivier; Gerdes, Christian A; Bousso, Philippe

    2016-10-04

    Anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) represent an effective treatment for a number of B cell malignancies and autoimmune disorders. Glycoengineering of anti-CD20mAb may contribute to increased anti-tumor efficacy through enhanced antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) and phagocytosis (ADP) as reported by in vitro studies. However, where and how glycoengineered Ab may potentiate therapeutic responses in vivo is yet to be elucidated. Here, we have performed mouse liver transplants to demonstrate that the liver is sufficient to mediate systemic B cells depletion after anti-CD20 treatment. Relying on intravital two-photon imaging of human CD20-expressing mice, we provide evidence that ADP by Kupffer cells (KC) is a major mechanism for rituximab-mediated B cell depletion. Notably, a glycoengineered anti-mouse CD20 Ab but not its wild-type counterpart triggered potent KC-mediated B cell depletion at low doses. Finally, distinct thresholds for KC phagocytosis were also observed for GA101 (obinutuzumab), a humanized glycoengineered type II anti-CD20 Ab and rituximab. Thus, we propose that enhanced phagocytosis of circulating B cells by KC represents an important in vivo mechanism underlying the improved activity of glycoengineered anti-CD20 mAbs.

  10. Immune Checkpoint Blockade and Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant.

    PubMed

    Merryman, Reid W; Armand, Philippe

    2017-02-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) relies primarily upon graft-versus-tumor activity for cancer eradication. Relapse remains the principal cause of treatment failure after HSCT, implying frequent immune escape, which in at least some cases, appears to be mediated by increased expression of inhibitory immune checkpoints. In an attempt to restore anti-tumor immunity, checkpoint blockade therapy (CBT) targeting PD-1 and CLTA-4 has been used in conjunction with both allogeneic and autologous HSCT. Clinical experience in this setting is limited to several small clinical trials and case series, but together they suggest that treatment with CBT can effectively amplify anti-tumor immune responses. However, intrinsic to its mechanism is also the risk that CBT in the HSCT setting may also cause significant immune toxicity. Fatal immune-related adverse events and graft-versus-host disease have been observed, but in most cases, immune side effects appear to be reversible with steroids and CBT discontinuation. As clinical investigation continues, improved understanding of immune checkpoint biology will be critical to optimize safe and efficacious treatment strategies.

  11. Time course investigation of PPAR{alpha}- and Kupffer cell-dependent effects of WY-14,643 in mouse liver using microarray gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, Courtney G.; Kosyk, Oksana; Bradford, Blair U.; Ross, Pamela K.; Burns, Amanda M.; Cunningham, Michael L.; Qu Pingping; Ibrahim, Joseph G.; Rusyn, Ivan

    2007-12-15

    Administration of peroxisome proliferators to rodents causes proliferation of peroxisomes, induction of {beta}-oxidation enzymes, hepatocellular hypertrophy and hyperplasia, with chronic exposure ultimately leading to hepatocellular carcinomas. Many responses associated with peroxisome proliferators are nuclear receptor-mediated events involving peroxisome proliferators-activated receptor alpha (PPAR{alpha}). A role for nuclear receptor-independent events has also been shown, with evidence of Kupffer cell-mediated free radical production, presumably through NAPDH oxidase, induction of redox-sensitive transcription factors involved in cytokine production and cytokine-mediated cell replication following acute treatment with peroxisome proliferators in rodents. Recent studies have demonstrated, by using p47{sup phox}-null mice which are deficient in NADPH oxidase, that this enzyme is not related to the phenotypic events caused by prolonged administration of peroxisome proliferators. In an effort to determine the timing of the transition from Kupffer cell-to PPAR{alpha}-dependent modulation of peroxisome proliferator effects, gene expression was assessed in liver from Ppar{alpha}-null, p47{sup phox}-null and corresponding wild-type mice following treatment with 4-chloro-6-(2,3-xylidino)-pyrimidynylthioacetic acid (WY-14,643) for 8 h, 24 h, 72 h, 1 week or 4 weeks. WY-14,643-induced gene expression in p47{sup phox}-null mouse liver differed substantially from wild-type mice at acute doses and striking differences in baseline expression of immune related genes were evident. Pathway mapping of genes that respond to WY-14,643 in a time- and dose-dependent manner demonstrates suppression of immune response, cell death and signal transduction and promotion of lipid metabolism, cell cycle and DNA repair. Furthermore, these pathways were largely dependent on PPAR{alpha}, not NADPH oxidase demonstrating a temporal shift in response to peroxisome proliferators. Overall, this

  12. Subtoxic Concentrations of Hepatotoxic Drugs Lead to Kupffer Cell Activation in a Human In Vitro Liver Model: An Approach to Study DILI

    PubMed Central

    Kegel, Victoria; Pfeiffer, Elisa; Burkhardt, Britta; Liu, Jia L.; Zeilinger, Katrin; Nüssler, Andreas K.; Seehofer, Daniel; Damm, Georg

    2015-01-01

    Drug induced liver injury (DILI) is an idiosyncratic adverse drug reaction leading to severe liver damage. Kupffer cells (KC) sense hepatic tissue stress/damage and therefore could be a tool for the estimation of consequent effects associated with DILI. Aim of the present study was to establish a human in vitro liver model for the investigation of immune-mediated signaling in the pathogenesis of DILI. Hepatocytes and KC were isolated from human liver specimens. The isolated KC yield was 1.2 ± 0.9 × 106 cells/g liver tissue with a purity of >80%. KC activation was investigated by the measurement of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI, DCF assay) and cell activity (XTT assay). The initial KC activation levels showed broad donor variability. Additional activation of KC using supernatants of hepatocytes treated with hepatotoxic drugs increased KC activity and led to donor-dependent changes in the formation of ROI compared to KC incubated with supernatants from untreated hepatocytes. Additionally, a compound- and donor-dependent increase in proinflammatory cytokines or in anti-inflammatory cytokines was detected. In conclusion, KC related immune signaling in hepatotoxicity was successfully determined in a newly established in vitro liver model. KC were able to detect hepatocyte stress/damage and to transmit a donor- and compound-dependent immune response via cytokine production. PMID:26491234

  13. Subtoxic Concentrations of Hepatotoxic Drugs Lead to Kupffer Cell Activation in a Human In Vitro Liver Model: An Approach to Study DILI.

    PubMed

    Kegel, Victoria; Pfeiffer, Elisa; Burkhardt, Britta; Liu, Jia L; Zeilinger, Katrin; Nüssler, Andreas K; Seehofer, Daniel; Damm, Georg

    2015-01-01

    Drug induced liver injury (DILI) is an idiosyncratic adverse drug reaction leading to severe liver damage. Kupffer cells (KC) sense hepatic tissue stress/damage and therefore could be a tool for the estimation of consequent effects associated with DILI. Aim of the present study was to establish a human in vitro liver model for the investigation of immune-mediated signaling in the pathogenesis of DILI. Hepatocytes and KC were isolated from human liver specimens. The isolated KC yield was 1.2 ± 0.9 × 10(6) cells/g liver tissue with a purity of >80%. KC activation was investigated by the measurement of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI, DCF assay) and cell activity (XTT assay). The initial KC activation levels showed broad donor variability. Additional activation of KC using supernatants of hepatocytes treated with hepatotoxic drugs increased KC activity and led to donor-dependent changes in the formation of ROI compared to KC incubated with supernatants from untreated hepatocytes. Additionally, a compound- and donor-dependent increase in proinflammatory cytokines or in anti-inflammatory cytokines was detected. In conclusion, KC related immune signaling in hepatotoxicity was successfully determined in a newly established in vitro liver model. KC were able to detect hepatocyte stress/damage and to transmit a donor- and compound-dependent immune response via cytokine production.

  14. Kupffer cell inactivation by carbon monoxide bound to red blood cells preserves hepatic cytochrome P450 via anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory effects exerted through the HMGB1/TLR-4 pathway during resuscitation from hemorrhagic shock.

    PubMed

    Ogaki, Shigeru; Taguchi, Kazuaki; Maeda, Hitoshi; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Ishima, Yu; Otagiri, Masaki; Maruyama, Toru

    2015-10-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) transfusions for controlling hemorrhaging induce systemic ischemia reperfusion, resulting in a decrease in hepatic cytochrome P450 (CYP) levels. Carbon monoxide (CO), when bound to red blood cells (CO-RBC) has the potential to protect the hepatic CYP protein to produce a resuscitative effect in a hemorrhagic shock rat model. The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanism by which CO-RBC resuscitation from a massive hemorrhage protects against a decrease in hepatic CYP. In the early phase (∼1h) after a hemorrhage and RBC resuscitation, hepatic CYP protein levels were significantly decreased with increasing hepatic free heme levels, but were maintained by a pre-treatment of gadolinium chloride (GdCl3), a Kupffer cell inhibitor, and Trolox, an anti-oxidant agent, as well as CO-RBC resuscitation. Under these conditions, the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) derived from activated Kupffer cells was increased, but this increase was suppressed by CO-RBC resuscitation. At a late phase (6∼24h), CYP mRNA levels decreased after hemorrhage and RBC resuscitation, but not in the case of CO-RBC resuscitation. The increases in plasma IL-6 and TNF-α levels were decreased by CO-RBC resuscitation via the suppression of the toll-like receptor-4 (TLR-4) and the expression of the high mobility group box-1 (HMGB-1). Hepatic CYP protection after a hemorrhage and CO-RBC resuscitation can be attributed to the inactivation of Kupffer cells, resulting in the suppression of ROS production in the early phase and the suppression of inflammatory cytokine production via the TLR-4/HMGB-1signal pathway in the late phase.

  15. Metabolism of supplemental iron (Fe) by hepatocytes (HC), kupffer cells (KC) and endothelial cells (EC) in neonatal pig liver

    SciTech Connect

    Caperna, T.J.; Failla, M.L.

    1986-03-05

    Newborn pigs rapidly develop anemia unless treated with supplemental Fe. The authors have developed methods to isolate and culture the predominant cell types in porcine liver to investigate cellular distribution and metabolism of Fe supplements. One-day (d) old piglets were injected with Fe-dextran (50 mg Fe/kg) and liver cells were isolated from treated and age-matched control piglets 1, 5, and 10 d later. The concentration (..mu..g/mg cell protein) of Fe increased 62-, 54-, and 5-fold over controls in KC, EC, and HC, respectively, 1 d after Fe injection. Thereafter, accumulated Fe was mobilized from all 3 cell types. By 10 d HC mobilized > 85% of accumulated Fe, while Fe levels in KC and EC from treated pigs were at least 15-fold higher than control levels. In vitro studies confirmed the greater capacity of KC and EC to accumulate colloidal Fe compared to HC. The concentration of ferritin (Ft) to liver cells from control pigs was below 0.3 ..mu..g/mg cell protein. After treatment, Ft levels peaked in HC and KC on d 1 at 5.0 and 15.6 ..mu..g/mg cell protein, but in EC on d 5 at 13.3 ..mu..g/mg. Ferritin Fe represented 9% of total Fe in KC and EC at all times after treatment, but as much as 48% in HC at 1 d. Continued investigation of hepatic cellular metabolism of supplemental Fe provides a useful model for investigating the treatment of human neonatal anemia.

  16. Loss of lysosomal membrane protein NCU-G1 in mice results in spontaneous liver fibrosis with accumulation of lipofuscin and iron in Kupffer cells

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Xiang Y.; Nesset, Cecilie Kasi; Damme, Markus; Løberg, Else-Marit; Lübke, Torben; Mæhlen, Jan; Andersson, Kristin B.; Lorenzo, Petra I.; Roos, Norbert; Thoresen, G. Hege; Rustan, Arild C.; Kase, Eili T.; Eskild, Winnie

    2014-01-01

    Human kidney predominant protein, NCU-G1, is a highly conserved protein with an unknown biological function. Initially described as a nuclear protein, it was later shown to be a bona fide lysosomal integral membrane protein. To gain insight into the physiological function of NCU-G1, mice with no detectable expression of this gene were created using a gene-trap strategy, and Ncu-g1gt/gt mice were successfully characterized. Lysosomal disorders are mainly caused by lack of or malfunctioning of proteins in the endosomal-lysosomal pathway. The clinical symptoms vary, but often include liver dysfunction. Persistent liver damage activates fibrogenesis and, if unremedied, eventually leads to liver fibrosis/cirrhosis and death. We demonstrate that the disruption of Ncu-g1 results in spontaneous liver fibrosis in mice as the predominant phenotype. Evidence for an increased rate of hepatic cell death, oxidative stress and active fibrogenesis were detected in Ncu-g1gt/gt liver. In addition to collagen deposition, microscopic examination of liver sections revealed accumulation of autofluorescent lipofuscin and iron in Ncu-g1gt/gt Kupffer cells. Because only a few transgenic mouse models have been identified with chronic liver injury and spontaneous liver fibrosis development, we propose that the Ncu-g1gt/gt mouse could be a valuable new tool in the development of novel treatments for the attenuation of fibrosis due to chronic liver damage. PMID:24487409

  17. Subanesthetic Isoflurane Reduces Zymosan-Induced Inflammation in Murine Kupffer Cells by Inhibiting ROS-Activated p38 MAPK/NF-κB Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hui; Wang, Lei; Li, Nan-lin; Li, Jun-tang; Yu, Feng; Zhao, Ya-li; Wang, Ling; Yi, Jun; Wang, Ling; Bian, Jie-fang; Chen, Jiang-hao; Yuan, Shi-fang; Wang, Ting; Lv, Yong-gang; Liu, Ning-ning; Zhu, Xiao-shan; Ling, Rui; Yun, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Volatile anesthetic isoflurane (ISO) has immunomodulatory effects. The fungal component zymosan (ZY) induces inflammation through toll-like receptor 2 or dectin-1 signaling. We investigated the molecular actions of subanesthetic (0.7%) ISO against ZY-induced inflammatory activation in murine Kupffer cells (KCs), which are known as the resident macrophages within the liver. We observed that ISO reduced ZY-induced cyclooxygenase 2 upregulation and prostaglandin E2 release, as determined by western blot and radioimmunoassay, respectively. ISO also reduced the production of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, IL-6, high-mobility group box-1, macrophage inflammatory protein-1α, macrophage inflammatory protein-2, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 as assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. ISO blocked the ZY-induced nuclear translocation and DNA-binding activity of nuclear factor- (NF)-κB p65. Moreover, ISO attenuated ZY-induced p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation partly by scavenging reactive oxygen species (ROS); the interregulation that ROS activated p38 MAPK followed by NF-κB activation was crucial for the ZY-induced inflammatory responses in KCs. An in vivo study by peritoneal injection of ZY into BALB/C mice confirmed the anti-inflammatory properties of 0.7% ISO against ZY in KCs. These results suggest that ISO ameliorates ZY-induced inflammatory responses in murine KCs by inhibiting the interconnected ROS/p38 MAPK/NF-κB signaling pathways. PMID:25147596

  18. Mercury-Selenium Relationships in Liver of Guiana Dolphin: The Possible Role of Kupffer Cells in the Detoxification Process by Tiemannite Formation

    PubMed Central

    Lailson-Brito, José; Dorneles, Paulo Renato; Andrade, Leonardo; Azevedo, Alexandre de Freitas; Fragoso, Ana Bernadete; Vidal, Lara Gama; Costa, Marianna Badini; Bisi, Tatiana Lemos; Almeida, Ronaldo; Carvalho, Dario Pires; Bastos, Wanderley Rodrigues; Malm, Olaf

    2012-01-01

    Top marine predators present high mercury concentrations in their tissues as consequence of biomagnification of the most toxic form of this metal, methylmercury (MeHg). The present study concerns mercury accumulation by Guiana dolphins (Sotalia guianensis), highlighting the selenium-mediated methylmercury detoxification process. Liver samples from 19 dolphins incidentally captured within Guanabara Bay (Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil) from 1994 to 2006 were analyzed for total mercury (THg), methylmercury (MeHg), total organic mercury (TOrgHg) and selenium (Se). X-ray microanalyses were also performed. The specimens, including from fetuses to 30-year-old dolphins, comprising 8 females and 11 males, presented high THg (0.53–132 µg/g wet wt.) and Se concentrations (0.17–74.8 µg/g wet wt.). Correlations between THg, MeHg, TOrgHg and Se were verified with age (p<0.05), as well as a high and positive correlation was observed between molar concentrations of Hg and Se (p<0.05). Negative correlations were observed between THg and the percentage of MeHg contribution to THg (p<0.05), which represents a consequence of the selenium-mediated methylmercury detoxification process. Accumulation of Se-Hg amorphous crystals in Kupffer Cells was demonstrated through ultra-structural analysis, which shows that Guiana dolphin is capable of carrying out the demethylation process via mercury selenide formation. PMID:22860072

  19. Effects of the in vitro administered ethanol and lipopolysaccharide toxin on membrane properties, intracellular free calcium and phagocytic function of isolated rat kupffer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Victorov, A.; Smith, T.; Abril, E.; Hamlin, E.; Earnest, D. )

    1991-03-11

    Low concentrations of ethanol slightly stimulated phagocytosis of cultured Kupffer cells (KC), producing practically no effect on membrane microviscosity and cytosolic free (Ca{sup 2+}){sub i}. On the contrary, high concentrations of ethanol significantly suppressed phagocytic function, increased fluidity of membrane lipids and caused a sustained rise in (Ca{sup 2}){sub i}; above the resting level of 41-85 nM. Treatment of KC with colchicine and cytochalasin B dramatically destructurized the plasma membrane lipids. Short term preincubation of KC with high doses of alcohol stimulated the disordering effects of both drugs, suggesting direct interaction of ethanol with microtubule and microfilament structures. The authors hypothesize that ethanol impairs phagocytosis of KC by concerted actions on membrane lipid fluidity, cytosolic free Ca{sup 2+} and functioning of cytoskeleton. On the other hand, incubation of KC with low concentrations of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) produced no changes in (Ca{sup 2+}){sub i}; or plasma membrane fluidity but reduced by several fold the fluidizing effect of subsequently added ethanol. They suggested that low doses of LPS, by activating second messengers other than Ca{sup 2+}, alter the functioning of the cytoskeleton and cause reorganization of the plasma membrane thus making KC membranes more resistent to the fluidizing action of ethanol and partially restoring the phagocytic function.

  20. CAR T-cell intrinsic PD-1 checkpoint blockade: A two-in-one approach for solid tumor immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Nan; Morello, Aurore; Tano, Zachary; Adusumilli, Prasad S

    2017-01-01

    PD-L1/2 expression in solid tumors inhibits chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell efficacy. A PD-1 dominant negative receptor expressed in CAR T cells provides cell-intrinsic checkpoint blockade and augments antitumor efficacy. A combinatorial immunotherapeutic strategy of combining CAR T cells with checkpoint blockade is a promising treatment approach for solid tumors.

  1. ETHANOL AND ARACHIDONIC ACID SYNERGIZE TO ACTIVATE KUPFFER CELLS AND MODULATE THE FIBROGENIC RESPONSE VIA TNFα, GSH, AND TGFβ-DEPENDENT MECHANISMS

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Aim because of the contribution of ethanol and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) to alcoholic liver disease, we investigated whether chronic ethanol administration and arachidonic acid (AA) could synergistically mediate Kupffer cell (KC) activation and modulate the stellate cell (HSC) fibrogenic response. Results 1) Ethanol and AA effects on KC and HSC mono-cultures: cell proliferation, lipid peroxidation, H2O2, O2.−, NADPH oxidase activity, and TNFα were higher in KCethanol than in KCcontrol, and were enhanced by AA; HSCethanol proliferated faster, increased collagen, and showed higher GSH than HSCcontrol, with modest effects by AA. 2) AA effects on the control co-culture: we previously reported (1) the ability of KC to induce a pro-fibrogenic response in HSC via ROS-dependent mechanisms; we now show that AA further increases cell proliferation and collagen in the control co-culture. The latter was prevented by vitamin E (an antioxidant) and by diphenyleneiodonium (a NADPH oxidase inhibitor). 3) Ethanol effects on the co-cultures: co-culture with KCcontrol or KCethanol induced HSCcontrol and HSCethanol proliferation; however, the pro-fibrogenic response in HSCethanol was suppressed due to up-regulation of TNFα and GSH, which was prevented by a TNFα neutralizing Ab and by l-buthionine-sulfoximine, a GSH-depleting agent. 4) Ethanol plus AA effects on the co-cultures: AA lowered TNFα in the HSCcontrol co-cultures allowing for enhanced collagen deposition; furthermore, AA restored the pro-fibrogenic response in the HSCethanol co-cultures by counteracting the up-regulation of TNFα and GSH with a significant increase in GSSG and in pro-fibrogenic TGFβ. Conclusion these results unveil synergism between ethanol and AA to the mechanism whereby KC mediate ECM remodeling, and suggest that even if chronic ethanol consumption sensitizes HSC to up-regulate anti-fibrogenic signals, their effects are blunted by a second ‘hit’ such as AA. PMID:19003881

  2. Regulation of myeloid cells by activated T cells determines the efficacy of PD-1 blockade.

    PubMed

    Eissler, Nina; Mao, Yumeng; Brodin, David; Reuterswärd, Philippa; Andersson Svahn, Helene; Johnsen, John Inge; Kiessling, Rolf; Kogner, Per

    2016-01-01

    Removal of immuno-suppression has been reported to enhance antitumor immunity primed by checkpoint inhibitors. Although PD-1 blockade failed to control tumor growth in a transgenic murine neuroblastoma model, concurrent inhibition of colony stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF-1R) by BLZ945 reprogrammed suppressive myeloid cells and significantly enhanced therapeutic effects. Microarray analysis of tumor tissues identified a significant increase of T-cell infiltration guided by myeloid cell-derived chemokines CXCL9, 10, and 11. Blocking the responsible chemokine receptor CXCR3 hampered T-cell infiltration and reduced antitumor efficacy of the combination therapy. Multivariate analysis of 59 immune-cell parameters in tumors and spleens detected the correlation between PD-L1-expressing myeloid cells and tumor burden. In vitro, anti-PD-1 antibody Nivolumab in combination with BLZ945 increased the activation of primary human T and NK cells. Importantly, we revealed a previously uncharacterized pathway, in which T cells secreted M-CSF upon PD-1 blockade, leading to enhanced suppressive capacity of monocytes by upregulation of PD-L1 and purinergic enzymes. In multiple datasets of neuroblastoma patients, gene expression of CD73 correlated strongly with myeloid cell markers CD163 and CSF-1R in neuroblastoma tumors, and associated with worse survival in high-risk patients. Altogether, our data reveal the dual role of activated T cells on myeloid cell functions and provide a rationale for the combination therapy of anti-PD-1 antibody with CSF-1R inhibitor.

  3. Anti-TNF monoclonal antibodies prevent haemorrhage-induced suppression of Kupffer cell antigen presentation and MHC class II antigen expression.

    PubMed Central

    Ertel, W; Morrison, M H; Ayala, A; Perrin, M M; Chaudry, I H

    1991-01-01

    Kupffer cells (KC), by virtue of their ability to present antigen (AP) and express major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II antigen (Ia), play a pivotal role in the host defence system against invading micro-organisms. Although haemorrhagic shock depresses the above KC functions, it is not known whether increased KC tumour necrosis factor (TNF) production and elevated TNF plasma levels following haemorrhage are responsible for it. To study this, C3H/HeN mice were pretreated intraperitoneally with either anti-murine TNF antibody (anti-TNF Ab) or saline. Twenty hours later mice were bled and maintained at a mean blood pressure of 35 mmHg for 60 min followed by adequate fluid resuscitation. Two and 24 hr later, plasma was collected and KC were isolated. AP was measured by co-culturing KC with the D10.G4.1 Th cell clone. Ia expression was determined by direct immunofluorescence. Interleukin (IL)-1, IL-6 and TNF levels in KC supernatants and plasma were measured with bioassays or ELISA. Haemorrhage increased circulating TNF levels by 215% at 2 hr and by 76% at 24 hr (P less than 0.05), which was prevented by pretreatment with anti-TNF Ab. Haemorrhage-induced increase of circulating IL-6 was abolished (P less than 0.05) at 2 hr but not at 24 hr in the anti-TNF Ab group. The suppression of KC AP (P less than 0.05) and Ia expression (P less than 0.05) due to haemorrhage was attenuated (P less than 0.05) in anti-TNF Ab-treated mice at 2 and 24 hr and KC IL-1 and TNF synthesis was further (P less than 0.01) increased. These results indicate that TNF plays a critical role in the initiation and regulation of KC AP, Ia expression, and cytokine production following haemorrhage. PMID:1748476

  4. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) processing by Kupffer cells releases a modified LPS with increased hepatocyte binding and decreased tumor necrosis factor-alpha stimulatory capacity.

    PubMed

    Treon, S P; Thomas, P; Broitman, S A

    1993-02-01

    Normal physiological clearance of gut-derived endotoxin lipopolysaccharide [LPS] has been described previously; initially, there is uptake by Kupffer cells (KC), then release of modified LPS, followed by hepatocyte uptake. Previous work in our laboratories indicated that LPS is structurally modified with loss of carbohydrate prior to its release by KC. In this study, we functionally characterize KC modified LPS. KC-modified 125I-LPS was prepared from primary rat KC. Escherichia coli 0127:B8 native 125I-LPS or KC-modified 125I-LPS (40 ng) was incubated for 1 hr with 1 x 10E6 primary hepatocytes. The binding of KC-modified LPS was 4.33-fold higher than native LPS (P = 0.0024). Binding analysis studies were conducted to determine the region of KC-modified LPS responsible for enhanced hepatocyte binding. KC-modified Salmonella minnesota LPS was competed with 100-fold excess native or mutant (Ra, Rc, Rd, or Re) strains of LPS or Lipid A with no decrease to hepatocyte binding. S. minnesota-native 125I-LPS was compared with KC-modified 125I-LPS in a study to assess induction of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-gamma by rat peritoneal macrophages. Native or KC-modified 125I-LPS (100 ng) was presented to 1 x 10E7 peritoneal macrophages for 6 hr. TNF-alpha was measured in supernatants using the WEHI-164 cytotoxicity assay. Native LPS induced 5.7-fold higher TNF-alpha levels than KC-modified LPS (P < 0.0001). The above data suggest that structural alterations in KC-modified LPS are accompanied by functional alterations resulting in enhanced hepatocyte binding and decreased TNF-alpha release. The latter result implies that an early step in LPS detoxification occurs in the KC in which LPS is modified to prevent elicitation of biologically active cytokines.

  5. Kupffer cells ameliorate hepatic insulin resistance induced by high-fat diet rich in monounsaturated fatty acids: the evidence for the involvement of alternatively activated macrophages

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Resident macrophages (Kupffer cells, KCs) in the liver can undergo both pro- or anti-inflammatory activation pathway and exert either beneficiary or detrimental effects on liver metabolism. Until now, their role in the metabolically dysfunctional state of steatosis remains enigmatic. Aim of our study was to characterize the role of KCs in relation to the onset of hepatic insulin resistance induced by a high-fat (HF) diet rich in monounsaturated fatty acids. Methods Male Wistar rats were fed either standard (SD) or high-fat (HF) diet for 4 weeks. Half of the animals were subjected to the acute GdCl3 treatment 24 and 72 hrs prior to the end of the experiment in order to induce the reduction of KCs population. We determined the effect of HF diet on activation status of liver macrophages and on the changes in hepatic insulin sensitivity and triacylglycerol metabolism imposed by acute KCs depletion by GdCl3. Results We found that a HF diet rich in MUFA itself triggers an alternative but not the classical activation program in KCs. In a steatotic, but not in normal liver, a reduction of the KCs population was associated with a decrease of alternative activation and with a shift towards the expression of pro-inflammatory activation markers, with the increased autophagy, elevated lysosomal lipolysis, increased formation of DAG, PKCε activation and marked exacerbation of HF diet-induced hepatic insulin resistance. Conclusions We propose that in the presence of a high MUFA content the population of alternatively activated resident liver macrophages may mediate beneficial effects on liver insulin sensitivity and alleviate the metabolic disturbances imposed by HF diet feeding and steatosis. Our data indicate that macrophage polarization towards an alternative state might be a useful strategy for treating type 2 diabetes. PMID:22439764

  6. Kupffer cell depletion protects against the steatosis, but not the liver damage, induced by marginal-copper, high-fructose diet in male rats

    PubMed Central

    Schuschke, Dale A.; Zhou, Zhanxiang; Zhong, Wei; Zhang, Jiayuan; Zhang, Xiang; Wang, Yuhua; McClain, Craig J.

    2015-01-01

    High-fructose feeding impairs copper status and leads to low copper availability, which is a novel mechanism in obesity-related fatty liver. Copper deficiency-associated hepatic iron overload likely plays an important role in fructose-induced liver injury. Excess iron in the liver is distributed throughout hepatocytes and Kupffer cells (KCs). The aim of this study was to examine the role of KCs in the pathogenesis of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease induced by a marginal-copper high-fructose diet (CuMF). Male weanling Sprague-Dawley rats were fed either a copper-adequate or a marginally copper-deficient diet for 4 wk. Deionized water or deionized water containing 30% fructose (wt/vol) was also given ad libitum. KCs were depleted by intravenous administration of gadolinium chloride (GdCl3) before and/or in the middle of the experimental period. Hepatic triglyceride accumulation was completely eliminated with KC depletion in CuMF consumption rats, which was associated with the normalization of elevated plasma monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and increased hepatic sterol regulatory element binding protein-1 expression. However, hepatic copper and iron content were not significantly affected by KC depletion. In addition, KC depletion reduced body weight and epididymal fat weight as well as adipocyte size. Plasma endotoxin and gut permeability were markedly increased in CuMF rats. Moreover, MCP-1 was robustly increased in the culture medium when isolated KCs from CuMF rats were treated with LPS. Our data suggest that KCs play a critical role in the development of hepatic steatosis induced by marginal-copper high-fructose diet. PMID:25813056

  7. A transgenic rat hepatocyte - Kupffer cell co-culture model for evaluation of direct and macrophage-related effect of poly(amidoamine) dendrimers.

    PubMed

    Jemnitz, Katalin; Bátai-Konczos, Attila; Szabó, Mónika; Ioja, Enikő; Kolacsek, Orsolya; Orbán, Tamás I; Török, György; Homolya, László; Kovács, Eszter; Jablonkai, István; Veres, Zsuzsa

    2017-02-01

    Increasing number of papers demonstrate that Kupffer cells (KCs) play a role in the development of drug induced liver injury (DILI). Furthermore, elevated intracellular Ca(2+) level of hepatocytes is considered as a common marker of DILI. Here we applied an in vitro model based on hepatocyte mono- and hepatocyte/KC co-cultures (H/KC) isolated from transgenic rats stably expressing the GCaMP2 fluorescent Ca(2+) sensor protein to investigate the effects of polycationic (G5), polyanionic (G4.5) and polyethylene-glycol coated neutral (G5 Peg) dendrimers known to accumulate in the liver, primarily in KCs. Following dendrimer exposure, hepatocyte homeostasis was measured by MTT cytotoxicity assay and by Ca(2+) imaging, while hepatocyte functions were studied by CYP2B1/2 inducibility, and bilirubin and taurocholate transport. G5 was significantly more cytotoxic than G4.5 for hepatocytes and induced Ca(2+) oscillation and sustained Ca(2+) signals at 1μM and10 μM, respectively both in hepatocytes and KCs. Dendrimer-induced Ca(2+) signals in hepatocytes were attenuated by macrophages. Activation of KCs by lipopolysaccharide and G5 decreased the inducibility of CYP2B1/2, which was restored by depleting the KCs with gadolinium-chloride and pentoxyphylline, suggesting a role of macrophages in the hindrance of CYP2B1/2 induction by G5 and lipopolysaccharide. In the H/KC, but not in the hepatocyte mono-culture, G5 reduced the canalicular efflux of bilirubin and stimulated the uptake and canalicular efflux of taurocholate. In conclusion, H/KC provides a good model for the prediction of hepatotoxic potential of drugs, especially of nanomaterials known to be trapped by macrophages, activation of which presumably contributes to DILI.

  8. The SMAC mimetic birinapant attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced liver injury by inhibiting the tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 3 degradation in Kupffer cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongxiang; Liao, Rui; He, Kun; Zhu, Xiwen; Li, Peizhi; Gong, Jianping

    2017-03-09

    It was demonstrated that second mitochondria-derived activator of caspases (SMAC) mimetic inhibites tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 3 (TRAF3) degradation and the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway activation induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in vitro. However, the effect of Smac mimetic in vivo is not clear. The present study was to investigate the role of Smac mimetic in LPS-induced liver injury in mice and its possible mechanism. An animal model of LPS-induced liver injury was established by intraperitoneally injecting mice with 10mg/kg LPS pretreatment with or without Smac mimetic birinapant (30mg/kg body weight). Birinapant significantly improved the survival rate of endotoxemic mice (P<0.05) and attenuated LPS-induced liver pathologic damage and inflammatory response. IL-1 and TNF-α levels in the serum were markedly decreased in birinapant pretreatment mice compared with control mice (P<0.05).The cellular inhibitor of apoptosis protein 1 (cIAP1) expression in liver resident macrophage (Kupffer cells, KCs) was significantly decreased in the Birinapant group compared to the Vehicle group (P<0.05). At the same time, total TRAF3 protein abundance in KCs rapidly declined after LPS stimulation in the Vehicle group. However, it remained constant in the Birinapant group. Moreover, K48-linked polyubiquitination of TRAF3 in KCs was markedly impressed in the birinapant group compared with the control group. At last, the JNK and p38 MAPK activation in KCs was significantly inhibited by birinapant pretreatment (P<0.05). These results suggested that birinapant attenuated liver injury and improved survival rates in endotoxemic mice by inhibited the expression of cIAP1, degradation of TRAF3 and aviation of MAPK signaling pathway.

  9. Sodium permeability and myocardial resistance to cell swelling during metabolic blockade.

    PubMed

    Pine, M B; Kahne, D; Jaski, B; Apstein, C S; Thorp, K; Abelmann, W H

    1980-07-01

    The role of cell membrane permeability to sodium in cell volume regulation during inhibition of the sodium-potassium exchange pump with ouabain and during total metabolic blockade was evaluated in sections of guinea pig renal cortex, ventricle, and atrium incubated in Krebs-Henseleit solution. In all tissues, 2 and 3 h of ouabain and metabolic blockade resulted in similar marked losses of potassium and parallel continuous reductions in resting membrane potentials. Only metabolic blockade of renal cortex increased cell water, chloride, and total monovalent cations (potassium plus sodium) significantly. Compared to ouabain, metabolic blockade markedly increased the rate of cellular washout of 24Na+ from renal cortex (t 1/2 reduced by 47%), which was significantly greater than reductions in t 1/2 from ventricle (16%) and atrium (15%). Thus, inhibition of sodium-potassium exchange pump activity was not sufficient to produce cell swelling unless associated with marked increases in cell membrane permeability to sodium, in which case sodium influx exceeded potassium loss and substantial increases in monovalent cations, chloride, and water occurred.

  10. Regulation of myeloid cells by activated T cells determines the efficacy of PD-1 blockade

    PubMed Central

    Eissler, Nina; Mao, Yumeng; Brodin, David; Andersson Svahn, Helene; Johnsen, John Inge

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Removal of immuno-suppression has been reported to enhance antitumor immunity primed by checkpoint inhibitors. Although PD-1 blockade failed to control tumor growth in a transgenic murine neuroblastoma model, concurrent inhibition of colony stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF-1R) by BLZ945 reprogrammed suppressive myeloid cells and significantly enhanced therapeutic effects. Microarray analysis of tumor tissues identified a significant increase of T-cell infiltration guided by myeloid cell-derived chemokines CXCL9, 10, and 11. Blocking the responsible chemokine receptor CXCR3 hampered T-cell infiltration and reduced antitumor efficacy of the combination therapy. Multivariate analysis of 59 immune-cell parameters in tumors and spleens detected the correlation between PD-L1-expressing myeloid cells and tumor burden. In vitro, anti-PD-1 antibody Nivolumab in combination with BLZ945 increased the activation of primary human T and NK cells. Importantly, we revealed a previously uncharacterized pathway, in which T cells secreted M-CSF upon PD-1 blockade, leading to enhanced suppressive capacity of monocytes by upregulation of PD-L1 and purinergic enzymes. In multiple datasets of neuroblastoma patients, gene expression of CD73 correlated strongly with myeloid cell markers CD163 and CSF-1R in neuroblastoma tumors, and associated with worse survival in high-risk patients. Altogether, our data reveal the dual role of activated T cells on myeloid cell functions and provide a rationale for the combination therapy of anti-PD-1 antibody with CSF-1R inhibitor. PMID:28123870

  11. IL-7 receptor blockade following T cell depletion promotes long-term allograft survival

    PubMed Central

    Mai, Hoa-Le; Boeffard, Françoise; Longis, Julie; Danger, Richard; Martinet, Bernard; Haspot, Fabienne; Vanhove, Bernard; Brouard, Sophie; Soulillou, Jean-Paul

    2014-01-01

    T cell depletion is commonly used in organ transplantation for immunosuppression; however, a restoration of T cell homeostasis following depletion leads to increased memory T cells, which may promote transplant rejection. The cytokine IL-7 is important for controlling lymphopoiesis under both normal and lymphopenic conditions. Here, we investigated whether blocking IL-7 signaling with a mAb that targets IL-7 receptor α (IL-7Rα) alone or following T cell depletion confers an advantage for allograft survival in murine transplant models. We found that IL-7R blockade alone induced indefinite pancreatic islet allograft survival if anti–IL-7R treatment was started 3 weeks before graft. IL-7R blockade following anti-CD4– and anti-CD8–mediated T cell depletion markedly prolonged skin allograft survival. Furthermore, IL-7 inhibition in combination with T cell depletion synergized with either CTLA-4Ig administration or suboptimal doses of tacrolimus to induce long-term skin graft acceptance in this stringent transplant model. Together, these therapies inhibited T cell reconstitution, decreased memory T cell numbers, increased the relative frequency of Tregs, and abrogated both cellular and humoral alloimmune responses. Our data suggest that IL-7R blockade following T cell depletion has potential as a robust, immunosuppressive therapy in transplantation. PMID:24569454

  12. Blockade of constitutively activated ERK signaling enhances cytotoxicity of microtubule-destabilizing agents in tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Tanimura, Susumu; Uchiyama, Aya; Watanabe, Kazushi; Yasunaga, Masahiro; Inada, Yoshiyuki; Kawabata, Takumi; Iwashita, Ken-Ichi; Noda, Sinji; Ozaki, Kei-Ichi; Kohno, Michiaki

    2009-01-16

    The extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathway is constitutively activated in many human tumor cell types. Given the cytoprotective role of this pathway, we examined whether its specific blockade might sensitize human tumor cells to the induction of apoptosis by various anticancer drugs. Although blockade of ERK signaling alone did not induce substantial cell death, it resulted in marked and selective enhancement of the induction of apoptosis by microtubule-destabilizing agents in tumor cells in which the ERK pathway is constitutively activated. The synergistic activation of c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase by the combination of an ERK pathway inhibitor and a microtubule-destabilizing agent appeared to be responsible, at least in part, for this effect. These results suggest that administration of the combination of an ERK pathway inhibitor and a microtubule-destabilizing agent is a potential chemotherapeutic strategy for the treatment of tumor cells with constitutive activation of the ERK pathway.

  13. Challenges and opportunities for checkpoint blockade in T-cell lymphoproliferative disorders.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Tycel; Devata, Sumana; Wilcox, Ryan A

    2016-01-01

    The T-cell lymphoproliferative disorders are a heterogeneous group of non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHL) for which current therapeutic strategies are inadequate, as most patients afflicted with these NHL will succumb to disease progression within 2 years of diagnosis. Appreciation of the genetic and immunologic landscape of these aggressive NHL, including PD-L1 (B7-H1, CD274) expression by malignant T cells and within the tumor microenvironment, provides a strong rationale for therapeutic targeting this immune checkpoint. While further studies are needed, the available data suggests that responses with PD-1 checkpoint blockade alone will unlikely approach those achieved in other lymphoproliferative disorders. Herein, we review the unique challenges posed by the T-cell lymphoproliferative disorders and discuss potential strategies to optimize checkpoint blockade in these T-cell derived malignancies.

  14. Blockade of the ERK pathway markedly sensitizes tumor cells to HDAC inhibitor-induced cell death

    SciTech Connect

    Ozaki, Kei-ichi; Minoda, Ai; Kishikawa, Futaba; Kohno, Michiaki . E-mail: kohnom@net.nagasaki-u.ac.jp

    2006-01-27

    Constitutive activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway is associated with the neoplastic phenotype of a large number of human tumor cells. Although specific blockade of the ERK pathway by treating such tumor cells with potent mitogen-activated protein kinase/ERK kinase (MEK) inhibitors completely suppresses their proliferation, it by itself shows only a modest effect on the induction of apoptotic cell death. However, these MEK inhibitors markedly enhance the efficacy of histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors to induce apoptotic cell death: such an enhanced cell death is observed only in tumor cells in which the ERK pathway is constitutively activated. Co-administration of MEK inhibitor markedly sensitizes tumor cells to HDAC inhibitor-induced generation of reactive oxygen species, which appears to mediate the enhanced cell death induced by the combination of these agents. These results suggest that the combination of MEK inhibitors and HDAC inhibitors provides an efficient chemotherapeutic strategy for the treatment of tumor cells in which the ERK pathway is constitutively activated.

  15. Opiate receptor blockade on human granulosa cells inhibits VEGF release.

    PubMed

    Lunger, Fabian; Vehmas, Anni P; Fürnrohr, Barbara G; Sopper, Sieghart; Wildt, Ludwig; Seeber, Beata

    2016-03-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine whether the main opioid receptor (OPRM1) is present on human granulosa cells and if exogenous opiates and their antagonists can influence granulosa cell vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) production via OPRM1. Granulosa cells were isolated from women undergoing oocyte retrieval for IVF. Complementary to the primary cells, experiments were conducted using COV434, a well-characterized human granulosa cell line. Identification and localization of opiate receptor subtypes was carried out using Western blot and flow cytometry. The effect of opiate antagonist on granulosa cell VEGF secretion was assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. For the first time, the presence of OPRM1 on human granulosa cells is reported. Blocking of opiate signalling using naloxone, a specific OPRM1 antagonist, significantly reduced granulosa cell-derived VEGF levels in both COV434 and granulosa-luteal cells (P < 0.01). The presence of opiate receptors and opiate signalling in granulosa cells suggest a possible role in VEGF production. Targeting this signalling pathway could prove promising as a new clinical option in the prevention and treatment of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome.

  16. PD1 blockade enhances cytotoxicity of in vitro expanded natural killer cells towards myeloma cells

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yanan; Feng, Xiaoli; Jiang, Yang; Shi, Xiaoyun; Xing, Xiangling; Liu, Xiaoli; Li, Nailin; Fadeel, Bengt; Zheng, Chengyun

    2016-01-01

    Aiming for an adoptive natural killer (NK) cell therapy, we have developed a novel protocol to expand NK cells from peripheral blood. With this protocol using anti-human CD16 antibody and interleukin (IL)-2, NK (CD3−CD56+) cells could be expanded about 4000-fold with over 70% purity during a 21-day culture. The expanded NK (exNK) cells were shown to be highly cytotoxic to multiple myeloma (MM) cells (RPMI8226) at low NK-target cell ratios. Furthermore, NK cells expanded in the presence of a blocking antibody (exNK+PD1-blockage) against programmed cell death protein-1 (PD1), a key counteracting molecule for NK and T cell activity, demonstrated more potent cytolytic activity against the RPMI8226 than the exNK cells without PD1 blocking. In parallel, the exNK cells showed significantly higher expression of NK activation receptors NKG2D, NKp44 and NKp30. In a murine model of MM, transfusion of exNK cells, exNK+PD1-blockage, and exNK plus intratumor injection of anti-PD-L2 antibody (exNK+PD-L2 blockage) all significantly suppressed tumor growth and prolonged survival of the myeloma mice. Importantly, exNK+PD1-blockage presented more efficient therapeutic effects. Our results suggest that the NK cell expansion protocol with PD1 blockade presented in this study has considerable potential for the clinical application of allo- and auto-NK cell-based therapies against malignancies. PMID:27356741

  17. Blockade of maitotoxin-induced oncotic cell death reveals zeiosis

    PubMed Central

    Estacion, Mark; Schilling, William P

    2002-01-01

    Background Maitotoxin (MTX) initiates cell death by sequentially activating 1) Ca2+ influx via non-selective cation channels, 2) uptake of vital dyes via formation of large pores, and 3) release of lactate dehydrogenase, an indication of cell lysis. MTX also causes formation of membrane blebs, which dramatically dilate during the cytolysis phase. To determine the role of phospholipase C (PLC) in the cell death cascade, U73122, a specific inhibitor of PLC, and U73343, an inactive analog, were examined on MTX-induced responses in bovine aortic endothelial cells. Results Addition of either U73122 or U73343, prior to MTX, produced a concentration-dependent inhibition of the cell death cascade (IC50 ≈ 1.9 and 0.66 μM, respectively) suggesting that the effect of these agents was independent of PLC. Addition of U73343 shortly after MTX, prevented or attenuated the effects of the toxin, but addition at later times had little or no effect. Time-lapse videomicroscopy showed that U73343 dramatically altered the blebbing profile of MTX-treated cells. Specifically, U73343 blocked bleb dilation and converted the initial blebbing event into "zeiosis", a type of membrane blebbing commonly associated with apoptosis. Cells challenged with MTX and rescued by subsequent addition of U73343, showed enhanced caspase-3 activity 48 hr after the initial insult, consistent with activation of the apoptotic program. Conclusions Within minutes of MTX addition, endothelial cells die by oncosis. Rescue by addition of U73343 shortly after MTX showed that a small percentage of cells are destined to die by oncosis, but that a larger percentage survive; cells that survive the initial insult exhibit zeiosis and may ultimately die by apoptotic mechanisms. PMID:11825342

  18. Grid cell spatial tuning reduced following systemic muscarinic receptor blockade.

    PubMed

    Newman, Ehren L; Climer, Jason R; Hasselmo, Michael E

    2014-06-01

    Grid cells of the medial entorhinal cortex exhibit a periodic and stable pattern of spatial tuning that may reflect the output of a path integration system. This grid pattern has been hypothesized to serve as a spatial coordinate system for navigation and memory function. The mechanisms underlying the generation of this characteristic tuning pattern remain poorly understood. Systemic administration of the muscarinic antagonist scopolamine flattens the typically positive correlation between running speed and entorhinal theta frequency in rats. The loss of this neural correlate of velocity, an important signal for the calculation of path integration, raises the question of what influence scopolamine has on the grid cell tuning as a read out of the path integration system. To test this, the spatial tuning properties of grid cells were compared before and after systemic administration of scopolamine as rats completed laps on a circle track for food rewards. The results show that the spatial tuning of the grid cells was reduced following scopolamine administration. The tuning of head direction cells, in contrast, was not reduced by scopolamine. This is the first report to demonstrate a link between cholinergic function and grid cell tuning. This work suggests that the loss of tuning in the grid cell network may underlie the navigational disorientation observed in Alzheimer's patients and elderly individuals with reduced cholinergic tone.

  19. Grid cell spatial tuning reduced following systemic muscarinic receptor blockade

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Ehren L.; Climer, Jason R.; Hasselmo, Michael E.

    2014-01-01

    Grid cells of the medial entorhinal cortex exhibit a periodic and stable pattern of spatial tuning that may reflect the output of a path integration system. This grid pattern has been hypothesized to serve as a spatial coordinate system for navigation and memory function. The mechanisms underlying the generation of this characteristic tuning pattern remain poorly understood. Systemic administration of the muscarinic antagonist scopolamine flattens the typically positive correlation between running speed and entorhinal theta frequency in rats. The loss of this neural correlate of velocity, an important signal for the calculation of path integration, raises the question of what influence scopolamine has on the grid cell tuning as a read out of the path integration system. To test this, the spatial tuning properties of grid cells were compared before and after systemic administration of scopolamine as rats completed laps on a circle track for food rewards. The results show that the spatial tuning of the grid cells was reduced following scopolamine administration. The tuning of head direction cells, in contrast, was not reduced by scopolamine. This is the first report to demonstrate a link between cholinergic function and grid cell tuning. This work suggests that the loss of tuning in the grid cell network may underlie the navigational disorientation observed in Alzheimer's patients and elderly individuals with reduced cholinergic tone. PMID:24493379

  20. Blockade of Glutamine Synthetase Enhances Inflammatory Response in Microglial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Palmieri, Erika M.; Menga, Alessio; Lebrun, Aurore; Hooper, Douglas C.; Butterfield, D. Allan

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Microglial cells are brain-resident macrophages engaged in surveillance and maintained in a constant state of relative inactivity. However, their involvement in autoimmune diseases indicates that in pathological conditions microglia gain an inflammatory phenotype. The mechanisms underlying this change in the microglial phenotype are still unclear. Since metabolism is an important modulator of immune cell function, we focused our attention on glutamine synthetase (GS), a modulator of the response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) activation in other cell types, which is expressed by microglia. Results: GS inhibition enhances release of inflammatory mediators of LPS-activated microglia in vitro, leading to perturbation of the redox balance and decreased viability of cocultured neurons. GS inhibition also decreases insulin-mediated glucose uptake in microglia. In vivo, microglia-specific GS ablation enhances expression of inflammatory markers upon LPS treatment. In the spinal cords from experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), GS expression levels and glutamine/glutamate ratios are reduced. Innovation: Recently, metabolism has been highlighted as mediator of immune cell function through the discovery of mechanisms that (behind these metabolic changes) modulate the inflammatory response. The present study shows for the first time a metabolic mechanism mediating microglial response to a proinflammatory stimulus, pointing to GS activity as a master modulator of immune cell function and thus unraveling a potential therapeutic target. Conclusions: Our study highlights a new role of GS in modulating immune response in microglia, providing insights into the pathogenic mechanisms associated with inflammation and new strategies of therapeutic intervention. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 26, 351–363. PMID:27758118

  1. Structure-activity relationship between carboxylic acids and T cell cycle blockade.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Kathleen M; DeLoose, Annick; Valentine, Jimmie L; Fifer, E Kim

    2006-04-04

    This study was designed to examine the potential structure-activity relationship between carboxylic acids, histone acetylation and T cell cycle blockade. Toward this goal a series of structural homologues of the short-chain carboxylic acid n-butyrate were studied for their ability to block the IL-2-stimulated proliferation of cloned CD4+ T cells. The carboxylic acids were also tested for their ability to inhibit histone deacetylation. In addition, Western blotting was used to examine the relative capacity of the carboxlic acids to upregulate the cyclin kinase-dependent inhibitor p21cip1 in T cells. As shown earlier n-butyrate effectively inhibited histone deacetylation. The increased acetylation induced by n-butyrate was associated with the upregulation of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21cip1 and the cell cycle blockade of CD4+ T cells. Of the other carboxylic acids studied, the short chain acids, C3-C5, without branching were the best inhibitors of histone deacetylase. This inhibition correlated with increased expression of the cell cycle blocker p21cip1, and the associated suppression of CD4+ T cell proliferation. The branched-chain carboxylic acids tested were ineffective in all the assays. These results underline the relationship between the ability of a carboxylic acid to inhibit histone deacetylation, and their ability to block T cell proliferation, and suggests that branching inhibits these effects.

  2. Evolution of Neoantigen Landscape during Immune Checkpoint Blockade in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Anagnostou, Valsamo; Smith, Kellie N; Forde, Patrick M; Niknafs, Noushin; Bhattacharya, Rohit; White, James; Zhang, Theresa; Adleff, Vilmos; Phallen, Jillian; Wali, Neha; Hruban, Carolyn; Guthrie, Violeta B; Rodgers, Kristen; Naidoo, Jarushka; Kang, Hyunseok; Sharfman, William; Georgiades, Christos; Verde, Franco; Illei, Peter; Li, Qing Kay; Gabrielson, Edward; Brock, Malcolm V; Zahnow, Cynthia A; Baylin, Stephen B; Scharpf, Robert B; Brahmer, Julie R; Karchin, Rachel; Pardoll, Drew M; Velculescu, Victor E

    2017-03-01

    Immune checkpoint inhibitors have shown significant therapeutic responses against tumors containing increased mutation-associated neoantigen load. We have examined the evolving landscape of tumor neoantigens during the emergence of acquired resistance in patients with non-small cell lung cancer after initial response to immune checkpoint blockade with anti-PD-1 or anti-PD-1/anti-CTLA-4 antibodies. Analyses of matched pretreatment and resistant tumors identified genomic changes resulting in loss of 7 to 18 putative mutation-associated neoantigens in resistant clones. Peptides generated from the eliminated neoantigens elicited clonal T-cell expansion in autologous T-cell cultures, suggesting that they generated functional immune responses. Neoantigen loss occurred through elimination of tumor subclones or through deletion of chromosomal regions containing truncal alterations, and was associated with changes in T-cell receptor clonality. These analyses provide insight into the dynamics of mutational landscapes during immune checkpoint blockade and have implications for the development of immune therapies that target tumor neoantigens.Significance: Acquired resistance to immune checkpoint therapy is being recognized more commonly. This work demonstrates for the first time that acquired resistance to immune checkpoint blockade can arise in association with the evolving landscape of mutations, some of which encode tumor neoantigens recognizable by T cells. These observations imply that widening the breadth of neoantigen reactivity may mitigate the development of acquired resistance. Cancer Discov; 7(3); 264-76. ©2017 AACR.See related commentary by Yang, p. 250This article is highlighted in the In This Issue feature, p. 235.

  3. TNF Blockade Maintains an IL-10+ Phenotype in Human Effector CD4+ and CD8+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Ceri A.; Durham, Lucy E.; Fleskens, Veerle; Evans, Hayley G.; Taams, Leonie S.

    2017-01-01

    CD4+ and CD8+ effector T cell subpopulations can display regulatory potential characterized by expression of the prototypically anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. However, the underlying cellular mechanisms that regulate expression of IL-10 in different T cell subpopulations are not yet fully elucidated. We recently showed that TNF inhibitors (TNFi) promote IL-10 expression in human CD4+ T cells, including IL-17+ CD4+ T cells. Here, we further characterized the regulation of IL-10 expression via blockade of TNF signaling or other cytokine/co-stimulatory pathways, in human T cell subpopulations. Addition of the TNFi drug adalimumab to anti-CD3-stimulated human CD4+ T cell/monocyte cocultures led to increased percentages of IL-10+ cells in pro-inflammatory IL-17+, IFNγ+, TNFα+, GM-CSF+, and IL-4+ CD4+ T cell subpopulations. Conversely, exogenous TNFα strongly decreased IL-10+ cell frequencies. TNF blockade also regulated IL-10 expression in CD4+ T cells upon antigenic stimulation. Using time course experiments in whole peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) cultures, we show that TNF blockade maintained, rather than increased, IL-10+ cell frequencies in both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells following in vitro stimulation in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Blockade of IL-17, IFNγ, IL-6R, or CD80/CD86-mediated co-stimulation did not significantly regulate IL-10 expression within CD4+ or CD8+ T cell subpopulations. We show that TNF blockade acts directly on effector CD4+ T cells, in the absence of monocytes or CD4+ CD25highCD127low regulatory T cells and independently of IL-27, resulting in higher IL-10+ frequencies after 3 days in culture. IL-10/IL-10R blockade reduced the frequency of IL-10-expressing cells both in the presence and absence of TNF blockade. Addition of recombinant IL-10 alone was insufficient to drive an increase in IL-10+ CD4+ T cell frequencies in 3-day CD4+ T cell/monocyte cocultures, but resulted in increased IL-10 expression at later time points in

  4. T cell costimulation blockade blunts pressure overload-induced heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Kallikourdis, Marinos; Martini, Elisa; Carullo, Pierluigi; Sardi, Claudia; Roselli, Giuliana; Greco, Carolina M.; Vignali, Debora; Riva, Federica; Ormbostad Berre, Anne Marie; Stølen, Tomas O.; Fumero, Andrea; Faggian, Giuseppe; Di Pasquale, Elisa; Elia, Leonardo; Rumio, Cristiano; Catalucci, Daniele; Papait, Roberto; Condorelli, Gianluigi

    2017-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a leading cause of mortality. Inflammation is implicated in HF, yet clinical trials targeting pro-inflammatory cytokines in HF were unsuccessful, possibly due to redundant functions of individual cytokines. Searching for better cardiac inflammation targets, here we link T cells with HF development in a mouse model of pathological cardiac hypertrophy and in human HF patients. T cell costimulation blockade, through FDA-approved rheumatoid arthritis drug abatacept, leads to highly significant delay in progression and decreased severity of cardiac dysfunction in the mouse HF model. The therapeutic effect occurs via inhibition of activation and cardiac infiltration of T cells and macrophages, leading to reduced cardiomyocyte death. Abatacept treatment also induces production of anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10). IL-10-deficient mice are refractive to treatment, while protection could be rescued by transfer of IL-10-sufficient B cells. These results suggest that T cell costimulation blockade might be therapeutically exploited to treat HF. PMID:28262700

  5. Human CAR T cells with cell-intrinsic PD-1 checkpoint blockade resist tumor-mediated inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Cherkassky, Leonid; Morello, Aurore; Villena-Vargas, Jonathan; Feng, Yang; Dimitrov, Dimiter S.; Jones, David R.; Sadelain, Michel; Adusumilli, Prasad S.

    2016-01-01

    Following immune attack, solid tumors upregulate coinhibitory ligands that bind to inhibitory receptors on T cells. This adaptive resistance compromises the efficacy of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapies, which redirect T cells to solid tumors. Here, we investigated whether programmed death-1–mediated (PD-1–mediated) T cell exhaustion affects mesothelin-targeted CAR T cells and explored cell-intrinsic strategies to overcome inhibition of CAR T cells. Using an orthotopic mouse model of pleural mesothelioma, we determined that relatively high doses of both CD28- and 4-1BB–based second-generation CAR T cells achieved tumor eradication. CAR-mediated CD28 and 4-1BB costimulation resulted in similar levels of T cell persistence in animals treated with low T cell doses; however, PD-1 upregulation within the tumor microenvironment inhibited T cell function. At lower doses, 4-1BB CAR T cells retained their cytotoxic and cytokine secretion functions longer than CD28 CAR T cells. The prolonged function of 4-1BB CAR T cells correlated with improved survival. PD-1/PD-1 ligand [PD-L1] pathway interference, through PD-1 antibody checkpoint blockade, cell-intrinsic PD-1 shRNA blockade, or a PD-1 dominant negative receptor, restored the effector function of CD28 CAR T cells. These findings provide mechanistic insights into human CAR T cell exhaustion in solid tumors and suggest that PD-1/PD-L1 blockade may be an effective strategy for improving the potency of CAR T cell therapies. PMID:27454297

  6. Human CAR T cells with cell-intrinsic PD-1 checkpoint blockade resist tumor-mediated inhibition.

    PubMed

    Cherkassky, Leonid; Morello, Aurore; Villena-Vargas, Jonathan; Feng, Yang; Dimitrov, Dimiter S; Jones, David R; Sadelain, Michel; Adusumilli, Prasad S

    2016-08-01

    Following immune attack, solid tumors upregulate coinhibitory ligands that bind to inhibitory receptors on T cells. This adaptive resistance compromises the efficacy of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapies, which redirect T cells to solid tumors. Here, we investigated whether programmed death-1-mediated (PD-1-mediated) T cell exhaustion affects mesothelin-targeted CAR T cells and explored cell-intrinsic strategies to overcome inhibition of CAR T cells. Using an orthotopic mouse model of pleural mesothelioma, we determined that relatively high doses of both CD28- and 4-1BB-based second-generation CAR T cells achieved tumor eradication. CAR-mediated CD28 and 4-1BB costimulation resulted in similar levels of T cell persistence in animals treated with low T cell doses; however, PD-1 upregulation within the tumor microenvironment inhibited T cell function. At lower doses, 4-1BB CAR T cells retained their cytotoxic and cytokine secretion functions longer than CD28 CAR T cells. The prolonged function of 4-1BB CAR T cells correlated with improved survival. PD-1/PD-1 ligand [PD-L1] pathway interference, through PD-1 antibody checkpoint blockade, cell-intrinsic PD-1 shRNA blockade, or a PD-1 dominant negative receptor, restored the effector function of CD28 CAR T cells. These findings provide mechanistic insights into human CAR T cell exhaustion in solid tumors and suggest that PD-1/PD-L1 blockade may be an effective strategy for improving the potency of CAR T cell therapies.

  7. [THE EXCESS OF PALMITIC FATTY ACID IN FOOD AS MAIN CAUSE OF LIPOIDOSIS OF INSULIN-DEPENDENT CELLS: SKELETAL MYOCYTES, CARDIO-MYOCYTES, PERIPORTAL HEPATOCYTES, KUPFFER MACROPHAGES AND B-CELLS OF PANCREAS].

    PubMed

    Titov, V N

    2016-02-01

    In phylogenesis, becoming of biologicalfunctions and biological reactions proceeds with the purpose ofpermanent increasing of "kinetic perfection ". The main role belongs to factors ofphysical, chemical and biological kinetics, their evaluation using systemic approach technique under permanent effect of natural selection. The late-in-phylogenesis insulin, proceeded with, in development of biological function of locomotion, specialization of insulin-dependent cells: skeletal myocytes, syncytium of cardiomyocytes, subcutaneous adipocytes, periportal hepatocytes, Kupffer's macrophages and β-cells of islets of pancreas. The insulin initiated formation of new, late in phylogenesis, large pool of fatty cells-subcutaneous adipocytes that increased kinetic parameters of biological function of locomotion. In realization of biological function of locomotion only adipocytes absorb exogenous mono unsaturated and saturated fatty acids in the form of triglycerides in composition of oleic and palmitic lipoproteins of very low density using apoE/B-100 endocytosis. The rest of insulin-dependent cells absorb fatty acids in the form of unesterified fatty acids from associates with albumin and under effect of CD36 of translocase offatty acids. The insulin in all insulin-depended cells inhibits biological reaction of lipolysis enhancing contributing into development of lipoidosis. The insulin expresses transfer offatty acids in the form of unsaturated fatty acids from adipocytes into matrix of mitochondria. The insulin supplies insulin-dependent cells with substrates for acquiring energy subject to that in pool of unsaturated fatty acids in adipocytes prevails hydrophobic palmitic unsaturated fatiy acid that slowly passes into matrix through external membrane ofmitochondria; oxidases of mitochondria so slowly implement its β-oxidation that content of exogenous palmitic unsaturatedfatty acid can't be higher than phylogenetic, physiological level - 15% of all amount offatty acids

  8. Biomimetic biodegradable artificial antigen presenting cells synergize with PD-1 blockade to treat melanoma.

    PubMed

    Kosmides, A K; Meyer, R A; Hickey, J W; Aje, K; Cheung, K N; Green, J J; Schneck, J P

    2017-02-01

    Biomimetic materials that target the immune system and generate an anti-tumor responses hold promise in augmenting cancer immunotherapy. These synthetic materials can be engineered and optimized for their biodegradability, physical parameters such as shape and size, and controlled release of immune-modulators. As these new platforms enter the playing field, it is imperative to understand their interaction with existing immunotherapies since single-targeted approaches have limited efficacy. Here, we investigate the synergy between a PLGA-based artificial antigen presenting cell (aAPC) and a checkpoint blockade molecule, anti-PD1 monoclonal antibody (mAb). The combination of antigen-specific aAPC-based activation and anti-PD-1 mAb checkpoint blockade induced the greatest IFN-γ secretion by CD8+ T cells in vitro. Combination treatment also acted synergistically in an in vivo murine melanoma model to result in delayed tumor growth and extended survival, while either treatment alone had no effect. This was shown mechanistically to be due to decreased PD-1 expression and increased antigen-specific proliferation of CD8+ T cells within the tumor microenvironment and spleen. Thus, biomaterial-based therapy can synergize with other immunotherapies and motivates the translation of biomimetic combinatorial treatments.

  9. Interleukin-1 blockade overcomes erlotinib resistance in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Stanam, Aditya; Gibson-Corley, Katherine N.; Love-Homan, Laurie; Ihejirika, Nnamdi; Simons, Andrean L.

    2016-01-01

    Erlotinib has demonstrated poor clinical response rates for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) to date and the majority of respondents acquire resistance to erlotinib relatively quickly. To elucidate novel pathways involved in erlotinib resistance, we compared the gene expression profiles of erlotinib-resistant (ER) vs. erlotinib-sensitive (ES) HNSCC cell lines. Enrichment analysis of microarray data revealed a deregulation of the IL-1 signaling pathway in ER versus ES-HNSCC cells. Gene expression of interleukin-1 alpha (IL1A) and interleukin-1 beta (IL1B) were significantly upregulated by > 2 fold in ER-SQ20B and ER-CAL 27 cells compared to their respective ES-cells. Secretion of the IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1RA) was significantly reduced in ER-cells compared to ES-cells. Blockade of IL-1 signaling using a recombinant IL-1R antagonist (anakinra) was able to inhibit the growth of ER-SQ20B and ER-CAL 27 but not ES-SQ20B and ES-CAL 27 xenografts as a single agent and in combination with erlotinib. ER-SQ20B xenografts treated with anakinra ± erlotinib were found to be less vascularized than ER-SQ20B xenografts treated with water or erlotinib. Mice bearing ER-SQ20B xenografts had significantly lesser circulating levels of G-CSF and IL-1β when treated with anakinra ± erlotinib compared to those treated with water or erlotinib alone. Furthermore, augmented mRNA levels of IL1A or interleukin-1 receptor accessory protein (IL1RAP) were associated with shortened survival in HNSCC patients. Altogether, blockade of the IL-1 pathway using anakinra overcame erlotinib resistance in HNSCC xenografts and may represent a novel strategy to overcome EGFR inhibitor resistance for treatment of HNSCC patients. PMID:27738319

  10. Precision medicine in immune checkpoint blockade therapy for non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoming; Cho, William C

    2017-12-01

    Immune checkpoint blockade therapy by targeting the programmed death protein 1/programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1) axis using antibodies has yielded promising clinical responses in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, owing to the dynamic expression of PD-L1, degree of mutational/neoantigen load, intratumoral heterogeneity, infiltrated immune cells of tumor microenvironment of NSCLC, the response rates to these agents are limited, despite several companion diagnostic assays by detecting PD-L1 in tumor cells have been introduced into clinical practice. Therefore, in this era of precision medicine, there is an urgent need for predictive biomarkers to identify NSCLC patients likely to benefit from this novel therapy.

  11. TNF-α blockade induces IL-10 expression in human CD4+ T cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Hayley G.; Roostalu, Urmas; Walter, Gina J.; Gullick, Nicola J.; Frederiksen, Klaus S.; Roberts, Ceri A.; Sumner, Jonathan; Baeten, Dominique L.; Gerwien, Jens G.; Cope, Andrew P.; Geissmann, Frederic; Kirkham, Bruce W.; Taams, Leonie S.

    2014-02-01

    IL-17+ CD4+ T (Th17) cells contribute to the pathogenesis of several human inflammatory diseases. Here we demonstrate that TNF inhibitor (TNFi) drugs induce the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 in CD4+ T cells including IL-17+ CD4+ T cells. TNFi-mediated induction of IL-10 in IL-17+ CD4+ T cells is Treg-/Foxp3-independent, requires IL-10 and is overcome by IL-1β. TNFi-exposed IL-17+ CD4+ T cells are molecularly and functionally distinct, with a unique gene signature characterized by expression of IL10 and IKZF3 (encoding Aiolos). We show that Aiolos binds conserved regions in the IL10 locus in IL-17+ CD4+ T cells. Furthermore, IKZF3 and IL10 expression levels correlate in primary CD4+ T cells and Aiolos overexpression is sufficient to drive IL10 in these cells. Our data demonstrate that TNF-α blockade induces IL-10 in CD4+ T cells including Th17 cells and suggest a role for the transcription factor Aiolos in the regulation of IL-10 in CD4+ T cells.

  12. Dual HER2 Blockade in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Harboring a HER2 Mutation.

    PubMed

    Mar, Nataliya; Vredenburgh, James J

    2015-10-01

    Identification of targetable oncogenic mutations in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has been a major advance in cancer treatment. Laboratory techniques to assess human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) positivity in NSCLC include immunohistochemistry (IHC) for protein overexpression, fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) for gene amplification, and next generation sequencing (NGS) for HER2 gene mutations. These tests have a controversial prognostic and predictive value, with an emerging association between HER2 gene mutations and treatment response to HER2 targeted therapy. We present a case of a woman with metastatic lung adenocarcinoma with HER2 positivity assessed by IHC and FISH, as well as a high gene copy number noted on NGS. She was observed to have significant disease progression following standard first-line platinum doublet chemotherapy. She was started on dual HER2 blockade in the second-line setting, which yielded a great response in the liver with stable disease elsewhere. To our knowledge, this is the first report describing successful use of dual HER2 blockade in metastatic HER2 positive NSCLC. We also review common laboratory techniques for determining HER2 positivity in NSCLC and their clinical applications.

  13. Clonal neoantigens elicit T cell immunoreactivity and sensitivity to immune checkpoint blockade

    PubMed Central

    McGranahan, Nicholas; Furness, Andrew J. S.; Rosenthal, Rachel; Ramskov, Sofie; Lyngaa, Rikke; Saini, Sunil Kumar; Jamal-Hanjani, Mariam; Wilson, Gareth A.; Birkbak, Nicolai J.; Hiley, Crispin T.; Watkins, Thomas B. K.; Shafi, Seema; Murugaesu, Nirupa; Mitter, Richard; Akarca, Ayse U.; Linares, Joseph; Marafioti, Teresa; Henry, Jake Y.; Van Allen, Eliezer M.; Miao, Diana; Schilling, Bastian; Schadendorf, Dirk; Garraway, Levi A.; Makarov, Vladimir; Rizvi, Naiyer A.; Snyder, Alexandra; Hellmann, Matthew D.; Merghoub, Taha; Wolchok, Jedd D.; Shukla, Sachet A.; Wu, Catherine J.; Peggs, Karl S.; Chan, Timothy A.; Hadrup, Sine R.; Quezada, Sergio A.; Swanton, Charles

    2016-01-01

    As tumors grow, they acquire mutations, some of which create neoantigens that influence the response of patients to immune checkpoint inhibitors. We explored the impact of neoantigen intratumor heterogeneity (ITH) on antitumor immunity. Through integrated analysis of ITH and neoantigen burden, we demonstrate a relationship between clonal neoantigen burden and overall survival in primary lung adenocarcinomas. CD8+ tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes reactive to clonal neoantigens were identified in early-stage non–small cell lung cancer and expressed high levels of PD-1. Sensitivity to PD-1 and CTLA-4 blockade in patients with advanced NSCLC and melanoma was enhanced in tumors enriched for clonal neoantigens. T cells recognizing clonal neoantigens were detectable in patients with durable clinical benefit. Cytotoxic chemotherapy–induced subclonal neoantigens, contributing to an increased mutational load, were enriched in certain poor responders. These data suggest that neoantigen heterogeneity may influence immune surveillance and support therapeutic developments targeting clonal neoantigens. PMID:26940869

  14. Immune checkpoint blockade in small cell lung cancer: is there a light at the end of the tunnel?

    PubMed Central

    Paglialunga, Luca; Salih, Zena; Ricciuti, Biagio; Califano, Raffaele

    2016-01-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is a very aggressive disease, characterised by rapid growth, high response rates to both chemotherapy and radiotherapy and subsequent development of treatment resistance in the vast majority of patients. In the past 30 years, little progress has been made in systemic treatments and the established management paradigm of platinum-based chemotherapy has reached an efficacy plateau. Several clinical trials have investigated targeted therapies, without producing clinically significant benefits. Recently presented early phase clinical trials with immune checkpoint inhibitors (blockade of the cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4) and blockade of the programmed cell death-1 (PD-1) receptor) have shown promising results. In this review, we present the emerging evidence on immune checkpoint blockade for SCLC. PMID:27843619

  15. Blockade of glucagon signaling prevents or reverses diabetes onset only if residual β-cells persist

    PubMed Central

    Damond, Nicolas; Thorel, Fabrizio; Moyers, Julie S; Charron, Maureen J; Vuguin, Patricia M; Powers, Alvin C; Herrera, Pedro L

    2016-01-01

    Glucagon secretion dysregulation in diabetes fosters hyperglycemia. Recent studies report that mice lacking glucagon receptor (Gcgr-/-) do not develop diabetes following streptozotocin (STZ)-mediated ablation of insulin-producing β-cells. Here, we show that diabetes prevention in STZ-treated Gcgr-/- animals requires remnant insulin action originating from spared residual β-cells: these mice indeed became hyperglycemic after insulin receptor blockade. Accordingly, Gcgr-/- mice developed hyperglycemia after induction of a more complete, diphtheria toxin (DT)-induced β-cell loss, a situation of near-absolute insulin deficiency similar to type 1 diabetes. In addition, glucagon deficiency did not impair the natural capacity of α-cells to reprogram into insulin production after extreme β-cell loss. α-to-β-cell conversion was improved in Gcgr-/- mice as a consequence of α-cell hyperplasia. Collectively, these results indicate that glucagon antagonism could i) be a useful adjuvant therapy in diabetes only when residual insulin action persists, and ii) help devising future β-cell regeneration therapies relying upon α-cell reprogramming. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13828.001 PMID:27092792

  16. Synergistic reversal of intrahepatic HCV-specific CD8 T cell exhaustion by combined PD-1/CTLA-4 blockade.

    PubMed

    Nakamoto, Nobuhiro; Cho, Hyosun; Shaked, Abraham; Olthoff, Kim; Valiga, Mary E; Kaminski, Mary; Gostick, Emma; Price, David A; Freeman, Gordon J; Wherry, E John; Chang, Kyong-Mi

    2009-02-01

    Viral persistence is associated with hierarchical antiviral CD8 T cell exhaustion with increased programmed death-1 (PD-1) expression. In HCV persistence, HCV-specific CD8 T cells from the liver (the site of viral replication) display increased PD-1 expression and a profound functional impairment that is not reversed by PD-1 blockade alone. Here, we report that the inhibitory receptor cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen-4 (CTLA-4) is preferentially upregulated in PD-1(+) T cells from the liver but not blood of chronically HCV-infected patients. PD-1/CTLA-4 co-expression in intrahepatic T cells was associated with a profound HCV-specific effector dysfunction that was synergistically reversed by combined PD-1/CTLA-4 blockade in vitro, but not by blocking PD-1 or CTLA-4 alone. A similar effect was observed in circulating HCV-specific CD8 T cells with increased PD-1/CTLA-4 co-expression during acute hepatitis C. The functional response to combined blockade was directly associated with CTLA-4 expression, lost with CD28-depletion and CD4-independent (including CD4(+)FoxP3(+) Tregs). We conclude that PD-1 and CTLA-4 pathways both contribute to virus-specific T cell exhaustion at the site of viral replication by a redundant mechanism that requires combined PD-1/CTLA-4 blockade to reverse. These findings provide new insights into the mechanisms of virus-specific T cell dysfunction, and suggest that the synergistic effect by combined inhibitory receptor blockade might have a therapeutic application against chronic viral infection in vivo, provided that it does not induce autoimmunity.

  17. Effect of cholecystokinin-2 receptor blockade on rat stomach ECL cells. A histochemical, electron-microscopic and chemical study.

    PubMed

    Chen, D; Zhao, C M; Norlén, P; Björkqvist, M; Ding, X Q; Kitano, M; Håkanson, R

    2000-01-01

    The ECL cells in the oxyntic mucosa of rat stomach produce histamine and chromogranin A-derived peptides such as pancreastatin. The cells respond to gastrin via cholecystokinin-2 (CCK2) receptors. A CCK2 receptor blockade was induced by treatment (for up to 8 weeks) with two receptor antagonists, YM022 and YF476. Changes in ECL-cell morphology were examined by immunocytochemistry and electron microscopy, while changes in ECL cell-related biochemical parameters were monitored by measuring serum pancreastatin and oxyntic mucosal pancreastatin, and histamine concentrations, and histidine decarboxylase (HDC) activity. The CCK2 receptor blockade reduced the ECL-cell density only marginally, if at all, but transformed the ECL cells from slender, elongated cells with prominent projections to small, spherical cells without projections. The Golgi complex and the rough endoplasmic reticulum were diminished. Secretory vesicles were greatly reduced in volume density in the trans Golgi area. Circulating pancreastatin concentration and oxyntic mucosal HDC activity were lowered within a few hours. Oxyntic mucosal histamine and pancreastatin concentrations were reduced only gradually. The CCK2 receptor blockade was found to prevent the effects of omeprazole-evoked hypergastrinaemia on the ECL-cell activity and density. In conclusion, gastrin, acting on CCK2 receptors, is needed to maintain the shape, size and activity of the ECL cells, but not for maintaining the ECL-cell population.

  18. Blockade of voltage-gated sodium channels inhibits invasion of endocrine-resistant breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Fatima H; Khajah, Maitham A; Yang, Ming; Brackenbury, William J; Luqmani, Yunus A

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated Na+ channels (VGSCs) are membrane proteins which are normally expressed in excitable cells but have also been detected in cancer cells, where they are thought to be involved in malignancy progression. In this study we examined the ion current and expression profile of VGSC (Nav1.5) in estrogen receptor (ER)-positive (MCF-7) and silenced (pII) breast cancer cells and its possible influence on their proliferation, motility and invasion. VGSC currents were analysed by whole cell patch clamp recording. Nav1.5 expression and localization, in response to EGF stimulation, was examined by western blotting and immunofluorescence respectively. Cell invasion (under-agarose and Matrigel assays), motility (wound healing assay) and proliferation (MTT assay) were assessed in pII cells in response to VGSC blockers, phenytoin (PHT) and tetrodotoxin (TTX), or by siRNA knockdown of Nav1.5. The effect of PHT and TTX on modulating EGF-induced phosphorylation of Akt and ERK1/2 was determined by western blotting. Total matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) was determined using a fluorometric-based activity assay. The level of various human proteases was detected by using proteome profiler array kit. VGSC currents were detected in pII cells, but were absent in MCF-7. Nav1.5 showed cytoplasmic and perinuclear expression in both MCF-7 and pII cells, with enhanced expression upon EGF stimulation. Treatment of pII cells with PHT, TTX or siRNA significantly reduced invasion towards serum components and EGF, in part through reduction of P-ERK1/2 and proteases such as cathepsin E, kallikrein-10 and MMP-7, as well as total MMP activity. At high concentrations, PHT inhibited motility while TTX reduced cell proliferation. Pharmacological or genetic blockade of Nav1.5 may serve as a potential anti-metastatic therapy for breast cancer.

  19. Blockade of TGF-beta enhances tumor vaccine efficacy mediated by CD8(+) T cells.

    PubMed

    Takaku, Shun; Terabe, Masaki; Ambrosino, Elena; Peng, Judy; Lonning, Scott; McPherson, John M; Berzofsky, Jay A

    2010-04-01

    Though TGF-beta inhibition enhances antitumor immunity mediated by CD8(+) T cells in several tumor models, it is not always sufficient for rejection of tumors. In this study, to maximize the antitumor effect of TGF-beta blockade, we tested the effect of anti-TGF-beta combined with an irradiated tumor vaccine in a subcutaneous CT26 colon carcinoma tumor model. The irradiated tumor cell vaccine alone in prophylactic setting significantly delayed tumor growth, whereas anti-TGF-beta antibodies alone did not show any antitumor effect. However, tumor growth was inhibited significantly more in vaccinated mice treated with anti-TGF-beta antibodies compared to vaccinated mice without anti-TGF-beta, suggesting that anti-TGF-beta synergistically enhanced irradiated tumor vaccine efficacy. CD8(+) T-cell depletion completely abrogated the vaccine efficacy, and so protection required CD8(+) T cells. Depletion of CD25(+) T regulatory cells led to the almost complete rejection of tumors without the vaccine, whereas anti-TGF-beta did not change the number of CD25(+) T regulatory cells in unvaccinated and vaccinated mice. Though the abrogation of CD1d-restricted NKT cells, which have been reported to induce TGF-beta production by MDSC through an IL-13-IL-4R-STAT6 pathway, partially enhanced antitumor immunity regardless of vaccination, abrogation of the NKT cell-IL-13-IL-4R-STAT-6 immunoregulatory pathway did not enhance vaccine efficacy. Taken together, these data indicated that anti-TGF-beta enhances efficacy of a prophylactic vaccine in normal individuals despite their not having the elevated TGF-beta levels found in patients with cancer and that the effect is not dependent on TGF-beta solely from CD4(+)CD25(+) T regulatory cells or the NKT cell-IL-13-IL-4R-STAT-6 immunoregulatory pathway.

  20. Pathogen Stimulation History Impacts Donor-Specific CD8(+) T Cell Susceptibility to Costimulation/Integrin Blockade-Based Therapy.

    PubMed

    Badell, I R; Kitchens, W H; Wagener, M E; Lukacher, A E; Larsen, C P; Ford, M L

    2015-12-01

    Recent studies have shown that the quantity of donor-reactive memory T cells is an important factor in determining the relative heterologous immunity barrier posed during transplantation. Here, we hypothesized that the quality of T cell memory also potently influences the response to costimulation blockade-based immunosuppression. Using a murine skin graft model of CD8(+) memory T cell-mediated costimulation blockade resistance, we elicited donor-reactive memory T cells using three distinct types of pathogen infections. Strikingly, we observed differential efficacy of a costimulation and integrin blockade regimen based on the type of pathogen used to elicit the donor-reactive memory T cell response. Intriguingly, the most immunosuppression-sensitive memory T cell populations were composed primarily of central memory cells that possessed greater recall potential, exhibited a less differentiated phenotype, and contained more multi-cytokine producers. These data, therefore, demonstrate that the memory T cell barrier is dependent on the specific type of pathogen infection via which the donor-reactive memory T cells are elicited, and suggest that the immune stimulation history of a given transplant patient may profoundly influence the relative barrier posed by heterologous immunity during transplantation.

  1. Hyperlipidemia Alters Regulatory T Cell Function and Promotes Resistance to Tolerance Induction Through Costimulatory Molecule Blockade

    PubMed Central

    Bagley, J.; Yuan, J.; Chandrakar, A.; Iacomini, J.

    2016-01-01

    Recent work from our laboratory has shown that hyperlipidemia promotes accelerated rejection of vascularized cardiac allografts in mice by inducing anti-donor Th17 reactivity and production of IL-17. Here, we show that hyperlipidemia also affects FoxP3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs). Hyperlipidemia promotes the development of Tregs that express low levels of CD25. Hyperlipidemia also promotes a decrease in central Tregs and an increase in effector Tregs that appears to account for the increase in the frequency of CD25low Tregs. Alterations in Treg subsets also appear to lead to alterations in Treg function. The ability of FoxP3+, CD25high, CD4+ Tregs from hyperlipidemic mice to inhibit proliferation of effector T cells stimulated with anti-CD3 and CD28 was reduced when compared with Tregs from control mice. Regulatory T cells isolated from hyperlipidemic recipients exhibit increased activation of Akt, and a reduction in Bim levels that permits the expansion of FoxP3+CD25lowCD4+ T cells. Hyperlipidemic mice were also resistant to tolerance induction using costimulatory molecule blockade consisting of anti-CD154 and CTLA4Ig, a strategy that requires Tregs. Together, our data suggest that hyperlipidemia profoundly affects Treg subsets and function as well as the ability to induce tolerance. PMID:26079467

  2. Ex Vivo Costimulatory Blockade to Generate Regulatory T Cells From Patients Awaiting Kidney Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Guinan, E C; Cole, G A; Wylie, W H; Kelner, R H; Janec, K J; Yuan, H; Oppatt, J; Brennan, L L; Turka, L A; Markmann, J

    2016-07-01

    Short-term outcomes of kidney transplantation have improved dramatically, but chronic rejection and regimen-related toxicity continue to compromise overall patient outcomes. Development of regulatory T cells (Tregs) as a means to decrease alloresponsiveness and limit the need for pharmacologic immunosuppression is an active area of preclinical and clinical investigation. Nevertheless, the immunomodulatory effects of end-stage renal disease on the efficacy of various strategies to generate and expand recipient Tregs for kidney transplantation are incompletely characterized. In this study, we show that Tregs can be successfully generated from either freshly isolated or previously cryopreserved uremic recipient (responder) and healthy donor (stimulator) peripheral blood mononuclear cells using the strategy of ex vivo costimulatory blockade with belatacept during mixed lymphocyte culture. Moreover, these Tregs maintain a CD3(+) CD4(+) CD25(+) CD127(lo) surface phenotype, high levels of intracellular FOXP3 and significant demethylation of the FOXP3 Treg-specific demethylation region on allorestimulation with donor stimulator cells. These data support evaluation of this simple, brief Treg production strategy in clinical trials of mismatched kidney transplantation.

  3. In vivo blockade of neural activity alters dendritic development of neonatal CA1 pyramidal cells.

    PubMed

    Groc, Laurent; Petanjek, Zdravko; Gustafsson, Bengt; Ben-Ari, Yehezkel; Hanse, Eric; Khazipov, Roustem

    2002-11-01

    During development, neural activity has been proposed to promote neuronal growth. During the first postnatal week, the hippocampus is characterized by an oscillating neural network activity and a rapid neuronal growth. In the present study we tested in vivo, by injecting tetanus toxin into the hippocampus of P1 rats, whether this neural activity indeed promotes growth of pyramidal cells. We have previously shown that tetanus toxin injection leads to a strong reduction in the frequency of spontaneous GABA and glutamatergic synaptic currents, and to a complete blockade of the early neural network activity during the first postnatal week. Morphology of neurobiotin-filled CA1 pyramidal cells was analyzed at the end of the first postnatal week (P6-10). In activity-reduced neurons, the total length of basal dendritic tree was three times less than control. The number, but not the length, of basal dendritic branches was affected. The growth impairment was restricted to the basal dendrites. The apical dendrite, the axons, or the soma grew normally during activity deprivation. Thus, the in vivo neural activity in the neonate hippocampus seems to promote neuronal growth by initiating novel branches.

  4. In vitro TNF blockade enhances ex vivo expansion of regulatory T cells in patients with immune thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Hui; Bussel, James; Yazdanbakhsh, Karina

    2017-01-01

    Summary Tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF) is an inflammatory cytokine that is elevated in a number of autoimmune diseases including immune thrombocytopenia (ITP), a bleeding disorder characterized by low platelet counts. In vitro TNF blockade increases expansion of the regulatory T cell (Treg) IKZF2 (also termed Helios) subset in T cell-monocyte cocultures from healthy donors, but its role on proliferative responses of Tregs in ITP patients, who have altered immunoregulatory compartment, remains unclear. TNF in CD4+ T cells from patients with chronic ITP were elevated and negatively correlated with peripheral Treg frequencies, suggesting a possible inhibitory effect of TNF on ITP Tregs. In vitro antibody neutralization with anti-TNF in T cell-monocyte cocultures resulted in a robust expansion of pre-existing ITP Tregs, higher than in healthy controls. Similar to the effects of anti-TNF antibodies, TNF blockade with antibodies against TNFRSF1B (anti-TNFRSF1B, previously termed anti-TNFRII) almost doubled ITP Treg expansion whereas neutralization with anti-TNFRSF1A (anti-TNFRI) antibodies had no effect on proliferative responses of Tregs. In addition, TNFRSF1B levels on ITP Tregs were significantly elevated, which may explain the increased susceptibility of patient Tregs to the actions of TNF blockade. Altogether, these data raise the possibility that TNF blockers, through their ability to increase Treg proliferation, may be efficacious in ITP patients. PMID:25252160

  5. B7-H1 Blockade Increases Survival of Dysfunctional CD8+ T Cells and Confers Protection against Leishmania donovani Infections

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Trupti; Rodriguez, Susana; Perovic, Vladimir; Cockburn, Ian A.; Stäger, Simona

    2009-01-01

    Experimental visceral leishmaniasis (VL) represents an exquisite model to study CD8+ T cell responses in a context of chronic inflammation and antigen persistence, since it is characterized by chronic infection in the spleen and CD8+ T cells are required for the development of protective immunity. However, antigen-specific CD8+ T cell responses in VL have so far not been studied, due to the absence of any defined Leishmania-specific CD8+ T cell epitopes. In this study, transgenic Leishmania donovani parasites expressing ovalbumin were used to characterize the development, function, and fate of Leishmania-specific CD8+ T cell responses. Here we show that L. donovani parasites evade CD8+ T cell responses by limiting their expansion and inducing functional exhaustion and cell death. Dysfunctional CD8+ T cells could be partially rescued by in vivo B7-H1 blockade, which increased CD8+ T cell survival but failed to restore cytokine production. Nevertheless, B7-H1 blockade significantly reduced the splenic parasite burden. These findings could be exploited for the design of new strategies for immunotherapeutic interventions against VL. PMID:19436710

  6. Functional blockade of α5β1 integrin induces scattering and genomic landscape remodeling of hepatic progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Cell scattering is a physiological process executed by stem and progenitor cells during embryonic liver development and postnatal organ regeneration. Here, we investigated the genomic events occurring during this process induced by functional blockade of α5β1 integrin in liver progenitor cells. Results Cells treated with a specific antibody against α5β1 integrin exhibited cell spreading and scattering, over-expression of liver stem/progenitor cell markers and activation of the ERK1/2 and p38 MAPKs signaling cascades, in a similar manner to the process triggered by HGF/SF1 stimulation. Gene expression profiling revealed marked transcriptional changes of genes involved in cell adhesion and migration, as well as genes encoding chromatin remodeling factors. These responses were accompanied by conspicuous spatial reorganization of centromeres, while integrin genes conserved their spatial positioning in the interphase nucleus. Conclusion Collectively, our results demonstrate that α5β1 integrin functional blockade induces cell migration of hepatic progenitor cells, and that this involves a dramatic remodeling of the nuclear landscape. PMID:20958983

  7. Local blockade of epithelial PDL-1 in the airways enhances T cell function and viral clearance during influenza virus infection.

    PubMed

    McNally, Beth; Ye, Fang; Willette, Meredith; Flaño, Emilio

    2013-12-01

    In order to maintain the gas exchange function of the lung following influenza virus infection, a delicate orchestration of positive and negative regulatory pathways must be maintained to attain viral eradication while minimizing local inflammation. The programmed death receptor 1 ligand/programmed death receptor 1 (PDL-1/PD-1) pathway plays an important immunoregulatory role, particularly in the context of T cell function. Here, we have shown that influenza virus infection of primary airway epithelial cells strongly enhances PDL-1 expression and does so in an alpha interferon receptor (IFNAR) signaling-dependent manner. PD-1 is expressed primarily on effector T cells in the lung, compared to effector memory and central memory cells, and shortly after influenza virus infection, an increased number of PD-1(+) T cells are recruited to the airways. Using in vitro cocultures of airway epithelial cells and T cells and in vivo models of influenza virus infection, we have demonstrated that blockade of airway epithelial PDL-1 improves CD8 T cell function, defined by increased production of gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and granzyme B and expression of CD107ab. Furthermore, PDL-1 blockade in the airways served to accelerate influenza virus clearance and enhance infection recovery. Our findings suggest that local manipulation of the PDL-1/PD-1 axis in the airways may represent a therapeutic alternative during acute influenza virus infection.

  8. Brief report: Blockade of Notch signaling in muscle stem cells causes muscular dystrophic phenotype and impaired muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shuibin; Shen, Huangxuan; Jin, Baofeng; Gu, Yumei; Chen, Zirong; Cao, Chunxia; Hu, Chengbin; Keller, Charles; Pear, Warren S; Wu, Lizi

    2013-04-01

    Muscular dystrophies are a group of devastating diseases characterized by progressive muscle weakness and degeneration, with etiologies including muscle gene mutations and regenerative defects of muscle stem cells. Notch signaling is critical for skeletal myogenesis and has important roles in maintaining the muscle stem cell pool and preventing premature muscle differentiation. To investigate the functional impact of Notch signaling blockade in muscle stem cells, we developed a conditional knock-in mouse model in which endogenous Notch signaling is specifically blocked in muscle stem cell compartment. Mice with Notch signaling inhibition in muscle stem cells showed several muscular dystrophic features and impaired muscle regeneration. Analyses of satellite cells and isolated primary myoblasts revealed that Notch signaling blockade in muscle stem cells caused reduced activation and proliferation of satellite cells but enhanced differentiation of myoblasts. Our data thus indicate that Notch signaling controls processes that are critical to regeneration in muscular dystrophy, suggesting that Notch inhibitor therapies could have potential side effects on muscle functions.

  9. Candida-elicited murine Th17 cells express high Ctla-4 compared with Th1 cells and are resistant to costimulation blockade.

    PubMed

    Krummey, Scott M; Floyd, Tamara L; Liu, Danya; Wagener, Maylene E; Song, Mingqing; Ford, Mandy L

    2014-03-01

    Effector and memory T cells may cross-react with allogeneic Ags to mediate graft rejection. Whereas the costimulation properties of Th1 cells are well studied, relatively little is known about the costimulation requirements of microbe-elicited Th17 cells. The costimulation blocker CTLA-4 Ig has been ineffective in the treatment of several Th17-driven autoimmune diseases and is associated with severe acute rejection following renal transplantation, leading us to investigate whether Th17 cells play a role in CD28/CTLA-4 blockade-resistant alloreactivity. We established an Ag-specific model in which Th1 and Th17 cells were elicited via Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Candida albicans immunization, respectively. C. albicans immunization elicited a higher frequency of Th17 cells and conferred resistance to costimulation blockade following transplantation. Compared with the M. tuberculosis group, C. albicans-elicited Th17 cells contained a higher frequency of IL-17(+)IFN-γ(+) producers and a lower frequency of IL-10(+) and IL-10(+)IL-17(+) cells. Importantly, Th17 cells differentially regulated the CD28/CTLA-4 pathway, expressing similarly high CD28 but significantly greater amounts of CTLA-4 compared with Th1 cells. Ex vivo blockade experiments demonstrated that Th17 cells are more sensitive to CTLA-4 coinhibition and therefore less susceptible to CTLA-4 Ig. These novel insights into the differential regulation of CTLA-4 coinhibition on CD4(+) T cells have implications for the immunomodulation of pathologic T cell responses during transplantation and autoimmunity.

  10. Blockade of pathological retinal ganglion cell hyperactivity improves optogenetically evoked light responses in rd1 mice

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, John M.; Degenaar, Patrick; Sernagor, Evelyne

    2015-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a progressive retinal dystrophy that causes visual impairment and eventual blindness. Retinal prostheses are the best currently available vision-restoring treatment for RP, but only restore crude vision. One possible contributing factor to the poor quality of vision achieved with prosthetic devices is the pathological retinal ganglion cell (RGC) hyperactivity that occurs in photoreceptor dystrophic disorders. Gap junction blockade with meclofenamic acid (MFA) was recently shown to diminish RGC hyperactivity and improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of RGC responses to light flashes and electrical stimulation in the rd10 mouse model of RP. We sought to extend these results to spatiotemporally patterned optogenetic stimulation in the faster-degenerating rd1 model and compare the effectiveness of a number of drugs known to disrupt rd1 hyperactivity. We crossed rd1 mice with a transgenic mouse line expressing the light-sensitive cation channel channelrhodopsin2 (ChR2) in RGCs, allowing them to be stimulated directly using high-intensity blue light. We used 60-channel ITO multielectrode arrays to record ChR2-mediated RGC responses from wholemount, ex-vivo retinas to full-field and patterned stimuli before and after application of MFA, 18-β-glycyrrhetinic acid (18BGA, another gap junction blocker) or flupirtine (Flu, a Kv7 potassium channel opener). All three drugs decreased spontaneous RGC firing, but 18BGA and Flu also decreased the sensitivity of RGCs to optogenetic stimulation. Nevertheless, all three drugs improved the SNR of ChR2-mediated responses. MFA also made it easier to discern motion direction of a moving bar from RGC population responses. Our results support the hypothesis that reduction of pathological RGC spontaneous activity characteristic in retinal degenerative disorders may improve the quality of visual responses in retinal prostheses and they provide insights into how best to achieve this for optogenetic prostheses

  11. Receptor for advanced glycation end product blockade enhances the chemotherapeutic effect of cisplatin in tongue squamous cell carcinoma by reducing autophagy and modulating the Wnt pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ziming; Wang, Hongyu; Zhang, Liao; Mei, Xifan; Hu, Jing; Huang, Keqiang

    2017-02-01

    Tongue squamous cell carcinoma (TSCC) is one of the most severe types of cancer with poor outcomes. Cisplatin is used widely to treat cancer cells, but many patients develop acquired drug resistance. The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is expressed widely in TSCC and associated with drug-induced chemotherapy resistance. However, the effect of RAGE and cisplatin on Tca-8113 cells remains unknown. We assayed the combined use of RAGE blockade and cisplatin effect on Tca-8113 cells' viability by MTT and apoptosis rate of Tca-8113 cells on RAGE blockade+cisplatin treatment; cisplatin alone; or RAGE blockade alone by flow cytometry. We observed the expressions of autophagy-related proteins beclin1, LC3II, p62; Wnt signaling-related proteins β-catenin, GSK3β, WNT5A, ROR-2; and apoptosis-related protein cleaved caspase-3, bcl-2-associated X proteins using western blot. We determined WNT5A and beclin1 expression on Tca-8113 cells by immunofluorescence. We further observed autophagy vacuoles by monodansylcadaverine staining. We found that RAGE blockade and cisplatin significantly decreased cell viability and increased the cell apoptosis rate compared with cisplatin alone. Furthermore, RAGE blockade suppressed the canonical Wnt pathway proteins β-catenin and GSK-3β, but upregulated noncanonical WNT5A and receptor ROR-2. We show that RAGE blockade suppressed the levels of autophagy-related protein LC3II/I, beclin1, accelerated degradation of autophagy for the increasing p62 expression, and increased cell apoptosis for the increasing expressions of cleaved caspase-3 and bcl-2-associated X proteins. We observed the location of WNT5A and beclin1 expressions on cells by immunofluorescence and their trends were consistent with western blotting. Taken together, our findings suggested that RAGE blockade+cisplatin improved chemotherapeutic effects by reducing autophagy and regulating Wnt/β-catenin to suppress the progression of TSCC.

  12. Blockade of CD47 ameliorates autoimmune inflammation in CNS by suppressing IL-1-triggered infiltration of pathogenic Th17 cells.

    PubMed

    Gao, Qiangguo; Zhang, Yi; Han, Chaofeng; Hu, Xiang; Zhang, Hua; Xu, Xiongfei; Tian, Jun; Liu, Yiqi; Ding, Yuanyuan; Liu, Juan; Wang, Chunmei; Guo, Zhenhong; Yang, Yongguang; Cao, Xuetao

    2016-05-01

    The migration of Th17 cells into central nervous system (CNS) tissue is the key pathogenic step in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) model. However, the mechanism underlying the pathogenic Th17 cell migration remains elusive. Here we report that blockade of CD47 with CD47-Fc fusion protein is effective in preventing and curing EAE by impairing infiltration of Th17 cells into CNS. However, CD47 deficiency does not directly impair the migration of Th17 cells. Mechanistic studies showed that CD47 deficiency inhibited degradation of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in proteasome of macrophages by Src activation and led to the increased nitric oxide (NO) production. Then NO suppressed inflammasome activation-induced IL-1β production. This lower IL-1β reduces the expression of IL-1R1 and migration-related chemokine receptors on CD47(-/-) Th17 cells, inhibiting the ability of Th17 cells to infiltrate into the CNS of CD47(-/-) mice and therefore suppressing EAE development. In vivo administration of exogenous IL-1β indeed promoted the infiltration CD47(-/-) Th17 cells into CNS and antagonized the protective role of CD47 deficiency in EAE pathogenesis. Our results demonstrate a potential preventive and therapeutic application of CD47 blockade in controlling EAE development.

  13. Vaccination with Dendritic Cell Myeloma Fusions in Conjuction with Stem Cell Transplantation and PD-1 Blockade

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-09-1-0296 TITLE: Vaccination with Dendritic Cell Myeloma Fusions in Conjuction with Stem Cell Transplantation and PD-1...Addendum 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 1May2014 - 30Apr2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Vaccination with Dendritic Cell Myeloma Fusions in Conjuction with Stem...anti-PD1 antibody (CT-011) alone (Cohort 1) and in conjunction with a dendritic cell/myeloma fusion cell vaccine (Cohort 2) following autologous

  14. Combination of Id2 Knockdown Whole Tumor Cells and Checkpoint Blockade: A Potent Vaccine Strategy in a Mouse Neuroblastoma Model.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, Lina; Morgan, Clifford; Sandler, Anthony D

    2015-01-01

    Tumor vaccines have held much promise, but to date have demonstrated little clinical success. This lack of success is conceivably due to poor tumor antigen presentation combined with immuno-suppressive mechanisms exploited by the tumor itself. Knock down of Inhibitor of differentiation protein 2 (Id2-kd) in mouse neuroblastoma whole tumor cells rendered these cells immunogenic. Id2-kd neuroblastoma (Neuro2a) cells (Id2-kd N2a) failed to grow in most immune competent mice and these mice subsequently developed immunity against further wild-type Neuro2a tumor cell challenge. Id2-kd N2a cells grew aggressively in immune-compromised hosts, thereby establishing the immunogenicity of these cells. Therapeutic vaccination with Id2-kd N2a cells alone suppressed tumor growth even in established neuroblastoma tumors and when used in combination with immune checkpoint blockade eradicated large established tumors. Mechanistically, immune cell depletion studies demonstrated that while CD8+ T cells are critical for antitumor immunity, CD4+ T cells are also required to induce a sustained long-lasting helper effect. An increase in number of CD8+ T-cells and enhanced production of interferon gamma (IFNγ) was observed in tumor antigen stimulated splenocytes of vaccinated mice. More importantly, a massive influx of cytotoxic CD8+ T-cells infiltrated the shrinking tumor following combined immunotherapy. These findings show that down regulation of Id2 induced tumor cell immunity and in combination with checkpoint blockade produced a novel, potent, T-cell mediated tumor vaccine strategy.

  15. Immunosuppressive Myeloid Cells' Blockade in the Glioma Microenvironment Enhances the Efficacy of Immune-Stimulatory Gene Therapy.

    PubMed

    Kamran, Neha; Kadiyala, Padma; Saxena, Meghna; Candolfi, Marianela; Li, Youping; Moreno-Ayala, Mariela A; Raja, Nicholas; Shah, Diana; Lowenstein, Pedro R; Castro, Maria G

    2017-01-04

    Survival of glioma (GBM) patients treated with the current standard of care remains dismal. Immunotherapeutic approaches that harness the cytotoxic and memory potential of the host immune system have shown great benefit in other cancers. GBMs have developed multiple strategies, including the accumulation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) to induce immunosuppression. It is therefore imperative to develop multipronged approaches when aiming to generate a robust anti-tumor immune response. Herein, we tested whether combining MDSC depletion or checkpoint blockade would augment the efficacy of immune-stimulatory herpes simplex type-I thymidine kinase (TK) plus Fms-like tyrosine kinase ligand (Flt3L)-mediated immune stimulatory gene therapy. Our results show that MDSCs constitute >40% of the tumor-infiltrating immune cells. These cells express IL-4Rα, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), arginase, programmed death ligand 1 (PDL1), and CD80, molecules that are critically involved in antigen-specific T cell suppression. Depletion of MDSCs strongly enhanced the TK/Flt3L gene therapy-induced tumor-specific CD8 T cell response, which lead to increased median survival and percentage of long-term survivors. Also, combining PDL1 or CTLA-4 immune checkpoint blockade greatly improved the efficacy of TK/Flt3L gene therapy. Our results, therefore, indicate that blocking MDSC-mediated immunosuppression holds great promise for increasing the efficacy of gene therapy-mediated immunotherapies for GBM.

  16. PD-1 Blockade Can Restore Functions of T-Cells in Epstein-Barr Virus-Positive Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Quan, Lina; Chen, Xue; Liu, Aichun; Zhang, Yan; Guo, Xiuchen; Yan, Shujie; Liu, Yue

    2015-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus-positive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (EBV+DLBCL) is an aggressive malignancy that is largely resistant to current therapeutic regimens, and is an attractive target for immune-based therapies. Anti-programmed death-1 (PD-1) antibodies showed encouraging anti-tumor effects in both preclinical models and advanced solid and hematological malignancies, but its efficacy against EBV+DLBCL is unknown. Herein, we performed experiments using co-culture system with T cells and lymphoma cell lines including EBV+DLBCL and EBV-DLBCL [including germinal center B-cell like (GCB)-DLBCL and non-GCB-DLBCL] in vitro. We show that lymphoma cells augmented the expression of PD-1 on T cells, decreased the proliferation of T cells, and altered the secretion of multiple cytokines. However, through PD-1 blockade, these functions could be largely restored. Notbaly, the effect of PD-1 blockade on antitumor immunity was more effective in EBV+DLBCL than that in EBV-DLBCL in vitro. These results suggest that T-cell exhaustion and immune escape in microenvironment is one of the mechanisms underlying DLBCL; and PD-1 blockade could present as a efficacious immunotherapeutic treatment for EBV+DLBCL.

  17. CDK4/6 or MAPK blockade enhances efficacy of EGFR inhibition in oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jin; Wu, Zhong; Wong, Gabrielle; Pectasides, Eirini; Nagaraja, Ankur; Stachler, Matthew; Zhang, Haikuo; Chen, Ting; Zhang, Haisheng; Liu, Jie Bin; Xu, Xinsen; Sicinska, Ewa; Sanchez-Vega, Francisco; Rustgi, Anil K.; Diehl, J. Alan; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Bass, Adam J.

    2017-01-01

    Oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma is a deadly disease where systemic therapy has relied upon empiric chemotherapy despite the presence of genomic alterations pointing to candidate therapeutic targets, including recurrent amplification of the gene encoding receptor tyrosine kinase epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Here, we demonstrate that EGFR-targeting small-molecule inhibitors have efficacy in EGFR-amplified oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC), but may become quickly ineffective. Resistance can occur following the emergence of epithelial–mesenchymal transition and by reactivation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway following EGFR blockade. We demonstrate that blockade of this rebound activation with MEK (mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase) inhibition enhances EGFR inhibitor-induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest, and delays resistance to EGFR monotherapy. Furthermore, genomic profiling shows that cell cycle regulators are altered in the majority of EGFR-amplified tumours and a combination of cyclin-dependent kinase 4/6 (CDK4/6) and EGFR inhibitors prevents the emergence of resistance in vitro and in vivo. These data suggest that upfront combination strategies targeting EGFR amplification, guided by adaptive pathway reactivation or by co-occurring genomic alterations, should be tested clinically. PMID:28059068

  18. Human Dendritic Cells Mitigate NK-Cell Dysfunction Mediated by Nonselective JAK1/2 Blockade.

    PubMed

    Curran, Shane A; Shyer, Justin A; St Angelo, Erin T; Talbot, Lillian R; Sharma, Sneh; Chung, David J; Heller, Glenn; Hsu, Katharine C; Betts, Brian C; Young, James W

    2017-01-01

    Janus kinase (JAK) inhibitors have achieved positive responses in myeloproliferative neoplasms, but at the expense of decreased natural killer (NK) cell numbers and compromised function. Selective JAK2 inhibition may also have a role in preventing and treating graft-versus-host disease after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Although JAK inhibitors can impair monocyte-derived dendritic cell (moDC) activation and function and suppress effector T-cell responses, the effects on NK cells and the relevant mechanisms remain undefined. Using common γc cytokines and distinct human dendritic cell (DC) subtypes, we compared the effects of a JAK2-specific (TG101348) with a less selective JAK1/2 (ruxolitinib) inhibitor on NK-cell activation and function. Ruxolitinib treatment completely blocked IL2, IL15, and DC-mediated STAT5 phosphorylation, along with the capacity of NK cells to secrete IFNγ or lyse NK cell-sensitive targets. Only NK-cell proliferation stimulated by moDCs resisted ruxolitinib treatment. In contrast, TG101348 treatment of stimulated NK cells resulted in far less functional compromise. TG101348 completely inhibited only soluble IL15-mediated STAT5 phosphorylation, which Langerhans-type DCs (LCs), presenting membrane-bound IL15 in trans, could salvage. These results demonstrate that ruxolitinib's nonselective inhibition of JAK1/2 results in profound NK-cell dysfunction by blocking downstream pSTAT5, hence providing a persuasive rationale for the development of selective JAK2 inhibitors for immunotherapeutic applications. Cancer Immunol Res; 5(1); 52-60. ©2016 AACR.

  19. Resistance of human glioblastoma multiforme cells to growth factor inhibitors is overcome by blockade of inhibitor of apoptosis proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ziegler, David S.; Wright, Renee D.; Kesari, Santosh; Lemieux, Madeleine E.; Tran, Mary A.; Jain, Monish; Zawel, Leigh; Kung, Andrew L.

    2008-01-01

    Multiple receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), including PDGFR, have been validated as therapeutic targets in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), yet inhibitors of RTKs have had limited clinical success. As various antiapoptotic mechanisms render GBM cells resistant to chemo- and radiotherapy, we hypothesized that these antiapoptotic mechanisms also confer resistance to RTK inhibition. We found that in vitro inhibition of PDGFR in human GBM cells initiated the intrinsic pathway of apoptosis, as evidenced by mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization, but downstream caspase activation was blocked by inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAPs). Consistent with this, inhibition of PDGFR combined with small molecule inactivation of IAPs induced apoptosis in human GBM cells in vitro and had synergistic antitumor effects in orthotopic mouse models of GBM and in primary human GBM neurospheres. These results demonstrate that concomitant inhibition of IAPs can overcome resistance to RTK inhibitors in human malignant GBM cells, and suggest that blockade of IAPs has the potential to improve treatment outcomes in patients with GBM. PMID:18677408

  20. Combined blockade of AKT/mTOR pathway inhibits growth of human hemangioma via downregulation of proliferating cell nuclear antigen.

    PubMed

    Ou, J M; Qui, M-K; Dai, Y-X; Dong, Q; Shen, J; Dong, P; Wang, X-F; Liu, Y-B; Fei, Z-W

    2012-01-01

    Protein kinase B (AKT)/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway plays a crucial role in the tumorigenesis and progression of multiple tumors, and has been shown to be important therapeutic targets for cancer. The present study aimed to explore the role and molecular mechanisms of AKT/mTOR pathway in human hemangioma (HA). Twenty-five cases of human HA tissues were collected. The expression of AKT, mTOR and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) proteins was evaluated using semi-quantitative immunohistochemistry in biopsy samples in different phases of HA. AKT/mTOR pathway was blocked by recombinant small hairpin RNA adenovirus vector rAd5-AKT+mTOR (rAd5-Am), used for infecting proliferating phase HA-derived endothelial cells (HDEC). The expression of AKT, mTOR and PCNA was detected by Real-time PCR and Western blot assays. Cell proliferative activities were determined by MTT assay, and cell cycle distribution and apoptosis were analyzed by flow cytometry. As a consequence, the expression of AKT, mTOR and PCNA was significantly increased in proliferative phase HA, while that was decreased in involutive phase. Combined blockade of AKT/mTOR pathway by rAd5-Am diminished cell proliferative activities, and induced cell apoptosis and cycle arrest with the decreased expression of AKT, mTOR and PCNA in proliferative phase HDEC. In conclusion, the activity of AKT/mTOR pathway was increased in proliferative phase HA, while it was decreased in involutive phase. Combined blockade of AKT/mTOR pathway might suppress cell proliferation via down-regulation of PCNA expression, and induce apoptosis and cycle arrest in proliferative phase HDEC, suggesting that AKT/mTOR pathway might represent the important therapeutic targets for human HA.

  1. Monoclonal antibody that inhibits infection of HeLa and rhabdomyosarcoma cells by selected enteroviruses through receptor blockade

    SciTech Connect

    Crowell, R.L.; Field, A.K.; Schleif, W.A.; Long, W.L.; Colonno, R.J.; Mapoles, J.E.; Emini, E. A.

    1986-02-01

    BALB/c mice were immunized with HeLa cells, and their spleen cells were fused with myeloma cells to produce hybridomas. Initial screening of culture fluids from 800 fusion products in a cell protection assay against coxsackievirus B3 (CB3) and the CB3-RD virus variant yielded five presumptive monoclonal antibodies with three specificities: (i) protection against CB3 on HeLa, (ii) protection against CB3-RD on rhabdomyosarcoma (RD) cells, and (iii) protection against both viruses on the respective cells. Only one of the monoclonal antibodies (with dual specificity) survived two subclonings and was studied in detail. The antibody was determined to have an immunoglobulin G2a isotype and protected cells by blockade of cellular receptors, since attachment of (/sup 35/S)methionine-labeled CB3 was inhibited by greater than 90%. The monoclonal antibody protected HeLa cells against infection by CB1, CB3, CB5, echovirus 6, and coxsackievirus A21 and RD cells against CB1-RD, CB3-RD, and CB5-Rd virus variants. The monoclonal antibody did not protect either cell type against 16 other immunotypes of picornaviruses. The monoclonal antibody produced only positive fluorescence on those cells which were protected against infection, and /sup 125/I-labeled antibody confirmed the specific binding to HeLa and RD cells. The results suggest that this monoclonal antibody possesses some of the receptor specificity of the group B coxsackieviruses.

  2. Predictive Efficacy Biomarkers of Programmed Cell Death 1/Programmed Cell Death 1 Ligand Blockade Therapy.

    PubMed

    Fang, Xiao-Na; Fu, Li-Wu

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitors of immune check-point molecule, programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) and its ligand, programmed cell death ligand 1 (PD-L1) have attracted much attention in cancer immunotherapy recently due to their durable antitumor effects in various malignances, especially the advanced ones. Unfortunately, only a fraction of patients with advanced tumors could benefit from anti-PD-1/PD-L1 therapy, while others still worsened. The key to this point is that there are no efficient biomarkers for screening anti-PD-1/PD-L1-sensitive patients. In this review, we aim at summarizing the latest advances of anti-PD-1/PDL1 immunotherapy and the potential predictive efficacy biomarkers to provide evidences for identifying anti-PD-1/PDL1- sensitive patients. The present article also includes the patent review coverage on this topic.

  3. Blockade of programmed death-1/programmed death ligand pathway enhances the antitumor immunity of human invariant natural killer T cells.

    PubMed

    Kamata, Toshiko; Suzuki, Akane; Mise, Naoko; Ihara, Fumie; Takami, Mariko; Makita, Yuji; Horinaka, Atsushi; Harada, Kazuaki; Kunii, Naoki; Yoshida, Shigetoshi; Yoshino, Ichiro; Nakayama, Toshinori; Motohashi, Shinichiro

    2016-12-01

    The role of invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells in antitumor immunity has been studied extensively, and clinical trials in patients with advanced cancer have revealed a prolonged survival in some cases. In recent years, humanized blocking antibodies against co-stimulatory molecules such as PD-1 have been developed. The enhancement of T cell function is reported to improve antitumor immunity, leading to positive clinical effects. However, there are limited data on the role of PD-1/programmed death ligand (PDL) molecules in human iNKT cells. In this study, we investigated the interaction between PD-1 on iNKT cells and PDL on antigen-presenting cells (APCs) in the context of iNKT cell stimulation. The blockade of PDL1 at the time of stimulation resulted in increased release of helper T cell (Th) 1 cytokines from iNKT cells, leading to the activation of NK cells. The direct antitumor function of iNKT cells was also enhanced after stimulation with anti-PDL1 antibody-treated APCs. According to these results, we conclude that the co-administration of anti-PDL1 antibody and alpha-galactosylceramide (αGalCer)-pulsed APCs enhances iNKT cell-mediated antitumor immunity.

  4. GD2-specific CAR T Cells Undergo Potent Activation and Deletion Following Antigen Encounter but can be Protected From Activation-induced Cell Death by PD-1 Blockade.

    PubMed

    Gargett, Tessa; Yu, Wenbo; Dotti, Gianpietro; Yvon, Eric S; Christo, Susan N; Hayball, John D; Lewis, Ian D; Brenner, Malcolm K; Brown, Michael P

    2016-06-01

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells have shown great promise in the treatment of hematologic malignancies but more variable results in the treatment of solid tumors and the persistence and expansion of CAR T cells within patients has been identified as a key correlate of antitumor efficacy. Lack of immunological "space", functional exhaustion, and deletion have all been proposed as mechanisms that hamper CAR T-cell persistence. Here we describe the events following activation of third-generation CAR T cells specific for GD2. CAR T cells had highly potent immediate effector functions without evidence of functional exhaustion in vitro, although reduced cytokine production reversible by PD-1 blockade was observed after longer-term culture. Significant activation-induced cell death (AICD) of CAR T cells was observed after repeated antigen stimulation, and PD-1 blockade enhanced both CAR T-cell survival and promoted killing of PD-L1(+) tumor cell lines. Finally, we assessed CAR T-cell persistence in patients enrolled in the CARPETS phase 1 clinical trial of GD2-specific CAR T cells in the treatment of metastatic melanoma. Together, these data suggest that deletion also occurs in vivo and that PD-1-targeted combination therapy approaches may be useful to augment CAR T-cell efficacy and persistence in patients.

  5. Suppression of experimental myasthenia gravis, a B cell-mediated autoimmune disease, by blockade of IL-18.

    PubMed

    Im, S H; Barchan, D; Maiti, P K; Raveh, L; Souroujon, M C; Fuchs, S

    2001-10-01

    Interleukin-18 (IL-18) is a pleiotropic proinflammatory cytokine that plays an important role in interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) production and IL-12-driven Th1 phenotype polarization. Increased expression of IL-18 has been observed in several autoimmune diseases. In this study we have analyzed the role of IL-18 in an antibody-mediated autoimmune disease and elucidated the mechanisms involved in disease suppression mediated by blockade of IL-18, using experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG) as a model. EAMG is a T cell-regulated, antibody-mediated autoimmune disease in which the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) is the major autoantigen. Th1- and Th2-type responses are both implicated in EAMG development. We show that treatment by anti-IL-18 during ongoing EAMG suppresses disease progression. The protective effect can be adoptively transferred to naive recipients and is mediated by increased levels of the immunosuppressive Th3-type cytokine TGF-beta and decreased AChR-specific Th1-type cellular responses. Suppression of EAMG is accompanied by down-regulation of the costimulatory factor CD40L and up-regulation of CTLA-4, a key negative immunomodulator. Our results suggest that IL-18 blockade may potentially be applied for immunointervention in myasthenia gravis.

  6. Enhanced T-cell immunity to osteosarcoma through antibody blockade of PD-1/PD-L1 interactions.

    PubMed

    Lussier, Danielle M; O'Neill, Lauren; Nieves, Lizbeth M; McAfee, Megan S; Holechek, Susan A; Collins, Andrea W; Dickman, Paul; Jacobsen, Jeffrey; Hingorani, Pooja; Blattman, Joseph N

    2015-04-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most common bone cancer in children and adolescents. Although 70% of patients with localized disease are cured with chemotherapy and surgical resection, patients with metastatic osteosarcoma are typically refractory to treatment. Numerous lines of evidence suggest that cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) limit the development of metastatic osteosarcoma. We have investigated the role of PD-1, an inhibitory TNFR family protein expressed on CTLs, in limiting the efficacy of immune-mediated control of metastatic osteosarcoma. We show that human metastatic, but not primary, osteosarcoma tumors express a ligand for PD-1 (PD-L1) and that tumor-infiltrating CTLs express PD-1, suggesting this pathway may limit CTLs control of metastatic osteosarcoma in patients. PD-L1 is also expressed on the K7M2 osteosarcoma tumor cell line that establishes metastases in mice, and PD-1 is expressed on tumor-infiltrating CTLs during disease progression. Blockade of PD-1/PD-L1 interactions dramatically improves the function of osteosarcoma-reactive CTLs in vitro and in vivo, and results in decreased tumor burden and increased survival in the K7M2 mouse model of metastatic osteosarcoma. Our results suggest that blockade of PD-1/PD-L1 interactions in patients with metastatic osteosarcoma should be pursued as a therapeutic strategy.

  7. Eradication of metastatic mouse cancers resistant to immune checkpoint blockade by suppression of myeloid-derived cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, KiBem; Skora, Andrew D; Li, Zhaobo; Liu, Qiang; Tam, Ada J; Blosser, Richard L; Diaz, Luis A; Papadopoulos, Nickolas; Kinzler, Kenneth W; Vogelstein, Bert; Zhou, Shibin

    2014-08-12

    Impressive responses have been observed in patients treated with checkpoint inhibitory anti-programmed cell death-1 (PD-1) or anti-cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen-4 (CTLA-4) antibodies. However, immunotherapy against poorly immunogenic cancers remains a challenge. Here we report that treatment with both anti-PD-1 and anti-CTLA-4 antibodies was unable to eradicate large, modestly immunogenic CT26 tumors or metastatic 4T1 tumors. Cotreatment with epigenetic-modulating drugs and checkpoint inhibitors markedly improved treatment outcomes, curing more than 80% of the tumor-bearing mice. Functional studies revealed that the primary targets of the epigenetic modulators were myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). A PI3K inhibitor that reduced circulating MDSCs also eradicated 4T1 tumors in 80% of the mice when combined with immune checkpoint inhibitors. Thus, cancers resistant to immune checkpoint blockade can be cured by eliminating MDSCs.

  8. Blockade of CD26-mediated T cell costimulation with soluble caveolin-1-Ig fusion protein induces anergy in CD4{sup +}T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ohnuma, Kei; Uchiyama, Masahiko; Hatano, Ryo; Takasawa, Wataru; Endo, Yuko; Dang, Nam H.; Morimoto, Chikao

    2009-08-21

    CD26 binds to caveolin-1 in antigen-presenting cells (APC), and that ligation of CD26 by caveolin-1 induces T cell proliferation in a TCR/CD3-dependent manner. We report herein the effects of CD26-caveolin-1 costimulatory blockade by fusion protein caveolin-1-Ig (Cav-Ig). Soluble Cav-Ig inhibits T cell proliferation and cytokine production in response to recall antigen, or allogeneic APC. Our data hence suggest that blocking of CD26-associated signaling by soluble Cav-Ig may be an effective approach as immunosuppressive therapy.

  9. Effects of epidermal growth factor receptor blockade on ependymoma stem cells in vitro and in orthotopic mouse models.

    PubMed

    Servidei, Tiziana; Meco, Daniela; Trivieri, Nadia; Patriarca, Valentina; Vellone, Valerio Gaetano; Zannoni, Gian Franco; Lamorte, Giuseppe; Pallini, Roberto; Riccardi, Riccardo

    2012-09-01

    Some lines of evidence suggest that tumors, including ependymoma, might arise from a subpopulation of cells, termed cancer stem cells (CSCs), with self-renewal and tumor-initiation properties. Given the strict dependence of CSCs on epidermal growth factor (EGF) through EGF receptor (EGFR), we investigated the effects of EGFR inhibitors in ependymoma-stem cells (SCs) in vitro and in orthotopic mouse models. We established two ependymoma-SC lines from two recurrent pediatric ependymoma. Both lines expressed markers of radial glia--the candidate SCs of ependymoma--and showed renewal ability, multipotency, and tumorigenicity after orthotopic implantation, despite markedly different expression of CD133 (94 vs. 6%). High phosphorylated-EGFR/EGFR ratio was detected, which decreased after differentiation. EGFR inhibitors (gefitinib and AEE788) reduced clonogenicity, proliferation and survival of ependymoma-SC lines dose-dependently, and blocked EGF-induced activation of EGFR, Akt and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2. Overall, AEE788 was more effective than gefitinib. EGFR blockade as well as differentiation strongly reduced CD133 expression. However, ex vivo treatment with AEE788 did not impair orthotopic tumor engraftment, whereas ex vivo differentiation did, suggesting that CD133 does not absolutely segregate for tumorigenicity in ependymoma-SCs. Orally administered AEE788 prolonged survival of mice bearing ependymoma-SC-driven orthotopic xenografts from 56 to 63 days, close to statistical significance (log-rank p=0.06). Our study describes for the first time EGFR signaling in ependymoma-SCs and the effects of EGFR blockade in complementary in vitro and in vivo systems. The experimental models we developed can be used to further investigate the activity of EGFR inhibitors or other antineoplastic agents in this tumor.

  10. Synergistic mobilization of hemopoietic progenitor cells using concurrent beta1 and beta2 integrin blockade or beta2-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Papayannopoulou, T; Priestley, G V; Nakamoto, B; Zafiropoulos, V; Scott, L M; Harlan, J M

    2001-03-01

    The hierarchy of cytoadhesion molecules involved in hematopoietic/stem progenitor cell mobilization has not yet been delineated. Previous studies have suggested an important role for alpha4beta1 integrin in this process. To test whether mobilization involves dynamic interactions of alpha4beta1 with other integrins on hematopoietic cells, especially the beta2 integrins, mice and primates were treated with anti-beta1 or anti-beta2 antibodies alone or in combination. A single injection of anti-alpha4beta1 antibody elicited reproducible mobilization in contrast to other antibodies, and 3 injections yielded higher mobilization efficiency than each of the other antibodies. When the anti-beta2 (anti-CD11a or anti-CD18) or anti-alpha5/beta1 integrin antibody was combined with anti-alpha4, an augmentation in mobilization was seen that was either additive or synergistic, depending on the potency of the antibody used. Synergy between anti-alpha4 and anti-CD18 (beta(2)) antibody blockade was seen in primates and confirmed in anti-alpha4-treated CD18-deficient mice. In the latter, there was a 49-fold increase in mobilization with anti-alpha4, much higher than in littermate control animals, in CD18 hypomorphic mice, or in other strains of mice tested. Data from both the antibody blockade and gene-targeted mice suggest that the cooperativity of alpha4beta1 with beta2 integrins becomes evident when they are concurrently inhibited. It is unclear whether this cooperativity is exerted at the stage of reversible adhesion versus migration, and enhancement of and whether the 2 integrins work in a sequential or parallel manner. Whatever the mechanism, the data provide a novel example of beta1 and beta2 integrin crosstalk in stem/progenitor cell mobilization.

  11. The antimalarial amodiaquine causes autophagic-lysosomal and proliferative blockade sensitizing human melanoma cells to starvation- and chemotherapy-induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Shuxi; Tao, Shasha; Rojo de la Vega, Montserrat; Park, Sophia L; Vonderfecht, Amanda A; Jacobs, Suesan L; Zhang, Donna D; Wondrak, Georg T

    2013-12-01

    Pharmacological inhibition of autophagic-lysosomal function has recently emerged as a promising strategy for chemotherapeutic intervention targeting cancer cells. Repurposing approved and abandoned non-oncological drugs is an alternative approach to the identification and development of anticancer therapeutics, and antimalarials that target autophagic-lysosomal functions have recently attracted considerable attention as candidates for oncological repurposing. Since cumulative research suggests that dependence on autophagy represents a specific vulnerability of malignant melanoma cells, we screened a focused compound library of antimalarials for antimelanoma activity. Here we report for the first time that amodiaquine (AQ), a clinical 4-aminoquinoline antimalarial with unexplored cancer-directed chemotherapeutic potential, causes autophagic-lysosomal and proliferative blockade in melanoma cells that surpasses that of its parent compound chloroquine. Monitoring an established set of protein markers (LAMP1, LC3-II, SQSTM1) and cell ultrastructural changes detected by electron microscopy, we observed that AQ treatment caused autophagic-lysosomal blockade in malignant A375 melanoma cells, a finding substantiated by detection of rapid inactivation of lysosomal cathepsins (CTSB, CTSL, CTSD). AQ-treatment was associated with early induction of energy crisis (ATP depletion) and sensitized melanoma cells to either starvation- or chemotherapeutic agent-induced cell death. AQ displayed potent antiproliferative effects, and gene expression array analysis revealed changes at the mRNA (CDKN1A, E2F1) and protein level (TP53, CDKN1A, CCND1, phospho-RB1 [Ser 780]/[Ser 807/811], E2F1) consistent with the observed proliferative blockade in S-phase. Taken together, our data suggest that the clinical antimalarial AQ is a promising candidate for repurposing efforts that aim at targeting autophagic-lysosomal function and proliferative control in malignant melanoma cells.

  12. Blockade of Hedgehog Signaling Synergistically Increases Sensitivity to Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Xiao-Yan; Zhang, Xu-Chao; Yang, Su-Qing; An, She-Juan; Chen, Zhi-Hong; Su, Jian; Xie, Zhi; Gou, Lan-Ying; Wu, Yi-Long

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant activation of the hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway has been implicated in the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and cancer stem-like cell (CSC) maintenance; both processes can result in tumor progression and treatment resistance in several types of human cancer. Hh cooperates with the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling pathway in embryogenesis. We found that the Hh signaling pathway was silenced in EGFR-TKI-sensitive non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells, while it was inappropriately activated in EGFR-TKI-resistant NSCLC cells, accompanied by EMT induction and ABCG2 overexpression. Upregulation of Hh signaling through extrinsic SHH exposure downregulated E-cadherin expression and elevated Snail and ABCG2 expression, resulting in gefitinib tolerance (P < 0.001) in EGFR-TKI-sensitive cells. Blockade of the Hh signaling pathway using the SMO antagonist SANT-1 restored E-cadherin expression and downregulate Snail and ABCG2 in EGFR-TKI-resistant cells. A combination of SANT-1 and gefitinib markedly inhibited tumorigenesis and proliferation in EGFR-TKI-resistant cells (P < 0.001). These findings indicate that hyperactivity of Hh signaling resulted in EGFR-TKI resistance, by EMT introduction and ABCG2 upregulation, and blockade of Hh signaling synergistically increased sensitivity to EGFR-TKIs in primary and secondary resistant NSCLC cells. E-cadherin expression may be a potential biomarker of the suitability of the combined application of an Hh inhibitor and EGFR-TKIs in EGFR-TKI-resistant NSCLCs. PMID:26943330

  13. Reversion of immune tolerance in advanced malignancy: modulation of myeloid-derived suppressor cell development by blockade of stem-cell factor function.

    PubMed

    Pan, Ping-Ying; Wang, George X; Yin, Bingjiao; Ozao, Junko; Ku, Teresa; Divino, Celia M; Chen, Shu-Hsia

    2008-01-01

    Tumor growth induced a significant increase of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) in the tumor-bearing host. In our previous study, we showed that MDSCs induced tumor-specific T-cell tolerance and the development of T regulatory cells (Tregs). Tumor-derived factors have been implicated in the accumulation of MDSCs. We hypothesize that reduction of MDSC accumulation in tumor-bearing hosts, through the blockade of tumor factors, can prevent T-cell anergy and Treg development and thereby improve immune therapy for the treatment of advanced tumors. Several tumor-derived factors were identified by gene array analysis. Among the candidate factors, stem- cell factor (SCF) is expressed by various human and murine carcinomas and was selected for further study. Mice bearing tumor cells with SCF siRNA knockdown exhibited significantly reduced MDSC expansion and restored proliferative responses of tumor-infiltrating T cells. More importantly, blockade of SCF receptor (ckit)-SCF interaction by anti-ckit prevented tumor-specific T-cell anergy, Treg development, and tumor angiogenesis. Furthermore, the prevention of MDSC accumulation in conjunction with immune activation therapy showed synergistic therapeutic effect when treating mice bearing large tumors. This information supports the notion that modulation of MDSC development may be required to achieve effective immune-enhancing therapy for the treatment of advanced tumors.

  14. Blockade of Fas signaling in breast cancer cells suppresses tumor growth and metastasis via disruption of Fas signaling-initiated cancer-related inflammation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qiuyan; Tan, Qinchun; Zheng, Yuanyuan; Chen, Kun; Qian, Cheng; Li, Nan; Wang, Qingqing; Cao, Xuetao

    2014-04-18

    Mechanisms for cancer-related inflammation remain to be fully elucidated. Non-apoptotic functions of Fas signaling have been proposed to play an important role in promoting tumor progression. It has yet to be determined if targeting Fas signaling can control tumor progression through suppression of cancer-related inflammation. In the current study we found that breast cancer cells with constitutive Fas expression were resistant to apoptosis induction by agonistic anti-Fas antibody (Jo2) ligation or Fas ligand cross-linking. Higher expression of Fas in human breast cancer tissue has been significantly correlated with poorer prognosis in breast cancer patients. To determine whether blockade of Fas signaling in breast cancer could suppress tumor progression, we prepared an orthotopic xenograft mouse model with mammary cancer cells 4T1 and found that blockade of Fas signaling in 4T1 cancer cells markedly reduced tumor growth, inhibited tumor metastasis in vivo, and prolonged survival of tumor-bearing mice. Mechanistically, blockade of Fas signaling in cancer cells significantly decreased systemic or local recruitment of myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) in vivo. Furthermore, blockade of Fas signaling markedly reduced IL-6, prostaglandin E2 production from breast cancer cells by impairing p-p38, and activity of the NFκB pathway. In addition, administration of a COX-2 inhibitor and anti-IL-6 antibody significantly reduced MDSC accumulation in vivo. Therefore, blockade of Fas signaling can suppress breast cancer progression by inhibiting proinflammatory cytokine production and MDSC accumulation, indicating that Fas signaling-initiated cancer-related inflammation in breast cancer cells may be a potential target for treatment of breast cancer.

  15. Blockade of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors by tivozanib has potential anti-tumour effects on human glioblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Momeny, Majid; Moghaddaskho, Farima; Gortany, Narges K.; Yousefi, Hassan; Sabourinejad, Zahra; Zarrinrad, Ghazaleh; Mirshahvaladi, Shahab; Eyvani, Haniyeh; Barghi, Farinaz; Ahmadinia, Leila; Ghazi-Khansari, Mahmoud; Dehpour, Ahmad R.; Amanpour, Saeid; Tavangar, Seyyed M.; Dardaei, Leila; Emami, Amir H.; Alimoghaddam, Kamran; Ghavamzadeh, Ardeshir; Ghaffari, Seyed H.

    2017-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) remains one of the most fatal human malignancies due to its high angiogenic and infiltrative capacities. Even with optimal therapy including surgery, radiotherapy and temozolomide, it is essentially incurable. GBM is among the most neovascularised neoplasms and its malignant progression associates with striking neovascularisation, evidenced by vasoproliferation and endothelial cell hyperplasia. Targeting the pro-angiogenic pathways is therefore a promising anti-glioma strategy. Here we show that tivozanib, a pan-inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptors, inhibited proliferation of GBM cells through a G2/M cell cycle arrest via inhibition of polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) signalling pathway and down-modulation of Aurora kinases A and B, cyclin B1 and CDC25C. Moreover, tivozanib decreased adhesive potential of these cells through reduction of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1). Tivozanib diminished GBM cell invasion through impairing the proteolytic cascade of cathepsin B/urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA)/matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2). Combination of tivozanib with EGFR small molecule inhibitor gefitinib synergistically increased sensitivity to gefitinib. Altogether, these findings suggest that VEGFR blockade by tivozanib has potential anti-glioma effects in vitro. Further in vivo studies are warranted to explore the anti-tumour activity of tivozanib in combinatorial approaches in GBM. PMID:28287096

  16. Gefitinib induces lung cancer cell autophagy and apoptosis via blockade of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway

    PubMed Central

    ZHAO, ZHONG-QUAN; YU, ZHONG-YANG; LI, JIE; OUYANG, XUE-NONG

    2016-01-01

    Gefitinib is a selective inhibitor of the tyrosine kinase epidermal growth factor receptor, which inhibits tumor pathogenesis, metastasis and angiogenesis, as well as promoting apoptosis. Therefore, gefitinib presents an effective drug for the targeted therapy of lung cancer. However, the underlying mechanisms by which gefitinib induces lung cancer cell death remain unclear. To investigate the effects of gefitinib on lung cancer cells and the mechanism of such, the present study analyzed the effect of gefitinib on the autophagy, apoptosis and proliferation of the A549 and A549-gefitinib-resistant (GR) cell lines GR. The regulation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (AKT)/ mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway was also investigated. Acridine orange staining revealed that gefitinib induced autophagy of A549 cells but not A549-GR cells. In addition, gefitinib promoted apoptosis and inhibited proliferation of A549 cells but not A549-GR cells. Furthermore, western blot analysis demonstrated that gefitinib treatment led to the downregulation of PI3K, AKT, pAKT, mTOR and phosphorylated-mTOR protein expression in A549 cells but not A549-GR cells. LY294002 blocked the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway and induced autophagy and apoptosis of A549 cells, however, no synergistic effect was observed following combined treatment with gefitinib and LY294002. In conclusion, the results of the present study indicate that gefitinib promotes autophagy and apoptosis of lung cancer cells via blockade of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway, which leads to lung cancer cell death. PMID:27347100

  17. Effects of the combined blockade of EGFR and ErbB-2 on signal transduction and regulation of cell cycle regulatory proteins in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    D'Alessio, Amelia; De Luca, Antonella; Maiello, Monica R; Lamura, Luana; Rachiglio, Anna Maria; Napolitano, Maria; Gallo, Marianna; Normanno, Nicola

    2010-09-01

    Treatment of breast cancer cells with a combination of the EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitor (EGFR-TKI) gefitinib and the anti-ErbB-2 monoclonal antibody trastuzumab results in a synergistic antitumor effect. In this study, we addressed the mechanisms involved in this phenomenon. The activation of signaling pathways and the expression of cell cycle regulatory proteins were studied in SK-Br-3 and BT-474 breast cancer cells, following treatment with EGFR and/or ErbB-2 inhibitors. Treatment with the gefitinib/trastuzumab combination produced, as compared with a single agent, a more prolonged blockade of AKT and MAPK activation, a more pronounced accumulation of cells in the G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle, a more significant increase in the levels of p27(kip1) and of hypophosphorylated pRb2, and a decrease in the levels of Cyclin D1 and survivin. Similar findings were observed with the EGFR/ErbB-2 inhibitor lapatinib. Gefitinib, trastuzumab, and their combination increased the stability of p27(kip1), with the combination showing the highest effects. Blockade of both receptors with gefitinib/trastuzumab or lapatinib induced a significant increase in the levels of p27(kip1) mRNA and in the nuclear levels of the p27(kip1) transcription factor FKHRL-1. Inhibition of PI3K signaling also produced a significant raise in p27(kip1) mRNA. Finally, down-modulation of FKHRL-1 with siRNAs prevented the lapatinib-induced increase of p27(kip1) mRNA. The synergism deriving from EGFR and ErbB-2 blockade is mediated by several different alterations in the activation of signaling proteins and in the expression of cell cycle regulatory proteins, including transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulation of p27(kip1) expression.

  18. Blockade of PD-1 Signaling Enhances Th2 Cell Responses and Aggravates Liver Immunopathology in Mice with Schistosomiasis japonica

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Sha; Jin, Xin; Li, Yalin; Li, Wei; Chen, Xiaojun; Xu, Lei; Zhu, Jifeng; Xu, Zhipeng; Zhang, Yang; Liu, Feng; Su, Chuan

    2016-01-01

    Background More than 220 million people worldwide are chronically infected with schistosomes, causing severe disease or even death. The major pathological damage occurring in schistosomiasis is attributable to the granulomatous inflammatory response and liver fibrosis induced by schistosome eggs. The inflammatory response is tightly controlled and parallels immunosuppressive regulation, constantly maintaining immune homeostasis and limiting excessive immunopathologic damage in important host organs. It is well known that the activation of programmed death 1 (PD-1) signaling causes a significant suppression of T cell function. However, the roles of PD-1 signaling in modulating CD4+ T cell responses and immunopathology during schistosome infection, have yet to be defined. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we show that PD-1 is upregulated in CD4+ T cells in Schistosoma japonicum (S. japonicum)-infected patients. We also show the upregulation of PD-1 expression in CD4+ T cells in the spleens, mesenteric lymph nodes, and livers of mice with S. japonicum infection. Finally, we found that the blockade of PD-1 signaling enhanced CD4+ T helper 2 (Th2) cell responses and led to more severe liver immunopathology in mice with S. japonicum infection, without a reduction of egg production or deposition in the host liver. Conclusions/Significance Overall, our study suggests that PD-1 signaling is specifically induced to control Th2-associated inflammatory responses during schistosome infection and is beneficial to the development of PD-1-based control of liver immunopathology. PMID:27792733

  19. ZLM-7 exhibits anti-angiogenic effects via impaired endothelial cell function and blockade of VEGF/VEGFR-2 signaling.

    PubMed

    Su, Min; Huang, Jingjia; Li, Jijia; Qin, Xiyuan; Tang, Xiaoning; Jin, Fang; Chen, Shali; Jiang, Chuanming; Zou, Zizheng; Peng, Kunjian; Nuruzzaman, Mohammed; Zhang, Jianting; Luo, Junli; Liu, Suyou; Luo, Zhiyong

    2016-04-05

    Inhibition of angiogenesis is a promising therapeutic strategy against cancer. In this study, we reported that ZLM-7, a combretastain A-4 (CA-4) derivative, exhibited anti-angiogenic activity in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, ZLM-7 induced microtubule cytoskeletal disassembly. It decreased VEGF-induced proliferation, migration, invasion and tube formation in endothelial cells, which are critical steps in angiogenesis. In vivo, ZLM-7 significantly inhibited neovascularization in a chicken chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) model and reduced the microvessel density in tumor tissues of MCF-7 xenograft mouse model. ZLM-7 also displayed comparable antiangiogenic and anti-tumor activities associated with the lead compound CA-4, but exhibited lower toxicity compared with CA-4. The anti-angiogenic effect of ZLM-7 was exerted via blockade of VEGF/VEGFR-2 signaling. ZLM-7 treatment suppressed the expression and secretion of VEGF in endothelial cells and MCF-7 cells under hypoxia. Further, ZLM-7 suppressed the VEGF-induced phosphorylation of VEGFR-2 and its downstream signaling mediators including activated AKT, MEK and ERK in endothelial cells. Overall, these results demonstrate that ZLM-7 exhibits anti-angiogenic activities by impairing endothelial cell function and blocking VEGF/VEGFR-2 signaling, suggesting that ZLM-7 might be a potential angiogenesis inhibitor.

  20. Blockade of Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK) inhibits the contractility and invasion potential of cancer stem like cells.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Srisathya; Ashok, Vandhana; Mohanty, Sagarajit; Das, Alakesh; Das, Sreya; Kumar, Sushant; Sen, Shamik; Purwar, Rahul

    2017-02-10

    Recent studies have implicated the roles of cancer stem like cells (CSCs) in cancer metastasis. However, very limited knowledge exists at the molecular and cellular level to target CSCs for prevention of cancer metastasis. In this study, we examined the roles of contractile dynamics of CSCs in cell invasion and delineated the underlying molecular mechanisms of their distinct cell invasion potential. Using de-adhesion assay and atomic force microscopy, we show that CSCs derived from melanoma and breast cancer cell lines exhibit increased contractility compared to non-CSCs across all tumor types. In addition, CSCs possess increased ECM remodeling capacity as quantified by collagen degradation assay. More importantly, pharmacological blockade of Rho-associated protein kinase completely abolished the contractility and collagen degradation capacity of both CSCs and non-CSCs. In conclusion, our study demonstrates the importance of cell contractility in regulating invasiveness of CSCs and suggests that pharmacological targeting of ROCK pathway represents a novel strategy for targeting both CSCs and bulk population for the treatment of cancer metastasis.

  1. The Effect of Therapeutic Blockades of Dust Particles-Induced Ca2+ Signaling and Proinflammatory Cytokine IL-8 in Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Ju Hee; Jeong, Sung Hwan; Hong, Jeong Hee

    2015-01-01

    Bronchial epithelial cells are the first barrier of defense against respiratory pathogens. Dust particles as extracellular stimuli are associated with inflammatory reactions after inhalation. It has been reported that dust particles induce intracellular Ca2+ signal, which subsequently increases cytokines production such as interleukin- (IL-) 8. However, the study of therapeutic blockades of Ca2+ signaling induced by dust particles in human bronchial epithelial cells is poorly understood. We investigated how to modulate dust particles-induced Ca2+ signaling and proinflammatory cytokine IL-8 expression. Bronchial epithelial BEAS-2B cells were exposed to PM10 dust particles and subsequent mediated intracellular Ca2+ signaling and reactive oxygen species signal. Our results show that exposure to several inhibitors of Ca2+ pathway attenuated the PM10-induced Ca2+ response and subsequent IL-8 mRNA expression. PM10-mediated Ca2+ signal and IL-8 expression were attenuated by several pharmacological blockades such as antioxidants, IP3-PLC blockers, and TRPM2 inhibitors. Our results show that blockades of PLC or TRPM2 reduced both of PM10-mediated Ca2+ signal and IL-8 expression, suggesting that treatment with these blockades should be considered for potential therapeutic trials in pulmonary epithelium for inflammation caused by environmental events such as seasonal dust storm. PMID:26640326

  2. Loss of AXIN1 drives acquired resistance to WNT pathway blockade in colorectal cancer cells carrying RSPO3 fusions.

    PubMed

    Picco, Gabriele; Petti, Consalvo; Centonze, Alessia; Torchiaro, Erica; Crisafulli, Giovanni; Novara, Luca; Acquaviva, Andrea; Bardelli, Alberto; Medico, Enzo

    2017-03-01

    In colorectal cancer (CRC), WNT pathway activation by genetic rearrangements of RSPO3 is emerging as a promising target. However, its low prevalence severely limits availability of preclinical models for in-depth characterization. Using a pipeline designed to suppress stroma-derived signal, we find that RSPO3 "outlier" expression in CRC samples highlights translocation and fusion transcript expression. Outlier search in 151 CRC cell lines identified VACO6 and SNU1411 cells as carriers of, respectively, a canonical PTPRK(e1)-RSPO3(e2) fusion and a novel PTPRK(e13)-RSPO3(e2) fusion. Both lines displayed marked in vitro and in vivo sensitivity to WNT blockade by the porcupine inhibitor LGK974, associated with transcriptional and morphological evidence of WNT pathway suppression. Long-term treatment of VACO6 cells with LGK974 led to the emergence of a resistant population carrying two frameshift deletions of the WNT pathway inhibitor AXIN1, with consequent protein loss. Suppression of AXIN1 in parental VACO6 cells by RNA interference conferred marked resistance to LGK974. These results provide the first mechanism of secondary resistance to WNT pathway inhibition.

  3. Increased Tim-3 expression in peripheral NK cells predicts a poorer prognosis and Tim-3 blockade improves NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity in human lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Xu, Liyun; Huang, Yanyan; Tan, Linlin; Yu, Wei; Chen, Dongdong; Lu, ChangChang; He, Jianying; Wu, Guoqing; Liu, Xiaoguang; Zhang, Yongkui

    2015-12-01

    T cell immunoglobulin- and mucin-domain-containing molecule-3 (Tim-3) has been shown to play an important role in mediating NK-cell function in human diseases. However, the relationship between Tim-3 expression in natural killer (NK) cells and human lung adenocarcinoma remains unclear. We therefore investigated the expression of Tim-3 in NK cells and explored the effect of Tim-3 blockade on NK cell-mediated activity in human lung adenocarcinoma. Upregulated expression of Tim-3 on CD3-CD56+ cells (P<0.05) and CD3-CD56(dim) cells (P<0.05) of patients with lung adenocarcinoma was detected by flow cytometry. Moreover, Tim-3 expression in CD3-CD56+ NK cells was higher in patients with lung adenocarcinoma with lymph node metastasis (LNM) (P<0.05) or with tumor stage T3-T4 (P<0.05). Tim-3 expression in CD56(dim) NK-cell subset was higher in patients with tumor size ≥3cm (P<0.05), or LNM (P<0.05) or with tumor stage T3-T4 (P<0.05). Further analysis showed that higher expressions of Tim-3 on both CD3-CD56+ NK cells and CD56(dim) NK-cell subset were independently correlated with shorter overall survival of patients with lung adenocarcinoma (log-rank test, P=0.0418, 0.0406, respectively). Importantly, blockade of Tim-3 signaling with anti-Tim-3 antibodies resulted in the increased cytotoxicity and IFN-γ production of peripheral NK cells from patients with lung adenocarcinoma. Our data indicate that Tim-3 expression in NK cells can function as a prognostic biomarker in human lung adenocarcinoma and support that Tim-3 could be a new target for an immunotherapeutic strategy.

  4. Implication of combined PD-L1/PD-1 blockade with cytokine-induced killer cells as a synergistic immunotherapy for gastrointestinal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Ruixuan; Ge, Xiaoxiao; Tang, Wenbo; Chang, Jinjia; Wu, Zheng; Liu, Xinyang; Lin, Ying; Zhang, Zhe; Li, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells represent a realistic approach in cancer immunotherapy with confirmed survival benefits in the context of metastatic solid tumors. However, therapeutic effects are limited to a fraction of patients. In this study, immune-resistance elements and ideal combination therapies were explored. Initially, phenotypic analysis was performed to document CD3, CD56, NKG2D, DNAM-1, PD-L1, PD-1, CTLA-4, TIM-3, 2B4, and LAG-3 on CIK cells. Upon engagement of CIK cells with the tumor cells, expression of PD-1 on CIK cells and PD-L1 on both cells were up-regulated. Over-expression of PD-L1 levels on tumor cells via lentiviral transduction inhibited tumoricidal activity of CIK cells, and neutralizing of PD-L1/PD-1 signaling axis could enhance their tumor-killing effect. Conversely, blockade of NKG2D, a major activating receptor of CIK cells, largely caused dysfunction of CIK cells. Functional study showed an increase of NKG2D levels along with PD-L1/PD-1 blockade in the presence of other immune effector molecule secretion. Additionally, combined therapy of CIK infusion and PD-L1/PD-1 blockade caused a delay of in vivo tumor growth and exhibited a survival advantage over untreated mice. These results provide a preclinical proof-of-concept for simultaneous PD-L1/PD-1 pathways blockade along with CIK infusion as a novel immunotherapy for unresectable cancers. PMID:26871284

  5. Dicoumarol relieves serum withdrawal-induced G0/1 blockade in HL-60 cells through a superoxide-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Bello, Rosario I; Gómez-Díaz, Consuelo; López-Lluch, Guillermo; Forthoffer, Nathalie; Córdoba-Pedregosa, María C; Navas, Plácido; Villalba, José M

    2005-06-01

    This work was set to study how dicoumarol affects the cell cycle in human myeloid leukemia HL-60 cells. Cells were accumulated in G0/1 after serum deprivation. However, when cells were treated with 5 microM dicoumarol in serum-free medium, a significant increment in the number of cells in S-phase was observed. Inhibition of G0/1 blockade was confirmed by the increase of thymidine incorporation, the phosphorylation of retinoblastoma protein, and the promotion of cell growth in long-term treatments in the absence of serum. Dicoumarol treatment increased superoxide levels, but did not affect peroxide. Increase of cellular superoxide was essential for inhibition of G0/1 blockade, since scavenging this reactive species with a cell-permeable form of SOD and the SOD mimetics 2-amino-3,5-dibromo-N-[trans-4-hydroxycyclohexyl]benzylamine (ambroxol, 100 microM) and copper[II]diisopropyl salicylate (CuDIPS, 10 microM) completely abolished the effect of dicoumarol. However, N-acetyl-cysteine, overexpression of Bcl-2 or a cell-permeable form of catalase were not effective. 5-Methoxy-1,2-dimethyl-3-[(4-nitrophenol)methyl]-indole-4,7-dione (ES936), a mechanism-based irreversible inhibitor of NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1), did not promote S phase entry, and dicoumarol still inhibited G0/1 blockade in the presence of ES936. We demonstrate that dicoumarol inhibits the normal blockade in G0/1 in HL-60 cells through a mechanism involving superoxide, but this effect is not dependent solely on the inhibition of the NQO1 catalytic activity. Our results send a precautionary message about use of dicoumarol to elucidate cellular processes involving oxidoreductases.

  6. Intratumoral injection of a CpG oligonucleotide reverts resistance to PD-1 blockade by expanding multifunctional CD8+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shu; Campos, Jose; Gallotta, Marilena; Gong, Mei; Crain, Chad; Naik, Edwina; Coffman, Robert L; Guiducci, Cristiana

    2016-11-15

    Despite the impressive rates of clinical response to programmed death 1 (PD-1) blockade in multiple cancers, the majority of patients still fail to respond to this therapy. The CT26 tumor in mice showed similar heterogeneity, with most tumors unaffected by anti-PD-1. As in humans, response of CT26 to anti-PD-1 correlated with increased T- and B-cell infiltration and IFN expression. We show that intratumoral injection of a highly interferogenic TLR9 agonist, SD-101, in anti-PD-1 nonresponders led to a complete, durable rejection of essentially all injected tumors and a majority of uninjected, distant-site tumors. Therapeutic efficacy of the combination was also observed with the TSA mammary adenocarcinoma and MCA38 colon carcinoma tumor models that show little response to PD-1 blockade alone. Intratumoral SD-101 substantially increased leukocyte infiltration and IFN-regulated gene expression, and its activity was dependent on CD8(+) T cells and type I IFN signaling. Anti-PD-1 plus intratumoral SD-101 promoted infiltration of activated, proliferating CD8(+) T cells and led to a synergistic increase in total and tumor antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells expressing both IFN-γ and TNF-α. Additionally, PD-1 blockade could alter the CpG-mediated differentiation of tumor-specific CD8(+) T cells into CD127(low)KLRG1(high) short-lived effector cells, preferentially expanding the CD127(high)KLRG1(low) long-lived memory precursors. Tumor control and intratumoral T-cell proliferation in response to the combined treatment is independent of T-cell trafficking from secondary lymphoid organs. These findings suggest that a CpG oligonucleotide given intratumorally may increase the response of cancer patients to PD-1 blockade, increasing the quantity and the quality of tumor-specific CD8(+) T cells.

  7. Intratumoral injection of a CpG oligonucleotide reverts resistance to PD-1 blockade by expanding multifunctional CD8+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shu; Campos, Jose; Gallotta, Marilena; Gong, Mei; Crain, Chad; Naik, Edwina; Coffman, Robert L.; Guiducci, Cristiana

    2016-01-01

    Despite the impressive rates of clinical response to programmed death 1 (PD-1) blockade in multiple cancers, the majority of patients still fail to respond to this therapy. The CT26 tumor in mice showed similar heterogeneity, with most tumors unaffected by anti–PD-1. As in humans, response of CT26 to anti–PD-1 correlated with increased T- and B-cell infiltration and IFN expression. We show that intratumoral injection of a highly interferogenic TLR9 agonist, SD-101, in anti–PD-1 nonresponders led to a complete, durable rejection of essentially all injected tumors and a majority of uninjected, distant-site tumors. Therapeutic efficacy of the combination was also observed with the TSA mammary adenocarcinoma and MCA38 colon carcinoma tumor models that show little response to PD-1 blockade alone. Intratumoral SD-101 substantially increased leukocyte infiltration and IFN-regulated gene expression, and its activity was dependent on CD8+ T cells and type I IFN signaling. Anti–PD-1 plus intratumoral SD-101 promoted infiltration of activated, proliferating CD8+ T cells and led to a synergistic increase in total and tumor antigen-specific CD8+ T cells expressing both IFN-γ and TNF-α. Additionally, PD-1 blockade could alter the CpG-mediated differentiation of tumor-specific CD8+ T cells into CD127lowKLRG1high short-lived effector cells, preferentially expanding the CD127highKLRG1low long-lived memory precursors. Tumor control and intratumoral T-cell proliferation in response to the combined treatment is independent of T-cell trafficking from secondary lymphoid organs. These findings suggest that a CpG oligonucleotide given intratumorally may increase the response of cancer patients to PD-1 blockade, increasing the quantity and the quality of tumor-specific CD8+ T cells. PMID:27799536

  8. CTLA-4 blockade following relapse of malignancy after allogeneic stem cell transplantation is associated with T cell activation but not with increased levels of T regulatory cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jiehua; Bashey, Asad; Zhong, Ruikun; Corringham, Sue; Messer, Karen; Pu, Minya; Ma, Wenxue; Chut, Theresa; Soiffer, Robert; Mitrovich, Rachel C; Lowy, Israel; Ball, Edward D

    2011-05-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 (CTLA-4) is a key negative regulator of T cell activation and proliferation. Ipilimumab is a human monoclonal antibody that specifically blocks the binding of CTLA-4 to its ligand. To test the hypothesis that blockade of CTLA-4 by ipilimumab could augment graft-versus-malignancy (GVM) effects without a significant impact on graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), we conducted a phase I clinical trial of ipilimumab infusion in patients with relapsed malignancy following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT). Here, we report the analysis of peripheral blood T lymphocyte reconstitution, T regulatory cell (Treg) expression, and T cell activation markers after a single dose of ipilimumab in 29 patients. Peripheral blood samples were collected from all patients before and after ipilimumab infusion. Lymphocyte immunophenotyes, including levels of CD4(+)CD25(high) cells and T cell activation markers, were analyzed in all cases. Levels of CD4(+)CD25(high)Foxp3(+) cells and intracellular CTLA-4 in CD4(+) T cells also were evaluated in the last 11 cases. We found lower baseline levels of CD4(+) and CD45RO(+) T cells in patients compared with normal controls. More than 50% of the patients had abnormally low lymphocyte counts (CD4 or/and CD8 T cells), and some had no circulating B lymphocytes. The percentages of both CD4(+)CD25(high) and CD4(+)CD25(high)Foxp3(+) T cells were significantly higher in patients before ipilimumab infusion than in healthy donors. Twenty of 29 patients exhibited an elevated level of CD4(+)CD25(low) activated T cells at baseline, compared with only 3 of 26 healthy donors. Both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocyte counts were significantly increased after ipilimumab infusion. There was no consistent change in absolute lymphocyte count or in the number of T cells expressing the activation marker CD69. However, increases in CD4(+)CD25(low) T cells were seen in 20 of 29 patients and increases in CD4

  9. Short-term EGFR blockade enhances immune-mediated cytotoxicity of EGFR mutant lung cancer cells: rationale for combination therapies

    PubMed Central

    Dominguez, Charli; Tsang, Kwong-Yok; Palena, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor (EGFR-TKI) erlotinib has been approved for years as a first-line therapy for patients harboring EGFR-sensitizing mutations. With the promising implementation of immunotherapeutic strategies for the treatment of lung cancer, there is a growing interest in developing combinatorial therapies that could utilize immune approaches in the context of conventional or targeted therapies. Tumor cells are known to evade immune attack by multiple strategies, including undergoing phenotypic plasticity via a process designated as the epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT). As signaling through EGFR is a major inducer of EMT in epithelial cells, we have investigated the effect of EGFR inhibition with erlotinib on tumor phenotype and susceptibility to immune attack. Our data shows that short-term exposure of tumor cells to low-dose erlotinib modulates tumor plasticity and immune-mediated cytotoxicity in lung cancer cells harboring a sensitizing EGFR mutation, leading to a remarkable enhancement of tumor lysis mediated by innate NK cells and antigen-specific T cells. This effect positively correlated with the ability of short-term EGFR blockade to modulate tumor phenotype towards a more epithelial one, as well as to increase susceptibility to caspase-mediated apoptosis. The effect, however, was lost when erlotinib was utilized for long periods of time in vitro or in vivo, which resulted in gain of mesenchymal features and decreased (rather than increased) tumor lysis in response to immune effector mechanisms. Our data provides rationale for potential combinations of erlotinib and immunotherapies for the treatment of lung carcinomas in the early setting, before the establishment of tumor relapse with long-term EGFR inhibition. PMID:27685624

  10. Blockade of STAT3 in T Cells Inhibits Germinal Center Reactions against Intranasal Allergens.

    PubMed

    Choi, Garam; Chung, Yeonseok

    2016-05-01

    Understanding the developmental mechanisms of humoral immunity against intranasal antigens is essential for the development of therapeutic approaches against air-borne pathogens as well as allergen-induced pulmonary inflammation. Follicular helper T (Tfh) cells expressing CXCR5 are required for humoral immunity by providing IL-21 and ICOS costimulation to activated B cells. However, the regulation of Tfh cell responses against intranasal antigens remains unclear. Here, we found that the generation of Tfh cells and germinal center B cells in the bronchial lymph node against intranasal proteinase antigens was independent of TGF-β. In contrast, administration of STAT3 inhibitor STA-21 suppressed the generation of Tfh cells and germinal center B cells. Compared with wild-type OT-II T cells, STAT3-deficient OT-II T cells transferred into recipients lacking T cells not only showed significantly reduced frequency Tfh cells, but also induced diminished IgG as well as IgE specific for the intranasal antigens. Cotransfer study of wild-type OT-II and STAT3-deficient OT-II T cells revealed that the latter failed to differentiate into Tfh cells. These findings demonstrate that T cell-intrinsic STAT3 is required for the generation of Tfh cells to intranasal antigens and that targeting STAT3 might be an effective approach to ameliorate antibody-mediated pathology in the lung.

  11. Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) attenuates high glucose-induced insulin signaling blockade in human hepG2 hepatoma cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chih-Li; Lin, Jen-Kun

    2008-08-01

    Insulin resistance is the primary characteristic of type 2 diabetes which as a result of insulin signaling defects. It has been suggested that the tea polyphenol (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) displays some antidiabetic effects, but the mechanism for EGCG insulin-enhancing effects is incompletely understood. In the present study, the investigations of EGCG on insulin signaling are performed in insulin-responsive human HepG2 cells cotreated with high glucose. We found that the high glucose condition causes significant increasing Ser307 phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1), leading to reduce insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of Akt. As the results, the insulin metabolic effects of glycogen synthesis and glucose uptake are inhibited by high glucose. However, the treatment of EGCG improves insulin-stimulated downsignaling by reducing IRS-1 Ser307 phosphorylation. Furthermore, we also demonstrated these EGCG effects are essential depends on the 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation. Together, our data suggest a putative link between high glucose and insulin resistance in HepG2 cells, and the EGCG treatment attenuates insulin signaling blockade by reducing IRS-1 Ser307 phosphorylation through the AMPK activation pathway.

  12. Critical role for CD8 T cells in allograft acceptance induced by DST and CD40/CD154 costimulatory blockade.

    PubMed

    Gao, Donghong; Lunsford, Keri E; Eiring, Anna M; Bumgardner, Ginny L

    2004-07-01

    Donor-specific transfusion (DST) and CD40/CD154 costimulation blockade is a powerful immunosuppressive strategy which prolongs survival of many allografts. The efficacy of DST and anti-CD154 mAb for prolongation of hepatocellular allograft survival was only realized in C57BL/6 mice that have both CD4- and CD8-dependent pathways available (median survival time, MST, 82 days). Hepatocyte rejection in CD8 KO mice which is CD4-dependent was not suppressed by DST and anti-CD154 mAb treatment (MST, 7 days); unexpectedly DST abrogated the beneficial effects of anti-CD154 mAb for suppression of hepatocyte rejection (MST, 42 days) and on donor-reactive alloantibody production. Hepatocyte rejection in CD4 KO mice which is CD8-dependent was suppressed by treatment with DST and anti-CD154 mAb therapy (MST, 35 days) but did not differ significantly from immunotherapy with anti-CD154 mAb alone (MST, 32 days). Induction of hepatocellular allograft acceptance by DST and anti-CD154 mAb immunotherapy was dependent on host CD8(+) T cells, as demonstrated by CD8 depletion studies in C57BL/6 mice (MST, 14 days) and CD8 reconstitution of CD8 KO mice (MST, 56 days). These studies demonstrate that both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell subsets contribute to induction of hepatocellular allograft acceptance by this immunotherapeutic strategy.

  13. Combined blockade of angiotensin II and prorenin receptors ameliorates podocytic apoptosis induced by IgA-activated mesangial cells.

    PubMed

    Leung, Joseph C K; Chan, Loretta Y Y; Saleem, M A; Mathieson, P W; Tang, Sydney C W; Lai, Kar Neng

    2015-07-01

    Glomerulo-podocytic communication plays an important role in the podocytic injury in IgA nephropathy (IgAN). In this study, we examine the role of podocytic angiotensin II receptor subtype 1 (AT1R) and prorenin receptor (PRR) in podocytic apoptosis in IgAN. Polymeric IgA (pIgA) was isolated from patients with IgAN and healthy controls. Conditioned media were prepared from growth arrested human mesangial cells (HMC) incubated with pIgA from patients with IgAN (IgA-HMC media) or healthy controls (Ctl-HMC media). A human podocyte cell line was used as a model to examine the regulation of the expression of AT1R, PRR, TNF-α and CTGF by IgA-HMC media. Podocytic nephrin expression, annexin V binding and caspase 3 activity were used as the functional readout of podocytic apoptosis. IgA-HMC media had no effect on AngII release by podocytes. IgA-HMC media significantly up-regulated the expression of AT1R and PRR, down-regulated nephrin expression and induced apoptosis in podocytes. Mono-blockade of AT1R, PRR, TNF-α or CTGF partially reduced podocytic apoptosis. IgA-HMC media activated NFκB, notch1 and HEY1 expression by podocytes and dual blockade of AT1R with PRR, or anti-TNF-α with anti-CTGF, effectively rescued the podocytic apoptosis induced by IgA-HMC media. Our data suggests that pIgA-activated HMC up-regulates the expression of AT1R and PRR expression by podocytes and the associated activation of NFκB and notch signalling pathways play an essential role in the podocytic apoptosis induced by glomerulo-podocytic communication in IgAN. Simultaneously targeting the AT1R and PRR could be a potential therapeutic option to reduce the podocytic injury in IgAN.

  14. Blockade of CTLA-4 on CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells abrogates their function in vivo.

    PubMed

    Read, Simon; Greenwald, Rebecca; Izcue, Ana; Robinson, Nicholas; Mandelbrot, Didier; Francisco, Loise; Sharpe, Arlene H; Powrie, Fiona

    2006-10-01

    Naturally occurring CD4+ regulatory T cells (T(R)) that express CD25 and the transcription factor FoxP3 play a key role in immune homeostasis, preventing immune pathological responses to self and foreign Ags. CTLA-4 is expressed by a high percentage of these cells, and is often considered as a marker for T(R) in experimental and clinical analysis. However, it has not yet been proven that CTLA-4 has a direct role in T(R) function. In this study, using a T cell-mediated colitis model, we demonstrate that anti-CTLA-4 mAb treatment inhibits T(R) function in vivo via direct effects on CTLA-4-expressing T(R), and not via hyperactivation of colitogenic effector T cells. Although anti-CTLA-4 mAb treatment completely inhibits T(R) function, it does not reduce T(R) numbers or their homing to the GALT, suggesting the Ab mediates its function by blockade of a signal required for T(R) activity. In contrast to the striking effect of the Ab, CTLA-4-deficient mice can produce functional T(R), suggesting that under some circumstances other immune regulatory mechanisms, including the production of IL-10, are able to compensate for the loss of the CTLA-4-mediated pathway. This study provides direct evidence that CTLA-4 has a specific, nonredundant role in the function of normal T(R). This role has to be taken into account when targeting CTLA-4 for therapeutic purposes, as such a strategy will not only boost effector T cell responses, but might also break T(R)-mediated self-tolerance.

  15. Selective Blockade of Human Natural Killer Cells by a Monoclonal Antibody

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, Walter

    1982-06-01

    A murine monoclonal antibody, 13.1, which blocks human natural killer (NK) cell-mediated lysis, has been developed. Hybridoma 13.1 was derived by fusion of NS-1 cells with spleen cells from mice immunized with an enriched population of NK cells. Supernatants of growing hybridomas were screened for their ability to block NK cell-mediated lysis of K562 targets. Antibody 13.1 is an IgG1 with a single light chain type and it does not fix complement. The 13.1 antigen is expressed on all peripheral blood mononuclear cells, with an antigen density approximately 1/30th that of HLA antigen heavy chain. Pretreatment and washing experiments revealed that inhibition of cytotoxicity occurred at the effector cell level only. Significant blocking was achieved with nanogram quantities of antibody and was not due to toxic effects on NK cells. Likewise, controls with other antibodies of the same subclass demonstrated that blocking was not a consequence of mere binding to NK cells. When a panel of 17 NK cell-susceptible targets was tested, the lysis of only 5 of these was blocked, namely K562, HL-60, KG-1, Daudi, and HEL, a human erythroleukemic cell line. The lysis of 12 human B cell and T cell line targets was not inhibited. In addition to the demonstration that the 13.1 antigen is a crucial cell surface structure involved in NK lysis, a heterogeneity of target cell recognition has been revealed that argues for the proposition that individual NK cells have multiple recognitive capabilities.

  16. In vitro VLA-4 blockade results in an impaired NK cell-mediated immune surveillance against melanoma.

    PubMed

    Gandoglia, Ilaria; Ivaldi, Federico; Carrega, Paolo; Armentani, Eric; Ferlazzo, Guido; Mancardi, Gianluigi; Kerlero de Rosbo, Nicole; Uccelli, Antonio; Laroni, Alice

    2017-01-01

    cells in the lower chamber, and that it was significantly reduced in presence of NTZ. Our results show that upon exposure to NTZ both cytolytic activity and migration toward melanoma cells were affected, suggesting that binding of NTZ to NK cells affects pathways involved in these NK-cell functions. We analyzed the expression of CD49d on NK cells from MS patients treated with NTZ and observed that it decreases with time of treatment. These data suggest that blockade of VLA-4 on NK-cell surface alters some key functions involved in the immune surveillance toward melanoma by NK cells and may provide a mechanistic explanation for the reported occurrence of melanoma in MS patients treated with NTZ.

  17. Blockade of TNF-α signaling benefits cancer therapy by suppressing effector regulatory T cell expansion.

    PubMed

    Chang, Li-Yuan; Lin, Yung-Chang; Chiang, Jy-Ming; Mahalingam, Jayashri; Su, Shih-Huan; Huang, Ching-Tai; Chen, Wei-Ting; Huang, Chien-Hao; Jeng, Wen-Juei; Chen, Yi-Cheng; Lin, Shi-Ming; Sheen, I-Shyan; Lin, Chun-Yen

    2015-10-01

    Effector but not naive regulatory T cells (Treg cells) can accumulate in the peripheral blood as well as the tumor microenvironment, expand during tumor progression and be one of the main suppressors for antitumor immunity. However, the underlying mechanisms for effector Treg cell expansion in tumor are still unknown. We demonstrate that effector Treg cell-mediated suppression of antitumor CD8(+) T cells is tumor-nonspecific. Furthermore, TNFR2 expression is increased in these Treg cells by Affymetrix chip analysis which was confirmed by monoclonal antibody staining in both hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and colorectal cancer (CRC) patients and murine models. Correspondingly, increased levels of TNF-α in both tissue and serum were also demonstrated. Interestingly, TNF-α could not only expand effector Treg cells through TNFR2 signaling, but also enhanced their suppressive activity against antitumor immunity of CD8(+) T cells. Furthermore, targeting TNFR2 signaling with a TNF-α inhibitor could selectively reduce rapid resurgence of effector Treg cells after cyclophosphamide-induced lymphodepletion and markedly inhibit the growth of established tumors. Herein, we propose a novel mechanism in which TNF-α could promote tumor-associated effector Treg cell expansion and suggest a new cancer immunotherapy strategy using TNF-α inhibitors to reduce effector Treg cells expansion after cyclophosphamide-induced lymphodepletion.

  18. Conditional and specific NF-kappaB blockade protects pancreatic beta cells from diabetogenic agents.

    PubMed

    Eldor, R; Yeffet, A; Baum, K; Doviner, V; Amar, D; Ben-Neriah, Y; Christofori, G; Peled, A; Carel, J C; Boitard, C; Klein, T; Serup, P; Eizirik, D L; Melloul, D

    2006-03-28

    Type 1 diabetes is characterized by the infiltration of inflammatory cells into pancreatic islets of Langerhans, followed by the selective and progressive destruction of insulin-secreting beta cells. Islet-infiltrating leukocytes secrete cytokines such as IL-1beta and IFN-gamma, which contribute to beta cell death. In vitro evidence suggests that cytokine-induced activation of the transcription factor NF-kappaB is an important component of the signal triggering beta cell apoptosis. To study the in vivo role of NF-kappaB in beta cell death, we generated a transgenic mouse line expressing a degradation-resistant NF-kappaB protein inhibitor (DeltaNIkappaBalpha), acting specifically in beta cells, in an inducible and reversible manner, by using the tet-on regulation system. In vitro, islets expressing the DeltaNIkappaBalpha protein were resistant to the deleterious effects of IL-1beta and IFN-gamma, as assessed by reduced NO production and beta-cell apoptosis. This effect was even more striking in vivo, where nearly complete protection against multiple low-dose streptozocin-induced diabetes was observed, with reduced intraislet lymphocytic infiltration. Our results show in vivo that beta cell-specific activation of NF-kappaB is a key event in the progressive loss of beta cells in diabetes. Inhibition of this process could be a potential effective strategy for beta-cell protection.

  19. Therapeutic CD94/NKG2A blockade improves natural killer cell dysfunction in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    McWilliams, Emily M; Mele, Jennifer M; Cheney, Carolyn; Timmerman, Elizabeth A; Fiazuddin, Faraz; Strattan, Ethan J; Mo, Xiaokui; Byrd, John C; Muthusamy, Natarajan; Awan, Farrukh T

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK)-cell count is predictive of chronic lymphoid leukemia (CLL) disease progression and their dysfunction is well documented, but the etiology of this is currently lacking. CLL cells have been shown to over-express HLA-E, the natural ligand for NKG2A expressed on NK-cells that generates a distinct negative signal relative to direct NK-cell cytotoxicity in other disease models. Utilizing a novel anti-NKG2A monoclonal blocking antibody (mAb), monalizumab, we explored the in vitro preclinical activity of targeting the NKG2A receptor, and the NKG2A/HLA-E interaction as a mechanism of tumor evasion in CLL patients. Our work confirmed overexpression of HLA-E on CLL B-cells and demonstrated NKG2A expression on CD56+/16+ NK-cells from CLL patients. We also demonstrate that blocking NKG2A on CLL NK-cells was sufficient to restore direct cytotoxicity ability of NK-cells against HLA-E-expressing targets without impacting NK-cell mediated antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. Additionally, we proved the specificity of monalizumab in blocking NKG2A through Fc-blocking mechanisms. This paper provides justification for the potential clinical utility of monalizumab in the treatment of patients with CLL.

  20. Reinvigorating Exhausted T Cells by Blockade of the PD-1 Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Junghwa; Ahn, Eunseon; Kissick, Haydn T.; Ahmed, Rafi

    2017-01-01

    T-cell exhaustion due to persistent antigen stimulation is a key feature of chronic viral infections and cancer. Programmed cell death-1 (PD-1) is a major regulator of T-cell exhaustion, and blocking the PD-1 pathway restores T-cell function and improves pathogen control and tumor eradication. Immunotherapy targeting the PD-1 inhibitory receptor pathway has demonstrated significant antitumor activity. Recently, antibodies blocking PD-1 have been approved for use in cancer patients. In this review, we summarize the role of the PD-1 pathway in chronic infection and cancer and the therapeutic potential of PD-1-directed immunotherapy in patients with chronic infection or cancer.

  1. Mutational landscape determines sensitivity to PD-1 blockade in non–small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rizvi, Naiyer A.; Hellmann, Matthew D.; Snyder, Alexandra; Kvistborg, Pia; Makarov, Vladimir; Havel, Jonathan J.; Lee, William; Yuan, Jianda; Wong, Phillip; Ho, Teresa S.; Miller, Martin L.; Rekhtman, Natasha; Moreira, Andre L.; Ibrahim, Fawzia; Bruggeman, Cameron; Gasmi, Billel; Zappasodi, Roberta; Maeda, Yuka; Sander, Chris; Garon, Edward B.; Merghoub, Taha; Wolchok, Jedd D.; Schumacher, Ton N.; Chan, Timothy A.

    2016-01-01

    Immune checkpoint inhibitors, which unleash a patient’s own T cells to kill tumors, are revolutionizing cancer treatment. To unravel the genomic determinants of response to this therapy, we used whole-exome sequencing of non–small cell lung cancers treated with pembrolizumab, an antibody targeting programmed cell death-1 (PD-1). In two independent cohorts, higher nonsynonymous mutation burden in tumors was associated with improved objective response, durable clinical benefit, and progression-free survival. Efficacy also correlated with the molecular smoking signature, higher neoantigen burden, and DNA repair pathway mutations; each factor was also associated with mutation burden. In one responder, neoantigen-specific CD8+ T cell responses paralleled tumor regression, suggesting that anti–PD-1 therapy enhances neoantigen-specific T cell reactivity. Our results suggest that the genomic landscape of lung cancers shapes response to anti–PD-1 therapy. PMID:25765070

  2. BK K+ channel blockade inhibits radiation-induced migration/brain infiltration of glioblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Klumpp, Lukas; Haehl, Erik; Schilbach, Karin; Lukowski, Robert; Kühnle, Matthias; Bernhardt, Günther; Buschauer, Armin; Zips, Daniel; Ruth, Peter; Huber, Stephan M.

    2016-01-01

    Infiltration of the brain by glioblastoma cells reportedly requires Ca2+ signals and BK K+ channels that program and drive glioblastoma cell migration, respectively. Ionizing radiation (IR) has been shown to induce expression of the chemokine SDF-1, to alter the Ca2+ signaling, and to stimulate cell migration of glioblastoma cells. Here, we quantified fractionated IR-induced migration/brain infiltration of human glioblastoma cells in vitro and in an orthotopic mouse model and analyzed the role of SDF-1/CXCR4 signaling and BK channels. To this end, the radiation-induced migratory phenotypes of human T98G and far-red fluorescent U-87MG-Katushka glioblastoma cells were characterized by mRNA and protein expression, fura-2 Ca2+ imaging, BK patch-clamp recording and transfilter migration assay. In addition, U-87MG-Katushka cells were grown to solid glioblastomas in the right hemispheres of immunocompromised mice, fractionated irradiated (6 MV photons) with 5 × 0 or 5 × 2 Gy, and SDF-1, CXCR4, and BK protein expression by the tumor as well as glioblastoma brain infiltration was analyzed in dependence on BK channel targeting by systemic paxilline application concomitant to IR. As a result, IR stimulated SDF-1 signaling and induced migration of glioblastoma cells in vitro and in vivo. Importantly, paxilline blocked IR-induced migration in vivo. Collectively, our data demonstrate that fractionated IR of glioblastoma stimulates and BK K+ channel targeting mitigates migration and brain infiltration of glioblastoma cells in vivo. This suggests that BK channel targeting might represent a novel approach to overcome radiation-induced spreading of malignant brain tumors during radiotherapy. PMID:26893360

  3. Chromatin structural changes in synchronized cells blocked in early S phase by sequential use of isoleucine deprivation and hydroxyurea blockade

    SciTech Connect

    D'Anna, J.A.; Prentice, D.A.

    1983-01-01

    The authors have investigated the loss of histone H1 from chromatin and the structure of chromatin from Chinese hamster (line CHO) cells blocked in early S phase by sequential use of isoleucine deprivation G/sub 1/ block and 1 mM hydroxyurea (HU) blockade. Measurements of H1 content in the cell and histone turnover indicate that H1 is lost from the cell and that there is negligible replacement synthesis of H1 during the period of the S-phase block. As H1 is lost, chromatin appears to undergo structural change. After 10 h of HU block, the new deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and a portion of the old DNA have measured nucleosome repeat lengths (37/sup 0/C digestion). By 24 h of HU block, nearly all of the chromatin has assumed a pseudoimmature conformation in which the nucleosome cores appear to be more closely packed along the DNA chain, but the new DNA is slightly more resistant than old DNA to attack by micrococcal nuclease. Electrophoretic analysis of nucleoprotein particles produced by micrococcal nuclease digestion of nuclei indicates that: the distribution of mononucleosome species changes during Hu block and some mononucleosome species appear to be enriched in normally minor proteins which may determine the electrophoretic mobility of the nucleoprotein particles in agarose-acrylamide gels. The results raise the possibility that: during the early stages of replication (or prior to the passage of the replication fork), H1 is dissociated from initiated replicons and H1 does not reassociate in a concerted fashion with the H1-depleted chromatin until the replication fork has passed and, perhaps, a substantial portion of the replicon has been replicated.

  4. Angiotensin type 1 receptor resistance to blockade in the opossum proximal tubule cell due to variations in the binding pocket.

    PubMed

    Nistala, Ravi; Andresen, Bradley T; Pulakat, Lakshmi; Meuth, Alex; Sinak, Catherine; Mandavia, Chirag; Thekkumkara, Thomas; Speth, Robert C; Whaley-Connell, Adam; Sowers, James R

    2013-04-15

    Blockade of the angiotensin (ANG) II receptor type 1 (AT(1)R) with angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) is widely used in the treatment of hypertension. However, ARBs are variably effective in reducing blood pressure, likely due, in part, to polymorphisms in the ARB binding pocket of the AT(1)R. Therefore, we need a better understanding of variations/polymorphisms that alter binding of ARBs in heterogeneous patient populations. The opossum proximal tubule cell (OKP) line is commonly used in research to evaluate renal sodium handling and therefore blood pressure. Investigating this issue, we found natural sequence variations in the opossum AT(1)R paralleling those observed in the human AT(1)R. Therefore, we posited that these sequence variations may explain ARB resistance. We demonstrate that OKP cells express AT(1)R mRNA, bind (125)I-labeled ANG II, and exhibit ANG II-induced phosphorylation of Jak2. However, Jak2 phosphorylation is not inhibited by five different ARBs commonly used to treat hypertension. Additionally, nonradioactive ANG II competes (125)I-ANG II efficiently, whereas a 10-fold molar excess of olmesartan and the ANG II receptor type 2 blocker PD-123319 is unable to block (125)I-ANG II binding. In contrast, ANG II binding to OKP cells stably expressing rat AT(1A)Rs, which have a conserved AT(1)R-binding pocket with human AT(1)R, is efficiently inhibited by olmesartan. A novel observation was that resistance to ARB binding to opossum AT(1)Rs correlates with variations from the human receptor at positions 108, 163, 192, and 198 within the ARB-binding pocket. These observations highlight the potential utility of evaluating AT(1)R polymorphisms within the ARB-binding pocket in various hypertensive populations.

  5. Glucocorticoid receptor blockade inhibits brain cell addition and aggressive signaling in electric fish, Apteronotus leptorhynchus.

    PubMed

    Dunlap, Kent D; Jashari, Denisa; Pappas, Kristina M

    2011-08-01

    When animals are under stress, glucocorticoids commonly inhibit adult neurogenesis by acting through glucocorticoid receptors (GRs). However, in some cases, conditions that elevate glucocorticoids promote adult neurogenesis, and the role of glucocorticoid receptors in these circumstances is not well understood. We examined the involvement of GRs in social enhancement of brain cell addition and aggressive signaling in electric fish, Apteronotus leptorhynchus. In this species, long-term social interaction simultaneously elevates plasma cortisol, enhances brain cell addition and increases production of aggressive electrocommunication signals ("chirps"). We implanted isolated and paired fish with capsules containing nothing (controls) or the GR antagonist, RU486, recorded chirp production and locomotion for 7d, and measured the density of newborn cells in the periventricular zone. Compared to isolated controls, paired controls showed elevated chirping in two phases: much higher chirp rates in the first 5h and moderately higher nocturnal rates thereafter. Treating paired fish with RU486 reduced chirp rates in both phases to those of isolated fish, demonstrating that GR activation is crucial for socially induced chirping. Neither RU486 nor social interaction affected locomotion. RU486 treatment to paired fish had a partial effect on cell addition: paired RU486 fish had less cell addition than paired control fish but more than isolated fish. This suggests that cortisol activation of GRs contributes to social enhancement of cell addition but works in parallel with another GR-independent mechanism. RU486 also reduced cell addition in isolated fish, indicating that GRs participate in the regulation of cell addition even when cortisol levels are low.

  6. In Vitro Apoptotic Effects of Farnesyltransferase blockade in Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells

    PubMed Central

    Giudice, V; Ricci, P; Marino, L; Rocco, M; Villani, G; Langella, M; Manente, L; Seneca, E; Ferrara, I; Pezzullo, L; Serio, B; Selleri, C

    2016-01-01

    Farnesyltransferase inhibitors (FTIs) are a class of oral anti-cancer drugs currently tested in phase I-II clinical trials for treatment of hematological malignancies. The in vitro effects of various FTIs (alpha-hydroxyfarnesylphosphonic acid, manumycin-A and SCH66336) were tested on CD34+ KG1a cell line and in primary acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells from 64 patients. By cell viability and clonogeneic methylcellulose assays, FTIs showed a significant inhibitory activity in CD34+ KG1a and primary bone marrow (BM) leukemic cells from 56% of AML patients. FTIs also induced activation of caspase-3 and Fas-independent apoptosis, confirmed by the finding that inhibition of caspase-8 was not associated with the rescue of FTI-treated cells. We concluded that other cellular events induced by FTIs may trigger activation of caspase-3 and subsequent apoptosis, but the expression of proapoptotic molecules, as Bcl-2 and Bcl-XL, and antiapoptotic, as Bcl-X(s), were not modified by FTIs. By contrast, expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) was increased in FTI-treated AML cells. Our results suggest a very complex mechanism of action of FTIs that require more studies for a better clinical use of the drugs alone or in combination in the treatment of hematological malignancies. PMID:27896224

  7. Prevention of Breast Cancer Cell Transformation by Blockade of the AP-1 Transcription Factor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-01

    methoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazo-lium) and PMS ( phenazine methosulfate) was added to the cells for 2 hours at 370 C and absorption at 495 nm...methoxyphenyl)- 2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium neo neomycin transferase nm nanometer O.D. Optical Density PMS phenazine methosulfate rtTA reverse...dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3- carboxy-methoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazo-lium) and PMS ( phenazine methosulfate) was added to the cells for 2

  8. Mitochondrial activation chemicals synergize with surface receptor PD-1 blockade for T cell-dependent antitumor activity

    PubMed Central

    Chamoto, Kenji; Chowdhury, Partha S.; Kumar, Alok; Sonomura, Kazuhiro; Matsuda, Fumihiko; Fagarasan, Sidonia; Honjo, Tasuku

    2017-01-01

    Although immunotherapy by PD-1 blockade has dramatically improved the survival rate of cancer patients, further improvement in efficacy is required to reduce the fraction of less sensitive patients. In mouse models of PD-1 blockade therapy, we found that tumor-reactive cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) in draining lymph nodes (DLNs) carry increased mitochondrial mass and more reactive oxygen species (ROS). We show that ROS generation by ROS precursors or indirectly by mitochondrial uncouplers synergized the tumoricidal activity of PD-1 blockade by expansion of effector/memory CTLs in DLNs and within the tumor. These CTLs carry not only the activation of mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) but also an increment of their downstream transcription factors such as PPAR-gamma coactivator 1α (PGC-1α) and T-bet. Furthermore, direct activators of mTOR, AMPK, or PGC-1α also synergized the PD-1 blockade therapy whereas none of above-mentioned chemicals alone had any effects on tumor growth. These findings will pave a way to developing novel combinatorial therapies with PD-1 blockade. PMID:28096382

  9. Mitochondrial activation chemicals synergize with surface receptor PD-1 blockade for T cell-dependent antitumor activity.

    PubMed

    Chamoto, Kenji; Chowdhury, Partha S; Kumar, Alok; Sonomura, Kazuhiro; Matsuda, Fumihiko; Fagarasan, Sidonia; Honjo, Tasuku

    2017-01-31

    Although immunotherapy by PD-1 blockade has dramatically improved the survival rate of cancer patients, further improvement in efficacy is required to reduce the fraction of less sensitive patients. In mouse models of PD-1 blockade therapy, we found that tumor-reactive cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) in draining lymph nodes (DLNs) carry increased mitochondrial mass and more reactive oxygen species (ROS). We show that ROS generation by ROS precursors or indirectly by mitochondrial uncouplers synergized the tumoricidal activity of PD-1 blockade by expansion of effector/memory CTLs in DLNs and within the tumor. These CTLs carry not only the activation of mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) but also an increment of their downstream transcription factors such as PPAR-gamma coactivator 1α (PGC-1α) and T-bet. Furthermore, direct activators of mTOR, AMPK, or PGC-1α also synergized the PD-1 blockade therapy whereas none of above-mentioned chemicals alone had any effects on tumor growth. These findings will pave a way to developing novel combinatorial therapies with PD-1 blockade.

  10. Dendritic Cell Vaccination Combined with CTLA4 Blockade in Patients with Metastatic Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Ribas, Antoni; Comin-Anduix, Begoña; Chmielowski, Bartosz; Jalil, Jason; de la Rocha, Pilar; McCannel, Tara A.; Ochoa, Maria Teresa; Seja, Elizabeth; Villanueva, Arturo; Oseguera, Denise K.; Straatsma, Bradley R.; Cochran, Alistair J.; Glaspy, John A.; Hui, Liu; Marincola, Francesco M.; Wang, Ena; Economou, James S.; Gomez-Navarro, Jesus

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Tumor antigen-loaded dendritic cells (DC) are believed to activate antitumor immunity by stimulating T cells, and cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 (CTLA4)-blocking antibodies should release a key negative regulatory pathway on T cells. The combination was tested in a phase 1 clinical trial in patients with advanced melanoma. Experimental Design Autologous DC were pulsed with MART-126-35 peptide and administered with a dose escalation of the CTLA4 blocking antibody tremelimumab. Sixteen patients were accrued to 5 dose levels. Primary endpoints were safety and immune effects; clinical efficacy was a secondary endpoint. Results Dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) of grade 3 diarrhea and grade 2 hypophysitis developed in 2 out of 3 patients receiving tremelimumab at 10 mg/kg monthly. Four patients had an objective tumor response, two partial responses (PR) and two complete responses (CR), all melanoma-free between 2 and 4 years after study initiation. There was no difference in immune monitoring results between patients with an objective tumor response and those without a response. Exploratory gene expression analysis suggested that immune-related gene signatures, in particular for B cell function, may be important in predicting response. Conclusion The combination of MART-1 peptide-pulsed DC and tremelimumab results in objective and durable tumor responses at the higher range of the expected response rate with either agent alone. PMID:19789309

  11. Blockade of interleukin-6 receptor suppresses the proliferation of H460 lung cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Yi, Hee; Cho, Hee-Jung; Cho, Soo-Min; Jo, Kyul; Park, Jin-A; Kim, Na-Hyun; Amidon, Gordon L; Kim, Jin-Suk; Shin, Ho-Chul

    2012-07-01

    IL-6/6R signaling is closely associated with tumor growth and poor prognosis. Although there is evidence that interleukin-6 receptor (IL-6R)-mediated signaling promotes the growth and malignancy of cancer, the role of IL-6R in cancer stem cells (CSCs) is poorly defined. This study investigated the role of IL-6R in the proliferation of CSCs. Sphere-forming cells were isolated from the H460 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell line and identified as CSCs using confocal microscopy, RT-PCR and WST-1 assay. The H460 spheres demonstrated the typical characteristics of CSCs, including CD133 expression, upregulation of Nanog, self-renewal, and drug resistance to methotrexate (MTX) and fluorouracil (5-FU). The release of IL-6R and its ligand, IL-6, were quantitatively determined and compared between CSCs and non-CSCs. The concentration of soluble IL-6R (sIL-6R) was remarkably high in CSCs compared to that in non-CSCs. Furthermore, significant upregulation of the IL-6R gene was also observed in the CSCs. The growth of CSCs was significantly inhibited by transfection with IL-6R small-interfering RNA (siRNA), as well as with the IL-6R monoclonal antibody (mAb). In addition, blocking both IL-6R and IL-6 using siRNA or mAbs intensified the inhibition of CSC proliferation. These findings indicate that IL-6R is present in CSCs and has an important role in the proliferation of CSCs in the H460 lung cancer cell line. Therefore, we suggest that IL-6R is both a viable target for the development of CSC-directed lung cancer therapeutics and a potential CSC marker in NSCLC.

  12. VEGF blockade enables oncolytic cancer virotherapy in part by modulating intratumoral myeloid cells.

    PubMed

    Currier, Mark A; Eshun, Francis K; Sholl, Allyson; Chernoguz, Artur; Crawford, Kelly; Divanovic, Senad; Boon, Louis; Goins, William F; Frischer, Jason S; Collins, Margaret H; Leddon, Jennifer L; Baird, William H; Haseley, Amy; Streby, Keri A; Wang, Pin-Yi; Hendrickson, Brett W; Brekken, Rolf A; Kaur, Balveen; Hildeman, David; Cripe, Timothy P

    2013-05-01

    Understanding the host response to oncolytic viruses is important to maximize their antitumor efficacy. Despite robust cytotoxicity and high virus production of an oncolytic herpes simplex virus (oHSV) in cultured human sarcoma cells, intratumoral (ITu) virus injection resulted in only mild antitumor effects in some xenograft models, prompting us to characterize the host inflammatory response. Virotherapy induced an acute neutrophilic infiltrate, a relative decrease of ITu macrophages, and a myeloid cell-dependent upregulation of host-derived vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Anti-VEGF antibodies, bevacizumab and r84, the latter of which binds VEGF and selectively inhibits binding to VEGF receptor-2 (VEGFR2) but not VEGFR1, enhanced the antitumor effects of virotherapy, in part due to decreased angiogenesis but not increased virus production. Neither antibody affected neutrophilic infiltration but both partially mitigated virus-induced depletion of macrophages. Enhancement of virotherapy-mediated antitumor effects by anti-VEGF antibodies could largely be recapitulated by systemic depletion of CD11b(+) cells. These data suggest the combined effect of oHSV virotherapy and anti-VEGF antibodies is in part due to modulation of a host inflammatory reaction to virus. Our data provide strong preclinical support for combined oHSV and anti-VEGF antibody therapy and suggest that understanding and counteracting the innate host response may help enable the full antitumor potential of oncolytic virotherapy.

  13. CK2 blockade causes MPNST cell apoptosis and promotes degradation of β-catenin.

    PubMed

    Kendall, Jed J; Chaney, Katherine E; Patel, Ami V; Rizvi, Tilat A; Largaespada, David A; Ratner, Nancy

    2016-08-16

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) are soft tissue sarcomas that are a major cause of mortality of Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) patients. MPNST patients have few therapeutic options available and only complete surgical resection can be curative. MPNST formation and survival are dependent on activated β-catenin signaling. The goal of this study was to determine if inhibition of the CK2 enzyme can be therapeutically exploited in MPNSTs, given CK2's role in mainta ining oncogenic phenotypes including stabilization of β-catenin. We found that CK2α is over-expressed in MPNSTs and is critical for maintaining cell survival, as the CK2 inhibitor, CX-4945 (Silmitasertib), and shRNA targeting CK2α each significantly reduce MPNST cell viability. These effects were preceded by loss of critical signaling pathways in MPNSTs, including destabilization of β-catenin and TCF8. CX-4945 administration in vivo slowed tumor growth and extends survival time. We conclude that CK2 inhibition is a promising approach to blocking β-catenin in MPNST cells, although combinatorial therapies may be required for maximal efficacy.

  14. CK2 blockade causes MPNST cell apoptosis and promotes degradation of β-catenin

    PubMed Central

    Kendall, Jed J.; Chaney, Katherine E.; Patel, Ami V.; Rizvi, Tilat A.; Largaespada, David A.; Ratner, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) are soft tissue sarcomas that are a major cause of mortality of Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) patients. MPNST patients have few therapeutic options available and only complete surgical resection can be curative. MPNST formation and survival are dependent on activated β-catenin signaling. The goal of this study was to determine if inhibition of the CK2 enzyme can be therapeutically exploited in MPNSTs, given CK2's role in mainta ining oncogenic phenotypes including stabilization of β-catenin. We found that CK2α is over-expressed in MPNSTs and is critical for maintaining cell survival, as the CK2 inhibitor, CX-4945 (Silmitasertib), and shRNA targeting CK2α each significantly reduce MPNST cell viability. These effects were preceded by loss of critical signaling pathways in MPNSTs, including destabilization of β-catenin and TCF8. CX-4945 administration in vivo slowed tumor growth and extends survival time. We conclude that CK2 inhibition is a promising approach to blocking β-catenin in MPNST cells, although combinatorial therapies may be required for maximal efficacy. PMID:27448963

  15. Degron protease blockade sensor to image epigenetic histone protein methylation in cells and living animals.

    PubMed

    Sekar, Thillai V; Foygel, Kira; Devulapally, Rammohan; Paulmurugan, Ramasamy

    2015-01-16

    Lysine methylation of histone H3 and H4 has been identified as a promising therapeutic target in treating various cellular diseases. The availability of an in vivo assay that enables rapid screening and preclinical evaluation of drugs that potentially target this cellular process will significantly expedite the pace of drug development. This study is the first to report the development of a real-time molecular imaging biosensor (a fusion protein, [FLuc2]-[Suv39h1]-[(G4S)3]-[H3-K9]-[cODC]) that can detect and monitor the methylation status of a specific histone lysine methylation mark (H3-K9) in live animals. The sensitivity of this sensor was assessed in various cell lines, in response to down-regulation of methyltransferase EHMT2 by specific siRNA, and in nude mice with lysine replacement mutants. In vivo imaging in response to a combination of methyltransferase inhibitors BIX01294 and Chaetocin in mice reveals the potential of this sensor for preclinical drug evaluation. This biosensor thus has demonstrated its utility in the detection of H3-K9 methylations in vivo and potential value in preclinical drug development.

  16. Blockade of PAR1 signaling with cell-penetrating pepducins inhibits Akt-survival pathways in breast cancer cells and suppresses tumor survival and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Eric; Boire, Adrienne; Agarwal, Anika; Nguyen, Nga; O'Callaghan, Katie; Tu, Powen; Kuliopulos, Athan; Covic, Lidija

    2009-01-01

    Protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1) is a G protein-coupled receptor that is not expressed in normal breast epithelia, but is up-regulated in invasive breast carcinomas. In the present study, we found that matrix metalloprotease-1 (MMP-1) robustly activates the PAR1-Akt survival pathway in breast carcinoma cells. This process is blocked by a cell-penetrating lipopeptide ‘pepducin’, P1pal-7, which is a potent inhibitor of cell viability in breast carcinoma cells expressing PAR1. Both a MMP-1 inhibitor and P1pal-7 significantly promote apoptosis in breast tumor xenografts and inhibit metastasis to the lungs by up to 88%. Dual therapy with P1pal-7 and taxotere inhibits the growth of MDA-MB-231 xenografts by 95%. Consistently, biochemical analysis of xenograft tumors treated with P1pal-7 or MMP-1 inhibitor demonstrated attenuated Akt activity. Ectopic expression of constitutively active Akt rescues breast cancer cells from the synergistic cytotoxicity of P1pal-7 and taxotere, suggesting that Akt is a critical component of PAR1-dependent cancer cell viability. Together, these findings indicate that blockade of MMP1-PAR1 signaling may provide a benefit beyond treatment with taxotere alone in advanced, metastatic breast cancer. PMID:19622769

  17. Targeting myeloid-derived suppressor cells with colony stimulating factor-1 receptor blockade can reverse immune resistance to immunotherapy in indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase-expressing tumors

    PubMed Central

    Holmgaard, Rikke B.; Zamarin, Dmitriy; Lesokhin, Alexander; Merghoub, Taha; Wolchok, Jedd D.

    2016-01-01

    Tumor indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) promotes immunosuppression by direct action on effector T cells and Tregs and through recruitment, expansion and activation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). Targeting of MDSCs is clinically being explored as a therapeutic strategy, though optimal targeting strategies and biomarkers predictive of response are presently unknown. Maturation and tumor recruitment of MDSCs are dependent on signaling through the receptor tyrosine kinase CSF-1R on myeloid cells. Here, we show that MDSCs are the critical cell population in IDO-expressing B16 tumors in mediating accelerated tumor outgrowth and resistance to immunotherapy. Using a clinically relevant drug, we show that inhibition of CSF-1R signaling can functionally block tumor-infiltrating MDSCs and enhance anti-tumor T cell responses. Furthermore, inhibition of CSF-1R sensitizes IDO-expressing tumors to immunotherapy with T cell checkpoint blockade, and combination of CSF-1R blockade with IDO inhibitors potently elicits tumor regression. These findings provide evidence for a critical and functional role for MDSCs on the in vivo outcome of IDO-expressing tumors. PMID:27211548

  18. Selective blockade and recovery of cell surface alpha 2-adrenergic receptors in human erythroleukemia (HEL) cells. Studies with the irreversible antagonist benextramine

    SciTech Connect

    McKernan, R.M.; Strickland, W.R.; Insel, P.A.

    1988-01-01

    alpha 2-Adrenergic receptors are present on human erythroleukemia (HEL) cells, both on the cell surface and in a sequestered compartment. In the current study we show that benextramine, a hydrophilic irreversible antagonist, can be used to investigate alpha 2-adrenergic receptor compartmentation in these cells. In membranes prepared from HEL cells, benextramine competed for all alpha 2-adrenergic receptors ( (/sup 3/H)yohimbine sites). In intact cells, at 4 degrees, benextramine exhibited a biphasic competition curve for alpha 2-adrenergic receptors, with EC50 values of approximately 10 microM and greater than 1 mM for the high and low affinity components, respectively. We propose that the alpha 2-adrenergic receptors preferentially blocked by benextramine are those on the surface of the cell, whereas those with low affinity are sequestered receptors because: 1) only epinephrine-accessible sites are removed by prior treatment of cells with benextramine, 2) a preparation enriched with surface membranes is also enriched in receptors with a high affinity for benextramine; and 3) after blockade of cell surface receptors (54 +/- 6% of total sites, n = 7) by benextramine, the ability of the alpha 2-adrenergic agonists epinephrine and UK-14,304 to inhibit forskolin-stimulated cAMP accumulation is lost. The latter result implies that only cell surface and not sequestered receptors are functionally coupled to adenylate cyclase. The return of receptors from the sequestered compartment to the cell surface and the recovery of alpha 2-adrenergic receptor function were measured after HEL cells were treated with benextramine (50 microM for 1 hr at 4 degrees). The recovery of receptor binding (t1/2 = 25 min) was somewhat slower than the recovery of function (t1/2 approximately 8 min).

  19. Expression of PD-L1 on Canine Tumor Cells and Enhancement of IFN-γ Production from Tumor-Infiltrating Cells by PD-L1 Blockade

    PubMed Central

    Maekawa, Naoya; Konnai, Satoru; Ikebuchi, Ryoyo; Okagawa, Tomohiro; Adachi, Mami; Takagi, Satoshi; Kagawa, Yumiko; Nakajima, Chie; Suzuki, Yasuhiko; Murata, Shiro; Ohashi, Kazuhiko

    2014-01-01

    Programmed death 1 (PD-1), an immunoinhibitory receptor, and programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1), its ligand, together induce the “exhausted” status in antigen-specific lymphocytes and are thus involved in the immune evasion of tumor cells. In this study, canine PD-1 and PD-L1 were molecularly characterized, and their potential as therapeutic targets for canine tumors was discussed. The canine PD-1 and PD-L1 genes were conserved among canine breeds. Based on the sequence information obtained, the recombinant canine PD-1 and PD-L1 proteins were constructed; they were confirmed to bind each other. Antibovine PD-L1 monoclonal antibody effectively blocked the binding of recombinant PD-1 with PD-L1–expressing cells in a dose-dependent manner. Canine melanoma, mastocytoma, renal cell carcinoma, and other types of tumors examined expressed PD-L1, whereas some did not. Interestingly, anti-PD-L1 antibody treatment enhanced IFN-γ production from tumor-infiltrating cells. These results showed that the canine PD-1/PD-L1 pathway is also associated with T-cell exhaustion in canine tumors and that its blockade with antibody could be a new therapeutic strategy for canine tumors. Further investigations are needed to confirm the ability of anti-PD-L1 antibody to reactivate canine antitumor immunity in vivo, and its therapeutic potential has to be further discussed. PMID:24915569

  20. Expression of PD-L1 on canine tumor cells and enhancement of IFN-γ production from tumor-infiltrating cells by PD-L1 blockade.

    PubMed

    Maekawa, Naoya; Konnai, Satoru; Ikebuchi, Ryoyo; Okagawa, Tomohiro; Adachi, Mami; Takagi, Satoshi; Kagawa, Yumiko; Nakajima, Chie; Suzuki, Yasuhiko; Murata, Shiro; Ohashi, Kazuhiko

    2014-01-01

    Programmed death 1 (PD-1), an immunoinhibitory receptor, and programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1), its ligand, together induce the "exhausted" status in antigen-specific lymphocytes and are thus involved in the immune evasion of tumor cells. In this study, canine PD-1 and PD-L1 were molecularly characterized, and their potential as therapeutic targets for canine tumors was discussed. The canine PD-1 and PD-L1 genes were conserved among canine breeds. Based on the sequence information obtained, the recombinant canine PD-1 and PD-L1 proteins were constructed; they were confirmed to bind each other. Antibovine PD-L1 monoclonal antibody effectively blocked the binding of recombinant PD-1 with PD-L1-expressing cells in a dose-dependent manner. Canine melanoma, mastocytoma, renal cell carcinoma, and other types of tumors examined expressed PD-L1, whereas some did not. Interestingly, anti-PD-L1 antibody treatment enhanced IFN-γ production from tumor-infiltrating cells. These results showed that the canine PD-1/PD-L1 pathway is also associated with T-cell exhaustion in canine tumors and that its blockade with antibody could be a new therapeutic strategy for canine tumors. Further investigations are needed to confirm the ability of anti-PD-L1 antibody to reactivate canine antitumor immunity in vivo, and its therapeutic potential has to be further discussed.

  1. Opioid blockade effect on insulin beta-cells secretory patterns in polycystic ovary syndrome. Oral glucose load versus intravenous glucagon bolus.

    PubMed

    Ciampelli, M; Fulghesu, A M; Guido, M; Murgia, F; Muzj, G; Belosi, C; Fortini, A; Cento, R; Lanzone, A

    1998-01-01

    In order to evaluate the involvement of endogenous opiates in the insulin disorders of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOs) a total of 25 PCOs women and 11 normo-ovulatory controls were studied by comparing the effect of a chronic opioid blockade on beta-cells responsiveness to oral glucose load and to intravenous glucagon bolus. Each patient, studied on follicular phase, underwent to oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), and, 2 days later, to a glucagon intravenous bolus (1 mg); these tests were then repeated after 6 weeks of naltrexone treatment (50 mg orally). Naltrexone treatment did not modify the insulin secretory patterns of control subjects, whereas the same therapy significantly reduced, in hyperinsulinemic PCOs women, the beta-cell hyperresponsiveness both to oral glucose load and to intravenous glucagon (p < 0.05 and p < 0.01, respectively), even if with different mean percent decrease (32% OGTT vs. 45% glucagon, p < 0.05). Moreover, normoinsulinemic PCOs patients showed a slight, but not significantly increase in the beta-cells response to OGTT after opioid blockade, whereas, in the same situation, the insulin release after glucagon bolus was significantly reduced (p < 0.01). Chronic opioid blockade did not modify gonadotropins, steroids and SHBG levels in either group. Our data show that naltrexone treatment is able to reduce the beta-cell response to a direct intravenous secretagogue stimulus in all PCOs patients, while only in hyperinsulinemic PCOs subjects the same treatment is effective in reducing the exaggerated insulin secretion after oral glucose load. The reason for such a discrepancy could be ascribed to a different effect of opioids on first- and second-phase insulin secretion, or, alternatively, to an involvement of other secretagogue factors, such as glucoincretins.

  2. Therapeutic PD-1 pathway blockade augments with other modalities of immunotherapy T-cell function to prevent immune decline in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Duraiswamy, Jaikumar; Freeman, Gordon J; Coukos, George

    2013-12-01

    The tumor microenvironment mediates induction of the immunosuppressive programmed cell death-1 (PD-1) pathway, and targeted interventions against this pathway can help restore antitumor immunity. To gain insight into these responses, we studied the interaction between PD-1 expressed on T cells and its ligands (PD-1:PD-L1, PD-1:PD-L2, and PD-L1:B7.1), expressed on other cells in the tumor microenvironment, using a syngeneic orthotopic mouse model of epithelial ovarian cancer (ID8). Exhaustion of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) correlated with expression of PD-1 ligands by tumor cells and tumor-derived myeloid cells, including tumor-associated macrophages (TAM), dendritic cells, and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC). When combined with GVAX or FVAX vaccination (consisting of irradiated ID8 cells expressing granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor or FLT3 ligand) and costimulation by agonistic α-4-1BB or TLR 9 ligand, antibody-mediated blockade of PD-1 or PD-L1 triggered rejection of ID8 tumors in 75% of tumor-bearing mice. This therapeutic effect was associated with increased proliferation and function of tumor antigen-specific effector CD8(+) T cells, inhibition of suppressive regulatory T cells (Treg) and MDSC, upregulation of effector T-cell signaling molecules, and generation of T memory precursor cells. Overall, PD-1/PD-L1 blockade enhanced the amplitude of tumor immunity by reprogramming suppressive and stimulatory signals that yielded more powerful cancer control.

  3. PD-1 blockade attenuates immunosuppressive myeloid cells due to inhibition of CD47/SIRPα axis in HPV negative head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yu, Guang-Tao; Bu, Lin-Lin; Huang, Cong-Fa; Zhang, Wen-Feng; Chen, Wan-Jun; Gutkind, J Silvio; Kulkarni, Ashok B; Sun, Zhi-Jun

    2015-12-08

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) and tumor associated macrophages (TAMs) play key roles in the tumor immune suppressive network and tumor progression. However, precise roles of programmed death-1 (PD-1) in immunological functions of MDSCs and TAMs in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) have not been clearly elucidated. In the present study, we show that PD-1 and PD-L1 levels were significantly higher in human HNSCC specimen than in normal oral mucosa. MDSCs and TAMs were characterized in mice and human HNSCC specimen, correlated well with PD-1 and PD-L1 expression. αPD-1 treatment was well tolerated and significantly reduced tumor growth in the HNSCC mouse model along with significant reduction in MDSCs and TAMs in immune organs and tumors. Molecular analysis suggests a reduction in the CD47/SIRPα pathway by PD-1 blockade, which regulates MDSCs, TAMs, dendritic cell as well as effector T cells. Hence, these data identify that PD-1/PD-L1 axis is significantly increased in human and mouse HNSCC. Adoptive αPD-1 immunotherapy may provide a novel therapeutic approach to modulate the micro- and macro-environment in HNSCC.

  4. Time-specific blockade of PDGFR with Imatinib (Glivec®) causes cataract and disruption of lens fiber cells in neonatal mice.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yin-Pin; He, Yang-Tao; Chen, Cheng-Li; Ji, Jun; Niu, Jian-Qin; Wang, Han-Zhi; Li, Shi-Feng; Huang, Lan; Mei, Feng

    2011-03-01

    This study aimed at investigating the response of lens epithelial cells in postnatal mice to Imatinib (Glivec®, a potent inhibitor of platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR)) treatment. Mouse eyes were sampled 10 days after administration of Imatinib (0.5 mg·g(-1)·day(-1)) for 3 days, at either 7, 14, or 21 days postpartum. Structural changes of lens were revealed by routine H.E. staining. Levels of proliferation and apoptosis were revealed by BrdU incorporation and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay, respectively, and immunofluorescent staining with anti-PDGFRα antibody was carried out on the sections of eyeball. PDGFRα and p-PDGFRαprotein levels were evaluated by Western blot. Our results indicated that administration of Imatinib led to blockade of PDGFR signaling. Formation of cataracts was found only in those mice where treatment started from 7 days postpartum (P7), but was not observed in those samples from P14 nor P21. Fiber cells were disorganized in cataract lens core as observed histologically, and migration of epithelial cells was also inhibited. No apoptosis was detected with the TUNEL method. Our results indicated blockade of PDGFR at the neonatal stage (P7) would lead to cataracts and lens fiber cells disorganization, suggesting that PDGFR signaling plays a time-specific and crucial role in the postnatal development of lens in the mouse, and also may provide a new approach to produce a congenital cataract animal model.

  5. Blockade of dendritic cell development by bacterial fermentation products butyrate and propionate through a transporter (Slc5a8)-dependent inhibition of histone deacetylases.

    PubMed

    Singh, Nagendra; Thangaraju, Muthusamy; Prasad, Puttur D; Martin, Pamela M; Lambert, Nevin A; Boettger, Thomas; Offermanns, Stefan; Ganapathy, Vadivel

    2010-09-03

    Mammalian colon harbors trillions of bacteria, yet there is no undue inflammatory response by the host against these bacteria under normal conditions. The bacterial fermentation products acetate, propionate, and butyrate are believed, at least in part, to be responsible for these immunosuppressive effects. Dendritic cells play an essential role in presentation of antigens to T lymphocytes and initiation of adaptive immune responses. Here we report that butyrate and propionate block the generation of dendritic cells from bone marrow stem cells, without affecting the generation of granulocytes. This effect is dependent on the Na(+)-coupled monocarboxylate transporter Slc5a8, which transports butyrate and propionate into cells, and on the ability of these two bacterial metabolites to inhibit histone deacetylases. Acetate, which is also a substrate for Slc5a8 but not an inhibitor of histone deacetylases, does not affect dendritic cell development, indicating the essential role of histone deacetylase inhibition in the process. The blockade of dendritic cell development by butyrate and propionate is associated with decreased expression of the transcription factors PU.1 and RelB. Butyrate also elicits its biologic effects through its ability to activate the G-protein-coupled receptor Gpr109a, but this mechanism is not involved in butyrate-induced blockade of dendritic cell development. The participation of Slc5a8 and the non-involvement of Gpr109a in butyrate effects have been substantiated using bone marrow cells obtained from Slc5a8(-/-) and Gpr109a(-/-) mice. These findings uncover an important mechanism underlying the anti-inflammatory functions of the bacterial fermentation products butyrate and propionate.

  6. Blockade of Dendritic Cell Development by Bacterial Fermentation Products Butyrate and Propionate through a Transporter (Slc5a8)-dependent Inhibition of Histone Deacetylases

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Nagendra; Thangaraju, Muthusamy; Prasad, Puttur D.; Martin, Pamela M.; Lambert, Nevin A.; Boettger, Thomas; Offermanns, Stefan; Ganapathy, Vadivel

    2010-01-01

    Mammalian colon harbors trillions of bacteria, yet there is no undue inflammatory response by the host against these bacteria under normal conditions. The bacterial fermentation products acetate, propionate, and butyrate are believed, at least in part, to be responsible for these immunosuppressive effects. Dendritic cells play an essential role in presentation of antigens to T lymphocytes and initiation of adaptive immune responses. Here we report that butyrate and propionate block the generation of dendritic cells from bone marrow stem cells, without affecting the generation of granulocytes. This effect is dependent on the Na+-coupled monocarboxylate transporter Slc5a8, which transports butyrate and propionate into cells, and on the ability of these two bacterial metabolites to inhibit histone deacetylases. Acetate, which is also a substrate for Slc5a8 but not an inhibitor of histone deacetylases, does not affect dendritic cell development, indicating the essential role of histone deacetylase inhibition in the process. The blockade of dendritic cell development by butyrate and propionate is associated with decreased expression of the transcription factors PU.1 and RelB. Butyrate also elicits its biologic effects through its ability to activate the G-protein-coupled receptor Gpr109a, but this mechanism is not involved in butyrate-induced blockade of dendritic cell development. The participation of Slc5a8 and the non-involvement of Gpr109a in butyrate effects have been substantiated using bone marrow cells obtained from Slc5a8−/− and Gpr109a−/− mice. These findings uncover an important mechanism underlying the anti-inflammatory functions of the bacterial fermentation products butyrate and propionate. PMID:20601425

  7. Blockade of T-cell activation by dithiocarbamates involves novel mechanisms of inhibition of nuclear factor of activated T cells.

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Martínez, S; Gómez del Arco, P; Armesilla, A L; Aramburu, J; Luo, C; Rao, A; Redondo, J M

    1997-01-01

    Dithiocarbamates (DTCs) have recently been reported as powerful inhibitors of NF-kappaB activation in a number of cell types. Given the role of this transcription factor in the regulation of gene expression in the inflammatory response, NF-kappaB inhibitors have been suggested as potential therapeutic drugs for inflammatory diseases. We show here that DTCs inhibited both interleukin 2 (IL-2) synthesis and membrane expression of antigens which are induced during T-cell activation. This inhibition, which occurred with a parallel activation of c-Jun transactivating functions and expression, was reflected by transfection experiments at the IL-2 promoter level, and involved not only the inhibition of NF-kappaB-driven reporter activation but also that of nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT). Accordingly, electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs) indicated that pyrrolidine DTC (PDTC) prevented NF-kappaB, and NFAT DNA-binding activity in T cells stimulated with either phorbol myristate acetate plus ionophore or antibodies against the CD3-T-cell receptor complex and simultaneously activated the binding of AP-1. Furthermore, PDTC differentially targeted both NFATp and NFATc family members, inhibiting the transactivation functions of NFATp and mRNA induction of NFATc. Strikingly, Western blotting and immunocytochemical experiments indicated that PDTC promoted a transient and rapid shuttling of NFATp and NFATc, leading to their accelerated export from the nucleus of activated T cells. We propose that the activation of an NFAT kinase by PDTC could be responsible for the rapid shuttling of the NFAT, therefore transiently converting the sustained transactivation of this transcription factor that occurs during lymphocyte activation, and show that c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) can act by directly phosphorylating NFATp. In addition, the combined inhibitory effects on NFAT and NF-KB support a potential use of DTCs as immunosuppressants. PMID:9343406

  8. PD-L1 is a novel direct target of HIF-1α, and its blockade under hypoxia enhanced MDSC-mediated T cell activation.

    PubMed

    Noman, Muhammad Zaeem; Desantis, Giacomo; Janji, Bassam; Hasmim, Meriem; Karray, Saoussen; Dessen, Philippe; Bronte, Vincenzo; Chouaib, Salem

    2014-05-05

    Tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells such as myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) and tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) form an important component of the hypoxic tumor microenvironment. Here, we investigated the influence of hypoxia on immune checkpoint receptors (programmed death [PD]-1 and CTLA-4) and their respective ligands (PD-1 ligand 1 [PD-L1], PD-L2, CD80, and CD86) on MDSCs. We demonstrate that MDSCs at the tumor site show a differential expression of PD-L1 as compared with MDSCs from peripheral lymphoid organ (spleen). Hypoxia caused a rapid, dramatic, and selective up-regulation of PD-L1 on splenic MDSCs in tumor-bearing mice. This was not limited to MDSCs, as hypoxia also significantly increased the expression of PD-L1 on macrophages, dendritic cells, and tumor cells. Furthermore, PD-L1 up-regulation under hypoxia was dependent on hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) but not HIF-2α. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and luciferase reporter assay revealed direct binding of HIF-1α to a transcriptionally active hypoxia-response element (HRE) in the PD-L1 proximal promoter. Blockade of PD-L1 under hypoxia enhanced MDSC-mediated T cell activation and was accompanied by the down-regulation of MDSCs IL-6 and IL-10. Finally, neutralizing antibodies against IL-10 under hypoxia significantly abrogated the suppressive activity of MDSCs. Simultaneous blockade of PD-L1 along with inhibition of HIF-1α may thus represent a novel approach for cancer immunotherapy.

  9. Two T-box genes play independent and cooperative roles to regulate morphogenesis of ciliated Kupffer's vesicle in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Amack, Jeffrey D; Wang, Xinghao; Yost, H Joseph

    2007-10-15

    The brain, heart and gastro-intestinal tract develop distinct left-right (LR) asymmetries. Asymmetric cilia-dependent fluid flow in the embryonic node in mouse, Kupffer's vesicle in zebrafish, notochordal plate in rabbit and gastrocoel roof plate in frog appears to be a conserved mechanism that directs LR asymmetric gene expression and establishes the orientation of organ asymmetry. However, the cellular processes and genetic pathways that control the formation of these essential ciliated structures are unknown. In zebrafish, migratory dorsal forerunner cells (DFCs) give rise to Kupffer's vesicle (KV), a ciliated epithelial sheet that forms a lumen and generates fluid flow. Using the epithelial marker atypical Protein Kinase C (aPKC) and other markers to analyze DFCs and KV cells, we describe a multi-step process by which DFCs form a functional KV. Using mutants and morpholinos, we show that two T-box transcription factors-No tail (Ntl)/Brachyury and Tbx16/Spadetail-cooperatively regulate an early step of DFC mesenchyme to epithelial transition (MET) and KV cell specification. Subsequently, each transcription factor independently controls a distinct step in KV formation: Tbx16 regulates apical clustering of KV cells and Ntl is necessary for KV lumen formation. By targeting morpholinos to DFCs, we show that these cell autonomous functions in KV morphogenesis are necessary for LR patterning throughout the embryo.

  10. Co-Stimulatory Blockade of the CD28/CD80-86/CTLA-4 Balance in Transplantation: Impact on Memory T Cells?

    PubMed Central

    Ville, Simon; Poirier, Nicolas; Blancho, Gilles; Vanhove, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    CD28 and CTLA-4 are prototypal co-stimulatory and co-inhibitory cell surface signaling molecules interacting with CD80/86, known to be critical for immune response initiation and regulation, respectively. Initial “bench-to-beside” translation, two decades ago, resulted in the development of CTLA4-Ig, a biologic that targets CD80/86 and prevents T-cell costimulation. In spite of its proven effectiveness in inhibiting allo-immune responses, particularly in murine models, clinical experience in kidney transplantation with belatacept (high-affinity CTLA4-Ig molecule) reveals a high incidence of acute, cell-mediated rejection. Originally, the etiology of belatacept-resistant graft rejection was thought to be heterologous immunity, i.e., the cross-reactivity of the pool of memory T cells from pathogen-specific immune responses with alloantigens. Recently, the standard view that memory T cells arise from effector cells after clonal contraction has been challenged by a “developmental” model, in which less differentiated memory T cells generate effector cells. This review delineates how this shift in paradigm, given the differences in co-stimulatory and co-inhibitory signal depending on the maturation stage, could profoundly affect our understanding of the CD28/CD80-86/CTLA-4 blockade and highlights the potential advantages of selectively targeting CD28, instead of CD80/86, to control post-transplant immune responses. PMID:26322044

  11. Intraluminal Blockade of Cell-Surface CD74 and Glucose Regulated Protein 78 Prevents Substance P-Induced Bladder Inflammatory Changes in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Vera, Pedro L.; Wang, Xihai; Bucala, Richard J.; Meyer-Siegler, Katherine L.

    2009-01-01

    Background Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a pro-inflammatory cytokine constitutively expressed by urothelial cells. During inflammatory stimuli, MIF is released into the lumen complexed to other proteins and these complexes can bind to urothelial cell-surface receptors to activate signaling pathways. Since MIF is complexed to α1-inhibitor III (A1-I3; a member of the α2-macroglubulin family) and glucose regulated protein 78 (GRP78) is a receptor for A1-I3 the goals of this study were to determine if substance P elicits urothelial cell-surface expression of GRP78 and to assess the functional role of CD74 (receptor for MIF) or GRP78 in substance P-induced bladder inflammatory changes. Methodology/Principal Findings Anesthetized male Sprague-Dawley rats received either saline or substance P (s.c.), bladders were collected 1 hour after treatment and processed for histology or protein/mRNA. The expression of GRP78 at urothelial cell-surface was determined by performing in vivo biotinylation of urothelial cell-surface proteins. Finally, in order to determine the effects of receptor blockade on substance P-induced MIF release and inflammatory changes, rats received either intraluminal antibodies to CD74, GRP78, both, or non-specific IgG (as a control). GRP78 and MIF immunostaining was simultaneously visualized in umbrella cells only after substance P treatment. Immunoprecipitation studies showed GRP78-MIF complexes increased after substance P while in vivo biotinylation confirmed substance P-induced GRP78 cell-surface expression in urothelial cells. Intraluminal blockade of CD74 and/or GRP78 prevented substance P-induced changes, including bladder edema, intraluminal MIF release by urothelial cells and production of inflammatory cytokines by urothelial cells. Conclusions/Significance GRP78 is expressed on the surface of urothelial cells after substance P treatment where it can bind MIF complexes. Blocking CD74 (receptor for MIF) and/or GRP78 prevented

  12. Blockade of Notch signaling promotes acetaminophen-induced liver injury.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Longfeng; Ke, Michael; Yue, Shi; Xiao, Wen; Yan, Youde; Deng, Xiaozhao; Ying, Qi-Long; Li, Jun; Ke, Bibo

    2017-03-13

    Liver injury after experimental acetaminophen treatment is mediated both by direct hepatocyte injury through a P450-generated toxic metabolite and indirectly by activated liver Kupffer cells and neutrophils. This study was designed to investigate the role of Notch signaling in the regulation of innate immune responses in acetaminophen (APAP)-induced liver injury. Using a mouse model of APAP-induced liver injury, wild-type (WT) and toll-like receptor 4 knockout (TLR4 KO) mice were injected intraperitoneally with APAP or PBS. Some animals were injected with γ-secretase inhibitor DAPT or DMSO vehicle. For the in vitro study, bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMs) were transfected with Notch1 siRNA, TLR4 siRNA, and non-specific (NS) siRNA and stimulated with LPS. Indeed, paracetamol/acetaminophen-induced liver damage was worse after Notch blockade with DAPT in wild-type mice, which was accompanied by significantly increased ALT levels, diminished hairy and enhancer of split-1 (Hes1), and phosphorylated Stat3 and Akt but enhanced high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), TLR4, NF-κB, and NLRP3 activation after APAP challenge. Mice receiving DAPT increased macrophage and neutrophil accumulation and hepatocellular apoptosis. However, TLR4 KO mice that received DAPT reduced APAP-induced liver damage and NF-κB, NLRP3, and cleaved caspase-1 activation. BMMs transfected with Notch1 siRNA reduced Hes1 and phosphorylated Stat3 and Akt but augmented HMGB1, TLR4, NF-κB, and NLRP3. Furthermore, TLR4 siRNA knockdown resulted in decreased NF-κB and NLRP3 and cleaved caspase-1 and IL-1β levels following LPS stimulation. These results demonstrate that Notch signaling regulates innate NLRP3 inflammasome activation through regulation of HMGB1/TLR4/NF-κB activation in APAP-induced liver injury. Our novel findings underscore the critical role of the Notch1-Hes1 signaling cascade in the regulation of innate immunity in APAP-triggered liver inflammation. This might imply a novel therapeutic

  13. T-cell epitope strength in WAP-T mouse mammary carcinomas is an important determinant in PD1/PD-L1 immune checkpoint blockade therapy

    PubMed Central

    Bruns, Michael; Wanger, Jara; Schumacher, Udo; Deppert, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Using the SV40 transgenic WAP-T/WAP-TNP mouse models for mammary carcinomas, we compared the response to immune checkpoint blockade therapy in tumor mice expressing either SV40 T-antigen containing the LCMV NP-epitope (T-AgNP in WAP-TNP mice), or the unmodified T-antigen (T-Ag in WAP-T mice). Specifically, we asked, whether the presence of the highly immunogenic NP-epitope in T-AgNP influences this response in comparison to the weakly immunogenic T-cell epitopes of T-Ag in WAP-T tumor mice. Treatment of WAP-TNP tumor mice with either anti-PD1 or anti-PD-L1 antibodies led to tumor regression, with anti-PD-L1 treatment being more effective. However, tumors had fully re-appeared after 21 days, indicating that CTL exhaustion had been rapidly re-established. Surprisingly, the same treatment applied to WAP-T tumor mice resulted in a significantly prolonged period of tumor regression. We provide evidence that in contrast to the weak antigenic stimuli exerted by T-cell epitopes of T-Ag, the strong antigenic stimulus of the NP-epitope in T-AgNP has a dual effect: (i) a rapid generation of active NP-specific CTLs, accompanied (ii) by accelerated CTL exhaustion. Our data support the hypothesis that the immunogenicity of tumor antigen T-cell epitopes strongly influences the success of immune checkpoint blockade therapy. PMID:27579535

  14. Tasquinimod modulates tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells and improves the antitumor immune response to PD-L1 blockade in bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Nakhlé, Jessica; Pierron, Valérie; Bauchet, Anne-Laure; Plas, Pascale; Thiongane, Amath; Meyer-Losic, Florence; Schmidlin, Fabien

    2016-06-01

    The infiltration of myeloid cells helps tumors to overcome immune surveillance and imparts resistance to cancer immunotherapy. Thus, strategies to modulate the effects of these immune cells may offer a potential therapeutic benefit. We report here that tasquinimod, a novel immunotherapy which targets S100A9 signaling, reduces the immunosuppressive properties of myeloid cells in preclinical models of bladder cancer (BCa). As single anticancer agent, tasquinimod treatment was effective in preventing early stage tumor growth, but did not achieve a clear antitumor effect in advanced tumors. Investigations of this response revealed that tasquinimod induces an increase in the expression of a negative regulator of T cell activation, Programmed-death-ligand 1 (PD-L1). This markedly weakens its antitumor immunity, yet provokes an "inflamed" milieu rendering tumors more prone to T cell-mediated immune attack by PD-L1 blockade. Interestingly, the combination of tasquinimod with an Anti-PD-L1 antibody enhanced the antitumor immune response in bladder tumors. This combination synergistically modulated tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells, thereby strongly affecting proliferation and activation of effector T cells. Together, our data provide insight into the rational combination of therapies that activate both innate and adaptive immune system, such as the association of S100A9-targeting agents with immune checkpoints inhibitors, to improve the response to cancer immunotherapeutic agents in BCa.

  15. Tasquinimod modulates tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells and improves the antitumor immune response to PD-L1 blockade in bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nakhlé, Jessica; Pierron, Valérie; Bauchet, Anne-Laure; Plas, Pascale; Thiongane, Amath; Meyer-Losic, Florence; Schmidlin, Fabien

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The infiltration of myeloid cells helps tumors to overcome immune surveillance and imparts resistance to cancer immunotherapy. Thus, strategies to modulate the effects of these immune cells may offer a potential therapeutic benefit. We report here that tasquinimod, a novel immunotherapy which targets S100A9 signaling, reduces the immunosuppressive properties of myeloid cells in preclinical models of bladder cancer (BCa). As single anticancer agent, tasquinimod treatment was effective in preventing early stage tumor growth, but did not achieve a clear antitumor effect in advanced tumors. Investigations of this response revealed that tasquinimod induces an increase in the expression of a negative regulator of T cell activation, Programmed-death-ligand 1 (PD-L1). This markedly weakens its antitumor immunity, yet provokes an “inflamed” milieu rendering tumors more prone to T cell-mediated immune attack by PD-L1 blockade. Interestingly, the combination of tasquinimod with an Anti-PD-L1 antibody enhanced the antitumor immune response in bladder tumors. This combination synergistically modulated tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells, thereby strongly affecting proliferation and activation of effector T cells. Together, our data provide insight into the rational combination of therapies that activate both innate and adaptive immune system, such as the association of S100A9-targeting agents with immune checkpoints inhibitors, to improve the response to cancer immunotherapeutic agents in BCa. PMID:27471612

  16. Overexpression of CD85j in TNBC patients inhibits Cetuximab-mediated NK-cell ADCC but can be restored with CD85j functional blockade.

    PubMed

    Roberti, María P; Juliá, Estefanía P; Rocca, Yamila S; Amat, Mora; Bravo, Alicia I; Loza, José; Coló, Federico; Loza, Carlos M; Fabiano, Verónica; Maino, Mercedes; Podhorzer, Ariel; Fainboim, Leonardo; Barrio, María M; Mordoh, José; Levy, Estrella M

    2015-05-01

    Clinical studies suggest that triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) patients with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-expressing tumors could benefit from therapy with Cetuximab, which targets EGFR. NK cells are the primary effectors of antibody (Ab)-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) and thus play a role in Ab-based therapies. We have previously described diminished levels of Cetuximab-mediated ADCC in vitro in patients with advanced breast cancer. Here, we investigated the potential causes of this NK-cell functional deficiency. We characterized NK-cell activating/inhibitory receptors in the peripheral blood of breast cancer patients and found CD85j inhibitory receptor overexpression. The capacity of NK cells to perform Cetuximab-triggered ADCC against TNBC cells correlated inversely with CD85j expression, even in the presence of the stimulatory cytokines IL-2 or IL-15. Hence, patients expressing high levels of CD85j had an impaired ability to lyse TNBC cells in the presence of Cetuximab. We also found that CD85j overexpression was associated with HLA-I and soluble HLA-G expression by tumors. A CD85j functional blockade with a CD85j antagonist Ab restored ADCC levels in breast cancer patients and reverted this negative effect. Our data suggest that strategies that overcome the hurdles of immune activation could improve Cetuximab clinical efficacy.

  17. GM-CSF signalling blockade and chemotherapeutic agents act in concert to inhibit the function of myeloid-derived suppressor cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Gargett, Tessa; Christo, Susan N; Hercus, Timothy R; Abbas, Nazim; Singhal, Nimit; Lopez, Angel F; Brown, Michael P

    2016-01-01

    Immune evasion is a recently defined hallmark of cancer, and immunotherapeutic approaches that stimulate an immune response to tumours are gaining recognition. However tumours may evade the immune response and resist immune-targeted treatment by promoting an immune-suppressive environment and stimulating the differentiation or recruitment of immunosuppressive cells. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) have been identified in a range of cancers and are often associated with tumour progression and poor patient outcomes. Pancreatic cancer in particular supports MDSC differentiation via the secretion of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), and MDSC are believed to contribute to the profoundly immune-suppressive microenvironment present in pancreatic tumours. MDSC-targeted therapies that deplete or inhibit this cell population have been proposed as a way to shift the balance in favour of a tumour-clearing immune response. In this study, we have modelled MDSC differentiation and function in vitro and this has provided us with the opportunity to test a range of potential MDSC-targeted therapies to identify candidates for further investigation. Using in vitro modelling we show here that the combination of GM-CSF-signalling blockade and gemcitabine suppresses both the MDSC phenotype and the inhibition of T-cell function by MDSC. PMID:28090321

  18. Enhancement of Muscle T Regulatory Cells and Improvement of Muscular Dystrophic Process in mdx Mice by Blockade of Extracellular ATP/P2X Axis.

    PubMed

    Gazzerro, Elisabetta; Baldassari, Simona; Assereto, Stefania; Fruscione, Floriana; Pistorio, Angela; Panicucci, Chiara; Volpi, Stefano; Perruzza, Lisa; Fiorillo, Chiara; Minetti, Carlo; Traggiai, Elisabetta; Grassi, Fabio; Bruno, Claudio

    2015-12-01

    Infiltration of immune cells and chronic inflammation substantially affect skeletal and cardiac muscle degeneration in Duchenne muscular dystrophy. In the immune system, extracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) released by dying cells is sensed as a danger associated molecular pattern through P2 purinergic receptors. Specifically, the P2X7 subtype has a prominent role in regulating immune system physiology and contributes to inflammasome activation also in muscle cells. Here, we show that in vivo blockade of the extracellular ATP/P2X purinergic signaling pathway by periodate-oxidized ATP delayed the progression of the dystrophic phenotype and dampened the local inflammatory response in mdx mice, a spontaneous mouse model of dystrophin deficiency. Reduced infiltration of leukocytes and macrophages and decreased expression of IL-6 were revealed in the muscles of periodate-oxidized ATP-treated mdx mice. Concomitantly, an increase in Foxp3(+) immunosuppressive regulatory T cells was observed and correlated with enhanced myofiber regeneration. Moreover, we detected reduced concentrations of profibrotic cytokines, including transforming growth factor-β and connective tissue growth factor, in muscles of periodate-oxidized ATP-treated mdx mice. The improvement of inflammatory features was associated with increased strength and reduced necrosis, thus suggesting that pharmacologic purinergic antagonism altering the adaptive immune component in the muscle infiltrates might represent a promising therapeutic approach in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

  19. Pharmacological blockade of either cannabinoid CB1 or CB2 receptors prevents both cocaine-induced conditioned locomotion and cocaine-induced reduction of cell proliferation in the hippocampus of adult male rat.

    PubMed

    Blanco-Calvo, Eduardo; Rivera, Patricia; Arrabal, Sergio; Vargas, Antonio; Pavón, Francisco Javier; Serrano, Antonia; Castilla-Ortega, Estela; Galeano, Pablo; Rubio, Leticia; Suárez, Juan; Rodriguez de Fonseca, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Addiction to major drugs of abuse, such as cocaine, has recently been linked to alterations in adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus. The endogenous cannabinoid system modulates this proliferative response as demonstrated by the finding that pharmacological activation/blockade of cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors not only modulates neurogenesis but also modulates cell death in the brain. In the present study, we evaluated whether the endogenous cannabinoid system affects cocaine-induced alterations in cell proliferation. To this end, we examined whether pharmacological blockade of either CB1 (Rimonabant, 3 mg/kg) or CB2 receptors (AM630, 3 mg/kg) would affect cell proliferation [the cells were labeled with 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU)] in the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the lateral ventricle and the dentate subgranular zone (SGZ). Additionally, we measured cell apoptosis (as monitored by the expression of cleaved caspase-3) and glial activation [by analyzing the expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and Iba-1] in the striatum and hippocampus during acute and repeated (4 days) cocaine administration (20 mg/kg). The results showed that acute cocaine exposure decreased the number of BrdU-immunoreactive (ir) cells in the SVZ and SGZ. In contrast, repeated cocaine exposure reduced the number of BrdU-ir cells only in the SVZ. Both acute and repeated cocaine exposure increased the number of cleaved caspase-3-, GFAP- and Iba1-ir cells in the hippocampus, and this effect was counteracted by AM630 or Rimonabant, which increased the number of BrdU-, GFAP-, and Iba1-ir cells in the hippocampus. These results indicate that the changes in neurogenic, apoptotic and gliotic processes that were produced by repeated cocaine administration were normalized by pharmacological blockade of CB1 and CB2. The restorative effects of cannabinoid receptor blockade on hippocampal cell proliferation were associated with the prevention of the induction of conditioned locomotion

  20. Ca2+ signals mediated by bradykinin type 2 receptors in normal pancreatic stellate cells can be inhibited by specific Ca2+ channel blockade

    PubMed Central

    Gryshchenko, Oleksiy; Gerasimenko, Julia V.

    2015-01-01

    Key points Bradykinin may play a role in the autodigestive disease acute pancreatitis, but little is known about its pancreatic actions.In this study, we have investigated bradykinin‐elicited Ca2+ signal generation in normal mouse pancreatic lobules.We found complete separation of Ca2+ signalling between pancreatic acinar (PACs) and stellate cells (PSCs). Pathophysiologically relevant bradykinin concentrations consistently evoked Ca2+ signals, via B2 receptors, in PSCs but never in neighbouring PACs, whereas cholecystokinin, consistently evoking Ca2+ signals in PACs, never elicited Ca2+ signals in PSCs.The bradykinin‐elicited Ca2+ signals were due to initial Ca2+ release from inositol trisphosphate‐sensitive stores followed by Ca2+ entry through Ca2+ release‐activated channels (CRACs). The Ca2+ entry phase was effectively inhibited by a CRAC blocker.B2 receptor blockade reduced the extent of PAC necrosis evoked by pancreatitis‐promoting agents and we therefore conclude that bradykinin plays a role in acute pancreatitis via specific actions on PSCs. Abstract Normal pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) are regarded as quiescent, only to become activated in chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. However, we now report that these cells in their normal microenvironment are far from quiescent, but are capable of generating substantial Ca2+ signals. We have compared Ca2+ signalling in PSCs and their better studied neighbouring acinar cells (PACs) and found complete separation of Ca2+ signalling in even closely neighbouring PACs and PSCs. Bradykinin (BK), at concentrations corresponding to the slightly elevated plasma BK levels that have been shown to occur in the auto‐digestive disease acute pancreatitis in vivo, consistently elicited substantial Ca2+ signals in PSCs, but never in neighbouring PACs, whereas the physiological PAC stimulant cholecystokinin failed to evoke Ca2+ signals in PSCs. The BK‐induced Ca2+ signals were mediated by B2 receptors and B2

  1. Cocoa flavonoids attenuate high glucose-induced insulin signalling blockade and modulate glucose uptake and production in human HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Cordero-Herrera, Isabel; Martín, María Ángeles; Goya, Luis; Ramos, Sonia

    2014-02-01

    Insulin resistance is the primary characteristic of type 2 diabetes. Cocoa and its main flavanol, (-)-epicatechin (EC), display some antidiabetic effects, but the mechanisms for their preventive activities related to glucose metabolism and insulin signalling in the liver remain largely unknown. In the present work, the preventive effect of EC and a cocoa polyphenolic extract (CPE) on insulin signalling and on both glucose production and uptake are studied in insulin-responsive human HepG2 cells treated with high glucose. Pre-treatment of cells with EC or CPE reverted decreased tyrosine-phosphorylated and total levels of IR, IRS-1 and -2 triggered by high glucose. EC and CPE pre-treatment also prevented the inactivation of the PI3K/AKT pathway and AMPK, as well as the diminution of GLUT-2 levels induced by high glucose. Furthermore, pre-treatment of cells with EC and CPE avoided the increase in PEPCK levels and the diminished glucose uptake provoked by high glucose, returning enhanced levels of glucose production and decreased glycogen content to control values. These findings suggest that EC and CPE improved insulin sensitivity of HepG2 treated with high glucose, preventing or delaying a potential hepatic dysfunction through the attenuation of the insulin signalling blockade and the modulation of glucose uptake and production.

  2. Blockade of CCR7 leads to decreased dendritic cell migration to draining lymph nodes and promotes graft survival in low-risk corneal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Hos, D; Dörrie, J; Schaft, N; Bock, F; Notara, M; Kruse, F E; Krautwald, S; Cursiefen, C; Bachmann, B O

    2016-05-01

    The chemokine receptor CCR7 is essential for migration of mature dendritic cells (DCs) to the regional lymph nodes, and it has been shown that blocking of CCR7 improves graft survival after high-risk corneal transplantation in vascularized recipient corneas. However, it is so far unknown whether blocking of CCR7 reduces migration of DCs from the avascular cornea to the draining lymph nodes and whether this leads to improved graft survival also in the low-risk setting of corneal transplantation, which accounts for the majority of perforating transplantations performed. Therefore, in this study, pellets containing Freund's adjuvant and bovine serum albumin (BSA) conjugated to Alexa488 fluorescent dye were implanted into the corneal stroma of BALB/c mice to analyze antigen uptake by corneal DCs and their migration to the regional lymph nodes. After pellet implantation, mice were either treated by local administration of a CCR7 blocking fusion protein that consisted of CCL19 fused to the Fc part of human IgG1 or a control-IgG. In vivo fluorescence microscopy showed uptake of Alexa488-conjugated BSA by corneal DCs within 8 h. Furthermore, analysis of single cell suspensions of draining lymph nodes prepared after 48 h revealed that 2.1 ± 0.3% of CD11c(+) cells were also Alexa488(+). Importantly, DC migration was significantly reduced after topical administration of CCL19-IgG (1.2 ± 0.2%; p < 0.05). To test the effect of CCR7 blockade on graft rejection after allogeneic low-risk keratoplasty, corneal transplantations were performed using C57BL/6-mice as donors and BALB/c-mice as recipients. Treatment mice received two intraperitoneal loading doses of CCL19-IgG prior to transplantation, followed by local treatment with CCL19-IgG containing eye drops for the first two weeks after transplantation. Control mice received same amounts of control-IgG. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed that in the CCL19-IgG treated group, 76% of the grafts survived through the end

  3. Testing chemotherapeutic agents in the feather follicle identifies a selective blockade of cell proliferation and a key role for sonic hedgehog signaling in chemotherapy-induced tissue damage.

    PubMed

    Xie, Guojiang; Wang, Hangwei; Yan, Zhipeng; Cai, Linyan; Zhou, Guixuan; He, Wanzhong; Paus, Ralf; Yue, Zhicao

    2015-03-01

    Chemotherapeutic agents induce complex tissue responses in vivo and damage normal organ functions. Here we use the feather follicle to investigate details of this damage response. We show that cyclophosphamide treatment, which causes chemotherapy-induced alopecia in mice and man, induces distinct defects in feather formation: feather branching is transiently and reversibly disrupted, thus leaving a morphological record of the impact of chemotherapeutic agents, whereas the rachis (feather axis) remains unperturbed. Similar defects are observed in feathers treated with 5-fluorouracil or taxol but not with doxorubicin or arabinofuranosyl cytidine (Ara-C). Selective blockade of cell proliferation was seen in the feather branching area, along with a downregulation of sonic hedgehog (Shh) transcription, but not in the equally proliferative rachis. Local delivery of the Shh inhibitor, cyclopamine, or Shh silencing both recapitulated this effect. In mouse hair follicles, those chemotherapeutic agents that disrupted feather formation also downregulated Shh gene expression and induced hair loss, whereas doxorubicin or Ara-C did not. Our results reveal a mechanism through which chemotherapeutic agents damage rapidly proliferating epithelial tissue, namely via the cell population-specific, Shh-dependent inhibition of proliferation. This mechanism may be targeted by future strategies to manage chemotherapy-induced tissue damage.

  4. Loss of oxidative defense and potential blockade of satellite cell maturation in the skeletal muscle of patients with cancer but not in the healthy elderly

    PubMed Central

    Brzeszczyńska, Joanna; Johns, Neil; Schilb, Alain; Degen, Simone; Degen, Martin; Langen, Ramon; Schols, Annemie; Glass, David J; Roubenoff, Ronenn; Greig, Carolyn A.

    2016-01-01

    Muscle wasting in old age or cancer may result from failed myofiber regeneration and/or accelerated atrophy. This study aimed to determine from transcriptomic analysis of human muscle the integrity of the cellular stress response system in relation to satellite cell differentiation or apoptosis in patients with cancer (weight-stable (CWS) or weight-losing (CWL)) or healthy elderly (HE) when compared with healthy middle-aged controls (HMA). 28 patients with cancer (CWS: 18 and CWL: 10), HE: 21 and HMA: 20 underwent biopsy of quadriceps muscle. The expression of transcription factors for muscle regeneration (Pax3, Pax7 and MyoD) was increased in CWS and HE compared with HMA (p<0.001). In contrast, the expression of the late myogenic differentiation marker MyoG was reduced in CWS and CWL but increased in HE (p<0.0001). Bax was significantly increased in CWS, CWL and HE (P<0.0001). Expression of the oxidative defense genes SOD2, GCLM, and Nrf2 was decreased in CWS and CWL but increased in HE (p<0.0001). There is evidence for blockade of satellite cell maturation, upregulation of apoptosis and reduced oxidative defense in the muscle of cancer patients. In the healthy elderly the potential for differentiation and oxidative defense is maintained. PMID:27454226

  5. Loss of oxidative defense and potential blockade of satellite cell maturation in the skeletal muscle of patients with cancer but not in the healthy elderly.

    PubMed

    Brzeszczyńska, Joanna; Johns, Neil; Schilb, Alain; Degen, Simone; Degen, Martin; Langen, Ramon; Schols, Annemie; Glass, David J; Roubenoff, Ronenn; Greig, Carolyn A; Jacobi, Carsten; Fearon, Kenneth Ch; Ross, James A

    2016-08-01

    Muscle wasting in old age or cancer may result from failed myofiber regeneration and/or accelerated atrophy. This study aimed to determine from transcriptomic analysis of human muscle the integrity of the cellular stress response system in relation to satellite cell differentiation or apoptosis in patients with cancer (weight-stable (CWS) or weight-losing (CWL)) or healthy elderly (HE) when compared with healthy middle-aged controls (HMA). 28 patients with cancer (CWS: 18 and CWL: 10), HE: 21 and HMA: 20 underwent biopsy of quadriceps muscle. The expression of transcription factors for muscle regeneration (Pax3, Pax7 and MyoD) was increased in CWS and HE compared with HMA (p≤0.001). In contrast, the expression of the late myogenic differentiation marker MyoG was reduced in CWS and CWL but increased in HE (p≤0.0001). Bax was significantly increased in CWS, CWL and HE (p≤0.0001). Expression of the oxidative defense genes SOD2, GCLM, and Nrf2 was decreased in CWS and CWL but increased in HE (p≤0.0001). There is evidence for blockade of satellite cell maturation, upregulation of apoptosis and reduced oxidative defense in the muscle of cancer patients. In the healthy elderly the potential for differentiation and oxidative defense is maintained.

  6. Sprouty2 Suppresses Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition of Human Lens Epithelial Cells through Blockade of Smad2 and ERK1/2 Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chuan; Chen, Xiaoyun; Qin, Yingyan; Qu, Bo; Luo, Lixia; Lin, Haotian; Wu, Mingxing; Chen, Weirong; Liu, Yizhi

    2016-01-01

    Transforming growth factor β (TGFβ)-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of lens epithelial cells (LECs) plays a key role in the pathogenesis of anterior subcapsular cataract (ASC) and capsule opacification. In mouse lens, Sprouty2 (Spry2) has a negative regulatory role on TGFβ signaling. However, the regulation of Spry2 during ASC development and how Spry2 modulates TGFβ signaling pathway in human LECs have not been characterized. Here, we demonstrate that Spry2 expression level is decreased in anterior capsule LECs of ASC patients. Spry2 negatively regulates TGFβ2-induced EMT and migration of LECs through inhibition of Smad2 and ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Also, blockade of Smad2 or ERK1/2 activation suppresses EMT caused by Spry2 downregulation. Collectively, our results for the first time show in human LECs that Spry2 has an inhibitory role in TGFβ signaling pathway. Our findings in human lens tissue and epithelial cells suggest that Spry2 may become a novel therapeutic target for the prevention and treatment of ASC and capsule opacification. PMID:27415760

  7. [Cancer immunotherapy by immuno-checkpoint blockade].

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Yutaka

    2015-10-01

    As cancer immunotherapies utilizing anti-tumor T-cell responses, immuno-checkpoint blockade and adoptive T-cell immunotherapy have recently achieved durable responses even in advanced cancer patients with metastases. Administration of antibodies on the T-cell surface, CTLA-4 and PD-1 (or PD-1 ligand PD-L1), resulted in tumor regression of not only melanoma and renal cell cancer which were known to be relatively sensitive to immunotherapy, but also various malignancies including lung, bladder, ovarian, gastric, and head and neck cancers, as well as hematological malignancies such as Hodgkin and B-cell malignant lymphomas. These findings have changed the status of immunotherapy in the development of cancer treatments. Currently, development of combinations employing cancer immunotherapy with immuno-checkpoint blockade, as well as personalized cancer immunotherapy based on the evaluation of pretreatment immune status, are in progress.

  8. Rapid blockade of telomerase activity and tumor cell growth by the DPL lipofection of ribbon antisense to hTR.

    PubMed

    Bajpai, Arun K; Park, Jeong-Hoh; Moon, Ik-Jae; Kang, Hyungu; Lee, Yun-Han; Doh, Kyung-Oh; Suh, Seong-Il; Chang, Byeong-Churl; Park, Jong-Gu

    2005-09-29

    Ribbon antisense (RiAS) to the hTR RNA, a component of the telomerase complex, was employed to inhibit telomerase activity and cancer cell growth. The antisense molecule, hTR-RiAS, combined with enhanced cellular uptake was shown to effectively inhibit telomerase activity and cause rapid cell death in various cancer cell lines. When cancer cells were treated with hTR-RiAS, the level of hTR RNA was reduced by more than 90% accompanied with reduction in telomerase activity. When checked for cancer cell viability, cancer cell lines treated with hTR-RiAS using DNA+Peptide+Lipid complex showed 70-80% growth inhibition in 3 days. The reduced cell viability was due to apoptosis as the percentage of cells exhibiting the sub-G0 arrest and DNA fragmentation increased after antisense treatment. Further, when subcutaneous tumors of a colon cancer cell line (SW480) were treated intratumorally with hTR-RiAS, tumor growth was markedly suppressed with almost total ablation of hTR RNA in the tumor tissue. Cells in the tumor tissue were also found to undergo apoptosis after hTR-RiAS treatment. These results suggest that hTR-RiAS is an effective anticancer reagent, with a potential for broad efficacy to diverse malignant tumors.

  9. Chemical and genetic blockade of HDACs enhances osteogenic differentiation of human adipose tissue-derived stem cells by oppositely affecting osteogenic and adipogenic transcription factors

    SciTech Connect

    Maroni, Paola; Brini, Anna Teresa; Arrigoni, Elena; Girolamo, Laura de; Niada, Stefania; Matteucci, Emanuela; Bendinelli, Paola; Desiderio, Maria Alfonsina

    2012-11-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Acetylation affected hASCs osteodifferentiation through Runx2-PPAR{gamma}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HDACs knocking-down favoured the commitment effect of osteogenic medium. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HDACs silencing early activated Runx2 and ALP. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PPAR{gamma} reduction and calcium/collagen deposition occurred later. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Runx2/PPAR{gamma} target genes were modulated in line with HDACs role in osteo-commitment. -- Abstract: The human adipose-tissue derived stem/stromal cells (hASCs) are an interesting source for bone-tissue engineering applications. Our aim was to clarify in hASCs the role of acetylation in the control of Runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2) and Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR) {gamma}. These key osteogenic and adipogenic transcription factors are oppositely involved in osteo-differentiation. The hASCs, committed or not towards bone lineage with osteoinductive medium, were exposed to HDACs chemical blockade with Trichostatin A (TSA) or were genetically silenced for HDACs. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and collagen/calcium deposition, considered as early and late osteogenic markers, were evaluated concomitantly as index of osteo-differentiation. TSA pretreatment, useful experimental protocol to analyse pan-HDAC-chemical inhibition, and switch to osteogenic medium induced early-osteoblast maturation gene Runx2, while transiently decreased PPAR{gamma} and scarcely affected late-differentiation markers. Time-dependent effects were observed after knocking-down of HDAC1 and 3: Runx2 and ALP underwent early activation, followed by late-osteogenic markers increase and by PPAR{gamma}/ALP activity diminutions mostly after HDAC3 silencing. HDAC1 and 3 genetic blockade increased and decreased Runx2 and PPAR{gamma} target genes, respectively. Noteworthy, HDACs knocking-down favoured the commitment effect of osteogenic medium. Our results reveal

  10. Double Blockade of Glioma Cell Proliferation and Migration by Temozolomide Conjugated with NPPB, a Chloride Channel Blocker.

    PubMed

    Park, Miri; Song, Chiman; Yoon, Hojong; Choi, Kee-Hyun

    2016-03-16

    Glioblastoma is the most common and aggressive primary malignant brain tumor. Temozolomide (TMZ), a chemotherapeutic agent combined with radiation therapy, is used as a standard treatment. The infiltrative nature of glioblastoma, however, interrupts effective treatment with TMZ and increases the tendency to relapse. Voltage-gated chloride channels have been identified as crucial regulators of glioma cell migration and invasion by mediating cell shape and volume change. Accordingly, chloride current inhibition by 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)-benzoate (NPPB), a chloride channel blocker, suppresses cell movement by diminishing the osmotic cell volume regulation. In this study, we developed a novel compound, TMZ conjugated with NPPB (TMZ-NPPB), as a potential anticancer drug. TMZ-NPPB blocked chloride currents in U373MG, a severely invasive human glioma cell line, and suppressed migration and invasion of U373MG cells. Moreover, TMZ-NPPB exhibited DNA modification activity similar to that of TMZ, and surprisingly showed remarkably enhanced cytotoxicity relative to TMZ by inducing apoptotic cell death via DNA damage. These findings indicate that TMZ-NPPB has a dual function in blocking both proliferation and migration of human glioma cells, thereby suggesting its potential to overcome challenges in current glioblastoma therapy.

  11. Blockade of Tumor Cell TGF-Betas: A Strategy to Reverse Antiestrogen Resistance in Human Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-01

    expression of FasL (Genestier et al., 1999). In metastatic progression of carcinomas. Transfection of dom- PC12 cells, removal of nerve growth factor...Dr. Lynn Cross (National Institutes of cells that had migrated through pores and reattached to the lower Health, Bethesda, MD). A plasmid vector

  12. Cancer immunology. Mutational landscape determines sensitivity to PD-1 blockade in non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Rizvi, Naiyer A; Hellmann, Matthew D; Snyder, Alexandra; Kvistborg, Pia; Makarov, Vladimir; Havel, Jonathan J; Lee, William; Yuan, Jianda; Wong, Phillip; Ho, Teresa S; Miller, Martin L; Rekhtman, Natasha; Moreira, Andre L; Ibrahim, Fawzia; Bruggeman, Cameron; Gasmi, Billel; Zappasodi, Roberta; Maeda, Yuka; Sander, Chris; Garon, Edward B; Merghoub, Taha; Wolchok, Jedd D; Schumacher, Ton N; Chan, Timothy A

    2015-04-03

    Immune checkpoint inhibitors, which unleash a patient's own T cells to kill tumors, are revolutionizing cancer treatment. To unravel the genomic determinants of response to this therapy, we used whole-exome sequencing of non-small cell lung cancers treated with pembrolizumab, an antibody targeting programmed cell death-1 (PD-1). In two independent cohorts, higher nonsynonymous mutation burden in tumors was associated with improved objective response, durable clinical benefit, and progression-free survival. Efficacy also correlated with the molecular smoking signature, higher neoantigen burden, and DNA repair pathway mutations; each factor was also associated with mutation burden. In one responder, neoantigen-specific CD8+ T cell responses paralleled tumor regression, suggesting that anti-PD-1 therapy enhances neoantigen-specific T cell reactivity. Our results suggest that the genomic landscape of lung cancers shapes response to anti-PD-1 therapy.

  13. Synthetic tambjamine analogues induce mitochondrial swelling and lysosomal dysfunction leading to autophagy blockade and necrotic cell death in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Rodilla, Ananda M; Korrodi-Gregório, Luís; Hernando, Elsa; Manuel-Manresa, Pilar; Quesada, Roberto; Pérez-Tomás, Ricardo; Soto-Cerrato, Vanessa

    2017-02-15

    Current pharmacological treatments for lung cancer show very poor clinical outcomes, therefore, the development of novel anticancer agents with innovative mechanisms of action is urgently needed. Cancer cells have a reversed pH gradient compared to normal cells, which favours cancer progression by promoting proliferation, metabolic adaptation and evasion of apoptosis. In this regard, the use of ionophores to modulate intracellular pH appears as a promising new therapeutic strategy. Indeed, there is a growing body of evidence supporting ionophores as novel antitumour drugs. Despite this, little is known about the implications of pH deregulation and homeostasis imbalance triggered by ionophores at the cellular level. In this work, we deeply analyse for the first time the anticancer effects of tambjamine analogues, a group of highly effective anion selective ionophores, at the cellular and molecular levels. First, their effects on cell viability were determined in several lung cancer cell lines and patient-derived cancer stem cells, demonstrating their potent cytotoxic effects. Then, we have characterized the induced lysosomal deacidification, as well as, the massive cytoplasmic vacuolization observed after treatment with these compounds, which is consistent with mitochondrial swelling. Finally, the activation of several proteins involved in stress response, autophagy and apoptosis was also detected, although they were not significantly responsible for the cell death induced. Altogether, these evidences suggest that tambjamine analogues provoke an imbalance in cellular ion homeostasis that triggers mitochondrial dysfunction and lysosomal deacidification leading to a potent cytotoxic effect through necrosis in lung cancer cell lines and cancer stem cells.

  14. Compound C induces protective autophagy in cancer cells through AMPK inhibition-independent blockade of Akt/mTOR pathway.

    PubMed

    Vucicevic, Ljubica; Misirkic, Maja; Janjetovic, Kristina; Vilimanovich, Urosh; Sudar, Emina; Isenovic, Esma; Prica, Marko; Harhaji-Trajkovic, Ljubica; Kravic-Stevovic, Tamara; Bumbasirevic, Vladimir; Trajkovic, Vladimir

    2011-01-01

    In the present study, we report that compound C, an inhibitor of a key intracellular energy sensor AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), can induce autophagy in cancer cells. The induction of autophagy in U251 human glioma cell line was demonstrated by acridine orange staining of intracellular acidic vesicles, Beclin 1 induction, p62 decrease and conversion of LC3-I to autophagosome-associated LC3-II in the presence of proteolysis inhibitors. The presence of autophagosome-like vesicles was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy. Compound C-mediated inhibition of AMPK and raptor in U251 cells was associated with paradoxical decrease in phosphorylation of AMPK/raptor-repressed mTOR, a major negative regulator of autophagy, and its downstream target p70S6K. The phosphorylation of an mTOR activator Akt and the PI3K-activating kinase Src was also impaired in compound C-treated cells. The siRNA-mediated AMPK silencing did not reduce the activity of the Akt/mTOR/p70S6K pathway and AMPK activators metformin and AIC AR failed to block compound C-induced autophagy. Autophagy inhibitors bafilomycin and chloroquine significantly increased the cytotoxicity of compound C towards U251 cells, as confirmed by increase in lactate dehydrogenase release, DNA fragmentation and caspase-3 activation. Similar effects of compound C were also observed in C6 rat glioma, L929 mouse fibrosarcoma and B16 mouse melanoma cell lines. Since compound C has previously been reported to suppress AMPK-dependent autophagy in different cell types, our findings suggest that the effects of compound C on autophagy might be dose-, cell type- and/or context-dependent. By demonstrating the ability of compound C to induce autophagic response in cancer cells via AMPK inhibition-independent downregulation of Akt/mTOR pathway, our results warrant caution when using compound C to inhibit AMPK-dependent cellular responses, but also support further exploration of compound C and related molecules as potential

  15. Lysosomal dysfunction and autophagy blockade contribute to IMB-6G-induced apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lu; Zhang, Na; Dou, Yueying; Mao, Genxiang; Bi, Chongwen; Pang, Weiqiang; Liu, Xiaojia; Song, Danqing; Deng, Hongbin

    2017-01-01

    Targeting the autophagic pathway is currently regarded as an attractive strategy for cancer drug discovery. Our previous work showed that IMB-6G is a novel N-substituted sophoridinic acid derivative with potent cytotoxicity against tumor cells, yet the effect of IMB-6G on autophagy and pancreatic cancer cell death remains unknown. Here, we show that IMB-6G inhibits the growth of MiaPaCa-2 and HupT-3 pancreatic cancer cells and induces caspase-mediated apoptosis, which is correlated with an accumulation of autophagic vacuoles. IMB-6G promotes autophagosome accumulation from the early stage of treatment but blocks autophagic flux in the degradation stage, mainly through attenuation of lysosomal cathepsin activity in pancreatic cancer cells. Moreover, IMB-6G triggers lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP), followed by cathepsin B/CTSB and cathepsin D/CTSD release from lysosomes into the cytoplasm. Inhibition of autophagosome formation with siRNA against autophagy protein 5 (Atg5) attenuates IMB-6G-induced LMP and apoptosis. Furthermore, cathepsin inhibitors relieve IMB-6G-induced apoptosis as well. Altogether, our findings demonstrate that IMB-6G is a novel autophagy inhibitor, which induces autophagy-dependent apoptosis through autophagosomal-cathepsin axis in pancreatic cancer cells and indicate the potential value of IMB-6G as a novel antitumor drug candidate. PMID:28139733

  16. Adrenomedullin blockade suppresses sunitinib-resistant renal cell carcinoma growth by targeting the ERK/MAPK pathway

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Qingsong; Zhang, Ming; Wang, Xin; Jia, Jianghua; Yang, Shuwen; Qu, Changbao; Li, Wei; Wang, Dongbin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the mechanisms underlying sunitinib resistance in RCC and to identify targets that may be used to overcome this resistance. Results Reanalysis of transcriptome microarray datasets (GSE64052 and GSE76068) showed that adrenomedullin expression was increased in sunitinib-resistant tumors. And adrenomedullin expression was increased in sunitinib-resistant tumor xenografts, accompanied by upregulation of phospho-ERK levels. However, blocking adrenomedullin inhibited sunitinib-resistant tumor growth. Treatment of RCC cells with sunitinib and ADM22-52 was superior to monotherapy with either agent. Additionally, adrenomedullin upregulated cAMP and activated the ERK/MAPK pathway, promoting cell proliferation, while knockdown of adrenomedullin inhibited RCC cell growth and invasion in vitro. Materials and methods We searched the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database to find data regarding sunitinib-resistant RCC. These data were subsequently reanalyzed to identify targets that contribute to sunitinib resistance, and adrenomedullin upregulation was found to mediate sunitinib resistance in RCC. Then, we created an RCC mouse xenograft model. Mice were treated with sunitinib, an adrenomedullin receptor antagonist (ADM22-52), a MEK inhibitor (PD98059) and different combinations of these three drugs to investigate their effects on tumor growth. RCC cells (786-0) were cultured in vitro and treated with an ADM22-52 or PD98059 to determine whether adrenomedullin activates the ERK/MAPK pathway. Adrenomedullin was knocked down in 786-0 cells via siRNA, and the effects of this knockdown on cell were subsequently investigated. Conclusions Adrenomedullin plays an important role in RCC resistance to sunitinib treatment. The combination of sunitinib and an adrenomedullin receptor antagonist may result in better outcomes in advanced RCC patients. PMID:27556517

  17. Embryonic GABA(B) receptor blockade alters cell migration, adult hypothalamic structure, and anxiety- and depression-like behaviors sex specifically in mice.

    PubMed

    Stratton, Matthew S; Staros, Michelle; Budefeld, Tomaz; Searcy, Brian T; Nash, Connor; Eitel, Chad; Carbone, David; Handa, Robert J; Majdic, Gregor; Tobet, Stuart A

    2014-01-01

    Neurons of the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) regulate the hypothalamic- pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and the autonomic nervous system. Females lacking functional GABA(B) receptors because of a genetic disruption of the R1 subunit have altered cellular characteristics in and around the PVN at birth. The genetic disruption precluded appropriate assessments of physiology or behavior in adulthood. The current study was conducted to test the long term impact of a temporally restricting pharmacological blockade of the GABA(B) receptor to a 7-day critical period (E11-E17) during embryonic development. Experiments tested the role of GABA(B) receptor signaling in fetal development of the PVN and later adult capacities for adult stress related behaviors and physiology. In organotypic slices containing fetal PVN, there was a female specific, 52% increase in cell movement speeds with GABA(B) receptor antagonist treatment that was consistent with a sex-dependent lateral displacement of cells in vivo following 7 days of fetal exposure to GABA(B) receptor antagonist. Anxiety-like and depression-like behaviors, open-field activity, and HPA mediated responses to restraint stress were measured in adult offspring of mothers treated with GABA(B) receptor antagonist. Embryonic exposure to GABA(B) receptor antagonist resulted in reduced HPA axis activation following restraint stress and reduced depression-like behaviors. There was also increased anxiety-like behavior selectively in females and hyperactivity in males. A sex dependent response to disruptions of GABA(B) receptor signaling was identified for PVN formation and key aspects of physiology and behavior. These changes correspond to sex specific prevalence in similar human disorders, namely anxiety disorders and hyperactivity.

  18. Embryonic GABAB Receptor Blockade Alters Cell Migration, Adult Hypothalamic Structure, and Anxiety- and Depression-Like Behaviors Sex Specifically in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Stratton, Matthew S.; Staros, Michelle; Budefeld, Tomaz; Searcy, Brian T.; Nash, Connor; Eitel, Chad; Carbone, David; Handa, Robert J.; Majdic, Gregor; Tobet, Stuart A.

    2014-01-01

    Neurons of the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) regulate the hypothalamic- pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and the autonomic nervous system. Females lacking functional GABAB receptors because of a genetic disruption of the R1 subunit have altered cellular characteristics in and around the PVN at birth. The genetic disruption precluded appropriate assessments of physiology or behavior in adulthood. The current study was conducted to test the long term impact of a temporally restricting pharmacological blockade of the GABAB receptor to a 7-day critical period (E11–E17) during embryonic development. Experiments tested the role of GABAB receptor signaling in fetal development of the PVN and later adult capacities for adult stress related behaviors and physiology. In organotypic slices containing fetal PVN, there was a female specific, 52% increase in cell movement speeds with GABAB receptor antagonist treatment that was consistent with a sex-dependent lateral displacement of cells in vivo following 7 days of fetal exposure to GABAB receptor antagonist. Anxiety-like and depression-like behaviors, open-field activity, and HPA mediated responses to restraint stress were measured in adult offspring of mothers treated with GABAB receptor antagonist. Embryonic exposure to GABAB receptor antagonist resulted in reduced HPA axis activation following restraint stress and reduced depression-like behaviors. There was also increased anxiety-like behavior selectively in females and hyperactivity in males. A sex dependent response to disruptions of GABAB receptor signaling was identified for PVN formation and key aspects of physiology and behavior. These changes correspond to sex specific prevalence in similar human disorders, namely anxiety disorders and hyperactivity. PMID:25162235

  19. Protection by imidazol(ine) drugs and agmatine of glutamate-induced neurotoxicity in cultured cerebellar granule cells through blockade of NMDA receptor

    PubMed Central

    Olmos, Gabriel; DeGregorio-Rocasolano, Nuria; Regalado, M Paz; Gasull, Teresa; Boronat, M Assumpció; Trullas, Ramón; Villarroel, Alvaro; Lerma, Juan; García-Sevilla, Jesús A

    1999-01-01

    neuroprotective against glutamate-induced necrotic neuronal cell death in vitro and that this effect is mediated through NMDA receptor blockade by interacting with a site located within the NMDA channel pore. PMID:10455281

  20. Kaempferol Inhibits Pancreatic Cancer Cell Growth and Migration through the Blockade of EGFR-Related Pathway In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jungwhoi; Kim, Jae Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most appalling cancers with a pessimistic prognosis. Despite many therapies, there has been no improvement of survival rates. In this study, we assessed the anti-cancer effects of kaempferol, a well known flavonoid having functional bio-activity against various malignant tumors. Kaempferol had anti-cancer effects on Miapaca-2, Panc-1, and SNU-213 human pancreatic cancer cells. In a dose-dependent manner, kaempferol decreased viability of these pancreatic cancer cells by increasing apoptosis. In particular, kaempferol effectively inhibited the migratory activity of human pancreatic cancer cells at relatively low dosages without any toxicity. The anti-cancer effect of kaempferol was mediated by inhibition of EGFR related Src, ERK1/2, and AKT pathways. These results collectively indicate that kaempferol, a phytochemical ingredient reported to have anti-viability and anti-oxidant properties, can act as a safety anti-migration reagent in human pancreatic cancer cells, which provide the rationale for further investigation of kaempferol as a strong candidate for the potential clinical trial of malignant pancreatic cancers. PMID:27175782

  1. Kaempferol Inhibits Pancreatic Cancer Cell Growth and Migration through the Blockade of EGFR-Related Pathway In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jungwhoi; Kim, Jae Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most appalling cancers with a pessimistic prognosis. Despite many therapies, there has been no improvement of survival rates. In this study, we assessed the anti-cancer effects of kaempferol, a well known flavonoid having functional bio-activity against various malignant tumors. Kaempferol had anti-cancer effects on Miapaca-2, Panc-1, and SNU-213 human pancreatic cancer cells. In a dose-dependent manner, kaempferol decreased viability of these pancreatic cancer cells by increasing apoptosis. In particular, kaempferol effectively inhibited the migratory activity of human pancreatic cancer cells at relatively low dosages without any toxicity. The anti-cancer effect of kaempferol was mediated by inhibition of EGFR related Src, ERK1/2, and AKT pathways. These results collectively indicate that kaempferol, a phytochemical ingredient reported to have anti-viability and anti-oxidant properties, can act as a safety anti-migration reagent in human pancreatic cancer cells, which provide the rationale for further investigation of kaempferol as a strong candidate for the potential clinical trial of malignant pancreatic cancers.

  2. CXCR4 blockade augments bone marrow progenitor cell recruitment to the neovasculature and reduces mortality after myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Jujo, Kentaro; Hamada, Hiromichi; Iwakura, Atsushi; Thorne, Tina; Sekiguchi, Haruki; Clarke, Trevor; Ito, Aiko; Misener, Sol; Tanaka, Toshikazu; Klyachko, Ekaterina; Kobayashi, Koichi; Tongers, Jörn; Roncalli, Jérôme; Tsurumi, Yukio; Hagiwara, Nobuhisa; Losordo, Douglas W

    2010-06-15

    We hypothesized that a small molecule CXCR4 antagonist, AMD3100 (AMD), could augment the mobilization of bone marrow (BM)-derived endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), thereby enhancing neovascularization and functional recovery after myocardial infarction. Single-dose AMD injection administered after the onset of myocardial infarction increased circulating EPC counts and myocardial vascularity, reduced fibrosis, and improved cardiac function and survival. In mice transplanted with traceable BM cells, AMD increased BM-derived cell incorporation in the ischemic border zone. In contrast, continuous infusion of AMD, although increasing EPCs in the circulation, worsened outcome by blocking EPC incorporation. In addition to its effects as a CXCR4 antagonist, AMD also up-regulated VEGF and matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) expression, and the benefits of AMD were not observed in the absence of MMP-9 expression in the BM. These findings suggest that AMD3100 preserves cardiac function after myocardial infarction by enhancing BM-EPC-mediated neovascularization, and that these benefits require MMP-9 expression in the BM, but not in the ischemic region. Our results indicate that AMD3100 could be a potentially useful therapy for the treatment of myocardial infarction.

  3. Activity blockade and GABAA receptor blockade produce synaptic scaling through chloride accumulation in embryonic spinal motoneurons and interneurons.

    PubMed

    Lindsly, Casie; Gonzalez-Islas, Carlos; Wenner, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Synaptic scaling represents a process whereby the distribution of a cell's synaptic strengths are altered by a multiplicative scaling factor. Scaling is thought to be a compensatory response that homeostatically controls spiking activity levels in the cell or network. Previously, we observed GABAergic synaptic scaling in embryonic spinal motoneurons following in vivo blockade of either spiking activity or GABAA receptors (GABAARs). We had determined that activity blockade triggered upward GABAergic scaling through chloride accumulation, thus increasing the driving force for these currents. To determine whether chloride accumulation also underlies GABAergic scaling following GABAAR blockade we have developed a new technique. We expressed a genetically encoded chloride-indicator, Clomeleon, in the embryonic chick spinal cord, which provides a non-invasive fast measure of intracellular chloride. Using this technique we now show that chloride accumulation underlies GABAergic scaling following blockade of either spiking activity or the GABAAR. The finding that GABAAR blockade and activity blockade trigger scaling via a common mechanism supports our hypothesis that activity blockade reduces GABAAR activation, which triggers synaptic scaling. In addition, Clomeleon imaging demonstrated the time course and widespread nature of GABAergic scaling through chloride accumulation, as it was also observed in spinal interneurons. This suggests that homeostatic scaling via chloride accumulation is a common feature in many neuronal classes within the embryonic spinal cord and opens the possibility that this process may occur throughout the nervous system at early stages of development.

  4. Blockade of the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase-Akt signaling pathway enhances the induction of apoptosis by microtubule-destabilizing agents in tumor cells in which the pathway is constitutively activated.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Yusuke; Hosokawa, Yoshihisa; Watanabe, Kazushi; Tanimura, Susumu; Ozaki, Kei-ichi; Kohno, Michiaki

    2007-03-01

    Constitutive activation of the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)-Akt signaling pathway is associated with the neoplastic phenotype in many human tumor cell types. Given the antiapoptotic role of this pathway, we examined whether its specific blockade might sensitize human tumor cells to the induction of apoptosis by various anticancer drugs. Although specific blockade of the PI3K-Akt pathway alone with inhibitors such as LY294002 did not induce cell death, it resulted in marked and selective enhancement of the induction of apoptosis by microtubule-destabilizing agents such as vincristine. This effect was apparent only in tumor cells in which the PI3K-Akt pathway is constitutively activated. Blockade of the PI3K-Akt pathway induced the activation of glycogen synthase kinase-3beta, which phosphorylates microtubule-associated proteins such as tau and thereby reduces their ability to bind and stabilize microtubules. The consequent destabilization of microtubules induced by the inhibition of PI3K-Akt signaling appeared to increase their sensitivity to low concentrations of microtubule-destabilizing agents that alone do not lead to the disruption of cytoplasmic microtubules in tumor cells. Such a synergistic effect on microtubule integrity was not apparent for stable microtubules in the neurites of neuronal cells. These results suggest that the administration of a combination of a PI3K-Akt pathway inhibitor and a microtubule-destabilizing agent is a potential chemotherapeutic strategy for the treatment of tumor cells in which this signaling pathway is constitutively activated.

  5. Pharmacological blockade of either cannabinoid CB1 or CB2 receptors prevents both cocaine-induced conditioned locomotion and cocaine-induced reduction of cell proliferation in the hippocampus of adult male rat

    PubMed Central

    Blanco-Calvo, Eduardo; Rivera, Patricia; Arrabal, Sergio; Vargas, Antonio; Pavón, Francisco Javier; Serrano, Antonia; Castilla-Ortega, Estela; Galeano, Pablo; Rubio, Leticia; Suárez, Juan; Rodriguez de Fonseca, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Addiction to major drugs of abuse, such as cocaine, has recently been linked to alterations in adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus. The endogenous cannabinoid system modulates this proliferative response as demonstrated by the finding that pharmacological activation/blockade of cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors not only modulates neurogenesis but also modulates cell death in the brain. In the present study, we evaluated whether the endogenous cannabinoid system affects cocaine-induced alterations in cell proliferation. To this end, we examined whether pharmacological blockade of either CB1 (Rimonabant, 3 mg/kg) or CB2 receptors (AM630, 3 mg/kg) would affect cell proliferation [the cells were labeled with 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU)] in the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the lateral ventricle and the dentate subgranular zone (SGZ). Additionally, we measured cell apoptosis (as monitored by the expression of cleaved caspase-3) and glial activation [by analyzing the expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and Iba-1] in the striatum and hippocampus during acute and repeated (4 days) cocaine administration (20 mg/kg). The results showed that acute cocaine exposure decreased the number of BrdU-immunoreactive (ir) cells in the SVZ and SGZ. In contrast, repeated cocaine exposure reduced the number of BrdU-ir cells only in the SVZ. Both acute and repeated cocaine exposure increased the number of cleaved caspase-3-, GFAP- and Iba1-ir cells in the hippocampus, and this effect was counteracted by AM630 or Rimonabant, which increased the number of BrdU-, GFAP-, and Iba1-ir cells in the hippocampus. These results indicate that the changes in neurogenic, apoptotic and gliotic processes that were produced by repeated cocaine administration were normalized by pharmacological blockade of CB1 and CB2. The restorative effects of cannabinoid receptor blockade on hippocampal cell proliferation were associated with the prevention of the induction of conditioned

  6. Differential blockade of agonist- and depolarization-induced sup 45 Ca2+ influx in smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wallnoefer, A.C.; Cauvin, C.; Lategan, T.W.; Rueegg, U.T. )

    1989-10-01

    ATP stimulated {sup 45}Ca2+ influx in rat aortic smooth muscle cells in a concentration-dependent manner (EC50 = 3.6 +/- 0.5 X 10(-7) M). ADP and GTP were less effective than ATP in stimulating {sup 45}Ca2+ influx; AMP was weakly active and the adenosine agonist 5'-(N-ethyl-carboxamido)-adenosine (NECA) had no effect. ATP gamma S was about equieffective with ATP, whereas alpha,beta-methylene-ATP (APCPP) did not induce {sup 45}Ca2+ influx. Stimulation of {sup 45}Ca2+ influx by ATP was not abolished by the dihydropyridine Ca2+ channel antagonist darodipine (PY 108-068), which completely blocked depolarization-induced {sup 45}Ca2+ influx. Inorganic cations (La3+, Cd2+, Co2+, Ni2+, Mn2+, and Mg2+) were able to inhibit both agonist- and depolarization-induced {sup 45}Ca2+ influx. Cd2+, however, was approximately 20 times more selective in blocking K+-stimulated than agonist-stimulated {sup 45}Ca2+ influx. These data indicate that ATP-stimulated Ca2+ influx in rat aortic smooth muscle cells is resistant to darodipine but is reduced by La3+, Cd2+, and other inorganic blockers of Ca2+ channels.

  7. Glycine transporter type 1 blockade changes NMDA receptor-mediated responses and LTP in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells by altering extracellular glycine levels

    PubMed Central

    Martina, Marzia; Gorfinkel, Yelena; Halman, Samantha; Lowe, John A; Periyalwar, Pranav; Schmidt, Christopher J; Bergeron, Richard

    2004-01-01

    Long-term potentiation (LTP) in the hippocampal CA1 region requires the activation of NMDA receptors (NMDARs). NMDAR activation in turn requires membrane depolarization as well as the binding of glutamate and its coagonist glycine. Previous pharmacological studies suggest that the glycine transporter type 1 (GlyT1) maintains subsaturating concentrations of glycine at synaptic NMDARs. Antagonists of GlyT1 increase levels of glycine in the synaptic cleft and, like direct glycine site agonists, can augment NMDAR currents and NMDAR-mediated functions such as LTP. In addition, stimulation of the glycine site initiates signalling through the NMDAR complex, priming the receptors for clathrin-dependent endocytosis. We have used a new potent GlyT1 antagonist, CP-802,079, with whole-cell patch-clamp recordings in acute rat hippocampal slices to determine the effect of GlyT1 blockade on LTP. Reverse microdialysis experiments in the hippocampus of awake, freely moving rats, showed that this drug elevated only the extracellular concentration of glycine. We found that CP-802,079, sarcosine and glycine significantly increased the amplitude of the NMDAR currents and LTP. In contrast, application of higher concentrations of CP-802,079 and glycine slightly reduced NMDAR currents and did not increase LTP. Overall, these data suggest that the level of glycine present in the synaptic cleft tightly regulates the NMDAR activity. This level is kept below the ‘set point’ of the NMDAR internalization priming mechanism by the presence of GlyT1-dependent uptake. PMID:15064326

  8. Blockade of Ets-1 attenuates epidermal growth factor-dependent collagen loss in human carotid plaque smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Rao, Velidi H; Rai, Vikrant; Stoupa, Samantha; Agrawal, Devendra K

    2015-09-15

    Although degradation of extracellular matrix by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) is thought to be involved in symptomatic (S) carotid plaques in atherosclerosis, the mechanisms of MMP expression are poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that collagen loss in vascular smooth vessel cells (VSMCs) isolated from S plaques was induced by epidermal growth factor (EGF) through the activation of p38-MAPK and JNK-MAPK pathways. Inhibitors of p38-MAPK and JNK-MAPK signaling pathways downregulated the expression of MMP-1 and MMP-9. In addition, we examined whether v-ets erythroblastosis virus E26 oncogene homologue 1 (Ets-1), an important regulator of different genes, is involved in destabilizing S plaques in patients with carotid stenosis. We demonstrate that EGF induces Ets-1 expression and decreases interstitial and basement membrane collagen in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) from patients with carotid stenosis. Increased expression of MMP-1 and -9 and decreased collagen mRNA transcripts were also found in Ets-1-overexpressed VSMCs. Transfection with both dominant-negative form of Ets-1 and small interfering RNA blocked EGF-induced MMP-1 and -9 expressions and increased the mRNA transcripts for collagen I (α1) and collagen III (α1) in S compared with asymptomatic (AS) carotid plaques. Inhibitors of p38-MAPK (SB202190) and JNK-MAPK (SP600125) signaling pathways decreased the expression of Ets-1, MMP-1, and MMP-9 and increased collagen type I and III expression in EGF-treated VSMCs. This study provides a mechanistic insight into the role of Ets-1 in the plaque destabilization in patients with carotid stenosis involving p38-MAPK and JNK signaling pathways.

  9. Traceable Coulomb blockade thermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahtela, O.; Mykkänen, E.; Kemppinen, A.; Meschke, M.; Prunnila, M.; Gunnarsson, D.; Roschier, L.; Penttilä, J.; Pekola, J.

    2017-02-01

    We present a measurement and analysis scheme for determining traceable thermodynamic temperature at cryogenic temperatures using Coulomb blockade thermometry. The uncertainty of the electrical measurement is improved by utilizing two sampling digital voltmeters instead of the traditional lock-in technique. The remaining uncertainty is dominated by that of the numerical analysis of the measurement data. Two analysis methods are demonstrated: numerical fitting of the full conductance curve and measuring the height of the conductance dip. The complete uncertainty analysis shows that using either analysis method the relative combined standard uncertainty (k  =  1) in determining the thermodynamic temperature in the temperature range from 20 mK to 200 mK is below 0.5%. In this temperature range, both analysis methods produced temperature estimates that deviated from 0.39% to 0.67% from the reference temperatures provided by a superconducting reference point device calibrated against the Provisional Low Temperature Scale of 2000.

  10. Age-related changes in the gene expression profile of antigen-specific mouse CD8+ T cells can be partially reversed by blockade of the BTLA/CD160 pathways during vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Dawany, Noor; Parzych, Elizabeth M; Showe, Louise C; Ertl, Hildegund CJ

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed gene expression profiles of young and aged mouse CD8+ T cells specific for the nucleoprotein (NP) of influenza A/PR8/34 virus. CD8+ T cells were stimulated either by the NP antigen expressed in its native form or fused into the herpes virus (HSV)-1 glycoprotein D (gD) protein, which blocks signaling through the immunoinhibitory B and T lymphocyte attenuator (BTLA) and CD160 pathways. We show that NP-specific CD8+ T cells from aged mice exhibit numerous differences in gene expression compared to NP-specific CD8+ T cells from young mice, including a significant reduction of expression in genes involved in T cell receptor (TcR) and CD28 signaling. We also show that these changes can be reversed in a sub-population (∼50%) of the aged mice by a BTLA/CD160 checkpoint blockade. These results suggest that BTLA/CD160 checkpoint blockade has potential value as a vaccine additive to induce better CD8+ T cell responses in the aged. PMID:27922818

  11. Kupffer-phase findings of hepatic hemangiomas in contrast-enhanced ultrasound with sonazoid.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Katsutoshi; Moriyasu, Fuminori; Saito, Kazuhiro; Yoshiara, Hiroki; Imai, Yasuharu

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess quantitatively the Kupffer-phase enhancement patterns of hepatic hemangiomas in contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) with Sonazoid. A total of 46 patients with 46 hepatic hemangiomas (17.1 ± 6.2 mm in diameter, 34 typical type and 12 high-flow type) underwent CEUS in the Kupffer phase. The lesion-to-liver contrast ratio in the Kupffer phase was quantitatively assessed for both types of hemangioma. Most of the hepatic hemangiomas, whether or not they were the high-flow type, were iso- to hypo-echoic relative to the surrounding liver parenchyma. The contrast ratio was -5.33 ± 6.70 dB for the high-flow hemangiomas and -4.54 ± 6.28 dB for the typical hemangiomas. There was no significant difference in contrast ratio between the two types of lesions (p = 0.73). All of the hemangiomas, whether of typical or high-flow type, are iso- to hypo-echoic relative to the surrounding liver parenchyma on Kupffer-phase imaging.

  12. Radiotherapy and immune checkpoint blockades: a snapshot in 2016

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Taeryool; Kim, In Ah

    2016-01-01

    Immune checkpoint blockades including monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) of cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4), programmed death-1 (PD-1), and programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) have been emerged as a promising anticancer therapy. Several immune checkpoint blockades have been approved by US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and have shown notable success in clinical trials for patients with advanced melanoma and non-small cell lung cancer. Radiotherapy is a promising combination partner of immune checkpoint blockades due to its potent pro-immune effect. This review will cover the current issue and the future perspectives for combined with radiotherapy and immune checkpoint blockades based upon the available preclinical and clinical data. PMID:28030901

  13. Blockade of the PD-1/PD-L1 axis augments lysis of AML cells by the CD33/CD3 BiTE antibody construct AMG 330: reversing a T-cell-induced immune escape mechanism.

    PubMed

    Krupka, C; Kufer, P; Kischel, R; Zugmaier, G; Lichtenegger, F S; Köhnke, T; Vick, B; Jeremias, I; Metzeler, K H; Altmann, T; Schneider, S; Fiegl, M; Spiekermann, K; Bauerle, P A; Hiddemann, W; Riethmüller, G; Subklewe, M

    2016-02-01

    Bispecific T-cell engagers (BiTEs) are very effective in recruiting and activating T cells. We tested the cytotoxicity of the CD33/CD3 BiTE antibody construct AMG 330 on primary acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells ex vivo and characterized parameters contributing to antileukemic cytolytic activity. The E:T ratio and the CD33 expression level significantly influenced lysis kinetics in long-term cultures of primary AML cells (n=38). AMG 330 induced T-cell-mediated proinflammatory conditions, favoring the upregulation of immune checkpoints on target and effector cells. Although not constitutively expressed at the time of primary diagnosis (n=123), PD-L1 was strongly upregulated on primary AML cells upon AMG 330 addition to ex vivo cultures (n=27, P<0.0001). This phenomenon was cytokine-driven as the sole addition of interferon (IFN)-γ and tumor necrosis factor-α also induced expression. Through blockade of the PD-1/PD-L1 interaction, AMG 330-mediated lysis (n=9, P=0.03), T-cell proliferation (n=9, P=0.01) and IFN-γ secretion (n=8, P=0.008) were significantly enhanced. The combinatorial approach was most beneficial in settings of protracted AML cell lysis. Taken together, we have characterized a critical resistance mechanism employed by primary AML cells under AMG 330-mediated proinflammatory conditions. Our results support the evaluation of checkpoint molecules in upcoming clinical trials with AMG 330 to enhance BiTE antibody construct-mediated cytotoxicity.

  14. Sox17 and chordin are required for formation of Kupffer's vesicle and left-right asymmetry determination in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Aamar, Emil; Dawid, Igor B

    2010-11-01

    Kupffer's vesicle (KV), a ciliated fluid-filled sphere in the zebrafish embryo with a critical role in laterality determination, is derived from a group of superficial cells in the organizer region of the gastrula named the dorsal forerunner cells (DFC). We have examined the role of the expression of sox17 and chordin (chd) in the DFC in KV formation and laterality determination. Whereas sox17 was known to be expressed in DFC, its function in these cells was not studied before. Further, expression of chd in these cells has not been reported previously. Targeted knockdown of Sox17 and Chd in DFC led to aberrant Left-Right (L-R) asymmetry establishment, as visualized by the expression of southpaw and lefty, and heart and pancreas placement in the embryo. These defects correlated with the formation of small KVs with apparently diminished cilia, consistent with the known requirement for ciliary function in the laterality organ for the establishment of L-R asymmetry.

  15. Blockade of MCP-1/CCR4 signaling-induced recruitment of activated regulatory cells evokes an antitumor immune response in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Wei; Li, Wei-Jin; Wei, Fan-Qin; Wong, Thian-Sze; Lei, Wen-Bin; Zhu, Xiao-Lin; Li, Jian; Wen, Wei-Ping

    2016-01-01

    FoxP3+ regulatory T (Treg) cells have diverse functions in the suppression of antitumor immunity. We show that FoxP3hiCD45RA−CD4+ Treg cells [activated Treg (aTreg) cells] are the predominant cell population among tumor-infiltrating FoxP3+ T cells, and that high aTreg cell-infiltrating content is associated with reduced survival in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). In vitro studies have demonstrated that aTreg cells can suppress tumor-associated antigen (TAA) effector T cell immune responses in HNSCC. Moreover, C-C chemokine receptor 4 (CCR4) was specifically expressed by aTreg cells in the peripheral blood of HNSCC patients. Using a RayBiotech human chemokine antibody array, we showed that monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), an endogenous CCR4-binding ligand, was specifically upregulated in the HNSCC microenvironment compared to the other four CCR4-binding ligands. Blocking MCP-1/CCR4 signaling-induced aTreg cell recruitment using a CCR4 antagonist evoked antitumor immunity in mice, and lead to inhibition of tumor growth and prolonged survival. Therefore, blocking aTreg cell trafficking in tumors using CCR4-binding agents may be an effective immunotherapy for HNSCC. PMID:27177223

  16. Preclinical Activity of Simvastatin Induces Cell Cycle Arrest in G1 via Blockade of Cyclin D-Cdk4 Expression in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC)

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Yu-Wei; Chang, Chi-Chang; Hung, Chao-Ming; Chen, Tzu-Yu; Huang, Tzuu-Yuan; Hsu, Yi-Chiang

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer-related death. Nonetheless, a decrease in overall incidence and mortality has been observed in the last 30 years due to prevention strategies and improvements in the use of chemotherapeutic agents. In recent studies, Simvastatin (SIM) has demonstrated anti-tumor activity, as well as potent chemopreventive action. As an inhibitor of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMG-CoA), SIM has been shown to stimulate apoptotic cell death. In this study, an MTT assay revealed the cytotoxic activity of SIM against human large cell lung cancer (Non-small cell lung cancer; NSCLC) cells (NCI-H460); however, induced apoptosis was not observed in NCI-H460 cells. Protein expression levels of cell cycle regulating proteins Cdk4, Cyclin D1, p16 and p27 were markedly altered by SIM. Collectively, our results indicate that SIM inhibits cell proliferation and arrests NCI-H460 cell cycle progression via inhibition of cyclin-dependent kinases and cyclins and the enhancement of CDK inhibitors p16 and p27. Our findings suggest that, in addition to the known effects on hypercholesterolemia therapy, SIM may also provide antitumor activity in established NSCLC. PMID:23481641

  17. Sept6 is required for ciliogenesis in Kupffer's vesicle, the pronephros, and the neural tube during early embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Gang; Gu, Qilin; He, Jiangyan; Lou, Qiyong; Chen, Xiaowen; Jin, Xia; Bi, Erfei; Yin, Zhan

    2014-04-01

    Septins are conserved filament-forming GTP-binding proteins that act as cellular scaffolds or diffusion barriers in a number of cellular processes. However, the role of septins in vertebrate development remains relatively obscure. Here, we show that zebrafish septin 6 (sept6) is first expressed in the notochord and then in nearly all of the ciliary organs, including Kupffer's vesicle (KV), the pronephros, eye, olfactory bulb, and neural tube. Knockdown of sept6 in zebrafish embryos results in reduced numbers and length of cilia in KV. Consequently, cilium-related functions, such as the left-right patterning of internal organs and nodal/spaw signaling, are compromised. Knockdown of sept6 also results in aberrant cilium formation in the pronephros and neural tube, leading to cilium-related defects in pronephros development and Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling. We further demonstrate that SEPT6 associates with acetylated α-tubulin in vivo and localizes along the axoneme in the cilia of zebrafish pronephric duct cells as well as cultured ZF4 cells. Our study reveals a novel role of sept6 in ciliogenesis during early embryonic development in zebrafish.

  18. Increase of cells expressing PD-L1 in bovine leukemia virus infection and enhancement of anti-viral immune responses in vitro via PD-L1 blockade.

    PubMed

    Ikebuchi, Ryoyo; Konnai, Satoru; Shirai, Tatsuya; Sunden, Yuji; Murata, Shiro; Onuma, Misao; Ohashi, Kazuhiko

    2011-09-26

    The inhibitory receptor programmed death-1 (PD-1) and its ligand, programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) are involved in immune evasion mechanisms for several pathogens causing chronic infections. Blockade of the PD-1/PD-L1 pathway restores anti-virus immune responses, with concomitant reduction in viral load. In a previous report, we showed that, in bovine leukemia virus (BLV) infection, the expression of bovine PD-1 is closely associated with disease progression. However, the functions of bovine PD-L1 are still unknown. To investigate the role of PD-L1 in BLV infection, we identified the bovine PD-L1 gene, and examined PD-L1 expression in BLV-infected cattle in comparison with uninfected cattle. The deduced amino acid sequence of bovine PD-L1 shows high homology to the human and mouse PD-L1. The proportion of PD-L1 positive cells, especially among B cells, was upregulated in cattle with the late stage of the disease compared to cattle at the aleukemic infection stage or uninfected cattle. The proportion of PD-L1 positive cells correlated positively with prediction markers for the progression of the disease such as leukocyte number, virus load and virus titer whilst on the contrary, it inversely correlated with the degree of interferon-gamma expression. Blockade of the PD-1/PD-L1 pathway in vitro by PD-L1-specific antibody upregulated the production of interleukin-2 and interferon-gamma, and correspondingly, downregulated the BLV provirus load and the proportion of BLV-gp51 expressing cells. These data suggest that PD-L1 induces immunoinhibition in disease progressed cattle during chronic BLV infection. Therefore, PD-L1 would be a potential target for developing immunotherapies against BLV infection.

  19. Cadmium-induced cell death of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons mediated by muscarinic M1 receptor blockade, increase in GSK-3β enzyme, β-amyloid and tau protein levels.

    PubMed

    Del Pino, Javier; Zeballos, Gabriela; Anadón, María José; Moyano, Paula; Díaz, María Jesús; García, José Manuel; Frejo, María Teresa

    2016-05-01

    Cadmium is a neurotoxic compound which induces cognitive alterations similar to those produced by Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the mechanism through which cadmium induces this effect remains unknown. In this regard, we described in a previous work that cadmium blocks cholinergic transmission and induces a more pronounced cell death on cholinergic neurons from basal forebrain which is partially mediated by AChE overexpression. Degeneration of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons, as happens in AD, results in memory deficits attributable to the loss of cholinergic modulation of hippocampal synaptic circuits. Moreover, cadmium has been described to activate GSK-3β, induce Aβ protein production and tau filament formation, which have been related to a selective loss of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons and development of AD. The present study is aimed at researching the mechanisms of cell death induced by cadmium on basal forebrain cholinergic neurons. For this purpose, we evaluated, in SN56 cholinergic mourine septal cell line from basal forebrain region, the cadmium toxic effects on neuronal viability through muscarinic M1 receptor, AChE splice variants, GSK-3β enzyme, Aβ and tau proteins. This study proves that cadmium induces cell death on cholinergic neurons through blockade of M1 receptor, overexpression of AChE-S and GSK-3β, down-regulation of AChE-R and increase in Aβ and total and phosphorylated tau protein levels. Our present results provide new understanding of the mechanisms contributing to the harmful effects of cadmium on cholinergic neurons and suggest that cadmium could mediate these mechanisms by M1R blockade through AChE splices altered expression.

  20. Enhanced Virus-Specific CD8+ T Cell Responses by Listeria monocytogenes-Infected Dendritic Cells in the Context of Tim-3 Blockade

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Cheng J.; Ren, Jun P.; Li, Guang Y.; Wu, Xiao Y.; Brockstedt, Dirk G.; Lauer, Peter; Moorman, Jonathan P.; Yao, Zhi Q.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we engineered Listeria monocytogens (Lm) by deleting the LmΔactA/ΔinlB virulence determinants and inserting HCV-NS5B consensus antigens to develop a therapeutic vaccine against hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. We tested this recombinant Lm-HCV vaccine in triggering of innate and adaptive immune responses in vitro using immune cells from HCV-infected and uninfected individuals. This live-attenuated Lm-HCV vaccine could naturally infect human dendritic cells (DC), thereby driving DC maturation and antigen presentation, producing Th1 cytokines, and triggering CTL responses in uninfected individuals. However, vaccine responses were diminished when using DC and T cells derived from chronically HCV-infected individuals, who express higher levels of inhibitory molecule Tim-3 on immune cells. Notably, blocking Tim-3 signaling significantly improved the innate and adaptive immune responses in chronically HCV-infected patients, indicating that novel strategies to enhance the potential of antigen presentation and cellular responses are essential for developing an effective therapeutic vaccine against HCV infection. PMID:24498204

  1. Enhanced virus-specific CD8+ T cell responses by Listeria monocytogenes-infected dendritic cells in the context of Tim-3 blockade.

    PubMed

    Ma, Cheng J; Ren, Jun P; Li, Guang Y; Wu, Xiao Y; Brockstedt, Dirk G; Lauer, Peter; Moorman, Jonathan P; Yao, Zhi Q

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we engineered Listeria monocytogens (Lm) by deleting the LmΔactA/ΔinlB virulence determinants and inserting HCV-NS5B consensus antigens to develop a therapeutic vaccine against hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. We tested this recombinant Lm-HCV vaccine in triggering of innate and adaptive immune responses in vitro using immune cells from HCV-infected and uninfected individuals. This live-attenuated Lm-HCV vaccine could naturally infect human dendritic cells (DC), thereby driving DC maturation and antigen presentation, producing Th1 cytokines, and triggering CTL responses in uninfected individuals. However, vaccine responses were diminished when using DC and T cells derived from chronically HCV-infected individuals, who express higher levels of inhibitory molecule Tim-3 on immune cells. Notably, blocking Tim-3 signaling significantly improved the innate and adaptive immune responses in chronically HCV-infected patients, indicating that novel strategies to enhance the potential of antigen presentation and cellular responses are essential for developing an effective therapeutic vaccine against HCV infection.

  2. Coulomb-blockade and Pauli-blockade magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Széchenyi, Gábor; Pályi, András

    2017-01-01

    Scanning-probe magnetometry is a valuable experimental tool to investigate magnetic phenomena at the micro- and nanoscale. We theoretically analyze the possibility of measuring magnetic fields via the electrical current flowing through quantum dots. We characterize the shot-noise-limited magnetic-field sensitivity of two devices: a single dot in the Coulomb blockade regime, and a double dot in the Pauli blockade regime. Constructing such magnetometers using carbon nanotube quantum dots would benefit from the large, strongly anisotropic and controllable g tensors, the low abundance of nuclear spins, and the small detection volume allowing for nanoscale spatial resolution; we estimate that a sensitivity below 1 μ T/√{Hz} can be achieved with this material. As quantum dots have already proven to be useful as scanning-probe electrometers, our proposal highlights their potential as hybrid sensors having in situ switching capability between electrical and magnetic sensing.

  3. Combination Approaches with Immune-Checkpoint Blockade in Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Swart, Maarten; Verbrugge, Inge; Beltman, Joost B

    2016-01-01

    In healthy individuals, immune-checkpoint molecules prevent autoimmune responses and limit immune cell-mediated tissue damage. Tumors frequently exploit these molecules to evade eradication by the immune system. Over the past years, immune-checkpoint blockade of cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4 and programed death-1 emerged as promising strategies to activate antitumor cytotoxic T cell responses. Although complete regression and long-term survival is achieved in some patients, not all patients respond. This review describes promising, novel combination approaches involving immune-checkpoint blockade in the context of the cancer-immunity cycle, aimed at increasing response rates to the single treatments. Specifically, we discuss combinations that promote antigen release and presentation, that further amplify T cell activation, that inhibit trafficking of regulatory T cells or MSDCs, that stimulate intratumoral T cell infiltration, that increase cancer recognition by T cells, and that stimulate tumor killing.

  4. Immunogenic chemotherapy sensitizes tumors to checkpoint blockade therapy

    PubMed Central

    Pfirschke, Christina; Engblom, Camilla; Rickelt, Steffen; Cortez-Retamozo, Virna; Garris, Christopher; Pucci, Ferdinando; Yamazaki, Takahiro; Colame, Vichnou Poirier; Newton, Andita; Redouane, Younes; Lin, Yi-Jang; Wojtkiewicz, Gregory; Iwamoto, Yoshiko; Mino-Kenudson, Mari; Huynh, Tiffany G.; Hynes, Richard O.; Freeman, Gordon J.; Kroemer, Guido; Zitvogel, Laurence; Weissleder, Ralph; Pittet, Mikael J.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Checkpoint blockade immunotherapies can be extraordinarily effective, but may benefit only the minority of patients whose tumors are pre-infiltrated by T cells. Here, using lung adenocarcinoma mouse models, including genetic models, we show that autochthonous tumors that lacked T cell infiltration and resisted current treatment options could be successfully sensitized to host antitumor T cell immunity when using appropriately selected immunogenic drugs (e.g. oxaliplatin combined with cyclophosphamide for treatment against tumors expressing oncogenic Kras and lacking Trp53). The antitumor response was triggered by direct drug actions on tumor cells, relied on innate immune sensing through toll-like receptor 4 signaling, and ultimately depended on CD8+ T cell antitumor immunity. Furthermore, instigating tumor infiltration by T cells sensitized tumors to checkpoint inhibition and controlled cancer durably. These findings indicate that the proportion of cancers responding to checkpoint therapy can be feasibly and substantially expanded by combining checkpoint blockade with immunogenic drugs. PMID:26872698

  5. Combination Approaches with Immune-Checkpoint Blockade in Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Swart, Maarten; Verbrugge, Inge; Beltman, Joost B.

    2016-01-01

    In healthy individuals, immune-checkpoint molecules prevent autoimmune responses and limit immune cell-mediated tissue damage. Tumors frequently exploit these molecules to evade eradication by the immune system. Over the past years, immune-checkpoint blockade of cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4 and programed death-1 emerged as promising strategies to activate antitumor cytotoxic T cell responses. Although complete regression and long-term survival is achieved in some patients, not all patients respond. This review describes promising, novel combination approaches involving immune-checkpoint blockade in the context of the cancer-immunity cycle, aimed at increasing response rates to the single treatments. Specifically, we discuss combinations that promote antigen release and presentation, that further amplify T cell activation, that inhibit trafficking of regulatory T cells or MSDCs, that stimulate intratumoral T cell infiltration, that increase cancer recognition by T cells, and that stimulate tumor killing. PMID:27847783

  6. Depletion of regulatory T cells leads to an exacerbation of delayed-type hypersensitivity arthritis in C57BL/6 mice that can be counteracted by IL-17 blockade.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Sara Marie; Hoffmann, Ute; Hamann, Alf; Bach, Emil; Danneskiold-Samsøe, Niels Banhos; Kristiansen, Karsten; Serikawa, Kyle; Fox, Brian; Kruse, Kim; Haase, Claus; Skov, Søren; Nansen, Anneline

    2016-04-01

    Rodent models of arthritis have been extensively used in the elucidation of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) pathogenesis and are instrumental in the development of therapeutic strategies. Here we utilise delayed-type hypersensitivity arthritis (DTHA), a model in C57BL/6 mice affecting one paw with synchronised onset, 100% penetrance and low variation. We investigate the role of regulatory T cells (Tregs) in DTHA through selective depletion of Tregsand the role of IL-17 in connection with Tregdepletion. Given the relevance of Tregsin RA, and the possibility of developing Treg-directed therapies, this approach could be relevant for advancing the understanding of Tregsin inflammatory arthritis. Selective depletion of Tregswas achieved using aFoxp3-DTR-eGFPmouse, which expresses the diphtheria toxin receptor (DTR) and enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) under control of theFoxp3gene. Anti-IL-17 monoclonal antibody (mAb) was used for IL-17 blockade. Numbers and activation of Tregsincreased in the paw and its draining lymph node in DTHA, and depletion of Tregsresulted in exacerbation of disease as shown by increased paw swelling, increased infiltration of inflammatory cells, increased bone remodelling and increased production of inflammatory mediators, as well as increased production of anti-citrullinated protein antibodies. Anti-IL-17 mAb treatment demonstrated that IL-17 is important for disease severity in both the presence and absence of Tregs, and that IL-17 blockade is able to rescue mice from the exacerbated disease caused by Tregdepletion and caused a reduction in RANKL, IL-6 and the number of neutrophils. We show that Tregsare important for the containment of inflammation and bone remodelling in DTHA. To our knowledge, this is the first study using theFoxp3-DTR-eGFPmouse on a C57BL/6 background for Tregdepletion in an arthritis model, and we here demonstrate the usefulness of the approach to study the role of Tregsand IL-17 in arthritis.

  7. Blockade of cholecystokinin-2 receptor and cyclooxygenase-2 synergistically induces cell apoptosis, and inhibits the proliferation of human gastric cancer cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wei-Hao; Zhu, Feng; Chen, Guo-Sheng; Su, Han; Luo, Cheng; Zhao, Qin-Shi; Zhang, Yuan; Shao, Yun; Sun, Jian; Zhou, Su-Ming; Ding, Guo-Xian; Cheng, Yun-Lin

    2008-05-18

    Gastrin and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) play important roles in the carcinogenesis and progression of gastric cancer. However, it remains unknown whether the combination of cholecystokinin-2 (CCK-2) receptor antagonist plus COX-2 inhibitor exerts synergistic anti-tumor effects on human gastric cancer. Here, we demonstrated that the combination of AG-041R (a CCK-2 receptor antagonist) plus NS-398 (a selective COX-2 inhibitor) treatment had synergistic effects on proliferation inhibition, apoptosis induction, down-regulation of Bcl-2 and up-regulation of Bax expression in MKN-45 cells. These results indicate that simultaneous targeting of CCK-2 receptor and COX-2 may inhibit gastric cancer development more effectively than targeting either molecule alone.

  8. Pharmacological blockade of fatty acid synthase (FASN) reverses acquired autoresistance to trastuzumab (Herceptin by transcriptionally inhibiting 'HER2 super-expression' occurring in high-dose trastuzumab-conditioned SKBR3/Tzb100 breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Vazquez-Martin, Alejandro; Colomer, Ramon; Brunet, Joan; Menendez, Javier A

    2007-10-01

    Elucidating the mechanisms underlying resistance to the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-targeted antibody trastuzumab (Tzb; Herceptin) is a major challenge that is beginning to be addressed. This dilemma is becoming increasingly important as recent studies strongly support a role for Tzb in the adjuvant setting for HER2-overexpressing early-stage breast cancers. We previously reported that pharmacological and RNA interference-induced inhibition of tumor-associated fatty acid synthase (FASN; Oncogenic antigen-519), a key metabolic enzyme catalyzing the synthesis of long-chain saturated fatty acids, drastically down-regulates HER2 expression in human breast cancer cells bearing HER2 gene amplification. Given that FASN blockade was found to suppress HER2 overexpression by attenuating the promoter activity of the HER2 gene, we here envisioned that this mechanism of action may represent a valuable strategy in breast cancers that have progressed while under Tzb. We created a preclinical model of Tzb resistance by continuously growing HER2-overexpressing SKBR3 breast cancer cells in the presence of clinically relevant concentrations of Tzb (20-185 microg/ml Tzb). This pool of Tzb-conditioned SKBR3 cells, which optimally grows now in the presence of 100 microg/ml trastuzumab (SKBR3/Tzb100 cells), exhibited HER2 levels notably higher (approximately 2-fold) than those found in SKBR3 parental cells. Real-time polymerase chain reaction studies showed that up-regulation of HER2 mRNA levels closely correlated with HER2 protein up-regulation in SKBR3/Tzb100 cells, thus suggesting that 'HER2 super-expression' upon acquisition of autoresistance to Tzb resulted, at least in part, from up-regulatory effects in the transcriptional rate of the HER2 gene. SKBR3/Tzb100 cells did not exhibit cross-resistance to C75, a small-compound specifically inhibiting FASN activity. On the contrary, SKBR3/Tzb100 cells showed a remarkably increased sensitivity (approximately 3-fold) to

  9. Primary cross-resistance to BRAFV600E-, MEK1/2- and PI3K/mTOR-specific inhibitors in BRAF-mutant melanoma cells counteracted by dual pathway blockade.

    PubMed

    Penna, Ilaria; Molla, Alessandra; Grazia, Giulia; Cleris, Loredana; Nicolini, Gabriella; Perrone, Federica; Picciani, Benedetta; Del Vecchio, Michele; de Braud, Filippo; Mortarini, Roberta; Anichini, Andrea

    2016-01-26

    Intrinsic cross-resistance to inhibition of different signaling pathways may hamper development of combinatorial treatments in melanoma, but the relative frequency of this phenotype and the strategies to overcome this hurdle remain poorly understood. Among 49 BRAF-mutant melanoma cell lines from patients not previously treated with target therapy, 21 (42.9%) showed strong primary resistance (IC50 > 1 μM) to a BRAFV600E inhibitor. Most of the BRAF-inhibitor-resistant cell lines showed also strong or intermediate cross-resistance to MEK1/2- and to PI3K/mTOR-specific inhibitors. Primary cross-resistance was confirmed in an independent set of 23 BRAF-mutant short-term melanoma cell cultures. MEK1/2 and PI3K/mTOR co-targeting was the most effective approach, compared to BRAF and PI3K/mTOR dual blockade, to counteract primary resistance to BRAF inhibition and the cross-resistant phenotype. This was shown by extensive drug interaction analysis, tumor growth inhibition assays in-vivo, p-ERK and p-AKT inhibition, promotion of melanoma apoptosis, apoptosis-related protein modulation, activation of effector caspases and selective modulation of genes involved in melanoma drug resistance and belonging to the ERK/MAPK and PI3K/AKT canonical pathways. Compared to co-targeting of mutant BRAF and PI3K/mTOR, the association of a MEK1/2 and a PI3K/mTOR inhibitor was more effective in the activation of Bax and of caspase-3 and in the induction of caspase-dependent melanoma apoptosis. Furthermore Bax silencing reduced the latter effects. These results suggest that intrinsic resistance to BRAF inhibition is frequently associated with primary cross-resistance to MEK and PI3K/mTOR blockade in BRAF-mutant melanoma and provide pre-clinical evidence for a combinatorial approach to counteract this phenotype.

  10. Angiogenesis and radiation response modulation after vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR2) blockade

    SciTech Connect

    Li Jing; Huang Shyhmin; Armstrong, Eric A.; Fowler, John F.; Harari, Paul M. . E-mail: harari@humonc.wisc.edu

    2005-08-01

    The formation of new blood vessels (angiogenesis) represents a critical factor in the malignant growth of solid tumors and metastases. Vascular endothelial cell growth factor (VEGF) and its receptor VEGFR2 represent central molecular targets for antiangiogenic intervention, because of their integral involvement in endothelial cell proliferation and migration. In the current study, we investigated in vitro and in vivo effects of receptor blockade on various aspects of the angiogenic process using monoclonal antibodies against VEGFR2 (cp1C11, which is human specific, and DC101, which is mouse specific). Molecular blockade of VEGFR2 inhibited several critical steps involved in angiogenesis. VEGFR2 blockade in endothelial cells attenuated cellular proliferation, reduced cellular migration, and disrupted cellular differentiation and resultant formation of capillary-like networks. Further, VEGFR2 blockade significantly reduced the growth response of human squamous cell carcinoma xenografts in athymic mice. The growth-inhibitory effect of VEGFR2 blockade in tumor xenografts seems to reflect antiangiogenic influence as demonstrated by vascular growth inhibition in an in vivo angiogenesis assay incorporating tumor-bearing Matrigel plugs. Further, administration of VEGFR2-blocking antibodies in endothelial cell cultures, and in mouse xenograft models, increased their response to ionizing radiation, indicating an interactive cytotoxic effect of VEGFR2 blockade with radiation. These data suggest that molecular inhibition of VEGFR2 alone, and in combination with radiation, can enhance tumor response through molecular targeting of tumor vasculature.

  11. Ultrastable Nontoxic RNA Nanoparticles for Targeting Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Stem Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-01

    nanoparticles to cancer cells; nanoscale size and shape which avoids rapid renal clearance and engulfment by lung macrophages and liver Kupffer cells; favorable...effectively block cancer progression and prevent metastases, while minimizing adverse side effects.13 Liver and other organ accumulations lead to low cancer...attractive for in vivo delivery applications, since it minimizes nonspecific cell entry, and entrapment by lung macrophages and liver Kupffer cells.11

  12. Enhanced NK cell adoptive antitumor effects against breast cancer in vitro via blockade of the transforming growth factor-β signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yue; Hu, Jinyue; Li, Rongguo; Song, Jian; Kang, Yujuan; Liu, Si; Zhang, Dongwei

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells have great potential for improving cancer immunotherapy. Adoptive NK cell transfer, an adoptive immunotherapy, represents a promising nontoxic anticancer therapy. However, existing data indicate that tumor cells can effectively escape NK cell-mediated apoptosis through immunosuppressive effects in the tumor microenvironment, and the therapeutic activity of adoptive NK cell transfer is not as efficient as anticipated. Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) is a potent immunosuppressant. Genetic and epigenetic events that occur during mammary tumorigenesis circumvent the tumor-suppressing activity of TGF-β, thereby permitting late-stage breast cancer cells to acquire an invasive and metastatic phenotype in response to TGF-β. To block the TGF-β signaling pathway, NK cells were genetically modified with a dominant-negative TGF-β type II receptor by optimizing electroporation using the Amaxa Nucleofector system. These genetically modified NK cells were insensitive to TGF-β and resisted the suppressive effect of TGF-β on MCF-7 breast cancer cells in vitro. Our results demonstrate that blocking the TGF-β signaling pathway to modulate the tumor microenvironment can improve the antitumor activity of adoptive NK cells in vitro, thereby providing a new rationale for the treatment of breast cancer. PMID:26124672

  13. Lapatinib and Obatoclax Kill Tumor Cells through Blockade of ERBB1/3/4 and through Inhibition of BCL-xL and MCL-1

    PubMed Central

    Cruickshanks, Nichola; Hamed, Hossein A.; Bareford, M. Danielle; Poklepovic, Andrew; Fisher, Paul B.; Grant, Steven

    2012-01-01

    Prior studies in breast cancer cells have shown that lapatinib and obatoclax interact in a greater than additive fashion to cause cell death and do so through a toxic form of autophagy. The present studies sought to extend our analyses to the central nervous system (CNS) tumor cells and to further define mechanisms of drug action. Lapatinib and obatoclax killed multiple CNS tumor isolates. Cells lacking PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog on chromosome 10) function were relatively resistant to drug combination lethality; expression of PTEN in PTEN-null cells restored drug sensitivity, and knockdown of PTEN promoted drug resistance. On the basis of knockdown of ERBB1-4 (erythroblastic leukemia viral oncogene homolog 1–4), we discovered that the inhibition of ERBB1/3/4 receptors were most important for enhancing obatoclax lethality rather than ERBB2. In parallel, we noted in CNS tumor cells that knockdown of BCL-xL (B-cell lymphoma-extra large)and MCL-1 (myeloid cell leukemia-1) interacted in an additive fashion to facilitate lapatinib lethality. Pretreatment of tumor cells with obatoclax enhanced the lethality of lapatinib to a greater extent than concomitant treatment. Treatment of animals carrying orthotopic CNS tumor isolates with lapatinib- and obatoclax-prolonged survival. Altogether, our data show that lapatinib and obatoclax therapy could be of use in the treatment of tumors located in the CNS. PMID:22357666

  14. Blockade of the chemokine receptor, CCR5, reduces the growth of orthotopically injected colon cancer cells via limiting cancerassociated fibroblast accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Tanabe, Yamato; Sasaki, Soichiro; Mukaida, Naofumi; Baba, Tomohisa

    2016-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) accumulate at tumor sites through the interaction between a chemokine, CCL3, and its receptor, CCR5, in the late phase of colitis-associated colon carcinogenesis. Here we examined the effect of a CCR5 antagonist, maraviroc, on tumor growth arising from the orthotopic injection of mouse or human colon cancer cell lines into the cecal wall by focusing on CAFs. Orthotopic injection of either cell line caused tumor formation together with leukocyte infiltration and fibroblast accumulation. Concomitant oral administration of maraviroc reduced tumor formation with few effects on leukocyte infiltration. In contrast, maraviroc reduced the intratumor number of α-smooth muscle actin-positive fibroblasts, which express epidermal growth factor, a crucial growth factor for colon cancer cell growth. These observations suggest that maraviroc or other CCR5 antagonists might act as novel anti-CRC drugs to dampen CAFs, an essential cell component for tumor progression. PMID:27340784

  15. Blockade of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Production in CD4^+ T Cells by an Intracellular CD4 Expressed Under Control of the Viral Long Terminal Repeat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buonocore, Linda; Rose, John K.

    1993-04-01

    A retroviral vector was constructed in which a gene encoding a mutated soluble CD4 protein that is retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (sCD4-KDEL) is expressed under control of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) regulatory elements. HIV-1 infection of a human T-cell line transduced with this vector led to induction of sCD4-KDEL synthesis and a block in transport of the HIV envelope protein to the cell surface. There was a complete block to maturation of infectious HIV-1 in the transduced cells, no viral spread, and little or no syncytium formation. Infected cells gradually disappeared from the culture over a period of 2 months. This intracellular trap for HIV has potential application in gene therapy for AIDS.

  16. CXCL12/CXCR4 Blockade by Oncolytic Virotherapy Inhibits Ovarian Cancer Growth by Decreasing Immunosuppression and Targeting Cancer Initiating Cells1

    PubMed Central

    Gil, Margaret; Komorowski, Marcin P.; Seshadri, Mukund; Rokita, Hanna; McGray, A. J Robert; Opyrchal, Mateusz; Odunsi, Kunle O.; Kozbor, Danuta

    2014-01-01

    Signals mediated by the chemokine CXCL12 and its receptor CXCR4 are involved in progression of ovarian cancer by enhancing tumor angiogenesis and immunosuppressive networks that regulate dissemination of peritoneal metastasis and development of cancer initiating cells (CICs). Here, we investigated the antitumor efficacy of a CXCR4 antagonist expressed by oncolytic vaccinia virus (OVV) against an invasive variant of the murine epithelial ovarian cancer cell line ID8-T. This variant harbors a high frequency of CICs that form multilayered spheroid cells and express the hyaluronan receptor CD44 as well as stem cell factor receptor CD117 (c-kit). Using an orthotopic ID8-T tumor model, we observed that intraperitoneal delivery of a CXCR4 antagonist-expressing OVV led to reduced metastatic spread of tumors and improved overall survival over that mediated by oncolysis alone. Inhibition of tumor growth with the armed virus was associated with efficient killing of CICs, reductions in expression of ascitic CXCL12 and VEGF, and decreases in intraperitoneal numbers of endothelial and myeloid cells as well as plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs). These changes, together with reduced recruitment of T regulatory cells, were associated with higher ratios of IFN-γ+/IL-10+ tumor-infiltrating T lymphocytes as well as induction of spontaneous humoral and cellular antitumor responses. Similarly, the CXCR4 antagonist released from virally-infected human CAOV2 ovarian carcinoma cells inhibited peritoneal dissemination of tumors in SCID mice leading to improved tumor-free survival in a xenograft model. Our findings demonstrate that OVV armed with a CXCR4 antagonist represents a potent therapy for ovarian CICs with a broad antitumor repertoire. PMID:25320277

  17. CXCL12/CXCR4 blockade by oncolytic virotherapy inhibits ovarian cancer growth by decreasing immunosuppression and targeting cancer-initiating cells.

    PubMed

    Gil, Margaret; Komorowski, Marcin P; Seshadri, Mukund; Rokita, Hanna; McGray, A J Robert; Opyrchal, Mateusz; Odunsi, Kunle O; Kozbor, Danuta

    2014-11-15

    Signals mediated by the chemokine CXCL12 and its receptor CXCR4 are involved in the progression of ovarian cancer through enhancement of tumor angiogenesis and immunosuppressive networks that regulate dissemination of peritoneal metastasis and development of cancer-initiating cells (CICs). In this study, we investigated the antitumor efficacy of a CXCR4 antagonist expressed by oncolytic vaccinia virus (OVV) against an invasive variant of the murine epithelial ovarian cancer cell line ID8-T. This variant harbors a high frequency of CICs that form multilayered spheroid cells and express the hyaluronan receptor CD44, as well as stem cell factor receptor CD117 (c-kit). Using an orthotopic ID8-T tumor model, we observed that i.p. delivery of a CXCR4 antagonist-expressing OVV led to reduced metastatic spread of tumors and improved overall survival compared with oncolysis alone. Inhibition of tumor growth with the armed virus was associated with efficient killing of CICs, reduced expression of ascitic CXCL12 and vascular endothelial growth factor, and decreases in i.p. numbers of endothelial and myeloid cells, as well as plasmacytoid dendritic cells. These changes, together with reduced recruitment of T regulatory cells, were associated with higher ratios of IFN-γ(+)/IL-10(+) tumor-infiltrating T lymphocytes, as well as induction of spontaneous humoral and cellular antitumor responses. Similarly, the CXCR4 antagonist released from virally infected human CAOV2 ovarian carcinoma cells inhibited peritoneal dissemination of tumors in SCID mice, leading to improved tumor-free survival in a xenograft model. Our findings demonstrate that OVV armed with a CXCR4 antagonist represents a potent therapy for ovarian CICs with a broad antitumor repertoire.

  18. Selective blockade of cancer cell proliferation and anchorage-independent growth by Plk1 activity-dependent suicidal inhibition of its polo-box domain.

    PubMed

    Park, Jung-Eun; Kim, Tae-Sung; Kim, Bo Yeon; Lee, Kyung S

    2015-01-01

    Polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1) plays a critical role in proper M-phase progression and cell proliferation. Plk1 is overexpressed in a broad spectrum of human cancers and is considered an attractive anticancer drug target. Although a large number of inhibitors targeting the catalytic domain of Plk1 have been developed, these inhibitors commonly exhibit a substantial level of cross-reactivity with other structurally related kinases, thus narrowing their applicable dose for patient treatment. Plk1 contains a C-terminal polo-box domain (PBD) that is essentially required for interacting with its binding targets. However, largely due to the lack of both specific and membrane-permeable inhibitors, whether PBD serves as an alternative target for the development of anticancer therapeutics has not been rigorously examined. Here, we used an intracellularly expressed 29-mer-long PBIP1-derived peptide (i.e., PBIPtide), which can be converted into a "suicidal" PBD inhibitor via Plk1-dependent self-priming and binding. Using this highly specific and potent system, we showed that Plk1 PBD inhibition alone is sufficient for inducing mitotic arrest and apoptotic cell death in cancer cells but not in normal cells, and that cancer cell-selective killing can occur regardless of the presence or absence of oncogenic RAS mutation. Intriguingly, PBD inhibition also effectively prevented anchorage-independent growth of malignant cancer cells. Thus, targeting PBD represents an appealing strategy for anti-Plk1 inhibitor development. Additionally, PBD inhibition-induced cancer cell-selective killing may not simply stem from activated RAS alone but, rather, from multiple altered biochemical and physiological mechanisms, which may have collectively contributed to Plk1 addiction in cancer cells.

  19. Blockade of excitatory synaptogenesis with proximal dendrites of dentate granule cells following rapamycin treatment in a mouse model of temporal lobe epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Yamawaki, Ruth; Thind, Khushdev; Buckmaster, Paul S.

    2014-01-01

    Inhibiting the mTOR signaling pathway with rapamycin blocks granule cell axon (mossy fiber) sprouting after epileptogenic injuries, including pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus. However, it remains unclear whether axons from other types of neurons sprout into the inner molecular layer and synapse with granule cell dendrites despite rapamycin treatment. If so, other aberrant positive-feedback networks might develop. To test this possibility stereological electron microscopy was used to estimate numbers of excitatory synapses in the inner molecular layer per hippocampus in pilocarpine-treated control mice, in mice 5 d after pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus, and after status epilepticus and daily treatment beginning 24 h later with rapamycin or vehicle for 2 months. The optical fractionator method was used to estimate numbers of granule cells in Nissl-stained sections so that numbers of excitatory synapses in the inner molecular layer per granule cell could be calculated. Control mice had an average of 2280 asymmetric synapses in the inner molecular layer per granule cell, which was reduced to 63% of controls 5 d after status epilepticus, recovered to 93% of controls in vehicle-treated mice 2 months after status epilepticus, but remained at only 63% of controls in rapamycin-treated mice. These findings reveal that rapamycin prevented excitatory axons from synapsing with proximal dendrites of granule cells and raise questions about the recurrent excitation hypothesis of temporal lobe epilepsy. PMID:25234294

  20. Preventing Effect of L-Type Calcium Channel Blockade on Electrophysiological Alterations in Dentate Gyrus Granule Cells Induced by Entorhinal Amyloid Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Pourbadie, Hamid Gholami; Naderi, Nima; Mehranfard, Nasrin; Janahmadi, Mahyar; Khodagholi, Fariba; Motamedi, Fereshteh

    2015-01-01

    The entorhinal cortex (EC) is one of the earliest affected brain regions in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). EC-amyloid pathology induces synaptic failure in the dentate gyrus (DG) with resultant behavioral impairment, but there is little known about its impact on neuronal properties in the DG. It is believed that calcium dyshomeostasis plays a pivotal role in the etiology of AD. Here, the effect of the EC amyloid pathogenesis on cellular properties of DG granule cells and also possible neuroprotective role of L-type calcium channel blockers (CCBs), nimodipine and isradipine, were investigated. The amyloid beta (Aβ) 1–42 was injected bilaterally into the EC of male rats and one week later, electrophysiological properties of DG granule cells were assessed. Voltage clamp recording revealed appearance of giant sIPSC in combination with a decrease in sEPSC frequency which was partially reversed by CCBs in granule cells from Aβ treated rats. EC amyloid pathogenesis induced a significant reduction of input resistance (Rin) accompanied by a profound decreased excitability in the DG granule cells. However, daily administration of CCBs, isradipine or nimodipine (i.c.v. for 6 days), almost preserved the normal excitability against Aβ. In conclusion, lower tendency to fire AP along with reduced Rin suggest that DG granule cells might undergo an alteration in the membrane ion channel activities which finally lead to the behavioral deficits observed in animal models and patients with early-stage Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:25689857

  1. Blockade of Tim-3 Pathway Ameliorates Interferon-γ Production from Hepatic CD8+ T Cells in a Mouse Model of Hepatitis B Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Ying; Hou, Nan; Zhang, Xiaoning; Zhao, Di; Liu, Ying; Wang, Jinjin; Luan, Fang; Shi, Wei; Zhu, Faliang; Sun, Wensheng; Zhang, Lining; Gao, Chengjiang; Gao, Lifen; Liang, Xiaohong; Ma, Chunhong

    2009-01-01

    T cell immunoglobulin- and mucin-domain-containing molecule-3 (Tim-3) has been reported to participate in the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases. However, whether Tim-3 is involved in hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection remains unknown. Here, we studied the expression and function of Tim-3 in a hydrodynamics-based mouse model of HBV infection. A significant increase of Tim-3 expression on hepatic T lymphocytes, especially on CD8+ T cells, was demonstrated in HBV model mice from day 7 to day 18. After Tim-3 knockdown by specific shRNAs, significantly increased IFN-γ production from hepatic CD8+ T cells in HBV model mice was observed. Very interestingly, we found Tim-3 expression on CD8+ T cells was higher in HBV model mice with higher serum anti-HBs production. Moreover, Tim-3 knockdown influenced anti-HBs production in vivo. Collectively, our data suggested that Tim-3 might act as a potent regulator of antiviral T-cell responses in HBV infection. PMID:19254478

  2. Prevention of ischemia-reperfusion injury in a rat skin flap model: the role of mast cells, cromolyn sodium, and histamine receptor blockade.

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, P G; Lee, J J; Mastorakos, D; Hu, Q Y; Pinto, J T; Santamaria, E

    2000-02-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the role of mast cells and their principal product, histamine, in ischemia/reperfusion injury. Cromolyn sodium, diphenhydramine, and cimetidine were administered to ischemic flaps just before reperfusion and evaluated for flap survival, mast cell count, neutrophil count, and myeloperoxidase levels. Epigastric island skin flaps were elevated in 49 rats; they were rendered ischemic by clamping the artery for 10 hours. Thirty minutes before reperfusion, the rats were treated with intraperitoneal saline (n = 11), cimetidine (n = 11), diphenhydramine (n = 11), or cromolyn sodium (n = 10). Flap survival was evaluated at 7 days. Neutrophil counts, mast cell counts, and myeloperoxidase levels were evaluated 12 hours after reperfusion. Flap necrosis in the sham group of animals (n = 6) was 0.0 percent, as expected, whereas the control group (saline-treated animals) had 47.3+/-33.4 percent necrosis. Animals treated with diphenhydramine and cimetidine demonstrated a significant decrease in flap necrosis to 17.7+/-8.8 percent and 19.4+/-14.7 percent, respectively. This protective effect was not seen with cromolyn sodium (44.3+/-35.6 percent). Both neutrophil and mast cell counts were significantly decreased in flaps from antihistamine-treated and sham animals versus both saline- and cromolyn sodium-treated groups. The administration of diphenhydramine and cimetidine before reperfusion can significantly reduce the extent of flap necrosis and the neutrophil and mast cell counts caused by ischemia/reperfusion. This protective effect is not seen with cromolyn sodium. The protective effect of antihistamines on flap necrosis might be related to the decrease in neutrophils and, possibly, mast cells within the flap.

  3. Selective targeting of JAK/STAT signaling is potentiated by Bcl-xL blockade in IL-2–dependent adult T-cell leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Meili; Mathews Griner, Lesley A.; Ju, Wei; Duveau, Damien Y.; Guha, Rajarshi; Petrus, Michael N.; Wen, Bernard; Maeda, Michiyuki; Shinn, Paul; Ferrer, Marc; Conlon, Kevin D.; Bamford, Richard N.; O’Shea, John J.; Thomas, Craig J.; Waldmann, Thomas A.

    2015-01-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) develops in individuals infected with human T-cell lymphotropic virus-1 (HTLV-1). Presently there is no curative therapy for ATL. HTLV-1–encoded protein Tax (transactivator from the X-gene region) up-regulates Bcl-xL (B-cell lymphoma-extra large) expression and activates interleukin-2 (IL-2), IL-9, and IL-15 autocrine/paracrine systems, resulting in amplified JAK/STAT signaling. Inhibition of JAK signaling reduces cytokine-dependent ex vivo proliferation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from ATL patients in smoldering/chronic stages. Currently, two JAK inhibitors are approved for human use. In this study, we examined activity of multiple JAK inhibitors in ATL cell lines. The selective JAK inhibitor ruxolitinib was examined in a high-throughput matrix screen combined with >450 potential therapeutic agents, and Bcl-2/Bcl-xL inhibitor navitoclax was identified as a strong candidate for multicomponent therapy. The combination was noted to strongly activate BAX (Bcl-2-associated X protein), effect mitochondrial depolarization, and increase caspase 3/7 activities that lead to cleavage of PARP (poly ADP ribose polymerase) and Mcl-1 (myeloid cell leukemia 1). Ruxolitinib and navitoclax independently demonstrated modest antitumor efficacy, whereas the combination dramatically lowered tumor burden and prolonged survival in an ATL murine model. This combination strongly blocked ex vivo proliferation of five ATL patients’ PBMCs. These studies provide support for a therapeutic trial in patients with smoldering/chronic ATL using a drug combination that inhibits JAK signaling and antiapoptotic protein Bcl-xL. PMID:26396258

  4. Platelet-Activating Factor Blockade Inhibits the T-Helper Type 17 Cell Pathway and Suppresses Psoriasis-Like Skin Disease in K5.hTGF-β1 Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Tej Pratap; Huettner, Barbara; Koefeler, Harald; Mayer, Gerlinde; Bambach, Isabella; Wallbrecht, Katrin; Schön, Michael P.; Wolf, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF), a potent biolipid mediator, is involved in a variety of cellular transduction pathways and plays a prominent role in inducing inflammation in different organs. We used K5.hTGF-β1 transgenic mice, which exhibit an inflammatory skin disorder and molecular and cytokine abnormalities with strong similarities to human psoriasis, to study the pathogenic role of PAF. We found that injecting PAF into the skin of transgenic mice led to inflammation and accelerated manifestation of the psoriatic phenotype by a local effect. In contrast, injecting mice with PAF receptor antagonist PCA-4248 lowered the PAF level (most likely by depressing an autocrine loop) and neutrophil, CD68+ cell (monocyte/macrophage), and CD3+ T-cell accumulation in the skin and blocked progression of the psoriasis-like phenotype. This effect of PAF blockade was specific and similar to that of psoralen–UV-A and was paralleled by a decrease in abnormally elevated mRNA and/or protein levels of T-helper type 17 cell–related cytokines IL-17A, IL-17F, IL-23, IL-12A, and IL-6 and its transcription factor signal transducer and activator of transcription 3. In contrast, PCA-4248 treatment up-regulated mRNA levels of cyclooxygenase-2 and IL-10 in dorsal skin and release of IL-10 in serum and skin. Interfering with PAF may offer the opportunity to develop novel therapeutic strategies for inflammatory psoriasis and associated comorbidities, including metabolic syndrome and atherosclerosis, in which the IL-17 axis may be involved. PMID:21281802

  5. Nano-encapsulation of a novel anti-Ran-GTPase peptide for blockade of regulator of chromosome condensation 1 (RCC1) function in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Haggag, Yusuf A; Matchett, Kyle B; Dakir, El-Habib; Buchanan, Paul; Osman, Mohammed A; Elgizawy, Sanaa A; El-Tanani, Mohamed; Faheem, Ahmed M; McCarron, Paul A

    2017-02-02

    Ran is a small ras-related GTPase and is highly expressed in aggressive breast carcinoma. Overexpression induces malignant transformation and drives metastatic growth. We have designed a novel series of anti-Ran-GTPase peptides, which prevents Ran hydrolysis and activation, and although they display effectiveness in silico, peptide activity is suboptimal in vitro due to reduced bioavailability and poor delivery. To overcome this drawback, we delivered an anti-Ran-GTPase peptide using encapsulation in PLGA-based nanoparticles (NP). Formulation variables within a double emulsion solvent evaporation technique were controlled to optimise physicochemical properties. NP were spherical and negatively charged with a mean diameter of 182-277nm. Peptide integrity and stability were maintained after encapsulation and release kinetics followed a sustained profile. We were interested in the relationship between cellular uptake and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) in the NP matrix, with results showing enhanced in vitro uptake with increasing PEG content. Peptide-loaded, pegylated (10% PEG)-PLGA NP induced significant cytotoxic and apoptotic effects in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells, with no evidence of similar effects in cells pulsed with free peptide. Western blot analysis showed that encapsulated peptide interfered with the proposed signal transduction pathway of the Ran gene. Our novel blockade peptide prevented Ran activation by blockage of regulator of chromosome condensation 1 (RCC1) following peptide release directly in the cytoplasm once endocytosis of the peptide-loaded nanoparticle has occurred. RCC1 blockage was effective only when a nanoparticulate delivery approach was adopted.

  6. High Potency VEGFRs/MET/FMS Triple Blockade by TAS-115 Concomitantly Suppresses Tumor Progression and Bone Destruction in Tumor-Induced Bone Disease Model with Lung Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fujioka, Yayoi; Kataoka, Yuki; Tanaka, Kenji; Hashimoto, Akihiro; Suzuki, Takamasa; Ito, Kenjiro; Haruma, Tomonori; Yamamoto-Yokoi, Hiromi; Harada, Naomoto; Sakuragi, Motomu; Oda, Nobuyuki; Matsuo, Kenichi; Inada, Masaki; Yonekura, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 25–40% of patients with lung cancer show bone metastasis. Bone modifying agents reduce skeletal-related events (SREs), but they do not significantly improve overall survival. Therefore, novel therapeutic approaches are urgently required. In this study, we investigated the anti-tumor effect of TAS-115, a VEGFRs and HGF receptor (MET)-targeted kinase inhibitor, in a tumor-induced bone disease model. A549-Luc-BM1 cells, an osteo-tropic clone of luciferase-transfected A549 human lung adenocarcinoma cells (A549-Luc), produced aggressive bone destruction associated with tumor progression after intra-tibial (IT) implantation into mice. TAS-115 significantly reduced IT tumor growth and bone destruction. Histopathological analysis showed a decrease in tumor vessels after TAS-115 treatment, which might be mediated through VEGFRs inhibition. Furthermore, the number of osteoclasts surrounding the tumor was decreased after TAS-115 treatment. In vitro studies demonstrated that TAS-115 inhibited HGF-, VEGF-, and macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF)-induced signaling pathways in osteoclasts. Moreover, TAS-115 inhibited Feline McDonough Sarcoma oncogene (FMS) kinase, as well as M-CSF and receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclast differentiation. Thus, VEGFRs/MET/FMS-triple inhibition in osteoclasts might contribute to the potent efficacy of TAS-115. The fact that concomitant dosing of sunitinib (VEGFRs/FMS inhibition) with crizotinib (MET inhibition) exerted comparable inhibitory efficacy for bone destruction to TAS-115 also supports this notion. In conclusion, TAS-115 inhibited tumor growth via VEGFR-kinase blockade, and also suppressed bone destruction possibly through VEGFRs/MET/FMS-kinase inhibition, which resulted in potent efficacy of TAS-115 in an A549-Luc-BM1 bone disease model. Thus, TAS-115 shows promise as a novel therapy for lung cancer patients with bone metastasis. PMID:27736957

  7. Blockade of Androgen Markers Using a Novel Betasitosterol, Thioctic Acid and Carnitine-containing Compound in Prostate and Hair Follicle Cell-based Assays.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li; Wang, Jiaolong; Mouser, Glen; Li, Yan Chun; Marcovici, Geno

    2016-06-01

    Androgenetic alopecia (AGA) affects approximately 70% of men and 40% of women in an age-dependent manner and is partially mediated by androgen hormones. Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) similarly affects 50% of the male population, rising by 10% each decade. Finasteride inhibits 5-alpha reductase (5AR) and is used to treat both disorders, despite offering limited clinical benefits accompanied by significant adverse side effects. Building on our previous work demonstrating the efficacy of naturally derived 5AR inhibitors (such as stigmasterol and beta sitosterol), we hypothesize that targeting 5AR as well as inflammatory pathways may yield improved efficacy in AGA and BPH. Here we address these dual pathomechanisms by examining the potency of a novel composition using in vitro assays of representative cell lines for AGA (hair follicle dermal papilla cells) and BPH (LNCaP prostate cells), respectively. Exposure of cells to the novel test composition down-regulated mRNA expression profiles characteristic of both disease processes, which outperformed finasteride. Changes in mRNA expression were corroborated at the protein level as assessed by western blotting. These studies provide proof of concept that novel, naturally derived compositions simultaneously targeting 5AR and inflammatory mediators may represent a rational approach to treating AGA and BPH. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Primary and acquired resistance to PD-1/PD-L1 blockade in cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiaohong; Wu, Xia

    2017-05-01

    PD-1/PD-L1 blockade appears to be a very promising immunotherapy with significant clinical benefits and durable responses in multiple tumor types. However, the effectual clinical benefits of PD-1/PD-L1 blockade are hampered by a high rate of primary resistance, where patients do not respond to PD-1/PD-L1 blockade initially. And more distressingly, most patients eventually develop acquired resistance after an initial response to PD-1/PD-L1 blockade. The mechanisms underlying primary and acquired resistance to PD-1/PD-L1 blockade have remained ambiguous. This review documents in detail the current understanding of the mechanisms through which resistance to anti-PD1/PD-L1 therapy occurs. The mechanisms underlying primary resistance to PD-1/PD-L1 blockade contain several immunoregulatory factors affecting tumor-specific immune responses within the immune microenvironment, co-enrichment of a group of 26 transcriptomic signatures (named innate anti-PD-1 resistance (IPRES) signatures) and cancer-cell-autonomous cues. The mechanism attributable to acquired resistance harbors evolution of neoantigen landscape, mutations of JAK and β-2-microglobulin, and epigenetic stability of exhausted T cells. At last, the promising therapeutic strategies to sensitize the resistant patients are also briefly discussed.

  9. Blockade of Y177 and Nuclear Translocation of Bcr-Abl Inhibits Proliferation and Promotes Apoptosis in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Qianyin; Huang, Zhenglan; Gao, Miao; Cao, Weixi; Xiao, Qin; Luo, Hongwei; Feng, Wenli

    2017-03-02

    The gradual emerging of resistance to imatinib urgently calls for the development of new therapy for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). The fusion protein Bcr-Abl, which promotes the malignant transformation of CML cells, is mainly located in the cytoplasm, while the c-Abl protein which is expressed in the nucleus can induce apoptosis. Based on the hetero-dimerization of FKBP (the 12-kDa FK506- and rapamycin-binding protein) and FRB (the FKBP-rapamycin binding domain of the protein kinase, mTOR) mediated by AP21967, we constructed a nuclear transport system to induce cytoplasmic Bcr-Abl into nuclear. In this study, we reported the construction of the nuclear transport system, and we demonstrated that FN3R (three nuclear localization signals were fused to FRBT2098L with a FLAG tag), HF2S (two FKBP domains were in tandem and fused to the SH2 domain of Grb2 with an HA tag) and Bcr-Abl form a complexus upon AP21967. Bcr-Abl was imported into the nucleus successfully by the nuclear transport system. The nuclear transport system inhibited CML cell proliferation through mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5) pathways mainly by HF2S. It was proven that nuclear located Bcr-Abl induced CML cell (including imatinib-resistant K562G01 cells) apoptosis by activation of p73 and its downstream molecules. In summary, our study provides a new targeted therapy for the CML patients even with Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor (TKI)-resistance.

  10. Blockade of Y177 and Nuclear Translocation of Bcr-Abl Inhibits Proliferation and Promotes Apoptosis in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qianyin; Huang, Zhenglan; Gao, Miao; Cao, Weixi; Xiao, Qin; Luo, Hongwei; Feng, Wenli

    2017-01-01

    The gradual emerging of resistance to imatinib urgently calls for the development of new therapy for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). The fusion protein Bcr-Abl, which promotes the malignant transformation of CML cells, is mainly located in the cytoplasm, while the c-Abl protein which is expressed in the nucleus can induce apoptosis. Based on the hetero-dimerization of FKBP (the 12-kDa FK506- and rapamycin-binding protein) and FRB (the FKBP-rapamycin binding domain of the protein kinase, mTOR) mediated by AP21967, we constructed a nuclear transport system to induce cytoplasmic Bcr-Abl into nuclear. In this study, we reported the construction of the nuclear transport system, and we demonstrated that FN3R (three nuclear localization signals were fused to FRBT2098L with a FLAG tag), HF2S (two FKBP domains were in tandem and fused to the SH2 domain of Grb2 with an HA tag) and Bcr-Abl form a complexus upon AP21967. Bcr-Abl was imported into the nucleus successfully by the nuclear transport system. The nuclear transport system inhibited CML cell proliferation through mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5) pathways mainly by HF2S. It was proven that nuclear located Bcr-Abl induced CML cell (including imatinib-resistant K562G01 cells) apoptosis by activation of p73 and its downstream molecules. In summary, our study provides a new targeted therapy for the CML patients even with Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor (TKI)-resistance. PMID:28257089

  11. Blockade efficacy of MEK/ERK-dependent autophagy enhances PI3K/Akt inhibitor NVP-BKM120's therapeutic effectiveness in lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Asmitananda; Zhang, Shuo; Wang, Ting; Liang, Yiqian; Shi, Puyu; Gao, Lei; Liu, Feng; Feng, Jing; Chen, Tianjun; Yang, Tian; Shang, Dong; Liu, Johnson J.; Xu, Feng; Chen, Mingwei

    2016-01-01

    NVP-BKM120 (BKM120) is a new pan-class I phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K) inhibitor and has been tested in clinical trials as an anticancer agent. In this study, we determined whether BKM120 induces autophagy and the impact of autophagy induction on BKM120's growth-inhibitory activity. BKM120 potently induced elevation of autophagosome-bound type II LC3 (LC3-II) protein, predominantly in cell lines insensitive to BKM120, thereby inducing autophagy. The presence of lysosomal protease inhibitor chloroquine further enhanced the levels of LC3-II. BKM120 combined with chloroquine, enhanced growth-inhibitory effects including induction of apoptosis, suggesting that autophagy is a protective mechanism counteracting BKM120's growth-inhibitory activity. Interestingly, BKM120 increased p-ERK1/2 levels. When blocking the activation of this signaling with MEK inhibitors or with knockdown of ERK1/2, the ability of BKM120 to increase LC3-II was attenuated and the growth-inhibitory effects including induction of apoptosis were accordingly enhanced, suggesting that the MEK/ERK activation contributes to BKM120-induced authophagy. In mouse xenograft model, we also found that the combination of BKM120 and PD0325901 synergistically suppressed cell growth in human lung cancer cells. Thus, the current study not only reveals mechanisms accounting for BKM120-induced autophagy, but also suggests an alternative method to enhance BKM120's therapeutic efficacy against non-small cell lung cancer(NSCLC) by blocking autophagy with either a lysosomal protease inhibitor or MEK inhibitor. PMID:27572309

  12. Dual blockade of the A1 and A2A adenosine receptor prevents amyloid beta toxicity in neuroblastoma cells exposed to aluminum chloride.

    PubMed

    Giunta, Salvatore; Andriolo, Violetta; Castorina, Alessandro

    2014-09-01

    In a previous work we have shown that exposure to aluminum (Al) chloride (AlCl3) enhanced the neurotoxicity of the amyloid beta(25-35) fragment (Abeta(25-35)) in neuroblastoma cells and affected the expression of Alzheimer's disease (AD)-related genes. Caffein, a compound endowed with beneficial effects against AD, exerts neuroprotection primarily through its antagonist activity on A2A adenosine receptors (A2AR), although it also inhibits A1Rs with similar potency. Still, studies on the specific involvement of these receptors in neuroprotection in a model of combined neurotoxicity (Abeta(25-35)+AlCl3) are missing. To address this issue, cultured SH-SY5Y cells exposed to Abeta(25-35)+AlCl3 were assessed for cell viability, morphology, intracellular ROS activity and expression of apoptosis-, stress- and AD-related proteins. To define the role of A1R and A2ARs, pretreatment with caffein, specific receptor antagonists (DPCPX or SCH58261) or siRNA-mediated gene knockdown were delivered. Results indicate that AlCl3 treatment exacerbated Abeta(25-35) toxicity, increased ROS production, lipid peroxidation, β-secretase-1 (BACE1) and amyloid precursor protein (APP). Interestingly, SCH58261 successfully prevented toxicity associated to Abeta(25-35) only, whereas pretreatment with both DPCPX and SCH58261 was required to fully avert Abeta(25-35)+AlCl3-induced damage, suggesting that A1Rs might also be critically involved in protection during combined toxicity. The effects of caffein were mimicked by both N-acetyl cysteine, an antioxidant, and desferrioxamine, likely acting through distinct mechanisms. Altogether, our data establish a novel protective function associated with A1R inhibition in the setting of combined Abeta(25-35)+AlCl3 neurotoxicity, and expand our current knowledge on the potential beneficial role of caffein to prevent AD progression in subjects environmentally exposed to aluminum.

  13. Reduced availability of voltage-gated sodium channels by depolarization or blockade by tetrodotoxin boosts burst firing and catecholamine release in mouse chromaffin cells

    PubMed Central

    Vandael, David H F; Ottaviani, Matteo M; Legros, Christian; Lefort, Claudie; Guérineau, Nathalie C; Allio, Arianna; Carabelli, Valentina; Carbone, Emilio

    2015-01-01

    Action potential (AP) firing in mouse chromaffin cells (MCCs) is mainly sustained by Cav1.3 L-type channels that drive BK and SK currents and regulate the pacemaking cycle. As secretory units, CCs optimally recruit Ca2+ channels when stimulated, a process potentially dependent on the modulation of the AP waveform. Our previous work has shown that a critical determinant of AP shape is voltage-gated sodium channel (Nav) channel availability. Here, we studied the contribution of Nav channels to firing patterns and AP shapes at rest (−50 mV) and upon stimulation (−40 mV). Using quantitative RT-PCR and immunoblotting, we show that MCCs mainly express tetrodotoxin (TTX)-sensitive, fast-inactivating Nav1.3 and Nav1.7 channels that carry little or no Na+ current during slow ramp depolarizations. Time constants and the percentage of recovery from fast inactivation and slow entry into closed-state inactivation are similar to that of brain Nav1.3 and Nav1.7 channels. The fraction of available Nav channels is reduced by half after 10 mV depolarization from −50 to −40 mV. This leads to low amplitude spikes and a reduction in repolarizing K+ currents inverting the net current from outward to inward during the after-hyperpolarization. When Nav channel availability is reduced by up to 20% of total, either by TTX block or steady depolarization, a switch from tonic to burst firing is observed. The spontaneous occurrence of high frequency bursts is rare under control conditions (14% of cells) but leads to major Ca2+-entry and increased catecholamine release. Thus, Nav1.3/Nav1.7 channel availability sets the AP shape, burst-firing initiation and regulates catecholamine secretion in MCCs. Nav channel inactivation becomes important during periods of high activity, mimicking stress responses. PMID:25620605

  14. Blockade of recombinant human IL-6 by tocilizumab suppresses matrix metalloproteinase-9 production in the C28/I2 immortalized human chondrocyte cell line.

    PubMed

    Meszaros, Evan C; Dahoud, Wissam; Mesiano, Sam; Malemud, Charles J

    Two immortalized human juvenile chondrocyte cell lines, T/C28a2 and C28/I2, were employed to determine the extent to which recombinant human (rh) IL-6 or rh-TNF-α increased the production of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9). The effect of rhIL-6 on neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) was also assessed. Although C28/I2 chondrocytes incubated with rhIL-6 (50 ng/ml) increased MMP-9 production which could not be mimicked by the T/C28a2 chondrocyte line, the effect of rhTNF-α on MMP-9 was more robust than with rhIL-6. The combinations of rhIL-6 and soluble IL-6 receptor-α (sIL-6Rα) or rhIL-6 and tocilizumab (TCZ), a fully-humanized recombinant monoclonal antibody that neutralizes the interaction between IL-6 and IL-6R significantly reduced MMP-9 production by C28/I2 chondrocytes. However, TCZ had no effect on rhTNF-α-induced MMP-9 production. By contrast, rhIL-6 did not increase the production of NGAL by C28/I2 chondrocytes although the number of NGAL-positive cells was significantly reduced by sIL-6R compared to its control group, but not by the combination of rhIL-6 plus TCZ compared to rhIL-6. In summary, these results showed that rhIL-6 stimulated the production of MMP-9, but not NGAL, in the C28/I2 chondrocyte line. TCZ or sIL-6Rα suppressed rhIL-6-induced MMP-9 production.

  15. Blockade of IL-33 release and suppression of type 2 innate lymphoid cell responses by helminth secreted products in airway allergy.

    PubMed

    McSorley, H J; Blair, N F; Smith, K A; McKenzie, A N J; Maizels, R M

    2014-09-01

    Helminth parasites such as the nematode Heligmosomoides polygyrus strongly inhibit T helper type 2 (Th2) allergy, as well as colitis and autoimmunity. Here, we show that the soluble excretory/secretory products of H. polygyrus (HES) potently suppress inflammation induced by allergens from the common fungus Alternaria alternata. Alternaria extract, when administered to mice intranasally with ovalbumin (OVA) protein, induces a rapid (1-48 h) innate response while also priming an OVA-specific Th2 response that can be evoked 14 days later by intranasal administration of OVA alone. In this model, HES coadministration with Alternaria/OVA suppressed early IL-33 release, innate lymphoid cell (ILC) production of IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13, and localized eosinophilia. Upon OVA challenge, type 2 ILC (ILC2)/Th2 cytokine production and eosinophilia were diminished in HES-treated mice. HES administration 6 h before Alternaria blocked the allergic response, and its suppressive activity was abolished by heat treatment. Administration of recombinant IL-33 at sensitization with Alternaria/OVA/HES abrogated HES suppression of OVA-specific responses at challenge, indicating that suppression of early Alternaria-induced IL-33 release could be central to the anti-allergic effects of HES. Thus, this helminth parasite targets IL-33 production as part of its armory of suppressive effects, forestalling the development of the type 2 immune response to infection and allergic sensitization.

  16. FAP positive fibroblasts induce immune checkpoint blockade resistance in colorectal cancer via promoting immunosuppression.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lingling; Qiu, Xiangting; Wang, Xinhua; He, Jian

    2017-03-13

    Immune checkpoint blockades that significantly prolonged survival of melanoma patients have been less effective on colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. Growing evidence suggested that fibroblast activation protein-alpha (FAP) on cancer associate fibroblasts (CAFs) has critical roles in regulating antitumor immune response by inducing tumor-promoting inflammation. In this study, we explored the roles of FAP in regulating the tumor immunity and immune checkpoint blockades resistance in CRC experimental systems. We found that CAFs with high FAP expression could induce immune checkpoint blockade resistance in CRC mouse model. Mechanistically, CAFs with high FAP expression promoted immunosuppression in the CRC tumor immune microenvironment by up-regulating CCL2 secretion, recruiting myeloid cells, and decreasing T-cell activity. In human CRC samples, FAP expression was proportional to myeloid cells number, but inversely related to T-cell number. High FAP expression also predicted poor survival of CRC patients. Taken together, our study suggested that high FAP expression in CAFs is one reason leading to immune checkpoint blockades resistance in CRC patients and FAP is an optional target for reversing immune checkpoint blockades resistance.

  17. Right-elevated expression of charon is regulated by fluid flow in medaka Kupffer's vesicle.

    PubMed

    Hojo, Motoki; Takashima, Shigeo; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Sumeragi, Akira; Shimada, Atsuko; Tsukahara, Tatsuya; Yokoi, Hayato; Narita, Takanori; Jindo, Tomoko; Kage, Takahiro; Kitagawa, Tadao; Kimura, Tetsuaki; Sekimizu, Koshin; Miyake, Akimitsu; Setiamarga, Davin; Murakami, Ryohei; Tsuda, Sachiko; Ooki, Shinya; Kakihara, Ken; Naruse, Kiyoshi; Takeda, Hiroyuki

    2007-06-01

    Recent studies have revealed that a cilium-generated liquid flow in the node has a crucial role in the establishment of the left-right (LR) axis in the mouse. In fish, Kupffer's vesicle (KV), a teleost-specific spherical organ attached to the tail region, is known to have an equivalent role to the mouse node during LR axis formation. However, at present, there has been no report of an asymmetric gene expressed in KV under the control of fluid flow. Here we report the earliest asymmetric gene in teleost KV, medaka charon, and its regulation. Charon is a member of the Cerberus/DAN family of proteins, first identified in zebrafish. Although zebrafish charon was reported to be symmetrically expressed in KV, medaka charon displays asymmetric expression with more intense expression on the right side. This asymmetric expression was found to be regulated by KV flow because symmetric and up-regulated charon expression was observed in flow-defective embryos with immotile cilia or disrupted KV. Taken together, medaka charon is a reliable gene marker for LR asymmetry in KV and thus, will be useful for the analysis of the early steps downstream of the fluid flow.

  18. Selective blockade of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors by pimobendan, a drug for the treatment of heart failure: reduction of catecholamine secretion and synthesis in adrenal medullary cells.

    PubMed

    Toyohira, Yumiko; Kubo, Tatsuhiko; Watanabe, Miyabi; Uezono, Yasuhito; Ueno, Susumu; Shinkai, Koji; Tsutsui, Masato; Izumi, Futoshi; Yanagihara, Nobuyuki

    2005-02-01

    Pimobendan, a Ca(2+) sensitizer, is used clinically in the treatment of chronic heart failure. Although chronic heart failure is associated with activation of the sympathetic nervous system, it remains unknown whether pimobendan affects the function of sympathetic neurons and the adrenal medulla. Here, we report the inhibitory effects of pimobendan on catecholamine secretion and synthesis in cultured bovine adrenal medullary cells. Pimobendan decreased the catecholamine secretion (IC(50)=29.5 microM) elicited by carbachol, an agonist at nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, but not that elicited by veratridine, an activator of voltage-dependent Na(+) channels, or by high K(+), an activator of voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels. Pimobendan also inhibited carbachol-induced influx of (22)Na(+) (IC(50)=25.9 microM) and (45)Ca(2+) (IC(50)=26.0 microM), but not veratridine-induced (22)Na(+) influx or high K(+)-induced (45)Ca(2+) influx. The reduction of catecholamine secretion caused by pimobendan was not overcome by increasing the concentration of carbachol. UD-CG 212, an active metabolite of pimobendan, lowered carbachol-induced catecholamine secretion with a concentration/inhibition curve similar to that of pimobendan. In experiments in situ, pimobendan suppressed both basal and carbachol-stimulated (14)C-catecholamine synthesis (IC(50)=5.3 and 4.9 microM) from [(14)C] tyrosine [but not from L: -3, 4-dihydroxyphenyl [3-(14)C] alanine ([(14)C]DOPA)], as well as tyrosine hydroxylase activity (IC(50)=3.8 and 4.3 microM). These findings suggest that pimobendan inhibits carbachol-induced catecholamines secretion and synthesis through suppression of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

  19. The zebrafish Kupffer's vesicle as a model system for the molecular mechanisms by which the lack of Polycystin-2 leads to stimulation of CFTR.

    PubMed

    Roxo-Rosa, Mónica; Jacinto, Raquel; Sampaio, Pedro; Lopes, Susana Santos

    2015-10-02

    In autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), cyst inflation and continuous enlargement are associated with marked transepithelial ion and fluid secretion into the cyst lumen via cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). Indeed, the inhibition or degradation of CFTR prevents the fluid accumulation within cysts. The in vivo mechanisms by which the lack of Polycystin-2 leads to CFTR stimulation are an outstanding challenge in ADPKD research and may bring important biomarkers for the disease. However, hampering their study, the available ADPKD in vitro cellular models lack the three-dimensional architecture of renal cysts and the ADPKD mouse models offer limited access for live-imaging experiments in embryonic kidneys. Here, we tested the zebrafish Kupffer's vesicle (KV) as an alternative model-organ. KV is a fluid-filled vesicular organ, lined by epithelial cells that express both CFTR and Polycystin-2 endogenously, being each of them easily knocked-down. Our data on the intracellular distribution of Polycystin-2 support its involvement in the KV fluid-flow induced Ca(2+)-signalling. Mirroring kidney cysts, the KV lumen inflation is dependent on CFTR activity and, as we clearly show, the knockdown of Polycystin-2 results in larger KV lumens through overstimulation of CFTR. In conclusion, we propose the zebrafish KV as a model organ to study the renal cyst inflation. Favouring its use, KV volume can be easily determined by in vivo imaging offering a live readout for screening compounds and genes that may prevent cyst enlargement through CFTR inhibition.

  20. Observation of ionic Coulomb blockade in nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Jiandong; Liu, Ke; Graf, Michael; Dumcenco, Dumitru; Kis, Andras; di Ventra, Massimiliano; Radenovic, Aleksandra

    2016-08-01

    Emergent behaviour from electron-transport properties is routinely observed in systems with dimensions approaching the nanoscale. However, analogous mesoscopic behaviour resulting from ionic transport has so far not been observed, most probably because of bottlenecks in the controlled fabrication of subnanometre nanopores for use in nanofluidics. Here, we report measurements of ionic transport through a single subnanometre pore junction, and the observation of ionic Coulomb blockade: the ionic counterpart of the electronic Coulomb blockade observed for quantum dots. Our findings demonstrate that nanoscopic, atomically thin pores allow for the exploration of phenomena in ionic transport, and suggest that nanopores may also further our understanding of transport through biological ion channels.

  1. Acquired RAS or EGFR mutations and duration of response to EGFR blockade in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Van Emburgh, Beth O.; Arena, Sabrina; Siravegna, Giulia; Lazzari, Luca; Crisafulli, Giovanni; Corti, Giorgio; Mussolin, Benedetta; Baldi, Federica; Buscarino, Michela; Bartolini, Alice; Valtorta, Emanuele; Vidal, Joana; Bellosillo, Beatriz; Germano, Giovanni; Pietrantonio, Filippo; Ponzetti, Agostino; Albanell, Joan; Siena, Salvatore; Sartore-Bianchi, Andrea; Di Nicolantonio, Federica; Montagut, Clara; Bardelli, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Blockade of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) with the monoclonal antibodies cetuximab or panitumumab is effective in a subset of colorectal cancers (CRCs), but the emergence of resistance limits the efficacy of these therapeutic agents. At relapse, the majority of patients develop RAS mutations, while a subset acquires EGFR extracellular domain (ECD) mutations. Here we find that patients who experience greater and longer responses to EGFR blockade preferentially develop EGFR ECD mutations, while RAS mutations emerge more frequently in patients with smaller tumour shrinkage and shorter progression-free survival. In circulating cell-free tumour DNA of patients treated with anti-EGFR antibodies, RAS mutations emerge earlier than EGFR ECD variants. Subclonal RAS but not EGFR ECD mutations are present in CRC samples obtained before exposure to EGFR blockade. These data indicate that clonal evolution of drug-resistant cells is associated with the clinical outcome of CRC patients treated with anti-EGFR antibodies. PMID:27929064

  2. VEGF blockade inhibits angiogenesis and reepithelialization of endometrium

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Xiujun; Krieg, Sacha; Kuo, Calvin J.; Wiegand, Stanley J.; Rabinovitch, Marlene; Druzin, Maurice L.; Brenner, Robert M.; Giudice, Linda C.; Nayak, Nihar R.

    2008-01-01

    Despite extensive literature on vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression and regulation by steroid hormones, the lack of clear understanding of the mechanisms of angiogenesis in the endometrium is a major limitation for use of antiangiogenic therapy targeting endometrial vessels. In the current work, we used the rhesus macaque as a primate model and the decidualized mouse uterus as a murine model to examine angiogenesis during endometrial breakdown and regeneration. We found that blockade of VEGF action with VEGF Trap, a potent VEGF blocker, completely inhibited neovascularization during endometrial regeneration in both models but had no marked effect on preexisting or newly formed vessels, suggesting that VEGF is essential for neoangiogenesis but not survival of mature vessels in this vascular bed. Blockade of VEGF also blocked reepithelialization in both the postmenstrual endometrium and the mouse uterus after decidual breakdown, evidence that VEGF has pleiotropic effects in the endometrium. In vitro studies with a scratch wound assay showed that the migration of luminal epithelial cells during repair involved signaling through VEGF receptor 2–neuropilin 1 (VEGFR2-NP1) receptors on endometrial stromal cells. The leading front of tissue growth during endometrial repair was strongly hypoxic, and this hypoxia was the local stimulus for VEGF expression and angiogenesis in this tissue. In summary, we provide novel experimental data indicating that VEGF is essential for endometrial neoangiogenesis during postmenstrual/postpartum repair.—Fan, X., Krieg, S., Kuo, C. J., Wiegand, S. J., Rabinovitch, M., Druzin, M. L., Brenner, R. M., Giudice, L. C., Nayak, N. R. VEGF blockade inhibits angiogenesis and reepithelialization of endometrium. PMID:18606863

  3. Synergistic effect of programmed cell death protein 1 blockade and secondary lymphoid tissue chemokine in the induction of anti-tumor immunity by a therapeutic cancer vaccine.

    PubMed

    Moeini, Soheila; Saeidi, Mohsen; Fotouhi, Fatemeh; Mondanizadeh, Mahdieh; Shirian, Sadegh; Mohebi, Alireza; Gorji, Ali; Ghaemi, Amir

    2017-02-01

    The use of DNA vaccines has become an attractive approach for generating antigen-specific cytotoxic CD8(+) T lymphocytes (CTLs), which can mediate protective antitumor immunity. The potency of DNA vaccines encoding weakly immunogenic tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) can be improved by using an adjuvant injected together with checkpoint antibodies. In the current study, we evaluated whether the therapeutic effects of a DNA vaccine encoding human papilloma virus type 16 (HPV-16) E7 can be enhanced by combined application of an immune checkpoint blockade directed against the programmed death-1 (PD-1) pathway and secondary lymphoid tissue chemokine (SLC) also known as CCL21 adjuvant, in a mouse cervical cancer model. The therapeutic effects of the DNA vaccine in combination with CCL21 adjuvant plus PD-1 blockade was evaluated using a tumor growth curve. To further investigate the mechanism underlying the antitumor response, cytolytic and lymphocyte proliferation responses in splenocytes were measured using non-radioactive cytotoxicity and MTT assays, respectively. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and IL-10 expression in the tumor and the levels of IFN-γ and IL-4 in supernatants of spleno-lymphocyte cultures were measured using ELISA. The immune efficacy was evaluated by in vivo tumor regression assay. The results showed that vaccination with a DNA vaccine in combination with the CCL21 adjuvant plus PD-1 blockade greatly enhanced cytotoxic T lymphocyte production and lymphocyte proliferation rates and greatly inhibited tumor progression. Moreover, the vaccine in combination with adjuvant and blockade significantly reduced intratumoral VEGF, IL-10 and splenic IL-4 but induced the expression of splenic IFN-γ. This formulation could be an effective candidate for a vaccine against cervical cancers and merits further investigation.

  4. Haemangioendothelioma (Kupffer cell angiosarcoma), myelofibrosis, splenic atrophy, and myeloma paraproteinaemia after parenteral thorotrast administration.

    PubMed Central

    Jennings, R C; Priestley, S E

    1978-01-01

    A case of thorotrastosis occurred 25 years after thorotrast angiography, with the previously unrecorded association of myeloma type paraproteinaemia. The relationship between haemangioendothelioma due to thorotrast and other vascular sarcomas of the liver is briefly reviewed. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 PMID:748384

  5. Angiopoietin-2 Blockade Promotes Survival of Corneal Transplants

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liwei; Li, Guangyu; Sessa, Roberto; Kang, Gyeong Jin; Shi, Meng; Ge, Shaokui; Gong, Anna Jiang; Wen, Ying; Chintharlapalli, Sudhakar; Chen, Lu

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Corneal transplantation remains the last hope for vision restoration, and lymphangiogenesis (LG) is a primary mediator of transplant rejection. This study was to investigate the specific role of angiopoietin-2 (Ang-2) in transplantation-associated LG and graft rejection. Methods Orthotopic corneal transplantation was performed between fully mismatched C57BL/6 (donor) and BALB/c (recipient) mice to assess the effects of Ang-2 blockade via neutralizing antibody. Grafts were evaluated in vivo by ophthalmic slit-lamp biomicroscopy and anterior segment optical coherence tomography (OCT) up to 8 weeks after surgery. Additionally, whole-mount corneas were analyzed for lymphatic and blood vessels and macrophages by immunofluorescent microscopy, and draining lymph nodes were assessed for donor-derived cells by flow cytometry. Results Anti-Ang-2 treatment significantly suppressed LG and graft rejection. In this study, we achieved 75% suppression of LG and 80% graft survival. Our approach also inhibited donor-derived cell trafficking to draining lymph nodes and affected macrophage morphologic phenotypes in the grafted corneas. Additionally, Ang-2 blockade also reduced central corneal thickening, a parameter strongly associated with graft rejection. Conclusions Ang-2 is critically involved in corneal transplant rejection and anti-Ang-2 treatment significantly improves the outcomes of corneal grafts. Moreover, we have shown that anterior segment OCT offers a new tool to monitor murine corneal grafts in vivo. This study not only reveals new mechanisms for transplant rejection, but also offers a novel strategy to treat it. PMID:28061513

  6. OX40L blockade protects against inflammation-driven fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Elhai, Muriel; Avouac, Jérôme; Hoffmann-Vold, Anna Maria; Ruzehaji, Nadira; Amiar, Olivia; Ruiz, Barbara; Brahiti, Hassina; Ponsoye, Matthieu; Fréchet, Maxime; Burgevin, Anne; Pezet, Sonia; Sadoine, Jérémy; Guilbert, Thomas; Nicco, Carole; Akiba, Hisaya; Heissmeyer, Vigo; Subramaniam, Arun; Resnick, Robert; Molberg, Øyvind; Kahan, André; Chiocchia, Gilles; Allanore, Yannick

    2016-01-01

    Treatment for fibrosis represents a critical unmet need, because fibrosis is the leading cause of death in industrialized countries, and there is no effective therapy to counteract the fibrotic process. The development of fibrosis relates to the interplay between vessel injury, immune cell activation, and fibroblast stimulation, which can occur in various tissues. Immunotherapies have provided a breakthrough in the treatment of immune diseases. The glycoprotein OX40–OX40 ligand (OX40L) axis offers the advantage of a targeted approach to costimulatory signals with limited impact on the whole immune response. Using systemic sclerosis (SSc) as a prototypic disease, we report compelling evidence that blockade of OX40L is a promising strategy for the treatment of inflammation-driven fibrosis. OX40L is overexpressed in the fibrotic skin and serum of patients with SSc, particularly in patients with diffuse cutaneous forms. Soluble OX40L was identified as a promising serum biomarker to predict the worsening of lung and skin fibrosis, highlighting the role of this pathway in fibrosis. In vivo, OX40L blockade prevents inflammation-driven skin, lung, and vessel fibrosis and induces the regression of established dermal fibrosis in different complementary mouse models. OX40L exerts potent profibrotic effects by promoting the infiltration of inflammatory cells into lesional tissues and therefore the release of proinflammatory mediators, thereafter leading to fibroblast activation. PMID:27298374

  7. Beta adrenergic receptor blockade of feline myocardium. Cardiac mechanics, energetics, and beta adrenoceptor regulation.

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, G; Kent, R L; McGonigle, P; Watanabe, A M

    1986-01-01

    Myocardial oxygen consumption is regulated by interrelated mechanical and inotropic conditions; there is a parallel increase in the aerobic metabolism and inotropic state during beta-adrenergic stimulation under fixed mechanical conditions. In contrast, there is some evidence that beta-blockade may reduce oxygen consumption through effects independent of its influence on mechanical conditions and contractile state, and that prolonged beta-blockade may sensitize the myocardium to beta-adrenergic stimulation. To clarify these two points, the present study examined the relationship of myocardial energetics to mechanics and inotropism during acute beta-blockade and after the withdrawal of long-term beta-blockade, whereupon the basis for any effect observed was sought by characterizing the number, affinity, and affinity states of the beta-receptors as well as the coupling of activated beta-receptors to cyclic AMP generation. Studies of right ventricular papillary muscles from control and chronically beta-blocked cats demonstrated contractile and energetic properties as well as dose-response behavior and inotropic specificity suggestive of an increase in myocardial sensitivity to beta-adrenoceptor stimulation in the latter group. Assays of cardiac beta-adrenoceptors from further groups of control and pretreated cats, both in cardiac tissue and in isolated cardiac muscle cells, failed to define a difference between the two groups either in terms of receptor number and affinity or in terms of the proportion of receptors in the high-affinity state. However, coupling of the activated beta-adrenoceptors to cyclic AMP generation was enhanced in cardiac muscle cells from chronically beta-blocked cats. These data demonstrate that beta-adrenoceptor blockade (a) produces parallel effects on inotropic state and oxygen consumption without an independent effect on either and (b) increases myocardial sensitivity to beta-adrenergic stimulation after beta-blockade withdrawal, not by "up

  8. Blockade of multiple human cardiac potassium currents by the antihistamine terfenadine: possible mechanism for terfenadine-associated cardiotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Crumb, W J; Wible, B; Arnold, D J; Payne, J P; Brown, A M

    1995-01-01

    Use of the antihistamine terfenadine has been associated with QT prolongation and torsade de pointes. One possible mechanism is blockade of cardiac potassium channels. We therefore characterized the effects of terfenadine on potassium currents recorded from isolated human cardiac myocytes. We demonstrated terfenadine block of the transient outward current and a novel, ultra-rapidly activating, delayed rectifier K+ current (IKur), which is very sensitive to 4-aminopyridine. IKur is probably produced by the protein product of Kv1.5a, a Shaker-like potassium channel cDNA cloned from human heart. We also compared terfenadine blockade of fHK (Kv1.5a) currents stably expressed in a human embryonic kidney cell line with terfenadine blockade of IKur in human atrial myocytes. Using the patch-clamp technique, we found that terfenadine produced a time-dependent reduction in Kv1.5a current that was consistent with blockade from the cytoplasmic side of the channel. The terfenadine-sensitive Kv1.5a current in human embryonic kidney cells was similar to the 4-aminopyridine-sensitive current in human atrial myocytes. In addition to blockade of the transient outward current and IKur, terfenadine at clinically relevant concentrations blocked both the rapidly and slowly activating components of the delayed rectifier in human atrial myocytes. Blockade of these K+ currents may contribute to the cardiotoxicity associated with terfenadine usage.

  9. Effect of beta blockade on singing performance.

    PubMed

    Gates, G A; Saegert, J; Wilson, N; Johnson, L; Shepherd, A; Hearne, E M

    1985-01-01

    The symptoms associated with performance anxiety, or the so-called stage fright syndrome, are similar to those of alpha and beta adrenergic stimulation. Suppression of symptoms and improvement in instrumentalist's performance after beta blockade suggest that this modality would be of benefit for singers as well. To evaluate the dose-effect relationship of beta blockade upon singing performance and the possible effect of these agents upon performance maturation, we studied 34 singing students during end of semester juries, using a double-blind crossover paradigm. Students performed once with either placebo, 20, 40, or 80 mg of nadolol, and again 48 hours later, with placebo. There was a significant dose-related, limiting effect upon intraperformance cardiac rate. A small, but statistically significant, dichotomous effect upon performance rating was noted: low-dose nadolol tended to enhance performance, whereas larger doses impaired performance. We conclude that the effects of low dose beta blockade upon singing are minimally helpful and high doses may detract from performance ability.

  10. Inhibition of TNFα during maturation of dendritic cells results in the development of semi-mature cells: a potential mechanism for the beneficial effects of TNFα blockade in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    van Lieshout, A W T; Barrera, P; Smeets, R; Pesman, G; van Riel, P L C M; van den Berg, W B; Radstake, T

    2005-01-01

    Background: Dendritic cells orchestrate pivotal immunological processes mediated by the production of cytokines and chemokines. Objective: To assess whether neutralisation of tumour necrosis factor α (TNFα) during maturation of dendritic cells affects their phenotype and behaviour, which might explain the beneficial effects of TNFα neutralisation in rheumatoid arthritis. Methods: Immature and fully matured dendritic cells were cultured from blood monocytes from patients with rheumatoid arthritis and healthy controls following standardised protocols. TNFα was neutralised by addition of the p55 soluble TNFα receptor, PEGsTNFRI. The effect of TNFα neutralisation on the phenotype (CD14, CD16, CD32, CD64, CD80, CD83, CD86, and MHC) of dendritic cells was investigated by flow cytometry. Expression of chemokines (CCL17, CCL18, CCL19, CCL22, CCL3, and CXCL8) and production of IL1ß and IL6 during dendritic cell differentiation and maturation were examined. Results: Neutralisation of TNFα during the differentiation and maturation of dendritic cells did not result in an altered dendritic cell phenotype in the rheumatoid patients or the healthy controls. In contrast, the expression of CCL17, CCL18, CCL19, CCL22, CCL3, and CXCL8 by dendritic cells was significantly reduced when TNFα activity was inhibited during lipopolysaccharide triggered dendritic cell maturation. The production of IL1ß and IL6 by mature dendritic cells was inhibited by PEGsTNFRI. Conclusions: Inhibition of TNFα activity during dendritic cell maturation leads to the development of semi-mature cells. These data suggest a novel pathway by which the neutralisation of TNFα might exert its therapeutic effects. PMID:15256380

  11. Targeting the MAPK and PI3K pathways in combination with PD1 blockade in melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Deken, Marcel A.; Gadiot, Jules; Jordanova, Ekaterina S.; Lacroix, Ruben; van Gool, Melissa; Kroon, Paula; Pineda, Cristina; Geukes Foppen, Marnix H.; Scolyer, Richard; Song, Ji-Ying; Verbrugge, Inge; Hoeller, Christoph; Dummer, Reinhard; Haanen, John B. A. G.; Long, Georgina V.; Blank, Christian U.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Immunotherapy of advanced melanoma with CTLA-4 or PD-1/PD-L1 checkpoint blockade induces in a proportion of patients long durable responses. In contrast, targeting the MAPK-pathway by selective BRAF and MEK inhibitors induces high response rates, but most patients relapse. Combining targeted therapy with immunotherapy is proposed to improve the long-term outcomes of patients. Preclinical data endorsing this hypothesis are accumulating. Inhibition of the PI3K-Akt-mTOR pathway may be a promising treatment option to overcome resistance to MAPK inhibition and for additional combination with immunotherapy. We therefore evaluated to which extent dual targeting of the MAPK and PI3K-Akt-mTOR pathways affects tumor immune infiltrates and whether it synergizes with PD-1 checkpoint blockade in a BRAFV600E/PTEN−/−-driven melanoma mouse model. Short-term dual BRAF + MEK inhibition enhanced tumor immune infiltration and improved tumor control when combined with PD-1 blockade in a CD8+ T cell dependent manner. Additional PI3K inhibition did not impair tumor control or immune cell infiltration and functionality. Analysis of on-treatment samples from melanoma patients treated with BRAF or BRAF + MEK inhibitors indicates that inhibitor-mediated T cell infiltration occurred in all patients early after treatment initiation but was less frequent found in on-treatment biopsies beyond day 15. Our findings provide a rationale for clinical testing of short-term BRAF + MEK inhibition in combination with immune checkpoint blockade, currently implemented at our institutes. Additional PI3K inhibition could be an option for BRAF + MEK inhibitor resistant patients that receive targeted therapy in combination with immune checkpoint blockade. PMID:28123875

  12. Blockade of KCa3.1 potassium channels protects against cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cheng-Lung; Liao, Jiunn-Wang; Hu, Oliver Yoa-Pu; Pao, Li-Heng

    2016-09-01

    Tubular cell apoptosis significantly contributes to cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury (AKI) pathogenesis. Although KCa3.1, a calcium-activated potassium channel, participates in apoptosis, its involvement in cisplatin-induced AKI is unknown. Here, we found that cisplatin treatment triggered an early induction of KCa3.1 expression associated with HK-2 cell apoptosis, the development of renal tubular damage, and apoptosis in mice. Treatment with the highly selective KCa3.1 blocker TRAM-34 suppressed cisplatin-induced HK-2 cell apoptosis. We further assessed whether KCa3.1 mediated cisplatin-induced AKI in genetic knockout and pharmacological blockade mouse models. KCa3.1 deficiency reduced renal function loss, renal tubular damage, and the induction of the apoptotic marker caspase-3 in the kidneys of cisplatin-treated KCa3.1 (-/-) mice. Pharmacological blockade of KCa3.1 by TRAM-34 similarly attenuated cisplatin-induced AKI in mice. Furthermore, we dissected the mechanisms underlying cisplatin-induced apoptosis reduction via KCa3.1 blockade. We found that KCa3.1 blockade attenuated cytochrome c release and the increase in the intrinsic apoptotic mediators Bax, Bak, and caspase-9 after cisplatin treatment. KCa3.1 blocking inhibited the cisplatin-induced activation of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress mediator caspase-12, which is independent of calcium-dependent protease m-calpain activation. Taken together, KCa3.1 blockade protects against cisplatin-induced AKI through the attenuation of apoptosis by interference with intrinsic apoptotic and ER stress-related mediators, providing a potential target for the prevention of cisplatin-induced AKI.

  13. Subverting the adaptive immune resistance mechanism to improve clinical responses to immune checkpoint blockade therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young J

    2015-01-01

    The correlation between tumor-infiltrating lymphocyte (TIL)-expression of programmed cell death ligand 1 (PD-L1) and clinical responsiveness to the PD-1 blocking antibody nivolumab implicates adaptive immune evasion mechanisms in cancer. We review our findings that tumor cell PD-L1 expression is induced by interferon γ (IFNγ) producing TILs. We provide a mechanistic rationale for combining IFNγ+ T helper type 1 (Th1)-inducing cancer vaccines with PD-1 immune checkpoint blockade. PMID:25964860

  14. Magnolol Attenuates Concanavalin A-induced Hepatic Fibrosis, Inhibits CD4(+) T Helper 17 (Th17) Cell Differentiation and Suppresses Hepatic Stellate Cell Activation: Blockade of Smad3/Smad4 Signalling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongjun; Ju, Baoling; Zhang, Xiaoli; Zhu, Yanfei; Nie, Ying; Xu, Yuanhong; Lei, Qiuxia

    2016-12-29

    Magnolol is a pharmacological biphenolic compound extracted from Chinese herb Magnolia officinalis, which displays anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects. This study was aimed at exploring the potential effect of magnolol on immune-related liver fibrosis. Herein, BALB/c mice were injected with concanavalin A (ConA, 8 mg/kg/week) up to 6 weeks to establish hepatic fibrosis, and magnolol (10, 20, 30 mg/kg/day) was given to these mice orally throughout the whole experiment. We found that magnolol preserved liver function and attenuated liver fibrotic injury in vivo. In response to ConA stimulation, the CD4(+) T cells preferred to polarizing towards CD4(+) T helper 17 (Th17) cells in liver. Magnolol was observed to inhibit Th17 cell differentiation in ConA-treated liver in addition to suppressing interleukin (IL)-17A generation. Hepatic stellate cells were activated in fibrotic liver as demonstrated by increased alpha smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and desmin. More transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 and activin A were secreted into the serum. Magnolol suppressed this abnormal HSC activation. Furthermore, the phosphorylation of Smad3 in its linker area (Thr179, Ser 204/208/213) was inhibited by magnolol. In vitro, the recombinant IL-17A plus TGF-β1 or activin A induced activation of human LX2 HSCs and promoted their collagen production. Smad3/Smad4 signalling pathway was activated in LX2 cells exposed to the fibrotic stimuli, as illustrated by the up-regulated phospho-Smad3 and the enhanced interaction between Smad3 and Smad4. These alterations were suppressed by magnolol. Collectively, our study reveals a novel antifibrotic effect of magnolol on Th17 cell-mediated fibrosis.

  15. SCIB2, an antibody DNA vaccine encoding NY-ESO-1 epitopes, induces potent antitumor immunity which is further enhanced by checkpoint blockade.

    PubMed

    Xue, Wei; Metheringham, Rachael L; Brentville, Victoria A; Gunn, Barbara; Symonds, Peter; Yagita, Hideo; Ramage, Judith M; Durrant, Lindy G

    2016-06-01

    Checkpoint blockade has demonstrated promising antitumor responses in approximately 10-40% of patients. However, the majority of patients do not make a productive immune response to their tumors and do not respond to checkpoint blockade. These patients may benefit from an effective vaccine that stimulates high-avidity T cell responses in combination with checkpoint blockade. We have previously shown that incorporating TRP-2 and gp100 epitopes into the CDR regions of a human IgG1 DNA (ImmunoBody®: IB) results in significant tumor regression both in animal models and patients. This vaccination strategy is superior to others as it targets antigen to antigen-presenting cells and stimulates high-avidity T cell responses. To broaden the application of this vaccination strategy, 16 NY-ESO-1 epitopes, covering over 80% of HLA phenotypes, were incorporated into the IB (SCIB2). They produced higher frequency and avidity T cell responses than peptide vaccination. These T cells were of sufficient avidity to kill NY-ESO-1-expressing tumor cells, and in vivo controlled the growth of established B16-NY-ESO-1 tumors, resulting in long-term survival (35%). When SCIB2 was given in combination with Treg depletion, CTLA-4 blockade or PD-1 blockade, long-term survival from established tumors was significantly enhanced to 56, 67 and 100%, respectively. Translating these responses into the clinic by using a combination of SCIB2 vaccination and checkpoint blockade can only further improve clinical responses.

  16. Studies Introducing Costimulation Blockade for Vascularized Composite Allografts in Non-Human Primates

    PubMed Central

    Freitas, AM; Samy, KP; Farris, AB; Leopardi, FV; Song, M; Stempora, L; Strobert, EA; Jenkins, JA; Kirk, AD; Cendales, LC

    2016-01-01

    Vascularized composite allografts (VCAs) are technically feasible. Similar to other organ transplants, VCAs are hampered by the toxicity and incomplete efficacy associated with conventional immunosuppression. Complications attributable to calcineurin inhibitors remain prevalent in the clinical cases reported to date, and these loom particularly large given the non-lifesaving nature of VCAs. Additionally, acute rejection remains almost ubiquitous, albeit controllable with current agents. Costimulation blockade offers the potential to provide prophylaxis from rejection without the adverse consequences of calcineurin-based regimens. In this study, we used a non-human-primate model of VCA in conjunction with immunosuppressive regimens containing combinations of B7-specific costimulation blockade with and without adhesion blockade with LFA3-Ig to determine what adjunctive role these agents could play in VCA transplantation when combined with more conventional agents. Compared to tacrolimus, the addition of belatacept improved rejection free allograft survival. The combination with LFA3-Ig reduced CD2hi memory T cells, however did not provide additional protection against allograft rejection and hindered protective immunity. Histology paralleled clinical histopathology and Banff grading. These data provide the basis for the study of costimulation blockade in VCA in a relevant preclinical model. PMID:26139552

  17. Divergent effects of RIP1 or RIP3 blockade in murine models of acute liver injury.

    PubMed

    Deutsch, M; Graffeo, C S; Rokosh, R; Pansari, M; Ochi, A; Levie, E M; Van Heerden, E; Tippens, D M; Greco, S; Barilla, R; Tomkötter, L; Zambirinis, C P; Avanzi, N; Gulati, R; Pachter, H L; Torres-Hernandez, A; Eisenthal, A; Daley, D; Miller, G

    2015-05-07

    Necroptosis is a recently described Caspase 8-independent method of cell death that denotes organized cellular necrosis. The roles of RIP1 and RIP3 in mediating hepatocyte death from acute liver injury are incompletely defined. Effects of necroptosis blockade were studied by separately targeting RIP1 and RIP3 in diverse murine models of acute liver injury. Blockade of necroptosis had disparate effects on disease outcome depending on the precise etiology of liver injury and component of the necrosome targeted. In ConA-induced autoimmune hepatitis, RIP3 deletion was protective, whereas RIP1 inhibition exacerbated disease, accelerated animal death, and was associated with increased hepatocyte apoptosis. Conversely, in acetaminophen-mediated liver injury, blockade of either RIP1 or RIP3 was protective and was associated with lower NLRP3 inflammasome activation. Our work highlights the fact that diverse modes of acute liver injury have differing requirements for RIP1 and RIP3; moreover, within a single injury model, RIP1 and RIP3 blockade can have diametrically opposite effects on tissue damage, suggesting that interference with distinct components of the necrosome must be considered separately.

  18. A2aR antagonists: Next generation checkpoint blockade for cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Leone, Robert D; Lo, Ying-Chun; Powell, Jonathan D

    2015-01-01

    The last several years have witnessed exciting progress in the development of immunotherapy for the treatment of cancer. This has been due in great part to the development of so-called checkpoint blockade. That is, antibodies that block inhibitory receptors such as CTLA-4 and PD-1 and thus unleash antigen-specific immune responses against tumors. It is clear that tumors evade the immune response by usurping pathways that play a role in negatively regulating normal immune responses. In this regard, adenosine in the immune microenvironment leading to the activation of the A2a receptor has been shown to represent one such negative feedback loop. Indeed, the tumor microenvironment has relatively high concentrations of adenosine. To this end, blocking A2a receptor activation has the potential to markedly enhance anti-tumor immunity in mouse models. This review will present data demonstrating the ability of A2a receptor blockade to enhance tumor vaccines, checkpoint blockade and adoptive T cell therapy. Also, as several recent studies have demonstrated that under certain conditions A2a receptor blockade can enhance tumor progression, we will also explore the complexities of adenosine signaling in the immune response. Despite important nuances to the A2a receptor pathway that require further elucidation, studies to date strongly support the development of A2a receptor antagonists (some of which have already been tested in phase III clinical trials for Parkinson Disease) as novel modalities in the immunotherapy armamentarium.

  19. Divergent effects of RIP1 or RIP3 blockade in murine models of acute liver injury

    PubMed Central

    Deutsch, M; Graffeo, C S; Rokosh, R; Pansari, M; Ochi, A; Levie, E M; Van Heerden, E; Tippens, D M; Greco, S; Barilla, R; Tomkötter, L; Zambirinis, C P; Avanzi, N; Gulati, R; Pachter, H L; Torres-Hernandez, A; Eisenthal, A; Daley, D; Miller, G

    2015-01-01

    Necroptosis is a recently described Caspase 8-independent method of cell death that denotes organized cellular necrosis. The roles of RIP1 and RIP3 in mediating hepatocyte death from acute liver injury are incompletely defined. Effects of necroptosis blockade were studied by separately targeting RIP1 and RIP3 in diverse murine models of acute liver injury. Blockade of necroptosis had disparate effects on disease outcome depending on the precise etiology of liver injury and component of the necrosome targeted. In ConA-induced autoimmune hepatitis, RIP3 deletion was protective, whereas RIP1 inhibition exacerbated disease, accelerated animal death, and was associated with increased hepatocyte apoptosis. Conversely, in acetaminophen-mediated liver injury, blockade of either RIP1 or RIP3 was protective and was associated with lower NLRP3 inflammasome activation. Our work highlights the fact that diverse modes of acute liver injury have differing requirements for RIP1 and RIP3; moreover, within a single injury model, RIP1 and RIP3 blockade can have diametrically opposite effects on tissue damage, suggesting that interference with distinct components of the necrosome must be considered separately. PMID:25950489

  20. Pleiotropic effects of extended blockade of CSF1R signaling in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Sauter, Kristin A; Pridans, Clare; Sehgal, Anuj; Tsai, Yi Ting; Bradford, Barry M; Raza, Sobia; Moffat, Lindsey; Gow, Deborah J; Beard, Philippa M; Mabbott, Neil A; Smith, Lee B; Hume, David A

    2014-08-01

    We investigated the role of CSF1R signaling in adult mice using prolonged treatment with anti-CSF1R antibody. Mutation of the CSF1 gene in the op/op mouse produces numerous developmental abnormalities. Mutation of the CSF1R has an even more penetrant phenotype, including perinatal lethality, because of the existence of a second ligand, IL-34. These effects on development provide limited insight into functions of CSF1R signaling in adult homeostasis. The carcass weight and weight of several organs (spleen, kidney, and liver) were reduced in the treated mice, but overall body weight gain was increased. Despite the complete loss of Kupffer cells, there was no effect on liver gene expression. The treatment ablated OCL, increased bone density and trabecular volume, and prevented the decline in bone mass seen in female mice with age. The op/op mouse has a deficiency in pancreatic β cells and in Paneth cells in the gut wall. Only the latter was reproduced by the antibody treatment and was associated with increased goblet cell number but no change in villus architecture. Male op/op mice are infertile as a result of testosterone insufficiency. Anti-CSF1R treatment ablated interstitial macrophages in the testis, but there was no sustained effect on testosterone or LH. The results indicate an ongoing requirement for CSF1R signaling in macrophage and OCL homeostasis but indicate that most effects of CSF1 and CSF1R mutations are due to effects on development.

  1. Down-regulation of tumor necrosis factor receptors by blockade of mitochondrial respiration.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Alcázar, J A; Hernández, I; De la Torre, M P; García, I; Santiago, E; Muñoz-Yagüe, M T; Solís-Herruzo, J A

    1995-10-13

    We have studied the effect of blockade of mitochondrial respiration on the binding of human 125I-TNF alpha to L929 cell receptors. Specific TNF alpha binding was decreased to about 20-40% of controls by blocking mitochondrial respiration. This effect was dose- and time-related and was observed independently of the level at which the respiration was blocked (respiratory chain, proton backflow, ATPase, anaerobiosis). This blockade had no effect on the half-life of the specific TNF alpha binding, the internalization or degradation of TNF alpha-receptor complexes, or the number of TNF alpha-binding sites. Scatchard analysis of TNF alpha binding data indicated a 2-4-fold decrease in the affinity of these binding sites. These effects did not appear to be related to the protein kinase C activity or to reactive oxygen radicals, since they were not antagonized by pretreatment of cells with oxygen radical scavengers, deferoxamine, or inhibitors of protein kinase C. Decrease in TNF alpha binding capacity correlated significantly with cellular ATP content (r = 0.94; p < 0.01) and with the cytocidal activity of TNF alpha against L929 cells. These findings suggest that blockade of mitochondrial respiration down-regulates the binding of TNF alpha to cells, most likely by changing the affinity of receptors for this cytokine. This down-regulation may increase the resistance of cells to TNF alpha cytotoxicity.

  2. Assessment of Methods for the Intracellular Blockade of GABAA Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Atherton, Laura A.; Burnell, Erica S.; Mellor, Jack R.

    2016-01-01

    Selective blockade of inhibitory synaptic transmission onto specific neurons is a useful tool for dissecting the excitatory and inhibitory synaptic components of ongoing network activity. To achieve this, intracellular recording with a patch solution capable of blocking GABAA receptors has advantages over other manipulations, such as pharmacological application of GABAergic antagonists or optogenetic inhibition of populations of interneurones, in that the majority of inhibitory transmission is unaffected and hence the remaining network activity preserved. Here, we assess three previously described methods to block inhibition: intracellular application of the molecules picrotoxin, 4,4’-dinitro-stilbene-2,2’-disulphonic acid (DNDS) and 4,4’-diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2’-disulphonic acid (DIDS). DNDS and picrotoxin were both found to be ineffective at blocking evoked, monosynaptic inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) onto mouse CA1 pyramidal cells. An intracellular solution containing DIDS and caesium fluoride, but lacking nucleotides ATP and GTP, was effective at decreasing the amplitude of IPSCs. However, this effect was found to be independent of DIDS, and the absence of intracellular nucleotides, and was instead due to the presence of fluoride ions in this intracellular solution, which also blocked spontaneously occurring IPSCs during hippocampal sharp waves. Critically, intracellular fluoride ions also caused a decrease in both spontaneous and evoked excitatory synaptic currents and precluded the inclusion of nucleotides in the intracellular solution. Therefore, of the methods tested, only fluoride ions were effective for intracellular blockade of IPSCs but this approach has additional cellular effects reducing its selectivity and utility. PMID:27501143

  3. Defining Effective Combinations of Immune Checkpoint Blockade and Oncolytic Virotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, Juan J; Sampath, Padma; Hou, Weizhou; Thorne, Steve H

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Recent data from randomized clinical trials with oncolytic viral therapies and with cancer immunotherapies have finally recapitulated the promise these platforms demonstrated in pre-clinical models. Perhaps the greatest advance with oncolytic virotherapy has been the appreciation of the importance of activation of the immune response in therapeutic activity. Meanwhile, the understanding that blockade of immune checkpoints (with antibodies that block the binding of PD1 to PDL1 or CTLA4 to B7-2) is critical for an effective anti-tumor immune response has revitalized the field of immunotherapy. The combination of immune activation using an oncolytic virus and blockade of immune checkpoints is therefore a logical next step. Experimental Design Here we explore such combinations and demonstrate their potential to produce enhanced responses in mouse tumor models. Different combinations and regimens were explored in immunocompetent mouse models of renal and colorectal cancer. Bioluminescence imaging and immune assays were used to determine the mechanisms mediating synergistic or antagonistic combinations. Results Interaction between immune checkpoint inhibitors and oncolytic virotherapy was found to be complex, with correct selection of viral strain, antibody and timing of the combination being critical for synergistic effects. Indeed, some combinations produced antagonistic effects and loss of therapeutic activity. A period of oncolytic viral replication and directed targeting of the immune response against the tumor were required for the most beneficial effects, with CD8+ and NK, but not CD4+ cells mediating the effects. Conclusions These considerations will be critical in the design of the inevitable clinical translation of these combination approaches. PMID:26187615

  4. Differential effects of acetylcholine and glutamate blockade on the spatiotemporal dynamics of retinal waves.

    PubMed

    Sernagor, E; Eglen, S J; O'Donovan, M J

    2000-01-15

    In the immature vertebrate retina, neighboring ganglion cells express spontaneous bursting activity (SBA), resulting in propagating waves. Previous studies suggest that the spontaneous bursting activity, asynchronous between the two eyes, controls the refinement of retinal ganglion cell projections to central visual targets. To understand how the patterns encoded within the waves contribute to the refinement of connections in the visual system, it is necessary to understand how wave propagation is regulated. We have used video-rate calcium imaging of spontaneous bursting activity in chick embryonic retinal ganglion cells to show how glutamatergic and cholinergic connections, two major excitatory synaptic drives involved in spontaneous bursting activity, contribute differentially to the spatiotemporal patterning of the waves. During partial blockade of cholinergic connections, cellular recruitment declines, leading to spatially more restricted waves. The velocity of wave propagation decreases during partial blockade of glutamatergic connections, but cellular recruitment remains substantially higher than during cholinergic blockade, thereby altering correlations in the activity of neighboring and distant ganglion cells. These findings show that cholinergic and glutamatergic connections exert different influences on the spatial and temporal properties of the waves, raising the possibility that they may play distinct roles during visual development.

  5. Compensatory upregulation of PD-1, LAG-3, and CTLA-4 limits the efficacy of single-agent checkpoint blockade in metastatic ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ruea-Yea; Francois, Ariel; McGray, Aj Robert; Miliotto, Anthony; Odunsi, Kunle

    2017-01-01

    Tumor-associated or -infiltrating lymphocytes (TALs or TILs) co-express multiple immune inhibitory receptors that contribute to immune suppression in the ovarian tumor microenvironment (TME). Dual blockade of PD-1 along with LAG-3 or CTLA-4 has been shown to synergistically enhance T-cell effector function, resulting in a delay in murine ovarian tumor growth. However, the mechanisms underlying this synergy and the relative contribution of other inhibitory receptors to immune suppression in the ovarian TME are unknown. Here, we report that multiple immune checkpoints are expressed in TALs and TILs isolated from ovarian tumor-bearing mice. Importantly, blockade of PD-1, LAG-3, or CTLA-4 alone using genetic ablation or blocking antibodies conferred a compensatory upregulation of the other checkpoint pathways, potentiating their capacity for local T-cell suppression that, in turn, could be overcome through combinatorial blockade strategies. Whereas single-agent blockade led to tumor outgrowth in all animals, dual antibody blockade against PD-1/CTLA-4 or triple blockade against PD-1/LAG-3/CTLA-4 resulted in tumor-free survival in 20% of treated mice. In contrast, dual blockade of LAG-3 and CTLA-4 pathways using PD-1 knockout mice led to tumor-free survival in 40% of treated mice, suggesting a hierarchical ordering of checkpoint function. Durable antitumor immunity was most strongly associated with increased numbers of CD8(+) T cells, the frequency of cytokine-producing effector T cells, reduced frequency of Tregs and arginine-expressing monocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells in the peritoneal TME. These data provide a basis for combinatorial checkpoint blockade in clinical intervention for ovarian cancer.

  6. Compensatory upregulation of PD-1, LAG-3, and CTLA-4 limits the efficacy of single-agent checkpoint blockade in metastatic ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Francois, Ariel; McGray, AJ Robert; Miliotto, Anthony; Odunsi, Kunle

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tumor-associated or -infiltrating lymphocytes (TALs or TILs) co-express multiple immune inhibitory receptors that contribute to immune suppression in the ovarian tumor microenvironment (TME). Dual blockade of PD-1 along with LAG-3 or CTLA-4 has been shown to synergistically enhance T-cell effector function, resulting in a delay in murine ovarian tumor growth. However, the mechanisms underlying this synergy and the relative contribution of other inhibitory receptors to immune suppression in the ovarian TME are unknown. Here, we report that multiple immune checkpoints are expressed in TALs and TILs isolated from ovarian tumor-bearing mice. Importantly, blockade of PD-1, LAG-3, or CTLA-4 alone using genetic ablation or blocking antibodies conferred a compensatory upregulation of the other checkpoint pathways, potentiating their capacity for local T-cell suppression that, in turn, could be overcome through combinatorial blockade strategies. Whereas single-agent blockade led to tumor outgrowth in all animals, dual antibody blockade against PD-1/CTLA-4 or triple blockade against PD-1/LAG-3/CTLA-4 resulted in tumor-free survival in 20% of treated mice. In contrast, dual blockade of LAG-3 and CTLA-4 pathways using PD-1 knockout mice led to tumor-free survival in 40% of treated mice, suggesting a hierarchical ordering of checkpoint function. Durable antitumor immunity was most strongly associated with increased numbers of CD8+ T cells, the frequency of cytokine-producing effector T cells, reduced frequency of Tregs and arginine-expressing monocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells in the peritoneal TME. These data provide a basis for combinatorial checkpoint blockade in clinical intervention for ovarian cancer. PMID:28197366

  7. CCR5 Blockade Suppresses Melanoma Development Through Inhibition of IL-6-Stat3 Pathway via Upregulation of SOCS3.

    PubMed

    Tang, Qiu; Jiang, Jun; Liu, Jian

    2015-12-01

    In order to understand how tumor cells can escape immune surveillance mechanisms and thus develop antitumor therapies, it is critically important to investigate the mechanisms by which the immune system interacts with the tumor microenvironment. In our current study, we found that chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) neutralization resulted in reduced melanoma tumor size, decreased percentage of CD11b+ Gr-1(+) myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), and increased proportion of cluster of differentiation (CD)3+ T cells in tumor tissues. Suppressive activity of MDSCs on CD4+ T cells and CD8+ T cell proliferation is significantly inhibited by anti-CCR5 antibody. CCR5 blockade also suppresses interleukin (IL)-6 induction, which in turn deactivates signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (Stat3) in tumors. Furthermore, the suppressed B16 tumor growth induced by CCR5 blockade is abolished with additional administration of recombinant IL-6. CCR5 blockade also induces suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3) upregulations, and anti-CCR5 antibody fails to suppress expression of phospho-Stat3 (p-Stat3), matrix metallopeptidase 9 (MMP9), and IL-6 in cells transfected with SOCS3 short-interfering RNA (SiRNA). All these data suggest that CCR5 blockade suppresses melanoma development through inhibition of IL-6-Stat3 pathway via upregulation of SOCS3.

  8. Blockade of store-operated calcium entry alleviates ethanol-induced hepatotoxicity via inhibiting apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Ruibing; Yan, Lihui; Luo, Zheng; Guo, Xiaolan; Yan, Ming

    2015-08-15

    Extracellular Ca{sup 2+} influx has been suggested to play a role in ethanol-induced hepatocyte apoptosis and necrosis. Previous studies indicated that store-operated Ca{sup 2+} entry (SOCE) was involved in liver injury induced by ethanol in HepG2 cells. However, the mechanisms underlying liver injury caused by SOCE remain unclear. We aimed to investigate the effects and mechanism of SOCE inhibition on liver injury induced by ethanol in BRL cells and Sprague–Dawley rats. Our data demonstrated that ethanol (0–400 mM) dose-dependently increased hepatocyte injury and 100 mM ethanol significantly upregulated the mRNA and protein expression of SOC for at least 72 h in BRL cells. Blockade of SOCE by pharmacological inhibitors and sh-RNA knockdown of STIM1 and Orai1 attenuated intracellular Ca{sup 2+} overload, restored the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), decreased cytochrome C release and inhibited ethanol-induced apoptosis. STIM1 and Orai1 expression was greater in ethanol-treated than control rats, and the SOCE inhibitor corosolic acid ameliorated the histopathological findings and alanine transaminase and aspartate transaminase activity as well as decreased cytochrome C release and inhibited alcohol-induced cell apoptosis. These findings suggest that SOCE blockade could alleviate alcohol-induced hepatotoxicity via inhibiting apoptosis. SOCE might be a useful therapeutic target in alcoholic liver diseases. - Highlights: • Blockade of SOCE alleviated overload of Ca{sup 2+} and hepatotoxicity after ethanol application. • Blockade of SOCE inhibited mitochondrial apoptosis after ethanol application. • SOCE might be a useful therapeutic target in alcoholic liver diseases.

  9. The Next Immune-Checkpoint Inhibitors: PD-1/PD-L1 Blockade in Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Mahoney, Kathleen M.; Freeman, Gordon J.; McDermott, David F.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Blocking the interaction between the programmed cell death (PD)-1 protein and one of its ligands, PD-L1, has been reported to have impressive antitumor responses. Therapeutics targeting this pathway are currently in clinical trials. Pembrolizumab and nivolumab are the first of this anti-PD-1 pathway family of checkpoint inhibitors to gain accelerated approval from the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of ipilimumab-refractory melanoma. Nivolumab has been associated with improved overall survival compared with dacarbazine in patients with previously untreated wild-type serine/threonine-protein kinase B-raf proto-oncogene BRAF melanoma. Although the most mature data are in the treatment of melanoma, the FDA has granted approval of nivolumab for squamous cell lung cancer and the breakthrough therapy designation to immune-checkpoint inhibitors for use in other cancers: nivolumab, an anti-PD-1 monoclonal antibody, for Hodgkin lymphoma, and MPDL-3280A, an anti-PD-L1 monoclonal antibody, for bladder cancer and non–small cell lung cancer. Here we review the literature on PD-1 and PD-L1 blockade and focus on the reported clinical studies that have included patients with melanoma. Methods PubMed was searched to identify relevant clinical studies of PD-1/PD-L1–targeted therapies in melanoma. A review of data from the current trials on clinicaltrial.gov was incorporated, as well as data presented in abstracts at the 2014 annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, given the limited number of published clinical trials on this topic. Findings The anti-PD-1 and anti-PD-L1 agents have been reported to have impressive antitumor effects in several malignancies, including melanoma. The greatest clinical activity in unselected patients has been seen in melanoma. Tumor expression of PD-L1 is a suggestive, but inadequate, biomarker predictive of response to immune-checkpoint blockade. However, tumors expressing little or no PD-L1 are

  10. Anticancer immunotherapy by CTLA-4 blockade: obligatory contribution of IL-2 receptors and negative prognostic impact of soluble CD25

    PubMed Central

    Hannani, Dalil; Vétizou, Marie; Enot, David; Rusakiewicz, Sylvie; Chaput, Nathalie; Klatzmann, David; Desbois, Melanie; Jacquelot, Nicolas; Vimond, Nadège; Chouaib, Salem; Mateus, Christine; Allison, James P; Ribas, Antoni; Wolchok, Jedd D; Yuan, Jianda; Wong, Philip; Postow, Michael; Mackiewicz, Andrzej; Mackiewicz, Jacek; Schadendorff, Dirk; Jaeger, Dirk; Korman, Alan J; Bahjat, Keith; Maio, Michele; Calabro, Luana; Teng, Michele WL; Smyth, Mark J; Eggermont, Alexander; Robert, Caroline; Kroemer, Guido; Zitvogel, Laurence

    2015-01-01

    The cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4)-blocking antibody ipilimumab induces immune-mediated long-term control of metastatic melanoma in a fraction of patients. Although ipilimumab undoubtedly exerts its therapeutic effects via immunostimulation, thus far clinically useful, immunologically relevant biomarkers that predict treatment efficiency have been elusive. Here, we show that neutralization of IL-2 or blocking the α and β subunits of the IL-2 receptor (CD25 and CD122, respectively) abolished the antitumor effects and the accompanying improvement of the ratio of intratumoral T effector versus regulatory cells (Tregs), which were otherwise induced by CTLA-4 blockade in preclinical mouse models. CTLA-4 blockade led to the reduction of a suppressive CD4+ T cell subset expressing Lag3, ICOS, IL-10 and Egr2 with a concomitant rise in IL-2-producing effector cells that lost FoxP3 expression and accumulated in regressing tumors. While recombinant IL-2 improved the therapeutic efficacy of CTLA-4 blockade, the decoy IL-2 receptor α (IL-2Rα, sCD25) inhibited the anticancer effects of CTLA-4 blockade. In 262 metastatic melanoma patients receiving ipilimumab, baseline serum concentrations of sCD25 represented an independent indicator of overall survival, with high levels predicting resistance to therapy. Altogether, these results unravel a role for IL-2 and IL-2 receptors in the anticancer activity of CTLA-4 blockade. Importantly, our study provides the first immunologically relevant biomarker, namely elevated serum sCD25, that predicts resistance to CTLA-4 blockade in patients with melanoma. PMID:25582080

  11. Does calcium channel blockade have a role in prevention of expression of sepsis in renal transplant recipients?

    PubMed Central

    D’Elia, John A; Gleason, Ray E; Monaco, Anthony P; Weinrauch, Larry A

    2016-01-01

    Many antihypertensive agents have been demonstrated to assist in preservation of kidney function, among them those that modulate calcium channels. Calcium channel blockers may also be of value in protecting hemodialysis patients from complications of sepsis. In diabetic recipients of kidney transplant allografts treated with cyclosporine, calcium channel blockade has been retrospectively linked to improved graft preservation and to fewer episodes of sepsis. This brief review outlines clinical and experimental publications on potential protection from sepsis by addition of calcium channel blockers to standard antibiotic therapy in individuals who may or may not have normal kidney function, or in the presence or absence of immunosuppression. Such mechanisms include blockade of antibiotic cytosolic extrusion in the cases of Pneumococci, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Plasmodium falciparum malaria, or Schistosoma mansoni; blockade of the calcineurin/calmodulin pathway (in immunosuppressed patients allowing for lower dosage of cyclosporine); stabilization of calcium movement at the level of sarcoplasmic reticulum by which shock (vasopressor instability) is prevented; or of cytosolic calcium influx and cell death (in the case of allograft acute tubular necrosis). Given the high cost of development of new antibiotics, a role for generic calcium channel blockade in sepsis prevention should be pursued by additional studies to investigate potential links between blockade of calcium channels and expression of sepsis in at-risk populations. PMID:27920569

  12. Genetic Basis for Clinical Response to CTLA-4 Blockade in Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Zaretsky, Jesse M.; Desrichard, Alexis; Walsh, Logan A.; Postow, Michael A.; Wong, Phillip; Ho, Teresa S.; Hollmann, Travis J.; Bruggeman, Cameron; Kannan, Kasthuri; Li, Yanyun; Elipenahli, Ceyhan; Liu, Cailian; Harbison, Christopher T.; Wang, Lisu; Ribas, Antoni

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Immune checkpoint inhibitors are effective cancer treatments, but molecular determinants of clinical benefit are unknown. Ipilimumab and tremelimumab are antibodies against cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4). Anti–CTLA-4 treatment prolongs overall survival in patients with melanoma. CTLA-4 blockade activates T cells and enables them to destroy tumor cells. METHODS We obtained tumor tissue from patients with melanoma who were treated with ipilimumab or tremelimumab. Whole-exome sequencing was performed on tumors and matched blood samples. Somatic mutations and candidate neoantigens generated from these mutations were characterized. Neoantigen peptides were tested for the ability to activate lymphocytes from ipilimumab-treated patients. RESULTS Malignant melanoma exomes from 64 patients treated with CTLA-4 blockade were characterized with the use of massively parallel sequencing. A discovery set consisted of 11 patients who derived a long-term clinical benefit and 14 patients who derived a minimal benefit or no benefit. Mutational load was associated with the degree of clinical benefit (P = 0.01) but alone was not sufficient to predict benefit. Using genomewide somatic neoepitope analysis and patient-specific HLA typing, we identified candidate tumor neoantigens for each patient. We elucidated a neo-antigen landscape that is specifically present in tumors with a strong response to CTLA-4 blockade. We validated this signature in a second set of 39 patients with melanoma who were treated with anti–CTLA-4 antibodies. Predicted neoantigens activated T cells from the patients treated with ipilimumab. CONCLUSIONS These findings define a genetic basis for benefit from CTLA-4 blockade in melanoma and provide a rationale for examining exomes of patients for whom anti–CTLA-4 agents are being considered. (Funded by the Frederick Adler Fund and others.) PMID:25409260

  13. PD-1 blockade induces responses by inhibiting adaptive immune resistance

    PubMed Central

    Tumeh, Paul C.; Harview, Christina L.; Yearley, Jennifer H.; Shintaku, I. Peter; Taylor, Emma J. M.; Robert, Lidia; Chmielowski, Bartosz; Spasic, Marko; Henry, Gina; Ciobanu, Voicu; West, Alisha N.; Carmona, Manuel; Kivork, Christine; Seja, Elizabeth; Cherry, Grace; Gutierrez, Antonio; Grogan, Tristan R.; Mateus, Christine; Tomasic, Gorana; Glaspy, John A.; Emerson, Ryan O.; Robins, Harlan; Pierce, Robert H.; Elashoff, David A.; Robert, Caroline; Ribas, Antoni

    2014-01-01

    Therapies that target the programmed death-1 (PD-1) receptor have shown unprecedented rates of durable clinical responses in patients with various cancer types.1–5 One mechanism by which cancer tissues limit the host immune response is via upregulation of PD-1 ligand (PD-L1) and its ligation to PD-1 on antigen-specific CD8 T-cells (termed adaptive immune resistance).6,7 Here we show that pre-existing CD8 T-cells distinctly located at the invasive tumour margin are associated with expression of the PD-1/PD-L1 immune inhibitory axis and may predict response to therapy. We analyzed samples from 46 patients with metastatic melanoma obtained before and during anti-PD1 therapy (pembrolizumab) using quantitative immunohistochemistry, quantitative multiplex immunofluorescence, and next generation sequencing for T-cell receptors (TCR). In serially sampled tumours, responding patients showed proliferation of intratumoural CD8+ T-cells that directly correlated with radiographic reduction in tumour size. Pre-treatment samples obtained from responding patients showed higher numbers of CD8, PD1, and PD-L1 expressing cells at the invasive tumour margin and inside tumours, with close proximity between PD-1 and PD-L1, and a more clonal TCR repertoire. Using multivariate analysis, we established a predictive model based on CD8 expression at the invasive margin and validated the model in an independent cohort of 15 patients. Our findings indicate that tumour regression following therapeutic PD-1 blockade requires pre-existing CD8+ T cells that are negatively regulated by PD-1/PD-L1 mediated adaptive immune resistance. PMID:25428505

  14. Optimal Photon Blockade on the Maximal Atomic Coherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yang; Zhang, Jun; Yu, Chang-shui

    2016-12-01

    There is generally no obvious evidence in any direct relation between photon blockade and atomic coherence. Here instead of only illustrating the photon statistics, we show an interesting relation between the steady-state photon blockade and the atomic coherence by designing a weakly driven cavity QED system with a two-level atom trapped. It is shown for the first time that the maximal atomic coherence has a perfect correspondence with the optimal photon blockade. The negative effects of the strong dissipations on photon statistics, atomic coherence and their correspondence are also addressed. The numerical simulation is also given to support all of our results.

  15. Combination immunotherapy with 4-1BBL and CTLA-4 blockade for the treatment of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Youlin, Kuang; Li, Zhang; Xiaodong, Weng; Xiuheng, Liu; Hengchen, Zhu

    2012-01-01

    Immune regulation has been shown to be involved in the progressive growth of some murine tumours. Interruption of immune regulatory pathways via activation of 4-1BB or cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen-4 (CTLA-4) blockade appears to be a promising strategy for cancer immunotherapy. In this study, we examined the effectiveness of 4-1BBL-expressing tumor cell vaccine in combination with CTLA-4 blockade on rejection of murine prostate cancer RM-1. We found that the combination of both a vaccine consisting of 4-1BBL-expressing RM-1 cells and CTLA-4 blockade resulted in regression of RM-1 tumors and a significant increase in survival of the tumour cell recipients, compared to that of either treatment alone. The combined vaccination resulted in higher CTL against RM-1 cells and increased secretion of IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-2 in the mix-cultured supernatant. These results suggest that combining activation of 4-1BB and blockade of CTLA-4 may offer a new strategy for prostate cancer immunotherapy.

  16. Gastrin-releasing peptide blockade as a broad-spectrum anti-inflammatory therapy for asthma

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Shutang; Potts, Erin N.; Cuttitta, Frank; Foster, W. Michael; Sunday, Mary E.

    2011-01-01

    Gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) is synthesized by pulmonary neuroendocrine cells in inflammatory lung diseases, such as bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). Many BPD infants develop asthma, a serious disorder of intermittent airway obstruction. Despite extensive research, early mechanisms of asthma remain controversial. The incidence of asthma is growing, now affecting >300 million people worldwide. To test the hypothesis that GRP mediates asthma, we used two murine models: ozone exposure for air pollution-induced airway hyperreactivity (AHR), and ovalbumin (OVA)-induced allergic airway disease. BALB/c mice were given small molecule GRP blocking agent 77427, or GRP blocking antibody 2A11, before exposure to ozone or OVA challenge. In both models, GRP blockade abrogated AHR and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) macrophages and granulocytes, and decreased BAL cytokines implicated in asthma, including those typically derived from Th1 (e.g., IL-2, TNFα), Th2 (e.g., IL-5, IL-13), Th17 (IL-17), macrophages (e.g., MCP-1, IL-1), and neutrophils (KC = IL-8). Dexamethasone generally had smaller effects on all parameters. Macrophages, T cells, and neutrophils express GRP receptor (GRPR). GRP blockade diminished serine phosphorylation of GRPR with ozone or OVA. Thus, GRP mediates AHR and airway inflammation in mice, suggesting that GRP blockade is promising as a broad-spectrum therapeutic approach to treat and/or prevent asthma in humans. PMID:21252304

  17. The Impact of CXCR4 Blockade on the Survival of Rat Brain Cortical Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Merino, José Joaquín; Garcimartín, Alba; López-Oliva, María Elvira; Benedí, Juana; González, María Pilar

    2016-01-01

    Background: Chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4) plays a role in neuronal survival/cell repair and also contributes to the progression of cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. Chemokine ligand 12 (CXCL12) binds to CXCR4. In this study, we have investigated whether CXCR4 blockade by AMD3100 (a CXCR4 antagonist, member of bicyclam family) may affect neuronal survival in the absence of insult. Thus, we have measured the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), Bax and Bcl-2 protein translocation, and cytochrome c release in AMD3100-treated brain cortical neurons at 7 DIV (days in vitro). Methods: For this aim, AMD3100 (200 nM) was added to cortical neurons for 24 h, and several biomarkers like cell viability, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release, caspase-3/9 activity, proteins Bax and Bcl-2 translocation, and cytochrome c release were analyzed by immunoblot. Results: CXCR4 blockade by AMD3100 (200 nM, 24 h) induces mitochondrial hyperpolarization and increases caspase-3/9 hyperpolarization without affecting LDH release as compared to untreated controls. AMD3100 also increases cytochrome c release and promotes Bax translocation to the mitochondria, whereas it raises cytosolic Bcl-2 levels in brain cortical neurons. Conclusion: CXCR4 blockade induces cellular death via intrinsic apoptosis in rat brain cortical neurons in absence of insult. PMID:27916896

  18. Heterologous immunity triggered by a single, latent virus in Mus musculus: combined costimulation- and adhesion- blockade decrease rejection.

    PubMed

    Beus, Jonathan M; Hashmi, Salila S; Selvaraj, Saranya A; Duan, Danxia; Stempora, Linda L; Monday, Stephanie A; Cheeseman, Jennifer A; Hamby, Kelly M; Speck, Samuel H; Larsen, Christian P; Kirk, Allan D; Kean, Leslie S

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying latent-virus-mediated heterologous immunity, and subsequent transplant rejection, especially in the setting of T cell costimulation blockade, remain undetermined. To address this, we have utilized MHV68 to develop a rodent model of latent virus-induced heterologous alloimmunity. MHV68 infection was correlated with multimodal immune deviation, which included increased secretion of CXCL9 and CXCL10, and with the expansion of a CD8(dim) T cell population. CD8(dim) T cells exhibited decreased expression of multiple costimulation molecules and increased expression of two adhesion molecules, LFA-1 and VLA-4. In the setting of MHV68 latency, recipients demonstrated accelerated costimulation blockade-resistant rejection of skin allografts compared to non-infected animals (MST 13.5 d in infected animals vs 22 d in non-infected animals, p<.0001). In contrast, the duration of graft acceptance was equivalent between non-infected and infected animals when treated with combined anti-LFA-1/anti-VLA-4 adhesion blockade (MST 24 d for non-infected and 27 d for infected, p = n.s.). The combination of CTLA-4-Ig/anti-CD154-based costimulation blockade+anti-LFA-1/anti-VLA-4-based adhesion blockade led to prolonged graft acceptance in both non-infected and infected cohorts (MST>100 d for both, p<.0001 versus costimulation blockade for either). While in the non-infected cohort, either CTLA-4-Ig or anti-CD154 alone could effectively pair with adhesion blockade to prolong allograft acceptance, in infected animals, the prolonged acceptance of skin grafts could only be recapitulated when anti-LFA-1 and anti-VLA-4 antibodies were combined with anti-CD154 (without CTLA-4-Ig, MST>100 d). Graft acceptance was significantly impaired when CTLA-4-Ig alone (no anti-CD154) was combined with adhesion blockade (MST 41 d). These results suggest that in the setting of MHV68 infection, synergy occurs predominantly between adhesion pathways and CD154-based costimulation, and

  19. [The micro-particles of blood plasma, micro-vesicles, exosomes, apoptotic bodies and Kupffer macrophage in liver: late in phylogenesis system of realization of biological function of endoecology].

    PubMed

    Titov, V N

    2014-07-01

    Probably, at early stages of phylogenesis and on the stage of first contacts of single cells in environment the mode of intercommunication was developed via formation of micro-vesicles. It is quite possible that this so complicated way was used during billions of years to develop the very early cenosises of functionally different cells. Later on, diffusion of humoral mediators within the framework of group of cells but without vesicles resulted in formation of very early regulated cenosises of various cells. In billions years, these paracrin regulated cenosises became structural and functional units of every organ. It is difficult to imagine that mode of early in phylogenesis humoral intercommunication of cells could preserve its significance in present conditions. At the same time, according to methodological approach of biological continuity in becoming of biological functions and biological reactions, micro-vesicles continue to function but with somehow different purposes. It is surmised that microparticles of blood plasma consist a heterogeneous population of micro-vesicles initially formed by cells, exosomes and apoptotic bodies. This population is a foundation of spontaneous, physical chemical formation of complexes in blood plasma on principles of absorption, hydrophobicity and ionic interaction of structural cells'components insoluble in water medium. It is assumed that presently formation of micro-particles in blood is functionally a kind of realization of phylogenetically late variant of biological function of endoecology, in inter-cellular medium, in local pool of intravascular blood plasma. This variant includes: a) microparticles, micro-vesicles, exosomes and apoptotic bodies as elements of biological reaction of support of "purity" of inter-cellular medium; b) in many respects highly specialized variant of phagocytosis of micro-particles by Kupffer macrophages in liver In the aggregate, this is a phylogenetically late medium of realization of

  20. Hepatic non-parenchymal cells and extracellular matrix participate in oval cell-mediated liver regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Chen, Xiao-Ping; Zhang, Wan-Guang; Zhang, Feng; Xiang, Shuai; Dong, Han-Hua; Zhang, Lei

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To elucidate the interaction between non-parenchymal cells, extracellular matrix and oval cells during the restituting process of liver injury induced by partial hepatectomy (PH). METHODS: We examined the localization of oval cells, non-parenchymal cells, and the extracellular matrix components using immunohistochemical and double immunofluorescent analysis during the proliferation and differentiation of oval cells in N-2-acetylaminofluorene (2-AAF)/PH rat model. RESULTS: By day 2 after PH, small oval cells began to proliferate around the portal area. Most of stellate cells and laminin were present along the hepatic sinusoids in the periportal area. Kupffer cells and fibronectin markedly increased in the whole hepatic lobule. From day 4 to 9, oval cells spread further into hepatic parenchyma, closely associated with stellate cells, fibronectin and laminin. Kupffer cells admixed with oval cells by day 6 and then decreased in the periportal zone. From day 12 to 15, most of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), laminin and fibronectin located around the small hepatocyte nodus, and minority of them appeared in the nodus. Kupffer cells were mainly limited in the pericentral sinusoids. After day 18, the normal liver lobule structures began to recover. CONCLUSION: Local hepatic microenvironment may participate in the oval cell-mediated liver regeneration through the cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. PMID:19195056

  1. Rydberg blockade effects at n ˜300 in strontium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Dunning, F. B.; Yoshida, S.; Burgdörfer, J.

    2015-11-01

    Rydberg blockade at n ˜300 , is examined using strontium n F13 Rydberg atoms excited in an atomic beam in a small volume defined by two tightly focused crossed laser beams. The observation of blockade for such states is challenging due to their extreme sensitivity to stray fields and the many magnetic sublevels associated with F states which results in a high local density of states. Nonetheless, with a careful choice of laser polarization to selectively excite only a limited number of these sublevels, sizable blockade effects are observed on an ˜0.1 mm length scale extending blockade measurements into the near-macroscopic regime and enabling study of the dynamics of strongly coupled many-body high-n Rydberg systems under carefully controlled conditions.

  2. Blockade involving high- n, n ~ 300 , strontium Rydberg atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Shuhei; Burgdörfer, Joachim; Zhang, Xinyue; Dunning, F. Barry

    2016-05-01

    The blockade of high- n strontium n1F3 Rydberg states contained in a hot atomic beam is investigated both theoretically and experimentally. One difficulty in such experiments is that, once created, Rydberg atoms move out of the excitation volume reducing blockade effects. While the effects of such motion are apparent, the data provide strong evidence of blockade, consistent with theoretical predictions. Because of their relatively high angular momentum (L = 3) , a pair of n1F3 Rydberg atoms have many degenerate states whose degeneracy is removed by Rydberg-Rydberg interactions yielding a high density of states near the target energy. To evaluate the effect of blockade not only the energy shifts but also the modification of the oscillator strengths for excitation have to be taken into account. The n-scaling of the interactions and the importance of high-order multipoles will also be discussed. Research supported by the NSF and Robert A. Welch Foundation.

  3. Selective relaxant binding agents for reversal of neuromuscular blockade.

    PubMed

    Bom, Anton; Epemolu, Ola; Hope, Frank; Rutherford, Samantha; Thomson, Karen

    2007-06-01

    Traditionally, reversal of neuromuscular blockade during anaesthesia was achieved by increasing the acetylcholine concentration in the neuromuscular junction using acetylcholinesterase inhibitors. However, this is ineffective against profound blockade. Furthermore, the increase in acetylcholine level is not limited to the neuromuscular junction, resulting in unwanted side effects requiring co-treatment with muscarinic antagonists. Selective relaxant binding agents offer a new approach for the reversal of neuromuscular blockade: encapsulation of the neuromuscular blocking agent, resulting in inactivation. As part of this new approach, cyclodextrin molecules have been designed that selectively encapsulate steroidal neuromuscular blocking agents. Both animal and human experiments have demonstrated that fast, effective and complete recovery from both normal and profound neuromuscular blockade is now possible. Furthermore, these cyclodextrin derivatives do not have the unwanted side effects of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors.

  4. Ablation of type I hypersensitivity in experimental allergic conjunctivitis by eotaxin-1/CCR3 blockade

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Takao; Ohbayashi, Masaharu; Kuo, Chuan Hui; Komatsu, Naoki; Yakura, Keiko; Tominaga, Takeshi; Inoue, Yoshitsugu; Higashi, Hidemitsu; Murata, Meguru; Takeda, Shuzo; Fukushima, Atsuki; Liu, Fu-Tong; Rothenberg, Marc E.; Ono, Santa Jeremy

    2009-01-01

    The immune response is regulated, in part, by effector cells whose activation requires multiple signals. For example, T cells require signals emanating from the T cell antigen receptor and co-stimulatory molecules for full activation. Here, we present evidence indicating that IgE-mediated hypersensitivity reactions in vivo also require cognate signals to activate mast cells. Immediate hypersensitivity reactions in the conjunctiva are ablated in mice deficient in eotaxin-1, despite normal numbers of tissue mast cells and levels of IgE. To further define the co-stimulatory signals mediated by chemokine receptor 3 (CCR3), an eotaxin-1 receptor, effects of CCR3 blockade were tested with an allergic conjunctivitis model and in ex vivo isolated connective tissue-type mast cells. Our results show that CCR3 blockade significantly suppresses allergen-mediated hypersensitivity reactions as well as IgE-mediated mast cell degranulation. We propose that a co-stimulatory axis by CCR3, mainly stimulated by eotaxin-1, is pivotal in mast cell-mediated hypersensitivity reactions. PMID:19147836

  5. Ablation of type I hypersensitivity in experimental allergic conjunctivitis by eotaxin-1/CCR3 blockade.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Dai; Nakamura, Takao; Ohbayashi, Masaharu; Kuo, Chuan Hui; Komatsu, Naoki; Yakura, Keiko; Tominaga, Takeshi; Inoue, Yoshitsugu; Higashi, Hidemitsu; Murata, Meguru; Takeda, Shuzo; Fukushima, Atsuki; Liu, Fu-Tong; Rothenberg, Marc E; Ono, Santa Jeremy

    2009-02-01

    The immune response is regulated, in part, by effector cells whose activation requires multiple signals. For example, T cells require signals emanating from the T cell antigen receptor and co-stimulatory molecules for full activation. Here, we present evidence indicating that IgE-mediated hypersensitivity reactions in vivo also require cognate signals to activate mast cells. Immediate hypersensitivity reactions in the conjunctiva are ablated in mice deficient in eotaxin-1, despite normal numbers of tissue mast cells and levels of IgE. To further define the co-stimulatory signals mediated by chemokine receptor 3 (CCR3), an eotaxin-1 receptor, effects of CCR3 blockade were tested with an allergic conjunctivitis model and in ex vivo isolated connective tissue-type mast cells. Our results show that CCR3 blockade significantly suppresses allergen-mediated hypersensitivity reactions as well as IgE-mediated mast cell degranulation. We propose that a co-stimulatory axis by CCR3, mainly stimulated by eotaxin-1, is pivotal in mast cell-mediated hypersensitivity reactions.

  6. Synovial expression of IL-15 in rheumatoid arthritis is not influenced by blockade of tumour necrosis factor

    PubMed Central

    Ernestam, Sofia; af Klint, Erik; Catrina, Anca Irinel; Sundberg, Erik; Engström, Marianne; Klareskog, Lars; Ulfgren, Ann-Kristin

    2006-01-01

    Blockade of tumour necrosis factor (TNF) is an effective treatment in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), but both non-responders and partial responders are quite frequent. This suggests that other pro-inflammatory cytokines may be of importance in the pathogenesis of RA and as possible targets for therapy. In this study we investigated the effect of TNF blockade (infliximab) on the synovial expression of IL-15 in RA in relation to different cell types and expression of other cytokines, to elucidate whether or not IL-15 is a possible target for therapy, independently of TNF blockade. Two arthroscopies with multiple biopsies were performed on nine patients with RA and knee-joint synovitis before and after three infusions of infliximab (3 mg/kg). Synovial biopsies were analysed with immunohistochemistry for expression of IL-15, TNF, IL-1α, IL-1ß and IFN-γ, and for the cell surface markers CD3, CD68 and CD163. Stained synovial biopsy sections were evaluated by computerized image analysis. IL-15 expression was detected in all synovial biopsies taken at baseline. After infliximab therapy, the expression of IL-15 was increased in four patients and reduced in five. Synovial expression of IL-15 was not correlated with any CD marker or with the presence of any other cytokine. Synovial cellularity was decreased after 8 to 10 weeks of treatment with a significant reduction of the CD68-positive synovial cells, whereas no significant change was seen in the number of CD3-positive T cells and CD163-expressing macrophages. The number of TNF-producing cells in the synovial tissue at baseline was correlated with a good response to therapy. Thus, in this study the synovial expression of IL-15 in RA was not consistently influenced by TNF blockade, being apparently independent of TNF expression in the synovium. Consequently, we propose that IL-15 should remain as a therapeutic target in RA, regardless of the response to TNF blockade. PMID:16507118

  7. Costimulation Blockade in Kidney Transplantation: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Malvezzi, Paolo; Jouve, Thomas; Rostaing, Lionel

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In the setting of solid-organ transplantation, calcineurin inhibitor (CNI)-based therapy remains the cornerstone of immunosuppression. However, long-term use of CNIs is associated with some degree of nephrotoxicity. This has led to exploring the blockade of some costimulation pathways as an efficient immunosuppressive tool instead of using CNIs. The only agent already in clinical use and approved by the health authorities for kidney transplant patients is belatacept (Nulojix), a fusion protein that interferes with cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated protein 4. Belatacept has been demonstrated to be as efficient as cyclosporine-based immunosuppression and is associated with significantly better renal function, that is, no nephrotoxicity. However, in the immediate posttransplant period, significantly more mild/moderate episodes of acute rejection have been reported, favored by the fact that cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated protein pathway has an inhibitory effect on the alloimmune response; thereby its inhibition is detrimental in this regard. This has led to the development of antibodies that target CD28. The most advanced is FR104, it has shown promise in nonhuman primate models of autoimmune diseases and allotransplantation. In addition, research into blocking the CD40-CD154 pathway is underway. A phase II study testing ASK1240, that is, anti-CD40 antibody has been completed, and the results are pending. PMID:27472094

  8. Interleukin-6 blockade in ocular inflammatory diseases

    PubMed Central

    Mesquida, M; Leszczynska, A; Llorenç, V; Adán, A

    2014-01-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is a key cytokine featuring redundancy and pleiotropic activity. It plays a central role in host defence against environmental stress such as infection and injury. Dysregulated, persistent interleukin (IL)-6 production has been implicated in the development of various autoimmune, chronic inflammatory diseases and even cancers. Significant elevation of IL-6 has been found in ocular fluids derived from refractory/chronic uveitis patients. In experimental autoimmune uveitis models with IL-6 knock-out mice, IL-6 has shown to be essential for inducing inflammation. IL-6 blockade can suppress acute T helper type 17 (Th17) responses via its differentiation and, importantly, can ameliorate chronic inflammation. Tocilizumab, a recombinant humanized anti-IL-6 receptor antibody, has been shown to be effective in several autoimmune diseases, including uveitis. Herein, we discuss the basic biology of IL-6 and its role in development of autoimmune conditions, focusing particularly on non-infectious uveitis. It also provides an overview of efficacy and safety of tocilizumab therapy for ocular inflammatory diseases. PMID:24528300

  9. Orbital excitation blockade and algorithmic cooling in quantum gases.

    PubMed

    Bakr, Waseem S; Preiss, Philipp M; Tai, M Eric; Ma, Ruichao; Simon, Jonathan; Greiner, Markus

    2011-12-21

    Interaction blockade occurs when strong interactions in a confined, few-body system prevent a particle from occupying an otherwise accessible quantum state. Blockade phenomena reveal the underlying granular nature of quantum systems and allow for the detection and manipulation of the constituent particles, be they electrons, spins, atoms or photons. Applications include single-electron transistors based on electronic Coulomb blockade and quantum logic gates in Rydberg atoms. Here we report a form of interaction blockade that occurs when transferring ultracold atoms between orbitals in an optical lattice. We call this orbital excitation blockade (OEB). In this system, atoms at the same lattice site undergo coherent collisions described by a contact interaction whose strength depends strongly on the orbital wavefunctions of the atoms. We induce coherent orbital excitations by modulating the lattice depth, and observe staircase-like excitation behaviour as we cross the interaction-split resonances by tuning the modulation frequency. As an application of OEB, we demonstrate algorithmic cooling of quantum gases: a sequence of reversible OEB-based quantum operations isolates the entropy in one part of the system and then an irreversible step removes the entropy from the gas. This technique may make it possible to cool quantum gases to have the ultralow entropies required for quantum simulation of strongly correlated electron systems. In addition, the close analogy between OEB and dipole blockade in Rydberg atoms provides a plan for the implementation of two-quantum-bit gates in a quantum computing architecture with natural scalability.

  10. Primary combined androgen blockade in localized disease and its mechanism.

    PubMed

    Namiki, Mikio; Kitagawa, Yasuhide; Mizokami, Atsushi; Koh, Eitetsu

    2008-04-01

    In spite of clinical practice guidelines such as NCI-PDQ - in which primary androgen deprivation therapy (PADT) is not recommended as the primary treatment for localized prostate cancer - many patients have been treated with PADT. One of the reasons is that urologists themselves permit patients' desire because they know the effectiveness of PADT for some patients in their experiences. In this review we demonstrate basic mechanisms and the clinical efficacy of primary combined androgen blockade (PCAB) for localized or locally advanced prostate cancer. Then we discuss which patients are candidates for PCAB, and show that more than 30% of low- or intermediate-risk localized prostate cancers could be controlled in the long term with only PCAB. Short-term or intermittent PADT could not be recommended because of the possibilities of changing the character of the cancer cells by incomplete androgen ablation. We propose algorithms for the treatment of localized prostate cancer not only in low- and intermediate-risk groups but also in the high-risk group.

  11. Two stages in lymphocyte mediator production by differential susceptibility to blockade using niridazole.

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, J C; Fajardo, I; David, J R

    1975-01-01

    Sera from guinea pigs given niridazole, an anti-schistosomal compound, have been shown to reversibly block the production of antigen-induced migration inhibitory factor by sensitized guinea pig lymph node cells. Since niridazole itself has no effect in vitro, the blockade of production of migration inhibitory factor is probably due to drug metabolites in the serum. We report here further studies on the mechanism of this drug-induced suppression of cellular hypersensitivity; the data show that niridazole active serum does not block the production of migration inhibitory factor once it has been initiated. Indeed, if niridazole active serum is added a little as 60 sec after the addition of antigen, the lymphocytes will produce migration inhibitory factor. These results suggest the presence of at least two stages in production of migration inhibitory factor after the addition of antigen to lymphocytes. The first, lasting less than 60 sec, is susceptible to blockade by niridazole active serum; the second is not. The elucidation of the mechanism of this blockade should lead to further understanding of the early events after antigen triggering of sensitized lymphocytes. PMID:1105584

  12. Durable antitumor responses to CD47 blockade require adaptive immune stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Sockolosky, Jonathan T.; Dougan, Michael; Ingram, Jessica R.; Ho, Chia Chi M.; Kauke, Monique J.; Almo, Steven C.; Ploegh, Hidde L.; Garcia, K. Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic antitumor antibodies treat cancer by mobilizing both innate and adaptive immunity. CD47 is an antiphagocytic ligand exploited by tumor cells to blunt antibody effector functions by transmitting an inhibitory signal through its receptor signal regulatory protein alpha (SIRPα). Interference with the CD47–SIRPα interaction synergizes with tumor-specific monoclonal antibodies to eliminate human tumor xenografts by enhancing macrophage-mediated antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP), but synergy between CD47 blockade and ADCP has yet to be demonstrated in immunocompetent hosts. Here, we show that CD47 blockade alone or in combination with a tumor-specific antibody fails to generate antitumor immunity against syngeneic B16F10 tumors in mice. Durable tumor immunity required programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) blockade in combination with an antitumor antibody, with incorporation of CD47 antagonism substantially improving response rates. Our results highlight an underappreciated contribution of the adaptive immune system to anti-CD47 adjuvant therapy and suggest that targeting both innate and adaptive immune checkpoints can potentiate the vaccinal effect of antitumor antibody therapy. PMID:27091975

  13. Investigation of Prolactin Receptor Activation and Blockade Using Time-Resolved Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Tallet, Estelle; Fernandez, Isabelle; Zhang, Chi; Salsac, Marion; Gregor, Nathalie; Ayoub, Mohammed Akli; Pin, Jean Philippe; Trinquet, Eric; Goffin, Vincent

    2011-01-01

    The prolactin receptor (PRLR) is emerging as a therapeutic target in oncology. Knowledge-based drug design led to the development of a pure PRLR antagonist (Del1-9-G129R-hPRL) that was recently shown to prevent PRL-induced mouse prostate tumorogenesis. In humans, the first gain-of-function mutation of the PRLR (PRLRI146L) was recently identified in breast tumor patients. At the molecular level, the actual mechanism of action of these two novel players in the PRL system remains elusive. In this study, we addressed whether constitutive PRLR activation (PRLRI146L) or PRLR blockade (antagonist) involved alteration of receptor oligomerization and/or of inter-chain distances compared to unstimulated and PRL-stimulated PRLR. Using a combination of various biochemical and spectroscopic approaches (co-IP, blue native electrophoresis, BRET1), we demonstrated that preformed PRLR homodimers are altered neither by PRL- or I146L-induced receptor triggering, nor by antagonist-mediated blockade. These findings were confirmed using a novel time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET) technology that allows monitoring distance changes between cell surface tagged receptors. This technology revealed that PRLR blockade or activation did not involve detectable distance changes between extracellular domains of receptor chains within the dimer. This study merges with our previous structural investigations suggesting that the mechanism of PRLR activation solely involves intermolecular contact adaptations leading to subtle intramolecular rearrangements. PMID:22649370

  14. Monitoring clonal evolution and resistance to EGFR blockade in the blood of metastatic colorectal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Siravegna, Giulia; Mussolin, Benedetta; Buscarino, Michela; Corti, Giorgio; Cassingena, Andrea; Crisafulli, Giovanni; Ponzetti, Agostino; Cremolini, Chiara; Amatu, Alessio; Lauricella, Calogero; Lamba, Simona; Hobor, Sebastijan; Avallone, Antonio; Valtorta, Emanuele; Rospo, Giuseppe; Medico, Enzo; Motta, Valentina; Antoniotti, Carlotta; Tatangelo, Fabiana; Bellosillo, Beatriz; Veronese, Silvio; Budillon, Alfredo; Montagut, Clara; Racca, Patrizia; Marsoni, Silvia; Falcone, Alfredo; Corcoran, Ryan B.; Di Nicolantonio, Federica; Loupakis, Fotios; Siena, Salvatore; Sartore-Bianchi, Andrea; Bardelli, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a genetic disease governed by clonal evolution1. Genotyping CRC tissue is employed for therapeutic purposes but this approach has significant limitations. A tissue sample represents a single snapshot in time, is subjected to selection bias due to tumor heterogeneity, and can be difficult to obtain. We exploited circulating DNA (ctDNA) to genotype colorectal tumors and track clonal evolution during therapies with the anti-EGFR antibodies cetuximab or panitumumab. We identified genomic alterations in KRAS, NRAS, MET, ERBB2, FLT3, EGFR and MAP2K1 in ctDNA of patients with primary or acquired resistance to EGFR blockade. Mutant RAS clones, which rise in blood during EGFR blockade, decline upon withdrawal of anti-EGFR antibodies indicating that clonal evolution continues beyond clinical progression. Pharmacogenomic analysis of CRC cells, which had acquired resistance to cetuximab, reveals that upon antibody withdrawal KRAS clones decay, while the population regains drug sensitivity. ctDNA profiles of patients who benefit from multiple challenging with anti-EGFR antibodies exhibit pulsatile levels of mutant KRAS. These results reveal that the CRC genome adapts dynamically to intermittent drug schedules and provide a molecular explanation for the efficacy of re-challenge therapies based on EGFR blockade. PMID:26030179

  15. Durable antitumor responses to CD47 blockade require adaptive immune stimulation.

    PubMed

    Sockolosky, Jonathan T; Dougan, Michael; Ingram, Jessica R; Ho, Chia Chi M; Kauke, Monique J; Almo, Steven C; Ploegh, Hidde L; Garcia, K Christopher

    2016-05-10

    Therapeutic antitumor antibodies treat cancer by mobilizing both innate and adaptive immunity. CD47 is an antiphagocytic ligand exploited by tumor cells to blunt antibody effector functions by transmitting an inhibitory signal through its receptor signal regulatory protein alpha (SIRPα). Interference with the CD47-SIRPα interaction synergizes with tumor-specific monoclonal antibodies to eliminate human tumor xenografts by enhancing macrophage-mediated antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP), but synergy between CD47 blockade and ADCP has yet to be demonstrated in immunocompetent hosts. Here, we show that CD47 blockade alone or in combination with a tumor-specific antibody fails to generate antitumor immunity against syngeneic B16F10 tumors in mice. Durable tumor immunity required programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) blockade in combination with an antitumor antibody, with incorporation of CD47 antagonism substantially improving response rates. Our results highlight an underappreciated contribution of the adaptive immune system to anti-CD47 adjuvant therapy and suggest that targeting both innate and adaptive immune checkpoints can potentiate the vaccinal effect of antitumor antibody therapy.

  16. Pleiotropic effects of extended blockade of CSF1R signaling in adult mice

    PubMed Central

    Sauter, Kristin A.; Pridans, Clare; Sehgal, Anuj; Tsai, Yi Ting; Bradford, Barry M.; Raza, Sobia; Moffat, Lindsey; Gow, Deborah J.; Beard, Philippa M.; Mabbott, Neil A.; Smith, Lee B.; Hume, David A.

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the role of CSF1R signaling in adult mice using prolonged treatment with anti-CSF1R antibody. Mutation of the CSF1 gene in the op/op mouse produces numerous developmental abnormalities. Mutation of the CSF1R has an even more penetrant phenotype, including perinatal lethality, because of the existence of a second ligand, IL-34. These effects on development provide limited insight into functions of CSF1R signaling in adult homeostasis. The carcass weight and weight of several organs (spleen, kidney, and liver) were reduced in the treated mice, but overall body weight gain was increased. Despite the complete loss of Kupffer cells, there was no effect on liver gene expression. The treatment ablated OCL, increased bone density and trabecular volume, and prevented the decline in bone mass seen in female mice with age. The op/op mouse has a deficiency in pancreatic β cells and in Paneth cells in the gut wall. Only the latter was reproduced by the antibody treatment and was associated with increased goblet cell number but no change in villus architecture. Male op/op mice are infertile as a result of testosterone insufficiency. Anti-CSF1R treatment ablated interstitial macrophages in the testis, but there was no sustained effect on testosterone or LH. The results indicate an ongoing requirement for CSF1R signaling in macrophage and OCL homeostasis but indicate that most effects of CSF1 and CSF1R mutations are due to effects on development. PMID:24652541

  17. The antifungal antibiotic, clotrimazole, inhibits chloride secretion by human intestinal T84 cells via blockade of distinct basolateral K+ conductances. Demonstration of efficacy in intact rabbit colon and in an in vivo mouse model of cholera.

    PubMed Central

    Rufo, P A; Merlin, D; Riegler, M; Ferguson-Maltzman, M H; Dickinson, B L; Brugnara, C; Alper, S L; Lencer, W I

    1997-01-01

    The antifungal antibiotic clotrimazole (CLT) blocks directly and with high potency the Ca2+-activated K+ channels of human erythrocytes, erythroleukemia cells, and ferret vascular smooth muscle cells. We recently reported that CLT inhibits Cl- secretion in human intestinal T84 cells, likely by affecting K+ transport (Rufo, P.A., L. Jiang, S.J. Moe, C. Brugnara, S.L. Alper, and W.I. Lencer. 1996. J. Clin. Invest. 98:2066-2075). To determine if CLT had direct effects on K+ conductances in T84 cells, we selectively permeabilized apical membranes of confluent T84 cell monolayers using the ionophore amphotericin B. This technique permits direct measurement of basolateral K+ transport. We found that CLT and a stable des-imidazolyl derivative inhibited directly two pharmacologically distinct basolateral membrane K+conductances, but had no effect on apical membrane Cl- conductances. The effects of CLT on Cl- secretion were also examined in intact tissue. CLT inhibited forskolin-induced Cl- secretion in rabbit colonic mucosal sheets mounted in Ussing chambers by 91%. CLT also inhibited cholera toxin-induced intestinal Cl- secretion in intact mice by 94%. These data provide direct evidence that CLT blocks Cl- secretion in intestinal T84 cells by inhibition of basolateral K+ conductances, and show that CLT inhibits salt and water secretion from intact tissue in vitro and in vivo. The results further support the suggestion that CLT and its metabolites may show clinical efficacy in the treatment of secretory diarrheas of diverse etiologies. PMID:9399958

  18. Human milk effects on neutrophil calcium metabolism: blockade of calcium influx after agonist stimulation.

    PubMed

    Chacon-Cruz, E; Oelberg, D G; Buescher, E S

    1999-08-01

    Neutrophils are the predominant cellular mediators of acute inflammation, and human milk suppresses multiple neutrophil functions. We sought to determine whether these effects were mediated through disruption of normal intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis. Exposure of human neutrophils to human milk, followed by washing, resulted in altered Ca2+ transient responses to formyl-peptide stimulation in which the peak cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration ([free Ca]) was the same as in unexposed cells, but the postpeak decline in [free Ca] was more rapid. This effect was observed after human milk exposures as brief as 10 s, persisted for up to 4 h after human milk removal, and was concentration dependent. On the basis of experiments examining Ca2+-free conditions followed by Ca2+ supplementation, and experiments examining spontaneous and stimulated manganese and barium influx into neutrophils, the human milk effect was due to blockade of Ca2+ influx. Decreased Ca2+ transient responses to other physiologic stimuli (IL-8, opsonized Staphylococcus aureus, and immune complexes) were observed after human milk exposures. Rat intestinal epithelial cells and HL-60 cells failed to show these effects, suggesting a selective effect on mature inflammatory cells. Characterization of the Ca2+-blocking activity showed it was heat and acid stable in human milk with a molecular mass between 30-100 kD. Commercial human milk lactoferrin exhibited Ca2+ influx blockade activity, but recombinant human lactoferrin showed none. Separation of the activity by heparin affinity chromatography showed that it was distinct from lactoferrin. Human milk-induced blockade of Ca2+ influx provides a potential mechanism for broad suppression of neutrophil functions that may contribute to the antiinflammatory properties of human milk.

  19. Localized oncolytic virotherapy overcomes systemic tumor resistance to immune checkpoint blockade immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Zamarin, Dmitriy; Holmgaard, Rikke B; Subudhi, Sumit K; Park, Joon Seok; Mansour, Mena; Palese, Peter; Merghoub, Taha; Wolchok, Jedd D; Allison, James P

    2014-03-05

    Preexisting lymphocytic infiltration of tumors is associated with superior prognostic outcomes in a variety of cancers. Recent studies also suggest that lymphocytic responses may identify patients more likely to benefit from therapies targeting immune checkpoints, suggesting that therapeutic efficacy of immune checkpoint blockade can be enhanced through strategies that induce tumor inflammation. To achieve this effect, we explored the immunotherapeutic potential of oncolytic Newcastle disease virus (NDV). We find that localized intratumoral therapy of B16 melanoma with NDV induces inflammatory responses, leading to lymphocytic infiltrates and antitumor effect in distant (nonvirally injected) tumors without distant virus spread. The inflammatory effect coincided with distant tumor infiltration with tumor-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, which was dependent on the identity of the virus-injected tumor. Combination therapy with localized NDV and systemic CTLA-4 blockade led to rejection of preestablished distant tumors and protection from tumor rechallenge in poorly immunogenic tumor models, irrespective of tumor cell line sensitivity to NDV-mediated lysis. Therapeutic effect was associated with marked distant tumor infiltration with activated CD8(+) and CD4(+) effector but not regulatory T cells, and was dependent on CD8(+) cells, natural killer cells, and type I interferon. Our findings demonstrate that localized therapy with oncolytic NDV induces inflammatory immune infiltrates in distant tumors, making them susceptible to systemic therapy with immunomodulatory antibodies, which provides a strong rationale for investigation of such combination therapies in the clinic.

  20. Theory of spin blockade in a triple quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Chang-Yu; Shim, Yun-Pil; Hawrylak, Pawel

    2011-03-01

    We present a theory of electronic properties and spin blockade in a linear triple quantum dots. We use micoroscopic LCHO-CI and double-band Hubbard model to analyze the electronic and spin properties of a triple quantum dots near a symmetrical quadruple point involving the (1,1,1) configuration which is essential for implementing quantum information processing with electron spin. We calculate spectral functions and relate them via the rate equation, including coupling with a phonon bath, to current as a function of applied bias. We show that the spin blockade in a triple quantum dots can serve as a spectroscopic tool to distinguish spin polarized states from spin depolarized states. We also show that a spin blockade is developed only at high bias when an onsite triplet state on the edge quantum dot connected to the source lead becomes accessible in the transport window. In contradiction to the case of double quantum dot molecule, the onsite triplet is not only essential for lifting spin blockade but also important for building up spin polarisation and spin blockade in the system. The authors would like to acknowledge financial support from NSERC, OGS, and QuantumWorks.

  1. Exploring dipole blockade using high- n strontium Rydberg atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xinyue; Ye, Shuzhen; Dunning, F. Barry; Hiller, Moritz; Yoshida, Shuhei; Burgdörfer, Joachim

    2014-05-01

    Studies of the production of strongly-polarized quasi-1D high- n, n ~ 300 , strontium `` nF'' Rydberg states in an atomic beam by three-photon excitation in a weak dc field suggest that (in the absence of blockade effects) densities of ~106 cm-3 might be achieved. At such densities the interparticle separation, ~ 100 μm , becomes comparable to that at which dipole blockade effects are expected to become important. Apparatus modifications are underway to allow the exploration of blockade at very high- n and the effects of the high energy level density. Blockade is also being examined through calculations of the energy spectrum for two interaction atoms. Access to the blockade regime promises creation of Rydberg atoms at well-defined separations whose interactions can be coherently controlled using electric field pulses thereby enabling study of the dynamics of strongly-coupled Rydberg systems. Research supported by the NSF, the Robert A. Welch Foundation, and the FWF (Austria).

  2. Reduction of metastasis, cell invasion, and adhesion in mouse osteosarcoma by YM529/ONO-5920-induced blockade of the Ras/MEK/ERK and Ras/PI3K/Akt pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Tsubaki, Masanobu; Satou, Takao; Itoh, Tatsuki; Imano, Motohiro; Ogaki, Mitsuhiko; Yanae, Masashi; Nishida, Shozo

    2012-03-15

    Osteosarcoma is one of the most common primary malignant bone tumors in children and adolescents. Some patients continue to have a poor prognosis, because of the metastatic disease. YM529/ONO-5920 is a nitrogen-containing bisphosphonate that has been used for the treatment of osteoporosis. YM529/ONO-5920 has recently been reported to induce apoptosis in various tumors including osteosarcoma. However, the mode of metastasis suppression in osteosarcoma by YM529/ONO-5920 is unclear. In the present study, we investigated whether YM529/ONO-5920 inhibited tumor cell migration, invasion, adhesion, or metastasis in the LM8 mouse osteosarcoma cell line. We found that YM529/ONO-5920 significantly inhibited metastasis, cell migration, invasion, and adhesion at concentrations that did not have antiproliferative effects on LM8 cells. YM529/ONO-5920 also inhibited the mRNA expression and protein activities of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). In addition, YM529/ONO-5920 suppressed phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and the serine/threonine protein kinase B (Akt) by the inhibition of Ras prenylation. Moreover, U0126, a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) 1/2 inhibitor, and LY294002, a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor, also inhibited LM8 cell migration, invasion, adhesion, and metastasis, as well as the mRNA expression and protein activities of MMP-1, MMP-2, MMP-9, and MT1-MMP. The results indicated that YM529/ONO-5920 suppressed the Ras/MEK/ERK and Ras/PI3K/Akt pathways, thereby inhibiting LM8 cell migration, invasion, adhesion, and metastasis. These findings suggest that YM529/ONO-5920 has potential clinical applications for the treatment of tumor cell metastasis in osteosarcoma. -- Highlights: ► We investigated whether YM529/ONO-5920 inhibited tumor metastasis in osteosarcoma. ► YM529/ONO-5920 inhibited metastasis, cell migration, invasion, and adhesion. ► YM529/ONO-5920 suppressed Ras signalings. ► YM529/ONO-5920

  3. Glycolipid presentation to natural killer T cells differs in an organ-dependent fashion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmieg, John; Yang, Guangli; Franck, Richard W.; van Rooijen, Nico; Tsuji, Moriya

    2005-01-01

    It has been shown that dendritic cells (DCs) are able to present glycolipids to natural killer (NK) T cells in vivo. However, the essential role of DCs, as well as the role of other cells in glycolipid presentation, is unknown. Here, we show that DCs are the crucial antigen-presenting cells (APCs) for splenic NK T cells, whereas Kupffer cells are the key APCs for hepatic NK T cells. Both cell types stimulate cytokine production by NK T cells within 2 h of glycolipid administration, but only DCs are involved in the systemic, downstream responses to glycolipid administration. More specifically, CD8+ DCs produce IL-12 in response to glycolipid presentation, which stimulates secondary IFN- production by NK cells in different organs. Different APCs participate in glycolipid presentation to NK T cells in vivo but differ in their involvement in the overall glycolipid response. dendritic cell | Kupffer cell

  4. Antibody-Mediated Phosphatidylserine Blockade Enhances the Antitumor Responses to CTLA-4 and PD-1 Antibodies in Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Freimark, Bruce D; Gong, Jian; Ye, Dan; Gray, Michael J; Nguyen, Van; Yin, Shen; Hatch, Michaela M S; Hughes, Christopher C W; Schroit, Alan J; Hutchins, Jeff T; Brekken, Rolf A; Huang, Xianming

    2016-06-01

    In tumor-bearing animals, the membrane phospholipid phosphatidylserine (PS) suppresses immune responses, suggesting that PS signaling could counteract the antitumor effect of antibody-driven immune checkpoint blockade. Here, we show that treating melanoma-bearing mice with a PS-targeting antibody enhances the antitumor activity of downstream checkpoint inhibition. Combining PS-targeting antibodies with CTLA-4 or PD-1 blockade resulted in significantly greater inhibition of tumor growth than did single-agent therapy. Moreover, combination therapy enhanced CD4(+) and CD8(+) tumor-infiltrating lymphocyte numbers; elevated the fraction of cells expressing the proinflammatory cytokines IL2, IFNγ, and TNFα; and increased the ratio of CD8 T cells to myeloid-derived suppressor cells and regulatory T cells in tumors. Similar changes in immune cell profiles were observed in splenocytes. Taken together, these data show that antibody-mediated PS blockade enhances the antitumor efficacy of immune checkpoint inhibition. Cancer Immunol Res; 4(6); 531-40. ©2016 AACR.

  5. Dexamethasone added to lidocaine prolongs axillary brachial plexus blockade.

    PubMed

    Movafegh, Ali; Razazian, Mehran; Hajimaohamadi, Fatemeh; Meysamie, Alipasha

    2006-01-01

    Different additives have been used to prolong regional blockade. We designed a prospective, randomized, double-blind study to evaluate the effect of dexamethasone added to lidocaine on the onset and duration of axillary brachial plexus block. Sixty patients scheduled for elective hand and forearm surgery under axillary brachial plexus block were randomly allocated to receive either 34 mL lidocaine 1.5% with 2 mL of isotonic saline chloride (control group, n = 30) or 34 mL lidocaine 1.5% with 2 mL of dexamethasone (8 mg) (dexamethasone group, n = 30). Neither epinephrine nor bicarbonate was added to the treatment mixture. We used a nerve stimulator and multiple stimulations technique in all of the patients. After performance of the block, sensory and motor blockade of radial, median, musculocutaneous, and ulnar nerves were recorded at 5, 15, and 30 min. The onset time of the sensory and motor blockade was defined as the time between last injection and the total abolition of the pinprick response and complete paralysis. The duration of sensory and motor blocks were considered as the time interval between the administration of the local anesthetic and the first postoperative pain and complete recovery of motor functions. Sixteen patients were excluded because of unsuccessful blockade. The duration of surgery and the onset times of sensory and motor block were similar in the two groups. The duration of sensory (242 +/- 76 versus 98 +/- 33 min) and motor (310 +/- 81 versus 130 +/- 31 min) blockade were significantly longer in the dexamethasone than in the control group (P < 0.01). We conclude that the addition of dexamethasone to lidocaine 1.5% solution in axillary brachial plexus block prolongs the duration of sensory and motor blockade.

  6. Vaccine-induced but not tumor-derived Interleukin-10 dictates the efficacy of Interleukin-10 blockade in therapeutic vaccination.

    PubMed

    Llopiz, Diana; Aranda, Fernando; Díaz-Valdés, Nancy; Ruiz, Marta; Infante, Stefany; Belsúe, Virginia; Lasarte, Juan José; Sarobe, Pablo

    2016-02-01

    Blocking antibodies against immunosuppressive molecules have shown promising results in cancer patients. However, there are not enough data to define those conditions dictating treatment efficacy. In this scenario, IL-10 is a cytokine with controversial effects on tumor growth. Thus, our aim was to characterize in which setting IL-10 blockade may potentiate the beneficial effects of a therapeutic vaccine In the IL-10-expressing B16-OVA and TC-1 P3 (A15) tumor models, therapeutic vaccination with tumor antigens plus the TLR7 ligand Imiquimod increased IL-10 production. Although blockade of IL-10 signal with anti-IL-10R antibodies did not inhibit tumor growth, when combined with vaccination it enhanced tumor rejection, associated with stronger innate and adaptive immune responses. Interestingly, a similar enhancement on immune responses was observed after simultaneous vaccination and IL-10 blockade in naive mice. However, when using vaccines containing as adjuvants the TLR3 ligand poly(I:C) or anti-CD40 agonistic antibodies, despite tumor IL-10 expression, anti-IL-10R antibodies did not provide any beneficial effect on tumor growth and antitumor immune responses. Of note, as opposed to Imiquimod, vaccination with this type of adjuvants did not induce IL-10 and correlated with a lack of in vitro IL-10 production by dendritic cells (DC). Finally, in B16-OVA-bearing mice, blockade of IL-10 during therapeutic vaccination with a multiple adjuvant combination (MAC) with potent immunostimulatory properties but still inducing IL-10 led to superior antitumor immunity and complete tumor rejection. These results suggest that for therapeutic antitumor vaccination, blockade of vaccine-induced IL-10 is more relevant than tumor-associated IL-10.

  7. Adaptive resistance to therapeutic PD-1 blockade is associated with upregulation of alternative immune checkpoints.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Shohei; Akbay, Esra A; Li, Yvonne Y; Herter-Sprie, Grit S; Buczkowski, Kevin A; Richards, William G; Gandhi, Leena; Redig, Amanda J; Rodig, Scott J; Asahina, Hajime; Jones, Robert E; Kulkarni, Meghana M; Kuraguchi, Mari; Palakurthi, Sangeetha; Fecci, Peter E; Johnson, Bruce E; Janne, Pasi A; Engelman, Jeffrey A; Gangadharan, Sidharta P; Costa, Daniel B; Freeman, Gordon J; Bueno, Raphael; Hodi, F Stephen; Dranoff, Glenn; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Hammerman, Peter S

    2016-02-17

    Despite compelling antitumour activity of antibodies targeting the programmed death 1 (PD-1): programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1) immune checkpoint in lung cancer, resistance to these therapies has increasingly been observed. In this study, to elucidate mechanisms of adaptive resistance, we analyse the tumour immune microenvironment in the context of anti-PD-1 therapy in two fully immunocompetent mouse models of lung adenocarcinoma. In tumours progressing following response to anti-PD-1 therapy, we observe upregulation of alternative immune checkpoints, notably T-cell immunoglobulin mucin-3 (TIM-3), in PD-1 antibody bound T cells and demonstrate a survival advantage with addition of a TIM-3 blocking antibody following failure of PD-1 blockade. Two patients who developed adaptive resistance to anti-PD-1 treatment also show a similar TIM-3 upregulation in blocking antibody-bound T cells at treatment failure. These data suggest that upregulation of TIM-3 and other immune checkpoints may be targetable biomarkers associated with adaptive resistance to PD-1 blockade.

  8. Structural basis of checkpoint blockade by monoclonal antibodies in cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ju Yeon; Lee, Hyun Tae; Shin, Woori; Chae, Jongseok; Choi, Jaemo; Kim, Sung Hyun; Lim, Heejin; Won Heo, Tae; Park, Kyeong Young; Lee, Yeon Ji; Ryu, Seong Eon; Son, Ji Young; Lee, Jee Un; Heo, Yong-Seok

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells express tumour-specific antigens derived via genetic and epigenetic alterations, which may be targeted by T-cell-mediated immune responses. However, cancer cells can avoid immune surveillance by suppressing immunity through activation of specific inhibitory signalling pathways, referred to as immune checkpoints. In recent years, the blockade of checkpoint molecules such as PD-1, PD-L1 and CTLA-4, with monoclonal antibodies has enabled the development of breakthrough therapies in oncology, and four therapeutic antibodies targeting these checkpoint molecules have been approved by the FDA for the treatment of several types of cancer. Here, we report the crystal structures of checkpoint molecules in complex with the Fab fragments of therapeutic antibodies, including PD-1/pembrolizumab, PD-1/nivolumab, PD-L1/BMS-936559 and CTLA-4/tremelimumab. These complex structures elucidate the precise epitopes of the antibodies and the molecular mechanisms underlying checkpoint blockade, providing useful information for the improvement of monoclonal antibodies capable of attenuating checkpoint signalling for the treatment of cancer. PMID:27796306

  9. Blockade of T-type voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels by benidipine, a dihydropyridine calcium channel blocker, inhibits aldosterone production in human adrenocortical cell line NCI-H295R.

    PubMed

    Akizuki, Osamu; Inayoshi, Atsushi; Kitayama, Tetsuya; Yao, Kozo; Shirakura, Shiro; Sasaki, Katsutoshi; Kusaka, Hideaki; Matsubara, Masahiro

    2008-04-28

    Benidipine, a long-lasting dihydropyridine calcium channel blocker, is used for treatment of hypertension and angina. Benidipine exerts pleiotropic pharmacological features, such as renoprotective and cardioprotective effects. In pathophysiological conditions, the antidiuretic hormone aldosterone causes development of renal and cardiovascular diseases. In adrenal glomerulosa cells, aldosterone is produced in response to extracellular potassium, which is mainly mediated by T-type voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels. More recently, it has been demonstrated that benidipine inhibits T-type Ca2+ channels in addition to L-type Ca2+ channels. Therefore, effect of calcium channel blockers, including benidipine, on aldosterone production and T-type Ca2+ channels using human adrenocortical cell line NCI-H295R was investigated. Benidipine efficiently inhibited KCl-induced aldosterone production at low concentration (3 and 10 nM), with inhibitory activity more potent than other calcium channel blockers. Patch clamp analysis indicated that benidipine concentration-dependently inhibited T-type Ca2+ currents at 10, 100 and 1000 nM. As for examined calcium channel blockers, inhibitory activity for T-type Ca2+ currents was well correlated with aldosterone production. L-type specific calcium channel blockers calciseptine and nifedipine showed no effect in both assays. These results indicate that inhibition of T-type Ca2+ channels is responsible for inhibition of aldosterone production in NCI-H295R cells. Benidipine efficiently inhibited KCl-induced upregulation of 11-beta-hydroxylase mRNA and aldosterone synthase mRNA as well as KCl-induced Ca2+ influx, indicating it as the most likely inhibition mechanism. Benidipine partially inhibited angiotensin II-induced aldosterone production, plus showed additive effects when used in combination with the angiotensin II type I receptor blocker valsartan. Benidipine also partially inhibited angiotensin II-induced upregulation of the above m

  10. Blockade of the inward rectifier potassium current by the Ca(2+)-ATPase inhibitor 2',5'-di(tert-butyl)-1,4-benzohydroquinone (BHQ).

    PubMed Central

    Hasséssian, H.; Vaca, L.; Kunze, D. L.

    1994-01-01

    1. We have investigated the effect of 2',5'-di (tert-butyl)-1,4-benzohydroquinone (BHQ) and thapsigargin, inhibitors of the intracellular Ca(2+)-ATPase, on ionic currents in rat basophilic leukaemia (RBL-2H3) cells under whole cell voltage clamp. 2. The whole cell current was inwardly rectifying and reversed at -35 +/- 6 mV (n = 16). The conductance of the inward current increased as the concentration of extracellular K+ was raised from 2.7 to 5.4, 10.8 and 21.6 mM. BaCl2 (100 microM) reduced the current to a small linear component and shifted the reversal potential to -4 +/- 3 mV (n = 6). A concentration of 50 microM BaCl2 produced 45 +/- 10% (n = 4) blockade of the inward current. 3. BHQ and thapsigargin were examined for their effects on the inwardly rectifying current. A maximal blockade of inward current was obtained within 6 min after perfusion with 10 microM BHQ. The small current remaining after blockade with BHQ had a linear voltage-dependence and reversed direction at -6 +/- 9 mV (n = 6). Thapsigargin (up to 3 microM) was without effect on the inward rectifier. 4. In contrast to the blockade of the inward rectifier produced by BaCl2 which was predominantly on the steady state current, particularly at the very hyperpolarized holding potentials (-120 mV), blockade by BHQ was equally strong on the instantaneous as well as the steady state current. 5. Blockade of the inward rectifier by BHQ may cause depolarization of the cell which will affect Ca2+ influx during investigations with BHQ.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7952872

  11. Safety guideline: skin antisepsis for central neuraxial blockade.

    PubMed

    Obstetric Anaesthetists' Association; Campbell, J P; Plaat, F; Checketts, M R; Bogod, D; Tighe, S; Moriarty, A; Koerner, R

    2014-11-01

    Concise guidelines are presented that recommend the method of choice for skin antisepsis before central neuraxial blockade. The Working Party specifically considered the concentration of antiseptic agent to use and its method of application. The advice presented is based on previously published guidelines, laboratory and clinical studies, case reports, and on the known properties of antiseptic agents.

  12. Peripheral metabolic effects of endocannabinoids and cannabinoid receptor blockade.

    PubMed

    Engeli, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    The endocannabinoid system consists of endogenous arachidonic acid derivates that activate cannabinoid receptors. The two most prominent endocannabinoids are anandamide and 2-arachidonoyl glycerol. In obesity, increased concentrations of circulating and tissue endocannabinoid levels have been described, suggesting increased activity of the endocannabinoid system. Increased availability of endocannabinoids in obesity may over-stimulate cannabinoid receptors. Blockade of cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptors was the only successful clinical development of an anti-obesity drug during the last decade. Whereas blockade of CB1 receptors acutely reduces food intake, the long-term effects on metabolic regulation are more likely mediated by peripheral actions in liver, skeletal muscle, adipose tissue, and the pancreas. Lipogenic effects of CB1 receptor signalling in liver and adipose tissue may contribute to regional adipose tissue expansion and insulin resistance in the fatty liver. The association of circulating 2-arachidonoyl glycerol levels with decreased insulin sensitivity strongly suggests further exploration of the role of endocannabinoid signalling for insulin sensitivity in skeletal muscle, liver, and adipose tissue. A few studies have suggested a specific role for the regulation of adiponectin secretion from adipocytes by endocannabinoids, but that has to be confirmed by more experiments. Also, the potential role of CB1 receptor blockade for the stimulation of energy expenditure needs to be studied in the future. Despite the current discussion of safety issues of cannabinoid receptor blockade, these findings open a new and exciting perspective on endocannabinoids as regulators of body weight and metabolism.

  13. Merchant Shipping in a Chinese Blockade of Taiwan

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    8:14:41 AM Color profile: Disabled Composite Default screen privateers, and blockade runners risking death in conflicts to which they had no...particular vessel at any given time, then, can be a challenging endeavor in- volving a maze of corporate relationships and contractual legalese. But more

  14. A new regime of Pauli-spin blockade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perron, Justin K.; Stewart, M. D.; Zimmerman, Neil M.

    2016-04-01

    Pauli-spin blockade (PSB) is a transport phenomenon in double quantum dots that allows for a type of spin to charge conversion often used to probe fundamental physics such as spin relaxation and singlet-triplet coupling. In this paper, we theoretically explore Pauli-spin blockade as a function of magnetic field B applied parallel to the substrate. In the well-studied low magnetic field regime, where PSB occurs in the forward (1, 1) → (0, 2) tunneling direction, we highlight some aspects of PSB that are not discussed in detail in existing literature, including the change in size of both bias triangles measured in the forward and reverse biasing directions as a function of B. At higher fields, we predict a crossover to "reverse PSB" in which current is blockaded in the reverse direction due to the occupation of a spin singlet as opposed to the traditional triplet blockade that occurs at low fields. The onset of reverse PSB coincides with the development of a tail like feature in the measured bias triangles and occurs when the Zeeman energy of the polarized triplet equals the exchange energy in the (0, 2) charge configuration. In Si quantum dots, these fields are experimentally accessible; thus, this work suggests a way to observe a crossover in magnetic field to qualitatively different behavior.

  15. Accurate Coulomb blockade thermometry up to 60 kelvin.

    PubMed

    Meschke, M; Kemppinen, A; Pekola, J P

    2016-03-28

    We demonstrate experimentally a precise realization of Coulomb blockade thermometry working at temperatures up to 60 K. Advances in nano-fabrication methods using electron beam lithography allow us to fabricate uniform arrays of sufficiently small tunnel junctions to guarantee an overall temperature reading precision of about 1%.

  16. CTLA-4 Blockade-Based Immunotherapy in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    V, Bok R, Small EJ. Prostate-specific antigen kinetics as a measure of the biologic effect of granulocyte- macrophage colony-stimulating factor in...Kwon ED, Truong T, Choi EM, Greenberg NM, et al. Combination immunotherapy of primary prostate cancer in a transgenic mouse model using CTLA-4 blockade

  17. The non-competitive blockade of GABAA receptors by an aqueous extract of water hemlock (Cicuta douglasii) tubers.

    PubMed

    Green, Benedict T; Goulart, Camila; Welch, Kevin D; Pfister, James A; McCollum, Isabelle; Gardner, Dale R

    2015-12-15

    Water hemlocks (Cicuta spp.) are acutely toxic members of the Umbellierae family; the toxicity is due to the presence of C17-polyacetylenes such as cicutoxin. There is only limited evidence of noncompetitive antagonism by C17-polyacetylenes at GABAA receptors. In this work with WSS-1 cells, we documented the noncompetitive blockade of GABAA receptors by an aqueous extract of water hemlock (Cicuta douglasii) and modulated the actions of the extract with a pretreatment of 10 μM midazolam.

  18. Emodin Isolated from Polygoni cuspidati Radix Inhibits TNF-α and IL-6 Release by Blockading NF-κB and MAP Kinase Pathways in Mast Cells Stimulated with PMA Plus A23187

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yue; Jeong, Yong-Tae; Li, Xian; Kim, Mi Jin; Park, Pil-Hoon; Hwang, Seung-Lark; Son, Jong Keun; Chang, Hyeun Wook

    2013-01-01

    Emodin, a naturally occurring anthraquinone derivative isolated from Polygoni cuspidati radix, has several beneficial pharmacologic effects, which include anti-cancer, anti-diabetic, and anti-inflammatory activities. In this study, the authors examined the effect of emodin on the production of proinflammatory cytokines, such as, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-6, in mouse bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs) stimulated with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) plus the calcium ionophore A23187. To investigate the mechanism responsible for the regulation of pro-inflammatory cytokine production by emodin, the authors assessed its effects on the activations of transcriptional factor nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). Emodin attenuated the nuclear translocation of (NF)-κB p65 and its DNA-binding activity by reducing the phosphorylation and degradation of IκBα and the phosphorylation of IκB kinase B (IKK). Furthermore, emodin dose-dependently attenuated the phosphorylations of MAPKs, such as, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), p38 MAP kinase, and the stress-activated protein kinases (SAPK)/c-Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK). Taken together, the findings of this study suggest that the anti-inflammatory effects of emodin on PMA plus A23187-stimulated BMMCs are mediated via the inhibition of NF-κB activation and of the MAPK pathway. PMID:24404333

  19. VLA-4 blockade by natalizumab inhibits sickle reticulocyte and leucocyte adhesion during simulated blood flow.

    PubMed

    White, Jennell; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Gupta, Dipti; Lancelot, Moira; Moore, Nancy; Sarnaik, Sharada; Hobbs, William E; Light, David R; Hines, Patrick

    2016-09-01

    Very Late Antigen-4 (VLA-4, α4β1-integrin, ITGA4) orchestrates cell-cell and cell-endothelium adhesion. Given the proposed role of VLA-4 in sickle cell disease (SCD) pathophysiology, we evaluated the ability of the VLA-4 blocking antibody natalizumab to inhibit SCD blood cell adhesion. Natalizumab recognized surface VLA-4 on leucocytes and reticulocytes in whole blood from SCD subjects. SCD reticulocytes were positive for VLA-4, while VLA-4 staining of non-SCD reticulocytes was undetectable. Titrations with natalizumab revealed the presence of saturable levels of VLA-4 on both SCD reticulocytes and leucocytes similar to healthy subject leucocytes. Under physiological flow conditions, the adhesion of SCD whole blood cells and isolated SCD leucocytes to immobilized vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1) was blocked by natalizumab in a dose-dependent manner, which correlated with cell surface receptor binding. Natalizumab also inhibited >50% of whole blood cell binding to TNF-α activated human umbilical vein endothelial cell monolayers under physiological flow at clinically relevant concentrations (10 to 100 μg/ml). This indicates that VLA-4 is the dominant receptor that drives SCD reticulocyte and mononuclear cell adhesion to VCAM-1 and that the VLA-4 adhesion to VCAM-1 is a significant contributor to SCD blood cell adhesion to endothelium. Thus, VLA-4 blockade may be beneficial in sickle cell disease.

  20. Blockade of beta1- and beta2-adrenoceptors delays wound contraction and re-epithelialization in rats.

    PubMed

    Souza, Bruna R; Santos, Jeanine S; Costa, Andréa M A

    2006-01-01

    1. The participation of sympathetic efferent fibres in wound healing is not well understood. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of beta(1)- and beta(2)-adrenoceptor blockade on rat excisional cutaneous wound healing. 2. Male rats were treated orally with propranolol dissolved in drinking water (50 mg/kg per day), whereas the control group received drinking water without propranolol. Propranolol was administered daily until rats were killed. A full-thickness excisional lesion was performed. The lesion area was measured to evaluate wound contraction. After rats had been killed, lesion and adjacent normal skin were formol fixed and paraffin embedded. Sections were stained with haematoxylin-eosin, Sirius red or Toluidine blue and immunostained for a-smooth muscle actin or proliferating cell nuclear antigen. 3. Propranolol-treated rats presented delayed wound contraction and epidermal healing and decreased hydroxyproline levels, collagen density and neo-epidermis thickness. Blockade of beta(1)- and beta(2)-adrenoceptors increased epidermal and connective tissue cell proliferation, polymorphonuclear leucocyte migration, myofibroblast density and mast cell migration. The volume density of blood vessels was increased and vessels were more dilated in propranolol-treated animals. 4. Thus, we conclude that beta(1)- and beta(2)-adrenoceptor blockade impairs cutaneous wound healing. This information should be considered by physicians during the treatment of patients who present with hypertension and problems in the healing process (such as venous ulcers).

  1. Partial neuromuscular blockade in humans enhances muscle blood flow during exercise independently of muscle oxygen uptake and acetylcholine receptor blockade.

    PubMed

    Hellsten, Ylva; Krustrup, Peter; Iaia, F Marcello; Secher, Niels H; Bangsbo, Jens

    2009-04-01

    This study examined the role of acetylcholine for skeletal muscle blood flow during exercise by use of the competitive neuromuscular blocking agent cisatracurium in combination with the acetylcholine receptor blocker glycopyrrone. Nine healthy male subjects performed a 10-min bout of one-legged knee-extensor exercise (18 W) during control conditions and with cisatracurium blockade, as well as with cisatracurium blockade with prior glycopyrrone infusion. Thigh blood flow and vascular conductance in control and with cisatracurium infusion were similar at rest and during passive movement of the leg, but higher (P < 0.05) during exercise with cisatracurium than in control (3.83 +/- 0.42 vs. 2.78 +/- 0.21 l/min and 26.9 +/- 3.4 vs. 21.8 +/- 2.0 ml.min(-1).mmHg(-1) at the end of exercise). Thigh oxygen uptake was similar in control and with cisatracurium infusion both at rest and during exercise, being 354 +/- 33 and 406 +/- 34 ml/min, at the end of exercise. Combined infusion of cisatracurium and glycopyrrone caused a similar increase in blood flow as cisatracurium infusion alone. The current results demonstrate that neuromuscular blockade leads to enhanced thigh blood flow and vascular conductance during exercise, events that are not associated with either acetylcholine or an increased oxygen demand. The results do not support an essential role for acetylcholine, released form the neuromuscular junction, in exercise hyperemia or for the enhanced blood flow during neuromuscular blockade. The enhanced exercise hyperemia during partial neuromuscular blockade may be related to a greater recruitment of fast-twitch muscle fibers.

  2. Blockade of cyclophilin D rescues dexamethasone-induced oxidative stress in gingival tissue

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Zhuoli; Xiao, Anqi; Yu, Haiyang; Gan, Xueqi

    2017-01-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) are frequently used for the suppression of inflammation in chronic inflammatory diseases. Excessive GCs usage is greatly associated with several side effects, including gingival ulceration, the downward migration of the epithelium, attachment loss and disruption of transeptal fibers. The mechanisms underlying GCs-induced impairments in gingival tissue remains poorly understood. Mitochondrial dysfunction is associated with various oral diseases, such as chronic periodontitis, age-related alveolar bone loss and hydrogen peroxide-induced cell injury in gingival. Here, we reported an unexplored role of cyclophilin D (CypD), the major component of mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP), in dexamethasone (Dex)-induced oxidative stress accumulation and cell dysfunctions in gingival tissue. We demonstrated that the expression level of CypD significantly increased under Dex treatment. Blockade of CypD by pharmaceutical inhibitor cyclosporine A (CsA) significantly protected against Dex-induced oxidative stress accumulation in gingival tissue. And the protective effects of blocking CypD in Dex-induced gingival fibroblasts dysfunction were evidenced by rescued mitochondrial function and suppressed production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In addition, blockade of CypD by pharmaceutical inhibitor CsA or gene knockdown also restored Dex-induced cell toxicity in HGF-1 cells, as shown by suppressed mitochondrial ROS production, increased CcO activity and decreased apoptosis. We also suggested a role of oxidative stress-mediated p38 signal transduction in this event, and antioxidant N-acety-l-cysteine (NAC) could obviously blunted Dex-induced oxidative stress. These findings provide new insights into the role of CypD-dependent mitochondrial pathway in the Dex-induced gingival injury, indicating that CypD may be potential therapeutic strategy for preventing Dex-induced oxidative stress and cell injury in gingival tissue. PMID:28273124

  3. Protection of malonate-induced GABA but not dopamine loss by GABA transporter blockade in rat striatum.

    PubMed

    Zeevalk, Gail D; Manzino, Lawrence; Sonsalla, Patricia K

    2002-07-01

    Previous work has shown that overstimulation of GABA(A) receptors can potentiate neuronal cell damage during excitotoxic or metabolic stress in vitro and that GABA(A) antagonists or GABA transport blockers are neuroprotective under these situations. Malonate, a reversible succinate dehydrogenase/mitochondrial complex II inhibitor, is frequently used in animals to model cell loss in neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases. To determine if GABA transporter blockade during mitochondrial impairment can protect neurons in vivo as compared with in vitro studies, rats received a stereotaxic infusion of malonate (2 micromol) into the left striatum to induce a metabolic stress. The nonsubstrate GABA transport blocker, NO711 (20 nmol) was infused in some rats 30 min before and 3 h following malonate infusion. After 1 week, dopamine and GABA levels in the striata were measured. Malonate caused a significant loss of striatal dopamine and GABA. Blockade of the GABA transporter significantly attenuated GABA, but not dopamine loss. In contrast with several in vitro reports, GABA(A) receptors were not a downstream mediator of protection by NO711. Intrastriatal infusion of malonate (2 micromol) plus or minus the GABA(A) receptor agonist muscimol (1 micromol), the GABA(A) Cl- binding site antagonist picrotoxin (50 nmol) or the GABA(B) receptor antagonist saclofen (33 nmol) did not modify loss of striatal dopamine or GABA when examined 1 week following infusion. These data show that GABA transporter blockade during mitochondrial impairment in the striatum provides protection to GABAergic neurons. GABA transporter blockade, which is currently a pharmacological strategy for the treatment of epilepsy, may thus also be beneficial in the treatment of acute and chronic conditions involving energy inhibition such as stroke/ischemia or Huntington's disease. These findings also point to fundamental differences between immature and adult neurons in the

  4. Current status and perspectives in translational biomarker research for PD-1/PD-L1 immune checkpoint blockade therapy.

    PubMed

    Ma, Weijie; Gilligan, Barbara M; Yuan, Jianda; Li, Tianhong

    2016-05-27

    Modulating immune inhibitory pathways has been a major recent breakthrough in cancer treatment. Checkpoint blockade antibodies targeting cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4) and programed cell-death protein 1 (PD-1) have demonstrated acceptable toxicity, promising clinical responses, durable disease control, and improved survival in some patients with advanced melanoma, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), and other tumor types. About 20 % of advanced NSCLC patients and 30 % of advanced melanoma patients experience tumor responses from checkpoint blockade monotherapy, with better clinical responses seen with the combination of anti-PD-1 and anti-CTLA-4 antibodies. Given the power of these new therapies, it is important to understand the complex and dynamic nature of host immune responses and the regulation of additional molecules in the tumor microenvironment and normal organs in response to the checkpoint blockade therapies. In this era of precision oncology, there remains a largely unmet need to identify the patients who are most likely to benefit from immunotherapy, to optimize the monitoring assays for tumor-specific immune responses, to develop strategies to improve clinical efficacy, and to identify biomarkers so that immune-related adverse events can be avoided. At this time, PD-L1 immunohistochemistry (IHC) staining using 22C3 antibody is the only FDA-approved companion diagnostic for patients with NSCLC-treated pembrolizumab, but more are expected to come to market. We here summarize the current knowledge, clinical efficacy, potential immune biomarkers, and associated assays for immune checkpoint blockade therapies in advanced solid tumors.

  5. Conductance of a proximitized nanowire in the Coulomb blockade regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Heck, B.; Lutchyn, R. M.; Glazman, L. I.

    2016-06-01

    We identify the leading processes of electron transport across finite-length segments of proximitized nanowires and build a quantitative theory of their two-terminal conductance. In the presence of spin-orbit interaction, a nanowire can be tuned across the topological transition point by an applied magnetic field. Due to a finite segment length, electron transport is controlled by the Coulomb blockade. Upon increasing of the field, the shape and magnitude of the Coulomb blockade peaks in the linear conductance are defined, respectively, by Andreev reflection, single-electron tunneling, and resonant tunneling through the Majorana modes emerging after the topological transition. Our theory provides the framework for the analysis of experiments with proximitized nanowires [such as reported in S. M. Albrecht et al., Nature (London) 531, 206 (2016), 10.1038/nature17162] and identifies the signatures of the topological transition in the two-terminal conductance.

  6. Lifting the Franck-Condon blockade in driven quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haughian, Patrick; Walter, Stefan; Nunnenkamp, Andreas; Schmidt, Thomas L.

    2016-11-01

    Electron-vibron coupling in quantum dots can lead to a strong suppression of the average current in the sequential tunneling regime. This effect is known as Franck-Condon blockade and can be traced back to an overlap integral between vibron states with different electron numbers which becomes exponentially small for large electron-vibron coupling strength. Here, we investigate the effect of a time-dependent drive on this phenomenon, in particular the effect of an oscillatory gate voltage acting on the electronic dot level. We employ two different approaches: perturbation theory based on nonequilibrium Keldysh Green's functions and a master equation in Born-Markov approximation. In both cases, we find that the drive can lift the blockade by exciting vibrons. As a consequence, the relative change in average current grows exponentially with the drive strength.

  7. Pauli spin blockade in CMOS double quantum dot devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotekar-Patil, D.; Corna, A.; Maurand, R.; Crippa, A.; Orlov, A.; Barraud, S.; Hutin, L.; Vinet, M.; Jehl, X.; De Franceschi, S.; Sanquer, M.

    2017-03-01

    Silicon quantum dots are attractive candidates for the development of scalable, spin-based qubits. Pauli spin blockade in double quantum dots provides an efficient, temperature independent mechanism for qubit readout. Here we report on transport experiments in double gate nanowire transistors issued from a CMOS process on 300 mm silicon-on-insulator wafers. At low temperature the devices behave as two few-electron quantum dots in series. We observe signatures of Pauli spin blockade with a singlet-triplet splitting ranging from 0.3 to 1.3 meV. Magneto-transport measurements show that transitions which conserve spin are shown to be magnetic-field independent up to B = 6 T.

  8. Photothermal therapy with immune-adjuvant nanoparticles together with checkpoint blockade for effective cancer immunotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qian; Xu, Ligeng; Liang, Chao; Wang, Chao; Peng, Rui; Liu, Zhuang

    2016-10-01

    A therapeutic strategy that can eliminate primary tumours, inhibit metastases, and prevent tumour relapses is developed herein by combining adjuvant nanoparticle-based photothermal therapy with checkpoint-blockade immunotherapy. Indocyanine green (ICG), a photothermal agent, and imiquimod (R837), a Toll-like-receptor-7 agonist, are co-encapsulated by poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA). The formed PLGA-ICG-R837 nanoparticles composed purely by three clinically approved components can be used for near-infrared laser-triggered photothermal ablation of primary tumours, generating tumour-associated antigens, which in the presence of R837-containing nanoparticles as the adjuvant can show vaccine-like functions. In combination with the checkpoint-blockade using anti-cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA4), the generated immunological responses will be able to attack remaining tumour cells in mice, useful in metastasis inhibition, and may potentially be applicable for various types of tumour models. Furthermore, such strategy offers a strong immunological memory effect, which can provide protection against tumour rechallenging post elimination of their initial tumours.

  9. Potential effect of angiotensin II receptor blockade in adipose tissue and bone.

    PubMed

    Nakagami, Hironori; Osako, Mariana Kiomy; Morishita, Ryuichi

    2013-01-01

    Recent evidence demonstrated that dysregulation of adipocytokine functions seen in abdominal obesity may be involved in the pathogenesis of the metabolic syndrome. Angiotensinogen, the precursor of angiotensin (Ang) II, is produced primarily in the liver, and also in adipose tissue, where it is up-regulated during the development of obesity and involved in blood pressure regulation and adipose tissue growth. Blockade of renin-angiotensin system (RAS) attenuates weight gain and adiposity by enhanced energy expenditure, and the favorable metabolic effects of telmisartan have been related to its Ang II receptor blockade and action as a partial agonist of peroxisome proliferators activated receptor (PPAR)-γ. PPARγ plays an important role in regulating carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, and ligands for PPARγ can improve insulin sensitivity and reduce triglyceride levels. Similarly, bone metabolism is closely regulated by hormones and cytokines, which have effects on both bone resorption and deposition. It is known that the receptors of Ang II are expressed in culture osteoclasts and osteoblasts, and Ang II is postulated to be able to act upon the cells involved in bone metabolism. In in vitro system, Ang II induced the differentiation and activation of osteoclasts responsible for bone resorption. Importantly, it was demonstrated by the sub-analysis of a recent clinical study that the fracture risk was significantly reduced by the usage of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. To treat the subgroups of hypertensive patients with osteoporosis RAS can be considered a novel target.

  10. Galectin-3 blockade inhibits cardiac inflammation and fibrosis in experimental hyperaldosteronism and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Martínez, Ernesto; Calvier, Laurent; Fernández-Celis, Amaya; Rousseau, Elodie; Jurado-López, Raquel; Rossoni, Luciana V; Jaisser, Frederic; Zannad, Faiez; Rossignol, Patrick; Cachofeiro, Victoria; López-Andrés, Natalia

    2015-10-01

    Hypertensive cardiac remodeling is accompanied by molecular inflammation and fibrosis, 2 mechanisms that finally affect cardiac function. At cardiac level, aldosterone promotes inflammation and fibrosis, although the precise mechanisms are still unclear. Galectin-3 (Gal-3), a β-galactoside-binding lectin, is associated with inflammation and fibrosis in the cardiovascular system. We herein investigated whether Gal-3 inhibition could block aldosterone-induced cardiac inflammation and fibrosis and its potential role in cardiac damage associated with hypertension. Aldosterone-salt-treated rats presented hypertension, cardiac inflammation, and fibrosis that were prevented by the pharmacological inhibition of Gal-3 with modified citrus pectin. Cardiac inflammation and fibrosis presented in spontaneously hypertensive rats were prevented by modified citrus pectin treatment, whereas Gal-3 blockade did not modify blood pressure levels. In the absence of blood pressure modifications, Gal-3 knockout mice were resistant to aldosterone-induced cardiac inflammation. In human cardiac fibroblasts, aldosterone increased Gal-3 expression via its mineralocorticoid receptor. Gal-3 and aldosterone enhanced proinflammatory and profibrotic markers, as well as metalloproteinase activities in human cardiac fibroblasts, effects that were not observed in Gal-3-silenced cells treated with aldosterone. In experimental hyperaldosteronism, the increase in Gal-3 expression was associated with cardiac inflammation and fibrosis, alterations that were prevented by Gal-3 blockade independently of blood pressure levels. These data suggest that Gal-3 could be a new molecular mechanism linking cardiac inflammation and fibrosis in situations with high-aldosterone levels, such as hypertension.

  11. Photothermal therapy with immune-adjuvant nanoparticles together with checkpoint blockade for effective cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qian; Xu, Ligeng; Liang, Chao; Wang, Chao; Peng, Rui; Liu, Zhuang

    2016-01-01

    A therapeutic strategy that can eliminate primary tumours, inhibit metastases, and prevent tumour relapses is developed herein by combining adjuvant nanoparticle-based photothermal therapy with checkpoint-blockade immunotherapy. Indocyanine green (ICG), a photothermal agent, and imiquimod (R837), a Toll-like-receptor-7 agonist, are co-encapsulated by poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA). The formed PLGA-ICG-R837 nanoparticles composed purely by three clinically approved components can be used for near-infrared laser-triggered photothermal ablation of primary tumours, generating tumour-associated antigens, which in the presence of R837-containing nanoparticles as the adjuvant can show vaccine-like functions. In combination with the checkpoint-blockade using anti-cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA4), the generated immunological responses will be able to attack remaining tumour cells in mice, useful in metastasis inhibition, and may potentially be applicable for various types of tumour models. Furthermore, such strategy offers a strong immunological memory effect, which can provide protection against tumour rechallenging post elimination of their initial tumours. PMID:27767031

  12. Study on Neuromuscular Blockade Action of Verapamil in Albino Rats

    PubMed Central

    Nagaral, Jayashree; GH, Shashikala; K, Jagadeesh; Kumar K, Sharath; GS, Jayanth; PK, Chennaveerappa; Patil, Rajani

    2013-01-01

    Background: Calcium Channel Blockers (CCBs) are now widely employed in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases and peri operative hypertension. It has been reported that calcium channel blockers inhibit neuromuscular transmission. They have been shown to increase the neuromuscular blockade produced by neuromuscular blocking agents in in-vitro muscle nerve preparations. The present study is undertaken to demonstrate the effect of calcium channel blocker, verapamil on neuromuscular transmission in albino rats. Objectives: To study the neuromuscular blockade action of verapamil in albino rats. Methods: Twenty four albino rats of either sex weigh 150-250gms are selected and are randomly divided into 4 equal groups. The experimental rats are divided into four groups of 6 rats each and they are given the following treatment. Group 1(Control) - Normal saline (1ml/ kg), Group 2 (Standard) - Pancuronium (0.04 mg/kg) Group 3-Verapamil (2.5mg/kg), Group 4-given Verapamil (10mg/kg). The time of onset of hind limb paralysis and total duration of recovery are noted using inclined screen method. Results: Analysis of the results of group 3 that was received 2.5mg/kg of Verapamil, there was no onset of paralysis, in group 4 that received injection Verapamil 10mg/kg, showed neuromuscular blockade activity. The mean onset of hind limb paralysis was delayed compared to standard group and the mean duration of hind limb paralysis was shorter than standard group. It was statistically significant (P≤ 0.05). Interpretation and conclusion: It is generally held that external calcium is not necessary for the contraction of mammalian skeletal muscle, the demonstration of inward calcium currents that can be abolished by CCBs in these muscles prompted to re-examine the effect of Verapamil on the neuromuscular transmission. The present study allows us to determine the neuromuscular blockade activity of Verapamil. PMID:24086855

  13. Beta-adrenergic blockade and atrio--ventricular conduction impairment.

    PubMed

    Giudicelli, J F; Lhoste, F; Boissier, J R

    1975-04-01

    Atrio--ventricular conduction and its modifications induced by six Beta-adrenergic blocking agents have been investigated in the dog. Premature atrial stimuli (St2) were applied at variable intervals following regular stimuli (St1) ensuring atrial pacing; atrial (AERP), nodoventricular (NERP) and global (GERP) effective refractory periods as well as global functional refractory period (GFRP) were determined before and after administration of each of the six drugs. When Beta-blockade was produced with d,1-propranolol which hwas membrane stabilizing effects (MSE) but no intrinsic sympathomimetic activity (ISA) or with sotalol, which has neither MSE nor ISA, all parameters were significantly increased. When Beta-blockade was achieved with pindolol or practolol, which have only a poor Beta-adrenolytic potency and no ISA. Alprenolol showed intermediate effects. Thus, it appears that Beta-blockade and not MSE, is responsible for the onset of A-V conduction impairment but that ISA, probably through a metabolic mechanism, affords protection against this impairment. On the other hand, measurement of ventricular effective refractory period (VERP) has shown that at the Purkinje-free junction, it is MSE which is mainly involved in conduction impairment.

  14. Dynamical Coulomb blockade of tunnel junctions driven by alternating voltages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabert, Hermann

    2015-12-01

    The theory of the dynamical Coulomb blockade is extended to tunneling elements driven by a time-dependent voltage. It is shown that, for standard setups where an external voltage is applied to a tunnel junction via an impedance, time-dependent driving entails an excitation of the modes of the electromagnetic environment by the applied voltage. Previous approaches for ac driven circuits need to be extended to account for the driven bath modes. A unitary transformation involving also the variables of the electromagnetic environment is introduced which allows us to split off the time dependence from the Hamiltonian in the absence of tunneling. This greatly simplifies perturbation-theoretical calculations based on treating the tunneling Hamiltonian as a perturbation. In particular, the average current flowing in the leads of the tunnel junction is studied. Explicit results are given for the case of an applied voltage with a constant dc part and a sinusoidal ac part. The connection with standard dynamical Coulomb blockade theory for constant applied voltage is established. It is shown that an alternating voltage source reveals significant additional effects caused by the electromagnetic environment. The hallmark of the dynamical Coulomb blockade in ac driven devices is a suppression of higher harmonics of the current by the electromagnetic environment. The theory presented basically applies to all tunneling devices driven by alternating voltages.

  15. Angular momentum blockade in nanoscale high-Tc superconducting grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancarella, Francesco; Balatsky, Alexander; Wallin, Mats; Rosengren, Anders; Nordita-Condensed Matter Collaboration; KTH-Theoretical Physics Collaboration

    2014-03-01

    We discuss the angular momentum blockade in small d-wave SC grains in an external magnetic field. We find abrupt changes in angular momentum state of the condensate (''angular momentum blockade'') as a result of the variation of the external field. The effect represents a direct analog of the Coulomb blockade. We use the Ginzburg-Landau theory to illustrate how the field turns a d-wave order parameter (OP) into a(dx2 -y2 + idxy)-OP. We derive the volume magnetic susceptibility as a function of the field, and corresponding small jumps in magnetization at critical values of the field that should be experimentally observable in SC grains. The observation of these jumps requires a small grain, since their extent is inversely proportional to the number of Cooper pairs in the sample. The general source of instability of the pure d-wave gap is the presence of gap nodes, completely lifted by the secondary OP component. A d + id' -state is chiral and hence has an orbital moment carried by Cooper pairs. We consider fields H <

  16. Mechanism-driven biomarkers to guide immune checkpoint blockade in cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Topalian, Suzanne L.; Taube, Janis M.; Anders, Robert A.; Pardoll, Drew M.

    2017-01-01

    With recent approvals for multiple therapeutic antibodies that block cytotoxic T lymphocyte associated antigen 4 (CTLA4) and programmed cell death protein 1 (PD1) in melanoma, non-small-cell lung cancer and kidney cancer, and additional immune checkpoints being targeted clinically, many questions still remain regarding the optimal use of drugs that block these checkpoint pathways. Defining biomarkers that predict therapeutic effects and adverse events is a crucial mandate, highlighted by recent approvals for two PDL1 diagnostic tests. Here, we discuss biomarkers for anti-PD1 therapy based on immunological, genetic and virological criteria. The unique biology of the CTLA4 immune checkpoint, compared with PD1, requires a different approach to biomarker development. Mechanism-based insights from such studies may guide the design of synergistic treatment combinations based on immune checkpoint blockade. PMID:27079802

  17. HDAC Inhibition Upregulates PD-1 Ligands in Melanoma and Augments Immunotherapy with PD-1 Blockade.

    PubMed

    Woods, David M; Sodré, Andressa L; Villagra, Alejandro; Sarnaik, Amod; Sotomayor, Eduardo M; Weber, Jeffrey

    2015-12-01

    Expression of PD-1 ligands by tumors and interaction with PD-1-expressing T cells in the tumor microenvironment can result in tolerance. Therapies targeting this coinhibitory axis have proven clinically successful in the treatment of metastatic melanoma, non-small cell lung cancer, and other malignancies. Therapeutic agents targeting the epigenetic regulatory family of histone deacetylases (HDAC) have shown clinical success in the treatment of some hematologic malignancies. Beyond direct tumor cell cytotoxicity, HDAC inhibitors have also been shown to alter the immunogenicity and enhance antitumor immune responses. Here, we show that class I HDAC inhibitors upregulated the expression of PD-L1 and, to a lesser degree, PD-L2 in melanomas. Evaluation of human and murine cell lines and patient tumors treated with a variety of HDAC inhibitors in vitro displayed upregulation of these ligands. This upregulation was robust and durable, with enhanced expression lasting past 96 hours. These results were validated in vivo in a B16F10 syngeneic murine model. Mechanistically, HDAC inhibitor treatment resulted in rapid upregulation of histone acetylation of the PD-L1 gene leading to enhanced and durable gene expression. The efficacy of combining HDAC inhibition with PD-1 blockade for treatment of melanoma was also explored in a murine B16F10 model. Mice receiving combination therapy had a slower tumor progression and increased survival compared with control and single-agent treatments. These results highlight the ability of epigenetic modifiers to augment immunotherapies, providing a rationale for combining HDAC inhibitors with PD-1 blockade.

  18. Angiotensin II Blockade and Renal Protection

    PubMed Central

    Kobori, Hiroyuki; Mori, Hirohito; Masaki, Tsutomu; Nishiyama, Akira

    2013-01-01

    Current national guidelines have recommended the use of renin-angiotensin system inhibitors, including angiotensin II type 1 receptor blockers (ARBs), in preference to other antihypertensive agents for treating hypertensive patients with chronic kidney disease. However, the mechanisms underlying the renoprotective effects of ARBs are multiple and complex. Blood pressure reduction by systemic vasodilation with an ARB contributes to its beneficial effects in treating kidney disease. Furthermore, ARB-induced renal vasodilation results in an increase in renal blood flow, leading to improvement of renal ischemia and hypoxia. ARBs are also effective in reducing urinary albumin excretion through a reduction in intraglomerular pressure and the protection of glomerular endothelium and/or podocyte injuries. In addition to blocking angiotensin II-induced renal cell and tissue injuries, ARBs can decrease intrarenal angiotensin II levels by reducing proximal tubular angiotensinogen and production of collecting duct renin, as well as angiotensin II accumulation in the kidney. In this review, we will briefly summarize our current understanding of the pharmacological effects of an ARB in the kidney. We will also discuss the possible mechanisms responsible for the renoprotective effects of ARBs on type 2 diabetic nephropathy. PMID:23176216

  19. Effects of calorie restriction and IGF-1 receptor blockade on the progression of 22Rv1 prostate cancer xenografts.

    PubMed

    Galet, Colette; Gray, Ashley; Said, Jonathan W; Castor, Brandon; Wan, Junxiang; Beltran, Pedro J; Calzone, Franck J; Elashoff, David; Cohen, Pinchas; Aronson, William J

    2013-07-03

    Calorie restriction (CR) inhibits prostate cancer progression, partially through modulation of the IGF axis. IGF-1 receptor (IGF-1R) blockade reduces prostate cancer xenograft growth. We hypothesized that combining calorie restriction with IGF-1R blockade would have an additive effect on prostate cancer growth. Severe combined immunodeficient mice were subcutaneously injected with 22Rv1 cells and randomized to: (1) Ad libitum feeding/intraperitoneal saline (Ad-lib); (2) Ad-lib/20 mg/kg twice weekly, intraperitoneal ganitumab [anti-IGF-1R antibody (Ad-lib/Ab)]; (3) 40% calorie restriction/intraperitoneal saline (CR); (4) CR/ intraperitoneal ganitumab, (CR/Ab). CR and ganitumab treatment were initiated one week after tumor injection. Euthanasia occurred 19 days post treatment. Results showed that CR alone decreased final tumor weight, plasma insulin and IGF-1 levels, and increased apoptosis. Ganitumab therapy alone reduced tumor growth but had no effect on final tumor weight. The combination therapy (CR/Ab) further decreased final tumor weight and proliferation, increased apoptosis in comparison to the Ad-lib group, and lowered plasma insulin levels relative to the Ad-lib and Ad-lib/Ab groups. Tumor AKT activation directly correlated with plasma IGF-1 levels. In conclusion, whereas ganitumab therapy modestly affected 22Rv1 tumor growth, combining IGF-1R blockade with calorie restriction resulted in a significant decrease in final tumor weight and improved metabolic profile.

  20. Therapeutic PD-L1 and LAG-3 blockade rapidly clears established blood-stage Plasmodium infection

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Noah S.; Moebius, Jacqueline; Pewe, Lecia L.; Traore, Boubacar; Doumbo, Ogobara K.; Tygrett, Lorraine T.; Waldschmidt, Thomas J.; Crompton, Peter D.; Harty, John T.

    2011-01-01

    Plasmodium infection of erythrocytes induces clinical malaria. Parasite-specific CD4+ T cells correlate with reduced parasite burdens and severity of human malaria, and are required to control blood-stage infection in mice. However, the characteristics of CD4+ T cells that determine protection or parasite persistence remain unknown. Here we show that P. falciparum infection of humans increased expression of an inhibitory receptor (PD-1) associated with T cell dysfunction. In vivo blockade of PD-L1 and LAG-3 restored CD4+ T cell function, amplified T follicular helper cell and germinal center B cell and plasmablast numbers, enhanced protective antibodies and rapidly cleared blood-stage malaria in mice. Thus, chronic malaria drives specific T cell dysfunction, which can be rescued to enhance parasite control using inhibitory therapies. PMID:22157630

  1. Therapeutic blockade of PD-L1 and LAG-3 rapidly clears established blood-stage Plasmodium infection.

    PubMed

    Butler, Noah S; Moebius, Jacqueline; Pewe, Lecia L; Traore, Boubacar; Doumbo, Ogobara K; Tygrett, Lorraine T; Waldschmidt, Thomas J; Crompton, Peter D; Harty, John T

    2011-12-11

    Infection of erythrocytes with Plasmodium species induces clinical malaria. Parasite-specific CD4(+) T cells correlate with lower parasite burdens and severity of human malaria and are needed to control blood-stage infection in mice. However, the characteristics of CD4(+) T cells that determine protection or parasite persistence remain unknown. Here we show that infection of humans with Plasmodium falciparum resulted in higher expression of the inhibitory receptor PD-1 associated with T cell dysfunction. In vivo blockade of the PD-1 ligand PD-L1 and the inhibitory receptor LAG-3 restored CD4(+) T cell function, amplified the number of follicular helper T cells and germinal-center B cells and plasmablasts, enhanced protective antibodies and rapidly cleared blood-stage malaria in mice. Thus, chronic malaria drives specific T cell dysfunction, and proper function can be restored by inhibitory therapies to enhance parasite control.

  2. Response to BRAF inhibition in melanoma is enhanced when combined with immune checkpoint blockade.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Zachary A; Juneja, Vikram R; Sage, Peter T; Frederick, Dennie T; Piris, Adriano; Mitra, Devarati; Lo, Jennifer A; Hodi, F Stephen; Freeman, Gordon J; Bosenberg, Marcus W; McMahon, Martin; Flaherty, Keith T; Fisher, David E; Sharpe, Arlene H; Wargo, Jennifer A

    2014-07-01

    BRAF-targeted therapy results in objective responses in the majority of patients; however, the responses are short lived (∼6 months). In contrast, treatment with immune checkpoint inhibitors results in a lower response rate, but the responses tend to be more durable. BRAF inhibition results in a more favorable tumor microenvironment in patients, with an increase in CD8(+) T-cell infiltrate and a decrease in immunosuppressive cytokines. There is also increased expression of the immunomodulatory molecule PDL1, which may contribute to the resistance. On the basis of these findings, we hypothesized that BRAF-targeted therapy may synergize with the PD1 pathway blockade to enhance antitumor immunity. To test this hypothesis, we developed a BRAF(V600E)/Pten(-/-) syngeneic tumor graft immunocompetent mouse model in which BRAF inhibition leads to a significant increase in the intratumoral CD8(+) T-cell density and cytokine production, similar to the effects of BRAF inhibition in patients. In this model, CD8(+) T cells were found to play a critical role in the therapeutic effect of BRAF inhibition. Administration of anti-PD1 or anti-PDL1 together with a BRAF inhibitor led to an enhanced response, significantly prolonging survival and slowing tumor growth, as well as significantly increasing the number and activity of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes. These results demonstrate synergy between combined BRAF-targeted therapy and immune checkpoint blockade. Although clinical trials combining these two strategies are ongoing, important questions still remain unanswered. Further studies using this new melanoma mouse model may provide therapeutic insights, including optimal timing and sequence of therapy.

  3. [The hemodynamic effect of thoracic sympathetic ganglion blockade in the anesthetized adult mongrel dogs].

    PubMed

    Yamagami, H

    1994-03-01

    Hemodynamic alterations with the thoracic sympathetic ganglion blockade were elucidated in the anesthetized open-chest dogs, under controlled ventilation with 100% oxygen and receiving fentanyl, pentobarbital and pancuronium administration, and the effect of blockade was assessed by increase in skin-surface temperature at the specific regions of the upper extremity. All dogs with thoracic sympathetic ganglion blockade revealed the increased skin temperature in blocked extremities and decreased skin temperature in the contralateral side with simultaneous compensatory vasoconstriction ("Borrowing-Lending phenomenon"). Four groups were classified according to the side and range of blockade: A-group (right Th7.8 ganglion, N = 17), B-group (left-Th7.8 ganglion, N = 8), C-group (right Th2.3 ganglion, N = 13) and D-group (left-Th2.3 ganglion, N = 10). The hemodynamic variables after the middle thoracic sympathetic ganglion blockade showed no remarkable changes but heart-rate, mean arterial blood pressure and cardiac output decreased significantly with the upper right-side thoracic sympathetic ganglion blockade, and the inhibited circulatory state lasted twenty minutes after blockade. No significant skin temperature changes were observed after blockade among four groups. The results suggest that the patient after upper thoracic sympathetic ganglion blockade should be cared with these circulatory changes in mind.

  4. The Naval Blockade: A Study of Factors Necessary for Effective Utilization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-06-05

    PERU AND BOLIVIA BY CHILE 1879-1884 THE SPANISH AMERICAN WAR 1898 , . THE DECLARATION OF LONDON 1909 WORLD WAR I: THE BRITISH BLOCKADE OF...operations ashore can have on the blockade at sea. THE BLOCKADE DP PERU AND BOLIVIA BY CHILE 1B79-1S84 Beginning in 1379, Chile used a vastly superior...fleet to blockade the coasts of Peru and Bolivia . This Chilean Fleet had two British built battleships, giving it sea power greatly superior to that

  5. Blood flow, sympathetic activity and pain relief following lumbar sympathetic blockade or surgical sympathectomy.

    PubMed

    Walsh, J A; Glynn, C J; Cousins, M J; Basedow, R W

    1985-02-01

    The physiological effects of local anaesthetic (bupivacaine), neurolytic (phenol) blockade and surgical ablation of the lumbar sympathetic chain were assessed in patients with peripheral vascular disease or sympathetic dystrophy. Local anaesthetic blockade in 49 patients resulted in significant decrease in pain, plantar sweating and in the vasoconstrictor ice response of the foot, as well as a significant increase in skin temperature and foot blood flow. Subsequent neurolytic blockade in 31 of these patients achieved an effective denervation as assessed by the same physiological measurements. The magnitude of changes in blood flow and sympathetic activity were similar for local anaesthetic and neurolytic blockade as well as in six patients who underwent surgical sympathectomy.

  6. OX40 blockade inhibits house dust mite driven allergic lung inflammation in mice and in vitro allergic responses in humans.

    PubMed

    Burrows, Katie E; Dumont, Celine; Thompson, Clare L; Catley, Matthew C; Dixon, Kate L; Marshall, Diane

    2015-04-01

    The costimulatory receptor OX40 is expressed on activated T cells and regulates T-cell responses. Here, we show the efficacy and mechanism of action of an OX40 blocking antibody using the chronic house dust mite (HDM) mouse model of lung inflammation and in vitro HDM stimulation of cells from HDM allergic human donors. We have demonstrated that OX40 blockade leads to a reduction in the number of eosinophils and neutrophils in the lavage fluid and lung tissue of HDM sensitized mice. This was accompanied by a decrease in activated and memory CD4(+) T cells in the lungs and further analysis revealed that both the Th2 and Th17 populations were inhibited. Improved lung function and decreased HDM-specific antibody responses were also noted. Significantly, efficacy was observed even when anti-OX40 treatment was delayed until after inflammation was established. OX40 blockade also inhibited the release of the Th2 cytokines IL-5 and IL-13 from cells isolated from HDM allergic human donors. Altogether, our data provide evidence of a role of the OX40/OX40L pathway in ongoing allergic lung inflammation and support clinical studies of a blocking OX40 antibody in Th2 high severe asthma patients.

  7. Prospective immunotherapies in childhood sarcomas: PD1/PDL1 blockade in combination with tumor vaccines.

    PubMed

    Nowicki, Theodore S; Anderson, Jennifer L; Federman, Noah

    2016-03-01

    Progress has slowed substantially in improving survival rates for pediatric sarcomas, particularly in refractory and metastatic disease. Significant progress has been made in the field of tumor vaccines for such malignancies, which target established tumor antigens. While tumor vaccines have demonstrated safety and improved survival rates, they are inadequate in mediating the regression of established tumor masses and metastases. Programmed cell death ligand 1 (PDL1) is a cell-surface protein induced in a number of adult malignancies. By acting on the corresponding T-cell receptor PD1, PDL1 is able to suppress cytotoxic T-cell-mediated tumor responses. Recent therapeutics blocking this interaction have shown promise in various adult cancers by restoring a functional T-cell response and by directing this response toward an activated, rather than regulatory, T-cell phenotype. We shall discuss the current state of tumor vaccines targeting pediatric sarcomas, review PD1-PDL1 interactions and current therapies targeting these interactions in adult malignancies, and discuss recent studies in which tumor vaccines, combined with PDL1 blockades, produced superior tumor regression compared with the vaccine alone. These studies provide a compelling case for investigation of PDL1 expression and its inhibition in pediatric sarcomas, while continuing to utilize tumor vaccines in tandem to achieve superior clinical outcomes.

  8. Quantum confinement and Coulomb blockade in isolated nanodiamond crystallites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolker, Asaf; Saguy, Cecile; Tordjman, Moshe; Kalish, Rafi

    2013-07-01

    We present direct experimental evidence of quantum confinement effects in single isolated nanodiamonds by scanning tunneling spectroscopy. For grains smaller than 4.5 nm, the band gap was found to increase with decreasing nanodiamond size and a well-defined, evenly spaced, 12-peak structure was observed on the conduction band side of the conductance curves. We attribute these peaks to the Coulomb blockade effect, reflecting the 12-fold degeneracy of the first electron-energy level in the confined nanodiamond. The present results shed light on the size dependence of the electronic properties of single nanodiamonds and are of major importance for future nanodiamond-based applications.

  9. Classical Coulomb blockade of a silicon nanowire dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shaoyun; Fukata, Naoki; Shimizu, Maki; Yamaguchi, Tomohiro; Sekiguchi, Takashi; Ishibashi, Koji

    2008-05-01

    Single electron transistors (SETs) have been fabricated with an individual n-type single-crystal silicon nanowire (SiNW) that was grown by a catalytic chemical vapor deposition technique, and their transport properties have been measured in low temperatures. The SiNW-SET in the present work exhibited well pronounced Coulomb oscillations in a wide gate voltage range from -10to10V, featuring in uniform peak height, uniform full width at half maximum, and equidistant peak spacing. The charging energy turned out to be 64μeV. The temperature dependence of Coulomb oscillations revealed that the dot worked within the classical Coulomb blockade model.

  10. Overcoming Barriers in Oncolytic Virotherapy with HDAC Inhibitors and Immune Checkpoint Blockade.

    PubMed

    Marchini, Antonio; Scott, Eleanor M; Rommelaere, Jean

    2016-01-06

    Oncolytic viruses (OVs) target and destroy cancer cells while sparing their normal counterparts. These viruses have been evaluated in numerous studies at both pre-clinical and clinical levels and the recent Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval of an oncolytic herpesvirus-based treatment raises optimism that OVs will become a therapeutic option for cancer patients. However, to improve clinical outcome, there is a need to increase OV efficacy. In addition to killing cancer cells directly through lysis, OVs can stimulate the induction of anti-tumour immune responses. The host immune system thus represents a "double-edged sword" for oncolytic virotherapy: on the one hand, a robust anti-viral response will limit OV replication and spread; on the other hand, the immune-mediated component of OV therapy may be its most important anti-cancer mechanism. Although the relative contribution of direct viral oncolysis and indirect, immune-mediated oncosuppression to overall OV efficacy is unclear, it is likely that an initial period of vigorous OV multiplication and lytic activity will most optimally set the stage for subsequent adaptive anti-tumour immunity. In this review, we consider the use of histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors as a means of boosting virus replication and lessening the negative impact of innate immunity on the direct oncolytic effect. We also discuss an alternative approach, aimed at potentiating OV-elicited anti-tumour immunity through the blockade of immune checkpoints. We conclude by proposing a two-phase combinatorial strategy in which initial OV replication and spread is maximised through transient HDAC inhibition, with anti-tumour immune responses subsequently enhanced by immune checkpoint blockade.

  11. Overcoming Barriers in Oncolytic Virotherapy with HDAC Inhibitors and Immune Checkpoint Blockade

    PubMed Central

    Marchini, Antonio; Scott, Eleanor M.; Rommelaere, Jean

    2016-01-01

    Oncolytic viruses (OVs) target and destroy cancer cells while sparing their normal counterparts. These viruses have been evaluated in numerous studies at both pre-clinical and clinical levels and the recent Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval of an oncolytic herpesvirus-based treatment raises optimism that OVs will become a therapeutic option for cancer patients. However, to improve clinical outcome, there is a need to increase OV efficacy. In addition to killing cancer cells directly through lysis, OVs can stimulate the induction of anti-tumour immune responses. The host immune system thus represents a “double-edged sword” for oncolytic virotherapy: on the one hand, a robust anti-viral response will limit OV replication and spread; on the other hand, the immune-mediated component of OV therapy may be its most important anti-cancer mechanism. Although the relative contribution of direct viral oncolysis and indirect, immune-mediated oncosuppression to overall OV efficacy is unclear, it is likely that an initial period of vigorous OV multiplication and lytic activity will most optimally set the stage for subsequent adaptive anti-tumour immunity. In this review, we consider the use of histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors as a means of boosting virus replication and lessening the negative impact of innate immunity on the direct oncolytic effect. We also discuss an alternative approach, aimed at potentiating OV-elicited anti-tumour immunity through the blockade of immune checkpoints. We conclude by proposing a two-phase combinatorial strategy in which initial OV replication and spread is maximised through transient HDAC inhibition, with anti-tumour immune responses subsequently enhanced by immune checkpoint blockade. PMID:26751469

  12. Pharmacologic blockade of angiopoietin-2 is efficacious against model hemangiomas in mice.

    PubMed

    Perry, Betsy N; Govindarajan, Baskaran; Bhandarkar, Sulochana S; Knaus, Ulla G; Valo, Monika; Sturk, Celina; Carrillo, Carol O; Sohn, Allie; Cerimele, Francesca; Dumont, Dan; Losken, Albert; Williams, Joseph; Brown, Lawrence F; Tan, Xiaolian; Ioffe, Ella; Yancopoulos, George D; Arbiser, Jack L

    2006-10-01

    Hemangioma of infancy is the most common neoplasm of childhood. While hemangiomas are classic examples of angiogenesis, the angiogenic factors responsible for hemangiomas are not fully understood. Previously, we demonstrated that malignant endothelial tumors arise in the setting of autocrine loops involving vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its major mitogenic receptor vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2. Hemangiomas of infancy differ from malignant endothelial tumors in that they usually regress, or can be induced to regress by pharmacologic means, suggesting that angiogenesis in hemangiomas differs fundamentally from that of malignant endothelial tumors. Here, we demonstrate constitutive activation of the endothelial tie-2 receptor in human hemangioma of infancy and, using a murine model of hemangioma, bEnd.3 cells; we show that bEnd.3 hemangiomas produce both angiopoietin-2 (ang-2) and its receptor, tie-2, in vivo. We also demonstrate that inhibition of tie-2 signaling with a soluble tie-2 receptor decreases bEnd.3 hemangioma growth in vivo. The efficacy of tie-2 blockade suggests that either tie-2 activation or ang-2 may be required for in vivo growth. To address this issue, we used tie-2-deficient bEnd.3 hemangioma cells, which, surprisingly, were fully proficient in in vivo growth. Previous studies from our laboratory and others have implicated reactive oxygen-generating nox enzymes in the angiogenic switch, so we examined the effect of nox inhibitors on ang-2 production in vitro and on bEnd.3 tumor growth in vivo. We then inhibited ang-2 production pharmacologically using novel inhibitors of nox enzymes and found that this treatment nearly abolished bEnd.3 hemangioma growth in vivo. Signal-transduction blockade targeting ang-2 production may be useful in the treatment of human hemangiomas in vivo.

  13. Ultrastructural changes in hepatic sinusoidal endothelial cells acutely exposed to colloidal iron.

    PubMed

    Bassett, Mark L; Dahlstrom, Jane E; Taylor, Matthew C; Koina, Mark E; Maxwell, Lesley; Francis, Douglas; Jain, Sanjiv; McLean, Allan J

    2003-07-01

    Hepatic sinusoidal endothelial cells form an important interface between the vascular system, represented by the sinusoids, and the space of Disse that surrounds the hepatocyte microvilli. This study aimed to assess the light microscopic and ultrastructural effects of acute exposure of hepatic sinusoidal endothelial cells to colloidal iron by injection of rats with iron polymaltose. Eight minutes after a single intravenous injection of iron polymaltose sinusoidal endothelial cells showed defenestration, and thickening and layering as assessed by transmission electron microscopy. Kupffer cells and stellate cells appeared activated. These changes were not observed in control animals, experiments using equivalent doses of maltose, or experiments using colloidal carbon except for Kupffer cell activation due to colloidal carbon. No significant light microscopic changes were seen in study or control animals. The findings indicate that acute exposure to colloidal iron causes changes in hepatic sinusoidal endothelial cells, stellate cells and Kupffer cells. This may be the result of a direct toxic effect of iron or increased production of reactive oxygen species. These observations suggest a possible mechanism for defenestration of sinusoidal endothelial cells in ageing and in disease states.

  14. Amelioration strategies fail to prevent tobacco smoke effects on neurodifferentiation: Nicotinic receptor blockade, antioxidants, methyl donors.

    PubMed

    Slotkin, Theodore A; Skavicus, Samantha; Card, Jennifer; Levin, Edward D; Seidler, Frederic J

    2015-07-03

    Tobacco smoke exposure is associated with neurodevelopmental disorders. We used neuronotypic PC12 cells to evaluate the mechanisms by which tobacco smoke extract (TSE) affects neurodifferentiation. In undifferentiated cells, TSE impaired DNA synthesis and cell numbers to a much greater extent than nicotine alone; TSE also impaired cell viability to a small extent. In differentiating cells, TSE enhanced cell growth at the expense of cell numbers and promoted emergence of the dopaminergic phenotype. Nicotinic receptor blockade with mecamylamine was ineffective in preventing the adverse effects of TSE and actually enhanced the effect of TSE on the dopamine phenotype. A mixture of antioxidants (vitamin C, vitamin E, N-acetyl-l-cysteine) provided partial protection against cell loss but also promoted loss of the cholinergic phenotype in response to TSE. Notably, the antioxidants themselves altered neurodifferentiation, reducing cell numbers and promoting the cholinergic phenotype at the expense of the dopaminergic phenotype, an effect that was most prominent for N-acetyl-l-cysteine. Treatment with methyl donors (vitamin B12, folic acid, choline) had no protectant effect and actually enhanced the cell loss evoked by TSE; they did have a minor, synergistic interaction with antioxidants protecting against TSE effects on growth. Thus, components of tobacco smoke perturb neurodifferentiation through mechanisms that cannot be attributed to the individual effects of nicotine, oxidative stress or interference with one-carbon metabolism. Consequently, attempted amelioration strategies may be partially effective at best, or, as seen here, can actually aggravate injury by interfering with normal developmental signals and/or by sensitizing cells to TSE effects on neurodifferentiation.

  15. CTLA4 blockade induces frequent tumor infiltration by activated lymphocytes regardless of clinical responses in humans

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Rong Rong; Jalil, Jason; Economou, James S.; Chmielowski, Bartosz; Koya, Richard C.; Mok, Stephen; Sazegar, Hooman; Seja, Elizabeth; Villanueva, Arturo; Gomez-Navarro, Jesus; Glaspy, John A.; Cochran, Alistair J.; Ribas, Antoni

    2011-01-01

    Background CTLA4 blocking monoclonal antibodies provide durable clinical benefit in a subset of patients with advanced melanoma mediated by intratumoral lymphocytic infiltrates. A key question is defining if the intratumoral infiltration is a differentiating factor between patients with and without tumor responses. Methods Paired baseline and post-dosing tumor biopsies from 19 subjects, including three patients with an objective tumor response, were prospectively collected from patients with metastatic melanoma receiving the anti-CTLA4 antibody tremelimumab within a clinical trial with primary endpoint of quantitating CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) infiltration in tumors. Samples were analyzed for cell density using automated imaging capture, and further characterized for functional lymphocyte properties by assessing the cell activation markers HLA-DR and CD45RO, the cell proliferation marker Ki67 and the T regulatory cell marker FOXP3. Results There was a highly significant increase in intratumoral infiltration by CD8+ cells in biopsies taken after tremelimumab treatment. This included increases between 1-fold and 100-fold changes in 14 out of 18 evaluable cases regardless of clinical tumor response or progression. There was no difference between the absolute number, location or cell density of infiltrating cells between clinical responders and patients with non-responding lesions that showed acquired intratumoral infiltrates. There were similar levels of expression of T cell activation markers (CD45RO, HLA-DR) in both groups, and no difference in markers for cell replication (Ki67) or the suppressor cell marker FOXP3. Conclusion CTLA4 blockade induces frequent increases in intratumoral T cell infiltration despite which only a minority of patients have objective tumor responses. PMID:21558401

  16. Cooperation of imipramine blue and tyrosine kinase blockade demonstrates activity against chronic myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Laidlaw, Kamilla M.E.; Berhan, Samuel; Liu, Suhu; Silvestri, Giovannino; Holyoake, Tessa L.; Frank, David A.; Aggarwal, Bharat; Bonner, Michael Y.; Perrotti, Danilo

    2016-01-01

    The use of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI), including nilotinib, has revolutionized the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). However current unmet clinical needs include combating activation of additional survival signaling pathways in persistent leukemia stem cells after long-term TKI therapy. A ubiquitous signaling alteration in cancer, including CML, is activation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) signaling, which may potentiate stem cell activity and mediate resistance to both conventional chemotherapy and targeted inhibitors. We have developed a novel nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase inhibitor, imipramine blue (IB) that targets ROS generation. ROS levels are known to be elevated in CML with respect to normal hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells and not corrected by TKI. We demonstrate that IB has additive benefit with nilotinib in inhibiting proliferation, viability, and clonogenic function of TKI-insensitive quiescent CD34+ CML chronic phase (CP) cells while normal CD34+ cells