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Sample records for kutsar avo trumm

  1. Nonbright spot AVO: Two examples

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, C.P.; Kinman, D.L.

    1994-12-31

    Utilization of amplitude-versus-offset (AVO) attribute sections such as the product of the normal incidence trace and gradient trace have been used extensively in bright spot (Class 3) AVO analysis and interpretation. However, while these sections have often worked well with Class 3 responses they are not reliable indicators of non-bright spot (Class 2) seismic anomalies. Analyzing Class 2 seismic data with AVO products will: (1) not detect the gas-charged reservoir because of near-zero acoustic impedance contrast between the sands and encasing shales, or (2) yield an incorrect (negative) AVO product if the normal incidence and gradient values are opposite in sign. Class 2 offset responses are divided into two sub-categories: those with phase reversals (Class 2p) and those without phase reversals (Class 2). An AVO procedure for these types of Class 2 anomalies is presented through two examples. The technique better exploits the nature of the prestack response, yielding a more definitive AVO attribute section, and the technique is adaptive to both Class 2 and Class 2p responses. When compared to a conventionally processed relative amplitude seismic section with characteristically low amplitude responses for near-zero acoustic impedance sands, this procedure clearly denotes the presence of gas-charged pore fluids within the reservoir.

  2. Nonbright-spot AVO: Two examples

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, C.P.; Kinman, D.L.

    1995-09-01

    The use of amplitude variation with offset (AVO) attribute sections such as the product of the normal incidence trace (A) and the gradient trace (B) have been used extensively in bright spot AVO analysis and interpretation. However, while these sections have often worked well with low acoustic impedance bright spot responses, they are not reliable indicators of nonbright-spot seismic anomalies. Analyzing nonbright-spot seismic data with common AVO attribute sections will: (1) not detect the gas-charged reservoir because of near-zero acoustic impedance contrast between the sands and encasing shales, or (2) yield an incorrect (negative) AVO product if the normal incidence and gradient values are opposite in sign. The authors divide nonbright-spot AVO offset responses into two subcategories: those with phase reversals and those without. An AVO analysis procedure for these anomalies is presented through two examples. The procedure exploits the nature of the prestack response, yielding a more definitive AVO attribute section, and this technique is adaptive to both subcategories of nonbright-spot AVO responses. This technique identifies the presence of gas-charged pore fluids within the reservoir when compared to a conventionally processed, relative amplitude seismic section with characteristically low amplitude responses for near-zero acoustic impedance contrast sands.

  3. AVO migration and inversion: Are they commutable?

    SciTech Connect

    Beydoun, W.B.; Jin, S.; Hanitzsch, C.

    1994-12-31

    With the increasing ambition of characterizing hydrocarbon traps in more subtle or complex reservoirs, Amplitude Variation with Offset (AVO) techniques are becoming a valuable seismic tool for quantitative seismic discrimination of lithologies and fluids. One of the biggest remaining challenges is to acquire and process the data in an amplitude preserved fashion and in multi-dimensional geology. This study is a component of this puzzle, and attempts to address the following processing question: what are the benefits of prestack migration before AVO inversion (process 1) versus performing an AVO inversion followed by a poststack migration (process 2)? The comparison is done on a 2-D synthetic model which is valid for process 2. The technique used for process 1 is the prestack depth AVO migration/inversion described in the text which estimates reflectivities and incidence angles in multi-dimensions from the data prior to AVO inversion. Process 2 results are derived using a commercial seismic processing software package.

  4. Three-parameter AVO crossplotting in anisotropic media

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chen, H.; Castagna, J.P.; Brown, R.L.; Ramos, A.C.B.

    2001-01-01

    Amplitude versus offset (AVO) interpretation can be facilitated by crossplotting AVO intercept (A), gradient (B), and curvature (C) terms. However, anisotropy, which exists in the real world, usually complicates AVO analysis. Recognizing anisotropic behavior on AVO crossplots can help avoid AVO interpretation errors. Using a modification to a three-term (A, B, and C) approximation to the exact anisotropic reflection coefficients for transversely isotropic media, we find that anisotropy has a nonlinear effect on an A versus C crossplot yet causes slope changes and differing intercepts on A versus B or C crossplots. Empirical corrections that result in more accurate crossplot interpretation are introduced for specific circumstances.

  5. AVO helps seismic imaging in deepwater environments

    SciTech Connect

    Skidmore, C.; Lindsay, R.O.; Ratcliff, D.

    1997-11-03

    Amplitude and frequency variations related to offset should be analyzed routinely during interpretation of seismic data acquired in deepwater environments. Amplitude variation with offset (AVO) in three dimensions is the key exploration tool in deep waters of the Gulf of Mexico. But application of the tool requires special care. Three-dimensional AVO helps the interpreter understand stratigraphy and the meaning of amplitude anomalies. Used in conjunction with well log data, it can help the interpreter distinguish amplitudes related to the presence of hydrocarbons from those that result from, for example, rock-property changes within a non-hydrocarbon-bearing layer, such as a shale, or residual gas (fizz water) in high-porosity sands. The paper discusses examples from the Gulf of Mexico, will control application, improving detail, and frequency-dependent analysis.

  6. Nonlinear Classification of AVO Attributes Using SVM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, B.; Zhou, H.

    2005-05-01

    A key research topic in reservoir characterization is the detection of the presence of fluids using seismic and well-log data. In particular, partial gas discrimination is very challenging because low and high gas saturation can result in similar anomalies in terms of Amplitude Variation with Offset (AVO), bright spot, and velocity sag. Hence, a successful fluid detection will require a good understanding of the seismic signatures of the fluids, high-quality data, and good detection methodology. Traditional attempts of partial gas discrimination employ the Neural Network algorithm. A new approach is to use the Support Vector Machine (SVM) (Vapnik, 1995; Liu and Sacchi, 2003). While the potential of the SVM has not been fully explored for reservoir fluid detection, the current nonlinear methods classify seismic attributes without the use of rock physics constraints. The objective of this study is to improve the capability of distinguishing a fizz-water reservoir from a commercial gas reservoir by developing a new detection method using AVO attributes and rock physics constraints. This study will first test the SVM classification with synthetic data, and then apply the algorithm to field data from the King-Kong and Lisa-Anne fields in Gulf of Mexico. While both field areas have high amplitude seismic anomalies, King-Kong field produces commercial gas but Lisa-Anne field does not. We expect that the new SVM-based nonlinear classification of AVO attributes may be able to separate commercial gas from fizz-water in these two fields.

  7. Asymptotic AVO equations for the VTI media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J. W.; Chang, Y. F.

    2016-12-01

    Nowadays, amplitude variation with offset (AVO) has become a commonly used seismic attribute in the petroleum exploration to reveal the lithology and estimate pore fluids underground. However, strata usually exhibit velocity anisotropy, thus the effect of anisotropy of stratum must be taken into account when applying the AVO analyzing. The exact solution of the anisotropic reflection coefficients of seismic waves is very complicated. For the practical use in the seismic exploration, Rüger proposed an approximation solution for P-wave reflection coefficients between transversely isotropic media with vertical symmetry axis (VTI media). In this study, we present an intuitive and direct approximation solution of P-wave reflection coefficients for VTI media. The velocity of the VTI media is approximated as a function of anisotropy coefficients and incident angles. Then the isotropic Zoeppritz equations were used to calculate the P-wave reflection coefficient. Afterward typically used two-layer models for the P-wave AVO analysis and commonly used anisotropy parameters were adopted to verify our new approximation. Study results show that our approximation is effective. Especially, for the model 3, for a shale-sand model with a low impedance sand, our approximation is better than Rüger's. A new and effective approximation solution of P-wave reflection coefficients for VTI media is proposed conclusively.

  8. Bayesian AVO inversion with consistent angle parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chao; Zhang, Jinmiao; Zhu, Zhenyu

    2017-04-01

    Amplitude versus offset (AVO) inversion has been extensively used in seismic exploration. Many different elastic parameters can be inverted by incorporating corresponding reflection coefficient approximations. Although efforts have been made to improve the accuracy of AVO inversions for years, there is still one problem that has long been ignored. In most methods, the angle in the approximation and the angle used in seismic angle gather extractions are not the same one. This inconsistency leads to inaccurate inversion results. In this paper, a Bayesian AVO inversion method with consistent angles is proposed to solve the problem and improve inversion accuracy. Firstly, a linearized P-wave reflection coefficient approximation with consistent angles is derived based on angle replacements. The equivalent form of the approximation in terms moduli and density is derived so that moduli can be inverted for reservoir characterization. Then, by convoluting it with seismic wavelets as the forward solver, a probabilistic prestack seismic inversion method with consistent angles is presented in a Bayesian scheme. The synthetic test proves that the accuracy of this method is higher than the traditional one. The real data example shows that the inversion result fits better with well log interpretation data, which verifies the feasibility of the proposed method.

  9. Thin bed tuning analysis using AVO stratigraphy methods

    SciTech Connect

    Ball, V.

    1989-03-01

    When conventional methods of seismic stratigraphy are applied to the thin bed problem, the final result is a function which relates a range of thicknesses to a range of impedances. Amplitude vs. Offset (AVO) stratigraphy provides an analysis method that can substantially reduce the range of the solution. AVO stratigraphy is not a simple extension of conventional seismic stratigraphy. The essential difference is that petrophysical modeling is introduced in order to parameterize the otherwise unwieldy attributes of density, velocity, and Poisson's ratio.

  10. 3-D AVO processing: Evolution of a processing sequence

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, I.F.; Mandache, V.; Campbell, S.; Lancaster, S.

    1994-12-31

    The use of seismic amplitudes has long been recognized as an important aid in the location of hydrocarbons. More recently, this has been extended to include the study of the variations of amplitude as the shot-receiver offset is changed. Here the authors present a case history outlining the development of an AVO processing sequence for application to 3D data sets, including the use of prestack 3D target oriented time migration. AVO attributes at different points in the processing sequence are compared. Successive improvements in the AVO response (both in the RO and gradient seismic sections) demonstrate the advantage of focusing diffraction energy in the CMP gathers prior to estimation of the AVO response. The effect of surface-related multiple energy and its removal is also addressed, comparing a conventional FK demultiple approach with that of the parabolic tau-p transform. Measures of statistical reliability of the AVO results are considered with comparisons of statistical measures being made at various stages of the imaging and multiple suppression. For example, the correlation coefficient associated with least-squares fitting shows an improvement for certain horizons after in-line migration, and further improvement after subsequent interpolation and cross-line migration.

  11. Azimuthal AVO signatures of fractured poroelastic sandstone layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Zhiqi; Li, Xiang-Yang

    2017-10-01

    Azimuthal P-wave amplitude variation with offset (AVO) offers a method for the characterisation of a naturally fractured system in a reservoir. This information is important for the analysis of fluid flow during production of, for example, oil, petroleum and natural gas. This paper provides a modelling scheme by incorporating the squirt-flow model for the prediction of velocity dispersion and attenuation with azimuthal reflectivity method for the calculation of frequency-dependent seismic responses. Azimuthal AVO responses from a fractured poroelastic sandstone layer encased within shale are investigated based on the proposed method. Azimuthal reflections are a combination of the dynamic information including the contrast in anisotropic properties, anisotropic propagation and attenuation within the layer, as well as tuning and interferences. Modelling results indicate that seismic responses from the top of the sandstone layer are dominated by reflection coefficients, and show azimuthal variations at far offset which is consistent with conventional azimuthal AVO theory. Reflections from the base, however, demonstrate complex azimuthal variations due to anisotropic propagation and attenuation of transmission waves within the layer. Tuning and interferences further complicate the azimuthal AVO responses for thinner layer thickness. The AVO responses of top reflections show no azimuthal variations for lower fluid mobility, while those of base reflections show visible and stable azimuthal variations even at near and moderate offsets for different fluid mobility. Results also reveal that it would be practical to investigate wavetrains reflected from the fractured layers that are regarded as integrated units, especially for thinner layers where reflections from the top and base are indistinguishable. In addition, near-offset stacked amplitudes of the reflected wavetrains show detectable azimuthal variations, which may offer an initial look at fracture orientations before

  12. South African Astronomy in the Internet Era: exploiting the AVO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charles, Phil

    2007-04-01

    The combination of SALT, the bid to host SKA and the association with HESS have propelled South Africa into a world-class position with regard to multi-wavelength observational facilities, indicating the scale of their hopes and aspirations post-1994. All of these facilities exploit the geographical advantage that South Africa possesses, combined with substantial international collaborations to share the financial burden, whilst benefitting the infrastructure and development of South African science and industry. However, the effective use of SALT (and which is far more critical for KAT, an SKA technology demonstrator) requires dramatic improvements in both the local and international Internet bandwidth, which lags far behind First World norms (in terms of both the data rates available and their cost). Such connectivity is essential for raw data transfer from telescope to data centre, and then subsequent access by (national and international) users of the processed data. Current capabilities are stretched to the limit by SALT operations alone (which are measured in terms of Gb/night), but completely different solutions will be needed for KAT and SKA (which require Gb/s). Potential solutions for both South African and international users of SALT are being developed which exploit the Astrophysical Virtual Observatory (AVO) and Grid concepts and the substantial international investment that is currently ongoing. A collaboration with the UK's AstroGRID is acting as a testbed in which the raw data archive will remain in Cape Town at SAAO, but AstroGRID will act as a front end for setting up data pipelining procedures from which only mostly reduced data need be transferred to the end user. Comparisons with other remote international facilities (e.g the observatories in La Palma, Spain) plus the infrastructure required for KAT will be presented and discussed.

  13. AVO in North of Paria, Venezuela: Gas methane versus condensate reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Regueiro, J.; Pena, A.

    1996-07-01

    The gas fields of North of Paria, offshore eastern Venezuela, present a unique opportunity for amplitude variations with offset (AVO) characterization of reservoirs containing different fluids: gas-condensate, gas (methane) and water (brine). AVO studies for two of the wells in the area, one with gas-condensate and the other with gas (methane) saturated reservoirs, show interesting results. Water sands and a fluid contact (condensate-water) are present in one of these wells, thus providing a control point on brine-saturated properties. The reservoirs in the second well consist of sands highly saturated with methane. Clear differences in AVO response exist between hydrocarbon-saturated reservoirs and those containing brine. However, it is also interesting that subtle but noticeable differences can be interpreted between condensate-and methane-saturated sands. These differences are attributed to differences in both in-situ fluid density and compressibility, and rock frame properties.

  14. Involvement of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Avo3p/Tsc11p in maintaining TOR complex 2 integrity and coupling to downstream signaling.

    PubMed

    Ho, Hsiang-Ling; Lee, Hsin-Yi; Liao, Hsien-Ching; Chen, Mei-Yu

    2008-08-01

    Target-of-rapamycin proteins (TORs) are Ser/Thr kinases serving a central role in cell growth control. TORs function in two conserved multiprotein complexes, TOR complex 1 (TORC1) and TORC2; the mechanisms underlying their actions and regulation are not fully elucidated. Saccharomyces TORC2, containing Tor2p, Avo1p, Avo2p, Avo3p/Tsc11p, Bit61p, and Lst8p, regulates cell integrity and actin organization. Two classes of avo3 temperature-sensitive (avo3(ts)) mutants that we previously identified display cell integrity and actin defects, yet one is suppressed by AVO1 while the other is suppressed by AVO2 or SLM1, defining two TORC2 downstream signaling mechanisms, one mediated by Avo1p and the other by Avo2p/Slm1p. Employing these mutants, we explored Avo3p functions in TORC2 structure and signaling. By observing binary protein interactions using coimmunoprecipitation, we discovered that the composition of TORC2 and its recruitment of the downstream effectors Slm1p and Slm2p were differentially affected in different avo3(ts) mutants. These molecular defects can be corrected only by expressing AVO3, not by expressing suppressors, highlighting the role of Avo3p as a structural and signaling scaffold for TORC2. Phenotypic modifications of avo3(ts) mutants by deletion of individual Rho1p-GTPase-activating proteins indicate that two TORC2 downstream signaling branches converge on Rho1p activation. Our results also suggest that Avo2p/Slm1p-mediated signaling, but not Avo1p-mediated signaling, links to Rho1p activation specifically through the Rho1p-guanine nucleotide exchange factor Tus1p.

  15. Applying Statistical Rock Physics to Quantify the Effects of Geologic Heterogeneities on Seismic AVO Signatures in Offshore Venezuela

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukerji, T.; Gonzalez, E.; Cobos, C.; Hung, E.; Mavko, G.

    2002-12-01

    The objective of this study was to better understand observed amplitude anomalies, and quantify the geologic uncertainty associated with the feasibility of using seismic AVO signatures to detect hydrocarbons in offshore Venezuela region. Data from four wells were analyzed. Prediction of shear velocity was carried out in selected wells as none of the wells have shear logs. Sand and shale properties were estimated from selected zones based on the gamma-ray logs and geologic information about the formations. Fluid substitution was carried out within the sand zones taking into account the properties of the reservoir fluids. Monte-Carlo (MC) simulations, incorporating statistical variability and correlations of rock properties, were used to compute normal-incidence reflectivity and AVO gradient for different pore fluid conditions: brine sands, oil sands and gas sands. The computed seismic signatures were used to evaluate the feasibility of using seismic AVO for pore fluid and lithology discrimination. Forward modeling of CDP gathers was carried out and AVO signatures from synthetic CDP gathers were compared to MC simulations. The main conclusions are: statistical rock physics and AVO modeling analyses of data from wells indicate that Pliocene gas/oil sands are expected to have observable seismic amplitude and AVO signatures, with negative R(0) and small gradient G at top sand. However, the signature changes from Pliocene to Miocene sands. Depth-dependent geologic trends in AVO patterns were identified using data from Pliocene and Miocene sands. Directly using Pliocene AVO patterns to interpret amplitudes from Miocene sands without correcting for the trend could lead to potential pitfalls. Miocene sands are expected to have much weaker fluid signatures, as they are high velocity, stiff sands. Volcanoclastics and carbonates are other possible sources of strong amplitude and AVO signatures, and hence may cause false alarms if not properly interpreted. A combination of

  16. Cauchy prior distribution-based AVO elastic parameter estimation via weakly nonlinear waveform inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ji-Qiang; Geng, Jian-Hua

    2013-12-01

    Cauchy priori distribution-based Bayesian AVO reflectivity inversion may lead to sparse estimates that are sensitive to large reflectivities. For the inversion, the computation of the covariance matrix and regularized terms requires prior estimation of model parameters, which makes the iterative inversion weakly nonlinear. At the same time, the relations among the model parameters are assumed linear. Furthermore, the reflectivities, the results of the inversion, or the elastic parameters with cumulative error recovered by integrating reflectivities are not well suited for detecting hydrocarbons and fluids. In contrast, in Bayesian linear AVO inversion, the elastic parameters can be directly extracted from prestack seismic data without linear assumptions for the model parameters. Considering the advantages of the abovementioned methods, the Bayesian AVO reflectivity inversion process is modified and Cauchy distribution is explored as a prior probability distribution and the time-variant covariance is also considered. Finally, we propose a new method for the weakly nonlinear AVO waveform inversion. Furthermore, the linear assumptions are abandoned and elastic parameters, such as P-wave velocity, S-wave velocity, and density, can be directly recovered from seismic data especially for interfaces with large reflectivities. Numerical analysis demonstrates that all the elastic parameters can be estimated from prestack seismic data even when the signal-to-noise ratio of the seismic data is low.

  17. Time-lapse AVO fluid inversion for dynamic reservoir characterization in Delhi Field, Louisiana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putri, Indah Hermansyah

    In the development stage, CO2 injection is becoming more widely used in enhanced oil recovery (EOR). Delhi Oil Field is part of Phases XIII and XIV of the Reservoir Characterization Project (RCP) Colorado School of Mines. The focus of these phases is to monitor the effectiveness of the CO 2 injection in Delhi Field by using multicomponent time-lapse seismic data. In this study, I analyze the amplitude versus offset (AVO) response of the time-lapse P-wave seismic data in order to quantify the fluid probability in the field. RCP acquired four square miles of multicomponent time-lapse seismic in Delhi Field to characterize the field dynamically. RCP's two surveys, monitor 1 and monitor 2, were shot in 2010 and 2011 after the start of CO2 injection in November 2009. Time-lapse AVO modeling was performed. The modeling results show that both the top Tuscaloosa and Paluxy Formations are class III AVO, and change toward class IV AVO by increasing the CO2 saturation in the reservoir. In addition, the Paluxy Formation shows a consistent result between the synthetic and real data, however, the Tuscaloosa Formation is not consistent as it is affected by tuning. AVO fluid inversion (AFI) was performed on both the Tuscaloosa and Paluxy Formations in order to quantify the fluid probability in these formations. The inversion results are confirmed by the pseudo gamma ray model, the porosity model, the permeability model, the pressure model, and the production data. In the Tuscaloosa and Paluxy Formations, oil and CO2 are located in the good quality, high porosity, and high permeability sandstones. The presence of CO2 is also confirmed by the pressure interpretation. Furthermore, production data from both Tuscaloosa and Paluxy Formations confirm the fluid presence in the reservoir.

  18. Seismic AVO response character of coal bed methane content in the Zhaozhuang coalmine of Qinshui Basin,China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, G.

    2016-12-01

    Coal bed methane content (CBMC) is a measure of the quantity of methane stored in coals, and is important for many applications, including the quantitative assessment of methane resources and methane extraction and control. The coal bed methane content (CBMC) in the Zhaozhuang coalmine of Jincheng coalfield, northwestern Qinshui Basin, is studied based on seismic data and well-logs together with laboratory measurements. The amplitude versus offset (AVO) response from the log characteristics was analyzed and the seismic amplitude, after relative preserved amplitude processing, was corrected to maintain the relative amplitude characteristics. The AVO attributes were calculated based on AVO theory and the statistical relationship between AVO attributes and CBMC was established and used to predict the CBMC. The results show that the Shuey approximation has better adaptability according to the Zoeppritz equation result; the designed fold number for an ordinary seismic data is insufficient for pre-stack data regarding the signal to noise ratio (SNR). Therefore a larger grid analysis was created in order to improve the SNR. The velocity field created by logging is better than that created by stack velocity in both accuracy and effectiveness. A reasonable distribution of the amplitude versus offset (AVO) attributes can be facilitated by taking the AVO response from logging as a standard for calibrating the amplitude distribution. Some AVO attributes have a close relationship with CBMC. The worst attribute is weighted polarization product, for which the correlation coefficient is 0.23; and the best attribute is the intercept, of which the correlation coefficient is -0.79. CBMC predicted by AVO attributes is better overall than that predicted by direct interpolation of CBMC; the validation error of the former is 12.5%, which is lower than that of the latter. CBMC of this area ranges from 7.1 m3/t to 21.4 m3/t.

  19. Petrophysical evaluation and its application to AVO based on conventional and CMR-MDT logs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Jun; Tangyan, Liu; Xiangjun, Liu

    2007-09-01

    Conventional loggings provide the essential data for AVO (Amplitude-Versus-Offset) analysis in rock physics, which can build a bridge linking petrophysics and seismic data. However, if some complex fluid systems, such as serious fluid invasion to formation, low resistivity response or complicated water salinity etc. exist in reservoirs, the conventional logs may fail to provide quality data, leading to calculated errors for elastic properties so worse that the AVO results cannot match the seismic data. To overcome such difficulties in Tertiary reservoirs of Bohai Gulf in China, we utilized both conventional logs and CMR-MDT tool (Combinable Magnetic Resonance and Modular Formation Dynamics Tester) to perform formation evaluation and reservoir descriptions. Our research proposes, it allows petrophysicists to acquire reservoir parameters (e.g. porosity, permeability, water saturation, bound fluids and pore pressure etc), and then these results to combine with core analysis based on laboratory’s measurements to carry out a further rock physics study and AVO analysis in seismic domain.

  20. Brittleness index calculation and evaluation for CBM reservoirs based on AVO simultaneous inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Haibo; Dong, Shouhua; Huang, Yaping; Wang, Haolong; Chen, Guiwu

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, a new approach is proposed for coalbed methane (CBM) reservoir brittleness index (BI) calculations. The BI, as a guide for fracture area selection, is calculated by dynamic elastic parameters (dynamic Young's modulus Ed and dynamic Poisson's ratio υd) obtained from an amplitude versus offset (AVO) simultaneous inversion. Among the three different classes of CBM reservoirs distinguished on the basis of brittleness in the theoretical part of this study, class I reservoirs with high BI values are identified as preferential target areas for fracturing. Therefore, we derive the AVO approximation equation expressed by Ed and υd first. This allows the direct inversion of the dynamic elastic parameters through the pre-stack AVO simultaneous inversion, which is based on Bayes' theorem. Thereafter, a test model with Gaussian white noise and a through-well seismic profile inversion is used to demonstrate the high reliability of the inversion parameters. Accordingly, the BI of a CBM reservoir section from the Qinshui Basin is calculated using the proposed method and a class I reservoir section detected through brittleness evaluation. From the outcome of this study, we believe the adoption of this new approach could act as a guide and reference for BI calculations and evaluations of CBM reservoirs.

  1. The consequence of measured porosities and clay contents on P-wave AVO for shaly sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Othman, Adel A. A.

    2004-12-01

    The modified AVO (amplitude versus offset) equations presented in Othman (2003 Tecnologia de la Intrusión de Agua de Mar en Acuifros Costeros: Paises Mediterráneos—Coastal Acquifer Intrusion Technology: Mediterranean Countries (Madrid: IGME) pp 295-302) are confirmed by application of our data. About 26 layers composed mainly of shales and sandstones encountered in an oil well in the Gulf of Suez are utilized in the present study. P-wave velocity, density, porosity and the clay content of these rocks are principal feedback parameters in this investigation. The attributes of the assessed AVO coefficient (Ra) are studied with reference to several parameter ratios in the AVO case. These ratios include the porosity ratio (phgr1/phgr2), Poisson's ratio (σ1/σ2), density ratio (ρ1/ρ2), clay content ratio (C1/C2) and P-wave velocity ratio (α1/α2). Subscripts 1 and 2 respectively refer to the upper and lower layers relative to the interface. The applied data reveal linear relationships between the velocity ratio, α1/α2, and the porosity ratio, phgr1/phgr2. α1/α2 is found to decrease with increasing phgr1/phgr2. The clay content ratio C1/C2 increases linearly with increasing phgr1/phgr2 as well as with increasing Poisson's ratio, σ1/σ2. The density ratio, ρ1/ρ2, demonstrates a weak decrease proportional to phgr1/phgr2. Ra generally increases with increasing phgr1/phgr2, C1/C2 and σ1/σ2. On the other hand, Ra decreases with increasing ρ1/ρ2 and α1/α2. These relations are valid for the offset condition according to our data.

  2. A Physical Study of Converted Wave AVO in a Fractured Reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, C. H.; Chang, Y. F.; Tsao, H. C.; Chang, J. W.

    2015-12-01

    Benefiting by the multicomponent seismic acquisition and processing techniques, the applications of converted waves in petroleum exploration is thus highlighted. A converted (C-) wave is initiated by a downward traveling P-wave that is converted on reflection to upcoming S-waves. Ascribing to its origins, C-wave takes the behaviors of P- and S-wave and becomes as one of the popular seismic attributes in the studies of a fractured reservoir. Making use of the scaled physical model, we aim on inspecting the azimuthal Amplitude Variation with Offset (AVO) of C-wave in a reservoir of vertically aligned fractures. In order to facilitate the objective of this study, reflection experiments were carried out on the orthogonal plane of a Horizontal Transversely Isotropic (HTI) model which is created to simulate a fractured reservoir. In laboratory manipulation, acoustic energy is triggered by a P-type transducer and the reflected energy is received an S-type transducer to detect the reflected energy, i.e. C-waves, originating by mode conversion. From fracture strike to facture normal, end-on shooting reflections were acquired from seven different directions. The angular interval in between the successive observation is 15 degrees. While viewing into the reflection profiles, events of P-, C1- and C2-waves can be readily identified. In the acquired profiles, the P-wave AVO is clearly observed and the phenomenon of C-wave splitting is revealed by the separation of traveltime-distance curves of C1- and C2-waves. However, it is aware of that the C-wave amplitudes are not simply varied or attenuated with offset in each observation. The complicated behaviors of C-wave AVO could be caused by the amount of energy, which is incident angle dependent, in reflected S-waves. Hence, our results indicate that the azimuthal C-wave AVO might not be a reliable seismic signature which can be used to delineate the fracture orientation of a fractured reservoir.

  3. Geologic data management at AVO: building authoritative coverage with radical availability (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, C.; Snedigar, S. F.; Nye, C. J.

    2009-12-01

    In 2002, the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) began creating the Geologic Database of Information on Volcanoes in Alaska (GeoDIVA) to create a system that contains complete, flexible, timely, and accurate geologic and geographic information on Pleistocene and younger volcanoes in Alaska. This system was primarily intended to be a tool for scientific investigation, crisis response, and public information - delivered in a dynamic, digital format to both internal and external users. It is now the back-end of the AVO public website. GeoDIVA does not interface with our daily monitoring activities, however -- seismic and satellite data are handled by different database efforts. GeoDIVA also doesn’t store volcanic unrest data, although we hope WOVOdat will. GeoDIVA does include modules for the following datasets: bibliography (every subsequent piece of data in GeoDIVA is tied to a reference), basic volcano information (~137 edifices), historical eruption history information (~550 events), images (~17,000), sample information (~4400), geochemistry (~1500; population in progress), petrography (very early stages of data creation), sample storage (~14,000), and Quaternary vent information (~1200 vents). Modules in progress include GIS data, tephra data, and geochronologic data. In recent years, we have been doing maintenance work on older modules (for example, adding new references to the bibliography, and creating new queries and data fields in response to user feedback) as well as developing, designing, and populating new modules. Population can be quite time consuming, as there are no pre-compiled comprehensive existing sources for most information on Alaskan volcanoes, and we carefully reference each item. Newer modules also require more complex data arrangements than older modules. To meet the needs of a diverse group of users on widely varying computer platforms, GeoDIVA data is primarily stored in a MySQL DBMS; PostGIS/PostgreSQL are currently used to store and

  4. The Analysis of the Influence of Reservoir Thickness on AVO Intercept-Gradient Crossplot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X. H.; Liu, Z.; Shaopeng, Z.

    2016-12-01

    AVO Intercept-Gradient Crossplot Analysis technique is an complex art of detecting natural gas and clean oil based on the inversion of hydrocarbons, which can intuitively analysis the change law of the two facultative attribute factors. In this research, based on the Shuey approximate formulas as a simplified of the full form of the Zoeppritz equation, we compared and anlaysised the impact of reservoir thickness on the P-G crossplot. We chose appropriate thickness according to Widess graphic, making the different models have good contrast, and we achieved good results.The double interface model with three-layer medium is used to study the effect of reservoir thickness. Among the model is the sandstone reservoir, and the upper and lowers layer of it are the surrounding rock with the same lithology. Four group models are designed to study. The Poisson's ratio of the middle sandstone reservoir is 0.1 and 0.4, and the reservoir speed is 2800 m/s and 2200 m/s in each case, respectively. The selection of reservoir thickness is related to the reservoir speed, the wavelength can be calculated in the case of the speed is determined. The thicknesses are all taken as λ/16,λ/8,3λ/16, λ/4 and 5λ/16 in accordance with Widess graphic formula.In summary, P and G change and both reach the largest absolute value with the change of the middle reservoir thickness. The thickness mainly affects the length of short axis and the long axis of the "elliptic curve" in the crossplot, but does not affect the degree of the slope of the long axis. The P-G crossplot is approximation of elliptic curve when the reservoir thickness is small and becomes more and more flat with the increase of the thickness, and it is almost a straight line when the reservoir thickness is λ/4, meanwhile the curve extends to the maximum along the long axis direction and the absolute value of P and G reach the maximum. The curve changes shorter in the oblique direction and tends to smooth with the increasing of

  5. Application of an adaptive acquisition regularization parameter based on an improved GCV criterion in pre-stack AVO inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Guangtan; Chen, Xiaohong; Li, Jingye; Luo, Cong; Wang, Benfeng

    2017-02-01

    In exploration geophysics, AVO inversion is undoubtedly the most common inverse problem which is ill-posed and must be regularized. Once regularization is used, the selection of the regularization parameter will become an important problem to solve. In practice, the proper regularization parameter value is usually data dependent and determined empirically. For one work area, inversion engineers often give a fixed parameter. In such a case, the results of AVO inversion will be accompanied by strong artificial subjective factors. Besides, it is difficult to guarantee that the fixed parameter could be applied to each trace of the seismic data. In this paper, we first emphasize the importance of the regularization parameter selection for the inverse problems. Then, based on a traditional GCV function, we propose an adaptive acquisition regularization parameter method which can be used in regularization for arbitrary norm conditions, and derive the theoretical formula of the adaptive computation of the regularization parameter. Applying this method to the AVO inversion of synthetic data and field data, we have found that the improved GCV method has better accuracy and robustness than the traditional method.

  6. Detection of hydrocarbons in reefs using AVO: case history from Alberta, Canada

    SciTech Connect

    Miles, D.; Gassaway, G.; Brown, R.; Bennett, L.; Bainer, R.

    1989-04-01

    Four common depth points for seismic lines on a Mesozoic reef complex in Alberta, Canada, were analyzed using SAMPLE, an amplitude vs. offset inversion. The locations varied from fore reef facies to back reef facies including two locations in the productive porosity of the main reef. SAMPLE analysis of the first location showed a tight shaly limestone of the Waterways Formation corresponding to the lime mud in front of the reef complex. In the reef complex, both the analyses showed hydrocarbons in the Swan Hills Formation. In the back reef location, the AVO inversion showed tight limestones with no hydrocarbons present. Thus, amplitude vs. offset inversion. SAMPLE, can determine whether the zone of interest is a tight limestone or shaly limestone, and that it is wet. SAMPLE also indicates the presence of hydrocarbons in limestones at the second and third locations on the productive reef. Thus, amplitude vs. offset inversion can distinguish between hydrocarbon-bearing and nonhydrocarbon-bearing zones on the basis of interval velocity and Poisson's ratio.

  7. The time-lapse AVO difference inversion for changes in reservoir parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longxiao, Zhi; Hanming, Gu; Yan, Li

    2016-12-01

    The result of conventional time-lapse seismic processing is the difference between the amplitude and the post-stack seismic data. Although stack processing can improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of seismic data, it also causes a considerable loss of important information about the amplitude changes and only gives the qualitative interpretation. To predict the changes in reservoir fluid more precisely and accurately, we also need the quantitative information of the reservoir. To achieve this aim, we develop the method of time-lapse AVO (amplitude versus offset) difference inversion. For the inversion of reservoir changes in elastic parameters, we apply the Gardner equation as the constraint and convert the three-parameter inversion of elastic parameter changes into a two-parameter inversion to make the inversion more stable. For the inversion of variations in the reservoir parameters, we infer the relation between the difference of the reflection coefficient and variations in the reservoir parameters, and then invert reservoir parameter changes directly. The results of the theoretical modeling computation and practical application show that our method can estimate the relative variations in reservoir density, P-wave and S-wave velocity, calculate reservoir changes in water saturation and effective pressure accurately, and then provide reference for the rational exploitation of the reservoir.

  8. Joint AVO inversion in the time and frequency domain with Bayesian interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zong, Zhao-Yun; Yin, Xing-Yao; Li, Kun

    2016-12-01

    Amplitude variations with offset or incident angle (AVO/AVA) inversion are typically combined with statistical methods, such as Bayesian inference or deterministic inversion. We propose a joint elastic inversion method in the time and frequency domain based on Bayesian inversion theory to improve the resolution of the estimated P- and S-wave velocities and density. We initially construct the objective function using Bayesian inference by combining seismic data in the time and frequency domain. We use Cauchy and Gaussian probability distribution density functions to obtain the prior information for the model parameters and the likelihood function, respectively. We estimate the elastic parameters by solving the initial objective function with added model constraints to improve the inversion robustness. The results of the synthetic data suggest that the frequency spectra of the estimated parameters are wider than those obtained with conventional elastic inversion in the time domain. In addition, the proposed inversion approach offers stronger antinoising compared to the inversion approach in the frequency domain. Furthermore, results from synthetic examples with added Gaussian noise demonstrate the robustness of the proposed approach. From the real data, we infer that more model parameter details can be reproduced with the proposed joint elastic inversion.

  9. Formation, structure and magnetism of the metastable defect fluorite phases AVO{sub 3.5+x} (A=In, Sc)

    SciTech Connect

    Shafi, Shahid P.; Lundgren, Rylan J.; Cranswick, Lachlan M.D.; Bieringer, Mario

    2007-12-15

    We report the preparation and stability of ScVO{sub 3.5+x} and the novel phase InVO{sub 3.5+x}. AVO{sub 3.5+x} (A=Sc, In) defect fluorite structures are formed as metastable intermediates during the topotactic oxidation of AVO{sub 3} bixbyites. The oxidation pathway has been studied in detail by means of thermogravimetric/differential thermal analysis and in-situ powder X-ray diffraction. The oxidation of the bixbyite phase follows a topotactic pathway at temperatures between 300 and 400 deg. C in air/carbon dioxide. The range of accessible oxygen stoichiometries for the AVO{sub 3.5+x} structures following this pathway are 0.00{<=}x{<=}0.22. Rietveld refinements against powder X-ray and neutron data revealed that InVO{sub 3.54} and ScVO{sub 3.70} crystallize in the defect fluorite structure in space group Fm-3 m (227) with a=4.9863(5) and 4.9697(3)A, respectively with A{sup 3+}/V{sup 4+} disorder on the (4a) cation site. Powder neutron diffraction experiments indicate clustering of oxide defects in all samples. Bulk magnetic measurements showed the presence of V{sup 4+} and the absence of magnetic ordering at low temperatures. Powder neutron diffraction experiments confirmed the absence of a long range ordered magnetic ground state. - Graphical abstract: Topotactic oxidation of AVO{sub 3} bixbyite to AVO{sub 3.5} defect fluorite structure followed by in-situ powder X-ray diffraction. The upper structural diagram shows a six coordinated (A/V)-O{sub 6} fragment in bixbyite, the lower structure illustrates the same seven-fold coordinated (A/V)-O{sub 7} cubic environment in the defect fluorite structure.

  10. Target of rapamycin complex 2 signals to downstream effector yeast protein kinase 2 (Ypk2) through adheres-voraciously-to-target-of-rapamycin-2 protein 1 (Avo1) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Liao, Hsien-Ching; Chen, Mei-Yu

    2012-02-24

    The conserved Ser/Thr kinase target of rapamycin (TOR) serves as a central regulator in controlling cell growth-related functions. There exist two distinct TOR complexes, TORC1 and TORC2, each coupling to specific downstream effectors and signaling pathways. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, TORC2 is involved in regulating actin organization and maintaining cell wall integrity. Ypk2 (yeast protein kinase 2), a member of the cAMP-dependent, cGMP-dependent, and PKC (AGC) kinase family, is a TORC2 substrate known to participate in actin and cell wall regulation. Employing avo3(ts) mutants with defects in TORC2 functions that are suppressible by active Ypk2, we investigated the molecular interactions involved in mediating TORC2 signaling to Ypk2. GST pulldown assays in yeast lysates demonstrated physical interactions between Ypk2 and components of TORC2. In vitro binding assays revealed that Avo1 directly binds to Ypk2. In avo3(ts) mutants, the TORC2-Ypk2 interaction was reduced and could be restored by AVO1 overexpression, highlighting the important role of Avo1 in coupling TORC2 to Ypk2. The interaction was mapped to an internal region (amino acids 600-840) of Avo1 and a C-terminal region of Ypk2. Ypk2(334-677), a truncated form of Ypk2 containing the Avo1-interacting region, was able to interfere with Avo1-Ypk2 interaction in vitro. Overexpressing Ypk2(334-677) in yeast cells resulted in a perturbation of TORC2 functions, causing defective cell wall integrity, aberrant actin organization, and diminished TORC2-dependent Ypk2 phosphorylation evidenced by the loss of an electrophoretic mobility shift. Together, our data support the conclusion that the direct Avo1-Ypk2 interaction is crucial for TORC2 signaling to the downstream Ypk2 pathway.

  11. The influence of the Goos-Hänchen effect on seismic data processing and AVO in attenuating media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhiyong

    2015-11-01

    The Goos-Hänchen (GH) effect induced by the total reflection of an incident beam of P-wave from a low-impedance medium to a high-impedance medium at near- and post-critical angles was theoretically simulated and discussed. For both PP- and PSV-waves, there may be large GH shifts (GHS) and penetration depths (PD) for both lossless and attenuating media. As the Q-factor increases, or the frequency of the seismic wave decreases, the GH effect is increased. However, in attenuating media, there may be non-zero GHS and PD at all non-zero incident angles, not just post-critical angles. GHS may be either positive or negative, while PD is positive only. Compared to the Q-factor in the incident medium, the Q-factor in the transmission medium may play a more dominant role in the determination of reflection coefficients, GHS, and PD. The GH-induced normal moveout (NMO) discrepancy of the PSV-wave may be larger than that of the PP-wave. Due to the GH effect, there may be an angle discrepancy (at fixed offset) between the GH-modified incident angle and the traditional incident angle. In addition, the GH effect at a given offset may produce two or three reflected waves, from different incident angles. These results suggest that, within their assumptions, the GH effect may lead to errors in NMO estimates and the vertical location of the reflector. Furthermore, there may be errors in offsets, incident angles, and reflection amplitudes, in the analyses of the amplitude variation with offset (AVO). These GH effects might be more important for seismic data at fixed offsets and shallow layers, and for sonic log data, which might fall into the post-critical angle regime. Therefore, there may be a necessity to take into account the GH effect in the interpretation of wide-angle reflection data in NMO and AVO analyses.

  12. CHARACTERIZATION OF AN AQUITARD AND DIRECT DETECTION OF LNAPL AT HILL AIR FORCE BASE USING GPR AVO AND MIGRATION VELOCITY ANALYSES

    SciTech Connect

    Deeds, Jake; Bradford, John

    2002-06-01

    Large quantities of non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPL), contaminate the near surface sediments at Operable Unit 1 (OU1), Hill Air Force Base (HAFB), Utah. In October 2000, a 3D, multi-offset GPR survey was acquired at OU1 with two objectives: (1) to image the aquifer/aquitard boundary at a depth of about 30 ft, and (2) to evaluate quantitative processing and interpretation methodologies for direct detection of NAPL. Using pre-stack depth migration, we map the aquitard boundary to about {+-} 1 ft throughout the survey area. An unusual reflection is identified within the vadose zone that does not correlate with known geology. The region below this reflection has anomalously high velocity, implying low electric permittivity, and the amplitude of the anomalous reflection deviates significantly from the background AVO trend. Fitting the Fresnel equation to the AVO data, we estimate the velocity contrast at the anomaly boundary and find that it is in good agreement with the migration velocity model. We interpret the anomaly as a previously unidentified NAPL rich zone. Subsequent coring and chemical analyses verify our interpretation. This exciting result implies that these methodologies may be useful for direct detection of NAPL at other HAFB locations and at sites with similar hydrogeology.

  13. Monitoring and quantifying changes in CO2 saturation during the injection and post-injection phases at the Ketzin pilot site using AVO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivandic, M.; Bergmann, P.; Juhlin, C.; Lueth, S.

    2016-12-01

    Monitoring and verification capabilities are crucial for the success of CO2 sequestration in underground storage reservoirs. Although the CO2 injection at the Ketzin pilot site for CO2 storage ceased in August 2013 after 67 kt of CO2 were successfully injected into a 630-650 meters deep saline reservoir, research activities, including post-injection monitoring, are still underway in order to address and close the entire life cycle of a storage site. A wide range of geophysical methods have been implemented at the Ketzin site to image the subsurface structure and the distribution of the CO2 plume. Among them, time-lapse 3D surface seismic monitoring has been successfully used for mapping the extent of the spreading plume and tracking its movement. Repeated 3D seismic observations performed at the site in 2009 (23 kt of CO2) and 2012 (61 kt of CO2) during the injection phase imaged the CO2 plume growth, evolution, and migration within the reservoir. The latest survey conducted in 2015, two years after the injection ended, revealed a decrease in intensity and extent of the amplitude anomaly in both the horizontal and vertical directions, which has been interpreted to be mainly due to CO2 dissolution in the formation brine and diffusion. In this study, the Amplitude Versus Offset (AVO) technique together with results of petrophysical experiments on core samples from the Ketzin reservoir are used to compare the three vintages of the repeat seismic data sets with the baseline from 2005 prior to CO2 injection in order to investigate the AVO response from the sandstone reservoir during the injection and post-injection phases and obtain a better insight into the state of saturation of the gaseous CO2. In addition, the fact that the injection was temporarily stopped during the 2012 data acquisition, resulting in decreased reservoir pressure, and that the latest post-injection 3D seismic survey provided a unique opportunity to observe the AVO response that is due to the

  14. Seismic modeling, rock physics, avo and seismic attribute analysis for illuminating sandstone facies of the Late Ordovic Ian Mamuniyat Reservoir, R-Field, Murzuq Basin-Libya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abushalah, Yousf Milad

    The Late Ordovician Mamuniyat Formation is the main hydrocarbon reservoir in the R-Field in Murzuq Basin, SW Libya. The Lower Mamuniyat, which is the only unit that was encountered in the study area, is composed of sandstone facies called Clean Mamuniyat and shaly sandstone facies called Dirty Mamuniyat. One major problem with the development of the R-Field is the difficulty of distinguishing the two units so this project was aimed to develop better methods for distinguishing between the two units of the Lower Mamuniyat. The other problem is to distinguish the transgressive shaly facies of the Bir Tlacsin, which has an impact on the hydrocarbon accumulation. Those issues manifested in limit of seismic resolution and interference that resulted from the converted shear mode waves. The dissertation was divided into three chapters. In the first chapter, seismic modeling using a deterministic and a Ricker wavelet were used to investigate the interference effects on the poststack seismic data and a bandpass filter was used to remove those effects. Instantaneous frequency, spectral-based colored inversion and rock physics were, then applied to determine the distributions of the sandstone facies of the Lower Mamuniyat Formation and to interpret the depositional setting of it. In the second chapter, spectral decomposition and inverted density were utilized to determine the distribution of the shaly facies of Bir Tlacsin, and its temporal thickness and to remap the top reservoir. In the last chapter, amplitude variation with offset (AVO) modeling, ray tracing, and spectral analysis were used to investigate the mode conversion and its effect on AVO signature, the amplitude of the near-mid and far offsets and frequency contents. Data enhancement then was performed using partial stacks and a bandpass filter.

  15. Mass comparison of the 1 kg silicon sphere AVO#3 traceable to the International Prototype K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picard, A.; Bignell, N.; Borys, M.; Downes, S.; Mizushima, S.

    2009-02-01

    To determine a new value of the Avogadro constant with a relative combined standard uncertainty of 2 × 10-8, the mass determination of a 1 kg 28Si sphere is crucial and should be determined with the highest level of accuracy. In the next two years the laboratories involved in the International Avogadro Project should be able to determine the mass of a 1 kg silicon sphere under vacuum with a combined standard uncertainty within 5 µg. To obtain such a target it is essential to gain experience and to promote cooperation in mass measurement on silicon spheres among the laboratories involved. For this purpose an international comparison has been performed to evaluate the weighing procedure and to reveal the difficulties encountered in the mass determination of a silicon sphere. This particular comparison, which is the first international mass comparison under vacuum conditions, has demonstrated that the reference value for the mass of a 1 kg silicon sphere can be determined traceable to the International Prototype with a standard uncertainty of 4.0 µg.

  16. Validation Summary Report: Meridian Software Systems, Inc., Meridian Ada, Version 4.1.3, Essence 486 under MS-DOS, 5.0 (host)=>ADSP-21020 (bare machine) (target), 930401W1.11314

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-04-01

    guidance for operations of the Ada certification system. Organization ( AVO ) Compliance of The ability of the implementation to pass an ACVC version. an...following tests have been withdrawn by the AVO . The rationale for withdrawing each test is available from either the AVO or the AVF. The publication...way expected by the original tests. B22003A B83033B B85013D A35801E was graded inapplicable by Evaluation Modification as directed by the AVO . The

  17. Thermophysical Properties of Matter - the TPRC Data Series. Volume 12. Thermal Expansion Metallic Elements and Alloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-01-01

    the Thermal Expansion of Silver and Palladium at Low Temperatures, ŕ Cryogenics, 8(5), 267-71, 1968. 270 51182 Masumoto, H., Salto , H., and Kadowaki...S46-S58, 1970. 442 44456 PoiWatovskii, E.G., Kutsar, A.R., and Dubovka, G.T., ",Possible Presence of a Special Triple Point in the P-T Diagram of a Fe

  18. Stochastic and Centrifuge Modelling of Jointed Rock

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-08-31

    1b Maxmu Tensile Prnia StesVcos fSeie * t 30󈨏 Preextin- Frcue and -ne a Wine Crck Subec toUix.Cmrsie* tesi Vetia Direction- Noe Hg eniesteslee i oe...34 30 - .-- rCo - 0.0024, A - 0.785 C"P.. ow’ tod 0. A 30 avo . exp. 25 - A 30comp, 20 13 45 avo . oxp. "o AN 45 comp. is A. O 60 avo xp) to,’ 10 60 comp

  19. Ada Compiler Validation Summary Report: Certificate Number: 890919W1. 10163 R. R. Software, Inc., Integrada, Version 3.2 Zenith Z-386/25 under Interactive Unix 2.1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-09-19

    Programming language, Ada Compiler Validation Summary Rep:rt, Ada Cormpiler Validation Capability, ACVC, Validation Testing, Ada Validation Office, AVO , Ada...Joint Program Office and administered by the Ada Validation Organization ( AVO ). On-site testing was completed 19 September 1989 at Madison WI. 1.2...USE OF THIS VALIDATION SUMMARY REPORT Consistent with the national laws of the originating country, the AVO may make full and free public disclosure of

  20. Ada Compiler Validation Summary Report: Certificate Number: 880524I1. 09118 Systeam KG Systeam Ada Compiler VAX/VMS Version 1.8 VAX 8530 (Host and Target)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-05-24

    Validation Summary Report, Ada Compiler Validation Capability, ACVC, Validation Testing, Ada Validation Office, AVO , Ada Validation Facility, AVF, ANSI...administered by the Ada Validation Organization ( AVO ). On-site testing was completed 88-05-24 at SYSTEAM KG at Karlsruhe. 1.2 USE OF THIS VALIDATION...SUMMARY REPORT Consistent with the national laws of the originating country, the AVO may make full and free public disclosure of this report. in the United

  1. Ada Compiler Validation Summary Report. Certificate Number: 880715S1. 09153. InterACT Corporation, InterACT Ada 1750A Compiler System, Release 3.0 VAX 11/785 Host, Fairchild F9450/1750A Target

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-07-15

    Programming language, Ada Compiler Validation Summary Report, Ada Compiler Validation Capability, ACVC, Validation Testing, Ada Validation Office, AVO ...the Ada Validation Organization ( AVO ). On-site testing was completed on 16 July 1988 at InterACT Corporation, New York, New York. 1.2 USE OF TIS...VAL1ITION SUMZMY REPOFG Consistent with the national laws of the originating country, the AVO may make full and free public disclosure of this report. In

  2. Ada Compiler Validation Summary Report: Certificate Number: 901130W1.1107, Concurrent Computer Corporation C3 Ada Version 1.1v, Concurrent Computer Corporation 6650 with Super Lightning Floating Point under RTU Version 5.0C (Self-Targeted).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-08-01

    part of the certification body that provides technical Validation guidance for operations of the Ada certification system. Organization ( AVO ) Compliance...4 C02MT 2 IMPLEMETATICK DEPENCIES 2.1 WITHDRAN TESTS The following tests have been withdrawn by the AVO . The rationale for withdrawing each test is...available from either the AVO or the AVF. The publication date for this list of withdrawn tests is 12 October 1990. E28005C B28006C C34006D B41308B

  3. Ada (Trade Name) Compiler Validation Summary Report: Verdix Corporation VAda-010-03315, Version 5.5 MicroVAX II Host iSBC 386/20P Intel Target.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-06-19

    Programming language, Ada Compiler Validation Summary Report, Ada % Compiler Validation Capability, ACVC, Validation Testing, Ada % Validation Office, AVO , Ada...the direction of the Ada lalJation Facility (AVF), according to Ada Validation Organization ( AVO ) polic ’’* and procedures. The AVF identified 2210 of...the AVF according to policies and procedures established by the Ada Validation Organization ( AVO ). On-site testing was conducted from 12 Jun.e 1987

  4. Ada Compiler Validation Summary Report: R.R. Software, Inc., Janus/ADA, Version 2.1.3, IBM PS/2, Model 70-80386 (Host & Target) 890919W1.10158

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-09-19

    Capability, ACVC, Validation Testing, Ada Validation Office, AVO , Ada Validation Facility, AVF, A%.SI/.UL-STD- 1815A, Ada Joint Program Office, AJPO 20...the direction of the AVF according to procedures established by the Ada JQ.Int Program Office and administered by the Ada Validation Organization ( AVO ...originating country, the AVO may make full and free public disclosure of this report. In the United States, this is provided in accordance with the

  5. Ada Compiler Validation Summary Report: Certificate Number: 900204N1. 10252 SD-Scicon plc XD Ada MC68000 V1.0-09 VAX Cluster Host and MC68000 Target

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-02-04

    Page I of 5 INTRODUCTION Organization ( AVO ). On-site testing was completed on February 4 1990 at SD-SCICON plc, Pembroke House, Pembroke Broadway...Camberley, Surrey, GU15 3XD, UK. 1.2 USE OF THIS VALIDATION SUMMARY REPORT Consistent with the national laws of the originating country, the AVO may make...compiler validations according to procedures contained in the Ada Compiler Validation Procedures and Guidelines. AVO The Ada Validation Organization. The

  6. VADS Sun4 = PowerPC Simulator, Product no. 2100-01455, Version 6.2. Host: Sun SPARCstation 2 (under SunOS 4.1.2) Target VADS PowerPC Instruction Set Simulator, executing on the Host

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-07-21

    certification body that provides technical validation guidance for operations of the Ada certification system. Organization ( AVO ) Compliance of The...CHAPTER 2 IMPLEMENTATION DEPENDENCIES 2.1 WITHDRAMN TESTS The following tests have been withdrawn by the AVO . The rationale for withdrawing each test...is available from either the AVO or the AVF. The publication date for this list of withdrawn tests is 22 Novenber 1993. B27005A E28005C 628006C

  7. Ada Compiler Validation Summary Report: Certificate Number: 890919W1. 10168, R.R. Software, Inc., Janus/ADA, Version 2.1.3, Northgate 386 under SCO UNIX

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-09-19

    Capability, ACVC, Validation Testing, Ada Validation Office, AVO , Ada Validation Facility, AVF, ANSI/PIL-STD- l8lSA, Ada Joint Program Office, A3PO 20...the Ada Validation Organization ( AVO ). On-site testing was completed 19 September 1989 at Madison WI. 1.2 USE OF THIS VALIDATION SUMMARY REPORT...Consistent with the national laws of the originating country, the AVO may make full and free public disclosure of this report. In the United States, this is

  8. Ada Compiler Validation Summary Report: Certificate Number: 900125N1. 10258, R. R. Software, Inc., Janus/Ada 2.1.3 386 to DOS Bell 386 Under Ms-Dos 4 Host

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-25

    Ada Validation Vabkdim Swmy Re t AVF-VSR-90502/69 R R Softmm Im 3MW/Ada 21.3 316 to DOS chaplerl - Page I of 5 INTRODUCTION Organization ( AVO ). On...1.2 USE OF THIS VALIDATION SUMMARY REPORT Consistent with the national laws of the originating country, the AVO may make full and free public...contained in the Ada Compiler Validation Procedures and Guidelines. AVO The Ada Validation Organization. The AVO has oversight authority over all AVF

  9. Diethylamino hydroxybenzoyl hexyl benzoate (DHHB) as additive to the UV filter avobenzone in cosmetic sunscreen formulations - Evaluation of the photochemical behavior and photostabilizing effect.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Camila Martins; Máximo, Leandro Nériton Cândido; Fontanezi, Bianca Bueno; da Silva, Roberto Santana; Gaspar, Lorena Rigo

    2017-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the photochemical behavior of DHHB and its photostabilizing effect on avobenzone (AVO) in different sunscreen formulations. The formulations were subjected to photostability studies by HPLC and spectrophotometry. In vitro phototoxicity was assessed using 3T3 fibroblast cultures. The mechanism of interaction between DHHB and AVO was investigated by steady state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. All formulations provided ultra-protection against UVA radiation. HPLC results demonstrated that DHHB did not present a photostabilizing effect on AVO. Fluorescence spectroscopy showed that AVO and DHHB interact by a static quenching mechanism and DHHB did not affect the AVO excited state lifetime. In addition, the energy transfer by Förster mechanism (FRET), which is the most often mechanism responsible for singlet-singlet quenching, is unlikely in this work. These results suggest why DHHB did not work as a photostabilizer on AVO singlet excited state. Phototoxicity results demonstrated that combinations containing DHHB (C2) did not show a phototoxic potential. Finally, although DHHB was considered to be photostable for all formulations studied (F2 and F3) it did not increase the photostability of AVO (F3). Thus, we suggested that formulations containing DHHB (F2) should be considered more advantageous than formulations containing AVO and AVO/DHHB (F1 and F3 respectively). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. 2011 volcanic activity in Alaska: summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGimsey, Robert G.; Maharrey, J. Zebulon; Neal, Christina A.

    2014-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, possible eruptions, and volcanic unrest at or near three separate volcanic centers in Alaska during 2011. The year was highlighted by the unrest and eruption of Cleveland Volcano in the central Aleutian Islands. AVO annual summaries no longer report on activity at Russian volcanoes.

  11. Frequency-Dependent Amplitude Versus Offset Variations in Porous Rocks with Aligned Fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaohui; Cao, Siyuan; Guo, Quanshi; Kang, Yonggan; Yu, Pengfei; Hu, Wei

    2017-03-01

    The theory of frequency-dependent amplitude versus offset (AVO) was developed for patchy-saturated model. In this work, we consider this theory in the case of an anisotropic medium based on a fractured-sandstone model. Thus, building on viscoelastic theory, we introduce a method for the computation of frequency-dependent AVO that is suitable for use in the case of an anisotropic medium. We use both analytical methods and numerical simulations to study P-P and P-S reflection coefficients, and results suggest that dispersion and anisotropy should not be neglected in AVO analysis. Indeed, for class I AVO reservoirs, the reflection magnitude of P-wave increases with frequency, while the responses of class II AVO reservoirs suggest that phase reversal occurs as frequency increases positively. In the case of class III AVO reservoirs, reflection magnitude decreases as frequency increases positively, while in the offset domain, the presence of anisotropy can distort or even reverse AVO responses. Thus, when compared to reflection coefficients for P-wave, reflection magnitude features of S-wave are more complex. The frequency-dependent AVO responses reported in this study provide insights for the interpretation of seismic anomalies in vertical transverse isotropy (VTI) dispersive reservoirs.

  12. Frequency-Dependent Amplitude Versus Offset Variations in Porous Rocks with Aligned Fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaohui; Cao, Siyuan; Guo, Quanshi; Kang, Yonggan; Yu, Pengfei; Hu, Wei

    2016-11-01

    The theory of frequency-dependent amplitude versus offset (AVO) was developed for patchy-saturated model. In this work, we consider this theory in the case of an anisotropic medium based on a fractured-sandstone model. Thus, building on viscoelastic theory, we introduce a method for the computation of frequency-dependent AVO that is suitable for use in the case of an anisotropic medium. We use both analytical methods and numerical simulations to study P-P and P-S reflection coefficients, and results suggest that dispersion and anisotropy should not be neglected in AVO analysis. Indeed, for class I AVO reservoirs, the reflection magnitude of P-wave increases with frequency, while the responses of class II AVO reservoirs suggest that phase reversal occurs as frequency increases positively. In the case of class III AVO reservoirs, reflection magnitude decreases as frequency increases positively, while in the offset domain, the presence of anisotropy can distort or even reverse AVO responses. Thus, when compared to reflection coefficients for P-wave, reflection magnitude features of S-wave are more complex. The frequency-dependent AVO responses reported in this study provide insights for the interpretation of seismic anomalies in vertical transverse isotropy (VTI) dispersive reservoirs.

  13. Alaska Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Venezky, Dina Y.; Murray, Tom; Read, Cyrus

    2008-01-01

    Steam plume from the 2006 eruption of Augustine volcano in Cook Inlet, Alaska. Explosive ash-producing eruptions from Alaska's 40+ historically active volcanoes pose hazards to aviation, including commercial aircraft flying the busy North Pacific routes between North America and Asia. The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) monitors these volcanoes to provide forecasts of eruptive activity. AVO is a joint program of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the Geophysical Institute of the University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAFGI), and the State of Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys (ADGGS). AVO is one of five USGS Volcano Hazards Program observatories that monitor U.S. volcanoes for science and public safety. Learn more about Augustine volcano and AVO at http://www.avo.alaska.edu.

  14. Reconnaissance amplitude versus offset techniques in the Niger Delta

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, J.; Gullette, K.

    1996-08-01

    Reconnaissance AVO (amplitude vs. offset) techniques have been invaluable in allowing the analyses and mapping of AVO on large-volume data sets in the Nigerian Niger Delta. Forward modelling of rock properties derived from well data on the shelf and regional ties of common depth point gathers to well control show that a shale on hydrocarbon bearing sand typically generates increasing amplitude with offset [Class 2 and Class 3 type anomalies of the Rutherford and Williams (1989) classification]. Consequently, processing and display techniques have been developed that distinguish the increasing amplitude with offset response associated with hydrocarbon bearing sands from the flatter AVO response of background water wet sands and shales. Attributes are created from angle stacks rather than by analyses of individual common depth point gathers over an entire data set. We show examples of a new AVO attribute which we call the Enhanced Restricted Gradient that highlights Class 2 and Class 3 type AVO anomalies more clearly than some of the standard AVO attributes used in the industry. The techniques described here provide a cost-effective and practical way of evaluating AVO character on large volume 2D and 3D data sets and should also be useful in other areas worldwide where hydrocarbon bearing reservoirs generate increasing amplitude with offset.

  15. Ada Compiler Validation Summary Report: Meridian Software Systems, Inc., AdaVantage, Version 3.0, SCI 302 (with Floating Point Co-Processor) (Host and Target), 890405W1.10054

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-04-05

    Validation Office, AVO , Ada Validation Facility, AVF, A;Si/Y.L-S7D- 1815A, Ada Joint Program~ Office, A3PD Z.ABST&RZ T (Conisnue, on reverie Sidf...established by the Ada Joint Program Office and administered by the Ada Validation Organization ( AVO ). On-site testing was completed 5 April 1989 at Laguana...Hills CA. 1.2 USE OF THIS VALIDATION SUMMARY REPORT Consistent with the national laws of the originating country, the AVO may make full and free

  16. Ada Compiler Validation Summary Report: Certificate Number: 890919W1. 10161, R.R. Software, Inc., Integrada, Version 5.2 IBM PS/2, Model 80

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-09-19

    Validation Testing, Ada Validation Office, AVO , Ada Validation Facility, AVF, ANSI/PlL-S.D- 1815A, Ada Joint Program Office, AJPO 20 . AISI AllI (Contenut...Validation Organization ( AVO ). On-site testing was completed 19 September 1989 at Madison WI. 1.2 USE OF THIS VALIDATION SUMMARY REPORT Consistent with the...national laws of the originating country, the AVO may make full and free public disclosure of this report. In the United States, this is provided in

  17. Ada Compiler Validation Summary Report: Certificate Number: 890621W1. 10105, Tandem Computers, Incorporated, Tandem Ada, Version T9270C30, Tandem NonStop VLX

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-06-21

    Validation Capability, ACVC, Validation Testing, Ada Validation Office, AVO , Ada Validation Facility, AVF, ANS1/F4’L-S7D- 1815A, Ada Joint PrograrM Office...by the Ada Validation Organization ( AVO ). On-site testing was completed 21 June 1989 at Cupertino CA. 1.2 USE OF THIS VALIDATION SUMMARY REPORT...Consistent with the national laws of the originating country, the AVO may make full and free public disclosure of this report. In the United States, this

  18. Ada (Trade Name) Compiler Validation Summary Report: Alsys Inc., AlsyCOMP 003, V3.1, IBM PC AT.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-06-04

    Summary Report, Ada Compiler Validation Capability, ACVC, Validation Testing, Ada Validation Office, AVO , Ada Validation Facility, AVF, ANSI/MIL-STD...ccordinq ’, Ada Validation Organization ( AVO ) policies * ~ The AVF lt!ntified 2210 of h 2399 tests in ACVC -, .8 to i prccsed during on--situ estLog of...8217, of ie-.ording h i;-1. i ci es i procedure:-" -,... i.-, i hy the .\\da I 11,-ganisation ( AVO ) on-site te.vasg was , .rdcted Erom I Tn j . Lhrough 4

  19. 1995 volcanic activity in Alaska and Kamchatka: summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGimsey, Robert G.; Neal, Christina A.

    1996-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptive activity or suspected volcanic activity (SVA) at 6 volcanic centers in 1995: Mount Martin (Katmai Group), Mount Veniaminof, Shishaldin, Makushin, Kliuchef/Korovin, and Kanaga. In addition to responding to eruptive activity at Alaska volcanoes, AVO also disseminated information for the Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT) on the 1995 eruptions of 2 Russian volcanoes: Bezymianny and Karymsky. This report summarizes volcanic activity in Alaska during 1995 and the AVO response, as well as information on the 2 Kamchatkan eruptions. Only those reports or inquiries that resulted in a "significant" investment of staff time and energy (here defined as several hours or more for reaction, tracking, and follow-up) are included. AVO typically receives dozens of phone calls throughout the year reporting steaming, unusual cloud sightings, or eruption rumors. Most of these are resolved quickly and are not tabulated here as part of the 1995 response record.

  20. Volcanic activity in Alaska: summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory 1993

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neal, Christina A.; McGimsey, Robert G.; Doukas, Michael P.

    1996-01-01

    During 1993, the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to episodes of eruptive activity or false alarms at nine volcanic centers in the state of Alaska. Additionally, as part of a formal role in KVERT (the Kamchatkan Volcano Eruption Response Team), AVO staff also responded to eruptions on the Kamchatka Peninsula, details of which are summarized in Miller and Kurianov (1993). In 1993, AVO maintained seismic instrumentation networks on four volcanoes of the Cook Inlet region--Spurr, Redoubt, Iliamna, and Augustine--and two stations at Dutton Volcano near King Cove on the Alaska Peninsula. Other routine elements of AVO's volcano monitoring program in Alaska include periodic airborne measurement of volcanic SO2 and CO2 at Cook Inlet volcanoes (Doukas, 1995) and maintenance of a lightning detection system in Cook Inlet (Paskievitch and others, 1995).

  1. 1994 Volcanic activity in Alaska: summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neal, Christina A.; Doukas, Michael P.; McGimsey, Robert G.

    1995-01-01

    During 1994, the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, possible eruptions, or false alarms at nine volcanic centers-- Mount Sanford, Iliamna, the Katmai group, Kupreanof, Mount Veniaminof, Shishaldin, Makushin, Mount Cleveland and Kanaga (table 1). Of these volcanoes, AVO has a real time, continuously recording seismic network only at Iliamna, which is located in the Cook Inlet area of south-central Alaska (fig. 1). AVO has dial-up access to seismic data from a 5-station network in the general region of the Katmai group of volcanoes. The remaining unmonitored volcanoes are located in sparsely populated areas of the Wrangell Mountains, the Alaska Peninsula, and the Aleutian Islands (fig. 1). For these volcanoes, the AVO monitoring program relies chiefly on receipt of pilot reports, observations of local residents and analysis of satellite imagery.

  2. [A blind bicycle repair man at the Stedelijk Museum: the exhibition and congress 'labour for the disabled' of 1928].

    PubMed

    Hermans, H J E; Schmidt, S H

    2002-01-01

    In the 1920's concern about the rising number of disabled unemployed urban poor led to the founding of the AVO (Dutch organization for labour care for the disabled) in 1927. The AVO presented the problem of the vulnerability of the physically and mentally disabled in the labour market as a matter of collective responsibility. At the Amsterdam AVO congress of 1928 expert contributors discussed the economic, social and medical aspects of disability and work. Simultaneously, a museum exhibition aimed at arousing the interest of the general public and at promoting a more understanding attitude towards the disabled. Though the twofold AVO manifestation raised an immediate favourable general response and the subject was put on the political agenda, the subsequent economic recession and war forestalled concrete measures. Essentially it was the first public debate on disability in the Netherlands.

  3. Augustine Volcano, Cook Inlet, Alaska January 31, 2006

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-02-02

    Since last spring, the U.S. Geological Survey Alaska Volcano Observatory AVO has detected increasing volcanic unrest at Augustine Volcano in Cook Inlet, Alaska near Anchorage. This image is from NASA Terra spacecraft.

  4. Augustine Volcano, Cook Inlet, Alaska January 12, 2006

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-02-02

    Since last spring, the U.S. Geological Survey Alaska Volcano Observatory AVO has detected increasing volcanic unrest at Augustine Volcano in Cook Inlet, Alaska near Anchorage. This image is from NASA Terra spacecraft.

  5. 2013 volcanic activity in Alaska: summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dixon, James P.; Cameron, Cheryl; McGimsey, Robert G.; Neal, Christina A.; Waythomas, Chris

    2015-08-14

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, volcanic unrest or suspected unrest, and seismic events at 18 volcanic centers in Alaska during 2013. Beginning with the 2013 AVO Summary of Events, the annual description of the AVO seismograph network and activity, once a stand-alone publication, is now part of this report. Because of this change, the annual summary now contains an expanded description of seismic activity at Alaskan volcanoes. Eruptions occurred at three volcanic centers in 2013: Pavlof Volcano in May and June, Mount Veniaminof Volcano in June through December, and Cleveland Volcano throughout the year. None of these three eruptive events resulted in 24-hour staffing at AVO facilities in Anchorage or Fairbanks.

  6. 2010 Volcanic activity in Alaska, Kamchatka, and the Kurile Islands: summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neal, Christina A.; Herrick, Julie; Girina, O.A.; Chibisova, Marina; Rybin, Alexander; McGimsey, Robert G.; Dixon, Jim

    2014-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, possible eruptions, volcanic unrest or suspected unrest at 12 volcanic centers in Alaska during 2010. The most notable volcanic activity consisted of intermittent ash emissions from long-active Cleveland volcano in the Aleutian Islands. AVO staff also participated in hazard communication regarding eruptions or unrest at seven volcanoes in Russia as part of an ongoing collaborative role in the Kamchatka and Sakhalin Volcanic Eruption Response Teams.

  7. 1996 volcanic activity in Alaska and Kamchatka: summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neal, Christina A.; McGimsey, Robert G.

    1997-01-01

    During 1996, the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptive activity, anomalous seismicity, or suspected volcanic activity at 10 of the approximately 40 active volcanic centers in the state of Alaska. As part of a formal role in KVERT (the Kamchatkan Volcano Eruption Response Team), AVO staff also disseminated information about eruptions and other volcanic unrest at six volcanic centers on the Kamchatka Peninsula and in the Kurile Islands, Russia.

  8. Software Engineering in Ada

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-03-22

    Avo Valmu - An aces value provides the locationi of. or "polnah. to". ani 4bjec which has been craea~d by the evaluation of an allocator. Keyword: amis...and traininp need.. of the DOD community. including methodologies and materials to rill those needu. Ada Va~lidation Orgamluatlo ( AVO ) - The component...type we the tesis for equality and inequality and the assignment operation. unless the type is limited.. in which case no operations awe implicitly

  9. Ada Compiler Validation Summary Report: Certificate Number 880608S1. 09144, Honeywell Bull, GCOS 8 Ada Compiler, Version 2.1, DPS 8000, DPS 8/70, DPS 90 (Target)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-06-08

    Compiler Validation Capability, ACVC, Validation Testing, Ada Validation Office, AVO , Ada Validation Facility, AVF, ANSI/MIL-STD- 1815A, Ada Joint Program...3-2 3 .4 W TESTS ................. 3-2 3 .5 INAPPI.CABLE TESIS ................ 3-2 3.6 TEST, PROCESSING, AND EVALUATItON MOIFICATIONS . . 3-4...Validation Organization ( AVO ). On-site testing was cmpleted 8 June 1988, at Honeywell Bull Corporation, Pnoenix, Arizona. 1. 2 USE OF THIS VALIDATION SUMR

  10. Ada Compiler Validation Summary Report: Certificate Number: 890919W1. 10156 R. R. Software, Inc., Janus/ADA, Version 2.1.3 Zenith Z-386/25.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-09-19

    Compiler Validation Summary Repcrt, Ada Cor piler Validation Capability, ACVC, Validation Testing, Ada Validation Office, AVO , Ada Validation Facility...results of the validation tesiing performed on an Ada compiler. Testing was carried out for the following purposes: • To attempt to identify any language...the Ada Validation Organization ( AVO ). On-site testing was completed 19 September 1989 at Madison WI. 1.2 USE OF THIS VALIDATION SUMMARY REPORT

  11. Preparation and characterization of cosmeceutical liposomes loaded with avobenzone and arbutin.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun-Jen; Nazzal, Sami; Chang, Tzu-Shan; Tsai, Tsuimin

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop and characterize a liposome delivery system coencapsulating two cosmeceutical ingredients, avobenzone (AVO) and arbutin (AR). Two different liposome preparation methods, that is, thin film hydration and reverse-phase evaporation, were evaluated. To obtain the optimal formulation, various ratios of lipid to AVO or AR were tested. The effects of liposome formulation and preparation method on particle size, entrapment efficiency (EE), and skin permeation rate were studied. The mean particle size of the liposome formulations obtained by the thin film hydration method was smaller than that obtained by the reverse-phase evaporation method. The EE of AR and AVO in liposomes prepared by the thin film method, however, was lower than that prepared by the reverse-phase evaporation method. No differences in membrane permeation were observed between the two preparation methods. A large portion of AR permeated through the membrane into the receptor chamber. On the other hand, AVO remained in the donor chamber or accumulated in the membrane. The results of this study revealed that liposomes are a promising delivery system for coencapsulated AR and AVO. Liposomes may aid in retaining the sunscreen (AVO) at the surface of the skin for sun protection meanwhile facilitating the penetration of the whitening agent (AR) into the deeper layers of the skin for whitening effect.

  12. Programmed Speed Reduction Enables Aortic Valve Opening and Increased Pulsatility in the LVAD-Assisted Heart.

    PubMed

    Tolpen, Sam; Janmaat, Jochem; Reider, Claudine; Kallel, Faouzi; Farrar, David; May-Newman, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Aortic valve opening (AVO) during left ventricular assist device (LVAD) support aids in preventing valve fusion, incompetence, and thrombosis. The programmed low speed algorithm (PLSA) allows AVO intermittently by reducing continuous motor speed during a dwell time. AVO and hemodynamics in the LVAD-assisted heart were measured using a HeartMate II (Thoratec Corporation, Pleasanton, CA) LVAD with a PLSA controller in a mock circulatory loop. Left ventricle and aortic pressures, LVAD, and total aortic flow were measured during pre-LVAD, non-PLSA and PLSA combinations of cardiac function, and LVAD speed. The low cardiac setting corresponded to a pre-LVAD cardiac output of 2.8 L/min, stroke volume of 40 ml, and ejection fraction of 22%; the medium setting produced values of 3.5 L/min, 50 ml, and 28%, respectively. Results show that the PLSA controller set at 10 krpm, dropping to 7 krpm for dwell time of 6 s, adequately produced AVO for all tested cardiac functions with only minimal changes in cardiac output. However, AVO frequency was independent of opening area and systolic duration, which both decreased with increasing LVAD support. Furthermore, aortic pulsatility index quadrupled in the aortic root and doubled in the distal aorta during PLSA conditions, providing evidence that AVO and blood mixing are enabled by PLSA control at the appropriate speed.

  13. In vitro cytotoxicity of Artemisia vulgaris L. essential oil is mediated by a mitochondria-dependent apoptosis in HL-60 leukemic cell line

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The essential oil (EO) of Artemisia vulgaris L. has been traditionally used worldwide for treating a large number of diseases. Although major components in A. vulgaris EO have been shown to inhibit growth of different cancer cells, as pure compounds or part of other plants extracted oil, no information is known about its anti-proliferative activities. Therefore, the current investigation has evaluated the toxicity of the plant extracted oil from buds (AVO-b) and leaves (AVO-l) and characterized their growth inhibitory effects on cancer cells. Methods AVO-b and AVO-l from A. vulgaris L. were extracted by hydrodistillation, and their effect on the viability of human HL-60 promyelocytic leukemia and various other cancer cell lines was tested using MTT assay. Flow cytometric analysis of apoptosis, DNA fragmentation assay, caspases enzymatic activities and Western blotting were used to determine the apoptotic pathway triggered by their action on HL-60 cells. Results Low concentrations of AVO-b and AVO-l inhibited the growth of HL-60 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Employing flow cytometric, DNA fragmentation and caspase activation analyses, demonstrated that the cytotoxic effect of the oils is mediated by a caspase-dependent apoptosis. Kinetic studies in the presence and absence specific caspase inhibitors showed that activation of caspase-8 was dependent and subsequent to the activation of caspases-9 and -3. In addition, the essential oil caused a disruption of the mitochondrial transmembrane potential (ΔΨm), increased the release of cytochrome c to the cytosol, and altered the expression of certain members of Bcl-2 family (Bcl-2, Bax and Bid), Apaf-1 and XIAP. Interestingly, low doses of AVO-b and AVO-1 also induced apoptosis in various cancer cell lines, but not in noncancerous cells. Conclusions The results demonstrate that the EO-induced apoptosis in HL-60 cells is mediated by caspase-dependent pathways, involving caspases-3, -9, and -8

  14. Response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory to Public Inquiry Concerning the 2006 Eruption of Augustine Volcano, Cook Inlet, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adleman, J. N.

    2006-12-01

    The 2006 eruption of Augustine Volcano provided the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) with an opportunity to test its newly renovated Operations Center (Ops) at the Alaska Science Center in Anchorage. Because of the demand for interagency operations and public communication, Ops became the hub of Augustine monitoring activity, twenty-four hours a day, seven days a week, from January 10 through May 19, 2006. During this time, Ops was staffed by 17 USGS AVO staff, and over two dozen Fairbanks-based AVO staff from the Alaska Department of Geological and Geophysical Surveys and the University of Alaska Fairbanks Geophysical Institute and USGS Volcano Hazards Program staff from outside Alaska. This group engaged in communicating with the public, media, and other responding agencies throughout the eruption. Before and during the eruption, reference sheets - ;including daily talking - were created, vetted, and distributed to prepare staff for questions about the volcano. These resources were compiled into a binder stationed at each Ops phone and available through the AVO computer network. In this way, AVO was able to provide a comprehensive, uniform, and timely response to callers and emails at all three of its cooperative organizations statewide. AVO was proactive in scheduling an Information Scientist for interviews on-site with Anchorage television stations and newspapers several times a week. Scientists available, willing, and able to speak clearly about the current activity were crucial to AVO's response. On January 19, 2006, two public meetings were held in Homer, 120 kilometers northeast of Augustine Volcano. AVO, the West Coast Alaska Tsunami Warning Center, and the Kenai Peninsula Borough Office of Emergency Management gave brief presentations explaining their roles in eruption response. Representatives from several local, state, and federal agencies were also available. In addition to communicating with the public by daily media interviews and phone calls to Ops

  15. 1997 volcanic activity in Alaska and Kamchatka: summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGimsey, Robert G.; Wallace, Kristi L.

    1999-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) monitors over 40 historically active volcanoes along the Aleutian Arc. Twenty are seismically monitored and for the rest, the AVO monitoring program relies mainly on pilot reports, observations of local residents and ship crews, and daily analysis of satellite images. In 1997, AVO responded to eruptive activity or suspect volcanic activity at 11 volcanic centers: Wrangell, Sanford, Shrub mud volcano, Iliamna, the Katmai group (Martin, Mageik, Snowy, and Kukak volcanoes), Chiginagak, Pavlof, Shishaldin, Okmok, Cleveland, and Amukta. Of these, AVO has real-time, continuously recording seismic networks at Iliamna, the Katmai group, and Pavlof. The phrase “suspect volcanic activity” (SVA), used to characterize several responses, is an eruption report or report of unusual activity that is subsequently determined to be normal or enhanced fumarolic activity, weather-related phenomena, or a non-volcanic event. In addition to responding to eruptive activity at Alaska volcanoes, AVO also disseminated information for the Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT) about the 1997 activity of 5 Russian volcanoes--Sheveluch, Klyuchevskoy, Bezymianny, Karymsky, and Alaid (SVA). This report summarizes volcanic activity and SVA in Alaska during 1997 and the AVO response, as well as information on the reported activity at the Russian volcanoes. Only those reports or inquiries that resulted in a “significant” investment of staff time and energy (here defined as several hours or more for reaction, tracking, and follow-up) are included. AVO typically receives dozens of reports throughout the year of steaming, unusual cloud sightings, or eruption rumors. Most of these are resolved quickly and are not tabulated here as part of the 1997 response record.

  16. Detection of hydrocarbons in carbonate lithological packages using amplitude vs offset inversin of seismic data: Case history from Alberta, Canada

    SciTech Connect

    Gassaway, G.S.; Brown, R.A.; Bennett, L.E.; Bainer, R.W. ); Miles, D.R.

    1990-02-01

    Amplitude vs. offset (AVO) analysis has been used since the late 1970s to find hydrocarbon accumulations. The method is usually used in clastic sediments, although some geophysicists have maintained that AVO inversion works in carbonate reservoirs that have a reflector associated with them. Previous workers compiled laboratory data from carbonate cores collected throughout the world. This data demonstrated the change in Poisson's ratio with a change in pore fluids or mineralogy. Because Poisson's ratio reflects changes in pore fluids or mineralogies in carbonates, AVO inversion can be used to determine the lithology and pore fluid changes. Four common depth points for seismic lines on a Mesozoic reef complex in Alberta, Canada, were analyzed using SAMPLE (Seismic Amplitude Measurement for Primary Lithology Estimation, Terra Linda Group's AVO inversion). The locations ranged from fore-reef facies to back-reef facies, including two locations in the productive porosity of the main reef. SAMPLE analysis of the first location showed a tight shaly limestone of the Waterways Formation corresponding to the lime mud in front of the reef complex. In the reef complex, both the analyses showed hydrocarbons in the Swan Hills Formation. In the back-reef location, the AVO inversion showed tight limestones with no hydrocarbons present. Thus, AVO inversion, SAMPLE, can determine whether the zone of interest is a tight limestone or shaly limestone, and whether it is wet. SAMPLE also indicates the presence of hydrocarbons in limestones at the second and third locations on the productive reef. Thus, AVO inversion can distinguish between hydrocarbon-bearing and nonhydrocarbon bearing zones on the basis of interval velocity and Poisson's ratio.

  17. Comparative trial of Aloe vera/olive oil combination cream versus phenytoin cream in the treatment of chronic wounds.

    PubMed

    Panahi, Y; Izadi, M; Sayyadi, N; Rezaee, R; Jonaidi-Jafari, N; Beiraghdar, F; Zamani, A; Sahebkar, A

    2015-10-01

    Aloe vera is a medicinal plant that has been traditionally used to accelerate wound healing. Olive oil is also a natural product that may contribute to wound healing owing to its antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory effects. The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of an Aloe vera-olive oil (AVO) combination cream on the healing process of chronic wounds. In this randomised, double-blind, comparator-controlled, parallel-group trial, patients with chronic wounds were treated with either AVO cream or phenytoin cream as the standard treatment for a period of 30 days. Wound healing was evaluated using Bates-Jensen assessment tool and the severity of pain was assessed using a visual analogue scale (VAS). After initial assessment, 60 patients with chronic wounds (41 with pressure ulcer, 13 with diabetic wounds and 6 with venous ulcers), were recruited and randomised into 2 groups of 30. After 30 days of treatment, significant improvements in the wound size, depth, and edges; necrotic tissue type and amount; exudate type and amount; colour of wound surroundings; and peripheral tissue oedema score were observed in the AVO cream group (p<0.001). The total score of wound healing showed significant improvement with both AVO (p<0.001) and phenytoin (p<0.01) creams, although AVO was more efficacious (p<0.001). Likewise, although both treatments reduced the initial VAS score, the efficacy of AVO was significantly greater (p<0.001). AVO cream significantly accelerates biological healing of chronic wounds and helps to reduce pain severity with a higher efficacy compared with phenytoin cream.

  18. Photostability evaluation of five UV-filters, trans-resveratrol and beta-carotene in sunscreens.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Juliana Vescovi; Lopes, Norberto Peporine; Gaspar, Lorena Rigo

    2015-10-12

    Trans-resveratrol (RES) is used in cosmetic formulations and beta-carotene (BTC) is a classical sunscreen antioxidant, but their photostability in sunscreens, a property directly correlated to performance and safety has not been addressed in the literature. This paper reports the assessment of RES and/or BTC influence on the photostability of five UV-filters (octyl methoxycinnamate - OMC, avobenzone -AVO, octocrylene - OCT, bemotrizinole - BMZ, octyltriazone - OTZ) in three different combinations after UVA exposure followed by the identification of degradation products and the assessment of photoreactivity. The evaluation of sunscreen photostability was performed by HPLC and spectrophotometric analysis, and degradation products were identified by GC-MS analysis. Components RES, BTC, OMC and AVO were significantly degraded after UV exposure (reduction of around 16% in recovery). According to HPLC analysis, all formulations presented similar photostability profiles. Eleven degradation products were identified in GC-MS analysis, among them products of RES, BTC, OMC and AVO photodegradation. All evaluated formulations were considered photoreactive, as well as the isolated compounds RES and AVO. Considering HPLC, spectrophotometric and GC-MS results, it is suggested that formulations containing BMZ were considered the most photostable. The combination RES+BTC in a sunscreen improved the photostability of AVO. The benefits of using a combination of antioxidants in sunscreens was demonstrated by showing that using RES+BTC+studied UV-filters led to more photostable formulations, which in turn implies in better safety and efficacy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Eruption of Alaska volcano breaks historic pattern

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Larsen, Jessica; Neal, Christina A.; Webley, Peter; Freymueller, Jeff; Haney, Matthew; McNutt, Stephen; Schneider, David; Prejean, Stephanie; Schaefer, Janet; Wessels, Rick L.

    2009-01-01

    In the late morning of 12 July 2008, the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) received an unexpected call from the U.S. Coast Guard, reporting an explosive volcanic eruption in the central Aleutians in the vicinity of Okmok volcano, a relatively young (~2000-year-old) caldera. The Coast Guard had received an emergency call requesting assistance from a family living at a cattle ranch on the flanks of the volcano, who reported loud "thunder," lightning, and noontime darkness due to ashfall. AVO staff immediately confirmed the report by observing a strong eruption signal recorded on the Okmok seismic network and the presence of a large dark ash cloud above Okmok in satellite imagery. Within 5 minutes of the call, AVO declared the volcano at aviation code red, signifying that a highly explosive, ash-rich eruption was under way.

  20. Negligible heat strain in armored vehicle officers wearing personal body armor

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Objectives This study evaluated the heat strain experienced by armored vehicle officers (AVOs) wearing personal body armor (PBA) in a sub-tropical climate. Methods Twelve male AVOs, aged 35-58 years, undertook an eight hour shift while wearing PBA. Heart rate and core temperature were monitored continuously. Urine specific gravity (USG) was measured before and after, and with any urination during the shift. Results Heart rate indicated an intermittent and low-intensity nature of the work. USG revealed six AVOs were dehydrated from pre through post shift, and two others became dehydrated. Core temperature averaged 37.4 ± 0.3°C, with maximum's of 37.7 ± 0.2°C. Conclusions Despite increased age, body mass, and poor hydration practices, and Wet-Bulb Globe Temperatures in excess of 30°C; the intermittent nature and low intensity of the work prevented excessive heat strain from developing. PMID:21801453

  1. 2008 Volcanic activity in Alaska, Kamchatka, and the Kurile Islands: Summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neal, Christina A.; McGimsey, Robert G.; Dixon, James P.; Cameron, Cheryl E.; Nuzhdaev, Anton A.; Chibisova, Marina

    2011-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, possible eruptions, and volcanic unrest or suspected unrest at seven separate volcanic centers in Alaska during 2008. Significant explosive eruptions at Okmok and Kasatochi Volcanoes in July and August dominated Observatory operations in the summer and autumn. AVO maintained 24-hour staffing at the Anchorage facility from July 12 through August 28. Minor eruptive activity continued at Veniaminof and Cleveland Volcanoes. Observed volcanic unrest at Cook Inlet's Redoubt Volcano presaged a significant eruption in the spring of 2009. AVO staff also participated in hazard communication regarding eruptions or unrest at nine volcanoes in Russia as part of a collaborative role in the Kamchatka and Sakhalin Volcanic Eruption Response Teams.

  2. 2012 volcanic activity in Alaska: summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herrick, Julie A.; Neal, Christina A.; Cameron, Cheryl E.; Dixon, James P.; McGimsey, Robert G.

    2014-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, possible eruptions, volcanic unrest, or suspected unrest at 11 volcanic centers in Alaska during 2012. Of the two verified eruptions, one (Cleveland) was clearly magmatic and the other (Kanaga) was most likely a single phreatic explosion. Two other volcanoes had notable seismic swarms that probably were caused by magmatic intrusions (Iliamna and Little Sitkin). For each period of clear volcanic unrest, AVO staff increased monitoring vigilance as needed, reviewed eruptive histories of the volcanoes in question to help evaluate likely outcomes, and shared observations and interpretations with the public. 2012 also was the 100th anniversary of Alaska’s Katmai-Novarupta eruption of 1912, the largest eruption on Earth in the 20th century and one of the most important volcanic eruptions in modern times. AVO marked this occasion with several public events.

  3. Amplitude versus offset analysis to marine seismic data acquired in Nankai Trough, offshore Japan where methane hydrate exists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hato, M.; Inamori, T.; Matsuoka, T.; Shimizu, S.

    2003-04-01

    Occurrence of methane hydrates in the Nankai Trough, located off the south-eastern coast of Japan, was confirmed by the exploratory test well drilling conducted by Japan’s Ministry of International Trade and Industry in 1999. Confirmation of methane hydrate has given so big impact to the Japan's future energy strategy and scientific and technological interest was derived from the information of the coring and logging results at the well. Following the above results, Japan National Oil Corporation (JNOC) launched the national project, named as MH21, for establishing the technology of methane hydrate exploration and related technologies such as production and development. As one of the research project for evaluating the total amount of the methane hydrate, Amplitude versus Offset (AVO) was applied to the seismic data acquired in the Nankai Trough area. The main purpose of the AVO application is to evaluate the validity of delineation of methane hydrate-bearing zones. Since methane hydrate is thought to accompany with free-gas in general just below the methane hydrate-bearing zones, the AVO has a possibility of describing the presence of free-gas. The free-gas is thought to be located just below the base of methane hydrate stability zone which is characterized by the Bottom Simulating Reflectors (BSRs) on the seismic section. In this sense, AVO technology, which was developed as gas delineation tools, can be utilized for methane hydrate exploration. The result of AVO analysis clearly shows gas-related anomaly below the BSRs. Appearance of the AVO anomaly has so wide variety. Some of the anomalies might not correspond to the free-gas existence, however, some of them may show free-gas. We are now going to develop methodology to clearly discriminate free-gas from non-gas zone by integrating various types of seismic methods such as seismic inversion and seismic attribute analysis.

  4. Use of SAR data to study active volcanoes in Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dean, K.G.; Engle, K.; Lu, Zhiming; Eichelberger, J.; Near, T.; Doukas, M.

    1996-01-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data of the Westdahl, Veniaminof, and Novarupta volcanoes in the Aleutian Arc of Alaska were analysed to investigate recent surface volcanic processes. These studies support ongoing monitoring and research by the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) in the North Pacific Ocean Region. Landforms and possible crustal deformation before, during, or after eruptions were detected and analysed using data from the European Remote Sensing Satellites (ERS), the Japanese Earth Resources Satellite (JERS) and the US Seasat platforms. Field observations collected by scientists from the AVO were used to verify the results from the analysis of SAR data.

  5. 2009 Volcanic activity in Alaska, Kamchatka, and the Kurile Islands: summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGimsey, Robert G.; Neal, Christina A.; Girina, Olga A.; Chibisova, Marina; Rybin, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, possible eruptions, volcanic unrest, and reports of unusual activity at or near eight separate volcanic centers in Alaska during 2009. The year was highlighted by the eruption of Redoubt Volcano, one of three active volcanoes on the western side of Cook Inlet and near south-central Alaska's population and commerce centers, which comprise about 62 percent of the State's population of 710,213 (2010 census). AVO staff also participated in hazard communication and monitoring of multiple eruptions at ten volcanoes in Russia as part of its collaborative role in the Kamchatka and Sakhalin Volcanic Eruption Response Teams.

  6. The Alaska Volcano Observatory - Expanded Monitoring of Volcanoes Yields Results

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brantley, Steven R.; McGimsey, Robert G.; Neal, Christina A.

    2004-01-01

    Recent explosive eruptions at some of Alaska's 52 historically active volcanoes have significantly affected air traffic over the North Pacific, as well as Alaska's oil, power, and fishing industries and local communities. Since its founding in the late 1980s, the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) has installed new monitoring networks and used satellite data to track activity at Alaska's volcanoes, providing timely warnings and monitoring of frequent eruptions to the aviation industry and the general public. To minimize impacts from future eruptions, scientists at AVO continue to assess volcano hazards and to expand monitoring networks.

  7. Use of SAR data to study active volcanoes in Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dean, K.G.; Engle, K.; Lu, Zhiming; Eichelberger, J.; Neal, T.; Doukas, M.

    1996-01-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data of Westdahl, Veniaminof, and Novarupta volcanoes in the Aleutian Arc of Alaska were analyzed to investigate recent surface volcanic processes. These studies support ongoing monitoring and research by the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) in the North Pacific Ocean Region. Landforms and possible crustal deformation before, during, or after eruptions were detected and analyzed using data from the European Remote Sensing Satellites (ERS), Japanese Earth Resources Satellite (JERS) and the U. S. Seasat platforms. Field observations collected by scientists from the AVO were used to verify the results from the analysis of SAR data.

  8. Analysis of Truss Frames by Method of the Stiffness Matrix

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-12-01

    i LL; ,,, A JPY December 1990 _ TESIS SAnalysis of Truss by Method of the Stiffness Matrix 0 N Ronald Laverne Kruse i AFIT Student Attending: Arizona...at the elastic center, 0 (Figure .3.2), are: R AX = Wix - Hot RBX W2x -Ho, RAY =WIY + Vo, (1) RBy WLy - Vo, MAB =- Mo + CH. + aVo + CMA, MBA =M - CH...AAx + RAYAAY M ABA RBXAx R BA ABY MAeB substituting from Equations (1): Ur = HoAAX + (W1 + VO)AAY - Hoa Bx + (W2 - Vo) ABY + (- Mo + clio + aVo + CMAC

  9. 2015 Volcanic activity in Alaska—Summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dixon, James P.; Cameron, Cheryl E.; Iezzi, Alexandra M.; Wallace, Kristi

    2017-09-28

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, volcanic unrest or suspected unrest, and seismic events at 14 volcanic centers in Alaska during 2015. The most notable volcanic activity consisted of continuing intermittent ash eruptions from Cleveland and Shishaldin volcanoes in the Aleutian Islands. Two eruptive episodes, at Veniaminof and Pavlof, on the Alaska Peninsula ended in 2015. During 2015, AVO re-established the seismograph network at Aniakchak, installed six new broadband seismometers throughout the Aleutian Islands, and added a Multiple component Gas Analyzer System (MultiGAS) station on Augustine.

  10. 2014 volcanic activity in Alaska: Summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cameron, Cheryl E.; Dixon, James P.; Neal, Christina A.; Waythomas, Christopher F.; Schaefer, Janet R.; McGimsey, Robert G.

    2017-09-07

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, possible eruptions, volcanic unrest or suspected unrest, and seismic events at 18 volcanic centers in Alaska during 2014. The most notable volcanic activity consisted of intermittent ash eruptions from long-active Cleveland and Shishaldin Volcanoes in the Aleutian Islands, and two eruptive episodes at Pavlof Volcano on the Alaska Peninsula. Semisopochnoi and Akutan volcanoes had seismic swarms, both likely the result of magmatic intrusion. The AVO also installed seismometers and infrasound instruments at Mount Cleveland during 2014.

  11. Volume measurements of 28Si spheres using an interferometer with a flat etalon to determine the Avogadro constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuramoto, N.; Fujii, K.; Yamazawa, K.

    2011-04-01

    The volumes of two 1 kg silicon spheres, AVO28-S5 and AVO28-S8, fabricated from a 28Si-enriched crystal were measured to determine the Avogadro constant by the x-ray crystal density method in the International Avogadro Coordination Project. The volumes were determined from diameter measurements of the two spheres using a laser interferometer with a flat etalon. In the diameter measurement, the sphere was placed between the two flat etalon plates. The gaps between the sphere and the etalon plates and the distance between the etalon plates were measured by phase-shifting interferometry with optical frequency tuning. The apparent volumes of the 28Si spheres were determined from the diameter measurement in many directions with relative combined standard uncertainties of 5.0 × 10-8 and 4.4 × 10-8 for AVO28-S5 and AVO28-S8, respectively. The effect of the surface layer on the diameter measurement was evaluated on the basis of the results of characterizing the sphere surface. By taking into account the effect of the surface layer, the silicon core volume excluding the surface layer and the actual volume including the surface layer were also determined. Details of the interferometer, data analysis and the uncertainty in the measurement are described.

  12. Tissue-print real-time RT-PCR for accurate detection of Citrus tristeza virus. Validation and comparison with Tissue print-ELISA.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) causes one of the most important virus diseases of Citrus species. The control of CTV in Spain and Central California is based on planting virus-free citrus on CTV-tolerant or -resistant rootstocks. However, quarantine and certification programs are still essential to avo...

  13. Amplitude versus offset modeling of the bottom simulating reflection associated with submarine gas hydrates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Andreassen, K.; Hart, P.E.; MacKay, M.

    1997-01-01

    A bottom simulating seismic reflection (BSR) that parallels the sea floor occurs worldwide on seismic profiles from outer continental margins. The BSR coincides with the base of the gas hydrate stability field and is commonly used as indicator of natural submarine gas hydrates. Despite the widespread assumption that the BSR marks the base of gas hydrate-bearing sediments, the occurrence and importance of low-velocity free gas in the sediments beneath the BSR has long been a subject of debate. This paper investigates the relative abundance of hydrate and free gas associated with the BSR by modeling the reflection coefficient or amplitude variation with offset (AVO) of the BSR at two separate sites, offshore Oregon and the Beaufort Sea. The models are based on multichannel seismic profiles, seismic velocity data from both sites and downhole log data from Oregon ODP Site 892. AVO studies of the BSR can determine whether free gas exists beneath the BSR if the saturation of gas hydrate above the BSR is less than approximately 30% of the pore volume. Gas hydrate saturation above the BSR can be roughly estimated from AVO studies, but the saturation of free gas beneath the BSR cannot be constrained from the seismic data alone. The AVO analyses at the two study locations indicate that the high amplitude BSR results primarily from free gas beneath the BSR. Hydrate concentrations above the BSR are calculated to be less than 10% of the pore volume for both locations studied.

  14. Emergy analysis of a silvo-pastoral system, a case study in southern Portugal

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Mediterranean silvo-pastoral system known as Montado, in Portugal, is a complex land use system composed of an open tree stratum in various densities and an herbaceous layer, used for livestock grazing. Livestock also profit from the acorns, and the grazing contributes to avo...

  15. Got Vision? Unity of Vision in Policy and Strategy: What it is, and Why we need it

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-01

    about the Sikh faith. He knew a lot about other religions as well. And he had a passion for poetry . Together, these avo- cations would have given...will be the stuff of stories—may be an absolutely essential, woefully under-remarked trait. 28 28. As conveyed in Lansdale’s autobiography, In the

  16. The analysis of frequency-dependent characteristics for fluid detection: a physical model experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shuang-Quan; Li, Xiang-Yang; Wang, Shang-Xu

    2012-06-01

    According to the Chapman multi-scale rock physical model, the seismic response characteristics vary for different fluid-saturated reservoirs. For class I AVO reservoirs and gas-saturation, the seismic response is a high-frequency bright spot as the amplitude energy shifts. However, it is a low-frequency shadow for the Class III AVO reservoirs saturated with hydrocarbons. In this paper, we verified the high-frequency bright spot results of Chapman for the Class I AVO response using the frequency-dependent analysis of a physical model dataset. The physical model is designed as inter-bedded thin sand and shale based on real field geology parameters. We observed two datasets using fixed offset and 2D geometry with different fluidsaturated conditions. Spectral and time-frequency analyses methods are applied to the seismic datasets to describe the response characteristics for gas-, water-, and oil-saturation. The results of physical model dataset processing and analysis indicate that reflection wave tuning and fluid-related dispersion are the main seismic response characteristic mechanisms. Additionally, the gas saturation model can be distinguished from water and oil saturation for Class I AVO utilizing the frequency-dependent abnormal characteristic. The frequency-dependent characteristic analysis of the physical model dataset verified the different spectral response characteristics corresponding to the different fluid-saturated models. Therefore, by careful analysis of real field seismic data, we can obtain the abnormal spectral characteristics induced by the fluid variation and implement fluid detection using seismic data directly.

  17. 2005 Volcanic Activity in Alaska, Kamchatka, and the Kurile Islands: Summary of Events and Response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGimsey, R.G.; Neal, C.A.; Dixon, J.P.; Ushakov, Sergey

    2008-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptive activity or suspected volcanic activity at or near 16 volcanoes in Alaska during 2005, including the high profile precursory activity associated with the 2005?06 eruption of Augustine Volcano. AVO continues to participate in distributing information about eruptive activity on the Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia, and in the Kurile Islands of the Russian Far East, in conjunction with the Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT) and the Sakhalin Volcanic Eruption Response Team (SVERT), respectively. In 2005, AVO helped broadcast alerts about activity at 8 Russian volcanoes. The most serious hazard posed from volcanic eruptions in Alaska, Kamchatka, or the Kurile Islands is the placement of ash into the atmosphere at altitudes traversed by jet aircraft along the North Pacific and Russian Trans East air routes. AVO, KVERT, and SVERT work collaboratively with the National Weather Service, Federal Aviation Administration, and the Volcanic Ash Advisory Centers to provide timely warnings of volcanic eruptions and the production and movement of ash clouds.

  18. Flow-Induced Vibrations of Taut Marine Cables with Attached Masses.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-11-01

    experinenii tesi ru11, 11 tt have been analy/ed in sulicient deiail. M\\Iso. ro. . oi ,.nd,itions ,rc made of modifications that will enhance the...under these same flow conditions. The drag coefficint on the strumming cable was predicted with the equation (see Appendix C) CD, AVo - CDo[I + 1.043 (2

  19. Emergy analysis of a silvo-pastoral system, a case study in southern Portugal

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Mediterranean silvo-pastoral system known as Montado, in Portugal, is a complex land use system composed of an open tree stratum in various densities and an herbaceous layer, used for livestock grazing. Livestock also profit from the acorns, and the grazing contributes to avo...

  20. Proposed Functional Architecture and Associated Benefits Analysis of a Common Ground Control Station for Unmanned Aircraft Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    to unique Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) and Ground Control Station (GCS) designs. A former Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition, Technology...includes a common Air Vehicle Operator (AVO) Human-Machine Interface. These requirements enabled the creation of an innovative functional architecture for...Station (GCS), Unmanned Aircraft System (UAS), Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV), common, commonality, interoperability, architecture, training, Air Vehicle

  1. New technology for the independent producer

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    This technology transfer conference consisted of the following six sessions: reservoir characterization; drilling, testing and completion; enhanced oil recovery; 3-d seismic and amplitude variation with offset (AVO); biotechnology for field applications; and well logging technology. Selected papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  2. Electrochemical Synthesis of Amorphous VO2 Colloids and Their Rapid Thermal Transforming to VO2 (M) Nanoparticles with Good Thermochromic Performance.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hao; Li, Ming; Zhong, Li; Luo, Yuan Yuan; Li, Guang Hai

    2016-12-05

    Amorphous VO2 (a-VO2 ) colloids were synthesized by electrochemical anodic oxidation of metallic vanadium. It was found that the a-VO2 colloids have a cotton-like morphology composed of very small clusters, and that the crystallization temperature of the a-VO2 colloids can be adjusted either by the electrolyte of the anodic oxidation or/and the dispersion agent of the colloids. VO2 (M) nanoparticles (NPs) (and a NP film) with an average size of about 50 nm can be obtained by a rapid thermal annealing of the a-VO2 colloids at 310 °C under air, which is beneficial for practical applications. The VO2 (M) NP film shows an obvious metal-semiconductor transition with a resistance less than 10 Ω in the metallic state. An integral visible transmittance of 40.7 %, a solar transmittance modulation of 9.4 %, and a resistance modulation in the order of 5×10(4) were realized in the VO2 (M) NP film.

  3. Prediction of stroke volume from oxygen pulse measurements in untrained and trained men.

    PubMed

    Bhambhani, Y; Norris, S; Bell, G

    1994-03-01

    This study examined the relationship of oxygen pulse (O2 pulse) to stroke volume (SV) and arterio-venous oxygen difference [(a-v)O2 diff] during submaximal cycle exercise in untrained (UG) and trained (TG) males. Fourteen volunteers in each group completed an incremental VO2 max test and a submaximal test at 60% VO2 max to determine cardiac output (Q) via CO2 rebreathing. VO2, Q, and heart rate (HR) were used to calculate SV and (a-v)O2 diff. There were no significant differences (p > .05) between the two groups for O2 pulse, SV, and (a-v)O2 diff during submaximal exercise. Stroke volume index (SVI) was significantly higher (p < .05) in the TG. O2 pulse was significantly related to SV and SVI (p < .05) but not to (a-v)O2 diff in both groups. Regression equations for predicting SV from O2 pulse for UG and TG were Y = 6.81X + 26.7, SE = 21.4, r = 0.84, and Y = 10.33X - 32.3, SE = 14.2, r = 0.71, respectively. These results suggest that O2 pulse can be used to predict SV during submaximal cycle exercise in untrained and trained men.

  4. Ada (Tradename) Compiler Validation Summary Report: TeleSoft TeleGen2 E68, Version 3.11. Host: MicroVAX II, Targets: Motorola 68020, 68010 Tektronix 8540 (M68010 CPU),

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-09-24

    Testing, Ada Validation Office, AVO, Ada Validation Facility, AVF, ANSI/MIL-STD- 1815A, Ada Joint Program Office, AJPO 20. ABS TRAC T (Continue on reverse...test SI results ara written to tha tyneenead buffor on the host comrouter usin the $1 sami line Vtt wer used for downlcading. $ £ TSAJA /2OgNLZA - w

  5. Use of new and old technologies and methods by the Alaska Volcano Observatory during the 2006 eruption of Augustine Volcano, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, T. L.; Nye, C. J.; Eichelberger, J. C.

    2006-12-01

    The recent eruption of Augustine Volcano was the first significant volcanic event in Cook Inlet, Alaska since 1992. In contrast to eruptions at remote Alaskan volcanoes that mainly affect aviation, ash from previous eruptions of Augustine has affected communities surrounding Cook Inlet, home to over half of Alaska's population. The 2006 eruption validated much of AVO's advance preparation, underscored the need to quickly react when a problem or opportunity developed, and once again demonstrated that while technology provides us with wonderful tools, professional relationships, especially during times of crisis, are still important. Long-term multi-parametric instrumental monitoring and background geological and geophysical studies represent the most fundamental aspect of preparing for any eruption. Once significant unrest was detected, AVO augmented the existing real-time network with additional instrumentation including web cameras. GPS and broadband seismometers that recorded data on site were also quickly installed as their data would be crucial for post-eruption research. Prior to 2006, most of most of AVO's eruption response plans and protocols had focused on the threat to aviation rather than ground-based hazards. However, the relationships and protocols developed for the aviation threat were sufficient to be adapted to the ash fall hazard, though it is apparent that more work, both scientific and with response procedures, is needed. Similarly, protocols were quickly developed for warning of a flank- collapse induced tsunami. Information flow within the observatory was greatly facilitated by an internal web site that had been developed and refined specifically for eruption response. Because AVO is a partnership of 3 agencies (U.S. Geological Survey, University of Alaska Fairbanks Geophysical Institute, and the Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys) with offices in both Fairbanks and Anchorage, web and internet-facing data servers provided

  6. Hazard communication by the Alaska Volcano Observatory Concerning the 2008 Eruptions of Okmok and Kasatochi Volcanoes, Aleutian Islands, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adleman, J. N.; Cameron, C. E.; Neal, T. A.; Shipman, J. S.

    2008-12-01

    The significant explosive eruptions of Okmok and Kasatochi volcanoes in 2008 tested the hazard communication systems at the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) including a rigorous test of the new format for written notices of volcanic activity. AVO's Anchorage-based Operations facility (Ops) at the USGS Alaska Science Center serves as the hub of AVO's eruption response. From July 12 through August 28, 2008 Ops was staffed around the clock (24/7). Among other duties, Ops staff engaged in communicating with the public, media, and other responding federal and state agencies and issued Volcanic Activity Notices (VAN) and Volcano Observatory Notifications for Aviation (VONA), recently established and standardized products to announce eruptions, significant activity, and alert level and color code changes. In addition to routine phone communications with local, national and international media, on July 22, AVO held a local press conference in Ops to share observations and distribute video footage collected by AVO staff on board a U.S. Coast Guard flight over Okmok. On July 27, AVO staff gave a public presentation on the Okmok eruption in Unalaska, AK, 65 miles northeast of Okmok volcano and also spoke with local public safety and industry officials, observers and volunteer ash collectors. AVO's activity statements, photographs, and selected data streams were posted in near real time on the AVO public website. Over the six-week 24/7 period, AVO staff logged and answered approximately 300 phone calls in Ops and approximately 120 emails to the webmaster. Roughly half the logged calls were received from interagency cooperators including NOAA National Weather Service's Alaska Aviation Weather Unit and the Center Weather Service Unit, both in Anchorage. A significant number of the public contacts were from mariners reporting near real-time observations and photos of both eruptions, as well as the eruption of nearby Cleveland Volcano on July 21. As during the 2006 eruption of

  7. Absolute silicon molar mass measurements, the Avogadro constant and the redefinition of the kilogram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vocke, R. D., Jr.; Rabb, S. A.; Turk, G. C.

    2014-10-01

    The results of an absolute silicon molar mass determination of two independent sets of samples from the highly 28Si-enriched crystal (AVO28) produced by the International Avogadro Coordination are presented and compared with results published by the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB, Germany), the National Research Council (NRC, Canada) and the National Metrology Institute of Japan (NMIJ, Japan). This study developed and describes significant changes to the published protocols for producing absolute silicon isotope ratios. The measurements were made at very high resolution on a multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer using tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) to dissolve and dilute all samples. The various changes in the measurement protocol and the use of TMAH resulted in significant improvements to the silicon isotope ratio precision over previously reported measurements and in particular, the robustness of the 29Si/30Si ratio of the AVO28 material. These new results suggest that a limited isotopic variability is present in the AVO28 material. The presence of this variability is at present singular and therefore its significance is not well understood. Fortunately, its magnitude is small enough so as to have an insignificant effect on the overall uncertainty of an Avogadro constant derived from the average molar mass of all four AVO28 silicon samples measured in this study. The NIST results confirm the AVO28 molar mass values reported by PTB and NMIJ and confirm that the virtual element-isotope dilution mass spectrometry approach to calibrated absolute isotope ratio measurements developed by PTB is capable of very high precision as well as accuracy. The Avogadro constant NA and derived Planck constant h based on these measurements, together with their associated standard uncertainties, are 6.02214076(19) × 1023 mol-1 and 6.62607017(21) × 10-34 Js, respectively.

  8. 2006 Volcanic Activity in Alaska, Kamchatka, and the Kurile Islands: Summary of Events and Response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neal, Christina A.; McGimsey, Robert G.; Dixon, James P.; Manevich, Alexander; Rybin, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, possible eruptions, and volcanic unrest at or near nine separate volcanic centers in Alaska during 2006. A significant explosive eruption at Augustine Volcano in Cook Inlet marked the first eruption within several hundred kilometers of principal population centers in Alaska since 1992. Glaciated Fourpeaked Mountain, a volcano thought to have been inactive in the Holocene, produced a phreatic eruption in the fall of 2006 and continued to emit copious amounts of volcanic gas into 2007. AVO staff also participated in hazard communication and monitoring of multiple eruptions at seven volcanoes in Russia as part of its collaborative role in the Kamchatka and Sakhalin Volcanic Eruption Response Teams.

  9. 2007 Volcanic activity in Alaska, Kamchatka, and the Kurile Islands: Summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGimsey, Robert G.; Neal, Christina A.; Dixon, James P.; Malik, Nataliya; Chibisova, Marina

    2011-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, possible eruptions, and volcanic unrest at or near nine separate volcanic centers in Alaska during 2007. The year was highlighted by the eruption of Pavlof, one of Alaska's most frequently active volcanoes. Glaciated Fourpeaked Mountain, a volcano thought to have been inactive in the Holocene, produced a phreatic eruption in the autumn of 2006 and continued to emit copious amounts of steam and volcanic gas into 2007. Redoubt Volcano showed the first signs of the unrest that would unfold in 2008-09. AVO staff also participated in hazard communication and monitoring of multiple eruptions at seven volcanoes in Russia as part of its collaborative role in the Kamchatka and Sakhalin Volcanic Eruption Response Teams.

  10. Intraventricular vorticity favors conservation of kinetic energy along the cardiac cycle: analysis in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy by post-processing color-doppler images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alhama, Marta; Benito, Yolanda; Bermejo, Javier; Yotti, Raquel; Perez-David, Esther; Barrio, Alicia; Perez Del Villar, Candelas; Gonzalez Mansilla, Ana; Fernandez Aviles, Francisco; Del Alamo, Juan Carlos

    2011-11-01

    Background: This study assesses if the left ventricle (LV) filling vortex developed during diastole may be a mechanism that improves systolic efficiency. 19 patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and 37 healthy volunteers were studied. Recently, we have developed and validated a method that derives two-dimensional maps of the LV flow from standard color-Doppler sequences. Two-dimensional maps of instantaneous LV flow were obtained, and circulation, energy and position of the main and secondary vortices were calculated along the cardiac cycle. At aortic valve opening (AVO) the vortex circulation is higher in DCM subjects than healthy volunteers. However, the position of the vortex is farthest form LV outflow tract (LVOT), and this results in lower flow velocity in LVOT at AVO. This phenomenon is altered in patients with DCM. Supported by ISCIII (Spain) and NIH 1 R21 HL108268-01 (US).

  11. A description of seismic amplitude techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shadlow, James

    2014-02-01

    The acquisition of seismic data is a non-invasive technique used for determining the sub surface geology. Changes in lithology and fluid fill affect the seismic wavelet. Analysing seismic data for direct hydrocarbon indicators (DHIs), such as full stack amplitude anomalies, or amplitude variation with offset (AVO), can help a seismic interpreter relate the geophysical response to real geology and, more importantly, to distinguish the presence of hydrocarbons. Inversion is another commonly used technique that attempts to tie the seismic data back to the geology. Much has been written about these techniques, and attempting to gain an understanding on the theory and application of them by reading through various journals can be quite daunting. The purpose of this paper is to briefly outline DHI analysis, including full stack amplitude anomalies, AVO and inversion and show the relationship between all three. The equations presented have been included for completeness, but the reader can pass over the mathematical detail.

  12. Catalog of earthquake hypocenters at Alaskan volcanoes: January 1 through December 31, 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dixon, James P.; Stihler, Scott D.

    2009-01-01

    Between January 1 and December 31, 2008, the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) located 7,097 earthquakes of which 5,318 occurred within 20 kilometers of the 33 volcanoes monitored by the AVO. Monitoring highlights in 2008 include the eruptions of Okmok Caldera, and Kasatochi Volcano, as well as increased unrest at Mount Veniaminof and Redoubt Volcano. This catalog includes descriptions of: (1) locations of seismic instrumentation deployed during 2008; (2) earthquake detection, recording, analysis, and data archival systems; (3) seismic velocity models used for earthquake locations; (4) a summary of earthquakes located in 2008; and (5) an accompanying UNIX tar-file with a summary of earthquake origin times, hypocenters, magnitudes, phase arrival times, location quality statistics, daily station usage statistics, and all files used to determine the earthquake locations in 2008.

  13. Implementation of Simple and Functional Web Applications at the Alaska Volcano Observatory Remote Sensing Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skoog, R. A.

    2007-12-01

    Web pages are ubiquitous and accessible, but when compared to stand-alone applications they are limited in capability. The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) Remote Sensing Group has implemented web pages and supporting server software that provide relatively advanced features to any user able to meet basic requirements. Anyone in the world with access to a modern web browser (such as Mozilla Firefox 1.5 or Internet Explorer 6) and reasonable internet connection can fully use the tools, with no software installation or configuration. This allows faculty, staff and students at AVO to perform many aspects of volcano monitoring from home or the road as easily as from the office. Additionally, AVO collaborators such as the National Weather Service and the Anchorage Volcanic Ash Advisory Center are able to use these web tools to quickly assess volcanic events. Capabilities of this web software include (1) ability to obtain accurate measured remote sensing data values on an semi- quantitative compressed image of a large area, (2) to view any data from a wide time range of data swaths, (3) to view many different satellite remote sensing spectral bands and combinations, to adjust color range thresholds, (4) and to export to KML files which are viewable virtual globes such as Google Earth. The technologies behind this implementation are primarily Javascript, PHP, and MySQL which are free to use and well documented, in addition to Terascan, a commercial software package used to extract data from level-0 data files. These technologies will be presented in conjunction with the techniques used to combine them into the final product used by AVO and its collaborators for operational volcanic monitoring.

  14. Proceedings of the U.S. Army Symposium on Gun Dynamics (4th) Held at Riviera Beach, Florida on 7-9 May 1985. Volume 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-05-01

    ioll - tile very trsk ont- hopee -’.o avo~il in cewcluuio!1, corf.plete valtdation requirc-r) niesurcaeat of displacv-ment &rxd rotacion . That the...34, APdJAL’GCOM tC .G’l,,Benevt Welapons labor ):.tory, Watervliet, NY, V-3i CHUI cmi June 1979. 2. Boresi, A. P., "A Review of Selected Works on Gun

  15. Ada Compiler Validation Summary Report: Certificate Number: 890504W1. 10079 Hewlett Packard Co. HP 9000 Series 300 Ada Compiler, Version 4.35 HP 9000 Series 300 Model 370

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-05-04

    Consistent with the national laws of the originating country, the AVO may make full and free public disclosure of this report. In the United States, this...implementation and maintenance of the Ada compiler listed above, and agree to the public disclosure of the final Validation Summary Report. I further agree to... continue to comply with the Ada trademark policy, as defined by the Ada Joint Program Office. I declare that all of the Ada language compilers listed

  16. Mt. Spurr's 1992 eruptions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    1993-01-01

    On 27 June, 1992, the Crater Peak vent on the south side of Mt. Spurr awoke from 39 years of dormancy and burst into sub-plinian eruption after 10 months of elevated seismicity. Two more eruptions followed in August and September. The volcano lies 125 km west of Anchorage, Alaska's largest city and an important international hub for air travel. The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) was able to warn communities and the aviation industry well in advance of these eruptions.

  17. Catalog of earthquake hypocenters at Alaskan volcanoes: January 1 through December 31, 2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dixon, James P.; Stihler, Scott D.; Power, John A.; Searcy, Cheryl K.

    2012-01-01

    Between January 1 and December 31, 2011, the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) located 4,364 earthquakes, of which 3,651 occurred within 20 kilometers of the 33 volcanoes with seismograph subnetworks. There was no significant seismic activity above background levels in 2011 at these instrumented volcanic centers. This catalog includes locations, magnitudes, and statistics of the earthquakes located in 2011 with the station parameters, velocity models, and other files used to locate these earthquakes.

  18. The Role of the Co-Chaperone, CHIP, in Androgen Independent Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-01

    expression in LNCap Tsai and LNCap C42 cells. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is an endogenous lipid growth factor that is thought to play important roles...Physiological responses to lysophosphatidic acid and related glycero-phospholipids. Prostaglandins 2001,64:47–62. 9 JK Cheng, T Bawa, P Leey, , et al. Role of...inhibitors of autophagy versus apoptosis. Autophagy is characterized by acidic vesicular organelle (AVO) formation, which is detected and measured by vital

  19. Resolution enhancement of robust Bayesian pre-stack inversion in the frequency domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Xingyao; Li, Kun; Zong, Zhaoyun

    2016-10-01

    AVO/AVA (amplitude variation with an offset or angle) inversion is one of the most practical and useful approaches to estimating model parameters. So far, publications on AVO inversion in the Fourier domain have been quite limited in view of its poor stability and sensitivity to noise compared with time-domain inversion. For the resolution and stability of AVO inversion in the Fourier domain, a novel robust Bayesian pre-stack AVO inversion based on the mixed domain formulation of stationary convolution is proposed which could solve the instability and achieve superior resolution. The Fourier operator will be integrated into the objective equation and it avoids the Fourier inverse transform in our inversion process. Furthermore, the background constraints of model parameters are taken into consideration to improve the stability and reliability of inversion which could compensate for the low-frequency components of seismic signals. Besides, the different frequency components of seismic signals can realize decoupling automatically. This will help us to solve the inverse problem by means of multi-component successive iterations and the convergence precision of the inverse problem could be improved. So, superior resolution compared with the conventional time-domain pre-stack inversion could be achieved easily. Synthetic tests illustrate that the proposed method could achieve high-resolution results with a high degree of agreement with the theoretical model and verify the quality of anti-noise. Finally, applications on a field data case demonstrate that the proposed method could obtain stable inversion results of elastic parameters from pre-stack seismic data in conformity with the real logging data.

  20. Properties of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer Above a Subtropical Oceanic Front.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-06-01

    8217 ,. ’%-.. - K. vi son, Tesis Advisor W.J Saw,cnd Reader Deartment of meteorology Gordon E. Schacher, Dean of Science and Engineering 3 ABSTRACT...P0ETA E0EAJ: CWN PE M/ Figzre ,.2S RIiosode rofie C mparso/ FNI) AVO 05 ar.S6, 010 \\1 ’. 2 i N. 6 52%’, oldid 𔃻.,\\\\-S 0 Mar S6 ();42 NI F 2S40,68 arm

  1. The Description of the ROBIN Program and Its Conversion to the Interdata 7-32 Computer System.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-05-01

    46 SFCJRT 47 END) 117 SCRAT RFAVGT PROG THEORFTICAL AVOING 14 NOV 79 R@I. S REM3:REAVGT. FOR 4 CROSS r NORXD 6 NL.STC 7, NL IST 9 SLIEROUTINE RFAiV1TC...58HAPOGEE NOT KNOWN. TIME OF FALL TESi NOT LISED ABOVE 5 ±3 *5 KIl ) LiIPO-F> .IPGF+±l GO TO- 399 3.IF (HI -77900. ) 350, 304, 304 2 3 1W 2%l (1

  2. Vibration Damping Response of Composite Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-04-01

    to predict the vibration damping of these coposites. L lein Irauu, .. rii. se i-s foi tesi specimel gC-miLtrics oSl0y, so that - material...manner that the strain in the x direction was determined. This development results in the transverse strain given as av (x,y,z) avO (x,y)ei~ t a 2wO(xy) ei

  3. Monitoring changes in VO2max via the Polar FT40 in female collegiate soccer players.

    PubMed

    Esco, Michael R; Snarr, Ronald L; Williford, Hank N

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine if the Polar FT40 could accurately track changes in maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max) in a group of female soccer players. Predicted VO2max (pVO2max) via the Polar FT40 and observed VO2max (aVO2max) from a maximal exercise test on a treadmill were determined for members of a collegiate soccer team (n = 20) before and following an 8-week endurance training protocol. Predicted (VO2max and aVO2max measures were compared at baseline and within 1 week post-training. Change values (i.e., the difference between pre to post) for each variable were also determined and compared. There was a significant difference in aVO2max (pre = 43.6 ± 2.4 ml · kg · min(-1), post = 46.2 ± 2.4 ml · kg · min(-1), P < 0.001) and pVO2max (pre = 47.3 ± 5.3 ml · kg · min(-1), post = 49.7 ± 6.2 ml · kg · min(-1), P = 0.009) following training. However, predicted values were significantly greater at each time point compared to observed values (P < 0.001 at pre and P = 0.008 at post). Furthermore, there was a weak correlation between the change in aVO2max and the change in pVO2max (r = 0.18, P = 0.45). The Polar FT40 does not appear to be a valid method for predicting changes in individual VO2max following 8 weeks of endurance training in female collegiate soccer players.

  4. Estimating stroke volume from oxygen pulse during exercise.

    PubMed

    Crisafulli, Antonio; Piras, Francesco; Chiappori, Paolo; Vitelli, Stefano; Caria, Marcello A; Lobina, Andrea; Milia, Raffaele; Tocco, Filippo; Concu, Alberto; Melis, Franco

    2007-10-01

    This investigation aimed at verifying whether it was possible to reliably assess stroke volume (SV) during exercise from oxygen pulse (OP) and from a model of arterio-venous oxygen difference (a-vO(2)D) estimation. The model was tested in 15 amateur male cyclists performing an exercise test on a cycle-ergometer consisting of a linear increase of workload up to exhaustion. Starting from the analysis of previous published data, we constructed a model of a-vO(2)D estimation (a-vO(2)D(est)) which predicted that the a-vO(2)D at rest was 30% of the total arterial O(2) content (CaO(2)) and that it increased linearly during exercise reaching a value of 80% of CaO(2) at the peak workload (W(max)) of cycle exercise. Then, the SV was calculated by applying the following equation, SV = OP/a-vO(2)D(est), where the OP was assessed as the oxygen uptake/heart rate. Data calculated by our model were compared with those obtained by impedance cardiography. The main result was that the limits of agreement between the SV assessed by impedance cardiography and the SV estimated were between 22.4 and -27.9 ml (+18.8 and -24% in terms of per cent difference between the two SV measures). It was concluded that our model for estimating SV during effort may be reasonably applicable, at least in a healthy population.

  5. Quantitative evaluation of clinical course in surgical ICU patients: the data conform to catastrophe theory.

    PubMed

    Abrams, J H; Barke, R A; Cerra, F B

    1984-12-01

    A response surface for critically ill patients is described. The coordinates of the three-dimensional response surface are two control variables, or state variables, related to aerobic and anaerobic metabolism, and a response variable, the A-VO2 difference. The data conform to a cusp catastrophe manifold. Cardiac insufficiency, adaptive response to stress, and sepsis may be distinguished by this model. The distinction between control and response variables is discussed.

  6. Impact of gate-source/drain channel architecture on the performance of an operational transconductance amplifier (OTA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kranti, Abhinav; Rashmi; Armstrong, G. Alastair

    2009-11-01

    In this work, we report on the significance of gate-source/drain extension region (also known as underlap design) optimization in double gate (DG) FETs to improve the performance of an operational transconductance amplifier (OTA). It is demonstrated that high values of intrinsic voltage gain (AVO_OTA) > 55 dB and unity gain frequency (fT_OTA) ~ 57 GHz in a folded cascode OTA can be achieved with gate-underlap channel design in 60 nm DG MOSFETs. These values correspond to 15 dB improvement in AVO_OTA and three fold enhancement in fT_OTA over a conventional non-underlap design. OTA performance based on underlap single gate SOI MOSFETs realized in ultra-thin body (UTB) and ultra-thin body BOX (UTBB) technologies is also evaluated. AVO_OTA values exhibited by a DG MOSFET-based OTA are 1.3-1.6 times higher as compared to a conventional UTB/UTBB single gate OTA. fT_OTA values for DG OTA are 10 GHz higher for UTB OTAs whereas a twofold improvement is observed with respect to UTBB OTAs. The simultaneous improvement in AVO_OTA and fT_OTA highlights the usefulness of underlap channel architecture in improving gain-bandwidth trade-off in analog circuit design. Underlap channel OTAs demonstrate high degree of tolerance to misalignment/oversize between front and back gates without compromising the performance, thus relaxing crucial process/technology-dependent parameters to achieve 'idealized' DG MOSFETs. Results show that underlap OTAs designed with a spacer-to-straggle (s/σ) ratio of 3.2 and operated below a bias current (IBIAS) of 80 µA demonstrate optimum performance. The present work provides new opportunities for realizing future ultra-wide band OTA design with underlap DG MOSFETs.

  7. Ada Compiler Validation Summary Report: Certificate Number: 930901W1. 11322. RISCAE Honeywell RH32-Targeted Area Compiler, 1.0 DEC Vaxstation 4000 Under VMS, 5.5=> RISCAE Honeywell RH32 Simulator Running on the Host Under VMS, 5.5

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-08-16

    illegal use of the Ada programaing language. 1-4 OIAPT 2 IMPLEMETATICN DEPEDEN4CIES 2.1 WITHDRAHT The following tests have been withdravn by the AVO. The...a (1.0 - 2.0*-S I)*2.00*204 LONGYFLOAT’MACHINE-ROUNDS a= tu LONG-yLOArMACHINE-OVERFILOWS a tre LONG-YLOAT’MACHIINE-RADIX =2 LONG-MOArMACHINEMANTISSA

  8. Mangiferin and naringenin affect the photostability and phototoxicity of sunscreens containing avobenzone.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Camila Martins; Gaspar, Lorena Rigo

    2015-10-01

    Efficient UV-absorbing molecules are designed to protect against UV-light exposure. However, the development of photostable sunscreens is important to preserve the photoprotective efficacy and to prevent the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and photodegradation products, which can promote phototoxic or photoallergic contact dermatitis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of mangiferin and naringenin on the photostability and phototoxicity of sunscreens containing avobenzone. Cosmetic sunscreen formulations containing octocrylene (OCT), octyl methoxycinnamate (OMC) and avobenzone (AVO) were prepared and supplemented or not with mangiferin, naringenin, or with both compounds in combination. For photostability studies, samples of the formulations were spread onto glass plates, exposed to UVA radiation and then analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) to determine UV filters and the antioxidants recovery. The phototoxicity of the UV filters and antioxidants was evaluated using 3T3 fibroblast cultures that were subjected (or not) to irradiation according to OECD TG 432. The photostability studies demonstrated that AVO and naringenin showed the highest photodegradation when present in formulation FN (containing octocrylene, avobenzone, octyl methoxycinnamate and naringenin). The addition of mangiferin to this combination (FMN) resulted in an improved photostability of both substances compared to FN. The in vitro phototoxicity test showed that only avobenzone was considered phototoxic. The combination containing AVO/naringenin exhibited phototoxic potential; however, this was reduced by the addition of mangiferin (combination CMN). The results of this study are promising because it was demonstrated that mangiferin could increase the photostability and reduce the phototoxic potential of the combination of naringenin and AVO. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Further insights in the ability of classical nonadditive potentials to model actinide ion-water interactions.

    PubMed

    Réal, Florent; Trumm, Michael; Schimmelpfennig, Bernd; Masella, Michel; Vallet, Valérie

    2013-04-05

    Pursuing our efforts on the development of accurate classical models to simulate radionuclides in complex environments (Réal et al., J. Phys. Chem. A 2010, 114, 15913; Trumm et al. J. Chem. Phys. 2012, 136, 044509), this article places a large emphasis on the discussion of the influence of models/parameters uncertainties on the computed structural, dynamical, and temporal properties. Two actinide test cases, trivalent curium and tetravalent thorium, have been studied with three different potential energy functions, which allow us to account for the polarization and charge-transfer effects occurring in hydrated actinide ion systems. The first type of models considers only an additive energy term for modeling ion/water charge-transfer effects, whereas the other two treat cooperative charge-transfer interactions with two different analytical expressions. Model parameters are assigned to reproduce high-level ab initio data concerning only hydrated ion species in gas phase. For the two types of cooperative charge-transfer models, we define two sets of parameters allowing or not to cancel out possible errors inherent to the force field used to model water/water interactions at the ion vicinity. We define thus five different models to characterize the solvation of each ion. For both ions, our cooperative charge-transfer models lead to close results in terms of structure in solution: the coordination number is included within 8 and 9, and the mean ion/water oxygen distances are 2.45 and 2.49 Å, respectively, for Th(IV) and Cm(III).

  10. Temperature contrasts in the water column inferred from amplitude-versus-offset analysis of acoustic reflections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Páramo, Pedro; Holbrook, W. Steven

    2005-12-01

    We show that seismic amplitude-versus-offset (AVO) analysis can be used to remotely quantify the temperature contrasts responsible for acoustic reflections in the ocean. We inferred the sound speed and density contrasts associated with two reflections in the Norwegian Sea by comparing their AVO response to that predicted by the Zoeppritz equations. Estimates of temperature contrasts were calculated from sound speed contrasts using Wilson's equation and compared with in situ temperature measurements from coincident expendable bathythermographs (XBTs). A strong reflection from Line 9 is best explained by a -6 m/s step in sound speed, corresponding to a temperature decrease of ~1.5°C. A weaker reflection from Line 11 yielded a sound speed contrast of -1.2 m/s, corresponding to a temperature decrease of ~0.3°C. The inferred temperature contrasts match those found in XBT data remarkably well. L1-norm misfits between predicted and calculated values indicate that the acoustic impedance contrasts are principally controlled by sound speed contrasts, rather than density contrasts. AVO analysis offers an accurate and robust technique for estimating sound speed (and therefore temperature) contrasts in the water column.

  11. Seismic offset balancing

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, C.P.; Beale, P.L.

    1994-01-01

    The ability to successfully predict lithology and fluid content from reflection seismic records using AVO techniques is contingent upon accurate pre-analysis conditioning of the seismic data. However, all too often, residual amplitude effects remain after the many offset-dependent processing steps are completed. Residual amplitude effects often represent a significant error when compared to the amplitude variation with offset (AVO) response that the authors are attempting to quantify. They propose a model-based, offset-dependent amplitude balancing method that attempts to correct for these residuals and other errors due to sub-optimal processing. Seismic offset balancing attempts to quantify the relationship between the offset response of back-ground seismic reflections and corresponding theoretical predictions for average lithologic interfaces thought to cause these background reflections. It is assumed that any deviation from the theoretical response is a result of residual processing phenomenon and/or suboptimal processing, and a simple offset-dependent scaling function is designed to correct for these differences. This function can then be applied to seismic data over both prospective and nonprospective zones within an area where the theoretical values are appropriate and the seismic characteristics are consistent. A conservative application of the above procedure results in an AVO response over both gas sands and wet sands that is much closer to theoretically expected values. A case history from the Gulf of Mexico Flexure Trend is presented as an example to demonstrate the offset balancing technique.

  12. Ratiometric analysis of Acridine Orange staining in the study of acidic organelles and autophagy.

    PubMed

    Thomé, Marcos P; Filippi-Chiela, Eduardo C; Villodre, Emilly S; Migliavaca, Celina B; Onzi, Giovana R; Felipe, Karina B; Lenz, Guido

    2016-12-15

    Acridine Orange is a cell-permeable green fluorophore that can be protonated and trapped in acidic vesicular organelles (AVOs). Its metachromatic shift to red fluorescence is concentration-dependent and, therefore, Acridine Orange fluoresces red in AVOs, such as autolysosomes. This makes Acridine Orange staining a quick, accessible and reliable method to assess the volume of AVOs, which increases upon autophagy induction. Here, we describe a ratiometric analysis of autophagy using Acridine Orange, considering the red-to-green fluorescence intensity ratio (R/GFIR) to quantify flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy data of Acridine-Orange-stained cells. This method measured with accuracy the increase in autophagy induced by starvation or rapamycin, and the reduction in autophagy produced by bafilomycin A1 or the knockdown of Beclin1 or ATG7. Results obtained with Acridine Orange, considering R/GFIR, correlated with the conversion of the unlipidated form of LC3 (LC3-I) into the lipidated form (LC3-II), SQSTM1 degradation and GFP-LC3 puncta formation, thus validating this assay to be used as an initial and quantitative method for evaluating the late step of autophagy in individual cells, complementing other methods. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  13. Prestack seismic inversion and reservoir property prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, Xingang

    In this dissertation, I have applied the method of prestack seismic inversion with uncertainty analysis. Also, I have developed the methods of the rock physics template analysis, the fluid modulus inversion and the reservoir property inversion from AVO attributes with and without constraint to improve the technique of reservoir characterization. I use the prestack seismic inversion to invert the elastic properties and use the statistical method to derive the posterior probability of the inverted elastic properties for the uncertainty analysis. I use the rock physics template drawn in the cross-plot of the inverted elastic properties to analyze the lithology and fluid property in the target reservoir. I develop the fluid modulus inversion method based on the simplified Gassmann's equation and the empirical rock physics relationship. Using the inverted fluid modulus, I estimate the gas saturation of the target reservoir before drilling. The reservoir property inversion is to predict the porosity, shale volume and water saturation of the reservoir from AVO attributes to enhance the reservoir interpretation and characterization. I apply this method with the statistical analysis together to execute the uncertainty analysis for the inversion results. Two methods of reservoir property inversion from AVO attributes are attempted in this dissertation: one is performed without constraint and the other is performed with the constrained relationship of the porosity and shale volume.

  14. Solid State Structure-Reactivity Studies on Bixbyites, Fluorites and Perovskites Belonging to the Vanadate, Titanate and Cerate Families

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafi, Shahid P.

    This thesis primarily focuses on the systematic understanding of structure-reactivity relationships in two representative systems: bixbyite and related structures as well as indium doped CeO2. Topotactic reaction routes have gained significant attention over the past two decades due to their potential to access kinetically controlled metastable materials. This has contributed substantially to the understanding of solid state reaction pathways and provided first insights into mechanisms. Contrary to the widely used ex-situ methods, in-situ techniques including powder x-ray diffraction and thermogravimetric-differential thermal analysis have been employed extensively throughout this work in order to follow the reaction pathways in real time. Detailed analysis of the AVO3 (A = In, Sc) bixbyite reactivity under oxidative conditions has been carried out and a variety of novel metastable oxygen defect phases have been identified and characterized. The novel metastable materials have oxygen deficient fluorite structures and consequently are potential ion conductors. Structural aspects of the topotactic vs. reconstructive transformations are illustrated with this model system. The structure-reactivity study of AVO3 phases was extended to AVO3 perovskite family. Based on the research methodologies and results from AVO3 bixbyite reactivity studies a generalized mechanistic oxidation pathway has been established with a non-vanadium phase, ScTiO3 bixbyite. However, there is stark contrast in terms of structural stability and features beyond this stability limit during AVO3 and ScTiO3 bixbyite reaction pathways. A series of complex reaction sequences including phase separation and phase transitions were identified during the investigation of ScTiO3 reactivity. The two-step formation pathway for the fluorite-type oxide ion conductor Ce1-xInxO2-delta (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.3) is being reported. The formation of the BaCe1-xInxO 3-delta perovskites and the subsequent CO2-capture reaction

  15. Amplitude vs. Offset Effects on Gas Hydrates at Woolsey Mound, Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Walter R., Jr.

    Due to the estimated massive quantities of natural methane hydrates, they represent one of the largest sources of future alternative energy on Earth. Methane hydrates have been found in the shallow sub-seafloor of the Northern Gulf of Mexico where the water depth is in excess of ~900 m. Mississippi Canyon Block 118 has been chosen by the Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium to be the site of a multi-sensor, multi-discipline sea-floor observatory for gas hydrate research. First evidence for gas hydrates at MC 118 was observed at Woolsey Mound. Subsurface evidence for gas hydrates has subsequently been substantiated by 3D seismic reflection data and piston coring. It is estimated that methane trapped within gas hydrates worldwide may exceed 1016 kg, one of the largest sources of hydrocarbons to date, and here they present an opportunity for exploitation via harvesting for energy production. The analysis of the 3-D seismic reflection data and integration with industry well logs reveals the subsurface structural and stratigraphic architecture of a thermogenic hydrate system in the Mississippi Canyon area (MC-118) of the Gulf of Mexico. Like many hydrocarbon systems in the Gulf of Mexico, Woolsey Mound is dominated by the presence and sporadic movement of allochthonous salt within the sedimentary section. Exploration-scale 3-D seismic imaging shows a network of faults connecting the mound to a salt diapir and an extended area of high P-wave velocity just beneath the sea floor. Gas hydrates exhibit clear seismic properties such as the bottom simulating reflector (BSR), relatively high P- and S- wave velocities, seismic blanking, and amplitude vs. offset (AVO) effects. These effects occur mainly due to the presence of free gas that is usually trapped by the more rigid overlying hydrate formations. In order to substantiate the presence of hydrates in the shallow subsurface at Woolsey Mound, an AVO analysis based on the variation of the P-wave reflection coefficient

  16. Exploring the Digital Universe with Europe's Astrophysical Virtual Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-12-01

    N° 73-2001 - Paris, 5 December 2001 The aim of AVO is to give astronomers instant access to the vast databanks now being built up by the world's observatories and forming what is in effect a "digital sky". Using AVO astronomers will be able, for example, to retrieve the elusive traces of the passage of an asteroid as it passes the Earth and so predict its future path and perhaps warn of a possible impact. When a giant star comes to the end of its life in a cataclysmic explosion called a supernova, they will be able to access the digital sky and pinpoint the star shortly before it exploded, adding invaluable data to the study of the evolution of stars. Modern observatories observe the sky continuously and data accumulates remorselessly in the digital archives. The growth rate is impressive and many hundreds of terabytes of data -corresponding to many thousands of billions of pixels - are already available to scientists. The real sky is being digitally reconstructed in the databanks. The volume and complexity of data and information available to astronomers are overwhelming. Hence the problem of how astronomers can possibly manage, distribute and analyse this great wealth of data. The Astrophysical Virtual Observatory will enable them to meet the challenge and "put the Universe online". AVO is a three-year project, funded by the European Commission under its Research and Technological Development (RTD) scheme, to design and implement a virtual observatory for the European astronomical community. The Commission has awarded a contract valued at EUR 4m for the project, starting on 15 November. AVO will provide software tools to enable astronomers to access the multi-wavelength data archives over the Internet and so give them the capability to resolve fundamental questions about the Universe by probing the digital sky. Equivalent searches of the "real" sky would, in comparison, both be prohibitively costly and take far too long. Towards a Global Virtual Observatory The

  17. Alaska Volcano Observatory at 20

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichelberger, J. C.

    2008-12-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) was established in 1988 in the wake of the 1986 Augustine eruption through a congressional earmark. Even within the volcanological community, there was skepticism about AVO. Populations directly at risk in Alaska were small compared to Cascadia, and the logistical costs of installing and maintaining monitoring equipment were much higher. Questions were raised concerning the technical feasibility of keeping seismic stations operating through the long, dark, stormy Alaska winters. Some argued that AVO should simply cover Augustine with instruments and wait for the next eruption there, expected in the mid 90s (but delayed until 2006), rather than stretching to instrument as many volcanoes as possible. No sooner was AVO in place than Redoubt erupted and a fully loaded passenger 747 strayed into the eruption cloud between Anchorage and Fairbanks, causing a powerless glide to within a minute of impact before the pilot could restart two engines and limp into Anchorage. This event forcefully made the case that volcano hazard mitigation is not just about people and infrastructure on the ground, and is particularly important in the heavily traveled North Pacific where options for flight diversion are few. In 1996, new funding became available through an FAA earmark to aggressively extend volcano monitoring far into the Aleutian Islands with both ground-based networks and round-the-clock satellite monitoring. Beyond the Aleutians, AVO developed a monitoring partnership with Russians volcanologists at the Institute of Volcanology and Seismology in Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky. The need to work together internationally on subduction phenomena that span borders led to formation of the Japan-Kamchatka-Alaska Subduction Processes (JKASP) consortium. JKASP meets approximately biennially in Sapporo, Petropavlovsk, and Fairbanks. In turn, these meetings and support from NSF and the Russian Academy of Sciences led to new international education and

  18. NON-INVASIVE DETERMINATION OF THE LOCATION AND DISTRIBUTION OF FREE-PHASE DENSE NONAQUEOUS PHASE LIQUIDS (DNAPL) BY SEISMIC REFLECTION TECHNIQUES

    SciTech Connect

    Michael G. Waddell; William J. Domoracki; Tom J. Temples

    2001-12-01

    This annual technical progress report is for part of Task 4 (site evaluation), Task 5 (2D seismic design, acquisition, and processing), and Task 6 (2D seismic reflection, interpretation, and AVO analysis) on DOE contact number DE-AR26-98FT40369. The project had planned one additional deployment to another site other than Savannah River Site (SRS) or DOE Hanford Site. After the SUBCON midyear review in Albuquerque, NM, it was decided that two additional deployments would be performed. The first deployment is to test the feasibility of using non-invasive seismic reflection and AVO analysis as a monitoring tool to assist in determining the effectiveness of Dynamic Underground Stripping (DUS) in removal of DNAPL. The second deployment is to the Department of Defense (DOD) Charleston Naval Weapons Station Solid Waste Management Unit 12 (SWMU-12), Charleston, SC to further test the technique to detect high concentrations of DNAPL. The Charleston Naval Weapons Station SWMU-12 site was selected in consultation with National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and DOD Naval Facilities Engineering Command Southern Division (NAVFAC) personnel. Based upon the review of existing data and due to the shallow target depth, the project team collected three Vertical Seismic Profiles (VSP) and an experimental P-wave seismic reflection line. After preliminary data analysis of the VSP data and the experimental reflection line data, it was decided to proceed with Task 5 and Task 6. Three high resolution P-wave reflection profiles were collected with two objectives; (1) design the reflection survey to image a target depth of 20 feet below land surface to assist in determining the geologic controls on the DNAPL plume geometry, and (2) apply AVO analysis to the seismic data to locate the zone of high concentration of DNAPL. Based upon the results of the data processing and interpretation of the seismic data, the project team was able to map the channel that is controlling the DNAPL plume

  19. Tracking changes in maximal oxygen consumption with the heart rate index in female collegiate soccer players.

    PubMed

    Esco, Michael R; Snarr, Ronald L; Flatt, Andrew; Leatherwood, Matthew; Whittaker, Adam

    2014-09-29

    The purpose of this study was to determine if the HRindex Method (VO2max = [6 x HRindex - 5] x 3.5, where HRindex = HRmax/HRrest) was accurate for tracking changes in VO2max following 8-weeks of endurance training among collegiate female soccer players. Predicted VO2max via the HRindex Method and observed VO2max from a maximal exercise test on a treadmill were determined for a group of female soccer athletes (n = 15) before and following an 8-week endurance training protocol. The predicted (pVO2max) and observed (aVO2max) values were compared at baseline and within 1-week post-training. Change values (i.e., the difference between pre to post) for each variable were also determined and compared. There was a significant difference between aVO2max before (43.2 ± 2.8 ml·kg·min(-1)) and following (46.2 ± 2.1 ml·kg·min(-1)) the 8-week training program (p < 0.05). However, pVO2max did not significantly change following training (pre = 43.4 ± 4.6 ml·kg·min(-1), post = 42.9 ± 4.1 ml·kg·min(-1), p = 0.53). Furthermore, the correlation between the change in aVO2max and the change in pVO2max was trivial and non-significant (r = 0.30, p = 0.28). The HRindex Method does not appear to be suitable for predicting changes in VO2max following 8-weeks of endurance training in female collegiate soccer players.

  20. Perfluorocarbon oxygen transport. A comparative study of four oxygenator designs.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, E R; Clymer, J J; Spruell, R D; Holman, W L

    1994-01-01

    Improvements made in current generation perfluorocarbon emulsions (PFCEs) warrant renewed interest in PFCEs as an oxygen (O2) carrying substance during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Before embarking on in vivo studies of PFCEs during CPB, an in vitro study was designed to: 1) demonstrate increased O2 content attributable to PFCEs, and 2) compare O2 transfer to a PFCE crystalloid mixture by four oxygenator designs (one bubble oxygenator, two hollow fiber membrane oxygenators, and one silastic membrane oxygenator). A circuit was designed to circulate fluid between a deoxygenating device and a test oxygenator. In protocol I, either a crystalloid solution or a crystalloid PFCE mixture was circulated through bubble oxygenators at flows ranging from 0.5 to 3 l/min, and at temperatures of 4, 20, 30, or 40 degrees C. In protocol II, a crystalloid PFCE mixture was circulated at flows ranging from 0.5 to 6 l/min at temperatures of 4, 20, 30, or 40 degrees C. Four different oxygenator designs were compared using the in vitro test circuit. The comparison variables for protocols I and II were arterovenous oxygen (AVO2) difference and O2 transfer rate measured at each flow for each temperature. Protocol I showed that the AVO2 differences and O2 transfer rates were higher in the crystalloid PFCE mixture than in the crystalloid solution, although statistical comparison was precluded by the small sample size. In protocol II, the hollow fiber and silastic membrane oxygenators had higher (P < 0.05) AVO2 differences and oxygen transfer rates than the bubble oxygenators at all flows and temperatures tested. Future trials to evaluate PFCEs during cardiopulmonary bypass should use hollow fiber or silastic membrane oxygenators, rather than bubble oxygenators, to maximize transfer of O2 to the PFCE.

  1. Appraisal of gas hydrate resources based on a P- and S-impedance reflectivity template: case study from the deep sea sediments in Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoar, Behnam Hosseini; Javaherian, Abdolrahim; Keshavarz Farajkhah, Nasser; Seddigh Arabani, Mojtaba

    2013-12-01

    The occurrence of a bottom simulating reflector (BSR) in the 2D seismic data from Makran's accretionary prism reveals the presence of gas hydrate and free gas several hundred meters below the seafloor of Iran's deep sea. According to the global distribution of marine hydrates, they are widely present in deep sea sediments, where high operational costs and hazards cause a lack of well log information. Therefore, developing a method to quantify the hydrate resources with seismic data is an ultimate goal for unexplored regions. In this study, the so-called reflectivity templates (RTs) are introduced for quantification of the hydrate and free gas near the BSR. These RTs are intuitive crossplots of P-impedance and S-impedance contrasts across the BSR. They are calculated theoretically based on the effective medium theory for different hydrate distribution modes with some assumptions on porosity and mineralogical composition of unconsolidated sediments. This technique suggests the possibility of using the amplitude variation versus offset (AVO) analysis of the BSR for a quantitative interpretation when well log data are not available. By superimposing the AVO-derived P-impedance and S-impedance contrasts across the BSR on these RTs, the saturations of the hydrate and free gas near the BSR could be estimated. Validation of this approach by synthetic data showed that a reliable quantification could be achieved if the model parameters were rearranged to a form in which the AVO inversion was independent of the S-wave to P-wave velocity-ratio assumption. Based on this approach applied on the 2D marine pre-stack time migrated seismic line in offshore Iran, 4% to 28% of the gas hydrate and 1% to 2% of the free gas are expected to be accumulated near the thrusted-ridge and thrusted-footwall types of BSRs.

  2. Alaska - Kamchatka Connection in Volcano Monitoring, Research, and Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izbekov, P. E.; Gordeev, E.; Eichelberger, J. C.; Neal, C. A.

    2009-12-01

    The Aleutian-Kamchatka portion of the Pacific Rim of Fire spans ~4400 km. This segment contains more than 80 active volcanoes and averages 4-6 eruptions per year. Resulting ash clouds travel for hundreds to thousands of kilometers defying political borders. To mitigate volcano hazard to aviation and local communities, the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) and the Institute of Volcanology and Seismology (IVS), in partnership with the Kamchatkan Branch of the Geophysical Survey of the Russian Academy of Sciences (KBGS), have established a collaborative program with three important components: (1) volcano monitoring with rapid information exchange, (2) cooperation in research projects at active volcanoes, and (3) a series of volcanological schools for students and young scientists. Cooperation in volcano monitoring includes dissemination of daily information on the state of volcanic activity in neighboring regions, satellite and visual data exchange, as well as sharing expertise and technologies between AVO and the Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), formed in 1993 under the auspices of both IVS and KBGS. Collaboration in scientific research is best illustrated by involvement of AVO, IVS, and KBGS faculty and graduate students in mutual international studies. One of the most recent examples is the NSF-funded Partnerships for International Research and Education (PIRE)-Kamchatka project focusing on multi-disciplinary study of Bezymianny volcano in Kamchatka. This international project is one of many that have been initiated as a direct result of a bi-annual series of meetings known as Japan-Kamchatka-Alaska Subduction Processes (JKASP) workshops that we organize together with colleagues from Hokkaido University, Japan. The most recent JKASP meeting was held in June 2009 in Fairbanks, Alaska and brought together more than 150 scientists and students. The key educational component of our collaborative program is the continuous series of international

  3. Determination of seismic anisotropy parameters from multicomponent vertical seismic profiles for improved seismic imaging and reservoir characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamimi, Naser

    Multicomponent vertical seismic profile (VSP) data can be used to determine seismic anisotropy more accurately. First, I modify the slowness-polarization method by including both P- and SV-wave data for estimating the anisotropy parameters delta and eta of VTI (transversely isotropic with vertical symmetry axis) media. Then I apply the technique to a multicomponent VSP dataset from the Wattenberg Field in Colorado, USA. The importance of the derived anisotropic velocity model from the joint P- and SV- wave slowness-polarization method for reservoir characterization at the Wells Ranch VSP area is: 1) identifying the possible existence of open fracture networks in the Niobrara Formation at the VSP well location, 2) improving the quality of the Niobrara Formation image which is vital for future drilling programs, 3) accurately depicting the structure in the well vicinity and finally 4) determining elastic properties of the Niobrara reservoir. To identify the existence of open fracture networks, azimuthal AVO response of top of the Niobrara Formation at the VSP well is analyzed. To correct the azimuthal AVO response for propagation phenomena, using the anisotropic velocity model from the joint slowness- polarization method, I modified the moveout-based anisotropic spreading correction (MASC) technique for the VSP data. The azimuthal AVO analysis shows very weak azimuthal anisotropy at the top of Niobrara Formation near the VSP well. This result indicates the lack of open natural fractures at the Niobrara Formation in this area and explains the low production associated with the well. In addition, I used the anisotropic velocity model obtained from the joint slowness-polarization method to build a 2D VSP image. Comparing the final VSP images using the isotropic and anisotropic velocity models with well data shows that the anisotropic image is more accurately depicted and if inverted would give more robust elastic parameter definition.

  4. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance features of mechanical dyssynchrony in patients with left bundle branch block.

    PubMed

    Revah, Giselle; Wu, Vincent; Huntjens, Peter R; Piekarski, Eve; Chyou, Janice Y; Axel, Leon

    2016-09-01

    Patients with left bundle branch block (LBBB) can exhibit mechanical dyssynchrony which may contribute to heart failure; such patients may benefit from cardiac resynchronization treatment (CRT). While cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) has become a common part of heart failure work-up, CMR features of mechanical dyssynchrony in patients with LBBB have not been well characterized. This study aims to investigate the potential of CMR to characterize mechanical features of LBBB. CMR examinations from 43 patients with LBBB on their electrocardiogram, but without significant focal structural abnormalities, and from 43 age- and gender-matched normal controls were retrospectively reviewed. The following mechanical features of LBBB were evaluated: septal flash (SF), apical rocking (AR), delayed aortic valve opening measured relative to both end-diastole (AVOED) and pulmonic valve opening (AVOPVO), delayed left-ventricular (LV) free-wall contraction, and curvatures of the septum and LV free-wall. Septal displacement curves were also generated, using feature-tracking techniques. The echocardiographic findings of LBBB were also reviewed in those subjects for whom they were available. LBBB was significantly associated with the presence of SF and AR; within the LBBB group, 79 % had SF and 65 % had AR. Delayed AVOED, AVOPVO, and delayed LV free-wall contraction were significantly associated with LBBB. AVOED and AVOPVO positively correlated with QRS duration and negatively correlated with ejection fraction. Hearts with electrocardiographic evidence of LBBB showed lower septal-to-LV free-wall curvature ratios at end-diastole compared to normal controls. CMR can be used to identify and evaluate mechanical dyssynchrony in patients with LBBB. None of the normal controls showed the mechanical features associated with LBBB. Moreover, not all patients with LBBB showed the same degree of mechanical dyssynchrony, which could have implications for CRT.

  5. Mechanisms of Effort Intolerance in Patients With Heart Failure and Borderline Ejection Fraction.

    PubMed

    Topilsky, Yan; Rozenbaum, Zach; Khoury, Shafik; Pressman, Gregg S; Gura, Yaniv; Sherez, Jack; Man, Avi; Shimiaie, Jason; Edwards, Sanford; Berookhim, Joshua; Le Tourneau, Thierry; Halkin, Amir; Biner, Simon; Keren, Gad; Aviram, Galit

    2017-02-01

    Combining echocardiography and cardiopulmonary stress testing allows noninvasive assessment of hemodynamics, and oxygen extraction (A-VO2 difference). We evaluated mechanisms of effort intolerance in patients with heart failure with borderline (40% to 49%) left ventricular ejection fraction (EF) (HF and Borderline Ejection fraction). We included 89 consecutive patients with HF and Borderline Ejection fraction (n = 25; 63.6 ± 14 years, 64% men), control subjects (n = 22), patients with HF with preserved EF (n = 26; EF ≥50%), and patients with HF with reduced EF (n = 16; <40%). Various echo parameters (left ventricular volumes, EF, stroke volume, mitral regurgitation [MR] volume, e', right ventricle end-diastolic area, and right ventricle end-systolic area), and ventilatory or combined parameters (peak oxygen consumption [VO2] and A-VO2 difference) were measured at 4 predefined activity stages. Effort-induced functional MR was frequent and more prevalent in HF and Borderline Ejection fraction than in all the other types of HF. In multivariable analysis heart rate response (p <0.0001), A-VO2 difference (p = 0.02), stroke volume (p = 0.002), and right ventricle end-systolic area were the only independent predictors of exercise capacity in HF and Borderline Ejection fraction but peak EF was not. In HF and Borderline Ejection fraction exercise intolerance is predominantly due to chronotropic incompetence, peripheral factors, and limited stroke volume reserve, which are related to right ventricle dysfunction and functional MR but not to left ventricular ejection fraction. Combined testing can be helpful in determining mechanisms of exercise intolerance in HF and Borderline Ejection fraction. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Tracking Changes in Maximal Oxygen Consumption with the Heart Rate Index in Female Collegiate Soccer Players

    PubMed Central

    Esco, Michael R.; Snarr, Ronald L.; Flatt, Andrew; Leatherwood, Matthew; Whittaker, Adam

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if the HRindex Method (VO2max = [6 x HRindex – 5] x 3.5, where HRindex = HRmax/HRrest) was accurate for tracking changes in VO2max following 8-weeks of endurance training among collegiate female soccer players. Predicted VO2max via the HRindex Method and observed VO2max from a maximal exercise test on a treadmill were determined for a group of female soccer athletes (n = 15) before and following an 8-week endurance training protocol. The predicted (pVO2max) and observed (aVO2max) values were compared at baseline and within 1-week post-training. Change values (i.e., the difference between pre to post) for each variable were also determined and compared. There was a significant difference between aVO2max before (43.2 ± 2.8 ml·kg·min−1) and following (46.2 ± 2.1 ml·kg·min−1) the 8-week training program (p < 0.05). However, pVO2max did not significantly change following training (pre = 43.4 ± 4.6 ml·kg·min−1, post = 42.9 ± 4.1 ml·kg·min−1, p = 0.53). Furthermore, the correlation between the change in aVO2max and the change in pVO2max was trivial and non-significant (r = 0.30, p = 0.28). The HRindex Method does not appear to be suitable for predicting changes in VO2max following 8-weeks of endurance training in female collegiate soccer players. PMID:25414744

  7. Advancing New 3D Seismic Interpretation Methods for Exploration and Development of Fractured Tight Gas Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    James Reeves

    2005-01-31

    In a study funded by the U.S. Department of Energy and GeoSpectrum, Inc., new P-wave 3D seismic interpretation methods to characterize fractured gas reservoirs are developed. A data driven exploratory approach is used to determine empirical relationships for reservoir properties. Fractures are predicted using seismic lineament mapping through a series of horizon and time slices in the reservoir zone. A seismic lineament is a linear feature seen in a slice through the seismic volume that has negligible vertical offset. We interpret that in regions of high seismic lineament density there is a greater likelihood of fractured reservoir. Seismic AVO attributes are developed to map brittle reservoir rock (low clay) and gas content. Brittle rocks are interpreted to be more fractured when seismic lineaments are present. The most important attribute developed in this study is the gas sensitive phase gradient (a new AVO attribute), as reservoir fractures may provide a plumbing system for both water and gas. Success is obtained when economic gas and oil discoveries are found. In a gas field previously plagued with poor drilling results, four new wells were spotted using the new methodology and recently drilled. The wells have estimated best of 12-months production indicators of 2106, 1652, 941, and 227 MCFGPD. The latter well was drilled in a region of swarming seismic lineaments but has poor gas sensitive phase gradient (AVO) and clay volume attributes. GeoSpectrum advised the unit operators that this location did not appear to have significant Lower Dakota gas before the well was drilled. The other three wells are considered good wells in this part of the basin and among the best wells in the area. These new drilling results have nearly doubled the gas production and the value of the field. The interpretation method is ready for commercialization and gas exploration and development. The new technology is adaptable to conventional lower cost 3D seismic surveys.

  8. Predicting and validating the motion of an ash cloud during the 2006 eruption of Mount Augustine volcano

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Collins, Richard L.; Fochesatto, Javier; Sassen, Kenneth; Webley, Peter W.; Atkinson, David E.; Dean, Kenneson G.; Cahill, Catherine F.; Mizutani, Kohei

    2007-01-01

    On 11 January 2006, Mount Augustine volcano in southern Alaska began erupting after 20- year repose. The Anchorage Forecast Office of the National Weather Service (NWS) issued an advisory on 28 January for Kodiak City. On 31 January, Alaska Airlines cancelled all flights to and from Anchorage after multiple advisories from the NWS for Anchorage and the surrounding region. The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) had reported the onset of the continuous eruption. AVO monitors the approximately 100 active volcanoes in the Northern Pacific. Ash clouds from these volcanoes can cause serious damage to an aircraft and pose a serious threat to the local communities, and to transcontinental air traffic throughout the Arctic and sub-Arctic region. Within AVO, a dispersion model has been developed to track the dispersion of volcanic ash clouds. The model, Puff, was used operational by AVO during the Augustine eruptive period. Here, we examine the dispersion of a volcanic ash (or aerosol) cloud from Mount Augustine across Alaska from 29 January through the 2 February 2006. We present the synoptic meteorology, the Puff predictions, and measurements from aerosol samplers, laser radar (or lidar) systems, and satellites. Aerosol samplers revealed the presence of volcanic aerosols at the surface at sites where Puff predicted the ash clouds movement. Remote sensing satellite data showed the development of the ash cloud in close proximity to the volcano consistent with the Puff predictions. Two lidars showed the presence of volcanic aerosol with consistent characteristics aloft over Alaska and were capable of detecting the aerosol, even in the presence of scattered clouds and where the ash cloud is too thin/disperse to be detected by remote sensing satellite data. The lidar measurements revealed the different trajectories of ash consistent with the Puff predictions. Dispersion models provide a forecast of volcanic ash cloud movement that might be undetectable by any other means but are

  9. Measurement of Diaphragmatic Blood Flow and Oxygen Consumption in the Dog by the Kety-Schmidt Technique

    PubMed Central

    Rochester, Dudley F.

    1974-01-01

    To assess energy expenditure of the diaphragm directly, a method was devised for percutaneous catheterization of the left inferior phrenic vein in dogs. Necropsy studies, including retrograde injection of india ink and measurement of radioactivity in diaphragmatic muscle strips, suggested that the territory drained by the inferior phrenic vein was uniformly perfused, and that there were no major anastomoses between this bed and adjacent ones. Diaphragmatic blood flow (˙Q di) was calculated from the integrated diaphragmatic arteriovenous difference of 85Kr by the Kety-Schmidt technique. Diaphragmatic oxygen consumption (˙Vo2 di) was determined as the product of ˙Q di and the diaphragmatic arteriovenous oxygen content difference [(A-V)O2 di]. When lightly anesthetized dogs breathed quietly, ˙Q di was 22±SD 6 ml/min/100 g, (A-V)O2 di was 6.1±SD 2.5 ml/100 ml, and ˙VO2 di averaged 1.2±SD 0.3 ml/min/100 g. This represented 1.0±SD 0.2% of total body oxygen consumption. ˙VO2 di remained relatively constant during quiet breathing, whereas ˙Q di varied directly with cardiac output and reciprocally with (A-V)O2 di. The oxygen consumption of the noncontracting diaphragm was 60±SD 20% of the level measured during quiet breathing. The energy expended by the diaphragm to support simple hyperventilation was small. A 100% increase in minute ventilation, induced by inhalation of 5% CO2 in 21% or 14% O2, increased ˙Q di 13%, (A-V)O2 di 19%, and ˙VO2 di 40%. The diaphragm consumed 0.13±SD 0.09 ml O2 for each additional liter of ventilation. In four dogs, pneumonia appeared to increase ˙VO2 both by increasing minute ventilation and by increasing the energy cost per liter of ventilation. PMID:4825221

  10. Catalog of earthquake hypocenters at Alaskan volcanoes: January 1 through December 31, 2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dixon, James P.; Stihler, Scott D.; Power, John A.; Searcy, Cheryl K.

    2011-01-01

    Between January 1 and December 31, 2010, the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) located 3,405 earthquakes, of which 2,846 occurred within 20 kilometers of the 33 volcanoes with seismograph subnetworks. There was no significant seismic activity in 2010 at these monitored volcanic centers. Seismograph subnetworks with severe outages in 2009 were repaired in 2010 resulting in three volcanic centers (Aniakchak, Korovin, and Veniaminof) being relisted in the formal list of monitored volcanoes. This catalog includes locations and statistics of the earthquakes located in 2010 with the station parameters, velocity models, and other files used to locate these earthquakes.

  11. Press Meeting 20 January 2003: First Light for Europe's Virtual Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-12-01

    Imagine you are an astronomer with instant, fingertip access to all existing observations of a given object and the opportunity to sift through them at will. In just a few moments, you can have information on all kinds about objects out of catalogues all over the world, including observations taken at different times. Over the next two years this scenario will become reality as Europe's Astrophysical Virtual Observatory (AVO) develops. Established only a year ago (cf. ESO PR 26/01), the AVO already offers astronomers a unique, prototype research tool that will lead the way to many outstanding new discoveries. Journalists are invited to a live demonstration of the capabilities of this exciting new initiative in astronomy. The demonstration will take place at the Jodrell Bank Observatory in Manchester, in the United Kingdom, on 20 January 2003, starting at 11:00. Sophisticated AVO tools will help scientists find the most distant supernovae - objects that reveal the cosmological makeup of our Universe. The tools are also helping astronomers measure the rate of birth of stars in extremely red and distant galaxies. Journalists will also have the opportunity to discuss the project with leading astronomers from across Europe. The new AVO website has been launched today, explaining the progress being made in this European Commission-funded project: URL: http://www.euro-vo.org/ To register your intention to attend the AVO First Light Demonstration, please provide your name and affiliation by January 13, 2003, to: Ian Morison, Jodrell Bank Observatory (full contact details below). Information on getting to the event is included on the webpage above. Programme for the AVO First Light Demonstration 11:00 Welcome, Phil Diamond (University of Manchester/Jodrell Bank Observatory) 11:05 Short introduction to Virtual Observatories, Piero Benvenuti (ESA/ST-ECF) 11:15 Q&A 11:20 Short introduction to the Astrophysical Virtual Observatory, Peter Quinn (ESO) 11:30 Q&A 11:35 Screening of

  12. Renewed Seismic Unrest at Mount Spurr Volcano, Alaska in 2004: Evidence for a Magmatic Intrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Power, J. A.; Stihler, S. D.; Dixon, J. P.; Moran, S. C.; Caplan-Auerbach, J.; Prejean, S. G.; McGee, K.; Doukas, M. P.; Roman, D. C.

    2004-12-01

    In early July 2004 the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) detected a pronounced increase in seismic activity beneath the summit of Mount Spurr volcano that continues at present. From 1 July through 31 August 2004, AVO located 1094 Volcano-Tectonic (VT) earthquakes and 177 Long-Period (LP) events within 12 km of the volcano's summit, although many events classified as VT contained mixed frequencies. The largest event has a magnitude of 1.6 and hypocentral depths generally range from 0 to 5 km below sea-level. The cumulative seismic moment for July - August 2004 is 5x10**13 Nm. Focal mechanisms of located events in July and August 2004 are dominated by normal faulting, which is consistent with what has been observed beneath the summit since 1984. This seismicity rate is the highest observed at Mount Spurr since the conclusion of the 1992 eruption sequence. Seismicity in 2004 differs markedly from that observed prior to the eruptions in 1992 in that almost all hypocenters are concentrated beneath the volcano's summit vent and not the historically active Crater Peak vent, site of eruptions in 1953 and 1992. Analysis of AVO earthquake catalogs suggests anomalous seismicity may have begun as early as 20 October 2002 with a prominent swarm of 60 VT earthquakes (Mmax = 2.4) located roughly 2 km west of the volcano's summit. Smaller increases in the shallow seismicity rates were also noted between July and November 2003 and beginning in February 2004. These events ranged in depth between 0 and 4 km below sea-level. A subtle increase of deep LP events was also detected beginning in July 2003 and peaking in June 2004, immediately prior to the onset of strong shallow seismicity. These events concentrate about 4 km to the southeast of Crater Peak, generally range in depth from 20 to 35 km and occur at a rate of 2 to 4 located events per month. Associated with the 2004 seismic activity AVO has also observed anomalous melting and disruption of the summit ice cap that began in late

  13. Volcanic eruptions, hazardous ash clouds and visualization tools for accessing real-time infrared remote sensing data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webley, P.; Dehn, J.; Dean, K. G.; Macfarlane, S.

    2010-12-01

    Volcanic eruptions are a global hazard, affecting local infrastructure, impacting airports and hindering the aviation community, as seen in Europe during Spring 2010 from the Eyjafjallajokull eruption in Iceland. Here, we show how remote sensing data is used through web-based interfaces for monitoring volcanic activity, both ground based thermal signals and airborne ash clouds. These ‘web tools’, http://avo.images.alaska.edu/, provide timely availability of polar orbiting and geostationary data from US National Aeronautics and Space Administration, National Oceanic and Atmosphere Administration and Japanese Meteorological Agency satellites for the North Pacific (NOPAC) region. This data is used operationally by the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) for monitoring volcanic activity, especially at remote volcanoes and generates ‘alarms’ of any detected volcanic activity and ash clouds. The webtools allow the remote sensing team of AVO to easily perform their twice daily monitoring shifts. The web tools also assist the National Weather Service, Alaska and Kamchatkan Volcanic Emergency Response Team, Russia in their operational duties. Users are able to detect ash clouds, measure the distance from the source, area and signal strength. Within the web tools, there are 40 x 40 km datasets centered on each volcano and a searchable database of all acquired data from 1993 until present with the ability to produce time series data per volcano. Additionally, a data center illustrates the acquired data across the NOPAC within the last 48 hours, http://avo.images.alaska.edu/tools/datacenter/. We will illustrate new visualization tools allowing users to display the satellite imagery within Google Earth/Maps, and ArcGIS Explorer both as static maps and time-animated imagery. We will show these tools in real-time as well as examples of past large volcanic eruptions. In the future, we will develop the tools to produce real-time ash retrievals, run volcanic ash dispersion

  14. Electrocortical Activity and Operator Workload: A Comparison of Changes in the Electroencephalogram and in Event-Related Potentials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-06-01

    8217NOR KLOAM_ F0LLOW FL:𔃽R T CO’.I,.’..DS ANID ’ VOIO THREATS I FOLLow rLIGHT I COMMAND, AVO :[,--- FDLI.OW FILIGHT COMMANDS -k’vD AVOID THREAMS...WCRKLOAD JUc 242 9 2685 5.35 TEST SESSION I TESI SE,10tW’ 2 5.30 - 4k 5.25 - BAND "- z 5.20 - z 5.15 - 5.10 X 5.05- V-0 > ,/ " ?.,0 a BAND z UJ p- 2.25 -J

  15. Feasibility study of simultaneous pre-stack inversion for Miocene clastic gas reservoirs in the Ulleung Basin, Offshore Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jun, J.; Lee, H.; Lim, S.; Shin, K.; Choi, B.

    2016-12-01

    DHIs are effective hydrocarbon exploration tools when they are properly calibrated with reservoir properties in a specific exploration area. Nevertheless, they can't always lead us to the success of exploration. This study discusses the effectiveness of DHIs in the Ulleung Basin, offshore Korea. Backarc opening caused by oblique subduction of the Pacific plate resulted in the multi-stage evolutions of the basin including NNE-SSW trending strike-slip movement in this region and caused highly complex structures. Most of HC explorations are targeting the deltaic sandstones intercalated with shales deposited during the Miocene. In those geological conditions, it is necessary to select an appropriate approach to indicate gas presences. During the last 30 years, gas exploration using DHIs have been conducted in this basin. Seismic amplitude anomalies and AVO Class III behaviors for Miocene clastic gas reservoirs are typically observed on 2D/3D seismic data. However, it has been proved that they are insufficient to indicate the gas reservoir. To find a more reliable DHI for gas presences, a simultaneous pre-stack inversion is conducted and AVO response is analyzed for the comparison. 3D Pre-STM gathers over the area of interest and two wells are used for inversion processes. The other two wells are used for the blind test to verify the inversion algorithm. Inversion attributes are estimated and cross-plotted to separate the gas-bearing sandstone from shale or brine sandstone based on the petrophysical analysis. As a result, it is clarified as below; The AVO analysis in this region has potential pitfalls caused by heterogeneities of porosity, mineralogy, cementation, compaction or other rock properties corresponding to the highly complex structures. It is assumed that those may give rise to AVO responses that mask fluid effects. Simultaneous pre-stack inversion plays a role as a notable DHI for Miocene clastic sandstone reservoirs in the Ulleung Basin. The gas saturated

  16. Quantitative seismic reservoir characterization of tight sands (granite wash) play at Stiles Ranch field in the Anadarko Basin, Texas (USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durrani, Muhammad Zahid Afzal

    The main objective of this study is to conduct quantitative seismic reservoir characterization study of the Granite Wash (Marmaton-tight sand) play at Stiles Ranch field in the Anadarko Basin, Texas (USA). The proposed methodology incorporates seismic petrophysics, rock physics, Amplitude Variation with Offset (AVO) analysis and seismic pre-stack simultaneous elastic impedance inversion. In addition, it utilizes geostatistical technique to improve the reservoir property estimation and quantify uncertainty in seismic lithology and fluid prediction. The general objective encompasses several more specific goals to study: well data conditioning and prediction of essential petrophysical properties (e.g., porosity, permeability and saturation), and their relationship to the elastic properties. Due to the multidisciplinary nature of seismic petrophysics, only three core aspects are focused on that cover the desired objectives: 1) porosity modeling, 2) shear wave prediction, and (3) fluid substitution. The rock types are characterized by Rock Physics Diagnostic (RPD) approach conducted on well log data calibrated with core data and thin sections. The Granite Wash reservoir elastic properties are upscaled from log to seismic scale using Backus averaging to obtain a more coarsely (upscaled) sampled data set equivalent to the seismic scale. Anisotropy parametric (epsilon, gamma and delta) log curves are estimated consistent with seismic measurements using rock properties, seismic velocity and clay volume (Vsh) as a function of depth. The reservoir elastic properties are related to both the depositional environment and burial history through rock physics depth trends as function of depth. Furthermore, based on the practical aspects two separate inversion approaches; AVO and Elastic Impedance (EI) are evaluated prior to their application to real seismic. Various AVO derived attribute volumes such as intercept (A), gradient (B) and reflection coefficients (scaled Poisson's ratio

  17. Status of the VOTech Design Study about User Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolensky, M.; Pierfederici, F.; Allen, M.; Boch, T.; Bonnarel, F.; Derrière, S.; Fernique, P.; Noddle, K.; Smareglia, R.

    2006-07-01

    The VOTech design study on future tools started in spring 2005. This project, co-funded by the EC, produces design documents and software prototypes for new VO-compliant end-user tools. It is based on the experience and feedback of precursor projects and on input from the scientific user community. This status report details a number of early deliverables available from the project pages wiki.eurovotech.org, section DS4. This includes a summary of existing tools, desired future tools as derived from the AVO SRM, requirements for a cross matcher, a simple method for transferring instrumental footprints, use cases for simulations and the evaluation of various technologies.

  18. Myocardial recovery after hypothermic arrest: a comparison of oxygenated crystalloid to blood cardioplegia. The role of calcium.

    PubMed

    Heitmiller, R F; DeBoer, L W; Geffin, G A; Toal, K W; Fallon, J T; Drop, L J; Teplick, R S; O'Keefe, D D; Daggett, W M

    1985-09-01

    We compared multidose crystalloid hyperkalemic cardioplegic solutions with and without added red cells in 24 canine hearts subjected to 5 hr of arrest at 10 degrees C. All cardioplegic solutions were fully oxygenated at 4 degrees C before delivery. Since blood cardioplegia contained Ca++ carried over with the red cells, Ca++ was added to the crystalloid solution in one group. The table below shows the hematocrit (HCT) and ionized Ca++ concentrations of the cardioplegic solutions, and coronary arteriovenous oxygen difference during infusion of cardioplegic solution (AVO2) (ml O2/100 ml). Recovery during reperfusion is shown as percent of prearrest left ventricular function (LVF) and prearrest myocardial ATP concentration.

  19. Predicting and validating the tracking of a Volcanic Ash Cloud during the 2006 Eruption of Mt. Augustine Volcano

    SciTech Connect

    Webley, Peter W.; Atkinson, D.; Collins, Richard L.; Dean, K.; Fochesatto, J.; Sassen, Kenneth; Cahill, Catherine F.; Prata, A.; Flynn, Connor J.; Mizutani, K.

    2008-11-01

    On 11 January 2006, Mount Augustine volcano in southern Alaska began erupting after 20-year repose. The Anchorage Forecast Office of the National Weather Service (NWS) issued an advisory on 28 January for Kodiak City. On 31 January, Alaska Airlines cancelled all flights to and from Anchorage after multiple advisories from the NWS for Anchorage and the surrounding region. The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) had reported the onset of the continuous eruption. AVO monitors the approximately 100 active volcanoes in the Northern Pacific. Ash clouds from these volcanoes can cause serious damage to an aircraft and pose a serious threat to the local communities, and to transcontinental air traffic throughout the Arctic and sub-Arctic region. Within AVO, a dispersion model has been developed to track the dispersion of volcanic ash clouds. The model, Puff, was used operational by AVO during the Augustine eruptive period. Here, we examine the dispersion of a volcanic ash cloud from Mount Augustine across Alaska from 29 January through the 2 February 2006. We present the synoptic meteorology, the Puff predictions, and measurements from aerosol samplers, laser radar (or lidar) systems, and satellites. UAF aerosol samplers revealed the presence of volcanic aerosols at the surface at sites where Puff predicted the ash clouds movement. Remote sensing satellite data showed the development of the ash cloud in close proximity to the volcano and a sulfur-dioxide cloud further from the volcano consistent with the Puff predictions. Lidars showed the presence of volcanic aerosol with consistent characteristics aloft over Alaska and were capable of detecting the aerosol, even in the presence of scattered clouds and where the cloud is too thin/disperse to be detected by remote sensing satellite data. The lidar measurements revealed the different trajectories of ash consistent with the Puff predictions. Dispersion models provide a forecast of volcanic ash cloud movement that might be

  20. Procurements by the Non-Acoustic Anti-Submarine Warfare Program Through the Environmental Technologies Laboratory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-06-14

    Audit Program Director, (703) 692-3179 (DSN 222-3179), or Ms. Kimberley A. Caprio , Audit Project Manager, (703) 692-3024 (DSN 222-3024). Copies of the...LITY. ASN (RD&AVO IAFX &A DEPUTYr ASS ISTANV SECRE’TAY OF TE9E Allh FORCE (CONTFOAC.TIN1) , SAF/AQC DI ±T rPHOC.IrJTýfl4Ew T LICY. AS!-, RMi1 I.,70 SAZWI...Stephenson Kimberley A. Caprio Stephanie F. Mandel Ira C. Gebler Lisa M. Waller Velma L. Booker

  1. Catalog of earthquake hypocenters at Alaskan volcanoes: January 1 through December 31, 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dixon, James P.; Stihler, Scott D.; Power, John A.; Tytgat, Guy; Estes, Steve; McNutt, Stephen R.

    2006-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO), a cooperative program of the U.S. Geological Survey, the Geophysical Institute of the University of Alaska Fairbanks, and the Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys, has maintained seismic monitoring networks at historically active volcanoes in Alaska since 1988 (Figure 1). The primary objectives of the seismic program are the real-time seismic monitoring of active, potentially hazardous, Alaskan volcanoes and the investigation of seismic processes associated with active volcanism. This catalog presents calculated earthquake hypocenters and seismic phase arrival data, and details changes in the seismic monitoring program for the period January 1 through December 31, 2005.The AVO seismograph network was used to monitor the seismic activity at thirty-two volcanoes within Alaska in 2005 (Figure 1). The network was augmented by two new subnetworks to monitor the Semisopochnoi Island volcanoes and Little Sitkin Volcano. Seismicity at these volcanoes was still being studied at the end of 2005 and has not yet been added to the list of permanently monitored volcanoes in the AVO weekly update. Following an extended period of monitoring to determine the background seismicity at the Mount Peulik, Ukinrek Maars, and Korovin Volcano, formal monitoring of these volcanoes began in 2005. AVO located 9,012 earthquakes in 2005.Monitoring highlights in 2005 include: (1) seismicity at Mount Spurr remaining above background, starting in February 2004, through the end of the year and into 2006; (2) an increase in seismicity at Augustine Volcano starting in May 2005, and continuing through the end of the year into 2006; (3) volcanic tremor and seismicity related to low-level strombolian activity at Mount Veniaminof in January to March and September; and (4) a seismic swarm at Tanaga Volcano in October and November.This catalog includes: (1) descriptions and locations of seismic instrumentation deployed in the field in 2005; (2) a

  2. A study aid for seismic data interpretation and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seok, R.; Lee, Y.; Lee, B.; Lee, G.

    2011-12-01

    We present the workflow for 3-D seismic data interpretation and analysis that is routinely performed throughout the exploration phase in the industry. The workflow is used as a study aid for the first-year graduate students in the Department of Energy Resources Engineering at Pukyong National University, Busan, Korea. The data used in this work consist of 3-D seismic and well-log data from the Sooner field, Colorado, USA and 2-D and 3-D seismic data from the Penobscot surveys carried out in the Scotian shelf, Canada. The Sooner field data are part of the tutorial data sets of Kingdom Suite° which was used for data interpretation and mapping. The Penobscot data are available from the OpendTect°'s website. OpendTect° was used for seismic attribute generation and Hampson-Russell° was used for amplitude variation with offset (AVO) analysis and inversion. The workflow includes: (1) structural interpretation and mapping and 3-D visualization; (2) time-depth conversion; (3) (sequence) stratigraphic analysis; (4) attribute analysis and 3-D visualization; (5) quantitative analysis (e.g., AVO, inversion); and (6) volumetric calculations.

  3. Testing and Adapting a Daytime Four Band Satellite Ash Detection Algorithm for Eruptions in Alaska and the Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrup-Henriksen, G.; Skoog, R. A.

    2007-12-01

    Volcanic ash is detectable from satellite remote sensing due to the differences in spectral signatures compared to meteorological clouds. Recently a new global daytime ash detection algorithm was developed at University of Madison, Wisconsin. The algorithm is based on four spectral bands with the central wavelengths 0.65, 3.75, 11 and 12 micrometers that are common on weather satellite sensors including MODIS, AVHRR, GOES and MTSAT. The initial development of the algorithm was primarily based on MODIS data with global coverage. We have tested it using three years of AVHRR data in Alaska and the Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia. All the AVHRR data have been manually analyzed and recorded into an observational database during the daily monitoring performed by the remote sensing group at the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO). By taking the manual observations as accurate we were able to examine the accuracy of the four-channel algorithm for daytime data. The results were also compared to the current automated ash alarm used by AVO, based on the reverse absorption technique, also known as the split window method, with a threshold of -1.7K. This comparison indicates that the four- banded technique has a higher sensitivity to volcanic ash, but a greater number of false alarms. The algorithm was modified to achieve a false alarm rate comparable to current ash alarm while still maintaining increased sensitivity.

  4. State-of-the-art mass determination of 28Si spheres for the Avogadro project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picard, A.; Barat, P.; Borys, M.; Firlus, M.; Mizushima, S.

    2011-04-01

    For a new determination of the Avogadro constant to play a role in the future redefinition and realization of the mass unit, the mass measurements involved need to be carried out at a very high level of accuracy. From a mass comparison among two 1 kg 28Si spheres and the 1 kg platinum-iridium (Pt/Ir) mass standards, the mass of the spheres must be determined with a combined standard uncertainty of less than 5 µg. The BIPM, the PTB and the NMIJ have carried out such a state-of-the-art mass comparison in air and under vacuum in order to reach this target set by the International Avogadro Coordination (IAC). The results obtained for the spheres AVO28-S5 and AVO28-S8 involved in the comparison have demonstrated that by using air buoyancy artefacts and sorption artefacts it is possible to achieve a relative uncertainty of 4.1 × 10-9. The reference value for each sphere has been determined, taking into account the traceability of the masses to the International Prototype of the kilogram, { K} , in due consideration of the correlations among 17 standards used directly or indirectly in this comparison.

  5. NON-INVASIVE DETERMINATION OF THE LOCATION AND DISTRIBUTION OF FREE-PHASE DENSE NONAQUEOUS PHASE LIQUIDS (DNAPL) BY SEISMIC REFLECTION TECHNIQUES

    SciTech Connect

    Michael G. Waddell; William J. Domoracki; Tom J. Temples; Jerome Eyer

    2001-05-01

    The Earth Sciences and Resources Institute, University of South Carolina is conducting a 14 month proof of concept study to determine the location and distribution of subsurface Dense Nonaqueous Phase Liquid (DNAPL) carbon tetrachloride (CCl{sub 4}) contamination at the 216-Z-9 crib, 200 West area, Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site, Washington by use of two-dimensional high resolution seismic reflection surveys and borehole geophysical data. The study makes use of recent advances in seismic reflection amplitude versus offset (AVO) technology to directly detect the presence of subsurface DNAPL. The techniques proposed are a noninvasive means towards site characterization and direct free-phase DNAPL detection. This report covers the results of Task 3 and change of scope of Tasks 4-6. Task 1 contains site evaluation and seismic modeling studies. The site evaluation consists of identifying and collecting preexisting geological and geophysical information regarding subsurface structure and the presence and quantity of DNAPL. The seismic modeling studies were undertaken to determine the likelihood that an AVO response exists and its probable manifestation. Task 2 is the design and acquisition of 2-D seismic reflection data designed to image areas of probable high concentration of DNAPL. Task 3 is the processing and interpretation of the 2-D data. Task 4, 5, and 6 were designing, acquiring, processing, and interpretation of a three dimensional seismic survey (3D) at the Z-9 crib area at 200 west area, Hanford.

  6. Interoperability in the CDS services.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genova, F.; Allen, M.; Bonnarel, F.; Boch, T.; Derriere, S.; Egret, D.; Fernique, P.; Ochsenbein, F.; Schaaff, A.; Wenger, M.

    2002-12-01

    The Astrophysical Virtual Observatory Project (PI: P. Quinn, ESO) has three Work Areas: Science case (P. Benvenuti, ST-ECF), Interoperability (F. Genova, CDS) and Advanced technologies (A. Lawrence, AstroGrid). The development of an Interoperability prototype, implementing a set of European archives into VizieR and Aladin, in collaboration with all the AVO partners, has been a first-year milestone of the AVO. Interoperability standards are widely discussed in all VO projects, and in the Interoperability Working Group first set by the European OPTICON Network. They are a main topic of the International Virtual Observatory Alliance. Specific developments and customizations have been integrated in SIMBAD, VizieR and Aladin. The adopted VOTable standard is used for the exchange of tabular data, and a VOTable parser, able to give rapidly access to tables containing large numbers of objects, has been developed. The categorization of column contents in VizieR tables and catalogues has lead to the definition of the Uniform Content Descriptors (UCDs). The UCDs have proven very powerful for building new functionalities such as checking of table contents, catalogue selection (e.g. finding tables which contain specific information item), filtering (e.g. visualizing, through Aladin, objects of a specific magnitude or colour range) and data transformation and combination (e.g. computing a colour index).

  7. A new 28Si single crystal: counting the atoms for the new kilogram definition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartl, G.; Becker, P.; Beckhoff, B.; Bettin, H.; Beyer, E.; Borys, M.; Busch, I.; Cibik, L.; D'Agostino, G.; Darlatt, E.; Di Luzio, M.; Fujii, K.; Fujimoto, H.; Fujita, K.; Kolbe, M.; Krumrey, M.; Kuramoto, N.; Massa, E.; Mecke, M.; Mizushima, S.; Müller, M.; Narukawa, T.; Nicolaus, A.; Pramann, A.; Rauch, D.; Rienitz, O.; Sasso, C. P.; Stopic, A.; Stosch, R.; Waseda, A.; Wundrack, S.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, X. W.

    2017-10-01

    A new single crystal from isotopically enriched silicon was used to determine the Avogadro constant N A by the x-ray-crystal density method. The new crystal, named Si28-23Pr11, has a higher enrichment than the former ‘AVO28’ crystal allowing a smaller uncertainty of the molar mass determination. Again, two 1 kg spheres were manufactured from this crystal. The crystal and the spheres were measured with improved and new methods. One sphere, Si28kg01a, was measured at NMIJ and PTB with very consistent results. The other sphere, Si28kg01b, was measured only at PTB and yielded nearly the same Avogadro constant value. The mean result for both 1 kg spheres is N A  =  6.022 140 526(70)  ×  1023 mol-1 with a relative standard uncertainty of 1.2  ×  10-8. This value deviates from the Avogadro value published in 2015 for the AVO28 crystal by about 3.9(2.1)  ×  10-8. Possible reasons for this difference are discussed and additional measurements are proposed.

  8. Performance comparison of streak camera recording systems

    SciTech Connect

    Derzon, M.; Barber, T.

    1995-07-01

    Streak camera based diagnostics are vital to the inertial confinement fusion program at Sandia National Laboratories. Performance characteristics of various readout systems coupled to an EGG-AVO streak camera were analyzed and compared to scaling estimates. The purpose of the work was to determine the limits of the streak camera performance and the optimal fielding conditions for the Amador Valley Operations (AVO) streak camera systems. The authors measured streak camera limitations in spatial resolution and sensitivity. Streak camera limits on spatial resolution are greater than 18 lp/mm at 4% contrast. However, it will be difficult to make use of any resolution greater than this because of high spatial frequency variation in the photocathode sensitivity. They have measured a signal to noise of 3,000 with 0.3 mW/cm{sup 2} of 830 nm light at a 10 ns/mm sweep speed. They have compared lens coupling systems with and without micro-channel plate intensifiers and systems using film or charge coupled device (CCD) readout. There were no conditions where film was found to be an improvement over the CCD readout. Systems utilizing a CCD readout without an intensifier have comparable resolution, for these source sizes and at a nominal cost in signal to noise of 3, over those with an intensifier. Estimates of the signal-to-noise for different light coupling methods show how performance can be improved.

  9. Three-dimensional P-wave velocity structure and precise earthquake relocation at Great Sitkin Volcano, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pesicek, Jeremy; Thurber, Clifford H.; DeShon, Heather R.; Prejean, Stephanie G.; Zhang, Haijiang

    2008-01-01

    Waveform cross-correlation with bispectrum verification is combined with double-difference tomography to increase the precision of earthquake locations and constrain regional 3D P-wave velocity heterogeneity at Great Sitkin volcano, Alaska. From 1999 through 2005, the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) recorded ∼1700 earthquakes in the vicinity of Great Sitkin, including two ML 4.3 earthquakes that are among the largest events in the AVO catalog. The majority of earthquakes occurred during 2002 and formed two temporally and spatially separate event sequences. The first sequence began on 17 March 2002 and was centered ∼20 km west of the volcano. The second sequence occurred on the southeast flank of Great Sitkin and began 28 May 2002. It was preceded by two episodes of volcanic tremor. Earthquake relocations of this activity on the southeast flank define a vertical planar feature oriented radially from the summit and in the direction of the assumed regional maximum compressive stress due to convergence along the Alaska subduction zone. This swarm may have been caused or accompanied by the emplacement of a dike. Relocations of the mainshock–aftershock sequence occurring west of Great Sitkin are consistent with rupture on a strike-slip fault. Tomographic images support the presence of a vertically dipping fault striking parallel to the direction of convergence in this region. The remaining catalog hypocenters relocate along discrete features beneath the volcano summit; here, low P-wave velocities possibly indicate the presence of magma beneath the volcano.

  10. Carbonate reservoir characterization using seismic velocity and amplitude variation with offset analysis: Hardeman basin, Texas, test case

    SciTech Connect

    Pigott, J.D.; Shrestha, R.K. ); Warwick, R.A. )

    1991-03-01

    Mississippian bioherms in the Hardeman basin, Texas, produce from dolomitized mud cores with porosities that can vary from 10 to 40%. These carbonate buildups, though often similar in seismic reflector boundary configuration, can vary remarkably in reservoir quality (e.g., porosity) owing to diagenesis. However, imaging these lateral variations of porosity and determining the reservoir pressure is possible with detailed seismic velocity control and amplitude variation with offset (AVO) analysis. The investigated 24-fold seismic profile was acquired by four Vibroseis trucks in the Hardeman basin across two bioherms, one oil-productive and other tight and water-filled. Detailed stacking velocity analyses on the relative amplitude processed line directly delineate areas of increasing and decreasing gross porosity and dramatically differentiate the two mounds. Moreover, the detailed velocity analyses help provide a more accurate stacked section with resultant better definition of the external mound configuration. Analysis of available laboratory compressional and shear wave velocity data for carbonate rocks reveal that Young's modulus in carbonates is a function of porosity and differential pressure. Comparison of the derived Young's modulus from an inversion of the AVO data for the unstacked line with the experimental laboratory data yield porosity and differential pressure estimates over the productive bioherm which are within 18% and 15%, respectively, of those observed in the borehole.

  11. Prazosin induces p53-mediated autophagic cell death in H9C2 cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi-Fan; Wu, Chau-Chung; Chen, Wen-Pin; Chen, Yuh-Lien; Su, Ming-Jai

    2011-08-01

    Prazosin, a quinazoline-based α(1)-adrenoceptor antagonist, is known to induce cell death, and this effect is independent of its α-blockade activity. However, the detailed molecular mechanisms involved are still not fully understood. In this study, we found that prazosin, but not doxazosin, could induce patterns of autophagy in H9C2 cells, including intracellular vacuole formation, microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3) conversion, and acidic vesicular organelle (AVO) augmentation. Western blot analysis of phosphorylated proteins showed that exposure to prazosin increased the levels of phospho-p53 and phospho-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) but dramatically decreased the levels of phospho-mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), phospho-protein kinase B (Akt), and phospho-ribosomal protein S6 kinase (p70S6K). Furthermore, although pretreatments with the pharmacological autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine and the p53 inhibitor pifithrin-α suppressed prazosin-induced AVO formation, they did not reverse prazosin-induced decline in cell viability but enhanced prazosin-induced caspase-3 activation. From these results we suggest that prazosin induces autophagic cell death via a p53-mediated mechanism. When the autophagy pathway was inhibited, prazosin still induced programmed cell death, at least in part through apoptotic caspase-3 cascade enhancement. Thus, our results indicate a potential new target in prazosin-induced cell death.

  12. The induction of apoptosis and autophagy by Wasabia japonica extract in colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Hsuan, Shu-Wen; Chyau, Charng-Cherng; Hung, Hsiao-Yu; Chen, Jing-Hsien; Chou, Fen-Pi

    2016-03-01

    Wasabia japonica (wasabi) has been shown to exhibit properties of detoxification, anti-inflammation and the induction of apoptosis in cancer cells. This study aimed to investigate the molecular mechanism of the cytotoxicity of wasabi extract (WE) in colon cancer cells to evaluate the potential of wasabi as a functional food for chemoprevention. Colo 205 cells were treated with different doses of WE, and the cytotoxicity was analyzed by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide. Apoptosis and autophagy were detected by 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole, 5,5',6,6'-tetrachloro-1,1',3,3'-tetraethyl-imidacarbo-yanine iodide and staining for acidic vascular organelles (AVOs), along with Western blotting. The results demonstrated that WE induced the extrinsic pathway and mitochondrial death machinery through the activation of TNF-α, Fas-L, caspases, truncated Bid and cytochrome C. WE also induced autophagy by decreasing the phosphorylation of Akt and mTOR and promoting the expression of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3-II and AVO formation. An in vivo xenograft model verified that tumor growth was delayed by WE treatment. Our studies revealed that WE exhibits anti-colon cancer properties through the induction of apoptosis and autophagy. These results provide support for the application of WE as a chemopreventive functional food and as a prospective treatment of colon cancer.

  13. Sulfasalazine induces autophagic cell death in oral cancer cells via Akt and ERK pathways.

    PubMed

    Han, Hye-Yeon; Kim, Hyungwoo; Jeong, Sung-Hee; Lim, Do-Seon; Ryu, Mi Heon

    2014-01-01

    Sulfasalazine (SSZ) is an anti-inflammatory drug that has been used to treat inflammatory bowel disease and rheumatoid arthritis for decades. Recently, some reports have suggested that SSZ also has anti-cancer properties against human tumors. However, little is known about the effects of SSZ on oral cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate the anti-cancer effects of SSZ in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cells and to elucidate the mechanisms involved. The authors investigated the anti-proliferative effect of SSZ using the MTT method in HSC-4 cells (an OSCC cell line). Cell cycle analysis, acidic vesicular organelle (AVO) staining, monodansylcadaverine (MDC) staining and Western blotting were also conducted to investigate the cytotoxic mechanism of SSZ. SSZ significantly inhibited the proliferation of HSC-4 cells in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, SSZ induced autophagic cell death, increased microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain (MAP1- LC; also known as LC) 3-II levels, as well as induced punctate AVO and MDC staining, resulted in autophagic cell death. Furthermore, these observations were accompanied by the inhibition of the Akt pathway and the activation of ERK pathway. These results suggest that SSZ promotes autophagic cell death via Akt and ERK pathways and has chemotherapeutic potential for the treatment of oral cancer.

  14. Evaluation of nanostructured lipid carriers (NLC) and nanoemulsions as carriers for UV-filters: characterization, in vitro penetration and photostability studies.

    PubMed

    Puglia, Carmelo; Damiani, Elisabetta; Offerta, Alessia; Rizza, Luisa; Tirendi, Giorgia Giusy; Tarico, Maria Stella; Curreri, Sergio; Bonina, Francesco; Perrotta, Rosario Emanuele

    2014-01-23

    The increased awareness of protection against UV radiation damages has led to a rise in the use of topically applied chemical sunscreen agents and to an increased need of innovative carriers designed to achieve the highest protective effect and reduce the toxicological risk resulting from the percutaneous absorption of these substances. In this paper, nanostructured lipid carriers (NLC) and nanoemulsions (NE) were formulated to optimize the topical application of different and widespread UVA or UVB sun filters (ethyl hexyltriazone (EHT), diethylamino hydroxybenzoyl hexyl benzoate (DHHB), bemotrizinol (Tinosorb S), octylmethoxycinnamate (OMC) and avobenzone (AVO)). The preparation and stability parameters of these nanocarriers have been investigated concerning particle size and zeta potential. The release pattern of the sunscreens from NLC and NE was evaluated in vitro, determining their percutaneous absorption through excised human skin. Additional in vitro studies were performed in order to evaluate, after UVA radiation treatment, the spectral stability of the sunfilters once formulated in NLC or NE. From the results obtained, when incorporated in NLC, the skin permeation abilities of the sun filter were drastically reduced, remaining mainly on the surface of the skin. The photostability studies showed that EHT, DHHB and Tinosorb S still retain their photostability when incorporated in these carriers, while OMC and AVO were not photostable as expected. However, no significant differences in terms of photoprotective efficacy between the two carriers were observed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. SEISMIC EVALUATION OF HYDROCARBON SATURATION IN DEEP-WATER RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Batzle; D-h Han; R. Gibson; Huw James

    2005-08-12

    We are now entering the final stages of our ''Seismic Evaluation of Hydrocarbon Saturation in Deep-Water Reservoirs'' project (Grant/Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-02NT15342). We have now developed several techniques to help distinguish economic hydrocarbon deposits from false ''Fizz'' gas signatures. These methods include using the proper in situ rock and fluid properties, evaluating interference effects on data, and doing better constrained inversions for saturations. We are testing these techniques now on seismic data from several locations in the Gulf of Mexico. In addition, we are examining the use of seismic attenuation as indicated by frequency shifts below potential reservoirs. During this quarter we have: Began our evaluation of our latest data set over the Neptune Field; Developed software for computing composite reflection coefficients; Designed and implemented stochastic turbidite reservoir models; Produced software & work flow to improve frequency-dependent AVO analysis; Developed improved AVO analysis for data with low signal-to-noise ratio; and Examined feasibility of detecting fizz gas using frequency attenuation. Our focus on technology transfer continues, both by generating numerous presentations for the upcoming SEG annual meeting, and by beginning our planning for our next DHI minisymposium next spring.

  16. Hibiscus sabdariffa leaf polyphenolic extract induces human melanoma cell death, apoptosis, and autophagy.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Chun-Tang; Hsuan, Shu-Wen; Lin, Hui-Hsuan; Hsu, Cheng-Chin; Chou, Fen-Pi; Chen, Jing-Hsien

    2015-03-01

    Melanoma is the least common but most fatal form of skin cancer. Previous studies have indicated that an aqueous extract of Hibiscus sabdariffa leaves possess hypoglycemic, hypolipidemic, and antioxidant effects. In this study, we want to investigate the anticancer activity of Hibiscus leaf polyphenolic (HLP) extract in melanoma cells. First, HLP was exhibited to be rich in epicatechin gallate (ECG) and other polyphenols. Apoptotic and autophagic activities of HLP and ECG were further evaluated by DAPI stain, cell-cycle analysis, and acidic vascular organelle (AVO) stain. Our results revealed that both HLP and ECG induced the caspases cleavages, Bcl-2 family proteins regulation, and Fas/FasL activation in A375 cells. In addition, we also revealed that the cells presented AVO-positive after HLP treatments. HLP could increase the expressions of autophagy-related proteins autophagy-related gene 5 (ATG5), Beclin1, and light chain 3-II (LC3-II), and induce autophagic cell death in A375 cells. These data indicated that the anticancer effect of HLP, partly contributed by ECG, in A375 cells. HLP potentially could be developed as an antimelanoma agent. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  17. Catalog of earthquake hypocenters at Alaskan volcanoes: January 1 through December 31, 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dixon, James P.; Stihler, Scott D.; Power, John A.; Searcy, Cheryl K.

    2010-01-01

    Between January 1 and December 31, 2009, the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) located 8,829 earthquakes, of which 7,438 occurred within 20 kilometers of the 33 volcanoes with seismograph subnetworks. Monitoring highlights in 2009 include the eruption of Redoubt Volcano, as well as unrest at Okmok Caldera, Shishaldin Volcano, and Mount Veniaminof. Additionally severe seismograph subnetwork outages resulted in four volcanoes (Aniakchak, Fourpeaked, Korovin, and Veniaminof) being removed from the formal list of monitored volcanoes in late 2009. This catalog includes descriptions of: (1) locations of seismic instrumentation deployed during 2009; (2) earthquake detection, recording, analysis, and data archival systems; (3) seismic velocity models used for earthquake locations; (4) a summary of earthquakes located in 2009; and (5) an accompanying UNIX tar-file with a summary of earthquake origin times, hypocenters, magnitudes, phase arrival times, location quality statistics, daily station usage statistics, all files used to determine the earthquake locations in 2009, and a dataless SEED volume for the AVO seismograph network.

  18. Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Russia: preventing the danger of volcanic eruptions to aviation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girina, O.; Neal, Ch.

    2012-04-01

    The Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT) has been a collaborative project of scientists from the Institute of Volcanology and Seismology, the Kamchatka Branch of Geophysical Surveys, and the Alaska Volcano Observatory (IVS, KB GS and AVO). The purpose of KVERT is to reduce the risk of costly, damaging, and possibly deadly encounters of aircraft with volcanic ash clouds. To reduce this risk, KVERT collects all possible volcanic information and issues eruption alerts to aviation and other emergency officials. KVERT was founded by Institute of Volcanic Geology and Geochemistry FED RAS in 1993 (in 2004, IVGG merged with the Institute of Volcanology to become IVS). KVERT analyzes volcano monitoring data (seismic, satellite, visual and video, and pilot reports), assigns the Aviation Color Code, and issues reports on eruptive activity and unrest at Kamchatkan (since 1993) and Northern Kurile (since 2003) volcanoes. KVERT receives seismic monitoring data from KB GS (the Laboratory for Seismic and Volcanic Activity). KB GS maintains telemetered seismic stations to investigate 11 of the most active volcanoes in Kamchatka. Data are received around the clock and analysts evaluate data each day for every monitored volcano. Satellite data are provided from several sources to KVERT. AVO conducts satellite analysis of the Kuriles, Kamchatka, and Alaska as part of it daily monitoring and sends the interpretation to KVERT staff. KVERT interprets MODIS and MTSAT images and processes AVHRR data to look for evidence of volcanic ash and thermal anomalies. KVERT obtains visual volcanic information from volcanologist's field trips, web-cameras that monitor Klyuchevskoy (established in 2000), Sheveluch (2002), Bezymianny (2003), Koryaksky (2009), Avachinsky (2009), Kizimen (2011), and Gorely (2011) volcanoes, and pilots. KVERT staff work closely with staff of AVO, AMC (Airport Meteorological Center) at Yelizovo Airport and the Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC), the

  19. Influence of exercise intensity on skeletal muscle blood flow, O2 extraction and O2 uptake on-kinetics.

    PubMed

    Jones, Andrew M; Krustrup, Peter; Wilkerson, Daryl P; Berger, Nicolas J; Calbet, José A; Bangsbo, Jens

    2012-09-01

    Following the start of low-intensity exercise in healthy humans, it has been established that the kinetics of skeletal muscle O(2) delivery is faster than, and does not limit, the kinetics of muscle O(2) uptake (V(O(2)(m))). Direct data are lacking, however, on the question of whether O(2) delivery might limit (V(O(2)(m))) kinetics during high-intensity exercise. Using multiple exercise transitions to enhance confidence in parameter estimation, we therefore investigated the kinetics of, and inter-relationships between, muscle blood flow (Q(m)), a-(V(O(2))) difference and (V(O(2)(m))) following the onset of low-intensity (LI) and high-intensity (HI) exercise. Seven healthy males completed four 6 min bouts of LI and four 6 min bouts of HI single-legged knee-extension exercise. Blood was frequently drawn from the femoral artery and vein during exercise and Q(m), a-(V(O(2))) difference and (V(O(2)(m))) were calculated and subsequently modelled using non-linear regression techniques. For LI, the fundamental component mean response time (MRT(p)) for Q(m) kinetics was significantly shorter than (V(O(2)(m))) kinetics (mean ± SEM, 18 ± 4 vs. 30 ± 4 s; P < 0.05), whereas for HI, the MRT(p) for Q(m) and (V(O(2)(m))) was not significantly different (27 ± 5 vs. 29 ± 4 s, respectively). There was no difference in the MRT(p) for either Q(m) or (V(O(2)(m))) between the two exercise intensities; however, the MRT(p)for a-(V(O(2)) difference was significantly shorter for HI compared with LI (17 ± 3 vs. 28 ± 4 s; P < 0.05). Excess O(2), i.e. oxygen not taken up (Q(m) x (V(O(2))), was significantly elevated within the first 5 s of exercise and remained unaltered thereafter, with no differences between LI and HI. These results indicate that bulk O(2) delivery does not limit (V(O(2)(m))) kinetics following the onset of LI or HI knee-extension exercise.

  20. Catalog of earthquake hypocenters at Alaskan volcanoes: January 1 through December 31, 2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dixon, James P.; Stihler, Scott D.; Power, John A.; Tytgat, Guy; Estes, Steve; Prejean, Stephanie; Sanchez, John J.; Sanches, Rebecca; McNutt, Stephen R.; Paskievitch, John

    2005-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO), a cooperative program of the U.S. Geological Survey, the Geophysical Institute of the University of Alaska Fairbanks, and the Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys, has maintained seismic monitoring networks at historically active volcanoes in Alaska since 1988. The primary objectives of the seismic program are the real-time seismic monitoring of active, potentially hazardous, Alaskan volcanoes and the investigation of seismic processes associated with active volcanism. This catalog presents the calculated earthquake hypocenter and phase arrival data, and changes in the seismic monitoring program for the period January 1 through December 31, 2004.These include Mount Wrangell, Mount Spurr, Redoubt Volcano, Iliamna Volcano, Augustine Volcano, Katmai volcanic cluster (Snowy Mountain, Mount Griggs, Mount Katmai, Novarupta, Trident Volcano, Mount Mageik, Mount Martin), Mount Peulik, Aniakchak Crater, Mount Veniaminof, Pavlof Volcano, Mount Dutton, Isanotski Peaks, Shishaldin Volcano, Fisher Caldera, Westdahl Peak, Akutan Peak, Makushin Volcano, Okmok Caldera, Great Sitkin Volcano, Kanaga Volcano, Tanaga Volcano, and Mount Gareloi. Over the past year, formal monitoring of Okmok, Tanaga and Gareloi were announced following an extended period of monitoring to determine the background seismicity at each volcanic center. The seismicity at Mount Peulik was still being studied at the end of 2004 and has yet to be added to the list of monitored volcanoes in the AVO weekly update. AVO located 6928 earthquakes in 2004.Monitoring highlights in 2004 include: (1) an earthquake swarm at Westdahl Peak in January; (2) an increase in seismicity at Mount Spurr starting in February continuing through the end of the year into 2005; (4) low-level tremor, and low-frequency events related to intermittent ash and steam emissions at Mount Veniaminof between April and October; (4) low-level tremor at Shishaldin Volcano between April and

  1. Catalog of earthquake hypocenters at Alaskan volcanoes: January 1 through December 31, 2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dixon, James P.; Stihler, Scott D.; Power, John A.; Tytgat, Guy; Moran, Seth C.; Sanchez, John J.; McNutt, Stephen R.; Estes, Steve; Paskievitch, John

    2004-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO), a cooperative program of the U.S. Geological Survey, the Geophysical Institute of the University of Alaska Fairbanks, and the Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys, has maintained seismic monitoring networks at historically active volcanoes in Alaska since 1988. The primary objectives of this program are the near real time seismic monitoring of active, potentially hazardous, Alaskan volcanoes and the investigation of seismic processes associated with active volcanism. This catalog presents the calculated earthquake hypocenter and phase arrival data, and changes in the seismic monitoring program for the period January 1 through December 31, 2003.The AVO seismograph network was used to monitor the seismic activity at twenty-seven volcanoes within Alaska in 2003. These include Mount Wrangell, Mount Spurr, Redoubt Volcano, Iliamna Volcano, Augustine Volcano, Katmai volcanic cluster (Snowy Mountain, Mount Griggs, Mount Katmai, Novarupta, Trident Volcano, Mount Mageik, Mount Martin), Aniakchak Crater, Mount Veniaminof, Pavlof Volcano, Mount Dutton, Isanotski Peaks, Shishaldin Volcano, Fisher Caldera, Westdahl Peak, Akutan Peak, Makushin Volcano, Okmok Caldera, Great Sitkin Volcano, Kanaga Volcano, Tanaga Volcano, and Mount Gareloi. Monitoring highlights in 2003 include: continuing elevated seismicity at Mount Veniaminof in January-April (volcanic unrest began in August 2002), volcanogenic seismic swarms at Shishaldin Volcano throughout the year, and low-level tremor at Okmok Caldera throughout the year. Instrumentation and data acquisition highlights in 2003 were the installation of subnetworks on Tanaga and Gareloi Islands, the installation of broadband installations on Akutan Volcano and Okmok Caldera, and the establishment of telemetry for the Okmok Caldera subnetwork. AVO located 3911 earthquakes in 2003.This catalog includes: (1) a description of instruments deployed in the field and their locations; (2) a

  2. Catalog of earthquake hypocenters at Alaskan volcanoes: January 1, 2000 through December 31, 2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dixon, James P.; Stihler, Scott D.; Power, John A.; Tytgat, Guy; Estes, Steve; Moran, Seth C.; Paskievitch, John; McNutt, Stephen R.

    2002-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO), a cooperative program of the U.S. Geological Survey, the Geophysical Institute of the University of Alaska Fairbanks, and the Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys, has maintained seismic monitoring networks at potentially active volcanoes in Alaska since 1988 (Power and others, 1993; Jolly and others, 1996; Jolly and others, 2001). The primary objectives of this program are the seismic surveillance of active, potentially hazardous, Alaskan volcanoes and the investigation of seismic processes associated with active volcanism. This catalog reflects the status and evolution of the seismic monitoring program, and presents the basic seismic data for the time period January 1, 2000, through December 31, 2001. For an interpretation of these data and previously recorded data, the reader should refer to several recent articles on volcano related seismicity on Alaskan volcanoes in Appendix G.The AVO seismic network was used to monitor twenty-three volcanoes in real time in 2000-2001. These include Mount Wrangell, Mount Spurr, Redoubt Volcano, Iliamna Volcano, Augustine Volcano, Katmai Volcanic Group (Snowy Mountain, Mount Griggs, Mount Katmai, Novarupta, Trident Volcano, Mount Mageik, Mount Martin), Aniakchak Crater, Pavlof Volcano, Mount Dutton, Isanotski Peaks, Shishaldin Volcano, Fisher Caldera, Westdahl Peak, Akutan Peak, Makushin Volcano, Great Sitkin Volcano, and Kanaga Volcano (Figure 1). AVO located 1551 and 1428 earthquakes in 2000 and 2001, respectively, on and around these volcanoes.Highlights of the catalog period (Table 1) include: volcanogenic seismic swarms at Shishaldin Volcano between January and February 2000 and between May and June 2000; an eruption at Mount Cleveland between February and May 2001; episodes of possible tremor at Makushin Volcano starting March 2001 and continuing through 2001, and two earthquake swarms at Great Sitkin Volcano in 2001.This catalog includes: (1) earthquake origin times

  3. Alaska - Russian Far East connection in volcano research and monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izbekov, P. E.; Eichelberger, J. C.; Gordeev, E.; Neal, C. A.; Chebrov, V. N.; Girina, O. A.; Demyanchuk, Y. V.; Rybin, A. V.

    2012-12-01

    The Kurile-Kamchatka-Alaska portion of the Pacific Rim of Fire spans for nearly 5400 km. It includes more than 80 active volcanoes and averages 4-6 eruptions per year. Resulting ash clouds travel for hundreds to thousands of kilometers defying political borders. To mitigate volcano hazard to aviation and local communities, the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) and the Institute of Volcanology and Seismology (IVS), in partnership with the Kamchatkan Branch of the Geophysical Survey of the Russian Academy of Sciences (KBGS), have established a collaborative program with three integrated components: (1) volcano monitoring with rapid information exchange, (2) cooperation in research projects at active volcanoes, and (3) volcanological field schools for students and young scientists. Cooperation in volcano monitoring includes dissemination of daily information on the state of volcanic activity in neighboring regions, satellite and visual data exchange, as well as sharing expertise and technologies between AVO and the Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT) and Sakhalin Volcanic Eruption Response Team (SVERT). Collaboration in scientific research is best illustrated by involvement of AVO, IVS, and KBGS faculty and graduate students in mutual international studies. One of the most recent examples is the NSF-funded Partnerships for International Research and Education (PIRE)-Kamchatka project focusing on multi-disciplinary study of Bezymianny volcano in Kamchatka. This international project is one of many that have been initiated as a direct result of a bi-annual series of meetings known as Japan-Kamchatka-Alaska Subduction Processes (JKASP) workshops that we organize together with colleagues from Hokkaido University, Japan. The most recent JKASP meeting was held in August 2011 in Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky and brought together more than 130 scientists and students from Russia, Japan, and the United States. The key educational component of our collaborative program

  4. Development of Alaska Volcano Observatory Seismic Networks, 1988-2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tytgat, G.; Paskievitch, J. F.; McNutt, S. R.; Power, J. A.

    2008-12-01

    The number and quality of seismic stations and networks on Alaskan volcanoes have increased dramatically in the 20 years from 1988 to 2008. Starting with 28 stations on six volcanoes in 1988, the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) now operates 194 stations in networks on 33 volcanoes spanning the 2000 km Aleutian Arc. All data are telemetered in real time to laboratory facilities in Fairbanks and Anchorage and recorded on digital acquisition systems. Data are used for both monitoring and research. The basic and standard network designs are driven by practical considerations including geography and terrain, access to commercial telecommunications services, and environmental vulnerability. Typical networks consist of 6 to 8 analog stations, whose data can be telemetered to fit on a single analog telephone circuit terminated ultimately in either Fairbanks or Anchorage. Towns provide access to commercial telecommunications and signals are often consolidated for telemetry by remote computer systems. Most AVO stations consist of custom made fiberglass huts that house the batteries, electronics, and antennae. Solar panels are bolted to the south facing side of the huts and the seismometers are buried nearby. The huts are rugged and have allowed for good station survivability and performance reliability. However, damage has occurred from wind, wind-blown pumice, volcanic ejecta, lightning, icing, and bears. Power is provided by multiple isolated banks of storage batteries charged by solar panels. Primary cells are used to provide backup power should the rechargable system fail or fall short of meeting the requirement. In the worst cases, snow loading blocks the solar panels for 7 months, so sufficient power storage must provide power for at least this long. Although primarily seismic stations, the huts and overall design allow additional instruments to be added, such as infrasound sensors, webcams, electric field meters, etc. Yearly maintenance visits are desirable, but some

  5. Seismic constraints on the nature of lower crustal reflectors beneath the extending Southern Transition Zone of the Colorado Plateau, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parsons, Thomas E.; Howie, John M.; Thompson, George A.

    1992-01-01

    We determine the reflection polarity and exploit variations in P and S wave reflectivity and P wave amplitude versus offset (AVO) to constrain the origin of lower crustal reflectivity observed on new three-component seismic data recorded across the structural transition of the Colorado Plateau. The near vertical incidence reflection data were collected by Stanford University in 1989 as part of the U.S. Geological Survey Pacific to Arizona Crustal Experiment that traversed the Arizona Transition Zone of the Colorado Plateau. The results of independent waveform modeling methods are consistent with much of the lower crustal reflectivity resulting from thin, high-impedance layers. The reflection polarity of the cleanest lower crustal events is positive, which implies that these reflections result from high-velocity contrasts, and the waveform character indicates that the reflectors are probably layers less than or approximately equal to 200 m thick. The lower crustal events are generally less reflective to incident S waves than to P waves, which agrees with the predicted behavior of high-velocity mafic layering. Analysis of the P wave AVO character of lower crustal reflections demonstrates that the events maintain a constant amplitude with offset, which is most consistent with a mafic-layering model. One exception is a high-amplitude (10 dB above background) event near the base of lower crustal reflectivity which abruptly decreases in amplitude at increasing offsets. The event has a pronounced S wave response, which along with its negative AVO trend is a possible indication of the presence of fluids in the lower crust. The Arizona Transition Zone is an active but weakly extended province, which causes us to discard models of lower crustal layering resulting from shearing because of the high degree of strain required to create such layers. Instead, we favor horizontal basaltic intrusions as the primary origin of high-impedance reflectors based on (1) The fact that

  6. Use of MODIS for volcanic eruption cloud detection, tracking, and measurement: Examples from the 2001 eruption of Cleveland volcano, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, D. J.; Prata, F. J.; Gu, Y.; Watson, M.; Rose, W. I.

    2001-12-01

    The Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), launched in December 1999 aboard the Terra satellite, has new capabilities that will improve the detection, tracking, and measurement of volcanic clouds. Volcanic clouds containing silicate ash, volcanic gases, aerosols, and water are potentially hazardous to aircraft. More than 100 aircraft have sustained documented damage over the past 20 years as a result of encountering volcanic clouds. This paper reports analytical results and interpretations of data from the MODIS instrument obtained for volcanic clouds generated during the 2001 eruption of Cleveland volcano. Cleveland volcano, located in the east-central Aleutian Islands 1500 km southwest of Anchorage, had explosive ash-producing eruptions on February 19, March 11, and March 19, 2001 that erupted material to altitudes of 4.5 to 10.6 km above sea level. The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) does not seismically monitor Cleveland volcano; however, the eruptions were detected and the volcanic clouds were tracked by AVO using near real-time AVHRR and GOES satellite data. Contemporaneous MODIS, AVHRR, and GOES data of the eruption clouds from all three events were analyzed retrospectively and preliminary results demonstrate: 1) Improved sensitivity for ash detection using MODIS versus AVHRR and GOES. The magnitude of the brightness temperature differences utilizing MODIS bands centered at 8.5 and 12.0 microns is 2-3 times greater than the magnitude of the brightness temperature differences calculated using AVHRR and GOES bands centered at 10.7 and 12.0 microns; 2) The ability to detect the sulfur dioxide component of volcanic clouds using the brightness temperature difference between MODIS bands centered at 7.3 and 12.0 microns. Separation of volcanic ash and sulfur dioxide was observed in the volcanic cloud generated by the February 19 eruption using this technique; 3) Volcanic ash mass retrievals from GOES and MODIS data (utilizing similar wavelengths

  7. Peak Oxygen Uptake during and after Long-duration Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Alan D., Jr.; Downs, Meghan E.; Lee, Stuart M. C.; Feiveson, Alan H.; Knudsen, Poul; Evetts, Simon N.; Ploutz-Snyder, Lori

    2014-01-01

    Aerobic capacity (VO2peak) previously has not been measured during or after long-duration spaceflight. PURPOSE: To measure VO2peak and submaximal exercise responses during and after International Space Station (ISS) missions. METHODS: Astronauts (9 M, 5 F: 49 +/- 5 yr, 175 +/- 7 cm, 77.2 +/- 15.1 kg, 40.6 +/- 6.4 mL/kg/min [mean +/-SD]) performed graded peak cycle tests 90 days before spaceflight, 15 d (FD15) after launch and every 30 d thereafter during flight, and 1 (R+1), 10 (R+10), and 30 d (R+30) after landing. Oxygen consumption (VO2) and heart rate (HR) were measured from rest to peak exercise, while cardiac output (Q), stroke volume (SV), and arterial-venous oxygen difference (a-vO2diff) were measured only during rest and submaximal exercise. Data were analyzed using mixed-model linear regression. Body mass contributed significantly to statistical models, and thus results are reported as modeled estimates for an average subject. RESULTS: Early inflight (FD15) VO2peak was 17% lower (95% CI = - 22%, -13%) than preflight. VO2peak increased during spaceflight (0.001 L/min/d, P = 0.02) but did not return to preflight levels. On R+1 VO2peak was 15% (95% CI = -19%, -10%) lower than preflight but recovered to within 2% of preflight by R+30 (95% CI = -6%, +3%). Peak HR was not significantly different from preflight at any time. Inflight submaximal VO2 and a-vO2diff were generally lower than preflight, but the Q vs. VO2 slope was unchanged. In contrast, the SV vs. VO2 slope was lower (P < 0.001), primarily due to elevated SV at rest, and the HR vs. VO2 slope was greater (P < 0.001), largely due to elevated HR during more intense exercise. On R+1 although the relationships between VO2 and Q, SV, and HR were not statistically different than preflight, resting and submaximal exercise SV was lower (P < 0.001), resting and submaximal exercise HR was higher (P < 0.002), and a-vO2diff was unchanged. HR and SV returned to preflight levels by R+30. CONCLUSION: In the average

  8. Free gas in Kumano forearc basin associated with methane hydrates and paleo-BSRs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, J.; Moore, G. F.

    2012-12-01

    anomalies, or bright spots, are DHIs observed in the seismic reflection data. These tend to be found within several chaotic packages beneath the BSR. Flat spots, thought to represent gas water contacts, are also observed, often in correlation with a phase change of bright horizons. Positive AVO (amplitude variation with offset) anomalies of the BSR and flat spots revealed in an amplitude analysis of the 3D survey also support the presence of free gas. The positive AVO anomaly and negative polarity of the BSR are consistent with a gas hydrate over gas interface; whereas the positive AVO anomaly combined with the positive polarity of the flat spots is consistent with gas water contacts.

  9. Seismic Evaluation of Hydrocarbon Saturation in Deep-Water Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Batzle

    2006-04-30

    During this last period of the ''Seismic Evaluation of Hydrocarbon Saturation in Deep-Water Reservoirs'' project (Grant/Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-02NT15342), we finalized integration of rock physics, well log analysis, seismic processing, and forward modeling techniques. Most of the last quarter was spent combining the results from the principal investigators and come to some final conclusions about the project. Also much of the effort was directed towards technology transfer through the Direct Hydrocarbon Indicators mini-symposium at UH and through publications. As a result we have: (1) Tested a new method to directly invert reservoir properties, water saturation, Sw, and porosity from seismic AVO attributes; (2) Constrained the seismic response based on fluid and rock property correlations; (3) Reprocessed seismic data from Ursa field; (4) Compared thin layer property distributions and averaging on AVO response; (5) Related pressures and sorting effects on porosity and their influence on DHI's; (6) Examined and compared gas saturation effects for deep and shallow reservoirs; (7) Performed forward modeling using geobodies from deepwater outcrops; (8) Documented velocities for deepwater sediments; (9) Continued incorporating outcrop descriptive models in seismic forward models; (10) Held an open DHI symposium to present the final results of the project; (11) Relations between Sw, porosity, and AVO attributes; (12) Models of Complex, Layered Reservoirs; and (14) Technology transfer Several factors can contribute to limit our ability to extract accurate hydrocarbon saturations in deep water environments. Rock and fluid properties are one factor, since, for example, hydrocarbon properties will be considerably different with great depths (high pressure) when compared to shallow properties. Significant over pressure, on the other hand will make the rocks behave as if they were shallower. In addition to the physical properties, the scale and tuning will alter our

  10. Exploring the Digital Universe with Europe's Astrophysical Virtual Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-12-01

    Vast Databanks at the Astronomers' Fingertips Summary A new European initiative called the Astrophysical Virtual Observatory (AVO) is being launched to provide astronomers with a breathtaking potential for new discoveries. It will enable them to seamlessly combine the data from both ground- and space-based telescopes which are making observations of the Universe across the whole range of wavelengths - from high-energy gamma rays through the ultraviolet and visible to the infrared and radio. The aim of the Astrophysical Virtual Observatory (AVO) project, which started on 15 November 2001, is to allow astronomers instant access to the vast databanks now being built up by the world's observatories and which are forming what is, in effect, a "digital sky" . Using the AVO, astronomers will, for example, be able to retrieve the elusive traces of the passage of an asteroid as it passes near the Earth and so enable them to predict its future path and perhaps warn of a possible impact. When a giant star comes to the end of its life in a cataclysmic explosion called a supernova, they will be able to access the digital sky and pinpoint the star shortly before it exploded so adding invaluable data to the study of the evolution of stars. Background information on the Astrophysical Virtual Observatory is available in the Appendix. PR Photo 34a/01 : The Astrophysical Virtual Observatory - an artist's impression. The rapidly accumulating database ESO PR Photo 34a/01 ESO PR Photo 34a/01 [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 345 pix - 90k] [Normal - JPEG: 800 x 689 pix - 656k] [Hi-Res - JPEG: 3000 x 2582 pix - 4.3M] ESO PR Photo 34a/01 shows an artist's impression of the Astrophysical Virtual Observatory . Modern observatories observe the sky continuously and data accumulates remorselessly in the digital archives. The growth rate is impressive and many hundreds of terabytes of data - corresponding to many thousands of billions of pixels - are already available to scientists. The real sky is being

  11. Ultrasonic and numerical modeling of reflections from simulated fractured reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen, T.; Zhu, Xiang,

    1997-10-01

    In order to develop modeling techniques for the characterization of fracture properties in tight gas sands from surface seismic reflection data we examine seismic waves scattered from anisotropic heterogeneity with laboratory data and numerical modeling. Laboratory models representing features of a fractured reservoir were constructed using Phenolite embedded in a Lucite background, and seismic surveys were gathered over these models. In parallel with laboratory measurement, finite-difference modeling of reflections from a fractured medium were carried out. Fracture zone properties were calculated using an effective medium theory, the variation of fracture density produced a heterogeneous medium. The heterogeneity was modeled with a stochastic process, characterized by a probability density function and an auto-correlation function. Results from both modeling efforts show that prestacked AVO data can contain important information describing reservoir heterogeneity.

  12. Artificial Intelligence Tools for Data Mining in Large Astronomical Databases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longo, Giuseppe; Donalek, Ciro; Raiconi, Giancarlo; Staiano, Antonino; Tagliaferri, Roberto; Pasian, Fabio; Sessa, Salvatore; Smareglia, Riccardo; Volpicelli, Alfredo

    The federation of heterogeneous large astronomical databases foreseen in the framework of the AVO and NVO projects will pose unprecedented data mining and visualization problems which may find a rather natural and user friendly answer in artificial intelligence (A.I.) tools based on neural networks, fuzzy-C sets or genetic algorithms. We shortly describe some tools implemented by the AstroNeural collaboration (Napoli-Salerno) aimed to perform complex tasks such as, for instance, unsupervised and supervised clustering and time series analysis. Two very different applications to the analysis of photometric redshifts of galaxies in the Sloan Early Data Release and to the telemetry of the TNG (telescopio nazionale Galileo) are also discussed as template cases.

  13. Renewed unrest at Mount Spurr Volcano, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Power, John A.

    2004-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO),a cooperative program of the U.S. Geological Survey, the University of Alaska Fairbanks Geophysical Institute, and the Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys, has detected unrest at Mount Spurr volcano, located about 125 km west of Anchorage, Alaska, at the northeast end of the Aleutian volcanic arc.This activity consists of increased seismicity melting of the summit ice cap, and substantial rates of C02 and H2S emission.The current unrest is centered beneath the volcano's 3374-m-high summit, whose last known eruption was 5000–6000 years ago. Since then, Crater Peak, 2309 m in elevation and 4 km to the south, has been the active vent. Recent eruptions occurred in 1953 and 1992.

  14. Catalog of earthquake hypocenters at Alaskan volcanoes: January 1, 1994 through December 31, 1999

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jolly, Arthur D.; Stihler, Scott D.; Power, John A.; Lahr, John C.; Paskievitch, John; Tytgat, Guy; Estes, Steve; Lockhart, Andrew B.; Moran, Seth C.; McNutt, Stephen R.; Hammond, William R.

    2001-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO), a cooperative program of the U.S. Geological Survey, the Geophysical Institute of the University of Alaska - Fairbanks, and the Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys, has maintained a seismic monitoring program at potentially active volcanoes in Alaska since 1988 (Power and others, 1993; Jolly and others, 1996). The primary objectives of this program are the seismic surveillance of active, potentially hazardous, Alaskan volcanoes and the investigation of seismic processes associated with active volcanism.Between 1994 and 1999, the AVO seismic monitoring program underwent significant changes with networks added at new volcanoes during each summer from 1995 through 1999. The existing network at Katmai –Valley of Ten Thousand Smokes (VTTS) was repaired in 1995, and new networks were installed at Makushin (1996), Akutan (1996), Pavlof (1996), Katmai - south (1996), Aniakchak (1997), Shishaldin (1997), Katmai - north (1998), Westdahl, (1998), Great Sitkin (1999) and Kanaga (1999). These networks added to AVO's existing seismograph networks in the Cook Inlet area and increased the number of AVO seismograph stations from 46 sites and 57 components in 1994 to 121 sites and 155 components in 1999. The 1995–1999 seismic network expansion increased the number of volcanoes monitored in real-time from 4 to 22, including Mount Spurr, Redoubt Volcano, Iliamna Volcano, Augustine Volcano, Mount Snowy, Mount Griggs, Mount Katmai, Novarupta, Trident Volcano, Mount Mageik, Mount Martin, Aniakchak Crater, Pavlof Volcano, Mount Dutton, Isanotski volcano, Shisaldin Volcano, Fisher Caldera, Westdahl volcano, Akutan volcano, Makushin Volcano, Great Sitkin volcano, and Kanaga Volcano (see Figures 1-15). The network expansion also increased the number of earthquakes located from about 600 per year in1994 and 1995 to about 3000 per year between 1997 and 1999.Highlights of the catalog period include: 1) a large volcanogenic seismic

  15. The next generation of shared seismic models for R&D.

    SciTech Connect

    Marfurt, K. J.; Wiley, R.; Martin, G. S.; House, L. S.; Larsen, S. C.

    2002-01-01

    We have created several elastic 2-D models and are currently defining a complex 3D elastic salt model for distribution to the international research community for use in the calibration of AVO, polarization filtering, tomography, multicomponent seismic analysis, converted wave tomography, and seismic attribute analysis. We have also obtained the release of several real 2-D data sets corresponding to the 2-D models to test the robustness of any new techniques. In addition to the synthetic seismograms generated over these models, we will release the model definition of layers and rock properties to the research community so that others may modify them to include features beyond the scope of our current effort, such as gas clouds, fractures, and diagenetic changes. Finally, we expect these models to serve as a test bed for impmving the computational efficiency of elastic mode ling as a goal in itself.

  16. Workshop on subduction, arc magmatic processes completes North Pacific meeting cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichelberger, John; Dehn, Jon

    What was once a remote backwater in the study of Earth processes—subduction and associated volcanism and seismicity of the far north Pacific region—has become a locus of real-time observation. For example, the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO)—a collaborative project of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the University of Alaska-Fairbanks (UAF), and the Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys (ADGGS) at Anchorage and Fairbanks— now maintains real-time seismic monitoring networks on 25 active volcanoes, from Cook Inlet to Adak Island; conducts continuous operational satellite surveillance of Alaska and Kamchatka for volcanic hot spots and ash plumes; and is now implementing real-time continuous GPS networks. Also, the Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT) of the Institute for Volcanic Geology and Geochemistry and the Institute of Seismology (both in Petropavlovsk on the Kamchatka Peninsula) is similarly active in the Russian Far East.

  17. Trace cable, locate faults with one instrument

    SciTech Connect

    Arias, A. )

    1994-12-01

    One of the problems with cable-tracing instruments that use radio-frequency (RF) signals is that they tend to radiate to nontarget conductors belonging to other utilities, such as telecommunications, gas, and cable TV. False readings generated by these RF units put repair crews at risk of locating the wrong lines, marking them, digging them up and so damaging another company's facilities. Crews at Florida Power Light Co (FP L) now are using a microprocessor-controlled transmitter that energizes the target cable at about 7776 Hz. This tracing frequency energizes only the secondary cable, even when nontarget conductors are nearby. An above-ground receiver detects this signal and guides the operator along the cable path. The instrument, known as the SFL-2000, is sold by AVO International, Blue Bell, Pa. 3 figs.

  18. Robust Rate Control System Designs for a Submersible

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-05-01

    w 0 4.) - >1 S0 > coc L4.4 .CD. 1 82 34 0 0 40 04 1 -4 38 NON-LIN~ER SIMULATION A-TI1ETA TIM ITIM m0go o so k ~ Ito i 0 ISO Ito SOD TIME Figur 5-3...4J1 0 - to @I 𔃾.4l- NW-L!NER19 31MULATION M-THETA -. -1 1) PO s 2 6 0 N 0 2 9 400 TIME -0 so so 120 ISO abW 240 n00 o 0 TIVE to so 110 ISO ago AtO 32r...360 mooTIME 860 In40 ISO i too avo ISO Sa SE. .o0___ TIM * Figure 5-5. Nonlinear simulation showing output error and respon~se for r -6 control

  19. Subglacial conditions at a sticky spot along Kamb Ice Stream, West Antarctica

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peters, L.E.; Anandakrishnan, S.

    2007-01-01

    We present the results of a seismic reflection experiment performed transverse to flow a few tens of kilometers above the main trunk of Kamb Ice Stream, West Antarctica, where we image a basal high surrounded by variable subglacial conditions. This high rises as much as 200 m above the surrounding bed, acting as a major sticking point that resists fast flow. Application of the amplitude variation with offset (AVO) seismic technique has highlighted regions of frozen sediments along our profile, suggesting that the ice stream is experiencing basal freeze-on in the region. The bedrock high appears to be at least partially draped in sediment cover, with a concentrated area of weak, dilatant till flanking one edge. This dilatant till is further dispersed along our profile, though it does not possess enough continuity to maintain streaming ice conditions. These results support the hypothesis that the ongoing shutdown of Kamb Ice Stream is due to a loss in continuous basal lubrication.

  20. Ada compiler validation summary report. Certificate number: 891116W1. 10191. Intel Corporation, IPSC/2 Ada, Release 1. 1, IPSC/2 parallel supercomputer, system resource manager host and IPSC/2 parallel supercomputer, CX-1 nodes target

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-11-16

    This VSR documents the results of the validation testing performed on an Ada compiler. Testing was carried out for the following purposes: To attempt to identify any language constructs supported by the compiler that do not conform to the Ada Standard; To attempt to identify any language constructs not supported by the compiler but required by the Ada Standard; and To determine that the implementation-dependent behavior is allowed by the Ada Standard. Testing of this compiler was conducted by SofTech, Inc. under the direction of he AVF according to procedures established by the Ada Joint Program Office and administered by the Ada Validation Organization (AVO). On-side testing was completed 16 November 1989 at Aloha OR.

  1. Impact of vehicular exhaust on ambient air quality of Rohtak city, India.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Vineeta; Dalal, Poonam; Chaudhry, Dhruva

    2010-11-01

    In the present study, ambient air quality of Rohtak city (Haryana) was monitored by High Volume Sampler. The selected parameters to judge the quality of air were Sulphur dioxide (SO2), Nitrogen dioxide NO), Ozone (O3) and Suspended particulate matters (SPM) which give a fair idea of pollution load carried by the air. The monitoring data were collected from six sites randomly selected in Rohtak city. Sulphur dioxide was found below the permissible limits of National Ambient Avo Quality Standards (NAAQS) at all the sites. Higher concentration of SO2 was observed during winter in comparison to summer and monsoon seasons. Nitrogen dioxide concentration was found to be above the prescribed standards of NAAOS at four sites in winter season. Ozone concentration was found below the prescribed standards (NAAOS), but its concentration was higher in summer season as compared to winter. Suspended particulate matter concentration was observed above the safety limits at all the sites in all three seasons.

  2. Monitoring volcanic threats using ASTER satellite data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duda, K.A.; Wessels, R.; Ramsey, M.; Dehn, J.

    2008-01-01

    This document summarizes ongoing activities associated with a research project funded by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) focusing on volcanic change detection through the use of satellite imagery. This work includes systems development as well as improvements in data analysis methods. Participating organizations include the NASA Land Processes Distributed Active Archive Center (LP DAAC) at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Center for Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS), the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) Science Team, the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) at the USGS Alaska Science Center, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory/California Institute of Technology (JPL/CalTech), the University of Pittsburgh, and the University of Alaska Fairbanks. ?? 2007 IEEE.

  3. NON-INVASIVE DETERMINATION OF THE LOCATION AND DISTRBUTION OF FREE-PHASE DENSE NONAQUEOUS PHASE LIQUIDS (DNAPL) BY SEISMIC REFLECTION TECHNIQUES

    SciTech Connect

    Michael G. Waddell; William J. Domoracki; Jerome Eyer

    2003-01-01

    The Earth Sciences and Resources Institute, University of South Carolina is conducting a proof of concept study to determine the location and distribution of subsurface DNAPL carbon tetrachloride (CCl{sub 4}) contamination at the 216-Z-9 crib, 200 West area, DOE Hanford Site, Washington by use of two-dimensional high-resolution seismic reflection surveys and borehole geophysical data. The study makes use of recent advances in seismic reflection amplitude versus offset (AVO) technology to directly detect the presence of subsurface DNAPL. The techniques proposed are noninvasive means of site characterization and direct free-phase DNAPL detection. This final report covers the results of Tasks 1, 2, and 3. Task (1) contains site evaluation and seismic modeling studies. The site evaluation consists of identifying and collecting preexisting geological and geophysical information regarding subsurface structure and the presence and quantity of DNAPL. The seismic modeling studies were undertaken to determine the likelihood that an AVO response exists and its probable manifestation. Task (2) is the design and acquisition of 2-D seismic reflection data to image areas of probable high concentration of DNAPL. Task (3) is the processing and interpretation of the 2-D data. During the commission of these tasks four seismic reflection profiles were collected. Subsurface velocity information was obtained by vertical seismic profile surveys in three wells. The interpretation of these data is in two parts. Part one is the construction and interpretation of structural contour maps of the contact between the Hanford Fine unit and the underlying Plio/Pleistocene unit and of the contact between the Plio/Pleistocene unit and the underlying caliche layer. These two contacts were determined to be the most likely surfaces to contain the highest concentration CCl{sub 4}. Part two of the interpretation uses the results of the AVO modeling to locate any seismic amplitude anomalies that might be

  4. SEISMIC MODELING ENGINES PHASE 1 FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    BRUCE P. MARION

    2006-02-09

    Seismic modeling is a core component of petroleum exploration and production today. Potential applications include modeling the influence of dip on anisotropic migration; source/receiver placement in deviated-well three-dimensional surveys for vertical seismic profiling (VSP); and the generation of realistic data sets for testing contractor-supplied migration algorithms or for interpreting AVO (amplitude variation with offset) responses. This project was designed to extend the use of a finite-difference modeling package, developed at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratories, to the advanced applications needed by industry. The approach included a realistic, easy-to-use 2-D modeling package for the desktop of the practicing geophysicist. The feasibility of providing a wide-ranging set of seismic modeling engines was fully demonstrated in Phase I. The technical focus was on adding variable gridding in both the horizontal and vertical directions, incorporating attenuation, improving absorbing boundary conditions and adding the optional coefficient finite difference methods.

  5. Catalog of earthquake hypocenters at Alaskan volcanoes: January 1 through December 31, 2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dixon, James P.; Stihler, Scott D.; Power, John A.; Searcy, Cheryl

    2008-01-01

    Between January 1 and December 31, 2006, AVO located 8,666 earthquakes of which 7,783 occurred on or near the 33 volcanoes monitored within Alaska. Monitoring highlights in 2006 include: an eruption of Augustine Volcano, a volcanic-tectonic earthquake swarm at Mount Martin, elevated seismicity and volcanic unrest at Fourpeaked Mountain, and elevated seismicity and low-level tremor at Mount Veniaminof and Korovin Volcano. A new seismic subnetwork was installed on Fourpeaked Mountain. This catalog includes: (1) descriptions and locations of seismic instrumentation deployed in the field during 2006, (2) a description of earthquake detection, recording, analysis, and data archival systems, (3) a description of seismic velocity models used for earthquake locations, (4) a summary of earthquakes located in 2006, and (5) an accompanying UNIX tar-file with a summary of earthquake origin times, hypocenters, magnitudes, phase arrival times, location quality statistics, daily station usage statistics, and all files used to determine the earthquake locations in 2006.

  6. Catalog of earthquake hypocenters at Alaskan volcanoes: January 1 through December 31, 2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dixon, James P.; Stihler, Scott D.; Power, John A.

    2008-01-01

    Between January 1 and December 31, 2007, AVO located 6,664 earthquakes of which 5,660 occurred within 20 kilometers of the 33 volcanoes monitored by the Alaska Volcano Observatory. Monitoring highlights in 2007 include: the eruption of Pavlof Volcano, volcanic-tectonic earthquake swarms at the Augustine, Illiamna, and Little Sitkin volcanic centers, and the cessation of episodes of unrest at Fourpeaked Mountain, Mount Veniaminof and the northern Atka Island volcanoes (Mount Kliuchef and Korovin Volcano). This catalog includes descriptions of : (1) locations of seismic instrumentation deployed during 2007; (2) earthquake detection, recording, analysis, and data archival systems; (3) seismic velocity models used for earthquake locations; (4) a summary of earthquakes located in 2007; and (5) an accompanying UNIX tar-file with a summary of earthquake origin times, hypocenters, magnitudes, phase arrival times, location quality statistics, daily station usage statistics, and all files used to determine the earthquake locations in 2007.

  7. Chalcone flavokawain B induces autophagic-cell death via reactive oxygen species-mediated signaling pathways in human gastric carcinoma and suppresses tumor growth in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chia-Ting; Hseu, You-Cheng; Thiyagarajan, Varadharajan; Lin, Kai-Yuan; Way, Tzong-Der; Korivi, Mallikarjuna; Liao, Jiuun-Wang; Yang, Hsin-Ling

    2017-04-03

    Flavokawain B (FKB), a naturally occurring chalcone in kava extracts, has been reported to possess anticancer activity. However, the effect of FKB on gastric cancer remains unclear. We examined the in vitro and in vivo anticancer activity and autophagy involvement of FKB and determined the underlying molecular mechanisms. FKB is potently cytotoxic to human gastric cancer cells (AGS/NCI-N87/KATO-III/TSGH9201) and mildly toxic towards normal (Hs738) cells and primary mouse hepatocytes. FKB-induced AGS cell death was characterized by autophagy, not apoptosis, as evidenced by increased LC3-II accumulation, GFP-LC3 puncta and acidic vesicular organelles (AVOs) formation, without resulting procaspase-3/PARP cleavage. FKB further caused p62/SQSTM1 activation, mTOR downregulation, ATG4B inhibition, and Beclin-1/Bcl-2 dysregulation. Silencing autophagy inhibitors CQ/3-MA and LC3 (shRNA) significantly reversed the FKB-induced cell death of AGS cells. FKB-triggered ROS generation and ROS inhibition by NAC pre-treatment diminished FKB-induced cell death, LC3 conversion, AVO formation, p62/SQSTM1 activation, ATG4B inhibition and Beclin-1/Bcl-2 dysregulation, which indicated ROS-mediated autophagy in AGS cells. Furthermore, FKB induces G2/M arrest and alters cell-cycle proteins through ROS-JNK signaling. Interestingly, FKB-induced autophagy is associated with the suppression of HER-2 and PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling cascades. FKB inhibits apoptotic Bax expression, and Bax-transfected AGS cells exhibit both apoptosis and autophagy; thus, FKB-inactivated Bax results in apoptosis inhibition. In vivo data demonstrated that FKB effectively inhibited tumor growth, prolonged the survival rate, and induced autophagy in AGS-xenografted mice. Notably, silencing of LC3 attenuated FKB-induced autophagy in AGS-xenografted tumors. FKB may be a potential chemopreventive agent in the activation of ROS-mediated autophagy of gastric cancer cells.

  8. Satellite monitoring of remote volcanoes improves study efforts in Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dean, K.; Servilla, M.; Roach, A.; Foster, B.; Engle, K.

    Satellite monitoring of remote volcanoes is greatly benefitting the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO), and last year's eruption of the Okmok Volcano in the Aleutian Islands is a good case in point. The facility was able to issue and refine warnings of the eruption and related activity quickly, something that could not have been done using conventional seismic surveillance techniques, since seismometers have not been installed at these locations.AVO monitors about 100 active volcanoes in the North Pacific (NOPAC) region, but only a handful are observed by costly and logistically complex conventional means. The region is remote and vast, about 5000 × 2500 km, extending from Alaska west to the Kamchatka Peninsula in Russia (Figure 1). Warnings are transmitted to local communities and airlines that might be endangered by eruptions. More than 70,000 passenger and cargo flights fly over the region annually, and airborne volcanic ash is a threat to them. Many remote eruptions have been detected shortly after the initial magmatic activity using satellite data, and eruption clouds have been tracked across air traffic routes. Within minutes after eruptions are detected, information is relayed to government agencies, private companies, and the general public using telephone, fax, and e-mail. Monitoring of volcanoes using satellite image data involves direct reception, real-time monitoring, and data analysis. Two satellite data receiving stations, located at the Geophysical Institute, University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF), are capable of receiving data from the advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR) on National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) polar orbiting satellites and from synthetic aperture radar (SAR) equipped satellites.

  9. Surface layer determination for the Si spheres of the Avogadro project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busch, I.; Azuma, Y.; Bettin, H.; Cibik, L.; Fuchs, P.; Fujii, K.; Krumrey, M.; Kuetgens, U.; Kuramoto, N.; Mizushima, S.

    2011-04-01

    For the accurate determination of the Avogadro constant, two 28Si spheres were produced, whose macroscopic density, in addition to other values, must be determined. To make a contribution to the new definition of the kilogram, a relative standard uncertainty of less than 2 × 10-8 has to be achieved. Each silicon surface is covered by a surface layer (SL). Consequently, correction parameters for the SL are determined to be applied to the mass and volume determination of the enriched spheres. With the use of a large set of surface analysing techniques, the structure of the SL is investigated. An unexpected metallic contamination existing on the sphere surface enlarges the uncertainty contribution of the correction parameters above the originally targeted value of 1 × 10-8. In the framework of this investigation this new obstacle is resolved in two ways. A new combination of analytical methods is applied to measure the SL mass mSL and the thickness dSL, including this new contamination, with an uncertainty of u(mSL) = 14.5 µg and 14.4 µg, respectively, and u(dSL) = 0.33 nm and 0.32 nm for the 28Si spheres AVO28-S5 and AVO28-S8, respectively. In the second part of the work, the chemical composition of these metallic contaminations is found to be Cu, Ni and Zn silicide compounds. For the removal of this contamination, a special procedure is developed, tested and applied to the spheres to produce the originally expected surface structure on the spheres. After the application of this new procedure the use of x-ray reflectometry directly at the spheres will be possible. It is expected to reduce the uncertainty contribution due to the SL down to 1 × 10-8.

  10. The autophagic- lysosomal pathway determines the fate of glial cells under manganese- induced oxidative stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Gorojod, R M; Alaimo, A; Porte Alcon, S; Pomilio, C; Saravia, F; Kotler, M L

    2015-10-01

    Manganese (Mn) overexposure is frequently associated with the development of a neurodegenerative disorder known as Manganism. The Mn-mediated generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) promotes cellular damage, finally leading to apoptotic cell death in rat astrocytoma C6 cells. In this scenario, the autophagic pathway could play an important role in preventing cytotoxicity. In the present study, we found that Mn induced an increase in the amount and total volume of acidic vesicular organelles (AVOs), a process usually related to the activation of the autophagic pathway. Particularly, the generation of enlarged AVOs was a ROS- dependent event. In this report we demonstrated for the first time that Mn induces autophagy in glial cells. This conclusion emerged from the results obtained employing a battery of autophagy markers: a) the increase in LC3-II expression levels, b) the formation of autophagic vesicles labeled with monodansylcadaverine (MDC) or LC3 and, c) the increase in Beclin 1/ Bcl-2 and Beclin 1/ Bcl-X(L) ratio. Autophagy inhibition employing 3-MA and mAtg5(K130R) resulted in decreased cell viability indicating that this event plays a protective role in Mn- induced cell death. In addition, mitophagy was demonstrated by an increase in LC3 and TOM-20 colocalization. On the other hand, we proposed the occurrence of lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP) based in the fact that cathepsins B and D activities are essential for cell death. Both cathepsin B inhibitor (Ca-074 Me) or cathepsin D inhibitor (Pepstatin A) completely prevented Mn- induced cytotoxicity. In addition, low dose of Bafilomycin A1 showed a similar effect, a finding that adds evidence about the lysosomal role in Mn cytotoxicity. Finally, in vivo experiments demonstrated that Mn induces injury and alters LC3 expression levels in rat striatal astrocytes. In summary, our results demonstrated that autophagy is activated to counteract the harmful effect caused by Mn. These data is valuable to

  11. PBO Operations in Alaska and Cascadia, Combining Regions and Collaborating with our Regional Partners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, K. E.; Boyce, E. S.; Dausz, K.; Feaux, K.; Mattioli, G. S.; Pyatt, C.; Willoughby, H.; Woolace, A. C.

    2015-12-01

    During the last year, the Alaska and the Cascadia regions of the EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) network were combined into a single management unit. While both remain distinct regions with their own challenges and engineering staff, every effort has been made to operate as a single team to improve efficiency and provide the highest possible data quality and uptime. Over the last several years a concerted effort has been made to work collaboratively with other institutions and stakeholders to defray ongoing costs by sharing staff and resources. UNAVCO currently operates four integrated GPS/seismic stations in collaboration with the Alaska Earthquake Center, eight with the Alaska Volcano Observatory, and three with the EarthScope TA. By the end of 2015, PBO and TA plan to install another 3 integrated and/or co-located geodetic and seismic systems. While most of these are designed around existing PBO stations, the 2014 installation at Middleton Island is a new station for both groups, providing PBO with an opportunity to expand geodetic data in Alaska. There were two major joint maintenance efforts in 2015:, the largest was a 5 day mission among PBO, AVO, and TA, which shared boat, helicopter, and staff on and around Augustine Volcano; the second, was a 10 day helicopter mission shared between AVO and PBO on Unimak Island. PBO Pacific Northwest is working closely with University of Washington to co-locate at least 9 Earthquake Early Warning Systems, which include the addition of strong motion sensors and high speed RT telemetry at PBO sites. The project is managed by University of Washington but UNAVCO is providing land contact information and infrastructure support. Summer 2015 upgrades include a complete overhaul of aging radio technology at two major networks and several small radio networks in Cascadia. The upgrades will increase reliability and enhance the speed of existing telemetry infrastructure and will continue through summer 2018.

  12. Effect of Endurance Training on the Determinants of Peak Exercise Oxygen Consumption in Elderly Patients with Stable Compensated Heart Failure and Preserved Ejection Fraction

    PubMed Central

    Haykowsky, Mark J.; Brubaker, Peter H.; Stewart, Kathryn P.; Morgan, Timothy M.; Eggebeen, Joel; Kitzman, Dalane W.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Evaluate the mechanism(s) for improved exercise capacity after endurance exercise training (ET) in elderly patients with heart failure and preserved ejection fraction (HFPEF). Background: Exercise intolerance, measured objectively by reduced peak oxygen consumption (VO2), is the primary chronic symptom in HFPEF and is improved by ET. However, the mechanism(s) are unknown. Methods Forty stable, compensated HFPEF outpatients (mean age 69 ± 6 yrs) were examined at baseline and after 4 months of ET (n=22) or attention control (n=18). VO2 and its determinants were assessed during rest and peak upright cycle exercise. Results Following ET, peak VO2 was higher than controls (16.3 ± 2.6 vs. 13.1 ± 3.4 ml/kg/min; p=0.002). This was associated with higher peak heart rate (139 ± 16 vs. 131 ± 20 beats/min; p=0.03), but no difference in peak end-diastolic volume (77 ± 18 vs. 77 ± 17 ml; p=0.51), stroke volume (48 ± 9 vs. 46 ± 9 ml; p=0.83), or cardiac output (6.6 ± 1.3 vs. 5.9 ± 1.5 L/min; p=0.32). However, estimated peak arterial-venous oxygen difference (A-VO2 Diff) was significantly higher in ET (19.8 ± 4.0 vs. 17.3 ± 3.7 ml/dl; p=0.03). The effect of ET on cardiac output was responsible for < 15% of the improvement in peak VO2. Conclusions In elderly stable compensated HFPEF patients, peak A-VO2 Diff was higher following ET and was the primary contributor to improved peak VO2. This suggests that peripheral mechanisms (improved microvascular and/or skeletal muscle function) contribute to the improved exercise capacity after ET in HFPEF. PMID:22766338

  13. Brief inhalation method to measure cerebral oxygen extraction fraction with PET: Accuracy determination under pathologic conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Altman, D.I.; Lich, L.L.; Powers, W.J. )

    1991-09-01

    The initial validation of the brief inhalation method to measure cerebral oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) with positron emission tomography (PET) was performed in non-human primates with predominantly normal cerebral oxygen metabolism (CMRO2). Sensitivity analysis by computer simulation, however, indicated that this method may be subject to increasing error as CMRO2 decreases. Accuracy of the method under pathologic conditions of reduced CMRO2 has not been determined. Since reduced CMRO2 values are observed frequently in newborn infants and in regions of ischemia and infarction in adults, we determined the accuracy of the brief inhalation method in non-human primates by comparing OEF measured with PET to OEF measured by arteriovenous oxygen difference (A-VO2) under pathologic conditions of reduced CMRO2 (0.27-2.68 ml 100g-1 min-1). A regression equation of OEF (PET) = 1.07 {times} OEF (A-VO2) + 0.017 (r = 0.99, n = 12) was obtained. The absolute error in oxygen extraction measured with PET was small (mean 0.03 {plus minus} 0.04, range -0.03 to 0.12) and was independent of cerebral blood flow, cerebral blood volume, CMRO2, or OEF. The percent error was higher (19 {plus minus} 37), particularly when OEF is below 0.15. These data indicate that the brief inhalation method can be used for measurement of cerebral oxygen extraction and cerebral oxygen metabolism under pathologic conditions of reduced cerebral oxygen metabolism, with these limitations borne in mind.

  14. SEISMIC EVALUATION OF HYDROCARBON SATURATION IN DEEP-WATER RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Batzle; D-h Han; R. Gibson; Huw James

    2005-01-22

    During this last quarter of the ''Seismic Evaluation of Hydrocarbon Saturation in Deep-Water Reservoirs'' project (Grant/Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-02NT15342), we have moved forward on several fronts, including data acquisition as well as analysis and application. During this quarter we have: (1) Completed our site selection (finally); (2) Measured fluid effects in Troika deep water sand sample; (3) Applied the result to Ursa ''fizz gas'' zone; (4) Compared thin layer property averaging on AVO response; (5) Developed target oriented NMO stretch correction; (6) Examined thin bed effects on A-B crossplots; and (7) Begun incorporating outcrop descriptive models in seismic forward models. Several factors can contribute to limit our ability to extract accurate hydrocarbon saturations in deep water environments. Rock and fluid properties are one factor, since, for example, hydrocarbon properties will be considerably different with great depths (high pressure) when compared to shallow properties. Significant over pressure, on the other hand will make the rocks behave as if they were shallower. In addition to the physical properties, the scale and tuning will alter our hydrocarbon indicators. Reservoirs composed of thin bed effects will broaden the reflection amplitude distribution with incident angle. Normal move out (NMO) stretch corrections based on frequency shifts can be applied to offset this effect. Tuning will also disturb the location of extracted amplitudes on AVO intercept and gradient (A-B) plots. Many deep water reservoirs fall this tuning thickness range. Our goal for the remaining project period is to systematically combine and document these various effects for use in deep water exploration.

  15. Integrating SAR and derived products into operational volcano monitoring and decision support systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, F. J.; McAlpin, D. B.; Gong, W.; Ajadi, O.; Arko, S.; Webley, P. W.; Dehn, J.

    2015-02-01

    Remote sensing plays a critical role in operational volcano monitoring due to the often remote locations of volcanic systems and the large spatial extent of potential eruption pre-cursor signals. Despite the all-weather capabilities of radar remote sensing and its high performance in monitoring of change, the contribution of radar data to operational monitoring activities has been limited in the past. This is largely due to: (1) the high costs associated with radar data; (2) traditionally slow data processing and delivery procedures; and (3) the limited temporal sampling provided by spaceborne radars. With this paper, we present new data processing and data integration techniques that mitigate some of these limitations and allow for a meaningful integration of radar data into operational volcano monitoring decision support systems. Specifically, we present fast data access procedures as well as new approaches to multi-track processing that improve near real-time data access and temporal sampling of volcanic systems with SAR data. We introduce phase-based (coherent) and amplitude-based (incoherent) change detection procedures that are able to extract dense time series of hazard information from these data. For a demonstration, we present an integration of our processing system with an operational volcano monitoring system that was developed for use by the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO). Through an application to a historic eruption, we show that the integration of SAR into systems such as AVO can significantly improve the ability of operational systems to detect eruptive precursors. Therefore, the developed technology is expected to improve operational hazard detection, alerting, and management capabilities.

  16. EarthScope's Transportable Array in Alaska and Western Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enders, M.; Miner, J.; Bierma, R. M.; Busby, R.

    2015-12-01

    EarthScope's Transportable Array (TA) in Alaska and Canada is an ongoing deployment of 261 high quality broadband seismographs. The Alaska TA is the continuation of the rolling TA/USArray deployment of 400 broadband seismographs in the lower 48 contiguous states and builds on the success of the TA project there. The TA in Alaska and Canada is operated by the IRIS Consortium on behalf of the National Science Foundation as part of the EarthScope program. By Sept 2015, it is anticipated that the TA network in Alaska and Canada will be operating 105 stations. During the summer 2015, TA field crews comprised of IRIS and HTSI station specialists, as well as representatives from our partner agencies the Alaska Earthquake Center and the Alaska Volcano Observatory and engineers from the UNAVCO Plate Boundary Observatory will have completed a total of 36 new station installations. Additionally, we will have completed upgrades at 9 existing Alaska Earthquake Center stations with borehole seismometers and the adoption of an additional 35 existing stations. As the array doubles in Alaska, IRIS continues to collaborate closely with other network operators, universities and research consortia in Alaska and Canada including the Alaska Earthquake Center (AEC), the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO), the UNAVCO Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO), the National Tsunami Warning Center (NTWC), Natural Resources Canada (NRCAN), Canadian Hazard Information Service (CHIS), the Yukon Geologic Survey (YGS), the Pacific Geoscience Center of the Geologic Survey, Yukon College and others. During FY14 and FY15 the TA has completed upgrade work at 20 Alaska Earthquake Center stations and 2 AVO stations, TA has co-located borehole seismometers at 5 existing PBO GPS stations to augment the EarthScope observatory. We present an overview of deployment plan and the status through 2015. The performance of new Alaska TA stations including improvements to existing stations is described.

  17. Inhibition of ROS production, autophagy or apoptosis signaling reversed the anticancer properties of Antrodia salmonea in triple-negative breast cancer (MDA-MB-231) cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chia-Ting; Korivi, Mallikarjuna; Huang, Hui-Chi; Thiyagarajan, Varadharajan; Lin, Kai-Yuan; Huang, Pei-Jane; Liu, Jer-Yuh; Hseu, You-Cheng; Yang, Hsin-Ling

    2017-05-01

    We investigated the in vitro and in vivo anticancer properties of Antrodia salmonea (AS), a well-known edible/medicinal mushroom in Taiwan, on human triple-negative breast cancer (MDA-MB-231) cells and xenografted nude mice; and revealed the underlying molecular mechanisms involved in autophagic- and apoptotic-cell death. Treatment of MDA-MB-231 cells with fermented culture broth of AS (0-200 μg/mL) inhibited cell viability/growth. AS-induced autophagy was evidenced via increased LC3-II accumulation, GFP-LC3 puncta and AVOs formation in MDA-MB-231 cells. These events are associated with increased ATG7, decreased p-mTOR, vanished SQSTM1/p62 expressions and dysregulated Beclin-1/Bcl-2 ratio. AS-induced apoptosis/necrosis through increased DNA fragmentation, Annexin-V/PI stained cells and Bax expression. Both mitochondrial (caspase-9/caspase-3/PARP) and death-receptor (caspase-8/FasL/Fas) signaling pathways are involved in execution of apoptosis. Interestingly, blockade of AS-induced ROS production by N-acetylcysteine pretreatment substantially attenuated AS-induced autophagy, mitochondrial dysfunction and autophagic/apoptotic-cell death. Inhibition of apoptosis by Z-VAD-FMK suppressed AS-induced autophagic-death (decreased LC3-II/AVOs). Similarly, inhibition of autophagy by 3-methyladenine/chloroquine diminished AS-induced apoptosis (decreased DNA fragmentation/caspase-3) in MDA-MB-231 cells. Bioluminescence imaging further confirmed that AS inhibited breast tumor growth in living MDA-MB-231-luciferase-injected nude mice. Taken together, AS crucially involved in execution/propagation of autophagic- or apoptotic-death of MDA-MB-231 cells, and decreased tumor growth in xenografted nude mice.

  18. Frequency-dependent reflection coefficients in elastic diffusive-viscous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, H.; Wang, X.; Gao, J.

    2016-12-01

    Amplitude variation with offset/angle of incidence (AVO/AVA) analysis is essential for hydrocarbon detection and reservoir characterization. Frequency-dependent AVO analysis plays an important role in seismic interpretation especially for the low-frequency seismic anomalies. The diffusive-viscous wave equation is used to explain these anomalies, but it does not consider the shear effect of rocks. In this work, we firstly extend the diffusive-viscous wave equation to the elastic case by considering the shear effect of rocks based on the mechanisms in megascopic porous media. The elastic diffusive-viscous wave equation contains the attenuation of compressional and shear waves in hydrocarbon-saturated media and it reduces to the classic elastic wave equation in a special case. Then, we investigate the reflection and transmission coefficients at an interface between two different elastic diffusive-viscous media. The reflection and transmission coefficients not only relate to the parameters of the media but also depend significantly on the frequency. Finally we give an example to analyze the dependences of the reflection and transmission coefficients on the frequency and incident angle at an interface between a brine-saturated shale and an oil-saturated sandstone. The results show that magnitudes of the reflection and transmission coefficients have peak values at low frequency (<10 Hz). Also, the magnitudes increase with increasing incident angle except for the transmitted P-wave. Moreover, the phase angles of reflection and transmission coefficients vary significantly at lower frequency (< 10 Hz) and larger incident angle (> 20 degree). These results may have a potential to interpret the seismic low-frequency phenomena in hydrocarbon reservoirs.

  19. A volcanic activity alert-level system for aviation: review of its development and application in Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    2013-01-01

    An alert-level system for communicating volcano hazard information to the aviation industry was devised by the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) during the 1989–1990 eruption of Redoubt Volcano. The system uses a simple, color-coded ranking that focuses on volcanic ash emissions: Green—normal background; Yellow—signs of unrest; Orange—precursory unrest or minor ash eruption; Red—major ash eruption imminent or underway. The color code has been successfully applied on a regional scale in Alaska for a sustained period. During 2002–2011, elevated color codes were assigned by AVO to 13 volcanoes, eight of which erupted; for that decade, one or more Alaskan volcanoes were at Yellow on 67 % of days and at Orange or Red on 12 % of days. As evidence of its utility, the color code system is integrated into procedures of agencies responsible for air-traffic management and aviation meteorology in Alaska. Furthermore, it is endorsed as a key part of globally coordinated protocols established by the International Civil Aviation Organization to provide warnings of ash hazards to aviation worldwide. The color code and accompanying structured message (called a Volcano Observatory Notice for Aviation) comprise an effective early-warning message system according to the United Nations International Strategy for Disaster Reduction. The aviation color code system currently is used in the United States, Russia, New Zealand, Iceland, and partially in the Philippines, Papua New Guinea, and Indonesia. Although there are some barriers to implementation, with continued education and outreach to Volcano Observatories worldwide, greater use of the aviation color code system is achievable.

  20. Diaphragmatic blood flow and energy expenditure in the dog. Effects of inspiratory airflow resistance and hypercapnia.

    PubMed

    Rochester, D F; Bettini, G

    1976-03-01

    To investigate the mechanisms which enable the diaphragm to preserve ventilation when the work of breathing is elevated, we measured diaphragmatic blood flow (Q di) and oxygen consumption (VO2 di) in lightly anesthetized dogs. The animals were studied when they breathed quietly, when they inhaled 5% CO2 in 21% or 14% O2, or when they inhaled these gas mixtures through moderate to severe inspiratory resistances. Q di was determined from the integrated diaphragmatic arteriovenous difference of krypton-85, by the Kety-Schmidt technique. VO2 di was calculated as the product of Q di and the diaphragmatic arteriovenous oxygen difference ([A-V]O2 di). Alteration in these parameters consequent to augmentation of ventilatory effort were compared with concomitant alterations in diaphragmatic electrical activity (EMG di) and an inspiratory pleural pressure-time index (PPTI). Addition of inspiratory resistances combined with inhalation of CO2 usually increased Q di and consistently increased VO2 di, EMG di, and PPTI, the maximum increases being approximately 400-1,600% above control levels. In individual animals, as inspiratory resistance was increased, VO2 di, EMG di, and PPTI rose in direct proportion to each other. In the group as a whole, during resistance breathing the oxygen requirements of the diaphragm were met by a combination of increased [A-V]O2 di and Q di. Unlike other skeletal muscles, oxygen extraction tended to plateau at peak loads, whereas blood flow continued to rise as PPTI and VO2 di increased. We conclude that augmentation of perfusion permits the diaphragm to sustain high levels of contractile effort when the work of breathing is increased.

  1. Material Property Estimation for Direct Detection of DNAPL using Integrated Ground-Penetrating Radar Velocity, Imaging and Attribute Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bradford, John; Smithson, Scott B.; Holbrook, Stephen

    2001-06-01

    The focus of our work is direct detection of DNAPLs, specifically chlorinated solvents, via material property estimation from surface ground-penetrating radar (GPR) data. We combine sophisticated GPR processing methodology with quantitative attribute analysis and material property estimation to determine the location and extent of residual and/or pooled DNAPL in both the vadose and saturated zones. An important byproduct of our research is state-of-the-art imaging which allows us to pinpoint attribute anomalies, characterize stratigraphy, identify fracture zones, and locate buried objects. Implementation and verification of these methodologies will be a significant advance in GPR research and in meeting DOE's need for reliable in-situ characterization of DNAPL contamination. Chlorinated solvents have much lower electric permittivity and conductivity than water. An electrical property contrast is induced when solvents displace water in the sediment column resulting in an anomalous GPR signature. To directly identify zones of DNAPL contamination, we focus on three aspects of reflected wave behavior--propagation velocity, frequency dependent attenuation, and amplitude variation with offset (AVO). Velocity analysis provides a direct estimate of electric permittivity, attenuation analysis provides a measure of conductivity, and AVO behavior is used to estimate the permittivity ratio at a reflecting boundary. Areas of anomalously low electric permittivity and conductivity are identified as potential DNAPL rich zones. Preliminary work illustrated significant potential for quantitative direct detection methodologies in identifying shallow DNAPL source zones. It is now necessary to verify these methodologies in a field setting. To this end, the project is field oriented and has three primary objectives: (1) Develop a suite of methodologies for direct detection of DNAPLs from surface GPR data (2) Controlled field verification at well characterized, contaminated sites (3

  2. Sex differences in the oxygen delivery, extraction, and uptake during moderate-walking exercise transition.

    PubMed

    Beltrame, Thomas; Villar, Rodrigo; Hughson, Richard L

    2017-09-01

    Previous studies in children and older adults demonstrated faster oxygen uptake (V̇O2) kinetics in males compared with females, but young healthy adults have not been studied. We hypothesized that young men would have faster aerobic system dynamics in response to the onset of exercise than women. Interactions between oxygen supply and utilization were characterized by the dynamics of V̇O2, deoxyhemoglobin (HHb), tissue saturation index (TSI), cardiac output (Q̇), and calculated arteriovenous O2 difference (a-vO2diff) in women and men. Eighteen healthy active young women and men (9 of each sex) with similar aerobic fitness levels volunteered for this study. Participants performed an incremental cardiopulmonary treadmill exercise test and 3 moderate-intensity treadmill exercise tests (at 80% V̇O2 of gas exchange threshold). Data related to the moderate exercise were submitted to exponential data modelling to obtain parameters related to the aerobic system dynamics. The time constants of V̇O2, a-vO2diff, HHb, and TSI (30 ± 6, 29 ± 1, 16 ± 1, and 15 ± 2 s, respectively) in women were statistically (p < 0.05) faster than the time constants in men (42 ± 10, 49 ± 21, 19 ± 3, and 20 ± 4 s, respectively). Although Q̇ dynamics were not statistically different (p = 0.06) between groups, there was a trend to slower Q̇ dynamics in men corresponding with the slower V̇O2 kinetics. These results indicated that the peripheral and pulmonary oxygen extraction dynamics were remarkably faster in women. Thus, contrary to the hypothesis, V̇O2 dynamics measured at the mouth at the onset of submaximal treadmill walking were faster in women compared with men.

  3. High temporal resolution MRI quantification of global cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen consumption in response to apneic challenge.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, Zachary B; Jain, Varsha; Englund, Erin K; Langham, Michael C; Wehrli, Felix W

    2013-10-01

    We present a technique for quantifying global cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen consumption (CMRO2) in absolute physiologic units at 3-second temporal resolution and apply the technique to quantify the dynamic CMRO2 response to volitional apnea. Temporal resolution of 3 seconds was achieved via a combination of view sharing and superior sagittal sinus-based estimation of total cerebral blood flow (tCBF) rather than tCBF measurement in the neck arteries. These modifications were first validated in three healthy adults and demonstrated to produce minimal errors in image-derived blood flow and venous oxygen saturation (SvO2) values. The technique was then applied in 10 healthy adults during an apnea paradigm of three repeated 30-second breath-holds. Subject-averaged baseline tCBF, arteriovenous oxygen difference (AVO2D), and CMRO2 were 48.6 ± 7.0 mL/100 g per minute, 29.4 ± 3.4 %HbO2, and 125.1 ± 11.4 μmol/100 g per minute, respectively. Subject-averaged maximum changes in tCBF and AVO2D were 43.5 ± 9.4% and -32.1 ± 5.7%, respectively, resulting in a small (6.0 ± 3.5%) but statistically significant (P=0.00044, two-tailed t-test) increase in average end-apneic CMRO2. This method could be used to investigate neurometabolic-hemodynamic relationships in normal physiology, to better define the biophysical origins of the BOLD signal, and to quantify neurometabolic responsiveness in diseases of altered neurovascular reactivity.

  4. From the Slab to the Surface: Origin, Storage, Ascent, and Eruption of Volatile-Bearing Magmas in the Aleutian arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roman, D.; Plank, T. A.; Hauri, E. H.; Rasmussen, D. J.; Power, J. A.; Lyons, J. J.; Haney, M. M.; Werner, C. A.; Kern, C.; Lopez, T. M.; Izbekov, P. E.; Stelling, P. L.

    2016-12-01

    We present initial results from an integrated geochemical-geophysical study of the Unimak-Cleveland corridor of the Aleutian volcanic arc, which encompasses six volcanoes spanning 450 km of the arc that have erupted in the past 25 years with a wide range of magmatic water contents. This relatively small corridor also exhibits a range of deep and upper-crustal seismicity, apparent magma storage depths, and depths to the subducting tectonic plate. The ultimate goal of this study is to link two normally disconnected big-picture problems: 1) the deep origin of magmas and volatiles, and 2) the formation and eruption of crustal magma reservoirs, which we will do by establishing the depth(s) of crustal magma reservoirs and pre-eruptive volatile contents throughout the corridor. Our preliminary work focuses on the geographic end members Shishaldin Volcano, which last erupted in 2014-2015, and Cleveland Volcano, which last erupted in April-May of this year (2016). Both systems are persistently degassing, open-vent volcanoes whose frequent eruptions are typically characterized by minimal precursory seismicity, making eruption forecasting challenging. At Cleveland, we analyze data from a 12-station broadband seismic network deployed from August 2015-July 2016, which is complemented by two permanent seismo-acoustic stations operated by the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO). We also analyze tephras from recent eruptions (including 2016) and conducted ground- and helicopter-based gas emission surveys. At Shishaldin, we analyze data from the permanent AVO network, which is comprised of mainly short-period, single-component seismic stations. We also present preliminary analyses of samples of recent eruptive deposits and gas emission data. Through integration of these various datasets we present preliminary interpretations related to the origin, storage, ascent and eruption of volatile-bearing magmas at Cleveland and Shishaldin volcanoes.

  5. A volcanic activity alert-level system for aviation: Review of its development and application in Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Guffanti, Marianne C.; Miller, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    An alert-level system for communicating volcano hazard information to the aviation industry was devised by the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) during the 1989–1990 eruption of Redoubt Volcano. The system uses a simple, color-coded ranking that focuses on volcanic ash emissions: Green—normal background; Yellow—signs of unrest; Orange—precursory unrest or minor ash eruption; Red—major ash eruption imminent or underway. The color code has been successfully applied on a regional scale in Alaska for a sustained period. During 2002–2011, elevated color codes were assigned by AVO to 13 volcanoes, eight of which erupted; for that decade, one or more Alaskan volcanoes were at Yellow on 67 % of days and at Orange or Red on 12 % of days. As evidence of its utility, the color code system is integrated into procedures of agencies responsible for air-traffic management and aviation meteorology in Alaska. Furthermore, it is endorsed as a key part of globally coordinated protocols established by the International Civil Aviation Organization to provide warnings of ash hazards to aviation worldwide. The color code and accompanying structured message (called a Volcano Observatory Notice for Aviation) comprise an effective early-warning message system according to the United Nations International Strategy for Disaster Reduction. The aviation color code system currently is used in the United States, Russia, New Zealand, Iceland, and partially in the Philippines, Papua New Guinea, and Indonesia. Although there are some barriers to implementation, with continued education and outreach to Volcano Observatories worldwide, greater use of the aviation color code system is achievable.

  6. Ultra Deep Wave Equation Imaging and Illumination

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander M. Popovici; Sergey Fomel; Paul Sava; Sean Crawley; Yining Li; Cristian Lupascu

    2006-09-30

    In this project we developed and tested a novel technology, designed to enhance seismic resolution and imaging of ultra-deep complex geologic structures by using state-of-the-art wave-equation depth migration and wave-equation velocity model building technology for deeper data penetration and recovery, steeper dip and ultra-deep structure imaging, accurate velocity estimation for imaging and pore pressure prediction and accurate illumination and amplitude processing for extending the AVO prediction window. Ultra-deep wave-equation imaging provides greater resolution and accuracy under complex geologic structures where energy multipathing occurs, than what can be accomplished today with standard imaging technology. The objective of the research effort was to examine the feasibility of imaging ultra-deep structures onshore and offshore, by using (1) wave-equation migration, (2) angle-gathers velocity model building, and (3) wave-equation illumination and amplitude compensation. The effort consisted of answering critical technical questions that determine the feasibility of the proposed methodology, testing the theory on synthetic data, and finally applying the technology for imaging ultra-deep real data. Some of the questions answered by this research addressed: (1) the handling of true amplitudes in the downward continuation and imaging algorithm and the preservation of the amplitude with offset or amplitude with angle information required for AVO studies, (2) the effect of several imaging conditions on amplitudes, (3) non-elastic attenuation and approaches for recovering the amplitude and frequency, (4) the effect of aperture and illumination on imaging steep dips and on discriminating the velocities in the ultra-deep structures. All these effects were incorporated in the final imaging step of a real data set acquired specifically to address ultra-deep imaging issues, with large offsets (12,500 m) and long recording time (20 s).

  7. Seismic Evaluation of Hydorcarbon Saturation in Deep-Water Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Batzle; D-h Han; R. Gibson; Huw James

    2005-10-31

    During this last quarter of the ''Seismic Evaluation of Hydrocarbon Saturation in Deep-Water Reservoirs'' project (Grant/Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-02NT15342), we have moved forward on several fronts, including data acquisition as well as analysis and application. During this quarter we have: (1) Completed our site selection (finally); (2) Measured fluid effects in Troika deep water sand sample; (3) Applied the result to Ursa ''fizz gas'' zone; (4) Compared thin layer property averaging on AVO response; (5) Developed target oriented NMO stretch correction; (6) Examined thin bed effects on A-B crossplots; and (7) Begun incorporating outcrop descriptive models in seismic forward models. Several factors can contribute to limit our ability to extract accurate hydrocarbon saturations in deep water environments. Rock and fluid properties are one factor, since, for example, hydrocarbon properties will be considerably different with great depths (high pressure) when compared to shallow properties. Significant over pressure, on the other hand will make the rocks behave as if they were shallower. In addition to the physical properties, the scale and tuning will alter our hydrocarbon indicators. Reservoirs composed of thin bed effects will broaden the reflection amplitude distribution with incident angle. Normal move out (NMO) stretch corrections based on frequency shifts can be applied to offset this effect. Tuning will also disturb the location of extracted amplitudes on AVO intercept and gradient (A-B) plots. Many deep water reservoirs fall this tuning thickness range. Our goal for the remaining project period is to systematically combine and document these various effects for use in deep water exploration.

  8. Seismic velocities for hydrate-bearing sediments using weighted equation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, M.W.; Hutchinson, D.R.; Collett, T.S.; Dillon, William P.

    1996-01-01

    A weighted equation based on the three-phase time-average and Wood equations is applied to derive a relationship between the compressional wave (P wave) velocity and the amount of hydrates filling the pore space. The proposed theory predicts accurate P wave velocities of marine sediments in the porosity range of 40-80% and provides a practical means of estimating the amount of in situ hydrate using seismic velocity. The shear (S) wave velocity is derived under the assumption that the P to S wave velocity ratio of the hydrated sediments is proportional to the weighted average of the P to S wave velocity ratios of the constituent components of the sediment. In the case that all constituent components are known, a weighted equation using multiphase time-average and Wood equations is possible. However, this study showed that a three-phase equation with modified matrix velocity, compensated for the clay content, is sufficient to accurately predict the compressional wave velocities for the marine sediments. This theory was applied to the laboratory measurements of the P and S wave velocities in permafrost samples to infer the amount of ice in the unconsolidated sediment. The results are comparable to the results obtained by repeatedly applying the two-phase wave scattering theory. The theory predicts that the Poisson's ratio of the hydrated sediments decreases as the hydrate concentration increases and the porosity decreases. In consequence, the amplitude versus offset (AVO) data for the bottom-simulating reflections may reveal positive, negative, or no AVO anomalies depending on the concentration of hydrates in the sediments.

  9. Catalog of earthquake hypocenters at Alaskan volcanoes: January 1 through December 31, 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dixon, James P.; Stihler, Scott D.; Power, John A.; Tytgat, Guy; Moran, Seth C.; Sánchez, John; Estes, Steve; McNutt, Stephen R.; Paskievitch, John

    2003-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO), a cooperative program of the U.S. Geological Survey, the Geophysical Institute of the University of Alaska Fairbanks, and the Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys, has maintained seismic monitoring networks at historically active volcanoes in Alaska since 1988 (Power and others, 1993; Jolly and others, 1996; Jolly and others, 2001; Dixon and others, 2002). The primary objectives of this program are the seismic monitoring of active, potentially hazardous, Alaskan volcanoes and the investigation of seismic processes associated with active volcanism. This catalog presents the basic seismic data and changes in the seismic monitoring program for the period January 1, 2002 through December 31, 2002. Appendix G contains a list of publications pertaining to seismicity of Alaskan volcanoes based on these and previously recorded data. The AVO seismic network was used to monitor twenty-four volcanoes in real time in 2002. These include Mount Wrangell, Mount Spurr, Redoubt Volcano, Iliamna Volcano, Augustine Volcano, Katmai Volcanic Group (Snowy Mountain, Mount Griggs, Mount Katmai, Novarupta, Trident Volcano, Mount Mageik, Mount Martin), Aniakchak Crater, Mount Veniaminof, Pavlof Volcano, Mount Dutton, Isanotski Peaks, Shishaldin Volcano, Fisher Caldera, Westdahl Peak, Akutan Peak, Makushin Volcano, Great Sitkin Volcano, and Kanaga Volcano (Figure 1). Monitoring highlights in 2002 include an earthquake swarm at Great Sitkin Volcano in May-June; an earthquake swarm near Snowy Mountain in July-September; low frequency (1-3 Hz) tremor and long-period events at Mount Veniaminof in September-October and in December; and continuing volcanogenic seismic swarms at Shishaldin Volcano throughout the year. Instrumentation and data acquisition highlights in 2002 were the installation of a subnetwork on Okmok Volcano, the establishment of telemetry for the Mount Veniaminof subnetwork, and the change in the data acquisition system to

  10. The development of efficient numerical time-domain modeling methods for geophysical wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Lieyuan

    This Ph.D. dissertation focuses on the numerical simulation of geophysical wave propagation in the time domain including elastic waves in solid media, the acoustic waves in fluid media, and the electromagnetic waves in dielectric media. This thesis shows that a linear system model can describe accurately the physical processes of those geophysical waves' propagation and can be used as a sound basis for modeling geophysical wave propagation phenomena. The generalized stability condition for numerical modeling of wave propagation is therefore discussed in the context of linear system theory. The efficiency of a series of different numerical algorithms in the time-domain for modeling geophysical wave propagation are discussed and compared. These algorithms include the finite-difference time-domain method, pseudospectral time domain method, alternating directional implicit (ADI) finite-difference time domain method. The advantages and disadvantages of these numerical methods are discussed and the specific stability condition for each modeling scheme is carefully derived in the context of the linear system theory. Based on the review and discussion of these existing approaches, the split step, ADI pseudospectral time domain (SS-ADI-PSTD) method is developed and tested for several cases. Moreover, the state-of-the-art stretched-coordinate perfect matched layer (SCPML) has also been implemented in SS-ADI-PSTD algorithm as the absorbing boundary condition for truncating the computational domain and absorbing the artificial reflection from the domain boundaries. After algorithmic development, a few case studies serve as the real-world examples to verify the capacities of the numerical algorithms and understand the capabilities and limitations of geophysical methods for detection of subsurface contamination. The first case is a study using ground penetrating radar (GPR) amplitude variation with offset (AVO) for subsurface non-aqueous-liquid (NAPL) contamination. The

  11. Blood flow regulation and oxygen uptake during high-intensity forearm exercise.

    PubMed

    Nyberg, S K; Berg, O K; Helgerud, J; Wang, E

    2017-04-01

    The vascular strain is very high during heavy handgrip exercise, but the intensity and kinetics to reach peak blood flow, and peak oxygen uptake, are uncertain. We included 9 young (25 ± 2 yr) healthy males to evaluate blood flow and oxygen uptake responses during continuous dynamic handgrip exercise with increasing intensity. Blood flow was measured using Doppler-ultrasound, and venous blood was drawn from a deep forearm vein to determine arteriovenous oxygen difference (a-vO2diff) during 6-min bouts of 60, 80, and 100% of maximal work rate (WRmax), respectively. Blood flow and oxygen uptake increased (P < 0.05) from 60%WRmax [557 ± 177(SD) ml/min; 56.0 ± 21.6 ml/min] to 80%WRmax (679 ± 190 ml/min; 70.6 ± 24.8 ml/min), but no change was seen from 80%WRmax to 100%WRmax Blood velocity (49.5 ± 11.5 to 58.1 ± 11.6 cm/s) and brachial diameter (0.49 ± 0.05 to 0.50 ± 0.06 cm) showed concomitant increases (P < 0.05) with blood flow from 60% to 80%WRmax, whereas no differences were observed in a-vO2diff Shear rate also increased (P < 0.05) from 60% (822 ± 196 s(-1)) to 80% (951 ± 234 s(-1)) of WRmax The mean response time (MRT) was slower (P < 0.05) for blood flow (60%WRmax 50 ± 22 s; 80%WRmax 51 ± 20 s; 100%WRmax 51 ± 23 s) than a-vO2diff (60%WRmax 29 ± 9 s; 80%WRmax 29 ± 5 s; 100%WRmax 20 ± 5 s), but not different from oxygen uptake (60%WRmax 44 ± 25 s; 80%WRmax 43 ± 14 s; 100%WRmax 41 ± 32 s). No differences were observed in MRT for blood flow or oxygen uptake with increased exercise intensity. In conclusion, when approaching maximal intensity, oxygen uptake appeared to reach a critical level at ~80% of WRmax and be regulated by blood flow. This implies that high, but not maximal, exercise intensity may be an optimal stimulus for shear stress-induced small muscle mass training adaptations.NEW & NOTEWORTHY This study evaluated blood flow regulation and oxygen uptake during small muscle mass forearm exercise with high to maximal intensity. Despite

  12. Detection and Appraisal of Gas Hydrates: Indian Scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sain, K.

    2009-04-01

    Gas hydrates, found in shallow sediments of permafrost and outer continental margins, are crystalline form of methane and water. The carbon within global gas hydrates is estimated two times the carbon contained in world-wide fossil fuels. It is also predicted that 15% recovery of gas hydrates can meet the global energy requirement for the next 200 years. Several parameters like bathymetry, seafloor temperature, sediment thickness, rate of sedimentation and total organic carbon content indicate very good prospect of gas hydrates in the vast offshore regions of India. Methane stored in the form of gas hydrates within the Indian exclusive economic zone is estimated to be few hundred times the country's conventional gas reserve. India produces less than one-third of her oil requirement and gas hydrates provide great hopes as a viable source of energy in the 21st century. Thus identification and quantitative assessment of gas hydrates are very important. By scrutiny and reanalysis of available surface seismic data, signatures of gas hydrates have been found out in the Kerala-Konkan and Saurashtra basins in the western margin, and Krishna-Godavari, Mahanadi and Andaman regions in the eastern margin of India by mapping the bottom simulating reflector or BSR based on its characteristic features. In fact, the coring and drilling in 2006 by the Indian National Gas Hydrate Program have established the ground truth in the eastern margin. It has become all the more important now to identify further prospective regions with or without BSR; demarcate the lateral/areal extent of gas hydrate-bearing sediments and evaluate their resource potential in both margins of India. We have developed various approaches based on seismic traveltime tomography; waveform inversion; amplitude versus offset (AVO) modeling; AVO attributes; seismic attributes and rock physics modeling for the detection, delineation and quantification of gas-hydrates. The blanking, reflection strength, instantaneous

  13. Meltwater Origin of the 2005 Mount Steller Landslide Confirmed by Analysis of Global Fiducials Program Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molnia, B. F.; Angeli, K.

    2012-12-01

    Alaska's Mt. Steller, a 3,236 m Chugach Mountains peak, is one of the target areas of the Bering Glacier Global Fiducials Program (GFP) site. On September 14, 2005, a large mass of rock, glacier ice, and snow, with a volume of ~50 million cubic meters, fell from just below Mt. Steller's south-facing summit and landed on the surface of a tributary to Bering Glacier, nearly 2,500 m below. The slide, which extended ~8 km down-glacier, was actually an ice-rock avalanche. The impact generated a seismic signal recorded with a magnitude of up to 5.2. Oblique aerial photography of the mountain, the head scarp, and the slide mass was collected for the U.S. Geological Survey's Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) on September 15, 2005. The photography delineated the morphology of the failed south-facing slope of the mountain and showed details of the sheared, near-summit hanging glacier and snow mass. Based on the photography, the AVO calculated the slide volume and length. Several weeks later, the AVO provided the first author with digital copies of the September 15 photography. These images were enhanced and examined in order to determine properties of the slide and to evaluate if the cause of the event could be determined. A number of features observed led to the conclusion that meltwater was probably responsible for destabilizing the glacier ice-bedrock contact and triggering the landslide. Specifically, a 10-15 m diameter englacial stream channel was seen in the truncated glacier ice that comprised the east wall of the landslide scarp and a water-polished channel opening was noted on the west wall scarp. Additionally, several depressions were noted that might have temporarily stored water. To confirm these observations, new cloud-free GFP imagery was obtained on October 24 and 28, 2005. Analysis of both sets of imagery documented that: (1) more than a month after the event, meltwater was exiting the east wall scarp channel and flowing down the face of the mountain; (2) the

  14. Completely <001> oriented anatase TiO2 nanoarrays: topotactic growth and orientation-related efficient photocatalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jingling; Wu, Qili; He, Shiman; Yan, Jing; Shi, Jianying; Chen, Jian; Wu, Mingmei; Yang, Xianfeng

    2015-08-01

    A TiO2 film has been facilely grown on a Ti foil via a general and simple acid vapor oxidation (AVO) strategy. Based on detailed characterization by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), we found that the TiO2 film was composed of anatase nanoarrays highly oriented along their <001> direction, resulting in a large exposed {001} top surface on the film. The growth mechanism based on a topotactic transformation was proposed according to a careful study of time-dependent experimental results. Resulting from the evaluation of photocatalytic performance compared with a commercial TiO2 photocatalyst (Degussa P25), the as-prepared oriented anatase TiO2 film showed higher efficiency for degradation of atrazine and acid orange II (AOII). The performance of photocatalysis is highly relevant to the preferential orientation. The efficient photocatalysis could be attributed to the highly reactive {001} facets on the anatase nanoarrays with super-hydrophilicity.A TiO2 film has been facilely grown on a Ti foil via a general and simple acid vapor oxidation (AVO) strategy. Based on detailed characterization by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), we found that the TiO2 film was composed of anatase nanoarrays highly oriented along their <001> direction, resulting in a large exposed {001} top surface on the film. The growth mechanism based on a topotactic transformation was proposed according to a careful study of time-dependent experimental results. Resulting from the evaluation of photocatalytic performance compared with a commercial TiO2 photocatalyst (Degussa P25), the as-prepared oriented anatase TiO2 film showed higher efficiency for degradation of atrazine and acid orange II (AOII). The performance of photocatalysis is highly relevant to the preferential orientation. The efficient photocatalysis could be attributed to the highly

  15. Ultrasonic Seismic Wave Elastic Moduli and Attenuation, Petro physical Models and Work Flows for Better Subsurface Imaging Related to Monitoring of Sequestrated Supercritical CO2 and Geothermal Energy Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harbert, W.; Delaney, D.; Mur, A. J.; Purcell, C.; Zorn, E.; Soong, Y.; Crandall, D.; Haljasmaa, I.

    2016-12-01

    To better understand the petrophysical response at ultrasonic frequencies in rhyolite and carbonate (relevant to CO2 storage and CO2 enhanced oil recovery) lithologies we conducted core analysis incorporating variation in temperature, effective pressure and pore filling fluid. Ultrasonic compressive and shear wave (VP, VS1 and VS2) velocities were measured allowing calculation of the Bulk modulus (K), Young's modulus (E), Lamè's first parameter (λ), Shear modulus (G), Poisson's ratio (ν), and P-wave modulus (M). In addition, from the ultrasonic waveform data collected, we employed the spectral ratio method to estimate the quality factor. Carbonate samples were tested dry, using atmospheric gas as the pore phase, and with deionized water, oil, and supercritical CO2. We observed that Qp was directly proportional to effective pressure in our rhyolite samples. In addition, we observed effects of core anisotropy on Qp, however this was not apparent in higher porosity samples. Increasing effective pressure seems to decrease the effects of ultrasonic P-wave anisotropy. Qp was inversely proportional to temperature, however this was not observed for higher porosity samples. Qp was highly dependent on the rock porosity. Higher porosity samples displayed significantly lower values of Qp. In our experiments we observed that ultrasonic wave scattering due to heterogeneities in the carbonate samples was dominant. Although we observed lower μρ values, trends in our data strongly agreed with the model proposed workers interpreting AVO trends in a LMR cross plot space. We found that μρ was proportional to temperature while λρ was temperature independent and that λρ-μρ trends were extremely dependent on porosity. Higher porosity results in lower values for both λρ and μρ. The presence of fluids causes a distinct shift in λρ values, an observation which could provide insight into subsurface exploration using amplitude variation with offset (AVO) classification. We

  16. Seismic and structural characterization of the fluid bypass system using 3D and partial stack seismic from passive margin: inside the plumbing system.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iacopini, David; Maestrelli, Daniele; Jihad, Ali; Bond, Clare; Bonini, Marco

    2017-04-01

    In recent years enormous attention has been paid to the understanding of the process and mechanism controlling the gas seepage and more generally the fluid expulsion affecting the earth system from onshore to offshore environment. This is because of their demonstrated impact to our environment, climate change and during subsea drilling operation. Several example from active and paleo system has been so far characterized and proposed using subsurface exploration, geophysical and geochemical monitoring technology approaches with the aims to explore what trigger and drive the overpressure necessary maintain the fluid/gas/material expulsion and what are the structure that act as a gateway for gaseous fluid and unconsolidated rock. In this contribution we explore a series of fluid escape structure (ranging from seepage pipes to large blowout pipes structure of km length) using 3D and partial stack seismic data from two distinctive passive margin from the north sea (Loyal field, West Shetland) and the Equatorial Brazil (Ceara' Basin). We will focuses on the characterization of the plumbing system internal architecture and, for selected example, exploring the AVO response (using partial stack) of the internal fluid/unconsolidated rock. The detailed seismic mapping and seismic attributes analysis of the conduit system helped us to recover some detail from the signal response of the chimney internal structures. We observed: (1) small to medium seeps and pipes following structural or sedimentary discontinuities (2) large pipes (probably incipient mud volcanoes) and blowup structures propagating upward irrespective of pre-existing fault by hydraulic fracturing and assisted by the buoyancy of a fluidised and mobilised mud-hydrocarbon mixture. The reflector termination observed inside the main conduits, the distribution of stacked bright reflectors and the AVO analysis suggests an evolution of mechanisms (involving mixture of gas, fluid and probably mud) during pipe birth and

  17. New Coastal Tsunami Gauges: Application at Augustine Volcano, Cook Inlet, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgy, M.; Bolton, D. K.

    2006-12-01

    Recent eruptive activity at Augustine Volcano and its associated tsunami threat to lower Cook Inlet pointed out the need for a quickly deployable tsunami detector which could be installed on Augustine Island's coast. The detector's purpose would be to verify tsunami generation by direct observation of the wave at the source to support tsunami warning decisions along populated coastlines. To fill this need the Tsunami Mobile Alert Real-Time (TSMART) system was developed at NOAA's West Coast/Alaska Tsunami Warning Center with support from the University of Alaska Tsunami Warning and Environmental Observatory for Alaska program (TWEAK) and the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO). The TSMART system consists of a pressure sensor installed as near as possible to the low tide line. The sensor is enclosed in a water-tight hypalon bag filled with propylene-glycol to prevent silt damage to the sensor and freezing. The bag is enclosed in a perforated, strong plastic pipe about 16 inches long and 8 inches in diameter enclosed at both ends for protection. The sensor is cabled to a data logger/radio/power station up to 300 feet distant. Data are transmitted to a base station and made available to the warning center in real-time through the internet. This data telemetry system can be incorporated within existing AVO and Plate Boundary Observatory networks which makes it ideal for volcano-tsunami monitoring. A TSMART network can be utilized anywhere in the world within 120 miles of an internet connection. At Augustine, two test stations were installed on the east side of the island in August 2006. The sensors were located very near the low tide limit and covered with rock, and the cable was buried to the data logger station which was located well above high tide mark. Data logger, radio, battery and other electronics are housed in an enclosure mounted to a pole which also supports an antenna and solar panel. Radio signal is transmitted to a repeater station higher up on the island

  18. Three-dimensional velocity structure and high-precision earthquake relocations at Augustine, Akutan, and Makushin Volcanoes, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syracuse, E. M.; Thurber, C. H.; Power, J. A.; Prejean, S. G.

    2010-12-01

    Alaska contains over 100 volcanoes, 21 of which have been active within the past 20 years, including Augustine in Cook Inlet, and Akutan and Makushin in the central Aleutian arc. We incorporate 14-15 years of earthquake data from the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) to obtain P-wave velocity structure and high-precision earthquake locations at each volcano. At Augustine, most relocated seismicity is beneath the summit at an average depth of 0.6 km. In the weeks leading to the 2006 eruption, seismicity shallowed and focused on a NW-SE line, suggestive of an inflating dike. Through August 2006, intermittent seismicity was observed at 1 to 4.5 km depth, pointing to an association with the transport of magma. Active-source data are also incorporated into the tomographic inversion, illuminating a high-velocity column beneath the summit, and elevated velocities on the south flank. The high-velocity column surrounds the observed deeper seismicity and is likely due to intruded volcanic material. The elevated velocities on the south flank are associated with uplifted zeolitzed sandstones. Akutan most recently erupted in 1992, before the seismic network was installed. Most seismicity is above 9 km depth, with 10% occurring between 14 to30 km depth. Seismicity is separated into two main groups that dip away from the caldera—one to the east and one to the west. The eastern group contains earthquakes from a swarm in early 1996 and the western group contains earthquakes from mid-1996 through the present that form rough lines radiating from the summit. Ongoing seismicity also occurs in a broader region beneath the caldera. Makushin most recently erupted in 1995, also prior to seismic monitoring by AVO. Relocations here show that most seismicity is at 3 to 13 km depth and either beneath the caldera or within one of two dipping clusters 20 km to the northeast. Additional seismicity occurs at up to 25 km depth beneath the summit, as well as scattered throughout the island at

  19. Infrasound Studies of Alaskan Volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNutt, S. R.; Arnoult, K.; Szuberla, C.; Olson, J. V.; Wilson, C. R.

    2010-12-01

    Infrasound has been used to study a number of Alaskan volcanic eruptions over the last 15 years. Arrays include the I53US array of 8 sensors in Fairbanks installed in 2002 under the CTBT umbrella; an array of 4 sensors installed at Okmok Volcano in summer 2010 by the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO); and a 6-sensor array installed in Dillingham in September 2010 by the UAF Infrasound Group. Individual sensors have been installed by AVO at Pavlof (1996), Shishaldin (1997), Augustine (2006), Fourpeaked (2006), and Redoubt (2009) volcanoes. These have been especially valuable because they provide precise source timing and signal strength that allow the correct identification of atmospheric paths. Small volcanic explosions have been recorded at local stations only for Pavlof, Shishaldin and Fourpeaked volcanoes. The more interesting large explosive eruptions have been recorded on both local stations and arrays from eruptions at Augustine in 2006 (13 events), Fourpeaked in 2006 (2 events), Cleveland in 2007 (1 event), Okmok in 2008 (1 sustained event), Kasatochi in 2008 (5 events), and Redoubt in 2009 (over 30 events). Pressures up to 6 Pa have been recorded for the largest Redoubt event at a distance of 547 km from the array, and 1.2 Pa for the largest Kasatochi event at a distance of 2104 km. We determined reduced pressures (equivalent pressure at 1 km assuming 1/r decay) and find that Kasatochi exceeds 2500 Pa and Redoubt 1600 Pa. The smaller explosive eruptions at Augustine yield reduced pressures of 40 to 300 Pa. There is reasonable correlation between measured pressures and signal durations and the ash cloud heights and tephra volumes, hence the infrasound data are useful for hazard assessment. However, the long travel times (3 sec per km) suggest that infrasound array data arrive too late for primary detection but are good for estimating other attributes such as size. Infrasound data may also be combined with seismic data to determine the partitioning of energy

  20. Augustine Volcano, Cook Inlet, Alaska (January 31, 2006)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    Since last spring, the U.S. Geological Survey's Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) has detected increasing volcanic unrest at Augustine Volcano in Cook Inlet, Alaska near Anchorage. Based on all available monitoring data, AVO regards that an eruption similar to 1976 and 1986 is the most probable outcome. During January, activity has been episodic, and characterized by emission of steam and ash plumes, rising to altitudes in excess of 9,000 m (30,000 ft), and posing hazards to aircraft in the vicinity. In the last week, volcanic flows have been seen on the volcano's flanks. An ASTER thermal image was acquired at night at 22:50 AST on January 31, 2006, during an eruptive phase of Augustine. The image shows three volcanic flows down the north flank of Augustine as white (hot) areas. The eruption plume spreads out to the east in a cone shape: it appears dark blue over the summit because it is cold and water ice dominates the composition; further downwind a change to orange color indicates that the plume is thinning and the signal is dominated by the presence of ash.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER provides scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance.

    The U.S. science team is located at

  1. Parameter coupling in seismic reflection amplitudes and the importance of the number VP/VS=2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Innanen, K. A.

    2012-12-01

    Elastic plane wave displacement reflection coefficients may be calculated exactly as solutions of the Zoeppritz equations, or approximately using one of many linear forms such as that due to Aki and Richards. Most practical analysis involves interpretation of the slope and intercept of reflection strength vs. the square of the sine of the angle of incidence, in the context of the Aki-Richards approximation. Several authors (e.g., Castagna et al., 1998; Foster et al., 2010) have pointed out that slope and intercept interpretations, and relationships between various linear approximate solutions tend to become dramatically simplified under the "Wiggins approximation", when the VP/V_S ratio is 2. The theoretical origins of the importance of VP/V_S=2 do not appear to have been fully explored. We derive a certain series expansion of the solutions for the Zoeppritz equations about functions of angle and VP, VS and density ρ contrasts, whose first order terms are equivalent to those of the Aki-Richards approximation. The second order terms, which expose coupling between parameter contrasts in their determination of reflection coefficients, shed light on the importance of VP/V_S=2. Every nonzero term involving coupling with density is seen to be proportional to ( (VS)/(V_P) - (1)/(2). V_P/V_S=2 can therefore be understood as a special circumstance in which density is uncoupled from V_P and V_S$ over a larger than normal range of parameter contrast magnitudes. The uncoupling in turn reduces the ways reflection strengths can vary with contrasts, and thus we have a mathematical expectation of more simplified behaviour. The coupling/uncoupling of parameters can be examined directly in terms of contrasts across the elastic interface, or alternatively in terms of P-, S- and density reflectivities. Castagna, J. P., H. W. Swan and D. J. Foster, 1998, Framework for AVO gradient and intercept interpretation, Geophysics 63, 3, 948-956. Foster, D. J., R. G. Keys and F. D. Lane

  2. Determination of the isotopic composition and molar mass of a new 'Avogadro' crystal: homogeneity and enrichment-related uncertainty reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pramann, Axel; Narukawa, Tomohiro; Rienitz, Olaf

    2017-10-01

    The molar mass M and isotopic composition (expressed in amount-of-substance fractions x( i Si) of the silicon isotopes 28Si, 29Si, and 30Si) of a new silicon crystal (notation: Si28-23Pr11) highly enriched in the 28Si isotope have been determined independently at PTB and NMIJ by measuring exactly the same sample solutions using both a high resolution multicollector-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (MC-ICP-MS). This crystal will be used for the complementary determination of the Avogadro constant N A and thus providing one of many key parameters in the planned redefinition of the SI units kilogram and mole, using fundamental constants. Samples from three different axial positions in the crystal ingot, each divided into several radial positions were measured in order to probe possible variations of the molar mass and isotopic composition. Results obtained at PTB and NMIJ agreed within the limits of uncertainty. The application of the latest improved measurement techniques as well as an improved determination of the calibration factors (K) required to correct for mass bias effects resulted in an averaged M  =  27.976 942 666(40) g mol‑1 with a relative combined uncertainty u c,rel(M)  =  1.4  ×  10‑9. The course of M as a function of the origin of the measured samples suggests no significant inhomogeneity within the limits of the claimed uncertainty throughout the crystal supporting its applicability for the determination of a new N A. This extends to x(28Si) and x(29Si). Variations in x(30Si) as a function of the sample location were observed, but a systematic relation to physical origins cannot be claimed. Compared to the previous silicon crystal (‘AVO28’, notation: Si28-10Pr11) used for the latest determination of N A, the enrichment increases from x(28Si)  =  0.999 957 52(12) mol mol‑1 (‘AVO28’) to x(28Si)  =  0.999 984 470(39) mol mol‑1 (Si28-23Pr11, discussed in this paper) which is

  3. Material Property Estimation for Direct Detections of DNAPL using Integrated Ground-Penetrating Radar Velocity, Imaging and Attribute Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bradford, John; Smithson, Scott B.; Holbrook, W. Stephen

    2004-06-14

    The focus of our work is direct detection of DNAPLs, specifically chlorinated solvents, via material property estimation from surface ground-penetrating radar (GPR) data. We combine sophisticated GPR processing methodology with quantitative attribute analysis and material property estimation to determine the location and extent of residual and/or pooled DNAPL in both the vadose and saturated zones. An important byproduct of our research is state-of-the-art imaging which allows us to pinpoint attribute anomalies, characterize stratigraphy, identify fracture zones, and locate buried objects. Implementation and verification of these methodologies will be a significant advance in GPR research and in meeting DOE's need for reliable in-situ characterization of DNAPL contamination. Chlorinated solvents have much lower electric permittivity and conductivity than water. An electrical property contrast is induced when solvents displace water in the sediment column resulting in an anomalous GPR signature. To directly identify zones of DNAPL contamination, we focus on three aspects of reflected wave behavior--propagation velocity, frequency dependent attenuation, and amplitude variation with offset (AVO). Velocity analysis provides a direct estimate of electric permittivity, attenuation analysis provides a measure of conductivity, and AVO behavior is used to estimate the permittivity ratio at a reflecting boundary. Areas of anomalously low electric permittivity and conductivity are identified as potential DNAPL rich zones. Preliminary work illustrated significant potential for quantitative direct detection methodologies in identifying shallow DNAPL source zones. It is now necessary to verify these methodologies in a field setting. To this end, the project is field oriented and has three primary objectives: (1) Develop a suite of methodologies for direct detection of DNAPLs from surface GPR data (2) Controlled field verification at well characterized, contaminated sites (3

  4. Material Property Estimation for Direct Detection of DNAPL using Integrated Ground-Penetrating Radar Velocity, Imaging and Attribute Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bradford, John; Smithson, Scott B.; Holbrook, W. Stephen

    2003-06-01

    The focus of our work is direct detection of DNAPLs, specifically chlorinated solvents, via material property estimation from surface ground-penetrating radar (GPR) data. We combine sophisticated GPR processing methodology with quantitative attribute analysis and material property estimation to determine the location and extent of residual and/or pooled DNAPL in both the vadose and saturated zones. An important byproduct of our research is state-of-the-art imaging which allows us to pinpoint attribute anomalies, characterize stratigraphy, identify fracture zones, and locate buried objects. Implementation and verification of these methodologies will be a significant advance in GPR research and in meeting DOE's need for reliable in-situ characterization of DNAPL contamination. Chlorinated solvents have much lower electric permittivity and conductivity than water. An electrical property contrast is induced when solvents displace water in the sediment column resulting in an anomalous GPR signature. To directly identify zones of DNAPL contamination, we focus on three aspects of reflected wave behavior--propagation velocity, frequency dependent attenuation, and amplitude variation with offset (AVO). Velocity analysis provides a direct estimate of electric permittivity, attenuation analysis provides a measure of conductivity, and AVO behavior is used to estimate the permittivity ratio at a reflecting boundary. Areas of anomalously low electric permittivity and conductivity are identified as potential DNAPL rich zones. Preliminary work illustrated significant potential for quantitative direct detection methodologies in identifying shallow DNAPL source zones. It is now necessary to verify these methodologies in a field setting. To this end, the project is field oriented and has three primary objectives: (1) Develop a suite of methodologies for direct detection of DNAPLs from surface GPR data (2) Controlled field verification at well characterized, contaminated sites (3

  5. Augustine Volcano, Cook Inlet, Alaska (January 31, 2006)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    Since last spring, the U.S. Geological Survey's Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) has detected increasing volcanic unrest at Augustine Volcano in Cook Inlet, Alaska near Anchorage. Based on all available monitoring data, AVO regards that an eruption similar to 1976 and 1986 is the most probable outcome. During January, activity has been episodic, and characterized by emission of steam and ash plumes, rising to altitudes in excess of 9,000 m (30,000 ft), and posing hazards to aircraft in the vicinity. In the last week, volcanic flows have been seen on the volcano's flanks. An ASTER thermal image was acquired at night at 22:50 AST on January 31, 2006, during an eruptive phase of Augustine. The image shows three volcanic flows down the north flank of Augustine as white (hot) areas. The eruption plume spreads out to the east in a cone shape: it appears dark blue over the summit because it is cold and water ice dominates the composition; further downwind a change to orange color indicates that the plume is thinning and the signal is dominated by the presence of ash.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER provides scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance.

    The U.S. science team is located at

  6. Intermediate-Term Declines in Seismicity at Mt. Wrangell and Mt. Veniaminof Volcanoes, Alaska, Following the November 3, 2002 Mw 7.9 Denali Fault Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, J. J.; McNutt, S. R.

    2003-12-01

    On November 3, 2002 a Mw 7.9 earthquake ruptured segments of the Denali Fault and adjacent faults in interior Alaska providing a unique opportunity to look for intermediate-term (days to weeks) responses of Alaskan volcanoes to shaking from a large regional earthquake. The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) monitors 24 volcanoes with seismograph networks. We examined one station per volcano, generally the closest to the vent (typically within 5 km) unless noise, or other factors made the data unusable. Data were digitally filtered between 0.8 and 5 Hz to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio. Data for the period four weeks before to four weeks after the Mw 7.9 earthquake were then plotted at a standard scale used for AVO routine monitoring. Mt. Veniaminof volcano, which has had recent mild eruptions and a rate of ten earthquakes per day on station VNNF, suffered a drop in seismicity by a factor of two after the earthquake; this lasted for 15 days. Wrangell, the closest volcano to the epicenter, had a background rate of about 16 earthquakes per day. Data from station WANC could not be measured for 3 days after the Mw 7.9 earthquake because the large number and size of aftershocks impeded identification of local earthquakes. For the following 30 days, however, its seismicity rate dropped by a factor of two. Seismicity then remained low for an additional 4 months at Wrangell, whereas that at Veniaminof returned to normal within weeks. The seismicity at both Mt. Veniaminof and Mt. Wrangell is dominated by low-frequency volcanic events. The detection thresholds for both seismograph networks are low and stations VNNF and WANC operated normally during the time of our study, thus we infer that the changes in seismicity may be related to the earthquake. It is known that Wrangell increased its heat output after the Mw 9.2 Alaska earthquake of 1964 and again after the Ms 7.1 St.Elias earthquake of 1979. The other volcanoes showed no changes in seismicity that can be attributable to

  7. Haemodynamic interactions of medetomidine and the peripheral alpha-2 antagonist MK-467 during step infusions in isoflurane-anaesthetised dogs.

    PubMed

    Kaartinen, Johanna; del Castillo, Jérôme R E; Salla, Kati; Troncy, Eric; Raekallio, Marja R; Vainio, Outi M

    2014-11-01

    The haemodynamic interactions of a step infusion with medetomidine (MED) and the peripherally acting alpha-2 antagonist MK-467 (MK) were compared with MED infused alone in isoflurane-anaesthetised dogs. Eight purposely-bred Beagles were used in a randomised crossover study. Anaesthesia was induced with propofol intravenously (IV) and maintained with isoflurane in oxygen. Dogs received 1.25 µg/kg MED as a 1 min loading dose IV, along with a step-down MED infusion at rates of 8.0 µg/kg/h (step 1: 0-20 min), 5.5 µg/kg/h (step 2: 20-40 min) and 4.0 µg/kg/h (step 3: 40-95 min). Five minutes after starting the MED infusion, the dogs received MK-467 in a step-up infusion at rates of 100 µg/kg/h (step 1: 5-35 min), 200 µg/kg/h (step 2: 35-65 min) and 500 µg/kg/h (step 3: 65-95 min). Heart rate (HR), systolic (SAP) and mean arterial (MAP) blood pressures and arteriovenous oxygen content differences (a-vO2 diff) were calculated. Plasma drug concentrations were analysed. Repeated-measures general linear mixed models with Bonferroni correction were used for statistical analyses. MED infusion alone increased SAP maximally by 24.9%, MAP by 34.7% and a-vO2 diff by 222.5%, and reduced HR by 32.3%, but these changes were significantly attenuated by MK-467. Most MED effects returned to baseline during step 2 of MK-467 infusion and step 3 of MED infusion (MED/MK-467 ratio 1:18 to 1:50). Plasma concentrations of MED tended to be lower with the addition of MK-467. The use of step infusions helped to narrow down the therapeutic range for the MED/MK-467 infusion dose ratio during isoflurane anaesthesia in dogs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Evaluation of the seismic reflection method as a monitoring tool during primary and enhanced coalbed methane production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lespinasse Fung, Diane Jael

    In this thesis I present an evaluation of the seismic reflection method as a monitoring tool during coalbed methane (CBM) production and enhanced coalbed methane (ECBM) production by CO2 injection. This evaluation is based on a workflow previously developed for monitoring CO2 storage in the Big George coalbeds in the Powder River Basin. I study the changes in seismic and the AVO response associated with coalbeds during primary production using a data set from the Mannville coals, which represent one of the most important CBM resources in the Province of Alberta. Using published data, I perform a single well flow simulation to make an assessment of its production forecast in a 10 year period. The flow simulation provides information on methane saturation and reservoir pressure during production, while the changes in porosity and permeability due to depletion are estimated according to the Palmer and Mansoori permeability model. Using well log data of the Corbett Field and the results of the flow simulation, I complete a Gassmann fluid substitution to replace brine by a mixture of brine and methane in the pore space and estimate the variations in Vp, Vs and density due to changes in fluid saturation. I evaluate offset dependent synthetic seismograms before and after fluid substitution, and I use different coalbed thicknesses to establish resolution limits. To observe significant changes in the character and phase of the wavelet due to the replacement of brine by methane I find that coalbed thickness must be at least 10 m, also in terms of AVO I observe that there is a decrease in amplitude with offset caused by the presence of methane in the pore space. Using the same methodology and production data from the Fruitland Coals Fairway in the North of the San Juan Basin U.S.A, which is considered the most productive CBM reservoir in the world, I evaluate Elastic Impedance (EI) and Elastic Impedance Coefficient (EC) response during ECBM by CO2 injection. In this case, I

  9. Apigenin induces autophagic cell death in human papillary thyroid carcinoma BCPAP cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Cheng, Xian; Gao, Yanyan; Zheng, Jie; Xu, Qiang; Sun, Yang; Guan, Haixia; Yu, Huixin; Sun, Zhen

    2015-11-01

    Apigenin, abundantly present in fruits and vegetables, is recognized as a flavonoid with anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and anticancer properties. In this study, we first investigated the anti-neoplastic effects of apigenin on papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) cell line BCPAP cells. Our results show that apigenin inhibited the viability of BCPAP cells in a dose-dependent manner. A large body of evidence demonstrates that autophagy contributes to cell death in certain contexts. In the present study, autophagy was induced by apigenin treatment in BCPAP cells, as evidenced by Beclin-1 accumulation, conversion of LC3 protein, p62 degradation as well as the significantly increased formation of acidic vesicular organelles (AVOs) compared to the control group. 3-MA, an autophagy inhibitor, rescued the cells from apigenin-induced cell death. Notably, apigenin enhanced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and subsequent induction of significant DNA damage as monitored by the TUNEL assay. In addition, apigenin treatment caused a significant accumulation of cells in the G2/M phase via down-regulation of Cdc25C expression. Our findings reveal that apigenin inhibits papillary thyroid cancer cell viability by the stimulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, induction of DNA damage, leading to G2/M cell cycle arrest followed by autophagic cell death. Thus, our results provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying apigenin-mediated autophagic cell death and suggest apigenin as a potential chemotherapeutic agent which is able to fight against papillary thyroid cancer.

  10. Morphological and physiological changes in Leishmania promastigotes induced by yangambin, a lignan obtained from Ocotea duckei.

    PubMed

    Monte Neto, Rubens L; Sousa, Louisa M A; Dias, Celidarque S; Barbosa Filho, José M; Oliveira, Márcia R; Figueiredo, Regina C B Q

    2011-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that yangambin, a lignan obtained from Ocotea duckei Vattimo (Lauraceae), shows antileishmanial activity against promastigote forms of Leishmania chagasi and Leishmania amazonensis. The aim of this study was to determine the in vitro effects of yangambin against these parasites using electron and confocal microscopy. L. chagasi and L. amazonensis promastigotes were incubated respectively with 50 μg/mL and 65 μg/mL of pure yangambin and stained with acridine orange. Treated-parasites showed significant alterations in fluorescence emission pattern and cell morphology when compared with control cells, including the appearance of abnormal round-shaped cells, loss of cell motility, nuclear pyknosis, cytoplasm acidification and increased number of acidic vesicular organelles (AVOs), suggesting important physiological changes. Ultrastructural analysis of treated-promatigotes showed characteristics of cell death by apoptosis as well as by autophagy. The presence of parasites exhibiting multiples nuclei suggests that yangambin may also affect the microtubule dynamic in both Leishmania species. Taken together our results show that yangambin is a promising agent against Leishmania. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Vicksburg, Frio successes lift Galveston Bay area prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Petzet, G.A.

    1997-08-11

    Tertiary plays are yielding gas and condensate reserves in Galveston and Trinity bays and adjacent Galveston and Chambers counties along the Upper Texas Gulf Coast. The area south and southeast of Houston has long been productive of gas mainly from Upper Frio sands. Operators armed with modern geophysical techniques are now targeting reserves in deeper Frio and Vicksburg horizons. Interpretation of 3D seismic data is being used on some projects, and 2D data and AVO analysis have also been helpful. TransTexas Gas Corp., Houston, believes it has encountered large potential reserves of high pressure gas in Vicksburg in Galveston Bay just north of Texas City. Several operators are drilling exploratory wells within 5--10 miles west of TransTexas` indicated discovery. Enserch Exploration Inc., Dallas, and Vintage Petroleum Corp., Tulsa, are successfully exploring Trinity Bay and northeastern Galveston Bay in Chambers County southwest of Anahuac. Elsewhere in Chambers County, Columbus Energy Corp., Denver, completed a Frio F-16 deeper pool gas/condensate discovery beneath giant Anahuac oil field. Several operators are reporting success at gas/condensate tests across the county. Exploration activities are discussed in these deposits.

  12. Solar Cell Materials by Design: Hybrid Pyroxene Corner-Sharing VO4 Tetrahedral Chains.

    PubMed

    El-Mellouhi, Fedwa; Akande, Akinlolu; Motta, Carlo; Rashkeev, Sergey N; Berdiyorov, Golibjon; Madjet, Mohamed El-Amine; Marzouk, Asma; Bentria, El Tayeb; Sanvito, Stefano; Kais, Sabre; Alharbi, Fahhad H

    2017-05-09

    Hybrid organic-inorganic frameworks provide numerous combinations of materials with a wide range of structural and electronic properties, which enable their use in various applications. In recent years, some of these hybrid materials-especially lead-based halide perovskites-have been successfully used for the development of highly efficient solar cells. The large variety of possible hybrid materials has inspired the search for other organic-inorganic frameworks that may exhibit enhanced performance over conventional lead halide perovskites. In this study, a new class of low-dimensional hybrid oxides for photovoltaic applications was developed by using electronic structure calculations in combination with analysis from existing materials databases, with a focus on vanadium oxide pyroxenes (tetrahedron-based frameworks), mainly due to their high stability and nontoxicity. Pyroxenes were screened with different cations [A] and detailed computational studies of their structural, electronic, optical and transport properties were performed. Low-dimensional hybrid vanadate pyroxenes [A]VO3 (with molecular cations [A] and corner-sharing VO4 tetrahedral chains) were found to satisfy all physical requirements needed to develop an efficient solar cell (a band gap of 1.0-1.7 eV, strong light absorption and good electron-transport properties). © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Impact of channel doping and spacer architecture on analog/RF performance of low power junctionless MOSFETs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Dipankar; Kranti, Abhinav

    2015-01-01

    This work reports on the significance of reducing channel doping and optimizing the spacer width to enhance analog/RF metrics of junctionless (JL) MOSFETs for operation at low current levels (˜30 μA μm-1). It is shown that optimally designed junctionless devices achieve 40-50% higher cut-off frequency (fT) and maximum oscillation frequency (fMAX), along with a 15% enhancement in intrinsic voltage gain (AVO) as compared to conventional junctionless (JL) transistors designed with a channel doping (Nd) of 1019 cm-3. The parasitic fringing capacitances are significantly reduced in optimized JL devices. The gain-bandwidth trade-off can be considerably improved around the analog ‘sweet spot’ as performance metrics are enhanced by 70-90%. Apart from the above benefits, the optimal JL design results in reduced sensitivity to variation in device parameters. Results will be useful for design and optimization of low power junctionless MOSFETs for analog/RF applications.

  14. Operational Monitoring of Volcanoes Using Keyhole Markup Language

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehn, J.; Bailey, J. E.; Webley, P.

    2007-12-01

    Volcanoes are some of the most geologically powerful, dynamic, visually appealing structures on the Earth's landscape. Volcanic eruptions are hard to predict, difficult to quantify and impossible to prevent, making effective monitoring a difficult proposition. In Alaska, volcanoes are an intrinsic part of the culture, with over 100 volcanoes and volcanic fields that have been active in historic time monitored by the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO). Observations and research are performed using a suite of methods and tools in the fields of remote sensing, seismology, geodesy and geology, producing large volumes of geospatial data. Keyhole Markup Language (KML) offers a context in which these different, and in the past disparate, data can be displayed simultaneously. Dynamic links keep these data current, allowing it to be used in an operational capacity. KML is used to display information from the aviation color codes and activity alert levels for volcanoes to locations of thermal anomalies, earthquake locations and ash plume modeling. The dynamic refresh and time primitive are used to display volcano webcam and satellite image overlays in near real-time. In addition a virtual globe browser using KML, such as Google Earth, provides an interface to further information using the hyperlink, rich- text and flash-embedding abilities supported within object description balloons. By merging these data sets in an easy to use interface, a virtual globe browser provides a better tool for scientists and emergency managers alike to mitigate volcanic crises.

  15. Soc Trang City Apt., Vietnam. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1971-03-25

    99.8 9908 99.0 9968 9968 9908 99.8 700 9965 9949 ,0 990o1 Yve 9734 7 81 918 997# aVo17 9991 9908 99o8 t 600 99.7,000 GO L0 00.0000.0 00,0 00,0 00.0...57.3 57.3 57,3 ooo 1773 5T1 17 7 57 703 蟕 T73 j77 575 3775 579- -557, T57; 57 , 2160o0 58o4 58.5 58.5 585 58,5 58.5 8. 58.5 58,5 580 58,5 58,5 58,5...of Hours with Tempe at w Dgi Bult,, 58410 ,717g, 7e aog 5,i 4~s 1#qss( --- 3 9’, 4𔃽e31 8 wt ulb 7- 91- -6 -7 - 97 D- P- 2-i---7-V 1 � 4oBC 325 545

  16. Cytolethal Distending Toxin Enhances Radiosensitivity in Prostate Cancer Cells by Regulating Autophagy.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hwai-Jeng; Liu, Hsin-Ho; Lin, Chia-Der; Kao, Min-Chuan; Chen, Yu-An; Chiang-Ni, Chuan; Jiang, Zhi-Pei; Huang, Mei-Zi; Lin, Chun-Jung; Lo, U-Ging; Lin, Li-Chiung; Lai, Cheng-Kuo; Lin, Ho; Hsieh, Jer-Tsong; Chiu, Cheng-Hsun; Lai, Chih-Ho

    2017-01-01

    Cytolethal distending toxin (CDT) produced by Campylobacter jejuni contains three subunits: CdtA, CdtB, and CdtC. Among these three toxin subunits, CdtB is the toxic moiety of CDT with DNase I activity, resulting in DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) and, consequently, cell cycle arrest at the G2/M stage and apoptosis. Radiation therapy is an effective modality for the treatment of localized prostate cancer (PCa). However, patients often develop radioresistance. Owing to its particular biochemical properties, we previously employed CdtB as a therapeutic agent for sensitizing radioresistant PCa cells to ionizing radiation (IR). In this study, we further demonstrated that CDT suppresses the IR-induced autophagy pathway in PCa cells by attenuating c-Myc expression and therefore sensitizes PCa cells to radiation. We further showed that CDT prevents the formation of autophagosomes via decreased high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) expression and the inhibition of acidic vesicular organelle (AVO) formation, which are associated with enhanced radiosensitivity in PCa cells. The results of this study reveal the detailed mechanism of CDT for the treatment of radioresistant PCa.

  17. Resveratrol-induced autophagy and apoptosis in cisplatin-resistant human oral cancer CAR cells: A key role of AMPK and Akt/mTOR signaling.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chao-Hsiang; Lee, Chao-Ying; Lu, Chi-Cheng; Tsai, Fuu-Jen; Hsu, Yuan-Man; Tsao, Je-Wei; Juan, Yu-Ning; Chiu, Hong-Yi; Yang, Jai-Sing; Wang, Ching-Chiung

    2017-03-01

    Resveratrol is known to be an effective chemo-preventive phytochemical against multiple tumor cells. However, the increasing drug resistance avoids the cancer treatment in oral cavity cancer. In this study, we investigated the oral antitumor activity of resveratrol and its mechanism in cisplatin-resistant human oral cancer CAR cells. Our results demonstrated that resveratrol had an extremely low toxicity in normal oral cells and provoked autophagic cell death to form acidic vesicular organelles (AVOs) and autophagic vacuoles in CAR cells by acridine orange (AO) and monodansylcadaverine (MDC) staining. Either DNA fragmentation or DNA condensation occurred in resveratrol-triggered CAR cell apoptosis. These inhibitors of PI3K class III (3-MA) and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) (compound c) suppressed the autophagic vesicle formation, LC3-II protein levels and autophagy induced by resveratrol. The pan-caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-FMK attenuated resveratrol-triggered cleaved caspase-9, cleaved caspase-3 and cell apoptosis. Resveratrol also enhanced phosphorylation of AMPK and regulated autophagy- and pro-apoptosis-related signals in resveratrol-treated CAR cells. Importantly, resveratrol also stimulated the autophagic mRNA gene expression, including Atg5, Atg12, Beclin-1 and LC3-II in CAR cells. Overall, our findings indicate that resveratrol is likely to induce autophagic and apoptotic death in drug-resistant oral cancer cells and might become a new approach for oral cancer treatment in the near future.

  18. The novel pterostilbene derivative ANK-199 induces autophagic cell death through regulating PI3 kinase class III/beclin 1/Atg‑related proteins in cisplatin‑resistant CAR human oral cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Min-Tsang; Chen, Hao-Ping; Lu, Chi-Cheng; Chiang, Jo-Hua; Wu, Tian-Shung; Kuo, Daih-Huang; Huang, Li-Jiau; Kuo, Sheng-Chu; Yang, Jai-Sing

    2014-08-01

    Pterostilbene is an effective chemopreventive agent against multiple types of cancer cells. A novel pterostilbene derivative, ANK-199, was designed and synthesized by our group. Its antitumor activity and mechanism in cisplatin-resistant CAR human oral cancer cells were investigated in this study. Our results show that ANK-199 has an extremely low toxicity in normal oral cell lines. The formation of autophagic vacuoles and acidic vesicular organelles (AVOs) was observed in the ANK-199-treated CAR cells by monodansylcadaverine (MDC) and acridine orange (AO) staining, suggesting that ANK-199 is able to induce autophagic cell death in CAR cells. Neither DNA fragmentation nor DNA condensation was observed, which means that ANK-199-induced cell death is not triggered by apoptosis. In accordance with morphological observation, 3-MA, a specific inhibitor of PI3K kinase class III, can inhibit the autophagic vesicle formation induced by ANK-199. In addition, ANK-199 is also able to enhance the protein levels of autophagic proteins, Atg complex, beclin 1, PI3K class III and LC3-II, and mRNA expression of autophagic genes Atg7, Atg12, beclin 1 and LC3-II in the ANK-199-treated CAR cells. A molecular signaling pathway induced by ANK-199 was therefore summarized. Results presented in this study show that ANK-199 may become a novel therapeutic reagent for the treatment of oral cancer in the near future (patent pending).

  19. Integrated seismic study of naturally fractured tight gas reservoirs. Technical progress report, April 1, 1993--June 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Mavko, G.; Nur, A.

    1993-07-26

    This was the seventh quarter of the contract. During this quarter we (1) continued the large task of processing the seismic data, (2) collected additional geological information to aid in the interpretation, (3) tied the well log data to the seismic via generation of synthetic seismograms, (4) began integrating regional structural information and fracture trends with our observations of structure in the study area, (5) began constructing a velocity model for time-to-depth conversion and subsequent AVO and raytrace modeling experiments, and (6) completed formulation of some theoretical tools for relating fracture density to observed elastic anisotropy. The study area is located at the southern end of the Powder River Basin in Converse County in east-central Wyoming. It is a low permeability fractured site, with both gas and oil present. Reservoirs are highly compartmentalized due to the low permeabilities, and fractures provide the only practical drainage paths for production. The two formations of interest are: The Niobrara: a fractured shale and limey shale to chalk, which is a reservoir rock, but also its own source rock. The Frontier: a tight sandstone lying directly below the Niobrara, brought into contact with it by an unconformity. A basemap is presented with the seismic lines being analyzed for this project plus locations of 13 wells that we are using to supplement the analysis. The arrows point to two wells for which we have constructed synthetic seismograms.

  20. New seismic reflection techniques applied to gas recognition in the Rharb Basin, Morocco

    SciTech Connect

    Jabour, H.; Dakki, M. )

    1994-07-01

    The Rharb basin in Morocco is a Tertiary foreland filled by clastic series during the Miocene and Pliocene. This terrigenous influx, derived from the prerif to the northeast and the Meseta to the south, is characterized by a sandy episode during much of the Messinian and the Tortonian. The sand deposits were probably related to the uplift and major erosion of a part of the prerif during the sliding of an olistostrome (prerif nappe). Although most of the wells drilled in the basin have encountered biogenic gas accumulations, the problem still facing exploration in the area is seismic resolution and thin-bed tuning analysis. Recent studies using high seismic resolution techniques have permitted the authors to gain a deep insight into the stratigraphy and depositional environment of the thin sand reservoirs and their fluid content. AVO stratigraphy, inversion of seismic traces into acoustic impedance traces and seismic attributes calculation, and computing provide a remarkable example of the possibilities of depicting the lateral and vertical evolution of reservoir facies and localizing biogenic gas accumulations. Out of five recent exploratory wells drilled based on this new technique, three encountered gas-bearing sands with economic potential. Fifty-three amplitude anomalies have been identified and await processing.

  1. Surface Deformation and Source Model at Semisopochnoi Volcano from InSAR and Seismic Analysis During the 2014 and 2015 Seismic Swarms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeGrandpre, K.; Pesicek, J. D.; Lu, Z.

    2016-12-01

    During the summer of 2014 and the early spring of 2015 two notable increases in seismic activity at Semisopochnoi volcano in the western Aleutian islands were recorded on AVO seismometers on Semisopochnoi and neighboring islands. These seismic swarms did not lead to an eruption. This study employs differential SAR techniques using TerraSAR-X images in conjunction with more accurately relocating the recorded seismic events through simultaneous inversion of event travel times and a three-dimensional velocity model using tomoDD. The interferograms created from the SAR images exhibit surprising coherence and an island wide spatial distribution of inflation that is then used in a Mogi model in order to define the three-dimensional location and volume change required for a source at Semisopochnoi to produce the observed surface deformation. The tomoDD relocations provide a more accurate and realistic three-dimensional velocity model as well as a tighter clustering of events for both swarms that clearly outline a linear seismic void within the larger group of shallow (<10 km) seismicity. While no direct conclusions as to the relationship of these seismic events and the observed surface deformation can be made at this time, these techniques are both complimentary and efficient forms of remotely monitoring volcanic activity that provide much deeper insights into the processes involved without having to risk hazardous or costly field work.

  2. Numerical Analysis of Velocity Dispersion in Multi-Phase Fluid-Saturated Porous Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xuehua; Zhong, Wenli; Gao, Gang; Zou, Wen; He, Zhenhua

    2016-12-01

    Seismic waves are subject to velocity dispersion when they propagate in fluid-saturated porous media. In this work, we explore the velocity dispersion behavior of P- and SV-waves in multi-phase fluid-saturated porous reservoirs while taking into account the effects of multi-phase pore fluids on the effective viscosities that control the wave-induced fluid flow. The effective viscosities associated with the hydrocarbon saturation of a synthetic sandstone reservoir saturated with different pore fluid mixtures are calculated using the Refutas model. We then analyze the frequency-dependent velocity, dispersion variation rate and characteristic frequency for different fluid saturation cases by employing Chapman's dynamic equivalent-medium theory. The results demonstrate that the hydrocarbon proportions and types in multi-phase mixed pore fluids significantly affect the magnitude and characteristic frequencies of velocity dispersion features for both the P- and S-waves. The dispersion anomalies of SV-waves are in general larger than those of the P-waves. This indicates that the velocity dispersion anomalies of SV-waves are equally sensitive to fluid saturation as the P-waves and should not be neglected. The velocities at lower frequencies (e.g., 10 and 100 Hz) within the seismic frequency range show a more remarkable decrease with increasing hydrocarbon proportion than those at higher frequency (1000 Hz). The numerical examples help to improve the understanding of the frequency-dependent AVO inversion from seismic reflection data.

  3. Astrogrid - Constructing the Uk's Virtual Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walton, Nicholas A.; Lawrence, Andrew; Linde, Anthony E.

    The UK AstroGrid Project (http://www.astrogrid.org) is one of three major world-wide projects (along with the European AVO and US-VO projects) which are creating an astronomical Virtual Observatory. This will be a set of co-operating and interoperable software systems that: * allow users to interrogate multiple data centres in a seamless and transparent way; * provide powerful new analysis and visualisation tools; * give data centres and providers a standard framework for publishing and delivering services using their data. AstroGrid's long term vision is not one of a single software package but rather of a framework which enables data centres to provide competing and co-operating data services and software providers to offer compatible analysis and visualisation tools. Our presentation will describe (and illustrate with live demonstrations) how AstroGrid is developing a standardised framework to allow such creative diversity which will: * to improve the quality efficiency ease speed and cost-effectiveness of on-line astronomical research * to make comparison and integration of data from diverse sources seamless and transparent * to remove data analysis barriers to interdisciplinary research * to make science involving manipulation of large datasets as easy and as powerful as possible.

  4. Geologic map of Mount Gareloi, Gareloi Island, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coombs, Michelle L.; McGimsey, Robert G.; Browne, Brandon L.

    2012-01-01

    As part of an effort to both monitor and study all historically active volcanoes in Alaska, the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) undertook a field program at Mount Gareloi in the summer of 2003. During a month-long period, seismic networks were installed at Mount Gareloi and the neighboring Tanaga volcanic cluster. During this time, we undertook the first geologic field study of the volcano since Robert Coats visited Gareloi Island for four days in 1946. Understanding the geology of this relatively small island is important from a hazards perspective, because Mount Gareloi lies beneath a heavily trafficked air route between North America and Asia and has frequently erupted airborne ash since 1760. At least two landslides from the island have deposited debris on the sea floor; thus, landslide-generated tsunamis are also a potential hazard. Since seismic instruments were installed in 2003, they have detected small but consistent seismic signals from beneath Mount Gareloi's edifice, suggesting an active hydrothermal system. Mount Gareloi is also important from the standpoint of understanding subduction-related volcanism, because it lies in the western portion of the volcanically active arc, where subduction is oblique to the arc front. Understanding the compositional evolution of Mount Gareloi fills a spatial gap in along-arc studies.

  5. Numerical Analysis of Velocity Dispersion in Multi-Phase Fluid-Saturated Porous Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xuehua; Zhong, Wenli; Gao, Gang; Zou, Wen; He, Zhenhua

    2017-03-01

    Seismic waves are subject to velocity dispersion when they propagate in fluid-saturated porous media. In this work, we explore the velocity dispersion behavior of P- and SV-waves in multi-phase fluid-saturated porous reservoirs while taking into account the effects of multi-phase pore fluids on the effective viscosities that control the wave-induced fluid flow. The effective viscosities associated with the hydrocarbon saturation of a synthetic sandstone reservoir saturated with different pore fluid mixtures are calculated using the Refutas model. We then analyze the frequency-dependent velocity, dispersion variation rate and characteristic frequency for different fluid saturation cases by employing Chapman's dynamic equivalent-medium theory. The results demonstrate that the hydrocarbon proportions and types in multi-phase mixed pore fluids significantly affect the magnitude and characteristic frequencies of velocity dispersion features for both the P- and S-waves. The dispersion anomalies of SV-waves are in general larger than those of the P-waves. This indicates that the velocity dispersion anomalies of SV-waves are equally sensitive to fluid saturation as the P-waves and should not be neglected. The velocities at lower frequencies (e.g., 10 and 100 Hz) within the seismic frequency range show a more remarkable decrease with increasing hydrocarbon proportion than those at higher frequency (1000 Hz). The numerical examples help to improve the understanding of the frequency-dependent AVO inversion from seismic reflection data.

  6. Reconstruction of signaling networks regulating fungal morphogenesis by transcriptomics.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Vera; Arentshorst, Mark; Flitter, Simon J; Nitsche, Benjamin M; Kwon, Min Jin; Reynaga-Peña, Cristina G; Bartnicki-Garcia, Salomon; van den Hondel, Cees A M J J; Ram, Arthur F J

    2009-11-01

    Coordinated control of hyphal elongation and branching is essential for sustaining mycelial growth of filamentous fungi. In order to study the molecular machinery ensuring polarity control in the industrial fungus Aspergillus niger, we took advantage of the temperature-sensitive (ts) apical-branching ramosa-1 mutant. We show here that this strain serves as an excellent model system to study critical steps of polar growth control during mycelial development and report for the first time a transcriptomic fingerprint of apical branching for a filamentous fungus. This fingerprint indicates that several signal transduction pathways, including TORC2, phospholipid, calcium, and cell wall integrity signaling, concertedly act to control apical branching. We furthermore identified the genetic locus affected in the ramosa-1 mutant by complementation of the ts phenotype. Sequence analyses demonstrated that a single amino acid exchange in the RmsA protein is responsible for induced apical branching of the ramosa-1 mutant. Deletion experiments showed that the corresponding rmsA gene is essential for the growth of A. niger, and complementation analyses with Saccharomyces cerevisiae evidenced that RmsA serves as a functional equivalent of the TORC2 component Avo1p. TORC2 signaling is required for actin polarization and cell wall integrity in S. cerevisiae. Congruently, our microscopic investigations showed that polarized actin organization and chitin deposition are disturbed in the ramosa-1 mutant. The integration of the transcriptomic, genetic, and phenotypic data obtained in this study allowed us to reconstruct a model for cellular events involved in apical branching.

  7. A shale rock physics model for analysis of brittleness index, mineralogy and porosity in the Barnett Shale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Zhiqi; Li, Xiang-Yang; Liu, Cai; Feng, Xuan; Shen, Ye

    2013-04-01

    We construct a rock physics workflow to link the elastic properties of shales to complex constituents and specific microstructure attributes. The key feature in our rock physics model is the degrees of preferred orientation of clay and kerogen particles defined by the proportions of such particles in their total content. The self-consistent approximation method and Backus averaging method are used to consider the isotropic distribution and preferred orientation of compositions and pores in shales. Using the core and well log data from the Barnett Shale, we demonstrate the application of the constructed templates for the evaluation of porosity, lithology and brittleness index. Then, we investigate the brittleness index defined in terms of mineralogy and geomechanical properties. The results show that as clay content increases, Poisson's ratio tends to increase and Young's modulus tends to decrease. Moreover, we find that Poisson's ratio is more sensitive to the variation in the texture of shales resulting from the preferred orientation of clay particles. Finally, based on the constructed rock physics model, we calculate AVO responses from the top and bottom of the Barnett Shale, and the results indicate predictable trends for the variations in porosity, lithology and brittleness index in shales.

  8. International Collaboration for the Virtual Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genova, F.; Benvenuti, P.; De Young, D. S.; Hanisch, R. J.; Lawrence, A.; Linde, T.; Quinn, P. J.; Szalay, A. S.; Walton, N. A.; Williams, R. D.

    2002-05-01

    There are now three major initiatives underway related to the virtual observatory. In the United States, the NSF's Information Technology Program is funding a project led by A. Szalay and R. Williams entitled "Building the Framework for the Virtual Observatory". Europe is sponsoring two programs: the Astrophysical Virtual Observatory (funded by the European Commission and led by P. Quinn) and AstroGrid (funded by the UK e-science program and led by A. Lawrence). Other national initiatives are forming in, e.g., Germany, India, Chile, Japan, and Australia. These VO projects are all strongly science driven, and aim to satisfy diverse scientific demands while accommodating possibly different priorities. Thus the VO projects will offer a wide range of functionalities. At the same time, it is clear that the underlying fabric upon which the VO's are built must have a high degree of commonality to ensure accessibility and functionality as the international VO becomes an operational reality. Thus, the major VO projects are working together to identify and agree upon these common elements that facilitate both the commonality and diversity in functionality required by the users of the international VO. Some of these common elements have to do with standards for data and interfaces. Some involve policy and yet others have to do with funding and securing international support at governmental levels. Effort is already underway in the development of metadata standards, and the joint leadership of the NVO, AVO, and AstroGrid projects is drafting an international VO roadmap.

  9. Automatic picking and attribute mapping for a quick evaluation of the potential of turbiditic sands and stratigraphic traps in frontier areas. An example from the deep offshore of the Niger Delta

    SciTech Connect

    Montagnier, P.; Rossi, T.; Clergeat, B.; Dall`astam, W.F.

    1996-12-31

    Most interpretation teams involved in the exploration of Nigeria`s deep offshore have been faced with a major challenge: (1) how to scan through a large volume of 3D data in a drastically short time frame... (2) with the captive of understanding the depositional pattern of slope fan and basin floor fan turbidites to identify mostly stratigraphic traps... (3) in an environment almost devoid of reference wells and calibration. A traditional approach was likely to miss both the deadlines and the sensitivity required for the sedimentological aspects of the study. Elfs answer was to rely extensively on the advanced functionalities of the SISMAGE (TM) workstation, in order to quickly generate time and seismic attribute maps which could then be interpreted in terms of structure and sedimentology. Two critical aspects were particularly well handled by the workstation: (1) the reliability of the extrapolation process from a loose grid of manually picked lines, and (2) the generation of seismic attribute maps relative not only to surfaces (e.g. sequence boundaries), but also to whole intervals through statistical calculation. In a second stage, the interpreters were able to focus on the most prospective areas and to move on to prospect generation, with the help of AVO studies. This approach is illustrated through an example from the deep offshore of the Niger delta.

  10. Automatic picking and attribute mapping for a quick evaluation of the potential of turbiditic sands and stratigraphic traps in frontier areas. An example from the deep offshore of the Niger Delta

    SciTech Connect

    Montagnier, P.; Rossi, T. ); Clergeat, B.; Dall'astam, W.F. )

    1996-01-01

    Most interpretation teams involved in the exploration of Nigeria's deep offshore have been faced with a major challenge: (1) how to scan through a large volume of 3D data in a drastically short time frame... (2) with the captive of understanding the depositional pattern of slope fan and basin floor fan turbidites to identify mostly stratigraphic traps... (3) in an environment almost devoid of reference wells and calibration. A traditional approach was likely to miss both the deadlines and the sensitivity required for the sedimentological aspects of the study. Elfs answer was to rely extensively on the advanced functionalities of the SISMAGE (TM) workstation, in order to quickly generate time and seismic attribute maps which could then be interpreted in terms of structure and sedimentology. Two critical aspects were particularly well handled by the workstation: (1) the reliability of the extrapolation process from a loose grid of manually picked lines, and (2) the generation of seismic attribute maps relative not only to surfaces (e.g. sequence boundaries), but also to whole intervals through statistical calculation. In a second stage, the interpreters were able to focus on the most prospective areas and to move on to prospect generation, with the help of AVO studies. This approach is illustrated through an example from the deep offshore of the Niger delta.

  11. NON-INVASIVE DETERMINATION OF THE LOCATION AND DISTRIBUTION OF FREE-PHASE DENSE NONAQUEOUS PHASE LIQUIDS (DNAPL) BY SEISMIC REFLECTION TECHNIQUES

    SciTech Connect

    Michael G. Waddell; William J. Domoracki; Tom J. Temples

    2001-05-01

    This semi-annual technical progress report is for part of Task 4 (site evaluation), on DOE contact number DE-AR26-98FT40369. The project had planned one additional deployment to another site other than Savannah River Site (SRS) or DOE Hanford. After the SUBCON midyear review in Albuquerque, NM, it was decided that two additional deployments would be performed. The first deployment is to test the feasibility of using non-invasive seismic reflection and AVO analysis as monitoring to assist in determining the effectiveness of Dynamic Underground Stripping (DUS) in removal of DNAPL. The Second deployment site is the Department of Defense (DOD) Charleston Navy Weapons Station, Solid Waste Management Unit 12 (SWMU-12) Charleston, SC was selected in consultation with National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and DOD Navy Facilities Engineering Command Southern Division (NAVFAC) personnel. Base upon the review of existing data and due to the shallow target depth the project team has collected three Vertical Seismic Profiles (VSP) and experimental reflection line. At the time of preparing this report VSP data and experimental reflection line data has been collected and has have preliminary processing on the data sets.

  12. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase, receptor interacting protein, and reactive oxygen species regulate shikonin-induced autophagy in human hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Gong, Ke; Zhang, Zhenxing; Chen, Yicheng; Shu, Hong-Bing; Li, Wenhua

    2014-09-05

    Shikonin, a naphthoquinone derived from the Chinese medicinal plant Lithospermum erythrorhizon, shows potential to be a cancer chemotherapeutic agent. Our previous data demonstrate that high doses (about 6 μM) of shikonin induce apoptosis in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells. Here, we discovered that a low dose of shikonin (2.5 μM) and a short treatment time (12h) induced autophagy, as evidenced by the upregulation of microtubule-associated protein 1A/1B-light chain 3 (LC3)-II, the formation of acidic autophagic vacuoles (AVOs), and the punctate fluorescence pattern of GFP-LC3 protein. Next, we investigated the mechanism and found reactive oxygen species accumulation after shikonin treatment. The reactive oxygen species scavengers NAC and Tiron completely blocked autophagy. We further found activation of ERK by generation of reactive oxygen species and inhibition of RIP pathway, which are at least partially connected to shikonin-induced autophagy. Moreover, experiments in vivo revealed similar results: shikonin caused the accumulation of reactive oxygen species and phospho-ERK and thus induced autophagy in a tumor xenograft model. These findings suggest that shikonin is an inducer of autophagy and may be a promising clinical antitumor drug. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Rottlerin induces autophagy and apoptotic cell death through a PKC-delta-independent pathway in HT1080 human fibrosarcoma cells: the protective role of autophagy in apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Song, Kyoung-Sub; Kim, Jong-Seok; Yun, Eun-Jin; Kim, Young-Rae; Seo, Kang-Sik; Park, Ji-Hoon; Jung, Yeon-Joo; Park, Jong-Il; Kweon, Gi-Ryang; Yoon, Wan-Hee; Lim, Kyu; Hwang, Byung-Doo

    2008-07-01

    Rottlerin is widely used as a protein kinase C-delta inhibitor. Recently, several reports have shown the possible apoptosis-inducing effect of rottlerin in some cancer cell lines. Here we report that rottlerin induces not only apoptosis but also autophagy via a PKC-delta-independent pathway in HT1080 human fibrosarcoma cells. Rottlerin treatment induced a dose- and time-dependent inhibition of cell growth, and cytoplasmic vacuolations were markedly shown. These vacuoles were identified as acidic autolysosomes by electron microscopy, acidic vesicular organelle (AVO) staining and transfection of green fluorescent protein-LC3. The LC3-II protein level also increased after treatment with rottlerin. Prolonged exposure to rottlerin eventually caused apoptosis via loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and translocation of AIF from mitochondria to the nucleus. However, the activities of caspase-3, -8 and -9 were not changed, and PARP did not show signs of cleavage. Interestingly, the pretreatment of cells with a specific inhibitor of autophagy (3-methyladenine) accelerated rottlerin-induced apoptosis as revealed by an analysis of the subdiploid fraction and TUNEL assay. Nevertheless, the knockdown of PKC-delta by RNA interference neither affected cell growth nor acidic vacuole formation. Similarly, rottlerin-induced cell death was not prevented by PKC-delta overexpression. Taken together, these findings suggest that rottlerin induces early autophagy and late apoptosis in a PKC-delta-independent manner, and the rottlerin-induced early autophagy may act as a survival mechanism against late apoptosis in HT1080 human fibrosarcoma cells.

  14. Autophagic Cell Death by Poncirus trifoliata Rafin., a Traditional Oriental Medicine, in Human Oral Cancer HSC-4 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Han, Hye-Yeon; Park, Bong-Soo; Lee, Guem San; Jeong, Seung-Hwa; Kim, Hyungwoo; Ryu, Mi Heon

    2015-01-01

    Poncirus trifoliata Rafin. has long been used as anti-inflammatory and antiallergic agent to treat gastrointestinal disorders and pulmonary diseases such as indigestion, constipation, chest fullness, chest pain, bronchitis, and sputum in Korea. P. trifoliata extract has recently been reported to possess anticancer properties; however, its mechanisms of action remain unclear. In this study, its antiproliferative effects and possible mechanisms were investigated in HSC-4 cells. The methanol extract of P. trifoliata (MEPT) significantly decreased the proliferation of HSC-4 cells (inhibitory concentration (IC)50 = 142.7 μg/mL) in a dose-dependent manner. While there were no significant changes observed upon cell cycle analysis and ANNEXIN V and 7-AAD double staining in the MEPT-treated groups, the intensity of acidic vesicular organelle (AVO) staining and microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain (LC) 3-II protein expression increased in response to MEPT treatment. Furthermore, 3-methyladenine (3-MA, autophagy inhibitor) effectively blocked the MEPT-induced cytotoxicity of HSC-4 cells and triggered the activation of p38 and extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) proteins. Taken together, our results indicate that MEPT is a potent autophagy agonist in oral cancer cells with antitumor therapeutic potential that acts through the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. PMID:26221173

  15. 7-Hydroxydehydronuciferine induces human melanoma death via triggering autophagy and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Pei-Fang; Chiu, Chien-Chih; Chen, Chung-Yi; Wang, Hui-Min David

    2015-12-01

    Melanoma is the deadliest cancer. We identified 7-hydroxydehydronuciferine (7-HDNF) isolated from the leaves of Nelumbo nucifera Gaertn cv. Rosa-plena to be a bio-active agent that antagonizes melanoma tumor growth in mice xenograft model in vivo. Cell proliferation assay demonstrated strong anticancer effects of 7-HDNF to exhibit a dose-dependent behaviour and displayed minor cytotoxicities on normal human skin cells, including epidermal keratinocytes and melanocytes, and dermal fibroblasts. With acridine orange (AO) staining and flow analysis, we found 7-HDNF induced the formation of intracellular vacuoles and the augmentation of acidic vesicular organelles (AVO). The apoptotic cell death ratio was measured via two-dimensional flow cytometry by annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)/propidium iodide (PI) double stained to confirm the cellular membrane asymmetry lost. One-dimensional flow cytometric analysis showed 7-HDNF increased the cellular arrest in cell cycle at the G2/M phase. Through Western blot examinations, protein expressions were discovered to verify autophagy and apoptosis response mechanisms sharing the associated pathways. Finally, 7-HDNF presented a high-quality antimigratory activity in wound-healing assay. Overall, 7-HDNF presented high-quality anticancer bio-functions and inhibited melanoma tumor growth in vivo and in vitro. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. A robust polynomial principal component analysis for seismic noise attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuchen; Lu, Wenkai; Wang, Benfeng; Liu, Lei

    2016-12-01

    Random and coherent noise attenuation is a significant aspect of seismic data processing, especially for pre-stack seismic data flattened by normal moveout correction or migration. Signal extraction is widely used for pre-stack seismic noise attenuation. Principle component analysis (PCA), one of the multi-channel filters, is a common tool to extract seismic signals, which can be realized by singular value decomposition (SVD). However, when applying the traditional PCA filter to seismic signal extraction, the result is unsatisfactory with some artifacts when the seismic data is contaminated by random and coherent noise. In order to directly extract the desired signal and fix those artifacts at the same time, we take into consideration the amplitude variation with offset (AVO) property and thus propose a robust polynomial PCA algorithm. In this algorithm, a polynomial constraint is used to optimize the coefficient matrix. In order to simplify this complicated problem, a series of sub-optimal problems are designed and solved iteratively. After that, the random and coherent noise can be effectively attenuated simultaneously. Applications on synthetic and real data sets note that our proposed algorithm can better suppress random and coherent noise and have a better performance on protecting the desired signals, compared with the local polynomial fitting, conventional PCA and a L1-norm based PCA method.

  17. Salinomycin simultaneously induces apoptosis and autophagy through generation of reactive oxygen species in osteosarcoma U2OS cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang-Hun; Choi, Young-Jun; Kim, Kwang-Youn; Yu, Sun-Nyoung; Seo, Young-Kyo; Chun, Sung-Sik; Noh, Kyung-Tae; Suh, Jeung-Tak; Ahn, Soon-Cheol

    2016-04-29

    Salinomycin, a polyether antibiotic, acts as a highly selective potassium ionophore. It was reported to anticancer activity on various cancer cell lines. In this study, salinomycin was examined on apoptosis and autophagy through generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in osteosarcoma U2OS cells. Apoptosis, autophagy, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and ROS were analyzed using flow cytometry. Also, expressions of apoptosis- and autophagy-related proteins were determined by western blotting. As a result, salinomycin triggered apoptosis of U2OS cells, which was accompanied by change of MMP and cleavage of caspases-3 and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase. And salinomycin increased the expression of autophagy-related protein and accumulation of acidic vesicular organelles (AVO). Salinomycin-induced ROS production promotes both apoptosis and autophagy, as evidenced by the result that treatment of N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC), a ROS scavenger, attenuated both apoptosis and autophagy. In addition, inhibition of autophagy by 3-methyladenine (3 MA) enhanced the salinoymcin-induced apoptosis. Taken together, these results suggested that salinomycin-induced autophagy, as a survival mechanism, might be a potential strategy through ROS regulation in cancer therapy.

  18. New insights into the North Taranaki Basin from New Zealand's first broadband 3D survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzcategui, Marjosbet; Francis, Malcolm; Kong, Wai Tin Vincent; Patenall, Richard; Fell, Dominic; Paxton, Andrea; Allen, Tristan

    2016-06-01

    The Taranaki Basin is the only hydrocarbon producing basin in New Zealand. The North Taranaki Basin has widespread two-dimensional (2D) seismic coverage and numerous wells that have not encountered commercial accumulations. This is attributed to the structural complexity in the central graben and the absence of necessary information to help understand the basin's evolution. An active petroleum system has been confirmed by hydrocarbon shows and non-commercial oil and gas discoveries (Karewa-1 and Kora-1). A broadband long offset three-dimensional (3D) seismic survey was acquired and processed by Schlumberger in 2013 to evaluate the hydrocarbon potential of the North Taranaki Basin. Innovative acquisition techniques were combined with advanced processing and imaging methods. Raypath distortions and depth uncertainty were significantly reduced by processing through tilted transverse isotropy (TTI) anisotropic Kirchhoff prestack depth migration with a geologically constrained velocity model. The survey provided the necessary information to understand the petroleum system and provide evidence for material hydrocarbon accumulations. In this investigation, we assessed the hydrocarbon potential of the North Taranaki Basin using the newly acquired data. 3D seismic interpretation and amplitude-versus-offset (AVO) analysis support the renewed potential of the basin and demonstrate effectiveness of these technologies that together can achieve encouraging results for hydrocarbon exploration.

  19. SEISMIC ATTENUATION FOR RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Joel Walls; M.T. Taner; Naum Derzhi; Gary Mavko; Jack Dvorkin

    2003-12-01

    We have developed and tested technology for a new type of direct hydrocarbon detection. The method uses inelastic rock properties to greatly enhance the sensitivity of surface seismic methods to the presence of oil and gas saturation. These methods include use of energy absorption, dispersion, and attenuation (Q) along with traditional seismic attributes like velocity, impedance, and AVO. Our approach is to combine three elements: (1) a synthesis of the latest rock physics understanding of how rock inelasticity is related to rock type, pore fluid types, and pore microstructure, (2) synthetic seismic modeling that will help identify the relative contributions of scattering and intrinsic inelasticity to apparent Q attributes, and (3) robust algorithms that extract relative wave attenuation attributes from seismic data. This project provides: (1) Additional petrophysical insight from acquired data; (2) Increased understanding of rock and fluid properties; (3) New techniques to measure reservoir properties that are not currently available; and (4) Provide tools to more accurately describe the reservoir and predict oil location and volumes. These methodologies will improve the industry's ability to predict and quantify oil and gas saturation distribution, and to apply this information through geologic models to enhance reservoir simulation. We have applied for two separate patents relating to work that was completed as part of this project.

  20. Combination of retinyl palmitate and UV-filters: phototoxic risk assessment based on photostability and in vitro and in vivo phototoxicity assays.

    PubMed

    Benevenuto, Carolina Gomes; Guerra, Lucas Offenbecker; Gaspar, Lorena Rigo

    2015-02-20

    This study aimed to assess the phototoxic potential of combined UV-filters and retinyl palmitate (RP) in the presence or not of bemotrizinol (BMTZ), employing photostability and in vitro and in vivo phototoxicity assays. The formulations tested contained octocrylene (OCT), octyl methoxycinnamate (OMC), benzophenone-3 (BZP-3) and RP (photostable) or octocrylene (OCT), octyl methoxycinnamate (OMC), avobenzone (AVO) and RP (less photostable). Both formulations were supplemented with bemotrizinol. Photostability was evaluated by exposing, or not, formulations spread on a glass plate to UVA/UVB irradiation. The resulting products were quantified by HPLC analysis. In vitro phototoxicity of UV-filters and combinations were evaluated using 3T3 viable monolayer fibroblast cultures submitted, or not, to irradiation according to OECD TG 432. In vivo photoallergy and photoxicity were assessed by clinical studies (photopatch test). Photostability assays showed that UV-filter bemotrizinol was a better photostabilizer for RP/benzophenone-3 than for RP/avobenzone. The in vitro phototoxicity of the combination RP/avobenzone was reduced by bemotrizinol. Clinical studies did not indicate phototoxic or photoallergenic potentials in all formulations tested. It is concluded that the 3T3 NRU phototoxicity test may be considered a supplementary assay in formulation developments, since it can detect chemically unstable and potentially phototoxic combinations. However, extrapolation of in vitro positive results to human photopatch tests may be performed only to a limited extent. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Rock Physics of Geologic Carbon Sequestration/Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Dvorkin, Jack; Mavko, Gary

    2013-05-31

    This report covers the results of developing the rock physics theory of the effects of CO{sub 2} injection and storage in a host reservoir on the rock's elastic properties and the resulting seismic signatures (reflections) observed during sequestration and storage. Specific topics addressed are: (a) how the elastic properties and attenuation vary versus CO{sub 2} saturation in the reservoir during injection and subsequent distribution of CO{sub 2} in the reservoir; (b) what are the combined effects of saturation and pore pressure on the elastic properties; and (c) what are the combined effects of saturation and rock fabric alteration on the elastic properties. The main new results are (a) development and application of the capillary pressure equilibrium theory to forecasting the elastic properties as a function of CO{sub 2} saturation; (b) a new method of applying this theory to well data; and (c) combining this theory with other effects of CO{sub 2} injection on the rock frame, including the effects of pore pressure and rock fabric alteration. An important result is translating these elastic changes into synthetic seismic responses, specifically, the amplitude-versus-offset (AVO) response depending on saturation as well as reservoir and seal type. As planned, three graduate students participated in this work and, as a result, received scientific and technical training required should they choose to work in the area of monitoring and quantifying CO{sub 2} sequestration.

  2. Variation of shear and compressional wave modulus upon saturation for pure pre-compacted sands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhuiyan, M. H.; Holt, R. M.

    2016-07-01

    Gassmann's fluid substitution theory is commonly used to predict seismic velocity change upon change in saturation, and is hence essential for 4-D seismic and AVO studies. This paper addresses the basics assumptions of the Gassmann theory, in order to see how well they are fulfilled in controlled laboratory experiments. Our focus is to investigate the sensitivity of shear modulus to fluid saturation, and the predictability of Gassmann's fluid substitution theory for P-wave modulus. Ultrasonic P- and S-wave velocities in dry and saturated (3.5 wt per cent NaCl) unconsolidated clean sands (Ottawa and Columbia) were measured in an oedometer test system (uniaxial strain conditions) over a range of 0.5-10 MPa external vertical stress. This study shows shear modulus hardening upon brine saturation, which is consistent with previous data found in the literature. Analysis of the data shows that most of the hardening of the ultrasonic shear modulus may be explained by Biot dispersion. Isotropic Gassmann's fluid substitution is found to underestimate the P-wave modulus upon fluid saturation. However, adding the Biot dispersion effect improves the prediction. More work is required to obtain good measurements of parameters influencing dispersion, such as tortuosity, which is very ambiguous and challenging to measure accurately.

  3. Quercetin induces protective autophagy in gastric cancer cells: involvement of Akt-mTOR- and hypoxia-induced factor 1α-mediated signaling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kui; Liu, Rui; Li, Jingyi; Mao, Jiali; Lei, Yunlong; Wu, Jinhua; Zeng, Jun; Zhang, Tao; Wu, Hong; Chen, Lijuan; Huang, Canhua; Wei, Yuquan

    2011-09-01

    Quercetin, a dietary antioxidant present in fruits and vegetables, is a promising cancer chemopreventive agent that inhibits tumor promotion by inducing cell cycle arrest and promoting apoptotic cell death. In this study, we examined the biological activities of quercetin against gastric cancer. Our studies demonstrated that exposure of gastric cancer cells AGS and MKN28 to quercetin resulted in pronounced pro-apoptotic effect through activating the mitochondria pathway. Meanwhile, treatment with quercetin induced appearance of autophagic vacuoles, formation of acidic vesicular organelles (AVOs), conversion of LC3-I to LC3-II, recruitment of LC3-II to the autophagosomes as well as activation of autophagy genes, suggesting that quercetin initiates the autophagic progression in gastric cancer cells. Furthermore, either administration of autophagic inhibitor chloroquine or selective ablation of atg5 or beclin 1 using small interfering RNA (siRNA) could augment quercetin-induced apoptotic cell death, suggesting that autophagy plays a protective role against quercetin-induced apoptosis. Moreover, functional studies revealed that quercetin activated autophagy by modulation of Akt-mTOR signaling and hypoxia-induced factor 1α (HIF-1α) signaling. Finally, a xenograft model provided additional evidence for occurrence of quercetin-induced apoptosis and autophagy in vivo. Together, our studies provided new insights regarding the biological and anti-proliferative activities of quercetin against gastric cancer, and may contribute to rational utility and pharmacological study of quercetin in future anti-cancer research.

  4. The Simple Spectral Access protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolensky, Markus; Tody, Doug

    2004-09-01

    The goal of the Simple Spectral Access (SSA) specification is to define a uniform interface to spectral data including spectral energy distributions (SEDs), 1D spectra, and time series data. In contrast to 2D images, spectra are stored in a wide variety of formats and there is no widely used standard in astronomy for representing spectral data, hence part of the challenge of specifying SSA was defining a general spectrophotometric data model as well as definitions of standard serializations in a variety of data formats including XML and FITS. Access is provided to both atlas (pre-computed) data and to virtual data which is computed on demand. The term simple in Simple Spectrum Access refers to the design goal of simplicity in both implementing spectral data services and in retrieving spectroscopic data from distributed data collections. SSA is a product of the data access layer (DAL) working group of the International Virtual Observatory Alliance (IVOA). The requirements were derived from a survey among spectral data providers and data consumers and were further refined in a broad discussion in meetings and electronic forums as well as by prototyping efforts within the European Astrophysical Virtual Observatory (AVO) and the US National Virtual Observatory (NVO).

  5. Improved vehicle occupancy data collection methods. Final report, 1994--1997

    SciTech Connect

    Heidtman, K.; Skarpness, B.; Tornow, C.

    1997-12-31

    The report evaluates current and emerging vehicle occupancy data collection methodologies. Five primary methods for collecting vehicle occupancy data were identified: the traditional roadside/windshield observation method, a recently developed carousel observational method, photographic surveillance, mail-out or telephone surveys, and accident database extraction method. The findings show that other methods besides the traditional windshield method may be advantageous for collecting vehicle occupancy information. The key factors in selecting a collection method are the conditions under which vehicle occupancy is to be estimated. For example, the accident method and mail-out surveys are well suited for developing regional vehicle occupancy estimates, while the windshield method and carousel method are well suited for corridor-specific estimates. Another key finding, which impact the selection of a method and sampling period, is the fact that average vehicle occupancy estimates vary significantly by time-of-day, day-of-week, and month-of-year. The implications of this finding is that agencies cannot continue to infer yearly AVO estimates from data collected during a limited time period such as the morning rush hour period. Recommendations for selecting and implementing a vehicle occupancy data collection method are also provided.

  6. Advanced Reservoir Imaging Using Frequency-Dependent Seismic Attributes

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Hilterman; Tad Patzek; Gennady Goloshubin; Dmitriy Silin; Charlotte Sullivan; Valeri Korneev

    2007-12-31

    Our report concerning advanced imaging and interpretation technology includes the development of theory, the implementation of laboratory experiments and the verification of results using field data. We investigated a reflectivity model for porous fluid-saturated reservoirs and demonstrated that the frequency-dependent component of the reflection coefficient is asymptotically proportional to the reservoir fluid mobility. We also analyzed seismic data using different azimuths and offsets over physical models of fractures filled with air and water. By comparing our physical model synthetics to numerical data we have identified several diagnostic indicators for quantifying the fractures. Finally, we developed reflectivity transforms for predicting pore fluid and lithology using rock-property statistics from 500 reservoirs in both the shelf and deep-water Gulf of Mexico. With these transforms and seismic AVO gathers across the prospect and its down-dip water-equivalent reservoir, fluid saturation can be estimated without a calibration well that ties the seismic. Our research provides the important additional mechanisms to recognize, delineate, and validate new hydrocarbon reserves and assist in the development of producing fields.

  7. The 2013 Eruptions of Pavlof and Mount Veniaminof Volcanoes, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, D. J.; Waythomas, C. F.; Wallace, K.; Haney, M. M.; Fee, D.; Pavolonis, M. J.; Read, C.

    2013-12-01

    Pavlof Volcano and Mount Veniaminof on the Alaska Peninsula erupted during the summer of 2013 and were monitored by the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) using seismic data, satellite and web camera images, a regional infrasound array and observer reports. An overview of the work of the entire AVO staff is presented here. The 2013 eruption of Pavlof Volcano began on May 13 after a brief and subtle period of precursory seismicity. Two volcano-tectonic (VT) earthquakes at depths of 6-8 km on April 24 preceded the onset of the eruption by 3 weeks. Given the low background seismicity at Pavlof, the VTs were likely linked to the ascent of magma. The onset of the eruption was marked by subtle pulsating tremor that coincided with elevated surface temperatures in satellite images. Activity during May and June was characterized by lava fountaining and effusion from a vent near the summit. Seismicity consisted of fluctuating tremor and numerous explosions that were detected on an infrasound array (450 km NE) and as ground-coupled airwaves at local and distant seismic stations (up to 650 km). Emissions of ash and sulfur dioxide were observed in satellite data extending as far as 300 km downwind at altitudes of 5-7 km above sea level. Ash collected in Sand Point (90 km E) were well sorted, 60-150 micron diameter juvenile glass shards, many of which had fluidal forms. Automated objective ash cloud detection and cloud height retrievals from the NOAA volcanic cloud alerting system were used to evaluate the hazard to aviation. A brief reconnaissance of Pavlof in July found that lava flows on the NW flank consist of rubbly, clast rich, 'a'a flows composed of angular blocks of agglutinate and rheomorphic lava. There are at least three overlapping flows, the longest of which extends about 5 km from the vent. Eruptive activity continued through early July, and has since paused or stopped. Historical eruptions of Mount Veniaminof volcano have been from an intracaldera cone within a 10

  8. Detection and Tracking of Volcanic Ash and SO2 and its Impact to Aviation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osiensky, J.; Hall, T.

    2008-12-01

    The eruptions of Okmok and Kasatochi Volcanoes in August 2008 produced a combination of volcanic ash and SO2 (sulfur dioxide) that impacted aviation across Alaska and the North Pacific Region. The Anchorage Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (A-VAAC) worked closely with the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) and Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Air Route Traffic Control Center (ARTCC) to ensure that accurate and timely detection and forecast of the ash plume occurred. Volcanic ash poses a hazard to all forms of transportation, but has been shown to be especially dangerous to aviation. Even a small eruption with limited vertical extent to the ash cloud impacts aviation traffic. A significant eruption where the ash cloud penetrates the jet airways (greater than 20,000 feet) requires major re-routing of air traffic, or even the cancellation of flights to ensure the safety of the airways. The AAWU and the AVO have demonstrated substantial experience successfully tracking volcanic ash clouds during the past 15 years. The AAWU issues special aviation warnings for volcanic ash (Volcanic Ash SIGMETs (Significant Meteorological Information)) to warn aircraft of impending ash hazards. However, an additional potential hazard to aviation associated with volcanic eruptions is being examined. A Sulfur Dioxide (SO2) cloud was identified and tracked across the Aleutians, Gulf of Alaska, and eventually into the Lower 48 states. The size and coverage of the SO2 clouds from the Okmok and Kasatochi eruptions may be unprecedented. There are currently no requirements to advise, or warn for SO2 as a hazard to aviation. However, SO2 has been demonstrated as a marker for potential areas of lower concentration volcanic ash. Dispersion models, such as NOAAs HYSPLIT, that are used to track volcanic ash are currently not tuned to track gases such as SO2. SO2 may not be a direct hazard to aviation per se; However, SO2 mixed with water produces H2SO4 (sulfuric acid), and long term exposure to even

  9. Significance of the basin wide reverse polarity reflector in the Offshore Sydney Basin, East Australian Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman Talukder, Asrarur; Nadri, Dariush; Rajput, Sanjeev; Clennell, Ben; Griffiths, Cedric; Breeze, David

    2010-05-01

    changes laterally and is characterized by patches of high amplitude (bright spots). Contour mapping shows that this reverse polarity reflector is continuous and regionally distributed. The depth of the reflector with respect to the sea surface is too shallow to be a BSR, typically caused at the interface between hydrate containing sediments above and free gas below. Reverse polarity is a common indicator of the accumulation of hydrocarbons. However, alternatively in such shallow depth it can also be caused by the presence of a soft sediment layer. Another important point to note is that no chimney or any other gas escape features have been observed in the vicinity originating from the reverse polarity reflector. However, in the adjacent continental slope, giant pockmarks have been observed on the bathymetry data. They most probably originated from gas sources in Permian coal measures. In order to understand what is causing this reverse polarity further quantitative analysis such as AVO and inversion has been done. AVO analysis and subsequent inversion of selected seismic lines show that some parts of the reversed polarity are characterized by bright spots, especially on the hanging wall side of the major faults, caused by the presence of gas. The stratigraphic position of the reflector suggests that the anomalous horizon could have been formed during the low-stand that followed the high-stand progradation event seen on dip sections. The gas accumulation could then be associated with "back reef" carbonates that during the low stand have been subjected to karstification causing the gas entrapment in vugular pore spaces.

  10. Density and Vs contrasts across mantle transition zone discontinuities beneath the Central Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, C.; Day, E. A.; De Hoop, M. V.; Campillo, M.; Goes, S. D. B.; Blythe, R. A.; van der Hilst, R. D.

    2016-12-01

    Mantle transition zone (MTZ) discontinuities at depths around 410 km and 660 km (hereinafter referred to as 410 and 660) play an important role in modulating mantle flow. Most MTZ studies focus on lateral variations in depth to the 410 and 660 (or the thickness of the MTZ) due to regional variations in temperature. Other variables, such as contrasts in mass density (Δρ), seismic (shear or compressional) wavespeed (Δβ or Δα), and impedance (ΔZ) across the interfaces, which are crucial for our understanding of mantle composition and dynamics, are not well constrained. In this study, we apply the amplitude versus offset (AVO) analysis, as is known in exploration seismology, to infer Δρ, Δβ and ΔZ across the 410 and 660 from the amplitudes of the underside reflections S410S and S660S (normalized by the amplitude of SS). A challenge for AVO analysis of MTZ discontinuities is that at distances less than 110° other seismic phases, such as multiples of S and Sdiff, strongly interfere with S410S and S660S. To be able to exploit short-distance signal, we suppress the multiples with a method based on curvelet transform. Both synthetic tests and field examples demonstrate the effectiveness of our method in which precursors are enhanced and interfering phases attenuated. We then convert the amplitude ratios of S410S/SS and S660S/SS into reflection coefficients at 410 and 660 by making corrections for geometrical spreading, intrinsic attenuation, mantle heterogeneity, and small-scale discontinuity topography. Δρ and Δβ are inferred by modeling the reflection coefficients as a function of distances. In the Central Pacific, our estimates (and 1σ uncertainties) of Δρ410, Δβ410, and ΔZ410 are 2.3±1.1%, 6.5±2.8%, and 8.8±1.8%, respectively. For the 660, we observe strong, apparent move-out of S660S, which is caused by polarity change in the reflection coefficients. Our best fits for Δρ660 and Δβ660 are 4.7±0.4% and 5.2±1.8%, respectively, and ΔZ660 is

  11. Augustine Volcano, Cook Inlet, Alaska (January 12, 2006)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    Since last spring, the U.S. Geological Survey's Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) has detected increasing volcanic unrest at Augustine Volcano in Cook Inlet, Alaska near Anchorage. Based on all available monitoring data, AVO regards that an eruption similar to 1976 and 1986 is the most probable outcome. During January, activity has been episodic, and characterized by emission of steam and ash plumes, rising to altitudes in excess of 9,000 m (30,000 ft), and posing hazards to aircraft in the vicinity. An ASTER image was acquired at 12:42 AST on January 12, 2006, during an eruptive phase of Augustine. The perspective rendition shows the eruption plume derived from the ASTER image data. ASTER's stereo viewing capability was used to calculate the 3-dimensional topography of the eruption cloud as it was blown to the south by prevailing winds. From a maximum height of 3060 m (9950 ft), the plume cooled and its top descended to 1900 m (6175 ft). The perspective view shows the ASTER data draped over the plume top topography, combined with a base image acquired in 2000 by the Landsat satellite, that is itself draped over ground elevation data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission. The topographic relief has been increased 1.5 times for this illustration. Comparison of the ASTER plume topography data with ash dispersal models and weather radar data will allow the National Weather Service to validate and improve such models. These models are used to forecast volcanic ash plume trajectories and provide hazard alerts and warnings to aircraft in the Alaska region.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER provides scientists in numerous

  12. [Myoelectric function, metabolism, intestinal circulation and vagal activity after chemical sympathectomy].

    PubMed

    Obuchowicz, Rafał; Sendur, Ryszard; Pawlik, Michał; Biernat, Jarosław; Koprowska, Bernadetta; Jaworek, Jolanta; Thor, Piotr J

    2002-01-01

    Adrenergic innervation plays an important role in the control of electric activity and circulatory parameters of the gut. Importance of adrenergic system as a modulator of motor, neural and metabolic activity of the intestine is studied extensively but still not well understood. We use 6-OHDA a neurotoxin and a blocking agent of adrenergic fibers, to evaluate their exact role in the control of vital parameters of the intestine and vagal nerves. 50 Wistar rats were used. Animals were fasted 24 h prior to experiment with free access to water allowed. Acute experiments were performed on 30 rats, divided in the three groups. Four experimental groups were established. I--sham operated. II and III--pretreated with 6-ODHA (25 mg//kg/24 h s.c.) 3 days before experiment. IV group were used for chronic procedure. Thiopental anesthesia (Vetbutal Biovet) was applied. Animals were artificially ventilated with positive pressure rodent ventilator (Ugo Basile), and heated with continuous temperature control by rectal thermistor (FST). Left carotid artery was cannulated and connected with electro manometer--arterial pressure (AP) was expressed in mm Hg. Right jugular vein was cannulated for continuous saline administration 0.2 ml/h. Mesenteric blood flow (MBF) was recorded with use of ultrasonic probe (Transonic systems T206). Microcirculatory blood Flow (LDBF) was estimated by laser Doppler flowmetry (Periflux 2001 Master). Arterio-venous difference (AVO2) was estimated from whole blood (AVOXimeter 1000 E). Oxygen uptake was calculated from MBF and AVO2 and expressed in ml/min/100 g tissue. Chronic experiments were performed on conscious animals with electrodes implanted to the serosal surface of the intestinal wall. Measurements of intestinal myoelectric parameters were performed one, two and three weeks after 6-OHDA administration. Vagal activity was recorded in left vagus nerve in the neck with suction electrodes (one month after 6-OHDA). 6-OHDA pretreatment evoked increase of

  13. Redoubt Volcano: 2009 Eruption Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bull, K. F.

    2009-12-01

    Redoubt Volcano is a 3110-m glaciated stratovolcano located 170 km SW of Anchorage, Alaska, on the W side of Cook Inlet. The edifice comprises a <1500-m-thick sequence of mid-Pleistocene to recent, basaltic to dacitic pyroclastic-, block-and-ash- and lava-flow deposits built on Jurassic tonalite. Magma-ice contact features are common. A dissected earlier cone underlies the E flank of Redoubt. Alunite-bearing debris flows to the SE, E and N suggest multiple flank collapses over Redoubt's history. Most recent eruptions occurred in 1966-68, and 1989-90. In March 2009, Redoubt erupted to produce pyroclastic flows, voluminous lahars, and tephra that fell over large portions of south-central Alaska. Regional and local air traffic was significantly disrupted, Anchorage airport was closed for over 12 hours, and oil production in Cook Inlet was halted for nearly five months. Unrest began in August, 2008 with reports of H2S odor. In late September, the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO)’s seismic network recorded periods of volcanic tremor. Throughout the fall, AVO noted increased fumarolic emissions and accompanying ice- and snow-melt on and around the 1990 dome, and gas measurements showed elevated H2S and CO2 emissions. On January 23, seismometers recorded 48 hrs of intermittent tremor and discrete, low-frequency to hybrid events. Over the next 6 weeks, seismicity waxed and waned, an estimated 5-6 million m3 of ice were lost due to melting, volcanic gas emissions increased, and debris flows emerged repeatedly from recently formed ice holes near the 1990 dome, located on the crater’s N (“Drift”) side. On March 15, a phreatic explosion deposited non-juvenile ash from a new vent in the summit ice cap just S of the 1990 dome. Ash from the explosion rose to ~4500 m above sea level (asl). The plume was accompanied by weak seismicity. The first magmatic explosion occurred on March 22. Over the next two weeks, more than 19 explosions destroyed at least two lava domes and

  14. Introduction to Augustine Volcano and Overview of the 2006 Eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nye, C. J.

    2006-12-01

    This overview represents the combined efforts of scores of people, including Alaska Volcano Observatory staff from the US Geological Survey, the University of Alaska Fairbanks Geophysical Institute, and the Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys; additional members of those agencies outside of AVO; and volcanologists from elsewhere. Augustine is a young, and therefore small island volcano in the Cook Inlet region of the eastern Aleutian arc. It is among the most active volcanoes in the arc, with six major historic eruptions, and a vigorous eruptive history going back at least 2,500 years. Eruptions typically begin explosively, and finish with the extrusion of domes and sometimes short, steep lava flows. At least 14 times (most recently in 1883) the -summit has become over-steepened and failed, producing debris avalanches which reached tidewater. Magmas within each of the well-studied eruptions are crystal-rich andesite spanning up to seven weight percent silica. Mixing and mingling are ubiquitous and occur at scales from meters to microns. In general, magmagenesis at Augustine is open, messy, and transcrustal. The 2006 eruption was broadly similar to the 20th century eruptions. Unrest began midway through 2005, with steadily increasing numbers of microearthquakes and continuous inflation of the edifice. By mid-December there were obvious morphological and thermal changes at the summit, as well as phreatic explosions and more passive venting of S-rich gasses. In mid-January 2006 phreatomagmatic explosions gave way to magmatic explosions, producing pyroclastic flows dominated by low-silica andesite, as well as lahars, followed by a small summit dome. In late January the nature of seismicity, eruptive style, and type of erupted magma all changed, and block-and-ash flows of high-silica, crystal-rich andesite were emplaced as the edifice deflated. Re-inflation well below the edifice and low-level effusion continued through February. During the second week

  15. Integrating sequence stratigraphy and rock-physics to interpret seismic amplitudes and predict reservoir quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Tanima

    improves the predictions of shear wave velocities. In addition, we provide empirical relations on normal compaction depth trends of porosity, velocities, and VP/VS ratio for shale and clean sands in shallow, supra-salt sediments in the Gulf of Mexico. Next, we identify probable spatial trends of sand/shale ratio and sorting as predicted by the conventional sequence stratigraphic model in minibasin settings (spill-and-fill model). These spatial trends are evaluated using well data from offshore West Africa, and the same well data are used to calibrate rock physics models (modified soft-sand model) that provide links between P-impedance and quartz/clay ratio, and sorting. The spatial increase in sand/shale ratio and sorting corresponds to an overall increase in P-impedance, and AVO intercept and gradient. The results are used as a guide to interpret sedimentological parameters from seismic attributes, away from the well locations. We present a quantitative link between carbonate cement and seismic attributes by combining stratigraphie cycles and the rock physics model (modified differential effective medium model). The variation in carbonate cement volume in West Africa can be linked with two distinct stratigraphic cycles: the coarsening-upward cycles and the fining-upward cycles. Cemented sandstones associated with these cycles exhibit distinct signatures on P-impedance vs. porosity and AVO intercept vs. gradient crossplots. These observations are important for assessing reservoir properties in the West Africa as well as in other analogous depositional environments. Finally, we investigate the relationship between seismic velocities and time temperature index (TTI) using basin and petroleum system modeling at Rio Muni basin, West Africa. We find that both VP and VS increase exponentially with TTI. The results can be applied to predict TTI, and thereby thermal maturity, from observed velocities.

  16. Observation of volcanoes through webcams: Tools and techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovick, J.; Lawlor, O.; Dean, K.; Dehn, J.

    2008-12-01

    This work explores techniques for deriving quantitative data from webcam observations. It illustrates the role that webcams can play in volcano monitoring, and shows our recently developed tools for the collation and dissemination of this data. Over the past 5 years, digital cameras have been installed at a number of volcanoes to allow the general public to see volcanic activity from the comfort of their own homes. In the last 3 years these webcam images have become part of the twice-daily volcano monitoring report by the remote sensing team of the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO). To allow comprehensive and systematic analysis, a database has been created containing all AVO webcam images as well as images from St. Helens and three KVERT webcams for Bezymianny, Klyucheskoy and Shiveluch. In total, some 1.6 million images are currently held. The number increases daily as new images are obtained and processed. The database holds additional information about each image such as both image-wide and localized-region statistics. Our tools have been developed to answer specific questions utilizing this data. Of the current 1.6 million images in the database, a very small percentage is considered interesting for volcano monitoring; the remainder can be ignored due to complete cloud cover or (for nocturnal images) lack of luminescence. We have developed a tool for automatically isolating uninteresting images (primarily based on image histograms.) Uninteresting images are tagged, which allows for them to be excluded from further processing. Our next tool is an automated system for isolating and measuring nocturnal luminescence. This tool has been developed using images of St. Helens and is being extended to work with other webcams where nightime lava glow have been seen. The system works by first minimizing each camera's unique dark current and amplification noise signals and then establishes if any pixels fulfill a number of criteria that would indicate they are real "glow

  17. Augustine Volcano, Cook Inlet, Alaska (January 12, 2006)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    Since last spring, the U.S. Geological Survey's Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) has detected increasing volcanic unrest at Augustine Volcano in Cook Inlet, Alaska near Anchorage. Based on all available monitoring data, AVO regards that an eruption similar to 1976 and 1986 is the most probable outcome. During January, activity has been episodic, and characterized by emission of steam and ash plumes, rising to altitudes in excess of 9,000 m (30,000 ft), and posing hazards to aircraft in the vicinity. An ASTER image was acquired at 12:42 AST on January 12, 2006, during an eruptive phase of Augustine. The perspective rendition shows the eruption plume derived from the ASTER image data. ASTER's stereo viewing capability was used to calculate the 3-dimensional topography of the eruption cloud as it was blown to the south by prevailing winds. From a maximum height of 3060 m (9950 ft), the plume cooled and its top descended to 1900 m (6175 ft). The perspective view shows the ASTER data draped over the plume top topography, combined with a base image acquired in 2000 by the Landsat satellite, that is itself draped over ground elevation data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission. The topographic relief has been increased 1.5 times for this illustration. Comparison of the ASTER plume topography data with ash dispersal models and weather radar data will allow the National Weather Service to validate and improve such models. These models are used to forecast volcanic ash plume trajectories and provide hazard alerts and warnings to aircraft in the Alaska region.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER provides scientists in numerous

  18. Prolonged exercise following diuretic-induced hypohydration: effects on cardiovascular and thermal strain.

    PubMed

    Roy, B D; Green, H J; Burnett, M E

    2000-07-01

    To examine the role of a reduction in plasma volume (PV) on the cardiovascular and thermoregulatory responses to submaximal exercise, ten untrained males (VO2 peak = 3.96 +/- 0.14 L x min(-1); mean +/- SE) performed 60 min of cycle exercise at -61% of VO2 peak while on a diuretic (DIU) and under control (CON) conditions. Participants consumed either Novotriamazide (100 mg triameterene + 50 mg hydrochlorothiazide, a diuretic) or a placebo, in random order, for 4 days prior to the exercise. Diuretic resulted in a calculated 14.6% reduction (P < 0.05) in resting PV. Heart rate was higher (P < 0.05) at rest and throughout exercise for DIU compared with CON. No differences were observed for cardiac output (Qc) and stroke volume (SV) at rest for the two conditions, but during exercise both Qc and SV were lower (P < 0.05) with DIU. Exercise VO2 (L x min(-1)) for CON and DIU at 30 min (2.39 +/- 0.09 vs 2.43 +/- 0.08) and 60 min (2.56 +/- 0.08 vs 2.53 +/- 0.12) were similar between conditions. Whole body a-vO2 difference was significantly greater (P < 0.05) for DIU both at rest and during exercise as compared with CON. Rectal temperature (Tre) was significantly higher (P < 0.05) during DIU from 15 min to the end of exercise. Blood concentrations of norepinephrine were higher (P < 0.05) with DIU compared to CON at 15 min of exercise and beyond. For blood epinephrine, no differences were observed between DIU and CON. These results suggest that reductions in PV led to greater circulating concentrations of norepinephrine which likely resulted from increased cardiac and thermoregulatory stresses. In addition, reductions in PV do not appear to increase cardiovascular instability during prolonged dynamic exercise.

  19. Volcano Monitoring Using Google Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, J. E.; Dehn, J.; Webley, P.; Skoog, R.

    2006-12-01

    At the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO), Google Earth is being used as a visualization tool for operational satellite monitoring of the region's volcanoes. Through the abilities of the Keyhole Markup Language (KML) utilized by Google Earth, different datasets have been integrated into this virtual globe browser. Examples include the ability to browse thermal satellite image overlays with dynamic control, to look for signs of volcanic activity. Webcams can also be viewed interactively through the Google Earth interface to confirm current activity. Other applications include monitoring the location and status of instrumentation; near real-time plotting of earthquake hypocenters; mapping of new volcanic deposits; and animated models of ash plumes within Google Earth, created by a combination of ash dispersion modeling and 3D visualization packages. The globe also provides an ideal interface for displaying near real-time information on detected thermal anomalies or "hotspot"; pixels in satellite images with elevated brightness temperatures relative to the background temperature. The Geophysical Institute at the University of Alaska collects AVHRR (Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer) and MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) through its own receiving station. The automated processing that follows includes application of algorithms that search for hotspots close to volcano location, flagging those that meet certain criteria. Further automated routines generate folders of KML placemarkers, which are linked to Google Earth through the network link function. Downloadable KML files have been created to provide links to various data products for different volcanoes and past eruptions, and to demonstrate examples of the monitoring tools developed. These KML files will be made accessible through a new website that will become publicly available in December 2006.

  20. Probing the homogeneity of the isotopic composition and molar mass of the ‘Avogadro’-crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pramann, Axel; Lee, Kyoung-Seok; Noordmann, Janine; Rienitz, Olaf

    2015-12-01

    Improved measurements on silicon crystal samples highly enriched in the 28Si isotope (known as ‘Si28’ or AVO28 crystal material) have been carried out at PTB to investigate local isotopic variations in the original crystal. This material was used for the determination of the Avogadro constant NA and therefore plays an important role in the upcoming redefinition of the SI units kilogram and mole, using fundamental constants. Subsamples of the original crystal have been extensively studied over the past few years at the National Research Council (NRC, Canada), the National Metrology Institute of Japan (NMIJ, Japan), the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST, USA), the National Institute of Metrology (NIM, People’s Republic of China), and multiple times at PTB. In this study, four to five discrete, but adjacent samples were taken from three distinct axial positions of the crystal to obtain a more systematic and comprehensive understanding of the distribution of the isotopic composition and molar mass throughout the crystal. Moreover, improved state-of-the-art techniques in the experimental measurements as well as the evaluation approach and the determination of the calibration factors were utilized. The average molar mass of the measured samples is M  =  27.976 970 12(12) g mol-1 with a relative combined uncertainty uc,rel(M)  =  4.4 ×10-9. This value is in astounding agreement with the values of single samples measured and published by NIST, NMIJ, and PTB. With respect to the associated uncertainties, no significant variations in the molar mass and the isotopic composition as a function of the sample position in the boule were observed and thus could not be traced back to an inherent property of the crystal. This means that the crystal is not only ‘homogeneous’ with respect to molar mass but also has predominantly homogeneous distribution of the three stable Si isotopes.

  1. Complex seismic amplitude inversion for P-wave and S-wave quality factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zong, Zhaoyun; Yin, Xingyao; Wu, Guochen

    2015-07-01

    Stratum quality factors (P-wave and S-wave quality factors, Qp and Qs) have gradually been utilized in the study of physical state of crust and uppermost mantle, tectonic evolution, hydrogeololgy, gas hydrates, petroleum exploration, etc. Different opinions of the seismic attenuation mechanism result in various approaches to estimate the P-wave and S-wave quality factors. Considering the viscoelasticity of the underground medium, the constitutive matrix of the Earth medium is written as the superposition of homogeneous background medium, elastic perturbation medium and viscoelastic perturbation medium. Under the hypothesis of Born integral and stationary phase approximation, the seismic reflectivity is initially raised in terms of P-wave and S-wave moduli, density, P-wave and S-wave quality factors. Furthermore, incorporating the complex seismic traces with the seismic wavelets at different offsets, a two-step inversion approach is proposed to estimate the P-wave and S-wave quality factors. The AVO/AVA Bayesian inversion approach is suggested to estimate the P-wave modulus and S-wave modulus with the real component of the pre-stack seismic data initially. Taking the estimated P-wave and S-wave moduli as prior information, the P-wave and S-wave quality factors are further estimated with the imaginary component of the complex pre-stack seismic data, which is the quadrature of the original data. Finally, synthetic examples demonstrate that the proposed approach is able to estimate P-wave and S-wave quality factors stably and properly, and two field data examples demonstrate that the proposed approach may work as an efficient approach to fluid identification.

  2. Atorvastatin Promotes Cytotoxicity and Reduces Migration and Proliferation of Human A172 Glioma Cells.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Karen A; Dal-Cim, Tharine; Lopes, Flávia G; Ludka, Fabiana K; Nedel, Cláudia B; Tasca, Carla I

    2017-02-08

    Malignant gliomas have resistance mechanisms to chemotherapy that enable tumor invasiveness and aggressiveness. Alternative therapies in cancer treatment, as statins, have been suggested to decrease proliferation, inhibit cell migration, and induce cell death. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of atorvastatin (ATOR) on cell viability, migration, proliferation, apoptosis, and autophagy in A172 human glioma cells. Temozolomide (TMZ), a chemotherapic used to glioma treatment, was tested as a comparison to cytotoxic effects on gliomas. Cell viability was also assessed in primary culture of cortical astrocytes. ATOR treatment (0.1 to 20 μM) did not alter astrocytic viability. However, in glioma cells, ATOR showed cytotoxic effect at 10 and 20 μM concentrations. TMZ (500 μM) reduced cell viability similarly to ATOR, and drug association did not show additive effect on cell viability. ATOR, TMZ, and their association decreased cell migration. ATOR also decreased glioma cell proliferation. ATOR increased apoptosis, and TMZ association showed a potentiation effect, enhancing it. ATOR and TMZ treatment increased acidic vesicular organelle (AVO) presence in A172 cells, an indicative of autophagy. ATOR effect of reducing A172 cell viability did not alter glutamate transport and glutamine synthetase activity, but it was partially prevented through antagonism of ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptors. Our data shows a cytotoxic effect of ATOR on glioma cells, whereas no toxicity was observed to astrocytes. ATOR showed similar cytotoxic effect as TMZ to glioma cells, and it may be a safer drug, regarding side effect induction, than chemotherapic agents.

  3. Chronology and References of Volcanic Eruptions and Selected Unrest in the United States, 1980-2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Diefenbach, Angela K.; Guffanti, Marianne; Ewert, John W.

    2009-01-01

    The United States ranks as one of the top countries in the world in the number of young, active volcanoes within its borders. The United States, including the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, is home to approximately 170 geologically active (age <10,000 years) volcanoes. As our review of the record shows, 30 of these volcanoes have erupted since 1980, many repeatedly. In addition to producing eruptions, many U.S. volcanoes exhibit periods of anomalous activity, unrest, that do not culminate in eruptions. Monitoring volcanic activity in the United States is the responsibility of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Volcano Hazards Program (VHP) and is accomplished with academic, Federal, and State partners. The VHP supports five Volcano Observatories - the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO), Cascades Volcano Observatory (CVO), Yellowstone Volcano Observatory (YVO), Long Valley Observatory (LVO), and Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO). With the exception of HVO, which was established in 1912, the U.S. Volcano Observatories have been established in the past 27 years in response to specific volcanic eruptions or sustained levels of unrest. As understanding of volcanic activity and hazards has grown over the years, so have the extent and types of monitoring networks and techniques available to detect early signs of anomalous volcanic behavior. This increased capability is providing us with a more accurate gauge of volcanic activity in the United States. The purpose of this report is to (1) document the range of volcanic activity that U.S. Volcano Observatories have dealt with, beginning with the 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens, (2) describe some overall characteristics of the activity, and (3) serve as a quick reference to pertinent published literature on the eruptions and unrest documented in this report.

  4. Reconstruction of Signaling Networks Regulating Fungal Morphogenesis by Transcriptomics▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Vera; Arentshorst, Mark; Flitter, Simon J.; Nitsche, Benjamin M.; Kwon, Min Jin; Reynaga-Peña, Cristina G.; Bartnicki-Garcia, Salomon; van den Hondel, Cees A. M. J. J.; Ram, Arthur F. J.

    2009-01-01

    Coordinated control of hyphal elongation and branching is essential for sustaining mycelial growth of filamentous fungi. In order to study the molecular machinery ensuring polarity control in the industrial fungus Aspergillus niger, we took advantage of the temperature-sensitive (ts) apical-branching ramosa-1 mutant. We show here that this strain serves as an excellent model system to study critical steps of polar growth control during mycelial development and report for the first time a transcriptomic fingerprint of apical branching for a filamentous fungus. This fingerprint indicates that several signal transduction pathways, including TORC2, phospholipid, calcium, and cell wall integrity signaling, concertedly act to control apical branching. We furthermore identified the genetic locus affected in the ramosa-1 mutant by complementation of the ts phenotype. Sequence analyses demonstrated that a single amino acid exchange in the RmsA protein is responsible for induced apical branching of the ramosa-1 mutant. Deletion experiments showed that the corresponding rmsA gene is essential for the growth of A. niger, and complementation analyses with Saccharomyces cerevisiae evidenced that RmsA serves as a functional equivalent of the TORC2 component Avo1p. TORC2 signaling is required for actin polarization and cell wall integrity in S. cerevisiae. Congruently, our microscopic investigations showed that polarized actin organization and chitin deposition are disturbed in the ramosa-1 mutant. The integration of the transcriptomic, genetic, and phenotypic data obtained in this study allowed us to reconstruct a model for cellular events involved in apical branching. PMID:19749177

  5. Station corrections for the Katmai Region Seismic Network

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Searcy, Cheryl K.

    2003-01-01

    Most procedures for routinely locating earthquake hypocenters within a local network are constrained to using laterally homogeneous velocity models to represent the Earth's crustal velocity structure. As a result, earthquake location errors may arise due to actual lateral variations in the Earth's velocity structure. Station corrections can be used to compensate for heterogeneous velocity structure near individual stations (Douglas, 1967; Pujol, 1988). The HYPOELLIPSE program (Lahr, 1999) used by the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) to locate earthquakes in Cook Inlet and the Aleutian Islands is a robust and efficient program that uses one-dimensional velocity models to determine hypocenters of local and regional earthquakes. This program does have the capability of utilizing station corrections within it's earthquake location proceedure. The velocity structures of Cook Inlet and Aleutian volcanoes very likely contain laterally varying heterogeneities. For this reason, the accuracy of earthquake locations in these areas will benefit from the determination and addition of station corrections. In this study, I determine corrections for each station in the Katmai region. The Katmai region is defined to lie between latitudes 57.5 degrees North and 59.00 degrees north and longitudes -154.00 and -156.00 (see Figure 1) and includes Mount Katmai, Novarupta, Mount Martin, Mount Mageik, Snowy Mountain, Mount Trident, and Mount Griggs volcanoes. Station corrections were determined using the computer program VELEST (Kissling, 1994). VELEST inverts arrival time data for one-dimensional velocity models and station corrections using a joint hypocenter determination technique. VELEST can also be used to locate single events.

  6. Effect of argan and olive oil consumption on the hormonal profile of androgens among healthy adult Moroccan men.

    PubMed

    Derouiche, Abdelfettah; Jafri, Ali; Driouch, Issam; El Khasmi, Mohammed; Adlouni, Ahmed; Benajiba, Nada; Bamou, Youssef; Saile, Rachid; Benouhoud, Mohammed

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the effect of virgin argan oil (VAO) and extra virgin olive oil (EVO) on the hormonal profile of androgens and anthropometric parameters among healthy adult Moroccan men during a controlled nutritional intervention. The study was carried out on 60 young and healthy male volunteers aged between 23 and 40 years old. During a stabilization period of 2 weeks they consumed butter. The group was then randomized into two categories, the first one consuming VAO and the second EVO for 3 weeks. Testosterone (T), luteinizing hormone (LH) and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEAS) serum concentrations were measured at the beginning of the study and at the end of each period. The Mann-Whitney test was used to compare the two groups (VAO and EVO) during each step of the study. Differences in androgens and anthropometric parameters between the baseline and after 3 weeks of the diet in the VAO and EVO groups were analyzed using the Wilcoxon test. T and LH serum concentrations significantly increased after the intervention period. T levels increased by 19.9% and 17.4% (p < 0.0001), and LH levels by 18.5% (p < 0.007) and 42.6% (p < 0.0001), respectively, for VAO and EVO (p < 0.0001). However, DHEAS serum concentrations, body weight, body mass index, arterial pressure and daily energetic intake did not show any significant variation after the intervention with either argan or olive oils. The results suggest that consumption of AVO and EVO might be the origin of a positive action on the androgen hormonal profile of men.

  7. Spaceborne and field-based observations of Bezymianny Volcano, Kamchatka from 2000- 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, A.; Ramsey, M.; Girina, O.; Belousov, A.; Durant, A.; Skilling, I.; Wolfe, A.

    2008-12-01

    Bezymianny is a very active stratovolcano located on the Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia. It is andesitic in magma composition and typically erupts one to two times per year. The aim of this study was to ascertain background thermal conditions, attempt to locate any thermal precursory signals, and investigate the deposition and cooling of pyroclastic flow deposits that are typically emplaced on the south-eastern flank. Block and ash samples were collected and analyzed using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) images and thermal infrared (TIR) spectroscopy to estimate the surface vesicularity of the blocks and ash within the deposit. In addition, data from the March 2000, January 2005, December 2006, October 2007, and August 2008 explosive eruptions have been collected using the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) with limited field-based ground studies. According to the Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT) and the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO), another explosive eruption occurred at Bezymianny Volcano on 19 August 2008 around 10:30 UTC. A clear linear thermal anomaly was observed oriented to the southeast at the lava dome in rapid-response night time ASTER data acquired on 26 August. Preliminary results show that the maximum temperature recorded was 51.6 C (52 C above background). This likely corresponded to a short (1.3 km) lava lobe that was emplaced within a pre- existing channel. Further to the southeast, a significant thermal anomaly was observed with temperatures reaching 21 C within the centre of the anomaly, due to a warm pyroclastic flow (PF) that travelled 4.8 km from the summit. This work highlights the utility of TIR data in combination with field studies (where possible) over a highly changeable, active volcanic region and continues to stress the critical need for high spatial and temporal resolution data in Kamchatka specifically and in the North Pacific region in general.

  8. Observations of deep long-period (DLP) seismic events beneath Aleutian arc volcanoes; 1989-2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Power, J.A.; Stihler, S.D.; White, R.A.; Moran, S.C.

    2004-01-01

    Between October 12, 1989 and December 31, 2002, the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) located 162 deep long-period (DLP) events beneath 11 volcanic centers in the Aleutian arc. These events generally occur at mid- to lower-crustal depths (10-45 km) and are characterized by emergent phases, extended codas, and a strong spectral peak between 1.0 and 3.0 Hz. Observed wave velocities and particle motions indicate that the dominant phases are P- and S-waves. DLP epicenters often extend over broad areas (5-20 km) surrounding the active volcanoes. The average reduced displacement of Aleutian DLPs is 26.5 cm2 and the largest event has a reduced displacement of 589 cm2 (or ML2.5). Aleutian DLP events occur both as solitary events and as sequences of events with several occurring over a period of 1-30 min. Within the sequences, individual DLPs are often separated by lower-amplitude volcanic tremor with a similar spectral character. Occasionally, volcano-tectonic earthquakes that locate at similar depths are contained within the DLP sequences.At most, Aleutian volcanoes DLPs appear to loosely surround the main volcanic vent and occur as part of background seismicity. A likely explanation is that they reflect a relatively steady-state process of magma ascent over broad areas in the lower and middle portions of the crust. At Mount Spurr, DLP seismicity was initiated by the 1992 eruptions and then slowly declined until 1997. At Shishaldin Volcano, a short-lived increase in DLP seismicity occurred about 10 months prior to the April 19, 1999 eruption. These observations suggest a link between eruptive activity and magma flux in the mid- to lower-crust and uppermost mantle.

  9. Seismic Characterization of a Gas Hydrate Chimney Associated with Acoustic Blanking: Pegasus Basin, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henrys, S. A.; Fraser, D. R. A.; Gorman, A. R.; Pecher, I. A.; Crutchley, G. J.

    2016-12-01

    The Pegasus Basin on the east coast of New Zealand's North Island in the southern part of the Hikurangi Margin is a frontier petroleum basin that is also expected to contain significant gas hydrate deposits. Extensive faulting in the basin has lead to the development of many interesting and unique focused accumulations of gas hydrates. A 2D seismic dataset acquired in 2009/2010 was reprocessed to examine the gas hydrate systems within the basin. Here, we present one of the more interesting hydrate features in the dataset: a presumed gas chimney within the regional gas hydrate stability zone at the centre of a roughly triangular (in 2D) region of low reflectivity, approximately 8 km wide, that is interpreted to be the result of acoustic blanking. Using automated high density velocity picking, the chimney structure is interpreted to be cored by a 200 m wide low-velocity zone which contains free gas and is flanked by high-velocity bands that are 200-400 m wide. The high-velocity zone is interpreted to correspond to concentrated hydrate deposits within the sedimentary pore spaces. Amplitude vs offset (AVO) and inversion techniques have been applied and the results of this work correspond well to the high-density velocity analyses. The analysis methods all indicate zones of free gas below the Bottom Simulating Reflection (BSR) and within the chimney. Areas of increased hydrate concentrations, including at the base of the gas hydrate stability zone, were also identified. A model for fluid flow and how free gas within the chimney at the centre of the blanking zone is converted to hydrate is discussed. The potential size of the gas hydrate resource present in this feature can be estimated based on the seismic velocities and physical properties determined by inversion.

  10. Integrated seismic study of naturally fractured tight gas reservoirs. Final report, September 1991--January 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Mavko, G.; Nur, A.

    1995-01-01

    The approach in this project has been to integrate the principles of rock physics into a quantitative processing and interpretation scheme that exploits, where possible, the broader spectrum of fracture zone signatures: (1) anomalous compressional and shear wave velocity; (2) Q and velocity dispersion; (3) increased velocity anisotropy; (4) amplitude vs. offset (AVO) response, and (5) variations in frequency content. As part of this the authors have attempted to refine some of the theoretical rock physics tools that should be applied in any field study to link the observed seismic signatures to the physical/geologic description of the fractured rock. The project had 3 key elements: (1) rock physics studies of the anisotropic viscoelastic signatures of fractured rocks, (2) acquisition and processing of seismic reflection field data, and (3) interpretation of seismic and well log data. The study site is in a producing field operated by Amoco and Arco at the southern boundary of the Powder River basin in Wyoming. During the winter of 1992--1993 the authors collected about 50 km of 9-component reflection seismic data and obtained existing log data from several wells in the vicinity. The paper gives background information on laboratory studies, seismic field studies of fracture anisotropy, and the problem of upscaling from the laboratory to the field. It discusses fluid effects on seismic anisotropy and a method for predicting stress-induced seismic anisotropy. Then results from the field experiment are presented and discussed: regional geologic framework and site description; seismic data acquisition; shear wave data and validation; and P-wave data analysis. 106 refs., 52 figs.

  11. Development of Scientific Tools at the USGS to Prepare for Ash-Producing Eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guffanti, M.; Mastin, L. G.; Wallace, K.; Schneider, D. J.; Neal, C. A.

    2015-12-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey has undertaken a focused effort over the past several years to develop scientific tools to improve capabilities to forecast, assess, and mitigate the adverse impacts of ash-producing eruptions. To improve forecasting capabilities, USGS scientists developed a Eulerian ash dispersion and deposition model, Ash3D, with output designed for operational use by other agencies. For ashfall hazards, Ash3D output includes forecasts of time of arrival and duration of ashfall, as well as traditional isopach maps. We coordinated with colleagues at the National Weather Service in Alaska to ensure Ash3D output is useable by NWS in its official ashfall advisories, and we are developing methods to generate long-term probabilistic ashfall hazard maps for DOE. For ash-cloud hazards, Ash3D output includes animations of cloud height, mass load, concentration, and arrival times over airports. To improve assessment capabilities, diverse approaches were pursued: a portable Doppler radar was acquired and successfully used to characterize ash plumes during the 2009 eruption of Redoubt Volcano in Alaska; a database system was created to manage ashfall collection and observations, including by the public ('Is Ash Falling?' at www.avo.alaska.edu/ashfall/ashreport.php); a display-and-analysis tool was developed that accesses public satellite data from a variety of sensors and platforms ('Volcview' at volcview.wr.usgs.gov/). To improve mitigation capabilities, the USGS hosts a website (volcanoes.usgs.gov/ash), developed by the partners of IAVCEI's International Volcanic Ashfall Impacts Working Group and recently revamped, that provides practical guidance about how to prepare for and recover from ash eruptions, organized by affected sector (buildings, transportation, power supply, health, agriculture, water supply, communications). With these various tools now available, scientists and citizenry are better prepared for ash eruptions.

  12. Inhibition of autophagy enhances DNA damage-induced apoptosis by disrupting CHK1-dependent S phase arrest.

    PubMed

    Liou, Jong-Shian; Wu, Yi-Chen; Yen, Wen-Yen; Tang, Yu-Shuan; Kakadiya, Rajesh B; Su, Tsann-Long; Yih, Ling-Huei

    2014-08-01

    DNA damage has been shown to induce autophagy, but the role of autophagy in the DNA damage response and cell fate is not fully understood. BO-1012, a bifunctional alkylating derivative of 3a-aza-cyclopenta[a]indene, is a potent DNA interstrand cross-linking agent with anticancer activity. In this study, BO-1012 was found to reduce DNA synthesis, inhibit S phase progression, and induce phosphorylation of histone H2AX on serine 139 (γH2AX) exclusively in S phase cells. Both CHK1 and CHK2 were phosphorylated in response to BO-1012 treatment, but only depletion of CHK1, but not CHK2, impaired BO-1012-induced S phase arrest and facilitated the entry of γH2AX-positive cells into G2 phase. CHK1 depletion also significantly enhanced BO-1012-induced cell death and apoptosis. These results indicate that BO-1012-induced S phase arrest is a CHK1-dependent pro-survival response. BO-1012 also resulted in marked induction of acidic vesicular organelle (AVO) formation and microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3) processing and redistribution, features characteristic of autophagy. Depletion of ATG7 or co-treatment of cells with BO-1012 and either 3-methyladenine or bafilomycin A1, two inhibitors of autophagy, not only reduced CHK1 phosphorylation and disrupted S phase arrest, but also increased cleavage of caspase-9 and PARP, and cell death. These results suggest that cells initiate S phase arrest and autophagy as pro-survival responses to BO-1012-induced DNA damage, and that suppression of autophagy enhances BO-1012-induced apoptosis via disruption of CHK1-dependent S phase arrest.

  13. Moveout-based geometrical-spreading correction for PS-waves in layered anisotropic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaoxia; Tsvankin, Ilya

    2008-06-01

    This paper is devoted to pre-stack amplitude analysis of reflection seismic data from anisotropic (e.g., fractured) media. Geometrical-spreading correction is an important component of amplitude-variation-with-offset (AVO) analysis, which provides high-resolution information for anisotropic parameter estimation and fracture characterization. Here, we extend the algorithm of moveout-based anisotropic spreading correction (MASC) to mode-converted PSV-waves in VTI (transversely isotropic with a vertical symmetry axis) media and symmetry planes of orthorhombic media. While the geometrical-spreading equation in terms of reflection traveltime has the same form for all wave modes in laterally homogeneous media, reflection moveout of PS-waves is more complicated than that of P-waves (e.g., it can become asymmetric in common-midpoint geometry). Still, for models with a horizontal symmetry plane, long-spread reflection traveltimes of PS waves can be well approximated by the Tsvankin-Thomsen and Alkhalifah-Tsvankin moveout equations, which are widely used for P-waves. Although the accuracy of the Alkhalifah-Tsvankin equation is somewhat lower, it includes fewer moveout parameters and helps to maintain the uniformity of the MASC algorithm for P- and PS-waves. The parameters of both moveout equations are obtained by least-squares traveltime fitting or semblance analysis and are different from those for P-waves. Testing on full-waveform synthetic data generated by the reflectivity method for layered VTI media confirms that MASC accurately reconstructs the plane-wave conversion coefficient from conventional-spread PS data. Errors in the estimated conversion coefficient, which become noticeable at moderate and large offsets, are mostly caused by the offset-dependent transmission loss of PS-waves.

  14. A Study on the Performance and Electrochemistry of Bryophyllum pinnatum Leaf (BPL) Electrochemical Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Mamun, Mohammad; Khan, M. I.; Sarker, M. H.; Khan, K. A.; Shajahan, M.; Professor K. A. Khan Team

    2017-01-01

    The study was carried out to investigate on an innovative invention, Pathor Kuchi Leaf (PKL) electrochemical cell, which is fueled with PKL sap of widely available plant called Bryophyllum pinnatum as an energy source for use in PKL battery to generate electricity. This battery, a primary source of electricity, has several order of magnitude longer shelf-lives than the traditional Galvanic cell battery, is still under investigation. In this regard, we have conducted some experiments using various instruments including Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer (AAS), Ultra-Violet Visible spectrophotometer (UV-Vis), pH meter, Ampere-Volt-Ohm Meter (AVO Meter) etc. The AAS, UV-Vis and pH metric analysis data provided that the potential and current were produced as the Zn electrode itself acts as reductant while Cu2+ and H+ ions are behaving as oxidant. The significant influence of secondary salt on current and potential leads to the dissociation of weak organic acids in PKL juice, and subsequent enrichment to the reactant ions by the secondary salt effects. However, the liquid junction potential was not as great as minimized with the opposite transference of organic acid anions and H+ ions as their dissimilar ionic mobilities. Moreover, the large value of equilibrium constant (K) implies the big change in Gibbs free energy (ΔG), revealed the additional electrical work in presence of PKL sap. This easily fabricated high performance PKL battery can show an excellent promise during the off-peak across the country-side. Dept. of Physics and Dept. of Chemistry.

  15. The Effect of Age-related Differences in Body Size and Composition on Cardiovascular Determinants of VO2max

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background. A reduction in maximal stroke volume (SVmax) and total blood volume (TBV) has been hypothesized to contribute to the decline in maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) with healthy aging. However, these variables have rarely been collected simultaneously in a board age range to support or refute this hypothesis. It is also unclear to what extent scaling size-related cardiovascular determinants of VO2max affects the interpretation of age-related differences. Methods. A retrospective analysis of VO2max, maximal cardiac output (QCmax), TBV, and body composition including fat-free mass (FFM) in 95 (51% M) healthy adults ranging from 19–86 years. Results. Absolute and indexed VO2max, QCmax, and maximal heart rate decreased in both sexes with age (p ≤ .031). SVmax declined with age when scaled to total body mass or body surface area (p ≤ .047) but not when expressed in absolute levels (p = .120) or relative to FFM (p = .464). Absolute and indexed TBVs (mL/kg; mL/m2) were not significantly affected by age but increased with age in both sexes when scaled to FFM (p ≤ .013). A lower arteriovenous oxygen difference (a-vO2diff) contributed to the reduction in VO2max with age in treadmill exercisers (p = .004) but not in the entire cohort (p = .128). Conclusion. These results suggest (a) a reduction in absolute SVmax, and TBV do not contribute substantially to the age-related reduction in VO2max, which instead results from a smaller QCmax due to a lower maximal heart rate, and (b) body composition scaling methods should be used to accurately describe the effect of aging on physical function and cardiovascular variables. PMID:23160363

  16. Effect of blood donation on maximal oxygen consumption.

    PubMed

    Birnbaum, L; Dahl, T; Boone, T

    2006-12-01

    This study determined the effect of donating one unit of blood on various physiological parameters associated with a VO2(max) test. Ten healthy, male subjects (23+/-4 years, 178+/-7.6 cm, 74.4+/-12.3 kg) completed a VO2(max) test 24 h before donating one unit of blood (~500 mL) and 24 h after donating blood. The Bruce protocol was used to determine the subjects' VO2(max). Physiological responses were measured at the end of the VO2(max) test. A repeated measures ANOVA was used to determine if there were significant (P<0.05) differences in the subjects' physiological responses between the VO2(max) before and after blood donation. Significant differences were found in VO2(max) (mean+/-SD, 3.18+/-0.74 vs 2.87+/-0.53 L.min(-1)), cardiac output (Q, 25+/-5 vs 22.5+/-3.3 L.min(-1)), stroke volume (SV, 134+/-37 vs 121+/-22 mL.beat(-1)), delivery of oxygen (DO(2), 5+/-.87 vs 3.97+/-.68 L.min(-1)), and hemoglobin concentration (Hb, 153+/-12 vs 135+/-16 gm.L(-1)). No significant changes were observed for heart rate (HR); arteriovenous oxygen difference (a-vO(2) diff), systolic blood pressure (SBP), and diastolic blood pressure (DBP). These findings indicate that donating one unit of blood decreased VO2(max) due to the decrease in Q, which resulted from the decrease in SV since HR was unchanged. The lower VO2(max) along with the decrease in DO(2) would be expected to have a negative effect on athletic performance.

  17. Sequential biventricular pacing improves regional contractility, longitudinal function and dyssynchrony in patients with heart failure and prolonged QRS

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Aims Biventricular pacing (BiP) is an effective treatment in systolic heart failure (HF) patients with prolonged QRS. However, approximately 35% of the patients receiving BiP are classified as non-responders. The aim of this study is to evaluate the acute effects of VV-optimization on systolic heart function. Methods Twenty-one HF patients aged 72 (46-88) years, QRS 154 (120-190) ms, were studied with echocardiography, Tissue Doppler Imaging (TDI) and 3D-echo the first day after receiving a BiP device. TDI was performed; during simultaneous pacing (LV-lead pacing 4 ms before the RV-lead) and during sequential pacing (LV 20 and 40 ms before RV and RV 20 and 40 ms before LV-lead pacing). Systolic heart function was studied by tissue tracking (TT) for longitudinal function and systolic maximal velocity (SMV) for regional contractility and signs of dyssynchrony assessed by time-delays standard deviation of aortic valve opening to SMV, AVO-SMV/SD and tissue synchronization imaging (TSI). Results The TT mean value preoperatively was 4,2 ± 1,5 and increased at simultaneous pacing to 5,0 ± 1,2 mm (p < 0,05), and at best VV-interval to 5,4 ± 1,2 (p < 0,001). Simultaneous pacing achieved better TT distance compared with preoperative in 16 patients (76%). However, it was still higher after VV-optimization in 12 patients 57%. Corresponding figures for SMV were 3,0 ± 0,7, 3,5 ± 0,8 (p < 0,01), and 3,6 ± 0,8 (p < 0,001). Also dyssynchrony improved. Conclusions VV-optimization in the acute phase improves systolic heart function more than simultaneous BiP pacing. Long-term effects should be evaluated in prospective randomized trials. PMID:20384995

  18. Sequential biventricular pacing improves regional contractility, longitudinal function and dyssynchrony in patients with heart failure and prolonged QRS.

    PubMed

    Edner, Magnus; Ring, Margareta; Särev, Tooomas

    2010-04-12

    Biventricular pacing (BiP) is an effective treatment in systolic heart failure (HF) patients with prolonged QRS. However, approximately 35% of the patients receiving BiP are classified as non-responders. The aim of this study is to evaluate the acute effects of VV-optimization on systolic heart function. Twenty-one HF patients aged 72 (46-88) years, QRS 154 (120-190) ms, were studied with echocardiography, Tissue Doppler Imaging (TDI) and 3D-echo the first day after receiving a BiP device. TDI was performed; during simultaneous pacing (LV-lead pacing 4 ms before the RV-lead) and during sequential pacing (LV 20 and 40 ms before RV and RV 20 and 40 ms before LV-lead pacing). Systolic heart function was studied by tissue tracking (TT) for longitudinal function and systolic maximal velocity (SMV) for regional contractility and signs of dyssynchrony assessed by time-delays standard deviation of aortic valve opening to SMV, AVO-SMV/SD and tissue synchronization imaging (TSI). The TT mean value preoperatively was 4.2 +/- 1.5 and increased at simultaneous pacing to 5.0 +/- 1.2 mm (p < 0.05), and at best VV-interval to 5.4 +/- 1.2 (p < 0.001). Simultaneous pacing achieved better TT distance compared with preoperative in 16 patients (76%). However, it was still higher after VV-optimization in 12 patients 57%. Corresponding figures for SMV were 3.0 +/- 0.7, 3.5 +/- 0.8 (p < 0,01), and 3.6 +/- 0.8 (p < 0.001). Also dyssynchrony improved. VV-optimization in the acute phase improves systolic heart function more than simultaneous BiP pacing. Long-term effects should be evaluated in prospective randomized trials.

  19. Discriminating Circulatory Problems From Deconditioning: Echocardiographic and Cardiopulmonary Exercise Test Analysis.

    PubMed

    Rozenbaum, Zach; Khoury, Shafik; Aviram, Galit; Gura, Yaniv; Sherez, Jack; Man, Avi; Shimiaie, Jason; Le Tourneau, Thierry; Halkin, Amir; Biner, Simon; Keren, Gad; Topilsky, Yan

    2017-02-01

    Discriminating circulatory problems with reduced stroke volume (SV) from deconditioning, in which the muscles cannot consume oxygen normally, by gas exchange parameters is difficult. We performed combined stress echocardiography (SE) and cardiopulmonary exercise tests (CPET) in 110 patients (20 with normal effort capacity, 54 with attenuated SV response, and 36 with deconditioning) to evaluate multiple hemodynamic parameters and oxygen content difference (A-V.o2 Diff) in four predefined activity levels to assess which of the gas measures may help in the discrimination. Reduced anaerobic threshold (AT), low unchanging peak oxygen pulse, periodic breathing, shallow Δ peak oxygen consumption (V.o2)/Δwork rate (WR) ratio, and high expired volume per unit time/carbon dioxide production (V.e/V.co2) slope were all associated with abnormal SV response (P < .05 for all). The best discriminator was V.e/V.co2 slope to V.o2 ratio (≥ 2.7; area under the curve [AUC], 0.79; P < .0001). The optimal gas exchange model included ΔV.o2/ΔWR < 8.6; V.e/V.co2 slope to peak V.o2 ratio ≥ 2.7, and periodic breathing (AUC of 0.84; P < .0001). The best single gas exchange parameter to discriminate between circulatory problems and deconditioning is V.e/V.co2 slope to peak V.O2 ratio. Combining it with ΔV.o2/ΔWR and periodic breathing improves the discriminative ability. Copyright © 2016 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Time Dependent Fluid Occurrence Offshore Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, L.

    2010-12-01

    Time Dependent Fluid Occurrence Offshore Taiwan Liwen Chenab, Wu-Cheng Chia, Char-Shine Liuc (mma@earth.sinica.edu.tw)(wchi@gate.sinica.edu.tw) ; aInstitute of Earth Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan bInstitute of Geosciences, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan ; cInstitute of Oceanography, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan Earthquake-induced groundwater flows have been observed recently. Such fluid flow might temporarily change the temperature field in the crust. Here we used seismically detected gas hydrate under seafloor to study the temperature fields at a few hundred meters subbottom depth before, and after the 2006 Henchuan earthquake (Mw7.0). We used the hydrate-related bottom-simulating-reflector (BSR) in seismic profiles to study the effects of gas/fluid migration on the BSR attributes. We have conducted two seismic experiments before and after the earthquake across the same transects near the hypocenter of the earthquake using similar air gun arrays and streamers. By analyzing this unique dataset, we found enhanced BSR reflectivity in average after the earthquake (~0.03), but the Sea-floor reflectivity is very similar (~0.5). We also found changed amplitudes versus offset (AVO) in the dataset (the gradient of reflection coefficient versus the angles was ~-0.34). We interpret these results as a consequence of earthquake-induced gas and fluid migration, bringing the gases underneath the BSR, thus the enhanced reflection coefficients. Next we will explore new methods to use the BSR as a flow meter. Using time-dependent seismic attribute analyses across transects before and after a large earthquake, we found strong evidences of earthquake-related fluid migrations and possibly associated temperature perturbations. This is among the first studies to document such feature in the offshore region.

  1. Highly-optimized TWSM software package for seismic diffraction modeling adapted for GPU-cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zyatkov, Nikolay; Ayzenberg, Alena; Aizenberg, Arkady

    2015-04-01

    Oil producing companies concern to increase resolution capability of seismic data for complex oil-and-gas bearing deposits connected with salt domes, basalt traps, reefs, lenses, etc. Known methods of seismic wave theory define shape of hydrocarbon accumulation with nonsufficient resolution, since they do not account for multiple diffractions explicitly. We elaborate alternative seismic wave theory in terms of operators of propagation in layers and reflection-transmission at curved interfaces. Approximation of this theory is realized in the seismic frequency range as the Tip-Wave Superposition Method (TWSM). TWSM based on the operator theory allows to evaluate of wavefield in bounded domains/layers with geometrical shadow zones (in nature it can be: salt domes, basalt traps, reefs, lenses, etc.) accounting for so-called cascade diffraction. Cascade diffraction includes edge waves from sharp edges, creeping waves near concave parts of interfaces, waves of the whispering galleries near convex parts of interfaces, etc. The basic algorithm of TWSM package is based on multiplication of large-size matrices (make hundreds of terabytes in size). We use advanced information technologies for effective realization of numerical procedures of the TWSM. In particular, we actively use NVIDIA CUDA technology and GPU accelerators allowing to significantly improve the performance of the TWSM software package, that is important in using it for direct and inverse problems. The accuracy, stability and efficiency of the algorithm are justified by numerical examples with curved interfaces. TWSM package and its separate components can be used in different modeling tasks such as planning of acquisition systems, physical interpretation of laboratory modeling, modeling of individual waves of different types and in some inverse tasks such as imaging in case of laterally inhomogeneous overburden, AVO inversion.

  2. Three Dimensional Ash Dispersion Modeling within Google Earth : Past Eruptions and Operational Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webley, P. W.; Bailey, J. E.; Dean, K.; Dehn, J.

    2006-12-01

    Virtual Globes have become widely used for visualization in the scientific environment. They have become a tool for displaying two/three dimensional geophysical data operationally and retrospectively. There are over 100 active volcanoes in the North Pacific (NOPAC) Region which includes those on the Aleutian Islands, Alaska Peninsula, Alaska mainland, and the Kamchatka Peninsula and Kurile Islands, Russia. Volcanic ash is a major operational hazard and is a serious threat to human health and the aviation industry. The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) monitors the volcanoes within the North Pacific (NOPAC) region and uses a volcanic ash dispersion model, Puff, to routinely track the ash clouds from volcanic eruptions. The model uses information such as event duration, size of ash plume and start time (from satellite or seismic data) to predict the movement of the ash cloud released. Puff allows the analyst to track a set number of particles, giving the location in space and time. In the recent past, Puff has been displayed in two dimensional maps of ash location, color coded by altitude and relative ash concentration. This is a useful tool for operational analysis but does not take full advantage of the three dimensional nature of the data. A virtual globe such as Google Earth allows the analyst to display markers at known locations. Given the three dimensionality of the Puff model, Google Earth becomes a tool to display these predictions of ash dispersion in various formats. Puff is a global ash dispersion model and the predicted ash cloud can be displayed quickly and automatically for any volcano. Here we show operational Puff predictions of the volcanic ash in three dimensions, both as iso- surfaces and particles, and study past eruptions to illustrate the capabilites that the Virtual Globes can provide.

  3. Waveform modeling of the seismic response of a mid-ocean ridge axial melt sill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Min; Stephen, R. A.; Canales, J. Pablo

    2017-02-01

    Seismic reflections from axial magma lens (AML) are commonly observed along many mid-ocean ridges, and are thought to arise from the negative impedance contrast between a solid, high-speed lid and the underlying low-speed, molten or partially molten (mush) sill. The polarity of the AML reflection (P AML P) at vertical incidence and the amplitude vs offset (AVO) behavior of the AML reflections (e.g., P AML P and S-converted P AML S waves) are often used as a diagnostic tool for the nature of the low-speed sill. Time-domain finite difference calculations for two-dimensional laterally homogeneous models show some scenarios make the interpretation of melt content from partial-offset stacks of P- and S-waves difficult. Laterally heterogeneous model calculations indicate diffractions from the edges of the finite-width AML reducing the amplitude of the AML reflections. Rough seafloor and/or a rough AML surface can also greatly reduce the amplitude of peg-leg multiples because of scattering and destructive interference. Mid-crustal seismic reflection events are observed in the three-dimensional multi-channel seismic dataset acquired over the RIDGE-2000 Integrated Study Site at East Pacific Rise (EPR, cruise MGL0812). Modeling indicates that the mid-crustal seismic reflection reflections are unlikely to arise from peg-leg multiples of the AML reflections, P-to-S converted phases, or scattering due to rough topography, but could probably arise from deeper multiple magma sills. Our results support the identification of Marjanović et al. (Nat Geosci 7(11):825-829, 2014) that a multi-level complex of melt lenses is present beneath the axis of the EPR.

  4. Seismic Characterization of the BSR in the Nishitsugaru Basin, Offshore Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, A.; Kobayashi, T.; Fujii, T.

    2016-12-01

    JOGMEC, as a member of research group for resources assessment of Research Consortium for Methane Hydrate Resources in Japan (MH21), has been conducting resources assessment of methane hydrate (MH) offshore surrounding Japan. This study aims to investigate the property of the bottom simulating reflector (BSR). In terms of resources assessment, it is important to understand the character and distribution of the BSR to interpret the methane hydrate concentrated zones (MHCZ) quantitatively. The BSR presence and its character were analysed through multichannel seismic reflection data (4800 m streamer, 384 channels, 48 fold) acquired in 2014 by geophysical vessel `Shigen', which is owned by Agency for Natural Resources and Energy. We investigated the seismic character and distribution of the BSR in Nishitsugaru basin which located in the west Aomori prefecture, Japan. Several folds and faults with large displacement can be seen on the three-dimensional (3D) seismic section of the study area. The BSR was very visible continuously and extends over a broad area of the Nishitsugaru basin. Strong amplitude with amplitude versus offset (AVO) anomaly related BSR were interpreted in the parallel sediment and mass transport deposit. Clear interval velocity contrast and phase shift of seismic reflection events were confirmed between above and below the BSR. The feature around chimney structure such as weak amplitude suggested that fluid migrated from deep part of the basin to sea floor through several faults caused by inversion tectonics. The BSR which lies too deep to be related to methane hydrates data is interpreted as a diagenetic related BSR and it indicates local heat flow in the basin. Even the focused area has not been drilled, the BSR and its interpretations are useful to understand thermal structure, fluid migration, and estimation of the MHCZ in the basin.

  5. Exercise-training-induced changes in metabolic capacity with age: the role of central cardiovascular plasticity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Eivind; Næss, Morten Svendsen; Hoff, Jan; Albert, Tobias Lie; Pham, Quan; Richardson, Russell S; Helgerud, Jan

    2014-04-01

    Although aging is typically associated with a decline in maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max), young and old subjects, of similar initial muscle metabolic capacity, increased quadriceps VO2max equally when this small muscle mass was trained in isolation. As it is unclear if this preserved exercise-induced plasticity with age is still evident with centrally challenging whole body exercise, we assessed maximal exercise responses in 13 young (24 ± 2 years) and 13 old (60 ± 3 years) males, matched for cycling VO2max (3.82 ± 0.66 and 3.69 ± 0.30 L min(-1), respectively), both before and after 8 weeks of high aerobic intensity cycle exercise training. As a consequence of the training both young and old significantly improved VO2max (13 ± 6 vs. 6 ± 7 %) and maximal power output (20 ± 6 vs. 10 ± 6 %, respectively) from baseline, however, the young exhibited a significantly larger increase than the old. Similarly, independently assessed maximal cardiac output (Q max) tended to increase more in the young (16 ± 14 %) than in the old (11 ± 12 %), with no change in a-vO2 difference in either group. Further examination of the components of Q max provided additional evidence of reduced exercise-induced plasticity in both maximal heart rate (young -3 %, old 0 %) and stroke volume (young 19 ± 15, old 11 ± 11 %) in the old. In combination, these findings imply that limited central cardiovascular plasticity may be responsible, at least in part, for the attenuated response to whole body exercise training with increasing age.

  6. DHI evaluation by combining rock physics simulation and statistical techniques for fluid identification of Cambrian-to-Cretaceous clastic reservoirs in Pakistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Nisar; Khalid, Perveiz; Shafi, Hafiz Muhammad Bilal; Connolly, Patrick

    2017-08-01

    The use of seismic direct hydrocarbon indicators is very common in exploration and reservoir development to minimise exploration risk and to optimise the location of production wells. DHIs can be enhanced using AVO methods to calculate seismic attributes that approximate relative elastic properties. In this study, we analyse the sensitivity to pore fluid changes of a range of elastic properties by combining rock physics studies and statistical techniques and determine which provide the best basis for DHIs. Gassmann fluid substitution is applied to the well log data and various elastic properties are evaluated by measuring the degree of separation that they achieve between gas sands and wet sands. The method has been applied successfully to well log data from proven reservoirs in three different siliciclastic environments of Cambrian, Jurassic, and Cretaceous ages. We have quantified the sensitivity of various elastic properties such as acoustic and extended elastic (EEI) impedances, elastic moduli (K sat and K sat-μ), lambda-mu-rho method (λρ and μρ), P-to-S-wave velocity ratio (V P/V S), and Poisson's ratio (σ) at fully gas/water saturation scenarios. The results are strongly dependent on the local geological settings and our modeling demonstrates that for Cambrian and Cretaceous reservoirs, K sat-μ, EEI, V P/V S, and σ are more sensitive to pore fluids (gas/water). For the Jurassic reservoir, the sensitivity of all elastic and seismic properties to pore fluid reduces due to high overburden pressure and the resultant low porosity. Fluid indicators are evaluated using two metrics: a fluid indicator coefficient based on a Gaussian model and an overlap coefficient which makes no assumptions about a distribution model. This study will provide a potential way to identify gas sand zones in future exploration.

  7. Eruption Forecasting in Alaska: A Retrospective and Test of the Distal VT Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prejean, S. G.; Pesicek, J. D.; Wellik, J.; Cameron, C.; White, R. A.; McCausland, W. A.; Buurman, H.

    2015-12-01

    United States volcano observatories have successfully forecast most significant US eruptions in the past decade. However, eruptions of some volcanoes remain stubbornly difficult to forecast effectively using seismic data alone. The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) has responded to 28 eruptions from 10 volcanoes since 2005. Eruptions that were not forecast include those of frequently active volcanoes with basaltic-andesite magmas, like Pavlof, Veniaminof, and Okmok volcanoes. In this study we quantify the success rate of eruption forecasting in Alaska and explore common characteristics of eruptions not forecast. In an effort to improve future forecasts, we re-examine seismic data from eruptions and known intrusive episodes in Alaska to test the effectiveness of the distal VT model commonly employed by the USGS-USAID Volcano Disaster Assistance Program (VDAP). In the distal VT model, anomalous brittle failure or volcano-tectonic (VT) earthquake swarms in the shallow crust surrounding the volcano occur as a secondary response to crustal strain induced by magma intrusion. Because the Aleutian volcanic arc is among the most seismically active regions on Earth, distinguishing distal VT earthquake swarms for eruption forecasting purposes from tectonic seismicity unrelated to volcanic processes poses a distinct challenge. In this study, we use a modified beta-statistic to identify pre-eruptive distal VT swarms and establish their statistical significance with respect to long-term background seismicity. This analysis allows us to explore the general applicability of the distal VT model and quantify the likelihood of encountering false positives in eruption forecasting using this model alone.

  8. Pore Structure and Petrophysical Characterization of Hamelin Pool Stromatolites, Shark Bay, Western Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karaca, E.; Eberli, G. P.; Weger, R. J.; Parke, E.

    2014-12-01

    Stromatolites are organic-sedimentary structures that form by trapping and binding of sediments and calcium carbonate precipitation through microbial activity. The largest modern stromatolite province is the hypersaline Hamelin Pool, Western Australia. Microbial precipitation generates a rigid framework with a wide range of porosities and pore sizes that influence the ultrasonic velocity permeability and resistivity in stromatolites. Stromatolites generally have simple and large pore structures and an impressive high permeability values. In the 55 core plugs, permeability varies from 0.5 D to 9 D, while porosity ranges from 17% to 46%. Ultrasonic velocity, measured under dry and saturated conditions, is generally high with a large scatter at any given porosity. Likewise large variations of porosity exist at any given velocity. For example, at 29% porosity, (dry) velocity ranges from 3611m/s to 5384m/s. Similarly at a velocity of 4048m/s the porosity ranges from 23% to 46%. Digital image analysis indicates that the main control on the variations is the pore complexity and size. Larger pores produce faster velocities at equal porosity. In saturated plugs compressional velocities increase up to 365m/s. In contrast, shear velocities show both a decrease (up to 578m/s) and an increase (up to 391m/s) in shear velocity (vs) with saturation. These changes in vsindicate that the stromatolites do change the shear modulus with saturation, thus violating the assumption by Gassmann. The cementation factor "m" (from Archie's equation, F = φ-m) determined from electrical resistivity varies in a narrow range from 2.1 to 2.6. This narrow range reduces the uncertainty in predicting the hydrocarbon/water saturation in stromatolites. The large range of porosities at a given velocity, however, makes porosity estimates from seismic inversion a challenge and, similarly, the shear moduli changes and the resultant shear strengthening and weakening add uncertainties to AVO analysis in

  9. The New USGS Volcano Hazards Program Web Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venezky, D. Y.; Graham, S. E.; Parker, T. J.; Snedigar, S. F.

    2008-12-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) Volcano Hazard Program (VHP) has launched a revised web site that uses a map-based interface to display hazards information for U.S. volcanoes. The web site is focused on better communication of hazards and background volcano information to our varied user groups by reorganizing content based on user needs and improving data display. The Home Page provides a synoptic view of the activity level of all volcanoes for which updates are written using a custom Google® Map. Updates are accessible by clicking on one of the map icons or clicking on the volcano of interest in the adjacent color-coded list of updates. The new navigation provides rapid access to volcanic activity information, background volcano information, images and publications, volcanic hazards, information about VHP, and the USGS volcano observatories. The Volcanic Activity section was tailored for emergency managers but provides information for all our user groups. It includes a Google® Map of the volcanoes we monitor, an Elevated Activity Page, a general status page, information about our Volcano Alert Levels and Aviation Color Codes, monitoring information, and links to monitoring data from VHP's volcano observatories: Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO), Cascades Volcano Observatory (CVO), Long Valley Observatory (LVO), Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO), and Yellowstone Volcano Observatory (YVO). The YVO web site was the first to move to the new navigation system and we are working on integrating the Long Valley Observatory web site next. We are excited to continue to implement new geospatial technologies to better display our hazards and supporting volcano information.

  10. Tetrandrine induces cell death in SAS human oral cancer cells through caspase activation-dependent apoptosis and LC3-I and LC3-II activation-dependent autophagy.

    PubMed

    Huang, An-Cheng; Lien, Jin-Cherng; Lin, Meng-Wei; Yang, Jai-Sing; Wu, Ping-Ping; Chang, Shu-Jen; Lai, Tung-Yuan

    2013-08-01

    Numerous studies have demonstrated that autophagy is associated with cancer development. Thus, agents to induce autophagy could be employed in some cases for the treatment of cancer. Our results showed that tetrandrine significantly decreased the viability of SAS cells in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Tetrandrine induced nuclear condensation, demonstrated by DAPI staining. The early events in apoptosis analysed by Annexin V/PI staining indicated that the percentage of cells staining positive for Annexin V was slightly increased in SAS cells with tetrandrine treatment but was much lower following bafilomycin A1 pre-treatment. Tetrandrine caused AVO and MDC induction in SAS cells in a concentration-dependent manner by fluorescence microscopy. Tetrandrine also caused LC-3 expression in SAS cells in a time-dependent manner. Our results show that tetrandrine treatment induced the levels of cleaved caspase-3 in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Tetrandrine treatment induced the levels of LC-3 II, Atg-5, beclin-1, p-S6, p-ULK, p-mTOR, p-Akt (S473) and raptor. Tetrandrine decreased cell viability, but bafilomycin A1, 3-MA, chloroquine and NAC protected tetrandrine-treated SAS cells against decrease of cell viability. Atg-5, beclin-1 siRNA decreased tetrandrine-induced cleaved caspase-3 and cleaved PARP in SAS cells and protected tetrandrine-treated SAS cells against decrease in cell viability. Chloroquine, NAC and bafilomycin A1 also decreased tetrandrine-induced cleaved caspase-3 and cleaved PARP in SAS cells. Our results indicate the tetrandrine induces apoptosis and autophagy of SAS human cancer cells via caspase-dependent and LC3-I and LC3-II‑dependent pathways.

  11. Frequency-Dependent Azimuthal Anisotropy of Seismic Reflectivity From a Layer With Discrete Fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, S.; Nihei, K. T.; Myer, L. R.

    2001-12-01

    Fractures in sedimentary rock can have a significant impact on the production of fluids and gas in the subsurface. These fractures often are regularly-spaced and near-vertical, with a preferred orientation due to the regional stresses that lead to their formation. The conventional approach for characterizing fractured rock using seismic waves treats the fractured rock as an equivalent homogeneous, transversely isotropic medium with the elastic symmetry axis aligned in the fracture-normal direction. This effective medium approach neglects scattering off and wave channeling along discrete fractures. We examine the effects of a layer containing a single set of vertical periodic or semi-periodic fractures on the scattering of elastic waves. A numerical technique developed by Hennion et al.(1990) is used to compute frequency-domain responses which subsequently are used to compute seismograms in the time domain. This is a hybrid technique between finite element and plane wave solutions to simulate the three-dimensional scattering of elastic waves. Each fracture is modeled explicitly, so that the model can simulate both discrete arrivals of scattered waves from individual fractures and multiply scattered waves among them. Using this technique, we examine both AVA (amplitude versus azimuth) and AVO (amplitude versus offset) responses of a fractured reservoir as a function of wave frequency and fracture properties. Our preliminary results show distinct features developing in the seismograms as the wavelength approaches the fracture spacing. Furthermore, reflected waves measured in the fracture-normal and fracture-parallel directions in azimuth exhibited clear differences in their spectral characteristics. These characteristics may provide additional information that can be used to estimate fracture orientation and spacing.

  12. Searching for stratigraphic traps in the Neuquen basin of Argentina

    SciTech Connect

    Blangy, J.P.; Follis, M.; Tavella, G.; Wright, C.

    1996-08-01

    Amoco Argentina oil Company secured a farm-in from YPF (50-50 partnership) over the blocks CN-VIII and ON-IX in the Neuquen basin of Argentina. Primary reservoir horizons are Late Jurassic and Early Cretaceous eolian sands. The petrophysical properties of these dunal sands contrast-sometimes sharply-with those of the silts and shales of similar age in the immediate area. Initial evaluation of the blocks had recognized stratigraphic potential associated with the dunal facies, especially in the CN-VIII block. The presence of reservoir quality Avile sands (Barremian age, 18-20% porosity) was mapped on the CN-VIII block directly from older vintage seismic. (1) Seismic Acquisition: Amoco shot approximately 400 km of high resolution 120-fold seismic in late 1994 to high-grade those leads identified on the old seismic. The CN-VIII block is partially covered by basalts of varying thickness. The Amoco survey resulted in an improved penetration through the basalts; it also had a much higher frequency content and yielded superior bed resolution than any previous survey in the area. (2) Seismic Processing and Modeling: Amoco reprocessed inhouse several key lines over producing fields in the immediate area and approximately 200 km of seismic from the 1994 survey in the CN-VIll block for detailed amplitude analysis. Seismic amplitude models [including (1) 2-D stratigraphic pinchout models describing the presence of porous sand lenses, and (2) AVO models] tie the 1994 data very well. (3) Integrated Seismic Interpretation and Reduction of Technical RISK: The integration of various disciplines (Petrophysics, Geophysics, Geology, and Engineering) resulted in the calibration/ranking of seismic responses observed over the CN-VIII area, thus substantially reducing the RISK on trap definition, reservoir quality, seal, and product associated with the early leads.

  13. Exploring Means of Determining Surface Deformation at Augustine Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovick, J. T.; Lawlor, O.; Dean, K.; Dehn, J.; Freymueller, J.; Atwood, D.

    2006-12-01

    The recent January 2006 eruption of Augustine Volcano followed a nearly a year of increased seismic activity, that has been actively monitored by the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO). The eruption has generated a topographical signal that GPS ground stations were able to monitor. This work addresses the question as to which other techniques are able to see this deformation. While we primarily use remotely sensed data, with SAR derived products and techniques as a focus, we also explore the use of ICESAT data. Deformation started in the summer of 2005, with a period of inflation leading up to the January 2006 eruption and which was then followed by a period deflation. The deformation of the flanks of Augustine island was subtle, and GPS stations at the perimeter of the island generally show less that 2cm of total deformation. The summit GPS stations show significantly greater inflation, however these stations were destroyed during the eruption. Traditional INSAR has difficulties when applied to a volcano like Augustine, due to the small area of the island, its large topographic relief, the deposition of ash over the large areas of the island and the long orbital repeat interval of current SAR satellites, all work against the technique. This does not mean however that the outlook is bleak, Permanent Scatterer (PS) INSAR related techniques show great potential. The scientific basis of each technique examined is explained along with the challenges, and limitations that are inherent therein. Deformation results obtained from each method are also presented, and compared with the GPS measurements. The following techniques are examined, 1) INSAR/DINSAR, 2) Permanent Scatterers, 3) Delta K interferometry, 4) ICESAT LIDAR integration, 5) SAR layover/shadow mapping and geometric techniques. Because eruptions at small island volcanoes are common throughout the Aleutian chain, techniques developed for the analysis of this eruption will have great applicability to these and

  14. Gas Hydrate Deposits in the Cauvery-Mannar Offshore Basin, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewangan, P.

    2015-12-01

    The analysis of geophysical and coring data from Mahanadi and Krishna-Godavari offshore basins, eastern continental margin of India, has established the presence of gas hydrate deposits; however, other promising petroliferous basins are relatively unexplored for gas hydrates. A collaborative program between GSI/MoM and CSIR-NIO was formulated to explore the Cauvery-Mannar offshore basin for gas hydrate deposits (Fig. 1a). High quality multi-channel reflection seismics (MCS) data were acquired with 3,000 cu. in airgun source array and 3 km long hydrophone streamer (240 channels) onboard R/V Samudra Ratnakar for gas hydrate studies. Other geophysical data such as gravity, magnetic and multibeam data were also acquired along with seismic data.After routine processing of seismic data, the bottom simulating reflectors (BSRs) are observed in the central and north-eastern part of the survey area. The BSRs are identified based on its characteristic features such as mimicking the seafloor, opposite polarity with respect to the seafloor and crosscutting the existing geological layers (Fig. 1b). At several locations, seismic signatures associated with free gas such as drop in interval velocity, pull-down structures, amplitude variation with offset (AVO) and attenuation are observed below the BSRs which confirm the presence of free gas in the study area. Acoustic chimneys are observed at some locations indicating vertical migration of the free gas. The observed seismic signatures established the presence of gas hydrates/free gas deposits in Cauvery-Mannar basin. Interestingly, BSRs appear to be distributed along the flanks of submarine canyon indicating the influence of geomorphology on the formation and distribution of gas hydrates.

  15. Transversely isotropic elasticity and poroelasticity arising from thin isotropic layers

    SciTech Connect

    Berryman, J.G.

    1997-07-01

    Since the classic work of Postma [1955] and Backus [1962], much has been learned about elastic constants in vertical transversely isotropic (VTI) media when the anisotropy is due to fine layering of isotropic elastic materials. However, new results are still being discovered. For example, the P-wave anisotropy parameter c{sub 11}/c{sub 33} lies in the range 1/4 {<=} c{sub 11}/c{sub 33} {<=} <{lambda}+2{mu}><1/({lambda}+2{mu})>, when the layers are themselves composed of isotropic elastic materials with Lame constants {lambda} and {mu} and the vertical average of the layers is symbolized by <{center_dot}>. The lower bound corrects a result of Postma. For porous layers, a connected solid frame forms the basis of the elastic behavior of a poroelastic medium in the presence of confining forces, while connected pores permit a percolating fluid (if present) to influence the mechanical response of the system from within. For isotropic and anisotropic poroelastic media, we establish general formulas for the behavior of transversely isotropic poroelasticity arising from laminations of isotropic components. The Backus averaging method is shown to provide elementary means of constructing general formulas. The results for confined fluids are then compared with the more general Gassmann [1951] formulas that must be satisfied by any anisotropic poroelastic medium and found to be in complete agreement. Such results are important for applications to oil exploration using AVO (amplitude versus offset) since the presence or absence of a fluid component, as well as the nature of the fluid, is the critical issue and the ways in which the fluid influences seismic reflection data still need to be better understood.

  16. Remotely Triggered Seismicity at Alaskan Volcanoes Following the Mw 7.9 Denali Fault Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, S. C.; Sanchez, J. J.; Power, J. A.; Stihler, S. D.; McNutt, S. R.

    2002-12-01

    The November 3, 2002, Mw 7.9 Denali Fault earthquake provided the largest source yet to investigate triggered earthquakes at Alaskan volcanoes. The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) operates short-period seismic networks on 24 historically active volcanoes in Alaska, 280 - 2100 km distant from the mainshock epicenter. The magnitude detection thresholds for these networks range from M 0.1 to M 1.5. Previous instances of triggered seismicity in Alaska have been recorded in the Katmai Volcanic Cluster, where a number of triggered events occurred following two large earthquakes on December 6, 1999 (60 km distant, Mw 7.0), and January 10, 2001 (35 km distant, Mw 6.8). We searched for evidence of triggered seismicity by examining the unfiltered waveforms for all stations in each volcano network for ~1 hour following the Mw 7.9 arrival. We looked for events within the mainshock coda with discrete P and S arrivals and/or arrivals on multiple stations. We also looked at filtered waveforms for time periods of several hours before and after the mainshock. We only found compelling evidence for triggering at the Katmai Volcanic Cluster (720-755 km SW of the mainshock), where two small earthquakes with distinct P and S arrivals appeared in the mainshock coda at one station. There was also a small increase in located earthquakes at Katmai over a period of several hours following the mainshock. Although it is certainly possible that triggered earthquakes occurred at other volcanoes while networks were clipped, our analysis indicates that any triggering was minimal. This is in striking contrast to triggered seismicity recorded at Yellowstone, Mammoth Mountain, The Geysers, Coso and possibly Mount Rainier following the Denali earthquake. The comparative lack of triggering could be a result of differences in size and/or activity of geothermal systems, directivity of the mainshock, the dominant frequency at each system, and/or local site conditions.

  17. Redox cycling of a copper complex with benzaldehyde nitrogen mustard-2-pyridine carboxylic acid hydrazone contributes to its enhanced antitumor activity, but no change in the mechanism of action occurs after chelation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yinli; Li, Cuiping; Fu, Yun; Liu, Youxun; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Yanfang; Zhou, Pingxin; Yuan, Yanbin; Zhou, Sufeng; Li, Shaoshan; Li, Changzheng

    2016-03-01

    Many anticancer drugs used in the clinical have potent metal chelating ability. The formed metal complex(es) may exhibit improved (or antagonistic) antitumor activity. However, the underlying mechanism has received limited attention. Therefore, investigation of the mechanism involved in the change upon chelation is required to extend our understanding of the effects of various drugs. In the present study, the proliferation inhibition effect of benzaldehyde nitrogen mustard-2-pyridine carboxylic acid hydrazone (BNMPH) and its copper complex on tumor cell lines was investigated. The copper chelate exhibited almost a 10-fold increase in antitumor activity (with IC50 <5 µM). The results showed that both BNMPH and its copper complex induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and caused upregulation of caspase 8 and Bax as well as the downregulation of Bcl-2, indicating that apoptosis was involved in the cytotoxic effects. DNA fragmentation noted in the comet assay further supported ROS involvement. The present study indicated that BNMPH and its copper complex effectively induced S phase arrest and the cell cycle arrest was associated with the downregulation of cyclin D1. The formation of acidic vesicular organelles (AVOs) and an increase in cleaved LC3-II demonstrated that autophagy occurred in the HepG2 cells treated with the agents. Taken together, BNMPH and its copper complex exhibited proliferation inhibition via apoptosis, cell cycle arrest and autophagy, which was dependent on ROS. The enhanced antitumor activity of the copper complex was due to its redox-cycling ability, but the mechanism was not altered compared to BNMPH. Our findings may significantly contribute to the understanding of the anti-proliferative effect of BNMPH and its copper complex.

  18. Volcano Monitoring Using Google Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, W.; Dehn, J.; Bailey, J. E.; Webley, P.

    2009-12-01

    At the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO), remote sensing is an important component of its daily monitoring of volcanoes. AVO’s remote sensing group (AVORS) primarily utilizes three satellite datasets; Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) data, from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) Polar Orbiting Satellites (POES), Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s (NASA) Terra and Aqua satellites, and NOAA’s Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) data. AVHRR and MODIS data are collected by receiving stations operated by the Geographic Information Network of Alaska (GINA) at the University of Alaska’s Geophysical Institute. An additional AVHRR data feed is supplied by NOAA’s Gilmore Creek satellite tracking station. GOES data are provided by the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), Monterey Bay. The ability to visualize these images and their derived products is critical for the timely analysis of the data. To this end, AVORS has developed javascript web interfaces that allow the user to view images and metadata. These work well for internal analysts to quickly access a given dataset, but they do not provide an integrated view of all the data. To do this AVORS has integrated its datasets with Keyhole Markup Language (KML) allowing them to be viewed by a number of virtual globes or other geobrowsers that support this code. Examples of AVORS’ use of KML include the ability to browse thermal satellite image overlays to look for signs of volcanic activity. Webcams can also be viewed interactively through KML to confirm current activity. Other applications include monitoring the location and status of instrumentation; near real-time plotting of earthquake hypocenters; mapping of new volcanic deposits using polygons; and animated models of ash plumes, created by a combination of ash dispersion modeling and 3D visualization packages.

  19. Frequency-Dependent Spherical-Wave Reflection in Acoustic Media: Analysis and Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jingnan; Wang, Shangxu; Wang, Jingbo; Dong, Chunhui; Yuan, Sanyi

    2017-02-01

    Spherical-wave reflectivity (SWR), which describes the seismic wave reflection in real subsurface media more accurately than plane-wave reflectivity (PWR), recently, again attracts geophysicists' attention. The recent studies mainly focus on the amplitude variation with offset/angle (AVO/AVA) attributes of SWR. For a full understanding of the reflection mechanism of spherical wave, this paper systematically investigates the frequency-dependent characteristics of SWR in a two-layer acoustic medium model with a planar interface. Two methods are used to obtain SWR. The first method is through the calculation of classical Sommerfeld integral. The other is by 3D wave equation numerical modeling. To enhance computation efficiency, we propose to perform wave equation simulation in cylindrical coordinates, wherein we for the first time implement unsplit convolutional perfectly matched layer as the absorbing boundary. Both methods yield the same results, which demonstrate the validity and accuracy of the computation. From both the numerical tests and the theoretical demonstration, we find that the necessary condition when frequency dependence of SWR occurs is that the upper and lower media have different velocities. At the precritical small angle, the SWR exhibits complicated frequency-dependent characteristics for varying medium parameters. Especially when the impedance of upper medium equals that of lower one, the PWR is zero according to geometric seismics. Whereas the SWR is nonzero: the magnitude of SWR decreases with growing frequency, and approaches that of the corresponding PWR at high frequency; the phase of SWR increases with growing frequency, but approaches 90° or -90° at high frequency. At near- and post-critical angles, large difference exists between SWR and PWR, and the difference is particularly great at low frequencies. Finally, we propose a nonlinear inversion method to estimate physical parameters and interface depth of media by utilizing the frequency

  20. KMAH index and separation of PSP-waves from streamer data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitrofanov, Georgy; Priimenko, Viatcheslav

    2017-08-01

    The presence of triplications (caustics) can be a serious problem in seismic data processing and analysis. The travel-time curve becomes multi-valued and the geometrical spreading correction factor tends to zero due to energy focusing. To select the regions of possible triplications (caustics) of travel-times, which can arise during the propagation of reflected seismic waves, we use the Keller-Maslov-Arnol'd-Hörmander (KMAH) index. The identification of such regions improves the selection of signals associated with target reflecting horizons and their use in solving various inverse dynamic problems, including amplitude-versus-offset (AVO) and full-waveform inversions. The importance of the KMAH index increases in 4D surveys when the structure of the model is already known, and it is necessary to conduct a detailed analysis of the shapes of seismic signals with increasing accuracy when solving inverse seismic problems. In addition, this index can be valuable when solving various marine seismic problems associated with single and converted waves, in particular with PSP-waves. The present work is dedicated to the separation of signals associated with this type of wave using surface marine seismic data. However, the proposed algorithm has a wider application. It is based on: (i) a priori information on the medium under study; (ii) ray tracing method. The ray tracing method enables the identification of the corresponding signals and the determination of the time and space intervals, in which such signals are most accurately traced. These intervals are used in the selection of target signals, particularly signals related to PSP-waves. In order to select optimal areas of observation with higher amplitudes of target signals, we use the τ -p transform. To improve the stability of the signal separation, KMAH index is used. This approach allows the elimination of possible triplications (caustics) in the travel-time curve from the selected intervals.

  1. A long-chain flavodoxin protects Pseudomonas aeruginosa from oxidative stress and host bacterial clearance.

    PubMed

    Moyano, Alejandro J; Tobares, Romina A; Rizzi, Yanina S; Krapp, Adriana R; Mondotte, Juan A; Bocco, José L; Saleh, Maria-Carla; Carrillo, Néstor; Smania, Andrea M

    2014-02-01

    Long-chain flavodoxins, ubiquitous electron shuttles containing flavin mononucleotide (FMN) as prosthetic group, play an important protective role against reactive oxygen species (ROS) in various microorganisms. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen which frequently has to face ROS toxicity in the environment as well as within the host. We identified a single ORF, hereafter referred to as fldP (for fl avo d oxin from P . aeruginosa), displaying the highest similarity in length, sequence identity and predicted secondary structure with typical long-chain flavodoxins. The gene was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant product (FldP) could bind FMN and exhibited flavodoxin activity in vitro. Expression of fldP in P. aeruginosa was induced by oxidative stress conditions through an OxyR-independent mechanism, and an fldP-null mutant accumulated higher intracellular ROS levels and exhibited decreased tolerance to H2O2 toxicity compared to wild-type siblings. The mutant phenotype could be complemented by expression of a cyanobacterial flavodoxin. Overexpression of FldP in a mutT-deficient P. aeruginosa strain decreased H2O2-induced cell death and the hypermutability caused by DNA oxidative damage. FldP contributed to the survival of P. aeruginosa within cultured mammalian macrophages and in infected Drosophila melanogaster, which led in turn to accelerated death of the flies. Interestingly, the fldP gene is present in some but not all P. aeruginosa strains, constituting a component of the P. aeruginosa accessory genome. It is located in a genomic island as part of a self-regulated polycistronic operon containing a suite of stress-associated genes. The collected results indicate that the fldP gene encodes a long-chain flavodoxin, which protects the cell from oxidative stress, thereby expanding the capabilities of P. aeruginosa to thrive in hostile environments.

  2. Geophysical Characterization for Potential Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in the Black Warrior Basin of Alabama

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodliffe, A. M.; Harris, W.; Rutter, R. S.; Clark, P.; Pashin, J. C.; Esposito, R. A.

    2011-12-01

    The southeastern US is a leading producer of carbon dioxide emissions in large part due to the high number of coal-fired power plants in the region. As part of a Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) funded geological characterization project we have collected a number of geophysical data sets that characterize the Black Warrior Basin in the vicinity of the Alabama Power Gorgas Steam Plant in Walker County, Alabama. These geophysical data sets are important for extending the results from our 8000-foot characterization hole throughout the basin. Two 5-mile seismic reflection profiles processed through pre-stack time migration image the Cambrian through Pennsylvanian stratigraphy in the basin. The major injection targets in the saline reservoirs of the Hartselle Sandstone, Tuscumbia Limestone, Stones River Group and Knox Group. Initial examination of the data show that it is well suited for techniques such as Amplitude Versus Offset (AVO) analysis and inversion with the downhole data. Multiple offset vertical seismic profiles (VSP) image the formations close to and at multiple azimuths away from the drill hole. These VSPs also provide an important link to the seismic reflection profiles, which pass a little less than a mile to the north of the drill hole. Three shallow microseismic wells in the vicinity of the main drill hole have 3-component geophones cemented at depths of 50, 150, and 250 foot. These wells, designed to record small magnitude seismic events resulting from low-volume water injection, are important for characterizing the local fracture pathways and stress fields. Downhole gravity data complements the usual suite of downhole tools by imaging density variations deeper into the formations and ensuring that the identified saline reservoirs are not locally discontinuous.

  3. Tetraarsenic hexoxide induces G2/M arrest, apoptosis, and autophagy via PI3K/Akt suppression and p38 MAPK activation in SW620 human colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Nagappan, Arulkumar; Lee, Won Sup; Yun, Jeong Won; Lu, Jing Nan; Chang, Seong-Hwan; Jeong, Jae-Hoon; Kim, Gon Sup; Jung, Jin-Myung; Hong, Soon Chan

    2017-01-01

    Tetraarsenic hexoxide (As4O6) has been used in Korean folk medicines for the treatment of cancer, however its anti-cancer mechanisms remain obscured. Here, this study investigated the anti-cancer effect of As4O6 on SW620 human colon cancer cells. As4O6 has showed a dose-dependent inhibition of SW620 cells proliferation. As4O6 significantly increased the sub-G1 and G2/M phase population, and Annexin V-positive cells in a dose-dependent manner. G2/M arrest was concomitant with augment of p21 and reduction in cyclin B1, cell division cycle 2 (cdc 2) expressions. Nuclear condensation, cleaved nuclei and poly (adenosine diphosphate‑ribose) polymerase (PARP) activation were also observed in As4O6-treated SW620 cells. As4O6 induced depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP, ΔΨm) but not reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Further, As4O6 increased death receptor 5 (DR5), not DR4 and suppressed the B‑cell lymphoma‑2 (Bcl-2) and X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) family proteins. As4O6 increased the formation of AVOs (lysosomes and autophagolysosomes) and promoted the conversion of microtubule-associated protein 1A/1B-light chain 3 (LC3)-I to LC3-II in a dose- and time- dependent manner. Interestingly, a specific phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt inhibitor (LY294002) augmented the As4O6 induced cell death; whereas p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (p38 MAPK) inhibitor (SB203580) abrogated the cell death. Thus, the present study provides the first evidence that As4O6 induced G2/M arrest, apoptosis and autophagic cell death through PI3K/Akt and p38 MAPK pathways alteration in SW620 cells. PMID:28355296

  4. Autophagy as a Survival Mechanism for Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cells in Endonuclease G-Mediated Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Masui, Atsushi; Hamada, Masakazu; Kameyama, Hiroyasu; Wakabayashi, Ken; Takasu, Ayako; Imai, Tomoaki; Iwai, Soichi; Yura, Yoshiaki

    2016-01-01

    Safingol, L- threo-dihydrosphingosine, induces cell death in human oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) cells through an endonuclease G (endoG) -mediated pathway. We herein determined whether safingol induced apoptosis and autophagy in oral SCC cells. Safingol induced apoptotic cell death in oral SCC cells in a dose-dependent manner. In safingol-treated cells, microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3)-I was changed to LC3-II and the cytoplasmic expression of LC3, amount of acidic vesicular organelles (AVOs) stained by acridine orange and autophagic vacuoles were increased, indicating the occurrence of autophagy. An inhibitor of autophagy, 3-methyladenine (3-MA), enhanced the suppressive effects of safingol on cell viability, and this was accompanied by an increase in the number of apoptotic cells and extent of nuclear fragmentation. The nuclear translocation of endoG was minimal at a low concentration of safingol, but markedly increased when combined with 3-MA. The suppressive effects of safingol and 3-MA on cell viability were reduced in endoG siRNA- transfected cells. The scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS) prevented cell death induced by the combinational treatment, whereas a pretreatment with a pan-caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk did not. These results indicated that safingol induced apoptosis and autophagy in SCC cells and that the suppression of autophagy by 3-MA enhanced apoptosis. Autophagy supports cell survival, but not cell death in the SCC cell system in which apoptosis occurs in an endoG-mediated manner. PMID:27658240

  5. An inverse scattering series method for attenuating elastic multiples from multicomponent land and ocean bottom seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matson, Kenneth Howell

    A method exists for marine seismic data which removes all orders of free surface multiples and suppresses all orders of internal multiples while leaving primaries intact. This method is based on the inverse scattering series and makes no assumptions about the subsurface earth model. The marine algorithm assumes that the sources and receivers are located in the water column. In the context of land and ocean bottom data, the sources and receivers are located on or in an elastic medium. This opens up the possibility of recording multicomponent seismic data. Because both compressional (P) and shear (S) primaries are recorded in multicomponent data, it has the potential for providing a more complete picture of the subsurface. Coupled with the benefits of the P and S primaries are a complex set of elastic free surface and internal multiples. In this thesis, I develop an inverse scattering series method to attenuate these elastic multiples from multicomponent land and ocean bottom data. For land data, this method removes elastic free surface multiples. For ocean bottom data, multiples associated with the top and bottom of the water column are removed. Internal multiples are strongly attenuated for both data types. In common with the marine formulation, this method makes no assumptions about the earth below the sources and receivers, and does not affect primaries. The latter property is important for amplitude variation with offset analysis (AVO). The theory for multiple attentuation requires four component (two source, two receiver) data, a known near surface or water bottom, near offsets, and a known source wavelet. Tests on synthetic data indicate that this method is still effective using data with less than four components and is robust with respect to errors in estimating the near surface or ocean bottom properties.

  6. An Algorithm for Evaluating Fresnel-Zone Textural Roughness for Seismic Facies Interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di, H.; Gao, D.

    2014-12-01

    In reflection seismic interpretation, a 1-D convolutional model is commonly used to interpret amplitude variations based on the geometric ray theory assuming seismic wave to reflect at a reflection point; however, the propagation of seismic waves actually occurs in a finite zone around the geometric ray path and gets reflected from a zone known as Fresnel zone. The collected signal at the surface turns out to be the superposition of reflections from within the Fresnel zone, which is a function of texture. Generally, for a rough texture such as sandstone, the dominant reflection is from the zone margin, while for a smooth texture such as marine shale, the dominant reflection is from the zone center. Based on this concept, Fresnel-zone texture directly affects amplitude variations with offset (AVO), azimuth (AVAZ), and frequency (AVF). Here we develop a computer algorithm for evaluating Fresnel-zone textural roughness. The algorithm starts with dividing the Fresnel zone into a set of micro-zones. It then builds an initial texture model to be convolved with an extracted wavelet. By comparing the synthetic signal from a Fresnel zone to the real seismic signal within an analysis window at a target location, the model is adjusted and updated until both synthetic and real signals match best. The roughness is evaluated as the correlation coefficient between the generated texture model within the Fresnel zone and the ideal model for a rough texture medium. Our new algorithm is applied to a deep-water 3D seismic volume over offshore Angola, west Africa. The results show that a rough texture is associated with channel sands, whereas a smooth texture with marine shale.

  7. Velocity analysis with local event slopes related probability density function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Peng; Lu, Wenkai; Zhang, Yingqiang

    2015-12-01

    Macro velocity model plays a key role in seismic imaging and inversion. The performance of traditional velocity analysis methods is degraded by multiples and amplitude-versus-offset (AVO) anomalies. Local event slopes, containing the subsurface velocity information, have been widely used to accomplish common time-domain seismic processing, imaging and velocity estimation. In this paper, we propose a method for velocity analysis with probability density function (PDF) related to local event slopes. We first estimate local event slopes with phase information in the Fourier domain. An adaptive filter is applied to improve the performance of slopes estimator in the low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) situation. Second, the PDF is approximated with the histogram function, which is related to attributes derived from local event slopes. As a graphical representation of the data distribution, the histogram function can be computed efficiently. By locating the ray path of the first arrival on the semblance image with straight-ray segments assumption, automatic velocity picking is carried out to establish velocity model. Unlike local event slopes based velocity estimation strategies such as averaging filters and image warping, the proposed method does not make the assumption that the errors of mapped velocity values are symmetrically distributed or that the variation of amplitude along the offset is slight. Extension of the method to prestack time-domain migration velocity estimation is also given. With synthetic and field examples, we demonstrate that our method can achieve high resolution, even in the presence of multiples, strong amplitude variations and polarity reversals.

  8. Inhibition of autophagy enhances DNA damage-induced apoptosis by disrupting CHK1-dependent S phase arrest

    SciTech Connect

    Liou, Jong-Shian; Wu, Yi-Chen; Yen, Wen-Yen; Tang, Yu-Shuan; Kakadiya, Rajesh B.; Su, Tsann-Long; Yih, Ling-Huei

    2014-08-01

    DNA damage has been shown to induce autophagy, but the role of autophagy in the DNA damage response and cell fate is not fully understood. BO-1012, a bifunctional alkylating derivative of 3a-aza-cyclopenta[a]indene, is a potent DNA interstrand cross-linking agent with anticancer activity. In this study, BO-1012 was found to reduce DNA synthesis, inhibit S phase progression, and induce phosphorylation of histone H2AX on serine 139 (γH2AX) exclusively in S phase cells. Both CHK1 and CHK2 were phosphorylated in response to BO-1012 treatment, but only depletion of CHK1, but not CHK2, impaired BO-1012-induced S phase arrest and facilitated the entry of γH2AX-positive cells into G2 phase. CHK1 depletion also significantly enhanced BO-1012-induced cell death and apoptosis. These results indicate that BO-1012-induced S phase arrest is a CHK1-dependent pro-survival response. BO-1012 also resulted in marked induction of acidic vesicular organelle (AVO) formation and microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3) processing and redistribution, features characteristic of autophagy. Depletion of ATG7 or co-treatment of cells with BO-1012 and either 3-methyladenine or bafilomycin A1, two inhibitors of autophagy, not only reduced CHK1 phosphorylation and disrupted S phase arrest, but also increased cleavage of caspase-9 and PARP, and cell death. These results suggest that cells initiate S phase arrest and autophagy as pro-survival responses to BO-1012-induced DNA damage, and that suppression of autophagy enhances BO-1012-induced apoptosis via disruption of CHK1-dependent S phase arrest. - Highlights: • Autophagy inhibitors enhanced the cytotoxicity of a DNA alkylating agent, BO-1012. • BO-1012-induced S phase arrest was a CHK1-dependent pro-survival response. • Autophagy inhibition enhanced BO-1012 cytotoxicity via disrupting the S phase arrest.

  9. Resveratrol Ameliorates Alcoholic Fatty Liver by Inducing Autophagy.

    PubMed

    Tang, Liying; Yang, Fengli; Fang, Zhirui; Hu, Chengmu

    2016-01-01

    Alcoholic fatty liver (AFL) is early stage of alcoholic liver disease, which can progress to steatohepatitis, fibrosis, and cirrhosis if alcohol consumption is continued. The pathogenesis of AFL is associated with excessive lipid accumulation in hepatocytes. Resveratrol (RES), a dietary polyphenol found in red wines and grapes, has been shown to have a hepatoprotective effect. Autophagy is a crucial physiological process in cellular catabolism that involves the regulation of lipid droplets. Autophagy maintains a balance between protein synthesis, degradation and self-recycling. In the present study, we evaluated the protective effects of RES (10[Formula: see text]mg/kg, 30[Formula: see text]mg/kg, 100[Formula: see text]mg/kg) on AFL mice fed with an ethanol Lieber-DeCarli liquid diet, and HepG2 cells in the presence of oleic acid and alcohol to investigate whether resveratrol could induce autophagy to attenuate lipid accumulation. The results showed that RES (30[Formula: see text]mg/kg and 100[Formula: see text]mg/kg) treatment significantly attenuated hepatic steatosis and lowered the activities of serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), triglyceride (TG), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C). H&E staining showed that RES reduced hepatic lipid accumulation. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images showed that RES treatment increased the number of autophagosomes and promoted the formation of autophagy. Western blot analysis showed that RES treatment increased the levels of microtubule-associated protein light chain3- II (LC3-II) and Beclin1, decreased expression of p62 protein. In addition, in vitro studies also demonstrated that RES led to the formation of acidic vesicular organelles (AVOs), however, 3-Methyladenine (3-MA), a specific inhibitor of autophagy, obviously inhibited the above effects of RES. In conclusion, RES has protective effects on alcoholic hepatic steatosis, and the potential mechanism might be involved

  10. Methylone and MDPV activate autophagy in human dopaminergic SH-SY5Y cells: a new insight into the context of β-keto amphetamines-related neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Valente, Maria João; Amaral, Cristina; Correia-da-Silva, Georgina; Duarte, José Alberto; Bastos, Maria de Lourdes; Carvalho, Félix; Guedes de Pinho, Paula; Carvalho, Márcia

    2017-05-19

    Autophagy has an essential role in neuronal homeostasis and its dysregulation has been recently linked to neurotoxic effects of a growing list of psychoactive drugs, including amphetamines. However, the role of autophagy in β-keto amphetamine (β-KA) designer drugs-induced neurotoxicity has hitherto not been investigated. In the present study, we show that two commonly abused cathinone derivatives, 3,4-methylenedioxymethcathinone (methylone) and 3,4-methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV), elicit morphological changes consistent with autophagy and neurodegeneration, including formation of autophagic vacuoles and neurite retraction in dopaminergic SH-SY5Y cells. Methylone and MDPV prompted the formation of acidic vesicular organelles (AVOs) and lead to increased expression of the autophagy-associated protein LC3-II in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Electron microscopy confirmed the presence of autophagosomes with typical double membranes and autolysosomes in cells exposed to both β-KA. The autophagic flux was further confirmed using bafilomycin A1, a known inhibitor of the late phase of autophagy. Moreover, we showed that autophagy markers were activated before the triggering of cell death and caspase 3 activation, suggesting that β-KA-induced autophagy precedes apoptotic cell death. To address the role of oxidative stress in autophagy induction, we also investigated the effects of antioxidant treatment with N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) on autophagy and apoptotic markers altered by these drugs. NAC significantly attenuated methylone- and MDPV-induced cell death by completely inhibiting the generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, and hampering both apoptotic and autophagic activity, suggesting that oxidative stress plays an important role in mediating autophagy and apoptosis elicited by these drugs.

  11. Oxygen pulse is not predictive of stroke volume in heart failure.

    PubMed

    McConnell, T R; Shearn, W M; Klinger, T A; Strohecker, K

    2006-06-01

    Stroke volume (SV) is the major cardiovascular discriminator between those that are exercise trained versus untrained individuals and healthy individuals versus those with pathologic left ventricular dysfunction. Furthermore, since the increase in oxygen pulse (O(2)P) (O(2)P=VO(2)/HR?oxygen uptake/heart rate) that occurs with exercise is a function of SV and the arterial-venous oxygen difference (a-vO(2)), O(2)P has been demonstrated a reliable indicator of SV for healthy individuals. Although commonly used as a physiological and clinical marker of SV, the validity of O(2)P as an indicator of SV in patients with heart failure has not been investigated. Thirty-one (23 men, 8 women) patients (age: 64+/-7.9; ejection fraction: 24+/-7.8) with chronic heart failure had cardiac output measured during steady-state workloads (25 watts and 75% VO(2peak)) upon entry and again at completion of 12 weeks of exercise training. Four patients were excluded due to clinical complications and 3 because of non-compliance; therefore, 24 patients completed the study. The relationships between SV and O2P are: 1) baseline: SV=11.1+4(O2P), SEE=11.8; r(2)=0.39 and 2) study completion: SV=25.1+2.3(O2P), SEE=12.7; r(2)=0.21. While SV did not increase after 25 watts, O2P continued to increase by 17%, respectively. In addition, there were no training effects on SV or O(2)P. As SV increased, O(2)P underpredicted measured SV. In patients with heart failure and poor left ventricular function, O(2)P is not recommended as a marker of the SV during exercise.

  12. Optical satellite data volcano monitoring: a multi-sensor rapid response system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duda, Kenneth A.; Ramsey, Michael; Wessels, Rick L.; Dehn, Jonathan

    2009-01-01

    In this chapter, the use of satellite remote sensing to monitor active geological processes is described. Specifically, threats posed by volcanic eruptions are briefly outlined, and essential monitoring requirements are discussed. As an application example, a collaborative, multi-agency operational volcano monitoring system in the north Pacific is highlighted with a focus on the 2007 eruption of Kliuchevskoi volcano, Russia. The data from this system have been used since 2004 to detect the onset of volcanic activity, support the emergency response to large eruptions, and assess the volcanic products produced following the eruption. The overall utility of such integrative assessments is also summarized. The work described in this chapter was originally funded through two National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Earth System Science research grants that focused on the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) instrument. A skilled team of volcanologists, geologists, satellite tasking experts, satellite ground system experts, system engineers and software developers collaborated to accomplish the objectives. The first project, Automation of the ASTER Emergency Data Acquisition Protocol for Scientific Analysis, Disaster Monitoring, and Preparedness, established the original collaborative research and monitoring program between the University of Pittsburgh (UP), the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO), the NASA Land Processes Distributed Active Archive Center (LP DAAC) at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center, and affiliates on the ASTER Science Team at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) as well as associates at the Earth Remote Sensing Data Analysis Center (ERSDAC) in Japan. This grant, completed in 2008, also allowed for detailed volcanic analyses and data validation during three separate summer field campaigns to Kamchatka Russia. The second project, Expansion and synergistic use

  13. Iterative Multiparameter Elastic Waveform Inversion Using Prestack Time Imaging and Kirchhoff approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaniani, Hassan

    This thesis proposes a "standard strategy" for iterative inversion of elastic properties from the seismic reflection data. The term "standard" refers to the current hands-on commercial techniques that are used for the seismic imaging and inverse problem. The method is established to reduce the computation time associated with elastic Full Waveform Inversion (FWI) methods. It makes use of AVO analysis, prestack time migration and corresponding forward modeling in an iterative scheme. The main objective is to describe the iterative inversion procedure used in seismic reflection data using simplified mathematical expression and their numerical applications. The frame work of the inversion is similar to (FWI) method but with less computational costs. The reduction of computational costs depends on the data conditioning (with or without multiple data), the level of the complexity of geological model and acquisition condition such as Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR). Many processing methods consider multiple events as noise and remove it from the data. This is the motivation for reducing the computational cost associated with Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) forward modeling and Reverse Time Migration (RTM)-based techniques. Therefore, a one-way solution of the wave equation for inversion is implemented. While less computationally intensive depth imaging methods are available by iterative coupling of ray theory and the Born approximation, it is shown that we can further reduce the cost of inversion by dropping the cost of ray tracing for traveltime estimation in a way similar to standard Prestack Time Migration (PSTM) and the corresponding forward modeling. This requires the model to have smooth lateral variations in elastic properties, so that the traveltime of the scatterpoints can be approximated by a Double Square Root (DSR) equation. To represent a more realistic and stable solution of the inverse problem, while considering the phase of supercritical angles, the

  14. Cardiac output, oxygen consumption and arteriovenous oxygen difference following a sudden rise in exercise level in humans.

    PubMed Central

    De Cort, S C; Innes, J A; Barstow, T J; Guz, A

    1991-01-01

    1. To investigate the relative contributions of increases in cardiac output and arteriovenous oxygen difference to the increase in oxygen consumption during exercise, the ventilatory and cardiovascular responses to a sudden transition from unloaded cycling to 70 or 80 W were measured in six normal healthy subjects. 2. Oxygen consumption (VO2) was measured breath-by-breath and corrected for changes in lung gas stores. Cardiac output (Q) was measured beat-by-beat using pulsed Doppler ultrasound, and blood pressure was measured beat-by-beat using a non-invasive finger cuff (Finapres). All data were calculated off-line, second-by-second. 3. Arteriovenous oxygen difference (A-VO2) was calculated from Q and VO2 using the Fick Principle. Left ventricular afterload was calculated by dividing Q by mean blood pressure. 4. The data for Q and VO2 were closely fitted by single exponential curves (mean r2 0.84 and 0.90 respectively; r is the correlation coefficient). These curves yielded mean time constants for the increases in Q and VO2 of 28 and 55 s respectively following the increase in exercise level. In each individual subject, the time course of adjustment of Q was faster than that of VO2. There was a mean lag of 15 s from the start of the new exercise level before the derived A-V O2 began to increase; the mean time constant for A-V O2 was 57 s. 5. If A-V O2 had remained constant, the observed rise in Q alone would have resulted in an average of 87% of the increase in VO2 which was observed after 5 s. If Q had remained constant, the observed increase in A-V O2 would have led to only 8% of the actual increase in VO2 after 5 s. 6. Mean and systolic blood pressure rose and afterload fell immediately after the onset of the increased workload. The time constants of the systolic blood pressure and afterload responses to exercise varied widely and ranged from 37 to 81 and 10 to 26 s respectively (n = 4). 7. We conclude that Q is responsible for most of the early increase in VO2

  15. Integrating sequence stratigraphy and seismic attributes for quantitative reservoir characterization: A case study of a Pliocene reservoir, Campeche Sound, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendez-Hernandez, Efrain

    An integrated workflow including analysis of seismic, core, well log and biostratigraphic data was developed and conducted to both construct a reliable geologic model and characterize a Pliocene gas reservoir which overlies the Cantarell field in the Campeche Sound, southern Gulf of Mexico. In 2003, the offshore exploratory Utan #1 well was drilled to investigate the gas potential of the Pliocene sequence. The well provided successful results from facies characterized by thin mixed siliciclastic-carbonate beds contained within a faulted rollover anticline. Campeche Sound is the most prolific Mexican oil producing province where the best fields are Mesozoic-Paleocene carbonates in structural traps. Therefore, little exploration has been focused on the overlying late Tertiary and more siliciclastic section, representing a gap in the knowledge of this part of the basin where new expectations arise for non-associated gas entrapments in a traditionally oil-producing province. Based upon development of a sequence stratigraphic framework, a new play analysis is developed where the reservoirs are identified as retrogradational shoreface parasequences sitting atop third-order sequence boundaries. Basic and advanced seismic attributes contribute to the stratigraphic interpretation and gas detection. Seismic inversion for reflectivity allowed better identification of key stratigraphic surfaces. Modeled Type-I AVO and a dimmed spectral decomposition response following structural contours provide reliability to gas discrimination and reservoir delineation. The seismic attributes will require additional support to be valuable as reservoir quality predictors. Because biogenic methane and thin sheet reservoirs define the rock-fluid system, development may be uneconomic. However, the trapped gas could be reinjected at deeper depths to improve recovery efficiency of oil in the Cantarell field. The knowledge gained from this research is an important contribution to the petroleum

  16. Elastic wavefield migration and tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Yuting

    Wavefield migration and tomography are well-developed under the acoustic assumption; however, multicomponent recorded seismic data include shear waves (S-modes) in addition to the compressional waves (P-modes). Constructing multicomponent wavefields and considering multiparameter model properties make it possible to utilize information provided by various wave modes, and this information allows for better characterization of the subsurface. In my thesis, I apply popular wavefield imaging and tomography to elastic media, and propose methods to address challenges posed by elastic multicomponent wavefields and multiparameter models. The key novelty of my research consists of new elastic imaging conditions, which generate elastic images with improved qualities and clear physical meaning. Moreover, I demonstrate an elastic wavefield tomography method to obtain realistic elastic models which benefits elastic migration. Migration techniques, including conventional RTM, extended RTM, and least-squares RTM (LSRTM), provide images of subsurface structures. I propose one imaging condition that computes potential images (PP, PS, SP, and SS). This imaging condition exploits pure P- and S-modes obtained by Helmholtz decomposition and corrects for the polarity reversal in PS and SP images. Using this imaging condition, I propose methods for conventional RTM and extended RTM. The extended imaging condition makes it possible to compute angle gathers for converted waves. The amplitudes of the scalar images indicate reflectivities, which can be used for amplitude verse offset (AVO) analysis; however, this imaging condition requires knowledge of the geologic dip. I propose a second imaging condition that computes perturbation images, i.e., P and S velocity perturbations. Because these images correspond to perturbations to material properties that are angle-independent, they do not have polarity reversals; therefore, they do not need dip information for polarity correction. I use this

  17. Muscle blood flow is reduced with dehydration during prolonged exercise in humans

    PubMed Central

    González-Alonso, José; Calbet, José A L; Nielsen, Bodil

    1998-01-01

    The present study examined whether the blood flow to exercising muscles becomes reduced when cardiac output and systemic vascular conductance decline with dehydration during prolonged exercise in the heat. A secondary aim was to determine whether the upward drift in oxygen consumption (V̇O2) during prolonged exercise is confined to the active muscles.Seven euhydrated, endurance-trained cyclists performed two bicycle exercise trials in the heat (35 °C; 40–50% relative humidity; 61 ± 2% of maximal V̇O2), separated by 1 week. During the first trial (dehydration trial, DE), they bicycled until volitional exhaustion (135 ± 4 min, mean ± s.e.m.), while developing progressive dehydration and hyperthermia (3.9 ± 0.3% body weight loss; 39.7 ± 0.2 °C oesophageal temperature, Toes). In the second trial (control trial), they bicycled for the same period of time while maintaining euhydration by ingesting fluids and stabilizing Toes at 38.2 ± 0.1 °C after 30 min exercise.In both trials, cardiac output, leg blood flow (LBF), vascular conductance and V̇O2 were similar after 20 min exercise. During the 20 min-exhaustion period of DE, cardiac output, LBF and systemic vascular conductance declined significantly (8–14%; P < 0.05) yet muscle vascular conductance was unaltered. In contrast, during the same period of control, all these cardiovascular variables tended to increase. After 135 ± 4 min of DE, the 2.0 ± 0.6 l min−1 lower blood flow to the exercising legs accounted for approximately two-thirds of the reduction in cardiac output. Blood flow to the skin also declined markedly as forearm blood flow was 39 ± 8% (P < 0.05) lower in DE vs. control after 135 ± 4 min.In both trials, whole body V̇O2 and leg V̇O2 increased in parallel and were similar throughout exercise. The reduced leg blood flow in DE was accompanied by an even greater increase in femoral arterial-venous O2 (a-vO2) difference.It is concluded that blood flow to the exercising muscles declines

  18. NON-INVASIVE DETERMINATION OF THE LOCATION AND DISTRIBUTION OF FREE-PHASE DENSE NONAQUEOUS PHASE LIQUIDS (DNAPL) BY SEISMIC REFLECTION TECHNIQUES

    SciTech Connect

    Michael G. Waddell; William J. Domoracki; Tom J. Temples

    2001-05-01

    This semi-annual technical progress report is for Task 4 site evaluation, Task 5 seismic reflection design and acquisition, and Task 6 seismic reflection processing and interpretation on DOE contact number DE-AR26-98FT40369. The project had planned one additional deployment to another site other than Savannah River Site (SRS) or DOE Hanford. During this reporting period the project had an ASME peer review. The findings and recommendation of the review panel, as well at the project team response to comments, are in Appendix A. After the SUBCON midyear review in Albuquerque, NM and the peer review it was decided that two additional deployments would be performed. The first deployment is to test the feasibility of using non-invasive seismic reflection and AVO analysis as monitoring to assist in determining the effectiveness of Dynamic Underground Stripping (DUS) in removal of DNAPL. Under the rescope of the project, Task 4 would be performed at the Charleston Navy Weapons Station, Charleston, SC and not at the Dynamic Underground Stripping (DUS) project at SRS. The project team had already completed Task 4 at the M-area seepage basin, only a few hundred yards away from the DUS site. Because the geology is the same, Task 4 was not necessary. However, a Vertical Seismic Profile (VSP) was conducted in one well to calibrate the geology to the seismic data. The first deployment to the DUS Site (Tasks 5 and 6) has been completed. Once the steam has been turned off these tasks will be performed again to compare the results to the pre-steam data. The results from the first deployment to the DUS site indicated a seismic amplitude anomaly at the location and depths of the known high concentrations of DNAPL. The deployment to another site with different geologic conditions was supposed to occur during this reporting period. The first site selected was DOE Paducah, Kentucky. After almost eight months of negotiation, site access was denied requiring the selection of another site

  19. The Unconventional Revolution in Exploration Geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    House, N. J.

    2014-12-01

    During the last 25 years, 3D seismic imaging has revolutionized hydrocarbon exploration by delivering an accurate 3 dimensional picture of the subsurface. The image is capable of detecting fluids within the reservoir, and has significantly reduced the risk of locating and developing hydrocarbon deposits. In late 1990s, deregulation of natural gas prices allowed long recognized deposits of natural gas locked in tight rocks be economic. It sparked factory drilling (repeatable high density evenly spaced) wells and hydraulic fracturing that would help unlock the reservoirs. All that was needed was a geologist to determine depths and limits of the reservoir and engineers to drill and complete the wells. If 3D seismic data was available, it might have been used to define both the limits of the field and drilling hazards. Generally the cost and time required to process and interpret 3D Seismic was considered too high to affect the perceived geologic risk of the Factory approach. Completion costs in unconventional reservoirs account for over 50% of the well costs. It's therefore critical to understand the geometry of how the rock is fracturing and determine optimum well spacing to balance the cost of development with the value of the gas or oil being produced. By extending AVO to the pre-stack domain, it's possible to simultaneously invert for Vp, Vs and density. Armed with these three fundamental rock properties that dictate elastic and inelastic rock response, researchers were able to combine those properties to tie directly to how well a rock will respond to hydraulic fracturing, or which rocks contain a higher TOC, or other rock properties that control how a rock responds to seismic waves or hydraulic fracturing. Combining these results allows interpreters to map areas of higher productivity, and identify bypassed reserves. Currently hundreds of different seismic attributes that are generated from 3D seismic data are used to identify the highest productive areas and

  20. Surface Deformation Caused by Shallow Magmatic Activity at Okmok Volcano Detected by GPS Campapigns 2000-2002

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyagi, Y.; Freymueller, J.; Kimata, F.; Sato, T.; Mann, D.; Fujii, N.; Kasahara, M.

    2002-12-01

    Okmok volcano is located on Umnak Island in the eastern part of Aleutian Arc. This volcano consists of a large caldera, and there are cones within the caldera. Okmok volcano has erupted more than 10 times during the last century, with the latest eruption occurring in February 1997. Significant surface deformation before, during and after the eruption has been detected by InSAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry). However, the area of coherent data has been limited to the northern half of the caldera. We have carried out GPS (Global Positioning System) measurement campaigns in 2000, 2001 and 2002, with financial support from IARC (International Arctic Research Center) and NASDA (National Space Development Agency of Japan), and logistical support from AVO (Alaska Volcano Observatory). We hoped to compare or combine the results from both InSAR and GPS, but regrettably, there have been no suitable since 2000. We have surveyed a total of 33 stations on and around Okmok volcano. As a result of the data from repeated GPS observations for the period 2000-2002, we detected significant deformation with several features. First, displacements at the sites located inside the caldera are larger in magnitude than the ones at the sites located outside the caldera. Second, the direction of horizontal displacements inside caldera shows a radial outward pattern from the center of the caldera; however, the magnitudes of some displacements are not consistent with a simple Mogi source. Third, the horizontal displacements for the period 2001-2002 show a more purely radial pattern and both horizontal and vertical displacements are much larger in magnitude than for the period 2000-2001. This indicates that magma has come closer to the surface over the last years. We observed steaming from the active vent in this summer, which had not been observed since at least 2000. We interpreted these deformations as an inflation of the caldera and assumed magma chamber beneath the approximate

  1. Shallow gas in Cenozoic sediments of the Southern North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trampe, Anna F.; Lutz, Rüdiger; Franke, Dieter; Thöle, Hauke; Arfai, Jashar

    2013-04-01

    Shallow petroleum systems in the southern North Sea are known for several decades but they were not actively explored for a long time. In recent years these unconventional shallow petroleum systems are studied in greater detail and one shallow gas field (A-12) is in production in the Netherlands. Additionally, oil was encountered in Miocene sandstones in the southern Danish North Sea (Lille John well) just north of the Danish-German border. Seismic amplitude anomalies are an indication for hydrocarbons in sediments. Therefore we have mapped the occurrence of seismic amplitude anomalies in the German North Sea based on more than 25.000 km of 2D seismic data and around 4.000 km2 of 3D seismic data. Amplitude anomalies are ubiquitous phenomena in the study area. These anomalies are not only caused by hydrocarbons but also by changing lithologies e.g. peat or fluid migration. Therefore several classes of seismic anomalies, e.g. bright spots, chimneys, blanking areas and velocity pull-down were mapped. Examples for these classes were studied with AVO (amplitude variation with offset) analyses to verify the existence or non-existence of gas in the sediments. Shallow gas can be produced and transported through the dense pipeline grid of the southern and central North Sea or it could be burned offshore close to wind parks in small power plants and the electric energy then transported through the existing power connections of the wind parks. Thus enabling a continuous energy supply during calm wind periods. This study is carried out within the framework of the project "Geoscientific Potential of the German North Sea (GPDN)" in which the Cenozoic sedimentary system was mapped in great detail. A detailed model of delta evolution (Baltic river system) was developed which serves as a structural framework. The studied interval is time equivalent to the Utsira formation which is used offshore Norway for sequestration of CO2. These different possibilities of using or exploiting

  2. Ash Emissions and Risk Management in the Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steensen, T. S.; Webley, P. W.; Stuefer, M.

    2012-12-01

    Located in the 'Ring of Fire', regions and communities around the Pacific Ocean often face volcanic eruptions and subsequent ash emissions. Volcanic ash clouds pose a significant risk to aviation, especially in the highly-frequented flight corridors around active volcano zones like Indonesia or Eastern Russia and the Alaskan Aleutian Islands. To mitigate and manage such events, a detailed quantitative analysis using a range of scientific measurements, including satellite data and Volcanic Ash Transport and Dispersion (VATD) model results, needs to be conducted in real-time. For the case study of the Sarychev Peak eruption in Russia's Kurile Islands during 2009, we compare ash loading and dispersion from Weather Research and Forecast model with online Chemistry (WRF-Chem) results with satellite data of the eruption. These parameters are needed for the real-time management of volcanic crises to outline no-fly zones and to predict the areas that the ash is most likely to reach in the near future. In the early stages after the eruption, an international group with representatives from the Kamchatkan and Sachalin Volcanic Eruption Response Teams (KVERT, SVERT), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) published early research on the geological and geophysical characteristics of the eruption and the behavior of the resulting ash clouds. The study presented here is a follow-up project aimed to implement VATD model results and satellite data retrospectively to demonstrate the possibilities to develop this approach in real-time for future eruptions. Our research finds that, although meteorological cloud coverage is high in those geographical regions and, consequently, these clouds can cover most of the ash clouds and as such prevent satellites from detecting it, both approaches compare well and supplement each other to reduce the risk of volcanic eruptions. We carry out spatial extent and absolute quantitative

  3. Integrating SAR with Optical and Thermal Remote Sensing for Operational Near Real-Time Volcano Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, F. J.; Webley, P.; Dehn, J.; Arko, S. A.; McAlpin, D. B.

    2013-12-01

    Volcanic eruptions are among the most significant hazards to human society, capable of triggering natural disasters on regional to global scales. In the last decade, remote sensing techniques have become established in operational forecasting, monitoring, and managing of volcanic hazards. Monitoring organizations, like the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO), are nowadays heavily relying on remote sensing data from a variety of optical and thermal sensors to provide time-critical hazard information. Despite the high utilization of these remote sensing data to detect and monitor volcanic eruptions, the presence of clouds and a dependence on solar illumination often limit their impact on decision making processes. Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) systems are widely believed to be superior to optical sensors in operational monitoring situations, due to the weather and illumination independence of their observations and the sensitivity of SAR to surface changes and deformation. Despite these benefits, the contributions of SAR to operational volcano monitoring have been limited in the past due to (1) high SAR data costs, (2) traditionally long data processing times, and (3) the low temporal sampling frequencies inherent to most SAR systems. In this study, we present improved data access, data processing, and data integration techniques that mitigate some of the above mentioned limitations and allow, for the first time, a meaningful integration of SAR into operational volcano monitoring systems. We will introduce a new database interface that was developed in cooperation with the Alaska Satellite Facility (ASF) and allows for rapid and seamless data access to all of ASF's SAR data holdings. We will also present processing techniques that improve the temporal frequency with which hazard-related products can be produced. These techniques take advantage of modern signal processing technology as well as new radiometric normalization schemes, both enabling the combination of

  4. Revision of the Malagasy ponerine ants of the genus Leptogenys Roger (Hymenoptera: Formicidae).

    PubMed

    Rakotonirina, Jean Claude; Fisher, Brian L

    2014-07-15

    Leptogenys is the most diverse ponerine ant genus in the world; it is widespread throughout tropical and subtropical regions and there are over 200 extant species described. Most species have ergatoid queens, and many have falcate, bowed mandibles and are specialists on isopod prey. Here, the Malagasy Leptogenys are revised with 60 species recognized, of which 40 are newly described, 18 redescribed, and two subspecies raised to species rank and redescribed. Included in the revision are a key to species based on the worker caste, geographic distributions, descriptions of intraspecific variation, and notes on natural history. The following species are redescribed: L. acutirostris Santschi, L. alluaudi Emery, L. angusta (Forel), L. antongilensis Emery, L. arcirostris Santschi, L. coerulescens Emery, L. falcigera Roger, L. gracilis Emery, L. grandidieri Forel, L. incisa Forel, L. maxillosa (F. Smith), L. oswaldi Forel, L. pavesii Emery, L. ridens Forel, L. saussurei (Forel), L. stuhlmanni Mayr, L. truncatirostris Forel, and L. voeltzkowi Forel. The following are raised to species and redescribed: L. imerinensis Forel stat. rev., stat. n.; and L. suarensis Emery stat. rev., stat. n. The following are described as new: L. alamando sp. n., L. alatapia sp. n., L. ambo sp. n., L. andritantely sp. n., L. anjara sp. n., L. avaratra sp. n., L. avo sp. n., L. barimaso sp. n., L. bezanozano sp. n., L. borivava sp. n., L. chrislaini sp. n., L. comajojo sp. n., L. diana sp. n., L. edsoni sp. n., L. fasika sp. n., L. fiandry sp. n., L. fotsivava sp. n., L. johary sp. n., L. lavavava sp. n., L. lohahela sp. n., L. lucida sp. n., L. malama sp. n., L. mangabe sp. n., L. manja sp. n., L. manongarivo sp. n., L. mayotte sp. n., L. namana sp. n., L. namoroka sp. n., L. pilaka sp. n., L. rabebe sp. n., L. rabesoni sp. n., L. ralipra sp. n., L. sahamalaza sp. n., L. tatsimo sp. n., L. toeraniva sp. n., L. tsingy sp. n., L. variabilis sp. n., L.vatovavy sp. n., L. vitsy sp. n., and L. zohy

  5. Tying rock properties from core to depositional processes and examining the relationship through forward seismic reflection modeling in the Kaiparowits Plateau, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dworsky, Karenth

    Nearshore fluvial to tidal transitional depositional systems are becoming increasingly important due to the large number of global hydrocarbon reserves held in such deposits. These deposits are inherently complex due to their heterolithic nature and therefore, interpreting facies and facies relationships in seismic reflection profiles is problematic. The fluvial and tidally influenced nearshore deposits of the late Cretaceous John Henry Member (JHM) of the Straight Cliffs Formation, located in the Kaiparowits Plateau of southern Utah, offers an excellent opportunity to improve our understanding of how the fluvial to tidal transition impacts subsurface petroleum reservoirs and their expression in seismic reflection profiles. The focus of the first chapter is to investigate the impact of heterogeneous depositional environments and their rock properties to model amplitude versus offset (AVO) using a single core. Core EP-25 exhibits lithofacies from a progradational succession, from shoreface through tidal to fluvial. In order to model the most likely lithofacies stacking patterns present in the core, Markov Chain analysis was conducted. Benchtop measurements performed on 1 inch core plugs obtained rock properties (Vp, Vs, density, permeability, and porosity) for each lithofacies. Average rock properties for each lithofacies were used to generate synthetic seismic reflection models of the different upward fining facies associations documented directly from the core, in order to model variations in amplitude versus offset responses as a function of variable tidal influence. The focus of the second chapter is to capture probable 3-dimensional geobody distributions with a particular focus on coal geobody distribution using previously studied cores and outcrops on the plateau. Three different seismic forward models were created ranging in complexity, using cores EP-25, EP-07, density logs, and the nearby outcrop study Left Hand Collet. The rock properties obtained from the

  6. A Trial of the Delineation of Gas Hydrate Bearing Zones using Seismic Methods Offshore Tokai Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inamori, T.; Hato, M.

    2002-12-01

    . JNOC, Japan National Oil Corporation, and METI conducted three 3D seismic surveys at offshore Tokai Japan in 2002 and they will drilled some research well at the same area from 2003 to 2004. We hope to image 3D gas hydrate bearing layers from the 3D seismic data and well results. To image the gas hydrate bearing zones, we will try to detect interval velocities from seismic data and to resolve much higher, we are planning to execute the multi-seismic attribute analysis and AVO inversion.

  7. Topotactic oxidation pathway of ScTiO3 and high-temperature structure evolution of ScTiO3.5 and Sc4Ti3O12-type phases.

    PubMed

    Shafi, Shahid P; Hernden, Bradley C; Cranswick, Lachlan M D; Hansen, Thomas C; Bieringer, Mario

    2012-02-06

    The novel oxide defect fluorite phase ScTiO(3.5) is formed during the topotactic oxidation of ScTiO(3) bixbyite. We report the oxidation pathway of ScTiO(3) and structure evolution of ScTiO(3.5), Sc(4)Ti(3)O(12), and related scandium-deficient phases as well as high-temperature phase transitions between room temperature and 1300 °Cusing in-situ X-ray diffraction. We provide the first detailed powder neutron diffraction study for ScTiO(3). ScTiO(3) crystallizes in the cubic bixbyite structure in space group Ia3 (206) with a = 9.7099(4) Å. The topotactic oxidation product ScTiO(3.5) crystallizes in an oxide defect fluorite structure in space group Fm3m (225) with a = 4.89199(5) Å. Thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis experiments combined with in-situ X-ray powder diffraction studies illustrate a complex sequence of a topotactic oxidation pathway, phase segregation, and ion ordering at high temperatures. The optimized bulk synthesis for phase pure ScTiO(3.5) is presented. In contrast to the vanadium-based defect fluorite phases AVO(3.5+x) (A = Sc, In) the novel titanium analogue ScTiO(3.5) is stable over a wide temperature range. Above 950 °C ScTiO(3.5) undergoes decomposition with the final products being Sc(4)Ti(3)O(12) and TiO(2). Simultaneous Rietveld refinements against powder X-ray and neutron diffraction data showed that Sc(4)Ti(3)O(12) also exists in the defect fluorite structure in space group Fm3m (225) with a = 4.90077(4) Å. Sc(4)Ti(3)O(12) undergoes partial reduction in CO/Ar atmosphere to form Sc(4)Ti(3)O(11.69(2)).

  8. The Use of High Resolution NWP data for Dispersion Modeling of Airborne Volcanic Ash and Tephra Fallout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton, D.; Webley, P. W.; Dean, K.; Peterson, R.

    2006-12-01

    Ash dispersion models are routinely used to predict the movement of ash clouds from volcanic eruptions. The Puff dispersion model is used by the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) in the North Pacific region as both an operational tool and for retrospective analysis of past events. The model requires some basic information to initialize a prediction including location of volcano, estimated plume height, particle size, initial distribution and the wind field to be used. Puff tracks the movement of a set number of hypothetical particles thereby predicting the transport of volcanic ash, and the location and relative amount of ash fallout. In the recent past, global, mesoscale and regional meteorological forecast models have been used as initialization for the Puff wind fields. These include the North American Mesoscale Model (NAM) and the Global Forecast System (GFS) model, at horizontal resolutions ranging from a few 10's to many 10's km. To use Puff as a tool for predicting ash/tephra fallout requires a much higher spatial resolution to resolve the low level wind patterns. Recently, high spatial resolution meteorological forecasts have been made possible using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model and incorporating its forecasts as initialization data for Puff. WRF can provide forecasts from sub km to 10's of km resolution and using nested grids can provide data at a several resolutions. WRF can be initialized using large scale operational models or re-analysis data for past events. Here we will show where WRF has been used as the initialization model for Puff at four eruptions within the NOPAC region (Mt. St Helens [1980], Mt. Spurr [1992], Mt. Redoubt [1989/90] and Mt. Augustine [2006]). In addition, the IAVCEI working group on modeling tephra fall hazards has outlined five eruptions (including Mt. St Helens) to study and we include those here as well, (El Chichon [1982], Cerro Negro [1995], Soufriere Hills [1997] and Mt. Etna [1998]). For this study, the

  9. SinoProbe Seismic Reflection Imaging of an Upper-Crustal "Bright Spot" Beneath the Karakoram Fault, West Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, C. L.; Lu, Z.; Klemperer, S. L.; Gao, R.; Dong, S.

    2012-12-01

    In October 2011 China's SinoProbe Program collected two active-source seismic reflection profiles across the Karakoram fault in Western Tibet. Line-A crosses the Ayi Shan, and Line-B north runs from Burang for c. 100-km, past Lake Manasarovar and across the southeastern end of the Karakoram Fault. A total of nearly 400 explosive-source shots were fired at variable spacing along Line-B into a 720-channel split spread with 50-m receiver spacing. The majority of the shots were nominally 50 kg, but several 200 kg shots and three 1000 kg shots were also used as sources. A bright mid-crustal reflector underlying the Karakoram Fault is clear on Line-B preliminary stacks and shot gathers. The bright-spot reflector appears to span ~.5 second two-way travel time, or ~ 1 km thickness, and extends laterally up to 40 km in the subsurface at ~6 second two-way travel time, or a depth of ~12.5 km using our best-fit NMO velocity of 4.2 km/s. Amplitude decay curves indicate the bright reflector has reflection amplitudes reaching at least 20 dB above background levels, the same as the well-known mid-crustal seismic bright spots identified in the Yangbajain graben, eastern Tibetan Plateau that have been demonstrated from their P-wave to S-wave conversions and AVO characteristics to represent fluids (pneumatolytic waters from cooling intrusions, or magma). Although Line-B was recorded only with vertical-component geophones, the 720-channel receiver spread provides source-receiver offsets to nominally 18 km, i.e. greater than the target depth. Shot-gathers show an additional deeper reflection phase at the appropriate time (~8 seconds two-way time), and with the appropriately lower NMO velocity, to represent P-to-S conversions from the bright-spot reflection. These reflections, strongest at larger offsets, may represent P-to-S conversions at incident angles of 22° to 48° and if so provide additional support for a fluid origin of the bright-spot. The existence of multiple hot springs

  10. Gas Hydrate and Pore Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinivella, Umberta; Giustiniani, Michela

    2014-05-01

    Many efforts have been devoted to quantify excess pore pressures related to gas hydrate dissociation in marine sediments below the BSR using several approaches. Dissociation of gas hydrates in proximity of the BSR, in response to a change in the physical environment (i.e., temperature and/or pressure regime), can liberate excess gas incrising the local pore fluid pressure in the sediment, so decreasing the effective normal stress. So, gas hydrate dissociation may lead to excess pore pressure resulting in sediment deformation or failure, such as submarine landslides, sediment slumping, pockmarks and mud volcanoes, soft-sediment deformation and giant hummocks. Moreover, excess pore pressure may be the result of gas hydrate dissociation due to continuous sedimentation, tectonic uplift, sea level fall, heating or inhibitor injection. In order to detect the presence of the overpressure below the BSR, we propose two approachs. The fist approach models the BSR depth versus pore pressure; in fact, if the free gas below the BSR is in overpressure condition, the base of the gas hydrate stability is deeper with respect to the hydrostatic case. This effect causes a discrepancy between seismic and theoretical BSR depths. The second approach models the velocities versus gas hydrate and free gas concentrations and pore pressure, considering the approximation of the Biot theory in case of low frequency, i.e. seismic frequency. Knowing the P and S seismic velocity from seismic data analysis, it is possibile to jointly estimate the gas hydrate and free gas concentrations and the pore pressure regime. Alternatively, if the S-wave velocity is not availbale (due to lack of OBS/OBC data), an AVO analysis can be performed in order to extract information about Poisson ratio. Our modeling suggests that the areas characterized by shallow waters (i.e., areas in which human infrastructures, such as pipelines, are present) are significantly affected by the presence of overpressure condition

  11. Status of EarthScope's Transportable Array in Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafner, K.; Busby, R. W.; Enders, M.

    2014-12-01

    The EarthScope's Transportable Array has completed its first year of operations in Alaska. The proposed station grid uses 85 km spacing & consists of ~290 locations in Alaska and Western Canada. About 60 of the grid locations will be at existing seismic stations operated by the AEC, AVO & ATWC and are being upgraded with shallow borehole installations or higher quality sensors as appropriate. About 10 new stations will be collocated with PBO GPS stations. At the end of July 2014, 90% of the site reconnaissance has been completed, & 25 sites have been permitted with private landowners or the State of Alaska. 11 new TA stations have been installed, & 7 existing stations (AK network code) have been upgraded. Data from these stations is flowing to the Array Network Facility (ANF) and being archived at the IRIS DMC. As the Transportable Array has moved to Alaska, IRIS has experimented with different portable drills and drilling techniques to create shallow holes (1-5 m deep, 15-20 cm in diameter) in permafrost and rock outcrops for seismometer installation. The goal of these new methods is to maintain or enhance a station's noise performance while minimizing its footprint & the equipment, materials, and overall expense required for its construction. Motivating this approach are recent developments in posthole broadband seismometer design & the unique conditions for operating in Alaska, where most areas are only accessible by small plane or helicopter, & permafrost underlies much of the region. IRIS contracted with a drilling specialist to create a prototype Transportable Drill (less than 1300 lbs with tooling) that is capable of augering to 5 m in unconsolidated materials and permafrost, downhole hammering to 2.5 m in bedrock with a steel casing following the bit and diamond coring in solid rock to 2 m. This drill has been successfully deployed by helicopter to create a hole 2.7 m deep and 15 cm diameter in bedrock. The auger mode was used successfully to install a

  12. The effects of menstrual cycle phase on the incidence of plateau at V˙O2max and associated cardiorespiratory dynamics.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Dan; Scruton, Adrian; Barnes, Richard; Baker, James; Prado, Luciano; Merzbach, Viviane

    2017-09-14

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of menstrual cycle phase on maximal oxygen uptake (V˙O2max) and associated cardiodynamic responses. A total of 16 active females volunteered of which n = 10 formed the non-oral contraceptive pill group (n-OCP), displaying a regular menstrual cycle of 28·4 ± 2·2 days (age 20·6 ± 1·6 years, height 169·9 ± 6·4 cm, mass 68·7 ± 7·9 kg) and n = 6 formed the oral contraceptive pill group (OCP) (monophasic pill) (age 21·7 years ± 2·16, height 168·1 cm ± 6·8 cm, mass 61·6 ± 6·8 kg). Each completed four incremental exercise tests for determination of V˙O2max, cardiac output, stroke volume and heart rate. Each test was completed according to the phases of the menstrual cycle as determined through salivary analysis of 17-β oestrodiol and progesterone. Non-significant differences were observed for V˙O2max across phases and between groups (P>0·05) with additional non-significant differences for Q˙max, HRmax and SVmax between groups. For ∆ V˙O2 during the final 60 s of the V˙O2max trial, significant differences were observed between OCP and n-OCP (P<0·05) with OCP showing zero V˙O2 plateaus in three pseudo-phases. Significant difference observed for a-vO2dif n-OCP between premenstruation and menstruation at 30-100% V˙O2max (P<0·05). Data suggest that the V˙O2 -plateau is effected by monophasic oral contraceptive pill, furthermore these data imply that V˙O2max test outcome is independent of menstrual cycle phase but caution should be applied when evaluating maximal oxygen uptake in females who are administered a monophasic oral contraceptive pill. © 2017 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Estimation of Physical Property Changes by Oil Saturation in Carbonates and Sandstone Using Computational Rock Physics Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, M.; Keehm, Y.

    2010-12-01

    Carbonate Reservoirs are drawing a great attention as global energy demands and consumption increase rapidly, since more than 60% of oil and 40% of gas of world reserves are in carbonate rocks. However, most of them are hard to develop mainly due to their complexity and heterogeneity, especially at the pore scale. In this study, we perform computational rock physics modeling (numerical simulations on pore microstructures of carbonate rocks) and compare the results with those from sandstone. The brief procedure of the method is (1) to obtain high-resolution pore microstructure with a spatial resolution of 1-2 micron by X-ray microtomography technique, (2) to perform two-phase lattice-Boltzmann (LB) flow simulation to obtain various oil and water saturations, then (3) to calculate physical properties, such as P-wave velocity and electrical conductivity through pore-scale property simulation techniques. For the carbonate rock, we identified much more isolated pores than sandstone by investigating pore microstructures. Thus permeability and electrical conductivity were much smaller than those of sandstone. The electrical conductivity versus oil saturation curve of the carbonate rock showed sharper decrease at low oil saturation, but similar slope at higher oil saturation. We think that higher complexity of pore connectivity is responsible for this effect. The P-wave velocity of the carbonate rock was much higher than sandstone and the it did not show any significant changes during the change of oil saturation. Therefore, we think that fluid discrimination by seismic data with P-wave velocity alone would pose a greate challenge in most carbonate reservoirs. In addition, the S-wave velocity seems not to be sensitive either, which suggest that the AVO-type analysis would also be difficult, though requires more researches. On the other hand, our computational rock physics approach can be useful in preliminary analysis of carbonate reservoirs since it can determine the

  14. Real-time Volcanic Cloud Products and Predictions for Aviation Alerts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krotkov, N. A.; Hughes, E. J.; da Silva, A. M., Jr.; Seftor, C. J.; Brentzel, K. W.; Hassinen, S.; Heinrichs, T. A.; Schneider, D. J.; Hoffman, R.; Myers, T.; Flynn, L. E.; Niu, J.; Theys, N.; Brenot, H. H.

    2016-12-01

    We will discuss progress of the NASA ASP project, which promotes the use of satellite volcanic SO2 (VSO2) and Ash (VA) data, and forecasting tools that enhance VA Decision Support Systems (DSS) at the VA Advisory Centers (VAACs) for prompt aviation warnings. The goals are: (1) transition NASA algorithms to NOAA for global NRT processing and integration into DSS at Washington VAAC for operational users and public dissemination; (2) Utilize Direct Broadcast capability of the Aura and SNPP satellites to process Direct Readout (DR) data at two high latitude locations in Finland and Fairbanks, Alaska to enhance VA DSS in Europe and at USGS's Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) and Alaska-VAAC; (3) Improve global Eulerian model-based VA/VSO2 forecasting and risk/cost assessments with Metron Aviation. Our global NRT OMI and OMPS data have been fully integrated into European Support to Aviation Control Service and NOAA operational web sites. We are transitioning OMPS processing to our partners at NOAA/NESDIS to integrate into operational processing environment. NASA's Suomi NPP Ozone Science Team, in conjunction with GSFC's Direct Readout Laboratory (DRL), have implemented Version 2 of the OMPS real-time DR processing package to generate VSO2 and VA products at the Geographic Information Network of Alaska (GINA) and the Finnish Meteorological Institute (FMI). The system provides real-time coverage over some of the most congested airspace and over many of the most active volcanoes in the world. The OMPS real time capability is now publicly available via DRL's IPOPP package. We use satellite observations to define volcanic source term estimates in the NASA GOES-5 model, which was updated allowing for the simulation of VA and VSO2 clouds. Column SO2 observations from SNPP/OMPS provide an initial estimate of the total cloud SO2 mass, and are used with backward transport analysis to make an initial cloud height estimate. Later VSO2 observations are used to "nudge" the SO2 mass

  15. A reduced cerebral metabolic ratio in exercise reflects metabolism and not accumulation of lactate within the human brain

    PubMed Central

    Dalsgaard, Mads K; Quistorff, Bjørn; Danielsen, Else R; Selmer, Christian; Vogelsang, Thomas; Secher, Niels H

    2004-01-01

    During maximal exercise lactate taken up by the human brain contributes to reduce the cerebral metabolic ratio, O2/(glucose + 1/2 lactate), but it is not known whether the lactate is metabolized or if it accumulates in a distribution volume. In one experiment the cerebral arterio-venous differences (AV) for O2, glucose (glc) and lactate (lac) were evaluated in nine healthy subjects at rest and during and after exercise to exhaustion. The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was drained through a lumbar puncture immediately after exercise, while control values were obtained from six other healthy young subjects. In a second experiment magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) was performed after exhaustive exercise to assess lactate levels in the brain (n = 5). Exercise increased the AVO2 from 3.2 ± 0.1 at rest to 3.5 ± 0.2 mm (mean ± s.e.m.; P < 0.05) and the AVglc from 0.6 ± 0.0 to 0.9 ± 0.1 mm (P < 0.01). Notably, the AVlac increased from 0.0 ± 0.0 to 1.3 ± 0.2 mm at the point of exhaustion (P < 0.01). Thus, maximal exercise reduced the cerebral metabolic ratio from 6.0 ± 0.3 to 2.8 ± 0.2 (P < 0.05) and it remained low during the early recovery. Despite this, the CSF concentration of lactate postexercise (1.2 ± 0.1 mm; n = 7) was not different from baseline (1.4 ± 0.1 mm; n = 6). Also, the 1H-MRS signal from lactate obtained after exercise was smaller than the estimated detection limit of ∼1.5 mm. The finding that an increase in lactate could not be detected in the CSF or within the brain rules out accumulation in a distribution volume and indicates that the lactate taken up by the brain is metabolized. PMID:14608005

  16. Electrogenerated chemiluminescence from heteroleptic iridium(III) complexes with multicolor emission.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yuyang; Gao, Hongfang; Wang, Xiaomei; Qi, Honglan

    2015-02-16

    Electrogenerated chemiluminescence (ECL) with different emission colors is important in the development of multichannel analytical techniques. In this report, five new heteroleptic iridium(III) complexes were synthesized, and their photophysical, electrochemical, and ECL properties were studied. Here, 2-(2,4-difluorophenyl)pyridine (dfppy, complex 1), 2-phenylbenzo[d]thiazole (bt, complex 2), and 2-phenylpyridine (ppy, complex 3) were used as the main ligands to tune the emission color, while avobenzone (avo) was used as the ancillary ligand. For comparison, complexes 4 and 5 with 2-phenylpyridine and 2-phenylbenzo[d]thiazole as the main ligand, respectively, and acetyl acetone (acac) as the ancillary ligand were also synthesized. All five iridium(III) complexes had strong intraligand absorption bands (π–π*) in the UV region (below 350 nm) and a featureless MLCT (d−π*) transition in the visible 400–500 nm range. Multicolored emissions were observed for these five iridium(III) complexes, including green, orange, and red for complexes 4, 5, 2, 1, 3, respectively. Density functional theory calculations indicate that the electronic density of the highest occupied molecular orbital is entirely located on the C^N ligands and the iridium atom, while the formation of the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) is complicated. The LUMO is mainly assigned to the ancillary ligand for complexes 1 and 3 but to the C^N ligand for complexes 2, 4, and 5. Cyclic voltammetry studies showed that all these complexes have a reversible oxidation wave, but no reduction waves were found in the electrochemical windows of CH2Cl2. The E1/2(ox) values of these complexes ranged from 0.642 to 0.978 V for complexes 3, 4, 2, 5, 1, (in increasing order) and are all lower than that of Ru(bpy)3(2+). Most importantly, when using tripropylamine as a coreactant, complexes 1–5 exhibited intense ECL signals with an emission wavelength centered at 616, 580, 663, 536, and 569 nm, respectively

  17. Broadening the Quality and Capabilities of the EarthScope Alaska Transportable Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busby, R. W.

    2016-12-01

    In 2016, the EarthScope Transportable Array (TA) program will have 195 broadband seismic stations operating in Alaska and western Canada. This ambitious project will culminate in a network of 268 new or upgraded real-time seismic stations operating through 2019. The challenging environmental conditions and the remoteness of Alaska have motivated a new method for constructing a high-quality, temporary seismic network. The Alaska TA station design builds on experience of the Lower 48 TA deployment and adds design requirements because most stations are accessible only by helicopter. The stations utilize new high-performance posthole sensors, a specially built hammer/auger drill, and lightweight lithium ion batteries to minimize sling loads. A uniform station design enables a modest crew to build the network on a short timeline and operate them through the difficult conditions of rural Alaska. The Alaska TA deployment has increased the quality of seismic data, with some well-sited 2-3 m posthole stations approaching the performance of permanent Global Seismic Network stations emplaced in 100 m boreholes. The real-time data access, power budget, protective enclosure and remote logistics of these TA stations has attracted collaborations with NASA, NOAA, USGS, AVO and other organizations to add auxiliary sensors to the suite of instruments at many TA stations. Strong motion sensors have been added to (18) stations near the subduction trench to complement SM stations operated by AEC, ANSS and GSN. All TA and most upgraded stations have pressure and infrasound sensors, and 150 TA stations are receiving a Vaisala weather sensor, supplied by the National Weather Service Alaska Region and NASA, capable of measuring temperature, pressure, relative humidity, wind speed/direction, and precipitation intensity. We are also installing about (40) autonomous soil temperature profile kits adjacent to northern stations. While the priority continues to be collecting seismic data, these

  18. Children with Burn Injury Have Impaired Cardiac Output during Submaximal Exercise.

    PubMed

    Rivas, Eric; Herndon, David N; Beck, Kenneth C; Suman, Oscar E

    2017-10-01

    Burn trauma damages resting cardiac function; however, it is currently unknown if the cardiovascular response to exercise is likewise impaired. We tested the hypothesis that, in children, burn injury lowers cardiac output (Q˙) and stroke volume (SV) during submaximal exercise. Five children with 49% ± 4% total body surface area (BSA) burned (two female, 11.7 ± 1 yr, 40.4 ± 18 kg, 141.1 ± 9 cm) and eight similar nonburned controls (five female, 12.5 ± 2 yr, 58.0 ± 17 kg, 147.3 ± 12 cm) with comparable exercise capacity (peak oxygen consumption [peak V˙O2]: 31.9 ± 11 vs 36.8 ± 8 mL O2·kg·min, P = 0.39) participated. The exercise protocol entailed a preexercise (pre-EX) rest period followed by 3-min exercise stages at 20 W and 50 W. V˙O2, HR, Q˙ (via nonrebreathing), SV (Q˙/HR), and arteriovenous O2 difference ([a-v]O2diff, Q˙/ V˙O2) were the primary outcome variables. Using a 2-way factorial ANOVA (group [G] × exercise [EX]), we found that Q˙ was approximately 27% lower in the burned than the nonburned group at 20 W of exercise (burned 5.7 ± 1.0 vs nonburned: 7.9 ± 1.8 L·min) and 50 W of exercise (burned 6.9 ± 1.6 vs nonburned 9.2 ± 3.2 L·min) (G-EX interaction, P = 0.012). SV did not change from rest to exercise in burned children but increased by approximately 24% in the nonburned group (main effect for EX, P = 0.046). Neither [a-v] O2diff nor V˙O2 differed between groups at rest or exercise, but HR response to exercise was reduced in the burn group (G-EX interaction, P = 0.004). When normalized to BSA, SV (index) was similar between groups; however, Q˙ (index) remained attenuated in the burned group (G-EX interaction, P < 0.008). Burned children have an attenuated cardiovascular response to submaximal exercise. Further investigation of hemodynamic function during exercise will provide insights important for cardiovascular rehabilitation in burned children.

  19. Intermediate-Term Declines in Seismicity at Two Volcanoes in Alaska Following the Mw7.9 Denali Fault Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNutt, S. R.; Sanchez, J. J.; Moran, S. C.; Power, J. A.

    2002-12-01

    The Mw7.9 Denali Fault earthquake provided an opportunity to look for intermediate-term (days to weeks) responses of Alaskan volcanoes to shaking from a large regional earthquake. The Alaska Volcano Observatory monitors 24 volcanoes with seismic networks. We examined one station for each volcano, generally the closest (typically 5 km from the vent) unless noise, site response, or other factors made the data unusable. Data were digitally bandpass filtered between 0.8 and 5 Hz to reduce noise from microseisms and wind. Data for the period three days before to three days after the Mw7.9 earthquake were then plotted at a standard scale used for AVO routine monitoring. Shishaldin volcano, which has a background rate of several hundred seismic events per day on station SSLS, showed no change from before to after the earthquake. Veniaminof volcano, which has had recent mild eruptions and a rate of several dozen seismic events per day on station VNNF, suffered a drop in seismicity at the time of the earthquake by a factor of 2.5; this lasted for 15 days. We tested this result using a different station, VNSS, and a different method of counting (non-filtered data on helicorder records) and found the same result. We infer that Veniaminof's activity was modified by the Mw7.9 earthquake. Wrangell, the closest volcano, had a background rate of about 10 events per day. Data from station WANC could not be measured for 8 days after the Mw7.9 earthquake because the large number of aftershocks precluded identification of local seismicity. For the following eight days, however, its seismicity rate was 30 percent lower than before. While subtle, we infer that this may be related to the earthquake. It is known that Wrangell increased its heat output after the Mw9.2 Alaska earthquake of 1964 and again after the Ms7.1 St. Elias earthquake of 1979. The other 21 volcanoes showed no changes in seismicity from 3 days before to 3 days after the Mw7.9 event. We conclude that intermediate

  20. Amplitude inversion of fast and slow converted waves for fracture characterization of the Montney Formation in Pouce Coupe field, Alberta, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacFarlane, Tyler L.

    The Montney Formation of western Canada is one of the largest economically viable gas resource plays in North America with reserves of 449TCF. As an unconventional tight gas play, the well development costs are high due to the hydraulic stimulations necessary for economic success. The Pouce Coupe research project is a multidisciplinary collaboration between the Reservoir Characterization Project (RCP) and Talisman Energy Inc. with the objective of understanding the reservoir to enable the optimization of well placement and completion design. The work in this thesis focuses on identifying the natural fractures in the reservoir that act as the delivery systems for hydrocarbon flow to the wellbore. Characterization of the Montney Formation at Pouce Coupe is based on time-lapse multicomponent seismic surveys that were acquired before and after the hydraulic stimulation of two horizontal wells. Since shear-wave velocities and amplitudes of the PS-waves are known to be sensitive to near-vertical fractures, I utilize isotropic simultaneous seismic inversions on azimuthally-sectored PS1 and PS2 data sets to obtain measurements of the fast and slow shear-velocities. Specifically, I analyze two orthogonal azimuths that are parallel and perpendicular to the strike of the dominant fracture system in the field. These volumes are used to approximate the shear-wave splitting parameter (gamma(s*)) that is closely related to crack density. Since crack density has a significant impact on defining the percolation zone, the work presented in this thesis provides information that can be utilized to reduce uncertainty in the reservoirs fracture model. Isotropic AVO inversion of azimuthally limited PS-waves demonstrates sufficient sensitivity to detect contrast between the anisotropic elastic properties of the reservoir and is capable of identifying regions with high crack density. This is supported by integration with spinner production logs, hydraulic stimulation history of the field

  1. Investigating the pre- and post-eruptive stress regime at Redoubt volcano, Alaska, from 2008-1010 using seismic anisotropy and stress-tensor inversions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardine, M.; Roman, D. C.

    2010-12-01

    Redoubt volcano, located on the west side of Cook Inlet approximately 170 km southwest of Anchorage, Alaska, began erupting in March 2009. The eruption, which consisted of at least 17 explosive events over a three-week time period followed by three months of dome-building, significantly impacted both aviation and oil production operations in the area. Pre-eruptive seismicity was generally limited to deep (>20 km) long-period (DLP) earthquakes starting in late 2008, transitioning to bursts of strong, shallow volcanic tremor for nearly three months prior to the eruption. The near-complete absence of precursory volcano-tectonic (VT) earthquakes is unusual for eruptions of this type and complicates understanding of the dynamics of the Redoubt magmatic system. However, the strong volcanic tremor preceding the eruption suggests that magma was ascending and the system was pressurizing for months prior to the first explosion - a situation during which VT earthquakes typically occur. The study of subtle changes in stress conditions at Redoubt may elucidate the reasons for the observed near-complete lack of precursory VT seismicity. Using first-motion data from waveforms recorded by seismic stations operated in the vicinity of Redoubt by the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) and the Alaska Earthquake Information Center (AEIC), we computed double-couple fault-plane solutions for approximately 200 VT earthquakes occurring in the months prior to and immediately following the first eruption in March 2009. The analysis of the fault-plane solutions using spatial and temporal stress-tensor inversions combined with cumulative misfit analysis will help to constrain if, when, and where localized precursory changes in stress occurred. In addition, we performed an analysis of shear-wave splitting using data from deep slab events located by AEIC within a 70 km radius for one year prior to and one year following the eruption, which resulted in approximately 500 high-quality measurements on

  2. Methods to improve the resolution of prestack migrated images, with application to a 3D dataset from a fractured reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, Gabriel

    I present three different methods to achieve increased definition in images from conventional seismic data, as illustrated with 3D data from the Fort Worth Basin's Barnett Shale fractured reservoir play, currently one of the hottest exploration and production trends in continental U.S. First, I present a method to correct for wavelet stretch in common-angle prestack migrated data. Wavelet stretch adversely influences contributions to the image from large angle or long offset data. Increasing the fidelity of large angles improves the vertical and lateral resolution in images from seismic data and from derived attributes, and positively impact AVA/AVO analysis. Achieving the greatest potential of this technique demands that I address the increased sensitivity to velocity errors and anisotropy. The other two methods presented here benefit from the balance in spectral content of the imaged data across angles and the increased resolution that are achieved from correcting for wavelet stretch. Then I introduce a new way to define azimuth binning in Kirchhoff prestack migration. This approach avoids mixing the typically weaker side-scattered energy with the stronger reflections from the sagittal plane. With the modified binning, signal and noise events are preferentially imaged in azimuth orientations normal to their apparent strike orientation, in surface- or map-views. This modified azimuthal binning also results in improved detection of out-of-the-plane steeply dipping reflectors, fractures and faults and their orientation, especially when combined with attributes such as curvature and coherence. Finally, I present an approach to measure lateral misalignment in prestack migrated seismic images and then correct for it by applying a warping procedure to these images. Though velocity errors are the most likely source for misalignment between images, it can also result from other imperfections in the imaging procedure. Lateral misalignment is most easily recognized and

  3. Multidimensional Absorptive-Dispersive Inverse Scattering and Parameter Leakage at the Linear Step

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Innanen, K. A.; Weglein, A. B.; Lira, J. E.

    2008-12-01

    Research is active into the use of inverse scattering to create direct non-linear methods for task-separated imaging, inversion, and Q compensation of primary reflections (Weglein et al., 2008). We will discuss some recent developments within the third of these efforts. First, we will describe an extension of the absorptive inverse scattering equations in multiple dimensions to the case of an absorptive reference medium. This requires a generalized definition of the perturbation as compared to the non-absorptive reference medium case. Second, because of its potential impact on a recently described prototype direct non-linear Q compensation algorithm (Innanen and Weglein, 2005; Innanen and Lira, 2008), we will discuss the issue of leakage of absorptive parameters. Leakage is an inverse phenomenon in which actual variations in one medium parameter lead to variations of the linear estimate of other parameters, especially at large angles and large contrasts. This is a linear issue exclusively; the full non-linear inverse scattering series addresses leakage, and corrects for it. Our prototype non-linear Q compensation algorithm involves the isolated use of some, but not all, of the non-linear terms of the inverse scattering series. The question we wish to address is: does this subset of the full inverse series also manage and correct for leakage, or will it over- or under-compensate at large angles and large contrasts? If the latter, further analysis and collection of inverse series components will likely be indicated. A. B. Weglein, A. C. Ramirez, K. A. Innanen, F. Liu, J. E. Lira and S. Jiang, 'The underlying unity of distinct processing algorithms for (1) the removal of free-surface and internal multiples, (2) Q compensation (without Q) (3) depth imaging, (4) nonlinear AVO, that derive from the inverse scattering series', 2008: Proc. Soc. Expl. Geop. K. A. Innanen and A. B. Weglein, 'Towards non-linear construction of a Q compensation operator directly from measured

  4. Effectiveness of imaging seismic attenuation using visco-acoustic full waveform tomography: Examples from the Seattle Fault Zone and Northern Perth Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takam Takougang, E.; Calvert, A. J.

    2012-12-01

    Attenuation characterizes the decrease in amplitude of seismic waves as they propagate away from the source. A seismic wave propagating in the subsurface will suffer from two types of attenuation: Intrinsic attenuation and scattering attenuation. Scattering attenuation is due to small scale heterogeneity in the subsurface, whereas intrinsic attenuation arises from inelastic rock properties. Intrinsic attenuation can provide key information about the subsurface, which can be of value to the mining as well as the oil and gas industry. However, accurate imaging of intrinsic seismic attenuation using visco-acoustic full-waveform tomography is not straight forward. Attenuation models recovered by visco-acoustic waveform tomography are often contain contaminated by scattering effects as well as elastic mode conversion artefacts due to the inability of the visco-acoustic approximation to perfectly predict the amplitude of visco-elastic field data. The effect of scattering can be reduced if a velocity model with a high resolution is used. This usually necessitates a two-step inversion approach consisting of first recovering the velocity model and later, the attenuation model. In this study, we present a specific preconditioning of the data based on matching the amplitude variation with offset (AVO) of the field and modelled visco-acoustic data, and a specific inversion approach based on a sequential recovering of the seismic velocity and attenuation models using the visco-acoustic approximation. Our purpose is to improve the quality of the recovered attenuation model by decoupling the reconstruction of velocity and attenuation, thus reducing artefacts. We apply the method to two different areas: The Seattle Fault Zone in Puget Sound in the northwestern USA, using marine seismic reflection data from the Seismic Hazards investigation in Puget Sound (SHIPS) survey collected in 1998, and the Allanooka area within the Northern Perth Basin using high resolution seismic

  5. (S)TEM analysis of functional transition metal oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, Miaofang

    Perovskite vanadates (AVO3) form an ideal family to study the structure-property relationships in transition metal oxides because their physical properties can easily be tailored by varying the A-site cations. (S)TEM is an ideal tool for this type of study due to its capacity for simultaneous imaging and chemical analysis. Determination of the oxidation state of vanadium in complex oxides have been carried out by electron energy loss spectroscopy. SrVO3/LaAlO3 is then studied both experimentally and theoretically as a prototype system. Extra electrons have been detected on the interface layer, and further proven to originate mainly from a change in the local bonding configuration of V at the La-O terminated substrate surface. Cr-containing stainless steel deposited with a LaCrO3 thin-film layer is a promising interconnect material of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC). Our investigation on its microstructural evolution reveals that the LaCrO 3 thin film plays a role in inhibiting the growth of an oxide layer on the metal surface and thus protects the surface of the stainless steel. Ca-doped LaCoO3 is a promising SOFC cathode material. The domain structures and the oxidation state of Co in Ca-doped LaCoO3, which are directly related to its mechanical properties and electronic conductivity, are investigated by in-situ TEM and EELS. The formation of microcracks is observed during thermal cycles. Ca-doping in LaCoO3 is shown to not only improve the electronic conductivity of the material, but is also likely to strengthen the grain boundaries. The realization of its application in SOFCs depends on depressing the ferroelastisity to reduce strain formation during thermal cycles. The application of the (S)TEM techniques used for studying the perovskite systems are further extended to other compounds containing transition metal elements. The refractory minerals from Comet 81 P/Wild-2 are studied to investigate the formation of the early solar system. A relatively high Ti3+/Ti 4

  6. The relations between natural gas hydrate distribution and structure on Muli basin Qinghai province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, C.; Li, Y.; Lu, Z.; Luo, S.; Qu, C.; Tan, S.; Zhang, P.

    2014-12-01

    The Muli area is located in a depression area which between middle Qilian and south Qilian tectonic elements. The natural gas hydrate stratum belongs the Jurassic series coal formation stratum, the main lithological character clamps the purple mudstone, the siltstone, the fine grain sandstone and the black charcoal mudstone for the green gray. The plutonic metamorphism is primarily deterioration function of the Muli area coal, is advantageous in forming the coal-bed gas. Cretaceous system, the Paleogene System and Neogene System mainly include the fine grain red clastic rock and clay stone. The distribution of Quaternary is widespread. The ice water - proluvial and glacier deposit are primarily depositional mode. The Qilian Montanan Muli permafrost area has the good gas source condition (Youhai Zhu 2006) and rich water resources. It is advantage to forming the natural gas hydrate. The natural gas hydrate is one kind of new latent energy, widely distributes in the mainland marginal sea bottom settlings and land permanent tundra. Through researching the area the structure ,the deposition carries on the analysis and responds the characteristic analysis simulation in the rock physics analysis and the seismic in the foundation, and then the reflected seismic data carried by tectonic analysis processing and the AVO characteristic analysis processing reveal that the research area existence natural gas hydrate (already by drilling confirmation) and the natural gas hydrate distribution and the structure relations is extremely close. In the structure development area, the fault and the crevasse crack growing, the natural gas hydrate distribution characteristic is obvious (this is also confirmed the storing space of natural gas hydrate in this area is mainly crevasse crack). This conclusion also agree with the actual drilling result. The research prove that the distribution of natural gas hydrate in this area is mainly controlled by structure control. The possibility of fault

  7. Seismic exploration methods for hydrothermal dolomite reservoirs: A case study of the Trenton-Black River groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogiesoba, Osareni Christopher

    This thesis discusses 3D seismic exploration for hydrothermal dolomite (HTD) reservoirs. During this project, I utilized some of the existing algorithms as well as developed my own methods. I mentioned that HTD reservoirs constitute an important hydrocarbon play-type the world over, and are particularly important within the Ordovician aged Trenton-Black River Group in eastern North America. I noted that 3D seismic is the best tool to explore for HTD but it is adversely affected by random noise and acquisition footprint which must be attenuated. I designed a post-stack processing flow that can be applied to attenuate noise, highlight fault terminations, and increase reflection events continuity. By predicting porosity using seismic attributes, I examined the relationships between porosity distribution and faulting, and between porosity and seismic attributes. Results show that porosity development depends on basement-related faults, and that hydrocarbon production rate depends on the presence of faults, fractures and porosity. The results show that the sag observed to be associated with HTD reservoirs on seismic sections is due to velocity pull-down and that the best porosity is developed in these areas. The methods and results presented in this project can be used in other places with similar geologic settings. By way of semblance, I developed a dual-parameter scanning algorithm that can recover both NMO velocity (vnmo) and the effective anisotropic parameter (etaeff) at the same time, from which interval eta (etaint) is obtained by inversion. Noise-free synthetic data application show 10% maximum deviation between the extracted and actual flint values, while noise-contaminated synthetic data show >20% deviation. Real data application shows that it is possible to discriminate between HTD and limestone. Further testing is required to establish its validity. A velocity ratio (Vp/Vs) extracting algorithm was developed using AVO prestack amplitude inversion. Noise

  8. Parallel Inversion Arithmetic for 3D Multi-Wave Pre-stack Elasticity Parameters and Its Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, S.; Li, L.

    2009-12-01

    Multi-wave seismic prospect is an elastic wave prospect by which all wave fields can be achieved. We can inverse the stratum lithological parameters and elastic parameters by the multi-wave amplitude characteristics in order to get the information of the reservoirs and fluids. At present, the main methods of multi-wave inversion are post-stack inversion and single component partial-stack inversion, which are based on the approximative expressions and isotropy media. Widely known, the post-stack inversion can only be used to inverse the impedance, three lithological parameters(P wave velocity,S wave velocity and density)can not be obtained independently in this kind of method. The single component is not the whole elastic wave inversion, and the theory formula of the isotropy media is unfit for the anisotropy media inversion. Therefore, based on the anisotropy media, the method of the multi-wave associated pre-stack inversion is studied by using of the precise AVA formulae in this paper. To the questions of the lithology identification and the prediction of reservoirs, the authors studied the associated inversion of 3D lithological parameters for the anisotropy media with 3D3C data. The basic processes of the parameter inversion are as follows: (1) create the velocity model and produce the NMO gathers, (2) match the layers of the P wave with the same layers of P-SV wave, and convert AVO gathers into AVA gathers, (3) inverse the lithology parameters and anisotropy coefficients with the NMO gather, and (4) compute the elastic parameters, elastic impedance, elastic impedance grads based on the inversed parameters. Because of the huge amount of computing work of 3D pre-stack parameter inversion, the parallel arithmetic of the 3D pre-stack parameter inversion is utilized to improve the computing efficiency. Via the 3D real data processing, it is proved that this method is effective and can be applied in the oil and gas prediction of the reservoirs.

  9. High Resolution/High Fidelity Seismic Imaging and Parameter Estimation for Geological Structure and Material Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Ru-Shan Wu, Xiao-Bi Xie, Thorne Lay

    2005-06-06

    In this project, we develop new theories and methods for multi-domain one-way wave-equation based propagators, and apply these techniques to seismic modeling, seismic imaging, seismic illumination and model parameter estimation in 3D complex environments. The major progress of this project includes: (1) The development of the dual-domain wave propagators. We continue to improve the one-way wave-equation based propagators. Our target is making propagators capable of handling more realistic velocity models. A wide-angle propagator for transversely isotropic media with vertically symmetric axis (VTI) has been developed for P-wave modeling and imaging. The resulting propagator is accurate for large velocity perturbations and wide propagation angles. The thin-slab propagator for one-way elastic-wave propagation is further improved. With the introduction of complex velocities, the quality factors Qp and Qs have been incorporated into the thin-slab propagator. The resulting viscoelastic thin-slab propagator can handle elastic-wave propagation in models with intrinsic attenuations. We apply this method to complex models for AVO modeling, random media characterization and frequency-dependent reflectivity simulation. (2) Exploring the Information in the Local Angle Domain. Traditionally, the local angle information can only be extracted using the ray-based method. We develop a wave-equation based technique to process the local angle domain information. The approach can avoid the singularity problem usually linked to the high-frequency asymptotic method. We successfully apply this technique to seismic illumination and the resulting method provides a practical tool for three-dimensional full-volume illumination analysis in complex structures. The directional illumination also provides information for angle-domain imaging corrections. (3) Elastic-Wave Imaging. We develop a multicomponent elastic migration method. The application of the multicomponent one-way elastic propagator

  10. Production-induced changes in reservoir geomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amoyedo, Sunday O.

    sensitivity of the reservoir and overburden shale of Forties Field, I observe that while pore pressure variations have not been significant in most parts of the field, a relatively higher decrease in pore pressure in a region of the reservoir has affected the geomechanical properties of both reservoir and overlying rock strata . I found that strain development in the field accounts, in part, for increased reservoir sand production and a negative velocity change in the overburden, which provides an indication of dilation. I use changes in the AVO intercept and gradient calibrated with laboratory measurements to decouple the time-lapse (4D) difference into saturation and pressure changes. Furthermore, I propose a new modification to time-lapse AVO inversion workflows to account for the effect of porosity change in measurements of time-lapse difference. This is particularly crucial in highly-compacting chalk and poorly consolidated clastic reservoirs. Rock-physics-driven inversion of 3D pre-stack seismic data plays a prominent role in the characterization of both reservoir and overburden rocks. Understanding the rock physics of the overburden rock is required for efficient production of the reservoir and to safeguard wellbore, down-hole assembly and supporting surface facilities. Taking Forties Field as a case study, I observe that while instability and subsequent failure of the overburden in the field can be linked to the rapid decrease of the unconfined compressive strength (UCS) at inclinations close to 45 degrees to the bedding plan, some zones in the overburden are characterized by extreme weakness regardless of the well angle through the rock. I use the correlation between unconfined compressive strength and elastic moduli (Young's and Bulk moduli), coupled with the results of simultaneous inversion to derive 3D elastic moduli, calibrated to laboratory measurements, to characterize the zones of extreme weakness. Time-lapse gravimetry continues to find increasing

  11. 3D multicomponent seismic characterization of a clastic reservoir in the Middle Magdalena Valley Basin, Colombia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velasquez-Espejo, Antonio Jose

    formations. The attribute extraction from the inverted P-wave amplitude for both acoustic impedance and VP/VS ratio allowed the characterization of stratigraphic features, in particular some channel geometries that are interpreted as part of a meandering fluvial system (point bars and crevasse splays). The lithological and petrophysical correlation of additional attributes from the elastic inversion and AVO is not reliable since there is no independent density, porosity, resistivity, permeability, etc., measurements to guarantee accurate and stable results; nonetheless VP/VS analysis using multicomponent seismic in the MMVB shows significant promise. Therefore, the acquisition of critical log data with new well drilling as well as an additional multi-attribute analysis based on AVO and a joint PP-PS inversion are strongly recommended.

  12. Time lapse seismic observations and effects of reservoir compressibility at Teal South oil field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Nayyer

    One of the original ocean-bottom time-lapse seismic studies was performed at the Teal South oil field in the Gulf of Mexico during the late 1990's. This work reexamines some aspects of previous work using modern analysis techniques to provide improved quantitative interpretations. Using three-dimensional volume visualization of legacy data and the two phases of post-production time-lapse data, I provide additional insight into the fluid migration pathways and the pressure communication between different reservoirs, separated by faults. This work supports a conclusion from previous studies that production from one reservoir caused regional pressure decline that in turn resulted in liberation of gas from multiple surrounding unproduced reservoirs. I also provide an explanation for unusual time-lapse changes in amplitude-versus-offset (AVO) data related to the compaction of the producing reservoir which, in turn, changed an isotropic medium to an anisotropic medium. In the first part of this work, I examine regional changes in seismic response due to the production of oil and gas from one reservoir. The previous studies primarily used two post-production ocean-bottom surveys (Phase I and Phase II), and not the legacy streamer data, due to the unavailability of legacy prestack data and very different acquisition parameters. In order to incorporate the legacy data in the present study, all three post-stack data sets were cross-equalized and examined using instantaneous amplitude and energy volumes. This approach appears quite effective and helps to suppress changes unrelated to production while emphasizing those large-amplitude changes that are related to production in this noisy (by current standards) suite of data. I examine the multiple data sets first by using the instantaneous amplitude and energy attributes, and then also examine specific apparent time-lapse changes through direct comparisons of seismic traces. In so doing, I identify time-delays that, when

  13. Comparing Clinical and Economic Outcomes Associated with Early Initiation of Combination Therapy of an Alpha Blocker and Dutasteride or Finasteride in Men with Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia in the United States.

    PubMed

    DerSarkissian, Maral; Xiao, Yongling; Duh, Mei Sheng; Lefebvre, Patrick; Swensen, Andrine R; Bell, Christopher F

    2016-10-01

    clinical progression (HR = 0.834, 95% CI = 0.663-1.043, P = 0.1122). While dutasteride was associated with higher pharmacy costs per month (adjusted monthly cost difference = $79, 95% CI = $45-$105), total all-cause medical costs were not significantly different between the 2 cohorts (adjusted monthly cost difference = -$44, 95% CI = -$110-$22). Clinical and economic outcomes were similar between the early dutasteride + AB and early finasteride + AB cohorts, with no statistically significant differences detected. Funding for this study was provided by GlaxoSmithKline (HO-14-15325 and AVO110072). Bell and Swensen are employees of GlaxoSmithKline. DerSarkissian, Xiao, Duh, and Lefebvre are employed by Analysis Group, a consulting company that received research grants from GlaxoSmithKline to conduct this study. Study concept and design were contributed by Bell, Swensen, Lefebvre, and Duh. Bell and Duh acquired the data. DerSarkissian and Xiao performed the statistical analysis and interpreted the data along with Lefebvre, Duh, and Bell. DerSarkissian and Bell drafted the manuscript. All authors contributed equally to critically revising the manuscript and providing final approval of the submitted manuscript.

  14. Volcano-Monitoring Instrumentation in the United States, 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Guffanti, Marianne; Diefenbach, Angela K.; Ewert, John W.; Ramsey, David W.; Cervelli, Peter F.; Schilling, Steven P.

    2010-01-01

    The United States is one of the most volcanically active countries in the world. According to the global volcanism database of the Smithsonian Institution, the United States (including its Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands) is home to about 170 volcanoes that are in an eruptive phase, have erupted in historical time, or have not erupted recently but are young enough (eruptions within the past 10,000 years) to be capable of reawakening. From 1980 through 2008, 30 of these volcanoes erupted, several repeatedly. Volcano monitoring in the United States is carried out by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Volcano Hazards Program, which operates a system of five volcano observatories-Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO), Cascades Volcano Observatory (CVO), Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO), Long Valley Observatory (LVO), and Yellowstone Volcano Observatory (YVO). The observatories issue public alerts about conditions and hazards at U.S. volcanoes in support of the USGS mandate under P.L. 93-288 (Stafford Act) to provide timely warnings of potential volcanic disasters to the affected populace and civil authorities. To make efficient use of the Nation's scientific resources, the volcano observatories operate in partnership with universities and other governmental agencies through various formal agreements. The Consortium of U.S. Volcano Observatories (CUSVO) was established in 2001 to promote scientific cooperation among the Federal, academic, and State agencies involved in observatory operations. Other groups also contribute to volcano monitoring by sponsoring long-term installation of geophysical instruments at some volcanoes for specific research projects. This report describes a database of information about permanently installed ground-based instruments used by the U.S. volcano observatories to monitor volcanic activity (unrest and eruptions). The purposes of this Volcano-Monitoring Instrumentation Database (VMID) are to (1) document the Nation's existing

  15. Emission rates of sulfur dioxide and carbon dioxide from Redoubt Volcano, Alaska during the 1989-1990 eruptions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Casadevall, T.J.; Doukas, M.P.; Neal, C.A.; McGimsey, R.G.; Gardner, C.A.

    1994-01-01

    pressurization of the shallow magma system and an increase in earthquake activity. Unlike the short-term SO2 decrease in March 1990, the long-term decrease of sulfur dioxide emission rates from March 1990 through May 1991 was coincident with low rates of seismic energy release and was interpreted to reflect gradual depressurization of the shallow magma reservoir. The long-term declines in seismic energy release and in SO2 emission rates led AVO scientists to conclude on April 19, 1991 that the potential for further eruptive activity from Redoubt Volcano had diminished, and on this basis, the level of concern color code for the volcano was changed from code yellow (Volcano is restless; earthquake activity is elevated; activity may include extrusion of lava) to code green (Volcano is in its normal 'dormant' state). ?? 1994.

  16. Headless Debris Flows From Mount Spurr Volcano, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGimsey, R. G.; Neal, C. A.; Waythomas, C. F.; Wessels, R.; Coombs, M. L.; Wallace, K. L.

    2004-12-01

    Sometime between June 20 and July 15, 2004-and contemporaneous with an increase of seismicity beneath the volcano, and elevated gas emissions-a sudden release of impounded water from the summit area of Mt. Spurr volcano produced about a dozen separate debris flow lobes emanating from crevasses and bergschrunds in the surface ice several hundred meters down the east-southeast flank from the summit. These debris flows were first observed by AVO staff on a July 15 overflight and appeared to represent a single flooding event; subsequent snow cover and limited accessibility have prevented direct investigation of these deposits. Observed from the air, they are dark, elongate lobate deposits, up to several hundred meters long and tens of meters wide, draping the steep (up to ~45 degree) slopes and cascading over and into crevasses. A water-rich phase from the flows continued down slope of the termini of several lobate deposits, eroding linear rills into the snow and ice down slope. We infer that the dark material composing these flows is likely remobilized coarse lapilli from the June 1992 tephra fall produced by an eruption of Crater Peak, a satellite vent of Mt. Spurr located 3.5 km to the south. Between 1 and 2 meters of basaltic andesite tephra fell directly on the Spurr summit during the 1992 eruption. The exact mechanism for sudden release of water-laden remobilized tephra flows from the summit basin is not clear. However, observations in early August, 2004, of an 80 m x 110-m-wide pit in the summit area snow and ice suggest the possibility of a partial roof collapse of a summit meltwater basin, likely associated with subglacial melting due to recent heat flux. Such a collapse could have led to the hydraulic surge of meltwater, and rapid mixing with tephra to produce slurries. These slurries traveled down slope beneath the ice surface to emerge through existing crevasses and other easy points of exit on the steep inclines. Mount Spurr is an ice- and snow covered

  17. Explosions of andesitic volcanoes in Kamchatka and danger of volcanic ash clouds to aviation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordeev, E. I.; Girina, O. A.; Neal, C. A.

    2010-12-01

    created the International KVERT Project, uniting scientists IVS FEB RAS, KB GS RAS and AVO USGS. To solve this problem and provide early warning of air services on the volcanic hazard, scientists analyze the data of seismic, video, visual and satellite monitoring of volcanoes of Kamchatka. In case of ash explosion, cloud or plume detection, information is sending via e-mail operatively to all interested users. Scientists collect all the information (research data, descriptions of eruptions from the literature, observations of tourists, etc.) of the active volcanoes. Based on analysis of historical activity Bezymianny, as well as its continuous monitoring data, scientists of KVERT Project repeatedly predicted the eruption of this volcano. It allowed notifying in time air services of the impending danger of aircraft. For example, in 2001-2010, were predicted 9 of its eruptions (December 16, 2001; December 25, 2002; January 11, 2005; May 9, 2006; May 11, 2007; October 14-15, 2007; August 19, 2008; December 16, 2009; May 31, 2010).

  18. Seismic and Geodetic Investigation of the 1996-1998 Earthquake Swarm at Strandline Lake, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilgore, W.; Roman, D. C.; Power, J. A.; Hansen, R. A.; Biggs, J.

    2009-12-01

    Microearthquake (< M3.0) swarms occur frequently in volcanic environments, but do not always culminate in an eruption. Such non-eruptive swarms may be caused by stresses induced by magma intrusion, hydrothermal fluid circulation, or regional tectonic processes, such as slow-slip earthquakes. Strandline Lake, located 30 km northeast of Mount Spurr volcano in south-central Alaska, experienced a strong earthquake swarm between August 1996 and August 1998. The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) catalog indicates that a total of 2,999 earthquakes were detected during the swarm period, with a maximum magnitude of Mw 3.1 and a depth range of 0-30 km below sea level (with the majority of catalog hypocenters located between 5-10 km BSL). The cumulative seismic moment of the swarm was 2.03e15 N m, equivalent to a cumulative magnitude of Mw 4.2. Because of the swarm's distance from the nearest Holocene volcanic vent, seismic monitoring was poor and gas and deformation data for the swarm period do not exist. However, combined waveforms from a dense seismic network on Mount Spurr and from several regional seismic stations allowed us to re-analyze the swarm earthquakes. We first developed a new 1-D velocity model for the Strandline Lake region by re-picking and inverting precise arrival times for 27 large Strandline Lake earthquakes. The new velocity model reduced the average RMS for these earthquakes from 0.16 to 0.11s, and the average horizontal and vertical location errors from 3.3 to 2.5 km and 4.7 to 3.0 km, respectively. Depths of the 27 earthquakes ranged from 10.5 to 22.1 km with an average depth of 16.6 km. A moderately high b-value of 1.33 was determined for the swarm period, possibly indicative of magmatic activity. However, a similarly high b-value of 1.25 was calculated for the background period. 28 well-constrained fault plane solutions for both swarm and background earthquakes indicate a diverse mixture of strike-slip, dip-slip, and reverse faulting beneath

  19. Finite-difference time-domain simulation of GPR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, How-Wei; Huang, Tai-Min

    1998-10-01

    mechanism can be used to adjust the width of the absorbing zone around the computational domain. By applying any combination of absorbing mechanism, non-physical reflections from the computation domain boundary can be effectively minimized. The algorithm enables us to use very thin absorbing boundaries. The model can be parameterized through velocity, relative electrical permittivity (dielectric constants), electrical conductivity, magnetic permeability, loss tangent, Q values, and attenuation. According to this scheme, widely varying electrical properties of near-surface earth materials can be modeled. The capability of simulating common-source, constant-offset and zero-offset gathers is also demonstrated through various synthetic examples. The synthetic cases for typical GPR applications include buried objects such as pipes of different materials, AVO analysis for ground water exploration, archaeological site investigation, and stratigraphy studies. The algorithms are also applied to iterative modeling of GPR data acquired over a gymnasium construction site on the NCCU campus.

  20. Improved Near-surface Velocity Models from Waveform Tomography Applied to Vibroseis MCS Reflection Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smithyman, B.; Clowes, R. M.

    2009-12-01

    sufficiently accurate starting model must be provided to allow convergence to an accurate final model. The Q-filter and deconvolution effects are theoretically accounted for in the waveform inversion process, once a starting model of sufficient quality is realized. To make this possible, preprocessing for waveform inversion is also necessary. It is designed to allow the use of the 2D, acoustic approximation to the wave equation in the waveform inversion implementation. The use of a 2D approximation to the true 3D geometry introduces AVO (Amplitude Variation with Offset) errors that must be accounted for in order for attenuation inversion to be possible. The acoustic approximation means that elastic propagation modes and mode-converted arrivals must be considered as systematic noise, with appropriate preprocessing steps to reduce their effects. Careful analysis of the early-arriving waveforms is necessary to deal with approximations due to the waveform inversion implementation, which are not easily separable from the approximations implicit in vibroseis acquisition. However, the potential benefits in near-surface velocity characterization and their wide applicability make the results of this research important for seismic processing and near-surface geological interpretation.

  1. Deep suture zone in the North Barents Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butsenko, Viktor; Kireev, Artem; Piskarev, Alexey; Savin, Vasily; Smirnov, Oleg

    2015-04-01

    magnetization. Calculated basement magnetization is 1.9 A/m to the West from an anomaly zone that is a characteristic for many igneous and metamorphic rocks of the diorite composition. Magnetization of the basement formations sharply increases to 3.6 A/m to the East. Similar values of magnetization are characterized basalts and dolerites, and also many metamorphic rocks of the basic and ultrabasic composition. Thus, the simulated magnetic field anomaly not only corresponds to limits of the heterochronous sedimentary basins, but also shows the border between two heterogeneous basement blocks. "Bright spot" anomalies are marked out on seismic sections. Bright spots are mainly located near the zone of negative magnetic anomaly along the East part of the North Barents Basin. The AVO analysis of the anomalies of the seismic recording has allowed to allocate possible hydrocarbon reservoirs and to subdivide them into the gas-saturated and oil-gas-saturated.

  2. Multicomponent Seismic Analysis and Calibration to Improve Recovery from Algal Mounds: Application to the Roadrunner/Towaoc area of the Paradox Basin, UTE Mountain UTE Reservation, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Joe Hachey

    2007-09-30

    of this upgrade to nine components was to provide additional shear wave component data that might prove useful in delineating internal mound reservoir attributes. Also, Red Willow extended the P-wave portion of the survey to the northwest of the original 6 mi{sup 2} (15.6 km{sup 2}) 3D9C area in order to extend coverage further to the northwest to the Marble Wash area. In order to accomplish this scope of work, 3D9C seismic data set covering two known reservoirs was acquired and processed. Three-dimensional, zero-offset vertical seismic profile (VSP) data was acquired to determine the shear wave velocities for processing the sh3Dseismic data. Anisotropic velocity, and azimuthal AVO processing was carried out in addition to the conventional 3D P-wave data processing. All P-, PS- and S-wave volumes of the seismic data were interpreted to map the seismic response. The interpretation consisted of conventional cross-plots of seismic attributes vs. geological and reservoir engineering data, as well as multivariate and neural net analyses to assess whether additional resolution on exploration and engineering parameters could be achieved through the combined use of several seismic variables. Engineering data in the two reservoirs was used to develop a combined lithology, structure and permeability map. On the basis of the seismic data, a well was drilled into the northern mound trend in the project area. This well, Roadrunner No.9-2, was brought into production in late April 2006 and continues to produce modest amounts of oil and gas. As of the end of August 2007, the well has produced approximately 12,000 barrels of oil and 32,000 mcf of gas. A static reservoir model was created from the seismic data interpretations and well data. The seismic data was tied to various markers identified in the well logs, which in turn were related to lithostratigraphy. The tops and thicknesses of the various units were extrapolated from well control based upon the seismic data that was

  3. A Portrait of One Hundred Thousand and One Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-08-01

    Rich and Inspiring Experience with NGC 300 Images from the ESO Science Data Archive Summary A series of wide-field images centred on the nearby spiral galaxy NGC 300 , obtained with the Wide-Field Imager (WFI) on the MPG/ESO 2.2-m telescope at the La Silla Observatory , have been combined into a magnificent colour photo. These images have been used by different groups of astronomers for various kinds of scientific investigations, ranging from individual stars and nebulae in NGC 300, to distant galaxies and other objects in the background. This material provides an interesting demonstration of the multiple use of astronomical data, now facilitated by the establishment of extensively documented data archives, like the ESO Science Data Archive that now is growing rapidly and already contains over 15 Terabyte. Based on the concept of Astronomical Virtual Observatories (AVOs) , the use of archival data sets is on the rise and provides a large number of scientists with excellent opportunities for front-line investigations without having to wait for precious observing time. In addition to presenting a magnificent astronomical photo, the present account also illustrates this important new tool of the modern science of astronomy and astrophysics. PR Photo 18a/02 : WFI colour image of spiral galaxy NGC 300 (full field) . PR Photo 18b/02 : Cepheid stars in NGC 300 PR Photo 18c/02 : H-alpha image of NGC 300 PR Photo 18d/02 : Distant cluster of galaxies CL0053-37 in the NGC 300 field PR Photo 18e/02 : Dark matter distribution in CL0053-37 PR Photo 18f/02 : Distant, reddened cluster of galaxies in the NGC 300 field PR Photo 18g/02 : Distant galaxies, seen through the outskirts of NGC 300 PR Photo 18h/02 : "The View Beyond" ESO PR Photo 18a/02 ESO PR Photo 18a/02 [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 412 pix - 112k] [Normal - JPEG: 1200 x 1237 pix - 1.7M] [Hi-Res - JPEG: 4000 x 4123 pix - 20.3M] Caption : PR Photo 18a/02 is a reproduction of a colour-composite image of the nearby spiral galaxy