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Sample records for l-alanine difracao multipla

  1. Vibrational dynamics of crystalline L-alanine

    SciTech Connect

    Bordallo, H.N.; Eckert, J.; Barthes, M.

    1997-11-01

    The authors report a new, complete vibrational analysis of L-alanine and L-alanine-d{sub 4} which utilizes IINS intensities in addition to frequency information. The use of both isotopomers resulted in a self-consistent force field for and assignment of the molecular vibrations in L-alanine. Some details of the calculation as well as a comparison of calculated and observed IINS spectra are presented. The study clarifies a number of important issues on the vibrational dynamics of this molecule and presents a self-consistent force field for the molecular vibrations in crystalline L-alanine.

  2. On the existence of 'L-alanine cadmium bromide'.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Bikshandarkoil R

    2013-12-01

    It is argued that the recently reported nonlinear optical crystal L-alanine cadmium bromide, grown by slow solvent evaporation method at room temperature [P. Ilayabarathi, J. Chandrasekaran, Spectrochim. Acta 96A (2012) 684-689] is the well-known L-alanine crystal. The isolation of L-alanine crystal is explained due to fractional crystallization.

  3. Atomic Layer Deposition of L-Alanine Polypeptide

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Yaqin; Li, Binsong; Jiang, Ying-Bing; Dunphy, Darren R.; Tsai, Andy; Tam, Siu-Yue; Fan, Hongyou Y.; Zhang, Hongxia; Rogers, David; Rempe, Susan; Atanassov, Plamen; Cecchi, Joseph L.; Brinker, C. Jeffrey

    2014-10-30

    L-Alanine polypeptide thin films were synthesized via atomic layer deposition (ALD). Rather, instead of using an amino acid monomer as the precursor, an L-alanine amino acid derivatized with a protecting group was used to prevent self-polymerization, increase the vapor pressure, and allow linear cycle-by-cycle growth emblematic of ALD. Moreover, the successful deposition of a conformal polypeptide film has been confirmed by FTIR, TEM, and Mass Spectrometry, and the ALD process has been extended to polyvaline.

  4. On the existence of "L-threonine formate", "L-alanine lithium chloride" and "bis L-alanine lithium chloride" crystals.

    PubMed

    Petrosyan, A M; Ghazaryan, V V; Fleck, M

    2013-03-15

    We argue that the recently reported crystals "L-threonine formate" as well as "L-alanine lithium chloride" and "bis L-alanine lithium chloride" actually are the well-known crystals L-threonine and L-alanine, respectively.

  5. [Regulation of key enzymes of L-alanine biosynthesis by Brevibacterium flavum producer strains].

    PubMed

    Melkonian, L O; Avetisova, G E; Ambartsumian, A A; Chakhalian, A Kh; Sagian, A S

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms of L-alanine overproduction by Brevibacterium flavum producer strains were studied. It was shown that beta-CI-L-alanine is an inhibitor of some key enzymes involved in the synthesis of L-alanine, including alanine transaminase and valine-pyruvate transaminase. Two highly active B. flavum GL1 and GL1 8 producer strains, which are resistant to the inhibitory effect of beta-Cl-L-alanine, were obtained using a parental B. flavum AA5 producer strain, characterized by a reduced activity of alanine racemase (>or=98%). It was demonstrated that the increased L-alanine synthesis efficiency observed in the producer strains developed in this work is associated with the absence of inhibition of alanine transaminase by the end product of the biosynthesis reaction, as well as with the effect of derepression of both alanine transaminase and valine-pyruvate transaminase synthesis by the studied compound.

  6. Efficient L-Alanine Production by a Thermo-Regulated Switch in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Li; Deng, Can; Cui, Wen-Jing; Liu, Zhong-Mei; Zhou, Zhe-Min

    2016-01-01

    L-Alanine has important applications in food, pharmaceutical and veterinary and is used as a substrate for production of engineered thermoplastics. Microbial fermentation could reduce the production cost and promote the application of L-alanine. However, the presence of L-alanine significantly inhibit cell growth rate and cause a decrease in the ultimate L-alanine productivity. For efficient L-alanine production, a thermo-regulated genetic switch was designed to dynamically control the expression of L-alanine dehydrogenase (alaD) from Geobacillus stearothermophilus on the Escherichia coli B0016-060BC chromosome. The optimal cultivation conditions for the genetically switched alanine production using B0016-060BC were the following: an aerobic growth phase at 33 °C with a 1-h thermo-induction at 42 °C followed by an oxygen-limited phase at 42 °C. In a bioreactor experiment using the scaled-up conditions optimized in a shake flask, B0016-060BC accumulated 50.3 g biomass/100 g glucose during the aerobic growth phase and 96 g alanine/100 g glucose during the oxygen-limited phase, respectively. The L-alanine titer reached 120.8 g/l with higher overall and oxygen-limited volumetric productivities of 3.09 and 4.18 g/l h, respectively, using glucose as the sole carbon source. Efficient cell growth and L-alanine production were reached separately, by switching cultivation temperature. The results revealed the application of a thermo-regulated strategy for heterologous metabolic production and pointed to strategies for improving L-alanine production.

  7. Characterization of the l-alanine exporter AlaE of Escherichia coli and its potential role in protecting cells from a toxic-level accumulation of l-alanine and its derivatives.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seryoung; Ihara, Kohei; Katsube, Satoshi; Hori, Hatsuhiro; Ando, Tasuke; Isogai, Emiko; Yoneyama, Hiroshi

    2015-08-01

    We previously reported that the alaE gene of Escherichia coli encodes the l-alanine exporter AlaE. The objective of this study was to elucidate the mechanism of the AlaE exporter. The minimum inhibitory concentration of l-alanine and l-alanyl-l-alanine in alaE-deficient l-alanine-nonmetabolizing cells MLA301ΔalaE was 4- and >4000-fold lower, respectively, than in the alaE-positive parent cells MLA301, suggesting that AlaE functions as an efflux pump to avoid a toxic-level accumulation of intracellular l-alanine and its derivatives. Furthermore, the growth of the alaE-deficient mutant derived from the l-alanine-metabolizing strain was strongly inhibited in the presence of a physiological level of l-alanyl-l-alanine. Intact MLA301ΔalaE and MLA301ΔalaE/pAlaE cells producing plasmid-borne AlaE, accumulated approximately 200% and 50%, respectively, of the [(3) H]l-alanine detected in MLA301 cells, suggesting that AlaE exports l-alanine. When 200 mmol/L l-alanine-loaded inverted membrane vesicles prepared from MLA301ΔalaE/pAlaE were placed in a solution containing 200 mmol/L or 0.34 μmol/L l-alanine, energy-dependent [(3) H]l-alanine accumulation occurred under either condition. This energy-dependent uphill accumulation of [(3) H]l-alanine was strongly inhibited in the presence of carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone but not by dicyclohexylcarbodiimide, suggesting that the AlaE-mediated l-alanine extrusion was driven by proton motive force. Based on these results, physiological roles of the l-alanine exporter are discussed.

  8. Enzymatic determination of carbon-14 labeled L-alanine in biological samples

    SciTech Connect

    Serra, F.; Palou, A.; Pons, A.

    1987-07-15

    A method for determination of L-alanine-specific radioactivity in biological samples is presented. This method is based on the specific enzymatic transformation of L-alanine to pyruvic acid hydrazone catalyzed by the enzyme L-alanine dehydrogenase, formation of the pyruvic acid 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazone derivative, and quantitative trapping in Amberlite XAD-7 columns, followed by radioactivity counting of the lipophilic eluate. No interferences from other UC-labeled materials such as D-glucose, glycerol, L-lactate, L-serine, L-glutamate, L-phenylalanine, glycine, L-leucine, and L-arginine were observed. This inexpensive and high-speed method is applicable to the simultaneous determination of L-alanine-specific radioactivity for a large number of samples.

  9. Expression of rat liver Na+/L-alanine co-transport in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Effect of glucagon in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Palacin, M; Werner, A; Dittmer, J; Murer, H; Biber, J

    1990-01-01

    Poly(A)+ RNA (mRNA) isolated from rat liver was injected into Xenopus laevis oocytes, and expression of Na+/L-alanine transport was assayed by measuring Na(+)-dependent uptake of L-[3H]alanine. Expression of Na+/L-alanine transport was detected 3-7 days after mRNA injection, and was due to an increment of the Na(+)-dependent component. After injection of 40 ng of total mRNA, Na(+)-dependent uptake of L-alanine was 2.5-fold higher than in water-injected oocytes. In contrast with Na+/L-alanine transport by water-injected oocytes, expressed Na+/L-alanine transport was inhibited by N-methylaminoisobutyric acid, was inhibited by an extracellular pH of 6.5 and was saturated at approx. 1 mM-L-alanine. After sucrose-density-gradient fractionation, highest expression of Na+/L-alanine uptake was observed with mRNA of 1.9-2.5 kb in length. Compared with mRNA isolated from control rats, mRNA isolated from glucagon-treated rats showed a approx. 2-fold higher expression of Na+/L-alanine transport. The results demonstrate that both liver Na+/L-alanine transport systems (A and ASC) can be expressed in X. laevis oocytes. Furthermore, the data obtained with mRNA isolated from glucagon-treated rats suggest that glucagon regulates liver Na+/L-alanine transport (at least in part) via the availability of the corresponding mRNA. Images Fig. 6. PMID:2396979

  10. L-alanine and inosine enhancement of glucose triggering in Bacillus megaterium spores.

    PubMed

    Bédard, J; Lefebvre, G M

    1989-08-01

    Both rate and extent of germination of Bacillus megaterium 14581 (ATCC) spores are considerably augmented when L-alanine and inosine are added to the glucose commonly used as triggering agent for this strain. This enhancement does not arise from heterogeneity in germination requirements of the dormant spore, but is rather a consequence of the combined action of glucose and either or both of the added reagents on a sizeable fraction of spores unable to germinate in glucose alone. Nearly half of the spores that eventually germinate in the mixture of germinants used are either triggered by glucose or are sensitized by it to subsequent triggering by L-alanine and inosine in the first 10 s of imbibition. For a good number of these spores, then, triggering consists of a sequence of separable events. PMID:2510916

  11. Adsorption of di-l-alanine on Cu(110) investigated with scanning tunneling microscopy [rapid communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stensgaard, I.

    2003-11-01

    Sub-monolayer growth of a small chiral peptide, di- L-alanine, on Cu(1 1 0) was investigated by variable temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). At low coverage and for temperatures above ≈-220 K the molecules nucleate along the [ 3¯ 3 2] direction to form short, mainly one-dimensional islands. An increase in coverage leads to the formation of [ 3¯ 3 2]-directed, elongated islands. Images with sub-molecular resolution reveal that the orientation of the molecules within one particular island depends on the deposition temperature. At higher coverage, up to one monolayer, the islands coalesce, giving rise to phase boundaries between domains of opposite orientation. An atomic-scale model for di- L-alanine on Cu(1 1 0) is presented.

  12. Characterisation of L-alanine and glycine absorption across the gut of an ancient vertebrate.

    PubMed

    Glover, Chris N; Bucking, Carol; Wood, Chris M

    2011-08-01

    This study utilised an in vitro technique to characterise absorption of two amino acids across the intestinal epithelium of Pacific hagfish, Eptatretus stoutii. Uptake of L-alanine and glycine conformed to Michaelis-Menten kinetics. An uptake affinity (K(m); substrate concentration required to attain a 50% uptake saturation) of 7.0 mM and an uptake capacity (J (max)) of 83 nmol cm(-2) h(-1) were described for L-alanine. The K(m) and J(max) for glycine were 2.2 mM and 11.9 nmol cm(-2) h(-1), respectively. Evidence suggested that the pathways of L-alanine and glycine absorption were shared, and sodium dependent. Further analysis indicated that glycine uptake was independent of luminal pH and proline, but a component of uptake was significantly impaired by 100-fold excesses of threonine or asparagine. The presence of a short-term (24 h) exposure to waterborne glycine, similar in nature to that which may be expected to occur when feeding inside an animal carcass, had no significant impact on gastrointestinal glycine uptake. This may indicate a lack of cross talk between absorptive epithelia. These results are the first published data to describe gastrointestinal uptake of an organic nutrient in the oldest extant vertebrate and may provide potential insight into the evolution of nutrient transport systems.

  13. L-alanine uptake in membrane vesicles from Mytilus edulis gills

    SciTech Connect

    Pajor, A.M.; Wright, S.H.

    1986-03-05

    Previous studies have shown that gills from M. edulis can accumulate L-alanine from seawater by a saturable process specific for ..cap alpha..-neutral amino acids. This uptake occurs against chemical gradients in excess of 10/sup 6/ to 1. To further characterize this uptake, membrane vesicles were prepared from M. edulis gill tissue by differential centrifugation. Enrichments of putative enzyme markers (relative to that in combined initial fractions) were as follows: ..gamma..-Glutamyltranspeptidase, 25-30x; Alkaline Phosphatase, 5-6x; K/sup +/-dependent para-Nitrophenyl Phosphatase, 3-5x; Succinate Dehydrogenase 0.1-0.2x. These results suggest that the preparation is enriched in plasma membranes, although histochemical studies will be needed to verify this. The time course of /sup 14/C-L-alanine uptake in the presence of inwardly-directed Na/sup +/ gradient showed a transient overshoot (3-5 fold) at 10 minutes which decreased to equilibrium after six hours. The size of the overshoot and early uptake rates depended on the size of the inwardly-directed Na/sup +/ gradient. No overshoot was seen in the presence of inwardly-directed gradients of LiCl or choline-Cl, or with equilibrium concentrations NaCl or mannitol. A reduced overshoot was seen with a gradient of NaSCN. A small overshoot was seen with an inwardly-directed gradient of KCl. Transport of L-alanine included saturable and diffusive components. Uptake of 6 ..mu..M L-alanine was inhibited more than 80% by 100 ..mu..M ..cap alpha..-zwitterionic amino acids (alanine, leucine, glycine); by 30 to 75% by proline, aspartate and lysine; and less than 20% by a ..beta..-amino acid, taurine. The results of these experiments agree with those from intact gill studies and support the hypothesis that L-alanine is transported into gill epithelial cells by a secondary active transport process involving Na/sup +/.

  14. Painting proteins blue: β-(1-azulenyl)-L-alanine as a probe for studying protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Moroz, Yurii S; Binder, Wolfgang; Nygren, Patrik; Caputo, Gregory A; Korendovych, Ivan V

    2013-01-18

    We demonstrated that β-(1-azulenyl)-L-alanine, a fluorescent pseudoisosteric analog of tryptophan, exhibits weak environmental dependence and thus allows for using weak intrinsic quenchers, such as methionines, to monitor protein-protein interactions while not perturbing them.

  15. FT-Raman and FTIR spectroscopic studies of N-octadecanoyl-L-alanine amphiphiles.

    PubMed

    Du, Xuezhong; Liang, Yingqiu

    2004-01-01

    FTIR spectroscopy is used to compare the difference in molecular structure between Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films (transferred at the surface pressure 40 mN/m with the vertical method and 0 mN/m with the horizontal method) and bulk sample of N-Octadecanoyl-L-alanine amphiphiles. The bulk sample possesses a very similar microstructure (intermolecular hydrogen-bonding interaction and triclinic chain packing) to the well-ordered LB films. Much information on molecular structure of the bulk sample is obtained using FT-Raman spectroscopy, and several weak Raman scattering peaks are assigned.

  16. Toxicity of the cyanobacterial neurotoxin beta-N-methylamino-L-alanine to three aquatic animal species.

    PubMed

    Purdie, Esme L; Metcalf, James S; Kashmiri, Shereen; Codd, Geoffrey A

    2009-01-01

    Beta-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA), a neurotoxin and candidate contributory cause of neurodegenerative diseases including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, is produced by aquatic and terrestrial cyanobacteria. We have determined BMAA toxicity to three aquatic animal species: zebra fish (Danio rerio), brine shrimp (Artemia salina) and the protozoan Nassula sorex. Responses included: clonus convulsions and abnormal spinal axis formation (D. rerio), loss of phototaxis (A. salina) and mortalities (all species). These systems offer potential to further understand BMAA toxicity and the bioaccumulation and fates of BMAA in aquatic food chains leading to potential human exposure.

  17. Characterization and biocompatibility of organogels based on L-alanine for parenteral drug delivery implants.

    PubMed

    Motulsky, Aude; Lafleur, Michel; Couffin-Hoarau, Anne-Claude; Hoarau, Didier; Boury, Frank; Benoit, Jean-Pierre; Leroux, Jean-Christophe

    2005-11-01

    The development of simple and efficient drug delivery systems for the sustained release of peptides/proteins and low molecular weight hydrophilic molecules is an ongoing challenge. The purpose of this work was to prepare and characterize novel biodegradable in situ-forming implants obtained via the self-assembly of L-alanine derivatives in pharmaceutical oils. Six different amphiphilic organogelators based on L-alanine were synthesized. These derivatives could successfully gel various vegetable and synthetic oils approved for parenteral administration. Gelation was thermoreversible, and phase transition temperatures depended on gelator structure, concentration and solvent. Hydrogen bonds and van der Waals interactions were shown to be the main forces implicated in network formation. Selected formulations were then injected subcutaneously in rats for preliminary assessment of biocompatibility. Histopathological analysis of the surrounding tissues revealed mild, chronic inflammation and an overall good biocompatibility profile of the implants over the 8 wk evaluation period. This study demonstrates that in situ-forming organogels represent a potentially promising platform for sustained drug delivery.

  18. Rapid Crystallization of L-Alanine on Engineered Surfaces using Metal-Assisted and Microwave-Accelerated Evaporative Crystallization.

    PubMed

    Alabanza, Anginelle M; Pozharski, Edwin; Aslan, Kadir

    2012-01-01

    This study demonstrates the application of metal-assisted and microwave-accelerated evaporative crystallization (MA-MAEC) technique to rapid crystallization of L-alanine on surface engineered silver nanostructures. In this regard, silver island films (SIFs) were modified with hexamethylenediamine (HMA), 1-undecanethiol (UDET), and 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUDA), which introduced -NH(2), -CH(3) and -COOH functional groups to SIFs, respectively. L-Alanine was crystallized on these engineered surfaces and blank SIFs at room temperature and using MA-MAEC technique. Significant improvements in crystal size, shape, and quality were observed on HMA-, MUDA- and UDET-modified SIFs at room temperature (crystallization time = 144, 40 and 147 min, respectively) as compared to those crystals grown on blank SIFs. Using the MA-MAEC technique, the crystallization time of L-alanine on engineered surfaces were reduced to 17 sec for microwave power level 10 (i.e., duty cycle 100%) and 7 min for microwave power level 1 (duty cycle 10%). Raman spectroscopy and powder x-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements showed that L-Alanine crystals grown on engineered surfaces using MA-MAEC technique had identical characteristic peaks of L-alanine crystals grown using traditional evaporative crystallization. PMID:22267957

  19. Growth, Structural And Optical Studies On Bis L-alanine Lithium Chloride (BLALC) Single Crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, A. S. J. Lucia; Selvarajan, P.; Perumal, S.

    2011-10-01

    Bis L-alanine Lithium Chloride (BLALC) single crystals were grown successfully by solution method with slow evaporation technique at room temperature. Crystals of size 15 x 9 x 4 mm3 have been obtained in 28 days. The grown crystals were colourless and transparent. Single crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD) study showed that BLALC belongs to orthorhombic system with a non-centro-symmetric space group P212121. The crystallinity of BLALC crystal was confirmed by the powder X-ray diffraction study and diffraction peaks were indexed. The functional groups of the grown crystals have been identified by FTIR studies. UV-visible transmittance spectrum was recorded to study the optical transparency of BLALC crystal. The nonlinear optical (NLO) property of the grown crystal was confirmed by Kurtz-Perry powder technique.

  20. Catalytic Stereoinversion of L-Alanine to Deuterated D-Alanine.

    PubMed

    Moozeh, Kimia; So, Soon Mog; Chin, Jik

    2015-08-01

    A combination of an achiral pyridoxal analogue and a chiral base has been developed for catalytic deuteration of L-alanine with inversion of stereochemistry to give deuterated D-alanine under mild conditions (neutral pD and 25 °C) without the use of any protecting groups. This system can also be used for catalytic deuteration of D-alanine with retention of stereochemistry to give deuterated D-alanine. Thus a racemic mixture of alanine can be catalytically deuterated to give an enantiomeric excess of deuterated D-alanine. While catalytic deracemization of alanine is forbidden by the second law of thermodynamics, this system can be used for catalytic deracemization of alanine with deuteration. Such green and biomimetic approach to catalytic stereocontrol provides insights into efficient amino acid transformations.

  1. Spectrofluorimetric determination of ofloxacin in milk with N-(9-fluorenylmethyloxycarbonyl)-L-alanine.

    PubMed

    Tong, Zhao; Bianfei, Yu; Wanjin, Tang; Haixia, Zhang

    2015-09-01

    It was found that N-(9-fluorenylmethyloxycarbonyl)-L-alanine (F-Ala) could interact with ofloxacin (OFL) and enhance the fluorescence of OFL, which could be used to set up a new fluorescence spectrophotometry method to detect OFL without isolation procedure. The experimental conditions were discussed and when MeOH was used as solvent, 0.001 μg mL(-1) of OFL could be detected. For making the method could be used easily in milk samples, MeOH/H2O (v/v, 4:1, pH 4.1) was used as the optimal solvent condition, the limit of quantification of OFL could be reached 0.01 μg mL(-1) in milk samples with recovery more than 88% at least.

  2. Thiophenyl-substituted triazolyl-thione L-alanine: asymmetric synthesis, aggregation and biological properties.

    PubMed

    Saghyan, Ashot S; Simonyan, Hayarpi M; Petrosyan, Satenik G; Geolchanyan, Arpine V; Roviello, Giovanni N; Musumeci, Domenica; Roviello, Valentina

    2014-10-01

    In this work, we report the asymmetric synthesis and characterization of an artificial amino acid based on triazolyl-thione L-alanine, which was modified with a thiophenyl-substituted moiety, as well as in vitro studies of its nucleic acid-binding ability. We found, by dynamic light scattering studies, that the synthetic amino acid was able to form supramolecular aggregates having a hydrodynamic diameter higher than 200 nm. Furthermore, we demonstrated, by UV and CD experiments, that the heteroaromatic amino acid, whose enzymatic stability was demonstrated by HPLC analysis also after 24 h of incubation in human serum, was able to bind a RNA complex, which is a feature of biomedical interest in view of innovative antiviral strategies based on modulation of RNA-RNA molecular recognition.

  3. Discovery of an L-alanine ester prodrug of the Hsp90 inhibitor, MPC-3100.

    PubMed

    Kim, Se-Ho; Tangallapally, Rajendra; Kim, In Chul; Trovato, Richard; Parker, Daniel; Patton, J Scott; Reeves, Leslie; Bradford, Chad; Wettstein, Daniel; Baichwal, Vijay; Papac, Damon; Bajji, Ashok; Carlson, Robert; Yager, Kraig M

    2015-11-15

    Various types of Hsp90 inhibitors have been and continue to undergo clinical investigation. One development candidate is the purine-based, synthetic Hsp90 inhibitor 1 (MPC-3100), which successfully completed a phase I clinical study. However, further clinical development of 1 was hindered by poor solubility and consequent formulation issues and promoted development of a more water soluble prodrug. Towards this end, numerous pro-moieties were explored in vitro and in vivo. These studies resulted in identification of L-alanine ester mesylate, 2i (MPC-0767), which exhibited improved aqueous solubility, adequate chemical stability, and rapid bioconversion without the need for solubilizing excipients. Based on improved physical characteristics and favorable PK and PD profiles, 2i mesylate was selected for further development. A convergent, scalable, chromatography-free synthesis for 2i mesylate was developed to support further clinical evaluation.

  4. Experimental and DFT computational studies of L-alanine cadmium chloride crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignatius, I. Cicili; Dheivamalar, S.; Kirubavathi, K.; Selvaraju, K.

    2016-05-01

    In this work, we report the combined experimental and theoretical study on molecular structure and vibrational spectra of nonlinear optical crystal L-alanine cadmium chloride (LACC). The single X-ray diffraction studies have revealed that the compound crystallizes in monoclinic system C2 space group with cell parameters a = 16.270, b = 7.358, c = 7.887 and Z = 4. FTIR and Raman spectra of the nonlinear optical materials LACC have been recorded and analyzed. The optimized geometric bond length and bond angles are obtained with the help of density functional theory (DFT) (B3LYP) calculation. The optimized geometric bond lengths and bond angles obtained by using DFT show good agreement with the experimental data. Using the natural bond orbital analysis the electronic effect and hydrogen bonding were confirmed. The HOMO-LUMO energy gap and the first order hyperpolarizability were calculated and it supports the nonlinear optical activity of LACC crystal.

  5. Controlled radical polymerization of an acrylamide containing L-alanine moiety via ATRP.

    PubMed

    Rafiee, Zahra

    2016-02-01

    Homopolymerization of an optically active acrylamide having an amino acid moiety in the side chain, N-acryloyl-L-alanine (AAla) was carried out via atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) at room temperature using 2-hydroxyethyl-2'-methyl-2'-bromopropionate (HMB) or sodium-4-(bromomethyl)benzoate (SBB) as initiator in pure water, methanol/water mixture and pure methanol solvents. The polymerization reaction resulted in the optically active biocompatible amino acid-based homopolymer in good yield with narrow molecular weight distribution. The number average molecular weight increased with conversion and polydispersity was low. The structure and molecular weight of synthesized polymer were characterized by (1)H NMR, FT-IR spectroscopic techniques and size-exclusion chromatography.

  6. Spectrofluorimetric determination of ofloxacin in milk with N-(9-fluorenylmethyloxycarbonyl)-L-alanine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Zhao; Bianfei, Yu; Wanjin, Tang; Haixia, Zhang

    2015-09-01

    It was found that N-(9-fluorenylmethyloxycarbonyl)-L-alanine (F-Ala) could interact with ofloxacin (OFL) and enhance the fluorescence of OFL, which could be used to set up a new fluorescence spectrophotometry method to detect OFL without isolation procedure. The experimental conditions were discussed and when MeOH was used as solvent, 0.001 μg mL-1 of OFL could be detected. For making the method could be used easily in milk samples, MeOH/H2O (v/v, 4:1, pH 4.1) was used as the optimal solvent condition, the limit of quantification of OFL could be reached 0.01 μg mL-1 in milk samples with recovery more than 88% at least.

  7. High-temperature Raman study of L-alanine, L-threonine and taurine crystals related to thermal decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavaignac, A. L. O.; Lima, R. J. C.; Façanha Filho, P. F.; Moreno, A. J. D.; Freire, P. T. C.

    2016-03-01

    In this work high-temperature Raman spectra are used to compare temperature dependence of the lattice mode wavenumber of L-alanine, L-threonine and taurine crystals. Anharmonic effects observed are associated with intermolecular N-H· · ·O hydrogen bond that plays an important role in thermal decomposition process of these materials. Short and strong hydrogen bonds in L-alanine crystal were associated with anharmonic effects in lattice modes leading to low thermal stability compared to taurine crystals. Connection between thermal decomposition process and anharmonic effects is furnished for the first time.

  8. Determination of β-Cyano-L-alanine, γ-Glutamyl-β-cyano-L-alanine, and Common Free Amino Acids in Vicia sativa (Fabaceae) Seeds by Reversed-Phase High-Performance Liquid Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Megías, Cristina; Cortés-Giraldo, Isabel; Girón-Calle, Julio; Vioque, Javier; Alaiz, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    A method for determination of β-cyano-L-alanine, γ-glutamyl-β-cyano-L-alanine and other free amino acids in Vicia sativa is presented. Seed extracts were derivatized by reaction with diethyl ethoxymethylenemalonate and analyzed by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. Calibration curves showed very good linearity of the response. The limit of detection and quantification was 0.15 and 0.50 μM, respectively. The method has high intra- (RSD = 0.28–0.31%) and interrepeatability (RSD = 2.76–3.08%) and remarkable accuracy with a 99% recovery in spiked samples. The method is very easy to carry out and allows for ready analysis of large number of samples using very basic HPLC equipment because the derivatized samples are very stable and have very good chromatographic properties. The method has been applied to the determination of γ-glutamyl-β-cyano-L-alanine, β-cyano-L-alanine, and common free amino acids in eight wild populations of V. sativa from southwestern Spain. PMID:25587488

  9. Cadmium inhibition of L-alanine transport into renal brush border membrane vesicles isolated from the winter flounder (Pseudopleuronectes americanus)

    SciTech Connect

    Bevan, C.; Kinne-Saffran, E.; Foulkes, E.C.; Kinne, R.K. )

    1989-12-01

    Using isolated brush border membrane vesicles from the kidney of the winter flounder (Pseudopleuronectes americanus), we have studied the effect of cadmium on L-alanine transport. Pretreatment of vesicles with 0.1 mM Cd{sup 2+} resulted in inhibition of L-alanine uptake in the presence of a NaCl (but not KCl) gradient. Inhibition was due to a specific interaction with the sodium-alanine cotransport system and not a change in the driving forces for alanine transport, since Cd{sup 2+} did not affect sodium-dependent D-glucose uptake. The effect of Cd{sup 2+} on Na{sup +}-alanine cotransport showed mixed-type inhibition which is only partially reversible by EDTA. Cd{sup 2+} uptake itself was shown to be time and temperature dependent, resulting in binding to both sides of the membrane. No direct correlation was possible between inhibition of L-alanine transport and the amount of Cd{sup 2+} taken up by the membranes. Nevertheless, the striking time dependence of the effect of Cd{sup 2+} on sodium-dependent L-alanine uptake and the inability of EDTA to reverse the inhibitory action of Cd{sup 2+} suggest that Cd{sup 2+} inhibits Na+-alanine cotransport at the cytoplasmic side of the membrane.

  10. β-(1-Azulenyl)-L-alanine--a functional probe for determination of pKa of histidine residues.

    PubMed

    Gosavi, Pallavi M; Moroz, Yurii S; Korendovych, Ivan V

    2015-03-28

    β-(1-Azulenyl)-L-alanine (AzAla) can be incorporated into the influenza A virus M2 proton channel. AzAla's sensitivity to the protonation state of the nearby histidines and the lack of environmental fluorescence dependence allow for direct and straightforward determination of histidine pKa values in ion channels.

  11. The GerW protein is essential for L-alanine-stimulated germination of Bacillus subtilis spores.

    PubMed

    Kuwana, Ritsuko; Takamatsu, Hiromu

    2013-11-01

    GerW (formerly called YtfJ) is a protein found in dormant spores of Bacillus subtilis. We have studied spore proteins in B. subtilis before, and here we report the characterization of GerW protein. Northern blot analysis revealed that gerW mRNA was transcribed by SigF-containing RNA polymerase beginning 1 h after the initiation of sporulation. Fluorescence was detected in forespores and dormant spores of B. subtilis recombinant strains expressing GerW-GFP. During germination in the presence of L-alanine or a mixture of L-asparagine, D-glucose, D-fructose and potassium ions (AGFK), normal spores of B. subtilis became darkened, stained positive with Hoechst 33342 and carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester (CFDA-SE), and released dipicolinic acid (DPA). In the case of gerW-deficient spores, AGFK triggered germination in a manner similar to that seen in the wild-type spores, whereas spores stimulated by L-alanine remained refractive under the phase contrast microscope, failed to stain positive with Hoechst 33342 or CFDA-SE, and released almost no DPA. These results indicate that GerW is essential for the L-alanine-induced breakdown of spore dormancy followed by core rehydration and the resumption of enzymatic activity, and suggest that GerW is involved in the early stages of germination in the presence of l-alanine.

  12. Biochemical characterization of an inhibitor of Escherichia coli UDP-N-acetylmuramyl-l-alanine ligase.

    PubMed

    Ehmann, David E; Demeritt, Julie E; Hull, Kenneth G; Fisher, Stewart L

    2004-05-01

    UDP-N-acetylmuramyl-l-alanine ligase (MurC) is an essential bacterial enzyme involved in peptidoglycan biosynthesis and a target for the discovery of novel antibacterial agents. As a result of a high-throughput screen (HTS) against a chemical library for inhibitors of MurC, a series of benzofuran acyl-sulfonamides was identified as potential leads. One of these compounds, Compound A, inhibited Escherichia coli MurC with an IC(50) of 2.3 microM. Compound A exhibited time-dependent, partially reversible inhibition of E. coli MurC. Kinetic studies revealed a mode of inhibition consistent with the compound acting competitively with the MurC substrates ATP and UDP-N-acetyl-muramic acid (UNAM) with a K(i) of 4.5 microM against ATP and 6.3 microM against UNAM. Fluorescence binding experiments yielded a K(d) of 3.1 microM for the compound binding to MurC. Compound A also exhibited high-affinity binding to bovine serum albumin (BSA) as evidenced by a severe reduction in MurC inhibition upon addition of BSA. This finding is consistent with the high lipophilicity of the compound. Advancement of this compound series for further drug development will require reduction of albumin binding. PMID:15134649

  13. Theoretical and experimental study of valence photoelectron spectrum of D,L-alanine amino acid.

    PubMed

    Farrokhpour, H; Fathi, F; De Brito, A Naves

    2012-07-01

    In this work, the He-I (21.218 eV) photoelectron spectrum of D,L-alanine in the gas phase is revisited experimentally and theoretically. To support the experiment, the high level ab initio calculations were used to calculate and assign the photoelectron spectra of the four most stable conformers of gaseous alanine, carefully. The symmetry adapted cluster/configuration interaction (SAC-CI) method based on single and double excitation operators (SD-R) and its more accurate version, termed general-R, was used to separately calculate the energies and intensities of the ionization bands of the L- and D-alanine conformers. The intensities of ionization bands were calculated based on the monopole approximation. Also, natural bonding orbital (NBO) calculations were employed for better spectral band assignment. The relative electronic energy, Gibbs free energy, and Boltzmann population ratio of the conformers were calculated at the experimental temperature (403 K) using several theoretical methods. The theoretical photoelectron spectrum of alanine was calculated by summing over the spectra of individual D and L conformers weighted by different population ratios. Finally, the population ratio of the four most stable conformers of alanine was estimated from the experimental photoelectron spectrum using theoretical calculations for the first time.

  14. Growth and characterization of L-alanine cadmium bromide a semiorganic nonlinear optical crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilayabarathi, P.; Chandrasekaran, J.

    2012-10-01

    A new semiorganic nonlinear optical crystal, L-alanine cadmium bromide (LACB) was grown from aqueous solution by slow solvent evaporation method at room temperature. As grown crystals were characterized for its spectral, thermal, linear and second order nonlinear optical properties. LACB crystallizes in orthorhombic system and unit cell parameters a = 5.771(2) Å, b = 6.014(4) Å, c = 12.298(2) Å, α = β = γ = 90° and volume = 426.8(3) Å3. The mode of vibrations of different molecular groups present in the crystal was identified by FTIR study. The grown crystals were found to be transparent in the entire visible region. The thermal strength and the decomposition of the grown crystals were studied using TG/DTA and DSC analysis. Dielectric measurement revealed that the crystals had very low dielectric constant at higher frequency in room temperature. The mechanical behavior was studied by Vicker's microhardness tester. The grown crystal has negative photoconductivity nature. The fluorescence spectrum of the crystal was recorded and its optical band gap is about 3.356 eV. The NLO property of crystal using modified Kurtz-Perry powder technique with Nd:YAG laser light of wavelength 1064 nm indicated that their second harmonic generation (SHG) efficiency was half that of pure KDP.

  15. Quantification of neurotoxin BMAA (β-N-methylamino-L-alanine) in seafood from Swedish markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Liying; Kiselova, Nadezda; Rosén, Johan; Ilag, Leopold L.

    2014-11-01

    The neurotoxin β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) produced naturally by cyanobacteria, diatoms and dinoflagellates can be transferred and accumulated up the food chain, and may be a risk factor for neurodegenerative diseases. This study provides the first systematic screening of BMAA exposure of a large population through the consumption of seafood sold in metropolitan markets. BMAA was distinguished from known isomers by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry after acidic hydrolysis and derivatization. Using deuterium-labeled internal standard, BMAA was quantified as 0.01-0.90 μg/g wet weight of tissues in blue mussel, oyster, shrimp, plaice, char and herring, but was undetectable (<0.01 μg/g) in other samples (salmon, cod, perch and crayfish). Provided that the content of BMAA detected is relevant for intake calculations, the data presented may be used for a first estimation of BMAA exposure through seafood from Swedish markets, and to refine the design of future toxicological experiments and assessments.

  16. β-N-methylamino-L-alanine induces neurological deficits and shortened life span in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xianchong; Escala, Wilfredo; Papapetropoulos, Spyridon; Zhai, R Grace

    2010-11-01

    The neurotoxic non-protein amino acid, β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA), was first associated with the high incidence of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis/Parkinsonism Dementia Complex (ALS/PDC) in Guam. Recently, BMAA has been implicated as a fierce environmental factor that contributes to the etiology of Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, in addition to ALS. However, the toxicity of BMAA in vivo has not been clearly demonstrated. Here we report our investigation of the neurotoxicity of BMAA in Drosophila. We found that dietary intake of BMAA reduced life span, locomotor functions, and learning and memory abilities in flies. The severity of the alterations in phenotype is correlated with the concentration of BMAA detected in flies. Interestingly, developmental exposure to BMAA had limited impact on survival rate, but reduced fertility in females, and caused delayed neurological impairment in aged adults. Our studies indicate that BMAA exposure causes chronic neurotoxicity, and that Drosophila serves as a useful model in dissecting the pathogenesis of ALS/PDC.

  17. The Cyanobacteria Derived Toxin Beta-N-Methylamino-L-Alanine and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Banack, Sandra Anne; Caller, Tracie A.; Stommel, Elijah W.

    2010-01-01

    There is mounting evidence to suggest that environmental factors play a major role in the development of neurodegenerative diseases like ALS (Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis). The non-protein amino acid beta-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) was first associated with the high incidence of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis/Parkinsonism Dementia Complex (ALS/PDC) in Guam, and has been implicated as a potential environmental factor in ALS, Alzheimer’s disease, and other neurodegenerative diseases. BMAA has a number of toxic effects on motor neurons including direct agonist action on NMDA and AMPA receptors, induction of oxidative stress, and depletion of glutathione. As a non-protein amino acid, there is also the strong possibility that BMAA could cause intraneuronal protein misfolding, the hallmark of neurodegeneration. While an animal model for BMAA-induced ALS is lacking, there is substantial evidence to support a link between this toxin and ALS. The ramifications of discovering an environmental trigger for ALS are enormous. In this article, we discuss the history, ecology, pharmacology and clinical ramifications of this ubiquitous, cyanobacteria-derived toxin. PMID:22069578

  18. Cycas micronesica (Cycadales) plants devoid of endophytic cyanobacteria increase in beta-methylamino-L-alanine.

    PubMed

    Marler, Thomas E; Snyder, Laura R; Shaw, Christopher A

    2010-09-15

    Cycads are among the most ancient of extant Spermatophytes, and are known for their pharmacologically active compounds. beta-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA) is one metabolite that been implicated as causal of human neurodegenerative diseases in Guam. We grew Cycas micronesica seedlings without endophytic cyanobacteria symbiosis, and quantified initial and ending BMAA in various plant tissues. BMAA increased 79% during nine months of seedling growth, and root tissue contained 75% of the ultimate BMAA pool. Endophytic cyanobacteria symbionts were not the source of BMAA increase in these seedlings, which contradicts previously reported claims that biosynthesis of this toxin by cyanobacteria initiates its accumulation in the Guam environment. The preferential loading of root tissue with BMAA does not support earlier reports that this toxin serves a defensive role against herbivory of leaf or seed tissues. The long history of conflicting results in Guam's cycad toxin research continues, and recent developments underscore the sense of urgency in continued research as this endangered cycad population approaches extirpation from the island.

  19. Biotransfer of β-N-Methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA) in a Eutrophicated Freshwater Lake

    PubMed Central

    Lage, Sandra; Annadotter, Heléne; Rasmussen, Ulla; Rydberg, Sara

    2015-01-01

    β-N-Methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA), a neurotoxic non-protein amino acid, plays a significant role as an environmental risk factor in neurodegenerative diseases, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. BMAA producers occur globally, colonizing almost all habitats and represent species from distinct phytoplanktonic groups, i.e., cyanobacteria, diatoms, and dinoflagellates. Bioaccumulation of BMAA in invertebrate and vertebrate organisms has also been registered around the globe. In the Baltic Sea, BMAA has been detected in several commercial fish species, raising the question of the bioaccumulation of BMAA in Swedish limnic systems. Here we find the presence of BMAA in water samples from Lake Finjasjön and identify its bioaccumulation patterns in both plankti-benthivorous and piscivorous fish, according to fish species, total weight, gender, and season of collection. For the first time, a large number of fish individuals were used in order to draw conclusions on BMAA bioaccumulation in a closed ecological community based on a statistical approach. We may, therefore, conclude that feeding patterns (plankti-benthivorous) and increased age of fish may lead to a higher tissue concentration of BMAA. PMID:25738330

  20. Cycas micronesica (Cycadales) plants devoid of endophytic cyanobacteria increase in beta-methylamino-L-alanine.

    PubMed

    Marler, Thomas E; Snyder, Laura R; Shaw, Christopher A

    2010-09-15

    Cycads are among the most ancient of extant Spermatophytes, and are known for their pharmacologically active compounds. beta-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA) is one metabolite that been implicated as causal of human neurodegenerative diseases in Guam. We grew Cycas micronesica seedlings without endophytic cyanobacteria symbiosis, and quantified initial and ending BMAA in various plant tissues. BMAA increased 79% during nine months of seedling growth, and root tissue contained 75% of the ultimate BMAA pool. Endophytic cyanobacteria symbionts were not the source of BMAA increase in these seedlings, which contradicts previously reported claims that biosynthesis of this toxin by cyanobacteria initiates its accumulation in the Guam environment. The preferential loading of root tissue with BMAA does not support earlier reports that this toxin serves a defensive role against herbivory of leaf or seed tissues. The long history of conflicting results in Guam's cycad toxin research continues, and recent developments underscore the sense of urgency in continued research as this endangered cycad population approaches extirpation from the island. PMID:20570592

  1. The secondary structures of poly ( L-alanine) blocks in some diblock copolymers of poly( L-alanine)- b-poly(ethylene glycol) monomethyl ether in the solid state characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance and infrared spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Guo L.; Sun, Ping C.; Lin, Hai; Ma, Jian B.

    2004-02-01

    The 13C cross-polarization/magic-angle spinning (CP/MAS) spectra of the solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and the infrared spectra of three diblock copolymers, poly ( L-alanine)- block-poly(ethylene glycol) monomethyl ether (PLA- b-MPEG), with various proportions of two blocks were studied in comparison with those of the homopolymer poly( L-alanine), PLA, and the blends of two blocks (PLA and MPEG). The secondary structures such as α-helix and β-sheet of poly ( L-alanine) (PLA) blocks in the block copolymers could be elucidated from the signals in the solid-state 13C CP/MAS NMR spectra and transmittance peaks in the Fourier-transformation infrared (FTIR) spectra. Dramatic differences in the secondary structures were observed for the diblock copolymers, homopolymer PLA and blend samples. It was found that with the increase of the fraction of PLA block in the block copolymers, the ratio of β-sheet to α-helical conformation of PLA block went up although the α-helical conformation was much more than β-sheet conformation in total. It contradicted the general prediction of the secondary structure of homopolypeptides or PLA/PEG blends, in which the β-sheet conformation content decreased with the decrease of the polymerization degree of PLA. The investigation in FTIR spectrometry resulted in the same conclusion.

  2. Acute β-N-Methylamino-L-alanine Toxicity in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Al-Sammak, Maitham Ahmed; Rogers, Douglas G.; Hoagland, Kyle D.

    2015-01-01

    The cyanobacterial neurotoxin β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is considered to be an “excitotoxin,” and its suggested mechanism of action is killing neurons. Long-term exposure to L-BMAA is believed to lead to neurodegenerative diseases including Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (Lou Gehrig's disease). Objectives of this study were to determine the presumptive median lethal dose (LD50), the Lowest-Observed-Adverse-Effect Level (LOAEL), and histopathologic lesions caused by the naturally occurring BMAA isomer, L-BMAA, in mice. Seventy NIH Swiss Outbred mice (35 male and 35 female) were used. Treatment group mice were injected intraperitoneally with 0.03, 0.3, 1, 2, and 3 mg/g body weight L-BMAA, respectively, and control mice were sham-injected. The presumptive LD50 of L-BMAA was 3 mg/g BW and the LOAEL was 2 mg/g BW. There were no histopathologic lesions in brain, liver, heart, kidney, lung, or spleen in any of the mice during the 14-day study. L-BMAA was detected in brains and livers in all of treated mice but not in control mice. Males injected with 0.03 mg/g BW, 0.3 mg/g BW, and 3.0 mg/g BW L-BMAA showed consistently higher concentrations (P < 0.01) in brain and liver samples as compared to females in those respective groups. PMID:26604922

  3. Environmental neurotoxins β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA) and mercury in shark cartilage dietary supplements.

    PubMed

    Mondo, Kiyo; Broc Glover, W; Murch, Susan J; Liu, Guangliang; Cai, Yong; Davis, David A; Mash, Deborah C

    2014-08-01

    Shark cartilage products are marketed as dietary supplements with claimed health benefits for animal and human use. Shark fin and cartilage products sold as extracts, dry powders and in capsules are marketed based on traditional Chinese medicine claims that it nourishes the blood, enhances appetite, and energizes multiple internal organs. Shark cartilage contains a mixture of chondroitin and glucosamine, a popular nutritional supplement ingested to improve cartilage function. Sharks are long-lived apex predators, that bioaccumulate environmental marine toxins and methylmercury from dietary exposures. We recently reported detection of the cyanobacterial toxin β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA) in the fins of seven different species of sharks from South Florida coastal waters. Since BMAA has been linked to degenerative brain diseases, the consumption of shark products may pose a human risk for BMAA exposures. In this report, we tested sixteen commercial shark cartilage supplements for BMAA by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC-FD) with fluorescence detection and ultra performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS). Total mercury (Hg) levels were measured in the same shark cartilage products by cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectrometry (CVAFS). We report here that BMAA was detected in fifteen out of sixteen products with concentrations ranging from 86 to 265μg/g (dry weight). All of the shark fin products contained low concentrations of Hg. While Hg contamination is a known risk, the results of the present study demonstrate that shark cartilage products also may contain the neurotoxin BMAA. Although the neurotoxic potential of dietary exposure to BMAA is currently unknown, the results demonstrate that shark cartilage products may contain two environmental neurotoxins that have synergistic toxicities.

  4. Inelastic neutron scattering, Raman, vibrational analysis with anharmonic corrections, and scaled quantum mechanical force field for polycrystalline L-alanine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Robert W.; Schlücker, Sebastian; Hudson, Bruce S.

    2008-01-01

    A scaled quantum mechanical harmonic force field (SQMFF) corrected for anharmonicity is obtained for the 23 K L-alanine crystal structure using van der Waals corrected periodic boundary condition density functional theory (DFT) calculations with the PBE functional. Scale factors are obtained with comparisons to inelastic neutron scattering (INS), Raman, and FT-IR spectra of polycrystalline L-alanine at 15-23 K. Calculated frequencies for all 153 normal modes differ from observed frequencies with a standard deviation of 6 wavenumbers. Non-bonded external k = 0 lattice modes are included, but assignments to these modes are presently ambiguous. The extension of SQMFF methodology to lattice modes is new, as are the procedures used here for providing corrections for anharmonicity and van der Waals interactions in DFT calculations on crystals. First principles Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics (BOMD) calculations are performed on the L-alanine crystal structure at a series of classical temperatures ranging from 23 K to 600 K. Corrections for zero-point energy (ZPE) are estimated by finding the classical temperature that reproduces the mean square displacements (MSDs) measured from the diffraction data at 23 K. External k = 0 lattice motions are weakly coupled to bonded internal modes.

  5. Domain Motions and Functionally-Key Residues of l-Alanine Dehydrogenase Revealed by an Elastic Network Model

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xing-Yuan; Zhang, Jing-Chao; Zhu, Yan-Ying; Su, Ji-Guo

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis l-alanine dehydrogenase (l-MtAlaDH) plays an important role in catalyzing l-alanine to ammonia and pyruvate, which has been considered to be a potential target for tuberculosis treatment. In the present work, the functional domain motions encoded in the structure of l-MtAlaDH were investigated by using the Gaussian network model (GNM) and the anisotropy network model (ANM). The slowest modes for the open-apo and closed-holo structures of the enzyme show that the domain motions have a common hinge axis centered in residues Met133 and Met301. Accompanying the conformational transition, both the 1,4-dihydronicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)-binding domain (NBD) and the substrate-binding domain (SBD) move in a highly coupled way. The first three slowest modes of ANM exhibit the open-closed, rotation and twist motions of l-MtAlaDH, respectively. The calculation of the fast modes reveals the residues responsible for the stability of the protein, and some of them are involved in the interaction with the ligand. Then, the functionally-important residues relevant to the binding of the ligand were identified by using a thermodynamic method. Our computational results are consistent with the experimental data, which will help us to understand the physical mechanism for the function of l-MtAlaDH. PMID:26690143

  6. Short one-pot chemo-enzymatic synthesis of L-lysine and L-alanine diblock co-oligopeptides.

    PubMed

    Fagerland, Jenny; Finne-Wistrand, Anna; Numata, Keiji

    2014-03-10

    Amphiphilic diblock co-oligopeptides are interesting and functional macromolecular materials for biomedical applications because of their self-assembling properties. Here, we developed a synthesis method for diblock co-oligopeptides by using chemo-enzymatic polymerization, which was a relatively short (30 min) and efficient reaction (over 40% yield). Block and random oligo(L-lysine-co-L-alanine) [oligo(Lys-co-Ala)] were synthesized using activated papain as enzymatic catalyst. The reaction time was optimized according to kinetic studies of oligo(L-alanine) and oligo(L-lysine). Using (1)H NMR spectroscopy and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry, we confirmed that diblock and random co-oligopeptides were synthesized. Optical microscopy further revealed differences in the crystalline morphology between random and block co-oligopeptides. Plate-like, hexagonal, and hollow crystals were formed due to the strong impact of the monomer distribution and pH of the solution. The different crystalline structures open up interesting possibilities to form materials for both tissue engineering and controlled drug/gene delivery systems.

  7. Crystal Engineering of l-Alanine with l-Leucine Additive using Metal-Assisted and Microwave-Accelerated Evaporative Crystallization

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we demonstrated that the change in the morphology of l-alanine crystals can be controlled with the addition of l-leucine using the metal-assisted and microwave accelerated evaporative crystallization (MA-MAEC) technique. Crystallization experiments, where an increasing stoichiometric amount of l-leucine is added to initial l-alanine solutions, were carried out on circular poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) disks modified with a 21-well capacity silicon isolator and silver nanoparticle films using microwave heating (MA-MAEC) and at room temperature (control experiments). The use of the MA-MAEC technique afforded for the growth of l-alanine crystals with different morphologies up to ∼10-fold faster than those grown at room temperature. In addition, the length of l-alanine crystals was systematically increased from ∼380 to ∼2000 μm using the MA-MAEC technique. Optical microscope images revealed that the shape of l-alanine crystals was changed from tetragonal shape (without l-leucine additive) to more elongated and wire-like structures with the addition of the l-leucine additive. Further characterization of l-alanine crystals was undertaken by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) measurements. In order to elucidate the growth mechanism of l-alanine crystals, theoretical simulations of l-alanine’s morphology with and without l-leucine additive were carried out using Materials Studio software in conjunction with our experimental data. Theoretical simulations revealed that the growth of l-alanine’s {011} and {120} crystal faces were inhibited due to the incorporation of l-leucine into these crystal faces in selected positions. PMID:24839404

  8. Neurotoxic Non-proteinogenic Amino Acid β-N-Methylamino-L-alanine and Its Role in Biological Systems.

    PubMed

    Popova, A A; Koksharova, O A

    2016-08-01

    Secondary metabolites of photoautotrophic organisms have attracted considerable interest in recent years. In particular, molecules of non-proteinogenic amino acids participating in various physiological processes and capable of producing adverse ecological effects have been actively investigated. For example, the non-proteinogenic amino acid β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is neurotoxic to animals including humans. It is known that BMAA accumulation via the food chain can lead to development of neurodegenerative diseases in humans such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases as well as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Moreover, BMAA can be mistakenly incorporated into a protein molecule instead of serine. Natural sources of BMAA and methods for its detection are discussed in this review, as well as the role of BMAA in metabolism of its producers and possible mechanisms of toxicity of this amino acid in different living organisms. PMID:27677549

  9. Vibrational spectral characterization, NLO studies and charge transfer analysis of the organometallic material L-Alanine cadmium chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arun Sasi, B. S.; Bright, K. C.; James, C.

    2016-01-01

    An organometallic nonlinear crystal, L-Alanine Cadmium Chloride (LACC) was synthesized by slow evaporation technique. The effects of hydrogen bonding on the structure, binding of ligand to metal ion, natural orbital occupancies, and vibrational frequencies were investigated using density functional theory (DFT) with the combined B3LYP and LANL2DZ basis set. Vibrational assignments were made on the basis of calculated potential energy distribution values from MOLVIB program. The topological analysis of electron localization function (ELF) provides basin population N (integrated density over the attractor basin), standard deviation (σ), and their relative fluctuation, defined as λ = σ2/N, which are sensitive criteria of delocalization. The molecular stability, electronic exchange interaction, and bond strength of the molecule were studied by natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis. The second harmonic generation (SHG) efficiency was determined using Kurtz and Perry method. Natural bond orbital analysis was carried out to study various intramolecular interactions that are responsible for the stabilization of the molecule.

  10. Self-Assembly, Supramolecular Organization, and Phase Behavior of L-Alanine Alkyl Esters (n = 9-18) and Characterization of Equimolar L-Alanine Lauryl Ester/Lauryl Sulfate Catanionic Complex.

    PubMed

    Sivaramakrishna, D; Swamy, Musti J

    2015-09-01

    A homologous series of l-alanine alkyl ester hydrochlorides (AEs) bearing 9-18 C atoms in the alkyl chain have been synthesized and characterized with respect to self-assembly, supramolecular structure, and phase transitions. The CMCs of AEs bearing 11-18 C atoms were found to range between 0.1 and 10 mM. Differential scanning calorimetric (DSC) studies showed that the transition temperatures (Tt), enthalpies (ΔHt) and entropies (ΔSt) of AEs in the dry state exhibit odd-even alternation, with the odd-chain-length compounds having higher Tt values, but the even-chain-length homologues showing higher values of ΔHt and ΔSt. In DSC measurements on hydrated samples, carried out at pH 5.0 and pH 10.0 (where they exist in cationic and neutral forms, respectively), compounds with 13-18 C atoms in the alkyl chain showed sharp gel-to-liquid crystalline phase transitions, and odd-even alternation was not seen in the thermodynamic parameters. The molecular structure, packing properties, and intermolecular interactions of AEs with 9 and 10 C atoms in the alkyl chain were determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction, which showed that the alkyl chains are packed in a tilted interdigitated bilayer format. d-Spacings obtained from powder X-ray diffraction studies exhibited a linear dependence on the alkyl chain length, suggesting that the other AEs also adopt an interdigitated bilayer structure. Turbidimetric, fluorescence spectroscopic, and isothermal titration calorimetric (ITC) studies established that in aqueous dispersions l-alanine lauryl ester hydrochloride (ALE·HCl) and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) form an equimolar complex. Transmission electron microscopic and DSC studies indicate that the complex exists as unilamellar liposomes, which exhibit a sharp phase transition at ∼39 °C. The aggregates were disrupted at high pH, suggesting that the catanionic complex would be useful to develop a base-labile drug delivery system. ITC studies indicated that ALE·HCl forms

  11. Relative output factor and beam profile measurements of small radiation fields with an L-alanine/K-Band EPR minidosimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Abrego, Felipe; Calcina, Carmen Sandra Guzman; Almeida, Adelaide de; Almeida, Carlos Eduardo de; Baffa, Oswaldo

    2007-05-15

    The performance of an L-alanine dosimeter with millimeter dimensions was evaluated for dosimetry in small radiation fields. Relative output factor (ROF) measurements were made for 0.5x0.5, 1x1, 3x3, 5x5, 10x10 cm{sup 2} square fields and for 5-, 10-, 20-, 40-mm-diam circular fields. In beam profile (BP) measurements, only 1x1, 3x3, 5x5 cm{sup 2} square fields and 10-, 20-, 40-mm-diam circular fields were used. For square and circular field irradiations, Varian/Clinac 2100, and a Siemens/Mevatron 6 MV linear accelerators were used, respectively. For a batch of 800 L-alanine minidosimeters (miniALAs) the average mass was 4.3{+-}0.5 (1{sigma}) mg, the diameter was 1.22{+-}0.07 (1{sigma}) mm, and the length was 3.5{+-}0.2 (1{sigma}) mm. A K-Band (24 GHz) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometer was used for recording the spectrum of irradiated and nonirradiated miniALAs. To evaluate the performance of the miniALAs, their ROF and BP results were compared with those of other types of detectors, such as an ionization chamber (PTW 0.125 cc), a miniTLD (LiF: Mg,Cu,P), and Kodak/X-Omat V radiographic film. Compared to other dosimeters, the ROF results for miniALA show differences of up to 3% for the smallest fields and 7% for the largest ones. These differences were within the miniALA experimental uncertainty ({approx}5-6% at 1{sigma}). For BP measurements, the maximum penumbra width difference observed between miniALA and film (10%-90% width) was less than 1 mm for square fields and within 1-2 mm for circular fields. These penumbra width results indicate that the spatial resolution of the miniALA is comparable to that of radiographic film and its dimensions are adequate for the field sizes used in this experiment. The K-Band EPR spectrometer provided adequate sensitivity for assessment of miniALAs with doses of the order of tens of Grays, making this dosimetry system (K-Band/miniALA) a potential candidate for use in radiosurgery dosimetry.

  12. The cyanobacterial neurotoxin β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA) induces neuronal and behavioral changes in honeybees.

    PubMed

    Okle, Oliver; Rath, Lisa; Galizia, C Giovanni; Dietrich, Daniel R

    2013-07-01

    The cyanobacterially produced neurotoxin beta-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA) is thought to induce amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/Parkinsonism dementia complex (ALS/PDC)-like symptoms. However, its mechanism of action and its pathway of intoxication are yet unknown. In vivo animal models suitable for investigating the neurotoxic effect of BMAA with applicability to the human are scarce. Hence, we used the honeybee (Apis mellifera) since its nervous system is relatively simple, yet having cognitive capabilities. Bees fed with BMAA-spiked sugar water had an increased mortality rate and a reduced ability to learn odors in a classical conditioning paradigm. Using (14)C-BMAA we demonstrated that BMAA is biologically available to the bee, and is found in the head, thorax and abdomen with little to no excretion. BMAA is also transferred from one bee to the next via trophallaxis resulting in an exposure of the whole beehive. BMAA bath application directly onto the brain leads to an altered Ca(2+) homeostasis and to generation of reactive oxygen species. These behavioral and physiological observations suggest that BMAA may have effects on bee brains similar to those assumed to occur in humans. Therefore the bee could serve as a surrogate model system for investigating the neurological effects of BMAA.

  13. Growth, structural, spectral, mechanical, thermal and dielectric characterization of phosphoric acid admixtured L-alanine (PLA) single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, A. S. J. Lucia; Selvarajan, P.; Perumal, S.

    2011-10-01

    Phosphoric acid admixtured L-alanine (PLA) single crystals were grown successfully by solution method with slow evaporation technique at room temperature. Crystals of size 18 mm × 12 mm × 8 mm have been obtained in 28 days. The grown crystals were colorless and transparent. The solubility of the grown samples has been found out at various temperatures. The lattice parameters of the grown crystals were determined by X-ray diffraction technique. The reflection planes of the sample were confirmed by the powder X-ray diffraction study and diffraction peaks were indexed. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) studies were used to confirm the presence of various functional groups in the crystals. UV-visible transmittance spectrum was recorded to study the optical transparency of grown crystal. The nonlinear optical (NLO) property of the grown crystal was confirmed by Kurtz-Perry powder technique and a study of its second harmonic generation efficiency in comparison with potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) has been made. The mechanical strength of the crystal was estimated by Vickers hardness test. The grown crystals were subjected to thermo gravimetric and differential thermal analysis (TG/DTA). The dielectric behavior of the sample was also studied.

  14. Equilibrium Dynamics of β-N-Methylamino-L-Alanine (BMAA) and Its Carbamate Adducts at Physiological Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, David; Goto, Joy J.; Krishnan, Viswanathan V

    2016-01-01

    Elevated incidences of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis/Parkinsonism Dementia complex (ALS/PDC) is associated with β-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA), a non-protein amino acid. In particular, the native Chamorro people living in the island of Guam were exposed to BMAA by consuming a diet based on the cycad seeds. Carbamylated forms of BMAA are glutamate analogues. The mechanism of neurotoxicity of the BMAA is not completely understood, and BMAA acting as a glutamate receptor agonist may lead to excitotoxicity that interferes with glutamate transport systems. Though the interaction of BMAA with bicarbonate is known to produce carbamate adducts, here we demonstrate that BMAA and its primary and secondary adducts coexist in solution and undergoes a chemical exchange among them. Furthermore, we determined the rates of formation/cleavage of the carbamate adducts under equilibrium conditions using two-dimensional proton exchange NMR spectroscopy (EXSY). The coexistence of the multiple forms of BMAA at physiological conditions adds to the complexity of the mechanisms by which BMAA functions as a neurotoxin. PMID:27513925

  15. β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) uptake by the animal model, Daphnia magna and subsequent oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Esterhuizen-Londt, Maranda; Wiegand, Claudia; Downing, Tim G

    2015-06-15

    β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA), produced by cyanobacteria, is a neurotoxin implicated in Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/Parkinsonism dementia complex (ALS/PDC). BMAA concentrations in cyanobacteria are lower than those thought to be necessary to result in neurological damage thus bioaccumulation or biomagnification is required to achieve concentrations able to cause neurodegeneration. Many cyanobacteria produce BMAA and uptake routes into the food web require examination. In this study we investigate the uptake of BMAA by adult phytoplanktivorus Daphnia magna via exposure to dissolved pure BMAA and BMAA containing cyanobacteria, as well as the subsequent oxidative stress response in the daphnia. Free BMAA and protein-associated BMAA were quantified by LC-MS/MS. Dissolved BMAA was taken up and was found as free BMAA in D. magna. No protein-associated BMAA was detected in D. magna after a 24-h exposure period. No BMAA was detectable in D. magna after exposure to BMAA containing cyanobacteria. BMAA inhibited the oxidative stress defence and biotransformation enzymes within 24-h exposure in the tested Daphnia and could therefore impair the oxidant status and the capability of detoxifying other substances in D. magna.

  16. Equilibrium Dynamics of β-N-Methylamino-L-Alanine (BMAA) and Its Carbamate Adducts at Physiological Conditions.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, David; Goto, Joy J; Krishnan, Viswanathan V

    2016-01-01

    Elevated incidences of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis/Parkinsonism Dementia complex (ALS/PDC) is associated with β-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA), a non-protein amino acid. In particular, the native Chamorro people living in the island of Guam were exposed to BMAA by consuming a diet based on the cycad seeds. Carbamylated forms of BMAA are glutamate analogues. The mechanism of neurotoxicity of the BMAA is not completely understood, and BMAA acting as a glutamate receptor agonist may lead to excitotoxicity that interferes with glutamate transport systems. Though the interaction of BMAA with bicarbonate is known to produce carbamate adducts, here we demonstrate that BMAA and its primary and secondary adducts coexist in solution and undergoes a chemical exchange among them. Furthermore, we determined the rates of formation/cleavage of the carbamate adducts under equilibrium conditions using two-dimensional proton exchange NMR spectroscopy (EXSY). The coexistence of the multiple forms of BMAA at physiological conditions adds to the complexity of the mechanisms by which BMAA functions as a neurotoxin. PMID:27513925

  17. The effect of β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) on oxidative stress response enzymes of the macrophyte Ceratophyllum demersum.

    PubMed

    Esterhuizen-Londt, M; Pflugmacher, S; Downing, T G

    2011-04-01

    Cyanobacteria are known to produce bioactive secondary metabolites such as hepatotoxins, cytotoxins and neurotoxins. The newly recognized neurotoxin β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is a naturally occurring non-protein amino acid found in the majority of cyanobacterial genera tested. Evidence that exists for implication of BMAA in neurodegenerative disorders relies on bioaccumulation and biomagnification from symbiotic cyanobacteria. Uptake and accumulation of free BMAA by various non-symbiotic organisms, including aquatic macrophytes, has been documented but to date limited evidence of ecotoxicology exists. We therefore investigated the effect of BMAA on the oxidative stress responses of the macrophyte, Ceratophyllum demersum. Markers for oxidative stress in this study are the antioxidative enzymes superoxide dismutase, catalase, guaiacol peroxidase, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase. We found that BMAA had an inhibitory effect on all the oxidative stress response enzymes tested in plants exposed to BMAA. However enzymes not related to oxidative stress response were not affected by BMAA in in vitro experiments. Binding studies in the presence of BMAA showed reduced enzyme specific activity over time compared to the control. This study shows that BMAA causes oxidative stress indirectly as it inhibits antioxidant enzymes required to combat reactive oxygen species that cause damage to cells. Further investigations are required to fully understand the inhibitory effect of BMAA on these enzymes. PMID:21334358

  18. Quantitative proteomics analysis of zebrafish exposed to sub-lethal dosages of β-methyl-amino-L-alanine (BMAA).

    PubMed

    Frøyset, Ann Kristin; Khan, Essa Ahsan; Fladmark, Kari Espolin

    2016-01-01

    The non-protein amino acid β-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is a neurotoxin present in microalgae and shown to accumulate in the food web. BMAA has been linked to the complex neurodegenerative disorder of Guam and to increased incidents sporadic ALS. Two main neurotoxic routes are suggested; an excitotoxic by acting as an agonist towards glutamate receptors and a metabolic by misincorporating into cellular proteins. We have used zebrafish, an increasingly used model for neurodegenerative diseases, to further identify signaling components involved in BMAA-induced toxicity. Zebrafish embryos were exposed to sub-lethal dosages of BMAA and a label-free proteomics analysis was conducted on larvae 4 days post fertilization. The exposed larvae showed no developmental abnormalities, but a reduced heart rate and increased expression of GSK3 isoforms. Search towards a reviewed database containing 2968 entries identified 480 proteins. Only 17 of these were regulated 2-fold or more in the exposed larvae. Seven of these proteins could be associated to glutamate receptor signaling and recycling. The remaining nine have all been linked to disturbance in protein homeostasis, reactive oxygen species (ROS) development or neuronal cell death. We also found that BMAA influenced the endocannabinoid system by up-regulation of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) and that FAAH inhibitor URB597 reduced the BMAA effect on heart rate and GSK3 expression. PMID:27404450

  19. Quantitative proteomics analysis of zebrafish exposed to sub-lethal dosages of β-methyl-amino-L-alanine (BMAA)

    PubMed Central

    Frøyset, Ann Kristin; Khan, Essa Ahsan; Fladmark, Kari Espolin

    2016-01-01

    The non-protein amino acid β-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is a neurotoxin present in microalgae and shown to accumulate in the food web. BMAA has been linked to the complex neurodegenerative disorder of Guam and to increased incidents sporadic ALS. Two main neurotoxic routes are suggested; an excitotoxic by acting as an agonist towards glutamate receptors and a metabolic by misincorporating into cellular proteins. We have used zebrafish, an increasingly used model for neurodegenerative diseases, to further identify signaling components involved in BMAA-induced toxicity. Zebrafish embryos were exposed to sub-lethal dosages of BMAA and a label-free proteomics analysis was conducted on larvae 4 days post fertilization. The exposed larvae showed no developmental abnormalities, but a reduced heart rate and increased expression of GSK3 isoforms. Search towards a reviewed database containing 2968 entries identified 480 proteins. Only 17 of these were regulated 2-fold or more in the exposed larvae. Seven of these proteins could be associated to glutamate receptor signaling and recycling. The remaining nine have all been linked to disturbance in protein homeostasis, reactive oxygen species (ROS) development or neuronal cell death. We also found that BMAA influenced the endocannabinoid system by up-regulation of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) and that FAAH inhibitor URB597 reduced the BMAA effect on heart rate and GSK3 expression. PMID:27404450

  20. The cyanobacterial neurotoxin beta-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) induces neuronal and behavioral changes in honeybees

    SciTech Connect

    Okle, Oliver; Rath, Lisa; Galizia, C. Giovanni; Dietrich, Daniel R.

    2013-07-01

    The cyanobacterially produced neurotoxin beta-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is thought to induce amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/Parkinsonism dementia complex (ALS/PDC)-like symptoms. However, its mechanism of action and its pathway of intoxication are yet unknown. In vivo animal models suitable for investigating the neurotoxic effect of BMAA with applicability to the human are scarce. Hence, we used the honeybee (Apis mellifera) since its nervous system is relatively simple, yet having cognitive capabilities. Bees fed with BMAA-spiked sugar water had an increased mortality rate and a reduced ability to learn odors in a classical conditioning paradigm. Using {sup 14}C-BMAA we demonstrated that BMAA is biologically available to the bee, and is found in the head, thorax and abdomen with little to no excretion. BMAA is also transferred from one bee to the next via trophallaxis resulting in an exposure of the whole beehive. BMAA bath application directly onto the brain leads to an altered Ca{sup 2+} homeostasis and to generation of reactive oxygen species. These behavioral and physiological observations suggest that BMAA may have effects on bee brains similar to those assumed to occur in humans. Therefore the bee could serve as a surrogate model system for investigating the neurological effects of BMAA. - Highlights: • Investigating of neurotoxic effects of BMAA in honeybees • BMAA impairs ALS markers (ROS, Ca{sup 2+}, learning, memory, odor) in bees. • A method for the observation of ROS development in living bees brain was established. • Honeybees are a suitable model to explore neurodegenerative processes. • Neurotoxic BMAA can be spread in bee populations by trophallaxis.

  1. The effect of exogenous β-N-methylamino-L: -alanine on the growth of Synechocystis PCC6803.

    PubMed

    Downing, Simoné; van de Venter, Maryna; Downing, Timothy G

    2012-01-01

    β-N-Methylamino-L: -alanine (BMAA), a non-proteinogenic amino acid, has been detected in a range of cyanobacteria, including terrestrial, aquatic, free living and endosymbiotic species. The widespread occurrence of cyanobacteria in the environment raises concerns regarding the ecological and toxicological impact of BMAA, and consequently, studies have focussed extensively on the toxicity and environmental impact of BMAA, while no research has addressed the ecophysiological or metabolic role of the compound in cyanobacteria. In this study, both the uptake of exogenous BMAA by and the effect of exogenous BMAA on the growth of Synechocystis PCC6803 were investigated. BMAA was rapidly taken up by the non-diazotrophic cyanobacterium Synechocystis PCC6803 in a concentration dependent manner. The presence of exogenous BMAA resulted in a substantial and concentration-dependent decrease in cell growth and the substantial loss of photosynthetic pigmentation. Similar effects were seen in the presence of the non-proteinogenic amino acid, 2,4-diaminobutyric acid but to a lesser degree than that of BMAA. The effects were reversed when light was decreased from 16 to 10 μmol m(-2) s(-1). Control cultures grown in the presence of L: -arginine, L: -asparagine, L: -glutamate and glycine showed normal or slightly increased growth with no change in pigmentation. The decrease in growth rate coupled to bleaching indicates that BMAA may induce chlorosis in the presence of adequate photosynthetic radiation suggesting a connection between BMAA and the induction of conditions, such as nitrogen or sulphur depletion, that result in growth arrest and the induction of chlorosis. PMID:21994035

  2. Long-term cognitive impairments in adult rats treated neonatally with beta-N-Methylamino-L-Alanine.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Oskar; Roman, Erika; Brittebo, Eva B

    2009-11-01

    Most cyanobacteria (blue-green algae) can produce the neurotoxin beta-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA). Dietary exposure to BMAA has been suggested to be involved in the etiology of the neurodegenerative disease amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/Parkinsonism-dementia complex (ALS/PDC). Little is known about BMAA-induced neurotoxicity following neonatal administration. Our previous studies have revealed an uptake of BMAA in the hippocampus and striatum of neonatal mice. Furthermore, rats treated with BMAA during the neonatal period displayed acute but transient motoric disturbances and failed to show habituation at juvenile age suggesting impairments in learning functions. In the present study, the aim was to investigate long-term behavioral effects of BMAA administration in neonatal rats. BMAA was administered on postnatal days 9-10 (200 or 600 mg/kg; subcutaneous injection). Spatial learning and memory was investigated in adulthood using the radial arm maze test. The results revealed impaired learning but not memory in BMAA-treated animals. The observed impairments were not due to alterations in motoric capacity, general activity, or behavioral profiles, as assessed in the multivariate concentric square field (MCSF) and open field tests. An aversive stimulus in the MCSF test revealed impairments in avoidance learning and/or memory. There was no difference in basal serum corticosterone levels in BMAA-treated animals, indicating that the observed long-term effects were not secondary to an altered basal hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis function. The present data demonstrated long-term learning impairments following neonatal BMAA administration. Further studies on biochemical effects in various brain regions and subsequent behavioral alterations are needed to elucidate the mechanisms of BMAA-induced developmental neurotoxicity.

  3. Maternal Transfer of the Cyanobacterial Neurotoxin β-N-Methylamino-L-Alanine (BMAA) via Milk to Suckling Offspring

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, Marie; Karlsson, Oskar; Bergström, Ulrika; Brittebo, Eva B.; Brandt, Ingvar

    2013-01-01

    The cyanobacterial neurotoxin β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) has been implicated in the etiology of neurodegenerative disease and proposed to be biomagnified in terrestrial and aquatic food chains. We have previously shown that the neonatal period in rats, which in humans corresponds to the last trimester of pregnancy and the first few years of age, is a particularly sensitive period for exposure to BMAA. The present study aimed to examine the secretion of 14C-labeled L- and D-BMAA into milk in lactating mice and the subsequent transfer of BMAA into the developing brain. The results suggest that secretion into milk is an important elimination pathway of BMAA in lactating mothers and an efficient exposure route predominantly for L-BMAA but also for D-BMAA in suckling mice. Following secretion of [14C]L-BMAA into milk, the levels of [14C]L-BMAA in the brains of the suckling neonatal mice significantly exceeded the levels in the maternal brains. In vitro studies using the mouse mammary epithelial HC11 cell line confirmed a more efficient influx and efflux of L-BMAA than of D-BMAA in cells, suggesting enantiomer-selective transport. Competition experiments with other amino acids and a low sodium dependency of the influx suggests that the amino acid transporters LAT1 and LAT2 are involved in the transport of L-BMAA into milk. Given the persistent neurodevelopmental toxicity following injection of L-BMAA to neonatal rodent pups, the current results highlight the need to determine whether BMAA is enriched mother's and cow's milk. PMID:24194910

  4. Synthesis of a molecularly imprinted sorbent for selective solid-phase extraction of β-N-methylamino-L-alanine.

    PubMed

    Svoboda, Pavel; Combes, Audrey; Petit, Julia; Nováková, Lucie; Pichon, Valérie

    2015-11-01

    The aim of the work was to synthesize a molecularly imprinted material for the selective solid-phase extraction (SPE) of β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (L-2-amino-3-methylpropionic acid; BMAA) from cyanobacterial extracts. BMAA and its structural analogs that can be used as template are small, polar and hydrophilic molecules. These molecules are poorly soluble in organic solvents that are commonly used for the synthesis of acrylic-based polymers. Therefore, a sol gel approach was chosen to carry out the synthesis and the resulting sorbents were evaluated with different extraction procedures in order to determine their ability to selectively retain BMAA. The presence of imprinted cavities in the sorbent was demonstrated by comparing elution profiles obtained by using molecularly imprinted silica (MIS) and non-imprinted silica (NIS) as a control. The molecularly imprinted solid-phase extraction (MISPE) procedure was first developed in a pure medium (acetonitrile) and further optimized for the treatment of cyanobacterial samples. It was characterized by high elution recoveries (89% and 77% respectively in pure and in real media).The repeatability of the extraction procedure in pure medium, in real medium and the reproducibility of MIS synthesis all expressed as RSD values of extraction recovery of BMAA were equal to 3%, 12% and 5%, respectively. A MIS capacity of 0.34 µmol/g was measured. The matrix effects, which affected the quantification of BMAA when employing a mixed mode sorbent, were completely removed by adding a clean-up step of the mixed-mode sorbent extract on the MIS.

  5. Evaluation of a thiodipeptide, L-phenylalanyl-Ψ[CS-N]-L-alanine, as a novel probe for peptide transporter 1.

    PubMed

    Arakawa, Hiroshi; Saito, Sachi; Kanagawa, Masahiko; Kamioka, Hiroki; Yano, Kentaro; Morimoto, Kaori; Ogihara, Takuo

    2014-01-01

    L-Phenylalanyl-Ψ[CS-N]-l-alanine (Phe-Ψ-Ala), a thiourea dipeptide, was evaluated as a probe for peptide transporter 1 (PEPT1). Uptake of Phe-Ψ-Ala in PEPT1-overexpressing HeLa cells was significantly higher than that in vector-transfected HeLa cells and the Km value was 275 ± 32 µM. The uptake was pH-dependent, being highest at pH 6.0, and was significantly decreased in the presence of PEPT1 inhibitors [glycylsarcosine (Gly-Sar), cephalexin, valaciclovir, glycylglycine, and glycylproline]. In metabolism assay using rat intestinal mucosa, rat hepatic microsomes, and human hepatocytes, the amount of Phe-Ψ-Ala was unchanged, whereas phenylalanylalanine was extensively decomposed. The clearance, distribution volume, and half-life of intravenously administered Phe-Ψ-Ala in rats were 0.151 ± 0.008 L/h/kg, 0.235 ± 0.012 L/kg, and 1.14 ± 0.07 h, respectively. The maximum plasma concentration of orally administered Phe-Ψ-Ala (2.31 ± 0.60 µg/mL) in the presence of Gly-Sar was significantly decreased compared with that in the absence of glycylsarcosine (3.74 ± 0.44 µg/mL), suggesting that the intestinal absorption of Phe-Ψ-Ala is mediated by intestinal PEPT1. In conclusion, our results indicate that Phe-Ψ-Ala is a high-affinity, metabolically stable, non-radioactive probe for PEPT1, and it should prove useful in studies of PEPT1, e.g., for predicting drug-drug interactions mediated by PEPT1 in vitro and in vivo.

  6. Dipeptide Nanotubes Containing Unnatural Fluorine-Substituted β(2,3)-Diarylamino Acid and L-Alanine as Candidates for Biomedical Applications.

    PubMed

    Bonetti, Andrea; Pellegrino, Sara; Das, Priyadip; Yuran, Sivan; Bucci, Raffaella; Ferri, Nicola; Meneghetti, Fiorella; Castellano, Carlo; Reches, Meital; Gelmi, Maria Luisa

    2015-09-18

    The synthesis and the structural characterization of dipeptides composed of unnatural fluorine-substituted β(2,3)-diarylamino acid and L-alanine are reported. Depending on the stereochemistry of the β amino acid, these dipeptides are able to self-assemble into proteolytic stable nanotubes. These architectures were able to enter the cell and locate in the cytoplasmic/perinuclear region and represent interesting candidates for biomedical applications.

  7. Amino acids (L-arginine and L-alanine) passivated CdS nanoparticles: Synthesis of spherical hierarchical structure and nonlinear optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talwatkar, S. S.; Tamgadge, Y. S.; Sunatkari, A. L.; Gambhire, A. B.; Muley, G. G.

    2014-12-01

    CdS nanoparticles (NPs) passivated with amino acids (L-alanine and L-arginine) having spherical hierarchical morphology were synthesized by room temperature wet chemical method. Synthesized NPs were characterized by ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy to study the variation of band gaps with concentration of surface modifying agents. Increase in band gap has been observed with the increase in concentration of surface modifying agents and was found more prominent for CdS NPs passivated with L-alanine. Powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis were carried out for the study of crystal structure and morphology of CdS NPs. The average particle size of CdS NPs calculated from Debye-Scherer formula was found to less than 5 nm and agrees well with those determined from UV-vis spectra and TEM data. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy was performed to know the functional groups of the grown NPs. Peaks in FT-IR spectra indicate the formation of CdS NPs and capping with L-alanine and L-arginine. Photoluminescence spectra of these NPs were also studied. Finally, colloidal solution of CdS-PVAc was subjected to Z-scan experiment under low power cw laser illumination to characterize them for third order nonlinear optical properties. CdS-PVAc colloidal solution shows enhanced nonlinear absorption due to RSA and weak FCA on account of two photon absorption processes triggered by thermal effect.

  8. Cycling time trial performance may be impaired by whey protein and L-alanine intake during prolonged exercise.

    PubMed

    Schroer, Adam B; Saunders, Michael J; Baur, Daniel A; Womack, Christopher J; Luden, Nicholas D

    2014-10-01

    Previous studies reported that adding protein (PRO) to carbohydrate (CHO) solutions enhances endurance performance. The ergogenic effect may be a function of additional protein/amino acid calories, but this has not been examined. In addition, although supplemental L-alanine (ALA) is readily oxidized during exercise, the subsequent impact on metabolism and prolonged endurance performance is unknown. The purpose of this investigation was to independently gauge the impact of whey PRO hydrolysate and ALA supplementation on performance and various physiological parameters. Eight cyclists (age: 22.3 ± 5.6 yr, weight: 70.0 ± 8.0 kg, VO2max: 59.4 ± 4.9 ml · kg(-1) · min(-1)) performed 120 min of constant-load cycling (55% of peak power) followed by a 30-km time trial (TT) under placebo (PLA), PRO, and ALA conditions. Magnitude-based qualitative inferences were applied to evaluate treatment differences and data are presented as percent difference between treatments ± 90% confidence limit. Both ALA (2.1 ± 2.7%) and PRO intake (-2.1 ± 2.2%) possibly harmed performance compared with PLA. Of interest, heart rate was possibly lower with ALA than PLA at 20- (-2.7 ± 3.4%) and 120-min (-1.7 ± 2.9%) of constant-load cycling and the serum interleukin-6 (IL-6) response to 120 min of cycling was likely attenuated with PRO compared with PLA (PLA, 6.6 ± 3.7 fold vs. PRO, 2.9 ± 1.8 fold). In addition, blood glucose levels were lower with PRO than PLA at 20- (-8.8 ± 2.3%; very likely) and 120-min (-4.9 ± 4.6%; likely) of constant-load cycling. Although ALA intake appears to lower HR and PRO ingestion dampens the IL-6 response to exercise, the ingestion of PRO (without CHO) or ALA does not enhance, and may actually impair, performance following prolonged cycling.

  9. Determination of the anti-inflammatory and cytoprotective effects of l-glutamine and l-alanine, or dipeptide, supplementation in rats submitted to resistance exercise.

    PubMed

    Raizel, Raquel; Leite, Jaqueline Santos Moreira; Hypólito, Thaís Menezes; Coqueiro, Audrey Yule; Newsholme, Philip; Cruzat, Vinicius Fernandes; Tirapegui, Julio

    2016-08-01

    We evaluated the effects of chronic oral supplementation with l-glutamine and l-alanine in their free form or as the dipeptide l-alanyl-l-glutamine (DIP) on muscle damage, inflammation and cytoprotection, in rats submitted to progressive resistance exercise (RE). Wistar rats (n 8/group) were submitted to 8-week RE, which consisted of climbing a ladder with progressive loads. In the final 21 d before euthanasia, supplements were delivered in a 4 % solution in drinking water. Glutamine, creatine kinase (CK), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), TNF-α, specific IL (IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-10) and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) levels were evaluated in plasma. The concentrations of glutamine, TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-10, as well as NF-κB activation, were determined in extensor digitorum longus (EDL) skeletal muscle. HSP70 level was assayed in EDL and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). RE reduced glutamine concentration in plasma and EDL (P<0·05 v. sedentary group). However, l-glutamine supplements (l-alanine plus l-glutamine (GLN+ALA) and DIP groups) restored glutamine levels in plasma (by 40 and 58 %, respectively) and muscle (by 93 and 105 %, respectively). GLN+ALA and DIP groups also exhibited increased level of HSP70 in EDL and PBMC, consistent with the reduction of NF-κB p65 activation and cytokines in EDL. Muscle protection was also indicated by attenuation in plasma levels of CK, LDH, TNF-α and IL-1β, as well as an increase in IL-6, IL-10 and MCP-1. Our study demonstrates that chronic oral l-glutamine treatment (given with l-alanine or as dipeptide) following progressive RE induces cyprotective effects mediated by HSP70-associated responses to muscle damage and inflammation. PMID:27215379

  10. Identification and Partial Characterization of a Novel UDP-N-Acetylenolpyruvoylglucosamine Reductase/UDP-N-Acetylmuramate:l-Alanine Ligase Fusion Enzyme from Verrucomicrobium spinosum DSM 4136T

    PubMed Central

    Naqvi, Kubra F.; Patin, Delphine; Wheatley, Matthew S.; Savka, Michael A.; Dobson, Renwick C. J.; Gan, Han Ming; Barreteau, Hélène; Blanot, Didier; Mengin-Lecreulx, Dominique; Hudson, André O.

    2016-01-01

    The enzymes involved in synthesizing the bacterial cell wall are attractive targets for the design of antibacterial compounds, since this pathway is essential for bacteria and is absent in animals, particularly humans. A survey of the genome of a bacterium that belongs to the phylum Verrucomicrobia, the closest free-living relative to bacteria from the Chlamydiales phylum, shows genetic evidence that Verrucomicrobium spinosum possesses a novel fusion open reading frame (ORF) annotated by the locus tag (VspiD_010100018130). The ORF, which is predicted to encode the enzymes UDP-N-acetylenolpyruvoylglucosamine reductase (MurB) and UDP-N-acetylmuramate:l-alanine ligase (MurC) that are involved in the cytoplasmic steps of peptidoglycan biosynthesis, was cloned. In vivo analyses using functional complementation showed that the fusion gene was able to complement Escherichia coli murB and murC temperature sensitive mutants. The purified recombinant fusion enzyme (MurB/CVs) was shown to be endowed with UDP-N-acetylmuramate:l-alanine ligase activity. In vitro analyses demonstrated that the latter enzyme had a pH optimum of 9.0, a magnesium optimum of 10 mM and a temperature optimum of 44–46°C. Its apparent Km values for ATP, UDP-MurNAc, and l-alanine were 470, 90, and 25 μM, respectively. However, all attempts to demonstrate an in vitro UDP-N-acetylenolpyruvoylglucosamine reductase (MurB) activity were unsuccessful. Lastly, Hidden Markov Model-based similarity search and phylogenetic analysis revealed that this fusion enzyme could only be identified in specific lineages within the Verrucomicrobia phylum. PMID:27047475

  11. Determination of the anti-inflammatory and cytoprotective effects of l-glutamine and l-alanine, or dipeptide, supplementation in rats submitted to resistance exercise.

    PubMed

    Raizel, Raquel; Leite, Jaqueline Santos Moreira; Hypólito, Thaís Menezes; Coqueiro, Audrey Yule; Newsholme, Philip; Cruzat, Vinicius Fernandes; Tirapegui, Julio

    2016-08-01

    We evaluated the effects of chronic oral supplementation with l-glutamine and l-alanine in their free form or as the dipeptide l-alanyl-l-glutamine (DIP) on muscle damage, inflammation and cytoprotection, in rats submitted to progressive resistance exercise (RE). Wistar rats (n 8/group) were submitted to 8-week RE, which consisted of climbing a ladder with progressive loads. In the final 21 d before euthanasia, supplements were delivered in a 4 % solution in drinking water. Glutamine, creatine kinase (CK), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), TNF-α, specific IL (IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-10) and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) levels were evaluated in plasma. The concentrations of glutamine, TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-10, as well as NF-κB activation, were determined in extensor digitorum longus (EDL) skeletal muscle. HSP70 level was assayed in EDL and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). RE reduced glutamine concentration in plasma and EDL (P<0·05 v. sedentary group). However, l-glutamine supplements (l-alanine plus l-glutamine (GLN+ALA) and DIP groups) restored glutamine levels in plasma (by 40 and 58 %, respectively) and muscle (by 93 and 105 %, respectively). GLN+ALA and DIP groups also exhibited increased level of HSP70 in EDL and PBMC, consistent with the reduction of NF-κB p65 activation and cytokines in EDL. Muscle protection was also indicated by attenuation in plasma levels of CK, LDH, TNF-α and IL-1β, as well as an increase in IL-6, IL-10 and MCP-1. Our study demonstrates that chronic oral l-glutamine treatment (given with l-alanine or as dipeptide) following progressive RE induces cyprotective effects mediated by HSP70-associated responses to muscle damage and inflammation.

  12. Compound-specific nitrogen isotope analysis of D-alanine, L-alanine, and valine: application of diastereomer separation to delta15N and microbial peptidoglycan studies.

    PubMed

    Takano, Yoshinori; Chikaraishi, Yoshito; Ogawa, Nanako O; Kitazato, Hiroshi; Ohkouchi, Naohiko

    2009-01-01

    We have developed an analytical method to determine the compound-specific nitrogen isotope compositions of individual amino acid enantiomers using gas chromatography/combustion/isotope ratio mass spectrometry. A novel derivatization of amino acid diastereomers by optically active (R)-(-)-2-butanol or (S)-(+)-2-butanol offers two advantages for nitrogen isotope analysis. First, chromatographic chiral separation can be achieved without the use of chiral stationary-phase columns. Second, the elution order of these compounds on the chromatogram can be switched by a designated esterification reaction. We applied the method to the compound-specific nitrogen isotope analysis of D- and L-alanine in a peptidoglycan derived from the cell walls of cultured bacteria (Firmicutes and Actinobacteria; Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus staphylolyticus, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Bacillus subtilis, Micrococcus luteus, and Streptomyces sp.), natural whole bacterial cells (Bacillus subtilis var. natto), (pseudo)-peptidoglycan from archaea (Methanobacterium sp.), and cell wall from eukaryota (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). We observed statistically significant differences in nitrogen isotopic compositions; e.g., delta15N ( per thousand vs air) in Staphylococcus staphylolyticus for d-alanine (19.2 +/- 0.5 per thousand, n = 4) and L-alanine (21.3 +/- 0.8 per thousand, n = 4) and in Bacillus subtilis for D-alanine (6.2 +/- 0.2 per thousand, n = 3) and L-alanine (8.2 +/- 0.4 per thousand, n = 3). These results suggest that enzymatic reaction pathways, including the alanine racemase reaction, produce a nitrogen isotopic difference in amino acid enantiomers, resulting in 15N-depleted D-alanine. This method is expected to facilitate compound-specific nitrogen isotope studies of amino acid stereoisomers.

  13. Mycobacterium smegmatis L-alanine dehydrogenase (Ald) is required for proficient utilization of alanine as a sole nitrogen source and sustained anaerobic growth.

    PubMed

    Feng, Zhengyu; Cáceres, Nancy E; Sarath, Gautam; Barletta, Raúl G

    2002-09-01

    NAD(H)-dependent L-alanine dehydrogenase (EC 1.4.1.1) (Ald) catalyzes the oxidative deamination of L-alanine and the reductive amination of pyruvate. To assess the physiological role of Ald in Mycobacterium smegmatis, we cloned the ald gene, identified its promoter, determined the protein expression levels, and analyzed the combined effects of nutrient supplementation, oxygen availability, and growth stage on enzyme activity. High Ald activities were observed in cells grown in the presence of L- or D-alanine regardless of the oxygen availability and growth stage. In exponentially growing cells under aerobic conditions, supplementation with alanine resulted in a 25- to 50-fold increase in the enzyme activity. In the absence of alanine supplementation, 23-fold-higher Ald activities were observed in cells grown exponentially under anaerobic conditions. Furthermore, M. smegmatis ald null mutants were constructed by targeted disruption and were shown to lack any detectable Ald activity. In contrast, the glycine dehydrogenase (EC 1.4.1.10) (Gdh) activity in mutant cells remained at wild-type levels, indicating that another enzyme protein is responsible for the physiologically relevant reductive amination of glyoxylate. The ald mutants grew poorly in minimal medium with L-alanine as the sole nitrogen source, reaching a saturation density 100-fold less than that of the wild-type strain. Likewise, mutants grew to a saturation density 10-fold less than that of the wild-type strain under anaerobic conditions. In summary, the phenotypes displayed by the M. smegmatis ald mutants suggest that Ald plays an important role in both alanine utilization and anaerobic growth.

  14. FT-IR and Raman spectroscopic and DFT studies of anti-cancer active molecule N-{(meta-ferrocenyl) Benzoyl} - L-Alanine - Glycine ethyl ester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xavier, T. S.; Kenny, Peter T. M.; Manimaran, D.; Joe, I. Hubert

    2015-06-01

    FT-Raman and FT-IR spectra of N-{(meta-ferrocenyl) Benzoyl} - L-alanine - glycine ethyl ester were recorded in solid phase. The optimized molecular geometry, the vibrational wavenumbers, the infrared intensities and the Raman scattering intensities were calculated by using density functional method(B3LYP) with 6-31G(d, p) basis set. Vibrational assignment of the molecule was done by using potential energy distribution analysis. Natural bond orbital analysis, Mulliken charge analysis and HOMO-LUMO energy were used to elucidate the reasons for intra molecular charge transfer. Docking studies were conducted to predict its anticancer activity.

  15. The effect of 100 MeV oxygen ion on electrical and optical properties of nonlinear optical l-alanine sodium nitrate single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Ahlam, M. A.; Prakash, A. P. Gnana

    2012-06-05

    Single crystals of nonlinear optical (NLO) L-alanine Sodium Nitrate (LASN) were grown by slow evaporation method. The grown crystals were irradiated by 100 MeV oxygen ions with the cumulative doses of 1Mrad, 6 Mrad and 10 Mrad. The dielectric properties, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and second harmonic generation (SHG) of the crystals were studied before and after irradiation. The dielectric constant was found to increase after irradiation. The DSC reveals that the melting point remains unaffected due to irradiation. The SHG efficiency of LASN was found to decrease with increase in radiation dose.

  16. Determination of the carbon, hydrogen and nitrogen contents of alanine and their uncertainties using the certified reference material L-alanine (NMIJ CRM 6011-a).

    PubMed

    Itoh, Nobuyasu; Sato, Ayako; Yamazaki, Taichi; Numata, Masahiko; Takatsu, Akiko

    2013-01-01

    The carbon, hydrogen, and nitrogen (CHN) contents of alanine and their uncertainties were estimated using a CHN analyzer and the certified reference material (CRM) L-alanine. The CHN contents and their uncertainties, as measured using the single-point calibration method, were 40.36 ± 0.20% for C, 7.86 ± 0.13% for H, and 15.66 ± 0.09% for N; the results obtained using the bracket calibration method were also comparable. The method described in this study is reasonable, convenient, and meets the general requirement of having uncertainties ≤ 0.4%.

  17. AmiC functions as an N-acetylmuramyl-l-alanine amidase necessary for cell separation and can promote autolysis in Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Daniel L; Dillard, Joseph P

    2006-10-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae is prone to undergo autolysis under many conditions not conducive to growth. The role of autolysis during gonococcal infection is not known, but possible advantages for the bacterial population include provision of nutrients to a starving population, modulation of the host immune response by released cell components, and donation of DNA for natural transformation. Biochemical studies indicated that an N-acetylmuramyl-l-alanine amidase is responsible for cell wall breakdown during autolysis. In order to better understand autolysis and in hopes of creating a nonautolytic mutant, we mutated amiC, the gene for a putative peptidoglycan-degrading amidase in N. gonorrhoeae. Characterization of peptidoglycan fragments released during growth showed that an amiC mutant did not produce free disaccharide, consistent with a role for AmiC as an N-acetylmuramyl-l-alanine amidase. Compared to the wild-type parent, the mutant exhibited altered growth characteristics, including slowed exponential-phase growth, increased turbidity in stationary phase, and increased colony opacity. Thin-section electron micrographs showed that mutant cells did not fully separate but grew as clumps. Complementation of the amiC deletion mutant with wild-type amiC restored wild-type growth characteristics and transparent colony morphology. Overexpression of amiC resulted in increased cell lysis, supporting AmiC's purported function as a gonococcal autolysin. However, amiC mutants still underwent autolysis in stationary phase, indicating that other gonococcal enzymes are also involved in this process.

  18. First report on the efficacy of l-alanine-based in situ-forming implants for the long-term parenteral delivery of drugs.

    PubMed

    Plourde, François; Motulsky, Aude; Couffin-Hoarau, Anne-Claude; Hoarau, Didier; Ong, Huy; Leroux, Jean-Christophe

    2005-11-28

    The recent advent of biotechnologies has led to the development of labile macromolecular therapeutic agents that require complex formulations for their efficient administration. This work reports a novel concept for the systemic, sustained delivery of such agents. The proposed approach is based on the spontaneous self-assembly of low-molecular weight amphiphilic amino acid derivatives in a hydrophobic pharmaceutical vehicle. The injectable, in situ-forming organogels were obtained by mixing N-stearoyl l-alanine (m)ethyl esters with a vegetable oil and a biocompatible hydrophilic solvent. The gels' in vivo-delivering properties were evaluated in rats with leuprolide, a luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonist used in prostate cancer, endometriosis and precocious puberty treatment. Following subcutaneous injection, the gels degraded and gradually released leuprolide for 14 to 25 days. Drug release was accompanied by sustained castration lasting up to 50 days, as assessed by testosterone levels. This study demonstrates that in situ-forming implants based on l-alanine derivatives represent a novel injectable platform for the controlled delivery of hydrophilic compounds, which is simpler than currently available implant and microsphere technologies.

  19. Cyanobacterial Blooms and the Occurrence of the neurotoxin beta-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) in South Florida Aquatic Food Webs

    PubMed Central

    Brand, Larry E.; Pablo, John; Compton, Angela; Hammerschlag, Neil; Mash, Deborah C.

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies demonstrate that most cyanobacteria produce the neurotoxin beta-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) and that it can biomagnify in at least one terrestrial food chain. BMAA has been implicated as a significant environmental risk in the development of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS). We examined several blooms of cyanobacteria in South Florida, and the BMAA content of resident animals, including species used as human food. A wide range of BMAA concentrations were found, ranging from below assay detection limits to approximately 7000 μg/g, a concentration associated with a potential long-term human health hazard. PMID:21057660

  20. Interaction of L-alanyl-L-valine and L-valyl-L-alanine with organic vapors: thermal stability of clathrates, sorption capacity and the change in the morphology of dipeptide films.

    PubMed

    Ziganshin, Marat A; Gubina, Nadezhda S; Gerasimov, Alexander V; Gorbatchuk, Valery V; Ziganshina, Sufia A; Chuklanov, Anton P; Bukharaev, Anastas A

    2015-08-21

    The strong effect of the amino acid sequence in L-alanyl-L-valine and L-valyl-L-alanine on their sorption properties toward organic compounds and water, and the thermal stability of the inclusion compounds of these dipeptides have been found. Generally, L-valyl-L-alanine has a greater sorption capacity for the studied compounds, but the thermal stability of the L-alanyl-L-valine clathrates is higher. Unusual selectivity of L-valyl-L-alanine for vapors of few chloroalkanes was observed. The correlation between the change in the surface morphology of thin film of dipeptides and stoichiometry of their clathrates with organic compounds was found. This discovery may be used to predict the influence of vapors on the morphology of films of short-chain oligopeptides.

  1. Studies on spin-trapped radicals in. gamma. -irradiated aqueous solutions of glycylglycine and glycyl-L-alanine by high-performance liquid chromatography and ESR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Moriya, F.; Makino, K.; Suzuki, N.; Rokushika, S.; Hatano, H.

    1980-12-25

    Aqueous solutions of glycylglycine and glycyl-L-alanine were ..gamma..-irradiated in the presence of a spin trap, 2-methyl-2-nitrosopropane. Stable spin adducts produced in the ..gamma..-irradiated solutions were analyzed by means of high-performance liquid chromatography and ESR spectroscopy. Five spin adducts were found and identified, as follows: t-BuN(O.)CH/sub 2/CONHCH/sub 2/COO/sup -/ (I) and NH/sub 3//sup +/CH/sub 2/CONHCH(COO/sup -/)N(O.)-t-Bu (IIb) from glycylglycine; t-BuN(O.)CH/sub 2/CONHCH(CH/sub 3/)COO/sup -/ (III), NH/sub 3//sup +/CH/sub 2/CONHC(CH/sub 3/)(COO/sup -/)N(O.)-t-Bu (IV) and NH/sub 3//sup +/CH/sub 2/CONHCH(COO/sup -/)CH/sub 2/N(O.)-t-Bu (V) from glycyl-L-alanine. It was found that spin adduct III exhibits ESR spectra with unequal splittings of the two ..beta.. hydrogens while spin adduct I does not. This fact revealed that the asymmetry of the delta carbon in spin adduct III causes the magnetic nonequivalence through a peptide bond. It was demonstrated that ESR spectra of spin adducts IIb and V changed remarkably with pH through the acid-dissociation equilibria of the carboxyl or amino groups. The pK/sub a/ values for the dissociation have been determined to be 2.0 for the carboxyl group of spin adduct IIb, and 3.0 for that of V.

  2. Enantioselective Collision-Activated Dissociation of Gas-Phase Tryptophan Induced by Chiral Recognition of Protonated uc(l)-Alanine Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujihara, Akimasa; Matsuyama, Hiroki; Tajiri, Michiko; Wada, Yoshinao; Hayakawa, Shigeo

    2016-06-01

    Enantioselective dissociation in the gas phase is important for enantiomeric enrichment and chiral transmission processes in molecular clouds regarding the origin of homochirality in biomolecules. Enantioselective collision-activated dissociation (CAD) of tryptophan (Trp) and the chiral recognition ability of uc(l)-alanine peptides (uc(l)-Ala n ; n = 2-4) were examined using a linear ion trap mass spectrometer. CAD spectra of gas-phase heterochiral H+(uc(d)-Trp)(uc(l)-Ala n ) and homochiral H+(uc(l)-Trp)(uc(l)-Ala n ) noncovalent complexes were obtained as a function of the peptide size n. The H2O-elimination product was observed in CAD spectra of both heterochiral and homochiral complexes for n = 2 and 4, and in homochiral H+(uc(l)-Trp)(uc(l)-Ala3), indicating that the proton is attached to the uc(l)-alanine peptide, and H2O loss occurs from H+(uc(l)-Ala n ) in the noncovalent complexes. H2O loss did not occur in heterochiral H+(uc(d)-Trp)(uc(l)-Ala3), where NH3 loss and (H2O + CO) loss were the primary dissociation pathways. In heterochiral H+(uc(d)-Trp)(uc(l)-Ala3), the protonation site is the amino group of uc(d)-Trp, and NH3 loss and (H2O + CO) loss occur from H+(uc(d)-Trp). uc(l)-Ala peptides recognize uc(d)-Trp through protonation of the amino group for peptide size n = 3. NH3 loss and (H2O + CO) loss from H+(uc(d)-Trp) proceeds via enantioselective CAD in gas-phase heterochiral H+(uc(d)-Trp)(uc(l)-Ala3) at room temperature, whereas uc(l)-Trp dissociation was not observed in homochiral H+(uc(l)-Trp)(uc(l)-Ala3). These results suggest that enantioselective dissociation induced by chiral recognition of uc(l)-Ala peptides through protonation could play an important role in enantiomeric enrichment and chiral transmission processes of amino acids.

  3. Transport of L-glutamine, L-alanine, L-arginine and L-histidine by the neuron-specific Slc38a8 (SNAT8) in CNS.

    PubMed

    Hägglund, Maria G A; Hellsten, Sofie V; Bagchi, Sonchita; Philippot, Gaëtan; Löfqvist, Erik; Nilsson, Victor C O; Almkvist, Ingrid; Karlsson, Edvin; Sreedharan, Smitha; Tafreshiha, Atieh; Fredriksson, Robert

    2015-03-27

    Glutamine transporters are important for regulating levels of glutamate and GABA in the brain. To date, six members of the SLC38 family (SNATs) have been characterized and functionally subdivided them into System A (SNAT1, SNAT2 and SNAT4) and System N (SNAT3, SNAT5 and SNAT7). Here we present the first functional characterization of SLC38A8, one of the previous orphan transporters from the family, and we suggest that the encoded protein should be named SNAT8 to adhere with the SNAT nomenclature. We show that SLC38A8 has preference for transporting L-glutamine, L-alanine, L-arginine, L-histidine and L-aspartate using a Na+-dependent transport mechanism and that the functional characteristics of SNAT8 have highest similarity to the known System A transporters. We also provide a comprehensive central nervous system expression profile in mouse brain for the Slc38a8 gene and the SNAT8 protein. We show that Slc38a8 (SNAT8) is expressed in all neurons, both excitatory and inhibitory, in mouse brain using in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry. Furthermore, proximity ligation assay shows highly similar subcellular expression of SNAT7 and SNAT8. In conclusion, the neuronal SLC38A8 has a broad amino acid transport profile and is the first identified neuronal System A transporter. This suggests a key role of SNAT8 in the glutamine/glutamate (GABA) cycle in the brain.

  4. Physicochemical Properties of L-Alanine in Aqueous Silver Sulphate Solutions at (298.15, 308.15, and 318.15) K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Biswajit; Sarkar, Abhijit; Roy, Pran Kumar; Brahman, Dhiraj

    2011-10-01

    Apparent molar volumes {(\\varphi_V)} and viscosity B coefficients for L-alanine in (0.005, 0.010, 0.015, and 0.020) mol · dm-3 aqueous silver sulphate (Ag2SO4) solutions were determined from the solution density and viscosity measurements at (298.15, 308.15, and 318.15) K as a function of amino acid concentration. The standard partial molar volumes {(\\varphi_V^0)} and experimental slopes {(S_V^ast )} obtained from the Masson equation were interpreted in terms of solute-solvent and solute-solute interactions, respectively. To analyze solution viscosities in terms of viscosity B coefficients, the Jones-Dole equation was applied. The structure-making or -breaking ability of the amino acid has also been discussed in terms of the sign of {(δ2\\varphi_V^0/δ T2)P} . The activation parameters of viscous flow for the ternary solutions were also derived and explained in terms of transition state theory.

  5. One-dimensional coordination polymers: Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes of N-(2-pyridylmethyl)-glycine and N-(2-pyridylmethyl)- L-alanine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaobai; Ranford, John D.; Vittal, Jagadese J.

    2006-08-01

    The crystal structures of three Cu(II) and one Zn(II) complexes of N-(2-pyridylmethyl)- L-glycine (Hpgly) and N-(2-pyridylmethyl)- L-alanine (Hpala) have been described. They are [Cu(pgly)Cl] · H 2O ( 1), [Cu(pala)Cl] · H 2O ( 2), [Cu(pala)(CH 3COO)] · 0.75H 2O ( 3), and [Zn(pgly)(NO 3)] ( 4). All these compounds have 1D polymeric structures in the solid state. In 1 and 2, the chloride ions bridge [Cu(pgly)] and [Cu(pala)] fragments, respectively, to generate 1D polymers while the bridging acetate ligands are responsible for the formation of ΛΔΛΔ type spiral polymers in 3. The nitrate ion in 4 is only acting as a terminal ligand while the carboxylate oxygen atom of the pala ligand bridges the Zn(II) centers to form the zigzag coordination polymeric chain. The 1D coordination polymers in 1 and 2 have very similar arrangements although crystallized in different space groups, and host 1D water chains in their crystal lattices.

  6. Pore Diameter Dependence and Segmental Dynamics of Poly-Z-L-lysine and Poly-L-alanine Confined in 1D Nanocylindrical Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuncel, Eylul; Suzuki, Yasuhito; Iossifidis, Agathaggelos; Steinhart, Martin; Butt, Hans-Jurgen; Floudas, George; Duran, Hatice

    Structure formation, thermodynamic stability, phase and dynamic behaviors of polypeptides are strongly affected by confinement. Since understanding the changes in these behaviors will allow their rational design as functional devices with tunable properties, herein we investigated Poly-Z-L-lysine (PZLL) and Poly-L-alanine (PAla) homopolypeptides confined in nanoporous alumina containing aligned cylindrical nanopores as a function of pore size by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy, Solid-state NMR, X-ray diffraction, Dielectric spectroscopy(DS). Bulk PZLL exhibits a glass transition temperature (Tg) at about 301K while PZLL nanorods showed slightly lower Tg (294K). The dynamic investigation by DS also revealed a decrease (4K) in Tg between bulk and PZLL nanorods. DS is a very sensitive probe of the local and global secondary structure relaxation through the large dipole to study effect of confinement. The results revealed that the local segmental dynamics, associated with broken hydrogen bonds, and segmental dynamics speed-up on confinement.

  7. Model Studies on the Antioxidative Effect of Polyphenols in Thermally Treated D-Glucose/L-Alanine Solutions with Added Metal Ions.

    PubMed

    Wilker, Daniel; Heinrich, Anna B; Kroh, Lothar W

    2015-12-30

    The influence of different polyphenolic compounds (PPs) on the Maillard reaction in a d-glucose/l-alanine model system with or without metal ions was studied under various reaction conditions. At temperatures up to 100 °C the PPs showed pro-oxidative effects due to their reducing effects on metal ions. This can be explained by a combined redox cycling mechanism of metals and PPs that promotes oxidation in the Maillard reaction. The antioxidative capacities of the PPs were measured with three different assays and correlated directly with their pro-oxidative effects on d-glucosone formation. The degree of the pro-oxidative effect depended not only on the PPs' reducing potential and their antioxidative ability but also on their concentration, the temperature, and the pH value of the model system. At low pH values and temperatures, the PPs were more stable and therefore showed an increased pro-oxidative tendency. In contrast, some of the used PPs were almost completely degraded at temperatures of 130 °C, and the formed polymers were able to complex metal ions. In the absence of these catalyzing ions, the oxidation ratio of d-glucose to d-glucosone was decreased.

  8. Nepenthes insignis uses a C2-portion of the carbon skeleton of L-alanine acquired via its carnivorous organs, to build up the allelochemical plumbagin.

    PubMed

    Rischer, Heiko; Hamm, Andreas; Bringmann, Gerhard

    2002-03-01

    Tropical pitcher plants (Nepenthes) catch animals in their specialized cup-shaped leaves, digest the prey by secreting enzymes, and actively take up the resulting compounds. The benefit of this behaviour is the ability to grow and compete in nutrient-poor habitats. Our present in vitro study shows that not only the nitrogen of alanine fed to the carnivorous organs is used by the plant but that in addition intact C2-units derived from C-2 and C-3 of stable isotope labelled L-alanine serve as building blocks, here exemplarily for the synthesis of the secondary metabolite plumbagin, a potent allelochemical. This result adds a new facet to the benefit of carnivory for plants. The availability of plumbagin by a de novo synthesis probably enhances the plants' fitness in their defence against phytophagous and pathogenic organisms. A missing specific uptake or CoA activation mechanism might be the reason that acetate fed to the pitchers was not incorporated into the naphthoquinone plumbagin. The dihydronaphthoquinone glucosides rossoliside and plumbaside A, here isolated for the first time from Nepenthes, by contrast, showed no incorporation after feeding of any of the two precursors, suggesting these compounds to be storage forms with probably very low turnover rates. PMID:11867092

  9. Characterization of a meso-chiral isomer of a hexanuclear Cu(II) cage from racemization of the L-alanine Schiff base.

    PubMed

    Rajesh, Chinnaiyan Mahalingam; Ray, Manabendra

    2014-09-14

    We are reporting structural characterization of two new hexanuclear cages (H3O)2[Cu3(μ3-OH)(μ3-NH3)(0.5)(L)3]2·8H2O (1) and (H3O)2[Cu3(μ3-OH)(μ3-H2O)(0.5)(L)3]2·8H2O (1a) where L(2-) is the dianionic form of the Schiff base of L-alanine and salicylaldehyde. The complex 1 has two C3 symmetric hydroxo bridged trinuclear halves joined by an ammonia or water molecule at the center through H-bonding. Each of the trinuclear halves is enantiopure but of opposite chirality to the other half, making the hexanuclear unit a meso isomer. Temperature dependent magnetic measurements showed the presence of ferromagnetic interactions among trinuclear Cu(II) units, a rare occurrence among trinuclear Cu(II) complexes. Characterization of the LiHL showed it to be enantiopure. Addition of a base, monitored using optical rotation, showed that racemization occurs as a result of base addition. The racemization depends on the base as well as the temperature. Base or Cu(II) induced racemization of amino acid derivatives has been indicated in a number of cases in the past but structural characterization of the products or formation of this type of chiral hexanuclear architecture was never reported. Structures of the complex and the ligand have a number of interesting H-bonding situations.

  10. Transfer of developmental neurotoxin β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA) via milk to nursed offspring: Studies by mass spectrometry and image analysis.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Marie; Karlsson, Oskar; Banack, Sandra Anne; Brandt, Ingvar

    2016-09-01

    The cyanobacterial non-proteinogenic amino acid β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA) is proposed to be involved in the etiology of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/parkinsonism dementia complex. When administered as single doses to neonatal rats, BMAA gives rise to cognitive and neurodegenerative impairments in the adult animal. Here, we employed mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and autoradiographic imaging to examine the mother-to-pup transfer of BMAA in rats. The results show that unchanged BMAA was secreted into the milk and distributed to the suckling pups. The concentration of BMAA in pup stomach milk and the neonatal liver peaked after 8h, while the concentration in the pup brain increased throughout the study period. About 1 and 6% of the BMAA recovered from adult liver and brain were released following hydrolysis, suggesting that this fraction was associated with protein. No association to milk protein was observed. Injection of rat pups with [methyl-(14)C]-l-BMAA or [carboxyl-(14)C]-l-BMAA resulted in highly similar distribution patterns, indicating no or low metabolic elimination of the methylamino- or carboxyl groups. In conclusion, BMAA is transported as a free amino acid to rat milk and suckling pups. The results strengthen the proposal that mothers' milk could be a source of exposure for BMAA in human infants.

  11. Detection of Cyanotoxins, β-N-methylamino-l-alanine and Microcystins, from a Lake Surrounded by Cases of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Banack, Sandra Anne; Caller, Tracie; Henegan, Patricia; Haney, James; Murby, Amanda; Metcalf, James S.; Powell, James; Cox, Paul Alan; Stommel, Elijah

    2015-01-01

    A cluster of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) has been previously described to border Lake Mascoma in Enfield, NH, with an incidence of ALS approximating 25 times expected. We hypothesize a possible association with cyanobacterial blooms that can produce β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA), a neurotoxic amino acid implicated as a possible cause of ALS/PDC in Guam. Muscle, liver, and brain tissue samples from a Lake Mascoma carp, as well as filtered aerosol samples, were analyzed for microcystins (MC), free and protein-bound BMAA, and the BMAA isomers 2,4-diaminobutyric acid (DAB) and N-(2-aminoethyl)glycine (AEG). In carp brain, BMAA and DAB concentrations were 0.043 μg/g ± 0.02 SD and 0.01 μg/g ± 0.002 SD respectively. In carp liver and muscle, the BMAA concentrations were 1.28 μg/g and 1.27 μg/g respectively, and DAB was not detected. BMAA was detected in the air filters, as were the isomers DAB and AEG. These results demonstrate that a putative cause for ALS, BMAA, exists in an environment that has a documented cluster of ALS. Although cause and effect have not been demonstrated, our observations and measurements strengthen the association. PMID:25643180

  12. Structural, vibrational spectroscopic studies and quantum chemical calculations of n-(2,4-dinitrophenyl)-L-alanine methyl ester by density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govindarasu, K.; Kavitha, E.

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, the vibrational wavenumbers of N-(2,4-dinitrophenyl)-L-alanine methyl ester (abbreviated as Dnp-ala-ome) were obtained from ab initio studies based on the density functional theory approach with B3LYP and M06-2X/6-31G(d,p) level of theories. The optimized geometry and structural features of the most potential nonlinear optical crystal Dnp-ala-ome and the vibrational spectral investigations have been thoroughly described with the FT-Raman and FT-IR spectra supported by the DFT computations. FT-IR (4000-400 cm-1) and FT-Raman spectra (3500-50 cm-1) in the solid phase and the UV-Vis spectra that dissolved in ethanol were recorded in the range of 200-800 nm. The Natural population analysis and natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis have also been carried out to analyze the effects of intramolecular charge transfer, intramolecular and hyperconjugative interactions on the geometries. The effects of frontier orbitals, HOMO and LUMO, transition of electron density transfer have also been discussed. The first order hyperpolarizability (β0) and related properties (β, α0 and Δα) of Dnp-ala-ome were calculated. In addition, molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) was investigated using theoretical calculations. The chemical reactivity and thermodynamic properties (heat capacity, entropy and enthalpy) of at different temperature are calculated.

  13. Transfer of developmental neurotoxin β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA) via milk to nursed offspring: Studies by mass spectrometry and image analysis.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Marie; Karlsson, Oskar; Banack, Sandra Anne; Brandt, Ingvar

    2016-09-01

    The cyanobacterial non-proteinogenic amino acid β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA) is proposed to be involved in the etiology of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/parkinsonism dementia complex. When administered as single doses to neonatal rats, BMAA gives rise to cognitive and neurodegenerative impairments in the adult animal. Here, we employed mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and autoradiographic imaging to examine the mother-to-pup transfer of BMAA in rats. The results show that unchanged BMAA was secreted into the milk and distributed to the suckling pups. The concentration of BMAA in pup stomach milk and the neonatal liver peaked after 8h, while the concentration in the pup brain increased throughout the study period. About 1 and 6% of the BMAA recovered from adult liver and brain were released following hydrolysis, suggesting that this fraction was associated with protein. No association to milk protein was observed. Injection of rat pups with [methyl-(14)C]-l-BMAA or [carboxyl-(14)C]-l-BMAA resulted in highly similar distribution patterns, indicating no or low metabolic elimination of the methylamino- or carboxyl groups. In conclusion, BMAA is transported as a free amino acid to rat milk and suckling pups. The results strengthen the proposal that mothers' milk could be a source of exposure for BMAA in human infants. PMID:27320960

  14. Environmental neurotoxin interaction with proteins: Dose-dependent increase of free and protein-associated BMAA (β-N-methylamino-L-alanine) in neonatal rat brain.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Oskar; Jiang, Liying; Ersson, Lisa; Malmström, Tim; Ilag, Leopold L; Brittebo, Eva B

    2015-01-01

    β-Methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is implicated in the aetiology of neurodegenerative disorders. Neonatal exposure to BMAA induces cognitive impairments and progressive neurodegenerative changes including intracellular fibril formation in the hippocampus of adult rats. It is unclear why the neonatal hippocampus is especially vulnerable and the critical cellular perturbations preceding BMAA-induced toxicity remains to be elucidated. The aim of this study was to compare the level of free and protein-associated BMAA in neonatal rat brain and peripheral tissues after different exposures to BMAA. Ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis revealed that BMAA passed the neonatal blood-brain barrier and was distributed to all studied brain areas. BMAA was also associated to proteins in the brain, especially in the hippocampus. The level in the brain was, however, considerably lower compared to the liver that is not a target organ for BMAA. In contrast to the liver there was a significantly increased level of protein-association of BMAA in the hippocampus and other brain areas following repeated administration suggesting that the degradation of BMAA-associated proteins may be lower in neonatal brain than in the liver. Additional evidence is needed in support of a role for protein misincorporation in the neonatal hippocampus for long-term effects of BMAA.

  15. Environmental neurotoxin interaction with proteins: Dose-dependent increase of free and protein-associated BMAA (β-N-methylamino-L-alanine) in neonatal rat brain

    PubMed Central

    Karlsson, Oskar; Jiang, Liying; Ersson, Lisa; Malmström, Tim; Ilag, Leopold L.; Brittebo, Eva B.

    2015-01-01

    β-Methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is implicated in the aetiology of neurodegenerative disorders. Neonatal exposure to BMAA induces cognitive impairments and progressive neurodegenerative changes including intracellular fibril formation in the hippocampus of adult rats. It is unclear why the neonatal hippocampus is especially vulnerable and the critical cellular perturbations preceding BMAA-induced toxicity remains to be elucidated. The aim of this study was to compare the level of free and protein-associated BMAA in neonatal rat brain and peripheral tissues after different exposures to BMAA. Ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis revealed that BMAA passed the neonatal blood-brain barrier and was distributed to all studied brain areas. BMAA was also associated to proteins in the brain, especially in the hippocampus. The level in the brain was, however, considerably lower compared to the liver that is not a target organ for BMAA. In contrast to the liver there was a significantly increased level of protein-association of BMAA in the hippocampus and other brain areas following repeated administration suggesting that the degradation of BMAA-associated proteins may be lower in neonatal brain than in the liver. Additional evidence is needed in support of a role for protein misincorporation in the neonatal hippocampus for long-term effects of BMAA. PMID:26498001

  16. Beta-N-methylamino-l-alanine: LC-MS/MS Optimization, Screening of Cyanobacterial Strains and Occurrence in Shellfish from Thau, a French Mediterranean Lagoon

    PubMed Central

    Réveillon, Damien; Abadie, Eric; Séchet, Véronique; Brient, Luc; Savar, Véronique; Bardouil, Michèle; Hess, Philipp; Amzil, Zouher

    2014-01-01

    β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA) is a neurotoxic non-protein amino acid suggested to be involved in neurodegenerative diseases. It was reported to be produced by cyanobacteria, but also found in edible aquatic organisms, thus raising concern of a widespread human exposure. However, the chemical analysis of BMAA and its isomers are controversial, mainly due to the lack of selectivity of the analytical methods. Using factorial design, we have optimized the chromatographic separation of underivatized analogues by a hydrophilic interaction chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (HILIC-MS/MS) method. A combination of an effective solid phase extraction (SPE) clean-up, appropriate chromatographic resolution and the use of specific mass spectral transitions allowed for the development of a highly selective and sensitive analytical procedure to identify and quantify BMAA and its isomers (in both free and total form) in cyanobacteria and mollusk matrices (LOQ of 0.225 and 0.15 µg/g dry weight, respectively). Ten species of cyanobacteria (six are reported to be BMAA producers) were screened with this method, and neither free nor bound BMAA could be found, while both free and bound DAB were present in almost all samples. Mussels and oysters collected in 2009 in the Thau Lagoon, France, were also screened, and bound BMAA and its two isomers, DAB and AEG, were observed in all samples (from 0.6 to 14.4 µg/g DW), while only several samples contained quantifiable free BMAA. PMID:25405857

  17. Dietary L-leucine and L-alanine supplementation have similar acute effects in the prevention of high-fat diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Freudenberg, Anne; Petzke, Klaus J; Klaus, Susanne

    2013-02-01

    High-protein diets have been shown to alleviate detrimental effects of high-fat diets and this effect can be partially mimicked by dietary L-leucine supplementation. Here, we aimed to elucidate the early mechanisms and the specificity of leucine effects. We performed a 1-week trial with male C57BL/6 mice fed ad libitum with semisynthetic high-fat diets containing an adequate (10 % w/w, AP) or high (50 % w/w, HP) amount of whey protein, or supplemented with L-leucine corresponding to the leucine content within the HP diet (Leu) or supplemented with equimolar L-alanine (Ala). Food and water intake were monitored continuously using a computer-controlled monitor system and body composition changes were assessed using quantitative NMR. HP completely prevented the AP-induced accumulation of body fat. Leu and Ala resulted in a similar reduction of body fat accumulation which was intermediate between AP and HP. There were no significant effects on plasma glucose or insulin. Triacylglycerol content and gene expression of lipogenesis enzymes in liver as well as plasma cholesterol were reduced by HP compared to AP with Leu and Ala again showing intermediate effects. Body fat gain and liver triacylglycerols were strongly correlated with total energy intake. Water intake was rapidly increased by HP feeding and total water intake correlated strongly with total amino nitrogen intake. We concluded that the positive effects of high-protein diets on metabolic syndrome associated traits are acutely due to effects on satiety possibly linked to amino nitrogen intake and on the subsequent suppression of liver lipogenesis without evidence for a specific leucine effect.

  18. Liquid chromatographic determination of the cyanobacterial toxin beta-n-methylamino-L-alanine in algae food supplements, freshwater fish, and bottled water.

    PubMed

    Scott, Peter M; Niedzwiadek, Barbara; Rawn, Dorothea F K; Lau, Ben P-Y

    2009-08-01

    Beta-N-Methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is a neurotoxin originally found in cycad seeds and now known to be produced by many species of freshwater and marine cyanobacteria. We developed a method for its determination in blue-green algae (BGA) food supplements, freshwater fish, and bottled water by using a strong cation-exchange, solid-phase extraction column for cleanup after 0.3 M trichloroacetic acid extraction of BGA supplements and fish. Bottled water was applied directly onto the solid-phase extraction column. For analysis of carbonated water, sonication and pH adjustment to 1.5 were needed. To determine protein-bound BMAA, the protein pellet left after extraction of the BGA supplement and fish was hydrolyzed by boiling with 6 M hydrochloric acid; BMAA was cleaned up on a C18 column and a strong cation-exchange, solid-phase extraction column. Determination of BMAA was by liquid chromatography of the fluorescent derivative formed with 9-fluorenylmethyl chloroformate. The method was validated by recovery experiments using spiking levels of 1.0 to 10 microg/g for BGA supplements, 0.5 to 5.0 microg/g for fish, and 0.002 microg/g for bottled water; mean recoveries were in the range of 67 to 89% for BGA supplements and fish, and 59 to 92% for bottled water. Recoveries of BMAA from spiked extracts of hydrolyzed protein from BGA supplements and fish ranged from 66 to 83%. The cleanup developed provides a useful method for surveying foods and supplements for BMAA and protein-bound BMAA.

  19. Analysis of β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) in spirulina-containing supplements by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    McCarron, Pearse; Logan, Alan C; Giddings, Sabrina D; Quilliam, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decade the amino acid beta-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) has come under intense scrutiny. International laboratory and epidemiological research continues to support the hypothesis that environmental exposure to BMAA (e.g., through dietary practices, water supply) can promote the risk of various neurodegenerative diseases. A wide variety of cyanobacteria spp. have previously been reported to produce BMAA, with production levels dependent upon species, strain and environmental conditions. Since spirulina (Arthrospira spp.) is a member of the cyanobacteria phylum frequently consumed via dietary supplements, the presence of BMAA in such products may have public health implications. In the current work, we have analyzed ten spirulina-containing samples for the presence of BMAA; six pure spirulina samples from two separate raw materials suppliers, and four commercially-available multi-ingredient products containing 1.45 g of spirulina per 8.5 g serving. Because of controversy surrounding the measurement of BMAA, we have used two complementary liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) methods: one based on reversed phase LC (RPLC) with derivatization and the other based on hydrophilic interaction LC (HILIC). Potential matrix effects were corrected for by internal standardization using a stable isotope labeled BMAA standard. BMAA was not detected at low limits of detection (80 ng/g dry weight) in any of these product samples. Although these results are reassuring, BMAA analyses should be conducted on a wider sample selection and, perhaps, as part of ongoing spirulina production quality control testing and specifications. PMID:25120905

  20. Near-IR laser generation of a high-energy conformer of L-alanine and the mechanism of its decay in a low-temperature nitrogen matrix.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Cláudio M; Lapinski, Leszek; Fausto, Rui; Reva, Igor

    2013-03-28

    Monomers of L-alanine (ALA) were isolated in cryogenic nitrogen matrices at 14 K. Two conformers were identified for the compound trapped from the gas-phase into the solid nitrogen environment. The potential energy surface (PES) of ALA was theoretically calculated at the MP2 and QCISD levels. Twelve minima were located on this PES. Seven low-energy conformers fall within the 0-10 kJ mol(-1) range and should be appreciably populated in the equilibrium gas phase prior to deposition. Observation of only two forms in the matrices is explained in terms of calculated barriers to conformational rearrangements. All conformers with the O=C-O-H moiety in the cis orientation are separated by low barriers and collapse to the most stable form I during deposition of the matrix onto the low-temperature substrate. The second observed form II has the O=C-O-H group in the trans orientation. The remaining trans forms have very high relative energies (between 24 and 30 kJ mol(-1)) and are not populated. The high-energy trans form VI, that differs from I only by rotation of the OH group, was found to be separated from other conformers by barriers that are high enough to open a perspective for its stabilization in a matrix. The form VI was photoproduced in situ by narrow-band near-infrared irradiation of the samples at 6935-6910 cm(-1), where the first overtone of the OH stretching vibration in form I appears. The photogenerated form VI decays in N2 matrices back to conformer I with a characteristic decay time of ∼15 min. The mechanism of the VI → I relaxation is rationalized in terms of the proton tunneling.

  1. Prolonged L-alanine exposure induces changes in metabolism, Ca(2+) handling and desensitization of insulin secretion in clonal pancreatic beta-cells.

    PubMed

    McClenaghan, Neville H; Scullion, Siobhan M; Mion, Brian; Hewage, Chandralal; Malthouse, J Paul G; Flatt, Peter R; Newsholme, Philip; Brennan, Lorraine

    2009-02-01

    Acute insulin-releasing actions of amino acids have been studied in detail, but comparatively little is known about the beta-cell effects of long-term exposure to amino acids. The present study examined the effects of prolonged exposure of beta-cells to the metabolizable amino acid L-alanine. Basal insulin release or cellular insulin content were not significantly altered by alanine culture, but acute alanine-induced insulin secretion was suppressed by 74% (P<0.001). Acute stimulation of insulin secretion with glucose, KCl or KIC (2-oxoisocaproic acid) following alanine culture was not affected. Acute alanine exposure evoked strong cellular depolarization after control culture, whereas AUC (area under the curve) analysis revealed significant (P<0.01) suppression of this action after culture with alanine. Compared with control cells, prior exposure to alanine also markedly decreased (P<0.01) the acute elevation of [Ca(2+)](i) (intracellular [Ca(2+)]) induced by acute alanine exposure. These diminished stimulatory responses were partially restored after 18 h of culture in the absence of alanine, indicating reversible amino-acid-induced desensitization. (13)C NMR spectra revealed that alanine culture increased glutamate labelling at position C4 (by 60%; P<0.01), as a result of an increase in the singlet peak, indicating increased flux through pyruvate dehydrogenase. Consistent with this, protein expression of the pyruvate dehydrogenase kinases PDK2 and PDK4 was significantly reduced. This was accompanied by a decrease in cellular ATP (P<0.05), consistent with diminished insulin-releasing actions of this amino acid. Collectively, these results illustrate the phenomenon of beta-cell desensitization by amino acids, indicating that prolonged exposure to alanine can induce reversible alterations to metabolic flux, Ca(2+) handling and insulin secretion. PMID:18702613

  2. A Highly Active and Negatively Charged Streptococcus pyogenes Lysin with a Rare d-Alanyl-l-Alanine Endopeptidase Activity Protects Mice against Streptococcal Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Lood, Rolf; Raz, Assaf; Molina, Henrik; Euler, Chad W.

    2014-01-01

    Bacteriophage endolysins have shown great efficacy in killing Gram-positive bacteria. PlyC, a group C streptococcal phage lysin, represents the most efficient lysin characterized to date, with a remarkably high specificity against different streptococcal species, including the important pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes. However, PlyC is a unique lysin, in terms of both its high activity and structure (two distinct subunits). We sought to discover and characterize a phage lysin active against S. pyogenes with an endolysin architecture distinct from that of PlyC to determine if it relies on the same mechanism of action as PlyC. In this study, we identified and characterized an endolysin, termed PlyPy (phage lysin from S. pyogenes), from a prophage infecting S. pyogenes. By in silico analysis, PlyPy was found to have a molecular mass of 27.8 kDa and a pI of 4.16. It was active against a majority of group A streptococci and displayed high levels of activity as well as binding specificity against group B and C streptococci, while it was less efficient against other streptococcal species. PlyPy showed the highest activity at neutral pH in the presence of calcium and NaCl. Surprisingly, its activity was not affected by the presence of the group A-specific carbohydrate, while the activity of PlyC was partly inhibited. Additionally, PlyPy was active in vivo and could rescue mice from systemic bacteremia. Finally, we developed a novel method to determine the peptidoglycan bond cleaved by lysins and concluded that PlyPy exhibits a rare d-alanyl-l-alanine endopeptidase activity. PlyPy thus represents the first lysin characterized from Streptococcus pyogenes and has a mechanism of action distinct from that of PlyC. PMID:24637688

  3. Analysis of β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) in spirulina-containing supplements by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decade the amino acid beta-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) has come under intense scrutiny. International laboratory and epidemiological research continues to support the hypothesis that environmental exposure to BMAA (e.g., through dietary practices, water supply) can promote the risk of various neurodegenerative diseases. A wide variety of cyanobacteria spp. have previously been reported to produce BMAA, with production levels dependent upon species, strain and environmental conditions. Since spirulina (Arthrospira spp.) is a member of the cyanobacteria phylum frequently consumed via dietary supplements, the presence of BMAA in such products may have public health implications. In the current work, we have analyzed ten spirulina-containing samples for the presence of BMAA; six pure spirulina samples from two separate raw materials suppliers, and four commercially-available multi-ingredient products containing 1.45 g of spirulina per 8.5 g serving. Because of controversy surrounding the measurement of BMAA, we have used two complementary liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) methods: one based on reversed phase LC (RPLC) with derivatization and the other based on hydrophilic interaction LC (HILIC). Potential matrix effects were corrected for by internal standardization using a stable isotope labeled BMAA standard. BMAA was not detected at low limits of detection (80 ng/g dry weight) in any of these product samples. Although these results are reassuring, BMAA analyses should be conducted on a wider sample selection and, perhaps, as part of ongoing spirulina production quality control testing and specifications. PMID:25120905

  4. β-N-methylamino-l-alanine causes neurological and pathological phenotypes mimicking Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS): the first step towards an experimental model for sporadic ALS.

    PubMed

    de Munck, Estefanía; Muñoz-Sáez, Emma; Miguel, Begoña G; Solas, M Teresa; Ojeda, Irene; Martínez, Ana; Gil, Carmen; Arahuetes, Rosa Ma

    2013-09-01

    β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (L-BMAA) is a neurotoxic amino acid that has been related to various neurodegenerative diseases. The aim of this work was to analyze the biotoxicity produced by L-BMAA in vivo in rats, trying to elucidate its physiopathological mechanisms and to search for analogies between the found effects and pathologies like Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS). Our data demonstrated that the neurotoxic effects in vivo were dosage-dependent. For evaluating the state of the animals, a neurological evaluation scale was developed as well as a set of functional tests. Ultrastructural cell analysis of spinal motoneurons has revealed alterations both in endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria. Since GSK3β could play a role in some neuropathological processes, we analyzed the alterations occurring in GSK3β levels in L-BMAA treated rats, we have observed an increase in the active form of GSK3β levels in lumbar spinal cord and motor cerebral cortex. On the other hand, (TAR)-DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43) increased in L-BMAA treated animals. Our results indicated that N-acetylaspartate (NAA) declined in animals treated with L-BMAA, and the ratio of N-acetylaspartate/choline (NAA/Cho), N-acetylaspartate/creatine (NAA/Cr) and N-acetylaspartate/choline+creatine (NAA/Cho+Cr) tended to decrease in lumbar spinal cord and motor cortex. This project offers some encouraging results that could help establishing the progress in the development of an animal model of sporadic ALS and L-BMAA could be a useful tool for this purpose.

  5. Antiferromagnetic spin chain behavior and a transition to 3D magnetic order in Cu(D,L-alanine)2: Roles of H-bonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvo, Rafael; Sartoris, Rosana P.; Calvo, Hernán L.; Chagas, Edson F.; Rapp, Raul E.

    2016-05-01

    We study the spin chain behavior, a transition to 3D magnetic order and the magnitudes of the exchange interactions for the metal-amino acid complex Cu(D,L-alanine)2•H2O, a model compound to investigate exchange couplings supported by chemical paths characteristic of biomolecules. Thermal and magnetic data were obtained as a function of temperature (T) and magnetic field (B0). The magnetic contribution to the specific heat, measured between 0.48 and 30 K, displays above 1.8 K a 1D spin-chain behavior that can be fitted with an intrachain antiferromagnetic (AFM) exchange coupling constant 2J0=(-2.12±0.08) cm-1 (defined as ℋex(i,i+1) = -2J0SiṡSi+1), between neighbor coppers at 4.49 Å along chains connected by non-covalent and H-bonds. We also observe a narrow specific heat peak at 0.89 K indicating a phase transition to a 3D magnetically ordered phase. Magnetization curves at fixed T = 2, 4 and 7 K with B0 between 0 and 9 T, and at T between 2 and 300 K with several fixed values of B0 were globally fitted by an intrachain AFM exchange coupling constant 2J0=(-2.27±0.02) cm-1 and g = 2.091±0.005. Interchain interactions J1 between coppers in neighbor chains connected through long chemical paths with total length of 9.51 Å cannot be estimated from magnetization curves. However, observation of the phase transition in the specific heat data allows estimating the range 0.1≤|2J1|≤0.4 cm-1, covering the predictions of various approximations. We analyze the magnitudes of 2J0 and 2J1 in terms of the structure of the corresponding chemical paths. The main contribution in supporting the intrachain interaction is assigned to H-bonds while the interchain interactions are supported by paths containing H-bonds and carboxylate bridges, with the role of the H-bonds being predominant. We compare the obtained intrachain coupling with studies of compounds showing similar behavior and discuss the validity of the approximations allowing to calculate the interchain

  6. ALS-linked SOD1 in glial cells enhances ß-N-Methylamino L-Alanine (BMAA)-induced toxicity in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Rafique; Zhang, Bing

    2012-01-01

    Environmental factors have been implicated in the etiology of a number of neurodegenerative diseases, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). However, the role of environmental agents in ALS remains poorly understood. To this end, we used transgenic fruit flies (Drosophila melanogaster) to explore the interaction between mutant superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) and chemicals such as ß-N-methylamino L-alanine (BMAA), the herbicide agent paraquat, and superoxide species. We expressed ALS-linked human SOD1 (hSOD1A4V, and hSOD1G85R), hSOD1wt as well as the Drosophila native SOD1 (dSOD1) in motoneurons (MNs) or in glial cells alone and simultaneously in both types of cells. We then examined the effect of BMAA (3 mM), paraquat (20 mM), and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, 1%) on the lifespan of SOD1-expressing flies. Our data show that glial expression of mutant and wild type hSOD1s reduces the ability of flies to climb. Further, we show that while all three chemicals significantly shorten the lifespan of flies, mutant SOD1 does not have a significant additional effect on the lifespan of flies fed on paraquat, but further shortens the lifespan of flies fed on H2O2. Finally, we show that BMAA shows a dramatic cell-type specific effect with mutant SOD1. Flies with expression of mutant hSOD1 in MNs survived longer on BMAA compared to control flies. In contrast, BMAA significantly shortened the lifespan of flies expressing mutant hSOD1 in glia. Consistent with a neuronal protection role, flies expressing these mutant hSOD1s in both MNs and glia also lived longer. Hence, our studies reveal a synergistic effect of mutant SOD1 with H2O2 and novel roles for mutant hSOD1s in neurons to reduce BMAA toxicity and in glia to enhance the toxicity of BMAA in flies. PMID:24627764

  7. N-Acetyl-L-alanine N'-methylamide: a density functional analysis of the vibrational absorption and vibrational circular dichroism spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalkanen, K. J.; Suhai, S.

    1996-07-01

    Ab initio 6-31G ∗ Becke 3LYP DFT optimized geometries, vibrational frequencies, vibrational absorption (VA) intensities and vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) intensities have been calculated for the eight low energy conformers of N-acetyl-L-alanine N'-methylamide (L-AANMA) in the gas phase and one conformer stabilized by the addition of four water molecules. The VA and VCD spectra are calculated with the 6-31G ∗ Becke 3LYP force fields (Hessians) and atomic polar tensors (APT); 6-31G ∗∗ RHF atomic axial tensors (AAT) for the eight gas phase structures and 6-31G ∗/6-31G RHF AAT for the L-AANMA-water complex. The VA and VCD spectra are also calculated using the 6-31G ∗ Becke 3LYP Hessians; 6-31G ∗∗ RHF APT and AAT for the eight gas phase structures and 6-31G ∗/6-31G RHF APT and AAT for the L-AANMA-water complex. The rotational strengths of the amide A, I, II, III, IV, V and VI modes found in proteins as a function of φ and ψ (for various secondary structures) are for the first time reported for an inherently optically active molecule (non-glycine model) using the 6-31G ∗∗ and 6-31G ∗/6-31G RHF DOG AAT and 6-31G ∗ Becke 3LYP Hessians and APT. This is also the first reported VCD calculation of a molecule with the solvent present. The molecule is not completely solvated, but the important hydrogen-bonded interactions are present and the feasibility of the calculation of the Hessian, APT and AAT with solvent molecules present is demonstrated. The VA and VCD spectra are compared to the experimental VA and VCD spectra in the literature and the conformational analysis (CA) and vibrational assignment of L-AANMA are reinvestigated. The rotational strengths of the amide modes for the various conformers are also compared to peptide and protein VCD spectra of molecules with known secondary structures. The agreement between the calculated rotational strengths of the various amide modes for which experimental measurements have been made is very good

  8. Quantum yields of decomposition and homo-dimerization of solid L-alanine induced by 7.2 eV Vacuum ultraviolet light irradiation: an estimate of the half-life of L-alanine on the surface of space objects.

    PubMed

    Izumi, Yudai; Nakagawa, Kazumichi

    2011-08-01

    One of the leading hypotheses regarding the origin of prebiotic molecules on primitive Earth is that they formed from inorganic molecules in extraterrestrial environments and were delivered by meteorites, space dust and comets. To evaluate the availability of extraterrestrial amino acids, it is necessary to examine their decomposition and oligomerization rates as induced by extraterrestrial energy sources, such as vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) and X-ray photons and high energy particles. This paper reports the quantum yields of decomposition ((8.2 ± 0.7) × 10(-2) photon(-1)) and homo-dimerization ((1.2 ± 0.3) × 10(-3) photon(-1)) and decomposition of the dimer (0.24 ± 0.06 photon(-1)) of solid L-alanine (Ala) induced by VUV light with an energy of 7.2 eV. Using these quantum yields, the half-life of L-Ala on the surface of a space object in the present earth orbit was estimated to be about 52 days, even when only photons with an energy of 7.2 eV emitted from the present Sun were considered. The actual half-life of solid L-Ala on the surface of a space object orbit around the present day Earth would certainly be much shorter than our estimate, because of the added effect of photons and particles of other energies. Thus, we propose that L-Ala needs to be shielded from solar VUV in protected environments, such as the interior of a meteorite, within a time scale of days after synthesis to ensure its arrival on the primitive Earth.

  9. Energetics of the molecular interactions of L-alanine and L-serine with xylitol, D-sorbitol, and D-mannitol in aqueous solutions at 298.15 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezhevoi, I. N.; Badelin, V. G.

    2013-04-01

    Integral enthalpies of dissolution Δsol H m of L-alanine and L-serine are measured via the calorimetry of dissolution in aqueous solutions of xylitol, D-sorbitol, and D-mannitol. Standard enthalpies of dissolution (Δsol H ○) and the transfer (Δtr H ○) of amino acids from water to binary solvent are calculated from the experimental data. Using the McMillan-Mayer theory, enthalpy coefficients of pairwise interactions h xy of amino acids with molecules of polyols are calculated that are negative. The obtained results are discussed within the theory of the prevalence of different types of interactions in mixed solutions and the effect of the structural features of interacting biomolecules on the thermochemical parameters of dissolution of amino acids.

  10. Determination of β-N-methylamino-L-alanine, N-(2-aminoethyl)glycine, and 2,4-diaminobutyric acid in Food Products Containing Cyanobacteria by Ultra-Performance Liquid Chromatography and Tandem Mass Spectrometry: Single-Laboratory Validation.

    PubMed

    Glover, W Broc; Baker, Teesha C; Murch, Susan J; Brown, Paula N

    2015-01-01

    A single-laboratory validation study was completed for the determination of β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA), N-(2-aminoethyl)glycine (AEG), and 2,4-diaminobutyric acid (DAB) in bulk natural health product supplements purchased from a health food store in Canada. BMAA and its isomers were extracted with acid hydrolysis to free analytes from protein association. Acid was removed with the residue evaporated to dryness and reconstituted with derivatization using 6-aminoquinolyl-N-hydroxysuccinimidyl carbamate (AccQ-Fluor). Chromatographic separation and detection were achieved using RP ultra-performance LC coupled to a tandem mass spectrometer operated in multiple reaction monitoring mode. Data from biological samples were evaluated for precision and accuracy across different days to ensure repeatability. Accuracy was assessed by spike recovery of biological samples using varying amino acid concentrations, with an average recovery across all samples of 108.6%. The analytical range was found to be 764-0.746 ng/mL prior to derivatization, thereby providing a linear range compatible with potentially widely varying analyte concentrations in commercial health food products. Both the U. S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and U. S. Pharmacopeia definitions were evaluated for determining method limits, with the FDA approach found to be most suitable having an LOD of 0.187 ng/mL and LLOQ of 0.746 ng/mL. BMAA in the collected specimens was detected at concentrations lower than 1 μg/g, while AEG and DAB were found at concentrations as high as 100 μg/g. Finding these analytes, even at low concentrations, has potential public health significance and suggests a need to screen such products prior to distribution. The method described provides a rapid, accurate, and precise method to facilitate that screening process. PMID:26651568

  11. Innovative effect of illite on improved microbiological conversion of L-tyrosine to 3,4 dihydroxy phenyl L-alanine (L-DOPA) by Aspergillus oryzae ME2 under acidic reaction conditions.

    PubMed

    Sikander, Ali; Ikram-ul-Haq

    2006-11-01

    In the present investigation, the previous ultraviolet irradiated mutant strain of Aspergillus oryzae UV-7 was further improved in terms of 3,4 dihydroxy phenyl L-alanine (L-DOPA) activity after chemical mutagenesis through 1-methyl 3-nitro 1-nitroso guanidine (MNNG = 250-1500 microg/ml) treatment (0-30 min). Among several mutant variants, the one that produced a larger amount of L-DOPA from L-tyrosine was designated to as ME2 and it was made 2-deoxy-D-glucose-resistant by growing it at various concentrations of 2 dg (0.01-0.025 %, w/v) in Vogel's agar medium. Relatively better production of L-DOPA (> 0.60 mg/ml) was obtained when 2.0% (w/v) glucose was used as a carbon source in the mycelium production medium and the tyrosinase activity increased constitutively (1.08 mg/ml), which resulted in a greater production of L-DOPA. At optimum pH0 (pH 6.0) and reaction time (60 min), more than 65% sugar was utilized for cell mass formation. The maximum conversion of L-tyrosine to L-DOPA (0.428 mg/ml) was achieved 60 min after the biochemical reaction. Mould mycelium was used for microbiological conversion of L-tyrosine to L-DOPA because tyrosinases, beta-carboxylases, and tyrosine hydroxylases are intracellular enzymes. The effect of illite (1.0 x 10(6)-6.0 x 10(6) M) on biochemical conversion of L-tyrosine to L-DOPA by Aspergillus oryzae ME(2 )was also carried out. Best results of L-DOPA biosynthesis were observed when the concentration of illite was 3.5 x 10(-6) M (1.686 mg/ml L-DOPA produced with 1.525 mg/ml consumption of L-tyrosine). It was noted that the addition of illite not only increased enzyme activity but also enhanced the permeability of cell membrane to facilitate the secretion of enzymes into the reaction broth. The comparison of kinetic parameters showed the ability of mutant to yield L-DOPA (i.e., Yp/x 7.360 +/- 0.04 mg/mg). When the culture grown on various illite concentrations was monitored for Qp, Qs, and qp, there was significant enhancement (p < 0

  12. Transfer Partial Molar Isentropic Compressibilities of ( l-Alanine/ l-Glutamine/Glycylglycine) from Water to 0.512 {mol} \\cdot {kg}^{-1} Aqueous {KNO}3/0.512 {mol} \\cdot {kg}^{-1} Aqueous {K}2{SO}4 Solutions Between 298.15 K and 323.15 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riyazuddeen; Gazal, Umaima

    2013-03-01

    Speeds of sound of ( l-alanine/ l-glutamine/glycylglycine + 0.512 {mol}\\cdot {kg}^{-1} aqueous {KNO}3/0.512 {mol}\\cdot {kg}^{-1} aqueous {K}2{SO}4) systems have been measured for several molal concentrations of amino acid/peptide at different temperatures: T = (298.15 to 323.15) K. Using the speed-of-sound and density data, the parameters, partial molar isentropic compressibilities φ _{kappa }0 and transfer partial molar isentropic compressibilities Δ _{tr} φ _{kappa }0, have been computed. The trends of variation of φ _{kappa }0 and Δ _{tr} φ _{kappa }0 with changes in molal concentration of the solute and temperature have been discussed in terms of zwitterion-ion, zwitterion-water dipole, ion-water dipole, and ion-ion interactions operative in the systems.

  13. Ruthenium-Nitrosyl Complexes with Glycine, l-Alanine, l-Valine, l-Proline, d-Proline, l-Serine, l-Threonine, and l-Tyrosine: Synthesis, X-ray Diffraction Structures, Spectroscopic and Electrochemical Properties, and Antiproliferative Activity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The reactions of [Ru(NO)Cl5]2– with glycine (Gly), l-alanine (l-Ala), l-valine (l-Val), l-proline (l-Pro), d-proline (d-Pro), l-serine (l-Ser), l-threonine (l-Thr), and l-tyrosine (l-Tyr) in n-butanol or n-propanol afforded eight new complexes (1–8) of the general formula [RuCl3(AA–H)(NO)]−, where AA = Gly, l-Ala, l-Val, l-Pro, d-Pro, l-Ser, l-Thr, and l-Tyr, respectively. The compounds were characterized by elemental analysis, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), 1H NMR, UV–visible and ATR IR spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, and X-ray crystallography. X-ray crystallography studies have revealed that in all cases the same isomer type (from three theoretically possible) was isolated, namely mer(Cl),trans(NO,O)-[RuCl3(AA–H)(NO)], as was also recently reported for osmium analogues with Gly, l-Pro, and d-Pro (see Z. Anorg. Allg. Chem.2013, 639, 1590–1597). Compounds 1, 4, 5, and 8 were investigated by ESI-MS with regard to their stability in aqueous solution and reactivity toward sodium ascorbate. In addition, cell culture experiments in three human cancer cell lines, namely, A549 (nonsmall cell lung carcinoma), CH1 (ovarian carcinoma), and SW480 (colon carcinoma), were performed, and the results are discussed in conjunction with the lipophilicity of compounds. PMID:24555845

  14. Antigen-specific suppression in genetic responder mice to L-glutamic acid60-L-alanine30-L-tyrosine10 (GAT). Characterization of conventional and hybridoma-derived factors produced by suppressor T cells from mice injected as neonates with syngeneic GAT macrophages.

    PubMed

    Sorensen, C M; Pierce, C W

    1982-12-01

    Spleen cells from C57BL/10 mice injected with syngeneic B10 L-glutamic acid60-L-alanine30-L-tyrosine10 (GAT)-pulsed macrophages (GAT-M phi) within 18 h of birth were unable to respond to soluble GAT, GAT-methylated bovine serum albumin, or B10 GAT-M phi as adults. Spleen cells from these neonatally treated mice responded at control levels to GAT presented in allogeneic M phi and to sheep erythrocytes. Partially purified T cells from these neonatally treated mice suppressed responses by syngeneic virgin, but not primed, spleen cells in an antigen-specific manner and acted during the early phases of the response. These responder GAT-specific suppressor T cells (GAT-TSR) were sensitive to anti-Thy-1 + C and 500-rad irradiation and have the phenotype Ly-1-2+, I-J+; GAT-TSR cells can only suppress responses by spleen cells syngeneic with the GAT-TSR cells at the I-J subregion of H-2. Restimulation of these Ts cells with syngeneic GAT-M phi induces an antigen-specific suppressor factor within the supernatant fluid. The factor, GAT-TsFR, is a glycoprotein with a molecular weight between 48,000 and 63,000, as determined by gel filtration chromatography using isotonic buffers; it bears serologically detectable determinants encoded by the I-J subregion of the H-2 complex, has an antigen-binding site for GAT and L-glutamic acid50-L-tyrosine50, and shares idiotypic determinants with anti-GAT antibodies. The presence of GAT-TsFR in the first 36 h of in vitro culture is required for significant suppression. Furthermore, only responses by spleen cell syngeneic with the cells producing GAT-TsFR at the I-J subregion are suppressed. The fusion of GAT-TsFR-producing cells with BW5147 resulted in generation of two hybridomas with properties and characteristics identical to those of the conventional GAT-TsFR with one exception: conventional and hybridoma 372.D6.5 GAT-TsFR only suppress responses by spleen cells of the I-Jb haplotype, whereas suppression mediated by the second hybridoma

  15. Chiral effects on helicity studied via the energy landscape of short (D, L)-alanine peptides.

    PubMed

    Neelamraju, Sridhar; Oakley, Mark T; Johnston, Roy L

    2015-10-28

    The homochirality of natural amino acids facilitates the formation of regular secondary structures such as α-helices and β-sheets. Here, we study the relationship between chirality and backbone structure for the example of hexa-alanine. The most stable stereoisomers are identified through global optimisation. Further, the energy landscape, a database of connected low-energy local minima and transition points, is constructed for various neutral and zwitterionic stereoisomers of hexa-alanine. Three order parameters for partial helicity are applied and metric disconnectivity graphs are presented with partial helicity as a metric. We also apply the Zimm-Bragg model to derive average partial helicities for Ace-(L-Ala)6-NHMe, Ace-(D-Ala-L-Ala)3-NHMe, and Ace-(L-Ala)3-(D-Ala)3-NHMe from the database of local minima and compare with previous studies.

  16. Chiral effects on helicity studied via the energy landscape of short (d, l)-alanine peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neelamraju, Sridhar; Oakley, Mark T.; Johnston, Roy L.

    2015-10-01

    The homochirality of natural amino acids facilitates the formation of regular secondary structures such as α-helices and β-sheets. Here, we study the relationship between chirality and backbone structure for the example of hexa-alanine. The most stable stereoisomers are identified through global optimisation. Further, the energy landscape, a database of connected low-energy local minima and transition points, is constructed for various neutral and zwitterionic stereoisomers of hexa-alanine. Three order parameters for partial helicity are applied and metric disconnectivity graphs are presented with partial helicity as a metric. We also apply the Zimm-Bragg model to derive average partial helicities for Ace-(l-Ala)6-NHMe, Ace-(d-Ala-l-Ala)3-NHMe, and Ace-(l-Ala)3-(d-Ala)3-NHMe from the database of local minima and compare with previous studies.

  17. Recombinant Expression of a Genome-encoded N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine Amidase that Synergistically Lyses Listeria monocytogenes Biofilms with a Protease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Listeria monocytogenes plays a significant role in human food-borne disease caused by eating food contaminated with the bacterium and although incidence is low it is a leading cause of life-threatening, bacterial food-borne disease in humans. L. monocytogenes serotypes 1/2a and 4b can form mixed-cu...

  18. Expression of a Clostridium perfringens genome-encoded putative N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase as a potential antimicrobial to control the bacterium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clostridium perfringens is a Gram-positive, spore-forming anaerobic bacterium that plays a substantial role in non-foodborne human, animal and avian diseases as well as human foodborne disease. Previously discovered C. perfringens bacteriophage lytic enzyme amino acid sequences were utilized to iden...

  19. Structural analysis and mutant growth properties reveal distinctive enzymatic and cellular roles for the three major L-alanine transaminases of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Peña-Soler, Esther; Fernandez, Francisco J; López-Estepa, Miguel; Garces, Fernando; Richardson, Andrew J; Quintana, Juan F; Rudd, Kenneth E; Coll, Miquel; Vega, M Cristina

    2014-01-01

    In order to maintain proper cellular function, the metabolism of the bacterial microbiota presents several mechanisms oriented to keep a correctly balanced amino acid pool. Central components of these mechanisms are enzymes with alanine transaminase activity, pyridoxal 5'-phosphate-dependent enzymes that interconvert alanine and pyruvate, thereby allowing the precise control of alanine and glutamate concentrations, two of the most abundant amino acids in the cellular amino acid pool. Here we report the 2.11-Å crystal structure of full-length AlaA from the model organism Escherichia coli, a major bacterial alanine aminotransferase, and compare its overall structure and active site composition with detailed atomic models of two other bacterial enzymes capable of catalyzing this reaction in vivo, AlaC and valine-pyruvate aminotransferase (AvtA). Apart from a narrow entry channel to the active site, a feature of this new crystal structure is the role of an active site loop that closes in upon binding of substrate-mimicking molecules, and which has only been previously reported in a plant enzyme. Comparison of the available structures indicates that beyond superficial differences, alanine aminotransferases of diverse phylogenetic origins share a universal reaction mechanism that depends on an array of highly conserved amino acid residues and is similarly regulated by various unrelated motifs. Despite this unifying mechanism and regulation, growth competition experiments demonstrate that AlaA, AlaC and AvtA are not freely exchangeable in vivo, suggesting that their functional repertoire is not completely redundant thus providing an explanation for their independent evolutionary conservation.

  20. Excess of L-alanine in amino acids synthesized in a plasma torch generated by a hypervelocity meteorite impact reproduced in the laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Managadze, George G.; Engel, Michael H.; Getty, Stephanie; Wurz, Peter; Brinckerhoff, William B.; Shokolov, Anatoly G.; Sholin, Gennady V.; Terent'ev, Sergey A.; Chumikov, Alexander E.; Skalkin, Alexander S.; Blank, Vladimir D.; Prokhorov, Vyacheslav M.; Managadze, Nina G.; Luchnikov, Konstantin A.

    2016-10-01

    We present a laboratory reproduction of hypervelocity impacts of a carbon containing meteorite on a mineral substance representative of planetary surfaces. The physical conditions of the resulting impact plasma torch provide favorable conditions for abiogenic synthesis of protein amino acids: We identified glycine and alanine, and in smaller quantities serine, in the produced material. Moreover, we observe breaking of alanine mirror symmetry with L excess, which coincides with the bioorganic world. Therefore the selection of L-amino acids for the formation of proteins for living matter could have been the result from plasma processes occurring during the impact meteorites on the surface. This indicates that the plasma torch from meteorite impacts could play an important role in the formation of biomolecular homochirality. Thus, meteorite impacts possibly were the initial stage of this process and promoted conditions for the emergence of a living matter.

  1. Modified triglycine sulphate (TGS) single crystals for pyroelectric infrared detector applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banan, M.; Lal, R. B.; Batra, Ashok

    1992-01-01

    Effects of caesium and cerium, L-alanine, and caesium plus L-alanine impurities on ferroelectric and pyroelectric properties of TGS crystals are investigated. Dielectric constant and loss, pyroelectric coefficient, spontaneous polarization, and coercive field measurements of these modified crystals, as a function of temperature, are reported. Caesium and cerium did not affect the electrical properties of TGS crystals significantly, whereas L-alanine- and, especially, Cs + L-alanine-doped TGS crystals exhibited promising improvements in pyroelectric properties, up to 48 C, as compared to pure TGS crystals.

  2. Substrate specificity of amino acid transport in sheep erythrocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Young, J D; Ellory, J C

    1977-01-01

    The specificity of amino acid transport in normal (high-glutathione) sheep erythrocytes was investigated by studying the interaction of various neutral and dibasic amino acids in both competition and exchange experiments. Apparent Ki values were obtained for amino acids as inhibitors of L-alanine influx. Amino acids previously found to be transported by high-glutathione cells at fast rates (L-cysteine, L-alpha-amino-n-butyrate) were the most effective inhibitors. D-Alanine and D-alpha-amino-n-butyrate were without effect. Of the remaining amino acids studied, only L-norvaline, L-valine, L-norleucine, L-serine and L-2,4-diamino-n-butyrate significantly inhibited L-alanine uptake. L-Alanine efflux from pre-loaded cells was markedly stimulated by extracellular L-alanine. Those amino acids that inhibited L-alanine influx also stimulated L-alanine efflux. In addition, D-alanine, D-alpha-amino-n-biutyrate, L-threonine, L-asparagine, L-alpha, beta-diaminoproprionate, L-ornithine, L-lysine and S-2-aminoethyl-L-cysteine also significantly stimulated L-alanine efflux. L-Lysine uptake was inhibited by L-alanine but not by D-alanine, and the inhibitory potency of L-alanine was not influenced by the replacement of Na+ in the incubation medium with choline. L-Lysine efflux from pre-loaded cells was stimulated by L-alanine but not by D-alanine. It is concluded that these cells possess a highly selective stero-specific amino acid-transport system. Although the optimum substrates are small neutral amino acids, this system also has a significant affinity for dibasic amino acids. PMID:849280

  3. Alanine increases blood pressure during hypotension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conlay, L. A.; Maher, T. J.; Wurtman, R. J.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of L-alanine administration on blood pressure (BP) during haemorrhagic shock was investigated using anesthetized rats whose left carotid arteries were cannulated for BP measurement, blood removal, and drug administration. It was found that L-alanine, in doses of 10, 25, 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg, increased the systolic BP of hypotensive rats by 38 to 80 percent (while 100 mg/kg pyruvate increased BP by only 9.4 mmhg, not significantly different from saline). The results suggest that L-alanine might influence cardiovascular function.

  4. Regulation of the ald gene encoding alanine dehydrogenase by AldR in Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Ji-A; Baek, Eun-Young; Kim, Si Wouk; Choi, Jong-Soon; Oh, Jeong-Il

    2013-08-01

    The regulatory gene aldR was identified 95 bp upstream of the ald gene encoding L-alanine dehydrogenase in Mycobacterium smegmatis. The AldR protein shows sequence similarity to the regulatory proteins of the Lrp/AsnC family. Using an aldR deletion mutant, we demonstrated that AldR serves as both activator and repressor for the regulation of ald gene expression, depending on the presence or absence of L-alanine. The purified AldR protein exists as a homodimer in the absence of L-alanine, while it adopts the quaternary structure of a homohexamer in the presence of L-alanine. The binding affinity of AldR for the ald control region was shown to be increased significantly by L-alanine. Two AldR binding sites (O1 and O2) with the consensus sequence GA-N₂-ATC-N₂-TC and one putative AldR binding site with the sequence GA-N₂-GTT-N₂-TC were identified upstream of the ald gene. Alanine and cysteine were demonstrated to be the effector molecules directly involved in the induction of ald expression. The cellular level of L-alanine was shown to be increased in M. smegmatis cells grown under hypoxic conditions, and the hypoxic induction of ald expression appears to be mediated by AldR, which senses the intracellular level of alanine.

  5. Involvement of alanine racemase in germination of Bacillus cereus spores lacking an intact exosporium.

    PubMed

    Venir, Elena; Del Torre, Manuela; Cunsolo, Vincenzo; Saletti, Rosaria; Musetti, Rita; Stecchini, Mara Lucia

    2014-02-01

    The L-alanine mediated germination of food isolated Bacillus cereus DSA 1 spores, which lacked an intact exosporium, increased in the presence of D-cycloserine (DCS), which is an alanine racemase (Alr) inhibitor, reflecting the activity of the Alr enzyme, capable of converting L-alanine to the germination inhibitor D-alanine. Proteomic analysis of the alkaline extracts of the spore proteins, which include exosporium and coat proteins, confirmed that Alr was present in the B. cereus DSA 1 spores and matched to that encoded by B. cereus ATCC 14579, whose spore germination was strongly affected by the block of conversion of L- to D-alanine. Unlike ATCC 14579 spores, L-alanine germination of B. cereus DSA 1 spores was not affected by the preincubation with DCS, suggesting a lack of restriction in the reactant accessibility.

  6. Glutamine and alanine-induced differential expression of intracellular IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α in LPS-stimulated monocytes in human whole-blood.

    PubMed

    Raspé, C; Czeslick, E; Weimann, A; Schinke, C; Leimert, A; Kellner, P; Simm, A; Bucher, M; Sablotzki, A

    2013-04-01

    To investigate the effects of the commonly-used immunomodulators l-glutamine, l-alanine, and the combination of both l-alanyl-l-glutamine (Dipeptamin(®)) on intracellular expression of IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α during endotoxemia, lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated human monocytes in a whole blood system were investigated by flow cytometry. Whole blood of twenty-seven healthy volunteers was stimulated with LPS and incubated with three different amino acid solutions (1. l-glutamine, 2. l-alanine, 3. l-alanyl-l-glutamine, each concentration 2 mM, 5 mM, incubation time 3 h). CD14(+) monocytes were phenotyped in whole-blood and intracellular expression of cytokines was assessed by flow cytometry. Our investigations showed for the first time in whole blood probes, imitating best physiologically present cellular interactions, that l-glutamine caused a dose-independent inhibitory effect on IL-6 and TNF-α production in human monocytes stimulated with LPS. However, l-alanine had contrary effects on IL-6 expression, significantly upregulating expression of IL-6 in LPS-treated monocytes. The impact of l-alanine on the expression of TNF-α was comparable with glutamine. Neither amino acid was able to affect IL-8 production in LPS-stimulated monocytes. The combination of both did not influence significantly IL-6 and IL-8 expression in monocytes during endotoxemia, however strongly reduced TNF-α production. For the regulation of TNF-α, l-glutamine, l-alanine and the combination of both show a congruent and exponentiated downregulating effect during endotoxemia, for the modulation of IL-6, l-glutamine and l-alanine featured opposite regulation leading to a canceling impact of each other when recombining both amino acids.

  7. Functional Characterization of a Melittin Analog Containing a Non-natural Tryptophan Analog

    PubMed Central

    Gosavi, Pallavi M.; Moroz, Yurii S.; Angevine, Christopher E.; Chavis, Amy E.; Reiner, Joseph E.; Korendovych, Ivan V.; Caputo, Gregory A.

    2015-01-01

    Tryptophan (Trp) is a naturally occurring amino acid, which exhibits fluorescence emission properties that are dependent on the polarity of the local environment around the Trp side chain. However, this sensitivity also complicates interpretation of fluorescence emission data. A non-natural analogue of tryptophan, β-(1-azulenyl)-L-alanine, exhibits fluorescence insensitive to local solvent polarity and does not impact the structure or characteristics of several peptides examined. In this study we investigated the effect of replacing Trp with β-(1-azulenyl)-L-alanine in the well-known bee-venom peptide melittin. This peptide provides a model framework for investigating the impact of replacing Trp with β-(1-azulenyl)-L- alanine in a functional peptide system that undergoes significant shifts in Trp fluorescence emission upon binding to lipid bilayers. Microbiological methods including assessment of the antimicrobial activity by minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) assays and bacterial membrane permeability assays indicated little difference between the Trp and the β-(1-azulenyl)-L-alanine-substituted versions of melittin. Circular dichroism spectroscopy showed both that peptides adopted the expected α-helical structures when bound to phospholipid bilayers and electrophysiological analysis indicated that both created membrane disruptions leading to significant conductance increases across model membranes. Both peptides exhibited a marked protection of the respective fluorophores when bound to bilayers indicating a similar membrane-bound topology. As expected, while fluorescence quenching and CD indicate the peptides are stably bound to lipid vesicles, the peptide containing β-(1-azulenyl)-L-alanine exhibited no fluorescence emission shift upon binding while the natural Trp exhibited >10 nm shift in emission spectrum barycenter. Taken together, the β-(1-azulenyl)-L-alanine can serve as a solvent insensitive alternative to Trp that does not have significant

  8. Secretion of d-alanine by Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Katsube, Satoshi; Sato, Kazuki; Ando, Tasuke; Isogai, Emiko; Yoneyama, Hiroshi

    2016-07-01

    Escherichia coli has an l-alanine export system that protects the cells from toxic accumulation of intracellular l-alanine in the presence of l-alanyl-l-alanine (l-Ala-l-Ala). When a DadA-deficient strain was incubated with 6.0 mM l-Ala-l-Ala, we detected l-alanine and d-alanine using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis at a level of 7.0 mM and 3.0 mM, respectively, after 48 h incubation. Treatment of the culture supernatant with d-amino acid oxidase resulted in the disappearance of a signal corresponding to d-alanine. Additionally, the culture supernatant enabled a d-alanine auxotroph to grow without d-alanine supplementation, confirming that the signal detected by HPLC was authentic d-alanine. Upon introduction of an expression vector harbouring the alanine racemase genes, alr or dadX, the extracellular level of d-alanine increased to 11.5 mM and 8.5 mM, respectively, under similar conditions, suggesting that increased metabolic flow from l-alanine to d-alanine enhanced d-alanine secretion. When high-density DadA-deficient cells preloaded with l-Ala-l-Ala were treated with 20 µM carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenyl hydrazone (CCCP), secretion of both l-alanine and d-alanine was enhanced ~twofold compared with that in cells without CCCP treatment. In contrast, the ATPase inhibitor dicyclohexylcarbodiimide did not exert such an effect on the l-alanine and d-alanine secretion. Furthermore, inverted membrane vesicles prepared from DadA-deficient cells lacking the l-alanine exporter AlaE accumulated [3H]D-alanine in an energy-dependent manner. This energy-dependent accumulation of [3H]D-alanine was strongly inhibited by CCCP. These results indicate that E. coli has a transport system(s) that exports d-alanine and that this function is most likely modulated by proton electrochemical potential. PMID:27166225

  9. CHARACTERIZATION OF AMINOPEPTIDASE IN THE FREE-LIVING NEMATODE PANAGRELLUS REDIVIVUS: SUBCELLULAR DISTRIBUTION AND POSSIBLE ROLE IN NEUROPEPTIDE METABOLISM

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aminopeptidase was detected in homogenates of the free-living nematode Panagrellus redivivus with the aminoacyl substrate L-alanine-4-nitroanilide (Ala-4-NA). Subcellular distribution of the enzyme was unequal, with approximately 80 percent of total aminopeptidase in the soluble fraction and the rem...

  10. 21 CFR 172.320 - Amino acids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...-Cysteine L-Cystine L-Glutamic acid L-Glutamine Aminoacetic acid (glycine) L-Histidine L-Isoleucine L... following: L-Alanine L-Arginine L-Arginine Monohydrochloride L-Cysteine Monohydrochloride L-Cystine... (including L-asparagine) 7.0 L-Cystine (including L-cysteine) 2.3 L-Glutamic acid (including L-glutamine)...

  11. 21 CFR 172.540 - DL-Alanine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false DL-Alanine. 172.540 Section 172.540 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES....540 DL-Alanine. DL-Alanine (a racemic mixture of D- and L-alanine; CAS Reg. No. 302-72-7) may...

  12. Development of fingermark on the surface of fired cartridge casing using amino acid sensitive reagents: Change of viewpoint.

    PubMed

    Hong, Sungwook; Han, Aleum

    2016-09-01

    Four amino acid sensitive fingermark enhancement reagents (ninhydrin, 5-methylthioninhydrin (5-MTN), 1,8-diazafloren-9-one (DFO), 1,2-indandione (1,2-IND) were used for the development of fingermark on the surface of brass. The reagents were used for the detection of a trace amount of metallic ion on the surface of cartridge casings to develop latent fingermarks. Ninhydrin-l-alanine (NIN-ALA), 5-MTN-l-alanine (MTN-ALA), DFO-l-alanine (DFO-ALA), 1,2-IND-l-alanine (IND-ALA) complexes were prepared and applied to the fired cartridge casings, for the further enhancement of fingermarks developed by corrosion on the surface of brass. Of the four complexes, NIN-ALA and MTN-ALA complexes induced color changes to enhance fingermarks on fired cartridge casings, but photoluminescence was not observed. About 31% of cartridge casings treated with MTN-ALA showed enhanced fingermarks. DFO-ALA and IND-ALA did not show any enhancement of fingermarks. PMID:27235594

  13. Low-Frequency Modes of Peptides and Globular Proteins in Solution Observed by Ultrafast OHD-RIKES Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Giraud, Gerard; Karolin, Jan; Wynne, Klaas

    2003-01-01

    The low-frequency (1–200 cm−1) vibrational spectra of peptides and proteins in solution have been investigated with ultrafast optical heterodyne-detected Raman-induced Kerr-effect spectroscopy (OHD-RIKES). Spectra have been obtained for di-L-alanine (ALA(2)) and the α-helical peptide poly-L-alanine (PLA) in dichloroacetic acid solution. The poly-L-alanine spectrum shows extra amplitude compared to the di-L-alanine spectrum, which can be explained by the secondary structure of the former. The globular proteins lysozyme, α-lactalbumin, pepsin, and β-lactoglobulin in aqueous solution have been studied to determine the possible influence of secondary or tertiary structure on the low-frequency spectra. The spectra of the globular proteins have been analyzed in terms of three nondiffusive Brownian oscillators. The lowest frequency oscillator corresponds to the so-called Boson peak observed in inelastic neutron scattering (INS). The remaining two oscillators are not observed in inelastic neutron scattering, do therefore not involve significant motion of hydrogen atoms, and may be associated with delocalized backbone torsions. PMID:12944303

  14. Role of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} on the kinetics of low-affinity high-capacity Na{sup +}-dependent alanine transport in SHR proximal tubular epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pinto, Vanda; Pinho, Maria Joao; Jose, Pedro A.; Soares-da-Silva, Patricio

    2010-07-30

    Research highlights: {yields} H{sub 2}O{sub 2} in excess is required for the presence of a low-affinity high-capacity component for the Na{sup +}-dependent [{sup 14}C]-L-alanine uptake in SHR PTE cells only. {yields} It is suggested that Na{sup +} binding in renal ASCT2 may be regulated by ROS in SHR PTE cells. -- Abstract: The presence of high and low sodium affinity states for the Na{sup +}-dependent [{sup 14}C]-L-alanine uptake in immortalized renal proximal tubular epithelial (PTE) cells was previously reported (Am. J. Physiol. 293 (2007) R538-R547). This study evaluated the role of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} on the Na{sup +}-dependent [{sup 14}C]-L-alanine uptake of ASCT2 in immortalized renal PTE cells from Wistar Kyoto rat (WKY) and spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR). Na{sup +} dependence of [{sup 14}C]-L-alanine uptake was investigated replacing NaCl with an equimolar concentration of choline chloride in vehicle- and apocynin-treated cells. Na{sup +} removal from the uptake solution abolished transport activity in both WKY and SHR PTE cells. Decreases in H{sub 2}O{sub 2} levels in the extracellular medium significantly reduced Na{sup +}-K{sub m} and V{sub max} values of the low-affinity high-capacity component in SHR PTE cells, with no effect on the high-affinity low-capacity state of the Na{sup +}-dependent [{sup 14}C]-L-alanine uptake. After removal of apocynin from the culture medium, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} levels returned to basal values within 1 to 3 h in both WKY and SHR PTE cells and these were found stable for the next 24 h. Under these experimental conditions, the Na{sup +}-K{sub m} and V{sub max} of the high-affinity low-capacity state were unaffected and the low-affinity high-capacity component remained significantly decreased 1 day but not 4 days after apocynin removal. In conclusion, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} in excess is required for the presence of a low-affinity high-capacity component for the Na{sup +}-dependent [{sup 14}C]-L-alanine uptake in SHR PTE cells only

  15. Binding-protein-dependent alanine transport in Rhodobacter sphaeroides is regulated by the internal pH.

    PubMed

    Abee, T; van der Wal, F J; Hellingwerf, K J; Konings, W N

    1989-09-01

    The properties of an L-alanine uptake system in Rhodobacter sphaeroides were studied and compared with those of H+/lactose symport in R. sphaeroides 4P1, a strain in which the lactose carrier of Escherichia coli has been cloned and functionally expressed (F. E. Nano, Ph.D. thesis, University of Illinois, Urbana, 1984). Previous studies indicated that both transport systems were active only when electron transfer took place in the respiratory or cyclic electron transfer chain, while uptake of L-alanine also required the presence of K+ (M. G. L. Elferink, Ph.D. thesis, University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands, 1986). The results presented in this paper offer an explanation for these findings. Transport of the nonmetabolizable L-alanine analog 2-alpha-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB) is mediated by a shock-sensitive transport system. The apparently unidirectional uptake of AIB results in accumulation levels which exceed 7 x 10(3). The finding of L-alanine-binding activity in the concentrated crude shock fluid indicates that L-alanine is taken up by a binding-protein-dependent transport system. Transport of the nonmetabolizable lactose analog methyl-beta-D-thiogalactopyranoside (TMG) by the lactose carrier under anaerobic conditions in the dark was observed in cells and membrane vesicles. This indicates that the H+/lactose symport system is active without electron transfer. Uptake of AIB, but not that of TMG, is inhibited by vanadate with a 50% inhibitory concentration of 50 microM, which suggests a role of a phosphorylated intermediate in AIB transport. Uptake of TMG and AIB is regulated by the internal pH. The initial rates of uptake increased with the internal pH, and and pKa values of 7.2 for TMG and 7.8 for AIB. At an internal pH of 7, no AIB uptake occurred, and the rate of TMG uptake was only 30% of the rate at an internal pH of 8. In a previous study, we found that K+ plays an essential role in regulating the internal pH (T. Abee, K. J. Hellingwerf, and W

  16. Reductive amination by recombinant Escherichia coli: whole cell biotransformation of 2-keto-3-methylvalerate to L-isoleucine.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, Elisabeth; Klatte, Stephanie; Wendisch, Volker F

    2013-11-01

    A whole cell biotransformation system for reductive amination has been studied in recombinant Escherichia coli cells. Reductive amination of 2-keto-3-methylvalerate to L-isoleucine by a two-enzyme-cascade was achieved by overproduction of endogenous L-alanine dependent transaminase AvtA and heterologous L-alanine dehydrogenase from Bacillus subtilis in recombinant E. coli. Up to 100 mM L-isoleucine were produced from 100 mM 2-keto-3-methylvalerate and 100 mM ammonium sulfate. Regeneration of NADH as cofactor in the whole cell system was driven by glucose catabolism. The effects of defined gene deletions in the central carbon metabolism on biotransformation were tested. Strains lacking the NuoG subunit of NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I) or aceA encoding the glyoxylate cycle enzyme isocitrate lyase exhibited increased biotransformation rates.

  17. Sucrose radical-production cross-section regarding heavy-ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, Kouichi; Ikota, Nobuo; Anzai, Kazunori

    2008-05-01

    We investigated the sucrose radical-production cross-section induced by heavy-ion irradiation. L-Alanine was also used in order to compare radical yield and cross-section. The stable free radicals after irradiation were analyzed by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). The radical yield obtained by the irradiated samples had a logarithmic correlation with the LET (linear energy transfer). Quantitative EPR analyses showed that radical productions for sucrose and L-alanine vary both by different particle irradiation and the LET under the same absorbed dose. Furthermore, the cross-sections of radical productions for samples were calculated. Both cross-sections for C ions irradiation under LET 30 keV/μm at 50 Gy dose were ˜3.0 × 10 -9 μm 2, taking account of the molecular areas of the samples. The values of the cross-sections imply that multiple ionizing particles involve producing stable radicals.

  18. Tryptophanase from Escherichia coli: catalytic and spectral properties in water-organic solvents.

    PubMed

    Faleev, N G; Dementieva, I S; Zakomirdina, L N; Gogoleva, O I; Belikov, V M

    1994-08-01

    In water-methanol and water-dimethylformamide (DMF) (1:1 v/v) solutions tryptophanase from E.coli retains its abilities to form a quinonoid complex with quasisubstrates and to catalyze the decomposition of S-o-nitrophenyl-L-cysteine (SOPC). Both the KM and Vmax values decrease in water-organic media. The affinities of tryptophanase for L-alanine, L-tryptophan, oxindolyl-L-alanine and indole in aqueous methanol are decreased, the effect being stronger for the more hydrophobic substances. In a water solution tryptophanase catalizes the reaction of SOPC with indole to form L-tryptophan while in water-organic solvents only decomposition of SOPC is observed.

  19. First-principles studies of pure and fluorine substituted alanines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Sardar; Vaizie, Hamide; Rahnamaye Aliabad, H. A.; Ahmad, Rashid; Khan, Imad; Ali, Zahid; Jalali-Asadabadi, S.; Ahmad, Iftikhar; Khan, Amir Abdullah

    2016-05-01

    This paper communicates the structural, electronic and optical properties of L-alanine, monofluoro and difluoro substituted alanines using density functional calculations. These compounds exist in orthorhombic crystal structure and the calculated structural parameters such as lattice constants, bond angles and bond lengths are in agreement with the experimental results. L-alanine is an indirect band gap insulator, while its fluorine substituted compounds (monofluoroalanine and difluoroalanine) are direct band gap insulators. The substitution causes reduction in the band gap and hence these optically tailored direct wide band gap materials have enhanced optical properties in the ultraviolet (UV) region of electromagnetic spectrum. Therefore, optical properties like dielectric function, refractive index, reflectivity and energy loss function are also investigated. These compounds have almost isotropic nature in the lower frequency range while at higher energies, they have a significant anisotropic nature.

  20. Dye-linked D-amino acid dehydrogenases: biochemical characteristics and applications in biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Satomura, Takenori; Sakuraba, Haruhiko; Suye, Shin-Ichiro; Ohshima, Toshihisa

    2015-11-01

    Dye-linked D-amino acid dehydrogenases (Dye-DADHs) catalyze the dehydrogenation of free D-amino acids in the presence of an artificial electron acceptor. Although Dye-DADHs functioning in catabolism of L-alanine and as primary enzymes in electron transport chains are widely distributed in mesophilic Gram-negative bacteria, biochemical and biotechnological information on these enzymes remains scanty. This is in large part due to their instability after isolation. On the other hand, in the last decade, several novel types of Dye-DADH have been found in thermophilic bacteria and hyperthermophilic archaea, where they contribute not only to L-alanine catabolism but also to the catabolism of other amino acids, including D-arginine and L-hydroxyproline. In this minireview, we summarize recent developments in our understanding of the biochemical characteristics of Dye-DADHs and their specific application to electrochemical biosensors. PMID:26362681

  1. Dye-linked D-amino acid dehydrogenases: biochemical characteristics and applications in biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Satomura, Takenori; Sakuraba, Haruhiko; Suye, Shin-Ichiro; Ohshima, Toshihisa

    2015-11-01

    Dye-linked D-amino acid dehydrogenases (Dye-DADHs) catalyze the dehydrogenation of free D-amino acids in the presence of an artificial electron acceptor. Although Dye-DADHs functioning in catabolism of L-alanine and as primary enzymes in electron transport chains are widely distributed in mesophilic Gram-negative bacteria, biochemical and biotechnological information on these enzymes remains scanty. This is in large part due to their instability after isolation. On the other hand, in the last decade, several novel types of Dye-DADH have been found in thermophilic bacteria and hyperthermophilic archaea, where they contribute not only to L-alanine catabolism but also to the catabolism of other amino acids, including D-arginine and L-hydroxyproline. In this minireview, we summarize recent developments in our understanding of the biochemical characteristics of Dye-DADHs and their specific application to electrochemical biosensors.

  2. Asymmetric adsorption by quartz - A model for the prebiotic origin of optical activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonner, W. M.; Kavasmaneck, P. R.; Martin, F. S.; Flores, J. J.

    1975-01-01

    One mechanism previously proposed for the abiotic accumulation of molecules of one chirality in nature is asymmetric adsorption on the chiral surfaces of optically active quartz crystals. Earlier literature in this field is reviewed, with the conclusion that previous investigations of this phenomenon, using optical rotation criteria, have afforded ambiguous results. We now have studied the adsorption of radioactive D- and L-alanine on powdered d- and l-quartz, using change in radioactivity level as a criterion for both gross and differential adsorption, d-Quartz preferentially adsorbed D-alanine from anhydrous dimethyl-formamide solution, and l-quartz L-alanine. The differential adsorption varied between 1.0 and 1.8%. The implications of these observations are discussed from the viewpoint of early chemical evolution and the origin of optically active organic compounds in nature.

  3. Halogenated DOPA in a Marine Adhesive Protein

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Cheng Jun; Srivastava, Aasheesh; Reifert, Jack R.; Waite, J. Herbert

    2009-01-01

    The sandcastle worm Phragmatopoma californica, a marine polychaete, constructs a tube-like shelter by cementing together sand grains using a glue secreted from the building organ in its thorax. The glue is a mixture of post-translationally modified proteins, notably the cement proteins Pc-1 and Pc-2 with the amino acid, 3,4-dihydroxyphenyl-L-alanine (DOPA). Significant amounts of a halogenated derivative of DOPA were isolated from the worm cement following partial acid hydrolysis and capture of catecholic amino acids by phenylboronate affinity chromatography. Analysis by tandem mass spectrometry and 1H NMR indicates the DOPA derivative to be 2-chloro-4, 5-dihydroxyphenyl-L-alanine. The potential roles of 2-chloro-DOPA in chemical defense and underwater adhesion are considered. PMID:20126508

  4. Dependence of the thermodynamic characteristics of the complexation of alanine-18-crown-6 on the composition of water-ethanol solvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usacheva, T. R.; Sharnin, V. A.; Chernov, I. V.

    2013-02-01

    Standard thermodynamic parameters (Δr G○, Δr H○, TΔr S○) for the complexation reaction of 18-crown-6 ether (18C6) with D,L-alanine (Ala) in mixed water-ethanol (H2O-EtOH) solvents are calculated from the data of calorimetric titrations performed at T = 298.15 K. It is established that an increase in the concentration of EtOH in mixed solvent leads to a rise in stability and an increase in the exothermicity of [Ala18C6] molecular complex formation; changes in the energetics of reaction upon a change in the solvent composition are determined by changes in the solvation state of 18C6, which is typical of the reactions of molecular complex formation of 18C6 with D,L-alanine and glycine in water-organic solvents.

  5. Modification of olfactory-related behavior in juvenile Atlantic salmon by changes in pH.

    PubMed

    Royce-Malmgren, C H; Watson, W H

    1987-03-01

    The hypothesis that low pH modifies the response of salmonids to certain olfactory stimuli was tested. An interactive video-computer system was used to monitor the behavior of juvenile Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar). At a pH of 7.6, animals were attracted to glycine and avoidedL-alanine. These effects were dose-dependent, with a threshold of 10(-7) M. The response of the fish to both amino acids changed when the pH of the test chamber was gradually lowered from 7.6 to 5.1; they became attracted toL-alanine and indifferent to glycine. These effects were reversible with a return to pH 7.6. Our findings suggest that acid rain may contribute to reductions in salmonid populations in acidified rivers by impairing the recognition of olfactory cues by salmon during their spawning migration.

  6. Aromatic radiofluorination with (/sup 18/F)fluorine gas: 6-(/sup 18/F)fluoro-L-dopa

    SciTech Connect

    Firnau, G.; Chirakal, R.; Garnett, E.S.

    1984-11-01

    A new synthesis is described for the routine production of 3,4-dihydroxy-6-(/sup 18/F)fluoro-phenyl-L-alanine (6-(/sup 18/F)fluoro-L-dopa). The reaction between (/sup 18/F)fluorine gas and 3,4-dihydroxyphenyl-L-alanine (L-dopa) in liquid hydrogen fluoride gave 2-, 5-, and 6-(/sup 18/F)fluoro-L-dopa. 6-(/sup 18/F)Fluoro-L-dopa was isolated by reverse-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography. From 100 mCi (/sup 18/F)F/sub 2/, the method produces 3 mCi of 6-(/sup 18/F)fluoro-L-dopa at the end of synthesis.

  7. Halogenated DOPA in a Marine Adhesive Protein.

    PubMed

    Sun, Cheng Jun; Srivastava, Aasheesh; Reifert, Jack R; Waite, J Herbert

    2009-02-01

    The sandcastle worm Phragmatopoma californica, a marine polychaete, constructs a tube-like shelter by cementing together sand grains using a glue secreted from the building organ in its thorax. The glue is a mixture of post-translationally modified proteins, notably the cement proteins Pc-1 and Pc-2 with the amino acid, 3,4-dihydroxyphenyl-L-alanine (DOPA). Significant amounts of a halogenated derivative of DOPA were isolated from the worm cement following partial acid hydrolysis and capture of catecholic amino acids by phenylboronate affinity chromatography. Analysis by tandem mass spectrometry and (1)H NMR indicates the DOPA derivative to be 2-chloro-4, 5-dihydroxyphenyl-L-alanine. The potential roles of 2-chloro-DOPA in chemical defense and underwater adhesion are considered.

  8. Addition of amino acids and dipeptides to fullerene C{sub 60} giving rise to monoadducts

    SciTech Connect

    Romanova, V.S.; Tsyryapkin, V.A.; Vol`pin, M.E.

    1994-12-01

    The authors have developed a general method for the direct addition of amino acids and dipeptides of various structures to fullerene C{sub 60}. In all cases the addition involves the amino group. The reaction proceeds when the solutions of fullerene and an amino acid (or dipeptide) are mixed at 50-100 {degrees}C. The fullerene derivatives of the following amino acids and dipeptides have been obtained: glycine, p-aminobenzoic acid, {omega}-aminocaproic acid, L-proline, L-alanine, L-alanyl-Lalanine, D,L-alanyl-D,L-alanine, glycyl-L-valine. The adduct of methyl L-ananinate with C{sub 60} was also prepared.

  9. Simulation of coherent energy transfer in an alpha-helical peptide by Fermi resonance.

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, D L; Collins, M A

    1992-01-01

    A mechanism by which NH stretching quanta are coherently transported along a chain of hydrogen bonded peptide groups is demonstrated by classical simulation of a section of the alpha-helical peptide poly(L-alanine). Vibrational motion takes place on a complex energy surface constructed from earlier ab initio and empirical surfaces. A speculative hypothesis of the biological role of this mechanism is presented, and the critical parameters governing the dynamics are identified and discussed. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:1547322

  10. Functional Characterization of Alanine Racemase from Schizosaccharomyces pombe: a Eucaryotic Counterpart to Bacterial Alanine Racemase

    PubMed Central

    Uo, Takuma; Yoshimura, Tohru; Tanaka, Naotaka; Takegawa, Kaoru; Esaki, Nobuyoshi

    2001-01-01

    Schizosaccharomyces pombe has an open reading frame, which we named alr1+, encoding a putative protein similar to bacterial alanine racemase. We cloned the alr1+ gene in Escherichia coli and purified the gene product (Alr1p), with an Mr of 41,590, to homogeneity. Alr1p contains pyridoxal 5′-phosphate as a coenzyme and catalyzes the racemization of alanine with apparent Km and Vmax values as follows: for l-alanine, 5.0 mM and 670 μmol/min/mg, respectively, and for d-alanine, 2.4 mM and 350 μmol/min/mg, respectively. The enzyme is almost specific to alanine, but l-serine and l-2-aminobutyrate are racemized slowly at rates 3.7 and 0.37% of that of l-alanine, respectively. S. pombe uses d-alanine as a sole nitrogen source, but deletion of the alr1+ gene resulted in retarded growth on the same medium. This indicates that S. pombe has catabolic pathways for both enantiomers of alanine and that the pathway for l-alanine coupled with racemization plays a major role in the catabolism of d-alanine. Saccharomyces cerevisiae differs markedly from S. pombe: S. cerevisiae uses l-alanine but not d-alanine as a sole nitrogen source. Moreover, d-alanine is toxic to S. cerevisiae. However, heterologous expression of the alr1+ gene enabled S. cerevisiae to grow efficiently on d-alanine as a sole nitrogen source. The recombinant yeast was relieved from the toxicity of d-alanine. PMID:11244061

  11. Determination of volatile aroma compounds of Ganoderma lucidum by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (HS-GC/MS).

    PubMed

    Taşkın, Hatıra; Kafkas, Ebru; Çakıroğlu, Özgün; Büyükalaca, Saadet

    2013-01-01

    This study was conducted at Horticulture Department of Cukurova University, Adana, Turkey during 2010-2011. Fresh sample of Ganoderma lucidum collected from Mersin province of Turkey was used as material. Volatile aroma compounds were performed by Headspace Gas Chromatography (HS-GC/MS). Alcohols, aldehydes, acids, phenol, L-Alanine, d-Alanine, 3Methyl, 2-Butanamine, 2-Propanamine were determined. 1-Octen-3-ol (Alcohol) and 3-methyl butanal (Aldehyde) were identified as major aroma compounds.

  12. Elastic and inelastic light scattering from single bacterial spores in an optical trap allows the monitoring of spore germination dynamics.

    PubMed

    Peng, Lixin; Chen, De; Setlow, Peter; Li, Yong-qing

    2009-05-15

    Raman scattering spectroscopy and elastic light scattering intensity (ESLI) were used to simultaneously measure levels of Ca-dipicolinic acid (CaDPA) and changes in spore morphology and refractive index during germination of individual Bacillus subtilis spores with and without the two redundant enzymes (CLEs), CwlJ and SleB, that degrade spores' peptidoglycan cortexes. Conclusions from these measurements include (1) CaDPA release from individual wild-type germinating spores was biphasic; in a first heterogeneous slow phase, T(lag), CaDPA levels decreased approximately 15%, and in the second phase ending at T(release), remaining CaDPA was released rapidly; (2) in L-alanine germination of wild-type spores and spores lacking SleB (a) the ESLI rose approximately 2-fold shortly before T(lag) at T(1), (b) following T(lag), the ESLI again rose approximately 2-fold at T(2) when CaDPA levels had decreased approximately 50%, and (c) the ESLI reached its maximum value at approximately T(release) and then decreased; (3) in CaDPA germination of wild-type spores, (a) T(lag) increased and the first increase in ESLI occurred well before T(lag), consistent with different pathways for CaDPA and L-alanine germination, (b) at T(release), the ESLI again reached its maximum value; (4) in L-alanine germination of spores lacking both CLEs and unable to degrade their cortex, the time DeltaT(release) (T(release) - T(lag)) for excretion of > or = 75% of CaDPA was approximately 15-fold higher than that for wild-type or sleB spores; and (5) spores lacking only CwlJ exhibited a similar but not identical ESLI pattern during L-alanine germination to that seen with cwlJ sleB spores and the high value for DeltaT(release).

  13. Purification and characterization of alanine dehydrogenase from a cyanobacterium, Phormidium lapideum.

    PubMed

    Sawa, Y; Tani, M; Murata, K; Shibata, H; Ochiai, H

    1994-11-01

    Alanine dehydrogenase (AlaDH) was purified to homogeneity from cell-free extracts of a non-N2-fixing filamentous cyanobacterium, Phormidium lapideum. The molecular mass of the native enzyme was 240 kDa, and SDS-PAGE revealed a minimum molecular mass of 41 kDa, suggesting a six-subunit structure. The NH2 terminal amino acid residues of the purified AlaDH revealed marked similarity with that of other AlaDHs. The enzyme was highly specific for L-alanine and NAD+, but showed relatively low amino-acceptor specificity. The pH optimum was 8.4 for reductive amination of pyruvate and 9.2 for oxidative deamination of L-alanine. The Km values were 5.0 mM for L-alanine and 0.04 mM for NAD+, 0.33 mM for pyruvate, 60.6 mM for NH4+ (pH 8.7), and 0.02 mM for NADH. Various L-amino acids including alanine, serine, threonine, and aromatic amino acids, inhibited the aminating reaction. The enzyme was inactivated upon incubation with pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) followed by reduction with sodium borohydride. The copresence of NADH and pyruvate largely protected the enzyme against the inactivation by PLP. PMID:7896761

  14. Deficiency in L-serine deaminase interferes with one-carbon metabolism and cell wall synthesis in Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao; El-Hajj, Ziad W; Newman, Elaine

    2010-10-01

    Escherichia coli K-12 provided with glucose and a mixture of amino acids depletes L-serine more quickly than any other amino acid even in the presence of ammonium sulfate. A mutant without three 4Fe4S L-serine deaminases (SdaA, SdaB, and TdcG) of E. coli K-12 is unable to do this. The high level of L-serine that accumulates when such a mutant is exposed to amino acid mixtures starves the cells for C(1) units and interferes with cell wall synthesis. We suggest that at high concentrations, L-serine decreases synthesis of UDP-N-acetylmuramate-L-alanine by the murC-encoded ligase, weakening the cell wall and producing misshapen cells and lysis. The inhibition by high L-serine is overcome in several ways: by a large concentration of L-alanine, by overproducing MurC together with a low concentration of L-alanine, and by overproducing FtsW, thus promoting septal assembly and also by overexpression of the glycine cleavage operon. S-Adenosylmethionine reduces lysis and allows an extensive increase in biomass without improving cell division. This suggests that E. coli has a metabolic trigger for cell division. Without that reaction, if no other inhibition occurs, other metabolic functions can continue and cells can elongate and replicate their DNA, reaching at least 180 times their usual length, but cannot divide.

  15. Partial enzymatic elimination and quantification of sarcosine from alanine using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Burton, Casey; Gamagedara, Sanjeewa; Ma, Yinfa

    2013-04-01

    Since sarcosine and D,L-alanine co-elute on reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) columns and the tandem mass spectrometer cannot differentiate them due to equivalent parent and fragment ions, derivatization is often required for analysis of sarcosine in LC/MS systems. This study offers an alternative to derivatization by employing partial elimination of sarcosine by enzymatic oxidation. The decrease in apparent concentration from the traditionally merged sarcosine-alanine peak associated with the enzymatic elimination has been shown to be proportional to the total sarcosine present (R(2) = 0.9999), allowing for determinations of urinary sarcosine. Sarcosine oxidase was shown to eliminate only sarcosine in the presence of D,L-alanine, and was consequently used as the selective enzyme. This newly developed technique has a method detection limit of 1 μg/L (parts per billion) with a linear range of 3 ppb-1 mg/L (parts per million) in urine matrices. The method was further validated through spiked recoveries of real urine samples, as well as the analysis of 35 real urine samples. The average recoveries for low, middle, and high sarcosine concentration spikes were 111.7, 90.8, and 90.1 %, respectively. In conclusion, this simple enzymatic approach coupled with HPLC/MS/MS is able to resolve sarcosine from D,L-alanine leading to underivatized quantification of sarcosine.

  16. Effects of high-salinity seawater acclimation on the levels of D-alanine in the muscle and hepatopancreas of kuruma prawn, Marsupenaeus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Naoko; Yokoyama, Masahumi

    2015-12-10

    Changes in D- and L-alanine contents were determined in the muscle and hepatopancreas of kuruma prawn Marsupenaeus japonicus, during acclimation from seawater containing 100% salinity to artificial seawater containing 150% salinity. In the hepatopancreas, contents of both amino acids increased by approximately threefold. The activity of alanine racemase, which catalyzes the interconversion of D- and L-alanine, also increased in the high-salinity seawater. In addition, the expression of the gene encoding alanine racemase increased in the hepatopancreas with an increase in the alanine racemase activity. These data indicate that the biosynthesis of D- and L-alanine is controlled by the gene expression level of alanine racemase, and D-alanine in the hepatopancreas functions as a major osmolyte for isosmotic regulation. In contrast, the content of D-alanine and alanine racemase activity did not change in the muscle during hyper-osmotic acclimation. Therefore, we suggest that D-alanine, which exists in the several tissues of M. japonicus, is considered to be utilized in some different physiological phenomena in different tissues.

  17. Investigation of gamma radiation effect on chemical properties and surface morphology of some nonlinear optical (NLO) single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahlam, M. A.; Ravishankar, M. N.; Vijayan, N.; Govindaraj, G.; Siddaramaiah; Gnana Prakash, A. P.

    2012-05-01

    The effect of Co-60 gamma irradiation on L-alanine cadmium chloride (LACC), L-alanine doped potassium dihydrogen orthophosphate (KDP) and L-arginine doped KDP nonlinear optical (NLO) single crystals were studied in doses ranging from 100 krad to 6 Mrad. The crystals were grown by slow evaporation method at room temperature. The effects of gamma irradiation on the chemical, surface morphology, DC electrical conductivity, thermal and mechanical properties of the grown crystals have been studied. The functional groups of unirradiated and irradiated crystals have been identified and confirmed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) studies. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of irradiated crystals shows some morphological changes in the crystals. The dc conductivity of LACC and L-alanine doped KDP crystals were found to increase with increase in radiation dose whereas in case of L-arginine doped KDP crystals, the dc conductivity was found to decrease with increase in radiation dose. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) thermograms reveals that there is no significant change in the melting point of the crystals after irradiation and the crystals does not decompose as a result of irradiation. The mechanical behavior of both unirradiated and irradiated crystals is explained with the indentation effects using Vicker's microhardness tester. The Vicker's hardness number HV and Mayer's index 'n' has been estimated and confirms that LACC belong to the hard materials.

  18. Role of catechol structure in the adsorption and transformation reactions of L-DOPA in soils.

    PubMed

    Furubayashi, Akihiro; Hiradate, Syuntaro; Fujii, Yoshiharu

    2007-02-01

    3-(3',4'-Dihydroxyphenyl)-L-alanine (L-DOPA), which is synthesized in velvet bean (Mucuna pruriens), inhibits plant growth. The concentration of L-DOPA in soil is reduced by adsorption and transformation reactions, which can result in the reduction of its plant-growth-inhibitory activity. To determine which part of the L-DOPA structure is involved in the adsorption and soil transformation reactions, we compared the kinetics of L-DOPA disappearance in a volcanic ash soil with that of L-phenylalanine (3-phenyl-L-alanine) and L-tyrosine (3-(4'-hydroxyphenyl)-L-alanine), compounds that are similar in structure to L-DOPA but do not have a catechol (o-dihydroxybenzene) moiety. L-Phenylalanine and L-tyrosine were not adsorbed and transformed in the soil at equilibrium pH values between 4 and 7. These results suggest that the adsorption and transformation reactions of L-DOPA in the soil involve the catechol moiety and not the amino and carboxylic acid groups, which are common to all three compounds. Like L-DOPA, (+)-catechin, another allelochemical that contains a catechol moiety, underwent adsorption and soil transformation reactions. Thus, we concluded that the concentrations of allelochemicals bearing a catechol moiety in soils will decrease rapidly owing to adsorption and transformation reactions, and this decrease will be faster in soils with a high pH value or high adsorption ability. Owing to this decrease in concentration, allelopathic phenomena may not occur.

  19. Biological activities of indoleacetylamino acids and their use as auxins in tissue culture

    SciTech Connect

    Hangarter, R.P.; Peterson, M.D.; Good, N.E.

    1980-05-01

    The auxin activities of a number of indoleacetylamino acid conjugates have been determined in three test systems: growth of tomato hypocotyl explants (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. cv. Marglobe); growth of tobacco callus cultures (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Wisconsin 38); and ethylene production from pea stems (Pisum sativum L. cv. Alaska). The activities of the conjugates differ greatly depending on the amino acid moiety. Indoleacetyl-L-alanine supports rapid callus growth from the tomato hypocotyls while inhibiting growth of shoots and roots. Indoleacetlyglycine behaves in a similar manner but is somewhat less effective in supporting callus growth and in inhibiting growth of shoots and roots. Indoleacetylglycine behaves in a similar manner but is somewhat less effective in supporting callus growth and in inhibiting shoot formation. The other amino acid conjugates tested (valine, leucine, aspartic acid, threonine, methionine, phenylalanine, and proline) support shoot formation without supporting root formation or much callus growth. The tobacco callus system, which forms abundant shoots in the presence or absence of free indoleacetic acid, produces only rapid undifferentiated growth in the presence of indoleacetyl-L-alanine and indoleacetylglycine. The other conjugates inhibit shoot formatin weakly if at all. Most of the conjugates induce sustained ethylene production from the pea stems but at rates well below the initial rates observed with free indoleacetic acid. Many, but not all of the effects of conjugates such as indoleacetyl-L-alanine can be mimicked by frequent renewals of the supply of free indoleacetic acid.

  20. Purification and characterization of selenocysteine beta-lyase from Citrobacter freundii

    SciTech Connect

    Chocat, P.; Esaki, N.; Tanizawa, K.; Nakamura, K.; Tanaka, H.; Soda, K.

    1985-08-01

    The purification and characterization of bacterial selenocysteine beta-lyase, an enzyme which specifically catalyzes the cleavage of L-selenocysteine to L-alanine and Se0, are presented. The enzyme, purified to near homogeneity from Citrobacter freundii, is monomeric with a molecular weight of ca. 64,000 and contains 1 mol of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate as a cofactor per mol of enzyme. L-Selenocysteine is the sole substrate. L-Cysteine is a competitive inhibitor of the enzyme. The enzyme also catalyzes the alpha, beta elimination of beta-chloro-L-alanine to form NH3, pyruvate, and Cl- and is irreversibly inactivated during the reaction. The physicochemical properties, e.g., amino acid composition and subunit structure, of the bacterial enzyme are fairly different from those of the pig liver enzyme. However, the catalytic properties of both enzymes, e.g., substrate specificity and inactivation by the substrate or a mechanism-based inactivator, beta-chloro-L-alanine, are very similar.

  1. Response of Bacillus Spores to Combinations of Germinative Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Foerster, Harold F.; Foster, J. W.

    1966-01-01

    Foerster, Harold F. (University of Texas, Austin), and J. W. Foster. Response of Bacillus spores to combinations of germinative compounds. J. Bacteriol. 91:1168–1177. 1966.—Spores of 21 strains of Bacillus megaterium and 25 other strains representing 13 species of Bacillus were produced under standardized conditions. The germination of a washed spore suspension of each strain was measured as a response to various combinations of 30 different germinative compounds. The strains were first typed with respect to their response to “primary” germination compounds, i.e., glucose, l-alanine, inosine, and l-alanine-inosine mixture, and also Na+ and K+. The second stage was the determination of the response to various organic and inorganic anions and cations, each strain being supplied with the “primary” compounds best for it. Marked differences in germination patterns were observed among species and strains of the same species. No relation to established taxonomic lines was evident. A nonspecific requirement for ions was found for all strains, but not all ions were effective. A striking degree of interchangeability of germinative chemicals was found. “Fractional germination” was very common. A mixture of l-alanine and inosine and various ions was the best germinative solution for most strains. Some anomalous germination patterns were encountered. Those studied included a strain whose cells lysed spontaneously upon germination and other strains for which l-leucine had striking germinative powers. PMID:4956331

  2. Structural Isotopic Effects in the smallest chiral amino acid: Observation of a structural phase transition in fully deuterated alanine.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordallo, Heloisa; de Souza, Joelma; de Tarso, Paulo; Argyriou, Dimitri

    2008-03-01

    A first study of possible changes instigated by deuteration in amino acids was carried out using neutron diffraction, inelastic neutron scattering and Raman scattering in L-alanine, C2H4(NH2)COOH. Careful analysis of the structural parameters shows that deuteration of L-alanine engenders significant geometric changes as a function of temperature, which can be directly related to the observation of new lattice vibration modes in the Raman spectra. The combination of the experimental data suggests that C2D4(ND2)COOD undergoes a structural phase transition (or a structural rearrangement) at about 170 K. Considering that this particular amino acid is a hydrogen-bonded system with short hydrogen bonds (OH ˜ 1.8 å), we evoke the Ubbelohde effect to conclude that substitution of hydrogen for deuterium gives rise to changes in the hydrogen-bonding interactions. The structural differences suggest distinct relative stabilities for the hydrogenous and deuterated L-alanine. De Souza et al. - Journal of Physical Chemistry B (Letters) 111, 5034-39 (2007)

  3. Characterization and astrocytic modulation of system L transporters in brain microvasculature endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Omidi, Yadollah; Barar, Jaleh; Ahmadian, Somaieh; Heidari, Hamid Reza; Gumbleton, Mark

    2008-04-01

    Brain trafficking of amino acids is mainly mediated by amino acids transport machineries of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), where astrocytes play a key maintenance role. However, little is known about astrocytes impacts on such transport systems, in particular system L that consists of large and small neutral amino acids (NAAs) transporters, that is, LAT1/4F2hc and LAT2/4F2hc, respectively. In the current investigation, functionality and expression of system L were studied in the immortalized mouse brain microvascular endothelial b.End3 cells cocultured with astrocytes or treated with astrocyte-conditioned media (ACM). LAT2/4F2hc mediated luminal uptake of L-phenylalanine and L-leucine resulted in significantly decreased affinity of system L in b.End3 cells treated with ACM, while LAT2/4F2hc mediated luminal uptake of L-alanine remained unchanged. Gene expression analysis revealed marked upregulation of LAT1 and 4F2hc, but downregulation of LAT2 in b.End3 cells cultured with ACM. The basal to apical transport of L-phenylalanine and L-alanine appeared to be significantly greater than that of the apical to basal direction in b.End3 cells indicating an efflux functionality of system L. No marked influence was observed for transport of L-phenylalanine in b.End3 cells cocultured with astrocytes, while a slight decrease was seen for L-alanine in the basal to apical direction. Based on our findings, we propose that system L functions as influx and/or efflux transport machinery displaying a greater propensity for the outward transport of large and small NAAs. Astrocytes appeared to modulate the transcriptic expression and uptake functionalities of system L, but not the transport activities. PMID:18210381

  4. Auxin amidohydrolases from Brassica rapa cleave the alanine conjugate of indolepropionic acid as a preferable substrate: a biochemical and modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Savić, Bojana; Tomić, Sanja; Magnus, Volker; Gruden, Kristina; Barle, Katja; Grenković, Renata; Ludwig-Müller, Jutta; Salopek-Sondi, Branka

    2009-09-01

    Two auxin amidohydrolases, BrIAR3 and BrILL2, from Chinese cabbage [Brassica rapa L. ssp. pekinensis (Lour.) Hanelt] were produced by heterologous expression in Escherichia coli, purified, and screened for activity towards N-(indol-3-ylacetyl)-L-alanine (IAA-Ala) and the long-chain auxin-amino acid conjugates, N-[3-(indol-3-yl)propionyl]-L-alanine (IPA-Ala) and N-[4-(indol-3-yl)butyryl]-L-alanine (IBA-Ala). IPA-Ala was shown to be the favored substrate of both enzymes, but BrILL2 was approximately 15 times more active than BrIAR3. Both enzymes cleaved IBA-Ala and IAA-Ala to a lesser extent. The enzyme kinetics were measured for BrILL2 and the obtained parameters suggested similar binding affinities for the long-chain auxin-amino acid conjugates (IPA-Ala and IBA-Ala). The velocity of the hydrolyzing reaction decreased in the order IPA-Ala > IBA-Ala > IAA-Ala. In a root growth bioassay, higher growth inhibition was caused by IPA-Ala and IBA-Ala in comparison with IAA-Ala. Neither these conjugates nor the corresponding free auxins affected the expression of the BrILL2 gene. A modeling study revealed several possible modes of IPA-Ala binding to BrILL2. Based on these results, two possible scenarios for substrate hydrolysis are proposed. In one the metal binding water is activated by the carboxyl group of the substrate itself, and in the other by a glutamate residue from the active site of the enzyme.

  5. Linear dichroism studies of tryptophanase and its quasisubstrate complexes oriented in polyacrylamide gel.

    PubMed

    Zakomirdina, L N; Sakharova, I S; Torchinsky, Y M

    1990-10-01

    Tryptophanase from Escherichia coli was oriented in a compressed slab of polyacrylamide gel and its linear dichroism (LD) and absorption spectra have been measured. The free enzyme displays four LD bands at 305, 340, 425 and 490 nm. Two bands at 340 and 425 nm belong to the internal coenzyme-lysine aldimine. The 305-nm band apparently belongs to an aromatic amino acid residue. The 490-nm band disappears after treatment with NaBH4 or after incubation with L-alanine and subsequent dialysis. It is suggested that the 490-nm band belongs to a quinonoid enzyme subform. The reaction of tryptophanase with threo-3-phenyl-DL-serine, L-threonine and D-alanine leads to formation of an external aldimine with an intense absorption band at 420-425 nm. The values of reduced LD (delta A/A) in this band strongly differ from that in the 420-nm band of the free enzyme. The LD value of the complex with D-alanine is intermediate between those of the free enzyme and the complex with 3-phenylserine. In the presence of indole the complex with D-alanine displays the same LD as that observed with 3-phenylserine. The reaction of tryptophanase with L-alanine or oxindolyl-L-alanine leads to formation of a quinonoid intermediate with an absorption band near 500 nm. The LD value in this band is close to that of an external aldimine with L-threonine. It is concluded that reorientations of the coenzyme occur in the course of the tryptophanase reaction.

  6. Mechanistic and Evolutionary Insights from the Reciprocal Promiscuity of Two Pyridoxal Phosphate-dependent Enzymes*

    PubMed Central

    Soo, Valerie W. C.; Yosaatmadja, Yuliana; Squire, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    Enzymes that utilize the cofactor pyridoxal 5′-phosphate play essential roles in amino acid metabolism in all organisms. The cofactor is used by proteins that adopt at least five different folds, which raises questions about the evolutionary processes that might explain the observed distribution of functions among folds. In this study, we show that a representative of fold type III, the Escherichia coli alanine racemase (ALR), is a promiscuous cystathionine β-lyase (CBL). Furthermore, E. coli CBL (fold type I) is a promiscuous alanine racemase. A single round of error-prone PCR and selection yielded variant ALR(Y274F), which catalyzes cystathionine β-elimination with a near-native Michaelis constant (Km = 3.3 mm) but a poor turnover number (kcat ≈10 h−1). In contrast, directed evolution also yielded CBL(P113S), which catalyzes l-alanine racemization with a poor Km (58 mm) but a high kcat (22 s−1). The structures of both variants were solved in the presence and absence of the l-alanine analogue, (R)-1-aminoethylphosphonic acid. As expected, the ALR active site was enlarged by the Y274F substitution, allowing better access for cystathionine. More surprisingly, the favorable kinetic parameters of CBL(P113S) appear to result from optimizing the pKa of Tyr-111, which acts as the catalytic acid during l-alanine racemization. Our data emphasize the short mutational routes between the functions of pyridoxal 5′-phosphate-dependent enzymes, regardless of whether or not they share the same fold. Thus, they confound the prevailing model of enzyme evolution, which predicts that overlapping patterns of promiscuity result from sharing a common multifunctional ancestor. PMID:27474741

  7. Food color, flavor, and conditioned avoidance among red-winged blackbirds.

    PubMed

    Werner, Scott J; Kimball, Bruce A; Provenza, Frederick D

    2008-01-28

    The relationship between food flavors and postingestive feedback enables mammalian herbivores to procure nutrients and avoid toxins within ever-changing environments. We conducted four experiments with red-winged blackbirds (Agelaius phoeniceus) in captivity to determine the relative roles of color and flavor cues paired with negative postingestive feedback. We first conducted baseline tests to assess preferences for colors and flavors. All blackbirds preferred red- to blue-colored food, and they preferred umami- (l-alanine) flavored to bitter/astringent food (tannic acid). We observed no difference in consumption of salty (NaCl) vs sour (citric acid) foods during baseline tests (i.e., neutral flavors). We then conditioned experimentally naïve blackbirds with intraperitoneal injections of lithium chloride (LiCl) to avoid food treated with red and l-alanine, or red and NaCl (n=30 birds per conditioning group). Subsequent to conditioning with LiCl, three test groups were established from each conditioned group to evaluate color and flavor preferences, and preferences for novel color-flavor pairings (e.g., red/tannic acid vs blue/l-alanine). Blackbirds avoided red and salty food throughout the 4-day test. Avoidance conditioned with LiCl extinguished for preferred flavors, but not for colors, of food. Conditioning affected indifference for the otherwise preferred flavor and avoidance for the otherwise neutral flavor. Relative to the neutral-flavor conditioning group, the group conditioned with a preferred flavor exhibited stronger conditioned avoidance of colored food. Unlike conditioned flavor avoidance, birds were conditioned to avoid red food only when blue food was made familiar prior to conditioning. Collectively, these results illustrate that blackbirds used affective processes (flavor-feedback relationships) to shift preference for both novel and familiar flavors, and cognitive associations (colors) to avoid food, subsequent to toxin exposure. We discuss the

  8. Mechanistic and Evolutionary Insights from the Reciprocal Promiscuity of Two Pyridoxal Phosphate-dependent Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Soo, Valerie W C; Yosaatmadja, Yuliana; Squire, Christopher J; Patrick, Wayne M

    2016-09-16

    Enzymes that utilize the cofactor pyridoxal 5'-phosphate play essential roles in amino acid metabolism in all organisms. The cofactor is used by proteins that adopt at least five different folds, which raises questions about the evolutionary processes that might explain the observed distribution of functions among folds. In this study, we show that a representative of fold type III, the Escherichia coli alanine racemase (ALR), is a promiscuous cystathionine β-lyase (CBL). Furthermore, E. coli CBL (fold type I) is a promiscuous alanine racemase. A single round of error-prone PCR and selection yielded variant ALR(Y274F), which catalyzes cystathionine β-elimination with a near-native Michaelis constant (Km = 3.3 mm) but a poor turnover number (kcat ≈10 h(-1)). In contrast, directed evolution also yielded CBL(P113S), which catalyzes l-alanine racemization with a poor Km (58 mm) but a high kcat (22 s(-1)). The structures of both variants were solved in the presence and absence of the l-alanine analogue, (R)-1-aminoethylphosphonic acid. As expected, the ALR active site was enlarged by the Y274F substitution, allowing better access for cystathionine. More surprisingly, the favorable kinetic parameters of CBL(P113S) appear to result from optimizing the pKa of Tyr-111, which acts as the catalytic acid during l-alanine racemization. Our data emphasize the short mutational routes between the functions of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate-dependent enzymes, regardless of whether or not they share the same fold. Thus, they confound the prevailing model of enzyme evolution, which predicts that overlapping patterns of promiscuity result from sharing a common multifunctional ancestor. PMID:27474741

  9. Autolysis of Microbial Cells: Salt Activation of Autolytic Enzymes in a Mutant of Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Gilpin, Richard W.; Chatterjee, Anadi N.; Young, Frank E.

    1972-01-01

    The effect of various salts on the autolysis of cell wall of a ribitol teichoic acid-deficient mutant of Staphylococcus aureus H (strain 52A5 carrying tar-1) was compared with the parent strain. In the presence of high concentrations of certain salts such as 1.0 m NaCl, the mutant undergoes autolysis with the release of osmotically sensitive spheroplasts. The parent strain is not affected by these conditions. The stimulation of lysis is related to an activation of N-acylmuramyl-l-alanine amidase. Images PMID:4591480

  10. Structure-Activity Relationships of Somatostatin Analogs in the Rabbit Ileum and the Rat Colon

    PubMed Central

    Rosenthal, Linda E.; Yamashiro, Darrell J.; Rivier, Jean; Vale, Wylie; Brown, Marvin; Dharmsathaphorn, Kiertisin

    1983-01-01

    Somatostatin increases absorption of electrolytes and inhibits diarrhea in patients with endocrine tumors and short bowel syndrome. In an attempt to develop a gut-specific somatostatin analog, each amino acid in the somatostatin molecule was replaced with L-alanine, deleted, or substituted with its D-isomer. The potency of each analog to stimulate ion transport in the rabbit ileum was then determined using the modified Ussing chamber technique. The results were compared to the ability of each analog to inhibit the stimulated release of growth hormone from cultured rat anterior pituitary cells and to inhibit the arginine-stimulated release of insulin and glucagon in the rat in vivo. Analogs that showed gut selectivity were then tested for their ion transport properties in the rat colon. Results: (a) Substitution with L-alanine or deletion of the amino acid at position 6, 7, 8, or 9 and deletion of Threonine10-produced analogs with significantly reduced ion transport properties to <4% of somatostatin's action. The substitution also markedly reduced the ability of the compounds to inhibit the release of growth hormone, insulin, and glucagon. (b) Selectivity of intestinal ion transport was achieved by any one of the following alterations: L-alanine substitution at Phenylalanine11, deletion of Phenylalanine11, substitution with D-lysine at Lysine4, or substitution with L-alanine at Lysine4. These compounds had intestinal ion transport properties of 52, 34, 139, and 94%, respectively, while demonstrating little or no inhibition of growth hormone, insulin or glucagon release. Conclusions: (a) Phenylalanine6, Phenylalanine7, Tryptophan8, and Lysine9 are required for the ion transport and other biologic actions of somatostatin, whereas Threonine10 serves as an essential spacer. (b) Alteration at Phenylalanine11 or Lysine4 yields analogs that are selective for ion transport in the rabbit ileum and rat colon. These findings should be taken into consideration when developing a

  11. Growth and study of triglycine sulfate (TGS) crystals in low-G for infrared detector applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lal, R. B.; Batra, A. K.; Aggarwal, M. D.; Wilcox, W. R.; Trolinger, J. D.

    1991-01-01

    Experiments on growth of TGS crystals using (010) and (001) oriented disc shape seeds in the low gravity environment aboard Spacelab-3 are presented. The holographic interferograms reconstructed on the ground demonstrated diffusion limited growth. The morphology of the crystals grown was similar to that of crystals grown on earth, except the faces were not fully developed and planar. The device quality of these crytals is considered to be comparable with the best crystals grown on earth. Better infrared detector characteristics were obtained by doping TGS with Cs and L-alanine simultaneously on the ground. Crystals grown on (010) poled seeds show improved morphology and pyroelectric properties.

  12. Polymerization of amino acids under primitive earth conditions.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flores, J. J.; Ponnamperuma, C.

    1972-01-01

    Small amounts of peptides were obtained when equal amounts of methane and ammonia were reacted with vaporized aqueous solutions of C14-labeled glycine, L-alanine, L-aspartic acid, L-glutamic acid and L-threonine in the presence of a continuous spark discharge in a 24-hr cyclic process. The experiment was designed to demonstrate the possibility of peptide synthesis under simulated primeval earth conditions. It is theorized that some dehydration-condensation processes may have taken place, with ammonium cyanide, the hydrogencyanide tetramer or aminonitriles as intermediate products, during the early chemical evolution of the earth.

  13. Antimicrobial Activity of Metal & Metal Oxide Nanoparticles Interfaced With Ligand Complexes Of 8-Hydroxyquinoline And α-Amino Acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhanjana, Gaurav; Kumar, Neeraj; Thakur, Rajesh; Dilbaghi, Neeraj; Kumar, Sandeep

    2011-12-01

    Antimicrobial nanotechnology is a recent addition to the fight against disease causing organisms, replacing heavy metals and toxins. In the present work, mixed ligand complexes of metals like zinc, silver etc. and metal oxide have been synthesized using 8-hydroxyquinoline (HQ) as a primary ligand and N-and/O-donor amino acids such as L-serine, L-alanine, glycine, cysteine and histidine as secondary ligands. These complexes were characterized using different spectroscopic techniques. The complexes were tested for antifungal and antibacterial activity by using agar well diffusion bioassay.

  14. The Effects of the Toxic Cyanobacterium Limnothrix (Strain AC0243) on Bufo marinus Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, Olivia; Fabbro, Larelle; Makiela, Sandrine

    2014-01-01

    Limnothrix (strain AC0243) is a cyanobacterium, which has only recently been identified as toxin producing. Under laboratory conditions, Bufo marinus larvae were exposed to 100,000 cells mL−1 of Limnothrix (strain AC0243) live cultures for seven days. Histological examinations were conducted post mortem and revealed damage to the notochord, eyes, brain, liver, kidney, pancreas, gastrointestinal tract, and heart. The histopathological results highlight the toxicological impact of this strain, particularly during developmental stages. Toxicological similarities to β-N-Methylamino-l-alanine are discussed. PMID:24662524

  15. Alpha-helical hydrophobic polypeptides form proton-selective channels in lipid bilayers.

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, A E; Deamer, D W

    1994-01-01

    Proton translocation is important in membrane-mediated processes such as ATP-dependent proton pumps, ATP synthesis, bacteriorhodopsin, and cytochrome oxidase function. The fundamental mechanism, however, is poorly understood. To test the theoretical possibility that bundles of hydrophobic alpha-helices could provide a low energy pathway for ion translocation through the lipid bilayer, polyamino acids were incorporated into extruded liposomes and planar lipid membranes, and proton translocation was measured. Liposomes with incorporated long-chain poly-L-alanine or poly-L-leucine were found to have proton permeability coefficients 5 to 7 times greater than control liposomes, whereas short-chain polyamino acids had relatively little effect. Potassium permeability was not increased markedly by any of the polyamino acids tested. Analytical thin layer chromatography measurements of lipid content and a fluorescamine assay for amino acids showed that there were approximately 135 polyleucine or 65 polyalanine molecules associated with each liposome. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy indicated that a major fraction of the long-chain hydrophobic peptides existed in an alpha-helical conformation. Single-channel recording in both 0.1 N HCl and 0.1 M KCl was also used to determine whether proton-conducting channels formed in planar lipid membranes (phosphatidylcholine/phosphatidylethanolamine, 1:1). Poly-L-leucine and poly-L-alanine in HCl caused a 10- to 30-fold increase in frequency of conductive events compared to that seen in KCl or by the other polyamino acids in either solution. This finding correlates well with the liposome observations in which these two polyamino acids caused the largest increase in membrane proton permeability but had little effect on potassium permeability. Poly-L-leucine was considerably more conductive than poly-L-alanine due primarily to larger event amplitudes and, to a lesser extent, a higher event frequency. Poly-L-leucine caused two

  16. Alpha-helical hydrophobic polypeptides form proton-selective channels in lipid bilayers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliver, A. E.; Deamer, D. W.

    1994-01-01

    Proton translocation is important in membrane-mediated processes such as ATP-dependent proton pumps, ATP synthesis, bacteriorhodopsin, and cytochrome oxidase function. The fundamental mechanism, however, is poorly understood. To test the theoretical possibility that bundles of hydrophobic alpha-helices could provide a low energy pathway for ion translocation through the lipid bilayer, polyamino acids were incorporated into extruded liposomes and planar lipid membranes, and proton translocation was measured. Liposomes with incorporated long-chain poly-L-alanine or poly-L-leucine were found to have proton permeability coefficients 5 to 7 times greater than control liposomes, whereas short-chain polyamino acids had relatively little effect. Potassium permeability was not increased markedly by any of the polyamino acids tested. Analytical thin layer chromatography measurements of lipid content and a fluorescamine assay for amino acids showed that there were approximately 135 polyleucine or 65 polyalanine molecules associated with each liposome. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy indicated that a major fraction of the long-chain hydrophobic peptides existed in an alpha-helical conformation. Single-channel recording in both 0.1 N HCl and 0.1 M KCl was also used to determine whether proton-conducting channels formed in planar lipid membranes (phosphatidylcholine/phosphatidylethanolamine, 1:1). Poly-L-leucine and poly-L-alanine in HCl caused a 10- to 30-fold increase in frequency of conductive events compared to that seen in KCl or by the other polyamino acids in either solution. This finding correlates well with the liposome observations in which these two polyamino acids caused the largest increase in membrane proton permeability but had little effect on potassium permeability. Poly-L-leucine was considerably more conductive than poly-L-alanine due primarily to larger event amplitudes and, to a lesser extent, a higher event frequency. Poly-L-leucine caused two

  17. Use of alanine-silicone pellets for electron paramagnetic resonance gamma dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Flores, J.; Galindo, S. )

    1991-03-01

    Silicone is proposed as an alternative binding substance in the production of D-L alanine pellets used in electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) dosimetry of gamma rays. The dosimeters are manufactured at room temperature, making the production simple. Examination by EPR silicone-alanine pellets irradiated with 60Co gamma rays in the dose range 10 to 10(6) Gy shows that the proposed silicone binder does not affect typical alanine dose-response curves. Thermal stability of the pellets below 40 degrees C is good, but their pre-dose EPR signal amplitude is slightly higher than for nonirradiated alanine.

  18. In Vitro Bactericidal and Bacteriolytic Activity of Ceragenin CSA-13 against Planktonic Cultures and Biofilms of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Other Pathogenic Streptococci

    PubMed Central

    Menéndez, Margarita; García, Ernesto

    2014-01-01

    Ceragenin CSA-13, a cationic steroid, is here reported to show a concentration-dependent bactericidal/bacteriolytic activity against pathogenic streptococci, including multidrug-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae. The autolysis promoted by CSA-13 in pneumococcal cultures appears to be due to the triggering of the major S. pneumoniae autolysin LytA, an N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase. CSA-13 also disintegrated pneumococcal biofilms in a very efficient manner, although at concentrations slightly higher than those required for bactericidal activity on planktonic bacteria. CSA-13 has little hemolytic activity which should allow testing its antibacterial efficacy in animal models. PMID:25006964

  19. The peptide Z-Aib-Aib-Aib-L-Ala-OtBu.

    PubMed

    Gessmann, Renate; Brückner, Hans; Petratos, Kyriacos

    2014-04-01

    The title peptide, N-benzyloxycarbonyl-α-aminoisobutyryl-α-aminoisobutyryl-α-aminoisobutyryl-L-alanine tert-butyl ester or Z-Aib-Aib-Aib-L-Ala-OtBu (Aib is α-aminoisobutyric acid, Z is benzyloxycarbonyl and OtBu indicates the tert-butyl ester), C27H42N4O7, is a left-handed helix with a right-handed conformation in the fourth residue, which is the only chiral residue. There are two 4→1 intramolecular hydrogen bonds in the structure. In the lattice, molecules are hydrogen bonded to form columns along the c axis.

  20. REVERSAL OF d-CYCLOSERINE INHIBITION OF BACTERIAL GROWTH BY ALANINE

    PubMed Central

    Zygmunt, Walter A.

    1962-01-01

    Zygmunt, Walter A. (Mead Johnson & Co., Evansville, Ind.). Reversal of d-cycloserine inhibition of bacterial growth by alanine. J. Bacteriol. 84:154–156. 1962.—Reversal of the antibacterial activity of d-4-amino-3-isoxazolidone by alanine in bacterial cultures actively growing on chemically defined media was compared in cultures requiring exogenous alanine and those capable of its synthesis. dl-Alanine was the most effective reversal agent in Pediococcus cerevisiae, an alanine-requiring organism, and d-alanine was effective in Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus, organisms synthesizing alanine. With all three cultures, l-alanine was the least effective reversal agent. PMID:16561951

  1. A method to assess the bacterial content of refrigerated meat.

    PubMed Central

    Perez de Castro, B; Asensio, M A; Sanz, B; Ordoñez, J A

    1988-01-01

    A new method has been developed to estimate the levels of gram-negative bacteria on refrigerated meat. The method is based on the aminopeptidase activity of these bacteria, which cleaves L-alanine-p-nitroanilide to yield p-nitroaniline, which is easily determined spectrophotometrically. This method allows the determination of levels around 10(6) to 10(7) CFU cm-2 in about 3 h. Because of the yellow color of p-nitroaniline, bacterial loads around 10(7) CFU cm-2 develop a color intense enough to be detected with the naked eye. PMID:3415222

  2. Cyanogenesis - a general phenomenon in the lepidoptera

    SciTech Connect

    Witthohn, K.; Naumann, C.M.

    1987-08-01

    There are two different pathways known to be used for the detoxification of hydrocyanic acid in insects, viz., rhodanese and ..beta..-cyano-L-alanine synthase. The authors consider the latter to be indicative for cyanogenesis, while rhodanese might, in general, play a more important role in sulfur transfer for protein synthesis. This paper reports on the distribution of ..beta..-cyano-L-alanine (BCA) in the Lepidoptera. First reports of cyanogenesis are presented for the following families: Papilionidae, Pieridae, Lycaenidae, Hesperiidae, Lymantriidae, Arctiidae, Notodontidae, Megalopygidae, Limacodidae, Cymatophoridae, Noctuidae, Geometridae, and Yponomeutidae. New and old records for three other families, the Nymphalidae, Zygaenidae, and Heterogynidae, are included to complete the present state of knowledge. Special emphasis has been laid on the Nymphalidae, where BCA has been detected in eight subfamilies. Taxonomic, geographic, and seasonal variation has been found in a number of cases. In all cases observed so far, the source of cyanogenesis in the Lepidoptera is most probably the cyanoglucosides linamarin and lotaustralin, although cyanogenesis based on mustard oil glucosides and cyclopentenoid glucosides might occur as well. BCA has been found in both cryptic and aposematic species, including taxa such as the Pieridae, Danainae, Ithomiinae, and Arctiidae, where the defensive biology is believed to be linked with other compounds, like mustard oil glucosides, cardenolides, or pyrrolizidinie alkaloids. The ecological interaction and significance of such secondary compounds is not yet understood.

  3. Purification, characterization, and cDNA cloning of opine dehydrogenases from the polychaete rockworm Marphysa sanguinea.

    PubMed

    Endo, Noriyuki; Kan-no, Nobuhiro; Nagahisa, Eizoh

    2007-06-01

    Alanopine dehydrogenase (AlDH) and three isoforms of strombine/alanopine dehydrogenase (St/AlDH) were purified from muscle tissue of the polychaete rockworm Marphysa sanguinea. The four enzymes, which can be distinguished by the isoelectric point, are monomeric 42 kDa proteins, possess similar pH-activity profiles, and display specificity for pyruvate and NAD(H). The three isoforms of St/AlDH show equivalent Km and Vmax for glycine and L-alanine and for D-strombine and meso-alanopine. Free amino acid levels in the muscle and D-strombine accumulation in vivo during muscle activity suggest that St/AlDHs function physiologically as StDH. AlDH shows specificity for L-alanine and meso-alanopine, but not for glycine or D-strombine. The amino acid sequences of AlDH and one of the St/AlDH isoforms were determined by a combination of amino acid sequence analysis and cDNA cloning. St/AlDH cDNA consisted of 1586 bp nucleotides that encode a 399-residue protein (43,346.70 Da), and AlDH cDNA consisted of 1587 bp nucleotides that encode a 399-residue protein (43,886.68 Da). The two amino acid sequences deduced from the cDNA displayed 67% amino acid identity, with greatest similarity to that of tauropine dehydrogenase from the polychaete Arabella iricolor. PMID:17350870

  4. Synthesis of deuterium-labelled halogen derivatives of L-tryptophan catalysed by tryptophanase.

    PubMed

    Winnicka, Elżbieta; Szymańska, Jolanta; Kańska, Marianna

    2016-06-01

    The isotopomers of halogen derivatives of l-tryptophan (l-Trp) (4'-F-, 7'-F-, 5'-Cl- and 7'-Br-l-Trp), specifically labelled with deuterium in α-position of the side chain, were obtained by enzymatic coupling of the corresponding halogenated derivatives of indole with S-methyl-l-cysteine in (2)H2O, catalysed by enzyme tryptophanase (EC 4.1.99.1). The positional deuterium enrichment of the resulting tryptophan derivatives was controlled using (1)H NMR. In accordance with the mechanism of the lyase reaction, a 100% deuterium labelling was observed in the α-position; the chemical yields were between 23 and 51%. Furthermore, β-F-l-alanine, synthesized from β-F-pyruvic acid by the l-alanine dehydrogenase reaction, has been tested as a coupling agent to obtain the halogenated deuterium-labelled derivatives of l-Trp. The chemical yield (∼30%) corresponded to that as observed with S-methyl-l-cysteine but the deuterium label was only 63%, probably due to the use of a not completely deuterated incubation medium.

  5. Forced swimming and imipramine modify plasma and brain amino acid concentrations in mice.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Tatsuro; Yamane, Haruka; Tomonaga, Shozo; Furuse, Mitsuhiro

    2009-01-01

    The relationships between monoamine metabolism and forced swimming or antidepressants have been well studied, however information is lacking regarding amino acid metabolism under these conditions. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of forced swimming and imipramine on amino acid concentrations in plasma, the cerebral cortex and the hypothalamus in mice. Forced swimming caused cerebral cortex concentrations of L-glutamine, L-alanine, and taurine to be increased, while imipramine treatment caused decreased concentrations of L-glutamate, L-alanine, L-tyrosine, L-methionine, and L-ornithine. In the hypothalamus, forced swimming decreased the concentration of L-serine while imipramine treatment caused increased concentration of beta-alanine. Forced swimming caused increased plasma concentration of taurine, while concentrations of L-serine, L-asparagine, L-glutamine and beta-alanine were decreased. Imipramine treatment caused increased plasma concentration of all amino acid, except for L-aspartate and taurine. In conclusion, forced swimming and imipramine treatment modify central and peripheral amino acid metabolism. These results may aid in the identification of amino acids that have antidepressant-like effects, or may help to refine the dosages of antidepressant drugs. PMID:19010319

  6. Alteration of substrate specificity of alanine dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Puja; Aldeborgh, Hannah; Carlucci, Lauren; Walsh, Lauren; Wasserman, Jordan; Zhou, Edward; Lefurgy, Scott T.; Mundorff, Emily C.

    2015-01-01

    The l-alanine dehydrogenase (AlaDH) has a natural history that suggests it would not be a promising candidate for expansion of substrate specificity by protein engineering: it is the only amino acid dehydrogenase in its fold family, it has no sequence or structural similarity to any known amino acid dehydrogenase, and it has a strong preference for l-alanine over all other substrates. By contrast, engineering of the amino acid dehydrogenase superfamily members has produced catalysts with expanded substrate specificity; yet, this enzyme family already contains members that accept a broad range of substrates. To test whether the natural history of an enzyme is a predictor of its innate evolvability, directed evolution was carried out on AlaDH. A single mutation identified through molecular modeling, F94S, introduced into the AlaDH from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtAlaDH) completely alters its substrate specificity pattern, enabling activity toward a range of larger amino acids. Saturation mutagenesis libraries in this mutant background additionally identified a double mutant (F94S/Y117L) showing improved activity toward hydrophobic amino acids. The catalytic efficiencies achieved in AlaDH are comparable with those that resulted from similar efforts in the amino acid dehydrogenase superfamily and demonstrate the evolvability of MtAlaDH specificity toward other amino acid substrates. PMID:25538307

  7. Greater Superficial Petrosal Nerve Transection in Rats does not Change Unconditioned Licking Responses to Putatively Sweet Taste Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Enshe; Blonde, Ginger; Garcea, Mircea

    2008-01-01

    The greater superficial petrosal nerve (GSP), innervating taste buds in the palate, is known to be exceptionally responsive to sucrose, especially compared with the responsiveness of the chorda tympani nerve (CT). However, whereas transection of the CT (CTX) alone has little or no effect on unconditioned licking responses to many “sweet” stimuli, the impact of GSP transection (GSPX) alone is equivocal. To further examine the role of the GSP on licking responses to putatively sweet-tasting substances, brief-access taste tests were conducted in nondeprived rats before and after sham surgery (SHAM) or CTX or GSPX. A range of concentrations of sucrose, L-alanine, glycine, and L-serine, with and without 1.0 mM inosine monophosphate (IMP) added, were used. All groups showed significant concentration-dependent increases in licking to all stimuli presurgically and postsurgically. CTX decreased licking responses relative to SHAM rats in the first sucrose test. There was also a group × concentration interaction for L-alanine, but post hoc tests did not reveal its basis. Other than this, there were no significant differences among the surgical groups. Interestingly, rats with GSPX tended to initiate fewer trials than SHAM rats. Overall, after GSPX, the remaining gustatory nerves are apparently sufficient to maintain concentration-dependent licking responses to all stimuli tested here. The disparity between our results and others in the literature where GSPX reduced licking responses to sucrose is possibly related to differences in surgical technique or test trial duration. PMID:18635557

  8. Synthesis of nano-sized stereoselective imprinted polymer by copolymerization of (S)-2-(acrylamido) propanoic acid and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate in the presence of racemic propranolol and copper ion.

    PubMed

    Alizadeh, Taher; Bagherzadeh, Azam; Shamkhali, Amir Nasser

    2016-06-01

    A new chiral functional monomer of (S)-2-(acrylamido) propanoic acid was obtained by reaction of (l)-alanine with acryloyl chloride. The resulting monomer was characterized by FT-IR and HNMR and then utilized for the preparation of chiral imprinted polymer (CIP). This was carried out by copolymerization of (l)-alanine-derived chiral monomer and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate, in the presence of racemic propranolol and copper nitrate, via precipitation polymerization technique, resulting in nano-sized networked polymer particles. The polymer obtained was characterized by scanning electron microscopy and FT-IR. The non-imprinted polymer was also synthesized and used as blank polymer. Density functional theory (DFT) was also employed to optimize the structures of two diasterometric ternary complexes, suspected to be created in the pre-polymerization step, by reaction of optically active isomers of propranolol, copper ion and (S)-2-(acrylamido) propanoic acid. Relative energies and other characteristics of the described complexes, calculated by the DFT, predicted the higher stability of (S)-propranolol involved complex, compared to (R)-propranolol participated complex. Practical batch extraction test which employed CIP as solid phase adsorbent, indicated that the CIP recognized selectively (S)-propranolol in the racemic mixture of propranolol; whereas, the non-imprinted polymer (NIP) showed no differentiation capability between two optically active isomers of propranolol. PMID:27040217

  9. Contaminant-specific targeting of olfactory sensory neuron classes: connecting neuron class impairment with behavioural deficits.

    PubMed

    Dew, William A; Azizishirazi, Ali; Pyle, Greg G

    2014-10-01

    The olfactory system of fish comprises several classes of olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs). The odourants L-alanine and taurocholic acid (TCA) specifically activate microvillous or ciliated OSNs, respectively, in fish. We recorded electro-olfactograms (EOG) in fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas; a laboratory-reared model species) and wild yellow perch (Perca flavescens) whose olfactory chambers were perfused with either L-alanine or TCA to determine if OSN classes were differentially vulnerable to contaminants, in this case copper or nickel. Results were consistent in both species and demonstrated that nickel targeted and impaired microvillous OSN function, while copper targeted and impaired ciliated OSN function. This result suggests that contaminant-specific effects observed in model laboratory species extrapolate to wild fish populations. Moreover, fathead minnows exposed to copper failed to perceive a conspecific alarm cue in a choice maze, whereas those exposed to nickel could respond to the same conspecific cue. These results demonstrate that fathead minnows perceive conspecific, damage-released alarm cue by ciliated, but not microvillous, OSNs. Fish living in copper-contaminated environments may be more vulnerable to predation than those in clean lakes owing to targeted effects on ciliated OSNs. PMID:24630454

  10. Two-fold odd-even effect in self-assembled nanowires from oligopeptide-polymer-substituted perylene bisimides.

    PubMed

    Marty, Roman; Nigon, Robin; Leite, Deborah; Frauenrath, Holger

    2014-03-12

    Organic nanowires are important building blocks for nanoscopic organic electronic devices. In order to ensure efficient charge transport through such nanowires, it is important to understand in detail the molecular parameters that guide self-assembly of π-conjugated molecules into one-dimensional stacks with optimal constructive π-π overlap. Here, we investigated the subtle relationship between molecular structure and supramolecular arrangement of the chromophores in self-assembled nanowires prepared from perylene bisimides with oligopeptide-polymer side chains. We observed a "two-fold" odd-even effect in circular dichroism spectra of these derivatives, depending on both the number of l-alanine units in the oligopeptide segments and length of the alkylene spacer between chromophore and oligopeptide substituents. Our results indicate that there is a complex interplay between the translation of molecular chirality into supramolecular helicity and the molecules' inherent propensity for well-defined one-dimensional aggregation into β-sheet-like superstructures in the presence of a central chromophore. Strong excitonic coupling as expressed by the appearance of hypsochromically and bathochromically shifted UV-vis absorptions and strong CD signals was systematically observed for molecules with an odd number of l-alanines in the side chains. The latter derivatives gave rise to nanowires with a significantly higher electron mobility. Our results, hence, provide an important design rule for self-assembled organic nanowires.

  11. Temperature effects in first-principles solid state calculations of the chemical shielding tensor made simple

    SciTech Connect

    Monserrat, Bartomeu Needs, Richard J.; Pickard, Chris J.

    2014-10-07

    We study the effects of atomic vibrations on the solid-state chemical shielding tensor using first principles density functional theory calculations. At the harmonic level, we use a Monte Carlo method and a perturbative expansion. The Monte Carlo method is accurate but computationally expensive, while the perturbative method is computationally more efficient, but approximate. We find excellent agreement between the two methods for both the isotropic shift and the shielding anisotropy. The effects of zero-point quantum mechanical nuclear motion are important up to relatively high temperatures: at 500 K they still represent about half of the overall vibrational contribution. We also investigate the effects of anharmonic vibrations, finding that their contribution to the zero-point correction to the chemical shielding tensor is small. We exemplify these ideas using magnesium oxide and the molecular crystals L-alanine and β-aspartyl-L-alanine. We therefore propose as the method of choice to incorporate the effects of temperature in solid state chemical shielding tensor calculations using the perturbative expansion within the harmonic approximation. This approach is accurate and requires a computational effort that is about an order of magnitude smaller than that of dynamical or Monte Carlo approaches, so these effects might be routinely accounted for.

  12. Metabolic changes in rats after intragastric administration of MGCD0103 (Mocetinostat), a HDAC class I inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qingwei; Wu, Haiya; Wen, Congcong; Sun, Fa; Yang, Xuezhi; Hu, Lufeng

    2015-01-01

    MGCD0103, an isotype-selective HDACi, has been clinically evaluated for the treatment of hematologic malignancies and advanced solid tumors, alone and in combination with standard-of-care agents. In this study, we developed a serum metabolomic method based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) to evaluate the effect of intragastric administration of MGCD0103 on rats. The MGCD0103 group rats were given 20, 40, 80 mg/kg of MGCD0103 by intragastric administration each day for 7 days. Pattern recognition analysis, including both principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least squares-discriminate analysis (PLS-DA) revealed that intragastric administration of MGCD0103 induced metabolic perturbations. As compared to the control group, the levels of L-alanine, L-isoleucine, and L-leucine of MGCD0103 group decreased. The results indicate that metabolomic methods based on GC-MS may be useful to elucidate side effect of MGCD0103 through the exploration of biomarkers (L-alanine, L-isoleucine, and L-leucine). According to the pathological changes of liver at difference dosage, MGCD0103 is hepatotoxic and its toxity is dose-dependent. PMID:26464683

  13. Efficient Enzymatic Preparation of (13) N-Labelled Amino Acids: Towards Multipurpose Synthetic Systems.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Eunice S; Gómez-Vallejo, Vanessa; Baz, Zuriñe; Llop, Jordi; López-Gallego, Fernando

    2016-09-12

    Nitrogen-13 can be efficiently produced in biomedical cyclotrons in different chemical forms, and its stable isotopes are present in the majority of biologically active molecules. Hence, it may constitute a convenient alternative to Fluorine-18 and Carbon-11 for the preparation of positron-emitter-labelled radiotracers; however, its short half-life demands for the development of simple, fast, and efficient synthetic processes. Herein, we report the one-pot, enzymatic and non-carrier-added synthesis of the (13) N-labelled amino acids l-[(13) N]alanine, [(13) N]glycine, and l-[(13) N]serine by using l-alanine dehydrogenase from Bacillus subtilis, an enzyme that catalyses the reductive amination of α-keto acids by using nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) as the redox cofactor and ammonia as the amine source. The integration of both l-alanine dehydrogenase and formate dehydrogenase from Candida boidinii in the same reaction vessel to facilitate the in situ regeneration of NADH during the radiochemical synthesis of the amino acids allowed a 50-fold decrease in the concentration of the cofactor without compromising reaction yields. After optimization of the experimental conditions, radiochemical yields were sufficient to carry out in vivo imaging studies in small rodents. PMID:27515007

  14. Digestion under duress: nutrient acquisition and metabolism during hypoxia in the Pacific hagfish.

    PubMed

    Bucking, Carol; Glover, Chris N; Wood, Chris M

    2011-01-01

    Hagfish feed by immersing themselves in the body cavities of decaying animals. This ensures a rich nutrient source for absorption via the gills, skin, and gut, but it may also subject hagfish to reduced levels of dissolved oxygen and elevated levels of the products of biological degradation. This study investigated the impacts of hypoxia and ammonia on the assimilation and metabolism of selected nutrients (glycine, l-alanine, and glucose) in Pacific hagfish (Eptatretus stoutii). Throughout exposure to hypoxia, plasma glucose levels increased. This was not accompanied by an increase in gut glucose transport, which suggests mobilization of glucose from body glycogen stores. Hypoxia preexposure enhanced glycine absorption across the gut and the gill, although l-alanine uptake was unchanged in these tissues. A 24-h period of exposure to hypoxia in hagfish concurrently exposed to waterborne radio-labeled glycine led to a large (5.7-fold) increase in brain glycine accumulation. Preexposure to high levels of waterborne ammonia (10 mM) for 24 h had no impact on gut or skin glycine uptake. These results indicate that hagfish are adapted to maintain nutrient assimilation despite environmental stressors and that tissue-specific absorption of key nutrients such as glycine can even be enhanced in order to sustain critical functions during hypoxia. PMID:22030853

  15. Biosynthesis of prodigiosin by non-proliferating wild-type Serratia marcescens and mutants deficient in catabolism of alanine, histidine, and proline.

    PubMed

    Lim, D V; Qadri, S M; Nichols, C; Williams, R P

    1977-01-01

    Mutants of Serratia marcescens Nima, designated as Aut, Hut, or Put, did not utilize L-alanine, L-histidine, or L-proline, respectively, as a sole carbon source but did utilize other amino acids or glycerol as carbon sources. The bacteria were permeable to alanine, histidine, and proline but lacked the enzymes responsible for degradation of these amino acids. The Aut mutant contained no L-alanine dehydrogenase activity, whereas the Hut and Put mutants contained only 7 and 4% of the histidase and proline oxidase activities, respectively, found in the wild-type strain. Rates of oxygen uptake and protein synthesis were significantly lower when the mutants were incubated in the presence of amino acids they could not degrade. Studies of L-[14C]alanine, L-[14C]histidine, and L-[14C]proline incorporation into prodigiosin synthesized by these mutants and the wild-type strain revealed that proline was incorporated intact, whereas all of alanine except the carboxyl group was incorporated into the pigment molecule. Histidine did not enter prodigiosin directly. These data suggested that the presence of unique biosynthetic pathways, independent of primary metabolism, leads to formation of prodigiosin from specific amino acids.

  16. D-amino acid-induced expression of D-amino acid oxidase in the yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Shouji; Okada, Hirotsune; Abe, Katsumasa; Kera, Yoshio

    2012-12-01

    We investigated D-amino acid oxidase (DAO) induction in the popular model yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. The product of the putative DAO gene of the yeast expressed in E. coli displayed oxidase activity to neutral and basic D-amino acids, but not to an L-amino acid or acidic D-amino acids, showing that the putative DAO gene encodes catalytically active DAO. DAO activity was weakly detected in yeast cells grown on a culture medium without D-amino acid, and was approximately doubled by adding D-alanine. The elimination of ammonium chloride from culture medium induced activity by up to eight-fold. L-Alanine also induced the activity, but only by about half of that induced by D-alanine. The induction by D-alanine reached a maximum level at 2 h cultivation; it remained roughly constant until cell growth reached a stationary phase. The best inducer was D-alanine, followed by D-proline and then D-serine. Not effective were N-carbamoyl-D,L-alanine (a better inducer of DAO than D-alanine in the yeast Trigonopsis variabilis), and both basic and acidic D-amino acids. These results showed that S. pombe DAO could be a suitable model for analyzing the regulation of DAO expression in eukaryotic organisms. PMID:22986818

  17. D-Galacturonic Acid: A Highly Reactive Compound in Nonenzymatic Browning. 2. Formation of Amino-Specific Degradation Products.

    PubMed

    Wegener, Steffen; Bornik, Maria-Anna; Kroh, Lothar W

    2015-07-22

    Thermal treatment of aqueous solutions of D-galacturonic acid and L-alanine at pH 3, 5, and 8 led to rapid and more intensive nonenzymatic browning reactions compared to similar solutions of other uronic acids and to Maillard reactions of reducing sugars. The hemiacetal ring structures of uronic acids had a high impact on browning behavior and reaction pathways. Besides reductic acid (1,2-dihydroxy-2-cyclopenten-1-one), 4,5-dihydroxy-2-cyclopenten-1-one (DHCP), furan-2-carboxaldehyde, and norfuraneol (4-hydroxy-5-methyl-3-(2H)-furanone) could be detected as typical products of nonenzymatic uronic acid browning reactions. 2-(2-Formyl-1H-pyrrole-1-yl)propanoic acid (FPA) and 1-(1-carboxyethyl)-3-hydroxypyridin-1-ium (HPA) were identified as specific reaction products of uronic acids with amine participation like l-alanine. In contrast, the structurally related D-galacturonic acid methyl ester showed less browning activity and degradation under equal reaction conditions. Pectin-specific degradation products such as 5-formyl-2-furanoic acid and 2-furanoic acid were found but could not be verified for d-galacturonic acid monomers alone. PMID:26111613

  18. Temperature effects in first-principles solid state calculations of the chemical shielding tensor made simple

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monserrat, Bartomeu; Needs, Richard J.; Pickard, Chris J.

    2014-10-01

    We study the effects of atomic vibrations on the solid-state chemical shielding tensor using first principles density functional theory calculations. At the harmonic level, we use a Monte Carlo method and a perturbative expansion. The Monte Carlo method is accurate but computationally expensive, while the perturbative method is computationally more efficient, but approximate. We find excellent agreement between the two methods for both the isotropic shift and the shielding anisotropy. The effects of zero-point quantum mechanical nuclear motion are important up to relatively high temperatures: at 500 K they still represent about half of the overall vibrational contribution. We also investigate the effects of anharmonic vibrations, finding that their contribution to the zero-point correction to the chemical shielding tensor is small. We exemplify these ideas using magnesium oxide and the molecular crystals L-alanine and β-aspartyl-L-alanine. We therefore propose as the method of choice to incorporate the effects of temperature in solid state chemical shielding tensor calculations using the perturbative expansion within the harmonic approximation. This approach is accurate and requires a computational effort that is about an order of magnitude smaller than that of dynamical or Monte Carlo approaches, so these effects might be routinely accounted for.

  19. Biochemical characterization of alanine racemase--a spore protein produced by Bacillus anthracis.

    PubMed

    Kanodia, Shivani; Agarwal, Shivangi; Singh, Priyanka; Agarwal, Shivani; Singh, Preeti; Bhatnagar, Rakesh

    2009-01-31

    Alanine racemase catalyzes the interconversion of L-alanine and D-alanine and plays a crucial role in spore germination and cell wall biosynthesis. In this study, alanine racemase produced by Bacillus anthracis was expressed and purified as a monomer in Escherichia coli and the importance of lysine 41 in the cofactor binding octapeptide and tyrosine 270 in catalysis was evaluated. The native enzyme exhibited an apparent K(m) of 3 mM for L-alanine, and a V(max) of 295 micromoles/min/mg, with the optimum activity occurring at 37 degrees C and a pH of 8-9. The activity observed in the absence of exogenous pyridoxal 5'-phosphate suggested that the cofactor is bound to the enzyme. Additionally, the UV-visible absorption spectra indicated that the activity was pH independece, of VV-visible absorption spectra suggests that the bound PLP exists as a protonated Schiff's base. Furthermore, the loss of activity observed in the apoenzyme suggested that bound PLP is required for catalysis. Finally, the enzyme followed non-competitive and mixed inhibition kinetics for hydroxylamine and propionate with a K(i) of 160 microM and 30 mM, respectively. [BMB reports 2009; 42(1): 47-52]. PMID:19192393

  20. Substrate Availability of Mutant SPT Alters Neuronal Branching and Growth Cone Dynamics in Dorsal Root Ganglia

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Byung Kyu; Chandra, Ankush; Kuljis, Dika; Schmidt, Brian P.

    2015-01-01

    Serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT) is a key enzyme in the first step of sphingolipid biosynthesis. Mutations in the SPTLC1 gene that encodes for SPT subunits cause hereditary sensory neuropathy type 1. However, little is understood about how mutant SPT regulates mechanisms of sensory neuron and axonal growth. Using transgenic mice overexpressing the C133W SPT mutant, we found that mutant dorsal root ganglia (DRG) during growth in vitro exhibit increased neurite length and branching, coinciding with elevated expression of actin-cross-linking proteins at the neuronal growth cone, namely phosphorylated Ezrin/Radixin/Moesin. In addition, inhibition of SPT was able to reverse the mutant phenotype. Because mutant SPT preferentially uses l-alanine over its canonical substrate l-serine, we also investigated the effects of substrate availability on DRG neurons. Supplementation with l-serine or removal of l-alanine independently restored normal growth patterns in mutant SPTLC1C133W DRG. Therefore, we report that substrate availability and selectivity of SPT influence the regulation of neurite growth in DRG neurons. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Hereditary sensory neuropathy type 1 is an autosomal-dominant disorder that leads to a sensory neuropathy due to mutations in the serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT) enzyme. We investigated how mutant SPT and substrate levels regulate neurite growth. Because SPT is an important enzyme in the synthesis of sphingolipids, our data are of broader significance to other peripheral and metabolic disorders. PMID:26446223

  1. X-ray diffraction study of nanocrystalline and amorphous structure within major and minor ampullate dragline spider silks

    SciTech Connect

    Sampath, Sujatha; Isdebski, Thomas; Jenkins, Janelle E.; Ayon, Joel V.; Henning, Robert W.; Orgel, Joseph P.R.O.; Antipoa, Olga; Yarger, Jeffery L.

    2012-07-25

    Synchrotron X-ray micro-diffraction experiments were carried out on Nephila clavipes (NC) and Argiope aurantia (AA) major (MA) and minor ampullate (MiA) fibers that make up dragline spider silk. The diffraction patterns show a semi-crystalline structure with {beta}-poly(L-alanine) nanocrystallites embedded in a partially oriented amorphous matrix. A superlattice reflection 'S' diffraction ring is observed, which corresponds to a crystalline component larger in size and is poorly oriented, when compared to the {beta}-poly(L-alanine) nanocrystallites that are commonly observed in dragline spider silks. Crystallite size, crystallinity and orientation about the fiber axis have been determined from the wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) patterns. In both NC and AA, the MiA silks are found to be more highly crystalline, when compared with the corresponding MA silks. Detailed analysis on the amorphous matrix shows considerable differences in the degree of order of the oriented amorphous component between the different silks studied and may play a crucial role in determining the mechanical properties of the silks.

  2. Identification of a Vibrio cholerae chemoreceptor that senses taurine and amino acids as attractants

    PubMed Central

    Nishiyama, So-ichiro; Takahashi, Yohei; Yamamoto, Kentaro; Suzuki, Daisuke; Itoh, Yasuaki; Sumita, Kazumasa; Uchida, Yumiko; Homma, Michio; Imada, Katsumi; Kawagishi, Ikuro

    2016-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae, the etiological agent of cholera, was found to be attracted by taurine (2-aminoethanesulfonic acid), a major constituent of human bile. Mlp37, the closest homolog of the previously identified amino acid chemoreceptor Mlp24, was found to mediate taxis to taurine as well as L-serine, L-alanine, L-arginine, and other amino acids. Methylation of Mlp37 was enhanced upon the addition of taurine and amino acids. Isothermal titration calorimetry demonstrated that a purified periplasmic fragment of Mlp37 binds directly to taurine, L-serine, L-alanine and L-arginine. Crystal structures of the periplamic domain of Mlp37 revealed that L-serine and taurine bind to the membrane-distal PAS domain in essentially in the same way. The structural information was supported by characterising the in vivo properties of alanine-substituted mutant forms of Mlp37. The fact that the ligand-binding domain of the L-serine complex had a small opening, which would accommodate a larger R group, accounts for the broad ligand specificity of Mlp37 and allowed us to visualise ligand binding to Mlp37 with fluorescently labelled L-serine. Taken together, we conclude that Mlp37 serves as the major chemoreceptor for taurine and various amino acids. PMID:26878914

  3. A 1-year study of the activities of seven hydrolases in a communal wastewater treatment plant: trends and correlations.

    PubMed

    Kreutz, Jennifer Anna; Böckenhüser, Ina; Wacht, Marion; Fischer, Klaus

    2016-08-01

    The activities of seven hydrolytic enzymes (L-alanine aminopeptidase, esterase, α-and β-glucosidase, phosphomonoesterase, phosphodiesterase, sulfatase) were monitored during 1 year in parallel and serial treatment units of the biological stage of a communal wastewater treatment plant. The spatial homogeneity of enzyme activities was high (coefficients of variation <10 % for the entire treatment stage). A significant difference between aerated and stirred tanks was not observed. Temperature seemed not to exert a direct influence. Long periods with comparably constant activities were interrupted by a few strong, short-time rises. The mean enzyme activities followed the sequence sulfatase < α-glucosidase < phosphodiesterase ≈ β-glucosidase≈esterase < phosphomonoesterase < L-alanine aminopeptidase. The enzyme activities correlated among themselves at different levels. Very strong (r > 0.8) and highly significant (p < 0.01) correlations between the activities of both glucosidases, both phosphoesterases, and between phosphomonoesterase and both glucosidases were ascertained, pointing to the importance of substrate specificity and similarity of metabolic functions. Moderate and strong activity correlations with various wastewater constituents and with process parameters, e.g., concentrations, loads and eliminated amounts of phosphorous, TOC concentrations and loads of the plant effluent, dry matter content of activated sludge, and sludge volume, were found. The esterase activity was least correlated with other enzymes and often showed deviating dependencies on process parameters, raising questions concerning its appropriateness as a sum parameter for enzymatic and heterotrophic activity.

  4. Exploring Solute-Solvent Interactions of -Amino Acids in Aqueous [] Arrangements by Volumetric, Viscometric, Refractometric, and Acoustic Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Mahendra Nath; Roy, Milan Chandra; Basak, Saptarshi

    2014-05-01

    Qualitative and quantitative analysis of molecular interaction prevailing in glycine, l-alanine, l-valine, and aqueous solution of ionic liquid (IL) [1-ethylpyridinium tetrafluoroborate (] have been investigated by thermophysical properties. The apparent molar volume (), viscosity -coefficient, molal refraction (), and adiabatic compressibility ( of glycine, l-alanine, and l-valine have been studied in 0.001 mol , 0.003 mol , and 0.005 mol aqueous 1-ethylpyridinium tetrafluoroborate [] solutions at 298.15 K from the values of densities , viscosities (), refractive index (, and speed of sound , respectively. The extent of interaction, i.e., the solute-solvent interaction is expressed in terms of the limiting apparent molar volume (, viscosity -coefficient, and limiting apparent molar adiabatic compressibility (. The limiting apparent molar volumes (, experimental slopes ( derived from the Masson equation, and viscosity - and -coefficients using the Jones-Dole equation have been interpreted in terms of ion-ion and ion-solvent interactions, respectively. Molal refractions ( have been calculated with the help of the Lorentz-Lorenz equation. The role of the solvent (aqueous IL solution) and the contribution of solute-solute and solute-solvent interactions to the solution complexes have also been analyzed through the derived properties.

  5. D-Galacturonic Acid: A Highly Reactive Compound in Nonenzymatic Browning. 2. Formation of Amino-Specific Degradation Products.

    PubMed

    Wegener, Steffen; Bornik, Maria-Anna; Kroh, Lothar W

    2015-07-22

    Thermal treatment of aqueous solutions of D-galacturonic acid and L-alanine at pH 3, 5, and 8 led to rapid and more intensive nonenzymatic browning reactions compared to similar solutions of other uronic acids and to Maillard reactions of reducing sugars. The hemiacetal ring structures of uronic acids had a high impact on browning behavior and reaction pathways. Besides reductic acid (1,2-dihydroxy-2-cyclopenten-1-one), 4,5-dihydroxy-2-cyclopenten-1-one (DHCP), furan-2-carboxaldehyde, and norfuraneol (4-hydroxy-5-methyl-3-(2H)-furanone) could be detected as typical products of nonenzymatic uronic acid browning reactions. 2-(2-Formyl-1H-pyrrole-1-yl)propanoic acid (FPA) and 1-(1-carboxyethyl)-3-hydroxypyridin-1-ium (HPA) were identified as specific reaction products of uronic acids with amine participation like l-alanine. In contrast, the structurally related D-galacturonic acid methyl ester showed less browning activity and degradation under equal reaction conditions. Pectin-specific degradation products such as 5-formyl-2-furanoic acid and 2-furanoic acid were found but could not be verified for d-galacturonic acid monomers alone.

  6. Enhancing the supply of oxaloacetate for L-glutamate production by pyc overexpression in different Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xuan; Wang, Jing; Xie, Xixian; Xu, Qingyang; Zhang, Chenglin; Chen, Ning

    2013-06-01

    During L-glutamate production, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase and pyruvate carboxylase (PCx) play important roles in supplying oxaloacetate to the tricarboxylic acid cycle. To explore the significance of PCx for L-glutamate overproduction, the pyc gene encoding PCx was amplified in Corynebacterium glutamicum GDK-9 triggered by biotin limitation and CN1021 triggered by a temperature shock, respectively. In the fed-batch cultures, GDK-9pXMJ19pyc exhibited 7.4 % lower L-alanine excretion and no improved L-glutamate production. In contrast, CN1021pXMJ19pyc finally exhibited 13 % lower L-alanine excretion and identical L-glutamate production, however, 8.5 % higher L-glutamate production was detected during a short period of the fermentation. It was indicated that pyc overexpression in L-glutamate producer strains, especially CN1021, increased the supply of oxaloacetate for L-glutamate synthesis and decreased byproduct excretion at the pyruvate node.

  7. Synthesis and incorporation of [6,7]-selenatryptophan into dihydrofolate reductase.

    PubMed

    Boles, Jeffrey O; Henderson, James; Hatch, Duane; Silks, Louis A

    2002-10-25

    Until recently, the only selenium containing amino acid which could be used to completely substitute for a wild type amino acid was selenomethionine (SeMet). In the last decade the preparation of SeMet containing proteins has proved to be valuable tools in the determination of three-dimensional structure by multiwavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) techniques. The potential utility of a selenium containing tryptophan analog, beta-seleno[3,2-b]pyrrolyl-L-alanine ([4,5]selenatryptophan), has recently been demonstrated in the literature. This finding shows promise for the bioincorporation of its positional isomer, beta-selenolo[2,3-b]pyrrolyl-L-alanine ([6,7]selenatryptophan), thereby adding to the essential arsenal of selenium-containing amino acids for use in the characterization of proteins. The synthesis of [6,7]selenatryptophan by enzymatic biotransformation with tryptophan synthase from selenolo[2,3-b]pyrrole was carried out as well as its characterization by NMR spectroscopy and thin layer chromatography. Selenatryptophyl dihydrofolate reductase ([6,7]SeTrp-DHFR) was then synthesized in vivo, purified, and found to exhibit no perturbations to enzymatic activity.

  8. A serendipitous discovery of antifreeze protein-specific activity in C-linked antifreeze glycoprotein analogs.

    PubMed

    Eniade, Adewale; Purushotham, Madhusudhan; Ben, Robert N; Wang, J B; Horwath, Kathleen

    2003-01-01

    Structurally diverse carbon-linked (C-linked) analogs of antifreeze glycoprotein (AFGP) have been prepared via linear or convergent solid phase synthesis. These analogs range in molecular weight from approx 1.5-4.1 KDa and do not possess the beta-D-galactose-1,3-alpha-D-N-acetylgalactosamine carbohydrate moiety or the L-threonine-L-alanine-L-alanine polypeptide backbone native to the AFGP wild-type. Despite these dramatic structural modifications, the 2.7-KDa and 4.1-KDa analogs possess antifreeze protein-specific activity as determined by recrystallization-inhibition (RI) and thermal hysteresis (TH) assays. These analogs are weaker than the wild-type in their activity, but nanoliter osmometry indicates that these compounds are binding to ice and affecting a localized freezing point depression. This is the first example of a C-linked AFGP analog that possesses TH and RI activity and suggests that the rational design and synthesis of chemically and biologically stable AFGP analogs is a feasible and worthwhile endeavor. Given the low degree of TH activity, these compounds may prove useful for the protection of cells during freezing and thawing cycles. PMID:12777711

  9. (L)-Valine production with minimization of by-products' synthesis in Corynebacterium glutamicum and Brevibacterium flavum.

    PubMed

    Hou, Xiaohu; Chen, Xinde; Zhang, Yue; Qian, He; Zhang, Weiguo

    2012-12-01

    Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC13032 and Brevibacterium flavum JV16 were engineered for L-valine production by over-expressing ilvEBN ( r ) C genes at 31 °C in 72 h fermentation. Different strategies were carried out to reduce the by-products' accumulation in L-valine fermentation and also to increase the availability of precursor for L-valine biosynthesis. The native promoter of ilvA of C. glutamicum was replaced with a weak promoter MPilvA (P-ilvAM1CG) to reduce the biosynthetic rate of L-isoleucine. Effect of different relative dissolved oxygen on L-valine production and by-products' formation was recorded, indicating that 15 % saturation may be the most appropriate relative dissolved oxygen for L-valine fermentation with almost no L-lactic acid and L-glutamate formed. To minimize L-alanine accumulation, alaT and/or avtA was inactivated in C. glutamicum and B. flavum, respectively. Compared to high concentration of L-alanine accumulated by alaT inactivated strains harboring ilvEBN ( r ) C genes, L-alanine concentration was reduced to 0.18 g/L by C. glutamicum ATCC13032MPilvA△avtA pDXW-8-ilvEBN ( r ) C, and 0.22 g/L by B. flavum JV16avtA::Cm pDXW-8-ilvEBN ( r ) C. Meanwhile, L-valine production and conversion efficiency were enhanced to 31.15 g/L and 0.173 g/g by C. glutamicum ATCC13032MPilvA△avtA pDXW-8-ilvEBN ( r ) C, 38.82 g/L and 0.252 g/g by B. flavum JV16avtA::Cm pDXW-8-ilvEBN ( r ) C. This study provides combined strategies to improve L-valine yield by minimization of by-products' production.

  10. Crystal structure of an unknown solvate of dodecakis­(μ2-alaninato-1:2κ2 O:N,O)cerium(III)hexa­nickel(II) aqua­tris­(hydroxido-κO)tris­(nitrato-κ2 O,O′)cerate(III)

    PubMed Central

    Bezzubov, Stanislav I.; Doljenko, Vladimir D.; Churakov, Andrei V.; Zharinova, Irina S.; Kiselev, Yuri M.

    2015-01-01

    The chiral title compound, [CeNi6(C3H6NO2)12][Ce(NO3)3(OH)3(H2O)], comprises a complex heterometallic Ni/Ce cation and a homonuclear Ce anion. Both the cation and anion exhibit point group symmetry 3. with the CeIII atom situated on the threefold rotation axis. The cation metal core consists of six NiII atoms coordinated in a slightly distorted octa­hedral N2O4 configuration by N and O atoms of 12 deprotonated l-alaninate ligands exhibiting both bridging and chelating modes. This metal–organic coordination motif encapsulates one CeIII atom that shows an icosa­hedral coordination by the O-donor atoms of the l-alaninate ligands, with Ce—O distances varying in the range 2.455 (5)–2.675 (3) Å. In the anion, the central CeIII ion is bound to three bidentate nitrate ligands, to three hydroxide ligands and to one water mol­ecule, with Ce—O distances in the range 2.6808 (19)–2.741 (2) Å. The H atoms of the coordinating water mol­ecule are disordered over three positions due to its location on a threefold rotation axis. Disorder is also observed in fragments of two l-alaninate ligands, with occupancy ratios of 0.608 (14):0.392 (14) and 0.669 (8):0.331 (8), respectively, for the two sets of sites. In the crystal, the complex cations and anions assemble through O—H⋯O and N—H⋯O hydrogen bonds into a three-dimensional network with large voids of approximately 1020 Å3. The contributions of highly disordered ethanol and water solvent mol­ecules to the diffraction data were removed with the SQUEEZE procedure [Spek (2015 ▸). Acta Cryst. C71, 9–18]. The given chemical formula and other crystal data do not take into account the unknown amount of these solvent mol­ecules. PMID:26594427

  11. Effect alteration of methamphetamine by amino acids or their salts on ambulatory activity in mice.

    PubMed

    Kuribara, H; Tadokoro, S

    1983-02-01

    Effect alterations of methamphetamine by pretreatment of amino acids or their salts on ambulatory activity in mice were investigated to confirm a fact that certain amino acids, particularly monosodium L-glutamate, are added to methamphetamine by the street users, and that the amino acids augment the effect of methamphetamine. The ambulatory activity of mouse was measured by a tilting-type round activity cage of 25 cm in diameter. The amino acids or their salts tested were monosodium L-glutamate, monosodium L-aspartate, gamma-amino-butyric acid, L-alanine, L-lysine hydrochloride and L-arginine hydrochloride. A single administration of each chemical at doses of 1 and 2 g/kg i.p. did not induce a marked change in the ambulatory activity in mice. Methamphetamine 2 mg/kg s.c. induced an increase in the ambulatory activity with a peak at 40 min after the administration, and the increased ambulatory activity persisted for 3 hr. The ambulation-increasing effect of methamphetamine was augmented by the pretreatment of monosodium L-glutamate and monosodium L-aspartate at 30 min before the methamphetamine administration, while attenuated by the pretreatment of L-lysine hydrochloride and L-arginine hydrochloride in a dose-dependent manner. Gamma-aminobutyric acid and L-alanine did not affect the effect of methamphetamine. Similar augmentation and attenuation in the ambulation-increasing effect of methamphetamine were induced by the pretreatment of sodium bicarbonate 0.9 g/kg i.p. (urinary alkalizer) and ammonium chloride 0.07 g/kg i.p. (urinary acidifier), respectively. The urinary pH level was elevated by the administration of monosodium L-glutamate, monosodium L-aspartate and sodium bicarbonate, and decreased by L-lysine hydrochloride, L-arginine hydrochloride and ammonium chloride. Gamma-aminobutyric acid and L-alanine did not elicit a marked change in the urinary pH level. The present experiment confirms the fact in human that monosodium L-glutamate augments the effect of

  12. Treponema denticola cystalysin exhibits significant alanine racemase activity accompanied by transamination: mechanistic implications.

    PubMed Central

    Bertoldi, Mariarita; Cellini, Barbara; Paiardini, Alessandro; Di Salvo, Martino; Borri Voltattorni, Carla

    2003-01-01

    To obtain information on the reaction specificity of cystalysin from the spirochaete bacterium Treponema denticola, the interaction with L- and D-alanine has been investigated. Binding of both alanine enantiomers leads to the appearance of an external aldimine absorbing at 429 nm and of a band absorbing at 498 nm, indicative of a quinonoid species. Racemization and transamination reactions were observed to occur with both alanine isomers as substrates. The steady-state kinetic parameters for racemization, k (cat) and K (m), for L-alanine are 1.05+/-0.03 s(-1) and 10+/-1 mM respectively, whereas those for D-alanine are 1.4+/-0.1 s(-1) and 10+/-1 mM. During the reaction of cystalysin with L- or D-alanine, a time-dependent loss of beta-elimination activity occurs concomitantly with the conversion of the pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) coenzyme into pyridoxamine 5'-phosphate (PMP). The catalytic efficiency of the half-transamination of L-alanine is found to be 5.3x10(-5) mM(-1) x s(-1), 5-fold higher when compared with that of D-alanine. The partition ratio between racemization and half-transamination reactions is 2.3x10(3) for L-alanine and 1.4x10(4) for D-alanine. The pH dependence of the kinetic parameters for both the reactions shows that the enzyme possesses a single ionizing residue with p K values of 6.5-6.6, which must be unprotonated for catalysis. Addition of pyruvate converts the PMP form of the enzyme back into the PLP form and causes the concomitant recovery of beta-elimination activity. In contrast with other PLP enzymes studied so far, but similar to alanine racemases, the apoform of the enzyme abstracted tritium from C4' of both (4' S)- and (4' R)-[4'-(3)H]PMP in the presence of pyruvate. Together with molecular modelling of the putative binding sites of L- and D-alanine at the active site of the enzyme, the implications of these studies for the mechanisms of the side reactions catalysed by cystalysin are discussed. PMID:12519070

  13. Knowledge of the bio-effects of ultrasound among physicians performing clinical ultrasonography: Results of a survey conducted by the Italian Society for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology (SIUMB).

    PubMed

    Piscaglia, F; Tewelde, A G; Righini, R; Gianstefani, A; Calliada, F; Bolondi, L

    2009-03-01

    Sommario INTRODUZIONE: La sicurezza nell'uso degli ultrasuoni va sempre considerata in campo ecografico, in quanto gli ultrasuoni sono in grado di indurre effetti biologici potenzialmente dannosi, soprattutto con l'introduzione di nuove tecnologie. SCOPO DELLO STUDIO: Valutare il livello di consapevolezza e di conoscenza dei medici italiani soci SIUMB sulla sicurezza nell'uso dell'ecografia nella pratica clinica. MATERIALI E METODI: Un questionario contenente 11 domande a risposta multipla è stato inviato per e-mail a soci SIUMB (Società Italiana di Ultrasonologia in Medicina e Biologia). Le risposte sono state inserite in un database elettronico ed analizzate statisticamente. RISULTATI: Sono tornati questionari da 105 soci, di età media di 44 anni i cui esami ecografici più frequentemente eseguiti, in aggiunta all'ecografia B-mode standard, erano l'ecoDoppler (74%), l'ecografia con mezzo di contrasto (43%) e l'ecografia pediatrica (43%). Solo il 50–60% conosceva la definizione corretta dell'Indice Meccanico e dell'Indice Termico. Quasi tutti i partecipanti comprendevano gli effetti biologici espressi con Indice Termico, nonostante che solo una minoranza sapesse in quale organo gli effetti biologici, in relazione all'Indice Meccanico, potevano, con più probabilità, verificarsi; analogamente solo una minoranza conosceva l'unità di grandezza per l'Indice Termico. La maggioranza era a conoscenza di come i tessuti del feto siano più suscettibili ai potenziali effetti di quelli adulti. Pochi partecipanti conoscevano le raccomandazioni delle Società Internazionali di Ultrasonologia in campo di sicurezza. CONCLUSIONI: Lo studio ha fatto emergere come sia necessaria una maggior diffusione delle conoscenze sugli effetti biologici degli ultrasuoni tra gli ecografisti italiani.

  14. Diatoms: A Novel Source for the Neurotoxin BMAA in Aquatic Environments

    PubMed Central

    Lage, Sandra; Jonasson, Sara; Shams, Shiva; Mehine, Martin; Ilag, Leopold L.; Rasmussen, Ulla

    2014-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) or Lou Gehrig’s disease is a neurological disorder linked to environmental exposure to a non-protein amino acid, β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA). The only organisms reported to be BMAA-producing, are cyanobacteria – prokaryotic organisms. In this study, we demonstrate that diatoms – eukaryotic organisms – also produce BMAA. Ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry revealed the occurrence of BMAA in six investigated axenic diatom cultures. BMAA was also detected in planktonic field samples collected on the Swedish west coast that display an overrepresentation of diatoms relative to cyanobacteria. Given the ubiquity of diatoms in aquatic environments and their central role as primary producers and the main food items of zooplankton, the use of filter and suspension feeders as livestock fodder dramatically increases the risk of human exposure to BMAA-contaminated food. PMID:24392143

  15. Protein properties of mackerel viscera extracted by supercritical carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Park, Ji Yeon; Back, Sung Sin; Chun, Byung Soo

    2008-07-01

    The extraction of mackerel viscera using supercritical carbon dioxide (SCO2) was performed under the conditions of temperature range from 35 to 45 degrees C, and constant pressure 25 MPa. The digestive enzyme activities were determined in comparison of untreated and treated SCO2 and solvent treatment. Activities were maintained with high level compared to that of solvent extraction. Also from result of SDS-PAGE, the protein denaturation was minimized when using SCO2 extraction. The major amino acids in the mackerel viscera were determined as glutamic acid, aspartic acid, glycine, leucine, lysine and the free amino acids were taurine, L-alanine, L-leucine, 1-methyl-L-histamine, 3-methyl-L-histidine.

  16. Protease-catalyzed peptide synthesis using inverse substrates: the influence of reaction conditions on the trypsin acyl transfer efficiency.

    PubMed

    Schellenberger, V; Jakubke, H D; Zapevalova, N P; Mitin, Y V

    1991-06-01

    Benzyloxycarbonyl-L-alanine p-guanidinophenyl ester behaves as a trypsin "inverse substrate," i.e., a cationic center is included in the leaving group instead of being in the acyl moiety. Using this substrate as an acyl donor, trypsin catalyzes the synthesis of peptide bonds that cannot be split by this enzyme. An optimal acyl transfer efficiency was achieved between pH 8 and 9 at 30 degrees C.The addition of as much as 50% cosolvent was shown to be of minor influence on the acyl transfer efficiency, whereas the reaction velocity decreases by more than one order of magnitude. The efficiency of H-Leu-NH(2) and H-Val-NH(2) in deacylation is almost the same for "inverse" and normal type substrates. PMID:18600704

  17. Exploration of interactions between bioactive solutes and vitamin B9 in aqueous medium by physico-chemical contrivances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath Roy, Mahendra; Chakraborti, Palash; Ekka, Deepak

    2014-09-01

    Molecular interaction prevailing in α-amino acids (glycine, L-alanine, L-valine) and aqueous solution of folic acid (FA) has been reported by physico-chemical properties as density (ρ), viscosity (η), refractive index (nD) and ultrasonic speed (u) at 298.15 K. The extent of interaction (solute-solvent interaction) is expressed in terms of the limiting apparent molar volume (φ0V), viscosity B-coefficient, molar refraction (RM) and limiting apparent molar adiabatic compressibility (φ0K). The trends in transfer volumes, Δφ0V, have been interpreted in terms of solute-cosolute interactions on the basis of a co-sphere overlap model. The role of the cosolute (FA), and the contribution of solute-solute and solute-solvent interactions to the solution complexes, has also been analysed through the derived properties.

  18. Double-quantum homonuclear rotary resonance: Efficient dipolar recovery in magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, N. C.; Bildsøe, H.; Jakobsen, H. J.; Levitt, M. H.

    1994-08-01

    We describe an efficient method for the recovery of homonuclear dipole-dipole interactions in magic-angle spinning NMR. Double-quantum homonuclear rotary resonance (2Q-HORROR) is established by fulfilling the condition ωr=2ω1, where ωr is the sample rotation frequency and ω1 is the nutation frequency around an applied resonant radio frequency (rf) field. This resonance can be used for double-quantum filtering and measurement of homonuclear dipolar interactions in the presence of magic-angle spinning. The spin dynamics depend only weakly on crystallite orientation allowing good performance for powder samples. Chemical shift effects are suppressed to zeroth order. The method is demonstrated for singly and doubly 13C labeled L-alanine.

  19. A novel low molecular weight alanine aminotransferase from fasted rat liver.

    PubMed

    Vedavathi, M; Girish, K S; Kumar, M Karuna

    2006-01-01

    Alanine is the most effective precursor for gluconeogenesis among amino acids, and the initial reaction is catalyzed by alanine aminotransferase (AlaAT). Although the enzyme activity increases during fasting, this effect has not been studied extensively. The present study describes the purification and characterization of an isoform of AlaAT from rat liver under fasting. The molecular mass of the enzyme is 17.7 kD with an isoelectric point of 4.2; glutamine is the N-terminal residue. The enzyme showed narrow substrate specificity for L-alanine with Km values for alanine of 0.51 mM and for 2-oxoglutarate of 0.12 mM. The enzyme is a glycoprotein. Spectroscopic and inhibition studies showed that pyridoxal phosphate (PLP) and free -SH groups are involved in the enzymatic catalysis. PLP activated the enzyme with a Km of 0.057 mM. PMID:16487061

  20. The debut of a rational treatment for an inherited neuropathy?

    PubMed Central

    Scherer, Steven S.

    2011-01-01

    Hereditary neuropathies are common neurological conditions characterized by progressive loss of motor and/or sensory function. There are no effective treatments. Among the many causes of hereditary neuropathies are dominant mutations in serine palmitoyltransferase, long chain base subunit 1 (SPTLC1), which cause hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type 1 (HSAN1). By incorporating l-alanine in place of l-serine, the mutant HSAN1–associated serine palmitoyltransferase generates deoxysphingolipids, which are thought to be neurotoxic. In this issue of the JCI, Garofalo and colleagues report that oral l-serine reverses the accumulation of deoxysphingolipids in humans with HSAN1 and in a transgenic mouse model. As oral l-serine reduces the severity of neuropathy in the mouse model of HSAN1, these data suggest a rational candidate therapy for this devastating condition. PMID:22045569

  1. Alahopcin, a new dipeptide antibiotic produced by Streptomyces albulus subsp. ochragerus subsp. nov.

    PubMed

    Higashide, E; Horii, S; Ono, H; Mizokami, N; Yamazaki, T; Shibata, M; Yoneda, M

    1985-03-01

    An actinomycete strain No. B-52653 was found to produce an antibiotic selectively active against the in vitro antibiotic resistant mutant of Staphylococcus aureus. Based on taxonomic studies, the name Streptomyces albulus subsp. ochragerus subsp. nov. is proposed for the strain. The microorganism produced two kinds of antibiotics; one identical with gougerotin, the other an amphoteric water soluble dipeptide containing L-alanine. The latter has the molecular formula C9H15N3O6 and is named alahopcin. It has a broad antibacterial spectrum and a synergistic effect with some other antibiotics against some antibiotic resistant staphylococci. Alahopcin has a low toxicity and was effective against experimental infections in mice caused by Staphylococcus aureus. PMID:3839222

  2. Isosulfazecin, a new beta-lactam antibiotic, produced by an acidophilic pseudomonad. Fermentation, isolation and characterization.

    PubMed

    Kintaka, K; Haibara, K; Asai, M; Imada, A

    1981-09-01

    A novel beta-lactam antibiotic, isosulfazecin (iSZ), was found to be produced by an acidophilic pseudomonad, Pseudomonas mesoacidophila sp. nov. iSZ was produced in parallel with bacterial growth in nutrient broth containing glycerol and sodium thiosulfate under aerated conditions. iSZ was isolated by chromatography on activated charcoal and anion-exchangers and crystallized from 70% aqueous methanol. The molecular formula was determined to be C12H20N4O9S from physiochemical data. The IR and NMR spectra suggested that iSZ has a beta-lactam ring, methoxyl and sulfonate groups. On acid hydrolysis, it gave L-alanine and D-glutamic acid. iSZ is an epimeric isomer of sulfazecin. iSZ was weakly active against Gram-positive and -negative bacteria, and was strongly active against mutants hypersensitive to beta-lactam antibiotics. PMID:7328050

  3. Vibrational averages along thermal lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monserrat, Bartomeu

    2016-01-01

    A method is proposed for the calculation of vibrational quantum and thermal expectation values of physical properties from first principles. Thermal lines are introduced: these are lines in configuration space parametrized by temperature, such that the value of any physical property along them is approximately equal to the vibrational average of that property. The number of sampling points needed to explore the vibrational phase space is reduced by up to an order of magnitude when the full vibrational density is replaced by thermal lines. Calculations of the vibrational averages of several properties and systems are reported, namely, the internal energy and the electronic band gap of diamond and silicon, and the chemical shielding tensor of L-alanine. Thermal lines pave the way for complex calculations of vibrational averages, including large systems and methods beyond semilocal density functional theory.

  4. How similar is the electronic structures of β-lactam and alanine?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Subhojyoti; Ahmed, Marawan; Wang, Feng

    2016-02-01

    The C1s spectra of β-lactam i.e. 2-azetidinone (C3H5NO), a drug and L-alanine (C3H7NO2), an amino acid, exhibit striking similarities, which may be responsible for the competition between 2-azetidinone and the alanyl-alanine moiety in biochemistry. The present study is to reveal the degree of similarities and differences between their electronic structures of the two model molecular pairs. It is found that the similarities in C1s and inner valence binding energy spectra are due to their bonding connections but other properties such as ring structure (in 2-azetidinone) and chiral carbon (alanine) can be very different. Further, the inner valence region of ionization potential greater than 18 eV for 2-azetidinone and alanine is also significantly similar. Finally the strained lactam ring exhibits more chemical reactivity measured at all non-hydrogen atoms by Fukui functions with respect to alanine.

  5. Synthesis, characterization of α-amino acid Schiff base derived Ru/Pt complexes: Induces cytotoxicity in HepG2 cell via protein binding and ROS generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsalme, Ali; Laeeq, Sameen; Dwivedi, Sourabh; Khan, Mohd. Shahnawaz; Al Farhan, Khalid; Musarrat, Javed; Khan, Rais Ahmad

    2016-06-01

    We have synthesized two new complexes of platinum (1) and ruthenium (2) with α-amino acid, L-alanine, and 2,3-dihydroxybenzaldehyde derived Schiff base (L). The ligand and both complexes were characterized by using elemental analysis and several other spectroscopic techniques viz; IR, 1H, 13C NMR, EPR, and ESI-MS. Furthermore, the protein-binding ability of synthesized complexes was monitored by UV-visible, fluorescence and circular dichroism techniques with a model protein, human serum albumin (HSA). Both the PtL2 and RuL2 complexes displayed significant binding towards HSA. Also, in vitro cytotoxicity assay for both complexes was carried out on human hepatocellular carcinoma cancer (HepG2) cell line. The results showed concentration-dependent inhibition of cell viability. Moreover, the generation of reactive oxygen species was also evaluated, and results exhibited substantial role in cytotoxicity.

  6. Fractionation of Dipeptidase Activities of Streptococcus lactis and Dipeptidase Specificity of Some Lactic Acid Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Sørhaug, Terje; Solberg, Peter

    1973-01-01

    Proteins in sonic extracts of Streptococcus lactis were separated by starch-gel electrophoresis at high voltage. Each slab was sliced longitudinally, and half was stained for peptidases in a mixture containing a peptide, L-amino acid oxidase (snake venom), peroxidase, and o-dianisdine; the other half was stained in amido black for protein. In addition to sonic treatment, trypsin also released enzyme from acetone-treated cells. Glycyl-L-phenylalanine, L-phenylalanyl-glycine, L-alanyl-L-phenylalanine, and L-phenylalanyl-L-alanine served as substrates in characterizing the enzymes. Five different fractions of various specificities appeared in the gels. Broad-range substrate specificities were found for sonic extracts of S. lactis, S. cremoris, S. durans, and Lactobacillus acidophilus. Images PMID:4633426

  7. Chemical Synthesis of Proteins with Non-Strategically Placed Cysteines Using Selenazolidine and Selective Deselenization.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Post Sai; Dery, Shahar; Metanis, Norman

    2016-01-18

    Although native chemical ligation has enabled the synthesis of hundreds of proteins, not all proteins are accessible through typical ligation conditions. The challenging protein, 125-residue human phosphohistidine phosphatase 1 (PHPT1), has three cysteines near the C-terminus, which are not strategically placed for ligation. Herein, we report the first sequential native chemical ligation/deselenization reaction. PHPT1 was prepared from three unprotected peptide segments using two ligation reactions at cysteine and alanine junctions. Selenazolidine was utilized as a masked precursor for N-terminal selenocysteine in the middle segment, and, following ligation, deselenization provided the native alanine residue. This approach was used to synthesize both the wild-type PHPT1 and an analogue in which the active-site histidine was substituted with the unnatural and isosteric amino acid β-thienyl-l-alanine. The activity of both proteins was studied and compared, providing insights into the enzyme active site. PMID:26636774

  8. Investigation of antibacterial mechanism and identification of bacterial protein targets mediated by antibacterial medicinal plant extracts.

    PubMed

    Yong, Ann-Li; Ooh, Keng-Fei; Ong, Hean-Chooi; Chai, Tsun-Thai; Wong, Fai-Chu

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we investigated the antibacterial mechanism and potential therapeutic targets of three antibacterial medicinal plants. Upon treatment with the plant extracts, bacterial proteins were extracted and resolved using denaturing gel electrophoresis. Differentially-expressed bacterial proteins were excised from the gels and subjected to sequence analysis by MALDI TOF-TOF mass spectrometry. From our study, seven differentially expressed bacterial proteins (triacylglycerol lipase, N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase, flagellin, outer membrane protein A, stringent starvation protein A, 30S ribosomal protein s1 and 60 kDa chaperonin) were identified. Additionally, scanning electron microscope study indicated morphological damages induced on bacterial cell surfaces. To the best of our knowledge, this represents the first time these bacterial proteins are being reported, following treatments with the antibacterial plant extracts. Further studies in this direction could lead to the detailed understanding of their inhibition mechanism and discovery of target-specific antibacterial agents.

  9. Laccase-catalyzed cross-linking of amino acids and peptides with dihydroxylated aromatic compounds.

    PubMed

    Mikolasch, Annett; Hahn, Veronika; Manda, Katrin; Pump, Judith; Illas, Nicole; Gördes, Dirk; Lalk, Michael; Gesell Salazar, Manuela; Hammer, Elke; Jülich, Wolf-Dieter; Rawer, Stephan; Thurow, Kerstin; Lindequist, Ulrike; Schauer, Frieder

    2010-08-01

    In order to design potential biomaterials, we investigated the laccase-catalyzed cross-linking between L-lysine or lysine-containing peptides and dihydroxylated aromatics. L-Lysine is one of the major components of naturally occurring mussel adhesive proteins (MAPs). Dihydroxylated aromatics are structurally related to 3,4-dihydroxyphenyl-L-alanine, another main component of MAPs. Mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance analyses show that the epsilon-amino group of L-lysine is able to cross-link dihydroxylated aromatics. Additional oligomer and polymer cross-linked products were obtained from di- and oligopeptides containing L-lysine. Potential applications in medicine or industry for biomaterials synthesised via the three component system consisting of the oligopeptide [Tyr-Lys]10, dihydroxylated aromatics and laccase are discussed.

  10. Synthesis and Cytotoxic Activity on Human Cancer Cells of Novel Isoquinolinequinone-Amino Acid Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Valderrama, Jaime A; Delgado, Virginia; Sepúlveda, Sandra; Benites, Julio; Theoduloz, Cristina; Buc Calderon, Pedro; Muccioli, Giulio G

    2016-09-08

    A variety of aminoisoquinoline-5,8-quinones bearing α-amino acids moieties were synthesized from 3-methyl-4-methoxycarbonylisoquinoline-5,8-quinone and diverse l- and d-α-amino acid methyl esters. The members of the series were evaluated for their cytotoxic activity against normal and cancer cell lines by using the (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) (MTT) assay. From the current investigation, structure-activity relationships demonstrate that the location and structure of the amino acid fragment plays a significant role in the cytotoxic effects. Moderate to high cytotoxic activity was observed and four members, derived from l-alanine, l-leucine, l-phenylalanine, and d-phenylalanine, were selected as promising compounds by their IC50 ranging from 0.5 to 6.25 μM and also by their good selectivity indexes (≥2.24).

  11. Bimodular Peptide Synthetase SidE Produces Fumarylalanine in the Human Pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus

    PubMed Central

    Steinchen, Wieland; Lackner, Gerald; Yasmin, Sabiha; Schrettl, Markus; Dahse, Hans-Martin

    2013-01-01

    The filamentous mold Aspergillus fumigatus causes invasive aspergillosis, a potentially life-threatening infectious disease, in humans. The sidE gene encodes a bimodular peptide synthetase and was shown previously to be strongly upregulated during initiation of murine lung infection. In this study, we characterized the two adenylation domains of SidE with the ATP-[32P]pyrophosphate exchange assay in vitro, which identified fumarate and l-alanine, respectively, as the preferred substrates. Using full-length holo-SidE, fumarylalanine (FA) formation was observed in vitro. Furthermore, FA was identified in A. fumigatus culture supernatants under inducing conditions, unless sidE was genetically inactivated. As FA is structurally related to established pharmaceutical products exerting immunomodulatory activity, this work may contribute to our understanding of the virulence of A. fumigatus. PMID:23974138

  12. Probing micro-solvation in "numbers": the case of neutral dipeptides in water.

    PubMed

    Takis, Panteleimon G; Papavasileiou, Konstantinos D; Peristeras, Loukas D; Melissas, Vasilios S; Troganis, Anastassios N

    2013-05-21

    How many solvent molecules and in what way do they interact directly with biomolecules? This is one of the most challenging questions regarding a deep understanding of biomolecular functionalism and solvation. We herein present a novel NMR spectroscopic study, achieving for the first time the quantification of the directly interacting water molecules with several neutral dipeptides. Our proposed method is supported by both molecular dynamics simulations and density functional theory calculations, advanced analysis of which allowed the identification of the direct interactions between solute-solvent molecules in the zwitterionic L-alanyl-L-alanine dipeptide-water system. Beyond the quantification of dipeptide-water molecule direct interactions, this NMR technique could be useful for the determination and elucidation of small to moderate bio-organic molecular groups' direct interactions with various polar solvent molecules, shedding light on the biomolecular micro-solvation processes and behaviour in various solvents.

  13. Bacterial cell motility of Burkholderia gut symbiont is required to colonize the insect gut.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jun Beom; Byeon, Jin Hee; Jang, Ho Am; Kim, Jiyeun Kate; Yoo, Jin Wook; Kikuchi, Yoshitomo; Lee, Bok Luel

    2015-09-14

    We generated a Burkholderia mutant, which is deficient of an N-acetylmuramyl-l-alanine amidase, AmiC, involved in peptidoglycan degradation. When non-motile ΔamiC mutant Burkholderia cells harboring chain form were orally administered to Riptortus insects, ΔamiC mutant cells were unable to establish symbiotic association. But, ΔamiC mutant complemented with amiC gene restored in vivo symbiotic association. ΔamiC mutant cultured in minimal medium restored their motility with single-celled morphology. When ΔamiC mutant cells harboring single-celled morphology were administered to the host insect, this mutant established normal symbiotic association, suggesting that bacterial motility is essential for the successful symbiosis between host insect and Burkholderia symbiont.

  14. Synthesis and anti-HIV evaluation of hybrid-type prodrugs conjugating HIV integrase inhibitors with d4t by self-cleavable spacers containing an amino acid residue.

    PubMed

    Fossey, Christine; Huynh, Ngoc-Trinh; Vu, Anh-Hoang; Vidu, Anamaria; Zarafu, Irina; Laduree, Daniel; Schmidt, Sylvie; Laumond, Geraldine; Aubertin, Anne-Marie

    2007-10-01

    In an attempt to combine the anti-HIV inhibitory capacity of reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors (NRTIs) and integrase (IN) inhibitors (INIs), several heterodimer analogues of the previously reported [d4T]-PABC-[INI] and [d4T]-OABC-[INI] prototypes have been prepared. In these novel series, we wished to extend our results to conjugates which incorporated an enzymatically labile aminoacid unit (L-alanine) connected to d4T through a self-immolative para- or ortho-aminobenzyl carbonate (PABC or OABC) spacer. Among the novel heterodimers, several derivatives show a potent anti-HIV-1 activity, which proved comparable to that of the [L-708,906]-PABC-[d4T] Heterodimer A prototype. However, although the compounds proved inhibitory to HIV-1, they were less potent than the parent compounds from which they were derived.

  15. 1-Deoxysphingolipids Encountered Exogenously and Made de Novo: Dangerous Mysteries inside an Enigma*

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Jingjing; Merrill, Alfred H.

    2015-01-01

    The traditional backbones of mammalian sphingolipids are 2-amino, 1,3-diols made by serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT). Many organisms additionally produce non-traditional, cytotoxic 1-deoxysphingoid bases and, surprisingly, mammalian SPT biosynthesizes some of them, too (e.g. 1-deoxysphinganine from l-alanine). These are rapidly N-acylated to 1-deoxy-“ceramides” with very uncommon biophysical properties. The functions of 1-deoxysphingolipids are not known, but they are certainly dangerous as contributors to sensory and autonomic neuropathies when elevated by inherited SPT mutations, and they are noticeable in diabetes, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, serine deficiencies, and other diseases. As components of food as well as endogenously produced, these substances are mysteries within an enigma. PMID:25947379

  16. Studies on Hydrogen Production by Photosynthetic Bacteria after Anaerobic Fermentation of Starch by a Hyperthermophile, Pyrococcus furiosus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugitate, Toshihiro; Fukatsu, Makoto; Ishimi, Katsuhiro; Kohno, Hideki; Wakayama, Tatsuki; Nakamura, Yoshihiro; Miyake, Jun; Asada, Yasuo

    In order to establish the sequential hydrogen production from waste starch using a hyperthermophile, Pyrococcus furiosus, and a photosynthetic bacterium, basic studies were done. P. furiosus produced hydrogen and acetate by anaerobic fermentation at 90°C. A photosynthetic bacterium, Rhodobacter sphaeroides RV, was able to produce hydrogen from acetate under anaerobic and light conditions at 30°C. However, Rb. sphaeroides RV was not able to produce hydrogen from acetate in the presence of sodium chloride that was essential for the growth and hydrogen production of P. furiosus although it produced hydrogen from lactate at a reduced rate with 1% sodium chloride. A newly isolated strain, CST-8, from natural environment was, however, able to produce hydrogen from acetate, especially with 3 mM L-alanine and in the presence of 1% sodium chloride. The sequential hydrogen production with P. furiosus and salt-tolerant photosynthetic bacteria could be probable at least in the laboratory experiment scale.

  17. Radiolysis of alanine adsorbed in a clay mineral

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilar-Ovando, Ellen Y.; Negron-Mendoza, Alicia

    2013-07-03

    Optical activity in molecules is a chemical characteristic of living beings. In this work, we examine the hypothesis of the influence of different mineral surfaces on the development of a specific chirality in organic molecules when subjected to conditions simulating the primitive Earth during the period of chemical evolution. By using X-ray diffraction techniques and HPLC/ELSD to analyze aqueous suspensions of amino acids adsorbed on minerals irradiated in different doses with a cobalt-60 gamma source, the experiments attempt to prove the hypothesis that some solid surfaces (like clays and meteorite rocks) may have a concentration capacity and protective role against external sources of ionizing radiation (specifically {gamma}-ray) for some organic compounds (like some amino acids) adsorbed on them. Preliminary results show a slight difference in the adsorption and radiolysis of the D-and L-alanine.

  18. Strecker degradation of amino acids promoted by a camphor-derived sulfonamide.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, M Fernanda N N; Ferreira, M João; Knittel, Ana S O; Oliveira, Maria da Conceição; Costa Pessoa, João; Herrmann, Rudolf; Wagner, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    A camphor-derived sulfonimine with a conjugated carbonyl group, oxoimine 1 (O2SNC10H13O), reacts with amino acids (glycine, L-alanine, L-phenylalanine, L-leucine) to form a compound O2SNC10H13NC10H14NSO2 (2) which was characterized by spectroscopic means (MS and NMR) and supported by DFT calculations. The product, a single diastereoisomer, contains two oxoimine units connected by a -N= bridge, and thus has a structural analogy to the colored product Ruhemann´s purple obtained by the ninhydrin reaction with amino acids. A plausible reaction mechanism that involves zwitterions, a Strecker degradation of an intermediate imine and water-catalyzed tautomerizations was developed by means of DFT calculations on potential transition states. PMID:27340465

  19. New salts of amino acids with dimeric cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghazaryan, V. V.; Fleck, M.; Petrosyan, A. M.

    2010-10-01

    Among salts of amino acids there are compounds with the composition 2A..HX, which consist of dimeric A...A+ cations with short symmetric or asymmetric hydrogen bonds between zwitter-ionic and protonated moieties. These species are materials liable to undergo phase transitions or possess interesting nonlinear optical properties. Here, we report the preparation of 20 new salts with dimeric cations from aqueous solutions, including compounds of glycine, betaine, β- alanine, L-alanine, L-phenylalanine, L-threonine, L-valine, L-leucine and L-proline, with BF4-, ClO4-, Cl-, Br-, HSeO3-, and HC2O4-; as anions. The prepared salts are characterized by IR and Raman spectroscopy. Some of them are grown in form of good quality single crystals, which allowed the determination of their crystal structure.

  20. Acquisition of Raman spectra of amino acids using portable instruments: Outdoor measurements and comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Culka, A.; Jehlička, J.; Edwards, H. G. M.

    2010-12-01

    Raman spectra of 13 amino acids: L-alanine, β-alanine, L-asparagine, L-aspartic acid, L-glutamic acid, L-glutamine, glycine, L-methionine, L-proline, L-serine, L-threonine, L-tryptophan and L-tyrosine were acquired outdoors using two portable Raman instruments from the Ahura and Delta Nu manufacturers, both with 785 nm laser excitation. Both instruments provide quality Raman spectra with nevertheless a variable dependence upon the prevailing experimental conditions. The data acquired in these experiments will inform the selection of suitable Raman spectrometers for the in-field detection of biomolecules of relevance to the search for life signatures spectroscopically in terrestrial extreme environments and in extraterrestrial exploration, especially of planetary surfaces and subsurfaces using robotic instrumentation.

  1. Enzymatic preparation of. cap alpha. - and. beta. -deuterated or tritiated amino acids with l-methionine. gamma. -lyase

    SciTech Connect

    Esaki, N.; Sawada, S.; Tanaka, H.; Soda, K.

    1982-01-15

    L-Methionine ..gamma..-lyase catalyzes the exchange of ..cap alpha..- and ..beta..-hydrogens of L-methionine and S-methyl-L-cysteine with deuterium or tritium of solvents. The rate of ..cap alpha..-hydrogen exchange with deuterium was about 40 times faster than that of the elimination reactions. The deuterium and tritium were exchanged also with the ..cap alpha..- and ..beta..-hydrogens of the straight-chain amino acids which do not undergo the elimination: L-alanine, L-..cap alpha..-aminobutyrate, L-norvaline, and L-norleucine. No exchange occurs for the D-isomers, acidic L-amino acids, basic L-amino acids, and branched-chain L-amino acids, although ..cap alpha..-hydrogen of glycine, L-trypotophan, and L-phenylalanine is exchanged slowly. These enzymatic hydrogen-exchange reactions facilitate specific labeling of the L-amino acids with deuterium and tritium.

  2. Investigation of biomolecules trapped in fluid inclusions inside halite crystals by Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osterrothová, Kateřina; Jehlička, Jan

    2011-12-01

    Raman spectroscopy was tested for the identification of biomolecules (glycine, L-alanine, β-alanine, L-serine, and γ-aminobutyric acid) trapped in fluid inclusions inside halite model crystals. The investigated biomolecules represent important targets for future astrobiological missions. We know from terrestrial conditions that organic molecules and microorganisms can be sealed within fluid inclusions and can survive intact even for hundreds of millions of years. Raman spectroscopy is currently being miniaturized for future extraterrestrial planetary exploration (ExoMars 2018). Raman spectroscopy has shown the ability to detect investigated aminoacids nondestructively without any sample preparation, in short measurement times, and in relatively low concentrations. The number of registered Raman bands of investigated aminoacids and their intensity clearly correlate with the given concentration of biomolecules within fluid inclusions.

  3. Physical gelation of organic liquids by achiral amino acid based amphiphilic gelators: Effect of chirality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Amrita; Patra, Trilochan; Dey, Joykrishna

    2013-01-01

    We report gelation behavior of a series of N-acyl-β-alanine (Cn-β-Ala) gelators in a variety of organic liquids. The effect of alkyl chain length was studied to elucidate gelation mechanism. The gelation behavior of the Cn-β-Ala gelators was compared with that of corresponding N-acyl-L-alanine (Cn-L-Ala) derivatives. Unlike Cn-L-Ala the Cn-β-Ala gelators failed to gel aliphatic hydrocarbons and exhibit phase-selective gelation in the presence of water. The gelation ability of Cn-β-Ala was observed to be poorer than Cn-L-Ala gelators. Also Cn-β-Ala organogels are thermally less stable, but they are observed to have higher mechanical strength than Cn-L-Ala organogels.

  4. The debut of a rational treatment for an inherited neuropathy?

    PubMed

    Scherer, Steven S

    2011-12-01

    Hereditary neuropathies are common neurological conditions characterized by progressive loss of motor and/or sensory function. There are no effective treatments. Among the many causes of hereditary neuropathies are dominant mutations in serine palmitoyltransferase, long chain base subunit 1 (SPTLC1), which cause hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type 1 (HSAN1). By incorporating L-alanine in place of L-serine, the mutant HSAN1–associated serine palmitoyltransferase generates deoxysphingolipids, which are thought to be neurotoxic. In this issue of the JCI, Garofalo and colleagues report that oral L-serine reverses the accumulation of deoxysphingolipids in humans with HSAN1 and in a transgenic mouse model. As oral L-serine reduces the severity of neuropathy in the mouse model of HSAN1, these data suggest a rational candidate therapy for this devastating condition. PMID:22045569

  5. /sup 13/N-labeled L-amino acids for in vivo assessment of local myocardial metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Baumgartner, F.J.; Barrio, J.R.; Henze, E.; Schelbert, H.R.; MacDonald, N.S.; Phelps, M.E.; Kuhl, D.E.

    1981-06-01

    The hot cell synthesis of sterile, pyrogen-free /sup 13/N-labeled L-amino acids was accomplished by employing the appropriate immobilized enzymes on a CNBr-activated Sepharose support and using remote, semiautomated systems. The syntheses were completed 6-12 min after cyclotron production of (/sup 13/N)ammonia. Myocardial time-activity curves after intracoronary injection of /sup 13/N-labeled L-amino acids in dogs were triexponential in both normal and ischemic myocardium. Higher retention of /sup 13/N activity was observed in ischemic segments. Positron computed tomography imaging also showed increased uptake of /sup 13/N-labeled L-glutamate and L-alanine in ischemic segments compared with normal myocardium when blood flow corrections were made. Myocardial transaminases are primarily responsible for the observed retention fractions. It suggests the participation of the carbon skeletons of these amino acids in the Krebs cycle.

  6. Alpha-amino acid behaves differently from beta- or gamma-amino acids as treated by trimetaphosphate.

    PubMed

    Gao, X; Liu, Y; Xu, P X; Cai, Y M; Zhao, Y F

    2008-01-01

    The condensation reactions of sodium trimetaphosphate with single amino acids, namely glycine, L-alanine, beta-alanine and gamma-aminobutyric acid or pairs of these amino acids were reinvestigated by electrospray ion-trap mass spectrometry and high performance liquid chromatography. It was found when mixtures were treated by sodium trimetaphosphate only in the presence of alpha-amino acid dipeptides were formed. Without addition of alpha-amino acids, the beta-amino acid or gamma-aminobutyric acid could not form peptide either by themselves or with their mixtures under the same conditions. From the data it is concluded that phosphate might select alpha-amino acids to produce the peptides being important precursors for the origin of life. PMID:17973074

  7. LambdaSa1 and LambdaSa2 Prophage Lysins of Streptococcus agalactiae▿

    PubMed Central

    Pritchard, David G.; Dong, Shengli; Kirk, Marion C.; Cartee, Robert T.; Baker, John R.

    2007-01-01

    Putative N-acetylmuramyl-l-alanine amidase genes from LambdaSa1 and LambdaSa2 prophages of Streptococcus agalactiae were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The purified enzymes lysed the cell walls of Streptococcus agalactiae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Staphylococcus aureus. The peptidoglycan digestion products in the cell wall lysates were not consistent with amidase activity. Instead, the structure of the muropeptide digestion fragments indicated that both the LambdaSa1 and LambdaSa2 lysins exhibited γ-d-glutaminyl-l-lysine endopeptidase activity. The endopeptidase cleavage specificity of the lysins was confirmed using a synthetic peptide substrate corresponding to a portion of the stem peptide and cross bridge of Streptococcus agalactiae peptidoglycan. The LambdaSa2 lysin also displayed β-d-N-acetylglucosaminidase activity. PMID:17905888

  8. Synthesis and Cytotoxic Activity on Human Cancer Cells of Novel Isoquinolinequinone-Amino Acid Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Valderrama, Jaime A; Delgado, Virginia; Sepúlveda, Sandra; Benites, Julio; Theoduloz, Cristina; Buc Calderon, Pedro; Muccioli, Giulio G

    2016-01-01

    A variety of aminoisoquinoline-5,8-quinones bearing α-amino acids moieties were synthesized from 3-methyl-4-methoxycarbonylisoquinoline-5,8-quinone and diverse l- and d-α-amino acid methyl esters. The members of the series were evaluated for their cytotoxic activity against normal and cancer cell lines by using the (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) (MTT) assay. From the current investigation, structure-activity relationships demonstrate that the location and structure of the amino acid fragment plays a significant role in the cytotoxic effects. Moderate to high cytotoxic activity was observed and four members, derived from l-alanine, l-leucine, l-phenylalanine, and d-phenylalanine, were selected as promising compounds by their IC50 ranging from 0.5 to 6.25 μM and also by their good selectivity indexes (≥2.24). PMID:27617997

  9. N-( p-Ethynylbenzoyl) derivatives of amino acid and dipeptide methyl esters - Synthesis and structural study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eißmann, Frank; Weber, Edwin

    2011-11-01

    A series of N-( p-ethynylbenzoyl) derivatives ( 1-4) of the amino acids glycine and L-alanine as well as the dipeptides glycylglycine and L-alanylglycine has been synthesized via a two-step reaction sequence including the reaction of an appropriate N-( p-bromobenzoyl) precursor with trimethylsilylacetylene followed by deprotection of the trimethylsilyl protecting group, respectively. X-ray crystal structures of the amino acid and dipeptide methyl esters 1-4 are reported. The amide and peptide bonds within each molecular structure are planar and adopt the trans-configuration. The packing structures are governed by N sbnd H⋯O interactions leading to the formation of characteristic strand motifs. Further stabilization results from weaker C sbnd H⋯O and C sbnd H⋯π contacts.

  10. Identification of the Scopularide Biosynthetic Gene Cluster in Scopulariopsis brevicaulis

    PubMed Central

    Lukassen, Mie Bech; Saei, Wagma; Sondergaard, Teis Esben; Tamminen, Anu; Kumar, Abhishek; Kempken, Frank; Wiebe, Marilyn G.; Sørensen, Jens Laurids

    2015-01-01

    Scopularide A is a promising potent anticancer lipopeptide isolated from a marine derived Scopulariopsis brevicaulis strain. The compound consists of a reduced carbon chain (3-hydroxy-methyldecanoyl) attached to five amino acids (glycine, l-valine, d-leucine, l-alanine, and l-phenylalanine). Using the newly sequenced S. brevicaulis genome we were able to identify the putative biosynthetic gene cluster using genetic information from the structurally related emericellamide A from Aspergillus nidulans and W493-B from Fusarium pseudograminearum. The scopularide A gene cluster includes a nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS1), a polyketide synthase (PKS2), a CoA ligase, an acyltransferase, and a transcription factor. Homologous recombination was low in S. brevicaulis so the local transcription factor was integrated randomly under a constitutive promoter, which led to a three to four-fold increase in scopularide A production. This indirectly verifies the identity of the proposed biosynthetic gene cluster. PMID:26184239

  11. Influence of L-isoleucine and pantothenate auxotrophy for L-valine formation in Corynebacterium glutamicum revisited by metabolome analyses.

    PubMed

    Bartek, Tobias; Makus, Pia; Klein, Bianca; Lang, Siegmund; Oldiges, Marco

    2008-04-01

    The effect of different amounts of supplemented L-isoleucine and pantothenate has been analysed with the auxotrophic strain Corynebacterium glutamicum DeltailvA DeltapanB, showing that the final biomass concentration of this preliminary L-valine production strain can be controlled by the amount of added L-isoleucine. One gramme cell dry weight is formed from 48 micromol L-isoleucine. Different amounts of available pantothenate affect the intracellular pyruvate concentration. By limiting pantothenate supplementation from 0.8 to 0.1 microM, a 35-fold increase of cytoplasmic pyruvate up to 14.2 mM can be observed, resulting in the increased formation of L-valine, L-alanine and organic acids in the presence of low pantothenate concentrations. These findings can be used to redirect the carbon flux from glycolysis via pyruvate to the TCA cycle towards the desired product L-valine.

  12. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and environmental factors

    PubMed Central

    Bozzoni, Virginia; Pansarasa, Orietta; Diamanti, Luca; Nosari, Guido; Cereda, Cristina; Ceroni, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    Summary Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder that affects central and peripheral motor neuron cells. Its etiology is unknown, although a relationship between genetic background and environmental factors may play a major role in triggering the neurodegeneration. In this review, we analyze the role of environmental factors in ALS: heavy metals, electromagnetic fields and electric shocks, pesticides, β-N-methylamino-L-alanine, physical activity and the controversial role of sports. The literature on the single issues is analyzed in an attempt to clarify, as clearly as possible, whether each risk factor significantly contributes to the disease pathogenesis. After summarizing conflicting observations and data, the authors provide a final synthetic statement. PMID:27027889

  13. Production and physicochemical assessment of new stevia amino acid sweeteners from the natural stevioside.

    PubMed

    Khattab, Sherine N; Massoud, Mona I; Jad, Yahya El-Sayed; Bekhit, Adnan A; El-Faham, Ayman

    2015-04-15

    New stevia amino acid sweeteners, stevia glycine ethyl ester (ST-GL) and stevia l-alanine methyl ester (ST-GL), were synthesised and characterised by IR, NMR ((1)H NMR and (13)C NMR) and elemental analysis. The purity of the new sweeteners was determined by HPLC and their sensory properties were evaluated relative to sucrose in an aqueous system. Furthermore, the stevia derivatives (ST-GL and ST-AL) were evaluated for their acute toxicity, melting point, solubility and heat stability. The novel sweeteners were stable in acidic, neutral or basic aqueous solutions maintained at 100 °C for 2 h. The sweetness intensity rate of the novel sweeteners was higher than sucrose. Stevia amino acid (ST-GL and ST-AL) solutions had a clean sweetness taste without bitterness when compared to stevioside. The novel sweeteners can be utilised as non-caloric sweeteners in the production of low-calorie food.

  14. Chirality Amplification in Tactoids of Lyotropic Chromonic Liquid Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Chenhui; Lavrentovich, Oleg

    2014-03-01

    We demonstrate an effective chirality amplification based on the long-range forces, extending over the scales of tens of micrometers, much larger than the single molecule (nanometer) scale. The mechanism is rooted in the long-range elastic nature of orientational order in lyotropic chromonic liquid crystals (LCLCs) that represent water solutions of achiral disc-like molecules. Minute quantities of chiral molecules such as amino acid L-alanine and limonene added to the droplets of LCLC lead to chiral amplification characterized by an increase of optical activity by a factor of 103 - 104. This effect allows one to discriminate and detect the absolute configuration of chiral molecules in an aqueous system, thus opening new possibilities in biosensing and other biological applications.

  15. Kinetics of acid hydrolysis and reactivity of some antibacterial hydrophilic iron(II) imino-complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaker, Ali Mohamed; Nassr, Lobna Abdel-Mohsen Ebaid; Adam, Mohamed Shaker Saied; Mohamed, Ibrahim Mohamed Abdelhalim

    2015-05-01

    Kinetic study of acid hydrolysis of some hydrophilic Fe(II) Schiff base amino acid complexes with antibacterial properties was performed using spectrophotometry. The Schiff base ligands were derived from sodium 2-hydroxybenzaldehyde-5-sulfonate and glycine, L-alanine, L-leucine, L-isoleucine, DL-methionine, DL-serine, or L-phenylalanine. The reaction was studied in aqueous media under conditions of pseudo-first order kinetics. Moreover, the acid hydrolysis was studied at different temperatures and the activation parameters were calculated. The general rate equation was suggested as follows: rate = k obs [Complex], where k obs = k 2 [H+]. The evaluated rate constants and activation parameters are consistent with the hydrophilicity of the investigated complexes.

  16. 2-Arylbenzothiazole, benzoxazole and benzimidazole derivatives as fluorogenic substrates for the detection of nitroreductase and aminopeptidase activity in clinically important bacteria.

    PubMed

    Cellier, Marie; Fabrega, Olivier J; Fazackerley, Elizabeth; James, Arthur L; Orenga, Sylvain; Perry, John D; Salwatura, Vindhya L; Stanforth, Stephen P

    2011-05-01

    A series of 2-(2-nitrophenyl)benzothiazole 7, 2-(2-nitrophenyl)benzoxazole 10 and 2-(2-nitrophenyl)benzimidazole 13 derivatives have been synthesised and assessed as indicators of nitroreductase activity across a range of clinically important Gram negative and Gram positive bacteria. The majority of Gram negative bacteria produced strongly fluorescent colonies with substrates 7 and 10 whereas fluorescence production in Gram positive bacteria was less widespread. The l-alanine 16 and 19 and β-alanine 21 and 23 derivatives have been prepared from 2-(2-aminophenyl)benzothiazole 14 and 2-(2-aminophenyl)benzoxazole 17. These four compounds have been evaluated as indicators of aminopeptidase activity. The growth of Gram positive bacteria was generally inhibited by these substrates but fluorescent colonies were produced with the majority of Gram negative bacteria tested.

  17. Alanine as an end product during fermentation of monosaccharides by Clostridium strain P2.

    PubMed

    Orlygsson, J; Anderson, R; Svensson, B H

    1995-11-01

    The thermophilic Clostridium P2 was isolated from a semi-continuously fed reactor with high ammonium concentration. This bacterium formed substantial amounts of L-alanine as a major fermentation product from glucose, fructose and mannose. Low amounts of acetate, butyrate, carbon dioxide and hydrogen were also formed. A high partial pressure of hydrogen inhibited the degradation of the monosaccharides, whereas hydrogen removal, in the form of methanogenesis was found to be stimulatory. However, the amount of alanine produced per mole of hexose degraded did not change. Hexose degradation and alanine production were favoured by high ammonium concentrations. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy studies provided strong evidence that an active Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathway existed and that alanine was produced via an amination of pyruvate.

  18. Infrared amide I' band of the coiled coil.

    PubMed

    Reisdorf, W C; Krimm, S

    1996-02-01

    The Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra of several coiled-coil proteins have been shown to possess unusual features in the amide I' region. Band maxima occur in the vicinity of 1630 cm-1, with component bands at higher frequency. This is well below the observed band at 1650 cm-1 found in standard alpha-helical polypeptides such as poly-L-alanine. Normal mode calculations on models of the coiled-coil structure have been performed to investigate this issue. We find that the observed band profile can be reproduced with very small random variation on the phi, psi of tropomyosin. We believe that the shift to lower frequency is due to additional hydrogen bonding of the solvent accessible backbone CO groups to water.

  19. Copper(II) triflate catalyzed amination of 1,3-dicarbonyl compounds.

    PubMed

    Ton, Thi My Uyen; Himawan, Fanny; Chang, Joyce Wei Wei; Chan, Philip Wai Hong

    2012-09-17

    A method to prepare α,α-acyl amino acid derivatives efficiently by Cu(OTf)(2)+1,10-phenanthroline (1,10-phen)-catalyzed amination of 1,3-dicarbonyl compounds with PhI=NSO(2) Ar is described. The mechanism is thought to initially involve aziridination of the enolic form of the substrate, formed in situ through coordination to the Lewis acidic metal catalyst, by the putative copper-nitrene/imido species generated from the reaction of the metal catalyst with the iminoiodane source. Subsequent ring opening of the resultant aziridinol adduct under the Lewis acidic conditions then provided the α-aminated product. The utility of this method was exemplified by the enantioselective synthesis of a precursor of 3-styryl-2-benzoyl-L-alanine. PMID:22890890

  20. Strecker degradation of amino acids promoted by a camphor-derived sulfonamide

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, M João; Knittel, Ana S O; Oliveira, Maria da Conceição; Costa Pessoa, João; Herrmann, Rudolf; Wagner, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    Summary A camphor-derived sulfonimine with a conjugated carbonyl group, oxoimine 1 (O2SNC10H13O), reacts with amino acids (glycine, L-alanine, L-phenylalanine, L-leucine) to form a compound O2SNC10H13NC10H14NSO2 (2) which was characterized by spectroscopic means (MS and NMR) and supported by DFT calculations. The product, a single diastereoisomer, contains two oxoimine units connected by a –N= bridge, and thus has a structural analogy to the colored product Ruhemann´s purple obtained by the ninhydrin reaction with amino acids. A plausible reaction mechanism that involves zwitterions, a Strecker degradation of an intermediate imine and water-catalyzed tautomerizations was developed by means of DFT calculations on potential transition states. PMID:27340465

  1. A density-based adaptive quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical method.

    PubMed

    Waller, Mark P; Kumbhar, Sadhana; Yang, Jack

    2014-10-20

    We present a density-based adaptive quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (DBA-QM/MM) method, whereby molecules can switch layers from the QM to the MM region and vice versa. The adaptive partitioning of the molecular system ensures that the layer assignment can change during the optimization procedure, that is, on the fly. The switch from a QM molecule to a MM molecule is determined if there is an absence of noncovalent interactions to any atom of the QM core region. The presence/absence of noncovalent interactions is determined by analysis of the reduced density gradient. Therefore, the location of the QM/MM boundary is based on physical arguments, and this neatly removes some empiricism inherent in previous adaptive QM/MM partitioning schemes. The DBA-QM/MM method is validated by using a water-in-water setup and an explicitly solvated L-alanyl-L-alanine dipeptide. PMID:24954803

  2. Bacillus cereus autolytic endoglucosaminidase active on cell wall peptidoglycan with N-unsubstituted glucosamine residues.

    PubMed

    Kawagishi, S; Araki, Y; Ito, E

    1980-01-01

    An autolytic glycosidase from a lysozyme-resistant strain of Bacillus cereus capable of cleaving the glycosidic linkages of N-unsubstituted glucosamine in the cell wall peptidoglycan was studied. This glycosidase activity, together with N-acetylmuramyl-L-alanine amidase activity, was found in an autolytic enzyme preparation obtained from the 20,000 x g precipitate fraction by means of autolysis followed by ammonium sulfate fractionation. The major saccharide fragments resulting from digestion of the untreated, non-N-acetylated, cell wall peptidoglycan of B. cereus with the autolytic enzyme preparation were identified as N-acetylmuramyl-glucosamine and its dimer. The peptidoglycan N-acetylated with acetic anhydride could also be digested with the same enzyme preparation, giving N-acetylmuramyl-N-acetylglucosamine and its dimer as the major saccharide fragments. PMID:6766437

  3. REDOR with a relative full-echo reference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, Anil K.; Cegelski, Lynette; O'Connor, Robert D.; Schaefer, Jacob

    2003-07-01

    REDOR and REDOR-like 13C{ 19F} and 2H{ 19F} NMR experiments have been performed on lyophilized whole cells of Staphylococcus aureus. The bacteria were grown to maturity on media containing L-[ 13C3]alanine or L-[methyl- d3]alanine, and then complexed with the 4-fluorobiphenyl derivative of chloroeremomycin, an analogue of the widely used antibiotic, vancomycin. The position of the 19F of the drug bound in the bacterial cell wall was determined relative to L-alanine 13C and 2H labels in the peptidoglycan peptide stem that was closest to the fluorinated biphenyl moiety of the drug. These determinations were made by dipolar recoupling methods that do not require an absolute measurement of the REDOR full echo (the signal observed without rotor-synchronized dephasing pulses) of the labels in the peptide stem.

  4. Influence of alanine uptake on Staphylococcus aureus surface charge and its susceptibility to two cationic antibacterial agents, nisin and low molecular weight chitosan.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li-Chen; Chiang, Wen-Dee; Chen, Wei-Chiuan; Chen, Hui-Huang; Huang, Yao-Wen; Chen, Wei-Jung; Lin, Shih-Bin

    2012-12-15

    Low molecular weight chitosan (LMWC) and nisin, recognized as cationic antibacterial agents (CAAs), inhibit bacterial growth by interacting with the anionically charged cell wall. In this study, alanine uptake significantly reduced the anionic cell surface charge, as determined by the zeta potential (ZP) measurements, of Staphylococcus aureus, resulting from the incorporation of d-alanine into the cell wall. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) tests and growth inhibition curves revealed that LMWC and nisin possessed inverse antibacterial activity against three strains of S. aureus, depending on the strains' net charge. A twofold reduction in the MIC value of nisin was obtained against S. aureus, inoculated in a 1.0% d- or l-alanine-augmented trypticase soy broth medium. A flocculation test demonstrated that neutralizing the anionic surface charge using d-alanine reduced the adsorption of S. aureus onto LMWC. Furthermore, the reduced surface net charge could enhance the colonization capacity of S. aureus on glass. PMID:22980819

  5. Biochemistry, genetics and regulation of bacilysin biosynthesis and its significance more than an antibiotic.

    PubMed

    Özcengiz, Gülay; Öğülür, İsmail

    2015-12-25

    Bacillus subtilis has the capacity to produce more than two dozen bioactive compounds with an amazing variety of chemical structures. Among them, bacilysin is a non-ribosomally synthesized dipeptide antibiotic consisting of l-alanine residue at the N terminus and a non-proteinogenic amino acid, l-anticapsin, at the C terminus. In spite of its simple structure, it is active against a wide range of bacteria and fungi. As a potent antimicrobial agent, we briefly review the biochemistry and genetics as well as the regulation of bacilysin biosynthesis within the frame of peptide pheromones-based control of secondary activities. Biological functions of bacilysin in the producer B. subtilis beyond its antimicrobial activity as well as potential biotechnological use of the biosynthetic enzyme l-amino acid ligase (Lal) are also discussed. PMID:25644640

  6. A density-based adaptive quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical method.

    PubMed

    Waller, Mark P; Kumbhar, Sadhana; Yang, Jack

    2014-10-20

    We present a density-based adaptive quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (DBA-QM/MM) method, whereby molecules can switch layers from the QM to the MM region and vice versa. The adaptive partitioning of the molecular system ensures that the layer assignment can change during the optimization procedure, that is, on the fly. The switch from a QM molecule to a MM molecule is determined if there is an absence of noncovalent interactions to any atom of the QM core region. The presence/absence of noncovalent interactions is determined by analysis of the reduced density gradient. Therefore, the location of the QM/MM boundary is based on physical arguments, and this neatly removes some empiricism inherent in previous adaptive QM/MM partitioning schemes. The DBA-QM/MM method is validated by using a water-in-water setup and an explicitly solvated L-alanyl-L-alanine dipeptide.

  7. Cyanobacterial blooms and biomagnification of the neurotoxin BMAA in South Florida coastal waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brand, L.; Mash, D.

    2008-12-01

    Blooms of cyanobacteria have developed in Florida Bay, Biscayne Bay and other coastal waters of South Florida. It has recently been shown that virtually all cyanobacteria produce the potent neurotoxin, beta-N- methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA). Studies in Guam indicate that BMAA can biomagnify up the food chain from cyanobacteria to human food and humans. Recent studies in Guam and on human brains in North America suggest an association between BMAA and neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS). A variety of organisms from South Florida coastal waters are being analyzed for BMAA content to determine if BMAA is biomagnifying in these food chains and if it is a potential human health hazard. Some have extremely high concentrations of BMAA.

  8. Pre-steady-state kinetic and structural analysis of interaction of methionine γ-lyase from Citrobacter freundii with inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, Nikita A; Faleev, Nicolai G; Kuznetsova, Alexandra A; Morozova, Elena A; Revtovich, Svetlana V; Anufrieva, Natalya V; Nikulin, Alexei D; Fedorova, Olga S; Demidkina, Tatyana V

    2015-01-01

    Methionine γ-lyase (MGL) catalyzes the γ-elimination of l-methionine and its derivatives as well as the β-elimination of l-cysteine and its analogs. These reactions yield α-keto acids and thiols. The mechanism of chemical conversion of amino acids includes numerous reaction intermediates. The detailed analysis of MGL interaction with glycine, l-alanine, l-norvaline, and l-cycloserine was performed by pre-steady-state stopped-flow kinetics. The structure of side chains of the amino acids is important both for their binding with enzyme and for the stability of the external aldimine and ketimine intermediates. X-ray structure of the MGL·l-cycloserine complex has been solved at 1.6 Å resolution. The structure models the ketimine intermediate of physiological reaction. The results elucidate the mechanisms of the intermediate interconversion at the stages of external aldimine and ketimine formation.

  9. Identification and Characterization of the Pyridomycin Biosynthetic Gene Cluster of Streptomyces pyridomyceticus NRRL B-2517*

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Tingting; Wang, Yemin; Yin, Jun; Du, Yanhua; Tao, Meifeng; Xu, Jing; Chen, Wenqing; Lin, Shuangjun; Deng, Zixin

    2011-01-01

    Pyridomycin is a structurally unique antimycobacterial cyclodepsipeptide containing rare 3-(3-pyridyl)-l-alanine and 2-hydroxy-3-methylpent-2-enoic acid moieties. The biosynthetic gene cluster for pyridomycin has been cloned and identified from Streptomyces pyridomyceticus NRRL B-2517. Sequence analysis of a 42.5-kb DNA region revealed 26 putative open reading frames, including two nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) genes and a polyketide synthase gene. A special feature is the presence of a polyketide synthase-type ketoreductase domain embedded in an NRPS. Furthermore, we showed that PyrA functioned as an NRPS adenylation domain that activates 3-hydroxypicolinic acid and transfers it to a discrete peptidyl carrier protein, PyrU, which functions as a loading module that initiates pyridomycin biosynthesis in vivo and in vitro. PyrA could also activate other aromatic acids, generating three pyridomycin analogues in vivo. PMID:21454714

  10. High-performance liquid chromatographic separation of the enantiomers of unusual alpha-amino acid analogues.

    PubMed

    Péter, A; Olajos, E; Casimir, R; Tourwé, D; Broxterman, Q B; Kaptein, B; Armstrong, D W

    2000-02-25

    The direct and indirect stereochemical resolution of the enantiomers of ring- and alpha-methyl-substituted phenylalanines and phenylalanine amides was attempted by high-performance liquid chromatographic methods. The direct separation was carried out on two chiral stationary phases, the crown-ether-based Crownpak CR(+), and the teicoplanin-based Chirobiotic T, while the indirect resolution was performed by applying pre-column derivatization with 2,3,4,6-tetra-O-acetyl-beta-D-glucopyranosyl isothiocyanate (GITC) and Nalpha-(2,4-dinitro-5-fluorophenyl)-L-alanine amide (Marfey's reagent, FDAA). The Chirobiotic T column was efficient in the separation of ring- and alpha-methyl-substituted phenylalanine analogues, but was ineffective for the amides of these analogues. The Crownpak CR(+) column separated the ring-substituted phenylalanines and amides, whereas the alpha-methylated analogues were coeluted. Of the two indirect methods, GITC derivatization seemed more effective than FDAA derivatization.

  11. The Use of Germinants to Potentiate the Sensitivity of Bacillus anthracis Spores to Peracetic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Celebi, Ozgur; Buyuk, Fatih; Pottage, Tom; Crook, Ant; Hawkey, Suzanna; Cooper, Callum; Bennett, Allan; Sahin, Mitat; Baillie, Leslie

    2016-01-01

    Elimination of Bacillus anthracis spores from the environment is a difficult and costly process due in part to the toxicity of current sporicidal agents. For this reason we investigated the ability of the spore germinants L-alanine (100 mM) and inosine (5 mM) to reduce the concentration of peracetic acid (PAA) required to inactivate B. anthracis spores. While L-alanine significantly enhanced (p = 0.0085) the bactericidal activity of 500 ppm PAA the same was not true for inosine suggesting some form of negative interaction. In contrast the germinant combination proved most effective at 100 ppm PAA (p = 0.0009). To determine if we could achieve similar results in soil we treated soil collected from the burial site of an anthrax infected animal which had been supplemented with spores of the Sterne strain of B. anthracis to increase the level of contamination to 104 spores/g. Treatment with germinants followed 1 h later by 5000 ppm PAA eliminated all of the spores. In contrast direct treatment of the animal burial site using this approach delivered using a back pack sprayer had no detectable effect on the level of B. anthracis contamination or on total culturable bacterial numbers over the course of the experiment. It did trigger a significant, but temporary, reduction (p < 0.0001) in the total spore count suggesting that germination had been triggered under real world conditions. In conclusion, we have shown that the application of germinants increase the sensitivity of bacterial spores to PAA. While the results of the single field trial were inconclusive, the study highlighted the potential of this approach and the challenges faced when attempting to perform real world studies on B. anthracis spores contaminated sites. PMID:26858699

  12. An autolysin ring associated with cell separation of Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, S; Sugai, M; Komatsuzawa, H; Nakashima, S; Oshida, T; Matsumoto, A; Suginaka, H

    1996-01-01

    atl is a newly discovered autolysin gene in Staphylococcus aureus. The gene product, ATL, is a unique, bifunctional protein that has an amidase domain and a glucosaminidase domain. It undergoes proteolytic processing to generate two extracellular peptidoglycan hydrolases, a 59-kDa endo-beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase and a 62-kDa N-acetylmuramyl-L-alanine amidase. It has been suggested that these enzymes are involved in the separation of daughter cells after cell division. We recently demonstrated that atl gene products are cell associated (unpublished data). The cell surface localization of the atl gene products was investigated by immunoelectron microscopy using anti-62-kDa N-acetylmuramyl-L-alanine amidase or anti-51-kDa endo-beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase immunoglobulin G. Protein A-gold particles reacting with the antigen-antibody complex were found to form a ring structure on the cell surface at the septal region for the next cell division site. Electron microscopic examination of an ultrathin section of the preembedded sample revealed preferential distribution of the gold particles at the presumptive sites for cell separation where the new septa had not been completed. The distribution of the gold particles on the surface of protoplast cells and the association of the gold particles with fibrous materials extending from the cells suggested that some atl gene products were associated with a cellular component extending from the cell membrane, such as lipoteichoic acid. The formation of a ring structure of atl gene products may be required for efficient partitioning of daughter cells after cell division. PMID:8626282

  13. Elucidating the pH-Dependent Structural Transition of T7 Bacteriophage Endolysin.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Meenakshi; Kumar, Dinesh; Poluri, Krishna Mohan

    2016-08-23

    Bacteriophages are the most abundant and diverse biological entities on earth. Bacteriophage endolysins are unique peptidoglycan hydrolases and have huge potential as effective enzybiotics in various infectious models. T7 bacteriophage endolysin (T7L), also known as N-acetylmuramoyl-l-alanine amidase or T7 lysozyme, is a 17 kDa protein that lyses a range of Gram-negative bacteria by hydrolyzing the amide bond between N-acetylmuramoyl residues and the l-alanine of the peptidoglycan layer. Although the activity profiles of several of the T7 family members have been known for many years, the molecular basis for their pH-dependent differential activity is not clear. In this study, we explored the pH-induced structural, stability, and activity characteristics of T7L by applying a variety of biophysical techniques and protein nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Our studies established a reversible structural transition of T7L below pH 6 and the formation of a partially denatured conformation at pH 3. This low-pH conformation is thermally stable and exposed its hydrophobic pockets. Further, NMR relaxation measurements and structural analysis unraveled that T7L is highly dynamic in its native state and a network of His residues are responsible for the observed pH-dependent conformational dynamics and transitions. As bacteriophage chimeric and engineered endolysins are being developed as novel therapeutics against multiple drug resistance pathogens, we believe that our results are of great help in designing these entities as broadband antimicrobial and/or antibacterial agents.

  14. Oral supplementations with L-glutamine or L-alanyl-L-glutamine do not change metabolic alterations induced by long-term high-fat diet in the B6.129F2/J mouse model of insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Bock, Patricia Martins; Krause, Mauricio; Schroeder, Helena Trevisan; Hahn, Gabriela Fernandes; Takahashi, Hilton Kenji; Schöler, Cinthia Maria; Nicoletti, Graziella; Neto, Luiz Domingos Zavarize; Rodrigues, Maria Inês Lavina; Bruxel, Maciel Alencar; Homem de Bittencourt, Paulo Ivo

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we aimed to investigate the effects of long-term supplementations with L-glutamine or L-alanyl-L-glutamine in the high-fat diet (HFD)-fed B6.129SF2/J mouse model over insulin sensitivity response and signaling, oxidative stress markers, metabolism and HSP70 expression. Mice were fed in a standard low-fat diet (STA) or a HFD for 20 weeks. In the 21th week, mice from the HFD group were allocated in five groups and supplemented for additional 8 weeks with different amino acids: HFD control group (HFD-Con), HFD + dipeptide L-alanyl-L-glutamine group (HFD-Dip), HFD + L-alanine group (HFD-Ala), HFD + L-glutamine group (HFD-Gln), or the HFD + L-alanine + L-glutamine (in their free forms) group (HFD-Ala + Gln). HFD induced higher body weight, fat pad, fasted glucose, and total cholesterol in comparison with STA group. Amino acid supplementations did not induce any modifications in these parameters. Although insulin tolerance tests indicated insulin resistance in all HFD groups, amino acid supplementations did not improve insulin sensitivity in the present model. There were also no significant differences in the immunocontents of insulin receptor, Akt, and Toll-like receptor-4. Notably, total 70 kDa heat shock protein (HSP72 + HSP73) contents in the liver was markedly increased in HFD-Con group as compared to STA group, which might suggest that insulin resistance is only in the beginning. Apparently, B6.129SF2/J mice are more resistant to the harmful effects of HFD through a mechanism that may include gut adaptation, reducing the absorption of nutrients, including amino acids, which may explain the lack of improvements in our intervention. PMID:26530165

  15. L-glutamine supplementations enhance liver glutamine-glutathione axis and heat shock factor-1 expression in endurance-exercise trained rats.

    PubMed

    Petry, Éder Ricardo; Cruzat, Vinicius Fernandes; Heck, Thiago Gomes; Homem de Bittencourt, Paulo Ivo; Tirapegui, Julio

    2015-04-01

    Liver L-glutamine is an important vehicle for the transport of ammonia and intermediary metabolism of amino acids between tissues, particularly under catabolic situations, such as high-intensity exercise. Hence, the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of oral supplementations with L-glutamine in its free or dipeptide forms (with L-alanine) on liver glutamine-glutathione (GSH) axis, and 70 kDa heat shock proteins (HSP70)/heat shock transcription factor 1 (HSF1) expressions. Adult male Wistar rats were 8-week trained (60 min/day, 5 days/week) on a treadmill. During the last 21 days, the animals were daily supplemented with 1 g of L-glutamine/kg body weight per day in either l-alanyl-L-glutamine dipeptide (DIP) form or a solution containing L-glutamine and l-alanine in their free forms (GLN+ALA) or water (controls). Exercise training increased cytosolic and nuclear HSF1 and HSP70 expression, as compared with sedentary animals. However, both DIP and GLN+ALA supplements enhanced HSF1 expression (in both cytosolic and nuclear fractions) in relation to exercised controls. Interestingly, HSF1 rises were not followed by enhanced HSP70 expression. DIP and GLN+ALA supplements increased plasma glutamine concentrations (by 62% and 59%, respectively) and glutamine to glutamate plasma ratio in relation to trained controls. This was in parallel with a decrease in plasma ammonium levels. Supplementations increased liver GSH (by 90%), attenuating the glutathione disulfide (GSSG) to GSH ratio, suggesting a redox state protection. In conclusion, oral administration with DIP and GLN+ALA supplements in endurance-trained rats improve liver glutamine-GSH axis and modulate HSF1 pathway. PMID:25202991

  16. Dietary L-glutamine supplementation improves pregnancy outcome in mice infected with type-2 porcine circovirus.

    PubMed

    Ren, Wenkai; Luo, Wei; Wu, Miaomiao; Liu, Gang; Yu, Xinglong; Fang, Jun; Li, Teijun; Yin, Yulong; Wu, Guoyao

    2013-09-01

    Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) causes reproductive failure in swine. As glutamine can enhance immune function in animals, this study was conducted with mice to test the hypothesis that dietary glutamine supplementation will improve pregnancy outcome in PCV2-infected dams. Beginning on day 0 of gestation, mice were fed a standard diet supplemented with 1.0% L-glutamine or 1.22% L-alanine (isonitrogenous control). All mice were infected with PCV2 (2000 TCID50) on day 10 of gestation. On day 17 of gestation, six mice from each group were euthanized to obtain maternal tissues and fetuses for hematology and histopathology tests. The remaining mice continued to receive their respective diets supplemented with 1.0% L-glutamine or 1.22% L-alanine through lactation. The PCV2 virus was present in maternal samples (serum and lung) of most mice in the control group but was not detected in the glutamine-supplemented mice. Dietary glutamine supplementation reduced abortion, decreased fetal deaths, and enhanced neonatal survival. The glutamine treatment also reduced concentrations of interleukin-6, while increasing concentrations of tumor necrosis factor-α and C-reactive protein, in the maternal serum of mice. Furthermore, glutamine supplementation attenuated microscopic lesions in maternal tissues (lung, spleen, and liver). Collectively, these results indicate that dietary glutamine supplementation is beneficial for ameliorating reproductive failure in virus-infected mice. The findings support the notion that gestating dams require adequate amounts of dietary glutamine for the optimal survival and growth of embryos, fetuses, and neonates, and have important implications for nutritional support of mammals (including swine and humans) during gestation and lactation.

  17. A multinuclear NMR relaxation study of the interaction of divalent metal ions with L-aspartic acid.

    PubMed

    Khazaeli, S; Viola, R E

    1984-09-01

    Carbon-13 spin-lattice relaxation times, T1, have been measured for aqueous solutions of L-aspartic acid, L-alanine, O-phospho-L-serine, and 2-mercapto-L-succinic acid in the presence of the paramagnetic metal ions, Cu2+ and Mn2+, and Mg2+ as a diamagnetic control, at ambient temperature and neutral pH. Nitrogen-15, oxygen-17 and proton relaxation times were also obtained for L-aspartic acid and phosphorus-31 relaxation times for O-phospho-L-serine under similar conditions. The structures of these complexes in solution were determined from the various metal ion-nuclei distances calculated from the paramagnetically-induced relaxation. These results indicate that the Cu2+ interaction with L-aspartic acid is through alpha-amino and beta-carboxyl groups while Mn2+ coordinates most strongly through alpha- and beta-carboxyl groups, with the possibility of a weak interaction through the amino group. An examination of the coordination of these divalent metal ions to an analog of L-aspartic acid in which the beta-carboxyl group is replaced by a phosphate group (O-phospho-L-serine) indicated that Cu2+ coordination is now probably through the alpha-amino and phosphate groups, while this analog is a monodentate ligand for Mn2+ coordinating through the phosphate group. Removal of the beta-carboxyl group (L-alanine) also results in Cu2+ coordination through the alpha-carboxyl and alpha-amino groups, and the same ligand interactions are observed with Mn2+. Replacement of the alpha-amino group of L-aspartic acid with an -SH group (2-mercapto-L-succinate) is sufficient to eliminate any specific coordination with either Cu2+ or Mn2+. PMID:6491655

  18. Novel HSAN1 mutation in serine palmitoyltransferase resides at a putative phosphorylation site that is involved in regulating substrate specificity.

    PubMed

    Ernst, Daniela; Murphy, Sinéad M; Sathiyanadan, Karthik; Wei, Yu; Othman, Alaa; Laurá, Matilde; Liu, Yo-Tsen; Penno, Anke; Blake, Julian; Donaghy, Michael; Houlden, Henry; Reilly, Mary M; Hornemann, Thorsten

    2015-03-01

    1-Deoxysphingolipids (1-deoxySL) are atypical sphingolipids that are formed by the enzyme serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT) due to a promiscuous use of L-alanine over its canonical substrate L-serine. Several mutations in SPT are associated with the hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type I (HSAN1). The current hypothesis is that these mutations induce a permanent shift in the affinity from L-serine toward L-alanine which results in a pathologically increased 1-deoxySL formation in HSAN1 patients. Also, wild-type SPT forms 1-deoxySL under certain conditions, and elevated levels were found in individuals with the metabolic syndrome and diabetes. However, the molecular mechanisms which control the substrate shift of the wild-type enzyme are not understood. Here, we report a novel SPTLC2-S384F variant in two unrelated HSAN1 families. Affected patients showed elevated plasma 1-deoxySL levels and expression of the S384F mutant in HEK293 cells increased 1-deoxySL formation. Previously, S384 has been reported as one of the two (S384 and Y387) putative phosphorylation sites in SPTLC2. The phosphorylation of wild-type SPTLC2 was confirmed by isoelectric focusing. The impact of an S384 phosphorylation on SPT activity was tested by creating mutants mimicking either a constitutively phosphorylated (S384D, S384E) or non-phosphorylated (S384A, Y387F, Y387F+S384A) protein. The S384D but not the S384E variant was associated with increased 1-deoxySL formation. The other mutations had no influence on activity and substrate affinity. In summary, our data show that S384F is a novel mutation in HSAN1 and that the substrate specificity of wild-type SPT might by dynamically regulated by a phosphorylation at this position.

  19. Solid-State NMR Study of Paramagnetic Bis(alaninato-κ(2)N,O)copper(II) and Bis(1-amino(cyclo)alkane-1-carboxylato-κ(2)N,O)copper(II) Complexes: Reflection of Stereoisomerism and Molecular Mobility in (13)C and (2)H Fast Magic Angle Spinning Spectra.

    PubMed

    Szalontai, Gábor; Csonka, Róbert; Speier, Gábor; Kaizer, József; Sabolović, Jasmina

    2015-05-18

    Solid-state stereochemistry and mobility of paramagnetic copper(II) complexes formed by aliphatic amino acids (l-alanine, d,l-alanine, 1-amino-2-methyl-alanine) and 1-amino(cyclo)alkane-1-carboxylic acids (alkane = propane, butane, pentane, hexane) as bidentate ligands has been studied by (13)C and (2)H solid-state fast magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy. We examined the prospective method to characterize solid-state paramagnetic compounds in a routine way. Both (13)C and (2)H MAS spectra can distinguish d,l and l,l diastereomers of natural and polydeuterated bis([Dn]alaninato)copper(II) (n = 0, 2, 8) complexes with axial and/or equatorial methyl positions (conformations) primarily due to different Fermi-contact (FC) contributions. The three-bond hyperfine couplings clearly show Karplus-like dependence on the torsional angles which turned out to be a useful assignment aid. Density functional theory calculations of the FC term and crystal structures were also used to aid the final assignments. The correlations obtained for bis(alaninato-κ(2)N,O)copper(II) complexes were successfully used to characterize other complexes. The usefulness of the (2)H MAS spectra of the deuterated complexes was underlined. Even the spectra of the easily exchangeable amine protons contained essential stereochemical information. In the case of a dimer structure of bis(1-aminohexane-1-carboxylato-κ(2)N,O)copper(II) both the (13)C and (2)H resolutions were good enough to confirm the presence of the cis and trans forms in the asymmetric unit. With regard to the internal solid-state motions in the crystal lattice, the obtained quadrupolar tensor parameters were similar for the d,l- and l,l-alaninato isomers and also for the cis-trans forms suggesting similar crystal packing effects, static amine deuterons involved in hydrogen bonding, and fast rotating methyl groups.

  20. Elucidating the pH-Dependent Structural Transition of T7 Bacteriophage Endolysin.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Meenakshi; Kumar, Dinesh; Poluri, Krishna Mohan

    2016-08-23

    Bacteriophages are the most abundant and diverse biological entities on earth. Bacteriophage endolysins are unique peptidoglycan hydrolases and have huge potential as effective enzybiotics in various infectious models. T7 bacteriophage endolysin (T7L), also known as N-acetylmuramoyl-l-alanine amidase or T7 lysozyme, is a 17 kDa protein that lyses a range of Gram-negative bacteria by hydrolyzing the amide bond between N-acetylmuramoyl residues and the l-alanine of the peptidoglycan layer. Although the activity profiles of several of the T7 family members have been known for many years, the molecular basis for their pH-dependent differential activity is not clear. In this study, we explored the pH-induced structural, stability, and activity characteristics of T7L by applying a variety of biophysical techniques and protein nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Our studies established a reversible structural transition of T7L below pH 6 and the formation of a partially denatured conformation at pH 3. This low-pH conformation is thermally stable and exposed its hydrophobic pockets. Further, NMR relaxation measurements and structural analysis unraveled that T7L is highly dynamic in its native state and a network of His residues are responsible for the observed pH-dependent conformational dynamics and transitions. As bacteriophage chimeric and engineered endolysins are being developed as novel therapeutics against multiple drug resistance pathogens, we believe that our results are of great help in designing these entities as broadband antimicrobial and/or antibacterial agents. PMID:27513288

  1. Inhibition of serine palmitoyltransferase in vitro and long-chain base biosynthesis in intact Chinese hamster ovary cells by. beta. -chloroalanine

    SciTech Connect

    Medlock, K.A.; Merrill, A.H. Jr.

    1988-09-06

    The effects of ..beta..-chloroalanine (..beta..-Cl-alanine) on the serine palmitoyltransferase activity and the de novo biosynthesis of sphinganine and sphingenine were investigated in vitro with rat liver microsomes and in vivo with intact Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. The inhibition in vitro was rapid, irreversible, and concentration and time dependent and apparently involved the active site because inactivation only occurred with ..beta..-Cl-L-alanine and was blocked by L-serine. These are characteristics of mechanism-based (suicide) inhibition. Serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT) was also inhibited when intact CHO cells were incubated with ..beta..-Cl-alanine and this treatment inhibited (/sup 14/C)serine incorporation into long-chain bases by intact cells. The concentration dependence of the loss of SPT activity and of long-chain base synthesis was identical. The effects of ..beta..-Cl-alanine appeared to occur with little perturbation of other cell functions: the cells exhibited no loss in cell viability, (/sup 14/C)serine uptake was not blocked, total lipid biosynthesis from (/sup 14/C)acetic acid was not decreased (nor was the appearance of radiolabel in cholesterol and phosphatidylcholine), and (/sup 3/H)thymidine incorporation into DNA was not affected. There appeared to be little effect on protein synthesis based on the incorporation of (/sup 3/H)leucine, which was only decreased by 14%. Although ..beta..-Cl-L-alanine is known to inhibit other pyridoxal 5'-phosphate dependent enzymes, alanine and aspartate transaminases were not inhibited under these conditions. These results establish the close association between the activity of serine palmitoyltransferase and the cellular rate of long-chain base formation and indicate that ..beta..-Cl-alanine and other mechanism-based inhibitors might be useful to study alterations in cellular long-chain base synthesis.

  2. Defining Multiple Characteristic Raman Bands of α-Amino Acids as Biomarkers for Planetary Missions Using a Statistical Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolfe, S. M.; Patel, M. R.; Gilmour, I.; Olsson-Francis, K.; Ringrose, T. J.

    2016-06-01

    Biomarker molecules, such as amino acids, are key to discovering whether life exists elsewhere in the Solar System. Raman spectroscopy, a technique capable of detecting biomarkers, will be on board future planetary missions including the ExoMars rover. Generally, the position of the strongest band in the spectra of amino acids is reported as the identifying band. However, for an unknown sample, it is desirable to define multiple characteristic bands for molecules to avoid any ambiguous identification. To date, there has been no definition of multiple characteristic bands for amino acids of interest to astrobiology. This study examined l-alanine, l-aspartic acid, l-cysteine, l-glutamine and glycine and defined several Raman bands per molecule for reference as characteristic identifiers. Per amino acid, 240 spectra were recorded and compared using established statistical tests including ANOVA. The number of characteristic bands defined were 10, 12, 12, 14 and 19 for l-alanine (strongest intensity band: 832 cm-1), l-aspartic acid (938 cm-1), l-cysteine (679 cm-1), l-glutamine (1090 cm-1) and glycine (875 cm-1), respectively. The intensity of bands differed by up to six times when several points on the crystal sample were rotated through 360 °; to reduce this effect when defining characteristic bands for other molecules, we find that spectra should be recorded at a statistically significant number of points per sample to remove the effect of sample rotation. It is crucial that sets of characteristic Raman bands are defined for biomarkers that are targets for future planetary missions to ensure a positive identification can be made.

  3. The Metabolic Responses to L-Glutamine of Livers from Rats with Diabetes Types 1 and 2

    PubMed Central

    Comar, Jurandir Fernando; de Oliveira, Denise Silva; Bracht, Livia; Kemmelmeier, Fumie Suzuki; Peralta, Rosane Marina; Bracht, Adelar

    2016-01-01

    There are several claims about the beneficial effects of supplementing L-glutamine to both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. The purpose of the present study was to provide detailed knowledge about the fate of this amino acid in the liver, the first organ that receives the compound when ingested orally. The study was done using the isolated perfused rat liver, an experimental system that preserves the microcirculation of the organ and that allows to measured several parameters during steady-state and pre steady-state conditions. L-Glutamine was infused in the portal vein (5 mM) and several parameters were monitored. Livers from type 1 diabetic rats showed an accelerated response to L-glutamine infusion. In consequence of this accelerated response livers from type 1 diabetic rats presented higher rates of ammonia, urea, glucose and lactate output during the first 25–30 minutes following L-glutamine infusion. As steady-state conditions approached, however, the difference between type 1 diabetes and control livers tended to disappear. Measurement of the glycogen content over a period of 100 minutes revealed that, excepting the initial phase of the L-glutamine infusion, the increased glucose output in livers from type 1 diabetic rats was mainly due to accelerated glycogenolysis. Livers from type 2 diabetic rats behaved similarly to control livers with no accelerated glucose output but with increased L-alanine production. L-Alanine is important for the pancreatic β-cells and from this point of view the oral intake of L-glutamine can be regarded as beneficial. Furthermore, the lack of increased glucose output in livers from type 2 diabetic rats is consistent with observations that even daily L-glutamine doses of 30 g do not increase the glycemic levels in well controlled type 2 diabetes patients. PMID:27490892

  4. Role of amino acids as additives on sperm motility, plasma membrane integrity and lipid peroxidation levels at pre-freeze and post-thawed ram semen.

    PubMed

    Sangeeta, Sharon; Arangasamy, A; Kulkarni, S; Selvaraju, S

    2015-10-01

    The possibility of including amino acids for cryopreservation of ram semen to improve the quality of frozen semen was explored in this study in sheep model. 24 samples were collected in triplicate from 8 rams of 2-3 year old Bannur cross bred rams maintained at the Institute Experimental Livestock Unit. Semen was diluted in tris-egg yolk glycerol diluent and made into 7 aliquots as follows: aliquot 1 served as control, "l-alanine" was added at 100 and 135mM in the aliquots 2 and 3, "l-glutamine" was added at 20 and 25mM in the aliquots 4 and 5 and "l-proline" was added at 25 and 50mM in the aliquots 6 and 7, respectively. Diluted semen was filled in 0.25ml French straws and frozen in LN2. Inclusion of "l-proline" and "l-glutamine" in the diluent increased the percent live sperm (P<0.001), total motility (P<0.05) and maintained higher functional membrane and acrosomal integrity (P<0.001) by decreasing lipid peroxidation (P<0.001) compared to the control group. In contrast, "l-alanine" decreased the percentage of total motility, fast progressive spermatozoa and increased (P<0.01) the percentage of immotile spermatozoa. It can be concluded that 20mM "l-glutamine" and 25mM "l-proline" can be used as semen additive to freeze ram semen as they prevented cryoinjuries to sperm and improved the pre-freeze and post-thaw semen characteristics. PMID:26362050

  5. Recombinant Expression of a Putative Amidase Cloned from the Genome of Listeria monocytogenes that Lyses the Bacterium and its Monolayer in Conjunction with a Protease.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Mustafa; Morales, Cesar A; Oakley, Brian B; Seal, Bruce S

    2012-03-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a Gram-positive, non-spore forming, catalase-positive rod that is a major bacterial food-borne disease agent associated with uncooked meats, including poultry, uncooked vegetables, soft cheeses, and unpasteurized milk. The bacterium may be carried by animals without signs of disease, can replicate at refrigeration temperatures, and is frequently associated with biofilms. There is a need to discover innovative pathogen intervention technologies for this bacterium. Consequently, bioinformatic analyses were used to identify genes encoding lytic protein sequences in the genomes of L. monocytogenes isolates. PCR primers were designed that amplified nucleotide sequences of a putative N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase gene from L. monocytogenes strain 4b. The resultant amplification product was cloned into an expression vector, propagated in Escherichia coli Rosetta strains, and the recombinant protein was purified to homogeneity. Gene and protein sequencing confirmed that the predicted and chemically determined amino acid sequence of the recombinant protein designated PlyLM was a putative N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase. The recombinant lytic protein was capable of lysing both the parental L. monocytogenes strain as well as other strains of the bacterium in spot and MIC/MIB assays, but was not active against other bacteria beyond the genus. A microtiter plate assay was utilized to assay for the ability of the recombinant lysin protein to potentially aid with digestion of a L. monocytogenes biofilm. Protease or lysozyme digestion alone did not significantly reduce the L. monocytogenes biofilm. Although the recombinant protein alone reduced the biofilm by only 20%, complete digestion of the bacterial monolayer was accomplished in conjunction with a protease.

  6. Oral supplementations with free and dipeptide forms of L-glutamine in endotoxemic mice: effects on muscle glutamine-glutathione axis and heat shock proteins.

    PubMed

    Cruzat, Vinicius F; Pantaleão, Lucas C; Donato, José; de Bittencourt, Paulo Ivo Homem; Tirapegui, Julio

    2014-03-01

    Sepsis is a leading cause of death in intensive care units worldwide. Low availability of glutamine contributes to the catabolic state of sepsis. L-Glutamine supplementation has antioxidant properties and modulates the expression of heat shock proteins (HSPs). This study investigated the effects of oral supplementation with L-glutamine plus L-alanine (GLN+ALA), both in the free form and L-alanyl-L-glutamine dipeptide (DIP), on glutamine-glutathione (GSH) axis and HSPs expression in endotoxemic mice. B6.129F2/J mice were subjected to endotoxemia (lipopolysaccharides from Escherichia coli, 5 mg.kg(-1), LPS group) and orally supplemented for 48 h with either L-glutamine (1 g.kg(-1)) plus L-alanine (0.61 g.kg(-1)) (GLN+ALA-LPS group) or 1.49 g.kg(-1) of DIP (DIP-LPS group). Endotoxemia reduced plasma and muscle glutamine concentrations [relative to CTRL group] which were restored in both GLN+ALA-LPS and DIP-LPS groups (P<.05). In supplemented groups were re-established GSH content and intracellular redox status (GSSG/GSH ratio) in circulating erythrocytes and muscle. Thiobarbituric acid reactive substance was 4-fold in LPS treated mice relative to the untreated CTRL group, and plasma TNF-α and IL-1β levels were attenuated by the supplements. Heat shock proteins 27, 70 and 90 (protein and mRNA) were elevated in the LPS group and were returned to basal levels (relative to CTRL group) in both GLN+ALA-LPS and DIP-LPS groups. Supplementations to endotoxemic mice resulted in up-regulation of GSH reductase, GSH peroxidase and glutamate cysteine ligase mRNA expression in muscle. In conclusion, oral supplementations with GLN+ALA or DIP are effective in reversing the conditions of LPS-induced deleterious impact on glutamine-GSH axis in mice under endotoxemia.

  7. The Metabolic Responses to L-Glutamine of Livers from Rats with Diabetes Types 1 and 2.

    PubMed

    Comar, Jurandir Fernando; de Oliveira, Denise Silva; Bracht, Livia; Kemmelmeier, Fumie Suzuki; Peralta, Rosane Marina; Bracht, Adelar

    2016-01-01

    There are several claims about the beneficial effects of supplementing L-glutamine to both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. The purpose of the present study was to provide detailed knowledge about the fate of this amino acid in the liver, the first organ that receives the compound when ingested orally. The study was done using the isolated perfused rat liver, an experimental system that preserves the microcirculation of the organ and that allows to measured several parameters during steady-state and pre steady-state conditions. L-Glutamine was infused in the portal vein (5 mM) and several parameters were monitored. Livers from type 1 diabetic rats showed an accelerated response to L-glutamine infusion. In consequence of this accelerated response livers from type 1 diabetic rats presented higher rates of ammonia, urea, glucose and lactate output during the first 25-30 minutes following L-glutamine infusion. As steady-state conditions approached, however, the difference between type 1 diabetes and control livers tended to disappear. Measurement of the glycogen content over a period of 100 minutes revealed that, excepting the initial phase of the L-glutamine infusion, the increased glucose output in livers from type 1 diabetic rats was mainly due to accelerated glycogenolysis. Livers from type 2 diabetic rats behaved similarly to control livers with no accelerated glucose output but with increased L-alanine production. L-Alanine is important for the pancreatic β-cells and from this point of view the oral intake of L-glutamine can be regarded as beneficial. Furthermore, the lack of increased glucose output in livers from type 2 diabetic rats is consistent with observations that even daily L-glutamine doses of 30 g do not increase the glycemic levels in well controlled type 2 diabetes patients. PMID:27490892

  8. Site-directed mutagenesis provides insight into racemization and transamination of alanine catalyzed by Treponema denticola cystalysin.

    PubMed

    Cellini, Barbara; Bertoldi, Mariarita; Paiardini, Alessandro; D'Aguanno, Simona; Voltattorni, Carla Borri

    2004-08-27

    In addition to alpha, beta-elimination of L-cysteine, Treponema denticola cystalysin catalyzes the racemization of both enantiomers of alanine accompanied by an overall transamination. Lys-238 and Tyr-123 or a water molecule located on the si and re face of the cofactor, respectively, have been proposed to act as the acid/base catalysts in the proton abstraction/donation at Calpha/C4' of the external aldimine. In this investigation, two site-directed mutants, K238A and Y123F, have been characterized. The Lys --> Ala mutation results in the complete loss of either lyase activity or racemase activity in both directions or transaminase activity toward L-alanine. However, the K238A mutant is able to catalyze the overall transamination of D-alanine, and only D-alanine is the product of the reverse transamination. For Y123F the k(cat)/K(m) is reduced 3.5-fold for alpha, beta-elimination, whereas it is reduced 300-400-fold for racemization. Y123F has approximately 18% of wild type transaminase activity with L-alanine and an extremely low transaminase activity with D-alanine. Moreover, the catalytic properties of the Y124F and Y123F/Y124F mutants rule out the possibility that the residual racemase and transaminase activities displayed by Y123F are due to Tyr-124. All these data, together with computational results, indicate a two-base racemization mechanism for cystalysin in which Lys-238 has been unequivocally identified as the catalyst acting on the si face of the cofactor. Moreover, this study highlights the importance of the interaction of Tyr-123 with water molecules for efficient proton abstraction/donation function on the re face. PMID:15210695

  9. l-Serine Deficiency Elicits Intracellular Accumulation of Cytotoxic Deoxysphingolipids and Lipid Body Formation*

    PubMed Central

    Esaki, Kayoko; Sayano, Tomoko; Sonoda, Chiaki; Akagi, Takumi; Suzuki, Takeshi; Ogawa, Takuya; Okamoto, Masahiro; Yoshikawa, Takeo; Hirabayashi, Yoshio; Furuya, Shigeki

    2015-01-01

    l-Serine is required to synthesize membrane lipids such as phosphatidylserine and sphingolipids. Nevertheless, it remains largely unknown how a diminished capacity to synthesize l-serine affects lipid homeostasis in cells and tissues. Here, we show that deprivation of external l-serine leads to the generation of 1-deoxysphingolipids (doxSLs), including 1-deoxysphinganine, in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (KO-MEFs) lacking d-3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (Phgdh), which catalyzes the first step in the de novo synthesis of l-serine. A novel mass spectrometry-based lipidomic approach demonstrated that 1-deoxydihydroceramide was the most abundant species of doxSLs accumulated in l-serine-deprived KO-MEFs. Among normal sphingolipid species in KO-MEFs, levels of sphinganine, dihydroceramide, ceramide, and hexosylceramide were significantly reduced after deprivation of external l-serine, whereas those of sphingomyelin, sphingosine, and sphingosine 1-phosphate were retained. The synthesis of doxSLs was suppressed by supplementing the culture medium with l-serine but was potentiated by increasing the ratio of l-alanine to l-serine in the medium. Unlike with l-serine, depriving cells of external l-leucine did not promote the occurrence of doxSLs. Consistent with results obtained from KO-MEFs, brain-specific deletion of Phgdh in mice also resulted in accumulation of doxSLs in the brain. Furthermore, l-serine-deprived KO-MEFs exhibited increased formation of cytosolic lipid bodies containing doxSLs and other sphingolipids. These in vitro and in vivo studies indicate that doxSLs are generated in the presence of a high ratio of l-alanine to l-serine in cells and tissues lacking Phgdh, and de novo synthesis of l-serine is necessary to maintain normal sphingolipid homeostasis when the external supply of this amino acid is limited. PMID:25903138

  10. Novel HSAN1 mutation in serine palmitoyltransferase resides at a putative phosphorylation site that is involved in regulating substrate specificity.

    PubMed

    Ernst, Daniela; Murphy, Sinéad M; Sathiyanadan, Karthik; Wei, Yu; Othman, Alaa; Laurá, Matilde; Liu, Yo-Tsen; Penno, Anke; Blake, Julian; Donaghy, Michael; Houlden, Henry; Reilly, Mary M; Hornemann, Thorsten

    2015-03-01

    1-Deoxysphingolipids (1-deoxySL) are atypical sphingolipids that are formed by the enzyme serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT) due to a promiscuous use of L-alanine over its canonical substrate L-serine. Several mutations in SPT are associated with the hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type I (HSAN1). The current hypothesis is that these mutations induce a permanent shift in the affinity from L-serine toward L-alanine which results in a pathologically increased 1-deoxySL formation in HSAN1 patients. Also, wild-type SPT forms 1-deoxySL under certain conditions, and elevated levels were found in individuals with the metabolic syndrome and diabetes. However, the molecular mechanisms which control the substrate shift of the wild-type enzyme are not understood. Here, we report a novel SPTLC2-S384F variant in two unrelated HSAN1 families. Affected patients showed elevated plasma 1-deoxySL levels and expression of the S384F mutant in HEK293 cells increased 1-deoxySL formation. Previously, S384 has been reported as one of the two (S384 and Y387) putative phosphorylation sites in SPTLC2. The phosphorylation of wild-type SPTLC2 was confirmed by isoelectric focusing. The impact of an S384 phosphorylation on SPT activity was tested by creating mutants mimicking either a constitutively phosphorylated (S384D, S384E) or non-phosphorylated (S384A, Y387F, Y387F+S384A) protein. The S384D but not the S384E variant was associated with increased 1-deoxySL formation. The other mutations had no influence on activity and substrate affinity. In summary, our data show that S384F is a novel mutation in HSAN1 and that the substrate specificity of wild-type SPT might by dynamically regulated by a phosphorylation at this position. PMID:25567748

  11. Molecular sizes of amino acid transporters in the luminal membrane from the kidney cortex, estimated by the radiation-inactivation method.

    PubMed Central

    Béliveau, R; Demeule, M; Jetté, M; Potier, M

    1990-01-01

    Renal brush-border membrane vesicles from rat kidney cortex were irradiated in frozen state with a gamma-radiation source. Initial rates of influx into these vesicles were estimated for substrates such as L-glutamic acid, L-alanine, L-proline and L-leucine to establish the molecular sizes of their carriers. Transport was measured in initial-rate conditions to avoid artifacts arising from a decrease in the driving force caused by a modification of membrane permeability. Initial rates of Na(+)-independent uptakes for those four substrates appeared unaffected in the dose range used (0-6 Mrad), indicating that the passive permeability of the membrane towards these substrates was unaffected. However, at higher doses of irradiation the Na+ influx and the intravesicular volume evaluated by the uptake of glucose at equilibrium were altered by radiation. Thus Na(+)-dependent influx values were corrected for volume changes, and the corrected values were used to compute radiation-inactivation sizes of the transport systems. Their respective values for L-glutamic acid, L-proline, L-leucine and L-alanine carriers were 250, 224, 293 and 274 kDa. The presence of the free-radicals scavenger benzoic acid in the frozen samples during irradiation did not affect the uptake of glucose, phosphate and alkaline phosphatase activity. These results indicate that freezing samples in a cryoprotective medium was enough to prevent secondary inactivation of transporters by free radicals. Uptakes of beta-alanine and L-lysine were much less affected by radiation. The radiation-inactivation size of the Na(+)-dependent beta-alanine carrier was 127 kDa and that of the L-lysine carrier was 90 kDa. PMID:1971509

  12. Line-narrowing in proton-detected nitrogen-14 NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavadini, Simone; Vitzthum, Veronika; Ulzega, Simone; Abraham, Anuji; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey

    2010-01-01

    In solids spinning at the magic angle, the indirect detection of single-quantum (SQ) and double-quantum (DQ) 14N spectra ( I = 1) via spy nuclei S = 1/2 such as protons can be achieved in the manner of heteronuclear single- or multiple-quantum correlation (HSQC or HMQC) spectroscopy. The HMQC method relies on the excitation of two-spin coherences of the type T11IT11S and T21IT11S at the beginning of the evolution interval t1. The spectra obtained by Fourier transformation from t1 to ω1 may be broadened by the homogenous decay of the transverse terms of the spy nuclei S. This broadening is mostly due to homonuclear dipolar S- S' interactions between the proton spy nuclei. In this work we have investigated the possibility of inserting rotor-synchronized symmetry-based C or R sequences and decoupling schemes such as Phase-Modulated Lee-Goldburg (PMLG) sequences in the evolution period. These schemes reduce the homonuclear proton-proton interactions and lead to an enhancement of the resolution of both SQ and DQ proton-detected 14N HMQC spectra. In addition, we have investigated the combination of HSQC with symmetry-based sequences and PMLG and shown that the highest resolution in the 14N dimension is achieved by using HSQC in combination with symmetry-based sequences of the R-type. We show improvements in resolution in samples of L-alanine and the tripeptide ala-ala-gly (AAG). In particular, for L-alanine the width of the 14N SQ peak is reduced from 2 to 1.2 kHz, in agreement with simulations. We report accurate measurements of quadrupolar coupling constants and asymmetry parameters for amide 14N in AAG peptide bonds.

  13. Gustatory responsiveness to the 20 proteinogenic amino acids in the spider monkey (Ateles geoffroyi).

    PubMed

    Larsson, Jenny; Maitz, Anna; Hernandez Salazar, Laura Teresa; Laska, Matthias

    2014-03-29

    The gustatory responsiveness of four adult spider monkeys to the 20 proteinogenic amino acids was assessed in two-bottle preference tests of brief duration (1min). We found that Ateles geoffroyi responded with significant preferences for seven amino acids (glycine, l-proline, l-alanine, l-serine, l-glutamic acid, l-aspartic acid, and l-lysine) when presented at a concentration of 100mM and/or 200mM and tested against water. At the same concentrations, the animals significantly rejected five amino acids (l-tryptophan, l-tyrosine, l-valine, l-cysteine, and l-isoleucine) and were indifferent to the remaining tastants. Further, the results show that the spider monkeys discriminated concentrations as low as 0.2mM l-lysine, 2mM l-glutamic acid, 10mM l-proline, 20mM l-valine, 40mM glycine, l-serine, and l-aspartic acid, and 80mM l-alanine from the alternative stimulus, with individual animals even scoring lower threshold values. A comparison between the taste qualities of the proteinogenic amino acids as described by humans and the preferences and aversions observed in the spider monkeys suggests a fairly high degree of agreement in the taste quality perception of these tastants between the two species. A comparison between the taste preference thresholds obtained with the spider monkeys and taste detection thresholds reported in human subjects suggests that the taste sensitivity of A. geoffroyi for the amino acids tested here might match that of Homo sapiens. The results support the assumption that the taste responses of spider monkeys to proteinogenic amino acids might reflect an evolutionary adaptation to their frugivorous and thus protein-poor diet. PMID:24480073

  14. Defining Multiple Characteristic Raman Bands of α-Amino Acids as Biomarkers for Planetary Missions Using a Statistical Method.

    PubMed

    Rolfe, S M; Patel, M R; Gilmour, I; Olsson-Francis, K; Ringrose, T J

    2016-06-01

    Biomarker molecules, such as amino acids, are key to discovering whether life exists elsewhere in the Solar System. Raman spectroscopy, a technique capable of detecting biomarkers, will be on board future planetary missions including the ExoMars rover. Generally, the position of the strongest band in the spectra of amino acids is reported as the identifying band. However, for an unknown sample, it is desirable to define multiple characteristic bands for molecules to avoid any ambiguous identification. To date, there has been no definition of multiple characteristic bands for amino acids of interest to astrobiology. This study examined L-alanine, L-aspartic acid, L-cysteine, L-glutamine and glycine and defined several Raman bands per molecule for reference as characteristic identifiers. Per amino acid, 240 spectra were recorded and compared using established statistical tests including ANOVA. The number of characteristic bands defined were 10, 12, 12, 14 and 19 for L-alanine (strongest intensity band: 832 cm(-1)), L-aspartic acid (938 cm(-1)), L-cysteine (679 cm(-1)), L-glutamine (1090 cm(-1)) and glycine (875 cm(-1)), respectively. The intensity of bands differed by up to six times when several points on the crystal sample were rotated through 360 °; to reduce this effect when defining characteristic bands for other molecules, we find that spectra should be recorded at a statistically significant number of points per sample to remove the effect of sample rotation. It is crucial that sets of characteristic Raman bands are defined for biomarkers that are targets for future planetary missions to ensure a positive identification can be made. PMID:26744263

  15. Glycine restores the anabolic response to leucine in a mouse model of acute inflammation.

    PubMed

    Ham, Daniel J; Caldow, Marissa K; Chhen, Victoria; Chee, Annabel; Wang, Xuemin; Proud, Christopher G; Lynch, Gordon S; Koopman, René

    2016-06-01

    Amino acids, especially leucine, potently stimulate protein synthesis and reduce protein breakdown in healthy skeletal muscle and as a result have received considerable attention as potential treatments for muscle wasting. However, the normal anabolic response to amino acids is impaired during muscle-wasting conditions. Although the exact mechanisms of this anabolic resistance are unclear, inflammation and ROS are believed to play a central role. The nonessential amino acid glycine has anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties and preserves muscle mass in calorie-restricted and tumor-bearing mice. We hypothesized that glycine would restore the normal muscle anabolic response to amino acids under inflammatory conditions. Relative rates of basal and leucine-stimulated protein synthesis were measured using SUnSET methodology 4 h after an injection of 1 mg/kg lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Whereas leucine failed to stimulate muscle protein synthesis in LPS-treated mice pretreated with l-alanine (isonitrogenous control), leucine robustly stimulated protein synthesis (+51%) in mice pretreated with 1 g/kg glycine. The improvement in leucine-stimulated protein synthesis was accompanied by a higher phosphorylation status of mTOR, S6, and 4E-BP1 compared with l-alanine-treated controls. Despite its known anti-inflammatory action in inflammatory cells, glycine did not alter the skeletal muscle inflammatory response to LPS in vivo or in vitro but markedly reduced DHE staining intensity, a marker of oxidative stress, in muscle cross-sections and attenuated LPS-induced wasting in C2C12 myotubes. Our observations in male C57BL/6 mice suggest that glycine may represent a promising nutritional intervention for the attenuation of skeletal muscle wasting.

  16. Defining Multiple Characteristic Raman Bands of α-Amino Acids as Biomarkers for Planetary Missions Using a Statistical Method.

    PubMed

    Rolfe, S M; Patel, M R; Gilmour, I; Olsson-Francis, K; Ringrose, T J

    2016-06-01

    Biomarker molecules, such as amino acids, are key to discovering whether life exists elsewhere in the Solar System. Raman spectroscopy, a technique capable of detecting biomarkers, will be on board future planetary missions including the ExoMars rover. Generally, the position of the strongest band in the spectra of amino acids is reported as the identifying band. However, for an unknown sample, it is desirable to define multiple characteristic bands for molecules to avoid any ambiguous identification. To date, there has been no definition of multiple characteristic bands for amino acids of interest to astrobiology. This study examined L-alanine, L-aspartic acid, L-cysteine, L-glutamine and glycine and defined several Raman bands per molecule for reference as characteristic identifiers. Per amino acid, 240 spectra were recorded and compared using established statistical tests including ANOVA. The number of characteristic bands defined were 10, 12, 12, 14 and 19 for L-alanine (strongest intensity band: 832 cm(-1)), L-aspartic acid (938 cm(-1)), L-cysteine (679 cm(-1)), L-glutamine (1090 cm(-1)) and glycine (875 cm(-1)), respectively. The intensity of bands differed by up to six times when several points on the crystal sample were rotated through 360 °; to reduce this effect when defining characteristic bands for other molecules, we find that spectra should be recorded at a statistically significant number of points per sample to remove the effect of sample rotation. It is crucial that sets of characteristic Raman bands are defined for biomarkers that are targets for future planetary missions to ensure a positive identification can be made.

  17. The Use of Germinants to Potentiate the Sensitivity of Bacillus anthracis Spores to Peracetic Acid.

    PubMed

    Celebi, Ozgur; Buyuk, Fatih; Pottage, Tom; Crook, Ant; Hawkey, Suzanna; Cooper, Callum; Bennett, Allan; Sahin, Mitat; Baillie, Leslie

    2016-01-01

    Elimination of Bacillus anthracis spores from the environment is a difficult and costly process due in part to the toxicity of current sporicidal agents. For this reason we investigated the ability of the spore germinants L-alanine (100 mM) and inosine (5 mM) to reduce the concentration of peracetic acid (PAA) required to inactivate B. anthracis spores. While L-alanine significantly enhanced (p = 0.0085) the bactericidal activity of 500 ppm PAA the same was not true for inosine suggesting some form of negative interaction. In contrast the germinant combination proved most effective at 100 ppm PAA (p = 0.0009). To determine if we could achieve similar results in soil we treated soil collected from the burial site of an anthrax infected animal which had been supplemented with spores of the Sterne strain of B. anthracis to increase the level of contamination to 10(4) spores/g. Treatment with germinants followed 1 h later by 5000 ppm PAA eliminated all of the spores. In contrast direct treatment of the animal burial site using this approach delivered using a back pack sprayer had no detectable effect on the level of B. anthracis contamination or on total culturable bacterial numbers over the course of the experiment. It did trigger a significant, but temporary, reduction (p < 0.0001) in the total spore count suggesting that germination had been triggered under real world conditions. In conclusion, we have shown that the application of germinants increase the sensitivity of bacterial spores to PAA. While the results of the single field trial were inconclusive, the study highlighted the potential of this approach and the challenges faced when attempting to perform real world studies on B. anthracis spores contaminated sites. PMID:26858699

  18. Comparative Studies of Enzymes Related to Serine Metabolism in Higher Plants 1

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Geoffrey P.; Rosenblum, I. Y.; Sallach, H. J.

    1968-01-01

    The following enzymes related to serine metabolism in higher plants have been investigated: 1) d-3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase, 2) phosphohydroxypyruvate:l-glutamate transaminase, 3) d-glycerate dehydrogenase, and 4) hydroxypyruvate:l-alanine transaminase. Comparative studies on the distribution of the 2 dehydrogenases in seeds and leaves from various plants revealed that d-3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase is widely distributed in seeds in contrast to d-glycerate dehydrogenase, which is either absent or present at low levels, and that the reverse pattern is observed in green leaves. The levels of activity of the 4 enzymes listed above were followed in different tissues of the developing pea (Pisum sativum, var. Alaska). In the leaf, from the tenth to seventeenth day of germination, the specific activity of d-glycerate dehydrogenase increased markedly and was much higher than d-3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase which remained relatively constant during this time period. Etiolation resulted in a decrease in d-glycerate dehydrogenase and an increase in d-3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase activities. In apical meristem, on the other hand, the level of d-3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase exceeded that of d-glycerate dehydrogenase at all time periods studied. Low and decreasing levels of both dehydrogenases were found in epicotyl and cotyledon. The specific activities of the 2 transaminases remained relatively constant during development in both leaf and apical meristem. In general, however, the levels of phosphohydroxypyruvate:l-glutamate transaminase were comparable to those of d-3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase in a given tissue as were those for hydroxypyruvate: l-alanine transaminase and d-glycerate dehydrogenase. PMID:5699148

  19. Effect of aliphatic, monocarboxylic, dicarboxylic, heterocyclic and sulphur-containing amino acids on Leishmania spp. chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Diaz, E; Zacarias, A K; Pérez, S; Vanegas, O; Köhidai, L; Padrón-Nieves, M; Ponte-Sucre, A

    2015-11-01

    In the sand-fly mid gut, Leishmania promastigotes are exposed to acute changes in nutrients, e.g. amino acids (AAs). These metabolites are the main energy sources for the parasite, crucial for its differentiation and motility. We analysed the migratory behaviour and morphological changes produced by aliphatic, monocarboxylic, dicarboxylic, heterocyclic and sulphur-containing AAs in Leishmania amazonensis and Leishmania braziliensis and demonstrated that L-methionine (10-12 m), L-tryptophan (10-11 m), L-glutamine and L-glutamic acid (10-6 m), induced positive chemotactic responses, while L-alanine (10-7 m), L-methionine (10-11 and 10-7 m), L-tryptophan (10-11 m), L-glutamine (10-12 m) and L-glutamic acid (10-9 m) induced negative chemotactic responses. L-proline and L-cysteine did not change the migratory potential of Leishmania. The flagellum length of L. braziliensis, but not of L. amazonensis, decreased when incubated in hyperosmotic conditions. However, chemo-repellent concentrations of L-alanine (Hypo-/hyper-osmotic conditions) and L-glutamic acid (hypo-osmotic conditions) decreased L. braziliensis flagellum length and L-methionine (10-11 m, hypo-/hyper-osmotic conditions) decreased L. amazonensis flagellum length. This chemotactic responsiveness suggests that Leishmania discriminate between slight concentration differences of small and structurally closely related molecules and indicates that besides their metabolic effects, AAs play key roles linked to sensory mechanisms that might determine the parasite's behaviour.

  20. Role of amino acids as additives on sperm motility, plasma membrane integrity and lipid peroxidation levels at pre-freeze and post-thawed ram semen.

    PubMed

    Sangeeta, Sharon; Arangasamy, A; Kulkarni, S; Selvaraju, S

    2015-10-01

    The possibility of including amino acids for cryopreservation of ram semen to improve the quality of frozen semen was explored in this study in sheep model. 24 samples were collected in triplicate from 8 rams of 2-3 year old Bannur cross bred rams maintained at the Institute Experimental Livestock Unit. Semen was diluted in tris-egg yolk glycerol diluent and made into 7 aliquots as follows: aliquot 1 served as control, "l-alanine" was added at 100 and 135mM in the aliquots 2 and 3, "l-glutamine" was added at 20 and 25mM in the aliquots 4 and 5 and "l-proline" was added at 25 and 50mM in the aliquots 6 and 7, respectively. Diluted semen was filled in 0.25ml French straws and frozen in LN2. Inclusion of "l-proline" and "l-glutamine" in the diluent increased the percent live sperm (P<0.001), total motility (P<0.05) and maintained higher functional membrane and acrosomal integrity (P<0.001) by decreasing lipid peroxidation (P<0.001) compared to the control group. In contrast, "l-alanine" decreased the percentage of total motility, fast progressive spermatozoa and increased (P<0.01) the percentage of immotile spermatozoa. It can be concluded that 20mM "l-glutamine" and 25mM "l-proline" can be used as semen additive to freeze ram semen as they prevented cryoinjuries to sperm and improved the pre-freeze and post-thaw semen characteristics.

  1. Specificity of inhibitors of serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT), a key enzyme in sphingolipid biosynthesis, in intact cells. A novel evaluation system using an SPT-defective mammalian cell mutant.

    PubMed

    Hanada, K; Nishijima, M; Fujita, T; Kobayashi, S

    2000-05-15

    In the present study, we demonstrate a model cell system for evaluating the specificity of inhibitors of serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT), the enzyme that catalyzes the first step of sphingolipid biosynthesis. The LY-B strain is a Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell mutant defective in SPT, and the LY-B/cLCB1 strain is a genetically corrected revertant of the mutant. Although LY-B cells grew only slightly in sphingolipid-deficient medium, their growth was restored to the level of LY-B/cLCB1 cells under sphingosine-supplied conditions, indicating that, in CHO cells, the growth inhibition caused by SPT inactivation was rescued almost fully by the metabolic complementation of sphingolipids. Cultivation of LY-B/cLCB1 cells in sphingolipid-deficient medium in the presence of 10 microM sphingofungin B and ISP-1 (myriocin, thermozymocidin), potent inhibitors of SPT activity, caused severe growth inhibition with approximately 95% inhibition of de novo sphingolipid synthesis. The growth inhibition by sphingofungin B and ISP-1 was rescued substantially by exogenous sphingosine, whereas the cytotoxicity of two other types of SPT inhibitor, L-cycloserine and beta-chloro-L-alanine, was hardly rescued. Similar cytotoxic patterns of these inhibitors also were observed on the growth of SPT-defective LY-B cells cultured under sphingosine-supplied conditions. The SPT inhibitors did not affect metabolic conversion of exogenous [(3)H]sphingosine to complex sphingolipids. Thus, the cytotoxicity of sphingofungin B and ISP-1, but not L-cycloserine or beta-chloro-L-alanine, is due largely to inhibition of sphingolipid synthesis by inhibiting the SPT activity.

  2. L-Serine Deficiency Elicits Intracellular Accumulation of Cytotoxic Deoxysphingolipids and Lipid Body Formation.

    PubMed

    Esaki, Kayoko; Sayano, Tomoko; Sonoda, Chiaki; Akagi, Takumi; Suzuki, Takeshi; Ogawa, Takuya; Okamoto, Masahiro; Yoshikawa, Takeo; Hirabayashi, Yoshio; Furuya, Shigeki

    2015-06-01

    L-serine is required to synthesize membrane lipids such as phosphatidylserine and sphingolipids. Nevertheless, it remains largely unknown how a diminished capacity to synthesize L-serine affects lipid homeostasis in cells and tissues. Here, we show that deprivation of external L-serine leads to the generation of 1-deoxysphingolipids (doxSLs), including 1-deoxysphinganine, in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (KO-MEFs) lacking D-3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (Phgdh), which catalyzes the first step in the de novo synthesis of L-serine. A novel mass spectrometry-based lipidomic approach demonstrated that 1-deoxydihydroceramide was the most abundant species of doxSLs accumulated in L-serine-deprived KO-MEFs. Among normal sphingolipid species in KO-MEFs, levels of sphinganine, dihydroceramide, ceramide, and hexosylceramide were significantly reduced after deprivation of external L-serine, whereas those of sphingomyelin, sphingosine, and sphingosine 1-phosphate were retained. The synthesis of doxSLs was suppressed by supplementing the culture medium with L-serine but was potentiated by increasing the ratio of L-alanine to L-serine in the medium. Unlike with L-serine, depriving cells of external L-leucine did not promote the occurrence of doxSLs. Consistent with results obtained from KO-MEFs, brain-specific deletion of Phgdh in mice also resulted in accumulation of doxSLs in the brain. Furthermore, L-serine-deprived KO-MEFs exhibited increased formation of cytosolic lipid bodies containing doxSLs and other sphingolipids. These in vitro and in vivo studies indicate that doxSLs are generated in the presence of a high ratio of L-alanine to L-serine in cells and tissues lacking Phgdh, and de novo synthesis of L-serine is necessary to maintain normal sphingolipid homeostasis when the external supply of this amino acid is limited. PMID:25903138

  3. Effects of supplementation with free glutamine and the dipeptide alanyl-glutamine on parameters of muscle damage and inflammation in rats submitted to prolonged exercise.

    PubMed

    Cruzat, Vinicius Fernandes; Rogero, Marcelo Macedo; Tirapegui, Julio

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the effect of the supplementation with the dipeptide L-alanyl-L-glutamine (DIP) and a solution containing L-glutamine and L-alanine on plasma levels markers of muscle damage and levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and glutamine metabolism in rats submitted to prolonged exercise. Rats were submitted to sessions of swim training for 6 weeks. Twenty-one days prior to euthanasia, the animals were supplemented with DIP (n = 8) (1.5 g.kg(-1)), a solution of free L-glutamine (1 g.kg(-1)) and free L-alanine (0.61 g.kg(-1)) (G&A, n = 8) or water (control (CON), n = 8). Animals were killed at rest before (R), after prolonged exercise (PE-2 h of exercise). Plasma concentrations of glutamine, glutamate, tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and activity of creatine kinase (CK), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and muscle concentrations of glutamine and glutamate were measured. The concentrations of plasma TNF-alpha, PGE2 and the activity of CK were lower in the G&A-R and DIP-R groups, compared to the CON-R. Glutamine in plasma (p < 0.04) and soleus muscle (p < 0.001) was higher in the DIP-R and G&A-R groups relative to the CON-R group. G&A-PE and DIP-PE groups exhibited lower concentrations of plasma PGE2 (p < 0.05) and TNF-alpha (p < 0.05), and higher concentrations of glutamine and glutamate in soleus (p < 0.001) and gastrocnemius muscles (p < 0.05) relative to the CON-PE group. We concluded that supplementation with free L-glutamine and the dipeptide LL-alanyl-LL-glutamine represents an effective source of glutamine, which may attenuate inflammation biomarkers after periods of training and plasma levels of CK and the inflammatory response induced by prolonged exercise.

  4. Effects of supplementation with free glutamine and the dipeptide alanyl-glutamine on parameters of muscle damage and inflammation in rats submitted to prolonged exercise.

    PubMed

    Cruzat, Vinicius Fernandes; Rogero, Marcelo Macedo; Tirapegui, Julio

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the effect of the supplementation with the dipeptide L-alanyl-L-glutamine (DIP) and a solution containing L-glutamine and L-alanine on plasma levels markers of muscle damage and levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and glutamine metabolism in rats submitted to prolonged exercise. Rats were submitted to sessions of swim training for 6 weeks. Twenty-one days prior to euthanasia, the animals were supplemented with DIP (n = 8) (1.5 g.kg(-1)), a solution of free L-glutamine (1 g.kg(-1)) and free L-alanine (0.61 g.kg(-1)) (G&A, n = 8) or water (control (CON), n = 8). Animals were killed at rest before (R), after prolonged exercise (PE-2 h of exercise). Plasma concentrations of glutamine, glutamate, tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and activity of creatine kinase (CK), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and muscle concentrations of glutamine and glutamate were measured. The concentrations of plasma TNF-alpha, PGE2 and the activity of CK were lower in the G&A-R and DIP-R groups, compared to the CON-R. Glutamine in plasma (p < 0.04) and soleus muscle (p < 0.001) was higher in the DIP-R and G&A-R groups relative to the CON-R group. G&A-PE and DIP-PE groups exhibited lower concentrations of plasma PGE2 (p < 0.05) and TNF-alpha (p < 0.05), and higher concentrations of glutamine and glutamate in soleus (p < 0.001) and gastrocnemius muscles (p < 0.05) relative to the CON-PE group. We concluded that supplementation with free L-glutamine and the dipeptide LL-alanyl-LL-glutamine represents an effective source of glutamine, which may attenuate inflammation biomarkers after periods of training and plasma levels of CK and the inflammatory response induced by prolonged exercise. PMID:19885855

  5. Synthesis and characterization of responsive nanoporous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abelow, Alexis Elizabeth

    This thesis describes the synthesis and properties of polymer or oligonucleotide-modified nanoporous membranes and nanopores which exhibit a response to external stimuli, synthesized with the intention of mimicking biological protein channels. The responsiveness of these systems arises as a function of the polymer or oligonucleotide modifier, which exhibit a change in conformation with exposure to temperature, pH, introduction of a small molecule, or electric potential. First, the transport of ions through supported silica colloidal films modified with poly(L-alanine) on platinum electrodes was studied using cyclic voltammetry. By monitoring the flux of a redox species through the polymer-modified colloidal film it is demonstrated that the polymer expands and contracts when the temperature was increased and decreased, respectively. We also observed an expansion and contraction as the pH was increased and decreased, respectively. Transport of a neutral dye molecule through free-standing silica colloidal films modified with poly(L-alanine) was also studied. As noted previously, the polymer expands and contracts as the pH is increased and decreased, respectively. Next, the transport was monitored through both silica colloidal film-modified Pt microelectrodes and Pt single nanopore electrodes as an oligonucleotide-based binder, or aptamer, was attached. The aptamer is responsive to a small molecule, cocaine where, in the absence of cocaine, only one "arm" of the aptamer is folded in on itself, leaving the rest of the chain partially unfolded, blocking the nanopores. However, when the cocaine molecule is introduced into solution, the aptamer folds completely in on itself, forming a three-armed structure with the small molecule encapsulated in the middle. This change in conformation is monitored by observing the change in transport of a redox species through the pores as cocaine is introduced into the system. We observed an increase rate of transport as the aptamer bound

  6. Injectable Hydrogel: Amplifying the pH Sensitivity of a Triblock Copolypeptide by Conjugating the N-Termini via Dynamic Covalent Bonding.

    PubMed

    Popescu, Maria-Teodora; Liontos, George; Avgeropoulos, Apostolos; Voulgari, Efstathia; Avgoustakis, Konstantinos; Tsitsilianis, Constantinos

    2016-07-13

    We explore the self-assembly behavior of aqueous solutions of an amphiphilic, pH-sensitive poly(l-alanine)-b-poly(l-glutamic acid)-b-poly(l-alanine), (A5E11A5) triblock copolypeptide, end-capped by benzaldehyde through Schiff base reaction. At elevated concentrations and under physiological pH (7.4) and ionic strength (0.15M), the bare copolypeptide aqueous solutions underwent a sol-gel transition after heating and slow cooling thermal treatment, forming opaque stiff gels due to a hierarchical self-assembly that led to the formation of β-sheet-based twisted super fibers (Popescu et al. Soft Matter 2015, 11, 331-342). The conjugation of the N-termini with benzaldehyde (Bz) through a Schiff base reaction amplifies the copolypeptide pH-sensitivity within a narrow pH window relevant for in vivo applications. Specifically, the dynamic character of the imine bond allowed coupling/decoupling of the Bz upon switching pH. The presence of Bz conjugates to the N-termini of the copolypeptide resulted in enhanced packing of the elementary superfibers into thick and short piles, which inhibited the ability of the system for gelation. However, partial cleavage of Bz upon lowering pH to 6.5 prompted recovery of the hydrogel. The sol-gel transition triggered by pH was reversible, due to the coupling/decoupling of the benzoic-imine dynamic covalent bonding, endowing thus the gelling system with injectability. Undesirably, the gelation temperature window was significantly reduced, which however can be regulated at physiological temperatures by using a suitable mixture of the bare and the Bz-conjugated coplypeptide. This triblock copolypeptide gelator was investigated as a scaffold for the encapsulation of polymersome nanocarriers, loaded with a hydrophilic model drug, calcein. The polymersome/polypeptide complex system showed prolonged probe release in pH 6.5, which is relevant to extracellular tumor environment, rendering the system potentially useful for sustained delivery of

  7. Functional Enhancement of Electrofusion-derived BRIN-BD11 Insulin-secreting Cells After Implantation into Diabetic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Emma L.; Abdel-Wahab, Yasser H. A.; Flatt, Peter R.

    2001-01-01

    Electrofusion-derived BRIN-BD11 cells are glucosesensitive insulin-secreting cells which provide an archetypal bioengineered surrogate β-cell for insulin replacement therapy in diabetes mellitus, 5x106 BRIN-BD11 cells were implanted intraperitoneally into severely hyperglycaemic (>24mmol/l) streptozotocin-induced insulin-treated diabetic athymic nude (nu/nu) mice. The implants reduced hyperglycaemia such that insulin injections were discontinued by 5–16 days (<17mmol/l) and normoglycaemia (<9mmol/l) was achieved by 7–20 days. Implanted cells were removed after 28 days and re-established in culture. After re-culture for 20 days, glucose-stimulated (16.7mmol/l) insulin release was enhanced by 121% (p<0.001) compared to non-implanted cells. Insulin responses to glucagon-like peptide-1 (10−9mol/l), cholecystokinin-8 (10−8 mol/l) and L-alanine (10 mmol/l) were increased by 32%, 31% and 68% respectively (p<0.05–0.01). Insulin content of the cells was 148% greater at 20 days after re-culture than before implantation (p<0.001), but basal insulin release (at 5.6 mmol/l glucose) was not changed. After re-culture for 40 days, insulin content declined to 68% of the content before implantation (p<0.01), although basal insulin release was unchanged. However, the insulin secretory responses to glucose, glucagonlike peptide-1, cholecystokinin-8 and L-alanine were decreased after 40 days of re-culture to 65%, 72%, 73% and 42% respectively of the values before implantation (p<0.05–0.01). The functional enhancement of electrofusion-derived surrogate β-cells that were re-cultured for 20 days after implantation and restoration of normoglycaemia indicates that the in vivo environment could greatly assist β-cell engineering approaches to therapy for diabetes. PMID:12369723

  8. The Hypothesis that the Genetic Code Originated in Coupled Synthesis of Proteins and the Evolutionary Predecessors of Nucleic Acids in Primitive Cells

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Brian R.

    2015-01-01

    Although analysis of the genetic code has allowed explanations for its evolution to be proposed, little evidence exists in biochemistry and molecular biology to offer an explanation for the origin of the genetic code. In particular, two features of biology make the origin of the genetic code difficult to understand. First, nucleic acids are highly complicated polymers requiring numerous enzymes for biosynthesis. Secondly, proteins have a simple backbone with a set of 20 different amino acid side chains synthesized by a highly complicated ribosomal process in which mRNA sequences are read in triplets. Apparently, both nucleic acid and protein syntheses have extensive evolutionary histories. Supporting these processes is a complex metabolism and at the hub of metabolism are the carboxylic acid cycles. This paper advances the hypothesis that the earliest predecessor of the nucleic acids was a β-linked polyester made from malic acid, a highly conserved metabolite in the carboxylic acid cycles. In the β-linked polyester, the side chains are carboxylic acid groups capable of forming interstrand double hydrogen bonds. Evolution of the nucleic acids involved changes to the backbone and side chain of poly(β-d-malic acid). Conversion of the side chain carboxylic acid into a carboxamide or a longer side chain bearing a carboxamide group, allowed information polymers to form amide pairs between polyester chains. Aminoacylation of the hydroxyl groups of malic acid and its derivatives with simple amino acids such as glycine and alanine allowed coupling of polyester synthesis and protein synthesis. Use of polypeptides containing glycine and l-alanine for activation of two different monomers with either glycine or l-alanine allowed simple coded autocatalytic synthesis of polyesters and polypeptides and established the first genetic code. A primitive cell capable of supporting electron transport, thioester synthesis, reduction reactions, and synthesis of polyesters and

  9. [Asymmetric synthesis of aromatic L-amino acids catalyzed by transaminase].

    PubMed

    Xia, Wenna; Sun, Yu; Min, Cong; Han, Wei; Wu, Sheng

    2012-11-01

    Aromatic L-Amino acids are important chiral building blocks for the synthesis of many drugs, pesticides, fine chemicals and food additives. Due to the high activity and steroselectivity, enzymatic synthesis of chiral building blocks has become the main research direction in asymmetric synthesis field. Guided by the phylogenetic analysis of transaminases from different sources, two representative aromatic transaminases TyrB and Aro8 in type I subfamily, from the prokaryote Escherichia coli and eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisia, respectively, were applied for the comparative study of asymmetric transamination reaction process and catalytic efficiency of reversely converting keto acids to the corresponding aromatic L-amino acid. Both TyrB and Aro8 could efficiently synthesize the natural aromatic amino acids phenylalanine and tyrosine as well as non-natural amino acid phenylglycine. The chiral HPLC analysis showed the produced amino acids were L-configuration and the e.e value was 100%. L-alanine was the optimal amino donor, and the transaminase TyrB and Aro8 could not use D-amino acids as amino donor. The optimal molar ratio of amino donor (L-alanine) and amino acceptor (aromatic alpha-keto acids) was 4:1. Both of the substituted group on the aromatic ring and the length of fatty acid carbon chain part in the molecular structure of aromatic substrate alpha-keto acid have the significant impact on the enzyme-catalyzed transamination efficiency. In the experiments of preparative-scale transamination synthesis of L-phenylglycine, L-phenylalanine and L-tyrosine, the specific production rate catalyzed by TryB were 0.28 g/(g x h), 0.31 g/(g x h) and 0.60 g/(g x h) and the specific production rate catalyzed by Aro8 were 0.61 g/(g x h), 0.48 g/(g x h) and 0.59 g/(g x h). The results obtained here were useful for applying the transaminases to asymmetric synthesis of L-amino acids by reversing the reaction balance in industry.

  10. Selective Sorption of Dissolved Organic Carbon Compounds by Temperate Soils

    SciTech Connect

    Jagadamma, Sindhu; Mayes, Melanie; Phillips, Jana Randolph

    2012-01-01

    Physico-chemical sorption of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) on soil minerals is one of the major processes of organic carbon (OC) stabilization in soils, especially in deeper layers. The attachment of C on soil solids is related to the reactivity of the soil minerals and the chemistry of the sorbate functional groups, but the sorption studies conducted without controlling microbial activity may overestimate the sorption potential of soil. This study was conducted to examine the sorptive characteristics of a diverse functional groups of simple OC compounds (D-glucose, L-alanine, oxalic acid, salicylic acid, and sinapyl alcohol) on temperate climate soil orders (Mollisols, Ultisols and Alfisols) with and without biological degradative processes. Equilibrium batch experiments were conducted using 0-100 mg C L-1 at a solid-solution ratio of 1:60 for 48 hrs and the sorption parameters were calculated by Langmuir model fitting. The amount of added compounds that remained in the solution phase was detected by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and total organic C (TOC) analysis. Soil sterilization was performed by -irradiation technique and experiments were repeated to determine the contribution of microbial degradation to apparent sorption. Overall, Ultisols did not show a marked preference for apparent sorption of any of the model compounds, as indicated by a narrower range of maximum sorption capacity (Smax) of 173-527 mg kg soil-1 across compounds. Mollisols exhibited a strong preference for apparent sorption of oxalic acid (Smax of 5290 mg kg soil-1) and sinapyl alcohol (Smax of 2031 mg kg soil-1) over the other compounds. The propensity for sorption of oxalic acid is mainly attributed to the precipitation of insoluble Ca-oxalate due to the calcareous nature of most Mollisol subsoils and its preference for sinapyl alcohol could be linked to the polymerization of this lignin monomer on 2:2 mineral dominated soils. The reactivity of Alfisols to DOC was in

  11. Mode of Action of Glycine on the Biosynthesis of Peptidoglycan

    PubMed Central

    Hammes, W.; Schleifer, K. H.; Kandler, O.

    1973-01-01

    The mechanism of glycine action in growth inhibition was studied on eight different species of bacteria of various genera representing the four most common peptidoglycan types. To inhibit the growth of the different organisms to 80%, glycine concentrations from 0.05 to 1.33 M had to be applied. The inhibited cells showed morphological aberrations. It has been demonstrated that glycine is incorporated into the nucleotide-activated peptidoglycan precursors. The amount of incorporated glycine was equivalent to the decrease in the amount of alanine. With one exception glycine is also incorporated into the peptidoglycan. Studies on the primary structure of both the peptidoglycan precursors and the corresponding peptidoglycan have revealed that glycine can replace l-alanine in position 1 and d-alanine residues in positions 4 and 5 of the peptide subunit. Replacement of l-alanine in position 1 of the peptide subunit together with an accumulation of uridine diphosphate-muramic acid (UDP-MurNAc), indicating an inhibition of the UDP-MurNAc:l-Ala ligase, has been found in three bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus, Lactobacillus cellobiosus and L. plantarum). However, discrimination against precursors with glycine in position 1 in peptidoglycan synthesis has been observed only in S. aureus. Replacement of d-alanine residues was most common. It occurred in the peptidoglycan with one exception in all strains studied. In Corynebacterium sp., C. callunae, L. plantarum, and L. cellobiosus most of the d-alanine replacing glycine occurs C-terminal in position 4, and in C. insidiosum and S. aureus glycine is found C-terminal in position 5. It is suggested that the modified peptidoglycan precursors are accumulated by being poor substrates for some of the enzymes involved in peptidoglycan synthesis. Two mechanisms leading to a more loosely cross-linked peptidoglycan and to morphological changes of the cells are considered. First, the accumulation of glycine-containing precursors may lead to

  12. Structural analysis of Bacillus subtilis 168 endospore peptidoglycan and its role during differentiation.

    PubMed Central

    Atrih, A; Zöllner, P; Allmaier, G; Foster, S J

    1996-01-01

    The structure of the endospore cell wall peptidoglycan of Bacillus subtilis has been examined. Spore peptidoglycan was produced by the development of a method based on chemical permeabilization of the spore coats and enzymatic hydrolysis of the peptidoglycan. The resulting muropeptides which were >97% pure were analyzed by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography, amino acid analysis, and mass spectrometry. This revealed that 49% of the muramic acid residues in the glycan backbone were present in the delta-lactam form which occurred predominantly every second muramic acid. The glycosidic bonds adjacent to the muramic acid delta-lactam residues were resistant to the action of muramidases. Of the muramic acid residues, 25.7 and 23.3% were substituted with a tetrapeptide and a single L-alanine, respectively. Only 2% of the muramic acids had tripeptide side chains and may constitute the primordial cell wall, the remainder of the peptidoglycan being spore cortex. The spore peptidoglycan is very loosely cross-linked at only 2.9% of the muramic acid residues, a figure approximately 11-fold less than that of the vegetative cell wall. The peptidoglycan from strain AA110 (dacB) had fivefold-greater cross-linking (14.4%) than the wild type and an altered ratio of muramic acid substituents having 37.0, 46.3, and 12.3% delta-lactam, tetrapeptide, and single L-alanine, respectively. This suggests a role for the DacB protein (penicillin-binding protein 5*) in cortex biosynthesis. The sporulation-specific putative peptidoglycan hydrolase CwlD plays a pivotal role in the establishment of the mature spore cortex structure since strain AA107 (cwlD) has spore peptidoglycan which is completely devoid of muramic acid delta-lactam residues. Despite this drastic change in peptidoglycan structure, the spores are still stable but are unable to germinate. The role of delta-lactam and other spore peptidoglycan structural features in the maintenance of dormancy, heat resistance

  13. Ornithine cyclodeaminase/μ-crystallin homolog from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus litoralis functions as a novel Δ1-pyrroline-2-carboxylate reductase involved in putative trans-3-hydroxy-l-proline metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Seiya; Tozawa, Yuzuru; Watanabe, Yasuo

    2014-01-01

    l-Ornithine cyclodeaminase (OCD) is involved in l-proline biosynthesis and catalyzes the unique deaminating cyclization of l-ornithine to l-proline via a Δ1-pyrroline-2-carboxyrate (Pyr2C) intermediate. Although this pathway functions in only a few bacteria, many archaea possess OCD-like genes (proteins), among which only AF1665 protein (gene) from Archaeoglobus fulgidus has been characterized as an NAD+-dependent l-alanine dehydrogenase (AfAlaDH). However, the physiological role of OCD-like proteins from archaea has been unclear. Recently, we revealed that Pyr2C reductase, involved in trans-3-hydroxy-l-proline (T3LHyp) metabolism of bacteria, belongs to the OCD protein superfamily and catalyzes only the reduction of Pyr2C to l-proline (no OCD activity) [FEBS Open Bio (2014) 4, 240–250]. In this study, based on bioinformatics analysis, we assumed that the OCD-like gene from Thermococcus litoralis DSM 5473 is related to T3LHyp and/or proline metabolism (TlLhpI). Interestingly, TlLhpI showed three different enzymatic activities: AlaDH; N-methyl-l-alanine dehydrogenase; Pyr2C reductase. Kinetic analysis suggested strongly that Pyr2C is the preferred substrate. In spite of their similar activity, TlLhpI had a poor phylogenetic relationship to the bacterial and mammalian reductases for Pyr2C and formed a close but distinct subfamily to AfAlaDH, indicating convergent evolution. Introduction of several specific amino acid residues for OCD and/or AfAlaDH by site-directed mutagenesis had marked effects on both AlaDH and Pyr2C reductase activities. The OCC_00387 gene, clustered with the TlLhpI gene on the genome, encoded T3LHyp dehydratase, homologous to the bacterial and mammalian enzymes. To our knowledge, this is the first report of T3LHyp metabolism from archaea. PMID:25161870

  14. Feeding response of subterranean termites Coptotermes curvignathus and Coptotermes gestroi (Blattodea: Rhinotermitidae) to baits supplemented with sugars, amino acids, and cassava.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Venite Pesigan; Sajap, Ahmad Said; Sahri, Mohd Hamami

    2013-08-01

    Feeding responses of subterranean termites Coptotermes curvignathus (Holmgren) and Coptotermes gestroi (Wasmann) (Blattodea: Rhinotermitidae) to bait matrices supplemented with various sugars, amino acids, and cassava were evaluated both in the laboratory and field. The results indicated that the two termite species consumed significantly different amount of filter papers that had been treated with various types and concentrations of sugars and amino acids. Based on consumption and survival data, filter papers with 3% glucose and 3% xylose were among the most consumed by C. curvignathus and C. gestroi, respectively. Both termite species consumed more of the filter papers treated with 3% casein than filter papers treated with L-alanine. Both species had a comparable survival rate compared with those in the controls. Results from laboratory and field trials on bait prototypes indicated that C. gestroi consumed more bait prototypes containing cellulose, 3% xylose, 3% casein, and cassava, whereas C curvignathus consumed more bait prototype containing cellulose, 3% glucose, and cassava, than on pure crystalline cellulose baits. Thus, with an improved and cost-effective bait formulation, a much wider control of subterranean termite colonies could be achieved. PMID:24020295

  15. Amino acid suppression of taurine-sensitive chemosensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Gleeson, R A; Ache, B W

    1985-05-27

    Single unit recordings from chemoreceptors on the antennule of the spiny lobster revealed a population of taurine-sensitive cells whose response is suppressed when taurine is presented in mixture with certain amino acids. A synthetic mixture of 21 amino acids plus betaine, which mimics the composition of a natural food stimulus (crab muscle tissue) and itself contains taurine, totally and reversibly blocked the taurine response of this group of receptor cells. An analysis of the contribution to this suppression by the six major components (based on concentration) in the mixture revealed partial or complete inhibitory activity by five of the compounds. In a sample group of the inhibited cells, mean percent suppression of the taurine response was 99% for glycine and L-arginine, 98% for L-glutamine, 60% for L-alanine and 43% for L-proline. Both glycine and alanine in binary mixture with taurine caused a right-shift in the concentration-response function for taurine, suggesting a competitive mechanism of suppression. pA2 values determined from these data yielded 4.17 for glycine and 3.55 for alanine. These results suggest that the processing of chemical information in quality and/or intensity coding of natural stimulus mixtures can be tempered by interactions of the components at the receptor-cell level, and possibly at the receptor-sites themselves.

  16. Purification and partial characterization of a novel calcium-binding protein from Bacillus cereus T spores and inhibition of germination by calmodulin antagonists

    SciTech Connect

    Shyu, Y.

    1989-01-01

    A novel calcium-binding protein has been purified from the dormant spores of Bacillus cereus T. B. cereus T spores were extensively washed, broken, and heated at 90{degree}C for 2 min. Using calcium-dependent hydrophobic interaction chromatography plus DEAE-cellulose and hydroxylapatite columns, a single protein was obtained which possessed calcium-binding capacity and some characteristics of calmodulin. This heat-stable protein was retained by hydrophobic matrices or a calmodulin antagonist in a calcium-dependent manner. The crude spore extract displaced bovine brain calmodulin from its antibody in a radioimmunoassay and the immunoreactive specific activity of the partially purified fraction which eluted from phenyl-Sepharose was ca. 200-fold greater than the crude spore extract. Purity of this protein was verified by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyarcylamide gel electrophoresis and reversed-phase HPLC. Calcium-binding ability was verified with a competitive calcium binding assay using Chelex-100 resin and {sup 45}Ca autoradiography. SDS-PAGE and amino acid composition indicated the molecular weight of the protein was 24-kDa. The effects of two calmodulin antagonists, trifluoperazine (TFP) and N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-naphthalene sulfonamide (W-7) on L-alanine-induced germination of Bacillus cereus T spores were examined by measuring commitment to germination, loss of heat resistance, release of calcium, decrease in optical density at 660 nm and phase-contrast microscopy.

  17. Tracking dipeptides at work-uptake and intracellular fate in CHO culture.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Kopper, Andres; Becker, Max; Pfizenmaier, Jennifer; Kessler, Christian; Karau, Andreas; Takors, Ralf

    2016-12-01

    Market demands for monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are steadily increasing worldwide. As a result, production processes using Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO) are in the focus of ongoing intensification studies for maximizing cell-specific and volumetric productivities. This includes the optimization of animal-derived component free (ADCF) cultivation media as part of good cell culture practice. Dipeptides are known to improve CHO culture performance. However, little or even conflicting assumptions exist about their putative import and functionality inside the cells. A set of well-known performance boosters and new dipeptide prospects was evaluated. The present study revealed that dipeptides are indeed imported in the cells, where they are decomposed to the amino acids building blocks. Subsequently, they are metabolized or, unexpectedly, secreted to the medium. Monoclonal antibody production boosting additives like L-alanine-L-glutamine (AQ) or glycyl-L-glutamine (GQ) can be assigned to fast or slow dipeptide uptake, respectively, thus pinpointing to the need to study dipeptide kinetics and to adjust their feeding individually for optimizing mAb production. PMID:27447702

  18. The impact of α-hydrazino acids embedded in short fluorescent peptides on peptide interactions with DNA and RNA.

    PubMed

    Suć, Josipa; Tumir, Lidija-Marija; Glavaš-Obrovac, Ljubica; Jukić, Marijana; Piantanida, Ivo; Jerić, Ivanka

    2016-06-01

    A series of novel hydrazino-based peptidomimetics and analogues comprising N-terminal lysine and C-terminal phenanthridinyl-l-alanine were prepared. The presented results demonstrate the up to now unknown possibility to finely modulate peptide interactions with DNA/RNA by α-hydrazino group insertion and how the different positioning of two α-hydrazino groups in peptides controls binding to various double stranded and single stranded DNA and RNA. All peptidomimetics bind with 1-10 micromolar affinity to ds-DNA/RNA, whereby the binding mode is a combination of electrostatic interactions and hydrophobic interactions within DNA/RNA grooves. Insertion of the α-hydrazino group into the peptide systematically decreased its fluorimetric response to DNA/RNA binding in the order: mono-hydrazino < alternating-hydrazino < sequential-hydrazino group. Binding studies of ss-polynucleotides suggest intercalation of phenanthridine between polynucleotide bases, whereby affinity and fluorimetric response decrease with the number of α-hydrazino groups in the peptide sequence. Particularly interesting was the interaction of two sequential α-hydrazino acids-peptidomimetic with poly rG, characterised by a specific strong increase of CD bands, while all other peptide/ssRNA combinations gave only a CD-band decrease. All mentioned interactions could also be reversibly controlled by adjusting the pH, due to the protonation of the fluorophore. PMID:27161341

  19. Structure of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis proteasome and mechanism of inhibition by a peptidyl boronate

    SciTech Connect

    Hu,G.; Lin, G.; Wang, M.; Dick, L.; Xu, R.; Nathan, C.; Li, H.

    2006-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) has the remarkable ability to resist killing by human macrophages. The 750 kDa proteasome, not available in most eubacteria except Actinomycetes, appears to contribute to Mtb's resistance. The crystal structure of the Mtb proteasome at 3.0 Angstroms resolution reveals a substrate-binding pocket with composite features of the distinct {beta}1, {beta}2 and {beta}5 substrate binding sites of eukaryotic proteasomes, accounting for the broad specificity of the Mtb proteasome towards oligopeptides described in the companion article [Lin et al. (2006), Mol Microbiol doi:10.1111/j.1365-2958.2005.05035.x]. The substrate entrance at the end of the cylindrical proteasome appears open in the crystal structure due to partial disorder of the a-subunit N-terminal residues. However, cryo-electron microscopy of the core particle reveals a closed end, compatible with the density observed in negative-staining electron microscopy that depended on the presence of the N-terminal octapeptides of the a-subunits in the companion article, suggesting that the Mtb proteasome has a gated structure. We determine for the first time the proteasomal inhibition mechanism of the dipeptidyl boronate N-(4-morpholine)carbonyl-{beta}-(1-naphthyl)-l-alanine-l-leucine boronic acid (MLN-273), an analogue of the antimyeloma drug bortezomib. The structure improves prospects for designing Mtb-specific proteasomal inhibitors as a novel approach to chemotherapy of tuberculosis.

  20. Raman spectra of amino acids and their aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Guangyong; Zhu, Xian; Fan, Qi; Wan, Xueliang

    2011-03-01

    Amino acids are the basic "building blocks" that combine to form proteins and play an important physiological role in all life-forms. Amino acids can be used as models for the examination of the importance of intermolecular bonding in life processes. Raman spectra serve to obtain information regarding molecular conformation, giving valuable insights into the topology of more complex molecules (peptides and proteins). In this paper, amino acids and their aqueous solution have been studied by Raman spectroscopy. Comparisons of certain values for these frequencies in amino acids and their aqueous solutions are given. Spectra of solids when compared to those of the solute in solution are invariably much more complex and almost always sharper. We present a collection of Raman spectra of 18 kinds of amino acids ( L-alanine, L-arginine, L-aspartic acid, cystine, L-glutamic acid, L-glycine, L-histidine, L-isoluecine, L-leucine, L-lysine, L-phenylalanine, L-methionone, L-proline, L-serine, L-threonine, L-tryptophan, L-tyrosine, L-valine) and their aqueous solutions that can serve as references for the interpretation of Raman spectra of proteins and biological materials.

  1. Interaction of bovine serum albumin with N-acyl amino acid based anionic surfactants: Effect of head-group hydrophobicity.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Subhajit; Dey, Joykrishna

    2015-11-15

    The function of a protein depends upon its structure and surfactant molecules are known to alter protein structure. For this reason protein-surfactant interaction is important in biological, pharmaceutical, and cosmetic industries. In the present work, interactions of a series of anionic surfactants having the same hydrocarbon chain length, but different amino acid head group, such as l-alanine, l-valine, l-leucine, and l-phenylalanine with the transport protein, bovine serum albumin (BSA), were studied at low surfactant concentrations using fluorescence and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). The results of fluorescence measurements suggest that the surfactant molecules bind simultaneously to the drug binding site I and II of the protein subdomain IIA and IIIA, respectively. The fluorescence as well as CD spectra suggest that the conformation of BSA goes to a more structured state upon surfactant binding at low concentrations. The binding constants of the surfactants were determined by the use of fluorescence as well as ITC measurements and were compared with that of the corresponding glycine-derived surfactant. The binding constant values clearly indicate a significant head-group effect on the BSA-surfactant interaction and the interaction is mainly hydrophobic in nature.

  2. Identification of novel adhesins of M. tuberculosis H37Rv using integrated approach of multiple computational algorithms and experimental analysis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sanjiv; Puniya, Bhanwar Lal; Parween, Shahila; Nahar, Pradip; Ramachandran, Srinivasan

    2013-01-01

    Pathogenic bacteria interacting with eukaryotic host express adhesins on their surface. These adhesins aid in bacterial attachment to the host cell receptors during colonization. A few adhesins such as Heparin binding hemagglutinin adhesin (HBHA), Apa, Malate Synthase of M. tuberculosis have been identified using specific experimental interaction models based on the biological knowledge of the pathogen. In the present work, we carried out computational screening for adhesins of M. tuberculosis. We used an integrated computational approach using SPAAN for predicting adhesins, PSORTb, SubLoc and LocTree for extracellular localization, and BLAST for verifying non-similarity to human proteins. These steps are among the first of reverse vaccinology. Multiple claims and attacks from different algorithms were processed through argumentative approach. Additional filtration criteria included selection for proteins with low molecular weights and absence of literature reports. We examined binding potential of the selected proteins using an image based ELISA. The protein Rv2599 (membrane protein) binds to human fibronectin, laminin and collagen. Rv3717 (N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase) and Rv0309 (L,D-transpeptidase) bind to fibronectin and laminin. We report Rv2599 (membrane protein), Rv0309 and Rv3717 as novel adhesins of M. tuberculosis H37Rv. Our results expand the number of known adhesins of M. tuberculosis and suggest their regulated expression in different stages.

  3. VER-246608, a novel pan-isoform ATP competitive inhibitor of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase, disrupts Warburg metabolism and induces context-dependent cytostasis in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Moore, Jonathan D; Staniszewska, Anna; Shaw, Terence; D'Alessandro, Jalanie; Davis, Ben; Surgenor, Alan; Baker, Lisa; Matassova, Natalia; Murray, James; Macias, Alba; Brough, Paul; Wood, Mike; Mahon, Patrick C

    2014-12-30

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK) is a pivotal enzyme in cellular energy metabolism that has previously been implicated in cancer through both RNAi based studies and clinical correlations with poor prognosis in several cancer types. Here, we report the discovery of a novel and selective ATP competitive pan-isoform inhibitor of PDK, VER-246608. Consistent with a PDK mediated MOA, VER-246608 increased pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) activity, oxygen consumption and attenuated glycolytic activity. However, these effects were only observed under D-glucose-depleted conditions and required almost complete ablation of PDC E1α subunit phosphorylation. VER-246608 was weakly anti-proliferative to cancer cells in standard culture media; however, depletion of either serum or combined D-glucose/L-glutamine resulted in enhanced cellular potency. Furthermore, this condition-selective cytostatic effect correlated with reduced intracellular pyruvate levels and an attenuated compensatory response involving deamination of L-alanine. In addition, VER-246608 was found to potentiate the activity of doxorubicin. In contrast, the lipoamide site inhibitor, Nov3r, demonstrated sub-maximal inhibition of PDK activity and no evidence of cellular activity. These studies suggest that PDK inhibition may be effective under the nutrient-depleted conditions found in the tumour microenvironment and that combination treatments should be explored to reveal the full potential of this therapeutic strategy.

  4. Discovery and structure determination of a novel Maillard-derived sweetness enhancer by application of the comparative taste dilution analysis (cTDA).

    PubMed

    Ottinger, Harald; Soldo, Tomislav; Hofmann, Thomas

    2003-02-12

    Application of a novel screening procedure, the comparative taste dilution analysis (cTDA), on the non-solvent-extractable reaction products formed in a thermally processed aqueous solution of glucose and l-alanine led to the discovery of the presence of a sweetness-enhancing Maillard reaction product. Isolation, followed by LC-MS and 1D- and 2D-NMR measurements, and synthesis led to its unequivocal identification as N-(1-carboxyethyl)-6-(hydroxymethyl)pyridinium-3-ol inner salt. This so-called alapyridaine, although being tasteless itself, is the first nonvolatile, sweetness-enhancing Maillard reaction product reported in the literature. Depending on the pH value, the detection thresholds of sweet sugars, amino acids, and aspartame, respectively, were found to be significantly decreased when alapyridaine was present; for example, the threshold of glucose decreased by a factor of 16 in an equimolar mixture of glucose and alapyridaine. Studies on the influence of the stereochemistry on taste-enhancing activity revealed that the (+)-(S)-alapyridaine is the physiologically active enantiomer, whereas the (-)-(R)-enantiomer did not affect sweetness perception at all. Thermal processing of aqueous solutions of alapyridaine at 80 degrees C demonstrated a high thermal and hydrolytic stability of that sweetness enhancer; for example, more than 90 or 80% of alapyridaine was recovered when heated for 5 h at pH 7.0, 5.0, or 3.0, respectively. PMID:12568569

  5. Determining the functional role of waterborne amino acid uptake in hagfish nutrition: a constitutive pathway when fasting or a supplementary pathway when feeding?

    PubMed

    Glover, Chris N; Blewett, Tamzin A; Wood, Chris M

    2016-10-01

    Hagfish are unique among aquatic "vertebrates" in their ability to absorb amino acids directly from the water via skin and gill epithelia, but it is unknown whether this phenomenon extends beyond a few studied substrates; what effect fed state has on absorption; and what functional role this may play in hagfish nutrition. Using in vivo and in vitro transport assays, uptake and tissue distribution of the waterborne amino acids L-alanine, L-lysine, and L-phenylalanine were examined as a function of fed state. All three amino acids were shown to be taken up from the water (lysine and phenylalanine for the first time). Following immersion in radiolabelled solutions for 24 h, phenylalanine was the amino acid that accumulated at the highest levels in almost all tissues, with the highest accumulation noted in red blood cells and bile, followed by gill and liver. In general, tissues of fed hagfish displayed a significantly reduced phenylalanine accumulation compared to tissues of hagfish fasted for 3 weeks. An in vitro assay showed that phenylalanine was transported across the skin at the highest rate, with the uptake of lysine occurring at the lowest rate. Feeding status had no significant effect on in vitro transport. These data indicate that dissolved organic nutrients are a significant source of nutrition to hagfish, and may be relatively more important during periods of fasting than during periods of feeding when immersed in decaying carcasses.

  6. Phosphoramidate ProTides of 2'-C-methylguanosine as highly potent inhibitors of hepatitis C virus. Study of their in vitro and in vivo properties.

    PubMed

    McGuigan, Christopher; Gilles, Arnaud; Madela, Karolina; Aljarah, Mohamed; Holl, Sabrina; Jones, Sarah; Vernachio, John; Hutchins, Jeff; Ames, Brenda; Bryant, K Dawn; Gorovits, Elena; Ganguly, Babita; Hunley, Damound; Hall, Andrea; Kolykhalov, Alexander; Liu, Yule; Muhammad, Jerry; Raja, Nicholas; Walters, Robin; Wang, Jin; Chamberlain, Stanley; Henson, Geoffrey

    2010-07-01

    Hepatitis C virus infection constitutes a serious health problem in need of more effective therapies. Nucleoside analogues with improved exposure, efficacy, and selectivity are recognized as likely key components of future HCV therapy. 2'-C-Methylguanosine triphosphate has been known as a potent inhibitor of HCV RNA polymerase for some time, but the parent nucleoside is only moderately active due to poor intracellular phosphorylation. We herein report the application of phosphoramidate ProTide technology to bypass the rate-limiting initial phosphorylation of this nucleoside. Over 30 novel ProTides are reported, with variations in the aryl, ester, and amino acid regions. l-Alanine compounds are recognized as potent and selective inhibitors of HCV in replicon assay but lack rodent plasma stability despite considerable ester variation. Amino acid variation retaining the lead benzyl ester moiety gives an increase in rodent stability but at the cost of potency. Finally l-valine esters with ester variation lead to potent, stable compounds. Pharmacokinetic studies on these agents in the mouse reveal liver exposure to the bioactive triphosphate species following single oral dosing. Systemic exposure of the ProTide and parent nucleoside are low, indicating possible low toxicity in vivo, while liver concentrations of the active species may be predictive of efficacy in the clinic. This represents one of the most thorough cross-species studies of ProTides to date.

  7. Endosymbiotic and Host Proteases in the Digestive Tract of the Invasive Snail Pomacea canaliculata: Diversity, Origin and Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Godoy, Martín S.; Castro-Vasquez, Alfredo; Vega, Israel A.

    2013-01-01

    Digestive proteases of the digestive tract of the apple snail Pomacea canaliculata were studied. Luminal protease activity was found in the crop, the style sac and the coiled gut and was significantly higher in the coiled gut. Several protease bands and their apparent molecular weights were identified in both tissue extracts and luminal contents by gel zymography: (1) a 125 kDa protease in salivary gland extracts and in the crop content; (2) a 30 kDa protease throughout all studied luminal contents and in extracts of the midgut gland and of the endosymbionts isolated from this gland; (3) two proteases of 145 and 198 kDa in the coiled gut content. All these proteases were inhibited by aprotinin, a serine-protease inhibitor, and showed maximum activity between 30°C and 35°C and pH between 8.5 and 9.5. Tissue L-alanine-N-aminopeptidase activity was determined in the wall of the crop, the style sac and the coiled gut and was significantly higher in the coiled gut. Our findings show that protein digestion in P. canaliculata is carried out through a battery of diverse proteases originated from the salivary glands and the endosymbionts lodged in the midgut gland and by proteases of uncertain origin that occur in the coiled gut lumen. PMID:23818959

  8. Group 11 complexes with amino acid derivatives: Synthesis and antitumoral studies.

    PubMed

    Ortego, Lourdes; Meireles, Margarida; Kasper, Cornelia; Laguna, Antonio; Villacampa, M Dolores; Gimeno, M Concepción

    2016-03-01

    Gold(I), gold(III), silver(I) and copper(I) complexes with modified amino acid esters and phosphine ligands have been prepared in order to test their cytotoxic activity. Two different phosphine fragments, PPh3 and PPh2py (py=pyridine), have been used. The amino acid esters have been modified by introducing an aromatic amine as pyridine that coordinates metal fragments through the nitrogen atom, giving complexes of the type [M(L)(PR3)](+) or [AuCl3(L)] (L=l-valine-N-(4-pyridylcarbonyl) methyl ester (L1), l-alanine-N-(4-pyridylcarbonyl) methyl ester (L2), l-phenylalanine-N-(4-pyridylcarbonyl) methyl-ester) (L3); M=Au(I), Ag(I), Cu(I), PR3=PPh3, PPh2py). The in vitro cytotoxic activity of metal complexes was tested against four tumor human cell lines and one tumor mouse cell line. A metabolic activity test (3-(4,5-dimethyl-thiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide, MTT) was used and IC50 values were compared with those obtained for cisplatin. Several complexes displayed significant cytotoxic activities. In order to determine whether antiproliferation and cell death are associated with apoptosis, NIH-3T3 cells were exposed to five selected complexes (Annexin V+ FITC, PI) and analyzed by flow cytometry. These experiments showed that the mechanism by which the complexes inhibit cell proliferation inducing cell death in NIH-3T3 cells is mainly apoptotic.

  9. Penicillin-induced liver injury during treatment for ocular neurosyphilis.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Janelle; Zainal, Abir; Naqvi, Syed Yaseen

    2016-01-01

    A 51-year-old man, homosexual, recently diagnosed with ocular neurosyphilis, presented to the emergency room with a 1-day history of fevers and chills. His vital signs were significant for a temperature of 102.8°F and tachycardia of 125 bpm. The patient had experienced blurred vision in his left eye and was diagnosed with ocular neurosyphilis 10 days prior to the current presentation. He was treated with a 14-day course of high-dose intravenous penicillin and oral prednisone. His laboratory studies were significant for transaminitis, with an aspartate aminotransferase of 1826 U/L, alanine aminotransferase of 1743 U/L, total bilirubin of 1.2 mg/dL and alkaline phosphatase of 68 U/L. After ruling out viral aetiologies and toxin-induced hepatic injury, penicillin was discontinued on the day following admission and transaminases promptly improved with resolution of symptoms. The patient's vision returned to normal within 2 weeks after discharge from hospital. PMID:27389728

  10. Biosensor-driven adaptive laboratory evolution of l-valine production in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Mahr, Regina; Gätgens, Cornelia; Gätgens, Jochem; Polen, Tino; Kalinowski, Jörn; Frunzke, Julia

    2015-11-01

    Adaptive laboratory evolution has proven a valuable strategy for metabolic engineering. Here, we established an experimental evolution approach for improving microbial metabolite production by imposing an artificial selective pressure on the fluorescent output of a biosensor using fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Cells showing the highest fluorescent output were iteratively isolated and (re-)cultivated. The L-valine producer Corynebacterium glutamicum ΔaceE was equipped with an L-valine-responsive sensor based on the transcriptional regulator Lrp of C. glutamicum. Evolved strains featured a significantly higher growth rate, increased L-valine titers (~25%) and a 3-4-fold reduction of by-product formation. Genome sequencing resulted in the identification of a loss-of-function mutation (UreD-E188*) in the gene ureD (urease accessory protein), which was shown to increase L-valine production by up to 100%. Furthermore, decreased L-alanine formation was attributed to a mutation in the global regulator GlxR. These results emphasize biosensor-driven evolution as a straightforward approach to improve growth and productivity of microbial production strains.

  11. Metabolic engineering of Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC13869 for L-valine production.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cheng; Li, Yanyan; Hu, Jinyu; Dong, Xunyan; Wang, Xiaoyuan

    2015-05-01

    In this study, an L-valine-producing strain was developed from Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC13869 through deletion of the three genes aceE, alaT and ilvA combined with the overexpression of six genes ilvB, ilvN, ilvC, lrp1, brnF and brnE. Overexpression of lrp1 alone increased L-valine production by 16-fold. Deletion of the aceE, alaT and ilvA increased L-valine production by 44-fold. Overexpression of the six genes ilvB, ilvN, ilvC, lrp1, brnE and brnF in the triple deletion mutant WCC003 further increased L-valine production. The strain WCC003/pJYW-4-ilvBNC1-lrp1-brnFE produced 243mM L-valine in flask cultivation and 437mM (51g/L) L-valine in fed-batch fermentation and lacked detectable amino-acid byproduct such as l-alanine and l-isoleucine that are usually found in the fermentation of L-valine-producing C. glutamicum.

  12. Determination of radical yields in solid-state drugs as one technique to identify drugs that will withstand radiosterilization: radioresistance of beta blockers.

    PubMed

    Engalytcheff, Alix; Deridder, Véronique; Debuyst, René; Tilquin, Bernard

    2003-07-01

    This article describes a simple preliminary test to determine whether a drug is sufficiently radioresistant to withstand radiosterilization. The test is based on the electron spin resonance (ESR) detection of radicals produced after irradiation of a solid-state drug, assuming that these radicals are the precursors of the final products detected after dissolution of the drug. A calibration curve has therefore been established by measuring ESR spectra of l-alanine irradiated at different doses. The response factor to quantify the radicals is the normalized double integration (DI) of the whole first-derivative ESR spectrum. The curve gives the relationship between the normalized DI and the number of radicals. Eight beta blockers have been chosen and their radical yield determined. This is the first time that several different drugs of the same pharmacological group have been studied and compared. The results obtained are similar for seven of the eight beta blockers; the mean G value (excepted for nadolol) is 3 x 10(-9) mol/J. This means that beta blockers are radioresistant. The two most radiosensitive drugs (nadolol and esmolol hydrochloride) were also studied by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). No significant loss of the active compound was detected, which confirms this radioresistant property. Moreover, no change in color or smell was observed. Using ESR and HPLC, beta blockers were identified as potential candidates for radiosterilization.

  13. Autoradiographic study of /sup 3/H-methylated elastase in hamster lungs

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, S.M.; Stone, P.J.; Snider, G.L.; Albright, J.T.; Franzblau, C.

    1983-05-01

    An emphysemalike condition can be induced in animal lungs by the instillation of a single dose of elastase. Autoradiography was used to determine the location of /sup 3/H-methylated porcine pancreatic elastase in hamster lungs at four time points. Six hours after instillation of radiolabeled enzyme the distribution of silver grains was very patchy, but in heavily labeled areas grains were concentrated over macrophages, connective tissue areas and over some fibroblasts. By 24 hr the labeling of connective tissue areas was no longer evident and almost all silver grains were associated with macrophages or with the edema fluid that filled many alveoli at this time. By 4 days only macrophages exhibited concentrations of silver grains. The labeling of macrophages was still evident at 7 days. Elastase inactivated by N-acetyl-(L-alanyl)3-L-alanine chloromethyl ketone showed a different distribution 6 hr after instillation. Silver grains were concentrated over macrophages and alveolar type II cells but showed no affinity for connective tissue areas or fibroblasts. By 24 hr almost all grains were located over heavily labeled macrophages.

  14. Physicochemical Behavior of Some Amino Acids/Glycylglycine in Aqueous D-Galactose Solutions at Different Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Anwar; Patel, Rajan; Shahjahan; Ansari, Nizamul Haque

    2010-03-01

    The apparent molar volumes {(overline{V_2})} for glycine (Gly), l-alanine (Ala), phenylalanine (Phe), and glycylglycine (Gly-Gly) in 0.10 m aqueous d-galactose solutions have been determined from density measurements at (298.15, 303.15, 308.15, and 313.15) K. The data for {(overline{V_2})} were utilized to estimate the partial molar volume at infinite dilution {(overline{V_2^0})} , and experimental slope {(S_v^ast)} . The transfer volume, {(overline{V2^0}_(tr))} , and hydration number, ( n H) were also evaluated. The viscosity data were used to evaluate A- and B-coefficients of the Jones-Dole equation, the free energy of activation of viscous flow per mole of the solvent {left(Δ μ1^{0ast} right)} and the solute {left(Δ μ 2^{0ast} right)} . The molar refractivity ( R D) was calculated from refractive index data. The results were discussed in terms of hydrophilic-ionic, hydrophilic-hydrophobic, and hydrophobic-hydrophobic interactions, and structure-making/-breaking ability of the solute (AAs/peptide) in aqueous d-galactose solutions.

  15. Second-generation sulfonamide inhibitors of D-glutamic acid-adding enzyme: activity optimisation with conformationally rigid analogues of D-glutamic acid.

    PubMed

    Sosič, Izidor; Barreteau, Hélène; Simčič, Mihael; Sink, Roman; Cesar, Jožko; Zega, Anamarija; Grdadolnik, Simona Golič; Contreras-Martel, Carlos; Dessen, Andréa; Amoroso, Ana; Joris, Bernard; Blanot, Didier; Gobec, Stanislav

    2011-07-01

    D-Glutamic acid-adding enzyme (MurD) catalyses the essential addition of d-glutamic acid to the cytoplasmic peptidoglycan precursor UDP-N-acetylmuramoyl-l-alanine, and as such it represents an important antibacterial drug-discovery target enzyme. Based on a series of naphthalene-N-sulfonyl-d-Glu derivatives synthesised recently, we synthesised two series of new, optimised sulfonamide inhibitors of MurD that incorporate rigidified mimetics of d-Glu. The compounds that contained either constrained d-Glu or related rigid d-Glu mimetics showed significantly better inhibitory activities than the parent compounds, thereby confirming the advantage of molecular rigidisation in the design of MurD inhibitors. The binding modes of the best inhibitors were examined with high-resolution NMR spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography. We have solved a new crystal structure of the complex of MurD with an inhibitor bearing a 4-aminocyclohexane-1,3-dicarboxyl moiety. These data provide an additional step towards the development of sulfonamide inhibitors with potential antibacterial activities. PMID:21524830

  16. Y-shaped probe for convenient and label-free detection of microRNA-21 in vitro.

    PubMed

    He, Kui; Liao, Rong; Cai, Changqun; Liang, Caishuang; Liu, Chan; Chen, Xiaoming

    2016-04-15

    A simple, highly selective, and label-free microRNA (miRNA) detection method based on l-alanine-reduced graphene oxide fluorescence quenching with a Y-shaped probe is proposed. The Y-shaped probe was synthesized by silver nitrate and a cytosine-rich molecular beacon (MB) in two terminals through sodium borohydride reduction, which generated a stronger fluorescent signal than ordinary DNA-templated silver nanoclusters (AgNCs). Meanwhile, the Y-shaped probe contained a single-stranded loop structure, which could be superbly adsorbed onto the surface of reduced graphene oxide (RGO) via π-π stacking interaction, and this special structure of the probe was designed to improve its sensitivity and selectivity. In addition, the quenching capacities of graphene oxide (GO) and RGO were compared in this research. The strong interaction between nucleobases of the loop structure and RGO nanosheet made the MB-AgNCs-RGO system exhibit minimal background fluorescence. In the presence of miRNA-21, the loop structure of the Y-shaped probe can hybridize with target miRNA-21; the molecular beacon encapsulated probe is far away from RGO surface and produces a detectable signal. The MB-AgNCs based approach provides a label-free avenue to detect miRNA with high selectivity and good reproducibility, which has a promising application in early clinical diagnosis and biomedical research. PMID:26854593

  17. A contribution for the definition of serum chemistry values in captive adults Antillean manatees (Trichechus manatus manatus Linnaeus, 1758).

    PubMed

    Silva, F M O; Vergara-Parente, J E; Gomes, J K N; Teixeira, M N; Lima, R P

    2007-04-01

    Serum chemistry analyses represents a fundamental tool for the diagnosis and understanding of diseases in marine mammals. Although several studies are being conducted within the field of clinical pathology, haematological and serum chemistry data for Antillean manatees are deficient. The purpose of this study was to determine serum chemistry values for captive Antillean manatees within the CMA/Ibama facility in Brazil. Serum samples were obtained from five captive adult Antillean manatees fed with seagrass and analysed for aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, bilirubin, alkaline phosphatase, urea, creatinine, glucose, triglycerides, cholesterol, total protein, albumin, globulin, phosphate, chloride, calcium and uric acid. Blood chemistry parameters were determined using a semi-automatic analyzer. Maximum, minimum, mean and standard deviations were calculated for each serum chemistry parameter. Differences on the values of males and females were verified using an unpaired Student's t-test. All the parameters analysed were similar between sexes, with exception of AP, which was higher in females (191.43 +/- 31.86 U/l). Alanine aminotransferase and uric acid values for Trichechus manatus manatus are reported for the first time in this paper. This study is the first to report serum chemistry parameter values for long-term captive male and female Antillean manatees. Therefore, the lower values of albumin, phosphate, chloride, cholesterol and triglycerides obtained here highlight the importance of clinical pathology during health monitoring of captive marine mammals.

  18. Isolation and characterization of cytosolic alanine aminotransferase isoforms from starved rat liver.

    PubMed

    Vedavathi, M; Girish, K S; Kumar, M Karuna

    2004-12-01

    Alanine is the most effective precursor for gluconeogenesis among amino acids and the initial reaction is catalyzed by alanine aminotransferases (AlaATs). It is a less extensively studied enzyme under starvation and known to that the enzyme activity increases in liver under starvation. The present study describes the purification and characterization of two isoforms of alanine aminotransferases from starved male rat liver under starvation. The molecular mass of isoforms was found to be 17.7 and 112.2 kDa with isoelectric points of 4.2 and 5.3 respectively for AlaAT I and AlaAT II. Both the enzymes showed narrow substrate specificity for L-alanine with different Km for alanine and 2-oxoglutarate. Both the enzymes were glycoprotein in nature. Inhibition, modification and spectroscopic studies showed that both PLP and free-SH groups are directly involved in the enzymatic catalysis. PLP activated both the enzymes with a Km 0.057 mM and 0.2 mM for AlaAT I and II respectively. PMID:15663181

  19. Purification and characterization of a protein phosphatase that dephosphorylates pyruvate kinase in an anoxia tolerant animal.

    PubMed

    Brooks, S P; Storey, K B

    1996-05-01

    A protein phosphatase that dephosphorylates pyruvate kinase (PK) in vitro was purified and characterized from the foot muscle of the anoxia tolerant gastropod mollusc Busycon canaliculatum. Purification involved three steps: negative chromatography through Blue Dextran and CM Sephadex, affinity chromatography on DEAE Sephadex and gel exclusion chromatography on Sephacryl S-400. Pyruvate kinase phosphatase (PK-Pase) activity was monitored by following changes in PK I50 values for L-alanine that had previously been linked to changes in the degree of PK phosphorylation. The purified PK-Pase gave a single band on SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with a molecular weight of 41 +/- 1 kdaltons. Isoelectric focusing analysis showed that the PK-Pase had an isoelectric point of 4.2 +/- 0.1. Kinetic analysis showed that the enzyme was a Type 2C protein phosphatase with a pH optimum of 6.5. Maximal activity required the presence of magnesium ions (KM = 7.9 +/- 0.6 microM) although high concentrations of Mg2+ were inhibitory (I50 = 2.3 +/- 0.4 mM). The protein phosphatase activity was not affected by either spermine, cAMP, cGMP, potassium phosphate, tartrate, NaF, HgCl2, citrate or concentrations of CaCl2 less than 10 mM. The enzyme could also use ATP, ADP, and GTP as substrates. PMID:8739044

  20. Purification and characterization of a highly stable tyrosinase from Thermomicrobium roseum.

    PubMed

    Kong, K H; Hong, M P; Choi, S S; Kim, Y T; Cho, S H

    2000-04-01

    Tyrosinase, with an isoelectric point at pH 4.9, was purified to electrophoretic homogeneity from an extremely thermophilic bacterium, Thermomicrobium roseum. Gel filtration, N-terminal amino acid sequencing and SDS/PAGE analysis indicate that T. roseum tyrosinase is composed of two identical subunits, each with a molecular mass of 43000 Da. The enzyme exhibited high substrate specificity towards catechol, chlorogenic acid, L-3-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)-L-alanine (L-DOPA) and pyrogallol. The K(m) value of the enzyme for L-DOPA was 0.18 mM. beta-Mercaptoethanol and sodium diethyldithiocarbamate notably inhibited the enzymic activity. The activity of the enzyme was optimal at pH 9.5 and 70 degrees C, and was increased by addition of 1 mM Mg(2+), K(+) or Cu(2+). The enzyme was highly stable against high temperature and guanidine hydrochloride. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of the enzyme was determined to be Asp-Ile-Asn-Gly-Gly-Gly-Ala-Thr-Leu-Pro-Gln-Lys-Leu-Tyr. These facts indicate that T. roseum tyrosinase appears to be distinct from the tyrosinases so far purified from other sources. PMID:10744956

  1. Production, purification, and properties of serine carboxypeptidase from Paecilomyces carneus.

    PubMed

    Umetsu, H; Hishinuma, K; Wake, H; Ichishima, E

    1996-07-01

    Seventeen strains of the genus Paecilomyces were examined for their ability to produce serine carboxypeptidase. Paecilomyces carneus IFO 7012 exhibited the highest potency for serine carboxypeptidase production. A maximum yield of serine carboxypeptidase was obtained by koji culture of the strain at 22 degrees C for 7 days. The serine carboxypeptidase was purified to homogeneity from an extract of the koji culture. The molecular weight of the enzyme was estimated to be 47,000 by HPLC. The isoelectric point of the enzyme was determined to be 4.0, and the optimum pH was 4.0 toward benzyloxycarbonyl-L-glutamyl-L-tyrosine (Z-Glu-Tyr) and benzyloxycarbonyl-L-phenylalanyl-L-alanine (Z-Phe-Ala), respectively. The enzyme was strongly inhibited by phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride and p-chloromercurybenzoate. Relative hydrolysis rates of N-acylpeptides and kinetic studies indicated that the enzyme preferred substrates having bulky amino acids in the penultimate position from their carboxy-termini. PMID:8661688

  2. Effect of pore structure on surface characteristics of zirconium phosphate-modified silica.

    PubMed

    El Shafei, Gamal M S

    2002-06-15

    Three samples of silica of different pore structure-predominantly microporous, S1; mesoporous, S2; and nonporous, S3-were modified with zirconium phosphate and examined. Pore structure analysis showed that modification had taken place in wider pores of S1 leaving a totally microporous sample, and in large pores of S2 giving a mesoporous sample of narrower pore size distribution. The modification of the nonporous sample decreased the surface area and pore volume to a lower extent than in the other two samples, but resulted in a surface of lower energy toward N2. The different distribution of surface silanol groups on the surfaces of different porosity may result in variable pictures on the modified surfaces as reflected in the differences observed in Brønsted acidity of modified surfaces. The use of these modified silica samples for amino acid adsorption (L-glutamic acid and L-alanine) indicated that both the isoelectric point of the amino acid and the distribution of surface groups on modified solids are controlling the adsorption process. PMID:16290676

  3. Purification and characterization of an immunogenic aminopeptidase of Brucella melitensis.

    PubMed

    Contreras-Rodriguez, Araceli; Ramirez-Zavala, Bernardo; Contreras, Andrea; Schurig, Gerhardt G; Sriranganathan, Nammalwar; Lopez-Merino, Ahide

    2003-09-01

    An immunogenic aminopeptidase was purified from Brucella melitensis strain VTRM1. The purification procedure consisted of ammonium sulfate fractionation and three chromatographic steps. This procedure resulted in a yield of 29% and a 144-fold increase in specific activity. The aminopeptidase appeared to be a monomeric enzyme with a molecular mass of 96 kDa and an isoelectric point of 4.8. Its activity was optimal at pH 7.0 at 40 degrees C. The enzyme was strongly inhibited by EDTA, 1,10-phenathroline, and divalent cations (Zn(2+) and Hg(2+)), suggesting that this protein was a metalloaminopeptidase. The enzyme showed preference for alanine at the N termini of aminoacyl derivatives. The K(m) values for L-alanine-p-nitroanilide (Ala-pNA) and Lys-pNA were 0.35 and 0.18 mM, respectively. The N-terminal sequence of aminopeptidase was used for a homologous search in the genomes of B. melitensis 16M and Brucella suis 1330. The analysis revealed an exact match of the probe sequence (36 bp) with an open reading frame of 2,652 bp encoding a protein predicted to be alanyl aminopeptidase (aminopeptidase N). Collectively, these data suggest designation of the B. melitensis enzyme as an aminopeptidase N. The aminopeptidase was recognized by sera from patients with acute and chronic brucellosis, suggesting that the enzyme may have important diagnostic implications. PMID:12933870

  4. Biosensor-driven adaptive laboratory evolution of l-valine production in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Mahr, Regina; Gätgens, Cornelia; Gätgens, Jochem; Polen, Tino; Kalinowski, Jörn; Frunzke, Julia

    2015-11-01

    Adaptive laboratory evolution has proven a valuable strategy for metabolic engineering. Here, we established an experimental evolution approach for improving microbial metabolite production by imposing an artificial selective pressure on the fluorescent output of a biosensor using fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Cells showing the highest fluorescent output were iteratively isolated and (re-)cultivated. The L-valine producer Corynebacterium glutamicum ΔaceE was equipped with an L-valine-responsive sensor based on the transcriptional regulator Lrp of C. glutamicum. Evolved strains featured a significantly higher growth rate, increased L-valine titers (~25%) and a 3-4-fold reduction of by-product formation. Genome sequencing resulted in the identification of a loss-of-function mutation (UreD-E188*) in the gene ureD (urease accessory protein), which was shown to increase L-valine production by up to 100%. Furthermore, decreased L-alanine formation was attributed to a mutation in the global regulator GlxR. These results emphasize biosensor-driven evolution as a straightforward approach to improve growth and productivity of microbial production strains. PMID:26453945

  5. Small GSK-3 Inhibitor Shows Efficacy in a Motor Neuron Disease Murine Model Modulating Autophagy

    PubMed Central

    de Munck, Estefanía; Palomo, Valle; Muñoz-Sáez, Emma; Perez, Daniel I.; Gómez-Miguel, Begoña; Solas, M. Teresa; Gil, Carmen; Martínez, Ana; Arahuetes, Rosa M.

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive motor neuron degenerative disease that has no effective treatment up to date. Drug discovery tasks have been hampered due to the lack of knowledge in its molecular etiology together with the limited animal models for research. Recently, a motor neuron disease animal model has been developed using β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (L-BMAA), a neurotoxic amino acid related to the appearing of ALS. In the present work, the neuroprotective role of VP2.51, a small heterocyclic GSK-3 inhibitor, is analysed in this novel murine model together with the analysis of autophagy. VP2.51 daily administration for two weeks, starting the first day after L-BMAA treatment, leads to total recovery of neurological symptoms and prevents the activation of autophagic processes in rats. These results show that the L-BMAA murine model can be used to test the efficacy of new drugs. In addition, the results confirm the therapeutic potential of GSK-3 inhibitors, and specially VP2.51, for the disease-modifying future treatment of motor neuron disorders like ALS. PMID:27631495

  6. A combination of a SEM technique and X-ray microanalysis for studying the spore germination process of Clostridium tyrobutyricum.

    PubMed

    Bassi, Daniela; Cappa, Fabrizio; Cocconcelli, Pier Sandro

    2009-06-01

    Clostridium tyrobutyricum is an anaerobic bacterium responsible for late blowing defects during cheese ripening and it is of scientific interest for biological hydrogen production. A scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coating technique and X-ray microanalysis were developed to analyze the architecture and chemical composition of spores upon germination in response to environmental changes. In addition, we investigated the effects of different compounds on this process. Agents and environmental conditions inducing germination were characterized monitoring changes in optical density (OD). Among all tested conditions, the greatest drop in OD(625) (57.4%) was obtained when spores were incubated in l-alanine/l-lactate buffer, pH 4.6. In addition, a carbon-coating SEM technique and X-ray microanalysis were used to observe the architecture of spores and to examine calcium dipicolinate release. Conditions inducing C. tyrobutyricum spore germination were identified and SEM X-ray microanalysis clearly distinguished germinating from dormant spores. We confirmed that calcium dipicolinate release is one of the first events occurring. These microscopy methods could be considered sensitive tools for evaluating morphological and chemical changes in spores of C. tyrobutyricum during the initial phase of germination. Information gathered from this work may provide new data for further research on germination.

  7. Supported absorption of CO2 by tetrabutylphosphonium amino acid ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianmin; Zhang, Suojiang; Dong, Kun; Zhang, Yanqiang; Shen, Youqing; Lv, Xingmei

    2006-05-15

    A new type of "task specific ionic liquid", tetrabutylphosphonium amino acid [P(C4)4][AA], was synthesized by the reaction of tetrabutylphosphonium hydroxide [P(C4)4][OH] with amino acids, including glycine, L-alanine, L-beta-alanine, L-serine, and L-lysine. The liquids produced were characterized by NMR, IR spectroscopies, and elemental analysis, and their thermal decomposition temperature, glass transition temperature, electrical conductivity, density, and viscosity were recorded in detail. The [P(C4)4][AA] supported on porous silica gel effected fast and reversible CO2 absorption when compared with bubbling CO2 into the bulk of the ionic liquid. No changes in absorption capacity and kinetics were found after four cycles of absorption/desorption. The CO2 absorption capacity at equilibrium was 50 mol % of the ionic liquids. In the presence of water (1 wt %), the ionic liquids could absorb equimolar amounts of CO2. The CO2 absorption mechanisms of the ionic liquids with and without water were different. PMID:16528787

  8. Biconical tapered optical fiber biosensor for measuring refractive index of a-amino acids in aqueous D-glucose and sucrose solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zibaii, M. I.; Latifi, H.; Karami, M.; Gholami, M.; Hosseini, S. M.; Ghezelayagh, M. H.

    2010-04-01

    A single-mode biconical tapered optical fiber (BTOF) sensor was utilized for sensing the variation of refractive index (RI) with concentration of D-glucose in double distilled deionized water and measuring of RI of amino acids (AAs) in carbohydrate solutions. This method showed a rewarding ability in understanding the basis of biomolecular interactions in biological systems. The BTOF is fabricated by heat pulling method, utilizing a CO2 laser. The detection limit of the BTOF was 50 ppb for the D-glucose concentration ranging from 0 to 80 ppm, and RI detection limit corresponding to these concentrations in the range at 1.3333 to 1.3404 was 5.4×10-6 as a refractometer sensor. The response of the BTOF shows that the different kinds of interactions of various groups of AAs such as L-alanine, L-leucine, and L-cystein with D-glucose, sucrose and water molecules depend on functional groups in AAs such as OH, SH;CH2;NH3+ ,COO-. These results can be interpreted in terms of solute-solute and solute-solvent interactions and structure making/breaking ability of solutes in the given solution.

  9. BMAA extraction of cyanobacteria samples: which method to choose?

    PubMed

    Lage, Sandra; Burian, Alfred; Rasmussen, Ulla; Costa, Pedro Reis; Annadotter, Heléne; Godhe, Anna; Rydberg, Sara

    2016-01-01

    β-N-Methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA), a neurotoxin reportedly produced by cyanobacteria, diatoms and dinoflagellates, is proposed to be linked to the development of neurological diseases. BMAA has been found in aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems worldwide, both in its phytoplankton producers and in several invertebrate and vertebrate organisms that bioaccumulate it. LC-MS/MS is the most frequently used analytical technique in BMAA research due to its high selectivity, though consensus is lacking as to the best extraction method to apply. This study accordingly surveys the efficiency of three extraction methods regularly used in BMAA research to extract BMAA from cyanobacteria samples. The results obtained provide insights into possible reasons for the BMAA concentration discrepancies in previous publications. In addition and according to the method validation guidelines for analysing cyanotoxins, the TCA protein precipitation method, followed by AQC derivatization and LC-MS/MS analysis, is now validated for extracting protein-bound (after protein hydrolysis) and free BMAA from cyanobacteria matrix. BMAA biological variability was also tested through the extraction of diatom and cyanobacteria species, revealing a high variance in BMAA levels (0.0080-2.5797 μg g(-1) DW).

  10. A Polysaccharide Deacetylase Gene (pdaA) Is Required for Germination and for Production of Muramic δ-Lactam Residues in the Spore Cortex of Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Fukushima, Tatsuya; Yamamoto, Hiroki; Atrih, Abdelmadjid; Foster, Simon J.; Sekiguchi, Junichi

    2002-01-01

    The predicted amino acid sequence of Bacillus subtilis yfjS (renamed pdaA) exhibits high similarity to those of several polysaccharide deacetylases. β-Galactosidase fusion experiments and results of Northern hybridization with sporulation sigma mutants indicated that the pdaA gene is transcribed by EσG RNA polymerase. pdaA-deficient spores were bright by phase-contrast microscopy, and the spores were induced to germination on the addition of l-alanine. Germination-associated spore darkening, a slow and partial decrease in absorbance, and slightly lower dipicolinic acid release compared with that by the wild-type strain were observed. In particular, the release of hexosamine-containing materials was lacking in the pdaA mutant. Muropeptide analysis indicated that the pdaA-deficient spores completely lacked muramic δ-lactam. A pdaA-gfp fusion protein constructed in strain 168 and pdaA-deficient strains indicated that the protein is localized in B. subtilis spores. The biosynthetic pathway of muramic δ-lactam is discussed. PMID:12374835

  11. Chirality amplification and detection by tactoids of lyotropic chromonic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Peng, Chenhui; Lavrentovich, Oleg D

    2015-10-01

    Detection of chiral molecules requires amplification of chirality to measurable levels. Typically, amplification mechanisms are considered at the microscopic scales of individual molecules and their aggregates. Here we demonstrate chirality amplification and visualization of structural handedness in water solutions of organic molecules that extends over the scale of many micrometers. The mechanism is rooted in the long-range elastic nature of orientational order in lyotropic chromonic liquid crystals (LCLCs) formed in water solutions of achiral disc-like molecules. The nematic LCLC coexists with its isotropic counterpart, forming elongated tactoids; the spatial confinement causes a structural twist even when the material is nonchiral. Minute quantities of chiral molecules such as the amino acid l-alanine and limonene transform the racemic array of left- and right-twisted tactoids into a homochiral set. The left and right chiral enantiomers are readily distinguished from each other as the induced structural handedness is visualized through a simple polarizing microscope observation. The effect is important for developing our understanding of chirality amplification mechanisms; it also might open up new possibilities in biosensing. PMID:26238525

  12. PCR use in miliary tuberculosis presenting with acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Riachy, Moussa Albert

    2011-01-01

    A 30-year-old pregnant woman admitted to the hospital for rapidly progressive dyspnoea, non-productive cough and altered general status evolving over 1-month period. Her vital signs showed a low blood pressure 90/60 mm Hg, pulse rate 100 beats/min, respiratory rate 32 breaths/min and oxygen saturation on room air of 88%. Laboratory findings showed haemoglobin 9.7 g/dl, white blood cells 15 000/mm3 (neutrophils 82%), C reactive protein 74 mg/l, alkaline phosphatase 320 U/l, alanine aminotransferase 62 IU/l, aspartate aminotransferase 120 IU/l, γ glutamyl transpeptidase 125 U/l; brain natriuretic peptide 25.4 pg/ml, procalcitonine >2, lactate dehydrogenase 1618 U/l. Chest radiographics showed diffuse bilateral micronodular pulmonary infiltrates and CT of the chest confirmed 1–3 mm diffuse bilateral micronodular infiltrates with ground glass opacities. Complete investigation including bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) for any viral, bacteriologic, acid-fast bacilli and full serum antibodies panel were all negative. DNA amplification for mycobacterium using PCR on the BAL rapidly rectified the diagnosis of tuberculosis. PMID:22694890

  13. PCR use in miliary tuberculosis presenting with acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Riachy, Moussa Albert

    2011-01-01

    A 30-year-old pregnant woman admitted to the hospital for rapidly progressive dyspnoea, non-productive cough and altered general status evolving over 1-month period. Her vital signs showed a low blood pressure 90/60 mm Hg, pulse rate 100 beats/min, respiratory rate 32 breaths/min and oxygen saturation on room air of 88%. Laboratory findings showed haemoglobin 9.7 g/dl, white blood cells 15 000/mm(3) (neutrophils 82%), C reactive protein 74 mg/l, alkaline phosphatase 320 U/l, alanine aminotransferase 62 IU/l, aspartate aminotransferase 120 IU/l, γ glutamyl transpeptidase 125 U/l; brain natriuretic peptide 25.4 pg/ml, procalcitonine >2, lactate dehydrogenase 1618 U/l. Chest radiographics showed diffuse bilateral micronodular pulmonary infiltrates and CT of the chest confirmed 1-3 mm diffuse bilateral micronodular infiltrates with ground glass opacities. Complete investigation including bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) for any viral, bacteriologic, acid-fast bacilli and full serum antibodies panel were all negative. DNA amplification for mycobacterium using PCR on the BAL rapidly rectified the diagnosis of tuberculosis. PMID:22694890

  14. Probing the active site tryptophan of Staphylococcus aureus thioredoxin with an analog

    PubMed Central

    Englert, Markus; Nakamura, Akiyoshi; Wang, Yane-Shih; Eiler, Daniel; Söll, Dieter; Guo, Li-Tao

    2015-01-01

    Genetically encoded non-canonical amino acids are powerful tools of protein research and engineering; in particular they allow substitution of individual chemical groups or atoms in a protein of interest. One such amino acid is the tryptophan (Trp) analog 3-benzothienyl-l-alanine (Bta) with an imino-to-sulfur substitution in the five-membered ring. Unlike Trp, Bta is not capable of forming a hydrogen bond, but preserves other properties of a Trp residue. Here we present a pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetase-derived, engineered enzyme BtaRS that enables efficient and site-specific Bta incorporation into proteins of interest in vivo. Furthermore, we report a 2.1 Å-resolution crystal structure of a BtaRS•Bta complex to show how BtaRS discriminates Bta from canonical amino acids, including Trp. To show utility in protein mutagenesis, we used BtaRS to introduce Bta to replace the Trp28 residue in the active site of Staphylococcus aureus thioredoxin. This experiment showed that not the hydrogen bond between residues Trp28 and Asp58, but the bulky aromatic side chain of Trp28 is important for active site maintenance. Collectively, our study provides a new and robust tool for checking the function of Trp in proteins. PMID:26582921

  15. Time sequence of the intensification of the liver glucose production induced by high-fat diet in mice.

    PubMed

    Obici, Simoni; Tavoni, Thauany Martins; Barrena, Helenton C; Curi, Rui; Bazotte, Roberto B

    2012-06-01

    It is well established that the development of insulin resistance shows a temporal sequence in different organs and tissues. Moreover, considering that the main aspect of insulin resistance in liver is a process of glucose overproduction from gluconeogenesis, we investigated if this metabolic change also shows temporal sequence. For this purpose, a well-established experimental model of insulin resistance induced by high-fat diet (HFD) was used. The mice received HFD (HFD group) or standard diet (COG group) for 1, 7, 14 or 56 days. The HFD group showed increased (P < 0.05 versus COG) epididymal, retroperitoneal and inguinal fat weight from days 1 to 56. In agreement with these results, the HFD group also showed higher body weight (P < 0.05 versus COG) from days 7 to 56. Moreover, the changes induced by HFD on liver gluconeogenesis were progressive because the increment (P < 0.05 versus COG) in glucose production from l-lactate, glycerol, l-alanine and l-glutamine occurred 7, 14, 56 and 56 days after the introduction of the HFD schedule, respectively. Furthermore, glycaemia and cholesterolemia increased (P < 0.05 versus COG) 14 days after starting the HFD schedule. Taken together, the results suggest that the intensification of liver gluconeogenesis induced by an HFD is not a synchronous 'all-or-nothing process' but is specific for each gluconeogenic substrate and is integrated in a temporal manner with the progressive augmentation of fasting glycaemia.

  16. Oligomerization of Glycine and Alanine Catalyzed by Iron Oxides: Implications for Prebiotic Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanker, Uma; Bhushan, Brij; Bhattacharjee, G.; Kamaluddin

    2012-02-01

    Iron oxide minerals are probable constituents of the sediments present in geothermal regions of the primitive earth. They might have adsorbed different organic monomers (amino acids, nucleotides etc.) and catalyzed polymerization processes leading to the formation of the first living cell. In the present work we tested the catalytic activity of three forms of iron oxides (Goethite, Akaganeite and Hematite) in the intermolecular condensation of each of the amino acids glycine and L-alanine. The effect of zinc oxide and titanium dioxide on the oligomerization has also been studied. Oligomerization studies were performed for 35 days at three different temperatures 50, 90 and 120°C without applying drying/wetting cycling. The products formed were characterized by HPLC and ESI-MS techniques. All three forms of iron oxides catalyzed peptide bond formation (23.2% of gly2 and 10.65% of ala2). The reaction was monitored every 7 days. Formation of peptides was observed to start after 7 days at 50°C. Maximum yield of peptides was found after 35 days at 90°C. Reaction at 120°C favors formation of diketopiperazine derivatives. It is also important to note that after 35 days of reaction, goethite produced dimer and trimer with the highest yield among the oxides tested. We suggest that the activity of goethite could probably be due to its high surface area and surface acidity.

  17. Preparation and properties of BSA-loaded microspheres based on multi-(amino acid) copolymer for protein delivery.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xingtao; Lv, Guoyu; Zhang, Jue; Tang, Songchao; Yan, Yonggang; Wu, Zhaoying; Su, Jiacan; Wei, Jie

    2014-01-01

    A multi-(amino acid) copolymer (MAC) based on ω-aminocaproic acid, γ-aminobutyric acid, L-alanine, L-lysine, L-glutamate, and hydroxyproline was synthetized, and MAC microspheres encapsulating bovine serum albumin (BSA) were prepared by a double-emulsion solvent extraction method. The experimental results show that various preparation parameters including surfactant ratio of Tween 80 to Span 80, surfactant concentration, benzyl alcohol in the external water phase, and polymer concentration had obvious effects on the particle size, morphology, and encapsulation efficiency of the BSA-loaded microspheres. The sizes of BSA-loaded microspheres ranged from 60.2 μm to 79.7 μm, showing different degrees of porous structure. The encapsulation efficiency of BSA-loaded microspheres also ranged from 38.8% to 50.8%. BSA release from microspheres showed the classic biphasic profile, which was governed by diffusion and polymer erosion. The initial burst release of BSA from microspheres at the first week followed by constant slow release for the next 7 weeks were observed. BSA-loaded microspheres could degrade gradually in phosphate buffered saline buffer with pH value maintained at around 7.1 during 8 weeks incubation, suggesting that microsphere degradation did not cause a dramatic pH drop in phosphate buffered saline buffer because no acidic degradation products were released from the microspheres. Therefore, the MAC microspheres might have great potential as carriers for protein delivery.

  18. Twisted and tubular silica structures by anionic surfactant fibers encapsulation.

    PubMed

    Chekini, Mahshid; Guénée, Laure; Marchionni, Valentina; Sharma, Manish; Bürgi, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    Organic molecules imprinting can be used for introducing specific properties and functionalities such as chirality to mesoporous materials. Particularly organic self-assemblies can work as a scaffold for templating inorganic materials such as silica. During recent years chiral imprinting of anionic surfactant for fabrication of twisted rod-like silica structures assisted by co-structuring directing agent were thoroughly investigated. The organic self-assemblies of anionic surfactants can also be used for introducing other shapes in rod-like silica structures. Here we report the formation of amphiphilic N-miristoyl-l-alanine self-assemblies in aqueous solution upon stirring and at presence of l-arginine. These anionic surfactant self-assemblies form fibers that grow by increasing the stirring duration. The fibers were studied using transmission electron microscopy, infra-red spectroscopy and vibrational circular dichroism. Addition of silica precursor 1,2-bis(triethoxysilyl)ethylene and co-structuring directing agent N-trimethoxysilylpropyl-N,N,N-trimethylammonium chloride at different stages of fibers' growth leads to formation of different silica structures. By controlling stirring duration, we obtained twisted tubular silica structures as a result of fibers encapsulation. We decorated these structures with gold nanoparticles by different methods and measured their optical activity.

  19. An inducible expression system for high-level expression of recombinant proteins in slow growing mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Leotta, Lisa; Spratt, Joanne M; Kong, Carlyn U; Triccas, James A

    2015-09-01

    A novel protein expression vector utilising the inducible hspX promoter of Mycobacterium tuberculosis was constructed and evaluated in this study. High-level induction of three mycobacterial antigens, comprising up to 9% of bacterial sonicate, was demonstrated in recombinant Mycobacterium bovis BCG when grown under low-oxygen tension, which serves to enhance hspX promoter activity. Recombinant proteins were efficiently purified from bacterial lysates in a soluble form by virtue of a C-terminal 6-histidine tag. Purification of the immunodominant M. tuberculosis Ag85B antigen using this system resulted in a recombinant protein that stimulated significant IFN-γ release from Ag85B-reactive T cells generated after vaccination of mice with an Ag85B-expressing vaccine. Further, the M. tuberculosis L-alanine dehydrogenase (Ald) protein purified from recombinant BCG displayed strong enzymatic activity in recombinant form. This study demonstrated that high levels of native-like recombinant mycobacterial proteins can be produced in mycobacterial hosts, and this may aid the analysis of mycobacterial protein function and the development of new treatments. PMID:26021569

  20. Perturbation of nuclear spin polarizations in solid state NMR of nitroxide-doped samples by magic-angle spinning without microwaves

    PubMed Central

    Thurber, Kent R.; Tycko, Robert

    2014-01-01

    We report solid state 13C and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments with magic-angle spinning (MAS) on frozen solutions containing nitroxide-based paramagnetic dopants that indicate significant perturbations of nuclear spin polarizations without microwave irradiation. At temperatures near 25 K, 1H and cross-polarized 13C NMR signals from 15N,13C-labeled L-alanine in trinitroxide-doped glycerol/water are reduced by factors as large as six compared to signals from samples without nitroxide doping. Without MAS or at temperatures near 100 K, differences between signals with and without nitroxide doping are much smaller. We attribute most of the reduction of NMR signals under MAS near 25 K to nuclear spin depolarization through the cross-effect dynamic nuclear polarization mechanism, in which three-spin flips drive nuclear polarizations toward equilibrium with spin polarization differences between electron pairs. When T1e is sufficiently long relative to the MAS rotation period, the distribution of electron spin polarization across the nitroxide electron paramagnetic resonance lineshape can be very different from the corresponding distribution in a static sample at thermal equilibrium, leading to the observed effects. We describe three-spin and 3000-spin calculations that qualitatively reproduce the experimental observations. PMID:24832263

  1. Solid state nuclear magnetic resonance with magic-angle spinning and dynamic nuclear polarization below 25 K.

    PubMed

    Thurber, Kent R; Potapov, Alexey; Yau, Wai-Ming; Tycko, Robert

    2013-01-01

    We describe an apparatus for solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) with dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) and magic-angle spinning (MAS) at 20-25 K and 9.4 Tesla. The MAS NMR probe uses helium to cool the sample space and nitrogen gas for MAS drive and bearings, as described earlier, but also includes a corrugated waveguide for transmission of microwaves from below the probe to the sample. With a 30 mW circularly polarized microwave source at 264 GHz, MAS at 6.8 kHz, and 21 K sample temperature, greater than 25-fold enhancements of cross-polarized (13)C NMR signals are observed in spectra of frozen glycerol/water solutions containing the triradical dopant DOTOPA-TEMPO when microwaves are applied. As demonstrations, we present DNP-enhanced one-dimensional and two-dimensional (13)C MAS NMR spectra of frozen solutions of uniformly (13)C-labeled l-alanine and melittin, a 26-residue helical peptide that we have synthesized with four uniformly (13)C-labeled amino acids. PMID:23238592

  2. Perturbation of nuclear spin polarizations in solid state NMR of nitroxide-doped samples by magic-angle spinning without microwaves.

    PubMed

    Thurber, Kent R; Tycko, Robert

    2014-05-14

    We report solid state (13)C and (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments with magic-angle spinning (MAS) on frozen solutions containing nitroxide-based paramagnetic dopants that indicate significant perturbations of nuclear spin polarizations without microwave irradiation. At temperatures near 25 K, (1)H and cross-polarized (13)C NMR signals from (15)N,(13)C-labeled L-alanine in trinitroxide-doped glycerol/water are reduced by factors as large as six compared to signals from samples without nitroxide doping. Without MAS or at temperatures near 100 K, differences between signals with and without nitroxide doping are much smaller. We attribute most of the reduction of NMR signals under MAS near 25 K to nuclear spin depolarization through the cross-effect dynamic nuclear polarization mechanism, in which three-spin flips drive nuclear polarizations toward equilibrium with spin polarization differences between electron pairs. When T1e is sufficiently long relative to the MAS rotation period, the distribution of electron spin polarization across the nitroxide electron paramagnetic resonance lineshape can be very different from the corresponding distribution in a static sample at thermal equilibrium, leading to the observed effects. We describe three-spin and 3000-spin calculations that qualitatively reproduce the experimental observations. PMID:24832263

  3. Solid state nuclear magnetic resonance with magic-angle spinning and dynamic nuclear polarization below 25 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurber, Kent R.; Potapov, Alexey; Yau, Wai-Ming; Tycko, Robert

    2013-01-01

    We describe an apparatus for solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) with dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) and magic-angle spinning (MAS) at 20-25 K and 9.4 Tesla. The MAS NMR probe uses helium to cool the sample space and nitrogen gas for MAS drive and bearings, as described earlier [1], but also includes a corrugated waveguide for transmission of microwaves from below the probe to the sample. With a 30 mW circularly polarized microwave source at 264 GHz, MAS at 6.8 kHz, and 21 K sample temperature, greater than 25-fold enhancements of cross-polarized 13C NMR signals are observed in spectra of frozen glycerol/water solutions containing the triradical dopant DOTOPA-TEMPO when microwaves are applied. As demonstrations, we present DNP-enhanced one-dimensional and two-dimensional 13C MAS NMR spectra of frozen solutions of uniformly 13C-labeled L-alanine and melittin, a 26-residue helical peptide that we have synthesized with four uniformly 13C-labeled amino acids.

  4. Perturbation of nuclear spin polarizations in solid state NMR of nitroxide-doped samples by magic-angle spinning without microwaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurber, Kent R.; Tycko, Robert

    2014-05-01

    We report solid state 13C and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments with magic-angle spinning (MAS) on frozen solutions containing nitroxide-based paramagnetic dopants that indicate significant perturbations of nuclear spin polarizations without microwave irradiation. At temperatures near 25 K, 1H and cross-polarized 13C NMR signals from 15N,13C-labeled L-alanine in trinitroxide-doped glycerol/water are reduced by factors as large as six compared to signals from samples without nitroxide doping. Without MAS or at temperatures near 100 K, differences between signals with and without nitroxide doping are much smaller. We attribute most of the reduction of NMR signals under MAS near 25 K to nuclear spin depolarization through the cross-effect dynamic nuclear polarization mechanism, in which three-spin flips drive nuclear polarizations toward equilibrium with spin polarization differences between electron pairs. When T1e is sufficiently long relative to the MAS rotation period, the distribution of electron spin polarization across the nitroxide electron paramagnetic resonance lineshape can be very different from the corresponding distribution in a static sample at thermal equilibrium, leading to the observed effects. We describe three-spin and 3000-spin calculations that qualitatively reproduce the experimental observations.

  5. The autolytic activity of the recombinant amidase of Staphylococcus saprophyticus is inhibited by its own recombinant GW repeats.

    PubMed

    Hell, Wolfgang; Reichl, Sylvia; Anders, Agnes; Gatermann, Sören

    2003-10-10

    The Aas (autolysin/adhesin of Staphylococcus saprophyticus) is a multifunctional surface protein containing two enzymatic domains an N-acetyl-muramyl-L-alanine amidase, an endo-beta-N-acetyl-D-glucosaminidase, and two different regions of repetitive sequences, an N-terminal and a C-terminal repetitive domain. The C-terminal repetitive domain is built up by the repeats R1, R2 and R3, which interconnect the putative active centers of the amidase and glucosaminidase. To investigate the influence of the C-terminal repeats and the N-terminal repeats on the amidase activity, the repetitive domains and fragments of them were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The influence of the different fragments on the activity of the recombinant amidase of the Aas, consisting of the active center of the enzyme and repeat R1, was investigated in a turbidimetric microassay. The different fragments derived from the C-terminal repeats inhibited the amidase activity, while the N-terminal repeats did not influence the activity of the enzyme. The inhibiting activity increased with the number of GW repeats the recombinant fragment contained. Thus we conclude, that the C-terminal GW repeats and not the N-terminal repeats are necessary for the cell wall targeting and the autolytic function of the amidase.

  6. Genetic basis of destruxin production in the entomopathogen Metarhizium robertsii.

    PubMed

    Giuliano Garisto Donzelli, Bruno; Krasnoff, Stuart B; Moon, Yong-Sun; Sun-Moon, Yong; Churchill, Alice C L; Gibson, Donna M

    2012-04-01

    Destruxins are among the most exhaustively researched secondary metabolites of entomopathogenic fungi, yet definitive evidence for their roles in pathogenicity and virulence has yet to be shown. To establish the genetic bases for the biosynthesis of this family of depsipeptides, we identified a 23,792-bp gene in Metarhizium robertsii ARSEF 2575 containing six complete nonribosomal peptide synthetase modules, with an N-methyltransferase domain in each of the last two modules. This domain arrangement is consistent with the positioning of the adjacent amino acids N-methyl-L: -valine and N-methyl-L: -alanine within the depsipeptide structure of destruxin. DXS expression levels in vitro and in vivo exhibited comparable patterns, beginning at low levels during the early growth phases and increasing with time. Targeted gene knockout using Agrobacterium-mediated transformation produced mutants that failed to synthesize destruxins, in comparison with wild type and ectopic control strains, indicating the involvement of this gene in destruxin biosynthesis. The destruxin synthetase (DXS) disruption mutant was as virulent as the control strain when conidial inoculum was topically applied to larvae of Spodoptera exigua, Galleria mellonella, and Tenebrio molitor indicating that destruxins are dispensable for virulence in these insect hosts. The DXS mutants exhibited no other detectable changes in morphology and development.

  7. Liver peroxisomal alanine:glyoxylate aminotransferase and the effects of mutations associated with Primary Hyperoxaluria Type I: An overview.

    PubMed

    Oppici, Elisa; Montioli, Riccardo; Cellini, Barbara

    2015-09-01

    Liver peroxisomal alanine:glyoxylate aminotransferase (AGT) (EC 2.6.1.44) catalyses the conversion of l-alanine and glyoxylate to pyruvate and glycine, a reaction that allows glyoxylate detoxification. Inherited mutations on the AGXT gene encoding AGT lead to Primary Hyperoxaluria Type I (PH1), a rare disorder characterized by the deposition of calcium oxalate crystals primarily in the urinary tract. Here we describe the results obtained on the biochemical features of AGT as well as on the molecular and cellular effects of polymorphic and pathogenic mutations. A complex scenario on the molecular pathogenesis of PH1 emerges in which the co-inheritance of polymorphic changes and the condition of homozygosis or compound heterozygosis are two important factors that determine the enzymatic phenotype of PH1 patients. All the reported data represent relevant steps toward the understanding of genotype/phenotype correlations, the prediction of the response of the patients to the available therapies, and the development of new therapeutic approaches. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cofactor-dependent proteins: evolution, chemical diversity and bio-applications.

  8. Real time viability detection of bacterial spores

    DOEpatents

    Vanderberg, Laura A.; Herdendorf, Timothy J.; Obiso, Richard J.

    2003-07-29

    This invention relates to a process for detecting the presence of viable bacterial spores in a sample and to a spore detection system, the process including placing a sample in a germination medium for a period of time sufficient for commitment of any present viable bacterial spores to occur, mixing the sample with a solution of a lanthanide capable of forming a fluorescent complex with dipicolinic acid, and, measuring the sample for the presence of dipicolinic acid, and the system including a germination chamber having inlets from a sample chamber, a germinant chamber and a bleach chamber, the germination chamber further including an outlet through a filtering means, the outlet connected to a detection chamber, the detection chamber having an inlet from a fluorescence promoting metal chamber and the detection chamber including a spectral excitation source and a means of measuring emission spectra from a sample, the detection chamber further connected to a waste chamber. A germination reaction mixture useful for promoting commitment of any viable bacterial spores in a sample including a combination of L-alanine, L-asparagine and D-glucose is also described.

  9. Crystal Structure of the Homo sapiens Kynureninase-3-Hydroxyhippuric Acid Inhibitor Complex: Insights into the Molecular Basis Of Kynureninase Substrate Specificity

    SciTech Connect

    Lima,Santiago; Kumar,Sunil; Gawandi,Vijay; Momany,Cory; Phillips,Robert S.

    2009-02-23

    Homo sapiens kynureninase is a pyridoxal-5'-phosphate dependent enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolytic cleavage of 3-hydroxykynurenine to yield 3-hydroxyanthranilate and L-alanine as part of the tryptophan catabolic pathway leading to the de novo biosynthesis of NAD{sup +}. This pathway results in quinolinate, an excitotoxin that is an NMDA receptor agonist. High levels of quinolinate have been correlated with the etiology of neurodegenerative disorders such as AIDS-related dementia and Alzheimer's disease. We have synthesized a novel kynureninase inhibitor, 3-hydroxyhippurate, cocrystallized it with human kynureninase, and solved the atomic structure. On the basis of an analysis of the complex, we designed a series of His-102, Ser-332, and Asn-333 mutants. The H102W/N333T and H102W/S332G/N333T mutants showed complete reversal of substrate specificity between 3-hydroxykynurenine and L-kynurenine, thus defining the primary residues contributing to substrate specificity in kynureninases.

  10. Difference in the structures of alanine tri- and tetra-peptides with antiparallel β-sheet assessed by X-ray diffraction, solid-state NMR and chemical shift calculations by GIPAW.

    PubMed

    Asakura, Tetsuo; Yazawa, Koji; Horiguchi, Kumiko; Suzuki, Furitsu; Nishiyama, Yusuke; Nishimura, Katsuyuki; Kaji, Hironori

    2014-01-01

    Alanine oligomers provide a key structure for silk fibers from spider and wild silkworms.We report on structural analysis of L-alanyl-L-alanyl-L-alanyl-L-alanine (Ala)4 with anti-parallel (AP) β-structures using X-ray and solid-state NMR. All of the Ala residues in the (Ala)4 are in equivalent positions, whereas for alanine trimer (Ala)3 there are two alternative locations in a unit cell as reported previously (Fawcett and Camerman, Acta Cryst., 1975, 31, 658-665). (Ala)4 with AP β-structure is more stable than AP-(Ala)3 due to formation of the stronger hydrogen bonds. The intermolecular structure of (Ala)4 is also different from polyalanine fiber structure, indicating that the interchain arrangement of AP β-structure changes with increasing alanine sequencelength. Furthermore the precise (1)H positions, which are usually inaccesible by X-ray diffraction method, are determined by high resolution (1)H solid state NMR combined with the chemical shift calculations by the gauge-including projector augmented wave method.

  11. Portable Fourier Transform Spectroscopy for Analysis of Surface Contamination and Quality Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pugel, Diane

    2012-01-01

    Progress has been made into adapting and enhancing a commercially available infrared spectrometer for the development of a handheld device for in-field measurements of the chemical composition of various samples of materials. The intent is to duplicate the functionality of a benchtop Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR) within the compactness of a handheld instrument with significantly improved spectral responsivity. Existing commercial technology, like the deuterated L-alanine triglycine sulfide detectors (DLATGS), is capable of sensitive in-field chemical analysis. This proposed approach compares several subsystem elements of the FTIR inside of the commercial, non-benchtop system to the commercial benchtop systems. These subsystem elements are the detector, the preamplifier and associated electronics of the detector, the interferometer, associated readout parameters, and cooling. This effort will examine these different detector subsystem elements to look for limitations in each. These limitations will be explored collaboratively with the commercial provider, and will be prioritized to meet the deliverable objectives. The tool design will be that of a handheld gun containing the IR filament source and associated optics. It will operate in a point-and-shoot manner, pointing the source and optics at the sample under test and capturing the reflected response of the material in the same handheld gun. Data will be captured via the gun and ported to a laptop.

  12. Characterization of some amino acid derivatives of benzoyl isothiocyanate: Crystal structures and theoretical prediction of their reactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odame, Felix; Hosten, Eric C.; Betz, Richard; Lobb, Kevin; Tshentu, Zenixole R.

    2015-11-01

    The reaction of benzoyl isothiocyanate with L-serine, L-proline, D-methionine and L-alanine gave 2-[(benzoylcarbamothioyl)amino]-3-hydroxypropanoic acid (I), 1-(benzoylcarbamothioyl)pyrrolidine-2-carboxylic acid (II), 2-[(benzoylcarbamothioyl)amino]-4-(methylsulfanyl)butanoic acid (III) and 2-[(benzoylcarbamothioyl)amino]propanoic acid (IV), respectively. The compounds have been characterized by IR, NMR, microanalyses and mass spectrometry. The crystal structures of all the compounds have also been discussed. Compound II showed rotamers in solution. DFT calculations of the frontier orbitals of the compounds have been carried out to ascertain the groups that contribute to the HOMO and LUMO, and to study their contribution to the reactivity of these compounds. The calculations indicated that the carboxylic acid group in these compounds is unreactive hence making the conversion to benzimidazoles via cyclization on the carboxylic acids impractical. This has been further confirmed by the reaction of compounds I-IV, respectively, with o-phenylene diamine which was unsuccessful but gave compound V.

  13. [Stardust Amines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dworkin, Jason P.

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the abundances of amino acids and amines, as well as their enantiomeric composition in water extracts of comet Wild 2 exposed aerogel and aluminum foils returned by Stardust using liquid chromatography with UV fluorescence detection and time of flight-mass spectrometry (LC-FD/ToF-MS). A suite of amino acids and amines including glycine, L-alanine, methylamine (MA), and ethylamine (EA) were identified in the Stardust bulk aerogel. With the exception of MA and EA, all other primary amines detected in comet-exposed aerogels were also present in the aerogel witness tile that was not exposed to Wild 2, suggesting that most amines are terrestrial in origin. The enhanced abundances of MA, EA, and possibly glycine in comet-exposed aerogel compared to controls, coupled with MA to EA ratios (approx.1 to 2) that are distinct from preflight aerogels (approx.7 to lo), suggest that these amines were captured from Wild 2. The presence of cometary amines in Stardust material supports the hypothesis that comets were an important source of prebiotic organics on the early Earth. To better understand their origin, a systematic study of all these species with C, N, and H compound specific isotopic analysis (CSIA) via gas chromatography quadrupole mass spectrometry in with parallel with combustion isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-QMS/IRMS) is being conducted. We will discuss our latest C-CSIA measurements and what they indicate about the origin of the amino acids extracted from Stardust samples.

  14. Shock synthesis of amino acids from impacting cometary and icy planet surface analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, Zita; Price, Mark C.; Goldman, Nir; Sephton, Mark A.; Burchell, Mark J.

    2013-12-01

    Comets are known to harbour simple ices and the organic precursors of the building blocks of proteins--amino acids--that are essential to life. Indeed, glycine, the simplest amino acid, was recently confirmed to be present on comet 81P/Wild-2 from samples returned by NASA's Stardust spacecraft. Impacts of icy bodies (such as comets) onto rocky surfaces, and, equally, impacts of rocky bodies onto icy surfaces (such as the jovian and saturnian satellites), could have been responsible for the manufacture of these complex organic molecules through a process of shock synthesis. Here we present laboratory experiments in which we shocked ice mixtures analogous to those found in a comet with a steel projectile fired at high velocities in a light gas gun to test whether amino acids could be produced. We found that the hypervelocity impact shock of a typical comet ice mixture produced several amino acids after hydrolysis. These include equal amounts of D- and L-alanine, and the non-protein amino acids α-aminoisobutyric acid and isovaline as well as their precursors. Our findings suggest a pathway for the synthetic production of the components of proteins within our Solar System, and thus a potential pathway towards life through icy impacts.

  15. Redox Capacity of an Extracellular Matrix Protein Associated with Adhesion in Mytilus californianus.

    PubMed

    Nicklisch, Sascha C T; Spahn, Jamie E; Zhou, Hongjun; Gruian, Cristina M; Waite, J Herbert

    2016-04-01

    Adhesive mussel foot proteins (Mfps) rely in part on DOPA (3,4-dihydroxyphenyl-l-alanine) side chains to mediate attachment to mineral surfaces underwater. Oxidation of DOPA to Dopaquinone (Q) effectively abolishes the adsorption of Mfps to these surfaces. The thiol-rich mussel foot protein-6 (Mfp-6) rescues adhesion compromised by adventitious DOPA oxidation by reducing Q back to DOPA. The redox chemistry and kinetics of foot-extracted Mfp-6 were investigated by using a nonspecific chromogenic probe to equilibrate with the redox pool. Foot-extracted Mfp-6 has a reducing capacity of ~17 e(-) per protein; half of this comes from the cysteine residues, whereas the other half comes from other constituents, probably a cohort of four or five nonadhesive, redox-active DOPA residues in Mfp-6 with an anodic peak potential ~500 mV lower than that for oxidation of cysteine to cystine. At higher pH, DOPA redox reversibility is lost possibly due to Q scavenging by Cys thiolates. Analysis by one- and two-dimensional proton nuclear magnetic resonance identified a pronounced β-sheet structure with a hydrophobic core in foot-extracted Mfp-6 protein. The structure endows redox-active side chains in Mfp-6, i.e., cysteine and DOPA, with significant reducing power over a broad pH range, and this power is measurably diminished in recombinant Mfp-6. PMID:26998552

  16. The Binding Mode of Second-Generation Sulfonamide Inhibitors of MurD: Clues for Rational Design of Potent MurD Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Simčič, Mihael; Sosič, Izidor; Hodošček, Milan; Barreteau, Hélène; Blanot, Didier; Gobec, Stanislav; Grdadolnik, Simona Golič

    2012-01-01

    A series of optimized sulfonamide derivatives was recently reported as novel inhibitors of UDP-N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine:D-glutamate ligase (MurD). These are based on naphthalene-N-sulfonyl-D-glutamic acid and have the D-glutamic acid replaced with rigidified mimetics. Here we have defined the binding site of these novel ligands to MurD using 1H/13C heteronuclear single quantum correlation. The MurD protein was selectively 13C-labeled on the methyl groups of Ile (δ1 only), Leu and Val, and was isolated and purified. Crucial Ile, Leu and Val methyl groups in the vicinity of the ligand binding site were identified by comparison of chemical shift perturbation patterns among the ligands with various structural elements and known binding modes. The conformational and dynamic properties of the bound ligands and their binding interactions were examined using the transferred nuclear Overhauser effect and saturation transfer difference. In addition, the binding mode of these novel inhibitors was thoroughly examined using unrestrained molecular dynamics simulations. Our results reveal the complex dynamic behavior of ligand–MurD complexes and its influence on ligand–enzyme contacts. We further present important findings for the rational design of potent Mur ligase inhibitors. PMID:23285193

  17. A Thermophilic Phage Endolysin Fusion to a Clostridium perfringens-Specific Cell Wall Binding Domain Creates an Anti-Clostridium Antimicrobial with Improved Thermostability

    PubMed Central

    Swift, Steven M.; Seal, Bruce S.; Garrish, Johnna K.; Oakley, Brian B.; Hiett, Kelli; Yeh, Hung-Yueh; Woolsey, Rebekah; Schegg, Kathleen M.; Line, John Eric; Donovan, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens is the third leading cause of human foodborne bacterial disease and is the presumptive etiologic agent of necrotic enteritis among chickens. Treatment of poultry with antibiotics is becoming less acceptable. Endolysin enzymes are potential replacements for antibiotics. Many enzymes are added to animal feed during production and are subjected to high-heat stress during feed processing. To produce a thermostabile endolysin for treating poultry, an E. coli codon-optimized gene was synthesized that fused the N-acetylmuramoyl-l-alanine amidase domain from the endolysin of the thermophilic bacteriophage ΦGVE2 to the cell-wall binding domain (CWB) from the endolysin of the C. perfringens-specific bacteriophage ΦCP26F. The resulting protein, PlyGVE2CpCWB, lysed C. perfringens in liquid and solid cultures. PlyGVE2CpCWB was most active at pH 8, had peak activity at 10 mM NaCl, 40% activity at 150 mM NaCl and was still 16% active at 600 mM NaCl. The protein was able to withstand temperatures up to 50 °C and still lyse C. perfringens. Herein, we report the construction and characterization of a thermostable chimeric endolysin that could potentially be utilized as a feed additive to control the bacterium during poultry production. PMID:26075507

  18. Microsphere-Incorporated Hybrid Thermogel for Neuronal Differentiation of Tonsil Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Patel, Madhumita; Moon, Hyo Jung; Jung, Bo Kyung; Jeong, Byeongmoon

    2015-07-15

    Neuronal differentiation of tonsil-derived mesenchymal stem cells (TMSCs) is investigated in a 3D hybrid system. The hybrid system is prepared by increasing the temperature of poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(l-alanine) aqueous solution to 37 °C through the heat-induced sol-to-gel transition, in which TMSCs and growth factor releasing microspheres are suspended. The in situ formed gel exhibits a modulus of 800 Pa at 37 °C, similar to that of brain tissue, and it is robust enough to hold the microspheres and cells during the 3D culture of TMSCs. The neuronal growth factors are released over 12-18 d, and the TMSCs in a spherical shape initially undergo multipolar elongation during the 3D culture. Significantly higher expressions of the neuronal biomarkers such as nuclear receptor related protein (Nurr-1), neuron specific enolase, microtubule associated protein-2, neurofilament-M, and glial fibrillary acidic protein are observed in both mRNA level and protein level in the hybrid systems than in the control experiments. This study proves the significance of a controlled drug delivery concept in tissue engineering or regenerative medicine, and a 3D hybrid system with controlled release of growth factors from microspheres in a thermogel can be a very promising tool. PMID:26033880

  19. Cyanobacterial Neurotoxin BMAA and Mercury in Sharks.

    PubMed

    Hammerschlag, Neil; Davis, David A; Mondo, Kiyo; Seely, Matthew S; Murch, Susan J; Glover, William Broc; Divoll, Timothy; Evers, David C; Mash, Deborah C

    2016-01-01

    Sharks have greater risk for bioaccumulation of marine toxins and mercury (Hg), because they are long-lived predators. Shark fins and cartilage also contain β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA), a ubiquitous cyanobacterial toxin linked to neurodegenerative diseases. Today, a significant number of shark species have found their way onto the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List of Threatened Species. Many species of large sharks are threatened with extinction due in part to the growing high demand for shark fin soup and, to a lesser extent, for shark meat and cartilage products. Recent studies suggest that the consumption of shark parts may be a route to human exposure of marine toxins. Here, we investigated BMAA and Hg concentrations in fins and muscles sampled in ten species of sharks from the South Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. BMAA was detected in all shark species with only seven of the 55 samples analyzed testing below the limit of detection of the assay. Hg concentrations measured in fins and muscle samples from the 10 species ranged from 0.05 to 13.23 ng/mg. These analytical test results suggest restricting human consumption of shark meat and fins due to the high frequency and co-occurrence of two synergistic environmental neurotoxic compounds. PMID:27537913

  20. Sensomics-Assisted Elucidation of the Tastant Code of Cooked Crustaceans and Taste Reconstruction Experiments.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Stefanie; Dunkel, Andreas; Hofmann, Thomas

    2016-02-10

    Sensory-guided fractionation by means of ultrafiltration and cation-exchange chromatography, followed by MS/MS quantitation, and taste re-engineering experiments revealed the key taste molecules coining the characteristic taste profile of the cooked meat of king prawns. Furthermore, quantitative analysis demonstrated that the taste differences between crustaceans are due to quantitative differences in the combinatorial code of tastants, rather than to qualitative differences in the tastant composition. Besides the amino acids glycine, L-proline, and L-alanine, the characteristic seafood-like sweet profile was found to be due to the sweet modulatory action of quaternary ammonium compounds, among which betaine, homarine, stachydrin, and trimethylamine-N-oxide were found as the key contributors on the basis of dose-activity considerations. Knowledge of this combinatorial tastant code provides the foundation for the development of more sophisticated crustacean flavors that are lacking any heavy metal ions and allergenic proteins present when using crustacean extracts for food flavoring.

  1. Perturbation of nuclear spin polarizations in solid state NMR of nitroxide-doped samples by magic-angle spinning without microwaves.

    PubMed

    Thurber, Kent R; Tycko, Robert

    2014-05-14

    We report solid state (13)C and (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments with magic-angle spinning (MAS) on frozen solutions containing nitroxide-based paramagnetic dopants that indicate significant perturbations of nuclear spin polarizations without microwave irradiation. At temperatures near 25 K, (1)H and cross-polarized (13)C NMR signals from (15)N,(13)C-labeled L-alanine in trinitroxide-doped glycerol/water are reduced by factors as large as six compared to signals from samples without nitroxide doping. Without MAS or at temperatures near 100 K, differences between signals with and without nitroxide doping are much smaller. We attribute most of the reduction of NMR signals under MAS near 25 K to nuclear spin depolarization through the cross-effect dynamic nuclear polarization mechanism, in which three-spin flips drive nuclear polarizations toward equilibrium with spin polarization differences between electron pairs. When T1e is sufficiently long relative to the MAS rotation period, the distribution of electron spin polarization across the nitroxide electron paramagnetic resonance lineshape can be very different from the corresponding distribution in a static sample at thermal equilibrium, leading to the observed effects. We describe three-spin and 3000-spin calculations that qualitatively reproduce the experimental observations.

  2. Development and validation of a supercritical fluid chromatography method for the direct determination of enantiomeric purity of provitamin B5 in cosmetic formulations with mass spectrometric detection.

    PubMed

    Khater, Syame; West, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    A rapid and efficient chiral supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC) method has been developed for the quantitative determination of panthenol enantiomers in cosmetic formulations (cream, lotion, wipe, and exfoliant). Indeed, the pharmacological effect only depends on the D form (Dexpanthenol) thus accurate measurement of its enantiomeric purity in formulated cosmetic products is of interest. The samples were prepared with liquid-liquid extraction followed by solid-phase extraction on Adsorbex amino cartridges. After testing several enantioselective columns in an attempt at reversing the elution order to have the minor enantiomer eluted first, the best separation of enantiomers and internal standard (N-acetyl-L-alanine) was achieved on a 3 μm-amylose-type immobilized polysaccharide chiral stationary phase (Chiralpak IA) in less than 6 min with a simple mobile phase comprising carbon dioxide and 11% methanol pumped at 2.3 mL/min, 25°C and 150 bar backpressure. Supercritical fluid chromatography coupled to both an optical diode-array detector and a user-friendly single-quadrupole mass spectrometer (Waters QDa) equipped with electrospray ionization source has been used. The on-line coupling ensures the technique to be more informative and improves detection sensitivity, as underivatized panthenol has a poor UV absorption. The limit of quantification (LOQ) achieved with single-ion recording was 0.5 μg/mL. The method was validated in terms of linearity, precision and accuracy and satisfactory results were obtained.

  3. Spectral characterization of novel ternary zinc(II) complexes containing 1,10-phenanthroline and Schiff bases derived from amino acids and salicylaldehyde-5-sulfonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boghaei, Davar M.; Gharagozlou, Mehrnaz

    2007-07-01

    A series of new ternary zinc(II) complexes [Zn(L 1-10)(phen)], where phen is 1,10-phenanthroline and H 2L 1-10 = tridentate Schiff base ligands derived from the condensation of amino acids (glycine, L-phenylalanine, L-valine, L-alanine, and L-leucine) and salicylaldehyde-5-sulfonates (sodium salicylaldehyde-5-sulfonate and sodium 3-methoxy-salicylaldehyde-5-sulfonate), have been synthesized. The complexes were characterized by elemental analysis, IR, UV-vis, 1H NMR, and 13C NMR spectra. The IR spectra of the complexes showed large differences between νas(COO) and νs(COO), Δ ν ( νas(COO) - νs(COO)) of 191-225 cm -1, indicating a monodentate coordination of the carboxylate group. Spectral data showed that in these ternary complexes the zinc atom is coordinated with the Schiff base ligand acts as a tridentate ONO moiety, coordinating to the metal through its phenolic oxygen, imine nitrogen, and carboxyl oxygen, and also with the neutral planar chelating ligand, 1,10-phenanthroline, coordinating through nitrogens.

  4. Retrospective screening of pesticide metabolites in ambient air using liquid chromatography coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    López, Antonio; Yusà, Vicent; Millet, Maurice; Coscollà, Clara

    2016-04-01

    A new methodology for the retrospective screening of pesticide metabolites in ambient air was developed, using liquid chromatography coupled to Orbitrap high-resolution mass spectrometry (UHPLC-HRMS), including two systematic workflows (i) post-run target screening (suspect screening) and (ii) non-target screening. An accurate-mass database was built and used for the post-run screening analysis. The database contained 240 pesticide metabolites found in different matrixes such as air, soil, water, plants, animals and humans. For non-target analysis, a "fragmentation-degradation" relationship strategy was selected. The proposed methodology was applied to 31 air samples (PM10) collected in the Valencian Region (Spain). In the post-target analysis 34 metabolites were identified, of which 11 (3-ketocarburan, carbofuran-7-phenol, carbendazim, desmethylisoproturon, ethiofencarb-sulfoxide, malaoxon, methiocarb-sulfoxide, N-(2-ethyl-6-methylphenyl)-L-alanine, omethoate, 2-hydroxy-terbuthylazine, and THPAM) were confirmed using analytical standards. The semiquantitative estimated concentration ranged between 6.78 and 198.31 pg m(-3). Likewise, two unknown degradation products of malaoxon and fenhexamid were elucidated in the non-target screening. PMID:26838378

  5. Pathogenesis of mucosal injury in the blind loop syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jonas, A; Krishnan, C; Forstner, G

    1978-11-01

    Bacterial extracts were prepared from cultures originating in chronic self-filling intestinal blind loops in rats. Their ability to remove active maltase molecules from isolated brush border membranes was studied in vitro. Twelve strains in 51 tested, belonging to one of three species, Bacteroides fragilis, Clostridium perfringens, and Streptococcus fecalis, possessed maltase-releasing activity. The ability to remove maltase correlated well with the ability to hydrolyze p-nitrophenyl-tert-butyloxycarbonyl-l-alaninate (NBA), an ester substrate rapidly hydrolyzed by elastase, but not with substrated favored by tryhsin and chymotrypsin. Maltase-releasing activity from C. perfringens was strongly inhibited by soybean trypsin inhibitor and to a lesser extent by lima bean trypsin inhibitor. Of four chloromethylketone active-site directed inhibitors tested with specificities for elastase, trypsin, and chymotrypsin, inhibition was maximal with elastase-specific inhibitors. In two species, activity was shown to be heat sensitive, and to be inhibited by concentration of the extract. In one species maltase-releasing activity was shown to be due to an enzyme of molecular weight at least 66,000 with the capacity to remove lactase, sucrase, and alkaline phosphatase, as well as maltase. The results indicate that anaerobic or facultatively anaerobic species, previously identified with the pathology of of the blind loop syndrome, contain proteases which are capable of removing components of the intestinal surface membrane. These proteases appear to have elastase-like substrate specificity and may be involved in the etiology of disaccharidase deficiency in bacterial overgrowth syndromes.

  6. Differential laser-induced perturbation Raman spectroscopy: a comparison with Raman spectroscopy for analysis and classification of amino acids and dipeptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oztekin, Erman K.; Smith, Sarah E.; Hahn, David W.

    2015-04-01

    Differential-laser induced perturbation spectroscopy (DLIPS) is a new spectral analysis technique for classification and identification, with key potential applications for analysis of complex biomolecular systems. DLIPS takes advantage of the complex ultraviolet (UV) laser-material interactions based on difference spectroscopy by coupling low intensity UV laser perturbation with a traditional spectroscopy probe. Here, we quantify the DLIPS performance using a Raman scattering probe in classification of basic constituents of collagenous tissues, namely, the amino acids glycine, L-proline, and L-alanine, and the dipeptides glycine-glycine, glycine-alanine and glycine-proline and compare the performance to a traditional Raman spectroscopy probe via several multivariate analyses. We find that the DLIPS approach yields an ˜40% improvement in discrimination among these tissue building blocks. The effects of the 193-nm perturbation laser are further examined by assessing the photodestruction of targeted material molecular bonds. The DLIPS method with a Raman probe holds promise for future tissue diagnosis, either as a stand-alone technique or as part of an orthogonal biosensing scheme.

  7. Nuclear magnetic relaxation studies of semiconductor nanocrystals and solids

    SciTech Connect

    Sachleben, J. R.

    1993-09-01

    Semiconductor nanocrystals, small biomolecules, and {sup 13}C enriched solids were studied through the relaxation in NMR spectra. Surface structure of semiconductor nanocrystals (CdS) was deduced from high resolution {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C liquid state spectra of thiophenol ligands on the nanocrystal surfaces. The surface coverage by thiophenol was found to be low, being 5.6 and 26% for nanocrystal radii of 11.8 and 19.2 {angstrom}. Internal motion is estimated to be slow with a correlation time > 10{sup {minus}8} s{sup {minus}1}. The surface thiophenol ligands react to form a dithiophenol when the nanocrystals were subjected to O{sub 2} and ultraviolet. A method for measuring {sup 14}N-{sup 1}H J-couplings is demonstrated on pyridine and the peptide oxytocin; selective 2D T{sub 1} and T{sub 2} experiments are presented for measuring relaxation times in crowded spectra with overlapping peaks in 1D, but relaxation effects interfere. Possibility of carbon-carbon cross relaxation in {sup 13}C enriched solids is demonstrated by experiments on zinc acetate and L-alanine.

  8. Parkinson-dementia complex and development of a new stable isotope dilution assay for BMAA detection in tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, Laura R.; Cruz-Aguado, Reyniel; Sadilek, Martin; Galasko, Douglas; Shaw, Christopher A.; Montine, Thomas J.

    2009-10-15

    {beta}-Methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) has been proposed as a global contributor to neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson-dementia complex (PDC) of Guam and Alzheimer's disease (AD). The literature on the effects of BMAA is conflicting with some but not all in vitro data supporting a neurotoxic action, and experimental animal data failing to replicate the pattern of neurodegeneration of these human diseases, even at very high exposures. Recently, BMAA has been reported in human brain from individuals afflicted with PDC or AD. Some of the BMAA in human tissue reportedly is freely extractable (free) while some is protein-associated and liberated by techniques that hydrolyze the peptide bond. The latter is especially intriguing since BMAA is a non-proteinogenic amino acid that has no known tRNA. We attempted to replicate these findings with techniques similar to those used by others; despite more than adequate sensitivity, we were unable to detect free BMAA. Recently, using a novel stable isotope dilution assay, we again were unable to detect free or protein-associated BMAA in human cerebrum. Here we review the development of our new assay for tissue detection of BMAA and show that we are able to detect free BMAA in liver but not cerebrum, nor do we detect any protein-associated BMAA in mice fed this amino acid. These studies demonstrate the importance of a sensitive and specific assay for tissue BMAA and seriously challenge the proposal that BMAA is accumulating in human brain.

  9. Identification of a new chromophoric substrate in the library of amino acid p-nitroanilides for continuous assay of VanX, a D,D-dipeptidase essential for vancomycin resistance.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Ming-Lung; Tseng, Min-Jen; Tseng, Ming-Chung; Chu, Yen-Ho

    2006-07-01

    As one of key bacterial proteins involved in vancomycin resistance, VanX is a D,D-dipeptidase that impedes bacterial cell wall biosynthesis by hydrolyzing the essential D-Ala-D-Ala dipeptide. Based on a report by Crowder and co-workers that L-alanine-p-nitroanilide (L-Ala-pNA) was a useful substrate for continuous assay of VanX, we constructed a library of 35 L- and D-amino acid p-nitroanilides to provide the needed diversity to discover new substrates that are more specific than L-Ala-pNA. We report here that, among all compounds tested, D-leucine-p-nitroanilide (D-Leu-pNA) was found to be the best substrate for VanX enzyme (KM=8.9+/-1.2 mM, kcat=0.0102+/-0.0016 s(-1), kcat/KM=0.0012 mM(-1)s(-1)). Although it is catalytically inefficient, this new VanX substrate needs essentially no sophisticated synthetic chemistry for preparation and therefore offers a convenient means for routine analysis of enzyme catalysis and the screening of potential inhibitors. Moreover, because it is the uncommon leucine in its D form in D-Leu-pNA, enzymatic activities due to other contaminated species in Escherichia coli used for VanX overproduction should be greatly reduced.

  10. Genomic and functional analyses of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains implicate ald in D-cycloserine resistance.

    PubMed

    Desjardins, Christopher A; Cohen, Keira A; Munsamy, Vanisha; Abeel, Thomas; Maharaj, Kashmeel; Walker, Bruce J; Shea, Terrance P; Almeida, Deepak V; Manson, Abigail L; Salazar, Alex; Padayatchi, Nesri; O'Donnell, Max R; Mlisana, Koleka P; Wortman, Jennifer; Birren, Bruce W; Grosset, Jacques; Earl, Ashlee M; Pym, Alexander S

    2016-05-01

    A more complete understanding of the genetic basis of drug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis is critical for prompt diagnosis and optimal treatment, particularly for toxic second-line drugs such as D-cycloserine. Here we used the whole-genome sequences from 498 strains of M. tuberculosis to identify new resistance-conferring genotypes. By combining association and correlated evolution tests with strategies for amplifying signal from rare variants, we found that loss-of-function mutations in ald (Rv2780), encoding L-alanine dehydrogenase, were associated with unexplained drug resistance. Convergent evolution of this loss of function was observed exclusively among multidrug-resistant strains. Drug susceptibility testing established that ald loss of function conferred resistance to D-cycloserine, and susceptibility to the drug was partially restored by complementation of ald. Clinical strains with mutations in ald and alr exhibited increased resistance to D-cycloserine when cultured in vitro. Incorporation of D-cycloserine resistance in novel molecular diagnostics could allow for targeted use of this toxic drug among patients with susceptible infections. PMID:27064254

  11. Fast Sterility Assessment by Germinable-Endospore Biodosimetry▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Yung, Pun To; Ponce, Adrian

    2008-01-01

    The increased demand for sterile products has created the need for rapid technologies capable of validating the hygiene of industrial production processes. Bacillus endospores are in standard use as biological indicators for evaluating the effectiveness of sterilization processes. Currently, culture-based methods, requiring more than 2 days before results become available, are employed to verify endospore inactivation. We describe a rapid, microscopy-based endospore viability assay (μEVA) capable of enumerating germinable endospores in less than 15 min. μEVA employs time-gated luminescence microscopy to enumerate single germinable endospores via terbium-dipicolinate (Tb-DPA) luminescence, which is triggered under UV excitation as 108 DPA molecules are released during germination on agarose containing Tb3+ and a germinant (e.g., l-alanine). Inactivation of endospore populations to sterility was monitored with μEVA as a function of thermal and UV dosage. A comparison of culturing results yielded nearly identical decimal reduction values, thus validating μEVA as a rapid biodosimetry method for monitoring sterilization processes. The simple Tb-DPA chemical test for germinability is envisioned to enable fully automated instrumentation for in-line monitoring of hygiene in industrial production processes. PMID:18836020

  12. Determining the functional role of waterborne amino acid uptake in hagfish nutrition: a constitutive pathway when fasting or a supplementary pathway when feeding?

    PubMed

    Glover, Chris N; Blewett, Tamzin A; Wood, Chris M

    2016-10-01

    Hagfish are unique among aquatic "vertebrates" in their ability to absorb amino acids directly from the water via skin and gill epithelia, but it is unknown whether this phenomenon extends beyond a few studied substrates; what effect fed state has on absorption; and what functional role this may play in hagfish nutrition. Using in vivo and in vitro transport assays, uptake and tissue distribution of the waterborne amino acids L-alanine, L-lysine, and L-phenylalanine were examined as a function of fed state. All three amino acids were shown to be taken up from the water (lysine and phenylalanine for the first time). Following immersion in radiolabelled solutions for 24 h, phenylalanine was the amino acid that accumulated at the highest levels in almost all tissues, with the highest accumulation noted in red blood cells and bile, followed by gill and liver. In general, tissues of fed hagfish displayed a significantly reduced phenylalanine accumulation compared to tissues of hagfish fasted for 3 weeks. An in vitro assay showed that phenylalanine was transported across the skin at the highest rate, with the uptake of lysine occurring at the lowest rate. Feeding status had no significant effect on in vitro transport. These data indicate that dissolved organic nutrients are a significant source of nutrition to hagfish, and may be relatively more important during periods of fasting than during periods of feeding when immersed in decaying carcasses. PMID:27215782

  13. The impact of α-hydrazino acids embedded in short fluorescent peptides on peptide interactions with DNA and RNA.

    PubMed

    Suć, Josipa; Tumir, Lidija-Marija; Glavaš-Obrovac, Ljubica; Jukić, Marijana; Piantanida, Ivo; Jerić, Ivanka

    2016-06-01

    A series of novel hydrazino-based peptidomimetics and analogues comprising N-terminal lysine and C-terminal phenanthridinyl-l-alanine were prepared. The presented results demonstrate the up to now unknown possibility to finely modulate peptide interactions with DNA/RNA by α-hydrazino group insertion and how the different positioning of two α-hydrazino groups in peptides controls binding to various double stranded and single stranded DNA and RNA. All peptidomimetics bind with 1-10 micromolar affinity to ds-DNA/RNA, whereby the binding mode is a combination of electrostatic interactions and hydrophobic interactions within DNA/RNA grooves. Insertion of the α-hydrazino group into the peptide systematically decreased its fluorimetric response to DNA/RNA binding in the order: mono-hydrazino < alternating-hydrazino < sequential-hydrazino group. Binding studies of ss-polynucleotides suggest intercalation of phenanthridine between polynucleotide bases, whereby affinity and fluorimetric response decrease with the number of α-hydrazino groups in the peptide sequence. Particularly interesting was the interaction of two sequential α-hydrazino acids-peptidomimetic with poly rG, characterised by a specific strong increase of CD bands, while all other peptide/ssRNA combinations gave only a CD-band decrease. All mentioned interactions could also be reversibly controlled by adjusting the pH, due to the protonation of the fluorophore.

  14. A contribution for the definition of serum chemistry values in captive adults Antillean manatees (Trichechus manatus manatus Linnaeus, 1758).

    PubMed

    Silva, F M O; Vergara-Parente, J E; Gomes, J K N; Teixeira, M N; Lima, R P

    2007-04-01

    Serum chemistry analyses represents a fundamental tool for the diagnosis and understanding of diseases in marine mammals. Although several studies are being conducted within the field of clinical pathology, haematological and serum chemistry data for Antillean manatees are deficient. The purpose of this study was to determine serum chemistry values for captive Antillean manatees within the CMA/Ibama facility in Brazil. Serum samples were obtained from five captive adult Antillean manatees fed with seagrass and analysed for aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, bilirubin, alkaline phosphatase, urea, creatinine, glucose, triglycerides, cholesterol, total protein, albumin, globulin, phosphate, chloride, calcium and uric acid. Blood chemistry parameters were determined using a semi-automatic analyzer. Maximum, minimum, mean and standard deviations were calculated for each serum chemistry parameter. Differences on the values of males and females were verified using an unpaired Student's t-test. All the parameters analysed were similar between sexes, with exception of AP, which was higher in females (191.43 +/- 31.86 U/l). Alanine aminotransferase and uric acid values for Trichechus manatus manatus are reported for the first time in this paper. This study is the first to report serum chemistry parameter values for long-term captive male and female Antillean manatees. Therefore, the lower values of albumin, phosphate, chloride, cholesterol and triglycerides obtained here highlight the importance of clinical pathology during health monitoring of captive marine mammals. PMID:17381673

  15. EPR study of light illumination effects on radicals in gamma-irradiated ?-alanine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciesielski, B.; Schultka, K.; Penkowski, M.; Sagstuen, E.

    2004-05-01

    Exposure of γ-irradiated L-alanine samples to sunlight and to light from a regular, fluorescent lamp resulted in significant changes in their EPR resonance patterns, both to spectral shapes and intensities. The experimental EPR spectra were numerically decomposed into three components reflecting contributions of three different radicals (R1-R3) generated by ionizing radiation in alanine. The light exposure caused a decay of the measured EPR signal intensity. For similar light intensities and exposure times the decay was much more pronounced in samples illuminated by sunlight than in samples illuminated by the fluorescent lamp. In both cases light-induced decay of R1 radicals was observed. Sunlight illumination resulted in a moderate decay of R2 radicals and in a doubling of the R3 radical population. On the other hand, fluorescent light caused a significant increase of R2 radicals and did not change the amount of R3 radicals. A quantitative analysis of the variations of the three radical contributions to the total EPR spectra upon fluorescent light exposure suggests a net R1→R2 free radical transformation. These effects of light on the alanine dosimetric signal should be taken into account in dosimetry protocols, assuring protection of alanine dosimeters from extended exposure to light.

  16. Aminopeptidase-like activities in Caenorhabditis elegans and the soybean cyst nematode, Heterodera glycines.

    PubMed

    Masler, E P; Kovaleva, E S; Sardanelli, S

    2001-09-01

    Aminopeptidase-like activities in crude whole body extracts of the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and the plant parasitic soybean cyst nematode Heterodera glycines were examined. General characteristics including pH optima, heat lability, and inactivation of enzyme by organic solvent were the same for the two species. All developmental stages of H. glycines exhibited activity. In older females, activity was present primarily in the eggs. Affinity for the substrate L-alanine-4-nitroanilide was the same regardless of the stage examined, and was similar for the two species (m for C. elegans and m for H. glycines). Nearly all (>95%) of C. elegans aminopeptidase-like activity was present in the soluble fraction of the extract, while H. glycines activity was distributed between the soluble and membrane fractions. Specific activities of the soluble enzymes were highest in C. elegans and H. glycines juveniles. The C. elegans enzyme was susceptible to a number of aminopeptidase inhibitors, particularly to amastatin and leuhistin, each of which inhibited aminopeptidase-like activity more than 90% at 90 microm. In H. glycines, aminopeptidase-like activity was inhibited 39% by amastatin at 900 microm. The apparent molecular weight of the soluble C. elegans enzyme is 70-80 kDa. Some activity in H. glycines is present in the 70-80 kDa range, but most activity (80-90%) is associated with a very high molecular weight (>240 kDa) component.

  17. Pyrylium Salts as Reactive Matrices for MALDI-MS Imaging of Biologically Active Primary Amines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shariatgorji, Mohammadreza; Nilsson, Anna; Källback, Patrik; Karlsson, Oskar; Zhang, Xiaoqun; Svenningsson, Per; Andren, Per E.

    2015-06-01

    Many neuroactive substances, including endogenous biomolecules, environmental compounds, and pharmaceuticals possess primary amine functional groups. Among these are catecholamine neurotransmitters (e.g., dopamine), many substituted phenethylamines (e.g., amphetamine), as well as amino acids and neuropeptides. In most cases, mass spectrometric (ESI and MALDI) analyses of trace amounts of such compounds are challenging because of their poor ionization properties. We present a method for chemical derivatization of primary amines by reaction with pyrylium salts that facilitates their detection by MALDI-MS and enables the imaging of primary amines in brain tissue sections. A screen of pyrylium salts revealed that the 2,4-diphenyl-pyranylium ion efficiently derivatizes primary amines and can be used as a reactive MALDI-MS matrix that induces both derivatization and desorption. MALDI-MS imaging with such matrix was used to map the localization of dopamine and amphetamine in brain tissue sections and to quantitatively map the distribution of the neurotoxin β- N-methylamino-L-alanine.

  18. A Rapid Endospore Viability Assay for Astrobiology, Planatery Protection and Biodefense

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponce, Adrian

    Bacillus endospores are in standard use as biological indicators for evaluating the effectiveness of sterilization processes. We describe a rapid endospore viability assay (EVA) capable of enumerating germinable endospores, which release 108 molecules of dipicolinic acid (DPA) when immobilized onto terbium ion (T b3 +)/L-alanine-doped agarose. Under UV excitation, endospore germination results in green luminescent spots that are enumerated using timegated Tb3+-DPA luminescence microscopy (i.e., MicroEVA). The luminescence intensity time courses were characteristic of the stage I germination dynamics. MicroEVA was applied to monitor inactivation to sterility of initial 5x106 CFU endospore populations in aqueous suspension as a function of thermal (95C) and UV (254nm, 22uW/cm2 ) dosage. MicroEVA and NASA Standard Assay culturing yielded similar D-values for both inactivation methods; thermal inactivation D-values were 10 min and 9.5 min, respectively, while UV inactivation D-values were 32 minutes and 35 minutes, respectively. In addition, MicroEVA was applied to investigate survival of endospores in extreme environments, including Atacama Desert soils and Greenland ice cores.

  19. Expression and delivery of an endolysin to combat Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed

    Gervasi, Teresa; Horn, Nikki; Wegmann, Udo; Dugo, Giacomo; Narbad, Arjan; Mayer, Melinda J

    2014-03-01

    Clostridium perfringens is a cause for increasing concern due to its responsibility for severe infections both in humans and animals, especially poultry. To find new control strategies to treat C. perfringens infection, we investigated the activity and delivery of a bacteriophage endolysin. We identified a new endolysin, designated CP25L, which shows similarity to an N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase domain and is distinct from other C. perfringens endolysins whose activity has been demonstrated in vitro. The cp25l gene was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli, and the gene product demonstrated lytic activity against all 25 C. perfringens strains tested. The probiotic strain Lactobacillus johnsonii FI9785 was engineered to deliver the endolysin to the gastrointestinal tract. The integration of the nisRK two-component regulatory system from the Lactococcus lactis nisin A biosynthesis operon into the chromosome of L. johnsonii allowed constitutive expression of the endolysin under the control of the nisA promoter (P nisA ), while the use of a signal peptide (SLPmod) led to successful secretion of the active endolysin to the surrounding media. The high specificity and activity of the endolysin suggest that it may be developed as an effective tool to enhance the control of C. perfringens by L. johnsonii in the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:23942878

  20. Differential laser-induced perturbation Raman spectroscopy: a comparison with Raman spectroscopy for analysis and classification of amino acids and dipeptides.

    PubMed

    Oztekin, Erman K; Smith, Sarah E; Hahn, David W

    2015-04-01

    Differential-laser induced perturbation spectroscopy (DLIPS) is a new spectral analysis technique for classification and identification, with key potential applications for analysis of complex biomolecular systems. DLIPS takes advantage of the complex ultraviolet (UV) laser–material interactions based on difference spectroscopy by coupling low intensity UV laser perturbation with a traditional spectroscopy probe. Here, we quantify the DLIPS performance using a Raman scattering probe in classification of basic constituents of collagenous tissues, namely, the amino acids glycine, L-proline, and L-alanine, and the dipeptides glycine–glycine, glycine–alanine and glycine–proline and compare the performance to a traditional Raman spectroscopy probe via several multivariate analyses. We find that the DLIPS approach yields an ~40% improvement in discrimination among these tissue building blocks. The effects of the 193-nm perturbation laser are further examined by assessing the photodestruction of targeted material molecular bonds. The DLIPS method with a Raman probe holds promise for future tissue diagnosis, either as a stand-alone technique or as part of an orthogonal biosensing scheme.

  1. A mechanism for slow release of biomagnified cyanobacterial neurotoxins and neurodegenerative disease in Guam

    PubMed Central

    Murch, Susan J.; Cox, Paul Alan; Banack, Sandra Anne

    2004-01-01

    As root symbionts of cycad trees, cyanobacteria of the genus Nostoc produce β-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA), a neurotoxic nonprotein amino acid. The biomagnification of BMAA through the Guam ecosystem fits a classic triangle of increasing concentrations of toxic compounds up the food chain. However, because BMAA is polar and nonlipophilic, a mechanism for its biomagnification through increasing trophic levels has been unclear. We report that BMAA occurs not only as a free amino acid in the Guam ecosystem but also can be released from a bound form by acid hydrolysis. After first removing free amino acids from tissue samples of various trophic levels (cyanobacteria, root symbioses, cycad seeds, cycad flour, flying foxes eaten by the Chamorro people, and brain tissues of Chamorros who died from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/Parkinsonism dementia complex), we then hydrolyzed the remaining fraction and found BMAA concentrations increased 10- to 240-fold. This bound form of BMAA may function as an endogenous neurotoxic reservoir, accumulating and being transported between trophic levels and subsequently being released during digestion and protein metabolism. Within brain tissues, the endogenous neurotoxic reservoir can slowly release free BMAA, thereby causing incipient and recurrent neurological damage over years or even decades, which may explain the observed long latency period for neurological disease onset among the Chamorro people. The presence of BMAA in brain tissues from Canadian patients who died of Alzheimer's disease suggests that exposure to cyanobacterial neurotoxins occurs outside of Guam. PMID:15295100

  2. Microsphere-Incorporated Hybrid Thermogel for Neuronal Differentiation of Tonsil Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Patel, Madhumita; Moon, Hyo Jung; Jung, Bo Kyung; Jeong, Byeongmoon

    2015-07-15

    Neuronal differentiation of tonsil-derived mesenchymal stem cells (TMSCs) is investigated in a 3D hybrid system. The hybrid system is prepared by increasing the temperature of poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(l-alanine) aqueous solution to 37 °C through the heat-induced sol-to-gel transition, in which TMSCs and growth factor releasing microspheres are suspended. The in situ formed gel exhibits a modulus of 800 Pa at 37 °C, similar to that of brain tissue, and it is robust enough to hold the microspheres and cells during the 3D culture of TMSCs. The neuronal growth factors are released over 12-18 d, and the TMSCs in a spherical shape initially undergo multipolar elongation during the 3D culture. Significantly higher expressions of the neuronal biomarkers such as nuclear receptor related protein (Nurr-1), neuron specific enolase, microtubule associated protein-2, neurofilament-M, and glial fibrillary acidic protein are observed in both mRNA level and protein level in the hybrid systems than in the control experiments. This study proves the significance of a controlled drug delivery concept in tissue engineering or regenerative medicine, and a 3D hybrid system with controlled release of growth factors from microspheres in a thermogel can be a very promising tool.

  3. Molecular interactions of α-amino acids insight into aqueous β-cyclodextrin systems.

    PubMed

    Ekka, Deepak; Roy, Mahendra Nath

    2013-10-01

    Qualitative and quantitative analysis of molecular interaction prevailing in glycine, L-alanine, L-valine and aqueous solution of β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) have been probed by thermophysical properties. Density (ρ), viscosity (η), and ultrasonic speed (u) measurements have been reported at different temperatures. The extent of interaction (solute-solvent interaction) is expressed in terms of the limiting apparent molar volume ([Formula: see text]), viscosity B-coefficient and limiting apparent molar adiabatic compressibility ([Formula: see text]). The changes on the enthalpy ([Formula: see text]) and entropy ([Formula: see text]) of the encapsulation analysis give information about the driving forces governing the inclusion. The temperature dependence behaviour of partial molar quantities and group contributions to partial molar volumes has been determined for the amino acids. The trends in transfer volumes, [Formula: see text], have been interpreted in terms of solute-cosolute interactions based on a cosphere overlap model. The role of the solvent (aqueous solution of β-CD) and the contribution of solute-solute and solute-solvent interactions to the solution complexes have also been analyzed through the derived properties.

  4. Enantiomer-specific selection of amino acids.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xueying; Tellez, Luis A; de Araujo, Ivan E

    2013-12-01

    Dietary intake of L-amino acids impacts on several physiological functions, including the control of gastrointestinal motility, pancreatic secretion, and appetite. However, the biological mechanisms regulating behavioral predilections for certain amino acid types remain poorly understood. We tested the hypothesis that, in mice, the potency with which a given glucogenic amino acid increases glucose utilization reflects its rewarding properties. We have found that: (1) during long-, but not short-, term preference tests, L-alanine and L-serine were preferred over their D-enantiomer counterparts, while no such effect was observed for L-threonine vs. D-threonine; (2) these behavioral patterns were closely associated with the ability of L-amino acids to promote increases in respiratory exchange ratios such that those, and only those, L-amino acids able to promote increases in respiratory exchange ratios were preferred over their D-isomers; (3) these behavioral preferences were independent of gustatory influences, since taste-deficient Trpm5 knockout mice displayed ingestive responses very similar to those of their wild-type counterparts. We conclude that the ability to promote increases in respiratory exchange ratios enhances the reward value of nutritionally relevant amino acids and suggest a mechanistic link between substrate utilization and amino acid preferences.

  5. Enantiomeric pair of copper(II) polypyridyl-alanine complexes: Effect of chirality on their interaction with biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Ng, Chew Hee; Chan, Cheang Wei; Lai, Jing Wei; Ooi, Ing Hong; Chong, Kok Vei; Maah, Mohd Jamil; Seng, Hoi Ling

    2016-07-01

    Like chiral organic drugs, the chemical and biological properties of metal complexes can be dependent on chirality. Two pairs of [Cu(phen)(ala)(H2O)]X·xH2O (phen=1.10-phenanthroline: X=NO3(-); ala: l-alanine (l-ala), 1 and d-alanine (d-ala) 2; and (X=Cl(-); ala: l-ala, 3 and d-ala, 4) complex salts (x=number of lattice water molecules) have been synthesized and characterized. The crystal structure of 3 has been determined. The same pair of enantiomeric species, viz. [Cu(phen)(l-ala)(H2O)](+) and [Cu(phen)(d-ala)(H2O)](+), have been identified to be present in the aqueous solutions of both 1 and 3, and in those of both 2 and 4 respectively. Both 3 and 4 bind more strongly to ds(AT)6 than ds(CG)6. There is no or insignificant effect of the chirality of 3 and 4 on the production of hydroxyl radicals, binding to deoxyribonucleic acid from calf thymus (CT-DNA), ds(CG)6, G-quadruplex and 17-base pair duplex, and inhibition of both topoisomerase I and proteasome. Among the three proteasome proteolytic sites, the trypsin-like site is inhibited most strongly by these complexes. However, the chirality of 3 and 4 does affect the number of restriction enzymes inhibited, and their binding constants towards ds(AT)6 and serum albumin. PMID:27105312

  6. Inactivation of the ampDE Operon Increases Transcription of algD and Affects Morphology and Encystment of Azotobacter vinelandii

    PubMed Central

    Núñez, Cinthia; Moreno, Soledad; Cárdenas, Luis; Soberón-Chávez, Gloria; Espín, Guadalupe

    2000-01-01

    Transcription of algD, encoding GDP-mannose dehydrogenase, the key enzyme in the alginate biosynthetic pathway, is highly regulated in Azotobacter vinelandii. We describe here the characterization of a Tn5 insertion mutant (AC28) which shows a higher level of expression of an algD::lacZ fusion. AC28 cells were morphologically abnormal and unable to encyst. The cloning and nucleotide sequencing of the Tn5-disrupted locus in AC28 revealed an operon homologous to the Escherichia coli ampDE operon. Tn5 was located within the ampD gene, encoding a cytosolic N-acetyl-anhydromuramyl-l-alanine amidase that participates in the intracellular recycling of peptidoglycan fragments. The ampE gene encodes a transmembrane protein, but the function of the protein is not known. We constructed strains carrying ampD or ampE mutations and one with an ampDE deletion. The strain with a deletion of the ampDE operon showed a phenotype similar to that of mutant AC28. The present work demonstrates that both alginate production and bacterial encystment are greatly influenced by the bacterial ability to recycle its cell wall. PMID:10940024

  7. Effect of diet-induced obesity on kinetic parameters of amino acid uptake by rat erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Picó, C; Pons, A; Palou, A

    1992-11-01

    The effects of cafeteria diet-induced obesity upon in vitro uptake of L-Alanine, Glycine, L-Lysine, L-Glutamine, L-Glutamic acid, L-Phenylalanine and L-Leucine by isolated rat erythrocytes have been studied. The total Phe and Leu uptakes followed Michaelis-Menten kinetics. The Glu uptake was fitted to diffusion kinetics. The uptakes of Ala, Gly, Lys and Gln were best explained by a two-component transport: one saturable and one diffusion. Obesity increased the Km value for Ala, Gln and Leu, and the Vmax value for Ala, but decreased the Vmax for Lys. Kinetic parameters of Phe uptake were unaffected by obesity. In addition, the pseudo-first order rate constant (Vmax/Km) for Ala, Gly, Gln, Lys and Leu uptake decreased as a result of cafeteria diet-induced obesity. The Kd value for Ala, Gly, Gln and Glu decreased and that of Lys increased as result of obesity. These adaptations could, at least in part, explain alterations in amino acid distribution between blood cells and plasma related to overfeeding or obesity.

  8. Permanganate oxidation of α-amino acids: kinetic correlations for the nonautocatalytic and autocatalytic reaction pathways.

    PubMed

    Perez-Benito, Joaquin F

    2011-09-01

    The reactions of permanganate ion with seven α-amino acids in aqueous KH(2)PO(4)/K(2)HPO(4) buffers have been followed spectrophotometrically at two different wavelengths: 526 nm (decay of MnO(4)(-)) and 418 nm (formation of colloidal MnO(2)). All of the reactions studied were autocatalyzed by colloidal MnO(2), with the contribution of the autocatalytic reaction pathway decreasing in the order glycine > l-threonine > l-alanine > l-glutamic acid > l-leucine > l-isoleucine > l-valine. The rate constants corresponding to the nonautocatalytic and autocatalytic pathways were obtained by means of either a differential rate law or an integrated one, the latter requiring the use of an iterative method for its implementation. The activation parameters for the two pathways were determined and analyzed to obtain statistically significant correlations for the series of reactions studied. The activation enthalpy of the nonautocatalytic pathway showed a strong, positive dependence on the standard Gibbs energy for the dissociation of the protonated amino group of the α-amino acid. Linear enthalpy-entropy correlations were found for both pathways, leading to isokinetic temperatures of 370 ± 21 K (nonautocatalytic) and 364 ± 28 K (autocatalytic). Mechanisms in agreement with the experimental data are proposed for the two reaction pathways.

  9. Effect of the boiling and decanting method of Khesari (Lathyrus sativus) detoxification, on changes in selected nutrients.

    PubMed

    Jha, K

    1987-03-01

    It is a well-known fact that the legume Khesari (Lathyrus sativus) causes lathyrism, a disease characterized by paralysis of the lower limbs in human beings. The toxic constituent is an amino acid identified as B-Oxalyl-Amino L-Alanine (BOAA). It has been reported that if the legume is boiled for two hours and the water is then decanted, almost 85% of the toxic amino acid is eliminated. Therefore, this investigation constitutes an effort to prevent the loss of other nutrients, simultaneously to the elimination of toxicity. As has been observed, as much as half the protein content, as well as 80.36% total sugars, 63.13% reducing sugars, 86.05% amino acids, and all thiamine, riboflavin and niacin are lost from dahl (dehulled, separated cotyledons), while the respective losses from the whole seeds are 47.25%, 45.73%, 74.69% and 80.00%, and all vitamins, in just a one-hour treatment. The losses of the toxic amino acid from dahl and whole seeds are 71.46% and 68.74%, respectively. The data for losses occurring in the two-hour and three-hour treatment are also described.

  10. Trypsin inhibition by macrocyclic and open-chain variants of the squash inhibitor MCoTI-II.

    PubMed

    Avrutina, Olga; Schmoldt, Hans-Ulrich; Gabrijelcic-Geiger, Dusica; Le Nguyen, Dung; Sommerhoff, Christian P; Diederichsen, Ulf; Kolmar, Harald

    2005-12-01

    MCoTI-I and MCoTI-II from the seeds of Momordica cochinchinensis are inhibitors of trypsin-like proteases and the only known members of the large family of squash inhibitors that are cyclic and contain an additional loop connecting the amino- and the carboxy-terminus. To investigate the contribution of macrocycle formation to biological activity, we synthesized a set of open-chain variants of MCoTI-II that lack the cyclization loop and contain various natural and non-natural amino acid substitutions in the reactive-site loop. Upon replacement of P1 lysine residue #10 within the open-chain variant of MCoTI-II by the non-natural isosteric nucleo amino acid AlaG [beta-(guanin-9-yl)-L-alanine], a conformationally restricted arginine mimetic, residual inhibitory activity was detected, albeit reduced by four orders of magnitude. While the cyclic inhibitors MCoTI-I and MCoTI-II were found to be very potent trypsin inhibitors, with picomolar inhibition constants, the open-chain variants displayed an approximately 10-fold lower affinity. These data suggest that the formation of a circular backbone in the MCoTI squash inhibitors results in enhanced affinity and therefore is a determinant of biological activity. PMID:16336125

  11. A novel aceE mutation leading to a better growth profile and a higher L-serine production in a high-yield L-serine-producing Corynebacterium glutamicum strain.

    PubMed

    Guo, Wen; Chen, Ziwei; Zhang, Xiaomei; Xu, Guoqiang; Zhang, Xiaojuan; Shi, Jinsong; Xu, Zhenghong

    2016-09-01

    A comparative genomic analysis was performed to study the genetic variations between the L-serine-producing strain Corynebacterium glutamicum SYPS-062 and the mutant strain SYPS-062-33a, which was derived from SYPS-062 by random mutagenesis with enhanced L-serine production. Some variant genes between the two strains were reversely mutated or deleted in the genome of SYPS-062-33a to verify the influences of the gene mutations introduced by random mutagenesis. It was found that a His-594 → Tyr mutation in aceE was responsible for the more accumulation of by-products, such as L-alanine and L-valine, in SYPS-062-33a. Furthermore, the influence of this point mutation on the L-serine production was investigated, and the results suggested that this point mutation led to a better growth profile and a higher L-serine production in the high-yield strain 33a∆SSAAI, which was derived from SYPS-062-33a by metabolic engineering with the highest L-serine production to date.

  12. Cyanogenesis-a general phenomenon in the lepidoptera?

    PubMed

    Witthohn, K; Naumann, C M

    1987-08-01

    There are two different pathways known to be used for the detoxification of hydrocyanic acid in insects, viz., rhodanese and β-cyano-L-ala-nine synthase. We consider the latter to be indicative for cyanogenesis, while rhodanese might, in general, play a more important role in sulfur transfer for protein synthesis. This paper reports on the distribution of β-cyano-L-alanine (BCA) in the Lepidoptera. First reports of cyanogenesis are presented for the following families: Papilionidae, Pieridae, Lycaenidae, Hesperiidae, Lymantriidae, Arctiidae, Notodontidae, Megalopygidae, Limacodidae, Cymatophoridae, Noctuidae, Geometridae, and Yponomeutidae. New and old records for three other families, the Nymphalidae, Zygaenidae, and Heterogynidae, are included to complete the present state of knowledge. Special emphasis has been laid on the Nymphalidae, where BCA has been detected in eight subfamilies. Taxonomic, geographic, and seasonal variation has been found in a number of cases. In all cases observed so far, the source of cyanogenesis in the Lepidoptera is most probably the cyanoglucosides linamarin and lotaustralin, although cyanogenesis based on mustard oil glucosides and cyclopentenoid glucosides might occur as well. BCA has been found in both cryptic and aposematic species, including taxa such as the Pieridae, Danainae, Ithomiinae, and Arctiidae, where the defensive biology is believed to be linked with other compounds, like mustard oil glucosides, cardenolides, or pyrrolizidine alkaloids. The ecological interaction and significance of such secondary compounds is not yet understood. PMID:24302389

  13. Genipin-cross-linked poly(L-lysine)-based hydrogels: synthesis, characterization, and drug encapsulation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Steven S S; Hsieh, Ping-Lun; Chen, Pei-Shan; Chen, Yu-Tien; Jan, Jeng-Shiung

    2013-11-01

    Genipin-cross-linked hydrogels composed of biodegradable and pH-sensitive cationic poly(L-lysine) (PLL), poly(L-lysine)-block-poly(L-alanine) (PLL-b-PLAla), and poly(L-lysine)-block-polyglycine (PLL-b-PGly) polypeptides were synthesized, characterized, and used as carriers for drug delivery. These polypeptide hydrogels can respond to pH-stimulus and their gelling and mechanical properties, degradation rate, and drug release behavior can be tuned by varying polypeptide composition and cross-linking degree. Comparing with natural polymers, the synthetic polypeptides with well-defined chain length and composition can warrant the preparation of the hydrogels with tunable properties to meet the criteria for specific biomedical applications. These hydrogels composed of natural building blocks exhibited good cell compatibility and enzyme degradability and can support cell attachment/proliferation. The evaluation of these hydrogels for in vitro drug release revealed that the controlled release profile was a biphasic pattern with a mild burst release and a moderate release rate thereafter, suggesting the drug molecules were encapsulated inside the gel matrix. With the versatility of polymer chemistry and conjugation of functional moieties, it is expected these hydrogels can be useful for biomedical applications such as polymer therapeutics and tissue engineering.

  14. Endosymbiotic and host proteases in the digestive tract of the invasive snail Pomacea canaliculata: diversity, origin and characterization.

    PubMed

    Godoy, Martín S; Castro-Vazquez, Alfredo; Castro-Vasquez, Alfredo; Vega, Israel A

    2013-01-01

    Digestive proteases of the digestive tract of the apple snail Pomacea canaliculata were studied. Luminal protease activity was found in the crop, the style sac and the coiled gut and was significantly higher in the coiled gut. Several protease bands and their apparent molecular weights were identified in both tissue extracts and luminal contents by gel zymography: (1) a 125 kDa protease in salivary gland extracts and in the crop content; (2) a 30 kDa protease throughout all studied luminal contents and in extracts of the midgut gland and of the endosymbionts isolated from this gland; (3) two proteases of 145 and 198 kDa in the coiled gut content. All these proteases were inhibited by aprotinin, a serine-protease inhibitor, and showed maximum activity between 30°C and 35°C and pH between 8.5 and 9.5. Tissue L-alanine-N-aminopeptidase activity was determined in the wall of the crop, the style sac and the coiled gut and was significantly higher in the coiled gut. Our findings show that protein digestion in P. canaliculata is carried out through a battery of diverse proteases originated from the salivary glands and the endosymbionts lodged in the midgut gland and by proteases of uncertain origin that occur in the coiled gut lumen.

  15. Structural Investigation of Park’s Nucleotide on Bacterial Translocase MraY: Discovery of Unexpected MraY Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kuo-Ting; Chen, Po-Ting; Lin, Cheng-Kun; Huang, Lin-Ya; Hu, Chia-Ming; Chang, Yi-Fan; Hsu, Hua-Ting; Cheng, Ting-Jen R.; Wu, Ying-Ta; Cheng, Wei-Chieh

    2016-01-01

    Systematic structural modifications of the muramic acid, peptide, and nucleotide moieties of Park’s nucleotide were performed to investigate the substrate specificity of B. subtilis MraY (MraYBS). It was found that the simplest analogue of Park’s nucleotide only bearing the first two amino acids, l-alanine-iso-d-glutamic acid, could function as a MraYBS substrate. Also, the acid group attached to the Cα of iso-d-glutamic acid was found to play an important role for substrate activity. Epimerization of the C4-hydroxyl group of muramic acid and modification at the 5-position of the uracil in Park’s nucleotide were both found to dramatically impair their substrate activity. Unexpectedly, structural modifications on the uracil moiety changed the parent molecule from a substrate to an inhibitor, blocking the MraYBS translocation. One unoptimized inhibitor was found to have a Ki value of 4 ± 1 μM against MraYBS, more potent than tunicamycins. PMID:27531195

  16. Oligomerization of glycine and alanine catalyzed by iron oxides: implications for prebiotic chemistry.

    PubMed

    Shanker, Uma; Bhushan, Brij; Bhattacharjee, G; Kamaluddin

    2012-02-01

    Iron oxide minerals are probable constituents of the sediments present in geothermal regions of the primitive earth. They might have adsorbed different organic monomers (amino acids, nucleotides etc.) and catalyzed polymerization processes leading to the formation of the first living cell. In the present work we tested the catalytic activity of three forms of iron oxides (Goethite, Akaganeite and Hematite) in the intermolecular condensation of each of the amino acids glycine and L-alanine. The effect of zinc oxide and titanium dioxide on the oligomerization has also been studied. Oligomerization studies were performed for 35 days at three different temperatures 50, 90 and 120°C without applying drying/wetting cycling. The products formed were characterized by HPLC and ESI-MS techniques. All three forms of iron oxides catalyzed peptide bond formation (23.2% of gly2 and 10.65% of ala2). The reaction was monitored every 7 days. Formation of peptides was observed to start after 7 days at 50°C. Maximum yield of peptides was found after 35 days at 90°C. Reaction at 120°C favors formation of diketopiperazine derivatives. It is also important to note that after 35 days of reaction, goethite produced dimer and trimer with the highest yield among the oxides tested. We suggest that the activity of goethite could probably be due to its high surface area and surface acidity.

  17. [Development of New Therapy for Malignant Mesothelioma Based on CD26 Molecule].

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Chikao; Ohnuma, Kei

    2016-07-01

    CD26 is a 110 kDa, type II transmembrane glycoprotein with dipeptidyl peptidase IV activity and is capable of cleaving Nterminal dipeptides with either L-proline or L-alanine at the penultimate position. Malignant mesothelioma(MM)is an aggressive malignancy arising from the mesothelial cells. It is generally associated with a history of asbestos exposure and has a very poor prognosis. Due to lack of efficacy of conventional treatments, novel therapeutic strategies are urgently needed to improve outcomes. Recently we showed that CD26 is preferentially expressed on epithelial type of MM cells but not on normal mesothelial cells. We have developed a highly biological active humanized anti-CD26 monoclonal antibody(mAb)and have published previously extensive in vivo data demonstrating the anti-tumor activity of humanized anti-CD26 mAb(YS110)in mouse xenograft models. The use of a humanized anti-CD26 mAb may therefore be a rational therapy for patients with MM. The first-in-human(FIH)phase I study performed in France demonstrates that humanized anti-CD26 therapy is generally well-tolerated with preliminary evidence of activity in patients with advanced/refractory CD26-expressing cancers, particularly refractory malignant mesothelioma. From the above results, the phase I clinical trial for malignant mesothelioma in Japan is to be started in the very near future. PMID:27431629

  18. Intramolecular interactions of L-phenylalanine: Valence ionization spectra and orbital momentum distributions of its fragment molecules.

    PubMed

    Ganesan, Aravindhan; Wang, Feng; Falzon, Chantal

    2011-02-01

    Intramolecular interactions between fragments of L-phenylalanine, i.e., phenyl and alaninyl, have been investigated using dual space analysis (DSA) quantum mechanically. Valence space photoelectron spectra (PES), orbital energy topology and correlation diagram, as well as orbital momentum distributions (MDs) of L-phenylalanine, benzene and L-alanine are studied using density functional theory methods. While fully resolved experimental PES of L-phenylalanine is not yet available, our simulated PES reproduces major features of the experimental measurement. For benzene, the simulated orbital MDs for 1e(1g) and 1a(2u) orbitals also agree well with those measured using electron momentum spectra. Our theoretical models are then applied to reveal intramolecular interactions of the species on an orbital base, using DSA. Valence orbitals of L-phenylalanine can be essentially deduced into contributions from its fragments such as phenyl and alaninyl as well as their interactions. The fragment orbitals inherit properties of their parent species in energy and shape (ie., MDs). Phenylalanine orbitals show strong bonding in the energy range of 14-20 eV, rather than outside of this region. This study presents a competent orbital based fragments-in-molecules picture in the valence space, which supports the fragment molecular orbital picture and building block principle in valence space. The optimized structures of the molecules are represented using the recently developed interactive 3D-PDF technique.

  19. Antimicrobial activity of lysostaphin and a Listeria monocytogenes bacteriophage endolysin produced and secreted by lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Turner, Mark S; Waldherr, Florian; Loessner, Martin J; Giffard, Philip M

    2007-01-01

    The expression and secretion signals of the Sep protein from Lactobacillus fermentum BR11 were used to direct export of two peptidoglycan hydrolases by Lb. fermentum BR11, Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG, Lactobacillus plantarum ATCC 14917 and Lactococcus lactis MG1363. The production levels, hydrolytic and bacteriocidal activities of the Listeria monocytogenes bacteriophage N-acetylmuramoyl-l-alanine amidase endolysin Ply511 and the glycylglycine endopeptidase lysostaphin were examined. Buffering of the growth media to a neutral pH allowed detection of Ply511 and lysostaphin peptidoglycan hydrolytic activity from all lactic acid bacteria. It was found that purified Ply511 has a pH activity range similar to that of lysostaphin with both enzymes functioning optimally under alkaline conditions. Supernatants from lactobacilli expressing lysostaphin reduced viability of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) by approximately 8 log(10) CFU/ml compared to controls. However, supernatants containing Ply511 were unable to control L. monocytogenes growth. In coculture experiments, both Lb. plantarum and Lb. fermentum synthesizing lysostaphin were able to effectively reduce MRSA cell numbers by >7.4 and 1.7 log(10)CFU/ml, respectively, while lactic acid bacteria secreting Ply511 were unable to significantly inhibit the growth of L. monocytogenes. Our results demonstrate that lysostaphin and Ply511 can be expressed in an active form from different lactic acid bacteria and lysostaphin showed superior killing activity. Lactobacilli producing lysostaphin may have potential for in situ biopreservation in foodstuffs or for prevention of S. aureus infections.

  20. Mouse Splenic Peroxidase and Its Role in Bactericidal Activity 1

    PubMed Central

    Strauss, R. R.; Paul, B. B.; Jacobs, A. A.; Sbarra, A. J.

    1972-01-01

    Spleen cell suspensions from AKR and CD-1 mice contain peroxidase activity as determined by guaiacol oxidation. This activity is found predominately in the 20,000 × g pellet fraction of spleen cell homogenates. In the presence of H2O2 and chloride ion at acidic pH, splenic peroxidase mediates the oxidation of d- or l-alanine to CO2, NH3, and acetaldehyde. The same reaction mixture without added amino acid can kill both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. The conditions for both reactions are similar. Both have an absolute requirement for H2O2 and chloride ion, neither is active at neutral or alkaline pH, and both are inhibited by the sulfonic amino acid taurine. In these aspects, splenic peroxidase is qualitatively similar in its activity to myeloperoxidase (MPO) from polymorphonuclear leukocytes. It is quantitatively different from MPO in that the latter is more potent on a per guaiacol unit basis with respect to both amino acid oxidation and bactericidal activity. Still another quantitative difference is that splenic peroxidase requires 0.1 m NaCl for activity, whereas MPO functions with as little as 0.005 m NaCl. Splenic peroxidase and MPO both appear to differ qualitatively from horseradish peroxidase in that the latter enzyme does not mediate amino acid oxidation. PMID:4632463

  1. Dietary exposure to an environmental toxin triggers neurofibrillary tangles and amyloid deposits in the brain

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Paul Alan; Davis, David A.; Mash, Deborah C.; Metcalf, James S.; Banack, Sandra Anne

    2016-01-01

    Neurofibrillary tangles (NFT) and β-amyloid plaques are the neurological hallmarks of both Alzheimer's disease and an unusual paralytic illness suffered by Chamorro villagers on the Pacific island of Guam. Many Chamorros with the disease suffer dementia, and in some villages one-quarter of the adults perished from the disease. Like Alzheimer's, the causal factors of Guamanian amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/parkinsonism dementia complex (ALS/PDC) are poorly understood. In replicated experiments, we found that chronic dietary exposure to a cyanobacterial toxin present in the traditional Chamorro diet, β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA), triggers the formation of both NFT and β-amyloid deposits similar in structure and density to those found in brain tissues of Chamorros who died with ALS/PDC. Vervets (Chlorocebus sabaeus) fed for 140 days with BMAA-dosed fruit developed NFT and sparse β-amyloid deposits in the brain. Co-administration of the dietary amino acid l-serine with l-BMAA significantly reduced the density of NFT. These findings indicate that while chronic exposure to the environmental toxin BMAA can trigger neurodegeneration in vulnerable individuals, increasing the amount of l-serine in the diet can reduce the risk. PMID:26791617

  2. Characterization of the N-Terminal Catalytic Domain of Lytµ1/6, an Endolysin from Streptomyces aureofaciens Phage µ1/6.

    PubMed

    Farkašovská, Jarmila; Godány, Andrej

    2016-10-01

    Previous characterization of Lytµ1/6, an endolysin from Streptomyces aureofaciens phage µ1/6, suggested that the N-terminal domain is responsible for the catalytic activity of Lytµ1/6. Mutational analyses (deletions and site-directed mutagenesis) demonstrated that lytic activity of Lytµ1/6 relies on the N-terminal part of about 200 amino acid residues. Various C-terminally truncated versions of Lytµ1/6 failed to cause lysis, indicating the necessity of the CBD for full enzyme activity. Functional analysis of the point mutants suggested that the residues K27, H31, E109, H176, and D184 were essential for lytic activity of the µ1/6 endolysin. Further characterization of the purified Lytµ1/6 revealed that this endolysin is an N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase which seems to be unrelated to any of the known conserved catalytic domains of phage endolysins or bacterial autolysins.

  3. Cyanobacterial Neurotoxin BMAA and Mercury in Sharks

    PubMed Central

    Hammerschlag, Neil; Davis, David A.; Mondo, Kiyo; Seely, Matthew S.; Murch, Susan J.; Glover, William Broc; Divoll, Timothy; Evers, David C.; Mash, Deborah C.

    2016-01-01

    Sharks have greater risk for bioaccumulation of marine toxins and mercury (Hg), because they are long-lived predators. Shark fins and cartilage also contain β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA), a ubiquitous cyanobacterial toxin linked to neurodegenerative diseases. Today, a significant number of shark species have found their way onto the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List of Threatened Species. Many species of large sharks are threatened with extinction due in part to the growing high demand for shark fin soup and, to a lesser extent, for shark meat and cartilage products. Recent studies suggest that the consumption of shark parts may be a route to human exposure of marine toxins. Here, we investigated BMAA and Hg concentrations in fins and muscles sampled in ten species of sharks from the South Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. BMAA was detected in all shark species with only seven of the 55 samples analyzed testing below the limit of detection of the assay. Hg concentrations measured in fins and muscle samples from the 10 species ranged from 0.05 to 13.23 ng/mg. These analytical test results suggest restricting human consumption of shark meat and fins due to the high frequency and co-occurrence of two synergistic environmental neurotoxic compounds. PMID:27537913

  4. Remarkable shape-sustaining, load-bearing, and self-healing properties displayed by a supramolecular gel derived from a bis-pyridyl-bis-amide of L-phenyl alanine.

    PubMed

    Das, Uttam Kumar; Banerjee, Subhabrata; Dastidar, Parthasarathi

    2014-09-01

    A series of bis-amides decorated with pyridyl and phenyl moieties derived from L-amino acids having an innocent side chain (L-alanine and L-phenyl alanine) were synthesized as potential low-molecular-weight gelators (LMWGs). Both protic and aprotic solvents were found to be gelled by most of the bis-amides with moderate to excellent gelation efficiency (minimum gelator concentration=0.32-4.0 wt.% and gel-sol dissociation temperature T(gel)=52-110 °C). The gels were characterized by rheology, DSC, SEM, TEM, and temperature-variable (1)H NMR measurements. pH-dependent gelation studies revealed that the pyridyl moieties took part in gelation. Structure-property correlation was attempted using single-crystal X-ray and powder X-ray diffraction data. Remarkably, one of the bis-pyridyl bis-amide gelators, namely 3,3-Phe (3-pyridyl bis-amide of L-phenylalanine) displayed outstanding shape-sustaining, load-bearing, and self-healing properties. PMID:24962554

  5. Twin-arginine translocation system (tat) mutants of Salmonella are attenuated due to envelope defects, not respiratory defects.

    PubMed

    Craig, Maureen; Sadik, Adam Y; Golubeva, Yekaterina A; Tidhar, Avital; Slauch, James M

    2013-09-01

    The twin-arginine translocation system (Tat) transports folded proteins across the cytoplasmic membrane and is critical to virulence in Salmonella and other pathogens. Experimental and bioinformatic data indicate that 30 proteins are exported via Tat in Salmonella Typhimurium. However, there are no data linking specific Tat substrates with virulence. We inactivated every Tat-exported protein and determined the virulence phenotype of mutant strains. Although a tat mutant is highly attenuated, no single Tat-exported substrate accounts for this virulence phenotype. Rather, the attenuation is due primarily to envelope defects caused by failure to translocate three Tat substrates, the N-acetylmuramoyl-l-alanine amidases, AmiA and AmiC, and the cell division protein, SufI. Strikingly, neither the amiA amiC nor the sufI mutations alone conferred any virulence defect. Although AmiC and SufI have previously been localized to the divisome, the synthetic phenotypes observed are the first to suggest functional overlap. Many Tat substrates are involved in anaerobic respiration, but we show that a mutant completely deficient in anaerobic respiration retains full virulence in both the oral and systemic phases of infection. Similarly, an obligately aerobic mutant is fully virulent. These results suggest that in the classic mouse model of infection, S. Typhimurium is replicating only in aerobic environments.

  6. The Escherichia coli amidase AmiC is a periplasmic septal ring component exported via the twin-arginine transport pathway.

    PubMed

    Bernhardt, Thomas G; de Boer, Piet A J

    2003-06-01

    The N-acetylmuramoyl-l-alanine amidases of Escherichia coli (AmiA, B and C) are periplasmic enzymes that remove murein cross-links by cleaving the peptide moiety from N-acetylmuramic acid. Ami- cells form chains, indicating that the amidases help to split the septal murein. Interestingly, cells defective in the twin-arginine protein transport (Tat) pathway show a similar division defect. We find that both AmiA and AmiC are routed to the periplasm via Tat, providing an explanation for the Tat- division phenotype. Taking advantage of the ability of Tat to export prefolded (fluorescent) green fluorescent protein (GFP) to the periplasm, we sublocalized AmiA and AmiC in live cells using functional fusions to GFP. Interestingly, the periplasmic localization of the fusions differed markedly. AmiA-GFP appeared to be dispersed throughout the periplasm in all cells. AmiC-GFP similarly appeared throughout the periplasm in small cells, but was concentrated almost exclusively at the septal ring in constricting cells. Recruitment of AmiC to the ring was mediated by an N-terminal non-amidase targeting domain and required the septal ring component FtsN. AmiC therefore replaces FtsN as the latest known recruit to the septal ring and is the first entirely periplasmic component to be localized.

  7. The crystal structure of the cell division amidase AmiC reveals the fold of the AMIN domain, a new peptidoglycan binding domain.

    PubMed

    Rocaboy, Mathieu; Herman, Raphael; Sauvage, Eric; Remaut, Han; Moonens, Kristof; Terrak, Mohammed; Charlier, Paulette; Kerff, Frederic

    2013-10-01

    Binary fission is the ultimate step of the prokaryotic cell cycle. In Gram-negative bacteria like Escherichia coli, this step implies the invagination of three biological layers (cytoplasmic membrane, peptidoglycan and outer membrane), biosynthesis of the new poles and eventually, daughter cells separation. The latter requires the coordinated action of the N-acetylmuramyl-L-alanine amidases AmiA/B/C and their LytM activators EnvC and NlpD to cleave the septal peptidoglycan. We present here the 2.5 Å crystal structure of AmiC which includes the first report of an AMIN domain structure, a β-sandwich of two symmetrical four-stranded β-sheets exposing highly conserved motifs on the two outer faces. We show that this N-terminal domain, involved in the localization of AmiC at the division site, is a new peptidoglycan-binding domain. The C-terminal catalytic domain shows an auto-inhibitory alpha helix obstructing the active site. AmiC lacking this helix exhibits by itself an activity comparable to that of the wild type AmiC activated by NlpD. We also demonstrate the interaction between AmiC and NlpD by microscale thermophoresis and confirm the importance of the active site blocking alpha helix in the regulation of the amidase activity.

  8. Hematologic and plasma biochemical reference intervals for Morelet's crocodiles (Crocodylus moreletii) in the northern wetlands of Campeche, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Padilla, Sergio E; Weber, Manuel; Jacobson, Elliott R

    2011-07-01

    Health surveys and hematologic and plasma biochemical analyses were conducted in 52 free-ranging and 51 captive Morelet's crocodiles (Crocodylus moreletii) in Campeche, Mexico, March-September 2007. Blood samples from 92 crocodiles (45 free-ranging and 47 captive) were collected for hematologic and plasma biochemical analyses. Average values of erythrocytes of free-ranging crocodiles were 1,046,166 cells/μl, and total white cells were 1.03 × 10(4) cells/μl. Captive crocodiles had erythrocyte and leukocyte values of 1,100,416 cells/μl and 8.51 × 10(3) cells/μl, respectively. There were no significant differences in values of erythrocytes or in hematocrit between free-ranging and captive crocodiles, or between sexes, or among size classes. Counts of leukocytes in free-ranging crocodiles were significantly higher than in captive individuals. The mean values of plasma analytes were 69.55 mg/l (glucose), 250.14 mg/l (cholesterol), 3.04 mg/l (uric acid), 2.70 mg/l (creatinine), and 20.20 IU/l (alanine aminotransferase). There were significant differences in cholesterol between free-ranging and captive crocodiles and between sexes.

  9. Isolation and characterization of a novel phage lysin active against Paenibacillus larvae, a honeybee pathogen

    PubMed Central

    LeBlanc, Lucy; Nezami, Sara; Yost, Diane; Tsourkas, Philippos; Amy, Penny S

    2015-01-01

    Paenibacillus larvae is the causative agent of American foulbrood (AFB) disease which affects early larval stages during honeybee development. Due to its virulence, transmissibility, capacity to develop antibiotic resistance, and the inherent resilience of its endospores, Paenibacillus larvae is extremely difficult to eradicate from infected hives which often must be burned. AFB contributes to the worldwide decline of honeybee populations, which are crucial for pollination and the food supply. We have isolated a novel bacteriophage lysin, PlyPalA, from the genome of a novel Paenibacillus larvae bacteriophage originally extracted from an environmental sample. PlyPalA has an N-terminal N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase catalytic domain and possesses lytic activity against infectious strains of Paenibacillus larvae without harming commensal bacteria known to compose the honeybee larval microbiota. A single dose of PlyPalA rescued 75% of larvae infected with endospores, showing that it represents a powerful tool for future treatment of AFB. This represents the first time that lysins have been tested for therapeutic use in invertebrates. PMID:26904379

  10. Triazolyl phenyl disulfides: 8-Amino-7-oxononanoate synthase inhibitors as potential herbicides.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Hoh-Gyu; Choi, Jung-Sup; Lim, Hee Kyung; Lee, Kee-In; Hwang, In Taek

    2015-11-01

    The chemical validation of a potential herbicide target was investigated with 8-amino-7-oxononanoate synthase (AONS, also known as 7-keto-8-aminopelargonate synthase, KAPAS) and triazolyl phenyl disulfide derivatives in vitro and in vivo. AONS activity was completely inhibited by these synthesized compounds, with an IC50 of 48 to 592μM in vitro. Forty five-day old Arabidopsis thaliana plants were completely killed by representative compound KHG23844 {N-(2-fluorophenyl)-3-(phenyldisulphanyl)-1H-1,2,4-triazole-1-carboxamide} at the application rate of 250gha(-1) of foliar treatment in greenhouse conditions. Foliar application of 1000gha(-1) KHG23844 induced 2.3-fold higher l-alanine accumulation in the treated A. thaliana plants. Foliar supplement of 1mM biotin at 1 and 2days before KHG23844 application effectively recovered the growth inhibition of A. thaliana plant treated with KHG23844. The results strongly suggested that representative compound KHG23844 and its derivatives are potential AONS inhibitors.

  11. The co-occurrence of two pyridine alkaloids, mimosine and trigonelline, in Leucaena leucocephala.

    PubMed

    Ogita, Shinjiro; Kato, Misako; Watanabe, Shin; Ashihara, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Leucaena leucocephala is a nitrogen-fixing tropical leguminous tree that produces two pyridine alkaloids, i. e. mimosine [beta-(3-hydroxy-4-pyridon-1-yl)-L-alanine] and trigonelline (1-methylpyridinium-3-carboxylate). Mimosine has been detected in leaves, flowers, pods, seeds, and roots, and it is one of the principal non-protein amino acids that occurs in all organs. Asparagine was the most abundant amino acid in flowers. The mimosine content varied from 3.3 micromol/g fresh weight (FW) in developing flowers to 171 micromol/g FW in mature seeds. Trigonelline was also detected in leaves, flowers, pods, and seeds, but not roots. The trigonelline content was lower than that of mimosine in all organs. It varied from 0.12 micromol/g FW in developing seeds to 2.6 micromol/g FW in mature seeds. [2-14C]Nicotinic acid supplied to the developing seeds was incorporated into trigonelline but not mimosine. This indicates that the pyridine and dihydroxypyridine structures of these two alkaloids are derived from distinct precursors. The physiological functions of mimosine and trigonelline are discussed briefly. PMID:24873033

  12. Small GSK-3 Inhibitor Shows Efficacy in a Motor Neuron Disease Murine Model Modulating Autophagy.

    PubMed

    de Munck, Estefanía; Palomo, Valle; Muñoz-Sáez, Emma; Perez, Daniel I; Gómez-Miguel, Begoña; Solas, M Teresa; Gil, Carmen; Martínez, Ana; Arahuetes, Rosa M

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive motor neuron degenerative disease that has no effective treatment up to date. Drug discovery tasks have been hampered due to the lack of knowledge in its molecular etiology together with the limited animal models for research. Recently, a motor neuron disease animal model has been developed using β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (L-BMAA), a neurotoxic amino acid related to the appearing of ALS. In the present work, the neuroprotective role of VP2.51, a small heterocyclic GSK-3 inhibitor, is analysed in this novel murine model together with the analysis of autophagy. VP2.51 daily administration for two weeks, starting the first day after L-BMAA treatment, leads to total recovery of neurological symptoms and prevents the activation of autophagic processes in rats. These results show that the L-BMAA murine model can be used to test the efficacy of new drugs. In addition, the results confirm the therapeutic potential of GSK-3 inhibitors, and specially VP2.51, for the disease-modifying future treatment of motor neuron disorders like ALS. PMID:27631495

  13. Perturbation of nuclear spin polarizations in solid state NMR of nitroxide-doped samples by magic-angle spinning without microwaves

    SciTech Connect

    Thurber, Kent R. Tycko, Robert

    2014-05-14

    We report solid state {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments with magic-angle spinning (MAS) on frozen solutions containing nitroxide-based paramagnetic dopants that indicate significant perturbations of nuclear spin polarizations without microwave irradiation. At temperatures near 25 K, {sup 1}H and cross-polarized {sup 13}C NMR signals from {sup 15}N,{sup 13}C-labeled L-alanine in trinitroxide-doped glycerol/water are reduced by factors as large as six compared to signals from samples without nitroxide doping. Without MAS or at temperatures near 100 K, differences between signals with and without nitroxide doping are much smaller. We attribute most of the reduction of NMR signals under MAS near 25 K to nuclear spin depolarization through the cross-effect dynamic nuclear polarization mechanism, in which three-spin flips drive nuclear polarizations toward equilibrium with spin polarization differences between electron pairs. When T{sub 1e} is sufficiently long relative to the MAS rotation period, the distribution of electron spin polarization across the nitroxide electron paramagnetic resonance lineshape can be very different from the corresponding distribution in a static sample at thermal equilibrium, leading to the observed effects. We describe three-spin and 3000-spin calculations that qualitatively reproduce the experimental observations.

  14. High-Resolution Waveguide THz Spectroscopy of Biological Molecules☆

    PubMed Central

    Laman, N.; Harsha, S. Sree; Grischkowsky, D.; Melinger, Joseph S.

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Low-frequency vibrational modes of biological molecules consist of intramolecular modes, which are dependent on the molecule as a whole, as well as intermolecular modes, which arise from hydrogen-bonding interactions and van der Waals forces. Vibrational modes thus contain important information about conformation dynamics of biological molecules, and can also be used for identification purposes. However, conventional Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) often result in broad, overlapping features that are difficult to distinguish. The technique of waveguide THz-TDS has been recently developed, resulting in sharper features. For this technique, an ordered polycrystalline film of the molecule is formed on a metal sample plate. This plate is incorporated into a metal parallel-plate waveguide and probed via waveguide THz-TDS. The planar order of the film reduces the inhomogeneous broadening, and cooling of the samples to 77K reduces the homogenous broadening. This combination results in the line-narrowing of THz vibrational modes, in some cases to an unprecedented degree. Here, this technique has been demonstrated with seven small biological molecules, thymine, deoxycytidine, adenosine, D-glucose, tryptophan, glycine, and L-alanine. The successful demonstration of this technique shows the possibilities and promise for future studies of internal vibrational modes of large biological molecules. PMID:17933879

  15. The Crystal Structure of the Pseudomonas dacunhae Aspartate-[beta]-Decarboxylase Dodecamer Reveals an Unknown Oligomeric Assembly for a Pyridoxal-5′-Phosphate-Dependent Enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Lima, Santiago; Sundararaju, Bakthavatsalam; Huang, Christina; Khristoforov, Roman; Momany, Cory; Phillips, Robert S.

    2010-09-01

    The Pseudomonas dacunhae L-aspartate-{beta}-decarboxylase (ABDC, aspartate 4-decarboxylase, aspartate 4-carboxylyase, E.C. 4.1.1.12) is a pyridoxal-5'-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the {beta}-decarboxylation of L-aspartate to produce L-alanine and CO{sub 2}. This catalytically versatile enzyme is known to form functional dodecamers at its optimal pH and is thought to work in conjunction with an L-Asp/L-Ala antiporter to establish a proton gradient across the membrane that can be used for ATP biosynthesis. We have solved the atomic structure of ABDC to 2.35 {angstrom} resolution using single-wavelength anomalous dispersion phasing. The structure reveals that ABDC oligomerizes as a homododecamer in an unknown mode among PLP-dependent enzymes and has highest structural homology with members of the PLP-dependent aspartate aminotransferase subfamily. The structure shows that the ABDC active site is very similar to that of aspartate aminotransferase. However, an additional arginine side chain (Arg37) was observed flanking the re-side of the PLP ring in the ABDC active site. The mutagenesis results show that although Arg37 is not required for activity, it appears to be involved in the ABDC catalytic cycle.

  16. Purification and kinetic characteristics of strombine dehydrogenase from the foot muscle of the hard clam (Meretrix lusoria).

    PubMed

    Lee, An-Chin; Lee, Kuen-Tsung; Pan, Li-Ying

    2011-01-01

    Strombine dehydrogenase (SDH, EC 1.5.1.22) from the foot of the hard clam Meretrix lusoria was purified over 470-fold to apparent homogeneity. It has a monomeric structure with a relative molecular mass of 46,000. Two isoenzymes were identified with isoelectric points of 6.83 and 6.88. SDH is heat labile, and has pH and temperature optima of 7.4-7.6 and 45-46°C, respectively. l-Alanine, glycine, and pyruvate are the preferred substrates. l-Serine is the third preferred amino acid. Iminodiacetate with the lowest K(i) of SDH at both pH 6.5 and 7.5 was the strongest inhibitor among succinate, acetate, iminodiacetate, oxaloacetate, and l-/d-lactate. The inhibitory activities of succinate at pH 6.5, and iminodiacetate and oxaloacetate at pH 7.5 on the SDH were higher. These inhibitors are either competitive or mixed-competitive inhibitors. Half of the enzymatic activity of SDH was inhibited by 0.2mM Fe(3+) and 0.6mM Zn(2+).

  17. Amide-conjugated indole-3-acetic acid and adventitious root formation in mung bean cuttings

    SciTech Connect

    Norcini, J.G.

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to investigate further the relationship between amide-conjugated auxin and adventitious root formation. Indoleacetylaspartic acid (IAA-aspartate) was positively identified as the predominant conjugate isolated from mung bean cuttings after the cuttings has been treated with 10/sup -3/ M IAA. In cuttings treated with (1-/sup 14/C)IAA immediately after excision (0 hr), the percent of extractable /sup 14/C in IAA-aspartate in the hypocotyl sharply increased until 36 hr, then steadily declined. (/sup 14/C)IAA was completely metabolized between 12 and 24 hr. The rooting activities of IAA-L-aspartate, IAA-L-alanine, and IAA-glycine were determined at various stages of root formation; some cuttings were pretreated with 10/sup -3/ M IAA at 0 hr. Pretreated cuttings that were treated with IAA-glycine at 12, 24, 36 hr exhibited the greatest consistency between replications, the greatest number of long roots, and the longest roots. The conjugates did not stimulate rooting as effectively as IAA, yet like IAA, generally enhanced rooting the greatest when applied before the first cell division (24 hr).

  18. Biosynthesis of prodigiosin, a secondary metabolite of Serratia marcescens.

    PubMed

    Williams, R P

    1973-03-01

    Prodigiosenes (prodigiosin and prodigiosin-like pigments) are known to be synthesized by only one genus of Eubacteriales and by two genera of Actinomycetales. Biosynthesis by Serratia marcescens occurs over a relatively narrow range of temperatures, although the bacteria grow over a broad range. When cultures of S. marcescens were incubated at 27 C in 1.0% casein hydrolysate, viable count and protein attained maximal values within 24 to 48 h, whereas prodigiosin did not reach a maximum until 96 h. The greatest amount of pigment was synthesized when cultures were in the senescent phase of growth. Suspensions of nonproliferating bacteria incubated at 27 C in only L-alanine also synthesized prodigiosin, although at a slower rate than growing cultures. Kinetics of growth for the wild-type, red S. marcescens and a white mutant were identical when incubated at 27 C, but the wild type produced abundant pigment. These results plus other data obtained from the literature suggest that prodigiosin is a secondary metabolite. The importance of this proposal to understanding the function of prodigiosin in S. marcescens is discussed.

  19. Thyroxine revisited.

    PubMed

    Katrusiak, Andrzej; Katrusiak, Anna

    2004-12-01

    The crystal structure of the common therapeutic agent, the pentahydrated sodium salt of L-thyroxine hormone (3-[4-(4-hydroxy-3,5-diiodophenoxy)-3,5-diiodophenyl]-L-alanine), has been determined and discussed in relation to the drug's stability. The stoichiometry and absolute configuration (-)-C(8)S-[C15H10I4NO4]-.Na+.5H2O have been confirmed. The crystals are built of a three-dimensional supramolecular network with two symmetry-independent L-thyroxine anions, in two distinct conformations not previously reported, linked by strong NH-O hydrogen bonds into dimers. Two independent sodium cations are fivefold and sixfold coordinated. The cations and two independent water molecules not involved in coordinating the Na cations form sheets along the crystallographic (001) planes. The presence of differently coordinated cations and non-coordinating water molecules may be responsible for water transport and loss, for decay of the crystals, and subsequent low stability of the drug. Only a conglomerate could be obtained when racemic sodium thyroxine was crystallized from ethanol and methanol solutions by evaporation, which explains the equal penta-hydration of the sodium salts of enantiomorphic and racemic thyroxine, and the fact that there are no apparent differences in their stability.

  20. Metal Dyshomeostasis and Inflammation in Alzheimer's and Parkinson's Diseases: Possible Impact of Environmental Exposures

    PubMed Central

    Myhre, Oddvar; Utkilen, Hans; Duale, Nur; Brunborg, Gunnar; Hofer, Tim

    2013-01-01

    A dysregulated metal homeostasis is associated with both Alzheimer's (AD) and Parkinson's (PD) diseases; AD patients have decreased cortex and elevated serum copper levels along with extracellular amyloid-beta plaques containing copper, iron, and zinc. For AD, a putative hepcidin-mediated lowering of cortex copper mechanism is suggested. An age-related mild chronic inflammation and/or elevated intracellular iron can trigger hepcidin production followed by its binding to ferroportin which is the only neuronal iron exporter, thereby subjecting it to lysosomal degradation. Subsequently raised neuronal iron levels can induce translation of the ferroportin assisting and copper binding amyloid precursor protein (APP); constitutive APP transmembrane passage lowers the copper pool which is important for many enzymes. Using in silico gene expression analyses, we here show significantly decreased expression of copper-dependent enzymes in AD brain and metallothioneins were upregulated in both diseases. Although few AD exposure risk factors are known, AD-related tauopathies can result from cyanobacterial microcystin and β-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) intake. Several environmental exposures may represent risk factors for PD; for this disease neurodegeneration is likely to involve mitochondrial dysfunction, microglial activation, and neuroinflammation. Administration of metal chelators and anti-inflammatory agents could affect disease outcomes. PMID:23710288

  1. Amino acid specificity of fibers of the facial/trigeminal complex innervating the maxillary barbel in the Japanese sea catfish, Plotosus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Caprio, John; Shimohara, Mami; Marui, Takayuki; Kohbara, Jun; Harada, Shuitsu; Kiyohara, Sadao

    2015-12-01

    The Japanese sea catfish, Plotosus japonicus, possesses taste and solitary chemoreceptor cells (SCCs) located on the external body surface that detect specific water-soluble substances. Here, we identify two major fiber types of the facial/trigeminal complex that transmit amino acid information to the medulla. Both single and few fiber preparations respond to amino acid stimulation in the 0.1 μM to mM range. One fiber type responds best to glycine and l-alanine (i.e. Gly/Ala fibers) whereas the other fiber type is best stimulated by l-proline and glycine betaine (hereafter referred to only as betaine) (i.e. Pro/Bet fibers). We demonstrate that betaine, which does not alter the pH of the seawater and therefore does not activate the animals' highly sensitive pH sensors (Caprio et al., Science 344:1154-1156, 2014), is sufficient to elicit appetitive food search behavior. We further show that the amino acid specificity of fibers of the facial/trigeminal complex in P. japonicus is different from that in Ariopsis felis (Michel and Caprio, J. Neurophysiol. 66:247-260, 1991; Michel et al., J. Comp. Physiol. A. 172:129-138, 1993), a representative member of the only other family (Ariidae) of extant marine catfishes. PMID:26459116

  2. Solid state nuclear magnetic resonance with magic-angle spinning and dynamic nuclear polarization below 25 K

    PubMed Central

    Thurber, Kent R.; Potapov, Alexey; Yau, Wai-Ming; Tycko, Robert

    2012-01-01

    We describe an apparatus for solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) with dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) and magic-angle spinning (MAS) at 20–25 K and 9.4 Tesla. The MAS NMR probe uses helium to cool the sample space and nitrogen gas for MAS drive and bearings, as described earlier (Thurber et al., J. Magn. Reson. 2008) [1], but also includes a corrugated waveguide for transmission of microwaves from below the probe to the sample. With a 30 mW circularly polarized microwave source at 264 GHz, MAS at 6.8 kHz, and 21 K sample temperature, greater than 25-fold enhancements of cross-polarized 13C NMR signals are observed in spectra of frozen glycerol/water solutions containing the triradical dopant DOTOPA-TEMPO when microwaves are applied. As demonstrations, we present DNP-enhanced one-dimensional and two-dimensional 13C MAS NMR spectra of frozen solutions of uniformly 13C-labeled L-alanine and melittin, a 26-residue helical peptide that we have synthesized with four uniformly 13C-labeled amino acids. PMID:23238592

  3. How significant to plant N nutrition is the direct consumption of soil microbes by roots?

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Paul W; Marsden, Karina A; Jones, Davey L

    2013-01-01

    Summary –The high degree to which plant roots compete with soil microbes for organic forms of nitrogen (N) is becoming increasingly apparent. This has culminated in the finding that plants may consume soil microbes as a source of N, but the functional significance of this process remains unknown. –We used 15N- and 14C-labelled cultures of soil bacteria to measure rates of acquisition of microbes by sterile wheat roots and plants growing in soil. We compared these rates with acquisition of 15N delivered as nitrate, amino acid monomer (l-alanine) and short peptide (l-tetraalanine), and the rate of decomposition of [14C] microbes by indigenous soil microbiota. –Acquisition of microbe 15N by both sterile roots and roots growing in soil was one to two orders of magnitude slower than acquisition of all other forms of 15N. Decomposition of microbes was fast enough to account for all 15N recovered, but approximately equal recovery of microbe 14C suggests that microbes entered roots intact. –Uptake of soil microbes by wheat (Triticum aestivum) roots appears to take place in soil. If wheat is typical, the importance of this process to terrestrial N cycling is probably minor in comparison with fluxes of other forms of soil inorganic and organic N. PMID:23718181

  4. The staying power of adhesion-associated antioxidant activity in Mytilus californianus.

    PubMed

    Miller, Dusty R; Spahn, Jamie E; Waite, J Herbert

    2015-10-01

    The California mussel, Mytilus californianus, adheres in the highly oxidizing intertidal zone with a fibrous holdfast called the byssus using 3, 4-dihydroxyphenyl-l-alanine (DOPA)-containing adhesive proteins. DOPA is susceptible to oxidation in seawater and, upon oxidation, loses adhesion. Successful mussel adhesion thus depends critically on controlling oxidation and reduction. To explore how mussels regulate redox during their functional adhesive lifetime, we tracked extractable protein concentration, DOPA content and antioxidant activity in byssal plaques over time. In seawater, DOPA content and antioxidant activity in the byssus persisted much longer than expected-50% of extractable DOPA and 30% of extractable antioxidant activity remained after 20 days. Antioxidant activity was located at the plaque-substrate interface, demonstrating that antioxidant activity keeps DOPA reduced for durable and dynamic adhesion. We also correlated antioxidant activity to cysteine and DOPA side chains of mussel foot proteins (mfps), suggesting that mussels use both cysteine and DOPA redox reservoirs for controlling interfacial chemistry. These data are discussed in the context of the biomaterial structure and properties of the marine mussel byssus.

  5. D-alanine incorporation into macromolecules and effects of D-alanine deprivation on active transport in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Clark, V L; Young, F E

    1978-03-01

    An auxotroph of Bacillus subtilis 168 unable to synthesize D-alanine loses the ability to support endogenously energized transport when deprived of D-alanine. Revertants of the mutant retain transport activity. The loss of transport is specific for substrates taken up by active transport; substrates taken up by group translocation are transported at normal rates. The loss of transport can be retarded by pretreatment of the cells with inhibitors of protein synthesis. Since the loss of transport could be due to an alteration in a D-alanine-containing polymer, we investigated the incorporation of D-[14C]alanine into macromolecules. The major D-alanine-containing polymers in B. subtilis are peptidoglycan and teichoic acid, with 4 to 6% of the D-[14C]alanine label found in trypsin-soluble material. Whereas the peptidoglycan and teichoic acid undergo turnover, the trypsin-soluble material does not. Treatment of the trypsin-soluble material with Pronase releases free D-alanine. Analysis of acid-hydrolyzed trypsin-soluble material indicated that approximately 75% of the radioactivity is present as D-alanine, with the remainder present as L-alanine. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of partially purified D-[14C]alanine-labeled membranes indicated the presence of two peaks of radioactivity (molecular weights, 230,000 and 80,000) that could be digested by trypsin. The results suggest that D-alanine may be covalently bound to cellular proteins.

  6. The effect of immunonutrition (glutamine, alanine) on fracture healing

    PubMed Central

    Küçükalp, Abdullah; Durak, Kemal; Bayyurt, Sarp; Sönmez, Gürsel; Bilgen, Muhammed S.

    2014-01-01

    Background There have been various studies related to fracture healing. Glutamine is an amino acid with an important role in many cell and organ functions. This study aimed to make a clinical, radiological, and histopathological evaluation of the effects of glutamine on fracture healing. Methods Twenty rabbits were randomly allocated into two groups of control and immunonutrition. A fracture of the fibula was made to the right hind leg. All rabbits received standard food and water. From post-operative first day for 30 days, the study group received an additional 2 ml/kg/day 20% L-alanine L-glutamine solution via a gastric catheter, and the control group received 2 ml/kg/day isotonic via gastric catheter. At the end of 30 days, the rabbits were sacrificed and the fractures were examined clinically, radiologically, and histopathologically in respect to the degree of union. Results Radiological evaluation of the control group determined a mean score of 2.5 according to the orthopaedists and 2.65 according to the radiologists. In the clinical evaluation, the mean score was 1.875 for the control group and 2.0 for the study group. Histopathological evaluation determined a mean score of 8.5 for the control group and 9.0 for the study group. Conclusion One month after orally administered glutamine–alanine, positive effects were observed on fracture healing radiologically, clinically, and histopathologically, although no statistically significant difference was determined.

  7. A new 2 methylalanine-PVC ESR dosimeter.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Bruno T; Chen, Felipe; Baffa, Oswaldo

    2005-02-01

    The use of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) as a binder to 2-methylalanine (2MA) dosimeters was investigated. It was recently shown by Olsson et al. (Radiat. Res. 157 (2002) 113), that 2MA is approximately 70% more sensitive than L-alanine which makes this substance a good candidate to replace alanine in ESR dosimetry. PVC is a low yield material for free radical production by ionizing radiation and a good binding material easily processed and widely available. PVC can be prepared at room temperature and mixed up to 50% in weight with 2MA to produce a pellet stable in mass and physical dimensions, in large quantities and with low background signal. Pure PVC pellet irradiated at 50 Gy gave weaker ESR signals compared to 2MA at the region of spectral interest. Spectrometer settings such as microwave power, and modulation amplitude were optimized for the measurements. This dosimeter production scheme allows the addition of Mn2+ ions for an internal reference signal, leading to a self-calibrated dosimeter (J. Radional. Nucl. Chem. 240 (1999) 215).

  8. Evidence for behavioral preference toward environmental concentrations of urban-use herbicides in a model adult fish.

    PubMed

    Tierney, Keith B; Sekela, Mark A; Cobbler, Christine E; Xhabija, Besa; Gledhill, Melissa; Ananvoranich, Sirinart; Zielinski, Barbara S

    2011-09-01

    Fish live in waters of contaminant flux. In three urban, fish-bearing waterways of British Columbia, Canada, we found the active ingredients of WeedEx, KillEx, and Roundup herbicide formulations (2,4-D, dicamba, glyphosate, and mecoprop) at low to high ng/L concentrations (0.26 to 309 ng/L) in routine conditions, i.e., no rain for at least one week. Following rain, these concentrations increased by an average of eightfold, suggesting runoff as a major route of herbicide introduction in these waterways. To determine whether fish might be able to limit point-source exposures through sensory-driven behaviors, we introduced pulses of representative herbicide mixtures to individual adult zebrafish (a model species) in flow-through tanks. Fish did the opposite of limit exposure; they chose to spend more time in pulses of herbicide mixtures representative of those that may occur with rain events. This attraction response was not altered by a previous 4-d exposure to lower concentrations of the mixtures, suggesting fish will not learn from previous exposures. However, previous exposures did alter an attraction response to an amino acid prevalent in food (L-alanine). The present study demonstrates that fish living within urban waterways may elect to place themselves in herbicide-contaminated environments and that these exposures may alter their behavioral responses to cues necessary for survival.

  9. Comparative 4f-4f absorption spectral study for the interactions of Nd(III) with some amino acids: Preliminary thermodynamics and kinetic studies of interaction of Nd(III):glycine with Ca(II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moaienla, T.; Bendangsenla, N.; David Singh, Th.; Sumitra, Ch.; Rajmuhon Singh, N.; Indira Devi, M.

    2012-02-01

    Spectral analysis of Nd(III) complexes with some amino acids viz.; glycine, L-alanine, L-phenylalanine and L-aspartic acid in the presence and absence of Ca 2+ was carried out in some organic solvents; CH 3OH, CH 3CN, DMF and dioxane using comparative absorption spectra of 4f-4f transitions. The study was carried out by evaluating various energy interaction parameters like Slator-Condon ( Fk), Lande factor ( ξ4f), nephelauxetic ratio ( β), bonding parameter ( b1/2), percent-covalency ( δ) by applying partial and multiple regression analysis. The values of oscillator strength ( Pobs) and Judd-Ofelt electric dipole intensity parameter Tλ ( λ = 2, 4, 6) for different 4f-4f transitions have been calculated. On analysis of the variation of the various energy interaction parameters as well as the changes in the oscillator strength ( Pobs) and Tλ values, reveal the mode of binding with the different ligands. Kinetic studies for the complexation of Nd(III):glycine:Ca(II) have also been discussed at different temperatures in DMF medium and from it the values of activation energy ( Ea) and thermodynamic parameters like Δ H°, Δ S° and Δ G° for the complexation are evaluated.

  10. Influence of functional groups on the C α-C β chain of L-phenylalanine and its derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesan, Aravindhan; Brunger, Michael; Wang, Feng

    2010-07-01

    L-phenylalanine ( L-phe) consists of three different functional groups, i.e., phenyl, carboxyl (-COOH) and amino (-NH 2), joining through the C α-C β bridge. Substitution of these groups produces 2-phenethylamine (PEA) and 3-phenylpropionic acid (PPA). Electronic structures of L-phe, PEA and PPA together with smaller "fragments" L-alanine and benzene were determined using density functional theory (DFT), from which core and valence shell ionization spectra were simulated. Comparison of the spectra reveals that core shell ionization energies clearly indicate that the carbon bridge is significantly affected by their functional group substitutions particularly at the C α site. In the valence space, quite unexpectedly, the frontier orbitals are concentrated on the benzene group although some energy splitting is observed. The orbitals which significantly affect the C α-C β carbon backbone are from the inner valence shell in the ionization energy region of 20-26 eV of the molecules.

  11. [Single-handed helical framework material [{Cu(sala)}n] incorporated peramylated β-cyclodextrin for improving gas chromatography enantioseparation].

    PubMed

    Xie, Shengming; Liu, Hong; Yang, Jiangrong; Ai, Ping; Yuan, Liming

    2016-01-01

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) as a new generation of functional molecular materials, have broad application prospects in enantioselective catalysis and chiral separation areas due to their unusual properties, such as high surface area, rich topologies, permanent microporous, availability of outer-surface modification and so on. A single-handed helical three-dimensional metal-organic framework material [{Cu(sala)}n] (H2sala=N-(2-hydroxybenzyl)-L-alanine) was incorporated with peramylated β-cyclodextrin for the preparation of novel capillary gas chromatography stationary phase. To investigate whether the use of a chiral MOF can enhance enantioseparation on peramylated β-cyclodextrin, three chiral columns were fabricated using different stationary phases for comparison, including column A ([{Cu (sala)}n]), column B (peramylated β-cyclodextrin) and column C ([{Cu(sala)}n]+peramylated β-cyclodextrin). The results of comparing the resolving abilities of the three columns for the same chiral compounds demonstrated that column C showed better enantioselectivity and higher resolution. The use of MOF [{Cu(sala)}n] can improve enantioseparation on peramylated β-cyclodextrin. PMID:27319175

  12. Antioxidant efficacy and adhesion rescue by a recombinant mussel foot protein-6.

    PubMed

    Nicklisch, Sascha C T; Das, Saurabh; Martinez Rodriguez, Nadine R; Waite, J Herbert; Israelachvili, Jacob N

    2013-01-01

    Mytilus foot protein type 6 (mfp-6) is crucial for maintaining the reducing conditions needed for optimal wet adhesion in marine mussels. In this report, we describe the expression and production of a recombinant Mytilus californianus foot protein type 6 variant 1 (rmfp-6.1) fused with a hexahistidine affinity tag in Escherichia coli and its purification by affinity chromatography. Recombinant mfp-6 showed high purification yields of 5-6 mg L(-1) cell culture and excellent solubility in low pH buffers that retard oxidation of its many thiol groups. Purified rmfp-6.1 protein showed high 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging activity when compared with vitamin C. Using the highly sensitive surface forces apparatus (SFA) technique to measure interfacial surface forces in the nano-Newton range, we show that rmfp-6.1 is also able to rescue the oxidation-dependent adhesion loss of mussel foot protein 3 (mfp-3) at pH 3. The adhesion rescue is related to a reduction of dopaquinone back to 3,4-dihydroxyphenyl-l-alanine in mfp-3, which is the reverse reaction observed during the detrimental enzymatic browning process in fruits and vegetables. Broadly viewed, rmfp-6.1 has potential as a versatile antioxidant for applications ranging from personal products to antispoilants for perishable foods during processing and storage. © 2013 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 29:1587-1593, 2013. PMID:24106182

  13. Cyanobacterial Neurotoxin BMAA and Mercury in Sharks.

    PubMed

    Hammerschlag, Neil; Davis, David A; Mondo, Kiyo; Seely, Matthew S; Murch, Susan J; Glover, William Broc; Divoll, Timothy; Evers, David C; Mash, Deborah C

    2016-08-16

    Sharks have greater risk for bioaccumulation of marine toxins and mercury (Hg), because they are long-lived predators. Shark fins and cartilage also contain β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA), a ubiquitous cyanobacterial toxin linked to neurodegenerative diseases. Today, a significant number of shark species have found their way onto the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List of Threatened Species. Many species of large sharks are threatened with extinction due in part to the growing high demand for shark fin soup and, to a lesser extent, for shark meat and cartilage products. Recent studies suggest that the consumption of shark parts may be a route to human exposure of marine toxins. Here, we investigated BMAA and Hg concentrations in fins and muscles sampled in ten species of sharks from the South Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. BMAA was detected in all shark species with only seven of the 55 samples analyzed testing below the limit of detection of the assay. Hg concentrations measured in fins and muscle samples from the 10 species ranged from 0.05 to 13.23 ng/mg. These analytical test results suggest restricting human consumption of shark meat and fins due to the high frequency and co-occurrence of two synergistic environmental neurotoxic compounds.

  14. The astrocytic transporter SLC7A10 (Asc-1) mediates glycinergic inhibition of spinal cord motor neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ehmsen, Jeffrey T.; Liu, Yong; Wang, Yue; Paladugu, Nikhil; Johnson, Anna E.; Rothstein, Jeffrey D.; du Lac, Sascha; Mattson, Mark P.; Höke, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    SLC7A10 (Asc-1) is a sodium-independent amino acid transporter known to facilitate transport of a number of amino acids including glycine, L-serine, L-alanine, and L-cysteine, as well as their D-enantiomers. It has been described as a neuronal transporter with a primary role related to modulation of excitatory glutamatergic neurotransmission. We find that SLC7A10 is substantially enriched in a subset of astrocytes of the caudal brain and spinal cord in a distribution corresponding with high densities of glycinergic inhibitory synapses. Accordingly, we find that spinal cord glycine levels are significantly reduced in Slc7a10-null mice and spontaneous glycinergic postsynaptic currents in motor neurons show substantially diminished amplitudes, demonstrating an essential role for SLC7A10 in glycinergic inhibitory function in the central nervous system. These observations establish the etiology of sustained myoclonus (sudden involuntary muscle movements) and early postnatal lethality characteristic of Slc7a10-null mice, and implicate SLC7A10 as a candidate gene and auto-antibody target in human hyperekplexia and stiff person syndrome, respectively. PMID:27759100

  15. L-glutamine stimulates jejunal sodium and chloride absorption in pig rotavirus enteritis.

    PubMed

    Rhoads, J M; Keku, E O; Quinn, J; Woosely, J; Lecce, J G

    1991-03-01

    Rotavirus enteritis is the leading cause of diarrhea in infants worldwide. A research priority of the World Health Organization is to develop oral rehydration solutions containing amino acids or other additives that will stimulate intestinal absorption more efficiently than the current glucose-based oral rehydration solutions. Glutamine is the principal metabolic fuel of the small bowel and a putative stimulator of mucosal repair. This report describes the transport response to mucosal L-glutamine following intestinal injury caused by porcine rotavirus. Peak symptoms and mucosal damage were observed 2-7 days after oral rotavirus inoculation. In vitro transport studies of the maximally injured region, the midjejunum (80% reduction in lactase), surprisingly, showed transport responses to L-glutamine (30 mmol/L) and L-alanine (30 mmol/L) that were similar qualitatively and quantitatively to those observed in control tissue. Subsequent application of mucosal D-glucose (30 mmol/L) caused additional stimulation of electrogenic Na+ transport, but the response to glucose was blunted (P less than 0.05) in the infected tissues. Glutamine and alanine enhanced Na+ absorption to a similar degree (2-2.5 muEq.cm-2.h-1), but glutamine stimulated equal amounts of electrogenic and electroneutral NaCl absorption, whereas alanine had no significant effect on net Cl- flux. Glutamine is a potentially useful substrate for investigation in oral rehydration solutions for infant diarrhea.

  16. Capture myopathy in an endangered sandhill crane (Grus canadensis pulla)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carpenter, J.W.; Thomas, N.J.; Reeves, S.

    1991-01-01

    Despite precautions to protect cranes, a 3-year-old endangered Mississippi sandhill crane (Grus canadensis pulla) was found caught in a leghold trap in Gautier, Mississippi, on 11 November 1987. The bird could have been in the trap for up to 16 hr and was standing and struggling to escape when it was discovered. Serum chemistries of the crane on 12 November revealed elevated lactic dehydrogenase (2,880 IU/L), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) (152 IU/L), and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) (>1,000 IU/L) values. Following surgical amputation of a fractured toe, the bird never attempted to stand and was unable to stand even when manually supported. Radiographic and physical examination of both legs did not reveal any anatomical abnormalities. Despite medical care, including supportive therapy, no improvement was observed in the bird's ability to stand and to support itself, and the bird died on 19 November. Serum chemistries and the postmortem and histopathologic findings were compatible with capture myopathy described in other species. Because of the possible susceptibility of long-legged birds such as the Mississippi sandhill crane to capture myopathy, special care must be taken when trapping, handling, chemically immobilizing, and transporting these species. In addition, precautions must be taken when conducting a predator-control program to ensure that nontarget wildlife are unlikely to encounter traps. Capture myopathy has only rarely been observed in wild birds, and this case represents the first report in a Mississippi sandhill crane.

  17. Dipeptide Aggregation in Aqueous Solution from Fixed Point-Charge Force Fields.

    PubMed

    Götz, Andreas W; Bucher, Denis; Lindert, Steffen; McCammon, J Andrew

    2014-04-01

    The description of aggregation processes with molecular dynamics simulations is a playground for testing biomolecular force fields, including a new generation of force fields that explicitly describe electronic polarization. In this work, we study a system consisting of 50 glycyl-l-alanine (Gly-Ala) dipeptides in solution with 1001 water molecules. Neutron diffraction experiments have shown that at this concentration, Gly-Ala aggregates into large clusters. However, general-purpose force fields in combination with established water models can fail to correctly describe this aggregation process, highlighting important deficiencies in how solute-solute and solute-solvent interactions are parametrized in these force fields. We found that even for the fully polarizable AMOEBA force field, the degree of association is considerably underestimated. Instead, a fixed point-charge approach based on the newly developed IPolQ scheme [Cerutti et al. J. Phys. Chem.2013, 117, 2328] allows for the correct modeling of the dipeptide aggregation in aqueous solution. This result should stimulate interest in novel fitting schemes that aim to improve the description of the solvent polarization effect within both explicitly polarizable and fixed point-charge frameworks.

  18. Boronate Complex Formation with Dopa Containing Mussel Adhesive Protein Retards pH-Induced Oxidation and Enables Adhesion to Mica

    PubMed Central

    Israelachvili, Jacob N.; Chen, Yunfei; Waite, J. Herbert

    2014-01-01

    The biochemistry of mussel adhesion has inspired the design of surface primers, adhesives, coatings and gels for technological applications. These mussel-inspired systems often focus on incorporating the amino acid 3,4-dihydroxyphenyl-L-alanine (Dopa) or a catecholic analog into a polymer. Unfortunately, effective use of Dopa is compromised by its susceptibility to auto-oxidation at neutral pH. Oxidation can lead to loss of adhesive function and undesired covalent cross-linking. Mussel foot protein 5 (Mfp-5), which contains ∼30 mole % Dopa, is a superb adhesive under reducing conditions but becomes nonadhesive after pH-induced oxidation. Here we report that the bidentate complexation of borate by Dopa to form a catecholato-boronate can be exploited to retard oxidation. Although exposure of Mfp-5 to neutral pH typically oxidizes Dopa, resulting in a>95% decrease in adhesion, inclusion of borate retards oxidation at the same pH. Remarkably, this Dopa-boronate complex dissociates upon contact with mica to allow for a reversible Dopa-mediated adhesion. The borate protection strategy allows for Dopa redox stability and maintained adhesive function in an otherwise oxidizing environment. PMID:25303409

  19. Amino acid specificity of fibers of the facial/trigeminal complex innervating the maxillary barbel in the Japanese sea catfish, Plotosus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Caprio, John; Shimohara, Mami; Marui, Takayuki; Kohbara, Jun; Harada, Shuitsu; Kiyohara, Sadao

    2015-12-01

    The Japanese sea catfish, Plotosus japonicus, possesses taste and solitary chemoreceptor cells (SCCs) located on the external body surface that detect specific water-soluble substances. Here, we identify two major fiber types of the facial/trigeminal complex that transmit amino acid information to the medulla. Both single and few fiber preparations respond to amino acid stimulation in the 0.1 μM to mM range. One fiber type responds best to glycine and l-alanine (i.e. Gly/Ala fibers) whereas the other fiber type is best stimulated by l-proline and glycine betaine (hereafter referred to only as betaine) (i.e. Pro/Bet fibers). We demonstrate that betaine, which does not alter the pH of the seawater and therefore does not activate the animals' highly sensitive pH sensors (Caprio et al., Science 344:1154-1156, 2014), is sufficient to elicit appetitive food search behavior. We further show that the amino acid specificity of fibers of the facial/trigeminal complex in P. japonicus is different from that in Ariopsis felis (Michel and Caprio, J. Neurophysiol. 66:247-260, 1991; Michel et al., J. Comp. Physiol. A. 172:129-138, 1993), a representative member of the only other family (Ariidae) of extant marine catfishes.

  20. Novel route of toxicant exposure in an ancient extant vertebrate: nickel uptake by hagfish skin and the modifying effects of slime.

    PubMed

    Glover, Chris N; Blewett, Tamzin A; Wood, Chris M

    2015-02-01

    Utilizing an in vitro technique, the skin of Pacific hagfish (Eptatretus stouti) was shown to take up nickel from the water via a high affinity, low capacity transport pathway. Uptake was biphasic, with saturation occurring at low nickel exposure concentrations, superseded by linear, diffusive uptake at levels greater than 50 μM. In vivo exposures showed that nickel accumulated mainly in the gill, heart, and brain, representing a tissue distribution distinct from that found in teleosts. Slime on the epidermal surface was shown to significantly reduce the uptake of low concentrations (10 μM) of the metals zinc and nickel, but slime had no effect on organic nutrient (the amino acid l-alanine) absorption. At a higher metal exposure concentration (1 mM), slime was no longer protective, indicating saturation of metal-binding sites. This is the first study to show that metals can be taken up by the integument of hagfish. The ability of the skin to act as a transport epithelium may be of particular importance for a burrowing, benthic scavenger, such as hagfish, which are likely to be exposed to relatively enriched levels of metal toxicants through their habitat and lifestyle, and this may have consequences for human health through hagfish consumption.

  1. Heat-induced temperature sensitivity of outgrowing Bacillus cereus spores.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, K M; Busta, F F

    1984-01-01

    Inactivation of Bacillus cereus spores during cooling (10 degrees C/h) from 90 degrees C occurred in two phases. One phase occurred during cooling from 90 to 80 degrees C; the second occurred during cooling from 46 to 38 degrees C. In contrast, no inactivation occurred when spores were cooled from a maximum temperature of 80 degrees C. Inactivation of spores at a constant temperature of 45 degrees C was induced by initial heat treatments from 80 to 90 degrees C. The higher temperatures accelerated the rate of inactivation. Germination of spores was required for 45 degrees C inactivation to occur; however, faster germination was not the cause of accelerated inactivation of spores receiving higher initial heat treatments. Repair of possible injury was not observed in Trypticase soy broth (BBL Microbiology Systems), peptone, beef extract, starch, or L-alanine at 30 or 35 degrees C. Microscopic evaluation of spores outgrowing at 45 degrees C revealed that when inactivation occurred, outgrowth halted at the swelling stage. Inhibition of protein synthesis by chloramphenicol at the optimum temperature also stopped outgrowth at swelling; thus protein synthesis may play a role in the 45 degree C inactivation mechanism. PMID:6426390

  2. Effects of Methylation on Zebularine Studied by Density Functional Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvam, Lalitha; Vasilyev, Vladislav; Wang, Feng; Vasilyev, Vladislav

    2009-06-01

    1-(β -D-ribofuranosyl)-2-pyrimidone (zebularine or zeb) and 1-(β -D-ribofuranosyl)-5-methyl-2-pyrimidinone (d5) are effective inhibitors of cytidine deaminases (CDA). Methyl modification of zeb at the C(5) position in the base moiety produces d5. A density functional theory (DFT) study reveals the impact of the methyl group on the electronic structures and spectra of the nucleoside pair. It is found that the addition of methyl group has little effect on the geometry of the nucleosides as well as their sugar puckering, but affects anisotropic properties such as dihedral angles, condensed Fukui functions and charge distribution can be seen in their molecular electrostatic potentials (MEPs). Electron spectra serve as the fingerprint for the methyl group. The valence spectra clearly indicate that the molecular pair is related in the inner valence space of IP > 20 eV, whereas the outer valence space reveals the methyl associated electronic structural modifications of the molecular pair. In the present study, the molecular orbitals (MO) such as MO8, MO18 and MO37 (HOMO as MO1) are identified as the fingerprint MOs for methyl, whereas other MOs marked in the figure are secondary methyl related MOs. Chemical shift in the inner shell and their spectra are also calculated. It reveals the similarities and differences of methyl effect to large nucleosides and small amino acids such as L-alanine.

  3. Catalysis of peptide formation by inorganic oxides: high efficiency of alumina under mild conditions on the Earth-like planets.

    PubMed

    Basiuk, V A; Sainz-Rojas, J

    2001-01-01

    Amino acid condensation catalyzed by inorganic oxides is a widely recognized way for prebiotic peptide formation. Silica and alumina are widely distributed in the Earth-like planets' crust as minerals of different complexity, and thus are attractive model catalysts for the studies of abiotic peptide synthesis. Experiments performed in other laboratories have shown that this process can be efficient at > 80 degrees C, which is not easy to find on the planetary surface in combination with sufficient concentrations of amino acids and necessary catalysts. In the present work we tested catalytic activity of three forms of alumina (which proved to be an efficient catalyst for this process) in the intermolecular condensation of L-alanine. We expanded the temperature interval down to 55 degrees C and used the simplest permanent heating procedure, without employing fluctuating drying/wetting conditions. The most important finding is that even under the lowest temperature considered (i.e. 55 degrees C), short peptide formation can be detected already after 10-30 days of heating. This fact implies that the abiotic peptide formation might occur in a wide variety of planetary environments, without need for high temperatures, given the presence of amino acid building blocks and alumina-containing minerals.

  4. Nuclear magnetic relaxation studies of semiconductor nanocrystals and solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachleben, J. R.

    1993-09-01

    Semiconductor nanocrystals, small biomolecules, and C-13 enriched solids were studied through the relaxation in NMR spectra. Surface structure of semiconductor nanocrystals (CdS) was deduced from high resolution H-1 and C-13 liquid state spectra of thiophenol ligands on the nanocrystal surfaces. The surface coverage by thiophenol was found to be low, being 5.6 and 26% for nanocrystal radii of 11.8 and 19.2 angstrom. Internal motion is estimated to be slow with a correlation time greater than 10(exp -8) s(exp -1). The surface thiophenol ligands react to form a dithiophenol when the nanocrystals were subjected to O2 and ultraviolet. A method for measuring (N-14)-(H-1) J-couplings is demonstrated on pyridine and the peptide oxytocin; selective 2D T(sub 1) and T(sub 2) experiments are presented for measuring relaxation times in crowded spectra with overlapping peaks in 1D, but relaxation effects interfere. Possibility of carbon-carbon cross relaxation in C-13 enriched solids is demonstrated by experiments on zinc acetate and L-alanine.

  5. The Origin of Amino Acids in Lunar Regolith Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Jamie E.; Callahan, Michael P.; Dworkin, Jason P.; Glavin, Daniel P.; McLain, Hannah L.; Noble, Sarah K.; Gibson, Everett K., Jr.

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed the amino acid content of seven lunar regolith samples returned by the Apollo 16 and Apollo 17 missions and stored under NASA curation since collection using ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection and time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Consistent with results from initial analyses shortly after collection in the 1970s, we observed amino acids at low concentrations in all of the curated samples, ranging from 0.2 parts-per-billion (ppb) to 42.7 ppb in hot-water extracts and 14.5 ppb to 651.1 ppb in 6M HCl acid-vapor-hydrolyzed, hot-water extracts. Amino acids identified in the Apollo soil extracts include glycine, D- and L-alanine, D- and L-aspartic acid, D- and L-glutamic acid, D- and L-serine, L-threonine, and L-valine, all of which had previously been detected in lunar samples, as well as several compounds not previously identified in lunar regoliths: -aminoisobutyric acid (AIB), D-and L-amino-n-butyric acid (-ABA), DL-amino-n-butyric acid, -amino-n-butyric acid, -alanine, and -amino-n-caproic acid. We observed an excess of the L enantiomer in most of the detected proteinogenic amino acids, but racemic alanine and racemic -ABA were present in some samples.

  6. The Amino Acid Composition of the Sutter's Mill Carbonaceous Chondrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, D. P.; Burton, A. S.; Elsila, J. E.; Dworkin, J. P.; Yin, Q. Z.; Cooper, G.; Jenniskens, P.

    2012-01-01

    In contrast to the Murchison meteorite which had a complex distribution of amino acids with a total C2 to Cs amino acid abundance of approx.14,000 parts-per-billion (ppb) [2], the Sutters Mill meteorite was found to be highly depleted in amino acids. Much lower abundances (approx.30 to 180 ppb) of glycine, beta-alanine, L-alanine and L-serine were detected in SM2 above procedural blank levels indicating that this meteorite sample experienced only minimal terrestrial amino acid contamination after its fall to Earth. Carbon isotope measurements will be necessary to establish the origin of glycine and beta-alanine in SM2. Other non-protein amino acids that are rare on Earth, yet commonly found in other CM meteorites such as aaminoisobutyric acid (alpha-AIB) and isovaline, were not identified in SM2. However, traces of beta-AIB (approx.1 ppb) were detected in SM2 and could be" extraterrestrial in origin. The low abundances of amino acids in the Sutter's Mill meteorite is consistent with mineralogical evidence that at least some parts of the Sutter's Mill meteorite parent body experienced extensive aqueous and/or thermal alteration.

  7. Nitrogen-doped carbon dots: a facile and general preparation method, photoluminescence investigation, and imaging applications.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yang; Wu, Ming; Liu, Yang; Feng, Xi-Zeng; Yin, Xue-Bo; He, Xi-Wen; Zhang, Yu-Kui

    2013-02-11

    Carbon dots (Cdots) are an important probe for imaging and sensing applications because of their fluorescence property, good biocompatibility, and low toxicity. However, complex procedures and strong acid treatment are often required and Cdots suffer from low photoluminescence (PL) emission. Herein, a facile and general strategy using carbonization of precursors and then extraction with solvents is proposed for the preparation of nitrogen-doped Cdots (N-Cdots) with 3-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)-L-alanine (L-DOPA), L-histidine, and L-arginine as precursor models. After they are heated, the precursors become carbonized. Nitrogen-doped Cdots are subsequently extracted into N,N'-dimethylformamide (DMF) from the carbogenic solid. A core-shell structure of Cdots with a carbon core and the oxygen-containing shell was observed. Nitrogen has different forms in N-Cdots and oxidized N-Cdots. The doped nitrogen and low oxidation level in N-Cdots improve their emission significantly. The N-Cdots show an emission with a nitrogen-content-dependent intensity and Cdot-size-dependent emission-peak wavelength. Imaging of HeLa cells, a human cervical cancer cell line, and HepG2 cells, a human hepatocellular liver carcinoma line, was observed with high resolution using N-Cdots as a probe and validates their use in imaging applications and their multicolor property in the living cell system.

  8. Consumption of fa cai Nostoc soup: a potential for BMAA exposure from Nostoc cyanobacteria in China?

    PubMed

    Roney, Britton R; Renhui, Li; Banack, Sandra Anne; Murch, Susan; Honegger, Rosmarie; Cox, Paul Alan

    2009-01-01

    Grown in arid regions of western China the cyanobacterium Nostoc flagelliforme--called fa cai in Mandarin and fat choy in Cantonese--is wild-harvested and used to make soup consumed during New Year's celebrations. High prices, up to $125 USD/kg, led to overharvesting in Inner Mongolia, Ningxia, Gansu, Qinghai, and Xinjiang. Degradation of arid ecosystems, desertification, and conflicts between Nostoc harvesters and Mongol herdsmen concerned the Chinese environmental authorities, leading to a government ban of Nostoc commerce. This ban stimulated increased marketing of a substitute made from starch. We analysed samples purchased throughout China as well as in Chinese markets in the United States and the United Kingdom. Some were counterfeits consisting of dyed starch noodles. A few samples from California contained Nostoc flagelliforme but were adulterated with starch noodles. Other samples, including those from the United Kingdom, consisted of pure Nostoc flagelliforme. A recent survey of markets in Cheng Du showed no real Nostoc flagelliforme to be marketed. Real and artificial fa cai differ in the presence of beta-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA). Given its status as a high-priced luxury food, the government ban on collection and marketing, and the replacement of real fa cai with starch substitutes consumed only on special occasions, it is anticipated that dietary exposure to BMAA from fa cai will be reduced in the future in China.

  9. Factors affecting detection of Brucella melitensis by BACTEC NR730, a nonradiometric system for hemocultures.

    PubMed Central

    Gamazo, C; Vitas, A I; López-Goñi, I; Díaz, R; Moriyón, I

    1993-01-01

    The detection of Brucella bacteremia by subculture does not always correlate with a positive signal in the BACTEC NR730 nonradiometric system (Becton Dickinson Diagnostic Instrument Systems, Sparks, Md.). The effect of the inoculum size, pH, sodium polyanetholesulfonate, carbon sources (i-erythritol, sodium pyruvate, monosodium glutamate, D-glucose, and L-alanine), and urea in the release of CO2 was evaluated by using the reference strain Brucella melitensis 16M. In standard NR6 vials with or without blood, inocula 5 to 10 times larger (at least 265 CFU per vial) than those usually found in the blood of patients with brucellosis were necessary to produce a positive growth value (GV) in 4 days or less, and similar results were obtained with vials supplemented with the substrates listed above. GVs were consistently lower in vials with sodium polyanetholesulfonate than in vials without this agent. Vials with no blood inoculated with 265 CFU per vial showed turbidity 1 day before GVs became positive, proving that the major limiting detection factor was the low level of release of CO2 and not an inadequate growth medium. In NR6 vials buffered to pH 6.2, GVs became positive faster and were higher than those in standard vials. NR6 vials at pH 6.2 with 0.3% sodium pyruvate yielded a positive GV in the first day of bacterial turbidity. PMID:8308111

  10. Resolution and isolation of enantiomers of (±)-isoxsuprine using thin silica gel layers impregnated with L-glutamic acid, comparison of separation of its diastereomers prepared with chiral derivatizing reagents having L-amino acids as chiral auxiliaries.

    PubMed

    Bhushan, Ravi; Nagar, Hariom

    2015-03-01

    Thin silica gel layers impregnated with optically pure l-glutamic acid were used for direct resolution of enantiomers of (±)-isoxsuprine in their native form. Three chiral derivatizing reagents, based on DFDNB moiety, were synthesized having l-alanine, l-valine and S-benzyl-l-cysteine as chiral auxiliaries. These were used to prepare diastereomers under microwave irradiation and conventional heating. The diastereomers were separated by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography on a C18 column with detection at 340 nm using gradient elution with mobile phase containing aqueous trifluoroacetic acid and acetonitrile in different compositions and by thin-layer chromatography (TLC) on reversed phase (RP) C18 plates. Diastereomers prepared with enantiomerically pure (+)-isoxsuprine were used as standards for the determination of the elution order of diastereomers of (±)-isoxsuprine. The elution order in the experimental study of RP-TLC and RP-HPLC supported the developed optimized structures of diastereomers based on density functional theory. The limit of detection was 0.1-0.09 µg/mL in TLC while it was in the range of 22-23 pg/mL in HPLC and 11-13 ng/mL in RP-TLC for each enantiomer. The conditions of derivatization and chromatographic separation were optimized. The method was validated for accuracy, precision, limit of detection and limit of quantification.

  11. Chimeric phage-bacterial enzymes: a clue to the modular evolution of genes.

    PubMed Central

    Díaz, E; López, R; García, J L

    1990-01-01

    Pneumococcal peptidoglycan amidase (N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase, EC 3.5.1.28) and phage CPL1 lysozyme degrade a common substrate (choline-containing pneumococcal cell walls); the former hydrolyzes the bond between muramic acid and alanine, whereas the latter breaks down the linkage between muramic acid and glucosamine. The amino acid sequences of their C-terminal domains are homologous. Chimeric genes were constructed by site-directed mutagenesis: a unique SnaBI restriction site in the cpl1 gene, coding for the phage lysozyme, was introduced at a location equivalent to the SnaBI site present in the lytA gene, which codes for the pneumococcal amidase. The resulting genes expressed lytic activities at levels similar to those of the parental genes. The gene products, which have been purified to electrophoretical homogeneity, exhibited unusual combined biochemical properties--e.g., by exchange of protein domains, we have switched the regulatory properties of these enzymes without altering their catalytic activities. Chimeric gene construction in Streptococcus pneumoniae and its bacteriophages is an excellent model to study the modular organization of genes and proteins and to help to establish evolutionary relationships between phage and bacteria. These constructions provide an experimental approach to the molecular processes involved in cassette recruitment during evolution and contribute support to the concept of bacteria as adaptable chimeras. Images PMID:1978320

  12. Rhabdomyolysis secondary to influenza A H1N1 vaccine resulting in acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Callado, Rodrigo Barbosa; Carneiro, Tassia Gabrielle Ponte; Parahyba, Camille Carneiro da Cunha; Lima, Neiberg de Alcantara; da Silva Junior, Geraldo Bezerra; Daher, Elizabeth de Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Influenza A infection has been described as a major viral cause of infection-induced rhabdomyolysis, but to date, only one reported case was described as having been induced by influenza vaccine. We describe a case of a man who had been using statins and developed rhabdomyolysis the day after influenza A H1N1 vaccination. A 58-year-old man was admitted at the emergency room complaining of impaired gait. The patient reported receiving influenza A H1N1 vaccine 5 days prior to the admission, with symptoms beginning the day after the inoculation. He reported ascending weakness, intense myalgia in the lower back, upper and lower limbs. The admission laboratory tests showed serum creatine phosphokinase: 7600 IU/L, creatinine: 3.0 mg/dL, urea: 185 mg/dL, aspartate aminotransferase: 592 IU/L, alanine aminotransferase: 630 IU/L, potassium: 5.4 mEq/L, lactate dehydrogenase: 2828 IU/L. Despite intravenous fluid therapy, the patient still persisted with oliguria and urinary output of 0.17 ml/kg/h. Hemodialysis was initiated and renal function recovery was observed after two weeks. The patient was hemodynamically stable and asymptomatic at hospital discharge. This is a rare side effect of influenza A H1N1 vaccine. Physicians should advise patients to seek medical care when muscle symptoms are present and consider the possibility of rhabdomyolysis due to vaccination. Trials are required to better define the incidence of this important side effect.

  13. Remarkable shape-sustaining, load-bearing, and self-healing properties displayed by a supramolecular gel derived from a bis-pyridyl-bis-amide of L-phenyl alanine.

    PubMed

    Das, Uttam Kumar; Banerjee, Subhabrata; Dastidar, Parthasarathi

    2014-09-01

    A series of bis-amides decorated with pyridyl and phenyl moieties derived from L-amino acids having an innocent side chain (L-alanine and L-phenyl alanine) were synthesized as potential low-molecular-weight gelators (LMWGs). Both protic and aprotic solvents were found to be gelled by most of the bis-amides with moderate to excellent gelation efficiency (minimum gelator concentration=0.32-4.0 wt.% and gel-sol dissociation temperature T(gel)=52-110 °C). The gels were characterized by rheology, DSC, SEM, TEM, and temperature-variable (1)H NMR measurements. pH-dependent gelation studies revealed that the pyridyl moieties took part in gelation. Structure-property correlation was attempted using single-crystal X-ray and powder X-ray diffraction data. Remarkably, one of the bis-pyridyl bis-amide gelators, namely 3,3-Phe (3-pyridyl bis-amide of L-phenylalanine) displayed outstanding shape-sustaining, load-bearing, and self-healing properties.

  14. Animal Models of Brain Maldevelopment Induced by Cycad Plant Genotoxins

    PubMed Central

    Kisby, Glen E.; Moore, Holly; Spencer, Peter S.

    2014-01-01

    Cycads are long-lived tropical and subtropical plants that contain azoxyglycosides (e.g., cycasin, macrozamin) and neurotoxic amino acids (notably β-N-methylamino-L-alanine L-BMAA), toxins that have been implicated in the etiology of a disappearing neurodegenerative disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and parkinsonism-dementia complex that has been present in high incidence among three genetically distinct populations in the western Pacific. The neuropathology of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/parkinsonism-dementia complex includes features suggestive of brain maldevelopment, an experimentally proven property of cycasin attributable to the genotoxic action of its aglycone methylazoxymethanol (MAM). This property of MAM has been exploited by neurobiologists as a tool to study perturbations of brain development. Depending on the neurodevelopmental stage, MAM can induce features in laboratory animals that model certain characteristics of epilepsy, schizophrenia, or ataxia. Studies in DNA repair-deficient mice show that MAM perturbs brain development through a DNA damage-mediated mechanism. The brain DNA lesions produced by systemic MAM appear to modulate the expression of genes that regulate neurodevelopment and contribute to neurodegeneration. Epigenetic changes (histone lysine methylation) have also been detected in the underdeveloped brain after MAM administration. The DNA damage and epigenetic changes produced by MAM and, perhaps by chemically related substances (e.g., nitrosamines, nitrosoureas, hydrazines), might be an important mechanism by which early-life exposure to genotoxicants can induce long-term brain dysfunction. PMID:24339036

  15. Production and characterization of L-fucose dehydrogenase from newly isolated Acinetobacter sp. strain SA-134.

    PubMed

    Ohshiro, Takashi; Morita, Noriyuki

    2014-01-01

    Microorganisms producing L-fucose dehydrogenase were screened from soil samples, and one of the isolated bacterial strains SA-134 was identified as Acinetobacter sp. by 16S rDNA gene analysis. The strain grew well utilizing L-fucose as a sole source of carbon, but all other monosaccharides tested such as D-glucose and D-arabinose did not support the growth of the strain in the absence of L-fucose. D-Arabinose inhibited the growth even in the culture medium containing L-fucose. Although the strain grew on some organic acids and amino acids such as citric acid and L-alanine as sole sources of carbon, the enzyme was produced only in the presence of L-fucose. The fucose dehydrogenase was purified to apparently homogeneity from the strain, and the native enzyme was a monomer of 25 kD. L-Fucose and D-arabinose were good substrates for the enzyme, but L-galactose was a poor substrate. The enzyme acted on both NAD(+) and NADP(+) in the similar manner.

  16. Genomic and functional analyses of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains implicate ald in D-cycloserine resistance

    PubMed Central

    Desjardins, Christopher A.; Cohen, Keira A.; Munsamy, Vanisha; Abeel, Thomas; Maharaj, Kashmeel; Walker, Bruce J.; Shea, Terrance P.; Almeida, Deepak V.; Manson, Abigail L.; Salazar, Alex; Padayatchi, Nesri; O’Donnell, Max R.; Mlisana, Koleka P.; Wortman, Jennifer; Birren, Bruce W.; Grosset, Jacques; Earl, Ashlee M.; Pym, Alexander S.

    2016-01-01

    A more complete understanding of the genetic basis of drug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis is critical for prompt diagnosis and optimal treatment, particularly for toxic second-line drugs like D-cycloserine. Here, we used whole-genome sequences from 498 strains of M. tuberculosis to identify novel resistance-conferring genotypes. By combining association and correlated evolution tests with strategies for amplifying signal from rare variants, we found that loss-of-function mutations in ald (Rv2780), encoding L-alanine dehydrogenase, were associated with unexplained drug resistance. Convergent evolution of this loss-of-function was observed exclusively among multidrug-resistant strains. Drug susceptibility testing established that ald loss-of-function conferred resistance to D-cycloserine, and susceptibility to the drug was partially restored by complementation of ald. Clinical strains with mutations in ald and alr exhibited increased resistance to D-cycloserine when cultured in vitro. Incorporation of D-cycloserine resistance in novel molecular diagnostics could allow for targeted utilization of this toxic drug among patients with susceptible infections. PMID:27064254

  17. Genomic Sequence of Bacteriophage ATCC 8074-B1 and Activity of Its Endolysin and Engineered Variants against Clostridium sporogenes

    PubMed Central

    Gasson, Michael J.; Narbad, Arjan

    2012-01-01

    Lytic bacteriophage ATCC 8074-B1 produces large plaques on its host Clostridium sporogenes. Sequencing of the 47,595-bp genome allowed the identification of 82 putative open reading frames, including those encoding proteins for head and tail morphogenesis and lysis. However, sequences commonly associated with lysogeny were absent. ORF 22 encodes an endolysin, CS74L, that shows homology to N-acetylmuramoyl-l-alanine amidases, and when expressed in Escherichia coli, the protein causes effective lysis of C. sporogenes cells when added externally. CS74L was also active on Clostridium tyrobutyricum and Clostridium acetobutylicum. The catalytic domain expressed alone (CS74L1–177) exhibited a similar activity and the same host range as the full-length endolysin. A chimeric endolysin consisting of the CS74L catalytic domain fused to the C-terminal domain of endolysin CD27L, derived from Clostridium difficile bacteriophage ΦCD27, was produced. This chimera (CSCD) lysed C. sporogenes cells with an activity equivalent to that of the catalytic domain alone. In contrast, the CD27L C-terminal domain reduced the efficacy of the CS74L catalytic domain when tested against C. tyrobutyricum. The addition of the CD27L C-terminal domain did not enable the lysin to target C. difficile or other CD27L-sensitive bacteria. PMID:22427494

  18. Enantiomeric pair of copper(II) polypyridyl-alanine complexes: Effect of chirality on their interaction with biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Ng, Chew Hee; Chan, Cheang Wei; Lai, Jing Wei; Ooi, Ing Hong; Chong, Kok Vei; Maah, Mohd Jamil; Seng, Hoi Ling

    2016-07-01

    Like chiral organic drugs, the chemical and biological properties of metal complexes can be dependent on chirality. Two pairs of [Cu(phen)(ala)(H2O)]X·xH2O (phen=1.10-phenanthroline: X=NO3(-); ala: l-alanine (l-ala), 1 and d-alanine (d-ala) 2; and (X=Cl(-); ala: l-ala, 3 and d-ala, 4) complex salts (x=number of lattice water molecules) have been synthesized and characterized. The crystal structure of 3 has been determined. The same pair of enantiomeric species, viz. [Cu(phen)(l-ala)(H2O)](+) and [Cu(phen)(d-ala)(H2O)](+), have been identified to be present in the aqueous solutions of both 1 and 3, and in those of both 2 and 4 respectively. Both 3 and 4 bind more strongly to ds(AT)6 than ds(CG)6. There is no or insignificant effect of the chirality of 3 and 4 on the production of hydroxyl radicals, binding to deoxyribonucleic acid from calf thymus (CT-DNA), ds(CG)6, G-quadruplex and 17-base pair duplex, and inhibition of both topoisomerase I and proteasome. Among the three proteasome proteolytic sites, the trypsin-like site is inhibited most strongly by these complexes. However, the chirality of 3 and 4 does affect the number of restriction enzymes inhibited, and their binding constants towards ds(AT)6 and serum albumin.

  19. Amino acid and carbohydrate preferences in C57BL/6ByJ and 129P3/J mice

    PubMed Central

    Bachmanov, Alexander A.; Beauchamp, Gary K.

    2008-01-01

    Compared with mice from the 129P3/J (129) inbred strain, mice from the C57BL/6ByJ (B6) inbred strain have higher consumption of several sweet-tasting amino acids and carbohydrates. To examine the relative contribution of taste and nutritive properties in these strain differences, we measured responses of B6 and 129 mice to eight sweet and non-sweet amino acids and carbohydrates in two-bottle preference tests with water. Mice from the two strains did not differ in consumption of non-sweet L-valine and L-histidine. Compared with 129 mice, B6 mice had higher consumption and lower preference thresholds for sweet amino acids L-glutamine, L-alanine and L-threonine, monosaccharides glucose and fructose, and maltooligosaccharide. These data suggest that differences in gustatory responsiveness are an important factor underlying higher consumption of some amino acids and carbohydrates by B6 mice compared with 129 mice. It is likely that in B6 mice, higher sweet taste responsiveness results in increased consumption of sweet-tasting amino acids and sugars, and higher taste responsiveness to complex carbohydrates results in increased consumption of maltooligosaccharide. However, postingestive processes also influence nutrient consumption and may be responsible for higher intake of carbohydrates compared with sweet-tasting amino acids. Results of this study set the stage for genetic analysis of differences between B6 and 129 mice in taste responsiveness and macronutrient consumption. PMID:17764708

  20. HHH syndrome (hyperornithinaemia, hyperammonaemia, homocitrullinuria), with fulminant hepatitis-like presentation.

    PubMed

    Fecarotta, S; Parenti, G; Vajro, P; Zuppaldi, A; Della Casa, R; Carbone, M T; Correra, A; Torre, G; Riva, S; Dionisi-Vici, C; Santorelli, F M; Andria, G

    2006-02-01

    We report a 3-year-old Italian patient with the hyperornithinaemia, hyperammonaemia, homocitrullinuria (HHH) syndrome who presented with neurological deterioration after an intercurrent infection. Hyperammonaemia, coagulopathy and moderate hypertransaminasaemia were detected on hospital admission. Severe hepatocellular necrosis with hypertransaminasaemia (aspartate aminotransferase 20,000 UI/L, alanine aminotransferase 18,400 UI/L) and coagulopathy (PT < 5%) rapidly developed within few days, prompting evaluation for liver transplantation. A protein-restricted diet and arginine supplementation were immediately started, with a rapid improvement of the patient's neurological conditions and normalization of liver function tests and blood ammonia. The diagnosis of HHH syndrome was based on the presence of the typical metabolic abnormalities. Molecular analysis of the SLC25A15 gene showed that the patient was heterozygous for two novel mutations (G113C and M273K). The diagnosis of HHH syndrome should be considered in patients with fulminant hepatitis-like presentations. Early identification and treatment of these patients can be life-saving and can avoid liver transplantation. PMID:16601889

  1. Deinococcus radioresistens sp. nov., a UV and gamma radiation-resistant bacterium isolated from mountain soil.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Sathiyaraj; Lee, Jae-Jin; Lim, Sang-Yong; Joe, Min-Ho; Im, Seong-Hun; Kim, Myung Kyum

    2015-02-01

    Two Gram-negative, non-motile, short rod-shaped bacterial strains, designated as 8A(T) and 28A, were isolated from Mount Deogyusan, Jeonbuk Province, South Korea. The isolates were analyzed by a polyphasic approach, revealing variations in their phenotypic characters but high DNA-DNA hybridisation values reciprocally, confirming that they belong to the same species. Both the isolates also showed a high resistance to UV compared with Deinococcus radiodurans, and a gamma-radiation resistance similar to other members of the genus Deinococcus. Phylogenetic analysis with the 16S rRNA gene sequences of closely related species indicated their similarities were below 97 %. Chemotaxonomic data showed the most abundant fatty acids to be C16:1ω7c and C16:0. The strains can be distinguished from closely related species by the production of esterase (C4) and α-galactosidase, and by their ability to assimilate L-alanine, L-histidine and N-acetyl-D-glucosamine. Based on the phenotypic, phylogenetic, and chemotaxonomic data, the isolates represent a novel species of the genus Deinococcus, for which the name Deinococcus radioresistens sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is 8A(T) (KEMB 9004-109(T) = JCM 19777(T)), and a second strain is 28A (KEMB 9004-113 = JCM 19778).

  2. A Collaborative Evaluation of LC-MS/MS Based Methods for BMAA Analysis: Soluble Bound BMAA Found to Be an Important Fraction.

    PubMed

    Faassen, Elisabeth J; Antoniou, Maria G; Beekman-Lukassen, Wendy; Blahova, Lucie; Chernova, Ekaterina; Christophoridis, Christophoros; Combes, Audrey; Edwards, Christine; Fastner, Jutta; Harmsen, Joop; Hiskia, Anastasia; Ilag, Leopold L; Kaloudis, Triantafyllos; Lopicic, Srdjan; Lürling, Miquel; Mazur-Marzec, Hanna; Meriluoto, Jussi; Porojan, Cristina; Viner-Mozzini, Yehudit; Zguna, Nadezda

    2016-03-01

    Exposure to β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA) might be linked to the incidence of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. Analytical chemistry plays a crucial role in determining human BMAA exposure and the associated health risk, but the performance of various analytical methods currently employed is rarely compared. A CYANOCOST initiated workshop was organized aimed at training scientists in BMAA analysis, creating mutual understanding and paving the way towards interlaboratory comparison exercises. During this workshop, we tested different methods (extraction followed by derivatization and liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis, or directly followed by LC-MS/MS analysis) for trueness and intermediate precision. We adapted three workup methods for the underivatized analysis of animal, brain and cyanobacterial samples. Based on recovery of the internal standard D₃BMAA, the underivatized methods were accurate (mean recovery 80%) and precise (mean relative standard deviation 10%), except for the cyanobacterium Leptolyngbya. However, total BMAA concentrations in the positive controls (cycad seeds) showed higher variation (relative standard deviation 21%-32%), implying that D₃BMAA was not a good indicator for the release of BMAA from bound forms. Significant losses occurred during workup for the derivatized method, resulting in low recovery (<10%). Most BMAA was found in a trichloroacetic acid soluble, bound form and we recommend including this fraction during analysis. PMID:26938542

  3. Suspected secondary thiafentanil intoxication in a captive mountain lion (Puma concolor).

    PubMed

    Wolfe, Lisa L; Miller, Michael W

    2005-10-01

    Inadvertent ingestion of thiafentanil oxalate by a captive adult female mountain lion (Puma concolor) caused a prolonged clinical syndrome that included sedation and depression, muscle tension, and myopathy that was incompletely antagonized by naltrexone HCl. A serum chemistry profile revealed markedly elevated creatinine phosphokinase (CK; 490,450 IU/l), alanine aminotransferase (ALT; 1,896 IU/l), and aspartate aminotransferase (AST; 4,321 IU/l) 2 days after onset. The affected animal's condition gradually improved over the next 15 days in response to supportive therapy that included diazepam (5 mg as needed), Normasol R (3 l/day), dexamethasone (tapering dose starting at 1 mg/kg), and ketoprofen (1 mg/kg). She eventually recovered completely. Based on these observations, carcasses of animals immobilized with thiafentanil should be marked and disposed of properly to preclude opportunities for secondary exposure and potential intoxication in scavenging species. In addition, caution is advised when using thiafentanil in animals that could be preyed upon before full metabolism of the drug.

  4. Trypsin inhibition by macrocyclic and open-chain variants of the squash inhibitor MCoTI-II.

    PubMed

    Avrutina, Olga; Schmoldt, Hans-Ulrich; Gabrijelcic-Geiger, Dusica; Le Nguyen, Dung; Sommerhoff, Christian P; Diederichsen, Ulf; Kolmar, Harald

    2005-12-01

    MCoTI-I and MCoTI-II from the seeds of Momordica cochinchinensis are inhibitors of trypsin-like proteases and the only known members of the large family of squash inhibitors that are cyclic and contain an additional loop connecting the amino- and the carboxy-terminus. To investigate the contribution of macrocycle formation to biological activity, we synthesized a set of open-chain variants of MCoTI-II that lack the cyclization loop and contain various natural and non-natural amino acid substitutions in the reactive-site loop. Upon replacement of P1 lysine residue #10 within the open-chain variant of MCoTI-II by the non-natural isosteric nucleo amino acid AlaG [beta-(guanin-9-yl)-L-alanine], a conformationally restricted arginine mimetic, residual inhibitory activity was detected, albeit reduced by four orders of magnitude. While the cyclic inhibitors MCoTI-I and MCoTI-II were found to be very potent trypsin inhibitors, with picomolar inhibition constants, the open-chain variants displayed an approximately 10-fold lower affinity. These data suggest that the formation of a circular backbone in the MCoTI squash inhibitors results in enhanced affinity and therefore is a determinant of biological activity.

  5. The effects of dose and radiation quality on the shape and power saturation of the EPR signal in alanine.

    PubMed

    Ciesielski, B; Wielopolski, L

    1994-10-01

    Variations in the shape and the power saturation of EPR spectra of L-alanine irradiated with photons, electrons, neutrons and protons are reported. It is shown that the ratio of the intensities of the satellite lines attributable to "spin flips" and the central line depend on the EPR microwave power, and it is proposed as a quantitative measure of the signal saturation effect. Dependence of this ratio on the microwave power is affected by the radiation quality and for doses in excess of 10 kGy by the absorbed dose. At high doses of low-LET radiation these changes are attributed to a high local density of free radicals, while for low doses of high-LET radiation these are due to changes induced in the crystal lattice. Consequently, the conventional peak-to-peak amplitude measurement of the EPR signal intensity is inaccurate when used for high doses and for comparison between radiations with different beam quality. The possibility to determine radiation quality from an EPR measurement is discussed. PMID:7938443

  6. The non-protein amino acid BMAA is misincorporated into human proteins in place of L-serine causing protein misfolding and aggregation.

    PubMed

    Dunlop, Rachael Anne; Cox, Paul Alan; Banack, Sandra Anne; Rodgers, Kenneth John

    2013-01-01

    Mechanisms of protein misfolding are of increasing interest in the aetiology of neurodegenerative diseases characterized by protein aggregation and tangles including Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), Lewy Body Dementia (LBD), and Progressive Supranuclear Palsy (PSP). Some forms of neurodegenerative illness are associated with mutations in genes which control assembly of disease related proteins. For example, the mouse sticky mutation sti, which results in undetected mischarging of tRNA(Ala) with serine resulting in the substitution of serine for alanine in proteins causes cerebellar Purkinje cell loss and ataxia in laboratory animals. Replacement of serine 422 with glutamic acid in tau increases the propensity of tau aggregation associated with neurodegeneration. However, the possibility that environmental factors can trigger abnormal folding in proteins remains relatively unexplored. We here report that a non-protein amino acid, β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA), can be misincorporated in place of L-serine into human proteins. We also report that this misincorporation can be inhibited by L-serine. Misincorporation of BMAA into human neuroproteins may shed light on putative associations between human exposure to BMAA produced by cyanobacteria and an increased incidence of ALS. PMID:24086518

  7. Assessing the effect of surface modification of polyamide RO membrane by l-DOPA on the short range physiochemical interactions with biopolymer fouling on the membrane.

    PubMed

    Azari, Sara; Zou, Linda; Cornelissen, Emile

    2014-08-01

    Theoretical predictions of interaction energies for membrane-biopolymer foulant pairs were used to compare the fouling tendencies of a virgin commercial polyamide reverse osmosis (RO) membrane with a amino acid 3-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)-l-alanine (l-DOPA) coated RO membrane. Lifshitz-van der Waals (LW) and Lewis acid-base (AB) surface tension components of the membranes were determined based on contact angle results using the van Oss approach. From these values, the LW and AB components of the free energy of adhesion between membrane and foulants were calculated. Electrostatic (EL) double layer interaction energies between the membrane and foulants were also estimated using the measured surface charge data of the membranes and fouling agents. Bovine serum albumin (BSA) and alginic acid sodium salt (alginate) were used as model biopolymers causing membrane fouling. Based on the calculated adhesion free energies, acid-base interactions were found to have the strongest impact on the adhesion of both BSA and alginate to the either membranes surfaces. It was found that l-DOPA modification has significantly lowered acid-base interaction affinity toward the adhesion of both foulants studied. On the basis of calculated free energies of adhesion, lower fouling tendency of the l-DOPA modified membrane was expected. The accelerated fouling tests indicated a lower flux decline rate for the modified membrane and confirmed the results obtained from theory.

  8. 13C-NMR analysis of Aspergillus mutants disturbed in pyruvate metabolism.

    PubMed

    Dijkema, C; Visser, J

    1987-12-10

    The metabolic consequences of two defects in pyruvate metabolism of the hyphal fungus Aspergillus nidulans have been investigated by natural abundance 13C-NMR spectroscopy. A pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (pdh) mutant, grown on acetate, accumulates alanine upon starvation which is derived from mannitol reserves. The L-alanine level increases further upon incubation with the non-permissive substrate D-glucose. L-Glutamate is absent from these spectra as it is required both for the transamination of pyruvate and as a reaction on an impaired energy metabolism in such a pdh-deficient strain. A pyruvate carboxylase (pyc) mutant, grown upon acetate, only starts to accumulate alanine after a long incubation period with D-glucose, due to the long-lasting presence of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and malic enzyme, which are both induced by growth on acetate. When this strain is grown on D-fructose and L-glutamate, alanine also accumulates within 3 h upon transfer to D-glucose.

  9. Translocation of Radioactive Carbon after the Application of 14C-Alanine and 14CO2 to Sunflower Leaves 1

    PubMed Central

    Chopowick, R. E.; Forward, D. F.

    1974-01-01

    14C-(UL)-l-Alanine was applied to the surface of mature leaves at the second node of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L. cv Commander) plants, under illumination. The alanine was absorbed during a 4-hour period, and some of it was metabolized by the absorbing tissue. After a lag period of about 15 minutes from first application, distribution of 14C through the plant proceeded in much the same pattern as when 14CO2 is assimilated by similar leaves. Most, if not all, of the 14C exported from the absorbing regions was in sucrose. Only minute amounts appeared in alanine or other amino acids in surrounding parts of the leaf blade or in the petiole, although these were strongly labeled in the tissue absorbing 14C-alanine. When 14CO2 was supplied for 15 minutes to leaves of different ages, amino acids were lightly labeled in the leaf blade. Mature green leaves exported only sucrose. Yellowing leaves on 60-day-old plants exported a variety of substances including amino acids. PMID:16658645

  10. Suspected secondary thiafentanil intoxication in a captive mountain lion (Puma concolor).

    PubMed

    Wolfe, Lisa L; Miller, Michael W

    2005-10-01

    Inadvertent ingestion of thiafentanil oxalate by a captive adult female mountain lion (Puma concolor) caused a prolonged clinical syndrome that included sedation and depression, muscle tension, and myopathy that was incompletely antagonized by naltrexone HCl. A serum chemistry profile revealed markedly elevated creatinine phosphokinase (CK; 490,450 IU/l), alanine aminotransferase (ALT; 1,896 IU/l), and aspartate aminotransferase (AST; 4,321 IU/l) 2 days after onset. The affected animal's condition gradually improved over the next 15 days in response to supportive therapy that included diazepam (5 mg as needed), Normasol R (3 l/day), dexamethasone (tapering dose starting at 1 mg/kg), and ketoprofen (1 mg/kg). She eventually recovered completely. Based on these observations, carcasses of animals immobilized with thiafentanil should be marked and disposed of properly to preclude opportunities for secondary exposure and potential intoxication in scavenging species. In addition, caution is advised when using thiafentanil in animals that could be preyed upon before full metabolism of the drug. PMID:16456179

  11. Y-shaped probe for convenient and label-free detection of microRNA-21 in vitro.

    PubMed

    He, Kui; Liao, Rong; Cai, Changqun; Liang, Caishuang; Liu, Chan; Chen, Xiaoming

    2016-04-15

    A simple, highly selective, and label-free microRNA (miRNA) detection method based on l-alanine-reduced graphene oxide fluorescence quenching with a Y-shaped probe is proposed. The Y-shaped probe was synthesized by silver nitrate and a cytosine-rich molecular beacon (MB) in two terminals through sodium borohydride reduction, which generated a stronger fluorescent signal than ordinary DNA-templated silver nanoclusters (AgNCs). Meanwhile, the Y-shaped probe contained a single-stranded loop structure, which could be superbly adsorbed onto the surface of reduced graphene oxide (RGO) via π-π stacking interaction, and this special structure of the probe was designed to improve its sensitivity and selectivity. In addition, the quenching capacities of graphene oxide (GO) and RGO were compared in this research. The strong interaction between nucleobases of the loop structure and RGO nanosheet made the MB-AgNCs-RGO system exhibit minimal background fluorescence. In the presence of miRNA-21, the loop structure of the Y-shaped probe can hybridize with target miRNA-21; the molecular beacon encapsulated probe is far away from RGO surface and produces a detectable signal. The MB-AgNCs based approach provides a label-free avenue to detect miRNA with high selectivity and good reproducibility, which has a promising application in early clinical diagnosis and biomedical research.

  12. Genomic and functional analyses of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains implicate ald in D-cycloserine resistance.

    PubMed

    Desjardins, Christopher A; Cohen, Keira A; Munsamy, Vanisha; Abeel, Thomas; Maharaj, Kashmeel; Walker, Bruce J; Shea, Terrance P; Almeida, Deepak V; Manson, Abigail L; Salazar, Alex; Padayatchi, Nesri; O'Donnell, Max R; Mlisana, Koleka P; Wortman, Jennifer; Birren, Bruce W; Grosset, Jacques; Earl, Ashlee M; Pym, Alexander S

    2016-05-01

    A more complete understanding of the genetic basis of drug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis is critical for prompt diagnosis and optimal treatment, particularly for toxic second-line drugs such as D-cycloserine. Here we used the whole-genome sequences from 498 strains of M. tuberculosis to identify new resistance-conferring genotypes. By combining association and correlated evolution tests with strategies for amplifying signal from rare variants, we found that loss-of-function mutations in ald (Rv2780), encoding L-alanine dehydrogenase, were associated with unexplained drug resistance. Convergent evolution of this loss of function was observed exclusively among multidrug-resistant strains. Drug susceptibility testing established that ald loss of function conferred resistance to D-cycloserine, and susceptibility to the drug was partially restored by complementation of ald. Clinical strains with mutations in ald and alr exhibited increased resistance to D-cycloserine when cultured in vitro. Incorporation of D-cycloserine resistance in novel molecular diagnostics could allow for targeted use of this toxic drug among patients with susceptible infections.

  13. Effects of extract derived from Eriobotrya japonica on liver function improvement in rats.

    PubMed

    Nishioka, Yutaka; Yoshioka, Saburo; Kusunose, Masahiko; Cui, Tailin; Hamada, Atuhide; Ono, Masahide; Miyamura, Mituhiko; Kyotani, Shojiro

    2002-08-01

    Eriobotrya japonica is considered a medicinal plant, and its leaves (Eriobotrya folia) have been used to treat skin diseases, as well as to relieve inflammation, pain, coughing, and sputa. In our evaluation of the pharmacological efficacy of the seed extracts, constituents of the seeds were found to contain the unsaturated fatty acids linolenic and linoleic acids and the sterol beta-sitosterol in the 70% EtOH and the MeOH extracts. The seed extracts were orally administered to rats with dimethylnitrosamine-induced hepatopathy, and blood L-asparate aminotransferase (AST) and L-alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels, liver retinoid level, and hydroxyproline level were measured. Liver fibrosis rates calculated after Azan-Mallory staining and evaluation of the liver function-improving effects of extracts were showed that AST, ALT, and hydroxyproline levels and liver fibrosis rates were significantly lower, and retinoid levels were significantly higher in hepatopathic rats treated with 70% EtOH and MeOH extracts of the seed than in water-treated control rats. This suggests that the positive effect on liver function of the extracts varies depending on the extracting solvent used. 70% EtOH and MeOH extract of the seeds inhibited the development of liver fibrosis in hepatopathic rats, thus exhibiting potent improvement. The unsaturated linolenic and linoleic acids and the sterol beta-sitosterol contained in these extracts may also contribute to the improvement of liver function.

  14. Nitrile-synthesizing enzyme: Screening, purification and characterization.

    PubMed

    Kumano, Takuto; Suzuki, Takahisa; Shimizu, Sakayu; Kobayashi, Michihiko

    2016-09-12

    Cyanide is known as a toxic compound for almost all living organisms. We have searched for cyanide-resistant bacteria from the soil and stock culture collection of our laboratory, and have found the existence of a lot of microorganisms grown on culture media containing 10 mM potassium cyanide. Almost all of these cyanide-resistant bacteria were found to show β-cyano-L-alanine (β-CNAla) synthetic activity. β-CNAla synthase is known to catalyze nitrile synthesis: the formation of β-CNAla from potassium cyanide and O-acetyl-L-serine or L-cysteine. We found that some microorganisms were able to detoxify cyanide using O-methyl-DL-serine, O-phospho-L-serine and β-chloro-DL-alanine. In addition, we purified β-CNAla synthase from Pseudomonas ovalis No. 111 in nine steps, and characterized the purified enzyme. This enzyme has a molecular mass of 60,000 and appears to consist of two identical subunits. The purified enzyme exhibits a maximum activity at pH 8.5-9.0 at an optimal temperature of 40-50°C. The enzyme is specific for O-acetyl-L-serine and β-chloro-DL-alanine. The Km value for O-acetyl-L-serine is 10.0 mM and Vmax value is 3.57 μmol/min/mg. PMID:27250663

  15. Determination of free L- and D-alanine in hydrolysed protein fertilisers by capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Cavani, Luciano; Ciavatta, Claudio; Gessa, Carlo

    2003-01-24

    of racemisation of hydrolysed protein fertilisers (HPFs) using an The objective of this study was to determine the degree inexpensive and easy to handle analytical method for qualitative control of the products. Using a polyacrylamide coated capillary and a run buffer containing 0.1 M Tris-borate+2.5 mM EDTA-Na2+0.1% sodium dodecylsulfate+10 mM beta-cyclodextrin a quantitative separation of D- and L-alanine (Ala) was made from an not treated HPF sample derivatised with dansyl chlorine by capillary electrophoresis. The D-Ala:[D-Ala+L-Ala] ratio, called degree of racemisation (RD), was calculated. The analysis of ten commercial HPFs has shown that more than 60% of HPFs have an RD > or = 40%. while only one product has shown an RD <5%. These results showed that most of the HPFs on the market are obtained with strong hydrolytic processes and high contents of D-amino acids are probably less effective as plant nutrients or even potentially dangerous to plants.

  16. Synthesis, physicochemical studies, embryos toxicity and DNA interaction of some new Iron(II) Schiff base amino acid complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Rahman, Laila H.; El-Khatib, Rafat M.; Nassr, Lobna A. E.; Abu-Dief, Ahmed M.

    2013-05-01

    New Fe(II) Schiff base amino acid complexes derived from the condensation of o-hydroxynaphthaldehyde with L-alanine, L-phenylalanine, L-aspartic acid, L-histidine and L-arginine were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, IR, electronic spectra, and conductance measurements. The stoichiometry and the stability constants of the complexes were determined spectrophotometrically. The investigated Schiff bases exhibited tridentate coordination mode with the general formulae [Fe(HL)2]·nH2O for all amino acids except L-histidine. But in case of L-histidine, the ligand acts as tetradentate ([FeL(H2O)2]·2H2O), where HL = mono anion and L = dianion of the ligand. The structure of the prepared complexes is suggested to be octahedral. The prepared complexes were tested for their toxicity on chick embryos and found to be safe until a concentration of 100 μg/egg with full embryos formation. The interaction between CT-DNA and the investigated complexes were followed by spectrophotometry and viscosity measurements. It was found that, the prepared complexes bind to DNA via classical intercalative mode and showed a different DNA cleavage activity with the sequence: nhi > nari > nali > nasi > nphali. The thermodynamic Profile of the binding of nphali complex and CT-DNA was constructed by analyzing the experimental data of absorption titration and UV melting studies with the McGhee equation, van't Hoff's equation, and the Gibbs-Helmholtz equation.

  17. Enrichment of Non-Terrestrial L-Proteinogenic Amino Acids by Aqueous Alteration on the Tagish Lake Meteorite Parent Body

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, Daniel P.; Elsila, Jamie E.; Burton, Aaron S.; Callahan, Michael P.; Dworkin, Jason P.; Herd, Christopher D. K.

    2012-01-01

    The distribution and isotopic and enantiomeric compositions of amino acids found in three distinct fragments of the Tagish Lake C2-type carbonaceous chondrite were investigated via liquid chromatography fluorescence detection time-of-flight mass spectrometry and gas chromatography isotope ratio mass spectrometry. Large L-enantiomeric excesses (L(sub ee) approx. 43 to 59%) of the a-hydrogen aspartic and glutamic amino acids were measured in Tagish Lake, whereas alanine, another alpha-hydrogen protein amino acid, was found to be nearly racemic (D approx. L) using both techniques. Carbon isotope measurements of D- and L-aspartic acid and D- and L-alanine in Tagish Lake fall well outside of the terrestrial range and indicate that the measured aspartic acid enantioenrichment is indigenous to the meteorite. Alternate explanations for the Lexcesses of aspartic acid such as interference from other compounds present in the sample, analytical biases, or terrestrial amino acid contamination were investigated and rejected. These results can be explained by differences in the solid-solution phase behavior of aspartic acid, which can form conglomerate enantiopure solids during crystallization, and alanine, which can only form racemic crystals.

  18. Retrospective screening of pesticide metabolites in ambient air using liquid chromatography coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    López, Antonio; Yusà, Vicent; Millet, Maurice; Coscollà, Clara

    2016-04-01

    A new methodology for the retrospective screening of pesticide metabolites in ambient air was developed, using liquid chromatography coupled to Orbitrap high-resolution mass spectrometry (UHPLC-HRMS), including two systematic workflows (i) post-run target screening (suspect screening) and (ii) non-target screening. An accurate-mass database was built and used for the post-run screening analysis. The database contained 240 pesticide metabolites found in different matrixes such as air, soil, water, plants, animals and humans. For non-target analysis, a "fragmentation-degradation" relationship strategy was selected. The proposed methodology was applied to 31 air samples (PM10) collected in the Valencian Region (Spain). In the post-target analysis 34 metabolites were identified, of which 11 (3-ketocarburan, carbofuran-7-phenol, carbendazim, desmethylisoproturon, ethiofencarb-sulfoxide, malaoxon, methiocarb-sulfoxide, N-(2-ethyl-6-methylphenyl)-L-alanine, omethoate, 2-hydroxy-terbuthylazine, and THPAM) were confirmed using analytical standards. The semiquantitative estimated concentration ranged between 6.78 and 198.31 pg m(-3). Likewise, two unknown degradation products of malaoxon and fenhexamid were elucidated in the non-target screening.

  19. Prebiotic organic microstructures.

    PubMed

    Bassez, Marie-Paule; Takano, Yoshinori; Kobayashi, Kensei

    2012-08-01

    Micro- and sub-micrometer spheres, tubules and fiber-filament soft structures have been synthesized in our experiments conducted with 3 MeV proton irradiations of a mixture of simple inorganic constituents, CO, N(2) and H(2)O. We analysed the irradiation products, with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). These laboratory organic structures produced a wide variety of proteinaceous and non-proteinaceous amino acids after HCl hydrolysis. The enantiomer analysis for D,L-alanine confirmed that the amino acids were abiotically synthesized during the laboratory experiment. We discuss the presence of CO(2) and the production of H(2) during exothermic processes of serpentinization and consequently we discuss the production of hydrothermal CO in a ferromagnesian silicate mineral environment. We also discuss the low intensity of the Earth's magnetic field during the Paleoarchaean Era and consequently we conclude that excitation sources arising from cosmic radiation were much more abundant during this Era. We then show that our laboratory prebiotic microstructures might be synthesized during the Archaean Eon, as a product of the serpentinization process of the rocks and of their mineral contents. PMID:22886610

  20. Design, synthesis and biological evaluation of phosphorodiamidate prodrugs of antiviral and anticancer nucleosides

    PubMed Central

    McGuigan, Christopher; Bourdin, Claire; Derudas, Marco; Hamon, Nadège; Hinsinger, Karen; Kandil, Sahar; Madela, Karolina; Meneghesso, Silvia; Pertusati, Fabrizio; Serpi, Michaela; Slusarczyk, Magdalena; Chamberlain, Stanley; Kolykhalov, Alexander; Vernachio, John; Vanpouille, Christophe; Introini, Andrea; Margolis, Leonid; Balzarini, Jan

    2014-01-01

    We herein report the application of the phosphorodiamidate phosphate prodrug approach to a series of thirteen nucleoside analogs with antiviral or anticancer activity. Twenty-five symmetrical phosphorodiamidates were synthesized, bearing esterified l-Alanine (and in one case d-alanine) in the prodrug moiety, each as single stereoisomer. The presence of an achiral phosphorus represents a potential advantage over the phosphoramidate ProTide approach, where diastereoisomeric mixtures are routinely obtained, and different biological profiles may be expected from the diastereoisomers. Optimization of the synthetic pathway allowed us to identify two general methods depending on the particular nucleoside analogs. All the compounds were biologically evaluated in antiviral and anticancer assays and several showed improvement of activity compared to their parent nucleosides, as in the case of ddA, d4T, abacavir and acyclovir against HIV-1 and/or HIV-2. The biological results were supported by metabolism studies with carboxypeptidase Y monitored by 31P NMR to investigate their bioactivation. This work further validates the phosphorodiamidate approach as a monophosphate prodrug motif with broad application in the antiviral and anticancer fields. PMID:24177359