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Sample records for l-alanine difracao multipla

  1. Vibrational dynamics of crystalline L-alanine

    SciTech Connect

    Bordallo, H.N.; Eckert, J.; Barthes, M.

    1997-11-01

    The authors report a new, complete vibrational analysis of L-alanine and L-alanine-d{sub 4} which utilizes IINS intensities in addition to frequency information. The use of both isotopomers resulted in a self-consistent force field for and assignment of the molecular vibrations in L-alanine. Some details of the calculation as well as a comparison of calculated and observed IINS spectra are presented. The study clarifies a number of important issues on the vibrational dynamics of this molecule and presents a self-consistent force field for the molecular vibrations in crystalline L-alanine.

  2. On the existence of ‘L-alanine cadmium bromide'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, Bikshandarkoil R.

    2013-12-01

    It is argued that the recently reported nonlinear optical crystal L-alanine cadmium bromide, grown by slow solvent evaporation method at room temperature [P. Ilayabarathi, J. Chandrasekaran, Spectrochim. Acta 96A (2012) 684-689] is the well-known L-alanine crystal. The isolation of L-alanine crystal is explained due to fractional crystallization.

  3. On the existence of 'L-alanine cadmium bromide'.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Bikshandarkoil R

    2013-12-01

    It is argued that the recently reported nonlinear optical crystal L-alanine cadmium bromide, grown by slow solvent evaporation method at room temperature [P. Ilayabarathi, J. Chandrasekaran, Spectrochim. Acta 96A (2012) 684-689] is the well-known L-alanine crystal. The isolation of L-alanine crystal is explained due to fractional crystallization.

  4. Atomic Layer Deposition of L-Alanine Polypeptide

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Yaqin; Li, Binsong; Jiang, Ying-Bing; Dunphy, Darren R.; Tsai, Andy; Tam, Siu-Yue; Fan, Hongyou Y.; Zhang, Hongxia; Rogers, David; Rempe, Susan; Atanassov, Plamen; Cecchi, Joseph L.; Brinker, C. Jeffrey

    2014-10-30

    L-Alanine polypeptide thin films were synthesized via atomic layer deposition (ALD). Rather, instead of using an amino acid monomer as the precursor, an L-alanine amino acid derivatized with a protecting group was used to prevent self-polymerization, increase the vapor pressure, and allow linear cycle-by-cycle growth emblematic of ALD. Moreover, the successful deposition of a conformal polypeptide film has been confirmed by FTIR, TEM, and Mass Spectrometry, and the ALD process has been extended to polyvaline.

  5. On the existence of ``l-threonine formate'', ``l-alanine lithium chloride'' and ``bis l-alanine lithium chloride'' crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrosyan, A. M.; Ghazaryan, V. V.; Fleck, M.

    2013-03-01

    We argue that the recently reported crystals "L-threonine formate" as well as "L-alanine lithium chloride" and "bis L-alanine lithium chloride" actually are the well-known crystals L-threonine and L-alanine, respectively.

  6. Pressure-induced phase transitions in L-alanine, revisited.

    PubMed

    Tumanov, N A; Boldyreva, E V; Kolesov, B A; Kurnosov, A V; Quesada Cabrera, R

    2010-08-01

    The effect of pressure on L-alanine has been studied by X-ray powder diffraction (up to 12.3 GPa), single-crystal X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and optical microscopy (up to approximately 6 GPa). No structural phase transitions have been observed. At approximately 2 GPa the cell parameters a and b become accidentally equal to each other, but without a change in space-group symmetry. Neither of two transitions reported by others (to a tetragonal phase at approximately 2 GPa and to a monoclinic phase at approximately 9 GPa) was observed. The changes in cell parameters were continuous up to the highest measured pressures and the cells remained orthorhombic. Some important changes in the intermolecular interactions occur, which also manifest themselves in the Raman spectra. Two new orthorhombic phases could be crystallized from a MeOH/EtOH/H(2)O pressure-transmitting mixture in the pressure range 0.8-4.7 GPa, but only if the sample was kept at these pressures for at least 1-2 d. The new phases converted back to L-alanine on decompression. Judging from the Raman spectra and cell parameters, the new phases are most probably not L-alanine but its solvates.

  7. Isotopic effects in mechanistic studies of biotransformations of fluorine derivatives of L-alanine catalysed by L-alanine dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Szymańska-Majchrzak, Jolanta; Pałka, Katarzyna; Kańska, Marianna

    2017-05-01

    Synthesis of 3-fluoro-[2-(2)H]-L-alanine (3-F-[(2)H]-L-Ala) in reductive amination of 3-fluoropyruvic acid catalysed by L-alanine dehydrogenase (AlaDH) was described. Fluorine derivative was used to study oxidative deamination catalysed by AlaDH applied kinetic (for 3-F-L-Ala in H2O - KIE's on Vmax: 1.1; on Vmax/KM: 1.2; for 3-F-L-Ala in (2)H2O - on Vmax: 1.4; on Vmax/KM: 2.1) and solvent isotope effect methods (for 3-F-L-Ala - SIE's on Vmax: 1.0; on Vmax/KM: 0.87; for 3-F-[2-(2)H]-L-Ala - on Vmax: 1.4; on Vmax/KM: 1.5). Studies explain some details of reaction mechanism.

  8. First-principles study of fluorination of L-Alanine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreepad, H. R.; Ravi, H. R.; Ahmed, Khaleel; Dayananda, H. M.; Umakanth, K.; Manohara, B. M.

    2013-02-01

    First-principles calculations based on Density Functional Theory have been done on effect of fluorination of an important amino acid - L-Alanine. Its structure has been simulated. The unit cell is orthorhombic with lattice parameters a=5.90Å, b=13.85Å and c=5.75Å with volume 470 (Å)3. Bond lengths and bond angles have been estimated. Electronic Density of States calculations show that the material has a band gap of 4.47eV. Electronic band structure indicates that the material can be effectively used for NLO applications. The electronic contribution to the dielectric constant has been calculated and its average value comes out to be 2.165.

  9. [Regulation of key enzymes of L-alanine biosynthesis by Brevibacterium flavum producer strains].

    PubMed

    Melkonian, L O; Avetisova, G E; Ambartsumian, A A; Chakhalian, A Kh; Sagian, A S

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms of L-alanine overproduction by Brevibacterium flavum producer strains were studied. It was shown that beta-CI-L-alanine is an inhibitor of some key enzymes involved in the synthesis of L-alanine, including alanine transaminase and valine-pyruvate transaminase. Two highly active B. flavum GL1 and GL1 8 producer strains, which are resistant to the inhibitory effect of beta-Cl-L-alanine, were obtained using a parental B. flavum AA5 producer strain, characterized by a reduced activity of alanine racemase (>or=98%). It was demonstrated that the increased L-alanine synthesis efficiency observed in the producer strains developed in this work is associated with the absence of inhibition of alanine transaminase by the end product of the biosynthesis reaction, as well as with the effect of derepression of both alanine transaminase and valine-pyruvate transaminase synthesis by the studied compound.

  10. Synthesis and GGCT Inhibitory Activity of N-Glutaryl-L-alanine Analogues.

    PubMed

    Ii, Hiromi; Yoshiki, Tatsuhiro; Hoshiya, Naoyuki; Uenishi, Jun'ichi

    2016-01-01

    γ-Glutamylcyclotransferase (GGCT) is an important enzyme that cleaves γ-glutamyl-amino acid in the γ-glutamyl cycle to release 5-oxoproline and amino acid. Eighteen N-acyl-L-alanine analogues including eleven new compounds have been synthesized and examined for their inhibitory activity against recombinant human GGCT protein. Simple N-glutaryl-L-alanine was found to be the most potent inhibitor for GGCT. Other N-glutaryl-L-alanine analogues having methyl and dimethyl substituents at the 2-position were moderately effective, while N-(3R-aminoglutary)-L-alanine, the substrate having an (R)-amino group at the 3-position or N-(N-methyl-3-azaglutaryl)-L-alanine, the substrate having an N-methyl substituent on the 3-azaglutaryl carbon, in constract, exhibited excellent inhibition properties.

  11. Impact of charged amino acid substitution in the transmembrane domain of L-alanine exporter, AlaE, of Escherichia coli on the L-alanine export.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seryoung; Ihara, Kohei; Katsube, Satoshi; Ando, Tasuke; Isogai, Emiko; Yoneyama, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    The Escherichia coli alaE gene encodes the L-alanine exporter, AlaE, that catalyzes active export of L-alanine using proton electrochemical potential. The transporter comprises only 149 amino acid residues and four predicted transmembrane domains (TMs), which contain three charged amino acid residues. The AlaE-deficient L-alanine non-metabolizing cells (ΔalaE cells) appeared hypersusceptible to L-alanyl-L-alanine showing a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 2.5 µg/ml for the dipeptide due to a toxic accumulation of L-alanine. To elucidate the mechanism by which AlaE exports L-alanine, we replaced charged amino acid residues in the TMs, glutamic acid-30 (TM-I), arginine-45 (TM-II), and aspartic acid-84 (TM-III) with their respective charge-conserved amino acid or a net neutral cysteine. The ΔalaE cells producing R45K or R45C appeared hypersusceptible to the dipeptide, indicating that arginine-45 is essential for AlaE activity. MIC of the dipeptide in the ΔalaE cells expressing E30D and E30C was 156 µg/ml and >10,000 µg/ml, respectively, thereby suggesting that a negative charge at this position is not essential. The ΔalaE cells expressing D84E or D84C showed an MIC >10,000 and 78 µg/ml, respectively, implying that a negative charge is required at this position. These results were generally consistent with that of the L-alanine accumulation experiments in intact cells. We therefore concluded that charged amino acid residues (R45 and D84) in the AlaE transmembrane domain play a pivotal role in L-alanine export. Replacement of three cysteine residues at C22, C28 (both in TM-I), and C135 (C-terminal region) with alanine showed only a marginal effect on L-alanine export.

  12. Efficient L-Alanine Production by a Thermo-Regulated Switch in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Li; Deng, Can; Cui, Wen-Jing; Liu, Zhong-Mei; Zhou, Zhe-Min

    2016-01-01

    L-Alanine has important applications in food, pharmaceutical and veterinary and is used as a substrate for production of engineered thermoplastics. Microbial fermentation could reduce the production cost and promote the application of L-alanine. However, the presence of L-alanine significantly inhibit cell growth rate and cause a decrease in the ultimate L-alanine productivity. For efficient L-alanine production, a thermo-regulated genetic switch was designed to dynamically control the expression of L-alanine dehydrogenase (alaD) from Geobacillus stearothermophilus on the Escherichia coli B0016-060BC chromosome. The optimal cultivation conditions for the genetically switched alanine production using B0016-060BC were the following: an aerobic growth phase at 33 °C with a 1-h thermo-induction at 42 °C followed by an oxygen-limited phase at 42 °C. In a bioreactor experiment using the scaled-up conditions optimized in a shake flask, B0016-060BC accumulated 50.3 g biomass/100 g glucose during the aerobic growth phase and 96 g alanine/100 g glucose during the oxygen-limited phase, respectively. The L-alanine titer reached 120.8 g/l with higher overall and oxygen-limited volumetric productivities of 3.09 and 4.18 g/l h, respectively, using glucose as the sole carbon source. Efficient cell growth and L-alanine production were reached separately, by switching cultivation temperature. The results revealed the application of a thermo-regulated strategy for heterologous metabolic production and pointed to strategies for improving L-alanine production.

  13. Temperature dependences of piezoelectric, elastic and dielectric constants of L-alanine crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tylczyński, Z.; Sterczyńska, A.; Wiesner, M.

    2011-09-01

    Temperature changes in the components of piezoelectric, elastic and dielectric tensors were studied in L-alanine crystals in the range 100-300 K. A jumpwise increase in the c55 component of the elastic stiffness accompanied by maxima in damping of all face-shear modes observed at 199 K in L-alanine crystal were interpreted as a result of changes in the NH3+ vibrations occurring through electron-phonon coupling. All components of the piezoelectric tensor show small anomalies in this temperature range. The components of the electromechanical coupling coefficient determined indicate that L-alanine is a weak piezoelectric.

  14. Temperature dependences of piezoelectric, elastic and dielectric constants of L-alanine crystal.

    PubMed

    Tylczyński, Z; Sterczyńska, A; Wiesner, M

    2011-09-07

    Temperature changes in the components of piezoelectric, elastic and dielectric tensors were studied in L-alanine crystals in the range 100-300 K. A jumpwise increase in the c(55) component of the elastic stiffness accompanied by maxima in damping of all face-shear modes observed at 199 K in L-alanine crystal were interpreted as a result of changes in the NH(3)(+) vibrations occurring through electron-phonon coupling. All components of the piezoelectric tensor show small anomalies in this temperature range. The components of the electromechanical coupling coefficient determined indicate that L-alanine is a weak piezoelectric.

  15. A comparative study on the growth and characterization of nonlinear optical amino acid crystals: L-alanine (LA) and L-alanine alaninium nitrate (LAAN).

    PubMed

    Aravindan, A; Srinivasan, P; Vijayan, N; Gopalakrishnan, R; Ramasamy, P

    2008-11-15

    A comparative study on the properties of L-alanine and LAAN crystals has been made and discussed. It may be concluded that the protonation of the amino group in the L-alanine molecule is the key factor in increasing the relative SHG efficiency of LAAN. The protonation is justified by the crystal structure analysis, FTIR and photoluminescence studies. The factor group vibrations are compared and found that there is an increase in vibrational modes of LA when reacted with nitric acid forming LAAN.

  16. Characterization of the l-alanine exporter AlaE of Escherichia coli and its potential role in protecting cells from a toxic-level accumulation of l-alanine and its derivatives.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seryoung; Ihara, Kohei; Katsube, Satoshi; Hori, Hatsuhiro; Ando, Tasuke; Isogai, Emiko; Yoneyama, Hiroshi

    2015-08-01

    We previously reported that the alaE gene of Escherichia coli encodes the l-alanine exporter AlaE. The objective of this study was to elucidate the mechanism of the AlaE exporter. The minimum inhibitory concentration of l-alanine and l-alanyl-l-alanine in alaE-deficient l-alanine-nonmetabolizing cells MLA301ΔalaE was 4- and >4000-fold lower, respectively, than in the alaE-positive parent cells MLA301, suggesting that AlaE functions as an efflux pump to avoid a toxic-level accumulation of intracellular l-alanine and its derivatives. Furthermore, the growth of the alaE-deficient mutant derived from the l-alanine-metabolizing strain was strongly inhibited in the presence of a physiological level of l-alanyl-l-alanine. Intact MLA301ΔalaE and MLA301ΔalaE/pAlaE cells producing plasmid-borne AlaE, accumulated approximately 200% and 50%, respectively, of the [(3) H]l-alanine detected in MLA301 cells, suggesting that AlaE exports l-alanine. When 200 mmol/L l-alanine-loaded inverted membrane vesicles prepared from MLA301ΔalaE/pAlaE were placed in a solution containing 200 mmol/L or 0.34 μmol/L l-alanine, energy-dependent [(3) H]l-alanine accumulation occurred under either condition. This energy-dependent uphill accumulation of [(3) H]l-alanine was strongly inhibited in the presence of carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone but not by dicyclohexylcarbodiimide, suggesting that the AlaE-mediated l-alanine extrusion was driven by proton motive force. Based on these results, physiological roles of the l-alanine exporter are discussed.

  17. Second harmonic generation studies in L-alanine single crystals grown from solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boomadevi, Shanmugam; Pandiyan, Krishnamoorthy

    2014-01-01

    Single crystals of L-alanine of dimensions 2×1.1×0.5 cm3 were grown by evaporation method using deionised water as a solvent. The morphology of the grown crystals had (1 2 0) and (0 1 1) as their prominent faces. UV-vis-near IR spectrum shows the transparency range of L-alanine crystal available for frequency doubling from 250 to 1400 nm. Phase-matched second harmonic generation was observed in L-alanine sample by using 7 ns Q-switched Nd:YAG laser with OPO set up. In the present work, phase matching was achieved by angle and wavelength tuning. The angular and spectral phase-matching bandwidths were determined experimentally for a 1.5 mm thick L-alanine crystal and the results have been compared with their theoretical results. Further the possible reasons for the broadening of SHG spectrum have been discussed.

  18. Interactions of L-alanine with alumina as studied by vibrational spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Ana R; de Barros, Ricardo Brito; Fidalgo, Alexandra; Ilharco, Laura M

    2007-09-25

    The interactions of L-alanine with gamma- and alpha-alumina have been investigated by diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS). L-alanine/alumina samples were dried from aqueous suspensions, at 36.5 degrees C, with two amino acid concentrations (0.4 and 0.8 mmol g-1) and at different pH values (1, 6, and 13). The vibrational spectra proved that the nature of L-alanine interactions with both aluminas is the same (hydrogen bonding), although the groups involved depend on the L-alanine form and on alumina surface groups, both controlled by the pH. For samples prepared at pH 1, cationic L-alanine [CH3CH(NH3+)COOH] displaces physisorbed water from alumina, and strong hydrogen bonds are established between the carbonyl groups of alanine, as electron donors, and the surface Al-OH2+ groups of alumina. This occurs at the expense of alanine dimer dissociation and breaking of intramolecular bonds. When samples are prepared at pH 6, the interacting groups are Al-OH2+ and the carboxylate groups of zwitterionic L-alanine [CH3CH(NH3+)COO-]. The affinity of L-alanine toward alumina decreases, as the strong NH3+...-OOC intermolecular hydrogen bonds prevail over the interactions with alumina. Thus, for a load of 0.8 mmol g-1, phase segregation is observed. On alpha-alumina, crystal deposition is even observed for a load of 0.4 mmol g-1. At pH 13, the carboxylate groups of anionic L-alanine [CH3CH(NH2)COO-] are not affected by alumina. Instead, hydrogen bond interactions occur between NH2 and the Al-OH surface groups of the substrate. Complementary N2 adsorption-desorption isotherms showed that adsorption of L-alanine occurs onto the alumina pore network for samples prepared at pH 1 and 13, whereas at pH 6 the amino acid/alumina interactions are not strong enough to promote adsorption. The mesoporous structure and the high specific surface area of gamma-alumina make it a more efficient substrate for adsorption of L-alanine. For each alumina, however, it is

  19. Determination of D- and L-alanine concentrations using a pyruvic acid sensor.

    PubMed

    Inaba, Yohei; Hamada-Sato, Naoko; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Imada, Chiaki; Watanabe, Etsuo

    2003-08-01

    The concentrations of D- and L-alanine in bivalves are useful as indicators of environmental pollution. Amino acid oxidase with a low substrate specificity catalyzes the oxidation of various amino acids. Among the various amino acids, pyruvic acid can be generated from alanine only by the catalytic oxidative reaction of this oxidase. Therefore, in this study, the concentrations of D- and L-alanine were determined from the concentration of pyruvic acid, which was determined from the consumption of oxygen based on the oxidative reaction of pyruvate oxidase. From this point of view, there is a very strong possibility that biosensors utilizing enzymes with a low substrate specificity can be developed. The results obtained were as follows. (1) The optimum conditions for the use of pyruvic acid sensor were as follows: temperature of 25 degrees C, pH of 6.8, flow rate of 0.1 ml/min, thiamin diphosphate concentration of 1.5 mM, and injection volume of 50 microl. (2) D-Alanine and L-alanine optimally reacted with D- and L-amino acid oxidase at 30 degrees C, pH 8.2, for 30 min and at 37 degrees C, pH 7.8, for 90 min, respectively. (3) The linear relationships between the concentrations of D- and L-alanine and the output of the sensor were obtained at 3.56-106.8 microg of D-alanine and 5.34-71.3 microg of L-alanine. (4) The concentrations of D- and L-alanine in Meretrix iusoria, Patinopecten yessonsi, and Corbicula leana obtained by the proposed assay were in good agreement with those determined by a conventional method.

  20. Inducible l-Alanine Exporter Encoded by the Novel Gene ygaW (alaE) in Escherichia coli ▿

    PubMed Central

    Hori, Hatsuhiro; Yoneyama, Hiroshi; Tobe, Ryuta; Ando, Tasuke; Isogai, Emiko; Katsumata, Ryoichi

    2011-01-01

    We previously isolated a mutant hypersensitive to l-alanyl-l-alanine from a non-l-alanine-metabolizing Escherichia coli strain and found that it lacked an inducible l-alanine export system. Consequently, this mutant showed a significant accumulation of intracellular l-alanine and a reduction in the l-alanine export rate compared to the parent strain. When the mutant was used as a host to clone a gene(s) that complements the dipeptide-hypersensitive phenotype, two uncharacterized genes, ygaW and ytfF, and two characterized genes, yddG and yeaS, were identified. Overexpression of each gene in the mutant resulted in a decrease in the intracellular l-alanine level and enhancement of the l-alanine export rate in the presence of the dipeptide, suggesting that their products function as exporters of l-alanine. Since ygaW exhibited the most striking impact on both the intra- and the extracellular l-alanine levels among the four genes identified, we disrupted the ygaW gene in the non-l-alanine-metabolizing strain. The resulting isogenic mutant showed the same intra- and extracellular l-alanine levels as observed in the dipeptide-hypersensitive mutant obtained by chemical mutagenesis. When each gene was overexpressed in the wild-type strain, which does not intrinsically excrete alanine, only the ygaW gene conferred on the cells the ability to excrete alanine. In addition, expression of the ygaW gene was induced in the presence of the dipeptide. On the basis of these results, we concluded that YgaW is likely to be the physiologically most relevant exporter for l-alanine in E. coli and proposed that the gene be redesignated alaE for alanine export. PMID:21531828

  1. Investigation on physical properties of L-alanine: An effect of Methylene blue dye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shkir, Mohd.; Yahia, I. S.; Al-Qahtani, A. M. A.; Ganesh, V.; AlFaify, S.

    2017-03-01

    In the present investigation, a bulk size (35 mm × 25 mm × 15 mm) single crystal of 0.1 wt% Methylene blue dye (MLB) added L-alanine is grown at room temperature using solution technique for the first time. The L-alanine crystals with higher concentrations of dye (0.5 and 1 wt%) were also grown. Solubility study was performed at different temperatures. Structural, vibrational and good quality was inveterate by powder XRD, FT-Raman and SEM analyses. High transmittance in dyed crystals was confirmed. The presence of MLB dye was confirmed by an absorption band centered at 650 nm. Optical band gap was calculated for pure and dyed L-alanine crystals and found to be 5.45 and 4.49 eV respectively. Photoluminescence intensity of UV-A emission band centered at 332 nm was found to be enhanced due to the presence of dye. The dielectric measurement was done in the wide frequency range. Furthermore, the third order nonlinear optical parameters are enhanced in dyed L-alanine crystals determined by Z-scan technique.

  2. Growth and characterization of pure and semiorganic nonlinear optical Lithium Sulphate admixtured l-alanine crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vela, T.; Selvarajan, P.; Freeda, T. H.; Balasubramanian, K.

    2013-04-01

    Lithium sulphate admixtured l-alanine (LSLA) salt was synthesized and the solubility of the commercially available l-alanine and the synthesized LSLA sample was determined in de-ionized water at various temperatures. In accordance with the solubility data, the saturated aqueous solutions of l-alanine and lithium admixtured l-alanine were prepared separately and the single crystals of the samples were grown by the solution method with a slow evaporation technique. Studying single x-ray diffraction shows that pure and LSLA crystal belong to the orthorhombic system with a non-centrosymmetric space group P212121. Using the powder x-ray diffraction study, the crystallinity of the grown crystals is confirmed and the diffraction peaks are indexed. The various functional groups present in the pure and LSLA crystal are elucidated from Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy study. UV-visible transmittance is recorded to study the optical transmittance range for the grown crystals. The powder second harmonic generation test confirms the nonlinear optical property of the grown crystals. From the microhardness test, the hardness of the grown crystals is estimated. The dielectric behaviour, such as the dielectric constant and the loss of the sample, are measured as a function of temperature and frequency. The ac conductivity of the grown crystals is also studied and the activation energy is calculated.

  3. Adsorption of di-l-alanine on Cu(110) investigated with scanning tunneling microscopy [rapid communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stensgaard, I.

    2003-11-01

    Sub-monolayer growth of a small chiral peptide, di- L-alanine, on Cu(1 1 0) was investigated by variable temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). At low coverage and for temperatures above ≈-220 K the molecules nucleate along the [ 3¯ 3 2] direction to form short, mainly one-dimensional islands. An increase in coverage leads to the formation of [ 3¯ 3 2]-directed, elongated islands. Images with sub-molecular resolution reveal that the orientation of the molecules within one particular island depends on the deposition temperature. At higher coverage, up to one monolayer, the islands coalesce, giving rise to phase boundaries between domains of opposite orientation. An atomic-scale model for di- L-alanine on Cu(1 1 0) is presented.

  4. Structure and vibrational spectra of L-alanine L-alaninium picrate monohydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghazaryan, V. V.; Fleck, M.; Petrosyan, A. M.

    2012-05-01

    Preparation, crystal and molecular structure as well as vibrational spectra of the crystal L-alanine L-alaninium picrate monohydrate are described. The title crystal is monoclinic, space group P21. The asymmetric unit contains one dimeric (L-Ala⋯L-Ala+) cation, one picrate anion and a water molecule. The O⋯O distance in the dimeric cation is equal to 2.553(2) Å. The IR and Raman spectra are interpreted based on the structure.

  5. Qualitative analysis of collective mode frequency shifts in L-alanine using terahertz spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Taulbee, Anita R; Heuser, Justin A; Spendel, Wolfgang U; Pacey, Gilbert E

    2009-04-01

    We have observed collective mode frequency shifts in deuterium-substituted L-alanine, three of which have previously only been calculated. Terahertz (THz) absorbance spectra were acquired at room temperature in the spectral range of 66-90 cm(-1), or 2.0-2.7 THz, for L-alanine (L-Ala) and four L-Ala compounds in which hydrogen atoms (atomic mass = 1 amu) were substituted with deuterium atoms (atomic mass = 2 amu): L-Ala-2-d, L-Ala-3,3,3-d(3), L-Ala-2,3,3,3-d(4), and L-Ala-d(7). The absorbance maxima of two L-Ala collective modes in this spectral range were recorded for multiple spectral measurements of each compound, and the magnitude of each collective mode frequency shift due to increased mass of these specific atoms was evaluated for statistical significance. Calculations were performed which predict the THz absorbance frequencies based on the estimated reduced mass of the modes. The shifts in absorbance maxima were correlated with the location(s) of the substituted deuterium atom(s) in the L-alanine molecule, and the atoms contributing to the absorbing delocalized mode in the crystal structure were deduced using statistics described herein. The statistical analyses presented also indicate that the precision of the method allows reproducible frequency shifts as small as 1 cm(-1) or 0.03 THz to be observed and that these shifts are not random error in the measurement.

  6. Evidence for disorder in L-alanine lattice detected by Pulsed-EPR spectroscopy at cryogenic temperatures.

    PubMed

    Maltar-Strmecki, N; Rakvin, B

    2006-03-13

    The unusual behavior of lattice dynamics of L-alanine has been assigned to intermolecular dynamics and localization of vibrational energy. Recent heat capacity and Pulsed-EPR measurements support presence of thermally activated dynamic orientational disorder in the L-alanine lattice below 20 K. In the present study, the additional evidence for possible thermally activated disordered behavior of L-alanine lattice have been obtained by investigating dependences of longitudinal relaxation time of first stable L-alanine radical, SAR1, on sample cooling rates for the same low temperature interval. The obtained relaxation time by Pulsed-EPR shows clear dependence on cooling rates and this behavior can be explained within two types of suggested spin-lattice relaxation mechanisms for the paramagnetic centers in the hydrogen-bonded organic crystal.

  7. 3-Phosphono-L-alanine as pyrophosphate mimic for DNA synthesis using HIV-1 reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shiqiong; Froeyen, Mathy; Lescrinier, Eveline; Marlière, Philippe; Herdewijn, Piet

    2011-01-07

    A series of sulf(on)ate and phosph(on)ate amino acid phosphoramidate analogues of deoxynucleotides were synthesized as potential substrates for HIV-1 reverse transcriptase. Taurine, L-cysteic acid, 3-phosphono-L-alanine, O-sulfonato-L-serine, and O-phospho-L-serine were investigated as leaving groups in an enzyme catalyzed DNA synthesis protocol. Among these analogues, the phosphonate congener performed best and 3-phosphono-L-alanine can be considered as an excellent mimic of the pyrophosphate (PPi) moiety of deoxyadenosine triphosphate, to be used in enzymatic synthesis of nucleic acids. During a single nucleotide incorporation assay the use of 3-phosphono-L-Ala-dAMP as substrate resulted in 95% conversion to a P + 1 strand in 60 min at 50 μM (a concentration 10 times less than found for L-Asp-dAMP) and with improved incorporation kinetics and less stalling. For the sequences investigated, the efficiency of the incorporation is base dependent and decreases in the order (A ≥ T = G > C). In all cases, the incorporation follows Watson-Crick rules.

  8. Discovery of an L-alanine ester prodrug of the Hsp90 inhibitor, MPC-3100.

    PubMed

    Kim, Se-Ho; Tangallapally, Rajendra; Kim, In Chul; Trovato, Richard; Parker, Daniel; Patton, J Scott; Reeves, Leslie; Bradford, Chad; Wettstein, Daniel; Baichwal, Vijay; Papac, Damon; Bajji, Ashok; Carlson, Robert; Yager, Kraig M

    2015-11-15

    Various types of Hsp90 inhibitors have been and continue to undergo clinical investigation. One development candidate is the purine-based, synthetic Hsp90 inhibitor 1 (MPC-3100), which successfully completed a phase I clinical study. However, further clinical development of 1 was hindered by poor solubility and consequent formulation issues and promoted development of a more water soluble prodrug. Towards this end, numerous pro-moieties were explored in vitro and in vivo. These studies resulted in identification of L-alanine ester mesylate, 2i (MPC-0767), which exhibited improved aqueous solubility, adequate chemical stability, and rapid bioconversion without the need for solubilizing excipients. Based on improved physical characteristics and favorable PK and PD profiles, 2i mesylate was selected for further development. A convergent, scalable, chromatography-free synthesis for 2i mesylate was developed to support further clinical evaluation.

  9. Catalytic Stereoinversion of L-Alanine to Deuterated D-Alanine.

    PubMed

    Moozeh, Kimia; So, Soon Mog; Chin, Jik

    2015-08-03

    A combination of an achiral pyridoxal analogue and a chiral base has been developed for catalytic deuteration of L-alanine with inversion of stereochemistry to give deuterated D-alanine under mild conditions (neutral pD and 25 °C) without the use of any protecting groups. This system can also be used for catalytic deuteration of D-alanine with retention of stereochemistry to give deuterated D-alanine. Thus a racemic mixture of alanine can be catalytically deuterated to give an enantiomeric excess of deuterated D-alanine. While catalytic deracemization of alanine is forbidden by the second law of thermodynamics, this system can be used for catalytic deracemization of alanine with deuteration. Such green and biomimetic approach to catalytic stereocontrol provides insights into efficient amino acid transformations.

  10. Spectrofluorimetric determination of ofloxacin in milk with N-(9-fluorenylmethyloxycarbonyl)-L-alanine.

    PubMed

    Tong, Zhao; Bianfei, Yu; Wanjin, Tang; Haixia, Zhang

    2015-09-05

    It was found that N-(9-fluorenylmethyloxycarbonyl)-L-alanine (F-Ala) could interact with ofloxacin (OFL) and enhance the fluorescence of OFL, which could be used to set up a new fluorescence spectrophotometry method to detect OFL without isolation procedure. The experimental conditions were discussed and when MeOH was used as solvent, 0.001 μg mL(-1) of OFL could be detected. For making the method could be used easily in milk samples, MeOH/H2O (v/v, 4:1, pH 4.1) was used as the optimal solvent condition, the limit of quantification of OFL could be reached 0.01 μg mL(-1) in milk samples with recovery more than 88% at least.

  11. Thiophenyl-substituted triazolyl-thione L-alanine: asymmetric synthesis, aggregation and biological properties.

    PubMed

    Saghyan, Ashot S; Simonyan, Hayarpi M; Petrosyan, Satenik G; Geolchanyan, Arpine V; Roviello, Giovanni N; Musumeci, Domenica; Roviello, Valentina

    2014-10-01

    In this work, we report the asymmetric synthesis and characterization of an artificial amino acid based on triazolyl-thione L-alanine, which was modified with a thiophenyl-substituted moiety, as well as in vitro studies of its nucleic acid-binding ability. We found, by dynamic light scattering studies, that the synthetic amino acid was able to form supramolecular aggregates having a hydrodynamic diameter higher than 200 nm. Furthermore, we demonstrated, by UV and CD experiments, that the heteroaromatic amino acid, whose enzymatic stability was demonstrated by HPLC analysis also after 24 h of incubation in human serum, was able to bind a RNA complex, which is a feature of biomedical interest in view of innovative antiviral strategies based on modulation of RNA-RNA molecular recognition.

  12. Controlled radical polymerization of an acrylamide containing L-alanine moiety via ATRP.

    PubMed

    Rafiee, Zahra

    2016-02-01

    Homopolymerization of an optically active acrylamide having an amino acid moiety in the side chain, N-acryloyl-L-alanine (AAla) was carried out via atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) at room temperature using 2-hydroxyethyl-2'-methyl-2'-bromopropionate (HMB) or sodium-4-(bromomethyl)benzoate (SBB) as initiator in pure water, methanol/water mixture and pure methanol solvents. The polymerization reaction resulted in the optically active biocompatible amino acid-based homopolymer in good yield with narrow molecular weight distribution. The number average molecular weight increased with conversion and polydispersity was low. The structure and molecular weight of synthesized polymer were characterized by (1)H NMR, FT-IR spectroscopic techniques and size-exclusion chromatography.

  13. Gliotoxicity of the cyanotoxin, β-methyl-amino-L-alanine (BMAA).

    PubMed

    Chiu, Alexander S; Gehringer, Michelle M; Braidy, Nady; Guillemin, Gilles J; Welch, Jeffrey H; Neilan, Brett A

    2013-01-01

    The amino acid variant β-methyl-amino-L-alanine (BMAA) has long been associated with the increased incidence and progression of the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/Parkinsonism dementia complex (ALS/PDC). Previous studies have indicated that BMAA damages neurons via excitotoxic mechanisms. We have challenged rat olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) with exogenous BMAA and found it to be cytotoxic. BMAA also induces a significant increase in Ca2+ influx, enhanced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and disrupts mitochondrial activity in OECs. This is the first study investigating BMAA toxicity using pure glial cells. These findings align BMAA with the three proposed mechanisms of degeneration in ALS, those being non-cell autonomous death, excitotoxicity and mitochondrial dysfunction.

  14. Distinguishing the cyanobacterial neurotoxin β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) from other diamino acids.

    PubMed

    Banack, S A; Metcalf, J S; Spáčil, Z; Downing, T G; Downing, S; Long, A; Nunn, P B; Cox, P A

    2011-04-01

    β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is produced by diverse taxa of cyanobacteria, and has been detected by many investigators who have searched for it in cyanobacterial blooms, cultures and collections. Although BMAA is distinguishable from proteinogenic amino acids and its isomer 2,4-DAB using standard chromatographic and mass spectroscopy techniques routinely used for the analysis of amino acids, we studied whether BMAA could be reliably distinguished from other diamino acids, particularly 2,6-diaminopimelic acid which has been isolated from the cell walls of many bacterial species. We used HPLC-FD, UHPLC-UV, UHPLC-MS, and triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) to differentiate BMAA from the diamino acids 2,6-diaminopimelic acid, N-2(amino)ethylglycine, lysine, ornithine, 2,4-diaminosuccinic acid, homocystine, cystine, tryptophan, as well as other amino acids including asparagine, glutamine, and methionine methylsulfonium.

  15. Growth, Structural And Optical Studies On Bis L-alanine Lithium Chloride (BLALC) Single Crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, A. S. J. Lucia; Selvarajan, P.; Perumal, S.

    2011-10-01

    Bis L-alanine Lithium Chloride (BLALC) single crystals were grown successfully by solution method with slow evaporation technique at room temperature. Crystals of size 15 x 9 x 4 mm3 have been obtained in 28 days. The grown crystals were colourless and transparent. Single crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD) study showed that BLALC belongs to orthorhombic system with a non-centro-symmetric space group P212121. The crystallinity of BLALC crystal was confirmed by the powder X-ray diffraction study and diffraction peaks were indexed. The functional groups of the grown crystals have been identified by FTIR studies. UV-visible transmittance spectrum was recorded to study the optical transparency of BLALC crystal. The nonlinear optical (NLO) property of the grown crystal was confirmed by Kurtz-Perry powder technique.

  16. Experimental and DFT computational studies of L-alanine cadmium chloride crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignatius, I. Cicili; Dheivamalar, S.; Kirubavathi, K.; Selvaraju, K.

    2016-05-01

    In this work, we report the combined experimental and theoretical study on molecular structure and vibrational spectra of nonlinear optical crystal L-alanine cadmium chloride (LACC). The single X-ray diffraction studies have revealed that the compound crystallizes in monoclinic system C2 space group with cell parameters a = 16.270, b = 7.358, c = 7.887 and Z = 4. FTIR and Raman spectra of the nonlinear optical materials LACC have been recorded and analyzed. The optimized geometric bond length and bond angles are obtained with the help of density functional theory (DFT) (B3LYP) calculation. The optimized geometric bond lengths and bond angles obtained by using DFT show good agreement with the experimental data. Using the natural bond orbital analysis the electronic effect and hydrogen bonding were confirmed. The HOMO-LUMO energy gap and the first order hyperpolarizability were calculated and it supports the nonlinear optical activity of LACC crystal.

  17. Fibrous biodegradable l-alanine-based scaffolds for vascular tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Srinath, Deepta; Lin, Shigang; Knight, Darryl K; Rizkalla, Amin S; Mequanint, Kibret

    2014-07-01

    In vascular tissue engineering, three-dimensional (3D) biodegradable scaffolds play an important role in guiding seeded cells to produce matrix components by providing both mechanical and biological cues. The objective of this work was to fabricate fibrous biodegradable scaffolds from novel poly(ester amide)s (PEAs) derived from l-alanine by electrospinning, and to study the degradation profiles and its suitability for vascular tissue-engineering applications. In view of this, l-alanine-derived PEAs (dissolved in chloroform) were electrospun together with 18-30% w/w polycaprolactone (PCL) to improve spinnability. A minimum of 18% was required to effectively electrospin the solution while the upper value was set in order to limit the influence of PCL on the electrospun PEA fibres. Electrospun fibre mats with average fibre diameters of ~0.4 µm were obtained. Both fibre diameter and porosity increased with increasing PEA content and solution concentration. The degradation of a PEA fibre mat over a period of 28 days indicated that mass loss kinetics was linear, and no change in molecular weight was found, suggesting a surface erosion mechanism. Human coronary artery smooth muscle cells (HCASMCs) cultured for 7 days on the fibre mats showed significantly higher viability (p < 0.0001), suggesting that PEA scaffolds provided a better microenvironment for seeded cells compared with control PCL fibre mats of similar fibre diameter and porosity. Furthermore, elastin expression on the PEA fibre mats was significantly higher than the pure PEA discs and pure PCL fibre mat controls (p < 0.0001). These novel biodegradable PEA fibrous scaffolds could be strong candidates for vascular tissue-engineering applications.

  18. Microwave-assisted synthesis and characterization of optically active poly (ester-imide)s incorporating L-alanine.

    PubMed

    Zahmatkesh, Saeed; Hajipour, Abdol R

    2010-04-01

    Pyromellitic dianhydride (1) was reacted with L-alanine (2) to result [N,N'-(pyromellitoyl)-bis-L-alanine diacid] (3). This compound (3) was converted to N,N'-(pyromellitoyl)-bis-L-alanine diacyl chloride (4) by reaction with thionyl chloride. The microwave-assisted polycondensation of this diacyl chloride (4) with polyethyleneglycol-diol (PEG-200) and/or three synthetic aromatic diols furnish a series of new PEIs and Co-PEIs in a laboratory microwave oven (Milestone). The resulting polymers and copolymers have inherent viscosities in the range of 0.31-0.53 dl g(-1). These polymers are optically active, thermally stable and soluble in polar aprotic solvents such as DMF, DMSO, NMP, DMAc, and sulfuric acid. All of the above polymers were fully characterized by IR spectroscopy, (1)H NMR spectroscopy, elemental analyses, specific rotation and thermal analyses. Some structural characterizations and physical properties of these optically active PEIs and Co-PEIs have been reported.

  19. High-temperature Raman study of L-alanine, L-threonine and taurine crystals related to thermal decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavaignac, A. L. O.; Lima, R. J. C.; Façanha Filho, P. F.; Moreno, A. J. D.; Freire, P. T. C.

    2016-03-01

    In this work high-temperature Raman spectra are used to compare temperature dependence of the lattice mode wavenumber of L-alanine, L-threonine and taurine crystals. Anharmonic effects observed are associated with intermolecular N-H· · ·O hydrogen bond that plays an important role in thermal decomposition process of these materials. Short and strong hydrogen bonds in L-alanine crystal were associated with anharmonic effects in lattice modes leading to low thermal stability compared to taurine crystals. Connection between thermal decomposition process and anharmonic effects is furnished for the first time.

  20. Determination of β -Cyano-L-alanine, γ -Glutamyl- β -cyano-L-alanine, and Common Free Amino Acids in Vicia sativa (Fabaceae) Seeds by Reversed-Phase High-Performance Liquid Chromatography.

    PubMed

    Megías, Cristina; Cortés-Giraldo, Isabel; Girón-Calle, Julio; Vioque, Javier; Alaiz, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    A method for determination of β-cyano-L-alanine, γ-glutamyl-β-cyano-L-alanine and other free amino acids in Vicia sativa is presented. Seed extracts were derivatized by reaction with diethyl ethoxymethylenemalonate and analyzed by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. Calibration curves showed very good linearity of the response. The limit of detection and quantification was 0.15 and 0.50 μM, respectively. The method has high intra- (RSD = 0.28-0.31%) and interrepeatability (RSD = 2.76-3.08%) and remarkable accuracy with a 99% recovery in spiked samples. The method is very easy to carry out and allows for ready analysis of large number of samples using very basic HPLC equipment because the derivatized samples are very stable and have very good chromatographic properties. The method has been applied to the determination of γ-glutamyl-β-cyano-L-alanine, β-cyano-L-alanine, and common free amino acids in eight wild populations of V. sativa from southwestern Spain.

  1. β-(1-Azulenyl)-L-alanine--a functional probe for determination of pKa of histidine residues.

    PubMed

    Gosavi, Pallavi M; Moroz, Yurii S; Korendovych, Ivan V

    2015-03-28

    β-(1-Azulenyl)-L-alanine (AzAla) can be incorporated into the influenza A virus M2 proton channel. AzAla's sensitivity to the protonation state of the nearby histidines and the lack of environmental fluorescence dependence allow for direct and straightforward determination of histidine pKa values in ion channels.

  2. The GerW protein is essential for L-alanine-stimulated germination of Bacillus subtilis spores.

    PubMed

    Kuwana, Ritsuko; Takamatsu, Hiromu

    2013-11-01

    GerW (formerly called YtfJ) is a protein found in dormant spores of Bacillus subtilis. We have studied spore proteins in B. subtilis before, and here we report the characterization of GerW protein. Northern blot analysis revealed that gerW mRNA was transcribed by SigF-containing RNA polymerase beginning 1 h after the initiation of sporulation. Fluorescence was detected in forespores and dormant spores of B. subtilis recombinant strains expressing GerW-GFP. During germination in the presence of L-alanine or a mixture of L-asparagine, D-glucose, D-fructose and potassium ions (AGFK), normal spores of B. subtilis became darkened, stained positive with Hoechst 33342 and carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester (CFDA-SE), and released dipicolinic acid (DPA). In the case of gerW-deficient spores, AGFK triggered germination in a manner similar to that seen in the wild-type spores, whereas spores stimulated by L-alanine remained refractive under the phase contrast microscope, failed to stain positive with Hoechst 33342 or CFDA-SE, and released almost no DPA. These results indicate that GerW is essential for the L-alanine-induced breakdown of spore dormancy followed by core rehydration and the resumption of enzymatic activity, and suggest that GerW is involved in the early stages of germination in the presence of l-alanine.

  3. Optical, thermal and magnetic studies of pure and cobalt chloride doped L-alanine cadmium chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benila, B. S.; Bright, K. C.; Delphine, S. Mary; Shabu, R.

    2017-03-01

    Single crystals of L-alanine cadmium chloride (LACC) and cobalt chloride (Co2+) doped LACC have been grown by the slow evaporation solution growth technique. The grown crystals were subjected to various characterizations such as powder XRD, SXRD, FTIR, UV-vis, EDAX, TG/DTA, VSM, Dielectric and Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) measurements. The lattice parameters of the grown crystals were determined by single crystal X-ray analysis. EDAX analysis confirms the presence of Co2+ ion in the host material. The functional group and optical behavior of the crystals were identified from FTIR and UV-vis spectrum analysis. Electrical parameters such as dielectric constant, dielectric loss have been studied. The thermal stability of the compound was found out using TGA/DTA analysis. Second Harmonic Generation of the samples was confirmed by Kurtz-Perry powder technique. Magnetic properties of the crystals studied by VSM were also reported. The encouraging results show that the cobalt chloride doped LACC crystals have greater potential applications in optical devices.

  4. Quantification of neurotoxin BMAA (β-N-methylamino-L-alanine) in seafood from Swedish markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Liying; Kiselova, Nadezda; Rosén, Johan; Ilag, Leopold L.

    2014-11-01

    The neurotoxin β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) produced naturally by cyanobacteria, diatoms and dinoflagellates can be transferred and accumulated up the food chain, and may be a risk factor for neurodegenerative diseases. This study provides the first systematic screening of BMAA exposure of a large population through the consumption of seafood sold in metropolitan markets. BMAA was distinguished from known isomers by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry after acidic hydrolysis and derivatization. Using deuterium-labeled internal standard, BMAA was quantified as 0.01-0.90 μg/g wet weight of tissues in blue mussel, oyster, shrimp, plaice, char and herring, but was undetectable (<0.01 μg/g) in other samples (salmon, cod, perch and crayfish). Provided that the content of BMAA detected is relevant for intake calculations, the data presented may be used for a first estimation of BMAA exposure through seafood from Swedish markets, and to refine the design of future toxicological experiments and assessments.

  5. Cycas micronesica (Cycadales) plants devoid of endophytic cyanobacteria increase in beta-methylamino-L-alanine.

    PubMed

    Marler, Thomas E; Snyder, Laura R; Shaw, Christopher A

    2010-09-15

    Cycads are among the most ancient of extant Spermatophytes, and are known for their pharmacologically active compounds. beta-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA) is one metabolite that been implicated as causal of human neurodegenerative diseases in Guam. We grew Cycas micronesica seedlings without endophytic cyanobacteria symbiosis, and quantified initial and ending BMAA in various plant tissues. BMAA increased 79% during nine months of seedling growth, and root tissue contained 75% of the ultimate BMAA pool. Endophytic cyanobacteria symbionts were not the source of BMAA increase in these seedlings, which contradicts previously reported claims that biosynthesis of this toxin by cyanobacteria initiates its accumulation in the Guam environment. The preferential loading of root tissue with BMAA does not support earlier reports that this toxin serves a defensive role against herbivory of leaf or seed tissues. The long history of conflicting results in Guam's cycad toxin research continues, and recent developments underscore the sense of urgency in continued research as this endangered cycad population approaches extirpation from the island.

  6. Growth and characterization of L-alanine cadmium bromide a semiorganic nonlinear optical crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilayabarathi, P.; Chandrasekaran, J.

    2012-10-01

    A new semiorganic nonlinear optical crystal, L-alanine cadmium bromide (LACB) was grown from aqueous solution by slow solvent evaporation method at room temperature. As grown crystals were characterized for its spectral, thermal, linear and second order nonlinear optical properties. LACB crystallizes in orthorhombic system and unit cell parameters a = 5.771(2) Å, b = 6.014(4) Å, c = 12.298(2) Å, α = β = γ = 90° and volume = 426.8(3) Å3. The mode of vibrations of different molecular groups present in the crystal was identified by FTIR study. The grown crystals were found to be transparent in the entire visible region. The thermal strength and the decomposition of the grown crystals were studied using TG/DTA and DSC analysis. Dielectric measurement revealed that the crystals had very low dielectric constant at higher frequency in room temperature. The mechanical behavior was studied by Vicker's microhardness tester. The grown crystal has negative photoconductivity nature. The fluorescence spectrum of the crystal was recorded and its optical band gap is about 3.356 eV. The NLO property of crystal using modified Kurtz-Perry powder technique with Nd:YAG laser light of wavelength 1064 nm indicated that their second harmonic generation (SHG) efficiency was half that of pure KDP.

  7. Cyanobacterial Neurotoxin β-N-Methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) in Shark Fins

    PubMed Central

    Mondo, Kiyo; Hammerschlag, Neil; Basile, Margaret; Pablo, John; Banack, Sandra A.; Mash, Deborah C.

    2012-01-01

    Sharks are among the most threatened groups of marine species. Populations are declining globally to support the growing demand for shark fin soup. Sharks are known to bioaccumulate toxins that may pose health risks to consumers of shark products. The feeding habits of sharks are varied, including fish, mammals, crustaceans and plankton. The cyanobacterial neurotoxin β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) has been detected in species of free-living marine cyanobacteria and may bioaccumulate in the marine food web. In this study, we sampled fin clips from seven different species of sharks in South Florida to survey the occurrence of BMAA using HPLC-FD and Triple Quadrupole LC/MS/MS methods. BMAA was detected in the fins of all species examined with concentrations ranging from 144 to 1836 ng/mg wet weight. Since BMAA has been linked to neurodegenerative diseases, these results may have important relevance to human health. We suggest that consumption of shark fins may increase the risk for human exposure to the cyanobacterial neurotoxin BMAA. PMID:22412816

  8. Theoretical and experimental study of valence photoelectron spectrum of D,L-alanine amino acid.

    PubMed

    Farrokhpour, H; Fathi, F; De Brito, A Naves

    2012-07-05

    In this work, the He-I (21.218 eV) photoelectron spectrum of D,L-alanine in the gas phase is revisited experimentally and theoretically. To support the experiment, the high level ab initio calculations were used to calculate and assign the photoelectron spectra of the four most stable conformers of gaseous alanine, carefully. The symmetry adapted cluster/configuration interaction (SAC-CI) method based on single and double excitation operators (SD-R) and its more accurate version, termed general-R, was used to separately calculate the energies and intensities of the ionization bands of the L- and D-alanine conformers. The intensities of ionization bands were calculated based on the monopole approximation. Also, natural bonding orbital (NBO) calculations were employed for better spectral band assignment. The relative electronic energy, Gibbs free energy, and Boltzmann population ratio of the conformers were calculated at the experimental temperature (403 K) using several theoretical methods. The theoretical photoelectron spectrum of alanine was calculated by summing over the spectra of individual D and L conformers weighted by different population ratios. Finally, the population ratio of the four most stable conformers of alanine was estimated from the experimental photoelectron spectrum using theoretical calculations for the first time.

  9. β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) metabolism in the aquatic macrophyte Ceratophyllum demersum.

    PubMed

    Downing, Simoné; Esterhuizen-Londt, Maranda; Grant Downing, Timothy

    2015-10-01

    The cyanobacterial neurotoxin, β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA) bioaccumulates and biomagnifies within the environment. However, most reports on the environmental presence of BMAA focus on the presence of BMAA in animals rather than in plants. Various laboratory studies have reported that this neurotoxin, implicated in neurodegenerative disease, is rapidly taken up by various aquatic and terrestrial plants, including crop plants. In this study the metabolism of BMAA in the aquatic macrophyte, Ceratophyllum demersum, was investigated using stable isotopically labelled BMAA. Data show that the toxin is rapidly removed from the environment by the plant. However, during depuration cellular BMAA concentrations decrease considerably, without excretion of the toxin back into the environment and without catabolism of BMAA, evidenced by the absence of label transfer to other amino acids. This strongly suggests that BMAA is metabolised via covalent modification and sequestered inside the plant as a BMAA-derivative. This modification may be reversed in humans following consumption of BMAA-containing plant material. These data therefore impact on the assessment of the risk of human exposure to this neurotoxin.

  10. Beta-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) in novel South African cyanobacterial isolates.

    PubMed

    Esterhuizen, M; Downing, T G

    2008-10-01

    Beta-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is a neurotoxic non-proteinogenic amino acid reportedly produced by the majority of cyanobacterial isolates. A novel method was developed for the detection of BMAA in biological samples. Cultures representing the taxonomic diversity and geographic distribution in Southern Africa were collected and made uni-algal by standard methods before analysis for the presence of both free and protein-associated BMAA. Protein-associated BMAA was released by acid hydrolysis in an inert atmosphere. Samples were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) with pre-derivatization of amino acids using Phenomonex EZ:faast of the tested cultures, 96% were positive for BMAA although several were below the limit for quantification. BMAA presence was not related to the geographic origin or taxonomy of isolates and no correlation between free and bound BMAA concentrations was observed within or between taxonomic groups. These data offer the first confirmation of the taxonomic and geographic ubiquity of BMAA in freshwater cyanobacteria.

  11. Biotransfer of β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) in a eutrophicated freshwater lake.

    PubMed

    Lage, Sandra; Annadotter, Heléne; Rasmussen, Ulla; Rydberg, Sara

    2015-03-02

    β-N-Methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA), a neurotoxic non-protein amino acid, plays a significant role as an environmental risk factor in neurodegenerative diseases, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. BMAA producers occur globally, colonizing almost all habitats and represent species from distinct phytoplanktonic groups, i.e., cyanobacteria, diatoms, and dinoflagellates. Bioaccumulation of BMAA in invertebrate and vertebrate organisms has also been registered around the globe. In the Baltic Sea, BMAA has been detected in several commercial fish species, raising the question of the bioaccumulation of BMAA in Swedish limnic systems. Here we find the presence of BMAA in water samples from Lake Finjasjön and identify its bioaccumulation patterns in both plankti-benthivorous and piscivorous fish, according to fish species, total weight, gender, and season of collection. For the first time, a large number of fish individuals were used in order to draw conclusions on BMAA bioaccumulation in a closed ecological community based on a statistical approach. We may, therefore, conclude that feeding patterns (plankti-benthivorous) and increased age of fish may lead to a higher tissue concentration of BMAA.

  12. Biotransfer of β-N-Methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA) in a Eutrophicated Freshwater Lake

    PubMed Central

    Lage, Sandra; Annadotter, Heléne; Rasmussen, Ulla; Rydberg, Sara

    2015-01-01

    β-N-Methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA), a neurotoxic non-protein amino acid, plays a significant role as an environmental risk factor in neurodegenerative diseases, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. BMAA producers occur globally, colonizing almost all habitats and represent species from distinct phytoplanktonic groups, i.e., cyanobacteria, diatoms, and dinoflagellates. Bioaccumulation of BMAA in invertebrate and vertebrate organisms has also been registered around the globe. In the Baltic Sea, BMAA has been detected in several commercial fish species, raising the question of the bioaccumulation of BMAA in Swedish limnic systems. Here we find the presence of BMAA in water samples from Lake Finjasjön and identify its bioaccumulation patterns in both plankti-benthivorous and piscivorous fish, according to fish species, total weight, gender, and season of collection. For the first time, a large number of fish individuals were used in order to draw conclusions on BMAA bioaccumulation in a closed ecological community based on a statistical approach. We may, therefore, conclude that feeding patterns (plankti-benthivorous) and increased age of fish may lead to a higher tissue concentration of BMAA. PMID:25738330

  13. Cyanobacterial neurotoxin β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) in shark fins.

    PubMed

    Mondo, Kiyo; Hammerschlag, Neil; Basile, Margaret; Pablo, John; Banack, Sandra A; Mash, Deborah C

    2012-02-01

    Sharks are among the most threatened groups of marine species. Populations are declining globally to support the growing demand for shark fin soup. Sharks are known to bioaccumulate toxins that may pose health risks to consumers of shark products. The feeding habits of sharks are varied, including fish, mammals, crustaceans and plankton. The cyanobacterial neurotoxin β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) has been detected in species of free-living marine cyanobacteria and may bioaccumulate in the marine food web. In this study, we sampled fin clips from seven different species of sharks in South Florida to survey the occurrence of BMAA using HPLC-FD and Triple Quadrupole LC/MS/MS methods. BMAA was detected in the fins of all species examined with concentrations ranging from 144 to 1836 ng/mg wet weight. Since BMAA has been linked to neurodegenerative diseases, these results may have important relevance to human health. We suggest that consumption of shark fins may increase the risk for human exposure to the cyanobacterial neurotoxin BMAA.

  14. Quantification of neurotoxin BMAA (β-N-methylamino-L-alanine) in seafood from Swedish markets.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Liying; Kiselova, Nadezda; Rosén, Johan; Ilag, Leopold L

    2014-11-06

    The neurotoxin β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) produced naturally by cyanobacteria, diatoms and dinoflagellates can be transferred and accumulated up the food chain, and may be a risk factor for neurodegenerative diseases. This study provides the first systematic screening of BMAA exposure of a large population through the consumption of seafood sold in metropolitan markets. BMAA was distinguished from known isomers by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry after acidic hydrolysis and derivatization. Using deuterium-labeled internal standard, BMAA was quantified as 0.01-0.90 μg/g wet weight of tissues in blue mussel, oyster, shrimp, plaice, char and herring, but was undetectable (<0.01 μg/g) in other samples (salmon, cod, perch and crayfish). Provided that the content of BMAA detected is relevant for intake calculations, the data presented may be used for a first estimation of BMAA exposure through seafood from Swedish markets, and to refine the design of future toxicological experiments and assessments.

  15. Lack of behavioral and neuropathological effects of dietary beta-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) in mice.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Aguado, Reyniel; Winkler, Daniella; Shaw, Christopher A

    2006-06-01

    Beta-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is an excitotoxin allegedly involved in ALS-parkinsonism-dementia complex (ALS-PDC), a neurological disorder found in Guam and its surrounding islands, in which motor neuron disease symptoms can present alone or can co-occur with parkinsonism and dementia. Although in vitro experiments have shown BMAA's neurotoxic properties, studies using adult animals and systemic administration which better model the case of environmentally-induced human neurodegenerative diseases have not supported the involvement of BMAA in these disorders. In order to better test the hypothesized role of BMAA in neurodegeneration, we fed adult mice BMAA at a dose (28 mg/kg body weight, daily for 30 days) that reproduces the natural levels and tested the animals with a battery of behavioural tests, the latter including the evaluation of motor coordination, motor neuron-mediated reflexes, locomotion, muscular strength and memory. We also assessed whether BMAA exposure triggers cell death in the central nervous system (CNS) of mice by examining neuronal numbers and glial response in the spinal cord and the brain. No motor, cognitive or neuropathological outcome resulted from this feeding paradigm. Our findings support neither the causal role of BMAA in neurodegeneration nor the specific involvement of this amino acid in ALS-PDC.

  16. The non-protein amino acid β-N-methylamino-L-alanine in Portuguese cyanobacterial isolates.

    PubMed

    Cervantes Cianca, Rosa C; Baptista, Mafalda S; Lopes, Viviana R; Vasconcelos, Vitor M

    2012-06-01

    The tailor made amino acid β-N-methyl-amino-L-alanine (BMAA) is a neurotoxin produced by cyanobacteria. It has been associated with certain forms of progressive neurodegenerative disease, including sporadic Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Alzheimer's disease. Some different reports of BMAA in cyanobacterial blooms from lakes, reservoirs, and other water resources have been made by different investigators. We here report the detection of BMAA of both free and protein-bound produced by cyanobacteria, belonging to the Chroococcales, Oscillatoriales and Nostocales ordered. We use a rapid and sensitive HPLC-FD method that utilizes methanol elution and the Waters AQC Tag chemistry. On other hand, we have used three different assay procedures for BMAA extraction from cyanobacteria: Trichloroacetic acid (TCA), Methanol/Acetone and hydrochloric acid (HCl). All assays let successfully detect BMAA in all cyanobacteria samples analyzed. Nevertheless, with TCA and HCl extraction procedures the highest BMAA values, for free as well as protein-bound BMAA were detected. BMAA content could not be related to the taxonomy of the isolates or to their geographical origin, and no correlation between free and protein-bound BMAA concentrations were observed within or between taxonomic groups. These data offer confirmation of the taxonomic and geographic ubiquity of BMAA from naturally occurring populations of cyanobacteria, for the first time reported for estuaries.

  17. β-N-Methylamino-L-alanine Induces Neurological Deficits and Shortened Life Span in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xianchong; Escala, Wilfredo; Papapetropoulos, Spyridon; Zhai, R. Grace

    2010-01-01

    The neurotoxic non-protein amino acid, β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA), was first associated with the high incidence of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis/Parkinsonism Dementia Complex (ALS/PDC) in Guam. Recently, BMAA has been implicated as a fierce environmental factor that contributes to the etiology of Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases, in addition to ALS. However, the toxicity of BMAA in vivo has not been clearly demonstrated. Here we report our investigation of the neurotoxicity of BMAA in Drosophila. We found that dietary intake of BMAA reduced life span, locomotor functions, and learning and memory abilities in flies. The severity of the alterations in phenotype is correlated with the concentration of BMAA detected in flies. Interestingly, developmental exposure to BMAA had limited impact on survival rate, but reduced fertility in females, and caused delayed neurological impairment in aged adults. Our studies indicate that BMAA exposure causes chronic neurotoxicity, and that Drosophila serves as a useful model in dissecting the pathogenesis of ALS/PDC. PMID:22069570

  18. Quantification of neurotoxin BMAA (β-N-methylamino-L-alanine) in seafood from Swedish markets

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Liying; Kiselova, Nadezda; Rosén, Johan; Ilag, Leopold L.

    2014-01-01

    The neurotoxin β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) produced naturally by cyanobacteria, diatoms and dinoflagellates can be transferred and accumulated up the food chain, and may be a risk factor for neurodegenerative diseases. This study provides the first systematic screening of BMAA exposure of a large population through the consumption of seafood sold in metropolitan markets. BMAA was distinguished from known isomers by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry after acidic hydrolysis and derivatization. Using deuterium-labeled internal standard, BMAA was quantified as 0.01–0.90 μg/g wet weight of tissues in blue mussel, oyster, shrimp, plaice, char and herring, but was undetectable (<0.01 μg/g) in other samples (salmon, cod, perch and crayfish). Provided that the content of BMAA detected is relevant for intake calculations, the data presented may be used for a first estimation of BMAA exposure through seafood from Swedish markets, and to refine the design of future toxicological experiments and assessments. PMID:25373604

  19. The Cyanobacteria Derived Toxin Beta-N-Methylamino-L-Alanine and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Banack, Sandra Anne; Caller, Tracie A.; Stommel, Elijah W.

    2010-01-01

    There is mounting evidence to suggest that environmental factors play a major role in the development of neurodegenerative diseases like ALS (Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis). The non-protein amino acid beta-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) was first associated with the high incidence of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis/Parkinsonism Dementia Complex (ALS/PDC) in Guam, and has been implicated as a potential environmental factor in ALS, Alzheimer’s disease, and other neurodegenerative diseases. BMAA has a number of toxic effects on motor neurons including direct agonist action on NMDA and AMPA receptors, induction of oxidative stress, and depletion of glutathione. As a non-protein amino acid, there is also the strong possibility that BMAA could cause intraneuronal protein misfolding, the hallmark of neurodegeneration. While an animal model for BMAA-induced ALS is lacking, there is substantial evidence to support a link between this toxin and ALS. The ramifications of discovering an environmental trigger for ALS are enormous. In this article, we discuss the history, ecology, pharmacology and clinical ramifications of this ubiquitous, cyanobacteria-derived toxin. PMID:22069578

  20. Deuterium NMR study of methyl group dynamics in L-alanine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beshah, Kebede; Olejniczak, Edward T.; Griffin, Robert G.

    1987-05-01

    Deuterium quadrupole echo spectroscopy is used to study the dynamics of the CD3 group in polycrystalline L-alanine-d3. Temperature-dependent quadrupole echo line shapes, their spectral intensities and τ dependence, and the anisotropy of the 2H spin-lattice relaxation were employed to determine the rate and mechanism of the -CD3 group motion. The rigid lattice Pake pattern observed at low temperature (T<-120 °C) transforms to a triplet spectrum characteristic of threefold jumps in the intermediate exchange regime (-120 to -70 °C) and this in turn to a Pake pattern of reduced breadth at higher temperatures (T>-70 °C). The quadrupole echo line shapes and their τ dependence, which are especially sensitive to the rate and mechanism of the motion, can be simulated quantitatively with the threefold jump model. We find Ea=20.0 kJ/mol for this process which is higher than is observed for most methyl groups, probably because of steric crowding in the L-Ala molecule. Finally, we observe a line shape due to the presence of multiple crystallographic forms which suggests that this technique can be extended to studies of the dynamics of more complex systems.

  1. Computational analysis of binding affinity and neural response at the l-alanine receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venanzi, Thomas J.; Bryant, Bruce P.; Venanzi, Carol A.

    1995-10-01

    A model of analogue-receptor binding is developed for the l-alanine receptor in the channel catfish using the AM1-SM2 and ab initio SCRF computational methods. Besides interactions involving the zwitterionic moiety of the amino acid analogue and complementary subsites on the receptor, the model suggests the presence of a hydrophobic pocket with dispersion interactions between the receptor and the residue on the amino acid analogue. Conformational analysis suggests not only a small compact active site on the receptor, but also that the analogues with the highest affinity occupy nearly identical regions of space. Although the binding interaction is dominated by the ionic terms, AM1-SM2 calculations indicate that free energy terms associated with cavity formation, solvent reorganization, and dispersion interactions can be correlated to activation and neural response. From a consideration of this model, molecular features of the analogues that are important for binding and neural response were deduced and other analogues or ligands were developed and tested.

  2. Laser trapping dynamics of L-alanine depending on the laser polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuyama, Ken-ichi; Ishiguro, Kei; Sugiyama, Teruki; Masuhara, Hiroshi

    2012-10-01

    We successfully demonstrate crystallization and crystal rotation of L-alanine in D2O solution using a focused laser beam of 1064 nm with right- or left-handed circularly polarization. Upon focusing each laser beam into a solution/air interface of the solution thin film, one single crystal is generally formed from the focal spot. The necessary time for the crystallization is systematically examined against polarization and power of the trapping laser. The significant difference in the average time is observed between two polarization directions at a relatively high laser power, where the left-handed circularly polarized laser takes 3 times longer than the right-handed one. On the other hand, the prepared crystal is stably trapped and rotated at the focal point by circularly polarized lasers after the crystallization, and the rotation direction is completely controlled by the polarization of the trapping laser. The mechanisms for the crystallization and the crystal rotation are discussed in terms of trapping force and rotation torque of circularly polarized lasers acting on the liquid-like clusters and its bulk crystal, respectively.

  3. Growth, structural, vibrational, optical, laser and dielectric aspects of L-alanine alaninium nitrate single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caroline, M. Lydia; Prakash, M.; Geetha, D.; Vasudevan, S.

    2011-09-01

    Bulk single crystals of L-alanine alaninium nitrate [abbreviated as LAAN], an intriguing material for frequency conversion has been grown from its aqueous solution by both slow solvent evaporation and by slow cooling techniques. The optimized pH value to grow good quality LAAN single crystal was found to be 2.5. The grown crystals were subjected to single crystal X-ray diffraction studies to determine the unit cell dimensions and morphology. Vibrational frequencies of the grown crystals by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic technique were investigated. Also, the presence of hydrogen and carbon atoms in the grown sample was confirmed using proton and carbon NMR analyses. The dielectric constant and dielectric loss measurements of the as grown crystal at different temperatures and frequencies of the applied field are measured and reported. LAAN has good optical transmission in the entire visible region with cutoff wavelength within the UV region confirms its suitability for device fabrications. The existence of second harmonic generation signals was observed using Nd:YAG laser with fundamental wavelength of 1064 nm. Its Laser Damage Threshold (LDT) was measured and also tested by using a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser and the value of LDT of LAAN is 17.76 GW/cm 2 respectively, is found to be better than certain organic and semiorganic materials.

  4. Growth, structural, vibrational, optical, laser and dielectric aspects of L-alanine alaninium nitrate single crystal.

    PubMed

    Caroline, M Lydia; Prakash, M; Geetha, D; Vasudevan, S

    2011-09-01

    Bulk single crystals of l-alanine alaninium nitrate [abbreviated as LAAN], an intriguing material for frequency conversion has been grown from its aqueous solution by both slow solvent evaporation and by slow cooling techniques. The optimized pH value to grow good quality LAAN single crystal was found to be 2.5. The grown crystals were subjected to single crystal X-ray diffraction studies to determine the unit cell dimensions and morphology. Vibrational frequencies of the grown crystals by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic technique were investigated. Also, the presence of hydrogen and carbon atoms in the grown sample was confirmed using proton and carbon NMR analyses. The dielectric constant and dielectric loss measurements of the as grown crystal at different temperatures and frequencies of the applied field are measured and reported. LAAN has good optical transmission in the entire visible region with cutoff wavelength within the UV region confirms its suitability for device fabrications. The existence of second harmonic generation signals was observed using Nd:YAG laser with fundamental wavelength of 1064 nm. Its Laser Damage Threshold (LDT) was measured and also tested by using a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser and the value of LDT of LAAN is 17.76GW/cm2 respectively, is found to be better than certain organic and semiorganic materials.

  5. Growth and characterization of L-alanine cadmium bromide a semiorganic nonlinear optical crystals.

    PubMed

    Ilayabarathi, P; Chandrasekaran, J

    2012-10-01

    A new semiorganic nonlinear optical crystal, l-alanine cadmium bromide (LACB) was grown from aqueous solution by slow solvent evaporation method at room temperature. As grown crystals were characterized for its spectral, thermal, linear and second order nonlinear optical properties. LACB crystallizes in orthorhombic system and unit cell parameters a=5.771(2)Å, b=6.014(4)Å, c=12.298(2)Å, α=β=γ=90° and volume=426.8(3)Å(3). The mode of vibrations of different molecular groups present in the crystal was identified by FTIR study. The grown crystals were found to be transparent in the entire visible region. The thermal strength and the decomposition of the grown crystals were studied using TG/DTA and DSC analysis. Dielectric measurement revealed that the crystals had very low dielectric constant at higher frequency in room temperature. The mechanical behavior was studied by Vicker's microhardness tester. The grown crystal has negative photoconductivity nature. The fluorescence spectrum of the crystal was recorded and its optical band gap is about 3.356 eV. The NLO property of crystal using modified Kurtz-Perry powder technique with Nd:YAG laser light of wavelength 1064nm indicated that their second harmonic generation (SHG) efficiency was half that of pure KDP.

  6. L-Alanine augments rhizobacteria-induced systemic resistance in cucumber.

    PubMed

    Park, K S; Paul, D; Kim, J S; Park, J W

    2009-01-01

    Bacillus vallismortis strain EXTN-1 is a proven biotic elicitor of systemic resistance in many crops against various pathogens. L: -Alanine (Ala) was tested in cucumber as a chemical elicitor of induced systemic resistance (ISR) against Colletotrichum orbiculare. In the greenhouse, both Ala and EXTN-1 induced significant levels of disease suppression in cucumber against anthracnose. When cucumber plants were treated with EXTN-1 and Ala together, augmentative disease suppression was observed. Experiments with transgenic tobacco plants carrying pathogenesis-related genes fused with the beta-glucuronidase (GUS) reported gene (PR-1a::GUS & PDF 1.2::GUS) showed an enhanced activation of both PR-1a and PDF 1.2 genes upon combined treatment with Ala and EXTN-1. RT-PCR analysis with transgenic (PR-1a or PDF 1.2 over expressing) Arabidopsis plant showed more enhanced expression of resistance genes PR-1a and PDF 1.2 upon combined treatment with Ala and EXTN-1 than either alone. An augmentative ISR effect, when the bacterial elicitor and chemical elicitor were combined together, was confirmed.

  7. Overview of the potent cyanobacterial neurotoxin β-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) and its analytical determination.

    PubMed

    Porojan, Cristina; Mitrovic, Simon M; Yeo, Darren C J; Furey, Ambrose

    2016-10-01

    Blue-green algae are responsible for the production of different types of toxins which can be neurotoxic, hepatotoxic, cytotoxic and dermatotoxic and that can affect both aquatic and terrestrial life. Since its discovery the neurotoxin β-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) has been a cause for concern, being associated with the neurodegenerative disease amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/Parkinsonism-dementia complex (ALS/PDC). The initial focus was on Guam where it was observed that a high number of people were affected by the ALS/PDC complex. Subsequently, researchers were surprised to find levels of BMAA in post mortem brains from Canadian patients who also suffered from ALS/PDC. Recent research demonstrates that BMAA has been found at different levels in the aquatic food web in the brackish waters of the Baltic Sea. There is emerging evidence to suggest that sand-borne algae from Qatar can also contain BMAA. Furthermore, there is now concern because BMAA has been found not only in warmer regions of the world but also in temperate regions like Europe. The aim of this review is to focus on the methods of extraction and analysis of the neurotoxic non-protein amino acid BMAA. We also consider the neurotoxicity, aetiology, and diverse sources and routes of exposure to BMAA. In recent years, different methods have been developed for the analysis of BMAA. Some of these use HPLC-FD, UPLC-UV, UPLC-MS and LC-MS/MS using samples that have been derivatised or underivatised. To date the LC-MS/MS approach is the most widely used analytical technique as it is the most selective and sensitive method for BMAA determination.

  8. Environmental neurotoxins β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA) and mercury in shark cartilage dietary supplements.

    PubMed

    Mondo, Kiyo; Broc Glover, W; Murch, Susan J; Liu, Guangliang; Cai, Yong; Davis, David A; Mash, Deborah C

    2014-08-01

    Shark cartilage products are marketed as dietary supplements with claimed health benefits for animal and human use. Shark fin and cartilage products sold as extracts, dry powders and in capsules are marketed based on traditional Chinese medicine claims that it nourishes the blood, enhances appetite, and energizes multiple internal organs. Shark cartilage contains a mixture of chondroitin and glucosamine, a popular nutritional supplement ingested to improve cartilage function. Sharks are long-lived apex predators, that bioaccumulate environmental marine toxins and methylmercury from dietary exposures. We recently reported detection of the cyanobacterial toxin β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA) in the fins of seven different species of sharks from South Florida coastal waters. Since BMAA has been linked to degenerative brain diseases, the consumption of shark products may pose a human risk for BMAA exposures. In this report, we tested sixteen commercial shark cartilage supplements for BMAA by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC-FD) with fluorescence detection and ultra performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS). Total mercury (Hg) levels were measured in the same shark cartilage products by cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectrometry (CVAFS). We report here that BMAA was detected in fifteen out of sixteen products with concentrations ranging from 86 to 265μg/g (dry weight). All of the shark fin products contained low concentrations of Hg. While Hg contamination is a known risk, the results of the present study demonstrate that shark cartilage products also may contain the neurotoxin BMAA. Although the neurotoxic potential of dietary exposure to BMAA is currently unknown, the results demonstrate that shark cartilage products may contain two environmental neurotoxins that have synergistic toxicities.

  9. Acute β-N-Methylamino-L-alanine Toxicity in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Al-Sammak, Maitham Ahmed; Rogers, Douglas G.; Hoagland, Kyle D.

    2015-01-01

    The cyanobacterial neurotoxin β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is considered to be an “excitotoxin,” and its suggested mechanism of action is killing neurons. Long-term exposure to L-BMAA is believed to lead to neurodegenerative diseases including Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (Lou Gehrig's disease). Objectives of this study were to determine the presumptive median lethal dose (LD50), the Lowest-Observed-Adverse-Effect Level (LOAEL), and histopathologic lesions caused by the naturally occurring BMAA isomer, L-BMAA, in mice. Seventy NIH Swiss Outbred mice (35 male and 35 female) were used. Treatment group mice were injected intraperitoneally with 0.03, 0.3, 1, 2, and 3 mg/g body weight L-BMAA, respectively, and control mice were sham-injected. The presumptive LD50 of L-BMAA was 3 mg/g BW and the LOAEL was 2 mg/g BW. There were no histopathologic lesions in brain, liver, heart, kidney, lung, or spleen in any of the mice during the 14-day study. L-BMAA was detected in brains and livers in all of treated mice but not in control mice. Males injected with 0.03 mg/g BW, 0.3 mg/g BW, and 3.0 mg/g BW L-BMAA showed consistently higher concentrations (P < 0.01) in brain and liver samples as compared to females in those respective groups. PMID:26604922

  10. The temperature-dependent single-crystal Raman spectroscopy of a model dipeptide: L-Alanyl-L-alanine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, J. G.; Arruda, L. M.; Pinheiro, G. S.; Lima, C. L.; Melo, F. E. A.; Ayala, A. P.; Filho, J. Mendes; Freire, P. T. C.

    2015-09-01

    A single-crystal of peptide L-alanyl-L-alanine (C6H12N2O3) was studied by Raman spectroscopy at low-temperature, and a tentative assignment of the normal modes was given. Evidence of a second order structural phase transition was found through Raman spectroscopy between the temperatures of 80 K and 60 K. Group theory considerations suggest that the transition leads the sample from the tetragonal to a monoclinic structure. Additionally, our study suggests that the mechanism for the structural phase transition is governed by the occupation of non-equivalent C1 local symmetry sites by the CH3 molecular groups. Analysis based on group theory suggests L-alanyl-L-alanine presents C2 symmetry at low temperatures.

  11. The temperature-dependent single-crystal Raman spectroscopy of a model dipeptide: L-Alanyl-L-alanine.

    PubMed

    Silva, J G; Arruda, L M; Pinheiro, G S; Lima, C L; Melo, F E A; Ayala, A P; Filho, J Mendes; Freire, P T C

    2015-09-05

    A single-crystal of peptide L-alanyl-L-alanine (C6H12N2O3) was studied by Raman spectroscopy at low-temperature, and a tentative assignment of the normal modes was given. Evidence of a second order structural phase transition was found through Raman spectroscopy between the temperatures of 80K and 60K. Group theory considerations suggest that the transition leads the sample from the tetragonal to a monoclinic structure. Additionally, our study suggests that the mechanism for the structural phase transition is governed by the occupation of non-equivalent C1 local symmetry sites by the CH3 molecular groups. Analysis based on group theory suggests L-alanyl-L-alanine presents C2 symmetry at low temperatures.

  12. Growth, spectral and crystallization perfection studies of semi organic non linear optical crystal - L-alanine lithium chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redrothu, Hanumantharao; Kalainathan, S.; Bhagavannarayana, G.

    2012-06-01

    Single crystals of L-alanine lithium chloride single crystals were successfully grown using slow evaporation solution growth technique at constant temperature (303K). The formation of the new crystal has been confirmed by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, FT-IR studies. The crystalline perfection was analyzed by high-resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD) rocking curve measurements. The powder second harmonic generation (SHG) has been confirmed by Nd: YAG laser. The results have been discussed in detail.

  13. Crystal Engineering of l-Alanine with l-Leucine Additive using Metal-Assisted and Microwave-Accelerated Evaporative Crystallization.

    PubMed

    Mojibola, Adeolu; Dongmo-Momo, Gilles; Mohammed, Muzaffer; Aslan, Kadir

    2014-05-07

    In this work, we demonstrated that the change in the morphology of l-alanine crystals can be controlled with the addition of l-leucine using the metal-assisted and microwave accelerated evaporative crystallization (MA-MAEC) technique. Crystallization experiments, where an increasing stoichiometric amount of l-leucine is added to initial l-alanine solutions, were carried out on circular poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) disks modified with a 21-well capacity silicon isolator and silver nanoparticle films using microwave heating (MA-MAEC) and at room temperature (control experiments). The use of the MA-MAEC technique afforded for the growth of l-alanine crystals with different morphologies up to ∼10-fold faster than those grown at room temperature. In addition, the length of l-alanine crystals was systematically increased from ∼380 to ∼2000 μm using the MA-MAEC technique. Optical microscope images revealed that the shape of l-alanine crystals was changed from tetragonal shape (without l-leucine additive) to more elongated and wire-like structures with the addition of the l-leucine additive. Further characterization of l-alanine crystals was undertaken by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) measurements. In order to elucidate the growth mechanism of l-alanine crystals, theoretical simulations of l-alanine's morphology with and without l-leucine additive were carried out using Materials Studio software in conjunction with our experimental data. Theoretical simulations revealed that the growth of l-alanine's {011} and {120} crystal faces were inhibited due to the incorporation of l-leucine into these crystal faces in selected positions.

  14. Synthesis, growth and optical properties of an efficient nonlinear optical single crystal: L-alanine DL-malic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirubagaran, R.; Madhavan, J.

    2015-02-01

    Single crystals of L-alanine DL-malic acid (LADLMA) have been grown from aqueous solution by slow-cooling technique. Powder X-ray diffraction studies reveal the structure of the crystal to be orthorhombic. The nonlinear optical conversion efficiency test was carried out for the grown crystals using the Kurtz powder technique. The third order nonlinear refractive index and the nonlinear absorption coefficient where evaluated by Z-scan measurements. As the material have a negative refractive index it could be used in the protection of optical sensors such as night vision devices.

  15. Determination of the non protein amino acid β-N-methylamino-l-alanine in estuarine cyanobacteria by capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Baptista, Mafalda S; Cianca, Rosa C C; Lopes, Viviana R; Almeida, C Marisa R; Vasconcelos, Vitor M

    2011-10-01

    A capillary electrophoretic method for the determination of the amino acid β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA) was achieved using a fused-silica capillary column (50 cm × 75 μm I.D.) filled with 5 mM sodium tetraborate solution (pH 9), with an applied voltage of 25 kV, at 25 °C. The method was then applied in quantifying BMAA in eighteen strains of lyophilized estuarine cyanobacteria, following amino acid extraction using 0.1 M trichloroacetic acid and 6 M hydrochloric acid, sequentially.

  16. Growth, spectroscopic, dielectric and nonlinear optical studies of semi organic nonlinear optical crystal - L-Alanine lithium chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanumantharao, Redrothu; Kalainathan, S.

    2012-02-01

    A new and efficient semi organic nonlinear optical crystal (NLO) from the amino acid family L-alanine lithium chloride (LAL) has been grown by slow evaporation technique from aqueous solution. The functional groups were identified from NMR spectral studies. Mass spectral analysis shows the molecular ion mass. Dielectric studies has been done for the grown crystal and relative SHG efficiency is measured by Kurtz and Perry method and found to about 0.43 times that of standard potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) crystals. The compound crystallized in non-centrosymmetric space group Pna21. The results have been discussed in detail.

  17. Growth, spectroscopic, dielectric and nonlinear optical studies of semi organic nonlinear optical crystal--L-alanine lithium chloride.

    PubMed

    Hanumantharao, Redrothu; Kalainathan, S

    2012-02-01

    A new and efficient semi organic nonlinear optical crystal (NLO) from the amino acid family L-alanine lithium chloride (LAL) has been grown by slow evaporation technique from aqueous solution. The functional groups were identified from NMR spectral studies. Mass spectral analysis shows the molecular ion mass. Dielectric studies has been done for the grown crystal and relative SHG efficiency is measured by Kurtz and Perry method and found to about 0.43 times that of standard potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) crystals. The compound crystallized in non-centrosymmetric space group Pna21. The results have been discussed in detail.

  18. Novel NMDA receptor-specific desensitization/inactivation produced by ingestion of the neurotoxins, β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) or β-N-oxalylamino-L-alanine (BOAA/β-ODAP).

    PubMed

    Koenig, Jane H; Goto, Joy J; Ikeda, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    The environmental neurotoxins BMAA (β-N-methylamino-L-alanine) and BOAA (β-N-oxalylamino-L-alanine) are implicated as possible causative agents for the neurodegenerative diseases, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/ParkinsonismDementia complex (ALS/PDC) and neurolathyrism, respectively. Both are structural analogs of the neurotransmitter, glutamate, and bind postsynaptic glutamate receptors. In this study, the effect of ingestion of these toxins on the response of a singly-innervated, identified, glutamatergic postsynaptic cell in a living, undissected Drosophila is observed by intracellular recording. Previously we have reported that ingested BMAA behaves as an NMDA agonist that produces an abnormal NMDA response in the postsynaptic cell. It is shown here that BOAA also behaves as an NMDA agonist, and produces an effect very similar to that of BMAA on the postsynaptic response. In response to a single stimulus, the amplitude of the NMDA component is decreased, while the time to peak and duration of the NMDA component are greatly increased. No discernable effect on the AMPA component of the response was observed. Furthermore, both BMAA and BOAA cause an NMDAR-specific desensitization in response to repetitive stimulation at the physiological frequency for the postsynaptic cell (5 Hz). The possibility that this phenomenon may represent a response to excessive Ca(2+) entry through NMDAR channels is discussed. This desensitization phenomenon, as well as the abnormal NMDAR gating characteristics induced by BMAA, appears to be rescued during higher frequency stimulation (e.g. 10, 20 Hz).

  19. Synthesis, growth, thermal, optical and mechanical properties of new organic NLO crystal: L-alanine DL-malic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaikumar, D.; Kalainathan, S.; Bhagavanarayana, G.

    2009-12-01

    A new organic nonlinear optical crystal, L-alanine DL-malic acid (LADLMA), has been grown from aqueous solution by the slow cooling technique. L-alanine and DL-malic acid were used in the ratio 2:1 for synthesis. Crystals of size 24×13×8 mm 3 have been obtained in 26 days. Characterizations were carried out to study the structural, optical and mechanical properties of the grown crystals. Single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis shows that they belong to the orthorhombic system. To study the crystalline perfection of the grown crystals, high-resolution X-ray diffraction (HR-XRD) study was carried out. The vibrational frequencies of various functional groups have been derived from FTIR spectrum. Thermal behaviour of the crystal was investigated by TG-DTA analyses. Transmission spectrum has been recorded in the solution state and the cut-off frequency has been determined. Nonlinear optical property of the crystal has been confirmed using the Kurtz powder technique and a study of its second harmonic generation efficiency in comparison with KDP has been made. Knoop hardness test was carried out and its Young's modulus was calculated.

  20. Response of L-alanine and 2-methylalanine minidosimeters for K-Band (24 GHz) EPR dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, F.; Graeff, C. F. O.; Baffa, O.

    2007-11-01

    Minidosimeters of L-alanine and 2-methylalanine (2MA) were prepared and tested as potential candidates for small radiation field dosimetry. To quantify the free radicals created by radiation a K-Band (24 GHz) EPR spectrometer was used. X-rays provided by a 6 MV clinical linear accelerator were used to irradiate the minidosimeters in the dose range of 0.5-30 Gy. The dose-response curves for both radiation sensitive materials displayed a good linear behavior in the dose range indicated with 2MA being more radiation sensitive than L-alanine. Moreover, 2MA showed a smaller LLD (lower limit detection) value. The proposed system minidosimeter/K-Band spectrometer was able to detect 10 Gy EPR spectra with good signal-to-noise ratio (S/N). The overall uncertainty indicates that this system shows a good performance for the detection of dose values of 20 Gy and above, which are dose values typically used in radiosurgery treatments.

  1. Expression of the alaE gene is positively regulated by the global regulator Lrp in response to intracellular accumulation of l-alanine in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Ihara, Kohei; Sato, Kazuki; Hori, Hatsuhiro; Makino, Yumiko; Shigenobu, Shuji; Ando, Tasuke; Isogai, Emiko; Yoneyama, Hiroshi

    2017-04-01

    The alaE gene in Escherichia coli encodes an l-alanine exporter that catalyzes the active export of l-alanine using proton electrochemical potential. In our previous study, alaE expression was shown to increase in the presence of l-alanyl-l-alanine (Ala-Ala). In this study, the global regulator leucine-responsive regulatory protein (Lrp) was identified as an activator of the alaE gene. A promoter less β-galactosidase gene was fused to an alaE upstream region (240 nucleotides). Cells that were lacZ-deficient and harbored this reporter plasmid showed significant induction of β-galactosidase activity (approximately 17-fold) in the presence of 6 mM l-alanine, l-leucine, and Ala-Ala. However, a reporter plasmid possessing a smaller alaE upstream region (180 nucleotides) yielded transformants with strikingly low enzyme activity under the same conditions. In contrast, lrp-deficient cells showed almost no β-galactosidase induction, indicating that Lrp positively regulates alaE expression. We next performed an electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and a DNase I footprinting assay using purified hexahistidine-tagged Lrp (Lrp-His). Consequently, we found that Lrp-His binds to the alaE upstream region spanning nucleotide -161 to -83 with a physiologically relevant affinity (apparent KD, 288.7 ± 83.8 nM). Furthermore, the binding affinity of Lrp-His toward its cis-element was increased by l-alanine and l-leucine, but not by Ala-Ala and d-alanine. Based on these results, we concluded that the gene expression of the alaE is regulated by Lrp in response to intracellular levels of l-alanine, which eventually leads to intracellular homeostasis of l-alanine concentrations.

  2. Crystal Engineering of l-Alanine with l-Leucine Additive using Metal-Assisted and Microwave-Accelerated Evaporative Crystallization

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we demonstrated that the change in the morphology of l-alanine crystals can be controlled with the addition of l-leucine using the metal-assisted and microwave accelerated evaporative crystallization (MA-MAEC) technique. Crystallization experiments, where an increasing stoichiometric amount of l-leucine is added to initial l-alanine solutions, were carried out on circular poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) disks modified with a 21-well capacity silicon isolator and silver nanoparticle films using microwave heating (MA-MAEC) and at room temperature (control experiments). The use of the MA-MAEC technique afforded for the growth of l-alanine crystals with different morphologies up to ∼10-fold faster than those grown at room temperature. In addition, the length of l-alanine crystals was systematically increased from ∼380 to ∼2000 μm using the MA-MAEC technique. Optical microscope images revealed that the shape of l-alanine crystals was changed from tetragonal shape (without l-leucine additive) to more elongated and wire-like structures with the addition of the l-leucine additive. Further characterization of l-alanine crystals was undertaken by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) measurements. In order to elucidate the growth mechanism of l-alanine crystals, theoretical simulations of l-alanine’s morphology with and without l-leucine additive were carried out using Materials Studio software in conjunction with our experimental data. Theoretical simulations revealed that the growth of l-alanine’s {011} and {120} crystal faces were inhibited due to the incorporation of l-leucine into these crystal faces in selected positions. PMID:24839404

  3. Vibrational spectral characterization, NLO studies and charge transfer analysis of the organometallic material L-Alanine cadmium chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arun Sasi, B. S.; Bright, K. C.; James, C.

    2016-01-01

    An organometallic nonlinear crystal, L-Alanine Cadmium Chloride (LACC) was synthesized by slow evaporation technique. The effects of hydrogen bonding on the structure, binding of ligand to metal ion, natural orbital occupancies, and vibrational frequencies were investigated using density functional theory (DFT) with the combined B3LYP and LANL2DZ basis set. Vibrational assignments were made on the basis of calculated potential energy distribution values from MOLVIB program. The topological analysis of electron localization function (ELF) provides basin population N (integrated density over the attractor basin), standard deviation (σ), and their relative fluctuation, defined as λ = σ2/N, which are sensitive criteria of delocalization. The molecular stability, electronic exchange interaction, and bond strength of the molecule were studied by natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis. The second harmonic generation (SHG) efficiency was determined using Kurtz and Perry method. Natural bond orbital analysis was carried out to study various intramolecular interactions that are responsible for the stabilization of the molecule.

  4. Environmental modulation of microcystin and β-N-methylamino-L-alanine as a function of nitrogen availability.

    PubMed

    Scott, L L; Downing, S; Phelan, R R; Downing, T G

    2014-09-01

    The most significant modulators of the cyanotoxins microcystin and β-N-methylamino-L-alanine in laboratory cyanobacterial cultures are the concentration of growth-medium combined nitrogen and nitrogen uptake rate. The lack of field studies that support these observations led us to investigate the cellular content of these cyanotoxins in cyanobacterial bloom material isolated from a freshwater impoundment and to compare these to the combined nitrogen availability. We established that these toxins typically occur in an inverse relationship in nature and that their presence is mainly dependent on the environmental combined nitrogen concentration, with cellular microcystin present at exogenous combined nitrogen concentrations of 29 μM and higher and cellular BMAA correlating negatively with exogenous nitrogen at concentrations below 40 μM. Furthermore, opposing nutrient and light gradients that form in dense cyanobacterial blooms may result in both microcystin and BMAA being present at a single sampling site.

  5. β-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is not found in the brains of patients with confirmed Alzheimer’s disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meneely, Julie P.; Chevallier, Olivier P.; Graham, Stewart; Greer, Brett; Green, Brian D.; Elliott, Christopher T.

    2016-11-01

    Controversy surrounds the proposed hypothesis that exposure to β-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) could play a role in various neurodegenerative conditions including Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Here we present the results of the most comprehensive scientific study on BMAA detection ever undertaken on brain samples from patients pathologically confirmed to have suffered from AD, and those from healthy volunteers. Following the full validation of a highly accurate and sensitive mass spectrometric method, no trace of BMAA was detected in the diseased brain or in the control specimens. This contradicts the findings of other reports and calls into question the significance of this compound in neurodegenerative disease. We have attempted to explain the potential causes of misidentification of BMAA in these studies.

  6. Neurotoxic Non-proteinogenic Amino Acid β-N-Methylamino-L-alanine and Its Role in Biological Systems.

    PubMed

    Popova, A A; Koksharova, O A

    2016-08-01

    Secondary metabolites of photoautotrophic organisms have attracted considerable interest in recent years. In particular, molecules of non-proteinogenic amino acids participating in various physiological processes and capable of producing adverse ecological effects have been actively investigated. For example, the non-proteinogenic amino acid β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is neurotoxic to animals including humans. It is known that BMAA accumulation via the food chain can lead to development of neurodegenerative diseases in humans such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases as well as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Moreover, BMAA can be mistakenly incorporated into a protein molecule instead of serine. Natural sources of BMAA and methods for its detection are discussed in this review, as well as the role of BMAA in metabolism of its producers and possible mechanisms of toxicity of this amino acid in different living organisms.

  7. β-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is not found in the brains of patients with confirmed Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Meneely, Julie P; Chevallier, Olivier P; Graham, Stewart; Greer, Brett; Green, Brian D; Elliott, Christopher T

    2016-11-08

    Controversy surrounds the proposed hypothesis that exposure to β-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) could play a role in various neurodegenerative conditions including Alzheimer's disease (AD). Here we present the results of the most comprehensive scientific study on BMAA detection ever undertaken on brain samples from patients pathologically confirmed to have suffered from AD, and those from healthy volunteers. Following the full validation of a highly accurate and sensitive mass spectrometric method, no trace of BMAA was detected in the diseased brain or in the control specimens. This contradicts the findings of other reports and calls into question the significance of this compound in neurodegenerative disease. We have attempted to explain the potential causes of misidentification of BMAA in these studies.

  8. 1H NMR determination of beta-N-methylamino-L-alanine (L-BMAA) in environmental and biological samples.

    PubMed

    Moura, Sidnei; Ultramari, Mariah de Almeida; de Paula, Daniela Mendes Louzada; Yonamine, Mauricio; Pinto, Ernani

    2009-04-01

    A nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) method for the determination of beta-N-methylamino-L-alanine (L-BMAA) in environmental aqueous samples was developed and validated. L-BMAA is a neurotoxic modified amino acid that can be produced by cyanobacteria in aqueous environments. This toxin was extracted from samples by means of solid-phase extraction (SPE) and identified and quantified by 1H NMR without further derivatization steps. The lower limit of quantification (LLOQ) was 5 microg/mL. Good inter and intra-assay precision was also observed (relative standard deviation <8.5%) with the use of 4-nitro-DL-phenylalanine as an internal standard (IS). This method of 1H NMR analysis is not time consuming and can be readily utilized to monitor L-BMAA and confirm its presence in environmental and biological samples.

  9. β-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is not found in the brains of patients with confirmed Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Meneely, Julie P.; Chevallier, Olivier P.; Graham, Stewart; Greer, Brett; Green, Brian D.; Elliott, Christopher T.

    2016-01-01

    Controversy surrounds the proposed hypothesis that exposure to β-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) could play a role in various neurodegenerative conditions including Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Here we present the results of the most comprehensive scientific study on BMAA detection ever undertaken on brain samples from patients pathologically confirmed to have suffered from AD, and those from healthy volunteers. Following the full validation of a highly accurate and sensitive mass spectrometric method, no trace of BMAA was detected in the diseased brain or in the control specimens. This contradicts the findings of other reports and calls into question the significance of this compound in neurodegenerative disease. We have attempted to explain the potential causes of misidentification of BMAA in these studies. PMID:27821863

  10. An optical overview of poly[μ(2)-L-alanine-μ(3)-nitrato-sodium(I)] crystals.

    PubMed

    Gallegos-Loya, E; Orrantia-Borunda, E; Duarte-Moller, A

    2012-01-01

    Single crystals of the semiorganic materials, L-alanine sodium nitrate (LASN) and D-alanine sodium nitrate (DASN), were grown from an aqueous solution by slow-evaporation technique. X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies were carried for the doped grown crystals. The absorption of these grown crystals was analyzed using UV-Vis-NIR studies, and it was found that these crystals possess minimum absorption from 200 to 1100 nm. An infrared (FTIR) spectrum of single crystal has been measured in the 4000-400 cm(-1) range. The assignment of the observed vibrational modes to corresponding symmetry type has been performed. A thermogravimetric study was carried out to determine the thermal properties of the grown crystal. The efficiency of second harmonic generation was obtained by a variant of the Kurtz-Perry method.

  11. Intramolecular vibrations in low-frequency normal modes of amino acids: L-alanine in the neat solid state.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Feng; Wang, Houng-Wei; Tominaga, Keisuke; Hayashi, Michitoshi

    2015-03-26

    This paper presents a theoretical analysis of the low-frequency phonons of L-alanine by using the solid-state density functional theory at the Γ point. We are particularly interested in the intramolecular vibrations accessing low-frequency phonons via harmonic coupling with intermolecular vibrations. A new mode-analysis method is introduced to quantify the vibrational characteristics of such intramolecular vibrations. We find that the torsional motions of COO(-) are involved in low-frequency phonons, although COO(-) is conventionally assumed to undergo localized torsion. We also find the broad distributions of intramolecular vibrations relevant to important functional groups of amino acids, e.g., the COO(-) and NH3(+) torsions, in the low-frequency phonons. The latter finding is illustrated by the concept of frequency distribution of vibrations. These findings may lead to immediate implications in other amino acid systems.

  12. Molecular dynamics simulations of mutated Mycobacterium tuberculosis L-alanine dehydrogenase to illuminate the role of key residues.

    PubMed

    Ling, Baoping; Bi, Siwei; Sun, Min; Jing, Zhihong; Li, Xiaoping; Zhang, Rui

    2014-05-01

    L-Alanine dehydrogenase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (L-MtAlaDH) catalyzes the NADH-dependent interconversion of l-alanine and pyruvate, and it is considered to be a potential target for the treatment of tuberculosis. The experiment has verified that amino acid replacement of the conserved active-site residues which have strong stability and no great changes in biological evolutionary process, such as His96 and Asp270, could lead to inactive mutants [Ågren et al., J. Mol. Biol. 377 (2008) 1161-1173]. However, the role of these conserved residues in catalytic reaction still remains unclear. Based on the crystal structures, a series of mutant structures were constructed to investigate the role of the conserved residues in enzymatic reaction by using molecular dynamics simulations. The results show that whatever the conserved residues were mutated, the protein can still convert its conformation from open state to closed state as long as NADH is present in active site. Asp270 maintains the stability of nicotinamide ring and ribose of NADH through hydrogen bond interactions, and His96 is helpful to convert the protein conformation by interactions with Gln271, whereas, they would lead to the structural rearrangement in active site and lose the catalytic activity when they were mutated. Additionally, we deduce that Met301 plays a major role in catalytic reaction due to fixing the nicotinamide ring of NADH to prevent its rotation, and we propose that Met301 would be mutated to the hydrophobic residue with large steric hindrance in side chain to test the activity of the protein in future experiment.

  13. Self-Assembly, Supramolecular Organization, and Phase Behavior of L-Alanine Alkyl Esters (n = 9-18) and Characterization of Equimolar L-Alanine Lauryl Ester/Lauryl Sulfate Catanionic Complex.

    PubMed

    Sivaramakrishna, D; Swamy, Musti J

    2015-09-08

    A homologous series of l-alanine alkyl ester hydrochlorides (AEs) bearing 9-18 C atoms in the alkyl chain have been synthesized and characterized with respect to self-assembly, supramolecular structure, and phase transitions. The CMCs of AEs bearing 11-18 C atoms were found to range between 0.1 and 10 mM. Differential scanning calorimetric (DSC) studies showed that the transition temperatures (Tt), enthalpies (ΔHt) and entropies (ΔSt) of AEs in the dry state exhibit odd-even alternation, with the odd-chain-length compounds having higher Tt values, but the even-chain-length homologues showing higher values of ΔHt and ΔSt. In DSC measurements on hydrated samples, carried out at pH 5.0 and pH 10.0 (where they exist in cationic and neutral forms, respectively), compounds with 13-18 C atoms in the alkyl chain showed sharp gel-to-liquid crystalline phase transitions, and odd-even alternation was not seen in the thermodynamic parameters. The molecular structure, packing properties, and intermolecular interactions of AEs with 9 and 10 C atoms in the alkyl chain were determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction, which showed that the alkyl chains are packed in a tilted interdigitated bilayer format. d-Spacings obtained from powder X-ray diffraction studies exhibited a linear dependence on the alkyl chain length, suggesting that the other AEs also adopt an interdigitated bilayer structure. Turbidimetric, fluorescence spectroscopic, and isothermal titration calorimetric (ITC) studies established that in aqueous dispersions l-alanine lauryl ester hydrochloride (ALE·HCl) and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) form an equimolar complex. Transmission electron microscopic and DSC studies indicate that the complex exists as unilamellar liposomes, which exhibit a sharp phase transition at ∼39 °C. The aggregates were disrupted at high pH, suggesting that the catanionic complex would be useful to develop a base-labile drug delivery system. ITC studies indicated that ALE·HCl forms

  14. Heterogeneity of L-alanine transport systems in brush-border membrane vesicles from rat placenta during late gestation.

    PubMed Central

    Alonso-Torre, S R; Serrano, M A; Medina, J M; Alvarado, F

    1992-01-01

    The placental uptake of L-alanine was studied by using purified brush-border membrane vesicles from rat trophoblasts. Saturation curves were carried out at 37 degrees C in buffers containing 100 mM (zero-trans)-NaSCN, -NaCl, -KSCN, -KCl, or -N-methyl-D-glucamine gluconate. The uncorrected uptake results were fitted by non-linear regression analysis to an equation involving one diffusional component either one or two saturable Michaelian transport terms. In the presence of NaCl, two distinct L-alanine transport systems were distinguished, named respectively System 1 (S-1; Vm1 about 760 pmol/s per mg of protein; KT1 = 0.5 mM) and System 2 (S-2; Vm2 about 1700 pmol/s per mg; KT2 = 9 mM). In contrast, in the presence of K+ (KCl = KSCN) or in the absence of any alkali-metal ions (N-methyl-D-glucamine gluconate), only one saturable system was apparent, which we identify as S-2. When Na+ is present, S-1, but not S-2, appears to be rheogenic, since its maximal transport capacity significantly increases in the presence of an inside-negative membrane potential, created either by replacing Cl- with the permeant anion thiocyanate (NaSCN > NaCl) or by applying an appropriate K+ gradient and valinomycin. alpha-(Methylamino)isobutyrate (methyl-AIB) appears to be a substrate of S-1, but not of S-2. For reasons that remain to be explained, however, methyl-AIB inhibits S-2. We conclude that S-1 represents a truly Na(+)-dependent mechanism, where Na+ behaves as an obligatory activator, whereas S-2 cannot discriminate between Na+ and K+, although its activity is higher in the presence of alkali-metal ions than in their absence (Na+ = K+ > N-methyl-D-glucammonium ion). S-2 appears to be fully developed 2 days before birth, whereas S-1 undergoes a capacity-type activation between days 19.5 and 21.5 of gestation, i.e. its apparent Vmax. nearly doubles, whereas its KT remains constant. PMID:1445280

  15. l-glutamine and l-alanine supplementation increase glutamine-glutathione axis and muscle HSP-27 in rats trained using a progressive high-intensity resistance exercise.

    PubMed

    Leite, Jaqueline Santos Moreira; Raizel, Raquel; Hypólito, Thaís Menezes; Rosa, Thiago Dos Santos; Cruzat, Vinicius Fernandes; Tirapegui, Julio

    2016-08-01

    In this study we investigated the chronic effects of oral l-glutamine and l-alanine supplementation, either in their free or dipeptide form, on glutamine-glutathione (GLN-GSH) axis and cytoprotection mediated by HSP-27 in rats submitted to resistance exercise (RE). Forty Wistar rats were distributed into 5 groups: sedentary; trained (CTRL); and trained supplemented with l-alanyl-l-glutamine, l-glutamine and l-alanine in their free form (GLN+ALA), or free l-alanine (ALA). All trained animals were submitted to a 6-week ladder-climbing protocol. Supplementations were offered in a 4% drinking water solution for 21 days prior to euthanasia. Plasma glutamine, creatine kinase (CK), myoglobin (MYO), and erythrocyte concentration of reduced GSH and glutathione disulfide (GSSG) were measured. In tibialis anterior skeletal muscle, GLN-GSH axis, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), and the expression of heat shock factor 1 (HSF-1), 27-kDa heat shock protein (HSP-27), and glutamine synthetase were determined. In CRTL animals, high-intensity RE reduced muscle glutamine levels and increased GSSG/GSH rate and TBARS, as well as augmented plasma CK and MYO levels. Conversely, l-glutamine-supplemented animals showed an increase in plasma and muscle levels of glutamine, with a reduction in GSSG/GSH rate, TBARS, and CK. Free l-alanine administration increased plasma glutamine concentration and lowered muscle TBARS. HSF-1 and HSP-27 were high in all supplemented groups when compared with CTRL (p < 0.05). The results presented herein demonstrate that l-glutamine supplemented with l-alanine, in both a free or dipeptide form, improve the GLN-GSH axis and promote cytoprotective effects in rats submitted to high-intensity RE training.

  16. Equilibrium Dynamics of β-N-Methylamino-L-Alanine (BMAA) and Its Carbamate Adducts at Physiological Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, David; Goto, Joy J.; Krishnan, Viswanathan V

    2016-01-01

    Elevated incidences of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis/Parkinsonism Dementia complex (ALS/PDC) is associated with β-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA), a non-protein amino acid. In particular, the native Chamorro people living in the island of Guam were exposed to BMAA by consuming a diet based on the cycad seeds. Carbamylated forms of BMAA are glutamate analogues. The mechanism of neurotoxicity of the BMAA is not completely understood, and BMAA acting as a glutamate receptor agonist may lead to excitotoxicity that interferes with glutamate transport systems. Though the interaction of BMAA with bicarbonate is known to produce carbamate adducts, here we demonstrate that BMAA and its primary and secondary adducts coexist in solution and undergoes a chemical exchange among them. Furthermore, we determined the rates of formation/cleavage of the carbamate adducts under equilibrium conditions using two-dimensional proton exchange NMR spectroscopy (EXSY). The coexistence of the multiple forms of BMAA at physiological conditions adds to the complexity of the mechanisms by which BMAA functions as a neurotoxin. PMID:27513925

  17. The effect of exogenous β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA) on the diatoms Phaeodactylum tricornutum and Thalassiosira weissflogii.

    PubMed

    Lage, Sandra; Ström, Linnea; Godhe, Anna; Rydberg, Sara

    2016-09-01

    β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA), a non-protein amino acid with neurodegenerative features, is known to be produced by cyanobacteria, diatoms and a dinoflagellate. BMAA research has intensified over the last decade, and knowledge has been gained about its bioaccumulation in aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems, toxic effects in model organisms and neurotoxicity in vivo and in vitro. Nevertheless, knowledge of the actual physiological role of BMAA in the producing species or of the ecological factors that regulate BMAA production is still lacking. A few studies propose that BMAA functions to signal nitrogen depletion in cyanobacteria. To investigate whether BMAA might have a similar role in diatoms, two diatom species - Phaeodactylum tricornutum and Thalassiosira weissflogii - were exposed to exogenous BMAA at environmental relevant concentrations, i.e. 0.005, 0.05 and 0.5μM. BMAA was taken up in a concentration dependent manner in both species in the BMAA free fraction and in the protein fraction of T. weissflogii. As a result of the treatments, the diatom cells at some of the time points and at some of the BMAA concentrations exhibited lower concentrations of chlorophyll a and protein, in comparison to controls. At the highest (0.5μM) concentration of BMAA, extracellular ammonia was found in the media of both species at all time points. These results suggest that BMAA interferes with nitrogen metabolism in diatoms, possibly by inhibiting ammonium assimilation via the GS/GOGAT pathway.

  18. Quantitative proteomics analysis of zebrafish exposed to sub-lethal dosages of β-methyl-amino-L-alanine (BMAA)

    PubMed Central

    Frøyset, Ann Kristin; Khan, Essa Ahsan; Fladmark, Kari Espolin

    2016-01-01

    The non-protein amino acid β-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is a neurotoxin present in microalgae and shown to accumulate in the food web. BMAA has been linked to the complex neurodegenerative disorder of Guam and to increased incidents sporadic ALS. Two main neurotoxic routes are suggested; an excitotoxic by acting as an agonist towards glutamate receptors and a metabolic by misincorporating into cellular proteins. We have used zebrafish, an increasingly used model for neurodegenerative diseases, to further identify signaling components involved in BMAA-induced toxicity. Zebrafish embryos were exposed to sub-lethal dosages of BMAA and a label-free proteomics analysis was conducted on larvae 4 days post fertilization. The exposed larvae showed no developmental abnormalities, but a reduced heart rate and increased expression of GSK3 isoforms. Search towards a reviewed database containing 2968 entries identified 480 proteins. Only 17 of these were regulated 2-fold or more in the exposed larvae. Seven of these proteins could be associated to glutamate receptor signaling and recycling. The remaining nine have all been linked to disturbance in protein homeostasis, reactive oxygen species (ROS) development or neuronal cell death. We also found that BMAA influenced the endocannabinoid system by up-regulation of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) and that FAAH inhibitor URB597 reduced the BMAA effect on heart rate and GSK3 expression. PMID:27404450

  19. The effect of β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) on oxidative stress response enzymes of the macrophyte Ceratophyllum demersum.

    PubMed

    Esterhuizen-Londt, M; Pflugmacher, S; Downing, T G

    2011-04-01

    Cyanobacteria are known to produce bioactive secondary metabolites such as hepatotoxins, cytotoxins and neurotoxins. The newly recognized neurotoxin β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is a naturally occurring non-protein amino acid found in the majority of cyanobacterial genera tested. Evidence that exists for implication of BMAA in neurodegenerative disorders relies on bioaccumulation and biomagnification from symbiotic cyanobacteria. Uptake and accumulation of free BMAA by various non-symbiotic organisms, including aquatic macrophytes, has been documented but to date limited evidence of ecotoxicology exists. We therefore investigated the effect of BMAA on the oxidative stress responses of the macrophyte, Ceratophyllum demersum. Markers for oxidative stress in this study are the antioxidative enzymes superoxide dismutase, catalase, guaiacol peroxidase, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase. We found that BMAA had an inhibitory effect on all the oxidative stress response enzymes tested in plants exposed to BMAA. However enzymes not related to oxidative stress response were not affected by BMAA in in vitro experiments. Binding studies in the presence of BMAA showed reduced enzyme specific activity over time compared to the control. This study shows that BMAA causes oxidative stress indirectly as it inhibits antioxidant enzymes required to combat reactive oxygen species that cause damage to cells. Further investigations are required to fully understand the inhibitory effect of BMAA on these enzymes.

  20. Reaction Pathways and Kinetics of a Cyanobacterial Neurotoxin β-N-Methylamino-L-Alanine (BMAA) during Chlorination.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Ting; Chen, Wan-Ru; Liu, Zhi-Quan; Lin, Tsair-Fuh

    2017-02-07

    β-N-Methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA), a probable cause of the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/parkinsonism-dementia complex (ALS/PDC), or Alzheimer's disease, has been identified in more than 20 cyanobacterial genera. However, its removal and fate in drinking water has never been reported before. In this study, the reaction of BMAA with chlorine, a common drinking-water oxidant/disinfectant, was investigated. A liquid chromatograph coupled with a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer was employed to quantify BMAA and its intermediates. Upon chlorination, four chlorinated intermediates, each with one or two chlorines, were identified. The disappearance of BMAA caused by chlorine follows a second-order reaction, with the rate constant k1 is 5.0 × 10(4) M(-1) s(-1) at pH ∼7.0. The chlorinated intermediates were found to further react with free chlorine, exhibiting a second-order rate constant k3 = 16.8 M(-1) s(-1). After all free chlorine was consumed, the chlorinated intermediates autodecomposed slowly with a first order rate constant k2 = 0.003 min(-1); when a reductant was added, these chlorinated intermediates were then reduced back to BMAA. The results as described shed a useful light on the reactivity, appearance, and removal of BMAA in the chlorination process of a drinking-water system.

  1. Equilibrium Dynamics of β-N-Methylamino-L-Alanine (BMAA) and Its Carbamate Adducts at Physiological Conditions.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, David; Goto, Joy J; Krishnan, Viswanathan V

    2016-01-01

    Elevated incidences of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis/Parkinsonism Dementia complex (ALS/PDC) is associated with β-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA), a non-protein amino acid. In particular, the native Chamorro people living in the island of Guam were exposed to BMAA by consuming a diet based on the cycad seeds. Carbamylated forms of BMAA are glutamate analogues. The mechanism of neurotoxicity of the BMAA is not completely understood, and BMAA acting as a glutamate receptor agonist may lead to excitotoxicity that interferes with glutamate transport systems. Though the interaction of BMAA with bicarbonate is known to produce carbamate adducts, here we demonstrate that BMAA and its primary and secondary adducts coexist in solution and undergoes a chemical exchange among them. Furthermore, we determined the rates of formation/cleavage of the carbamate adducts under equilibrium conditions using two-dimensional proton exchange NMR spectroscopy (EXSY). The coexistence of the multiple forms of BMAA at physiological conditions adds to the complexity of the mechanisms by which BMAA functions as a neurotoxin.

  2. The use of L-serine to prevent β-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA)-induced proteotoxic stress in vitro.

    PubMed

    Main, Brendan J; Dunlop, Rachael A; Rodgers, Kenneth J

    2016-01-01

    β-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA), a non-protein amino acid synthesised by cyanobacteria, has been linked to a complex neurological disorder on Guam and more recently to other cases of sporadic ALS (sALS), however the mechanisms of BMAA toxicity are not completely understood. We have previously demonstrated that BMAA is misincorporated into newly synthesised proteins by human neuroblastoma cells and fibroblasts, resulting in the formation of autofluorescent material and the induction of apoptotic cell death. In the present study we show that BMAA at low levels does not cause an acute toxicity in neuroblastoma cells but increases the expression of the ER stress marker, C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) and increases the activity of the pro-apoptotic enzyme caspase-3. We also observed an increase in the activity of the lysosomal cysteine proteases cathepsin B and L, characteristic of the accumulation of proteins in the lysosomal system. We were able to prevent these proteotoxic effects in neuroblastoma cells through co-treatment with l-serine suggesting that they resulted from incorporation of BMAA into proteins. Misincorporation provides a possible mechanism whereby BMAA could initiate misfolding, and the accumulation of aggregate-prone proteins in neurons. This build-up of misfolded proteins could explain the long latency period of the disease previously reported on Guam.

  3. Quantitative proteomics analysis of zebrafish exposed to sub-lethal dosages of β-methyl-amino-L-alanine (BMAA).

    PubMed

    Frøyset, Ann Kristin; Khan, Essa Ahsan; Fladmark, Kari Espolin

    2016-07-12

    The non-protein amino acid β-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is a neurotoxin present in microalgae and shown to accumulate in the food web. BMAA has been linked to the complex neurodegenerative disorder of Guam and to increased incidents sporadic ALS. Two main neurotoxic routes are suggested; an excitotoxic by acting as an agonist towards glutamate receptors and a metabolic by misincorporating into cellular proteins. We have used zebrafish, an increasingly used model for neurodegenerative diseases, to further identify signaling components involved in BMAA-induced toxicity. Zebrafish embryos were exposed to sub-lethal dosages of BMAA and a label-free proteomics analysis was conducted on larvae 4 days post fertilization. The exposed larvae showed no developmental abnormalities, but a reduced heart rate and increased expression of GSK3 isoforms. Search towards a reviewed database containing 2968 entries identified 480 proteins. Only 17 of these were regulated 2-fold or more in the exposed larvae. Seven of these proteins could be associated to glutamate receptor signaling and recycling. The remaining nine have all been linked to disturbance in protein homeostasis, reactive oxygen species (ROS) development or neuronal cell death. We also found that BMAA influenced the endocannabinoid system by up-regulation of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) and that FAAH inhibitor URB597 reduced the BMAA effect on heart rate and GSK3 expression.

  4. The cyanobacterial neurotoxin β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA) induces neuronal and behavioral changes in honeybees.

    PubMed

    Okle, Oliver; Rath, Lisa; Galizia, C Giovanni; Dietrich, Daniel R

    2013-07-01

    The cyanobacterially produced neurotoxin beta-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA) is thought to induce amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/Parkinsonism dementia complex (ALS/PDC)-like symptoms. However, its mechanism of action and its pathway of intoxication are yet unknown. In vivo animal models suitable for investigating the neurotoxic effect of BMAA with applicability to the human are scarce. Hence, we used the honeybee (Apis mellifera) since its nervous system is relatively simple, yet having cognitive capabilities. Bees fed with BMAA-spiked sugar water had an increased mortality rate and a reduced ability to learn odors in a classical conditioning paradigm. Using (14)C-BMAA we demonstrated that BMAA is biologically available to the bee, and is found in the head, thorax and abdomen with little to no excretion. BMAA is also transferred from one bee to the next via trophallaxis resulting in an exposure of the whole beehive. BMAA bath application directly onto the brain leads to an altered Ca(2+) homeostasis and to generation of reactive oxygen species. These behavioral and physiological observations suggest that BMAA may have effects on bee brains similar to those assumed to occur in humans. Therefore the bee could serve as a surrogate model system for investigating the neurological effects of BMAA.

  5. Cell therapy for skin wound using fibroblast encapsulated poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(L-alanine) thermogel.

    PubMed

    Yun, Eun Jung; Yon, Bora; Joo, Min Kyung; Jeong, Byeongmoon

    2012-04-09

    As a new application of a thermogel, a poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(L-alanine) (PEG-L-PA) gel encapsulating fibroblasts was investigated for wound healing. The fibroblasts were encapsulated by the temperature sensitive sol-to-gel transition of the polymer aqueous solution. Under the in vitro three-dimensional (3D) cell culture condition, the PEG-L-PA thermogel was comparable with Matrigel for cell proliferation and was significantly better than Matrigel for collagen types I and III formation. After confirming the excellent 3D microenvironment of the PEG-L-PA thermogel for fibroblasts, in vivo wound healing was investigated by injecting the cell-suspended polymer aqueous solution on incisions of rat skin, where the cell-encapsulated gel was formed in situ. Compared with the phosphate buffered saline treated system and the cell-free PEG-L-PA thermogel, the cell-encapsulated PEG-L-PA thermogel not only accelerated the wound closure but also improved epithelialization and the formation of skin appendages such as keratinocyte layer (epidermis), hair follicles, and sebaceous glands. The results demonstrate the potential of thermogels for cell therapy as an injectable tissue-engineering scaffold.

  6. β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) uptake by the animal model, Daphnia magna and subsequent oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Esterhuizen-Londt, Maranda; Wiegand, Claudia; Downing, Tim G

    2015-06-15

    β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA), produced by cyanobacteria, is a neurotoxin implicated in Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/Parkinsonism dementia complex (ALS/PDC). BMAA concentrations in cyanobacteria are lower than those thought to be necessary to result in neurological damage thus bioaccumulation or biomagnification is required to achieve concentrations able to cause neurodegeneration. Many cyanobacteria produce BMAA and uptake routes into the food web require examination. In this study we investigate the uptake of BMAA by adult phytoplanktivorus Daphnia magna via exposure to dissolved pure BMAA and BMAA containing cyanobacteria, as well as the subsequent oxidative stress response in the daphnia. Free BMAA and protein-associated BMAA were quantified by LC-MS/MS. Dissolved BMAA was taken up and was found as free BMAA in D. magna. No protein-associated BMAA was detected in D. magna after a 24-h exposure period. No BMAA was detectable in D. magna after exposure to BMAA containing cyanobacteria. BMAA inhibited the oxidative stress defence and biotransformation enzymes within 24-h exposure in the tested Daphnia and could therefore impair the oxidant status and the capability of detoxifying other substances in D. magna.

  7. New Typical Vector of Neurotoxin β-N-Methylamino-l-Alanine (BMAA) in the Marine Benthic Ecosystem

    PubMed Central

    Li, Aifeng; Song, Jialiang; Hu, Yang; Deng, Longji; Ding, Ling; Li, Meihui

    2016-01-01

    The neurotoxin β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA) has been identified as an environmental factor triggering neurodegenerative diseases such as Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) and Alzheimer’s disease (AD). We investigated the possible vectors of BMAA and its isomers 2,4-diaminobutyric acid (DAB) and N-2(aminoethyl)glycine (AEG) in marine mollusks collected from the Chinese coast. Sixty-eight samples of marine mollusks were collected along the Chinese coast in 2016, and were analyzed by an HILIC-MS/MS (hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography with tandem quadrupole mass spectrometer) method without derivatization. BMAA was detected in a total of five samples from three species: Neverita didyma, Solen strictus, and Mytilus coruscus. The top three concentrations of free-form BMAA (0.99~3.97 μg·g−1 wet weight) were detected in N. didyma. DAB was universally detected in most of the mollusk samples (53/68) with no species-specific or regional differences (0.051~2.65 μg·g−1 wet weight). No AEG was detected in any mollusk samples tested here. The results indicate that the gastropod N. didyma might be an important vector of the neurotoxin BMAA in the Chinese marine ecosystem. The neurotoxin DAB was universally present in marine bivalve and gastropod mollusks. Since N. didyma is consumed by humans, we suggest that the origin and risk of BMAA and DAB toxins in the marine ecosystem should be further investigated in the future. PMID:27827914

  8. New Typical Vector of Neurotoxin β-N-Methylamino-l-Alanine (BMAA) in the Marine Benthic Ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Li, Aifeng; Song, Jialiang; Hu, Yang; Deng, Longji; Ding, Ling; Li, Meihui

    2016-11-04

    The neurotoxin β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA) has been identified as an environmental factor triggering neurodegenerative diseases such as Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). We investigated the possible vectors of BMAA and its isomers 2,4-diaminobutyric acid (DAB) and N-2(aminoethyl)glycine (AEG) in marine mollusks collected from the Chinese coast. Sixty-eight samples of marine mollusks were collected along the Chinese coast in 2016, and were analyzed by an HILIC-MS/MS (hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography with tandem quadrupole mass spectrometer) method without derivatization. BMAA was detected in a total of five samples from three species: Neverita didyma, Solen strictus, and Mytilus coruscus. The top three concentrations of free-form BMAA (0.99~3.97 μg·g(-1) wet weight) were detected in N. didyma. DAB was universally detected in most of the mollusk samples (53/68) with no species-specific or regional differences (0.051~2.65 μg·g(-1) wet weight). No AEG was detected in any mollusk samples tested here. The results indicate that the gastropod N. didyma might be an important vector of the neurotoxin BMAA in the Chinese marine ecosystem. The neurotoxin DAB was universally present in marine bivalve and gastropod mollusks. Since N. didyma is consumed by humans, we suggest that the origin and risk of BMAA and DAB toxins in the marine ecosystem should be further investigated in the future.

  9. The Arabidopsis thaliana isogene NIT4 and its orthologs in tobacco encode beta-cyano-L-alanine hydratase/nitrilase.

    PubMed

    Piotrowski, M; Schönfelder, S; Weiler, E W

    2001-01-26

    Nitrilases (nitrile aminohydrolases, EC ) are enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of nitriles to the corresponding carbon acids. Among the four known nitrilases of Arabidopsis thaliana, the isoform NIT4 is the most divergent one, and homologs of NIT4 are also known from species not belonging to the Brassicaceae like Nicotiana tabacum and Oryza sativa. We expressed A. thaliana NIT4 as hexahistidine tag fusion protein in Escherichia coli. The purified enzyme showed a strong substrate specificity for beta-cyano-l-alanine (Ala(CN)), an intermediate product of cyanide detoxification in higher plants. Interestingly, not only aspartic acid but also asparagine were identified as products of NIT4-catalyzed Ala(CN) hydrolysis. Asn itself was no substrate for NIT4, indicating that it is not an intermediate but one of two reaction products. NIT4 therefore has both nitrilase and nitrile hydratase activity. Several lines of evidence indicate that the catalytic center for both reactions is the same. The NIT4 homologs of N. tabacum were found to catalyze the same reactions and protein extracts of A. thaliana, N. tabacum and Lupinus angustifolius also converted Ala(CN) to Asp and Asn in vitro. NIT4 may play a role in cyanide detoxification during ethylene biosynthesis because extracts from senescent leaves of A. thaliana showed higher Ala(CN) hydratase/nitrilase activities than extracts from nonsenescent tissue.

  10. Growth, structural, spectral, mechanical, thermal and dielectric characterization of phosphoric acid admixtured L-alanine (PLA) single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, A. S. J. Lucia; Selvarajan, P.; Perumal, S.

    2011-10-01

    Phosphoric acid admixtured L-alanine (PLA) single crystals were grown successfully by solution method with slow evaporation technique at room temperature. Crystals of size 18 mm × 12 mm × 8 mm have been obtained in 28 days. The grown crystals were colorless and transparent. The solubility of the grown samples has been found out at various temperatures. The lattice parameters of the grown crystals were determined by X-ray diffraction technique. The reflection planes of the sample were confirmed by the powder X-ray diffraction study and diffraction peaks were indexed. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) studies were used to confirm the presence of various functional groups in the crystals. UV-visible transmittance spectrum was recorded to study the optical transparency of grown crystal. The nonlinear optical (NLO) property of the grown crystal was confirmed by Kurtz-Perry powder technique and a study of its second harmonic generation efficiency in comparison with potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) has been made. The mechanical strength of the crystal was estimated by Vickers hardness test. The grown crystals were subjected to thermo gravimetric and differential thermal analysis (TG/DTA). The dielectric behavior of the sample was also studied.

  11. Growth, structural, spectral, mechanical, thermal and dielectric characterization of phosphoric acid admixtured L-alanine (PLA) single crystals.

    PubMed

    Rose, A S J Lucia; Selvarajan, P; Perumal, S

    2011-10-15

    Phosphoric acid admixtured L-alanine (PLA) single crystals were grown successfully by solution method with slow evaporation technique at room temperature. Crystals of size 18 mm×12 mm×8 mm have been obtained in 28 days. The grown crystals were colorless and transparent. The solubility of the grown samples has been found out at various temperatures. The lattice parameters of the grown crystals were determined by X-ray diffraction technique. The reflection planes of the sample were confirmed by the powder X-ray diffraction study and diffraction peaks were indexed. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) studies were used to confirm the presence of various functional groups in the crystals. UV-visible transmittance spectrum was recorded to study the optical transparency of grown crystal. The nonlinear optical (NLO) property of the grown crystal was confirmed by Kurtz-Perry powder technique and a study of its second harmonic generation efficiency in comparison with potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) has been made. The mechanical strength of the crystal was estimated by Vickers hardness test. The grown crystals were subjected to thermo gravimetric and differential thermal analysis (TG/DTA). The dielectric behavior of the sample was also studied.

  12. Influence of L-alanine doping on crystalline perfection, SHG efficiency, optical and mechanical properties of KDP single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakir, Mohd.; Ganesh, V.; Riscob, B.; Maurya, K. K.; Wahab, M. A.; Bhagavannarayana, G.; Kishan Rao, K.

    2011-09-01

    Pure and L-alanine (LA) doped single crystals of potassium dihydrogen orthophosphate (KDP) were grown by slow evaporation solution technique (SEST) in aqueous solution at ambient temperature. Powder X-ray diffraction study was done to confirm the crystal system and lattice parameters of KDP. No additional phases were observed at all doping concentrations (1-7.5 mol%), which was further confirmed by FT-Raman spectroscopy analysis. The influence of LA doping on the crystalline perfection was assessed by high-resolution X-ray diffractometry (HRXRD) analysis. HRXRD studies revealed that the grown crystals could accommodate LA at the interstitial positions in the crystalline matrix of KDP up to some critical concentration without any deterioration in the crystalline perfection. Above this concentration, very low angle structural grain boundaries were developed and it seems that the excess LA above the critical concentration was segregated along the grain boundaries. The SHG efficiency was measured using the Kurtz powder technique. The relative SHG efficiency of the crystals was found to be increased with doping concentration up to 5 mol% and above this it decreases. Optical transmission study also revealed the same behavior with enhancement up to 5 mol% concentration and later decreased. The hardness values were found to be increased by increasing the doping concentration.

  13. The cyanobacterial neurotoxin beta-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) induces neuronal and behavioral changes in honeybees

    SciTech Connect

    Okle, Oliver; Rath, Lisa; Galizia, C. Giovanni; Dietrich, Daniel R.

    2013-07-01

    The cyanobacterially produced neurotoxin beta-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is thought to induce amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/Parkinsonism dementia complex (ALS/PDC)-like symptoms. However, its mechanism of action and its pathway of intoxication are yet unknown. In vivo animal models suitable for investigating the neurotoxic effect of BMAA with applicability to the human are scarce. Hence, we used the honeybee (Apis mellifera) since its nervous system is relatively simple, yet having cognitive capabilities. Bees fed with BMAA-spiked sugar water had an increased mortality rate and a reduced ability to learn odors in a classical conditioning paradigm. Using {sup 14}C-BMAA we demonstrated that BMAA is biologically available to the bee, and is found in the head, thorax and abdomen with little to no excretion. BMAA is also transferred from one bee to the next via trophallaxis resulting in an exposure of the whole beehive. BMAA bath application directly onto the brain leads to an altered Ca{sup 2+} homeostasis and to generation of reactive oxygen species. These behavioral and physiological observations suggest that BMAA may have effects on bee brains similar to those assumed to occur in humans. Therefore the bee could serve as a surrogate model system for investigating the neurological effects of BMAA. - Highlights: • Investigating of neurotoxic effects of BMAA in honeybees • BMAA impairs ALS markers (ROS, Ca{sup 2+}, learning, memory, odor) in bees. • A method for the observation of ROS development in living bees brain was established. • Honeybees are a suitable model to explore neurodegenerative processes. • Neurotoxic BMAA can be spread in bee populations by trophallaxis.

  14. The effect of exogenous β-N-methylamino-L: -alanine on the growth of Synechocystis PCC6803.

    PubMed

    Downing, Simoné; van de Venter, Maryna; Downing, Timothy G

    2012-01-01

    β-N-Methylamino-L: -alanine (BMAA), a non-proteinogenic amino acid, has been detected in a range of cyanobacteria, including terrestrial, aquatic, free living and endosymbiotic species. The widespread occurrence of cyanobacteria in the environment raises concerns regarding the ecological and toxicological impact of BMAA, and consequently, studies have focussed extensively on the toxicity and environmental impact of BMAA, while no research has addressed the ecophysiological or metabolic role of the compound in cyanobacteria. In this study, both the uptake of exogenous BMAA by and the effect of exogenous BMAA on the growth of Synechocystis PCC6803 were investigated. BMAA was rapidly taken up by the non-diazotrophic cyanobacterium Synechocystis PCC6803 in a concentration dependent manner. The presence of exogenous BMAA resulted in a substantial and concentration-dependent decrease in cell growth and the substantial loss of photosynthetic pigmentation. Similar effects were seen in the presence of the non-proteinogenic amino acid, 2,4-diaminobutyric acid but to a lesser degree than that of BMAA. The effects were reversed when light was decreased from 16 to 10 μmol m(-2) s(-1). Control cultures grown in the presence of L: -arginine, L: -asparagine, L: -glutamate and glycine showed normal or slightly increased growth with no change in pigmentation. The decrease in growth rate coupled to bleaching indicates that BMAA may induce chlorosis in the presence of adequate photosynthetic radiation suggesting a connection between BMAA and the induction of conditions, such as nitrogen or sulphur depletion, that result in growth arrest and the induction of chlorosis.

  15. The natural non-protein amino acid N-β-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is incorporated into protein during synthesis.

    PubMed

    Glover, W Broc; Mash, Deborah C; Murch, Susan J

    2014-11-01

    N-β-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is an amino acid produced by cyanobacteria and accumulated through trophic levels in the environment and natural food webs. Human exposure to BMAA has been linked to progressive neurodegenerative diseases, potentially due to incorporation of BMAA into protein. The insertion of BMAA and other non-protein amino acids into proteins may trigger protein misfunction, misfolding and/or aggregation. However, the specific mechanism by which BMAA is associated with proteins remained unidentified. Such studies are challenging because of the complexity of biological systems and samples. A cell-free in vitro protein synthesis system offers an excellent approach for investigation of changing amino acid composition in protein. In this study, we report that BMAA incorporates into protein as an error in synthesis when a template DNA sequence is used. Bicinchoninic acid assay of total protein synthesis determined that BMAA effectively substituted for alanine and serine in protein product. LC-MS/MS confirmed that BMAA was selectively inserted into proteins in place of other amino acids, but isomers N-(2-aminoethyl)glycine (AEG) and 2,4-diaminobutyric acid (DAB) did not share this characteristic. Incorporation of BMAA into proteins was significantly higher when genomic DNA from post-mortem brain was the template. About half of BMAA in the synthetic proteins was released with denaturation with sodium dodecylsulfonate and dithiothreitol, but the remaining BMAA could only be released by acid hydrolysis. Together these data demonstrate that BMAA is incorporated into the amino acid backbone of proteins during synthesis and also associated with proteins through non-covalent bonding.

  16. Maternal transfer of the cyanobacterial neurotoxin β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) via milk to suckling offspring.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Marie; Karlsson, Oskar; Bergström, Ulrika; Brittebo, Eva B; Brandt, Ingvar

    2013-01-01

    The cyanobacterial neurotoxin β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) has been implicated in the etiology of neurodegenerative disease and proposed to be biomagnified in terrestrial and aquatic food chains. We have previously shown that the neonatal period in rats, which in humans corresponds to the last trimester of pregnancy and the first few years of age, is a particularly sensitive period for exposure to BMAA. The present study aimed to examine the secretion of (14)C-labeled L- and D-BMAA into milk in lactating mice and the subsequent transfer of BMAA into the developing brain. The results suggest that secretion into milk is an important elimination pathway of BMAA in lactating mothers and an efficient exposure route predominantly for L-BMAA but also for D-BMAA in suckling mice. Following secretion of [(14)C]L-BMAA into milk, the levels of [(14)C]L-BMAA in the brains of the suckling neonatal mice significantly exceeded the levels in the maternal brains. In vitro studies using the mouse mammary epithelial HC11 cell line confirmed a more efficient influx and efflux of L-BMAA than of D-BMAA in cells, suggesting enantiomer-selective transport. Competition experiments with other amino acids and a low sodium dependency of the influx suggests that the amino acid transporters LAT1 and LAT2 are involved in the transport of L-BMAA into milk. Given the persistent neurodevelopmental toxicity following injection of L-BMAA to neonatal rodent pups, the current results highlight the need to determine whether BMAA is enriched mother's and cow's milk.

  17. Global cellular responses to β-methyl-amino-L-alanine (BMAA) by olfactory ensheathing glial cells (OEC).

    PubMed

    Chiu, Alexander S; Braidy, Nady; Marçal, Helder; Welch, Jeffrey H; Gehringer, Michelle M; Guillemin, Gilles J; Neilan, Brett A

    2015-06-01

    This study utilised a proteomics approach to identify any differential protein expression in a glial cell line, rat olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs), treated with the cyanotoxin β-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA). Five proteins of interest were identified, namely Rho GDP-dissociation inhibitor 1 (RhoGDP1), Nck-associated protein 1 (NCKAP1), voltage-dependent anion-selective channel protein 1 (VDAC1), 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase type-2 (3hCoAdh2), and ubiquilin-4 (UBQLN4). Four of these candidates, nuclear receptor subfamily 4 group A member 1 (Nur77), cyclophilin A (CyPA), RhoGDP1 and VDAC1, have been reported to be involved in cell growth. A microarray identified UBQLN4, palladin and CyPA, which have been implicated to have roles in excitotoxicity. Moreover, the NCKAP1, UBQLN4, CyPA and 3hCoAdh2 genes have been associated with abnormal protein aggregation. Differential expression of genes involved in mitochondrial activity, Nur77, 3hCoAdh2, VDAC1 and UBQLN4, were also identified. Confirmatory reverse transcription quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) analysis of transcripts generated from the genes of interest corroborated the differential expression trends identified in the global protein analysis. BMAA induced cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase of OEC and apoptosis after 48 h at concentrations of 250 μM and 500 μM. Collectively, this work advances our understanding of the mechanism of BMAA-mediated glial-toxicity in vitro.

  18. Development of an analytical procedure for quantifying the underivatized neurotoxin β-N-methylamino-L-alanine in brain tissues.

    PubMed

    Combes, Audrey; El Abdellaoui, Saïda; Vial, Jérome; Lagrange, Emmeline; Pichon, Valérie

    2014-07-01

    The cyanotoxin β-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) has received renewed attention as an environmental risk factor for sporadic cases of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) (Nunn et al., Brain Res 410:375-379, 1987). The aim of the present study was to develop and to validate an analytical procedure that allows the quantification of native BMAA and of its natural isomer, 2,4 diaminobutyric acid (DAB), in brain tissues. An analytical procedure was previously reported by our group for the determination of underivatized BMAA in environmental samples. It included a step of sample clean-up by solid phase extraction (SPE) with a mixed-mode sorbent and the analyses were performed by LC/MS-MS using hydrophilic interaction chromatography and multiple reactions monitoring scan mode. As brain tissues have a higher lipid content, the crucial step of sample clean-up had been optimized by evaluating the efficiency of the addition of a liquid/liquid extraction step prior to the SPE procedure or alternatively, of washing steps to the SPE extraction procedure. The efficiency was checked by visualizing the complexity of the resulting chromatograms in LC/MS and their performance by using spiked brain samples. The optimized analytical procedure, including a washing step with cyclohexane to the SPE with a recovery yield close to 100%, was validated using the total error approach and allowed the quantification of BMAA in a concentration level ranging from 20 to 1,500 ng/g in brain samples. Finally, the feasibility of implementation of this procedure was verified in human brain samples from two patients who died of ALS.

  19. Synthesis of a molecularly imprinted sorbent for selective solid-phase extraction of β-N-methylamino-L-alanine.

    PubMed

    Svoboda, Pavel; Combes, Audrey; Petit, Julia; Nováková, Lucie; Pichon, Valérie

    2015-11-01

    The aim of the work was to synthesize a molecularly imprinted material for the selective solid-phase extraction (SPE) of β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (L-2-amino-3-methylpropionic acid; BMAA) from cyanobacterial extracts. BMAA and its structural analogs that can be used as template are small, polar and hydrophilic molecules. These molecules are poorly soluble in organic solvents that are commonly used for the synthesis of acrylic-based polymers. Therefore, a sol gel approach was chosen to carry out the synthesis and the resulting sorbents were evaluated with different extraction procedures in order to determine their ability to selectively retain BMAA. The presence of imprinted cavities in the sorbent was demonstrated by comparing elution profiles obtained by using molecularly imprinted silica (MIS) and non-imprinted silica (NIS) as a control. The molecularly imprinted solid-phase extraction (MISPE) procedure was first developed in a pure medium (acetonitrile) and further optimized for the treatment of cyanobacterial samples. It was characterized by high elution recoveries (89% and 77% respectively in pure and in real media).The repeatability of the extraction procedure in pure medium, in real medium and the reproducibility of MIS synthesis all expressed as RSD values of extraction recovery of BMAA were equal to 3%, 12% and 5%, respectively. A MIS capacity of 0.34 µmol/g was measured. The matrix effects, which affected the quantification of BMAA when employing a mixed mode sorbent, were completely removed by adding a clean-up step of the mixed-mode sorbent extract on the MIS.

  20. Maternal Transfer of the Cyanobacterial Neurotoxin β-N-Methylamino-L-Alanine (BMAA) via Milk to Suckling Offspring

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, Marie; Karlsson, Oskar; Bergström, Ulrika; Brittebo, Eva B.; Brandt, Ingvar

    2013-01-01

    The cyanobacterial neurotoxin β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) has been implicated in the etiology of neurodegenerative disease and proposed to be biomagnified in terrestrial and aquatic food chains. We have previously shown that the neonatal period in rats, which in humans corresponds to the last trimester of pregnancy and the first few years of age, is a particularly sensitive period for exposure to BMAA. The present study aimed to examine the secretion of 14C-labeled L- and D-BMAA into milk in lactating mice and the subsequent transfer of BMAA into the developing brain. The results suggest that secretion into milk is an important elimination pathway of BMAA in lactating mothers and an efficient exposure route predominantly for L-BMAA but also for D-BMAA in suckling mice. Following secretion of [14C]L-BMAA into milk, the levels of [14C]L-BMAA in the brains of the suckling neonatal mice significantly exceeded the levels in the maternal brains. In vitro studies using the mouse mammary epithelial HC11 cell line confirmed a more efficient influx and efflux of L-BMAA than of D-BMAA in cells, suggesting enantiomer-selective transport. Competition experiments with other amino acids and a low sodium dependency of the influx suggests that the amino acid transporters LAT1 and LAT2 are involved in the transport of L-BMAA into milk. Given the persistent neurodevelopmental toxicity following injection of L-BMAA to neonatal rodent pups, the current results highlight the need to determine whether BMAA is enriched mother's and cow's milk. PMID:24194910

  1. Strong water-mediated friction asymmetry and surface dynamics of zwitterionic solids at ambient conditions: L-alanine as a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segura, J. J.; Verdaguer, A.; Garzón, L.; Barrena, E.; Ocal, C.; Fraxedas, J.

    2011-03-01

    Water molecules strongly interact with freshly cleaved (011) surfaces of L-alanine single crystals at low relative humidity (below 10%) promoting diffusion of L-alanine molecules. Species mobility is enhanced above ˜40% leading to the formation of two-dimensional islands with long-range order through Ostwald ripening. Scanning force microscopy experiments reveal that both, islands and terraces, are identical in nature (composition and crystallographic structure) but a relevant friction asymmetry appearing upon water-surface interaction evidences that orientation dependent properties exist between them at the molecular level. We interpret this observation as due to water incorporation in the topmost surface crystal structure. Eventually, for high humidity values, surface dissolution and roughening occur.

  2. Strong water-mediated friction asymmetry and surface dynamics of zwitterionic solids at ambient conditions: L-alanine as a case study.

    PubMed

    Segura, J J; Verdaguer, A; Garzón, L; Barrena, E; Ocal, C; Fraxedas, J

    2011-03-28

    Water molecules strongly interact with freshly cleaved (011) surfaces of L-alanine single crystals at low relative humidity (below 10%) promoting diffusion of L-alanine molecules. Species mobility is enhanced above ~40% leading to the formation of two-dimensional islands with long-range order through Ostwald ripening. Scanning force microscopy experiments reveal that both, islands and terraces, are identical in nature (composition and crystallographic structure) but a relevant friction asymmetry appearing upon water-surface interaction evidences that orientation dependent properties exist between them at the molecular level. We interpret this observation as due to water incorporation in the topmost surface crystal structure. Eventually, for high humidity values, surface dissolution and roughening occur.

  3. Dipeptide Nanotubes Containing Unnatural Fluorine-Substituted β(2,3)-Diarylamino Acid and L-Alanine as Candidates for Biomedical Applications.

    PubMed

    Bonetti, Andrea; Pellegrino, Sara; Das, Priyadip; Yuran, Sivan; Bucci, Raffaella; Ferri, Nicola; Meneghetti, Fiorella; Castellano, Carlo; Reches, Meital; Gelmi, Maria Luisa

    2015-09-18

    The synthesis and the structural characterization of dipeptides composed of unnatural fluorine-substituted β(2,3)-diarylamino acid and L-alanine are reported. Depending on the stereochemistry of the β amino acid, these dipeptides are able to self-assemble into proteolytic stable nanotubes. These architectures were able to enter the cell and locate in the cytoplasmic/perinuclear region and represent interesting candidates for biomedical applications.

  4. Transferability and reproducibility in electron-density studies--bond-topological and atomic properties of tripeptides of the type L-alanyl-X-L-alanine.

    PubMed

    Grabowsky, Simon; Kalinowski, Roman; Weber, Manuela; Förster, Diana; Paulmann, Carsten; Luger, Peter

    2009-08-01

    In the last decade three different data bank approaches have been developed that are intended to make electron-density examinations of large biologically important molecules possible. They rely on Bader's concept of transferability of submolecular fragments with retention of their electronic properties. Therefore, elaborate studies on the quantification of transferability in experiment and theory are still very important. Tripeptides of the type L-alanyl-X-L-alanine (X being any of the 20 naturally encoded amino acids) serve as a model case between amino acids and proteins. The two experimental electron-density determinations (L-alanyl-L-histidinyl-L-alanine and L-alanyl-L-phenylalanyl-L-alanine, highly resolved synchrotron X-ray diffraction data sets) performed in this study and theoretical calculations on all 20 different L-alanyl-X-L-alanine molecules contribute to a better estimation of transferability in the peptide case. As a measure of reproducibility and transferability, standard deviations from averaging over bond-topological and atomic properties of atoms or bonds that are considered equal in their chemical environments were calculated. This way, transferability and reproducibility indices were introduced. It can be shown that experimental transferability indices generally slightly exceed experimental reproducibility indices and that these larger deviations can be attributed to chemical effects such as changes in the geometry (bond lengths and angles), the polarization pattern and the neighboring sphere due to crystal packing. These effects can partly be separated from each other and quantified with the help of gas-phase calculations at optimized and experimental geometries. Thus, the degree of transferability can be quantified in very narrow limits taking into account experimental errors and chemical effects.

  5. Polarised Raman and infrared spectral analysis of L-alanine oxalate (C5H9NO6)--a non-linear optical single crystal.

    PubMed

    Krishnakumar, V; Nagalakshmi, R

    2006-06-01

    L-alanine oxalate (C5H9NO6), a promising material for effective frequency conversion, was grown by standard slow evaporation technique. Solubility studies were carried out at different temperatures. Unambiguous assignments of fundamental modes of various molecular groups were made from the recorded infrared and polarised Raman spectra. The non-linear optical property has been confirmed from the optical transmission and fluorescence spectra.

  6. Amino acids (L-arginine and L-alanine) passivated CdS nanoparticles: Synthesis of spherical hierarchical structure and nonlinear optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talwatkar, S. S.; Tamgadge, Y. S.; Sunatkari, A. L.; Gambhire, A. B.; Muley, G. G.

    2014-12-01

    CdS nanoparticles (NPs) passivated with amino acids (L-alanine and L-arginine) having spherical hierarchical morphology were synthesized by room temperature wet chemical method. Synthesized NPs were characterized by ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy to study the variation of band gaps with concentration of surface modifying agents. Increase in band gap has been observed with the increase in concentration of surface modifying agents and was found more prominent for CdS NPs passivated with L-alanine. Powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis were carried out for the study of crystal structure and morphology of CdS NPs. The average particle size of CdS NPs calculated from Debye-Scherer formula was found to less than 5 nm and agrees well with those determined from UV-vis spectra and TEM data. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy was performed to know the functional groups of the grown NPs. Peaks in FT-IR spectra indicate the formation of CdS NPs and capping with L-alanine and L-arginine. Photoluminescence spectra of these NPs were also studied. Finally, colloidal solution of CdS-PVAc was subjected to Z-scan experiment under low power cw laser illumination to characterize them for third order nonlinear optical properties. CdS-PVAc colloidal solution shows enhanced nonlinear absorption due to RSA and weak FCA on account of two photon absorption processes triggered by thermal effect.

  7. Quantitative determination of the neurotoxin β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) by capillary electrophoresis-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kerrin, Elliott S; White, Robert L; Quilliam, Michael A

    2017-02-01

    Recent reports of the widespread occurrence of the neurotoxin β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) in cyanobacteria and particularly seafood have raised concerns for public health. LC-MS/MS is currently the analytical method of choice for BMAA determinations but incomplete separation of isomeric and isobaric compounds, matrix suppression and conjugated forms are plausible limitations. In this study, capillary electrophoresis (CE) coupled with MS/MS has been developed as an alternative method for the quantitative determination of free BMAA. Using a bare fused silica capillary, a phosphate buffer (250 mM, pH 3.0) and UV detection, it was possible to separate BMAA from four isomers, but the limit of detection (LOD) of 0.25 μg mL(-1) proved insufficient for analysis of typical samples. Coupling the CE to a triple quadrupole MS was accomplished using a custom sheath-flow interface. The best separation was achieved with a 5 M formic acid in water/acetonitrile (9:1) background electrolyte. Strong acid hydrolysis of lyophilized samples was used to release BMAA from conjugated forms. Field-amplified stacking after injection was achieved by lowering sample ionic strength with a cation-exchange cleanup procedure. Quantitation was accomplished using isotope dilution with deuterium-labelled BMAA as internal standard. An LOD for BMAA in solution of 0.8 ng mL(-1) was attained, which was equivalent to 16 ng g(-1) dry mass in samples using the specified extraction procedure. This was comparable with LC-MS/MS methods. The method displayed excellent resolution of amino acid isomers and had no interference from matrix components. The presence of BMAA in cycad, mussel and lobster samples was confirmed by CE-MS/MS, but not in an in-house cyanobacterial reference material, with quantitative results agreeing with those from LC-MS/MS. Graphical Abstract CE-MS separation and detection of BMAA, its isomers and the internal standard BMAA-d3.

  8. Determination of the anti-inflammatory and cytoprotective effects of l-glutamine and l-alanine, or dipeptide, supplementation in rats submitted to resistance exercise.

    PubMed

    Raizel, Raquel; Leite, Jaqueline Santos Moreira; Hypólito, Thaís Menezes; Coqueiro, Audrey Yule; Newsholme, Philip; Cruzat, Vinicius Fernandes; Tirapegui, Julio

    2016-08-01

    We evaluated the effects of chronic oral supplementation with l-glutamine and l-alanine in their free form or as the dipeptide l-alanyl-l-glutamine (DIP) on muscle damage, inflammation and cytoprotection, in rats submitted to progressive resistance exercise (RE). Wistar rats (n 8/group) were submitted to 8-week RE, which consisted of climbing a ladder with progressive loads. In the final 21 d before euthanasia, supplements were delivered in a 4 % solution in drinking water. Glutamine, creatine kinase (CK), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), TNF-α, specific IL (IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-10) and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) levels were evaluated in plasma. The concentrations of glutamine, TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-10, as well as NF-κB activation, were determined in extensor digitorum longus (EDL) skeletal muscle. HSP70 level was assayed in EDL and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). RE reduced glutamine concentration in plasma and EDL (P<0·05 v. sedentary group). However, l-glutamine supplements (l-alanine plus l-glutamine (GLN+ALA) and DIP groups) restored glutamine levels in plasma (by 40 and 58 %, respectively) and muscle (by 93 and 105 %, respectively). GLN+ALA and DIP groups also exhibited increased level of HSP70 in EDL and PBMC, consistent with the reduction of NF-κB p65 activation and cytokines in EDL. Muscle protection was also indicated by attenuation in plasma levels of CK, LDH, TNF-α and IL-1β, as well as an increase in IL-6, IL-10 and MCP-1. Our study demonstrates that chronic oral l-glutamine treatment (given with l-alanine or as dipeptide) following progressive RE induces cyprotective effects mediated by HSP70-associated responses to muscle damage and inflammation.

  9. Identification and Partial Characterization of a Novel UDP-N-Acetylenolpyruvoylglucosamine Reductase/UDP-N-Acetylmuramate:l-Alanine Ligase Fusion Enzyme from Verrucomicrobium spinosum DSM 4136T

    PubMed Central

    Naqvi, Kubra F.; Patin, Delphine; Wheatley, Matthew S.; Savka, Michael A.; Dobson, Renwick C. J.; Gan, Han Ming; Barreteau, Hélène; Blanot, Didier; Mengin-Lecreulx, Dominique; Hudson, André O.

    2016-01-01

    The enzymes involved in synthesizing the bacterial cell wall are attractive targets for the design of antibacterial compounds, since this pathway is essential for bacteria and is absent in animals, particularly humans. A survey of the genome of a bacterium that belongs to the phylum Verrucomicrobia, the closest free-living relative to bacteria from the Chlamydiales phylum, shows genetic evidence that Verrucomicrobium spinosum possesses a novel fusion open reading frame (ORF) annotated by the locus tag (VspiD_010100018130). The ORF, which is predicted to encode the enzymes UDP-N-acetylenolpyruvoylglucosamine reductase (MurB) and UDP-N-acetylmuramate:l-alanine ligase (MurC) that are involved in the cytoplasmic steps of peptidoglycan biosynthesis, was cloned. In vivo analyses using functional complementation showed that the fusion gene was able to complement Escherichia coli murB and murC temperature sensitive mutants. The purified recombinant fusion enzyme (MurB/CVs) was shown to be endowed with UDP-N-acetylmuramate:l-alanine ligase activity. In vitro analyses demonstrated that the latter enzyme had a pH optimum of 9.0, a magnesium optimum of 10 mM and a temperature optimum of 44–46°C. Its apparent Km values for ATP, UDP-MurNAc, and l-alanine were 470, 90, and 25 μM, respectively. However, all attempts to demonstrate an in vitro UDP-N-acetylenolpyruvoylglucosamine reductase (MurB) activity were unsuccessful. Lastly, Hidden Markov Model-based similarity search and phylogenetic analysis revealed that this fusion enzyme could only be identified in specific lineages within the Verrucomicrobia phylum. PMID:27047475

  10. The structure of the O-polysaccharide from the lipopolysaccharide of Providencia stuartii O57 containing an amide of D-galacturonic acid with L-alanine.

    PubMed

    Kocharova, Nina A; Ovchinnikova, Olga G; Bushmarinov, Ivan S; Toukach, Filip V; Torzewska, Agnieszka; Shashkov, Alexander S; Knirel, Yuriy A; Rozalski, Antoni

    2005-03-21

    The O-polysaccharide (O-antigen) was obtained by mild acid degradation of the lipopolysaccharide of Providencia stuartii O57:H29. Studies by sugar and methylation analyses along with (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy, including two-dimensional (1)H,(1)H COSY, TOCSY, ROESY, H-detected (1)H,(13)C HSQC, and HMBC experiments, showed that the polysaccharide contains an amide of D-galacturonic acid with L-alanine and has the following pentasaccharide repeating unit: [formula: see text

  11. FT-IR and Raman spectroscopic and DFT studies of anti-cancer active molecule N-{(meta-ferrocenyl) Benzoyl} - L-Alanine - Glycine ethyl ester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xavier, T. S.; Kenny, Peter T. M.; Manimaran, D.; Joe, I. Hubert

    2015-06-01

    FT-Raman and FT-IR spectra of N-{(meta-ferrocenyl) Benzoyl} - L-alanine - glycine ethyl ester were recorded in solid phase. The optimized molecular geometry, the vibrational wavenumbers, the infrared intensities and the Raman scattering intensities were calculated by using density functional method(B3LYP) with 6-31G(d, p) basis set. Vibrational assignment of the molecule was done by using potential energy distribution analysis. Natural bond orbital analysis, Mulliken charge analysis and HOMO-LUMO energy were used to elucidate the reasons for intra molecular charge transfer. Docking studies were conducted to predict its anticancer activity.

  12. Cyanobacterial Blooms and the Occurrence of the neurotoxin beta-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) in South Florida Aquatic Food Webs.

    PubMed

    Brand, Larry E; Pablo, John; Compton, Angela; Hammerschlag, Neil; Mash, Deborah C

    2010-09-01

    Recent studies demonstrate that most cyanobacteria produce the neurotoxin beta-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) and that it can biomagnify in at least one terrestrial food chain. BMAA has been implicated as a significant environmental risk in the development of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS). We examined several blooms of cyanobacteria in South Florida, and the BMAA content of resident animals, including species used as human food. A wide range of BMAA concentrations were found, ranging from below assay detection limits to approximately 7000 μg/g, a concentration associated with a potential long-term human health hazard.

  13. Investigation of the nitrogen hyperfine coupling of the second stable radical in γ-irradiated L-alanine crystals by 2D-HYSCORE spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maltar-Strmečki, Nadica; Rakvin, Boris

    2012-09-01

    The second stable radical, NH3+C(CH3)COO, R2, in the γ-irradiated single crystal of L-alanine and its fully 15N-enriched analogue were studied by an advanced pulsed EPR technique, 2D-HYSCORE (two-dimensional hyperfine sublevel correlation) spectroscopy at 200 K. The nitrogen hyperfine coupling tensor of the R2 radical was determined from the HYSCORE data and provides new experimental data for improved characterization of the R2 radical in the crystal lattice. The results obtained complement the experimental proton data available for the R2 radical and could lead to increased accuracy and reliability of EPR spectrum simulations.

  14. The effect of 100 MeV oxygen ion on electrical and optical properties of nonlinear optical l-alanine sodium nitrate single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahlam, M. A.; Prakash, A. P. Gnana

    2012-06-01

    Single crystals of nonlinear optical (NLO) L-alanine Sodium Nitrate (LASN) were grown by slow evaporation method. The grown crystals were irradiated by 100 MeV oxygen ions with the cumulative doses of 1Mrad, 6 Mrad and 10 Mrad. The dielectric properties, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and second harmonic generation (SHG) of the crystals were studied before and after irradiation. The dielectric constant was found to increase after irradiation. The DSC reveals that the melting point remains unaffected due to irradiation. The SHG efficiency of LASN was found to decrease with increase in radiation dose.

  15. Determination of the carbon, hydrogen and nitrogen contents of alanine and their uncertainties using the certified reference material L-alanine (NMIJ CRM 6011-a).

    PubMed

    Itoh, Nobuyasu; Sato, Ayako; Yamazaki, Taichi; Numata, Masahiko; Takatsu, Akiko

    2013-01-01

    The carbon, hydrogen, and nitrogen (CHN) contents of alanine and their uncertainties were estimated using a CHN analyzer and the certified reference material (CRM) L-alanine. The CHN contents and their uncertainties, as measured using the single-point calibration method, were 40.36 ± 0.20% for C, 7.86 ± 0.13% for H, and 15.66 ± 0.09% for N; the results obtained using the bracket calibration method were also comparable. The method described in this study is reasonable, convenient, and meets the general requirement of having uncertainties ≤ 0.4%.

  16. Trinucleotide expansions leading to an extended poly-L-alanine segment in the poly (A) binding protein PABPN1 cause fibril formation.

    PubMed

    Scheuermann, Till; Schulz, Barbe; Blume, Alfred; Wahle, Elmar; Rudolph, Rainer; Schwarz, Elisabeth

    2003-12-01

    The nuclear poly(A) binding protein (PABPN1) stimulates poly(A) polymerase and controls the lengths of poly(A) tails during pre-mRNA processing. The wild-type protein possesses 10 consecutive Ala residues immediately after the start methionine. Trinucleotide expansions in the coding sequence result in an extension of the Ala stretch to maximal 17 Ala residues in total. Individuals carrying the trinucleotide expansions suffer from oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD). Intranuclear inclusions consisting predominantly of PABPN1 have been recognized as a pathological hallmark of the genetic disorder. To elucidate the molecular events that lead to disease, recombinant PABPN1, and N-terminal fragments of the protein with varying poly-L-alanine stretches were analyzed. As the full-length protein displayed a strong tendency to aggregate into amorphous deposits, soluble N-terminal fragments were also studied. Expansion of the poly-L-alanine sequence to the maximal length observed in OPMD patients led to an increase of alpha-helical structure. Upon prolonged incubation the protein was found in fibrils that showed all characteristics of amyloid-like fibers. The lag-phase of fibril formation could be reduced by seeding. Structural analysis of the fibrils indicated antiparallel beta-sheets.

  17. Identification of novel inhibitors against Mycobacterium tuberculosis L-alanine dehydrogenase (MTB-AlaDH) through structure-based virtual screening.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Shalini; Devi, Parthiban Brindha; Soni, Vijay; Yogeeswari, Perumal; Sriram, Dharmarajan

    2014-02-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) the etiological agent of tuberculosis (TB) survives in the human host for decades evading the immune system in a latent or persistent state. The Rv2780 (ald) gene that codes for L-alanine dehydrogenase (L-AlaDH) enzyme catalyzes reversible oxidative deamination of L-alanine to pyruvate and is overexpressed under hypoxic and nutrient starvation conditions in MTB. At present, as there is no suitable drug available to treat dormant tuberculosis; it is essential to identify drug candidates that could potentially treat dormant TB. Availability of crystal structure of MTB L-AlaDH bound with co-factor NAD+ facilitated us to employ structure-based virtual screening approach to obtain new hits from a commercial library of Asinex database using energy-optimized pharmacophore modeling. The resulting pharmacophore consisted of three hydrogen bond donor sites (D) and two hydrogen bond acceptor sites (A). The database compounds with a fitness score more than 1.0 were further subjected to Glide high-throughput virtual screening and docking. Thus, we report the identification of best five hits based on structure-based design and their in vitro enzymatic inhibition studies revealed IC₅₀ values in the range of 35-80 μM.

  18. Studies on optical, mechanical and transport properties of NLO active L-alanine formate single crystal grown by modified Sankaranarayanan Ramasamy (SR) method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Justin Raj, C.; Dinakaran, S.; Krishnan, S.; Milton Boaz, B.; Robert, R.; Jerome Das, S.

    2008-04-01

    Bulk single crystals of L-alanine formate of 10 mm diameter and 50 mm length have been grown with an aid of modified Sankaranarayanan-Ramasamy (SR) uniaxial crystal growth method within a period of ten days. The optical properties of the grown crystal were calculated from UV transmission spectral analysis. The second harmonic generation efficiency of the grown crystal was confirmed by Kurtz powder test. In order to determine the mechanical strength of the crystal, Vicker's microhardness test was carried along the growth plane (0 0 1). Dielectric studies reveal that both dielectric constant and dielectric loss decreases with increase in frequency. Photoconductivity study confirms the negative photoconducting nature of the crystal.

  19. The metabolism of the non-proteinogenic amino acid β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis PCC6803.

    PubMed

    Downing, Simoné; Downing, Timothy Grant

    2016-06-01

    The neurotoxic amino acid β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is produced by cyanobacteria under nitrogen starvation conditions and its metabolism is closely associated with cellular nitrogen control. Very little is known regarding the metabolism or biosynthesis of this amino acid in the producing organisms and current knowledge is limited to the spontaneous formation of carbamate adducts in the presence of aqueous carbon dioxide, the rapid removal of free cellular BMAA upon the addition of ammonia to nitrogen-starved cyanobacterial cultures, and the link between cellular nitrogen status and BMAA synthesis. Data presented here show that exogenous BMAA is readily metabolised by cyanobacteria during which, the primary amino group is rapidly transferred to other cellular amino acids. Furthermore, data suggest that BMAA is metabolised in cyanobacteria via a reversible transamination reaction. This study presents novel data on BMAA metabolism in cyanobacteria and provides the first proposed biosynthetic precursor to BMAA biosynthesis in cyanobacteria.

  20. Cyanobacterial Blooms and the Occurrence of the neurotoxin beta-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) in South Florida Aquatic Food Webs

    PubMed Central

    Brand, Larry E.; Pablo, John; Compton, Angela; Hammerschlag, Neil; Mash, Deborah C.

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies demonstrate that most cyanobacteria produce the neurotoxin beta-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) and that it can biomagnify in at least one terrestrial food chain. BMAA has been implicated as a significant environmental risk in the development of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS). We examined several blooms of cyanobacteria in South Florida, and the BMAA content of resident animals, including species used as human food. A wide range of BMAA concentrations were found, ranging from below assay detection limits to approximately 7000 μg/g, a concentration associated with a potential long-term human health hazard. PMID:21057660

  1. Kinetic Studies and Mechanism of Hydrogen Peroxide Catalytic Decomposition by Cu(II) Complexes with Polyelectrolytes Derived from L-Alanine and Glycylglycine

    PubMed Central

    Skounas, Spyridon; Methenitis, Constantinos; Pneumatikakis, George; Morcellet, Michel

    2010-01-01

    The catalytic decomposition of hydrogen peroxide by Cu(II) complexes with polymers bearing L-alanine (PAla) and glycylglycine (PGlygly) in their side chain was studied in alkaline aqueous media. The reactions were of pseudo-first order with respect to [H2O2] and [L-Cu(II)] (L stands for PAla or PGlygly) and the reaction rate was increased with pH increase. The energies of activation for the reactions were determined at pH 8.8, in a temperature range of 293–308 K. A suitable mechanism is proposed to account for the kinetic data, which involves the Cu(II)/Cu(I) redox pair, as has been demonstrated by ESR spectroscopy. The trend in catalytic efficiency is in the order PGlygly>PAla, due to differences in modes of complexation and in the conformation of the macromolecular ligands. PMID:20721280

  2. Kinetic Studies and Mechanism of Hydrogen Peroxide Catalytic Decomposition by Cu(II) Complexes with Polyelectrolytes Derived from L-Alanine and Glycylglycine.

    PubMed

    Skounas, Spyridon; Methenitis, Constantinos; Pneumatikakis, George; Morcellet, Michel

    2010-01-01

    The catalytic decomposition of hydrogen peroxide by Cu(II) complexes with polymers bearing L-alanine (PAla) and glycylglycine (PGlygly) in their side chain was studied in alkaline aqueous media. The reactions were of pseudo-first order with respect to [H(2)O(2)] and [L-Cu(II)] (L stands for PAla or PGlygly) and the reaction rate was increased with pH increase. The energies of activation for the reactions were determined at pH 8.8, in a temperature range of 293-308 K. A suitable mechanism is proposed to account for the kinetic data, which involves the Cu(II)/Cu(I) redox pair, as has been demonstrated by ESR spectroscopy. The trend in catalytic efficiency is in the order PGlygly>PAla, due to differences in modes of complexation and in the conformation of the macromolecular ligands.

  3. Chiral recognition in association between antimony potassium tartrate and bis(L-alaninate)ethylenediamine cobalt(III) complexes using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    PubMed

    Arakawa; Kobayashi; Ama

    2000-09-01

    The chiral recognition of metal complexes by a quick and sensitive mass spectrometric analysis was investigated. The principle is introduction of an external chiral standard compound and detection of the differential association with two optical isomers. Using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry we detected weak intermolecular association between the external chiral anion bis(mu-L-, D-tartrato)-diantimonate(III), [Sb2(L-, D-tart)2]2- and isomeric bis(L-alaninate) ethylenediamine cobalt(III) complex ions, [Co(L-ala)2(en)]+ in acetonitrile/water solution. The difference in the association with optical isomers of the Co complex was measured. The results were interpreted based on a model of intermolecular interaction involving hydrogen bonding. The prospects of the mass spectrometry method for chiral recognition using the external chiral negative ion [Sb2(L-, D-tart)2]2- was discussed.

  4. Enhancement in second harmonic generation efficiency, laser damage threshold and optical transparency of Mn 2+ doped L-alanine crystals: A correlation with crystalline perfection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushwaha, S. K.; Rathee, S. P.; Maurya, K. K.; Bhagavannarayana, G.

    2011-08-01

    Effect on crystalline perfection, second harmonic generation (SHG) efficiency, laser damage threshold (LDT) and optical transparency due to Mn 2+ doping in L-alanine crystals has been investigated. The crystalline perfection of pure and doped crystals was evaluated by high-resolution X-ray diffractometry, which revealed the improvement in the crystalline perfection at low and moderate doping concentrations. At moderate and high concentrations, the Mn 2+ ions were found to be incorporated predominantly at the interstitial sites of the crystalline matrix. The actual incorporated amount of dopants in the crystals was analyzed by atomic absorption spectroscopy. The optical transparency, SHG efficiency, and laser damage threshold of the grown crystals with different concentrations of Mn 2+ were investigated. From these studies it is revealed that Mn 2+ doping lead to a considerable enhancement in the measured nonlinear optical properties with a correlation on crystalline perfection.

  5. Enantioselective Collision-Activated Dissociation of Gas-Phase Tryptophan Induced by Chiral Recognition of Protonated uc(l)-Alanine Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujihara, Akimasa; Matsuyama, Hiroki; Tajiri, Michiko; Wada, Yoshinao; Hayakawa, Shigeo

    2016-06-01

    Enantioselective dissociation in the gas phase is important for enantiomeric enrichment and chiral transmission processes in molecular clouds regarding the origin of homochirality in biomolecules. Enantioselective collision-activated dissociation (CAD) of tryptophan (Trp) and the chiral recognition ability of uc(l)-alanine peptides (uc(l)-Ala n ; n = 2-4) were examined using a linear ion trap mass spectrometer. CAD spectra of gas-phase heterochiral H+(uc(d)-Trp)(uc(l)-Ala n ) and homochiral H+(uc(l)-Trp)(uc(l)-Ala n ) noncovalent complexes were obtained as a function of the peptide size n. The H2O-elimination product was observed in CAD spectra of both heterochiral and homochiral complexes for n = 2 and 4, and in homochiral H+(uc(l)-Trp)(uc(l)-Ala3), indicating that the proton is attached to the uc(l)-alanine peptide, and H2O loss occurs from H+(uc(l)-Ala n ) in the noncovalent complexes. H2O loss did not occur in heterochiral H+(uc(d)-Trp)(uc(l)-Ala3), where NH3 loss and (H2O + CO) loss were the primary dissociation pathways. In heterochiral H+(uc(d)-Trp)(uc(l)-Ala3), the protonation site is the amino group of uc(d)-Trp, and NH3 loss and (H2O + CO) loss occur from H+(uc(d)-Trp). uc(l)-Ala peptides recognize uc(d)-Trp through protonation of the amino group for peptide size n = 3. NH3 loss and (H2O + CO) loss from H+(uc(d)-Trp) proceeds via enantioselective CAD in gas-phase heterochiral H+(uc(d)-Trp)(uc(l)-Ala3) at room temperature, whereas uc(l)-Trp dissociation was not observed in homochiral H+(uc(l)-Trp)(uc(l)-Ala3). These results suggest that enantioselective dissociation induced by chiral recognition of uc(l)-Ala peptides through protonation could play an important role in enantiomeric enrichment and chiral transmission processes of amino acids.

  6. Physical gelation of binary mixtures of hydrocarbons mediated by n-lauroyl-L-alanine and characterization of their thermal and mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Santanu; Pal, Asish

    2008-04-24

    Fatty acid amides, such as n-lauroyl-L-alanine, gelate both aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbon solvents efficiently. In addition this compound is found to gelate the binary solvent mixtures comprised of aromatic hydrocarbon, e.g., toluene and aliphatic hydrocarbons, e.g., n-heptane. Scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy show that the fiber thickness of the gel assembly increases progressively in the binary mixture of n-heptane and toluene with increasing percentage of toluene. The self-assembly patterns of the gels in individual solvents, n-heptane and toluene, are however different. The toluene gel consists of predominantly one type of morphological species, while n-heptane gel has more than one species leading to the polymorphic nature of the gel. The n-heptane gel is thermally more stable than the toluene gel as evident from the measurement using differential scanning calorimetry. The thermal stability of the gels prepared in the binary mixture of n-heptane and toluene is dependent on the composition of solvent mixture. Rheology of the gels shows that they are shear-thinning material and show characteristic behavior of soft viscoelastic solid. For the gels prepared from binary solvent mixture of toluene and n-heptane, with incorporation of more toluene in the binary mixture, the gel becomes a more viscoelastic solid. The time sweep rheology experiment demonstrates that the gel made in n-heptane has faster gel formation kinetics than that prepared in toluene.

  7. Structural and Biochemical Analyses of Mycobacterium tuberculosis N-Acetylmuramyl-l-alanine Amidase Rv3717 Point to a Role in Peptidoglycan Fragment Recycling*

    PubMed Central

    Prigozhin, Daniil M.; Mavrici, Daniela; Huizar, John P.; Vansell, Hilary J.; Alber, Tom

    2013-01-01

    Peptidoglycan hydrolases are key enzymes in bacterial cell wall homeostasis. Understanding the substrate specificity and biochemical activity of peptidoglycan hydrolases in Mycobacterium tuberculosis is of special interest as it can aid in the development of new cell wall targeting therapeutics. In this study, we report biochemical and structural characterization of the mycobacterial N-acetylmuramyl-l-alanine amidase, Rv3717. The crystal structure of Rv3717 in complex with a dipeptide product shows that, compared with previously characterized peptidoglycan amidases, the enzyme contains an extra disulfide-bonded β-hairpin adjacent to the active site. The structure of two intermediates in assembly reveal that Zn2+ binding rearranges active site residues, and disulfide formation promotes folding of the β-hairpin. Although Zn2+ is required for hydrolysis of muramyl dipeptide, disulfide oxidation is not required for activity on this substrate. The orientation of the product in the active site suggests a role for a conserved glutamate (Glu-200) in catalysis; mutation of this residue abolishes activity. The product binds at the head of a closed tunnel, and the enzyme showed no activity on polymerized peptidoglycan. These results point to a potential role for Rv3717 in peptidoglycan fragment recycling. PMID:24019530

  8. Pore Diameter Dependence and Segmental Dynamics of Poly-Z-L-lysine and Poly-L-alanine Confined in 1D Nanocylindrical Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuncel, Eylul; Suzuki, Yasuhito; Iossifidis, Agathaggelos; Steinhart, Martin; Butt, Hans-Jurgen; Floudas, George; Duran, Hatice

    Structure formation, thermodynamic stability, phase and dynamic behaviors of polypeptides are strongly affected by confinement. Since understanding the changes in these behaviors will allow their rational design as functional devices with tunable properties, herein we investigated Poly-Z-L-lysine (PZLL) and Poly-L-alanine (PAla) homopolypeptides confined in nanoporous alumina containing aligned cylindrical nanopores as a function of pore size by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy, Solid-state NMR, X-ray diffraction, Dielectric spectroscopy(DS). Bulk PZLL exhibits a glass transition temperature (Tg) at about 301K while PZLL nanorods showed slightly lower Tg (294K). The dynamic investigation by DS also revealed a decrease (4K) in Tg between bulk and PZLL nanorods. DS is a very sensitive probe of the local and global secondary structure relaxation through the large dipole to study effect of confinement. The results revealed that the local segmental dynamics, associated with broken hydrogen bonds, and segmental dynamics speed-up on confinement.

  9. Distinguishing the cyanobacterial neurotoxin beta-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) from its structural isomer 2,4-diaminobutyric acid (2,4-DAB).

    PubMed

    Banack, S A; Downing, T G; Spácil, Z; Purdie, E L; Metcalf, J S; Downing, S; Esterhuizen, M; Codd, G A; Cox, P A

    2010-11-01

    The cyanobacterial neurotoxin beta-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) has been associated with certain forms of progressive neurodegenerative disease, including sporadic Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Alzheimer's disease. Reports of BMAA in cyanobacterial blooms from lakes, reservoirs, and other water resources continue to be made by investigators in a variety of laboratories. Recently it was suggested that during analysis BMAA may be confused with its structural isomer 2,4-diaminobutyric acid (2,4-DAB), or that current detection methods may mistake other compounds for BMAA. We here review the evidence that BMAA can be consistently and reliably separated from 2,4-DAB during reversed-phase HPLC, and that BMAA can be confidently distinguished from 2,4-DAB during triple quadrupole LC-MS/MS analysis by i) different retention times, ii) diagnostic product ions resulting from collision-induced dissociation, and iii) consistent ratios between selected reaction monitoring (SRM) transitions. Furthermore, underivatized BMAA can be separated from 2,4-DAB with an amino acid analyzer with post-column visualization using ninhydrin. Other compounds that may be theoretically confused with BMAA during chloroformate derivatization during GC analysis are distinguished due to their different retention times.

  10. Reversed-phase HPLC/FD method for the quantitative analysis of the neurotoxin BMAA (β-N-methylamino-L-alanine) in cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Cianca, R C Cervantes; Baptista, M S; Silva, Luís Pinto da; Lopes, V R; Vasconcelos, V M

    2012-03-01

    A method has been developed and optimized in order to detect and quantify the non-protein amino acid β-N-methylamino-L-alanine(BMAA) in cyanobacteria. The novelty of the method is that we have used methanol instead of acetonitrile as the eluent. The method includes extraction with 0.1 M trichloroacetic acid (free BMAA) or protein hydrolysis with 6 M hydrochloric acid (total BMAA), derivatization with AQC (6-aminoquinolyl-N-hydroxysuccinimidyl carbamate) and reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography analysis with fluorescence detection (HPLC/FD). Detection limits ranged from 0.35 to 0.75 pg injected, while quantification limits ranged from 1.10 to 2.55 pg injected for total and free BMAA hydrolysis, respectively. The linear response range was up to 850 pmol in both methods, embracing three orders of magnitude. The method was successfully applied to a lyophilized estuarine species of Nostoc (LEGE 06077). All previous published methods for BMAA quantification, using HPLC/FD, have reported the usage of acetonitrile. This is the first report using methanol as the mobile phase. Although the elution strength differs with both solvents, the final method proved efficient for the quantification of BMAA in this complex sample. The method resulted effective, low-priced, and simple, being suitable for routine monitoring of BMAA in cyanobacteria.

  11. Transfer of developmental neurotoxin β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA) via milk to nursed offspring: Studies by mass spectrometry and image analysis.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Marie; Karlsson, Oskar; Banack, Sandra Anne; Brandt, Ingvar

    2016-09-06

    The cyanobacterial non-proteinogenic amino acid β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA) is proposed to be involved in the etiology of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/parkinsonism dementia complex. When administered as single doses to neonatal rats, BMAA gives rise to cognitive and neurodegenerative impairments in the adult animal. Here, we employed mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and autoradiographic imaging to examine the mother-to-pup transfer of BMAA in rats. The results show that unchanged BMAA was secreted into the milk and distributed to the suckling pups. The concentration of BMAA in pup stomach milk and the neonatal liver peaked after 8h, while the concentration in the pup brain increased throughout the study period. About 1 and 6% of the BMAA recovered from adult liver and brain were released following hydrolysis, suggesting that this fraction was associated with protein. No association to milk protein was observed. Injection of rat pups with [methyl-(14)C]-l-BMAA or [carboxyl-(14)C]-l-BMAA resulted in highly similar distribution patterns, indicating no or low metabolic elimination of the methylamino- or carboxyl groups. In conclusion, BMAA is transported as a free amino acid to rat milk and suckling pups. The results strengthen the proposal that mothers' milk could be a source of exposure for BMAA in human infants.

  12. Environmental neurotoxin interaction with proteins: Dose-dependent increase of free and protein-associated BMAA (β-N-methylamino-L-alanine) in neonatal rat brain.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Oskar; Jiang, Liying; Ersson, Lisa; Malmström, Tim; Ilag, Leopold L; Brittebo, Eva B

    2015-10-26

    β-Methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is implicated in the aetiology of neurodegenerative disorders. Neonatal exposure to BMAA induces cognitive impairments and progressive neurodegenerative changes including intracellular fibril formation in the hippocampus of adult rats. It is unclear why the neonatal hippocampus is especially vulnerable and the critical cellular perturbations preceding BMAA-induced toxicity remains to be elucidated. The aim of this study was to compare the level of free and protein-associated BMAA in neonatal rat brain and peripheral tissues after different exposures to BMAA. Ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis revealed that BMAA passed the neonatal blood-brain barrier and was distributed to all studied brain areas. BMAA was also associated to proteins in the brain, especially in the hippocampus. The level in the brain was, however, considerably lower compared to the liver that is not a target organ for BMAA. In contrast to the liver there was a significantly increased level of protein-association of BMAA in the hippocampus and other brain areas following repeated administration suggesting that the degradation of BMAA-associated proteins may be lower in neonatal brain than in the liver. Additional evidence is needed in support of a role for protein misincorporation in the neonatal hippocampus for long-term effects of BMAA.

  13. Environmental neurotoxin interaction with proteins: Dose-dependent increase of free and protein-associated BMAA (β-N-methylamino-L-alanine) in neonatal rat brain

    PubMed Central

    Karlsson, Oskar; Jiang, Liying; Ersson, Lisa; Malmström, Tim; Ilag, Leopold L.; Brittebo, Eva B.

    2015-01-01

    β-Methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is implicated in the aetiology of neurodegenerative disorders. Neonatal exposure to BMAA induces cognitive impairments and progressive neurodegenerative changes including intracellular fibril formation in the hippocampus of adult rats. It is unclear why the neonatal hippocampus is especially vulnerable and the critical cellular perturbations preceding BMAA-induced toxicity remains to be elucidated. The aim of this study was to compare the level of free and protein-associated BMAA in neonatal rat brain and peripheral tissues after different exposures to BMAA. Ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis revealed that BMAA passed the neonatal blood-brain barrier and was distributed to all studied brain areas. BMAA was also associated to proteins in the brain, especially in the hippocampus. The level in the brain was, however, considerably lower compared to the liver that is not a target organ for BMAA. In contrast to the liver there was a significantly increased level of protein-association of BMAA in the hippocampus and other brain areas following repeated administration suggesting that the degradation of BMAA-associated proteins may be lower in neonatal brain than in the liver. Additional evidence is needed in support of a role for protein misincorporation in the neonatal hippocampus for long-term effects of BMAA. PMID:26498001

  14. Determination of the neurotoxin BMAA (beta-N-methylamino-L-alanine) in cycad seed and cyanobacteria by LC-MS/MS (liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry).

    PubMed

    Rosén, Johan; Hellenäs, Karl-Erik

    2008-12-01

    A highly specific method for the analysis of beta-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) by LC-MS/MS (liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry) has been developed and applied for cycad seeds and cyanobacteria. BMAA was analysed as a free fraction or as total BMAA after acidic hydrolysis to release any protein-bound BMAA. Deuterium labelled BMAA was synthesised and used as internal standard. The method comprises HILIC (hydrophilic interaction chromatography) and positive electrospray ionisation of the native compound, i.e. no derivatisation was used. For safe identification five specific product ions (m/z 102, 88, 76, 73 and 44), all derived from a precursor ion of m/z 119 and originating from different parts of the molecule, were detected (typical relative abundance 100%, 16%, 14%, 12% and 22% respectively). Cyanobacteria or muscle tissue was spiked with BMAA (10 to 1000 microg g(-1)) to validate the method (accuracy 95% to 109%, relative standard deviation 1% to 6%). The detection limit for free and total BMAA in tissue was <1 microg g(-1) and <4 microg g(-1) respectively. BMAA was successfully identified and quantified in cycad seeds, whereas previously reported findings of BMAA in samples of cyanobacteria could not be confirmed. Instead, the presence of alpha-,gamma-diamino butyric acid (DAB), an isomer of BMAA, was confirmed in one sample. The possible implications of this finding are discussed.

  15. Early hippocampal cell death, and late learning and memory deficits in rats exposed to the environmental toxin BMAA (β-N-methylamino-L-alanine) during the neonatal period.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Oskar; Roman, Erika; Berg, Anna-Lena; Brittebo, Eva B

    2011-06-01

    We have reported previously that exposure to the cyanobacterial neurotoxin β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) during the neonatal period causes cognitive impairments in adult rats. The aim of this study was to investigate the long-term effects of neonatal BMAA exposure on learning and memory mechanisms and to identify early morphological changes in the neonatal brain. BMAA was injected subcutaneously in rat pups on postnatal days 9-10. BMAA (50 and 200 mg/kg) caused distinct deficits in spatial learning and memory in adult animals but no morphological changes. No impairment of recognition memory was detected, suggesting that neonatal exposure to BMAA preferentially affects neuronal systems that are important for spatial tasks. Histopathological examination revealed early neuronal cell death as determined by TUNEL staining in the hippocampus 24 h after a high dose (600 mg/kg) of BMAA whereas no changes were observed at lower doses (50 and 200 mg/kg). In addition, there was a low degree of neuronal cell death in the retrosplenial and cingulate cortices, areas that are also important for cognitive function. Taken together, these results indicate that BMAA is a developmental neurotoxin inducing long-term changes in cognitive function. The risk posed by BMAA as a potential human neurotoxin merits further consideration, particularly if the proposed biomagnifications in the food chain are confirmed.

  16. Detection of Cyanotoxins, β-N-methylamino-l-alanine and Microcystins, from a Lake Surrounded by Cases of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Banack, Sandra Anne; Caller, Tracie; Henegan, Patricia; Haney, James; Murby, Amanda; Metcalf, James S.; Powell, James; Cox, Paul Alan; Stommel, Elijah

    2015-01-01

    A cluster of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) has been previously described to border Lake Mascoma in Enfield, NH, with an incidence of ALS approximating 25 times expected. We hypothesize a possible association with cyanobacterial blooms that can produce β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA), a neurotoxic amino acid implicated as a possible cause of ALS/PDC in Guam. Muscle, liver, and brain tissue samples from a Lake Mascoma carp, as well as filtered aerosol samples, were analyzed for microcystins (MC), free and protein-bound BMAA, and the BMAA isomers 2,4-diaminobutyric acid (DAB) and N-(2-aminoethyl)glycine (AEG). In carp brain, BMAA and DAB concentrations were 0.043 μg/g ± 0.02 SD and 0.01 μg/g ± 0.002 SD respectively. In carp liver and muscle, the BMAA concentrations were 1.28 μg/g and 1.27 μg/g respectively, and DAB was not detected. BMAA was detected in the air filters, as were the isomers DAB and AEG. These results demonstrate that a putative cause for ALS, BMAA, exists in an environment that has a documented cluster of ALS. Although cause and effect have not been demonstrated, our observations and measurements strengthen the association. PMID:25643180

  17. β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA) and isomers: Distribution in different food web compartments of Thau lagoon, French Mediterranean Sea.

    PubMed

    Réveillon, Damien; Abadie, Eric; Séchet, Véronique; Masseret, Estelle; Hess, Philipp; Amzil, Zouher

    2015-09-01

    The neurotoxin BMAA (β-N-methylamino-l-alanine) and its isomer DAB (2,4-diaminobutyric acid) have been detected in seafood worldwide, including in Thau lagoon (French Mediterranean Sea). A cluster of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a neurodegenerative disease associated with BMAA, has also been observed in this region. Mussels, periphyton (i.e. biofilms attached to mussels) and plankton were sampled between July 2013 and October 2014, and analyzed using HILIC-MS/MS. BMAA, DAB and AEG (N-(2-aminoethyl)glycine) were found in almost all the samples of the lagoon. BMAA and DAB were present at 0.58 and 0.83, 2.6 and 3.3, 4.0 and 7.2 μg g(-1) dry weight in plankton collected with nets, periphyton and mussels, respectively. Synechococcus sp., Ostreococcus tauri, Alexandrium catenella and eight species of diatoms were cultured and screened for BMAA and analogs. While Synechococcus sp., O. tauri and A. catenella did not produce BMAA under our culture conditions, four diatoms species contained both BMAA and DAB. Hence, diatoms may be a source of BMAA for mussels. Unlike other toxins produced by microalgae, BMAA and DAB were detected in significant amounts in tissues other than digestive glands in mussels.

  18. β-N-Methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) perturbs alanine, aspartate and glutamate metabolism pathways in human neuroblastoma cells as determined by metabolic profiling.

    PubMed

    Engskog, Mikael K R; Ersson, Lisa; Haglöf, Jakob; Arvidsson, Torbjörn; Pettersson, Curt; Brittebo, Eva

    2017-02-04

    β-Methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is a non-proteinogenic amino acid that induces long-term cognitive deficits, as well as an increased neurodegeneration and intracellular fibril formation in the hippocampus of adult rodents following short-time neonatal exposure and in vervet monkey brain following long-term exposure. It has also been proposed to be involved in the etiology of neurodegenerative disease in humans. The aim of this study was to identify metabolic effects not related to excitotoxicity or oxidative stress in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. The effects of BMAA (50, 250, 1000 µM) for 24 h on cells differentiated with retinoic acid were studied. Samples were analyzed using LC-MS and NMR spectroscopy to detect altered intracellular polar metabolites. The analysis performed, followed by multivariate pattern recognition techniques, revealed significant perturbations in protein biosynthesis, amino acid metabolism pathways and citrate cycle. Of specific interest were the BMAA-induced alterations in alanine, aspartate and glutamate metabolism and as well as alterations in various neurotransmitters/neuromodulators such as GABA and taurine. The results indicate that BMAA can interfere with metabolic pathways involved in neurotransmission in human neuroblastoma cells.

  19. Beta-N-methylamino-l-alanine: LC-MS/MS Optimization, Screening of Cyanobacterial Strains and Occurrence in Shellfish from Thau, a French Mediterranean Lagoon

    PubMed Central

    Réveillon, Damien; Abadie, Eric; Séchet, Véronique; Brient, Luc; Savar, Véronique; Bardouil, Michèle; Hess, Philipp; Amzil, Zouher

    2014-01-01

    β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA) is a neurotoxic non-protein amino acid suggested to be involved in neurodegenerative diseases. It was reported to be produced by cyanobacteria, but also found in edible aquatic organisms, thus raising concern of a widespread human exposure. However, the chemical analysis of BMAA and its isomers are controversial, mainly due to the lack of selectivity of the analytical methods. Using factorial design, we have optimized the chromatographic separation of underivatized analogues by a hydrophilic interaction chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (HILIC-MS/MS) method. A combination of an effective solid phase extraction (SPE) clean-up, appropriate chromatographic resolution and the use of specific mass spectral transitions allowed for the development of a highly selective and sensitive analytical procedure to identify and quantify BMAA and its isomers (in both free and total form) in cyanobacteria and mollusk matrices (LOQ of 0.225 and 0.15 µg/g dry weight, respectively). Ten species of cyanobacteria (six are reported to be BMAA producers) were screened with this method, and neither free nor bound BMAA could be found, while both free and bound DAB were present in almost all samples. Mussels and oysters collected in 2009 in the Thau Lagoon, France, were also screened, and bound BMAA and its two isomers, DAB and AEG, were observed in all samples (from 0.6 to 14.4 µg/g DW), while only several samples contained quantifiable free BMAA. PMID:25405857

  20. Protein association of the neurotoxin and non-protein amino acid BMAA (β-N-methylamino-L-alanine) in the liver and brain following neonatal administration in rats.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Oskar; Jiang, Liying; Andersson, Marie; Ilag, Leopold L; Brittebo, Eva B

    2014-04-07

    The environmental neurotoxin β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is not an amino acid that is normally found in proteins. Our previous autoradiographic study of (3)H-labeled BMAA in adult mice unexpectedly revealed a tissue distribution similar to that of protein amino acids. The aim of this study was to characterize the distribution of free and protein-bound BMAA in neonatal rat tissues following a short exposure using autoradiographic imaging and ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS). The autoradiographic imaging of (14)C-L-BMAA demonstrated a distinct uptake of radioactivity that was retained following acid extraction in tissues with a high rate of cell turnover and/or protein synthesis. The UHPLC-MS/MS analysis conclusively demonstrated a dose-dependent increase of protein-associated BMAA in neonatal rat tissues. The level of protein-associated BMAA in the liver was more than 10 times higher than that in brain regions not fully protected by the blood-brain barrier which may be due to the higher rate of protein synthesis in the liver. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that BMAA was associated with rat proteins suggesting that BMAA may be misincorporated into proteins. However, protein-associated BMAA seemed to be cleared over time, as none of the samples from adult rats had any detectable free or protein-associated BMAA.

  1. Beta-N-methylamino-L-alanine: LC-MS/MS optimization, screening of cyanobacterial strains and occurrence in shellfish from Thau, a French Mediterranean lagoon.

    PubMed

    Réveillon, Damien; Abadie, Eric; Séchet, Véronique; Brient, Luc; Savar, Véronique; Bardouil, Michèle; Hess, Philipp; Amzil, Zouher

    2014-11-17

    β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is a neurotoxic non-protein amino acid suggested to be involved in neurodegenerative diseases. It was reported to be produced by cyanobacteria, but also found in edible aquatic organisms, thus raising concern of a widespread human exposure. However, the chemical analysis of BMAA and its isomers are controversial, mainly due to the lack of selectivity of the analytical methods. Using factorial design, we have optimized the chromatographic separation of underivatized analogues by a hydrophilic interaction chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (HILIC-MS/MS) method. A combination of an effective solid phase extraction (SPE) clean-up, appropriate chromatographic resolution and the use of specific mass spectral transitions allowed for the development of a highly selective and sensitive analytical procedure to identify and quantify BMAA and its isomers (in both free and total form) in cyanobacteria and mollusk matrices (LOQ of 0.225 and 0.15 µg/g dry weight, respectively). Ten species of cyanobacteria (six are reported to be BMAA producers) were screened with this method, and neither free nor bound BMAA could be found, while both free and bound DAB were present in almost all samples. Mussels and oysters collected in 2009 in the Thau Lagoon, France, were also screened, and bound BMAA and its two isomers, DAB and AEG, were observed in all samples (from 0.6 to 14.4 µg/g DW), while only several samples contained quantifiable free BMAA.

  2. Stimulation of L-asparate beta-decarboxylase formation by L-glutamate in Pseudomonas dacunhae and Improved production of L-alanine.

    PubMed

    Shibatani, T; Kakimoto, T; Chibata, I

    1979-09-01

    The formation of L-asparate beta-decarboxylase by Pseudomonas dacunhae was compared on media containing a variety of organic acids and amino acids as a carbon source. Although the enzyme was formed constitutively when the organism was grown on basal medium or on that containing tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates, it was induced twofold by L-glutamate and repressed one-tenth by L-serine. L-Glutamine, L-proline, L-leucine, glycine, and L-threonine also showed induction effects lower than that of L-glutamate. L-Glutamate derepressed the serine effect. This glutamate effect was observed effect was observed with other microoganisms, e.g., Achromobacter pestifer and Achromobacter liquidum. Since the intermediates from L-glutamate metabolism had no effect, this induction effect was specific to L-glutamate. The formation of some glutamate-related enzymes was measured and is discussed in relation to the formation of L-asparate beta-decarboxylase. L-Asparate beta-decarboxylase was purified to an electrophoretically homogenous state from L-glutamate-grown cells of P. dacunhae, and some properties were compared with those of the enzyme from fumarate-grown cells. The two enzymes were identical in disc electrophoresis, molecular weight, and some enzymatic properties. The industrial production of L-alanine from L-aspartic acid acid was improved by using the culture broth with highly induced L-asparate beta-decarboxylase (9.4 U/ml of broth).

  3. Nepenthes insignis uses a C2-portion of the carbon skeleton of L-alanine acquired via its carnivorous organs, to build up the allelochemical plumbagin.

    PubMed

    Rischer, Heiko; Hamm, Andreas; Bringmann, Gerhard

    2002-03-01

    Tropical pitcher plants (Nepenthes) catch animals in their specialized cup-shaped leaves, digest the prey by secreting enzymes, and actively take up the resulting compounds. The benefit of this behaviour is the ability to grow and compete in nutrient-poor habitats. Our present in vitro study shows that not only the nitrogen of alanine fed to the carnivorous organs is used by the plant but that in addition intact C2-units derived from C-2 and C-3 of stable isotope labelled L-alanine serve as building blocks, here exemplarily for the synthesis of the secondary metabolite plumbagin, a potent allelochemical. This result adds a new facet to the benefit of carnivory for plants. The availability of plumbagin by a de novo synthesis probably enhances the plants' fitness in their defence against phytophagous and pathogenic organisms. A missing specific uptake or CoA activation mechanism might be the reason that acetate fed to the pitchers was not incorporated into the naphthoquinone plumbagin. The dihydronaphthoquinone glucosides rossoliside and plumbaside A, here isolated for the first time from Nepenthes, by contrast, showed no incorporation after feeding of any of the two precursors, suggesting these compounds to be storage forms with probably very low turnover rates.

  4. Characterization of a meso-chiral isomer of a hexanuclear Cu(II) cage from racemization of the L-alanine Schiff base.

    PubMed

    Rajesh, Chinnaiyan Mahalingam; Ray, Manabendra

    2014-09-14

    We are reporting structural characterization of two new hexanuclear cages (H3O)2[Cu3(μ3-OH)(μ3-NH3)(0.5)(L)3]2·8H2O (1) and (H3O)2[Cu3(μ3-OH)(μ3-H2O)(0.5)(L)3]2·8H2O (1a) where L(2-) is the dianionic form of the Schiff base of L-alanine and salicylaldehyde. The complex 1 has two C3 symmetric hydroxo bridged trinuclear halves joined by an ammonia or water molecule at the center through H-bonding. Each of the trinuclear halves is enantiopure but of opposite chirality to the other half, making the hexanuclear unit a meso isomer. Temperature dependent magnetic measurements showed the presence of ferromagnetic interactions among trinuclear Cu(II) units, a rare occurrence among trinuclear Cu(II) complexes. Characterization of the LiHL showed it to be enantiopure. Addition of a base, monitored using optical rotation, showed that racemization occurs as a result of base addition. The racemization depends on the base as well as the temperature. Base or Cu(II) induced racemization of amino acid derivatives has been indicated in a number of cases in the past but structural characterization of the products or formation of this type of chiral hexanuclear architecture was never reported. Structures of the complex and the ligand have a number of interesting H-bonding situations.

  5. Structural, vibrational spectroscopic studies and quantum chemical calculations of n-(2,4-dinitrophenyl)-L-alanine methyl ester by density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govindarasu, K.; Kavitha, E.

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, the vibrational wavenumbers of N-(2,4-dinitrophenyl)-L-alanine methyl ester (abbreviated as Dnp-ala-ome) were obtained from ab initio studies based on the density functional theory approach with B3LYP and M06-2X/6-31G(d,p) level of theories. The optimized geometry and structural features of the most potential nonlinear optical crystal Dnp-ala-ome and the vibrational spectral investigations have been thoroughly described with the FT-Raman and FT-IR spectra supported by the DFT computations. FT-IR (4000-400 cm-1) and FT-Raman spectra (3500-50 cm-1) in the solid phase and the UV-Vis spectra that dissolved in ethanol were recorded in the range of 200-800 nm. The Natural population analysis and natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis have also been carried out to analyze the effects of intramolecular charge transfer, intramolecular and hyperconjugative interactions on the geometries. The effects of frontier orbitals, HOMO and LUMO, transition of electron density transfer have also been discussed. The first order hyperpolarizability (β0) and related properties (β, α0 and Δα) of Dnp-ala-ome were calculated. In addition, molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) was investigated using theoretical calculations. The chemical reactivity and thermodynamic properties (heat capacity, entropy and enthalpy) of at different temperature are calculated.

  6. Near-IR laser generation of a high-energy conformer of L-alanine and the mechanism of its decay in a low-temperature nitrogen matrix.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Cláudio M; Lapinski, Leszek; Fausto, Rui; Reva, Igor

    2013-03-28

    Monomers of L-alanine (ALA) were isolated in cryogenic nitrogen matrices at 14 K. Two conformers were identified for the compound trapped from the gas-phase into the solid nitrogen environment. The potential energy surface (PES) of ALA was theoretically calculated at the MP2 and QCISD levels. Twelve minima were located on this PES. Seven low-energy conformers fall within the 0-10 kJ mol(-1) range and should be appreciably populated in the equilibrium gas phase prior to deposition. Observation of only two forms in the matrices is explained in terms of calculated barriers to conformational rearrangements. All conformers with the O=C-O-H moiety in the cis orientation are separated by low barriers and collapse to the most stable form I during deposition of the matrix onto the low-temperature substrate. The second observed form II has the O=C-O-H group in the trans orientation. The remaining trans forms have very high relative energies (between 24 and 30 kJ mol(-1)) and are not populated. The high-energy trans form VI, that differs from I only by rotation of the OH group, was found to be separated from other conformers by barriers that are high enough to open a perspective for its stabilization in a matrix. The form VI was photoproduced in situ by narrow-band near-infrared irradiation of the samples at 6935-6910 cm(-1), where the first overtone of the OH stretching vibration in form I appears. The photogenerated form VI decays in N2 matrices back to conformer I with a characteristic decay time of ∼15 min. The mechanism of the VI → I relaxation is rationalized in terms of the proton tunneling.

  7. Analysis of β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) in spirulina-containing supplements by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    McCarron, Pearse; Logan, Alan C; Giddings, Sabrina D; Quilliam, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decade the amino acid beta-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) has come under intense scrutiny. International laboratory and epidemiological research continues to support the hypothesis that environmental exposure to BMAA (e.g., through dietary practices, water supply) can promote the risk of various neurodegenerative diseases. A wide variety of cyanobacteria spp. have previously been reported to produce BMAA, with production levels dependent upon species, strain and environmental conditions. Since spirulina (Arthrospira spp.) is a member of the cyanobacteria phylum frequently consumed via dietary supplements, the presence of BMAA in such products may have public health implications. In the current work, we have analyzed ten spirulina-containing samples for the presence of BMAA; six pure spirulina samples from two separate raw materials suppliers, and four commercially-available multi-ingredient products containing 1.45 g of spirulina per 8.5 g serving. Because of controversy surrounding the measurement of BMAA, we have used two complementary liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) methods: one based on reversed phase LC (RPLC) with derivatization and the other based on hydrophilic interaction LC (HILIC). Potential matrix effects were corrected for by internal standardization using a stable isotope labeled BMAA standard. BMAA was not detected at low limits of detection (80 ng/g dry weight) in any of these product samples. Although these results are reassuring, BMAA analyses should be conducted on a wider sample selection and, perhaps, as part of ongoing spirulina production quality control testing and specifications.

  8. Selective brain uptake and behavioral effects of the cyanobacterial toxin BMAA (beta-N-methylamino-L-alanine) following neonatal administration to rodents.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Oskar; Lindquist, Nils Gunnar; Brittebo, Eva B; Roman, Erika

    2009-06-01

    Cyanobacteria are extensively distributed in terrestrial and aquatic environments all over the world. Most cyanobacteria can produce the neurotoxin beta-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA), which has been detected in several water systems and could accumulate in food chains. The aim of the study was to investigate the transfer of BMAA to fetal and neonatal brains and the effects of BMAA on the development of behavioral characteristics during the brain growth spurt (BGS) in rodents. Pregnant and neonatal mice were given an injection of (3)H-BMAA on gestational day 14 and postnatal day (PND) 10, respectively, and processed for tape-section autoradiography. The study revealed transplacental transfer of (3)H-BMAA and a significant uptake in fetal mouse brain. The radioactivity was specifically located in the hippocampus, striatum, brainstem, spinal cord and cerebellum of 10-day-old mice. The effect of repeated BMAA treatment (200 or 600 mg/kg s.c.) during BGS on rat behavior was also studied. BMAA treatment on PND 9-10 induced acute alterations, such as impaired locomotor ability and hyperactivity, in the behavior of neonatal rats. Furthermore, rats given the high dose of BMAA failed to habituate to the test environment when tested at juvenile age. In conclusion, the results demonstrated that BMAA was transferred to the neonatal brain and induced significant changes in the behavior of neonatal rats following administration during BGS. The observed behavioral changes suggest possible cognitive impairment. Increased information on the long-term effects of BMAA on cognitive function following fetal and neonatal exposure is required for assessment of the risk to children's health.

  9. Systematic detection of BMAA (β-N-methylamino-l-alanine) and DAB (2,4-diaminobutyric acid) in mollusks collected in shellfish production areas along the French coasts.

    PubMed

    Réveillon, Damien; Séchet, Véronique; Hess, Philipp; Amzil, Zouher

    2016-02-01

    The neurotoxin β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA) is naturally present in some microalgal species in the marine environment. The accumulation of BMAA has widely been observed in filter-feeding bivalves that are known to consume primary producers constituting the base of complex aquatic food webs. This study was performed to assess the occurrence of BMAA and isomers in mollusks collected from nine representative shellfish production areas located on the three French coasts (Channel, Atlantic and Mediterranean sites). The use of a highly selective and sensitive HILIC-MS/MS method, with D5DAB as internal standard, revealed the systematic detection of BMAA and DAB, in concentrations ranging from 0.20 to 6.7 μg g(-1) dry weight of digestive gland tissues of mollusks. While we detected BMAA in four strains of diatoms in a previous study, here BMAA was only detected in one diatom species previously not investigated out of the 23 microalgal species examined (belonging to seven classes). The concentrations of BMAA and DAB in mussels and oysters were similar at different sampling locations and despite the high diversity of phytoplankton populations that mollusks feed on at these locations. Only small variations of BMAA and DAB levels were observed and these were not correlated to any of the phytoplankton species reported. Therefore, extensive research should be performed on both origin and metabolism of BMAA in shellfish. The levels observed in this study are similar to those found in other studies in France or elsewhere. A previous study had related such levels to a cluster of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis in the South of France; hence the widespread occurrence of BMAA in shellfish from all coasts in France found in this study suggests the need for further epidemiological and toxicological studies to establish the levels that are relevant for a link between the consumption of BMAA-containing foodstuffs and neurodegenerative diseases.

  10. Liquid chromatographic determination of the cyanobacterial toxin beta-n-methylamino-L-alanine in algae food supplements, freshwater fish, and bottled water.

    PubMed

    Scott, Peter M; Niedzwiadek, Barbara; Rawn, Dorothea F K; Lau, Ben P-Y

    2009-08-01

    Beta-N-Methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is a neurotoxin originally found in cycad seeds and now known to be produced by many species of freshwater and marine cyanobacteria. We developed a method for its determination in blue-green algae (BGA) food supplements, freshwater fish, and bottled water by using a strong cation-exchange, solid-phase extraction column for cleanup after 0.3 M trichloroacetic acid extraction of BGA supplements and fish. Bottled water was applied directly onto the solid-phase extraction column. For analysis of carbonated water, sonication and pH adjustment to 1.5 were needed. To determine protein-bound BMAA, the protein pellet left after extraction of the BGA supplement and fish was hydrolyzed by boiling with 6 M hydrochloric acid; BMAA was cleaned up on a C18 column and a strong cation-exchange, solid-phase extraction column. Determination of BMAA was by liquid chromatography of the fluorescent derivative formed with 9-fluorenylmethyl chloroformate. The method was validated by recovery experiments using spiking levels of 1.0 to 10 microg/g for BGA supplements, 0.5 to 5.0 microg/g for fish, and 0.002 microg/g for bottled water; mean recoveries were in the range of 67 to 89% for BGA supplements and fish, and 59 to 92% for bottled water. Recoveries of BMAA from spiked extracts of hydrolyzed protein from BGA supplements and fish ranged from 66 to 83%. The cleanup developed provides a useful method for surveying foods and supplements for BMAA and protein-bound BMAA.

  11. Analysis of β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) in spirulina-containing supplements by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decade the amino acid beta-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) has come under intense scrutiny. International laboratory and epidemiological research continues to support the hypothesis that environmental exposure to BMAA (e.g., through dietary practices, water supply) can promote the risk of various neurodegenerative diseases. A wide variety of cyanobacteria spp. have previously been reported to produce BMAA, with production levels dependent upon species, strain and environmental conditions. Since spirulina (Arthrospira spp.) is a member of the cyanobacteria phylum frequently consumed via dietary supplements, the presence of BMAA in such products may have public health implications. In the current work, we have analyzed ten spirulina-containing samples for the presence of BMAA; six pure spirulina samples from two separate raw materials suppliers, and four commercially-available multi-ingredient products containing 1.45 g of spirulina per 8.5 g serving. Because of controversy surrounding the measurement of BMAA, we have used two complementary liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) methods: one based on reversed phase LC (RPLC) with derivatization and the other based on hydrophilic interaction LC (HILIC). Potential matrix effects were corrected for by internal standardization using a stable isotope labeled BMAA standard. BMAA was not detected at low limits of detection (80 ng/g dry weight) in any of these product samples. Although these results are reassuring, BMAA analyses should be conducted on a wider sample selection and, perhaps, as part of ongoing spirulina production quality control testing and specifications. PMID:25120905

  12. β-N-methylamino-l-alanine causes neurological and pathological phenotypes mimicking Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS): the first step towards an experimental model for sporadic ALS.

    PubMed

    de Munck, Estefanía; Muñoz-Sáez, Emma; Miguel, Begoña G; Solas, M Teresa; Ojeda, Irene; Martínez, Ana; Gil, Carmen; Arahuetes, Rosa Ma

    2013-09-01

    β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (L-BMAA) is a neurotoxic amino acid that has been related to various neurodegenerative diseases. The aim of this work was to analyze the biotoxicity produced by L-BMAA in vivo in rats, trying to elucidate its physiopathological mechanisms and to search for analogies between the found effects and pathologies like Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS). Our data demonstrated that the neurotoxic effects in vivo were dosage-dependent. For evaluating the state of the animals, a neurological evaluation scale was developed as well as a set of functional tests. Ultrastructural cell analysis of spinal motoneurons has revealed alterations both in endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria. Since GSK3β could play a role in some neuropathological processes, we analyzed the alterations occurring in GSK3β levels in L-BMAA treated rats, we have observed an increase in the active form of GSK3β levels in lumbar spinal cord and motor cerebral cortex. On the other hand, (TAR)-DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43) increased in L-BMAA treated animals. Our results indicated that N-acetylaspartate (NAA) declined in animals treated with L-BMAA, and the ratio of N-acetylaspartate/choline (NAA/Cho), N-acetylaspartate/creatine (NAA/Cr) and N-acetylaspartate/choline+creatine (NAA/Cho+Cr) tended to decrease in lumbar spinal cord and motor cortex. This project offers some encouraging results that could help establishing the progress in the development of an animal model of sporadic ALS and L-BMAA could be a useful tool for this purpose.

  13. β-N-Methylamino-L-alanine exposure alters defense against oxidative stress in aquatic plants Lomariopsis lineata, Fontinalis antipyretica, Riccia fluitans and Taxiphyllum barbieri.

    PubMed

    Contardo-Jara, Valeska; Funke, Marc Sebastian; Peuthert, Anja; Pflugmacher, Stephan

    2013-02-01

    Four different aquatic plants, the Pteridophyte Lomariopsis lineata and the Bryophytes Fontinalis antipyretica, Riccia fluitans and Taxiphyllum barbieri, were tested for their capacity to absorb the neurotoxin β-N-Methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) from water and thus their possible applicability in a "Green Liver System". After exposure to 10 and 100 μg L(-1) BMAA for 1, 3, 7 and 14 days exposure concentration of medium and tissue were analyzed by LC-MS/MS. The amount removed by the plants within only 1 day was equal to the biological degradation of 14 days. Comparing the "BMAA-removal" capacity of the 4 tested aquatic plants R. fluitans, L. lineata and T. barbieri turned out to be most effective in cleaning the water from this cyanobacterial toxin by up to 97% within 14 days. Activity of the antioxidant enzymes peroxidase (POD) and catalase (CAT), as well as biotransformation enzyme glutathione S-transferase (GST) was compared between exposed and control plants to determine possible harmful effects induced by BMAA. Whereas the Bryophytes displayed increased POD activity and subsequent adaptation when exposed to the lower concentration, as well as partly inhibited antioxidant response at the higher applied BMAA concentration, the Pteridophyte L. lineata reacted with increased POD activity during the whole experiment and increased GST activity after longer exposure for 14 days. To give a recommendation of the suitability of an aquatic plant to be used for sustainable phytoremediation of contaminated water, testing of removal capacity of specific contaminants as well as studying general physiological parameters giving hint on survivability in such environments has to be combined.

  14. Phase matching, X-Ray topography, optical and thermal analysis of L-alanine cadmium chloride monohydrate: a nonlinear optical material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna, Anuj; Vijayan, N.; Riscob, B.; Gour, B. S.; Haranath, D.; Philip, J.; Verma, S.; Jayalakshmy, M. S.; Bhagavannarayana, G.; Halder, S. K.

    2014-03-01

    A potential semiorganic nonlinear optical material, L-alanine cadmium chloride monohydrate has been successfully synthesised and single crystals have been grown by slow evaporation solution growth technique at room temperature by using double distilled water as the solvent. The lattice dimensions of the grown crystal have been analysed by adopting powder X-ray diffraction technique and found that it crystallised in monoclinic system with space group C2. The crystalline perfection of the as-grown crystal has been assessed by high resolution X-ray diffraction and X-ray topography techniques and observed that the quality of the grown specimen is reasonably good. Its optical properties were examined by UV-Vis and photoluminescence techniques and found that there is no absorption in the entire visible range. Its functional groups were identified from FT-Raman and observed that there is no incorporation of other impurities during crystallisation. Its relative second harmonic generation efficiency has been tested with different particle size by Kurtz powder technique and found that within the coherence length the title compound is phase matchable. Its various thermal properties like thermal conductivity, specific heat, thermal effusivity, etc. have been evaluated by photopyroelectric technique and compared with other organic and inorganic materials. To confirm its piezoelectric response, its piezoelectric charge coefficient was measured using piezometer and found low. Its optical homogeneity as well as birefringence measurement of the grown specimen has been carried out by interferometric technique. The surface defects of the grown LACCM single crystal were analysed with etching at room temperature using water as an etchant.

  15. Differential effect of beta-N-oxalylamino-L-alanine, the Lathyrus sativus neurotoxin, and (+/-)-alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionate on the excitatory amino acid and taurine levels in the brain of freely moving rats.

    PubMed

    La Bella, V; Piccoli, F

    2000-05-01

    We studied the effect of beta-oxalylamino-L-alanine, a glutamate analog present in Lathyrus sativus seeds and implicated in the etiopathogenesis of neurolathyrism, and (+/-)-alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionate on the extracellular levels of aspartate, glutamate and taurine in the primary motor cortex of freely moving rats. We found that while both neurotoxins increase the level of aspartate and glutamate, only (+/-)-alpha(-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionate is able to modulate the level of taurine. GYKI-52466, a non-competitive non-NMDA antagonist, inhibited beta-oxalylamino-L-alanine-induced increase of aspartate, but not that of glutamate. Conversely, this antagonist proved to be very efficient in blocking the stimulating effect of (+/-)-alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionate on all three amino acids. We suggest that beta-oxalylamino-L-alanine increases the level of glutamate in vivo by a mechanism not connected to its effect on the non-NMDA receptors, which might involve the inhibition of glutamate transport. This would allow the excitatory neurotransmitter to reach a concentration sufficient to stimulate the non-NMDA receptors, which in their turn mediate the specific release of aspartate. Although the role of aspartate as a neurotransmitter is still under discussion, it might indeed amplify the excitotoxic cascade through its action on NMDA receptors. We speculate that this sequence of events might represent an important step in the molecular cascade leading to the appearance of the selective motoneuron degeneration in neurolathyrism.

  16. Antiferromagnetic spin chain behavior and a transition to 3D magnetic order in Cu(D,L-alanine)2: Roles of H-bonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvo, Rafael; Sartoris, Rosana P.; Calvo, Hernán L.; Chagas, Edson F.; Rapp, Raul E.

    2016-05-01

    We study the spin chain behavior, a transition to 3D magnetic order and the magnitudes of the exchange interactions for the metal-amino acid complex Cu(D,L-alanine)2•H2O, a model compound to investigate exchange couplings supported by chemical paths characteristic of biomolecules. Thermal and magnetic data were obtained as a function of temperature (T) and magnetic field (B0). The magnetic contribution to the specific heat, measured between 0.48 and 30 K, displays above 1.8 K a 1D spin-chain behavior that can be fitted with an intrachain antiferromagnetic (AFM) exchange coupling constant 2J0=(-2.12±0.08) cm-1 (defined as ℋex(i,i+1) = -2J0SiṡSi+1), between neighbor coppers at 4.49 Å along chains connected by non-covalent and H-bonds. We also observe a narrow specific heat peak at 0.89 K indicating a phase transition to a 3D magnetically ordered phase. Magnetization curves at fixed T = 2, 4 and 7 K with B0 between 0 and 9 T, and at T between 2 and 300 K with several fixed values of B0 were globally fitted by an intrachain AFM exchange coupling constant 2J0=(-2.27±0.02) cm-1 and g = 2.091±0.005. Interchain interactions J1 between coppers in neighbor chains connected through long chemical paths with total length of 9.51 Å cannot be estimated from magnetization curves. However, observation of the phase transition in the specific heat data allows estimating the range 0.1≤|2J1|≤0.4 cm-1, covering the predictions of various approximations. We analyze the magnitudes of 2J0 and 2J1 in terms of the structure of the corresponding chemical paths. The main contribution in supporting the intrachain interaction is assigned to H-bonds while the interchain interactions are supported by paths containing H-bonds and carboxylate bridges, with the role of the H-bonds being predominant. We compare the obtained intrachain coupling with studies of compounds showing similar behavior and discuss the validity of the approximations allowing to calculate the interchain

  17. ALS-linked SOD1 in glial cells enhances ß-N-Methylamino L-Alanine (BMAA)-induced toxicity in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Islam, Rafique; Kumimoto, Emily L; Bao, Hong; Zhang, Bing

    2012-01-01

    Environmental factors have been implicated in the etiology of a number of neurodegenerative diseases, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). However, the role of environmental agents in ALS remains poorly understood. To this end, we used transgenic fruit flies (Drosophila melanogaster) to explore the interaction between mutant superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) and chemicals such as ß-N-methylamino L-alanine (BMAA), the herbicide agent paraquat, and superoxide species. We expressed ALS-linked human SOD1 (hSOD1A4V, and hSOD1G85R), hSOD1wt as well as the Drosophila native SOD1 (dSOD1) in motoneurons (MNs) or in glial cells alone and simultaneously in both types of cells. We then examined the effect of BMAA (3 mM), paraquat (20 mM), and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, 1%) on the lifespan of SOD1-expressing flies. Our data show that glial expression of mutant and wild type hSOD1s reduces the ability of flies to climb. Further, we show that while all three chemicals significantly shorten the lifespan of flies, mutant SOD1 does not have a significant additional effect on the lifespan of flies fed on paraquat, but further shortens the lifespan of flies fed on H2O2. Finally, we show that BMAA shows a dramatic cell-type specific effect with mutant SOD1. Flies with expression of mutant hSOD1 in MNs survived longer on BMAA compared to control flies. In contrast, BMAA significantly shortened the lifespan of flies expressing mutant hSOD1 in glia. Consistent with a neuronal protection role, flies expressing these mutant hSOD1s in both MNs and glia also lived longer. Hence, our studies reveal a synergistic effect of mutant SOD1 with H2O2 and novel roles for mutant hSOD1s in neurons to reduce BMAA toxicity and in glia to enhance the toxicity of BMAA in flies.

  18. N- Trichloro- and dichloroacetyl amino acids and compounds of amino acids with halogeno acetic acids: 35Cl nuclear quadrupole resonance spectroscopy; crystal structure of N- trichloroacetyl- glycine, - DL-alanine, and - L-alanine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Shi-qi; Kehrer, Armin; Ofial, Armin R.; Weiss, Alarich

    1995-02-01

    The crystal structures of N- trichloroacetyl- glycine ( N- TCA- G), N-trichloroacetyl-dl-alanine ( N-TCA- dl-A ), and N-trichloroacetyl- l-alanine ( N-TCA- l-A ) were determined. In addition, the 35Cl NQR spectra of these N-trichloroacetyl amino acids, of N-trichloroacetyl- l-valine ( N-TCA- l-V ), and of N- dichloroacetyl- glycine and - L-alanine were measured, mostly as a function of temperature. Compounds of glycine and L-alanine with chlorodifluoroacetic acid, of glycine and L-leucine with monochloroacetic acid, of glycine and L-leucine with dichloroacetic acid, and of glycine and L-leucine with trichloroacetic acid were also studied using 35Cl NQR. The structures (in picometres and degrees) were found to be as follows. N- TCA- G: Pna2 1, Z = 8, a = 1641, b = 1002, c = 1018. N-TCA- dl-A : {C2}/{c}, Z = 8, a = 3280, b = 556, c = 1031, β = 96.68. N-TCA- l-A: P1 , Z = 2, a = 967, b = 949, c = 619, α = 74.97, β = 74.20, γ = 61.20. The 35Cl NQR frequencies (ν) were observed in the range 35-41 MHz, and decrease with increasing temperature. Some of the resonances bleach out at a temperature ( Tb) far below the melting temperature; this provides information about the crystal structures at 77 K. No phase transitions were observed by differential thermal analysis between 77 and 295 K. The crystal structures are discussed in connection with the NQR results, and conclusions are drawn about the structures of the compounds for which only 35Cl NQR data are available.

  19. Quantum yields of decomposition and homo-dimerization of solid L-alanine induced by 7.2 eV Vacuum ultraviolet light irradiation: an estimate of the half-life of L-alanine on the surface of space objects.

    PubMed

    Izumi, Yudai; Nakagawa, Kazumichi

    2011-08-01

    One of the leading hypotheses regarding the origin of prebiotic molecules on primitive Earth is that they formed from inorganic molecules in extraterrestrial environments and were delivered by meteorites, space dust and comets. To evaluate the availability of extraterrestrial amino acids, it is necessary to examine their decomposition and oligomerization rates as induced by extraterrestrial energy sources, such as vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) and X-ray photons and high energy particles. This paper reports the quantum yields of decomposition ((8.2 ± 0.7) × 10(-2) photon(-1)) and homo-dimerization ((1.2 ± 0.3) × 10(-3) photon(-1)) and decomposition of the dimer (0.24 ± 0.06 photon(-1)) of solid L-alanine (Ala) induced by VUV light with an energy of 7.2 eV. Using these quantum yields, the half-life of L-Ala on the surface of a space object in the present earth orbit was estimated to be about 52 days, even when only photons with an energy of 7.2 eV emitted from the present Sun were considered. The actual half-life of solid L-Ala on the surface of a space object orbit around the present day Earth would certainly be much shorter than our estimate, because of the added effect of photons and particles of other energies. Thus, we propose that L-Ala needs to be shielded from solar VUV in protected environments, such as the interior of a meteorite, within a time scale of days after synthesis to ensure its arrival on the primitive Earth.

  20. Energetics of the molecular interactions of L-alanine and L-serine with xylitol, D-sorbitol, and D-mannitol in aqueous solutions at 298.15 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezhevoi, I. N.; Badelin, V. G.

    2013-04-01

    Integral enthalpies of dissolution Δsol H m of L-alanine and L-serine are measured via the calorimetry of dissolution in aqueous solutions of xylitol, D-sorbitol, and D-mannitol. Standard enthalpies of dissolution (Δsol H ○) and the transfer (Δtr H ○) of amino acids from water to binary solvent are calculated from the experimental data. Using the McMillan-Mayer theory, enthalpy coefficients of pairwise interactions h xy of amino acids with molecules of polyols are calculated that are negative. The obtained results are discussed within the theory of the prevalence of different types of interactions in mixed solutions and the effect of the structural features of interacting biomolecules on the thermochemical parameters of dissolution of amino acids.

  1. Structure of the O-polysaccharide of Proteus vulgaris O44: a new O-antigen that contains an amide of D-glucuronic acid with L-alanine.

    PubMed

    Toukach, Filip V; Perepelov, Andrei V; Bartodziejska, Beata; Shashkov, Alexander S; Blaszczyk, Aleksandra; Arbatsky, Nikolay P; Rozalski, Antoni; Knirel, Yuriy A

    2003-06-23

    The O-polysaccharide of Proteus vulgaris O44, strain PrK 67/57 was studied by 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy, including 2D COSY, TOCSY, ROESY, H-detected 1H, 13C HMQC, HMQC-TOCSY and HMBC experiments. The polysaccharide was found to contain an amide of D-glucuronic acid with L-alanine [D-GlcA6(L-Ala)], and the following structure of the linear pentasaccharide repeating unit was established: [structure: see text]. The structural data of the O-polysaccharide and the results of serological studies with P. vulgaris O44 O-antiserum showed that the strain studied is unique among Proteus bacteria, which is in agreement with its classification in a separate Proteus serogroup, O44.

  2. Prolonged continuous intravenous infusion of the dipeptide L-alanine- L-glutamine significantly increases plasma glutamine and alanine without elevating brain glutamate in patients with severe traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Low plasma glutamine levels are associated with worse clinical outcome. Intravenous glutamine infusion dose- dependently increases plasma glutamine levels, thereby correcting hypoglutaminemia. Glutamine may be transformed to glutamate which might limit its application at a higher dose in patients with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). To date, the optimal glutamine dose required to normalize plasma glutamine levels without increasing plasma and cerebral glutamate has not yet been defined. Methods Changes in plasma and cerebral glutamine, alanine, and glutamate as well as indirect signs of metabolic impairment reflected by increased intracranial pressure (ICP), lactate, lactate-to-pyruvate ratio, electroencephalogram (EEG) activity were determined before, during, and after continuous intravenous infusion of 0.75 g L-alanine-L-glutamine which was given either for 24 hours (group 1, n = 6) or 5 days (group 2, n = 6) in addition to regular enteral nutrition. Lab values including nitrogen balance, urea and ammonia were determined daily. Results Continuous L-alanine-L-glutamine infusion significantly increased plasma and cerebral glutamine as well as alanine levels, being mostly sustained during the 5 day infusion phase (plasma glutamine: from 295 ± 62 to 500 ± 145 μmol/ l; brain glutamine: from 183 ± 188 to 549 ± 120 μmol/ l; plasma alanine: from 327 ± 91 to 622 ± 182 μmol/ l; brain alanine: from 48 ± 55 to 89 ± 129 μmol/ l; p < 0.05, ANOVA, post hoc Dunn’s test). Plasma glutamate remained unchanged and cerebral glutamate was decreased without any signs of cerebral impairment. Urea and ammonia were significantly increased within normal limits without signs of organ dysfunction (urea: from 2.7 ± 1.6 to 5.5 ± 1.5 mmol/ l; ammonia: from 12 ± 6.3 to 26 ± 8.3 μmol/ l; p < 0.05, ANOVA, post hoc Dunn’s test). Conclusions High dose L-alanine-L-glutamine infusion (0

  3. Elucidation of matrix effects and performance of solid-phase extraction for LC-MS/MS analysis of β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) and 2,4-diaminobutyric acid (DAB) neurotoxins in cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Li, Aifeng; Fan, Hua; Ma, Feifei; McCarron, Pearse; Thomas, Krista; Tang, Xianghai; Quilliam, Michael A

    2012-03-07

    A liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method using hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) was developed for the analysis of neurotoxins β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) and 2,4-diaminobutyric acid (DAB), using multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) scan mode. Oasis-MCX and Strata-X-C polymeric cation-exchange cartridges were used to clean extracts of cyanobacterial cultures, including two strains of Microcystis aeruginosa and one strain of Nostoc sp. The performance of the solid-phase extraction (SPE) cartridges for BMAA and DAB were evaluated using mixed standards and spiked cyanobacterial extracts, which demonstrated recoveries of BMAA and DAB ranging from 66% to 91%. Matrix effects in LC-MS/MS were evaluated, and while there was no effect on BMAA quantitation, suppression of DAB was found. Full scan (Q1) and enhanced product ion (EPI) monitoring showed that the DAB suppression may be due to closely eluting compounds, including lysine, histidine, arginine and three other compounds with [M + H](+) m/z of 88, 164 and 191. The procedures developed allow the sensitive and effective analysis of trace BMAA and DAB levels in cyanobacteria. While DAB was confirmed to be present, no BMAA was found in the cyanobacterial samples tested in the present study.

  4. Improved detection of β-N-methylamino-L-alanine using N-hydroxysuccinimide ester of N-butylnicotinic acid for the localization of BMAA in blue mussels (Mytilus edulis).

    PubMed

    Andrýs, Rudolf; Zurita, Javier; Zguna, Nadezda; Verschueren, Klaas; De Borggraeve, Wim M; Ilag, Leopold L

    2015-05-01

    β-N-Methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is an important non-protein amino acid linked to neurodegenerative diseases, specifically amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Because it can be transferred and bioaccumulated higher up the food chain, it poses significant public health concerns; thus, improved detection methods are of prime importance for the identification and management of these toxins. Here, we report the successful use of N-hydroxysuccinimide ester of N-butylnicotinic acid (C4-NA-NHS) for the efficient separation of BMAA from its isomers and higher sensitivity in detecting BMAA compared to the current method of choice using 6-aminoquinolyl-N-hydroxysuccinimidyl carbamate (AQC) derivatization. Implementation of this efficient method allowed localization of BMAA in the non-visceral tissues of blue mussels, suggesting that more efficient depuration may be required to remove this toxin prior to consumption. This is a crucial method in establishing the absence or presence of the neurotoxic amino acid BMAA in food, environmental or biomedical samples.

  5. Determination of the neurotoxins BMAA (beta-N-methylamino-L-alanine) and DAB (alpha-,gamma-diaminobutyric acid) by LC-MSMS in Dutch urban waters with cyanobacterial blooms.

    PubMed

    Faassen, Elisabeth J; Gillissen, Frits; Zweers, Hans A J; Lürling, Miquel

    2009-01-01

    We aimed to determine concentrations of the neurotoxic amino acids beta-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) and alpha-,gamma-diaminobutyric acid (DAB) in mixed species scum material from Dutch urban waters that suffer from cyanobacterial blooms. BMAA and DAB were analysed in scum material without derivatization by LC-MSMS (liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry) using hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC). Our method showed high selectivity, good recovery of added compounds after sample extraction (86% for BMAA and 85% for DAB), acceptable recovery after sample hydrolysation (70% for BMAA and 56% for DAB) and acceptable precision. BMAA and DAB could be detected at an injected amount of 0.34 pmol. Free BMAA was detected in nine of the 21 sampled locations with a maximum concentration of 42 microg/g DW. Free DAB was detected in two locations with a maximum concentration of 4 microg/g DW. No protein-associated forms were detected. This study is the first to detect underivatized BMAA in cyanobacterial scum material using LC-MSMS. Ubiquity of BMAA in cyanobacteria scums of Dutch urban waters could not be confirmed, where BMAA and DAB concentrations were relatively low; however, co-occurrence with other cyanobacterial neurotoxins might pose a serious health risk including chronic effects from low-level doses.

  6. LC-MS/MS determination of the isomeric neurotoxins BMAA (beta-N-methylamino-L-alanine) and DAB (2,4-diaminobutyric acid) in cyanobacteria and seeds of Cycas revoluta and Lathyrus latifolius.

    PubMed

    Krüger, Thomas; Mönch, Bettina; Oppenhäuser, Steven; Luckas, Bernd

    2010-01-01

    Since diverse taxa of cyanobacteria has been linked to biosynthesis of BMAA, a controversy has arisen about the detection of neurotoxic amino acids in cyanobacteria. In this context, a novel LC-MS/MS method was developed for the unambiguous determination of beta-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) and 2,4-diaminobutyric acid (DAB) in cyanobacteria and selected plant seeds. Both neurotoxic and non-proteinogenic amino acids were analyzed without derivatization considering the total concentration of the free and protein-bound form. The investigation of overall 62 cyanobacterial samples of worldwide origin by application of this method revealed the absence of BMAA, whereas seeds of Cycas revoluta contained 6.96 microg g(-1) of free BMAA. In contrast, the isomer DAB was confirmed in 16 cyanobacterial samples in concentrations of 0.07-0.83 microg g(-1),whereof one sample is distributed as nutritional supplement. In addition, seeds of Lathyrus latifolius contained 4.21 microg g(-1) of free DAB. Limits of detection were for BMAA<1.0 microg g(-1) in the cyanobacterial matrix and<0.14 microg g(-1) in angiosperm seeds. DAB exhibits higher sensitivities of <0.06 microg g(-1) in cyanobacteria and <0.008 microg g(-1) in angiosperm seeds. The highly specific analysis method with increased detection sensitivity eliminates the disadvantages of derivatization-based methods to be discussed.

  7. Quality measures of imaging mass spectrometry aids in revealing long-term striatal protein changes induced by neonatal exposure to the cyanobacterial toxin β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA).

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Oskar; Bergquist, Jonas; Andersson, Malin

    2014-01-01

    Many pathological processes are not directly correlated to dramatic alterations in protein levels. The changes in local concentrations of important proteins in a subset of cells or at specific loci are likely to play a significant role in disease etiologies, but the precise location might be unknown, or the concentration might be too small to be adequately sampled for traditional proteomic techniques. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) is a unique analytical method that combines analysis of multiple molecular species and of their distribution in a single platform. As reproducibility is essential for successful biomarker discovery, it is important to systematically assess data quality in biologically relevant MALDI IMS experiments. In the present study, we applied four simple tools to study the reproducibility for individual sections, within-group variation, and between-group variation of data acquired from brain sections of 21 animals divided into three treatment groups. We also characterized protein changes in distinct regions of the striatum from six-month-old rats treated neonatally (postnatal days 9-10) with the cyanobacterial toxin β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA), which has been implicated in neurodegenerative diseases. The results showed that optimized experimental settings can yield high-quality MALDI IMS data with relatively low variation (14% to 15% coefficient of variance) that allow the characterization of subtle changes in protein expression in various subregions of the brain. This was further exemplified by the dose-dependent reduction of myelin basic protein in the caudate putamen and the nucleus accumbens of adult rats neonatally treated with BMAA (150 and 460 mg/kg). The reduction in myelin basic protein was confirmed through immunohistochemistry and indicates that developmental exposure to BMAA may induce structural effects on axonal growth and/or directly on the proliferation of oligodendrocytes

  8. 2.0A resolution crystal structures of the ternary complexes of human phenylalanine hydroxylase catalytic domain with tetrahydrobiopterin and 3-(2-thienyl)-L-alanine or L-norleucine: substrate specificity and molecular motions related to substrate binding.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Ole Andreas; Stokka, Anne J; Flatmark, Torgeir; Hough, Edward

    2003-10-31

    The crystal structures of the catalytic domain of human phenylalanine hydroxylase (hPheOH) in complex with the physiological cofactor 6(R)-L-erythro-5,6,7,8-tetrahydrobiopterin (BH(4)) and the substrate analogues 3-(2-thienyl)-L-alanine (THA) or L-norleucine (NLE) have been determined at 2.0A resolution. The ternary THA complex confirms a previous 2.5A structure, and the ternary NLE complex shows that similar large conformational changes occur on binding of NLE as those observed for THA. Both structures demonstrate that substrate binding triggers structural changes throughout the entire protomer, including the displacement of Tyr138 from a surface position to a buried position at the active site, with a maximum displacement of 20.7A for its hydroxyl group. Two hinge-bending regions, centred at Leu197 and Asn223, act in consort upon substrate binding to create further large structural changes for parts of the C terminus. Thus, THA/L-Phe binding to the active site is likely to represent the epicentre of the global conformational changes observed in the full-length tetrameric enzyme. The carboxyl and amino groups of THA and NLE are positioned identically in the two structures, supporting the conclusion that these groups are of key importance in substrate binding, thus explaining the broad non-physiological substrate specificity observed for artificially activated forms of the enzyme. However, the specific activity with NLE as the substrate was only about 5% of that with THA, which is explained by the different affinities of binding and different catalytic turnover.

  9. ApoSOD1 lacking dismutase activity neuroprotects motor neurons exposed to beta-methylamino-L-alanine through the Ca2+/Akt/ERK1/2 prosurvival pathway

    PubMed Central

    Petrozziello, Tiziana; Secondo, Agnese; Tedeschi, Valentina; Esposito, Alba; Sisalli, MariaJosè; Scorziello, Antonella; Di Renzo, Gianfranco; Annunziato, Lucio

    2017-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a severe human adult-onset neurodegenerative disease affecting lower and upper motor neurons. In >20% of cases, the familial form of ALS is caused by mutations in the gene encoding Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD1). Interestingly, administration of wild-type SOD1 to SOD1G93A transgenic rats ameliorates motor symptoms through an unknown mechanism. Here we investigated whether the neuroprotective effects of SOD1 are due to the Ca2+-dependent activation of such prosurvival signaling pathway and not to its catalytic activity. To this aim, we also examined the mechanism of neuroprotective action of ApoSOD1, the metal-depleted state of SOD1 that lacks dismutase activity, in differentiated motor neuron-like NSC-34 cells and in primary motor neurons exposed to the cycad neurotoxin beta-methylamino-L-alanine (L-BMAA). Preincubation of ApoSOD1 and SOD1, but not of human recombinant SOD1G93A, prevented cell death in motor neurons exposed to L-BMAA. Moreover, ApoSOD1 elicited ERK1/2 and Akt phosphorylation in motor neurons through an early increase of intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i). Accordingly, inhibition of ERK1/2 by siMEK1 and PD98059 counteracted ApoSOD1- and SOD1-induced neuroprotection. Similarly, transfection of the dominant-negative form of Akt in NSC-34 motor neurons and treatment with the selective PI3K inhibitor LY294002 prevented ApoSOD1- and SOD1-mediated neuroprotective effects in L-BMAA-treated motor neurons. Furthermore, ApoSOD1 and SOD1 prevented the expression of the two markers of L-BMAA-induced ER stress GRP78 and caspase-12. Collectively, our data indicate that ApoSOD1, which is devoid of any catalytic dismutase activity, exerts a neuroprotective effect through an early activation of Ca2+/Akt/ERK1/2 pro-survival pathway that, in turn, prevents ER stress in a neurotoxic model of ALS. PMID:28085149

  10. L-alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase II of rat kidney and liver mitochondria possesses cysteine S-conjugate beta-lyase activity: a contributing factor to the nephrotoxicity/hepatotoxicity of halogenated alkenes?

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Arthur J L; Krasnikov, Boris F; Okuno, Etsuo; Jeitner, Thomas M

    2003-01-01

    Several halogenated alkenes are metabolized in part to cysteine S-conjugates, which are mitochondrial toxicants of kidney and, to a lesser extent, other organs. Toxicity is due to cysteine S-conjugate beta-lyases, which convert the cysteine S-conjugate into pyruvate, ammonia and a reactive sulphur-containing fragment. A section of the human population is exposed to halogenated alkenes. To understand the health effects of such exposure, it is important to identify cysteine S-conjugate beta-lyases that contribute to mitochondrial damage. Mitochondrial aspartate aminotransferase [Cooper, Bruschi, Iriarte and Martinez-Carrion (2002) Biochem. J. 368, 253-261] and mitochondrial branched-chain aminotransferase [Cooper, Bruschi, Conway and Hutson (2003) Biochem. Pharmacol. 65, 181-192] exhibit beta-lyase activity toward S -(1,2-dichlorovinyl)-L-cysteine (the cysteine S-conjugate of trichloroethylene) and S -(1,1,2,2-tetrafluoroethyl)-L-cysteine (the cysteine S-conjugate of tetrafluoroethylene). Turnover leads to eventual inactivation of these enzymes. Here we report that mitochondrial L-alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase II, which, in the rat, is most active in kidney, catalyses cysteine S-conjugate beta-lyase reactions with S -(1,1,2,2-tetrafluoroethyl)-L-cysteine, S -(1,2-dichlorovinyl)-L-cysteine and S -(benzothiazolyl-L-cysteine); turnover leads to inactivation. Previous workers showed that the reactive-sulphur-containing fragment released from S -(1,1,2,2-tetrafluoroethyl)-L-cysteine and S -(1,2-dichlorovinyl)-L-cysteine is toxic by acting as a thioacylating agent - particularly of lysine residues in nearby proteins. Toxicity, however, may also involve 'self-inactivation' of key enzymes. The present findings suggest that alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase II may be an important factor in the well-established targeting of rat kidney mitochondria by toxic halogenated cysteine S-conjugates. Previous reports suggest that alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase II is absent

  11. Crystal structure of the ternary complex of the catalytic domain of human phenylalanine hydroxylase with tetrahydrobiopterin and 3-(2-thienyl)-L-alanine, and its implications for the mechanism of catalysis and substrate activation.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Ole Andreas; Flatmark, Torgeir; Hough, Edward

    2002-07-26

    Phenylalanine hydroxylase catalyzes the stereospecific hydroxylation of L-phenylalanine, the committed step in the degradation of this amino acid. We have solved the crystal structure of the ternary complex (hPheOH-Fe(II).BH(4).THA) of the catalytically active Fe(II) form of a truncated form (DeltaN1-102/DeltaC428-452) of human phenylalanine hydroxylase (hPheOH), using the catalytically active reduced cofactor 6(R)-L-erythro-5,6,7,8-tetrahydrobiopterin (BH(4)) and 3-(2-thienyl)-L-alanine (THA) as a substrate analogue. The analogue is bound in the second coordination sphere of the catalytic iron atom with the thiophene ring stacking against the imidazole group of His285 (average interplanar distance 3.8A) and with a network of hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic contacts. Binding of the analogue to the binary complex hPheOH-Fe(II).BH(4) triggers structural changes throughout the entire molecule, which adopts a slightly more compact structure. The largest change occurs in the loop region comprising residues 131-155, where the maximum r.m.s. displacement (9.6A) is at Tyr138. This loop is refolded, bringing the hydroxyl oxygen atom of Tyr138 18.5A closer to the iron atom and into the active site. The iron geometry is highly distorted square pyramidal, and Glu330 adopts a conformation different from that observed in the hPheOH-Fe(II).BH(4) structure, with bidentate iron coordination. BH(4) binds in the second coordination sphere of the catalytic iron atom, and is displaced 2.6A in the direction of Glu286 and the iron atom, relative to the hPheOH-Fe(II).BH(4) structure, thus changing its hydrogen bonding network. The active-site structure of the ternary complex gives new insight into the substrate specificity of the enzyme, notably the low affinity for L-tyrosine. Furthermore, the structure has implications both for the catalytic mechanism and the molecular basis for the activation of the full-length tetrameric enzyme by its substrate. The large conformational change, moving

  12. Innovative effect of illite on improved microbiological conversion of L-tyrosine to 3,4 dihydroxy phenyl L-alanine (L-DOPA) by Aspergillus oryzae ME2 under acidic reaction conditions.

    PubMed

    Sikander, Ali; Ikram-ul-Haq

    2006-11-01

    In the present investigation, the previous ultraviolet irradiated mutant strain of Aspergillus oryzae UV-7 was further improved in terms of 3,4 dihydroxy phenyl L-alanine (L-DOPA) activity after chemical mutagenesis through 1-methyl 3-nitro 1-nitroso guanidine (MNNG = 250-1500 microg/ml) treatment (0-30 min). Among several mutant variants, the one that produced a larger amount of L-DOPA from L-tyrosine was designated to as ME2 and it was made 2-deoxy-D-glucose-resistant by growing it at various concentrations of 2 dg (0.01-0.025 %, w/v) in Vogel's agar medium. Relatively better production of L-DOPA (> 0.60 mg/ml) was obtained when 2.0% (w/v) glucose was used as a carbon source in the mycelium production medium and the tyrosinase activity increased constitutively (1.08 mg/ml), which resulted in a greater production of L-DOPA. At optimum pH0 (pH 6.0) and reaction time (60 min), more than 65% sugar was utilized for cell mass formation. The maximum conversion of L-tyrosine to L-DOPA (0.428 mg/ml) was achieved 60 min after the biochemical reaction. Mould mycelium was used for microbiological conversion of L-tyrosine to L-DOPA because tyrosinases, beta-carboxylases, and tyrosine hydroxylases are intracellular enzymes. The effect of illite (1.0 x 10(6)-6.0 x 10(6) M) on biochemical conversion of L-tyrosine to L-DOPA by Aspergillus oryzae ME(2 )was also carried out. Best results of L-DOPA biosynthesis were observed when the concentration of illite was 3.5 x 10(-6) M (1.686 mg/ml L-DOPA produced with 1.525 mg/ml consumption of L-tyrosine). It was noted that the addition of illite not only increased enzyme activity but also enhanced the permeability of cell membrane to facilitate the secretion of enzymes into the reaction broth. The comparison of kinetic parameters showed the ability of mutant to yield L-DOPA (i.e., Yp/x 7.360 +/- 0.04 mg/mg). When the culture grown on various illite concentrations was monitored for Qp, Qs, and qp, there was significant enhancement (p < 0

  13. Computation of energy interaction parameters as well as electric dipole intensity parameters for the absorption spectral study of the interaction of Pr(III) with L-phenylalanine, L-glycine, L-alanine and L-aspartic acid in the presence and absence of Ca 2+ in organic solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moaienla, T.; Singh, Th. David; Singh, N. Rajmuhon; Devi, M. Indira

    2009-10-01

    Studying the absorption difference and comparative absorption spectra of the interaction of Pr(III) and Nd(III) with L-phenylalanine, L-glycine, L-alanine and L-aspartic acid in the presence and absence of Ca 2+ in organic solvents, various energy interaction parameters like Slater-Condon ( FK), Racah ( Ek), Lande factor ( ξ4f), nephelauxetic ratio ( β), bonding ( b1/2), percentage-covalency ( δ) have been evaluated applying partial and multiple regression analysis. The values of oscillator strength ( P) and Judd-Ofelt electric dipole intensity parameter Tλ ( λ = 2, 4, 6) for different 4f-4f transitions have been computed. On analysis of the variation of the various energy interaction parameters as well as the changes in the oscillator strength ( P) and Tλ values reveal the mode of binding with different ligands.

  14. Ruthenium-Nitrosyl Complexes with Glycine, l-Alanine, l-Valine, l-Proline, d-Proline, l-Serine, l-Threonine, and l-Tyrosine: Synthesis, X-ray Diffraction Structures, Spectroscopic and Electrochemical Properties, and Antiproliferative Activity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The reactions of [Ru(NO)Cl5]2– with glycine (Gly), l-alanine (l-Ala), l-valine (l-Val), l-proline (l-Pro), d-proline (d-Pro), l-serine (l-Ser), l-threonine (l-Thr), and l-tyrosine (l-Tyr) in n-butanol or n-propanol afforded eight new complexes (1–8) of the general formula [RuCl3(AA–H)(NO)]−, where AA = Gly, l-Ala, l-Val, l-Pro, d-Pro, l-Ser, l-Thr, and l-Tyr, respectively. The compounds were characterized by elemental analysis, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), 1H NMR, UV–visible and ATR IR spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, and X-ray crystallography. X-ray crystallography studies have revealed that in all cases the same isomer type (from three theoretically possible) was isolated, namely mer(Cl),trans(NO,O)-[RuCl3(AA–H)(NO)], as was also recently reported for osmium analogues with Gly, l-Pro, and d-Pro (see Z. Anorg. Allg. Chem.2013, 639, 1590–1597). Compounds 1, 4, 5, and 8 were investigated by ESI-MS with regard to their stability in aqueous solution and reactivity toward sodium ascorbate. In addition, cell culture experiments in three human cancer cell lines, namely, A549 (nonsmall cell lung carcinoma), CH1 (ovarian carcinoma), and SW480 (colon carcinoma), were performed, and the results are discussed in conjunction with the lipophilicity of compounds. PMID:24555845

  15. Chiral effects on helicity studied via the energy landscape of short (D, L)-alanine peptides.

    PubMed

    Neelamraju, Sridhar; Oakley, Mark T; Johnston, Roy L

    2015-10-28

    The homochirality of natural amino acids facilitates the formation of regular secondary structures such as α-helices and β-sheets. Here, we study the relationship between chirality and backbone structure for the example of hexa-alanine. The most stable stereoisomers are identified through global optimisation. Further, the energy landscape, a database of connected low-energy local minima and transition points, is constructed for various neutral and zwitterionic stereoisomers of hexa-alanine. Three order parameters for partial helicity are applied and metric disconnectivity graphs are presented with partial helicity as a metric. We also apply the Zimm-Bragg model to derive average partial helicities for Ace-(L-Ala)6-NHMe, Ace-(D-Ala-L-Ala)3-NHMe, and Ace-(L-Ala)3-(D-Ala)3-NHMe from the database of local minima and compare with previous studies.

  16. β-N-Methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) uptake by the aquatic macrophyte Ceratophyllum demersum.

    PubMed

    Esterhuizen, M; Pflugmacher, S; Downing, T G

    2011-01-01

    Free-living freshwater cyanobacteria contain BMAA in both free cellular and protein-associated forms. Free BMAA released on bloom collapse or during cellular turnover creates a potential source of the non-proteinogenic amino acid for bioaccumulation and biomagnification in aquatic ecosystems. Uptake of free amino acids is well documented in macrophytes and the potential for aquatic macrophytes to bioaccumulate BMAA therefore poses a potential threat where such macrophytes constitute a food source in an ecosystem. BMAA uptake and accumulation by the aquatic macrophyte Ceratophyllum demersum was therefore investigated. Rapid uptake of significant amounts of BMAA was observed in C. demersum. Both free and protein-associated BMAA were observed with protein association following accumulation of free BMAA. The protein association suggests potential biomaccumulation by aquatic macrophytes and offers a possibility of phytoremediation for BMAA removal.

  17. Excitotoxic potential of the cyanotoxin β-methyl-amino-L-alanine (BMAA) in primary human neurons.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Alexander S; Gehringer, Michelle M; Braidy, Nady; Guillemin, Gilles J; Welch, Jeffrey H; Neilan, Brett A

    2012-11-01

    The toxicity of the cyanobacterial modified amino acid, BMAA, has been described in rat, mouse and leech neurons. Particular emphasis has been placed on the potential ability of BMAA to induce neuronal damage via excitotoxic mechanisms. Here we present data indicating that the effects observed on lower organisms are also evident in a human model. Our data indicates that BMAA induces increased intracellular Ca²⁺ influx, DNA damage, mitochondrial activity, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release and generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The amelioration of LDH release in the presence of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist MK801 indicates that the neurotoxic effects of BMAA are mediated via NMDA receptor activation. Additionally, we have shown that BMAA induces the expression of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and caspase-3 indicating that it can stimulate apoptosis in human neurons, presumably via activation of NMDA receptors.

  18. Analysis of β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (L-BMAA) neurotoxicity in rat cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Sáez, Emma; de Munck García, Estefanía; Arahuetes Portero, Rosa Ma; Martínez, Ana; Solas Alados, Ma Teresa; Miguel, Begoña Gómez

    2015-05-01

    Due to its structural similarity to glutamate, L-BMAA could be a trigger for neurodegenerative disorders caused by changes in the intracellular medium, such as increased oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, impaired synthesis and protein degradation and the imbalance of some enzymes. It is also important to note that according to some published studies, L-BMAA will be incorporated into proteins, causing the alteration of protein homeostasis. Neuronal cells are particularly prone to suffer damage in protein folding and protein accumulation because they have not performed cellular division. In this work, we will analyse the cerebellum impairment triggered by L-BMAA in treated rats. The cerebellum is one of the most important subcortical motor centres and ensures that movements are performed with spatial and temporal precision. Cerebellum damage caused by L-BMAA can contribute to motor impairment. To characterize this neurodegenerative pathology, we first carried out ultrastructure analysis in Purkinje cells showing altered mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and Golgi apparatus (GA). We then performed biochemical assays of GSK3 and TDP-43 in cerebellum, obtaining an increase of both biomarkers with L-BMAA treatment and, finally, performed autophagy studies that revealed a higher level of these processes after treatment. This work provides evidence of cerebellar damage in rats after treatment with L-BMAA. Three months after treatment, affected rats cannot restore the normal functions of the cerebellum regarding motor coordination and postural control.

  19. Effects of L-Alanine and Inosine Germinants on the Elasticity of Bacillus anthracis Spores

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-22

    several Bacillus species, such as B. subtilis, B. cereus , B. anthracis, andB. atrophaeus.6,8,12 Inosine is a purine ribonucleoside that has been shown to...Germinants on the Elasticity of Bacillus anthracis Spores Paola A. Pinzon-Arango,† Ramanathan Nagarajan,‡ and Terri A. Camesano*,† †Department of Chemical...surface of dormant Bacillus anthracis spores consists of a multilayer of protein coats and a thick peptidoglycan layer that allow the cells to resist

  20. Growth, structural, spectral, mechanical and dielectric characterization of RbCl-doped L-alanine hydrogen chloride monohydrate single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucia Rose, A. S. J.; Selvarajan, P.; Perumal, S.

    2011-02-01

    Pure (undoped) and RbCl-doped LAHC single crystals were grown successfully by the solution method with the slow evaporation technique at room temperature. The grown crystals were colourless and transparent. The solubility of the grown samples were found out at various temperatures. The lattice parameters of the grown crystals were determined by the single crystal X-ray diffraction technique and the diffracting planes were indentified by recording the powder X-ray diffraction pattern. UV-visible transmittance studies were carried out for the grown samples. Chemical analysis and atomic absorption studies indicate the presence of rubidium in the doped LAHC crystals. Nonlinear optical studies reveal that the SHG efficiency increases when the LAHC crystal is doped with rubidium chloride (RbCl). From microhardness studies, it is observed that the RbCl-doped LAHC crystal is harder than the pure sample. It is observed that the dielectric properties of the LAHC crystal are altered when it is doped with rubidium chloride.

  1. Recombinant Expression of a Genome-encoded N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine Amidase that Synergistically Lyses Listeria monocytogenes Biofilms with a Protease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Listeria monocytogenes plays a significant role in human food-borne disease caused by eating food contaminated with the bacterium and although incidence is low it is a leading cause of life-threatening, bacterial food-borne disease in humans. L. monocytogenes serotypes 1/2a and 4b can form mixed-cu...

  2. Validation of the analytical procedure for the determination of the neurotoxin β-N-methylamino-L-alanine in complex environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Combes, Audrey; El Abdellaoui, Saïda; Sarazin, Cédric; Vial, Jérome; Mejean, Annick; Ploux, Olivier; Pichon, Valérie

    2013-04-10

    The neurotoxic l-2-amino-3-methylaminopropionic acid (BMAA) was hypothesized to be involved in sporadic cases of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Studies highlighting a possible implication of environmental factors in the incidence of sporadic ALS have become more numerous over recent years. Over the past years, the most widely used method for quantifying BMAA was based on the derivatization of this polar and basic molecule with a fluorescent compound (6-aminoquinolonyl-N-hydroxysuccinimidyl, 6-AQC). This derivatization allows the retention of the conjugate by reversed-phase liquid chromatography and its detection by fluorescence. Nevertheless, recent findings have shown that this method applied to complex samples may cause false positive responses. We therefore developed an analytical procedure for the determination of underivatized BMAA at trace level in complex environmental matrices (river water, cyanobacteria and biofilm) using solid-phase extraction (SPE) based on mixed mode sorbent to concentrate and clean up real samples. Analyzes were performed by hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC) coupled to electrospray ionization and tandem mass spectrometry used in multiple reaction monitoring scan mode. Analytical procedures were validated for the different natural samples using the total error approach. BMAA can be quantified by these reliable and highly selective analytical methods in a range of only a few ng mL(-1) in river water and a few ng mg(-1) dry weight in cyanobacteria and biofilm matrices.

  3. Expression of a Clostridium perfringens genome-encoded putative N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase as a potential antimicrobial to control the bacterium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clostridium perfringens is a Gram-positive, spore-forming anaerobic bacterium that plays a substantial role in non-foodborne human, animal and avian diseases as well as human foodborne disease. Previously discovered C. perfringens bacteriophage lytic enzyme amino acid sequences were utilized to iden...

  4. Excess of L-alanine in amino acids synthesized in a plasma torch generated by a hypervelocity meteorite impact reproduced in the laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Managadze, George G.; Engel, Michael H.; Getty, Stephanie; Wurz, Peter; Brinckerhoff, William B.; Shokolov, Anatoly G.; Sholin, Gennady V.; Terent'ev, Sergey A.; Chumikov, Alexander E.; Skalkin, Alexander S.; Blank, Vladimir D.; Prokhorov, Vyacheslav M.; Managadze, Nina G.; Luchnikov, Konstantin A.

    2016-10-01

    We present a laboratory reproduction of hypervelocity impacts of a carbon containing meteorite on a mineral substance representative of planetary surfaces. The physical conditions of the resulting impact plasma torch provide favorable conditions for abiogenic synthesis of protein amino acids: We identified glycine and alanine, and in smaller quantities serine, in the produced material. Moreover, we observe breaking of alanine mirror symmetry with L excess, which coincides with the bioorganic world. Therefore the selection of L-amino acids for the formation of proteins for living matter could have been the result from plasma processes occurring during the impact meteorites on the surface. This indicates that the plasma torch from meteorite impacts could play an important role in the formation of biomolecular homochirality. Thus, meteorite impacts possibly were the initial stage of this process and promoted conditions for the emergence of a living matter.

  5. Failure to Detect the Neurotoxin Beta-n-methylamino-l-alanine in Samples Collected during an Avian Vacuolar Myelinopathy (AVM) Epornitic in J. Strom Thurmond Lake

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-01

    may be present in the critical habitat of another highly endangered raptor, the Florida snail kite, Rhostrahmus socialibilis (Robertson 2012). This...from Lathyrus latifolius. Science 134: 188–190. Robertson, S. R. Potential threats of the exotic apple snail (Pomaceae insularum) to aquatic

  6. Structural analysis and mutant growth properties reveal distinctive enzymatic and cellular roles for the three major L-alanine transaminases of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Peña-Soler, Esther; Fernandez, Francisco J; López-Estepa, Miguel; Garces, Fernando; Richardson, Andrew J; Quintana, Juan F; Rudd, Kenneth E; Coll, Miquel; Vega, M Cristina

    2014-01-01

    In order to maintain proper cellular function, the metabolism of the bacterial microbiota presents several mechanisms oriented to keep a correctly balanced amino acid pool. Central components of these mechanisms are enzymes with alanine transaminase activity, pyridoxal 5'-phosphate-dependent enzymes that interconvert alanine and pyruvate, thereby allowing the precise control of alanine and glutamate concentrations, two of the most abundant amino acids in the cellular amino acid pool. Here we report the 2.11-Å crystal structure of full-length AlaA from the model organism Escherichia coli, a major bacterial alanine aminotransferase, and compare its overall structure and active site composition with detailed atomic models of two other bacterial enzymes capable of catalyzing this reaction in vivo, AlaC and valine-pyruvate aminotransferase (AvtA). Apart from a narrow entry channel to the active site, a feature of this new crystal structure is the role of an active site loop that closes in upon binding of substrate-mimicking molecules, and which has only been previously reported in a plant enzyme. Comparison of the available structures indicates that beyond superficial differences, alanine aminotransferases of diverse phylogenetic origins share a universal reaction mechanism that depends on an array of highly conserved amino acid residues and is similarly regulated by various unrelated motifs. Despite this unifying mechanism and regulation, growth competition experiments demonstrate that AlaA, AlaC and AvtA are not freely exchangeable in vivo, suggesting that their functional repertoire is not completely redundant thus providing an explanation for their independent evolutionary conservation.

  7. Structure-based design of a new series of D-glutamic acid based inhibitors of bacterial UDP-N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine:D-glutamate ligase (MurD).

    PubMed

    Tomasić, Tihomir; Zidar, Nace; Sink, Roman; Kovac, Andreja; Blanot, Didier; Contreras-Martel, Carlos; Dessen, Andréa; Müller-Premru, Manica; Zega, Anamarija; Gobec, Stanislav; Kikelj, Danijel; Masic, Lucija Peterlin

    2011-07-14

    MurD ligase is one of the key enzymes participating in the intracellular steps of peptidoglycan biosynthesis and constitutes a viable target in the search for novel antibacterial drugs to combat bacterial drug-resistance. We have designed, synthesized, and evaluated a new series of D-glutamic acid-based Escherichia coli MurD inhibitors incorporating the 5-benzylidenethiazolidin-4-one scaffold. The crystal structure of 16 in the MurD active site has provided a good starting point for the design of structurally optimized inhibitors 73-75 endowed with improved MurD inhibitory potency (IC(50) between 3 and 7 μM). Inhibitors 74 and 75 showed weak activity against Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus faecalis. Compounds 73-75, with IC(50) values in the low micromolar range, represent the most potent D-Glu-based MurD inhibitors reported to date.

  8. Modified triglycine sulphate (TGS) single crystals for pyroelectric infrared detector applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banan, M.; Lal, R. B.; Batra, Ashok

    1992-01-01

    Effects of caesium and cerium, L-alanine, and caesium plus L-alanine impurities on ferroelectric and pyroelectric properties of TGS crystals are investigated. Dielectric constant and loss, pyroelectric coefficient, spontaneous polarization, and coercive field measurements of these modified crystals, as a function of temperature, are reported. Caesium and cerium did not affect the electrical properties of TGS crystals significantly, whereas L-alanine- and, especially, Cs + L-alanine-doped TGS crystals exhibited promising improvements in pyroelectric properties, up to 48 C, as compared to pure TGS crystals.

  9. Substrate Specificity of the Aspartate:Alanine Antiporter (AspT) of Tetragenococcus halophilus in Reconstituted Liposomes*

    PubMed Central

    Sasahara, Ayako; Nanatani, Kei; Enomoto, Masaru; Kuwahara, Shigefumi; Abe, Keietsu

    2011-01-01

    The aspartate:alanine antiporter (AspT) of the lactic acid bacterium Tetragenococcus halophilus is a member of the aspartate:alanine exchanger (AAEx) transporter family. T. halophilus AspT catalyzes the electrogenic exchange of l-aspartate1− with l-alanine0. Although physiological functions of AspT were well studied, l-aspartate1−:l-alanine0 antiport mechanisms are still unsolved. Here we report that the binding sites of l-aspartate and l-alanine are independently present in AspT by means of the kinetic studies. We purified His6-tagged T. halophilus AspT and characterized its kinetic properties when reconstituted in liposomes (Km = 0.35 ± 0.03 mm for l-aspartate, Km = 0.098 ± 0 mm for d-aspartate, Km = 26 ± 2 mm for l-alanine, Km = 3.3 ± 0.2 mm for d-alanine). Competitive inhibition by various amino acids of l-aspartate or l-alanine in self-exchange reactions revealed that l-cysteine selectively inhibited l-aspartate self-exchange but only weakly inhibited l-alanine self-exchange. Additionally, l-serine selectively inhibited l-alanine self-exchange but barely inhibited l-aspartate self-exchange. The aspartate analogs l-cysteine sulfinic acid, l-cysteic acid, and d-cysteic acid competitively and strongly inhibited l-aspartate self-exchange compared with l-alanine self-exchange. Taken together, these kinetic data suggest that the putative binding sites of l-aspartate and l-alanine are independently located in the substrate translocation pathway of AspT. PMID:21719707

  10. Substrate specificity of the aspartate:alanine antiporter (AspT) of Tetragenococcus halophilus in reconstituted liposomes.

    PubMed

    Sasahara, Ayako; Nanatani, Kei; Enomoto, Masaru; Kuwahara, Shigefumi; Abe, Keietsu

    2011-08-19

    The aspartate:alanine antiporter (AspT) of the lactic acid bacterium Tetragenococcus halophilus is a member of the aspartate:alanine exchanger (AAEx) transporter family. T. halophilus AspT catalyzes the electrogenic exchange of L-aspartate(1-) with L-alanine(0). Although physiological functions of AspT were well studied, L-aspartate(1-):L-alanine(0) antiport mechanisms are still unsolved. Here we report that the binding sites of L-aspartate and L-alanine are independently present in AspT by means of the kinetic studies. We purified His(6)-tagged T. halophilus AspT and characterized its kinetic properties when reconstituted in liposomes (K(m) = 0.35 ± 0.03 mm for L-aspartate, K(m) = 0.098 ± 0 mm for D-aspartate, K(m) = 26 ± 2 mm for L-alanine, K(m) = 3.3 ± 0.2 mm for D-alanine). Competitive inhibition by various amino acids of L-aspartate or L-alanine in self-exchange reactions revealed that L-cysteine selectively inhibited L-aspartate self-exchange but only weakly inhibited L-alanine self-exchange. Additionally, L-serine selectively inhibited L-alanine self-exchange but barely inhibited L-aspartate self-exchange. The aspartate analogs L-cysteine sulfinic acid, L-cysteic acid, and D-cysteic acid competitively and strongly inhibited L-aspartate self-exchange compared with L-alanine self-exchange. Taken together, these kinetic data suggest that the putative binding sites of L-aspartate and L-alanine are independently located in the substrate translocation pathway of AspT.

  11. Man-Materiel Systems. Questionnaire and Interview Design (Subjective Testing Techniques). Volume I

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-07-25

    paragraph H-10, appendix H). o 4-19 ’*~ mS ’ ■ » I TECOM Pan 602-1. Vol I (5) Method» of Ranking. There are several methods of wording...Background of participants 3-4 Basic multipla choica quastion 4-12 Bias r • • • 5-3. 9-2. Laading quaations 5-3. L adad words 5-4...quaationnaira daalgn 2-1 Mathoda of ranking 4-20 Mlddla catagorlaa 4-9. 4-31 Multipla cholca quaatlona 4-12 Basic aultipla cholca 4-12 Exaaplaa

  12. Alanine increases blood pressure during hypotension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conlay, L. A.; Maher, T. J.; Wurtman, R. J.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of L-alanine administration on blood pressure (BP) during haemorrhagic shock was investigated using anesthetized rats whose left carotid arteries were cannulated for BP measurement, blood removal, and drug administration. It was found that L-alanine, in doses of 10, 25, 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg, increased the systolic BP of hypotensive rats by 38 to 80 percent (while 100 mg/kg pyruvate increased BP by only 9.4 mmhg, not significantly different from saline). The results suggest that L-alanine might influence cardiovascular function.

  13. Synthesis of isotopically labeled versions of L-MTP-PE (mifamurtide) and MDP.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuexian; Plesescu, Mihaela; Prakash, Shimoga R

    2013-01-01

    L-MTP-PE (1), an immunomodulator and its metabolite MDP (4) were synthesized from labeled l-alanine and its protected derivative, respectively. The key intermediate product for the labeled L-MTP-PE synthesis, [(13) C3 ,D4 ]-alanyl-cephalin (2A), was synthesized from [(13) C3 ,D4 ]-l-alanine (3A) in three steps. The key intermediate product for labeled MDP synthesis, amine 11, was prepared from [(13) C3 ,(15) N]-Boc-l-alanine (5A) in two steps.

  14. Diode Dynamics, Beam Generation and Transport and Plasma Erosion Opening Switch Development.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-05-17

    provide standoff protecti.on for the ion diode~s) b) allow close packing of multipla generators saround a coamion target :IiaT.Lr and c) facili- tate tim...beam and plasma parame:ers in w1hich the very intense ion bea= ms behave like weak beams in prescribed electromagnetic fields. As a result, concepts of

  15. Narrative Job Descriptions as Potential Sources of Job Analysis Ratings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-05-05

    for comparison purposes. Vnlidity Estimates Toble 2 presents the results of the multipla regression analyses between the PAQ job dimensions and the...comprised of individuals in roles that involved "Blue- collar Supervision." The profile for the former group was d fined primarily in te.• ms of higher than

  16. The Impact of Army and Family Factors on Individual Readiness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-08-01

    the hierarchical multipla regression analysis. Each of the nine sets of variables that entered int, the regression equation increased the R2...year or rmon of gradoat. credit. but no graduate degree WI a. To develop matunty. ditscipline o: 21’I 0Z Master’s dere (MA. MS . MFA) M MPesorisibiliry

  17. Software Process Development and Enactment: Concepts and Definitions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-09-01

    desirable to simultaneously plan multipla Instantlations to reduce the amount of planning and improve the efficiency of Instantlation, Evolution: The act of...refinement of the process definition before the responsibility to enact is transferred. For exampe, Mr. Jones may delegate his approval authority to Ms . Doe

  18. Fuel Character Effects on Current, High Pressure Ratio, Can-Type Turbine Combustion Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-04-01

    out (’ LCF low cycle fatigue TLR fuel lower heating value, MJ/kg Mach number MS Gulf mineral seal oil, fuel additive NO oxides of nitrogen K P...fuel properties are presented in Subsections C (single variable) and D ( multipla variables). Projections of combustor and turtine hardware life based

  19. An Analysis of the Computer System Chargeback Concept in the Naval Industrial Fund Environment.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-06-01

    resource is a single, s-raightforward economic cn, in contrast to multipla , pa-rtially noneconomic goals for other staff ac-ivities. Howev-_, this...at -the- same ti- ms the NIF act ivit-y and its parent command are preparing a II budget (which conta-r~s the anticipated work to be performed for

  20. National Dam Safety Program. Lake Thunderhead Dam (MO 10007), Grand - Chariton Basin, Putnam County, Missouri. Phase I Inspection Report.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-05-01

    1965 by Howard Construction Co., Sedalia, Mo. According to Ms . Quigley, Unionville City Clerk, this project was financed by a loan from the U.S.D.A...to accomplish the d;I=ernz rcquired it will be neoessary to use a multipla sta4e well point instaflsto=. where separate rows of well "oints are drien

  1. An Experimental Brain Missile Wound: Ascertaining Pathophysiology and Evaluating Treatments to Lower Mortality and Morbidity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-06-04

    a soldier might get a brain wound as well as another wound (eg femoral artery) leading to significant blood loss. Multipla fragment wounds are...cerebral circulation in health and disease. Circ Res 34:749-760, 1974 91. Lassen NA, Christensen MS : Physiology of cerebral blood flow. Br J Anesthesiol 48

  2. Regulation of the ald gene encoding alanine dehydrogenase by AldR in Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Ji-A; Baek, Eun-Young; Kim, Si Wouk; Choi, Jong-Soon; Oh, Jeong-Il

    2013-08-01

    The regulatory gene aldR was identified 95 bp upstream of the ald gene encoding L-alanine dehydrogenase in Mycobacterium smegmatis. The AldR protein shows sequence similarity to the regulatory proteins of the Lrp/AsnC family. Using an aldR deletion mutant, we demonstrated that AldR serves as both activator and repressor for the regulation of ald gene expression, depending on the presence or absence of L-alanine. The purified AldR protein exists as a homodimer in the absence of L-alanine, while it adopts the quaternary structure of a homohexamer in the presence of L-alanine. The binding affinity of AldR for the ald control region was shown to be increased significantly by L-alanine. Two AldR binding sites (O1 and O2) with the consensus sequence GA-N₂-ATC-N₂-TC and one putative AldR binding site with the sequence GA-N₂-GTT-N₂-TC were identified upstream of the ald gene. Alanine and cysteine were demonstrated to be the effector molecules directly involved in the induction of ald expression. The cellular level of L-alanine was shown to be increased in M. smegmatis cells grown under hypoxic conditions, and the hypoxic induction of ald expression appears to be mediated by AldR, which senses the intracellular level of alanine.

  3. MultipLa--a tool for the combined overall estimation of various types of manual handling tasks.

    PubMed

    Karlheinz, Schaub; Max, Bierwirth; Michaela, Kugler; Ralph, Bruder

    2012-01-01

    In the 1990ies the German Federal Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (FIOSH) published "Key Indicator Methods" (KIM) for the evaluation of manual material handling tasks. These methods served as a national German implementation of the EU Manual Handling Directive (90/269/EEC). These methods allow the evaluation of individual handling tasks like lifting or pushing. KIM tools do not allow evaluating complex handling tasks like a combined lifting and pushing task. With respect to the needs at shop floor level (e.g. logistics), MultipLa tries to bridge that gap by means of an EXCEL based worksheet using the KIM philosophy. In the past several algorithms for a risk assessment had been developed. At the moment MultipLa is in a test phase at several automotive OEMs.

  4. Involvement of alanine racemase in germination of Bacillus cereus spores lacking an intact exosporium.

    PubMed

    Venir, Elena; Del Torre, Manuela; Cunsolo, Vincenzo; Saletti, Rosaria; Musetti, Rita; Stecchini, Mara Lucia

    2014-02-01

    The L-alanine mediated germination of food isolated Bacillus cereus DSA 1 spores, which lacked an intact exosporium, increased in the presence of D-cycloserine (DCS), which is an alanine racemase (Alr) inhibitor, reflecting the activity of the Alr enzyme, capable of converting L-alanine to the germination inhibitor D-alanine. Proteomic analysis of the alkaline extracts of the spore proteins, which include exosporium and coat proteins, confirmed that Alr was present in the B. cereus DSA 1 spores and matched to that encoded by B. cereus ATCC 14579, whose spore germination was strongly affected by the block of conversion of L- to D-alanine. Unlike ATCC 14579 spores, L-alanine germination of B. cereus DSA 1 spores was not affected by the preincubation with DCS, suggesting a lack of restriction in the reactant accessibility.

  5. Chemical shift tensor determination using magnetically oriented microcrystal array (MOMA): 13C solid-state CP NMR without MAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusumi, R.; Kimura, F.; Song, G.; Kimura, T.

    2012-10-01

    Chemical shift tensors for the carboxyl and methyl carbons of L-alanine crystals were determined using a magnetically oriented microcrystal array (MOMA) prepared from a microcrystalline powder sample of L-alanine. A MOMA is a single-crystal-like composite in which microcrystals are aligned three-dimensionally in a matrix resin. The single-crystal rotation method was applied to the MOMA to determine the principal values and axes of the chemical shift tensors. The result showed good agreement with the literature data for the single crystal of L-alanine. This demonstrates that the present technique is a powerful tool for determining the chemical shift tensor of a crystal from a microcrystal powder sample.

  6. Department of the Navy Supporting Data for Fiscal Year 1984 Budget Estimates Descriptive Summaries Submitted to Congress January 1983. Research, Development, Test and Evaluation, Navy. Book 2. Tactical Programs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-01

    EQUIPMENT ----------------------------------------------------------------------------- 9-.7 6 451 O N C O M M UN IC A T IO N S SY S T E MS ...34masage processinx, Anti-Jam performance and Time Division Multipla Access backward compatibility consistent with both stated requirements ed analytic...Research Facility, Monterey, CA; and Naval Ocean Research and Development Activity, Ray St. Louis, MS . CONTRACTORS: None. OTHERS: Applied Research

  7. Improving the Selection, Classification, and Utilization of Army Enlisted Personnel. Annual Report, 1984 Fiscal Year

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-07-01

    involved, and encouragement to all project staff, the project would not exist MS " today. ■’*">■’ •/ v 2~; With the conclusion of the second...repair services are available failing to get equipment to them to get it fixed, or unnecessarily delaying getting it into repair. 191 S&& Ms ...criteria. Unfortunately, these inter- ccrrelations cannot be measured without observing multipla criteria for single individuals. However, because the

  8. The Shock and Vibration Digest. Volume 14, Number 8

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-08-01

    MS 38677, J. Energy Resources Tech., Trans. ASME, IM (1). PP 47-52 (Mar 1982) 4 figs, 7 refs Key Words: Offshore structures, Wave forces, Submerged...hipt ara pratantad. A ttatittical mathod of multipla linear regret- tion wet utad for data prooattlng. Calculated and meatured ratuitt ware...Waterways Experiment Station, Vicksburg, MS , Rept. No. WES-MP-C-77-11-3, 36 pp (Nov 1981) AD-A109 814 Key Wordi: Concrete», Nondettructlve tatti

  9. Better Management of Private Pension Plan Data Can Reduce Costs and Improve ERISA Administration.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-10-19

    benefit payable to any partlcioe nt to be o rsd" . . U.Sl. M091 I’M"W~IS Ms 31-0nosarl is51632 67 APPENDIX V APPENDIX V 5500-K Annual Return/Report of...c) 0 Multiemployer plan (d) [] Multipla -emplayer-collectively-bargained plan (e) E] Multiple-employer plan (other) 5 (a) (I) Mam of plan 10

  10. Aircraft Crash Survival Design Guide. Volume 1. Design Criteria and Checklists

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-12-01

    50th 99 percentile dummy (Reference 36) it, Test 1 and a clad 95th-percentile dummy in Test 2. Dynamic testing of multipla -occupant seats shnuld be...Idiyn nir-rf l ATFl rAr T nflrTn Rubbins, D. H.., et al, uEVELUOI’IIE I Ali,’u TEa , I ING ur ilIURlMIU JLLMI nLJI IN, SYST[ MS , Highway Safety Research

  11. The Department of Defense Critical Technologies Plan for the Committees on Armed Services United States Congress

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-05-01

    suppression algorithms Passive * Demonstrate imaging IR * Demonstrate dual band 150 seekers seekers for multipla missions seekers supporting ATR...Program (TrCP) also provides exchange mechi i:, ms through a number of activities in conventional weapons. All of the Services have a number of data and...of 0 Prototyp garner"t and and blolig" aWM degradation enz ms to cloh fibeta and equipment finishos whkih equipmnent surfacesw% c~atiy degrade agenits

  12. Effects of Competition and Mode of Fire on Physiological Responses, Psychological Stress Reactions, and Shooting Performance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-07-01

    during baseline day and record-fire day. 113 Table S Analysis of Variance of Mean Heart Rates Source $$ df MS F p Total 3089.334 23 Between 1204.334 11...Sensation aaakin92 Resond Phe a•t•M1 level .A ArLouna£l. Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum. Zuckerman, M., & Lubin, B. (1965). Manal Igt£rthe Multipla Affect Adat

  13. Nuclear and Electron Relaxation. Chianti Workshop on Magnetic Resonance (3rd) Held in San Miniato, Pisa, Italy on May 28-June 2, 1989

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-06-01

    laboratory. The measured T1 values span a wide range, from less than a ms to minutes (even days at liquid He temperature). Even at room temperature, T1...intervallo di temperatura compreso da 200 a 3509K, usando le potenzialitd delle nuove metodologie spettroscopiche di multipla irradiazione a risposta...long (5-15 ms ). This is possibly to be ascribed to a long electronic relaxation rate which is unexpected in metal clusters. Indeed, iron (II) is

  14. Nonlinear Analysis of Frame Structures Subjected to Blast Overpressures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-05-01

    Ms . Marie Mitchell of Aumann & Whitney for technical typing and to Messrs. V. Kald, A. Maggio and F. Wendling for preparing the art- work contained in...commnonly referred to as " ms points"). Consequently, the model has a limited number of the strctue’snormal modes of vibration. The nature of these...exterior members, as shown in Figure 14b. In general, multipla intermediate mass points are utilized as a more accurate representation of the local

  15. Role of the gerI Operon of Bacillus cereus 569 in the Response of Spores to Germinants

    PubMed Central

    Clements, Mark O.; Moir, Anne

    1998-01-01

    Bacillus cereus 569 (ATCC 10876) germinates in response to inosine or to l-alanine, but the most rapid germination response is elicited by a combination of these germinants. Mutants defective in their germination response to either inosine or to l-alanine were isolated after Tn917-LTV1 mutagenesis and enrichment procedures; one class of mutant could not germinate in response to inosine as a sole germinant but still germinated in response to l-alanine, although at a reduced rate; another mutant germinated normally in response to inosine but was slowed in its germination response to l-alanine. These mutants demonstrated that at least two signal response pathways are involved in the triggering of germination. Stimulation of germination in l-alanine by limiting concentrations of inosine and stimulation of germination in inosine by low concentrations of l-alanine were still detectable in these mutants, suggesting that such stimulation is not dependent on complete functionality of both these germination loci. Two transposon insertions that affected inosine germination were found to be located 2.2 kb apart on the chromosome. This region was cloned and sequenced, revealing an operon of three open reading frames homologous to those in the gerA and related operons of Bacillus subtilis. The individual genes of this gerI operon have been named gerIA, gerIB, and gerIC. The GerIA protein is predicted to possess an unusually long, charged, N-terminal domain containing nine tandem copies of a 13-amino-acid glutamine- and serine-rich sequence. PMID:9852021

  16. Glutamine and alanine-induced differential expression of intracellular IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α in LPS-stimulated monocytes in human whole-blood.

    PubMed

    Raspé, C; Czeslick, E; Weimann, A; Schinke, C; Leimert, A; Kellner, P; Simm, A; Bucher, M; Sablotzki, A

    2013-04-01

    To investigate the effects of the commonly-used immunomodulators l-glutamine, l-alanine, and the combination of both l-alanyl-l-glutamine (Dipeptamin(®)) on intracellular expression of IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α during endotoxemia, lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated human monocytes in a whole blood system were investigated by flow cytometry. Whole blood of twenty-seven healthy volunteers was stimulated with LPS and incubated with three different amino acid solutions (1. l-glutamine, 2. l-alanine, 3. l-alanyl-l-glutamine, each concentration 2 mM, 5 mM, incubation time 3 h). CD14(+) monocytes were phenotyped in whole-blood and intracellular expression of cytokines was assessed by flow cytometry. Our investigations showed for the first time in whole blood probes, imitating best physiologically present cellular interactions, that l-glutamine caused a dose-independent inhibitory effect on IL-6 and TNF-α production in human monocytes stimulated with LPS. However, l-alanine had contrary effects on IL-6 expression, significantly upregulating expression of IL-6 in LPS-treated monocytes. The impact of l-alanine on the expression of TNF-α was comparable with glutamine. Neither amino acid was able to affect IL-8 production in LPS-stimulated monocytes. The combination of both did not influence significantly IL-6 and IL-8 expression in monocytes during endotoxemia, however strongly reduced TNF-α production. For the regulation of TNF-α, l-glutamine, l-alanine and the combination of both show a congruent and exponentiated downregulating effect during endotoxemia, for the modulation of IL-6, l-glutamine and l-alanine featured opposite regulation leading to a canceling impact of each other when recombining both amino acids.

  17. Binding region of alanopine dehydrogenase predicted by unbiased molecular dynamics simulations of ligand diffusion.

    PubMed

    Gohlke, Holger; Hergert, Ulrike; Meyer, Tatu; Mulnaes, Daniel; Grieshaber, Manfred K; Smits, Sander H J; Schmitt, Lutz

    2013-10-28

    Opine dehydrogenases catalyze the reductive condensation of pyruvate with L-amino acids. Biochemical characterization of alanopine dehydrogenase from Arenicola marina revealed that this enzyme is highly specific for L-alanine. Unbiased molecular dynamics simulations with a homology model of alanopine dehydrogenase captured the binding of L-alanine diffusing from solvent to a putative binding region near a distinct helix-kink-helix motif. These results and sequence comparisons reveal how mutations and insertions within this motif dictate the L-amino acid specificity.

  18. Inhibition of small-intestinal sugar and amino acid transport by the enterotoxin of Shigella dysenteriae I.

    PubMed

    Binder, H J; Whiting, D S

    1977-05-01

    The enterotoxin of Shigella dysenteriae I produces fluid and electrolyte secretion in the rabbit ileum. These present studies were designed to evaluate nonelectrolyte transport in rabbit ileal mucosa exposed to Shigella enterotoxin. Both 10 mM galactose and 5 mM L-alanine absorptions were significantly impaired in enterotoxin-exposed ileal mucosa compared with control mucosa. L-Alanine influx was not imparied in two other secretory processes: that induced by cholera enterotoxin and hyperosmolarity. These studies provide evidence that both surgar and amino acid absorptions are diminished in the small intestine by the enterotoxin of S. dysenteriae I.

  19. Inhibition of small-intestinal sugar and amino acid transport by the enterotoxin of Shigella dysenteriae I.

    PubMed Central

    Binder, H J; Whiting, D S

    1977-01-01

    The enterotoxin of Shigella dysenteriae I produces fluid and electrolyte secretion in the rabbit ileum. These present studies were designed to evaluate nonelectrolyte transport in rabbit ileal mucosa exposed to Shigella enterotoxin. Both 10 mM galactose and 5 mM L-alanine absorptions were significantly impaired in enterotoxin-exposed ileal mucosa compared with control mucosa. L-Alanine influx was not imparied in two other secretory processes: that induced by cholera enterotoxin and hyperosmolarity. These studies provide evidence that both surgar and amino acid absorptions are diminished in the small intestine by the enterotoxin of S. dysenteriae I. PMID:324910

  20. Murine Macrophages Kill the Vegetative Form of Bacillus anthracis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-08-18

    inhibitor of the germination of B. anthracis and Bacillus cereus spores. It converts L-alanine to D-alanine, an isomer that is not recognized by...nation of Bacillus cereus spores in response to L-alanine and to inosine: the roles of gerL and gerQ operons. Microbiology 148:2089–2095. 5. Dixon, T...anthracis. J. Appl. Bacteriol. 62:269–273. 32. Todd, S. J., A. J. Moir, M. J. Johnson, and A. Moir. 2003. Genes of Bacillus cereus and Bacillus anthracis

  1. Characterization and properties of an LL-oligopeptidase from sporulating cells of Bacillus sphaericus.

    PubMed Central

    Vacheron, M J; Guinand, M; Michel, G

    1981-01-01

    An LL-oligopeptidase was characterized in the cell cytoplasm of sporulating Bacillus sphaericus 9602. Its activity showed a threefold increase throughout sporulation. The enzyme has lytic activity on various LL-dipeptides, especially on dipeptides with N-terminal L-alanine. Lytic activity was also found on some tripeptides and larger peptides which contain the sequence L-Ala-L-Ala. The role of this oligopeptidase in relation to sporulation may be to supply the cell with L-alanine for the biosynthesis of the peptide chains of the spore cortex. PMID:7007343

  2. Amino acid uptake by liver of genetically obese Zucker rats.

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, B; Felipe, A; Casado, J; Pastor-Anglada, M

    1991-01-01

    Alanine and glutamine uptake by the liver of 50-52-day-old genetically obese Zucker rats and their lean littermates has been studied. The net uptake in vivo of L-alanine is 2-fold higher in the obese animals. No significant change in L-glutamine net balance was found. We also studied the Na(+)-dependent uptake of L-alanine and L-glutamine into plasma-membrane vesicles isolated from either obese- or lean-rat livers. Vmax. values of both L-alanine and L-glutamine transport were 2-fold higher in those preparations from obese rats. No change in Km was observed. As suggested by inhibition studies, this seemed to be mediated by an enhancement of the activities of systems A, ASC and N. We conclude that the liver of the obese Zucker rat is extremely efficient in taking up neutral amino acids from the afferent blood, which results in an enhanced net uptake of L-alanine in vivo. The changes in transport activities at the plasma-membrane level might contribute to increase amino acid disposal by liver, probably for lipogenic purposes, as recently reported by Terrettaz & Jeanrenaud [Biochem. J. (1990) 270, 803-807]. PMID:1684102

  3. Microbial production of amino acids in Japan.

    PubMed

    Kumagai, H

    2000-01-01

    The microbial biotechnology of amino acids production which was developed and industrialized in Japan have been summarized. The amino acids include L-glutamic acid, L-lysine, L-threonine, L-aspartic acid, L-alanine, L-cysteine, L-dihydroxyphenylalanine, D-p-hydroxyphenyl-glycine, and hydroxy-L-proline.

  4. Unusual substrate specificity of the peptidoglycan MurE ligase from Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae.

    PubMed

    Patin, Delphine; Turk, Samo; Barreteau, Hélène; Mainardi, Jean-Luc; Arthur, Michel; Gobec, Stanislav; Mengin-Lecreulx, Dominique; Blanot, Didier

    2016-02-01

    Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae is a Gram-positive bacterium pathogenic to many species of birds and mammals, including humans. The main feature of its peptidoglycan is the presence of l-alanine at position 3 of the peptide stem. In the present work, we cloned the murE gene from E. rhusiopathiae and purified the corresponding protein as His6-tagged form. Enzymatic assays showed that E. rhusiopathiae MurE was indeed an l-alanine-adding enzyme. Surprisingly, it was also able, although to a lesser extent, to add meso-diaminopimelic acid, the amino acid found at position 3 in many Gram-negative bacteria, Bacilli and Mycobacteria. Sequence alignment of MurE enzymes from E. rhusiopathiae and Escherichia coli revealed that the DNPR motif that is characteristic of meso-diaminopimelate-adding enzymes was replaced by HDNR. The role of the latter motif in the interaction with l-alanine and meso-diaminopimelic acid was demonstrated by site-directed mutagenesis experiments and the construction of a homology model. The overexpression of the E. rhusiopathiae murE gene in E. coli resulted in the incorporation of l-alanine at position 3 of the peptide part of peptidoglycan.

  5. Synthesis, characterization, and biocompatible properties of alanine-grafted chitosan copolymers.

    PubMed

    Park, Gyu Han; Kang, Min-Sil; Knowles, Jonathan C; Gong, Myoung-Seon

    2016-04-01

    In order to overcome major problems regarding the lack of affinity to solvents and limited reactivity of the free amines of chitosan, introduction of appropriate spacer arms having terminal amine function is considered of interest. L-Alanine-N-carboxyanhydride was grafted onto chitosan via anionic ring-opening polymerization. The chemical and structural characterizations of L-alanine-grafted chitosan (Ala-g-Cts) were confirmed through Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H NMR). In addition, the viscoelastic properties of Ala-g-Cts were examined by means of a rotational viscometer, and thermal analysis was carried out with a thermogravimetric analyzer and differential scanning calorimetry. Morphological changes in the chitosan L-alanine moiety were determined by x-ray diffraction. To determine the feasibility of using these films as biomedical materials, we investigated the effects of their L-alanine content on physical and mechanical properties. The biodegradation results of crosslinked Ala-g-Cts films were evaluated in phosphate-buffered solution containing lysozyme at 37℃. Proliferation of MC3T3-E1 cells on crosslinked Ala-g-Cts films was also investigated with use of the CCK-8 assay.

  6. Electron Spin Relaxation in Irradiated Solids.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-03-01

    the development and use of ELDOR techniques to study the spectral diffusion in irradiated L-alanine and other irradiated organic solids. Pulsed STELDOR...and pulsed two-frequency ELDOR methods were developed and the details of the implementation is reported. The assignment of relaxation times that gave

  7. Redox self-sufficient whole cell biotransformation for amination of alcohols.

    PubMed

    Klatte, Stephanie; Wendisch, Volker F

    2014-10-15

    Whole cell biotransformation is an upcoming tool to replace common chemical routes for functionalization and modification of desired molecules. In the approach presented here the production of various non-natural (di)amines was realized using the designed whole cell biocatalyst Escherichia coli W3110/pTrc99A-ald-adh-ta with plasmid-borne overexpression of genes for an l-alanine dehydrogenase, an alcohol dehydrogenase and a transaminase. Cascading alcohol oxidation with l-alanine dependent transamination and l-alanine dehydrogenase allowed for redox self-sufficient conversion of alcohols to the corresponding amines. The supplementation of the corresponding (di)alcohol precursors as well as amino group donor l-alanine and ammonium chloride were sufficient for amination and redox cofactor recycling in a resting buffer system. The addition of the transaminase cofactor pyridoxal-phosphate and the alcohol dehydrogenase cofactor NAD(+) was not necessary to obtain complete conversion. Secondary and cyclic alcohols, for example, 2-hexanol and cyclohexanol were not aminated. However, efficient redox self-sufficient amination of aliphatic and aromatic (di)alcohols in vivo was achieved with 1-hexanol, 1,10-decanediol and benzylalcohol being aminated best.

  8. User-Friendly, Syntax Directed Input to a Computer Aided Design System.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-06-01

    indepen- dern-. oblems arise in both compu:er aided design and in software development as a result of multipla types cf computz , mUtiple languages...Base CONLAN. Ease CONLAN is defined cy three i- ms , a set of object types and cperations, syntax, and a comPuta-IoL model. It is defined with Primitive...ycsjum on Computer Hardware= DescrT:--c-: -Lanquaqes. ~ p. =-3’EEET73 28. H1Il, F. J., and Petezzcn, J. R., DjZt4- S Lt-= Ms : Hardware O~gan iza,,i.n cand

  9. A Multiple Bridge for Elimination of Contact-Resistance Errors in Resistance Strain-Gage Measurements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1946-03-01

    g@ge. ‘ ,, 3. If’&’ ms a,b or h)k are used and a m&ing-coil galva- nometersis the’detector, an appreciable &Gsistance is introductid ‘into this...denoglnator because]it would oontrihuto only third-order % ms .” I;merting equation (39) into the identity- . . iGl ( )‘iG2””b ‘Gl”- ‘G2 (40) (37) may...measurement of alternating strains through slip .rings. --- Ii .,+- ● A A s r r Rh s Two-pole multipla -” position switch R Single-pole multiple

  10. Future Directions of Nonlinear Dynamics in Physical and Biological Systems. (Physica D Nonlinear. Volume 68, Number 1)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-09-15

    Alamos National Labor.lory, MS B-258, Los Alamos, NM 87545. Cellular automata, Interacting particle systems USA Adaptive dynamics C.K.R.T. JONES...exhibit resonant be- mensions of the junctions are 200 am by 10/um haviour at all multipla n of one half-wavelength and they are closely spaced in...conjugated --electron molecules Brian M. Pierce Hughes Aircraft Company, Bldg. R02, MS V518, P.O. Box 92426, Los Angeles, CA 90009-2426, USA The nonresonant w

  11. Remote Tropospheric Radio Communication,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-03-19

    large F ricd cbservazicns. 7rkm the same distribution they find Thus, V’e= - this median valie cf five minute : ms values. PFge 15. qunning in forward... multipla -prongel tropcsEleric cnanrel; te .Feed cf these changes is from the pcrtions of tle hertz tc several hertz. Characteristic VOC = 30025107 PAGE...not exceed 0.2-0.3 vs. Therefore vith the pulsp sethcd cf mcasurenent trinsmitter must emni Fulsas on tle crier of 0.1 and even 0.05 ms . Cnly than at

  12. International Workshop on Structural and Functional Aspects of the Cholinergic Synapse Held in Jerusalem, Isreal on 30 August-4 September 1987

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-09-01

    receptor unt/a Oniv.s to ms time resolution ;1.20 End of session 12:30 Lunch ACETYLCHOLINE RECEPTOR (III) CHAIURMAN: A. KARLIN (New York) 14.00 F.J. BARRA...were studied and found to be heterogeneous in some cases, suggesting that multipla forms of the receptor can exist. TIen crude vesiclas were banded in in...neurotranseitter and inhibitors, directly on a cell sur:face; (i) a cell flow method vith a 5 ms time rtsolution, and (Ii) eynthesis of inactl’ neurorrar

  13. An Analysis of the Effectiveness of the Problem Solving Skills for Managers Training Package--USCG

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-03-01

    OH--. I tO I M I I S I I i I w -31 1 C5 1 *- 1 * 1 . l 1 . . -n.. II I I (f) * a , p U U) 1 0014 I In 1 M 1 I -I IC4 I faI (i0d I " mS It mII I I I I...visor "Passing -0.29 92 .769t h_ Buck" 0.0030 H{(A3) Multipla -choic 0.13,49Qua st loan air’s 2.73 35 .010, score 0.0030 H (A4) Subo;dina.. P

  14. ARPA/NRL X-Ray Laser Program - Semiannual Technical Report to Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-03-01

    creased line shifts. The (sparse) data16 available on line shifts with multipla M vacancies indicate that an emission-absorption line overlap fortunately...photon (23) 102 ^ümk^^HäiiM,,- ..■^.Ma^fc.^a»aa.t^«fcMif ^a.^ r^^aM^&^-^^a^^^ amik^c^a ummäiiütä&ä^ ms *^ ’UIUVWWIIWW^I.^IM.IPP^WWIUVMJ i4.li...Cavity from a plasma gun or a duoplasmatron injectBa iui.u operation at Lyman-cv at a reduced gcln coefficient Ms been suggested [120], [167], and

  15. Efficiency Analysis of the Electronic Mail System (INFOMAIL) on the Defense Data Network.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-12-01

    the provider of the standard interface. Also the procurement of multipla pieces of equipment .-ith their installation into a user’s facility further...i’Y,: ms provided low cost but effective access to the network rasources. i improve the efficiency of the fkC’s interface with the netwcrk rc -,uirrs...PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Kevin R. Kavanaugh, BS, Capt, USAF r13. TYPE OF REPORT 13b. TIME COVERED FRO4 DATE OF REPORT Yr, h. Day, f 5 PAGE COUNT * MS Thesis

  16. Role of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} on the kinetics of low-affinity high-capacity Na{sup +}-dependent alanine transport in SHR proximal tubular epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pinto, Vanda; Pinho, Maria Joao; Jose, Pedro A.; Soares-da-Silva, Patricio

    2010-07-30

    Research highlights: {yields} H{sub 2}O{sub 2} in excess is required for the presence of a low-affinity high-capacity component for the Na{sup +}-dependent [{sup 14}C]-L-alanine uptake in SHR PTE cells only. {yields} It is suggested that Na{sup +} binding in renal ASCT2 may be regulated by ROS in SHR PTE cells. -- Abstract: The presence of high and low sodium affinity states for the Na{sup +}-dependent [{sup 14}C]-L-alanine uptake in immortalized renal proximal tubular epithelial (PTE) cells was previously reported (Am. J. Physiol. 293 (2007) R538-R547). This study evaluated the role of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} on the Na{sup +}-dependent [{sup 14}C]-L-alanine uptake of ASCT2 in immortalized renal PTE cells from Wistar Kyoto rat (WKY) and spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR). Na{sup +} dependence of [{sup 14}C]-L-alanine uptake was investigated replacing NaCl with an equimolar concentration of choline chloride in vehicle- and apocynin-treated cells. Na{sup +} removal from the uptake solution abolished transport activity in both WKY and SHR PTE cells. Decreases in H{sub 2}O{sub 2} levels in the extracellular medium significantly reduced Na{sup +}-K{sub m} and V{sub max} values of the low-affinity high-capacity component in SHR PTE cells, with no effect on the high-affinity low-capacity state of the Na{sup +}-dependent [{sup 14}C]-L-alanine uptake. After removal of apocynin from the culture medium, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} levels returned to basal values within 1 to 3 h in both WKY and SHR PTE cells and these were found stable for the next 24 h. Under these experimental conditions, the Na{sup +}-K{sub m} and V{sub max} of the high-affinity low-capacity state were unaffected and the low-affinity high-capacity component remained significantly decreased 1 day but not 4 days after apocynin removal. In conclusion, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} in excess is required for the presence of a low-affinity high-capacity component for the Na{sup +}-dependent [{sup 14}C]-L-alanine uptake in SHR PTE cells only

  17. The 8-amino-7-oxopelargonate synthase from Bacillus sphaericus. Purification and preliminary characterization of the cloned enzyme overproduced in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Ploux, O; Marquet, A

    1992-01-01

    The 8-amino-7-oxopelargonate synthase [6-carboxyhexanoyl-CoA:L-alanine carboxyhexanoyltransferase (decarboxylating); EC 2.3.1.47] from Bacillus sphaericus involved in biotin biosynthesis was purified from an Escherichia coli overproducing strain. The purification afforded an electrophoretically homogeneous enzyme with a specific activity of 0.67 unit/mg. The purified enzyme is a monomer of 41 kDa. N-Terminal sequencing of the first 14 amino acid residues showed complete agreement with the predicted sequence from the bioF gene. The pure enzyme showed the characteristic absorption band (425 nm) of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate-dependent enzymes. Furthermore, the holoenzyme was resolved during an affinity step yielding the inactive apoenzyme, which recovered activity and the 425 nm-absorption band on dialysis against pyridoxal 5'-phosphate. Km values for L-alanine and pimeloyl-CoA were respectively 3 mM and 1 microM. Images Fig. 1. PMID:1575677

  18. R76 in transmembrane domain 3 of the aspartate:alanine transporter AspT is involved in substrate transport.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Satomi; Nanatani, Kei; Abe, Keietsu

    2016-01-01

    The L-aspartate:L-alanine antiporter of Tetragenococcus halophilus (AspT) possesses an arginine residue (R76) within the GxxxG motif in the central part of transmembrane domain 3 (TM3)-a residue that has been estimated to transport function. In this study, we carried out amino acid substitutions of R76 and used proteoliposome reconstitution for analyzing the transport function of each substitution. Both l-aspartate and l-alanine transport assays showed that R76K has higher activity than the AspT-WT (R76), whereas R76D and R76E have lower activity than the AspT-WT. These results suggest that R76 is involved in AspT substrate transport.

  19. Addition of amino acids and dipeptides to fullerene C{sub 60} giving rise to monoadducts

    SciTech Connect

    Romanova, V.S.; Tsyryapkin, V.A.; Vol`pin, M.E.

    1994-12-01

    The authors have developed a general method for the direct addition of amino acids and dipeptides of various structures to fullerene C{sub 60}. In all cases the addition involves the amino group. The reaction proceeds when the solutions of fullerene and an amino acid (or dipeptide) are mixed at 50-100 {degrees}C. The fullerene derivatives of the following amino acids and dipeptides have been obtained: glycine, p-aminobenzoic acid, {omega}-aminocaproic acid, L-proline, L-alanine, L-alanyl-Lalanine, D,L-alanyl-D,L-alanine, glycyl-L-valine. The adduct of methyl L-ananinate with C{sub 60} was also prepared.

  20. Aromatic radiofluorination with (/sup 18/F)fluorine gas: 6-(/sup 18/F)fluoro-L-dopa

    SciTech Connect

    Firnau, G.; Chirakal, R.; Garnett, E.S.

    1984-11-01

    A new synthesis is described for the routine production of 3,4-dihydroxy-6-(/sup 18/F)fluoro-phenyl-L-alanine (6-(/sup 18/F)fluoro-L-dopa). The reaction between (/sup 18/F)fluorine gas and 3,4-dihydroxyphenyl-L-alanine (L-dopa) in liquid hydrogen fluoride gave 2-, 5-, and 6-(/sup 18/F)fluoro-L-dopa. 6-(/sup 18/F)Fluoro-L-dopa was isolated by reverse-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography. From 100 mCi (/sup 18/F)F/sub 2/, the method produces 3 mCi of 6-(/sup 18/F)fluoro-L-dopa at the end of synthesis.

  1. First-principles studies of pure and fluorine substituted alanines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Sardar; Vaizie, Hamide; Rahnamaye Aliabad, H. A.; Ahmad, Rashid; Khan, Imad; Ali, Zahid; Jalali-Asadabadi, S.; Ahmad, Iftikhar; Khan, Amir Abdullah

    2016-05-01

    This paper communicates the structural, electronic and optical properties of L-alanine, monofluoro and difluoro substituted alanines using density functional calculations. These compounds exist in orthorhombic crystal structure and the calculated structural parameters such as lattice constants, bond angles and bond lengths are in agreement with the experimental results. L-alanine is an indirect band gap insulator, while its fluorine substituted compounds (monofluoroalanine and difluoroalanine) are direct band gap insulators. The substitution causes reduction in the band gap and hence these optically tailored direct wide band gap materials have enhanced optical properties in the ultraviolet (UV) region of electromagnetic spectrum. Therefore, optical properties like dielectric function, refractive index, reflectivity and energy loss function are also investigated. These compounds have almost isotropic nature in the lower frequency range while at higher energies, they have a significant anisotropic nature.

  2. Asymmetric adsorption by quartz - A model for the prebiotic origin of optical activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonner, W. M.; Kavasmaneck, P. R.; Martin, F. S.; Flores, J. J.

    1975-01-01

    One mechanism previously proposed for the abiotic accumulation of molecules of one chirality in nature is asymmetric adsorption on the chiral surfaces of optically active quartz crystals. Earlier literature in this field is reviewed, with the conclusion that previous investigations of this phenomenon, using optical rotation criteria, have afforded ambiguous results. We now have studied the adsorption of radioactive D- and L-alanine on powdered d- and l-quartz, using change in radioactivity level as a criterion for both gross and differential adsorption, d-Quartz preferentially adsorbed D-alanine from anhydrous dimethyl-formamide solution, and l-quartz L-alanine. The differential adsorption varied between 1.0 and 1.8%. The implications of these observations are discussed from the viewpoint of early chemical evolution and the origin of optically active organic compounds in nature.

  3. [Raman scattering study of DL-alanine].

    PubMed

    Gong, Yan; Wang, Wen-qing

    2006-01-01

    Studies of Raman vibration spectra are useful to obtaining information on biomolecular crystals. The cell dimensions of the L- and DL-alanine crystals are nearly identical, and both structures belong to the orthorhombic system, but the space group is P2(1) 2(1) 2(1) for the L-isomer, and Pna2(1) for the racemate crystal. The Raman spectrum of L-alanine has been measured by many authors. The present work is focusing on the Raman scattering study of DL-alanine powder. Based on the analysis of the differences between DL-alanine and L-alanine Raman spectra, the authors obtained indispensable information on hydrogen bond and the motion of the molecular conformation in alanine crystals.

  4. Probing crystal packing of uniformly (13)C-enriched powder samples using homonuclear dipolar coupling measurements.

    PubMed

    Mollica, Giulia; Dekhil, Myriam; Ziarelli, Fabio; Thureau, Pierre; Viel, Stéphane

    2015-02-01

    The relationship between the crystal packing of powder samples and long-range (13)C-(13)C homonuclear dipolar couplings is presented and illustrated for the case of uniformly (13)C-enriched L-alanine and L-histidine·HCl·H2O. Dipolar coupling measurement is based on the partial reintroduction of dipolar interactions by spinning the sample slightly off-magic-angle, while the coupling of interest for a given spin pair is isolated with a frequency-selective pulse. A cost function is used to correlate the so-derived dipolar couplings to trial crystal structures of the samples under study. This procedure allowed for the investigation of the l-alanine space group and L-histidine·HCl·H2O space group and unit-cell parameters.

  5. Inter and intra plant variability of enzyme profiles including various phosphoesterases and sulfatase of six wastewater treatment plants.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Klaus; Wolff, Bert; Emmerling, Christoph

    2013-06-01

    Biodegradation of organic wastewater constituents by activated sludge microorganisms is based on enzymatic processes. It is supposed that wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) differ in their enzymatic fingerprints. To determine such fingerprints, activated sludges from nine aerated tanks of six WWTPs were repeatedly sampled and analyzed for the activities of l-alanine aminopeptidase, esterase, α- and β-glucosidase, alkaline phosphatase, phosphodiesterase, phosphotriesterase, and sulfatase. In one WWTP the enzymatic activities and their variations within 1 week were assayed in various process stages. Mostly the enzymatic profiles were dominated by l-alanine aminopeptidase, followed by alkaline phosphatase. They differed in variable contributions of esterase, phosphodiesterase, α- and β-glucosidase. The sulfatase activity was generally low. For the first time phosphotriesterase activity was detected in various samples, but with limited analytical validity. Particle mass-related activities of individual enzymes varied between plants by factors 2-4 and up to 11, when related to suspension volumes.

  6. Monitoring of shrimp and farmed fish sold in Canada for cyanobacterial toxins.

    PubMed

    Niedzwiadek, Barbara; Scott, Peter M; Lau, Ben P-Y

    2012-01-01

    Sixty-one samples of shrimp and 32 samples of farmed fish collected from retail markets across Canada were analyzed for cyanobacterial toxins, including microcystins, paralytic shellfish poisons (saxitoxins), cylindrospermopsin, and β-N-methylamino-L-alanine, using established methods of analysis. None of these toxins were detected in any of the samples. Some shrimp samples screened for paralytic shellfish poisons showed the presence of unknown peaks in the chromatogram after periodate oxidation.

  7. Presynaptic Modulation of the Hippocampal Mossy Fiber Synapse

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-09-14

    effects of the neurotoxic amino acids BOAA and beta-N-methylamino-L-alanine ( BMAA ) on the release of both glutamate and dynorphin A(1-8) from...hippocampal mossy fiber synaptosomes. Our interest in these amino acids arose from the recent suggestion that BOAA and BMAA exert their neurotoxic effects on...the central nervous system by increasing the release of glutamate. We found that the non-NMDA receptor agonist BOAA but not BMAA , an NMDA agonist

  8. A silaproline-containing dipeptide.

    PubMed

    Vivet, B; Cavelier, F; Martinez, J; Didierjean, C; Marraud, M; Aubry, A

    2000-12-01

    The silaproline-containing dipeptide N-(3, 3-dimethyl-1-pivaloyl-1-aza-3-sila-5-cyclopentylcarbonyl)-L- alanine isopropylamide, C(17)H(33)N(3)O(3)Si, has two independent molecules in the asymmetric unit and each adopts a beta-II folded conformation, where the amide on the terminal C interacts intramolecularly with the pivaloyl O atom. The five-membered silaproline ring is C(beta)-puckered, an infrequent conformation for the homologous proline ring.

  9. The Aspergillus nidulans Proline Permease as a Model for Understanding the Factors Determining Substrate Binding and Specificity of Fungal Amino Acid Transporters*

    PubMed Central

    Gournas, Christos; Evangelidis, Thomas; Athanasopoulos, Alexandros; Mikros, Emmanuel; Sophianopoulou, Vicky

    2015-01-01

    Amino acid uptake in fungi is mediated by general and specialized members of the yeast amino acid transporter (YAT) family, a branch of the amino acid polyamine organocation (APC) transporter superfamily. PrnB, a highly specific l-proline transporter, only weakly recognizes other Put4p substrates, its Saccharomyces cerevisiae orthologue. Taking advantage of the high sequence similarity between the two transporters, we combined molecular modeling, induced fit docking, genetic, and biochemical approaches to investigate the molecular basis of this difference and identify residues governing substrate binding and specificity. We demonstrate that l-proline is recognized by PrnB via interactions with residues within TMS1 (Gly56, Thr57), TMS3 (Glu138), and TMS6 (Phe248), which are evolutionary conserved in YATs, whereas specificity is achieved by subtle amino acid substitutions in variable residues. Put4p-mimicking substitutions in TMS3 (S130C), TMS6 (F252L, S253G), TMS8 (W351F), and TMS10 (T414S) broadened the specificity of PrnB, enabling it to recognize more efficiently l-alanine, l-azetidine-2-carboxylic acid, and glycine without significantly affecting the apparent Km for l-proline. S253G and W351F could transport l-alanine, whereas T414S, despite displaying reduced proline uptake, could transport l-alanine and glycine, a phenotype suppressed by the S130C mutation. A combination of all five Put4p-ressembling substitutions resulted in a functional allele that could also transport l-alanine and glycine, displaying a specificity profile impressively similar to that of Put4p. Our results support a model where residues in these positions determine specificity by interacting with the substrates, acting as gating elements, altering the flexibility of the substrate binding core, or affecting conformational changes of the transport cycle. PMID:25572393

  10. Response of Bacillus Spores to Combinations of Germinative Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Foerster, Harold F.; Foster, J. W.

    1966-01-01

    Foerster, Harold F. (University of Texas, Austin), and J. W. Foster. Response of Bacillus spores to combinations of germinative compounds. J. Bacteriol. 91:1168–1177. 1966.—Spores of 21 strains of Bacillus megaterium and 25 other strains representing 13 species of Bacillus were produced under standardized conditions. The germination of a washed spore suspension of each strain was measured as a response to various combinations of 30 different germinative compounds. The strains were first typed with respect to their response to “primary” germination compounds, i.e., glucose, l-alanine, inosine, and l-alanine-inosine mixture, and also Na+ and K+. The second stage was the determination of the response to various organic and inorganic anions and cations, each strain being supplied with the “primary” compounds best for it. Marked differences in germination patterns were observed among species and strains of the same species. No relation to established taxonomic lines was evident. A nonspecific requirement for ions was found for all strains, but not all ions were effective. A striking degree of interchangeability of germinative chemicals was found. “Fractional germination” was very common. A mixture of l-alanine and inosine and various ions was the best germinative solution for most strains. Some anomalous germination patterns were encountered. Those studied included a strain whose cells lysed spontaneously upon germination and other strains for which l-leucine had striking germinative powers. PMID:4956331

  11. Biological activities of indoleacetylamino acids and their use as auxins in tissue culture

    SciTech Connect

    Hangarter, R.P.; Peterson, M.D.; Good, N.E.

    1980-05-01

    The auxin activities of a number of indoleacetylamino acid conjugates have been determined in three test systems: growth of tomato hypocotyl explants (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. cv. Marglobe); growth of tobacco callus cultures (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Wisconsin 38); and ethylene production from pea stems (Pisum sativum L. cv. Alaska). The activities of the conjugates differ greatly depending on the amino acid moiety. Indoleacetyl-L-alanine supports rapid callus growth from the tomato hypocotyls while inhibiting growth of shoots and roots. Indoleacetlyglycine behaves in a similar manner but is somewhat less effective in supporting callus growth and in inhibiting growth of shoots and roots. Indoleacetylglycine behaves in a similar manner but is somewhat less effective in supporting callus growth and in inhibiting shoot formation. The other amino acid conjugates tested (valine, leucine, aspartic acid, threonine, methionine, phenylalanine, and proline) support shoot formation without supporting root formation or much callus growth. The tobacco callus system, which forms abundant shoots in the presence or absence of free indoleacetic acid, produces only rapid undifferentiated growth in the presence of indoleacetyl-L-alanine and indoleacetylglycine. The other conjugates inhibit shoot formatin weakly if at all. Most of the conjugates induce sustained ethylene production from the pea stems but at rates well below the initial rates observed with free indoleacetic acid. Many, but not all of the effects of conjugates such as indoleacetyl-L-alanine can be mimicked by frequent renewals of the supply of free indoleacetic acid.

  12. The impact of synthetic analogs of histidine on copper(II) and nickel(II) coordination properties to an albumin-like peptide. Possible leads towards new metallodrugs.

    PubMed

    Zawisza, Izabela; Mital, Mariusz; Polkowska-Nowakowska, Agnieszka; Bonna, Arkadiusz; Bal, Wojciech

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of our research was to obtain peptidomimetics possessing Cu(II) and Ni(II) binding properties, which would be useful for biomedical applications. In this context we used potentiometry, UV-VIS and CD spectroscopies to characterize the Cu(II) and Ni(II) binding properties of pentapeptide analogs of the N-terminal sequence of histatin 5. The peptides investigated had a general sequence DSXAK-am (am stands for C-terminal amide), with X including His and its three synthetic analogs, (4-thiazolyl)-L-alanine (1), (2-pyridyl)-L-alanine (2), and (pyrazol-1-yl)-L-alanine (3). The heterocyclic nitrogens present in these analogs were significantly more acidic than that of the His imidazole. We found that DSXAK-am peptides were able to bind Cu(II) and Ni(II) and form 4N complexes in a cooperative fashion, with similar affinities. These results indicate that acidic heterocyclic amino acids provide a viable alternative for histidine in peptidomimetics designed for metal ion binding.

  13. Investigation of gamma radiation effect on chemical properties and surface morphology of some nonlinear optical (NLO) single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahlam, M. A.; Ravishankar, M. N.; Vijayan, N.; Govindaraj, G.; Siddaramaiah; Gnana Prakash, A. P.

    2012-05-01

    The effect of Co-60 gamma irradiation on L-alanine cadmium chloride (LACC), L-alanine doped potassium dihydrogen orthophosphate (KDP) and L-arginine doped KDP nonlinear optical (NLO) single crystals were studied in doses ranging from 100 krad to 6 Mrad. The crystals were grown by slow evaporation method at room temperature. The effects of gamma irradiation on the chemical, surface morphology, DC electrical conductivity, thermal and mechanical properties of the grown crystals have been studied. The functional groups of unirradiated and irradiated crystals have been identified and confirmed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) studies. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of irradiated crystals shows some morphological changes in the crystals. The dc conductivity of LACC and L-alanine doped KDP crystals were found to increase with increase in radiation dose whereas in case of L-arginine doped KDP crystals, the dc conductivity was found to decrease with increase in radiation dose. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) thermograms reveals that there is no significant change in the melting point of the crystals after irradiation and the crystals does not decompose as a result of irradiation. The mechanical behavior of both unirradiated and irradiated crystals is explained with the indentation effects using Vicker's microhardness tester. The Vicker's hardness number HV and Mayer's index 'n' has been estimated and confirms that LACC belong to the hard materials.

  14. Effects of high-salinity seawater acclimation on the levels of D-alanine in the muscle and hepatopancreas of kuruma prawn, Marsupenaeus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Naoko; Yokoyama, Masahumi

    2015-12-10

    Changes in D- and L-alanine contents were determined in the muscle and hepatopancreas of kuruma prawn Marsupenaeus japonicus, during acclimation from seawater containing 100% salinity to artificial seawater containing 150% salinity. In the hepatopancreas, contents of both amino acids increased by approximately threefold. The activity of alanine racemase, which catalyzes the interconversion of D- and L-alanine, also increased in the high-salinity seawater. In addition, the expression of the gene encoding alanine racemase increased in the hepatopancreas with an increase in the alanine racemase activity. These data indicate that the biosynthesis of D- and L-alanine is controlled by the gene expression level of alanine racemase, and D-alanine in the hepatopancreas functions as a major osmolyte for isosmotic regulation. In contrast, the content of D-alanine and alanine racemase activity did not change in the muscle during hyper-osmotic acclimation. Therefore, we suggest that D-alanine, which exists in the several tissues of M. japonicus, is considered to be utilized in some different physiological phenomena in different tissues.

  15. Partial enzymatic elimination and quantification of sarcosine from alanine using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Burton, Casey; Gamagedara, Sanjeewa; Ma, Yinfa

    2013-04-01

    Since sarcosine and D,L-alanine co-elute on reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) columns and the tandem mass spectrometer cannot differentiate them due to equivalent parent and fragment ions, derivatization is often required for analysis of sarcosine in LC/MS systems. This study offers an alternative to derivatization by employing partial elimination of sarcosine by enzymatic oxidation. The decrease in apparent concentration from the traditionally merged sarcosine-alanine peak associated with the enzymatic elimination has been shown to be proportional to the total sarcosine present (R(2) = 0.9999), allowing for determinations of urinary sarcosine. Sarcosine oxidase was shown to eliminate only sarcosine in the presence of D,L-alanine, and was consequently used as the selective enzyme. This newly developed technique has a method detection limit of 1 μg/L (parts per billion) with a linear range of 3 ppb-1 mg/L (parts per million) in urine matrices. The method was further validated through spiked recoveries of real urine samples, as well as the analysis of 35 real urine samples. The average recoveries for low, middle, and high sarcosine concentration spikes were 111.7, 90.8, and 90.1 %, respectively. In conclusion, this simple enzymatic approach coupled with HPLC/MS/MS is able to resolve sarcosine from D,L-alanine leading to underivatized quantification of sarcosine.

  16. Biological activities of indoleacetylamino acids and their use as auxins in tissue culture.

    PubMed

    Hangarter, R P; Peterson, M D; Good, N E

    1980-05-01

    THE AUXIN ACTIVITIES OF A NUMBER OF INDOLEACETYLAMINO ACID CONJUGATES HAVE BEEN DETERMINED IN THREE TEST SYSTEMS: growth of tomato hypocotyl explants (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. cv. Marglobe); growth of tobacco callus cultures (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Wisconsin 38); and ethylene production from pea stems (Pisum sativum L. cv. Alaska). The activities of the conjugates differ greatly depending on the amino acid moiety. Indoleacetyl-l-alanine supports rapid callus growth from the tomato hypocotyls while inhibiting growth of shoots and roots. Indoleacetylglycine behaves in a similar manner but is somewhat less effective in supporting callus growth and in inhibiting shoot formation. The other amino acid conjugates tested (valine, leucine, aspartic acid, threonine, methionine, phenylalanine, and proline) support shoot formation without supporting root formation or much callus growth. The tobacco callus system, which forms abundant shoots in the presence or absence of free indoleacetic acid, produces only rapid undifferentiated growth in the presence of indoleacetyl-l-alanine and indoleacetylglycine. The other conjugates inhibit shoot formation weakly if at all. Most of the conjugates induce sustained ethylene production from the pea stems but at rates well below the initial rates observed with free indoleacetic acid. Many, but not all of the effects of conjugates such as indoleacetyl-l-alanine can be mimicked by frequent renewals of the supply of free indoleacetic acid.

  17. Biological Activities of Indoleacetylamino Acids and Their Use as Auxins in Tissue Culture 1

    PubMed Central

    Hangarter, Roger P.; Peterson, Michael D.; Good, Norman E.

    1980-01-01

    The auxin activities of a number of indoleacetylamino acid conjugates have been determined in three test systems: growth of tomato hypocotyl explants (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. cv. Marglobe); growth of tobacco callus cultures (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Wisconsin 38); and ethylene production from pea stems (Pisum sativum L. cv. Alaska). The activities of the conjugates differ greatly depending on the amino acid moiety. Indoleacetyl-l-alanine supports rapid callus growth from the tomato hypocotyls while inhibiting growth of shoots and roots. Indoleacetylglycine behaves in a similar manner but is somewhat less effective in supporting callus growth and in inhibiting shoot formation. The other amino acid conjugates tested (valine, leucine, aspartic acid, threonine, methionine, phenylalanine, and proline) support shoot formation without supporting root formation or much callus growth. The tobacco callus system, which forms abundant shoots in the presence or absence of free indoleacetic acid, produces only rapid undifferentiated growth in the presence of indoleacetyl-l-alanine and indoleacetylglycine. The other conjugates inhibit shoot formation weakly if at all. Most of the conjugates induce sustained ethylene production from the pea stems but at rates well below the initial rates observed with free indoleacetic acid. Many, but not all of the effects of conjugates such as indoleacetyl-l-alanine can be mimicked by frequent renewals of the supply of free indoleacetic acid. Images PMID:16661279

  18. Development of fast disintegrating compressed tablets using amino acid as disintegration accelerator: evaluation of wetting and disintegration of tablet on the basis of surface free energy.

    PubMed

    Fukami, Jinichi; Ozawa, Asuka; Yoshihashi, Yasuo; Yonemochi, Etsuo; Terada, Katsuhide

    2005-12-01

    A fast disintegrating compressed tablet was formulated using amino acids, such as L-lysine HCl, L-alanine, glycine and L-tyrosine as disintegration accelerator. The tablets having the hardness of about 4 kgf were prepared and the effect of amino acids on the wetting time and disintegration time in the oral cavity of tablets was examined on the basis of surface free energy of amino acids. The wetting time of the tablets increased in the order of L-lysine HCl, L-alanine, glycine and L-tyrosine, whereas the disintegration time in the oral cavity of the tablets increased in the order of L-alanine, glycine, L-lysine HCl and L-tyrosine. These behaviors were well analyzed by the introduction of surface free energy. When the polar component of amino acid was large value or the dispersion component was small value, faster wetting of tablet was observed. When the dispersion component of amino acid was large value or the dispersion component was small value, faster disintegration of tablet was observed, expect of L-tyrosine tablet. The fast disintegration of tablets was explained by the theory presented by Matsumaru.

  19. Purification and characterization of selenocysteine beta-lyase from Citrobacter freundii

    SciTech Connect

    Chocat, P.; Esaki, N.; Tanizawa, K.; Nakamura, K.; Tanaka, H.; Soda, K.

    1985-08-01

    The purification and characterization of bacterial selenocysteine beta-lyase, an enzyme which specifically catalyzes the cleavage of L-selenocysteine to L-alanine and Se0, are presented. The enzyme, purified to near homogeneity from Citrobacter freundii, is monomeric with a molecular weight of ca. 64,000 and contains 1 mol of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate as a cofactor per mol of enzyme. L-Selenocysteine is the sole substrate. L-Cysteine is a competitive inhibitor of the enzyme. The enzyme also catalyzes the alpha, beta elimination of beta-chloro-L-alanine to form NH3, pyruvate, and Cl- and is irreversibly inactivated during the reaction. The physicochemical properties, e.g., amino acid composition and subunit structure, of the bacterial enzyme are fairly different from those of the pig liver enzyme. However, the catalytic properties of both enzymes, e.g., substrate specificity and inactivation by the substrate or a mechanism-based inactivator, beta-chloro-L-alanine, are very similar.

  20. Purification and characterization of selenocysteine beta-lyase from Citrobacter freundii.

    PubMed Central

    Chocat, P; Esaki, N; Tanizawa, K; Nakamura, K; Tanaka, H; Soda, K

    1985-01-01

    The purification and characterization of bacterial selenocysteine beta-lyase, an enzyme which specifically catalyzes the cleavage of L-selenocysteine to L-alanine and Se0, are presented. The enzyme, purified to near homogeneity from Citrobacter freundii, is monomeric with a molecular weight of ca. 64,000 and contains 1 mol of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate as a cofactor per mol of enzyme. L-Selenocysteine is the sole substrate (Km, 0.95 mM). L-Cysteine is a competitive inhibitor of the enzyme (Ki, 0.65 mM). The enzyme also catalyzes the alpha, beta elimination of beta-chloro-L-alanine to form NH3, pyruvate, and Cl- and is irreversibly inactivated during the reaction. The physicochemical properties, e.g., amino acid composition and subunit structure, of the bacterial enzyme are fairly different from those of the pig liver enzyme (Esaki et al., J. Biol. Chem. 257:4386-4391, 1982). However, the catalytic properties of both enzymes, e.g., substrate specificity and inactivation by the substrate or a mechanism-based inactivator, beta-chloro-L-alanine, are very similar. PMID:2991201

  1. Characterization of alanine catabolism in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and its importance for proliferation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Boulette, Megan L; Baynham, Patricia J; Jorth, Peter A; Kukavica-Ibrulj, Irena; Longoria, Aissa; Barrera, Karla; Levesque, Roger C; Whiteley, Marvin

    2009-10-01

    The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes a variety of infections in immunocompromised individuals, including individuals with the heritable disease cystic fibrosis. Like the carbon sources metabolized by many disease-causing bacteria, the carbon sources metabolized by P. aeruginosa at the host infection site are unknown. We recently reported that l-alanine is a preferred carbon source for P. aeruginosa and that two genes potentially involved in alanine catabolism (dadA and dadX) are induced during in vivo growth in the rat peritoneum and during in vitro growth in sputum (mucus) collected from the lungs of individuals with cystic fibrosis. The goals of this study were to characterize factors required for alanine catabolism in P. aeruginosa and to assess the importance of these factors for in vivo growth. Our results reveal that dadA and dadX are arranged in an operon and are required for catabolism of l-alanine. The dad operon is inducible by l-alanine, d-alanine, and l-valine, and induction is dependent on the transcriptional regulator Lrp. Finally, we show that a mutant unable to catabolize dl-alanine displays decreased competitiveness in a rat lung model of infection.

  2. Purification and gene cloning of alpha-methylserine aldolase from Ralstonia sp. strain AJ110405 and application of the enzyme in the synthesis of alpha-methyl-L-serine.

    PubMed

    Nozaki, Hiroyuki; Kuroda, Shinji; Watanabe, Kunihiko; Yokozeki, Kenzo

    2008-12-01

    By screening microorganisms that are capable of assimilating alpha-methyl-DL-serine, we detected alpha-methylserine aldolase in Ralstonia sp. strain AJ110405, Variovorax paradoxus AJ110406, and Bosea sp. strain AJ110407. A homogeneous form of this enzyme was purified from Ralstonia sp. strain AJ110405, and the gene encoding the enzyme was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The enzyme appeared to be a homodimer consisting of identical subunits, and its molecular mass was found to be 47 kDa. It contained 0.7 to 0.8 mol of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate per mol of subunit and could catalyze the interconversion of alpha-methyl-L-serine to L-alanine and formaldehyde in the absence of tetrahydrofolate. Formaldehyde was generated from alpha-methyl-L-serine but not from alpha-methyl-D-serine, L-serine, or D-serine. Alpha-methyl-L-serine synthesis activity was detected when L-alanine was used as the substrate. In contrast, no activity was detected when D-alanine was used as the substrate. In the alpha-methyl-L-serine synthesis reaction, the enzymatic activity was inhibited by an excess amount of formaldehyde, which was one of the substrates. We used cells of E. coli as a whole-cell catalyst to express the gene encoding alpha-methylserine aldolase and effectively obtained a high yield of optically pure alpha-methyl-L-serine using L-alanine and formaldehyde.

  3. Small Arms Handbook WS - 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1966-01-01

    single and multiple moving targets. sound targets And a combination of sound and multipla mc~ving targets. Tests are conducted at tile end of these...therefore, are Lalled "active" syste ms . ’A~.tve ’ nfrarcd systents are ous~.e;stible to dote~~tion by a properly equipped enemy. d. Filtered infrared tight...Sim u e nt n% ,IiI withl the d vic’ how i it’ F iu re 5. ms ytmI*n isdI -rhis ~oxwit M.14 or M. Rifle $-anl be ugcq an all Rifie sqa~i TA"I’w c of F

  4. Enzymatic resolution for the preparation of enantiomerically enriched D-beta-heterocyclic alanine derivatives using Escherichia coli aromatic L-amino acid transaminase.

    PubMed

    Cho, Byung-Kwan; Park, Hyung-Yeon; Seo, Joo-Hyun; Kinnera, Koteshwar; Lee, Bon-Su; Kim, Byung-Gee

    2004-11-20

    An enzymatic resolution was carried out for the preparation of enriched beta-heterocyclic D-alanine derivatives using Escherichia coli aromatic L-amino acid transaminase. The excess of pyrazole, imidazole, or 1,2,4-triazole reacted with methyl-2-acetamidoacrylate in acetonitrile in the presence of potassium carbonate at 60 degrees C, directly leading to make the potassium salt of the corresponding N-acetyl-beta-heterocyclic alanine derivatives. After the acidic deprotection of the N-acetyl group, 10 mM of racemic pyrazolylalanine, triazolylalanine, and imidazolylalanine were resolved to D-pyrazolylalanine, D-triazolylalanine, and D-imidazolylalanine with 46% (85% ee), 42% (72% ee), and 48% (95% ee) conversion yield in 18 h, respectively, using E. coli aromatic L-amino acid transaminase (EC 2.6.1.5). Although the three beta-heterocyclic L-alanine derivatives have similar molecular structures, they showed different reaction rates and enantioselectivities. The relative reactivities of the transaminase toward the beta-heterocyclic L-alanine derivatives could be explained by the relationship between the substrate binding energy (E, kcal/mol) to the enzyme active site and the distance (delta, A) from the nitrogen of alpha-amino group of the substrates to the C4' carbon of PLP-Lys258 Schiff base. As the ratio of the substrate binding energy (E) to the distance (delta) becomes indicative value of k(cat)/K(M) of the enzyme to the substrate, the relative reactivities of the beta-heterocyclic L-alanine derivatives were successfully correlated with E/delta, and the relationship was confirmed by our experiments.

  5. Analysis of the Effects of a gerP Mutation on the Germination of Spores of Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Butzin, Xuan Yi; Troiano, Anthony J.; Coleman, William H.; Griffiths, Keren K.; Doona, Christopher J.; Feeherry, Florence E.; Wang, Guiwen; Li, Yong-qing

    2012-01-01

    As previously reported, gerP Bacillus subtilis spores were defective in nutrient germination triggered via various germinant receptors (GRs), and the defect was eliminated by severe spore coat defects. The gerP spores' GR-dependent germination had a longer lag time between addition of germinants and initiation of rapid release of spores' dipicolinic acid (DPA), but times for release of >90% of DPA from individual spores were identical for wild-type and gerP spores. The gerP spores were also defective in GR-independent germination by DPA with its associated Ca2+ divalent cation (CaDPA) but germinated better than wild-type spores with the GR-independent germinant dodecylamine. The gerP spores exhibited no increased sensitivity to hypochlorite, suggesting that these spores have no significant coat defect. Overexpression of GRs in gerP spores did lead to faster germination via the overexpressed GR, but this was still slower than germination of comparable gerP+ spores. Unlike wild-type spores, for which maximal nutrient germinant concentrations were between 500 μM and 2 mM for l-alanine and ≤10 mM for l-valine, rates of gerP spore germination increased up to between 200 mM and 1 M l-alanine and 100 mM l-valine, and at 1 M l-alanine, the rates of germination of wild-type and gerP spores with or without all alanine racemases were almost identical. A high pressure of 150 MPa that triggers spore germination by activating GRs also triggered germination of wild-type and gerP spores identically. All these results support the suggestion that GerP proteins facilitate access of nutrient germinants to their cognate GRs in spores' inner membrane. PMID:22904285

  6. Mechanistic and Evolutionary Insights from the Reciprocal Promiscuity of Two Pyridoxal Phosphate-dependent Enzymes*

    PubMed Central

    Soo, Valerie W. C.; Yosaatmadja, Yuliana; Squire, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    Enzymes that utilize the cofactor pyridoxal 5′-phosphate play essential roles in amino acid metabolism in all organisms. The cofactor is used by proteins that adopt at least five different folds, which raises questions about the evolutionary processes that might explain the observed distribution of functions among folds. In this study, we show that a representative of fold type III, the Escherichia coli alanine racemase (ALR), is a promiscuous cystathionine β-lyase (CBL). Furthermore, E. coli CBL (fold type I) is a promiscuous alanine racemase. A single round of error-prone PCR and selection yielded variant ALR(Y274F), which catalyzes cystathionine β-elimination with a near-native Michaelis constant (Km = 3.3 mm) but a poor turnover number (kcat ≈10 h−1). In contrast, directed evolution also yielded CBL(P113S), which catalyzes l-alanine racemization with a poor Km (58 mm) but a high kcat (22 s−1). The structures of both variants were solved in the presence and absence of the l-alanine analogue, (R)-1-aminoethylphosphonic acid. As expected, the ALR active site was enlarged by the Y274F substitution, allowing better access for cystathionine. More surprisingly, the favorable kinetic parameters of CBL(P113S) appear to result from optimizing the pKa of Tyr-111, which acts as the catalytic acid during l-alanine racemization. Our data emphasize the short mutational routes between the functions of pyridoxal 5′-phosphate-dependent enzymes, regardless of whether or not they share the same fold. Thus, they confound the prevailing model of enzyme evolution, which predicts that overlapping patterns of promiscuity result from sharing a common multifunctional ancestor. PMID:27474741

  7. How stable is a collagen triple helix? An ab initio study on various collagen and beta-sheet forming sequences.

    PubMed

    Pálfi, Villo K; Perczel, András

    2008-07-15

    Collagen forms the well characterized triple helical secondary structure, stabilized by interchain H-bonds. Here we have investigated the stability of fully optimized collagen triple helices and beta-pleated sheets by using first principles (ab initio and DFT) calculations so as to determine the secondary structure preference depending on the amino acid composition. Models composed of a total of 18 amino acid residues were studied at six different amino acid compositions: (i) L-alanine only, (ii) glycine only, (iii) L-alanines and glycine, (iv) L-alanines and D-alanine, (v) L-prolines with glycine, (vi) L-proline, L-hydroxyproline, and glycine. The last two, v and vi, were designed to mimic the core part of collagen. Furthermore, ii, iii, and iv model the binding and/or recognition sites of collagen. Finally, i models the G-->A replacement, rare in collagen. All calculated structures show great resemblance to those determined by X-ray crystallography. Calculated triple helix formation affinities correlate well with experimentally determined stabilities derived from melting point (T(m)) data of different collagen models. The stabilization energy of a collagen triple helical structure over that of a beta-pleated sheet is 2.1 kcal mol(-1) per triplet for the [(-Pro-Hyp-Gly-)(2)](3) collagen peptide. This changes to 4.8 kcal mol(-1) per triplet of destabilization energy for the [(-Ala-Ala-Gly-)(2)](3) sequence, known to be disfavored in collagen. The present study proves that by using first principles methods for calculating stabilities of supramolecular complexes, such as collagen and beta-pleated sheets, one can obtain stability data in full agreement with experimental observations, which envisage the applicability of QM in molecular design.

  8. Food color, flavor, and conditioned avoidance among red-winged blackbirds.

    PubMed

    Werner, Scott J; Kimball, Bruce A; Provenza, Frederick D

    2008-01-28

    The relationship between food flavors and postingestive feedback enables mammalian herbivores to procure nutrients and avoid toxins within ever-changing environments. We conducted four experiments with red-winged blackbirds (Agelaius phoeniceus) in captivity to determine the relative roles of color and flavor cues paired with negative postingestive feedback. We first conducted baseline tests to assess preferences for colors and flavors. All blackbirds preferred red- to blue-colored food, and they preferred umami- (l-alanine) flavored to bitter/astringent food (tannic acid). We observed no difference in consumption of salty (NaCl) vs sour (citric acid) foods during baseline tests (i.e., neutral flavors). We then conditioned experimentally naïve blackbirds with intraperitoneal injections of lithium chloride (LiCl) to avoid food treated with red and l-alanine, or red and NaCl (n=30 birds per conditioning group). Subsequent to conditioning with LiCl, three test groups were established from each conditioned group to evaluate color and flavor preferences, and preferences for novel color-flavor pairings (e.g., red/tannic acid vs blue/l-alanine). Blackbirds avoided red and salty food throughout the 4-day test. Avoidance conditioned with LiCl extinguished for preferred flavors, but not for colors, of food. Conditioning affected indifference for the otherwise preferred flavor and avoidance for the otherwise neutral flavor. Relative to the neutral-flavor conditioning group, the group conditioned with a preferred flavor exhibited stronger conditioned avoidance of colored food. Unlike conditioned flavor avoidance, birds were conditioned to avoid red food only when blue food was made familiar prior to conditioning. Collectively, these results illustrate that blackbirds used affective processes (flavor-feedback relationships) to shift preference for both novel and familiar flavors, and cognitive associations (colors) to avoid food, subsequent to toxin exposure. We discuss the

  9. Altered Muscle Metabolism in Rats After Thermal Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-12-01

    by Herndon et a-ketoglutarate. 600 mM L -alanine, 0.18 mM NADH. 1.2 U/ml al." Briefly, this procedure consists of anesthetizing the rat (50 mg lactate...whole homogenates of the gastrocnemius muscle 9 sec and the abdomen for 3 sec in 980C water. Saline (20 ml) was to oxidize pyruvate- l -"C to "CO, was...the same time Econofluor (New England Nuclear, Boston. Mass.) and 10% metha- of day. nol. Oleate- l -’C oxidation rates by whole gastrocnemius homoge

  10. The phenylthiourea is a competitive inhibitor of the enzymatic oxidation of DOPA by phenoloxidase.

    PubMed

    Ryazanova, Alexandra D; Alekseev, Alexander A; Slepneva, Irina A

    2012-02-01

    Phenoloxidase is a key enzyme of melanization catalyzing the oxidation of phenols. Phenylthiourea (PTU) is the well-known and widely used inhibitor of phenoloxidase. However, the mechanism of its action is not quite clear. In the present work, the effect of PTU on the enzymatic oxidation of 3-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)-l-alanine (DOPA) by phenoloxidase was studied by spectrophotometric methods. The inhibition constant of PTU was estimated as 0.21 ± 0.09 µM and the competitive type of inhibition was determined for this reaction.

  11. A method to assess the bacterial content of refrigerated meat.

    PubMed Central

    Perez de Castro, B; Asensio, M A; Sanz, B; Ordoñez, J A

    1988-01-01

    A new method has been developed to estimate the levels of gram-negative bacteria on refrigerated meat. The method is based on the aminopeptidase activity of these bacteria, which cleaves L-alanine-p-nitroanilide to yield p-nitroaniline, which is easily determined spectrophotometrically. This method allows the determination of levels around 10(6) to 10(7) CFU cm-2 in about 3 h. Because of the yellow color of p-nitroaniline, bacterial loads around 10(7) CFU cm-2 develop a color intense enough to be detected with the naked eye. PMID:3415222

  12. Inorganic nitrogen assimilation by the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas capsulata.

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, B C; Gest, H

    1976-01-01

    The photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas capsulata lacks glutamate dehydrogenase and normally uses the glutamine synthetase/glutamate synthase sequence of reactions for assimilation of N2 and ammonia. The glutamine synthetase in cell-free extracts of the organism is completely sedimented by centrifugation at 140,000 X g for 2 h, is inhibited by L-alanine but not by adenosine 5'-monophosphate, and exhibits two apparent Km values for ammonia (ca. 13 muM and 1 mM). PMID:10281

  13. Alpha-helical hydrophobic polypeptides form proton-selective channels in lipid bilayers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliver, A. E.; Deamer, D. W.

    1994-01-01

    Proton translocation is important in membrane-mediated processes such as ATP-dependent proton pumps, ATP synthesis, bacteriorhodopsin, and cytochrome oxidase function. The fundamental mechanism, however, is poorly understood. To test the theoretical possibility that bundles of hydrophobic alpha-helices could provide a low energy pathway for ion translocation through the lipid bilayer, polyamino acids were incorporated into extruded liposomes and planar lipid membranes, and proton translocation was measured. Liposomes with incorporated long-chain poly-L-alanine or poly-L-leucine were found to have proton permeability coefficients 5 to 7 times greater than control liposomes, whereas short-chain polyamino acids had relatively little effect. Potassium permeability was not increased markedly by any of the polyamino acids tested. Analytical thin layer chromatography measurements of lipid content and a fluorescamine assay for amino acids showed that there were approximately 135 polyleucine or 65 polyalanine molecules associated with each liposome. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy indicated that a major fraction of the long-chain hydrophobic peptides existed in an alpha-helical conformation. Single-channel recording in both 0.1 N HCl and 0.1 M KCl was also used to determine whether proton-conducting channels formed in planar lipid membranes (phosphatidylcholine/phosphatidylethanolamine, 1:1). Poly-L-leucine and poly-L-alanine in HCl caused a 10- to 30-fold increase in frequency of conductive events compared to that seen in KCl or by the other polyamino acids in either solution. This finding correlates well with the liposome observations in which these two polyamino acids caused the largest increase in membrane proton permeability but had little effect on potassium permeability. Poly-L-leucine was considerably more conductive than poly-L-alanine due primarily to larger event amplitudes and, to a lesser extent, a higher event frequency. Poly-L-leucine caused two

  14. Analytical protocol for identification of BMAA and DAB in biological samples.

    PubMed

    Spácil, Zdenek; Eriksson, Johan; Jonasson, Sara; Rasmussen, Ulla; Ilag, Leopold L; Bergman, Birgitta

    2010-01-01

    Beta-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is a non-protein amino acid, thought to be inflicting neurodegenerative diseases related to ALS/PDC in human beings. Due to conflicting data concerning the presence of BMAA in various biological matrixes, we present a robust and sensitive method for high confidence identification of BMAA after derivatization by 6-aminoquinolyl-N-hydroxysuccinimidyl carbamate (AQC). The efficient sample pretreatment in combination with LC-MS/MS SRM enables chromatographic separation of BMAA from the isomer 2,3-diaminobutyric acid (DAB). The method is applicable for selective BMAA/DAB detection in various biological samples ranging from a prokaryotic cyanobacterium to eukaryotic fish.

  15. The Effects of the Toxic Cyanobacterium Limnothrix (Strain AC0243) on Bufo marinus Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, Olivia; Fabbro, Larelle; Makiela, Sandrine

    2014-01-01

    Limnothrix (strain AC0243) is a cyanobacterium, which has only recently been identified as toxin producing. Under laboratory conditions, Bufo marinus larvae were exposed to 100,000 cells mL−1 of Limnothrix (strain AC0243) live cultures for seven days. Histological examinations were conducted post mortem and revealed damage to the notochord, eyes, brain, liver, kidney, pancreas, gastrointestinal tract, and heart. The histopathological results highlight the toxicological impact of this strain, particularly during developmental stages. Toxicological similarities to β-N-Methylamino-l-alanine are discussed. PMID:24662524

  16. Deuterium isotope effect on 13C chemical shifts of tetrabutylammonium salts of Schiff bases amino acids.

    PubMed

    Rozwadowski, Z

    2006-09-01

    Deuterium isotope effects on 13C chemical shift of tetrabutylammonium salts of Schiff bases, derivatives of amino acids (glycine, L-alanine, L-phenylalanine, L-valine, L-leucine, L-isoleucine and L-methionine) and various ortho-hydroxyaldehydes in CDCl3 have been measured. The results have shown that the tetrabutylammonium salts of the Schiff bases amino acids, being derivatives of 2-hydroxynaphthaldehyde and 3,5-dibromosalicylaldehyde, exist in the NH-form, while in the derivatives of salicylaldehyde and 5-bromosalicylaldehyde a proton transfer takes place. The interactions between COO- and NH groups stabilize the proton-transferred form through a bifurcated intramolecular hydrogen bond.

  17. Polymerization of amino acids under primitive earth conditions.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flores, J. J.; Ponnamperuma, C.

    1972-01-01

    Small amounts of peptides were obtained when equal amounts of methane and ammonia were reacted with vaporized aqueous solutions of C14-labeled glycine, L-alanine, L-aspartic acid, L-glutamic acid and L-threonine in the presence of a continuous spark discharge in a 24-hr cyclic process. The experiment was designed to demonstrate the possibility of peptide synthesis under simulated primeval earth conditions. It is theorized that some dehydration-condensation processes may have taken place, with ammonium cyanide, the hydrogencyanide tetramer or aminonitriles as intermediate products, during the early chemical evolution of the earth.

  18. The mussel thread cuticle, a biological granular composite coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holten-Andersen, Niels; Birkedal, Henrik; Lee, Kaa Yee C.; Waite, J. Herbert

    2009-03-01

    The cuticle of mussel byssal threads is a peculiar natural granular composite coating that combines high extensibility with high stiffness and hardness. In this study fluorescence microscopy and elemental analysis were exploited to show that the 3, 4-dihydroxyphenyl-L-alanine (dopa) residues of mussel foot protein-1 co-localize with Fe and Ca distributions in the cuticle of Mytilus galloprovincials mussel byssal threads. Removal of Fe and Ca from the cuticle by chelation results in a 50% reduction in hardness. Dopa-metal complexes may be a significant source of stability as cross-links in the composite cuticles.

  19. Reduced Acid Dissociation of Amino-Acids at the Surface of Water

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    We use surface-specific intensity vibrational sum-frequency generation and attenuated total reflection spectroscopy to probe the ionization state of the amino-acids l-alanine and l-proline at the air/water surface and in the bulk. The ionization state is determined by probing the vibrational signatures of the carboxylic acid group, representing the nondissociated acid form, and the carboxylate anion group, representing the dissociated form, over a wide range of pH values. We find that the carboxylic acid group deprotonates at a significantly higher pH at the surface than in the bulk. PMID:28177623

  20. Reduced Acid Dissociation of Amino-Acids at the Surface of Water.

    PubMed

    Strazdaite, Simona; Meister, Konrad; Bakker, Huib J

    2017-03-15

    We use surface-specific intensity vibrational sum-frequency generation and attenuated total reflection spectroscopy to probe the ionization state of the amino-acids l-alanine and l-proline at the air/water surface and in the bulk. The ionization state is determined by probing the vibrational signatures of the carboxylic acid group, representing the nondissociated acid form, and the carboxylate anion group, representing the dissociated form, over a wide range of pH values. We find that the carboxylic acid group deprotonates at a significantly higher pH at the surface than in the bulk.

  1. Synthesis and characterization of bis-thiourea having amino acid derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fakhar, Imran; Yamin, Bohari M.; Hasbullah, Siti Aishah

    2016-11-01

    In this article four new symmetric bis-thiourea derivatives having amino acid linkers were reported with good yield. Isophthaloyl dichloride was used as spacer and L-alanine, L-aspartic acid, L-phenylalanine and L-glutamic acid were used as linkers. Bis-thiourea derivatives were prepared from relatively stable isophthaloyl isothiocyanate intermediate. Newly synthesized bis-thiourea derivatives were characterized by FTIR, H-NMR, 13C-NMR and CHNS-O elemental analysis techniques. Characterization data was in good agreement with the expected derivatives, hence confirmed the synthesis of four new derivatives of bis-thiourea having amino acids.

  2. Amplification of Diverse Catalytic Properties of Evolving Molecules in a Simulated Hydrothermal Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, Shinnosuke; Koyama, Akihiro; Nemoto, Atsushi; Honda, Hajime; Imai, Ei-Ichi; Hatori, Kuniyuki; Matsuno, Koichiro

    2003-12-01

    We observed chemical evolution in a mixture of four amino acids, glycine, L-alanine, L-valine and L-aspartic acid, circulated through a flow reactor simulating the thermodynamic conditions of a hydrothermal environment. These monomers form peptides with tertiary structures and potential catalytic functions. The HPLC profile of synthesized oligomers varied with each particular run, but the products were found to separate into distinct clusters when more than one hundred runs were compared statistically. This observation suggests that chemical evolution on the early Earth had stochastic aspects that must be understood in order to develop useful models of prebiotic evolution.

  3. Immunoregulation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-05-01

    provided by Dr. R. G. Webster, St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN. The polymers L-Glutamic acid6O:L-Alanine 3O:L-TyrosinelO (GAT) and (L...I-\\-- / Ipfll< - ((/t fi’, i III Ii//I! ll I/it lPKI Ii//t heI (Rc b/Ccli// i /I/it i- intrzIc i n iIc ito 0 p fIN - 1I!IiI e n ’c m it d \\m t\\ u

  4. Effect of static magnetic field on endospore germination.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wen Jie; Liu, Si Li; Yung, Pun To

    2017-02-01

    This work investigated the effect of static magnetic field (SMF) on Bacillus atrophaeus endospore germination. Germination was triggered by L-alanine in 1.3-T SMF and characterized by ion release, Ca(2+) -dipicolinic acid release, and water influx. These events were monitored by electrical conductivity, Tb-DPA fluorescence, and optical density, respectively. Culturability of endospore germinated in SMF exposure was evaluated by CFU enumeration. Results indicated that 1.3-T SMF failed to significantly affect endospore germination and culturability, suggesting that the three aforementioned processes were not sensitive to SMF. Bioelectromagnetics. 38:121-127, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Lysis of Escherichia coli by Glycine Is Potentiated by Pyridoxine Starvation

    PubMed Central

    Dempsey, Walter B.

    1973-01-01

    Pyridoxineless mutants of Escherichia coli are lysed in a few hours when starved for pyridoxine in a glucose minimal medium containing glycine at 10 mM. The lysis is prevented equally well by l-alanine and by d-alanine when either is present at 0.1 mM. The lysis is potentiated by 0.5 mM l-methionine. The peculiar susceptibility of E. coli B to glycine-mediated lysis during starvation for pyridoxine suggests that the starvation reduces the availability of some normal antagonist of glycine, presumably alanine. PMID:4583221

  6. Electron transport and electrochemical proton gradient in membrane vesicles of Clostridium thermoautotrophicum.

    PubMed Central

    Hugenholtz, J; Ljungdahl, L G

    1989-01-01

    Membrane vesicles of Clostridium thermoautotrophicum containing carbon monoxide dehydrogenase generated a proton motive force when exposed to CO. This proton motive force, with a value of -140 mV, consisted of only an electrical potential at pH 7.5 and above and of an electrical potential and pH gradient at a lower pH. The proton motive force drove the uptake of L-alanine by the vesicles to a concentration of 300 times that of the medium. PMID:2708323

  7. Inhibiting Inosine Hydrolase and Alanine Racemase to Enhance the Germination of Bacillus anthracis Sterne Spores: Potential Spore Decontamination Strategies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-19

    hydrolase {lunH) defective mutant of Sterne strain with kanamycin insertion (Sterne iunh::O-kan-2) from Biology Department at Louisiana Tech University...40 50 60 Time (min) PBS PBS-H AI AI-H • iunH mutant (c) Fluorescent assay 300 *** 200 - Sterne 100 - iunH 0~------------~-------o 20 40 60...200 0 20 40 60 time -min 100 20 40 60 time -min Germination rate of iunH mutant spores initiated by L-alanine and inosine in presence of DCS 10

  8. Growth and study of triglycine sulfate (TGS) crystals in low-G for infrared detector applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lal, R. B.; Batra, A. K.; Aggarwal, M. D.; Wilcox, W. R.; Trolinger, J. D.

    1991-01-01

    Experiments on growth of TGS crystals using (010) and (001) oriented disc shape seeds in the low gravity environment aboard Spacelab-3 are presented. The holographic interferograms reconstructed on the ground demonstrated diffusion limited growth. The morphology of the crystals grown was similar to that of crystals grown on earth, except the faces were not fully developed and planar. The device quality of these crytals is considered to be comparable with the best crystals grown on earth. Better infrared detector characteristics were obtained by doping TGS with Cs and L-alanine simultaneously on the ground. Crystals grown on (010) poled seeds show improved morphology and pyroelectric properties.

  9. Role of Lipotropes in Mammary Carcinogenesis.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-09-01

    6 1. Experimental M ethods ......................................... 6 2. R esults...Pyridoxine HC1 0.022 Calcium phosphate, 4.5 Riboflavin 0.022 dibasic L -Alanine 3.5 Thiamine HC1 0.022 L -Arginine HC1 12.1 Glycine 23.3 L -Asparagine 6.0 L ...histidine HC1.H 20 4.5 L -Aspartic acid 3.5 L -isoleucine 8.2 L -Cystine 3.5 L -leucine 11.1 L -Glutamic acid 40.0 L -lysine HC1 18.0 Mineral mix, 35.0 L

  10. Reducing lactate secretion by ldhA Deletion in L-glutamate- producing strain Corynebacterium glutamicum GDK-9

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dalong; Guan, Dan; Liang, Jingbo; Guo, Chunqian; Xie, Xixian; Zhang, Chenglin; Xu, Qingyang; Chen, Ning

    2014-01-01

    L-lactate is one of main byproducts excreted in to the fermentation medium. To improve L-glutamate production and reduce L-lactate accumulation, L-lactate dehydrogenase-encoding gene ldhA was knocked out from L-glutamate producing strain Corynebacterium glutamicum GDK-9, designated GDK-9ΔldhA. GDK-9ΔldhA produced approximately 10.1% more L-glutamate than the GDK-9, and yielded lower levels of such by-products as α-ketoglutarate, L-lactate and L-alanine. Since dissolved oxygen (DO) is one of main factors affecting L-lactate formation during L-glutamate fermentation, we investigated the effect of ldhA deletion from GDK-9 under different DO conditions. Under both oxygen-deficient and high oxygen conditions, L-glutamate production by GDK-9ΔldhA was not higher than that of the GDK-9. However, under micro-aerobic conditions, GDK-9ΔldhA exhibited 11.61% higher L-glutamate and 58.50% lower L-alanine production than GDK-9. Taken together, it is demonstrated that deletion of ldhA can enhance L-glutamate production and lower the unwanted by-products concentration, especially under micro-aerobic conditions. PMID:25763057

  11. Cyanogenesis - a general phenomenon in the lepidoptera

    SciTech Connect

    Witthohn, K.; Naumann, C.M.

    1987-08-01

    There are two different pathways known to be used for the detoxification of hydrocyanic acid in insects, viz., rhodanese and ..beta..-cyano-L-alanine synthase. The authors consider the latter to be indicative for cyanogenesis, while rhodanese might, in general, play a more important role in sulfur transfer for protein synthesis. This paper reports on the distribution of ..beta..-cyano-L-alanine (BCA) in the Lepidoptera. First reports of cyanogenesis are presented for the following families: Papilionidae, Pieridae, Lycaenidae, Hesperiidae, Lymantriidae, Arctiidae, Notodontidae, Megalopygidae, Limacodidae, Cymatophoridae, Noctuidae, Geometridae, and Yponomeutidae. New and old records for three other families, the Nymphalidae, Zygaenidae, and Heterogynidae, are included to complete the present state of knowledge. Special emphasis has been laid on the Nymphalidae, where BCA has been detected in eight subfamilies. Taxonomic, geographic, and seasonal variation has been found in a number of cases. In all cases observed so far, the source of cyanogenesis in the Lepidoptera is most probably the cyanoglucosides linamarin and lotaustralin, although cyanogenesis based on mustard oil glucosides and cyclopentenoid glucosides might occur as well. BCA has been found in both cryptic and aposematic species, including taxa such as the Pieridae, Danainae, Ithomiinae, and Arctiidae, where the defensive biology is believed to be linked with other compounds, like mustard oil glucosides, cardenolides, or pyrrolizidinie alkaloids. The ecological interaction and significance of such secondary compounds is not yet understood.

  12. A 1-year study of the activities of seven hydrolases in a communal wastewater treatment plant: trends and correlations.

    PubMed

    Kreutz, Jennifer Anna; Böckenhüser, Ina; Wacht, Marion; Fischer, Klaus

    2016-08-01

    The activities of seven hydrolytic enzymes (L-alanine aminopeptidase, esterase, α-and β-glucosidase, phosphomonoesterase, phosphodiesterase, sulfatase) were monitored during 1 year in parallel and serial treatment units of the biological stage of a communal wastewater treatment plant. The spatial homogeneity of enzyme activities was high (coefficients of variation <10 % for the entire treatment stage). A significant difference between aerated and stirred tanks was not observed. Temperature seemed not to exert a direct influence. Long periods with comparably constant activities were interrupted by a few strong, short-time rises. The mean enzyme activities followed the sequence sulfatase < α-glucosidase < phosphodiesterase ≈ β-glucosidase≈esterase < phosphomonoesterase < L-alanine aminopeptidase. The enzyme activities correlated among themselves at different levels. Very strong (r > 0.8) and highly significant (p < 0.01) correlations between the activities of both glucosidases, both phosphoesterases, and between phosphomonoesterase and both glucosidases were ascertained, pointing to the importance of substrate specificity and similarity of metabolic functions. Moderate and strong activity correlations with various wastewater constituents and with process parameters, e.g., concentrations, loads and eliminated amounts of phosphorous, TOC concentrations and loads of the plant effluent, dry matter content of activated sludge, and sludge volume, were found. The esterase activity was least correlated with other enzymes and often showed deviating dependencies on process parameters, raising questions concerning its appropriateness as a sum parameter for enzymatic and heterotrophic activity.

  13. Decrystallization of Crystals Using Gold "Nano-Bullets" and the Metal-Assisted and Microwave-Accelerated Decrystallization Technique.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Nishone; Boone-Kukoyi, Zainab; Shortt, Raquel; Lansiquot, Carisse; Kioko, Bridgit; Bonyi, Enock; Toker, Salih; Ozturk, Birol; Aslan, Kadir

    2016-10-18

    Gout is caused by the overproduction of uric acid and the inefficient metabolism of dietary purines in humans. Current treatments of gout, which include anti-inflammatory drugs, cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors, and systemic glucocorticoids, have harmful side-effects. Our research laboratory has recently introduced an innovative approach for the decrystallization of biological and chemical crystals using the Metal-Assisted and Microwave-Accelerated Evaporative Decrystallization (MAMAD) technique. In the MAMAD technique, microwave energy is used to heat and activate gold nanoparticles that behave as "nano-bullets" to rapidly disrupt the crystal structure of biological crystals placed on planar surfaces. In this study, crystals of various sizes and compositions were studied as models for tophaceous gout at different stages (i.e., uric acid as small crystals (~10-100 μm) and l-alanine as medium (~300 μm) and large crystals (~4400 μm). Our results showed that the use of the MAMAD technique resulted in the reduction of the size and number of uric acid and l-alanine crystals up to >40% when exposed to intermittent microwave heating (up to 20 W power at 8 GHz) in the presence of 20 nm gold nanoparticles up to 120 s. This study demonstrates that the MAMAD technique can be potentially used as an alternative therapeutic method for the treatment of gout by effective decrystallization of large crystals, similar in size to those that often occur in gout.

  14. Chiral resolution of salbutamol in plasma sample by a new chiral ligand-exchange chromatography method after its extraction with nano-sized imprinted polymer.

    PubMed

    Alizadeh, Taher; Shamkhali, Amir Naser

    2016-01-15

    A new chromatographic procedure, based upon chiral ligand-exchange principal, was developed for the resolution of salbutamol enantiomers. The separation was carried out on a C18 column. (l)-Alanine and Cu(2+) were applied as chiral resolving agent and complexing ion, respectively. The kind of copper salt had definitive effect on the enantioseparation. Density functional theory (DFT) was used to substantiate the effect of various anions, accompanying Cu(2+), on the formation of ternary complexes, assumed to be created during separation process. The DFT results showed that the anion kind had huge effect on the stability difference between two corresponding diastereomeric complexes and their chemical structures. It was shown that the extent of participation of the chiral selector in the ternary diastereomeric complexes formation was managed by the anion kind, affecting thus the enantioseparation efficiency of the developed method. Water/methanol (70:30) mixture containing (l)-alanine-Cu(2+) (4:1) was found to be the best mobile phase for salbutamol enantioseparation. In order to analyze sulbutamol enantiomers in plasma samples, racemic salbutamol was first extracted from the samples via nano-sized salbutamol-imprinted polymer and then enantioseparated by the developed method.

  15. X-ray diffraction study of nanocrystalline and amorphous structure within major and minor ampullate dragline spider silks

    SciTech Connect

    Sampath, Sujatha; Isdebski, Thomas; Jenkins, Janelle E.; Ayon, Joel V.; Henning, Robert W.; Orgel, Joseph P.R.O.; Antipoa, Olga; Yarger, Jeffery L.

    2012-07-25

    Synchrotron X-ray micro-diffraction experiments were carried out on Nephila clavipes (NC) and Argiope aurantia (AA) major (MA) and minor ampullate (MiA) fibers that make up dragline spider silk. The diffraction patterns show a semi-crystalline structure with {beta}-poly(L-alanine) nanocrystallites embedded in a partially oriented amorphous matrix. A superlattice reflection 'S' diffraction ring is observed, which corresponds to a crystalline component larger in size and is poorly oriented, when compared to the {beta}-poly(L-alanine) nanocrystallites that are commonly observed in dragline spider silks. Crystallite size, crystallinity and orientation about the fiber axis have been determined from the wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) patterns. In both NC and AA, the MiA silks are found to be more highly crystalline, when compared with the corresponding MA silks. Detailed analysis on the amorphous matrix shows considerable differences in the degree of order of the oriented amorphous component between the different silks studied and may play a crucial role in determining the mechanical properties of the silks.

  16. Amino Acid Transport in Mycobacterium smegmatis

    PubMed Central

    Yabu, Kunihiko

    1970-01-01

    The transport of d-alanine, d-glutamic acid, and d-valine in Mycobacterium smegmatis was compared quantitatively with that of their l-isomers. It appeared that the uptake of d-alanine was mediated by an active process displaying saturation kinetics characteristic of enzyme function, whereas the uptake of d-glutamic acid was accomplished by a passive process showing diffusion kinetics. Both processes were involved in the uptake of l-alanine, l-glutamic acid, d-valine, and l-valine. d-Valine competed with l-valine for entry into the cell through a single active process. d-Alanine and l-alanine also utilized the same active process, but the d-isomer could not enter the cell through the passive process. The passive process exhibited characteristics of diffusion, but was sensitive to sulfhydryl-blocking reagents and showed competition among structurally related amino acids. These last findings suggested that the passive process is a facilitated diffusion. PMID:5437732

  17. Equilibria and absorption spectra of tryptophanase.

    PubMed

    Metzler, C M; Viswanath, R; Metzler, D E

    1991-05-25

    Tryptophanase (tryptophan: indole-lyase) from Escherichia coli has been isolated in the holoenzyme form and its absorption spectra and acid-base chemistry have been reevaluated. Apoenzyme has been prepared by dialysis against sodium phosphate and L-alanine and molar absorptivities of the coenzyme bands have been estimated by readdition of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate. The spectrophotometric titration curve, whose midpoint is at pH 7.6 in 0.1 M potassium phosphate buffers, indicates some degree of cooperativity in dissociation of a pair of protons. Resolution of the computed spectra of individual ionic forms of the enzyme with lognormal distribution curves shows that band shapes are similar to those of model Schiff bases and of aspartate aminotransferase. Using molar areas from the latter we estimated amounts of individual tautomeric species. In addition to ketoenamine and enolimine or covalent adduct the high pH form also appears to contain approximately 18% of a species with a dipolar ionic ring (protonated on the ring nitrogen and with phenolate -O-). We suggest that this may be the catalytically active form of the coenzyme in tryptophanase. The equilibrium between tryptophanase and L-alanine has also been reevaluated.

  18. D-Galacturonic Acid: A Highly Reactive Compound in Nonenzymatic Browning. 2. Formation of Amino-Specific Degradation Products.

    PubMed

    Wegener, Steffen; Bornik, Maria-Anna; Kroh, Lothar W

    2015-07-22

    Thermal treatment of aqueous solutions of D-galacturonic acid and L-alanine at pH 3, 5, and 8 led to rapid and more intensive nonenzymatic browning reactions compared to similar solutions of other uronic acids and to Maillard reactions of reducing sugars. The hemiacetal ring structures of uronic acids had a high impact on browning behavior and reaction pathways. Besides reductic acid (1,2-dihydroxy-2-cyclopenten-1-one), 4,5-dihydroxy-2-cyclopenten-1-one (DHCP), furan-2-carboxaldehyde, and norfuraneol (4-hydroxy-5-methyl-3-(2H)-furanone) could be detected as typical products of nonenzymatic uronic acid browning reactions. 2-(2-Formyl-1H-pyrrole-1-yl)propanoic acid (FPA) and 1-(1-carboxyethyl)-3-hydroxypyridin-1-ium (HPA) were identified as specific reaction products of uronic acids with amine participation like l-alanine. In contrast, the structurally related D-galacturonic acid methyl ester showed less browning activity and degradation under equal reaction conditions. Pectin-specific degradation products such as 5-formyl-2-furanoic acid and 2-furanoic acid were found but could not be verified for d-galacturonic acid monomers alone.

  19. Temperature effects in first-principles solid state calculations of the chemical shielding tensor made simple

    SciTech Connect

    Monserrat, Bartomeu Needs, Richard J.; Pickard, Chris J.

    2014-10-07

    We study the effects of atomic vibrations on the solid-state chemical shielding tensor using first principles density functional theory calculations. At the harmonic level, we use a Monte Carlo method and a perturbative expansion. The Monte Carlo method is accurate but computationally expensive, while the perturbative method is computationally more efficient, but approximate. We find excellent agreement between the two methods for both the isotropic shift and the shielding anisotropy. The effects of zero-point quantum mechanical nuclear motion are important up to relatively high temperatures: at 500 K they still represent about half of the overall vibrational contribution. We also investigate the effects of anharmonic vibrations, finding that their contribution to the zero-point correction to the chemical shielding tensor is small. We exemplify these ideas using magnesium oxide and the molecular crystals L-alanine and β-aspartyl-L-alanine. We therefore propose as the method of choice to incorporate the effects of temperature in solid state chemical shielding tensor calculations using the perturbative expansion within the harmonic approximation. This approach is accurate and requires a computational effort that is about an order of magnitude smaller than that of dynamical or Monte Carlo approaches, so these effects might be routinely accounted for.

  20. A serendipitous discovery of antifreeze protein-specific activity in C-linked antifreeze glycoprotein analogs.

    PubMed

    Eniade, Adewale; Purushotham, Madhusudhan; Ben, Robert N; Wang, J B; Horwath, Kathleen

    2003-01-01

    Structurally diverse carbon-linked (C-linked) analogs of antifreeze glycoprotein (AFGP) have been prepared via linear or convergent solid phase synthesis. These analogs range in molecular weight from approx 1.5-4.1 KDa and do not possess the beta-D-galactose-1,3-alpha-D-N-acetylgalactosamine carbohydrate moiety or the L-threonine-L-alanine-L-alanine polypeptide backbone native to the AFGP wild-type. Despite these dramatic structural modifications, the 2.7-KDa and 4.1-KDa analogs possess antifreeze protein-specific activity as determined by recrystallization-inhibition (RI) and thermal hysteresis (TH) assays. These analogs are weaker than the wild-type in their activity, but nanoliter osmometry indicates that these compounds are binding to ice and affecting a localized freezing point depression. This is the first example of a C-linked AFGP analog that possesses TH and RI activity and suggests that the rational design and synthesis of chemically and biologically stable AFGP analogs is a feasible and worthwhile endeavor. Given the low degree of TH activity, these compounds may prove useful for the protection of cells during freezing and thawing cycles.

  1. The antineoplastic effect of carnosine is accompanied by induction of PDK4 and can be mimicked by L-histidine.

    PubMed

    Letzien, Ulrike; Oppermann, Henry; Meixensberger, Jürgen; Gaunitz, Frank

    2014-04-01

    Carnosine (β-alanyl-L-histidine) is a naturally occurring dipeptide that shows antineoplastic effects in cell culture as well as in animal experiments. Since its mode of action and the targets at the molecular level have not yet been elucidated, we performed qRT-PCR experiments with RNA isolated from glioblastoma cell lines treated with carnosine, β-alanine, L-alanine, L-histidine and the dipeptide L-alanine-L-histidine. The experiments identified a strong induction of expression of the gene encoding pyruvate dehydrogenase 4 (PDK4) under the influence of carnosine and L-histidine, but not by the other substances employed. In addition, inhibition of cell viability was only detected in cells treated with carnosine and L-histidine, with the latter showing a significantly stronger effect than carnosine. Since the tumor cells expressed the tissue form of carnosinase (CN2) but almost no serum carnosinase (CN1), we conclude that cleavage by CN2 is a prerequisite for the antineoplastic effect of carnosine. In addition, enhanced expression of PDK4 under the influence of carnosine/L-histidine opens a new perspective for the interpretation of the ergogenic potential of dietary β-alanine supplementation and adds a new contribution to a growing body of evidence that single amino acids can regulate key metabolic pathways important in health and disease.

  2. A Better Understanding of Protein Structure and Function by the Synthesis and Incorporation of Selenium- and Tellurium Containing Tryptophan Analogs

    SciTech Connect

    Helmey, Sherif Samir; Rice, Ambrose Eugene; Hatch, Duane Michael; Silks, Louis A.; Marti-Arbona, Ricardo

    2016-08-17

    Unnatural heavy metal-containing amino acid analogs have shown to be very important in the analysis of protein structure, using methods such as X-ray crystallography, mass spectroscopy, and NMR spectroscopy. Synthesis and incorporation of selenium-containing methionine analogs has already been shown in the literature however with some drawbacks due to toxicity to host organisms. Thus synthesis of heavy metal tryptophan analogs should prove to be more effective since the amino acid tryptophan is naturally less abundant in many proteins. For example, bioincorporation of β-seleno[3,2-b]pyrrolyl-L-alanine ([4,5]SeTrp) and β-selenolo[2,3-b]pyrrolyl-L-alanine ([6,7]SeTrp) has been shown in the following proteins without structural or catalytic perturbations: human annexin V, barstar, and dihydrofolate reductase. The reported synthesis of these Se-containing analogs is currently not efficient for commercial purposes. Thus a more efficient, concise, high-yield synthesis of selenotryptophan, as well as the corresponding, tellurotryptophan, will be necessary for wide spread use of these unnatural amino acid analogs. This research will highlight our progress towards a synthetic route of both [6,7]SeTrp and [6,7]TeTrp, which ultimately will be used to study the effect on the catalytic activity of Lignin Peroxidase (LiP).

  3. Detection of Cyanotoxins in Algae Dietary Supplements

    PubMed Central

    Roy-Lachapelle, Audrey; Solliec, Morgan; Bouchard, Maryse F.; Sauvé, Sébastien

    2017-01-01

    Algae dietary supplements are marketed worldwide as natural health products. Although their proprieties have been claimed as beneficial to improve overall health, there have been several previous reports of contamination by cyanotoxins. These products generally contain non-toxic cyanobacteria, but the methods of cultivation in natural waters without appropriate quality controls allow contamination by toxin producer species present in the natural environment. In this study, we investigated the presence of total microcystins, seven individual microcystins (RR, YR, LR, LA, LY, LW, LF), anatoxin-a, dihydroanatoxin-a, epoxyanatoxin-a, cylindrospermopsin, saxitoxin, and β-methylamino-l-alanine in 18 different commercially available products containing Spirulina or Aphanizomenon flos-aquae. Total microcystins analysis was accomplished using a Lemieux oxidation and a chemical derivatization using dansyl chloride was needed for the simultaneous analysis of cylindrospermopsin, saxitoxin, and β-methylamino-l-alanine. Moreover, the use of laser diode thermal desorption (LDTD) and ultra-high performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) both coupled to high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) enabled high performance detection and quantitation. Out of the 18 products analyzed, 8 contained some cyanotoxins at levels exceeding the tolerable daily intake values. The presence of cyanotoxins in these algal dietary supplements reinforces the need for a better quality control as well as consumer’s awareness on the potential risks associated with the consumption of these supplements. PMID:28245621

  4. Functional analysis of all aminotransferase proteins inferred from the genome sequence of Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Marienhagen, Jan; Kennerknecht, Nicole; Sahm, Hermann; Eggeling, Lothar

    2005-11-01

    Twenty putative aminotransferase (AT) proteins of Corynebacterium glutamicum, or rather pyridoxal-5'-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzymes, were isolated and assayed among others with L-glutamate, L-aspartate, and L-alanine as amino donors and a number of 2-oxo-acids as amino acceptors. One outstanding AT identified is AlaT, which has a broad amino donor specificity utilizing (in the order of preference) L-glutamate > 2-aminobutyrate > L-aspartate with pyruvate as acceptor. Another AT is AvtA, which utilizes L-alanine to aminate 2-oxo-isovalerate, the L-valine precursor, and 2-oxo-butyrate. A second AT active with the L-valine precursor and that of the other two branched-chain amino acids, too, is IlvE, and both enzyme activities overlap partially in vivo, as demonstrated by the analysis of deletion mutants. Also identified was AroT, the aromatic AT, and this and IlvE were shown to have comparable activities with phenylpyruvate, thus demonstrating the relevance of both ATs for L-phenylalanine synthesis. We also assessed the activity of two PLP-containing cysteine desulfurases, supplying a persulfide intermediate. One of them is SufS, which assists in the sulfur transfer pathway for the Fe-S cluster assembly. Together with the identification of further ATs and the additional analysis of deletion mutants, this results in an overview of the ATs within an organism that may not have been achieved thus far.

  5. Structural evolution of amino acid crystals under stress from a non-empirical density functional

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabatini, Riccardo; Küçükbenli, Emine; Kolb, Brian; Thonhauser, T.; de Gironcoli, Stefano

    2012-10-01

    Use of the non-local correlation functional vdW-DF (from ‘van der Waals density functional’ Dion M et al 2004 Phys. Rev. Lett. 92 246401) has become a popular approach for including van der Waals interactions within density functional theory. In this work, we extend the vdW-DF theory and derive the corresponding stress tensor in a fashion similar to the LDA and GGA approach, which allows for a straightforward implementation in any electronic structure code. We then apply our methodology to investigate the structural evolution of amino acid crystals of glycine and l-alanine under pressure up to 10 GPa—with and without van der Waals interactions—and find that for an accurate description of intermolecular interactions and phase transitions in these systems, the inclusion of van der Waals interactions is crucial. For glycine, calculations including the vdW-DF (vdW-DF-c09x) functional are found to systematically overestimate (underestimate) the crystal lattice parameters, yet the stability ordering of the different polymorphs is determined accurately, at variance with the GGA case. In the case of l-alanine, our vdW-DF results agree with recent experiments that question the phase transition reported for this crystal at 2.3 GPa, as the a and c cell parameters happen to become equal but no phase transition is observed.

  6. Structure of supersaturated solution and crystal nucleation induced by diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ooshima, Hiroshi; Igarashi, Koichi; Iwasa, Hideo; Yamamoto, Ren

    2013-06-01

    The effect of a seed crystal on nucleation of L-alanine from a quiescent supersaturated solution was investigated. When a seed crystal was not used, nucleation did not occur at least for 5 h. When a seed crystal was introduced into the supersaturated solution with careful attention to avoid convection of the solution, fine crystals appeared at the place far from the seed crystal. At that time, there was no convection at the place that fine crystals appeared. Namely, there was no possibility that those fine crystals came from the surface of seed crystal. We supposed that nucleation was induced by directional diffusion of solute molecules caused by growth of the seed crystal. In order to prove this hypothesis, we designed an experiment using an apparatus composed of two compartments divided by a dialysis membrane that L-alanine molecules could freely permeate. Two supersaturated solutions having a supersaturation ratio of 1.2 and a smaller ratio were placed in the two compartments in the absence of seed crystals. This apparatus allowed the directional diffusion of solute molecules between two solutions. Nucleation occurred within 30 min. The frequency of nucleation among 7-times repeated experiments was in proportion to the difference of supersaturation ratio between the two solutions. This result poses a new mechanism of the secondary nucleation that the directional diffusion caused by growth of existing crystals induces nucleation.

  7. Temperature effects in first-principles solid state calculations of the chemical shielding tensor made simple

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monserrat, Bartomeu; Needs, Richard J.; Pickard, Chris J.

    2014-10-01

    We study the effects of atomic vibrations on the solid-state chemical shielding tensor using first principles density functional theory calculations. At the harmonic level, we use a Monte Carlo method and a perturbative expansion. The Monte Carlo method is accurate but computationally expensive, while the perturbative method is computationally more efficient, but approximate. We find excellent agreement between the two methods for both the isotropic shift and the shielding anisotropy. The effects of zero-point quantum mechanical nuclear motion are important up to relatively high temperatures: at 500 K they still represent about half of the overall vibrational contribution. We also investigate the effects of anharmonic vibrations, finding that their contribution to the zero-point correction to the chemical shielding tensor is small. We exemplify these ideas using magnesium oxide and the molecular crystals L-alanine and β-aspartyl-L-alanine. We therefore propose as the method of choice to incorporate the effects of temperature in solid state chemical shielding tensor calculations using the perturbative expansion within the harmonic approximation. This approach is accurate and requires a computational effort that is about an order of magnitude smaller than that of dynamical or Monte Carlo approaches, so these effects might be routinely accounted for.

  8. Solvation and hydrogen bonding in alanine- and glycine-containing dipeptides probed using solution- and solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bhate, Manasi P; Woodard, Jaie C; Mehta, Manish A

    2009-07-15

    The NMR chemical shift is a sensitive reporter of peptide secondary structure and its solvation environment, and it is potentially rich with information about both backbone dihedral angles and hydrogen bonding. We report results from solution- and solid-state (13)C and (15)N NMR studies of four zwitterionic model dipeptides, L-alanyl-L-alanine, L-alanyl-glycine, glycyl-L-alanine, and glycyl-glycine, in which we attempt to isolate structural and environmental contributions to the chemical shift. We have mapped hydrogen-bonding patterns in the crystalline states of these dipeptides using the published crystal structures and correlated them with (13)C and (15)N magic angle spinning chemical shift data. To aid in the interpretation of the solvated chemical shifts, we performed ab initio quantum chemical calculations to determine the low-energy conformers and their chemical shifts. Assuming low energy barriers to interconversion between thermally accessible conformers, we compare the Boltzmann-averaged chemical shifts with the experimentally determined solvated-state shifts. The results allow us to correlate the observed differences in chemical shifts between the crystalline and solvated states to changes in conformation and hydrogen bonding that occur upon solvation.

  9. METABOLIC CHARACTERIZATION OF THE GENUS BRUCELLA I.

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Margaret E.; Cameron, H. S.

    1961-01-01

    Meyer, Margaret E. (University of California, Davis), and H. S. Cameron. Metabolic characterization of the genus Brucella. I. Statistical evaluation of the oxidative rates by which type I of each species can be identified. J. Bacteriol. 82:387–395. 1961.—The oxidative uptake rates on 11 amino acid and seven carbohydrate substrates were determined for 75 strains of brucellae that had been identified by the conventional determinative methods as Brucella melitensis type I, Brucella abortus type I, or Brucella suis type I. By calculating the standard deviation of the oxidative rates, it was demonstrated that a metabolic pattern that is characteristic and definitive for each of the species was formed by their differential oxidative utilization of substrate groups, and that qualitative as well as quantitative metabolic differences exist among the Brucella species. B. melitensis oxidized l-alanine, l-asparagine, and l-glutamic acid, but not l-arginine, dl-citrulline, l-lysine, dl-ornithine, l-arabinose, d-galactose, d-ribose, or d-xylose. B. abortus differed qualitatively from B. melitensis in that it oxidized the carbohydrate substrates. B. suis differed quantitatively from both of these species in its consistently low oxidative rates of l-alanine, l-asparagine, and l-glutamic acid, and its high rates of utilization of the carbohydrate substrates. It differed qualitatively in that it oxidized the four amino acid substrates that are components of the urea cycle. PMID:13770011

  10. Synthesis of nano-sized stereoselective imprinted polymer by copolymerization of (S)-2-(acrylamido) propanoic acid and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate in the presence of racemic propranolol and copper ion.

    PubMed

    Alizadeh, Taher; Bagherzadeh, Azam; Shamkhali, Amir Nasser

    2016-06-01

    A new chiral functional monomer of (S)-2-(acrylamido) propanoic acid was obtained by reaction of (l)-alanine with acryloyl chloride. The resulting monomer was characterized by FT-IR and HNMR and then utilized for the preparation of chiral imprinted polymer (CIP). This was carried out by copolymerization of (l)-alanine-derived chiral monomer and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate, in the presence of racemic propranolol and copper nitrate, via precipitation polymerization technique, resulting in nano-sized networked polymer particles. The polymer obtained was characterized by scanning electron microscopy and FT-IR. The non-imprinted polymer was also synthesized and used as blank polymer. Density functional theory (DFT) was also employed to optimize the structures of two diasterometric ternary complexes, suspected to be created in the pre-polymerization step, by reaction of optically active isomers of propranolol, copper ion and (S)-2-(acrylamido) propanoic acid. Relative energies and other characteristics of the described complexes, calculated by the DFT, predicted the higher stability of (S)-propranolol involved complex, compared to (R)-propranolol participated complex. Practical batch extraction test which employed CIP as solid phase adsorbent, indicated that the CIP recognized selectively (S)-propranolol in the racemic mixture of propranolol; whereas, the non-imprinted polymer (NIP) showed no differentiation capability between two optically active isomers of propranolol.

  11. Gene cloning of alpha-methylserine aldolase from Variovorax paradoxus and purification and characterization of the recombinant enzyme.

    PubMed

    Nozaki, Hiroyuki; Kuroda, Shinji; Watanabe, Kunihiko; Yokozeki, Kenzo

    2008-10-01

    The alpha-methylserine aldolase gene from Variovorax paradoxus strains AJ110406, NBRC15149, and NBRC15150 was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Formaldehyde release activity from alpha-methyl-L-serine was detected in the cell-free extract of E.coli expressing the gene from three strains. The recombinant enzyme from V. paradoxus NBRC15150 was purified. The Vmax and Km of the enzyme for the formaldehyde release reaction from alpha-methyl-L-serine were 1.89 micromol min(-1) mg(-1) and 1.2 mM respectively. The enzyme was also capable of catalyzing the synthesis of alpha-methyl-L-serine and alpha-ethyl-L-serine from L-alanine and L-2-aminobutyric acid respectively, accompanied by hydroxymethyl transfer from formaldehyde. The purified enzyme also catalyzed alanine racemization. It contained 1 mole of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate per mol of the enzyme subunit, and exhibited a specific spectral peak at 429 nm. With L-alanine and L-2-aminobutyric acid as substrates, the specific peak, assumed to be a result of the formation of a quinonoid intermediate, increased at 498 nm and 500 nm respectively.

  12. Quantification of amino acids in fermentation media by isocratic HPLC analysis of their α-hydroxy acid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Pleissner, Daniel; Wimmer, Reinhard; Eriksen, Niels T

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we describe a novel method for quantification of amino acids. First, α-hydroxy acid derivatives of amino acids were formed after reaction with dinitrogen trioxide by the van Slyke reaction. Second, the α-hydroxy acid derivatives were separated on an Aminex HPX-87H column (Bio-Rad) eluted isocratically with 5 mM H(2)SO(4) and quantified by refractive index detection. We were able to measure the reaction products of 13 of the 20 classical amino acids: glycine, l-alanine, l-valine, l-leucine, l-isoleucine, l-methionine, l-serine, l-threonine, l-asparagine, l-glutamine, l-aspartic acid, l-glutamic acid, and l-proline. We obtained linear relationships between the product peak areas and initial amino acid concentration, whereby the concentrations of these amino acids could be quantified on the basis of the quantification of their products. The method can be used to analyze amino acids in parallel with other small molecules, such as sugars or short chain fatty acids, and was used for parallel quantification of glycine, l-alanine, or l-glutamic acid, and glucose uptake in cultures of the heterotrophic dinoflagellate Crypthecodinium cohnii . The method can also be used to quantify other amines, as demonstrated by detection of Tris (2-amino-2-(hydroxymethyl)propane-1,3-diol).

  13. Responses of single facial taste fibers in the sea catfish, Arius felis, to amino acids.

    PubMed

    Michel, W; Caprio, J

    1991-07-01

    1. Taste buds in catfish are found not only within the oropharyngeal cavity, as in mammals, but are also located along the external body surface of the animal from the barbels and lips to the caudal fin. Because these taste buds are innervated by the facial (cranial VII) nerve, the extraoral taste system of catfish is analogous to the mammalian taste system of the anterior two-thirds of the tongue, which contains taste buds innervated by the chorda tympani nerve, and of the soft palate and nasoincisor ducts, which contain taste buds innervated by the greater superficial petrosal nerve. 2. The majority of information concerning the specificity of individual taste fibers in vertebrates has been obtained primarily in mammals to stimuli representing the four basic human taste qualities (i.e., salty, sweet, sour, and bitter). In the present report, we examine the evidence for gustatory fiber types within the stimulus class of amino acids, compounds known to be especially relevant gustatory stimuli for catfish and other teleosts. 3. Action potentials were recorded from 60 individual facial taste neurons obtained from 28 sea catfish (Arius felis). Stimuli were 10(-4) M concentrations of L-alanine, D-alanine, glycine, L-proline, L-histidine, and L-arginine, compounds selected from an original stimulus list of 28 amino acids. Responses were quantified as the number of action potentials evoked at various time intervals from the first 0.5 s up to 10 s of response time. 4. The spontaneous activity of 42 fully characterized neurons was 0.8 +/- 2.1 SD spikes/3 s. The average rate of spike discharge increased 50-fold during stimulation with the most effective amino acid (42 +/- 31 spikes/3 s, mean +/- SD). The majority of the sampled neurons were not narrowly tuned to the amino acid stimulants tested (mean breadth of responsiveness, H = 0.60; range 0-0.95). 5. Hierarchical cluster analysis of the fully characterized neurons identified two large and two small groups of cells. The

  14. Probing micro-solvation in "numbers": the case of neutral dipeptides in water.

    PubMed

    Takis, Panteleimon G; Papavasileiou, Konstantinos D; Peristeras, Loukas D; Melissas, Vasilios S; Troganis, Anastassios N

    2013-05-21

    How many solvent molecules and in what way do they interact directly with biomolecules? This is one of the most challenging questions regarding a deep understanding of biomolecular functionalism and solvation. We herein present a novel NMR spectroscopic study, achieving for the first time the quantification of the directly interacting water molecules with several neutral dipeptides. Our proposed method is supported by both molecular dynamics simulations and density functional theory calculations, advanced analysis of which allowed the identification of the direct interactions between solute-solvent molecules in the zwitterionic L-alanyl-L-alanine dipeptide-water system. Beyond the quantification of dipeptide-water molecule direct interactions, this NMR technique could be useful for the determination and elucidation of small to moderate bio-organic molecular groups' direct interactions with various polar solvent molecules, shedding light on the biomolecular micro-solvation processes and behaviour in various solvents.

  15. Investigation of antibacterial mechanism and identification of bacterial protein targets mediated by antibacterial medicinal plant extracts.

    PubMed

    Yong, Ann-Li; Ooh, Keng-Fei; Ong, Hean-Chooi; Chai, Tsun-Thai; Wong, Fai-Chu

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we investigated the antibacterial mechanism and potential therapeutic targets of three antibacterial medicinal plants. Upon treatment with the plant extracts, bacterial proteins were extracted and resolved using denaturing gel electrophoresis. Differentially-expressed bacterial proteins were excised from the gels and subjected to sequence analysis by MALDI TOF-TOF mass spectrometry. From our study, seven differentially expressed bacterial proteins (triacylglycerol lipase, N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase, flagellin, outer membrane protein A, stringent starvation protein A, 30S ribosomal protein s1 and 60 kDa chaperonin) were identified. Additionally, scanning electron microscope study indicated morphological damages induced on bacterial cell surfaces. To the best of our knowledge, this represents the first time these bacterial proteins are being reported, following treatments with the antibacterial plant extracts. Further studies in this direction could lead to the detailed understanding of their inhibition mechanism and discovery of target-specific antibacterial agents.

  16. Structure-based design, synthesis and biological evaluation of novel β-secretase inhibitors containing a pyrazole or thiazole moiety as the P3 ligand.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Arun K; Brindisi, Margherita; Yen, Yu-Chen; Xu, Xiaoming; Huang, Xiangping; Devasamudram, Thippeswamy; Bilcer, Geoffrey; Lei, Hui; Koelsch, Gerald; Mesecar, Andrew D; Tang, Jordan

    2015-02-01

    We describe structure-based design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of a series of novel inhibitors bearing a pyrazole (compounds 3a-h) or a thiazole moiety (compounds 4a-e) as the P3 ligand. We have also explored Boc-β-amino-l-alanine as a novel P2 ligand. A number of inhibitors have displayed β-secretase inhibitory potency. Inhibitor 4c has shown potent BACE1 inhibitory activity, Ki=0.25nM, cellular EC50 of 194nM, and displayed good selectivity over BACE2. A model of 4c was created based upon the X-ray structure of 2-bound β-secretase which revealed critical interactions in the active site.

  17. 1-Deoxysphingolipids Encountered Exogenously and Made de Novo: Dangerous Mysteries inside an Enigma*

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Jingjing; Merrill, Alfred H.

    2015-01-01

    The traditional backbones of mammalian sphingolipids are 2-amino, 1,3-diols made by serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT). Many organisms additionally produce non-traditional, cytotoxic 1-deoxysphingoid bases and, surprisingly, mammalian SPT biosynthesizes some of them, too (e.g. 1-deoxysphinganine from l-alanine). These are rapidly N-acylated to 1-deoxy-“ceramides” with very uncommon biophysical properties. The functions of 1-deoxysphingolipids are not known, but they are certainly dangerous as contributors to sensory and autonomic neuropathies when elevated by inherited SPT mutations, and they are noticeable in diabetes, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, serine deficiencies, and other diseases. As components of food as well as endogenously produced, these substances are mysteries within an enigma. PMID:25947379

  18. REDOR with a relative full-echo reference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, Anil K.; Cegelski, Lynette; O'Connor, Robert D.; Schaefer, Jacob

    2003-07-01

    REDOR and REDOR-like 13C{ 19F} and 2H{ 19F} NMR experiments have been performed on lyophilized whole cells of Staphylococcus aureus. The bacteria were grown to maturity on media containing L-[ 13C3]alanine or L-[methyl- d3]alanine, and then complexed with the 4-fluorobiphenyl derivative of chloroeremomycin, an analogue of the widely used antibiotic, vancomycin. The position of the 19F of the drug bound in the bacterial cell wall was determined relative to L-alanine 13C and 2H labels in the peptidoglycan peptide stem that was closest to the fluorinated biphenyl moiety of the drug. These determinations were made by dipolar recoupling methods that do not require an absolute measurement of the REDOR full echo (the signal observed without rotor-synchronized dephasing pulses) of the labels in the peptide stem.

  19. Kinetics of acid hydrolysis and reactivity of some antibacterial hydrophilic iron(II) imino-complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaker, Ali Mohamed; Nassr, Lobna Abdel-Mohsen Ebaid; Adam, Mohamed Shaker Saied; Mohamed, Ibrahim Mohamed Abdelhalim

    2015-05-01

    Kinetic study of acid hydrolysis of some hydrophilic Fe(II) Schiff base amino acid complexes with antibacterial properties was performed using spectrophotometry. The Schiff base ligands were derived from sodium 2-hydroxybenzaldehyde-5-sulfonate and glycine, L-alanine, L-leucine, L-isoleucine, DL-methionine, DL-serine, or L-phenylalanine. The reaction was studied in aqueous media under conditions of pseudo-first order kinetics. Moreover, the acid hydrolysis was studied at different temperatures and the activation parameters were calculated. The general rate equation was suggested as follows: rate = k obs [Complex], where k obs = k 2 [H+]. The evaluated rate constants and activation parameters are consistent with the hydrophilicity of the investigated complexes.

  20. Studies on Hydrogen Production by Photosynthetic Bacteria after Anaerobic Fermentation of Starch by a Hyperthermophile, Pyrococcus furiosus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugitate, Toshihiro; Fukatsu, Makoto; Ishimi, Katsuhiro; Kohno, Hideki; Wakayama, Tatsuki; Nakamura, Yoshihiro; Miyake, Jun; Asada, Yasuo

    In order to establish the sequential hydrogen production from waste starch using a hyperthermophile, Pyrococcus furiosus, and a photosynthetic bacterium, basic studies were done. P. furiosus produced hydrogen and acetate by anaerobic fermentation at 90°C. A photosynthetic bacterium, Rhodobacter sphaeroides RV, was able to produce hydrogen from acetate under anaerobic and light conditions at 30°C. However, Rb. sphaeroides RV was not able to produce hydrogen from acetate in the presence of sodium chloride that was essential for the growth and hydrogen production of P. furiosus although it produced hydrogen from lactate at a reduced rate with 1% sodium chloride. A newly isolated strain, CST-8, from natural environment was, however, able to produce hydrogen from acetate, especially with 3 mM L-alanine and in the presence of 1% sodium chloride. The sequential hydrogen production with P. furiosus and salt-tolerant photosynthetic bacteria could be probable at least in the laboratory experiment scale.

  1. Metals and the integrity of a biological coating: the cuticle of mussel byssus.

    PubMed

    Holten-Andersen, Niels; Mates, Thomas E; Toprak, Muhammet S; Stucky, Galen D; Zok, Frank W; Waite, J Herbert

    2009-04-09

    The cuticle of mussel byssal threads is a robust natural coating that combines high extensibility with high stiffness and hardness. In this study, fluorescence microscopy and elemental analysis were exploited to show that the 3,4-dihydroxyphenyl-L-alanine (dopa) residues of mussel foot protein-1 colocalize with Fe and Ca distributions in the cuticle of Mytilus galloprovincialis mussel byssal threads. Chelated removal of Fe and Ca from the cuticle of intact threads resulted in a 50% reduction in cuticle hardness, and thin sections subjected to the same treatment showed a disruption of cuticle integrity. Dopa-metal complexes may provide significant interactions for the integrity of composite cuticles deformed under tension.

  2. Synthesis, characterization of α-amino acid Schiff base derived Ru/Pt complexes: Induces cytotoxicity in HepG2 cell via protein binding and ROS generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsalme, Ali; Laeeq, Sameen; Dwivedi, Sourabh; Khan, Mohd. Shahnawaz; Al Farhan, Khalid; Musarrat, Javed; Khan, Rais Ahmad

    2016-06-01

    We have synthesized two new complexes of platinum (1) and ruthenium (2) with α-amino acid, L-alanine, and 2,3-dihydroxybenzaldehyde derived Schiff base (L). The ligand and both complexes were characterized by using elemental analysis and several other spectroscopic techniques viz; IR, 1H, 13C NMR, EPR, and ESI-MS. Furthermore, the protein-binding ability of synthesized complexes was monitored by UV-visible, fluorescence and circular dichroism techniques with a model protein, human serum albumin (HSA). Both the PtL2 and RuL2 complexes displayed significant binding towards HSA. Also, in vitro cytotoxicity assay for both complexes was carried out on human hepatocellular carcinoma cancer (HepG2) cell line. The results showed concentration-dependent inhibition of cell viability. Moreover, the generation of reactive oxygen species was also evaluated, and results exhibited substantial role in cytotoxicity.

  3. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of an alanine dehydrogenase from Bacillus megaterium WSH-002.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiaoyun; Yi, Qiufen; Zhang, Guofang; Zhu, Xianming; Zhou, Honggang; Dong, Hui

    2013-08-01

    Alanine dehydrogenase (L-AlaDH) from Bacillus megaterium WSH-002 catalyses the NAD⁺-dependent interconversion of L-alanine and pyruvate. The enzyme was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) cells and purified with a His6 tag by Ni²⁺-chelating affinity chromatography for X-ray crystallographic analysis. Crystals were grown in a solution consisting of 0.1 M HEPES pH 8.0, 12%(w/v) polyethylene glycol 8000, 8%(v/v) ethylene glycol at a concentration of 15 mg ml⁻¹ purified protein. The crystal diffracted to 2.35 Å resolution and belonged to the trigonal space group R32, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 125.918, c = 144.698 Å.

  4. Preparation and application of abietic acid-derived optically active helical polymers and their chiral hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Yao, Fei; Zhang, Dongyue; Zhang, Chaohong; Yang, Wantai; Deng, Jianping

    2013-02-01

    A novel chiral monomer N-propargyl abietamide, M1, was synthesized from abietic acid and catalytically polymerized with (nbd)Rh+B-(C6H5)4 (nbd=norbornadiene), providing polymer [poly(1)] with a molecular weight of 13,000-36,000 at a yield of 59-84%. Poly(1) did not form stable helices in tetrahydrofuran at room temperature whereas copolymerization of M1 and the achiral N-propargylamide monomer, M2, led to the formation of helical optically active copolymers as indicated by circular dichroism studies, UV-vis spectroscopy, and specific optical rotation measurements. Hydrogels were prepared based on an optically active helical copolymer, poly(M1(0.32)-co-M2(0.68)) that exhibited enantioselective recognition toward l-alanine. The novel chiral polymers derived from abietic acid are expected to find applications in such areas as chiral recognition, chiral resolution, and chiral catalysis.

  5. Maintaining network security: how macromolecular structures cross the peptidoglycan layer.

    PubMed

    Scheurwater, Edie M; Burrows, Lori L

    2011-05-01

    Peptidoglycan plays a vital role in bacterial physiology, maintaining cell shape and resisting cellular lysis from high internal turgor pressures. Its integrity is carefully maintained by controlled remodeling during growth and division by the coordinated activities of penicillin-binding proteins, lytic transglycosylases, and N-acetylmuramyl-l-alanine amidases. However, its small pore size (∼2 nm) and covalently closed structure make it a formidable barrier to the assembly of large macromolecular cell-envelope-spanning complexes involved in motility and secretion. Here, we review the strategies used by Gram-negative bacteria to assemble such macromolecular complexes across the peptidoglycan layer, while preserving its essential structural role. In addition, we discuss evidence that suggests that peptidoglycan can be integrated into cell-envelope-spanning complexes as a structural and functional extension of their architecture.

  6. Vibrational averages along thermal lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monserrat, Bartomeu

    2016-01-01

    A method is proposed for the calculation of vibrational quantum and thermal expectation values of physical properties from first principles. Thermal lines are introduced: these are lines in configuration space parametrized by temperature, such that the value of any physical property along them is approximately equal to the vibrational average of that property. The number of sampling points needed to explore the vibrational phase space is reduced by up to an order of magnitude when the full vibrational density is replaced by thermal lines. Calculations of the vibrational averages of several properties and systems are reported, namely, the internal energy and the electronic band gap of diamond and silicon, and the chemical shielding tensor of L-alanine. Thermal lines pave the way for complex calculations of vibrational averages, including large systems and methods beyond semilocal density functional theory.

  7. Radiolysis of alanine adsorbed in a clay mineral

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilar-Ovando, Ellen Y.; Negron-Mendoza, Alicia

    2013-07-03

    Optical activity in molecules is a chemical characteristic of living beings. In this work, we examine the hypothesis of the influence of different mineral surfaces on the development of a specific chirality in organic molecules when subjected to conditions simulating the primitive Earth during the period of chemical evolution. By using X-ray diffraction techniques and HPLC/ELSD to analyze aqueous suspensions of amino acids adsorbed on minerals irradiated in different doses with a cobalt-60 gamma source, the experiments attempt to prove the hypothesis that some solid surfaces (like clays and meteorite rocks) may have a concentration capacity and protective role against external sources of ionizing radiation (specifically {gamma}-ray) for some organic compounds (like some amino acids) adsorbed on them. Preliminary results show a slight difference in the adsorption and radiolysis of the D-and L-alanine.

  8. Novel electrochemical method for the characterization of the degree of chirality in chiral polyaniline.

    PubMed

    Feng, Zhang; Li, Ma; Yan, Yang; Jihai, Tang; Xiao, Li; Wanglin, Li

    2013-01-01

    A novel method to indicate the degree of chirality in polyaniline (PANI) was developed. The (D-camphorsulfonic acid)- and (HCl)-PANI-based electrodes exhibited significantly different electrochemical performances in D- and L-Alanine (Ala) aqueous solution, respectively, which can be used for the characterization the optical activity of chiral PANI. Cyclic voltammogram, tafel, and open circuit potential of PANI-based electrodes were measured within D- and L-Ala electrolyte solution, respectively. The open circuit potentials under different reacting conditions were analyzed by Doblhofer model formula, in which [C(+)](poly1)/[C(+)](poly2) was used as a parameter to characterize the degree of chirality in chiral PANI. The results showed that [C(+)](poly1)/[C(+)](poly2) can be increased with increasing concentrations of (1S)-(+)- and (1R)-(-)-10-camphorsulfonic acid. In addition, we detected that appropriate response time and lower temperature are necessary to improve the degree of chirality.

  9. FORMATION OF “PROTOPLASTS” OF STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS WITH A FUNGAL N-ACETYLHEXOSAMINIDASE1

    PubMed Central

    Hash, John H.; Wishnick, Marcia; Miller, Philip A.

    1964-01-01

    Hash, John H. (Lederle Laboratories, Pearl River, N.Y.), Marcia Wishnick, and Philip A. Miller. Formation of “protoplasts” of Staphylococcus aureus with a fungal N-acetylhexosaminidase. J. Bacteriol. 87:432–437. 1964.—“Protoplasts” of Staphylococcus aureus were obtained when cells were treated with a fungal N-acetyl-hexosaminidase in hypertonic sucrose solution. The “protoplasts” were sensitive to osmotic shock, and were free of amino sugars and rigid cell walls. They were unable to regenerate cell walls and form colonies. They may be true protoplasts. Osmotic barriers in the “protoplasts” were preserved, and the “protoplasts” incorporated C14-l-alanine at about 60% of the rate of intact cells. Images PMID:14151068

  10. Biochemistry, genetics and regulation of bacilysin biosynthesis and its significance more than an antibiotic.

    PubMed

    Özcengiz, Gülay; Öğülür, İsmail

    2015-12-25

    Bacillus subtilis has the capacity to produce more than two dozen bioactive compounds with an amazing variety of chemical structures. Among them, bacilysin is a non-ribosomally synthesized dipeptide antibiotic consisting of l-alanine residue at the N terminus and a non-proteinogenic amino acid, l-anticapsin, at the C terminus. In spite of its simple structure, it is active against a wide range of bacteria and fungi. As a potent antimicrobial agent, we briefly review the biochemistry and genetics as well as the regulation of bacilysin biosynthesis within the frame of peptide pheromones-based control of secondary activities. Biological functions of bacilysin in the producer B. subtilis beyond its antimicrobial activity as well as potential biotechnological use of the biosynthetic enzyme l-amino acid ligase (Lal) are also discussed.

  11. BMAA inhibits nitrogen fixation in the cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. PCC 7120.

    PubMed

    Berntzon, Lotta; Erasmie, Sven; Celepli, Narin; Eriksson, Johan; Rasmussen, Ulla; Bergman, Birgitta

    2013-08-21

    Cyanobacteria produce a range of secondary metabolites, one being the neurotoxic non-protein amino acid β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA), proposed to be a causative agent of human neurodegeneration. As for most cyanotoxins, the function of BMAA in cyanobacteria is unknown. Here, we examined the effects of BMAA on the physiology of the filamentous nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. PCC 7120. Our data show that exogenously applied BMAA rapidly inhibits nitrogenase activity (acetylene reduction assay), even at micromolar concentrations, and that the inhibition was considerably more severe than that induced by combined nitrogen sources and most other amino acids. BMAA also caused growth arrest and massive cellular glycogen accumulation, as observed by electron microscopy. With nitrogen fixation being a process highly sensitive to oxygen species we propose that the BMAA effects found here may be related to the production of reactive oxygen species, as reported for other organisms.

  12. Diatoms: A Novel Source for the Neurotoxin BMAA in Aquatic Environments

    PubMed Central

    Lage, Sandra; Jonasson, Sara; Shams, Shiva; Mehine, Martin; Ilag, Leopold L.; Rasmussen, Ulla

    2014-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) or Lou Gehrig’s disease is a neurological disorder linked to environmental exposure to a non-protein amino acid, β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA). The only organisms reported to be BMAA-producing, are cyanobacteria – prokaryotic organisms. In this study, we demonstrate that diatoms – eukaryotic organisms – also produce BMAA. Ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry revealed the occurrence of BMAA in six investigated axenic diatom cultures. BMAA was also detected in planktonic field samples collected on the Swedish west coast that display an overrepresentation of diatoms relative to cyanobacteria. Given the ubiquity of diatoms in aquatic environments and their central role as primary producers and the main food items of zooplankton, the use of filter and suspension feeders as livestock fodder dramatically increases the risk of human exposure to BMAA-contaminated food. PMID:24392143

  13. Previous studies underestimate BMAA concentrations in cycad flour.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ran; Banack, Sandra Anne

    2009-01-01

    The traditional diet of the Chamorro people of Guam has high concentrations of the neurotoxin BMAA, beta-methyl-amino-L-alanine, in cycad tortillas and from animals that feed on cycad seeds. We measured BMAA concentration in washed cycad flour and compared different extraction methods used by previous researchers in order to determine how much BMAA may have been unaccounted for in prior research. Samples were analyzed with AQC precolumn derivatization using HPLC-FD detection and verified with UPLC-UV, UPLC-MS, and triple quadrupole LC/MS/MS. Although previous workers had studied only the free amino acid component of BMAA in washed cycad flour, we detected significant levels of protein-associated BMAA in washed cycad flour. These data support a link between ALS/PDC and exposure to BMAA.

  14. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and environmental factors

    PubMed Central

    Bozzoni, Virginia; Pansarasa, Orietta; Diamanti, Luca; Nosari, Guido; Cereda, Cristina; Ceroni, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    Summary Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder that affects central and peripheral motor neuron cells. Its etiology is unknown, although a relationship between genetic background and environmental factors may play a major role in triggering the neurodegeneration. In this review, we analyze the role of environmental factors in ALS: heavy metals, electromagnetic fields and electric shocks, pesticides, β-N-methylamino-L-alanine, physical activity and the controversial role of sports. The literature on the single issues is analyzed in an attempt to clarify, as clearly as possible, whether each risk factor significantly contributes to the disease pathogenesis. After summarizing conflicting observations and data, the authors provide a final synthetic statement. PMID:27027889

  15. Morphometric and neurochemical alterations found in l-BMAA treated rats.

    PubMed

    de Munck, Estefanía; Muñoz-Sáez, Emma; Miguel, Begoña G; Solas, M Teresa; Martínez, Ana; Arahuetes, Rosa M

    2015-05-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by progressive muscle paralysis that reflects the motoneurons' degeneration. Several studies support the relationship between β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (l-BMAA), a neurotoxic amino acid produced by cyanobacteria and diatoms, and the sporadic occurrence of ALS and other neurodegenerative diseases. Therefore, the study of its neurotoxicity mechanisms has assumed great relevance in recent years. Recently, our research team has proposed a sporadic ALS animal model by l-BMAA administration in rats, which displays many pathophysiological features of human ALS. In this paper, we deepen the characterization of this model corroborating the occurrence of alterations present in ALS patients such as decreased muscle volume, thinning of the motor cortex, enlarged brain's lateral ventricles, and alteration of both bulbar nuclei and neurotransmitters' levels. Therefore, we conclude that l-BMAA treated rats could be a good model which mimics degenerative features that ALS causes in humans.

  16. Diatoms: a novel source for the neurotoxin BMAA in aquatic environments.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Liying; Eriksson, Johan; Lage, Sandra; Jonasson, Sara; Shams, Shiva; Mehine, Martin; Ilag, Leopold L; Rasmussen, Ulla

    2014-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) or Lou Gehrig's disease is a neurological disorder linked to environmental exposure to a non-protein amino acid, β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA). The only organisms reported to be BMAA-producing, are cyanobacteria--prokaryotic organisms. In this study, we demonstrate that diatoms--eukaryotic organisms--also produce BMAA. Ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry revealed the occurrence of BMAA in six investigated axenic diatom cultures. BMAA was also detected in planktonic field samples collected on the Swedish west coast that display an overrepresentation of diatoms relative to cyanobacteria. Given the ubiquity of diatoms in aquatic environments and their central role as primary producers and the main food items of zooplankton, the use of filter and suspension feeders as livestock fodder dramatically increases the risk of human exposure to BMAA-contaminated food.

  17. Multiple neurotoxic items in the Chamorro diet link BMAA with ALS/PDC.

    PubMed

    Banack, Sandra Anne; Murch, Susan J

    2009-01-01

    Beta-methyl-amino-L-alanine, (BMAA), is found in multiple components of the traditional Chamorro diet of Guam and this confounds epidemiological analysis based on a single dietary item. However, using hair as a non-invasive measure of BMAA exposure may help determine risks for developing motor neuron disease. BMAA found in brain tissues of patients with ALS/PDC and not generally in controls suggests that BMAA crosses the blood-brain barrier in patients with disease and is associated with neurodegenerative disease. An examination of frozen versus fixed autopsy tissue from ALS/PDC patients suggests that earlier studies of BMAA in ALS/PDC patients based on fixed tissues may have underestimated the concentration of BMAA in brain tissues. We suggest that the Chamorro people are exposed to chronically low levels of BMAA in the diet and that further research is needed to understand chronic BMAA toxicity.

  18. Screening for non-protein amino acids in seeds of the Guam cycad, Cycas circinalis, by an improved GC-MS method.

    PubMed

    Oh, C H; Brownson, D M; Mabry, T J

    1995-02-01

    The non-protein amino acid, beta-N-methyl-amino-L-alanine (L-BMAA) from Cycas circinalis seeds, has been implicated as a causative agent of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-Parkinsonism dementia complex (ALS-PDC), a disease known from Guam and other areas in the western Pacific. We analyzed C. circinalis seeds for additional free non-protein amino acids by a recently developed GC-MS method. The samples were prepared by water extraction of seed flour. The amino acids present in the extract were derivatized by N(O,S)-isobutyloxycarbonylation of the amine functional groups and then tert-butyldimethylsilylation of the carboxyl functional groups. Peaks for a total of seventeen derivatives of non-protein amino acids were detected by GC-MS. In addition to L-BMAA, four other non-protein amino acids were identified as beta-alanine, gamma-amino-butyric acid, pyroglutamic acid, and alpha-aminoadipic acid.

  19. BMAA Inhibits Nitrogen Fixation in the Cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. PCC 7120

    PubMed Central

    Berntzon, Lotta; Erasmie, Sven; Celepli, Narin; Eriksson, Johan; Rasmussen, Ulla; Bergman, Birgitta

    2013-01-01

    Cyanobacteria produce a range of secondary metabolites, one being the neurotoxic non-protein amino acid β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA), proposed to be a causative agent of human neurodegeneration. As for most cyanotoxins, the function of BMAA in cyanobacteria is unknown. Here, we examined the effects of BMAA on the physiology of the filamentous nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. PCC 7120. Our data show that exogenously applied BMAA rapidly inhibits nitrogenase activity (acetylene reduction assay), even at micromolar concentrations, and that the inhibition was considerably more severe than that induced by combined nitrogen sources and most other amino acids. BMAA also caused growth arrest and massive cellular glycogen accumulation, as observed by electron microscopy. With nitrogen fixation being a process highly sensitive to oxygen species we propose that the BMAA effects found here may be related to the production of reactive oxygen species, as reported for other organisms. PMID:23966039

  20. Cyanobacterial blooms and biomagnification of the neurotoxin BMAA in South Florida coastal waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brand, L.; Mash, D.

    2008-12-01

    Blooms of cyanobacteria have developed in Florida Bay, Biscayne Bay and other coastal waters of South Florida. It has recently been shown that virtually all cyanobacteria produce the potent neurotoxin, beta-N- methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA). Studies in Guam indicate that BMAA can biomagnify up the food chain from cyanobacteria to human food and humans. Recent studies in Guam and on human brains in North America suggest an association between BMAA and neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS). A variety of organisms from South Florida coastal waters are being analyzed for BMAA content to determine if BMAA is biomagnifying in these food chains and if it is a potential human health hazard. Some have extremely high concentrations of BMAA.

  1. The influence of manufacture on the free D-amino acid content of Cheddar cheese.

    PubMed

    Csapó, J; Varga-Visi, E; Lóki, K; Albert, Cs

    2006-06-01

    The changes in the concentration and those of composition of alanine, aspartic acid and glutamic acid enantiomers were investigated during manufacture of Cheddar cheese. The amount of D-alanine increased continuously during ripening following the liberation of L-alanine originated from the proteolysis of milk proteins. There was slightly more D-aspartic and D-glutamic acid in the dry matter of curd after pressing than before pressurization. The D-amino acid content and the ratio of the D-enantiomers related to the total amount of free amino acids differed significantly among cheeses produced with different single-strain starters. The D-amino acid composition changed during manufacture, but the influence of the strain selection was not significant on the D-amino acid pattern.

  2. Processing of mussel adhesive protein analog thin films by matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristescu, R.; Patz, T.; Narayan, R. J.; Menegazzo, N.; Mizaikoff, B.; Mihaiescu, D. E.; Messersmith, P. B.; Stamatin, I.; Mihailescu, I. N.; Chrisey, D. B.

    2005-07-01

    Mussel adhesive proteins are a new class of biologically-derived materials that possess unique biocompatibility, bioactivity, and adhesion properties. We have demonstrated successful thin film growth of 3,4-dihydroxyphenyl- L-alanine modified poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(propylene oxide)-poly(ethylene oxide) (DOPA modified- PEO-PPO-PEO) block copolymer, a mussel adhesive protein analog, using matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation. We have demonstrated that the main functional groups of the mussel adhesive protein analog are present in the transferred film. The effect of increasing of chain length of the mussel adhesive protein analog on film structure was also examined. These novel polymer thin films could have numerous medical and technological applications if their thin film properties are similar to what is found in bulk. This is the first report of successful MAPLE deposition of this material as thin films.

  3. MAPLE deposition of biomaterial multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Califano, Valeria; Bloisi, Francesco; Vicari, Luciano R. M.; Colombi, Paolo; Bontempi, Elza; Depero, Laura E.

    2008-09-01

    Double layers of polyethylene glycol (PEG) and 3-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)-2-methyl- L-alanine (m-DOPA) thin films were obtained by matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE) technique, by depositing a first layer of m-DOPA on Si substrate and a second layer of PEG on top of it. The films were characterized by low angle X-ray diffraction (LAXRD), X-ray reflectivity (XRR), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and micro-Raman spectroscopy. From these analyses it resulted that PEG was deposited without any relevant damage both in terms of chemical structure and molecular weight. Furthermore, PEG chains were mostly in the extended conformation, although PEG micelles appeared.

  4. Rapid scan electron paramagnetic resonance at 1.0 GHz of defect centers in γ-irradiated organic solids.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yilin; Rinard, George A; Quine, Richard W; Eaton, Sandra S; Eaton, Gareth R

    2016-02-01

    The radicals in six (60)Co γ-irradiated solids: malonic acid, glycylglycine, 2,6 di-t-butyl 4-methyl phenol, L-alanine, dimethyl malonic acid, and 2-amino isobutyric acid, were studied by rapid scan electron paramagnetic resonance at L-band (1.04 GHz) using a customized Bruker Elexsys spectrometer and a locally-designed dielectric resonator. Sinusoidal scans with widths up to 18.2 mT were generated with the recently described coil driver and Litz wire coils. Power saturation curves showed that the rapid scan signals saturated at higher powers than did conventional continuous wave signals. The rapid scan data were deconvolved and background subtracted to obtain absorption spectra. For the same data acquisition time the signal-to-noise for the absorption spectra obtained in rapid scans were 23 to 37 times higher than for first-derivative spectra obtained by conventional continuous wave electron paramagnetic resonance.

  5. The Transition from Stiff to Compliant Materials in Squid Beaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miserez, Ali; Schneberk, Todd; Sun, Chengjun; Zok, Frank W.; Waite, J. Herbert

    2008-03-01

    The beak of the Humboldt squid Dosidicus gigas represents one of the hardest and stiffest wholly organic materials known. As it is deeply embedded within the soft buccal envelope, the manner in which impact forces are transmitted between beak and envelope is a matter of considerable scientific interest. Here, we show that the hydrated beak exhibits a large stiffness gradient, spanning two orders of magnitude from the tip to the base. This gradient is correlated with a chemical gradient involving mixtures of chitin, water, and His-rich proteins that contain 3,4-dihydroxyphenyl-L-alanine (dopa) and undergo extensive stabilization by histidyl-dopa cross-link formation. These findings may serve as a foundation for identifying design principles for attaching mechanically mismatched materials in engineering and biological applications.

  6. The transition from stiff to compliant materials in squid beaks.

    PubMed

    Miserez, Ali; Schneberk, Todd; Sun, Chengjun; Zok, Frank W; Waite, J Herbert

    2008-03-28

    The beak of the Humboldt squid Dosidicus gigas represents one of the hardest and stiffest wholly organic materials known. As it is deeply embedded within the soft buccal envelope, the manner in which impact forces are transmitted between beak and envelope is a matter of considerable scientific interest. Here, we show that the hydrated beak exhibits a large stiffness gradient, spanning two orders of magnitude from the tip to the base. This gradient is correlated with a chemical gradient involving mixtures of chitin, water, and His-rich proteins that contain 3,4-dihydroxyphenyl-L-alanine (dopa) and undergo extensive stabilization by histidyl-dopa cross-link formation. These findings may serve as a foundation for identifying design principles for attaching mechanically mismatched materials in engineering and biological applications.

  7. The Clostridium botulinum GerAB germination protein is located in the inner membrane of spores.

    PubMed

    Alberto, François; Botella, Lucien; Carlin, Fréderic; Nguyen-The, Christophe; Broussolle, Véronique

    2005-12-15

    Clostridium botulinum dormant spores germinate in presence of l-alanine via a specific receptor composed of GerAA, GerAB and GerAC proteins. In Bacillus subtilis spores, GerAA and GerAC proteins were located in the inner membrane of the spore. We studied the location of the GerAB protein in C. botulinum spore fractions by Western-blot analysis, using an antipeptidic antibody. The protein GerAB was in vitro translated and used to confirm the specificity of the antibodies. GerAB was not present in a coat and spore outer membrane fraction but was present in a fraction of decoated spores containing inner membrane. These results strongly suggest that the protein GerAB is located in the inner membrane of the spore.

  8. Fenton degradation of Cartap hydrochloride: identification of the main intermediates and the degradation pathway.

    PubMed

    Tian, Kaixun; Ming, Cuixiang; Dai, Youzhi; Honore Ake, Kouassi Marius

    2015-01-01

    The advanced oxidation of Cartap hydrochloride (Cartap) promoted by the Fenton system in an aqueous medium was investigated. Based on total organic carbon, chemical oxygen demand and high-performance liquid chromatography, the oxidation of Cartap is quite efficient by the Fenton system. Its long chain is easily destroyed, but the reaction does not proceed to complete mineralization. Ion chromatography detection indicated the formation of acetic acid, propionic acid, formic acid, nitrous acid and sulfuric acid in the reaction mixtures. Further evidence of nitrogen monoxide and sulfur dioxide formation was obtained by using a flue gas analyzer. Monitoring by gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer demonstrated the formation of oxalic acid, ethanol, carbon dioxide, and L-alanine ethylamide. Based on these experimental results, plausible degradation pathways for Cartap mineralization in an aqueous medium by the Fenton system are proposed.

  9. How similar is the electronic structures of β-lactam and alanine?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Subhojyoti; Ahmed, Marawan; Wang, Feng

    2016-02-01

    The C1s spectra of β-lactam i.e. 2-azetidinone (C3H5NO), a drug and L-alanine (C3H7NO2), an amino acid, exhibit striking similarities, which may be responsible for the competition between 2-azetidinone and the alanyl-alanine moiety in biochemistry. The present study is to reveal the degree of similarities and differences between their electronic structures of the two model molecular pairs. It is found that the similarities in C1s and inner valence binding energy spectra are due to their bonding connections but other properties such as ring structure (in 2-azetidinone) and chiral carbon (alanine) can be very different. Further, the inner valence region of ionization potential greater than 18 eV for 2-azetidinone and alanine is also significantly similar. Finally the strained lactam ring exhibits more chemical reactivity measured at all non-hydrogen atoms by Fukui functions with respect to alanine.

  10. Exploration of interactions between bioactive solutes and vitamin B9 in aqueous medium by physico-chemical contrivances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath Roy, Mahendra; Chakraborti, Palash; Ekka, Deepak

    2014-09-01

    Molecular interaction prevailing in α-amino acids (glycine, L-alanine, L-valine) and aqueous solution of folic acid (FA) has been reported by physico-chemical properties as density (ρ), viscosity (η), refractive index (nD) and ultrasonic speed (u) at 298.15 K. The extent of interaction (solute-solvent interaction) is expressed in terms of the limiting apparent molar volume (φ0V), viscosity B-coefficient, molar refraction (RM) and limiting apparent molar adiabatic compressibility (φ0K). The trends in transfer volumes, Δφ0V, have been interpreted in terms of solute-cosolute interactions on the basis of a co-sphere overlap model. The role of the cosolute (FA), and the contribution of solute-solute and solute-solvent interactions to the solution complexes, has also been analysed through the derived properties.

  11. Pre-steady-state kinetic and structural analysis of interaction of methionine γ-lyase from Citrobacter freundii with inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, Nikita A; Faleev, Nicolai G; Kuznetsova, Alexandra A; Morozova, Elena A; Revtovich, Svetlana V; Anufrieva, Natalya V; Nikulin, Alexei D; Fedorova, Olga S; Demidkina, Tatyana V

    2015-01-02

    Methionine γ-lyase (MGL) catalyzes the γ-elimination of l-methionine and its derivatives as well as the β-elimination of l-cysteine and its analogs. These reactions yield α-keto acids and thiols. The mechanism of chemical conversion of amino acids includes numerous reaction intermediates. The detailed analysis of MGL interaction with glycine, l-alanine, l-norvaline, and l-cycloserine was performed by pre-steady-state stopped-flow kinetics. The structure of side chains of the amino acids is important both for their binding with enzyme and for the stability of the external aldimine and ketimine intermediates. X-ray structure of the MGL·l-cycloserine complex has been solved at 1.6 Å resolution. The structure models the ketimine intermediate of physiological reaction. The results elucidate the mechanisms of the intermediate interconversion at the stages of external aldimine and ketimine formation.

  12. Production and physicochemical assessment of new stevia amino acid sweeteners from the natural stevioside.

    PubMed

    Khattab, Sherine N; Massoud, Mona I; Jad, Yahya El-Sayed; Bekhit, Adnan A; El-Faham, Ayman

    2015-04-15

    New stevia amino acid sweeteners, stevia glycine ethyl ester (ST-GL) and stevia l-alanine methyl ester (ST-GL), were synthesised and characterised by IR, NMR ((1)H NMR and (13)C NMR) and elemental analysis. The purity of the new sweeteners was determined by HPLC and their sensory properties were evaluated relative to sucrose in an aqueous system. Furthermore, the stevia derivatives (ST-GL and ST-AL) were evaluated for their acute toxicity, melting point, solubility and heat stability. The novel sweeteners were stable in acidic, neutral or basic aqueous solutions maintained at 100 °C for 2 h. The sweetness intensity rate of the novel sweeteners was higher than sucrose. Stevia amino acid (ST-GL and ST-AL) solutions had a clean sweetness taste without bitterness when compared to stevioside. The novel sweeteners can be utilised as non-caloric sweeteners in the production of low-calorie food.

  13. The CHAP domain: a large family of amidases including GSP amidase and peptidoglycan hydrolases.

    PubMed

    Bateman, Alex; Rawlings, Neil D

    2003-05-01

    Cleavage of peptidoglycan plays an important role in bacterial cell division, cell growth and cell lysis. Here, we reveal that several known peptidoglycan amidases fall into a family, which includes many proteins of previously unknown function. The family includes two different peptidoglycan cleavage activities: L-muramoyl-L-alanine amidase and D-alanyl-glycyl endopeptidase activity. The family includes the amidase portion of the bifunctional glutathionylspermidine synthase/amidase enzyme from bacteria and pathogenic trypanosomes. The glutathionylspermidine synthase is thought to be a key component of the alternative pathway in trypanosomes for protection from oxygen-radical damage and has been proposed as a potential drug target. The CHAP (cysteine, histidine-dependent amidohydrolases/peptidases) domain is often found in association with other domains that cleave peptidoglycan. The large number of multifunctional hydrolases suggests that they might act in a cooperative manner to cleave specialized substrates.

  14. Design of chiral monochloro-s-triazine reagents for the liquid chromatographic separation of amino acid enantiomers.

    PubMed

    Brückner, H; Wachsmann, M

    2003-05-23

    A series of chiral derivatizing reagents (CDRs) was synthesized by nucleophilic replacement of one chlorine atom in cyanuric chloride (2,4,6-trichloro-1,3,5-triazine; s-triazine) by alkoxy (methoxy, butoxy, 1,1,1-trifluoroethoxy) or aryloxy groups (phenoxy, nitrophenoxy, phenylphenoxy, 4-methylcoumaryloxy), and displacement of a second chlorine by L-alanine amide, L-phenylalanine amide, L-proline tert.-butyl ester, or Boc-L-lysine tert.-butyl ester. Further, CDRs were investigated in which two chlorine atoms in cyanuric chloride were substituted consecutively by L-valine amide and L-phenylalanine amide. The resulting CDRs having a remaining reactive chlorine were tested for their capability of derivatizing DL-amino acids followed by liquid chromatographic separation of the resulting diastereomers.

  15. Synergism between hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) and nitric oxide (NO) in vasorelaxation induced by stonustoxin (SNTX), a lethal and hypotensive protein factor isolated from stonefish Synanceja horrida venom.

    PubMed

    Liew, H C; Khoo, H E; Moore, P K; Bhatia, M; Lu, J; Moochhala, S M

    2007-04-10

    Stonustoxin (SNTX) is a 148 kDa, dimeric, hypotensive and lethal protein factor isolated from the venom of the stonefish Synanceja horrida. SNTX (10-320 ng/ml) progressively causes relaxation of endothelium-intact, phenylephrine (PE)-precontracted rat thoracic aortic rings. The SNTX-induced vasorelaxation was inhibited by L-N(G)-nitro arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), suggesting that nitric oxide (NO) contributes to the SNTX-induced response. Interestingly, D, L-proparglyglycine (PAG) and beta-cyano-L-alanine (BCA), irreversible and competitive inhibitors of cystathionine-gamma-lyase (CSE) respectively, also inhibited SNTX-induced vasorelaxation, indicating that H(2)S may also play a part in the effect of SNTX. The combined use of L-NAME with PAG or BCA showed that H(2)S and NO act synergistically in effecting SNTX-induced vasorelaxation.

  16. Amine-tethered adsorbents based on three-dimensional macroporous silica for CO(2) capture from simulated flue gas and air.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fa-Qian; Wang, Lei; Huang, Zhao-Ge; Li, Chao-Qin; Li, Wei; Li, Rong-Xun; Li, Wei-Hua

    2014-03-26

    New covalently tethered CO2 adsorbents are synthesized through the in situ polymerization of N-carboxyanhydride (NCA) of l-alanine from amine-functionalized three-dimensional (3D) interconnected macroporous silica (MPS). The interconnected macropores provide low-resistant pathways for the diffusion of CO2 molecules, while the abundant mesopores ensure the high pore volume. The adsorbents exhibit high molecular weight (of up to 13058 Da), high amine loading (more than 10.98 mmol N g(-1)), fast CO2 capture kinetics (t1/2 < 1 min), high adsorption capacity (of up to 3.86 mmol CO2 g(-1) in simulated flue gas and 2.65 mmol CO2 g(-1) in simulated ambient air under 1 atm of dry CO2), as well as good stability over 120 adsorption-desorption cycles, which allows the overall CO2 capture process to be promising and sustainable.

  17. Rapid scan electron paramagnetic resonance at 1.0 GHz of defect centers in γ-irradiated organic solids

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yilin; Rinard, George A.; Quine, Richard W.; Eaton, Sandra S.; Eaton, Gareth R.

    2016-01-01

    The radicals in six 60Co γ-irradiated solids: malonic acid, glycylglycine, 2,6 di-t-butyl 4-methyl phenol, L-alanine, dimethyl malonic acid, and 2-amino isobutyric acid, were studied by rapid scan electron paramagnetic resonance at L-band (1.04 GHz) using a customized Bruker Elexsys spectrometer and a locally-designed dielectric resonator. Sinusoidal scans with widths up to 18.2 mT were generated with the recently described coil driver and Litz wire coils. Power saturation curves showed that the rapid scan signals saturated at higher powers than did conventional continuous wave signals. The rapid scan data were deconvolved and background subtracted to obtain absorption spectra. For the same data acquisition time the signal-to-noise for the absorption spectra obtained in rapid scans were 23 to 37 times higher than for first-derivative spectra obtained by conventional continuous wave electron paramagnetic resonance. PMID:26834505

  18. Double-quantum homonuclear rotary resonance: Efficient dipolar recovery in magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, N. C.; Bildsøe, H.; Jakobsen, H. J.; Levitt, M. H.

    1994-08-01

    We describe an efficient method for the recovery of homonuclear dipole-dipole interactions in magic-angle spinning NMR. Double-quantum homonuclear rotary resonance (2Q-HORROR) is established by fulfilling the condition ωr=2ω1, where ωr is the sample rotation frequency and ω1 is the nutation frequency around an applied resonant radio frequency (rf) field. This resonance can be used for double-quantum filtering and measurement of homonuclear dipolar interactions in the presence of magic-angle spinning. The spin dynamics depend only weakly on crystallite orientation allowing good performance for powder samples. Chemical shift effects are suppressed to zeroth order. The method is demonstrated for singly and doubly 13C labeled L-alanine.

  19. On the vibrational behavior of single- and double-walled carbon nanotubes under the physical adsorption of biomolecules in the aqueous environment: a molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Ajori, S; Ansari, R; Darvizeh, M

    2016-03-01

    The adsorption of biomolecules on the walls of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in an aqueous environment is of great importance in the field of nanobiotechnology. In this study, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were performed to understand the mechanical vibrational behavior of single- and double-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs and DWCNTs) under the physical adsorption of four important biomolecules (L-alanine, guanine, thymine, and uracil) in vacuum and an aqueous environment. It was observed that the natural frequencies of these CNTs in vacuum reduce under the physical adsorption of biomolecules. In the aqueous environment, the natural frequency of each pure CNT decreased as compared to its natural frequency in vacuum. It was also found that the frequency shift for functionalized CNTs as compared to pure CNTs in the aqueous environment was dependent on the radius and the number of walls of the CNT, and could be positive or negative.

  20. Supramolecular gelators based on benzenetricarboxamides for ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Ishioka, Yumi; Minakuchi, Nami; Mizuhata, Minoru; Maruyama, Tatsuo

    2014-02-21

    Supramolecular gelators comprising 1,3,5-benzenetricarboxylic acids and amino acid methyl esters (glycine, L-alanine, L-valine, L-leucine, L-methionine, and L-phenylalanine) for ionic liquids were developed. Ten types of ionic liquids were gelated using the above-mentioned gelators at relatively low concentrations. Field emission-scanning electron microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy analyses revealed that these gelators self-assembled into an entangled fibrous structure in ionic liquids, leading to the gelation of the ionic liquids. Comparison studies, involving compounds analogous to the gelators, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy measurements suggested that hydrogen bonding played a key role in the self-assembly of the gelator molecules. The ionogels displayed reversible thermal transition characteristics and viscoelastic properties typical of a gel. The gelation of the ionic liquids studied under a wide range of gelator concentrations did not affect the intrinsic conductivity of the ionic liquids.

  1. Inhibitors of alanine racemase enzyme: a review.

    PubMed

    Azam, Mohammed Afzal; Jayaram, Unni

    2016-08-01

    Alanine racemase is a fold type III PLP-dependent amino acid racemase enzyme catalysing the conversion of l-alanine to d-alanine utilised by bacterial cell wall for peptidoglycan synthesis. As there are no known homologs in humans, it is considered as an excellent antibacterial drug target. The standard inhibitors of this enzyme include O-carbamyl-d-serine, d-cycloserine, chlorovinyl glycine, alaphosphin, etc. d-Cycloserine is indicated for pulmonary and extra pulmonary tuberculosis but therapeutic use of drug is limited due to its severe toxic effects. Toxic effects due to off-target affinities of cycloserine and other substrate analogs have prompted new research efforts to identify alanine racemase inhibitors that are not substrate analogs. In this review, an updated status of known inhibitors of alanine racemase enzyme has been provided which will serve as a rich source of structural information and will be helpful in generating selective and potent inhibitor of alanine racemase.

  2. Water structure around peptide fragments in aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    McLain, Sylvia E; Soper, Alan K; Watts, Prof Anthony

    2008-01-01

    The bulk water structure around small peptide fragments - glycyl-L-alanine, glycyl-L-proline and L-alanyl-L-proline - has been determined by a combination of neutron diffraction with isotopic substitution and empirical potential structural refinement techniques. The addition of each of the dipeptides to water yields a decreased water-water coordination in the surrounding water solvent. Additionally both the Ow-Ow radial distribution functions and the water-water spatial density functions in all of the solutions indicate an electrostrictive effect in the second water coordination shell of the bulk water network. This effect is not observed in similar experiments on the amino acid L-proline alone in solution, which is one component of two of the peptides measured here.

  3. Investigation of biomolecules trapped in fluid inclusions inside halite crystals by Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osterrothová, Kateřina; Jehlička, Jan

    2011-12-01

    Raman spectroscopy was tested for the identification of biomolecules (glycine, L-alanine, β-alanine, L-serine, and γ-aminobutyric acid) trapped in fluid inclusions inside halite model crystals. The investigated biomolecules represent important targets for future astrobiological missions. We know from terrestrial conditions that organic molecules and microorganisms can be sealed within fluid inclusions and can survive intact even for hundreds of millions of years. Raman spectroscopy is currently being miniaturized for future extraterrestrial planetary exploration (ExoMars 2018). Raman spectroscopy has shown the ability to detect investigated aminoacids nondestructively without any sample preparation, in short measurement times, and in relatively low concentrations. The number of registered Raman bands of investigated aminoacids and their intensity clearly correlate with the given concentration of biomolecules within fluid inclusions.

  4. Theoretical investigation of the optical and EPR parameters for VO 2+ion in some complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalfaoğlu, Emel; Karabulut, Bünyamin

    2012-04-01

    The molecular orbital coefficients and the EPR parameters of trisodium citrate dihydrate, sodium hydrogen oxalate monohydrate, potassium d-gluconate monohydrate and L-Alanine vanadyl complexes are calculated theoretically. Two d-d transition spectra and EPR parameters for the VO2+ complex are calculated theoretically by using crystal-field theory. The calculated g and A paramaters have indicated that paramagnetic center is axially symmetric. Having the relations of g∥A⊥ for VO2+ ions, it can be concluded that VO2+ ions are located in distorted octahedral sites (C4v) elongated along the z-axis and the ground state of the paramagnetic electron is dxy.

  5. Chirality Amplification in Tactoids of Lyotropic Chromonic Liquid Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Chenhui; Lavrentovich, Oleg

    2014-03-01

    We demonstrate an effective chirality amplification based on the long-range forces, extending over the scales of tens of micrometers, much larger than the single molecule (nanometer) scale. The mechanism is rooted in the long-range elastic nature of orientational order in lyotropic chromonic liquid crystals (LCLCs) that represent water solutions of achiral disc-like molecules. Minute quantities of chiral molecules such as amino acid L-alanine and limonene added to the droplets of LCLC lead to chiral amplification characterized by an increase of optical activity by a factor of 103 - 104. This effect allows one to discriminate and detect the absolute configuration of chiral molecules in an aqueous system, thus opening new possibilities in biosensing and other biological applications.

  6. Crystal growth, structural and thermal studies of amino acids admixtured L-arginine phosphate monohydrate single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anandan, P.; Saravanan, T.; Parthipan, G.; Kumar, R. Mohan; Bhagavannarayana, G.; Ravi, G.; Jayavel, R.

    2011-05-01

    To study the improved characteristics of L-arginine phosphate monohydrate (LAP) crystals, amino acids mixed LAP crystals have been grown by slow cooling method. Amino acids like glycine, L-alanine, and L-valine have been selected for doping. Optical quality bulk crystals have been harvested after a typical growth period of about twenty days. The effect of amino acids in the crystal lattice and molecular vibrational frequencies of various functional groups in the crystals have been studied using X-ray powder diffraction and Fourier Transform infrared (FTIR) analyses respectively. Thermal behavior of the amino acids mixed LAP crystals have been studied from the TG and DTG analyses. High-resolution X-ray diffraction studies have been carried out to find the crystalline nature. Optical transmission studies have been carried out by UV-vis spectrophotometer. The cut off wavelength is below 240 nm for the grown crystals.

  7. N-( p-Ethynylbenzoyl) derivatives of amino acid and dipeptide methyl esters - Synthesis and structural study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eißmann, Frank; Weber, Edwin

    2011-11-01

    A series of N-( p-ethynylbenzoyl) derivatives ( 1-4) of the amino acids glycine and L-alanine as well as the dipeptides glycylglycine and L-alanylglycine has been synthesized via a two-step reaction sequence including the reaction of an appropriate N-( p-bromobenzoyl) precursor with trimethylsilylacetylene followed by deprotection of the trimethylsilyl protecting group, respectively. X-ray crystal structures of the amino acid and dipeptide methyl esters 1-4 are reported. The amide and peptide bonds within each molecular structure are planar and adopt the trans-configuration. The packing structures are governed by N sbnd H⋯O interactions leading to the formation of characteristic strand motifs. Further stabilization results from weaker C sbnd H⋯O and C sbnd H⋯π contacts.

  8. Enhanced sensitivity in high-resolution 1H solid-state NMR spectroscopy with DUMBO dipolar decoupling under ultra-fast MAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salager, Elodie; Stein, Robin S.; Steuernagel, Stefan; Lesage, Anne; Elena, Bénédicte; Emsley, Lyndon

    2009-02-01

    The solid-state NMR 1H homonuclear decoupling sequences in the DUMBO family are shown to be effective at ultra-fast MAS rates of up to 65 kHz. The sequences are applied to model compounds glycine and [2- 13C]- L-alanine as well as the dipeptide β- L-Asp- L-Ala in windowed and continuous phase-modulated versions. They are shown to achieve especially impressive resolution when implemented in a 2D constant-time experiment. At 65 kHz MAS, 1H resolution using homonuclear decoupling is similar to that obtained at lower MAS rates, but peak intensity, and therefore spectral sensitivity, is improved by a factor of 5 over homonuclear-decoupled spectra at 10 kHz MAS.

  9. 1-Deoxysphingolipids Encountered Exogenously and Made de Novo: Dangerous Mysteries inside an Enigma.

    PubMed

    Duan, Jingjing; Merrill, Alfred H

    2015-06-19

    The traditional backbones of mammalian sphingolipids are 2-amino, 1,3-diols made by serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT). Many organisms additionally produce non-traditional, cytotoxic 1-deoxysphingoid bases and, surprisingly, mammalian SPT biosynthesizes some of them, too (e.g. 1-deoxysphinganine from L-alanine). These are rapidly N-acylated to 1-deoxy-"ceramides" with very uncommon biophysical properties. The functions of 1-deoxysphingolipids are not known, but they are certainly dangerous as contributors to sensory and autonomic neuropathies when elevated by inherited SPT mutations, and they are noticeable in diabetes, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, serine deficiencies, and other diseases. As components of food as well as endogenously produced, these substances are mysteries within an enigma.

  10. ESR study of some gamma irradiated amino acids and condensed 1,4-dihydropyridines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydın, Murat; Şimşek, Rahime; Gündüz, Miyase Gözde; Şafak, Cihat; Osmanoğlu, Y. Emre

    2013-03-01

    L-alanine methyl ester hydrochloride, 2-aminoisobutyric acid and some condensed 1,4-dihydropyridine derivatives (Compounds R1-R4) were gamma irradiated, the induced free radicals was investigated at room temperature by electron spin resonance techniques. The observed paramagnetic species of amino acids compounds were attributed to the CH3ĊHCOOCH3 and (CH3)2ĊCOOH radicals, respectively. The observed spectra of the 1,4-dihydropyridine derivatives interpreted in terms of some type of amine radical fragments. The spectra were computer simulated and the g values of the radicals and the hyperfine structure constants of the unpaired electron with nearby protons and 14N nucleus were determined. In this study, the observed paramagnetic species were found to be stable at room temperature more than 2 months.

  11. The two-component cell lysis genes holWMY and lysWMY of the Staphylococcus warneri M phage varphiWMY: cloning, sequencing, expression, and mutational analysis in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Yokoi, Ken-Ji; Kawahigashi, Nobutaka; Uchida, Maiko; Sugahara, Kazuki; Shinohara, Masayuki; Kawasaki, Ken-Ichi; Nakamura, Shogo; Taketo, Akira; Kodaira, Ken-Ichi

    2005-05-23

    From the genome library of Staphylococcus warneri M, the two successive cell-lysis genes (holWMY and lytWMY) were cloned and characterized. The lytWMY gene encoded a protein (LysWMY), whose calculated molecular mass and pI were 54 kDa and 8.95, respectively. When overproduced in Escherichia coli, lysWMY directed a protein of 45 kDa (smaller than the predicted molecular mass), having N-terminal 13 residues identical with those predicted from DNA. Comparative analysis revealed that LysWMY significantly resembles the putative N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidases encoded by the staphylococcal phages phi11, 80 alpha, and Twort. Examination of modular organization of LysWMY identified three putative domains CHAP (for D-alanyl-glycyl endopeptidase), amidase (L-muramoyl-L-alanine amidase), and SH3 (cell wall recognition). Gene knockout analysis revealed that each of the two domains of CHAP and amidase was responsible for cell-lytic activity on a zymogram gel. Site-directed mutation of Cys29Ala, His92Ala, or Asn114Ala in the CHAP domain substantially reduced cell-lytic activity, suggesting that this Cys-His-Asn triad is crucial for the enzymatic function. On the other hand, the holWMY gene encoded a protein (HolWMY) with molecular mass and pI of 16 kDa and 4.36; this protein contained two potential transmembrane helices, resembling other predicted holins (a cytoplasmic membrane-disrupting protein) encoded by the S. aureus phage, phi11, 80 alpha, and Twort. Upon mitomycin C exposure of S. warneri M, a prophage (phiWMY) was induced and the virion was examined under electron microscopy. PCR amplification and sequencing revealed the presence of the holWMY-lysWMY genes in the phage genome.

  12. Defining Multiple Characteristic Raman Bands of α-Amino Acids as Biomarkers for Planetary Missions Using a Statistical Method.

    PubMed

    Rolfe, S M; Patel, M R; Gilmour, I; Olsson-Francis, K; Ringrose, T J

    2016-06-01

    Biomarker molecules, such as amino acids, are key to discovering whether life exists elsewhere in the Solar System. Raman spectroscopy, a technique capable of detecting biomarkers, will be on board future planetary missions including the ExoMars rover. Generally, the position of the strongest band in the spectra of amino acids is reported as the identifying band. However, for an unknown sample, it is desirable to define multiple characteristic bands for molecules to avoid any ambiguous identification. To date, there has been no definition of multiple characteristic bands for amino acids of interest to astrobiology. This study examined L-alanine, L-aspartic acid, L-cysteine, L-glutamine and glycine and defined several Raman bands per molecule for reference as characteristic identifiers. Per amino acid, 240 spectra were recorded and compared using established statistical tests including ANOVA. The number of characteristic bands defined were 10, 12, 12, 14 and 19 for L-alanine (strongest intensity band: 832 cm(-1)), L-aspartic acid (938 cm(-1)), L-cysteine (679 cm(-1)), L-glutamine (1090 cm(-1)) and glycine (875 cm(-1)), respectively. The intensity of bands differed by up to six times when several points on the crystal sample were rotated through 360 °; to reduce this effect when defining characteristic bands for other molecules, we find that spectra should be recorded at a statistically significant number of points per sample to remove the effect of sample rotation. It is crucial that sets of characteristic Raman bands are defined for biomarkers that are targets for future planetary missions to ensure a positive identification can be made.

  13. Role of amino acids as additives on sperm motility, plasma membrane integrity and lipid peroxidation levels at pre-freeze and post-thawed ram semen.

    PubMed

    Sangeeta, Sharon; Arangasamy, A; Kulkarni, S; Selvaraju, S

    2015-10-01

    The possibility of including amino acids for cryopreservation of ram semen to improve the quality of frozen semen was explored in this study in sheep model. 24 samples were collected in triplicate from 8 rams of 2-3 year old Bannur cross bred rams maintained at the Institute Experimental Livestock Unit. Semen was diluted in tris-egg yolk glycerol diluent and made into 7 aliquots as follows: aliquot 1 served as control, "l-alanine" was added at 100 and 135mM in the aliquots 2 and 3, "l-glutamine" was added at 20 and 25mM in the aliquots 4 and 5 and "l-proline" was added at 25 and 50mM in the aliquots 6 and 7, respectively. Diluted semen was filled in 0.25ml French straws and frozen in LN2. Inclusion of "l-proline" and "l-glutamine" in the diluent increased the percent live sperm (P<0.001), total motility (P<0.05) and maintained higher functional membrane and acrosomal integrity (P<0.001) by decreasing lipid peroxidation (P<0.001) compared to the control group. In contrast, "l-alanine" decreased the percentage of total motility, fast progressive spermatozoa and increased (P<0.01) the percentage of immotile spermatozoa. It can be concluded that 20mM "l-glutamine" and 25mM "l-proline" can be used as semen additive to freeze ram semen as they prevented cryoinjuries to sperm and improved the pre-freeze and post-thaw semen characteristics.

  14. [Cardioprotective effects of glutamine in patients with ischemic heart disease operated under conditions of extracorporeal blood circulation].

    PubMed

    Lomivorotov, V V; Efremov, S M; Shmyrev, V A; Ponomarev, D N; Sviatchenko, A V; Kniaz'kova, L G

    2012-01-01

    It was conducted a study of glutamine cardioptotective effects during perioperative use in patients with ischemic heart disease, operated under CB. Exclusion criteria were: left ventricular ejection fraction less than 50%, diabetes melitus, myocardial infarction less than 3 months ago, Patients of the study group (n=25) had glutamine (20% solution N(2)-L-alanine-L-glutamine ("Dipeptiven" Fresenius Kabi, Germany); 0.4 g/kg/day. Patients of control group (n=25) received placebo (0.9% NaCl solution). The main indicators were the dynamics of troponin I, as well as central hemodynamics parameters. On the 1-st day after operation the concentration of troponin I was significantly lower in the glutamine-group compared placebo-group (1.280 (0.840-2.230) 2.410 (1.060-6.600) ng/ml; p=0.035). 4 hours after CB in a glutamine-group also had significantly large indicators of cardiac index (2.58 (2.34-2.91) l/min/m2 vs 2.03 (1.76-2.32)) l/min/m2; p=0,002) and stroke index (32.8 (27.8-36.0.) ml/m2 vs 26.1 (22.6-31.8) ml/m2; p=0.023). Systemic vascular resistance index was significantly lower in glutamine-group (1942 (1828-2209) dyn x s/cm(-5)/m2 vs 2456 (2400-3265) dyn x s/cm(-5)/m2; p=0.001). Conclusion. Perioperative use of N(2)-L-alanine-L-glutamine during the first 24 hours ofperioperative period gives cardioprotective effect in patients with ischemic heart disease operated under CB.

  15. Defining Multiple Characteristic Raman Bands of α-Amino Acids as Biomarkers for Planetary Missions Using a Statistical Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolfe, S. M.; Patel, M. R.; Gilmour, I.; Olsson-Francis, K.; Ringrose, T. J.

    2016-06-01

    Biomarker molecules, such as amino acids, are key to discovering whether life exists elsewhere in the Solar System. Raman spectroscopy, a technique capable of detecting biomarkers, will be on board future planetary missions including the ExoMars rover. Generally, the position of the strongest band in the spectra of amino acids is reported as the identifying band. However, for an unknown sample, it is desirable to define multiple characteristic bands for molecules to avoid any ambiguous identification. To date, there has been no definition of multiple characteristic bands for amino acids of interest to astrobiology. This study examined l-alanine, l-aspartic acid, l-cysteine, l-glutamine and glycine and defined several Raman bands per molecule for reference as characteristic identifiers. Per amino acid, 240 spectra were recorded and compared using established statistical tests including ANOVA. The number of characteristic bands defined were 10, 12, 12, 14 and 19 for l-alanine (strongest intensity band: 832 cm-1), l-aspartic acid (938 cm-1), l-cysteine (679 cm-1), l-glutamine (1090 cm-1) and glycine (875 cm-1), respectively. The intensity of bands differed by up to six times when several points on the crystal sample were rotated through 360 °; to reduce this effect when defining characteristic bands for other molecules, we find that spectra should be recorded at a statistically significant number of points per sample to remove the effect of sample rotation. It is crucial that sets of characteristic Raman bands are defined for biomarkers that are targets for future planetary missions to ensure a positive identification can be made.

  16. Solid-State NMR Study of Paramagnetic Bis(alaninato-κ(2)N,O)copper(II) and Bis(1-amino(cyclo)alkane-1-carboxylato-κ(2)N,O)copper(II) Complexes: Reflection of Stereoisomerism and Molecular Mobility in (13)C and (2)H Fast Magic Angle Spinning Spectra.

    PubMed

    Szalontai, Gábor; Csonka, Róbert; Speier, Gábor; Kaizer, József; Sabolović, Jasmina

    2015-05-18

    Solid-state stereochemistry and mobility of paramagnetic copper(II) complexes formed by aliphatic amino acids (l-alanine, d,l-alanine, 1-amino-2-methyl-alanine) and 1-amino(cyclo)alkane-1-carboxylic acids (alkane = propane, butane, pentane, hexane) as bidentate ligands has been studied by (13)C and (2)H solid-state fast magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy. We examined the prospective method to characterize solid-state paramagnetic compounds in a routine way. Both (13)C and (2)H MAS spectra can distinguish d,l and l,l diastereomers of natural and polydeuterated bis([Dn]alaninato)copper(II) (n = 0, 2, 8) complexes with axial and/or equatorial methyl positions (conformations) primarily due to different Fermi-contact (FC) contributions. The three-bond hyperfine couplings clearly show Karplus-like dependence on the torsional angles which turned out to be a useful assignment aid. Density functional theory calculations of the FC term and crystal structures were also used to aid the final assignments. The correlations obtained for bis(alaninato-κ(2)N,O)copper(II) complexes were successfully used to characterize other complexes. The usefulness of the (2)H MAS spectra of the deuterated complexes was underlined. Even the spectra of the easily exchangeable amine protons contained essential stereochemical information. In the case of a dimer structure of bis(1-aminohexane-1-carboxylato-κ(2)N,O)copper(II) both the (13)C and (2)H resolutions were good enough to confirm the presence of the cis and trans forms in the asymmetric unit. With regard to the internal solid-state motions in the crystal lattice, the obtained quadrupolar tensor parameters were similar for the d,l- and l,l-alaninato isomers and also for the cis-trans forms suggesting similar crystal packing effects, static amine deuterons involved in hydrogen bonding, and fast rotating methyl groups.

  17. Line-narrowing in proton-detected nitrogen-14 NMR.

    PubMed

    Cavadini, Simone; Vitzthum, Veronika; Ulzega, Simone; Abraham, Anuji; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey

    2010-01-01

    In solids spinning at the magic angle, the indirect detection of single-quantum (SQ) and double-quantum (DQ) (14)N spectra (I=1) via spy nuclei S=1/2 such as protons can be achieved in the manner of heteronuclear single- or multiple-quantum correlation (HSQC or HMQC) spectroscopy. The HMQC method relies on the excitation of two-spin coherences of the type T(11)(I)T(11)(S) and T(21)(I)T(11)(S) at the beginning of the evolution interval t(1). The spectra obtained by Fourier transformation from t(1) to omega(1) may be broadened by the homogenous decay of the transverse terms of the spy nuclei S. This broadening is mostly due to homonuclear dipolar S-S' interactions between the proton spy nuclei. In this work we have investigated the possibility of inserting rotor-synchronized symmetry-based C or R sequences and decoupling schemes such as Phase-Modulated Lee-Goldburg (PMLG) sequences in the evolution period. These schemes reduce the homonuclear proton-proton interactions and lead to an enhancement of the resolution of both SQ and DQ proton-detected (14)N HMQC spectra. In addition, we have investigated the combination of HSQC with symmetry-based sequences and PMLG and shown that the highest resolution in the (14)N dimension is achieved by using HSQC in combination with symmetry-based sequences of the R-type. We show improvements in resolution in samples of l-alanine and the tripeptide ala-ala-gly (AAG). In particular, for l-alanine the width of the (14)N SQ peak is reduced from 2 to 1.2 kHz, in agreement with simulations. We report accurate measurements of quadrupolar coupling constants and asymmetry parameters for amide (14)N in AAG peptide bonds.

  18. Effect of Na+ Concentration and Nutritional Factors on the Lag Phase and Exponential Growth Rates of the Marine Bacterium Deleya aesta and of Other Marine Species

    PubMed Central

    Berthelet, Marc; MacLeod, Robert A.

    1989-01-01

    Growth of the marine bacterium Deleya aesta in a succinate minimal medium showed increasingly long lag phases as Na+ was decreased below the optimum (200 to 500 mM). The minimum Na+ concentration permitting growth consistently was 15 mM. Supplementation of the medium with KHCO3 (as a source of CO2) or yeast extract, especially in combination, reduced the lag phase, increased the rate of exponential growth, and allowed growth at 8 mM Na+. KHCO3 did not reduce the lag period but did increase the rate of exponential growth of Deleya venusta, Deleya pacifica, and Alteromonas haloplanktis 214. Yeast extract was active for all three. The effect of yeast extract on D. aesta could be reproduced by a mixture of amino acids approximating its amino acid composition. l-Alanine, l-aspartate, and l-methionine, in combination, were the most effective in reducing the lag phase, although not as effective as the complete mixture. Succinate, l-aspartate, and l-alanine were transported into the cells by largely independent pathways and oxidized at rates which were much lower at 10 than at 200 mM Na+. l-Methionine was transported at a low rate in the absence of Na+ and at a higher rate at 10 mM but was not oxidized. Above 25 mM Na+, the rate of transport of the carbon source was not the rate-limiting step for growth. It is concluded that a combination of transportable carbon sources reduced the lag period and increased the rate of exponential growth because they can be taken up independently and at low Na+ utilized simultaneously. PMID:16347969

  19. Insulin-releasing and insulin-like activity of Agaricus campestris (mushroom).

    PubMed

    Gray, A M; Flatt, P R

    1998-05-01

    Agaricus campestris (mushroom) has been documented as a traditional treatment for diabetes. Here the administration of mushroom in the diet (62.5 g/kg) and drinking water (2.5 g/l) countered the hyperglycaemia of streptozotocin-diabetic mice. An aqueous extract of mushroom (1 mg/ml) stimulated 2-deoxyglucose transport (2.0-fold), glucose oxidation (1.5-fold) and incorporation of glucose into glycogen (1.8-fold) in mouse abdominal muscle. In acute 20 min tests, 0.25-1 mg/ml aqueous extract of mushroom evoked a stepwise 3.5- to 4.6-fold stimulation of insulin secretion from the BRIN-BD11 pancreatic B-cell line. This effect was abolished by 0.5 mM diazoxide and prior exposure to extract did not affect subsequent stimulation of insulin secretion by 10 mM L-alanine, thereby negating a detrimental effect on cell viability. The effect of extract was potentiated by 16.7 mM glucose, L-alanine (10 mM) and IBMX (1 mM), and a depolarising concentration of KCl (25 mM) did not augment the insulin-releasing activity of mushroom. Activity of the extract was found to be heat stable, acetone soluble and unaltered by exposure to alkali, but decreased with exposure to acid. Dialysis to remove components with molecular mass < 2000 Da caused a 40% reduction in activity. Sequential extraction with solvents revealed insulin-releasing activity to be greatest in polar fractions. Lack of haemagglutinin activity with extract activity indicated that activity was unlikely to be due to a lectin-mediated event. These results demonstrate the presence of antihyperglycaemic, insulin-releasing and insulin-like activity in A. campestris.

  20. Injectable small molecule hydrogel as a potential nanocarrier for localized and sustained in vivo delivery of doxorubicin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Manish; Kundu, Somanath; Reddy M, Amarendar; Sreekanth, Vedagopuram; Motiani, Rajender K.; Sengupta, Sagar; Srivastava, Aasheesh; Bajaj, Avinash

    2014-10-01

    The majority of the localized drug delivery systems are based on polymeric or polypeptide scaffolds, as weak intermolecular interactions of low molecular weight hydrogelators (LMHGs, Mw <500 Da) are significantly perturbed in the presence of anticancer drugs. Here, we present l-alanine derived low molecular weight hydrogelators (LMHGs) that remain injectable even after entrapping the anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX). These DOX containing nanoassemblies (DOX-Gel) showed promising anticancer activity in mice models. Subcutaneous injection of DOX-Gel near the tumor achieved a greater decrease in tumour load than by intravenous injection of DOX (DOX-IV), and local injection of DOX alone (DOX-Local) at the tumor site. We noticed that DOX-Gel nanocarriers are especially effective when injected during the early stage of tumor progression, and achieve a substantial decrease in tumor load in the long term.The majority of the localized drug delivery systems are based on polymeric or polypeptide scaffolds, as weak intermolecular interactions of low molecular weight hydrogelators (LMHGs, Mw <500 Da) are significantly perturbed in the presence of anticancer drugs. Here, we present l-alanine derived low molecular weight hydrogelators (LMHGs) that remain injectable even after entrapping the anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX). These DOX containing nanoassemblies (DOX-Gel) showed promising anticancer activity in mice models. Subcutaneous injection of DOX-Gel near the tumor achieved a greater decrease in tumour load than by intravenous injection of DOX (DOX-IV), and local injection of DOX alone (DOX-Local) at the tumor site. We noticed that DOX-Gel nanocarriers are especially effective when injected during the early stage of tumor progression, and achieve a substantial decrease in tumor load in the long term. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Scheme 1, Fig. S1-S6, synthesis of hydrogels; experimental section for gelation, rheology, MALDI, microscopy and

  1. The Metabolic Responses to L-Glutamine of Livers from Rats with Diabetes Types 1 and 2

    PubMed Central

    Comar, Jurandir Fernando; de Oliveira, Denise Silva; Bracht, Livia; Kemmelmeier, Fumie Suzuki; Peralta, Rosane Marina; Bracht, Adelar

    2016-01-01

    There are several claims about the beneficial effects of supplementing L-glutamine to both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. The purpose of the present study was to provide detailed knowledge about the fate of this amino acid in the liver, the first organ that receives the compound when ingested orally. The study was done using the isolated perfused rat liver, an experimental system that preserves the microcirculation of the organ and that allows to measured several parameters during steady-state and pre steady-state conditions. L-Glutamine was infused in the portal vein (5 mM) and several parameters were monitored. Livers from type 1 diabetic rats showed an accelerated response to L-glutamine infusion. In consequence of this accelerated response livers from type 1 diabetic rats presented higher rates of ammonia, urea, glucose and lactate output during the first 25–30 minutes following L-glutamine infusion. As steady-state conditions approached, however, the difference between type 1 diabetes and control livers tended to disappear. Measurement of the glycogen content over a period of 100 minutes revealed that, excepting the initial phase of the L-glutamine infusion, the increased glucose output in livers from type 1 diabetic rats was mainly due to accelerated glycogenolysis. Livers from type 2 diabetic rats behaved similarly to control livers with no accelerated glucose output but with increased L-alanine production. L-Alanine is important for the pancreatic β-cells and from this point of view the oral intake of L-glutamine can be regarded as beneficial. Furthermore, the lack of increased glucose output in livers from type 2 diabetic rats is consistent with observations that even daily L-glutamine doses of 30 g do not increase the glycemic levels in well controlled type 2 diabetes patients. PMID:27490892

  2. Functional Analysis of All Aminotransferase Proteins Inferred from the Genome Sequence of Corynebacterium glutamicum

    PubMed Central

    Marienhagen, Jan; Kennerknecht, Nicole; Sahm, Hermann; Eggeling, Lothar

    2005-01-01

    Twenty putative aminotransferase (AT) proteins of Corynebacterium glutamicum, or rather pyridoxal-5′-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzymes, were isolated and assayed among others with l-glutamate, l-aspartate, and l-alanine as amino donors and a number of 2-oxo-acids as amino acceptors. One outstanding AT identified is AlaT, which has a broad amino donor specificity utilizing (in the order of preference) l-glutamate > 2-aminobutyrate > l-aspartate with pyruvate as acceptor. Another AT is AvtA, which utilizes l-alanine to aminate 2-oxo-isovalerate, the l-valine precursor, and 2-oxo-butyrate. A second AT active with the l-valine precursor and that of the other two branched-chain amino acids, too, is IlvE, and both enzyme activities overlap partially in vivo, as demonstrated by the analysis of deletion mutants. Also identified was AroT, the aromatic AT, and this and IlvE were shown to have comparable activities with phenylpyruvate, thus demonstrating the relevance of both ATs for l-phenylalanine synthesis. We also assessed the activity of two PLP-containing cysteine desulfurases, supplying a persulfide intermediate. One of them is SufS, which assists in the sulfur transfer pathway for the Fe-S cluster assembly. Together with the identification of further ATs and the additional analysis of deletion mutants, this results in an overview of the ATs within an organism that may not have been achieved thus far. PMID:16267288

  3. Microwave Heating of Synthetic Skin Samples for Potential Treatment of Gout Using the Metal-Assisted and Microwave-Accelerated Decrystallization Technique

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Physical stability of synthetic skin samples during their exposure to microwave heating was investigated to demonstrate the use of the metal-assisted and microwave-accelerated decrystallization (MAMAD) technique for potential biomedical applications. In this regard, optical microscopy and temperature measurements were employed for the qualitative and quantitative assessment of damage to synthetic skin samples during 20 s intermittent microwave heating using a monomode microwave source (at 8 GHz, 2–20 W) up to 120 s. The extent of damage to synthetic skin samples, assessed by the change in the surface area of skin samples, was negligible for microwave power of ≤7 W and more extensive damage (>50%) to skin samples occurred when exposed to >7 W at initial temperature range of 20–39 °C. The initial temperature of synthetic skin samples significantly affected the extent of change in temperature of synthetic skin samples during their exposure to microwave heating. The proof of principle use of the MAMAD technique was demonstrated for the decrystallization of a model biological crystal (l-alanine) placed under synthetic skin samples in the presence of gold nanoparticles. Our results showed that the size (initial size ∼850 μm) of l-alanine crystals can be reduced up to 60% in 120 s without damage to synthetic skin samples using the MAMAD technique. Finite-difference time-domain-based simulations of the electric field distribution of an 8 GHz monomode microwave radiation showed that synthetic skin samples are predicted to absorb ∼92.2% of the microwave radiation. PMID:27917407

  4. Gustatory responsiveness to the 20 proteinogenic amino acids in the spider monkey (Ateles geoffroyi).

    PubMed

    Larsson, Jenny; Maitz, Anna; Hernandez Salazar, Laura Teresa; Laska, Matthias

    2014-03-29

    The gustatory responsiveness of four adult spider monkeys to the 20 proteinogenic amino acids was assessed in two-bottle preference tests of brief duration (1min). We found that Ateles geoffroyi responded with significant preferences for seven amino acids (glycine, l-proline, l-alanine, l-serine, l-glutamic acid, l-aspartic acid, and l-lysine) when presented at a concentration of 100mM and/or 200mM and tested against water. At the same concentrations, the animals significantly rejected five amino acids (l-tryptophan, l-tyrosine, l-valine, l-cysteine, and l-isoleucine) and were indifferent to the remaining tastants. Further, the results show that the spider monkeys discriminated concentrations as low as 0.2mM l-lysine, 2mM l-glutamic acid, 10mM l-proline, 20mM l-valine, 40mM glycine, l-serine, and l-aspartic acid, and 80mM l-alanine from the alternative stimulus, with individual animals even scoring lower threshold values. A comparison between the taste qualities of the proteinogenic amino acids as described by humans and the preferences and aversions observed in the spider monkeys suggests a fairly high degree of agreement in the taste quality perception of these tastants between the two species. A comparison between the taste preference thresholds obtained with the spider monkeys and taste detection thresholds reported in human subjects suggests that the taste sensitivity of A. geoffroyi for the amino acids tested here might match that of Homo sapiens. The results support the assumption that the taste responses of spider monkeys to proteinogenic amino acids might reflect an evolutionary adaptation to their frugivorous and thus protein-poor diet.

  5. Copolymer-grafted silica phase from a cation-anion monomer pair for enhanced separation in reversed-phase liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Mallik, Abul K; Qiu, Hongdeng; Takafuji, Makoto; Ihara, Hirotaka

    2014-05-01

    This work reports a new imidazolium and L-alanine derived copolymer-grafted silica stationary phase for ready separation of complex isomers using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). For this purpose, 1-allyl-3-octadecylimidazolium bromide ([AyImC18]Br) and N-acryloyl-L-alanine sodium salt ([AAL]Na) ionic liquids (IL) monomers were synthesized. Subsequently, the bromide counteranion was exchanged with the 2-(acrylamido)propanoate organic counteranion by reacting the [AyImC18]Br with excess [AAL]Na in water. The obtained IL cation-anion monomer pair was then copolymerized on mercaptopropyl-modified silica (Sil-MPS) via a surface-initiated radical chain-transfer reaction. The selective retention behaviors of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), including some positional isomers, steroids, and nucleobases were investigated using the newly obtained Sil-poly(ImC18-AAL), and octadecyl silylated silica (ODS) was used as the reference column. Interesting results were obtained for the separation of PAHs, steroids, and nucleobases with the new organic phase. The results showed that the Sil-poly(ImC18-AAL) presented multiple noncovalent interactions, including hydrophobic, π-π, carbonyl-π, and ion-dipole interactions for the separation of PAHs and dipolar compounds. Only pure water was sufficient as the mobile phase for the separation of the nucleobases. Ten nucleosides and bases were separated, using only water as the mobile phase, within a very short time using the Sil-poly(ImC18-AAL), which is otherwise difficult to achieve using conventional hydrophobic columns such as ODS. The combination of electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions are important for the effective separation of such basic compounds without the use of any organic additive as the eluent on the Sil-poly(ImC18-AAL) column.

  6. l-Serine Deficiency Elicits Intracellular Accumulation of Cytotoxic Deoxysphingolipids and Lipid Body Formation*

    PubMed Central

    Esaki, Kayoko; Sayano, Tomoko; Sonoda, Chiaki; Akagi, Takumi; Suzuki, Takeshi; Ogawa, Takuya; Okamoto, Masahiro; Yoshikawa, Takeo; Hirabayashi, Yoshio; Furuya, Shigeki

    2015-01-01

    l-Serine is required to synthesize membrane lipids such as phosphatidylserine and sphingolipids. Nevertheless, it remains largely unknown how a diminished capacity to synthesize l-serine affects lipid homeostasis in cells and tissues. Here, we show that deprivation of external l-serine leads to the generation of 1-deoxysphingolipids (doxSLs), including 1-deoxysphinganine, in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (KO-MEFs) lacking d-3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (Phgdh), which catalyzes the first step in the de novo synthesis of l-serine. A novel mass spectrometry-based lipidomic approach demonstrated that 1-deoxydihydroceramide was the most abundant species of doxSLs accumulated in l-serine-deprived KO-MEFs. Among normal sphingolipid species in KO-MEFs, levels of sphinganine, dihydroceramide, ceramide, and hexosylceramide were significantly reduced after deprivation of external l-serine, whereas those of sphingomyelin, sphingosine, and sphingosine 1-phosphate were retained. The synthesis of doxSLs was suppressed by supplementing the culture medium with l-serine but was potentiated by increasing the ratio of l-alanine to l-serine in the medium. Unlike with l-serine, depriving cells of external l-leucine did not promote the occurrence of doxSLs. Consistent with results obtained from KO-MEFs, brain-specific deletion of Phgdh in mice also resulted in accumulation of doxSLs in the brain. Furthermore, l-serine-deprived KO-MEFs exhibited increased formation of cytosolic lipid bodies containing doxSLs and other sphingolipids. These in vitro and in vivo studies indicate that doxSLs are generated in the presence of a high ratio of l-alanine to l-serine in cells and tissues lacking Phgdh, and de novo synthesis of l-serine is necessary to maintain normal sphingolipid homeostasis when the external supply of this amino acid is limited. PMID:25903138

  7. Effect of aliphatic, monocarboxylic, dicarboxylic, heterocyclic and sulphur-containing amino acids on Leishmania spp. chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Diaz, E; Zacarias, A K; Pérez, S; Vanegas, O; Köhidai, L; Padrón-Nieves, M; Ponte-Sucre, A

    2015-11-01

    In the sand-fly mid gut, Leishmania promastigotes are exposed to acute changes in nutrients, e.g. amino acids (AAs). These metabolites are the main energy sources for the parasite, crucial for its differentiation and motility. We analysed the migratory behaviour and morphological changes produced by aliphatic, monocarboxylic, dicarboxylic, heterocyclic and sulphur-containing AAs in Leishmania amazonensis and Leishmania braziliensis and demonstrated that L-methionine (10-12 m), L-tryptophan (10-11 m), L-glutamine and L-glutamic acid (10-6 m), induced positive chemotactic responses, while L-alanine (10-7 m), L-methionine (10-11 and 10-7 m), L-tryptophan (10-11 m), L-glutamine (10-12 m) and L-glutamic acid (10-9 m) induced negative chemotactic responses. L-proline and L-cysteine did not change the migratory potential of Leishmania. The flagellum length of L. braziliensis, but not of L. amazonensis, decreased when incubated in hyperosmotic conditions. However, chemo-repellent concentrations of L-alanine (Hypo-/hyper-osmotic conditions) and L-glutamic acid (hypo-osmotic conditions) decreased L. braziliensis flagellum length and L-methionine (10-11 m, hypo-/hyper-osmotic conditions) decreased L. amazonensis flagellum length. This chemotactic responsiveness suggests that Leishmania discriminate between slight concentration differences of small and structurally closely related molecules and indicates that besides their metabolic effects, AAs play key roles linked to sensory mechanisms that might determine the parasite's behaviour.

  8. Microwave Heating of Synthetic Skin Samples for Potential Treatment of Gout Using the Metal-Assisted and Microwave-Accelerated Decrystallization Technique.

    PubMed

    Toker, Salih; Boone-Kukoyi, Zainab; Thompson, Nishone; Ajifa, Hillary; Clement, Travis; Ozturk, Birol; Aslan, Kadir

    2016-11-30

    Physical stability of synthetic skin samples during their exposure to microwave heating was investigated to demonstrate the use of the metal-assisted and microwave-accelerated decrystallization (MAMAD) technique for potential biomedical applications. In this regard, optical microscopy and temperature measurements were employed for the qualitative and quantitative assessment of damage to synthetic skin samples during 20 s intermittent microwave heating using a monomode microwave source (at 8 GHz, 2-20 W) up to 120 s. The extent of damage to synthetic skin samples, assessed by the change in the surface area of skin samples, was negligible for microwave power of ≤7 W and more extensive damage (>50%) to skin samples occurred when exposed to >7 W at initial temperature range of 20-39 °C. The initial temperature of synthetic skin samples significantly affected the extent of change in temperature of synthetic skin samples during their exposure to microwave heating. The proof of principle use of the MAMAD technique was demonstrated for the decrystallization of a model biological crystal (l-alanine) placed under synthetic skin samples in the presence of gold nanoparticles. Our results showed that the size (initial size ∼850 μm) of l-alanine crystals can be reduced up to 60% in 120 s without damage to synthetic skin samples using the MAMAD technique. Finite-difference time-domain-based simulations of the electric field distribution of an 8 GHz monomode microwave radiation showed that synthetic skin samples are predicted to absorb ∼92.2% of the microwave radiation.

  9. Molecular sizes of amino acid transporters in the luminal membrane from the kidney cortex, estimated by the radiation-inactivation method.

    PubMed Central

    Béliveau, R; Demeule, M; Jetté, M; Potier, M

    1990-01-01

    Renal brush-border membrane vesicles from rat kidney cortex were irradiated in frozen state with a gamma-radiation source. Initial rates of influx into these vesicles were estimated for substrates such as L-glutamic acid, L-alanine, L-proline and L-leucine to establish the molecular sizes of their carriers. Transport was measured in initial-rate conditions to avoid artifacts arising from a decrease in the driving force caused by a modification of membrane permeability. Initial rates of Na(+)-independent uptakes for those four substrates appeared unaffected in the dose range used (0-6 Mrad), indicating that the passive permeability of the membrane towards these substrates was unaffected. However, at higher doses of irradiation the Na+ influx and the intravesicular volume evaluated by the uptake of glucose at equilibrium were altered by radiation. Thus Na(+)-dependent influx values were corrected for volume changes, and the corrected values were used to compute radiation-inactivation sizes of the transport systems. Their respective values for L-glutamic acid, L-proline, L-leucine and L-alanine carriers were 250, 224, 293 and 274 kDa. The presence of the free-radicals scavenger benzoic acid in the frozen samples during irradiation did not affect the uptake of glucose, phosphate and alkaline phosphatase activity. These results indicate that freezing samples in a cryoprotective medium was enough to prevent secondary inactivation of transporters by free radicals. Uptakes of beta-alanine and L-lysine were much less affected by radiation. The radiation-inactivation size of the Na(+)-dependent beta-alanine carrier was 127 kDa and that of the L-lysine carrier was 90 kDa. PMID:1971509

  10. Atomic force microscopy study of germination and killing of Bacillus atrophaeus spores.

    PubMed

    Pinzón-Arango, Paola A; Scholl, Geoffrey; Nagarajan, Ramanathan; Mello, Charlene M; Camesano, Terri A

    2009-01-01

    Bacterial spores such as Bacillus atrophaeus are one of the most resistant life forms known and are extremely resistant to chemical and environmental factors in the dormant state. During germination, as bacterial spores progress towards the vegetative state, they become susceptible to anti-sporal agents. B. atrophaeus spores were exposed to the non-nutritive germinant dodecylamine (DDA), a cationic surfactant that can also be used as a killing agent, for up to 60 min, or to the nutrient germinant L-alanine. In kinetic studies, 99% of the spores were killed within 5 min of exposure to DDA. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) can be used as a sensitive tool to assess how the structure of the spore coat changes upon exposure to germinants or killing agents. Changes in cell height and roughness over time of exposure to DDA were examined using AFM. DDA caused the spore height to decrease by >50%, which may have been due to a partial breakdown of the spore coat. Treatment of B. atrophaeus with the nutrient germinant resulted in a decrease in height of spores after 2 h of incubation, from 0.7 +/- 0.1 microm to 0.3 +/- 0.2 microm. However, treatment with L-alanine did not change the surface roughness of the spores, indicating that the changes that occur during germination take place underneath the spore coat. We propose that exposure to DDA at high concentrations causes pores to form in the coat layer, killing B. atrophaeus without the need to fully germinate spores.

  11. Characterization of free and alginate-polylysine-alginate microencapsulated Erwinia herbicola for the conversion of ammonia, pyruvate, and phenol into L-tyrosine

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd-George, I.; Chang, T.M.S.

    1995-12-20

    The whole cell tyrosine phenol-lyase activity of Erwinia herbicola was microencapsulated. The authors studied the use of this for the conversion of ammonia and pyruvate along with phenol or catechol, respectively, into L-tyrosine or dihydroxyphenyl-L-alanine (L-dopa). The reactions are relevant to the development of new methods for the production of L-tyrosine and L-dopa. The growth of E. herbicola at temperatures from 22 C to 32 C is stable, since at these temperatures the cells grow up to the stationary phase and remain there for at least 10 h. At 37 C the cells grow rapidly, but they also enter the death phase rapidly. There is only limited growth of E. herbicola at 42 C. Whole cells of E. herbicola were encapsulated within alginate-polylysine-alginate microcapsules (916 {+-} 100 {micro}m, mean {+-} std. dev.). The TPL activity of the cells catalyzed the production of L-tyrosine or dihydroxyphenol-L-alanine (L-dopa) from ammonia, pyruvate, and phenol or catechol, respectively. In the production of tyrosine, an integrated equation based on an ordered ter-uni rapid equilibrium mechanism can be used to find the kinetic parameters of TPL. In an adequately stirred system, the apparent values of the kinetic parameters of whole cell TPL are equal whether the cells are free or encapsulated. The apparent K{sub M} of tyrosine varies with the amount of whole cells in the system, ranging from 0.2 to 0.3 mM. The apparent K{sub M} for phenol is 0.5 mM. The apparent K{sub M} values for pyruvate and ammonia are an order of magnitude greater for whole cells than they are for the cell free enzyme.

  12. Effects of straight alkyl chain, extra hydroxylated alkyl chain and branched chain amino acids on gastric emptying evaluated using a non-invasive breath test in conscious rats

    PubMed Central

    Uchida, Masayuki; Kobayashi, Orie; Iwasawa, Kaori; Shimizu, Kimiko

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Some amino acids been known to influence gastric emptying. Thus we have evaluated the effects of straight alkyl chain, extra hydroxylated alkyl chain and branched chain amino acids on gastric emptying. Materials and Methods: Gastric emptying was evaluated in rats after feeding with Racol (nutrient formulae) containing [1-13C] acetic acid. Using a breath test, the content of 13CO2 in their expired air was measured by infrared analyzers. Rats were orally administered with test amino acids, while control rats were administered orally with distilled water. Results: The expired 13CO2 content in the expired air increased with time, peaked after about 30 min and decreased thereafter. Among the amino acids having an alkyl chain, l-serine, l-alanine and l-glycine, significantly decreased the 13CO2 content and Cmax, and delayed Tmax, suggesting inhibition and delay of gastric emptying. AUC120 min values of l-alanine and l-glycine also decreased significantly. l-Threonine significantly decreased 13CO2 content and delayed Tmax, but had no influence on Cmax and AUC120 min values, suggesting a delay of gastric emptying. l-Isoleucine and l-leucine and l-valine significantly decreased 13CO2 content, suggesting inhibition of the gastric emptying, but Cmax, Tmax and AUC120 min values were not significantly affected. Conclusion: The results show that the amino acids used in the present study had different effects on gastric emptying. Moreover, it was found that inhibition and delay of gastric emptying were clearly classifiable by analyzing the change in 13CO2 content of the expired air and the Cmax, Tmax and AUC120 min values. PMID:27169776

  13. Engineering of alanine dehydrogenase from Bacillus subtilis for novel cofactor specificity.

    PubMed

    Lerchner, Alexandra; Jarasch, Alexander; Skerra, Arne

    2016-09-01

    The l-alanine dehydrogenase of Bacillus subtilis (BasAlaDH), which is strictly dependent on NADH as redox cofactor, efficiently catalyzes the reductive amination of pyruvate to l-alanine using ammonia as amino group donor. To enable application of BasAlaDH as regenerating enzyme in coupled reactions with NADPH-dependent alcohol dehydrogenases, we alterated its cofactor specificity from NADH to NADPH via protein engineering. By introducing two amino acid exchanges, D196A and L197R, high catalytic efficiency for NADPH was achieved, with kcat /KM  = 54.1 µM(-1)  Min(-1) (KM  = 32 ± 3 µM; kcat  = 1,730 ± 39 Min(-1) ), almost the same as the wild-type enzyme for NADH (kcat /KM  = 59.9 µM(-1)  Min(-1) ; KM  = 14 ± 2 µM; kcat  = 838 ± 21 Min(-1) ). Conversely, recognition of NADH was much diminished in the mutated enzyme (kcat /KM  = 3 µM(-1)  Min(-1) ). BasAlaDH(D196A/L197R) was applied in a coupled oxidation/transamination reaction of the chiral dicyclic dialcohol isosorbide to its diamines, catalyzed by Ralstonia sp. alcohol dehydrogenase and Paracoccus denitrificans ω-aminotransferase, thus allowing recycling of the two cosubstrates NADP(+) and l-Ala. An excellent cofactor regeneration with recycling factors of 33 for NADP(+) and 13 for l-Ala was observed with the engineered BasAlaDH in a small-scale biocatalysis experiment. This opens a biocatalytic route to novel building blocks for industrial high-performance polymers.

  14. The Use of Germinants to Potentiate the Sensitivity of Bacillus anthracis Spores to Peracetic Acid.

    PubMed

    Celebi, Ozgur; Buyuk, Fatih; Pottage, Tom; Crook, Ant; Hawkey, Suzanna; Cooper, Callum; Bennett, Allan; Sahin, Mitat; Baillie, Leslie

    2016-01-01

    Elimination of Bacillus anthracis spores from the environment is a difficult and costly process due in part to the toxicity of current sporicidal agents. For this reason we investigated the ability of the spore germinants L-alanine (100 mM) and inosine (5 mM) to reduce the concentration of peracetic acid (PAA) required to inactivate B. anthracis spores. While L-alanine significantly enhanced (p = 0.0085) the bactericidal activity of 500 ppm PAA the same was not true for inosine suggesting some form of negative interaction. In contrast the germinant combination proved most effective at 100 ppm PAA (p = 0.0009). To determine if we could achieve similar results in soil we treated soil collected from the burial site of an anthrax infected animal which had been supplemented with spores of the Sterne strain of B. anthracis to increase the level of contamination to 10(4) spores/g. Treatment with germinants followed 1 h later by 5000 ppm PAA eliminated all of the spores. In contrast direct treatment of the animal burial site using this approach delivered using a back pack sprayer had no detectable effect on the level of B. anthracis contamination or on total culturable bacterial numbers over the course of the experiment. It did trigger a significant, but temporary, reduction (p < 0.0001) in the total spore count suggesting that germination had been triggered under real world conditions. In conclusion, we have shown that the application of germinants increase the sensitivity of bacterial spores to PAA. While the results of the single field trial were inconclusive, the study highlighted the potential of this approach and the challenges faced when attempting to perform real world studies on B. anthracis spores contaminated sites.

  15. The Use of Germinants to Potentiate the Sensitivity of Bacillus anthracis Spores to Peracetic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Celebi, Ozgur; Buyuk, Fatih; Pottage, Tom; Crook, Ant; Hawkey, Suzanna; Cooper, Callum; Bennett, Allan; Sahin, Mitat; Baillie, Leslie

    2016-01-01

    Elimination of Bacillus anthracis spores from the environment is a difficult and costly process due in part to the toxicity of current sporicidal agents. For this reason we investigated the ability of the spore germinants L-alanine (100 mM) and inosine (5 mM) to reduce the concentration of peracetic acid (PAA) required to inactivate B. anthracis spores. While L-alanine significantly enhanced (p = 0.0085) the bactericidal activity of 500 ppm PAA the same was not true for inosine suggesting some form of negative interaction. In contrast the germinant combination proved most effective at 100 ppm PAA (p = 0.0009). To determine if we could achieve similar results in soil we treated soil collected from the burial site of an anthrax infected animal which had been supplemented with spores of the Sterne strain of B. anthracis to increase the level of contamination to 104 spores/g. Treatment with germinants followed 1 h later by 5000 ppm PAA eliminated all of the spores. In contrast direct treatment of the animal burial site using this approach delivered using a back pack sprayer had no detectable effect on the level of B. anthracis contamination or on total culturable bacterial numbers over the course of the experiment. It did trigger a significant, but temporary, reduction (p < 0.0001) in the total spore count suggesting that germination had been triggered under real world conditions. In conclusion, we have shown that the application of germinants increase the sensitivity of bacterial spores to PAA. While the results of the single field trial were inconclusive, the study highlighted the potential of this approach and the challenges faced when attempting to perform real world studies on B. anthracis spores contaminated sites. PMID:26858699

  16. Role of aspartate-133 and histidine-458 in the mechanism of tryptophan indole-lyase from Proteus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Demidkina, Tatyana V; Zakomirdina, Lyudmila N; Kulikova, Vitalia V; Dementieva, Irene S; Faleev, Nicolai G; Ronda, Luca; Mozzarelli, Andrea; Gollnick, Paul D; Phillips, Robert S

    2003-09-30

    Tryptophan indole-lyase (Trpase) from Proteus vulgaris is a pyridoxal 5'-phosphate dependent enzyme that catalyzes the reversible hydrolytic cleavage of L-Trp to yield indole and ammonium pyruvate. Asp-133 and His-458 are strictly conserved in all sequences of Trpase, and they are located in the proposed substrate-binding region of Trpase. These residues were mutated to alanine to probe their role in substrate binding and catalysis. D133A mutant Trpase has no measurable activity with L-Trp as substrate, but still retains activity with S-(o-nitrophenyl)-L-cysteine, S-alkyl-L-cysteines, and beta-chloro-L-alanine. H458A mutant Trpase has 1.6% of wild-type Trpase activity with L-Trp, and high activity with S-(o-nitrophenyl)-L-cysteine, S-alkyl-L-cysteines, and beta-chloro-L-alanine. H458A mutant Trpase does not exhibit the pK(a) of 5.3 seen in the pH dependence of k(cat)/K(m) of L-Trp for wild-type Trpase. Both mutant enzymes are inhibited by L-Ala, L-Met, and L-Phe, with K(i) values similar to those of wild-type Trpase, but oxindolyl-L-alanine and beta-phenyl-DL-serine show much weaker binding to the mutant enzymes, suggesting that Asp-133 and His-458 are involved in the binding of these ligands. D133A and H458A mutant Trpase exhibit absorption and CD spectra in the presence of substrates and inhibitors that are similar to wild-type Trpase, with peaks at about 420 and 500 nm. The rate constants for formation of the 500 nm bands for the mutant enzymes are equal to or greater than those of wild-type Trpase, indicating that Asp-133 and His-458 do not play a role in the formation of quinonoid intermediates. In constrast to wild-type and H458A mutant Trpase, D133A mutant Trpase forms an intermediate from S-ethyl-L-Cys that absorbs at 345 nm, and is likely to be an alpha-aminoacrylate. Crystals of D133A and H458A mutant Trpase bind amino acids with similar affinity as the proteins in solution, except for L-Ala, which binds to D133A mutant Trpase crystals about 20-fold

  17. [Lo stile di attaccamento insicuro è un fattore di rischio di ridotta densità minerale ossea in donne in menopausa. Uno studio pilota].

    PubMed

    Niolu, Cinzia; Bianciardi, Emanuela; Di Lorenzo, Giorgio; Nicolai, Sara; Celi, Monica; Ribolsi, Michele; Pietropolli, Adalgisa; Ticconi, Carlo; Tarantino, Umberto; Siracusano, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    RIASSUNTO. Introduzione. La depressione maggiore (MD) e l'osteoporosi sono malattie ad alta prevalenza nel genere femminile, associate a morbosità e mortalità. Sebbene alcuni studi abbiano dimostrato un'associazione tra MD, ridotta densità minerale ossea (BMD) e osteoporosi, non sono stati chiariti i meccanismi causali. Lo stile di attaccamento insicuro è stato messo in relazione con la patogenesi e il decorso di malattie croniche come la MD e le malattie cardiovascolari. Obiettivo di questo studio pilota è esplorare la relazione tra MD e BMD. Si ipotizza che lo stile di attaccamento possa agire da mediatore. Metodi. Il campione è formato da 101 donne in menopausa, 49 con MD e 52 controlli sani. La diagnosi di MD è stata formulata con l'intervista clinica e la Beck Depression Inventory. Lo stile di attaccamento è stato esplorato usando il Relationship Questionnaire, la BMD con la Mineralometria Ossea Computerizzata con tecnica DXA (Dual energy X-ray Absorptiometry). Risultati. L'analisi univariata ha mostrato che le donne con MD avevano valori di BMD inferiori rispetto ai controlli sani. Nelle analisi di regressione multipla la MD non è emersa come predittore significativo di ridotta BMD. Lo stile di attaccamento insicuro "preoccupato" è risultato un predittore significativo di ridotta BMD in tutti i siti scheletrici misurati con la DXA: colonna vertebrale lombare (p=0,008) e segmenti femorali: "femoral neck" (p=0,011), "total hip" (p=0,002). Conclusioni. Questo è il primo studio che esplora il possibile ruolo di MD e stile di attaccamento sulla BMD. Lo stile di attaccamento è risultato un predittore di ridotta BMD, indipendentemente dalla MD. L'attaccamento insicuro potrebbe avere un ruolo nella patogenesi dell'osteoporosi anche indipendente dalla MD. Se questi risultati saranno confermati, gli interventi terapeutici focalizzati sullo stile di attaccamento potrebbero contribuire al miglioramento della comorbilità psichiatrica e medica legata all'osteoporosi.

  18. Effects of a short outpatient rehabilitation treatment on disability of multiple sclerosis patients--a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Patti, Francesco; Ciancio, Maria Rita; Cacopardo, Manuela; Reggio, Ester; Fiorilla, Teresa; Palermo, Filippo; Reggio, Arturo; Thompson, Alan J

    2003-07-01

    It is well known that neurorehabilitation can reduce disability or improve handicap of people with multiple sclerosis (MS). The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a short period (6 weeks) of a tailored, individualised outpatient rehabilitation program in people with progressive MS. A randomised-controlled trial was undertaken in patients with primary and secondary progressive MS referred to the Centro Sclerosi Multipla of Catania. One hundred and eleven patients were assessed at baseline and at 12 weeks with validated measures of disability (Functional Independence Measure (FIM)) and impairment (Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) and Functional Systems Scale). Of the 111, 58 were randomly assigned to the treatment group and 53 to the control group. All patients had been previously trained in a home exercise program. Both groups were well matched for age, sex, disease duration and severity, disability and quality of life (Short Form-36). At the end of 6 weeks patients allocated to the rehabilitation treatment group showed significant improvement in their level of disability compared with the control group,while the level of impairment did not change. Thirty-two patients of the treatment group and four of the control group improved on the FIM by two or more steps at 12 weeks (p<0.0001). An improvement by 1 EDSS step occurred in only two patients of the treatment group and in one patient of the control group. Benefits were maintained for a further six weeks. This study demonstrates that a short outpatient rehabilitation treatment improves disability of MS patients, without changing their impairment and confirms the effectiveness of rehabilitation in people with MS.

  19. Decomposition of sodium formate and L- and D-alanine in the Pampas de La Joya soils: Implications as a new geochemical analogue to Martian regolith

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdivia-Silva, Julio E.; Navarro-González, Rafael; Rosa, José De La; McKay, Christopher P.

    2012-03-01

    The organic compounds on the Martian surface are still undetectable by the previous Viking mission that has been sent to Mars even though they are expected to be there by exogenous and/or endogenous synthesis. The high abiotic reactivity has been the most acceptable explanation for the apparently absence of organic matter in the regolith.Earth soils that have geochemical properties similar to those expected on the surface of Mars could help to decipher this question on the surface and shallow subsurface of the Red Planet. This work aims to demonstrate that the place known as the Pampas de La Joya desert in southern Peru, contains soils that have nonbiological chemical decomposition mechanisms of organic compounds under conditions of the Viking Labeled Release Experiment (LRx). We compare the organic decomposition kinetics of these hyper-arid soils with those seen in samples from arid and semiarid regions of the Atacama Desert, and data obtained by Viking LRx in the Martian regolith. 13Carbon-labeled organic compounds (sodium formate, D-, and L-alanine) were added in aqueous solution to different soil samples in order to analyze the evolved carbon dioxide (13CO2) generated during their degradation. As expected, there were significant differences in the evolved gas behavior between soil samples under similar experimental conditions. When sodium formate was added to hyper-arid samples, there was a peak of 13CO2 gas released demonstrating high oxidation activity in the soil. Heat treatment of soil samples did not completely eliminate the CO2 production. An increase in the decomposition rates ˜7 days after the first addition of organics showed a response consistent with biological activity. The addition of D- and L-alanine demonstrated that the production of 13CO2 due to biological decomposition began 5-8 days after incubation. Our results suggest that these soils from Pampas de La Joya present at least two types of oxidants, a thermostable one which is highly

  20. Selective Sorption of Dissolved Organic Carbon Compounds by Temperate Soils

    SciTech Connect

    Jagadamma, Sindhu; Mayes, Melanie; Phillips, Jana Randolph

    2012-01-01

    Physico-chemical sorption of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) on soil minerals is one of the major processes of organic carbon (OC) stabilization in soils, especially in deeper layers. The attachment of C on soil solids is related to the reactivity of the soil minerals and the chemistry of the sorbate functional groups, but the sorption studies conducted without controlling microbial activity may overestimate the sorption potential of soil. This study was conducted to examine the sorptive characteristics of a diverse functional groups of simple OC compounds (D-glucose, L-alanine, oxalic acid, salicylic acid, and sinapyl alcohol) on temperate climate soil orders (Mollisols, Ultisols and Alfisols) with and without biological degradative processes. Equilibrium batch experiments were conducted using 0-100 mg C L-1 at a solid-solution ratio of 1:60 for 48 hrs and the sorption parameters were calculated by Langmuir model fitting. The amount of added compounds that remained in the solution phase was detected by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and total organic C (TOC) analysis. Soil sterilization was performed by -irradiation technique and experiments were repeated to determine the contribution of microbial degradation to apparent sorption. Overall, Ultisols did not show a marked preference for apparent sorption of any of the model compounds, as indicated by a narrower range of maximum sorption capacity (Smax) of 173-527 mg kg soil-1 across compounds. Mollisols exhibited a strong preference for apparent sorption of oxalic acid (Smax of 5290 mg kg soil-1) and sinapyl alcohol (Smax of 2031 mg kg soil-1) over the other compounds. The propensity for sorption of oxalic acid is mainly attributed to the precipitation of insoluble Ca-oxalate due to the calcareous nature of most Mollisol subsoils and its preference for sinapyl alcohol could be linked to the polymerization of this lignin monomer on 2:2 mineral dominated soils. The reactivity of Alfisols to DOC was in

  1. The Hypothesis that the Genetic Code Originated in Coupled Synthesis of Proteins and the Evolutionary Predecessors of Nucleic Acids in Primitive Cells.

    PubMed

    Francis, Brian R

    2015-02-11

    Although analysis of the genetic code has allowed explanations for its evolution to be proposed, little evidence exists in biochemistry and molecular biology to offer an explanation for the origin of the genetic code. In particular, two features of biology make the origin of the genetic code difficult to understand. First, nucleic acids are highly complicated polymers requiring numerous enzymes for biosynthesis. Secondly, proteins have a simple backbone with a set of 20 different amino acid side chains synthesized by a highly complicated ribosomal process in which mRNA sequences are read in triplets. Apparently, both nucleic acid and protein syntheses have extensive evolutionary histories. Supporting these processes is a complex metabolism and at the hub of metabolism are the carboxylic acid cycles. This paper advances the hypothesis that the earliest predecessor of the nucleic acids was a β-linked polyester made from malic acid, a highly conserved metabolite in the carboxylic acid cycles. In the β-linked polyester, the side chains are carboxylic acid groups capable of forming interstrand double hydrogen bonds. Evolution of the nucleic acids involved changes to the backbone and side chain of poly(β-d-malic acid). Conversion of the side chain carboxylic acid into a carboxamide or a longer side chain bearing a carboxamide group, allowed information polymers to form amide pairs between polyester chains. Aminoacylation of the hydroxyl groups of malic acid and its derivatives with simple amino acids such as glycine and alanine allowed coupling of polyester synthesis and protein synthesis. Use of polypeptides containing glycine and l-alanine for activation of two different monomers with either glycine or l-alanine allowed simple coded autocatalytic synthesis of polyesters and polypeptides and established the first genetic code. A primitive cell capable of supporting electron transport, thioester synthesis, reduction reactions, and synthesis of polyesters and

  2. Synthesis and characterization of responsive nanoporous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abelow, Alexis Elizabeth

    This thesis describes the synthesis and properties of polymer or oligonucleotide-modified nanoporous membranes and nanopores which exhibit a response to external stimuli, synthesized with the intention of mimicking biological protein channels. The responsiveness of these systems arises as a function of the polymer or oligonucleotide modifier, which exhibit a change in conformation with exposure to temperature, pH, introduction of a small molecule, or electric potential. First, the transport of ions through supported silica colloidal films modified with poly(L-alanine) on platinum electrodes was studied using cyclic voltammetry. By monitoring the flux of a redox species through the polymer-modified colloidal film it is demonstrated that the polymer expands and contracts when the temperature was increased and decreased, respectively. We also observed an expansion and contraction as the pH was increased and decreased, respectively. Transport of a neutral dye molecule through free-standing silica colloidal films modified with poly(L-alanine) was also studied. As noted previously, the polymer expands and contracts as the pH is increased and decreased, respectively. Next, the transport was monitored through both silica colloidal film-modified Pt microelectrodes and Pt single nanopore electrodes as an oligonucleotide-based binder, or aptamer, was attached. The aptamer is responsive to a small molecule, cocaine where, in the absence of cocaine, only one "arm" of the aptamer is folded in on itself, leaving the rest of the chain partially unfolded, blocking the nanopores. However, when the cocaine molecule is introduced into solution, the aptamer folds completely in on itself, forming a three-armed structure with the small molecule encapsulated in the middle. This change in conformation is monitored by observing the change in transport of a redox species through the pores as cocaine is introduced into the system. We observed an increase rate of transport as the aptamer bound

  3. Citrulline a More Suitable Substrate than Arginine to Restore NO Production and the Microcirculation during Endotoxemia

    PubMed Central

    Wijnands, Karolina A. P.; Vink, Hans; Briedé, Jacob J.; van Faassen, Ernst E.; Lamers, Wouter H.; Buurman, Wim A.; Poeze, Martijn

    2012-01-01

    Background Impaired microcirculation during endotoxemia correlates with a disturbed arginine-nitric oxide (NO) metabolism and is associated with deteriorating organ function. Improving the organ perfusion in endotoxemia, as often seen in patients with severe infection or systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) is, therefore, an important therapeutic target. We hypothesized that supplementation of the arginine precursor citrulline rather than arginine would specifically increase eNOS-induced intracellular NO production and thereby improve the microcirculation during endotoxemia. Methodology/Principal Findings To study the effects of L-Citrulline and L-Arginine supplementation on jejunal microcirculation, intracellular arginine availability and NO production in a non-lethal prolonged endotoxemia model in mice. C57/Bl6 mice received an 18 hrs intravenous infusion of endotoxin (LPS, 0.4 µg•g bodyweight−1•h−1), combined with either L-Citrulline (6.25 mg•h-1), L-Arginine (6.25 mg•h−1), or L-Alanine (isonitrogenous control; 12.5 mg•h−1) during the last 6 hrs. The control group received an 18 hrs sterile saline infusion combined with L-Alanine or L-Citrulline during the last 6 hrs. The microcirculation was evaluated at the end of the infusion period using sidestream dark-field imaging of jejunal villi. Plasma and jejunal tissue amino-acid concentrations were measured by HPLC, NO tissue concentrations by electron-spin resonance spectroscopy and NOS protein concentrations using Western blot. Conclusion/Significance L-Citrulline supplementation during endotoxemia positively influenced the intestinal microvascular perfusion compared to L-Arginine-supplemented and control endotoxemic mice. L-Citrulline supplementation increased plasma and tissue concentrations of arginine and citrulline, and restored intracellular NO production in the intestine. L-Arginine supplementation did not increase the intracellular arginine availability. Jejunal tissues in the

  4. The Hypothesis that the Genetic Code Originated in Coupled Synthesis of Proteins and the Evolutionary Predecessors of Nucleic Acids in Primitive Cells

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Brian R.

    2015-01-01

    Although analysis of the genetic code has allowed explanations for its evolution to be proposed, little evidence exists in biochemistry and molecular biology to offer an explanation for the origin of the genetic code. In particular, two features of biology make the origin of the genetic code difficult to understand. First, nucleic acids are highly complicated polymers requiring numerous enzymes for biosynthesis. Secondly, proteins have a simple backbone with a set of 20 different amino acid side chains synthesized by a highly complicated ribosomal process in which mRNA sequences are read in triplets. Apparently, both nucleic acid and protein syntheses have extensive evolutionary histories. Supporting these processes is a complex metabolism and at the hub of metabolism are the carboxylic acid cycles. This paper advances the hypothesis that the earliest predecessor of the nucleic acids was a β-linked polyester made from malic acid, a highly conserved metabolite in the carboxylic acid cycles. In the β-linked polyester, the side chains are carboxylic acid groups capable of forming interstrand double hydrogen bonds. Evolution of the nucleic acids involved changes to the backbone and side chain of poly(β-d-malic acid). Conversion of the side chain carboxylic acid into a carboxamide or a longer side chain bearing a carboxamide group, allowed information polymers to form amide pairs between polyester chains. Aminoacylation of the hydroxyl groups of malic acid and its derivatives with simple amino acids such as glycine and alanine allowed coupling of polyester synthesis and protein synthesis. Use of polypeptides containing glycine and l-alanine for activation of two different monomers with either glycine or l-alanine allowed simple coded autocatalytic synthesis of polyesters and polypeptides and established the first genetic code. A primitive cell capable of supporting electron transport, thioester synthesis, reduction reactions, and synthesis of polyesters and

  5. Structural analysis of Bacillus subtilis 168 endospore peptidoglycan and its role during differentiation.

    PubMed Central

    Atrih, A; Zöllner, P; Allmaier, G; Foster, S J

    1996-01-01

    The structure of the endospore cell wall peptidoglycan of Bacillus subtilis has been examined. Spore peptidoglycan was produced by the development of a method based on chemical permeabilization of the spore coats and enzymatic hydrolysis of the peptidoglycan. The resulting muropeptides which were >97% pure were analyzed by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography, amino acid analysis, and mass spectrometry. This revealed that 49% of the muramic acid residues in the glycan backbone were present in the delta-lactam form which occurred predominantly every second muramic acid. The glycosidic bonds adjacent to the muramic acid delta-lactam residues were resistant to the action of muramidases. Of the muramic acid residues, 25.7 and 23.3% were substituted with a tetrapeptide and a single L-alanine, respectively. Only 2% of the muramic acids had tripeptide side chains and may constitute the primordial cell wall, the remainder of the peptidoglycan being spore cortex. The spore peptidoglycan is very loosely cross-linked at only 2.9% of the muramic acid residues, a figure approximately 11-fold less than that of the vegetative cell wall. The peptidoglycan from strain AA110 (dacB) had fivefold-greater cross-linking (14.4%) than the wild type and an altered ratio of muramic acid substituents having 37.0, 46.3, and 12.3% delta-lactam, tetrapeptide, and single L-alanine, respectively. This suggests a role for the DacB protein (penicillin-binding protein 5*) in cortex biosynthesis. The sporulation-specific putative peptidoglycan hydrolase CwlD plays a pivotal role in the establishment of the mature spore cortex structure since strain AA107 (cwlD) has spore peptidoglycan which is completely devoid of muramic acid delta-lactam residues. Despite this drastic change in peptidoglycan structure, the spores are still stable but are unable to germinate. The role of delta-lactam and other spore peptidoglycan structural features in the maintenance of dormancy, heat resistance

  6. Ornithine cyclodeaminase/μ-crystallin homolog from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus litoralis functions as a novel Δ1-pyrroline-2-carboxylate reductase involved in putative trans-3-hydroxy-l-proline metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Seiya; Tozawa, Yuzuru; Watanabe, Yasuo

    2014-01-01

    l-Ornithine cyclodeaminase (OCD) is involved in l-proline biosynthesis and catalyzes the unique deaminating cyclization of l-ornithine to l-proline via a Δ1-pyrroline-2-carboxyrate (Pyr2C) intermediate. Although this pathway functions in only a few bacteria, many archaea possess OCD-like genes (proteins), among which only AF1665 protein (gene) from Archaeoglobus fulgidus has been characterized as an NAD+-dependent l-alanine dehydrogenase (AfAlaDH). However, the physiological role of OCD-like proteins from archaea has been unclear. Recently, we revealed that Pyr2C reductase, involved in trans-3-hydroxy-l-proline (T3LHyp) metabolism of bacteria, belongs to the OCD protein superfamily and catalyzes only the reduction of Pyr2C to l-proline (no OCD activity) [FEBS Open Bio (2014) 4, 240–250]. In this study, based on bioinformatics analysis, we assumed that the OCD-like gene from Thermococcus litoralis DSM 5473 is related to T3LHyp and/or proline metabolism (TlLhpI). Interestingly, TlLhpI showed three different enzymatic activities: AlaDH; N-methyl-l-alanine dehydrogenase; Pyr2C reductase. Kinetic analysis suggested strongly that Pyr2C is the preferred substrate. In spite of their similar activity, TlLhpI had a poor phylogenetic relationship to the bacterial and mammalian reductases for Pyr2C and formed a close but distinct subfamily to AfAlaDH, indicating convergent evolution. Introduction of several specific amino acid residues for OCD and/or AfAlaDH by site-directed mutagenesis had marked effects on both AlaDH and Pyr2C reductase activities. The OCC_00387 gene, clustered with the TlLhpI gene on the genome, encoded T3LHyp dehydratase, homologous to the bacterial and mammalian enzymes. To our knowledge, this is the first report of T3LHyp metabolism from archaea. PMID:25161870

  7. Origin and incidence of 2-methoxy-3,5-dimethylpyrazine, a compound with a "fungal" and "corky" aroma found in cork stoppers and oak chips in contact with wines.

    PubMed

    Chatonnet, Pascal; Fleury, Antoine; Boutou, Stéphane

    2010-12-08

    This study identifies a previously isolated bacterium as Rhizobium excellensis, a new species of proteobacteria able to form a large quantity of 2-methoxy-3,5-dimethylpyrazine (MDMP). R. excellensis actively synthesizes MDMP from L-alanine and L-leucine and, to a lesser extent, from L-phenylalanine and L-valine. MDMP is a volatile, strong-smelling substance detected in wines with cork stoppers that have an unpleasant "corky", "herbaceous" (potato, green hazelnut), or "dusty" odor that is very different from the typical "fungal" nose of a "corked" wine that is generally due to 2,4,6-trichloroanisole (TCA). The contamination of cork by MDMP is not correlated with the presence of TCA. It appears possible that R. excellensis is the microorganism mainly responsible for the presence of this molecule in cork bark. However, other observations suggest that MDMP might taint wine through other ways. Oak wood can also be contaminated and affect wines with which it comes into contact. Nevertheless, because 93% of the MDMP content in wood is destroyed after 10 min at 220 °C, sufficiently toasted oak barrels or alternatives probably do not represent a major source of MDMP in most of the cases. Due to MDMP's relatively low detection threshold estimated at 2.1 ng/L, its presence in about 40% of the untreated natural cork stoppers sampled at concentrations above 10 ng/cork suggests that this compound, if extracted from the stoppers, may pose a risk for wine producers.

  8. 13C NMR of tunnelling methyl groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detken, A.

    The dipolar interactions between the protons and the central 13C nucleus of a 13CH3 group are used to study rotational tunnelling and incoherent dynamics of such groups in molecular solids. Single-crystal 13C NMR spectra are derived for arbitrary values of the tunnel frequency upsilon t. Similarities to ESR and 2H NMR are pointed out. The method is applied to three different materials. In the hydroquinone/acetonitrile clathrate, the unique features in the 13C NMR spectra which arise from tunnelling with a tunnel frequency that is much larger than the dipolar coupling between the methyl protons and the 13C nucleus are demonstrated, and the effects of incoherent dynamics are studied. The broadening of the 13C resonances is related to the width of the quasi-elastic line in neutron scattering. Selective magnetization transfer experiments for studying slow incoherent dynamics are proposed. For the strongly hindered methyl groups of L-alanine, an upper limit for upsilon is derived from the 13C NMR spectrum. In aspirinTM (acetylsalicylic acid), incoherent reorientations dominate the spectra down to the lowest temperatures studied; their rate apparently increases with decreasing temperature below 25K.

  9. Permanganate oxidation of α-amino acids: kinetic correlations for the nonautocatalytic and autocatalytic reaction pathways.

    PubMed

    Perez-Benito, Joaquin F

    2011-09-08

    The reactions of permanganate ion with seven α-amino acids in aqueous KH(2)PO(4)/K(2)HPO(4) buffers have been followed spectrophotometrically at two different wavelengths: 526 nm (decay of MnO(4)(-)) and 418 nm (formation of colloidal MnO(2)). All of the reactions studied were autocatalyzed by colloidal MnO(2), with the contribution of the autocatalytic reaction pathway decreasing in the order glycine > l-threonine > l-alanine > l-glutamic acid > l-leucine > l-isoleucine > l-valine. The rate constants corresponding to the nonautocatalytic and autocatalytic pathways were obtained by means of either a differential rate law or an integrated one, the latter requiring the use of an iterative method for its implementation. The activation parameters for the two pathways were determined and analyzed to obtain statistically significant correlations for the series of reactions studied. The activation enthalpy of the nonautocatalytic pathway showed a strong, positive dependence on the standard Gibbs energy for the dissociation of the protonated amino group of the α-amino acid. Linear enthalpy-entropy correlations were found for both pathways, leading to isokinetic temperatures of 370 ± 21 K (nonautocatalytic) and 364 ± 28 K (autocatalytic). Mechanisms in agreement with the experimental data are proposed for the two reaction pathways.

  10. Molecular interactions of α-amino acids insight into aqueous β-cyclodextrin systems.

    PubMed

    Ekka, Deepak; Roy, Mahendra Nath

    2013-10-01

    Qualitative and quantitative analysis of molecular interaction prevailing in glycine, L-alanine, L-valine and aqueous solution of β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) have been probed by thermophysical properties. Density (ρ), viscosity (η), and ultrasonic speed (u) measurements have been reported at different temperatures. The extent of interaction (solute-solvent interaction) is expressed in terms of the limiting apparent molar volume ([Formula: see text]), viscosity B-coefficient and limiting apparent molar adiabatic compressibility ([Formula: see text]). The changes on the enthalpy ([Formula: see text]) and entropy ([Formula: see text]) of the encapsulation analysis give information about the driving forces governing the inclusion. The temperature dependence behaviour of partial molar quantities and group contributions to partial molar volumes has been determined for the amino acids. The trends in transfer volumes, [Formula: see text], have been interpreted in terms of solute-cosolute interactions based on a cosphere overlap model. The role of the solvent (aqueous solution of β-CD) and the contribution of solute-solute and solute-solvent interactions to the solution complexes have also been analyzed through the derived properties.

  11. Effects of endogenous D-alanine synthesis and autoinhibition of Bacillus anthracis germination on in vitro and in vivo infections.

    PubMed

    McKevitt, Matthew T; Bryant, Katie M; Shakir, Salika M; Larabee, Jason L; Blanke, Steven R; Lovchik, Julie; Lyons, C Rick; Ballard, Jimmy D

    2007-12-01

    Bacillus anthracis transitions from a dormant spore to a vegetative bacillus through a series of structural and biochemical changes collectively referred to as germination. The timing of germination is important during early steps in infection and may determine if B. anthracis survives or succumbs to responsive macrophages. In the current study experiments determined the contribution of endogenous D-alanine production to the efficiency and timing of B. anthracis spore germination under in vitro and in vivo conditions. Racemase-mediated production of endogenous D-alanine by B. anthracis altered the kinetics for initiation of germination over a range of spore densities and exhibited a threshold effect wherein small changes in spore number resulted in major changes in germination efficiency. This threshold effect correlated with D-alanine production, was prevented by an alanine racemase inhibitor, and required L-alanine. Interestingly, endogenous production of inhibitory levels of D-alanine was detected under experimental conditions that did not support germination and in a germination-deficient mutant of B. anthracis. Racemase-dependent production of D-alanine enhanced survival of B. anthracis during interaction with murine macrophages, suggesting a role for inhibition of germination during interaction with these cells. Finally, in vivo experiments revealed an approximately twofold decrease in the 50% lethal dose of B. anthracis spores administered in the presence of D-alanine, indicating that rates of germination may be directly influenced by the levels of this amino acid during early stages of disease.

  12. Composite System of Graphene Oxide and Polypeptide Thermogel As an Injectable 3D Scaffold for Adipogenic Differentiation of Tonsil-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Patel, Madhumita; Moon, Hyo Jung; Ko, Du Young; Jeong, Byeongmoon

    2016-03-02

    As two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterials, graphene (G) and graphene oxide (GO) have evolved into new platforms for biomedical research as biosensors, imaging agents, and drug delivery carriers. In particular, the unique surface properties of GO can be an important tool in modulating cellular behavior and various biological sequences. Here, we report that a composite system of graphene oxide/polypeptide thermogel (GO/P), prepared by temperature-sensitive sol-to-gel transition of a GO-suspended poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(L-alanine) (PEG-PA) aqueous solution significantly enhances the expression of adipogenic biomarkers, including PPAR-γ, CEBP-α, LPL, AP2, ELOVL3, and HSL, compared to both a pure hydrogel system and a composite system of G/P, graphene-incorporated hydrogel. We prove that insulin, an adipogenic differentiation factor, preferentially adhered to GO, is supplied to the incorporated stem cells in a sustained manner over the three-dimensional (3D) cell culture period. On the other hand, insulin is partially denatured in the presence of G and interferes with the adipogenic differentiation of the stem cells. The study suggests that a 2D/3D composite system is a promising platform as a 3D cell culture matrix, where the surface properties of 2D materials in modulating the fates of the stem cells are effectively transcribed in a 3D culture system.

  13. Texcoconibacillus texcoconensis gen. nov., sp. nov., alkalophilic and halotolerant bacteria isolated from soil of the former lake Texcoco (Mexico).

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Romero, Erick; Coutiño-Coutiño, María de los Angeles; Valenzuela-Encinas, César; López-Ramírez, María Patricia; Marsch, Rodolfo; Dendooven, Luc

    2013-09-01

    A novel Gram-positive, rod-shaped, spore-forming bacterium, designated 13CC(T) was isolated from soil of the former lake Texcoco. The strain was aerobic, catalase-positive and oxidase-negative. It grew at salinities of 0-26% (w/v) NaCl with an optimum at 9-16% (w/v) NaCl. The cells contain peptidoglycan type A1γ, A1γ' with glycine instead of l-alanine and three variations of peptidoglycan type A4γ. The only quinone detected was MK-7. The major fatty acid was anteiso-C(15:0). The polar lipids fraction consisted of diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine and three different phospholipids. The DNA G+C content was 37.5 mol%. Maximum-likelihood phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that strain 13CC(T) was closely related to members of the genus Bacillus and shared 92.35% similarity with Bacillus agaradhaerens, 92.28% with Bacillus neizhouensis and 92.21% with Bacillus locisalis. It is proposed based on the phenotypic, genotypic and phylogenetic analyses that the novel isolate should be classified as a representative of a new genus and novel species, for which the name Texcoconibacillus texcoconensis gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of Texcoconibacillus texcoconensis is 13CC(T) ( =JCM 17654(T) =DSM 24696(T)).

  14. Animal evaluation of technetium-99m triamide mercaptide complexes as potential renal imaging agents

    SciTech Connect

    Eshima, D.; Taylor, A. Jr.; Fritzberg, A.R.; Kasina, S.; Hansen, L.; Sorenson, J.F.

    1987-07-01

    Technetium-99m mercaptoacetylglycylglycylglycine (MAG3), a (/sup 99m/Tc)triamide mercaptide (N3S) compound has been synthesized in an attempt to obviate the stereochemistry problems associated with the diamide dimercaptide (N2S2) ligands. Because initial studies have been promising, the terminal glycine on the MAG3 compound has been varied to create a new series of N3S compounds. Twelve new N3S complexes were initially screened in mice and the more promising complexes, /sup 99m/Tc mercaptoacetylgylcylglycyl-glycine ((/sup 99m/Tc)MAG3), /sup 99m/Tc mercaptoacetylgylcylglycyl-L-alanine ((/sup 99m/Tc)MAG2-Ala), and both complexes of /sup 99m/Tc mercaptoeacetylglycylglycyl-L-asparagine ((/sup 99m/Tc)MAG2-Asn) and /sup 99m/Tc mercaptoacetylglycylglycyl-L-glutamine ((/sup 99m/Tc)MAG2-Gln), were further evaluated in rats utilizing constant infusion blood clearances, extraction efficiencies and protein binding assays. The renal excretion of all these complexes compared favorably with simultaneously administered (/sup 131/I)OIH and (/sup 125/I)iothalamate. The triamide mercaptide complexes represent a new ligand class for /sup 99m/Tc, which may provide a variety of complexes for the evaluation of renal tubular function.

  15. Protein Homeostasis Defects of Alanine-Glyoxylate Aminotransferase: New Therapeutic Strategies in Primary Hyperoxaluria Type I

    PubMed Central

    Pey, Angel L.; Albert, Armando; Salido, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    Alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase catalyzes the transamination between L-alanine and glyoxylate to produce pyruvate and glycine using pyridoxal 5′-phosphate (PLP) as cofactor. Human alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase is a peroxisomal enzyme expressed in the hepatocytes, the main site of glyoxylate detoxification. Its deficit causes primary hyperoxaluria type I, a rare but severe inborn error of metabolism. Single amino acid changes are the main type of mutation causing this disease, and considerable effort has been dedicated to the understanding of the molecular consequences of such missense mutations. In this review, we summarize the role of protein homeostasis in the basic mechanisms of primary hyperoxaluria. Intrinsic physicochemical properties of polypeptide chains such as thermodynamic stability, folding, unfolding, and misfolding rates as well as the interaction of different folding states with protein homeostasis networks are essential to understand this disease. The view presented has important implications for the development of new therapeutic strategies based on targeting specific elements of alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase homeostasis. PMID:23956997

  16. Probing the active site tryptophan of Staphylococcus aureus thioredoxin with an analog

    PubMed Central

    Englert, Markus; Nakamura, Akiyoshi; Wang, Yane-Shih; Eiler, Daniel; Söll, Dieter; Guo, Li-Tao

    2015-01-01

    Genetically encoded non-canonical amino acids are powerful tools of protein research and engineering; in particular they allow substitution of individual chemical groups or atoms in a protein of interest. One such amino acid is the tryptophan (Trp) analog 3-benzothienyl-l-alanine (Bta) with an imino-to-sulfur substitution in the five-membered ring. Unlike Trp, Bta is not capable of forming a hydrogen bond, but preserves other properties of a Trp residue. Here we present a pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetase-derived, engineered enzyme BtaRS that enables efficient and site-specific Bta incorporation into proteins of interest in vivo. Furthermore, we report a 2.1 Å-resolution crystal structure of a BtaRS•Bta complex to show how BtaRS discriminates Bta from canonical amino acids, including Trp. To show utility in protein mutagenesis, we used BtaRS to introduce Bta to replace the Trp28 residue in the active site of Staphylococcus aureus thioredoxin. This experiment showed that not the hydrogen bond between residues Trp28 and Asp58, but the bulky aromatic side chain of Trp28 is important for active site maintenance. Collectively, our study provides a new and robust tool for checking the function of Trp in proteins. PMID:26582921

  17. The effect of immunonutrition (glutamine, alanine) on fracture healing

    PubMed Central

    Küçükalp, Abdullah; Durak, Kemal; Bayyurt, Sarp; Sönmez, Gürsel; Bilgen, Muhammed S.

    2014-01-01

    Background There have been various studies related to fracture healing. Glutamine is an amino acid with an important role in many cell and organ functions. This study aimed to make a clinical, radiological, and histopathological evaluation of the effects of glutamine on fracture healing. Methods Twenty rabbits were randomly allocated into two groups of control and immunonutrition. A fracture of the fibula was made to the right hind leg. All rabbits received standard food and water. From post-operative first day for 30 days, the study group received an additional 2 ml/kg/day 20% L-alanine L-glutamine solution via a gastric catheter, and the control group received 2 ml/kg/day isotonic via gastric catheter. At the end of 30 days, the rabbits were sacrificed and the fractures were examined clinically, radiologically, and histopathologically in respect to the degree of union. Results Radiological evaluation of the control group determined a mean score of 2.5 according to the orthopaedists and 2.65 according to the radiologists. In the clinical evaluation, the mean score was 1.875 for the control group and 2.0 for the study group. Histopathological evaluation determined a mean score of 8.5 for the control group and 9.0 for the study group. Conclusion One month after orally administered glutamine–alanine, positive effects were observed on fracture healing radiologically, clinically, and histopathologically, although no statistically significant difference was determined.

  18. Group 11 complexes with amino acid derivatives: Synthesis and antitumoral studies.

    PubMed

    Ortego, Lourdes; Meireles, Margarida; Kasper, Cornelia; Laguna, Antonio; Villacampa, M Dolores; Gimeno, M Concepción

    2016-03-01

    Gold(I), gold(III), silver(I) and copper(I) complexes with modified amino acid esters and phosphine ligands have been prepared in order to test their cytotoxic activity. Two different phosphine fragments, PPh3 and PPh2py (py=pyridine), have been used. The amino acid esters have been modified by introducing an aromatic amine as pyridine that coordinates metal fragments through the nitrogen atom, giving complexes of the type [M(L)(PR3)](+) or [AuCl3(L)] (L=l-valine-N-(4-pyridylcarbonyl) methyl ester (L1), l-alanine-N-(4-pyridylcarbonyl) methyl ester (L2), l-phenylalanine-N-(4-pyridylcarbonyl) methyl-ester) (L3); M=Au(I), Ag(I), Cu(I), PR3=PPh3, PPh2py). The in vitro cytotoxic activity of metal complexes was tested against four tumor human cell lines and one tumor mouse cell line. A metabolic activity test (3-(4,5-dimethyl-thiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide, MTT) was used and IC50 values were compared with those obtained for cisplatin. Several complexes displayed significant cytotoxic activities. In order to determine whether antiproliferation and cell death are associated with apoptosis, NIH-3T3 cells were exposed to five selected complexes (Annexin V+ FITC, PI) and analyzed by flow cytometry. These experiments showed that the mechanism by which the complexes inhibit cell proliferation inducing cell death in NIH-3T3 cells is mainly apoptotic.

  19. Biochemical and immunological identification of human neutrophil elastase on nitrocellulose membranes.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, K H

    1991-01-01

    Human neutrophil elastase (HNE) was analyzed for protein(s), antibody staining and activity staining, on lithium dodecyl sulfate (LDS) polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis followed by Western blotting. The HNE activity, which was identified with N-acetyl-D,L-alanine alpha-naphthyl ester as substrate, was well preserved in the presence of 0.1% LDS at 4 C during electrophoresis. As little as 0.1 microgram HNE was required for the activity staining. The HNE appeared to be three peptides having a major band at mass ratio 27,000, a second major band at mass ratio 28,000 with a minor protein band at mass ratio 29,000. On transfer to nitrocellulose, the mass ratio 28,000 band displayed poor immunoreactivity. This was the second most dense band with highest enzymatic staining. This procedure is a useful method and analytical tool to determine the correlation of enzymatically active proteins, subunits and immunoreactive protein(s) of elastase from various sources, including neutrophils.

  20. Gold surface with gold nitride-a surface enhanced Raman scattering active substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brieva, A. C.; Alves, L.; Krishnamurthy, S.; Šiller, L.

    2009-03-01

    The nitration of gold surfaces is a nonpolluting method, which can lead to large scale production of substrates with remarkable properties and applications. We present a topographical study of the nanoscale structure of the gold nitride surfaces produced by radio frequency (rf) nitrogen plasma etching of thin gold films. Atomic force microscopy images taken after rf etching reveal the striking appearance of the cluster assembly with large clusters surrounded by small clusters (7.9±1.4 and 2.3±0.9 nm, respectively) appearing to exhibit an attractive interaction. We discuss the possible mechanism for this attraction based on a colloid model by Messina et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 85, 872 (2000)]. This surface exhibits a notable surface enhanced Raman scattering effect demonstrated with L-alanine and rhodamine-6G. The significance of this work is that we found that this SERS active gold nitride surface can be prepared in just one step: by nitrogen plasma etching a thin gold film. Until now most SERS active gold cluster covered surfaces have been prepared in several steps very often requiring complex lithography.

  1. Perturbation of nuclear spin polarizations in solid state NMR of nitroxide-doped samples by magic-angle spinning without microwaves.

    PubMed

    Thurber, Kent R; Tycko, Robert

    2014-05-14

    We report solid state (13)C and (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments with magic-angle spinning (MAS) on frozen solutions containing nitroxide-based paramagnetic dopants that indicate significant perturbations of nuclear spin polarizations without microwave irradiation. At temperatures near 25 K, (1)H and cross-polarized (13)C NMR signals from (15)N,(13)C-labeled L-alanine in trinitroxide-doped glycerol/water are reduced by factors as large as six compared to signals from samples without nitroxide doping. Without MAS or at temperatures near 100 K, differences between signals with and without nitroxide doping are much smaller. We attribute most of the reduction of NMR signals under MAS near 25 K to nuclear spin depolarization through the cross-effect dynamic nuclear polarization mechanism, in which three-spin flips drive nuclear polarizations toward equilibrium with spin polarization differences between electron pairs. When T1e is sufficiently long relative to the MAS rotation period, the distribution of electron spin polarization across the nitroxide electron paramagnetic resonance lineshape can be very different from the corresponding distribution in a static sample at thermal equilibrium, leading to the observed effects. We describe three-spin and 3000-spin calculations that qualitatively reproduce the experimental observations.

  2. HHH syndrome (hyperornithinaemia, hyperammonaemia, homocitrullinuria), with fulminant hepatitis-like presentation.

    PubMed

    Fecarotta, S; Parenti, G; Vajro, P; Zuppaldi, A; Della Casa, R; Carbone, M T; Correra, A; Torre, G; Riva, S; Dionisi-Vici, C; Santorelli, F M; Andria, G

    2006-02-01

    We report a 3-year-old Italian patient with the hyperornithinaemia, hyperammonaemia, homocitrullinuria (HHH) syndrome who presented with neurological deterioration after an intercurrent infection. Hyperammonaemia, coagulopathy and moderate hypertransaminasaemia were detected on hospital admission. Severe hepatocellular necrosis with hypertransaminasaemia (aspartate aminotransferase 20,000 UI/L, alanine aminotransferase 18,400 UI/L) and coagulopathy (PT < 5%) rapidly developed within few days, prompting evaluation for liver transplantation. A protein-restricted diet and arginine supplementation were immediately started, with a rapid improvement of the patient's neurological conditions and normalization of liver function tests and blood ammonia. The diagnosis of HHH syndrome was based on the presence of the typical metabolic abnormalities. Molecular analysis of the SLC25A15 gene showed that the patient was heterozygous for two novel mutations (G113C and M273K). The diagnosis of HHH syndrome should be considered in patients with fulminant hepatitis-like presentations. Early identification and treatment of these patients can be life-saving and can avoid liver transplantation.

  3. The co-occurrence of two pyridine alkaloids, mimosine and trigonelline, in Leucaena leucocephala.

    PubMed

    Ogita, Shinjiro; Kato, Misako; Watanabe, Shin; Ashihara, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Leucaena leucocephala is a nitrogen-fixing tropical leguminous tree that produces two pyridine alkaloids, i. e. mimosine [beta-(3-hydroxy-4-pyridon-1-yl)-L-alanine] and trigonelline (1-methylpyridinium-3-carboxylate). Mimosine has been detected in leaves, flowers, pods, seeds, and roots, and it is one of the principal non-protein amino acids that occurs in all organs. Asparagine was the most abundant amino acid in flowers. The mimosine content varied from 3.3 micromol/g fresh weight (FW) in developing flowers to 171 micromol/g FW in mature seeds. Trigonelline was also detected in leaves, flowers, pods, and seeds, but not roots. The trigonelline content was lower than that of mimosine in all organs. It varied from 0.12 micromol/g FW in developing seeds to 2.6 micromol/g FW in mature seeds. [2-14C]Nicotinic acid supplied to the developing seeds was incorporated into trigonelline but not mimosine. This indicates that the pyridine and dihydroxypyridine structures of these two alkaloids are derived from distinct precursors. The physiological functions of mimosine and trigonelline are discussed briefly.

  4. Cardiac drug-drug interaction between HCV-NS5B pronucleotide inhibitors and amiodarone is determined by their specific diastereochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Lagrutta, Armando; Regan, Christopher P.; Zeng, Haoyu; Imredy, John P.; Koeplinger, Kenneth; Morissette, Pierre; Liu, Liping; Wollenberg, Gordon; Brynczka, Christopher; Lebrón, José; DeGeorge, Joseph; Sannajust, Frederick

    2017-01-01

    Severe bradycardia/bradyarrhythmia following coadministration of the HCV-NS5B prodrug sofosbuvir with amiodarone was recently reported. Our previous preclinical in vivo experiments demonstrated that only certain HCV-NS5B prodrugs elicit bradycardia when combined with amiodarone. In this study, we evaluate the impact of HCV-NS5B prodrug phosphoramidate diastereochemistry (D-/L-alanine, R-/S-phosphoryl) in vitro and in vivo. Co-applied with amiodarone, L-ala,SP prodrugs increased beating rate and decreased beat amplitude in human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CMs), but D-ala,RP produgs, including MK-3682, did not. Stereochemical selectivity on emerging bradycardia was confirmed in vivo. Diastereomer pairs entered cells equally well, and there was no difference in intracellular accumulation of L-ala,SP metabolites ± amiodarone, but no D-ala,RP metabolites were detected. Cathepsin A (CatA) inhibitors attenuated L-ala,SP prodrug metabolite formation, yet exacerbated L-ala,SP + amiodarone effects, implicating the prodrugs in these effects. Experiments indicate that pharmacological effects and metabolic conversion to UTP analog are L-ala,SP prodrug-dependent in cardiomyocytes. PMID:28327633

  5. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometric method for metabolic profiling of tobacco leaves.

    PubMed

    Li, Yong; Pang, Tao; Li, Yanli; Wang, Xiaolin; Li, Qinghua; Lu, Xin; Xu, Guowang

    2011-06-01

    A gas chromatography-mass spectrometric method was developed for profiling of tobacco leaves. The differentiation among tobacco leaves planted in two different regions was investigated. Prior to analysis, the extraction solvent formulation was optimized and a combination of water, methanol and acetonitrile with a volume ratio of 3:1:1 was found to be optimal. The reproducibility of the method was satisfactory. Kendall tau-b rank correlation coefficients were equal to 1 (p<0.05) for 82% of the resolved peaks (up to 95% of the overall peak areas), indicating the good response correlation. Forty-four compounds including 9 saccharides, 9 alcohols, 9 amino acids, 16 organic acids and phosphoric acid were identified based on standard compounds. The method was successfully applied for profiling of tobacco leaves from Zimbabwe and Yunnan of China. Our result revealed that levels of saccharides and their derivatives including xylose, ribose, fructose, glucose, turanose, xylitol and glyceric acid were more abundant while sucrose, glucitol and D-gluconic acid were less abundant in tobacco leaves from Yunnan as compared to those from Zimbabwe. Amino acids such as L-alanine, L-tyrosine and L-threonine were found to be richer in Zimbabwe tobacco than in Yunnan tobacco.

  6. Rethinking cycad metabolite research.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Laura R; Marler, Thomas E

    2011-01-01

    Cycads are among the most ancient of extant Spermatophytes, and are known for their numerous pharmacologically active compounds. One compound in particular, β-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA), has been implicated as the cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/Parkinson dementia complex (ALS/PDC) on Guam. Previous studies allege that BMAA is produced exclusively by cyanobacteria, and is transferred to cycads through the symbiotic relationship between these cyanobacteria and the roots of cycads. We recently published data showing that Cycas micronesica seedlings grown without endophytic cyanobacteria do in fact increase in BMAA, invalidating the foundation of the BMAA hypothesis. We use this example to suggest that the frenzy centered on BMAA and other single putative toxins has hindered progress. The long list of cycad-specific compounds may have important roles in signaling or communication, but these possibilities have been neglected during decades of attempts to force single metabolites into a supposed anti-herbivory function. We propose that an unbiased, comprehensive approach may be a more appropriate means of proceeding with cycad biochemistry research.

  7. Paraffin Oxidation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa I. Induction of Paraffin Oxidation

    PubMed Central

    van Eyk, J.; Bartels, Trude J.

    1968-01-01

    The induction of paraffin oxidation in intact cells of Pseudomonas aeruginosa was investigated. Oxidation of 14C-heptane by cell-free extracts of adapted cells showed that the activity of whole cells is a reliable reflection of the synthesis of the first enzyme in the degradation of n-alkanes. Induction was significantly affected by glucose and could be completely repressed by malate. The amino acids l-proline, l-alanine, l-arginine, and l-tyrosine exhibited a rather low repressor action. Malonate, a nonrepressive carbon source, allowed gratuitous enzyme synthesis. A number of compounds which did not sustain growth were found to be suitable substitutes for paraffins as an inducer. Among these were cyclopropane and diethoxymethane. The induction studied under conditions of gratuity with the latter compound as an inducer showed immediate linear kinetics only at saturating inducer concentrations. With n-hexane as the inducer, a lag time was always observed, even when high concentrations were used. PMID:4979100

  8. Nuclear magnetic relaxation studies of semiconductor nanocrystals and solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachleben, J. R.

    1993-09-01

    Semiconductor nanocrystals, small biomolecules, and C-13 enriched solids were studied through the relaxation in NMR spectra. Surface structure of semiconductor nanocrystals (CdS) was deduced from high resolution H-1 and C-13 liquid state spectra of thiophenol ligands on the nanocrystal surfaces. The surface coverage by thiophenol was found to be low, being 5.6 and 26% for nanocrystal radii of 11.8 and 19.2 angstrom. Internal motion is estimated to be slow with a correlation time greater than 10(exp -8) s(exp -1). The surface thiophenol ligands react to form a dithiophenol when the nanocrystals were subjected to O2 and ultraviolet. A method for measuring (N-14)-(H-1) J-couplings is demonstrated on pyridine and the peptide oxytocin; selective 2D T(sub 1) and T(sub 2) experiments are presented for measuring relaxation times in crowded spectra with overlapping peaks in 1D, but relaxation effects interfere. Possibility of carbon-carbon cross relaxation in C-13 enriched solids is demonstrated by experiments on zinc acetate and L-alanine.

  9. Advancements in accuracy of the alanine dosimetry system. Part 2. The influence of the irradiation temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagy, Vitaly; Puhl, James M.; Desrosiers, Marc F.

    2000-01-01

    Systematic measurements of the temperature coefficient for alanine electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) response have been performed for irradiation in the temperature range (10-50)°C and in the absorbed dose range (1-100) kGy at the dose rate 9.5 kGy/h. During the 60Co rad -ray irradiation, rad - L-alanine dosimeters were kept in a sealed aluminum holder that provided an effective heat exchange with the temperature-controlled environment. The time between the irradiation and signal measurements was standardized, and a reference sample fixed in the resonant cavity was used to correct the signals for small variations in the spectrometer sensitivity. The temperature coefficient for each dose was determined from approximately 30 experimental points processed by the weighted least-squares technique after the necessary statistical tests were done. The temperature coefficients thus determined were considerably lower than previously reported. The dose dependence of the temperature coefficient features a minimum at (20-30) kGy (about 0.135%/K) with higher values at 1 kGy (0.17%/K) and at 100 kGy ((0.175-0.19) %/K). With the exception of very high doses, no significant distinction was found between the temperature coefficients of Bruker and NIST dosimeters, which differ in shape and binder content.

  10. Identification of two novel pigment precursors and a reddish-purple pigment involved in the blue-green discoloration of onion and garlic.

    PubMed

    Imai, Shinsuke; Akita, Kaori; Tomotake, Muneaki; Sawada, Hiroshi

    2006-02-08

    By using a model reaction system representing blue-green discoloration that occurs when purees of onion (Allium cepa L.) and garlic (Allium sativum L.) are mixed, we isolated two pigment precursors (PPs) and a reddish-purple pigment (PUR-1) and determined their chemical structures. PPs were isolated from a heat-treated solution containing color developer (CD) and either l-valine or l-alanine, and their structures were determined as 2-(3,4-dimethylpyrrolyl)-3-methylbutanoic acid (PP-Val), and 2-(3,4-dimethyl-1H-pyrrolyl) propanoic acid (PP-Ala), respectively. Next, PUR-1 was isolated from a heat-treated solution containing PP-Val and allicin, and its structure was determined as (1E)-1-(1-((1S)-1-carboxy-2-methylpropyl)-3,4-dimethyl-1H-pyrrol-2-yl)-prop-1-enylene-3-(1-((1S)-1-carboxy-2-methylpropyl)-3,4-dimethyl-1H-pyrrol-2-ylidenium). The structure of PUR-1 suggested that PP molecules containing a 3,4-dimethyl pyrrole ring had been cross-linked by an allyl group of allicin to form conjugated pigments. While PUR-1 is a dipyrrole compound exhibiting a reddish-purple color, a color shift toward blue to green can be expected as the cross-linking reaction continues to form, for example, tri- or tetrapyrrole compounds.

  11. Regulation of the Bacterial Cell Wall: Analysis of a Mutant of Bacillus subtilis Defective in Biosynthesis of Teichoic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Boylan, R. J.; Mendelson, N. H.; Brooks, D.; Young, F. E.

    1972-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis 168ts-200B is a temperature-sensitive mutant of B. subtilis 168 which grows as rods at 30 C but as irregular spheres at 45 C. Growth at the nonpermissive temperature resulted in a deficiency of teichoic acid in the cell wall. A decrease in teichoic acid synthesis coupled with the rapid turnover of this polymer led to a progressive loss until less than 20% of the level found in wild-type rods remained in spheres. Extracts of cells grown at 45 C contained amounts of the enzymes involved in the biosynthesis and glucosylation of teichoic acids that were equal to or greater than those found in normal rods. Cell walls of the spheres were deficient also in the endogenous autolytic enzyme (N-acyl muramyl-l-alanine amidase). Genetic analysis of the mutant by PBS1-mediated transduction and deoxyribonucleic acid-mediated transformation demonstrated that the lesion responsible for these effects (tag-1) is tightly linked to the genes which regulate the glucosylation of teichoic acid in the mid-portion of the chromosome of B. subtilis. PMID:4622900

  12. [Stardust Amines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dworkin, Jason P.

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the abundances of amino acids and amines, as well as their enantiomeric composition in water extracts of comet Wild 2 exposed aerogel and aluminum foils returned by Stardust using liquid chromatography with UV fluorescence detection and time of flight-mass spectrometry (LC-FD/ToF-MS). A suite of amino acids and amines including glycine, L-alanine, methylamine (MA), and ethylamine (EA) were identified in the Stardust bulk aerogel. With the exception of MA and EA, all other primary amines detected in comet-exposed aerogels were also present in the aerogel witness tile that was not exposed to Wild 2, suggesting that most amines are terrestrial in origin. The enhanced abundances of MA, EA, and possibly glycine in comet-exposed aerogel compared to controls, coupled with MA to EA ratios (approx.1 to 2) that are distinct from preflight aerogels (approx.7 to lo), suggest that these amines were captured from Wild 2. The presence of cometary amines in Stardust material supports the hypothesis that comets were an important source of prebiotic organics on the early Earth. To better understand their origin, a systematic study of all these species with C, N, and H compound specific isotopic analysis (CSIA) via gas chromatography quadrupole mass spectrometry in with parallel with combustion isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-QMS/IRMS) is being conducted. We will discuss our latest C-CSIA measurements and what they indicate about the origin of the amino acids extracted from Stardust samples.

  13. Identification of three complementation units in the gerA spore germination locus of Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed Central

    Zuberi, A R; Feavers, I M; Moir, A

    1985-01-01

    The gerA locus, mutations in which affect the germination response of spores to L-alanine and related amino acids, is contained within a 6-kilobase region of DNA cloned in phage and plasmid vectors. Fragments from this region, subcloned in the shuttle vector pHV33, were introduced into Bacillus subtilis, and their ability to complement chromosomal gerA mutations in a recE4 background was examined. Although the plasmids were somewhat unstable, it was possible to score complementation within spore-containing colonies on nutrient agar by their ability to reduce 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride in an overlay. These studies have assigned the 10 gerA mutations tested to three complementation groups. An analysis of Tn1000 insertions into the cloned DNA of two relatively stable plasmids that together encompass the entire gerA region has identified more precisely the location and extent of the complementation units; recombination studies and in vitro mutagenesis were used to further delineate the extents of two of the units. The evidence suggests that the three complementation units are adjacent and that they are probably capable of separate transcription. PMID:2985546

  14. Rapid peptide metabolism: A major component of soil nitrogen cycling?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrell, Mark; Hill, Paul W.; Wanniarachchi, Sudas D.; Farrar, John; Bardgett, Richard D.; Jones, Davey L.

    2011-09-01

    Proteinaceous and peptidic nitrogen is a potential direct nutrient source for both plants and microbes in the soil, without prior degradation to amino acids and mineralization. We used a series of five sites along an elevation gradient from 15 m a.s.l. to 710 m a.s.l. along which primary productivity decreases to investigate peptide utilization rates by soil microbes. Using 14C-labeled L-alanine, L-dialanine, and L-trialanine in a series of incubation experiments, we show that peptides are directly and rapidly assimilated by soil microbes, and that they are utilized for both biomass production and respiration. Alanine, dialanine, and trialanine were mineralized rapidly by soil microbes from the five sites along the gradient. Across all five sites, dialanine and trialanine were mineralized faster than alanine. In competition experiments, a 100-fold excess of alanine had no effect on the rate of trialanine mineralization in four of the five sites, and the same excess of trialanine had no effect on alanine mineralization. This is indicative of uptake of the intact peptide by the soil microbial community. Our findings have implications for understanding terrestrial nitrogen cycling because they point to a short-circuit whereby large peptides and proteins need only be extracellularly cleaved to short chain length peptides before direct assimilation by microbes.

  15. Endosymbiotic and Host Proteases in the Digestive Tract of the Invasive Snail Pomacea canaliculata: Diversity, Origin and Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Godoy, Martín S.; Castro-Vasquez, Alfredo; Vega, Israel A.

    2013-01-01

    Digestive proteases of the digestive tract of the apple snail Pomacea canaliculata were studied. Luminal protease activity was found in the crop, the style sac and the coiled gut and was significantly higher in the coiled gut. Several protease bands and their apparent molecular weights were identified in both tissue extracts and luminal contents by gel zymography: (1) a 125 kDa protease in salivary gland extracts and in the crop content; (2) a 30 kDa protease throughout all studied luminal contents and in extracts of the midgut gland and of the endosymbionts isolated from this gland; (3) two proteases of 145 and 198 kDa in the coiled gut content. All these proteases were inhibited by aprotinin, a serine-protease inhibitor, and showed maximum activity between 30°C and 35°C and pH between 8.5 and 9.5. Tissue L-alanine-N-aminopeptidase activity was determined in the wall of the crop, the style sac and the coiled gut and was significantly higher in the coiled gut. Our findings show that protein digestion in P. canaliculata is carried out through a battery of diverse proteases originated from the salivary glands and the endosymbionts lodged in the midgut gland and by proteases of uncertain origin that occur in the coiled gut lumen. PMID:23818959

  16. The staying power of adhesion-associated antioxidant activity in Mytilus californianus.

    PubMed

    Miller, Dusty R; Spahn, Jamie E; Waite, J Herbert

    2015-10-06

    The California mussel, Mytilus californianus, adheres in the highly oxidizing intertidal zone with a fibrous holdfast called the byssus using 3, 4-dihydroxyphenyl-l-alanine (DOPA)-containing adhesive proteins. DOPA is susceptible to oxidation in seawater and, upon oxidation, loses adhesion. Successful mussel adhesion thus depends critically on controlling oxidation and reduction. To explore how mussels regulate redox during their functional adhesive lifetime, we tracked extractable protein concentration, DOPA content and antioxidant activity in byssal plaques over time. In seawater, DOPA content and antioxidant activity in the byssus persisted much longer than expected-50% of extractable DOPA and 30% of extractable antioxidant activity remained after 20 days. Antioxidant activity was located at the plaque-substrate interface, demonstrating that antioxidant activity keeps DOPA reduced for durable and dynamic adhesion. We also correlated antioxidant activity to cysteine and DOPA side chains of mussel foot proteins (mfps), suggesting that mussels use both cysteine and DOPA redox reservoirs for controlling interfacial chemistry. These data are discussed in the context of the biomaterial structure and properties of the marine mussel byssus.

  17. Boronate Complex Formation with Dopa Containing Mussel Adhesive Protein Retards pH-Induced Oxidation and Enables Adhesion to Mica

    PubMed Central

    Israelachvili, Jacob N.; Chen, Yunfei; Waite, J. Herbert

    2014-01-01

    The biochemistry of mussel adhesion has inspired the design of surface primers, adhesives, coatings and gels for technological applications. These mussel-inspired systems often focus on incorporating the amino acid 3,4-dihydroxyphenyl-L-alanine (Dopa) or a catecholic analog into a polymer. Unfortunately, effective use of Dopa is compromised by its susceptibility to auto-oxidation at neutral pH. Oxidation can lead to loss of adhesive function and undesired covalent cross-linking. Mussel foot protein 5 (Mfp-5), which contains ∼30 mole % Dopa, is a superb adhesive under reducing conditions but becomes nonadhesive after pH-induced oxidation. Here we report that the bidentate complexation of borate by Dopa to form a catecholato-boronate can be exploited to retard oxidation. Although exposure of Mfp-5 to neutral pH typically oxidizes Dopa, resulting in a>95% decrease in adhesion, inclusion of borate retards oxidation at the same pH. Remarkably, this Dopa-boronate complex dissociates upon contact with mica to allow for a reversible Dopa-mediated adhesion. The borate protection strategy allows for Dopa redox stability and maintained adhesive function in an otherwise oxidizing environment. PMID:25303409

  18. The staying power of adhesion-associated antioxidant activity in Mytilus californianus

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Dusty R.; Spahn, Jamie E.; Waite, J. Herbert

    2015-01-01

    The California mussel, Mytilus californianus, adheres in the highly oxidizing intertidal zone with a fibrous holdfast called the byssus using 3, 4-dihydroxyphenyl-l-alanine (DOPA)-containing adhesive proteins. DOPA is susceptible to oxidation in seawater and, upon oxidation, loses adhesion. Successful mussel adhesion thus depends critically on controlling oxidation and reduction. To explore how mussels regulate redox during their functional adhesive lifetime, we tracked extractable protein concentration, DOPA content and antioxidant activity in byssal plaques over time. In seawater, DOPA content and antioxidant activity in the byssus persisted much longer than expected—50% of extractable DOPA and 30% of extractable antioxidant activity remained after 20 days. Antioxidant activity was located at the plaque–substrate interface, demonstrating that antioxidant activity keeps DOPA reduced for durable and dynamic adhesion. We also correlated antioxidant activity to cysteine and DOPA side chains of mussel foot proteins (mfps), suggesting that mussels use both cysteine and DOPA redox reservoirs for controlling interfacial chemistry. These data are discussed in the context of the biomaterial structure and properties of the marine mussel byssus. PMID:26468070

  19. Structure-Guided Functional Characterization of DUF1460 Reveals a New, Highly Specific NlpC/P60 Amidase Family

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qingping; Mengin-Lecreulx, Dominique; Patin, Delphine; Grant, Joanna C.; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Knuth, Mark W.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Elsliger, Marc-André; Deacon, Ashley M.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY GlcNAc-1,6-anhydro-MurNAc-tetrapeptide is a major peptidoglycan degradation intermediate and a cytotoxin. It is generated by lytic transglycosylases and further degraded and recycled by various enzymes. We have identified and characterized a novel, highly specific N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase (AmiA) from Bacteroides uniformis, a member of the DUF1460 protein family, that hydrolyzes GlcNAc-1,6-anhydro-MurNAc-peptide into disaccharide and stem peptide. The high-resolution apo-structure at 1.15 Å resolution shows that AmiA is related to NlpC/P60 γ-D-Glu-meso-diaminopimelic acid amidases and shares a common catalytic core and cysteine peptidase-like active site. AmiA has evolved structural adaptations that reconfigure the substrate recognition site. The preferred substrates for AmiA were predicted in silico based on structural and bioinformatics data, and were subsequently characterized experimentally. Further crystal structures of AmiA in complexes with GlcNAc-1,6-anhydro-MurNAc and GlcNAc have enabled us to elucidate substrate recognition and specificity. DUF1460 is highly conserved in structure and defines a new amidase family. PMID:25465128

  20. Metabolic profiling of root exudates from two ecotypes of Sedum alfredii treated with Pb based on GC-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Qing; Wang, Shiyu; Sun, Li-Na; Wang, Hui

    2017-01-01

    Phytoremediation is an effective method to remediate Pb-contaminated soils and root exudates play an important role in this process. Based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and metabolomics method, this study focuses on the comparative metabolic profiling analysis of root exudates from the Pb-accumulating and non-accumulating ecotypes of Sedum alfredii treated with 0 and 50 μmol/L Pb. The results obtained show that plant type and Pb stress can significantly change the concentrations and species of root exudates, and fifteen compounds were identified and assumed to be potential biomarkers. Leaching experiments showed that l-alanine, l-proline and oxalic acid have a good effect to activate Pb in soil, glyceric acid and 2-hydroxyacetic acid have a general effect to activate Pb in soil. 4-Methylphenol and 2-methoxyphenol might be able to activate Pb in soil, glycerol and diethyleneglycol might be able to stabilize Pb in soil, but these activation effect and stabilization effect were all not obvious.

  1. Serum enzyme status of Chios ewes fed increasing amounts of copper from copper sulfate.

    PubMed

    Bampidis, V A; Christodoulou, V; Chatzipanagiotou, A; Sossidou, E; Salangoudis, A

    2010-06-01

    This study aimed to evaluate effects of orally administered copper (Cu) to Chios sheep breed on serum levels of aspartate aminotransferase (AST), l-alanine aminotransferase (ALT), lactate deydrogenase (LDH) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP), in order to establish a practical and effective method in diagnosing the prehemolytic stage of chronic Cu poisoning. Eighteen ewes were allocated to three treatments of six ewes and fed a diet that contained 16.4 mg/day of Cu. Ewes in treatment Cu-0 received no additional Cu (control), while those in treatments Cu-60 and Cu-95 received 60 and 95 mg additional Cu/day, respectively, as an oral solution of copper sulfate. Therefore the ewes in treatment Cu-0, Cu-60 and Cu-95 consumed 16.4, 76.4 and 111.4 mg Cu/day, respectively. Serum enzyme levels were similar among treatments and all ewes remained clinically healthy until the end of the experiment. Results suggest that Chios ewes exhibit tolerance to Cu supplementation for up to 6 weeks.

  2. Novel nanostructure amino acid-based poly(amide-imide)s enclosing benzimidazole pendant group in green medium: fabrication and characterization.

    PubMed

    Mallakpour, Shadpour; Dinari, Mohammad

    2012-10-01

    In the present work, several novel optically active nanostructure poly(amide-imide)s (PAI)s were synthesized via step-growth polymerization reaction of chiral diacids based on pyromellitic dianhydride-derived dicarboxylic acids containing different natural amino acids such as L-alanine, S-valine, L-leucine, L-isoleucine, L-methionine, and L-phenylalanine with 2-(3,5-diaminophenyl)-benzimidazole under green conditions using molten tetrabutylammonium bromide. The new optically active PAIs were achieved in good yields and moderate inherent viscosity up to 0.41 dL/g. The synthesized polymers were characterized with FT-IR, (1)H-NMR, X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), elemental and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) techniques. These polymers show high solubility in organic polar solvents due to the presence of amino acid and benzimidazole pendant group at room temperature. FE-SEM results show that, these chiral nanostructured PAIs have spherical shapes and the particle size is around 20-80 nm. On the basis of TGA data, such PAIs are thermally stable and can be classified as self-extinguishing polymers. In addition due to the existence of amino acids in the polymer backbones, these macromolecules are not only optically active but also could be biodegradable and thus may well be classified under environmentally friendly materials.

  3. Ionic liquid catalyzed synthesis and characterization of heterocyclic and optically active poly (amide-imide)s incorporating L-amino acids.

    PubMed

    Zahmatkesh, Saeed

    2011-02-01

    N,N'-pyromelliticdiimido-di-L-alanine (1), N,N'-Pyromelliticdiimido-di-L-phenylalanine (2), and N,N'-Pyromelliticdiimido-di-L-leucine (3) were prepared from the reaction of Pyromellitic dianhydride with corresponding L-amino acids in a mixture of glacial acetic acid and pyridine solution (3/2 ratio) under refluxing conditions. A series of poly (amide-imide)s containing L-amino acids were prepared from the synthesized dicarboxylic acids with two synthetic aromatic diamines in an ionic liquid (IL) as a green, safe and eco-friendly medium and also reactions catalysis agent. Evaluation of data shows that IL is the better polyamidation medium than the reported method and the catalysis stand on the higher inherent viscosities of the obtained PAIs and the rate of polymerizations beyond the greener reaction conditions and deletion of some essential reagents in conventional manners. Characterization were performs by means of IR, MS and (1)H NMR spectroscopy, elemental analysis, specific rotation, thermogravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetric techniques. Molecular weights of the obtained polymers were evaluated viscometrically, and the measured inherent viscosities were in the range 0.43-0.85 dL/g. These polymers were readily soluble in many organic solvents. These polymers still kept good thermal stability with glass transition temperatures in the range of 94-154°C, and the decomposition temperature under the nitrogen atmosphere for 10% weight-loss temperatures in excess of 308°C.

  4. The astrocytic transporter SLC7A10 (Asc-1) mediates glycinergic inhibition of spinal cord motor neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ehmsen, Jeffrey T.; Liu, Yong; Wang, Yue; Paladugu, Nikhil; Johnson, Anna E.; Rothstein, Jeffrey D.; du Lac, Sascha; Mattson, Mark P.; Höke, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    SLC7A10 (Asc-1) is a sodium-independent amino acid transporter known to facilitate transport of a number of amino acids including glycine, L-serine, L-alanine, and L-cysteine, as well as their D-enantiomers. It has been described as a neuronal transporter with a primary role related to modulation of excitatory glutamatergic neurotransmission. We find that SLC7A10 is substantially enriched in a subset of astrocytes of the caudal brain and spinal cord in a distribution corresponding with high densities of glycinergic inhibitory synapses. Accordingly, we find that spinal cord glycine levels are significantly reduced in Slc7a10-null mice and spontaneous glycinergic postsynaptic currents in motor neurons show substantially diminished amplitudes, demonstrating an essential role for SLC7A10 in glycinergic inhibitory function in the central nervous system. These observations establish the etiology of sustained myoclonus (sudden involuntary muscle movements) and early postnatal lethality characteristic of Slc7a10-null mice, and implicate SLC7A10 as a candidate gene and auto-antibody target in human hyperekplexia and stiff person syndrome, respectively. PMID:27759100

  5. Development and validation of a supercritical fluid chromatography method for the direct determination of enantiomeric purity of provitamin B5 in cosmetic formulations with mass spectrometric detection.

    PubMed

    Khater, Syame; West, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    A rapid and efficient chiral supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC) method has been developed for the quantitative determination of panthenol enantiomers in cosmetic formulations (cream, lotion, wipe, and exfoliant). Indeed, the pharmacological effect only depends on the D form (Dexpanthenol) thus accurate measurement of its enantiomeric purity in formulated cosmetic products is of interest. The samples were prepared with liquid-liquid extraction followed by solid-phase extraction on Adsorbex amino cartridges. After testing several enantioselective columns in an attempt at reversing the elution order to have the minor enantiomer eluted first, the best separation of enantiomers and internal standard (N-acetyl-L-alanine) was achieved on a 3 μm-amylose-type immobilized polysaccharide chiral stationary phase (Chiralpak IA) in less than 6 min with a simple mobile phase comprising carbon dioxide and 11% methanol pumped at 2.3 mL/min, 25°C and 150 bar backpressure. Supercritical fluid chromatography coupled to both an optical diode-array detector and a user-friendly single-quadrupole mass spectrometer (Waters QDa) equipped with electrospray ionization source has been used. The on-line coupling ensures the technique to be more informative and improves detection sensitivity, as underivatized panthenol has a poor UV absorption. The limit of quantification (LOQ) achieved with single-ion recording was 0.5 μg/mL. The method was validated in terms of linearity, precision and accuracy and satisfactory results were obtained.

  6. Structural Basis of Murein Peptide Specificity of a γ-D-glutamyl-L-diamino Acid Endopeptidase

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qingping; Sudek, Sebastian; McMullan, Daniel; Miller, Mitchell D.; Geierstanger, Bernhard; Jones, David H.; Sri Krishna, S.; Spraggon, Glen; Bursalay, Badry; Abdubek, Polat; Acosta, Claire; Ambing, Eileen; Astakhova, Tamara; Axelrod, Herbert L.; Carlton, Dennis; Caruthers, Jonathan; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Clayton, Thomas; Deller, Marc C.; Duan, Lian; Elias, Ylva; Elsliger, Marc-Andre; Feuerhelm, Julie; Grzechnik, Slawomir K.; Hale, Joanna; Han, Gye Won; Haugen, Justin; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Jin, Kevin K.; Klock, Heath E.; Knuth, Mark W.; Kozbial, Piotr; Kumar, Abhinav; Marciano, David; Morse, Andrew T.; Nigoghossian, Edward; Okach, Linda; Oommachen, Silvya; Paulsen, Jessica; Reyes, Ron; Rife, Christopher L.; Trout, Christina V.; van den Bedem, Henry; Weekes, Dana; White, Aprilfawn; Wolf, Guenter; Zubieta, Chloe; Hodgson, Keith O.; Wooley, John; Deacon, Ashley M.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2009-01-01

    Crystal structures of two homologous peptidases from cyanobacteria Anabaena variabilis and Nostoc punctiforme at 1.05 Å and 1.60 Å resolution represent the first structures of a large class of cell-wall, cysteine peptidases that contain an N-terminal bacterial SH3-like domain (SH3b) and a C-terminal NlpC/P60 cysteine peptidase domain. The NlpC/P60 domain is a primitive, papain-like peptidase in the CA clan of cysteine peptidases with a Cys126/His176/His188 catalytic triad and a conserved catalytic core. We deduced from structure and sequence analysis, and then experimentally, that that these two proteins act as γ-D-glutamyl-L-diamino acid endopeptidases (EC 3.4.22.-). The active site is located near the interface between the SH3b and NlpC/P60 domains, where the SH3b domain may help define substrate specificity, instead of functioning as a targeting domain, so that only muropeptides with an N-terminal L-alanine can bind to the active site. PMID:19217401

  7. Health-based reference intervals for ALAT, ASAT and GT in serum, measured according to the recommendations of the European Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (ECCLS).

    PubMed

    Leino, A; Impivaara, O; Irjala, K; Mäki, J; Peltola, O; Järvisalo, J

    1995-05-01

    The reference intervals for the activities of L-alanine aminotransferase (EC 2.6.1.2, ALAT), L-aspartate aminotransferase (EC 2.6.1.1, ASAT) and gamma-glutamyltransferase (EC 2.3.2.2, GT) in serum were determined according to the recommendations of the European Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (ECCLS). Serum specimens from 954 subjects were analysed for ALAT and ASAT and from 794 subjects for GT. The subjects, aged 27-67 years, were participants in general health surveys. The reference population was formed by excluding subjects with any disease, or on any medication, affecting the liver, and also those consuming excessive amounts of alcohol. The 95% inner reference intervals for ALAT and ASAT were 9-50 (n = 189) and 15-36 U l-1 (n = 192) in men and 8-38 (n = 270) and 13-33 U l-1 (n = 270) in women. For GT the reference interval was 11-58 in men (n = 165) and 8-42 U l-1 in women (n = 220). Serum GT levels correlated clearly with alcohol consumption. Serum ALAT and ASAT were only slightly associated with alcohol consumption at levels less than 280 g per week in men and 190 g per week in women. There were modest positive associations between the three enzyme levels and body mass index. None of the enzymes correlated significantly with age.

  8. Peptide coupling between amino acids and the carboxylic acid of a functionalized chlorido-gold(I)-phosphane.

    PubMed

    Kriechbaum, Margit; List, Manuela; Himmelsbach, Markus; Redhammer, Günther J; Monkowius, Uwe

    2014-10-06

    We have developed a protocol for the direct coupling between methyl ester protected amino acids and the chlorido-gold(I)-phosphane (p-HOOC(C6H4)PPh2)AuCl. By applying the EDC·HCl/NHS strategy (EDC·HCl = N-ethyl-N'-(3-(dimethylamino)propyl)carbodiimide hydrochloride, NHS = N-hydroxysuccinimide), the methyl esters of l-phenylalanine, glycine, l-leucine, l-alanine, and l-methionine are coupled with the carboxylic acid of the gold complex in moderate to good yields (62-88%). All amino acid tagged gold complexes were characterized by (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy and high-resolution mass spectrometry. As corroborated by measurement of the angle of optical rotation, no racemization occurred during the reaction. The molecular structure of the leucine derivative was determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. In the course of developing an efficient coupling protocol, the acyl chlorides (p-Cl(O)C(C6H4)PPh2)AuX (X = Cl, Br) were also prepared and characterized.

  9. Stronger Dopamine D1 Receptor-Mediated Neurotransmission in Dyskinesia.

    PubMed

    Farré, Daniel; Muñoz, Ana; Moreno, Estefanía; Reyes-Resina, Irene; Canet-Pons, Júlia; Dopeso-Reyes, Iria G; Rico, Alberto J; Lluís, Carme; Mallol, Josefa; Navarro, Gemma; Canela, Enric I; Cortés, Antonio; Labandeira-García, José L; Casadó, Vicent; Lanciego, José L; Franco, Rafael

    2015-12-01

    Radioligand binding assays to rat striatal dopamine D1 receptors showed that brain lateralization of the dopaminergic system were not due to changes in expression but in agonist affinity. D1 receptor-mediated striatal imbalance resulted from a significantly higher agonist affinity in the left striatum. D1 receptors heteromerize with dopamine D3 receptors, which are considered therapeutic targets for dyskinesia in parkinsonian patients. Expression of both D3 and D1-D3 receptor heteromers were increased in samples from 6-hydroxy-dopamine-hemilesioned rats rendered dyskinetic by treatment with 3, 4-dihydroxyphenyl-L-alanine (L-DOPA). Similar findings were obtained using striatal samples from primates. Radioligand binding studies in the presence of a D3 agonist led in dyskinetic, but not in lesioned or L-DOPA-treated rats, to a higher dopamine sensitivity. Upon D3-receptor activation, the affinity of agonists for binding to the right striatal D1 receptor increased. Excess dopamine coming from L-DOPA medication likely activates D3 receptors thus making right and left striatal D1 receptors equally responsive to dopamine. These results show that dyskinesia occurs concurrently with a right/left striatal balance in D1 receptor-mediated neurotransmission.

  10. Expression, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of SufE (XAC2355) from Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri.

    PubMed

    Guzzo, Cristiane R; Silva, Lucicleide R; Galvão-Botton, Leonor M P; Barbosa, João A R G; Farah, Chuck S

    2006-03-01

    Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri (Xac) SufE (XAC2355) is a member of a family of bacterial proteins that are conserved in several pathogens and phytopathogens. The Escherichia coli suf operon is involved in iron-sulfur cluster biosynthesis under iron-limitation and stress conditions. It has recently been demonstrated that SufE and SufS form a novel two-component cysteine desulfarase in which SufS catalyses the conversion of L-cysteine to L-alanine, forming a protein-bound persulfide intermediate. The S atom is then transferred to SufE, from which it is subsequently transferred to target molecules or reduced to sulfide in solution. Here, the cloning, expression, crystallization and phase determination of Xac SufE crystals are described. Recombinant SufE was crystallized in space group P2(1)2(1)2(1) and diffracted to 1.9 A resolution at a synchrotron source. The unit-cell parameters are a = 45.837, b = 58.507, c = 98.951 A, alpha = beta = gamma = 90 degrees. The calculated Matthews coefficient indicated the presence of two molecules in the asymmetric unit. Phasing was performed by molecular-replacement using E. coli SufE as a model (PDB code 1mzg) and an interpretable map was obtained.

  11. BMAA extraction of cyanobacteria samples: which method to choose?

    PubMed

    Lage, Sandra; Burian, Alfred; Rasmussen, Ulla; Costa, Pedro Reis; Annadotter, Heléne; Godhe, Anna; Rydberg, Sara

    2016-01-01

    β-N-Methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA), a neurotoxin reportedly produced by cyanobacteria, diatoms and dinoflagellates, is proposed to be linked to the development of neurological diseases. BMAA has been found in aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems worldwide, both in its phytoplankton producers and in several invertebrate and vertebrate organisms that bioaccumulate it. LC-MS/MS is the most frequently used analytical technique in BMAA research due to its high selectivity, though consensus is lacking as to the best extraction method to apply. This study accordingly surveys the efficiency of three extraction methods regularly used in BMAA research to extract BMAA from cyanobacteria samples. The results obtained provide insights into possible reasons for the BMAA concentration discrepancies in previous publications. In addition and according to the method validation guidelines for analysing cyanotoxins, the TCA protein precipitation method, followed by AQC derivatization and LC-MS/MS analysis, is now validated for extracting protein-bound (after protein hydrolysis) and free BMAA from cyanobacteria matrix. BMAA biological variability was also tested through the extraction of diatom and cyanobacteria species, revealing a high variance in BMAA levels (0.0080-2.5797 μg g(-1) DW).

  12. Is exposure to cyanobacteria an environmental risk factor for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and other neurodegenerative diseases?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, Walter G.; Borenstein, Amy R.; Nelson, Lorene M.; Codd, Geoffrey A.; Rosen, Barry H.; Stommel, Elijah W.; Cox, Paul Alan

    2013-01-01

    There is a broad scientific consensus that amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is caused by gene-environment interactions. Mutations in genes underlying familial ALS (fALS) have been discovered in only 5–10% of the total population of ALS patients. Relatively little attention has been paid to environmental and lifestyle factors that may trigger the cascade of motor neuron death leading to the syndrome of ALS, although exposure to chemicals including lead and pesticides, and to agricultural environments, smoking, certain sports, and trauma have all been identified with an increased risk of ALS. There is a need for research to quantify the relative roles of each of the identified risk factors for ALS. Recent evidence has strengthened the theory that chronic environmental exposure to the neurotoxic amino acid β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) produced by cyanobacteria may be an environmental risk factor for ALS. Here we describe methods that may be used to assess exposure to cyanobacteria, and hence potentially to BMAA, namely an epidemiologic questionnaire and direct and indirect methods for estimating the cyanobacterial load in ecosystems. Rigorous epidemiologic studies could determine the risks associated with exposure to cyanobacteria, and if combined with genetic analysis of ALS cases and controls could reveal etiologically important gene-environment interactions in genetically vulnerable individuals.

  13. An inducible expression system for high-level expression of recombinant proteins in slow growing mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Leotta, Lisa; Spratt, Joanne M; Kong, Carlyn U; Triccas, James A

    2015-09-01

    A novel protein expression vector utilising the inducible hspX promoter of Mycobacterium tuberculosis was constructed and evaluated in this study. High-level induction of three mycobacterial antigens, comprising up to 9% of bacterial sonicate, was demonstrated in recombinant Mycobacterium bovis BCG when grown under low-oxygen tension, which serves to enhance hspX promoter activity. Recombinant proteins were efficiently purified from bacterial lysates in a soluble form by virtue of a C-terminal 6-histidine tag. Purification of the immunodominant M. tuberculosis Ag85B antigen using this system resulted in a recombinant protein that stimulated significant IFN-γ release from Ag85B-reactive T cells generated after vaccination of mice with an Ag85B-expressing vaccine. Further, the M. tuberculosis L-alanine dehydrogenase (Ald) protein purified from recombinant BCG displayed strong enzymatic activity in recombinant form. This study demonstrated that high levels of native-like recombinant mycobacterial proteins can be produced in mycobacterial hosts, and this may aid the analysis of mycobacterial protein function and the development of new treatments.

  14. Difference in the structures of alanine tri- and tetra-peptides with antiparallel β-sheet assessed by X-ray diffraction, solid-state NMR and chemical shift calculations by GIPAW.

    PubMed

    Asakura, Tetsuo; Yazawa, Koji; Horiguchi, Kumiko; Suzuki, Furitsu; Nishiyama, Yusuke; Nishimura, Katsuyuki; Kaji, Hironori

    2014-01-01

    Alanine oligomers provide a key structure for silk fibers from spider and wild silkworms.We report on structural analysis of L-alanyl-L-alanyl-L-alanyl-L-alanine (Ala)4 with anti-parallel (AP) β-structures using X-ray and solid-state NMR. All of the Ala residues in the (Ala)4 are in equivalent positions, whereas for alanine trimer (Ala)3 there are two alternative locations in a unit cell as reported previously (Fawcett and Camerman, Acta Cryst., 1975, 31, 658-665). (Ala)4 with AP β-structure is more stable than AP-(Ala)3 due to formation of the stronger hydrogen bonds. The intermolecular structure of (Ala)4 is also different from polyalanine fiber structure, indicating that the interchain arrangement of AP β-structure changes with increasing alanine sequencelength. Furthermore the precise (1)H positions, which are usually inaccesible by X-ray diffraction method, are determined by high resolution (1)H solid state NMR combined with the chemical shift calculations by the gauge-including projector augmented wave method.

  15. Liver peroxisomal alanine:glyoxylate aminotransferase and the effects of mutations associated with Primary Hyperoxaluria Type I: An overview.

    PubMed

    Oppici, Elisa; Montioli, Riccardo; Cellini, Barbara

    2015-09-01

    Liver peroxisomal alanine:glyoxylate aminotransferase (AGT) (EC 2.6.1.44) catalyses the conversion of l-alanine and glyoxylate to pyruvate and glycine, a reaction that allows glyoxylate detoxification. Inherited mutations on the AGXT gene encoding AGT lead to Primary Hyperoxaluria Type I (PH1), a rare disorder characterized by the deposition of calcium oxalate crystals primarily in the urinary tract. Here we describe the results obtained on the biochemical features of AGT as well as on the molecular and cellular effects of polymorphic and pathogenic mutations. A complex scenario on the molecular pathogenesis of PH1 emerges in which the co-inheritance of polymorphic changes and the condition of homozygosis or compound heterozygosis are two important factors that determine the enzymatic phenotype of PH1 patients. All the reported data represent relevant steps toward the understanding of genotype/phenotype correlations, the prediction of the response of the patients to the available therapies, and the development of new therapeutic approaches. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cofactor-dependent proteins: evolution, chemical diversity and bio-applications.

  16. Differential laser-induced perturbation Raman spectroscopy: a comparison with Raman spectroscopy for analysis and classification of amino acids and dipeptides.

    PubMed

    Oztekin, Erman K; Smith, Sarah E; Hahn, David W

    2015-04-01

    Differential-laser induced perturbation spectroscopy (DLIPS) is a new spectral analysis technique for classification and identification, with key potential applications for analysis of complex biomolecular systems. DLIPS takes advantage of the complex ultraviolet (UV) laser–material interactions based on difference spectroscopy by coupling low intensity UV laser perturbation with a traditional spectroscopy probe. Here, we quantify the DLIPS performance using a Raman scattering probe in classification of basic constituents of collagenous tissues, namely, the amino acids glycine, L-proline, and L-alanine, and the dipeptides glycine–glycine, glycine–alanine and glycine–proline and compare the performance to a traditional Raman spectroscopy probe via several multivariate analyses. We find that the DLIPS approach yields an ~40% improvement in discrimination among these tissue building blocks. The effects of the 193-nm perturbation laser are further examined by assessing the photodestruction of targeted material molecular bonds. The DLIPS method with a Raman probe holds promise for future tissue diagnosis, either as a stand-alone technique or as part of an orthogonal biosensing scheme.

  17. Searching for the simplest structural units to describe the three-dimensional structure of proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perczel, András; Csizmadia, Imre G.

    Ab initio computations have been carried out during the past several years on diamides of single amino acids (HCO-NHCHR-CONH2 where R=H (glycine), -CH3 (alanine), -CH(CH3)2 (valine) and -CH2OH (serine)) exploring all possible backbone and side chain conformations. Selected conformations were studied in our laboratory on threonine (R=CH(CH3)OH), cystein (R=CH2-SH) and phenyl-alanine (R=CH2-CH5H6) diamides. Tri-, tetra-, penta-, hexa- and hepta-amide systems of poly-L-alanine (H-(CONH-CHCH3-CONH)n-H 2≤n≤6) were also investigated at selected backbone conformations. All these studies confirmed the results of multidimensional conformation analyses: the jth amino acid residue in a polypeptide has a maximum of nine (9) discrete backbone conformations. These structures correspond to nine conformational centres on the 2D-Ramachandran map. On the basis of this rinding, it can be shown that the folded secondary structure of any protein with known internal coordinates, can be described in terms of these nine discrete conformation types.

  18. Biconical tapered optical fiber biosensor for measuring refractive index of a-amino acids in aqueous D-glucose and sucrose solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zibaii, M. I.; Latifi, H.; Karami, M.; Gholami, M.; Hosseini, S. M.; Ghezelayagh, M. H.

    2010-04-01

    A single-mode biconical tapered optical fiber (BTOF) sensor was utilized for sensing the variation of refractive index (RI) with concentration of D-glucose in double distilled deionized water and measuring of RI of amino acids (AAs) in carbohydrate solutions. This method showed a rewarding ability in understanding the basis of biomolecular interactions in biological systems. The BTOF is fabricated by heat pulling method, utilizing a CO2 laser. The detection limit of the BTOF was 50 ppb for the D-glucose concentration ranging from 0 to 80 ppm, and RI detection limit corresponding to these concentrations in the range at 1.3333 to 1.3404 was 5.4×10-6 as a refractometer sensor. The response of the BTOF shows that the different kinds of interactions of various groups of AAs such as L-alanine, L-leucine, and L-cystein with D-glucose, sucrose and water molecules depend on functional groups in AAs such as OH, SH;CH2;NH3+ ,COO-. These results can be interpreted in terms of solute-solute and solute-solvent interactions and structure making/breaking ability of solutes in the given solution.

  19. Metabolic profiling of root exudates from two ecotypes of Sedum alfredii treated with Pb based on GC-MS

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Qing; Wang, Shiyu; Sun, Li-na; Wang, Hui

    2017-01-01

    Phytoremediation is an effective method to remediate Pb-contaminated soils and root exudates play an important role in this process. Based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and metabolomics method, this study focuses on the comparative metabolic profiling analysis of root exudates from the Pb-accumulating and non-accumulating ecotypes of Sedum alfredii treated with 0 and 50 μmol/L Pb. The results obtained show that plant type and Pb stress can significantly change the concentrations and species of root exudates, and fifteen compounds were identified and assumed to be potential biomarkers. Leaching experiments showed that l-alanine, l-proline and oxalic acid have a good effect to activate Pb in soil, glyceric acid and 2-hydroxyacetic acid have a general effect to activate Pb in soil. 4-Methylphenol and 2-methoxyphenol might be able to activate Pb in soil, glycerol and diethyleneglycol might be able to stabilize Pb in soil, but these activation effect and stabilization effect were all not obvious. PMID:28051189

  20. Redox Capacity of an Extracellular Matrix Protein Associated with Adhesion in Mytilus californianus.

    PubMed

    Nicklisch, Sascha C T; Spahn, Jamie E; Zhou, Hongjun; Gruian, Cristina M; Waite, J Herbert

    2016-04-05

    Adhesive mussel foot proteins (Mfps) rely in part on DOPA (3,4-dihydroxyphenyl-l-alanine) side chains to mediate attachment to mineral surfaces underwater. Oxidation of DOPA to Dopaquinone (Q) effectively abolishes the adsorption of Mfps to these surfaces. The thiol-rich mussel foot protein-6 (Mfp-6) rescues adhesion compromised by adventitious DOPA oxidation by reducing Q back to DOPA. The redox chemistry and kinetics of foot-extracted Mfp-6 were investigated by using a nonspecific chromogenic probe to equilibrate with the redox pool. Foot-extracted Mfp-6 has a reducing capacity of ~17 e(-) per protein; half of this comes from the cysteine residues, whereas the other half comes from other constituents, probably a cohort of four or five nonadhesive, redox-active DOPA residues in Mfp-6 with an anodic peak potential ~500 mV lower than that for oxidation of cysteine to cystine. At higher pH, DOPA redox reversibility is lost possibly due to Q scavenging by Cys thiolates. Analysis by one- and two-dimensional proton nuclear magnetic resonance identified a pronounced β-sheet structure with a hydrophobic core in foot-extracted Mfp-6 protein. The structure endows redox-active side chains in Mfp-6, i.e., cysteine and DOPA, with significant reducing power over a broad pH range, and this power is measurably diminished in recombinant Mfp-6.

  1. Membrane topology of aspartate:alanine antiporter AspT from Comamonas testosteroni.

    PubMed

    Fujiki, Takashi; Nanatani, Kei; Nishitani, Kei; Yagi, Kyoko; Ohnishi, Fumito; Yoneyama, Hiroshi; Uchida, Takafumi; Nakajima, Tasuku; Abea, Keietsu

    2007-01-01

    We cloned the aspT gene encoding the L-aspartate:L-alanine antiporter AspTCt in Comamonas testosteroni genomic DNA. Analysis of the nucleotide sequence revealed that C. testosteroni has an asp operon containing aspT upstream of the l-aspartate 4-decarboxylase gene, and that the gene order of the asp operon of C. testosteroni is the inverse of that of Tetragenococcus halophilus. We used proteoliposomes to confirm the transport processes of AspTCt. To elucidate the two-dimensional structure of AspTCt, we analysed its membrane topology by means of alkaline phosphatase (PhoA) and beta-lactamase (BlaM) fusion methods. The fusion analyses revealed that AspTCt has seven transmembrane segments (TMs), a large cytoplasmic loop containing approximately 200 amino acid residues between TM4 and TM5, a cytoplasmic N-terminus, and a periplasmic C-terminus. These results suggest that the orientation of the N-terminus of AspTCt differs from that of tetragenococcal AspT, even though these two AspT orthologues catalyse the same transport reactions.

  2. Gyrodactylus salmonis infection impairs the olfactory system of rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Lari, E; Pyle, G G

    2017-01-20

    Monogenean worms are ectoparasites that are known to be infectious to a wide variety of fish. Few species of monogenean parasites have been reported in the olfactory chamber of fish in current peer-reviewed literature. However, the impacts of these parasites on the olfactory system are not well understood. In this study, the effects of Gyrodactylus salmonis on the olfactory system structure and performance were investigated in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). The olfactory performance of the infected fish was examined using an electro-olfactography (EOG) technique, while the ultrastructure of the olfactory rosette was studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and light microscopy (LM). The infected rainbow trout displayed reduced responses to two standard olfactory cues (L-alanine and TCA). The SEM micrographs revealed that many regions of the olfactory epithelium in the infected fish were heavily pitted and the LM examination of the olfactory epithelium showed local proliferation of mucous cells in the sensory regions as compared to the control group. The results of this study demonstrated that G. salmonis causes physical damage to the olfactory system of fish that lead to olfactory impairment.

  3. Mammalian selenocysteine lyase is involved in selenoprotein biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Kurokawa, Suguru; Takehashi, Masanori; Tanaka, Hiromitsu; Mihara, Hisaaki; Kurihara, Tatsuo; Tanaka, Seigo; Hill, Kristina; Burk, Raymond; Esaki, Nobuyoshi

    2011-01-01

    Selenocysteine lyase (SCL) catalyzes the decomposition of L-selenocysteine to yield L-alanine and selenium by acting exclusively on l-selenocysteine. The X-ray structural analysis of rat SCL has demonstrated how SCL discriminates L-selenocysteine from L-cysteine on the molecular basis. SCL has been proposed to function in the recycling of the micronutrient selenium from degraded selenoproteins containing selenocysteine residues, but the role of SCL in selenium metabolism in vivo remains unclear. We here demonstrate that the (75)Se-labeling efficiency of selenoproteins with (75)Se-labeled selenoprotein P (Sepp1) as a selenium source was decreased in HeLa cells transfected with SCL siRNA as compared to the cells transfected with control siRNA. Immunocytochemical analyses showed high SCL expression in kidney and liver cells, where selenocysteine is recovered from selenoproteins. Mature testes of mice exhibited a specific staining pattern of SCL in spermatids that actively produce selenoproteins. However, SCL was weakly expressed in Sertoli cells, which receive Sepp1 and supply selenium to germ cells. These demonstrate that SCL occurs in the cells requiring selenoproteins, probably to recycle selenium derived from selenoproteins such as Sepp1.

  4. The autolytic activity of the recombinant amidase of Staphylococcus saprophyticus is inhibited by its own recombinant GW repeats.

    PubMed

    Hell, Wolfgang; Reichl, Sylvia; Anders, Agnes; Gatermann, Sören

    2003-10-10

    The Aas (autolysin/adhesin of Staphylococcus saprophyticus) is a multifunctional surface protein containing two enzymatic domains an N-acetyl-muramyl-L-alanine amidase, an endo-beta-N-acetyl-D-glucosaminidase, and two different regions of repetitive sequences, an N-terminal and a C-terminal repetitive domain. The C-terminal repetitive domain is built up by the repeats R1, R2 and R3, which interconnect the putative active centers of the amidase and glucosaminidase. To investigate the influence of the C-terminal repeats and the N-terminal repeats on the amidase activity, the repetitive domains and fragments of them were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The influence of the different fragments on the activity of the recombinant amidase of the Aas, consisting of the active center of the enzyme and repeat R1, was investigated in a turbidimetric microassay. The different fragments derived from the C-terminal repeats inhibited the amidase activity, while the N-terminal repeats did not influence the activity of the enzyme. The inhibiting activity increased with the number of GW repeats the recombinant fragment contained. Thus we conclude, that the C-terminal GW repeats and not the N-terminal repeats are necessary for the cell wall targeting and the autolytic function of the amidase.

  5. Enantiomeric pair of copper(II) polypyridyl-alanine complexes: Effect of chirality on their interaction with biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Ng, Chew Hee; Chan, Cheang Wei; Lai, Jing Wei; Ooi, Ing Hong; Chong, Kok Vei; Maah, Mohd Jamil; Seng, Hoi Ling

    2016-07-01

    Like chiral organic drugs, the chemical and biological properties of metal complexes can be dependent on chirality. Two pairs of [Cu(phen)(ala)(H2O)]X·xH2O (phen=1.10-phenanthroline: X=NO3(-); ala: l-alanine (l-ala), 1 and d-alanine (d-ala) 2; and (X=Cl(-); ala: l-ala, 3 and d-ala, 4) complex salts (x=number of lattice water molecules) have been synthesized and characterized. The crystal structure of 3 has been determined. The same pair of enantiomeric species, viz. [Cu(phen)(l-ala)(H2O)](+) and [Cu(phen)(d-ala)(H2O)](+), have been identified to be present in the aqueous solutions of both 1 and 3, and in those of both 2 and 4 respectively. Both 3 and 4 bind more strongly to ds(AT)6 than ds(CG)6. There is no or insignificant effect of the chirality of 3 and 4 on the production of hydroxyl radicals, binding to deoxyribonucleic acid from calf thymus (CT-DNA), ds(CG)6, G-quadruplex and 17-base pair duplex, and inhibition of both topoisomerase I and proteasome. Among the three proteasome proteolytic sites, the trypsin-like site is inhibited most strongly by these complexes. However, the chirality of 3 and 4 does affect the number of restriction enzymes inhibited, and their binding constants towards ds(AT)6 and serum albumin.

  6. How significant to plant N nutrition is the direct consumption of soil microbes by roots?

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Paul W; Marsden, Karina A; Jones, Davey L

    2013-01-01

    Summary –The high degree to which plant roots compete with soil microbes for organic forms of nitrogen (N) is becoming increasingly apparent. This has culminated in the finding that plants may consume soil microbes as a source of N, but the functional significance of this process remains unknown. –We used 15N- and 14C-labelled cultures of soil bacteria to measure rates of acquisition of microbes by sterile wheat roots and plants growing in soil. We compared these rates with acquisition of 15N delivered as nitrate, amino acid monomer (l-alanine) and short peptide (l-tetraalanine), and the rate of decomposition of [14C] microbes by indigenous soil microbiota. –Acquisition of microbe 15N by both sterile roots and roots growing in soil was one to two orders of magnitude slower than acquisition of all other forms of 15N. Decomposition of microbes was fast enough to account for all 15N recovered, but approximately equal recovery of microbe 14C suggests that microbes entered roots intact. –Uptake of soil microbes by wheat (Triticum aestivum) roots appears to take place in soil. If wheat is typical, the importance of this process to terrestrial N cycling is probably minor in comparison with fluxes of other forms of soil inorganic and organic N. PMID:23718181

  7. Consumption of fa cai Nostoc soup: a potential for BMAA exposure from Nostoc cyanobacteria in China?

    PubMed

    Roney, Britton R; Renhui, Li; Banack, Sandra Anne; Murch, Susan; Honegger, Rosmarie; Cox, Paul Alan

    2009-01-01

    Grown in arid regions of western China the cyanobacterium Nostoc flagelliforme--called fa cai in Mandarin and fat choy in Cantonese--is wild-harvested and used to make soup consumed during New Year's celebrations. High prices, up to $125 USD/kg, led to overharvesting in Inner Mongolia, Ningxia, Gansu, Qinghai, and Xinjiang. Degradation of arid ecosystems, desertification, and conflicts between Nostoc harvesters and Mongol herdsmen concerned the Chinese environmental authorities, leading to a government ban of Nostoc commerce. This ban stimulated increased marketing of a substitute made from starch. We analysed samples purchased throughout China as well as in Chinese markets in the United States and the United Kingdom. Some were counterfeits consisting of dyed starch noodles. A few samples from California contained Nostoc flagelliforme but were adulterated with starch noodles. Other samples, including those from the United Kingdom, consisted of pure Nostoc flagelliforme. A recent survey of markets in Cheng Du showed no real Nostoc flagelliforme to be marketed. Real and artificial fa cai differ in the presence of beta-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA). Given its status as a high-priced luxury food, the government ban on collection and marketing, and the replacement of real fa cai with starch substitutes consumed only on special occasions, it is anticipated that dietary exposure to BMAA from fa cai will be reduced in the future in China.

  8. Enantiomeric NMR signal separation behavior and mechanism of samarium(III) and neodymium(III) complexes with (S,S)-ethylenediamine-N,N'-disuccinate.

    PubMed

    Aizawa, Sen-Ichi; Okano, Masaru; Kidani, Takahiro

    2017-04-12

    Enantiomeric (1) H and (13) C NMR signal separation behaviors of various α-amino acids and DL-tartarate were investigated by using the samarium(III) and neodymium(III) complexes with (S,S)-ethylenediamine-N,N'-disuccinate as chiral shift reagents. A relatively smaller concentration ratio of the lanthanide(III) complex to substrates was suitable for the neodymium(III) complex compared with the samarium(III) one, striking a balance between relatively greater signal separation and broadening. To clarify the difference in the signal separation behavior, the chemical shifts of β-protons for fully bound D- and L-alanine (δb (D) and δb (L)) and their adduct formation constants (Ks) were obtained for both metal complexes. Preference for D-alanine was similarly observed for both complexes, while it was revealed that the difference between the δb (D) and δb (L) values is the significant factor to determine the enantiomeric signal separation. The neodymium(III) and samarium(III) complexes can be used complementarily for higher and smaller concentration ranges of substrates, respectively, because the neodymium(III) complex gives the larger difference between the δb (D) and δb (L) values with greater signal broadening compared to the samarium(III) complex.

  9. Hydrocarbon-stapled lipopeptides exhibit selective antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Jenner, Zachary B; Crittenden, Christopher M; Gonzalez, Martín; Brodbelt, Jennifer S; Bruns, Kerry A

    2017-01-10

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) occur widely in nature and have been studied for their therapeutic potential. AMPs are of interest due to the large number of possible chemical structural combinations using natural and unnatural amino acids, with varying effects on their biological activities. Using physicochemical properties from known naturally occurring amphipathic cationic AMPs, several hydrocarbon-stapled lipopeptides (HSLPs) were designed, synthesized, and tested for antimicrobial properties. Peptides were chemically modified by N-terminal acylation, C-terminal amidation, and some were hydrocarbon stapled by intramolecular olefin metathesis. The effects of peptide length, amphipathic character, and stapling on antimicrobial activity were tested against Escherichia coli, three species of Gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus megaterium, and Enterococcus faecalis), and two strains of Candida albicans. Peptides were shown to disrupt liposomes of different phospholipid composition, as measured by leakage of a fluorescent compound from vesicles. Peptides with (S)-2-(4'-pentenyl)-alanine substituted for L-alanine in a reference peptide showed a marked increase in antimicrobial activity, hemolysis, and membrane disruption. Stapled peptides exhibited slightly higher antimicrobial potency; those with greatest hydrophobic character showed the greatest hemolysis and liposome leakage, but lower antimicrobial activity. The results support a model of HSLPs as membrane-disruptive AMPs with potent antimicrobial activity and relatively low hemolytic potential at biologically active peptide concentrations. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  10. Metal Dyshomeostasis and Inflammation in Alzheimer's and Parkinson's Diseases: Possible Impact of Environmental Exposures

    PubMed Central

    Myhre, Oddvar; Utkilen, Hans; Duale, Nur; Brunborg, Gunnar; Hofer, Tim

    2013-01-01

    A dysregulated metal homeostasis is associated with both Alzheimer's (AD) and Parkinson's (PD) diseases; AD patients have decreased cortex and elevated serum copper levels along with extracellular amyloid-beta plaques containing copper, iron, and zinc. For AD, a putative hepcidin-mediated lowering of cortex copper mechanism is suggested. An age-related mild chronic inflammation and/or elevated intracellular iron can trigger hepcidin production followed by its binding to ferroportin which is the only neuronal iron exporter, thereby subjecting it to lysosomal degradation. Subsequently raised neuronal iron levels can induce translation of the ferroportin assisting and copper binding amyloid precursor protein (APP); constitutive APP transmembrane passage lowers the copper pool which is important for many enzymes. Using in silico gene expression analyses, we here show significantly decreased expression of copper-dependent enzymes in AD brain and metallothioneins were upregulated in both diseases. Although few AD exposure risk factors are known, AD-related tauopathies can result from cyanobacterial microcystin and β-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) intake. Several environmental exposures may represent risk factors for PD; for this disease neurodegeneration is likely to involve mitochondrial dysfunction, microglial activation, and neuroinflammation. Administration of metal chelators and anti-inflammatory agents could affect disease outcomes. PMID:23710288

  11. Pyrylium Salts as Reactive Matrices for MALDI-MS Imaging of Biologically Active Primary Amines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shariatgorji, Mohammadreza; Nilsson, Anna; Källback, Patrik; Karlsson, Oskar; Zhang, Xiaoqun; Svenningsson, Per; Andren, Per E.

    2015-06-01

    Many neuroactive substances, including endogenous biomolecules, environmental compounds, and pharmaceuticals possess primary amine functional groups. Among these are catecholamine neurotransmitters (e.g., dopamine), many substituted phenethylamines (e.g., amphetamine), as well as amino acids and neuropeptides. In most cases, mass spectrometric (ESI and MALDI) analyses of trace amounts of such compounds are challenging because of their poor ionization properties. We present a method for chemical derivatization of primary amines by reaction with pyrylium salts that facilitates their detection by MALDI-MS and enables the imaging of primary amines in brain tissue sections. A screen of pyrylium salts revealed that the 2,4-diphenyl-pyranylium ion efficiently derivatizes primary amines and can be used as a reactive MALDI-MS matrix that induces both derivatization and desorption. MALDI-MS imaging with such matrix was used to map the localization of dopamine and amphetamine in brain tissue sections and to quantitatively map the distribution of the neurotoxin β- N-methylamino-L-alanine.

  12. Detection of BMAA in the human central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Berntzon, L; Ronnevi, L O; Bergman, B; Eriksson, J

    2015-04-30

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is an extremely devastating neurodegenerative disease with an obscure etiology. The amino acid β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA) produced by globally widespread phytoplankton has been implicated in the etiology of human motor neuron diseases [corrected]. BMAA was recently proven to be present in Baltic Sea food webs, ranging from plankton to larger Baltic Sea organisms, some serving as important food items (fish) for humans. To test whether exposure to BMAA in a Baltic Sea setting is reflected in humans, blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from individuals suffering from ALS were analyzed, together with sex- and age-matched individuals not inflicted with ALS. Ultra high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) and multiple reaction monitoring (MRM), in conjunction with diagnostic transitions revealed BMAA in three (12%) of the totally 25 Swedish individuals tested, with no preference for those suffering from ALS. The three BMAA-positive samples were all retrieved from the CSF, while BMAA was not detected in the blood. The data show that BMAA, potentially originating from Baltic Sea phytoplankton, may reach the human central nervous system, but does not lend support to the notion that BMAA is resident specifically in ALS-patients. However, while dietary exposure to BMAA may be intermittent and, if so, difficult to detect, our data provide the first demonstration of BMAA in the central nervous system of human individuals ante mortem quantified with UHPLC-MS/MS, and therefore calls for extended research efforts.

  13. BMAA selectively injures motor neurons via AMPA/kainate receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Rao, Shyam D; Banack, Sandra Anne; Cox, Paul Alan; Weiss, John H

    2006-09-01

    The toxin beta-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA) has been proposed to contribute to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-Parkinsonism Dementia Complex of Guam (ALS/PDC) based on its ability to induce a similar disease phenotype in primates and its presence in cycad seeds, which constituted a dietary item in afflicted populations. Concerns about the apparent low potency of this toxin in relation to estimated levels of human ingestion led to a slowing of BMAA research. However, recent reports identifying potential new routes of exposure compel a re-examination of the BMAA/cycad hypothesis. BMAA was found to induce selective motor neuron (MN) loss in dissociated mixed spinal cord cultures at concentrations ( approximately 30 muM) significantly lower than those previously found to induce widespread neuronal degeneration. The glutamate receptor antagonist NBQX prevented BMAA-induced death, implicating excitotoxic activation of AMPA/kainate receptors. Using microfluorimetric techniques, we further found that BMAA induced preferential [Ca(2+)](i) rises and selective reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in MNs with minimal effect on other spinal neurons. Cycad seed extracts also triggered preferential AMPA/kainate-receptor-dependent MN injury, consistent with the idea that BMAA is a crucial toxic component in this plant. Present findings support the hypothesis that BMAA may contribute to the selective MN loss in ALS/PDC.

  14. Production of BMAA and DAB by diatoms (Phaeodactylum tricornutum, Chaetoceros sp., Chaetoceros calcitrans and, Thalassiosira pseudonana) and bacteria isolated from a diatom culture.

    PubMed

    Réveillon, Damien; Séchet, Véronique; Hess, Philipp; Amzil, Zouher

    2016-09-01

    Microalgae have previously been reported to contain β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA), and the global presence of these primary producers has been associated with the widespread occurrence of BMAA in marine organisms. It has been repeatedly shown that filter-feeding bivalves accumulate phytoplankton species and their toxins. In this study, the concentrations of total soluble BMAA and DAB as a function of growth phase were observed for four non-axenic diatom species (i.e. Phaeodactylum tricornutum, Chaetoceros sp., Chaetoceros calcitrans and Thalassiosira pseudonana). These strains had previously been shown to contain BMAA using a highly selective HILIC-MS/MS method. BMAA cell quota appeared to be species-specific, however, highest BMAA concentrations were always obtained during the stationary growth phase, for all four species, suggesting that BMAA is a secondary metabolite. While DAB was detected in a bacterial culture isolated from a culture of P. tricornutum, the presence or absence of a bacterial population did not influence production of BMAA and DAB by P. tricornutum, i.e. no significant difference was noted for BMAA and DAB production between axenic and non-axenic cultures. The presence of DAB in bacteria had previously been shown, and raised the question as to whether DAB observed in many species of microalgae may arise from the non-axenic culture conditions or from the microalgae themselves.

  15. Methods for simultaneous detection of the cyanotoxins BMAA, DABA, and anatoxin-a in environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Al-Sammak, Maitham Ahmed; Hoagland, Kyle D; Snow, Daniel D; Cassada, David

    2013-12-15

    Blue-green algae, also known as cyanobacteria, can produce several different groups of toxins in the environment including hepatotoxins (microcystins), neurotoxic non-protein amino acids β-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA), and 2,4-diaminobutyric (DABA), as well as the bicyclic amine alkaloid anatoxin-a. Few studies have addressed the methods necessary for an accurate determination of cyanotoxins in environmental samples, and none have been published that can detect these cyanotoxins together in a single sample. Cyanotoxins occur in a wide range of environmental samples including water, fish, and aquatic plant samples. Using polymeric cation exchange solid phase extraction (SPE) coupled with liquid chromatography and fluorescence detection (HPLC/FD), and liquid chromatography ion trap tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS), these compounds can for the first time be simultaneously quantified in a variety of environmental sample types. The extraction method for biological samples can distinguish bound and free cyanotoxins. Detection limits for water ranged from 5 to 7 μg/L using HPLC/FD, while detection limits for and LC/MS were in the range of 0.8-3.2 μg/L.

  16. A Collaborative Evaluation of LC-MS/MS Based Methods for BMAA Analysis: Soluble Bound BMAA Found to Be an Important Fraction.

    PubMed

    Faassen, Elisabeth J; Antoniou, Maria G; Beekman-Lukassen, Wendy; Blahova, Lucie; Chernova, Ekaterina; Christophoridis, Christophoros; Combes, Audrey; Edwards, Christine; Fastner, Jutta; Harmsen, Joop; Hiskia, Anastasia; Ilag, Leopold L; Kaloudis, Triantafyllos; Lopicic, Srdjan; Lürling, Miquel; Mazur-Marzec, Hanna; Meriluoto, Jussi; Porojan, Cristina; Viner-Mozzini, Yehudit; Zguna, Nadezda

    2016-02-29

    Exposure to β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA) might be linked to the incidence of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. Analytical chemistry plays a crucial role in determining human BMAA exposure and the associated health risk, but the performance of various analytical methods currently employed is rarely compared. A CYANOCOST initiated workshop was organized aimed at training scientists in BMAA analysis, creating mutual understanding and paving the way towards interlaboratory comparison exercises. During this workshop, we tested different methods (extraction followed by derivatization and liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis, or directly followed by LC-MS/MS analysis) for trueness and intermediate precision. We adapted three workup methods for the underivatized analysis of animal, brain and cyanobacterial samples. Based on recovery of the internal standard D₃BMAA, the underivatized methods were accurate (mean recovery 80%) and precise (mean relative standard deviation 10%), except for the cyanobacterium Leptolyngbya. However, total BMAA concentrations in the positive controls (cycad seeds) showed higher variation (relative standard deviation 21%-32%), implying that D₃BMAA was not a good indicator for the release of BMAA from bound forms. Significant losses occurred during workup for the derivatized method, resulting in low recovery (<10%). Most BMAA was found in a trichloroacetic acid soluble, bound form and we recommend including this fraction during analysis.

  17. BMAA--an unusual cyanobacterial neurotoxin.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Kaivalya J; Weiss, John H

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The toxin ss-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) was proposed to contribute to the ALS/Parkinsonism-dementia complex of Guam (ALS/PDC) based on its presence in cycad seeds, which constituted a dietary item in afflicted populations, and its ability to induce a similar disease phenotype in primates. Although the role of BMAA in human neurodegenerative disease is still highly debated, it appears to injure cultured neurons via mechanisms involving overactivation of neuroexcitatory glutamate receptors. However, BMAA lacks the side-chain acidic group of glutamate and other excitatory amino acids, and in its place has an amino group. In past studies we found that toxic and excitatory effects of BMAA on cultured neurons were dependent upon the presence of bicarbonate in the medium, and suggested that formation of a carbamate adduct of the side-chain amino group might produce structures capable of activating glutamate receptors. Also, while BMAA is a weal agonist at NMDA-type glutamate receptors, we found low levels of BMAA to selectively damage vulnerable sub-populations of neurons, including motor neurons, via activation of AMPA/kainate receptors. Recent reports that BMAA is produced by cyanobacteria in diverse ecosystems and is present in brain and spinal cord tissues from sporadic ALS and Alzheimer's patients as well as brains of ALS/PDC patients provide strong motivation for further investigations of its toxic mechanisms and contributions to human disease.

  18. Cyanobacterial Neurotoxin BMAA and Mercury in Sharks.

    PubMed

    Hammerschlag, Neil; Davis, David A; Mondo, Kiyo; Seely, Matthew S; Murch, Susan J; Glover, William Broc; Divoll, Timothy; Evers, David C; Mash, Deborah C

    2016-08-16

    Sharks have greater risk for bioaccumulation of marine toxins and mercury (Hg), because they are long-lived predators. Shark fins and cartilage also contain β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA), a ubiquitous cyanobacterial toxin linked to neurodegenerative diseases. Today, a significant number of shark species have found their way onto the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List of Threatened Species. Many species of large sharks are threatened with extinction due in part to the growing high demand for shark fin soup and, to a lesser extent, for shark meat and cartilage products. Recent studies suggest that the consumption of shark parts may be a route to human exposure of marine toxins. Here, we investigated BMAA and Hg concentrations in fins and muscles sampled in ten species of sharks from the South Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. BMAA was detected in all shark species with only seven of the 55 samples analyzed testing below the limit of detection of the assay. Hg concentrations measured in fins and muscle samples from the 10 species ranged from 0.05 to 13.23 ng/mg. These analytical test results suggest restricting human consumption of shark meat and fins due to the high frequency and co-occurrence of two synergistic environmental neurotoxic compounds.

  19. Presence of the neurotoxin BMAA in aquatic ecosystems: what do we really know?

    PubMed

    Faassen, Elisabeth J

    2014-03-21

    The neurotoxin β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is suspected to play a role in the neurological diseases amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, and Parkinson's disease. BMAA production by cyanobacteria has been reported and contact with cyanobacteria infested waters or consumption of aquatic organisms are possible pathways to human exposure. However, there is little consensus regarding whether BMAA is present in cyanobacteria or not, and if so, at what concentrations. The aim of this review is to indicate the current state of knowledge on the presence of BMAA in aquatic ecosystems. Some studies have convincingly shown that BMAA can be present in aquatic samples at the µg/g dry weight level, which is around the detection limit of some equally credible studies in which no BMAA was detected. However, for the majority of the reviewed articles, it was unclear whether BMAA was correctly identified, either because inadequate analytical methods were used, or because poor reporting of analyses made it impossible to verify the results. Poor analysis, reporting and prolific errors have shaken the foundations of BMAA research. First steps towards estimation of human BMAA exposure are to develop and use selective, inter-laboratory validated methods and to correctly report the analytical work.

  20. Evaluation of a commercial enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the determination of the neurotoxin BMAA in surface waters.

    PubMed

    Faassen, Elisabeth J; Beekman, Wendy; Lürling, Miquel

    2013-01-01

    The neurotoxin β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is suspected to play a role in Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Because BMAA seems to be produced by cyanobacteria, surface waters are screened for BMAA. However, reliable analysis of BMAA requires specialized and expensive equipment. In 2012, a commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for determination of BMAA in surface waters was released. This kit could enable fast and relatively cheap screening of surface waters for BMAA. The objective of this study was to determine whether the BMAA ELISA kit was suitable for the determination of BMAA concentrations in surface waters. We hypothesised that the recovery of spiked samples was close to 100% and that the results of unspiked sample analysis were comparable between ELISA and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis. However, we found that recovery was higher than 100% in most spiked samples, highest determined recovery was over 400%. Furthermore, the ELISA gave a positive signal for nearly each tested sample while no BMAA could be detected by LC-MS/MS. We therefore conclude that in its current state, the kit is not suitable for screening surface waters for BMAA.