Science.gov

Sample records for l-carnitine ame

  1. l-Carnitine and heart disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhong-Yu; Liu, Ying-Yi; Liu, Guo-Hui; Lu, Hai-Bin; Mao, Cui-Ying

    2018-02-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a key cause of deaths worldwide, comprising 15-17% of healthcare expenditure in developed countries. Current records estimate an annual global average of 30 million cardiac dysfunction cases, with a predicted escalation by two-three folds for the next 20-30years. Although β-blockers and angiotensin-converting-enzymes are commonly prescribed to control CVD risk, hepatotoxicity and hematological changes are frequent adverse events associated with these drugs. Search for alternatives identified endogenous cofactor l-carnitine, which is capable of promoting mitochondrial β-oxidation towards a balanced cardiac energy metabolism. l-Carnitine facilitates transport of long-chain fatty acids into the mitochondrial matrix, triggering cardioprotective effects through reduced oxidative stress, inflammation and necrosis of cardiac myocytes. Additionally, l-carnitine regulates calcium influx, endothelial integrity, intracellular enzyme release and membrane phospholipid content for sustained cellular homeostasis. Carnitine depletion, characterized by reduced expression of "organic cation transporter-2" gene, is a metabolic and autosomal recessive disorder that also frequently associates with CVD. Hence, exogenous carnitine administration through dietary and intravenous routes serves as a suitable protective strategy against ventricular dysfunction, ischemia-reperfusion injury, cardiac arrhythmia and toxic myocardial injury that prominently mark CVD. Additionally, carnitine reduces hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetic ketoacidosis, hyperglycemia, insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, insulin resistance, obesity, etc. that enhance cardiovascular pathology. These favorable effects of l-carnitine have been evident in infants, juvenile, young, adult and aged patients of sudden and chronic heart failure as well. This review describes the mechanism of action, metabolism and pharmacokinetics of l-carnitine. It specifically emphasizes upon the beneficial

  2. L-carnitine--metabolic functions and meaning in humans life.

    PubMed

    Pekala, Jolanta; Patkowska-Sokoła, Bozena; Bodkowski, Robert; Jamroz, Dorota; Nowakowski, Piotr; Lochyński, Stanisław; Librowski, Tadeusz

    2011-09-01

    L-Carnitine is an endogenous molecule involved in fatty acid metabolism, biosynthesized within the human body using amino acids: L-lysine and L-methionine, as substrates. L-Carnitine can also be found in many foods, but red meats, such as beef and lamb, are the best choices for adding carnitine into the diet. Good carnitine sources also include fish, poultry and milk. Essentially, L-carnitine transports the chains of fatty acids into the mitochondrial matrix, thus allowing the cells to break down fat and get energy from the stored fat reserves. Recent studies have started to shed light on the beneficial effects of L-carnitine when used in various clinical therapies. Because L-carnitine and its esters help reduce oxidative stress, they have been proposed as a treatment for many conditions, i.e. heart failure, angina and weight loss. For other conditions, such as fatigue or improving exercise performance, L-carnitine appears safe but does not seem to have a significant effect. The presented review of the literature suggests that continued studies are required before L-carnitine administration could be recommended as a routine procedure in the noted disorders. Further research is warranted in order to evaluate the biochemical, pharmacological, and physiological determinants of the response to carnitine supplementation, as well as to determine the potential benefits of carnitine supplements in selected categories of individuals who do not have fatty acid oxidation defects.

  3. l-Carnitine Supplementation in Recovery after Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Fielding, Roger; Riede, Linda; Lugo, James P.; Bellamine, Aouatef

    2018-01-01

    Given its pivotal role in fatty acid oxidation and energy metabolism, l-carnitine has been investigated as ergogenic aid for enhancing exercise capacity in the healthy athletic population. Early research indicates its beneficial effects on acute physical performance, such as increased maximum oxygen consumption and higher power output. Later studies point to the positive impact of dietary supplementation with l-carnitine on the recovery process after exercise. It is demonstrated that l-carnitine alleviates muscle injury and reduces markers of cellular damage and free radical formation accompanied by attenuation of muscle soreness. The supplementation-based increase in serum and muscle l-carnitine contents is suggested to enhance blood flow and oxygen supply to the muscle tissue via improved endothelial function thereby reducing hypoxia-induced cellular and biochemical disruptions. Studies in older adults further showed that l-carnitine intake can lead to increased muscle mass accompanied by a decrease in body weight and reduced physical and mental fatigue. Based on current animal studies, a role of l-carnitine in the prevention of age-associated muscle protein degradation and regulation of mitochondrial homeostasis is suggested. PMID:29534031

  4. l-Carnitine Supplementation in Recovery after Exercise.

    PubMed

    Fielding, Roger; Riede, Linda; Lugo, James P; Bellamine, Aouatef

    2018-03-13

    Given its pivotal role in fatty acid oxidation and energy metabolism, l-carnitine has been investigated as ergogenic aid for enhancing exercise capacity in the healthy athletic population. Early research indicates its beneficial effects on acute physical performance, such as increased maximum oxygen consumption and higher power output. Later studies point to the positive impact of dietary supplementation with l-carnitine on the recovery process after exercise. It is demonstrated that l-carnitine alleviates muscle injury and reduces markers of cellular damage and free radical formation accompanied by attenuation of muscle soreness. The supplementation-based increase in serum and muscle l-carnitine contents is suggested to enhance blood flow and oxygen supply to the muscle tissue via improved endothelial function thereby reducing hypoxia-induced cellular and biochemical disruptions. Studies in older adults further showed that l-carnitine intake can lead to increased muscle mass accompanied by a decrease in body weight and reduced physical and mental fatigue. Based on current animal studies, a role of l-carnitine in the prevention of age-associated muscle protein degradation and regulation of mitochondrial homeostasis is suggested.

  5. Production of L-carnitine by secondary metabolism of bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Bernal, Vicente; Sevilla, Ángel; Cánovas, Manuel; Iborra, José L

    2007-01-01

    The increasing commercial demand for L-carnitine has led to a multiplication of efforts to improve its production with bacteria. The use of different cell environments, such as growing, resting, permeabilized, dried, osmotically stressed, freely suspended and immobilized cells, to maintain enzymes sufficiently active for L-carnitine production is discussed in the text. The different cell states of enterobacteria, such as Escherichia coli and Proteus sp., which can be used to produce L-carnitine from crotonobetaine or D-carnitine as substrate, are analyzed. Moreover, the combined application of both bioprocess and metabolic engineering has allowed a deeper understanding of the main factors controlling the production process, such as energy depletion and the alteration of the acetyl-CoA/CoA ratio which are coupled to the end of the biotransformation. Furthermore, the profiles of key central metabolic activities such as the TCA cycle, the glyoxylate shunt and the acetate metabolism are seen to be closely interrelated and affect the biotransformation efficiency. Although genetically modified strains have been obtained, new strain improvement strategies are still needed, especially in Escherichia coli as a model organism for molecular biology studies. This review aims to summarize and update the state of the art in L-carnitine production using E. coli and Proteus sp, emphasizing the importance of proper reactor design and operation strategies, together with metabolic engineering aspects and the need for feed-back between wet and in silico work to optimize this biotransformation. PMID:17910757

  6. Acetyl-L-carnitine improves aged brain function.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Satoru; Iwamoto, Machiko; Kon, Kazuo; Waki, Hatsue; Ando, Susumu; Tanaka, Yasukazu

    2010-07-01

    The effects of acetyl-L-carnitine (ALCAR), an acetyl derivative of L-carnitine, on memory and learning capacity and on brain synaptic functions of aged rats were examined. Male Fischer 344 rats were given ALCAR (100 mg/kg bodyweight) per os for 3 months and were subjected to the Hebb-Williams tasks and AKON-1 task to assess their learning capacity. Cholinergic activities were determined with synaptosomes isolated from brain cortices of the rats. Choline parameters, the high-affinity choline uptake, acetylcholine (ACh) synthesis and depolarization-evoked ACh release were all enhanced in the ALCAR group. An increment of depolarization-induced calcium ion influx into synaptosomes was also evident in rats given ALCAR. Electrophysiological studies using hippocampus slices indicated that the excitatory postsynaptic potential slope and population spike size were both increased in ALCAR-treated rats. These results indicate that ALCAR increases synaptic neurotransmission in the brain and consequently improves learning capacity in aging rats.

  7. L-carnitine protects against testicular dysfunction caused by gamma irradiation in mice.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Mohamed Mohamed; Ibrahim, Zein Shaban; Alkafafy, Mohamed; El-Shazly, Samir Ahmed

    2014-07-01

    This study was conducted on mice to evaluate the radioprotective role of L-carnitine against γ-ray irradiation-induced testicular damage. Adult male mice were exposed to whole body irradiation at a total dose of 1 Gy. Radiation exposure was continued 24 h a day (0.1 Gy/day) throughout the 10 days exposure period either in the absence and/or presence of L-carnitine at an i.p. dose of 10 mg/kg body weight/day. Results revealed that γ-rays irradiation suppressed the expression of ABP and CYP450SCC mRNA, whereas treatment with L-carnitine prior and throughout γ-rays irradiation exposure inhibited this suppression. Treatment with γ-ray irradiation or L-carnitine down-regulated expression of aromatase mRNA. With combined treatment, L-carnitine significantly normalized aromatase expression. γ-Ray irradiation up-regulated expression of FasL and Cyclin D2 mRNA, while L-carnitine inhibited these up-regulations. Results also showed that γ-ray-irradiation up-regulated TNF-α, IL1-β and IFN-γ mRNA expressions compared to either controls or the L-carnitine treated group. Moreover, γ-irradiation greatly reduced serum testosterone levels, while L-carnitine, either alone or in combination with irradiation, significantly increased serum testosterone levels compared to controls. In addition, γ-irradiation induced high levels of sperm abnormalities (43%) which were decreased to 12% in the presence of L-carnitine. In parallel with these findings, histological examination showed that γ-irradiation induced severe tubular degenerative changes, which were reduced by L-carnitine pre-treatment. These results clarified the immunostimulatory effects of L-carnitine and its radioprotective role against testicular injury. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  8. The Effect of Acetyl-L-Carnitine Administration on Persons with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pueschel, Siegfried M.

    2006-01-01

    Since previous investigations reported improvements in cognition of patients with dementia after acetyl-L-carnitine therapy and since there is an increased risk for persons with Down syndrome to develop Alzheimer disease, this study was designed to investigate the effect of acetyl-L-carnitine administration on neurological, intellectual, and…

  9. CaiT of Escherichia coli, a new transporter catalyzing L-carnitine/gamma -butyrobetaine exchange.

    PubMed

    Jung, Heinrich; Buchholz, Marion; Clausen, Jurgen; Nietschke, Monika; Revermann, Anne; Schmid, Roland; Jung, Kirsten

    2002-10-18

    l-Carnitine is essential for beta-oxidation of fatty acids in mitochondria. Bacterial metabolic pathways are used for the production of this medically important compound. Here, we report the first detailed functional characterization of the caiT gene product, a putative transport protein whose function is required for l-carnitine conversion in Escherichia coli. The caiT gene was overexpressed in E. coli, and the gene product was purified by affinity chromatography and reconstituted into proteoliposomes. Functional analyses with intact cells and proteoliposomes demonstrated that CaiT is able to catalyze the exchange of l-carnitine for gamma-butyrobetaine, the excreted end product of l-carnitine conversion in E. coli, and related betaines. Electrochemical ion gradients did not significantly stimulate l-carnitine uptake. Analysis of l-carnitine counterflow yielded an apparent external K(m) of 105 microm and a turnover number of 5.5 s(-1). Contrary to related proteins, CaiT activity was not modulated by osmotic stress. l-Carnitine binding to CaiT increased the protein fluorescence and caused a red shift in the emission maximum, an observation explained by ligand-induced conformational alterations. The fluorescence effect was specific for betaine structures, for which the distance between trimethylammonium and carboxyl groups proved to be crucial for affinity. Taken together, the results suggest that CaiT functions as an exchanger (antiporter) for l-carnitine and gamma-butyrobetaine according to the substrate/product antiport principle.

  10. [Cellular uptake of TPS-L-carnitine synthesised as transporter-based renal targeting prodrug].

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Zhu, Di; Sun, Xun

    2012-11-01

    To synthesize transporter-based renal targeting prodrug TPS-L-Carnitine and to determine its cellular uptake in vitro. Triptolide (TP) was conjugated with L-carnitine using succinate as the linker to form TPS-L-Carnitine, which could be specifically recognized by OCTN2, a cationic transporter with high affinity to L-Carnitine and is highly expressed on the apical membrane of renal proximal tubule cells. Cellular uptake assays of the prodrug and its parent drug were performed on HK-2 cells, a human proximal tubule cell line, in different temperature, concentration and in the presence of competitive inhibitors. TPS-L-Carnitine was taken up into HK-2 cells in a saturable and temperature- and concentration-dependent manner. The uptake process could be inhibited by the competitive inhibitors. The uptake of TPS-L-Carnitine was significantly higher than that of TP at 37 degrees C in the same drug concentration. TPS-L-Carnitine was taken through endocytosis mediated by transporter. TPS-L-Carnitine provides a good renal targeting property and lays the foundation for further studies in vivo.

  11. L-Carnitine Supplementation Improves the Behavioral Symptoms in Autistic Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fahmy, Sarah Farid; El-hamamsy, Manal H.; Zaki, Osama K.; Badary, Osama A.

    2013-01-01

    L-Carnitine was proposed as a potential treatment for patients diagnosed with autism to ameliorate the behavioral symptoms associated with the disease. Thirty children diagnosed with autism were randomly assigned to receive (100 mg/kg bodyweight/day) of liquid L-carnitine (n = 16) or placebo (n = 14) for 6 months. Measurements included changes in…

  12. Acetyl-L-carnitine and alpha-lipoic acid: possible neurotherapeutic agents for mood disorders?

    PubMed

    Soczynska, Joanna K; Kennedy, Sidney H; Chow, Cindy S M; Woldeyohannes, Hanna O; Konarski, Jakub Z; McIntyre, Roger S

    2008-06-01

    Mood disorders are associated with decrements in cognitive function, which are insufficiently treated with contemporary pharmacotherapies. To evaluate the putative neurotherapeutic effects of the mitochondrial cofactors, L-carnitine, acetyl-L-carnitine, and alpha-lipoic acid; and to provide a rationale for investigating their efficacy in the treatment of neurocognitive deficits associated with mood disorders. A PubMed search of English-language articles published between January 1966 and March 2007 was conducted using the search terms carnitine and lipoic acid. L-carnitine and alpha-lipoic acid may offer neurotherapeutic effects (e.g., neurocognitive enhancement) via disparate mechanisms including antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and metabolic regulation. Preliminary controlled trials in depressed geriatric populations also suggest an antidepressant effect with acetyl-L-carnitine. L-carnitine and alpha-lipoic acid are pleiotropic agents capable of offering neuroprotective and possibly cognitive-enhancing effects for neuropsychiatric disorders in which cognitive deficits are an integral feature.

  13. Acute administration of cefepime lowers L-carnitine concentrations in early lactation stage rat milk.

    PubMed

    Ling, Binbing; Alcorn, Jane

    2008-07-01

    Our study investigated the potential for important in vivo drug-nutrient transport interactions at the lactating mammary gland using the L-carnitine transporter substrates, cefepime and L-carnitine, as proof-of-concept. On d 4 (n = 6/treatment) and d 10 (n = 6/treatment) of lactation, rats were administered cefepime (250 mg/h) or saline by continuous i.v. infusion (4 h). Serum and milk L-carnitine and cefepime concentrations were quantified by HPLC-UV. In whole mammary gland, organic cation/carnitine transporter (OCTN)1, OCTN2, OCTN3, amino acid transporter B(0,+) (ATB(0,+)), and L-carnitine transporter 2 expression were determined by quantitative RT-PCR and by western blot and immunohistochemistry when possible. Cefepime caused a 56% decrease in milk L-carnitine concentrations on lactation d 4 (P = 0.0048) but did not affect milk L-carnitine at lactation d 10 or serum L-carnitine concentrations at either time. The mean L-carnitine and cefepime milk:serum ratios (M/S) decreased from 9.1 +/- 0.4 to 4.9 +/- 0.6 (P < 0.0001) and 0.89 +/- 0.3 to 0.12 +/- 0.02 (P = 0.0473), respectively, between d 4 and d 10 of lactation. In both groups, OCTN2 (P < 0.0001), OCTN3 (P = 0.0039), and ATB(0,+) (P = 0.004) mRNA expression and OCTN2 protein (P < 0.0001) were higher in mammary glands at d 4 of lactation compared with d 10. Immunohistochemistry revealed OCTN1 and OCTN2 localization in the mammary alveolar epithelium and OCTN3 expression in the interstitial space and blood vessel endothelium. In conclusion, cefepime significantly decreased milk L-carnitine concentrations only at d 4 of lactation. Relative to d 10, enhanced expression of OCTN2 and ATB(0,+) in mammary glands at d 4 of lactation and higher M/S (L-carnitine and cefepime) suggests cefepime competes with L-carnitine for L-carnitine transporters expressed in the lactating mammary gland to adversely affect L-carnitine milk concentrations and these effects depend upon lactation stage.

  14. [The hypotriglyceridemic action of the combination of L-carnitine + simvastatin vs. L-carnitine and vs. simvastatin].

    PubMed

    Savica, V; Bellinghieri, G; Lamanna, F

    1992-01-01

    Previous studies had determined the role played by L-carnitine and simvastatin in the treatment of altered lipidemia in dialyzed patients with chronic uremia. The authors carried out a study on the above substances either singly or together administered to the same patients with chronic uremia in hemodialysis. This study was aimed at demonstrating the possible synergic normolipidemic action of both substances in comparison with their single administration, because their different mechanism of action could be metabolically enhanced. The obtained results demonstrated that the therapeutic association proposed is preferable to the use of the single substances. Moreover, a higher and more rapid normolipidemic effect was obtained after using L-carnitina associated with simvastatin with respect to the separated substances.

  15. [Therapy of arrhythmia induced by myocardial ischemia. Association of L-carnitine, propafenone and mexiletine].

    PubMed

    Mondillo, S; Faglia, S; D'Aprile, N; Mangiacotti, L; Campolo, M A; Agricola, E; Palazzuoli, V

    1995-12-01

    To assess the anti-arrythmic effect of L-carnitina, propafenone and mexiletine, we tested the drugs in 50 patients with effort angina and ventricular ectopic beats (VEB). The patients were randomized in 5 groups: Group A: was treated with oral L-carnitine at the dose of 2 g x 3 for two weeks. Group B: oral propafenone at the dose of 300 mg x 3 for two weeks. Group C: as group B+L-carnitine+g x 3 at the second weeks. Group D: oral mexiletine at the dose of 200 mg x 3 for two weeks. Group E: as group D+L-carnitine 2 gr x 3 at the second week. After 7 and 14 days of treatment, in all patients an Holter examination was performed. Our results show that L-carnitine exerts a significant reduction of the VEB and its administration potentiates the anti-arrythmic effect of propafenone and mexiletine.

  16. L-carnitine alleviates sciatic nerve crush injury in rats: functional and electron microscopy assessments

    PubMed Central

    Avsar, Ümmü Zeynep; Avsar, Umit; Aydin, Ali; Yayla, Muhammed; Ozturkkaragoz, Berna; Un, Harun; Saritemur, Murat; Mercantepe, Tolga

    2014-01-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that L-carnitine exhibits neuroprotective effects on injured sciatic nerve of rats with diabetes mellitus. It is hypothesized that L-carnitine exhibits neuroprotective effects on injured sciatic nerve of rats. Rat sciatic nerve was crush injured by a forceps and exhibited degenerative changes. After intragastric administration of 50 and 100 mg/kg L-carnitine for 30 days, axon area, myelin sheath area, axon diameter, myelin sheath diameter, and numerical density of the myelinated axons of injured sciatic nerve were similar to normal, and the function of injured sciatic nerve also improved significantly. These findings suggest that L-carnitine exhibits neuroprotective effects on sciatic nerve crush injury in rats. PMID:25206754

  17. Reduced L-Carnitine Transport in Aortic Endothelial Cells from Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats

    PubMed Central

    Salsoso, Rocío; Guzmán-Gutiérrez, Enrique; Arroyo, Pablo; Salomón, Carlos; Zambrano, Sonia; Ruiz-Armenta, María Victoria; Blanca, Antonio Jesús; Pardo, Fabián; Leiva, Andrea; Mate, Alfonso; Sobrevia, Luis; Vázquez, Carmen María

    2014-01-01

    Impaired L-carnitine uptake correlates with higher blood pressure in adult men, and L-carnitine restores endothelial function in aortic rings from spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR). Thus, endothelial dysfunction in hypertension could result from lower L-carnitine transport in this cell type. L-Carnitine transport is mainly mediated by novel organic cation transporters 1 (Octn1, Na+-independent) and 2 (Octn2, Na+-dependent); however, their kinetic properties and potential consequences in hypertension are unknown. We hypothesize that L-carnitine transport kinetic properties will be altered in aortic endothelium from spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). L-Carnitine transport was measured at different extracellular pH (pHo 5.5–8.5) in the absence or presence of sodium in rat aortic endothelial cells (RAECs) from non-hypertensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats and SHR. Octn1 and Octn2 mRNA relative expression was also determined. Dilation of endothelium-intact or denuded aortic rings in response to calcitonine gene related peptide (CGRP, 0.1–100 nmol/L) was measured (myography) in the absence or presence of L-carnitine. Total L-carnitine transport was lower in cells from SHR compared with WKY rats, an effect due to reduced Na+-dependent (Na+ dep) compared with Na+-independent (Na+ indep) transport components. Saturable L-carnitine transport kinetics show maximal velocity (V max), without changes in apparent K m for Na+ indep transport in SHR compared with WKY rats. Total and Na+ dep component of transport were increased, but Na+ indep transport was reduced by extracellular alkalization in WKY rats. However, alkalization reduced total and Na+ indep transport in cells from SHR. Octn2 mRNA was higher than Octn-1 mRNA expression in cells from both conditions. Dilation of artery rings in response to CGRP was reduced in vessels from SHR compared with WKY rats. CGRP effect was endothelium-dependent and restored by L-carnitine. All together these results suggest that reduced

  18. Crystal Structure of an L-Carnitine Complex with Pyrogallol[4]arene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujisawa, I.; Takeuchi, D.; Kitamura, Y.; Okamoto, R.; Aoki, K.

    2012-03-01

    L-Carnitine is essential for the transport of long-chain fatty acids from cytosol into mitochondria for generating metabolic energy. The survey of crystal structures of carnitine-containing proteins in the Protein Data Bank reveals that carnitine can take several conformations with the quarternary trimethylammonium terminal being always bound to aromatic residues through cation-π interactions in acyltransferases or carnitine-binding proteins. In order to demonstrate the importance of cation-π interaction as a carnitine recognition mechanism in the artificial receptor-ligand system that mimics the carnitine-binding sites, we have determined the crystal structure of a complex formed between L-carnitine and pyrogallol[4]arene (pyrogallol cyclic tetramer: PCT) as a carnitine receptor, 2PCT·2(L-carnitine)·4EtOH. There form two crystallographically independent monomeric [PCT·L-carnitine] substructures, which further form an obliquely arranged capsule-like dimeric [PCT·L-carnitine]2 structure through a pair of O-H (PCT)···O (L-carnitine) hydrogen bonds. This is the first report of PCT complex with chiral molecules. In each of the two monomeric [PCT·L-carnitine] substructures, the L-carnitine molecule takes the elongated form with an intramolecular hydrogen bond between the hydroxyl group and the carboxylate oxygen, and the cationic trimethylammonium moiety is incorporated into the cavity of the bowl-shaped PCT molecule through cation-π interactions. These features are similar to those at the D-carnitine-binding site in the crystal structure of the glycine betaine/carnitine/choline-binding protein complex.

  19. L-carnitine prevents memory impairment induced by chronic REM-sleep deprivation.

    PubMed

    Alzoubi, Karem H; Rababa'h, Abeer M; Owaisi, Amani; Khabour, Omar F

    2017-05-01

    Sleep deprivation (SD) negatively impacts memory, which was related to oxidative stress induced damage. L-carnitine is a naturally occurring compound, synthesized endogenously in mammalian species and known to possess antioxidant properties. In this study, the effect of L-carnitine on learning and memory impairment induced by rapid eye movement sleep (REM-sleep) deprivation was investigated. REM-sleep deprivation was induced using modified multiple platform model (8h/day, for 6 weeks). Simultaneously, L-carnitine was administered (300mg/kg/day) intraperitoneally for 6 weeks. Thereafter, the radial arm water maze (RAWM) was used to assess spatial learning and memory. Additionally, the hippocampus levels of antioxidant biomarkers/enzymes: reduced glutathione (GSH), oxidized glutathione (GSSG), GSH/GSSG ratio, glutathione peroxidase (GPx), catalase, and superoxide dismutase (SOD) and thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) were assessed. The results showed that chronic REM-sleep deprivation impaired both short- and long-term memory (P<0.05), whereas L-carnitine treatment protected against this effect. Furthermore, L-carnitine normalized chronic REM-sleep deprivation induced reduction in the hippocampus ratio of GSH/GSSG, activity of catalase, GPx, and SOD. No change was observed in TBARS among tested groups (P>0.05). In conclusion, chronic REM-sleep deprivation induced memory impairment, and treatment with L-carnitine prevented this impairment through normalizing antioxidant mechanisms in the hippocampus. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Effects of Oral L-Carnitine on Liver Functions after Transarterial Chemoembolization in Intermediate-Stage HCC Patients.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Abeer; Tsuda, Yasuhiro; Asai, Akira; Yokohama, Keisuke; Nakamura, Ken; Sujishi, Tetsuya; Ohama, Hideko; Tsuchimoto, Yusuke; Fukunishi, Shinya; Abdelaal, Usama M; Arafa, Usama A; Hassan, Ali T; Kassem, Ali M; Higuchi, Kazuhide

    2015-01-01

    Transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) is usually followed by hepatic dysfunction. We evaluated the effects of L-carnitine on post-TACE impaired liver functions. Methods. 53 cirrhotic hepatocellular carcinoma patients at Osaka Medical College were enrolled in this study and assigned into either L-carnitine group receiving 600 mg oral L-carnitine daily or control group. Liver functions were evaluated at pre-TACE and 1, 4, and 12 weeks after TACE. Results. The L-carnitine group maintained Child-Pugh (CP) score at 1 week after TACE and exhibited significant improvement at 4 weeks after TACE (P < 0.01). Conversely, the control group reported a significant CP score deterioration at 1 week (P < 0.05) and 12 weeks after TACE (P < 0.05). L-carnitine suppressed serum albumin deterioration at 1 week after TACE. There were significant differences between L-carnitine and control groups regarding mean serum albumin changes from baseline to 1 week (P < 0.05) and 4 weeks after TACE (P < 0.05). L-carnitine caused prothrombin time improvement from baseline to 1, 4 (P < 0.05), and 12 weeks after TACE. Total bilirubin mean changes from baseline to 1 week after TACE exhibited significant differences between L-carnitine and control groups (P < 0.05). The hepatoprotective effects of L-carnitine were enhanced by branched chain amino acids combination. Conclusion. L-carnitine maintained and improved liver functions after TACE.

  1. History of L-carnitine: implications for renal disease.

    PubMed

    Matera, Mario; Bellinghieri, Guido; Costantino, Giuseppe; Santoro, Domenico; Calvani, Menotti; Savica, Vincenzo

    2003-01-01

    L-carnitine (LC) plays an essential metabolic role that consists in transferring the long chain fatty acids (LCFAs) through the mitochondrial barrier, thus allowing their energy-yielding oxidation. Other functions of LC are protection of membrane structures, stabilizing a physiologic coenzyme-A (CoA)-sulfate hydrate/acetyl-CoA ratio, and reduction of lactate production. On the other hand, numerous observations have stressed the carnitine ability of influencing, in several ways, the control mechanisms of the vital cell cycle. Much evidence suggests that apoptosis activated by palmitate or stearate addition to cultured cells is correlated with de novo ceramide synthesis. Investigations in vitro strongly support that LC is able to inhibit the death planned, most likely by preventing sphingomyelin breakdown and consequent ceramide synthesis; this effect seems to be specific for acidic sphingomyelinase. The reduction of ceramide generation and the increase in the serum levels of insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1, could represent 2 important mechanisms underlying the observed antiapoptotic effects of acetyl-LC. Primary carnitine deficiency is an uncommon inherited disorder, related to functional anomalies in a specific organic cation/carnitine transporter (hOCTN2). These conditions have been classified as either systemic or myopathic. Secondary forms also are recognized. These are present in patients with renal tubular disorders, in which excretion of carnitine may be excessive, and in patients on hemodialysis. A lack of carnitine in hemodialysis patients is caused by insufficient carnitine synthesis and particularly by the loss through dialytic membranes, leading, in some patients, to carnitine depletion with a relative increase in esterified forms. Many studies have shown that LC supplementation leads to improvements in several complications seen in uremic patients, including cardiac complications, impaired exercise and functional capacities, muscle symptoms

  2. Use of L-carnitine and humate in laying quail diets.

    PubMed

    Yalçin, Sakine; Ergün, A; Erol, Handan; Yalçin, Suzan; Ozsoy, B

    2005-01-01

    This experiment was carried out to determine the effects of using L-carnitine and humate alone or in combination in quail diets on laying performance, egg traits and blood parameters. A total of 280 Japanese quails aged 10 weeks, divided into one control group and three treatment groups, were used. The diets of the first, second and third treatment groups were supplemented with 100 mg L-carnitine/kg, 1.5 g humate (Farmagülatör Dry Plus)/kg and 100 mg L-camitine + 1.5 g humate/kg, respectively. The experimental period lasted 16 weeks. The addition of L-carnitine and sodium humate alone or in combination did not significantly affect body weight, feed consumption, egg production, feed conversion ratio, mortality, egg-shell thickness, egg yolk index and the percentages of egg-shell, albumen and yolk. Egg weight increased (P < 0.001) with L-carnitine supplementation. The values of egg albumen height (P < 0.05), egg albumen index (P < 0.01) and egg Haugh unit (P < 0.05) were increased with humate supplementation. Egg cholesterol content and blood serum parameters were not affected by the supplementation of L-carnitine with or without humate. The results in this study demonstrated that L-carnitine supplementation increased egg weight while humate addition increased egg albumen index and egg Haugh unit of laying quails. However, the combined administration of L-carnitine and humate did not have any significant effects on the parameters measured.

  3. Effect of L-carnitine on diabetogenic action of streptozotocin in rats.

    PubMed

    Uysal, Nazan; Yalaz, Giray; Acikgoz, Osman; Gonenc, Sevil; Kayatekin, Berkant Muammer

    2005-08-01

    L-carnitine is a naturally compound widely distributed in the body. It has an antiradical effect and decreases lipid peroxidation. In acute or chronic streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats, the pancreatic content of carnitine was found to be significantly lower than nondiabetic group. We investigated the effects of L-carnitine on the development of STZ-induced diabetes in rats, to determine if L-carnitine can prevent the onset of diabetes or reduce the severity of hyperglycemia and this prevention/reduction is associated with the reduction in oxidative stress. The rats were divided into 3 groups: Control, STZ-treated (65 mg/kg intraperitoneally) and L-carnitine (500 mg/kg) and STZ-treated. Oxidative stress was assessed by measuring pancreatic thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) formation levels using the method of Rehncrona et al, pancreatic superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities using a Randox test combination (RANSOD and RANDOX). L-carnitine did not prevent the onset of diabetes at this dose. Development of diabetes was associated with an increase in pancreatic TBARS (0.028 +/- 0.008 and 0.046 +/- 0.017 nmol/mg Protein, respectively), and GPx activity (0.067 +/- 0.011 and 0.098 +/- 0.016 U/mg Protein, respectively). L-carnitine prevented this increase induced by diabetes; TBARS (0.039 +/- 0.006 nmol/mg Protein) and GPx activity (0.053 +/- 0.011 U/mg Protein). These results suggest that L-carnitine exerts anti-oxidative effect in experimental diabetes.

  4. Ameliorative effects of l-carnitine on rats raised on a diet supplemented with lead acetate.

    PubMed

    El-Sherbini, El-Said; El-Sayed, Gehad; El Shotory, Rehab; Gheith, Nervana; Abou-Alsoud, Mohamed; Harakeh, Steve Mustapha; Karrouf, Gamal I

    2017-09-01

    Lead intoxication has been a major health hazard in humans. It affects people at all ages. Its toxicity is associated with various organs of the body and affects different metabolic pathways. Based on histological data, l-carnitine reduced the severity of tissue damage produced as a result of exposure of rats to lead acetate. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the underlying mechanism of protection offered by l-carnitine against lead acetate intoxication using male Sprague-Dawley rats. Forty male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into four groups with ten rats in each. The first group (G1) served as the control group and animals received standard diet only. The second group (G2) received lead acetate in their diet. The third group (G3) was the l-carnitine treated group and received the normal standard diet supplemented with l-carnitine. While the fourth group (G4) had a diet supplemented with both lead acetate and l-carnitine. At the end of each experiment, blood (serum and whole blood) were collected from each animal and analyzed for the following parameters: serum testosterone levels, serum nitric oxide and serum malondialdehyde. This is in addition to looking at the enzymatic activities of two important enzymes (superoxide dismutase and catalase) and on (glutathione reductase) which are indicative of the antioxidant activities in the whole blood. The results indicated that l-carnitine will counteract the undesirable effects of lead intoxication. It exerted its antioxidant potential by reducing the production of ROS and scavenging free radicals by maintaining and protecting the level of the of antioxidant enzymes SOD, CAT and glutathione peroxidase. Conclusion: l-Carnitine may play an important role in reversing the undesirable effects of lead intoxication. Future studies should be conducted to see whether such an effect is applicable in humans exposed to lead poising.

  5. L-carnitine and cancer cachexia. I. L-carnitine distribution and metabolic disorders in cancer cachexia.

    PubMed

    Szefel, Jarosław; Kruszewski, Wiesław Janusz; Ciesielski, Maciej; Szajewski, Mariusz; Kawecki, Krzysztof; Aleksandrowicz-Wrona, Ewa; Jankun, Jerzy; Lysiak-Szydłowska, Wiesława

    2012-07-01

    Cancer cachexia (CC), a progressive loss of body mass, is associated with decreased energy production. Abnormally low levels of L-carnitine (LC) in skeletal muscle means that mitochondrial β-oxidation of long-chain fatty acids (LCFA) does not occur efficiently in patients with CC. We assessed the influence of CC on LC distribution and the effects of parenteral lipid emulsions on plasma LC levels and urinary excretion. Fifty patients with CC were randomly assigned to total parenteral nutrition (TPN) with long-chain triglycerides (LCTs), or LCTs plus medium-chain triglycerides (MCTs) as 50/50. Patients were further separated into those with body-mass index (BMI) ≤ 19 kg/m(2) and BMI >19 kg/m(2). Plasma concentrations of total LC (TC) and free LC (FC) and their urinary excretion were measured, along with skeletal muscle LC levels. On average, plasma FC and TC were higher than reference values in all patients. Patients with BMI ≤ 19 kg/m(2) had lower plasma FC and TC than those with BMI >19 kg/m(2). Skeletal muscle FC in the BMI ≤ 19 kg/m(2) group was lower than reference value, but within the normal range in others. LC and FC urinary excretion was higher than reference values. Plasma LC and its urinary excretion were higher in patients administered pure LCTs relative to those given MCTs/LCTs. A decrease in skeletal muscle LC in cancer patients with CC (BMI ≤ 19 kg/m(2)) correlates with an increase in its plasma levels and increased renal excretion. A diet of MCTs/LCTs reduces LC release from muscle to plasma and urine more effectively than LCTs.

  6. L-carnitine reduces susceptibility to bupivacaine-induced cardiotoxicity: an experimental study in rats.

    PubMed

    Wong, Gail K; Pehora, Carolyne; Crawford, Mark W

    2017-03-01

    The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of acute administration of L-carnitine 100 mg·kg -1 iv on susceptibility to bupivacaine-induced cardiotoxicity in rats. In the first of two experiments, L-carnitine 100 mg·kg -1 iv (n = 10) or saline iv (n = 10) was administered to anesthetized and mechanically ventilated Sprague-Dawley rats following which an infusion of bupivacaine 2.0 mg·kg -1 ·min -1 iv was given until asystole occurred. The primary outcome was the probability of survival. Secondary outcomes included times to asystole, first dysrhythmia, and to 50% reductions in heart rate (HR) and mean arterial pressure (MAP). To determine whether the same dose of L-carnitine is effective in treating established bupivacaine cardiotoxicity, we also conducted a second experiment in which bupivacaine 20 mg·kg -1 iv was infused over 20 sec. Animals (n = 10 per group) received one of four iv treatments: 30% lipid emulsion 4.0 mL·kg -1 , L-carnitine 100 mg·kg -1 , 30% lipid emulsion plus L-carnitine, or saline. The primary outcome was the return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) during resuscitation. In the first study, L-carnitine 100 mg·kg -1 increased the probability of survival during bupivacaine infusion (hazard ratio, 12.0; 95% confidence interval, 3.5 to 41.5; P < 0.001). In L-carnitine-treated animals, the times to asystole, first dysrhythmia, and to 50% reductions in HR and MAP increased by 33% (P < 0.001), 65% (P < 0.001), 71% (P < 0.001), and 63% (P < 0.001), respectively. In the second study, no animal in the control or L-carnitine alone groups achieved ROSC when compared with the lipid emulsion groups (P < 0.01). These findings suggest that acute administration of L-carnitine 100 mg·kg -1 decreases susceptibility to bupivacaine cardiotoxicity, but is ineffective during resuscitation from bupivacaine-induced cardiac arrest.

  7. Natural zwitterionic l-Carnitine as efficient cryoprotectant for solvent-free cell cryopreservation.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Hongwen; Yang, Jing; Zhang, Jiamin; Pan, Chao; Cai, Nana; Zhu, Yingnan; Zhang, Lei

    2017-07-15

    Organic solvents, such as dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and glycerol, have been commonly used as cryoprotectants (CPAs) in cell cryopreservation. However, their cytotoxicity and need of complex freezing protocols have impeded their applications especially in clinical cell therapy and regenerative medicine. Trehalose has been explored as a natural CPA to cryopreserve cells, but its poor cell permeability frequently results in low cryopreservation efficacy. In this work, we presented that a natural zwitterionic molecule-l-carnitine-could serve as a promising CPA for solvent-free cryopreservation. We demonstrated that l-carnitine possessed strong ability to depress water freezing point, and with ultrarapid freezing protocol, we studied the post-thaw survival efficiency of four cell lines (GLC-82 cells, MCF-7 cells, NIH-3T3 cells and Sheep Red Blood Cells) using l-carnitine without addition of any organic solvents. At the optimum l-carnitine concentration, all four cell lines could achieve above 80% survival efficiency, compared with the significantly lower efficiency using organic CPAs and trehalose. After cryopreservation, the recovered cell behaviors including cell attachment and proliferation were found to be similar to the normal cells, indicating that the cell functionalities were not affected. Moreover, l-carnitine showed no observable cytotoxicity, which was superior to the organic CPAs. This work offered an attractive alternative to traditional CPAs and held great promise to revolutionize current cryopreservation technologies, to benefit the patients in various cell-based clinical applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. L-Carnitine suppresses oleic acid-induced membrane permeability transition of mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Oyanagi, Eri; Yano, Hiromi; Kato, Yasuko; Fujita, Hirofumi; Utsumi, Kozo; Sasaki, Junzo

    2008-10-01

    Membrane permeability transition (MPT) of mitochondria has an important role in apoptosis of various cells. The classic type of MPT is characterized by increased Ca(2+) transport, membrane depolarization, swelling, and sensitivity to cyclosporin A. In this study, we investigated whether L-carnitine suppresses oleic acid-induced MPT using isolated mitochondria from rat liver. Oleic acid-induced MPT in isolated mitochondria, inhibited endogenous respiration, caused membrane depolarization, and increased large amplitude swelling, and cytochrome c (Cyt. c) release from mitochondria. L-Carnitine was indispensable to beta-oxidation of oleic acid in the mitochondria, and this reaction required ATP and coenzyme A (CoA). In the presence of ATP and CoA, L-carnitine stimulated oleic acid oxidation and suppressed the oleic acid-induced depolarization, swelling, and Cyt. c release. L-Carnitine also contributed to maintaining mitochondrial function, which was decreased by the generation of free fatty acids with the passage of time after isolation. These results suggest that L-carnitine acts to maintain mitochondrial function and suppresses oleic acid-mediated MPT through acceleration of beta-oxidation. Copyright (c) 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Determination of L-carnitine, acetyl-L-carnitine and propionyl-L-carnitine in human plasma by high-performance liquid chromatography after pre-column derivatization with 1-aminoanthracene.

    PubMed

    Longo, A; Bruno, G; Curti, S; Mancinelli, A; Miotto, G

    1996-11-15

    A new sensitive high-performance liquid chromatographic procedure for the determination of L-carnitine (LC), acetyl-L-carnitine (ALC) and propionyl-L-carnitine (PLC) in human plasma has been developed. Precolumn derivatization with 1-aminoanthracene (1AA), performed in phosphate buffer in the presence of 1-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-3-ethylcarbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC) as catalyst, is involved. The fluorescent derivatives were isocratically separated on a reversed-phase column (C18). The eluate was monitored with a fluorimetric detector set at 248 nm (excitation wavelength) and 418 nm (emission wavelength). Because of the presence of endogenous carnitines, the validation was performed using dialyzed plasma. The identity of the derivatized compounds was assessed by mass spectrometry and the purity of the chromatographic peaks was confirmed by HPLC-tandem mass spectrometry. The limits of quantitation were 5 nmol/ml for LC, 1 nmol/ml for ALC and 0.25 nmol/ml for PLC. The recovery of the extraction procedure was in the range 82.6%-95.4% for all 3 compounds. Good linearity (R approximately 0.99) was observed within the calibration ranges studied: 5-160 nmol/ml for LC, 1-32 nmol/ml for ALC and 0.25-8 nmol/ml for PLC. Precision was in the range 0.3-16.8% and accuracy was always lower than 10.6%.

  10. Sibutramine and L-carnitine compared to sibutramine alone on insulin resistance in diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Derosa, Giuseppe; Maffioli, Pamela; Salvadeo, Sibilla A T; Ferrari, Ilaria; Gravina, Alessia; Mereu, Roberto; D'Angelo, Angela; Palumbo, Ilaria; Randazzo, Sabrina; Cicero, Arrigo F G

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of one year of treatment with sibutramine plus L-carnitine compared to sibutramine on body weight, glycemic control, and insulin resistance state in type 2 diabetic patients. Two hundred and fifty-four patients with uncontrolled type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) [glycated hemoglobin (HbA(1c)) >8.0%] in therapy with different oral hypoglycemic agents or insulin were enrolled in this study and randomised to take sibutramine 10 mg plus L-carnitine 2 g or sibutramine 10 mg in monotherapy. We evaluated at baseline, and after 3, 6, 9, and 12 months these parameters: body weight, body mass index (BMI), glycated hemoglobin (HbA(1c)), fasting plasma glucose (FPG), post-prandial plasma glucose (PPG), fasting plasma insulin (FPI), homeostasis model assessment insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR), total cholesterol (TC), low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C), high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C), triglycerides (Tg), retinol binding protein-4 (RBP-4), resistin, visfatin, high sensitivity-C reactive protein (Hs-CRP). There was a decrease in body weight, BMI, HbA(1c), FPI, HOMA-IR, and RBP-4 in both groups, even when the values obtained with sibutramine plus L-carnitine were lower than the values obtained in sibutramine group. There was a faster decrease of FPG, PPG, TC, LDL-C, resistin and Hs-CRP with sibutramine plus L-carnitine even when no differences between the two groups were obtained. Furthermore, only sibutramine plus L-carnitine improved Tg, and visfatin. Sibutramine plus L-carnitine gave a faster improvement of lipid profile, insulin resistance parameters, glycemic control, and body weight compared to sibutramine.

  11. The possible protective effect of L-carnitine on tilmicosin-induced cardiotoxicity in mice.

    PubMed

    Kart, A; Yapar, K; Karapehlivan, M; Citil, M

    2007-04-01

    The protective effect of L-carnitine was investigated against tilmicosin-induced cardiotoxic effects including blood creatine kinase (CK), CK-MB, total sialic acid as well as the alterations in glutathione and malondialdehyde concentrations in mice. Thirty-two Balb/C mice were divided into four groups including group 1 (control), group 2 (L-carnitine, s.c., 500 mg/kg for 5 days), group 3 (tilmicosin, s.c., single dose of 75 mg/kg) and group 4 (L-carnitine plus tilmicosin). Serum CK, CK-MB and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were significantly (P < 0.05) higher in group 3 compared with those of other groups. Total sialic acid level in group 3 was found to be significantly (P < 0.05) higher than that in groups 1 and 2, as well. Contrary to these results, glutathione level in group 3 was found to be significantly (P < 0.05) lower than that in groups 1 and 2. In group 4, serum CK, CK-MB, MDA and total sialic acid levels were found to be significantly (P < 0.05) lower than those in group 3. These results suggest that tilmicosin is cardiotoxic in mice as evidenced by higher total sialic acid, CK and CK-MB. In addition, tilmicosin caused the decrease in glutathione and increase in MDA levels. However, administration of L-carnitine could ameliorate these adverse toxic effects of tilmicosin in mice.

  12. Proximate Composition, and l-Carnitine and Betaine Contents in Meat from Korean Indigenous Chicken

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Samooel; Bae, Young Sik; Yong, Hae In; Lee, Hyun Jung; Seo, Dong Won; Park, Hee Bok; Lee, Jun Heon; Jo, Cheorun

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the proximate composition and l-carnitine and betaine content of meats from 5 lines of Korean indigenous chicken (KIC) for developing highly nutritious meat breeds with health benefits from the bioactive compounds such as l-carnitine and betaine in meat. In addition, the relevance of gender (male and female) and meat type (breast and thigh meat) was examined. A total of 595 F1 progeny (black [B], grey-brown [G], red-brown [R], white [W], and yellow-brown [Y]) from 70 full-sib families were used. The moisture, protein, fat, and ash contents of the meats were significantly affected by line, gender, and meat type (p<0.05). The males in line G and females in line B showed the highest protein and the lowest fat content of the meats. l-carnitine and betaine content showed effects of meat type, line, and gender (p<0.05). The highest l-carnitine content was found in breast and thigh meats from line Y in both genders. The breast meat from line G and the thigh meat from line R had the highest betaine content in males. The female breast and thigh meats showed the highest betaine content in line R. These data could be valuable for establishing selection strategies for developing highly nutritious chicken meat breeds in Korea. PMID:26580444

  13. Intestinal microbiota metabolism of L-carnitine, a nutrient in red meat, promotes atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Koeth, Robert A.; Wang, Zeneng; Levison, Bruce S.; Buffa, Jennifer A.; Org, Elin; Sheehy, Brendan T.; Britt, Earl B.; Fu, Xiaoming; Wu, Yuping; Li, Lin; Smith, Jonathan D.; DiDonato, Joseph A.; Chen, Jun; Li, Hongzhe; Wu, Gary D.; Lewis, James D.; Warrier, Manya; Brown, J. Mark; Krauss, Ronald M.; Tang, W. H. Wilson; Bushman, Frederic D.; Lusis, Aldons J.; Hazen, Stanley L.

    2013-01-01

    Intestinal microbiota metabolism of choline/phosphatidylcholine produces trimethylamine (TMA), which is further metabolized to a proatherogenic species, trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO). Herein we demonstrate that intestinal microbiota metabolism of dietary L-carnitine, a trimethylamine abundant in red meat, also produces TMAO and accelerates atherosclerosis. Omnivorous subjects are shown to produce significantly more TMAO than vegans/vegetarians following ingestion of L-carnitine through a microbiota-dependent mechanism. Specific bacterial taxa in human feces are shown to associate with both plasma TMAO and dietary status. Plasma L-carnitine levels in subjects undergoing cardiac evaluation (n = 2,595) predict increased risks for both prevalent cardiovascular disease (CVD) and incident major adverse cardiac events (MI, stroke or death), but only among subjects with concurrently high TMAO levels. Chronic dietary L-carnitine supplementation in mice significantly altered cecal microbial composition, markedly enhanced synthesis of TMA/TMAO, and increased atherosclerosis, but not following suppression of intestinal microbiota. Dietary supplementation of TMAO, or either carnitine or choline in mice with intact intestinal microbiota, significantly reduced reverse cholesterol transport in vivo. Intestinal microbiota may thus participate in the well-established link between increased red meat consumption and CVD risk. PMID:23563705

  14. Intestinal microbiota metabolism of L-carnitine, a nutrient in red meat, promotes atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Koeth, Robert A; Wang, Zeneng; Levison, Bruce S; Buffa, Jennifer A; Org, Elin; Sheehy, Brendan T; Britt, Earl B; Fu, Xiaoming; Wu, Yuping; Li, Lin; Smith, Jonathan D; DiDonato, Joseph A; Chen, Jun; Li, Hongzhe; Wu, Gary D; Lewis, James D; Warrier, Manya; Brown, J Mark; Krauss, Ronald M; Tang, W H Wilson; Bushman, Frederic D; Lusis, Aldons J; Hazen, Stanley L

    2013-05-01

    Intestinal microbiota metabolism of choline and phosphatidylcholine produces trimethylamine (TMA), which is further metabolized to a proatherogenic species, trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO). We demonstrate here that metabolism by intestinal microbiota of dietary L-carnitine, a trimethylamine abundant in red meat, also produces TMAO and accelerates atherosclerosis in mice. Omnivorous human subjects produced more TMAO than did vegans or vegetarians following ingestion of L-carnitine through a microbiota-dependent mechanism. The presence of specific bacterial taxa in human feces was associated with both plasma TMAO concentration and dietary status. Plasma L-carnitine levels in subjects undergoing cardiac evaluation (n = 2,595) predicted increased risks for both prevalent cardiovascular disease (CVD) and incident major adverse cardiac events (myocardial infarction, stroke or death), but only among subjects with concurrently high TMAO levels. Chronic dietary L-carnitine supplementation in mice altered cecal microbial composition, markedly enhanced synthesis of TMA and TMAO, and increased atherosclerosis, but this did not occur if intestinal microbiota was concurrently suppressed. In mice with an intact intestinal microbiota, dietary supplementation with TMAO or either carnitine or choline reduced in vivo reverse cholesterol transport. Intestinal microbiota may thus contribute to the well-established link between high levels of red meat consumption and CVD risk.

  15. Oleoyl-L-carnitine inhibits glycine transport by GlyT2

    PubMed Central

    Carland, JE; Mansfield, RE; Ryan, RM; Vandenberg, RJ

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Concentrations of extracellular glycine in the CNS are regulated by two Na+/Cl–-dependent glycine transporters, GlyT1 and GlyT2. Selective inhibitors of GlyT1 have been developed for the treatment of schizophrenia, whilst selective inhibitors of GlyT2 are analgesic in animal models of pain. We have assessed a series of endogenous lipids as inhibitors of GlyT1 and GlyT2. Experimental Approach Human GlyT1 and GlyT2 were expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes, and the inhibitory actions of a series of acylcarnitines on glycine transport were measured using electrophysiological techniques. Key Results Oleoyl-l-carnitine inhibited glycine transport by GlyT2, with an IC50 of 340 nM, which is 15-fold more potent than the previously identified lipid inhibitor N-arachidonyl-glycine. Oleoyl-l-carnitine had a slow onset of inhibition and a slow washout. Using a series of chimeric GlyT1/2 transporters and point mutant transporters, we have identified an isoleucine residue in extracellular loop 4 of GlyT2 that conferred differences in sensitivity to oleoyl-l-carnitine between GlyT2 and GlyT1. Conclusions and Implications Oleoyl-l-carnitine is a potent non-competitive inhibitor of GlyT2. Previously identified GlyT2 inhibitors show potential as analgesics and the identification of oleoyl-l-carnitine as a novel GlyT2 inhibitor may lead to new ways of treating pain. PMID:22978602

  16. Translating the basic knowledge of mitochondrial functions to metabolic therapy: role of L-carnitine.

    PubMed

    Marcovina, Santica M; Sirtori, Cesare; Peracino, Andrea; Gheorghiade, Mihai; Borum, Peggy; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Ardehali, Hossein

    2013-02-01

    Mitochondria play important roles in human physiological processes, and therefore, their dysfunction can lead to a constellation of metabolic and nonmetabolic abnormalities such as a defect in mitochondrial gene expression, imbalance in fuel and energy homeostasis, impairment in oxidative phosphorylation, enhancement of insulin resistance, and abnormalities in fatty acid metabolism. As a consequence, mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to the pathophysiology of insulin resistance, obesity, diabetes, vascular disease, and chronic heart failure. The increased knowledge on mitochondria and their role in cellular metabolism is providing new evidence that these disorders may benefit from mitochondrial-targeted therapies. We review the current knowledge of the contribution of mitochondrial dysfunction to chronic diseases, the outcomes of experimental studies on mitochondrial-targeted therapies, and explore the potential of metabolic modulators in the treatment of selected chronic conditions. As an example of such modulators, we evaluate the efficacy of the administration of L-carnitine and its analogues acetyl and propionyl L-carnitine in several chronic diseases. L-carnitine is intrinsically involved in mitochondrial metabolism and function as it plays a key role in fatty acid oxidation and energy metabolism. In addition to the transportation of free fatty acids across the inner mitochondrial membrane, L-carnitine modulates their oxidation rate and is involved in the regulation of vital cellular functions such as apoptosis. Thus, L-carnitine and its derivatives show promise in the treatment of chronic conditions and diseases associated with mitochondrial dysfunction but further translational studies are needed to fully explore their potential. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. γ–Butyrobetaine is a pro-atherogenic intermediate in gut microbial metabolism of L-carnitine to TMAO

    PubMed Central

    Koeth, Robert A.; Levison, Bruce S.; Culley, Miranda K.; Buffa, Jennifer A.; Wang, Zeneng; Gregory, Jill C.; Org, Elin; Wu, Yuping; Li, Lin; Smith, Jonathan D.; Wilson Tang, W. H.; DiDonato, Joseph A.; Lusis, Aldons J.; Hazen, Stanley L.

    2014-01-01

    Summary L- Carnitine, a nutrient in red meat, was recently reported to accelerate atherosclerosis via a metaorganismal pathway involving gut microbial trimethylamine (TMA) formation and host hepatic conversion into trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO). Herein we show that following L-carnitine ingestion, γ-butyrobetaine (γBB) is produced as an intermediary metabolite by gut microbes at a site anatomically proximal to and at a rate ~1000-fold higher than the formation of TMA. Moreover, we show γBB is the major gut microbial metabolite formed from dietary L-carnitine in mice, and like dietary L-carnitine, in a gut microbiota-dependent manner is converted into TMA and TMAO, and accelerates atherosclerosis. Gut microbial composition and functional metabolic studies reveal distinct taxa are associated with the production of γBB versus TMA/TMAO from dietary L-carnitine. Moreover, despite their close structural similarity, chronic dietary exposure to L-carnitine versus γBB promotes development of functionally distinct microbial communities optimized for the metabolism of L-carnitine versus γBB, respectively. PMID:25440057

  18. Effect of L-Carnitine in Patients With Liver Cirrhosis on Energy Metabolism Using Indirect Calorimetry: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Yoshiyuki; Nishikawa, Hiroki; Enomoto, Hirayuki; Yoh, Kazunori; Iwata, Yoshinori; Hasegawa, Kunihiro; Nakano, Chikage; Kishino, Kyohei; Shimono, Yoshihiro; Takata, Ryo; Nishimura, Takashi; Aizawa, Nobuhiro; Ikeda, Naoto; Takashima, Tomoyuki; Ishii, Akio; Iijima, Hiroko; Nishiguchi, Shuhei

    2016-12-01

    L-carnitine supplementation has been suggested to show several favorable effects on patients with liver cirrhosis (LC). However, there have been no reports regarding the effect of L-carnitine on energy metabolism in patients with LC using indirect calorimetry which is a well-established method for assessing the degree of liver malnutrition. We examined the effect of L-carnitine in patients with LC on energy metabolism using indirect calorimetry. A total of 13 LC patients who are scheduled to be treated with L-carnitine (1,800 mg/day) were analyzed in this study. None of the patients previously received L-carnitine. An evaluation of the nutritional status was performed at the initiation of L-carnitine therapy and after 4 weeks of L-carnitine therapy. We evaluated the effect of L-carnitine on the nutritional status and energy metabolism by comparing various clinical variables at these two time points. In addition, the changes in the nutritional status of the patients were also evaluated using indirect calorimetry. After 4 weeks of L-carnitine treatment, for all cases, the mean substrate oxidation rates of carbohydrate (%C) increased from 37.6% to 48.2%, the mean substrate oxidation rates of fat (%F) decreased from 40.2% to 31.9% and the mean substrate oxidation rates of protein (%P) decreased from 22.2% to 19.9%. In a subgroup analysis of patients with baseline non-protein respiratory quotient (npRQ) < 0.85, the mean %C increased from 15.3% to 34.2%, the mean %F decreased from 59.9% to 45.1%, and the mean %P decreased from 24.8% to 20.6%. After 4 weeks of L-carnitine treatment, for all cases (n = 13), the mean value of npRQ increased in comparison with the baseline levels, although the difference was not significant (0.868 ± 0.060 vs. 0.838 ± 0.097, P = 0.19). Conversely, in patients with baseline npRQ < 0.85, the npRQ value significantly increased after 4 weeks treatment of L-carnitine compared with the baseline levels (0.827 ± 0.030 vs. 0.760 ± 0.043, P = 0

  19. Effects of dietary L-carnitine and coenzyme Q10 supplementation on performance and ascites mortality of broilers.

    PubMed

    Geng, Ailian; Guo, Yuming; Yuan, Jianmin

    2004-12-01

    The study was conducted to determine the effects of dietary L-carnitine and coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) supplementation on growth performance and ascites mortality of broilers. A 3 x 3 factorial arrangement was employed with three levels (0, 75 and 150 mg/kg) of L-carnitine and three levels of CoQ10 (0, 20 and 40 mg/kg) supplementation during the experiment. Five hundred and forty one-day-old Arbor Acre male broiler chicks were randomly allocated into nine groups with six replicates each. All birds were fed with the basal diets from day 1 to 7 and changed to the experimental diets from day 8. During day 15 to 21 all the birds were exposed to low ambient temperature (15-18 degrees C) to induce ascites. The results showed that under this condition, growth performance of broilers were not significantly affected by CoQ10 or L-carnitine + CoQ10 supplementation during week 0-3 and 0-6, but body weight gain (BWG) of broilers was significantly reduced by 150 mg/ kg L-carnitine during week 0-6. Packed cell volume (PCV) of broilers was significantly decreased by L-carnitine and L-carnitine + CoQ10 supplementation (P < 0.05). Erythrocyte osmotic fragility (EOF), ascites heart index (AHI) and ascites mortality of broilers were significantly decreased by L-carnitine, CoQ10 and L-carnitine + CoQ10 supplementation. Though no significant changes were observed in total antioxidative capability (T-AOC), total superoxide dismutase (T-SOD) was increased by L-carnitine, CoQ10 and L-carnitine + CoQ10 supplementation (P < 0.05). Malonaldehyde (MDA) content was significantly decreased by CoQ10 and L-carnitine + CoQ10 supplementation. The results indicate that dietary L-carnitine and CoQ10 supplementation reduce ascites mortality of broilers; the reason may be partially associated with their antioxidative effects.

  20. Lotus leaf extract and L-carnitine influence different processes during the adipocyte life cycle

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The cellular and molecular mechanisms of adipose tissue biology have been studied extensively over the last two decades. Adipose tissue growth involves both an increase in fat cell size and the formation of mature adipocytes from precursor cells. To investigate how natural substances influence these two processes, we examined the effects of lotus leaf extract (Nelumbo nucifera-extract solution obtained from Silab, France) and L-carnitine on human preadipocytes and adipocytes. Methods For our in vitro studies, we used a lotus leaf extract solution alone or in combination with L-carnitine. Utilizing cultured human preadipocytes, we investigated lotus leaf extract solution-induced inhibition of triglyceride incorporation during adipogenesis and possible effects on cell viability. Studies on human adipocytes were performed aiming to elucidate the efficacy of lotus leaf extract solution to stimulate lipolytic activity. To further characterize lotus leaf extract solution-mediated effects, we determined the expression of the transcription factor adipocyte determination and differentiation factor 1 (ADD1/SREBP-1c) on the RNA- and protein level utilizing qRT-PCR and immunofluorescence analysis. Additionally, the effect of L-carnitine on beta-oxidation was analyzed using human preadipocytes and mature adipocytes. Finally, we investigated additive effects of a combination of lotus leaf extract solution and L-carnitine on triglyceride accumulation during preadipocyte/adipocyte differentiation. Results Our data showed that incubation of preadipocytes with lotus leaf extract solution significantly decreased triglyceride accumulation during adipogenesis without affecting cell viability. Compared to controls, adipocytes incubated with lotus leaf extract solution exhibited a significant increase in lipolysis-activity. Moreover, cell populations cultivated in the presence of lotus leaf extract solution showed a decrease in adipocyte differentiation capacity as indicated

  1. Lotus leaf extract and L-carnitine influence different processes during the adipocyte life cycle.

    PubMed

    Siegner, Ralf; Heuser, Stefan; Holtzmann, Ursula; Söhle, Jörn; Schepky, Andreas; Raschke, Thomas; Stäb, Franz; Wenck, Horst; Winnefeld, Marc

    2010-08-05

    The cellular and molecular mechanisms of adipose tissue biology have been studied extensively over the last two decades. Adipose tissue growth involves both an increase in fat cell size and the formation of mature adipocytes from precursor cells. To investigate how natural substances influence these two processes, we examined the effects of lotus leaf extract (Nelumbo nucifera-extract solution obtained from Silab, France) and L-carnitine on human preadipocytes and adipocytes. For our in vitro studies, we used a lotus leaf extract solution alone or in combination with L-carnitine. Utilizing cultured human preadipocytes, we investigated lotus leaf extract solution-induced inhibition of triglyceride incorporation during adipogenesis and possible effects on cell viability. Studies on human adipocytes were performed aiming to elucidate the efficacy of lotus leaf extract solution to stimulate lipolytic activity. To further characterize lotus leaf extract solution-mediated effects, we determined the expression of the transcription factor adipocyte determination and differentiation factor 1 (ADD1/SREBP-1c) on the RNA- and protein level utilizing qRT-PCR and immunofluorescence analysis. Additionally, the effect of L-carnitine on beta-oxidation was analyzed using human preadipocytes and mature adipocytes. Finally, we investigated additive effects of a combination of lotus leaf extract solution and L-carnitine on triglyceride accumulation during preadipocyte/adipocyte differentiation. Our data showed that incubation of preadipocytes with lotus leaf extract solution significantly decreased triglyceride accumulation during adipogenesis without affecting cell viability. Compared to controls, adipocytes incubated with lotus leaf extract solution exhibited a significant increase in lipolysis-activity. Moreover, cell populations cultivated in the presence of lotus leaf extract solution showed a decrease in adipocyte differentiation capacity as indicated by a decrease in the ADD1

  2. Evaluating effects of L-carnitine on human bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Fujisawa, Koichi; Takami, Taro; Fukui, Yumi; Quintanilha, Luiz Fernando; Matsumoto, Toshihiko; Yamamoto, Naoki; Sakaida, Isao

    2017-05-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent cells showing potential for use in regenerative medicine. Culture techniques that are more stable and methods for the more efficient production of MSCs with therapeutic efficacy are needed. We evaluate the effects of growing bone marrow (Bm)-derived MSCs in the presence of L-carnitine, which is believed to promote lipid metabolism and to suppress apoptosis. The presence of L-carnitine decreased the degree of drug-induced apoptosis and suppressed adipogenic differentiation. Metabolomic analysis by means of the exhaustive investigation of metabolic products showed that, in addition to increased β-oxidation and the expression of all carnitine derivatives other than deoxycarnitine (an intermediate in carnitine synthesis), polysaturated and polyunsaturated acids were down-regulated. An integrated analysis incorporating both serial analysis of gene expression and metabolomics revealed increases in cell survival, suggesting the utility of carnitine. The addition of carnitine elevated the oxygen consumption rate by BmMSCs that had been cultured for only a few generations and those that had become senescent following repeated replication indicating that mitochondrial activation occurred. Our exhaustive analysis of the effects of various carnitine metabolites thus suggests that the addition of L-carnitine to BmMSCs during expansion enables efficient cell production.

  3. L-carnitine supplementation decreases the left ventricular mass in patients undergoing hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Sakurabayashi, Tai; Miyazaki, Shigeru; Yuasa, Yasuko; Sakai, Shinji; Suzuki, Masashi; Takahashi, Sachio; Hirasawa, Yoshihei

    2008-06-01

    Patients on long-term hemodialysis become deficient in carnitine and are frequently treated with carnitine supplementation to offset their renal anemia, lipid abnormality and cardiac dysfunction. The therapeutic value of carnitine supplementation on left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) in patients with normal cardiac systolic function remains uncertain. The cardiac morphology and function of 10 patients given 10 mg/kg of L-carnitine orally, immediately after hemodialysis sessions 3 times per week for a 12-month period were compared with 10 untreated control patients. Using echocardiography, left ventricular fractional shortening (LVFS) and left ventricular mass index (LVMI) were measured before and after the study period. As a result, amounts of serum-free carnitine increased from 28.4+/-4.7 to 58.5+/-12.1 micromol/L. The LVMI decreased significantly from 151.8+/-21.2 to 134.0+/-16.0 g/m(2) in treated patients (p<0.01), yet the LVMI in untreated control patients did not change significantly (ie, from 153.3+/-28.2 to 167.1+/-43.1 g/m(2)). However, LVFS values remained unchanged in both groups. Although L-carnitine promoted a 31% reduction in erythropoietin requirements, hematocrit and blood pressure did not change during the study period. Supplementation with L-carnitine induced regression of LVH in patients on hemodialysis, even for those with normal systolic function.

  4. The effect of fermented buckwheat on producing l-carnitine- and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-enriched designer eggs.

    PubMed

    Park, Namhyeon; Lee, Tae-Kyung; Nguyen, Thi Thanh Hanh; An, Eun-Bae; Kim, Nahyun M; You, Young-Hyun; Park, Tae-Sub; Kim, Doman

    2017-07-01

    The potential of fermented buckwheat as a feed additive was studied to increase l-carnitine and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in designer eggs. Buckwheat contains high levels of lysine, methionine and glutamate, which are precursors for the synthesis of l-carnitine and GABA. Rhizopus oligosporus was used for the fermentation of buckwheat to produce l-carnitine and GABA that exert positive effects such as enhanced metabolism, antioxidant activities, immunity and blood pressure control. A novel analytical method for simultaneously detecting l-carnitine and GABA was developed using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) and LC/MS/MS. The fermented buckwheat extract contained 4 and 34 times more l-carnitine and GABA respectively compared with normal buckwheat. Compared with the control, the fermented buckwheat extract-fed group showed enriched l-carnitine (13.6%) and GABA (8.4%) in the yolk, though only l-carnitine was significantly different (P < 0.05). Egg production (9.4%), albumen weight (2.1%) and shell weight (5.8%) were significantly increased (P < 0.05). There was no significant difference in yolk weight, and total cholesterol (1.9%) and triglyceride (4.9%) in the yolk were lowered (P < 0.05). Fermented buckwheat as a feed additive has the potential to produce l-carnitine- and GABA-enriched designer eggs with enhanced nutrition and homeostasis. These designer eggs pose significant potential to be utilized in superfood production and supplement industries. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  5. The inhibitory effects of fluoroquinolones on L-carnitine transport in placental cell line BeWo.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Takeshi; Yasuda, Satoru; Osaka, Yuki; Asari, Masaru; Kobayashi, Masaki; Itagaki, Shirou; Iseki, Ken

    2008-03-03

    L-Carnitine plays an important role in lipid metabolism by facilitating the transport of long-chain fatty acids across the mitochondrial inner membrane followed by fatty acid beta-oxidation. It is known that members of the OCTN family play an important role in L-carnitine transport in the placenta. Investigation of drug-drug or drug-nutrient interaction in the placenta is important for establishment of safety drug medication during pregnancy. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of fluoroquinolones, inhibitors of OCTN2, on L-carnitine transport in the placenta which is known to have a high expression level of OCTN2. We investigated the inhibitory effect of five fluoroquinolones, ciprofloxacin (CPFX), gatifloxacin (GFLX), ofloxacin (OFLX), levofloxacin (LVFX) and grepafloxacin (GPFX), on L-carnitine transport mediated by OCTN2 in placental cell line BeWo cells. We found that all of the fluoroquinolones inhibited L-carnitine transport, GPFX being the strongest inhibitor. We also found that the inhibitory effects of LVFX and GPFX depended on their existence ratio of zwitterionic forms as, we reported previously. Furthermore, we elucidated the LVFX transport mechanism in BeWo cells. LVFX was transported actively by transporters. However, we found that LVFX transport was Na+-independent and l-carnitine had no inhibitory effect on LVFX transport, suggesting that LVFX acts as inhibitor of OCTN2, not as a substrate for OCTN2.

  6. Pharmacokinetics of propionyl-l-carnitine in humans: evidence for saturable tubular reabsorption

    PubMed Central

    Pace, S; Longo, A; Toon, S; Rolan, P; Evans, A M

    2000-01-01

    Aims Propionyl-l-carnitine (PLC) is an endogenous compound which, along with l-carnitine (LC) and acetyl-l-carnitine (ALC), forms a component of the endogenous carnitine pool in humans and most, if not all, animal species. PLC is currently under investigation for the treatment of peripheral artery disease, and the present study was conducted to assess the pharmacokinetics of intravenous propionyl-l-carnitine hydrochloride. Methods This was a placebo-controlled, double-blind, parallel group, dose-escalating study in which 24 healthy males were divided into four groups of six. Four subjects from each group received propionyl-l-carnitine hydrochloride and two received placebo. The doses (1 g, 2 g, 4 g and 8 g) were administered as a constant rate infusion over 2 h and blood and urine were collected for 24 h from the start of the infusion. PLC, ALC and LC in plasma and urine were quantified by h.p.l.c. Results All 24 subjects successfully completed the study and the infusions were well tolerated. In addition to the expected increase in PLC levels, the plasma concentrations and urinary excretion of LC and ALC also increased above baseline values following intravenous propionyl-l-carnitine hydrochloride administration. At a dose of 1 g, PLC was found to have a mean (± s.d.) half-life of 1.09 ± 0.15 h, a clearance of 11.6 ± 0.24 l h−1 and a volume of distribution of 18.3 ± 2.4 l. None of these parameters changed with dose. In placebo-treated subjects, endogenous PLC, LC and ALC underwent extensive renal tubular reabsorption, as indicated by renal excretory clearance to GFR ratios of less than 0.1. The renal-excretory clearance of PLC, which was 0.33 ± 0.38 l h−1 under baseline condition, increased (P < 0.001) from 1.98 ± 0.59 l h−1 at a dose of 1 g to 5.55 ± 1.50 l h−1 at a dose of 8 g (95% confidence interval for the difference was 2.18,4.97). As a consequence, the percent of the dose excreted unchanged in urine increased (P < 0.001) from 18.1 ± 5.5% (1 g

  7. [Effect and safety of L-carnitine in the treatment of idiopathic oligoasthenozoospermia: a systemic review].

    PubMed

    Shang, Xue-jun; Wang, Ling-ling; Mo, Dun-sheng; Cai, Hong-cai; Zheng, Da-dong; Zhou, Yuan-zhong

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the effect and safety of L-carnitine in the treatment of idiopathic oligoasthenozoospermia based on current clinical evidence. We searched the Cochrane Library, PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CNKI, VIP, CBM and Wanfang Database from the establishment to April 2014 for the published literature on the treatment of idiopathic oligoasthenozoospermia with L-carnitine. We conducted literature screening, data extraction, and assessment of the methodological quality of the included trials according to the inclusion and exclusion criteria, followed by statistical analysis with the RevMan 5. 2 software. Seven randomized controlled trials involving 751 patients with idiopathic oligoasthenozoospermia met the inclusion criteria, and 678 of them were included in the meta-analysis. L-carnitine treatment achieved a significantly increased rate of spontaneous pregnancy as compared with the control group (RR = 3.2, 95% CI 1.74 to 5.87, P = 0.0002). After 12-16 and 24-26 weeks of medication, total sperm motility (WMD = 5.21, 95% CI 2.78 to 7.64, P < 0.0001 and WMD = 9.29, 95% CI 1.28 to 17.29, P = 0.02) and the percentage of progressively motile sperm (WMD = 12.44, 95% CI 4.58 to 20.31, P = 0.002 and WMD = 9.76, 95% CI 3.56 to 15.97, P = 0.002) were remarkably higher than those in the control group, but no statistically significant differences were observed in sperm concentration between the two groups (WMD = 4.91, 95% CI -2.63 to 12.45, P = 0.2 and WMD = 0.93, 95% CI -3.48 to 5.34, P = 0.68). After 12-16 weeks of treatment, the percentage of morphologically abnormal sperm was markedly decreased in the L-carnitine group as compared with the control (WMD = -2.48, 95% CI -4.35 to -0.61, P = 0.009), but showed no significant difference from the latter group after 24-26 weeks (WMD = -4.38, 95% CI -9.66 to 0.89, P = 0.1). No statistically significant difference was found in the semen volume between the two groups after 12-16 or 24-26 weeks of medication (WMD = -0.13, 95% CI -0.43 to

  8. Gender differences in locomotor and stereotypic behavior associated with l-carnitine treatment in mice.

    PubMed

    Benvenga, Salvatore; Itri, Elenora; Hauser, Peter; De Tolla, Louis; Yu, Sui-Foh; Testa, Giuseppe; Pappalardo, Maria Angela; Trimarchi, Francesco; Amato, Antonino

    2011-02-01

    The carnitines exert neuroprotective and neuromodulatory actions, and carnitine supplementation increases locomotor activity (LMA) in experimental animals. We measured 13 indexes of LMA and 3 indexes of stereotypic activity (STA) in adult male and female caged mice. In a randomized 4-week trial, 10 males and 10 females received 50 mg/kg body weight PO l-carnitine, and another 10 males and 10 females received placebo. Compared with placebo-treated females, placebo-treated males had a greater number of stereotypies (NSTs), stereotypy counts (STCs), stereotypy time (STT), and right front time (RFT), but smaller total distance traveled (TDT), margin distance (MD), number of vertical movements (NVMs), and left rear time (LRT). Compared with placebo-treated males, carnitine-treated males had greater horizontal activity (HA), movement time (MT), NVM, STT, TDT, STC, MD, LRT, and clockwise revolutions (CRs), but smaller left front time (LFT) and RFT. Compared with placebo-treated females, carnitine-treated females had greater NST, STC, STT, LFT, and RFT, but smaller NM, HA, NVM, VA, MT, anticlockwise revolutions (ACRs), CR, TDT, and MD; right rear time (RRT) remained statistically insignificant across all comparisons. In summary, l-carnitine caused gender differences to persist for STC, diminish for NST and STT, disappear for LRT and NVM, change in the opposite direction for TDT and MD, appear de novo for HA, VA, NM, MT, and LFT, and remain absent for RRT and ACR. Some indexes of LMA and STA are sexually dimorphic in adult mice, and l-carnitine differentially maintains, diminishes/cancels, inverts, or creates the sexual dimorphism of particular indexes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier HS Journals, Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. [Micronutrients in oncology. Current data about vitamin D, selenium, L-carnitine and vitamin C].

    PubMed

    Gröber, Uwe; Mücke, Ralph; Holzhauer, Peter; Kisters, Klaus

    2013-04-01

    Many patients receiving cancer treatment use micronutrient supplements, with the intention to complement their cancer treatment, or help them cope with the therapy- and disease-associated side-effects. Up to 90% of the cancer patients are adding antioxidants without the knowledge of the treating physician. There are many concerns that antioxidants might decrease the effectiveness of chemotherapy, but increasing evidence suggests a benefit when antioxidants and other micronutrients, such as selenium, L-carnitine and vitamin D are added to conventional cytotoxic therapies. It is imperative that physicians discuss the use ofantioxidant and other micronutrient supplements with their cancer patients and educate them about potentially negative, but also potentially beneficial effects.

  10. Effects of acute L-carnitine intake on metabolic and blood lactate levels of elite badminton players.

    PubMed

    Eroğlu, Hüseyin; Senel, Omer; Güzel, Nevin A

    2008-04-01

    Purpose of this study is to research the effects of acute L-Carnitine intake on badminton players' metabolic and blood lactate values. A total of 16 Turkish national badminton players (8 male, 8 female) were voluntarily participated into study. MaxVO2, MET, energy consumption, HR (heart rate), VE (minute ventilation), R (respiratory exchange ratio), AT (anaerobic threshold), oxygen pulse and blood lactate (LA) of subjects were measured by Sensormedics VmaxST and Accutrend Lactate Analyzer. The participants were subjected to the test protocol twice before and after 2g of L-Carnitine intake. The data were evaluated by the use of SPSS 13.0 for Windows. No significant differences were found between 1st. (without L-Carnitine intake) and 2nd. (with L-Carnitine intake) measurements of female participants as regards to all measured parameters. There was a significant difference in EMHR (exercise maximum heart rate) of males between two measurements (p<0.05). However the differences in other parameters were not significant. AT values of female subjects were not significant difference (p>0.05). Respiratory exchange ratio of males was significantly different at anaerobic threshold (p<0.05). Results of this study show that L-carnitine intake one hour prior to the exercise has no effect on the metabolic and blood lactate values of badminton players.

  11. Effects of L-carnitine and coenzyme q10 on impaired spermatogenesis caused by isoproterenol in male rats.

    PubMed

    Ghanbarzadeh, S; Garjani, A; Ziaee, M; Khorrami, A

    2014-09-01

    Nowadays, cardiovascular diseases and male infertility are two big health problems in industrial countries.The aim of the present study was to investigate the protective role of coenzyme Q10 and L-Carnitine pretreatment in the impaired spermatogenesis caused by isoproterenol (ISO) in male rats.Thirty-two male Wistar rats were allocated in 4 groups. ISO was injected for 2 consecutive days (100 mg/kg) in ISO treated groups. Before ISO administration, pretreatment with Coenzyme Q10 (10 mg/kg/day) and L-Carnitine (350 mg/kg/day) were conducted for 20 consecutive days. Sex hormones level, malondialdehyde (MDA) and total antioxidant concentration as well as testis, epididymis and seminal vesicle weight were investigated.Increase in the concentration of MDA and decrease in total antioxidant level was observed following ISO administration. Accordingly, the sperm viability as well as testis, epididymis and seminal vesicle weights were decreased. In the case of sex hormones, the testosterone and LH levels were decreased and the concentration of FSH was increased. Pretreatment with L-carnitine and Coenzyme Q10 significantly decreased the MDA level and increased total antioxidant, LH and testosterone levels. Pretreatment with L-carnitine and Coenzyme Q10 also improved semen parameters and organs weight which were impaired by ISO administration.L-carnitine and Coenzyme Q10 pretreatment could protect spermatogenesis in male rats with ISO administration. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. Automation of a spectrophotometric method for measuring L -carnitine in human blood serum

    PubMed Central

    Galan, Amparo; Padros, Anna; Arambarri, Marta; Martin, Silvia

    1998-01-01

    A spectrometric method for the determination of L-carnitine has been developed based on the reaction of the 5, 5 ′ dithiobis-(2-nitrobenzoic) acid (DTNB) and adapted to a Technicon RA-2000 automatic analyser Química Farmacéutica Bayer, S.A.). The detection limit of the method is 13.2 μmol/l, with a measurement interval ranging from 30 to 320 μmoll1. Imprecision and accuracy are good even at levels close to the detection limit (coeffcient of variation of 5.4% for within-run imprecision for a concentration of 35 μmol/l). A good correlation was observed between the method studied and the radiometric method. The method evaluated has suffcient analytical sensitivity to diagnose carnitine deficiencies. The short time period required for sample processing (30 samples in 40min), the simple methodology and apparatus, the ease of personnel training and the low cost of the reagents make this method a good alternative to the classical radiometric method for evaluating serum L-carnitine in clinical laboratories without radioactive installations. PMID:18924818

  13. Automation of a spectrophotometric method for measuring L -carnitine in human blood serum.

    PubMed

    Galan, A; Padros, A; Arambarri, M; Martin, S

    1998-01-01

    A spectrometric method for the determination of L-carnitine has been developed based on the reaction of the 5,5' dithiobis-(2-nitrobenzoic) acid (DTNB) and adapted to a Technicon RA-2000 automatic analyser Química Farmacéutica Bayer, S.A.). The detection limit of the method is 13.2 mumol/l, with a measurement interval ranging from 30 to 320 mumoll1. Imprecision and accuracy are good even at levels close to the detection limit (coeffcient of variation of 5.4% for within-run imprecision for a concentration of 35 mumol/l). A good correlation was observed between the method studied and the radiometric method. The method evaluated has suffcient analytical sensitivity to diagnose carnitine deficiencies. The short time period required for sample processing (30 samples in 40min), the simple methodology and apparatus, the ease of personnel training and the low cost of the reagents make this method a good alternative to the classical radiometric method for evaluating serum L-carnitine in clinical laboratories without radioactive installations.

  14. The effects of L-carnitine on spinal cord ischemia/reperfusion injury in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Tetik, O; Yagdi, T; Islamoglu, F; Calkavur, T; Posacioglu, H; Atay, Y; Ayik, F; Canpolat, L; Yuksel, M

    2002-02-01

    Paraplegia after distal aortic aneurysm repair remains a persistent clinical problem. We hypothesized that the tolerance of the spinal cord to an ischemic period could be improved with hypothermic Ringer's Lactate containing L-Carnitine. Twenty-eight New Zealand white rabbits were used as spinal cord ischemia models. We separated rabbits into four equal groups and clamped each animal's abdominal aorta distal to the left renal artery. We occluded the aortas above the iliac bifurcation for 30 minutes. In group I, the infrarenal aorta was clamped without infusing any solution. In group II, Ringer's Lactate solution was infused at + 25degrees C for 3 minutes at a rate of 5 ml/min into the isolated aortic segments immediately after cross-clamping and the last 3 minutes of ischemia. In group III, Ringer's Lactate solution at +3 degrees C was given in the same method as that of group II. In group IV, Ringer's Lactate solution at +3 degrees C plus 100 mg/kg of L-carnitine was infused using the same technique. We assessed the neurological status of the hind limbs 24 and 48 hours after operation according to Tarlov's criteria. All animals were sacrificed and spinal cords were harvested for histological analyses. The neurological status in groups III and IV was significantly superior to that of groups I and II. All the animals in group I had complete hind-limb paraplegia. Complete hind-limb paraplegia occurred in 5 rabbits in group II. Two of the 7 animals in group III had spastic paraplegia, and none at all in group IV. Histological analysis of the cross-clamped segments of the rabbits with paraplegia in group I, II and III revealed changes consistent with ischemic injury, while findings were normal for the normal animals in group III and IV. In this model, the infusion of hypothermic Ringer's Lactate contained L-carnitine provided sufficient spinal cord protection against ischemia. Clinically, this may be a useful adjunct for prevention of paraplegia during surgery of the

  15. Protective effects of l-carnitine and piracetam against mitochondrial permeability transition and PC3 cell necrosis induced by simvastatin.

    PubMed

    Costa, Rute A P; Fernandes, Mariana P; de Souza-Pinto, Nadja C; Vercesi, Aníbal E

    2013-02-15

    Mitochondrial oxidative stress followed by membrane permeability transition (MPT) has been considered as a possible mechanism for statins cytotoxicity. Statins use has been associated with reduced risk of cancer incidence, especially prostate cancer. Here we investigated the pathways leading to simvastatin-induced prostate cancer cell death as well as the mechanisms of cell death protection by l-carnitine or piracetam. These compounds are known to prevent and/or protect against cell death mediated by oxidative mitochondrial damage induced by a variety of conditions, either in vivo or in vitro. The results provide evidence that simvastatin induced MPT and cell necrosis were sensitive to either l-carnitine or piracetam in a dose-dependent fashion and mediated by additive mechanisms. When combined, l-carnitine and piracetam acted at concentrations significantly lower than they act individually. These results shed new light into both the cytotoxic mechanisms of statins and the mechanisms underlying the protection against MPT and cell death by the compounds l-carnitine and piracetam. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. [Can the treatment with L-carnitine improve the inflammation in chronic hemodialysis patients?].

    PubMed

    Grazi, G; Meriggioli, M; Donati, G

    2004-01-01

    Inflammation in patients on chronic hemodialysis (HD) is related to malnutrition and atherosclerosis; anemia is also often present in these patients. It has been demonstrated that l-carnitina treatment, in addition to reducing the need for erythropoietin (EPO), improves nutritional parameters and cardiac performance. To evaluate the effect of l-carnitine on the inflammatory pathology in patients on chronic HD, we studied 11 patients with no sure signs of malnutrition, flogistic and infective pathologies and with C-reactive protein (CRP) <2 mg/dL. We evaluated at baseline, after 6 and 12 months CRP, serum albumin, hemoglobin (Hb),nPCR and EPO weekly requirement. We observed a reduction in CRP (from 0.88 +/- 0.65 to 0.42 +/- 0.17 mg/dL after 6 months and to 0.50 + 0.36 mg/dL after 12 months), an increase in serum albumin (from 10.9 +/- 1.23 to 2.08 +/- 1.88 and to 11.8 +/- 1.15 g/dL) and an increase in nPCR (from 0.96 +/- 0.09 to 1.15 +/- 0.2 and to 1.16 +/- 0.18 g/kg/die); EPO weekly requirement decreased (from 7363 +/- 2941 to 5909 +/- 3207 units after 6 months and to 5363 +/- 3139 units after 12 months). These results seem to underline a positive effect of l-carnitine on the inflammatory pathology of patients on chronic hemodialytic treatment.

  17. Effects of combination of sibutramine and L-carnitine compared with sibutramine monotherapy on inflammatory parameters in diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Derosa, Giuseppe; Maffioli, Pamela; Salvadeo, Sibilla A T; Ferrari, Ilaria; Gravina, Alessia; Mereu, Roberto; D'Angelo, Angela; Palumbo, Ilaria; Randazzo, Sabrina; Cicero, Arrigo F G

    2011-03-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effects of 12-month treatment with sibutramine plus L-carnitine compared with sibutramine alone on body weight, glycemic control, insulin resistance, and inflammatory state in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients. Two hundred fifty-four patients with uncontrolled type 2 diabetes mellitus (glycated hemoglobin [HbA(1c)] >8.0%) in therapy with different oral hypoglycemic agents or insulin were enrolled in this study and randomized to take sibutramine 10 mg plus L-carnitine 2 g or sibutramine 10 mg in monotherapy. We evaluated at baseline and after 3, 6, 9, and 12 months these parameters: body weight, body mass index, HbA(1c), fasting plasma glucose, postprandial plasma glucose, fasting plasma insulin, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance index, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, leptin, tumor necrosis factor-α, adiponectin, vaspin, and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein. Sibutramine plus L-carnitine gave a faster improvement of fasting plasma glucose, postprandial plasma glucose, lipid profile, leptin, tumor necrosis factor-α, and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein compared with sibutramine alone. Furthermore, there was a better improvement of body weight, HbA(1c), fasting plasma insulin, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance index, vaspin, and adiponectin with sibutramine plus L-carnitine compared with sibutramine alone. Sibutramine plus L-carnitine gave a better and faster improvement of all the analyzed parameters compared with sibutramine alone without giving any severe adverse effect. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Effects of dietary L-carnitine and coenzyme Q10 at different supplemental ages on growth performance and some immune response in ascites-susceptible broilers.

    PubMed

    Geng, Ailian; Li, Baoming; Guo, Yuming

    2007-02-01

    Effects of dietary L-carnitine and coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) at different supplemental ages on performance and some immune response were investigated in ascites-susceptible broilers. A 3 x 2 x 2 factorial design was used consisting of L-carnitine supplementation (0, 75, and 100 mg/kg), CoQ10 supplementation (0 and 40 mg/kg) and different supplemental ages (from day 1 on and from day 10 on). A total of 480 one-day-old Arbor Acre male broiler chicks were randomly allocated to 12 groups, every group had five replicates, each with eight birds. The birds were fed a corn-soybean based diet for six weeks. From day 10-21, all the birds were exposed to a low ambient temperature (12-15 degrees C) to increase the susceptibility to ascites. No significant effects were observed on growth performance by L-carnitine, CoQ10 supplementation, and different supplemental ages. Packed cell volume was significantly decreased by L-carnitine supplementation alone, and ascites heart index and ascites mortality were decreased by L-carnitine, CoQ10 supplementation alone, and L-carnitine + CoQ10 supplementation together (p < 0.05). Heart index of broilers was significantly improved by L-carnitine, CoQ10 supplementation alone during 0-3 week. Serum IgG content was improved by L-carnitine supplementation alone (p < 0.05), but lysozyme activity was increased by L-carnitine + CoQ10 supplementation together (p < 0.05). A significant L-carnitine by supplemental age interaction was observed in lysozyme activity. L-carnitine supplementation alone had no effects on the peripheral blood lymphocyte (PBL) proliferation in response to concanavalin A (ConA) and lipopolysaccharide, but supplemental CoQ10 alone and L-carnitine+ CoQ10 together decreased the PBL proliferation in response to ConA (p < 0.05). The present study suggested that L-carnitine + CoQ10 supplementation together had positive effects on some immune response of ascites-susceptible broilers, which might benefit for the reduction of broilers

  19. Effects of L-carnitine on reproductive performance, milk composition, placental development and IGF concentrations in blood plasma and placental chorions in sows.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shihai; Tian, Min; Song, Hanqing; Shi, Kui; Wang, Yijiang; Guan, Wutai

    2018-05-29

    Recent studies have shown that L-carnitine supplementation of sows during pregnancy and lactation enhances their reproductive performance, but the underlying mechanisms are still needed to be further confirmed. This study was conducted to investigate the function of L-carnitine on placental development, milk nutrient content and release of hormones in sows. In this experiment, 40 multiparous crossbred sows (Yorkshire × Landrace) were allotted to two groups fed diets with or without a supplemental 50 mg/kg L-carnitine. The experimental diets were fed from d 1 post-coitus until d 21 post-partum. L-carnitine-treated sow had fewer weak piglets (p < 0.05) and a greater percentage of oestrus by 5 after 5-d post-partum (p < 0.05) than control sows. The percentage fat from colostrum was greater in L-carnitine-treated sow than control sows (p < 0.05). L-carnitine-treated sows had greater plasma concentrations of triglyceride and insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 and lesser plasma concentrations of glucose and IGF-binding protein (IGFBP-3) on day 60 of pregnancy (p < 0.05). A clearer structure of chorions, better-developed capillaries and absence of necrosis were observed in L-carnitine-treated sows compared with control sows. The protein abundance of IGF-1 and IGF-2 in placental chorions was greater in L-carnitine-treated sows compared with control sows (p < 0.05). This study suggests that sows fed an L-carnitine supplemented diet during pregnancy improved reproductive performance through enhancement of placental development and by increasing IGF concentrations in blood plasma and placental chorions.

  20. [Myocardial protective effect of L-carnitine in children with hand, foot and mouth disease caused by Coxsackie A16 virus].

    PubMed

    Cui, Ya-Jie; Song, Chun-Lan; Chen, Fang; Li, Peng; Cheng, Yi-Bing

    2017-08-01

    To investigate the myocardial protective effect of L-carnitine in children with hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) caused by Coxsackie A16 virus and possible mechanisms. A total of 60 HFMD children with abnormal myocardial enzyme after Coxsackie A16 virus infection were enrolled and randomly divided into L-carnitine group and fructose-1,6-diphosphate group (fructose group), with 30 children in each group. The two groups were given L-carnitine or fructose diphosphate in addition to antiviral and heat clearance treatment. Another 30 healthy children who underwent physical examination were enrolled as control group. The changes in myocardial zymogram, malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and apoptosis factors sFas and sFasL after treatment were compared between groups. There was no significant difference in treatment response between the L-carnitine group and the fructose group (P>0.05). One child in the fructose group progressed to critical HFMD, which was not observed in the L-carnitine group. Before treatment, the L-carnitine group and the fructose group had significantly higher indices of myocardial zymogram and levels of MDA, sFas, and sFasL and a significantly lower level of SOD than the control group (P<0.05), while there were no significant differences in these indices between the L-carnitine group and the fructose group (P>0.05). After treatment, the L-carnitine group and the fructose group had significant reductions in the indices of myocardial zymogram and levels of MDA, sFas, and sFasL and a significant increase in the level of SOD (P<0.05); the fructose group had a significantly higher level of creatine kinase (CK) than the control group and the L-carnitine group, and there were no significant differences in other myocardial enzyme indices, MDA, sFas, and sFasL between the L-carnitine group and the fructose group, as well as between the L-carnitine and fructose groups and the control group (P>0.05). SOD level was negatively correlated with

  1. L-Carnitine supplementation improved clinical status without changing oxidative stress and lipid profile in women with knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Malek Mahdavi, Aida; Mahdavi, Reza; Kolahi, Sousan; Zemestani, Maryam; Vatankhah, Amir-Mansour

    2015-08-01

    Considering the pathologic importance of oxidative stress and altered lipid metabolism in osteoarthritis (OA), this study aimed to investigate the effect of l-carnitine supplementation on oxidative stress, lipid profile, and clinical status in women with knee OA. We hypothesized that l-carnitine would improve clinical status by modulating serum oxidative stress and lipid profile. In this randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, 72 overweight or obese women with mild to moderate knee OA were randomly allocated into 2 groups to receive 750 mg/d l-carnitine or placebo for 8 weeks. Dietary intake was evaluated using 24-hour recall for 3 days. Serum malondialdehyde (MDA), total antioxidant capacity (TAC) and lipid profile, visual analog scale for pain intensity, and patient global assessment of severity of disease were assessed before and after supplementation. Only 69 patients (33 in the l-carnitine group and 36 in the placebo group) completed the study. l-Carnitine supplementation resulted in significant reductions in serum MDA (2.46 ± 1.13 vs 2.16 ± 0.94 nmol/mL), total cholesterol (216.09 ± 34.54 vs 206.12 ± 39.74 mg/dL), and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (129.45 ± 28.69 vs 122.05 ± 32.76 mg/dL) levels compared with baseline (P < .05), whereas these parameters increased in the placebo group. Serum triglyceride, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and TAC levels did not change significantly in both groups (P > .05). No significant differences were observed in dietary intake, serum lipid profile, MDA, and TAC levels between groups after adjusting for baseline values and covariates (P > .05). There were significant intragroup and intergroup differences in pain intensity and patient global assessment of disease status after supplementation (P < .05). Collectively, l-carnitine improved clinical status without changing oxidative stress and lipid profile significantly in women with knee OA. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Pharmaco-electroencephalographic and clinical effects of the cholinergic substance--acetyl-L-carnitine--in patients with organic brain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, W M; Dietrich, B; Hiersemenzel, R

    1990-01-01

    In two double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical studies of the nootropic compound acetyl-L-carnitine on the electroencephalogram (EEG) and impaired brain functions of elderly outpatients with mild to moderate cognitive decline of the organic brain syndrome, statistically significant effects could be detected after eight weeks (on the EEG), and after 12 weeks of treatment (on the physician's clinical global impression and the patient-rated level of activities of daily living). Side-effects of acetyl-L-carnitine were generally minor and overall rare. Longer treatment periods and further specifications with regard to the aetiopathology and degree of cognitive impairment are recommended for further clinical studies of this promising compound.

  3. Effects of dietary L-carnitine and ractopamine HCl on the metabolic response to handling in finishing pigs.

    PubMed

    James, B W; Tokach, M D; Goodband, R D; Nelssen, J L; Dritz, S S; Owen, K Q; Woodworth, J C; Sulabo, R C

    2013-09-01

    Two experiments (384 pigs; C22 × L326; PIC) were conducted to determine the interactive effect of dietary L-carnitine and ractopamine HCl (RAC) on the metabolic response of pigs to handling. Experiments were arranged as split-split plots with handling as the main plot and diets as subplots (4 pens per treatment). Dietary L-carnitine (0 or 50 mg/kg) was fed from 36.0 kg to the end of the experiments (118 kg), and RAC (0 or 20 mg/kg) was fed the last 4 wk of each experiment. At the end of each experiment, 4 pigs per pen were assigned to 1 of 2 handling treatments. Gently handled pigs were moved at a moderate walking pace 3 times through a 50-m course and up and down a 15° loading ramp. Aggressively handled pigs were moved as fast as possible 3 times through the same course, but up and down a 30° ramp, and shocked 3 times with an electrical prod. Blood was collected immediately before and after handling in Exp. 1 and immediately after and 1 h after handling in Exp. 2. Feeding RAC increased (P < 0.01) ADG and G:F, but there was no effect (P > 0.10) of L-carnitine on growth performance. In Exp. 1 and 2, aggressive handling increased (P < 0.01) blood lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), lactate, cortisol, and rectal temperature and decreased blood pH. In Exp. 1, there was a RAC × handling interaction (P < 0.06) for the difference in pre- and posthandling blood pH and rectal temperature. Aggressively handled pigs fed RAC had decreased blood pH and increased rectal temperature compared with gently handled pigs, demonstrating the validity of the handling model. Pigs fed RAC had increased (P < 0.01) LDH compared with pigs not fed RAC. Pigs fed L-carnitine had increased (P < 0.03) lactate compared with pigs not fed L-carnitine. In Exp. 2, pigs fed RAC had lower (P < 0.02) blood pH immediately after handling, but pH returned to control levels by 1 h posthandling. Lactate, LDH, cortisol, and rectal temperature changes from immediately posthandling to 1 h posthandling were not

  4. Effect of glycine propionyl-L-carnitine on aerobic and anaerobic exercise performance.

    PubMed

    Smith, Webb A; Fry, Andrew C; Tschume, Lesley C; Bloomer, Richard J

    2008-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of glycine propionyl-L-carnitine (GPLC) supplementation and endurance training for 8 wk on aerobic- and anaerobic-exercise performance in healthy men and women (age 18-44 yr). Participants were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 groups: placebo (n=9), 1 g/d GPLC (n=11), or 3 g/d GPLC (n=12), in a double-blind fashion. Muscle carnitine (vastus lateralis), VO(2peak), exercise time to fatigue, anaerobic threshold, anaerobic power, and total work were measured at baseline and after an 8-wk aerobic-training program. There were no statistical differences (p> .05) between or within the 3 groups for any performance-related variable or muscle carnitine concentrations after 8 wk of supplementation and training. These results suggest that up to 3 g/d GPLC for 8 wk in conjunction with aerobic-exercise training is ineffective for increasing muscle carnitine content and has no significant effects on aerobic- or anaerobic-exercise performance.

  5. Dynamics of L-Carnitine in Plasma and Urine in Patients Undergoing Cisplatin Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Gomi, Daisuke; Tanaka, Aika; Fukushima, Toshirou; Kobayashi, Takashi; Matsushita, Hirohide; Sekiguchi, Nodoka; Sakamoto, Akiyuki; Sasaki, Shigeru; Mamiya, Keiko; Koizumi, Tomonobu

    2017-01-01

    Several studies have indicated that cisplatin (cis-diamminedichloroplatinum II; CDDP) causes urinary excretion of L-carnitine (LC). However, the underlying cofactors affecting the increased urinary excretion remain unclear. The present study was performed to evaluate the dynamics of LC in plasma and urine after CDDP chemotherapy and to examine the relations with clinical parameters, such as gender, body mass index (BMI), and renal function. Twenty-two patients treated with CDDP therapy were selected. Blood and urine samples were taken from patients before starting CDDP treatment (day 0), on the next day (day 1), and on the seventh day (day 7). We measured plasma and urine concentrations of total, free, and acyl-LC, and examined the relationships with gender, age, treatment cycle, skeletal muscle mass, BMI, glomerular filtration rate, and change in creatinine concentration after CDDP administration. Both urinary and plasma concentrations of 3 types of LC increased markedly on day 1 and subsequently reverted to the pre-CDDP level on day 7. There was a positive correlation between the % changes in plasma and urine LC (correlation coefficient 0.59, p = 0.003) on day 1, but no significant relations were seen in other clinical parameters. CDDP transiently increased plasma LC levels. The mechanism seemed to involve recruitment for marked urinary loss of LC. However, these changes in plasma and urinary LC levels were not related to clinical factors, suggesting that the dynamics of LC were independent of preexisting physical parameters. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Assessment of pharmacokinetic interaction between piracetam and l-carnitine in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Gustavo D; Zaffalon, Gabriela Traldi; Silveira, Antonio Sérgio; Ramacciato, Juliana Cama; Motta, Rogério Heládio Lopes; Gagliano-Jucá, Thiago; Lopes, Anibal Gil; de Almeida Magalhães, José Cássio; De Nucci, Gilberto

    2016-04-01

    A rapid, sensitive and specific method for quantifying piracetam in human plasma using Piracetam d-8 as the internal standard (IS) is described. The analyte and the IS were extracted from plasma by one-step precipitation of protein using an acetonitrile (100%). The extracts were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS). The method had a chromatographic run time of 3.8 min and a linear calibration curve over the range 0.5-50 µg/mL (r > 0.99). This LC-MS-MS procedure was used to assess the bioavailability of two piracetam formulations: piracetam + l-carnitine (Piracar®; 270/330 mg tablet) and piracetam (Nootropil®; 800 mg tablet) in healthy volunteers of both sexes. The geometric means with corresponding 90% confidence interval (CI) for test/reference percentage ratios were 88.49% (90% CI = 81.19 - 96.46) for peak concentration/dose and 102.55% (90% CI = 100.62 - 104.51) for AUCinf /dose. The limit of quantitation of 0.5 µg/mL is well suited for pharmacokinetic studies in healthy volunteers. It was concluded that piracetam (Piracar®; 270/330 mg tablet) has a bioavailability equivalent to the piracetam (Nootropil®; 800 mg tablet) formulation with regard to both the rate and the extent of absorption. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Protein and lipid damage in maple syrup urine disease patients: l-carnitine effect.

    PubMed

    Mescka, Caroline Paula; Wayhs, Carlos Alberto Yasin; Vanzin, Camila Simioni; Biancini, Giovana Brondani; Guerreiro, Gilian; Manfredini, Vanusa; Souza, Carolina; Wajner, Moacir; Dutra-Filho, Carlos Severo; Vargas, Carmen Regla

    2013-02-01

    Maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) is an inborn error of metabolism biochemically characterized by elevated levels of the branched chain amino acids (BCAA) leucine, isoleucine, valine and the corresponding branched-chain α-keto acids. This disorder is clinically characterized by ketoacidosis, seizures, coma, psychomotor delay and mental retardation whose pathophysiology is not completely understood. Recent studies have shown that oxidative stress may be involved in neuropathology of MSUD. l-Carnitine (l-Car) plays a central role in the cellular energy metabolism because it transports long-chain fatty acids for oxidation and ATP generation. In recent years many studies have demonstrated the antioxidant role of this compound. In this work, we investigated the effect of BCAA-restricted diet supplemented or not with l-Car on lipid peroxidation and in protein oxidation in MSUD patients. We found a significant increase of malondialdehyde and of carbonyl content in plasma of MSUD patients under BCAA-restricted diet compared to controls. Furthermore, patients under BCAA-restricted diet plus l-Car supplementation presented a marked reduction of malondialdehyde content in relation to controls, reducing the lipid peroxidation. In addition, free l-Car concentrations were negatively correlated with malondialdehyde levels. Our data show that l-Car may have an antioxidant effect, protecting against the lipid peroxidation and this could represent an additional therapeutic approach to the patients affected by MSUD. Copyright © 2012 ISDN. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Differentially Expressed Genes in Hirudo medicinalis Ganglia after Acetyl-L-Carnitine Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Federighi, Giuseppe; Macchi, Monica; Bernardi, Rodolfo; Scuri, Rossana; Brunelli, Marcello; Durante, Mauro; Traina, Giovanna

    2013-01-01

    Acetyl-l-carnitine (ALC) is a naturally occurring substance that, when administered at supra-physiological concentration, is neuroprotective. It is involved in membrane stabilization and in enhancement of mitochondrial functions. It is a molecule of considerable interest for its clinical application in various neural disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease and painful neuropathies. ALC is known to improve the cognitive capability of aged animals chronically treated with the drug and, recently, it has been reported that it impairs forms of non-associative learning in the leech. In the present study the effects of ALC on gene expression have been analyzed in the leech Hirudo medicinalis. The suppression subtractive hybridisation methodology was used for the generation of subtracted cDNA libraries and the subsequent identification of differentially expressed transcripts in the leech nervous system after ALC treatment. The method detects differentially but also little expressed transcripts of genes whose sequence or identity is still unknown. We report that a single administration of ALC is able to modulate positively the expression of genes coding for functions that reveal a lasting effect of ALC on the invertebrate, and confirm the neuroprotective and neuromodulative role of the substance. In addition an important finding is the modulation of genes of vegetal origin. This might be considered an instance of ectosymbiotic mutualism. PMID:23308261

  9. Dietary L-carnitine supplementation in obese cats alters carnitine metabolism and decreases ketosis during fasting and induced hepatic lipidosis.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, Géraldine; Paragon, Bernard M; Milliat, Fabien; Lutton, Claude

    2002-02-01

    This study was designed to determine whether dietary carnitine supplement could protect cats from ketosis and improve carnitine and lipid metabolism in experimental feline hepatic lipidosis (FHL). Lean spayed queens received a diet containing 40 (CL group, n = 7) or 1000 (CH group, n = 4) mg/kg of L-carnitine during obesity development. Plasma fatty acid, beta-hydroxybutyrate and carnitine, and liver and muscle carnitine concentrations were measured during experimental induction of FHL and after treatment. In control cats (CL group), fasting and FHL increased the plasma concentrations of fatty acids two- to threefold (P < 0.0001) and beta-hydroxybutyrate > 10-fold (from a basal 0.22 +/- 0.03 to 1.70 +/- 0.73 after 3 wk fasting and 3.13 +/- 0.49 mmol/L during FHL). In carnitine-supplemented cats, these variables increased significantly (P < 0.0001) only during FHL (beta-hydroxybutyrate, 1.42 +/- 0.17 mmol/L). L-Carnitine supplementation significantly increased plasma, muscle and liver carnitine concentrations. Liver carnitine concentration increased dramatically from the obese state to FHL in nonsupplemented cats, but not in supplemented cats, which suggests de novo synthesis of carnitine from endogenous amino acids in control cats and reversible storage in supplemented cats. These results demonstrate the protective effect of a dietary L-carnitine supplement against fasting ketosis during obesity induction. Increasing the L-carnitine level of diets in cats with low energy requirements, such as after neutering, and a high risk of obesity could therefore be recommended.

  10. Protective effect of L-carnitine and L-arginine against busulfan-induced oligospermia in adult rat.

    PubMed

    Abd-Elrazek, A M; Ahmed-Farid, O A H

    2018-02-01

    Busulfan is an anticancer drug caused variety of adverse effects for patients with cancer. But it could cause damage to the male reproductive system as one of its adverse effects. This study aimed to investigate the protective effect of L-carnitine and L-arginine on semen quality, oxidative stress parameters and testes cell energy after busulfan treatment. Adult male rats were divided into four groups: control (Con), busulfan (Bus), busulfan plus L-arginine (Bus + L-arg) and busulfan plus L-carnitine (Bus + L-car). After 28 days, the semen was collected from the epididymis and the testes were assessed. Sperm count, motility and velocity were measured by CASA, and smears were prepared for assessment of sperm morphology. Serum and testes supernatants were separated for DNA metabolites, oxidative stress and cell energy parameters. Testes tissues also subjected for caspase-3. The results showed significant improvement in sperm morphology, motility, velocity and count in the groups treated with L-arginine and L-carnitine and accompanied with an increase in MDA, GSSG and ATP, reduction in GSH, AMP, ADP, NO and 8-OHDG also recorded. These results are supported by caspase-3. Administration of L-arg and L-car attenuated the cytotoxic effects of busulfan by improving semen parameters, reducing oxidative stress and maintaining cell energy. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  11. [Animal experiment studies on the changes in lipid and protein metabolism in L-carnitine-supplemented total parenteral nutrition].

    PubMed

    Böhles, H; Segerer, H; Fekl, W; Stehr, K

    1983-02-01

    The influence of i.v. L-carnitine on parameters of lipid- and nitrogen metabolism was studied during total parenteral nutrition of mini pigs (x: 4077; n = 9). The infusion protocol was divided into isocaloric and isonitrogenous 48-hour-periods. Amino acids (3 g/kg/day) were administered throughout all three periods. 140 Cal/kg/day were given as non-protein calories, consisting only of glucose during period 1. During periods 2 and 3 an amount of glucose calorically equivalent to 4 g fat/kg/day was substituted with a lipid emulsion. In period 3, L-carnitine (1,5 mg/kg/day) was added. During the entire regime key parameters of fat and nitrogen metabolism were determined. During all three periods indirect calorimetry was performed and the respiratory quotient calculated. The results demonstrate a more effective lipolysis and oxydation of fatty acids during L-carnitine supplementation. This results in an increased energy gain from exogenously administered fat and a distinct improvement of nitrogen balance.

  12. Reduction of apoptosis through the mitochondrial pathway by the administration of acetyl-L-carnitine to mouse fibroblasts in culture

    SciTech Connect

    Pillich, Rudolf Tito; Dipartimento di Genetica e Biologia Molecolare, Universita di Roma 'La Sapienza', P.le A. Moro, 5-00185 Rome; Scarsella, Gianfranco

    It is shown in literature that stress, such as deprivation of trophic factors and hypoxia, induces apoptosis in cultured cells and in tissues. In light of these results, we explored the possibility of protecting cells from programmed death by improving the metabolism of the mitochondrion. To this end, acetyl-L-carnitine was administered at various concentrations under conditions of serum deprivation. The choice of this drug was based on the accepted notion that acetyl-L-carnitine is able to stabilize mitochondrial membranes and to increase the supply of energy to the organelle. The results presented here indicate that the drug protects cells from apoptoticmore » death: this is demonstrated by a lower positivity to the TUNEL reaction and by a strong reduction of the apoptotic DNA ladder in serum-deprived cells. The involvement of the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway was assessed by cytochrome C release and immunoreactivity to caspase 3. Moreover, acetyl-L-carnitine stimulates cell proliferation.« less

  13. L-carnitine mitigates UVA-induced skin tissue injury in rats through downregulation of oxidative stress, p38/c-Fos signaling, and the proinflammatory cytokines.

    PubMed

    Salama, Samir A; Arab, Hany H; Omar, Hany A; Gad, Hesham S; Abd-Allah, Gamil M; Maghrabi, Ibrahim A; Al Robaian, Majed M

    2018-04-01

    UVA comprises more than 90% of the solar UV radiation reaching the Earth. Artificial lightening lamps have also been reported to emit significant amounts of UVA. Exposure to UVA has been associated with dermatological disorders including skin cancer. At the molecular level, UVA damages different cellular biomolecules and triggers inflammatory responses. The current study was devoted to investigate the potential protective effect of L-carnitine against UVA-induced skin tissue injury using rats as a mammalian model. Rats were distributed into normal control group (NC), L-carnitine control group (LC), UVA-Exposed group (UVA), and UVA-Exposed and L-carnitine-treated group (UVA-LC). L-carnitine significantly attenuated UVA-induced elevation of the DNA damage markers 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxo-dG) and cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) as well as decreased DNA fragmentation and the activity of the apoptotic marker caspase-3. In addition, L-carnitine substantially reduced the levels of lipid peroxidation marker (TBARS) and protein oxidation marker (PCC) and significantly elevated the levels of the total antioxidant capacity (TAC) and the antioxidant reduced glutathione (GSH) in the skin tissues. Interestingly, L-carnitine upregulated the level of the DNA repair protein proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). Besides it mitigated the UVA-induced activation of the oxidative stress-sensitive signaling protein p38 and its downstream target c-Fos. Moreover, L-carnitine significantly downregulated the levels of the early response proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β. Collectively, our results highlight, for the first time, the potential attenuating effects of L-carnitine on UVA-induced skin tissue injury in rats that is potentially mediated through suppression of UVA-induced oxidative stress and inflammatory responses. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Effect of L-Carnitine Supplementation on Reverse Remodeling in Patients with Ischemic Heart Disease Undergoing Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting: A Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    da Silva Guimarães, Sheila; de Souza Cruz, Wanise; da Silva, Licinio; Maciel, Gabrielle; Huguenin, Ana Beatriz; de Carvalho, Monicque; Costa, Bárbara; da Silva, Geisiane; da Costa, Carlos; D'Ippolito, João Alvaro; Colafranceschi, Alexandre; Scalco, Fernanda; Boaventura, Gilson

    2017-01-01

    During cardiac failure, cardiomyocytes have difficulty in using the substrates to produce energy. L-carnitine is a necessary nutrient for the transport of fatty acids that are required for generating energy. Coronary artery graft surgery reduces the plasma levels of L-carnitine and increases the oxidative stress. This study demonstrates the effect of L-carnitine supplementation on the reverse remodeling of patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft. Patients with ischemic heart failure who underwent coronary graft surgery were randomized to group A - supplemented with L-carnitine or group B controls. Left ventricular ejection fraction, left ventricular systolic and diastolic diameters were assessed preoperatively, 60 and 180 days after surgery. Our study included 28 patients (26 [93.0%] males) with a mean age ± SD of 58.1 ± 10.5 years. The parameters for the evaluation of reverse remodeling did not improve after 60 and 180 days of coronary artery bypass grafting in comparison between groups (p > 0.05). Evaluation within the L-carnitine group showed a 37.1% increase in left ventricle ejection fraction (p = 0.002) and 14.3% (p = 0.006) and 3.3% (p > 0.05) reduction in systolic and diastolic diameters, respectively. L-carnitine supplementation at a dose of 50 mg/kg combined with artery bypass surgery did not demonstrate any additional benefit in reverse remodeling. However, evaluation within the L-carnitine group may indicate a clinical benefit of L-carnitine supplementation. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Propionyl-L-carnitine improves endothelial function, microcirculation and pain management in critical limb ischemia.

    PubMed

    De Marchi, S; Zecchetto, S; Rigoni, A; Prior, M; Fondrieschi, L; Scuro, A; Rulfo, F; Arosio, E

    2012-10-01

    Chronic critical limb ischemia (CLI) is a severe condition of hypo-perfusion of lower limbs, which is associated with inflammation and a pro-coagulative state. It is a disease at high risk of amputation and cardiovascular death. Propionyl-L-carnitine (PLC) is efficacious in improving pain free walking distance in peripheral arterial disease with claudication; it also exerts favorable effects on the arterial wall and on endothelial function. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of PLC on microcirculation, endothelial function and pain relief in patients affected by CLI not suitable for surgical intervention. We enrolled 48 patients with CLI. Patients were randomized into two groups: the first group was treated with PLC, the second was treated with saline solution. All of them underwent the following tests: laser Doppler flowmetry at the forefoot at rest and after ischemia, trans cutaneous oxygen partial pressure and carbon dioxide partial pressure at the forefoot at rest and after ischemia, endothelium dependent dilation of the brachial artery. All tests were repeated after treatments. Pain was assessed by visual analog pain scale. Endothelium dependent dilation increased after PLC (9.5 ± 3.2 vs 4.9 ± 1.4 %; p < 0.05). Post-ischemic peak flow with laser-Doppler flow increased after PLC. TcPO2 increased, while TcPCO2 decreased after PLC; CO2 production decreased after PLC. VAS showed a significant reduction in pain perception after active treatment. In CLI patients, PLC can improve microcirculation (post ischemic hyperemia, TcPO2 and TcPCO2 production). PLC also enhances endothelium dependent dilation and reduces analgesic consumption and pain perception.

  16. Propionyl-L-Carnitine Enhances Wound Healing and Counteracts Microvascular Endothelial Cell Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Scioli, Maria Giovanna; Lo Giudice, Pietro; Bielli, Alessandra; Tarallo, Valeria; De Rosa, Alfonso; De Falco, Sandro; Orlandi, Augusto

    2015-01-01

    Background Impaired wound healing represents a high cost for health care systems. Endothelial dysfunction characterizes dermal microangiopathy and contributes to delayed wound healing and chronic ulcers. Endothelial dysfunction impairs cutaneous microvascular blood flow by inducing an imbalance between vasorelaxation and vasoconstriction as a consequence of reduced nitric oxide (NO) production and the increase of oxidative stress and inflammation. Propionyl-L-carnitine (PLC) is a natural derivative of carnitine that has been reported to ameliorate post-ischemic blood flow recovery. Methods and Results We investigated the effects of PLC in rat skin flap and cutaneous wound healing. A daily oral PLC treatment improved skin flap viability and associated with reactive oxygen species (ROS) reduction, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and NO up-regulation, accelerated wound healing and increased capillary density, likely favoring dermal angiogenesis by up-regulation for iNOS, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), placental growth factor (PlGF) and reduction of NADPH-oxidase 4 (Nox4) expression. In serum-deprived human dermal microvascular endothelial cell cultures, PLC ameliorated endothelial dysfunction by increasing iNOS, PlGF, VEGF receptors 1 and 2 expression and NO level. In addition, PLC counteracted serum deprivation-induced impairment of mitochondrial β-oxidation, Nox4 and cellular adhesion molecule (CAM) expression, ROS generation and leukocyte adhesion. Moreover, dermal microvascular endothelial cell dysfunction was prevented by Nox4 inhibition. Interestingly, inhibition of β-oxidation counteracted the beneficial effects of PLC on oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction. Conclusion PLC treatment improved rat skin flap viability, accelerated wound healing and dermal angiogenesis. The beneficial effects of PLC likely derived from improvement of mitochondrial β-oxidation and reduction of Nox4-mediated oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction

  17. Urinary biomarkers of oxidative damage in Maple syrup urine disease: the L-carnitine role.

    PubMed

    Guerreiro, Gilian; Mescka, Caroline Paula; Sitta, Angela; Donida, Bruna; Marchetti, Desirèe; Hammerschmidt, Tatiane; Faverzani, Jessica; Coelho, Daniella de Moura; Wajner, Moacir; Dutra-Filho, Carlos Severo; Vargas, Carmen Regla

    2015-05-01

    Maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) is a disorder of branched-chain amino acids (BCAA). The defect in the branched-chain α-keto acid dehydrogenase complex activity leads to an accumulation of these compounds and their corresponding α-keto-acids and α-hydroxy-acids. Studies have shown that oxidative stress may be involved in neuropathology of MSUD. L-carnitine (L-car), which has demonstrated an important role as antioxidant by reducing and scavenging free radicals formation and by enhancing the activity of antioxidant enzymes, have been used in the treatment of some metabolic rare disorders. This study evaluated the oxidative stress parameters, di-tyrosine, isoprostanes and antioxidant capacity, in urine of MSUD patients under protein-restricted diet supplemented or not with L-car capsules at a dose of 50 mg kg(-1) day(-1). It was also determined urinary α-keto isocaproic acid levels as well as blood free L-car concentrations in blood. It was found a deficiency of carnitine in patients before the L-car supplementation. Significant increases of di-tyrosine and isoprostanes, as well as reduced antioxidant capacity, were observed before the treatment with L-car. The L-car supplementation induced beneficial effects on these parameters reducing the di-tyrosine and isoprostanes levels and increasing the antioxidant capacity. It was also showed a significant increase in urinary of α-ketoisocaproic acid after 2 months of L-car treatment, compared to control group. In conclusion, our results suggest that L-car may have beneficial effects in the treatment of MSUD by preventing oxidative damage to the cells and that urine can be used to monitorize oxidative damage in patients affected by this disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. L-carnitine significantly decreased aging of rat adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Mobarak, Halimeh; Fathi, Ezzatollah; Farahzadi, Raheleh; Zarghami, Nosratollah; Javanmardi, Sara

    2017-03-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells are undifferentiated cells that have the ability to divide continuously and tissue regeneration potential during the transplantation. Aging and loss of cell survival, is one of the main problems in cell therapy. Since the production of free radicals in the aging process is effective, the use of antioxidant compounds can help in scavenging free radicals and prevent the aging of cells. The aim of this study is evaluate the effects of L-carnitine (LC) on proliferation and aging of rat adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (rADSC). rADSCs were isolated from inguinal region of 5 male Rattus rats. Oil red-O, alizarin red-S and toluidine blue staining were performed to evaluate the adipogenic, osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation of rADSCs, respectively. Flow cytometric analysis was done for investigating the cell surface markers. The methyl thiazol tetrazolium (MTT) method was used to determine the cell proliferation of rADSCs following exposure to different concentrations of LC. rADSCs aging was evaluated by beta-galactosidase staining. The results showed significant proliferation of rADSCs 48 h after treatment with concentrations of 0.2 mM LC. In addition, in the presence of 0.2 mM LC, rADSCs appeared to be growing faster than control group and 0.2 mM LC supplementation could significantly decrease the population doubling time and aging of rADSCs. It seems that LC would be a good antioxidant to improve lifespan of rADSCs due to the decrease in aging.

  19. Effects of propionyl-L-carnitine on ischemia-reperfusion injury in hamster cheek pouch microcirculation.

    PubMed

    Lapi, Dominga; Sabatino, Lina; Altobelli, Giovanna Giuseppina; Mondola, Paolo; Cimini, Vincenzo; Colantuoni, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    Propionyl-l-carnitine (pLc) exerts protective effects in different experimental models of ischemia-reperfusion (I/R). The aim of the present study was to assess the effects of intravenously and topically applied pLc on microvascular permeability increase induced by I/R in the hamster cheek pouch preparation. The hamster cheek pouch microcirculation was visualized by fluorescence microscopy. Microvascular permeability, leukocyte adhesion to venular walls, perfused capillary length, and capillary red blood cell velocity (V(RBC)) were evaluated by computer-assisted methods. E-selectin expression was assessed by in vitro analysis. Lipid peroxidation and reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation were determined by thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) and 2'-7'-dichlorofluorescein (DCF), respectively. In control animals, I/R caused a significant increase in permeability and in the leukocyte adhesion in venules. Capillary perfusion and V(RBC) decreased. TBARS levels and DCF fluorescence significantly increased compared with baseline. Intravenously infused pLc dose-dependently prevented leakage and leukocyte adhesion, preserved capillary perfusion, and induced vasodilation at the end of reperfusion, while ROS concentration decreased. Inhibition of nitric oxide synthase prior to pLc caused vasoconstriction and partially blunted the pLc-induced protective effects; inhibition of the endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF) abolished pLc effects. Topical application of pLc on cheek pouch membrane produced the same effects as observed with intravenous administration. pLc decreased the E-selectin expression. pLc prevents microvascular changes induced by I/R injury. The reduction of permeability increase could be mainly due to EDHF release induce vasodilatation together with NO. The reduction of E-selectin expression prevents leukocyte adhesion and permeability increase.

  20. Distinct effects of ketamine and acetyl l-carnitine on the dopamine system in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Bonnie L.; Dumas, Melanie; Cuevas, Elvis; Gu, Qiang; Paule, Merle G.; Ali, Syed F.; Kanungo, Jyotshna

    2016-01-01

    Ketamine, a noncompetitive N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor antagonist is commonly used as a pediatric anesthetic. We have previously shown that acetyl L-carnitine (ALCAR) prevents ketamine toxicity in zebrafish embryos. In mammals, ketamine is known to modulate the dopaminergic system. NMDA receptor antagonists are considered as promising anti-depressants, but the exact mechanism of their function is unclear. Here, we measured the levels of dopamine (DA) and its metabolites, 3, 4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) and homovanillic acid (HVA), in the zebrafish embryos exposed to ketamine in the presence and absence of 0.5 mM ALCAR. Ketamine, at lower doses (0.1–0.3 mM), did not produce significant changes in DA, DOPAC or HVA levels in 52 h post-fertilization embryos treated for 24 h. In these embryos, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) mRNA expression remained unchanged. However, 2 mM ketamine (internal embryo exposure levels equivalent to human anesthetic plasma concentration) significantly reduced DA level and TH mRNA indicating that DA synthesis was adversely affected. In the presence or absence of 2 mM ketamine, ALCAR showed similar effects on DA level and TH mRNA, but increased DOPAC level compared to control. ALCAR reversed 2 mM ketamine-induced reduction in HVA levels. With ALCAR alone, the expression of genes encoding the DA metabolizing enzymes, MAO (monoamine oxidase) and catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT), was not affected. However, ketamine altered MAO mRNA expression, except at the 0.1 mM dose. COMT transcripts were reduced in the 2 mM ketamine-treated group. These distinct effects of ketamine and ALCAR on the DA system may shed some light on the mechanism on how ketamine can work as an anti-depressant, especially at sub-anesthetic doses that do not affect DA metabolism and suppress MAO gene expression. PMID:26898327

  1. Methamphetamine Inhibits the Glucose Uptake by Human Neurons and Astrocytes: Stabilization by Acetyl-L-Carnitine

    PubMed Central

    Szlachetka, Adam M.; Haorah, James

    2011-01-01

    Methamphetamine (METH), an addictive psycho-stimulant drug exerts euphoric effects on users and abusers. It is also known to cause cognitive impairment and neurotoxicity. Here, we hypothesized that METH exposure impairs the glucose uptake and metabolism in human neurons and astrocytes. Deprivation of glucose is expected to cause neurotoxicity and neuronal degeneration due to depletion of energy. We found that METH exposure inhibited the glucose uptake by neurons and astrocytes, in which neurons were more sensitive to METH than astrocytes in primary culture. Adaptability of these cells to fatty acid oxidation as an alternative source of energy during glucose limitation appeared to regulate this differential sensitivity. Decrease in neuronal glucose uptake by METH was associated with reduction of glucose transporter protein-3 (GLUT3). Surprisingly, METH exposure showed biphasic effects on astrocytic glucose uptake, in which 20 µM increased the uptake while 200 µM inhibited glucose uptake. Dual effects of METH on glucose uptake were paralleled to changes in the expression of astrocytic glucose transporter protein-1 (GLUT1). The adaptive nature of astrocyte to mitochondrial β-oxidation of fatty acid appeared to contribute the survival of astrocytes during METH-induced glucose deprivation. This differential adaptive nature of neurons and astrocytes also governed the differential sensitivity to the toxicity of METH in these brain cells. The effect of acetyl-L-carnitine for enhanced production of ATP from fatty oxidation in glucose-free culture condition validated the adaptive nature of neurons and astrocytes. These findings suggest that deprivation of glucose-derived energy may contribute to neurotoxicity of METH abusers. PMID:21556365

  2. Effects of Propionyl-L-Carnitine on Ischemia–Reperfusion Injury in Hamster Cheek Pouch Microcirculation

    PubMed Central

    Lapi, Dominga; Sabatino, Lina; Altobelli, Giovanna Giuseppina; Mondola, Paolo; Cimini, Vincenzo; Colantuoni, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose Propionyl-l-carnitine (pLc) exerts protective effects in different experimental models of ischemia–reperfusion (I/R). The aim of the present study was to assess the effects of intravenously and topically applied pLc on microvascular permeability increase induced by I/R in the hamster cheek pouch preparation. Methods The hamster cheek pouch microcirculation was visualized by fluorescence microscopy. Microvascular permeability, leukocyte adhesion to venular walls, perfused capillary length, and capillary red blood cell velocity (VRBC) were evaluated by computer-assisted methods. E-selectin expression was assessed by in vitro analysis. Lipid peroxidation and reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation were determined by thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) and 2′-7′-dichlorofluorescein (DCF), respectively. Results In control animals, I/R caused a significant increase in permeability and in the leukocyte adhesion in venules. Capillary perfusion and VRBC decreased. TBARS levels and DCF fluorescence significantly increased compared with baseline. Intravenously infused pLc dose-dependently prevented leakage and leukocyte adhesion, preserved capillary perfusion, and induced vasodilation at the end of reperfusion, while ROS concentration decreased. Inhibition of nitric oxide synthase prior to pLc caused vasoconstriction and partially blunted the pLc-induced protective effects; inhibition of the endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF) abolished pLc effects. Topical application of pLc on cheek pouch membrane produced the same effects as observed with intravenous administration. pLc decreased the E-selectin expression. Conclusions pLc prevents microvascular changes induced by I/R injury. The reduction of permeability increase could be mainly due to EDHF release induce vasodilatation together with NO. The reduction of E-selectin expression prevents leukocyte adhesion and permeability increase. PMID:21423374

  3. Propionyl-L-carnitine limits chronic ventricular dilation after myocardial infarction in rats.

    PubMed

    Micheletti, R; Di Paola, E D; Schiavone, A; English, E; Benatti, P; Capasso, J M; Anversa, P; Bianchi, G

    1993-04-01

    To determine whether propionyl-L-carnitine (PLC) administration ameliorates ventricular remodeling after myocardial infarction, we performed coronary occlusion in rats and examined the long-term effects of the drug 19-24 wk after surgery. In view of the well-established role of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors in the reduction of ventricular dilation after infarction, the therapeutic impact of oral PLC (60 mg/kg) was compared with that of enalapril (1 mg/kg). Infarct size measured planimetrically was found to be comparable in untreated, PLC-treated, and enalapril-treated rats, averaging 40-46% of the left ventricular free wall. Heart weight was increased 14, 16, and 11% with no treatment, with PLC, and with enalapril, respectively. The relationship between left ventricular filling pressure and chamber volume demonstrated that PLC and enalapril significantly prevented the expansion in cavitary size after infarction. These protective influences were observed throughout the range of filling pressures measured, from 0 to 30 mmHg. At a uniform reference point of filling pressure of 4 mmHg, untreated infarcted hearts showed an expansion in ventricular volume of 2.17-fold (P < 0.0001). Corresponding increases in this parameter after PLC and enalapril were 36 and 43%, respectively, both not statistically significant. Moreover, PLC was capable of reducing the alterations in myocardial compliance associated with myocardial infarction. In conclusion, PLC reduces the magnitude of decompensated eccentric hypertrophy produced by myocardial infarction in a manner similar to that found with ACE inhibition.

  4. Impact of L-carnitine on plasma lipoprotein(a) concentrations: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Serban, Maria-Corina; Sahebkar, Amirhossein; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P.; Toth, Peter P.; Jones, Steven R.; Muntner, Paul; Blaha, Michael J.; Andrica, Florina; Martin, Seth S.; Borza, Claudia; Lip, Gregory Y. H.; Ray, Kausik K.; Rysz, Jacek; Hazen, Stanley L.; Banach, Maciej

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to assess the impact of L-carnitine on plasma Lp(a) concentrations through systematic review and meta-analysis of available RCTs. The literature search included selected databases up to 31st January 2015. Meta-analysis was performed using fixed-effects or random-effect model according to I2 statistic. Effect sizes were expressed as weighted mean difference (WMD) and 95% confidence interval (CI). The meta-analysis showed a significant reduction of Lp(a) levels following L-carnitine supplementation (WMD: −8.82 mg/dL, 95% CI: −10.09, −7.55, p < 0.001). When the studies were categorized according to the route of administration, a significant reduction in plasma Lp(a) concentration was observed with oral (WMD: −9.00 mg/dL, 95% CI: −10.29, −7.72, p < 0.001) but not intravenous L-carnitine (WMD: −2.91 mg/dL, 95% CI: −10.22, 4.41, p = 0.436). The results of the meta-regression analysis showed that the pooled estimate is independent of L-carnitine dose (slope: −0.30; 95% CI: −4.19, 3.59; p = 0.878) and duration of therapy (slope: 0.18; 95% CI: −0.22, 0.59; p = 0.374). In conclusion, the meta-analysis suggests a significant Lp(a) lowering by oral L-carnitine supplementation. Taking into account the limited number of available Lp(a)-targeted drugs, L-carnitine might be an effective alternative to effectively reduce Lp(a). Prospective outcome trials will be required to fully elucidate the clinical value and safety of oral L-carnitine supplementation. PMID:26754058

  5. L-carnitine supplementation for the management of fatigue in patients with hypothyroidism on levothyroxine treatment: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    An, Jee Hyun; Kim, Yoon Jung; Kim, Kyeong Jin; Kim, Sun Hwa; Kim, Nam Hoon; Kim, Hee Young; Kim, Nan Hee; Choi, Kyung Mook; Baik, Sei Hyun; Choi, Dong Seop; Kim, Sin Gon

    2016-10-29

    Hypothyroid patients experience fatigue-related symptoms despite adequate thyroid hormone replacement. Thyroid hormone plays an essential role in carnitine-dependent fatty acid import and oxidation. We investigated the effects of L-carnitine supplementation on fatigue in patients with hypothyroidism. In total, 60 patients (age 50.0 ± 9.2 years, 3 males, 57 females) who still experienced fatigue (fatigue severity scale [FSS] score ≥ 36) were given L-carnitine (n = 30, 990 mg L-carnitine twice daily) or placebo (n = 30) for 12 weeks. After 12 weeks, although neither the FSS score nor the physical fatigue score (PFS) changed significantly, the mental fatigue score (MFS) was significantly decreased by treatment with L-carnitine compared with placebo (from 4.5 ± 1.9 to 3.9 ± 1.5 vs. from 4.2 ± 1.8 to 4.6 ± 1.6, respectively; P < 0.01). In the L-carnitine group, 75.0%, 53.6%, and 50.0% of patients showed improvement in the FSS score, PFS, and MFS, respectively, but only 20.0%, 24.0%, and 24.0%, respectively, did so in the placebo group (all P < 0.05). Both the PFS and MFS were significantly improved in patients younger than 50 years and those with free T3 ≥ 4.0 pg/mL by treatment with L-carnitine compared with placebo. Additionally, the MFS was significantly improved in patients taking thyroid hormone after thyroid cancer surgery. These results suggest that L-carnitine supplementation may be useful in alleviating fatigue symptoms in hypothyroid patients, especially in those younger than 50 years and those who have hypothyroidism after thyroidectomy for thyroid cancer (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01769157).

  6. Propionyl-L-Carnitine is Efficacious in Ulcerative Colitis Through its Action on the Immune Function and Microvasculature.

    PubMed

    Scioli, Maria Giovanna; Stasi, Maria Antonietta; Passeri, Daniela; Doldo, Elena; Costanza, Gaetana; Camerini, Roberto; Fociani, Paolo; Arcuri, Gaetano; Lombardo, Katia; Pace, Silvia; Borsini, Franco; Orlandi, Augusto

    2014-03-20

    Microvascular endothelial dysfunction characterizes ulcerative colitis (UC), the most widespread form of inflammatory bowel disease. Intestinal mucosal microvessels in UC display aberrant expression of cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) and increased inflammatory cell recruitment. Propionyl-L-carnitine (PLC), an ester of L-carnitine required for the mitochondrial transport of fatty acids, ameliorates propionyl-CoA bioavailability and reduces oxidative stress in ischemic tissues. The present study aimed to document the efficacy of anti-oxidative stress properties of PLC in counteracting intestinal microvascular endothelial dysfunction and inflammation. To evaluate the efficacy in vivo, we analyzed the effects in intestinal biopsies of patients with mild-to-moderate UC receiving oral PLC co-treatment and in rat TNBS-induced colitis; in addition, we investigated antioxidant PLC action in TNF-α-stimulated human intestinal microvascular endothelial cells (HIMECs) in vitro. Four-week PLC co-treatment reduced intestinal mucosal polymorph infiltration and CD4(+) lymphocytes, ICAM-1(+) and iNOS(+) microvessels compared with placebo-treated patients with UC. Oral and intrarectal administration of PLC but not L-carnitine or propionate reduced intestinal damage and microvascular dysfunction in rat TNBS-induced acute and reactivated colitis. In cultured TNF-α-stimulated HIMECs, PLC restored β-oxidation and counteracted NADPH oxidase 4-generated oxidative stress-induced CAM expression and leukocyte adhesion. Inhibition of β-oxidation by L-aminocarnitine increased reactive oxygen species production and PLC beneficial effects on endothelial dysfunction and leukocyte adhesion. Finally, PLC reduced iNOS activity and nitric oxide accumulation in rat TNBS-induced colitis and in HIMEC cultures. Our results show that the beneficial antioxidant effect of PLC targeting intestinal microvasculature restores endothelial β-oxidation and function, and reduces mucosal inflammation in UC

  7. Propionyl-L-Carnitine is Efficacious in Ulcerative Colitis Through its Action on the Immune Function and Microvasculature

    PubMed Central

    Scioli, Maria Giovanna; Stasi, Maria Antonietta; Passeri, Daniela; Doldo, Elena; Costanza, Gaetana; Camerini, Roberto; Fociani, Paolo; Arcuri, Gaetano; Lombardo, Katia; Pace, Silvia; Borsini, Franco; Orlandi, Augusto

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Microvascular endothelial dysfunction characterizes ulcerative colitis (UC), the most widespread form of inflammatory bowel disease. Intestinal mucosal microvessels in UC display aberrant expression of cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) and increased inflammatory cell recruitment. Propionyl-L-carnitine (PLC), an ester of L-carnitine required for the mitochondrial transport of fatty acids, ameliorates propionyl-CoA bioavailability and reduces oxidative stress in ischemic tissues. The present study aimed to document the efficacy of anti-oxidative stress properties of PLC in counteracting intestinal microvascular endothelial dysfunction and inflammation. Methods: To evaluate the efficacy in vivo, we analyzed the effects in intestinal biopsies of patients with mild-to-moderate UC receiving oral PLC co-treatment and in rat TNBS-induced colitis; in addition, we investigated antioxidant PLC action in TNF-α-stimulated human intestinal microvascular endothelial cells (HIMECs) in vitro. Results: Four-week PLC co-treatment reduced intestinal mucosal polymorph infiltration and CD4+ lymphocytes, ICAM-1+ and iNOS+ microvessels compared with placebo-treated patients with UC. Oral and intrarectal administration of PLC but not L-carnitine or propionate reduced intestinal damage and microvascular dysfunction in rat TNBS-induced acute and reactivated colitis. In cultured TNF-α-stimulated HIMECs, PLC restored β-oxidation and counteracted NADPH oxidase 4-generated oxidative stress-induced CAM expression and leukocyte adhesion. Inhibition of β-oxidation by L-aminocarnitine increased reactive oxygen species production and PLC beneficial effects on endothelial dysfunction and leukocyte adhesion. Finally, PLC reduced iNOS activity and nitric oxide accumulation in rat TNBS-induced colitis and in HIMEC cultures. Conclusions: Our results show that the beneficial antioxidant effect of PLC targeting intestinal microvasculature restores endothelial β-oxidation and function, and

  8. Effect of L-carnitine supplementation on growth performance, nutrient utilization, and nitrogen balance of broilers fed with animal fat.

    PubMed

    Murali, P; George, S K; Ally, K; Dipu, M T

    2015-04-01

    This experiment was conducted to evaluate the effect of L-carnitine supplementation on growth performance, nutrient utilization and nitrogen balance in broilers fed with animal fat. 80 day-old Cobb commercial broiler chicks were randomly assigned into two dietary treatment groups with four replicates of ten chicks each. The diets were isonitrogenous and isocaloric. The birds in both the control (T1) and treatment group (T2) were fed with a diet having 5% animal fat, while the treatment group (T2) was supplemented with 900 mg of L-carnitine. The birds were fed with standard broiler starter ration up to 4 weeks of age and finisher ration up to 6 weeks of age. The average body weight (g), cumulative feed intake (g) and cumulative feed conversion ratio belonging to groups T1 and T2 at 6(th) week of age were 2091.25 and 2151.11, 3976.49 and 4171.68, 1.97 and 1.96 respectively. The percentage availability of the nutrients of two experimental rations T1 and T2 was 68.23 and 68.00 for dry matter, 58.72 and 55.98 for crude protein, 73.85 and 71.35 for ether extract, 34.19 and 33.86 for crude fiber, 79.18 and 79.59 for nitrogen free extract, 70.24 and 70.03 for energy efficiency and nitrogen balance (g/day) were 2.35 and 2.39, respectively. This study suggests that the supplementation of 900 mg L-carnitine in diet with added animal fat had no effect on growth performance, nutrient utilization, and nitrogen balance of broilers.

  9. The Study of Hemodialysis Effectiveness on the Change Rate of Lipid Peroxidation and L-Carnitine Level in Hemodialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Isfahani, Maryam; Sheikh, Nasrin

    2010-01-01

    Carnitine is a small molecule widely present in all cells from prokaryotic to eukaryotic. It is an important element in β-oxidation of fatty acids. Carnitine is a scavenger of oxygen free radicals in mammalian tissues. Lack of carnitine in a hemodialysis patient can lead to carnitine deficiency. Oxidation of fatty acids and lipid metabolism are severly affected by carnitine deficiency. Oxidative stress is defined as imbalance between formation of free radicals and antioxidative defense mechanisms. It has been proposed to play a role in many disease states. In hemodialysis patients multiple factors can lead to a a high susceptibility to oxidative stress. The aim of this study was to determine hemodialysis effectiveness on the change rate of serum L-carnitine and lipid peroxidation. 27 patients with chronic renal failure (24-80 yrs) who undergo hemodialysis for 6-12 months were selected (M= 17, F= 10). Malondialdehyde (MDA), as an indicator of lipid peroxidation was measured colorimetrically with a standard thiobarbituric acid (TBA) method. L-carnitine was measured with enzymatic UV method (ROCHE, Spectronic Genesis 2, 340 nm). The weight mean of L-carnitine before and after hemodialysis was 7.67±3.6 mg/l and 2.07±1.6 mg/l, respectively (P<0.001). The weight mean of pre-hemodialysis MDA was 4.17±1.24 µmol/l, following hemodialysis -4.98±1.2 µmol/l (P<0.001). Results showed that 55.6% of patients suffered from carnitine defciency. Serum carnitine was found to be decreased markedly after hemodialysis (P<0.001). Our findings indicated that oxidative stress in these patients is further exacerbated by hemodialysis, as evidenced by increased lipid peroxidation. The relationship between serum L-carnitine and MDA before and after hemodialysis was observed (r=0.82; p<0.001; r=0.75; p<0.001). PMID:27683353

  10. Autonomy @ Ames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Dalsem, William; Krishnakumar, Kalmanje Srinivas

    2016-01-01

    This is a powerpoint presentation that highlights autonomy across the 15 NASA technology roadmaps, including specific examples of projects (past and present) at NASA Ames Research Center. The NASA technology roadmaps are located here: http:www.nasa.govofficesocthomeroadmapsindex.html

  11. Effects of Oral L-Carnitine Administration in Narcolepsy Patients: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Cross-Over and Placebo-Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Miyagawa, Taku; Kawamura, Hiromi; Obuchi, Mariko; Ikesaki, Asuka; Ozaki, Akiko; Tokunaga, Katsushi; Inoue, Yuichi; Honda, Makoto

    2013-01-01

    Narcolepsy is a sleep disorder characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness, cataplexy, and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep abnormalities. A genome-wide association study (GWAS) identified a novel narcolepsy-related single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), which is located adjacent to the carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1B (CPT1B) gene encoding an enzyme involved in β-oxidation of long-chain fatty acids. The mRNA expression levels of CPT1B were associated with this SNP. In addition, we recently reported that acylcarnitine levels were abnormally low in narcolepsy patients. To assess the efficacy of oral l-carnitine for the treatment of narcolepsy, we performed a clinical trial administering l-carnitine (510 mg/day) to patients with the disease. The study design was a randomized, double-blind, cross-over and placebo-controlled trial. Thirty narcolepsy patients were enrolled in our study. Two patients were withdrawn and 28 patients were included in the statistical analysis (15 males and 13 females, all with HLA-DQB1*06:02). l-carnitine treatment significantly improved the total time for dozing off during the daytime, calculated from the sleep logs, compared with that of placebo-treated periods. l-carnitine efficiently increased serum acylcarnitine levels, and reduced serum triglycerides concentration. Differences in the Japanese version of the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) and the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36) vitality and mental health subscales did not reach statistical significance between l-carnitine and placebo. This study suggests that oral l-carnitine can be effective in reducing excessive daytime sleepiness in narcolepsy patients. Trial Registration University hospital Medical Information Network (UMIN) UMIN000003760 PMID:23349733

  12. Protective effects of vitamins E, B and C and L-carnitine in the prevention of cisplatin-induced ototoxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Tokgöz, S Alicura; Vuralkan, E; Sonbay, N D; Çalişkan, M; Saka, C; Beşalti, Ö; Akin, İ

    2012-05-01

    This experimental study aimed to investigate the effects of vitamins E, B and C and L-carnitine in preventing cisplatin-induced ototoxicity. Twenty-five adult, male, Wistar albino rats were randomly allocated to receive intraperitoneal cisplatin either alone or preceded by vitamins B, E or C or L-carnitine. Auditory brainstem response (i.e. hearing thresholds and wave I-IV intervals) and distortion product otoacoustic emissions (i.e. signal-to-noise ratios) were recorded before and 72 hours after cisplatin administration. The following statistically significant differences were seen: control group pre- vs post-treatment wave I-IV interval values (p < 0.05); control vs vitamin E and B groups' I-IV interval values (p < 0.05); control vs other groups' hearing thresholds; vitamin E vs vitamin B and C and L-carnitine groups' hearing thresholds (p < 0.05); and vitamin B vs vitamin C and L-carnitine groups' hearing thresholds (p < 0.05). Statistically significant decreases were seen when comparing the initial and final signal-to-noise ratios in the control, vitamin B and L-carnitine groups (2000 and 3000 Hz; p < 0.01), and the initial and final signal-to-noise ratios in the control group (at 4000 Hz; p < 0.01). Vitamins B, E and C and L-carnitine appear to reduce cisplatin-induced ototoxicity in rats. The use of such additional treatments to decrease cisplatin-induced ototoxicity in humans is still under discussion.

  13. Propionyl-L-carnitine hydrochloride for treatment of mild to moderate colonic inflammatory bowel diseases

    PubMed Central

    Merra, Giuseppe; Gasbarrini, Giovanni; Laterza, Lucrezia; Pizzoferrato, Marco; Poscia, Andrea; Scaldaferri, Franco; Arena, Vincenzo; Fiore, Francesca; Cittadini, Achille; Sgambato, Alessandro; Franceschi, Francesco; Gasbarrini, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To assess clinical and endoscopic response to propionyl-L-carnitine hydrochloride (PLC) in colonic inflammatory bowel disease. METHODS: Patients suffering from mild to moderate ulcerative colitis (UC) or Crohn’s disease (CD) colitis, with disease activity index (DAI) between 3 and 10 and under stable therapy with oral aminosalicylates, mercaptopurine or azathioprine, for at least 8 wk prior to baseline assessments, were considered suitable for enrollment. Fourteen patients were enrolled to assume PLC 2 g/d (two active tablets twice daily) orally. Clinical-endoscopic and histological activity were assessed by DAI and histological index (HI), respectively, following a colonoscopy performed immediately before and after 4 wk treatment. Clinical response was defined as a lowering of at least 3 points in DAI and clinical remission as a DAI score ≤ 2. Histological response was defined as an improvement of HI of at least 1 point. We used median values for the analysis. Differences pre- and post-treatment were analyzed by Wilcoxon signed rank test. RESULTS: All patients enrolled completed the study. One patient, despite medical advice, took deflazacort 5 d before follow-up colonoscopy examination. No side effects were reported by patients during the trial. After treatment, 71% (SE 12%) of patients achieved clinical response, while 64% (SE 13%) obtained remission. Separating UC from CD patients, we observed a clinical response in 60% (SE 16%) and 100%, respectively. Furthermore 60% (SE 16%) of UC patients and 75% (SE 25%) of CD patients were in clinical remission after therapy. The median DAI was 7 [interquartile range (IQR): 4-8] before treatment and decreased to 2 (IQR: 1-3) (P < 0.01) after treatment. Only patients with UC showed a significant reduction of DAI, from a median 6.5 (IQR: 4-9) before treatment to 2 (IQR: 1-3) after treatment (P < 0.01). Conversely, in CD patients, although displaying a clear reduction of DAI from 7 (IQR: 5.5-7.5) before therapy to 1

  14. Propionyl-L-carnitine hydrochloride for treatment of mild to moderate colonic inflammatory bowel diseases.

    PubMed

    Merra, Giuseppe; Gasbarrini, Giovanni; Laterza, Lucrezia; Pizzoferrato, Marco; Poscia, Andrea; Scaldaferri, Franco; Arena, Vincenzo; Fiore, Francesca; Cittadini, Achille; Sgambato, Alessandro; Franceschi, Francesco; Gasbarrini, Antonio

    2012-09-28

    To assess clinical and endoscopic response to propionyl-L-carnitine hydrochloride (PLC) in colonic inflammatory bowel disease. Patients suffering from mild to moderate ulcerative colitis (UC) or Crohn's disease (CD) colitis, with disease activity index (DAI) between 3 and 10 and under stable therapy with oral aminosalicylates, mercaptopurine or azathioprine, for at least 8 wk prior to baseline assessments, were considered suitable for enrollment. Fourteen patients were enrolled to assume PLC 2 g/d (two active tablets twice daily) orally. Clinical-endoscopic and histological activity were assessed by DAI and histological index (HI), respectively, following a colonoscopy performed immediately before and after 4 wk treatment. Clinical response was defined as a lowering of at least 3 points in DAI and clinical remission as a DAI score ≤ 2. Histological response was defined as an improvement of HI of at least 1 point. We used median values for the analysis. Differences pre- and post-treatment were analyzed by Wilcoxon signed rank test. All patients enrolled completed the study. One patient, despite medical advice, took deflazacort 5 d before follow-up colonoscopy examination. No side effects were reported by patients during the trial. After treatment, 71% (SE 12%) of patients achieved clinical response, while 64% (SE 13%) obtained remission. Separating UC from CD patients, we observed a clinical response in 60% (SE 16%) and 100%, respectively. Furthermore 60% (SE 16%) of UC patients and 75% (SE 25%) of CD patients were in clinical remission after therapy. The median DAI was 7 [interquartile range (IQR): 4-8] before treatment and decreased to 2 (IQR: 1-3) (P < 0.01) after treatment. Only patients with UC showed a significant reduction of DAI, from a median 6.5 (IQR: 4-9) before treatment to 2 (IQR: 1-3) after treatment (P < 0.01). Conversely, in CD patients, although displaying a clear reduction of DAI from 7 (IQR: 5.5-7.5) before therapy to 1.5 (IQR: 0.5-2.5) after

  15. Testicular toxicity and sperm quality following copper exposure in Wistar albino rats: ameliorative potentials of L-carnitine.

    PubMed

    Khushboo, Maurya; Murthy, Meesala Krishna; Devi, Maibam Sunita; Sanjeev, Sanasam; Ibrahim, Kalibulla Syed; Kumar, Nachimuthu Senthil; Roy, Vikas Kumar; Gurusubramanian, Guruswami

    2018-01-01

    Copper is a persistent toxic and bio-accumulative heavy metal of global concern. Continuous exposure of copper compounds of different origin is the most common form of copper poisoning and in turn adversely altering testis morphology and function and affecting sperm quality. L-carnitine has a vital role in the spermatogenesis, physiology of sperm, sperm production and quality. This study was designed to examine whether the detrimental effects of long-term copper consumption on sperm quality and testis function of Wistar albino rat could be prevented by L-carnitine therapy. The parameters included were sperm quality (concentration, viability, motility, and morphology), histopathology, serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST), serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT), serum urea, serum creatinine, serum testosterone and testis antioxidant enzyme levels (superoxide dismutase and glutathione-S-transferase), and biomarkers of oxidative stress (lipid peroxidation and expression of heat shock protein 70 in testis). Three-month-old male Wistar rats (n = 30) were divided into six groups as group 1 (G1, 0.9% saline control), group 2 (G2, CuSO4 200 mg/kg dissolved in 0.9% saline water), groups 3 and 4 (G3 and G4, L-carnitine 50 and 100 mg/kg dissolved in 0.9% saline water, respectively), and groups 5 and 6 (G5 and G6, CuSO 4 200 mg/kg plus L-carnitine, 50 and 100 mg/kg dissolved in 0.9% saline water, respectively). Doses of copper (200 mg/kg) and L-carnitine (50 and 100 mg/kg) alone and in combinations along with untreated control were administered orally for 30 days. The following morphological, physiological, and biochemical alterations were observed due to chronic exposure of copper (200 mg/kg) to rats in comparison with the untreated control: (1) generation of oxidative stress through rise in testis lipid peroxidation (12.21 vs 3.5 nmol MDA equivalents/mg protein) and upregulation of heat shock protein (overexpression of HSP70 in testis), (2) liver and kidney

  16. The Effect of L-Carnitine Treatment on Levels of Malondialdehyde and Glutathione in Patients with Age Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ates, Orhan; Alp, H. Hakan; Mumcu, Ugur; Azizi, Sedat; Cinici, Emine; Kiziltunc, Ahmet; Baykal, Orhan

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the antioxidant properties of the L-carnitine (LC) in the treatment of patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Materials and Methods: This study involved 60 patients diagnosed with early AMD. The patients were divided into two groups. Group I was the study group that received LC supplementation for 3 months. Group II was the control group and did not consent to LC supplementation over the 3 months. At the end of the 3-month period, markers of lipid peroxidation, malondialdehyde (MDA) and reduced glutathione (GSH) were measured in the two groups. Results: In the study group, the MDA level was significantly reduced, while the GSH level was significantly increased at the end of the 3-month period (P<0.001). Conclusion: Our results suggest that LC may protect against oxidative damage by decreasing the MDA level, a marker of lipid peroxidation, and increasing GSH. PMID:25610013

  17. Creatine, L-Carnitine, and ω3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Supplementation from Healthy to Diseased Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    D'Antona, Giuseppe; Nabavi, Seyed Mohammad; Micheletti, Piero; Aquilani, Roberto; Nisoli, Enzo; Rondanelli, Mariangela; Daglia, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Myopathies are chronic degenerative pathologies that induce the deterioration of the structure and function of skeletal muscle. So far a definitive therapy has not yet been developed and the main aim of myopathy treatment is to slow the progression of the disease. Current nonpharmacological therapies include rehabilitation, ventilator assistance, and nutritional supplements, all of which aim to delay the onset of the disease and relieve its symptoms. Besides an adequate diet, nutritional supplements could play an important role in the treatment of myopathic patients. Here we review the most recent in vitro and in vivo studies investigating the role supplementation with creatine, L-carnitine, and ω3 PUFAs plays in myopathy treatment. Our results suggest that these dietary supplements could have beneficial effects; nevertheless continued studies are required before they could be recommended as a routine treatment in muscle diseases. PMID:25243159

  18. Intense Exercise and Aerobic Conditioning Associated with Chromium or L-Carnitine Supplementation Modified the Fecal Microbiota of Fillies

    PubMed Central

    Feringer, Walter Heinz; Carvalho, Júlia Ribeiro Garcia; Rodrigues, Isadora Mestriner; Jordão, Lilian Rezende; Fonseca, Mayara Gonçalves; Carneiro de Rezende, Adalgiza Souza; de Queiroz Neto, Antonio; Weese, J. Scott; da Costa, Márcio Carvalho

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies performed in humans and rats have reported that exercise can alter the intestinal microbiota. Athletic horses perform intense exercise regularly, but studies characterizing horse microbiome during aerobic conditioning programs are still limited. Evidence has indicated that this microbial community is involved in the metabolic homeostasis of the host. Research on ergogenic substances using new sequencing technologies have been limited to the intestinal microbiota and there is a considerable demand for scientific studies that verify the effectiveness of these supplements in horses. L-carnitine and chromium are potentially ergogenic substances for athletic humans and horses since they are possibly able to modify the metabolism of carbohydrates and lipids. This study aimed to assess the impact of acute exercise and aerobic conditioning, associated either with L-carnitine or chromium supplementation, on the intestinal microbiota of fillies. Twelve “Mangalarga Marchador” fillies in the incipient fitness stage were distributed into four groups: control (no exercise), exercise, L-carnitine (10g/day) and chelated chromium (10mg/day). In order to investigate the impact of acute exercise or aerobic conditioning on fecal microbiota all fillies undergoing the conditioning program were analyzed as a separate treatment. The fillies underwent two incremental exercise tests before and after training on a treadmill for 42 days at 70–80% of the lactate threshold intensity. Fecal samples were obtained before and 48 h after acute exercise (incremental exercise test). Bacterial populations were characterized by sequencing the V4 region of the 16S rRNA gene using the MiSeq Illumina platform, and 5,224,389 sequences were obtained from 48 samples. The results showed that, overall, the two most abundant phyla were Firmicutes (50.22%) followed by Verrucomicrobia (15.13%). The taxa with the highest relative abundances were unclassified Clostridiales (17.06%) and "5 genus

  19. Intense Exercise and Aerobic Conditioning Associated with Chromium or L-Carnitine Supplementation Modified the Fecal Microbiota of Fillies.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Maria Luiza Mendes de; Feringer, Walter Heinz; Carvalho, Júlia Ribeiro Garcia; Rodrigues, Isadora Mestriner; Jordão, Lilian Rezende; Fonseca, Mayara Gonçalves; Carneiro de Rezende, Adalgiza Souza; de Queiroz Neto, Antonio; Weese, J Scott; Costa, Márcio Carvalho da; Lemos, Eliana Gertrudes de Macedo; Ferraz, Guilherme de Camargo

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies performed in humans and rats have reported that exercise can alter the intestinal microbiota. Athletic horses perform intense exercise regularly, but studies characterizing horse microbiome during aerobic conditioning programs are still limited. Evidence has indicated that this microbial community is involved in the metabolic homeostasis of the host. Research on ergogenic substances using new sequencing technologies have been limited to the intestinal microbiota and there is a considerable demand for scientific studies that verify the effectiveness of these supplements in horses. L-carnitine and chromium are potentially ergogenic substances for athletic humans and horses since they are possibly able to modify the metabolism of carbohydrates and lipids. This study aimed to assess the impact of acute exercise and aerobic conditioning, associated either with L-carnitine or chromium supplementation, on the intestinal microbiota of fillies. Twelve "Mangalarga Marchador" fillies in the incipient fitness stage were distributed into four groups: control (no exercise), exercise, L-carnitine (10g/day) and chelated chromium (10mg/day). In order to investigate the impact of acute exercise or aerobic conditioning on fecal microbiota all fillies undergoing the conditioning program were analyzed as a separate treatment. The fillies underwent two incremental exercise tests before and after training on a treadmill for 42 days at 70-80% of the lactate threshold intensity. Fecal samples were obtained before and 48 h after acute exercise (incremental exercise test). Bacterial populations were characterized by sequencing the V4 region of the 16S rRNA gene using the MiSeq Illumina platform, and 5,224,389 sequences were obtained from 48 samples. The results showed that, overall, the two most abundant phyla were Firmicutes (50.22%) followed by Verrucomicrobia (15.13%). The taxa with the highest relative abundances were unclassified Clostridiales (17.06%) and "5 genus

  20. Acetyl-L-Carnitine as an Adjunctive Therapy in the Treatment of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder in Children and Adolescents: A Placebo-Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abbasi, Seyed-Hesameddin; Heidari, Shahram; Mohammadi, Mohammad-Reza; Tabrizi, Mina; Ghaleiha, Ali; Akhondzadeh, Shahin

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to test whether a previous observed Acetyl-L-carnitine (ALC) treatment effect could be repeated in an ALC adjunctive therapy treatment trial of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children and adolescents. This was a six-week, randomized clinical trial undertaken in an outpatient child and adolescent…

  1. L-carnitine is an endogenous HDAC inhibitor selectively inhibiting cancer cell growth in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hongbiao; Liu, Ningning; Guo, Haiping; Liao, Siyan; Li, Xiaofen; Yang, Changshan; Liu, Shouting; Song, Wenbin; Liu, Chunjiao; Guan, Lixia; Li, Bing; Xu, Li; Zhang, Change; Wang, Xuejun; Dou, Q Ping; Liu, Jinbao

    2012-01-01

    L-carnitine (LC) is generally believed to transport long-chain acyl groups from fatty acids into the mitochondrial matrix for ATP generation via the citric acid cycle. Based on Warburg's theory that most cancer cells mainly depend on glycolysis for ATP generation, we hypothesize that, LC treatment would lead to disturbance of cellular metabolism and cytotoxicity in cancer cells. In this study, Human hepatoma HepG2, SMMC-7721 cell lines, primary cultured thymocytes and mice bearing HepG2 tumor were used. ATP content was detected by HPLC assay. Cell cycle, cell death and cell viability were assayed by flow cytometry and MTS respectively. Gene, mRNA expression and protein level were detected by gene microarray, Real-time PCR and Western blot respectively. HDAC activities and histone acetylation were detected both in test tube and in cultured cells. A molecular docking study was carried out with CDOCKER protocol of Discovery Studio 2.0 to predict the molecular interaction between L-carnitine and HDAC. Here we found that (1) LC treatment selectively inhibited cancer cell growth in vivo and in vitro; (2) LC treatment selectively induces the expression of p21(cip1) gene, mRNA and protein in cancer cells but not p27(kip1); (4) LC increases histone acetylation and induces accumulation of acetylated histones both in normal thymocytes and cancer cells; (5) LC directly inhibits HDAC I/II activities via binding to the active sites of HDAC and induces histone acetylation and lysine-acetylation accumulation in vitro; (6) LC treatment induces accumulation of acetylated histones in chromatin associated with the p21(cip1) gene but not p27(kip1) detected by ChIP assay. These data support that LC, besides transporting acyl group, works as an endogenous HDAC inhibitor in the cell, which would be of physiological and pathological importance.

  2. The effect of acetyl-L-carnitine on lenticular calpain activity in prevention of selenite-induced cataractogenesis.

    PubMed

    Elanchezhian, R; Sakthivel, M; Geraldine, P; Thomas, P A

    2009-05-01

    The present study sought to determine whether acetyl-L-carnitine (ALCAR) prevents selenite cataractogenesis by mechanisms involving lenticular calpain activity, Wistar rat pups were divided into 3 groups of 15 each. Group I (normal) rats received an intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of normal saline on postpartum day 10; Group II (cataract-untreated) rats received a single subcutaneous (s.c.) injection of sodium selenite (19micromol/kg body weight) on postpartum day 10; Group III (cataract-treated) pups received a single s.c. injection of sodium selenite on postpartum day 10 and intraperitoneal injections of acetyl-L-carnitine (200mg/kg body weight) on postpartum days 9-14. At the end of the study period (postpartum day 16), both eyes of each rat pup were examined by slit-lamp biomicroscopy. There was dense lenticular opacification in all Group II rats, minimal lenticular opacification in 33% of Group III rats, and no lenticular opacification in 67% of Group III and in all Group I rats. Group II lenses exhibited significantly lower mean values of calpain activity and Lp82 (lens-specific calpain) protein expression, decreases in relative transcript level of m-calpain mRNA and significantly higher mean Ca(2+) concentrations than Group I or Group III lenses; the values of these parameters in Group III rat lenses (ALCAR-treated) approximated those in Group I rat lenses. The results suggest that, in addition to its already-described antioxidant potential, ALCAR prevents selenite cataractogenesis by maintaining calpain activity at near normal levels. These findings may stimulate further efforts to develop ALCAR as a novel drug for prevention of cataract.

  3. An acetyl-L-carnitine switch on mitochondrial dysfunction and rescue in the metabolomics study on aluminum oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaobo; Zhang, Chengcheng; Zhang, Xin; Wang, Shizhi; Meng, Qingtao; Wu, Shenshen; Yang, Hongbao; Xia, Yankai; Chen, Rui

    2016-01-16

    Due to the wide application of engineered aluminum oxide nanoparticles and increased aluminum containing particulate matter suspending in air, exposure of human to nano-scale aluminum oxide nanoparticles (Al2O3 NPs) is becoming inevitable. In the present study, RNA microarray coupled with metabolomics analysis were used to uncover mechanisms underlying cellular responses to Al2O3 NPs and imply the potential rescue. We found that Al2O3 NPs significantly triggered down-regulation of mitochondria-related genes located in complex I, IV and V, which were involved in oxidative phosphorylation and neural degeneration pathways, in human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells. Subsequent cell- and animal- based assays confirmed that Al2O3 NPs caused mitochondria-dependent apoptosis and oxidative stress either in vitro or in vivo, which were consistent with the trends of gene regulation. To rescue the Al2O3 NPs induced mitochondria dysfunction, disruption of small molecular metabolites of HBE were profiled using metabolomics analysis, which facilitates identification of potential antagonizer or supplement against nanoparticle-involved damages. Supplementation of an antioxidant, acetyl-L-carnitine, completely or partially restored the Al2O3 NPs modulated gene expression levels in mitochondrial complex I, IV and V. It further reduced apoptosis and oxidative damages in both Al2O3 NPs treated HBE cells and animal lung tissues. Thus, our results demonstrate the potential mechanism of respiratory system damages induced by Al2O3 NPs. Meanwhile, based on the metabolomics profiling, application of acetyl-L-carnitine is suggested to ameliorate mitochondria dysfunction associated with Al2O3 NPs.

  4. Beneficial effect of butyrate, Lactobacillus casei and L-carnitine combination in preference to each in experimental colitis

    PubMed Central

    Moeinian, Mahsa; Ghasemi-Niri, Seyedeh Farnaz; Mozaffari, Shilan; Abdolghaffari, Amir Hossein; Baeeri, Maryam; Navaea-Nigjeh, Mona; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the beneficial effect of the combination of butyrate, Lactobacillus casei, and L-carnitine in a rat colitis model. METHODS: Rats were divided into seven groups. Four groups received oral butyrate, L-carnitine, Lactobacillus casei and the combination of three agents for 10 consecutive days. The remaining groups included negative and positive controls and a sham group. Macroscopic, histopathological examinations, and biomarkers such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interlukin-1β (IL-1β), myeloperoxidase (MPO), thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), and ferric reduced ability of plasma (FRAP) were determined in the colon. RESULTS: The combination therapy exhibited a significant beneficial effect in alleviation of colitis compared to controls. Overall changes in reduction of TNF-α (114.66 ± 18.26 vs 171.78 ± 9.48 pg/mg protein, P < 0.05), IL-1β (24.9 ± 1.07 vs 33.06 ± 2.16 pg/mg protein, P < 0.05), TBARS (0.2 ± 0.03 vs 0.49 ± 0.04 μg/mg protein, P < 0.01), MPO (15.32 ± 0.4 vs 27.24 ± 3.84 U/mg protein, P < 0.05), and elevation of FRAP (23.46 ± 1.2 vs 15.02 ± 2.37 μmol/L, P < 0.05) support the preference of the combination therapy in comparison to controls. Although the monotherapies were also effective in improvement of colitis markers, the combination therapy was much better in improvement of colon oxidative stress markers including FRAP, TBARS, and MPO. CONCLUSION: The present combination is a suitable mixture in control of experimental colitis and should be trialed in the clinical setting. PMID:25152589

  5. L-Carnitine Is an Endogenous HDAC Inhibitor Selectively Inhibiting Cancer Cell Growth In Vivo and In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Siyan; Li, Xiaofen; Yang, Changshan; Liu, Shouting; Song, Wenbin; Liu, Chunjiao; Guan, Lixia; Li, Bing; Xu, Li; Zhang, Change; Wang, Xuejun; Dou, Q. Ping; Liu, Jinbao

    2012-01-01

    L-carnitine (LC) is generally believed to transport long-chain acyl groups from fatty acids into the mitochondrial matrix for ATP generation via the citric acid cycle. Based on Warburg's theory that most cancer cells mainly depend on glycolysis for ATP generation, we hypothesize that, LC treatment would lead to disturbance of cellular metabolism and cytotoxicity in cancer cells. In this study, Human hepatoma HepG2, SMMC-7721 cell lines, primary cultured thymocytes and mice bearing HepG2 tumor were used. ATP content was detected by HPLC assay. Cell cycle, cell death and cell viability were assayed by flow cytometry and MTS respectively. Gene, mRNA expression and protein level were detected by gene microarray, Real-time PCR and Western blot respectively. HDAC activities and histone acetylation were detected both in test tube and in cultured cells. A molecular docking study was carried out with CDOCKER protocol of Discovery Studio 2.0 to predict the molecular interaction between L-carnitine and HDAC. Here we found that (1) LC treatment selectively inhibited cancer cell growth in vivo and in vitro; (2) LC treatment selectively induces the expression of p21cip1 gene, mRNA and protein in cancer cells but not p27kip1; (4) LC increases histone acetylation and induces accumulation of acetylated histones both in normal thymocytes and cancer cells; (5) LC directly inhibits HDAC I/II activities via binding to the active sites of HDAC and induces histone acetylation and lysine-acetylation accumulation in vitro; (6) LC treatment induces accumulation of acetylated histones in chromatin associated with the p21cip1 gene but not p27kip1 detected by ChIP assay. These data support that LC, besides transporting acyl group, works as an endogenous HDAC inhibitor in the cell, which would be of physiological and pathological importance. PMID:23139833

  6. Effects of dietary supplementation with L-carnitine and fat on blood acid-base responses to handling in slaughter weight pigs.

    PubMed

    Bertol, T M; Ellis, M; Hamilton, D N; Johnson, E W; Ritter, M J

    2005-01-01

    Blood acid-base responses to handling were evaluated in slaughter weight pigs fed diets supplemented with l-carnitine and fat. The study was carried out as a randomized block design with a 2 x 2 factorial arrangement of treatments: 1) dietary L-carnitine supplementation (0 vs. 150 ppm, as-fed basis); and 2) dietary fat supplementation (0 vs. 5%, as-fed basis). Sixty pigs (91.1 +/- 5.14 kg BW) were housed in mixed-gender groups of five and had ad libitum access to test diets (0.68% true ileal digestible lysine, 3,340 kcal of ME/kg, as-fed basis) for 3 wk. At the end of the feeding period (110.3 +/- 7.52 kg BW), pigs were subjected to a standard handling procedure, which consisted of moving individual animals through a facility (12.2 m long x 0.91 m wide) for eight laps (up and down the facility), using electric prods (two times per lap). There was no interaction between dietary L-carnitine and fat supplementation for any measurement. Pigs fed 150 ppm of supplemental L-carnitine had lower baseline blood glucose (P < 0.05) and higher baseline blood lactate (P < 0.05) concentrations than the nonsupplemented pigs. After handling, pigs fed L-carnitine-supplemented diets had a higher (P < 0.05) blood pH and showed a smaller (P < 0.05) decrease in blood pH and base excess than those fed the nonsupplemental diets. Baseline plasma FFA concentrations were higher (P < 0.01) in pigs fed the 5% fat diet. After the handling procedure, blood glucose, lactate, and plasma FFA were higher (P < 0.05) in pigs fed the 5 vs. 0% fat diets, but blood pH, bicarbonate, and base excess were not affected by dietary fat. The handling procedure decreased (P < 0.01) blood pH, bicarbonate, base excess, and total carbon dioxide and increased (P < 0.01) blood lactate, partial pressure of oxygen, and glucose, and also increased (P < 0.01) rectal temperature. Free fatty acid concentrations were increased by handling in pigs fed both 0 and 5% fat and 150 ppm L-carnitine. In conclusion, dietary L-carnitine

  7. Myocardial Protective Effects of L-Carnitine on Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury in Patients With Rheumatic Valvular Heart Disease Undergoing Cardiac Surgery.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Xue, Li; Sun, Haifeng; Xu, Suochun

    2016-12-01

    The authors used L-carnitine as an ingredient in cardioplegic solution during valve replacement surgery to investigate the protective effect of L-carnitine on myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury (MIRI) and its possible mechanism. Prospective, randomized study. A tertiary-care hospital. The study comprised 90 patients undergoing valve replacement under cardiopulmonary bypass. Patients were divided randomly into 3 groups. L-carnitine was added to the crystalloid cardioplegic solution for experimental group 1 (3 g/L) and experimental group 2 (6 g/L), whereas no L-carnitine was used in the control group. The remainder of the treatment was identical for all 3 groups. Serum was collected from each patient 1 hour before the surgery and at 2, 6, 24, and 72 hours after unclamping the aorta, and tissue samples were obtained before cardiac arrest and after unclamping the aorta. The postoperative levels of serum aspartate aminotransferase, creatine kinase, creatine kinase-MB isozyme, and lactic acid dehydrogenase and the apoptotic index were all lower in the 2 experimental groups than those in the control group. In addition, each of the aforementioned serum enzyme levels and the apoptotic index in all 3 groups significantly increased after unclamping the aorta compared with baseline levels taken before surgery. Bcl-2 expression was higher and Bax was lower in the 2 experimental groups compared with those of the control group after unclamping the aorta. However, there was no significant difference in all the postoperative indices between the 2 experimental groups. L-carnitine may reduce cardiopulmonary bypass-induced myocardial apoptosis through modulating the expressions of Bcl-2 and Bax, resulting in a protective effect from MIRI. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. L-Carnitine/Simvastatin Reduces Lipoprotein (a) Levels Compared with Simvastatin Monotherapy: A Randomized Double-Blind Placebo-Controlled Study.

    PubMed

    Florentin, M; Elisaf, M S; Rizos, C V; Nikolaou, V; Bilianou, E; Pitsavos, C; Liberopoulos, E N

    2017-01-01

    Lipoprotein (a) [Lp(a)] is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. There are currently limited therapeutic options to lower Lp(a) levels. L-Carnitine has been reported to reduce Lp(a) levels. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of L-carnitine/simvastatin co-administration with that of simvastatin monotherapy on Lp(a) levels in subjects with mixed hyperlipidemia and elevated Lp(a) concentration. Subjects with levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) >160 mg/dL, triacylglycerol (TAG) >150 mg/dL and Lp(a) >20 mg/dL were included in this study. Subjects were randomly allocated to receive L-carnitine 2 g/day plus simvastatin 20 mg/day (N = 29) or placebo plus simvastatin 20 mg/day (N = 29) for a total of 12 weeks. Lp(a) was significantly reduced in the L-carnitine/simvastatin group [-19.4%, from 52 (20-171) to 42 (15-102) mg/dL; p = 0.01], but not in the placebo/simvastatin group [-6.7%, from 56 (26-108) to 52 (27-93) mg/dL, p = NS versus baseline and p = 0.016 for the comparison between groups]. Similar significant reductions in total cholesterol, LDL-C, apolipoprotein (apo) B and TAG were observed in both groups. Co-administration of L-carnitine with simvastatin was associated with a significant, albeit modest, reduction in Lp(a) compared with simvastatin monotherapy in subjects with mixed hyperlipidemia and elevated baseline Lp(a) levels.

  9. [ACTION OF L-CARNITINE, CORVITIN AND THEIR COMBINATION ON FUNCTIONAL STATE OF LIVER IN EXPERIMENTAL MODEL OF REYE SYNDROME IN RATS].

    PubMed

    Ghonghadze, M; Antelava, N; Liluashvili, K; Okujava, M; Pachkoria, K

    2017-02-01

    Administration of Aacetylsalicylic acid in children with viral infections (influence B, chickenpox) can be related with development of Reye syndrome - severe encephalopathy and liver insufficiency with mortality in 50% of cases. During Reye syndrome most important is deficiency of carnitine and hepatocyte damage. Decreased amount of carnitine impairs the energy function of mitochondria and gluconeogenesis as well as production of urea. As a result develops toxic encephalopathy and liver insufficiency. The goal of the research was assessment of efficacy of L-Carnitine, Corvitin and their combination on functional state of liver in experimental model of Reye Syndrome in rats. The study was performed on mature white male Wistar rates with body mass 150-180g. 50 rats were randomly divided into 5 groups (10 rats in each group). The model of Reye syndrome was induced in accordance with A.Vengersky's method. Intraperitoneal administration of 4-pentenoic acid was performed once daily during seven days, the used dosage was 20mg/kg. The treatment of toxic hepatitis was carried with intraperitoneal administration of L-Carnitine 300mg/kg, Corvitine 100mg/kg and concurrent administration of these drugs. Monotherapy with Corvitin and L-Carnitin successfully improved liver function and equally decreased indicators of hepatocyte's cytolyses and increased levels of glucose and urea. The markers of cholestasis was slightly more improved during use of L-Carnitine. Simultaneous use of both drugs was effective in rats with Reye syndrome, indicators of liver damage normalized and herewith, no mortality outcome was observed. The most pronounced hepatoprotective effect of concurrent administration of L-Carnitine and Corvitin may be due to synergic action of these drugs and such regime can be recommended for correction of liver function during Reye syndrome.

  10. Efficacy of L-carnitine supplementation on frailty status and its biomarkers, nutritional status, and physical and cognitive function among prefrail older adults: a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Badrasawi, M; Shahar, Suzana; Zahara, A M; Nor Fadilah, R; Singh, Devinder Kaur Ajit

    2016-01-01

    Frailty is a biological syndrome of decreased reserve and resistance to stressors due to decline in multiple physiological systems. Amino acid deficiency, including L-carnitine, has been proposed to be associated with its pathophysiology. Nevertheless, the efficacy of L-carnitine supplementation on frailty status has not been documented. Thus, this study aimed to determine the effect of 10-week L-carnitine supplement (1.5 g/day) on frailty status and its biomarkers and also physical function, cognition, and nutritional status among prefrail older adults in Klang Valley, Malaysia. This study is a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial conducted among 50 prefrail subjects randomized into two groups (26 in L-carnitine group and 24 in placebo group). Outcome measures include frailty status using Fried criteria and Frailty Index accumulation of deficit, selected frailty biomarkers (interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and insulin-like growth factor-1), physical function, cognitive function, nutritional status and biochemical profile. The results indicated that the mean scores of Frailty Index score and hand grip test were significantly improved in subjects supplemented with L-carnitine ( P <0.05 for both parameters) as compared to no change in the placebo group. Based on Fried criteria, four subjects (three from the L-carnitine group and one from the control group) transited from prefrail status to robust after the intervention. L-carnitine supplementation has a favorable effect on the functional status and fatigue in prefrail older adults.

  11. Effect of dosage and application mode of L-carnitine on plasma lipid and egg-yolk cholesterol of turkeys, hatchability of eggs and post-hatch growth of their offsprings.

    PubMed

    Oso, A O; Fafiolu, A O; Adeleke, M A; Ladokun, O A; Sobayo, R A; Jegede, A V; Peters, S O; Oyebamiji, O A; Akinsola, J

    2014-08-01

    The effect of dosage and application mode of L-carnitine on plasma lipid and egg-yolk cholesterol of breeder turkeys, hatchability of eggs and post-hatch growth response was investigated using 180 breeder hens. The hens were assigned to six dietary treatments in a 2 × 3 factorial arrangements of two application modes of L-carnitine (diet and drinking water) supplemented at 0, 50 and 100 ppm (mg/kg or mg/l) levels, respectively. Each treatment was replicated five times with six hens per replicate. Dietary inclusion of 50 ppm L-carnitine showed the lowest (p < 0.01) plasma total cholesterol (TC) and low-density lipoprotein concentration (LDL). Breeder hens offered 50 ppm L-carnitine with no regard to application mode recorded the highest (p < 0.01) plasma high-density lipoprotein (HDL). Hens offered 50 and 100 ppm L-carnitine irrespective of application mode also showed reduced (p < 0.01) egg-yolk TC concentration at 32 weeks of age. Dietary supplementation of 50 ppm L-carnitine for breeder turkeys recorded the lowest (p < 0.01) egg-yolk triglyceride (TG) at 40 weeks of age. Hens offered 50 ppm L-carnitine irrespective of application mode recorded the highest (p < 0.05) hen-day egg production. Incidence of dead-in-shell also reduced (p < 0.05) with increasing dosage of L-carnitine. Dietary supplementation of 50 ppm and oral application in drinking water of 100 ppm L-carnitine for breeder turkeys resulted in highest (p < 0.05) egg fertility. Offsprings from breeder hens fed diets supplemented with L-carnitine recorded no post-hatch mortality. Highest (p < 0.05) post-hatch final live weight and weight gain was obtained with poults obtained from hens fed diet supplemented with 50 ppm L-carnitine. In conclusion, dietary supplementation of 50 ppm L-carnitine for turkey hens showed improved serum lipid profile, egg fertility, reduced dead-in-shell, egg-yolk cholesterol and resulted in improved post-hatch growth performance.

  12. L-carnitine and pyruvate are prosurvival factors during the storage of stallion spermatozoa at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Gibb, Zamira; Lambourne, Sarah R; Quadrelli, Julianne; Smith, Nathan D; Aitken, Robert J

    2015-10-01

    The spermatozoa of many stallions do not tolerate being cooled, restricting the commercial viability of these animals and necessitating the development of a chemically defined room temperature (RT) storage medium. This study examined the impact of two major modulators of oxidative phosphorylation, pyruvate (Pyr) and L-carnitine (L-C), on the storage of stallion spermatozoa at RT. Optimal concentrations of Pyr (10 mM) and L-C (50 mM) were first identified and these concentrations were then used to investigate the effects of these compounds on sperm functionality and oxidative stress at RT. Mitochondrial and cytosolic reactive oxygen species, along with lipid peroxidation, were all significantly suppressed by the addition of L-C (48 h MitoSOX Red negative: 46.2% vs. 26.1%; 48 and 72 h dihydroethidium negative: 61.6% vs. 43.1% and 64.4% vs. 46.9%, respectively; 48 and 72 h 4-hydroxynonenal negative: 37.1% vs. 23.8% and 41.6% vs. 25.7%, respectively), while the Pyr + L-C combination resulted in significantly higher motility compared to the control at 72 h (total motility: 64.2% vs. 39.4%; progressive motility: 34.2% vs. 15.2%). In addition, supplementation with L-C significantly reduced oxidative DNA damage at 72 h (9.0% vs. 15.6%). To investigate the effects of L-C as an osmolyte, comparisons were made between media that were osmotically balanced with NaCl, choline chloride, or L-C. This analysis demonstrated that spermatozoa stored in the L-C balanced medium had significantly higher total motility (55.0% vs. 39.0%), rapid motility (44.0% vs. 25.7%), and ATP levels (70.9 vs. 12.8 ng/ml) following storage compared with the NaCl treatment, while choline chloride did not significantly improve these parameters compared to the control. Finally, mass spectrometry was used to demonstrate that a combination of Pyr and L-C produced significantly higher acetyl-L-carnitine production than any other treatment (6.7 pg/10(6) spermatozoa vs. control at 4.0 pg/10(6) spermatozoa

  13. Pro-inflammatory and oxidative stress pathways which compromise sperm motility and survival may be altered by L-carnitine

    PubMed Central

    Helal, Gouda K; Al-Yahya, Abdulaziz A; Aleisa, Abdulaziz M; Al-Rejaie, Salim S; Al-Bakheet, Saleh A

    2009-01-01

    The testis is an immunologically privileged organ. Sertoli cells can form a blood-testis barrier and protect sperm cells from self-immune system attacks. Spermatogenesis may be inhibited by severe illness, bacterial infections and chronic inflammatory diseases but the mechanism(s) is poorly understood. Our objective is to help in understanding such mechanism(s) to develop protective agents against temporary or permanent testicular dysfunction. Lipopolysaccaride (LPS) is used as a model of animal sepsis while L-carnitine (LCR) is used as a protective agent. A total of 60 male Swiss albino rats were divided into four groups (15/group). The control group received Saline; the 2nd group was given LCR (500 mg/kg i.p, once). The third group was treated with LPS (5 mg/kg i.p once) and the fourth group received LCR then LPS after three hours. From each group, five rats were used for histopathological examination. Biochemical parameters were assessed in the remaining ten rats. At the end of the experiment, animals were lightly anaesthetized with ether where blood samples were collected and testes were dissected on ice. Sperm count and motility were evaluated from cauda epididymis in each animal. Also, oxidative stress was evaluated by measuring testicular contents of reduced glutathione (GSH), malondialdehyde (MDA) and 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-HDG, the DNA adduct for oxidative damage) in testicular DNA. The pro-inflammatory mediator nitric oxide (NO) in addition to lactate dehydrogenase (LDHx) isoenzyme-x activity as an indicator for normal spermatozoal metabolism were assessed in testicular homogenate. Serum interlukin (IL)-2 level was also assessed as a marker for T-helper cell function. The obtained data revealed that LPS induced marked reductions in sperm's count and motility, obstruction in seminiferous tubules, hypospermia and dilated congested blood vessels in testicular sections concomitant with decreased testicular GSH content and LDHx activity. Moreover, the

  14. The effect of dietary supplementation with calcium salts of long chain fatty acids and/or L-carnitine on ovarian activity of Rahmani ewes.

    PubMed

    El-Shahat, K H; Abo-El maaty, Amal M

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of dietary supplementation with calcium salts of long chain fatty acids with or without of l-carnitine on ovarian activity using 24 Rahmani ewes randomly allocated to four treatments. Control animals (n=6) were fed a basal diet of hay (64.2%) and barley grain (35.0%) plus minerals and vitamins (0.8%). Ewes on the three treatments received the same basal diet supplemented with calcium salts of long chain fatty acids (CSFA) at 3% of the basal diet dry matter intake (1.4 kg/ewe/d); 250 ppm l-carnitine (LC); or both these supplements (CSFA+LC). All use exhibited natural estrus on one or two occasions and were weighed at the start and the end of the study as well as body condition score was assessed at the end of study. All ewes were then synchronised for estrus using intravaginal sponges for 12 d prior to the start of the nutritional treatments and three weeks after the nutritional treatments began. The nutritional treatments were imposed for a total of 8 weeks. Blood samples were collected prior to the start of treatments and every two weeks thereafter except after sponge removal of first and second synchronisation where the blood samples were collected daily for progesterone assay. The results revealed that Rahmani ewes received basal diet (control) and l-carnitine had significantly decrease final body weight and body condition score (36.3+/-0.4; 36.8+/-0.3; 2.2+/-0.04; 2.1+/-0.05; p<0.05, respectively) than those on CSFA and CSFA+LC (38.6+/-0.9; 39.5+/-0.6; 3.3+/-0.07; 3.4+/-0.06; respectively). At the second ultrasound examination, the control animals had significantly fewer total follicles (7.3+/-0.8; p<0.05) than those on the CSFA (8.4+/-0.8), l-carnitine (8.7+/-1.5) and CSFA+LC (8.0+/-0.6) treatments. The increased numbers occurred in the medium and large categories of follicles. In addition, the ovulation rates were significantly lower (p<0.05) for control (1.3+/-0.2) and l-carnitine (1.5+/-0.00) than for CSFA (2.5+/-0.3) and

  15. Regulatory effect of acetyl-l-carnitine on expression of lenticular antioxidant and apoptotic genes in selenite-induced cataract.

    PubMed

    Elanchezhian, R; Sakthivel, M; Geraldine, P; Thomas, P A

    2010-03-30

    Differential expression of apoptotic genes has been demonstrated in selenite-induced cataract. Acetyl-l-carnitine (ALCAR) has been shown to prevent selenite cataractogenesis by maintaining lenticular antioxidant enzyme and redox system components at near normal levels and also by inhibiting lenticular calpain activity. The aim of the present experiment was to investigate the possibility that ALCAR also prevents selenite-induced cataractogenesis by regulating the expression of antioxidant (catalase) and apoptotic [caspase-3, early growth response protein-1 (EGR-1) and cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COX-I)] genes. The experiment was conducted on 9-day-old Wistar rat pups, which were divided into normal, cataract-untreated and cataract-treated groups. Putative changes in gene expression in whole lenses removed from the rats were determined by measuring mRNA transcript levels of the four genes by RT-PCR analysis, using glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) as an internal control. The expression of lenticular caspase-3 and EGR-1 genes appeared to be upregulated, as inferred by detecting increased mRNA transcript levels, while that of COX-I and catalase genes appeared to be downregulated (lowered mRNA transcript levels) in the lenses of cataract-untreated rats. However, in rats treated with ALCAR, the lenticular mRNA transcript levels were maintained at near normal (control) levels. These results suggest that ALCAR may prevent selenite-induced cataractogenesis by preventing abnormal expression of lenticular genes governing apoptosis.

  16. Role of mitochondrial dysfunction in neurotoxicity of MPP+: partial protection of PC12 cells by acetyl-L-carnitine.

    PubMed

    Virmani, Ashraf; Gaetani, Franco; Binienda, Zbigniew; Xu, Alex; Duhart, Helen; Ali, Syed F

    2004-10-01

    The damage to the central nervous system that is observed after administration of either methamphetamine (METH) or 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+), the neurotoxic metabolite of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), is known to be linked to dopamine (DA). The underlying neurotoxicity mechanism for both METH and MPP+ seem to involve free radical formation and impaired mitochondrial function. The MPP+ is thought to selectively kill nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons by inhibiting mitochondrial complex I, with cell death being attributed to oxidative stress damage to these vulnerable DA neurons. In the present study, MPP+ was shown to significantly inhibit the response to MTT by cultured PC12 cells. This inhibitory action of MPP+ could be partially reversed by the co-incubation of the cells with the acetylated form of carnitine, acetyl-L-carnitine (ALC). Since at least part of the toxic action of MPP+ is related to mitochondrial inhibition, the partial reversal of the inhibition of MTT response by ALC could involve a partial restoration of mitochondrial function. The role carnitine derivatives, such as ALC, play in attenuating MPP+ and METH-evoked toxicity is still under investigation to elucidate the contribution of mitochondrial dysfunction in mechanisms of neurotoxicity.

  17. Children at risk of diabetes type 1. Treatment with acetyl-L-carnitine plus nicotinamide - case reports.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Ivana Cristina; Del Carmen Camberos, María; Passicot, Gisel Anabel; Martucci, Lucía Camila; Cresto, Juan Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objectives: The aim was to evaluate the treatment with acetyl-L-carnitine (50 mg/kg/day) and nicotinamide (25 mg/kg/day) in children at risk of type 1 diabetes. This treatment was effective and harmless in experimental type 1 diabetes in mice. Nine out of seventy healthy participants of the type 1 diabetes risk study were treated. They were typified for diabetes with HLA-DQB1 and positive autoantibodies. Children with a first peak of insulin response ≤48 µU were randomly distributed in control and treated patients. Children evolution was followed with an intravenous glucose tolerance test. Control children were treated when was another risk parameter was added. During their evolution all children were treated. Treatment periods differ (range: 120-16 months) because children began treatment at different times. During the treatment 4 patients recovered their parameters and the medication was suspended; 2 patients continued the treatment with favorable evolution. Two children evolved slowly with normal growth and development. One girl became diabetic because she was treated late. In children at risk, this treatment delays the development or remits the evolution of type 1 diabetes.

  18. Simple determination of betaine, l-carnitine and choline in human urine using self-packed column and column-switching ion chromatography with nonsuppressed conductivity detection.

    PubMed

    Wei, Dan; Zhu, Yan; Guo, Ming

    2018-02-01

    A sequential online extraction, clean-up and separation system for the determination of betaine, l-carnitine and choline in human urine using column-switching ion chromatography with nonsuppressed conductivity detection was developed in this work. A self-packed pretreatment column (50 × 4.6 mm, i.d.) was used for the extraction and clean-up of betaine, l-carnitine and choline. The separation was achieved using self-packed cationic exchange column (150 × 4.6 mm, i.d.), followed by nonsuppressed conductivity detection. Under optimized experimental conditions, the developed method presented good analytical performance, with excellent linearity in the range of 0.60-100 μg mL -1 for betaine, 0.75-100 μg mL -1 for l-carnitine and 0.50-100 μg mL -1 for choline, with all correlation coefficients (R 2 ) >0.99 in urine. The limits of detection were 0.15 μg mL -1 for betaine, 0.20 μg mL -1 for l-carnitine and 0.09 μg mL -1 for choline. The intra- and inter-day accuracy and precision for all quality controls were within ±10.32 and ±9.05%, respectively. Satisfactory recovery was observed between 92.8 and 102.0%. The validated method was successfully applied to the detection of urinary samples from 10 healthy people. The values detected in human urine using the proposed method showed good agreement with the measurement reported previously. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Effect of L-carnitine supplementation on the body carnitine pool, skeletal muscle energy metabolism and physical performance in male vegetarians.

    PubMed

    Novakova, Katerina; Kummer, Oliver; Bouitbir, Jamal; Stoffel, Sonja D; Hoerler-Koerner, Ulrike; Bodmer, Michael; Roberts, Paul; Urwyler, Albert; Ehrsam, Rolf; Krähenbühl, Stephan

    2016-02-01

    More than 95% of the body carnitine is located in skeletal muscle, where it is essential for energy metabolism. Vegetarians ingest less carnitine and carnitine precursors and have lower plasma carnitine concentrations than omnivores. Principle aims of the current study were to assess the plasma and skeletal muscle carnitine content and physical performance of male vegetarians and matched omnivores under basal conditions and after L-carnitine supplementation. Sixteen vegetarians and eight omnivores participated in this interventional study with oral supplementation of 2 g L-carnitine for 12 weeks. Before carnitine supplementation, vegetarians had a 10% lower plasma carnitine concentration, but maintained skeletal muscle carnitine stores compared to omnivores. Skeletal muscle phosphocreatine, ATP, glycogen and lactate contents were also not different from omnivores. Maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) and workload (P max) per bodyweight (bicycle spiroergometry) were not significantly different between vegetarians and omnivores. Sub-maximal exercise (75% VO2max for 1 h) revealed no significant differences between vegetarians and omnivores (respiratory exchange ratio, blood lactate and muscle metabolites). Supplementation with L-carnitine significantly increased the total plasma carnitine concentration (24% in omnivores, 31% in vegetarians) and the muscle carnitine content in vegetarians (13%). Despite this increase, P max and VO2max as well as muscle phosphocreatine, lactate and glycogen were not significantly affected by carnitine administration. Vegetarians have lower plasma carnitine concentrations, but maintained muscle carnitine stores compared to omnivores. Oral L-carnitine supplementation normalizes the plasma carnitine stores and slightly increases the skeletal muscle carnitine content in vegetarians, but without affecting muscle function and energy metabolism.

  20. Protection of rat skeletal muscle fibers by either L-carnitine or coenzyme Q10 against statins toxicity mediated by mitochondrial reactive oxygen generation

    PubMed Central

    La Guardia, P. G.; Alberici, L. C.; Ravagnani, F. G.; Catharino, R. R.; Vercesi, A. E.

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial redox imbalance has been implicated in mechanisms of aging, various degenerative diseases and drug-induced toxicity. Statins are safe and well-tolerated therapeutic drugs that occasionally induce myotoxicity such as myopathy and rhabdomyolysis. Previous studies indicate that myotoxicity caused by statins may be linked to impairment of mitochondrial functions. Here, we report that 1-h incubation of permeabilized rat soleus muscle fiber biopsies with increasing concentrations of simvastatin (1–40 μM) slowed the rates of ADP-or FCCP-stimulated respiration supported by glutamate/malate in a dose-dependent manner, but caused no changes in resting respiration rates. Simvastatin (1 μM) also inhibited the ADP-stimulated mitochondrial respiration supported by succinate by 24% but not by TMPD/ascorbate. Compatible with inhibition of respiration, 1 μM simvastatin stimulated lactate release from soleus muscle samples by 26%. Co-incubation of muscle samples with 1 mM L-carnitine, 100 μM mevalonate or 10 μM coenzyme Q10 (Co-Q10) abolished simvastatin effects on both mitochondrial glutamate/malate-supported respiration and lactate release. Simvastatin (1 μM) also caused a 2-fold increase in the rate of hydrogen peroxide generation and a decrease in Co-Q10 content by 44%. Mevalonate, Co-Q10 or L-carnitine protected against stimulation of hydrogen peroxide generation but only mevalonate prevented the decrease in Co-Q10 content. Thus, independently of Co-Q10 levels, L-carnitine prevented the toxic effects of simvastatin. This suggests that mitochondrial respiratory dysfunction induced by simvastatin, is associated with increased generation of superoxide, at the levels of complexes-I and II of the respiratory chain. In all cases the damage to these complexes, presumably at the level of 4Fe-4S clusters, is prevented by L-carnitine. PMID:23720630

  1. L-carnitine supplementation in patients with HIV/AIDS and fatigue: a double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot study.

    PubMed

    Cruciani, Ricardo A; Revuelta, Manuel; Dvorkin, Ella; Homel, Peter; Lesage, Pauline; Esteban-Cruciani, Nora

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of L-carnitine supplementation on fatigue in patients with terminal human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS). In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group study, patients who had end-stage HIV/AIDS with carnitine deficiency and fatigue received 3 g of oral L-carnitine or placebo for 2 weeks, followed by a 2-week, open-label phase with the same amount of L-carnitine for all patients. The primary outcome was the degree of fatigue according to the Brief Fatigue Inventory. Secondary outcomes included serum carnitine and lactate levels, physical, emotional, social, and functional well-being, performance status, mood, and CD4 count. Eighteen patients in the treatment arm and 17 in the placebo arm completed the trial. At the end of the double-blind phase, total and free carnitine levels in the treatment arm rose from 28±9 to 48±17 nM/L (P<0.001) and from 24±8 to 40±13 nM/L (P<0.001) respectively, with no changes in the placebo arm. The primary outcome, ie, fatigue measured at the end of the blinded phase, did not improve. Secondary outcomes of function, quality of life, and mood did not show improvement either. The secondary outcome of serum lactate decreased from baseline in the treatment group (1.45±0.76 to 1.28±0.52 mmol/L) and increased in the placebo group (1.38±0.62 to 1.84±0.74 mmol/L; P<0.005). Our study suggests that 3 g of oral L-carnitine supplementation for 2 weeks in terminally ill HIV/AIDS patients does not improve fatigue. This study might help to determine the dose and duration of treatment used in future clinical trials, as higher doses and/or longer periods of supplementation might be needed in order to detect an improvement. The reduction in serum lactate levels suggests a potential role for L-carnitine supplementation in patients undergoing certain types of antiretroviral therapy. This study contributes evidence-based data to the

  2. L-carnitine supplementation in patients with HIV/AIDS and fatigue: a double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Cruciani, Ricardo A; Revuelta, Manuel; Dvorkin, Ella; Homel, Peter; Lesage, Pauline; Esteban-Cruciani, Nora

    2015-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of L-carnitine supplementation on fatigue in patients with terminal human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS). Methods In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group study, patients who had end-stage HIV/AIDS with carnitine deficiency and fatigue received 3 g of oral L-carnitine or placebo for 2 weeks, followed by a 2-week, open-label phase with the same amount of L-carnitine for all patients. The primary outcome was the degree of fatigue according to the Brief Fatigue Inventory. Secondary outcomes included serum carnitine and lactate levels, physical, emotional, social, and functional well-being, performance status, mood, and CD4 count. Results Eighteen patients in the treatment arm and 17 in the placebo arm completed the trial. At the end of the double-blind phase, total and free carnitine levels in the treatment arm rose from 28±9 to 48±17 nM/L (P<0.001) and from 24±8 to 40±13 nM/L (P<0.001) respectively, with no changes in the placebo arm. The primary outcome, ie, fatigue measured at the end of the blinded phase, did not improve. Secondary outcomes of function, quality of life, and mood did not show improvement either. The secondary outcome of serum lactate decreased from baseline in the treatment group (1.45±0.76 to 1.28±0.52 mmol/L) and increased in the placebo group (1.38±0.62 to 1.84±0.74 mmol/L; P<0.005). Conclusion Our study suggests that 3 g of oral L-carnitine supplementation for 2 weeks in terminally ill HIV/AIDS patients does not improve fatigue. This study might help to determine the dose and duration of treatment used in future clinical trials, as higher doses and/or longer periods of supplementation might be needed in order to detect an improvement. The reduction in serum lactate levels suggests a potential role for L-carnitine supplementation in patients undergoing certain types of antiretroviral therapy. This study

  3. Leptin Induces Oxidative Stress Through Activation of NADPH Oxidase in Renal Tubular Cells: Antioxidant Effect of L-Carnitine.

    PubMed

    Blanca, Antonio J; Ruiz-Armenta, María V; Zambrano, Sonia; Salsoso, Rocío; Miguel-Carrasco, José L; Fortuño, Ana; Revilla, Elisa; Mate, Alfonso; Vázquez, Carmen M

    2016-10-01

    Leptin is a protein involved in the regulation of food intake and in the immune and inflammatory responses, among other functions. Evidences demonstrate that obesity is directly associated with high levels of leptin, suggesting that leptin may directly link obesity with the elevated cardiovascular and renal risk associated with increased body weight. Adverse effects of leptin include oxidative stress mediated by activation of NADPH oxidase. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of L-carnitine (LC) in rat renal epithelial cells (NRK-52E) exposed to leptin in order to generate a state of oxidative stress characteristic of obesity. Leptin increased superoxide anion (O2 (•) -) generation from NADPH oxidase (via PI3 K/Akt pathway), NOX2 expression and nitrotyrosine levels. On the other hand, NOX4 expression and hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 ) levels diminished after leptin treatment. Furthermore, the expression of antioxidant enzymes, catalase, and superoxide dismutase, was altered by leptin, and an increase in the mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory factors was also found in leptin-treated cells. LC restored all changes induced by leptin to those levels found in untreated cells. In conclusion, stimulation of NRK-52E cells with leptin induced a state of oxidative stress and inflammation that could be reversed by preincubation with LC. Interestingly, LC induced an upregulation of NOX4 and restored the release of its product, hydrogen peroxide, which suggests a protective role of NOX4 against leptin-induced renal damage. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2281-2288, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Effect of L-Carnitine Supplementation on Apelin and Apelin Receptor (Apj) Expression in Cardiac Muscle of Obese Diabetic Rats.

    PubMed

    Ranjbar Kohan, Neda; Nazifi, Saeed; Tabandeh, Mohammad Reza; Ansari Lari, Maryam

    2018-10-01

    L-carnitine (LC) has been shown to protect cardiac metabolism in diabetes patients with cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). Apelin, a newly discovered adipocytokines, is an important regulator of cardiac muscle function; however, the role of the level of expression of Apelin axis in improvement of cardiac function by LC in diabetic patients, is not clear. In the present study, obese insulin-resistant rats were used to determine the effect of LC, when given orally with a high-calorie diet, on Apelin and Apelin receptor (Apj) expression in cardiac muscle. In this experimental study, rats were fed with high-fat/high-carbohydrate diet for five weeks and subsequently were injected with streptozotocin 30 mg/kg for induction of obesity and insulin resistance. After confirming the induction of diabetes (serum glucose above 7.5 mmol/L), the animals received LC 300 mg/kg in drinking water for 28 days. On days 0, 14 and 28 after treatment, cardiac Apelin and Apj gene expression was evaluated by real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis. Serum levels of insulin, Apelin, glucose, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) were also measured using commercial kits. Cardiac Apelin and Apj expression and serum Apelin were increased in obese rats, while LC supplementation decreased the serum levels of Apelin and down-regulated Apelin and Apj expression in cardiac muscle. These changes were associated with reduced insulin resistance markers and serum inflammatory factors and improved lipid profile. We concluded that LC supplementation could attenuate the over-expression of Apelin axis in heart of diabetic rats, a novel mechanism by which LC improves cardiovascular complications in diabetic patients. Copyright© by Royan Institute. All rights reserved.

  5. Acetyl-l-carnitine partially prevents benzene-induced hematotoxicity and oxidative stress in C3H/He mice.

    PubMed

    Sun, Rongli; Zhang, Juan; Wei, Haiyan; Meng, Xing; Ding, Qin; Sun, Fengxia; Cao, Meng; Yin, Lihong; Pu, Yuepu

    2017-04-01

    Benzene is an environmental pollutant and occupational toxicant which induces hematotoxicity. Our previous metabonomics study suggested that acetyl-l-carnitine (ALCAR) decreased in the mouse plasma and bone marrow (BM) cells due to benzene exposure. In the present study, the topic on whether ALCAR influences hematotoxicity caused by benzene exposure was explored. Thirty-two male C3H/He mice were divided into four groups: control group (C: vehicle, oil), benzene group (150mg/kg body weight (b.w.) benzene), benzene+A1 group (150mg/kg b.w. benzene+100mg/kg b.w. ALCAR), and benzene+A2 group (150mg/kg b.w. benzene+200mg/kg b.w. ALCAR). Benzene was injected subcutaneously, and ALCAR was orally administrated via gavage once daily for 4 weeks consecutively. After the experimental period, the blood routine, BM cell number and frequency of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell (HS/PC) were assessed. The mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP level were determined to evaluate the mitochondrial function. Reactive oxygen species (ROS), hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were also examined, and the comet assay was performed to measure oxidative stress. Results showed that ALCAR intervention can partially reduce the benzene-induced damage on BM and HS/PCs and can simultaneously alleviate the DNA damage by reducing benzene-induced H 2 O 2, ROS, and MDA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. L-Carnitine halts apoptosis and myelosuppression induced by carboplatin in rat bone marrow cell cultures (BMC).

    PubMed

    Abd-Allah, Adel R A; Al-Majed, Abdulhakeem A; Al-Yahya, Abdulaziz A; Fouda, Soliman I; Al-Shabana, Othman A

    2005-07-01

    Carboplatin (CP), a second generation platinum compound, is effective against various types of cancers, producing less nephrotoxicity and ototoxicity but more myelotoxicity than cisplatinum. CP-myelosuppression is the rate-limiting step of its clinical use. Prevention of CP-myelosuppression is a major target in the field of chemotherapy. Therefore, the present study investigates the use of L-carnitine (LCR)-an antioxidant, cardioprotective, neuroprotective, and immunostimulant nontoxic natural compound-to protect against CP-induced myelosuppression. The viability of BMC was studied using a trypan blue exclusion technique following incubation with CP and/or LCR as a function of time and concentration. Apoptosis was tested for by detecting the amount of DNA fragmentation and the visualization of DNA ladders upon gel electrophoresis. Bone marrow progenitor cell function was examined by colony forming unit assay. Cellular contents of glutathione (GSH) and malondialdehyde (MDA) were also estimated. Results revealed that LC50 of CP is 4.7 mM and the highest safe concentration of LCR is 5 mM. Co-exposure of LCR+CP rescued BMC viability by 37% compared to the CP-treated cultures. The LCR halts CP-induced apoptosis and it significantly improves the function of the bone marrow progenitors by increasing the number of colony-forming units as a response to granulocyte/macrophage colony stimulating factors. Finally, LCR restores CP-induced GSH depletion and prevents MDA elevation in BMC. In summary, the results suggest that LCR is able to protect against CP-induced myelosuppression, which suggests its use as an adjuvant therapy. This finding merits further investigation into the mechanism(s) of such protection as well as its interaction with CP antitumor activity.

  7. L-Carnitine in rooster semen cryopreservation: Flow cytometric, biochemical and motion findings for frozen-thawed sperm.

    PubMed

    Fattah, A; Sharafi, M; Masoudi, R; Shahverdi, A; Esmaeili, V; Najafi, A

    2017-02-01

    Rooster semen cryopreservation is not efficient for artificial insemination in breeder flocks. L-Carnitine (LC) has been evaluated for effectiveness in cryopreservation media on the characteristics of rooster sperm after freeze-thawing. Motility characteristics, membrane functionality, abnormal morphology, apoptotic like changes, mitochondria activity and lipid peroxidation of rooster sperms were assessed after freeze-thawing with different concentrations of LC in Beltsville medium. Semen samples were collected from 12 roosters, twice a week, and diluted in the extenders that contained different concentrations of LC. Supplementation of Beltsevile with 1 and 2 mM LC was found to result in higher total motility (68.2± 1.7% and 69.1± 1.7%, respectively), progressive motility (28.4± 1.6%, 29.8± 1.6%), membrane functionality (76.2± 1.9% and 75.9± 1.9%), viability (58.2 ± 1.1%, 59.1 ± 1.1%) and lower significant of lipid peroxidation (2.53 ± 0.08 nmol/ml, 2.49 ± 0.08 nmol/ml) compared to control group containing no LC. Lower motility, progressive motility, and viability were observed in frozen-thawed sperm in extender containing 8 mM LC (35.8± 1.7%, 9.6± 1.2% and 27.1 ± 1.2%, respectively) compared to control. Morphology and mitochondrial activity were not affected by different concentrations of LC. Our results showed that supplementation of Beltsville extender with 1 and 2 mM LC significantly improved the quality of rooster sperm quality after freeze-thawing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Dose- dependent ameliorative effects of quercetin and l-Carnitine against atrazine- induced reproductive toxicity in adult male Albino rats.

    PubMed

    Abdel Aziz, Rabie L; Abdel-Wahab, Ahmed; Abo El-Ela, Fatma I; Hassan, Nour El-Houda Y; El-Nahass, El-Shaymaa; Ibrahim, Marwa A; Khalil, Abdel-Tawab A Y

    2018-06-01

    This study aimed to determine the protective effects of co-administration of Quercetin (QT) or l-Carnitine (LC) against the oxidative stress induced by Atrazine (ATZ) in the reproductive system of intact male Albino rats. 36 rats were divided equally into 6 groups. Rats in the control negative "CNT" group received 1.5 ml distilled water for 21 days. All rats in the other groups received ATZ (120 mg/kg bw) through gavage. Groups 3 and 4 were co-administered with either low or high dose of QT (10 "ATZLQT" and 50 "ATZHQT" mg/kg bw, respectively). Groups 5 and 6 were co-administered with either low or high dose of LC (200 "ATZLLC" and 400 "ATZHLC" mg/kg bw, respectively). At the end of the experiment, animals were sacrificed and all samples were collected. ATZ significantly increased serum level of malondialdehyde (MDA) and decreased total antioxidant capacity (TAC). Also, ATZ increased significantly the sperm cell abnormalities and reduced both testicular IgA and serum testosterone levels. Testicular DNA laddering % and CYP17A1 mRNA expression were significantly reduced in ATZ group. Interestingly, co-administration with low dose QT or different doses of LC succeeded to counteract the negative toxic effects of ATZ on serum oxidative stress indicators, serum testosterone levels, testicular IgA level and improved testicular CYP17A1 mRNA expression. In conclusion, QT in low dose and LC in both low and high doses exerted a significant protective action against the reproductive toxicity of ATZ, while higher dose of QT failed induce immune-stimulant effect against ATZ in adult male Albino rats. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Blood Pressure and Metabolic Effects of Acetyl-l-Carnitine in Type 2 Diabetes: DIABASI Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Parvanova, Aneliya; Trillini, Matias; Podestà, Manuel A; Iliev, Ilian P; Aparicio, Carolina; Perna, Annalisa; Peraro, Francesco; Rubis, Nadia; Gaspari, Flavio; Cannata, Antonio; Ferrari, Silvia; Bossi, Antonio C; Trevisan, Roberto; Parameswaran, Sreejith; Chávez-Iñiguez, Jonathan S; Masnic, Fahrudin; Seck, Sidy Mohamed; Jiamjariyaporn, Teerayuth; Cortinovis, Monica; Perico, Luca; Sharma, Kanishka; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Ruggenenti, Piero; Warnock, David G

    2018-05-01

    Acetyl-l-carnitine (ALC), a mitochondrial carrier involved in lipid oxidation and glucose metabolism, decreased systolic blood pressure (SBP), and ameliorated insulin sensitivity in hypertensive nondiabetic subjects at high cardiovascular risk. To assess the effects of ALC on SBP and glycemic and lipid control in patients with hypertension, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D), and dyslipidemia on background statin therapy. After 4-week run-in period and stratification according to previous statin therapy, patients were randomized to 6-month, double-blind treatment with ALC or placebo added-on simvastatin. Five diabetology units and one clinical research center in Italy. Two hundred twenty-nine patients with hypertension and dyslipidemic T2D >40 years with stable background antihypertensive, hypoglycemic, and statin therapy and serum creatinine <1.5 mg/dL. Oral ALC 1000 mg or placebo twice daily on top of stable simvastatin therapy. Primary outcome was SBP. Secondary outcomes included lipid and glycemic profiles. Total-body glucose disposal rate and glomerular filtration rate were measured in subgroups by hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp and iohexol plasma clearance, respectively. SBP did not significantly change after 6-month treatment with ALC compared with placebo (-2.09 mm Hg vs -3.57 mm Hg, P = 0.9539). Serum cholesterol, triglycerides, and lipoprotein(a), as well as blood glucose, glycated hemoglobin, fasting insulin levels, homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance index, glucose disposal rate, and glomerular filtration rate did not significantly differ between treatments. Adverse events were comparable between groups. Six-month oral ALC supplementation did not affect blood pressure, lipid and glycemic control, insulin sensitivity and kidney function in hypertensive normoalbuminuric and microalbuminuric T2D patients on background statin therapy.

  10. Effect of Acetyl-L-Carnitine on Antioxidant Status, Lipid Peroxidation, and Oxidative Damage of Arsenic in Rat.

    PubMed

    Sepand, Mohammad Reza; Razavi-Azarkhiavi, Kamal; Omidi, Ameneh; Zirak, Mohammad Reza; Sabzevari, Samin; Kazemi, Ali Reza; Sabzevari, Omid

    2016-05-01

    Arsenic (As) is a widespread environmental contaminant present around the world in both organic and inorganic forms. Oxidative stress is postulated as the main mechanism for As-induced toxicity. This study was planned to examine the protective effect of acetyl-L-carnitine (ALC) on As-induced oxidative damage in male rats. Animals were randomly divided into four groups of control (saline), sodium arsenite (NaAsO2, 20 mg/kg), ALC (300 mg/kg), and NaAsO2 plus ALC. Animals were dosed orally for 28 successive days. Blood and tissue samples including kidney, brain, liver, heart, and lung were collected on the 28th day and evaluated for oxidative damage and histological changes. NaAsO2 exposure caused a significant lipid peroxidation as evidenced by elevation in thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS). The activity of antioxidant enzymes such as glutathione-S-transferase (GST), catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), as well as sulfhydryl group content (SH group) was significantly suppressed in various organs following NaAsO2 treatment (P < 0.05). Furthermore, NaAsO2 administration increased serum values of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and bilirubin. Our findings revealed that co-administration of ALC and NaAsO2 significantly suppressed the oxidative damage induced by NaAsO2. Tissue histological studies have confirmed the biochemical findings and provided evidence for the beneficial role of ALC. The results concluded that ALC attenuated NaAsO2-induced toxicity, and this protective effect may result from the ability of ALC in maintaining oxidant-antioxidant balance.

  11. Acetyl-L-Carnitine Supplementation and the Treatment of Depressive Symptoms: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Veronese, Nicola; Stubbs, Brendon; Solmi, Marco; Ajnakina, Olesya; Carvalho, Andre F; Maggi, Stefania

    Deficiency of acetyl-L-carnitine (ALC) seems to play a role in the risk of developing depression, indicating a dysregulation of fatty acid transport across the inner membrane of mitochondria. However, data about ALC supplementation in humans are limited. We thus conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis investigating the effect of ALC on depressive symptoms across randomized controlled trials (RCTs). A literature search in major databases, without language restriction, was undertaken from inception until 30 December 2016. Eligible studies were RCTs of ALC alone or in combination with antidepressant medications, with a control group taking placebo/no intervention or antidepressants. Standardized mean differences (SMDs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used for summarizing outcomes with a random-effect model. Twelve RCTs (11 of which were ALC monotherapy) with a total of 791 participants (mean age = 54 years, % female = 65%) were included. Pooled data across nine RCTs (231 treated with ALC versus 216 treated with placebo and 20 no intervention) showed that ALC significantly reduced depressive symptoms (SMD = -1.10, 95% CI = -1.65 to -0.56, I = 86%). In three RCTs comparing ALC versus antidepressants (162 for each group), ALC demonstrated similar effectiveness compared with established antidepressants in reducing depressive symptoms (SMD = 0.06, 95% CI = -0.22 to 0.34, I = 31%). In these latter RCTs, the incidence of adverse effects was significantly lower in the ALC group than in the antidepressant group. Subgroup analyses suggested that ALC was most efficacious in older adults. ALC supplementation significantly decreases depressive symptoms compared with placebo/no intervention, while offering a comparable effect with that of established antidepressant agents with fewer adverse effects. Future large scale trials are required to confirm/refute these findings.

  12. Acetyl-L-carnitine (ALC) administration positively affects reproductive axis in hypogonadotropic women with functional hypothalamic amenorrhea.

    PubMed

    Genazzani, A D; Lanzoni, C; Ricchieri, F; Santagni, S; Rattighieri, E; Chierchia, E; Monteleone, P; Jasonni, V M

    2011-04-01

    Hypothalamic amenorrhea (HA) is characterized by neuroendocrine impairment that, in turn, negatively modulates endocrine function, mainly within the reproductive axis. HA presents with hypo-LH, hypoestrogenism and, until now, a definite therapeutic strategy has not yet been found. The aim of the following study was to test the efficacy of acetyl-L-carnitine (ALC) administration in HA-affected subjects. Twenty-four patients affected by stress-induced HA were divided into two groups according to LH plasma levels: group A, hypo-LH (LH≤3 mIU/ml; no.=16), and group B, normo-LH (LH>3 mIU/ml; no.=8), were treated with ALC (1 g/day, per os) for 16 weeks. Patients underwent baseline hormonal assessment, pulsatility test (for LH and FSH), naloxone test (for LH, FSH and cortisol) both before and after 16 weeks of treatment. Under ALC administration hypo-LH patients showed a significant increase in LH plasma levels (from 1.4±0.3 to 3.1±0.5 mIU/ml, p<0.01) and in LH pulse amplitude (p<0.001). No changes were observed in the normo-LH group. LH response to naloxone was restored under ALC therapy. Maximal LH response and area under the curve under naloxone were significantly increased (p<0.05 and p<0.01, respectively). No changes were observed in the normo-LH patients. Our data support the hypothesis of a specific role of ALC on counteracting the stress-induced abnormalities in hypo-LH patients affected by hypothalamic amenorrhea.

  13. L-carnitine protects against nickel-induced neurotoxicity by maintaining mitochondrial function in Neuro-2a cells

    SciTech Connect

    He Mindi; Xu Shangcheng; Lu Yonghui

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is thought to be a part of the mechanism underlying nickel-induced neurotoxicity. L-carnitine (LC), a quaternary ammonium compound biosynthesized from the amino acids lysine and methionine in all mammalian species, manifests its neuroprotective effects by improving mitochondrial energetics and function. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether LC could efficiently protect against nickel-induced neurotoxicity. Here, we exposed a mouse neuroblastoma cell line (Neuro-2a) to different concentrations of nickel chloride (NiCl{sub 2}) (0.25, 0.5, 1, and 2 mM) for 24 h, or to 0.5 mM and 1 mM NiCl{sub 2} for various periods (0, 3, 6, 12,more » or 24 h). We found that nickel significantly increased the cell viability loss and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release in Neuro-2a cells. In addition, nickel exposure significantly elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS) and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels, disrupted the mitochondrial membrane potential ({Delta}{Psi}{sub m}), reduced adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) concentrations and decreased mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy numbers and mtRNA transcript levels. However, all of the cytotoxicities and mitochondrial dysfunctions that were triggered by nickel were efficiently attenuated by pretreatment with LC. These protective effects of LC may be attributable to its role in maintaining mitochondrial function in nickel-treated cells. Our results suggest that LC may have great pharmacological potential in protecting against the adverse effects of nickel in the nervous system.« less

  14. Stabilization of superoxide dismutase by acetyl-l-carnitine in human brain endothelium during alcohol exposure: novel protective approach.

    PubMed

    Haorah, James; Floreani, Nicholas A; Knipe, Bryan; Persidsky, Yuri

    2011-10-15

    Oxidative damage of the endothelium disrupts the integrity of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). We have shown before that alcohol exposure increases the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS; superoxide and hydroxyl radical) and nitric oxide (NO) in brain endothelial cells by activating NADPH oxidase and inducible nitric oxide synthase. We hypothesize that impairment of antioxidant systems, such as a reduction in catalase and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, by ethanol exposure may elevate the levels of ROS/NO in endothelium, resulting in BBB damage. This study examines whether stabilization of antioxidant enzyme activity results in suppression of ROS levels by anti-inflammatory agents. To address this idea, we determined the effects of ethanol on the kinetic profile of SOD and catalase activity and ROS/NO generation in primary human brain endothelial cells (hBECs). We observed an enhanced production of ROS and NO levels due to the metabolism of ethanol in hBECs. Similar increases were found after exposure of hBECs to acetaldehyde, the major metabolite of ethanol. Ethanol simultaneously augmented ROS generation and the activity of antioxidative enzymes. SOD activity was increased for a much longer period of time than catalase activity. A decline in SOD activity and protein levels preceded elevation of oxidant levels. SOD stabilization by the antioxidant and mitochondria-protecting agent acetyl-L-carnitine (ALC) and the anti-inflammatory agent rosiglitazone suppressed ROS levels, with a marginal increase in NO levels. Mitochondrial membrane protein damage and decreased membrane potential after ethanol exposure indicated mitochondrial injury. These changes were prevented by ALC. Our findings suggest the counteracting mechanisms of oxidants and antioxidants during alcohol-induced oxidative stress at the BBB. The presence of enzymatic stabilizers favors the ROS-neutralizing antioxidant redox of the BBB, suggesting an underlying protective mechanism of NO for brain

  15. Efficacy of L-carnitine supplementation on frailty status and its biomarkers, nutritional status, and physical and cognitive function among prefrail older adults: a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Badrasawi, M; Shahar, Suzana; Zahara, AM; Nor Fadilah, R; Singh, Devinder Kaur Ajit

    2016-01-01

    Background Frailty is a biological syndrome of decreased reserve and resistance to stressors due to decline in multiple physiological systems. Amino acid deficiency, including L-carnitine, has been proposed to be associated with its pathophysiology. Nevertheless, the efficacy of L-carnitine supplementation on frailty status has not been documented. Thus, this study aimed to determine the effect of 10-week L-carnitine supplement (1.5 g/day) on frailty status and its biomarkers and also physical function, cognition, and nutritional status among prefrail older adults in Klang Valley, Malaysia. Methodology This study is a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial conducted among 50 prefrail subjects randomized into two groups (26 in L-carnitine group and 24 in placebo group). Outcome measures include frailty status using Fried criteria and Frailty Index accumulation of deficit, selected frailty biomarkers (interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and insulin-like growth factor-1), physical function, cognitive function, nutritional status and biochemical profile. Results The results indicated that the mean scores of Frailty Index score and hand grip test were significantly improved in subjects supplemented with L-carnitine (P<0.05 for both parameters) as compared to no change in the placebo group. Based on Fried criteria, four subjects (three from the L-carnitine group and one from the control group) transited from prefrail status to robust after the intervention. Conclusion L-carnitine supplementation has a favorable effect on the functional status and fatigue in prefrail older adults. PMID:27895474

  16. High degree of efficacy in the treatment of cyclic vomiting syndrome with combined co-enzyme Q10, L-carnitine and amitriptyline, a case series

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Cyclic vomiting syndrome (CVS), defined by recurrent stereotypical episodes of nausea and vomiting, is a relatively-common disabling and historically difficult-to-treat condition associated with migraine headache and mitochondrial dysfunction. Limited data suggests that the anti-migraine therapies amitriptyline and cyproheptadine, and the mitochondrial-targeted cofactors co-enzyme Q10 and L-carnitine, have efficacy in episode prophylaxis. Methods A retrospective chart review of 42 patients seen by one clinician that met established CVS diagnostic criteria revealed 30 cases with available outcome data. Participants were treated on a loose protocol consisting of fasting avoidance, co-enzyme Q10 and L-carnitine, with the addition of amitriptyline (or cyproheptadine in those < 5 years) in refractory cases. Blood level monitoring of the therapeutic agents featured prominently in management. Results Vomiting episodes resolved in 23 cases, and improved by > 75% and > 50% in three and one additional case respectively. Among the three treatment failures, two could not tolerate amitriptyline (as was also the case in the child with only > 50% efficacy) and one had multiple congenital gastrointestinal anomalies. Excluding the latter case, substantial efficacy (> 75% response) was 26/29 at the start of treatment, and 26/26 in those able to tolerate the regiment, including high dosages of amitriptyline. Conclusion Our data suggest that a protocol consisting of mitochondrial-targeted cofactors (co-enzyme Q10 and L-carnitine) plus amitriptyline (or possibly cyproheptadine in preschoolers) coupled with blood level monitoring is highly effective in the prevention of vomiting episodes. PMID:21846334

  17. Effects of acetaldehyde and L-carnitine on morphology and enzyme activity of myocardial mitochondria in rats.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yuan-Zhe; Wang, Guo-Feng; Wang, Qi; Zhang, Xue-Ying; Yan, Bin; Hu, Wei-Na

    2014-12-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of acetaldehyde (AA) and L-carnitine (LC) on morphology and enzyme activity of myocardial mitochondria in rats. Sixty-five Wistar rats were randomly divided into 4 groups: the control group (n = 20), the AA low-dose group (n = 15), the AA high-dose group (n = 15) and the AA + LC group (n = 15). Different doses (110 mg/kg and 220 mg/kg) AA was injected intraperitoneally once a day for 4 weeks. After 4 weeks administration, transmission electron microscope (TEM) observation of morphology of rat myocardial mitochondria was performed. Serum levels of succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), superoxide dismutase (SOD), malondialdehyde (MDA) and cardiac troponin I (cTnI) were detected to evaluate mitochondrial enzymes activities. Light micrograph of rat myocardiocytes in the control group showing normal architecture of myocytes. The numerical density and number of mitochondria in both low-dose and high-dose AA groups were lower than that of the control group. After administration of LC, the rats in the AA + LC group showed an obvious increase in the numerical density and number of mitochondria. TEM showed that both low-dose and high-dose AA could induce myocardial mitochondrial damage in rats in a dose-dependent manner, such as mitochondrial swelling, disruptions of crest and membrane, mitochondrial deficiency. The degree of mitochondrial damage of the AA + LC group was significantly decreased after administration of LC. Our results showed that serum levels of SDH and SOD in the AA + LC and control groups were also higher than those of the low-dose and high-dose AA groups; while the MDA level in the AA + LC and control groups were lower than that of the low-dose and high-dose AA groups. The low-dose AA, high-dose AA and AA + LC groups exhibited a higher level of serum cTnI than that of the control group. However, there was no significant difference in serum cTnI level among the low-dose AA, high-dose AA and AA + LC groups. Our findings

  18. Deciphering the potential efficacy of acetyl-L-carnitine (ALCAR) in maintaining connexin-mediated lenticular homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Muralidharan, Arumugam Ramachandran; Leema, George; Annadurai, Thangaraj; Anitha, Thirugnanasambandhar Sivasubramanian; Thomas, Philip A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To determine the putative role of acetyl-L-carnitine (ALCAR) in maintaining normal intercellular communication in the lens through connexin. Methods In the present study, Wistar rat pups were divided into 3 groups of eight each. On postpartum day ten, Group I rat pups received an intraperitoneal injection (50 µl) of 0.89% saline. Rats in Groups II and III received a subcutaneous injection (50 µl) of sodium selenite (19 µmol/kg bodyweight); Group III rat pups also received an intraperitoneal injection of ALCAR (200 mg/kg bodyweight) once daily on postpartum days 9–14. Both eyes of each pup were examined from day 16 up to postpartum day 30. Alterations in the mean activity of the channel pumps, calcium-ATPase and sodium/potassium-ATPase, were determined. The expression of genes encoding key lenticular gap junctions (connexin 46 and connexin 50) and a channel pump (plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase [PMCA1]) was evaluated by reverse transcription-PCR. Immunoblot analysis was also performed to confirm the differential expression of key lenticular connexin proteins. In addition, bioinformatics analysis was performed to determine the interacting residues of the connexin proteins with ALCAR. Results Significantly lower mean activities of Ca2+-ATPase and Na+/K+ -ATPase were observed in the lenses of Group II rats than those in Group I rat lenses. However, the observed mean activities of Ca2+-ATPase and Na+/K+-ATPase in Group III rat lenses were significantly higher than those in Group II rat lenses. The mean mRNA transcript levels of the connexin 46 and connexin 50 genes were significantly lower, while the mean levels of PMCA1 gene transcripts were significantly higher, in Group II rat lenses than in Group I rat lenses. Immunoblot analysis also confirmed the altered expression of connexin proteins in lysates of whole lenses of Group II rats. However, the expression of connexin 46 and connexin 50 proteins in lenses from group III rats was essentially similar to that

  19. Deciphering the potential efficacy of acetyl-L-carnitine (ALCAR) in maintaining connexin-mediated lenticular homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Muralidharan, Arumugam Ramachandran; Leema, George; Annadurai, Thangaraj; Anitha, Thirugnanasambandhar Sivasubramanian; Thomas, Philip A; Geraldine, Pitchairaj

    2012-01-01

    To determine the putative role of acetyl-L-carnitine (ALCAR) in maintaining normal intercellular communication in the lens through connexin. In the present study, Wistar rat pups were divided into 3 groups of eight each. On postpartum day ten, Group I rat pups received an intraperitoneal injection (50 µl) of 0.89% saline. Rats in Groups II and III received a subcutaneous injection (50 µl) of sodium selenite (19 µmol/kg bodyweight); Group III rat pups also received an intraperitoneal injection of ALCAR (200 mg/kg bodyweight) once daily on postpartum days 9-14. Both eyes of each pup were examined from day 16 up to postpartum day 30. Alterations in the mean activity of the channel pumps, calcium-ATPase and sodium/potassium-ATPase, were determined. The expression of genes encoding key lenticular gap junctions (connexin 46 and connexin 50) and a channel pump (plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase [PMCA1]) was evaluated by reverse transcription-PCR. Immunoblot analysis was also performed to confirm the differential expression of key lenticular connexin proteins. In addition, bioinformatics analysis was performed to determine the interacting residues of the connexin proteins with ALCAR. Significantly lower mean activities of Ca(2+)-ATPase and Na(+)/K(+) -ATPase were observed in the lenses of Group II rats than those in Group I rat lenses. However, the observed mean activities of Ca(2+)-ATPase and Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase in Group III rat lenses were significantly higher than those in Group II rat lenses. The mean mRNA transcript levels of the connexin 46 and connexin 50 genes were significantly lower, while the mean levels of PMCA1 gene transcripts were significantly higher, in Group II rat lenses than in Group I rat lenses. Immunoblot analysis also confirmed the altered expression of connexin proteins in lysates of whole lenses of Group II rats. However, the expression of connexin 46 and connexin 50 proteins in lenses from group III rats was essentially similar to that noted in

  20. Efficacy and Safety of L-Carnitine Treatment for Chronic Heart Failure: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiaolong; Qu, Huiyan; Yang, Zongguo; Rong, Jingfeng; Cai, Wan; Zhou, Hua

    2017-01-01

    Background . Whether additional benefit can be achieved with the use of L-carnitine (L-C) in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) remains controversial. We therefore performed a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to evaluate the effects of L-C treatment in CHF patients. Methods . Pubmed, Ovid Embase, Web of Science, and Cochrane Library databases, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) database, Wanfang database, Chinese Biomedical (CBM) database, and Chinese Science and Technology Periodicals database (VIP) until September 30, 2016, were identified. Studies that met the inclusion criteria were systematically evaluated by two reviewers independently. Results . 17 RCTs with 1625 CHF patients were included in this analysis. L-C treatment in CHF was associated with considerable improvement in overall efficacy (OR = 3.47, P < 0.01), left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) (WMD: 4.14%, P = 0.01), strike volume (SV) (WMD: 8.21 ml, P = 0.01), cardiac output (CO) (WMD: 0.88 L/min, P < 0.01), and E/A (WMD: 0.23, P < 0.01). Moreover, treatment with L-C also resulted in significant decrease in serum levels of BNP (WMD: -124.60 pg/ml, P = 0.01), serum levels of NT-proBNP (WMD: -510.36 pg/ml, P < 0.01), LVESD (WMD: -4.06 mm, P < 0.01), LVEDD (WMD: -4.79 mm, P < 0.01), and LVESV (WMD: -20.16 ml, 95% CI: -35.65 to -4.67, P < 0.01). However, there were no significant differences in all-cause mortality, 6-minute walk, and adverse events between L-C and control groups. Conclusions . L-C treatment is effective for CHF patients in improving clinical symptoms and cardiac functions, decreasing serum levels of BNP and NT-proBNP. And it has a good tolerance.

  1. L-carnitine is a survival factor for chilled storage of rooster semen for a long time.

    PubMed

    Fattah, A; Sharafi, M; Masoudi, R; Shahverdi, A; Esmaeili, V

    2017-02-01

    Rooster sperm is sensitive to cooling, which restricts procedures to store sperms for extended periods of time for artificial insemination of commercial flocks. This study was conducted to evaluate the suitability of adding L-carnitine (LC) to chilled-storage of rooster sperm and its effects on sperm quality parameters and its fertility potential during storage at 5 °C. Pooled semen from roosters were divided into six equal aliquots and diluted with media supplemented with different concentrations of LC (0, 0.5, 1, 2, 4 and 8 mM LC). Diluted semen samples were cooled to 5 °C and stored over 48 h. Motility, viability, membrane functionality, lipid peroxidation and mitochondria activity of the sperm were assessed at 0, 24 and 48 h of storage. Moreover, fertility potential of chilled stored sperm was considered at 24 h of storage. While sperm quality was not affected by LC at the beginning of storage (0 h), supplementation of extender with 1 and 2 mM of LC significantly improved the percentage of sperm motility, viability, membrane integrity and mitochondria activity at 24 h and 48 h compared to other groups. Lipid peroxidation was significantly reduced in sperm samples diluted with 1 and 2 mM LC at 24 h (2.15 ± 0.52 nmol/ml and 2.21 ± 0.52 nmol/ml) and 48 h (3.42 ± 0.49 nmol/ml and 3.38 ± 0.49 nmol/ml) compared to other groups. Furthermore, fertility rates during artificial insemination using sperms cooled for 24 h in the presence of 1 and 2 mM LC were significantly higher (78%) than in the control group (64%). These findings suggest that optimum doses of LC could protect rooster sperm against cool storage-induced functional and structural damages. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Protective effect of acetyl-L-carnitine on propofol-induced toxicity in embryonic neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fang; Rainosek, Shuo W; Sadovova, Natalya; Fogle, Charles M; Patterson, Tucker A; Hanig, Joseph P; Paule, Merle G; Slikker, William; Wang, Cheng

    2014-05-01

    Propofol is a widely used general anesthetic. A growing body of data suggests that perinatal exposure to general anesthetics can result in long-term deleterious effects on brain function. In the developing brain there is evidence that general anesthetics can cause cell death, synaptic remodeling, and altered brain cell morphology. Acetyl-L-carnitine (L-Ca), an anti-oxidant dietary supplement, has been reported to prevent neuronal damage from a variety of causes. To evaluate the ability of L-Ca to protect against propofol-induced neuronal toxicity, neural stem cells were isolated from gestational day 14 rat fetuses and on the eighth day in culture were exposed for 24h to propofol at 10, 50, 100, 300 and 600 μM, with or without L-Ca (10 μM). Markers of cellular proliferation, mitochondrial health, cell death/damage and oxidative damage were monitored to determine: (1) the effects of propofol on neural stem cell proliferation; (2) the nature of propofol-induced neurotoxicity; (3) the degree of protection afforded by L-Ca; and (4) to provide information regarding possible mechanisms underlying protection. After propofol exposure at a clinically relevant concentration (50 μM), the number of dividing cells was significantly decreased, oxidative DNA damage was increased and a significant dose-dependent reduction in mitochondrial function/health was observed. No significant effect on lactase dehydrogenase (LDH) release was observed at propofol concentrations up to 100 μM. The oxidative damage at 50 μM propofol was blocked by L-Ca. Thus, clinically relevant concentrations of propofol induce dose-dependent adverse effects on rat embryonic neural stem cells by slowing or stopping cell division/proliferation and causing cellular damage. Elevated levels of 8-oxoguanine suggest enhanced oxidative damage [reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation] and L-Ca effectively blocks at least some of the toxicity of propofol, presumably by scavenging oxidative species and/or reducing

  3. Acetyl-L-Carnitine Augmentation of Clozapine in Partial-Responder Schizophrenia: A 12-Week, Open-Label Uncontrolled Preliminary Study.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Antonio; Pandolfo, Gianluca; Crucitti, Manuela; Lorusso, Simona; Zoccali, Rocco Antonio; Muscatello, Maria Rosaria Anna

    This was the first 12-week, open-label, uncontrolled trial aimed at exploring the efficacy of acetyl-L-carnitine (ALC) add-on pharmacotherapy on clinical symptoms and cognitive functioning in 15 schizophrenia patients with suboptimal clinical response despite receiving clozapine (CLZ) monotherapy at the highest tolerated dosage. After clinical (Positive and Negative Symptoms Scale [PANSS]) and neuropsychological (Wisconsin Card Sorting Test, Stroop Color-Word Test, Verbal Fluency Test) assessments, patients received 1 g/d of ALC for 12 weeks. A final sample of 9 subjects completed the study. Acetyl-L-carnitine augmentation of CLZ significantly reduced only PANSS domains "positive" (P = 0.049); at end point, only 2 subjects (22.2% of the completers) reached a minimal improvement (25% reduction in PANSS total score). No significant differences emerged in cognitive performances at the end of the study; effect sizes were small in each explored cognitive dimension. The findings provide preliminary evidence that ALC added to ongoing CLZ treatment appeared to be ineffective to improve symptoms in schizophrenia patients who have failed to respond sufficiently to CLZ. Further trials with adequately powered methodology are needed to identify which augmentation strategies are more effective in schizophrenia patients showing a suboptimal response to CLZ.

  4. Modulatory effects of l-carnitine plus l-acetyl-carnitine on neuroendocrine control of hypothalamic functions in functional hypothalamic amenorrhea (FHA).

    PubMed

    Genazzani, Alessandro D; Despini, Giulia; Czyzyk, Adam; Podfigurna, Agnieszka; Simoncini, Tommaso; Meczekalski, Blazej

    2017-12-01

    Functional hypothalamic amenorrhea (FHA) is a relatively frequent disease due to the combination of metabolic, physical, or psychological stressors. It is characterized by the low endogenous GnRH-induced gonadotropin secretion, thus triggering the ovarian blockade and a hypoestrogenic condition. Up to now various therapeutical strategies have been proposed, both using hormonal treatment as well as neuroactive compounds. Since carnitine, namely l-acetyl-carnitine (LAC), has been demonstrated to be effective in the modulation of the central hypothalamic control of GnRH secretion, we aimed to evaluate whether a combined integrative treatment for 12 weeks of LAC (250 mg/die) and l-carnitine (500 mg/die) was effective in improving the endocrine and metabolic pathways in a group of patients (n = 27) with FHA. After the treatment, interval mean LH plasma levels increased while those of cortisol and amylase decreased significantly. When patients were subdivided according to baseline LH levels, only hypo-LH patients showed the significant increase of LH plasma levels and the significant decrease of both cortisol and amylase plasma levels. The increased 17OHP/cortisol ratio, as index of the adrenal activity, demonstrated the reduced stress-induced adrenal activity. In conclusion, our data sustain the hypothesis that the integrative administration of LAC plus l-carnitine reduced both the metabolic and the neuroendocrine impairment of patients with FHA.

  5. Screening of melatonin, α-tocopherol, folic acid, acetyl-L-carnitine and resveratrol for anti-dengue 2 virus activity.

    PubMed

    Paemanee, Atchara; Hitakarun, Atitaya; Roytrakul, Sittiruk; Smith, Duncan R

    2018-05-16

    Infections with the mosquito transmitted dengue virus (DENV) are a significant public health burden in many parts of the world. Despite the introduction of a commercial vaccine in some parts of the world, the majority of the populations at risk of infection remain unprotected against this disease, and there is currently no treatment for DENV infection. Natural compounds offer the prospect of cheap and sustainable therapeutics to reduce the disease burden during infection, and thus potentially alleviate the risk of more severe disease. This study evaluated the potential anti-DENV 2 activity of five natural compounds namely melatonin, α-tocopherol, folic acid, acetyl-L-carnitine and resveratrol in two different cell lines. Screening of the compounds showed that one compound (acetyl-L-carnitine) showed no effect on DENV infection, three compounds (melatonin, α-tocopherol and folic acid) slightly increased levels of infection, while the 5th compound, resveratrol, showed some limited anti-DENV activity, with resveratrol reducing virus output with an EC 50 of less than 25 μM. These results suggest that some commonly taken natural compounds may have beneficial effects on DENV infection, but that others may potentially add to the disease burden.

  6. We Are Ames

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-01-26

    Ames Research Center, one of NASA's ten field Centers, is located in the heart of California's Silicon Valley. For 75 years, Ames has led the Agency and the country in conducting world-class research and development. Let some of Ames' employees tell you about the work that they do.

  7. Usefulness of L-carnitine, a naturally occurring peripheral antagonist of thyroid hormone action, in iatrogenic hyperthyroidism: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Benvenga, S; Ruggeri, R M; Russo, A; Lapa, D; Campenni, A; Trimarchi, F

    2001-08-01

    Old studies in animals and unblinded studies in a few hyperthyroid patients suggested that L -carnitine is a periferal antagonist of thyroid hormone action at least in some tissues. This conclusion was substantiated by our recent observation that carnitine inhibits thyroid hormone entry into the nucleus of hepatocytes, neurons, and fibroblasts. In the randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled 6-month trial reported here, we assessed whether 2 or 4 g/d oral L-carnitine were able to both reverse and prevent/minimize nine hyperthyroidism- related symptoms. We also evaluated changes on nine thyroid hormone-sensitive biochemical parameters and on vertebral and hip mineral density (bone mineral density). Fifty women under a fixed TSH-suppressive dose of L -T(4) for all 6 months were randomly allocated to five groups of 10 subjects each. Group 0 associated placebo for 6 months; groups A2 and A4 started associating placebo (first bimester), substituted placebo with 2 or 4 g/d carnitine (second bimester), and then returned to the association with placebo. Groups B2 and B4 started associating 2 and 4 g/d carnitine for the first two bimesters, and then substituted carnitine with placebo (third bimester). Symptoms and biochemical parameters worsened in group 0. In group A, symptoms and biochemical parameters worsened during the first bimester, returned to baseline or increased minimally during the second bimester (except osteocalcin and urinary OH-proline), and worsened again in the third bimester. In group B, symptoms and biochemical parameters (except osteocalcin and urinary OH-proline) did not worsen or even improved over the first 4 months; they tended to worsen in the third bimester. In both the A and B groups, the two doses of carnitine were similarly effective. At the end of the trial, bone mineral density tended to increase in groups B and A (B > A). In conclusion, L-carnitine is effective in both reversing and preventing symptoms of hyperthyroidism and has a

  8. l-Carnitine Modulates Epileptic Seizures in Pentylenetetrazole-Kindled Rats via Suppression of Apoptosis and Autophagy and Upregulation of Hsp70.

    PubMed

    Hussein, Abdelaziz M; Adel, Mohamed; El-Mesery, Mohamed; Abbas, Khaled M; Ali, Amr N; Abulseoud, Osama A

    2018-03-14

    l-Carnitine is a unique nutritional supplement for athletes that has been recently studied as a potential treatment for certain neuropsychiatric disorders. However, its efficacy in seizure control has not been investigated. Sprague Dawley rats were randomly assigned to receive either saline (Sal) (negative control) or pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) 40 mg/kg i.p. × 3 times/week × 3 weeks. The PTZ group was further subdivided into two groups, the first received oral l-carnitine (l-Car) (100 mg/kg/day × 4 weeks) (PTZ + l-Car), while the second group received saline (PTZ + Sal). Daily identification and quantification of seizure scores, time to the first seizure and the duration of seizures were performed in each animal. Molecular oxidative markers were examined in the animal brains. l-Car treatment was associated with marked reduction in seizure score ( p = 0.0002) that was indicated as early as Day 2 of treatment and continued throughout treatment duration. Furthermore, l-Car significantly prolonged the time to the first seizure ( p < 0.0001) and shortened seizure duration ( p = 0.028). In addition, l-Car administration for four weeks attenuated PTZ-induced increase in the level of oxidative stress marker malondialdehyde (MDA) ( p < 0.0001) and reduced the activity of catalase enzyme ( p = 0.0006) and increased antioxidant GSH activity ( p < 0.0001). Moreover, l-Car significantly reduced PTZ-induced elevation in protein expression of caspase-3 ( p < 0.0001) and β-catenin ( p < 0.0001). Overall, our results suggest a potential therapeutic role of l-Car in seizure control and call for testing these preclinical results in a proof of concept pilot clinical study.

  9. Efficacy of a novel formulation of L-Carnitine, creatine, and leucine on lean body mass and functional muscle strength in healthy older adults: a randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled study.

    PubMed

    Evans, Malkanthi; Guthrie, Najla; Pezzullo, John; Sanli, Toran; Fielding, Roger A; Bellamine, Aouatef

    2017-01-01

    Progressive decline in skeletal muscle mass and function are growing concerns in an aging population. Diet and physical activity are important for muscle maintenance but these requirements are not always met. This highlights the potential for nutritional supplementation. As a primary objective, we sought to assess the effect of a novel combination of L-Carnitine, creatine and leucine on muscle mass and performance in older subjects. Forty-two healthy older adults aged 55-70 years were randomized to receive either a novel L-Carnitine (1500 mg), L-leucine (2000 mg), creatine (3000 mg), Vitamin D3 (10 μg) (L-Carnitine-combination) product ( n  = 14), L-Carnitine (1500 mg) ( n  = 14), or a placebo ( n  = 14) for eight weeks. We evaluated body mass by DXA, upper and lower strength by dynamometry, and walking distance by a 6-min walk test at baseline and after eight weeks of intervention. These measures, reflecting muscle mass, functional strength and mobility have been combined to generate a primary composite score. Quality of life, blood safety markers, and muscle biopsies for protein biomarker analysis were also conducted at baseline and the end of the study. The primary composite outcome improved by 63.5 percentage points in the L-Carnitine-combination group vs. placebo ( P  = 0.013). However, this composite score did not change significantly in the L-Carnitine group ( P =  0.232), and decreased slightly in the placebo group ( P =  0.534). Participants supplemented with the L-Carnitine-combination showed a 1.0 kg increase in total lean muscle mass ( P  = 0.013), leg lean muscle mass (0.35 kg, P =  0.005), and a 1.0 kg increase in lower leg strength ( P  = 0.029) at week 8. In addition, these increases were significant when compared to the placebo group (P =  0.034, P =  0.026, and P =  0.002, respectively). Total mTOR protein expression was increased in participants in the L-Carnitine-combination group at the end of

  10. L-Carnitine treatment reduces severity of physical and mental fatigue and increases cognitive functions in centenarians: a randomized and controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Malaguarnera, Mariano; Cammalleri, Lisa; Gargante, Maria Pia; Vacante, Marco; Colonna, Valentina; Motta, Massimo

    2007-12-01

    Centenarians are characterized by weakness, decreasing mental health, impaired mobility, and poor endurance. L-Carnitine is an important contributor to cellular energy metabolism. This study evaluated the efficacy of L-carnitine on physical and mental fatigue and on cognitive functions of centenarians. This was a placebo-controlled, randomized, double-blind, 2-phase study. Sixty-six centenarians with onset of fatigue after even slight physical activity were recruited to the study. The 2 groups received either 2 g levocarnitine once daily (n = 32) or placebo (n = 34). Efficacy measures included changes in total fat mass, total muscle mass, serum triacylglycerol, total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), Activities of Daily Living, and a 6-min walking corridor test. At the end of the study period, the levocarnitine-treated centenarians, compared with the placebo group, showed significant improvements in the following markers: total fat mass (-1.80 compared with 0.6 kg; P < 0.01), total muscle mass (3.80 compared with 0.8 kg; P < 0.01), plasma concentrations of total carnitine (12.60 compared with -1.70 mumol; P < 0.05), plasma long-chain acylcarnitine (1.50 compared with -0.1 micromol; P < 0.001), and plasma short-chain acylcarnitine (6.0 compared with -1.50 micromol; P < 0.001). Significant differences were also found in physical fatigue (-4.10 compared with -1.10; P < 0.01), mental fatigue (-2.70 compared with 0.30; P < 0.001), fatigue severity (-23.60 compared with 1.90; P < 0.001), and MMSE (4.1 compared with 0.6; P < 0.001). Our study indicates that oral administration of levocarnitine produces a reduction of total fat mass, increases total muscular mass, and facilitates an increased capacity for physical and cognitive activity by reducing fatigue and improving cognitive functions.

  11. Ames Lab 101: Technology Transfer

    ScienceCinema

    Covey, Debra

    2017-12-13

    Ames Laboratory Associate Laboratory Director, Sponsored Research Administration, Debra Covey discusses technology transfer. Covey also discusses Ames Laboratory's most successful transfer, lead-free solder.

  12. The effect of acetyl-L-carnitine and R-alpha-lipoic acid treatment in ApoE4 mouse as a model of human Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Shenk, Justin C; Liu, Jiankang; Fischbach, Kathryn; Xu, Kui; Puchowicz, Michel; Obrenovich, Mark E; Gasimov, Eldar; Alvarez, Ludis Morales; Ames, Bruce N; Lamanna, Joseph C; Aliev, Gjumrakch

    2009-08-15

    We measured age-dependent effects of human ApoE4 on cerebral blood flow (CBF) using ApoE4 transgenic mice compared to age-matched wild-type (WT) mice by use of [(14)C] iodoantipyrene autoradiography. ApoE4 associated factors reduce CBF gradually to create brain hypoperfusion when compared to WT, and the differences in CBF are greatest as animals age from 6-weeks to 12-months. Transmission electron microscopy with colloidal gold immunocytochemistry showed structural damage in young and aged microvessel endothelium of ApoE4 animals extended to the cytoplasm of perivascular cells, perivascular nerve terminals and hippocampal neurons and glial cells. These abnormalities coexist with mitochondrial structural alteration and mitochondrial DNA overproliferation and/or deletion in all brain cellular compartments. Spatial memory and temporal memory tests showed a trend in improving cognitive function in ApoE4 mice fed selective mitochondrial antioxidants acetyl-l-carnitine and R-alpha-lipoic acid. Our findings indicate that ApoE4 genotype-induced mitochondrial changes and associated structural damage may explain age-dependent pathology seen in AD, indicating potential for novel treatment strategies in the near future.

  13. Short-term effects of a green coffee extract-, Garcinia c ambogia- and L-carnitine-containing chewing gum on snack intake and appetite regulation.

    PubMed

    Bobillo, Cecilia; Finlayson, Graham; Martínez, Ana; Fischman, Daniela; Beneitez, Analisa; Ferrero, Alejandro J; Fernández, Belisario E; Mayer, Marcos A

    2018-03-01

    Different studies have assessed the influence of chewing gum to aid control of appetite and reduce food intake. The aims of the present study were to evaluate the effects of chewing gum on satiety, food hedonics and snack intake and to explore the potential effects of the combination of Garcinia c ambogia, green coffee extract and L-carnitine on satiety, when administered in a gum format. This was a prospective study in which 57 subjects randomly received three kinds of treatments, in a crossover design: (1) active gum; (2) placebo gum; and (3) no gum. Food preferences and appetite sensations were evaluated by means of the Leeds Food Preference Questionnaire and visual analog scales. There was a significant reduction in low-fat sweet snack intake with placebo gum and the active gum compared to no gum and a reduction in high-fat sweet snack intake with the active gum compared to placebo gum and no gum. Total caloric intake was only reduced in the active gum condition. Both the active and placebo gum conditions significantly reduced hunger and prospective food consumption and increased fullness compared to no gum and were associated with a reduced wanting for sweet food in the LFPQ, consistent in a reduction in the relative preference for sweet snacks versus savoury snacks. This study supports the notion that chewing gum containing nutraceutical products might aid in the control over snack intake and reduce hunger sensations.

  14. Cats in Positive Energy Balance Have Lower Rates of Adipose Gain When Fed Diets Containing 188 versus 121 ppm L-Carnitine

    PubMed Central

    Gooding, M. A.; Minikhiem, D. L.

    2016-01-01

    L-carnitine (LC) is included in select adult feline diets for weight management. This study investigated whether feeding adult cats with diets containing either 188 ppm of LC (LC188) or 121 ppm of LC (LC121) and feeding them 120% of maintenance energy requirement (MER) resulted in differences in total energy expenditure (EE), metabolic fuel selection, BW, body composition, and behavior. Cats (n = 20, 4 ± 1.2 yrs) were stratified for BCS and randomly assigned to one of two dietary treatments and fed for 16 weeks. BW was measured weekly, and indirect calorimetry, body composition, physical activity, play motivation, and cognition were measured at baseline and throughout the study. A mixed, repeated measures, ANCOVA model was used. Cats in both treatments gained BW (P < 0.05) throughout the study, with no differences between treatments at any time point (P > 0.05). There were no differences in body composition between groups at baseline; however, body fat (g) and body fat : lean mass ratio were greater in cats fed LC121 in contrast to cats fed LC188 (P < 0.05) on week 16. No other outcomes differed between treatments (P > 0.05). Supplying dietary LC at a dose of at least 188 ppm may be beneficial for the health and well-being of cats fed above MER. PMID:27652290

  15. Evaluation of lenticular antioxidant and redox system components in the lenses of acetyl-L-carnitine treatment in BSO-induced glutathione deprivation.

    PubMed

    Elanchezhian, R; Sakthivel, M; Isai, M; Geraldine, P; Thomas, P A

    2009-07-31

    To investigate whether acetyl-L-carnitine (ALCAR) retards L-buthionine-(S,R)-sulfoximine (BSO)-induced cataractogenesis in Wistar rat pups. On postpartum day 3, group I pups received intraperitoneal (ip) saline and group II and group III pups received i.p. injections of BSO once daily for three consecutive days. In addition, group III pups received ip ALCAR once daily from postpartum days 3-15. Both eyes of each pup were examined up from postpartum day 16 to day 30. After sacrifice, extricated pup lenses were analyzed for antioxidant and redox system components. There was dense lenticular opacification in all group II pups, minimal opacification in 40% of group III pups, and no opacification in 60% of group III pups and in all of group I pups. Group II lenses exhibited significantly lower values of antioxidant and redox system components and higher malondialdehyde concentrations than in group I or group III lenses. ALCAR prevents cataractogenesis in the BSO-induced cataract model, possibly by inhibiting depleting antioxidant enzyme and redox system components and inhibiting lipid peroxidation.

  16. Evaluation of lenticular antioxidant and redox system components in the lenses of acetyl-L-carnitine treatment in BSO-induced glutathione deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Elanchezhian, R.; Sakthivel, M.; Isai, M.; Thomas, P.A.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To investigate whether acetyl-L-carnitine (ALCAR) retards L-buthionine-(S,R)-sulfoximine (BSO)-induced cataractogenesis in Wistar rat pups. Methods On postpartum day 3, group I pups received intraperitoneal (ip) saline and group II and group III pups received i.p. injections of BSO once daily for three consecutive days. In addition, group III pups received ip ALCAR once daily from postpartum days 3–15. Both eyes of each pup were examined up from postpartum day 16 to day 30. After sacrifice, extricated pup lenses were analyzed for antioxidant and redox system components. Results There was dense lenticular opacification in all group II pups, minimal opacification in 40% of group III pups, and no opacification in 60% of group III pups and in all of group I pups. Group II lenses exhibited significantly lower values of antioxidant and redox system components and higher malondialdehyde concentrations than in group I or group III lenses. Conclusions ALCAR prevents cataractogenesis in the BSO-induced cataract model, possibly by inhibiting depleting antioxidant enzyme and redox system components and inhibiting lipid peroxidation. PMID:19649174

  17. Acetyl-L-carnitine for alcohol craving and relapse prevention in anhedonic alcoholics: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot trial.

    PubMed

    Martinotti, Giovanni; Reina, Daniela; Di Nicola, Marco; Andreoli, Sara; Tedeschi, Daniela; Ortolani, Ilaria; Pozzi, Gino; Iannoni, Emerenziana; D'Iddio, Stefania; Janiri, Luigi

    2010-01-01

    The study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of acetyl-l-carnitine (ALC), at different doses, in relapse prevention and craving in anhedonic detoxified alcohol-dependent subjects. Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, pilot study in 64 alcohol-dependent anhedonic patients: 23 received ALC at a dose of 3 g/day, 21 received ALC at a dosage of 1 g/day and 20 were given placebo. Intensity of alcohol craving was evaluated by Visual Analogue Scale. Subjects were evaluated at the beginning of treatment and after 10, 30, 60 and 90 days. Survival analysis showed that patients treated with ALC remained completely abstinent for longer than those treated with placebo (Z = -2.27; P < 0.05). From the 10th day onwards, a greater reduction of craving was observed in the ALC 1 g group than with placebo (P = 0.035). The two groups did not differ in the percentage of subjects remaining abstinent for the entire study period or the number of subjects who relapsed (defined as five or more standard drinks (four for women) on a single occasion or drinking on five or more days in 1 week). The results of this study suggest that ALC can reduce craving and the time to first drink. ALC use was safe. Further studies are needed to clarify to confirm, over longer periods, these short-term outcome benefits.

  18. Effect of in situ delivery of acetyl-L-carnitine on peripheral nerve regeneration and functional recovery in transected sciatic nerve in rat.

    PubMed

    Farahpour, Mohammad Reza; Ghayour, Sina Jangkhahe

    2014-12-01

    The repair of peripheral nerve injuries is still one of the most challenging tasks and concerns in neurosurgery, plastic and orthopedic surgery. Effect of acetyl-L-carnitine (ALC) loaded chitosan conduit as an in situ delivery system of ALC in bridging the defects was studied using a rat sciatic nerve regeneration model. A 10-mm sciatic nerve defect was bridged using a chitosan conduit (CHIT/ALC) filled with 10 μL ALC (100 ng/mL). In control group (CHIT), the conduit was filled with the same volume of the phosphate buffered solution. The regenerated fibers were studied 4, 8, 12 and 16 weeks after surgery. The functional and electrophysiological studies confirmed faster recovery of the regenerated axons in ALC treated than control group (P < 0.05). The mean ratios of gastrocnemius muscles weight were measured. There was statistically significant difference between the muscle weight ratios of CHIT/ALC and CHIT groups (P<0.05). Morphometric indices of regenerated fibers showed number and diameter of the myelinated fibers in CHIT/ALC were significantly higher than in control group. In immuohistochemistry, the location of reactions to S-100 in CHIT/ALC was clearly more positive than CHIT group. ALC when loaded in a chitosan conduit resulted in improvement of functional recovery and quantitative morphometric indices of sciatic nerve. Copyright © 2014 Surgical Associates Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Acetyl-L-carnitine and oxaloacetate in post-treatment against LTP impairment in a rat ischemia model. An in vitro electrophysiological study.

    PubMed

    Kocsis, K; Knapp, L; Mészáros, J; Kis, Z; Farkas, T; Vécsei, L; Toldi, J

    2015-06-01

    A high proportion of research relating to cerebral ischemia focuses on neuroprotection. The application of compounds normally present in the organism is popular, because they do not greatly influence the synaptic activity by receptor modulation, and can be administered without serious side effects. Oxaloacetate (OxAc) and acetyl-L-carnitine (ALC) are such favorable endogenous molecules. ALC can exert a protective effect by improving the energy state of the neurons under ischemic conditions. A promising neuroprotective strategy is glutamate scavenging, which can be achieved by the intravenous administration of OxAc. This study involved the possible protective effects of ALC and OxAc in different post-treatment protocols against long-term potentiation (LTP) impairment. Ischemia was induced in rats by 2-vessel occlusion, which led to a decreased LTP relative to the control group. High-dose (200 mg/kg) ALC or OxAc post-treatment resulted in a higher potentiation relative to the 2VO group, but it did not reach the control level, whereas low-dose ALC (100 mg/kg) in combination with OxAc completely restored the LTP function. Many previous studies have concluded that ALC can be protective only as pretreatment. The strategy described here reveals that ALC can also be neuroprotective when utilized as post-treatment against ischemia.

  20. Effects of Combined Treatment with Branched-Chain Amino Acids, Citric Acid, L-Carnitine, Coenzyme Q10, Zinc, and Various Vitamins in Tumor-Bearing Mice.

    PubMed

    Awa, Hiroko; Futamura, Akihiko; Higashiguchi, Takashi; Ito, Akihiro; Mori, Naoharu; Murai, Miyo; Ohara, Hiroshi; Chihara, Takeshi; Kaneko, Takaaki

    2017-03-01

    A functional dietary supplement (FDS) containing Coenzyme Q10, branched-chain amino acids and L-carnitine was administered to tumor-bearing mice, investigating its effects on tumor and muscle tissues. Experiment (A): B16 melanoma cells were implanted subcutaneously into the right side of the abdomen of 8- to 9-week-old C57BL/6J mice. The mice were divided into two groups: a FDS group that received oral administration of FDS (n=10), and a control group that received oral administration of glucose (n=10). The moribund condition was used as the endpoint, and median survival time was determined. Experiment (B): On day 21 after tumor implantation, tumors, soleus muscle, gastrocnemius muscle, and suprahyoid muscles were collected. Tumor and muscle weight and other aspects were evaluated in each group: FDS group (n=15) and control group (n=15). The median survival time was comparable (21 d in the FDS group vs. 18 d in the control group, p=0.30). However, cumulative food intake was significantly higher in the FDS group than the control group (p=0.011). Metastasis of melanoma to the lung was observed in the control group but not in the FDS group (p=0.043). The weight of the suprahyoid muscles was significantly higher in the FDS group than in the control group (p=0.0045). The weight of the tumor was significantly lower in the FDS group than in the control group (p=0.013). The results possibly suggest oral administration of FDS in tumor-bearing mice enhances the maintenance of suprahyoid muscles, resulting in an extended feeding period and suppression of tumor growth and metastasis.

  1. Prevention of DNA damage by L-carnitine induced by metabolites accumulated in maple syrup urine disease in human peripheral leukocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Mescka, Caroline Paula; Wayhs, Carlos Alberto Yasin; Guerreiro, Gilian; Manfredini, Vanusa; Dutra-Filho, Carlos Severo; Vargas, Carmen Regla

    2014-09-15

    Maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) is an inherited aminoacidopathy caused by a deficiency in branched-chain α-keto acid dehydrogenase complex activity that leads to the accumulation of the branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) leucine (Leu), isoleucine, and valine and their respective α-keto-acids, α-ketoisocaproic acid (KIC), α keto-β-methylvaleric acid, and α-ketoisovaleric acid. The major clinical features presented by MSUD patients include ketoacidosis, failure to thrive, poor feeding, apnea, ataxia, seizures, coma, psychomotor delay, and mental retardation; however, the pathophysiology of this disease is poorly understood. MSUD treatment consists of a low protein diet supplemented with a mixture containing micronutrients and essential amino acids but excluding BCAAs. Studies have shown that oxidative stress may be involved in the neuropathology of MSUD, with the existence of lipid and protein oxidative damage in affected patients. In recent years, studies have demonstrated the antioxidant role of L-carnitine (L-Car), which plays a central function in cellular energy metabolism and for which MSUD patients have a deficiency. In this work, we investigated the in vitro effect of Leu and KIC in the presence or absence of L-Car on DNA damage in peripheral whole blood leukocytes using the alkaline comet assay with silver staining and visual scoring. Leu and KIC resulted in a DNA damage index that was significantly higher than that of the control group, and L-Car was able to significantly prevent this damage, mainly that due to KIC. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Inhibitory effects of alcohol on glucose transport across the blood-brain barrier leads to neurodegeneration: preventive role of acetyl-L: -carnitine.

    PubMed

    Abdul Muneer, P M; Alikunju, Saleena; Szlachetka, Adam M; Haorah, James

    2011-04-01

    Evidence shows that alcohol intake causes oxidative neuronal injury and neurocognitive deficits that are distinct from the classical Wernicke-Korsakoff neuropathy. Our previous findings indicated that alcohol-elicited blood-brain barrier (BBB) damage leads to neuroinflammation and neuronal loss. The dynamic function of the BBB requires a constant supply and utilization of glucose. Here we examined whether interference of glucose uptake and transport at the endothelium by alcohol leads to BBB dysfunction and neuronal degeneration. We tested the hypothesis in cell culture of human brain endothelial cells, neurons and alcohol intake in animal by immunofluorescence, Western blotting and glucose uptake assay methods. We found that decrease in glucose uptake correlates the reduction of glucose transporter protein 1 (GLUT1) in cell culture after 50 mM ethanol exposure. Decrease in GLUT1 protein levels was regulated at the translation process. In animal, chronic alcohol intake suppresses the transport of glucose into the frontal and occipital regions of the brain. This finding is validated by a marked decrease in GLUT1 protein expression in brain microvessel (the BBB). In parallel, alcohol intake impairs the BBB tight junction proteins occludin, zonula occludens-1, and claudin-5 in the brain microvessel. Permeability of sodium fluorescein and Evans Blue confirms the leakiness of the BBB. Further, depletion of trans-endothelial electrical resistance of the cell monolayer supports the disruption of BBB integrity. Administration of acetyl-L: -carnitine (a neuroprotective agent) significantly prevents the adverse effects of alcohol on glucose uptake, BBB damage and neuronal degeneration. These findings suggest that alcohol-elicited inhibition of glucose transport at the blood-brain interface leads to BBB malfunction and neurological complications.

  3. Metabolic Agents that Enhance ATP can Improve Cognitive Functioning: A Review of the Evidence for Glucose, Oxygen, Pyruvate, Creatine, and L-Carnitine

    PubMed Central

    Owen, Lauren; Sunram-Lea, Sandra I.

    2011-01-01

    Over the past four or five decades, there has been increasing interest in the neurochemical regulation of cognition. This field received considerable attention in the 1980s, with the identification of possible cognition enhancing agents or “smart drugs”. Even though many of the optimistic claims for some agents have proven premature, evidence suggests that several metabolic agents may prove to be effective in improving and preserving cognitive performance and may lead to better cognitive aging through the lifespan. Aging is characterized by a progressive deterioration in physiological functions and metabolic processes. There are a number of agents with the potential to improve metabolic activity. Research is now beginning to identify these various agents and delineate their potential usefulness for improving cognition in health and disease. This review provides a brief overview of the metabolic agents glucose, oxygen, pyruvate, creatine, and L-carnitine and their beneficial effects on cognitive function. These agents are directly responsible for generating ATP (adenosine triphosphate) the main cellular currency of energy. The brain is the most metabolically active organ in the body and as such is particularly vulnerable to disruption of energy resources. Therefore interventions that sustain adenosine triphosphate (ATP) levels may have importance for improving neuronal dysfunction and loss. Moreover, recently, it has been observed that environmental conditions and diet can affect transgenerational gene expression via epigenetic mechanisms. Metabolic agents might play a role in regulation of nutritional epigenetic effects. In summary, the reviewed metabolic agents represent a promising strategy for improving cognitive function and possibly slowing or preventing cognitive decline. PMID:22254121

  4. Effects of in ovo administration of L-carnitine on hatchability performance, glycogen status and insulin-like growth factor-1 of broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Shafey, T M; Al-Batshan, H A; Al-Owaimer, A N; Al-Samawei, K A

    2010-02-01

    1. Eggs from a meat-type breeder flock (Ross) were used in two trials to study the effects of in ovo administration of L-carnitine (carnitine) on hatchability traits (hatchability percentage, embryo deaths, pipped with live or dead embryo), chick weight at hatch as an absolute value (CWT) or expressed as a percentage of egg weight (CWT%), hatching period, glycogen status (liver and pectoral muscle) and plasma insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) of hatched chicks were investigated. There were 9 treatments with three replicates of each. Treatments were non-injected control (negative control), or injection with sterilised saline (09%, positive control), or sterilised saline with carnitine at 25, 50, 100, 200, 300, 400, and 500 microg/egg. 2. In ovo carnitine treatment increased CWT, CWT%, glycogen in the liver and pectoral muscle, glycogen index and plasma IGF-1 of hatched chicks, and did not influence hatchability traits and hatching period. The glycogen index of hatched chicks of the in ovo carnitine treatments with values (500 > 400 = 300 > 200) was higher than that of the control and in ovo carnitine at 25, 50, and 100 microg/egg treatments. The nature of response to carnitine was cubic for CWT and CWT%, and linear for glycogen in the liver and pectoral muscle, glycogen index of hatched chicks when the negative control or positive control treatment was used as base line. 3. It was concluded that in ovo administration of carnitine at 25-500 microg/egg increased chick weight at hatch and IGF-1, and did not influence hatchability traits and hatching period of eggs. The linear relationship between in ovo administration of carnitine and glycogen status of hatched chicks indicated that increasing in ovo doses improved glycogen status of hatched chicks.

  5. NASA Ames 2016 Highlights

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-12-28

    2016 presented the opportunity for NASA's Ames Research Center to meet its challenges and opportunities head on. Projects ranged from testing the next generation of air traffic control software to studying the stars of our galaxy. From developing life science experiments that flew aboard the International Space Station to helping protect our planet through airborne Earth observation campaigns. NASA's missions and programs are challenging and the people at NASA Ames Research Center continue to reach new heights and reveal the unknown for the benefit of all humankind!

  6. Ames Lab 101: Danny Shechtman Returns to the Ames Laboratory

    ScienceCinema

    Shechtman, Danny

    2018-05-07

    Danny Shechtman, Ames Laboratory Scientist and winner of the Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2011, returned to the Ames Lab on February 14, 2012. During this time, the Nobel Laureate met with the press as well as ISU students.

  7. Ames Fitness Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pratt, Randy

    1993-01-01

    The Ames Fitness Program services 5,000 civil servants and contractors working at Ames Research Center. A 3,000 square foot fitness center, equipped with cardiovascular machines, weight training machines, and free weight equipment is on site. Thirty exercise classes are held each week at the Center. A weight loss program is offered, including individual exercise prescriptions, fitness testing, and organized monthly runs. The Fitness Center is staffed by one full-time program coordinator and 15 hours per week of part-time help. Membership is available to all employees at Ames at no charge, and there are no fees for participation in any of the program activities. Prior to using the Center, employees must obtain a physical examination and complete a membership package. Funding for the Ames Fitness Program was in jeopardy in December 1992; however, the employees circulated a petition in support of the program and collected more than 1500 signatures in only three days. Funding has been approved through October 1993.

  8. NASA Ames ATM Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denery, Dallas G.

    2000-01-01

    The NASA Ames research Center, in cooperation with the FAA and the industry, has a series of major research efforts underway that are aimed at : 1) improving the flow of traffic in the national airspace system; and 2) helping to define the future air traffic management system. The purpose of this presentation will be to provide a brief summary of some of these activities.

  9. [Effects of L-carnitine on the apoptosis of spermatogenic cells and epididymal sperm count and motility in rats with diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Kang, Ning; Ma, Jie-hua; Zhou, Xin; Fan, Xiao-bo; Shang, Xue-jun; Huang, Yu-feng

    2011-05-01

    To explore the effects of L-carnitine (LC) on the apoptosis of spermatogenic cells and on the count and motility of epididymal sperm in rats with diabetes mellitus (DM). Twenty-four SD rats (200-230 g) were randomly divided into a control group, a DM model group and an LC group. After the establishment of DM models in the latter two groups by injection of streptozotocin (STZ) at 65 mg/kg, the controls and DM models were treated intragastrically with physiological saline, while the rats in the LC group with LC at 300 mg/kg, all for 6 consecutive weeks. Twenty-four hours after the last administration, all the rats were killed for the detection of the count and motility of epididymal sperm and the apoptosis of spermatogenic cells. The motilities of caput and cauda epididymal sperm were (53.7 +/- 1.8)% and (60.3 +/- 1.6)% in the LC group, significantly higher than in the DM model group ([32.2 +/- 2.0]% and [40.5 +/- 1.4]%, P < 0.05), but remarkably lower than in the control ([63.1 +/- 2.4 ]% and [68.9 +/- 1.3]%, P < 0.05). The count of cauda epididymal sperm was (25.5 +/- 1.1) x 10(6)/100 mg in the DM models, and was increased to (32.0 +/- 1.5) x 10(6)/100 mg after LC treatment (P < 0.05), but still markedly lower than in the controls ([37.8 +/- 1.1] x 10(6)/100 mg) (P < 0.05). The apoptosis rate of spermatogenic cells was (52.5 +/- 4.4)% in the DM model group, and it was reduced to (35.3 +/- 3.5)% after LC administration (P < 0.05), but still significantly higher than in the control group ([3.7 +/- 1.3]%) (P < 0.05). Intragastrically gavage of LC at 300 mg/kg for 6 weeks increased the epididymal sperm count, improved sperm motility, and reduced the apoptosis of spermatogenic cells in rats with DM.

  10. Efficacy of l-carnitine administration on fatigue, nutritional status, oxidative stress, and related quality of life in 12 advanced cancer patients undergoing anticancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Gramignano, Giulia; Lusso, Maria Rita; Madeddu, Clelia; Massa, Elena; Serpe, Roberto; Deiana, Laura; Lamonica, Giovanna; Dessì, Mariele; Spiga, Carla; Astara, Giorgio; Macciò, Antonio; Mantovani, Giovanni

    2006-02-01

    Fatigue is a multidimensional symptom that is described in terms of perceived energy, mental capacity, and psychological status: it can impair daily functioning and lead to negative effects on quality of life. It is one of the most common side effects of chemotherapy and radiotherapy. In recent studies, l-carnitine (LC) supplementation has been demonstrated to be able to improve fatigue symptoms in patients with cancer. In the present study we tested the efficacy and safety of LC supplementation in a population of patients who had advanced cancer and developed fatigue, high blood levels of reactive oxygen species, or both. As outcome measures we evaluated fatigue and quality of life in relation to oxidative stress, nutritional status, and laboratory variables, mainly levels of reactive oxygen species, glutathione peroxidase, and proinflammatory cytokines. From March to July 2004, 12 patients who had advanced tumors (50% at stage IV) at different sites were enrolled (male-to-female ratio 2:10, mean age 60 y, range 42-73). Patients were only slightly anemic (hemoglobin 10.9 g/dL) and hemoglobin levels did not change after treatment. LC was administered orally at 6 g/d for 4 wk. All patients underwent antineoplastic treatment during LC supplementation. Fatigue, as measured by the Multidimensional Fatigue Symptom Inventory-Short Form, decreased significantly, particularly for the General and Physical scales, and for quality of life in each subscale of quality of life in relation to oxidative stress. Nutritional variables (lean body mass and appetite) increased significantly after LC supplementation. Levels of reactive oxygen species decreased and glutathione peroxidase increased but not significantly. Proinflammatory cytokines did not change significantly. Improvement of symptoms with respect to fatigue and quality of life in relation to oxidative stress may be explained mainly by an increase in lean body mass, which may be considered the most important nutritional or

  11. Treatment with acetyl-l-carnitine during in vitro maturation of buffalo oocytes improves oocyte quality and subsequent embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hui-Yan; Yang, Xiao-Gan; Lu, Sheng-Sheng; Liang, Xing-Wei; Lu, Yang-Qing; Zhang, Ming; Lu, Ke-Huan

    2018-06-01

    Oocyte quality is one of the important factors in female fertility, in vitro maturation (IVM), and subsequent embryonic development. In the present study, we assessed whether acetyl-l-carnitine (ALC) supplementation during in vitro maturation of buffalo oocytes could improve oocyte quality and subsequent embryonic development. To determine the optimal level of ALC supplementation, we matured cumulus-oocyte complexes in maturation medium supplemented with 0, 2.5, and 5 mM ALC. The oocytes with a polar body were selected for parthenogenetic activation (PA) and in vitro fertilization (IVF). We found that oocytes matured in 2.5 mM ALC had significantly higher PA blastocyst rate (P < 0.05) and blastocyst cell number than those of unsupplemented oocytes (P < 0.05) and a significantly higher IVF blastocyst rate than that of oocytes matured in 5 mM ALC (P < 0.05). In all further experiments, we supplemented the maturation medium with 2.5 mM ALC. We then tested whether ALC supplementation could improve various markers of oocytes and cumulus cells. We compared cell proliferation; concentrations of reactive oxygen species (ROS), intracellular ATP, estradiol, and progesterone; mitochondrial distribution; mitochondrial DNA copy number (mtDNA); and expression levels of four genes encoding oocyte-derived factors (GDF9, BMP15) and steroid hormones (StAR, P450scc) between the supplemented and unsupplemented oocytes and cumulus cells. Cumulus cells matured with ALC supplementation were more prolific than those matured without ALC supplementation (P < 0.05). Oocytes treated with ALC had lower concentrations of intracellular ROS (P < 0.05) and a higher rate of diffuse mitochondrial distributions (P < 0.05) than those of untreated oocytes. Additionally, the mtDNA was higher in the ALC-treated oocytes (P < 0.05) and cumulus cells (P < 0.05) than that in the untreated cells. The ALC-treated maturation medium had a higher postmaturation

  12. Acetyl L-carnitine targets adenosine triphosphate synthase in protecting zebrafish embryos from toxicities induced by verapamil and ketamine: An in vivo assessment.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaoqing; Dumas, Melanie; Robinson, Bonnie L; Ali, Syed F; Paule, Merle G; Gu, Qiang; Kanungo, Jyotshna

    2017-02-01

    Verapamil is a Ca 2 + channel blocker and is highly prescribed as an anti-anginal, antiarrhythmic and antihypertensive drug. Ketamine, an antagonist of the Ca 2 + -permeable N-methyl-d-aspartate-type glutamate receptors, is a pediatric anesthetic. Previously we have shown that acetyl l-carnitine (ALCAR) reverses ketamine-induced attenuation of heart rate and neurotoxicity in zebrafish embryos. Here, we used 48 h post-fertilization zebrafish embryos that were exposed to relevant drugs for 2 or 4 h. Heart beat and overall development were monitored in vivo. In 48 h post-fertilization embryos, 2 mm ketamine reduced heart rate in a 2 or 4 h exposure and 0.5 mm ALCAR neutralized this effect. ALCAR could reverse ketamine's effect, possibly through a compensatory mechanism involving extracellular Ca 2 + entry through L-type Ca 2 + channels that ALCAR is known to activate. Hence, we used verapamil to block the L-type Ca 2 + channels. Verapamil was more potent in attenuating heart rate and inducing morphological defects in the embryos compared to ketamine at specific times of exposure. ALCAR reversed cardiotoxicity and developmental toxicity in the embryos exposed to verapamil or verapamil plus ketamine, even in the presence of 3,4,5-trimethoxybenzoic acid 8-(diethylamino)octyl ester, an inhibitor of intracellular Ca 2 + release suggesting that ALCAR acts via effectors downstream of Ca 2 + . In fact, ALCAR's protective effect was blunted by oligomycin A, an inhibitor of adenosine triphosphate synthase that acts downstream of Ca 2 + during adenosine triphosphate generation. We have identified, for the first time, using in vivo studies, a downstream effector of ALCAR that is critical in abrogating ketamine- and verapamil-induced developmental toxicities. Published 2016. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. Published 2016. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  13. SMA CARNI-VAL trial part I: double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial of L-carnitine and valproic acid in spinal muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Swoboda, Kathryn J; Scott, Charles B; Crawford, Thomas O; Simard, Louise R; Reyna, Sandra P; Krosschell, Kristin J; Acsadi, Gyula; Elsheik, Bakri; Schroth, Mary K; D'Anjou, Guy; LaSalle, Bernard; Prior, Thomas W; Sorenson, Susan L; Maczulski, Jo Anne; Bromberg, Mark B; Chan, Gary M; Kissel, John T

    2010-08-19

    Valproic acid (VPA) has demonstrated potential as a therapeutic candidate for spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) in vitro and in vivo. Two cohorts of subjects were enrolled in the SMA CARNIVAL TRIAL, a non-ambulatory group of "sitters" (cohort 1) and an ambulatory group of "walkers" (cohort 2). Here, we present results for cohort 1: a multicenter phase II randomized double-blind intention-to-treat protocol in non-ambulatory SMA subjects 2-8 years of age. Sixty-one subjects were randomized 1:1 to placebo or treatment for the first six months; all received active treatment the subsequent six months. The primary outcome was change in the modified Hammersmith Functional Motor Scale (MHFMS) score following six months of treatment. Secondary outcomes included safety and adverse event data, and change in MHFMS score for twelve versus six months of active treatment, body composition, quantitative SMN mRNA levels, maximum ulnar CMAP amplitudes, myometry and PFT measures. At 6 months, there was no difference in change from the baseline MHFMS score between treatment and placebo groups (difference = 0.643, 95% CI = -1.22-2.51). Adverse events occurred in >80% of subjects and were more common in the treatment group. Excessive weight gain was the most frequent drug-related adverse event, and increased fat mass was negatively related to change in MHFMS values (p = 0.0409). Post-hoc analysis found that children ages two to three years that received 12 months treatment, when adjusted for baseline weight, had significantly improved MHFMS scores (p = 0.03) compared to those who received placebo the first six months. A linear regression analysis limited to the influence of age demonstrates young age as a significant factor in improved MHFMS scores (p = 0.007). This study demonstrated no benefit from six months treatment with VPA and L-carnitine in a young non-ambulatory cohort of subjects with SMA. Weight gain, age and treatment duration were significant confounding variables that should

  14. Two-Year Trends of Taxane-Induced Neuropathy in Women Enrolled in a Randomized Trial of Acetyl-L-Carnitine (SWOG S0715).

    PubMed

    Hershman, Dawn L; Unger, Joseph M; Crew, Katherine D; Till, Cathee; Greenlee, Heather; Minasian, Lori M; Moinpour, Carol M; Lew, Danika L; Fehrenbacher, Louis; Wade, James L; Wong, Siu-Fun; Fisch, Michael J; Lynn Henry, N; Albain, Kathy S

    2018-06-01

    Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is a common and disabling side effect of taxanes. Acetyl-L-carnitine (ALC) was unexpectedly found to increase CIPN in a randomized trial. We investigated the long-term patterns of CIPN among patients in this trial. S0715 was a randomized, double-blind, multicenter trial comparing ALC (1000 mg three times a day) with placebo for 24 weeks in women undergoing adjuvant taxane-based chemotherapy for breast cancer. CIPN was measured by the 11-item neurotoxicity (NTX) component of the FACT-Taxane scale at weeks 12, 24, 36, 52, and 104. We examined NTX scores over two years using linear mixed models for longitudinal data. Individual time points were examined using linear regression. Regression analyses included stratification factors and the baseline score as covariates. All statistical tests were two-sided. Four-hundred nine subjects were eligible for evaluation. Patients receiving ALC had a statistically significantly (P = .01) greater reduction in NTX scores (worse CIPN) of -1.39 points (95% confidence interval [CI] = -2.48 to -0.30) than the placebo group. These differences were particularly evident at weeks 24 (-1.68, 95% CI = -3.02 to -0.33), 36 (-1.37, 95% CI = -2.69 to -0.04), and 52 (-1.83, 95% CI = -3.35 to -0.32). At 104 weeks, 39.5% on the ALC arm and 34.4% on the placebo arm reported a five-point (10%) decrease from baseline. For both treatment groups, 104-week NTX scores were statistically significantly different compared with baseline (P < .001). For both groups, NTX scores were reduced from baseline and remained persistently low. Twenty-four weeks of ALC therapy resulted in statistically significantly worse CIPN over two years. Understanding the mechanism of this persistent effect may inform prevention and treatment strategies. Until then, the potential efficacy and harms of commonly used supplements should be rigorously studied.

  15. Ames Engineering Directorate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Veronica J.

    2017-01-01

    The Ames Engineering Directorate is the principal engineering organization supporting aerospace systems and spaceflight projects at NASA's Ames Research Center in California's Silicon Valley. The Directorate supports all phases of engineering and project management for flight and mission projects-from R&D to Close-out-by leveraging the capabilities of multiple divisions and facilities.The Mission Design Center (MDC) has full end-to-end mission design capability with sophisticated analysis and simulation tools in a collaborative concurrent design environment. Services include concept maturity level (CML) maturation, spacecraft design and trades, scientific instruments selection, feasibility assessments, and proposal support and partnerships. The Engineering Systems Division provides robust project management support as well as systems engineering, mechanical and electrical analysis and design, technical authority and project integration support to a variety of programs and projects across NASA centers. The Applied Manufacturing Division turns abstract ideas into tangible hardware for aeronautics, spaceflight and science applications, specializing in fabrication methods and management of complex fabrication projects. The Engineering Evaluation Lab (EEL) provides full satellite or payload environmental testing services including vibration, temperature, humidity, immersion, pressure/altitude, vacuum, high G centrifuge, shock impact testing and the Flight Processing Center (FPC), which includes cleanrooms, bonded stores and flight preparation resources. The Multi-Mission Operations Center (MMOC) is composed of the facilities, networks, IT equipment, software and support services needed by flight projects to effectively and efficiently perform all mission functions, including planning, scheduling, command, telemetry processing and science analysis.

  16. Ames Hybrid Combustion Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zilliac, Greg; Karabeyoglu, Mustafa A.; Cantwell, Brian; Hunt, Rusty; DeZilwa, Shane; Shoffstall, Mike; Soderman, Paul T.; Bencze, Daniel P. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    The report summarizes the design, fabrication, safety features, environmental impact, and operation of the Ames Hybrid-Fuel Combustion Facility (HCF). The facility is used in conducting research into the scalability and combustion processes of advanced paraffin-based hybrid fuels for the purpose of assessing their applicability to practical rocket systems. The facility was designed to deliver gaseous oxygen at rates between 0.5 and 16.0 kg/sec to a combustion chamber operating at pressures ranging from 300 to 900. The required run times were of the order of 10 to 20 sec. The facility proved to be robust and reliable and has been used to generate a database of regression-rate measurements of paraffin at oxygen mass flux levels comparable to those of moderate-sized hybrid rocket motors.

  17. Ames Lab 101: Lanthanum Decanting

    ScienceCinema

    Riedemann, Trevor

    2018-04-27

    Ames Laboratory scientist Trevor Riedemann explains the process that allows Ames Laboratory to produce some of the purest lanthanum in the world. This and other high-purity rare-earth elements are used to create alloys used in various research projects and play a crucial role in the Planck satellite mission.

  18. Ames Lab 101: Rare Earths

    ScienceCinema

    Gschneidner, Karl

    2017-12-11

    "Mr. Rare Earth," Ames Laboratory scientist Karl Gschneidner Jr., explains the importance of rare-earth materials in many of the technologies we use today -- ranging from computers to hybrid cars to wind turbines. Gschneidner is a world renowned rare-earths expert at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory.

  19. Acetyl-L-carnitine supplementation to old rats partially reverts the age-related mitochondrial decay of soleus muscle by activating peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1alpha-dependent mitochondrial biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Pesce, Vito; Fracasso, Flavio; Cassano, Pierluigi; Lezza, Angela Maria Serena; Cantatore, Palmiro; Gadaleta, Maria Nicola

    2010-01-01

    The age-related decay of mitochondrial function is a major contributor to the aging process. We tested the effects of 2-month-daily acetyl-L-carnitine (ALCAR) supplementation on mitochondrial biogenesis in the soleus muscle of aged rats. This muscle is heavily dependent on oxidative metabolism. Mitochondrial (mt) DNA content, citrate synthase activity, transcript levels of some nuclear- and mitochondrial-coded genes (cytochrome c oxidase subunit IV [COX-IV], 16S rRNA, COX-I) and of some factors involved in the mitochondrial biogenesis signaling pathway (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma [PPARgamma] coactivator-1alpha [PGC-1alpha], mitochondrial transcription factor A mitochondrial [TFAM], mitochondrial transcription factor 2B [TFB2]), as well as the protein content of PGC-1alpha were determined. The results suggest that the ALCAR treatment in old rats activates PGC-1alpha-dependent mitochondrial biogenesis, thus partially reverting the age-related mitochondrial decay.

  20. Comparison of serum concentrations of symmetric dimethylarginine and creatinine as kidney function biomarkers in healthy geriatric cats fed reduced protein foods enriched with fish oil, L-carnitine, and medium-chain triglycerides.

    PubMed

    Hall, J A; Yerramilli, M; Obare, E; Yerramilli, M; Yu, S; Jewell, D E

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether feeding cats reduced protein and phosphorus foods with added fish oil, L-carnitine, and medium-chain triglycerides (MCT) altered serum biomarkers of renal function. Thirty-two healthy cats, mean age 14.0 (8.3-19.6) years, were fed control food or one of two experimental foods for 6 months. All foods had similar concentrations of moisture, protein, and fat (approximately 8.0%, 26.5%, and 20.0%, respectively). Both experimental foods contained added fish oil (1.5%) and L-carnitine (500 mg/kg). Experimental-food 2 also contained increased MCT (10.5% from coconut oil), 1.5% added corn oil, and reduced animal fat. Glomerular filtration rate (GFR), serum biochemistries, renal function biomarkers including serum creatinine (sCr) and symmetrical dimethylarginine (SDMA), and plasma metabolomic profiles were measured at baseline, and at 1.5, 3, and 6 months. Body composition was determined by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Although both experimental foods altered plasma fatty acids, carnitine and related metabolites, and lysophospholipid concentrations, there were no changes in renal function biomarkers. There was, however, a benefit in using SDMA versus sCr to assess renal function in older cats with less total lean mass. Compared with cats <12 years, those >15 years had lower total lean mass (P < 0.01), lower GFR (P = 0.04), and lower sCr concentrations (P < 0.01). However, SDMA concentrations (P < 0.01) were higher in older cats. This study shows that in cats, serum SDMA concentration is more highly correlated with GFR than sCr concentration, and, unlike sCr, which declines with age because of muscle wasting, SDMA increases as GFR declines with age. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. NASA Ames Research Center Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, Jack

    2006-01-01

    A general overview of the NASA Ames Research Center is presented. The topics include: 1) First Century of Flight, 1903-2003; 2) NACA Research Centers; 3) 65 Years of Innovation; 4) Ames Projects; 5) NASA Ames Research Center Today-founded; 6) Astrobiology; 7) SOFIA; 8) To Explore the Universe and Search for Life: Kepler: The Search for Habitable Planets; 9) Crew Exploration Vehicle/Crew Launch Vehicle; 10) Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS); 11) Thermal Protection Materials and Arc-Jet Facility; 12) Information Science & Technology; 13) Project Columbia Integration and Installation; 14) Air Traffic Management/Air Traffic Control; and 15) New Models-UARC.

  2. Ames Research Center Publications-1976

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherwood, B.

    1978-01-01

    Bibliography of the publications of Ames Research Center authors and contractors, which appeared in formal NASA publications, journal articles, books, chapters of books, patents, and contractor reports. Covers 1976.

  3. Ames research center publications, 1975

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherwood, B. R. (Compiler)

    1977-01-01

    This bibliography cites 851 documents by Ames Research Center personnel and contractors which appeared in formal NASA publications, journals, books, patents, and contractor reports in 1975, or not included in previous annual bibliographies. An author index is provided.

  4. Ames Optimized TCA Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cliff, Susan E.; Reuther, James J.; Hicks, Raymond M.

    1999-01-01

    Configuration design at Ames was carried out with the SYN87-SB (single block) Euler code using a 193 x 49 x 65 C-H grid. The Euler solver is coupled to the constrained (NPSOL) and the unconstrained (QNMDIF) optimization packages. Since the single block grid is able to model only wing-body configurations, the nacelle/diverter effects were included in the optimization process by SYN87's option to superimpose the nacelle/diverter interference pressures on the wing. These interference pressures were calculated using the AIRPLANE code. AIRPLANE is an Euler solver that uses a unstructured tetrahedral mesh and is capable of computations about arbitrary complete configurations. In addition, the buoyancy effects of the nacelle/diverters were also included in the design process by imposing the pressure field obtained during the design process onto the triangulated surfaces of the nacelle/diverter mesh generated by AIRPLANE. The interference pressures and nacelle buoyancy effects are added to the final forces after each flow field calculation. Full details of the (recently enhanced) ghost nacelle capability are given in a related talk. The pseudo nacelle corrections were greatly improved during this design cycle. During the Ref H and Cycle 1 design activities, the nacelles were only translated and pitched. In the cycle 2 design effort the nacelles can translate vertically, and pitch to accommodate the changes in the lower surface geometry. The diverter heights (between their leading and trailing edges) were modified during design as the shape of the lower wing changed, with the drag of the diverter changing accordingly. Both adjoint and finite difference gradients were used during optimization. The adjoint-based gradients were found to give good direction in the design space for configurations near the starting point, but as the design approached a minimum, the finite difference gradients were found to be more accurate. Use of finite difference gradients was limited by the

  5. Computational Methods Development at Ames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwak, Dochan; Smith, Charles A. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation outlines the development at Ames Research Center of advanced computational methods to provide appropriate fidelity computational analysis/design capabilities. Current thrusts of the Ames research include: 1) methods to enhance/accelerate viscous flow simulation procedures, and the development of hybrid/polyhedral-grid procedures for viscous flow; 2) the development of real time transonic flow simulation procedures for a production wind tunnel, and intelligent data management technology; and 3) the validation of methods and the flow physics study gives historical precedents to above research, and speculates on its future course.

  6. Ames Research Center cryogenics program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kittel, Peter

    1987-01-01

    Viewgraphs describe the Ames Research Center's cryogenics program. Diagrams are given of a fluid management system, a centrifugal pump, a flow meter, a liquid helium test facility, an extra-vehicular activity coupler concept, a dewar support with passive orbital disconnect, a pulse tube refrigerator, a dilution refrigerator, and an adiabatic demagnetization cooler.

  7. Acetyl-L-carnitine activates the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivators PGC-1α/PGC-1β-dependent signaling cascade of mitochondrial biogenesis and decreases the oxidized peroxiredoxins content in old rat liver.

    PubMed

    Pesce, Vito; Nicassio, Luigi; Fracasso, Flavio; Musicco, Clara; Cantatore, Palmiro; Gadaleta, Maria Nicola

    2012-04-01

    The behavior of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivators PGC-1α/PGC-β-dependent mitochondrial biogenesis signaling pathway, as well as the level of some antioxidant enzymes and proteins involved in mitochondrial dynamics in the liver of old rats before and after 2 months of acetyl-L-carnitine (ALCAR) supplementation, was tested. The results reveal that ALCAR treatment is able to reverse the age-associated decline of PGC-1α, PGC-1β, nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF-1), mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM), nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) dehydrogenase subunit 1 (ND1), and cytochrome c oxidase subunit IV (COX IV) protein levels, of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content, and of citrate synthase activity. Moreover, it partially reverses the mitochondrial superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2) decline and reduces the cellular content of oxidized peroxiredoxins. These data demonstrate that ALCAR treatment is able to promote in the old rat liver a new mitochondrial population that can contribute to the cellular oxidative stress reduction. Furthermore, a remarkable decline of Drp1 and of Mfn2 proteins is reported here for the first time, suggesting a reduced mitochondrial dynamics in aging liver with no effect of ALCAR treatment.

  8. 2017 Solar Eclipse, Ames Research Center

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-08-21

    Taking a break from their duties at the Ames Vertical Gun Range to look up at the eclipse over Ames Research Center in Mountain View are from left to right are Alfredo "Freddie" Perez, Chuck Cornelison, Don Bowling, Adam Parish

  9. NASA Ames Research Center: An Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tu, Eugene; Yan, Jerry Chi Yiu

    2017-01-01

    This overview of NASA Ames Research Center is intended to give the target audience of university students a general understanding of the mission, core competencies, and research goals of NASA and Ames.

  10. The Ames Project (1942-1946)

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2018-04-26

    The Ames Laboratory was officially founded on May 17, 1947, following development of a process to purify uranium metal for the historic Manhattan Project. From 1942 to 1946, Ames Lab scientists produced over two-million pounds of uranium metal. A U.S. Department of Energy national research laboratory, the Ames Laboratory creates materials and energy solutions. Iowa State University operates Ames Laboratory under contract with the DOE.

  11. NASA Ames Environmental Sustainability Report 2011

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, Ann H.

    2011-01-01

    The 2011 Ames Environmental Sustainability Report is the second in a series of reports describing the steps NASA Ames Research Center has taken toward assuring environmental sustainability in NASA Ames programs, projects, and activities. The Report highlights Center contributions toward meeting the Agency-wide goals under the 2011 NASA Strategic Sustainability Performance Program.

  12. Management process invaded Ames as the Center shifted from NACA to NASA oversight. Ames constructed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1968-01-01

    Management process invaded Ames as the Center shifted from NACA to NASA oversight. Ames constructed a review room in its headquarters building where, in the graphical style that prevailed in the 1960's, Ames leadership could review progress against schedule, budget and performance measures. Shown, in October 1965 is Merrill Mead chief of Ames' program and resources office. (for H Julian Allen Retirement album)

  13. Transformation Systems at NASA Ames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buntine, Wray; Fischer, Bernd; Havelund, Klaus; Lowry, Michael; Pressburger, TOm; Roach, Steve; Robinson, Peter; VanBaalen, Jeffrey

    1999-01-01

    In this paper, we describe the experiences of the Automated Software Engineering Group at the NASA Ames Research Center in the development and application of three different transformation systems. The systems span the entire technology range, from deductive synthesis, to logic-based transformation, to almost compiler-like source-to-source transformation. These systems also span a range of NASA applications, including solving solar system geometry problems, generating data analysis software, and analyzing multi-threaded Java code.

  14. NASA-Ames vertical gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, P. H.

    1984-01-01

    A national facility, the NASA-Ames vertical gun range (AVGR) has an excellent reputation for revealing fundamental aspects of impact cratering that provide important constraints for planetary processes. The current logistics in accessing the AVGR, some of the past and ongoing experimental programs and their relevance, and the future role of this facility in planetary studies are reviewed. Publications resulting from experiments with the gun (1979 to 1984) are listed as well as the researchers and subjects studied.

  15. Acetyl-L-carnitine prevents total body hydroxyl free radical and uric acid production induced by 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) in the rat.

    PubMed

    Loots, Du Toit; Mienie, Lodewyk J; Bergh, Jacobus J; Van der Schyf, Cornelis J

    2004-07-23

    Acetyl-L-carnitine (ALCAR) is intimately involved in the transport of long chain fatty acids across the inner mitochondrial membrane during oxidative phosphorylation. ALCAR also has been reported to attenuate the occurrence of parkinsonian symptoms associated with 1-methyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) in vivo, and protects in vitro against the toxicity of the neurotoxic 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+) metabolite of MPTP. The mechanism for these protective effects remains unclear. ALCAR may attenuate hydroxyl (HO*) free radical production in the MPTP/MPP+ neurotoxic pathway through several mechanisms. Most studies on MPTP/MPP+ toxicity and protection by ALCAR have focused on in vivo brain chemistry and in vitro neuronal culture studies. The present study investigates the attenuative effects of ALCAR on whole body oxidative stress markers in the urine of rats treated with MPTP. In a first study, ALCAR totally prevented the MPTP-induced formation of HO* measured by salicylate radical trapping. In a second study, the production of uric acid after MPTP administration-a measure of oxidative stress mediated through xanthine oxidase-was also prevented by ALCAR. Because ALCAR is unlikely to be a potent radical scavenger, these studies suggest that ALCAR protects against MPTP/MPP+-mediated oxidative stress through other mechanisms. We speculate that ALCAR may operate through interference with organic cation transporters such as OCTN2 and/or carnitine-acylcarnitine translocase (CACT), based partly on the above findings and on semi-empirical electronic similarity calculations on ALCAR, MPP+, and two other substrates for these transporters.

  16. Ames Life Science Data Archive: Translational Rodent Research at Ames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Alan E.; French, Alison J.; Ngaotheppitak, Ratana; Leung, Dorothy M.; Vargas, Roxana S.; Maese, Chris; Stewart, Helen

    2014-01-01

    The Life Science Data Archive (LSDA) office at Ames is responsible for collecting, curating, distributing and maintaining information pertaining to animal and plant experiments conducted in low earth orbit aboard various space vehicles from 1965 to present. The LSDA will soon be archiving data and tissues samples collected on the next generation of commercial vehicles; e.g., SpaceX & Cygnus Commercial Cargo Craft. To date over 375 rodent flight experiments with translational application have been archived by the Ames LSDA office. This knowledge base of fundamental research can be used to understand mechanisms that affect higher organisms in microgravity and help define additional research whose results could lead the way to closing gaps identified by the Human Research Program (HRP). This poster will highlight Ames contribution to the existing knowledge base and how the LSDA can be a resource to help answer the questions surrounding human health in long duration space exploration. In addition, it will illustrate how this body of knowledge was utilized to further our understanding of how space flight affects the human system and the ability to develop countermeasures that negate the deleterious effects of space flight. The Ames Life Sciences Data Archive (ALSDA) includes current descriptions of over 700 experiments conducted aboard the Shuttle, International Space Station (ISS), NASA/MIR, Bion/Cosmos, Gemini, Biosatellites, Apollo, Skylab, Russian Foton, and ground bed rest studies. Research areas cover Behavior and Performance, Bone and Calcium Physiology, Cardiovascular Physiology, Cell and Molecular Biology, Chronobiology, Developmental Biology, Endocrinology, Environmental Monitoring, Gastrointestinal Physiology, Hematology, Immunology, Life Support System, Metabolism and Nutrition, Microbiology, Muscle Physiology, Neurophysiology, Pharmacology, Plant Biology, Pulmonary Physiology, Radiation Biology, Renal, Fluid and Electrolyte Physiology, and Toxicology. These

  17. NASA Ames Sonic Boom Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durston, Donald A.; Kmak, Francis J.

    2009-01-01

    Multiple sonic boom wind tunnel models were tested in the NASA Ames Research Center 9-by 7-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel to reestablish related test techniques in this facility. The goal of the testing was to acquire higher fidelity sonic boom signatures with instrumentation that is significantly more sensitive than that used during previous wind tunnel entries and to compare old and new data from established models. Another objective was to perform tunnel-to-tunnel comparisons of data from a Gulfstream sonic boom model tested at the NASA Langley Research Center 4-foot by 4-foot Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel.

  18. A multi-ingredient containing carbohydrate, proteins L-glutamine and L-carnitine attenuates fatigue perception with no effect on performance, muscle damage or immunity in soccer players.

    PubMed

    Naclerio, Fernando; Larumbe-Zabala, Eneko; Cooper, Robert; Allgrove, Judith; Earnest, Conrad P

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effects of ingesting a multi-ingredient (53 g carbohydrate, 14.5 g whey protein, 5 g glutamine, 1.5 g L-carnitine-L-tartrate) supplement, carbohydrate only, or placebo on intermittent performance, perception of fatigue, immunity, and functional and metabolic markers of recovery. Sixteen amateur soccer players ingested their respective treatments before, during and after performing a 90-min intermittent repeated sprint test. Primary outcomes included time for a 90-min intermittent repeated sprint test (IRS) followed by eleven 15 m sprints. Measurements included creatine kinase, myoglobin, interleukine-6, Neutrophil; Lymphocytes and Monocyte before (pre), immediately after (post), 1 h and 24 h after exercise testing period. Overall, time for the IRS and 15 m sprints was not different between treatments. However, the perception of fatigue was attenuated (P<0.001) for the multi-ingredient (15.9±1.4) vs. placebo (17.8±1.4) but not for the carbohydrate (17.0±1.9) condition. Several changes in immune/inflammatory indices were noted as creatine kinase peaked at 24 h while Interleukin-6 and myoglobin increased both immediately after and at 1 h compared with baseline (P<0.05) for all three conditions. However, Myoglobin (P<0.05) was lower 1 h post-exercise for the multi-ingredient (241.8±142.6 ng·ml(-1)) and CHO (265.4±187.8 ng·ml(-1)) vs. placebo (518.6±255.2 ng·ml(-1)). Carbohydrate also elicited lower neutrophil concentrations vs. multi-ingredient (3.9±1.5 10(9)/L vs. 4.9±1.8 10(9)/L, P = 0.016) and a reduced (P<0.05) monocytes count (0.36±0.09 10(9)/L) compared to both multi-ingredient (0.42±0.09 10(9)/L) and placebo (0.42±0.12 10(9)/L). In conclusion, multi-ingredient and carbohydrate supplements did not improve intermittent performance, inflammatory or immune function. However, both treatments did attenuate serum myoglobin, while only carbohydrate blunted post-exercise leukocytosis.

  19. A Multi-Ingredient Containing Carbohydrate, Proteins L-Glutamine and L-Carnitine Attenuates Fatigue Perception with No Effect on Performance, Muscle Damage or Immunity in Soccer Players

    PubMed Central

    Naclerio, Fernando; Larumbe-Zabala, Eneko; Cooper, Robert; Allgrove, Judith; Earnest, Conrad P.

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effects of ingesting a multi-ingredient (53g carbohydrate, 14.5g whey protein, 5g glutamine, 1.5g L-carnitine-L-tartrate) supplement, carbohydrate only, or placebo on intermittent performance, perception of fatigue, immunity, and functional and metabolic markers of recovery. Sixteen amateur soccer players ingested their respective treatments before, during and after performing a 90-min intermittent repeated sprint test. Primary outcomes included time for a 90-min intermittent repeated sprint test (IRS) followed by eleven 15 m sprints. Measurements included creatine kinase, myoglobin, interleukine-6, Neutrophil; Lymphocytes and Monocyte before (pre), immediately after (post), 1h and 24h after exercise testing period. Overall, time for the IRS and 15 m sprints was not different between treatments. However, the perception of fatigue was attenuated (P<0.001) for the multi-ingredient (15.9±1.4) vs. placebo (17.8±1.4) but not for the carbohydrate (17.0±1.9) condition. Several changes in immune/inflammatory indices were noted as creatine kinase peaked at 24h while Interleukin-6 and myoglobin increased both immediately after and at 1h compared with baseline (P<0.05) for all three conditions. However, Myoglobin (P<0.05) was lower 1h post-exercise for the multi-ingredient (241.8±142.6 ng·ml-1) and CHO (265.4±187.8 ng·ml-1) vs. placebo (518.6±255.2 ng·ml-1). Carbohydrate also elicited lower neutrophil concentrations vs. multi-ingredient (3.9±1.5 109/L vs. 4.9±1.8 109/L, P = 0.016) and a reduced (P<0.05) monocytes count (0.36±0.09 109/L) compared to both multi-ingredient (0.42±0.09 109/L) and placebo (0.42±0.12 109/L). In conclusion, multi-ingredient and carbohydrate supplements did not improve intermittent performance, inflammatory or immune function. However, both treatments did attenuate serum myoglobin, while only carbohydrate blunted post-exercise leukocytosis. PMID:25915424

  20. 2017 Solar Eclipse, Ames Research Center

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-08-21

    Taking a break from his duties at the Ames Vertical Gun Range to look up at the eclipse over Ames Research Center in Mountain View Adam Parrish not only views but wears, on his forehead, the image of the 2017 Solar eclipse at 09:20:56 on August 21, 2017.

  1. Tiger Team Assessment of the Ames Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    This report documents the Tiger Assessment of the Ames Laboratory (Ames), located in Ames, Iowa. Ames is operated for the US Department of Energy (DOE) by Iowa State University. The assessment was conducted from February 10 to March 5, 1992, under the auspices of the Office of Special Projects, Office of the Assistant Secretary of Environment, Safety and Health, Headquarters, DOE. The assessment was comprehensive, encompassing Environment, Safety, and Health (ES H) disciplines; management practices; and contractor and DOE self-assessments. Compliance with applicable Federal, State of Iowa, and local regulations; applicable DOE Orders; best management practices; and internal requirements atmore » Ames Laboratory were assessed. In addition, an evaluation of the adequacy and effectiveness of DOE and the site contractor's management of ES H/quality assurance program was conducted.« less

  2. Photographer: NASA Ames On 20 December 1989, Ames buried a time capsule and unveiled a sculpture at

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Photographer: NASA Ames On 20 December 1989, Ames buried a time capsule and unveiled a sculpture at the spot where, fifty years earlier, Russel Robinson had turned the first spade of dirt for the Ames construction shack: Robinson (left) Ames Director Dale Compton (center) and Ames Deputy Director Sy Syvertson (right)

  3. The Ames Power Monitoring System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osetinsky, Leonid; Wang, David

    2003-01-01

    The Ames Power Monitoring System (APMS) is a centralized system of power meters, computer hardware, and specialpurpose software that collects and stores electrical power data by various facilities at Ames Research Center (ARC). This system is needed because of the large and varying nature of the overall ARC power demand, which has been observed to range from 20 to 200 MW. Large portions of peak demand can be attributed to only three wind tunnels (60, 180, and 100 MW, respectively). The APMS helps ARC avoid or minimize costly demand charges by enabling wind-tunnel operators, test engineers, and the power manager to monitor total demand for center in real time. These persons receive the information they need to manage and schedule energy-intensive research in advance and to adjust loads in real time to ensure that the overall maximum allowable demand is not exceeded. The APMS (see figure) includes a server computer running the Windows NT operating system and can, in principle, include an unlimited number of power meters and client computers. As configured at the time of reporting the information for this article, the APMS includes more than 40 power meters monitoring all the major research facilities, plus 15 Windows-based client personal computers that display real-time and historical data to users via graphical user interfaces (GUIs). The power meters and client computers communicate with the server using Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) on Ethernet networks, variously, through dedicated fiber-optic cables or through the pre-existing ARC local-area network (ARCLAN). The APMS has enabled ARC to achieve significant savings ($1.2 million in 2001) in the cost of power and electric energy by helping personnel to maintain total demand below monthly allowable levels, to manage the overall power factor to avoid low power factor penalties, and to use historical system data to identify opportunities for additional energy savings. The APMS also

  4. The Ames Vertical Gun Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karcz, J. S.; Bowling, D.; Cornelison, C.; Parrish, A.; Perez, A.; Raiche, G.; Wiens, J.-P.

    2016-01-01

    The Ames Vertical Gun Range (AVGR) is a national facility for conducting laboratory- scale investigations of high-speed impact processes. It provides a set of light-gas, powder, and compressed gas guns capable of accelerating projectiles to speeds up to 7 km s(exp -1). The AVGR has a unique capability to vary the angle between the projectile-launch and gravity vectors between 0 and 90 deg. The target resides in a large chamber (diameter approximately 2.5 m) that can be held at vacuum or filled with an experiment-specific atmosphere. The chamber provides a number of viewing ports and feed-throughs for data, power, and fluids. Impacts are observed via high-speed digital cameras along with investigation-specific instrumentation, such as spectrometers. Use of the range is available via grant proposals through any Planetary Science Research Program element of the NASA Research Opportunities in Space and Earth Sciences (ROSES) calls. Exploratory experiments (one to two days) are additionally possible in order to develop a new proposal.

  5. Simulation of Ames Backbone Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shahnasser, Hamid

    1998-01-01

    The networking demands of Ames Research Center are dramatically increasing. More and more workstations are requested to run video and audio applications on the network. These applications require a much greater bandwidth than data applications. The existing ARCLAN 2000 network bandwidth is insufficient, due to the use of FDDI as its backbone, for accommodating video applications. Operating at a maximum of 100 Mbps, FDDI can handle only a few workstations running multimedia applications. The ideal solution is to replace the current ARCLAN 2000 FDDI backbone with an ATM backbone. ATM has the capability to handle the increasing traffic loads on the ARCLAN 2000 that results from these new applications. As it can be seen from Figure 1, ARCLAN 2000 have a total of 32 routers (5 being core routers) each connected to the FDDI backbone via a 100 Mbps link. This network serves 34 different locations by using 34 hubs that are connected to secondary routers. End users are connected to the secondary routers with 10 Mbps links.

  6. Ames Lab 101: Next Generation Power Lines

    ScienceCinema

    Russell, Alan

    2017-12-22

    Ames Laboratory scientist Alan Russell discusses the need to develop new power lines that are stronger and more conductive as a way to address the problem of the nation's aging and inadequate power grid.

  7. Ames Lab 101: osgBullet

    ScienceCinema

    McCorkle, Doug

    2017-12-27

    Ames Laboratory scientist Doug McCorkle explains osgBullet, a 3-D virtual simulation software, and how it helps engineers design complex products and systems in a realistic, real-time virtual environment.

  8. Ames Lab 101: Reinventing the Power Cable

    ScienceCinema

    Russell, Alan

    2018-01-16

    Ames Laboratory researchers are working to develop new electrical power cables that are stronger and lighter than the cables currently used in the nation's power grid. Nano Tube animation by Iain Goodyear

  9. Ames Research Center Research and Technology 2000

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This report highlights the challenging work accomplished during fiscal year 2000 by Ames research scientists,engineers, and technologists. It discusses research and technologies that enable the Information Age, that expand the frontiers of knowledge for aeronautics and space, and that help to maintain U.S. leadership in aeronautics and space research and technology development. The accomplishments are grouped into four categories based on four of NASA's Strategic Enterprises: Aerospace Technology, Space Science, Biological and Physical Research, and Earth Science. The primary purpose of this report is to communicate knowledge-to inform our stakeholders, customer, and partners, and the people of the United States about the scope and diversity of Ames' mission,the nature of Ames' research and technolog) activities,and the stimulating challenges ahead. The accomplishments cited illustrate the contributions that Ames is willing to improve the quality of life for our citizens and the economic position of the United States in the world marketplace.

  10. The IBM PC at NASA Ames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peredo, James P.

    1988-01-01

    Like many large companies, Ames relies very much on its computing power to get work done. And, like many other large companies, finding the IBM PC a reliable tool, Ames uses it for many of the same types of functions as other companies. Presentation and clarification needs demand much of graphics packages. Programming and text editing needs require simpler, more-powerful packages. The storage space needed by NASA's scientists and users for the monumental amounts of data that Ames needs to keep demand the best database packages that are large and easy to use. Availability to the Micom Switching Network combines the powers of the IBM PC with the capabilities of other computers and mainframes and allows users to communicate electronically. These four primary capabilities of the PC are vital to the needs of NASA's users and help to continue and support the vast amounts of work done by the NASA employees.

  11. A Classroom Modification of the Ames Test.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yavornitzky, Joseph; Trzeciak, Victor

    1979-01-01

    A modification of the Ames test for detecting carcinogens and mutagens using a strain of bacteria is described. A suggestion is given for checking the correctness of procedures by using particular hair dyes which have been shown to be mutogenic. (Author/SA)

  12. Ames Research Center Publications: A Continuing Bibliography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The Ames Research Center Publications: A Continuing Bibliography contains the research output of the Center indexed during 1981 in Scientific and Technical Aerospace Reports (STAR), Limited Scientific and Technical Aerospace Reports (LSTAR), International Aerospace Abstracts (IAA), and Computer Program Abstracts (CPA). This bibliography is published annually in an attempt to effect greater awareness and distribution of the Center's research output.

  13. Ames Lab 101: Single Crystal Growth

    SciTech Connect

    Schlagel, Deborah

    2013-09-27

    Ames Laboratory scientist Deborah Schlagel talks about the Lab's research in growing single crystals of various metals and alloys. The single crystal samples are vital to researchers' understanding of the characteristics of a materials and what gives these materials their particular properties.

  14. Ames Lab 101: Ultrafast Magnetic Switching

    ScienceCinema

    Wang; Jigang

    2018-01-01

    Ames Laboratory physicists have found a new way to switch magnetism that is at least 1000 times faster than currently used in magnetic memory technologies. Magnetic switching is used to encode information in hard drives, magnetic random access memory and other computing devices. The discovery potentially opens the door to terahertz and faster memory speeds.

  15. Ames Lab 101: Rare-Earth Recycling

    ScienceCinema

    Ryan Ott

    2017-12-22

    Recycling keeps paper, plastics, and even jeans out of landfills. Could recycling rare-earth magnets do the same? Perhaps, if the recycling process can be improved. Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory are working to more effectively remove the neodymium, a rare earth, from the mix of other materials in a magnet.

  16. NASA Ames Fluid Mechanics Laboratory research briefs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Sanford (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    The Ames Fluid Mechanics Laboratory research program is presented in a series of research briefs. Nineteen projects covering aeronautical fluid mechanics and related areas are discussed and augmented with the publication and presentation output of the Branch for the period 1990-1993.

  17. Ames Lab 101: Single Crystal Growth

    ScienceCinema

    Schlagel, Deborah

    2018-01-16

    Ames Laboratory scientist Deborah Schlagel talks about the Lab's research in growing single crystals of various metals and alloys. The single crystal samples are vital to researchers' understanding of the characteristics of a materials and what gives these materials their particular properties.

  18. Ames Lab 101: C6: Virtual Engineering

    ScienceCinema

    McCorkle, Doug

    2018-01-01

    Ames Laboratory scientist Doug McCorkle explains the importance of virtual engineering and talks about the C6. The C6 is a three-dimensional, fully-immersive synthetic environment residing in the center atrium of Iowa State University's Howe Hall.

  19. Terminal Area ATM Research at NASA Ames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobias, Leonard

    1997-01-01

    The presentation will highlight the following: (1) A brief review of ATC research underway 15 years ago; (2) A summary of Terminal Area ATM Tool Development ongoing at NASA Ames; and (3) A projection of research activities 10-15 years from now.

  20. 76 FR 22900 - Decision To Evaluate a Petition To Designate a Class of Employees From Ames Laboratory in Ames...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-25

    ... as follows: Facility: Ames Laboratory. Location: Ames, Iowa. Job Titles and/or Job Duties: All.... FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Stuart L. Hinnefeld, Director, Division of Compensation Analysis and...

  1. NASA AMES Remote Operations Center for 2001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, M.; Marshall, J.; Cox, S.; Galal, K.

    1999-01-01

    There is a Memorandum of Agreement between NASA Ames, JPL, West Virginia University and University of Arizona which led to funding for the MECA microscope and to the establishment of an Ames facility for science analysis of microscopic and other data. The data and analysis will be by agreement of the Mars Environmental Compatibility Assessment (MECA), Robotic Arm Camera (RAC) and other PI's. This facility is intended to complement other analysis efforts with one objective of this facility being to test the latest information technologies in support of actual mission science operations. Additionally, it will be used as a laboratory for the exploration of collaborative science activities. With a goal of enhancing the science return for both Human Exploration and Development of Space (HEDS) and Astrobiology we shall utilize various tools such as superresolution and the Virtual Environment Vehicle Interface (VEVI) virtual reality visualization tools. In this presentation we will describe the current planning for this facility.

  2. Visualization of fluid dynamics at NASA Ames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Val

    1989-01-01

    The hardware and software currently used for visualization of fluid dynamics at NASA Ames is described. The software includes programs to create scenes (for example particle traces representing the flow over an aircraft), programs to interactively view the scenes, and programs to control the creation of video tapes and 16mm movies. The hardware includes high performance graphics workstations, a high speed network, digital video equipment, and film recorders.

  3. Simulation Applications at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Inouye, M.

    1984-01-01

    Aeronautical applications of simulation technology at Ames Research Center are described. The largest wind tunnel in the world is used to determine the flow field and aerodynamic characteristics of various aircraft, helicopter, and missile configurations. Large computers are used to obtain similar results through numerical solutions of the governing equations. Capabilities are illustrated by computer simulations of turbulence, aileron buzz, and an exhaust jet. Flight simulators are used to assess the handling qualities of advanced aircraft, particularly during takeoff and landing.

  4. NASA Ames aerospace systems directorate research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albers, James A.

    1991-01-01

    The Aerospace Systems Directorate is one of four research directorates at the NASA Ames Research Center. The Directorate conducts research and technology development for advanced aircraft and aircraft systems in intelligent computational systems and human-machine systems for aeronautics and space. The Directorate manages research and aircraft technology development projects, and operates and maintains major wind tunnels and flight simulation facilities. The Aerospace Systems Directorate's research and technology as it relates to NASA agency goals and specific strategic thrusts are discussed.

  5. Microbiology and potential applications of aerobic methane oxidation coupled to denitrification (AME-D) process: A review.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jing; Wang, Qian; Yuan, Mengdong; Tan, Giin-Yu Amy; Sun, Faqian; Wang, Cheng; Wu, Weixiang; Lee, Po-Heng

    2016-03-01

    Aerobic methane oxidation coupled to denitrification (AME-D) is an important link between the global methane and nitrogen cycles. This mini-review updates discoveries regarding aerobic methanotrophs and denitrifiers, as a prelude to spotlight the microbial mechanism and the potential applications of AME-D. Until recently, AME-D was thought to be accomplished by a microbial consortium where denitrifying bacteria utilize carbon intermediates, which are excreted by aerobic methanotrophs, as energy and carbon sources. Potential carbon intermediates include methanol, citrate and acetate. This mini-review presents microbial thermodynamic estimations and postulates that methanol is the ideal electron donor for denitrification, and may serve as a trophic link between methanotrophic bacteria and denitrifiers. More excitingly, new discoveries have revealed that AME-D is not only confined to the conventional synergism between methanotrophic bacteria and denitrifiers. Specifically, an obligate aerobic methanotrophic bacterium, Methylomonas denitrificans FJG1, has been demonstrated to couple partial denitrification with methane oxidation, under hypoxia conditions, releasing nitrous oxide as a terminal product. This finding not only substantially advances the understanding of AME-D mechanism, but also implies an important but unknown role of aerobic methanotrophs in global climate change through their influence on both the methane and nitrogen cycles in ecosystems. Hence, further investigation on AME-D microbiology and mechanism is essential to better understand global climate issues and to develop niche biotechnological solutions. This mini-review also presents traditional microbial techniques, such as pure cultivation and stable isotope probing, and powerful microbial techniques, such as (meta-) genomics and (meta-) transcriptomics, for deciphering linked methane oxidation and denitrification. Although AME-D has immense potential for nitrogen removal from wastewater, drinking

  6. Air Traffic Management Research at NASA Ames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Thomas J.

    2012-01-01

    The Aviation Systems Division at the NASA Ames Research Center conducts leading edge research in air traffic management concepts and technologies. This overview will present concepts and simulation results for research in traffic flow management, safe and efficient airport surface operations, super density terminal area operations, separation assurance and system wide modeling and simulation. A brief review of the ongoing air traffic management technology demonstration (ATD-1) will also be presented. A panel discussion, with Mr. Davis serving as a panelist, on air traffic research will follow the briefing.

  7. Aerothermodynamics research at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deiwert, George S.

    1987-01-01

    Research activity in the aerothermodynamics branch at the NASA Ames Research Center is reviewed. Advanced concepts and mission studies relating to the next generation aerospace transportation systems are summarized and directions for continued research identified. Theoretical and computational studies directed at determining flow fields and radiative and convective heating loads in real gases are described. Included are Navier-Stokes codes for equilibrium and thermochemical nonequilibrium air. Experimental studies in the 3.5-ft hypersonic wind tunnel, the ballistic ranges, and the electric arc driven shock tube are described. Tested configurations include generic hypersonic aerospace plane configurations, aeroassisted orbital transfer vehicle shapes and Galileo probe models.

  8. NASA Ames Hosts 2017 Breakthrough Prize

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-12-08

    NASA's Ames Research Center in Silicon Valley was the location of the 5th annual Breakthrough Prize ceremony, honoring scientific achievement. Researchers and engineers rubbed shoulders with Hollywood actors, Top-40 musicians, astronauts, sports heroes and Silicon Valley luminaries on the red carpet. Winners were honored with $3 million dollar prizes in the categories of physics, life sciences and mathematics with more than $25 million dollars awarded during the ceremony. The prizes were created by Sergey Brin, co-founder of Google and Anne Wojcicki, founder of 23 and Me; Mark Zuckerberg and Priscilla Chan of Facebook, and Yuri and Julia Milner.

  9. IRAS observations of Shapley-Ames galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Jong, T.; Clegg, P. E.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Soifer, B. T.; Habing, H. J.; Houck, J. R.; Aumann, H. H.; Raimond, E.

    1984-01-01

    A preliminary discussion of the infrared properties of a representative subsample of galaxies in the Revised Shapley-Ames Catalog (B less than about 13 mag) is presented. Of the 165 galaxies in the sample, 108 predominantly spiral galaxies, are detected in the infrared by IRAS. None of the elliptical galaxies and only about 25 percent of the lenticular galaxies scanned were detected. The range of infrared-to-blue luminosity ratios, a measure of the infrared excess of galaxies, is large, varying from roughly 0.1 to roughly 5. The data suggest that weakly infrared emitting galaxies are cool (100-60 micron color temperatures of about 25 K), while the more infrared luminous ones tend to be warmer (about 50 K). The rate of star formation in barred spiral galaxies is apparently higher than in normal spirals. About 1 solar mass/year of interstellar matter is converted into massive stars in the typical spiral galaxy.

  10. Ames Lab 101: 3D Metals Printer

    ScienceCinema

    Ott, Ryan

    2018-01-16

    To meet one of the biggest energy challenges of the 21st century - finding alternatives to rare-earth elements and other critical materials - scientists will need new and advanced tools. The Critical Materials Institute at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory has a new one: a 3D printer for metals research. 3D printing technology, which has captured the imagination of both industry and consumers, enables ideas to move quickly from the initial design phase to final form using materials including polymers, ceramics, paper and even food. But the Critical Materials Institute (CMI) will apply the advantages of the 3D printing process in a unique way: for materials discovery.

  11. Leveraging object-oriented development at Ames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wenneson, Greg; Connell, John

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents lessons learned by the Software Engineering Process Group (SEPG) from results of supporting two projects at NASA Ames using an Object Oriented Rapid Prototyping (OORP) approach supported by a full featured visual development environment. Supplemental lessons learned from a large project in progress and a requirements definition are also incorporated. The paper demonstrates how productivity gains can be made by leveraging the developer with a rich development environment, correct and early requirements definition using rapid prototyping, and earlier and better effort estimation and software sizing through object-oriented methods and metrics. Although the individual elements of OO methods, RP approach and OO metrics had been used on other separate projects, the reported projects were the first integrated usage supported by a rich development environment. Overall the approach used was twice as productive (measured by hours per OO Unit) as a C++ development.

  12. Ames Lab 101: 3D Metals Printer

    SciTech Connect

    Ott, Ryan

    2014-02-13

    To meet one of the biggest energy challenges of the 21st century - finding alternatives to rare-earth elements and other critical materials - scientists will need new and advanced tools. The Critical Materials Institute at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory has a new one: a 3D printer for metals research. 3D printing technology, which has captured the imagination of both industry and consumers, enables ideas to move quickly from the initial design phase to final form using materials including polymers, ceramics, paper and even food. But the Critical Materials Institute (CMI) will apply the advantages of the 3Dmore » printing process in a unique way: for materials discovery.« less

  13. Center Overview and UAV Highlights at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feng, Deborah; Yan, Jerry Chi Yiu

    2017-01-01

    The PowerPoint presentation gives an overview of NASA Ames Research Center and its core competencies, as well as some of the highlights of Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) and Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) accomplishments and innovations by researchers at Ames.

  14. NASA Ames Research Center Air Traffic Management Research Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lozito, Sandy

    2017-01-01

    This is a presentation to the Owl Feather Society, a group of people who are retired from NASA Ames Research Center. I am providing a summary of the ATM research here at NASA Ames to this group as part of a lunch time talk series. The presentation will be at Michael's Restaurant in Mountain View, CA on July 18.

  15. NASA Administrator Visits Ames Research Center (Reporter Pkg - May 2013)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-05-24

    NASA Administrator Charles Bolden and Congressman Mike Honda (D-San Jose, CA) were special guests at Ames Research Center recently. During their visit, they visited the SpaceShop, where they were shown demonstrations of Ames' contributions to the PhoneSat nano-satellite mission and 3D printing activity

  16. Reaching for the APEX at Ames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohut, Matthew

    2008-01-01

    The multidimensional design of the APEX program is the result of an extensive research and development effort dating back nearly a decade. "In the late 1990s and early 2000, we were pretty successful at getting new research and technology projects here at the center," Johnson says, "and we had a lack of critical mass of project managers. We were taking people who were primarily researchers and putting them in the position of managing projects." Smith and Johnson held a series of workshops across the center during 2000 and 2001 to gather feedback about how to address this issue. When they briefed the center's senior management on their findings, one of the top recommendations was to establish a project manager development program at Ames. At that point, they cast a wide net for ideas and information. "We did centerwide needs assessment, we did focus groups, we did surveys," Smith says. "We came up with a proposal for what a program would look like, tying in what we knew about the Academy of Program1 Project Leadership (now the Academy for Program/Project and Engineering Leadership, or APPEL), what we've seen at other centers, what other centers have tried. We were always checking to make sure our program mapped to APPEL. We also looked at the PMI [Project Management Institute] model, INCOSE [International Council on Systems Engineering], CMMI [Capability Maturity Model Integration], you name it." "We had a lot of conversations with the Jet Propulsion Lab and Goddard," Johnson adds. "We saw those centers as models for what Ames was aspiring to be in terms of a center for managing space flight missions." Their research confirmed what they already knew-that strong practitioner involvement would be critical to their program design process. 'XPEX is for the practitioner by the practitioner," Smith says. "They have to be a part of designing it. Otherwise there's no way we could design a program that meets their needs." At the same time that they worked at the grassroots

  17. ARCGRAPH SYSTEM - AMES RESEARCH GRAPHICS SYSTEM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hibbard, E. A.

    1994-01-01

    Ames Research Graphics System, ARCGRAPH, is a collection of libraries and utilities which assist researchers in generating, manipulating, and visualizing graphical data. In addition, ARCGRAPH defines a metafile format that contains device independent graphical data. This file format is used with various computer graphics manipulation and animation packages at Ames, including SURF (COSMIC Program ARC-12381) and GAS (COSMIC Program ARC-12379). In its full configuration, the ARCGRAPH system consists of a two stage pipeline which may be used to output graphical primitives. Stage one is associated with the graphical primitives (i.e. moves, draws, color, etc.) along with the creation and manipulation of the metafiles. Five distinct data filters make up stage one. They are: 1) PLO which handles all 2D vector primitives, 2) POL which handles all 3D polygonal primitives, 3) RAS which handles all 2D raster primitives, 4) VEC which handles all 3D raster primitives, and 5) PO2 which handles all 2D polygonal primitives. Stage two is associated with the process of displaying graphical primitives on a device. To generate the various graphical primitives, create and reprocess ARCGRAPH metafiles, and access the device drivers in the VDI (Video Device Interface) library, users link their applications to ARCGRAPH's GRAFIX library routines. Both FORTRAN and C language versions of the GRAFIX and VDI libraries exist for enhanced portability within these respective programming environments. The ARCGRAPH libraries were developed on a VAX running VMS. Minor documented modification of various routines, however, allows the system to run on the following computers: Cray X-MP running COS (no C version); Cray 2 running UNICOS; DEC VAX running BSD 4.3 UNIX, or Ultrix; SGI IRIS Turbo running GL2-W3.5 and GL2-W3.6; Convex C1 running UNIX; Amhdahl 5840 running UTS; Alliant FX8 running UNIX; Sun 3/160 running UNIX (no native device driver); Stellar GS1000 running Stellex (no native device driver

  18. Ames collaborative study of cosmic ray neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hewitt, J. E.; Hughes, L.; Mccaslin, J. B.; Stephens, L. D.; Rindi, A.; Smith, A. R.; Thomas, R. H.; Griffith, R. V.; Welles, C. G.; Baum, J. W.

    1976-01-01

    The results of a collaborative study to define both the neutron flux and the spectrum more precisely and to develop a dosimetry package that can be flown quickly to altitude for solar flare events are described. Instrumentation and analysis techniques were used which were developed to measure accelerator-produced radiation. The instruments were flown in the Ames Research Center high altitude aircraft. Neutron instrumentation consisted of Bonner spheres with both active and passive detector elements, threshold detectors of both prompt-counter and activation-element types, a liquid scintillation spectrometer based on pulse-shape discrimination, and a moderated BF3 counter neutron monitor. In addition, charged particles were measured with a Reuter-Stokes ionization chamber system and dose equivalent with another instrument. Preliminary results from the first series of flights at 12.5 km (41,000 ft) are presented, including estimates of total neutron flux intensity and spectral shape and of the variation of intensity with altitude and geomagnetic latitude.

  19. NASA Ames UV-LED Poster Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaroux, Belgacem Amar

    2015-01-01

    UV-LED is a small satellite technology demonstration payload being flown on the Saudisat-4 spacecraft that is demonstrating non-contacting charge control of an isolated or floating mass using new solid-state ultra-violet light emitting diodes (UV-LEDs). Integrated to the rest of the spacecraft and launched on a Dnepr in June 19, 2014, the project is a collaboration between the NASA Ames Research Center (ARC), Stanford University, and King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology (KACST). Beginning with its commissioning in December, 2015, the data collected by UV-LED have validated a novel method of charge control that will improve the performance of drag-free spacecraft allowing for concurrent science collection during charge management operations as well as reduce the mass, power and volume required while increasing lifetime and reliability of a charge management subsystem. UV-LED continues to operate, exploring new concepts in non-contacting charge control and collecting data crucial to understanding the lifetime of ultra-violet light emitting diodes in space. These improvements are crucial to the success of ground breaking missions such as LISA and BBO, and demonstrates the ability of low cost small satellite missions to provide technological advances that far exceed mission costs.

  20. Ames life science telescience testbed evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haines, Richard F.; Johnson, Vicki; Vogelsong, Kristofer H.; Froloff, Walt

    1989-01-01

    Eight surrogate spaceflight mission specialists participated in a real-time evaluation of remote coaching using the Ames Life Science Telescience Testbed facility. This facility consisted of three remotely located nodes: (1) a prototype Space Station glovebox; (2) a ground control station; and (3) a principal investigator's (PI) work area. The major objective of this project was to evaluate the effectiveness of telescience techniques and hardware to support three realistic remote coaching science procedures: plant seed germinator charging, plant sample acquisition and preservation, and remote plant observation with ground coaching. Each scenario was performed by a subject acting as flight mission specialist, interacting with a payload operations manager and a principal investigator expert. All three groups were physically isolated from each other yet linked by duplex audio and color video communication channels and networked computer workstations. Workload ratings were made by the flight and ground crewpersons immediately after completing their assigned tasks. Time to complete each scientific procedural step was recorded automatically. Two expert observers also made performance ratings and various error assessments. The results are presented and discussed.

  1. 17. Woodworking Mill (basement): view looking north showing Ames Iron ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. Woodworking Mill (basement): view looking north showing Ames Iron Works steam boiler; note turbine control handle in middle right of photo - Ben Thresher's Mill, State Aid No. 1, Barnet, Caledonia County, VT

  2. Ames Lab 101: BAM (Boron-Aluminum-Magnesium)

    ScienceCinema

    Cook, Bruce

    2017-12-13

    Materials scientist, Bruce Cook, discusses the super hard, low friction, and lubricious alloy know as BAM (Boron-Aluminum-Magnesium). BAM was discovered by Bruce Cook and his team at the Ames Laboratory.

  3. Ames Lab 101: Real-Time 3D Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Song

    2010-08-02

    Ames Laboratory scientist Song Zhang explains his real-time 3-D imaging technology. The technique can be used to create high-resolution, real-time, precise, 3-D images for use in healthcare, security, and entertainment applications.

  4. Ames Lab 101: Real-Time 3D Imaging

    ScienceCinema

    Zhang, Song

    2017-12-22

    Ames Laboratory scientist Song Zhang explains his real-time 3-D imaging technology. The technique can be used to create high-resolution, real-time, precise, 3-D images for use in healthcare, security, and entertainment applications.

  5. Ames Research Center Publications, July 1971 through December 1973

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A bibliography of the publications of Ames Research Center authors and contractors which appeared as formal NASA publications, journal articles, books, chapters of books, patents, and contractor reports is presented. Years covered are July 1971 through December 1973.

  6. Peregrine Rocket Motor Test at the Ames Outdoor Aerodynamic Rese

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-02-15

    (Left): Kyle Botteon (front) and Hunjpp Kim (Behind), NASA JPL. (Right): Gregory Zilliac, Advance Propulsion Technician. NASA Ames, preparing the Peregrine Hybrid Rocket Engine at the Outdoor Aerodynamic Research Facility (OARF, N-249).

  7. Peregrine Rocket Motor Test at the Ames Outdoor Aerodynamic Rese

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-02-15

    Ashley Karp, NASA JPL (Left) and Hunjoo Kim, NASA JPL (Right) attaching heat sensors the Peregrine Hybrid Rocket Engine prior to its test at the Outdoor Aerodynamic Research Facility (OARF, N-249) at NASA's Ames Research Center.

  8. Peregrine Rocket Motor Test at the Ames Outdoor Aerodynamic Rese

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-02-15

    Hunjoo Kim, NASA JPL (Left) and Ashley Karp, NASA JPL (Right) attaching heat sensors the Peregrine Hybrid Rocket Engine prior to its test at the Outdoor Aerodynamic Research Facility (OARF, N-249) at NASA’s Ames Research Center.

  9. Quantifying Climate Change Hydrologic Risk at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, W. B.; Bromirski, P. D.; Coats, R. N.; Costa-Cabral, M.; Fong, J.; Loewenstein, M.; Milesi, C.; Miller, N.; Murphy, N.; Roy, S.

    2013-12-01

    In response to 2009 Executive Order 13514 mandating U.S. federal agencies to evaluate infrastructure vulnerabilities due to climate variability and change we provide an analysis of future climate flood risk at NASA Ames Research Center (Ames) along South S.F. Bay. This includes likelihood analysis of large-scale water vapor transport, statistical analysis of intense precipitation, high winds, sea level rise, storm surge, estuary dynamics, saturated overland flooding, and likely impacts to wetlands and habitat loss near Ames. We use the IPCC CMIP5 data from three Atmosphere-Ocean General Circulation Models with Radiative Concentration Pathways of 8.5 Wm-2 and 4.5 Wm-2 and provide an analysis of climate variability and change associated with flooding and impacts at Ames. Intense storms impacting Ames are due to two large-scale processes, sub-tropical atmospheric rivers (AR) and north Pacific Aleutian low-pressure (AL) storm systems, both of which are analyzed here in terms of the Integrated Water Vapor (IWV) exceeding a critical threshold within a search domain and the wind vector transporting the IWV from southerly to westerly to northwesterly for ARs and northwesterly to northerly for ALs and within the Ames impact area during 1970-1999, 2040-2069, and 2070-2099. We also include a statistical model of extreme precipitation at Ames based on large-scale climatic predictors, and characterize changes using CMIP5 projections. Requirements for levee height to protect Ames are projected to increase and continually accelerate throughout this century as sea level rises. We use empirical statistical and analytical methods to determine the likelihood, in each year from present through 2099, of water level surpassing different threshold values in SF Bay near NASA Ames. We study the sensitivity of the water level corresponding to a 1-in-10 and 1-in-100 likelihood of exceedance to changes in the statistical distribution of storm surge height and ENSO height, in addition to

  10. The Ames MER microscopic imager toolkit

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sargent, R.; Deans, Matthew; Kunz, C.; Sims, M.; Herkenhoff, K.

    2005-01-01

    12The Mars Exploration Rovers, Spirit and Opportunity, have spent several successful months on Mars, returning gigabytes of images and spectral data to scientists on Earth. One of the instruments on the MER rovers, the Athena Microscopic Imager (MI), is a fixed focus, megapixel camera providing a ??3mm depth of field and a 31??31mm field of view at a working distance of 63 mm from the lens to the object being imaged. In order to maximize the science return from this instrument, we developed the Ames MI Toolkit and supported its use during the primary mission. The MI Toolkit is a set of programs that operate on collections of MI images, with the goal of making the data more understandable to the scientists on the ground. Because of the limited depth of field of the camera, and the often highly variable topography of the terrain being imaged, MI images of a given rock are often taken as a stack, with the Instrument Deployment Device (IDD) moving along a computed normal vector, pausing every few millimeters for the MI to acquire an image. The MI Toolkit provides image registration and focal section merging, which combine these images to form a single, maximally in-focus image, while compensating for changes in lighting as well as parallax due to the motion of the camera. The MI Toolkit also provides a 3-D reconstruction of the surface being imaged using stereo and can embed 2-D MI images as texture maps into 3-D meshes produced by other imagers on board the rover to provide context. The 2-D images and 3-D meshes output from the Toolkit are easily viewed by scientists using other mission tools, such as Viz or the MI Browser.This paper describes the MI Toolkit in detail, as well as our experience using it with scientists at JPL during the primary MER mission. ?? 2005 IEEE.

  11. AME position statement on adrenal incidentaloma.

    PubMed

    Terzolo, M; Stigliano, A; Chiodini, I; Loli, P; Furlani, L; Arnaldi, G; Reimondo, G; Pia, A; Toscano, V; Zini, M; Borretta, G; Papini, E; Garofalo, P; Allolio, B; Dupas, B; Mantero, F; Tabarin, A

    2011-06-01

    To assess currently available evidence on adrenal incidentaloma and provide recommendations for clinical practice. A panel of experts (appointed by the Italian Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AME)) appraised the methodological quality of the relevant studies, summarized their results, and discussed the evidence reports to find consensus. Unenhanced computed tomography (CT) is recommended as the initial test with the use of an attenuation value of ≤10 Hounsfield units (HU) to differentiate between adenomas and non-adenomas. For tumors with a higher baseline attenuation value, we suggest considering delayed contrast-enhanced CT studies. Positron emission tomography (PET) or PET/CT should be considered when CT is inconclusive, whereas fine needle aspiration biopsy may be used only in selected cases suspicious of metastases (after biochemical exclusion of pheochromocytoma). HORMONAL ASSESSMENT: Pheochromocytoma and excessive overt cortisol should be ruled out in all patients, whereas primary aldosteronism has to be considered in hypertensive and/or hypokalemic patients. The 1 mg overnight dexamethasone suppression test is the test recommended for screening of subclinical Cushing's syndrome (SCS) with a threshold at 138 nmol/l for considering this condition. A value of 50 nmol/l virtually excludes SCS with an area of uncertainty between 50 and 138 nmol/l. Surgery is recommended for masses with suspicious radiological aspects and masses causing overt catecholamine or steroid excess. Data are insufficient to make firm recommendations for or against surgery in patients with SCS. However, adrenalectomy may be considered when an adequate medical therapy does not reach the treatment goals of associated diseases potentially linked to hypercortisolism.

  12. The Ames MER Microscopic Imager Toolkit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sargent, Randy; Deans, Matthew; Kunz, Clayton; Sims, Michael; Herkenhoff, Ken

    2005-01-01

    The Mars Exploration Rovers, Spirit and Opportunity, have spent several successful months on Mars, returning gigabytes of images and spectral data to scientists on Earth. One of the instruments on the MER rovers, the Athena Microscopic Imager (MI), is a fixed focus, megapixel camera providing a plus or minus mm depth of field and a 3lx31mm field of view at a working distance of 63 mm from the lens to the object being imaged. In order to maximize the science return from this instrument, we developed the Ames MI Toolkit and supported its use during the primary mission. The MI Toolkit is a set of programs that operate on collections of MI images, with the goal of making the data more understandable to the scientists on the ground. Because of the limited depth of field of the camera, and the often highly variable topography of the terrain being imaged, MI images of a given rock are often taken as a stack, with the Instrument Deployment Device (IDD) moving along a computed normal vector, pausing every few millimeters for the MI to acquire an image. The MI Toolkit provides image registration and focal section merging, which combine these images to form a single, maximally in-focus image, while compensating for changes in lighting as well as parallax due to the motion of the camera. The MI Toolkit also provides a 3-D reconstruction of the surface being imaged using stereo and can embed 2-D MI images as texture maps into 3-D meshes produced by other imagers on board the rover to provide context. The 2-D images and 3-D meshes output from the Toolkit are easily viewed by scientists using other mission tools, such as Viz or the MI Browser. This paper describes the MI Toolkit in detail, as well as our experience using it with scientists at JPL during the primary MER mission.

  13. NASA Ames Celebrates Curiosity Rover's Landing on Mars (Reporter Package)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-08-08

    Nearly 7,000 people came to NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, Calif., to watch the Mars Science Laboratory rover Curiosity land on Mars. A full day's worth of activities and discussions with local Mars experts informed attendees about the contributions NASA Ames made to the mission. The highlight of the event was the live NASA TV broadcast of MSL's entry, descent and landing on the Martian surface.

  14. Harrison Ford Tapes Climate Change Show at Ames (Reporter Package)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-04-11

    Hollywood legend Harrison Ford made a special visit to NASA's Ames Research Center to shoot an episode for a new documentary series about climate change called 'Years of Living Dangerously.' After being greeted by Center Director Pete Worden, Ford was filmed meeting with NASA climate scientists and discussed global temperature prediction data processed using one of the world's fastest supercomputers at Ames. Later he flew in the co-pilot seat in a jet used to gather data for NASA air quality studies.

  15. Fifteen Years of Laboratory Astrophysics at Ames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allamandola, L. J.; Sandford, S. A.; Salama, F.; Hudgins, D. M.; Bernstein, M.; Goorvitch, David (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    of the Ames Program will be given. We have been involved in identifying 9 out of the 14 interstellar pre-cometary ice species known, determined their abundances and the physical nature of the ice structure. Details on our ice work are given in the paper by Sandford et al. Our group is among the pioneers of the PAH model. We built the theoretical framework, participated in the observations and developed the experimental techniques needed to test the model. We demonstrated that the ubiquitous infrared emission spectrum associated with many interstellar objects can be matched by laboratory spectra of neutral and positively charged PAHs and that PAHs were excellent candidates for the diffuse interstellar band (DIB) carriers. See Salama et al. and Hudgins et al.

  16. PMARC - PANEL METHOD AMES RESEARCH CENTER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashby, D. L.

    1994-01-01

    Panel methods are moderate cost tools for solving a wide range of engineering problems. PMARC (Panel Method Ames Research Center) is a potential flow panel code that numerically predicts flow fields around complex three-dimensional geometries. PMARC's predecessor was a panel code named VSAERO which was developed for NASA by Analytical Methods, Inc. PMARC is a new program with many additional subroutines and a well-documented code suitable for powered-lift aerodynamic predictions. The program's open architecture facilitates modifications or additions of new features. Another improvement is the adjustable size code which allows for an optimum match between the computer hardware available to the user and the size of the problem being solved. PMARC can be resized (the maximum number of panels can be changed) in a matter of minutes. Several other state-of-the-art PMARC features include internal flow modeling for ducts and wind tunnel test sections, simple jet plume modeling essential for the analysis and design of powered-lift aircraft, and a time-stepping wake model which allows the study of both steady and unsteady motions. PMARC is a low-order panel method, which means the singularities are distributed with constant strength over each panel. In many cases low-order methods can provide nearly the same accuracy as higher order methods (where the singularities are allowed to vary linearly or quadratically over each panel). Low-order methods have the advantage of a shorter computation time and do not require exact matching between panels. The flow problem is solved by assuming that the body is at rest in a moving flow field. The body is modeled as a closed surface which divides space into two regions -- one region contains the flow field of interest and the other contains a fictitious flow. External flow problems, such as a wing in a uniform stream, have the external region as the flow field of interest and the internal flow as the fictitious flow. This arrangement is

  17. Alcohol mixed with energy drink (AMED): A critical review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Verster, Joris C; Benson, Sarah; Johnson, Sean J; Alford, Chris; Godefroy, Samuel Benrejeb; Scholey, Andrew

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to critically review the (1) prevalence of alcohol mixed with energy drink (AMED) consumption, (2) motives for AMED consumption, (3) correlates of AMED consumption, and (4) whether AMED consumption has an impact on (a) alcohol consumption, (b) subjective intoxication, and (c) risk-taking behavior. Overall a minority of the population consumes AMED, typically infrequently. Motives for AMED consumption are predominantly hedonistic and social. Meta-analyses revealed that AMED consumers drink significantly more alcohol than alcohol-only (AO) consumers. Within-subject comparisons restricted to AMED consumers revealed that alcohol consumption does not significantly differ between typical AMED and AO occasions. On past month heaviest drinking occasions, AMED users consume significantly less alcohol on AMED occasions when compared to AO occasions. AMED consumers experience significantly fewer negative consequences and risk-taking behavior on AMED occasions compared with AO occasions. Meta-analyses of subjective intoxication studies suggest that AMED consumption does not differentially affect subjective intoxication when compared to AO consumption. In conclusion, when compared to AO consumption, mixing alcohol with energy drink does not affect subjective intoxication and seems unlikely to increase total alcohol consumption, associated risk-taking behavior, nor other negative alcohol-related consequences. Further research may be necessary to fully reveal the effects of AMED. © 2018 The Authors Human Psychopharmacology: Clinical and Experimental Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Alcohol mixed with energy drink (AMED): A critical review and meta‐analysis

    PubMed Central

    Benson, Sarah; Johnson, Sean J.; Alford, Chris; Godefroy, Samuel Benrejeb; Scholey, Andrew

    2018-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this systematic review and meta‐analysis was to critically review the (1) prevalence of alcohol mixed with energy drink (AMED) consumption, (2) motives for AMED consumption, (3) correlates of AMED consumption, and (4) whether AMED consumption has an impact on (a) alcohol consumption, (b) subjective intoxication, and (c) risk‐taking behavior. Overall a minority of the population consumes AMED, typically infrequently. Motives for AMED consumption are predominantly hedonistic and social. Meta‐analyses revealed that AMED consumers drink significantly more alcohol than alcohol‐only (AO) consumers. Within‐subject comparisons restricted to AMED consumers revealed that alcohol consumption does not significantly differ between typical AMED and AO occasions. On past month heaviest drinking occasions, AMED users consume significantly less alcohol on AMED occasions when compared to AO occasions. AMED consumers experience significantly fewer negative consequences and risk‐taking behavior on AMED occasions compared with AO occasions. Meta‐analyses of subjective intoxication studies suggest that AMED consumption does not differentially affect subjective intoxication when compared to AO consumption. In conclusion, when compared to AO consumption, mixing alcohol with energy drink does not affect subjective intoxication and seems unlikely to increase total alcohol consumption, associated risk‐taking behavior, nor other negative alcohol‐related consequences. Further research may be necessary to fully reveal the effects of AMED. PMID:29417616

  19. Building Climate Resilience at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iraci, L. T.; Mueller, C.; Podolske, J. R.; Milesi, C.

    2016-12-01

    NASA Ames Research Center, located at the southern end of the San Francisco Bay (SFB) estuary, has identified three primary vulnerabilities to changes in climate. The Ames Climate Adaptation Science Investigator (CASI) workgroup has studied each of these challenges to operations and the potential exposure of infrastructure and employees to an increased frequency of hazards. Sea level rise inundation scenarios for the SFB Area generally refer to projected scenarios in mean sea level rather than changes in extreme tides that could occur during future storm conditions. In the summer of 2014, high resolution 3-D mapping of the low-lying portion of Ames was performed. Those data are integrated with improved sea level inundation scenarios to identify the buildings, basements and drainage systems potentially affected. We will also identify the impacts of sea level and storm surge effects on transportation to and from the Center. This information will help Center management develop future master plans. Climate change will also lead to changes in temperature, storm frequency and intensity. These changes have potential impacts on localized floods and ecosystems, as well as on electricity and water availability. Over the coming decades, these changes will be imposed on top of ongoing land use and land cover changes, especially those deriving from continued urbanization and increase in impervious surface areas. These coupled changes have the potential to create a series of cascading impacts on ecosystems, including changes in primary productivity and disturbance of hydrological properties and increased flood risk. The majority of the electricity used at Ames is supplied by hydroelectric dams, which will be influenced by reductions in precipitation or changes in the timing or phase of precipitation which reduces snow pack. Coupled with increased demand for summertime air conditioning and other cooling needs, NASA Ames is at risk for electricity shortfalls. To assess the

  20. Application of CFD in aeronautics at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksymiuk, Catherine M.; Enomoto, Francis Y.; Vandalsem, William R.

    1995-03-01

    The role of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) at Ames Research Center has expanded to address a broad range of aeronautical problems, including wind tunnel support, flight test support, design, and analysis. Balancing the requirements of each new problem against the available resources - software, hardware, time, and expertise - is critical to the effective use of CFD. Several case studies of recent applications highlight the depth of CFD capability at Ames, the tradeoffs involved in various approaches, and lessons learned in the use of CFD as an engineering tool.

  1. The 1994 Ames Research Center publications: A bibliography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scarich, Shelley J. (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    This document is a compilation of the scientific and technical information that Ames Research Center has produced during the calendar year 1994. Included are citations for formal reports, high-number conference publications, high-number technical memorandums, contractor reports, journal articles, meeting presentation, tech briefs, patents, and translations.

  2. Overview of FIREMEN program at Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kourtides, D. A.

    1978-01-01

    The Ames Firemen Program is described. The key elements of the program include: (1) the development and evaluation of aircraft interior composite panels; (2) the thermochemical and flammability characterization of thermoset and thermoplastic resins; and (3) the evolution of fire resist aircraft seat components. The first two elements are presented.

  3. The Western Aeronautical Test Range of NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, A. L.

    1984-01-01

    An overview of the Western Aeronautical Test Range (WATR) of NASA Ames Research Center (ARC) is presented in this paper. The three WATR facilities are discussed, and three WATR elements - mission control centerns, communications systems, real-time processing and display systems, and tracking systems -are reviewed. The relationships within the NASA WATR, with respect to the NASA aeronautics program, are also discussed.

  4. Synthesis of (±)-Tetrapetalone A-Me Aglycon**

    PubMed Central

    Carlsen, Peter N.; Mann, Tyler J.; Hoveyda, Amir H.

    2014-01-01

    The first synthesis of (±)-tetrapetalone A-Me aglycon is described. Key bond-forming reactions include Nazarov cyclization, a ring-closing metathesis (RCM) promoted with complete diastereoselectivity by a chiral Mo-based complex, tandem conjugate reduction-intramolecular aldol cyclization, and oxidative dearomatization. PMID:25045072

  5. Record Number of Summer Students Work at Ames in 2014

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-09-16

    NASA's Ames Research Center concluded the 2014 summer student program session that featured a record number of participants from around the globe. More than 1,100 students with high school- to graduate-level education took part in a wide variety of science activities. Some of the activities included robotics, aeronautics, biology, computer science, engineering and astrophysics.

  6. Peregrine Rocket Motor Test at the Ames Outdoor Aerodynamic Rese

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-02-15

    From Left to Right: 1. Hunjoo Kim (NASA JPL) 2. Kyle Botteon (NASA JPL) 3. Ashley Karp (NASA JPL) 4. Brian Schratz (NASA JPL) Testing the Peregrine Hybrid Rocket Engine at the Outdoor Aerodynamic Research Facility (building N249, OARF) at Ames Research Center.

  7. Ames Laboratory site environmental report, calendar year 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Mathison, L.K.

    1989-05-01

    The summarized data and conclusions from the Ames Laboratory environmental monitoring program are presented in this Annual Site Environmental Report. Ames Laboratory is located on the campus of Iowa State University (ISU) and occupies several buildings owned by the Department of Energy. A study is being conducted to identify environmental sampling methods which can characterize and separate the impact of Ames Laboratory's campus activities and that of ISU. This will enable the Laboratory to determine what possible impact it's operations may be having to the environment, if any. Two Pollution Abatement projects were begun in 1988. They were: removal ofmore » thorium contaminated soil resulting from a historical release of thorium at the Laboratory, to the Ames, Iowa Water Pollution Control (sewage) Plant and demolition of a small Blockhouse'' constructed of concrete block which had been used for low level radioactive waste handling. The contaminated soil has been removed and transported to Hanford, WA for disposal. A final site radiological survey for thorium is pending. In addition, contaminated debris was transported to Hanford, WA for disposal and a final site survey is pending. 7 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.« less

  8. Peregrine Rocket Motor Test at the Ames Outdoor Aerodynamic Rese

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-02-15

    From Left to Right: Ashley Karp (NASA JPL), Hunjoo Kim (NASA JPL), Brian Schratz (NASA JPL) and Kyle Botteon (NASA JPL) Testing the Peregrine Hybrid Rocket Engine at the Outdoor Aerodynamic Research Facility (building N249, OARF) at NASA’s Ames Research Center.

  9. Human Robotic Study at Houghton Crater - virtual reality study from NASA Ames (FFC) Future Fight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Human Robotic Study at Houghton Crater - virtual reality study from NASA Ames (FFC) Future Fight Central simulator tower L-R: Dr Geoffrey Briggs; Jen Jasper (seated); Dr Jan Akins and Mr. Tony Gross, Ames

  10. Welcome to Ames Research Center (1987 forum on Federal technology transfer)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballhaus, William F., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    NASA Ames Research Center has a long and distinguished history of technology development and transfer. Recently, in a welcoming speech to the Forum on Federal Technology Transfer, Director Ballhouse of Ames described significant technologies which have been transferred from Ames to the private sector and identifies future opportunities.

  11. Developing questionnaires for educational research: AMEE Guide No. 87

    PubMed Central

    La Rochelle, Jeffrey S.; Dezee, Kent J.; Gehlbach, Hunter

    2014-01-01

    In this AMEE Guide, we consider the design and development of self-administered surveys, commonly called questionnaires. Questionnaires are widely employed in medical education research. Unfortunately, the processes used to develop such questionnaires vary in quality and lack consistent, rigorous standards. Consequently, the quality of the questionnaires used in medical education research is highly variable. To address this problem, this AMEE Guide presents a systematic, seven-step process for designing high-quality questionnaires, with particular emphasis on developing survey scales. These seven steps do not address all aspects of survey design, nor do they represent the only way to develop a high-quality questionnaire. Instead, these steps synthesize multiple survey design techniques and organize them into a cohesive process for questionnaire developers of all levels. Addressing each of these steps systematically will improve the probabilities that survey designers will accurately measure what they intend to measure. PMID:24661014

  12. Developing questionnaires for educational research: AMEE Guide No. 87.

    PubMed

    Artino, Anthony R; La Rochelle, Jeffrey S; Dezee, Kent J; Gehlbach, Hunter

    2014-06-01

    In this AMEE Guide, we consider the design and development of self-administered surveys, commonly called questionnaires. Questionnaires are widely employed in medical education research. Unfortunately, the processes used to develop such questionnaires vary in quality and lack consistent, rigorous standards. Consequently, the quality of the questionnaires used in medical education research is highly variable. To address this problem, this AMEE Guide presents a systematic, seven-step process for designing high-quality questionnaires, with particular emphasis on developing survey scales. These seven steps do not address all aspects of survey design, nor do they represent the only way to develop a high-quality questionnaire. Instead, these steps synthesize multiple survey design techniques and organize them into a cohesive process for questionnaire developers of all levels. Addressing each of these steps systematically will improve the probabilities that survey designers will accurately measure what they intend to measure.

  13. A static data flow simulation study at Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barszcz, Eric; Howard, Lauri S.

    1987-01-01

    Demands in computational power, particularly in the area of computational fluid dynamics (CFD), led NASA Ames Research Center to study advanced computer architectures. One architecture being studied is the static data flow architecture based on research done by Jack B. Dennis at MIT. To improve understanding of this architecture, a static data flow simulator, written in Pascal, has been implemented for use on a Cray X-MP/48. A matrix multiply and a two-dimensional fast Fourier transform (FFT), two algorithms used in CFD work at Ames, have been run on the simulator. Execution times can vary by a factor of more than 2 depending on the partitioning method used to assign instructions to processing elements. Service time for matching tokens has proved to be a major bottleneck. Loop control and array address calculation overhead can double the execution time. The best sustained MFLOPS rates were less than 50% of the maximum capability of the machine.

  14. Ames Research Center SR&T program and earth observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poppoff, I. G.

    1972-01-01

    An overview is presented of the research activities in earth observations at Ames Research Center. Most of the tasks involve the use of research aircraft platforms. The program is also directed toward the use of the Illiac 4 computer for statistical analysis. Most tasks are weighted toward Pacific coast and Pacific basin problems with emphasis on water applications, air applications, animal migration studies, and geophysics.

  15. Avrocar Test in Ames 40x80 Foot Wind Tunnel.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1961-04-03

    Rear view of the Avrocar with tail, mounted on variable height struts. Overhead doors of the wind tunnel test section open. The first Avrocar, S/N 58-7055 (marked AV-7055), after tethered testing, became the "wind tunnel" test model at NASA Ames, where it remained in storage from 1961 until 1966, when it was donated to the National Air and Space Museum, in Suitland, Maryland.

  16. NASA Ames and Future of Space Exploration, Science, and Aeronautics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Pushing the frontiers of aeronautics and space exploration presents multiple challenges. NASA Ames Research Center is at the forefront of tackling these issues, conducting cutting edge research in the fields of air traffic management, entry systems, advanced information technology, intelligent human and robotic systems, astrobiology, aeronautics, space, earth and life sciences and small satellites. Knowledge gained from this research helps ensure the success of NASA's missions, leading us closer to a world that was only imagined as science fiction just decades ago.

  17. Ames Research Center publications: A continuing bibliography, 1980

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    This bibliography lists formal NASA publications, journal articles, books, chapters of books, patents, contractor reports, and computer programs that were issued by Ames Research Center and indexed by Scientific and Technical Aerospace Reports, Limited Scientific and Technical Aerospace Reports, International Aerospace Abstracts, and Computer Program Abstracts in 1980. Citations are arranged by directorate, type of publication, and NASA accession numbers. Subject, personal author, corporate source, contract number, and report/accession number indexes are provided.

  18. Is the Moon Illusion a Celestial Ames Demonstration?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brecher, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    To most naked eye observers, the Moon appears larger when seen near the horizon than it does when seen near the zenith. This "Moon Illusion” has been reported from as early as the fourth century BC and has been the subject of hundreds of papers and two books. Its explanation does not lie in the realm of physics (atmospheric refraction) or astronomy (eccentric lunar orbit) but, rather, in the realm of visual perception. Theories for the cause of the effect abound but, at present, there is no universally accepted explanation. Because the effect can be easily observed in many locations and during the course of an academic year, the moon illusion can provide a nice astronomical example that involves both direct observations and theoretical analysis. As part of the NSF funded "Project LITE: Light Inquiry Through Experiments", we have been developing inexpensive experiments and demonstrations that can be done at home. One of these is a miniature version of the classic "Ames Room". The life size version was originally developed by Adelbert Ames, Jr. and can be seen in many science museums. Our "digital” Ames Room has been designed to be printed on heavy paper using an inexpensive inkjet printer from a PDF file that is posted on the Project LITE web site http://lite.bu.edu and then cut and folded to make the room. When viewed through one wall using a commonly available door viewer, it dramatically demonstrates how the eye and brain system assesses the relative size of objects by making comparisons with the surrounding environment in which the objects are placed. In this presentation we will discuss some insights that the Ames Room provides that may offer clues to the correct explanation for the Moon Illusion. Project LITE is supported by the NSF through DUE Grant # 0715975.

  19. Public Watches IRIS Launch Broadcast at NASA Ames (Reporter Pkg)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-06-27

    Crowds of space enthusiasts gathered at Ames Research Center to witness the broadcast of NASA's Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph or IRIS Mission as it launched from an aircraft out of Vandenberg Air Force Base in California. Speakers shared insights about the IRIS Mission and attendees cheered as the Pegasus rocket successfully separated from the L-1011 launch aircraft and proceeded to fire its rockets and launch into a polar orbit around the Earth.

  20. The 1979 Ames Research Center Publications: A continuing bibliography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    This bibliography lists formal NASA publications, journal articles, books, chapters of books, patents, and contractor reports issued by Ames Research Center which were indexed by Scientific and Technical Aerospace Reports, Limited Scientific and Technical Aerospace Reports, and International Aerospace Abstracts in 1979. Citations are arranged by directorate, type of publication, and NASA accession numbers. Subject, Personal Author, Corporate Source, Contract Number, and Report/Accession Number Indexes are provided.

  1. Formulation of Ames 24E2 IR-black coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Sheldon M.

    1991-01-01

    The formulation of Ames 24E2 IR-black coating and a rationale for the selection of its components are given. The objective was to make a very rough, very thick, and highly absorbing coating to attenuate the specular reflectance of telescope baffles at far-IR wavelengths. Application and curing instructions are also given. Outgassing measurements are quite low following a 24-hour radiative cure.

  2. Computational Fluid Dynamics Program at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holst, Terry L.

    1989-01-01

    The Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Program at NASA Ames Research Center is reviewed and discussed. The technical elements of the CFD Program are listed and briefly discussed. These elements include algorithm research, research and pilot code development, scientific visualization, advanced surface representation, volume grid generation, and numerical optimization. Next, the discipline of CFD is briefly discussed and related to other areas of research at NASA Ames including experimental fluid dynamics, computer science research, computational chemistry, and numerical aerodynamic simulation. These areas combine with CFD to form a larger area of research, which might collectively be called computational technology. The ultimate goal of computational technology research at NASA Ames is to increase the physical understanding of the world in which we live, solve problems of national importance, and increase the technical capabilities of the aerospace community. Next, the major programs at NASA Ames that either use CFD technology or perform research in CFD are listed and discussed. Briefly, this list includes turbulent/transition physics and modeling, high-speed real gas flows, interdisciplinary research, turbomachinery demonstration computations, complete aircraft aerodynamics, rotorcraft applications, powered lift flows, high alpha flows, multiple body aerodynamics, and incompressible flow applications. Some of the individual problems actively being worked in each of these areas is listed to help define the breadth or extent of CFD involvement in each of these major programs. State-of-the-art examples of various CFD applications are presented to highlight most of these areas. The main emphasis of this portion of the presentation is on examples which will not otherwise be treated at this conference by the individual presentations. Finally, a list of principal current limitations and expected future directions is given.

  3. Ames Research Center publications: A continuing bibliography, 1978

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    This bibliography lists formal NASA publications, journal articles, books, chapters of books, patents and contractor reports issued by Ames Research Center which were indexed by Scientific and Technical Aerospace Abstracts, Limited Scientific and Technical Aerospace Abstracts, and International Aerospace Abstracts in 1978. Citations are arranged by directorate, type of publication and NASA accession numbers. Subject, personal author, corporate source, contract number, and report/accession number indexes are provided.

  4. Simulator sickness research program at NASA-Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccauley, Michael E.; Cook, Anthony M.

    1987-01-01

    The simulator sickness syndrome is receiving increased attention in the simulation community. NASA-Ames Research Center has initiated a program to facilitate the exchange of information on this topic among the tri-services and other interested government organizations. The program objectives are to identify priority research issues, promote efficient research strategies, serve as a repository of information, and disseminate information to simulator users.

  5. Ames Coronagraph Experiment: Enabling Missions to Directly Image Exoplanets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belikov, Ruslan

    2014-01-01

    Technology to find biomarkers and life on other worlds is rapidly maturing. If there is a habitable planet around the nearest star, we may be able to detect it this decade with a small satellite mission. In the 2030 decade, we will likely know if there is life in our Galactic neighborhood (1000 nearest stars). The Ames Coronagraph Experiment is developing coronagraphic technologies to enable such missions.

  6. Air Traffic Management Research at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Katharine

    2005-01-01

    Since the late 1980's, NASA Ames researchers have been investigating ways to improve the air transportation system through the development of decision support automation. These software advances, such as the Center-TRACON Automation System (eTAS) have been developed with teams of engineers, software developers, human factors experts, and air traffic controllers; some ASA Ames decision support tools are currently operational in Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) facilities and some are in use by the airlines. These tools have provided air traffic controllers and traffic managers the capabilities to help reduce overall delays and holding, and provide significant cost savings to the airlines as well as more manageable workload levels for air traffic service providers. NASA is continuing to collaborate with the FAA, as well as other government agencies, to plan and develop the next generation of decision support tools that will support anticipated changes in the air transportation system, including a projected increase to three times today's air-traffic levels by 2025. The presentation will review some of NASA Ames' recent achievements in air traffic management research, and discuss future tool developments and concepts currently under consideration.

  7. NASA Ames Arc Jets and Range, Capabilities for Planetary Entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fretter, Ernest F.

    2005-01-01

    NASA is pursuing innovative technologies and concepts as part of America's Vision for Space Exploration. The rapidly emerging field of nanotechnology has led to new concepts for multipurpose shields to prevent catastrophic loss of vehicles and crew against the triple threats of aeroheating during atmospheric entry, radiation (Solar and galactic cosmic rays) and Micrometorid/Orbital Debris (MMOD) strikes. One proposed concept is the Thermal Radiation Impact Protection System (TRIPS) using carbon nanotubes, hydrogenated carbon nanotubes, and ceramic coatings as a multi-use TPS. The Thermophysics Facilities Branch of the Space Technology Division at NASA Ames Research Center provides testing services for the development and validation of the present and future concepts being developed by NASA and national and International research firms. The Branch operates two key facilities - the Range Complex and the Arc Jets. The Ranges include both the Ames Vertical Gun Range (AVGR) and the Hypervelocity Free Flight (HFF) gas guns best suited for MMOD investigations. Test coupons can be installed in the AVGR or HFF and subjected to particle impacts from glass or metal particles from micron to _ inch (6.35-mm) diameters and at velocities from 5 to 8 kilometers per second. The facility can record high-speed data on film and provide damage assessment for analysis by the Principle Investigator or Ames personnel. Damaged articles can be installed in the Arc Jet facility for further testing to quantify the effects of damage on the heat shield s performance upon entry into atmospheric environments.

  8. Unique life sciences research facilities at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulenburg, G. M.; Vasques, M.; Caldwell, W. F.; Tucker, J.

    1994-01-01

    The Life Science Division at NASA's Ames Research Center has a suite of specialized facilities that enable scientists to study the effects of gravity on living systems. This paper describes some of these facilities and their use in research. Seven centrifuges, each with its own unique abilities, allow testing of a variety of parameters on test subjects ranging from single cells through hardware to humans. The Vestibular Research Facility allows the study of both centrifugation and linear acceleration on animals and humans. The Biocomputation Center uses computers for 3D reconstruction of physiological systems, and interactive research tools for virtual reality modeling. Psycophysiological, cardiovascular, exercise physiology, and biomechanical studies are conducted in the 12 bed Human Research Facility and samples are analyzed in the certified Central Clinical Laboratory and other laboratories at Ames. Human bedrest, water immersion and lower body negative pressure equipment are also available to study physiological changes associated with weightlessness. These and other weightlessness models are used in specialized laboratories for the study of basic physiological mechanisms, metabolism and cell biology. Visual-motor performance, perception, and adaptation are studied using ground-based models as well as short term weightlessness experiments (parabolic flights). The unique combination of Life Science research facilities, laboratories, and equipment at Ames Research Center are described in detail in relation to their research contributions.

  9. The State-of-Play of Anomalous Microwave Emission (AME) research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickinson, Clive; Ali-Haïmoud, Y.; Barr, A.; Battistelli, E. S.; Bell, A.; Bernstein, L.; Casassus, S.; Cleary, K.; Draine, B. T.; Génova-Santos, R.; Harper, S. E.; Hensley, B.; Hill-Valler, J.; Hoang, Thiem; Israel, F. P.; Jew, L.; Lazarian, A.; Leahy, J. P.; Leech, J.; López-Caraballo, C. H.; McDonald, I.; Murphy, E. J.; Onaka, T.; Paladini, R.; Peel, M. W.; Perrott, Y.; Poidevin, F.; Readhead, A. C. S.; Rubiño-Martín, J.-A.; Taylor, A. C.; Tibbs, C. T.; Todorović, M.; Vidal, Matias

    2018-02-01

    Anomalous Microwave Emission (AME) is a component of diffuse Galactic radiation observed at frequencies in the range ≈ 10-60 GHz. AME was first detected in 1996 and recognised as an additional component of emission in 1997. Since then, AME has been observed by a range of experiments and in a variety of environments. AME is spatially correlated with far-IR thermal dust emission but cannot be explained by synchrotron or free-free emission mechanisms, and is far in excess of the emission contributed by thermal dust emission with the power-law opacity consistent with the observed emission at sub-mm wavelengths. Polarization observations have shown that AME is very weakly polarized ( ≲ 1 %). The most natural explanation for AME is rotational emission from ultra-small dust grains ("spinning dust"), first postulated in 1957. Magnetic dipole radiation from thermal fluctuations in the magnetization of magnetic grain materials may also be contributing to the AME, particularly at higher frequencies ( ≳ 50 GHz). AME is also an important foreground for Cosmic Microwave Background analyses. This paper presents a review and the current state-of-play in AME research, which was discussed in an AME workshop held at ESTEC, The Netherlands, June 2016.

  10. NASA/Ames Research Center's science and applications aircraft program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, G. Warren

    1991-01-01

    NASA-Ames Research Center operates a fleet of seven Science and Applications Aircraft, namely the C-141/Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO), DC-8, C-130, Lear Jet, and three ER-2s. These aircraft are used to satisfy two major objectives, each of equal importance. The first is to acquire remote and in-situ scientific data in astronomy, astrophysics, earth sciences, ocean processes, atmospheric physics, meteorology, materials processing and life sciences. The second major objective is to expedite the development of sensors and their attendant algorithms for ultimate use in space and to simulate from an aircraft, the data to be acquired from spaceborne sensors. NASA-Ames Science and Applications Aircraft are recognized as national and international facilities. They have performed and will continue to perform, operational missions from bases in the United States and worldwide. Historically, twice as many investigators have requested flight time than could be accommodated. This situation remains true today and is expected to increase in the years ahead. A major advantage of the existing fleet of aircraft is their ability to cover a large expanse of the earth's ecosystem from the surface to the lower stratosphere over large distances and time aloft. Their large payload capability allows a number of scientists to use multi-investigator sensor suites to permit simultaneous and complementary data gathering. In-flight changes to the sensors or data systems have greatly reduced the time required to optimize the development of new instruments. It is doubtful that spaceborne systems will ever totally replace the need for airborne science aircraft. The operations philosophy and capabilities exist at NASA-Ames Research Center.

  11. Final environmental impact statement for Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    The NASA-Ames Research Center is described. together with the nature of its activities, from which it can be seen that the center is basically not a major pollution source. Geographical, and climatic characteristics of the site are described. inasmuch as they influence both the choice of disposal methods and the environmental effects of the pollutants. The known or probable pollution sources at the center are described. Where the intensities of these sources might exceed the recommended guidelines, the corrective actions that have been taken are described.

  12. A Standard Kinematic Model for Flight Simulation at NASA Ames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcfarland, R. E.

    1975-01-01

    A standard kinematic model for aircraft simulation exists at NASA-Ames on a variety of computer systems, one of which is used to control the flight simulator for advanced aircraft (FSAA). The derivation of the kinematic model is given and various mathematical relationships are presented as a guide. These include descriptions of standardized simulation subsystems such as the atmospheric turbulence model and the generalized six-degrees-of-freedom trim routine, as well as an introduction to the emulative batch-processing system which enables this facility to optimize its real-time environment.

  13. A decade of aeroacoustic research at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitz, Frederic H.; Mosher, M.; Kitaplioglu, Cahit; Cross, J.; Chang, I.

    1988-01-01

    The rotorcraft aeroacoustic research accomplishments of the past decade at Ames Research Center are reviewed. These include an extensive sequence of flight, ground, and wind tunnel tests that have utilized the facilities to guide and pioneer theoretical research. Many of these experiments were of benchmark quality. The experiments were used to isolate the inadequacies of linear theory in high-speed impulsive noise research, have led to the development of theoretical approaches, and have guided the emerging discipline of computational fluid dynamics to rotorcraft aeroacoustic problems.

  14. Technology transfer in the NASA Ames Advanced Life Support Division

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, Kathleen; Schlater, Nelson; Bilardo, Vincent; Masson, Paul

    1992-01-01

    This paper summarizes a representative set of technology transfer activities which are currently underway in the Advanced Life Support Division of the Ames Research Center. Five specific NASA-funded research or technology development projects are synopsized that are resulting in transfer of technology in one or more of four main 'arenas:' (1) intra-NASA, (2) intra-Federal, (3) NASA - aerospace industry, and (4) aerospace industry - broader economy. Each project is summarized as a case history, specific issues are identified, and recommendations are formulated based on the lessons learned as a result of each project.

  15. The Ames Virtual Environment Workstation: Implementation issues and requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Scott S.; Jacoby, R.; Bryson, S.; Stone, P.; Mcdowall, I.; Bolas, M.; Dasaro, D.; Wenzel, Elizabeth M.; Coler, C.; Kerr, D.

    1991-01-01

    This presentation describes recent developments in the implementation of a virtual environment workstation in the Aerospace Human Factors Research Division of NASA's Ames Research Center. Introductory discussions are presented on the primary research objectives and applications of the system and on the system's current hardware and software configuration. Principle attention is then focused on unique issues and problems encountered in the workstation's development with emphasis on its ability to meet original design specifications for computational graphics performance and for associated human factors requirements necessary to provide compelling sense of presence and efficient interaction in the virtual environment.

  16. Evolutionary Ensemble for In Silico Prediction of Ames Test Mutagenicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Huanhuan; Yao, Xin

    Driven by new regulations and animal welfare, the need to develop in silico models has increased recently as alternative approaches to safety assessment of chemicals without animal testing. This paper describes a novel machine learning ensemble approach to building an in silico model for the prediction of the Ames test mutagenicity, one of a battery of the most commonly used experimental in vitro and in vivo genotoxicity tests for safety evaluation of chemicals. Evolutionary random neural ensemble with negative correlation learning (ERNE) [1] was developed based on neural networks and evolutionary algorithms. ERNE combines the method of bootstrap sampling on training data with the method of random subspace feature selection to ensure diversity in creating individuals within an initial ensemble. Furthermore, while evolving individuals within the ensemble, it makes use of the negative correlation learning, enabling individual NNs to be trained as accurate as possible while still manage to maintain them as diverse as possible. Therefore, the resulting individuals in the final ensemble are capable of cooperating collectively to achieve better generalization of prediction. The empirical experiment suggest that ERNE is an effective ensemble approach for predicting the Ames test mutagenicity of chemicals.

  17. Current Testing Capabilities at the NASA Ames Ballistic Ranges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsey, Alvin; Tam, Tim; Bogdanoff, David; Gage, Peter

    1999-01-01

    Capabilities for designing and performing ballistic range tests at the NASA Ames Research Center are presented. Computational tools to assist in designing and developing ballistic range models and to predict the flight characteristics of these models are described. A CFD code modeling two-stage gun performance is available, allowing muzzle velocity, maximum projectile base pressure, and gun erosion to be predicted. Aerodynamic characteristics such as drag and stability can be obtained at speeds ranging from 0.2 km/s to 8 km/s. The composition and density of the test gas can be controlled, which allows for an assessment of Reynolds number and specific heat ratio effects under conditions that closely match those encountered during planetary entry. Pressure transducers have been installed in the gun breech to record the time history of the pressure during launch, and pressure transducers have also been installed in the walls of the range to measure sonic boom effects. To illustrate the testing capabilities of the Ames ballistic ranges, an overview of some of the recent tests is given.

  18. NASA Ames Sustainability Initiatives: Aeronautics, Space Exploration, and Sustainable Futures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grymes, Rosalind A.

    2015-01-01

    In support of the mission-specific challenges of aeronautics and space exploration, NASA Ames produces a wealth of research and technology advancements with significant relevance to larger issues of planetary sustainability. NASA research on NexGen airspace solutions and its development of autonomous and intelligent technologies will revolutionize both the nation's air transporation systems and have applicability to the low altitude flight economy and to both air and ground transporation, more generally. NASA's understanding of the Earth as a complex of integrated systems contributes to humanity's perception of the sustainability of our home planet. Research at NASA Ames on closed environment life support systems produces directly applicable lessons on energy, water, and resource management in ground-based infrastructure. Moreover, every NASA campus is a 'city'; including an urbanscape and a workplace including scientists, human relations specialists, plumbers, engineers, facility managers, construction trades, transportation managers, software developers, leaders, financial planners, technologists, electricians, students, accountants, and even lawyers. NASA is applying the lessons of our mission-related activities to our urbanscapes and infrastructure, and also anticipates a leadership role in developing future environments for living and working in space.

  19. Design, development and evaluation of Stanford/Ames EVA prehensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leifer, Larry J.; Aldrich, J.; Leblanc, M.; Sabelman, E.; Schwandt, D.

    1988-01-01

    Space Station operations and maintenance are expected to make unprecedented demands on astronaut EVA. With Space Station expected to operate with an 8 to 10 psi atmosphere (4 psi for Shuttle operations), the effectivness of pressurized gloves is called into doubt at the same time that EVA activity levels are to be increased. To address the need for more frequent and complex EVA missions and also to extend the dexterity, duration, and safety of EVA astronauts, NASA Ames and Stanford University have an ongoing cooperative agreement to explore and compare alternatives. This is the final Stanford/Ames report on manually powered Prehensors, each of which consists of a shroud forming a pressure enclosure around the astronaut's hand, and a linkage system to transfer the motions and forces of the hand to mechanical digits attached to the shroud. All prehensors are intended for attachment to a standard wrist coupling, as found on the AX-5 hard suit prototype, so that realistic tests can be performed under normal and reduced gravity as simulated by water flotation.

  20. The Atomic Mass Evaluation (AME2012): Status and Perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondev, F. G.; Audi, G.; Wang, M.; Xu, X.; Wapstra, A. H.; MacCormick, M.; Pfeiffer, B.

    2013-10-01

    The atomic mass is a fundamental property of the nucleus that has wide applications in natural sciences and technology. The new evaluated mass table, AME2012, has been recently published as a collaborative effort between scientists from China, Europe and USA, under the leadership of G. Audi. It represents a significant update of the previous AME2003 evaluation by considering a large number of precise experimental results obtained at existing Penning Trap and Storage Ring facilities, thus expending the region of experimentally known masses towards exotic neutron- and proton-rich nuclei. Since the presence of isomers plays an important role in determining the masses of many nuclei, a complementary database, NUBASE2012, that contains the isomer-level properties for all nuclei was also developed. This presentation will briefly review recent achievements of the collaboration, present on-going activities, and reflect on ideas for future developments and challenges in the field of evaluation of atomic masses. The work at ANL was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Physics, under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  1. Upgrades and Modifications of the NASA Ames HFFAF Ballistic Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogdanoff, David W.; Wilder, Michael C.; Cornelison, Charles J.; Perez, Alfredo J.

    2017-01-01

    The NASA Ames Hypervelocity Free Flight Aerodynamics Facility ballistic range is described. The various configurations of the shadowgraph stations are presented. This includes the original stations with film and configurations with two different types of digital cameras. Resolution tests for the 3 shadowgraph station configurations are described. The advantages of the digital cameras are discussed, including the immediate availability of the shadowgraphs. The final shadowgraph station configuration is a mix of 26 Nikon cameras and 6 PI-MAX2 cameras. Two types of trigger light sheet stations are described visible and IR. The two gunpowders used for the NASA Ames 6.251.50 light gas guns are presented. These are the Hercules HC-33-FS powder (no longer available) and the St. Marks Powder WC 886 powder. The results from eight proof shots for the two powders are presented. Both muzzle velocities and piston velocities are 5 9 lower for the new St. Marks WC 886 powder than for the old Hercules HC-33-FS powder (no longer available). The experimental and CFD (computational) piston and muzzle velocities are in good agreement. Shadowgraph-reading software that employs template-matching pattern recognition to locate the ballistic-range model is described. Templates are generated from a 3D solid model of the ballistic-range model. The accuracy of the approach is assessed using a set of computer-generated test images.

  2. A Perspective on NASA Ames Air Traffic Management Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroeder, Jeffery A.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes past and present air-traffic-management research at NASA Ames Research Center. The descriptions emerge from the perspective of a technical manager who supervised the majority of this research for the last four years. Past research contributions built a foundation for calculating accurate flight trajectories to enable efficient airspace management in time. That foundation led to two predominant research activities that continue to this day - one in automatically separating aircraft and the other in optimizing traffic flows. Today s national airspace uses many of the applications resulting from research at Ames. These applications include the nationwide deployment of the Traffic Management Advisor, new procedures enabling continuous descent arrivals, cooperation with industry to permit more direct flights to downstream way-points, a surface management system in use by two cargo carriers, and software to evaluate how well flights conform to national traffic management initiatives. The paper concludes with suggestions for prioritized research in the upcoming years. These priorities include: enabling more first-look operational evaluations, improving conflict detection and resolution for climbing or descending aircraft, and focusing additional attention on the underpinning safety critical items such as a reliable datalink.

  3. Ames Test to Detect Mutagenicity of 2-Alkylcyclobutanones: A Review.

    PubMed

    Barbezan, Angélica B; Martins, Regiane; Bueno, Jennifer B; Villavicencio, Anna Lúcia C H

    2017-07-01

    Food irradiation is an effective and safe method for preservation and long-term storage, and it is approved for use in over 60 countries for various applications in a wide variety of food products. This process is performed by use of accelerated electron beams, X-rays, or gamma radiation ( 60 Co or 137 Cs). 2-Alkylcyclobutanones (2-ACBs) are the only known radiolytic products generated from foods that have fatty acids (triglycerides) and are subjected to irradiation. Since the 1990s toxicological safety studies of 2-ACBs have been conducted extensively through synthetic compounds, then and tests to determine if the compounds have any mutagenic activity are strictly necessary. The Ames test was chosen by many researchers to assess the mutagenicity of 2-ACBs. The test uses distinct bacterial cell lines Salmonella typhimurium to detect point mutations at sites guanine-cytosine (G-C) and Escherichia coli to detect point mutations at sites adenine-thymine (A-T). This bibliographic research aims to bring together all the results obtained and a comparison and cell lines used, type of plates, and solvents. This research showed that no mutagenic activity was observed in any of the cell lines and concentrations evaluated by the works of authors, so the 2-ACBs compounds showed no mutagenic substance in concentrations detectable by the Ames test. © 2017 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  4. Semantic Web Infrastructure Supporting NextFrAMES Modeling Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakhankar, T.; Fekete, B. M.; Vörösmarty, C. J.

    2008-12-01

    Emerging modeling frameworks offer new ways to modelers to develop model applications by offering a wide range of software components to handle common modeling tasks such as managing space and time, distributing computational tasks in parallel processing environment, performing input/output and providing diagnostic facilities. NextFrAMES, the next generation updates to the Framework for Aquatic Modeling of the Earth System originally developed at University of New Hampshire and currently hosted at The City College of New York takes a step further by hiding most of these services from modeler behind a platform agnostic modeling platform that allows scientists to focus on the implementation of scientific concepts in the form of a new modeling markup language and through a minimalist application programming interface that provide means to implement model processes. At the core of the NextFrAMES modeling platform there is a run-time engine that interprets the modeling markup language loads the module plugins establishes the model I/O and executes the model defined by the modeling XML and the accompanying plugins. The current implementation of the run-time engine is designed for single processor or symmetric multi processing (SMP) systems but future implementation of the run-time engine optimized for different hardware architectures are anticipated. The modeling XML and the accompanying plugins define the model structure and the computational processes in a highly abstract manner, which is not only suitable for the run-time engine, but has the potential to integrate into semantic web infrastructure, where intelligent parsers can extract information about the model configurations such as input/output requirements applicable space and time scales and underlying modeling processes. The NextFrAMES run-time engine itself is also designed to tap into web enabled data services directly, therefore it can be incorporated into complex workflow to implement End-to-End application

  5. Brown Adipose Tissue Function Is Enhanced in Long-Lived, Male Ames Dwarf Mice

    PubMed Central

    McFadden, Samuel; Fang, Yimin; Huber, Joshua A.; Zhang, Chi; Sun, Liou Y.; Bartke, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Ames dwarf mice (Prop1df/df) are long-lived due to a loss of function mutation, resulting in deficiency of GH, TSH, and prolactin. Along with a marked extension of longevity, Ames dwarf mice have improved energy metabolism as measured by an increase in their oxygen consumption and heat production, as well as a decrease in their respiratory quotient. Along with alterations in energy metabolism, Ames dwarf mice have a lower core body temperature. Moreover, Ames dwarf mice have functionally altered epididymal white adipose tissue (WAT) that improves, rather than impairs, their insulin sensitivity due to a shift from pro- to anti-inflammatory cytokine secretion. Given the unique phenotype of Ames dwarf epididymal WAT, their improved energy metabolism, and lower core body temperature, we hypothesized that Ames dwarf brown adipose tissue (BAT) may function differently from that of their normal littermates. Here we use histology and RT-PCR to demonstrate that Ames dwarf mice have enhanced BAT function. We also use interscapular BAT removal to demonstrate that BAT is necessary for Ames dwarf energy metabolism and thermogenesis, whereas it is less important for their normal littermates. Furthermore, we show that Ames dwarf mice are able to compensate for loss of interscapular BAT by using their WAT depots as an energy source. These findings demonstrate enhanced BAT function in animals with GH and thyroid hormone deficiencies, chronic reduction of body temperature, and remarkably extended longevity. PMID:27740871

  6. Aerial Survey of Ames Research Center - Flight Simulation Complex' Flight simulators create an

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1967-01-01

    Aerial Survey of Ames Research Center - Flight Simulation Complex' Flight simulators create an authentic aircraft environment by generating the appropriate physical cues that provide the sensations of flight.

  7. Atmosphere of Freedom: Sixty Years at the NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugos, Glenn E.; Launius, Roger (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Throughout Ames History, four themes prevail: a commitment to hiring the best people; cutting-edge research tools; project management that gets things done faster, better and cheaper; and outstanding research efforts that serve the scientific professions and the nation. More than any other NASA Center, Ames remains shaped by its origins in the NACA (National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics). Not that its missions remain the same. Sure, Ames still houses the world's greatest collection of wind tunnels and simulation facilities, its aerodynamicists remain among the best in the world, and pilots and engineers still come for advice on how to build better aircraft. But that is increasingly part of Ames' past. Ames people have embraced two other missions for its future. First, intelligent systems and information science will help NASA use new tools in supercomputing, networking, telepresence and robotics. Second, astrobiology will explore lore the prospects for life on Earth and beyond. Both new missions leverage Ames long-standing expertise in computation and in the life sciences, as well as its relations with the computing and biotechnology firms working in the Silicon Valley community that has sprung up around the Center. Rather than the NACA missions, it is the NACA culture that still permeates Ames. The Ames way of research management privileges the scientists and engineers working in the laboratories. They work in an atmosphere of freedom, laced with the expectation of integrity and responsibility. Ames researchers are free to define their research goals and define how they contribute to the national good. They are expected to keep their fingers on the pulse of their disciplines, to be ambitious yet frugal in organizing their efforts, and to always test their theories in the laboratory or in the field. Ames' leadership ranks, traditionally, are cultivated within this scientific community. Rather than manage and supervise these researchers, Ames leadership merely

  8. Reduced Crew Operations Research at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandt, Summer L.; Lachter, Joel

    2017-01-01

    In 2012, NASA began exploring the feasibility of single pilot reduced crew operations (SPORCO) in the context of scheduled passenger air carrier operations (i.e., Parts 121 and 135). This research was spurred by two trends in aviation research: the trend toward reducing costs and a shortage of pilots. A series of simulations were conducted to develop tools and a concept of operations to support RCO. This slide deck is a summary of the NASA Ames RCO research prepared for an R T team at Airbus. Airbus is considering moving forward with reducing crew during the cruise phase of flight with long-haul flights and is interested in the work we have completed.

  9. Space technology test facilities at the NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, Anthony R.; Rodrigues, Annette T.

    1990-01-01

    The major space research and technology test facilities at the NASA Ames Research Center are divided into five categories: General Purpose, Life Support, Computer-Based Simulation, High Energy, and the Space Exploraton Test Facilities. The paper discusses selected facilities within each of the five categories and discusses some of the major programs in which these facilities have been involved. Special attention is given to the 20-G Man-Rated Centrifuge, the Human Research Facility, the Plant Crop Growth Facility, the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation Facility, the Arc-Jet Complex and Hypersonic Test Facility, the Infrared Detector and Cryogenic Test Facility, and the Mars Wind Tunnel. Each facility is described along with its objectives, test parameter ranges, and major current programs and applications.

  10. Applied Computational Fluid Dynamics at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holst, Terry L.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The field of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) has advanced to the point where it can now be used for many applications in fluid mechanics research and aerospace vehicle design. A few applications being explored at NASA Ames Research Center will be presented and discussed. The examples presented will range in speed from hypersonic to low speed incompressible flow applications. Most of the results will be from numerical solutions of the Navier-Stokes or Euler equations in three space dimensions for general geometry applications. Computational results will be used to highlight the presentation as appropriate. Advances in computational facilities including those associated with NASA's CAS (Computational Aerosciences) Project of the Federal HPCC (High Performance Computing and Communications) Program will be discussed. Finally, opportunities for future research will be presented and discussed. All material will be taken from non-sensitive, previously-published and widely-disseminated work.

  11. Computational Fluid Dynamics at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kutler, Paul

    1994-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is beginning to play a major role in the aircraft industry of the United States because of the realization that CFD can be a new and effective design tool and thus could provide a company with a competitive advantage. It is also playing a significant role in research institutions, both governmental and academic, as a tool for researching new fluid physics, as well as supplementing and complementing experimental testing. In this presentation, some of the progress made to date in CFD at NASA Ames will be reviewed. The presentation addresses the status of CFD in terms of methods, examples of CFD solutions, and computer technology. In addition, the role CFD will play in supporting the revolutionary goals set forth by the Aeronautical Policy Review Committee established by the Office of Science and Technology Policy is noted. The need for validated CFD tools is also briefly discussed.

  12. The NASA Ames Fatigue Countermeasures Program: The Next Generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosekind, Mark R.; Neri, David F.; Miller, Donna L.; Gregory, Kevin B.; Webbon, Lissa L.; Oyung, Ray L.

    1997-01-01

    Twenty-four hour, global aviation operations pose unique challenges to humans. Physiological requirements related to sleep, the internal circadian clock, and human fatigue are critical factors that are known to affect safety, performance, and productivity. Understanding the human operators' physiological capabilities, and limitations, will be important to address these issues as global demand for aviation activities continues to increase. In 1980, in response to a Congressional request, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Ames Research Center initiated a Fatigue/Jet Lag Program to examine the role of fatigue in flight operations. Originally established by Dr. John K. Lauber and Dr. Charles E. Billings, the Program was designed to address three objectives: (1) determine the extent of fatigue, sleep loss, and circadian disruption in flight operations; (2) determine how fatigue affected flight crew performance; and (3) develop strategies to maximize performance and alertness during flight operations.

  13. Computational Nanotechnology at NASA Ames Research Center, 1996

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Globus, Al; Bailey, David; Langhoff, Steve; Pohorille, Andrew; Levit, Creon; Chancellor, Marisa K. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Some forms of nanotechnology appear to have enormous potential to improve aerospace and computer systems; computational nanotechnology, the design and simulation of programmable molecular machines, is crucial to progress. NASA Ames Research Center has begun a computational nanotechnology program including in-house work, external research grants, and grants of supercomputer time. Four goals have been established: (1) Simulate a hypothetical programmable molecular machine replicating itself and building other products. (2) Develop molecular manufacturing CAD (computer aided design) software and use it to design molecular manufacturing systems and products of aerospace interest, including computer components. (3) Characterize nanotechnologically accessible materials of aerospace interest. Such materials may have excellent strength and thermal properties. (4) Collaborate with experimentalists. Current in-house activities include: (1) Development of NanoDesign, software to design and simulate a nanotechnology based on functionalized fullerenes. Early work focuses on gears. (2) A design for high density atomically precise memory. (3) Design of nanotechnology systems based on biology. (4) Characterization of diamonoid mechanosynthetic pathways. (5) Studies of the laplacian of the electronic charge density to understand molecular structure and reactivity. (6) Studies of entropic effects during self-assembly. Characterization of properties of matter for clusters up to sizes exhibiting bulk properties. In addition, the NAS (NASA Advanced Supercomputing) supercomputer division sponsored a workshop on computational molecular nanotechnology on March 4-5, 1996 held at NASA Ames Research Center. Finally, collaborations with Bill Goddard at CalTech, Ralph Merkle at Xerox Parc, Don Brenner at NCSU (North Carolina State University), Tom McKendree at Hughes, and Todd Wipke at UCSC are underway.

  14. Using databases in medical education research: AMEE Guide No. 77.

    PubMed

    Cleland, Jennifer; Scott, Neil; Harrild, Kirsten; Moffat, Mandy

    2013-05-01

    This AMEE Guide offers an introduction to the use of databases in medical education research. It is intended for those who are contemplating conducting research in medical education but are new to the field. The Guide is structured around the process of planning your research so that data collection, management and analysis are appropriate for the research question. Throughout we consider contextual possibilities and constraints to educational research using databases, such as the resources available, and provide concrete examples of medical education research to illustrate many points. The first section of the Guide explains the difference between different types of data and classifying data, and addresses the rationale for research using databases in medical education. We explain the difference between qualitative research and qualitative data, the difference between categorical and quantitative data, and the difference types of data which fall into these categories. The Guide reviews the strengths and weaknesses of qualitative and quantitative research. The next section is structured around how to work with quantitative and qualitative databases and provides guidance on the many practicalities of setting up a database. This includes how to organise your database, including anonymising data and coding, as well as preparing and describing your data so it is ready for analysis. The critical matter of the ethics of using databases in medical educational research, including using routinely collected data versus data collected for research purposes, and issues of confidentiality, is discussed. Core to the Guide is drawing out the similarities and differences in working with different types of data and different types of databases. Future AMEE Guides in the research series will address statistical analysis of data in more detail.

  15. NASA Ames and Traveling Space Museum Host Space Day at Bay Area Schools (Version 2 - Final)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-08-10

    NASA Ames and the Traveling Space Museum visited under-represented students in the Bay Area in an effort to excite them to the possibilities in science, technology, engineering and mathematics. Includes soundbites from Lewis Braxton III (NASA Ames) and actress Nichelle Nichols (TSM).

  16. Selected Topics in Overset Technology Development and Applications At NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, William M.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents a general overview of overset technology development and applications at NASA Ames Research Center. The topics include: 1) Overview of overset activities at NASA Ames; 2) Recent developments in Chimera Grid Tools; 3) A general framework for multiple component dynamics; 4) A general script module for automating liquid rocket sub-systems simulations; and 5) Critical future work.

  17. (New) NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe comes to Ames for employee briefing and tour. Here he welcomes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (New) NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe comes to Ames for employee briefing and tour. Here he welcomes JASON kids to NASA while handing out patches and pins. Tom Clausen and Donald James, Ames Education Office in background.

  18. (New) NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe comes to Ames for employee briefing and tour. Meets with

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (New) NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe comes to Ames for employee briefing and tour. Meets with Roberto Cruz, National Hispanic University (left) at Amesto sign the educational MOU between NHU and Ames.

  19. Sixth Annual NASA Ames Space Science and Astrobiology Jamboree

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollingsworth, Jeffery; Howell, Steve; Fonda, Mark; Dateo, Chris; Martinez, Christine M.

    2018-01-01

    Welcome to the Sixth Annual NASA Ames Research Center, Space Science and Astrobiology Jamboree at NASA Ames Research Center (ARC). The Space Science and Astrobiology Division consists of over 60 Civil Servants, with more than 120 Cooperative Agreement Research Scientists, Post-Doctoral Fellows, Science Support Contractors, Visiting Scientists, and many other Research Associates. Within the Division there is engagement in scientific investigations over a breadth of disciplines including Astrobiology, Astrophysics, Exobiology, Exoplanets, Planetary Systems Science, and many more. The Division's personnel support NASA spacecraft missions (current and planned), including SOFIA, K2, MSL, New Horizons, JWST, WFIRST, and others. Our top-notch science research staff is spread amongst three branches in five buildings at ARC. Naturally, it can thus be difficult to remain abreast of what fellow scientific researchers pursue actively, and then what may present and/or offer regarding inter-Branch, intra-Division future collaborative efforts. In organizing this annual jamboree, the goals are to offer a wholesome, one-venue opportunity to sense the active scientific research and spacecraft mission involvement within the Division; and to facilitate communication and collaboration amongst our research scientists. Annually, the Division honors one senior research scientist with a Pollack Lecture, and one early career research scientist with an Outstanding Early Career Space Scientist Lecture. For the Pollack Lecture, the honor is bestowed upon a senior researcher who has made significant contributions within any area of research aligned with space science and/or astrobiology. This year we are pleased to honor Linda Jahnke. With the Early Career Lecture, the honor is bestowed upon an early-career researcher who has substantially demonstrated great promise for significant contributions within space science, astrobiology, and/or, in support of spacecraft missions addressing such

  20. (New) NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe comes to Ames for employee briefing and tour. Meets with

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (New) NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe comes to Ames for employee briefing and tour. Meets with Roberto Cruz, National Hispanic University (seated, right) and Ames Center Director Dr. Henry McDonald follow the signing of the educational MOU between NHU and Ames.

  1. (New) NASA Director Sean O'Keefe comes to Ames for employee briefing and tour. Meets with Roberto

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (New) NASA Director Sean O'Keefe comes to Ames for employee briefing and tour. Meets with Roberto Cruz, National Hispanic University (seated, right) and Ames Center Director Dr. Henry McDonald follow the signing of the educational MOU between NHU and Ames.

  2. Ethnography in qualitative educational research: AMEE Guide No. 80.

    PubMed

    Reeves, Scott; Peller, Jennifer; Goldman, Joanne; Kitto, Simon

    2013-08-01

    Ethnography is a type of qualitative research that gathers observations, interviews and documentary data to produce detailed and comprehensive accounts of different social phenomena. The use of ethnographic research in medical education has produced a number of insightful accounts into its role, functions and difficulties in the preparation of medical students for clinical practice. This AMEE Guide offers an introduction to ethnography - its history, its differing forms, its role in medical education and its practical application. Specifically, the Guide initially outlines the main characteristics of ethnography: describing its origins, outlining its varying forms and discussing its use of theory. It also explores the role, contribution and limitations of ethnographic work undertaken in a medical education context. In addition, the Guide goes on to offer a range of ideas, methods, tools and techniques needed to undertake an ethnographic study. In doing so it discusses its conceptual, methodological, ethical and practice challenges (e.g. demands of recording the complexity of social action, the unpredictability of data collection activities). Finally, the Guide provides a series of final thoughts and ideas for future engagement with ethnography in medical education. This Guide is aimed for those interested in understanding ethnography to develop their evaluative skills when reading such work. It is also aimed at those interested in considering the use of ethnographic methods in their own research work.

  3. NASA Ames Research Center 60 MW Power Supply Modernization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choy, Yuen Ching; Ilinets, Boris V.; Miller, Ted; Nagel, Kirsten (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The NASA Ames Research Center 60 MW DC Power Supply was built in 1974 to provide controlled DC power for the Thermophysics Facility Arc Jet Laboratory. The Power Supply has gradually losing reliability due to outdated technology and component life limitation. NASA has decided to upgrade the existing rectifier modules with contemporary high-power electronics and control equipment. NASA plans to complete this project in 2001. This project includes a complete replacement of obsolete thyristor stacks in all six rectifier modules and rectifier bridge control system. High power water-cooled thyristors and freewheeling diodes will be used. The rating of each of the six modules will be 4000 A at 5500 V. The control firing angle signal will be sent from the Facility Control System to six modules via fiberoptic cable. The Power Supply control and monitoring system will include a Master PLC in the Facility building and a Slave PLC in each rectifier module. This system will also monitor each thyristor level in each stack and the auxiliary equipment.

  4. Mobile technologies in medical education: AMEE Guide No. 105.

    PubMed

    Masters, Ken; Ellaway, Rachel H; Topps, David; Archibald, Douglas; Hogue, Rebecca J

    2016-06-01

    Mobile technologies (including handheld and wearable devices) have the potential to enhance learning activities from basic medical undergraduate education through residency and beyond. In order to use these technologies successfully, medical educators need to be aware of the underpinning socio-theoretical concepts that influence their usage, the pre-clinical and clinical educational environment in which the educational activities occur, and the practical possibilities and limitations of their usage. This Guide builds upon the previous AMEE Guide to e-Learning in medical education by providing medical teachers with conceptual frameworks and practical examples of using mobile technologies in medical education. The goal is to help medical teachers to use these concepts and technologies at all levels of medical education to improve the education of medical and healthcare personnel, and ultimately contribute to improved patient healthcare. This Guide begins by reviewing some of the technological changes that have occurred in recent years, and then examines the theoretical basis (both social and educational) for understanding mobile technology usage. From there, the Guide progresses through a hierarchy of institutional, teacher and learner needs, identifying issues, problems and solutions for the effective use of mobile technology in medical education. This Guide ends with a brief look to the future.

  5. Research activity at the shock tube facility at NASA Ames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Surendra P.

    1992-03-01

    The real gas phenomena dominate the relaxation process occurring in the flow around hypersonic vehicles. The air flow around these vehicles undergoes vibrational excitation, chemical dissociation, and ionization. These chemical and kinetic phenomena absorb energy, change compressibility, cause temperature to fall, and density to rise. In high-altitude, low density environments, the characteristic thicknesses of the shock layers can be smaller than the relaxation distances required for the gas to attain chemical and thermodynamic equilibrium. To determine the effects of chemical nonequilibrium over a realistic hypersonic vehicle, it would be desirable to conduct an experiment in which all aspects of fluid flow are simulated. Such an experiment is extremely difficult to setup. The only practical alternative is to develop a theoretical model of the phenomena and to compute the flow around the vehicle including the chemical nonequilibrium, and compare the results with the experiments conducted in the facilities under conditions where only a portion of the flow phenomena is simulated. Three types of experimental data are needed to assist the aerospace community in this model development process: (1) data which will enhance our phenomenological understanding of the relaxation process, (2) data on rate reactions for the relevant reactions, and (3) data on bulk properties, such as spectral radiation emitted by the gas, for a given set of aerodynamic conditions. NASA Ames is in a process of collecting such data by simulating the required aerothermochemical conditions in an electric arc driven shock tube.

  6. Recent Developments in Ultra High Temperature Ceramics at NASA Ames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Sylvia M.; Gasch, Matt; Lawson, John W.; Gusman, Michael I.; Stackpole, Margaret M.

    2009-01-01

    NASA Ames is pursuing a variety of approaches to modify and control the microstructure of UHTCs with the goal of improving fracture toughness, oxidation resistance and controlling thermal conductivity. The overall goal is to produce materials that can perform reliably as sharp leading edges or nose tips in hypersonic reentry vehicles. Processing approaches include the use of preceramic polymers as the SiC source (as opposed to powder techniques), the addition of third phases to control grain growth and oxidation, and the use of processing techniques to produce high purity materials. Both hot pressing and field assisted sintering have been used to make UHTCs. Characterization of the mechanical and thermal properties of these materials is ongoing, as is arcjet testing to evaluate performance under simulated reentry conditions. The preceramic polymer approach has generated a microstructure in which elongated SiC grains grow in the form of an in-situ composite. This microstructure has the advantage of improving fracture toughness while potentially improving oxidation resistance by reducing the amount and interconnectivity of SiC in the material. Addition of third phases, such as Ir, results in a very fine-grained microstructure, even in hot-pressed samples. The results of processing and compositional changes on microstructure and properties are reported, along with selected arcjet results.

  7. Neurolab: Final Report for the Ames Research Center Payload

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maese, A. Christopher (Editor); Ostrach, Louis H. (Editor); Dalton, Bonnie P. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Neurolab, the final Spacelab mission, launched on STS-90 on April 17, 1998, was dedicated to studying the nervous system. NASA cooperated with domestic and international partners to conduct the mission. ARC's (Ames Research Center's) Payload included 15 experiments designed to study the adaptation and development of the nervous system in microgravity. The payload had the largest number of Principal and Co-Investigators, largest complement of habitats and experiment unique equipment flown to date, and most diverse distribution of live specimens ever undertaken by ARC, including rodents, toadfish, swordtail fish, water snails, hornweed and crickets To facilitate tissue sharing and optimization of science objectives, investigators were grouped into four science discipline teams: Neuronal Plasticity, Mammalian Development, Aquatic, and Neurobiology. Several payload development challenges were experienced and required an extraordinary effort, by all involved, to meet the launch schedule. With respect to hardware and the total amount of recovered science, Neurolab was regarded as an overall success. However, a high mortality rate in one rodent group and several hardware anomalies occurred inflight that warranted postflight investigations. Hardware, science, and operations lessons were learned that should be taken into consideration by payload teams developing payloads for future Shuttle missions and the International Space Station.

  8. A note on the revised galactic neutron spectrum of the Ames collaborative study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, H. J.

    1980-01-01

    Energy distributions of the neutron dose equivalents in the 0.1 to 300 Mev interval for the Ames and Hess spectra are compared. The Ames spectrum shows no evaporation peak, moves the bulk of the flux away from the region of elastic collision and spreads it more evenly over higher energies. The neutron spectrum in space does not seem to hear out the Ames model. Emulsion findings on all manned missions of the past consistently indicate that evaporation events are a prolific source of neutrons in space.

  9. Briefing to University of Porto on NASA Airborne Science Program and Ames UAVs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fladeland, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    NASA Ames is exploring a partnership with the University of Portugal to jointly develop and test new autonomous vehicle technologies. As part of the discussions I will be briefing the University of Portugal faculty on the NASA Airborne Science Program (ASP) and associated activities at NASA Ames Research Center. The presentation will communicate the requirements that drive the program, the assets available to NASA researchers, and discuss research projects that have used unmanned aircraft systems including MIZOPEX, Surprise Valley, and Florida Keys Coral Reef assessment. Other topics will include the SIERRA and Dragon Eye UAV projects operated at Ames.

  10. Making Stuff Outreach at the Ames Laboratory and Iowa State University

    SciTech Connect

    Ament, Katherine; Karsjen, Steven; Leshem-Ackerman, Adah

    The U. S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory in Ames, Iowa was a coalition partner for outreach activities connected with NOVA's Making Stuff television series on PBS. Volunteers affiliated with the Ames Laboratory and Iowa State University, with backgrounds in materials science, took part in activities including a science-themed Family Night at a local mall, Science Cafes at the Science Center of Iowa, teacher workshops, demonstrations at science nights in elementary and middle schools, and various other events. We describe a selection of the activities and present a summary of their outcomes and extent of their impact on Ames, Desmore » Moines and the surrounding communities in Iowa. In Part 2, results of a volunteer attitude survey are presented, which shed some light on the volunteer experience and show how the volunteers participation in outreach activities has affected their views of materials education.« less

  11. 3rd Annual NASA Ames Space Science and Astrobiology Jamboree

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dotson, Jessie

    2015-01-01

    The Space Science and Astrobiology Division at NASA Ames Research Center consists of over 50 civil servants and more than 110 contractors, co-­-ops, post-­-docs and associates. Researchers in the division are pursuing investigations in a variety of fields including exoplanets, planetary science, astrobiology and astrophysics. In addition, division personnel support a wide variety of NASA missions including (but not limited to) Kepler, SOFIA, LADEE, JWST, and New Horizons. With such a wide variety of interesting research going on, distributed among three branches in at least 5 different buildings, it can be difficult to stay abreast of what one's fellow researchers are doing. Our goal in organizing this symposium is to facilitate communication and collaboration among the scientists within the division, and to give center management and other ARC researchers and engineers an opportunity to see what scientific research and science mission work is being done in the division. We are also continuing the tradition within the Space Science and Astrobiology Division to honor one senior and one early career scientist with the Pollack Lecture and the Early Career Lecture, respectively. With the Pollack Lecture, our intent is to select a senior researcher who has made significant contributions to any area of research within the space sciences, and we are pleased to honor Dr. William Borucki this year. With the Early Career Lecture, our intent is to select a young researcher within the division who, by their published scientific papers, shows great promise for the future in any area of space science research, and we are pleased to honor Dr. Melinda Kahre this year

  12. Ames Stereo Pipeline for Operation IceBridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyer, R. A.; Alexandrov, O.; McMichael, S.; Fong, T.

    2017-12-01

    We are using the NASA Ames Stereo Pipeline to process Operation IceBridge Digital Mapping System (DMS) images into terrain models and to align them with the simultaneously acquired LIDAR data (ATM and LVIS). The expected outcome is to create a contiguous, high resolution terrain model for each flight that Operation IceBridge has flown during its eight year history of Arctic and Antarctic flights. There are some existing terrain models in the NSIDC repository that cover 2011 and 2012 (out of the total period of 2009 to 2017), which were made with the Agisoft Photoscan commercial software. Our open-source stereo suite has been verified to create terrains of similar quality. The total number of images we expect to process is around 5 million. There are numerous challenges with these data: accurate determination and refinement of camera pose when the images were acquired based on data logged during the flights and/or using information from existing orthoimages, aligning terrains with little or no features, images containing clouds, JPEG artifacts in input imagery, inconsistencies in how data was acquired/archived over the entire period, not fully reliable camera calibration files, and the sheer amount of data. We will create the majority of terrain models at 40 cm/pixel with a vertical precision of 10 to 20 cm. In some circumstances when the aircraft was flying higher than usual, those values will get coarser. We will create orthoimages at 10 cm/pixel (with the same caveat that some flights are at higher altitudes). These will differ from existing orthoimages by using the underlying terrain we generate rather than some pre-existing very low-resolution terrain model that may differ significantly from what is on the ground at the time of IceBridge acquisition.The results of this massive processing will be submitted to the NSIDC so that cryosphere researchers will be able to use these data for their investigations.

  13. "Ames Research Center: Linking our Origins to our Future"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DesMarais, David J.

    2005-01-01

    Our research traces a path from interstellar materials to inhabited worlds and beyond. We examine how protoplanetary disks evolve and form terrestrial planets, the evolutionary paths of habitable planets, and how external factors (e.g., orbital eccentricity) and internal factors (atmospheric circulation) affect habitability. We trace, spectroscopically and chemically, the evolution of organic molecules from the interstellar medium onto habitable bodies. We examine how membranes might form under prebiotic planetary conditions. We evolve proteins capable of sustaining early metabolism, such as synthesis of biopolymers and transport of ions across membranes. We estimate the frequency of finding a functional prebiotic protein that formed spontaneously. We characterize the formation of diagnostic microbial biosignatures in rock-hosted ecosystems in ophiolite springs as an analog for subsurface life within our solar system, and photosynthetic microbial mats as biota that could be detected on extrasolar planets. We develop quantitative models that simulate energy relationships, biogeochemical cycling, trace gas exchange, and biodiversity. We examine the effects of climate variability on a vegetation-rich biosphere over intermediate time scales, using South American ecosystems as a model. We address natural transport of life beyond its planet of origin, such as on a meteorite, where survivors must withstand radiation, desiccation, and time in transit. We fly organisms and ecosystems in low Earth orbit to test their resistance to space. The Ames E&PO program disseminates these themes to national- and international-scale audiences through partnerships with the California Academy of Sciences, Yellow stone National Park, New York Hall of Science, and several K-14 educational organizations.

  14. Flight Test 4 Preliminary Results: NASA Ames SSI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Isaacson, Doug; Gong, Chester; Reardon, Scott; Santiago, Confesor

    2016-01-01

    Realization of the expected proliferation of Unmanned Aircraft System (UAS) operations in the National Airspace System (NAS) depends on the development and validation of performance standards for UAS Detect and Avoid (DAA) Systems. The RTCA Special Committee 228 is charged with leading the development of draft Minimum Operational Performance Standards (MOPS) for UAS DAA Systems. NASA, as a participating member of RTCA SC-228 is committed to supporting the development and validation of draft requirements as well as the safety substantiation and end-to-end assessment of DAA system performance. The Unmanned Aircraft System (UAS) Integration into the National Airspace System (NAS) Project conducted flight test program, referred to as Flight Test 4, at Armstrong Flight Research Center from April -June 2016. Part of the test flights were dedicated to the NASA Ames-developed Detect and Avoid (DAA) System referred to as JADEM (Java Architecture for DAA Extensibility and Modeling). The encounter scenarios, which involved NASA's Ikhana UAS and a manned intruder aircraft, were designed to collect data on DAA system performance in real-world conditions and uncertainties with four different surveillance sensor systems. Flight test 4 has four objectives: (1) validate DAA requirements in stressing cases that drive MOPS requirements, including: high-speed cooperative intruder, low-speed non-cooperative intruder, high vertical closure rate encounter, and Mode CS-only intruder (i.e. without ADS-B), (2) validate TCASDAA alerting and guidance interoperability concept in the presence of realistic sensor, tracking and navigational errors and in multiple-intruder encounters against both cooperative and non-cooperative intruders, (3) validate Well Clear Recovery guidance in the presence of realistic sensor, tracking and navigational errors, and (4) validate DAA alerting and guidance requirements in the presence of realistic sensor, tracking and navigational errors. The results will be

  15. Some innovations and accomplishments of Ames Research Center since its inception

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The innovations and accomplishments of Ames Research Center from 1940 through 1966 are summarized and illustrated. It should be noted that a number of accomplishments were begun at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Facility before that facility became part of the Ames Research Center. Such accomplishments include the first supersonic flight, the first hypersonic flight, the lunar landing research vehicle, and the first digital fly-by-wire aircraft.

  16. The AME2016 atomic mass evaluation (I). Evaluation of input data; and adjustment procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, W. J.; Audi, G.; Wang, Meng

    This paper is the first of two articles (Part I and Part II) that presents the results of the new atomic mass evaluation, Ame2016. It includes complete information on the experimental input data (also including unused and rejected ones), as well as details on the evaluation procedures used to derive the tables of recommended values given in the second part. This article describes the evaluation philosophy and procedures that were implemented in the selection of specific nuclear reaction, decay and mass-spectrometric results. These input values were entered in the least-squares adjustment for determining the best values for the atomic massesmore » and their uncertainties. Details of the calculation and particularities of the Ame are then described. All accepted and rejected data, including outweighted ones, are presented in a tabular format and compared with the adjusted values obtained using the least-squares fit analysis. Differences with the previous Ame2012 evaluation are discussed and specific information is presented for several cases that may be of interest to Ame users. The second Ame2016 article gives a table with the recommended values of atomic masses, as well as tables and graphs of derived quantities, along with the list of references used in both the Ame2016 and the Nubase2016 evaluations (the first paper in this issue). Amdc: http://amdc.impcas.ac.cn/« less

  17. The AME2016 atomic mass evaluation (I). Evaluation of input data; and adjustment procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, W. J.; Audi, G.; Wang, Meng; Kondev, F. G.; Naimi, S.; Xu, Xing

    2017-03-01

    This paper is the first of two articles (Part I and Part II) that presents the results of the new atomic mass evaluation, AME2016. It includes complete information on the experimental input data (also including unused and rejected ones), as well as details on the evaluation procedures used to derive the tables of recommended values given in the second part. This article describes the evaluation philosophy and procedures that were implemented in the selection of specific nuclear reaction, decay and mass-spectrometric results. These input values were entered in the least-squares adjustment for determining the best values for the atomic masses and their uncertainties. Details of the calculation and particularities of the AME are then described. All accepted and rejected data, including outweighted ones, are presented in a tabular format and compared with the adjusted values obtained using the least-squares fit analysis. Differences with the previous AME2012 evaluation are discussed and specific information is presented for several cases that may be of interest to AME users. The second AME2016 article gives a table with the recommended values of atomic masses, as well as tables and graphs of derived quantities, along with the list of references used in both the AME2016 and the NUBASE2016 evaluations (the first paper in this issue). AMDC: http://amdc.impcas.ac.cn/ Contents The AME2016 atomic mass evaluation (I). Evaluation of input data; and adjustment proceduresAcrobat PDF (1.2 MB) Table I. Input data compared with adjusted valuesAcrobat PDF (1.3 MB)

  18. Ames-2016 line lists for 13 isotopologues of CO2: Updates, consistency, and remaining issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang (黄新川), Xinchuan; Schwenke, David W.; Freedman, Richard S.; Lee, Timothy J.

    2017-12-01

    A new 626-based Ames-2 PES refinement and Ames-2016 line lists for 13 CO2 isotopologues are reported. A consistent σRMS = ±0.02 cm-1 is established for hundreds of isotopologue band origins using the Ames-2 PES. Ames-2016 line lists are computed at 296 K, 1000 K and 4000 K using the Ames-2 PES and the same DMS-N2 dipole surface used previously, with J up to 150, E‧ up to 24,000 cm-1 or 18,000 cm-1 and appropriate intensity cutoffs. The lists are compared to the CDSD-296, CDSD-4000 databases, UCL line lists, and a few recent highly accurate CO2 intensity measurements. Both agreements and discrepancies are discussed. Compared to the old Ames CO2 lists, the Ames-2016 line lists have line position deviations reduced by 50% or more, which consequently leads to more reliable intensities. The line shape parameters in the Ames-2016 line lists are predicted using the newly assigned conventional vibrational polyad quantum numbers for rovibrational levels below 12,000 cm-1 so the quality of the line shape parameters is similar to that of CDSD or HITRAN. This study further proves that a semi-empirically refined PES (Ames-1 and Ames-2) coupled with a high quality ab initio DMS (DMS-N2 and UCL) may generate IR predictions with consistent accuracy and is thus helpful in the analysis of laboratory spectra and simulations of various isotopologues. The Ames-2016 lists based on DMS-N2 have reached the ∼1% intensity prediction accuracy level for the recent 626 30013-00001 and 20013-00001 bands, but further quantification and improvements require sub-percent or sub-half-percent accurate experimental intensities. The inter-isotopologue consistency of the intensity prediction accuracies should have reached better than 1-3% for regular bands not affected by resonances. Since the Effective Dipole Models (EDM) in CDSD and HITRAN have 1-20% or even larger uncertainties, we show that the Ames lists can provide better alternative IR data for many hard-to-determine isotopologue bands

  19. Study of optical techniques for the Ames unitary wind tunnels. Part 3: Angle of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, George

    1992-01-01

    A review of optical sensors that are capable of accurate angle of attack measurements in wind tunnels was conducted. These include sensors being used or being developed at NASA Ames and Langley Research Centers, Boeing Airplane Company, McDonald Aircraft Company, Arnold Engineering Development Center, National Aerospace Laboratory of the Netherlands, National Research Council of Canada, and the Royal Aircraft Establishment of England. Some commercial sensors that may be applicable to accurate angle measurements were also reviewed. It was found that the optical sensor systems were based on interferometers, polarized light detector, linear or area photodiode cameras, position sensing photodetectors, and laser scanners. Several of the optical sensors can meet the requirements of the Ames Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel. Two of these, the Boeing interferometer and the Complere lateral effect photodiode sensors are being developed for the Ames Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel.

  20. The AME2016 atomic mass evaluation (II). Tables, graphs and references

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Meng; Audi, G.; Kondev, F. G.

    This paper is the second part of the new evaluation of atomic masses, Ame2016. Using least-squares adjustments to all evaluated and accepted experimental data, described in Part I, we derive tables with numerical values and graphs to replace those given in Ame2012. The first table lists the recommended atomic mass values and their uncertainties. It is followed by a table of the influences of data on primary nuclides, a table of various reaction and decay energies, and finally, a series of graphs of separation and decay energies. The last section of this paper lists all references of the input datamore » used in the Ame2016 and the Nubase2016 evaluations (first paper in this issue). Amdc: http://amdc.impcas.ac.cn/« less

  1. Optimization of the Ames/salmonella mutagenicity assay for use with extracts of aquatic sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Papoulias, Diana M.; Buckler, Denny R.; Tillitt, Donald E.

    1996-01-01

    Non-mutagenic components interfered with the ability of the standard Ames/salmonella assay to detect mutagenicity in extracts of contaminated Great Lakes sediments. The use of gel permeation chromatography (GPC) to remove these macromolecules from methylene chloride extracts prior to Ames testing enhanced the likelihood of transfer of mutagenic components into dimethyl sulf oxide (the assay solvent). Therefore, to optimize the assay's sensitivity we pre-treated sediment extracts using GPC and increased metabolic activity through the use of a 30% S9 mix. Increasing the level of Aroclor 1254-induced rat liver S9, typically used to metabolically activate promutagens, had the additional beneficial effect of reducing the cytotoxicity of the extracts. As applied in this study, the Ames assay can serve as a sensitive test for screening the mutagenic potential of large numbers of uncharacterized sediment extracts.

  2. Comparison of Heat Flux Gages for High Enthalpy Flows - NASA Ames and IRS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loehle, Stefan; Nawaz, Anuscheh; Herdrich, Georg; Fasoulas, Stefanos; Martinez, Edward; Raiche, George

    2016-01-01

    This article is a companion to a paper on heat flux measurements as initiated under a Space Act Agreement in 2011. The current focus of this collaboration between the Institute of Space Systems (IRS) of the University of Stuttgart and NASA Ames Research Center is the comparison and refinement of diagnostic measurements. A first experimental campaign to test different heat flux gages in the NASA Interaction Heating Facility (IHF) and the Plasmawindkanaele (PWK) at IRS was established. This paper focuses on the results of the measurements conducted at IRS. The tested gages included a at face and hemispherical probe head, a 4" hemispherical slug calorimeter, a null-point calorimeter from Ames and a null-point calorimeter developed for this purpose at IRS. The Ames null-point calorimeter was unfortunately defective upon arrival. The measured heat fluxes agree fairly well with each other. The reason for discrepancies can be attributed to signal-to-noise levels and the probe geometry.

  3. Reinventing the ames test as a quantitative lab that connects classical and molecular genetics.

    PubMed

    Goodson-Gregg, Nathan; De Stasio, Elizabeth A

    2009-01-01

    While many institutions use a version of the Ames test in the undergraduate genetics laboratory, students typically are not exposed to techniques or procedures beyond qualitative analysis of phenotypic reversion, thereby seriously limiting the scope of learning. We have extended the Ames test to include both quantitative analysis of reversion frequency and molecular analysis of revertant gene sequences. By giving students a role in designing their quantitative methods and analyses, students practice and apply quantitative skills. To help students connect classical and molecular genetic concepts and techniques, we report here procedures for characterizing the molecular lesions that confer a revertant phenotype. We suggest undertaking reversion of both missense and frameshift mutants to allow a more sophisticated molecular genetic analysis. These modifications and additions broaden the educational content of the traditional Ames test teaching laboratory, while simultaneously enhancing students' skills in experimental design, quantitative analysis, and data interpretation.

  4. Corrective Action Plan in response to the March 1992 Tiger Team Assessment of the Ames Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-11-20

    On March 5, 1992, a Department of Energy (DOE) Tiger Team completed an assessment of the Ames Laboratory, located in Ames, Iowa. The purpose of the assessment was to provide the Secretary of Energy with a report on the status and performance of Environment, Safety and Health (ES H) programs at Ames Laboratory. Detailed findings of the assessment are presented in the report, DOE/EH-0237, Tiger Team Assessment of the Ames Laboratory. This document, the Ames Laboratory Corrective Action Plan (ALCAP), presents corrective actions to overcome deficiencies cited in the Tiger Team Assessment. The Tiger Team identified 53 Environmental findings, frommore » which the Team derived four key findings. In the Safety and Health (S H) area, 126 concerns were identified, eight of which were designated Category 11 (there were no Category I concerns). Seven key concerns were derived from the 126 concerns. The Management Subteam developed 19 findings which have been summarized in four key findings. The eight S H Category 11 concerns identified in the Tiger Team Assessment were given prompt management attention. Actions to address these deficiencies have been described in individual corrective action plans, which were submitted to DOE Headquarters on March 20, 1992. The ALCAP includes actions described in this early response, as well as a long term strategy and framework for correcting all remaining deficiencies. Accordingly, the ALCAP presents the organizational structure, management systems, and specific responses that are being developed to implement corrective actions and to resolve root causes identified in the Tiger Team Assessment. The Chicago Field Office (CH), IowaState University (ISU), the Institute for Physical Research and Technology (IPRT), and Ames Laboratory prepared the ALCAP with input from the DOE Headquarters, Office of Energy Research (ER).« less

  5. Corrective Action Plan in response to the March 1992 Tiger Team Assessment of the Ames Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-11-20

    On March 5, 1992, a Department of Energy (DOE) Tiger Team completed an assessment of the Ames Laboratory, located in Ames, Iowa. The purpose of the assessment was to provide the Secretary of Energy with a report on the status and performance of Environment, Safety and Health (ES&H) programs at Ames Laboratory. Detailed findings of the assessment are presented in the report, DOE/EH-0237, Tiger Team Assessment of the Ames Laboratory. This document, the Ames Laboratory Corrective Action Plan (ALCAP), presents corrective actions to overcome deficiencies cited in the Tiger Team Assessment. The Tiger Team identified 53 Environmental findings, from whichmore » the Team derived four key findings. In the Safety and Health (S&H) area, 126 concerns were identified, eight of which were designated Category 11 (there were no Category I concerns). Seven key concerns were derived from the 126 concerns. The Management Subteam developed 19 findings which have been summarized in four key findings. The eight S&H Category 11 concerns identified in the Tiger Team Assessment were given prompt management attention. Actions to address these deficiencies have been described in individual corrective action plans, which were submitted to DOE Headquarters on March 20, 1992. The ALCAP includes actions described in this early response, as well as a long term strategy and framework for correcting all remaining deficiencies. Accordingly, the ALCAP presents the organizational structure, management systems, and specific responses that are being developed to implement corrective actions and to resolve root causes identified in the Tiger Team Assessment. The Chicago Field Office (CH), IowaState University (ISU), the Institute for Physical Research and Technology (IPRT), and Ames Laboratory prepared the ALCAP with input from the DOE Headquarters, Office of Energy Research (ER).« less

  6. AmeriFlux US-Br1 Brooks Field Site 10- Ames

    DOE Data Explorer

    Parkin, Tim [USDA; Prueger, John [National Laboratory for Agriculture and the Environment

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-Br1 Brooks Field Site 10- Ames. Site Description - The Brooks Field Site 10 - Ames Site is one of three sites (Brooks Field Site 11 and Brooks Field Site 1011) located in a corn/soybean agricultural landscape of central Iowa. The farming systems, associated tillage, and nutrient management practices for soybean/corn production are typical of those throughout Upper Midwest Corn Belt. All three sites are members of the AmeriFlux network. Information for all three can be found in synchronous pages of this website.

  7. AmeriFlux US-Br3 Brooks Field Site 11- Ames

    DOE Data Explorer

    Parkin, Tim [USDA; Prueger, John [National Laboratory for Agriculture and the Environment

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-Br3 Brooks Field Site 11- Ames. Site Description - The Brooks Field Site 11 - Ames Site is one of three sites (Brooks Field Site 10 and Brooks Field Site 1011) located in a corn/soybean agricultural landscape of central Iowa. The farming systems, associated tillage, and nutrient management practices for soybean/corn production are typical of those throughout Upper Midwest Corn Belt. All three sites are members of the AmeriFlux network. Information for all three can be found in synchronous pages of this website.

  8. The Brothers Were Wright - An Abridged History of Wind Tunnel Testing at Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchholz, Steve

    2017-01-01

    The Wright Brothers used wind tunnel data to refine their design for the first successful airplane back in 1903. Today, wind tunnels are still in use all over the world gathering data to improve the design of cars, trucks, airplanes, missiles and spacecraft. Ames Research Center is home to many wind tunnels, including the Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel complex. Built in the early 1950s, it is one of the premiere transonic and supersonic testing facilities in the country. Every manned spacecraft has been tested in the wind tunnels at Ames. This is a testing history from past to present.

  9. AME - Asteroseismology Made Easy. Estimating stellar properties by using scaled models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundkvist, Mia; Kjeldsen, Hans; Silva Aguirre, Victor

    2014-06-01

    Context. Stellar properties and, in particular stellar radii of exoplanet host stars, are essential for measuring the properties of exoplanets, therefore it is becoming increasingly important to be able to supply reliable stellar radii fast. Grid-modelling is an obvious choice for this, but that only offers a low degree of transparency to non-specialists. Aims: Here we present a new, easy, fast, and transparent method of obtaining stellar properties for stars exhibiting solar-like oscillations. The method, called Asteroseismology Made Easy (AME), can determine stellar masses, mean densities, radii, and surface gravities, as well as estimate ages. We present AME as a visual and powerful tool that could be useful, in particular, in light of the large number of exoplanets being found. Methods: AME consists of a set of figures from which the stellar parameters can be deduced. These figures are made from a grid of stellar evolutionary models that cover masses ranging from 0.7 M⊙ to 1.6 M⊙ in steps of 0.1 M⊙ and metallicities in the interval -0.3 dex ≤ [Fe/H] ≤ +0.3 dex in increments of 0.1 dex. The stellar evolutionary models are computed using the Modules for Experiments in Stellar Astrophysics (MESA) code with simple input physics. Results: We have compared the results from AME with results for three groups of stars: stars with radii determined from interferometry (and measured parallaxes), stars with radii determined from measurements of their parallaxes (and calculated angular diameters), and stars with results based on modelling their individual oscillation frequencies. We find that a comparison of the radii from interferometry to those from AME yields a weighted mean of the fractional differences of just 2%. This is also the level of deviation that we find when we compare the parallax-based radii to the radii determined from AME. Conclusions: The comparison between independently determined stellar parameters and those found using AME show that our method

  10. A Survey of Knowledge Management Research & Development at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, Richard M.; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This chapter catalogs knowledge management research and development activities at NASA Ames Research Center as of April 2002. A general categorization scheme for knowledge management systems is first introduced. This categorization scheme divides knowledge management capabilities into five broad categories: knowledge capture, knowledge preservation, knowledge augmentation, knowledge dissemination, and knowledge infrastructure. Each of nearly 30 knowledge management systems developed at Ames is then classified according to this system. Finally, a capsule description of each system is presented along with information on deployment status, funding sources, contact information, and both published and internet-based references.

  11. Study of optical techniques for the Ames unitary wind tunnel, part 7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, George

    1993-01-01

    A summary of optical techniques for the Ames Unitary Plan wind tunnels are discussed. Six optical techniques were studied: Schlieren, light sheet and laser vapor screen, angle of attack, model deformation, infrared imagery, and digital image processing. The study includes surveys and reviews of wind tunnel optical techniques, some conceptual designs, and recommendations for use of optical methods in the Ames Unitary Plan wind tunnels. Particular emphasis was placed on searching for systems developed for wind tunnel use and on commercial systems which could be readily adapted for wind tunnels. This final report is to summarize the major results and recommendations.

  12. Energy Remote Sensing Applications Projects at the NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, S. D.; Likens, W. C.; Mouat, D. A.

    1982-01-01

    The NASA Ames Research Center is active in energy projects primarily in the role of providing assistance to users in the solution of a number of problems related to energy. Data bases were produced which can be used, in combination with other sources of information, to solve spatially related energy problems. Six project activities at Ames are described which relate to energy and remote sensing. Two projects involve power demand forecasting and estimations using remote sensing and geographic information systems; two others involve transmission line routing and corridor analysis; one involves a synfuel user needs assessment through remote sensing; and the sixth involves the siting of energy facilities.

  13. NASA Ames Science Instrument Launches Aboard New Mars Rover (CheMin)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-11-23

    When NASA's Mars Science Laboratory lands in a region known as Gale Crater in August of 2012, it will be poised to carry out the most sophisticated chemical analysis of the Martian surface to date. One of the 10 instruments on board the rover Curiosity will be CheMin - short for chemistry and mineralogy. Developed by Ames researcher David Blake and his team, it will use new technology to analyze and identify minerals in the Martian rocks and soil. Youtube: NASA Ames Scientists Develop MSL Science Instrument

  14. PMARC_12 - PANEL METHOD AMES RESEARCH CENTER, VERSION 12

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashby, D. L.

    1994-01-01

    Panel method computer programs are software tools of moderate cost used for solving a wide range of engineering problems. The panel code PMARC_12 (Panel Method Ames Research Center, version 12) can compute the potential flow field around complex three-dimensional bodies such as complete aircraft models. PMARC_12 is a well-documented, highly structured code with an open architecture that facilitates modifications and the addition of new features. Adjustable arrays are used throughout the code, with dimensioning controlled by a set of parameter statements contained in an include file; thus, the size of the code (i.e. the number of panels that it can handle) can be changed very quickly. This allows the user to tailor PMARC_12 to specific problems and computer hardware constraints. In addition, PMARC_12 can be configured (through one of the parameter statements in the include file) so that the code's iterative matrix solver is run entirely in RAM, rather than reading a large matrix from disk at each iteration. This significantly increases the execution speed of the code, but it requires a large amount of RAM memory. PMARC_12 contains several advanced features, including internal flow modeling, a time-stepping wake model for simulating either steady or unsteady (including oscillatory) motions, a Trefftz plane induced drag computation, off-body and on-body streamline computations, and computation of boundary layer parameters using a two-dimensional integral boundary layer method along surface streamlines. In a panel method, the surface of the body over which the flow field is to be computed is represented by a set of panels. Singularities are distributed on the panels to perturb the flow field around the body surfaces. PMARC_12 uses constant strength source and doublet distributions over each panel, thus making it a low order panel method. Higher order panel methods allow the singularity strength to vary linearly or quadratically across each panel. Experience has shown

  15. Construction of the Fan Drive Enclosure of the 40x80 Foot Wind Tunnel at Ames.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1943-08-26

    Concrete frame enclosing the fan drive bents of the 40x80 foot wind tunnel at ames. Once installed, six 40-foot-diameter fans, each powered by a 6000-horsepower electric motor maintained airflow at 230 mph or less (these are still tornado velocities).

  16. SOFIA Aircraft Visits NASA Ames, Reporter Package for TWAN/Web

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-10-19

    Taking a break from its science mission flights, the Stratospheric Observatory For Infrared Astronomy or SOFIA came to NASA Ames Research Center to offer tours to employees and VIP's alike. For two days, the aircraft was opened up so that dignitaries, members of the media, NASA employees and the general public could take self-guided tours of the aircraft.

  17. NASA Ames Helps Re-enter the Dragon (Centerpiece for TWAN and Web)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-05-14

    When the SpaceX Dragon spacecraft returns to Earth after its mission to the International Space Station, it will depend on a heat shield material called PICA-X to protect it during reentry. The heat shield material, called Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator or PICA-X, was developed in partnership with NASA Ames Research Center.

  18. THE DELTA UVRB MUTATIONS IN THE AMES STRAINS OF SALMONELLA SPAN 15-119 GENES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    The 4uvrB mutationesent in strains of Salmonella enterica Typhirnurium used commonly in the Salmonella (Ames) mutagenicity assay were isolated independently on separate occasions: chl-1005 (bio uvrBgal) for the hisG46-containing strains TA1535 and TA100; chl- 10...

  19. Construction of the 40x80 Foot Wind Tunnel at Ames.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1943-07-07

    Looking South from inside the diffuser of the 40x80 foot wind tunnel at NACA's Ames Research Center. Construction began in late 1941, the mammoth construction task sorely taxing the resources of the new center. Two and a half years later, in dune 1944, the 40 x 80-foot full-scale tunnel went into operation.

  20. Satellite communications provisions on NASA Ames instrumented aircraft platforms for Earth science research/applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shameson, L.; Brass, J. A.; Hanratty, J. J.; Roberts, A. C.; Wegener, S. S.

    1995-01-01

    Earth science activities at NASA Ames are research in atmospheric and ecosystem science, development of remote sensing and in situ sampling instruments, and their integration into scientific research platform aircraft. The use of satellite communications can greatly extend the capability of these agency research platform aircraft. Current projects and plans involve satellite links on the Perseus UAV and the ER-2 via TDRSS and a proposed experiment on the NASA Advanced Communications Technology Satellite. Provisions for data links on the Perseus research platform, via TDRSS S-band multiple access service, have been developed and are being tested. Test flights at Dryden are planned to demonstrate successful end-to-end data transfer. A Unisys Corp. airborne satcom STARLink system is being integrated into an Ames ER-2 aircraft. This equipment will support multiple data rates up to 43 Mb/s each via the TDRS S Ku-band single access service. The first flight mission for this high-rate link is planned for August 1995. Ames and JPL have proposed an ACTS experiment to use real-time satellite communications to improve wildfire research campaigns. Researchers and fire management teams making use of instrumented aircraft platforms at a prescribed burn site will be able to communicate with experts at Ames, the U.S. Forest Service, and emergency response agencies.

  1. GE Fan in Wing VZ-11 VTOL airplane in Ames 40x80 Foot Wind Tunnel.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1962-12-27

    3/4 front view VZ-11 ground test - variable height struts. Engines of the VZ-11 are a pair of General Electric J85-5 turbojets, mounted in high in the centre fuselage, well away from fan disturbance. Designed in the Ames 40x80 foot wind tunnel.

  2. Kaman K-16 in 40x80 Foot Wind Tunnel at Ames Research Center.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1962-09-19

    Test No. 175 Kaman K-16 in 40x80 Foot Wind Tunnel at Ames Research Center. Kaman K-16B was an experimental tilt wing aircraft, it used the fuselage of a JRF-5 and was powered by two General Electric YT58-GE-2A engines.

  3. Kaman K-16 in 40x80 Foot Wind Tunnel at Ames Research Center.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1962-09-19

    Test No. 175 Kaman K-16 in 40x80 Foot Wind Tunnel at Ames Research Center. Pictured with two Kaman employees. 3/4 Front view of Airplane. Kaman K-16B was an experimental tilt wing aircraft, it used the fuselage of a JRF-5 and was powered by two General Electric YT58-GE-2A engines.

  4. Kaman K-16 in 40x80 Foot Wind Tunnel at Ames Research Center.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1962-09-19

    Test No. 175 Kaman K-16 being lowered into the 40x80 foot wind tunnel at NASA's Ames Research Center, viewed from the front. Kaman K-16B was an experimental tilt wing aircraft, it used the fuselage of a JRF-5 and was powered by two General Electric YT58-GE-2A engines.

  5. Vanguard 2C VTOL Airplane Tested in the Ames 40x80 Foot Wind Tunnel.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1960-02-01

    Vanguard 2C vertical take-off and landing (VTOL) airplane, wind tunnel test. Front view from below, model 14 1/2 feet high disk off. Nasa Ames engineer Ralph Maki in photo. Variable height struts and ground plane, low pressure ratio, fan in wing. 02/01/1960.

  6. Evaluating Fatigue in Operational Settings: The NASA Ames Fatigue Countermeasures Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosekind, Mark R.; Gregory, Kevin; Miller, Donna; Webbon, Lissa; Oyung, Ray

    1996-01-01

    In response to a 1980 Congressional request, NASA Ames initiated a program to examine fatigue in flight operations. The Program objectives are to examine fatigue, sleep loss, and circadian disruption in flight operations, determine the effects of these factors on flight crew performance, and the development of fatigue countermeasures. The NASA Ames Fatigue Countermeasures Program conducts controlled laboratory experiments, full-mission flight simulations, and field studies. A range of subjective, behavioral, performance, physiological, and environmental measures are used depending on study objectives. The Program has developed substantial expertise in gathering data during actual flight operations and in other work settings. This has required the development of ambulatory and other measures that can be carried throughout the world and used at 41,000 feet in aircraft cockpits. The NASA Ames Fatigue Countermeasures Program has examined fatigue in shorthaul, longhaul, overnight cargo, and helicopter operations. A recent study of planned cockpit rest periods demonstrated the effectiveness of a brief inflight nap to improve pilot performance and alertness. This study involved inflight reaction time/vigilance performance testing and EEG/EOG measures of physiological alertness. The NASA Ames Fatigue Countermeasures Program has applied scientific findings to the development of education and training materials on fatigue countermeasures, input to federal regulatory activities on pilot flight, duty, and rest requirements, and support of National Transportation Safety Board accident investigations. Current activities are examining fatigue in nonaugmented longhaul flights, regional/commuter flight operations, corporate/business aviation, and psychophysiological variables related to performance.

  7. Research and technology activities at Ames Research Center's Biomedical Research Division

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martello, N.

    1985-01-01

    Various research and technology activities at Ames Research Center's Biomedical Research Division are described. Contributions to the Space Administration's goals in the life sciences include descriptions of research in operational medicine, cardiovascular deconditioning, motion sickness, bone alterations, muscle atrophy, fluid and electrolyte changes, radiation effects and protection, behavior and performance, gravitational biology, and life sciences flight experiments.

  8. A survey of planning and scheduling research at the NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zweben, Monte

    1988-01-01

    NASA Ames Research Center has a diverse program in planning and scheduling. This paper highlights some of our research projects as well as some of our applications. Topics addressed include machine learning techniques, action representations and constraint-based scheduling systems. The applications discussed are planetary rovers, Hubble Space Telescope scheduling, and Pioneer Venus orbit scheduling.

  9. A survey of planning and scheduling research at the NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zweben, Monte

    1989-01-01

    NASA Ames Research Center has a diverse program in planning and scheduling. Some research projects as well as some applications are highlighted. Topics addressed include machine learning techniques, action representations and constraint-based scheduling systems. The applications discussed are planetary rovers, Hubble Space Telescope scheduling, and Pioneer Venus orbit scheduling.

  10. Operational procedures for ground station operation: ATS-3 Hawaii-Ames satellite link experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishioka, K.; Gross, E. H.

    1979-01-01

    Hardware description and operational procedures for the ATS-3 Hawaii-Ames satellite computer link are presented in basic step-by-step instructions. Transmit and receive channels and frequencies are given. Details such as switch settings for activating the station to the sequence of turning switches on are provided. Methods and procedures for troubleshooting common problems encountered with communication stations are also provided.

  11. Expression of oxidative phosphorylation components in mitochondria of long-living Ames dwarf mice

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Reduced signaling of the growth hormone (GH)/insulin-like growth factor-1(IGF-1) pathway is associated with extended life span in several species. Ames dwarf mice are GH and IGF-1 deficient and live 50-68% longer than wild type littermates (males and females, respectively). Previously, we have shown...

  12. Cultivating a Grassroots Aerospace Innovation Culture at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    D'Souza, Sarah; Sanchez, Hugo; Lewis, Ryan

    2017-01-01

    This paper details the adaptation of specific 'knowledge production' methods to implement a first of its kind, grassroots event that provokes a cultural change in how the NASA Ames civil servant community engages in the creation and selection of innovative ideas. Historically, selection of innovative proposals at NASA Ames Research Center is done at the highest levels of management, isolating the views and perspectives of the larger civil servant community. Additionally, NASA innovation programs are typically open to technical organizations and do not engage non-technical organizations to bring forward innovative processes/business practices. Finally, collaboration on innovative ideas and associated solutions tend to be isolated to organizational silos. In this environment, not all Ames employees feel empowered to innovate and opportunities for employee collaboration are limited. In order to address these issues, the 'innovation contest' method was adapted to create the NASA Ames Innovation Fair, a unique, grassroots innovation opportunity for the civil servant community. The Innovation Fair consisted of a physical event with a virtual component. The physical event provided innovators the opportunity to collaborate and pitch their innovations to the NASA Ames community. The civil servant community then voted for the projects that they viewed as innovative and would contribute to NASA's core mission, making this event a truly grassroots effort. The Innovation Fair website provided a location for additional knowledge sharing, discussion, and voting. On March 3rd, 2016, the 'First Annual NASA Ames Innovation Fair' was held with 49 innovators and more than 300 participants collaborating and/or voting for the best innovations. Based on the voting results, seven projects were awarded seed funding for projects ranging from innovative cost models to innovations in aerospace technology. Surveys of both innovators and Fair participants show the Innovation Fair was successful

  13. Functional activity of L-carnitine transporters in human airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ingoglia, Filippo; Visigalli, Rossana; Rotoli, Bianca Maria; Barilli, Amelia; Riccardi, Benedetta; Puccini, Paola; Dall'Asta, Valeria

    2016-02-01

    Carnitine plays a physiologically important role in the β-oxidation of fatty acids, facilitating the transport of long-chain fatty acids across the inner mitochondrial membrane. Distribution of carnitine within the body tissues is mainly performed by novel organic cation transporter (OCTN) family, including the isoforms OCTN1 (SLC22A4) and OCTN2 (SLC22A5) expressed in human. We performed here a characterization of carnitine transport in human airway epithelial cells A549, Calu-3, NCl-H441, and BEAS-2B, by means of an integrated approach combining data of mRNA/protein expression with the kinetic and inhibition analyses of L-[(3)H]carnitine transport. Carnitine uptake was strictly Na(+)-dependent in all cell models. In A549 and BEAS-2B cells, carnitine uptake was mediated by one high-affinity component (Km<2 μM) identifiable with OCTN2. In both these cell models, indeed, carnitine uptake was maximally inhibited by betaine and strongly reduced by SLC22A5/OCTN2 silencing. Conversely, Calu-3 and NCl-H441 exhibited both a high (Km~20 μM) and a low affinity (Km>1 mM) transport component. While the high affinity component is identifiable with OCTN2, the low affinity uptake is mediated by ATB(0,+), a Na(+), and Cl(-)-coupled transport system for neutral and cationic amino acids, as demonstrated by the inhibition by leucine and arginine, as well as by SLC6A14/ATB(0,+) silencing. The presence of this transporter leads to a massive accumulation of carnitine inside the cells and may be of peculiar relevance in pathologic conditions of carnitine deficiency, such as those associated to OCTN2 defects. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. CoQ10 and L-carnitine for statin myalgia?

    PubMed

    DiNicolantonio, James J

    2012-10-01

    Statins are a standard of care in many clinical settings such as acute myocardial infarction and for patients having or at risk of cardiovascular (CV) disease. This is based on a plethora of data showing reductions in CV events and mortality. The CV benefit of statins can be partly explained by their ability to inhibit of HMG-CoA reductase, which subsequently lowers cholesterol and decreases the formation of mevalonate. However, the inhibition of the mevalonate pathway decreases the formation of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) within the body. It has been a long-standing theory that statin-associated muscle pain (myalgia) is caused, or at least partly contributed by, a reduction in CoQ10 levels in muscle mitochondria. One of the main side effects of statins is myalgia, which causes the patient to either stop their statin or significantly reduce the dose of their statin. The question of whether CoQ10 can help treat statin myopathy is a common one encountered by clinicians in current day practice.

  15. Effects of L-carnitine pretreatment in methamphetamine and 3-nitropropionic acid-induced neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Binienda, Zbigniew K; Przybyla, Beata D; Robinson, Bonnie L; Salem, Nadia; Virmani, Ashraf; Amato, Antonino; Ali, Syed F

    2006-08-01

    Adult, male Sprague-Dawley rats were injected with 3-ni-tropropionic acid (3-NPA) at 30 mg/kg or methamphetamine (METH) at 20 mg/kg alone or following pretreatment with L-cartnitine (LC) at 100 mg/kg. Rectal temperature was measured before and 4 h following treatment. Animals were sacrificed at 4 h posttreatment. Monoamine neurotransmitters, dopamine (DA) and serotonin (5-HT), and their metabolites were analyzed in the striatum using high-performance liquid chromatography method coupled with electrochemical detection (HPLC/ED). Transcripts of several genes related to DA metabolism were quantified using real time reverse transciption polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Core temperature decreased significantly after 3-NPA acid and increased in METH-treated rats (P < 0.05). Temperature change at 4 h exhibited a significant LC effect for 3-NPA, preventing hypothermia (P < 0.05) and no effect for METH. Concentration of DA and 5-HT, and their metabolites, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC), homovanillic acid (HVA), and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), increased significantly in 3-NPA and decreased in METH-treated rats. An increase in DOPAC/DA turnover and serotonin observed after 3-NPA was abolished in LC-/3-NPA-treated rats. In both 3-NPA- and METH-treated rats, LC prevented an increase in DA receptor D(1) gene expression. It appears that carnitine effect preventing hypothermia after 3-NPA treatments may be related not only to its mitochondriotropic actions but also to inhibitory effect on the DA and 5-HT systems activated after the exposure to 3-NPA. The same effect observed at the transcriptional level, at least for the DA receptor D(1), may account for protection against METH toxicity.

  16. Safety Measures of L-Carnitine L-Tartrate Supplementation in Healthy Men.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubin, Martyn R.; Volek, Jeff S.; Gomez, Ana L.; Ratamess, Nicholas A.; French, Duncan N.; Sharman, Matthew J.; Kraemer, William J.

    2001-01-01

    Examined the effects of ingesting the dietary supplement L- CARNIPURE on liver and renal function and blood hematology among healthy men. Analysis of blood samples indicated that there were no statistically significant differences between the L-CARNIPURE and placebo conditions for any variables examined, suggesting there are no safety concerns…

  17. [L-carnitine treatment and fish odor syndrome: an unwaited adverse effect].

    PubMed

    Rocher, F; Caruba, C; Broly, F; Lebrun, C

    2011-01-01

    Levocarnitine treatment is usually well tolerated, with essentially dose-dependent diarrhea as the main induced adverse effect. We report a case of fish odor syndrome during levocarnitine treatment which resolved after levocarnitine discontinuation. This adverse effect seems to be correlated with excedent carnitine intake and might be expressed when the elimination pathway becomes saturated or in a situation of deficiency enzymatic metabolism. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. AMES Stereo Pipeline Derived DEM Accuracy Experiment Using LROC-NAC Stereopairs and Weighted Spatial Dependence Simulation for Lunar Site Selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laura, J. R.; Miller, D.; Paul, M. V.

    2012-03-01

    An accuracy assessment of AMES Stereo Pipeline derived DEMs for lunar site selection using weighted spatial dependence simulation and a call for outside AMES derived DEMs to facilitate a statistical precision analysis.

  19. Recent Geological and Hydrological Activity in Amazonis and Elysium Basins and Their Link, Marte Valles (AME): Prime Target for Future Reconnaissance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dohm, J. M.; Robbins, S. J.; Hynek, B. M.

    2012-03-01

    Amazonis and Elysium basins and their link, Marte Vallis (AME), uniquely point to a geologically and hydrologically active Mars. We will present evidence for why AME reconnaissance can help address whether Mars is geologically, hydrologically, and biologically active.

  20. Ames Women's Influence Network (WIN) Hidden Figures talk with "Computers" Carolyn Hofstetter and Carol Mead co-sponsored by the AAAG

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-02-01

    Ames Women's Influence Network (WIN) Hidden Figures talk with "Computers" Carolyn Hofstetter and Carol Mead co-sponsored by the AAAG. Left to right Barbara Miller, Ames EEO, Computers Carolyn Hofstetter and Carol Mead

  1. Ames Women's Influence Network (WIN) Hidden Figures talk with "Computers" Carolyn Hofstetter and Carol Mead co-sponsored by the AAAG

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-02-01

    Ames Women's Influence Network (WIN) Hidden Figures talk with "Computers" Carolyn Hofstetter and Carol Mead co-sponsored by the AAAG.. Left to right Barbara Miller, Ames EEO, Computers Carolyn Hofstetter and Carol Mead

  2. Endothelial function and vascular oxidative stress in long-lived GH/IGF-deficient Ames dwarf mice

    PubMed Central

    Csiszar, Anna; Labinskyy, Nazar; Perez, Viviana; Recchia, Fabio A.; Podlutsky, Andrej; Mukhopadhyay, Partha; Losonczy, Gyorgy; Pacher, Pal; Austad, Steven N.; Bartke, Andrzej; Ungvari, Zoltan

    2008-01-01

    Hypopituitary Ames dwarf mice have low circulating growth hormone (GH)/IGF-I levels, and they have extended longevity and exhibit many symptoms of delayed aging. To elucidate the vascular consequences of Ames dwarfism we compared endothelial O2•− and H2O2 production, mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, expression of antioxidant enzymes, and nitric oxide (NO) production in aortas of Ames dwarf and wild-type control mice. In Ames dwarf aortas endothelial O2•− and H2O2 production and ROS generation by mitochondria were enhanced compared with those in vessels of wild-type mice. In Ames dwarf aortas there was a less abundant expression of Mn-SOD, Cu,Zn-SOD, glutathione peroxidase (GPx)-1, and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). NO production and acetylcholine-induced relaxation were also decreased in aortas of Ames dwarf mice. In cultured wild-type mouse aortas and in human coronary arterial endothelial cells treatment with GH and IGF significantly reduced cellular O2•− and H2O2 production and ROS generation by mitochondria and upregulated expression of Mn-SOD, Cu,Zn-SOD, GPx-1, and eNOS. Thus GH and IGF-I promote antioxidant phenotypic changes in the endothelial cells, whereas Ames dwarfism leads to vascular oxidative stress. PMID:18757483

  3. A non-randomized [corrected] controlled trial of the active music engagement (AME) intervention on children with cancer.

    PubMed

    Robb, Sheri L; Clair, Alicia A; Watanabe, Masayo; Monahan, Patrick O; Azzouz, Faouzi; Stouffer, Janice W; Ebberts, Allison; Darsie, Emily; Whitmer, Courtney; Walker, Joey; Nelson, Kirsten; Hanson-Abromeit, Deanna; Lane, Deforia; Hannan, Ann

    2008-07-01

    Coping theorists argue that environmental factors affect how children perceive and respond to stressful events such as cancer. However, few studies have investigated how particular interventions can change coping behaviors. The active music engagement (AME) intervention was designed to counter stressful qualities of the in-patient hospital environment by introducing three forms of environmental support. The purpose of this multi-site randomized controlled trial was to determine the efficacy of the AME intervention on three coping-related behaviors (i.e. positive facial affect, active engagement, and initiation). Eighty-three participants, ages 4-7, were randomly assigned to one of three conditions: AME (n = 27), music listening (ML; n = 28), or audio storybooks (ASB; n = 28). Conditions were videotaped to facilitate behavioral data collection using time-sampling procedures. After adjusting for baseline differences, repeated measure analyses indicated that AME participants had a significantly higher frequency of coping-related behaviors compared with ML or ASB. Positive facial affect and active engagement were significantly higher during AME compared with ML and ASB (p<0.0001). Initiation was significantly higher during AME than ASB (p<0.05). This study supports the use of the AME intervention to encourage coping-related behaviors in hospitalized children aged 4-7 receiving cancer treatment. (c) 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. The viability of establishing collaborative, reconfigurable research environments for the Human Performance Research Laboratory at NASA Ames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clipson, Colin

    1994-01-01

    This paper will review and summarize research initiatives conducted between 1987 and 1992 at NASA Ames Research Center by a research team from the University of Michigan Architecture Research Laboratory. These research initiatives, funded by a NASA grant NAG2-635, examined the viability of establishing collaborative, reconfigurable research environments for the Human Performance Research Laboratory at NASA Ames in California. Collaborative Research Environments are envisioned as a way of enhancing the work of NASA research teams, optimizing the use of shared resources, and providing superior environments for housing research activities. The Integrated Simulation Project at NASA, Ames Human Performance Research Laboratory is one of the current realizations of this initiative.

  5. Effect of ecological viewing conditions on the Ames' distorted room illusion.

    PubMed

    Gehringer, W L; Engel, E

    1986-05-01

    Ecological theory asserts that the Ames' distorted room illusion (DRI) occurs as a result of the artificial restriction of information pickup. According to Gibson (1966, 1979), the illusion is eliminated when binocular vision and/or head movement are allowed. In Experiment 1, to measure the DRI, we used a size-matching technique employing discs placed within an Ames' distorted room. One hundred forty-four subjects viewed the distorted room or a control apparatus under four different viewing conditions (i.e., restricted or unrestricted head movement), using monocular and binocular vision. In Experiment 2, subjects viewed binocularly and were instructed to move freely while making judgments. Overall, the main findings of this study were that the DRI decreased with increases in viewing access and that the DRI persisted under all viewing conditions. The persistence of the illusion was felt to contradict Gibson's position.

  6. Robust Mosaicking of Stereo Digital Elevation Models from the Ames Stereo Pipeline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Tae Min; Moratto, Zachary M.; Nefian, Ara Victor

    2010-01-01

    Robust estimation method is proposed to combine multiple observations and create consistent, accurate, dense Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) from lunar orbital imagery. The NASA Ames Intelligent Robotics Group (IRG) aims to produce higher-quality terrain reconstructions of the Moon from Apollo Metric Camera (AMC) data than is currently possible. In particular, IRG makes use of a stereo vision process, the Ames Stereo Pipeline (ASP), to automatically generate DEMs from consecutive AMC image pairs. However, the DEMs currently produced by the ASP often contain errors and inconsistencies due to image noise, shadows, etc. The proposed method addresses this problem by making use of multiple observations and by considering their goodness of fit to improve both the accuracy and robustness of the estimate. The stepwise regression method is applied to estimate the relaxed weight of each observation.

  7. Antimutagenic components in Glycyrrhiza against N-methyl-N-nitrosourea in the Ames assay.

    PubMed

    Inami, Keiko; Mine, Yusuke; Kojo, Yukiko; Tanaka, Satomi; Ishikawa, Satoko; Mochizuki, Masataka

    2017-03-01

    Antimutagenesis against N-nitroso compounds contribute to prevention of human cancer. We have found that Glycyrrhiza aspera ethanolic extract exhibits antimutagenic activity against N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU) using the Ames assay with Salmonella typhimurium TA1535. In the present study, eight purified components from Glycyrrhiza, namely glabridin, glycyrrhetinic acid, glycyrrhizin, licochalcone A, licoricesaponin H2, licoricesaponin G2, liquiritigenin and liquiritin were evaluated for their antimutagenicity against MNU in the Ames assay with S. typhimurium TA1535. Glycyrrhetinic acid, glycyrrhizin, licoricesaponin G2, licoricesaponin H2 and liquiritin did not show the antimutagenicity against MNU in S. typhimurium TA1535. Glabridin, licochalcone A and liquiritigenin reduced revertant colonies derived from MNU in S. typhimurium TA1535 without showing cytotoxic effects, indicating that these compounds possess antimutagenic activity against MNU. The inhibitory activity of glabridin and licochalcone A was more effective than that of liquiritigenin. Thus, Glycyrrhiza contains antimutagenic components against DNA alkylating, direct-acting carcinogens.

  8. The NASA Ames Life Sciences Data Archive: Biobanking for the Final Frontier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rask, Jon; Chakravarty, Kaushik; French, Alison J.; Choi, Sungshin; Stewart, Helen J.

    2017-01-01

    The NASA Ames Institutional Scientific Collection involves the Ames Life Sciences Data Archive (ALSDA) and a biospecimen repository, which are responsible for archiving information and non-human biospecimens collected from spaceflight and matching ground control experiments. The ALSDA also manages a biospecimen sharing program, performs curation and long-term storage operations, and facilitates distribution of biospecimens for research purposes via a public website (https:lsda.jsc.nasa.gov). As part of our best practices, a tissue viability testing plan has been developed for the repository, which will assess the quality of samples subjected to long-term storage. We expect that the test results will confirm usability of the samples, enable broader science community interest, and verify operational efficiency of the archives. This work will also support NASA open science initiatives and guides development of NASA directives and policy for curation of biological collections.

  9. Preliminary pioneer 10 encounter results from the ames research center plasma analyzer experiment.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, J H; Collard, H R; Mihalov, J D; Intriligator, D S

    1974-01-25

    Preliminary results from the Ames Research Center plasma analyzer experiment for the Pioneer 10 Jupiter encounter indicate that Jupiter has a detached bow shock and magnetopause similar to the case at Earth but much larger in spatial extent. In contrast to Earth, Jupiter's outer magnetosphere appears to be highly inflated by thermal plasma and therefore highly responsive in size to changes in solar wind dynamic pressure.

  10. Experimental program for real gas flow code validation at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deiwert, George S.; Strawa, Anthony W.; Sharma, Surendra P.; Park, Chul

    1989-01-01

    The experimental program for validating real gas hypersonic flow codes at NASA Ames Rsearch Center is described. Ground-based test facilities used include ballistic ranges, shock tubes and shock tunnels, arc jet facilities and heated-air hypersonic wind tunnels. Also included are large-scale computer systems for kinetic theory simulations and benchmark code solutions. Flight tests consist of the Aeroassist Flight Experiment, the Space Shuttle, Project Fire 2, and planetary probes such as Galileo, Pioneer Venus, and PAET.

  11. Study of optical techniques for the Ames unitary wind tunnel. Part 5: Infrared imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, George

    1992-01-01

    A survey of infrared thermography for aerodynamics was made. Particular attention was paid to boundary layer transition detection. IR thermography flow visualization of 2-D and 3-D separation was surveyed. Heat transfer measurements and surface temperature measurements were also covered. Comparisons of several commercial IR cameras were made. The use of a recently purchased IR camera in the Ames Unitary Plan Wind Tunnels was studied. Optical access for these facilities and the methods to scan typical models was investigated.

  12. Recent Developments in Gun Operating Techniques at the NASA Ames Ballistic Ranges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogdanoff, D. W.; Miller, R. J.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes recent developments in gun operating techniques at the Ames ballistic range complex. This range complex has been in operation since the early 1960s. Behavior of sabots during separation and projectile-target impact phenomena have long been observed by means of short-duration flash X-rays: new versions allow operation in the lower-energy ("soft") X-ray range and have been found to be more effective than the earlier designs. The dynamics of sabot separation is investigated in some depth from X-ray photographs of sabots launched in the Ames 1.0 in and 1.5 in guns; the sabot separation dynamics appears to be in reasonably good agreement with standard aerodynamic theory. Certain sabot packages appear to suffer no erosion or plastic deformation on traversing the gun barrel, contrary to what would be expected. Gun erosion data from the Ames 0.5 in, 1.0 in, and 1.5 in guns is examined in detail and can be correlated with a particular non- dimensionalized powder mass parameter. The gun erosion increases very rapidly as this parameter is increased. Representative shapes of eroded gun barrels are given. Guided by a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code, the operating conditions of the Ames 0.5 in and 1.5 in guns were modified. These changes involved: (1) reduction in the piston mass, powder mass and hydrogen fill pressure and (2) reduction in pump tube volume, while maintaining hydrogen mass. These changes resulted in muzzle velocity increases of 0.5-0.8 km/sec, achieved simultaneously with 30-50 percent reductions in gun erosion.

  13. The Ames 12-Foot Pressure Tunnel: Tunnel Empty Flow Calibration Results and Discussion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zell, Peter T.; Banducci, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    An empty test section flow calibration of the refurbished NASA Ames 12-Foot Pressure Tunnel was recently completed. Distributions of total pressure, dynamic pressure, Mach number, flow angularity temperature, and turbulence are presented along with results obtained prior to facility demolition. Axial static pressure distributions along tunnel centerline are also compared. Test section model support geometric configurations will be presented along with a discussion of the issues involved with different model mounting schemes.

  14. The Ames two-dimensional stratosphere-mesospheric model. [chemistry and transport of SST pollution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitten, R. C.; Borucki, W. J.; Watson, V. R.; Capone, L. A.; Maples, A. L.; Riegel, C. A.

    1974-01-01

    A two-dimensional model of the stratosphere and mesosphere has recently been developed at Ames Research Center. The model contains chemistry based on 18 species that are solved for at each step and a seasonally-varying transport model based on both winds and eddy transport. The model is described and a preliminary assessment of the impact of supersonic aircraft flights on the ozone layer is given.

  15. Shock Tube and Ballistic Range Facilities at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grinstead, Jay H.; Wilder, Michael C.; Reda, Daniel C.; Cornelison, Charles J.; Cruden, Brett A.; Bogdanoff, David W.

    2010-01-01

    The Electric Arc Shock Tube (EAST) facility and the Hypervelocity Free Flight Aerodynamic Facility (HFFAF) at NASA Ames Research Center are described. These facilities have been in operation since the 1960s and have supported many NASA missions and technology development initiatives. The facilities have world-unique capabilities that enable experimental studies of real-gas aerothermal, gas dynamic, and kinetic phenomena of atmospheric entry.

  16. Flight researh at NASA Ames Research Center: A test pilot's perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, G. Warren

    1987-01-01

    In 1976 NASA elected to assign responsibility for each of the various flight regimes to individual research centers. The NASA Ames Research Center at Moffett Field, California was designated lead center for vertical and short takeoff and landing, V/STOL research. The three most recent flight research airplanes being flown at the center are discussed from the test pilot's perspective: the Quiet Short Haul Research Aircraft; the XV-15 Tilt Rotor Research Aircraft; and the Rotor Systems Research Aircraft.

  17. NASA Ames Contributes to Orion / EFT-1 Test Flight (Reporter Pkg)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-12-03

    NASA's Orion spacecraft is built to take humans farther than they've ever gone before. Orion will serve as the exploration vehicle that will carry the crew to space, provide emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during the space travel, and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. NASA's Ames Research Center played a critical role in the development and preparation for the flight test designated Exploration Flight Test 1, or EFT-1.

  18. Study of optical techniques for the Ames unitary wind tunnel: Digital image processing, part 6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, George

    1993-01-01

    A survey of digital image processing techniques and processing systems for aerodynamic images has been conducted. These images covered many types of flows and were generated by many types of flow diagnostics. These include laser vapor screens, infrared cameras, laser holographic interferometry, Schlieren, and luminescent paints. Some general digital image processing systems, imaging networks, optical sensors, and image computing chips were briefly reviewed. Possible digital imaging network systems for the Ames Unitary Wind Tunnel were explored.

  19. Consolidated Laser-Induced Fluorescence Diagnostic Systems for the NASA Ames Arc Jet Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grinstead, Jay H.; Wilder, Michael C.; Porter, Barry J.; Brown, Jeffrey D.; Yeung, Dickson; Battazzo, Stephen J.; Brubaker, Timothy R.

    2016-01-01

    The spectroscopic diagnostic technique of two photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence (TALIF) of atomic species for non-intrusive arc jet flow property measurement was first implemented at NASA Ames in the mid-1990s. Use of TALIF expanded at NASA Ames and to NASA Johnson's arc jet facility in the late 2000s. In 2013-2014, NASA combined the agency's large-scale arc jet test capabilities at NASA Ames. Concurrent with that effort, the agency also sponsored a project to establish two comprehensive LIF diagnostic systems for the Aerodynamic Heating Facility (AHF) and Interaction Heating Facility (IHF) arc jets. The scope of the project enabled further engineering development of the existing IHF LIF system as well as the complete reconstruction of the original AHF LIF system. The updated LIF systems are identical in design and capability. They represent the culmination of over 20 years of development experience in transitioning a specialized laboratory research tool into a measurement system for large-scale, high-demand test facilities. This paper documents the overall system design from measurement requirements to implementation. Representative data from the redeveloped AHF and IHF LIF systems are also presented.

  20. Consolidated Laser-Induced Fluorescence Diagnostic Systems for the NASA Ames Arc Jet Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grinstead, Jay; Wilder, Michael C.; Porter, Barry; Brown, Jeff; Yeung, Dickson; Battazzo, Steve; Brubaker, Tim

    2016-01-01

    The spectroscopic diagnostic technique of two photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence (TALIF) of atomic species for non-intrusive arc jet flow property measurement was first implemented at NASA Ames in the mid-1990s. Use of TALIF expanded at NASA Ames and to NASA Johnsons arc jet facility in the late 2000s. In 2013-2014, NASA combined the agency's large-scale arc jet test capabilities at NASA Ames. Concurrent with that effort, the agency also sponsored a project to establish two comprehensive LIF diagnostic systems for the Aerodynamic Heating Facility (AHF) and Interaction Heating Facility (IHF) arc jets. The scope of the project enabled further engineering development of the existing IHF LIF system as well as the complete reconstruction of the original AHF LIF system. The updated LIF systems are identical in design and capability. They represent the culmination of over 20 years of development experience in transitioning a specialized laboratory research tool into a measurement system for large-scale, high-demand test facilities. This paper documents the overall system design from measurement requirements to implementation. Representative data from the redeveloped AHF and IHF LIF systems are also presented.

  1. Ameli-EAUR project: which lessons for the promotion of agricultural value chains?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traoré, M. B.; Dakouré, M. S.; Maïga, A. H.

    2017-03-01

    Due to the lack of rain, dry spell and agricultural insufficient inputs, agricultural yields are very low and do not allow achieving food self-sufficiency in countries such as Burkina Faso. To fight against this situation in the context of climate change, several researches have emerged such as agronomic research with the promotion of crop varieties that require little water and short growth period. The Ameli-EAUR project is another example of research. This project aimed to promote hygiene and sanitation by the use of sanitation by-product in rural and sub-urban areas of Burkina Faso. Ameli-EAUR project was initiated and implemented within five years. Completed in 2015, it appears necessary to think over its impacts on production hence the question: which lessons for the promotion of agriculture, specifically for agricultural value chains“? Based on the result of a post-survey performed one year after the end of the project, the aim of this presentation is to show that project can support the promotion of agricultural Value Chains in spite of difficulties if we take into account some parameters. To do this, we will start by presenting briefly Ameli-EAUR; then we will take stock of the project; finally, we will examine the possibilities it offers for the promotion of agricultural value chains, taking as example the vegetable gardening. We will also try to show the limits of value chains which are presented nowadays as a solution to many problems of agriculture in Africa.

  2. The Earth Science Unmanned Aerial System (UAS) Demonstration in the Rover Scape at NASA's Ames Research Center.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-09-30

    Flight Test in the Roverscape (N-269) at NASA's Ames Research Center, the project team tests the DJI Matrice 600 Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) equipped with a radio tracking receiver to study the invasive asian carp in the Mississippi River.

  3. State of the Art High-Throughput Approaches to Genotoxicity: Flow Micronucleus, Ames II, GreenScreen and Comet

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    State of the Art High-Throughput Approaches to Genotoxicity: Flow Micronucleus, Ames II, GreenScreen and Comet (Presented by Dr. Marilyn J. Aardema, Chief Scientific Advisor, Toxicology, Dr. Leon Stankowski, et. al. (6/28/2012)

  4. NASA Ames DEVELOP Interns: Helping the Western United States Manage Natural Resources One Project at a Time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justice, Erin; Newcomer, Michelle

    2010-01-01

    The western half of the United States is made up of a number of diverse ecosystems ranging from arid desert to coastal wetlands and rugged forests. Every summer for the past 7 years students ranging from high school to graduate level gather at NASA Ames Research Center (ARC) as part of the DEVELOP Internship Program. Under the guidance of Jay Skiles [Ames Research Center (ARC) - Ames DEVELOP Manager] and Cindy Schmidt [ARC/San Jose State University Ames DEVELOP Coordinator] they work as a team on projects exploring topics including: invasive species, carbon flux, wetland restoration, air quality monitoring, storm visualizations, and forest fires. The study areas for these projects have been in Washington, Utah, Oregon, Nevada, Hawaii, Alaska and California. Interns combine data from NASA and partner satellites with models and in situ measurements to complete prototype projects demonstrating how NASA data and resources can help communities tackle their Earth Science related problems.

  5. Computational Modeling of the Ames 11-Ft Transonic Wind Tunnel in Conjunction with IofNEWT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Djomehri, M. Jahed; Buning, Pieter G.; Erickson, Larry L.; George, Michael W. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Technical advances in Computational Fluid Dynamics have now made it possible to simulate complex three-dimensional internal flows about models of various size placed in a Transonic Wind Tunnel. TWT wall interference effects have been a source of error in predicting flight data from actual wind tunnel measured data. An advantage of such internal CFD calculations is to directly compare numerical results with the actual tunnel data for code assessment and tunnel flow analysis. A CFD capability has recently been devised for flow analysis of the NASA/Ames 11-Ft TWT facility. The primary objectives of this work are to provide a CFD tool to study the NASA/Ames 11-Ft TWT flow characteristics, to understand the slotted wall interference effects, and to validate CFD codes. A secondary objective is to integrate the internal flowfield calculations with the Pressure Sensitive Paint data, a surface pressure distribution capability in Ames' production wind tunnels. The effort has been part of the Ames IofNEWT, Integration of Numerical and Experimental Wind Tunnels project, which is aimed at providing further analytical tools for industrial application. We used the NASA/Ames OVERFLOW code to solve the thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations. Viscosity effects near the model are captured by Baldwin-Lomax or Baldwin-Barth turbulence models. The solver was modified to model the flow behavior in the vicinity of the tunnel longitudinal slotted walls. A suitable porous type wall boundary condition was coded to account for the cross-flow through the test section. Viscous flow equations were solved in generalized coordinates with a three-factor implicit central difference scheme in conjunction with the Chimera grid procedure. The internal flow field about the model and the tunnel walls were descretized by the Chimera overset grid system. This approach allows the application of efficient grid generation codes about individual components of the configuration; separate minor grids were developed

  6. The NASA Ames Hypervelocity Free Flight Aerodynamic Facility: Experimental Simulation of the Atmospheric Break-Up of Meteors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilder, M. C.; Bogdanoff, D. W.

    2015-01-01

    The Hypervelocity Free Flight Aerodynamic Facility at NASA Ames Research Center provides a potential platform for the experimental simulation of meteor breakup at conditions that closely match full-scale entry condition for select parameters. The poster describes the entry environment simulation capabilities of the Hypervelocity Free Flight Aerodynamic Facility (HFFAF) at NASA Ames Research Center and provides example images of the fragmentation of a hypersonic projectile for which break-up was initiated by mechanical forces (impact with a thin polymer diaphragm).

  7. Results of the NASP Ames Integrated Mixing Hypersonic Engine (AIMHYE) Scramjet Test Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavolowsky, John A.; Loomis, Mark P.; Deiwert, George S.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes the test techniques and results from the National Aerospace Plane Government Work Package 53, the Ames Integrated Mixing Hypersonic Engine (AIMHYE) Scramjet Test program conducted in the NASA Ames 16-Inch Combustion Driven Shock Tunnel. This was a series of near full-scale scramjet combustor tests with the objective to obtain high speed combustor and nozzle data from an engine with injector configurations similar to the NASP E21 and E22a designs. The experimental test approach was to use a large combustor model (80-100% throat height) designed and fabricated for testing in the semi-free jet mode. The conditions tested were similar to the "blue book" conditions at Mach 12, 14, and 16. GWP 53 validated use of large, long test time impulse facilities, specifically the Ames 16-Inch Shock Tunnel, for high Mach number scramjet propulsion testing an integrated test rig (inlet, combustor, and nozzle). Discussion of key features of the test program will include: effects of the 2-D combustor inlet pressure profile; performance of large injectors' fueling system that included nozzlettes, base injection, and film cooling; and heat transfer measurements to the combustor. Significant instrumentation development and application efforts include the following: combustor force balance application for measurement of combustor drag for comparison with integrated point measurements of skin friction; nozzle metric strip for measuring thrust with comparison to integrated pressure measurements; and nonintrusive optical fiber-based diode laser absorption measurements of combustion products for determination of combustor performance. Direct measurements will be reported for specific test article configurations and compared with CFD solutions.

  8. NASA Ames Research Center R and D Services Directorate Biomedical Systems Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollitt, J.; Flynn, K.

    1999-01-01

    The Ames Research Center R&D Services Directorate teams with NASA, other government agencies and/or industry investigators for the development, design, fabrication, manufacturing and qualification testing of space-flight and ground-based experiment hardware for biomedical and general aerospace applications. In recent years, biomedical research hardware and software has been developed to support space-flight and ground-based experiment needs including the E 132 Biotelemetry system for the Research Animal Holding Facility (RAHF), E 100 Neurolab neuro-vestibular investigation systems, the Autogenic Feedback Systems, and the Standard Interface Glove Box (SIGB) experiment workstation module. Centrifuges, motion simulators, habitat design, environmental control systems, and other unique experiment modules and fixtures have also been developed. A discussion of engineered systems and capabilities will be provided to promote understanding of possibilities for future system designs in biomedical applications. In addition, an overview of existing engineered products will be shown. Examples of hardware and literature that demonstrate the organization's capabilities will be displayed. The Ames Research Center R&D Services Directorate is available to support the development of new hardware and software systems or adaptation of existing systems to meet the needs of academic, commercial/industrial, and government research requirements. The Ames R&D Services Directorate can provide specialized support for: System concept definition and feasibility Mathematical modeling and simulation of system performance Prototype hardware development Hardware and software design Data acquisition systems Graphical user interface development Motion control design Hardware fabrication and high-fidelity machining Composite materials development and application design Electronic/electrical system design and fabrication System performance verification testing and qualification.

  9. Recent Upgrades to the NASA Ames Mars General Circulation Model: Applications to Mars' Water Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollingsworth, Jeffery L.; Kahre, M. A.; Haberle, R. M.; Montmessin, F.; Wilson, R. J.; Schaeffer, J.

    2008-09-01

    We report on recent improvements to the NASA Ames Mars general circulation model (GCM), a robust 3D climate-modeling tool that is state-of-the-art in terms of its physics parameterizations and subgrid-scale processes, and which can be applied to investigate physical and dynamical processes of the present (and past) Mars climate system. The most recent version (gcm2.1, v.24) of the Ames Mars GCM utilizes a more generalized radiation code (based on a two-stream approximation with correlated k's); an updated transport scheme (van Leer formulation); a cloud microphysics scheme that assumes a log-normal particle size distribution whose first two moments are treated as atmospheric tracers, and which includes the nucleation, growth and sedimentation of ice crystals. Atmospheric aerosols (e.g., dust and water-ice) can either be radiatively active or inactive. We apply this version of the Ames GCM to investigate key aspects of the present water cycle on Mars. Atmospheric dust is partially interactive in our simulations; namely, the radiation code "sees" a prescribed distribution that follows the MGS thermal emission spectrometer (TES) year-one measurements with a self-consistent vertical depth scale that varies with season. The cloud microphysics code interacts with a transported dust tracer column whose surface source is adjusted to maintain the TES distribution. The model is run from an initially dry state with a better representation of the north residual cap (NRC) which accounts for both surface-ice and bare-soil components. A seasonally repeatable water cycle is obtained within five Mars years. Our sub-grid scale representation of the NRC provides for a more realistic flux of moisture to the atmosphere and a much drier water cycle consistent with recent spacecraft observations (e.g., Mars Express PFS, corrected MGS/TES) compared to models that assume a spatially uniform and homogeneous north residual polar cap.

  10. Effect of protracted estrogen administration on the thyroid of Ames dwarf mice.

    PubMed

    Vidal, S; Cameselle-Teijeiro, J; Horvath, E; Kovacs, K; Bartke, A

    2001-04-01

    The effect of protracted estrogen administration on estrogen receptor expression and cellular composition of the thyroid was examined in genetically thyrotropin (TSH)-deficient female Ames dwarf mice (df/df) to reveal whether estrogen might act independently from TSH. inducing changes in thyroid morphology and function. To evaluate such changes, the thyroid from four estrogen-implanted Ames dwarf mice, four sham-implanted Ames dwarf mice and four sham-implanted normal littermate mice were investigated histologically, immunohistochemically and morphometrically. Our morphologic study demonstrated significant differences in the colloid areas of normal and dwarf mice (P<0.001). The correlation observed between this parameter and body weights (r=0.610, P<0.05) and thyroid weights (r=0.729, P<0.01) suggests that the decrease in the colloid areas is not a result of abnormal folliculogenesis but is in direct correlation with the small thyroid and body size of dwarf mice. Although two types of estrogen receptors are known to exist in the present study, only the alpha (ERalpha) variant was found in the thyroid. ERalpha immunoreactivity was detected in the nuclei of parafollicular cells but not of the follicular epithelium. No significant differences were reported in ER expression between estrogen-implanted dwarf mice and sham-implanted dwarf mice, suggesting that estrogen receptor expression in the thyroid is independent of circulating estrogen levels. In spite of the absence of ERalpha in follicular cells, protracted estrogen administration affected mainly the follicular cells. Our results suggest that when TSH is absent estrogens may exert a negative feedback on the activity of follicular cells.

  11. Ames S-32 O-16 O-18 Line List for High-Resolution Experimental IR Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Xinchuan; Schwenke, David W.; Lee, Timothy J.

    2016-01-01

    By comparing to the most recent experimental data and spectra of the SO2 628 ?1/?3 bands (see Ulenikov et al., JQSRT 168 (2016) 29-39), this study illustrates the reliability and accuracy of the Ames-296K SO2 line list, which is accurate enough to facilitate such high-resolution spectroscopic analysis. The SO2 628 IR line list is computed on a recently improved potential energy surface (PES) refinement, denoted Ames-Pre2, and the published purely ab initio CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVQZ dipole moment surface. Progress has been made in both energy level convergence and rovibrational quantum number assignments agreeing with laboratory analysis models. The accuracy of the computed 628 energy levels and line list is similar to what has been achieved and reported for SO2 626 and 646, i.e. 0.01-0.03 cm(exp -1) for bands up to 5500 cm(exp -1). During the comparison, we found some discrepancies in addition to overall good agreements. The three-IR-list based feature-by-feature analysis in a 0.25 cm(exp -1) spectral window clearly demonstrates the power of the current Ames line lists with new assignments, correction of some errors, and intensity contributions from varied sources including other isotopologues. We are inclined to attribute part of detected discrepancies to an incomplete experimental analysis and missing intensity in the model. With complete line position, intensity, and rovibrational quantum numbers determined at 296 K, spectroscopic analysis is significantly facilitated especially for a spectral range exhibiting such an unusually high density of lines. The computed 628 rovibrational levels and line list are accurate enough to provide alternatives for the missing bands or suspicious assignments, as well as helpful to identify these isotopologues in various celestial environments. The next step will be to revisit the SO2 828 and 646 spectral analyses.

  12. Feature combination networks for the interpretation of statistical machine learning models: application to Ames mutagenicity.

    PubMed

    Webb, Samuel J; Hanser, Thierry; Howlin, Brendan; Krause, Paul; Vessey, Jonathan D

    2014-03-25

    A new algorithm has been developed to enable the interpretation of black box models. The developed algorithm is agnostic to learning algorithm and open to all structural based descriptors such as fragments, keys and hashed fingerprints. The algorithm has provided meaningful interpretation of Ames mutagenicity predictions from both random forest and support vector machine models built on a variety of structural fingerprints.A fragmentation algorithm is utilised to investigate the model's behaviour on specific substructures present in the query. An output is formulated summarising causes of activation and deactivation. The algorithm is able to identify multiple causes of activation or deactivation in addition to identifying localised deactivations where the prediction for the query is active overall. No loss in performance is seen as there is no change in the prediction; the interpretation is produced directly on the model's behaviour for the specific query. Models have been built using multiple learning algorithms including support vector machine and random forest. The models were built on public Ames mutagenicity data and a variety of fingerprint descriptors were used. These models produced a good performance in both internal and external validation with accuracies around 82%. The models were used to evaluate the interpretation algorithm. Interpretation was revealed that links closely with understood mechanisms for Ames mutagenicity. This methodology allows for a greater utilisation of the predictions made by black box models and can expedite further study based on the output for a (quantitative) structure activity model. Additionally the algorithm could be utilised for chemical dataset investigation and knowledge extraction/human SAR development.

  13. Intoxication-Related AmED (Alcohol Mixed with Energy Drink) Expectancies Scale: Initial Development and Validation

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Kathleen E.; Dermen, Kurt H.; Lucke, Joseph F.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Young adult use of alcohol mixed with energy drinks (AmEDs) has been linked with elevated risks for a constellation of problem behaviors. These risks may be conditioned by expectancies regarding the effects of caffeine in conjunction with alcohol consumption. The aim of this study was to describe the construction and psychometric evaluation of the Intoxication-Related AmED Expectancies Scale (AmED_EXPI), 15 self-report items measuring beliefs about how the experience of AmED intoxication differs from the experience of noncaffeinated alcohol (NCA) intoxication. METHODS Scale development and testing were conducted using data from a U.S. national sample of 3,105 adolescents and emerging adults aged 13–25. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses were conducted to evaluate the factor structure and establish factor invariance across gender, age, and prior experience with AmED use. Cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses examining correlates of AmED use were used to assess construct and predictive validity. RESULTS In confirmatory factor analyses, fit indices for the hypothesized four-factor structure (i.e., Intoxication Management [IM], Alertness [AL], Sociability [SO], and Jitters [JT]) revealed a moderately good fit to the data. Together, these factors accounted for 75.3% of total variance. The factor structure was stable across male/female, teen/young adult, and AmED experience/no experience subgroups. The resultant unit-weighted subscales showed strong internal consistency and satisfactory convergent validity. Baseline scores on the IM, SO, and JT subscales predicted changes in AmED use over a subsequent three-month period. CONCLUSIONS The AmED_EXPI appears to be a reliable and valid tool for measuring expectancies about the effects of caffeine during alcohol intoxication. PMID:28421613

  14. Administrator Bolden visits Ames on This Week @NASA – February 19, 2016

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-02-19

    NASA Administrator Charles Bolden visited Ames Research Center at Moffett Field, California to thank employees for the work they do on behalf of the agency to improve aviation. President Obama’s Fiscal Year 2017 budget proposal for NASA calls for a multi-year investment in aeronautics research that will enable the agency to test, demonstrate and validate cutting-edge technologies designed to make aviation cleaner, greener, safer, and quieter. Also, Cygnus leaves the space station, New astrophysics mission, X-ray astronomy mission launches, and NEAR Shoemaker anniversary!

  15. Laser velocimeter measurements of dynamic stall. [conducted in the Ames two foot wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, F. K.

    1984-01-01

    Laser velocimeter measurements were made during the study of a two-dimensional NACA 0012 airfoil undergoing conditions of dynamic stall. The measurements, which were obtained in the Ames 2 foot wind tunnel at reduced frequencies of 0.12 and 1.2, show significant flow field hysteresis around the static stall angle. Comparisons were also made with dual-plate interferograms and good agreement was found for the attached flow cases. For separated flow, characteristic vortex shedding caused poor agreement and significantly increased the measured Reynolds shear stresses.

  16. Memoirs of an Aeronautical Engineer: Flight Tests at Ames Research Center: 1940-1970

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Seth B.

    2002-01-01

    Seth worked over a period of several years to prepare this monograph-collecting information, drafting the text, and finding and selecting the historic photographs. He describes the beginnings of flight research as he knew it at Ames Research Center, recalls numerous World War II programs, relates his experiences with powered-lift aircraft, and concludes with his impressions of two international flight research efforts. His comprehensive collection of large-format photographs of the airplanes and people involved in the various flight activities related in the text constitutes a compelling part of his work.

  17. Evaluation of nuclear-facility decommissioning projects. Summary report: Ames Laboratory Research Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Link, B.W.; Miller, R.L.

    1983-07-01

    This document summarizes the available information concerning the decommissioning of the Ames Laboratory Research Reactor (ALRR), a five-megawatt heavy water moderated and cooled research reactor. The data were placed in a computerized information retrieval/manipulation system which permits its future utilization for purposes of comparative analysis. This information is presented both in detail in its computer output form and also as a manually assembled summarization which highlights the more important aspects of the decommissioning program. Some comparative information with reference to generic decommissioning data extracted from NUREG/CR 1756, Technology, Safety and Costs of Decommissioning Nuclear Research and Test Reactors, is included.

  18. Yesterday, today and tomorrow: A perspective of CFD at NASA's Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kutler, Paul; Gross, Anthony R.

    1987-01-01

    The opportunity to reflect on the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) progam at the NASA Ames Research Center (its beginning, its present state, and its direction for the future) is afforded. Essential elements of the research program during each period are reviewed, including people, facilities, and research problems. The burgeoning role that CFD is playing in the aerospace business is discussed, as is the necessity for validated CFD tools. The current aeronautical position of this country is assessed, as are revolutionary goals to help maintain its aeronautical supremacy in the world.

  19. Recent Progress in Entry Radiation Measurements in the NASA Ames Electric ARC Shock Tube Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruden, Brett A.

    2012-01-01

    The Electric Arc Shock Tube (EAST) at NASA Ames Research Center is NASA's only working shock tube capable of obtaining conditions representative of entry in a multitude of planetary atmospheres. The facility is capable of mapping spectroscopic signatures of a wide range of planetary entries from the Vacuum Ultraviolet through Mid-Wave Infrared (120-5500 nm). This paper summarizes the tests performed in EAST for Earth, Mars and Venus entries since 2008, then focuses on a specific test case for CO2/N2 mixtures. In particular, the paper will focus on providing information for the proper interpretation of the EAST data.

  20. Feasibility study of transit photon correlation anemometer for Ames Research Center unitary wind tunnel plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayo, W. T., Jr.; Smart, A. E.

    1979-01-01

    A laser transit anemometer measured a two-dimensional vector velocity, using the transit time of scattering particles between two focused and parallel laser beams. The objectives were: (1) the determination of the concentration levels and light scattering efficiencies of naturally occurring, submicron particles in the NASA/Ames unitary wind tunnel and (2) the evaluation based on these measured data of a laser transit anemometer with digital correlation processing for nonintrusive velocity measurement in this facility. The evaluation criteria were the speeds at which point velocity measurements could be realized with this technique (as determined from computer simulations) for given accuracy requirements.

  1. Supporting flight data analysis for Space Shuttle Orbiter Experiments at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, M. J.; Budnick, M. P.; Yang, L.; Chiasson, M. P.

    1983-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Orbiter Experiments program in responsible for collecting flight data to extend the research and technology base for future aerospace vehicle design. The Infrared Imagery of Shuttle (IRIS), Catalytic Surface Effects, and Tile Gap Heating experiments sponsored by Ames Research Center are part of this program. The paper describes the software required to process the flight data which support these experiments. In addition, data analysis techniques, developed in support of the IRIS experiment, are discussed. Using the flight data base, the techniques have provided information useful in analyzing and correcting problems with the experiment, and in interpreting the IRIS image obtained during the entry of the third Shuttle mission.

  2. Supporting flight data analysis for Space Shuttle Orbiter experiments at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, M. J.; Budnick, M. P.; Yang, L.; Chiasson, M. P.

    1983-01-01

    The space shuttle orbiter experiments program is responsible for collecting flight data to extend the research and technology base for future aerospace vehicle design. The infrared imagery of shuttle (IRIS), catalytic surface effects, and tile gap heating experiments sponsored by Ames Research Center are part of this program. The software required to process the flight data which support these experiments is described. In addition, data analysis techniques, developed in support of the IRIS experiment, are discussed. Using the flight data base, the techniques provide information useful in analyzing and correcting problems with the experiment, and in interpreting the IRIS image obtained during the entry of the third shuttle mission.

  3. Dynamic Calibration of the NASA Ames Rotor Test Apparatus Steady/Dynamic Rotor Balance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, Randall L.; vanAken, Johannes M.

    1996-01-01

    The NASA Ames Rotor Test Apparatus was modified to include a Steady/Dynamic Rotor Balance. The dynamic calibration procedures and configurations are discussed. Random excitation was applied at the rotor hub, and vibratory force and moment responses were measured on the steady/dynamic rotor balance. Transfer functions were computed using the load cell data and the vibratory force and moment responses from the rotor balance. Calibration results showing the influence of frequency bandwidth, hub mass, rotor RPM, thrust preload, and dynamic loads through the stationary push rods are presented and discussed.

  4. Test-section noise of the Ames 7 by 10-foot wind tunnel no. 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soderman, P. T.

    1976-01-01

    An investigation was made of the test-section noise levels at various wind speeds in the Ames 7- by 10-Foot Wind Tunnel No. 1. No model was in the test section. Results showed that aerodynamic noise from various struts used to monitor flow conditions in the test section dominated the wind-tunnel background noise over much of the frequency spectrum. A tapered microphone stand with a thin trailing edge generated less noise than did a constant-chord strut with a blunt trailing edge. Noise from small holes in the test-section walls was insignificant.

  5. Study of optical techniques for the Ames unitary wind tunnels. Part 1: Schlieren

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, George

    1992-01-01

    Alignment procedures and conceptual designs for the rapid alignment of the Ames Unitary Wind Tunnel schlieren systems were devised. The schlieren systems can be aligned by translating the light source, the mirrors, and the knife edge equal distances. One design for rapid alignment consists of a manual pin locking scheme. The other is a motorized electronic position scheme. A study of two optical concepts which can be used with the schlieren system was made. These are the 'point diffraction interferometers' and the 'focus schlieren'. Effects of vibrations were studied.

  6. Global biology - An interdisciplinary scientific research program at NASA, Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawless, J. G.; Colin, L.

    1983-01-01

    NASA has initiated new effort in Global Biology, the primary focus of which is to understand biogeochemical cycles. As part of this effort, an interdisciplinary team of scientists has formed at Ames Research Center to investigate the cycling of sulfur in the marine coastal zone and to study the cycling of nitrogen in terrestrial ecosystems. Both studies will use remotely sensed data, coupled with ground-based research, to identify and measure the transfer of major and minor biologically produced gases between these ecosystems and global reservoirs.

  7. Global Biology: An Interdisciplinary Scientific Research Program at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawless, James G.; Colin, Lawrence

    1984-01-01

    NASA has initiated new effort in Global Biology, the primary focus of which is to understand biogeochemical cycles. As part of this effort, an interdisciplinary team of scientists has formed at Ames Research Center to investigate the cycling of sulfur in the marine coastal zone and to study the cycling of nitrogen in terrestrial ecosystems. Both studies will use remotely sensed data, coupled with ground-based research, to identify and measure the transfer of major and minor biologically produced gases between these ecosystems and global reservoirs.

  8. NASA Ames Hosts Viewing Party for Final Shuttle Launch (Reporter Package)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-07-12

    The public was invited to NASA's Ames Research Center to observe a live televised broadcast of the final space shuttle launch on July 8, 2011. The STS-135 mission is the final flight of NASA's Space Shuttle Program. The orbiter Atlantis is carrying a system to investigate the potential for robotically refueling existing spacecraft and bring back a failed ammonia pump to help NASA better understand and improve pump designs for future systems. It also will deliver spare parts to sustain space station operations after the shuttles retire from service.

  9. Testing of SLA-561V in NASA-Ames' Turbulent Flow Duct with Augmented Radiative Heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sepka, Steven A.; Kornienko, Robert S.; Radbourne, Chris A.

    2010-01-01

    As part of Mars Science Laboratory s (MSL) heatshield development program, SLA-561 was tested in NASA Ames Turbulent Flow Duct (TFD) Facility. For these tests, the TFD facility was modified to include a ceramic plate located in the wall opposite to the test model. Normally the TFD wall opposite to the test model is water-cooled steel. Installing a noncooled ceramic plate allows the ceramic to absorb convective heating and radiate the energy back to the test model as the plate heats up. This work was an effort to increase the severity of TFD test conditions. Presented here are the results from these tests.

  10. Aircraft flight flutter testing at the NASA Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kehoe, Michael W.

    1988-01-01

    Many parameter identification techniques have been used at the NASA Ames Research Center, Dryden Research Facility at Edwards Air Force Base to determine the aeroelastic stability of new and modified research vehicles in flight. This paper presents a summary of each technique used with emphasis on fast Fourier transform methods. Experiences gained from application of these techniques to various flight test programs are discussed. Also presented are data-smoothing techniques used for test data distorted by noise. Data are presented for various aircraft to demonstrate the accuracy of each parameter identification technique discussed.

  11. Transverse vorticity measurements in the NASA Ames 80 x 120 wind tunnel boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foss, John F.; Bhol, D. G.; Bramkamp, F. D.; Klewicki, J. G.

    1994-01-01

    The MSU compact four-wire transverse vorticity probe permits omega(sub z)(t) measurements in a nominally 1 sq mm domain. Note that a conventional coordinate system is used with x and y in the streamwise and normal directions respectively. The purpose of this investigation was to acquire time series data in the same access port at the ceiling of the 80 ft x 120 ft wind tunnel (NASA Ames Research Center) as earlier used by the Wallace group from the University of Maryland and to compare the present results with those of the three-component vorticity probe used in that earlier study.

  12. Study of optical techniques for the Ames unitary wind tunnels. Part 4: Model deformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, George

    1992-01-01

    A survey of systems capable of model deformation measurements was conducted. The survey included stereo-cameras, scanners, and digitizers. Moire, holographic, and heterodyne interferometry techniques were also looked at. Stereo-cameras with passive or active targets are currently being deployed for model deformation measurements at NASA Ames and LaRC, Boeing, and ONERA. Scanners and digitizers are widely used in robotics, motion analysis, medicine, etc., and some of the scanner and digitizers can meet the model deformation requirements. Commercial stereo-cameras, scanners, and digitizers are being improved in accuracy, reliability, and ease of operation. A number of new systems are coming onto the market.

  13. Loss of 3-D shape constancy in interior spaces: the basis of the Ames-room illusion.

    PubMed

    Dorward, F M; Day, R H

    1997-01-01

    The apparently rectangular form of the irregularly shaped Ames room is explained in terms of a loss of interior 3-D shape constancy consequent on viewing the room with one eye through a small specifically positioned aperture. In the absence of retinal disparity and motion parallax the appearance of the room is held to shift markedly toward the rectangular dimensions of its retinal image. Three experiments designed to test this explanation with a miniature (one-tenth size) version of the Ames room No 1 with the matched 2-D shape of the back wall and as an index of interior 3-D shape are reported. The experiments showed that interior constancy was almost fully restored with binocular viewing of the room (experiment 1). The effect with a 'skeletal' version of the room was about the same as that with the conventional version and was clearly evident when the back wall or its frame version was presented alone (experiment 2), and it varied according to whether the interior perspective corresponded with that of the Ames or a rectangular room (experiment 3). Experiment 3 also showed that a rectangular room is significantly distorted when the interior perspective accords with that of the Ames room. These outcomes are construed as supporting the loss-of-constancy explanation and as showing that the Ames-room effect is one of a class of illusions attributable to the absence of stimulus correlates that normally sustain visual shape constancy.

  14. IGF-1 mediated phosphorylation of specific IRS-1 serines in Ames dwarf fibroblasts is associated with longevity.

    PubMed

    Papaconstantinou, John; Hsieh, Ching-Chyuan

    2015-11-03

    Insulin/IGF-1 signaling involves phosphorylation/dephosphorylation of serine/threonine or tyrosine residues of the insulin receptor substrate (IRS) proteins and is associated with hormonal control of longevity determination of certain long-lived mice. The stimulation of serine phosphorylations by IGF-1 suggests there is insulin/IGF-1 crosstalk that involves the phosphorylation of the same serine residues. By this mechanism, insulin and IGF-1 mediated phosphorylation of specific IRS-1 serines could play a role in longevity determination.We used fibroblasts from WT and Ames dwarf mice to examine whether: (a) IGF-1 stimulates phosphorylation of IRS-1 serines targeted by insulin; (b) the levels of serine phosphorylation differ in WT vs. Ames fibroblasts; and (c) aging affects the levels of these serine phosphorylations which are altered in the Ames dwarf mutant. We have shown that IRS-1 is a substrate for IGF-1 induced phosphorylation of Ser307, Ser612, Ser636/639, and Ser1101; that the levels of phosphorylation of these serines are significantly lower in Ames vs. WT cells; that IGF-1 mediated phosphorylation of these serines increases with age in WT cells. We propose that insulin/IGF-1 cross talk and level of phosphorylation of specific IRS-1 serines may promote the Ames dwarf longevity phenotype.

  15. Recent Advancements in the Infrared Flow Visualization System for the NASA Ames Unitary Plan Wind Tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garbeff, Theodore J., II; Baerny, Jennifer K.

    2017-01-01

    The following details recent efforts undertaken at the NASA Ames Unitary Plan wind tunnels to design and deploy an advanced, production-level infrared (IR) flow visualization data system. Highly sensitive IR cameras, coupled with in-line image processing, have enabled the visualization of wind tunnel model surface flow features as they develop in real-time. Boundary layer transition, shock impingement, junction flow, vortex dynamics, and buffet are routinely observed in both transonic and supersonic flow regimes all without the need of dedicated ramps in test section total temperature. Successful measurements have been performed on wing-body sting mounted test articles, semi-span floor mounted aircraft models, and sting mounted launch vehicle configurations. The unique requirements of imaging in production wind tunnel testing has led to advancements in the deployment of advanced IR cameras in a harsh test environment, robust data acquisition storage and workflow, real-time image processing algorithms, and evaluation of optimal surface treatments. The addition of a multi-camera IR flow visualization data system to the Ames UPWT has demonstrated itself to be a valuable analyses tool in the study of new and old aircraft/launch vehicle aerodynamics and has provided new insight for the evaluation of computational techniques.

  16. Low body temperature in long-lived Ames dwarf mice at rest and during stress.

    PubMed

    Hunter, W S; Croson, W B; Bartke, A; Gentry, M V; Meliska, C J

    1999-09-01

    Among homeothermic animals, larger species generally have lower metabolic rates and live longer than do smaller species. Because Ames dwarf mice (dwarfs) live approximately 1 year longer than their larger normal sex- and age-matched siblings (normals), we hypothesized that they would have lower body core temperature (Tco). We, therefore, measured Tco of six dwarfs and six normals during 24-h periods of ad lib feeding, 24-h food deprivation, and emotional stress induced by cage switching. With ad lib feeding, Tco of dwarfs averaged 1.6 degrees C lower than normals; during food deprivation, Tco of both dwarfs and controls was significantly lower than when food was available ad lib; and following cage switch, Tco was elevated in both groups. However, during all three experiments, Tco was significantly lower in dwarfs than in normals. These data support the hypothesis that Ames dwarf mice, which live longer than normal size controls, maintain lower Tco than normals. Because dwarfs are deficient in thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and growth hormone (GH), their low Tco may be a result of reduced thermogenesis due to lack of those hormones. However, whether low Tco per se is related to the increased longevity of the dwarf mice remains an interesting possibility to be investigated.

  17. Extending the NASA Ames Mars General Circulation Model to Explore Mars’ Middle Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brecht, Amanda; Hollingsworth, J.; Kahre, M.; Schaeffer, J.

    2013-10-01

    The NASA Ames Mars General Circulation Model (MGCM) upper boundary has been extended to ~120 km altitude (p ~10-5 mbar). The extension of the MGCM upper boundary initiates the ability to understand the connection between the lower and upper atmosphere of Mars through the middle atmosphere 70 - 120 km). Moreover, it provides the opportunity to support future missions (i.e. the 2013 MAVEN mission). A major factor in this extension is the incorporation of the Non-Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (NLTE) heating (visible) and cooling (infrared). This modification to the radiative transfer forcing (i.e., RT code) has been significantly tested in a 1D vertical column and now has been ported to the full 3D Mars GCM. Initial results clearly show the effects of NLTE in the upper middle atmosphere. Diagnostic of seasonal mean fields and large-scale wave activity will be shown with insight into circulation patterns in the middle atmosphere. Furthermore, sensitivity tests with the resolution of the pressure and temperature grids, in which the k-coefficients are calculated upon, have been performed in the 1D RT code. Our progress on this research will be presented. Brecht is supported by NASA’s Postdoctoral Program at the Ames Research Center, administered by Oak Ridge Associated Universities through a contract with NASA.

  18. Mutagenicity of ω-3 fatty acid peroxidation products in the Ames test.

    PubMed

    Grúz, Petr; Shimizu, Masatomi; Sugiyama, Kei-Ichi; Honma, Masamitsu

    2017-07-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) represent one of the main building blocks of cellular membranes and their varying composition impacts lifespan as well as susceptibility to cancer and other degenerative diseases. Increased intake of ω-3 PUFA is taught to compensate for the abundance of ω-6 PUFA in modern human diet and prevent cardiocirculatory diseases. However, highly unsaturated PUFA of marine and seed origin easily oxidize to aldehydic products which form DNA adducts. With increased PUFA consumption it is prudent to re-evaluate ω-3 PUFA safety and the genotoxic hazards of their metabolites. We have used the standard Ames test to examine the mutagenicity of 2 hexenals derived from lipid peroxidation of the common ω-3 PUFA in human diet and tissues. Both 4-hydroxyhexenal and 2-hexenal derived from the ω-3 docosahexaenoic and α-linolenic acid, respectively, induced base substitutions in the TA104 and TA100 Ames strains in a dose dependent manner. Their mutagenicity was dependent on the Y-family DNA polymerase RI and they did not induce other types of mutations such as the -2 and -1 frameshifts in the TA98 and TA97 strains. Our results expand previous findings about the mutagenicity of related ω-3 peroxidation product 4-oxohexenal and raise alert that overuse of ω-3 rich oils may have adverse effect on genome stability. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Consolidated Laser-Induced Fluorescence Diagnostic Systems for the NASA Ames Arc Jet Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grinstead, Jay H.; Wilder, Michael C.; Porter, Barry J.; Brown, Jeffrey D.; Yeung, Dickson; Battazzo, Stephen J.; Brubaker, Timothy R.

    2016-01-01

    The spectroscopic diagnostic technique of two photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) of atomic species for non-intrusive arc jet flow property measurement was first implemented at NASA Ames in the mid-1990s. In 2013-2014, NASA combined the agency's large-scale arc jet test capabilities at NASA Ames. Concurrent with that effort, the agency also sponsored a project to establish two comprehensive LIF diagnostic systems for the Aerodynamic Heating Facility (AHF) and Interaction Heating Facility (IHF) arc jets. The scope of the project enabled further engineering development of the existing IHF LIF system as well as the complete reconstruction of the AHF LIF system. The updated LIF systems are identical in design and capability. They represent the culmination of over 20 years of development experience in transitioning a specialized laboratory research tool into a measurement system for large-scale, high-demand test facilities. This paper will document the latest improvements of the LIF system design and demonstrations of the redeveloped AHF and IHF LIF systems.

  20. Diverse Studies in the Reactivated NASA/Ames Radiation Facility: From Shock Layer Spectroscopy to Thermal Protection System Impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Robert J.; Hartman, G. Joseph (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    NASA/Ames' Hypervelocity Free-Flight Radiation Facility has been reactivated after having been decommissioned for some 15 years, first tests beginning in early 1994. This paper discusses two widely different studies from the first series, one involving spectroscopic analysis of model shock-layer radiation, and the other the production of representative impact damage in space shuttle thermal protection tiles for testing in the Ames arc-jet facilities. These studies emphasize the interorganizational and interdisciplinary value of the facility in the newly-developing structure of NASA.

  1. Methionine flux to transsulfuration is enhanced in the long living Ames dwarf mouse

    PubMed Central

    Uthus, Eric O.; Brown-Borg, Holly M.

    2007-01-01

    Long-lived Ames dwarf mice lack growth hormone, prolactin, and thyroid stimulating hormone. Additionally the dwarf mice have enzyme activities and levels that combat oxidative stress more efficiently than those of normal mice. We have shown that methionine metabolism in Ames mice is markedly different than in their wild type littermates. In our previous work we hypothesized that the flux of methionine to the transsulfuration pathway is enhanced in the dwarf mice. The current study was designed to determine whether the flux of methionine to the transsulfuration pathway is increased. We did this by injecting either l-[methyl-3H]-methionine or l-[35S]-methionine into dwarf or normal mice and then determined retained label (in form of S-adenosylmethionine) 45 min later. The amount of retained hepatic 3H and 35S label was significantly reduced in the dwarf mice; at 45 min the specific radioactivity of SAM (pCi/nmol SAM) was 56% lower (p < 0.05) for 3H-label and 64% lower (p < 0.005) for 35S-label in dwarf than wild type mice. Retention of 35S was significantly lower in the brain (37%, p < 0.04) and kidney (47%, p < 0.02) of the dwarf compared to wild type mice; there was no statistical difference in retained 3H-label in either brain or kidney. This suggests that both the methyl-moiety and the carbon chain of methionine are lost much faster in the dwarf compared to the wild type mouse, implying that both transmethylation in the liver and transsulfuration in the liver, brain, and kidney are increased in the dwarf mice. As further support, we determined by real-time RT PCR the expression of methionine metabolism genes in livers of mice. Compared to wild type, the Ames dwarf had increased expression of methionine adenosyltransferase 1a (2.3-fold, p = 0.013), glycine N-methyltransferase (3.8-fold, p = 0.023), betaine homocysteine methyltransferase (5.5-fold, p = 0.0006), S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase (3.8-fold, p = 0.0005), and cystathionase (2.6-fold; tended to be

  2. Enthalpy By Energy Balance for Aerodynamic Heating Facility at NASA Ames Research Center Arc Jet Complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hightower, T. Mark; MacDonald, Christine L.; Martinez, Edward R.; Balboni, John A.; Anderson, Karl F.; Arnold, Jim O. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The NASA Ames Research Center (ARC) Arc Jet Facilities' Aerodynamic Heating Facility (AHF) has been instrumented for the Enthalpy By Energy Balance (EB2) method. Diagnostic EB2 data is routinely taken for all AHF runs. This paper provides an overview of the EB2 method implemented in the AHF. The chief advantage of the AHF implementation over earlier versions is the non-intrusiveness of the instruments used. For example, to measure the change in cooling water temperature, thin film 1000 ohm Resistance Temperature Detectors (RTDs) are used with an Anderson Current Loop (ACL) as the signal conditioner. The ACL with 1000 ohm RTDs allows for very sensitive measurement of the increase in temperature (Delta T) of the cooling water to the arc heater, which is a critical element of the EB2 method. Cooling water flow rates are measured with non-intrusive ultrasonic flow meters.

  3. An evaluation plan of bus architectures and protocols using the NASA Ames intelligent redundant actuation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Defeo, P.; Chen, M.

    1987-01-01

    Means for evaluating data bus architectures and protocols for highly integrated flight control system applications are needed. Described are the criteria and plans to do this by using the NASA/Ames Intelligent Redundant Actuation System (IRAS) experimental set-up. Candidate bus architectures differ from one another in terms of: topology, access control, message transfer schemes, message characteristics, initialization. data flow control, transmission rates, fault tolerance, and time synchronization. The evaluation criteria are developed relative to these features. A preliminary, analytical evaluation of four candidate busses (MIL-STD-1553B, DATAC, Ethernet, and HSIS) is described. A bus must be exercised in a real-time environment to evaluate its dynamic characteristics. A plan for real-time evaluation of these four busses using a combination of hardware and simulation techniques is presented.

  4. McDonnell Model XV-1 Convertiplane in the Ames 40x80 Foot Wind Tunnel.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1954-05-17

    Foreword, front view of McDonnell Model XV-1 Convertiplane in the Ames 40x80 Foot Wind Tunnel. The McDonnell XV-1 was an experimental compound gyroplane developed for a joint research program between the United States Air Force and the United States Army to explore technologies to develop an aircraft that could take off and land like a helicopter but fly at faster airspeeds, similar to a conventional airplane. The XV-1 would reach a speed of 200 mph (322 km/h), faster than any previous rotorcraft, but the program was terminated due to the tip-jet noise and complexity of the technology which gave only a modest gain in performance.

  5. Updates on Modeling the Water Cycle with the NASA Ames Mars Global Climate Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahre, M. A.; Haberle, R. M.; Hollingsworth, J. L.; Montmessin, F.; Brecht, A. S.; Urata, R.; Klassen, D. R.; Wolff, M. J.

    2017-01-01

    Global Circulation Models (GCMs) have made steady progress in simulating the current Mars water cycle. It is now widely recognized that clouds are a critical component that can significantly affect the nature of the simulated water cycle. Two processes in particular are key to implementing clouds in a GCM: the microphysical processes of formation and dissipation, and their radiative effects on heating/ cooling rates. Together, these processes alter the thermal structure, change the dynamics, and regulate inter-hemispheric transport. We have made considerable progress representing these processes in the NASA Ames GCM, particularly in the presence of radiatively active water ice clouds. We present the current state of our group's water cycle modeling efforts, show results from selected simulations, highlight some of the issues, and discuss avenues for further investigation.­

  6. Development and operation of a real-time simulation at the NASA Ames Vertical Motion Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sweeney, Christopher; Sheppard, Shirin; Chetelat, Monique

    1993-01-01

    The Vertical Motion Simulator (VMS) facility at the NASA Ames Research Center combines the largest vertical motion capability in the world with a flexible real-time operating system allowing research to be conducted quickly and effectively. Due to the diverse nature of the aircraft simulated and the large number of simulations conducted annually, the challenge for the simulation engineer is to develop an accurate real-time simulation in a timely, efficient manner. The SimLab facility and the software tools necessary for an operating simulation will be discussed. Subsequent sections will describe the development process through operation of the simulation; this includes acceptance of the model, validation, integration and production phases.

  7. Bayesian Research at the NASA Ames Research Center,Computational Sciences Division

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Robin D.

    2003-01-01

    NASA Ames Research Center is one of NASA s oldest centers, having started out as part of the National Advisory Committee on Aeronautics, (NACA). The site, about 40 miles south of San Francisco, still houses many wind tunnels and other aviation related departments. In recent years, with the growing realization that space exploration is heavily dependent on computing and data analysis, its focus has turned more towards Information Technology. The Computational Sciences Division has expanded rapidly as a result. In this article, I will give a brief overview of some of the past and present projects with a Bayesian content. Much more than is described here goes on with the Division. The web pages at http://ic.arc. nasa.gov give more information on these, and the other Division projects.

  8. F-111B in Ames 40x80 Foot Wind Tunnel.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-02-06

    Installation Photos, 3/4 front view from below. F-111B in Ames 40x80 Foot Wind Tunnel. The General Dynamics/Grumman F-111B was a long-range carrier-based interceptor aircraft that was planned to be a follow-on to the F-4 Phantom II. The F-111B was developed in the 1960s by General Dynamics in conjunction with Grumman for the United States Navy (USN) as part of the joint Tactical Fighter Experimental (TFX) with the United States Air Force (USAF) to produce a common fighter for the services that could perform a variety of missions. It incorporated innovations such as variable-geometry wings, afterburning turbofan engines, and a long-range radar and missile weapons system.

  9. The NASA Ames 16-Inch Shock Tunnel Nozzle Simulations and Experimental Comparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    TokarcikPolsky, S.; Papadopoulos, P.; Venkatapathy, E.; Delwert, G. S.; Edwards, Thomas A. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The 16-Inch Shock Tunnel at NASA Ames Research Center is a unique test facility used for hypersonic propulsion testing. To provide information necessary to understand the hypersonic testing of the combustor model, computational simulations of the facility nozzle were performed and results are compared with available experimental data, namely static pressure along the nozzle walls and pitot pressure at the exit of the nozzle section. Both quasi-one-dimensional and axisymmetric approaches were used to study the numerous modeling issues involved. The facility nozzle flow was examined for three hypersonic test conditions, and the computational results are presented in detail. The effects of variations in reservoir conditions, boundary layer growth, and parameters of numerical modeling are explored.

  10. Building intelligent systems: Artificial intelligence research at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedland, P.; Lum, H.

    1987-01-01

    The basic components that make up the goal of building autonomous intelligent systems are discussed, and ongoing work at the NASA Ames Research Center is described. It is noted that a clear progression of systems can be seen through research settings (both within and external to NASA) to Space Station testbeds to systems which actually fly on the Space Station. The starting point for the discussion is a truly autonomous Space Station intelligent system, responsible for a major portion of Space Station control. Attention is given to research in fiscal 1987, including reasoning under uncertainty, machine learning, causal modeling and simulation, knowledge from design through operations, advanced planning work, validation methodologies, and hierarchical control of and distributed cooperation among multiple knowledge-based systems.

  11. Building intelligent systems - Artificial intelligence research at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedland, Peter; Lum, Henry

    1987-01-01

    The basic components that make up the goal of building autonomous intelligent systems are discussed, and ongoing work at the NASA Ames Research Center is described. It is noted that a clear progression of systems can be seen through research settings (both within and external to NASA) to Space Station testbeds to systems which actually fly on the Space Station. The starting point for the discussion is a 'truly' autonomous Space Station intelligent system, responsible for a major portion of Space Station control. Attention is given to research in fiscal 1987, including reasoning under uncertainty, machine learning, causal modeling and simulation, knowledge from design through operations, advanced planning work, validation methodologies, and hierarchical control of and distributed cooperation among multiple knowledge-based systems.

  12. Reduction of Background Noise in the NASA Ames 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaeger, Stephen M.; Allen, Christopher S.; Soderman, Paul T.; Olson, Larry E. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Background noise in both open-jet and closed wind tunnels adversely affects the signal-to-noise ratio of acoustic measurements. To measure the noise of increasingly quieter aircraft models, the background noise will have to be reduced by physical means or through signal processing. In a closed wind tunnel, such as the NASA Ames 40- by 80- Foot Wind Tunnel, the principle background noise sources can be classified as: (1) fan drive noise; (2) microphone self-noise; (3) aerodynamically induced noise from test-dependent hardware such as model struts and junctions; and (4) noise from the test section walls and vane set. This paper describes the steps taken to minimize the influence of each of these background noise sources in the 40 x 80.

  13. Waste Processing Research and Technology Development at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, John; Kliss, Mark

    2004-01-01

    The current "store and return" approach for handling waste products generated during low Earth orbit missions will not meet the requirements for future human missions identified in NASA s new Exploration vision. The objective is to develop appropriate reliable waste management systems that minimize maintenance and crew time, while maintaining crew health and safety, as well as providing protection of planetary surfaces. Solid waste management requirements for these missions include waste volume reduction, stabilization and storage, water recovery, and ultimately recovery of carbon dioxide, nutrients and other resources from a fully regenerative food production life support system. This paper identifies the key drivers for waste management technology development within NASA, and provides a roadmap for the developmental sequence and progression of technologies. Recent results of research and technology development activities at NASA Ames Research Center on candidate waste management technologies with emphasis on compaction, lyophilization, and incineration are discussed.

  14. Supersonic Retropropulsion Experimental Results from the NASA Ames 9- x 7-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, Scott A.; Rhode, Matthew N.; Edquist, Karl T.

    2012-01-01

    Supersonic retropropulsion was experimentally examined in the Ames Research Center 9x7-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel at Mach 1.8 and 2.4. The experimental model, previously designed for and tested in the Langley Research Center Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel at Mach 2.4, 3.5 and 4.6, was a 5-in diameter 70-deg sphere-cone forebody with a 9.55-in long cylindrical aftbody. The forebody was designed to accommodate up to four 4:1 area ratio nozzles, one on the model centerline and the other three on the half radius spaced 120-deg apart. Surface pressure and flow visualization were the primary measurements, including high-speed data to investigate the dynamics of the interactions between the bow and nozzle shocks. Three blowing configurations were tested with thrust coefficients up to 10 and angles of attack up to 20-deg. Preliminary results and observations from the test are provided

  15. Upper surface blowing noise of the NASA-Ames quiet short-haul research aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bohn, A. J.; Shovlin, M. D.

    1980-01-01

    An experimental study of the propulsive-lift noise of the NASA-Ames quiet short-haul research aircraft (QSRA) is described. Comparisons are made of measured QSRA flyover noise and model propulsive-lift noise data available in references. Developmental tests of trailing-edge treatments were conducted using sawtooth-shaped and porous USB flap trailing-edge extensions. Small scale parametric tests were conducted to determine noise reduction/design relationships. Full-scale static tests were conducted with the QSRA preparatory to the selection of edge treatment designs for flight testing. QSRA flight and published model propulsive-lift noise data have similar characteristics. Noise reductions of 2 to 3 dB were achieved over a wide range of frequency and directivity angles in static tests of the QSRA. These noise reductions are expected to be achieved or surpassed in flight tests planned by NASA in 1980.

  16. Development of Implicit Methods in CFD NASA Ames Research Center 1970's - 1980's

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pulliam, Thomas H.

    2010-01-01

    The focus here is on the early development (mid 1970's-1980's) at NASA Ames Research Center of implicit methods in Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). A class of implicit finite difference schemes of the Beam and Warming approximate factorization type will be addressed. The emphasis will be on the Euler equations. A review of material pertinent to the solution of the Euler equations within the framework of implicit methods will be presented. The eigensystem of the equations will be used extensively in developing a framework for various methods applied to the Euler equations. The development and analysis of various aspects of this class of schemes will be given along with the motivations behind many of the choices. Various acceleration and efficiency modifications such as matrix reduction, diagonalization and flux split schemes will be presented.

  17. THE NASA AMES POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON INFRARED SPECTROSCOPIC DATABASE: THE COMPUTED SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Bauschlicher, C. W.; Ricca, A.; Boersma, C.

    The astronomical emission features, formerly known as the unidentified infrared bands, are now commonly ascribed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The laboratory experiments and computational modeling done at the NASA Ames Research Center to create a collection of PAH IR spectra relevant to test and refine the PAH hypothesis have been assembled into a spectroscopic database. This database now contains over 800 PAH spectra spanning 2-2000 {mu}m (5000-5 cm{sup -1}). These data are now available on the World Wide Web at www.astrochem.org/pahdb. This paper presents an overview of the computational spectra in the database and the tools developed to analyzemore » and interpret astronomical spectra using the database. A description of the online and offline user tools available on the Web site is also presented.« less

  18. The NASA Ames integral aircraft passenger seat concept - A human engineering approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kubokawa, C. C.

    1974-01-01

    A new NASA Ames concept for an aircraft passenger seat has been under research and development since 1968. It includes many human-factor features that will provide protection to the passenger from vibration, jostle, and high impact. It is comfortable and safer than any of the seats presently in use. An in-depth design, fabrication, and impact analysis was conducted in order to design a seat that will maximize passenger protection in high g impacts (20 g horizontal -Gx, 36 g vertical +Gz, 16 g lateral Gy). The method for absorbing impact energy was accomplished with a combination of stretching stainless steel cables, thread breaking of stitches, hydraulic mechanism and the special Temper Form cushions. The restraint system for the seat consisted of a lap belt and shoulder harness inertia reel combination.

  19. Reactivation and upgrade of the NASA Ames 16-Inch Shock Tunnel - Status report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogdanoff, David W.; Zambrana, Horacio A.; Cavolowsky, John A.; Newfield, Mark E.; Cornelison, Charles J.; Miller, Robert J.

    1992-01-01

    The NASA Ames 16-Inch Shock Tunnel has been reactivated after seventeen years of inactivity. In the years before deactivating the facility, it was operated at enthalpies of 4,700 J/gm and pressures up to 260 atm or at enthalpies of 1900 J/gm over a wide pressure range. Since reactivating, the facility has been operated at enthalpies up to 12,000 J/gm and pressures up to 408 atm. The present paper describes the steps taken in upgrading the facility and summarizes the currently achievable conditions. The selection of the driver gas, the steps taken to improve the driver burn, and the diaphragm opening techniques are described. The pressure and heat flux instrumentation, the optical diagnostics and the data acquisition system are also described.

  20. New Diagnostic, Launch and Model Control Techniques in the NASA Ames HFFAF Ballistic Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogdanoff, David W.

    2012-01-01

    This report presents new diagnostic, launch and model control techniques used in the NASA Ames HFFAF ballistic range. High speed movies were used to view the sabot separation process and the passage of the model through the model splap paper. Cavities in the rear of the sabot, to catch the muzzle blast of the gun, were used to control sabot finger separation angles and distances. Inserts were installed in the powder chamber to greatly reduce the ullage volume (empty space) in the chamber. This resulted in much more complete and repeatable combustion of the powder and hence, in much more repeatable muzzle velocities. Sheets of paper or cardstock, impacting one half of the model, were used to control the amplitudes of the model pitch oscillations.

  1. Supersonic Retropropulsion CFD Validation with Ames Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel Test Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schauerhamer, Daniel G.; Zarchi, Kerry A.; Kleb, William L.; Edquist, Karl T.

    2013-01-01

    A validation study of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) for Supersonic Retropropulsion (SRP) was conducted using three Navier-Stokes flow solvers (DPLR, FUN3D, and OVERFLOW). The study compared results from the CFD codes to each other and also to wind tunnel test data obtained in the NASA Ames Research Center 90 70 Unitary PlanWind Tunnel. Comparisons include surface pressure coefficient as well as unsteady plume effects, and cover a range of Mach numbers, levels of thrust, and angles of orientation. The comparisons show promising capability of CFD to simulate SRP, and best agreement with the tunnel data exists for the steadier cases of the 1-nozzle and high thrust 3-nozzle configurations.

  2. Report on the Stanford/Ames direct-link space suit prehensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jameson, J. W.; Leifer, Larry

    1987-01-01

    Researchers at the Center for Design Research at Stanford University, in collaboration with NASA Ames at Moffet Field, California, are developing hand-powered mechanical prehensors to replace gloves for EVA spacesuits. The design and functional properties of the first version Direct Link Prehensor (DLP) is discussed. It has a total of six degrees-of-freedom and is the most elaborate of three prehensors being developed for the project. The DLP has a robust design and utilizes only linkages and revolute joints for the drive system. With its anthropomorphic configuration of two fingers and a thumb, it is easy to control and is capable of all of the basic prehension patterns such as cylindrical or lateral pinch grasps. Kinematic analysis reveals that, assuming point contacts, a grasped object can be manipulated with three degrees-of-freedom. Yet, in practice more degrees-of-freedom are possible.

  3. How to write an educational research grant: AMEE Guide No. 101.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Maria A; Gruppen, Larry D; Artino, Anthony R; Uijtdehaage, Sebastian; Szauter, Karen; Durning, Steven J

    2016-01-01

    Writing an educational research grant in health profession education is challenging, not only for those doing it for the first time but also for more experienced scholars. The intensity of the competition, the peculiarities of the grant format, the risk of rejection, and the time required are among the many obstacles that can prevent educational researchers with interesting and important ideas from writing a grant, that could provide the funding needed to turn their scholarly ideas into reality. The aim of this AMEE Guide is to clarify the grant-writing process by (a) explaining the mechanics and structure of a typical educational research grant proposal, and (b) sharing tips and strategies for making the process more manageable.

  4. X-ray K-edge analysis of drain lines in Wilhelm Hall, Ames Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, T.; Whitmore, C.

    1999-01-05

    From August 12--27, 1998 X-ray K-edge measurements were made on drain lines in seven rooms in Wilhelm Hall, Ames Laboratory. The purpose of these measurements was to determine the extent of thorium (and other heavy metal) contamination inside these pipes. The K-edge method is a noninvasive inspection technique that can provide accurate quantification of heavy metal contamination interior to an object. Of the seven drain lines inspected, one was found to have no significant contamination, three showed significant thorium deposits, two showed mercury contamination, and one line was found to contain mercury, thorium and uranium. The K-edge measurements were foundmore » to be consistent with readings from hand-held survey meters, and provided much greater detail on the location and amount of heavy metal contamination.« less

  5. Development and Flight of the NASA-Ames Research Center Payload on Spacelab-J

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, Gregory K.; Ball, Sally M.; Stolarik, Thomas M.; Eodice, Michael T.

    1993-01-01

    Spacelab-J was an international Spacelab mission with numerous innovative Japanese and American materials and life science experiments. Two of the Spacelab-J experiments were designed over a period of more than a decade by a team from NASA-Ames Research Center. The Frog Embryology Experiment investigated and is helping to resolve a century-long quandary on the effects of gravity on amphibian development. The Autogenic Feedback Training Experiment, flown on Spacelab-J as part of a multi-mission investigation, studied the effects of Autogenic Feedback Therapy on limiting the effects of Space Motion Sickness on astronauts. Both experiments employed the use of a wide variety of specially designed hardware to achieve the experiment objectives. This paper reviews the development of both experiments, from the initial announcement of opportunity in 1978, through selection on Spacelab-J and subsequent hardware and science procedures development, culminating in the highly successful Spacelab-J flight in September 1992.

  6. The Ames dwarf mutation attenuates Alzheimer's disease phenotype of APP/PS1 mice.

    PubMed

    Puig, Kendra L; Kulas, Joshua A; Franklin, Whitney; Rakoczy, Sharlene G; Taglialatela, Giulio; Brown-Borg, Holly M; Combs, Colin K

    2016-04-01

    APP/PS1 double transgenic mice expressing human mutant amyloid precursor protein (APP) and presenilin-1 (PS1) demonstrate robust brain amyloid beta (Aβ) peptide containing plaque deposition, increased markers of oxidative stress, behavioral dysfunction, and proinflammatory gliosis. On the other hand, lack of growth hormone, prolactin, and thyroid-stimulating hormone due to a recessive mutation in the Prop 1 gene (Prop1df) in Ames dwarf mice results in a phenotype characterized by potentiated antioxidant mechanisms, improved learning and memory, and significantly increased longevity in homozygous mice. Based on this, we hypothesized that a similar hormone deficiency might attenuate disease changes in the brains of APP/PS1 mice. To test this idea, APP/PS1 mice were crossed to the Ames dwarf mouse line. APP/PS1, wild-type, df/+, df/df, df/+/APP/PS1, and df/df/APP/PS1 mice were compared at 6 months of age through behavioral testing and assessing amyloid burden, reactive gliosis, and brain cytokine levels. df/df mice demonstrated lower brain growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor 1 concentrations. This correlated with decreased astrogliosis and microgliosis in the df/df/APP/PS1 mice and, surprisingly, reduced Aβ plaque deposition and Aβ 1-40 and Aβ 1-42 concentrations. The df/df/APP/PS1 mice also demonstrated significantly elevated brain levels of multiple cytokines in spite of the attenuated gliosis. These data indicate that the df/df/APP/PS1 line is a unique resource in which to study aging and resistance to disease and suggest that the affected pituitary hormones may have a role in regulating disease progression. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The NASA Ames Research Center Institutional Scientific Collection: History, Best Practices and Scientific Opportunities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rask, Jon C.; Chakravarty, Kaushik; French, Alison; Choi, Sungshin; Stewart, Helen

    2017-01-01

    The NASA Ames Life Sciences Institutional Scientific Collection (ISC), which is composed of the Ames Life Sciences Data Archive (ALSDA) and the Biospecimen Storage Facility (BSF), is managed by the Space Biosciences Division and has been operational since 1993. The ALSDA is responsible for archiving information and animal biospecimens collected from life science spaceflight experiments and matching ground control experiments. Both fixed and frozen spaceflight and ground tissues are stored in the BSF within the ISC. The ALSDA also manages a Biospecimen Sharing Program, performs curation and long-term storage operations, and makes biospecimens available to the scientific community for research purposes via the Life Science Data Archive public website (https:lsda.jsc.nasa.gov). As part of our best practices, a viability testing plan has been developed for the ISC, which will assess the quality of archived samples. We expect that results from the viability testing will catalyze sample use, enable broader science community interest, and improve operational efficiency of the ISC. The current viability test plan focuses on generating disposition recommendations and is based on using ribonucleic acid (RNA) integrity number (RIN) scores as a criteria for measurement of biospecimen viablity for downstream functional analysis. The plan includes (1) sorting and identification of candidate samples, (2) conducting a statiscally-based power analysis to generate representaive cohorts from the population of stored biospecimens, (3) completion of RIN analysis on select samples, and (4) development of disposition recommendations based on the RIN scores. Results of this work will also support NASA open science initiatives and guides development of the NASA Scientific Collections Directive (a policy on best practices for curation of biological collections). Our RIN-based methodology for characterizing the quality of tissues stored in the ISC since the 1980s also creates unique

  8. Ames Women's Influence Network (WIN) Hidden Figures talk with "Computers" Carolyn Hofstetter and Carol Mead co-sponsored by the AAAG

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-02-01

    Ames Women's Influence Network (WIN) Hidden Figures talk with "Computers" Carolyn Hofstetter and Carol Mead co-sponsored by the AAAG. Left to right Barbara Miller, Ames EEO, Computers Carolyn Hoffstetter and Carol Mead, talking to Carolyn Hofstetter is Arlene Spencer

  9. The Earth Science Unmanned Aerial System (UAS) Demonstration in the Rover Scape at NASA's Ames Research Center.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-09-30

    Flight Test in the Roverscape (N-269) at NASA's Ames Research Center, the project team tests the DJI Matrice 600 Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) equipped with a radio tracking receiver to study the invasive asian carp in the Mississippi River. Rick, Kolyer, Jonas Jonsson, Ethan, Pinsker, Bob Dahlgren.

  10. ASCORBIC ACID REDUCTION OF ACTIVE CHLORINE PRIOR TO DETERMINING AMES MUTAGENICITY OF CHLORINATED NATURAL ORGANIC MATTER (NOM)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many potable water disinfection byproducts (DBPs) that result from the reaction of natural organic matter (NOM) with oxidizing chlorine are known or suspected to be carcinogenic and mutagenic. The Ames assay is routinely used to assess an overall level of mutagenicity for all com...

  11. Aerial View Of The Site From The 40x80 Foot Wind Tunnel At Nasa Ames Research Center.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1943-03-12

    (03/12/1943) Aerial view of the site from the 40x80 wind tunnel At NASA Ames Research Center. Site includes the 16 foot and 7x10 wind tunnels in the background. Building 200 also under construction. Framing for the drive fans of the 40x80 in scene.

  12. Landing and Rollout STS-135 Crew Training on the Vertical Motion Simulator (VMS) at NASA Ames (Reporter Pkg)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-07-05

    Every Space Shuttle flight crew has trained for the final phase of a Shuttle mission, landing and rollout, using the VMS at NASA Ames. This story follows at the crew of STS-135, the final Space Shuttle mission, as they train on the VMS. Includes an interview with Chris Ferguson, the STS-135 mission commander.

  13. Transforming BIM to BEM: Generation of Building Geometry for the NASA Ames Sustainability Base BIM

    SciTech Connect

    O'Donnell, James T.; Maile, Tobias; Rose, Cody

    Typical processes of whole Building Energy simulation Model (BEM) generation are subjective, labor intensive, time intensive and error prone. Essentially, these typical processes reproduce already existing data, i.e. building models already created by the architect. Accordingly, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) developed a semi-automated process that enables reproducible conversions of Building Information Model (BIM) representations of building geometry into a format required by building energy modeling (BEM) tools. This is a generic process that may be applied to all building energy modeling tools but to date has only been used for EnergyPlus. This report describes and demonstrates each stage inmore » the semi-automated process for building geometry using the recently constructed NASA Ames Sustainability Base throughout. This example uses ArchiCAD (Graphisoft, 2012) as the originating CAD tool and EnergyPlus as the concluding whole building energy simulation tool. It is important to note that the process is also applicable for professionals that use other CAD tools such as Revit (“Revit Architecture,” 2012) and DProfiler (Beck Technology, 2012) and can be extended to provide geometry definitions for BEM tools other than EnergyPlus. Geometry Simplification Tool (GST) was used during the NASA Ames project and was the enabling software that facilitated semi-automated data transformations. GST has now been superseded by Space Boundary Tool (SBT-1) and will be referred to as SBT-1 throughout this report. The benefits of this semi-automated process are fourfold: 1) reduce the amount of time and cost required to develop a whole building energy simulation model, 2) enable rapid generation of design alternatives, 3) improve the accuracy of BEMs and 4) result in significantly better performing buildings with significantly lower energy consumption than those created using the traditional design process, especially if the simulation model was used as a

  14. Emission Spectroscopy and Radiometric Measurements in the NASA Ames IHF Arc Jet Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winter, Michael W.; Raiche, George A.; Prabhu, Dinesh K.

    2012-01-01

    Plasma diagnostic measurement campaigns in the NASA Ames Interaction Heating Facility (IHF) have been conducted over the last several years with a view towards characterizing the flow in the arc jet facility by providing data necessary for modeling and simulation. Optical emission spectroscopy has been used in the plenum and in the free jet of the nozzle. Radiation incident over a probe surface has also been measured using radiometry. Plenum measurements have shown distinct radial profiles of temperature over a range of operating conditions. For cases where large amounts of cold air are added radially to the main arc-heated stream, the temperature profiles are higher by as much as 1500 K than the profiles assumed in flow simulations. Optical measurements perpendicular to the flow direction in the free jet showed significant contributions to the molecule emission through inverse pre-dissociation, thus allowing determination of atom number densities from molecular emission. This has been preliminarily demonstrated with the N2 1st Positive System. Despite the use of older rate coefficients, the resulting atom densities are reasonable and surprisingly close to flow predictions.

  15. Flow Property Measurement Using Laser-Induced Fluorescence in the NASA Ames Interaction Heating Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grinstead, Jay Henderson; Porter, Barry J.; Carballo, Julio Enrique

    2011-01-01

    The spectroscopic diagnostic technique of two photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence (TALIF) of atomic species has been applied to single-point measurements of velocity and static temperature in the NASA Ames Interaction Heating Facility (IHF) arc jet. Excitation spectra of atomic oxygen and nitrogen were recorded while scanning a tunable dye laser over the absorption feature. Thirty excitation spectra were acquired during 8 arc jet runs at two facility operating conditions; the number of scans per run varied between 2 and 6. Curve fits to the spectra were analyzed to recover their Doppler shifts and widths, from which the flow velocities and static temperatures, respectively, were determined. An increase in the number of independent flow property pairs from each as-measured scan was obtained by extracting multiple lower-resolution scans. The larger population sample size enabled the mean property values and their uncertainties for each run to be characterized with greater confidence. The average plus or minus 2 sigma uncertainties in the mean velocities and temperatures for all 8 runs were plus or minus 1.4% and plus or minus 11%, respectively.

  16. The display of molecular models with the Ames Interactive Modeling System (AIMS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egan, J. T.; Hart, J.; Burt, S. K.; Macelroy, R. D.

    1982-01-01

    A visualization of molecular models can lead to a clearer understanding of the models. Sophisticated graphics devices supported by minicomputers make it possible for the chemist to interact with the display of a very large model, altering its structure. In addition to user interaction, the need arises also for other ways of displaying information. These include the production of viewgraphs, film presentation, as well as publication quality prints of various models. To satisfy these needs, the display capability of the Ames Interactive Modeling System (AIMS) has been enhanced to provide a wide range of graphics and plotting capabilities. Attention is given to an overview of the AIMS system, graphics hardware used by the AIMS display subsystem, a comparison of graphics hardware, the representation of molecular models, graphics software used by the AIMS display subsystem, the display of a model obtained from data stored in molecule data base, a graphics feature for obtaining single frame permanent copy displays, and a feature for producing multiple frame displays.

  17. The NASA Ames Hypersonic Combustor-Model Inlet CFD Simulations and Experimental Comparisons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatapathy, E.; Tokarcik-Polsky, S.; Deiwert, G. S.; Edwards, Thomas A. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Computations have been performed on a three-dimensional inlet associated with the NASA Ames combustor model for the hypersonic propulsion experiment in the 16-inch shock tunnel. The 3-dimensional inlet was designed to have the combustor inlet flow nearly two-dimensional and of sufficient mass flow necessary for combustion. The 16-inch shock tunnel experiment is a short duration test with test time of the order of milliseconds. The flow through the inlet is in chemical non-equilibrium. Two test entries have been completed and limited experimental results for the inlet region of the combustor-model are available. A number of CFD simulations, with various levels of simplifications such as 2-D simulations, 3-D simulations with and without chemical reactions, simulations with and without turbulent conditions, etc., have been performed. These simulations have helped determine the model inlet flow characteristics and the important factors that affect the combustor inlet flow and the sensitivity of the flow field to these simplifications. In the proposed paper, CFD modeling of the hypersonic inlet, results from the simulations and comparison with available experimental results will be presented.

  18. Evaluation of ames Multistix-SG for urine specific gravity versus refractometer specific gravity.

    PubMed

    Adams, L J

    1983-12-01

    A comparison of urine specific gravity by a commercially available multiple reagent strip (Multistix-SG; Ames Division, Miles Laboratory) versus refractometer specific gravity (TS Meter; American Optical Corporation) was performed on 214 routine urine specimens. Agreement to +/- 0.005 was found in 72% of the specimens (r = 0.80). Urine specific gravity by the Multistix-SG showed a significant positive bias at urine pHs less than or equal to 6.0 and a negative bias at urine pHs greater than 7.0 in comparison to refractometer specific gravity. At concentrated (specific gravity greater than or equal to 1.020) specific gravities, up to 25% of urine specimens were misclassified as not concentrated by Multistix-SG specific gravity in comparison to refractometer specific gravity. The additional cost of the specific gravity reagent to a multiple reagent test strip in addition to the poor performance relative to refractometer specific gravity leads to the conclusion that including this specific gravity methodology on a multiple reagent strip is neither cost effective nor clinically useful.

  19. Peptide Conjugated Phosphorodiamidate Morpholino Oligomers Increase Survival of Mice Challenged with Ames Bacillus anthracis

    PubMed Central

    Geller, Bruce L.; Mellbye, Brett; Lane, Douglas; Iversen, Patrick L.; Bavari, Sina

    2012-01-01

    Targeting bacterial essential genes using antisense phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomers (PMOs) represents an important strategy in the development of novel antibacterial therapeutics. PMOs are neutral DNA analogues that inhibit gene expression in a sequence-specific manner. In this study, several cationic, membrane-penetrating peptides were conjugated to PMOs (PPMOs) that target 2 bacterial essential genes: acyl carrier protein (acpP) and gyrase A (gyrA). These were tested for their ability to inhibit growth of Bacillus anthracis, a gram-positive spore-forming bacterium and causative agent of anthrax. PPMOs targeted upstream of both target gene start codons and conjugated with the bacterium-permeating peptide (RFF)3R were found to be most effective in inhibiting bacterial growth in vitro. Both of the gene-targeted PPMOs protected macrophages from B. anthracis induced cell death. Subsequent, in vivo testing of the PPMOs resulted in increased survival of mice challenged with the virulent Ames strain of B. anthracis. Together, these studies suggest that PPMOs targeting essential genes have the potential of being used as antisense antibiotics to treat B. anthracis infections. PMID:22978365

  20. Ames Research Center FY 2000 Implementation Plan: Leading Technology into the New Millennium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This document presents the implementation plan for Ames Research Center (ARC) within the overall framework of the NASA Strategic Plan. It describes how ARC intends to implement its Center of Excellence responsibilities, Agency assigned missions, Agency and Enterprise lead programs, and other roles in support of NASA's vision and mission. All Federal agencies are required by the 1993 Government Performance and Results Act to implement a long-term strategic planning process that includes measurable outcomes and strict accountability. At NASA, this planning process is shaped by the Space Act of 1958, annual appropriations, and other external mandates, as well as by customer requirements. The resulting Strategic Plan sets the overall architecture for what we do, identifies who our customers are, and directs where we are going and why. The Strategic Plan is the basis upon which decisions regarding program implementation and resource deployment are made. Whereas the strategic planning process examines the long-term direction of the organization and identifies a specific set of goals, the implementation planning process examines the detailed performance of the organization and allocates resources toward meeting these goals. It is the purpose of this implementation document to provide the connection between the NASA Strategic Plan and the specific programs and support functions that ARC employees perform. This connection flows from the NASA Strategic Plan, through the various Strategic Enterprise plans to the ARC Center of Excellence, primary missions, Lead Center programs, program support responsibilities, and ultimately, to the role of the individual ARC employee.

  1. Educational Projects in Unmanned Aerial Systems at the NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahlgren, Robert P.

    2017-01-01

    Unmanned aerial systems (UAS), autonomy and robotics technology have been fertile ground for developing a wide variety of interdisciplinary student learning opportunities. In this talk, several projects will be described that leverage small fixed-wing UAS that have been modified to carry science payloads. These aircraft provide a unique hands-on experience for a wide range of students from college juniors to graduate students pursuing degrees in electrical engineering, aeronautical engineering, mechanical engineering, applied mathematics, physics, structural engineering and other majors. By combining rapid prototyping, design reuse and open-source philosophies, a sustainable educational program has been organized structured as full-time internships during the summer, part-time internships during the school year, short details for military cadets, and paid positions. As part of this program, every summer one or more UAS is developed from concept through design, build and test phases using the tools and facilities at the NASA Ames Research Center, ultimately obtaining statements of airworthiness and flight release from the Agency before test flights are performed. In 2016 and 2017 student projects focused on the theme of 3D printed modular airframes that may be optimized for a given mission and payload. Now in its fifth year this program has served over 35 students, and has provided a rich learning experience as they learn to rapidly develop new aircraft concepts in a highly regulated environment, on systems that will support principal investigators at university, NASA, and other US federal agencies.

  2. Development of a high-velocity free-flight launcher : the Ames light-gas gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charters, A C; Denardo, B Pat; Rossow, Vernon J

    1955-01-01

    Recent interest in long-range missiles has stimulated a search for new experimental techniques which can reproduce in the laboratory the high temperatures and Mach numbers associated with the missiles' flight. One promising possibility lies in free-flight testing of laboratory models which are flown at the full velocity of the missile. In this type of test, temperatures are approximated and aerodynamic heating of the model is representative of that experienced by the missile in high-velocity flight. A prime requirement of the free-flight test technique is a device which had the capacity for launching models at the velocities desired. In response to thie need, a gun firing light models at velocities up to 15,000 feet per second has been developed at the Ames Aeronautical Laboratory. The design of this gun, the analysis of its performance, and the results of the initial firing trials are described in this paper. The firing trials showed that the measured velocities and pressures agreed well with the predicted values. Also, the erosion of the launch tube was very small for the eleven rounds fired. The performance of the gun suggests that it will prove to be a satisfactory launcher for high-velocity free-flight tests. However, it should be mentioned that only the gross performance has been evaluated so far, and, consequently, the operation of the gun must be investigated in further detail before its performance can be reliably predicted over its full operating range.

  3. Optimization Study of the Ames 0.5 Two-Stage Light Gas Gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogdanoff, D. W.

    1996-01-01

    There is a need for more faithful simulation of space debris impacts on various space vehicles. Space debris impact velocities can range up to 14 km/sec and conventional two-stage light gas guns with moderately heavy saboted projectiles are limited to launch velocities of 7-8 km/sec. Any increases obtained in the launch velocities will result in more faithful simulations of debris impacts. It would also be valuable to reduce the maximum gun and projectile base pressures and the gun barrel erosion rate. In this paper, the results of a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) study designed to optimize the performance of the NASA Ames 0.5' gun by systematically varying seven gun operating parameters are reported. Particularly beneficial effects were predicted to occur if (1) the piston mass was decreased together with the powder mass and the hydrogen fill pressure and (2) the pump tube length was decreased. The optimum set of changes in gun operating conditions were predicted to produce an increase in muzzle velocity of 0.7-1.0 km/sec, simultaneously with a substantial decrease in gun erosion. Preliminary experimental data have validated the code predictions. Velocities of up to 8.2 km/sec with a 0.475 cm diameter saboted aluminum sphere have been obtained, along with large reductions in gun erosion rates.

  4. Simulation of 3-D Nonequilibrium Seeded Air Flow in the NASA-Ames MHD Channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, Sumeet; Tannehill, John C.; Mehta, Unmeel B.

    2004-01-01

    The 3-D nonequilibrium seeded air flow in the NASA-Ames experimental MHD channel has been numerically simulated. The channel contains a nozzle section, a center section, and an accelerator section where magnetic and electric fields can be imposed on the flow. In recent tests, velocity increases of up to 40% have been achieved in the accelerator section. The flow in the channel is numerically computed us ing a 3-D parabolized Navier-Stokes (PNS) algorithm that has been developed to efficiently compute MHD flows in the low magnetic Reynolds number regime: The MHD effects are modeled by introducing source terms into the PNS equations which can then be solved in a very efficient manner. The algorithm has been extended in the present study to account for nonequilibrium seeded air flows. The electrical conductivity of the flow is determined using the program of Park. The new algorithm has been used to compute two test cases that match the experimental conditions. In both cases, magnetic and electric fields are applied to the seeded flow. The computed results are in good agreement with the experimental data.

  5. Physical-Chemical Solid Waste Processing for Space Missions at Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, John W.; Pisharody, Suresh; Moran, Mark; Wignarajah, K.; Tleimat, Maher; Pace, Greg

    2001-01-01

    As space missions become longer in duration and reach out to more distant locations such as Mars, solids waste processing progresses from storage technologies to reclamation technologies. Current low Earth orbit technologies consist of store-and dispose to space or return to Earth. Fully regenerative technologies recycle wastes. The materials reclaimed from waste can be used to provide the basic materials to support plant growth for food including carbon dioxide, water, and nutrients. Other products can also be reclaimed from waste such as hydrocarbons and activated carbon. This poster describes development at Ames Research Center of a process to make activated carbon from space mission wastes and to make an incineration system that produces clean flue gas. Inedible biomass and feces contain hydrocarbons in a form that can be pyrolyzed and converted to activated carbon. The activated carbon can then be used to clean up contaminants from various other life support systems; in particular, the activated carbon can be used regeneratively to remove NOx from incinerator flue gas. Incinerator flue gas can also be cleaned up by the use of reductive and oxidative catalysts. A catalytic incinerator flue gas cleanup system has been developed at ARC that produces flue gas clean enough (with the exception of carbon dioxide) to meet the Space Minimum Allowable Concentration limits for human exposure.

  6. Stanford/NASA-Ames Center of Excellence in model-based human performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wandell, Brian A.

    1990-01-01

    The human operator plays a critical role in many aeronautic and astronautic missions. The Stanford/NASA-Ames Center of Excellence in Model-Based Human Performance (COE) was initiated in 1985 to further our understanding of the performance capabilities and performance limits of the human component of aeronautic and astronautic projects. Support from the COE is devoted to those areas of experimental and theoretical work designed to summarize and explain human performance by developing computable performance models. The ultimate goal is to make these computable models available to other scientists for use in design and evaluation of aeronautic and astronautic instrumentation. Within vision science, two topics have received particular attention. First, researchers did extensive work analyzing the human ability to recognize object color relatively independent of the spectral power distribution of the ambient lighting (color constancy). The COE has supported a number of research papers in this area, as well as the development of a substantial data base of surface reflectance functions, ambient illumination functions, and an associated software package for rendering and analyzing image data with respect to these spectral functions. Second, the COE supported new empirical studies on the problem of selecting colors for visual display equipment to enhance human performance in discrimination and recognition tasks.

  7. Sources and levels of background noise in the NASA Ames 40- by 80-foot wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soderman, Paul T.

    1988-01-01

    Background noise levels are measured in the NASA Ames Research Center 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel following installation of a sound-absorbent lining on the test-section walls. Results show that the fan-drive noise dominated the empty test-section background noise at airspeeds below 120 knots. Above 120 knots, the test-section broadband background noise was dominated by wind-induced dipole noise (except at lower harmonics of fan blade-passage tones) most likely generated at the microphone or microphone support strut. Third-octave band and narrow-band spectra are presented for several fan operating conditions and test-section airspeeds. The background noise levels can be reduced by making improvements to the microphone wind screen or support strut. Empirical equations are presented relating variations of fan noise with fan speed or blade-pitch angle. An empirical expression for typical fan noise spectra is also presented. Fan motor electric power consumption is related to the noise generation. Preliminary measurements of sound absorption by the test-section lining indicate that the 152 mm thick lining will adequately absorb test-section model noise at frequencies above 300 Hz.

  8. Ames expedited site characterization demonstration at the former manufactured gas plant site, Marshalltown, Iowa

    SciTech Connect

    Bevolo, A.J.; Kjartanson, B.H.; Wonder, J.D.

    1996-03-01

    The goal of the Ames Expedited Site Characterization (ESC) project is to evaluate and promote both innovative technologies (IT) and state-of-the-practice technologies (SOPT) for site characterization and monitoring. In April and May 1994, the ESC project conducted site characterization, technology comparison, and stakeholder demonstration activities at a former manufactured gas plant (FMGP) owned by Iowa Electric Services (IES) Utilities, Inc., in Marshalltown, Iowa. Three areas of technology were fielded at the Marshalltown FMGP site: geophysical, analytical and data integration. The geophysical technologies are designed to assess the subsurface geological conditions so that the location, fate and transport of the targetmore » contaminants may be assessed and forecasted. The analytical technologies/methods are designed to detect and quantify the target contaminants. The data integration technology area consists of hardware and software systems designed to integrate all the site information compiled and collected into a conceptual site model on a daily basis at the site; this conceptual model then becomes the decision-support tool. Simultaneous fielding of different methods within each of the three areas of technology provided data for direct comparison of the technologies fielded, both SOPT and IT. This document reports the results of the site characterization, technology comparison, and ESC demonstration activities associated with the Marshalltown FMGP site. 124 figs., 27 tabs.« less

  9. Incorporation of EGPWS in the NASA Ames Research Center 747-400 Flight Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sallant, Ghislain; DeGennaro, Robert A.

    2001-01-01

    The NASA Ames Research Center CAE Boeing 747300 flight simulator is used primarily for the study of human factors in aviation safety. The simulator is constantly upgraded to maintain a configuration match to a specific United Airlines aircraft and maintains the highest level of FAA certification to ensure credibility to the results of research programs. United's 747-400 fleet and hence the simulator are transitioning from the older Ground Proximity Warning System (GPWS) to the state-of-the-art Enhanced Ground Proximity Warning System (EGPWS). GPWS was an early attempt to reduce or eliminate Controlled Flight Into Terrain (CFIT). Basic GPWS alerting modes include: excessive descent rate, excessive terrain closure rate, altitude loss after takeoff, unsafe terrain clearance, excessive deviation below glideslope, advisory callouts and windshear alerting. However, since GPWS uses the radar altimeter which looks straight down, ample warning is not always provided. EGPWS retains all of the basic functions of GPWS but adds the ability to look ahead by comparing the aircraft position to an internal database and provide additional alerting and display capabilities. This paper evaluates three methods of incorporating EGPWS in the simulator and describes the implementation and architecture of the preferred option.

  10. Computational fluid dynamics at NASA Ames and the numerical aerodynamic simulation program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, V. L.

    1985-01-01

    Computers are playing an increasingly important role in the field of aerodynamics such as that they now serve as a major complement to wind tunnels in aerospace research and development. Factors pacing advances in computational aerodynamics are identified, including the amount of computational power required to take the next major step in the discipline. The four main areas of computational aerodynamics research at NASA Ames Research Center which are directed toward extending the state of the art are identified and discussed. Example results obtained from approximate forms of the governing equations are presented and discussed, both in the context of levels of computer power required and the degree to which they either further the frontiers of research or apply to programs of practical importance. Finally, the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation Program--with its 1988 target of achieving a sustained computational rate of 1 billion floating-point operations per second--is discussed in terms of its goals, status, and its projected effect on the future of computational aerodynamics.

  11. Rotorcraft research testing in the National Full-Scale Aerodynamics Complex at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warmbrodt, W.; Smith, C. A.; Johnson, W.

    1985-01-01

    The unique capabilities of the National Full-Scale Aerodynamics Complex (NFAC) for testing rotorcraft systems are described. The test facilities include the 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel, the 80- by 120-Foot Wind Tunnel, and the Outdoor Aerodynamic Research Facility. The Ames 7- by 10-Foot Subsonic Wind Tunnel is also used in support of the rotor research programs conducted in the NFAC. Detailed descriptions of each of the facilities, with an emphasis on helicopter rotor test capability, are presented. The special purpose rotor test equipment used in conducting helicopter research is reviewed. Test rigs to operate full-scale helicopter main rotors, helicopter tail rotors, and tilting prop-rotors are available, as well as full-scale and small-scale rotor systems for use in various research programs. The test procedures used in conducting rotor experiments are discussed together with representative data obtained from previous test programs. Specific examples are given for rotor performance, loads, acoustics, system interactions, dynamic and aeroelastic stability, and advanced technology and prototype demonstration models.

  12. Stationary eddies in the Mars general circulation as simulated by the NASA-Ames GCM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, J. R.; Pollack, J. B.; Haberle, Robert M.

    1993-01-01

    Quasistationary eddies are prominent in a large set of simulations of the Mars general circulation performed with the NASA-Ames GCM. Various spacecraft observations have at least hinted at the existence of such eddies in the Mars atmosphere. The GCM stationary eddies appear to be forced primarily by the large Mars topography, and (to a much lesser degree) by spatial variations in the surface albedo and thermal inertia. The stationary eddy circulations exhibit largest amplitudes at high altitudes (above 30-40 km) in the winter extratropical regions. In these regions they are of planetary scale, characterized largely by zonal wavenumbers 1 and 2. Southern Hemisphere winter appears to be dominated by a very strong wave 1 pattern, with both waves 1 and 2 being prominent in the Northern Hemisphere winter regime. This difference seems to be basically understandable in terms of differences in the topography in the two hemispheres. The stationary eddies in the northern winter extratropics are found to increase in amplitude with dust loading. This behavior appears to be at least partly associated with changes in the structure of the zonal-mean flow that favor a greater response to wave 1 topographic forcing. There are also strong stationary eddy circulations in the tropics and in the summer hemisphere. The eddies in the summer subtropics and extratropics arc substantially stronger in southern summer than in northern summer. The summer hemisphere stationary circulations are relatively shallow and are characterized by smaller zonal scales than those in the winter extratropics.

  13. Flow Quality Measurements in the NASA Ames Upgraded 11-by 11-Foot Transonic Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amaya, Max A.; Murthy, Sreedhara V.; George, M. W. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Among the many upgrades designed and implemented in the NASA Ames 11-by 11-Foot Transonic Wind Tunnel over the past few years, several directly affect flow quality in the test section: a turbulence reduction system with a honeycomb and two screens, a flow smoothing system in the back leg diffusers, an improved drive motor control system, and a full replacement set of composite blades for the compressor. Prior to the shut-down of the tunnel for construction activities, an 8-foot span rake populated with flow instrumentation was traversed in the test section to fully document the flow quality and establish a baseline against which the upgrades could be characterized. A similar set of measurements was performed during the recent integrated system test trials, but the scope was somewhat limited in accordance with the primary objective of such tests, namely to return the tunnel to a fully operational status. These measurements clearly revealed substantial improvements in flow angularity and significant reductions in turbulence level for both full-span and semi-span testing configurations, thus making the flow quality of the tunnel one of the best among existing transonic facilities.

  14. GEMINI-TITAN (GT)-3 - WEIGHTLESSNESS EXPERIMENT - AMES RESEARCH CENTER (ARC), CA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1965-03-01

    S65-18762 (March 1965) --- Effects of the weightless environment on cell division, the basic growth process for living tissue, will be studied during the Gemini-Titan 3 flight scheduled for March 23, 1965. A spiny black sea urchin (upper left) is stimulated by mild electric shock or potassium chloride. As a result it sheds many thousands of eggs. When fertilized, these eggs become actively dividing cells very similar in basic processes to cells of other animals, including humans. These pictures show stages of cell division. At upper right is a single cell; at lower right cell divisions have produced many cells. Cell photos are magnified about 700 times, and all cells shown are too small to be seen by the naked eye. (Photos at upper right and lower left are of sea urchin eggs. Group of cells at lower right are from a sand dollar, which like the sea urchin, is an Echinoderm. Its eggs are virtually identical and are used interchangeably with those of the sea urchin in NASA Ames Center weightlessness experiments.) The Gemini experiment will involve cell division like that shown here. This will take place during several hours of weightlessness aboard the Gemini spacecraft. The experiment will be flown back to laboratories at Cape Kennedy after spacecraft recovery. It has been designed so that any abnormal cell division found by postflight analysis should suggest that the weightless environment has effects on individual cells. This might mean hazards for prolonged periods of manned spaceflight.

  15. Fidelity assessment of a UH-60A simulation on the NASA Ames vertical motion simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atencio, Adolph, Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Helicopter handling qualities research requires that a ground-based simulation be a high-fidelity representation of the actual helicopter, especially over the frequency range of the investigation. This experiment was performed to assess the current capability to simulate the UH-60A Black Hawk helicopter on the Vertical Motion Simulator (VMS) at NASA Ames, to develop a methodology for assessing the fidelity of a simulation, and to find the causes for lack of fidelity. The approach used was to compare the simulation to the flight vehicle for a series of tasks performed in flight and in the simulator. The results show that subjective handling qualities ratings from flight to simulator overlap, and the mathematical model matches the UH-60A helicopter very well over the range of frequencies critical to handling qualities evaluation. Pilot comments, however, indicate a need for improvement in the perceptual fidelity of the simulation in the areas of motion and visual cuing. The methodology used to make the fidelity assessment proved useful in showing differences in pilot work load and strategy, but additional work is needed to refine objective methods for determining causes of lack of fidelity.

  16. Spectral Generation from the Ames Mars GCM for the Study of Martian Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klassen, David R.; Kahre, Melinda A.; Wolff, Michael J.; Haberle, Robert; Hollingsworth, Jeffery L.

    2017-10-01

    Studies of martian clouds come from two distinct groups of researchers: those modeling the martian system from first principles and those observing Mars from ground-based and orbital platforms. The model-view begins with global circulation models (GCMs) or mesoscale models to track a multitude of state variables over a prescribed set of spatial and temporal resolutions. The state variables can then be processed into distinct maps of derived product variables, such as integrated optical depth of aerosol (e.g., water ice cloud, dust) or column integrated water vapor for comparison to observational results. The observer view begins, typically, with spectral images or imaging spectra, calibrated to some form of absolute units then run through some form of radiative transfer model to also produce distinct maps of derived product variables. Both groups of researchers work to adjust model parameters and assumptions until some level of agreement in derived product variables is achieved. While this system appears to work well, it is in some sense only an implicit confirmation of the model assumptions that attribute to the work from both sides. We have begun a project of testing the NASA Ames Mars GCM and key aerosol model assumptions more directly by taking the model output and creating synthetic TES-spectra from them for comparison to actual raw-reduced TES spectra. We will present some preliminary generated GCM spectra and TES comparisons.

  17. Training for life science experiments in space at the NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodrigues, Annette T.; Maese, A. Christopher

    1993-01-01

    As this country prepares for exploration to other planets, the need to understand the affects of long duration exposure to microgravity is evident. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Ames Research Center's Space Life Sciences Payloads Office is responsible for a number of non-human life sciences payloads on NASA's Space Shuttle's Spacelab. Included in this responsibility is the training of those individuals who will be conducting the experiments during flight, the astronauts. Preparing a crew to conduct such experiments requires training protocols that build on simple tasks. Once a defined degree of performance proficiency is met for each task, these tasks are combined to increase the complexity of the activities. As tasks are combined into in-flight operations, they are subjected to time constraints and the crew enhances their skills through repetition. The science objectives must be completely understood by the crew and are critical to the overall training program. Completion of the in-flight activities is proof of success. Because the crew is exposed to the background of early research and plans for post-flight analyses, they have a vested interest in the flight activities. The salient features of this training approach is that it allows for flexibility in implementation, consideration of individual differences, and a greater ability to retain experiment information. This training approach offers another effective alternative training tool to existing methodologies.

  18. Scholarship, publication, and career advancement in health professions education: AMEE Guide No. 43.

    PubMed

    McGaghie, William C

    2009-07-01

    Scholarship and publication are key contributors to career advancement in health professions education worldwide. Scholarship is expressed in many ways including original research; integration and synthesis of ideas and data, often across disciplines; application of skill and knowledge to problems that have consequences for health professionals, students, and patients; and teaching in many forms. Professional publication also has diverse outlets ranging from empirical articles in peer reviewed journals, textbook chapters, videos, simulation technologies, and many other means of expression. Scholarship and publication are evaluated and judged using criteria that are consensual, public, and transparent. This three-part AMEE Guide presents advice about how to prepare and publish health professions education research reports and other forms of scholarship in professional journals and other outlets. Part One addresses scholarship-its varieties, assessment, and attributes of productive scholars and scholarly teams. Part Two maps the road to publication, beginning with what's important and reportable and moving to manuscript planning and writing, gauging manuscript quality, manuscript submission and review, and writing in English. Part Three offers 21 practical suggestions about how to advance a successful and satisfying career in the academic health professions. Concluding remarks encourage health professions educators to pursue scholarship with vision and reflection.

  19. Investigation of seismicity and related effects at NASA Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility, Computer Center, Edwards, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cousineau, R. D.; Crook, R., Jr.; Leeds, D. J.

    1985-01-01

    This report discusses a geological and seismological investigation of the NASA Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility site at Edwards, California. Results are presented as seismic design criteria, with design values of the pertinent ground motion parameters, probability of recurrence, and recommended analogous time-history accelerograms with their corresponding spectra. The recommendations apply specifically to the Dryden site and should not be extrapolated to other sites with varying foundation and geologic conditions or different seismic environments.

  20. Original Research: Metabolic alterations from early life thyroxine replacement therapy in male Ames dwarf mice are transient.

    PubMed

    Darcy, Justin; Fang, Yimin; Hill, Cristal M; McFadden, Sam; Sun, Liou Y; Bartke, Andrzej

    2016-10-01

    Ames dwarf mice are exceptionally long-lived due to a Prop1 loss of function mutation resulting in deficiency of growth hormone, thyroid-stimulating hormone and prolactin. Deficiency in thyroid-stimulating hormone and growth hormone leads to greatly reduced levels of circulating thyroid hormones and insulin-like growth factor 1, as well as a reduction in insulin secretion. Early life growth hormone replacement therapy in Ames dwarf mice significantly shortens their longevity, while early life thyroxine (T4) replacement therapy does not. Possible mechanisms by which early life growth hormone replacement therapy shortens longevity include deleterious effects on glucose homeostasis and energy metabolism, which are long lasting. A mechanism explaining why early life T4 replacement therapy does not shorten longevity remains elusive. Here, we look for a possible explanation as to why early life T4 replacement therapy does not impact longevity of Ames dwarf mice. We found that early life T4 replacement therapy increased body weight and advanced the age of sexual maturation. We also find that early life T4 replacement therapy does not impact glucose tolerance or insulin sensitivity, and any deleterious effects on oxygen consumption, respiratory quotient and heat production are transient. Lastly, we find that early life T4 replacement therapy has long-lasting effects on bone mineral density and bone mineral content. We suggest that the transient effects on energy metabolism and lack of effects on glucose homeostasis are the reasons why there is no shortening of longevity after early life T4 replacement therapy in Ames dwarf mice. © 2016 by the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine.