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Sample records for l-sorbose dehydrogenase accelerative

  1. Purification and Properties of a New L-Sorbose Dehydrogenase Accelerative Protein from Bacillus megaterium Bred by Ion-Beam Implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Shiguang; Yao, Liming; Su, Caixin; Wang, Tao; Wang, Jun; Tang, Mingli; Yu, Zengliang

    2008-06-01

    Bacillus megaterium BM302 bred by ion-beam implantation produces L-sorbose dehydrogenase accelerative protein (SAP) to accelerate the activity of L-sorbose dehydrogenase (SDH) of Gluconobacter oxydans in the 2-keto-L-gulonic acid (2KLG) fermentation from L-sorbose by the mixed culture of B. megaterium BM302 and G. oxydans. The SAP purified by three chromatographic steps gave 35-fold purification with a yield of 13% and a specific activity of 5.21 units/mg protein. The molecular weight of the purified SAP was about 58 kDa. The SDH accelerative activity of SAP at pH 7 and 50°C was the highest. Additionally, it retained 60% activity at a pH range of 6.5 ~ 10 and was stable at 20°C ~ 60°C. After 0.32-unit SAP was added to the single cultured G. oxydans strains, the SDH activity was apparently accelerated and the 2KLG yield of GO29, GO112, G0 and GI13 was enhanced 2.1, 3.3, 3.5 and 2.9 folds respectively over that of the strains without the addition of SAP.

  2. L-Sorbose but not D-tagatose induces hemolysis of dog erythrocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Bär, A; Leeman, W R

    1999-04-01

    Previous investigations have demonstrated that L-sorbose induces hemolysis of dog erythrocytes. This effect is probably the consequence of an ATP depletion of the red blood cells subsequent to inhibition of hexokinase, and thus the glycolytic pathway, by sorbose 1-phosphate. In the present study, the susceptibility of dog erythrocytes to D-tagatose, a stereoisomer of L-sorbose, was examined. Washed dog erythrocytes were suspended in Hanks' balanced salt solution (HBSS, containing 5.6 mM glucose) with or without the addition of 0.6, 6, and 60 mM L-sorbose or D-tagatose, or in HBSS with total glucose concentrations of 5.6, 6 and 60 mM D-glucose. After incubation for 24 h at 34 degrees C, the suspensions were centrifuged, and the percentage of hemolysis was determined by measuring the hemoglobin in the sediment and the supernatant. The amount of hemoglobin released in the medium did not differ significantly between the control (HBSS) and the test incubations with glucose or D-tagatose supplementation. In contrast, the addition of 6 and 60 mM L-sorbose resulted in significant hemolysis. At the low dose (0.6 mM), L-sorbose did not have an adverse effect. It is concluded that D-tagatose, unlike L-sorbose, does not have a hemolytic effect on canine erythrocytes. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  3. Off-line FIA monitoring of D-sorbitol consumption during L-sorbose production using a sorbitol biosensor.

    PubMed

    Sefcovicová, Jana; Vikartovská, Alica; Pätoprstý, Vladimír; Magdolen, Peter; Katrlík, Jaroslav; Tkac, Jan; Gemeiner, Peter

    2009-06-30

    A ferricyanide mediated amperometric biosensor system implementing D-sorbitol dehydrogenase together with diaphorase for sensitive detection of D-sorbitol was used. The biosensor system was successfully integrated into an off-line FIA system with a throughput of detection of 10 h(-1). The device exhibited limit of detection of 20 microM with an average relative standard deviation of analysis of samples of 2.2%. The signal of the biosensor was linear up to 1.1 mM for D-sorbitol with sensitivity of (72 +/- 2) nA mM(-1), while a dynamic range was much wider up to 18 mM. The sorbitol biosensor gave reliable results even in the presence of a high molar excess of L-sorbose, a product of the biotransformation process, as judged from an excellent agreement with HPLC and GC.

  4. Mechanism of mutarotation in supercooled liquid phase: Studies on L-sorbose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wlodarczyk, P.; Paluch, M.; Grzybowski, A.; Kaminski, K.; Cecotka, A.; Ziolo, J.; Markowski, J.

    2012-09-01

    We have studied mutarotation in anhydrous supercooled L-sorbose by means of dielectric spectroscopy. The phenomenon observed in L-sorbose is much faster than in the structurally similar D-fructose. The kinetics of this process has been determined by applying 1st order kinetics model. Activation energy equal to 68 kJ/mol was obtained from temperature dependence of rate constants. To understand differences in mutarotation rate between D-fructose and L-sorbose, quantum mechanical calculations were performed to study mechanism of this phenomenon. The possible impact of water absorbed from air on the mutarotation in supercooled liquid state has been checked. It turned out that the process is probably intermolecular and the water molecules or other carbohydrate molecules assist in the proton transfer process. Finally we have shown that the rate constant can be alternatively determined from frequency of the maximum of peak, obtained by performing Fourier transform of kinetic curve.

  5. Cloning of the Escherichia coli sor genes for L-sorbose transport and metabolism and physical mapping of the genes near metH and iclR.

    PubMed

    Wehmeier, U F; Nobelmann, B; Lengeler, J W

    1992-12-01

    The sor genes for L-sorbose (Sor) degradation of Escherichia coli EC3132, a wild-type strain, have been cloned on a 10.8-kbp fragment together with parts of the metH gene. The genes were mapped by restriction analysis, by deletion mapping, and by insertion mutagenesis with Tn1725. Seven sor genes with their corresponding gene products have been identified. They form an operon (gene order sorCpCDFBAME) inducible by L-sorbose, and their products have the following functions: SorC (36 kDa), regulatory protein with repressor-activator functions; SorD (29 kDa), D-glucitol-6-phosphate dehydrogenase; SorF and SorB (14 and 19 kDa, respectively), and SorA and SorM (27 and 29 kDa, respectively), two soluble and two membrane-bound proteins, respectively, of an L-sorbose phosphotransferase transport system; SorE (45 kDa), sorbose-1-phosphate reductase. The sor operon from E. coli EC3132 thus is identical to the operon from Klebsiella pneumoniae KAY2026. On the basis of restriction mapping followed by Southern hybridization experiments, the sor genes were mapped at 91.2 min on the chromosome, 3.3 kbp downstream of the metH-iclR gene cluster, and shown to be transcribed in a counterclockwise direction. The chromosomal map of the Sor+ strain EC3132 differs from that of the Sor- strain K-12 in approximately 8.6 kbp.

  6. Biosynthesis of l-Sorbose and l-Psicose Based on C-C Bond Formation Catalyzed by Aldolases in an Engineered Corynebacterium glutamicum Strain.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jiangang; Li, Jitao; Men, Yan; Zhu, Yueming; Zhang, Ying; Sun, Yuanxia; Ma, Yanhe

    2015-07-01

    The property of loose stereochemical control at aldol products from aldolases helped to synthesize multiple polyhydroxylated compounds with nonnatural stereoconfiguration. In this study, we discovered for the first time that some fructose 1,6-diphosphate aldolases (FruA) and tagatose 1,6-diphosphate (TagA) aldolases lost their strict stereoselectivity when using l-glyceraldehyde and synthesized not only l-sorbose but also a high proportion of l-psicose. Among the aldolases tested, TagA from Bacillus licheniformis (BGatY) showed the highest enzyme activity with l-glyceraldehyde. Subsequently, a "one-pot" reaction based on BGatY and fructose-1-phosphatase (YqaB) generated 378 mg/liter l-psicose and 199 mg/liter l-sorbose from dihydroxyacetone-phosphate (DHAP) and l-glyceraldehyde. Because of the high cost and instability of DHAP, a microbial fermentation strategy was used further to produce l-sorbose/l-psicose from glucose and l-glyceraldehyde, in which DHAP was obtained from glucose through the glycolytic pathway, and some recombination pathways based on FruA or TagA and YqaB were constructed in Escherichia coli and Corynebacterium glutamicum strains. After evaluation of different host cells and combinations of FruA or TagA with YqaB and optimization of gene expression, recombinant C. glutamicum strain WT(pXFTY) was selected and produced 2.53 g/liter total ketoses, with a yield of 0.50 g/g l-glyceraldehyde. Moreover, deletion of gene cgl0331, encoding the Zn-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase in C. glutamicum, was confirmed for the first time to significantly decrease conversion of l-glyceraldehyde to glycerol and to increase yield of target products. Finally, fed-batch culture of strain SY14(pXFTY) produced 3.5 g/liter l-sorbose and 2.3 g/liter l-psicose, with a yield of 0.61 g/g l-glyceraldehyde. This microbial fermentation strategy also could be applied to efficiently synthesize other l-sugars.

  7. Biosynthesis of l-Sorbose and l-Psicose Based on C—C Bond Formation Catalyzed by Aldolases in an Engineered Corynebacterium glutamicum Strain

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jiangang; Li, Jitao; Men, Yan; Zhu, Yueming; Zhang, Ying; Ma, Yanhe

    2015-01-01

    The property of loose stereochemical control at aldol products from aldolases helped to synthesize multiple polyhydroxylated compounds with nonnatural stereoconfiguration. In this study, we discovered for the first time that some fructose 1,6-diphosphate aldolases (FruA) and tagatose 1,6-diphosphate (TagA) aldolases lost their strict stereoselectivity when using l-glyceraldehyde and synthesized not only l-sorbose but also a high proportion of l-psicose. Among the aldolases tested, TagA from Bacillus licheniformis (BGatY) showed the highest enzyme activity with l-glyceraldehyde. Subsequently, a “one-pot” reaction based on BGatY and fructose-1-phosphatase (YqaB) generated 378 mg/liter l-psicose and 199 mg/liter l-sorbose from dihydroxyacetone-phosphate (DHAP) and l-glyceraldehyde. Because of the high cost and instability of DHAP, a microbial fermentation strategy was used further to produce l-sorbose/l-psicose from glucose and l-glyceraldehyde, in which DHAP was obtained from glucose through the glycolytic pathway, and some recombination pathways based on FruA or TagA and YqaB were constructed in Escherichia coli and Corynebacterium glutamicum strains. After evaluation of different host cells and combinations of FruA or TagA with YqaB and optimization of gene expression, recombinant C. glutamicum strain WT(pXFTY) was selected and produced 2.53 g/liter total ketoses, with a yield of 0.50 g/g l-glyceraldehyde. Moreover, deletion of gene cgl0331, encoding the Zn-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase in C. glutamicum, was confirmed for the first time to significantly decrease conversion of l-glyceraldehyde to glycerol and to increase yield of target products. Finally, fed-batch culture of strain SY14(pXFTY) produced 3.5 g/liter l-sorbose and 2.3 g/liter l-psicose, with a yield of 0.61 g/g l-glyceraldehyde. This microbial fermentation strategy also could be applied to efficiently synthesize other l-sugars. PMID:25888171

  8. Continuous 2-keto-L-gulonic acid fermentation from L-sorbose by Ketogulonigenium vulgare DSM 4025.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Yoshinori; Sugisawa, Teruhide; Hoshino, Tatsuo

    2009-04-01

    A single-stage continuous fermentation process for the production of 2-keto-L-gulonic acid (2KGA) from L-sorbose using Ketogulonigenium vulgare DSM 4025 was developed. The chemostat culture with the dilution rate that was calculated based on the relationship between the 2KGA production rate and the 2KGA concentration was feasible for production with high concentration of 2KGA. In this system, 112.2 g/L of 2KGA on the average was continuously produced from 114 g/L of L-sorbose. A steady state of the fermentation was maintained for the duration of more than 110 h. The dilution rate was kept in the range of 0.035 and 0.043 h(-1), and the 2KGA productivity was 3.90 to 4.80 g/L/h. The average molar conversion yield of 2KGA from L-sorbose was 91.3%. Under the optimal conditions, L-sorbose concentration was kept at 0 g/L. Meanwhile, the dissolved oxygen level was changing in response to the dilution rate and 2KGA concentration. In the dissolved oxygen (DO) range of 16% to 58%, it was revealed that the relationship between DO and D possessed high degree of positive correlation under the L-sorbose limiting condition (complete consumption of L-sorbose). Increasing D closer to the critical value for washing out point of the continuous fermentation, DO value tended to be gradually increased up to 58%. In conclusion, an efficient and reproducible continuous fermentation process for 2KGA production by K. vulgare DSM 4025 could be developed using a medium containing baker's yeast without using a second helper microorganism.

  9. Titanium-Beta Zeolites Catalyze the Stereospecific Isomerization of D-Glucose to L-Sorbose via Intramolecular C5-C1 Hydride Shift

    SciTech Connect

    Gounder, Rajamani; Davis, Mark E.

    2013-06-03

    Pure-silica zeolite beta containing Lewis acidic framework Ti4+ centers (Ti-Beta) is shown to catalyze the isomerization of D-glucose to L-sorbose via an intramolecular C5–C1 hydride shift. Glucose–sorbose isomerization occurs in parallel to glucose–fructose isomerization on Ti-Beta in both water and methanol solvents, with fructose formed as the predominant product in water and sorbose as the predominant product in methanol (at 373 K) at initial times and over the course of >10 turnovers. Isotopic tracer studies demonstrate that 13C and D labels placed respectively at the C1 and C2 positions of glucose are retained respectively at the C6 and C5 positions of sorbose, consistent with its formation via an intramolecular C5–C1 hydride shift isomerization mechanism. This direct Lewis acid-mediated pathway for glucose–sorbose isomerization appears to be unprecedented among heterogeneous or biological catalysts and sharply contrasts indirect base-mediated glucose–sorbose isomerization via 3,4-enediol intermediates or via retro-aldol fragmentation and recombination of sugar fragments. Measured first-order glucose–sorbose isomerization rate constants (per total Ti; 373 K) for Ti-Beta in methanol are similar for glucose and glucose deuterated at the C2 position (within a factor of ~1.1), but are a factor of ~2.3 lower for glucose deuterated at each carbon position, leading to H/D kinetic isotope effects expected for kinetically relevant intramolecular C5–C1 hydride shift steps. Optical rotation measurements show that isomerization of D-(+)-glucose (92% enantiomeric purity) with Ti-Beta in water (373 K) led to the formation of L-(-)-sorbose (73% enantiomeric purity) and D-(-)-fructose (87% enantiomeric purity) as the predominant stereoisomers, indicating that stereochemistry is preserved at carbon centers not directly involved in intramolecular C5–C1 or C2–C1 hydride shift steps, respectively. This new Lewis acid

  10. Study of 1-deoxy-1-(indol-3-yl)-L-sorbose, 1-deoxy-1-(indol-3-yl)-L-tagatose, and their analogs.

    PubMed

    Lavrenov, Sergey N; Korolev, Alexander M; Reznikova, Marina I; Sosnov, Andrey V; Preobrazhenskaya, Maria N

    2003-01-20

    Alkaline degradation of the ascorbigen 2-C-[(indol-3-yl)methyl]-alpha-L-xylo-hex-3-ulofuranosono-1,4-lactone (1a) led to a mixture of 1-deoxy-1-(indol-3-yl)-L-sorbose (2a) and 1-deoxy-1-(indol-3-yl)-L-tagatose (3a). The mixture of diastereomeric ketoses underwent acetylation and pyranose ring opening under the action of acetic anhydride in pyridine in the presence of 4-dimethylaminopyridine (DMAP) with the formation of a mixture of (E)-2,3,4,5,6-penta-O-acetyl-1-deoxy-1-(indol-3-yl)-L-xylo-hex-1-enitol (4a) and (E)-2,3,4,5,6-penta-O-acetyl-1-deoxy-1-(indol-3-yl)-L-lyxo-hex-1-enitol (5a), which were separated chromatographically. Deacetylation of 4a or 5a afforded cyclised tetrols, tosylation of which in admixture resulted in 1-deoxy-1-(indol-3-yl)-3,5-di-O-tosyl-alpha-L-sorbopyranose (12a) and 1-deoxy-1-(indol-3-yl)-4,5-di-O-tosyl-alpha-L-tagatopyranose (13a). Under alkaline conditions 13a readily formed 2-hydroxy-4-hydroxymethyl-3-(indol-3-yl)cyclopenten-2-one (15a) in 90% yield. Similar transformations were performed for N-methyl- and N-methoxyindole derivatives.

  11. Evidence from studies of temperature-dependent changes of D-glucose, D-mannose and L-sorbose permeability that different states of activation of the human erythrocyte hexose transporter exist for good and bad substrates.

    PubMed

    Naftalin, R J

    1997-08-14

    (1) The inhibition constant of L-sorbose flux from fresh human erythrocytes by D-glucose, Ki(sorbose) increases on cooling from 50 degrees C to 30 degrees C from 5.15 +/- 0.89 mM to 12.24 +/- 1.9 mM; the Ki(sorbose) of D-mannose increases similarly, indicating that the process is endothermic. (2) The activation energy Ea(sorbose) of net L-sorbose exit is 62.9 +/- 3.1 kJ/mol; in the co-presence of 5 mM D-glucose Ea(sorbose) is reduced to 41.7 +/- 1.6 kJ/mol (P < 0.005). (3) Cooling from 35 degrees C to 21 degrees C decreases the Ki(inf, cis) of auto-inhibition of D-glucose net exit from 5.2 +/- 0.3 mM to 1.36 +/- 0.06 mM; the Ki(inf, cis) of D-mannose falls from 10.9 +/- 1.65 mM to 5.7 +/- 0.3 mM. (4) The activation energy of D-glucose zero-trans net exit is 34.7 +/- 2.1 kJ/mol and that of D-mannose exit is 69.4 +/- 3.7 kJ/mol (P < 0.0025). (5) The exothermic and exergonic processes of auto-inhibition of D-glucose net exit are larger than those for D-mannose (P < 0.03). These data are consistent with D-glucose binding promoting an activated transporter state which following dissociation transiently remains; if an L-sorbose molecule binds within the relaxation time after D-glucose dissociation, it will have a higher mobility than otherwise. Cooling slows the relaxation time of the activated state hence raises the probability that L-sorbose will bind to the glucose-activated transporter. D-Glucose donates twice as much energy to the transporter as D-mannose, consequently produces more facilitation of flux. This view is inconsistent with the alternating carrier model of sugar transport in which net flux is considered to be rate-limited by return of the empty carrier, but is consistent with fixed two-site models.

  12. POLYOL DEHYDROGENASES OF AZOTOBACTER AGILIS

    PubMed Central

    Marcus, Leon; Marr, Allen G.

    1961-01-01

    Marcus, Leon (University of California, Davis), and Allen G. Marr. Polyol dehydrogenases of Azotobacter agilis. J. Bacteriol. 82:224–232. 1961.—Two soluble diphosphopyridine-linked polyol dehydrogenases are formed by Azotobacter agilis (A. vinelandii). The first, d-mannitol dehydrogenase is induced by d-mannitol and all of the pentitols except l-arabitol. Ribitol is an excellent inducer of mannitol dehydrogenase although it is not metabolized, nor does the enzyme act upon it. This allows study of the gratuitous induction of mannitol dehydrogenase. Of the polyols tested, mannitol dehydrogenase oxidizes d-mannitol, d-arabitol, d-rhamnitol, and perseitol, demonstrating its requirement for substrates bearing the d-manno configuration. The corresponding 2-ketoses, d-fructose, d-xylulose, and presumably d-rhamnulose, and perseulose are reduced. The second enzyme, l-iditol dehydrogenase is induced only by polyols containing the d-xylo configuration, i.e., sorbitol and xylitol. l-Iditol dehydrogenase oxidizes d-xylo polyols seven times faster than it does d-ribo polyols. Substrates oxidized include l-iditol, sorbitol, xylitol, and ribitol. The corresponding 2-ketoses, l-sorbose, d-fructose, d-xylulose, and d-ribulose, are reduced. The two polyol dehydrogenases have been separated and purified by chromatography on a modified cellulose ion exchanger. PMID:13766585

  13. A highly efficient sorbitol dehydrogenase from Gluconobacter oxydans G624 and improvement of its stability through immobilization

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae-Su; Patel, Sanjay K. S.; Selvaraj, Chandrabose; Jung, Woo-Suk; Pan, Cheol-Ho; Kang, Yun Chan; Lee, Jung-Kul

    2016-01-01

    A sorbitol dehydrogenase (GoSLDH) from Gluconobacter oxydans G624 (G. oxydans G624) was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3)-CodonPlus RIL. The complete 1455-bp codon-optimized gene was amplified, expressed, and thoroughly characterized for the first time. GoSLDH exhibited Km and kcat values of 38.9 mM and 3820 s−1 toward L-sorbitol, respectively. The enzyme exhibited high preference for NADP+ (vs. only 2.5% relative activity with NAD+). GoSLDH sequencing, structure analyses, and biochemical studies, suggested that it belongs to the NADP+-dependent polyol-specific long-chain sorbitol dehydrogenase family. GoSLDH is the first fully characterized SLDH to date, and it is distinguished from other L-sorbose-producing enzymes by its high activity and substrate specificity. Isothermal titration calorimetry showed that the protein binds more strongly to D-sorbitol than other L-sorbose-producing enzymes, and substrate docking analysis confirmed a higher turnover rate. The high oxidation potential of GoSLDH for D-sorbitol was confirmed by cyclovoltametric analysis. Further, stability of GoSLDH significantly improved (up to 13.6-fold) after cross-linking of immobilized enzyme on silica nanoparticles and retained 62.8% residual activity after 10 cycles of reuse. Therefore, immobilized GoSLDH may be useful for L-sorbose production from D-sorbitol. PMID:27633501

  14. A pyrroloquinoline quinine-dependent membrane-bound d-sorbitol dehydrogenase from Gluconobacter oxydans exhibits an ordered Bi Bi reaction mechanism.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xue-Peng; Wei, Liu-Jing; Ye, Jian-Bin; Yin, Bo; Wei, Dong-Zhi

    2008-09-15

    A membrane-bound pyrroloquinoline quinine (PQQ)-dependent D-sorbitol dehydrogenase (mSLDH) in Gluconobacter oxydans participates in the oxidation of D-sorbitol to L-sorbose by transferring electrons to ubiquinone which links to the respiratory chain. To elucidate the kinetic mechanism, the enzyme purified was subjected to two-substrate steady-state kinetic analysis, product and substrate inhibition studies. These kinetic data indicate that the catalytic reaction follows an ordered Bi Bi mechanism, where the substrates bind to the enzyme in a defined order (first ubiquinone followed by D-sorbitol), while products are released in sequence (first L-sorbose followed by ubiquinol). From these findings, we proposed that the native mSLDH bears two different substrate-binding sites, one for ubiquinone and the other for D-sorbitol, in addition to PQQ-binding and Mg(2+)-binding sites in the catalytic center.

  15. ACCEL, a program for data acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haar, R. R.; Curtis, L. J.

    1993-06-01

    ACCEL is a computer program for data acquisition and experimental control used at the University of Toledo's Heavy Ion Accelerator facility, THIA. ACCEL is written in Pascal and runs on an IBM PC in conjunction with a Keithley Series 500 Data Acquisition System for data collection in beam-foil studies of the lifetimes of excited atomic states. In addition to photon counting, foil positioning and wavelength scanning may be programmed. Collected data are displayed graphically, printed as collected, and stored on disk for later analysis. The program allows flexible control and is designed to allow new functions to be added easily.

  16. Alternative Assessments for Accelerative Learning Classes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hiltibran, Cheryl

    With the advent of accelerative learning changing the teaching paradigm, it is important to establish more effective ways of evaluating and assessing learning competencies. Alternative assessments are necessary because: (1) all learning needs to be placed into the larger context of the real world; (2) the ultimate purpose of education is for the…

  17. Suggestive-Accelerative Learning and Teaching in Foreign Languages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herr, Kay U.

    The suggestive-accelerative approach to foreign language instruction is described. This method, first used in Bulgaria by Georgi Lozanov, emphasizes bringing the imagination to bear on the learning task, in a relaxed classroom environment. After establishing a calm atmosphere through direct and indirect suggestion, the teacher proceeds to…

  18. Response to ACCEL: Emphasize Development, Domains, and Application

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olszewski-Kubilius, Paula; Subotnik, Rena F.; Worrell, Frank C.

    2017-01-01

    In this article, we provide a response to the Active Concerned Citizenship and Ethical Leadership (ACCEL) model put forward by Sternberg (2017). Our commentary focuses on four critical areas that do not receive sufficient attention in Sternberg's proposed model: (a) the developmental nature of giftedness; (b) that giftedness is domain specific,…

  19. Dimensions of Mathematical Thinking and Learning in ACCEL

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sriraman, Bharath

    2017-01-01

    Sternberg (2017) summarizes the history of identification of giftedness in the 20th century and presents a case for the shortcomings of measures such as IQ for problem-solving skills required in the 21st century. The Active Concerned Citizenship and Ethical Leadership (ACCEL) model is proposed to replace the outdated construct of IQ, particularly…

  20. Percutaneous Coronary Intervention Enhances Accelerative Wave Intensity in Coronary Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Narayan, Om; Leung, Michael C. H.; Wong, Dennis T. L.; Meredith, Ian T.; Cameron, James D.

    2015-01-01

    Background The systolic forward travelling compression wave (sFCW) and diastolic backward travelling decompression waves (dBEW) predominantly accelerate coronary blood flow. The effect of a coronary stenosis on the intensity of these waves in the distal vessel is unknown. We investigated the relationship between established physiological indices of hyperemic coronary flow and the intensity of the two major accelerative coronary waves identified by Coronary Wave Intensity analysis (CWIA). Methodology / Principal Findings Simultaneous intracoronary pressure and velocity measurement was performed during adenosine induced hyperemia in 17 patients with pressure / Doppler flow wires positioned distal to the target lesion. CWI profiles were generated from this data. Fractional Flow Reserve (FFR) and Coronary Flow Velocity Reserve (CFVR) were calculated concurrently. The intensity of the dBEW was significantly correlated with FFR (R = -0.70, P = 0.003) and CFVR (R = -0.73, P = 0.001). The intensity of the sFCW was also significantly correlated with baseline FFR (R = 0.71, p = 0.002) and CFVR (R = 0.59, P = 0.01). Stenting of the target lesion resulted in a median 178% (interquartile range 55–280%) (P<0.0001) increase in sFCW intensity and a median 117% (interquartile range 27–509%) (P = 0.001) increase in dBEW intensity. The increase in accelerative wave intensity following PCI was proportionate to the baseline FFR and CFVR, such that stenting of lesions associated with the greatest flow limitation (lowest FFR and CFVR) resulted in the largest increases in wave intensity. Conclusions Increasing ischemia severity is associated with proportionate reductions in cumulative intensity of both major accelerative coronary waves. Impaired diastolic microvascular decompression may represent a novel, important pathophysiologic mechanism driving the reduction in coronary blood flow in the setting of an epicardial stenosis. PMID:26658896

  1. The Journal of Suggestive-Accelerative Learning and Teaching, Volume 3, Number 1, Spring 1978.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuster, Donald H., Ed.

    1978-01-01

    Contents of this issue are as follows: "Applied Suggestology in the United States: Suggestive-Accelerative Learning and Teaching" by Dean F. Held; "A Study of Suggestopedia Features that Can Be Omitted Once Students Learn How to Learn" by D.H. Schuster and P.J. Wardell; "Evaluation of the Suggestive-Accelerative Lozanov…

  2. The Journal of the Society for Accelerative Learning and Teaching, Volume 7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of the Society for Accelerative Learning and Teaching, 1982

    1982-01-01

    The four 1982 numbers of the Journal of the Society for Accelerative Learning and Teaching (SALT) include articles on: a comparison of the Tomatis Method and Suggestopedia; the CLC system of accelerated learning; Suggestopedia in the English-as-a-second-language classroom; experiments with SALT techniques; accelerative learning techniques for…

  3. The Journal of the Society for Accelerative Learning and Teaching, Volume 7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of the Society for Accelerative Learning and Teaching, 1982

    1982-01-01

    The four 1982 numbers of the Journal of the Society for Accelerative Learning and Teaching (SALT) include articles on: a comparison of the Tomatis Method and Suggestopedia; the CLC system of accelerated learning; Suggestopedia in the English-as-a-second-language classroom; experiments with SALT techniques; accelerative learning techniques for…

  4. Accelerative propagation and explosion triggering by expanding turbulent premixed flames.

    PubMed

    Akkerman, V'yacheslav; Chaudhuri, Swetaprovo; Law, Chung K

    2013-02-01

    The dynamics and morphology of outwardly propagating, accelerating turbulent premixed flames and the effect of flame acceleration on explosion triggering are analyzed. Guided by recent theoretical results and substantiated by experiments, we find that an expanding flame front in an externally forced, near-isotropic turbulent environment exhibits accelerative propagation given by a well-defined power law based on the average global flame radius. In this context the limits of the power-law exponent and the effective turbulence intensity experienced by the flame are derived. The power-law exponent is found to be substantially larger than that for the hydrodynamically unstable cellular laminar flames, hence facilitating the possibility of detonation triggering in turbulent environments. For large length scales, hydrodynamic instability is expected to provide additional acceleration, thus further favoring the attainment of detonation triggering.

  5. High charge state, ion-atom collision experiments using accel-decel

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, E.M.; Clark, M.W.; Tanis, J.A.; Graham, W.G.

    1987-01-01

    Recent studies of /sub 16/S/sup 13 +/ + He collisions between 2.5 and 200 MeV, which were made using the accel-decel technique with the Brookhaven National Laboratory coupled MP tandem Van de Graaff accelerators, are discussed. Cross sections were measured for single electron-capture and -loss as well as K x rays correlated to electron-capture. Other planned ion-atom collision experiments requiring accel-decel are also presented. 18 refs., 3 figs.

  6. Accel-decel extraction system for PIG sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spädtke, P.; Heymach, F.; Hollinger, R.; Leible, K. D.; Mayr, R.; Shi, L. Q.

    2002-02-01

    Increasing the brightness of the ion beam is a typical demand for any accelerator. In order to fill the heavy ion synchrotron (SIS) up to the space charge limit, higher pulse currents are necessary. The UNILAC is operated with a pulse length up to 6 ms and a repetition rate up to 50 s-1. For the injection into the SIS a pulse length of 300 μs at 0.3 s-1 is required. The transverse acceptance of the RFQ is 138 π mm mrad. According to Child's law, the ion current density which can be extracted from a plasma source is for the space charge limited flow proportional to Φ1.5/d2. With Φ and d denoting the extraction voltage and the width of the extraction gap. One approach to generate higher ion currents is to increase the extraction voltage in the regularly used extraction system. However, the required beam velocity is fixed by the RFQ structure with 2.2 keV/u. The mass-to-charge ratio which is to be accelerated can be between 1 and 65, resulting in a total voltage drop from 2.2 up to 143 kV (extraction and postacceleration voltage). The other approach is to decrease the gap width in the extraction system, but there is an optimum in the aspect ratio. To generate an ion beam with a higher current at low energy, a triode extraction system operated in accel-decel (Uacc,Udec) mode is a possible solution. By applying a negative potential at the second electrode a higher extraction field strength can be achieved. The effects of extraction field, arc current, and ion energy on the extracted ion beam current and its emittance were investigated.

  7. Journal of the Society for Accelerative Learning and Teaching; Volume 12, Number 1-4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuster, Don, Ed.

    1987-01-01

    The basic focus on this journal, which publishes a wide variety of articles on suggestive and accelerative learning, is Suggestopedia theory, research, and application. Articles in the volume presented here include: "The Effects of Superlearning on Retention/Hypermnesia of Rare English Words in College Students" (Lynn D. Anderson);…

  8. The Journal of Suggestive-Accelerative Learning and Teaching, Volume 5, Number 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Suggestive-Accelerative Learning and Teaching, 1980

    1980-01-01

    A collection of articles concerning suggestive-accelerative learning and teaching (SALT) methods includes: "Suggestive Teaching Methods in the Soviet Union" (Eva Szalontai); "SALT Applied to Remedial Reading: A Critical Review" (Allyn Prichard and Jean Taylor); "The Waldorf Schools: An Artistic Approach to Education"…

  9. The Journal of the Society for Accelerative Learning and Teaching. Volume 15, 1990.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of the Society for Accelerative Learning and Teaching, 1990

    1990-01-01

    Articles in this volume of the Journal of the Society for Accelerative Learning and Teaching (SALT) include the following: "Accelerated Learning Components in Elementary Classrooms"; "Ball-Stick Bird: Teaching with the Story Engram"; "A SALT Pilot Study in College Developmental Mathematics"; "Black Education in…

  10. The Journal of Suggestive-Accelerative Learning and Teaching, Volume 3, Number 2, Summer 1978.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuster, Donald H., Ed.

    1978-01-01

    Contents of this issue are as follows: "Suggestopedia: The Use of Music and Suggestion in Learning and Hypermnesia:" by Elizabeth Risova Philipov; "A Two Year Evaluation of the Suggestive-Accelerative Learning and Teaching (SALT) Method in Central Iowa Public Schools" by D.H. Schuster and R.A. Prichard; "Improving Lecturer…

  11. The Journal of the Society for Accelerative Learning and Teaching. Volume 11, 1986.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of the Society for Accelerative Learning and Teaching, 1986

    1986-01-01

    The Society for Accelerative Learning and Teaching has published a series of collected works on many aspects of suggestive learning-teaching-therapy counseling within the theoretical and procedural confines of Suggestology and/or Suggestopedia. The articles cover a variety of subjects including critical reviews, theoretical analyses, speculative…

  12. AcceleRater: a web application for supervised learning of behavioral modes from acceleration measurements.

    PubMed

    Resheff, Yehezkel S; Rotics, Shay; Harel, Roi; Spiegel, Orr; Nathan, Ran

    2014-01-01

    The study of animal movement is experiencing rapid progress in recent years, forcefully driven by technological advancement. Biologgers with Acceleration (ACC) recordings are becoming increasingly popular in the fields of animal behavior and movement ecology, for estimating energy expenditure and identifying behavior, with prospects for other potential uses as well. Supervised learning of behavioral modes from acceleration data has shown promising results in many species, and for a diverse range of behaviors. However, broad implementation of this technique in movement ecology research has been limited due to technical difficulties and complicated analysis, deterring many practitioners from applying this approach. This highlights the need to develop a broadly applicable tool for classifying behavior from acceleration data. Here we present a free-access python-based web application called AcceleRater, for rapidly training, visualizing and using models for supervised learning of behavioral modes from ACC measurements. We introduce AcceleRater, and illustrate its successful application for classifying vulture behavioral modes from acceleration data obtained from free-ranging vultures. The seven models offered in the AcceleRater application achieved overall accuracy of between 77.68% (Decision Tree) and 84.84% (Artificial Neural Network), with a mean overall accuracy of 81.51% and standard deviation of 3.95%. Notably, variation in performance was larger between behavioral modes than between models. AcceleRater provides the means to identify animal behavior, offering a user-friendly tool for ACC-based behavioral annotation, which will be dynamically upgraded and maintained.

  13. Suggestive, Accelerative Learning and Teaching: A Manual of Classroom Procedures Based on the Lozanov Method.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuster, Donald H.; And Others

    The Suggestive Accelerative Learning and Teaching Method uses aspects of suggestion and unusual styles of presenting material to accelerate classroom learning. The essence of this technique is the use of a combination of physical relaxation exercises, mental concentration and suggestive principles to strengthen a person's ego and expand his memory…

  14. The Journal of the Society for Accelerative Learning and Teaching, Volume 9, 1984.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of the Society for Accelerative Learning and Teaching, 1984

    1984-01-01

    The four 1984 numbers of the journal contain articles on the following topics: reading and visual imagery; script preparation for accelerative learning and teaching; guided relaxation and baroque music's effects on student test performance; imagery in the creative process; suggestopedia in English as a second language (ESL) instruction;…

  15. The Journal of the Society for Accelerative Learning and Teaching, Volume 10, 1985.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuster, Don H., Ed.

    1985-01-01

    Four numbers of the journal contain a variety of articles on methods and programs of accelerative learning and teaching, including: "Music Therapy and Education"; "The Effects of Background Music on Vocabulary Learning"; "Terminating the Tyranny of Time from 21st Century Education"; "An Example of Limbic…

  16. The Journal of the Society for Accelerative Learning and Teaching. Volume 13, 1988.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of the Society for Accelerative Learning and Teaching, 1988

    1988-01-01

    These four 1988 issues of the journal of the Society for Accelerated Learning and Teaching (SALT) include the following articles: "Educating the Children of Changing Cultures"; "All Stars to Center Stage: Accelerative Learning in the School of Business"; "SALT in the First Grade Classroom"; "Unlearning…

  17. Does ACCEL Excel as a Model of Giftedness? A Reply to Commentators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sternberg, Robert J.

    2017-01-01

    In this essay, I respond to commentators on my article on the Active Concerned Citizenship and Ethical Leadership (ACCEL) model for understanding giftedness. I cover a number of topics that arose in or out of the commentaries, in particular, systems inertia; toxic leadership; teaching for creativity; flight from reality; the role of science,…

  18. The Journal of the Society for Accelerative Learning and Teaching, Volume 9, 1984.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of the Society for Accelerative Learning and Teaching, 1984

    1984-01-01

    The four 1984 numbers of the journal contain articles on the following topics: reading and visual imagery; script preparation for accelerative learning and teaching; guided relaxation and baroque music's effects on student test performance; imagery in the creative process; suggestopedia in English as a second language (ESL) instruction;…

  19. The Journal of the Society for Accelerative Learning and Teaching, 1992.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of the Society for Accelerative Learning and Teaching, 1992

    1992-01-01

    This document consists of the two issues (1/2 and 3/4) of the Journal of the Society for Accelerative Learning and Teaching published during 1992. Articles in these issues include: "Hemispheric Preference, Intelligence and Creative Interests" (John W. Zimmer, David Guip, Dean L. Meinke, Dennis J. Hocevar); "Reading Test Anxiety with the Swish"…

  20. Effectiveness of the Trima Accel cell separator in the double dose plateletpheresis.

    PubMed

    Keklik, Muzaffer; Korkmaz, Serdal; Kalan, Ugur; Sarikoc, Murat; Keklik, Ertugrul

    2016-10-01

    The use of apheresis equipment to collect blood components has rapidly increased in the past years. A variety of apheresis instruments are now available on the market for double dose plateletpheresis. We evaluated an apheresis instrument, the Trima Accel, with regard to platelet (PLT) yield, collection efficiency (CE), and collection rate (CR) in a retrospective, randomized study in 110 donors. The Trima Accel cell separator efficiently collected double dose platelets with median PLT yields of 3.7 × 10(11), mean CE of 74.99 ± 14.40% and mean CR of 0.096 ± 0.012 × 10(11)/min.

  1. Detonative propagation and accelerative expansion of the Crab Nebula shock front.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yang; Law, Chung K

    2011-10-21

    The accelerative expansion of the Crab Nebula's outer envelope is a mystery in dynamics, as a conventional expanding blast wave decelerates when bumping into the surrounding interstellar medium. Here we show that the strong relativistic pulsar wind bumping into its surrounding nebula induces energy-generating processes and initiates a detonation wave that propagates outward to form the current outer edge, namely, the shock front, of the nebula. The resulting detonation wave, with a reactive downstream, then provides the needed power to maintain propagation of the shock front. Furthermore, relaxation of the curvature-induced reduction of the propagation velocity from the initial state of formation to the asymptotic, planar state of Chapman-Jouguet propagation explains the observed accelerative expansion. Potential richness in incorporating reactive fronts in the description of various astronomical phenomena is expected. © 2011 American Physical Society

  2. Computer model of the MFTF-B neutral beam Accel dc power supply

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, J.H.

    1983-11-30

    Using the SCEPTRE circuit modeling code, a computer model was developed for the MFTF Neutral Beam Power Supply System (NBPSS) Accel dc Power Supply (ADCPS). The ADCPS provides 90 kV, 88 A, to the Accel Modulator. Because of the complex behavior of the power supply, use of the computer model is necessary to adequately understand the power supply's behavior over a wide range of load conditions and faults. The model developed includes all the circuit components and parameters, and some of the stray values. The model has been well validated for transients with times on the order of milliseconds, and with one exception, for steady-state operation. When using a circuit modeling code for a system with a wide range of time constants, it can become impossible to obtain good solutions for all time ranges at once. The present model concentrates on the millisecond-range transients because the compensating capacitor bank tends to isolate the power supply from the load for faster transients. Attempts to include stray circuit elements with time constants in the microsecond and shorter range have had little success because of huge increases in computing time that result. The model has been successfully extended to include the accel modulator.

  3. The Journal of the Society for Accelerative Learning and Teaching. (Volume 5, Numbers 3 through Volume 6, Number 4).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of the Society for Accelerative Learning and Teaching, 1981

    1981-01-01

    Numbers 3 and 4 of volume 5 and numbers 1 through 4 of volume 6 of the journal, spanning fall 1980 through winter 1981, include articles concerning the individualized study center; consciousness, psychology, and education; suggestive-accelerative learning and suggestopedia; creativity; brain lateralization; the Lozanov method; biofeedback and…

  4. The Journal of Suggestive-Accelerative Learning and Teaching, Volume 5, Number 1. Proceedings of the SALT Conference (1980).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuster, Donald, Ed.

    1980-01-01

    The proceedings of the 1980 Suggestive-Accelerative Learning and Teaching (SALT) conference include: "Creative Power in Action: Discovering Your 'Right' Mind" (Carole Austen and Hilary Johnson); "The Co-Creative Teacher: A Key Dimension in Accelerated Learning in the Classroom" (Susan M. Campbell); "The Application of…

  5. The Journal of Suggestive-Accelerative Learning and Teaching, Volume 5, Number 1. Proceedings of the SALT Conference (1980).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuster, Donald, Ed.

    1980-01-01

    The proceedings of the 1980 Suggestive-Accelerative Learning and Teaching (SALT) conference include: "Creative Power in Action: Discovering Your 'Right' Mind" (Carole Austen and Hilary Johnson); "The Co-Creative Teacher: A Key Dimension in Accelerated Learning in the Classroom" (Susan M. Campbell); "The Application of…

  6. The Journal of the Society for Accelerative Learning and Teaching. (Volume 5, Numbers 3 through Volume 6, Number 4).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of the Society for Accelerative Learning and Teaching, 1981

    1981-01-01

    Numbers 3 and 4 of volume 5 and numbers 1 through 4 of volume 6 of the journal, spanning fall 1980 through winter 1981, include articles concerning the individualized study center; consciousness, psychology, and education; suggestive-accelerative learning and suggestopedia; creativity; brain lateralization; the Lozanov method; biofeedback and…

  7. The Journal for the Society of Accelerative Learning and Teaching, Volume 11, Numbers 1-4, 1986.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    The Journal for the Society of Accelerative Learning and Teaching, 1986

    1986-01-01

    The four 1986 issues of the journal on suggestive and accelerative learning and teaching (SALT) include articles on these topics: SALT components in English composition instruction; music therapy for moderately retarded students; the brain and accelerated learning; accelerated learning and self-concept; remedial reading; versions of the concert…

  8. Cloning, Expression, and Characterization of a Thermophilic Endoglucanase, AcCel12B from Acidothermus cellulolyticus 11B

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Junling; Gao, Gui; Li, Yuwei; Yang, Liangzhen; Liang, Yanli; Jin, Hanyong; Han, Weiwei; Feng, Yan; Zhang, Zuoming

    2015-01-01

    The gene ABK52392 from the thermophilic bacterium Acidothermus cellulolyticus 11B was predicted to be endoglucanase and classified into glycoside hydrolase family 12. ABK52392 encodes a protein containing a catalytic domain and a carbohydrate binding module. ABK52392 was cloned and functionally expressed in Escherichia coli. After purification by Ni-NTA agarose affinity chromatography and Q-Sepharose® Fast Flow chromatography, the properties of the recombinant protein (AcCel12B) were characterized. AcCel12B exhibited optimal activity at pH 4.5 and 75 °C. The half-lives of AcCel12B at 60 and 70 °C were about 90 and 2 h, respectively, under acidic conditions. The specific hydrolytic activities of AcCel12B at 70 °C and pH 4.5 for sodium carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) and regenerated amorphous cellulose (RAC) were 118.3 and 104.0 U·mg−1, respectively. The Km and Vmax of AcCel12B for CMC were 25.47 mg·mL−1 and 131.75 U·mg−1, respectively. The time course of hydrolysis for RAC was investigated by measuring reducing ends in the soluble and insoluble phases. The total hydrolysis rate rapidly decreased after the early stage of incubation and the generation of insoluble reducing ends decreased earlier than that of soluble reducing ends. High thermostability of the cellulase indicates its potential commercial significance and it could be exploited for industrial application in the future. PMID:26506341

  9. Ac-cel, a novel antioxidant, protects against hydrogen peroxide-induced injury in PC12 cells via attenuation of mitochondrial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xianjun; Chen, Yuting; Liu, Qunfang; Wu, Jian; Wang, Luoyi; Tang, Xican; Zhao, Weimin; Zhang, Haiyan

    2013-07-01

    Oxidative stress has been implicated in pathophysiology of many neurodegenerative diseases (ND) and increased oxidative stress is closely associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. As a result, looking for potent antioxidants, especially those targeting mitochondria, has become an attractive strategy in ND therapy. In this study, we explored protective effects and potential mechanism of Ac-cel, a novel compound, against hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2))-induced injury in PC12 cells. Pretreatment of PC12 cells with Ac-cel prior to 24 h of H(2)O(2) exposure markedly attenuated cytotoxicity induced by H(2)O(2) as evidenced by morphological changes and 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Ac-cel also exhibited potent antiapoptotic effect demonstrated by results of annexin V and PI staining. The above beneficial effects of Ac-cel were accompanied by improved mitochondrial function, reduced caspase-3 cleavage as well as upregulated ratio of Bcl-2/Bax protein expression. Moreover, Ac-cel pretreatment markedly reversed intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation following 30 min of H(2)O(2) exposure in PC12 cells. Further, subcellular investigation indicated that Ac-cel significantly reduced production of mitochondrial ROS in isolated rat cortical mitochondria. Taken together, the present study, for the first time, reports that Ac-cel pretreatment inhibits H(2)O(2)-stimulated early accumulation of intracellular ROS possibly via reducing mitochondrial ROS production directly and leads to subsequent preservation of mitochondrial function. These results indicate that Ac-cel is a potential drug candidate for treatment of oxidative stress-associated ND.

  10. Lactate dehydrogenase test

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003471.htm Lactate dehydrogenase test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) is a protein that helps produce energy ...

  11. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003671.htm Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) is a protein that ...

  12. The ACCEL model for accelerating the detoxification kinetics of hydrocarbons requiring initial monooxygenation reactions.

    PubMed

    Dahlen, Elizabeth P; Rittmann, Bruce E

    2006-06-01

    The two-tank accelerator/aerator modification of activated sludge significantly increases the biodegradation of hydrocarbons requiring initial monooxygenation reactions, such as phenol and 2,4-dichlorophenol (DCP). The small accelerator tank has a controlled low dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration that can enrich the biomass in NADH + H+. It also has a very high specific growth rate (mu acc) that up-regulates the biomass's content of the monooxygenase enzyme. Here, we develop and test the ACCEL model, which quantifies all key phenomena taking place when the accelerator/aerator system is used to enhance biodegradation of hydrocarbons requiring initial monooxygenations. Monooxygenation kinetics follow a multiplicative relationship in which the organic substrates (phenol or DCP) and DO have separate Monod terms, while the biomass's content of NADH + H+ has a first-order term. The monooxygenase enzyme has different affinities (K values) for phenol and DCP. The biomass's NADH + H+ content is based on a proportioning of NAD(H) according to the relative rates of NADH + H+ sources and sinks. Biomass synthesis occurs simultaneously through utilization of acetate, phenol, and DCP, but each has its own true yield. The ACCEL model accurately simulates all trends for one-tank and two-tank experiments in which acetate, phenol, and DCP are biodegraded together. In particular, DCP removal is affected most by DOacc and the retention-time ratio, Theta acc/Theta total. Adding an accelerator tank dramatically increases DCP removal, and the best DCP removal occurs for 0.2 < DOacc < 0.5 mg/l and 0.08 < Theta acc/Theta total < 0.2. The rates of phenol and DCP utilization follow the multiplicative relationship with a maximum specific rate coefficient proportional to mu acc. Finally, mu acc increases rapidly for Theta acc/Theta total < 0.25, acetate removal in the accelerator fuels the high mu acc, and the biomass's NADH + H+ content increases very dramatically for DO acc < 0.25 mg/l.

  13. Desirable limits of accelerative forces in a space-based materials processing facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naumann, Robert J.

    1990-01-01

    There are three categories of accelerations to be encountered on orbiting spacecraft: (1) quasi-steady accelerations, caused by atmospheric drag or by gravity gradients, 10(exp -6) to 10(exp -7) g sub o; (2) transient accelerations, caused by movements of the astronauts, mass translocations, landing and departure of other spacecraft, etc.; and (3) oscillary accelerations, caused by running machinery (fans, pumps, generators). Steady accelerations cause continuing displacements; transients cause time-limited displacements. The important aspect is the area under the acceleration curve, measured over a certain time interval. Note that this quantity is not equivalent to a velocity because of friction effects. Transient motions are probably less important than steady accelerations because they only produce constant displacements. If the accelerative forces were not equal and opposite, the displacement would increase with time. A steady acceleration will produce an increasing velocity of a particle, but eventually an equilibrium value will be reached where drag and acceleration forces are equal. From then on, the velocity will remain constant, and the displacement will increase linearly with time.

  14. Comparison of plateletpheresis on the Fenwal Amicus, Fresenius COM.TEC, and Trima Accel Cell separators.

    PubMed

    Keklik, Muzaffer; Eser, Bulent; Kaynar, Leylagul; Sivgin, Serdar; Keklik, Ertugrul; Solmaz, Musa; Ozturk, Ahmet; Buyukoglan, Ruksan; Yay, Mehmet; Cetin, Mustafa; Unal, Ali

    2015-06-01

    Blood component donations by apheresis have become more common in modern blood transfusion practices. We compared three apheresis instruments (Fenwal Amicus, Fresenius COM.TEC, and Trima Accel) with regard to platelet (PLT) yield, collection efficiency (CE), and collection rate (CR). The single-needle or double-needle plateletpheresis procedures of the three instruments were compared in a retrospective, randomized study in 270 donors. The blood volume processed was higher in the COM.TEC compared with the Amicus and Trima. Also there was a significantly higher median volume of ACD used in collections on the COM.TEC compared with the Amicus and Trima. The PLT yield was significantly lower with the COM.TEC compared with the Amicus and Trima. Additionally, the CE was significantly lower with the COM.TEC compared with the Amicus and Trima. There was no significant difference in median separation time and CR between the three groups. When procedures were compared regarding CE by using Amicus device, it was significantly higher in single-needle than double-needle plateletpheresis. When double-needle Amicus system was compared with double-needle COM.TEC system, CE and PLT yield were significantly higher with Amicus system. When single-needle Amicus system was compared with single-needle Trima system, CE and PLT yield were significantly higher with Trima system. All instruments collected PLTs efficiently. However, the CE was lower with the COM.TEC compared with the Amicus and Trima. Also, we found Amicus single-needle system collected PLTs more efficiently compared with the double-needle system. CE and PLT yields were significantly higher with the single-needle Trima instrument compared with the single-needle Amicus device.

  15. Frequency and specificity of the Trima Accel "verify WBCs" advisory: considerations for product management.

    PubMed

    Galel, Susan A; Gaitan, Juliana; Yu, Darlene T; Tolentino, Lorna; Webster, Jan; Sugasawara, Elaine; Wilson, Jo Ann; Boone, Cynthia; Lendio, Patricia

    2012-05-01

    The Trima Accel displays a "verify WBCs" message if the plateletpheresis product (PLT) may not be leukoreduced (LR). Most blood banks require sensitive white blood cell (WBC) testing of these PLTs by flow or Nageotte. We evaluated how often these PLTs were non-LR by European or US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) criteria and whether sensitive WBC testing is necessary. Phase 1 reviewed the frequency of this message with various procedure types and the flow WBC results for PLTs with or without the message. Phase 2 assessed how many FDA LR failures were detectable by a hematology analyzer. In Phase 3, PLTs were managed by hematology analyzer results. In Phase 1, 3.8% of PLT-only and 11.1% of PLT-plasma collections had the "verify WBCs" message. Only 1% of "verify" PLTs contained more than 1 × 10(6) WBCs and only 0.5% were FDA LR failures. In Phase 2, 10 of 670 "verify" PLTs and one nonflagged PLT were FDA LR failures. Six of 11 LR failures had hematology analyzer WBC concentrations of 0.4 × 10(9) /L or higher. In Phase 3, "verify" PLTs were allowed in inventory if hematology analyzer WBC concentration was below 0.4 × 10(9) /L; inventory quality control showed no FDA LR failures by flow. Trima Version 6.0 software lowered the "verify" message frequency in PLT-plasma procedures but not in PLT-only procedures. Four percent of Trima PLT collections have the "verify WBCs" message but almost all of these are LR by European and FDA criteria. Fifty percent of FDA LR failures were detectable by a hematology analyzer. Sensitive WBC testing of all "verify WBCs" PLTs may not be necessary to satisfy LR quality assurance requirements. © 2011 American Association of Blood Banks.

  16. Plant Formate Dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    John Markwell

    2005-01-10

    The research in this study identified formate dehydrogenase, an enzyme that plays a metabolic role on the periphery of one-carbon metabolism, has an unusual localization in Arabidopsis thaliana and that the enzyme has an unusual kinetic plasticity. These properties make it possible that this enzyme could be engineered to attempt to engineer plants with an improved photosynthetic efficiency. We have produced transgenic Arabidopsis and tobacco plants with increased expression of the formate dehydrogenase enzyme to initiate further studies.

  17. Exploring the Dynamic Relationship between the Accelerative Integrated Method (AIM) and the Core French Teachers Who Use It: Why Agency and Experience Matter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnott, Stephanie

    2011-01-01

    Over the last decade, almost 4,000 Canadian schools have moved to using the Accelerative Integrated Method (AIM) for core French (CF) instruction. Following researchers' recommendations (Brumfit, 1984; Lapkin, Mady, & Arnott, 2009; Larsen-Freeman, 1996, 2000; Prahbu, 1990), I am shifting the focus in this case study from product to process. In…

  18. Histological evaluation of Accell Connexus(®) and Bio-Oss(®) on quality and rate of bone healing: a single blind experimental study on rabbit's calvarium.

    PubMed

    Khorsand, A; Rasouli Ghahroudi, A A R; Motahhari, P; Rezaei Rad, M; Soleimani Shayesteh, Y

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of Accell Connexus(®) on the quality and rate of healing in experimental defects of rabbit calvarium compared to Bio-Oss®. Twelve 2.5-3.5 kg weighing New Zealand white rabbits were used. Three defects (3×6 mm) were created in the cranium of the animals subsequently filled with Accell Connexus(®), Bio-Oss® or served as controls. The animals were sacrificed four, six and eight weeks postoperatively and the histology blocks were studied in terms of inflammation, trabeculation thickness, bone type regeneration, foreign body and remained biomaterial by light microscope. The data were subject to Mann-Whitney U test. Increased inflammatory reaction, foreign body reaction, delayed bone formation and lower rate of ossification were observed in DBM-filled defects compared to Bio-Oss® or controls. However, no significant differences were observed in bone formation between Bio-Oss®, Accell Connexus(®) and control specimens in the three time intervals. Furthermore, no significant differences were noted between Bio-Oss® and control groups. Accell Connexus(®) showeda lower rate of ossification and bone healing compared to Bio-Oss® or controlgroups. Other studies in this field seem necessary.

  19. The Microbial Conversion of D-Sorbitol to L-Sorbose: An Interdisciplinary Experiment Illustrating an Industrial Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Volker, Eugene J.; Schultz, Clyde

    1978-01-01

    Describes an experiment that has been introduced in the organic chemistry laboratory program at Shepherd College, Shepherdstown, West Virginia. It illustrates microbial reaction and its role in the synthesis of vitamin C. (HM)

  20. The Microbial Conversion of D-Sorbitol to L-Sorbose: An Interdisciplinary Experiment Illustrating an Industrial Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Volker, Eugene J.; Schultz, Clyde

    1978-01-01

    Describes an experiment that has been introduced in the organic chemistry laboratory program at Shepherd College, Shepherdstown, West Virginia. It illustrates microbial reaction and its role in the synthesis of vitamin C. (HM)

  1. Cyanobacterial NADPH dehydrogenase complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Teruo; Mi, Hualing

    2007-07-01

    Cyanobacteria possess functionally distinct multiple NADPH dehydrogenase (NDH-1) complexes that are essential to CO2 uptake, photosystem-1 cyclic electron transport and respiration. The unique nature of cyanobacterial NDH-1 complexes is the presence of subunits involved in CO2 uptake. Other than CO2 uptake, chloroplastic NDH-1 complex has similar role as cyanobacterial NDH-1 complexes in photosystem-1 cyclic electron transport and respiration (chlororespiration). In this mini-review we focus on the structure and function of cyanobacterial NDH-1 complexes and their phylogeny. The function of chloroplastic NDH-1 complex and characteristics of plants defective in NDH-1 are also described forcomparison.

  2. LACTIC DEHYDROGENASES OF PSEUDOMONAS NATRIEGENS.

    PubMed

    WALKER, H; EAGON, R G

    1964-07-01

    Walker, Hazel (University of Georgia, Athens), and R. G. Eagon. Lactic dehydrogenases of Pseudomonas natriegens. J. Bacteriol. 88:25-30. 1964.-Lactic dehydrogenases specific for d- and l-lactate were demonstrated in Pseudomonas natriegens. The l-lactic dehydrogenase showed considerable heat stability, and 40% of the activity remained in extracts after heating at 60 C for 10 min. An essential thiol group for enzyme activity was noted. The results of these experiments were consistent with the view that lactate was dehydrogenated initially by a flavin cofactor and that electrons were transported through a complete terminal oxidase system to oxygen. The intracellular site of these lactic dehydrogenases was shown to be the cell membrane. It was suggested that the main physiological role of these lactic dehydrogenases is that of lactate utilization.

  3. LACTIC DEHYDROGENASES OF PSEUDOMONAS NATRIEGENS

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Hazel; Eagon, R. G.

    1964-01-01

    Walker, Hazel (University of Georgia, Athens), and R. G. Eagon. Lactic dehydrogenases of Pseudomonas natriegens. J. Bacteriol. 88:25–30. 1964.—Lactic dehydrogenases specific for d- and l-lactate were demonstrated in Pseudomonas natriegens. The l-lactic dehydrogenase showed considerable heat stability, and 40% of the activity remained in extracts after heating at 60 C for 10 min. An essential thiol group for enzyme activity was noted. The results of these experiments were consistent with the view that lactate was dehydrogenated initially by a flavin cofactor and that electrons were transported through a complete terminal oxidase system to oxygen. The intracellular site of these lactic dehydrogenases was shown to be the cell membrane. It was suggested that the main physiological role of these lactic dehydrogenases is that of lactate utilization. Images PMID:14197895

  4. Periodontal Regeneration of 1-, 2-, and 3-Walled Intrabony Defects Using Accell Connexus Versus Demineralized Freeze-Dried Bone Allograft: A Randomized Parallel Arm Clinical Control Trial

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    PERIODONTAL  REGENERATION  OF  1-­‐,  2-­‐,  AND  3-­‐WALLED  INTRABONY  DEFECTS  USING  ACCELL   CONNEXUS... Periodontics  Graduate  Program   Naval  Postgraduate  Dental  School   Uniformed  Services  University  of  the...Peter Bertrand, CAPT (ret), DC, USN Chairman, Periodontics Department Director, Periodontics Dept Glenn Munro, CAPT, DC, USN Dean, Naval Postgraduate

  5. Lactate dehydrogenase-elevating virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This book chapter describes the taxonomic classification of Lactate dehydrogenase-elevating virus (LDV). Included are: host, genome, classification, morphology, physicochemical and physical properties, nucleic acid, proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, geographic range, phylogenetic properties, biologic...

  6. Alcohol Dehydrogenase from Methylobacterium organophilum

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, H. J.; Hanson, R. S.

    1978-01-01

    The alcohol dehydrogenase from Methylobacterium organophilum, a facultative methane-oxidizing bacterium, has been purified to homogeneity as indicated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-gel electrophoresis. It has several properties in common with the alcohol dehydrogenases from other methylotrophic bacteria. The active enzyme is a dimeric protein, both subunits having molecular weights of about 62,000. The enzyme exhibits broad substrate specificity for primary alcohols and catalyzes the two-step oxidation of methanol to formate. The apparent Michaelis constants of the enzyme are 2.9 × 10−5 M for methanol and 8.2 × 10−5 M for formaldehyde. Activity of the purified enzyme is dependent on phenazine methosulfate. Certain characteristics of this enzyme distinguish it from the other alcohol dehydrogenases of other methylotrophic bacteria. Ammonia is not required for, but stimulates the activity of newly purified enzyme. An absolute dependence on ammonia develops after storage of the purified enzyme. Activity is not inhibited by phosphate. The fluorescence spectrum of the enzyme indicates that it and the cofactor associated with it may be chemically different from the alcohol dehydrogenases from other methylotrophic bacteria. The alcohol dehydrogenases of Hyphomicrobium WC-65, Pseudomonas methanica, Methylosinus trichosporium, and several facultative methylotrophs are serologically related to the enzyme purified in this study. The enzymes of Rhodopseudomonas acidophila and of organisms of the Methylococcus group did not cross-react with the antiserum prepared against the alcohol dehydrogenase of M. organophilum. Images PMID:80974

  7. 77 FR 53913 - Accellent

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-04

    ... Management Group (CMG), Marathon Staffing, And Excel Personnel, Inc., Englewood, Colorado; Amended... Management Group (CMG), and Marathon Staffing. The Department's notice of determination was published in the... workers from Aerotek, Corporate Management Group (CMG), Marathon Staffing, and Excel Personnel, Inc...

  8. Periodontal Regeneration Of 1-, 2-, and 3-Walled Intrabony Defects Using Accell Connexus (registered trademark) Versus Demineralized Freeze-Dried Bone Allograft: A Randomized Parallel Arm Clinical Control Trial

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    PERIODONTAL REGENERATION OF 1-, 2-, AND 3-WALLED INTRABONY DEFECTS USING ACCELL CONNEXUS® VERSUS DEMINERALIZED FREEZE- DRIED BONE ALLOGRAFT: A...the Faculty of the Periodontics Graduate Program Naval Postgraduate Dental School Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences in partial...June 2015 graduation. Thesis Committee: Matthew B. Miller, CDR, DC, USN Program Director, Periodontics Department Thu Getka, CAPT, DC, USN

  9. Histological evaluation of Accell Connexus® and Bio-Oss® on quality and rate of bone healing: a single blind experimental study on rabbit’s calvarium

    PubMed Central

    Khorsand, A.; Rasouli Ghahroudi, A. A. R.; Motahhari, P.; Rezaei Rad, M.; Soleimani Shayesteh, Y.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of Accell Connexus® on the quality and rate of healing in experimental defects of rabbit calvarium compared to Bio-Oss®. Materials and Methods: Twelve 2.5–3.5 kg weighing New Zealand white rabbits were used. Three defects (3×6 mm) were created in the cranium of the animals subsequently filled with Accell Connexus®, Bio-Oss® or served as controls. The animals were sacrificed four, six and eight weeks postoperatively and the histology blocks were studied in terms of inflammation, trabeculation thickness, bone type regeneration, foreign body and remained biomaterial by light microscope. The data were subject to Mann-Whitney U test. Results: Increased inflammatory reaction, foreign body reaction, delayed bone formation and lower rate of ossification were observed in DBM-filled defects compared to Bio-Oss® or controls. However, no significant differences were observed in bone formation between Bio-Oss®, Accell Connexus® and control specimens in the three time intervals. Furthermore, no significant differences were noted between Bio-Oss® and control groups. Conclusion: Accell Connexus® showeda lower rate of ossification and bone healing compared to Bio-Oss® or controlgroups. Other studies in this field seem necessary. PMID:23066476

  10. Wiring of PQQ-dehydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Laurinavicius, Valdas; Razumiene, Julija; Ramanavicius, Arunas; Ryabov, Alexander D

    2004-12-15

    The performance of pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) dependent alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and two types of PQQ-glucose dehydrogenases in solution and when immobilized on the carbon paste electrodes modified with ferrocene derivatives is investigated. The immobilization of ADH consisting of PQQ and four hemes improves its stability up to 10 times. Both PQQ and heme moieties are involved in the electron transport from substrate to electrode. The ferrocene derivatives improve the electron transport 10-fold. Membrane-bound alcohol dehydrogenase from Gluconobacter sp. 33, intracellular soluble glucose dehydrogenase from Acinetobacter calcoaceticus L.M.D. 79.41 (s-GDH), and the membrane-bound enzyme (m-GDH) from Erwinia sp. 34-1 were purified and investigated. Soluble and membrane-bound PQQ-glucose dehydrogenases display different behavior during the immobilization on the modified carbon electrodes. The immobilization of s-GDH leads to a decrease in both stability and substrate specificity of the enzyme. This suggests that PQQ dissociates from the enzyme active center and operates as a free-diffusing mediator. The rate-limiting step of the process is likely the loading of PQQ onto the apo-enzyme. The immobilization of m-GDH leads to its substantial stabilization and improves the substrate specificity. The nature of m-GDH binding to the electrode surface is presumably similar to the binding to the cell membrane through its anchor-subunit. The enzyme operates as an enzyme and mediator complex.

  11. Michael hydratase alcohol dehydrogenase or just alcohol dehydrogenase?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The Michael hydratase – alcohol dehydrogenase (MhyADH) from Alicycliphilus denitrificans was previously identified as a bi-functional enzyme performing a hydration of α,β-unsaturated ketones and subsequent oxidation of the formed alcohols. The investigations of the bi-functionality were based on a spectrophotometric assay and an activity staining in a native gel of the dehydrogenase. New insights in the recently discovered organocatalytic Michael addition of water led to the conclusion that the previously performed experiments to identify MhyADH as a bi-functional enzyme and their results need to be reconsidered and the reliability of the methodology used needs to be critically evaluated. PMID:24949265

  12. Genetics Home Reference: lactate dehydrogenase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... dehydrogenase-B pieces (subunits) of the lactate dehydrogenase enzyme. This enzyme is found throughout the body and is important ... cells. There are five different forms of this enzyme, each made up of four protein subunits. Various ...

  13. Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Revisited

    PubMed Central

    O'Connell, Jerome T.; Henderson, Alfred R.

    1984-01-01

    Hemolytic diseases associated with drugs have been recognized since antiquity. Many of these anemias have been associated with oxidizing agents and deficiencies in the intraerythrocytic enzyme glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase. This paper outlines the discovery, prevalence, and variants of this enzyme. Methods of diagnosis of associated anemias are offered. PMID:6502728

  14. Efficacy comparison of Accell Evo3 and Grafton demineralized bone matrix putties against autologous bone in a rat posterolateral spine fusion model.

    PubMed

    Brecevich, Antonio T; Kiely, Paul D; Yoon, B Victor; Nguyen, Joseph T; Cammisa, Frank P; Abjornson, Celeste

    2017-06-01

    Spinal fusion procedures are intended to stabilize the spinal column for a multitude of disorders including abnormal curvature, traumatic instability, degenerative instability, and damage from infections or tumors. As an aid in the bone healing response, bone graft materials are used to bridge joints for arthrodesis and promote unions in pseudoarthrosis. Currently, the gold standard for stabilizing fusion masses in spinal procedures involves using the osteogenic, osteoinductive, and osteoconductive properties of autologous iliac crest corticocancellous bone. However, considerable morbidity is associated with harvesting the autologous graft. Donor site complications including infection, large hematomas, and pain have been reported at rates as high as 50% (Boden and Jeffrey, 1995). Biologically, the rate of bone repair dictates the rate at which the fusion mass will unite under autologous graft conditions. The purpose of this study is to compare the quality and rate of fusion between Accell Evo3 and Grafton demineralized bone matrix (DBM), with the gold standard iliac crest bone graft (ICBG) as the control, in athymic rat posterolateral fusion. This study was a randomized, controlled study in a laboratory setting at the Hospital for Special Surgery in New York City. Blinded observations were made, which created an assessment of outcomes for successful fusions between each method. Forty-eight (48) athymic rats were used in this study and underwent posterolateral lumbar fusion. They were assessed at either 3 weeks or 9 weeks to see the rate and efficacy of fusion. Outcome measures will be the efficacy of the different bone grafts and their success rates of fusion in the rats. A comparison of the quality and rate of fusion between Accell Evo3® (DBM A) and Grafton (DBM B), with the gold standard iliac crest bone graft (ICBG) as the control, was performed using the established posterolateral intertransverse process on an athymic rat model. Materials were evaluated for

  15. Inhibition effects of furfural on alcohol dehydrogenase, aldehyde dehydrogenase and pyruvate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed Central

    Modig, Tobias; Lidén, Gunnar; Taherzadeh, Mohammad J

    2002-01-01

    The kinetics of furfural inhibition of the enzymes alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH; EC 1.1.1.1), aldehyde dehydrogenase (AlDH; EC 1.2.1.5) and the pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) complex were studied in vitro. At a concentration of less than 2 mM furfural was found to decrease the activity of both PDH and AlDH by more than 90%, whereas the ADH activity decreased by less than 20% at the same concentration. Furfural inhibition of ADH and AlDH activities could be described well by a competitive inhibition model, whereas the inhibition of PDH was best described as non-competitive. The estimated K(m) value of AlDH for furfural was found to be about 5 microM, which was lower than that for acetaldehyde (10 microM). For ADH, however, the estimated K(m) value for furfural (1.2 mM) was higher than that for acetaldehyde (0.4 mM). The inhibition of the three enzymes by 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) was also measured. The inhibition caused by HMF of ADH was very similar to that caused by furfural. However, HMF did not inhibit either AlDH or PDH as severely as furfural. The inhibition effects on the three enzymes could well explain previously reported in vivo effects caused by furfural and HMF on the overall metabolism of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, suggesting a critical role of these enzymes in the observed inhibition. PMID:11964178

  16. Characterization of retinaldehyde dehydrogenase 3

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Caroline E.; Brocklehurst, Keith; Pickersgill, Richard W.; Warren, Martin J.

    2005-01-01

    RALDH3 (retinal dehydrogenase 3) was characterized by kinetic and binding studies, protein engineering, homology modelling, ligand docking and electrostatic-potential calculations. The major recognition determinant of an RALDH3 substrate was shown to be an eight-carbon chain bonded to the aldehyde group whose kinetic influence (kcat/Km at pH 8.5) decreases when shortened or lengthened. Surprisingly, the β-ionone ring of all-trans-retinal is not a major recognition site. The dissociation constants (Kd) of the complexes of RALDH3 with octanal, NAD+ and NADH were determined by intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence. The similarity of the Kd values for the complexes with NAD+ and with octanal suggests a random kinetic mechanism for RALDH3, in contrast with the ordered sequential mechanism often associated with aldehyde dehydrogenase enzymes. Inhibition of RALDH3 by tri-iodothyronine binding in competition with NAD+, predicted by the modelling, was established kinetically and by immunoprecipitation. Mechanistic implications of the kinetically influential ionizations with macroscopic pKa values of 5.0 and 7.5 revealed by the pH-dependence of kcat are discussed. Analogies with data for non-phosphorylating glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase from Streptococcus mutans, together with the present modelled structure of the thioacyl RALDH3, suggest (a) that kcat characterizes deacylation of this intermediate for specific substrates and (b) the assignment of the pKa of the major ionization (approximating to 7.5) to the perturbed carboxy group of Glu280 whose conjugate base is envisaged as supplying general base catalysis to attack of a water molecule. The macroscopic pKa of the minor ionization (5.0) is considered to approximate to that of the carboxy group of Glu488. PMID:16241904

  17. Cellobiose dehydrogenase in cellulose degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Eriksson, L.; Igarashi, Kiyohiko; Samejima, Masahiro

    1996-10-01

    Cellobiose dehydrogenase is produced by a variety of fungi. Although it was already discovered during the 70`s, it`s role in cellulose and lignin degradation is yet ambiguous. The enzyme contains both heme and FAD as prosthetic groups, and seems to have a domain specifically designed to bind the enzyme to cellulose. It`s affinity to amorphous cellulose is higher than to crystalline cellulose. We will report on the binding behavior of the enzyme, its usefulness in elucidation of cellulose structures and also, possibilities for applications such as its use in measuring individual and synergistic mechanisms for cellulose degradation by endo- and exo-glucanases.

  18. Cephalopod alcohol dehydrogenase: purification and enzymatic characterization.

    PubMed

    Rosario Fernández, M; Jörnvall, H; Moreno, A; Kaiser, R; Parés, X

    1993-08-16

    Octopus, squid and cuttle-fish organs were examined for alcohol dehydrogenase activity. Only one form was detectable, with properties typical of mammalian class III alcohol dehydrogenase. The corresponding protein was purified from octopus and enzymatically characterized. Ion-exchange and affinity chromatography produced a pure protein in excellent yield (73%) after 1600-fold purification. Enzymatic parameters with several substrates were similar to those for the human class III alcohol dehydrogenase, demonstrating a largely conserved function of the enzyme through wide lines of divergence covering vertebrates, cephalopods and bacteria. The results establish the universal occurrence of class III alcohol dehydrogenase and its strictly conserved functional properties in separate living forms. The absence of other alcohol dehydrogenases in cephalopods is compatible with the emergence of the ethanol-active class I type at a later stage, in lineages leading to vertebrates.

  19. [The PQQ-dehydrogenases. A novel example of bacterial quinoproteins].

    PubMed

    Flores-Encarnación, Marcos; Sánchez-Cuevas, Mariano; Ortiz-Gutiérrez, Felipe

    2004-01-01

    The word "quinoprotein" describes four groups of different enzymes which have cofactors containing o-quinones. Pyrrolo-quinoline quinone (PQQ) is not covalently attached. PQQ is the cofactor of several quinoprotein bacterial dehydrogenases including glucose dehydrogenase (G-DH), alcohol dehydrogenase (A-DH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (AL-DH). These dehydrogenases are located in the periplasm of Gram-negative bacteria. This report summarises the structural properties of quinoprotein dehydrogenases, such as the biological functions and biotechnological aspects more important.

  20. Benzyl alcohol dehydrogenase and benzaldehyde dehydrogenase II from Acinetobacter calcoaceticus. Substrate specificities and inhibition studies.

    PubMed Central

    MacKintosh, R W; Fewson, C A

    1988-01-01

    The apparent Km and maximum velocity values of benzyl alcohol dehydrogenase and benzaldehyde dehydrogenase II from Acinetobacter calcoaceticus were determined for a range of alcohols and aldehydes and the corresponding turnover numbers and specificity constants were calculated. Benzyl alcohol was the most effective alcohol substrate for benzyl alcohol dehydrogenase. Perillyl alcohol was the second most effective substrate, and was the only non-aromatic alcohol oxidized. The other substrates of benzyl alcohol dehydrogenase were all aromatic in nature, with para-substituted derivatives of benzyl alcohol being better substrates than other derivatives. Coniferyl alcohol and cinnamyl alcohol were also substrates. Benzaldehyde was much the most effective substrate for benzaldehyde dehydrogenase II. Benzaldehydes with a single small substituent group in the meta or para position were better substrates than any other benzaldehyde derivatives. Benzaldehyde dehydrogenase II could also oxidize the aliphatic aldehydes hexan-1-al and octan-1-al, although poorly. Benzaldehyde dehydrogenase II was substrate-inhibited by benzaldehyde when the assay concentration exceeded approx. 10 microM. Benzaldehyde dehydrogenase II, but not benzyl alcohol dehydrogenase, exhibited esterase activity with 4-nitrophenyl acetate as substrate. Both benzyl alcohol dehydrogenase and benzaldehyde dehydrogenase II were inhibited by the thiol-blocking reagents iodoacetate, iodoacetamide, 4-chloromercuribenzoate and N-ethylmaleimide. Benzyl alcohol or benzaldehyde respectively protected against these inhibitions. NAD+ also gave some protection. Neither benzyl alcohol dehydrogenase nor benzaldehyde dehydrogenase II was inhibited by the metal-ion-chelating agents EDTA, 2,2'-bipyridyl, pyrazole or 2-phenanthroline. Neither enzyme was inhibited by a range of plausible metabolic inhibitors such as mandelate, phenylglyoxylate, benzoate, succinate, acetyl-CoA, ATP or ADP. Benzaldehyde dehydrogenase II was

  1. Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Luzzatto, Lucio; Nannelli, Caterina; Notaro, Rosario

    2016-04-01

    G6PD is a housekeeping gene expressed in all cells. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) is part of the pentose phosphate pathway, and its main physiologic role is to provide NADPH. G6PD deficiency, one of the commonest inherited enzyme abnormalities in humans, arises through one of many possible mutations, most of which reduce the stability of the enzyme and its level as red cells age. G6PD-deficient persons are mostly asymptomatic, but they can develop severe jaundice during the neonatal period and acute hemolytic anemia when they ingest fava beans or when they are exposed to certain infections or drugs. G6PD deficiency is a global health issue.

  2. Opine dehydrogenases in marine invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Harcet, Matija; Perina, Drago; Pleše, Bruna

    2013-10-01

    It is well known today that opine production anaerobic pathways are analogs to the classical glycolytic pathway (lactate production pathway). These pathways, catalyzed by a group of enzymes called opine dehydrogenases (OpDHs), ensure continuous flux of glycolysis and a constant supply of ATP by maintaining the NADH/NAD(+) ratio during exercise and hypoxia, thus regulating the cytosolic redox balance in glycolysis under anoxia. OpDHs are distributed in a wide range of marine invertebrate phyla, including sponges (Porifera). Phylogenetic analyses supported with enzymatic assays strongly indicate that sponge OpDHs constitute an enzyme class unrelated to other OpDHs. Therefore, OpDHs in marine invertebrates are divided into two groups, a mollusk/annelid type and a sponge type, which belongs to the OCD/mu-crystallin family.

  3. 21 CFR 862.1445 - Lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... dehydrogenase isoenzymes test system is a device intended to measure the activity of lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes (a group of enzymes with similar biological activity) in serum. Measurements of...

  4. 21 CFR 862.1445 - Lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... dehydrogenase isoenzymes test system is a device intended to measure the activity of lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes (a group of enzymes with similar biological activity) in serum. Measurements of...

  5. 21 CFR 862.1445 - Lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... dehydrogenase isoenzymes test system is a device intended to measure the activity of lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes (a group of enzymes with similar biological activity) in serum. Measurements of...

  6. 21 CFR 862.1445 - Lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... dehydrogenase isoenzymes test system is a device intended to measure the activity of lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes (a group of enzymes with similar biological activity) in serum. Measurements of...

  7. Molecular characterization of benzyl alcohol dehydrogenase and benzaldehyde dehydrogenase II of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus.

    PubMed Central

    Gillooly, D J; Robertson, A G; Fewson, C A

    1998-01-01

    The nucleotide sequences of xylB and xylC from Acinetobacter calcoaceticus, the genes encoding benzyl alcohol dehydrogenase and benzaldehyde dehydrogenase II, were determined. The complete nucleotide sequence indicates that these two genes form part of an operon and this was supported by heterologous expression and physiological studies. Benzaldehyde dehydrogenase II is a 51654 Da protein with 484 amino acids per subunit and it is typical of other prokaryotic and eukaryotic aldehyde dehydrogenases. Benzyl alcohol dehydrogenase has a subunit Mr of 38923 consisting of 370 amino acids, it stereospecifically transfers the proR hydride of NADH, and it is a member of the family of zinc-dependent long-chain alcohol dehydrogenases. The enzyme appears to be more similar to animal and higher-plant alcohol dehydrogenases than it is to most other microbial alcohol dehydrogenases. Residue His-51 of zinc-dependent alcohol dehydrogenases is thought to be necessary as a general base for catalysis in this category of alcohol dehydrogenases. However, this residue was found to be replaced in benzyl alcohol dehydrogenase from A. calcoaceticus by an isoleucine, and the introduction of a histidine residue in this position did not alter the kinetic coefficients, pH optimum or substrate specificity of the enzyme. Other workers have shown that His-51 is also absent from the TOL-plasmid-encoded benzyl alcohol dehydrogenase of Pseudomonas putida and so these two closely related enzymes presumably have a catalytic mechanism that differs from that of the archetypal zinc-dependent alcohol dehydrogenases. PMID:9494109

  8. Asparagusate dehydrogenases and lipoyl dehydrogenase from asparagus mitochondria. Physical, chemical, and enzymatic properties.

    PubMed

    Yanagawa, H; Egami, F

    1976-06-25

    Asparagusate dehydrogenases I and II and lipoyl dehydrogenase have been obtained in homogeneous state from asparagus mitochondria. They are flavin enzymes with 1 mol of FAD/mol of protein. Asparagusate dehydrogenases I and II and lipoyl dehydrogenase have s20,w of 6.22 S, 6.39 S, and 5.91 S, respectively, and molecular weights of 111,000, 110,000, and 95,000 (sedimentation equilibrium) or 112,000, 112,000, and 92,000 (gel filtration). They are slightly acidic proteins with isoelectric points of 6.75, 5.75, and 6.80. Both asparagusate dehydrogenases catalyzed the reaction Asg(SH)2 + NAD+ equilibrium AsgS2 + NADH + H+ and exhibit lipoyl dehydrogenase and diaphorase activities. Lipoyl dehydrogenase is specific for lipoate and has no asparagusate dehydrogenase activity. NADP cannot replace NAD in any case. Optimum pH for substrate reduction of the three enzymes are near 5.9. Asparagusate dehydrogenases I and II have Km values of 21.5 mM and 20.0 mM for asparagusate and 3.0 mM and 3.3 mM for lipoate, respectively. Lipoyl dehydrogenase activity of asparagusate dehydrogenases is enhanced by NAD and surfactants such as lecithin and Tween 80, but asparagusate dehydrogenase activity is not enhanced. Asparagusate dehydrogenases are strongly inhibited by mercuric ion, p-chloromercuribenzoic acid, and N-ethylmaleimide. Amino acid composition of the three enzymes is presented and discussed.

  9. Shikimate dehydrogenase from Pinu sylvestris L. needles

    SciTech Connect

    Osipov, V.I.; Shein, I.V.

    1986-07-10

    Shikimate dehydrogenase was isolated by extraction from pine needles and partially purified by fractionation with ammonium sulfate. In conifers, in contrast to other plants, all three isoenzymes of shikimate dehydrogenase exhibit activity not only with NADP/sup +/, but also with NAD/sup +/. The values of K/sub m/ for shikimate, when NADP/sup +/ and NAD/sup +/ are used as cofactors, are 0.22 and 1.13 mM, respectively. The enzyme is maximally active at pH 10 with both cofactors. It is suggested that NAD-dependent shikimate dehydrogenase catalyzes the initial reaction of the alternative pathway of the conversion of shikimic acid to hydroxybenzoic acid. The peculiarities of the organization and regulation of the initial reactions of the shikimate pathway in conifers and in plants with shikimate dehydrogenase absolutely specific for NADP are discussed.

  10. Genetics Home Reference: dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the skin on the palms and soles (hand-foot syndrome); shortness of breath; and hair loss may also ... dehydrogenase deficiency , with its early-onset neurological symptoms, is a rare disorder. Its prevalence is ...

  11. Isocitrate dehydrogenase mutations in gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Waitkus, Matthew S.; Diplas, Bill H.; Yan, Hai

    2016-01-01

    Over the last decade, extraordinary progress has been made in elucidating the underlying genetic causes of gliomas. In 2008, our understanding of glioma genetics was revolutionized when mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 (IDH1/2) were identified in the vast majority of progressive gliomas and secondary glioblastomas (GBMs). IDH enzymes normally catalyze the decarboxylation of isocitrate to generate α-ketoglutarate (αKG), but recurrent mutations at Arg132 of IDH1 and Arg172 of IDH2 confer a neomorphic enzyme activity that catalyzes reduction of αKG into the putative oncometabolite D-2-hydroxyglutate (D2HG). D2HG inhibits αKG-dependent dioxygenases and is thought to create a cellular state permissive to malignant transformation by altering cellular epigenetics and blocking normal differentiation processes. Herein, we discuss the relevant literature on mechanistic studies of IDH1/2 mutations in gliomas, and we review the potential impact of IDH1/2 mutations on molecular classification and glioma therapy. PMID:26188014

  12. Regulation of heart muscle pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Ronald H.; Randle, Philip J.; Denton, Richard M.

    1974-01-01

    1. The activity of pig heart pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase was assayed by the incorporation of [32P]phosphate from [γ-32P]ATP into the dehydrogenase complex. There was a very close correlation between this incorporation and the loss of pyruvate dehydrogenase activity with all preparations studied. 2. Nucleoside triphosphates other than ATP (at 100μm) and cyclic 3′:5′-nucleotides (at 10μm) had no significant effect on kinase activity. 3. The Km for thiamin pyrophosphate in the pyruvate dehydrogenase reaction was 0.76μm. Sodium pyrophosphate, adenylyl imidodiphosphate, ADP and GTP were competitive inhibitors against thiamin pyrophosphate in the dehydrogenase reaction. 4. The Km for ATP of the intrinsic kinase assayed in three preparations of pig heart pyruvate dehydrogenase was in the range 13.9–25.4μm. Inhibition by ADP and adenylyl imidodiphosphate was predominantly competitive, but there was nevertheless a definite non-competitive element. Thiamin pyrophosphate and sodium pyrophosphate were uncompetitive inhibitors against ATP. It is suggested that ADP and adenylyl imidodiphosphate inhibit the kinase mainly by binding to the ATP site and that the adenosine moiety may be involved in this binding. It is suggested that thiamin pyrophosphate, sodium pyrophosphate, adenylyl imidodiphosphate and ADP may inhibit the kinase by binding through pyrophosphate or imidodiphosphate moieties at some site other than the ATP site. It is not known whether this is the coenzyme-binding site in the pyruvate dehydrogenase reaction. 5. The Km for pyruvate in the pyruvate dehydrogenase reaction was 35.5μm. 2-Oxobutyrate and 3-hydroxypyruvate but not glyoxylate were also substrates; all three compounds inhibited pyruvate oxidation. 6. In preparations of pig heart pyruvate dehydrogenase free of thiamin pyrophosphate, pyruvate inhibited the kinase reaction at all concentrations in the range 25–500μm. The inhibition was uncompetitive. In the presence of thiamin pyrophosphate

  13. Characterization of succinate dehydrogenase and alpha-glycerophosphate dehydrogenase in pancreatic islets.

    PubMed

    Lenzen, S; Panten, U

    1983-12-01

    Succinate dehydrogenase activities in homogenates of rat and ob/ob mouse pancreatic islets were only 13% of the activities in homogenates of liver and were also several times lower than in homogenates of pancreatic acinar tissue. This indicates that the content of mitochondria in pancreatic islet cells is very low. The very low activity of succinate dehydrogenase is in agreement with the low mitochondrial volume in the cytoplasmic ground substance of pancreatic islet cells as observed in morphometric studies. This may represent the poor equipment of pancreatic islet cells with electron transport chains and thus provide a regulatory role for the generation of reducing equivalents and chemical energy for the regulation of insulin secretion. The activities of succinate dehydrogenase in tissue homogenates of pancreatic islets, pancreatic acinar tissue, and liver were significantly inhibited by malonate and diazoxide but not by glucose, mannoheptulose, streptozotocin, or verapamil. Tolbutamide inhibited only pancreatic islet succinate dehydrogenase significantly, providing evidence for a different behavior of pancreatic islet cell mitochondria. Therefore diazoxide and tolbutamide may affect pancreatic islet function through their effects on succinate dehydrogenase activity. The activities of alpha-glycerophosphate dehydrogenase in homogenates of pancreatic islets and liver from rats and ob/ob mice were in the same range, while activities in homogenates of pancreatic acinar tissue were lower. None of the test agents affected alpha-glycerophosphate dehydrogenase activity. Thus the results provide no support for the recent contention that alpha-glycerophosphate dehydrogenase activity may be critical for the regulation of insulin secretion.

  14. Digitalis metabolism and human liver alcohol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed Central

    Frey, W A; Vallee, B L

    1980-01-01

    Human liver alcohol dehydrogenase (alcohol: NAD" oxidoreductase, EC 1.1.1.1) catalyzes the oxidation of the 3 beta-OH group of digitoxigenin, digoxigenin, and gitoxigenin to their 3-keto derivatives, which have been characterized by high performance liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry. These studies have identified human liver alcohol dehydrogenase as the unknown NAD(H)-dependent liver enzyme specific for the free hydroxyl group at C3 of the cardiac genins; this hydroxyl is the critical site of the genins' enzymatic oxidation and concomitant pharmacological inactivation in humans. Several kinetic approaches have demonstrated that ethanol and the pharmacologically active components of the digitalis glycosides are oxidized with closely similar kcat/Km values at the same site on human liver alcohol dehydrogenase, for which they compete. Human liver alcohol dehydrogenase thereby becomes an important biochemical link in the metabolism, pharmacology, and toxicology of ethanol and these glycosides, structurally unrelated agents that are both used widely. Both the competition of ethanol with these cardiac sterols and the narrow margin of safety in the therapeutic use of digitalis derivatives would seem to place at increased risk those individuals who receive digitalis and simultaneously consume large amounts of ethanol or whose alcohol dehydrogenase function is impaired. PMID:6987673

  15. Benzene toxicity: emphasis on cytosolic dihydrodiol dehydrogenases

    SciTech Connect

    Bolcsak, L.E.

    1982-01-01

    Blood dyscrasias such as leukopenia and anemia have been clearly identified as consequences of chronic benzene exposure. The metabolites, phenol, catechol, and hydroquinone produced inhibition of /sup 59/Fe uptake in mice which followed the same time course as that produced by benzene. The inhibitor of benzene oxidation, 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole, mitigated the inhibitory effects of benzene and phenol only. These data support the contention that benzene toxicity is mediated by a metabolite and suggest that the toxicity of phenol is a consequence of its metabolism to hydroquinone and that the route of metabolism to catechol may also contribute to the production of toxic metabolite(s). The properties of mouse liver cytosolic dihydrodiol dehydrogenases were examined. These enzymes catalyze the NADP/sup +/-dependent oxidation of trans-1,2-dihydro-1,2-dihydroxybenzene (BDD) to catechol, a possible toxic metabolite of benzene produced via this metabolic route. Four distinct dihydrodiol dehydrogenases (DD1, DD2, DD3, and DD4) were purified to apparent homogeneity as judged by SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and isoelectric focusing. DD1 appeared to be identical to the major ketone reductase and 17..beta..-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activity in the liver. DD2 exhibited aldehyde reductase activity. DD3 and DD4 oxidized 17..beta..-hydroxysteroids, but no carbonyl reductase activity was detected. These relationships between BDD dehydrogenases and carbonyl reductase and/or 17..beta..-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activities were supported by several lines of evidence.

  16. Sorbitol dehydrogenase: structure, function and ligand design.

    PubMed

    El-Kabbani, O; Darmanin, C; Chung, R P-T

    2004-02-01

    Sorbitol dehydrogenase (SDH), a member of the medium-chain dehydrogenase/reductase protein family and the second enzyme of the polyol pathway of glucose metabolism, converts sorbitol to fructose strictly using NAD(+) as coenzyme. SDH is expressed almost ubiquitously in all mammalian tissues. The enzyme has attracted considerable interest due to its implication in the development of diabetic complications and thus its tertiary structure may facilitate the development of drugs for the treatment of diabetes sufferers. Modelling studies suggest that SDH is structurally homologous to mammalian alcohol dehydrogenase with respect to conserved zinc binding motif and a hydrophobic substrate-binding pocket. Recently, the three-dimensional (3-D) structure of a mammalian SDH was solved, and it was found that while the overall 3-D structures of SDH and alcohol dehydrogenase are similar, the zinc coordination in the active sites of the two enzymes is different. The available structural and biochemical information of SDH are currently being utilized in a structure-based approach to develop drugs for the treatment or prevention of the complications of diabetes. This review provides an overview of the recent advances in the structure, function and drug development fields of sorbitol dehydrogenase.

  17. Fundamental molecular differences between alcohol dehydrogenase classes.

    PubMed Central

    Danielsson, O; Atrian, S; Luque, T; Hjelmqvist, L; Gonzàlez-Duarte, R; Jörnvall, H

    1994-01-01

    Two types of alcohol dehydrogenase in separate protein families are the "medium-chain" zinc enzymes (including the classical liver and yeast forms) and the "short-chain" enzymes (including the insect form). Although the medium-chain family has been characterized in prokaryotes and many eukaryotes (fungi, plants, cephalopods, and vertebrates), insects have seemed to possess only the short-chain enzyme. We have now also characterized a medium-chain alcohol dehydrogenase in Drosophila. The enzyme is identical to insect octanol dehydrogenase. It is a typical class III alcohol dehydrogenase, similar to the corresponding human form (70% residue identity), with mostly the same residues involved in substrate and coenzyme interactions. Changes that do occur are conservative, but Phe-51 is of functional interest in relation to decreased coenzyme binding and increased overall activity. Extra residues versus the human enzyme near position 250 affect the coenzyme-binding domain. Enzymatic properties are similar--i.e., very low activity toward ethanol (Km beyond measurement) and high selectivity for formaldehyde/glutathione (S-hydroxymethylglutathione; kcat/Km = 160,000 min-1.mM-1). Between the present class III and the ethanol-active class I enzymes, however, patterns of variability differ greatly, highlighting fundamentally separate molecular properties of these two alcohol dehydrogenases, with class III resembling enzymes in general and class I showing high variation. The gene coding for the Drosophila class III enzyme produces an mRNA of about 1.36 kb that is present at all developmental stages of the fly, compatible with the constitutive nature of the vertebrate enzyme. Taken together, the results bridge a previously apparent gap in the distribution of medium-chain alcohol dehydrogenases and establish a strictly conserved class III enzyme, consistent with an important role for this enzyme in cellular metabolism. Images PMID:8197167

  18. [Interaction of succinate dehydrogenase and oxaloacetate].

    PubMed

    Kotliar, A B; Vinogradov, A D

    1984-04-01

    The equilibrium and rate constants for interaction of the reduced and oxidized membrane-bound succinate dehydrogenase (EC 1.3.99.1) with oxaloacetate were determined. The 10-fold decrease in the oxaloacetate affinity for the reduced enzyme was shown to be due to the 10-fold increase of the enzyme-inhibitor complex dissociation rate, which occurs upon its reduction. The rate of dissociation induced by succinate is 10 times higher than that induced by malonate in the submitochondrial particles, being equal in the soluble enzyme preparations. The rates of dissociation induced by malonate excess, or by the enzyme irreversibly utilizing oxaloacetate (transaminase in the presence of glutamate) are also equal. The data obtained suggest that succinate dehydrogenase interaction with succinate and oxaloacetate results from the competition for a single dicarboxylate-specific site. In submitochondrial particles all succinate dehydrogenase molecules are in redox equilibrium provided for by endogenous ubiquinone. No electronic equilibrium between the individual enzyme molecules exists, when succinate dehydrogenase is solubilized.

  19. Effects of herbal infusions, tea and carbonated beverages on alcohol dehydrogenase and aldehyde dehydrogenase activity.

    PubMed

    Li, Sha; Gan, Li-Qin; Li, Shu-Ke; Zheng, Jie-Cong; Xu, Dong-Ping; Li, Hua-Bin

    2014-01-01

    Various alcoholic beverages containing different concentrations of ethanol are widely consumed, and excessive alcohol consumption may result in serious health problems. The consumption of alcoholic beverages is often accompanied by non-alcoholic beverages, such as herbal infusions, tea and carbonated beverages to relieve drunk symptoms. The aim of this study was to supply new information on the effects of these beverages on alcohol metabolism for nutritionists and the general public, in order to reduce problems associated with excessive alcohol consumption. The effects of 57 kinds of herbal infusions, tea and carbonated beverages on alcohol dehydrogenase and aldehyde dehydrogenase activity were evaluated. Generally, the effects of these beverages on alcohol dehydrogenase and aldehyde dehydrogenase activity are very different. The results suggested that some beverages should not be drank after excessive alcohol consumption, and several beverages may be potential dietary supplements for the prevention and treatment of problems related to excessive alcohol consumption.

  20. Development of an amine dehydrogenase for synthesis of chiral amines.

    PubMed

    Abrahamson, Michael J; Vázquez-Figueroa, Eduardo; Woodall, Nicholas B; Moore, Jeffrey C; Bommarius, Andreas S

    2012-04-16

    A leucine dehydrogenase has been successfully altered through several rounds of protein engineering to an enantioselective amine dehydrogenase. Instead of the wild-type α-keto acid, the new amine dehydrogenase now accepts the analogous ketone, methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK), which corresponds to exchange of the carboxy group by a methyl group to produce chiral (R)-1,3-dimethylbutylamine.

  1. Calculations of hydrogen tunnelling and enzyme catalysis: a comparison of liver alcohol dehydrogenase, methylamine dehydrogenase and soybean lipoxygenase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tresadern, Gary; McNamara, Jonathan P.; Mohr, Matthias; Wang, Hong; Burton, Neil A.; Hillier, Ian H.

    2002-06-01

    Although the potential energy barrier for hydrogen transfer is similar for the enzymes liver alcohol dehydrogenase, methylamine dehydrogenase and soybean lipoxygenase, the degree of tunnelling is predicted to differ greatly, and is reflected by their primary kinetic isotope effects.

  2. [Thermal stability of lactate dehydrogenase and alcohol dehydrogenase incorporated into highly concentrated gels].

    PubMed

    Kulis, Iu Iu

    1979-03-01

    The rate constants for inactivation of lactate dehydrogenase and alcohol dehydrogenase in solution at 65 degrees C (pH 7,5) are 0,72 and 0,013 min-1, respectively. The enzyme incorporation into acrylamide gels results in immobilized enzymes, whose residual activity is 18--25% of the original one. In 6,7% gels the rate of thermal inactivation for lactate dehydrogenase is decreased nearly 10-fold, whereas the inactivation rate for alcohol dehydrogenase is increased 4,6-fold as compared to the soluble enzymes. In 14% and 40% gels the inactivation constants for lactate dehydrogenase are 6,3.10(-3) and 5,9.10(-4) min-1, respectively. In 60% gels the thermal inactivation of lactate dehydrogenase is decelerated 3600-fold as compared to the native enzyme. The enthalpy and enthropy for the inactivation of the native enzyme are equal to 62,8 kcal/mole and 116,9 cal/(mole.grad.) for the native enzyme and those of gel-incorporated (6,7%) enzyme -- 38,7 kcal/mole and 42 cal/(mole.grad.), respectively. The thermal stability of alcohol dehydrogenase in 60% gels is increased 12-fold. To prevent gel swelling, methacrylic acid and allylamine were added to the matrix, with subsequent treatment by dicyclohexylcarbodiimide. The enzyme activity of the modified gels is 2,7--3% of that for the 6,7% gels. The stability of lactate dehydrogenase in such gels is significantly increased. A mechanism of stabilization of the subunit enzymes in highly concentrated gels is discussed.

  3. Assessment of the changes in arch perimeter and irregularity in the mandibular arch during initial alignment with the AcceleDent Aura appliance vs no appliance in adolescents: A single-blind randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Miles, Peter; Fisher, Elizabeth

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this 2-arm parallel trial was to assess the effects of the AcceleDent Aura (OrthoAccel Technologies, Houston, Tex) appliance on the increase in mandibular anterior arch perimeter, the reduction in mandibular arch irregularity, and the amount of discomfort during initial alignment of the mandibular arch with fixed appliances. Forty Class II adolescent patients with full fixed appliances and treated with maxillary premolar extractions and no extractions in the mandibular arch participated in this randomized clinical trial. They were recruited in a private practice and treated by 1 clinician. Randomization to either a no-appliance group or the AcceleDent Aura appliance group was accomplished with permuted blocks of 10 patients with the allocations concealed in opaque, sealed envelopes. Both the operator and the outcome assessor were blinded, but it was not feasible to blind the patients. Discomfort was recorded during the first week of treatment. Mandibular anterior arch perimeter and anterior irregularity were measured from plaster models taken at the start of treatment and after 5, 8, and 10 weeks. No patients were lost to follow-up, and no data were missing. There was no difference in anterior arch perimeter at the start of treatment (P = 0.85; median, 0.6 mm; 95% confidence interval [CI], -1.6, +1.8 mm) or at any other time point (5 weeks: P = 0.84; median, -0.2 mm; 95% CI, -1.6, +1.2 mm; 8 weeks: P = 0.56; median, -0.3 mm; 95% CI, -1.6, +0.7 mm; 10 weeks: P = 0.67; median, -0.1 mm; 95% CI, -1.5, +1.1 mm). There was also no difference between groups for incisor irregularity (P = 0.46; median, -0.5 mm; 95% CI, -2.2, +2.8 mm; P = 0.80; median, 0.0 mm; 95% CI, -1.0, +1.1 mm; P = 0.70; median, 0.1 mm; 95% CI, -0.7, +0.8 mm; P = 0.65; median, 0.2 mm; 95% CI, -0.6, +0.6 mm). No difference was detected at any time during the first week for discomfort (baseline: P = 0.84; median, -1.5 mm; 95% CI, -15.9, +9.8

  4. Properties of formate dehydrogenase in Methanobacterium formicicum

    SciTech Connect

    Schauer, N.L.; Ferry, J.G.

    1982-04-01

    Soluble formate dehydrogenase from Methanobacterium formicicum was purified 71-fold with a yield of 35%. Purification was performed anaerobically in the presence of 10 mM sodium azide which stabilized the enzyme. The purified enzyme reduced, with formate, 50..mu..mol of methyl viologen per min per mg of protein and 8.2 ..mu..mol of coenzyme F/sub 420/ per min per mg of protein. The apparent K/sub m/ for 7,8-didemethyl-8-hydroxy-5-deazariboflavin, a hydrolytic derivative of coenzyme F/sub 420/, was 10-fold greater (63 ..mu..M) than for coenzyme F/sub 420/ (6 ..mu..M). The purified enzyme also reduced flavin mononucleotide (K/sub m/ = 13 ..mu..M) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (K/sub m/ = 25 ..mu..M) with formate, but did not reduce NAD/sup +/ or NADP/sup +/. The reduction of NADP/sup +/ with formate required formate dehydrogenase, coenzyme F/sub 420/, and coenzyme F/sub 420/:NADP/sup +/ oxidoreductase. The formate dehydrogenase had an optimal pH of 7.9 when assayed with the physiological electron acceptor coenzyme F/sub 420/. The optimal reaction rate occurred at 55/sup 0/C. The molecular weight was 288,000 as determined by gel filtration. The purified formate dehydrogenase was strongly inhibited by cyanide (K/sub i/ = 6 ..mu..M), azide (K/sub i/ = 39 ..mu..M),..cap alpha..,..cap alpha..-dipyridyl, and 1,10-phenanthroline. Denaturation of the purified formate dehydrogenase with sodium dodecyl sulfate under aerobic conditions revealed a fluorescent compound. Maximal excitation occurred at 385 nm, with minor peaks at 277 and 302 nm. Maximal fluorescence emission occurred at 455 nm.

  5. Characterization of xylitol dehydrogenase from Debaryomyces hansenii

    SciTech Connect

    Girio, F.M.; Amaral-Collaco, M.T.; Pelica, F.

    1996-01-01

    The xylitol dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.9) from xylose-grown cells of Debaryomyces hansenii was partially purified in two chromatographic steps, and characterization studies were carried out in order to investigate the role of the xylitol dehydrogenase-catalyzed step in the regulation of D-xylose metabolism. The enzyme was most active at pH 9.0-9.5, and exhibited a broad polyol specificity. The Michaelis constants for xylitol and NAD{sup +} were 16.5 and 0.55 mM, respectively. Ca{sup 2+}, Mg{sup 2+}, and Mn{sup 2+} did not affect the enzyme activity. Conversely, Zn{sup 2+}, Cd{sup 2+}, and Co{sup 2+} strongly inhibited the enzyme activity. It was concluded that NAD{sup +}-xylitol dehydrogenase from D. hansenii has similarities with other xylose-fermenting yeasts in respect to optimal pH, substrate specificity, and K{sub m} value for xylitol, and therefore should be named L-iditol:NAD{sup +}-5-oxidoreductase (EC 1.1.1.14). The reason D. hansenii is a good xylitol producer is not because of its value of K for xylitol, which is low enough to assure its fast oxidation by NAD{sup +}-xylitol dehydrogenase. However, a higher K{sub m} value of xylitol dehydrogenase for NAD{sup +} compared to the K{sub m} values of other xylose-fermenting yeasts may be responsible for the higher xylitol yields. 22 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. "Enzymogenesis": classical liver alcohol dehydrogenase origin from the glutathione-dependent formaldehyde dehydrogenase line.

    PubMed Central

    Danielsson, O; Jörnvall, H

    1992-01-01

    Analysis of the activity and structure of lower vertebrate alcohol dehydrogenases reveals that relationships between the classical liver and yeast enzymes need not be continuous. Both the ethanol activity of class I-type alcohol dehydrogenase (alcohol:NAD+ oxidoreductase, EC 1.1.1.1) and the glutathione-dependent formaldehyde activity of the class III-type enzyme [formaldehyde:NAD+ oxidoreductase (glutathione-formylating), EC 1.2.1.1] are present in liver down to at least the stage of bony fishes (cod liver: ethanol activity, 3.4 units/mg of protein in one enzyme; formaldehyde activity, 4.5 units/mg in the major form of another enzyme). Structural analysis of the latter protein reveals it to be a typical class III enzyme, with limited variation from the mammalian form and therefore with stable activity and structure throughout much of the vertebrate lineage. In contrast, the classical alcohol dehydrogenase (the class I enzyme) appears to be the emerging form, first in activity and later also in structure. The class I activity is present already in the piscine line, whereas the overall structural-type enzyme is not observed until amphibians and still more recent vertebrates. Consequently, the class I/III duplicatory origin appears to have arisen from a functional class III form, not a class I form. Therefore, ethanol dehydrogenases from organisms existing before this duplication have origins separate from those leading to the "classical" liver alcohol dehydrogenases. The latter now often occur in isozyme forms from further gene duplications and have a high rate of evolutionary change. The pattern is, however, not simple and we presently find in cod the first evidence for isozymes also within a class III alcohol dehydrogenase. Overall, the results indicate that both of these classes of vertebrate alcohol dehydrogenase are important and suggest a protective metabolic function for the whole enzyme system. Images PMID:1409630

  7. Purification of arogenate dehydrogenase from Phenylobacterium immobile.

    PubMed

    Mayer, E; Waldner-Sander, S; Keller, B; Keller, E; Lingens, F

    1985-01-07

    Phenylobacterium immobile, a bacterium which is able to degrade the herbicide chloridazon, utilizes for L-tyrosine synthesis arogenate as an obligatory intermediate which is converted in the final biosynthetic step by a dehydrogenase to tyrosine. This enzyme, the arogenate dehydrogenase, has been purified for the first time in a 5-step procedure to homogeneity as confirmed by electrophoresis. The Mr of the enzyme that consists of two identical subunits amounts to 69000 as established by gel electrophoresis after cross-linking the enzyme with dimethylsuberimidate. The Km values were 0.09 mM for arogenate and 0.02 mM for NAD+. The enzyme has a high specificity with respect to its substrate arogenate.

  8. Peafowl lactate dehydrogenase: problem of isoenzyme identification.

    PubMed

    Rose, R G; Wilson, A C

    1966-09-16

    Peafowl, like other vertebrates, contain multiple forms of lactate dehydrogenase. The electrophoretic properties of the peafowl isoenzymes are unusual in that the isoenzyme from heart tissue can be either more or less anodic than that of muscle, depending on the pH. This finding focuses attention on the problem of isoenzyme identification. It is suggested that isoenzymes be identified on the basis of properties that are chemically and biologically more significant than electrophoretic mobility.

  9. Dihydrodiol dehydrogenase and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Smithgall, T.E.

    1986-01-01

    Carcinogenic activation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by microsomal monoxygenases proceeds through trans-dihydrodiol metabolites to diol-epoxide ultimate carcinogens. This thesis directly investigated the role of dihydrodiol dehydrogenase, a cytosolic NAD(P)-linked oxidoreductase, in the detoxification of polycyclic aromatic trans-dihydrodiols. A wide variety of non-K-region trans-dihydrodiols were synthesized and shown to be substrates for the homogeneous rat liver dehydrogenase, including several potent proximate carcinogens derived from 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene, 5-methylchrysene, and benzo(a)pyrene. Since microsomal activation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons is highly stereospecific, the stereochemical course of enzymatic trans-dihydrodiol oxidation was monitored using circular dichroism spectropolarimetry. The major product formed from the dehydrogenase-catalyzed oxidation of the trans-1,2-dihydrodiol of naphthalene was characterized using UV, IR, NMR, and mass spectroscopy, and appears to be 4-hydroxy-1,2-naphthoquinone. Mass spectral analysis suggests that an analogous hydroxylated o-quinone is formed as the major product of benzo(a)pyrene-7,8-dihydrodiol oxidation. Enzymatic oxidation of trans-dihydrodiols was shown to be potently inhibited by all of the major classes of the nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs. Enhancement of trans-dihydrodiol proximate carcinogen oxidation may protect against possible adverse effects of the aspirin-like drugs, and help maintain the balance between activation and detoxification of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

  10. Relationships within the aldehyde dehydrogenase extended family.

    PubMed Central

    Perozich, J.; Nicholas, H.; Wang, B. C.; Lindahl, R.; Hempel, J.

    1999-01-01

    One hundred-forty-five full-length aldehyde dehydrogenase-related sequences were aligned to determine relationships within the aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) extended family. The alignment reveals only four invariant residues: two glycines, a phenylalanine involved in NAD binding, and a glutamic acid that coordinates the nicotinamide ribose in certain E-NAD binary complex crystal structures, but which may also serve as a general base for the catalytic reaction. The cysteine that provides the catalytic thiol and its closest neighbor in space, an asparagine residue, are conserved in all ALDHs with demonstrated dehydrogenase activity. Sixteen residues are conserved in at least 95% of the sequences; 12 of these cluster into seven sequence motifs conserved in almost all ALDHs. These motifs cluster around the active site of the enzyme. Phylogenetic analysis of these ALDHs indicates at least 13 ALDH families, most of which have previously been identified but not grouped separately by alignment. ALDHs cluster into two main trunks of the phylogenetic tree. The largest, the "Class 3" trunk, contains mostly substrate-specific ALDH families, as well as the class 3 ALDH family itself. The other trunk, the "Class 1/2" trunk, contains mostly variable substrate ALDH families, including the class 1 and 2 ALDH families. Divergence of the substrate-specific ALDHs occurred earlier than the division between ALDHs with broad substrate specificities. A site on the World Wide Web has also been devoted to this alignment project. PMID:10210192

  11. Xanthine dehydrogenase and 2-furoyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase from Pseudomonas putida Fu1: two molybdenum-containing dehydrogenases of novel structural composition.

    PubMed Central

    Koenig, K; Andreesen, J R

    1990-01-01

    The constitutive xanthine dehydrogenase and the inducible 2-furoyl-coenzyme A (CoA) dehydrogenase could be labeled with [185W]tungstate. This labeling was used as a reporter to purify both labile proteins. The radioactivity cochromatographed predominantly with the residual enzymatic activity of both enzymes during the first purification steps. Both radioactive proteins were separated and purified to homogeneity. Antibodies raised against the larger protein also exhibited cross-reactivity toward the second smaller protein and removed xanthine dehydrogenase and 2-furoyl-CoA dehydrogenase activity up to 80 and 60% from the supernatant of cell extracts, respectively. With use of cell extract, Western immunoblots showed only two bands which correlated exactly with the activity stains for both enzymes after native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Molybdate was absolutely required for incorporation of 185W, formation of cross-reacting material, and enzymatic activity. The latter parameters showed a perfect correlation. This evidence proves that the radioactive proteins were actually xanthine dehydrogenase and 2-furoyl-CoA dehydrogenase. The apparent molecular weight of the native xanthine dehydrogenase was about 300,000, and that of 2-furoyl-CoA dehydrogenase was 150,000. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of both enzymes revealed two protein bands corresponding to molecular weights of 55,000 and 25,000. The xanthine dehydrogenase contained at least 1.6 mol of molybdenum, 0.9 ml of cytochrome b, 5.8 mol of iron, and 2.4 mol of labile sulfur per mol of enzyme. The composition of the 2-furoyl-CoA dehydrogenase seemed to be similar, although the stoichiometry was not determined. The oxidation of furfuryl alcohol to furfural and further to 2-furoic acid by Pseudomonas putida Fu1 was catalyzed by two different dehydrogenases. Images PMID:2170335

  12. First Crystal Structure of l-Lysine 6-Dehydrogenase as an NAD-dependent Amine Dehydrogenase*

    PubMed Central

    Yoneda, Kazunari; Fukuda, Junya; Sakuraba, Haruhiko; Ohshima, Toshihisa

    2010-01-01

    A gene encoding an l-lysine dehydrogenase was identified in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus horikoshii. The gene was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, and its product was purified and characterized. The expressed enzyme is the most thermostable l-lysine dehydrogenase yet described, with a half-life of 180 min at 100 °C. The product of the enzyme's catalytic activity is Δ1-piperideine-6-carboxylate, which makes this enzyme an l-lysine 6-dehydrogenase (EC 1.4.1.18) that catalyzes the reductive deamination of the ϵ- amino group and a type of NAD-dependent amine dehydrogenase. The three-dimensional structure of the enzyme was determined using the mercury-based multiple-wavelength anomalous dispersion method at a resolution of 2.44 Å in the presence of NAD and sulfate ion. The asymmetric unit consisted of two subunits, and a crystallographic 2-fold axis generated the functional dimer. Each monomer consisted of a Rossmann fold domain and a C-terminal catalytic domain, and the fold of the catalytic domain showed similarity to that of saccharopine reductase. Notably, the structures of subunits A and B differed significantly. In subunit A, the active site contained a sulfate ion that was not seen in subunit B. Consequently, subunit A adopted a closed conformation, whereas subunit B adopted an open one. In each subunit, one NAD molecule was bound to the active site in an anti-conformation, indicating that the enzyme makes use of pro-R-specific hydride transfer between the two hydrides at C-4 of NADH (type A specificity). This is the first description of the three-dimensional structure of l-lysine 6-dehydrogenase as an NAD-dependent amine dehydrogenase. PMID:20056607

  13. Dehydrogenase and Oxoreductase Activities of Porcine Placental 11Beta-Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenase

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-07

    activity (p < .001). There were positive linear associations (p < . 01) between net dehydrogenase activity (dehydrogenase minus oxoreductase) and...Fragments ( ~ 3 grams ) of placentae from 7-8 fetuses from each of three gilts were removed and placed in ice cold sterile Eagle’s Minimum Essential...Females (n) Males Fetal weight ( grams ) 12 272.7 ± 20.7b 10 302.5 ± 12.8b Fetal length (mm) 12 185.9 ± 5.4 b 10 196.4± 4.8b Placental weight ( grams

  14. Inhibitory effect of disulfiram (Antabuse) on alcohol dehydrogenase activity.

    PubMed

    Carper, W R; Dorey, R C; Beber, J H

    1987-10-01

    We investigated the effect of disulfiram (Antabuse) on the activity of alcohol dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.1) in vitro. We observed a time-dependent inhibition of this dehydrogenase by disulfiram and diethyldithiocarbamate similar to that obtained for aldehyde dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.1.3). These results suggest a possible explanation for various side effects observed in the clinical use of Antabuse.

  15. Inhibition of membrane-bound succinate dehydrogenase by disulfiram.

    PubMed

    Jay, D

    1991-04-01

    The effect of disulfiram on succinate oxidase and succinate dehydrogenase activities of beef heart submitochondrial particles was studied. Results show that disulfiram inhibits both functions. Succinate and malonate suppress the inhibitory action of disulfiram when succinate dehydrogenase is stabilized in an active conformation. Disulfiram is not able to inhibit the enzyme when succinate dehydrogenase is inactivated by oxaloacetate. The inhibitory effect of disulfiram is reverted by the addition of dithiothreitol. From these results, it is proposed that disulfiram inhibits the utilization of succinate by a direct modification of an -SH group located in the catalytically active site of succinate dehydrogenase.

  16. A lipoamide dehydrogenase from Neisseria meningitidis has a lipoyl domain.

    PubMed

    Bringas, R; Fernandez, J

    1995-04-01

    A protein of molecular weight of 64 kDa (p64k) found in the outer membrane of Neisseria meningitidis shows a high degree of homology with both the lipoyl domain of the acetyltransferase and the entire sequence of the lipoamide dehydrogenase, the E2 and E3 components of the dehydrogenase multienzyme complexes, respectively. The alignment of the p64k with lipoyl domains and lipoamide dehydrogenases from different species is presented. The possible implications of this protein in binding protein-dependent transport are discussed. This is the first lipoamide dehydrogenase reported to have a lipoyl domain.

  17. Placental glucose dehydrogenase polymorphism in Koreans.

    PubMed

    Kim, Y J; Paik, S G; Park, H Y

    1994-12-01

    The genetic polymorphism of placental glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) was investigated in 300 Korean placentae using horizontal starch gel electrophoresis. The allele frequencies for GDH1, GDH2 and GDH3 were 0.537, 0.440 and 0.005, respectively, which were similar to those in Japanese. We also observed an anodal allele which was similar to the GDH4 originally reported in Chinese populations at a low frequency of 0.015. An additional new cathodal allele (named GDH6) was observed in the present study with a very low frequency of 0.003.

  18. Spectra of glutamate dehydrogenase with diethylstilbestrol.

    PubMed

    Hillar, M

    1978-02-01

    Glutamate dehydrogenase displays hyperchromicity at 256 nm and at 276 nm upon binding of diethylstilbestrol. Increase in absorbancy is linear at both regions up to 250 micrometer DES, and becomes parabolic at higher concentration of DES. ADP in the presence of DES causes decrease in absorbancy at 256 nm; absorbancy at 276 nm increased by DES is not affected by ADP. DES prevents spectral effects produced by GTP (decrease in absorbancy at 254 nm and at 276 nm). ADP still decreases absorbancy at 254 nm, leaving the 276 nm region unchanged. ADP enhances spectral effects produced by GTP. GTP, however, prevents changes produced by ADP.

  19. Hydrogenases and formate dehydrogenases of Syntrophobacter fumaroxidans.

    PubMed

    de Bok, F A M; Roze, E H A; Stams, A J M

    2002-08-01

    The syntrophic propionate-oxidizing bacterium Syntrophobacter fumaroxidans possesses two distinct formate dehydrogenases and at least three distinct hydrogenases. All of these reductases are either loosely membrane-associated or soluble proteins and at least one of the hydrogenases is located in the periplasm. These enzymes were expressed on all growth substrates tested, though the levels of each enzyme showed large variations. These findings suggest that both H2 and formate are involved in the central metabolism of the organism, and that both these compounds may serve as interspecies electron carriers during syntrophic growth on propionate.

  20. Identity of the subunits and the stoicheiometry of prosthetic groups in trimethylamine dehydrogenase and dimethylamine dehydrogenase.

    PubMed Central

    Kasprzak, A A; Papas, E J; Steenkamp, D J

    1983-01-01

    Trimethylamine dehydrogenases from bacterium W3A1 and Hyphomicrobium X and the dimethylamine dehydrogenase from Hyphomicrobium X were found to contain only one kind of subunit. The millimolar absorption coefficient of a single [4Fe-4S] cluster in trimethylamine dehydrogenase from bacterium W3A1 was estimated to be 14.8 mM-1 . cm-1 at 443 nm. From this value a 1:1 stoicheiometry of the prosthetic groups, 6-S-cysteinyl-FMN and the [4Fe-4S] cluster, was established. Millimolar absorption coefficients of the three enzymes were in the range 49.4-58.7 mM-1 . cm-1 at approx. 440 nm. This range of values is consistent with the presence of two [4Fe-4S] clusters and two flavin residues, for which the millimolar absorption coefficient had earlier been found to be 12.3 mM-1 . cm-1 at 437 nm. The N-terminal amino acid was alanine in each of the three enzymes. Sequence analysis of the first 15 residues from the N-terminus of dimethylamine dehydrogenase indicated a single unique sequence. Two identical subunits, each containing covalently bound 6-S-cysteinyl-FMN and a [4Fe-4S] cluster, in each of the enzymes are therefore indicated. Images Fig. 1. PMID:6882357

  1. Kinetic mechanism of chicken liver xanthine dehydrogenase.

    PubMed Central

    Bruguera, P; Lopez-Cabrera, A; Canela, E I

    1988-01-01

    The kinetic behaviour of chicken-liver xanthine dehydrogenase (xanthine/NAD+ oxidoreductase; EC 1.2.1.37) has been studied. Steady-state results, obtained from a wide range of concentrations of substrates and products, were fitted by rational functions of degree 1:1, 1:2, 2:2 and 3:3 with respect to substrates, and 0:1, 1:1, 0:2 and 1:2 with regard to products, using a non-linear regression program which guarantees the fit. The goodness of fit was improved using a computer program that combines model discrimination, parameter refinement and sequential experimental design. The AIC and F tests were also used for model discrimination. For comparative purposes, the xanthine/oxygen oxidoreductase reaction was also studied. From the functions which give the maximum improvement, the complete rate equation was deduced. The significance of the terms was stated by the above methods. It was concluded that xanthine dehydrogenase requires a minimum mechanism of degree 1:1 for xanthine, 2:2 for NAD+, 1:1 for uric acid and 1:2 for NADH in the xanthine/NAD+ oxidoreductase reaction. These are the minimum degrees required but a rate equation of higher degree is not excluded. PMID:3422556

  2. Properties of a Purified Halophilic Malic Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, P. K.; Halvorson, H. Orin

    1965-01-01

    Holmes, P. K. (University of Illinois, Urbana), and H. Orin Halvorson. Properties of a purified halophilic malic dehydrogenase. J. Bacteriol. 90:316–326. 1965.—The malic dehydrogenase (MDH) from Halobacterium salinarium required high concentrations of monovalent ions for stability and activity. Studies of inactivation rates at different salt concentrations suggested that approximately 25% NaCl (w/v) is required to stabilize MDH. From 50 to 100% reactivation, depending on the salt concentration present during inactivation, could occur in 2.5 to 5 m NaCl or KCl. The optimal salt concentration for activity of MDH was a function of the pH, and ranged from 1 to 3 m NaCl or KCl. The effect of salt concentration on the pH-activity curves occurred chiefly below pH 7.0. Inactivation of MDH with heat or thiol reagents showed that the enzyme was more labile in the state induced by absence of salt. The activation of MDH by salts was attributed to a decreased rate of dissociation of MDH and reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH2). The inactivation of the enzyme in the absence of salt could be largely prevented by the presence of NADH2. The S20.w of MDH decreased threefold at low salt concentrations. The enzyme was assumed to be in its native compact configuration only in the presence of a high concentration of salt. PMID:14329442

  3. Structure of glycerol dehydrogenase from Serratia.

    PubMed

    Musille, Paul; Ortlund, Eric

    2014-02-01

    The 1.90 Å resolution X-ray crystal structure of glycerol dehydrogenase derived from contaminating bacteria present during routine Escherichia coli protein expression is presented. This off-target enzyme showed intrinsic affinity for Ni(2+)-Sepharose, migrated at the expected molecular mass for the target protein during gel filtration and was crystallized before it was realised that contamination had occurred. In this study, it is shown that liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) can efficiently identify the protein composition of crystals in a crystallization experiment as part of a structure-determination pipeline for an unknown protein. The high-resolution X-ray data enabled sequencing directly from the electron-density maps, allowing the source of contamination to be placed within the Serratia genus. Incorporating additional protein-identity checks, such as tandem LC-MS/MS, earlier in the protein expression, purification and crystallization workflow may have prevented the unintentional structure determination of this metabolic enzyme, which represents the first enterobacterial glycerol dehydrogenase reported to date.

  4. Catecholamine regulation of lactate dehydrogenase in rat brain cell culture

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, S.; McGinnis, J.F.; de Vellis, J.

    1980-03-25

    The mechanism of catecholamine induction of the soluble cytoplasmic enzyme lactate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.27) was studied in the rat glial tumor cell line, C6. Lactate dehydrogenase was partially purified from extracts of (/sup 3/H)leucine-labeled cells by affinity gel chromatography and quantitatively immunoprecipitated with anti-lactate dehydrogenase-5 IgG and with antilactate dehydrogenase-1 IgG. The immunoprecipitates were dissociated and electrophoresed on sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gels. Using this methodology, the increased enzyme activity of lactate dehydrogenase in norepinephrine-treated C6 cells was observed to be concomitant with the increased synthesis of enzyme molecules. Despite the continued presence of norepinephrine, the specific increase in the rate of synthesis of lactate dehydrogenase was transient. It was first detected at 4 h, was maximum at 9 h, and returned to basal levels by 24 h. The half-life of lactate dehydrogenase enzyme activity was 36 h during the induction and 40 h during deinduction. The half-life for decay of /sup 3/H-labeled lactate dehydrogenase was 41 h. These observations suggest that the increase in lactate dehydrogenase activity in norepinephrine-treated cells does not involve any change in the rate of degradation. Norepinephrine increased the specific rate of synthesis of both lactate dehydrogenase-5 (a tetramer of four M subunits) and lactate dehydrogenase-1 (a tetramer of four H subunits), although to different extents. Since these subunits are coded for by two separate genes on separate chromosomes, it suggests that the regulatory mechanism involves at least two separate sites of action.

  5. Yeast surface display of dehydrogenases in microbial fuel-cells.

    PubMed

    Gal, Idan; Schlesinger, Orr; Amir, Liron; Alfonta, Lital

    2016-12-01

    Two dehydrogenases, cellobiose dehydrogenase from Corynascus thermophilus and pyranose dehydrogenase from Agaricus meleagris, were displayed for the first time on the surface of Saccharomyces cerevisiae using the yeast surface display system. Surface displayed dehydrogenases were used in a microbial fuel cell and generated high power outputs. Surface displayed cellobiose dehydrogenase has demonstrated a midpoint potential of -28mV (vs. Ag/AgCl) at pH=6.5 and was used in a mediator-less anode compartment of a microbial fuel cell producing a power output of 3.3μWcm(-2) using lactose as fuel. Surface-displayed pyranose dehydrogenase was used in a microbial fuel cell and generated high power outputs using different substrates, the highest power output that was achieved was 3.9μWcm(-2) using d-xylose. These results demonstrate that surface displayed cellobiose dehydrogenase and pyranose dehydrogenase may successfully be used in microbial bioelectrochemical systems. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. A chemical proteomic probe for detecting dehydrogenases: catechol rhodanine.

    PubMed

    Ge, Xia; Sem, Daniel S

    2012-01-01

    Inherent complexity of the proteome often demands that it be studied as manageable subsets, termed subproteomes. A subproteome can be defined in a number of ways, although a pragmatic approach is to define it based on common features in an active site that lead to binding of a common small molecule ligand (e.g., a cofactor or a cross-reactive drug lead). The subproteome, so defined, can be purified using that common ligand tethered to a resin, with affinity chromatography. Affinity purification of a subproteome is described in the next chapter. That subproteome can then be analyzed using a common ligand probe, such as a fluorescent common ligand that can be used to stain members of the subproteome in a native gel. Here, we describe such a fluorescent probe, based on a catechol rhodanine acetic acid (CRAA) ligand that binds to dehydrogenases. The CRAA ligand is fluorescent and binds to dehydrogenases at pH > 7, and hence can be used effectively to stain dehydrogenases in native gels to identify what subset of proteins in a mixture are dehydrogenases. Furthermore, if one is designing inhibitors to target one or more of these dehydrogenases, the CRAA staining can be performed in a competitive assay format, with or without inhibitor, to assess the selectivity of the inhibitor for the targeted dehydrogenase. Finally, the CRAA probe is a privileged scaffold for dehydrogenases, and hence can easily be modified to increase affinity for a given dehydrogenase.

  7. Toxic Neuronal Death by Glyeraldehyde-3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase and Mitochondria

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-08-01

    Neuroreport, 10(5), 1149-1153. Sioud, M., & Jespersen, L. (1996). Enhancement of hammerhead ribozyme catalysis by glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase...1996) Enhancemen t of hammerhead r ibozyme cata lysis by glycera ldehyde-3- phospha te dehydrogenase. J Mol Biol 257:775–789. Sirover MA (1997) Role of

  8. Conformations of Diphosphopyridine Coenzymes upon Binding to Dehydrogenases

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chi-Yu; Eichner, Ronald D.; Kaplan, Nathan O.

    1973-01-01

    The binding of oxidized as well as reduced coenzyme to some dehydrogenases has been studied under different concentration ratios and temperatures by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. A significant difference in the spectral behavior between DPN+ and DPNH upon binding is interpreted in terms of fast and slow on-off rates relative to the nuclear magnetic resonance time scale in the binding of these two coenzymes. Significant downfield shifts of DPN+ were observed upon binding, comparable in magnitude to those expected upon opening (destacking) of the coenzymes in the case of chicken-muscle and lobster-tail lactate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.27) and yeast alchol dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.1.). A preliminary survey of several other dehydrogenases is consistent with these findings. In the case of 3-phosphoglyceraldehyde dehydrogenase, there is a possibility that the coenzyme exists in the folded form. PMID:4351183

  9. Characterization of the developmentally regulated Bacillus subtilis glucose dehydrogenase gene.

    PubMed Central

    Lampel, K A; Uratani, B; Chaudhry, G R; Ramaley, R F; Rudikoff, S

    1986-01-01

    The DNA sequence of the structural gene for glucose dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.47) of Bacillus subtilis was determined and comprises 780 base pairs. The subunit molecular weight of glucose dehydrogenase as deduced from the nucleotide sequence is 28,196, which agrees well with the subunit molecular weight of 31,500 as determined from sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The sequence of the 49 amino acids at the NH2 terminus of glucose dehydrogenase purified from sporulating B. subtilis cells matched the amino acid sequence derived from the DNA sequence. Glucose dehydrogenase was purified from an Escherichia coli strain harboring pEF1, a plasmid that contains the B. subtilis gene encoding glucose dehydrogenase. This enzyme has the identical amino acid sequence at the NH2 terminus as the B. subtilis enzyme. A putative ribosome-binding site, 5'-AGGAGG-3', which is complementary to the 3' end of the 16S rRNA of B. subtilis, was found 6 base pairs preceding the translational start codon of the structural gene of glucose dehydrogenase. No known promoterlike DNA sequences that are recognized by B. subtilis RNA polymerases were present immediately preceding the translational start site of the glucose dehydrogenase structural gene. The glucose dehydrogenase gene was found to be under sporulation control at the trancriptional level. A transcript of 1.6 kilobases hybridized to a DNA fragment within the structural gene of glucose dehydrogenase. This transcript was synthesized 3 h after the cessation of vegetative growth concomitant to the appearance of glucose dehydrogenase. Images PMID:3082854

  10. GLYCERALDEHYDE 3-PHOSPHATE DEHYDROGENASE-S, A SPERM-SPECIFIC GLYCOLYTIC ENZYME, IS REQUIRED FOR SPERM MOTILITY AND MALE FERTILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    While glycolysis is highly conserved, it is remarkable that several novel isozymes in this central metabolic pathway are found in mammalian sperm. Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase-S (GAPDS) is the product of a mouse gene expressed only during spermatogenesis and, like it...

  11. GLYCERALDEHYDE 3-PHOSPHATE DEHYDROGENASE-S, A SPERM-SPECIFIC GLYCOLYTIC ENZYME, IS REQUIRED FOR SPERM MOTILITY AND MALE FERTILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    While glycolysis is highly conserved, it is remarkable that several novel isozymes in this central metabolic pathway are found in mammalian sperm. Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase-S (GAPDS) is the product of a mouse gene expressed only during spermatogenesis and, like it...

  12. Enantiocomplementary Yarrowia lipolytica Oxidoreductases: Alcohol Dehydrogenase 2 and Short Chain Dehydrogenase/Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Napora-Wijata, Kamila; Strohmeier, Gernot A.; Sonavane, Manoj N.; Avi, Manuela; Robins, Karen; Winkler, Margit

    2013-01-01

    Enzymes of the non-conventional yeast Yarrowia lipolytica seem to be tailor-made for the conversion of lipophilic substrates. Herein, we cloned and overexpressed the Zn-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase ADH2 from Yarrowia lipolytica in Escherichia coli. The purified enzyme was characterized in vitro. The substrate scope for YlADH2 mediated oxidation and reduction was investigated spectrophotometrically and the enzyme showed a broader substrate range than its homolog from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A preference for secondary compared to primary alcohols in oxidation direction was observed for YlADH2. 2-Octanone was investigated in reduction mode in detail. Remarkably, YlADH2 displays perfect (S)-selectivity and together with a highly (R)-selective short chain dehydrogenase/ reductase from Yarrowia lipolytica it is possible to access both enantiomers of 2-octanol in >99% ee with Yarrowia lipolytica oxidoreductases. PMID:24970175

  13. The dihydroorotate dehydrogenases: Past and present.

    PubMed

    Reis, Renata A G; Calil, Felipe Antunes; Feliciano, Patricia Rosa; Pinheiro, Matheus Pinto; Nonato, M Cristina

    2017-06-27

    The flavoenzyme dihydroorotate dehydrogenase catalyzes the stereoselective oxidation of (S)-dihydroorotate to orotate in the fourth of the six conserved enzymatic reactions involved in the de novo pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway. Inhibition of pyrimidine metabolism by selectively targeting DHODHs has been exploited in the development of new therapies against cancer, immunological disorders, bacterial and viral infections, and parasitic diseases. Through a chronological narrative, this review summarizes the efforts of the scientific community to achieve our current understanding of structural and biochemical properties of DHODHs. It also attempts to describe the latest advances in medicinal chemistry for therapeutic development based on the selective inhibition of DHODH, including an overview of the experimental techniques used for ligand screening during the process of drug discovery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. NADH electrochemical sensor coupled with dehydrogenase enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Yamanaka, Hideko; Mascini, Marco )

    1992-06-01

    A graphite electrode assembled in a flow cell has shown to be a good detector for NADH. Current is linearly dependent on concentration in the range 10{sup {minus}7}-10{sup {minus}3} M without any mediator at the potential applied of 300 mV vs Ag/AgCl. Lactate and alcohol dehydrogenases were immobilized near to the electrode surface or in a reactor to obtain an NADH-based biosensor for lactate or ethanol. With lactate the authors succeeded to obtain a response only if the reactor was used and for alcohol a current proportional to the concentration was obtained either if the enzyme was immobilized in a membrane and placed near the electrode surface or when the enzyme was immobilized in a reactor form. By FIA procedures fast responses and recoveries were obtained, but with a short linear range.

  15. Fast internal dynamics in alcohol dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Monkenbusch, M.; Stadler, A. Biehl, R.; Richter, D.; Ollivier, J.; Zamponi, M.

    2015-08-21

    Large-scale domain motions in alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) have been observed previously by neutron spin-echo spectroscopy (NSE). We have extended the investigation on the dynamics of ADH in solution by using high-resolution neutron time-of-flight (TOF) and neutron backscattering (BS) spectroscopy in the incoherent scattering range. The observed hydrogen dynamics were interpreted in terms of three mobility classes, which allowed a simultaneous description of the measured TOF and BS spectra. In addition to the slow global protein diffusion and domain motions observed by NSE, a fast internal process could be identified. Around one third of the protons in ADH participate in the fast localized diffusive motion. The diffusion coefficient of the fast internal motions is around two third of the value of the surrounding D{sub 2}O solvent. It is tempting to associate the fast internal process with solvent exposed amino acid residues with dangling side chains.

  16. Lactate dehydrogenase isoenzyme patterns in cetaceans.

    PubMed

    Reidarson, T H; McBain, J; Dalton, L M

    1999-06-01

    Serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) isoenzyme activity was analyzed in cetaceans. Animals that were treated by i.m. injection and others that received azole therapy had distinctly different LDH isoenzyme profiles. A third distinctive pattern was occasionally observed in clinically normal animals with elevations in total transaminase and LDH activity levels. DH isoenzyme activity patterns were not affected by mild or moderate hemolysis, refrigeration after 24 hr, or freezing for 24 hr with subsequent thawing. However, severe hemolysis produced artifactual changes similar to those observed in individuals that received injections but of a lesser magnitude. DH isoenzyme activity patterns may provide useful corroboration of other clinical findings when diagnostic modalities are limited, especially to differentiate nonspecific enzyme elevation from nonpathologic elevations in serum enzyme concentrations due to i.m. injections or azole therapy.

  17. Stability of immobilized yeast alcohol dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Ooshima, H.; Genko, Y.; Harano, Y.

    1981-12-01

    The effects of substrate on stabilities of native (NA) and three kinds of immobilized yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (IMA), namely PGA (the carrier; porous glass), SEA (agarose gel) prepared covalently, and AMA (anion-exchange resin) prepared ionically, were studied. The following results were obtained. 1) The deactivations of NA and IMA free from the substrate or in the presence of ethanol obey the first-order kinetics, whereas, in the presence of butyraldehyde, their deactivation behaviors are explained on the basis of coexistence of two components of YADHs, namely the labile E1 and the comparatively stable E2, with different first-order deactivation constants. (2) A few attempts for stabilization of IMA were carried out from the viewpoint of the effects of crosslinkages among the subunits of YADH for PGA and the multibonding between the carrier and enzyme for SEA. The former is effective for the stabilization, whereas the latter is not. (Refs. 19).

  18. [Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency in Japan].

    PubMed

    Kanno, Hitoshi; Ogura, Hiromi

    2015-07-01

    In the past 10 years, we have diagnosed congenital hemolytic anemia in 294 patients, approximately 33% of whom were found to have glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency. It is becoming more common for Japanese to marry people of other ethnic origins, such that G6PD deficiency is becoming more prevalent in Japan. Japanese G6PD deficiency tends to be diagnosed in the neonatal period due to severe jaundice, while G6PD-deficient patients with foreign ancestors tend to be diagnosed at the onset of an acute hemolytic crisis before the age of six. It is difficult to predict the clinical course of each patient by G6PD activity, reduced glutathione content, or the presence/absence of severe neonatal jaundice. We propose that both neonatal G6PD screening and systematic analyses of G6PD gene mutations may be useful for personalized management of patients with G6PD-deficient hemolytic anemia.

  19. Mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase and cardiac diseases

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Che-Hong; Sun, Lihan; Mochly-Rosen, Daria

    2010-01-01

    Numerous conditions promote oxidative stress, leading to the build-up of reactive aldehydes that cause cell damage and contribute to cardiac diseases. Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs) are important enzymes that eliminate toxic aldehydes by catalysing their oxidation to non-reactive acids. The review will discuss evidence indicating a role for a specific ALDH enzyme, the mitochondrial ALDH2, in combating oxidative stress by reducing the cellular ‘aldehydic load’. Epidemiological studies in humans carrying an inactive ALDH2, genetic models in mice with altered ALDH2 levels, and small molecule activators of ALDH2 all highlight the role of ALDH2 in cardioprotection and suggest a promising new direction in cardiovascular research and the development of new treatments for cardiovascular diseases. PMID:20558439

  20. Crystal structure of Arabidopsis thaliana cytokinin dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, Euiyoung; Bingman, Craig A.; Bitto, Eduard; Aceti, David J.; Phillips, Jr., George N.

    2008-08-13

    Since first discovered in Zea mays, cytokinin dehydrogenase (CKX) genes have been identified in many plants including rice and Arabidopsis thaliana, which possesses CKX homologues (AtCKX1-AtCKX7). So far, the three-dimensional structure of only Z. mays CKX (ZmCKX1) has been determined. The crystal structures of ZmCKX1 have been solved in the native state and in complex with reaction products and a slowly reacting substrate. The structures revealed four glycosylated asparagine residues and a histidine residue covalently linked to FAD. Combined with the structural information, recent biochemical analyses of ZmCKX1 concluded that the final products of the reaction, adenine and a side chain aldehyde, are formed by nonenzymatic hydrolytic cleavage of cytokinin imine products resulting directly from CKX catalysis. Here, we report the crystal structure of AtCKX7 (gene locus At5g21482.1, UniProt code Q9FUJ1).

  1. Fast internal dynamics in alcohol dehydrogenase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monkenbusch, M.; Stadler, A.; Biehl, R.; Ollivier, J.; Zamponi, M.; Richter, D.

    2015-08-01

    Large-scale domain motions in alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) have been observed previously by neutron spin-echo spectroscopy (NSE). We have extended the investigation on the dynamics of ADH in solution by using high-resolution neutron time-of-flight (TOF) and neutron backscattering (BS) spectroscopy in the incoherent scattering range. The observed hydrogen dynamics were interpreted in terms of three mobility classes, which allowed a simultaneous description of the measured TOF and BS spectra. In addition to the slow global protein diffusion and domain motions observed by NSE, a fast internal process could be identified. Around one third of the protons in ADH participate in the fast localized diffusive motion. The diffusion coefficient of the fast internal motions is around two third of the value of the surrounding D2O solvent. It is tempting to associate the fast internal process with solvent exposed amino acid residues with dangling side chains.

  2. Betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase isozymes of spinach

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, A.D.; Weretilnyk, E.A.; Weigel, P.

    1986-04-01

    Betaine is synthesized in spinach chloroplasts via the pathway Choline ..-->.. Betaine Aldehyde ..-->.. Betaine; the second step is catalyzed by betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase (BADH). The subcellular distribution of BADH was determined in leaf protoplast lysates; BADH isozymes were separated by 6-9% native PAGE. The chloroplast stromal fraction contains a single BADH isozyme (number1) that accounts for > 80% of the total protoplast activity; the extrachloroplastic fraction has a minor isozyme (number2) which migrates more slowly than number1. Both isozymes appear specific for betaine aldehyde, are more active with NAD than NADP, and show a ca. 3-fold activity increase in salinized leaves. The phenotype of a natural variant of isozyme number1 suggests that the enzyme is a dimer.

  3. Kinetic studies of dogfish liver glutamate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed Central

    Electricwala, A H; Dickinson, F M

    1979-01-01

    Initial-rate studies were made of the oxidation of L-glutamate by NAD+ and NADP+ catalysed by highly purified preparations of dogfish liver glutamate dehydrogenase. With NAD+ as coenzyme the kinetics show the same features of coenzyme activation as seen with the bovine liver enzyme [Engel & Dalziel (1969) Biochem. J. 115, 621--631]. With NADP+ as coenzyme, initial rates are much slower than with NAD+, and Lineweaver--Burk plots are linear over extended ranges of substrate and coenzyme concentration. Stopped-flow studies with NADP+ as coenzyme give no evidence for the accumulation of significant concentrations of NADPH-containing complexes with the enzyme in the steady state. Protection studies against inactivation by pyridoxal 5'-phosphate indicate that NAD+ and NADP+ give the same degree of protection in the presence of sodium glutarate. The results are used to deduce information about the mechanism of glutamate oxidation by the enzyme. Initial-rate studies of the reductive amination of 2-oxoglutarate by NADH and NADPH catalysed by dogfish liver glutamate dehydrogenase showed that the kinetic features of the reaction are very similar with both coenzymes, but reactions with NADH are much faster. The data show that a number of possible mechanisms for the reaction may be discarded, including the compulsory mechanism (previously proposed for the enzyme) in which the sequence of binding is NAD(P)H, NH4+ and 2-oxoglutarate. The kinetic data suggest either a rapid-equilibrium random mechanism or the compulsory mechanism with the binding sequence NH4+, NAD(P)H, 2-oxoglutarate. However, binding studies and protection studies indicate that coenzyme and 2-oxoglutarate do bind to the free enzyme. PMID:35153

  4. Variants of glycerol dehydrogenase having D-lactate dehydrogenase activity and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Qingzhao; Shanmugam, Keelnatham T.; Ingram, Lonnie O'Neal

    2017-08-29

    The present invention provides methods of designing and generating glycerol dehydrogenase (GlyDH) variants that have altered function as compared to a parent polypeptide. The present invention further provides nucleic acids encoding GlyDH polypeptide variants having altered function as compared to the parent polypeptide. Host cells comprising polynucleotides encoding GlyDH variants and methods of producing lactic acids are also provided in various aspects of the invention.

  5. Multiple alcohol dehydrogenases but no functional acetaldehyde dehydrogenase causing excessive acetaldehyde production from ethanol by oral streptococci.

    PubMed

    Pavlova, Sylvia I; Jin, Ling; Gasparovich, Stephen R; Tao, Lin

    2013-07-01

    Ethanol consumption and poor oral hygiene are risk factors for oral and oesophageal cancers. Although oral streptococci have been found to produce excessive acetaldehyde from ethanol, little is known about the mechanism by which this carcinogen is produced. By screening 52 strains of diverse oral streptococcal species, we identified Streptococcus gordonii V2016 that produced the most acetaldehyde from ethanol. We then constructed gene deletion mutants in this strain and analysed them for alcohol and acetaldehyde dehydrogenases by zymograms. The results showed that S. gordonii V2016 expressed three primary alcohol dehydrogenases, AdhA, AdhB and AdhE, which all oxidize ethanol to acetaldehyde, but their preferred substrates were 1-propanol, 1-butanol and ethanol, respectively. Two additional dehydrogenases, S-AdhA and TdhA, were identified with specificities to the secondary alcohol 2-propanol and threonine, respectively, but not to ethanol. S. gordonii V2016 did not show a detectable acetaldehyde dehydrogenase even though its adhE gene encodes a putative bifunctional acetaldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase. Mutants with adhE deletion showed greater tolerance to ethanol in comparison with the wild-type and mutant with adhA or adhB deletion, indicating that AdhE is the major alcohol dehydrogenase in S. gordonii. Analysis of 19 additional strains of S. gordonii, S. mitis, S. oralis, S. salivarius and S. sanguinis showed expressions of up to three alcohol dehydrogenases, but none showed detectable acetaldehyde dehydrogenase, except one strain that showed a novel ALDH. Therefore, expression of multiple alcohol dehydrogenases but no functional acetaldehyde dehydrogenase may contribute to excessive production of acetaldehyde from ethanol by certain oral streptococci.

  6. Biochemical and structural characterization of Cryptosporidium parvum Lactate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Cook, William J; Senkovich, Olga; Hernandez, Agustin; Speed, Haley; Chattopadhyay, Debasish

    2015-03-01

    The protozoan parasite Cryptosporidium parvum causes waterborne diseases worldwide. There is no effective therapy for C. parvum infection. The parasite depends mainly on glycolysis for energy production. Lactate dehydrogenase is a major regulator of glycolysis. This paper describes the biochemical characterization of C. parvum lactate dehydrogenase and high resolution crystal structures of the apo-enzyme and four ternary complexes. The ternary complexes capture the enzyme bound to NAD/NADH or its 3-acetylpyridine analog in the cofactor binding pocket, while the substrate binding site is occupied by one of the following ligands: lactate, pyruvate or oxamate. The results reveal distinctive features of the parasitic enzyme. For example, C. parvum lactate dehydrogenase prefers the acetylpyridine analog of NADH as a cofactor. Moreover, it is slightly less sensitive to gossypol inhibition compared with mammalian lactate dehydrogenases and not inhibited by excess pyruvate. The active site loop and the antigenic loop in C. parvum lactate dehydrogenase are considerably different from those in the human counterpart. Structural features and enzymatic properties of C. parvum lactate dehydrogenase are similar to enzymes from related parasites. Structural comparison with malate dehydrogenase supports a common ancestry for the two genes.

  7. Priapism and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency: An underestimated correlation?

    PubMed

    De Rose, Aldo Franco; Mantica, Guglielmo; Tosi, Mattia; Bovio, Giulio; Terrone, Carlo

    2016-10-05

    Priapism is a rare clinical condition characterized by a persistent erection unrelated to sexual excitement. Often the etiology is idiopathic. Three cases of priapism in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency patients have been described in literature. We present the case of a 39-year-old man with glucose- 6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency, who reached out to our department for the arising of a non-ischemic priapism without arteriolacunar fistula. We suggest that the glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency could be an underestimated risk factor for priapism.

  8. 21 CFR 862.1380 - Hydroxybutyric dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... dehydrogenase (HBD) in plasma or serum. HBD measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of myocardial infarction, renal damage (such as rejection of transplants), certain hematological diseases (such as acute...

  9. 21 CFR 862.1380 - Hydroxybutyric dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... dehydrogenase (HBD) in plasma or serum. HBD measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of myocardial infarction, renal damage (such as rejection of transplants), certain hematological diseases (such as acute...

  10. 21 CFR 862.1380 - Hydroxybutyric dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... dehydrogenase (HBD) in plasma or serum. HBD measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of myocardial infarction, renal damage (such as rejection of transplants), certain hematological diseases (such as acute...

  11. 21 CFR 862.1440 - Lactate dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... dehydrogenase measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of liver diseases such as acute viral hepatitis, cirrhosis, and metastatic carcinoma of the liver, cardiac diseases such as myocardial...

  12. 21 CFR 862.1440 - Lactate dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... dehydrogenase measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of liver diseases such as acute viral hepatitis, cirrhosis, and metastatic carcinoma of the liver, cardiac diseases such as myocardial...

  13. 21 CFR 862.1440 - Lactate dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... dehydrogenase measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of liver diseases such as acute viral hepatitis, cirrhosis, and metastatic carcinoma of the liver, cardiac diseases such as myocardial...

  14. 21 CFR 862.1440 - Lactate dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... dehydrogenase measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of liver diseases such as acute viral hepatitis, cirrhosis, and metastatic carcinoma of the liver, cardiac diseases such as myocardial...

  15. 21 CFR 862.1440 - Lactate dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... dehydrogenase measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of liver diseases such as acute viral hepatitis, cirrhosis, and metastatic carcinoma of the liver, cardiac diseases such as myocardial...

  16. ALDEHYDE DEHYDROGENASES EXPRESSION DURING POSTNATAL DEVELOPMENT: LIVER VS. LUNG

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aldehydes are highly reactive molecules present in the environment, and can be produced during biotransformation of xenobiotics. Although the lung can be a major target for aldehyde toxicity, development of aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs), which detoxify aldehydes, in lung has be...

  17. 21 CFR 862.1380 - Hydroxybutyric dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... dehydrogenase (HBD) in plasma or serum. HBD measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of myocardial infarction, renal damage (such as rejection of transplants), certain hematological diseases (such as...

  18. Protein engineering reveals ancient adaptive replacements in isocitrate dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Dean, Antony M.; Golding, G. Brian

    1997-01-01

    Evolutionary analysis indicates that eubacterial NADP-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenases (EC 1.1.1.42) first evolved from an NAD-dependent precursor about 3.5 billion years ago. Selection in favor of utilizing NADP was probably a result of niche expansion during growth on acetate, where isocitrate dehydrogenase provides 90% of the NADPH necessary for biosynthesis. Amino acids responsible for differing coenzyme specificities were identified from x-ray crystallographic structures of Escherichia coli isocitrate dehydrogenase and the distantly related Thermus thermophilus NAD-dependent isopropylmalate dehydrogenase. Site-directed mutagenesis at sites lining the coenzyme binding pockets has been used to invert the coenzyme specificities of both enzymes. Reconstructed ancestral sequences indicate that these replacements are ancestral. Hence the adaptive history of molecular evolution is amenable to experimental investigation. PMID:9096353

  19. Glucose oxidation and PQQ-dependent dehydrogenases in Gluconobacter oxydans.

    PubMed

    Hölscher, Tina; Schleyer, Ute; Merfort, Marcel; Bringer-Meyer, Stephanie; Görisch, Helmut; Sahm, Hermann

    2009-01-01

    Gluconobacter oxydans is famous for its rapid and incomplete oxidation of a wide range of sugars and sugar alcohols. The organism is known for its efficient oxidation of D-glucose to D-gluconate, which can be further oxidized to two different keto-D-gluconates, 2-keto-D-gluconate and 5-keto-D-gluconate, as well as 2,5-di-keto-D-gluconate. For this oxidation chain and for further oxidation reactions, G. oxydans possesses a high number of membrane-bound dehydrogenases. In this review, we focus on the dehydrogenases involved in D-glucose oxidation and the products formed during this process. As some of the involved dehydrogenases contain pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) as a cofactor, also PQQ synthesis is reviewed. Finally, we will give an overview of further PQQ-dependent dehydrogenases and discuss their functions in G. oxydans ATCC 621H (DSM 2343). Copyright (c) 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. ALDEHYDE DEHYDROGENASES EXPRESSION DURING POSTNATAL DEVELOPMENT: LIVER VS. LUNG

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aldehydes are highly reactive molecules present in the environment, and can be produced during biotransformation of xenobiotics. Although the lung can be a major target for aldehyde toxicity, development of aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs), which detoxify aldehydes, in lung has be...

  1. Mammalian class IV alcohol dehydrogenase (stomach alcohol dehydrogenase): structure, origin, and correlation with enzymology.

    PubMed Central

    Parés, X; Cederlund, E; Moreno, A; Hjelmqvist, L; Farrés, J; Jörnvall, H

    1994-01-01

    The structure of a mammalian class IV alcohol dehydrogenase has been determined by peptide analysis of the protein isolated from rat stomach. The structure indicates that the enzyme constitutes a separate alcohol dehydrogenase class, in agreement with the distinct enzymatic properties; the class IV enzyme is somewhat closer to class I (the "classical" liver alcohol dehydrogenase; approximately 68% residue identities) than to the other classes (II, III, and V; approximately 60% residue identities), suggesting that class IV might have originated through duplication of an early vertebrate class I gene. The activity of the class IV protein toward ethanol is even higher than that of the classical liver enzyme. Both Km and kcat values are high, the latter being the highest of any class characterized so far. Structurally, these properties are correlated with replacements at the active site, affecting both substrate and coenzyme binding. In particular, Ala-294 (instead of valine) results in increased space in the middle section of the substrate cleft, Gly-47 (instead of a basic residue) results in decreased charge interactions with the coenzyme pyrophosphate, and Tyr-363 (instead of a basic residue) may also affect coenzyme binding. In combination, these exchanges are compatible with a promotion of the off dissociation and an increased turnover rate. In contrast, residues at the inner part of the substrate cleft are bulky, accounting for low activity toward secondary alcohols and cyclohexanol. Exchanges at positions 259-261 involve minor shifts in glycine residues at a reverse turn in the coenzyme-binding fold. Clearly, class IV is distinct in structure, ethanol turnover, stomach expression, and possible emergence from class I. PMID:8127901

  2. Enzymic and structural studies on Drosophila alcohol dehydrogenase and other short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases.

    PubMed

    Smilda, T; Kamminga, A H; Reinders, P; Baron, W; van Hylckama Vlieg, J E; Beintema, J J

    2001-05-01

    Enzymic and structural studies on Drosophila alcohol dehydrogenases and other short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases (SDRs) are presented. Like alcohol dehydrogenases from other Drosophila species, the enzyme from D. simulans is more active on secondary than on primary alcohols, although ethanol is its only known physiological substrate. Several secondary alcohols were used to determine the kinetic parameters kcat and Km. The results of these experiments indicate that the substrate-binding region of the enzyme allows optimal binding of a short ethyl side-chain in a small binding pocket, and of a propyl or butyl side-chain in large binding pocket, with stereospecificity for R(-) alcohols. At a high concentration of R(-) alcohols substrate activation occurs. The kcat and Km values determined under these conditions are about two-fold, and two orders of magnitude, respectively, higher than those at low substrate concentrations. Sequence alignment of several SDRs of known, and unknown three-dimensional structures, indicate the presence of several conserved residues in addition to those involved in the catalyzed reactions. Structural roles of these conserved residues could be derived from observations made on superpositioned structures of several SDRs with known structures. Several residues are conserved in tetrameric SDRs, but not in dimeric ones. Two halohydrin-halide-lyases show significant homology with SDRs in the catalytic domains of these enzymes, but they do not have the structural features required for binding NAD+. Probably these lyases descend from an SDR, which has lost the capability to bind NAD+, but the enzyme reaction mechanisms may still be similar.

  3. Quinohemoprotein alcohol dehydrogenases: structure, function, and physiology.

    PubMed

    Toyama, Hirohide; Mathews, F Scott; Adachi, Osao; Matsushita, Kazunobu

    2004-08-01

    Quino(hemo)protein alcohol dehydrogenases (ADH) that have pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) as the prosthetic group are classified into 3 groups, types I, II, and III. Type I ADH is a simple quinoprotein having PQQ as the only prosthetic group, while type II and type III ADHs are quinohemoprotein having heme c as well as PQQ in the catalytic polypeptide. Type II ADH is a soluble periplasmic enzyme and is widely distributed in Proteobacteria such as Pseudomonas, Ralstonia, Comamonas, etc. In contrast, type III ADH is a membrane-bound enzyme working on the periplasmic surface solely in acetic acid bacteria. It consists of three subunits that comprise a quinohemoprotein catalytic subunit, a triheme cytochrome c subunit, and a third subunit of unknown function. The catalytic subunits of all the quino(hemo)protein ADHs have a common structural motif, a quinoprotein-specific superbarrel domain, where PQQ is deeply embedded in the center. In addition, in the type II and type III ADHs this subunit contains a unique heme c domain. Various type II ADHs each have a unique substrate specificity, accepting a wide variety of alcohols, as is discussed on the basis of recent X-ray crystallographic analyses. Electron transfer within both type II and III ADHs is discussed in terms of the intramolecular reaction from PQQ to heme c and also from heme to heme, and in terms of the intermolecular reaction with azurin and ubiquinone, respectively. Unique physiological functions of both types of quinohemoprotein ADHs are also discussed.

  4. Human liver aldehyde dehydrogenase: coenzyme binding

    SciTech Connect

    Kosley, L.L.; Pietruszko, R.

    1987-05-01

    The binding of (U-/sup 14/C) NAD to mitochondrial (E2) and cytoplasmin(E1) aldehyde dehydrogenase was measured by gel filtration and sedimentation techniques. The binding data for NAD and (E1) yielded linear Scatchard plots giving a dissociation constant of 25 (+/- 8) uM and the stoichiometry of 2 mol of NAD bound per mol of E1. The binding data for NAD and (E2) gave nonlinear Scatchard plots. The binding of NADH to E2 was measured via fluorescence enhancement; this could not be done with E1 because there was no signal. The dissociation constant for E2 by this technique was 0.7 (+/- 0.4) uM and stoichiometry of 1.0 was obtained. The binding of (U-/sup 14/C) NADH to (E1) and (E2) was also measured by the sedimentation technique. The binding data for (E1) and NADH gave linear Scatchard plots giving a dissociation constant of 13 (+/- 6) uM and the stoichiometry of 2.0. The binding data for NADH to (E2) gave nonlinear Scatchard plots. With (E1), the dissociation constants for both NAD and NADH are similar to those determined kinetically, but the stoichiometry is only half of that found by stopped flow technique. With (E2) the dissociation constant by fluorometric procedure was 2 orders of magnitude less than that from catalytic reaction.

  5. Elusive transition state of alcohol dehydrogenase unveiled.

    PubMed

    Roston, Daniel; Kohen, Amnon

    2010-05-25

    For several decades the hydride transfer catalyzed by alcohol dehydrogenase has been difficult to understand. Here we add to the large corpus of anomalous and paradoxical data collected for this reaction by measuring a normal (> 1) 2 degrees kinetic isotope effect (KIE) for the reduction of benzaldehyde. Because the relevant equilibrium effect is inverse (< 1), this KIE eludes the traditional interpretation of 2 degrees KIEs. It does, however, enable the development of a comprehensive model for the "tunneling ready state" (TRS) of the reaction that fits into the general scheme of Marcus-like models of hydrogen tunneling. The TRS is the ensemble of states along the intricate reorganization coordinate, where H tunneling between the donor and acceptor occurs (the crossing point in Marcus theory). It is comparable to the effective transition state implied by ensemble-averaged variational transition state theory. Properties of the TRS are approximated as an average of the individual properties of the donor and acceptor states. The model is consistent with experimental findings that previously appeared contradictory; specifically, it resolves the long-standing ambiguity regarding the location of the TRS (aldehyde-like vs. alcohol-like). The new picture of the TRS for this reaction identifies the principal components of the collective reaction coordinate and the average structure of the saddle point along that coordinate.

  6. Malic dehydrogenase locus of Paramecium tetraurelia.

    PubMed

    Williams, T J; Smith-Sonneborn, J

    1980-04-01

    A search was undertaken for naturally occurring genetic markers for use in clonal aging studies of Paramecium tetraurelia. Clonal age is defined as the number of cell divisions since the last sexual process. Autogamy (self-fertilization) is a sexual process which can occur in aging lines, resulting in homozygosity and initiation of the next generation. Such "illicit" autogamies must be detected and eliminated from the aged clone. With codominant alleles, heterozygous aging lines can be established which will express a phenotype distinguishable from that of either parental type and autogamy can then be monitored by the appearance of either segregant homozygous phenotype. However, very few codominant alleles are available in this species. Electrophoretic mobilities of malic dehydrogenase (MDH) were assayed in 11 stocks of Paramecium tetraurelia by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Nine stocks showed a single-banded "stock 51" type, while stock 174 and stock 29 each exhibited unique mobility. Crosses between stock 51 and the deviant stocks revealed distinct three-banded patterns indicative of heterozygosity of the F1 generation. In the autogamous F2 generation, 1:1 segregation of the parental types were recovered. The pattern of inheritance is consistent with codominant alleles and Mendelian inheritance. These naturally occurring biochemical markers are stable with increasing clonal age and are therefore useful genetic markers for studies of cellular aging.

  7. Targeting isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) in cancer.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Takeo; Khawaja, Muhammad Rizwan; DiNardo, Courtney D; Atkins, Johnique T; Janku, Filip

    2016-05-01

    Isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) is an essential enzyme for cellular respiration in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. Recurrent mutations in IDH1 or IDH2 are prevalent in several cancers including glioma, acute myeloid leukemia (AML), cholangiocarcinoma and chondrosarcoma. The mutated IDH1 and IDH2 proteins have a gain-of-function, neomorphic activity, catalyzing the reduction of α-ketoglutarate (α-KG) to 2-hydroxyglutarate (2-HG) by NADPH. Cancer-associated IDH mutations block normal cellular differentiation and promote tumorigenesis via the abnormal production of the oncometabolite 2-HG. High levels of 2-HG have been shown to inhibit α-KG dependent dioxygenases, including histone and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) demethylases, which play a key role in regulating the epigenetic state of cells. Current targeted inhibitors of IDH1 (AG120, IDH305), IDH2 (AG221), and pan-IDH1/2 (AG881) selectively inhibit mutant IDH protein and induce cell differentiation in in vitro and in vivo models. Preliminary results from phase I clinical trials with IDH inhibitors in patients with advanced hematologic malignancies have demonstrated an objective response rate ranging from 31% to 40% with durable responses (>1 year) observed. Furthermore, the IDH inhibitors have demonstrated early signals of activity in solid tumors with IDH mutations, including cholangiocarcinomas and low grade gliomas.

  8. Iodination of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Jean O.; Harris, J. Ieuan

    1970-01-01

    1. A high degree of homology in the positions of tyrosine residues in glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase from lobster and pig muscle, and from yeast, prompted an examination of the reactivity of tyrosine residues in the enzyme. 2. Iodination of the enzyme from lobster muscle with low concentrations of potassium tri-[125I]-iodide led to the identification of tyrosine residues of differing reactivity. Tyrosine-46 appeared to be the most reactive in the native enzyme. 3. When the monocarboxymethylated enzyme was briefly treated with small amounts of iodine, iodination could be confined almost entirely to tyrosine-46 in the lobster enzyme; tyrosine-39 or tyrosine-42, or both, were also beginning to react. 4. These three tyrosine residues were also those that reacted most readily in the carboxymethylated pig and yeast enzymes. 5. The difficulties in attaining specific reaction of the native enzyme are considered. 6. The differences between our results and those of other workers are discussed. ImagesPLATE 1PLATE 2 PMID:5530750

  9. Carbon Monoxide Dehydrogenase Activity in Bradyrhizobium japonicum

    PubMed Central

    Lorite, María J.; Tachil, Jörg; Sanjuán, Juán; Meyer, Ortwin; Bedmar, Eulogio J.

    2000-01-01

    Bradyrhizobium japonicum strain 110spc4 was capable of chemolithoautotrophic growth with carbon monoxide (CO) as a sole energy and carbon source under aerobic conditions. The enzyme carbon monoxide dehydrogenase (CODH; EC 1.2.99.2) has been purified 21-fold, with a yield of 16% and a specific activity of 58 nmol of CO oxidized/min/mg of protein, by a procedure that involved differential ultracentrifugation, anion-exchange chromatography, hydrophobic interaction chromatography, and gel filtration. The purified enzyme gave a single protein and activity band on nondenaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and had a molecular mass of 230,000 Da. The 230-kDa enzyme was composed of large (L; 75-kDa), medium (M; 28.4-kDa), and small (S; 17.2-kDa) subunits occurring in heterohexameric (LMS)2 subunit composition. The 75-kDa polypeptide exhibited immunological cross-reactivity with the large subunit of the CODH of Oligotropha carboxidovorans. The B. japonicum enzyme contained, per mole, 2.29 atoms of Mo, 7.96 atoms of Fe, 7.60 atoms of labile S, and 1.99 mol of flavin. Treatment of the enzyme with iodoacetamide yielded di(carboxamidomethyl)molybdopterin cytosine dinucleotide, identifying molybdopterin cytosine dinucleotide as the organic portion of the B. japonicum CODH molybdenum cofactor. The absorption spectrum of the purified enzyme was characteristic of a molybdenum-containing iron-sulfur flavoprotein. PMID:10788353

  10. Targeting Aldehyde Dehydrogenase 2: New Therapeutic Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Che-Hong; Ferreira, Julio Cesar Batista; Gross, Eric R.; Mochly-Rosen, Daria

    2014-01-01

    A family of detoxifying enzymes called aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs) has been a subject of recent interest, as its role in detoxifying aldehydes that accumulate through metabolism and to which we are exposed from the environment has been elucidated. Although the human genome has 19 ALDH genes, one ALDH emerges as a particularly important enzyme in a variety of human pathologies. This ALDH, ALDH2, is located in the mitochondrial matrix with much known about its role in ethanol metabolism. Less known is a new body of research to be discussed in this review, suggesting that ALDH2 dysfunction may contribute to a variety of human diseases including cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, neurodegenerative diseases, stroke, and cancer. Recent studies suggest that ALDH2 dysfunction is also associated with Fanconi anemia, pain, osteoporosis, and the process of aging. Furthermore, an ALDH2 inactivating mutation (termed ALDH2*2) is the most common single point mutation in humans, and epidemiological studies suggest a correlation between this inactivating mutation and increased propensity for common human pathologies. These data together with studies in animal models and the use of new pharmacological tools that activate ALDH2 depict a new picture related to ALDH2 as a critical health-promoting enzyme. PMID:24382882

  11. Elusive transition state of alcohol dehydrogenase unveiled

    PubMed Central

    Roston, Daniel; Kohen, Amnon

    2010-01-01

    For several decades the hydride transfer catalyzed by alcohol dehydrogenase has been difficult to understand. Here we add to the large corpus of anomalous and paradoxical data collected for this reaction by measuring a normal (> 1) 2° kinetic isotope effect (KIE) for the reduction of benzaldehyde. Because the relevant equilibrium effect is inverse (< 1), this KIE eludes the traditional interpretation of 2° KIEs. It does, however, enable the development of a comprehensive model for the “tunneling ready state” (TRS) of the reaction that fits into the general scheme of Marcus-like models of hydrogen tunneling. The TRS is the ensemble of states along the intricate reorganization coordinate, where H tunneling between the donor and acceptor occurs (the crossing point in Marcus theory). It is comparable to the effective transition state implied by ensemble-averaged variational transition state theory. Properties of the TRS are approximated as an average of the individual properties of the donor and acceptor states. The model is consistent with experimental findings that previously appeared contradictory; specifically, it resolves the long-standing ambiguity regarding the location of the TRS (aldehyde-like vs. alcohol-like). The new picture of the TRS for this reaction identifies the principal components of the collective reaction coordinate and the average structure of the saddle point along that coordinate. PMID:20457944

  12. Herbicidal Activity of an Isopropylmalate Dehydrogenase Inhibitor.

    PubMed Central

    Wittenbach, V. A.; Teaney, P. W.; Hanna, W. S.; Rayner, D. R.; Schloss, J. V.

    1994-01-01

    Isopropylmalate dehydrogenase (IPMDH) is the third enzyme specific to leucine biosynthesis. It catalyzes the oxidative decarboxylation of 3-isopropylmalate (3-IPM) to 2-ketoisocaproic acid. The partially purified enzyme from pea (Pisum sativum L.) shows a broad pH optimum of 7.8 to 9.1 and has Km values for 3-IPM and NAD of 18 and 40 [mu]M, respectively. O-Isobutenyl oxalylhydroxamate (O-IbOHA) has been discovered to be an excellent inhibitor of the pea IPMDH, with an apparent inhibitor constant of 5 nM. As an herbicide, O-IbOHA showed only moderate activity on a variety of broadleaf and grass species. We characterized the herbicidal activity of O-IbOHA on corn (Zea mays L.), a sensitive species; giant foxtail (Setaria faberi) and morning glory (Ipomoea purpurea [L.] Roth), moderately tolerant species; and soybean [Glycine max L. Merr.), a tolerant species. Differences in tolerance among the species were not due to differences in the sensitivity of IPMDH. Studies with [14C]O-IbOHA suggested that uptake and translocation were not major limitations for herbicidal activity, nor were they determinants of tolerance. Moreover, metabolism could not account for the difference in tolerance of corn, foxtail, and morning glory, although it might account for the tolerance of soybean. Herbicidal activity on all four species was correlated with the accumulation of 3-IPM in the plants. PMID:12232331

  13. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency in Chinese

    PubMed Central

    Lai, H. C.; Lai, Michael P. Y.; Leung, Kevin S. N.

    1968-01-01

    In a Chinese population 1,000 full-term male neonates and a further 117 jaundiced neonates of both sexes were studied in an investigation of the frequency of deficiency of erythrocyte glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD). This enzyme was found to be deficient in 3·6% of male neonates. Correlation of the results with the birthplace of the 602 mothers who were known to come from Kwangtung province showed no significant differences in the frequency of the deficiency between certain parts of the province. The deficiency of G6PD in hemizygous males is profound but it is not associated with erythrocyte acid monophosphoesterase deficiency in Chinese in Hong Kong. The G6PD deficiency accounts for 15·4% of all the 117 cases of neonatal jaundice. The relative importance of G6PD deficiency as a cause of neonatal jaundice does not differ materially in male and female mutants. Neonatal jaundice can occur in all genotypes of G6PD mutation in Chinese. PMID:5697334

  14. Halophile aldehyde dehydrogenase from Halobacterium salinarum.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyo-Jeong; Joo, Won-A; Cho, Chang-Won; Kim, Chan-Wha

    2006-01-01

    Halobacterium salinarum is a member of the halophilic archaea. In the present study, H. salinarum was cultured at various NaCl concentrations (3.5, 4.3, and 6.0 M NaCl), and its proteome was determined and identificated via proteomics technique. We detected 14 proteins which were significantly down-regulated in 3.5 M and/or 6 M NaCl. Among the identified protein spots, aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) was selected for evaluation with regard to its potential applications in industry. The most effective metabolism function exhibited by ALDH is the oxidation of aldehydes to carboxylic acids. The ALDH gene from H. salinarum (1.5 kb fragment) was amplified by PCR and cloned into the E. coli strain, BL21 (DE3), with the pGEX-KG vector. We subsequently analyzed the enzyme activity of the recombinant ALDH (54 kDa) at a variety of salt concentrations. The purified recombinant ALDH from H. salinarum exhibited the most pronounced activity at 1 M NaCl. Therefore, the ALDH from H.salinarum is a halophilic enzyme, and may prove useful for applications in hypersaline environments.

  15. Carbon monoxide dehydrogenase activity in Bradyrhizobium japonicum.

    PubMed

    Lorite, M J; Tachil, J; Sanjuán, J; Meyer, O; Bedmar, E J

    2000-05-01

    Bradyrhizobium japonicum strain 110spc4 was capable of chemolithoautotrophic growth with carbon monoxide (CO) as a sole energy and carbon source under aerobic conditions. The enzyme carbon monoxide dehydrogenase (CODH; EC 1.2.99.2) has been purified 21-fold, with a yield of 16% and a specific activity of 58 nmol of CO oxidized/min/mg of protein, by a procedure that involved differential ultracentrifugation, anion-exchange chromatography, hydrophobic interaction chromatography, and gel filtration. The purified enzyme gave a single protein and activity band on nondenaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and had a molecular mass of 230,000 Da. The 230-kDa enzyme was composed of large (L; 75-kDa), medium (M; 28.4-kDa), and small (S; 17.2-kDa) subunits occurring in heterohexameric (LMS)(2) subunit composition. The 75-kDa polypeptide exhibited immunological cross-reactivity with the large subunit of the CODH of Oligotropha carboxidovorans. The B. japonicum enzyme contained, per mole, 2.29 atoms of Mo, 7.96 atoms of Fe, 7.60 atoms of labile S, and 1.99 mol of flavin. Treatment of the enzyme with iodoacetamide yielded di(carboxamidomethyl)molybdopterin cytosine dinucleotide, identifying molybdopterin cytosine dinucleotide as the organic portion of the B. japonicum CODH molybdenum cofactor. The absorption spectrum of the purified enzyme was characteristic of a molybdenum-containing iron-sulfur flavoprotein.

  16. [Alcohol dehydrogenase and aldehyde dehydrogenase as tumour markers and factors intensifying carcinogenesis in colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Jelski, Wojciech; Orywal, Karolina; Kedra, Bogusław; Szmitkowski, Maciej

    2008-06-01

    Numerous experiments have shown that alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) are present in cells of various cancers and play role in carcinogenesis. The aim of this study was to compare the capacity for ethanol metabolism measured by ADH isoenzymes and ALDH activity, between colorectal cancer and normal colonic mucosa. We have also investigated the serum activity of these enzymes in colorectal cancer patients as potential tumour markers. The activities of ADH isoenzymes and ALDH were measured in the: cancer tissue, healthy colonic mucosa and serum of 42 patients with colorectal cancer. For the measurement of the activity of class I ADH isoenzyme and ALDH activity the fluorometric methods was employed. The total ADH activity and activity of class III and IV isoenzymes was measured by the photometric method. The activity of total alcohol dehydrogenase and class I of ADH were significantly higher in cancer cells than in healthy tissues. The other tested classes of ADH had higher activities in cancer tissue but the differences were not statistically significant. The activity of ALDH was significantly lower in the cancer cells. The activities of all tested enzymes and isoenzymes in colorectal cancer tissue were not significantly higher in drinkers than in non-drinkers. Additionally we observed statistically significant increasing activity of class I ADH isoenzymes in the sera of patients with colorectal cancer. For this reason the total ADH activity was also significantly increased. The activities of ADH III and ADH IV isoenzymes and ALDH were unchanged in the sera of patients. There were no marked differences in activities of all tested enzymes and isoenzymes between drinkers and non-drinkers (with colorectal cancer). The differences in activities of total ADH and class I ADH isoenzymes between colorectal cancer tissues and healthy mucosa might be a factor of ethanol metabolism disorders, which can intensify carcinogenesis. The increased total

  17. Succinate Dehydrogenase Loss in Familial Paraganglioma: Biochemistry, Genetics, and Epigenetics

    PubMed Central

    Her, Yeng F.; Maher, L. James

    2015-01-01

    It is counterintuitive that metabolic defects reducing ATP production can cause, rather than protect from, cancer. Yet this is precisely the case for familial paraganglioma, a form of neuroendocrine malignancy caused by loss of succinate dehydrogenase in the tricarboxylic acid cycle. Here we review biochemical, genetic, and epigenetic considerations in succinate dehydrogenase loss and present leading models and mysteries associated with this fascinating and important tumor. PMID:26294907

  18. Enzymatic Transformation of Morphine by Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenase from Pseudomonas testosteroni

    PubMed Central

    Liras, Paloma; Kasparian, Stephen S.; Umbreit, Wayne W.

    1975-01-01

    Enzyme preparations from Pseudomonas testosteroni containing α- and β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases catalyzed the oxidation of morphine and codeine by nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide. Morphine was converted in relatively low yield into 14-hydroxymorphinone probably via morphinone as an intermediate. Codeine was converted to codeinone and 14-hydroxycodeinone. Only the conversions at the 6-position were carried out by the hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase. Hydroxylation at the 14-position did occur spontaneously (or enzymatically with a contaminating enzyme) after oxidation at the 6-position. PMID:172013

  19. Kinetic and mechanistic studies of methylated liver alcohol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, C S

    1978-01-01

    Reductive methylation of lysine residues activates liver alcohol dehydrogenase in the oxidation of primary alcohols, but decreases the activity of the enzyme towards secondary alcohols. The modification also desensitizes the dehydrogenase to substrate inhibition at high alcohol concentrations. Steady-state kinetic studies of methylated liver alcohol dehydrogenase over a wide range of alcohol concentrations suggest that alcohol oxidation proceeds via a random addition of coenzyme and substrate with a pathway for the formation of the productive enzyme-NADH-alcohol complex. To facilitate the analyses of the effects of methylation on liver alcohol dehydrogenase and factors affecting them, new operational kinetic parameters to describe the results at high substrate concentration were introduced. The changes in the dehydrogenase activity on alkylation were found to be associated with changes in the maximum velocities that are affected by the hydrophobicity of alkyl groups introduced at lysine residues. The desensitization of alkylated liver alcohol dehydrogenase to substrate inhibition is identified with a decrease in inhibitory Michaelis constants for alcohols and this is favoured by the steric effects of substituents at the lysine residues. PMID:697732

  20. The Genetics of Alcohol Metabolism: Role of Alcohol Dehydrogenase and Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Variants

    PubMed Central

    Edenberg, Howard J.

    2007-01-01

    The primary enzymes involved in alcohol metabolism are alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH). Both enzymes occur in several forms that are encoded by different genes; moreover, there are variants (i.e., alleles) of some of these genes that encode enzymes with different characteristics and which have different ethnic distributions. Which ADH or ALDH alleles a person carries influence his or her level of alcohol consumption and risk of alcoholism. Researchers to date primarily have studied coding variants in the ADH1B, ADH1C, and ALDH2 genes that are associated with altered kinetic properties of the resulting enzymes. For example, certain ADH1B and ADH1C alleles encode particularly active ADH enzymes, resulting in more rapid conversion of alcohol (i.e., ethanol) to acetaldehyde; these alleles have a protective effect on the risk of alcoholism. A variant of the ALDH2 gene encodes an essentially inactive ALDH enzyme, resulting in acetaldehyde accumulation and a protective effect. It is becoming clear that noncoding variants in both ADH and ALDH genes also may influence alcohol metabolism and, consequently, alcoholism risk; the specific nature and effects of these variants still need further study. PMID:17718394

  1. Effect of fermented sea tangle on the alcohol dehydrogenase and acetaldehyde dehydrogenase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Cha, Jae-Young; Jeong, Jae-Jun; Yang, Hyun-Ju; Lee, Bae-Jin; Cho, Young-Su

    2011-08-01

    Sea tangle, a kind of brown seaweed, was fermented with Lactobacillus brevis BJ-20. The gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) content in fermented sea tangle (FST) was 5.56% (w/w) and GABA in total free amino acid of FST was 49.5%. The effect of FST on the enzyme activities and mRNA protein expression of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and acetaldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) involved in alcohol metabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae was investigated. Yeast was cultured in YPD medium supplemented with different concentrations of FST powder [0, 0.4, 0.8, and 1.0% (w/v)] for 18 h. FST had no cytotoxic effect on the yeast growth. The highest activities and protein expressions of ADH and ALDH from the cell-free extracts of S. cerevisiae were evident with the 0.4% and 0.8% (w/v) FST-supplemented concentrations, respectively. The highest concentrations of GABA as well as minerals (Zn, Ca, and Mg) were found in the cell-free extracts of S. cerevisiae cultured in medium supplemented with 0.4% (w/v) FST. The levels of GABA, Zn, Ca, and Mg in S. cerevisiae were strongly correlated with the enzyme activities of ADH and ALDH in yeast. These results indicate that FST can enhance the enzyme activities and protein expression of ADH and ALDH in S. cerevisiae.

  2. Stringency of substrate specificity of Escherichia coli malate dehydrogenase.

    SciTech Connect

    Boernke, W. E.; Millard, C. S.; Stevens, P. W.; Kakar, S. N.; Stevens, F. J.; Donnelly, M. I.; Nebraska Wesleyan Univ.

    1995-09-10

    Malate dehydrogenase and lactate dehydrogenase are members of the structurally and functionally homologous family of 2-ketoacid dehydrogenases. Both enzymes display high specificity for their respective keto substrates, oxaloacetate and pyruvate. Closer analysis of their specificity, however, reveals that the specificity of malate dehydrogenase is much stricter and less malleable than that of lactate dehydrogenase. Site-specific mutagenesis of the two enzymes in an attempt to reverse their specificity has met with contrary results. Conversion of a specific active-site glutamine to arginine in lactate dehydrogenase from Bacillus stearothermophilus generated an enzyme that displayed activity toward oxaloacetate equal to that of the native enzyme toward pyruvate (H. M. Wilks et al. (1988) Science 242, 1541-1544). We have constructed a series of mutants in the mobile, active site loop of the Escherichia coli malate dehydrogenase that incorporate the complementary change, conversion of arginine 81 to glutamine, to evaluate the role of charge distribution and conformational flexibility within this loop in defining the substrate specificity of these enzymes. Mutants incorporating the change R81Q all had reversed specificity, displaying much higher activity toward pyruvate than to the natural substrate, oxaloacetate. In contrast to the mutated lactate dehydrogenase, these reversed-specificity mutants were much less active than the native enzyme. Secondary mutations within the loop of the E. coli enzyme (A80N, A80P, A80P/M85E/D86T) had either no or only moderately beneficial effects on the activity of the mutant enzyme toward pyruvate. The mutation A80P, which can be expected to reduce the overall flexibility of the loop, modestly improved activity toward pyruvate. The possible physiological relevance of the stringent specificity of malate dehydrogenase was investigated. In normal strains of E. coli, fermentative metabolism was not affected by expression of the mutant

  3. Structural Studies of Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciszak, Ewa; Korotchkina, Lioubov G.; Dominiak, Paulina; Sidhu, Sukhdeep; Patel, Mulchand S.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Human pyruvate dehydrogenase (E1) catalyzes the irreversible decarboxylation of pyruvate in the presence of Mg(2+) and thiamin pyrophosphate (TPP) followed by the rate-limiting reductive acetylation of the lipoyl moiety linked to dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase. The three-dimensional structure of human E1 is elucidated using the methods of macromolecular X-ray crystallography. The structure is an alpha, alpha', beta and beta' tetramer with the protein units being in the tetrahedral arrangement. Each 361-residue alpha-subunit and 329-residue beta-subunit is composed of a beta-sheet core surrounded by alpha-helical domains. Each subunit is in extensive contact with all the three subunits involving TPP and magnesium cofactors, and potassium ions. The two binding sites for TPP are at the alpha-beta' and alpha'-beta interfaces, each involving a magnesium ion and Phe6l, His63, Tyr89, and Met200 from the alpha-subunit (or alpha'-subunit), and Met81 Phe85, His128 from the beta-subunit (or beta'-subunit). K+ ions are nestled between two beta-sheets and the end of an alpha-helix in each beta-subunit, where they are coordinated by four carbonyl oxygen groups from Ile12, Ala160, Asp163, and Asnl65, and a water molecule. The catalytic C2 carbon of thiazolium ring in this structure forms a 3.2 A contact with a water molecule involved in a series of H-bonds with other water molecules, and indirectly with amino acids including those involved in the catalysis and regulation of the enzyme.

  4. Yeast Alcohol Dehydrogenase Structure and Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) alcohol dehydrogenase I (ADH1) is the constitutive enzyme that reduces acetaldehyde to ethanol during the fermentation of glucose. ADH1 is a homotetramer of subunits with 347 amino acid residues. A structure for ADH1 was determined by X-ray crystallography at 2.4 Å resolution. The asymmetric unit contains four different subunits, arranged as similar dimers named AB and CD. The unit cell contains two different tetramers made up of “back-to-back” dimers, AB:AB and CD:CD. The A and C subunits in each dimer are structurally similar, with a closed conformation, bound coenzyme, and the oxygen of 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol ligated to the catalytic zinc in the classical tetrahedral coordination with Cys-43, Cys-153, and His-66. In contrast, the B and D subunits have an open conformation with no bound coenzyme, and the catalytic zinc has an alternative, inverted coordination with Cys-43, Cys-153, His-66, and the carboxylate of Glu-67. The asymmetry in the dimeric subunits of the tetramer provides two structures that appear to be relevant for the catalytic mechanism. The alternative coordination of the zinc may represent an intermediate in the mechanism of displacement of the zinc-bound water with alcohol or aldehyde substrates. Substitution of Glu-67 with Gln-67 decreases the catalytic efficiency by 100-fold. Previous studies of structural modeling, evolutionary relationships, substrate specificity, chemical modification, and site-directed mutagenesis are interpreted more fully with the three-dimensional structure. PMID:25157460

  5. Succinate dehydrogenase gene mutations in cardiac paragangliomas.

    PubMed

    Martucci, Victoria L; Emaminia, Abbas; del Rivero, Jaydira; Lechan, Ronald M; Magoon, Bindiya T; Galia, Analyza; Fojo, Tito; Leung, Steve; Lorusso, Roberto; Jimenez, Camilo; Shulkin, Barry L; Audibert, Jennifer L; Adams, Karen T; Rosing, Douglas R; Vaidya, Anand; Dluhy, Robert G; Horvath, Keith A; Pacak, Karel

    2015-06-15

    Pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas are chromaffin cell tumors arising from neuroendocrine cells. At least 1/3 of paragangliomas are related to germline mutations in 1 of 17 genes. Although these tumors can occur throughout the body, cardiac paragangliomas are very rare, accounting for <0.3% of mediastinal tumors. The purpose of this study was to determine the clinical characteristics of patients with cardiac paragangliomas, particularly focusing on their genetic backgrounds. A retrospective chart analysis of 15 patients with cardiac paragangliomas was performed to determine clinical presentation, genetic background, diagnostic workup, and outcomes. The average age at diagnosis was 41.9 years. Typical symptoms of paraganglioma (e.g., hypertension, sweating, palpitations, headache) were reported at initial presentation in 13 patients (86.7%); the remaining 2, as well as 4 symptomatic patients, initially presented with cardiac-specific symptoms (e.g., chest pain, dyspnea). Genetic testing was done in 13 patients (86.7%); 10 (76.9%) were positive for mutations in succinate dehydrogenase (SDHx) subunits B, C, or D. Thirteen patients (86.7%) underwent surgery to remove the paraganglioma with no intraoperative morbidity or mortality; 1 additional patient underwent surgical resection but experienced intraoperative complications after removal of the tumor due to co-morbidities and did not survive. SDHx mutations are known to be associated with mediastinal locations and malignant behavior of paragangliomas. In this report, the investigators extend the locations of predominantly SDHx-related paragangliomas to cardiac tumors. In conclusion, cardiac paragangliomas are frequently associated with underlying SDHx germline mutations, suggesting a need for genetic testing of all patients with this rare tumor. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Structural Studies of Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciszak, Ewa; Korotchkina, Lioubov G.; Dominiak, Paulina; Sidhu, Sukhdeep; Patel, Mulchand S.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Human pyruvate dehydrogenase (E1) catalyzes the irreversible decarboxylation of pyruvate in the presence of Mg(2+) and thiamin pyrophosphate (TPP) followed by the rate-limiting reductive acetylation of the lipoyl moiety linked to dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase. The three-dimensional structure of human E1 is elucidated using the methods of macromolecular X-ray crystallography. The structure is an alpha, alpha', beta and beta' tetramer with the protein units being in the tetrahedral arrangement. Each 361-residue alpha-subunit and 329-residue beta-subunit is composed of a beta-sheet core surrounded by alpha-helical domains. Each subunit is in extensive contact with all the three subunits involving TPP and magnesium cofactors, and potassium ions. The two binding sites for TPP are at the alpha-beta' and alpha'-beta interfaces, each involving a magnesium ion and Phe6l, His63, Tyr89, and Met200 from the alpha-subunit (or alpha'-subunit), and Met81 Phe85, His128 from the beta-subunit (or beta'-subunit). K+ ions are nestled between two beta-sheets and the end of an alpha-helix in each beta-subunit, where they are coordinated by four carbonyl oxygen groups from Ile12, Ala160, Asp163, and Asnl65, and a water molecule. The catalytic C2 carbon of thiazolium ring in this structure forms a 3.2 A contact with a water molecule involved in a series of H-bonds with other water molecules, and indirectly with amino acids including those involved in the catalysis and regulation of the enzyme.

  7. The Carbon Monoxide Dehydrogenase from Desulfovibrio vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Hadj-Saïd, Jessica; Pandelia, Maria-Eirini; Léger, Christophe; Fourmond, Vincent; Dementin, Sébastien

    2015-12-01

    Ni-containing Carbon Monoxide Dehydrogenases (CODHs) catalyze the reversible conversion between CO and CO₂and are involved in energy conservation and carbon fixation. These homodimeric enzymes house two NiFeS active sites (C-clusters) and three accessory [4Fe-4S] clusters. The Desulfovibrio vulgaris (Dv) genome contains a two-gene CODH operon coding for a CODH (cooS) and a maturation protein (cooC) involved in nickel insertion in the active site. According to the literature, the question of the precise function of CooC as a chaperone folding the C-cluster in a form which accommodates free nickel or as a mere nickel donor is not resolved. Here, we report the biochemical and spectroscopic characterization of two recombinant forms of the CODH, produced in the absence and in the presence of CooC, designated CooS and CooS(C), respectively. CooS contains no nickel and cannot be activated, supporting the idea that the role of CooC is to fold the C-cluster so that it can bind nickel. As expected, CooS(C) is Ni-loaded, reversibly converts CO and CO₂, displays the typical Cred1 and Cred2 EPR signatures of the C-cluster and activates in the presence of methyl viologen and CO in an autocatalytic process. However, Ni-loaded CooS(C) reaches maximum activity only upon reductive treatment in the presence of exogenous nickel, a phenomenon that had not been observed before. Surprisingly, the enzyme displays the Cred1 and Cred2 signatures whether it has been activated or not, showing that this activation process of the Ni-loaded Dv CODH is not associated with structural changes at the active site.

  8. Succinate Dehydrogenase Gene Mutations in Cardiac Paragangliomas

    PubMed Central

    Martucci, Victoria L.; Emaminia, Abbas; del Rivero, Jaydira; Lechan, Ronald M.; Magoon, Bindiya T.; Galia, Analyza; Fojo, Tito; Leung, Steve; Lorusso, Roberto; Jimenez, Camilo; Shulkin, Barry L.; Audibert, Jennifer L.; Adams, Karen T.; Rosing, Douglas R.; Vaidya, Anand; Dluhy, Robert G.; Horvath, Keith A.; Pacak, Karel

    2015-01-01

    Pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas are chromaffin cell tumors arising from neuroendocrine cells. At least one third of paragangliomas are related to germline mutations in one of 17 genes. While these tumors can occur throughout the body, cardiac paragangliomas are very rare, accounting for less than 0.3% of mediastinal tumors. The purpose of this study was to determine the clinical characteristics of patients with cardiac paragangliomas, particularly focusing on their genetic backgrounds. A retrospective chart analysis of fifteen patients with cardiac paraganglioma was performed to determine clinical presentation, genetic background, diagnostic work-up, and outcomes. The average age at diagnosis was 41.9 years. Typical symptoms of paraganglioma (e.g., hypertension, sweating, palpitations, headache) were reported at initial presentation in 13 patients (86.7%); the remaining 2, as well as 4 symptomatic patients, initially presented with cardiac-specific symptoms (e.g., chest pain, dyspnea). Genetic testing was done in 13 cases (86.7%); 10 (76.9%) were positive for mutations in succinate dehydrogenase (SDHx) subunits B, C, or D. Thirteen cases (86.7%) underwent surgery to remove the paraganglioma with no intraoperative morbidity or mortality; one additional patient underwent surgical resection but experienced intraoperative complications after removal of the tumor due to comorbities and did not survive. SDHx mutations are known to be associated with mediastinal locations and malignant behavior of paragangliomas. In this report, we extend the locations of predominantly SDHx-related paragangliomas to cardiac tumors. In conclusion, cardiac paragangliomas are frequently associated with underlying SDHx germline mutations, suggesting a need for genetic testing of all patients with this rare tumor. PMID:25896150

  9. Regulation of dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Johnston, S J; Ridge, S A; Cassidy, J; McLeod, H L

    1999-09-01

    Dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD) is responsible for degradation of the pyrimidines uracil and thymine and the inactivation of the chemotherapeutic agent 5-fluorouracil. DPD activity is highly variable in cancer populations, and this variation may influence the antitumor efficacy of 5-fluorouracil. However, little is known about the regulation of DPD mRNA expression in any tissues. Using a reverse transcription competitive PCR assay, we quantified DPD mRNA levels in 10 matched colorectal tumors and adjacent normal mucosae and 7 colorectal liver metastases and adjacent normal livers. Lower levels of DPD mRNA expression were observed in colorectal tumor compared with adjacent normal colon mucosa (median, 0.01 versus 0.37 amole/microg total RNA, P = 0.02). DPD mRNA expression was also lower in metastases than adjacent normal liver tissue (median, 0.11 versus 1.17 amole/microg total RNA, P = 0.001). DPD mRNA expression was higher in normal liver than normal colonic mucosa (median, 1.17 versus 0.37 amole/microg total RNA, P = 0.02). A significant relationship was observed between DPD mRNA and catalytic activity (r(s) = 0.66, P<0.001). The tumor:normal ratio for DPD mRNA, protein, and activity was relatively stable in liver (0.25, 0.55, and 0.51, respectively) but varied considerably in colon (0.085, 0.9, and 1.25, respectively), consistent with enhanced translation of DPD transcript in primary colorectal tumor. This suggests that DPD can be regulated at the levels of both transcription and translation.

  10. Isocitrate dehydrogenase mutations in myeloid malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Medeiros, B C; Fathi, A T; DiNardo, C D; Pollyea, D A; Chan, S M; Swords, R

    2017-01-01

    Alterations to genes involved in cellular metabolism and epigenetic regulation are implicated in the pathogenesis of myeloid malignancies. Recurring mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) genes are detected in approximately 20% of adult patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and 5% of adults with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). IDH proteins are homodimeric enzymes involved in diverse cellular processes, including adaptation to hypoxia, histone demethylation and DNA modification. The IDH2 protein is localized in the mitochondria and is a critical component of the tricarboxylic acid (also called the ‘citric acid' or Krebs) cycle. Both IDH2 and IDH1 (localized in the cytoplasm) proteins catalyze the oxidative decarboxylation of isocitrate to α-ketoglutarate (α-KG). Mutant IDH enzymes have neomorphic activity and catalyze reduction of α-KG to the (R) enantiomer of 2-hydroxyglutarate, which is associated with DNA and histone hypermethylation, altered gene expression and blocked differentiation of hematopoietic progenitor cells. The prognostic significance of mutant IDH (mIDH) is controversial but appears to be influenced by co-mutational status and the specific location of the mutation (IDH1-R132, IDH2-R140, IDH2-R172). Treatments specifically or indirectly targeted to mIDH are currently under clinical investigation; these therapies have been generally well tolerated and, when used as single agents, have shown promise for inducing responses in some mIDH patients when used as first-line treatment or in relapsed or refractory AML or MDS. Use of mIDH inhibitors in combination with drugs with non-overlapping mechanisms of action is especially promising, as such regimens may address the clonal heterogeneity and the multifactorial pathogenic processes involved in mIDH myeloid malignancies. Advances in mutational analysis have made testing more rapid and convenient, and less expensive; such testing should become part of routine diagnostic workup and repeated at

  11. Properties and subunit structure of pig heart pyruvate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Hamada, M; Hiraoka, T; Koike, K; Ogasahara, K; Kanzaki, T

    1976-06-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase [EC 1.2.4.1] was separated from the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex and its molecular weight was estimated to be about 150,000 by sedimentation equilibrium methods. The enzyme was dissociated into two subunits (alpha and beta), with estimated molecular weights of 41,000 (alpha) and 36,000 (beta), respectively, by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in sodium dodecyl sulfate. The subunits were separated by phosphocellulose column chromatography and their chemical properties were examined. The subunit structure of the pyruvate dehydrogenase was assigned as alpha2beta2. The content of right-handed alpha-helix in the enzyme molecule was estimated to be about 29 and 28% by optical rotatory dispersion and by circular dichroism, respectively. The enzyme contained no thiamine-PP, and its dehydrogenase activity was completely dependent on added thiamine-PP and partially dependent on added Mg2+ and Ca2+. The Km value of pyruvate dehydrogenase for thiamine diphosphate was estimated to be 6.5 X 10(-5) M in the presence of Mg2+ or Ca2+. The enzyme showed highly specific activity for thiamine-PP dependent oxidation of both pyruvate and alpha-ketobutyrate, but it also showed some activity with alpha-ketovalerate, alpha-ketoisocaproate, and alpha-ketoisovalerate. The pyruvate dehydrogenase activity was strongly inhibited by bivalent heavy metal ions and by sulfhydryl inhibitors; and the enzyme molecule contained 27 moles of 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid)-reactive sulfhydryl groups and a total of 36 moles of sulfhydryl groups. The inhibitory effect of p-chloromercuribenzoate was prevented by preincubating the enzyme with thiamine-PP plus pyruvate. The structure of pyruvate dehydrogenase necessary for formation of the complex is also reported.

  12. Purification and characterization of benzaldehyde dehydrogenase I from Acinetobacter calcoaceticus.

    PubMed Central

    Chalmers, R M; Fewson, C A

    1989-01-01

    Benzaldehyde dehydrogenase I was purified from Acinetobacter calcoaceticus by DEAE-Sephacel, phenyl-Sepharose and f.p.l.c. gel-filtration chromatography. The enzyme was homogeneous and completely free from the isofunctional enzyme benzaldehyde dehydrogenase II, as judged by denaturing and non-denaturing polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis. The subunit Mr value was 56,000 (determined by SDS/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis). Estimations of the native Mr value by gel-filtration chromatography gave values of 141,000 with a f.p.l.c. Superose 6 column, but 219,000 with Sephacryl S300. Chemical cross-linking of the enzyme subunits indicated that the enzyme is tetrameric. Benzaldehyde dehydrogenase I was activated more than 100-fold by K+, Rb+ and NH4+, and the apparent Km for K+ was 11.2 mM. The pH optimum in the presence of K+ was 9.5 and the pI of the enzyme was 5.55. The apparent Km values for benzaldehyde and NAD+ were 0.69 microM and 96 microM respectively, and the maximum velocity was approx. 110 mumol/min per mg of protein. Various substituted benzaldehydes were oxidized at significant rates, and NADP+ was also used as cofactor, although much less effectively than NAD+. Benzaldehyde dehydrogenase I had an NAD+-activated esterase activity with 4-nitrophenol acetate as substrate, and the dehydrogenase activity was inhibited by a range of thiol-blocking reagents. The absorption spectrum indicated that there was no bound cofactor or prosthetic group. Some of the properties of the enzyme are compared with those of other aldehyde dehydrogenases, specifically the very similar isofunctional enzyme benzaldehyde dehydrogenase II from the same organism. Images Fig. 1. PMID:2597133

  13. Direct transfer of NADH between alpha-glycerol phosphate dehydrogenase and lactate dehydrogenase: fact or misinterpretation?

    PubMed

    Srivastava, D K; Smolen, P; Betts, G F; Fukushima, T; Spivey, H O; Bernhard, S A

    1989-09-01

    Following the criticism by Chock and Gutfreund [Chock, P.B. & Gutfreund, H. (1988) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 85, 8870-8874], that our proposal of direct transfer of NADH between glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (alpha-glycerol phosphate dehydrogenase, alpha-GDH; EC 1.1.1.8) and L-lactate dehydrogenase (LDH; EC 1.1.1.27) was based on a misinterpretation of the kinetic data, we have reinvestigated the transfer mechanism between this enzyme pair. By using the "enzyme buffering" steady-state kinetic technique [Srivastava, D.K. & Bernhard, S.A. (1984) Biochemistry 23, 4538-4545], we examined the mechanism (random diffusion vs. direct transfer) of transfer of NADH between rabbit muscle alpha-GDH and pig heart LDH. The steady-state data reveal that the LDH-NADH complex and the alpha-GDH-NADH complex can serve as substrate for the alpha-GDH-catalyzed reaction and the LDH-catalyzed reaction, respectively. This is consistent with the direct-transfer mechanism and inconsistent with a mechanism in which free NADH is the only competent substrate for either enzyme-catalyzed reaction. The discrepancy between this conclusion and that of Chock and Gutfreund comes from (i) their incorrect measurement of the Km for NADH in the alpha-GDH-catalyzed reaction, (ii) inadequate design and range of the steady-state kinetic experiments, and (iii) their qualitative assessment of the prediction of the direct-transfer mechanism. Our transient kinetic measurements for the transfer of NADH from alpha-GDH to LDH and from LDH to alpha-GDH show that both are slower than predicted on the basis of free equilibration of NADH through the aqueous environment. The decrease in the rate of equilibration of NADH between alpha-GDH and LDH provides no support for the random-diffusion mechanism; rather, it suggests a direct interaction between enzymes that modulates the transfer rate of NADH. Thus, contrary to Chock and Gutfreund's conclusion, all our experimental data compel us to propose, once again, that

  14. Rearrangement of mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase subunit dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase protein–protein interactions by the MDM2 ligand nutlin‐3

    PubMed Central

    Way, Luke; Faktor, Jakub; Dvorakova, Petra; Nicholson, Judith; Vojtesek, Borek; Graham, Duncan; Ball, Kathryn L.

    2016-01-01

    Drugs targeting MDM2's hydrophobic pocket activate p53. However, these agents act allosterically and have agonist effects on MDM2's protein interaction landscape. Dominant p53‐independent MDM2‐drug responsive‐binding proteins have not been stratified. We used as a variable the differential expression of MDM2 protein as a function of cell density to identify Nutlin‐3 responsive MDM2‐binding proteins that are perturbed independent of cell density using SWATH‐MS. Dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase, the E3 subunit of the mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, was one of two Nutlin‐3 perturbed proteins identified fours hour posttreatment at two cell densities. Immunoblotting confirmed that dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase was induced by Nutlin‐3. Depletion of MDM2 using siRNA also elevated dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase in Nutlin‐3 treated cells. Mitotracker confirmed that Nutlin‐3 inhibits mitochondrial activity. Enrichment of mitochondria using TOM22+ immunobeads and TMT labeling defined key changes in the mitochondrial proteome after Nutlin‐3 treatment. Proximity ligation identified rearrangements of cellular protein–protein complexes in situ. In response to Nutlin‐3, a reduction of dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase/dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase protein complexes highlighted a disruption of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex. This coincides with an increase in MDM2/dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase complexes in the nucleus that was further enhanced by the nuclear export inhibitor Leptomycin B. The data suggest one therapeutic impact of MDM2 drugs might be on the early perturbation of specific protein–protein interactions within the mitochondria. This methodology forms a blueprint for biomarker discovery that can identify rearrangements of MDM2 protein–protein complexes in drug‐treated cells. PMID:27273042

  15. Renal inner medullary choline dehydrogenase activity: characterization and modulation.

    PubMed

    Grossman, E B; Hebert, S C

    1989-01-01

    Betaine belongs to the trimethylamine class of osmolytes (osmotically active substances believed to play an important role in cell volume homeostasis) and has recently been identified in the inner medulla of the mammalian kidney. Trimethylamines accumulate in the renal inner medulla during hypertonic stress, and betaine content in the inner medulla has been shown recently to increase during hypernatremia, yet the mechanisms governing the modulation of trimethylamine content and, in particular, of betaine content are not well understood. In this study, we demonstrate the presence of choline dehydrogenase activity in the renal inner medullas of three separate rat strains. Choline dehydrogenase is the enzyme that catalyzes the first of two successive oxidation steps in the biosynthetic conversion of choline to betaine. The presence of choline dehydrogenase activity in the inner medulla suggests that betaine accumulation in the inner medulla may result, at least in part, through in situ synthesis. The Km and Vmax of the reaction in the inner medullas of Long-Evans rats are 4.7 +/- 0.5 mM and 36.9 +/- 5.0 nmol.mg protein-1.min-1, respectively. These values are similar to the characteristics of choline dehydrogenase in mammalian liver. During hypernatremia, when betaine content of the inner medulla has been shown to increase 1.5-fold, choline dehydrogenase activity remains unchanged (or slightly increased), whereas enzyme activity in the cortex increases approximately 50%. Possible mechanisms of inner medullary betaine accumulation are discussed.

  16. Dehydrogenase activity of forest soils depends on the assay used

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Januszek, Kazimierz; Długa, Joanna; Socha, Jarosław

    2015-01-01

    Dehydrogenases are exclusively intracellular enzymes, which play an important role in the initial stages of oxidation of soil organic matter. One of the most frequently used methods to estimate dehydrogenase activity in soil is based on the use of triphenyltetrazolium chloride as an artificial electron acceptor. The purpose of this study was to compare the activity of dehydrogenases of forest soils with varied physicochemical properties using different triphenyltetrazolium chloride assays. The determination was carried out using the original procedure by Casida et al., a modification of the procedure which involves the use of Ca(OH)2 instead of CaCO3, the Thalmann method, and the assay by Casida et al. without addition of buffer or any salt. Soil dehydrogenase activity depended on the assay used. Dehydrogenase determined by the Casida et al. method without addition of buffer or any salt correlated with the pH values of soils. The autoclaved strongly acidic samples of control soils showed high concentrations of triphenylformazan, probably due to chemical reduction of triphenyltetrazolium chloride. There is, therefore, a need for a sterilization method other than autoclaving, ie a process that results in significant changes in soil properties, thus helping to increase the chemical reduction of triphenyltetrazolium chloride.

  17. Quantitative cytochemical measurement of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase activity.

    PubMed

    Henderson, B

    1976-08-25

    A system has been developed for the quantitative measurment of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase activity in tissue sections. An obstacle to the histochemical study of this enzyme has been the fact that the substrate, gylceraldehyde 3-phosphate, is very unstable. In the present system a stable compound, fructose 1, 6-diphosphate, is used as the primary substrate and the demonsatration of the glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase activity depends on the conversion of this compound into the specific substrate by the aldolase present in the tissue. The characteristics of the dehydrogenase activity resulting from the addition of fructose 1, 6-diphosphate, resemble closely the known properties of purified glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase. Use of polyvinyl alcohol in the reaction medium prevents release of enzymes from the sections, as occurs in aqueous media. Although in this study intrinsic aldolase activity was found to be adequate for the rapid conversion of fructose 1, 6-diphosphate into the specific substrate for the dehydrogenase, the use of exogenous aldolase may be of particular advantage in assessing the intergrity of the Embden-Meyerhof pathway.

  18. Purification and characterization of limonoate dehydrogenase from Rhodococcus fascians.

    PubMed

    Humanes, L; López-Ruiz, A; Merino, M T; Roldán, J M; Diez, J

    1997-09-01

    Limonoate dehydrogenase from Rhodococcus fascians has been purified to electrophoretic homogeneity by a procedure that consists of ion-exchange, hydrophobic, and affinity chromatography. The native enzyme has a molecular mass of around 128,000 Da and appears to be composed of four similar subunits (30,000 Da each). The isoelectric point is 4.9 as determined by isoelectric focusing. The homogeneous enzyme was used to determine the NH2-terminal amino acid sequence. The enzyme was purified from cells grown in either fructose or limonoate as a carbon source. Limonoate dehydrogenase activity was higher in limonoate-grown cultures. Additionally, the enzyme preparations differed in their affinity for limonoids but not for NAD+. In all cases limonoate dehydrogenase exhibited a higher catalytic rate and stronger affinity for limonoate A-ring lactone than for disodium limonoate, the limonoid traditionally used for in vitro activity assays. Our data confirm previous reports proposing that limonoate A-ring lactone is the physiological substrate for limonoate dehydrogenase. The increase in limonoate dehydrogenase activity observed in limonoate-grown cultures appears to be caused by a rise in protein levels, since chloramphenicol prevented such an effect.

  19. Purification and characterization of limonoate dehydrogenase from Rhodococcus fascians.

    PubMed Central

    Humanes, L; López-Ruiz, A; Merino, M T; Roldán, J M; Diez, J

    1997-01-01

    Limonoate dehydrogenase from Rhodococcus fascians has been purified to electrophoretic homogeneity by a procedure that consists of ion-exchange, hydrophobic, and affinity chromatography. The native enzyme has a molecular mass of around 128,000 Da and appears to be composed of four similar subunits (30,000 Da each). The isoelectric point is 4.9 as determined by isoelectric focusing. The homogeneous enzyme was used to determine the NH2-terminal amino acid sequence. The enzyme was purified from cells grown in either fructose or limonoate as a carbon source. Limonoate dehydrogenase activity was higher in limonoate-grown cultures. Additionally, the enzyme preparations differed in their affinity for limonoids but not for NAD+. In all cases limonoate dehydrogenase exhibited a higher catalytic rate and stronger affinity for limonoate A-ring lactone than for disodium limonoate, the limonoid traditionally used for in vitro activity assays. Our data confirm previous reports proposing that limonoate A-ring lactone is the physiological substrate for limonoate dehydrogenase. The increase in limonoate dehydrogenase activity observed in limonoate-grown cultures appears to be caused by a rise in protein levels, since chloramphenicol prevented such an effect. PMID:9292989

  20. Characterization of interactions of dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase with its binding protein in the human pyruvate dehydrogenase complex

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Yun-Hee; Patel, Mulchand S.

    2010-05-07

    Unlike pyruvate dehydrogenase complexes (PDCs) from prokaryotes, PDCs from higher eukaryotes have an additional structural component, E3-binding protein (BP), for binding of dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (E3) in the complex. Based on the 3D structure of the subcomplex of human (h) E3 with the di-domain (L3S1) of hBP, the amino acid residues (H348, D413, Y438, and R447) of hE3 for binding to hBP were substituted singly by alanine or other residues. These substitutions did not have large effects on hE3 activity when measured in its free form. However, when these hE3 mutants were reconstituted in the complex, the PDC activity was significantly reduced to 9% for Y438A, 20% for Y438H, and 18% for D413A. The binding of hE3 mutants with L3S1 determined by isothermal titration calorimetry revealed that the binding affinities of the Y438A, Y438H, and D413A mutants to L3S1 were severely reduced (1019-, 607-, and 402-fold, respectively). Unlike wild-type hE3 the binding of the Y438A mutant to L3S1 was accompanied by an unfavorable enthalpy change and a large positive entropy change. These results indicate that hE3-Y438 and hE3-D413 play important roles in binding of hE3 to hBP.

  1. Participation of phosphofructokinase, malate dehydrogenase and isocitrate dehydrogenase in capacitation and acrosome reaction of boar spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Breininger, E; Dubois, D; Pereyra, V E; Rodriguez, P C; Satorre, M M; Cetica, P D

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this work was to determine the enzymatic activity of phosphofructokinase (PFK), malate dehydrogenase (MDH) and isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) in boar spermatozoa and study their participation in bicarbonate-induced capacitation and follicular fluid-induced acrosome reaction. Enzymatic activity of these enzymes was determined spectrophotometrically in extracts of boar spermatozoa. Sperm suspensions were incubated in the presence of bicarbonate (40 mM), a well-known capacitation inducer, or follicular fluid (30%), as an acrosome reaction inducer, and different concentrations of oxoglutarate, oxalomalate and hydroxymalonate, inhibitors of PFK, IDH and MDH, respectively. Capacitation percentages were determined by the fluorescence technique of chlortetracycline (CTC), and true acrosome reaction was determined by trypan blue and differential-interferential contrast, optical microscopy. The activity of PFK in boar spermatozoa enzymatic extracts was 1.70 ± 0.19 U/10(10) spermatozoa, the activity of NAD- and NADP-dependent IDH was 0.111 ± 0.005 U/10(10) and 2.22 ± 0.14 U/10(10) spermatozoa, respectively, and the activity of MDH was 4.24 ± 0.38 U/10(10) spermatozoa. The addition of the specific inhibitors of these enzymes prevented sperm capacitation and decreased sperm motility during capacitation and inhibited the acrosome reaction (AR), without affecting the sperm motility during this process. Our results demonstrate the participation of PFK, IDH and MDH in bicarbonate-induced capacitation and follicular fluid-induced acrosome reaction in boar spermatozoa, contributing to elucidate the mechanisms that produce energy necessary for these processes in porcine spermatozoa. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  2. Radial immunodiffusion and immunoelectrophoresis compared for identifying autoantibodies to lactate dehydrogenase in human serum.

    PubMed

    Harff, G A; Backer, E T

    1990-12-14

    Variant electrophoretic patterns of lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes were studied. By radial immunodiffusion and immunoelectrophoresis, immunoglobulin and light chain class of autoantibodies to lactate dehydrogenase were identified in nine sera: seven of these sera demonstrated IgG (5 lambda, 2 kappa) autoantibodies to lactate dehydrogenase, the other two demonstrated IgA (both kappa) autoantibodies to lactate dehydrogenase, the other two demonstrated IgA (both kappa) autoantibodies to lactate dehydrogenase. We conclude that radial immunodiffusion and immunoelectrophoresis are equally effective for identifying auto-antibodies to lactate dehydrogenase in serum. Radial immunodiffusion, however, is easier to perform than immunoelectrophoresis.

  3. Double-ternary complex affinity chromatography: preparation of alcohol dehydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Lange, L G; Vallee, B L

    1976-10-19

    A general affinity chromatographic method for alcohol dehydrogenase purification has been developed by employing immobilized 4-substituted pyrazole derivatives that isolate the enzyme through formation of a specific ternary complex. Sepharose 4B is activated with 300 mg of cyanogen bromide/ml of packed gel and coupled to 4-[3-(N-6-aminocaproyl)aminopropyl]pyrazole. From crude liver extracts in 50 mM phosphate-0.37 mM nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, pH 7.5, alcohol dehydrogenase is optimally bound at a capacity of 4-5 mg of enzyme/ml of gel. Addition of ethanol, propanol, or butanol, 500 mM, results in the formation of a second ternary complex, which allows the elution of bound enzyme in high yield and purity. This double-ternary complex affinity chromatography has been applied successfully to human, horse, rat, and rabbit liver extracts to isolate the respective homogeneous alcohol dehydrogenases.

  4. Asymmetric oxidoreductions catalyzed by alcohol dehydrogenase in organic solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Grunwald, J.; Wirz, B.; Scollar, M.P.; Klibanov, A.M.

    1986-10-15

    A methodology is developed for the use of alcohol dehydrogenase (and other NAD/sup +//NADH-dependent enzymes) as catalysts in organic solvents. The enzyme and the cofactor are deposited onto the surface of glass beads which are then suspended in a water-immiscible organic solvent containing the substrate. Both NADH and NAD/sup +/ are efficiently regenerated in such a system with alcohol dehydrogenase-catalyzed oxidation of ethanol and reduction of isobutyraldehyde, respectively; cofactor turnover numbers of 10/sup 5/ to greater than 10/sup 6/ have been obtained. With use of asymmetric oxidoreductions catalyzed by horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase in isopropyl ether, optically active (ee of 95 to 100%) alcohols and ketones have been prepared on a 1 to 10 mmol scale.

  5. Metabolism of glycyrrhetic acid by rat liver microsomes: glycyrrhetinate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Akao, T; Akao, T; Kobashi, K

    1990-02-06

    Glycyrrhetic acid, derived from a main component of liquorice, was converted to 3-ketoglycyrrhetic acid reversibly by rat liver homogenates in the presence of NADPH or NADP+. Glycyrrhetic acid-oxidizing and 3-ketoglycyrrhetic acid-reducing activities were localized in microsomes among the subcellular fractions of rat liver. Glycyrrhetic acid-oxidizing activity and 3-ketoglycyrrhetic acid-reducing activities showed pH optima at 6.3 and 8.5, respectively, and required NADP+ or NAD+ and NADPH or NADH, respectively, indicating that these activities were due to glycyrrhetinate dehydrogenase. The dehydrogenase was not solubilized from the membranes by the treatment with 1 M NaCl or sonication, indicating that the enzyme is a membrane component. The dehydrogenase was solubilized with detergents such as Emalgen 913, Triton X-100 and sodium cholate, and then separated from 3 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (5 beta-androstan-3 beta-ol-17-one-oxidizing activity) by butyl-Toyopearl 650 M column chromatography. Partially purified enzyme catalyzed the reversible reaction between glycyrrhetic acid and 3-ketoglycyrrhetic acid, but was inactive toward 3-epiglycyrrhetic acid and other steroids having the 3 beta-hydroxyl group. The enzyme required NADP+ and NADPH for the highest activities of oxidation and reduction, respectively, and NAD+ and NADH for considerable activities, similar to the results with microsomes. From these results the enzyme is defined as glycyrrhetinate dehydrogenase, being quite different from 3 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase of Ruminococcus sp. from human intestine, which is active for both glycyrrhetic acid and steroids having the 3 beta-hydroxyl group.

  6. Crystal structure of homoisocitrate dehydrogenase from Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    SciTech Connect

    Bulfer, Stacie L.; Hendershot, Jenna M.; Trievel, Raymond C.

    2013-09-18

    Lysine biosynthesis in fungi, euglena, and certain archaebacteria occurs through the {alpha}-aminoadipate pathway. Enzymes in the first steps of this pathway have been proposed as potential targets for the development of antifungal therapies, as they are absent in animals but are conserved in several pathogenic fungi species, including Candida, Cryptococcus, and Aspergillus. One potential antifungal target in the {alpha}-aminoadipate pathway is the third enzyme in the pathway, homoisocitrate dehydrogenase (HICDH), which catalyzes the divalent metal-dependent conversion of homoisocitrate to 2-oxoadipate (2-OA) using nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD{sup +}) as a cofactor. HICDH belogns to a family of {beta}-hydroxyacid oxidative decarboxylases that includes malate dehydrogenase, tartrate dehydrogenase, 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase, isocitrate dehydrogenase (ICDH), and 3-isopropylmalte dehydrogenase (IPMDH). ICDH and IPMDH are well-characterized enzymes that catalyze the decarboxylation of isocitrate to yield 2-oxoglutarate (2-OG) in the citric acid cycle and the conversion of 3-isopropylmalate to 2-oxoisovalerate in the leucine biosynthetic pathway, respectively. Recent structural and biochemical studies of HICDH reveal that this enzyme shares sequence, structural, and mechanistic homology with ICDH and IPMDH. To date, the only published structures of HICDH are from the archaebacteria Thermus thermophilus (TtHICDH). Fungal HICDHs diverge from TtHICDH in several aspects, including their thermal stability, oligomerization state, and substrate specificity, thus warranting further characterization. To gain insights into these differences, they determined crystal structures of a fungal Schizosaccharomyces pombe HICDH (SpHICDH) as an apoenzyme and as a binary complex with additive tripeptide glycyl-glycyl-glycine (GGG) to 1.55 {angstrom} and 1.85 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. Finally, a comparison of the SpHICDH and TtHICDH structures reveal differences in

  7. Stepwise metabolic engineering of Gluconobacter oxydans WSH-003 for the direct production of 2-keto-L-gulonic acid from D-sorbitol.

    PubMed

    Gao, Lili; Hu, Yudong; Liu, Jie; Du, Guocheng; Zhou, Jingwen; Chen, Jian

    2014-07-01

    2-Keto-L-gulonic acid (2-KLG), the direct precursor of vitamin C, is currently produced by a two-step fermentation route from D-sorbitol. However, this route involves three bacteria, making the mix-culture system complicated and redundant. Thus, replacement of the conventional two-step fermentation process with a one-step process could be revolutionary in vitamin C industry. In this study, different combinations of five L-sorbose dehydrogenases (SDH) and two L-sorbosone dehydrogenases (SNDH) from Ketogulonicigenium vulgare WSH-001 were introduced into Gluconobacter oxydans WSH-003, an industrial strain used for the conversion of d-sorbitol to L-sorbose. The optimum combination produced 4.9g/L of 2-KLG. In addition, 10 different linker peptides were used for the fusion expression of SDH and SNDH in G. oxydans. The best recombinant strain (G. oxydans/pGUC-k0203-GS-k0095) produced 32.4g/L of 2-KLG after 168h. Furthermore, biosynthesis of pyrroloquinoline quinine (PQQ), a cofactor of those dehydrogenases, was enhanced to improve 2-KLG production. With the stepwise metabolic engineering of G. oxydans, the final 2-KLG production was improved to 39.2g/L, which was 8.0-fold higher than that obtained using independent expression of the dehydrogenases. These results bring us closer to the final one-step industrial-scale production of vitamin C.

  8. Journal of Accelerative Learning and Teaching, 1995.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Accelerative Learning and Teaching, 1995

    1995-01-01

    Issues 1 and 2 (combined) of the 1995 journal contain these articles: "Accelerated Learning in a Beginning College-Level French Class at the University of Houston" (Patrice Caux); "The Psychobiology of Learning and Memory" (Don Schuster); "Do the Seeds of Accelerated Language Learning and Teaching Lie in a Behavioral…

  9. Prostaglandin dehydrogenase and the initiation of labor.

    PubMed

    Challis, J R; Patel, F A; Pomini, F

    1999-01-01

    In summary, these studies have suggested that prostaglandin dehydrogenase may have a central role to play in the mechanisms which determine biologically active prostaglandin concentrations within human fetal membranes and placenta at the time of labor, at term or preterm. Moreover, our studies indicate that the regulation of PGDH may by multifactorial (figure 3). In certain regions of the membranes, we suggest that PGDH expression may be influenced by levels of anti-inflammatory and pro-inflammatory cytokines. In other regions of the membranes, we suggest that PGDH may be regulated at a transcriptional level by competing activities of progesterone and cortisol. The action of progesterone could be effected through systemically-derived steroid, or by locally synthesized steroid, acting in a paracrine and/or autocrine fashion. The effects of cortisol in placenta must be due to glucocorticoid derived from the maternal or fetal compartment, since the placenta lacks the hydroxylases required for endogenous cortisol production. However, metabolism of cortisol by 11 beta-HSD-2 reduces the potency of this glucocorticoid in placental tissue. In chorion however, cortisol may be formed locally, from cortisone, in addition to its being derived from the maternal circulation and/or from the amniotic fluid. Our current studies do not allow us to delineate whether the effects of progesterone and cortisol on PGDH are exerted through the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) or progesterone receptor (PR) or both. It is possible that through pregnancy, PGDH activity is maintained by progesterone acting either through low levels of PR in membranes, or, more likely, acting through GR. At term, elevated levels of cortisol compete with and displace progesterone from GR, resulting in inhibition of PGDH transcription and activity. In this way, local withdrawal of progesterone action would be effected within human intrauterine tissues, without requiring changes in systemic, circulating progesterone

  10. The α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex in cancer metabolic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Vatrinet, Renaud; Leone, Giulia; De Luise, Monica; Girolimetti, Giulia; Vidone, Michele; Gasparre, Giuseppe; Porcelli, Anna Maria

    2017-01-01

    Deregulated metabolism is a well-established hallmark of cancer. At the hub of various metabolic pathways deeply integrated within mitochondrial functions, the α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex represents a major modulator of electron transport chain activity and tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA) flux, and is a pivotal enzyme in the metabolic reprogramming following a cancer cell's change in bioenergetic requirements. By contributing to the control of α-ketoglutarate levels, dynamics, and oxidation state, the α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase is also essential in modulating the epigenetic landscape of cancer cells. In this review, we will discuss the manifold roles that this TCA enzyme and its substrate play in cancer.

  11. Purification of xanthine dehydrogenase and sulfite oxidase from chicken liver.

    PubMed

    Ratnam, K; Brody, M S; Hille, R

    1996-05-01

    Xanthine dehydrogenase and sulfite oxidase from chicken liver are oxomolybdenum enzymes which catalyze the oxidation of xanthine to uric acid and sulfite to sulfate, respectively. Independent purification protocols have been previously described for both enzymes. Here we describe a procedure by which xanthine dehydrogenase and sulfite oxidase are purified simultaneously from the same batch of fresh chicken liver. Also, unlike the protocols described earlier, this procedure avoids the use of acetone extraction as well as a heat step, thus minimizing damage to the molybdenum centers of the enzymes.

  12. The Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complexes: Structure-based Function and Regulation*

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Mulchand S.; Nemeria, Natalia S.; Furey, William; Jordan, Frank

    2014-01-01

    The pyruvate dehydrogenase complexes (PDCs) from all known living organisms comprise three principal catalytic components for their mission: E1 and E2 generate acetyl-coenzyme A, whereas the FAD/NAD+-dependent E3 performs redox recycling. Here we compare bacterial (Escherichia coli) and human PDCs, as they represent the two major classes of the superfamily of 2-oxo acid dehydrogenase complexes with different assembly of, and interactions among components. The human PDC is subject to inactivation at E1 by serine phosphorylation by four kinases, an inactivation reversed by the action of two phosphatases. Progress in our understanding of these complexes important in metabolism is reviewed. PMID:24798336

  13. Reversible inactivation of CO dehydrogenase with thiol compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Kreß, Oliver; Gnida, Manuel; Pelzmann, Astrid M.; Marx, Christian; Meyer-Klaucke, Wolfram; Meyer, Ortwin

    2014-05-09

    Highlights: • Rather large thiols (e.g. coenzyme A) can reach the active site of CO dehydrogenase. • CO- and H{sub 2}-oxidizing activity of CO dehydrogenase is inhibited by thiols. • Inhibition by thiols was reversed by CO or upon lowering the thiol concentration. • Thiols coordinate the Cu ion in the [CuSMo(=O)OH] active site as a third ligand. - Abstract: Carbon monoxide dehydrogenase (CO dehydrogenase) from Oligotropha carboxidovorans is a structurally characterized member of the molybdenum hydroxylase enzyme family. It catalyzes the oxidation of CO (CO + H{sub 2}O → CO{sub 2} + 2e{sup −} + 2H{sup +}) which proceeds at a unique [CuSMo(=O)OH] metal cluster. Because of changing activities of CO dehydrogenase, particularly in subcellular fractions, we speculated whether the enzyme would be subject to regulation by thiols (RSH). Here we establish inhibition of CO dehydrogenase by thiols and report the corresponding K{sub i}-values (mM): L-cysteine (5.2), D-cysteine (9.7), N-acetyl-L-cysteine (8.2), D,L-homocysteine (25.8), L-cysteine–glycine (2.0), dithiothreitol (4.1), coenzyme A (8.3), and 2-mercaptoethanol (9.3). Inhibition of the enzyme was reversed by CO or upon lowering the thiol concentration. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) of thiol-inhibited CO dehydrogenase revealed a bimetallic site in which the RSH coordinates to the Cu-ion as a third ligand ([Mo{sup VI}(=O)OH{sub (2)}SCu{sup I}(SR)S-Cys]) leaving the redox state of the Cu(I) and the Mo(VI) unchanged. Collectively, our findings establish a regulation of CO dehydrogenase activity by thiols in vitro. They also corroborate the hypothesis that CO interacts with the Cu-ion first. The result that thiol compounds much larger than CO can freely travel through the substrate channel leading to the bimetallic cluster challenges previous concepts involving chaperone function and is of importance for an understanding how the sulfuration step in

  14. Differential energetic metabolism during Trypanosoma cruzi differentiation. I. Citrate synthase, NADP-isocitrate dehydrogenase, and succinate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Adroher, F J; Osuna, A; Lupiañez, J A

    1988-11-15

    The activities of the mitochondrial enzymes citrate synthase (citrate oxaloacetatelyase, EC 4.1.3.7), NADP-linked isocitrate dehydrogenase (threo-Ds-isocitrate:NADP+ oxidoreductase (decarboxylating), EC 1.1.1.42), and succinate dehydrogenase (succinate: FAD oxidoreductase, EC 1.3.99.1) as well as their kinetic behavior in the two developmental forms of Trypanosoma cruzi at insect vector stage, epimastigotes and infective metacyclic trypomastigotes, were studied. The results presented in this work clearly demonstrate a higher mitochondrial metabolism in the metacyclic forms as is shown by the extraordinary enhanced activities of metacyclic citrate synthase, isocitrate dehydrogenase, and succinate dehydrogenase. In epimastigotes, the specific activities of citrate synthase at variable concentrations of oxalacetate and acetyl-CoA were 24.6 and 26.6 mU/mg of protein, respectively, and the Michaelis constants were 7.88 and 6.84 microM for both substrates. The metacyclic enzyme exhibited the following kinetic parameters: a specific activity of 228.4 mU/mg and Km of 3.18 microM for oxalacetate and 248.5 mU/mg and 2.75 microM, respectively, for acetyl-CoA. NADP-linked isocitrate dehydrogenase specific activities for epimastigotes and metacyclics were 110.2 and 210.3 mU/mg, whereas the apparent Km's were 47.9 and 12.5 microM, respectively. No activity for the NAD-dependent isozyme was found in any form of T. cruzi differentiation. The particulated succinate dehydrogenase showed specific activities of 8.2 and 39.1 mU/mg for epimastigotes and metacyclic trypomastigotes, respectively, although no significant changes in the Km (0.46 and 0.48 mM) were found. The cellular role and the molecular mechanism that probably take place during this significant shift in the mitochondrial metabolism during the T. cruzi differentiation have been discussed.

  15. Effects of lactate dehydrogenase suppression and glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase overexpression on cellular metabolism.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Dae-won; Cho, Il Taeg; Kim, Tae Soo; Bae, Gun Won; Kim, Ik-Hwan; Kim, Ick Young

    2006-03-01

    In order to conduct a physiological functional study of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPDH), we engineered a CHO dhfr(-) cell, by overexpressing either the anti-sense LDH-A RNA (anti-LDH cells) or GPDH (GP3 cells), or both (GP3/anti-LDH cells). LDH activity in the cell cytosol, and lactate content and pHe change in the growth media were found to decrease according to the order: cell lines GP3/anti-LDH > anti-LDH > GP3 > CHO. Intracellular ATP contents, representing the extent of respiration rate, also decreased, according to a rank order as follows: GP3 > CHO > GP3/anti-LDH > anti-LDH. We also attempted to identify and characterize any physiological changes occurring in the cells which harbored diverse metabolic pathways. First, anti-LDH cells with heightened respiration rates were found to display a higher degree of sensitivity to the prooxidant tert-butyl hydroperoxide (tBOOH), and the mitochondrial complex III inhibitor, antimycin A, than the GPDH-expressing cells (GP3 and GP3/anti-LDH), which have a lower respiration rate. Second, the anti-sense LDH-A RNA-expressing cells (anti-LDH and GP3/anti-LDH) evidenced a higher degree of resistance to apoptosis by cell-cell contact inhibition, and a faster doubling time ( approximately 19 h compared with approximately 26 h) than the CHO and GP3 cells. Additionally, cell growth in an extended culture under HCO(3) (-)-free conditions to induce a steep acidification could be maintained with the anti-sense LDH-A RNA-expressing cells, but could not be maintained with the CHO and GP3 cells. Third, we observed that the most appropriate cell line for the optical production of a certain therapeutic protein (Tissue-Plasminogen Activator) was the GP3/anti-LDH cells. Collectively, our data indicate a variety of physiological roles for LDH and GPDH, including cellular acidosis, oxidoresistance, apoptosis by both acidosis and cell-cell contact inhibition, cell growth, and the generation of

  16. Evidence that adrenal hexose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase can effect microsomal P450 cytochrome steroidogenic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Foster, Christy A; Mick, Gail J; Wang, Xudong; McCormick, Kenneth

    2013-09-01

    The role of adrenal hexose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in providing reducing equivalents to P450 cytochrome steroidogenic enzymes in the endoplasmic reticulum is uncertain. Hexose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase resides in the endoplasmic reticulum lumen and co-localizes with the bidirectional enzyme 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1. Hexose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase likely provides 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1 with NADPH electrons via channeling. Intracellularly, two compartmentalized reactions generate NADPH upon oxidation of glucose-6-phosphate: cytosolic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and microsomal hexose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase. Because some endoplasmic reticulum enzymes require an electron donor (NADPH), it is conceivable that hexose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase serves in this capacity for these pathways. Besides 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1, we examined whether hexose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase generates reduced pyridine nucleotide for pivotal adrenal microsomal P450 enzymes. 21-hydroxylase activity was increased with glucose-6-phosphate and, also, glucose and glucosamine-6-phosphate. The latter two substrates are only metabolized by hexose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, indicating that requisite NADPH for 21-hydroxylase activity was not via glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase. Moreover, dihydroepiandrostenedione, a non-competitive inhibitor of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, but not hexose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, did not curtail activation by glucose-6-phosphate. Finally, the most compelling observation was that the microsomal glucose-6-phosphate transport inhibitor, chlorogenic acid, blunted the activation by glucose-6-phosphate of both 21-hydroxylase and 17-hydroxylase indicating that luminal hexose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase can supply NADPH for these enzymes. Analogous kinetic observations were found with microsomal 17-hydroxylase. These findings indicate that hexose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase can be a source, but not exclusively so, of NADPH

  17. Phanerochaete chrysosporium Cellobiohydrolase and Cellobiose Dehydrogenase Transcripts in Wood

    PubMed Central

    Vallim, Marcelo A.; Janse, Bernard J. H.; Gaskell, Jill; Pizzirani-Kleiner, Aline A.; Cullen, Daniel

    1998-01-01

    The transcripts of structurally related cellobiohydrolase genes in Phanerochaete chrysosporium-colonized wood chips were quantified. The transcript patterns obtained were dramatically different from the transcript patterns obtained previously in defined media. Cellobiose dehydrogenase transcripts were also detected, which is consistent with the hypothesis that such transcripts play an important role in cellulose degradation. PMID:9572973

  18. 21 CFR 862.1380 - Hydroxybutyric dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hydroxybutyric dehydrogenase test system. 862.1380 Section 862.1380 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test...

  19. 21 CFR 862.1445 - Lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes test system. 862.1445 Section 862.1445 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry...

  20. 21 CFR 862.1420 - Isocitric dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Isocitric dehydrogenase test system. 862.1420 Section 862.1420 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test...

  1. NADP+-Preferring d-Lactate Dehydrogenase from Sporolactobacillus inulinus

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Lingfeng; Xu, Xiaoling; Wang, Limin; Ma, Yanhe

    2015-01-01

    Hydroxy acid dehydrogenases, including l- and d-lactate dehydrogenases (L-LDH and D-LDH), are responsible for the stereospecific conversion of 2-keto acids to 2-hydroxyacids and extensively used in a wide range of biotechnological applications. A common feature of LDHs is their high specificity for NAD+ as a cofactor. An LDH that could effectively use NADPH as a coenzyme could be an alternative enzymatic system for regeneration of the oxidized, phosphorylated cofactor. In this study, a d-lactate dehydrogenase from a Sporolactobacillus inulinus strain was found to use both NADH and NADPH with high efficiencies and with a preference for NADPH as its coenzyme, which is different from the coenzyme utilization of all previously reported LDHs. The biochemical properties of the D-LDH enzyme were determined by X-ray crystal structural characterization and in vivo and in vitro enzymatic activity analyses. The residue Asn174 was demonstrated to be critical for NADPH utilization. Characterization of the biochemical properties of this enzyme will contribute to understanding of the catalytic mechanism and provide referential information for shifting the coenzyme utilization specificity of 2-hydroxyacid dehydrogenases. PMID:26150461

  2. Molecular cloning of gluconobacter oxydans DSM 2003 xylitol dehydrogenase gene.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, H Mir Mohammad; Ahmadi, R; Aghaabdollahian, S; Mofid, M R; Ghaemi, Y; Abedi, D

    2011-01-01

    Due to the widespread applications of xylitol dehydrogenase, an enzyme used for the production of xylitol, the present study was designed for the cloning of xylitol dehydrogenase gene from Glcunobacter oxydans DSM 2003. After extraction of genomic DNA from this bacterium, xylitol dehydrogenase gene was replicated using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The amplified product was entered into pTZ57R cloning vector by T/A cloning method and transformation was performed by heat shocking of the E. coli XL1-blue competent cells. Following plasmid preparation, the cloned gene was digested out and ligated into the expression vector pET-22b(+). Electrophoresis of PCR product showed a 789 bp band. Recombinant plasmid (rpTZ57R) was then constructed. This plasmid was double digested with XhoI and EcoRI resulting in 800 bp and 2900 bp bands. The obtained insert was ligated into pET-22b(+) vector and its orientation was confirmed with XhoI and BamHI restriction enzymes. In conclusion, in the present study the recombinant expression vector containing xylitol dehydrogenase gene has been constructed and can be used for the production of this enzyme in high quantities.

  3. Genetics Home Reference: 2-methylbutyryl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... down proteins from food into smaller parts called amino acids. Amino acids can be further processed to provide energy for ... methylbutyryl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency cannot process a particular amino acid called isoleucine. Most cases of 2-methylbutyryl-CoA ...

  4. Distribution of the Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex in Developing Soybean Cotyledons

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The somewhat surprising report that storage proteins and oil are non-uniformly distributed in the cotyledons of developing soybeans prompted us to determine the spatial distribution of the mitochondrial and plastidial forms of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC). It has been proposed that pla...

  5. Red Algal Bromophenols as Glucose 6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Mikami, Daisuke; Kurihara, Hideyuki; Kim, Sang Moo; Takahashi, Koretaro

    2013-01-01

    Five bromophenols isolated from three Rhodomelaceae algae (Laurencia nipponica, Polysiphonia morrowii, Odonthalia corymbifera) showed inhibitory effects against glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD). Among them, the symmetric bromophenol dimer (5) showed the highest inhibitory activity against G6PD. PMID:24152564

  6. Molecular properties of succinate dehydrogenase isolated from Micrococcus luteus (lysodeikticus).

    PubMed Central

    Crowe, B A; Owen, P

    1983-01-01

    Succinate dehydrogenase (EC 1.3.99.1) of Micrococcus luteus was selectively precipitated from Triton X-100-solubilized membranes by using specific antiserum. The precipitated enzyme contained equimolar amounts of four polypeptides with apparent molecular weights of 72,000, 30,000, 17,000, and 15,000. The 72,000 polypeptide possessed a covalently bound flavin prosthetic group and appeared to be strongly antigenic as judged by immunoprinting experiments. Low-temperature absorption spectroscopy revealed the presence of cytochrome b556 in the antigen complex. By analogy with succinate dehydrogenase purified from other sources, the 72,000 and 30,000 polypeptides were considered to represent subunits of the succinate dehydrogenase enzyme, whereas one (or both) of the low-molecular-weight polypeptides was attributed to the apoprotein of the b-type cytochrome. A succinate dehydrogenase antigen cross-reacting with the M. luteus enzyme complex could be demonstrated in membranes of Micrococcus roseus, Micrococcus flavus, and Sarcina lutea, but not in the membranes isolated from a wide variety of other gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. Images PMID:6402500

  7. Purification and properties of Klebsiella aerogenes D-arabitol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed Central

    Neuberger, M S; Patterson, R A; Hartley, B S

    1979-01-01

    An Escherichia coli K12 strain was constructed that synthesized elevated quantities of Klebsiella aerogenes D-arabitol dehydrogenase; the enzyme accounted for about 5% of the soluble protein in this strain. Some 280 mg of enzyme was purified from 180 g of cell paste. The purified enzyme was active as a monomer of 46,000 mol.wt. The amino acid composition and kinetic constants of the enzyme for D-arabitol and D-mannitol are reported. The apparent Km for D-mannitol was more than 3-fold that for D-arabitol, whereas the maximum velocities with both substrates were indistinguishable. The enzyme purified from the E. coli K12 construct was indistinguishable by the criteria of molecular weight, electrophoretic mobility in native polyacrylamide gel and D-mannitol/D-arabitol activity ratio from D-arabitol dehydrogenase synthesized in wild-type K. aerogenes. Purified D-arabitol dehydrogenase showed no immunological cross-reaction with K. aerogenes ribitol dehydrogenase. During electrophoresis in native polyacrylamide gels, oxidation by persulphate catalysed the formation of inactive polymeric forms of the enzyme. Dithiothreitol and pre-electrophoresis protected against this polymerization. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:393250

  8. Genetics Home Reference: 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... step that metabolizes groups of fats called medium-chain fatty acids and short-chain fatty acids. Mutations in the HADH gene lead ... a shortage of 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase. Medium-chain and short-chain fatty acids cannot be metabolized ...

  9. 21 CFR 862.1670 - Sorbitol dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sorbitol dehydrogenase test system. 862.1670 Section 862.1670 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES.... Measurements obtained by this device are used in the diagnosis and treatment of liver disorders such as...

  10. 21 CFR 862.1565 - 6-Phosphogluconate dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false 6-Phosphogluconate dehydrogenase test system. 862.1565 Section 862.1565 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... are used in the diagnosis and treatment of certain liver diseases (such as hepatitis) and anemias. (b...

  11. Efficiency of superoxide anions in the inactivation of selected dehydrogenases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodacka, Aleksandra; Serafin, Eligiusz; Puchala, Mieczyslaw

    2010-09-01

    The most ubiquitous of the primary reactive oxygen species, formed in all aerobes, is the superoxide free radical. It is believed that the superoxide anion radical shows low reactivity and in oxidative stress it is regarded mainly as an initiator of more reactive species such as rad OH and ONOO -. In this paper, the effectiveness of inactivation of selected enzymes by radiation-generated superoxide radicals in comparison with the effectiveness of the other products of water radiolysis is examined. We investigate three enzymes: glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). We show that the direct contribution of the superoxide anion radical to GAPDH and ADH inactivation is significant. The effectiveness of the superoxide anion in the inactivation of GAPDH and ADG was only 2.4 and 2.8 times smaller, respectively, in comparison with hydroxyl radical. LDH was practically not inactivated by the superoxide anion. Despite the fact that the studied dehydrogenases belong to the same class of enzymes (oxidoreductases), all have a similar molecular weight and are tetramers, their susceptibility to free-radical damage varies. The differences in the radiosensitivity of the enzymes are not determined by the basic structural parameters analyzed. A significant role in inactivation susceptibility is played by the type of amino acid residues and their localization within enzyme molecules.

  12. 21 CFR 864.7360 - Erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase... § 864.7360 Erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase assay. (a) Identification. An erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase assay is a device used to measure the activity of the enzyme glucose-6...

  13. 21 CFR 864.7360 - Erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase... § 864.7360 Erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase assay. (a) Identification. An erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase assay is a device used to measure the activity of the enzyme glucose-6...

  14. 21 CFR 864.7360 - Erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase... § 864.7360 Erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase assay. (a) Identification. An erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase assay is a device used to measure the activity of the enzyme glucose-6...

  15. 21 CFR 864.7360 - Erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase... § 864.7360 Erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase assay. (a) Identification. An erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase assay is a device used to measure the activity of the enzyme glucose-6...

  16. 21 CFR 864.7360 - Erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase... § 864.7360 Erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase assay. (a) Identification. An erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase assay is a device used to measure the activity of the enzyme glucose-6...

  17. Spatial variability of the dehydrogenase activity in forest soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Błońska, Ewa; Lasota, Jarosław

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the spatial variability of the dehydrogenase activity (DH) in forest soils using geostatistics. We have studied variability soil dehydrogenase and their relationship with variability of some physic-chemical properties. Two study areas (A and B) were set up in southern Poland in the Zlotoryja Forest District. Study areas were covered by different types of vegetation (A- broadleaf forest with beech, ash and sycamore), B- coniferous forest with Norway spruce). The soils were classified as Dystric Cambisols (WRB 2006). The samples for laboratory testing were collected from 49 places on each areas. 15 cm of surface horizon of soil were taken (with previously removed litter). Dehydrogenase activity was marked with Lenhard's method according to the Casida procedure. Soil pH, nitrogen (N) and soil organic carbon (C) content (by LECO CNS 2000 carbon analyzer) was marked. C/N ratio was calculated. Particle size composition was determined using laser diffraction. Statistical analysis were performed using STATISTICA 10 software. Geostatistical analysis and mapping were done by application of GS 9+ (Gamma Design) and Surfer 11 (Golden Software). The activity of DH ranged between 5,02 and 71,20 mg TPP• kg-1 •24 h-1 on the A area and between 0,94 and 16,47 mg TPP• kg-1 •24 h-1. Differences in spatial variability of the analised features were noted. The variability of dehydrogenase activity on the A study area was described by an exponential model, whereas on the B study area the spatial correlation has not been noted. The relationship of dehydrogenase activity with the remaining parameters of soil was noted only in the case of A study area. The variability of organic carbon content on the A and B study areas were described by an exponential model. The variability of nitrogen content on both areas were described by an spherical model.

  18. Glutamate dehydrogenases: the why and how of coenzyme specificity.

    PubMed

    Engel, Paul C

    2014-01-01

    NAD(+) and NADP(+), chemically similar and with almost identical standard oxidation-reduction potentials, nevertheless have distinct roles, NAD(+) serving catabolism and ATP generation whereas NADPH is the biosynthetic reductant. Separating these roles requires strict specificity for one or the other coenzyme for most dehydrogenases. In many organisms this holds also for glutamate dehydrogenases (GDH), NAD(+)-dependent for glutamate oxidation, NADP(+)-dependent for fixing ammonia. In higher animals, however, GDH has dual specificity. It has been suggested that GDH in mitochondria reacts only with NADP(H), the NAD(+) reaction being an in vitro artefact. However, contrary evidence suggests mitochondrial GDH not only reacts with NAD(+) but maintains equilibrium using the same pool as accessed by β-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase. Another complication is the presence of an energy-linked dehydrogenase driving NADP(+) reduction by NADH, maintaining the coenzyme pools at different oxidation-reduction potentials. Its coexistence with GDH makes possible a futile cycle, control of which is not yet properly explained. Structural studies show NAD(+)-dependent, NADP(+)-dependent and dual-specificity GDHs are closely related and a few site-directed mutations can reverse specificity. Specificity for NAD(+) or for NADP(+) has probably emerged repeatedly during evolution, using different structural solutions on different occasions. In various GDHs the P7 position in the coenzyme-binding domain plays a key role. However, whereas in other dehydrogenases an acidic P7 residue usually hydrogen bonds to the 2'- and 3'-hydroxyls, dictating NAD(+) specificity, among GDHs, depending on detailed conformation of surrounding residues, an acidic P7 may permit binding of NAD(+) only, NADP(+) only, or in higher animals both.

  19. Catalytic Mechanism of Short Ethoxy Chain Nonylphenol Dehydrogenase Belonging to a Polyethylene Glycol Dehydrogenase Group in the GMC Oxidoreductase Family

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xin; Ohta, Takeshi; Kawabata, Takeshi; Kawai, Fusako

    2013-01-01

    Ethoxy (EO) chain nonylphenol dehydrogenase (NPEO-DH) from Ensifer sp. AS08 and EO chain octylphenol dehydrogenase from Pseudomonas putida share common molecular characteristics with polyethylene glycol (PEG) dehydrogenases (PEG-DH) and comprise a PEG-DH subgroup in the family of glucose-methanol-choline (GMC) oxidoreductases that includes glucose/alcohol oxidase and glucose/choline dehydrogenase. Three-dimensional (3D) molecular modeling suggested that differences in the size, secondary structure and hydropathy in the active site caused differences in their substrate specificities toward EO chain alkylphenols and free PEGs. Based on 3D molecular modeling, site-directed mutagenesis was utilized to introduce mutations into potential catalytic residues of NPEO-DH. From steady state and rapid kinetic characterization of wild type and mutant NPEO-DHs, we can conclude that His465 and Asn507 are directly involved in the catalysis. Asn507 mediates the transfer of proton from a substrate to FAD and His465 transfers the same proton from the reduced flavin to an electron acceptor. PMID:23306149

  20. NADH dehydrogenase-like behavior of nitrogen-doped graphene and its application in NAD(+)-dependent dehydrogenase biosensing.

    PubMed

    Gai, Pan-Pan; Zhao, Cui-E; Wang, Ying; Abdel-Halim, E S; Zhang, Jian-Rong; Zhu, Jun-Jie

    2014-12-15

    A novel electrochemical biosensing platform for nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+))-dependent dehydrogenase catalysis was designed using the nitrogen-doped graphene (NG), which had properties similar to NADH dehydrogenase (CoI). NG mimicked flavin mononucleotide (FMN) in CoI and efficiently catalyzed NADH oxidation. NG also acted as an electron transport "bridge" from NADH to the electrode due to its excellent conductivity. In comparison with a bare gold electrode, an 800 mV decrease in the overpotential for NADH oxidation and CoI-like behavior were observed at NG-modified electrode, which is the largest decrease in overpotential for NADH oxidation reported to date. The catalytic rate constant (k) for the CoI-like behavior of NG was estimated to be 2.3×10(5) M(-1) s(-1), which is much higher than that of other previously reported FMN analogs. The Michaelis-Menten constant (Km) of NG was 26 μM, which is comparable to the Km of CoI (10 μM). Electrodes modified with NG and NG/gold nanoparticals/formate dehydrogenase (NG/AuNPs/FDH) showed excellent analytical performance for the detection of NADH and formate. This electrode fabrication strategy could be used to create a universal biosensing platform for developing NAD(+)-dependent dehydrogenase biosensors and biofuel cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Inducible UDP-glucose dehydrogenase from French bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) locates to vascular tissue and has alcohol dehydrogenase activity.

    PubMed

    Robertson, D; Smith, C; Bolwell, G P

    1996-01-01

    UDP-glucose dehydrogenase is responsible for channelling UDP-glucose into the pool of UDP-sugars utilized in the synthesis of wall matrix polysaccharides and glycoproteins. It has been purified to homogeneity from suspension-cultured cells of French bean by a combination of hydrophobic-interaction chromatography, gel filtration and dye-ligand chromatography. The enzyme had a subunit of Mr 40,000. Km values were measured for UDP-glucose as 5.5 +/- 1.4 mM and for NAD+ as 20 +/- 3 microM. It was subject to inhibition by UDP-xylose. UDP-glucose dehydrogenase activity co-purified with alcohol dehydrogenase activity from suspension-cultured cells, elicitor-treated cells and elongating hypocotyls, even when many additional chromatographic steps were employed subsequently. The protein from each source was resolved into virtually identical patterns of isoforms on two-dimensional isoelectric focusing/PAGE. However, a combination of peptide mapping and sequence analysis, gel analysis using activity staining and kinetic analysis suggests that both activities are a function of the same protein. An antibody was raised and used to immunolocalize UDP-glucose dehydrogenase to developing xylem and phloem of French bean hypocotyl. Together with data published previously, these results are consistent with an important role in the regulation of carbon flux into wall matrix polysaccharides.

  2. Short Chain Dehydrogenase/Reductase Rdhe2 Is a Novel Retinol Dehydrogenase Essential for Frog Embryonic Development*

    PubMed Central

    Belyaeva, Olga V.; Lee, Seung-Ah; Adams, Mark K.; Chang, Chenbei; Kedishvili, Natalia Y.

    2012-01-01

    The enzymes responsible for the rate-limiting step in retinoic acid biosynthesis, the oxidation of retinol to retinaldehyde, during embryogenesis and in adulthood have not been fully defined. Here, we report that a novel member of the short chain dehydrogenase/reductase superfamily, frog sdr16c5, acts as a highly active retinol dehydrogenase (rdhe2) that promotes retinoic acid biosynthesis when expressed in mammalian cells. In vivo assays of rdhe2 function show that overexpression of rdhe2 in frog embryos leads to posteriorization and induction of defects resembling those caused by retinoic acid toxicity. Conversely, antisense morpholino-mediated knockdown of endogenous rdhe2 results in phenotypes consistent with retinoic acid deficiency, such as defects in anterior neural tube closure, microcephaly with small eye formation, disruption of somitogenesis, and curved body axis with bent tail. Higher doses of morpholino induce embryonic lethality. Analyses of retinoic acid levels using either endogenous retinoic acid-sensitive gene hoxd4 or retinoic acid reporter cell line both show that the levels of retinoic acid are significantly decreased in rdhe2 morphants. Taken together, these results provide strong evidence that Xenopus rdhe2 functions as a retinol dehydrogenase essential for frog embryonic development in vivo. Importantly, the retinol oxidizing activity of frog rdhe2 is conserved in its mouse homologs, suggesting that rdhe2-related enzymes may represent the previously unrecognized physiologically relevant retinol dehydrogenases that contribute to retinoic acid biosynthesis in higher vertebrates. PMID:22291023

  3. Crystal structure of quinone-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase from Pseudogluconobacter saccharoketogenes. A versatile dehydrogenase oxidizing alcohols and carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Rozeboom, Henriëtte J; Yu, Shukun; Mikkelsen, Rene; Nikolaev, Igor; Mulder, Harm J; Dijkstra, Bauke W

    2015-12-01

    The quinone-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase (PQQ-ADH, E.C. 1.1.5.2) from the Gram-negative bacterium Pseudogluconobacter saccharoketogenes IFO 14464 oxidizes primary alcohols (e.g. ethanol, butanol), secondary alcohols (monosaccharides), as well as aldehydes, polysaccharides, and cyclodextrins. The recombinant protein, expressed in Pichia pastoris, was crystallized, and three-dimensional (3D) structures of the native form, with PQQ and a Ca(2+) ion, and of the enzyme in complex with a Zn(2+) ion and a bound substrate mimic were determined at 1.72 Å and 1.84 Å resolution, respectively. PQQ-ADH displays an eight-bladed β-propeller fold, characteristic of Type I quinone-dependent methanol dehydrogenases. However, three of the four ligands of the Ca(2+) ion differ from those of related dehydrogenases and they come from different parts of the polypeptide chain. These differences result in a more open, easily accessible active site, which explains why PQQ-ADH can oxidize a broad range of substrates. The bound substrate mimic suggests Asp333 as the catalytic base. Remarkably, no vicinal disulfide bridge is present near the PQQ, which in other PQQ-dependent alcohol dehydrogenases has been proposed to be necessary for electron transfer. Instead an associated cytochrome c can approach the PQQ for direct electron transfer. © 2015 The Protein Society.

  4. Derivatives of cinnamic acid interact with the nucleotide binding site of mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase. Effects on the dehydrogenase reaction and stimulation of esterase activity by nucleotides.

    PubMed

    Poole, R C; Bowden, N J; Halestrap, A P

    1993-04-22

    A wide variety of cinnamic acid derivatives are inhibitors of the low Km mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase. Two of the most potent inhibitors are alpha-cyano-3,4-dihydroxythiocinnamamide (Ki0.6 microM) and alpha-cyano-3,4,5-trihydroxycinnamonitrile (Ki2.6 microM). With propionaldehyde as substrate the inhibition by these compounds was competitive with respect to NAD+. alpha-Fluorocinnamate was a much less effective inhibitor of the enzyme, with mixed behaviour towards NAD+, but with a major competitive component. These cinnamic acid derivatives were ineffective as inhibitors of the aldehyde dehydrogenase-catalysed hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl acetate, but inhibited the ability of NAD+ and NADH to activate this activity. Inhibition of the stimulation of esterase activity was competitive with respect to NAD+ and NADH, and the derived Ki values were the same as for inhibition of dehydrogenase activity. NAD+, but not acetaldehyde, could elute the low Km aldehyde dehydrogenase from alpha-cyanocinnamate-Sepharose, to which the enzyme binds specifically (Poole RC and Halestrap AP, Biochem J 259: 105-110, 1989). The cinnamic acid derivatives have little effect on lactate dehydrogenase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase or a high Km aldehyde dehydrogenase present in rat liver mitochondria. It is concluded that some cinnamic acid derivatives are potent inhibitors of the low Km aldehyde dehydrogenase, by competing with NAD+/NADH for binding to the enzyme. They are much less effective as inhibitors of other NAD(+)-dependent dehydrogenases.

  5. Succinate dehydrogenase subunit D and succinate dehydrogenase subunit B mutation analysis in canine phaeochromocytoma and paraganglioma.

    PubMed

    Holt, D E; Henthorn, P; Howell, V M; Robinson, B G; Benn, D E

    2014-07-01

    Phaeochromocytomas (PCs) are tumours of the adrenal medulla chromaffin cells. Paragangliomas (PGLs) arise in sympathetic ganglia (previously called extra-adrenal PCs) or in non-chromaffin parasympathetic ganglia cells that are usually non-secretory. Parenchymal cells from these tumours have a common embryological origin from neural crest ectoderm. Several case series of canine PCs and PGLs have been published and a link between the increased incidence of chemoreceptor neoplasia in brachycephalic dog breeds and chronic hypoxia has been postulated. A similar link to hypoxia in man led to the identification of germline heterozygous mutations in the gene encoding succinate dehydrogenase subunit D (SDHD) and subsequently SDHA, SDHB and SDHC in similar tumours. We investigated canine PCs (n = 6) and PGLs (n = 2) for SDHD and SDHB mutations and in one PGL found a somatic SDHD mutation c.365A>G (p.Lys122Arg) in exon 4, which was not present in normal tissue from this brachycephalic dog. Two PCs were heterozygous for both c.365A>G (p.Lys122Arg) mutation and an exon 3 silent variant c.291G>A. We also identified the heterozygous SDHB exon 2 mutation c.113G>A (p.Arg38Gln) in a PC. These results illustrate that genetic mutations may underlie tumourigenesis in canine PCs and PGLs. The spontaneous nature of these canine diseases and possible association of PGLs with hypoxia in brachycephalic breeds may make them an attractive model for studying the corresponding human tumours. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Molecular Determinants of the Cofactor Specificity of Ribitol Dehydrogenase, a Short-Chain Dehydrogenase/Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Hee-Jung; Tiwari, Manish Kumar; Singh, Ranjitha

    2012-01-01

    Ribitol dehydrogenase from Zymomonas mobilis (ZmRDH) catalyzes the conversion of ribitol to d-ribulose and concomitantly reduces NAD(P)+ to NAD(P)H. A systematic approach involving an initial sequence alignment-based residue screening, followed by a homology model-based screening and site-directed mutagenesis of the screened residues, was used to study the molecular determinants of the cofactor specificity of ZmRDH. A homologous conserved amino acid, Ser156, in the substrate-binding pocket of the wild-type ZmRDH was identified as an important residue affecting the cofactor specificity of ZmRDH. Further insights into the function of the Ser156 residue were obtained by substituting it with other hydrophobic nonpolar or polar amino acids. Substituting Ser156 with the negatively charged amino acids (Asp and Glu) altered the cofactor specificity of ZmRDH toward NAD+ (S156D, [kcat/Km,NAD]/[kcat/Km,NADP] = 10.9, where Km,NAD is the Km for NAD+ and Km,NADP is the Km for NADP+). In contrast, the mutants containing positively charged amino acids (His, Lys, or Arg) at position 156 showed a higher efficiency with NADP+ as the cofactor (S156H, [kcat/Km,NAD]/[kcat/Km,NADP] = 0.11). These data, in addition to those of molecular dynamics and isothermal titration calorimetry studies, suggest that the cofactor specificity of ZmRDH can be modulated by manipulating the amino acid residue at position 156. PMID:22344653

  7. Molecular determinants of the cofactor specificity of ribitol dehydrogenase, a short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase.

    PubMed

    Moon, Hee-Jung; Tiwari, Manish Kumar; Singh, Ranjitha; Kang, Yun Chan; Lee, Jung-Kul

    2012-05-01

    Ribitol dehydrogenase from Zymomonas mobilis (ZmRDH) catalyzes the conversion of ribitol to d-ribulose and concomitantly reduces NAD(P)(+) to NAD(P)H. A systematic approach involving an initial sequence alignment-based residue screening, followed by a homology model-based screening and site-directed mutagenesis of the screened residues, was used to study the molecular determinants of the cofactor specificity of ZmRDH. A homologous conserved amino acid, Ser156, in the substrate-binding pocket of the wild-type ZmRDH was identified as an important residue affecting the cofactor specificity of ZmRDH. Further insights into the function of the Ser156 residue were obtained by substituting it with other hydrophobic nonpolar or polar amino acids. Substituting Ser156 with the negatively charged amino acids (Asp and Glu) altered the cofactor specificity of ZmRDH toward NAD(+) (S156D, [k(cat)/K(m)(,NAD)]/[k(cat)/K(m)(,NADP)] = 10.9, where K(m)(,NAD) is the K(m) for NAD(+) and K(m)(,NADP) is the K(m) for NADP(+)). In contrast, the mutants containing positively charged amino acids (His, Lys, or Arg) at position 156 showed a higher efficiency with NADP(+) as the cofactor (S156H, [k(cat)/K(m)(,NAD)]/[k(cat)/K(m)(,NADP)] = 0.11). These data, in addition to those of molecular dynamics and isothermal titration calorimetry studies, suggest that the cofactor specificity of ZmRDH can be modulated by manipulating the amino acid residue at position 156.

  8. Expression of lactate dehydrogenase C correlates with poor prognosis in renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hua, Yibo; Liang, Chao; Zhu, Jundong; Miao, Chenkui; Yu, Yajie; Xu, Aimin; Zhang, Jianzhong; Li, Pu; Li, Shuang; Bao, Meiling; Yang, Jie; Qin, Chao; Wang, Zengjun

    2017-03-01

    Lactate dehydrogenase C is an isoenzyme of lactate dehydrogenase and a member of the cancer-testis antigens family. In this study, we aimed to investigate the expression and functional role of lactate dehydrogenase C and its basic mechanisms in renal cell carcinoma. First, a total of 133 cases of renal cell carcinoma samples were analysed in a tissue microarray, and Kaplan-Meier survival curve analyses were performed to investigate the correlation between lactate dehydrogenase C expression and renal cell carcinoma progression. Lactate dehydrogenase C protein levels and messenger RNA levels were significantly upregulated in renal cell carcinoma tissues, and the patients with positive lactate dehydrogenase C expression had a shorter progression-free survival, indicating the oncogenic role of lactate dehydrogenase C in renal cell carcinoma. In addition, further cytological experiments demonstrated that lactate dehydrogenase C could prompt renal cell carcinoma cells to produce lactate, and increase metastatic and invasive potential of renal cell carcinoma cells. Furthermore, lactate dehydrogenase C could induce the epithelial-mesenchymal transition process and matrix metalloproteinase-9 expression. In summary, these findings showed lactate dehydrogenase C was associated with poor prognosis in renal cell carcinoma and played a pivotal role in the migration and invasion of renal cell carcinoma cells. Lactate dehydrogenase C may act as a novel biomarker for renal cell carcinoma progression and a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of renal cell carcinoma.

  9. [Effect of hypobaric hypoxia on the dehydrogenase activities of respiration and photosynthetic metabolism in barley seedlings].

    PubMed

    Voytsekovskaya, S A; Astafurova, T P; Verkhoturova, G S; Postovalova, V M

    2015-01-01

    Hypobaric hypoxia effects on enzymes of photosynthesis and respiration metabolism were explored in 8-day old seedlings of barley Hordeum vulgare L. in the dark or light. 16-hour exposure in rarified atmosphere that causes reductions of partial pressure of air gases and, consequently, hypobaric hypoxia (P(air) = 8.3 κPa, pO2 = 1.7 κPa, pCO2 = 0.003 κPa) up-regulated the activities of piruvate kinase, alcohol dehydrogenase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and NADP x N-glyceraldehyde phosphate dehydrogenase both in the dark and light. NAD- and NAD-N-malate dehydrogenase activities were down-regulated. Levels of NAD- and NAD x H- malate dehydrogenases were decreased. Activation of the NADP-malic enzyme activity, invariably high activity of NADP-isocitrate dehydrogenase and growth of NADP x N- glyceraldehyde phosphate dehydrogenase are considered as a mechanism of barley seedlings adaptation to hypobaric hypoxia.

  10. Reconstitution of mammalian pyruvate dehydrogenase and 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complexes: analysis of protein X involvement and interaction of homologous and heterologous dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenases.

    PubMed Central

    Sanderson, S J; Khan, S S; McCartney, R G; Miller, C; Lindsay, J G

    1996-01-01

    Optimal conditions for rapid and efficient reconstitution of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) activity are demonstrated by using an improved method for the dissociation of the multienzyme complex into its constituent E1 (substrate-specific 2-oxoacid decarboxylase) and E3 (dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase) components and isolated E2/X (where E2 is dihydrolipoamide acyltransferase) core assembly. Selective cleavage of the protein X component of the purified E2/X core with the proteinase arg C decreases the activity of the reconstituted complex to residual levels (i.e. 8-12%); however, significant recovery of reconstitution is achieved on addition of a large excess (i.e. 50-fold) of parent E3. N-terminal sequence analysis of the truncated 35,000-M(r) protein X fragment locates the site of cleavage by arg C at the extreme N-terminal boundary of a putative E3-binding domain and corresponds to the release of a 15,000-M(r) N-terminal fragment comprising both the lipoyl and linker sequences. In native PDC this region of protein X is shown to be partly protected from proteolytic attack by the presence of E3. Recovery of complex activity in the presence of excess E3 after arg C treatment is thought to result from low-affinity interactions with the partly disrupted subunit-binding domain on X and/or the intact analogous subunit binding domain on E2. Contrasting recoveries for arg C-modified E2/X/E1 core, and untreated E2/E1 core of the 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complex, reconstituted with excess bovine heart E3, pig heart E3 or yeast E3 point to subtle differences in subunit interactions with heterologous E3s and offer an explanation for the inability of previous investigators to achieve restoration of PDC function after selective proteolysis of the protein X component. PMID:8870656

  11. Purification and preliminary characterization of alcohol dehydrogenase from Aspergillus nidulans.

    PubMed Central

    Creaser, E H; Porter, R L; Britt, K A; Pateman, J A; Doy, C H

    1985-01-01

    Aspergillus alcohol dehydrogenase is produced in response to growth in the presence of a wide variety of inducers, of which the most effective are short-chain alcohols and ketones, e.g. butan-2-one and propan-2-ol. The enzyme can be readily extracted from fresh or freeze-dried cells and purified to homogeneity on Blue Sepharose in a single step by using specific elution with NAD+ and pyrazole. The pure enzyme has Mr 290 000 by electrophoresis or gel filtration; it is a homopolymer with subunit Mr 37 500 by electrophoresis in sodium dodecyl sulphate; its amino acid composition corresponds to Mr 37 900, and the native enzyme contains one zinc atom per subunit. The enzyme is NAD-specific and has a wide substrate activity in the forward and reverse reactions; its activity profile is not identical with those of other alcohol dehydrogenases. PMID:3156582

  12. A specific radiochemical assay for pyrroline-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Small, C; Jones, M E

    1987-03-01

    Previous studies of pyrroline-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase have been conducted using a spectrophotometric method to monitor substrate-dependent NAD(P)H production. For the assay of the mammalian enzyme, the spectrophotometric assay was found to be unacceptable for kinetic studies as the production of NAD(P)H was nonlinear with time and protein concentration. An assay which measures radiolabeled glutamate production by this enzyme in the presence of NAD+ from radiolabeled pyrroline-5-carboxylate has been developed. Separation of substrate from product is achieved by column chromatography using Dowex 50 cation-exchange resin. The product isolated by this procedure was identified as glutamate. This new assay is linear with time and protein concentration and gives reproducible results. The assay is not influenced by competing enzyme activities, such as glutamate dehydrogenase, in a liver homogenate so that quantitative conversion of pyrroline-5-carboxylate to glutamate is observed.

  13. Regional development of glutamate dehydrogenase in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Leong, S F; Clark, J B

    1984-07-01

    The development of glutamate dehydrogenase enzyme activity in rat brain regions has been followed from the late foetal stage to the adult and through to the aged (greater than 2 years) adult. In the adult brain the enzyme activity was greatest in the medulla oblongata and pons greater than midbrain = hypothalamus greater than cerebellum = striatum = cortex. In the aged adult brain, glutamate dehydrogenase activity was significantly lower in the medulla oblongata and pons when compared to the 90-day-old adult value, but not in other regions. The enzyme-specific activity of nonsynaptic (free) mitochondria purified from the medulla oblongata and pons of 90-day-old animals was about twice that of mitochondria purified from the striatum and the cortex. The specific activity of the enzyme in synaptic mitochondria purified from the above three brain regions, however, remained almost constant.

  14. Structural basis for cellobiose dehydrogenase action during oxidative cellulose degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Tien-Chye; Kracher, Daniel; Gandini, Rosaria; Sygmund, Christoph; Kittl, Roman; Haltrich, Dietmar; Hällberg, B. Martin; Ludwig, Roland; Divne, Christina

    2015-07-01

    A new paradigm for cellulose depolymerization by fungi focuses on an oxidative mechanism involving cellobiose dehydrogenases (CDH) and copper-dependent lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMO); however, mechanistic studies have been hampered by the lack of structural information regarding CDH. CDH contains a haem-binding cytochrome (CYT) connected via a flexible linker to a flavin-dependent dehydrogenase (DH). Electrons are generated from cellobiose oxidation catalysed by DH and shuttled via CYT to LPMO. Here we present structural analyses that provide a comprehensive picture of CDH conformers, which govern the electron transfer between redox centres. Using structure-based site-directed mutagenesis, rapid kinetics analysis and molecular docking, we demonstrate that flavin-to-haem interdomain electron transfer (IET) is enabled by a haem propionate group and that rapid IET requires a closed CDH state in which the propionate is tightly enfolded by DH. Following haem reduction, CYT reduces LPMO to initiate oxygen activation at the copper centre and subsequent cellulose depolymerization.

  15. NADH dehydrogenase subunit genes in the mitochondrial DNA of yeasts.

    PubMed Central

    Nosek, J; Fukuhara, H

    1994-01-01

    The genes encoding the NADH dehydrogenase subunits of respiratory complex I have not been identified so far in the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of yeasts. In the linear mtDNA of Candida parapsilosis, we found six new open reading frames whose sequences were unambiguously homologous to those of the genes known to code for NADH dehydrogenase subunit proteins of different organisms, i.e., ND1, ND2, ND3, ND4L, ND5, and ND6. The gene for ND4 also appears to be present, as judged from hybridization experiments with a Podospora gene probe. Specific transcripts from these open reading frames (ND genes) could be detected in the mitochondria. Hybridization experiments using C. parapsilosis genes as probes suggested that ND genes are present in the mtDNAs of a wide range of yeast species including Candida catenulata, Pichia guilliermondii, Clavispora lusitaniae, Debaryomyces hansenii, Hansenula polymorpha, and others. Images PMID:7521869

  16. Pressure regulation of malic dehydrogenase in reversed micelles.

    PubMed

    Klyachko, N L; Levashov, P A; Levashov, A V; Balny, C

    1999-01-27

    Malic dehydrogenase (MDH) studied in water and reversed micelles upon pressure application revealed a difference in catalysis. Whereas MDH in water appeared to be not sensitive to the pressure increasing, the catalytic activity of MDH in reversed micelles showed bell-shaped dependencies both on pressure and surfactant hydration degree, w0. The catalytic activity of MDH was found to be maximal under moderate pressure equal to 300-500 bar and at w0 approximately 14 with the difference between lowest and highest levels of the catalytic activity amounted to about 10 times. The work presented demonstrates for the first time the co-operative effect of reversed micelles and pressure application to malic dehydrogenase leading to the enzyme regulation that cannot be realized in aqueous solution. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  17. Alcohol Dehydrogenase and Ethanol in the Stems of Trees 1

    PubMed Central

    Kimmerer, Thomas W.; Stringer, Mary A.

    1988-01-01

    Anaerobic fermentation in plants is usually thought to be a transient phenomenon, brought about by environmental limitations to oxygen availability, or by structural constraints to oxygen transport. The vascular cambium of trees is separated from the air by the outer bark and secondary phloem, and we hypothesized that the cambium may experience sufficient hypoxia to induce anaerobic fermentation. We found high alcohol dehydrogenase activity in the cambium of several tree species. Mean activity of alcohol dehydrogenase in Populus deltoides was 165 micromoles NADH oxidized per minute per gram fresh weight in May. Pyruvate decarboxylase activity was also present in the cambium of P. deltoides, with mean activity of 26 micromoles NADH oxidized per minute per gram fresh weight in May. Lactate dehydrogenase activity was not present in any tree species we examined. Contrary to our expectation, alcohol dehydrogenase activity was inversely related to bark thickness in Acer saccharum and unrelated to bark thickness in two Populus species. Bark thickness may be less important in limiting oxygen availability to the cambium than is oxygen consumption by rapidly respiring phloem and cambium in actively growing trees. Ethanol was present in the vascular cambium of all species examined, with mean concentrations of 35 to 143 nanomoles per gram fresh weight, depending on species. Ethanol was also present in xylem sap and may have been released from the cambium into the transpiration stream. The presence in the cambium of the enzymes necessary for fermentation as well as the products of fermentation is evidence that respiration in the vascular cambium of trees may be oxygen-limited, but other biosynthetic origins of ethanol have not been ruled out. PMID:16666209

  18. Enantioselective oxidation of aldehydes catalyzed by alcohol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Könst, Paul; Merkens, Hedda; Kara, Selin; Kochius, Svenja; Vogel, Andreas; Zuhse, Ralf; Holtmann, Dirk; Arends, Isabel W C E; Hollmann, Frank

    2012-09-24

    Teaching old dogs new tricks: Alcohol dehydrogenases (ADHs) may be established redox biocatalysts but they still are good for a few surprises. ADHs can be used to oxidize aldehydes, and this was demonstrated by the oxidative dynamic kinetic resolution of profens. In the presence of a suitable cofactor regeneration system, this reaction can occur with high selectivity. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (HSDs) in bacteria: a bioinformatic perspective.

    PubMed

    Kisiela, Michael; Skarka, Adam; Ebert, Bettina; Maser, Edmund

    2012-03-01

    Steroidal compounds including cholesterol, bile acids and steroid hormones play a central role in various physiological processes such as cell signaling, growth, reproduction, and energy homeostasis. Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (HSDs), which belong to the superfamily of short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases (SDR) or aldo-keto reductases (AKR), are important enzymes involved in the steroid hormone metabolism. HSDs function as an enzymatic switch that controls the access of receptor-active steroids to nuclear hormone receptors and thereby mediate a fine-tuning of the steroid response. The aim of this study was the identification of classified functional HSDs and the bioinformatic annotation of these proteins in all complete sequenced bacterial genomes followed by a phylogenetic analysis. For the bioinformatic annotation we constructed specific hidden Markov models in an iterative approach to provide a reliable identification for the specific catalytic groups of HSDs. Here, we show a detailed phylogenetic analysis of 3α-, 7α-, 12α-HSDs and two further functional related enzymes (3-ketosteroid-Δ(1)-dehydrogenase, 3-ketosteroid-Δ(4)(5α)-dehydrogenase) from the superfamily of SDRs. For some bacteria that have been previously reported to posses a specific HSD activity, we could annotate the corresponding HSD protein. The dominating phyla that were identified to express HSDs were that of Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria, and Firmicutes. Moreover, some evolutionarily more ancient microorganisms (e.g., Cyanobacteria and Euryachaeota) were found as well. A large number of HSD-expressing bacteria constitute the normal human gastro-intestinal flora. Another group of bacteria were originally isolated from natural habitats like seawater, soil, marine and permafrost sediments. These bacteria include polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons-degrading species such as Pseudomonas, Burkholderia and Rhodococcus. In conclusion, HSDs are found in a wide variety of microorganisms including

  20. Parasite Lactate Dehydrogenase for Diagnosis of Plasmodium Falciparum. Phase II.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-04-01

    Diagnosis of Plasmodium Falciparum PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Robert C. Piper, Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Flow, Incorporated Portland, Oregon 97201...Phase 11 (24 Mar 95 - 23 Mar 97) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS Parasite Lactate Dehydrogenase for Diagnosis of Plasmodium Falciparum DAMD...that infected patients become ill. Four species of Plasmodium infect humans. P. falciparum accounts for -85 % of the world’s malaria. P. falciparum is

  1. Inhibition of membrane-bound succinate dehydrogenase by fluorescamine.

    PubMed

    Jay, D; Jay, E G; Garcia, C

    1993-12-01

    Fluorescamine rapidly inactivated membrane-bound succinate dehydrogenase. The inhibition of the enzyme by this reagent was prevented by succinate and malonate, suggesting that the group modified by fluorescamine was located at the active site. The modification of the active site sulfhydryl group by 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid) (DTNB) did not alter the inhibitory action of fluorescamine. However, the protective effect of malonate against fluorescamine inhibition was abolished in the enzyme modified at the thiol.

  2. Reappraisal of the Regulation of Lactococcal l-Lactate Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    van Niel, Ed W. J.; Palmfeldt, Johan; Martin, Rani; Paese, Marco; Hahn-Hägerdal, Bärbel

    2004-01-01

    Lactococcal lactate dehydrogenases (LDHs) are coregulated at the substrate level by at least two mechanisms: the fructose-1,6-biphosphate/phosphate ratio and the NADH/NAD ratio. Among the Lactococcus lactis species, there are strains that are predominantly regulated by the first mechanism (e.g., strain 65.1) or by the second mechanism (e.g., strain NCDO 2118). A more complete model of the kinetics of the regulation of lactococcal LDH is discussed. PMID:15006814

  3. Cloning, purification and crystallization of Thermus thermophilus proline dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    White, Tommi A.; Tanner, John J.

    2005-08-01

    Cloning, purification and crystallization of T. thermophilus proline dehydrogenase is reported. The detergent n-octyl β-d-glucopyranoside was used to reduce polydispersity, which enabled crystallization. Nature recycles l-proline by converting it to l-glutamate. This four-electron oxidation process is catalyzed by the two enzymes: proline dehydrogenase (PRODH) and Δ{sup 1}-pyrroline-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase. This note reports the cloning, purification and crystallization of Thermus thermophilus PRODH, which is the prototype of a newly discovered superfamily of bacterial monofunctional PRODHs. The results presented here include production of a monodisperse protein solution through use of the detergent n-octyl β-d-glucopyranoside and the growth of native crystals that diffracted to 2.3 Å resolution at Advanced Light Source beamline 4.2.2. The space group is P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 82.2, b = 89.6, c = 94.3 Å. The asymmetric unit is predicted to contain two protein molecules and 46% solvent. Molecular-replacement trials using a fragment of the PRODH domain of the multifunctional Escherichia coli PutA protein as the search model (24% amino-acid sequence identity) did not produce a satisfactory solution. Therefore, the structure of T. thermophilus PRODH will be determined by multiwavelength anomalous dispersion phasing using a selenomethionyl derivative.

  4. Mitochondrial alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex generates reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Starkov, Anatoly A; Fiskum, Gary; Chinopoulos, Christos; Lorenzo, Beverly J; Browne, Susan E; Patel, Mulchand S; Beal, M Flint

    2004-09-08

    Mitochondria-produced reactive oxygen species (ROS) are thought to contribute to cell death caused by a multitude of pathological conditions. The molecular sites of mitochondrial ROS production are not well established but are generally thought to be located in complex I and complex III of the electron transport chain. We measured H(2)O(2) production, respiration, and NADPH reduction level in rat brain mitochondria oxidizing a variety of respiratory substrates. Under conditions of maximum respiration induced with either ADP or carbonyl cyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone,alpha-ketoglutarate supported the highest rate of H(2)O(2) production. In the absence of ADP or in the presence of rotenone, H(2)O(2) production rates correlated with the reduction level of mitochondrial NADPH with various substrates, with the exception of alpha-ketoglutarate. Isolated mitochondrial alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase (KGDHC) and pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDHC) complexes produced superoxide and H(2)O(2). NAD(+) inhibited ROS production by the isolated enzymes and by permeabilized mitochondria. We also measured H(2)O(2) production by brain mitochondria isolated from heterozygous knock-out mice deficient in dihydrolipoyl dehydrogenase (Dld). Although this enzyme is a part of both KGDHC and PDHC, there was greater impairment of KGDHC activity in Dld-deficient mitochondria. These mitochondria also produced significantly less H(2)O(2) than mitochondria isolated from their littermate wild-type mice. The data strongly indicate that KGDHC is a primary site of ROS production in normally functioning mitochondria.

  5. Characterization of two β-decarboxylating dehydrogenases from Sulfolobus acidocaldarius.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kento; Nakanishi, Fumika; Tomita, Takeo; Akiyama, Nagisa; Lassak, Kerstin; Albers, Sonja-Verena; Kuzuyama, Tomohisa; Nishiyama, Makoto

    2016-11-01

    Sulfolobus acidocaldarius, a hyperthermoacidophilic archaeon, possesses two β-decarboxylating dehydrogenase genes, saci_0600 and saci_2375, in its genome, which suggests that it uses these enzymes for three similar reactions in lysine biosynthesis through 2-aminoadipate, leucine biosynthesis, and the tricarboxylic acid cycle. To elucidate their roles, these two genes were expressed in Escherichia coli in the present study and their gene products were characterized. Saci_0600 recognized 3-isopropylmalate as a substrate, but exhibited slight and no activity for homoisocitrate and isocitrate, respectively. Saci_2375 exhibited distinct and similar activities for isocitrate and homoisocitrate, but no detectable activity for 3-isopropylmalate. These results suggest that Saci_0600 is a 3-isopropylmalate dehydrogenase for leucine biosynthesis and Saci_2375 is a dual function enzyme serving as isocitrate-homoisocitrate dehydrogenase. The crystal structure of Saci_0600 was determined as a closed-form complex that binds 3-isopropylmalate and Mg(2+), thereby revealing the structural basis for the extreme thermostability and novel-type recognition of the 3-isopropyl moiety of the substrate.

  6. Daidzin: a potent, selective inhibitor of human mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Keung, W M; Vallee, B L

    1993-02-15

    Human mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH-I) is potently, reversibly, and selectively inhibited by an isoflavone isolated from Radix puerariae and identified as daidzin, the 7-glucoside of 4',7-dihydroxyisoflavone. Kinetic analysis with formaldehyde as substrate reveals that daidzin inhibits ALDH-I competitively with respect to formaldehyde with a Ki of 40 nM, and uncompetitively with respect to the coenzyme NAD+. The human cytosolic aldehyde dehydrogenase isozyme (ALDH-II) is nearly 3 orders of magnitude less sensitive to daidzin inhibition. Daidzin does not inhibit human class I, II, or III alcohol dehydrogenases, nor does it have any significant effect on biological systems that are known to be affected by other isoflavones. Among more than 40 structurally related compounds surveyed, 12 inhibit ALDH-I, but only prunetin and 5-hydroxydaidzin (genistin) combine high selectivity and potency, although they are 7- to 15-fold less potent than daidzin. Structure-function relationships have established a basis for the design and synthesis of additional ALDH inhibitors that could both be yet more potent and specific.

  7. Metformin suppresses gluconeogenesis by inhibiting mitochondrial glycerophosphate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Madiraju, Anila K; Erion, Derek M; Rahimi, Yasmeen; Zhang, Xian-Man; Braddock, Demetrios T; Albright, Ronald A; Prigaro, Brett J; Wood, John L; Bhanot, Sanjay; MacDonald, Michael J; Jurczak, Michael J; Camporez, Joao-Paulo; Lee, Hui-Young; Cline, Gary W; Samuel, Varman T; Kibbey, Richard G; Shulman, Gerald I

    2014-06-26

    Metformin is considered to be one of the most effective therapeutics for treating type 2 diabetes because it specifically reduces hepatic gluconeogenesis without increasing insulin secretion, inducing weight gain or posing a risk of hypoglycaemia. For over half a century, this agent has been prescribed to patients with type 2 diabetes worldwide, yet the underlying mechanism by which metformin inhibits hepatic gluconeogenesis remains unknown. Here we show that metformin non-competitively inhibits the redox shuttle enzyme mitochondrial glycerophosphate dehydrogenase, resulting in an altered hepatocellular redox state, reduced conversion of lactate and glycerol to glucose, and decreased hepatic gluconeogenesis. Acute and chronic low-dose metformin treatment effectively reduced endogenous glucose production, while increasing cytosolic redox and decreasing mitochondrial redox states. Antisense oligonucleotide knockdown of hepatic mitochondrial glycerophosphate dehydrogenase in rats resulted in a phenotype akin to chronic metformin treatment, and abrogated metformin-mediated increases in cytosolic redox state, decreases in plasma glucose concentrations, and inhibition of endogenous glucose production. These findings were replicated in whole-body mitochondrial glycerophosphate dehydrogenase knockout mice. These results have significant implications for understanding the mechanism of metformin's blood glucose lowering effects and provide a new therapeutic target for type 2 diabetes.

  8. Purification and characterization of dimeric dihydrodiol dehydrogenase from dog liver.

    PubMed

    Sato, K; Nakanishi, M; Deyashiki, Y; Hara, A; Matsuura, K; Ohya, I

    1994-09-01

    High NADP(+)-linked dihydrodiol dehydrogenase activity was detected in dog liver cytosol, from which a dimeric enzyme composed of M(r) 39,000 subunits was purified to homogeneity. The enzyme oxidized trans-cyclohexanediol, and trans-dihydrodiols of benzene and naphthalene, the [1R,2R]-isomers of which were selectively oxidized. In the reverse reaction in the presence of NADPH as a coenzyme, the enzyme reduced alpha-dicarbonyl compounds, such as methylglyoxal, 3-deoxyglucosone, and diacetyl, and some compounds with a carbonyl group, such as glyceraldehyde, lactaldehyde, and acetoin. 4-Hydroxyphenylketones and ascorbates inhibited the enzyme. The results of steady-state kinetic analyses indicated that the reaction proceeds through an ordered bi bi mechanism with the coenzyme binding to the free enzyme, and suggested that the inhibitors bind to the enzyme-NADP+ binary complex. The dimeric enzyme was detected in liver and kidney of dog, and was immunochemically similar to the dimeric enzymes from monkey kidney, rabbit lens, and pig liver. The sequences (total 127 amino acid residues) of eight peptides derived on enzymatic digestion of the dog liver enzyme did not show significant similarity with the primary structures of members of the aldo-keto reductase and short chain dehydrogenase superfamilies, which include monomeric dihydrodiol dehydrogenases and carbonyl reductase, respectively.

  9. Functional Analysis of a Mosquito Short Chain Dehydrogenase Cluster

    PubMed Central

    Mayoral, Jaime G.; Leonard, Kate T.; Defelipe, Lucas A.; Turjansksi, Adrian G.; Nouzova, Marcela; Noriegal, Fernando G.

    2013-01-01

    The short chain dehydrogenases (SDR) constitute one the oldest and largest families of enzymes with over 46,000 members in sequence databases. About 25% of all known dehydrogenases belong to the SDR family. SDR enzymes have critical roles in lipid, amino acid, carbohydrate, hormone and xenobiotic metabolism as well as in redox sensor mechanisms. This family is present in archaea, bacteria, and eukaryota, emphasizing their versatility and fundamental importance for metabolic processes. We identified a cluster of eight SDRs in the mosquito Aedes aegypti (AaSDRs). Members of the cluster differ in tissue specificity and developmental expression. Heterologous expression produced recombinant proteins that had diverse substrate specificities, but distinct from the conventional insect alcohol (ethanol) dehydrogenases. They are all NADP+-dependent and they have S-enantioselectivity and preference for secondary alcohols with 8–15 carbons. Homology modeling was used to build the structure of AaSDR1 and two additional cluster members. The computational study helped explain the selectivity towards the (10S)-isomers as well as the reduced activity of AaSDR4 and AaSDR9 for longer isoprenoid substrates. Similar clusters of SDRs are present in other species of insects, suggesting similar selection mechanisms causing duplication and diversification of this family of enzymes. PMID:23238893

  10. Inhibition of porcine kidney betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase by hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Rosas-Rodríguez, Jesús A; Figueroa-Soto, Ciria G; Valenzuela-Soto, Elisa M

    2010-01-01

    Renal hyperosmotic conditions may produce reactive oxygen species, which could have a deleterious effect on the enzymes involved in osmoregulation. Hydrogen peroxide was used to provoke oxidative stress in the environment of betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase in vitro. Enzyme activity was reduced as hydrogen peroxide concentration was increased. Over 50% of the enzyme activity was lost at 100 μM hydrogen peroxide at two temperatures tested. At pH 8.0, under physiological ionic strength conditions, peroxide inhibited the enzyme. Initial velocity assays of betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase in the presence of hydrogen peroxide (0-200 μM) showed noncompetitive inhibition with respect to NAD(+) or to betaine aldehyde at saturating concentrations of the other substrate at pH 7.0 or 8.0. Inhibition data showed that apparent V(max) decreased 40% and 26% under betaine aldehyde and NAD(+) saturating concentrations at pH 8.0, while at pH 7.0 V(max) decreased 40% and 29% at betaine aldehyde and NAD(+) saturating concentrations. There was little change in apparent Km(NAD) at either pH, while Km(BA) increased at pH 7.0. K(i) values at pH 8 and 7 were calculated. Our results suggest that porcine kidney betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase could be inhibited by hydrogen peroxide in vivo, thus compromising the synthesis of glycine betaine.

  11. An efficient ribitol-specific dehydrogenase from Enterobacter aerogenes.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ranjitha; Singh, Raushan; Kim, In-Won; Sigdel, Sujan; Kalia, Vipin C; Kang, Yun Chan; Lee, Jung-Kul

    2015-05-01

    An NAD(+)-dependent ribitol dehydrogenase from Enterobacter aerogenes KCTC 2190 (EaRDH) was cloned and successfully expressed in Escherichia coli. The complete 729-bp gene was amplified, cloned, expressed, and subsequently purified in an active soluble form using nickel affinity chromatography. The enzyme had an optimal pH and temperature of 11.0 and 45°C, respectively. Among various polyols, EaRDH exhibited activity only toward ribitol, with Km, Vmax, and kcat/Km values of 10.3mM, 185Umg(-1), and 30.9s(-1)mM(-1), respectively. The enzyme showed strong preference for NAD(+) and displayed no detectable activity with NADP(+). Homology modeling and sequence analysis of EaRDH, along with its biochemical properties, confirmed that EaRDH belongs to the family of NAD(+)-dependent ribitol dehydrogenases, a member of short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SCOR) family. EaRDH showed the highest activity and unique substrate specificity among all known RDHs. Homology modeling and docking analysis shed light on the molecular basis of its unusually high activity and substrate specificity.

  12. Asp295 stabilizes the active-site loop structure of pyruvate dehydrogenase, facilitating phosphorylation of Ser292 by pyruvate dehydrogenase-kinase

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We have developed an invitro system for detailed analysis of reversible phosphorylation of the plant mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, comprising recombinant Arabidopsis thaliana a2b2-hetero tetrameric pyruvate dehydrogenase (E1) plus A.thaliana E1-kinase (AtPDK). Upon addition of MgATP...

  13. Levels of Alpha-Glycerophosphate Dehydrogenase, Triosephosphate Isomerase and Lactic Acid Dehydrogenase in Muscles of the Cockroach, ’Periplaneta americana’ L.,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The level of alpha-glycerophosphate dehydrogenase is slightly higher in leg muscle than in thoracic muscle of the American cockroach, Periplaneta ... americana . Triosephosphate isomerase in leg muscle is about twice that of thoracic muscle. There is little lactic acid dehydrogenase in both muscles. (Author)

  14. A quantitative histochemical study of lactate dehydrogenase and succinate dehydrogenase activities in the membrana granulosa of the ovulatory follicle of the rat.

    PubMed

    Zoller, L C; Enelow, R

    1983-11-01

    Using a microdensitometer, lactate dehydrogenase and succinate dehydrogenase activities were measured in the membrana granulosa of the rat ovulatory follicle. Ovaries were removed on each day of the oestrous cycle; oestrus, dioestrus-1, dioestrus-2, and proestrus; and enzyme activities measured in the membrana granulosa as a whole and in four regions within it: peripheral (PR), antral (AR), cumulus oophorus (CO) and corona radiata (CR). Throughout the cycle, lactate dehydrogenase activity was greatest in PR. On oestrus, lactate dehydrogenase activity was progressively less in AR, CO and CR. On dioestrus-1, activity was identical in AR and CO and less in CR. On dioestrus-2, activity was greater in AR than in CO or CR. By proestrus, activity was equal in AR, CO and CR. In the membrana granulosa as a whole, and in each region, lactate dehydrogenase activity declined as ovulation approached. In contrast, succinate dehydrogenase activity in the membrana granulosa as a whole and in PR was constant throughout the cycle. Activity fluctuated in the other regions. Succinate dehydrogenase activity on oestrus was greatest in PR, less in AR and CO and least in CR. On the remaining days, succinate dehydrogenase activity was greatest in PR and less but equal in the remainder of the membrana granulosa.

  15. X-linked glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) and autosomal 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGD) polymorphisms in baboons

    SciTech Connect

    VandeBerg, J.L.; Aivaliotis, M.J.; Samollow, P.B. )

    1992-12-01

    Electrophoretic polymorphisms of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGD) were examined in captive colonies of five subspecies of baboons (Papio hamadryas). Phenotype frequencies and family data verified the X-linked inheritance of the G6PD polymorphism. Insufficient family data were available to confirm autosomal inheritance of the 6PGD polymorphism, but the electrophoretic patterns of variant types (putative heterozygotes) suggested the codominant expression of alleles at an autosomal locus. Implications of the G6PD polymorphism are discussed with regard to its utility as a marker system for research on X-chromosome inactivation during baboon development and for studies of clonal cell proliferation and/or cell selection during the development of atherosclerotic lesions in the baboon model. 61 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  16. Cloning, sequencing and mutagenesis of the genes for aromatic amine dehydrogenase from Alcaligenes faecalis and evolution of amine dehydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Chistoserdov, A Y

    2001-08-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the aromatic amine utilization (aau) gene region from Alcaligenes faecalis contained nine genes (orf-1, aauBEDA, orf-2, orf-3, orf-4 and hemE) transcribed in the same direction. The aauB and aauA genes encode the periplasmic aromatic amine dehydrogenase (AADH) large and small subunit polypeptides, respectively, and were homologous to mauB and mauA, the genes for the large and small subunits of methylamine dehydrogenase (MADH). aauE and aauD are homologous to mauE and mauD and apparently carry out the same function of transport and folding of the small subunit polypeptide in the periplasm. No analogues of the mauF, mauG, mauL, mauM and mauN genes responsible for biosynthesis of tryptophan tryptophylquinone (the prosthetic group of amine dehydrogenases) were found in the aau cluster. orf-2 was predicted to encode a small periplasmic monohaem c-type cytochrome. No biological function can be assigned to polypeptides encoded by orf-1, orf-3 and orf-4 and mutations in these genes appeared to be lethal. Mutants generated by insertions into mauD were not able to use phenylethylamine, tyramine and tryptamine as a source of carbon and phenylethylamine, 3'-hydroxytyramine (dopamine) and tyramine as a source of nitrogen, indicating that AADH is the only enzyme involved in utilization of primary amines in A. faecalis. AADH genes are present in Alcaligenes xylosoxydans subsp. xylosoxydans, but not in other beta- and gamma-proteobacteria. Phylogenetic analysis of amine dehydrogenases (MADH and AADH) indicated that AADH and MADH evolutionarily diverged before separation of proteobacteria into existing subclasses.

  17. Methodological problems in the histochemical demonstration of succinate semialdehyde dehydrogenase activity.

    PubMed

    Bernocchi, G; Barni, S

    1983-12-01

    Methodological aspects of the histochemical technique for the demonstration of succinate semialdehyde dehydrogenase activity (EC 1.2.1.24) (indicative of the degradative step of gamma-aminobutyric acid catabolism) have been analysed in rat Purkinje neurons, where gamma-aminobutyric acid has been shown to be a neurotransmitter, and in hepatocytes, where it is metabolized. During a histochemical incubation for the enzyme, artefacts of succinate dehydrogenase activity and the 'nothing dehydrogenase' reaction are produced. Inhibition of these artefacts by the addition of two inhibitors, malonate and p-hydroxybenzaldehyde, revealed specific reaction products. Formazan granules, which can be ascribed only to specific succinate semialdehyde dehydrogenase activity, are obtained by adding malonate to the incubation medium in order to inhibit both succinate dehydrogenase activity and nothing dehydrogenase. The formation of these granules is completely inhibited by p-hydroxybenzaldehyde, an inhibitor of succinate semialdehyde dehydrogenase activity. Different levels of succinate semialdehyde dehydrogenase activity were noted in Purkinje neurons. This activity was also found in hepatocytes, mostly in the portal area, but with a lesser degree of intensity and specificity. Indeed, non-specific formazan granules were still produced, because of the 'nothing dehydrogenase' reaction, even in the presence of malonate. Thus, a malonate-insensitive 'nothing dehydrogenase' reaction seems to be present in neural and hepatic tissues.

  18. Cloning and cDNA sequence of the dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase component of human. cap alpha. -ketoacid dehydrogenase complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Pons, G.; Raefsky-Estrin, C.; Carothers, D.J.; Pepin, R.A.; Javed, A.A.; Jesse, B.W.; Ganapathi, M.K.; Samols, D.; Patel, M.S.

    1988-03-01

    cDNA clones comprising the entire coding region for human dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase have been isolated from a human liver cDNA library. The cDNA sequence of the largest clone consisted of 2082 base pairs and contained a 1527-base open reading frame that encodes a precursor dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase of 509 amino acid residues. The first 35-amino acid residues of the open reading frame probably correspond to a typical mitochondrial import leader sequence. The predicted amino acid sequence of the mature protein, starting at the residue number 36 of the open reading frame, is almost identical (>98% homology) with the known partial amino acid sequence of the pig heart dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase. The cDNA clone also contains a 3' untranslated region of 505 bases with an unusual polyadenylylation signal (TATAAA) and a short poly(A) track. By blot-hybridization analysis with the cDNA as probe, two mRNAs, 2.2 and 2.4 kilobases in size, have been detected in human tissues and fibroblasts, whereas only one mRNA (2.4 kilobases) was detected in rat tissues.

  19. Structural Insights into the Drosophila melanogaster Retinol Dehydrogenase, a Member of the Short-Chain Dehydrogenase/Reductase Family

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Lukas; Tsybovsky, Yaroslav; Alexander, Nathan S.; Babino, Darwin; Leung, Nicole Y.; Montell, Craig; Banerjee, Surajit; von Lintig, Johannes; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    The 11-cis-retinylidene chromophore of visual pigments isomerizes upon interaction with a photon, initiating a downstream cascade of signaling events that ultimately lead to visual perception. 11-cis-Retinylidene is regenerated through enzymatic transformations collectively called the visual cycle. The first and rate-limiting enzymatic reaction within this cycle, i.e., the reduction of all-trans-retinal to all-trans-retinol, is catalyzed by retinol dehydrogenases. Here, we determined the structure of Drosophila melanogaster photoreceptor retinol dehydrogenase (PDH) isoform C that belongs to the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) family. This is the first reported structure of a SDR that possesses this biologically important activity. Two crystal structures of the same enzyme grown under different conditions revealed a novel conformational change of the NAD+ cofactor, likely representing a change during catalysis. Amide hydrogen–deuterium exchange of PDH demonstrated changes in the structure of the enzyme upon dinucleotide binding. In D. melanogaster, loss of PDH activity leads to photoreceptor degeneration that can be partially rescued by transgenic expression of human RDH12. Based on the structure of PDH, we analyzed mutations causing Leber congenital amaurosis 13 in a homology model of human RDH12 to obtain insights into the molecular basis of RDH12 disease-causing mutations. PMID:27809489

  20. Human dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR family) member 11 is a novel type of 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Endo, Satoshi; Miyagi, Namiki; Matsunaga, Toshiyuki; Hara, Akira; Ikari, Akira

    2016-03-25

    We report characterization of a member of the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase superfamily encoded in a human gene, DHRS11. The recombinant protein (DHRS11) efficiently catalyzed the conversion of the 17-keto group of estrone, 4- and 5-androstenes and 5α-androstanes into their 17β-hydroxyl metabolites with NADPH as a coenzyme. In contrast, it exhibited reductive 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activity toward 5β-androstanes, 5β-pregnanes, 4-pregnenes and bile acids. Additionally, DHRS11 reduced α-dicarbonyls (such as diacetyl and methylglyoxal) and alicyclic ketones (such as 1-indanone and loxoprofen). The enzyme activity was inhibited in a mixed-type manner by flavonoids, and competitively by carbenoxolone, glycyrrhetinic acid, zearalenone, curcumin and flufenamic acid. The expression of DHRS11 mRNA was observed widely in human tissues, most abundantly in testis, small intestine, colon, kidney and cancer cell lines. Thus, DHRS11 represents a novel type of 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase with unique catalytic properties and tissue distribution.

  1. Evidence for distinct dehydrogenase and isomerase sites within a single 3. beta. -hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase/5-ene-4-ene isomerase protein

    SciTech Connect

    Luu-The, V.; Takahashi, Masakazu; de Launoit, Y.; Dumont, M.; Lachance, Y.; Labrie, F. )

    1991-09-10

    Complementary DNA encoding human 3{beta}-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase/5-ene-4-ene isomerase (3-{beta}-HSD) has been expressed in transfected GH{sub 4}C{sub 1} with use of the cytomegalovirus promoter. The activity of the expressed protein clearly shows that both dehydrogenase and isomerase enzymatic activities are present within a single protein. However, such findings do not indicate whether the two activities reside within one or two closely related catalytic sites. With use of ({sup 3}H)-5-androstenedione, the intermediate compound in dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) transformation into 4-androstenedione by 3{beta}-HSD, the present study shows that 4MA (N,N-diethyl-4-methyl-3-oxo-4-aza-5{alpha}-androstane-17{beta}-carboxamide) and its analogues of 5-androstenedione to 4-androstenedione with an approximately 1,000-fold higher K{sub i} value. The present results thus strongly suggest that dehydrogenase and isomerase activities are present at separate sites on the 3-{beta}-HSD protein. Such data suggest that the irreversible step in the transformation of DHEA to 4-androstenedione is due to a separate site possessing isomerase activity that converts the 5-ene-3-keto to a much more stable 4-ene-3-keto configuration.

  2. High-fat diet enhanced retinal dehydrogenase activity, but suppressed retinol dehydrogenase activity in liver of rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mian; Liu, Can; Hu, Meng-yue; Zhang, Ji; Xu, Ping; Li, Feng; Zhong, Ze-yu; Liu, Li; Liu, Xiao-dong

    2015-04-01

    Evidence has shown that hyperlipidemia is associated with retinoid dyshomeostasis. In liver, retinol is mainly oxidized to retinal by retinol dehydrogenases (RDHs) and alcohol dehydrogenases (ADHs), further converted to retinoic acid by retinal dehydrogenases (RALDHs). The aim of this study was to investigate whether high-fat diet (HFD) induced hyperlipidemia affected activity and expression of hepatic ADHs/RDHs and RALDHs in rats. Results showed that retinol levels in liver, kidney and adipose tissue of HFD rats were significantly increased, while plasma retinol and hepatic retinal levels were markedly decreased. HFD rats exhibited significantly downregulated hepatic ADHs/RDHs activity and Adh1, Rdh10 and Dhrs9 expression. Oppositely, hepatic RALDHs activity and Raldh1 expression were upregulated in HFD rats. In HepG2 cells, treatment of HFD rat serum inhibited ADHs/RDHs activity and induced RALDHs activity. Among the tested abnormally altered components in HFD rat serum, cholesterol reduced ADHs/RDHs activity and RDH10 expression, while induced RALDHs activity and RALDH1 expression in HepG2 cells. Contrary to the effect of cholesterol, cholesterol-lowering agent pravastatin upregulated ADHs/RDHs activity and RDH10 expression, while suppressed RALDHs activity and RALDH1 expression. In conclusion, hyperlipidemia oppositely altered activity and expression of hepatic ADHs/RDHs and RALDHs, which is partially due to the elevated cholesterol levels. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. The amino acid sequence of ribitol dehydrogenase-F, a mutant enzyme with improved xylitol dehydrogenase activity.

    PubMed

    Homsi-Brandeburgo, M I; Toyama, M H; Marangoni, S; Ward, R J; Giglio, J R; Hartley, B S

    1999-05-01

    A mutant ribitol dehydrogenase (RDH-F) was purified from Klebsiella aerogenes strain F which evolved from the wild-type strain A under selective pressure to improve growth on xylitol, a poor substrate used as sole carbon source. The ratio of activities on xylitol (500 mM) and ribitol (50 mM) was 0.154 for RDH-F compared to 0.033 for the wild-type (RDH-A) enzyme. The complete amino acid sequence of RDH-F showed the mutations. Q60 for E60 and V215 for L215 in the single polypeptide chain of 249 amino acid residues. Structural modeling based on homologies with two other microbial dehydrogenases suggests that E60 --> Q60 is a neutral mutation, since it lies in a region far from the catalytic site and should not cause structural perturbations. In contrast, L215 --> V215 lies in variable region II and would shift a loop that interacts with the NADH cofactor. Another improved ribitol dehydrogenase, RDH-D, contains an A196 --> P196 mutation that would disrupt a surface alpha-helix in region II. Hence conformational changes in this region appear to be responsible for the improved xylitol specificity.

  4. High substrate specificity of ipsdienol dehydrogenase (IDOLDH), a short-chain dehydrogenase from Ips pini bark beetles

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa-Teran, Rubi; Pak, Heidi; Blomquist, Gary J.; Tittiger, Claus

    2016-01-01

    Ips spp. bark beetles use ipsdienol, ipsenol, ipsdienone and ipsenone as aggregation pheromone components and pheromone precursors. For Ips pini, the short-chain oxidoreductase ipsdienol dehydrogenase (IDOLDH) converts (−)-ipsdienol to ipsdienone, and thus likely plays a role in determining pheromone composition. In order to further understand the role of IDOLDH in pheromone biosynthesis, we compared IDOLDH to its nearest functionally characterized ortholog with a solved structure: human L-3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase type II/ amyloid-β binding alcohol dehydrogenase (hHADH II/ABAD), and conducted functional assays of recombinant IDOLDH to determine substrate and product ranges and structural characteristics. Although IDOLDH and hHADH II/ABAD had only 35% sequence identity, their predicted tertiary structures had high identity. We found IDOLDH is a functional homo-tetramer. In addition to oxidizing (−)-ipsdienol, IDOLDH readily converted racemic ipsenol to ipsenone, and stereo-specifically reduced both ketones to their corresponding (−)-alcohols. The (+)-enantiomers were never observed as products. Assays with various substrate analogs showed IDOLDH had high substrate specificity for (−)-ipsdienol, ipsenol, ipsenone and ipsdienone, supporting that IDOLDH functions as a pheromone-biosynthetic enzyme. These results suggest that different IDOLDH orthologs and or activity levels contribute to differences in Ips spp. pheromone composition. PMID:26953347

  5. High substrate specificity of ipsdienol dehydrogenase (IDOLDH), a short-chain dehydrogenase from Ips pini bark beetles.

    PubMed

    Figueroa-Teran, Rubi; Pak, Heidi; Blomquist, Gary J; Tittiger, Claus

    2016-09-01

    Ips spp. bark beetles use ipsdienol, ipsenol, ipsdienone and ipsenone as aggregation pheromone components and pheromone precursors. For Ips pini, the short-chain oxidoreductase ipsdienol dehydrogenase (IDOLDH) converts (-)-ipsdienol to ipsdienone, and thus likely plays a role in determining pheromone composition. In order to further understand the role of IDOLDH in pheromone biosynthesis, we compared IDOLDH to its nearest functionally characterized ortholog with a solved structure: human L-3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase type II/ amyloid-β binding alcohol dehydrogenase (hHADH II/ABAD), and conducted functional assays of recombinant IDOLDH to determine substrate and product ranges and structural characteristics. Although IDOLDH and hHADH II/ABAD had only 35% sequence identity, their predicted tertiary structures had high identity. We found IDOLDH is a functional homo-tetramer. In addition to oxidizing (-)-ipsdienol, IDOLDH readily converted racemic ipsenol to ipsenone, and stereo-specifically reduced both ketones to their corresponding (-)-alcohols. The (+)-enantiomers were never observed as products. Assays with various substrate analogs showed IDOLDH had high substrate specificity for (-)-ipsdienol, ipsenol, ipsenone and ipsdienone, supporting that IDOLDH functions as a pheromone-biosynthetic enzyme. These results suggest that different IDOLDH orthologs and or activity levels contribute to differences in Ips spp. pheromone composition. © The Authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Japanese Biochemical Society. All rights reserved.

  6. Chirality of the hydrogen transfer to the coenzyme catalyzed by ribitol dehydrogenase from Klebsiella pneumoniae and D-mannitol 1-phosphate dehydrogenase from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Alizade, M A; Gaede, K; Brendel, K

    1976-08-01

    The stereochemistry of the hydrogen transfer to NAD catalyzed by ribitol dehydrogenase (ribitol:NAD 2-oxidoreductase, EC 1.1.1.56) from Klebsiella pneumoniae and D-mannitol-1-phosphate dehydrogenase (D-mannitol-1-phosphate:NAD 2-oxidoreductase, EC 1.1.1.17) from Escherichia coli was investigated. [4-3H]NAD was enzymatically reduced with nonlabelled ribitol in the presence of ribitol dehydrogenase and with nonlabelled D-mannitol 1-phosphate and D-mannitol 1-phosphate dehydrogenase, respectively. In both cases the [4-3H]-NADH produced was isolated and the chirality at the C-4 position determined. It was found that after the transfer of hydride, the label was in both reactions exclusively confined to the (4R) position of the newly formed [4-3H]NADH. In order to explain these results, the hydrogen transferred from the nonlabelled substrates to [4-3H]NAD must have entered the (4S) position of the nicotinamide ring. These data indicate for both investigated inducible dehydrogenases a classification as B or (S) type enzymes. Ribitol also can be dehydrogenated by the constitutive A-type L-iditol dehydrogenase (L-iditol:NAD 5-oxidoreductase, EC 1.1.1.14) from sheep liver. When L-iditol dehydrogenase utilizes ribitol as hydrogen donor, the same A-type classification for this oxidoreductase, as expected, holds true. For the first time, opposite chirality of hydrogen transfer to NAD in one organic reaction--ribitol + NAD = D-ribu + NADH + H--is observed when two different dehydrogenases, the inducible ribitol dehydrogenase from K. pneumoniae and the constitutive L-iditol dehydrogenase from sheep liver, are used as enzymes. This result contradicts the previous generalization that the chirality of hydrogen transfer to the coenzyme for the same reaction is independent of the source of the catalyzing enzyme.

  7. Dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase from halophilic archaebacteria: purification and properties of the enzyme from halobacterium halobium

    SciTech Connect

    Danson, J.J.; McQuattie, A.; Stevenson, K.J.

    1986-07-01

    Halophilic archaebacteria possess dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase activity but apparently lack the 2-oxoacid dehydrogenase multienzyme complexes of which it is usually an integral component. In this paper, the purification of dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase from Halobacterium halobium is reported. The enzyme is a dimer with a polypeptide chain M/sub r/ of 58,000 (+/-3000). The amino acid composition of the enzyme is compared with those of the eubacterial and eukaryotic dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenases, and evidence is presented to suggest that the N-terminal amino acid of the H. halobium enzyme is blocked. Chemical modification with the trivalent arsenical reagent (p-aminophenyl)dichloroarsine indicates the involvement of a reversibly reducible disulfide bond in the enzyme's catalytic mechanism. The possible metabolic role of this dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase in the absence of 2-oxoacid dehydrogenase complexes is discussed.

  8. Isolation, sequence, and characterization of the Cercospora nicotianae phytoene dehydrogenase gene.

    PubMed Central

    Ehrenshaft, M; Daub, M E

    1994-01-01

    We have cloned and sequenced the Cercospora nicotianae gene for the carotenoid biosynthetic enzyme phytoene dehydrogenase. Analysis of the derived amino acid sequence revealed it has greater than 50% identity with its counterpart in Neurospora crassa and approximately 30% identity with prokaryotic phytoene dehydrogenases and is related, but more distantly, to phytoene dehydrogenases from plants and cyanobacteria. Our analysis confirms that phytoene dehydrogenase proteins fall into two groups: those from plants and cyanobacteria and those from eukaryotic and noncyanobacter prokaryotic microbes. Southern analysis indicated that the C. nicotianae phytoene dehydrogenase gene is present in a single copy. Extraction of beta-carotene, the sole carotenoid accumulated by C. nicotianae, showed that both light- and dark-grown cultures synthesize carotenoids, but higher levels accumulate in the light. Northern (RNA) analysis of poly(A)+ RNA, however, showed no differential accumulation of phytoene dehydrogenase mRNA between light- and dark-grown fungal cultures. Images PMID:8085820

  9. Central carbon metabolism in marine bacteria examined with a simplified assay for dehydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Wen, Weiwei; Wang, Shizhen; Zhou, Xiaofen; Fang, Baishan

    2013-06-01

    A simplified assay platform was developed to measure the activities of the key oxidoreductases in central carbon metabolism of various marine bacteria. Based on microplate assay, the platform was low-cost and simplified by unifying the reaction conditions of enzymes including temperature, buffers, and ionic strength. The central carbon metabolism of 16 marine bacteria, involving Pseudomonas, Exiguobacterium, Marinobacter, Citreicella, and Novosphingobium were studied. Six key oxidoreductases of central carbon metabolism, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, pyruvate dehydrogenase, 2-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase, malate dehydrogenase, malic enzyme, and isocitrate dehydrogenase were investigated by testing their activities in the pathway. High activity of malate dehydrogenase was found in Citreicella marina, and the specific activity achieved 22 U/mg in cell crude extract. The results also suggested that there was a considerable variability on key enzymes' activities of central carbon metabolism in some strains which have close evolutionary relationship while they adapted to the requirements of the niche they (try to) occupy.

  10. Molecular cloning and tissue distribution of mammalian L-threonine 3-dehydrogenases

    PubMed Central

    Edgar, Alasdair J

    2002-01-01

    Background In mammals, L-threonine is an indispensable amino acid. The conversion of L-threonine to glycine occurs through a two-step biochemical pathway involving the enzymes L-threonine 3-dehydrogenase and 2-amino-3-ketobutyrate coenzyme A ligase. The L-threonine 3-dehydrogenase enzyme has been purified and characterised, but the L-threonine 3-dehydrogenase gene has not previously been identified in mammals. Results Transcripts for L-threonine 3-dehydrogenase from both the mouse and pig are reported. The ORFs of both L-threonine dehydrogenase cDNAs encode proteins of 373 residues (41.5 kDa) and they share 80% identity. The mouse gene is located on chromosome 14, band C. The amino-terminal regions of these proteins have characteristics of a mitochondrial targeting sequence and are related to the UDP-galactose 4-epimerases, with both enzyme families having an amino-terminal NAD+ binding domain. That these cDNAs encode threonine dehydrogenases was shown, previously, by tiling 13 tryptic peptide sequences, obtained from purified L-threonine dehydrogenase isolated from porcine liver mitochondria, on to the pig ORF. These eukaryotic L-threonine dehydrogenases also have significant similarity with the prokaryote L-threonine dehydrogenase amino-terminus peptide sequence of the bacterium, Clostridium sticklandii. In murine tissues, the expression of both L-threonine dehydrogenase and 2-amino-3-ketobutyrate coenzyme A ligase mRNAs were highest in the liver and were also present in brain, heart, kidney, liver, lung, skeletal muscle, spleen and testis. Conclusions The first cloning of transcripts for L-threonine dehydrogenase from eukaryotic organisms are reported. However, they do not have any significant sequence homology to the well-characterised Escherichia coli L-threonine dehydrogenase. PMID:12097150

  11. [Class III alcohol dehydrogenase and its role in the human body].

    PubMed

    Jelski, Wojciech; Sani, Tufik Alizade; Szmitkowski, Maciej

    2006-01-01

    Class III alcohol dehydrogenase is composed of two chi subunits, encoded by the ADH5 gene and existing in all tissues examined. It possesses a great ability to metabolize long-chain alcohols, while its capacity to oxidize ethanol is very limited. The amino-acid sequence homology and identical structural and kinetic properties indicate that class III alcohol dehydrogenase and formaldehyde dehydrogenase are identical enzymes. ADH III plays a significant role in the metabolism of formaldehyde in the human body.

  12. Cancer-associated isocitrate dehydrogenase mutations induce mitochondrial DNA instability.

    PubMed

    Kingsbury, Joanne M; Shamaprasad, Nachiketha; Billmyre, R Blake; Heitman, Joseph; Cardenas, Maria E

    2016-08-15

    A major advance in understanding the progression and prognostic outcome of certain cancers, such as low-grade gliomas, acute myeloid leukaemia, and chondrosarcomas, has been the identification of early-occurring mutations in the NADP(+)-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase genes IDH1 and IDH2 These mutations result in the production of the onco-metabolite D-2-hydroxyglutarate (2HG), thought to contribute to disease progression. To better understand the mechanisms of 2HG pathophysiology, we introduced the analogous glioma-associated mutations into the NADP(+ )isocitrate dehydrogenase genes (IDP1, IDP2, IDP3) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Intriguingly, expression of the mitochondrial IDP1(R148H) mutant allele results in high levels of 2HG production as well as extensive mtDNA loss and respiration defects. We find no evidence for a reactive oxygen-mediated mechanism mediating this mtDNA loss. Instead, we show that 2HG production perturbs the iron sensing mechanisms as indicated by upregulation of the Aft1-controlled iron regulon and a concomitant increase in iron levels. Accordingly, iron chelation, or overexpression of a truncated AFT1 allele that dampens transcription of the iron regulon, suppresses the loss of respirative capacity. Additional suppressing factors include overexpression of the mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase gene ALD5 or disruption of the retrograde response transcription factor RTG1 Furthermore, elevated α-ketoglutarate levels also suppress 2HG-mediated respiration loss; consistent with a mechanism by which 2HG contributes to mtDNA loss by acting as a toxic α-ketoglutarate analog. Our findings provide insight into the mechanisms that may contribute to 2HG oncogenicity in glioma and acute myeloid leukaemia progression, with the promise for innovative diagnostic and prognostic strategies and novel therapeutic modalities.

  13. Purification of acetaldehyde dehydrogenase and alcohol dehydrogenases from Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus 39E and characterization of the secondary-alcohol dehydrogenase (2 degrees Adh) as a bifunctional alcohol dehydrogenase--acetyl-CoA reductive thioesterase.

    PubMed

    Burdette, D; Zeikus, J G

    1994-08-15

    The purification and characterization of three enzymes involved in ethanol formation from acetyl-CoA in Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus 39E (formerly Clostridium thermohydrosulfuricum 39E) is described. The secondary-alcohol dehydrogenase (2 degrees Adh) was determined to be a homotetramer of 40 kDa subunits (SDS/PAGE) with a molecular mass of 160 kDa. The 2 degrees Adh had a lower catalytic efficiency for the oxidation of 1 degree alcohols, including ethanol, than for the oxidation of secondary (2 degrees) alcohols or the reduction of ketones or aldehydes. This enzyme possesses a significant acetyl-CoA reductive thioesterase activity as determined by NADPH oxidation, thiol formation and ethanol production. The primary-alcohol dehydrogenase (1 degree Adh) was determined to be a homotetramer of 41.5 kDa (SDS/PAGE) subunits with a molecular mass of 170 kDa. The 1 degree Adh used both NAD(H) and NADP(H) and displayed higher catalytic efficiencies for NADP(+)-dependent ethanol oxidation and NADH-dependent acetaldehyde (identical to ethanal) reduction than for NADPH-dependent acetaldehyde reduction or NAD(+)-dependent ethanol oxidation. The NAD(H)-linked acetaldehyde dehydrogenase was a homotetramer (360 kDa) of identical subunits (100 kDa) that readily catalysed thioester cleavage and condensation. The 1 degree Adh was expressed at 5-20% of the level of the 2 degrees Adh throughout the growth cycle on glucose. The results suggest that the 2 degrees Adh primarily functions in ethanol production from acetyl-CoA and acetaldehyde, whereas the 1 degree Adh functions in ethanol consumption for nicotinamide-cofactor recycling.

  14. Purification of acetaldehyde dehydrogenase and alcohol dehydrogenases from Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus 39E and characterization of the secondary-alcohol dehydrogenase (2 degrees Adh) as a bifunctional alcohol dehydrogenase--acetyl-CoA reductive thioesterase.

    PubMed Central

    Burdette, D; Zeikus, J G

    1994-01-01

    The purification and characterization of three enzymes involved in ethanol formation from acetyl-CoA in Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus 39E (formerly Clostridium thermohydrosulfuricum 39E) is described. The secondary-alcohol dehydrogenase (2 degrees Adh) was determined to be a homotetramer of 40 kDa subunits (SDS/PAGE) with a molecular mass of 160 kDa. The 2 degrees Adh had a lower catalytic efficiency for the oxidation of 1 degree alcohols, including ethanol, than for the oxidation of secondary (2 degrees) alcohols or the reduction of ketones or aldehydes. This enzyme possesses a significant acetyl-CoA reductive thioesterase activity as determined by NADPH oxidation, thiol formation and ethanol production. The primary-alcohol dehydrogenase (1 degree Adh) was determined to be a homotetramer of 41.5 kDa (SDS/PAGE) subunits with a molecular mass of 170 kDa. The 1 degree Adh used both NAD(H) and NADP(H) and displayed higher catalytic efficiencies for NADP(+)-dependent ethanol oxidation and NADH-dependent acetaldehyde (identical to ethanal) reduction than for NADPH-dependent acetaldehyde reduction or NAD(+)-dependent ethanol oxidation. The NAD(H)-linked acetaldehyde dehydrogenase was a homotetramer (360 kDa) of identical subunits (100 kDa) that readily catalysed thioester cleavage and condensation. The 1 degree Adh was expressed at 5-20% of the level of the 2 degrees Adh throughout the growth cycle on glucose. The results suggest that the 2 degrees Adh primarily functions in ethanol production from acetyl-CoA and acetaldehyde, whereas the 1 degree Adh functions in ethanol consumption for nicotinamide-cofactor recycling. Images Figure 1 PMID:8068002

  15. A novel nicotinoprotein aldehyde dehydrogenase involved in polyethylene glycol degradation.

    PubMed

    Ohta, T; Tani, A; Kimbara, K; Kawai, F

    2005-09-01

    A gene (pegC) encoding aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) was located 3.4 kb upstream of a gene encoding polyethylene glycol (PEG) dehydrogenase (pegA) in Sphingomonas macrogoltabidus strain 103. ALDH was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified on a Ni-nitrilotriacetic acid agarose column. The recombinant enzyme was a homotetramer consisting of four 46.1-kDa subunits. The alignment of the putative amino acid sequence of the cloned enzyme showed high similarity with a group of NAD(P)-dependent ALDHs (identity 36-52%); NAD-binding domains (Rossmann fold and four glycine residues) and catalytic residues (Glu225 and Cys259) were well conserved. The cofactor, which was extracted from the purified enzyme, was tightly bound to the enzyme and identified as NADP. The enzyme contained 0.94 mol NADP per subunit. The enzyme was activated by Ca(2+), but by no other metals; no metal (Zn, Fe, Mg, or Mn) was detected in the purified recombinant enzyme. Activity was inhibited by p-chloromercuric benzoate, and heavy metals such as Hg, Cu, Pb and Cd, indicating that a cysteine residue is involved in the activity. Enzyme activity was independent of N,N-dimethyl-p-nitrosoaniline as an electron acceptor. Trans-4-(N,N-dimethylamino)-cinnamaldehyde was not oxidized as a substrate, but the compound worked as an inhibitor for the enzyme, as did pyrazole. The enzyme acted on n-aldehydes C(2)-C(14)) and PEG-aldehydes. Thus the enzyme was concluded to be a novel Ca(2+)-activating nicotinoprotein (NADP-containing) PEG-aldehyde dehydrogenase involved in the degradation of PEG in S. macrogoltabidus strain 103.

  16. [Dihydropirymidine dehydrogenase (DPD)--a toxicity marker for 5-fluorouracil?].

    PubMed

    Jedrzychowska, Adriana; Dołegowska, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    In proceedings relating to patients suffering from cancer, an important step is predicting response and toxicity to treatment. Depending on the type of cancer, physicians use the generally accepted schema of treatment, for example pharmacotherapy. 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) is the most widely used anticancer drug in chemotherapy for colon, breast, and head and neck cancer. Patients with dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD) deficiency, which is responsible for the metabolism of 5-FU, may experience severe side effects during treatment, and even death. In many publications the need for determining the activity of DPD is discussed, which would protect the patient from the numerous side effects of treatment. However, in practice these assays are not done routinely, despite the high demand. In most cases, a genetic test is used to detect changes in the gene encoding DPD (such as in the USA), but because of the large number of mutations the genetic test cannot be used as a screening test. Dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase activity has been shown to have high variability among the general population, with an estimated proportion of at least 3-5% of individuals showing low or deficient DPD activity. In this publication we presents data about average dihydropirymidine dehydrogenase activity in various populations of the world (e.g. Japan, Ghana, Great Britain) including gender differences and collected information about the possibility of determination of DPD activity in different countries. Detection of reduced DPD activity in patients with planned chemotherapy will allow a lower dosage of 5-FU or alternative treatment without exposing them to adverse reactions.

  17. Lactate Dehydrogenase C and Energy Metabolism in Mouse Sperm1

    PubMed Central

    Odet, Fanny; Gabel, Scott A.; Williams, Jason; London, Robert E.; Goldberg, Erwin; Eddy, Edward M.

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrated previously that disruption of the germ cell-specific lactate dehydrogenase C gene (Ldhc) led to male infertility due to defects in sperm function, including a rapid decline in sperm ATP levels, a decrease in progressive motility, and a failure to develop hyperactivated motility. We hypothesized that lack of LDHC disrupts glycolysis by feedback inhibition, either by causing a defect in renewal of the NAD+ cofactor essential for activity of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase, sperm (GAPDHS), or an accumulation of pyruvate. To test these hypotheses, nuclear magnetic resonance analysis was used to follow the utilization of labeled substrates in real time. We found that in sperm lacking LDHC, glucose consumption was disrupted, but the NAD:NADH ratio and pyruvate levels were unchanged, and pyruvate was rapidly metabolized to lactate. Moreover, the metabolic disorder induced by treatment with the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) inhibitor sodium oxamate was different from that caused by lack of LDHC. This supported our earlier conclusion that LDHA, an LDH isozyme present in the principal piece of the flagellum, is responsible for the residual LDH activity in sperm lacking LDHC, but suggested that LDHC has an additional role in the maintenance of energy metabolism in sperm. By coimmunoprecipitation coupled with mass spectrometry, we identified 27 proteins associated with LDHC. A majority of these proteins are implicated in ATP synthesis, utilization, transport, and/or sequestration. This led us to hypothesize that in addition to its role in glycolysis, LDHC is part of a complex involved in ATP homeostasis that is disrupted in sperm lacking LDHC. PMID:21565994

  18. Cancer-associated isocitrate dehydrogenase mutations induce mitochondrial DNA instability

    PubMed Central

    Kingsbury, Joanne M.; Shamaprasad, Nachiketha; Billmyre, R. Blake; Heitman, Joseph; Cardenas, Maria E.

    2016-01-01

    A major advance in understanding the progression and prognostic outcome of certain cancers, such as low-grade gliomas, acute myeloid leukaemia, and chondrosarcomas, has been the identification of early-occurring mutations in the NADP+-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase genes IDH1 and IDH2. These mutations result in the production of the onco-metabolite D-2-hydroxyglutarate (2HG), thought to contribute to disease progression. To better understand the mechanisms of 2HG pathophysiology, we introduced the analogous glioma-associated mutations into the NADP+ isocitrate dehydrogenase genes (IDP1, IDP2, IDP3) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Intriguingly, expression of the mitochondrial IDP1R148H mutant allele results in high levels of 2HG production as well as extensive mtDNA loss and respiration defects. We find no evidence for a reactive oxygen-mediated mechanism mediating this mtDNA loss. Instead, we show that 2HG production perturbs the iron sensing mechanisms as indicated by upregulation of the Aft1-controlled iron regulon and a concomitant increase in iron levels. Accordingly, iron chelation, or overexpression of a truncated AFT1 allele that dampens transcription of the iron regulon, suppresses the loss of respirative capacity. Additional suppressing factors include overexpression of the mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase gene ALD5 or disruption of the retrograde response transcription factor RTG1. Furthermore, elevated α-ketoglutarate levels also suppress 2HG-mediated respiration loss; consistent with a mechanism by which 2HG contributes to mtDNA loss by acting as a toxic α-ketoglutarate analog. Our findings provide insight into the mechanisms that may contribute to 2HG oncogenicity in glioma and acute myeloid leukaemia progression, with the promise for innovative diagnostic and prognostic strategies and novel therapeutic modalities. PMID:27427385

  19. Steroleosin, a sterol-binding dehydrogenase in seed oil bodies.

    PubMed

    Lin, Li-Jen; Tai, Sorgan S K; Peng, Chi-Chung; Tzen, Jason T C

    2002-04-01

    Besides abundant oleosin, three minor proteins, Sop 1, 2, and 3, are present in sesame (Sesamum indicum) oil bodies. The gene encoding Sop1, named caleosin for its calcium-binding capacity, has recently been cloned. In this study, Sop2 gene was obtained by immunoscreening, and it was subsequently confirmed by amino acid partial sequencing and immunological recognition of its overexpressed protein in Escherichia coli. Immunological cross recognition implies that Sop2 exists in seed oil bodies of diverse species. Along with oleosin and caleosin genes, Sop2 gene was transcribed in maturing seeds where oil bodies are actively assembled. Sequence analysis reveals that Sop2, tentatively named steroleosin, possesses a hydrophobic anchoring segment preceding a soluble domain homologous to sterol-binding dehydrogenases/reductases involved in signal transduction in diverse organisms. Three-dimensional structure of the soluble domain was predicted via homology modeling. The structure forms a seven-stranded parallel beta-sheet with the active site, S-(12X)-Y-(3X)-K, between an NADPH and a sterol-binding subdomain. Sterol-coupling dehydrogenase activity was demonstrated in the overexpressed soluble domain of steroleosin as well as in purified oil bodies. Southern hybridization suggests that one steroleosin gene and certain homologous genes may be present in the sesame genome. Comparably, eight hypothetical steroleosin-like proteins are present in the Arabidopsis genome with a conserved NADPH-binding subdomain, but a divergent sterol-binding subdomain. It is indicated that steroleosin-like proteins may represent a class of dehydrogenases/reductases that are involved in plant signal transduction regulated by various sterols.

  20. Buformin suppresses the expression of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Yano, Akiko; Kubota, Masafumi; Iguchi, Kazuhiro; Usui, Shigeyuki; Hirano, Kazuyuki

    2006-05-01

    The biguanides metformin and buformin, which are clinically used for diabetes mellitus, are known to improve resistance to insulin in patients. Biguanides were reported to cause lactic acidosis as a side effect. Since the mechanism of the side effect still remains obscure, we have examined genes whose expression changes by treating HepG2 cells with buformin in order to elucidate the mechanisms of the side effect. A subtraction cDNA library was constructed by the method of suppressive subtractive hybridization and the screening of the library was performed with cDNA probes prepared from HepG2 cells treated with or without buformin for 12 h. The expression of the gene and the protein obtained by the screening was monitored by real-time RT-PCR with specific primers and Western blotting with specific antibody. The amounts of ATP and NAD+ were determined with luciferase and alcohol dehydrogenase, respectively. We found that expression of the glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPD) gene was suppressed by treating HepG2 cells with 0.25 mM buformin for 12 h as a result of the library screening. The decrease in the expression depended on the treatment period. The amount of GAPD protein also decreased simultaneously with the suppression of the gene expression by the treatment with buformin. The amount of ATP and NAD+ in the HepG2 cells treated with buformin decreased to 10 and 20% of the control, respectively. These observations imply that the biguanide causes deactivation of the glycolytic pathway and subsequently the accumulation of pyruvate and NADH and a decrease in NAD+. Therefore, the reaction equilibrium catalyzed by lactate dehydrogenase leans towards lactate production and this may result in lactic acidosis.

  1. [The role of hepatic and erythrocyte aldehyde dehydrogenase in the development of burn toxemia in rats].

    PubMed

    Solov'eva, A G

    2009-01-01

    The study was designed to examine catalytic properties of non-specific aldehyde dehydrogenase from rat liver and erythrocyte as the main markers of endogenous intoxication after burn. Enzymatic activity was assayed from changes in the rate of NADH synthesis during acetaldehyde oxidation. Burn was shown to decrease it both in the liver and in erythrocytes which resulted in the accumulation of toxic aldehydes and the development of intoxication. Simultaneous fall in alcohol dehydrogenase and lactate dehydrogenase activities is supposed to contribute to the decrease of aldehyde dehydrogenase activity as a result of thermal injury.

  2. Ribitol dehydrogenase of Klebsiella aerogenes. Sequence and properties of wild-type and mutant strains.

    PubMed Central

    Dothie, J M; Giglio, J R; Moore, C B; Taylor, S S; Hartley, B S

    1985-01-01

    Evidence is presented for the sequence of 249 amino acids in ribitol dehydrogenase-A from Klebsiella aerogenes. Continuous culture on xylitol yields strains that superproduce 'wild-type' enzyme but mutations appear to have arisen in this process. Other strains selected by such continuous culture produce enzymes with increased specific activity for xylitol but without loss of ribitol activity. One such enzyme, ribitol dehydrogenase-D, has Pro-196 for Gly-196. Another, ribitol dehydrogenase-B, has a different mutation. PMID:3904726

  3. Identification, Cloning, and Characterization of l-Phenylserine Dehydrogenase from Pseudomonas syringae NK-15

    PubMed Central

    Ueshima, Sakuko; Muramatsu, Hisashi; Nakajima, Takanori; Yamamoto, Hiroaki; Kato, Shin-ichiro; Misono, Haruo; Nagata, Shinji

    2010-01-01

    The gene encoding d-phenylserine dehydrogenase from Pseudomonas syringae NK-15 was identified, and a 9,246-bp nucleotide sequence containing the gene was sequenced. Six ORFs were confirmed in the sequenced region, four of which were predicted to form an operon. A homology search of each ORF predicted that orf3 encoded l-phenylserine dehydrogenase. Hence, orf3 was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli cells and recombinant ORF3 was purified to homogeneity and characterized. The purified ORF3 enzyme showed l-phenylserine dehydrogenase activity. The enzymological properties and primary structure of l-phenylserine dehydrogenase (ORF3) were quite different from those of d-phenylserine dehydrogenase previously reported. l-Phenylserine dehydrogenase catalyzed the NAD+-dependent oxidation of the β-hydroxyl group of l-β-phenylserine. l-Phenylserine and l-threo-(2-thienyl)serine were good substrates for l-phenylserine dehydrogenase. The genes encoding l-phenylserine dehydrogenase and d-phenylserine dehydrogenase, which is induced by phenylserine, are located in a single operon. The reaction products of both enzymatic reactions were 2-aminoacetophenone and CO2. PMID:21048868

  4. Selective inhibition of 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase from Trypanosoma brucei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertelli, Massimo; El-Bastawissy, Eman; Knaggs, Michael H.; Barrett, Michael P.; Hanau, Stefania; Gilbert, Ian H.

    2001-05-01

    A number of triphenylmethane derivatives have been screened against 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase from Trypanosoma brucei and sheep liver. Some of these compounds show good inhibition of the enzymes and also selectivity towards the parasite enzyme. Modelling was undertaken to dock the compounds into the active sites of both enzymes. Using a combination of DOCK 3.5 and FLEXIDOCK a correlation was obtained between docking score and both activity for the enzymes and selectivity. Visualisation of the docked structures of the inhibitors in the active sites of the enzymes yielded a possible explanation of the selectivity for the parasite enzyme.

  5. Characteristics of butanol metabolism in alcohol dehydrogenase-deficient deermice.

    PubMed Central

    Alderman, J A; Kato, S; Lieber, C S

    1989-01-01

    Deermice lacking the low-Km alcohol dehydrogenase eliminated butan-1-ol, a substrate for microsomal oxidation but not for catalase, at 117 mumol/min per kg body wt. Microsomal fractions and hepatocytes metabolized butan-1-ol also (Vmax. = 6.7 nmol/min per nmol of cytochrome P-450, Km = 0.85 mM; Vmax. = 5.3 nmol/min per 10(6) cells, Km = 0.71 mM respectively). These results are consistent with alcohol oxidation by the microsomal system in these deermice. PMID:2930472

  6. Structures of citrate synthase and malate dehydrogenase of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Ferraris, Davide M; Spallek, Ralf; Oehlmann, Wulf; Singh, Mahavir; Rizzi, Menico

    2015-02-01

    The tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle is a central metabolic pathway of all aerobic organisms and is responsible for the synthesis of many important precursors and molecules. TCA cycle plays a key role in the metabolism of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and is involved in the adaptation process of the bacteria to the host immune response. We present here the first crystal structures of M. tuberculosis malate dehydrogenase and citrate synthase, two consecutive enzymes of the TCA, at 2.6 Å and 1.5 Å resolution, respectively. General analogies and local differences with the previously reported homologous protein structures are described. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. In vitro hydrogen production by glucose dehydrogenase and hydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Woodward, J.

    1996-10-01

    A new in vitro enzymatic pathway for the generation of molecular hydrogen from glucose has been demonstrated. The reaction is based upon the oxidation of glucose by Thermoplasma acidophilum glucose dehydrogenase with the concomitant oxidation of NADPH by Pyrococcus furiosus hydrogenase. Stoichiometric yields of hydrogen were produced from glucose with continuous cofactor recycle. This simple system may provide a method for the biological production of hydrogen from renewable sources. In addition, the other product of this reaction, gluconic acid, is a high-value commodity chemical.

  8. Desensitization of glutamate dehydrogenase by reaction of tyrosne residues.

    PubMed

    Price, N C; Radda, G K

    1969-09-01

    1. The reaction of glutamate dehydrogenase with N-acetylimidazole and with tetranitromethane leads to modification of tyrosine residues. 2. Modification of 1 tyrosine residue/subunit does not affect the enzymic activity but decreases the response of the enzyme to the allosteric inhibitor, GTP. 3. The physical properties of the enzyme (sedimentation coefficient and optical rotatory dispersion) remain unaltered. 4. GTP partially protects against desensitization. 5. The diminished responses of the modified enzymes to GTP are also detected by using the fluorescence of 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulphonate as a conformational probe. 6. Difficulties that generally arise in chemical modifications from inhomogeneous distributions of products are discussed.

  9. [Effects of H2-blockers on alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) activity].

    PubMed

    Jelski, Wojciech; Orywal, Karolina; Szmitkowski, Maciej

    2008-12-01

    First-pass metabolism (FPM) of alcohol is demonstrated by lower blood alcohol concentrations after oral than intravenous administration of the same dose. FPM occurs predominantly in the stomach and has been attributed to class IV of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) isoenzyme localizated in the gastric mucosa. A number of factors that influence on gastric ADH activity and thereby modulate FPM have been identified. These include age, sex, ethnicity, concentrations and amounts of alcohol consumed and drugs. Several H2-receptor antagonists, including cimetidine and ranitidine, inhibit gastric ADH activity and reduce FPM, resulting in higher blood alcohol concentrations after H2-blockers administration.

  10. Malaria, favism and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Huheey, J E; Martin, D L

    1975-10-15

    Although glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficient individuals may suffer (sometimes fatally) from favism, a high incidence of this trait occurs in many Mediterranean populations. This apparent paradox is explained on the basis of a synergistic interaction between favism and G-6-PD deficiency that provides increased protection against malaria compared to that of the G-6-PD deficiency alone. This relationship is analogous to that between various hemoglobins and malaria in that there is selection for a more severe trait if it provides more protection against malaria.

  11. Catalytically active monomers of E. coli glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Levashov, P A; Muronetz, V I; Klyachko, N L; Nagradova, N K

    1998-04-01

    Monomeric forms of E. coli glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase have been prepared using two different experimental approaches: (1) covalent immobilization of a tetramer on a solid support via a single subunit with subsequent dissociation of non-covalently bound subunits in the presence of urea, and (2) entrapment of monomeric species into reversed micelles of Aerosol OT in octane. Isolated monomers were shown to be catalytically active, exhibiting KM values close to the parameters characteristic of the tetrameric forms. Like tetramers, isolated monomers did not use NADP7 as a coenzyme.

  12. Direct Observation of Correlated Interdomain Motion in Alcohol Dehydrogenase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biehl, Ralf; Hoffmann, Bernd; Monkenbusch, Michael; Falus, Peter; Préost, Sylvain; Merkel, Rudolf; Richter, Dieter

    2008-09-01

    Interdomain motions in proteins are essential to enable or promote biochemical function. Neutron spin-echo spectroscopy is used to directly observe the domain dynamics of the protein alcohol dehydrogenase. The collective motion of domains as revealed by their coherent form factor relates to the cleft opening dynamics between the binding and the catalytic domains enabling binding and release of the functional important cofactor. The cleft opening mode hardens as a result of an overall stiffening of the domain complex due to the binding of the cofactor.

  13. Drug-induced haemolysis in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Chan, T K; Todd, D; Tso, S C

    1976-01-01

    People with the variants of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPD) deficiency common in the southern Chinese (Canton, B(-)Chinese, and Hong Kong-Pokfulam) have a moderate shortening of red-cell survival but no anaemia when they are in the steady state. With a cross-transfusion technique, primaquine, nitrofurantoin, and large doses of aspirin were found to aggravate the haemolysis while sulphamethoxazole did so only in some people. Individual differences in drug metabolism may be the reason for this. Many commonly used drugs reported to accentuate haemolysis in GPD deficiency did not shorten red-cell survival. PMID:990860

  14. Amino acid substitutions at glutamate-354 in dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase of Escherichia coli lower the sensitivity of pyruvate dehydrogenase to NADH.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhentao; Do, Phi Minh; Rhee, Mun Su; Govindasamy, Lakshmanan; Wang, Qingzhao; Ingram, Lonnie O; Shanmugam, K T

    2012-05-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) of Escherichia coli is inhibited by NADH. This inhibition is partially reversed by mutational alteration of the dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (LPD) component of the PDH complex (E354K or H322Y). Such a mutation in lpd led to a PDH complex that was functional in an anaerobic culture as seen by restoration of anaerobic growth of a pflB, ldhA double mutant of E. coli utilizing a PDH- and alcohol dehydrogenase-dependent homoethanol fermentation pathway. The glutamate at position 354 in LPD was systematically changed to all of the other natural amino acids to evaluate the physiological consequences. These amino acid replacements did not affect the PDH-dependent aerobic growth. With the exception of E354M, all changes also restored PDH-dependent anaerobic growth of and fermentation by an ldhA, pflB double mutant. The PDH complex with an LPD alteration E354G, E354P or E354W had an approximately 20-fold increase in the apparent K(i) for NADH compared with the native complex. The apparent K(m) for pyruvate or NAD(+) for the mutated forms of PDH was not significantly different from that of the native enzyme. A structural model of LPD suggests that the amino acid at position 354 could influence movement of NADH from its binding site to the surface. These results indicate that glutamate at position 354 plays a structural role in establishing the NADH sensitivity of LPD and the PDH complex by restricting movement of the product/substrate NADH, although this amino acid is not directly associated with NAD(H) binding.

  15. Evolution of D-lactate dehydrogenase activity from glycerol dehydrogenase and its utility for D-lactate production from lignocellulose

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qingzhao; Ingram, Lonnie O.; Shanmugam, K. T.

    2011-01-01

    Lactic acid, an attractive, renewable chemical for production of biobased plastics (polylactic acid, PLA), is currently commercially produced from food-based sources of sugar. Pure optical isomers of lactate needed for PLA are typically produced by microbial fermentation of sugars at temperatures below 40 °C. Bacillus coagulans produces L(+)-lactate as a primary fermentation product and grows optimally at 50 °C and pH 5, conditions that are optimal for activity of commercial fungal cellulases. This strain was engineered to produce D(−)-lactate by deleting the native ldh (L-lactate dehydrogenase) and alsS (acetolactate synthase) genes to impede anaerobic growth, followed by growth-based selection to isolate suppressor mutants that restored growth. One of these, strain QZ19, produced about 90 g L-1 of optically pure D(−)-lactic acid from glucose in < 48 h. The new source of D-lactate dehydrogenase (D-LDH) activity was identified as a mutated form of glycerol dehydrogenase (GlyDH; D121N and F245S) that was produced at high levels as a result of a third mutation (insertion sequence). Although the native GlyDH had no detectable activity with pyruvate, the mutated GlyDH had a D-LDH specific activity of 0.8 μmoles min-1 (mg protein)-1. By using QZ19 for simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of cellulose to D-lactate (50 °C and pH 5.0), the cellulase usage could be reduced to 1/3 that required for equivalent fermentations by mesophilic lactic acid bacteria. Together, the native B. coagulans and the QZ19 derivative can be used to produce either L(+) or D(−) optical isomers of lactic acid (respectively) at high titers and yields from nonfood carbohydrates. PMID:22065761

  16. Evolution of D-lactate dehydrogenase activity from glycerol dehydrogenase and its utility for D-lactate production from lignocellulose.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qingzhao; Ingram, Lonnie O; Shanmugam, K T

    2011-11-22

    Lactic acid, an attractive, renewable chemical for production of biobased plastics (polylactic acid, PLA), is currently commercially produced from food-based sources of sugar. Pure optical isomers of lactate needed for PLA are typically produced by microbial fermentation of sugars at temperatures below 40 °C. Bacillus coagulans produces L(+)-lactate as a primary fermentation product and grows optimally at 50 °C and pH 5, conditions that are optimal for activity of commercial fungal cellulases. This strain was engineered to produce D(-)-lactate by deleting the native ldh (L-lactate dehydrogenase) and alsS (acetolactate synthase) genes to impede anaerobic growth, followed by growth-based selection to isolate suppressor mutants that restored growth. One of these, strain QZ19, produced about 90 g L(-1) of optically pure D(-)-lactic acid from glucose in < 48 h. The new source of D-lactate dehydrogenase (D-LDH) activity was identified as a mutated form of glycerol dehydrogenase (GlyDH; D121N and F245S) that was produced at high levels as a result of a third mutation (insertion sequence). Although the native GlyDH had no detectable activity with pyruvate, the mutated GlyDH had a D-LDH specific activity of 0.8 μmoles min(-1) (mg protein)(-1). By using QZ19 for simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of cellulose to D-lactate (50 °C and pH 5.0), the cellulase usage could be reduced to 1/3 that required for equivalent fermentations by mesophilic lactic acid bacteria. Together, the native B. coagulans and the QZ19 derivative can be used to produce either L(+) or D(-) optical isomers of lactic acid (respectively) at high titers and yields from nonfood carbohydrates.

  17. Proline dehydrogenase 2 (PRODH2) is a hydroxyproline dehydrogenase (HYPDH) and molecular target for treating primary hyperoxaluria

    PubMed Central

    Summitt, Candice B.; Johnson, Lynnette C.; Jönsson, Thomas J.; Parsonage, Derek; Holmes, Ross P.; Lowther, W. Todd

    2015-01-01

    The primary hyperoxalurias (PH), types 1–3, are disorders of glyoxylate metabolism that result in increased oxalate production and calcium oxalate stone formation. The breakdown of trans-4-hydroxy-L-proline (Hyp) from endogenous and dietary sources of collagen makes a significant contribution to the cellular glyoxylate pool. Proline dehydrogenase 2 (PRODH2), historically known as hydroxyproline oxidase, is the first step in the hydroxyproline catabolic pathway and represents a drug target to reduce the glyoxylate and oxalate burden of PH patients. This study is the first report of the expression, purification, and biochemical characterization of human PRODH2. Evaluation of a panel of N-terminal and C-terminal truncation variants indicated that residues 157–515 contain the catalytic core with one FAD molecule. The 12-fold higher kcat/Km value of 0.93 M−1·s−1 for Hyp over Pro demonstrates the preference for Hyp as substrate. Moreover, an anaerobic titration determined a Kd value of 125 μM for Hyp, a value ~1600-fold lower than the Km value. A survey of ubiquinone analogues revealed that menadione, duroquinone, and CoQ1 reacted more efficiently than oxygen as the terminal electron acceptor during catalysis. Taken together, these data and the slow reactivity with sodium sulfite support that PRODH2 functions as a dehydrogenase and most likely utilizes CoQ10 as the terminal electron acceptor in vivo. Thus, we propose that the name of PRODH2 be changed to hydroxyproline dehydrogenase (HYPDH). Three Hyp analogues were also identified to inhibit the activity of HYPDH, representing the first steps toward the development of a novel approach to treat all forms of PH. PMID:25697095

  18. Structural organization of the human sorbitol dehydrogenase gene (SORD)

    SciTech Connect

    Iwata, T.; Carper, D.; Popescu, N.C.

    1995-03-01

    The primary structure of human sorbitol dehydrogenase (SORD) was determined by cDNA and genomic cloning. The nucleotide sequence of the mRNA covers 2471 bp including an open reading frame that yields a protein of 356 amino acid residues. The gene structure of SORD spans approximatley 30 kb divided into 9 exons and 8 introns. The gene was localized to chromosome 15q21.1 by in situ hybridization. Two transcription initiation sites were detected. Three Sp1 sites and a repetitive sequence (CAAA){sub 5} were observed in the 5{prime} noncoding region; no classical TATAA or CCAAT elements were found. The related alcohol dehydrogenases and {zeta}-crystallin have the same gene organization split by 8 introns, but no splice points coincide between SORD and these gene types. The deduced amino acid sequence of the SORD structure differs at a few positions from the directly determined protein sequence, suggesting allelic forms of the enzyme. High levels of SORD transcripts were observed in lens and kidney, as judged from Northern blot analysis. 42 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Expression, purification, and characterization of formaldehyde dehydrogenase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wangluo; Chen, Shuai; Liao, Yuanping; Wang, Dingli; Ding, Jianfeng; Wang, Yingming; Ran, Xiaoyuan; Lu, Daru; Zhu, Huaxing

    2013-12-01

    As a member of zinc-containing medium-chain alcohol dehydrogenase family, formaldehyde dehydrogenase (FDH) can oxidize toxic formaldehyde to less active formate with NAD(+) as a cofactor and exists in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Most FDHs are well known to be glutathione-dependent in the catalysis of formaldehyde oxidation, but the enzyme from Pseudomonas putida is an exception, which is independent of glutathione. To identify novel glutathione-independent FDHs from other bacterial strains and facilitate the corresponding structural and enzymatic studies, high-level soluble expression and efficient purification of these enzymes need to be achieved. Here, we present molecular cloning, expression, and purification of the FDH from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which is a Gram-negative pathogenic bacterium causing opportunistic human infection. The FDH of P. aeruginosa shows high sequence identity (87.97%) with that of P. putida. Our results indicated that coexpression with molecular chaperones GroES, GroEL, and Tig has significantly attenuated inclusion body formation and improved the solubility of the recombinant FDH in Escherichiacoli cells. A purification protocol including three chromatographic steps was also established to isolate the recombinant FDH to homogeneity with a yield of ∼3.2 mg from 1L of cell culture. The recombinant P. aeruginosa FDH was properly folded and biologically functional, as demonstrated by the mass spectrometric, crystallographic, and enzymatic characterizations of the purified proteins. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Crystal structure of a chimaeric bacterial glutamate dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Oliveira, Tânia; Sharkey, Michael A.; Engel, Paul C.; Khan, Amir R.

    2016-05-23

    Glutamate dehydrogenases (EC 1.4.1.2–4) catalyse the oxidative deamination of L-glutamate to α-ketoglutarate using NAD(P)+as a cofactor. The bacterial enzymes are hexameric, arranged with 32 symmetry, and each polypeptide consists of an N-terminal substrate-binding segment (domain I) followed by a C-terminal cofactor-binding segment (domain II). The catalytic reaction takes place in the cleft formed at the junction of the two domains. Distinct signature sequences in the nucleotide-binding domain have been linked to the binding of NAD+versusNADP+, but they are not unambiguous predictors of cofactor preference. In the absence of substrate, the two domains move apart as rigid bodies, as shown by the apo structure of glutamate dehydrogenase fromClostridium symbiosum. Here, the crystal structure of a chimaeric clostridial/Escherichia colienzyme has been determined in the apo state. The enzyme is fully functional and reveals possible determinants of interdomain flexibility at a hinge region following the pivot helix. The enzyme retains the preference for NADP+cofactor from the parentE. colidomain II, although there are subtle differences in catalytic activity.

  1. Lactate Dehydrogenase Catalysis: Roles of Keto, Hydrated, and Enol Pyruvate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meany, J. E.

    2007-09-01

    Many carbonyl substrates of oxidoreductase enzymes undergo hydration and enolization so that these substrate systems are partitioned between keto, hydrated (gem-diol), and enol forms in aqueous solution. Some oxidoreductase enzymes are subject to inhibition by high concentrations of substrate. For such enzymes, two questions arise pertaining to enzyme "substrate" interactions: (i) which form of the substrate system serves as the preferential substrate and (ii) which form acts to inhibit the enzyme? Thus the relative concentrations of the forms of these substrate systems (keto, hydrated, enol) may provide a form of metabolic control. In this light, the present article considers the reduction of pyruvate by lactate dehydrogenase in the presence of NADH. This reaction is inhibited by relatively high concentrations of pyruvate and the physiological significance of this inhibition has been a subject of controversy for many years. Summarized in this article are data from the literature pertaining to the interactions of keto, hydrated, and enol pyruvate with lactate dehydrogenase. Biochemistry instructors and their students are invited to review such pertinent articles so that they also may evaluate the possibility that the "substrate" inhibition of the isoenzymes in the heart muscle may be, under certain conditions, relevant as a form of metabolic control.

  2. Structural analysis of fungus-derived FAD glucose dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Hiromi; Sakai, Genki; Mori, Kazushige; Kojima, Katsuhiro; Kamitori, Shigehiro; Sode, Koji

    2015-01-01

    We report the first three-dimensional structure of fungus-derived glucose dehydrogenase using flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) as the cofactor. This is currently the most advanced and popular enzyme used in glucose sensor strips manufactured for glycemic control by diabetic patients. We prepared recombinant nonglycosylated FAD-dependent glucose dehydrogenase (FADGDH) derived from Aspergillus flavus (AfGDH) and obtained the X-ray structures of the binary complex of enzyme and reduced FAD at a resolution of 1.78 Å and the ternary complex with reduced FAD and D-glucono-1,5-lactone (LGC) at a resolution of 1.57 Å. The overall structure is similar to that of fungal glucose oxidases (GOxs) reported till date. The ternary complex with reduced FAD and LGC revealed the residues recognizing the substrate. His505 and His548 were subjected for site-directed mutagenesis studies, and these two residues were revealed to form the catalytic pair, as those conserved in GOxs. The absence of residues that recognize the sixth hydroxyl group of the glucose of AfGDH, and the presence of significant cavity around the active site may account for this enzyme activity toward xylose. The structural information will contribute to the further engineering of FADGDH for use in more reliable and economical biosensing technology for diabetes management. PMID:26311535

  3. Enzymatic urea adaptation: lactate and malate dehydrogenase in elasmobranchs.

    PubMed

    Laganà, G; Bellocco, E; Mannucci, C; Leuzzi, U; Tellone, E; Kotyk, A; Galtieri, A

    2006-01-01

    Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and malate dehydrogenase (MDH) electrophoretic tissue patterns of two different orders of Elasmobranchii: Carchariniformes (Galeus melanostomus and Prionace glauca) and Squaliformes (Etmopterus spinax and Scymnorinus licha) were studied. The number of loci expressed for these enzymes was the same of other elasmobranch species. Differences in tissue distribution were noted in LDH from G. melanostomus due to the presence of an additional heterotetramer in the eye tissue. There were also differences in MDH. In fact, all the tissues of E. spinax and G. melanostomus showed two mitochondrial bands. Major differences were noted in the number of isozymes detected in the four compared elasmobranchs. The highest polymorphism was observed in E. spinax and G. melanostomus, two species that live in changeable environmental conditions. The resistance of isozymes after urea treatment was examined; the resulting patterns showed a quite good resistance of the enzymes, higher for LDH than MDH, also at urea concentration much greater than physiological one. These results indicated that the total isozyme resistance can be considered higher in urea accumulators (such as elasmobranchs) than in the non-accumulators (such as teleosts).

  4. The 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase reaction in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    de Silva, A O; Fraenkel, D G

    1979-10-25

    This study is an attempt to relate in vivo use of the 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase reaction in Escherichia coli with the characteristics of the enzyme determined in vitro. 1) The enzyme was obtained pure by affinity chromatography and kinetically characterized; as already known, ATP and fructose-1,6-P2 were inhibitors. 2) A series of isogenic strains were made in which in vivo use of thereaction might differ, e.g. a wild type strain versus a mutant lacking 6-phosphogluconate dehydrase, as grown on gluconate; a phosphoglucose isomerase mutant grown on glucose or glycerol. 3) The in vivo rate of use of the 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase reaction was determined from measurements of growth rate and yield and from the specific activity of alanine after growth in 1-14C-labeled substrates. 4) The intracellular concentrations of 6-phosphogluconate, NADP+, fructose-1,6-P2, and ATP were measured for the strains in growth on several carbon sources. 5) The metabolite concentrations were used for assay of the enzyme in vitro. The results allow one to calculate how fast the reaction would function in vivo if ATP and fructose-1,6-P2 were its important effectors and if the in vitro assay conditions apply in vivo. The predicted in vivo rates ranged down to as low as one-tenth of the actual rates, and, accordingly, one cannot yet draw firm conclusions about how the reaction is actually controlled in vivo.

  5. Phytoestrogens as inhibitors of fungal 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Kristan, Katja; Krajnc, Katja; Konc, Janez; Gobec, Stanislav; Stojan, Jure; Rizner, Tea Lanisnik

    2005-09-01

    Different phytoestrogens were tested as inhibitors of 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase from the fungus Cochliobolus lunatus (17beta-HSDcl), a member of the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase superfamily. Phytoestrogens inhibited the oxidation of 100 microM 17beta-hydroxyestra-4-en-3-one and the reduction of 100 microM estra-4-en-3,17-dione, the best substrate pair known. The best inhibitors of oxidation, with IC(50) below 1 microM, were flavones hydroxylated at positions 3, 5 and 7: 3-hydroxyflavone, 3,7-dihydroxyflavone, 5,7-dihydroxyflavone (chrysin) and 5-hydroxyflavone, together with 5-methoxyflavone. The best inhibitors of reduction were less potent; 3-hydroxyflavone, 5-methoxyflavone, coumestrol, 3,5,7,4'-tetrahydroxyflavone (kaempferol) and 5-hydroxyflavone all had IC(50) values between 1 and 5 microM. Docking the representative inhibitors chrysin and kaempferol into the active site of 17beta-HSDcl revealed the possible binding mode, in which they are sandwiched between the nicotinamide moiety and Tyr212. The structural features of phytoestrogens, inhibitors of both oxidation and reduction catalyzed by the fungal 17beta-HSD, are similar to the reported structural features of phytoestrogen inhibitors of human 17beta-HSD types 1 and 2.

  6. Phytoestrogens as inhibitors of fungal 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Kristan, Katja; Krajnc, Katja; Konc, Janez; Gobec, Stanislav; Stojan, Jure; Lanisnik Rizner, Tea

    2005-08-01

    Different phytoestrogens were tested as inhibitors of 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase from the fungus Cochliobolus lunatus (17beta-HSDcl), a member of the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase superfamily. Phytoestrogens inhibited the oxidation of 100microM 17beta-hydroxyestra-4-en-3-one and the reduction of 100microM estra-4-en-3,17-dione, the best substrate pair known. The best inhibitors of oxidation, with IC(50) below 1microM, were flavones hydroxylated at positions 3, 5 and 7: 3-hydroxyflavone, 3,7-dihydroxyflavone, 5,7-dihydroxyflavone (chrysin) and 5-hydroxyflavone, together with 5-methoxyflavone. The best inhibitors of reduction were less potent; 3-hydroxyflavone, 5-methoxyflavone, coumestrol, 3,5,7,4'-tetrahydroxyflavone (kaempferol) and 5-hydroxyflavone, all had IC(50) values between 1 and 5microM. Docking the representative inhibitors chrysin and kaempferol into the active site of 17beta-HSDcl revealed the possible binding mode, in which they are sandwiched between the nicotinamide moiety and Tyr212. The structural features of phytoestrogens, inhibitors of both oxidation and reduction catalyzed by the fungal 17beta-HSD, are similar to the reported structural features of phytoestrogen inhibitors of human 17beta-HSD types 1 and 2.

  7. Structural basis for cellobiose dehydrogenase action during oxidative cellulose degradation

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Tien-Chye; Kracher, Daniel; Gandini, Rosaria; Sygmund, Christoph; Kittl, Roman; Haltrich, Dietmar; Hällberg, B. Martin; Ludwig, Roland; Divne, Christina

    2015-01-01

    A new paradigm for cellulose depolymerization by fungi focuses on an oxidative mechanism involving cellobiose dehydrogenases (CDH) and copper-dependent lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMO); however, mechanistic studies have been hampered by the lack of structural information regarding CDH. CDH contains a haem-binding cytochrome (CYT) connected via a flexible linker to a flavin-dependent dehydrogenase (DH). Electrons are generated from cellobiose oxidation catalysed by DH and shuttled via CYT to LPMO. Here we present structural analyses that provide a comprehensive picture of CDH conformers, which govern the electron transfer between redox centres. Using structure-based site-directed mutagenesis, rapid kinetics analysis and molecular docking, we demonstrate that flavin-to-haem interdomain electron transfer (IET) is enabled by a haem propionate group and that rapid IET requires a closed CDH state in which the propionate is tightly enfolded by DH. Following haem reduction, CYT reduces LPMO to initiate oxygen activation at the copper centre and subsequent cellulose depolymerization. PMID:26151670

  8. Phenylbutyrate Therapy for Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex Deficiency and Lactic Acidosis

    PubMed Central

    Ferriero, Rosa; Manco, Giuseppe; Lamantea, Eleonora; Nusco, Edoardo; Ferrante, Mariella I.; Sordino, Paolo; Stacpoole, Peter W.; Lee, Brendan; Zeviani, Massimo; Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    Lactic acidosis is a build-up of lactic acid in the blood and tissues, which can be due to several inborn errors of metabolism as well as nongenetic conditions. Deficiency of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHC) is the most common genetic disorder leading to lactic acidosis. Phosphorylation of specific serine residues of the E1α subunit of PDHC by pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK) inactivates the enzyme, whereas dephosphorylation restores PDHC activity. We found that phenylbutyrate enhances PDHC enzymatic activity in vitro and in vivo by increasing the proportion of unphosphorylated enzyme through inhibition of PDK. Phenylbutyrate given to C57B6/L wild-type mice results in a significant increase in PDHC enzyme activity and a reduction of phosphorylated E1α in brain, muscle, and liver compared to saline-treated mice. By means of recombinant enzymes, we showed that phenylbutyrate prevents phosphorylation of E1α through binding and inhibition of PDK, providing a molecular explanation for the effect of phenylbutyrate on PDHC activity. Phenylbutyrate increases PDHC activity in fibroblasts from PDHC-deficient patients harboring various molecular defects and corrects the morphological, locomotor, and biochemical abnormalities in the noam631 zebrafish model of PDHC deficiency. In mice, phenylbutyrate prevents systemic lactic acidosis induced by partial hepatectomy. Because phenylbutyrate is already approved for human use in other diseases, the findings of this study have the potential to be rapidly translated for treatment of patients with PDHC deficiency and other forms of primary and secondary lactic acidosis. PMID:23467562

  9. New model for polymerization of oligomeric alcohol dehydrogenases into nanoaggregates.

    PubMed

    Barzegar, Abolfazl; Moosavi-Movahedi, Ali A; Kyani, Anahita; Goliaei, Bahram; Ahmadian, Shahin; Sheibani, Nader

    2010-02-01

    Polymerization and self-assembly of proteins into nanoaggregates of different sizes and morphologies (nanoensembles or nanofilaments) is a phenomenon that involved problems in various neurodegenerative diseases (medicine) and enzyme instability/inactivity (biotechnology). Thermal polymerization of horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase (dimeric) and yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (tetrameric), as biotechnological ADH representative enzymes, was evaluated for the development of a rational strategy to control aggregation. Constructed ADH nuclei, which grew to larger amorphous nanoaggregates, were prevented via high repulsion strain of the net charge values. Good correlation between the variation in scattering and lambda(-2) was related to the amorphousness of the nanoaggregated ADHs, shown by electron microscopic images. Scattering corrections revealed that ADH polymerization was related to the quaternary structural changes, including delocalization of subunits without unfolding, i.e. lacking the 3D conformational and/or secondary-ordered structural changes. The results demonstrated that electrostatic repulsion was not only responsible for disaggregation but also caused a delay in the onset of aggregation temperature, decreasing maximum values of aggregation and amounts of precipitation. Together, our results demonstrate and propose a new model of self-assembly for ADH enzymes based on the construction of nuclei, which grow to formless nanoaggregates with minimal changes in the tertiary and secondary conformations.

  10. CYTOCHEMICAL LOCALIZATION OF TWO GLYCOLYTIC DEHYDROGENASES IN WHITE SKELETAL MUSCLE

    PubMed Central

    Fahimi, H. Dariush; Karnovsky, Morris J.

    1966-01-01

    The cytochemical localization, by conventional methods, of lactate and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenases is limited, firstly, by the solubility of these enzymes in aqueous media and, secondly, by the dependence of the final electron flow from reduced nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide (NADH) to the tetrazolium on tissue diaphorase activity: localization is therefore that of the diaphorase, which in rabbit adductor magnus is mitochondrial. NADH has been found to have great affinity to bind in the sarcoplasmic reticulum, and, therefore, if it is generated freely in the incubation media containing 2,2',5,5'-tetra-p-nitrophenyl-3,3'-(3,3'-dimethoxy-4,4'-phenylene)-ditetrazolium chloride (TNBT) and N-methyl phenazonium methyl sulfate (PMS), it can bind there and cause a false staining. Since such a production of NADH can readily occur in the incubation media for glycolytic dehydrogenases due to diffusion of these soluble enzymes from tissue sections, the prevention of enzyme solubilization is extremely important. Fixation in formaldehyde prevented such enzyme diffusion, while at the same time sufficient activity persisted to allow for adequate staining. The incubation media contained PMS, so that the staining system was largely independent of tissue diaphorase activity. Application of these methods to adductor magnus of rabbit revealed by light microscopy, for both enzymes, a fine network which was shown by electron microscopy to represent staining of the sarcoplasmic reticulum. Mitochondria also reacted. These findings add further support for the notion that the sarcoplasmic reticulum is probably involved in glycolytic activity. PMID:4288329

  11. Interaction of mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase monomer with phospholipid vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Webster, K A; Patel, H V; Freeman, K B; Papahadjopoulos, D

    1979-01-01

    The association between bovine and porcine mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.37) and phospholipid vesicles was investigated. At concentrations at which malate dehydrogenase exists as a dimer, entrapment within the aqueous compartment but not binding of the 14C-labelled enzyme was observed. The dissociated enzyme was labile to moderate heat and to p-chloromercuribenzoate, but in both cases inactivation was decreased by incubation with suspensions of charged phospholipid vesicles. This suggested an interaction between enzyme subunits and phospholipid, and this was confirmed by direct binding measurements and by studies that followed changes in the fluorescein-labelled enzyme. The circular-dichroism spectra of the enzyme indicated a high alpha-helix content, and suggested that a small conformational change occurred when the enzyme dissociated. Fluorescence data also suggested less-rigid molecules after dissociation. A possible mechanism, based on the flexibility of enzyme monomer and its interaction with phospholipids, by which mitochondrial matrix enzymes are specifically localized in cells, is discussed. PMID:435273

  12. Isolation and characterisation of the glycerol dehydrogenase from Bacillus stearothermophilus.

    PubMed

    Spencer, P; Bown, K J; Scawen, M D; Atkinson, T; Gore, M G

    1989-02-23

    A protocol for the rapid purification of the glycerol dehydrogenase (glycerol: NAD+ 2-oxidoreductase, EC 1.1.1.6) from the thermophile Bacillus stearothermophilus has been developed using a combination of chromatographic techniques including affinity chromatography on a Sepharose-immobilised triazine dye (Procion red, HE3B, ICI). Substrate specificity has been examined and Km values determined. The protein has been shown to have an oligomeric Mr of approx. 180,000 and consists of four identical subunits of Mr 42,000. Exposure to chelating agents (e.g., EDTA) leads to total loss of activity; the EDTA-inactivated enzyme can be reactivated by Zn2+ and requires 1 mol equivalent of zinc per subunit for full catalytic activity. Other divalent cations such as Cd2+ and Co2+ will reactivate the apo-enzyme but yields an enzyme of lower specific activity. The enzyme binds 1 equivalent of NADH per subunit and during catalysis transfers the 4-pro-R hydride from the nicotinamide ring of the reduced-coenzyme to the substrate. Glycerol increases the dissociation constant for the interaction between NADH and Zn-metallo-glycerol dehydrogenase (ZnGDH) but has no effect on the equilibrium between NADH and metal-depleted enzyme.

  13. alpha-Ketoglutarate dehydrogenase mutant of Rhizobium meliloti.

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, M J; Fraenkel, D G

    1979-01-01

    A mutant of Rhizobium meliloti selected as unable to grow on L-arabinose also failed to grow on acetate or pyruvate. It grew, but slower than the parental strain, on many other carbon sources. Assay showed it to lack alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase (kgd) activity, and revertants of normal growth phenotype contained the activity again. Other enzymes of the tricarboxylic acid cycle and of the glyoxylate cycle were present in both mutant and parent strains. Enzymes of pyruvate metabolism were also assayed. L-Arabinose degradation in R. meliloti was found to differ from the known pathway in R. japonicum, since the former strain lacked 2-keto-o-deoxy-L-arabonate aldolase but contained alpha-ketoglutarate semialdehyde dehydrogenase; thus, it is likely that R. meliloti has the L-arabinose pathway leading to alpha-ketoglutarate rather than the one to glycolaldehyde and pyruvate. This finding accounts for the L-arabinose negativity of the mutant. Resting cells of the mutant were able to metabolize the three substrates which did not allow growth. PMID:762018

  14. Differing roles of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinases during mouse oocyte maturation

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Xiaojing; Zhang, Liang; Han, Longsen; Ge, Juan; Ma, Rujun; Zhang, Xuesen; Moley, Kelle; Schedl, Tim; Wang, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pyruvate dehydrogenase kinases (PDKs) modulate energy homeostasis in multiple tissues and cell types, under various nutrient conditions, through phosphorylation of the α subunit (PDHE1α, also known as PDHA1) of the pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) complex. However, the roles of PDKs in meiotic maturation are currently unknown. Here, by undertaking knockdown and overexpression analysis of PDK paralogs (PDK1–PDK4) in mouse oocytes, we established the site-specificity of PDKs towards the phosphorylation of three serine residues (Ser232, Ser293 and Ser300) on PDHE1α. We found that PDK3-mediated phosphorylation of Ser293-PDHE1α results in disruption of meiotic spindle morphology and chromosome alignment and decreased total ATP levels, probably through inhibition of PDH activity. Unexpectedly, we discovered that PDK1 and PDK2 promote meiotic maturation, as their knockdown disturbs the assembly of the meiotic apparatus, without significantly altering ATP content. Moreover, phosphorylation of Ser232-PDHE1α was demonstrated to mediate PDK1 and PDK2 action in meiotic maturation, possibly through a mechanism that is distinct from PDH inactivation. These findings reveal that there are divergent roles of PDKs during oocyte maturation and indicate a new mechanism controlling meiotic structure. PMID:25991547

  15. Increased salivary aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 in non-reticular oral lichen planus.

    PubMed

    Mansourian, Arash; Shanbehzadeh, Najmeh; Kia, Seyed Javad; Moosavi, Mahdieh-Sadat

    2017-01-01

    Oral lichen planus is a potentially malignant disorder. One of the malignant transformation markers is cancer stem cells. One of the proposed marker for the detection of cancer stem cells's in head and neck cancer is aldehyde dehydrogenase. Recently it is shown that aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 expression in tissue samples is associated with oral lichen planus malignant transformation. This study evaluates salivary aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 in oral lichen planus. Thirty patients and 30 age and sex-matched healthy volunteers were recruited. Oral lichen planus was diagnosed based on the modified World Health Organization criteria. Subjects in the case group were divided into reticular and non-reticular forms. Unstimulated salivary samples were collected at 10-12 AM. Saliva concentrations of aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 were measured by ELISA. The differences between aldehyde dehydrogenase levels in the oral lichen planus group compared with the control group were not significant but aldehyde dehydrogenase in non-reticular oral lichen planus was significantly higher than that of the reticular form. This is a cross-sectional study, thus longitudinal studies in oral lichen planus may present similar or different results. The mechanism of malignant transformation in oral lichen planus is not defined. Previous analyses revealed that the aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 expression is significantly correlated with increased risk of transformation. This finding is consistent with our results because in the erosive and ulcerative forms of oral lichen planus, which have an increased risk of transformation, salivary aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 was overexpressed. A higher salivary aldehyde dehydrogenase level in non-reticular oral lichen planus can be a defensive mechanism against higher oxidative stress in these groups. Aldehyde dehydrogenase may be one of the malignant transformation markers in oral lichen planus. Further studies are needed for introducing aldehyde dehydrogenase as a prognostic

  16. Creation of a thermostable NADP⁺-dependent D-amino acid dehydrogenase from Ureibacillus thermosphaericus strain A1 meso-diaminopimelate dehydrogenase by site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Akita, Hironaga; Doi, Katsumi; Kawarabayasi, Yutaka; Ohshima, Toshihisa

    2012-09-01

    A thermostable, NADP(+)-dependent D: -amino acid dehydrogenase (DAADH) was created from the meso-diaminopimelate dehydrogenase of Ureibacillus thermosphaericus strain A1 by introducing five point mutations into amino acid residues located in the active site. The recombinant protein, expressed in Escherichia coli, was purified to homogeneity using a two-step separation procedure and then characterized. In the presence of NADP(+), the protein catalyzed the oxidative deamination of several D: -amino acids, including D: -cyclohexylalanine, D: -isoleucine and D: -2-aminooctanoate, but not meso-diaminopimelate, confirming the creation of a NADP(+)-dependent DAADH. For the reverse reaction, the corresponding 2-oxo acids were aminated in the presence of NADPH and ammonia. In addition, the D: -amino acid dehydrogenase showed no loss of activity at 65 °C, indicating the mutant enzyme was more thermostable than its parental meso-diaminopimelate dehydrogenase.

  17. Formation of homo- and heterooligomeric supramolecular structures by D-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and lactate dehydrogenase in reversed micelles of aerosol OT in octane.

    PubMed

    Levashov, A V; Ugolnikova, A V; Ivanov, M V; Klyachko, N L

    1997-07-01

    The supramolecular structure of oligomeric enzymes can be specifically regulated by changing the size of an inner cavity of Aerosol OT reversed micelles in octane. Both D-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) reveal an ability to exist and function in monomeric, dimeric and tetrameric forms (homooligomers). Various heterooligomeric complexes, in particular, GAPDH monomer--LDH monomer, GAPDH dimer--LDH tetramer were detected in reversed micelles.

  18. A 'random steady-state' model for the pyruvate dehydrogenase and alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase enzyme complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najdi, T. S.; Hatfield, G. W.; Mjolsness, E. D.

    2010-03-01

    The multienzyme complexes, pyruvate dehydrogenase and alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase, involved in the central metabolism of Escherichia coli consist of multiple copies of three different enzymes, E1, E2 and E3, that cooperate to channel substrate intermediates between their active sites. The E2 components form the core of the complex, while a mixture of E1 and E3 components binds to the core. We present a random steady-state model to describe catalysis by such multienzyme complexes. At a fast time scale, the model describes the enzyme catalytic mechanisms of substrate channeling at a steady state, by polynomially approximating the analytic solution of a biochemical master equation. At a slower time scale, the structural organization of the different enzymes in the complex and their random binding/unbinding to the core is modeled using methods from equilibrium statistical mechanics. Biologically, the model describes the optimization of catalytic activity by substrate sharing over the entire enzyme complex. The resulting enzymatic models illustrate the random steady state (RSS) for modeling multienzyme complexes in metabolic pathways.

  19. The influence of oxygen on radiation-induced structural and functional changes in glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and lactate dehydrogenase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodacka, Aleksandra; Serafin, Eligiusz; Bubinski, Michal; Krokosz, Anita; Puchala, Mieczyslaw

    2012-07-01

    Proteins are major targets for oxidative damage due to their abundance in cells and high reactivity with free radicals. In the present study we examined the influence of oxygen on radiation-induced inactivation and structural changes of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). We chose these two enzymes because they occur at high concentrations and participate in the most important processes in organisms; furthermore, they show considerable similarity in their structure. Protein solutions were irradiated with X-rays in doses ranging from 0.1 to 0.7 kGy, in air and N2O. The much higher radiation inactivation of GAPDH as compared to LDH is correlated with substantially greater structural changes in this protein, mainly involving the loss of free thiol groups (-SH). Of lesser importance in the differentiation of the radiosensitivity of the studied enzymes are tryptophan residues. Molecular oxygen, present during irradiation, increased to a significantly greater extent the inactivation and structural changes of GAPDH than that of LDH. The results suggest that the greater effect of oxygen on GAPDH is due to the higher efficiency of the superoxide radical, the higher amount of hydroperoxides generated, and the higher degree of unfolding of this protein.

  20. In vivo regulation of alcohol dehydrogenase and lactate dehydrogenase in Rhizopus oryzae to improve L-lactic acid fermentation.

    PubMed

    Thitiprasert, Sitanan; Sooksai, Sarintip; Thongchul, Nuttha

    2011-08-01

    Rhizopus oryzae is becoming more important due to its ability to produce an optically pure L: -lactic acid. However, fermentation by Rhizopus usually suffers from low yield because of production of ethanol as a byproduct. Limiting ethanol production in living immobilized R. oryzae by inhibition of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) was observed in shake flask fermentation. The effects of ADH inhibitors added into the medium on the regulation of ADH and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) as well as the production of cell biomass, lactic acid, and ethanol were elucidated. 1,2-diazole and 2,2,2-trifluroethanol were found to be the effective inhibitors used in this study. The highest lactic acid yield of 0.47 g/g glucose was obtained when 0.01 mM 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol was present during the production phase of the pregrown R. oryzae. This represents about 38% increase in yield as compared with that from the simple glucose fermentation. Fungal metabolism was suppressed when iodoacetic acid, N-ethylmaleimide, 4,4'-dithiodipyridine, or 4-hydroxymercury benzoic acid were present. Dramatic increase in ADH and LDH activities but slight change in product yields might be explained by the inhibitors controlling enzyme activities at the pyruvate branch point. This showed that in living R. oryzae, the inhibitors regulated the flux through the related pathways.

  1. Acute and chronic ethanol exposure differentially alters alcohol dehydrogenase and aldehyde dehydrogenase activity in the zebrafish liver.

    PubMed

    Tran, Steven; Nowicki, Magda; Chatterjee, Diptendu; Gerlai, Robert

    2015-01-02

    Chronic ethanol exposure paradigms have been successfully used in the past to induce behavioral and central nervous system related changes in zebrafish. However, it is currently unknown whether chronic ethanol exposure alters ethanol metabolism in adult zebrafish. In the current study we examine the effect of acute ethanol exposure on adult zebrafish behavioral responses, as well as alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity in the liver. We then examine how two different chronic ethanol exposure paradigms (continuous and repeated ethanol exposure) alter behavioral responses and liver enzyme activity during a subsequent acute ethanol challenge. Acute ethanol exposure increased locomotor activity in a dose-dependent manner. ADH activity was shown to exhibit an inverted U-shaped curve and ALDH activity was decreased by ethanol exposure at all doses. During the acute ethanol challenge, animals that were continuously housed in ethanol exhibited a significantly reduced locomotor response and increased ADH activity, however, ALDH activity did not change. Zebrafish that were repeatedly exposed to ethanol demonstrated a small but significant attenuation of the locomotor response during the acute ethanol challenge but ADH and ALDH activity was similar to controls. Overall, we identified two different chronic ethanol exposure paradigms that differentially alter behavioral and physiological responses in zebrafish. We speculate that these two paradigms may allow dissociation of central nervous system-related and liver enzyme-dependent ethanol induced changes in zebrafish.

  2. The diagnostic value of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) isoenzymes and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) measurement in the sera of colorectal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Jelski, Wojciech; Mroczko, Barbara; Szmitkowski, Maciej

    2010-10-01

    The activity of total alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and class I isoenzymes is significantly higher in colorectal cancer tissue than in healthy mucosa. The activity of these enzymes in cancer cells is probably reflected in the sera and could thus be helpful for diagnosing colorectal cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate a potential role of ADH and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) as tumor markers for colorectal cancer. We defined diagnostic sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and receiver-operating characteristics (ROC) curve for tested enzymes. Serum samples were taken from 182 patients with colorectal cancer before treatment and from 160 control subjects. Total ADH activity and class III and IV isoenzymes were measured by photometric, but ALDH activity and ADH I and II by the fluorometric method, with class-specific fluorogenic substrates. There was significant increase in the activity of ADH I isoenzyme and ADH total in the sera of colorectal cancer patients compared to the control. The diagnostic sensitivity for ADH I was 76%, specificity 82%, AND positive and negative predictive values were 85 and 74%, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of ADH I increased with the stage of the carcinoma. The area under ROC curve for ADH I was 0.72. The results suggest a potential role for ADH I as marker for colorectal cancer.

  3. Electrochemical conversion of carbon dioxide to methanol with the assistance of formate dehydrogenase and methanol dehydrogenase as biocatalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Kuwabata, Susumu; Tsuda, Ryo; Yoneyama, Hiroshi )

    1994-06-15

    Electrolysis at potentials between -0.7 and -0.9 V vs SCE of carbon dioxide-saturated phosphate buffer solutions (pH7) containing formate dehydrogenase (FDH) and either methyl viologen (MV[sup 2+]) or pyrroloquinolinequinone (PQQ) as an electron mediator yielded formate with current efficiencies as high as 90%. The enzyme was durable as long as the electrolysis was carried out in the dark. Electrolysis of phosphate buffer solutions containing sodium formate in the presence of methanol dehydrogenase (MDH) and MV[sup 2+] at -0.7 V vs SCE yielded formaldehyde if the concentration of the enzyme used was low, whereas both formaldehyde and methanol were produced for relatively high concentrations of the enzyme where the methanol production began to occur when the formaldehyde produced accumulated. The use of PQQ in place of MV[sup 2+] as the electron mediator exclusively produced methanol alone after some induction period in the electrolysis. On the basis of these results, successful attempts have been made to reduce carbon dioxide to methanol with cooperative assistance of FDH and MDH in the presence of PQQ as the electron mediator. The role of enzyme and mediator in these reduction processes is discussed in detail. 34 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. The Development of Leucine Dehydrogenase and Formate Dehydrogenase Bifunctional Enzyme Cascade Improves the Biosynthsis of L-tert-Leucine.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jixue; Zhang, Yonghui; Sun, Dongfang; Jiang, Wei; Wang, Shizhen; Fang, Baishan

    2016-11-01

    Leucine dehydrogenase (LDH) and formate dehydrogenase (FDH) were assembled together based on a high-affinity interaction between two different cohesins in a miniscaffoldin and corresponding dockerins in LDH and FDH. The miniscaffoldin with two enzymes was further absorbed by regenerated amorphous cellulose (RAC) to form a bifunctional enzyme complex (miniscaffoldin with LDH and FDH adsorbed by RAC, RSLF) in vitro. The enzymatic characteristics of the bifunctional enzyme complex and free enzymes mixture were systematically compared. The synthesis of L-tert-leucine by the RSLF and free enzyme mixture were compared under different concentrations of enzymes, coenzyme, and substrates. The initial L-tert-leucine production rate by RSLF was enhanced by 2-fold compared with that of the free enzyme mixture. Ninety-one grams per liter of L-tert-leucine with an enantiomeric purity of 99 % e.e. was obtained by RSLF multienzyme catalysis. The results indicated that the bifuntional enzyme complex based on cohesin-dockerin interaction has great potential in the synthesis of L-tert-leucine.

  5. The activity of class I, II, III, and IV alcohol dehydrogenase isoenzymes and aldehyde dehydrogenase in endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Orywal, Karolina; Jelski, Wojciech; Zdrodowski, Michał; Szmitkowski, Maciej

    2010-01-01

    The metabolism of cancerous cells is in many ways different than in healthy cells. In endometrial cancer, cells exhibit activity of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH), which participate in the metabolism of many biological substances. The aim of this study was to compare the metabolism of endometrial cancer cells and normal endometrial cells by measurement of ADH isoenzymes and ALDH activities in these tissues. The study material consists of cancerous endometrial tissues obtained from 34 patients. Total ADH activity was measured using the photometric method and ALDH activity using the fluorometric method. For the measurement of class I and II ADH isoenzyme activity, we employed the fluorometric method, with class-specific fluorogenic substrates. The activity of class III and IV ADH was measured using the photometric method. The activity of the class I ADH isoenzyme was significantly higher in the endometrial cancer tissues when compared with normal endometrial tissues. The other classes of ADH tested did not show significant differences between activity of cancerous cells and healthy endometrium. The activity of total ADH was also significantly higher in endometrial cancer. The increased activity of total ADH in endometrial cancer, especially the class I isoenzyme and normal activity of ALDH, may be the cause of disorders in metabolic pathways that use these isoenzymes and could increase the concentration of acetaldehyde, which is cancerogenic substance. J. Clin. Lab. Anal. 24:334-339, 2010. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. The diagnostic value of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) isoenzymes and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) measurement in the sera of gastric cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Jelski, Wojciech; Orywal, Karolina; Laniewska, Magdalena; Szmitkowski, Maciej

    2010-12-01

    Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) are present in gastric cancer cells (GC). Moreover, the activity of total ADH and class IV isoenzymes is significantly higher in cancer tissue than in healthy mucosa. The activity of these enzymes in cancer cells is probably reflected in the sera and could thus be helpful for diagnostics of gastric cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate a potential role of ADH and ALDH as tumor markers for gastric cancer. We defined diagnostic sensitivity, specificity, predictive value for positive and negative results, and receiver-operating characteristics (ROC) curve for tested enzymes. Serum samples were taken from 168 patients with gastric cancer before treatment and from 168 control subjects. Total ADH activity and class III and IV isoenzymes were measured by photometric but ALDH activity and ADH I and II by the fluorometric method, with class-specific fluorogenic substrates. There was significant increase in the activity of ADH IV isoenzyme and ADH total in the sera of gastric cancer patients compared to the control. The diagnostic sensitivity for ADH IV was 73%, specificity 79%, positive and negative predictive values were 81 and 72% respectively. Area under ROC curve for ADH IV was 0.67. The results suggest a potential role for ADH IV as marker of gastric cancer.

  7. Evaluation of alcohol dehydrogenase and aldehyde dehydrogenase enzymes as bi-enzymatic anodes in a membraneless ethanol microfluidic fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galindo-de-la-Rosa, J.; Arjona, N.; Arriaga, L. G.; Ledesma-García, J.; Guerra-Balcázar, M.

    2015-12-01

    Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (AldH) enzymes were immobilized by covalent binding and used as the anode in a bi-enzymatic membraneless ethanol hybrid microfluidic fuel cell. The purpose of using both enzymes was to optimize the ethanol electro-oxidation reaction (EOR) by using ADH toward its direct oxidation and AldH for the oxidation of aldehydes as by-products of the EOR. For this reason, three enzymatic bioanode configurations were evaluated according with the location of enzymes: combined, vertical and horizontally separated. In the combined configuration, a current density of 16.3 mA cm-2, a voltage of 1.14 V and a power density of 7.02 mW cm-2 were obtained. When enzymes were separately placed in a horizontal and vertical position the ocp drops to 0.94 V and to 0.68 V, respectively. The current density also falls to values of 13.63 and 5.05 mA cm-2. The decrease of cell performance of bioanodes with separated enzymes compared with the combined bioanode was of 31.7% and 86.87% for the horizontal and the vertical array.

  8. Molecular characterization of an aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase gene from Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824.

    PubMed Central

    Nair, R V; Bennett, G N; Papoutsakis, E T

    1994-01-01

    A gene (aad) coding for an aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase (AAD) was identified immediately upstream of the previously cloned ctfA (J. W. Cary, D. J. Petersen, E. T. Papoutsakis, and G. N. Bennett, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 56:1576-1583, 1990) of Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 and sequenced. The 2,619-bp aad codes for a 96,517-Da protein. Primer extension analysis identified two transcriptional start sites 83 and 243 bp upstream of the aad start codon. The N-terminal section of AAD shows homology to aldehyde dehydrogenases of bacterial, fungal, mammalian, and plant origin, while the C-terminal section shows homology to alcohol dehydrogenases of bacterial (which includes three clostridial alcohol dehydrogenases) and yeast origin. AAD exhibits considerable amino acid homology (56% identity) over its entire sequence to the trifunctional protein encoded by adhE from Escherichia coli. Expression of aad from a plasmid in C. acetobutylicum showed that AAD, which appears as a approximately 96-kDa band in denaturing protein gels, provides elevated activities of NADH-dependent butanol dehydrogenase, NAD-dependent acetaldehyde dehydrogenase and butyraldehyde dehydrogenase, and a small increase in NADH-dependent ethanol dehydrogenase. A 957-bp open reading frame that could potentially encode a 36,704-Da protein was identified upstream of aad. Images PMID:8300540

  9. AROMATIC METABOLISM IN PLANTS. I. A STUDY OF THE PREPHENATE DEHYDROGENASE FROM BEAN PLANTS,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Prephenate dehydrogenase (prephenate: NADP(+) oxidoreductase (decarboxylating)) was isolated from cotyledons of wax bean ( Phaseolus vulgaris L. var...mung bean ( Phaseolus aureus Roxb.). A study was made of the variation in the amount of prephenate dehydrogenase and aromatic amino acid transaminase in

  10. Heterogeneous expression of protein and mRNA in pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Wexler, I D; Kerr, D S; Ho, L; Lusk, M M; Pepin, R A; Javed, A A; Mole, J E; Jesse, B W; Thekkumkara, T J; Pons, G

    1988-01-01

    Deficiency of pyruvate dehydrogenase [pyruvate:lipoamide 2-oxidoreductase (decarboxylating and acceptor-acetylating), EC 1.2.4.1], the first component of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, is associated with lactic acidosis and central nervous system dysfunction. Using both specific antibodies to pyruvate dehydrogenase and cDNAs coding for its two alpha and beta subunits, we characterized pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency in 11 patients. Three different patterns were found on immunologic and RNA blot analyses. (i) Seven patients had immunologically detectable crossreactive material for the alpha and beta proteins of pyruvate dehydrogenase. (ii) Two patients had no detectable crossreactive protein for either the alpha or beta subunit but had normal amounts of mRNA for both alpha and beta subunits. (iii) The remaining two patients also had no detectable crossreactive protein but had diminished amounts of mRNA for the alpha subunit of pyruvate dehydrogenase only. These results indicate that loss of pyruvate dehydrogenase activity may be associated with either absent or catalytically inactive proteins, and in those cases in which this enzyme is absent, mRNA for one of the subunits may also be missing. When mRNA for one of the subunits is lacking, both protein subunits are absent, suggesting that a mutation affecting the expression of one of the subunit proteins causes the remaining uncomplexed subunit to be unstable. The results show that several different mutations account for the molecular heterogeneity of pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency. Images PMID:3140238

  11. Monitoring of fatty aldehyde dehydrogenase by formation of pyrenedecanoic acid from pyrenedecanal

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Markus A.; Watschinger, Katrin; Golderer, Georg; Maglione, Manuel; Sarg, Bettina; Lindner, Herbert H.; Werner-Felmayer, Gabriele; Terrinoni, Alessandro; Wanders, Ronald J. A.; Werner, Ernst R.

    2010-01-01

    Fatty aldehyde dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.1.48) converts long-chain fatty aldehydes to the corresponding acids. Deficiency in this enzyme causes the Sjogren Larsson Syndrome, a rare inherited disorder characterized by ichthyosis, spasticity, and mental retardation. Using a fluorescent aldehyde, pyrenedecanal, and HPLC with fluorescence detection, we developed a novel method to monitor fatty aldehyde dehydrogenase activity by quantification of the product pyrenedecanoic acid together with the substrate pyrenedecanal and possible side products, such as aldehyde adducts. As shown with recombinant enzymes, pyrenedecanal showed a high preference for fatty aldehyde dehydrogenase compared with other aldehyde dehydrogenases. The method allowed detection of fatty aldehyde dehydrogenase activity in nanogram amounts of microsomal or tissue protein and microgram amounts of Sjogren Larsson syndrome patients' skin fibroblast protein. It could successfully be adapted for the analysis of fatty aldehyde dehydrogenase activity in gel slices derived from low-temperature SDS-PAGE, showing that fatty aldehyde dehydrogenase activity from solubilized rat liver microsomes migrates as a dimer. Thus, monitoring of pyrenedecanoic acid formation from pyrenedecanal by HPLC with fluorescence detection provides a robust and sensitive method for determination of fatty aldehyde dehydrogenase activity. PMID:19965611

  12. The crystal structure of SDR-type pyridoxal 4-dehydrogenase of Mesorhizobium loti.

    PubMed

    Chu, Huy Nhat; Kobayashi, Jun; Mikami, Bunzo; Yagi, Toshiharu

    2011-01-01

    Pyridoxal 4-dehydrogenase catalyzes the irreversible oxidation of pyridoxal to 4-pyridoxolactone and is involved in degradation pathway I of pyridoxine, a vitamin B(6) compound. Its crystal structure was elucidated for the first time. Molecular replacement with (S)-1-phenylthanol dehydrogenase (PDB code 2EW8) was adopted to determine the tertiary structure of the NAD(+)-bound enzyme.

  13. A rapid procedure for eliminating chromatofocusing buffer and concentrating minor active subforms of mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Gelpí, J L; Gracia, V; Imperial, S; Mazo, A; Cortés, A

    1990-11-01

    Mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase from several sources contains different molecular forms whose origin is still under discussion. Separation of these subforms has been achieved by chromatofocusing. A simple and rapid method, based on 5' AMP Sepharose chromatography, has been developed to concentrate mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase subforms and simultaneously remove chromatofocusing buffer.

  14. Cloning and mRNA Expression of NADH Dehydrogenase during Ochlerotatus taeniorhynchus Development and Pesticide Response

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    NADH dehydrogenase, the largest of the respiratory complexes, is the first enzyme of the mitochondrial electron transport chain. We have cloned and sequenced cDNA of NADH dehydrogenase gene from Ochlerotatus (Ochlerotatus) taeniorhynchus (Wiedemann) adult (GeneBank Accession number: FJ458415). The ...

  15. Activity of select dehydrogenases with Sepharose-immobilized N6-carboxymethyl-NAD

    PubMed Central

    Beauchamp, Justin; Vieille, Claire

    2015-01-01

    N6-carboxymethyl-NAD (N6-CM-NAD) can be used to immobilize NAD onto a substrate containing terminal primary amines. We previously immobilized N6-CM-NAD onto sepharose beads and showed that Thermotoga maritima glycerol dehydrogenase could use the immobilized cofactor with cofactor recycling. We now show that Saccharomyces cerevisiae alcohol dehydrogenase, rabbit muscle L-lactate dehydrogenase (type XI), bovine liver L-glutamic dehydrogenase (type III), Leuconostoc mesenteroides glucose-6-phosphate dehydro-genase, and Thermotoga maritima mannitol dehydrogenase are active with soluble N6-CM-NAD. The products of all enzymes but 6-phospho-D-glucono-1,5-lactone were formed when sepharose-immobilized N6-CM-NAD was recycled by T. maritima glycerol dehydrogenase, indicating that N6-immobilized NAD is suitable for use by a variety of different dehydrogenases. Observations of the enzyme active sites suggest that steric hindrance plays a greater role in limiting or allowing activity with the modified cofactor than do polarity and charge of the residues surrounding the N6-amine group on NAD. PMID:25611453

  16. Mammalian alcohol dehydrogenases of separate classes: intermediates between different enzymes and intraclass isozymes.

    PubMed Central

    Jörnvall, H; Höög, J O; von Bahr-Lindström, H; Vallee, B L

    1987-01-01

    A comparison of the structure of class II human liver alcohol dehydrogenase (alcohol:NAD+ oxidoreductase, EC 1.1.1.1) (containing pi subunits) with those of the human class I isozymes (containing alpha, beta, and gamma subunits) reveals differences at about 40% of all positions. Variations are large for active-site regions, the segment around the second zinc atom, and for segments involved in subunit interactions. The two classes of alcohol dehydrogenase have diverged to exhibit structural differences to about half the extent of those between alcohol and polyol dehydrogenases. Hence, the two classes of alcohol dehydrogenase represent steps in enzyme rather than isozyme divergence. An evolutionary scheme that relates different types of zinc-containing mammalian dehydrogenases to one another encompasses at least three levels of gene duplication subsequent to the early step(s) of assembly of building unit(s). The first level of duplication results in the formation of now clearly different enzymes. The second level concerns the various classes of alcohol dehydrogenase, forming steps between typical enzymes and isozymes. The third level encompasses recent and multiple duplications in isozyme evolution of alcohol dehydrogenases. This scheme, linking zinc-containing dehydrogenases at different levels, resembles that in other protein families and reflects general patterns in protein relationships. PMID:3472225

  17. Activity of select dehydrogenases with sepharose-immobilized N(6)-carboxymethyl-NAD.

    PubMed

    Beauchamp, Justin; Vieille, Claire

    2015-01-01

    N(6)-carboxymethyl-NAD (N(6)-CM-NAD) can be used to immobilize NAD onto a substrate containing terminal primary amines. We previously immobilized N(6)-CM-NAD onto sepharose beads and showed that Thermotoga maritima glycerol dehydrogenase could use the immobilized cofactor with cofactor recycling. We now show that Saccharomyces cerevisiae alcohol dehydrogenase, rabbit muscle L-lactate dehydrogenase (type XI), bovine liver L-glutamic dehydrogenase (type III), Leuconostoc mesenteroides glucose-6-phosphate dehydro-genase, and Thermotoga maritima mannitol dehydrogenase are active with soluble N(6)-CM-NAD. The products of all enzymes but 6-phospho-D-glucono-1,5-lactone were formed when sepharose-immobilized N(6)-CM-NAD was recycled by T. maritima glycerol dehydrogenase, indicating that N(6)-immobilized NAD is suitable for use by a variety of different dehydrogenases. Observations of the enzyme active sites suggest that steric hindrance plays a greater role in limiting or allowing activity with the modified cofactor than do polarity and charge of the residues surrounding the N(6)-amine group on NAD.

  18. Mutation of Arg-115 of human class III alcohol dehydrogenase: a binding site required for formaldehyde dehydrogenase activity and fatty acid activation.

    PubMed Central

    Engeland, K; Höög, J O; Holmquist, B; Estonius, M; Jörnvall, H; Vallee, B L

    1993-01-01

    The origin of the fatty acid activation and formaldehyde dehydrogenase activity that distinguishes human class III alcohol dehydrogenase (alcohol:NAD+ oxidoreductase, EC 1.1.1.1) from all other alcohol dehydrogenases has been examined by site-directed mutagenesis of its Arg-115 residue. The Ala- and Asp-115 mutant proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli and purified by affinity chromatography and ion-exchange HPLC. The activities of the recombinant native and mutant enzymes toward ethanol are essentially identical, but mutagenesis greatly decreases the kcat/Km values for glutathione-dependent formaldehyde oxidation. The catalytic efficiency for the Asp variant is < 0.1% that of the unmutated enzyme, due to both a higher Km and a lower kcat value. As with the native enzyme, neither mutant can oxidize methanol, be saturated by ethanol, or be inhibited by 4-methylpyrazole; i.e., they retain these class III characteristics. In contrast, however, their activation by fatty acids, another characteristic unique to class III alcohol dehydrogenase, is markedly attenuated. The Ala mutant is activated only slightly, but the Asp mutant is not activated at all. The results strongly indicate that Arg-115 in class III alcohol dehydrogenase is a component of the binding site for activating fatty acids and is critical for the binding of S-hydroxymethylglutathione in glutathione-dependent formaldehyde dehydrogenase activity. PMID:8460164

  19. Amphibian alcohol dehydrogenase, the major frog liver enzyme. Relationships to other forms and assessment of an early gene duplication separating vertebrate class I and class III alcohol dehydrogenases

    SciTech Connect

    Cederlund, E.; Joernvall, H. ); Peralba, J.M.; Pares, X. )

    1991-03-19

    Submammalian alcohol dehydrogenase structures can be used to evaluate the origins and functions of different types of the mammalian enzyme. Two avian forms were recently reported, and the authors now define the major amphibian alcohol dehydrogenase. The enzyme from the liver of the Green frog Rana perezi was purified, carboxymethylated, and submitted to amino acid sequence determination by peptide analysis of six different digest. The protein has a 375-residue subunit and is a class I alcohol dehydrogenase, bridging the gap toward the original separation of the classes that are observable in the human alcohol dehydrogenase system. In relation to the human class I enzyme, the amphibian protein has residue identities exactly halfway (68%) between those for the corresponding avian enzyme (74%) and the human class III enzyme (62%), suggesting an origin of the alcohol dehnydrogenase classes very early in or close to the evolution of the vertebrate line. This conclusion suggests that these enzyme classes are more universal among animals than previously realized and constitutes the first real assessment of the origin of the duplications leading to the alcohol dehydrogenase classes. In conclusion, the amphibian enzyme allows a rough positioning of the divergence of the alcohol dehydrogenase classes, shows that the class I type is widesprread in vertebrates, and functionally conforms with greater variations at the substrate-binding than the coenzyme-binding site.

  20. Structural and functional properties of a yeast xylitol dehydrogenase, a Zn2+-containing metalloenzyme similar to medium-chain sorbitol dehydrogenases.

    PubMed Central

    Lunzer, R; Mamnun, Y; Haltrich, D; Kulbe, K D; Nidetzky, B

    1998-01-01

    The NAD+-dependent xylitol dehydrogenase from the xylose-assimilating yeast Galactocandida mastotermitis has been purified in high yield (80%) and characterized. Xylitol dehydrogenase is a heteronuclear multimetal protein that forms homotetramers and contains 1 mol of Zn2+ ions and 6 mol of Mg2+ ions per mol of 37.4 kDa protomer. Treatment with chelating agents such as EDTA results in the removal of the Zn2+ ions with a concomitant loss of enzyme activity. The Mg2+ ions are not essential for activity and are removed by chelation or extensive dialysis without affecting the stability of the enzyme. Results of initial velocity studies at steady state for d-sorbitol oxidation and d-fructose reduction together with the characteristic patterns of product inhibition point to a compulsorily ordered Theorell-Chance mechanism of xylitol dehydrogenase in which coenzyme binds first and leaves last. At pH 7.5, the binding of NADH (Ki approximately 10 microM) is approx. 80-fold tighter than that of NAD+. Polyhydroxyalcohols require at least five carbon atoms to be good substrates of xylitol dehydrogenase, and the C-2 (S), C-3 (R) and C-4 (R) configuration is preferred. Therefore xylitol dehydrogenase shares structural and functional properties with medium-chain sorbitol dehydrogenases. PMID:9806889

  1. Biochemical properties of alcohol dehydrogenase from Drosophila lebanonensis.

    PubMed Central

    Winberg, J O; Hovik, R; McKinley-McKee, J S; Juan, E; Gonzalez-Duarte, R

    1986-01-01

    Purified Drosophila lebanonensis alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) revealed one enzymically active zone in starch gel electrophoresis at pH 8.5. This zone was located on the cathode side of the origin. Incubation of D. lebanonensis Adh with NAD+ and acetone altered the electrophoretic pattern to more anodal migrating zones. D. lebanonensis Adh has an Mr of 56,000, a subunit of Mr of 28 000 and is a dimer with two active sites per enzyme molecule. This agrees with a polypeptide chain of 247 residues. Metal analysis by plasma emission spectroscopy indicated that this insect alcohol dehydrogenase is not a metalloenzyme. In studies of the substrate specificity and stereospecificity, D. lebanonensis Adh was more active with secondary than with primary alcohols. Both alkyl groups in the secondary alcohols interacted hydrophobically with the alcohol binding region of the active site. The catalytic centre activity for propan-2-ol was 7.4 s-1 and the maximum velocity of most secondary alcohols was approximately the same and indicative of rate-limiting enzyme-coenzyme dissociation. For primary alcohols the maximum velocity varied and was much lower than for secondary alcohols. The catalytic centre activity for ethanol was 2.4 s-1. With [2H6]ethanol a primary kinetic 2H isotope effect of 2.8 indicated that the interconversion of the ternary complexes was rate-limiting. Pyrazole was an ethanol-competitive inhibitor of the enzyme. The difference spectra of the enzyme-NAD+-pyrazole complex gave an absorption peak at 305 nm with epsilon 305 14.5 X 10(3) M-1 X cm-1. Concentrations and amounts of active enzyme can thus be determined. A kinetic rate assay to determine the concentration of enzyme active sites is also presented. This has been developed from active site concentrations established by titration at 305 nm of the enzyme and pyrazole with NAD+. In contrast with the amino acid composition, which indicated that D. lebanonensis Adh and the D. melanogaster alleloenzymes were not

  2. Biochemical properties of alcohol dehydrogenase from Drosophila lebanonensis.

    PubMed

    Winberg, J O; Hovik, R; McKinley-McKee, J S; Juan, E; Gonzalez-Duarte, R

    1986-04-15

    Purified Drosophila lebanonensis alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) revealed one enzymically active zone in starch gel electrophoresis at pH 8.5. This zone was located on the cathode side of the origin. Incubation of D. lebanonensis Adh with NAD+ and acetone altered the electrophoretic pattern to more anodal migrating zones. D. lebanonensis Adh has an Mr of 56,000, a subunit of Mr of 28 000 and is a dimer with two active sites per enzyme molecule. This agrees with a polypeptide chain of 247 residues. Metal analysis by plasma emission spectroscopy indicated that this insect alcohol dehydrogenase is not a metalloenzyme. In studies of the substrate specificity and stereospecificity, D. lebanonensis Adh was more active with secondary than with primary alcohols. Both alkyl groups in the secondary alcohols interacted hydrophobically with the alcohol binding region of the active site. The catalytic centre activity for propan-2-ol was 7.4 s-1 and the maximum velocity of most secondary alcohols was approximately the same and indicative of rate-limiting enzyme-coenzyme dissociation. For primary alcohols the maximum velocity varied and was much lower than for secondary alcohols. The catalytic centre activity for ethanol was 2.4 s-1. With [2H6]ethanol a primary kinetic 2H isotope effect of 2.8 indicated that the interconversion of the ternary complexes was rate-limiting. Pyrazole was an ethanol-competitive inhibitor of the enzyme. The difference spectra of the enzyme-NAD+-pyrazole complex gave an absorption peak at 305 nm with epsilon 305 14.5 X 10(3) M-1 X cm-1. Concentrations and amounts of active enzyme can thus be determined. A kinetic rate assay to determine the concentration of enzyme active sites is also presented. This has been developed from active site concentrations established by titration at 305 nm of the enzyme and pyrazole with NAD+. In contrast with the amino acid composition, which indicated that D. lebanonensis Adh and the D. melanogaster alleloenzymes were not

  3. Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex Activity in Normal and Deficient Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Sheu, Kwan-Fu Rex; Hu, Chii-Whei C.; Utter, Merton F.

    1981-01-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) activity in human skin fibroblasts appears to be regulated by a phosphorylation-dephosphorylation mechanism, as is the case with other animal cells. The enzyme can be activated by pretreating the cells with dichloroacetate (DCA), an inhibitor of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase, before they are disrupted for measurement of PDC activity. With such treatment, the activity reaches 5-6 nmol/min per mg of protein at 37°C with fibroblasts from infants. Such values represent an activation of about 5-20-fold over those observed with untreated cells. That this assay, based on [1-14C]pyruvate decarboxylation, represents a valid measurement of the overall PDC reaction is shown by the dependence of 14CO2 production on the presence of thiamin-PP, coenzyme A (CoA), Mg++, and NAD+. Also, it has been shown that acetyl-CoA and 14CO2 are formed in a 1:1 ratio. A similar degree of activation of PDC can also be achieved by adding purified pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphatase and high concentrations of Mg++ and Ca++, or in some cases by adding the metal ions alone to the cell homogenate after disruption. These results strongly suggest that activation is due to dephosphorylation. Addition of NaF, which inhibits dephosphorylation, leads to almost complete loss of PDC activity. Assays of completely activated PDC were performed on two cell lines originating from patients reported to be deficient in this enzyme (Blass, J. P., J. Avigan, and B. W. Ublendorf. 1970. J. Clin. Invest. 49: 423-432; Blass, J. P., J. D. Schuman, D. S. Young, and E. Ham. 1972. J. Clin. Invest. 51: 1545-1551). Even after activation with DCA, fibroblasts from the patients showed values of only 0.1 and 0.3 nmol/min per mg of protein. A familial study of one of these patients showed that both parents exhibited activity in fully activated cells about half that of normal values, whereas cells from a sibling appeared normal. These results demonstrate the inheritance nature of PDC deficiency

  4. Increased IMP dehydrogenase gene expression in solid tumor tissues and tumor cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Collart, F.R.; Chubb, C.B.; Mirkin, B.L.; Huberman, E.

    1992-07-10

    IMP dehydrogenase, a regulatory enzyme of guanine nucleotide biosynthesis, may play a role in cell proliferation and malignancy. To assess this possibility, we examined IMP dehydrogenase expression in a series of human solid tumor tissues and tumor cell lines in comparison with their normal counterparts. Increased IMP dehydrogenase gene expression was observed in brain tumors relative to normal brain tissue and in sarcoma cells relative to normal fibroblasts. Similarly, in several B- and T-lymphoid leukemia cell lines, elevated levels of IMP dehydrogenase mRNA and cellular enzyme were observed in comparison with the levels in peripheral blood lymphocytes. These results are consistent with an association between increased IMP dehydrogenase expression and either enhanced cell proliferation or malignant transformation.

  5. Changing kinetic properties of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase from pea chloroplasts during photosynthetic induction

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, X.; Anderson, L.E.

    1987-04-01

    The first enzyme of the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway, glucose-6-P dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.49), is inactivated when pea chloroplasts are irradiated. They have examined the kinetics of light inactivation of glucose-6-P dehydrogenase in intact chloroplasts during photosynthetic induction and the kinetic parameters of the active (dark) and less active (light) form of the dehydrogenase. Light inactivation of the dehydrogenase is rapid and occurs before photosynthetic O/sub 2/ evolution is measureable in intact chloroplasts. Likewise dark activation is quite rapid. The major change in the kinetic parameters of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase is in maximal velocity. This light inactivation probably prevents operation of a futile cycle involving glucose-6-P, NADPH and oxidative and reductive pentose phosphate pathway enzymes.

  6. Succinate dehydrogenase-deficient GISTs are characterized by IGF1R overexpression.

    PubMed

    Chou, Angela; Chen, Jason; Clarkson, Adele; Samra, Jaswinder S; Clifton-Bligh, Roderick J; Hugh, Thomas J; Gill, Anthony J

    2012-09-01

    Succinate dehydrogenase-deficient gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) demonstrate unique pathological and clinical features, including the absence of activating mutations of KIT and PDGFRA, and primary resistance to imatinib. They arise exclusively in the stomach and account for 5-7.5% of all adult stomach GISTs and the great majority of these tumors in childhood. Insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF1R) overexpression has been associated with wild-type and pediatric GISTs. We propose that IGF1R overexpression is a feature of succinate dehydrogenase-deficient GISTs as a group. We assessed succinate dehydrogenase complex subunit B (SDHB) and IGF1R expression by immunohistochemistry in eight known succinate dehydrogenase-deficient GISTs, three GISTs arising in the setting of neurofibromatosis type 1 syndrome and 40 unselected GISTs. Selected KIT and PDGFRA exons were amplified and sequenced from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumor samples. All eight succinate dehydrogenase-deficient tumors were wild-type for KIT and PDGFRA, succinate dehydrogenase B negative and demonstrated IGF1R overexpression. The three neurofibromatosis-related tumors were succinate dehydrogenase B positive and IGF1R negative. Of the 40 unselected upper GISTs, five were wild-type for KIT and PDGFRA in the selected exons. Two of the wild-type GISTs were succinate dehydrogenase B negative and showed IGF1R overexpression and three were succinate dehydrogenase B positive and IGF1R negative. We conclude that IGF1R overexpression is a feature of succinate dehydrogenase deficient GIST as a group, rather than pediatric or wild-type GIST per se. Therefore, IGF1R inhibition represents a potential rational therapeutic approach in this recently recognized subgroup of GIST.

  7. Environmental inhibition of 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Reidenberg, M M

    2000-04-03

    Gossypol, a polyphenolic compound from cotton seed, caused hypokalemia in some men receiving it in a trial of its contraceptive activity. Searching for the mechanism for its hypokalemic action led to the observation that it inhibited 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase. This would enhance mineralocorticoid effect in the kidney. Many other polyphenols also inhibit this enzyme including those in grapefruit juice. Ingesting 1-2 l of grapefruit juice inhibited this enzyme in two men in a clinical experiment. Tea polyphenols inhibit this enzyme and add to the inhibition caused by gossypol. Men in China have lower serum potassium values than men elsewhere and this is due to the environment, presumably the diet, in China. The importance of dietary and other exogenous inhibitors of this enzyme in electrolyte metabolism remains to be determined.

  8. [Sorbitol-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Gene Polymorhism in Malus Mill. (Rosaceae)].

    PubMed

    Boris, K V; Kudryavtsev, A M; Kochieva, E Z

    2015-11-01

    The sorbitol-6-phosphate dehydrogenase gene (S6PDH) sequences of six representatives of the genus Malus, which belong to five different taxonomic sections, were examined for the first time. The exon-intron structure and polymorphism of the nucleotide and amino acid sequences of these genes was characterized. The intraspecific polymorphism of the S6PDH gene was assessed for the first time in 40 Russian and foreign apple (Malus domestica) cultivars. It was demonstrated that the interspecific polymorphism level of the S6PDH coding sequences in the studied. representatives of the genus Malus was 4%, and the intraspecific polymorphism level of M. domestica cultivars was very low, constituting 0.96%.

  9. A red-shifted fluorescent substrate for aldehyde dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Minn, Il; Wang, Haofan; Mease, Ronnie C.; Byun, Youngjoo; Yang, Xing; Wang, Julia; Leach, Steven D.; Pomper, Martin G.

    2014-01-01

    Selection of cells positive for aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity from a green fluorescent background is difficult with existing reagents. Here we report a red-shifted fluorescent substrate for ALDH, AldeRed 588-A, for labeling viable ALDHpos cells. We demonstrate that AldeRed 588-A successfully isolates ALDHhi human hematopoietic stem cells from heterogeneous cord blood mononuclear cells. AldeRed 588-A can be used for multi-color applications to fractionate ALDHpos cells in the presence of green fluorophores including the ALDEFLUOR™ reagent and cells expressing eGFP. AldeRed 588-A stains ALDHpos murine pancreatic centroacinar and terminal duct cells, as visualized by fluorescent microscopy. AldeRed588-A provides a useful tool to select stem cells or study ALDH within a green fluorescent background. PMID:24759454

  10. Encapsulation of alcohol dehydrogenase in mannitol by spray drying.

    PubMed

    Shiga, Hirokazu; Joreau, Hiromi; Neoh, Tze Loon; Furuta, Takeshi; Yoshii, Hidefumi

    2014-03-24

    The retention of the enzyme activity of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) has been studied in various drying processes such as spray drying. The aim of this study is to encapsulate ADH in mannitol, either with or without additive in order to limit the thermal denaturation of the enzyme during the drying process. The retention of ADH activity was investigated at different drying temperatures. When mannitol was used, the encapsulated ADH was found inactive in all the dried powders. This is presumably due to the quick crystallization of mannitol during spray drying that resulted in the impairment of enzyme protection ability in comparison to its amorphous form. Maltodextin (dextrose equivalent = 11) was used to reduce the crystallization of mannitol. The addition of maltodextrin increased ADH activity and drastically changed the powder X-ray diffractogram of the spray-dried powders.

  11. The reaction of choline dehydrogenase with some electron acceptors.

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, M C; Dawson, A P

    1975-01-01

    1. The choline dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.99.1) WAS SOLUBILIZED FROM ACETONE-DRIED POWDERS OF RAT LIVER MITOCHONDRIA BY TREATMENT WITH Naja naja venom. 2. The kinetics of the reaction of enzyme with phenazine methosulphate and ubiquinone-2 as electron acceptors were investigated. 3. With both electron acceptors the reaction mechanism appears to involve a free, modified-enzyme intermediate. 4. With some electron acceptors the maximum velocity of the reaction is independent of the nature of the acceptor. With phenazine methosulphate and ubiquinone-2 as acceptors the Km value for choline is also independent of the nature of the acceptor molecule. 5. The mechanism of the Triton X-100-solubilized enzyme is apparently the smae as that for the snake venom solubilized enzyme. PMID:1218095

  12. The reaction of choline dehydrogenase with some electron acceptors.

    PubMed

    Barrett, M C; Dawson, A P

    1975-12-01

    1. The choline dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.99.1) WAS SOLUBILIZED FROM ACETONE-DRIED POWDERS OF RAT LIVER MITOCHONDRIA BY TREATMENT WITH Naja naja venom. 2. The kinetics of the reaction of enzyme with phenazine methosulphate and ubiquinone-2 as electron acceptors were investigated. 3. With both electron acceptors the reaction mechanism appears to involve a free, modified-enzyme intermediate. 4. With some electron acceptors the maximum velocity of the reaction is independent of the nature of the acceptor. With phenazine methosulphate and ubiquinone-2 as acceptors the Km value for choline is also independent of the nature of the acceptor molecule. 5. The mechanism of the Triton X-100-solubilized enzyme is apparently the smae as that for the snake venom solubilized enzyme.

  13. Fabricating polystyrene fiber-dehydrogenase assemble as a functional biocatalyst.

    PubMed

    An, Hongjie; Jin, Bo; Dai, Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Immobilization of the enzymes on nano-structured materials is a promising approach to enhance enzyme stabilization, activation and reusability. This study aimed to develop polystyrene fiber-enzyme assembles to catalyze model formaldehyde to methanol dehydrogenation reaction, which is an essential step for bioconversion of CO2 to a renewable bioenergy. We fabricated and modified electrospun polystyrene fibers, which showed high capability to immobilize dehydrogenase for the fiber-enzyme assembles. Results from evaluation of biochemical activities of the fiber-enzyme assemble showed that nitriation with the nitric/sulfuric acid ratio (v/v, 10:1) and silanization treatment delivered desirable enzyme activity and long-term storage stability, showing great promising toward future large-scale applications.

  14. Heterogeneity of liver alcohol dehydrogenase on starch-gel electrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    McKinley-McKee, J. S.; Moss, D. W.

    1965-01-01

    1. Purified horse-liver alcohol dehydrogenase is heterogeneous on starch-gel electrophoresis in several buffer systems. 2. The electrophoretic pattern is altered by the addition to the buffers of oxidized or reduced coenzymes, isobutyramide, metal ions or metal-chelating agents. 3. The effect of coenzymes on the pattern suggests that the major cause of the observed heterogeneity is not the existence of isoenzymes, but the presence in the enzyme preparations of coenzyme–enzyme complexes or complexes with other nucleotides similar to, but less reactive than, the coenzymes. 4. Metal ions and chelating agents influence the electrophoretic separation by partial denaturation and inactivation of the enzyme. ImagesFig. 1.Fig. 2.Fig. 3.Fig. 4. PMID:4285890

  15. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension, hormones, and 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases

    PubMed Central

    Markey, Keira A; Uldall, Maria; Botfield, Hannah; Cato, Liam D; Miah, Mohammed A L; Hassan-Smith, Ghaniah; Jensen, Rigmor H; Gonzalez, Ana M; Sinclair, Alexandra J

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) results in raised intracranial pressure (ICP) leading to papilledema, visual dysfunction, and headaches. Obese females of reproductive age are predominantly affected, but the underlying pathological mechanisms behind IIH remain unknown. This review provides an overview of pathogenic factors that could result in IIH with particular focus on hormones and the impact of obesity, including its role in neuroendocrine signaling and driving inflammation. Despite occurring almost exclusively in obese women, there have been a few studies evaluating the mechanisms by which hormones and adipokines exert their effects on ICP regulation in IIH. Research involving 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1, a modulator of glucocorticoids, suggests a potential role in IIH. Improved understanding of the complex interplay between adipose signaling factors such as adipokines, steroid hormones, and ICP regulation may be key to the understanding and future management of IIH. PMID:27186074

  16. IMP Dehydrogenase: Structural Schizophrenia and an Unusual Base

    SciTech Connect

    Hedstrom,L.; Gan, L.

    2006-01-01

    Textbooks describe enzymes as relatively rigid templates for the transition state of a chemical reaction, and indeed an enzyme such as chymotrypsin, which catalyzes a relatively simple hydrolysis reaction, is reasonably well described by this model. Inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) undergoes a remarkable array of conformational transitions in the course of a complicated catalytic cycle, offering a dramatic counterexample to this view. IMPDH displays several other unusual mechanistic features, including an Arg residue that may act as a general base catalyst and a dynamic monovalent cation site. Further, IMPDH appears to be involved in 'moon-lighting' functions that may require additional conformational states. How the balance between conformational states is maintained and how the various conformational states interconvert is only beginning to be understood.

  17. Hemolytic anemia caused by glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Olivares, N; Medina, C; Sánchez-Corona, J; Rivas, F; Rivera, H; Hernández, A; Delgado, J L; Ibarra, B; Cantú, J M; Vaca, G; Martínez, C

    1979-01-01

    Results are reported concerning quantitation of glucose -6- phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) enzyme activity where in one of the members of a family a clinical diagnosis of acute hemolytic anemia due to G6PD deficiency had been established. In the propositus, G6PD levels were found to be less than 10 per cent thus confirming diagnosis; the same enzymatic deficiency was identified in one of the siblings without a history of hematologic pathology and in a maternal cousin with a history of neonatal jaundice as well as two obliged carriers. Electrophoretical enzyme phenotype was similar to A variant in three affected males. Advantages of prevention and medical care possible with early diagnosis of G6PD deficiency are discussed.

  18. Expanding the clinical spectrum of 3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Tabatabaie, L.; Klomp, L. W. J.; Rubio-Gozalbo, M. E.; Spaapen, L. J. M.; Haagen, A. A. M.; Dorland, L.

    2010-01-01

    3-Phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (3-PGDH) deficiency is considered to be a rare cause of congenital microcephaly, infantile onset of intractable seizures and severe psychomotor retardation. Here, we report for the first time a very mild form of genetically confirmed 3-PGDH deficiency in two siblings with juvenile onset of absence seizures and mild developmental delay. Amino acid analysis showed serine values in CSF and plasma identical to what is observed in the severe infantile form. Both patients responded favourably to relatively low dosages of serine supplementation with cessation of seizures, normalisation of their EEG abnormalities and improvement of well-being and behaviour. These cases illustrate that 3-PGDH deficiency can present with mild symptoms and should be considered as a treatable disorder in the differential diagnosis of mild developmental delay and seizures. Synopsis: we present a novel mild phenotype in patients with 3-PGDH deficiency. PMID:21113737

  19. Dihydropyrazine-induced inactivation of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Takechi, Shinji; Nakahara, Kazuhide; Yamaguchi, Tadatoshi

    2010-01-01

    Dihydropyrazine (DHP), which is produced during the Maillard reaction, generates radicals that not only cause breakage of chromosomal DNA leading to mutagenic lesions but also induce oxidative damage to cellular proteins. In the present study, we show that three DHP derivatives, which generated superoxide anions, caused inhibition of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH). SH-compounds, such as cysteine, dithiothreitol (DTT), 2-mercaptoethanol, 2-mercaptoethylamine, and N-acetyl-cysteine, suppressed the inhibition of GAPDH by DHP in vitro, although the effect of DHP on GAPDH was not reversed by DTT. In addition, DHP-exposed Escherichia coli showed almost unaffected growth on plates containing a rich medium, but poor growth on plates containing M9 synthetic medium with glucose as the sole carbon source. Furthermore, DHP-exposed E. coli exhibited reduced GAPDH activity. These findings indicate that DHP disturbs the glycolytic pathway by inhibiting GAPDH activity.

  20. Alcohol dehydrogenase polymorphism in barrel cactus populations of Drosophila mojavensis.

    PubMed

    Cleland, S; Hocutt, G D; Breitmeyer, C M; Markow, T A; Pfeiler, E

    1996-07-01

    Starch gel electrophoresis revealed that the alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH-2) locus was polymorphic in two populations (from Agua Caliente, California and the Grand Canyon, Arizona) of cactophilic Drosophila mojavensis that utilize barrel cactus (Ferocactus acanthodes) as a host plant. Electromorphs representing products of a slow (S) and a fast (F) allele were found in adult flies. The frequency of the slow allele was 0.448 in flies from Agua Caliente and 0.659 in flies from the Grand Canyon. These frequencies were intermediate to those of the low (Baja California peninsula, Mexico) and high (Sonora, Mexico and southern Arizona) frequency Adh-2S populations of D. mojavensis that utilize different species of host cacti.

  1. 17 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activity in canine pancreas

    SciTech Connect

    Mendoza-Hernandez, G.; Lopez-Solache, I.; Rendon, J.L.; Diaz-Sanchez, V.; Diaz-Zagoya, J.C.

    1988-04-15

    The mitochondrial fraction of the dog pancreas showed NAD(H)-dependent enzyme activity of 17 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase. The enzyme catalyzes oxidoreduction between androstenedione and testosterone. The apparent Km value of the enzyme for androstenedione was 9.5 +/- 0.9 microM, the apparent Vmax was determined as 0.4 nmol mg-1 min-1, and the optimal pH was 6.5. In phosphate buffer, pH 7.0, maximal rate of androstenedione reduction was observed at 37 degrees C. The oxidation of testosterone by the enzyme proceeded at the same rate as the reduction of the androstenedione at a pH of 6.8-7.0. The apparent Km value and the optimal pH of the enzyme for testosterone were 3.5 +/- 0.5 microM and 7.5, respectively.

  2. Separation of turkey lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes using isoelectric focusing technique.

    PubMed

    Heinová, Dagmar; Kostecká, Zuzana; Csank, Tomáš

    2016-01-01

    Native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis at pH 8.8 did not allow to separate lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) isoenzymes of turkey origin. Five electrophoretically distinguishable forms of the enzyme were detected in serum and tissues of turkey using IEF technique in a pH range of 3-9. Generally, three different groups were seen: (i) those having an anodic domination (heart, kidney, pancreas, and erythrocytes) with mainly LDH-1 fraction, (ii) those having a cathodic domination (breast muscle and serum) with prevalence of LDH-5, and (iii) those with a more uniform distribution (liver, spleen, lung, and brain). The specific enzyme activity was the highest in the breast muscle, followed by heart muscle, and brain. Low activities were detected in serum, kidney, and liver.

  3. Suicidal dephosphorylation of thiamine pyrophosphate coupled with pyruvate dehydrogenase complex.

    PubMed

    Strumilo, Slawomir; Dobrzyn, Pawel; Czerniecki, Jan; Tylicki, Adam

    2004-12-01

    Earlier it was noted that purified pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) produced by "Sigma" usually contains almost saturating amounts of thiamine pyrophosphate (ThPP). In this communication we present the observation that the endogenous ThPP coupled to PDC is dephosphorylated while staying at -10 degrees C, because in the enzyme preparation thiamine monophosphate and un-phosphorylated thiamine appear (HPLC determination). Under the same conditions exogenous ThPP is not dephosphorylated despite contact with the PDC preparation. This may suggest that interactions of some active groups of the enzyme with molecules of endogenous ThPP leads to break-up of the phosphoesters bonds, and destruction of the coenzyme. Decrease of PDC activity during storage is not in proportion with the degree of ThPP dephosphorylation. However the observed instability of PDC activity may be a consequence of the spontaneous process of its coenzyme autodestruction.

  4. Emerging Concepts in the Flavinylation of Succinate Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyung J.; Winge, Dennis R.

    2013-01-01

    The Succinate Dehydrogenase (SDH) heterotetrameric complex catalyzes the oxidation of succinate to fumarate in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and in the aerobic respiratory chains of eukaryotes and bacteria. Essential in this catalysis, is the covalently-linked cofactor flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) in subunit1 (Sdh1) of the SDH enzyme complex. The mechanism of FAD insertion and covalent attachment to Sdh1 is unknown. Our working concept of this flavinylation process has relied mostly on foundational works from the 1990s ago and by applying the principles learned from other enzymes containing a similarly linked FAD. The discovery of the flavinylation factor Sdh5, however, has provided new insight into the possible mechanism associated with Sdh1 flavinylation, bringing into question the autocatalytic mechanism associated with other flavoenzymes. This review focuses on encapsulating prior and recent advances towards understanding the mechanism associated with flavinylation of Sdh1 and how this flavinylation process affects the overall assembly of SDH. PMID:23380393

  5. Aldehyde dehydrogenase is used by cancer cells for energy metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Joon Hee; Lee, Seon-Hyeong; Hong, Dongwan; Lee, Jae-Seon; Ahn, Hee-Sung; Ahn, Ju-Hyun; Seong, Tae Wha; Lee, Chang-Hun; Jang, Hyonchol; Hong, Kyeong Man; Lee, Cheolju; Lee, Jae-Ho; Kim, Soo-Youl

    2016-01-01

    We found that non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells express high levels of multiple aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) isoforms via an informatics analysis of metabolic enzymes in NSCLC and immunohistochemical staining of NSCLC clinical tumor samples. Using a multiple reaction-monitoring mass spectrometry analysis, we found that multiple ALDH isozymes were generally abundant in NSCLC cells compared with their levels in normal IMR-90 human lung cells. As a result of the catalytic reaction mediated by ALDH, NADH is produced as a by-product from the conversion of aldehyde to carboxylic acid. We hypothesized that the NADH produced by ALDH may be a reliable energy source for ATP production in NSCLC. This study revealed that NADH production by ALDH contributes significantly to ATP production in NSCLC. Furthermore, gossypol, a pan-ALDH inhibitor, markedly reduced the level of ATP. Gossypol combined with phenformin synergistically reduced the ATP levels, which efficiently induced cell death following cell cycle arrest. PMID:27885254

  6. Method To Identify Specific Inhibiutors Of Imp Dehydrogenase

    DOEpatents

    Collart, Frank R.; Huberman, Eliezer

    2000-11-28

    This invention relates to methods to identify specific inhibitors of the purine nucleotide synthesis enzyme, IMP dehydrogenase (IMPDH). IMPDH is an essential enzyme found in all free-living organisms from humans to bacteria and is an important therapeutic target. The invention allows the identification of specific inhibitors of any IMPDH enzyme which can be expressed in a functional form in a recombinant host cell. A variety of eukaryotic or prokaryotic host systems commonly used for the expression of recombinant proteins are suitable for the practice of the invention. The methods are amenable to high throughput systems for the screening of inhibitors generated by combinatorial chemistry or other methods such as antisense molecule production. Utilization of exogenous guanosine as a control component of the methods allows for the identification of inhibitors specific for IMPDH rather than other causes of decreased cell proliferation.

  7. [Effect Of Polyelectrolytes on Catalytic Activity of Alcohol Dehydrogenase].

    PubMed

    Dubrovsky, A V; Musina, E V; Kim, A L; Tikhonenko, S A

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescent and optical spectroscopy were used to study the interaction of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) with negatively charged polystyrene sulfonate (PSS) and dextran sulfate (DS), as well as positively charged poly(diallyldimethylammonium) (PDADMA). As found, DS and PDADMA did not affect the structural and catalytic enzyme properties. In contrast, PSS slightly decreased the protein self-fluorescence over 1 h of incubation, which is associated with partial destruction of its quaternary (globular) structure. Investigation of the ADH activity with and without PSS showed its dependency on the incubation time and the PSS presence. Sodium chloride (2.0 M and 0.2 M) or ammonium sulfate (0.1 M) added to the reaction mixture did not completely protect the enzyme quaternary structure from the PSS action. However ammonium sulfate or 0.2 M sodium chloride stabilized the enzyme and partially inhibited the negative PSS effect.

  8. Engineered PQQ-Glucose Dehydrogenase as a Universal Biosensor Platform.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhong; Murphy, Lindy; Stein, Viktor; Johnston, Wayne A; Alcala-Perez, Siro; Alexandrov, Kirill

    2016-08-17

    Biosensors with direct electron output hold promise for nearly seamless integration with portable electronic devices. However, so far, they have been based on naturally occurring enzymes that significantly limit the spectrum of detectable analytes. Here, we present a novel biosensor architecture based on analyte-driven intermolecular recombination and activity reconstitution of a re-engineered component of glucometers: PQQ-glucose dehydrogenase. We demonstrate that this sensor architecture can be rapidly adopted for the detection of immunosuppressant drugs, α-amylase protein, or protease activity of thrombin and Factor Xa. The biosensors could be stored in dried form without appreciable loss of activity. We further show that ligand-induced activity of the developed biosensors could be directly monitored by chronoamperometry, enabling construction of disposable sensory electrodes. We expect that this architecture could be expanded to the detection of other biochemical activities, post-translational modifications, nucleic acids, and inorganic molecules.

  9. Over-Expression, Purification and Crystallization of Human Dihydrolipoamide Dehydrogenase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, Y. S.; Ciszak, Ewa; Patel, Mulchand

    2000-01-01

    Dehydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (E3; dihydrolipoan-tide:NAD+ oxidoreductase, EC 1.8.1.4) is a common catalytic component found in pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex, and branched-chain cc-keto acid dehydrogenase complex. E3 is also a component (referred to as L protein) of the glycine cleavage system in bacterial metabolism (2). Active E3 forms a homodimer with four distinctive subdomain structures (FAD binding, NAD+ binding, central and interface domains) with non-covalently but tightly bound FAD in the holoenzyme. Deduced amino acids from cloned full-length human E3 gene showed a total of 509 amino acids with a leader sequence (N-terminal 35 amino acids) that is excised (mature form) during transportation of expressed E3 into mitochondria membrane. So far, three-dimensional structure of human E3 has not been reported. Our effort to achieve the elucidation of the X-ray crystal structure of human E3 will be presented. Recombinant pPROEX-1 expression vector (from GIBCO BRL Life Technologies) having the human E3 gene without leader sequence was constructed by Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) and subsequent ligation, and cloned in E.coli XL1-Blue by transformation. Since pPROEX-1 vector has an internal His-tag (six histidine peptide) located at the upstream region of a multicloning site, one-step affinity purification of E3 using nickelnitriloacetic acid (Ni-NTA) agarose resin, which has a strong affinity to His-tag, was feasible. Also a seven-amino-acid spacer peptide and a recombinant tobacco etch virus protease recognition site (seven amino acids peptide) found between His-tag and first amino acid of expressed E3 facilitated the cleavage of His-tag from E3 after the affinity purification. By IPTG induction, ca. 15 mg of human E3 (mature form) was obtained from 1L LB culture with overnight incubation at 25C. Over 98% of purity of E3 from one-step Ni-NTA agarose affinity purification was confirmed by SDS-PAGE analysis. For

  10. Over-Expression, Purification and Crystallization of Human Dihydrolipoamide Dehydrogenase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, Y. S.; Ciszak, Ewa; Patel, Mulchand

    2000-01-01

    Dehydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (E3; dihydrolipoan-tide:NAD+ oxidoreductase, EC 1.8.1.4) is a common catalytic component found in pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex, and branched-chain cc-keto acid dehydrogenase complex. E3 is also a component (referred to as L protein) of the glycine cleavage system in bacterial metabolism (2). Active E3 forms a homodimer with four distinctive subdomain structures (FAD binding, NAD+ binding, central and interface domains) with non-covalently but tightly bound FAD in the holoenzyme. Deduced amino acids from cloned full-length human E3 gene showed a total of 509 amino acids with a leader sequence (N-terminal 35 amino acids) that is excised (mature form) during transportation of expressed E3 into mitochondria membrane. So far, three-dimensional structure of human E3 has not been reported. Our effort to achieve the elucidation of the X-ray crystal structure of human E3 will be presented. Recombinant pPROEX-1 expression vector (from GIBCO BRL Life Technologies) having the human E3 gene without leader sequence was constructed by Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) and subsequent ligation, and cloned in E.coli XL1-Blue by transformation. Since pPROEX-1 vector has an internal His-tag (six histidine peptide) located at the upstream region of a multicloning site, one-step affinity purification of E3 using nickelnitriloacetic acid (Ni-NTA) agarose resin, which has a strong affinity to His-tag, was feasible. Also a seven-amino-acid spacer peptide and a recombinant tobacco etch virus protease recognition site (seven amino acids peptide) found between His-tag and first amino acid of expressed E3 facilitated the cleavage of His-tag from E3 after the affinity purification. By IPTG induction, ca. 15 mg of human E3 (mature form) was obtained from 1L LB culture with overnight incubation at 25C. Over 98% of purity of E3 from one-step Ni-NTA agarose affinity purification was confirmed by SDS-PAGE analysis. For

  11. Benzaldehyde dehydrogenase from chitosan-treated Sorbus aucuparia cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Gaid, Mariam M; Sircar, Debabrata; Beuerle, Till; Mitra, Adinpunya; Beerhues, Ludger

    2009-09-01

    Cell cultures of Sorbus aucuparia respond to the addition of chitosan with the accumulation of the biphenyl phytoalexin aucuparin. The carbon skeleton of this inducible defense compound is formed by biphenyl synthase (BIS) from benzoyl-CoA and three molecules of malonyl-CoA. The formation of benzoyl-CoA proceeds via benzaldehyde as an intermediate. Benzaldehyde dehydrogenase (BD), which converts benzaldehyde into benzoic acid, was detected in cell-free extracts from S. aucuparia cell cultures. BD and BIS were induced by chitosan treatment. The preferred substrate for BD was benzaldehyde (K(m)=49 microM). Cinnamaldehyde and various hydroxybenzaldehydes were relatively poor substrates. BD activity was strictly dependent on the presence of NAD(+) as a cofactor (K(m)=67 microM).

  12. Involvement of snapdragon benzaldehyde dehydrogenase in benzoic acid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Long, Michael C; Nagegowda, Dinesh A; Kaminaga, Yasuhisa; Ho, Kwok Ki; Kish, Christine M; Schnepp, Jennifer; Sherman, Debra; Weiner, Henry; Rhodes, David; Dudareva, Natalia

    2009-07-01

    Benzoic acid (BA) is an important building block in a wide spectrum of compounds varying from primary metabolites to secondary products. Benzoic acid biosynthesis from L-phenylalanine requires shortening of the propyl side chain by two carbons, which can occur via a beta-oxidative pathway or a non-beta-oxidative pathway, with benzaldehyde as a key intermediate. The non-beta-oxidative route requires benzaldehyde dehydrogenase (BALDH) to convert benzaldehyde to BA. Using a functional genomic approach, we identified an Antirrhinum majus (snapdragon) BALDH, which exhibits 40% identity to bacterial BALDH. Transcript profiling, biochemical characterization of the purified recombinant protein, molecular homology modeling, in vivo stable isotope labeling, and transient expression in petunia flowers reveal that BALDH is capable of oxidizing benzaldehyde to BA in vivo. GFP localization and immunogold labeling studies show that this biochemical step occurs in the mitochondria, raising a question about the role of subcellular compartmentalization in BA biosynthesis.

  13. Sequential injection analysis of ethanol using immobilized alcohol dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Hedenfalk, M.; Mattiasson, B.

    1996-05-01

    A Sequential Injection (SI) system was used to analyze the ethanol concentration in fermentation broth. The method is based on the use of immobilized NAD{sup +} dependent alcohol dehydrogenase. A non-linear standard curve for ethanol (range 0.25-100 mM) was used to determine the concentration in fermentation broth and the results correlated well with HPLC measurements. The assay time was 140 s, 0.5 {mu}mol of cofactor was used for each determination, and the relative standard deviation was less than 6% when analyzing fermentation samples. The assay system is very stable and makes it possible to reduce the cofactor consumption while keeping the system set up simple.

  14. Mechanistic enzymology of CO dehydrogenase from Clostridium thermoaceticum

    SciTech Connect

    Ragsdale, S.W.

    1992-01-01

    The final steps in acetyl-CoA biosynthesis by anaerobic bacteria are performed by carbon monoxide dehydrogenase (CODH), a nickel/iron-sulfur protein. An important achievement was to establish conditions under which acetyl-CoA synthesis by purified enzymes equals the in vivo rate of acetate synthesis. Under these optimized conditions we established that the rate limiting step in the synthesis of acetyl-CoA from methyl-H[sub 4]folate, CO and CoA is likely to be the methylation of CODH by the methylated corrinoid/iron-sulfur protein. We then focused on stopped flow studies of this rate limiting transmethylation reaction and established its mechanism. We have studied the carbonylation of CODH by infrared and resonance Raman spectroscopy and determined that the [Ni-Fe[sup 3-4]S[sub 4

  15. Conjugated bilirubin in neonates with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, M; Rubaltelli, F F; Hammerman, C; Vilei, M T; Leiter, C; Abramov, A; Muraca, M

    1996-05-01

    We used a system capable of measuring conjugated bilirubin and its monoconjugated and diconjugated fractions in serum to assess bilirubin conjugation in 29 glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD)-deficient, term, male newborn infants and 35 control subjects; all had serum bilirubin levels > or = 256 mumol/L (15 mg/dI). The median value for diconjugated bilirubin was lower in the G6PD-deficient neonates than in control subjects (0.06 (range 0.00 to 1.84) vs 0.21 (range 0.00 to 1.02) mumol/L, p = 0.006). Diglucuronide was undetectable in 11 (38.9%) of the G6PD-deficient infants versus 3 (8.6%) of the control subjects (p = 0.015). These findings imply a partial defect of bilirubin conjugation not previously demonstrated in G6PD-deficient newborn infants.

  16. Microbial metabolic activity in soil as measured by dehydrogenase determinations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casida, L. E., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    The dehydrogenase technique for measuring the metabolic activity of microorganisms in soil was modified to use a 6-h, 37 C incubation with either glucose or yeast extract as the electron-donating substrate. The rate of formazan production remained constant during this time interval, and cellular multiplication apparently did not occur. The technique was used to follow changes in the overall metabolic activities of microorganisms in soil undergoing incubation with a limiting concentration of added nutrient. The sequence of events was similar to that obtained by using the Warburg respirometer to measure O2 consumption. However, the major peaks of activity occurred earlier with the respirometer. This possibly is due to the lack of atmospheric CO2 during the O2 consumption measurements.

  17. Microbial metabolic activity in soil as measured by dehydrogenase determinations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casida, L. E., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    The dehydrogenase technique for measuring the metabolic activity of microorganisms in soil was modified to use a 6-h, 37 C incubation with either glucose or yeast extract as the electron-donating substrate. The rate of formazan production remained constant during this time interval, and cellular multiplication apparently did not occur. The technique was used to follow changes in the overall metabolic activities of microorganisms in soil undergoing incubation with a limiting concentration of added nutrient. The sequence of events was similar to that obtained by using the Warburg respirometer to measure O2 consumption. However, the major peaks of activity occurred earlier with the respirometer. This possibly is due to the lack of atmospheric CO2 during the O2 consumption measurements.

  18. Kinetic study of porcine kidney betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Figueroa-Soto, C G; Valenzuela-Soto, E M

    2000-03-16

    Porcine kidney betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.1.8) kinetic properties were determined at low substrate concentrations. The double-reciprocal plots of initial velocity versus substrate concentration are linear and intersect at the left of the 1/v axis and showed substrate inhibition with betaine aldehyde. Studies of inhibition by NADH and dead-end analogs showed that NADH is a mixed inhibitor against NAD(+) and betaine aldehyde. AMP is competitive with respect to NAD(+) and mixed with betaine aldehyde. Choline is competitive against betaine aldehyde and uncompetitive with respect to NAD(+). The kinetic behavior is consistent with an Iso-Ordered Bi-Bi Steady-State mechanism. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  19. Ketonic diet in the management of pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Falk, R E; Cederbaum, S D; Blass, J P; Gibson, G E; Kark, R A; Carrel, R E

    1976-11-01

    Two brothers, aged 11 years 6 months and 2 years 3 months, with psychomotor and growth retardation, episodes of weakness, ataxia, ophthalmoplegia, and elevated levels of blood pyruvate were shown to have a deficiency in the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDH). When they ate a diet high enough in fats to cause ketonemia but not acidosis, there was a fall in blood pyruvate levels, a decrease in the frequency and severity of the episodes of neurological deterioration, an increased rate of growth and development in the younger brother, and increased strength and endurance in the older one. The possibility of dietary treatment makes the early diagnosis of PDH deficiency more important. Determination of blood pyruvate and lactate levels following a standard glucose meal (glucose-pyruvate test) appears to be the most reliable screening test for this condition.

  20. Alcohol Dehydrogenase of Bacillus strain for Measuring Alcohol Electrochemically

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iswantini, D.; Nurhidayat, N.; Ferit, H.

    2017-03-01

    Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) was applied to produce alcohol biosensor. The enzyme was collected from cultured Bacillus sp. in solid media. From 6 tested isolates, bacteria from fermented rice grain (TST.A) showed the highest oxidation current which was further applied as the bioreceptor. Various ethanol concentrations was measured based on the increase of maximum oxidation current value. However, a reduction value was happened when the ethanol concentration was higher than 5%. Comparing the result of spectrophotometry measurement, R2 value obtained from the biosensor measurement method was higher. The new proposed method resulted a wider detection range, from 0.1-5% of ethanol concentration. The result showed that biosensor method has big potency to be used as alcohol detector in foods or bevearages.

  1. Biofuel cell anode: NAD +/glucose dehydrogenase-coimmobilized ketjenblack electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyake, T.; Oike, M.; Yoshino, S.; Yatagawa, Y.; Haneda, K.; Kaji, H.; Nishizawa, M.

    2009-09-01

    We have studied the coimmobilization of glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) and its cofactor, oxidized nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD +), on a ketjenblack (KB) electrode as a step toward a biofuel cell anode that works without mediators. A KB electrode was first treated with a sulfuric acid/nitric acid/water mixture to lower the overvoltage for NADH oxidation, and was next chemically modified with NAD + and GDH. The improved GDH/NAD +/KB electrode is found to oxidize glucose around 0 V vs. Ag/AgCl. A biofuel cell constructed with a bilirubin oxidase-immobilized KB cathode showed a maximum power density of 52 μW/cm 2 at 0.3 V.

  2. Pleiotropic effects of lactate dehydrogenase inactivation in Lactobacillus casei.

    PubMed

    Viana, Rosa; Yebra, María Jesús; Galán, José Luis; Monedero, Vicente; Pérez-Martínez, Gaspar

    2005-01-01

    In lactic acid bacteria, conversion of pyruvic to lactic acid through the activity of lactate dehydrogenase (Ldh) constitutes the final step of the homofermentative pathway. Lactobacillus casei has two characterized genes encoding Ldh activities. The ldhL gene codes for an L-Ldh, which specifically catalyzes the formation of L-lactate, whereas the hicD gene codes for a D-hydroxyisocaproate dehydrogenase (HicDH), which catalyzes the conversion of pyruvate into D-lactate. In L. casei cells fermenting glucose, a mixture of L-/D-lactate with a 97:3% ratio was formed. Inactivation of hicD led to undetectable D-lactate levels after glucose fermentation, while L-lactate levels remained constant. Inactivation of ldhL did not abolish the production of L-lactate, but the lactate final concentration decreased about 25% compared to the wild type, suggesting the presence of at least a second L-Ldh. Moreover, part of the pyruvate flux was rerouted and half of the lactate produced was in the D-isomer form. ldhL inactivation in L. casei showed additional interesting effects. First, the glycolytic flux from pyruvate to lactate was redirected and other fermentation products, including acetate, acetoin, pyruvate, ethanol, diacetyl, mannitol and CO(2), were produced. Second, a lack of carbon catabolite repression of lactose metabolism and N-acetyl-glucosaminidase activity was observed. This second effect could be partly avoided by growing the cells under aeration, since NADH oxidases could account for NAD+ regeneration.

  3. Aldehyde dehydrogenase. Covalent intermediate in aldehyde dehydrogenation and ester hydrolysis.

    PubMed Central

    Blatter, E E; Abriola, D P; Pietruszko, R

    1992-01-01

    4-trans-(NN-Dimethylamino)cinnamaldehyde (an aldehyde, DACA) and 4-trans-(NN-dimethylamino)cinnamoylimidazole (an amide, DACI) have been shown to be substrates for human aldehyde dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.1.3) which form chromophoric covalent intermediates. The spectra of covalent intermediates from both the cytoplasmic (E1) and mitochondrial (E2) isoenzymes derived from DACA and DACI were compared. The spectra were similar when either substrate was used, and also when the two isoenzymes were compared, and resembled that obtained for 4-trnas-(NN-dimethylamino)cinnamoyl-N-acetylcysteine, but differed from the spectrum of 4-trans-(NN-dimethylamino)cinnamoyl ethyl ester. After extensive digestion of the covalent intermediates from both 3H-labelled DACA and DACI with Pronase and purification, the labelled amino acid was identified as cysteine. Covalent intermediates from both DACA and DACI were also digested with trypsin, and labelled peptides were purified by ion-exchange and reverse-phase chromatography. Amino acid sequence analysis showed that the peptide comprising residues 273-307 was labelled by both DACA and DACI. The radioactive label at cysteine residues 301-303 of the primary structure could be unequivocally identified by employing the DACA derivative. Assignment of label to cysteine-302 was achieved by employing iodoacetamide-labelled E1 isoenzyme (iodoacetamide specifically labels cysteine-302), in which case there was no formation of the covalent intermediate from either DACA or DACI. In addition, cysteine-302 is the only cysteine residue conserved in all aldehyde dehydrogenases sequenced. Thus cysteine-302 is the amino acid residue that forms a covalent intermediate with both aldehyde and ester substrates. PMID:1546951

  4. Biochemical and structural characterization of Plasmodium falciparum glutamate dehydrogenase 2.

    PubMed

    Zocher, Kathleen; Fritz-Wolf, Karin; Kehr, Sebastian; Fischer, Marina; Rahlfs, Stefan; Becker, Katja

    2012-05-01

    Glutamate dehydrogenases (GDHs) play key roles in cellular redox, amino acid, and energy metabolism, thus representing potential targets for pharmacological interventions. Here we studied the functional network provided by the three known glutamate dehydrogenases of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. The recombinant production of the previously described PfGDH1 as hexahistidyl-tagged proteins was optimized. Additionally, PfGDH2 was cloned, recombinantly produced, and characterized. Like PfGDH1, PfGDH2 is an NADP(H)-dependent enzyme with a specific activity comparable to PfGDH1 but with slightly higher K(m) values for its substrates. The three-dimensional structure of hexameric PfGDH2 was solved to 3.1 Å resolution. The overall structure shows high similarity with PfGDH1 but with significant differences occurring at the subunit interface. As in mammalian GDH1, in PfGDH2 the subunit-subunit interactions are mainly assisted by hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions, whereas in PfGDH1 these contacts are mediated by networks of salt bridges and hydrogen bonds. In accordance with this, the known bovine GDH inhibitors hexachlorophene, GW5074, and bithionol were more effective on PfGDH2 than on PfGDH1. Subcellular localization was determined for all three plasmodial GDHs by fusion with the green fluorescent protein. Based on our data, PfGDH1 and PfGDH3 are cytosolic proteins whereas PfGDH2 clearly localizes to the apicoplast, a plastid-like organelle specific for apicomplexan parasites. This study provides new insights into the structure and function of GDH isoenzymes of P. falciparum, which represent potential targets for the development of novel antimalarial drugs.

  5. Conformational Changes and Catalysis by Alcohol Dehydrogenase§

    PubMed Central

    Plapp, Bryce V.

    2009-01-01

    As shown by X-ray crystallography, horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase undergoes a global conformational change upon binding of NAD+ or NADH, involving a rotation of the catalytic domain relative to the coenzyme binding domain and the closing up of the active site to produce a catalytically efficient enzyme. The conformational change requires a complete coenzyme and is affected by various chemical or mutational substitutions that can increase the catalytic turnover by altering the kinetics of the isomerization and rate of dissociation of coenzymes. The binding of NAD+ is kinetically limited by a unimolecular isomerization (corresponding to the conformational change) that is controlled by deprotonation of the catalytic zinc-water to produce a negatively-charged zinc-hydroxide, which can attract the positively-charged nicotinamide ring. The deprotonation is facilitated by His-51 acting through a hydrogen-bonded network to relay the proton to solvent. Binding of NADH also involves a conformational change, but the rate is very fast. After the enzyme binds NAD+ and closes up, the substrate displaces the hydroxide bound to the catalytic zinc; this exchange may involve a double displacement reaction where the carboxylate group of a glutamate residue first displaces the hydroxide (inverting the tetrahedral coordination of the zinc), and then the exogenous ligand displaces the glutamate. The resulting enzyme-NAD+-alcoholate complex is poised for hydrogen transfer, and small conformational fluctuations may bring the reactants together so that the hydride ion is transferred by quantum mechanical tunneling. In the process, the nicotinamide ring may become puckered, as seen in structures of complexes of the enzyme with NADH. The conformational changes of alcohol dehydrogenase demonstrate the importance of protein dynamics in catalysis. PMID:19583966

  6. Lactate dehydrogenase A silencing in IDH mutant gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Chesnelong, Charles; Chaumeil, Myriam M.; Blough, Michael D.; Al-Najjar, Mohammad; Stechishin, Owen D.; Chan, Jennifer A.; Pieper, Russell O.; Ronen, Sabrina M.; Weiss, Samuel; Luchman, H. Artee; Cairncross, J. Gregory

    2014-01-01

    Background Mutations of the isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 gene (IDH1/2) were initially thought to enhance cancer cell survival and proliferation by promoting the Warburg effect. However, recent experimental data have shown that production of 2-hydroxyglutarate by IDH mutant cells promotes hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)1α degradation and, by doing so, may have unexpected metabolic effects. Methods We used human glioma tissues and derived brain tumor stem cells (BTSCs) to study the expression of HIF1α target genes in IDH mutant (mt) and IDH wild-type (wt) tumors. Focusing thereafter on the major glycolytic enzyme, lactate dehydrogenase A (LDHA), we used standard molecular methods and pyrosequencing-based DNA methylation analysis to identify mechanisms by which LDHA expression was regulated in human gliomas. Results We found that HIF1α-responsive genes, including many essential for glycolysis (SLC2A1, PDK1, LDHA, SLC16A3), were underexpressed in IDHmt gliomas and/or derived BTSCs. We then demonstrated that LDHA was silenced in IDHmt derived BTSCs, including those that did not retain the mutant IDH1 allele (mIDHwt), matched BTSC xenografts, and parental glioma tissues. Silencing of LDHA was associated with increased methylation of the LDHA promoter, as was ectopic expression of mutant IDH1 in immortalized human astrocytes. Furthermore, in a search of The Cancer Genome Atlas, we found low expression and high methylation of LDHA in IDHmt glioblastomas. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of downregulation of LDHA in cancer. Although unexpected findings, silencing of LDHA and downregulation of several other glycolysis essential genes raise the intriguing possibility that IDHmt gliomas have limited glycolytic capacity, which may contribute to their slow growth and better prognosis. PMID:24366912

  7. Physicochemical Characterization of a Thermostable Alcohol Dehydrogenase from Pyrobaculum aerophilum

    PubMed Central

    Vitale, Annalisa; Thorne, Natasha; Lovell, Scott; Battaile, Kevin P.; Hu, Xin; Shen, Min; D'Auria, Sabato; Auld, Douglas S.

    2013-01-01

    In this work we characterize an alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrobaculum aerophilum (PyAeADHII). We have previously found that PyAeADHII has no activity when standard ADH substrates are used but is active when α-tetralone is used as substrate. Here, to gain insights into enzyme function, we screened several chemical libraries for enzymatic modulators using an assay employing α-tetralone. The results indicate that PyAeADHII activity in the presence of α-tetralone was inhibited by compounds such as flunarizine. We also examined metal coordination of the enzyme in solution by performing metal substitution of the enzyme-bound zinc (Zn2+) with cobalt. The solution-based absorption spectra for cobalt substituted PyAeADHII supports substitution at the structural Zn2+ site. To gain structural insight, we obtained the crystal structure of both wild-type and cobalt-substituted PyAeADHII at 1.75 Å and 2.20 Å resolution, respectively. The X-ray data confirmed one metal ion per monomer present only at the structural site with otherwise close conservation to other ADH enzymes. We next determined the co-crystal structure of the NADPH-bound form of the enzyme at 2.35 Å resolution to help define the active site region of the enzyme and this data shows close structural conservation with horse ADH, despite the lack of a catalytic Zn2+ ion in PyAeADHII. Modeling of α-tetralone into the NADPH bound structure suggests an arginine as a possible catalytic residue. The data presented here can yield a better understanding of alcohol dehydrogenases lacking the catalytic zinc as well as the structural features inherent to thermostable enzymes. PMID:23755111

  8. Metabolic Connection of Inflammatory Pain: Pivotal Role of a Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Kinase-Pyruvate Dehydrogenase-Lactic Acid Axis.

    PubMed

    Jha, Mithilesh Kumar; Song, Gyun Jee; Lee, Maan Gee; Jeoung, Nam Ho; Go, Younghoon; Harris, Robert A; Park, Dong Ho; Kook, Hyun; Lee, In-Kyu; Suk, Kyoungho

    2015-10-21

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase kinases (PDK1-4) are mitochondrial metabolic regulators that serve as decision makers via modulation of pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) activity to convert pyruvate either aerobically to acetyl-CoA or anaerobically to lactate. Metabolic dysregulation and inflammatory processes are two sides of the same coin in several pathophysiological conditions. The lactic acid surge associated with the metabolic shift has been implicated in diverse painful states. In this study, we investigated the role of PDK-PDH-lactic acid axis in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory pain. Deficiency of Pdk2 and/or Pdk4 in mice attenuated complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-induced pain hypersensitivities. Likewise, Pdk2/4 deficiency attenuated the localized lactic acid surge along with hallmarks of peripheral and central inflammation following intraplantar administration of CFA. In vitro studies supported the role of PDK2/4 as promoters of classical proinflammatory activation of macrophages. Moreover, the pharmacological inhibition of PDKs or lactic acid production diminished CFA-induced inflammation and pain hypersensitivities. Thus, a PDK-PDH-lactic acid axis seems to mediate inflammation-driven chronic pain, establishing a connection between metabolism and inflammatory pain. The mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) kinases (PDKs) and their substrate PDH orchestrate the conversion of pyruvate either aerobically to acetyl-CoA or anaerobically to lactate. Lactate, the predominant end product of glycolysis, has recently been identified as a signaling molecule for neuron-glia interactions and neuronal plasticity. Pathological metabolic shift and subsequent lactic acid production are thought to play an important role in diverse painful states; however, their contribution to inflammation-driven pain is still to be comprehended. Here, we report that the PDK-PDH-lactic acid axis constitutes a key component of inflammatory pain pathogenesis. Our findings establish an

  9. Human liver class I alcohol dehydrogenase gammagamma isozyme: the sole cytosolic 3beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase of iso bile acids.

    PubMed

    Marschall, H U; Oppermann, U C; Svensson, S; Nordling, E; Persson, B; Höög, J O; Jörnvall, H

    2000-04-01

    3beta-Hydroxy (iso) bile acids are formed during enterohepatic circulation from 3alpha-hydroxy bile acids and constitute normal compounds in plasma but are virtually absent in bile. Isoursodeoxycholic acid (isoUDCA) is a major metabolite of UDCA. In a recent study it was found that after administration of isoUDCA, UDCA became the major acid in bile. Thus, epimerization of the 3beta-hydroxy to a 3alpha-hydroxy group, catalyzed by 3beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (HSD) and 3-oxo-reductases must occur. The present study aims to characterize the human liver bile acid 3beta-HSD. Human liver cytosol and recombinant alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) betabeta and gammagamma isozymes were subjected to native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) and isoelectric focusing. Activity staining with oxidized nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) or oxidized nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP(+)) as cofactors and various iso bile acids as substrates was used to screen for 3beta-HSD activity. Reaction products were identified and quantified by gas chromotography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Computer-assisted substrate docking of isoUDCA to the active site of a 3-dimensional model of human class I gammagamma ADH was performed. ADH gammagamma isozyme was identified as the iso bile acid 3beta-HSD present in human liver cytosol, with NAD(+) as a cofactor. Values for k(cat)/K(m) were in the rank order isodeoxycholic acid (isoDCA), isochenodeoxycholic acid (isoCDCA), isoUDCA, and isolithocholic acid (isoLCA) (0.10, 0.09, 0.08, and 0. 05 min(-1) x micromol/L(-1), respectively). IsoUDCA fits as substrate to the 3-dimensional model of the active-site of ADH gammagamma. ADH gammagamma isozyme was defined as the only bile acid 3beta-HSD in human liver cytosol. Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases are candidates for the binding and transport of 3alpha-hydroxy bile acids. We assume that ADH gammagamma isozyme is involved in cytosolic bile acid binding and transport processes as well.

  10. Microbial Oxidation of Methane and Methanol: Crystallization of Methanol Dehydrogenase and Properties of Holo- and Apo-Methanol Dehydrogenase from Methylomonas methanica

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Ramesh N.; Hou, Ching T.; Felix, Andre

    1978-01-01

    Procedures are described for the purification and crystallization of methanol dehydrogenase from the soluble fraction of the type I obligate methylotroph Methylomonas methanica strain S1. The crystallized enzyme is homogeneous as judged by acrylamide gel electrophoresis and ultracentrifugation. The enzyme had a high pH optimum (9.5) and required ammonium salt as an activator. In the presence of phenazine methosulfate as an electron acceptor, the enzyme catalyzed the oxidation of primary alcohols and formaldehyde. Secondary, tertiary, and aromatic alcohols were not oxidized. The molecular weight as well as subunit size of methanol dehydrogenase was 60,000, indicating that it is monomeric. The sedimentation constant (s20,w) was 3.1S. The amino acid composition of the crystallized enzyme is also presented. Antisera prepared against the crystalline enzyme were nonspecific; they cross-reacted with and inhibited the isofunctional enzyme from other obligate methylotrophic bacteria. The crystalline methanol dehydrogenase had an absorption peak at 350 nm in the visible region and weak fluorescence peaks at 440 and 470 nm due to the presence of a pteridine derivative as the prosthetic group. A procedure was developed for the preparation of apo-methanol dehydrogenase. The molecular weights, sedimentation constants, electrophoretic mobilities, and immunological properties of apo- and holo-methanol dehydrogenases are identical. Apo-methanol dehydrogenase lacked the absorption peak at 350 nm and the fluorescence peaks at 440 and 470 nm and was catalytically inactive. All attempts to reconstitute an active enzyme from apo-methanol dehydrogenase, using various pteridine derivatives, were unsuccessful. Images PMID:415046

  11. Coupling between d-3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase and d-2-hydroxyglutarate dehydrogenase drives bacterial l-serine synthesis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen; Zhang, Manman; Gao, Chao; Zhang, Yipeng; Ge, Yongsheng; Guo, Shiting; Guo, Xiaoting; Zhou, Zikang; Liu, Qiuyuan; Zhang, Yingxin; Ma, Cuiqing; Tao, Fei; Xu, Ping

    2017-09-05

    l-Serine biosynthesis, a crucial metabolic process in most domains of life, is initiated by d-3-phosphoglycerate (d-3-PG) dehydrogenation, a thermodynamically unfavorable reaction catalyzed by d-3-PG dehydrogenase (SerA). d-2-Hydroxyglutarate (d-2-HG) is traditionally viewed as an abnormal metabolite associated with cancer and neurometabolic disorders. Here, we reveal that bacterial anabolism and catabolism of d-2-HG are involved in l-serine biosynthesis in Pseudomonas stutzeri A1501 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1. SerA catalyzes the stereospecific reduction of 2-ketoglutarate (2-KG) to d-2-HG, responsible for the major production of d-2-HG in vivo. SerA combines the energetically favorable reaction of d-2-HG production to overcome the thermodynamic barrier of d-3-PG dehydrogenation. We identified a bacterial d-2-HG dehydrogenase (D2HGDH), a flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD)-dependent enzyme, that converts d-2-HG back to 2-KG. Electron transfer flavoprotein (ETF) and ETF-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (ETFQO) are also essential in d-2-HG metabolism through their capacity to transfer electrons from D2HGDH. Furthermore, while the mutant with D2HGDH deletion displayed decreased growth, the defect was rescued by adding l-serine, suggesting that the D2HGDH is functionally tied to l-serine synthesis. Substantial flux flows through d-2-HG, being produced by SerA and removed by D2HGDH, ETF, and ETFQO, maintaining d-2-HG homeostasis. Overall, our results uncover that d-2-HG-mediated coupling between SerA and D2HGDH drives bacterial l-serine synthesis.

  12. Stereoselective carveol dehydrogenase from Rhodococcus erythropolis DCL14. A novel nicotinoprotein belonging to the short chain dehydrogenase/reductase superfamily.

    PubMed

    van der Werf, M J; van der Ven, C; Barbirato, F; Eppink, M H; de Bont, J A; van Berkel, W J

    1999-09-10

    A novel nicotinoprotein, catalyzing the dichlorophenolindophenol-dependent oxidation of carveol to carvone, was purified to homogeneity from Rhodococcus erythropolis DCL14. The enzyme is specifically induced after growth on limonene and carveol. Dichlorophenolindophenol-dependent carveol dehydrogenase (CDH) is a homotetramer of 120 kDa with each subunit containing a tightly bound NAD(H) molecule. The enzyme is optimally active at pH 5.5 and 50 degrees C and displays a broad substrate specificity with a preference for substituted cyclohexanols. When incubated with a diastereomeric mixture of (4R)- or (4S)-carveol, CDH stereoselectively catalyzes the conversion of the (6S)-carveol stereoisomers only. Kinetic studies with pure stereoisomers showed that this is due to large differences in V(max)/K(m) values and simultaneous product inhibition by (R)- or (S)-carvone. The R. erythropolis CDH gene (limC) was identified in an operon encoding the enzymes involved in limonene degradation. The CDH nucleotide sequence revealed an open reading frame of 831 base pairs encoding a 277-amino acid protein with a deduced mass of 29,531 Da. The CDH primary structure shares 10-30% sequence identity with members of the short chain dehydrogenase/reductase superfamily. Structure homology modeling with trihydroxynaphthalene reductase from Magnaporthe grisea suggests that CDH from R. erythropolis DCL14 is an alpha/beta one-domain protein with an extra loop insertion involved in NAD binding and a flexible C-terminal part involved in monoterpene binding.

  13. Dimerization and enzymatic activity of fungal 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase from the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Kristan, Katja; Deluca, Dominga; Adamski, Jerzy; Stojan, Jure; Rižner, Tea Lanišnik

    2005-01-01

    Background 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase from the fungus Cochliobolus lunatus (17β-HSDcl) is a member of the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) superfamily. SDR proteins usually function as dimers or tetramers and 17β-HSDcl is also a homodimer under native conditions. Results We have investigated here which secondary structure elements are involved in the dimerization of 17β-HSDcl and examined the importance of dimerization for the enzyme activity. Sequence similarity with trihydroxynaphthalene reductase from Magnaporthe grisea indicated that Arg129 and His111 from the αE-helices interact with the Asp121, Glu117 and Asp187 residues from the αE and αF-helices of the neighbouring subunit. The Arg129Asp and His111Leu mutations both rendered 17β-HSDcl monomeric, while the mutant 17β-HSDcl-His111Ala was dimeric. Circular dichroism spectroscopy analysis confirmed the conservation of the secondary structure in both monomers. The three mutant proteins all bound coenzyme, as shown by fluorescence quenching in the presence of NADP+, but both monomers showed no enzymatic activity. Conclusion We have shown by site-directed mutagenesis and structure/function analysis that 17β-HSDcl dimerization involves the αE and αF helices of both subunits. Neighbouring subunits are connected through hydrophobic interactions, H-bonds and salt bridges involving amino acid residues His111 and Arg129. Since the substitutions of these two amino acid residues lead to inactive monomers with conserved secondary structure, we suggest dimerization is a prerequisite for catalysis. A detailed understanding of this dimerization could lead to the development of compounds that will specifically prevent dimerization, thereby serving as a new type of inhibitor. PMID:16359545

  14. Improved Production of Propionic Acid in Propionibacterium jensenii via Combinational Overexpression of Glycerol Dehydrogenase and Malate Dehydrogenase from Klebsiella pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Long; Zhuge, Xin; Shin, Hyun-dong; Chen, Rachel R.; Li, Jianghua

    2015-01-01

    Microbial production of propionic acid (PA), an important chemical building block used as a preservative and chemical intermediate, has gained increasing attention for its environmental friendliness over traditional petrochemical processes. In previous studies, we constructed a shuttle vector as a useful tool for engineering Propionibacterium jensenii, a potential candidate for efficient PA synthesis. In this study, we identified the key metabolites for PA synthesis in P. jensenii by examining the influence of metabolic intermediate addition on PA synthesis with glycerol as a carbon source under anaerobic conditions. We also further improved PA production via the overexpression of the identified corresponding enzymes, namely, glycerol dehydrogenase (GDH), malate dehydrogenase (MDH), and fumarate hydratase (FUM). Compared to those in wild-type P. jensenii, the activities of these enzymes in the engineered strains were 2.91- ± 0.17- to 8.12- ± 0.37-fold higher. The transcription levels of the corresponding enzymes in the engineered strains were 2.85- ± 0.19- to 8.07- ± 0.63-fold higher than those in the wild type. The coexpression of GDH and MDH increased the PA titer from 26.95 ± 1.21 g/liter in wild-type P. jensenii to 39.43 ± 1.90 g/liter in the engineered strains. This study identified the key metabolic nodes limiting PA overproduction in P. jensenii and further improved PA titers via the coexpression of GDH and MDH, making the engineered P. jensenii strain a potential industrial producer of PA. PMID:25595755

  15. The molybdenum formylmethanofuran dehydrogenase operon and the tungsten formylmethanofuran dehydrogenase operon from Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum. Structures and transcriptional regulation.

    PubMed

    Hochheimer, A; Linder, D; Thauer, R K; Hedderich, R

    1996-11-15

    Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum contains a tungsten formylmethanofuran dehydrogenase (FwdABCD) and a molybdenum formylmethanofuran dehydrogenase (FmdABC). The fwdHFGDACB operon encoding the tungsten enzyme has recently been characterized. We report here on the structure and expression of the gene cluster encoding the molybdenum enzyme. This gene cluster is composed of three open reading frames (fmdECB). The fmdB gene was found to encode the molybdopterin-dinucleotide-binding subunit harboring the enzyme's active site; FmdB is thus functionally equivalent to FwdB. fmdC encodes a protein with sequence similarity to FwdC in its N-terminal part and with sequence similarity to FwdD in its C-terminal part; FmdC is thus functionally equivalent to FwdC and FwdD. Interestingly, the fmd operon lacks a gene fmdA encoding the subunit FmdA of the molybdenum enzyme. FmdA has the same apparent molecular mass and the same N-terminal amino acid sequence as FwdA and only one DNA sequence encoding for this N-terminal amino acid sequence was found in the M. thermoautotrophicum genome. It is therefore proposed that FmdA and FwdA are encoded by the same gene namely fwdA in the fwd operon. In agreement with this proposal is the finding that fwdA is expressed constitutively: northern-blot analysis of RNA from tungstate- and molybdate-grown cells of M. thermo-autotrophicum revealed that the fwdHFGDACB gene cluster is transcribed in the presence of either molybdate or tungstate in the growth medium whereas the fmdECB gene cluster was only transcribed when molybdate was present.

  16. Structure and mechanism of benzaldehyde dehydrogenase from Pseudomonas putida ATCC 12633, a member of the Class 3 aldehyde dehydrogenase superfamily.

    PubMed

    Zahniser, Megan P D; Prasad, Shreenath; Kneen, Malea M; Kreinbring, Cheryl A; Petsko, Gregory A; Ringe, Dagmar; McLeish, Michael J

    2017-03-01

    Benzaldehyde dehydrogenase from Pseudomonas putida (PpBADH) belongs to the Class 3 aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) family. The Class 3 ALDHs are unusual in that they are generally dimeric (rather than tetrameric), relatively non-specific and utilize both NAD+ and NADP+. To date, X-ray structures of three Class 3 ALDHs have been determined, of which only two have cofactor bound, both in the NAD+ form. Here we report the crystal structure of PpBADH in complex with NADP+ and a thioacyl intermediate adduct. The overall architecture of PpBADH resembles that of most other members of the ALDH superfamily, and the cofactor binding residues are well conserved. Conversely, the pattern of cofactor binding for the rat Class 3 ALDH differs from that of PpBADH and other ALDHs. This has been interpreted in terms of a different mechanism for the rat enzyme. Comparison with the PpBADH structure, as well as multiple sequence alignments, suggest that one of two conserved glutamates, at positions 215 (209 in rat) and 337 (333 in rat), would act as the general base necessary to hydrolyze the thioacyl intermediate. While the latter is the general base in the rat Class 3 ALDH, site-specific mutagenesis indicates that Glu215 is the likely candidate for PpBADH, a result more typical of the Class 1 and 2 ALDH families. Finally, this study shows that hydride transfer is not rate limiting, lending further credence to the suggestion that PpBADH is more similar to the Class 1 and 2 ALDHs than it is to other Class 3 ALDHs. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Biorhythms of activities of liver and blood dehydrogenases and changes in body weight of the rats feeding normal diet or excess of sugar substitutes.

    PubMed

    Petrovich, Yu A; Volozhin, A I; Zubtsov, V A; Kichenko, S M

    2007-12-01

    Biorhythms with higher levels of activity of sorbitol dehydrogenase and lactate dehydrogenase in blood plasma, specific activity of sorbitol dehydrogenase, lactate dehydrogenase, and malate dehydrogenase in the liver, and body weight of rats were more pronounced in the spring-summer period than in the autumn-winter period. These specific features were revealed in animals feeding a normal diet or food with 54 and 27% sugar substitute sorbitol. However, specific activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in the liver was higher in the autumn-winter period. Activity of sorbitol dehydrogenase in blood plasma increased by tens of times due to induction of sorbitol synthesis (substrate) in the liver. Sugar substitute xylitol is structurally similar to sorbitol, but is not the substrate for sorbitol dehydrogenase. However, the effect of xylitol on activities of lactate dehydrogenase, malate dehydrogenase, and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in the spring-summer period was similar to that of sorbitol.

  18. The importance of alcohol dehydrogenase in regulation of ethanol metabolism in rat liver cells.

    PubMed Central

    Page, R A; Kitson, K E; Hardman, M J

    1991-01-01

    We used titration with the inhibitors tetramethylene sulphoxide and isobutyramide to assess quantitatively the importance of alcohol dehydrogenase in regulation of ethanol oxidation in rat hepatocytes. In hepatocytes isolated from starved rats the apparent Flux Control Coefficient (calculated assuming a single-substrate irreversible reaction with non-competitive inhibition) of alcohol dehydrogenase is 0.3-0.5. Adjustment of this coefficient to allow for alcohol dehydrogenase being a two-substrate reversible enzyme increases the value by 1.3-1.4-fold. The final value of the Flux Control Coefficient of 0.5-0.7 indicates that alcohol dehydrogenase is a major rate-determining enzyme, but that other factors also have a regulatory role. In hepatocytes from fed rats the Flux Control Coefficient for alcohol dehydrogenase decreases with increasing acetaldehyde concentration. This suggests that, as acetaldehyde concentrations rise, control of the pathway shifts from alcohol dehydrogenase to other enzymes, particularly aldehyde dehydrogenase. There is not a single rate-determining step for the ethanol metabolism pathway and control is shared among several steps. PMID:1898355

  19. Control of glycolytic flux in Zymomonas mobilis by glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Snoep, J.L. |; Arfman, N.; Yomano, L.P.; Ingram, L.O.; Westerhoff, H.V.; Conway, T.

    1996-07-20

    Alycolytic genes in Zymomonas mobilis are highly expressed and constitute half of the cytoplasmic protein. The first four genes (glf, zwf, edd, glk) in this pathway form an operon encoding a glucose permease, glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6-P dehydrogenase), 6-phosphogluconate dehydratase, and glucokinase, respectively. Each gene was overexpressed from a tac promoter to investigate the control of glycolysis during the early stages of batch fermentation when flux (qCO{sub 2}) is highest. Almost half of flux control appears to reside with G6-P dehydrogenase (C{sub G6-P dehydrogenase}{sup J} = 0.4). Although Z. mobilis exhibits one of the highest rates of glycolysis known, recombinants with elevated G6-P dehydrogenase had a 10% to 13% higher glycolytic flux than the native organism. A small increase in flux was also observed for recombinants expressing glf. Results obtained did not allow a critical evaluation of glucokinase and this enzyme may also represent an important control point. 6-Phosphogluconate dehydratase appears to be saturating at native levels. With constructs containing the full operon, growth rate and flux were both reduced, complicating interpretations. However, results obtained were also consistent with G6-P dehydrogenase as a primary site of control. Flux was 17% higher in operon constructs which exhibited a 17% increase in G6-P dehydrogenase specific activity, relative to the average of other operon constructs which contain a frameshift mutation in zwf.

  20. Peripartal changes in serum alkaline phosphatase activity and lactate dehydrogenase activity in dairy cows.

    PubMed Central

    Peter, A T; Bosu, W T; MacWilliams, P; Gallagher, S

    1987-01-01

    Peripartal serum alkaline phosphatase activity and lactate dehydrogenase activity were measured in 30 dairy cows in order to examine the association between retained fetal membranes and enzyme activity. Daily blood samples were obtained from pregnant cows, starting 15 days before the expected day of calving until eight days after parturition. Sera from 15 cows which retained fetal membranes longer than 24 hours and 15 cows which shed fetal membranes within six hours after parturition were analyzed for alkaline phosphatase and lactate dehydrogenase enzyme activities. Mean alkaline phosphatase enzyme activities ranged from 15.93 to 32.6 U/L in retained and nonretained placenta cows. There was a trend towards higher serum alkaline phosphatase activities in retained placenta cows but the differences were not significant among the groups (P greater than 0.05). Mean lactate dehydrogenase activities ranged from 307.2 to 438.86 U/L in nonretained and retained placenta cows. Lactate dehydrogenase enzyme activities in nonretained and retained placenta cows were similar (P greater than 0.05). The alkaline phosphatase and lactate dehydrogenase enzyme activities peaked at the time of parturition in both groups. However, the differences in alkaline phosphatase and lactate dehydrogenase activities on different days within non-retained and retained placenta cows were significant (P less than 0.05). Results indicate that prepartal changes in alkaline phosphatase and lactate dehydrogenase enzyme activities are not predictive of placental retention postpartum. PMID:3453274

  1. Accumulation of 2-Keto-L-Gulonate at 33°C by a Thermotolerant Gluconobacter Oxydans Mutant Obtained by Ion Beam Implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Bing; Xu, An; Zhang, Wan; Zhou, Wei; Wang, Jun; Yao, Jianming; Yu, Zengliang

    2006-03-01

    To obtain thermotolerant mutants of G. oxydans, which can enhance the transformation rate of L-sorbose to 2-Keto-L-gulonate (2-KLG) at 33oC in a two-step process of vitamin C manufacture, ion beam was used as a mutation source. Gluconobacter oxydans G0 and Bacillus megaterium B0 were used in this study. The original strain Gluconobacter oxydans G0 was mutated by the heavy ion implantation facility at the Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences. Several mutants including Gluconobacter oxydans GI13 were isolated and cocultured with Bacillus megaterium B0 at 33oC in shaking flasks. The average transformation rate of the new mixed strain GI13-B0 in per gram-molecule reached 94.4% after seven passages in shaking flasks, which was increased by 7% when compared with the original mixed strain G0-B0 (Gluconobacter oxydans G0 and Bacillus megaterium B0). Moreover, the transformation rate of I13B0 was stable at 94% at temperatures ranging from 25oC to 33oC, which would be of much value in reducing energy consumption in the manufacture of L-ascorbic acid, especially in the season of summer. To clarify some mechanism of the mutation, the specific activities of L-sorbose dehydrogenase in both G0 and GI13 were estimated.

  2. Antibodies to pyruvate dehydrogenase in primary biliary cirrhosis: correlation with histology.

    PubMed

    Kisand, K E; Kisand, K V; Karvonen, A L; Vuoristo, M; Mattila, J; Mäkinen, J; Uibo, R

    1998-09-01

    Antimitochondrial antibodies to pyruvate dehydrogenase are the hallmark of primary biliary cirrhosis. Their pathogenic role has not been proven, although antibodies to pyruvate dehydrogenase are bound to biliary epithelium. The aim of this study was to characterize serum IgA antibodies to pyruvate dehydrogenase and to evaluate their response to different treatment regimens. We also compared the level of antibodies with severity of histological lesions and the data of biochemical liver tests. Serum samples were collected at baseline and after 24 months from 61 primary biliary cirrhosis patients, whereas 23 patients were treated with ursodeoxycholic acid, 20 with colchicine, and 18 with placebo. ELISA was used to detect antibodies to pyruvate dehydrogenase. IgA and IgG were separated with jacalin and protein-A, respectively. Capacity of immunoglobulins to inhibit enzymatic activity was detected by spectrophotometric observation of the rate of enzyme reaction. 49 (80.3%) of the 61 patients possessed IgA antibodies to pyruvate dehydrogenase. Significant decrease in IgA antibodies was observed only in the ursodeoxycholic acid group (p<0.05). 15 of 18 IgA preparations and all 24 IgG preparations of patients' sera were inhibitory towards pyruvate dehydrogenase (mean inhibitory percent +/-SD: 42+/-33.4% and 79+/-22.4%, respectively, at a protein concentration of 100 microg/ml). The level of serum antibodies to pyruvate dehydrogenase correlated with several histological parameters (fibrosis, inflammatory infiltrate), but not with biochemical parameters. Our data reveal that IgA antibodies to pyruvate dehydrogenase inhibit enzyme function. The correlation between antibodies to pyruvate dehydrogenase and histological parameters might suggest the pathogenic role of these antibodies.

  3. Human gastric alcohol dehydrogenase activity: effect of age, sex, and alcoholism.

    PubMed Central

    Seitz, H K; Egerer, G; Simanowski, U A; Waldherr, R; Eckey, R; Agarwal, D P; Goedde, H W; von Wartburg, J P

    1993-01-01

    As various isoenzymes of gastric alcohol dehydrogenase exist and as the effect of sex and age on these enzymes is unknown, this study measured the activity of gastric alcohol dehydrogenase at high and low ethanol concentrations in endoscopic biopsy specimens from a total of 290 patients of various ages and from 10 patients with chronic alcoholism. Gastric alcohol dehydrogenase was also detected by immunohistological tests in biopsy specimens from 40 patients by the use of a polyclonal rabbit antibody against class I alcohol dehydrogenase. A significant correlation was found between the immunohistological reaction assessed by the intensity of the colour reaction in the biopsy specimen and the activity of alcohol dehydrogenase measured at 580 mM ethanol. While alcohol dehydrogenase activity measured at 16 mM ethanol was not significantly affected by age and sex, both factors influenced alcohol dehydrogenase activity measured at 580 mM ethanol. Young women below 50 years of age had significantly lower alcohol dehydrogenase activities in the gastric corpus and antrum when compared with age matched controls (SEM) (6.4 (0.7) v 8.8 (0.6) nmol/min/mg protein; p < 0.001 and 6.0 (1.3) v 9.5 (1.3) nmol/min/mg protein; p < 0.001). Over 50 years of age this sex difference was no longer detectable, as high Km gastric alcohol dehydrogenase activity decreases with age only in men and not in women. In addition, extremely low alcohol dehydrogenase activities have been found in gastric biopsy specimens from young male alcoholics (2.2 (0.5) nmol/min/mg protein), which returned to normal after two to three weeks of abstinence. The activity of alcohol dehydrogenase in the human stomach measured at 580 mM ethanol is decreased in young women, in elderly men, and in the subject with alcoholism. This decrease in alcohol dehydrogenase activity may contribute to the reduced first pass metabolism of ethanol associated with raised ethanol blood concentrations seen in these people. Images Figure

  4. Binding region of alanopine dehydrogenase predicted by unbiased molecular dynamics simulations of ligand diffusion.

    PubMed

    Gohlke, Holger; Hergert, Ulrike; Meyer, Tatu; Mulnaes, Daniel; Grieshaber, Manfred K; Smits, Sander H J; Schmitt, Lutz

    2013-10-28

    Opine dehydrogenases catalyze the reductive condensation of pyruvate with L-amino acids. Biochemical characterization of alanopine dehydrogenase from Arenicola marina revealed that this enzyme is highly specific for L-alanine. Unbiased molecular dynamics simulations with a homology model of alanopine dehydrogenase captured the binding of L-alanine diffusing from solvent to a putative binding region near a distinct helix-kink-helix motif. These results and sequence comparisons reveal how mutations and insertions within this motif dictate the L-amino acid specificity.

  5. On the role of microsomal aldehyde dehydrogenase in metabolism of aldehydic products of lipid peroxidation.

    PubMed

    Antonenkov, V D; Pirozhkov, S V; Panchenko, L F

    1987-11-30

    To elucidate a possible role of membrane-bound aldehyde dehydrogenase in the detoxication of aldehydic products of lipid peroxidation, the substrate specificity of the highly purified microsomal enzyme was investigated. The aldehyde dehydrogenase was active with different aliphatic aldehydes including 4-hydroxyalkenals, but did not react with malonic dialdehyde. When Fe/ADP-ascorbate-induced lipid peroxidation of arachidonic acid was carried out in an in vitro system, the formation of products which react with microsomal aldehyde dehydrogenase was observed parallel with malonic dialdehyde accumulation.

  6. An NAD-specific glutamate dehydrogenase from cyanobacteria. Identification and properties.

    PubMed

    Chávez, S; Candau, P

    1991-07-08

    The unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 presents a hexameric NAD-specific glutamate dehydrogenase with a molecular mass of 295 kDa. The enzyme differs from the NADP-glutamate dehydrogenase found in the same strain and is coded by a different gene. NAD-glutamate dehydrogenase shows a high coenzyme specificity, catalyzes preferentially glutamate formation and presents Km values for ammonium, NADH and 2-oxoglutarate of 4.5 mM, 50 microM and 1.8 mM respectively. An animating role for the enzyme is discussed.

  7. AB104. Glucose-6 phospate dehydrogenase deficiency among mongolian neonates

    PubMed Central

    Batjargal, Khishigjargal; Nansal, Gerelmaa; Zagd, Gerelmaa; Ganbaatar, Erdenetuya

    2015-01-01

    Background and objective Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is the most common enzyme deficiency in humans, affecting 400 million people worldwide and a high prevalence in persons of African, Middle Asian countries. The most common clinical manifestations are neonatal jaundice and acute hemolytic anemia, which is caused by the impairment of erythrocyte’s ability to remove harmful oxidative stress triggered by exogenous agents such as drugs, infection, or fava bean ingestion. Neonatal hyperbilirubinemia caused by G6PD is strongly associated with mortality and long-term neurodevelopmental impairment. The study aims to determine a level of G6PD in healthy neonates. Methods We obtained blood spot samples from 268 infants around 24-72 hours in their age who has unsuspected intranatal and neonatal disorders. Glucose 6 phosphate dehydrogenase “Perkin Elmer, Finland” level is determined by Victor 2D Fluorometer assay, developing of neonatal jaundice is examined by recall. Results The76.5% of all participants (n=205) was assessed 4.36±1.15 Ug/Hb in normal reference range of G6PD, other 23.5% (n=63) was 0.96±0.51 Ug/Hb with G6PD deficiency. In the both sex, 51.5% of male 0.88±0.46 Ug/Hb (n=33) and 47.6% of female (n=30) 0.97±0.55 Ug/Hb was assessed with G6PD deficiency. Developing Jaundice period in number of 63 neonates with G6PD deficiency, 86% of neonates (n=54) was in 1-4 days, 4% of neonates (n=3) was in 5-7 days and there is no sign of jaundice in 9% (n=6). Therefore neonates with G6PD deficiency, 53.9% (n=34) continued jaundice more than two weeks. Conclusions G6PD deficiency was determined in male neonates (51.5%) more than female (47.6%). The 76.5% of all participants (n=205) was assessed 4.36±1.15 Ug/Hb in normal reference range of G6PDH other 23.5% (n=63) of all participants was 0.96±0.51 Ug/Hb with G6PD deficiency. It shows that G6PD might be one potential risk of neonatal jaundice and hyperbilirubinemia in neonates in Mongolia.

  8. Mechanistic studies on the dehydrogenases of methylotrophic bacteria. 2. Kinetic studies on the intramolecular electron transfer in trimethylamine and dimethylamine dehydrogenase.

    PubMed Central

    Steenkamp, D J; Beinert, H

    1982-01-01

    E.p.r. spectroscopy of the trimethylamine and dimethylamine dehydrogenases of Hyphomicrobium X indicates that the substrate-reduced forms of these enzymes exist in the triplet state, which arise through interaction of a reduced [4Fe-4S] cluster and flavosemiquinone, with e.p.r. signals which differ in detail from those of the trimethylamine dehydrogenase of bacterium W3A1. Under certain conditions the intramolecular electron transfer between the flavoquinol form of 6-S-cysteinyl-FMN and the [4Fe-4S] cluster in all three dehydrogenases was much slower than the preceding reduction of the flavin to the flavoquinol form. Trimethylamine dehydrogenases from both organisms show a time-dependent broadening of the e.p.r. signals centred around g = 2 after mixing with trimethylamine. The broadening of the e.p.r. signals could be correlated with an unexpected dependence of the rate of formation of the triplet state on substrate concentration. A model which accounts in a qualitative manner for the substrate dependence of the formation of the triplet state in the trimethylamine dehydrogenase of Hyphomicrobium X is proposed. The binding of the substrate to the reduced form of the enzyme seems to result in a conformational change of the enzyme to a form in which the rate of intramolecular electron transfer is decreased. This finding may be correlated with the observation of hyperbolic substrate inhibition for both trimethylamine dehydrogenases. The results indicate the transfer of an electron to the [4Fe-4S] cluster to be an obligatory step in catalysis and suggest that the transfer of electrons from these enzymes to electron acceptors is mediated solely through the [4Fe-4S] cluster. PMID:6297456

  9. Use of the sulphite adduct of nicotinamide–adenine dinucleotide to study ionizations and the kinetics of lactate dehydrogenase and malate dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Parker, David M.; Lodola, Alberto; Holbrook, J. John

    1978-01-01

    1. The formation of the non-enzymic adduct of NAD+ and sulphite was investigated. In agreement with others we conclude that the dianion of sulphite adds to NAD+. 2. The formation of ternary complexes of either lactate dehydrogenase or malate dehydrogenase with NAD+ and sulphite was investigated. The u.v. spectrum of the NAD–sulphite adduct was the same whether free or enzyme-bound at either pH6 or pH8. This suggests that the free and enzyme-bound adducts have a similar electronic structure. 3. The effect of pH on the concentration of NAD–sulphite bound to both enzymes was measured in a new titration apparatus. Unlike the non-enzymic adduct (where the stability change with pH simply reflects HSO3−=SO32−+H+), the enzyme-bound adduct showed a bell-shaped pH–stability curve, which indicated that an enzyme side chain of pK=6.2 must be protonated for the complex to form. Since the adduct does not bind to the enzyme when histidine-195 of lactate dehydrogenase is ethoxycarbonylated we conclude that the protein group involved is histidine-195. 4. The pH-dependence of the formation of a ternary complex of lactate dehydrogenase, NAD+ and oxalate suggested that an enzyme group is protonated when this complex forms. 5. The rate at which NAD+ binds to lactate dehydrogenase and malate dehydrogenase was measured by trapping the enzyme-bound NAD+ by rapid reaction with sulphite. The rate of NAD+ dissociation from the enzymes was calculated from the bimolecular association kinetic constant and from the equilibrium binding constant and was in both cases much faster than the forward Vmax.. No kinetic evidence was found that suggested that there were interactions between protein subunits on binding NAD+. ImagesFig. 1.Fig. 3.Fig. 4. PMID:30452

  10. Structural Biology of Proteins of the Multi-enzyme Assembly Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Objectives and research challenges of this effort include: 1. Need to establish Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex protein crystals; 2. Need to test value of microgravity for improving crystal quality of Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex protein crystals; 3. Need to improve flight hardware in order to control and understand the effects of microgravity on crystallization of Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex proteins; 4. Need to integrate sets of national collaborations with the restricted and specific requirements of flight experiments; 5. Need to establish a highly controlled experiment in microgravity with a rigor not yet obtained; 6. Need to communicate both the rigor of microgravity experiments and the scientific value of results obtained from microgravity experiments to the national community; and 7. Need to advance the understanding of Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex structures so that scientific and commercial advance is identified for these proteins.

  11. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency presented with convulsion: a rare case.

    PubMed

    Merdin, Alparslan; Avci, Fatma; Guzelay, Nihal

    2014-01-29

    Red blood cells carry oxygen in the body and Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase protects these cells from oxidative chemicals. If there is a lack of Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase, red blood cells can go acute hemolysis. Convulsion is a rare presentation for acute hemolysis due to Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase deficiency. Herein, we report a case report of a Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase deficiency diagnosed patient after presentation with convulsion. A 70 year-old woman patient had been hospitalized because of convulsion and fatigue. She has not had similar symptoms before. She had ingested fava beans in the last two days. Her hypophyseal and brain magnetic resonance imaging were normal. Blood transfusion was performed and the patient recovered.

  12. Mitochondrial type II NAD(P)H dehydrogenases in fungal cell death

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, A. Pedro; Videira, Arnaldo

    2015-01-01

    During aerobic respiration, cells produce energy through oxidative phosphorylation, which includes a specialized group of multi-subunit complexes in the inner mitochondrial membrane known as the electron transport chain. However, this canonical pathway is branched into single polypeptide alternative routes in some fungi, plants, protists and bacteria. They confer metabolic plasticity, allowing cells to adapt to different environmental conditions and stresses. Type II NAD(P)H dehydrogenases (also called alternative NAD(P)H dehydrogenases) are non-proton pumping enzymes that bypass complex I. Recent evidence points to the involvement of fungal alternative NAD(P)H dehydrogenases in the process of programmed cell death, in addition to their action as overflow systems upon oxidative stress. Consistent with this, alternative NAD(P)H dehydrogenases are phylogenetically related to cell death - promoting proteins of the apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF)-family. PMID:28357279

  13. Isolation and nucleotide sequence of the methanol dehydrogenase structural gene from Paracoccus denitrificans.

    PubMed Central

    Harms, N; de Vries, G E; Maurer, K; Hoogendijk, J; Stouthamer, A H

    1987-01-01

    A genomic clone bank of Paracoccus denitrificans DNA has been constructed in the expression vector set pEX1, pEX2, and pEX3. Screening of this clone bank with antibodies raised against P. denitrificans methanol dehydrogenase resulted in the isolation of a clone, pNH3, that synthesized methanol dehydrogenase cross-reactive proteins. The nucleotide sequence of the P. denitrificans DNA fragment inserted in this clone has been determined and shown to contain the full methanol dehydrogenase structural gene. DNA cross-hybridization was found with DNA fragments which have been reported to contain the methanol dehydrogenase structural genes from Methylobacterium sp. strain AM1 and Methylobacterium organophilum. Images PMID:3114231

  14. Cloning and sequencing of the alcohol dehydrogenase II gene from Zymomonas mobilis

    DOEpatents

    Ingram, Lonnie O.; Conway, Tyrrell

    1992-01-01

    The alcohol dehydrogenase II gene from Zymomonas mobilis has been cloned and sequenced. This gene can be expressed at high levels in other organisms to produce acetaldehyde or to convert acetaldehyde to ethanol.

  15. Identification of epsilon-crystallin from swan lens as lactate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Chiou, S H; Chang, W P; Lai, T A

    1989-10-01

    Characterization of lens crystallins from black swan, a rare aquatic bird belonging to the family Anatidae, was carried out to search for epsilon-crystallin with lactate dehydrogenase activity. Biochemical comparison of epsilon-crystallins isolated from the swan and duck lenses plus lactate dehydrogenase of chicken heart has also been made in order to establish the structural/functional relatedness of these proteins. Amino acid analyses showed essentially similar overall compositions for these three proteins. Kinetic analysis revealed differences between avian epsilon-crystallins and the authentic heart-type lactate dehydrogenase. The swan lenses similar to duck lenses appeared to contain a thermostable epsilon-crystallin which possesses very high enzymatic activity of lactate dehydrogenase. The characterization of epsilon-crystallins from the available species of aquatic birds may provide some insights into the evolution of this unique crystallin in the Aves and their enzymatic roles inside the lens.

  16. Identification of c-crystallin from swan lens as lactate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Chiou, S-H; Chang, W-P; Lai, T-A

    1989-01-01

    Chuacterization of lens crystallins from black swan, a rare aquatic bird belonging to the family Anatidae, was carried out to search for e-crystallin with lactate dehydrogenase activity. Biochemical comparison of E-crystallins isolated from the swan and duck lenses plus lactate dehydrogenase of chicken heart has also been made in order to establish the structural/functional relatedness of these proteins. Amino acid analyses showed essentially similar overall compositions for these three proteins. Kinetic analysis revealed differences between avian E-crystallins and the authentic heart-type lactate dehydrogenase. The swan lenses similar to duck lenses appeared to contain a thermostable E-crystallin which possesses very high enzymatic activity of lactate dehydrogenase. The characterization of E-crystallins from the available species of aquatic birds may provide some insights into the evolution of this unique crystallin in the Aves and their enzymatic roles inside the lens.

  17. DEVELOPMENTAL EXPRESSION OF ALDEHYDE DEHYDROGENASE IN RAT: A COMPARISON OF LIVER AND LUNG DEVELOPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Metabolism is one of the major determinants for age-related susceptibility changes to chemicals. Aldehydes are highly reactive molecules present in the environment and can be produced during biotransformation of xenobiotics. Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDH) are important in aldehyd...

  18. DEVELOPMENTAL EXPRESSION OF ALDEHYDE DEHYDROGENASE IN RAT: A COMPARISON OF LIVER AND LUNG DEVELOPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Metabolism is one of the major determinants for age-related susceptibility changes to chemicals. Aldehydes are highly reactive molecules present in the environment and can be produced during biotransformation of xenobiotics. Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDH) are important in aldehyd...

  19. Structural Biology of Proteins of the Multi-enzyme Assembly Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Objectives and research challenges of this effort include: 1. Need to establish Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex protein crystals; 2. Need to test value of microgravity for improving crystal quality of Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex protein crystals; 3. Need to improve flight hardware in order to control and understand the effects of microgravity on crystallization of Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex proteins; 4. Need to integrate sets of national collaborations with the restricted and specific requirements of flight experiments; 5. Need to establish a highly controlled experiment in microgravity with a rigor not yet obtained; 6. Need to communicate both the rigor of microgravity experiments and the scientific value of results obtained from microgravity experiments to the national community; and 7. Need to advance the understanding of Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex structures so that scientific and commercial advance is identified for these proteins.

  20. Identification and Characterization of an Inducible NAD(P)H Dehydrogenase from Red Beetroot Mitochondria.

    PubMed Central

    Menz, R. I.; Day, D. A.

    1996-01-01

    Exogenous NADH oxidation of mitochondria isolated from red beetroots (Beta vulgaris L.) increased dramatically upon slicing and aging the tissue. Anion-exchange chromatography of soluble fractions derived by sonication from fresh and aged beetroot mitochondria yielded three NADH dehydrogenase activity peaks. The third peak from aged beetroot mitochondria was separated into two activities by blue-affinity chromatography. One of these (the unbound peak) readily oxidized dihydrolipoamide, whereas the other (the bound peak) did not. The latter was an NAD(P)H dehydrogenase with high quinone and ferricyanide reductase activity and was absent from fresh beet mitochondria. Further affinity chromatography of the NAD(P)H dehydrogenase indicated enrichment of a 58-kD polypeptide on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. We propose that this 58-kD protein is the inducible, external NADH dehydrogenase. PMID:12226415

  1. Identification and Characterization of an Inducible NAD(P)H Dehydrogenase from Red Beetroot Mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Menz, R. I.; Day, D. A.

    1996-10-01

    Exogenous NADH oxidation of mitochondria isolated from red beetroots (Beta vulgaris L.) increased dramatically upon slicing and aging the tissue. Anion-exchange chromatography of soluble fractions derived by sonication from fresh and aged beetroot mitochondria yielded three NADH dehydrogenase activity peaks. The third peak from aged beetroot mitochondria was separated into two activities by blue-affinity chromatography. One of these (the unbound peak) readily oxidized dihydrolipoamide, whereas the other (the bound peak) did not. The latter was an NAD(P)H dehydrogenase with high quinone and ferricyanide reductase activity and was absent from fresh beet mitochondria. Further affinity chromatography of the NAD(P)H dehydrogenase indicated enrichment of a 58-kD polypeptide on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. We propose that this 58-kD protein is the inducible, external NADH dehydrogenase.

  2. Heterozygosity of the sheep: Polymorphism of 'malic enzyme', isocitrate dehydrogenase (NADP+), catalase and esterase.

    PubMed

    Baker, C M; Manwell, C

    1977-04-01

    In contrast to other reports, it is found that the sheep has approximately as much enzyme variation as man. Most of the genetically interpretable enzyme variation in heart, liver, kidney and muscle from 52 sheep (Merinos or Merino crosses) is in the NADP-dependent dehydrogenases [two 'malic enzymes' and the supernatant isocitrate dehydrogenase (NADP+)] and in the esterases. Ten different loci for NAD-dependent dehydrogenases are electrophoretically monomorphic, as are five different NADH diaphorases from heart muscle and 15 different major proteins from skeletal muscle. It is highly statistically significant that NADP-dependent dehydrogenases and esterases are polymorphic but representatives of several other major classes of enzymes are not. The physiological significance of this polymorphism may be related to the role of these enzymes in growth and detoxication, sheep having been selected by man for faster growth, of wool or of carcass, and for grazing a wide variety of plants.

  3. A SURVEY OF DEHYDROGENASES IN VARIOUS EPITHELIAL CELLS IN THE RAT

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Donald G.

    1963-01-01

    Several different epithelial elements that have intense active transport or protein secretory functions were histochemically assayed in several dehydrogenase media by a recently perfected method. The mitochondria represented the only site of activity, not only when tested in the succinate and D-β-hydroxybutyrate media, but also when tested in the lactate, malate, and isocitrate media. The reaction for D-β-hydroxybutyric dehydrogenase in the mouse kidney was curiously limited to the mitochondria of the distal segment of the proximal convoluted tubule, a finding that most convincingly shows that dehydrogenase activity may be differentiated in certain instances from diaphorase activity by the ditetrazole methods and that D-β-hydroxybutyric dehydrogenase is not present in all mitochondria. Tetranitro-BT is favored over nitro-BT in studies conducted on most organs prepared without fixation and on formalin-fixed tissues that consist of lipid-containing or active transport cells. PMID:13998476

  4. Quinazolinethiones and quinazolinediones, novel inhibitors of inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase: synthesis and initial structure-activity relationships.

    PubMed

    Buckley, George M; Davies, Natasha; Dyke, Hazel J; Gilbert, Philip J; Hannah, Duncan R; Haughan, Alan F; Hunt, Caroline A; Pitt, William R; Profit, Rachael H; Ray, Nicholas C; Richard, Marianna D; Sharpe, Andrew; Taylor, Alicia J; Whitworth, Justine M; Williams, Sophie C

    2005-02-01

    The development of a series of novel quinazolinethiones and quinazolinediones as inhibitors of inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) is described. The synthesis, in vitro inhibitory values for IMPDH II and in vitro inhibitory value for PBMC proliferation are discussed.

  5. The Effect of Salinity on the Malic Dehydrogenase of Pea Roots 1

    PubMed Central

    Hason-Porath, Edna; Poljakoff-Mayber, Alexandra

    1969-01-01

    Effect of salinity on malate dehydrogenase activity was studied. Pea root tips contain 2 different malate dehydrogenases. One is located in the particulate, mitochondrial fraction, the other in the soluble, cytoplasmic fraction. Both can act when coupled with either NAD or NADP. Growing plants in Na2SO4 salinated medium did not affect the pattern of the malate dehydrogenases in the root tips. Growing plants in NaCl salinated media resulted in the appearance of a new, third isoenzyme. This new isoenzyme was located in the cytoplasmic fraction. Salinity of both types, when present in growth medium, induced increases in the NADP coupled activity of the mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase. The NAD coupled activity, however, was depressed except in the cytoplasmic fraction of plants grown in media salinated with NaCl to 1 atmosphere. Addition of either of the salts to assay media of enzymes, isolated from plants grown in non salinated substrate, did not have any significant effect. PMID:16657152

  6. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 inhibits inflammatory response and regulates atherosclerotic plaque

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Shu-jian; Zhang, Ming-xiang; Wang, Xu-ping; Yuan, Qiu-huan; Xue, Li; Wang, Jia-li; Cui, Zhao-qiang; Zhang, Yun; Xu, Feng; Chen, Yu-guo

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) rs671 polymorphism, which eliminates ALDH2 activity down to 1%-6%, is a susceptibility gene for coronary disease. Here we investigated the underlying mechanisms based on our prior clinical and experimental studies. Male apoE−/− mice were transfected with GFP, ALDH2-overexpression and ALDH2-RNAi lentivirus respectively (n=20 each) after constrictive collars were placed around the right common carotid arteries. Consequently, ALDH2 gene silencing led to an increased en face plaque area, more unstable plaque with heavier accumulation of lipids, more macrophages, less smooth muscle cells and collagen, which were associated with aggravated inflammation. However, ALDH2 overexpression displayed opposing effects. We also found that ALDH2 activity decreased in atherosclerotic plaques of human and aged apoE−/− mice. Moreover, in vitro experiments with human umbilical vein endothelial cells further illustrated that, inhibition of ALDH2 activity resulted in elevating inflammatory molecules, an increase of nuclear translocation of NF-κB, and enhanced phosphorylation of NF-κB p65, AP-1 c-Jun, Jun-N terminal kinase and p38 MAPK, while ALDH2 activation could trigger contrary effects. These findings suggested that ALDH2 can influence plaque development and vulnerability, and inflammation via MAPK, NF-κB and AP-1 signaling pathways. PMID:27191745

  7. Yeast cell-based analysis of human lactate dehydrogenase isoforms.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Lulu Ahmed; Tachikawa, Hiroyuki; Gao, Xiao-Dong; Nakanishi, Hideki

    2015-12-01

    Human lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) has attracted attention as a potential target for cancer therapy and contraception. In this study, we reconstituted human lactic acid fermentation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, with the goal of constructing a yeast cell-based LDH assay system. pdc null mutant yeast (mutated in the endogenous pyruvate decarboxylase genes) are unable to perform alcoholic fermentation; when grown in the presence of an electron transport chain inhibitor, pdc null strains exhibit a growth defect. We found that introduction of the human gene encoding LDHA complemented the pdc growth defect; this complementation depended on LDHA catalytic activity. Similarly, introduction of the human LDHC complemented the pdc growth defect, even though LDHC did not generate lactate at the levels seen with LDHA. In contrast, the human LDHB did not complement the yeast pdc null mutant, although LDHB did generate lactate in yeast cells. Expression of LDHB as a red fluorescent protein (RFP) fusion yielded blebs in yeast, whereas LDHA-RFP and LDHC-RFP fusion proteins exhibited cytosolic distribution. Thus, LDHB exhibits several unique features when expressed in yeast cells. Because yeast cells are amenable to genetic analysis and cell-based high-throughput screening, our pdc/LDH strains are expected to be of use for versatile analyses of human LDH. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Japanese Biochemical Society. All rights reserved.

  8. Psychotic mania in glucose-6-phosphate-dehydrogenase-deficient subjects

    PubMed Central

    Bocchetta, Alberto

    2003-01-01

    Background Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency has been associated with acute psychosis, catatonic schizophrenia, and bipolar disorders by previous inconclusive reports. A particularly disproportionate rate of enzyme deficiency was found in manic schizoaffective patients from 662 lithium patients surveyed in Sardinia. The purpose of this study was to describe clinical characteristics which may be potentially associated with G6PD deficiency. Methods Characteristics of episodes, course of illness, family pattern of illness, laboratory tests, and treatment response of 29 G6PD-deficient subjects with a Research Diagnostic Criteria diagnosis of manic schizoaffective disorder were abstracted from available records. Results The most peculiar pattern was that of acute recurrent psychotic manic episodes, mostly characterized by loosening of associations, agitation, catatonic symptoms, and/or transient confusion, concurrent hyperbilirubinemia, positive psychiatric family history, and partial response to long-term lithium treatment. Conclusions A relationship between psychiatric disorder and G6PD deficiency is to be searched in the bipolar spectrum, particularly among patients with a history of acute episodes with psychotic and/or catatonic symptoms or with transient confusion. PMID:12844366

  9. Modulation of lactate dehydrogenase isozymes by modified base queuine.

    PubMed

    Pathak, C; Vinayak, Manjula

    2005-09-01

    The modified base queuine is a nutrient factor for lower and higher eukaryotes except yeast. It is synthesized in eubacteria and inserted into the wobble position of specific tRNAs (tRNA(GUN)) in exchange of guanine at position 34. The tRNAs of Q family are completely modified in terminally differentiated somatic cells. However, mainly free queuine is present in embryonic and fast proliferating cells, tRNA remains Q deficient. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) A mRNA and LDH A protein is known to increase when cells are grown in hypoxic conditions. In the present study, the level of LDH isozymes is analyzed in different tissues of normal and cancerous (DLA) mice and the effect of queuine treatment on LDH isozyme is observed. LDH A isozyme is shown to increase in serum and liver of DLA mice. The level and activity of LDH A decreases on queuine treatment. In skeletal muscle and heart, LDH A isozyme decreases while LDH B increases in DLA mice. Queuine administration leads to change back towards normal. In case of brain, LDH A increases but LDH B decreases in DLA mice. Queuine treatment leads to decrease in A4 anaerobic isozymes of LDH. The results suggest that queuine suppresses anaerobic glycolytic pathway, which leads to tumor suppression of DLA mice.

  10. SERUM VALUES OF ALKALINE PHOSPHATASE AND LACTATE DEHYDROGENASE IN OSTEOSARCOMA

    PubMed Central

    ZUMÁRRAGA, JUAN PABLO; BAPTISTA, ANDRÉ MATHIAS; ROSA, LUIS PABLO DE LA; CAIERO, MARCELO TADEU; CAMARGO, OLAVO PIRES DE

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To study the relationship between the pre and post chemotherapy (CT) serum levels of alkaline phosphatase (AP) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and the percentage of tumor necrosis (TN) found in specimens after the pre surgical CT in patients with osteosarcoma. Methods: Series of cases with retrospective evaluation of patients diagnosed with osteosarcoma. Participants were divided into two groups according to serum values of both enzymes. The values of AP and LDH were obtained before and after preoperative CT. The percentage of tumor necrosis (TN) of surgical specimens of each patient was also included. Results: One hundred and thirty seven medical records were included from 1990 to 2013. Both the AP as LDH decreased in the patients studied, being the higher in pre CT than post CT. The average LHD decrease was 795.12U/L and AP decrease was 437.40 U/L. The average TN was 34.10 %. There was no statistically significant correlation between the serums values and the percentage of tumoral necrosis. Conclusion: The serum levels values of AP and LDH are not good predictors for the chemotherapy-induced necrosis in patients with osteosarcoma. Level of Evidence IV, Case Series. PMID:27217815

  11. Structural and Kinetic Studies of Formate Dehydrogenase from Candida boidinii.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qi; Gakhar, Lokesh; Wickersham, Kyle; Francis, Kevin; Vardi-Kilshtain, Alexandra; Major, Dan T; Cheatum, Christopher M; Kohen, Amnon

    2016-05-17

    The structure of formate dehydrogenase from Candida boidinii (CbFDH) is of both academic and practical interests. First, this enzyme represents a unique model system for studies on the role of protein dynamics in catalysis, but so far these studies have been limited by the availability of structural information. Second, CbFDH and its mutants can be used in various industrial applications (e.g., CO2 fixation or nicotinamide recycling systems), and the lack of structural information has been a limiting factor in commercial development. Here, we report the crystallization and structural determination of both holo- and apo-CbFDH. The free-energy barrier for the catalyzed reaction was computed and indicates that this structure indeed represents a catalytically competent form of the enzyme. Complementing kinetic examinations demonstrate that the recombinant CbFDH has a well-organized reactive state. Finally, a fortuitous observation has been made: the apoenzyme crystal was obtained under cocrystallization conditions with a saturating concentration of both the cofactor (NAD(+)) and inhibitor (azide), which has a nanomolar dissociation constant. It was found that the fraction of the apoenzyme present in the solution is less than 1.7 × 10(-7) (i.e., the solution is 99.9999% holoenzyme). This is an extreme case where the crystal structure represents an insignificant fraction of the enzyme in solution, and a mechanism rationalizing this phenomenon is presented.

  12. Alcohol dehydrogenase and an inactivator from rice seedlings

    SciTech Connect

    Shimomura, S.; Beevers, H.

    1983-01-01

    Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) was measured in the various organs of rice seedlings (Oryza sativa) growing in air. In extracts from ungerminated seeds, the ADH is stable, but in extracts from seedlings more than 2 days old the enzyme initially present loses activity in a time- and temperature-dependent fashion, due to the presence of an inactivating component which increases with age in roots and shoots. The inactivation can be prevented completely by dithiothreitol, and when this is included in the extraction medium the apparent loss of total ADH in roots and shoots with age is not observed. In seedlings grown in N/sub 2/, ADA levels in coleoptile extracts are higher than those in air, the enzyme is stable, and no inactivator can be detected. When seedlings grown for 5 days in air were transferred to N/sub 2/ for 3 days, ADA levels increased and there was a decline in inactivator activity. Transfer back to air after 1 day in N/sub 2/ led to loss of the accumulated ADH and increase in inactivator. These reciprocal changes and the fact that the inactivator is absent from coleoptiles of seedlings grown in N/sub 2/ appear to suggest a regulator role for the inactivator in vivo. However, it is clear that high levels of inactivator and ADH can exist in cells of seedlings grown in air for long periods without loss of enzyme activity, and it is argued that they must normally be separately compartmented.

  13. Purification and characterization of alcohol dehydrogenase from Gluconobacter suboxydans.

    PubMed

    Islami, M; Shabani, A; Saifi-Abolhassan, M; Sepehr, Sh; Soudi, M R; Mossavi-Nejad, S Z

    2008-01-15

    Purification and characterization of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) from Gluconobacter suboxydans was done in order to biotechnological and industrial application. Solubilization of enzyme from bacterial membrane fraction by Triton X-100 and subsequent fractionation on DEAE-Sephadex A-50 and Hydroxyapatite was successful in enzyme purification. Enzyme assay reaction mixture contained potassium ferricyanide 0.1 M, McIlvaine buffer 0.1 M (pH 5.5), Triton X-100 10%, ethanol 1 M and enzyme solution. The purified ADH Optimum pH activity was 5.5. The enzyme was in maximum stability in pH 5.8. The substrate specificity of the enzyme was determined using the same enzyme assay method as described above, except that various substrates (100 mM) were used instead of ethanol. The relative activity of the ADH for ethanol was higher than the others. The effects of metal ions and inhibitors on the activity of the enzyme were examined by measuring the activity using the same assay method as described above. Activity of purified enzyme was increased in the presence of Ca(+2) and was decreased in presence the of ethylenediamine tetra acetic acid (EDTA). Because the proper structure and function of the enzyme is related to structural Ca(+2) and EDTA can chelate Ca(+2). An apparent Michaelis constant for ethanol were examined to be 1.7 x 10(-3) M for ethanol as substrate.

  14. Triazaspirodimethoxybenzoyls as Selective Inhibitors of Mycobacterial Lipoamide Dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Bryk, Ruslana; Arango, Nancy; Venugopal, Aditya; Warren, J. David; Park, Yun-Hee; Patel, Mulchand S.; Lima, Christopher D.; Nathan, Carl

    2010-06-25

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) remains the leading single cause of death from bacterial infection. Here we explored the possibility of species-selective inhibition of lipoamide dehydrogenase (Lpd), an enzyme central to Mtb's intermediary metabolism and antioxidant defense. High-throughput screening of combinatorial chemical libraries identified triazaspirodimethoxybenzoyls as high-nanomolar inhibitors of Mtb's Lpd that were noncompetitive versus NADH, NAD{sup +}, and lipoamide and >100-fold selective compared to human Lpd. Efficacy required the dimethoxy and dichlorophenyl groups. The structure of an Lpd-inhibitor complex was resolved to 2.42 {angstrom} by X-ray crystallography, revealing that the inhibitor occupied a pocket adjacent to the Lpd NADH/NAD{sup +} binding site. The inhibitor did not overlap with the adenosine moiety of NADH/NAD{sup +} but did overlap with positions predicted to bind the nicotinamide rings in NADH and NAD{sup +} complexes. The dimethoxy ring occupied a deep pocket adjacent to the FAD flavin ring where it would block coordination of the NADH nicotinamide ring, while the dichlorophenyl group occupied a more exposed pocket predicted to coordinate the NAD{sup +} nicotinamide. Several residues that are not conserved between the bacterial enzyme and its human homologue were predicted to contribute both to inhibitor binding and to species selectivity, as confirmed for three residues by analysis of the corresponding mutant Mtb Lpd proteins. Thus, nonconservation of residues lining the electron-transfer tunnel in Mtb Lpd can be exploited for development of species-selective Lpd inhibitors.

  15. Inhibitory effects of ionic liquids on the lactic dehydrogenase activity.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xing; Fan, Yunchang; Zhang, Heng; Zhong, Yingying; Yang, Yang; Miao, Juan; Hua, Shaofeng

    2016-05-01

    Ionic liquids (ILs) were widely used in scientific and industrial application and have been reported to possess potential toxicity to the environment and human health. The effects of six typical N-methylimidazolium-based ILs ([Cnmim]X, n=4, 6, 8; X=Br(-), Cl(-), BF4(-), CF3SO3(-)) on the lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) activity and the molecular interaction mechanism of ILs and the LDH were investigated with the aid of spectroscopic techniques. Experimental results showed that the LDH activity was inhibited in the presence of ILs. For the ILs with the same anion but different cations, their inhibitory ability on the LDH activity increased with increasing the alkyl chain length on the IL cation. Thermodynamic parameters, enthalpy change (ΔH) and entropy change (ΔS) were obtained by analyzing the fluorescence behavior of LDH with the addition of ILs. Both positive ΔH and ΔS suggested that hydrophobicity was the major driven force in the interaction process as expected.

  16. SOME PROPERTIES OF THE LACTIC DEHYDROGENASE AGENT OF MICE

    PubMed Central

    du Buy, Herman G.; Johnson, Martin L.

    1965-01-01

    The lactic dehydrogenase agent was obtained in quantities sufficient for purification studies by growing the virus in Ehrlich ascites tumor-bearing mice. A rapid method of titration of the agent is described. Subsequent to the standard procedure of concentration of virus by treatment with hyaluronidase and centrifugation, lipids were removed by extraction with PE, without major loss of infectivity. Electron microscopic sections of purified preparations contained particles consisting of a dense inner ring of about 25 mµ and a less dense ring extending to about 50 mµ. The particles occur frequently in single-membraned vesicles of varying size, and occasionally in large double-membraned bodies. The purified LDH agent did not stimulate the formation of neutralizing antibodies in rabbits and guinea pigs. The crude LDH agent was found to be a low interferon producer. Increased interferon, produced by secondary inoculation with Newcastle disease virus temporarily decreased the titer of the LDH agent. The results of others regarding the nature and the size of the LDH agent are interpreted in regard to the findings presented, and the role of interferon in permanently LDH agent infected mice is discussed. PMID:5840539

  17. Determinants of performance in the isocitrate dehydrogenase of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Dean, A. M.; Shiau, A. K.; Koshland, D. E.

    1996-01-01

    The substrate specificity of the NADP-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase of Escherichia coli was investigated by combining site-directed mutagenesis and utilization of alternative substrates. A comparison of the kinetics of the wild-type enzyme with 2R-malate reveals that the gamma-carboxylate of 2R,3S-isocitrate contributes a factor of 12,000,000 to enzyme performance. Analysis of kinetic data compiled for 10 enzymes and nine different substrates reveals that a factor of 1,650 can be ascribed to the hydrogen bond formed between S113 and the gamma-carboxylate of bound isocitrate, a factor of 150 to the negative charge of the gamma-carboxylate, and a factor of 50 for the gamma-methyl. These results are entirely consistent with X-ray structures of Michaelis complexes that show a hydrogen bond positions the gamma-carboxylate of isocitrate so that a salt bridge can form to the nicotinamide ring of NADP. PMID:8745412

  18. Novel Inhibitors of Mitochondrial sn-Glycerol 3-phosphate Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Orr, Adam L.; Ashok, Deepthi; Sarantos, Melissa R.; Ng, Ryan; Shi, Tong; Gerencser, Akos A.; Hughes, Robert E.; Brand, Martin D.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial sn-glycerol 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (mGPDH) is a ubiquinone-linked enzyme in the mitochondrial inner membrane best characterized as part of the glycerol phosphate shuttle that transfers reducing equivalents from cytosolic NADH into the mitochondrial electron transport chain. Despite the widespread expression of mGPDH and the availability of mGPDH-null mice, the physiological role of this enzyme remains poorly defined in many tissues, likely because of compensatory pathways for cytosolic regeneration of NAD+ and mechanisms for glycerol phosphate metabolism. Here we describe a novel class of cell-permeant small-molecule inhibitors of mGPDH (iGP) discovered through small-molecule screening. Structure-activity analysis identified a core benzimidazole-phenyl-succinamide structure as being essential to inhibition of mGPDH while modifications to the benzimidazole ring system modulated both potency and off-target effects. Live-cell imaging provided evidence that iGPs penetrate cellular membranes. Two compounds (iGP-1 and iGP-5) were characterized further to determine potency and selectivity and found to be mixed inhibitors with IC50 and Ki values between ∼1–15 µM. These novel mGPDH inhibitors are unique tools to investigate the role of glycerol 3-phosphate metabolism in both isolated and intact systems. PMID:24587137

  19. Not only students can express alcohol dehydrogenase: goldfish can too!

    PubMed

    Chamberland, Valérie; Rioux, Pierre

    2010-12-01

    This article describes a novel approach to study the metabolic regulation of the respiratory system in vertebrates that suits physiology lessons for undergraduate students. It consists of an experimental demonstration of the goldfish's (Carassius auratus) adaptations to anoxia. The goldfish is one of the few vertebrates showing strong enzymatic plasticity for the expression of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), which allows it to survive long periods of severe anoxia. Therefore, we propose two simple laboratory exercises in which students are first asked to characterize the distribution of ADH isozymes in the goldfish by performing cellulose acetate electrophoresis. The second part of this laboratory lesson is the determination of liver glycogen. To further student comprehension, an interspecies comparative component is integrated, in which the same subjects are studied in an anoxia-sensitive species, the brook charr (Salvelinus fontinalis). ADH in goldfish is restricted to skeletal muscles, where it catalyzes alcoholic fermentation, permitting ethanol excretion through the gills and therefore preventing lactate acidosis caused by sustained glycolysis during anoxia. Electrophoresis also reveals the occurrence of a liver isozyme in the brook charr, which ADH catalyzes in the opposite pathway, allowing the usual ethanol degradation. As for the liver glycogen assay, it shows largely superior content in the goldfish liver compared with the brook charr, providing goldfish with a sustained energy supply during anoxia. The results of this laboratory exercise clearly demonstrate several physiological strategies developed by goldfish to cope with such a crucial environmental challenge as oxygen depletion.

  20. Virtual fragment screening for novel inhibitors of 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Ruda, Gian Filippo; Campbell, Gordon; Alibu, Vincent P; Barrett, Michael P; Brenk, Ruth; Gilbert, Ian H

    2010-07-15

    The enzyme 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase is a potential drug target for the parasitic protozoan Trypanosoma brucei, the causative organism of human African trypanosomiasis. This enzyme has a polar active site to accommodate the phosphate, hydroxyl and carboxylate groups of the substrate, 6-phosphogluconate. A virtual fragment screen was undertaken of the enzyme to discover starting points for the development of inhibitors which are likely to have appropriate physicochemical properties for an orally bioavailable compound. A virtual screening library was developed, consisting of compounds with functional groups that could mimic the phosphate group of the substrate, but which have a higher pKa. Following docking, hits were clustered and appropriate compounds purchased and assayed against the enzyme. Three fragments were identified that had IC50 values in the low micromolar range and good ligand efficiencies. Based on these initial hits, analogues were procured and further active compounds were identified. Some of the fragments identified represent potential starting points for a medicinal chemistry programme to develop potent drug-like inhibitors of the enzyme. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Human choline dehydrogenase: medical promises and biochemical challenges.

    PubMed

    Salvi, Francesca; Gadda, Giovanni

    2013-09-15

    Human choline dehydrogenase (CHD) is located in the inner membrane of mitochondria primarily in liver and kidney and catalyzes the oxidation of choline to glycine betaine. Its physiological role is to regulate the concentrations of choline and glycine betaine in the blood and cells. Choline is important for regulation of gene expression, the biosynthesis of lipoproteins and membrane phospholipids and for the biosynthesis of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine; glycine betaine plays important roles as a primary intracellular osmoprotectant and as methyl donor for the biosynthesis of methionine from homocysteine, a required step for the synthesis of the ubiquitous methyl donor S-adenosyl methionine. Recently, CHD has generated considerable medical attention due to its association with various human pathologies, including male infertility, homocysteinuria, breast cancer and metabolic syndrome. Despite the renewed interest, the biochemical characterization of the enzyme has lagged behind due to difficulties in the obtainment of purified, active and stable enzyme. This review article summarizes the medical relevance and the physiological roles of human CHD, highlights the biochemical knowledge on the enzyme, and provides an analysis based on the comparison of the protein sequence with that of bacterial choline oxidase, for which structural and biochemical information is available.

  2. Retinol Dehydrogenases Regulate Vitamin A Metabolism for Visual Function

    PubMed Central

    Sahu, Bhubanananda; Maeda, Akiko

    2016-01-01

    The visual system produces visual chromophore, 11-cis-retinal from dietary vitamin A, all-trans-retinol making this vitamin essential for retinal health and function. These metabolic events are mediated by a sequential biochemical process called the visual cycle. Retinol dehydrogenases (RDHs) are responsible for two reactions in the visual cycle performed in retinal pigmented epithelial (RPE) cells, photoreceptor cells and Müller cells in the retina. RDHs in the RPE function as 11-cis-RDHs, which oxidize 11-cis-retinol to 11-cis-retinal in vivo. RDHs in rod photoreceptor cells in the retina work as all-trans-RDHs, which reduce all-trans-retinal to all-trans-retinol. Dysfunction of RDHs can cause inherited retinal diseases in humans. To facilitate further understanding of human diseases, mouse models of RDHs-related diseases have been carefully examined and have revealed the physiological contribution of specific RDHs to visual cycle function and overall retinal health. Herein we describe the function of RDHs in the RPE and the retina, particularly in rod photoreceptor cells, their regulatory properties for retinoid homeostasis and future therapeutic strategy for treatment of retinal diseases. PMID:27879662

  3. Detailed kinetics and regulation of mammalian 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Mitochondrial 2-oxoglutarate (α-ketoglutarate) dehydrogenase complex (OGDHC), a key regulatory point of tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, plays vital roles in multiple pathways of energy metabolism and biosynthesis. The catalytic mechanism and allosteric regulation of this large enzyme complex are not fully understood. Here computer simulation is used to test possible catalytic mechanisms and mechanisms of allosteric regulation of the enzyme by nucleotides (ATP, ADP), pH, and metal ion cofactors (Ca2+ and Mg2+). Results A model was developed based on an ordered ter-ter enzyme kinetic mechanism combined with con-formational changes that involve rotation of one lipoic acid between three catalytic sites inside the enzyme complex. The model was parameterized using a large number of kinetic data sets on the activity of OGDHC, and validated by comparison of model predictions to independent data. Conclusions The developed model suggests a hybrid rapid-equilibrium ping-pong random mechanism for the kinetics of OGDHC, consistent with previously reported mechanisms, and accurately describes the experimentally observed regulatory effects of cofactors on the OGDHC activity. This analysis provides a single consistent theoretical explanation for a number of apparently contradictory results on the roles of phosphorylation potential, NAD (H) oxidation-reduction state ratio, as well as the regulatory effects of metal ions on ODGHC function. PMID:21943256

  4. Purification and enzymatic characterization of alcohol dehydrogenase from Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Fangfang; Hu, Tao; An, Yan; Huang, Jianqin; Xu, Yingwu

    2013-08-01

    Alcohol dehydrogenases (ADH) catalyze the interconversion between alcohols and aldehydes with the reduction of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) to NADH. In this study, for the first time we report an over-expression and purification strategy for the Arabidosis thaliana ADH (AtADH), and characterize its enzymatic properties. AtADH was expressed in an Escherichia coli system, the polyhistidine-tag was removed after the recombinant AtADH protein was purified by metal chelating affinity chromatography. Activity assays demonstrated that AtADH has distinct enzymatic properties when compared with many well-known ADHs. It held peak activity at pH 10.5 and showed broad substrate selectivity for primary and secondary alcohols. The kinetic Km parameters for both ethanol and coenzyme were in the order of mM. This relative low affinity may reflect the need of the plant to maintain a supply of NAD(+) in nature. Different from yeast ADH, AtADH showed almost the same activity for short straight chain alcohols and reduced activity for secondary alcohols. This broad spectrum in alcohol selection and the observed higher catalytic activity (high Vmax (EtOH)) may result from the requirement of the single enzyme to accommodate many substrates. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases (SDR): the 2002 update.

    PubMed

    Oppermann, Udo; Filling, Charlotta; Hult, Malin; Shafqat, Naeem; Wu, Xiaoqiu; Lindh, Monica; Shafqat, Jawed; Nordling, Erik; Kallberg, Yvonne; Persson, Bengt; Jörnvall, Hans

    2003-02-01

    Short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases (SDR) form a large, functionally heterogeneous protein family presently with about 3000 primary and about 30 3D structures deposited in databases. Despite low sequence identities between different forms (about 15-30%), the 3D structures display highly similar alpha/beta folding patterns with a central beta-sheet, typical of the Rossmann-fold. Based on distinct sequence motifs functional assignments and classifications are possible, making it possible to build a general nomenclature system. Recent mutagenetic and structural studies considerably extend the knowledge on the general reaction mechanism, thereby establishing a catalytic tetrad of Asn-Ser-Tyr-Lys residues, which presumably form the framework for a proton relay system including the 2'-OH of the nicotinamide ribose, similar to the mechanism found in horse liver ADH. Based on their cellular functions, several SDR enzymes appear as possible and promising pharmacological targets with application areas spanning hormone-dependent cancer forms or metabolic diseases such as obesity and diabetes, and infectious diseases.

  6. Functional characterization of a vanillin dehydrogenase in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Ding, Wei; Si, Meiru; Zhang, Weipeng; Zhang, Yaoling; Chen, Can; Zhang, Lei; Lu, Zhiqiang; Chen, Shaolin; Shen, Xihui

    2015-01-27

    Vanillin dehydrogenase (VDH) is a crucial enzyme involved in the degradation of lignin-derived aromatic compounds. Herein, the VDH from Corynebacterium glutamicum was characterized. The relative molecular mass (Mr) determined by SDS-PAGE was ~51 kDa, whereas the apparent native Mr values revealed by gel filtration chromatography were 49.5, 92.3, 159.0 and 199.2 kDa, indicating the presence of dimeric, trimeric and tetrameric forms. Moreover, the enzyme showed its highest level of activity toward vanillin at pH 7.0 and 30°C, and interestingly, it could utilize NAD(+) and NADP(+) as coenzymes with similar efficiency and showed no obvious difference toward NAD(+) and NADP(+). In addition to vanillin, this enzyme exhibited catalytic activity toward a broad range of substrates, including p-hydroxybenzaldehyde, 3,4-dihydroxybenzaldehyde, o-phthaldialdehyde, cinnamaldehyde, syringaldehyde and benzaldehyde. Conserved catalytic residues or putative cofactor interactive sites were identified based on sequence alignment and comparison with previous studies, and the function of selected residues were verified by site-directed mutagenesis analysis. Finally, the vdh deletion mutant partially lost its ability to grow on vanillin, indicating the presence of alternative VDH(s) in Corynebacterium glutamicum. Taken together, this study contributes to understanding the VDH diversity from bacteria and the aromatic metabolism pathways in C. glutamicum.

  7. Glutamate dehydrogenase 1 and SIRT4 regulate glial development.

    PubMed

    Komlos, Daniel; Mann, Kara D; Zhuo, Yue; Ricupero, Christopher L; Hart, Ronald P; Liu, Alice Y-C; Firestein, Bonnie L

    2013-03-01

    Congenital hyperinsulinism/hyperammonemia (HI/HA) syndrome is caused by an activation mutation of glutamate dehydrogenase 1 (GDH1), a mitochondrial enzyme responsible for the reversible interconversion between glutamate and α-ketoglutarate. The syndrome presents clinically with hyperammonemia, significant episodic hypoglycemia, seizures, and frequent incidences of developmental and learning defects. Clinical research has implicated that although some of the developmental and neurological defects may be attributed to hypoglycemia, some characteristics cannot be ascribed to low glucose and as hyperammonemia is generally mild and asymptomatic, there exists the possibility that altered GDH1 activity within the brain leads to some clinical changes. GDH1 is allosterically regulated by many factors, and has been shown to be inhibited by the ADP-ribosyltransferase sirtuin 4 (SIRT4), a mitochondrially localized sirtuin. Here we show that SIRT4 is localized to mitochondria within the brain. SIRT4 is highly expressed in glial cells, specifically astrocytes, in the postnatal brain and in radial glia during embryogenesis. Furthermore, SIRT4 protein decreases in expression during development. We show that factors known to allosterically regulate GDH1 alter gliogenesis in CTX8 cells, a novel radial glial cell line. We find that SIRT4 and GDH1 overexpression play antagonistic roles in regulating gliogenesis and that a mutant variant of GDH1 found in HI/HA patients accelerates the development of glia from cultured radial glia cells.

  8. Asparaginyl deamidation in two glutamate dehydrogenase isoenzymes from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    DeLuna, Alexander; Quezada, Héctor; Gómez-Puyou, Armando; González, Alicia

    2005-03-25

    The non-enzymatic deamidation of asparaginyl residues is a major source of spontaneous damage of several proteins under physiological conditions. In many cases, deamidation and isoaspartyl formation alters the biological activity or stability of the native polypeptide. Rates of deamidation of particular residues depend on many factors including protein structure and solvent exposure. Here, we investigated the spontaneous deamidation of the two NADP-glutamate dehydrogenase isoenzymes from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which have different kinetic properties and are differentially expressed in this yeast. Our results show that Asn54, present in Gdh3p but missing in the GDH1-encoded homologue, is readily deamidated in vitro under alkaline conditions. Relative to the native enzyme, deamidated Gdh3p shows reduced protein stability. The different deamidation rates of the two isoenzymes could explain to some extent, the relative in vivo instability of the allosteric Gdh3p enzyme, compared to that of Gdh1p. It is thus possible that spontaneous asparaginyl modification could play a role in the metabolic regulation of ammonium assimilation and glutamate biosynthesis.

  9. Regulation by ammonium of glutamate dehydrogenase (NADP+) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Bogonez, E; Satrústegui, J; Machado, A

    1985-06-01

    The activity of glutamate dehydrogenase (NADP+) (EC 1.4.1.4; NADP-GDH) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is decreased under conditions in which intracellular ammonia concentrations increases. A high internal ammonia concentration can be obtained (a) by increasing the ammonium sulphate concentration in the culture medium, and (b) by growing the yeast either in acetate + ammonia media, where the pH of the medium rises during growth, or in heavily buffered glucose + ammonia media at pH 7.5. Under these conditions cellular oxoglutarate concentrations do not vary and changes in NADP-GDH activity appear to provide a constant rate of oxoglutarate utilization. The following results suggest that the decrease in NADP-GDH activity in ammonia-accumulating yeast cells is brought about by repression of synthesis: (i) after a shift to high ammonium sulphate concentrations, the number of units of activity per cell decreased as the inverse of cell doubling; and (ii) the rate of degradation of labelled NADP-GDH was essentially the same in ammonia-accumulating yeast cells and in controls, whereas the synthesis constant was much lower in the ammonia-accumulating cells than in the controls.

  10. Single amino acid polymorphism in aldehyde dehydrogenase gene superfamily.

    PubMed

    Priyadharshini Christy, J; George Priya Doss, C

    2015-01-01

    The aldehyde dehydrogenase gene superfamily comprises of 19 genes and 3 pseudogenes. These superfamily genes play a vital role in the formation of molecules that are involved in life processes, and detoxification of endogenous and exogenous aldehydes. ALDH superfamily genes associated mutations are implicated in various diseases, such as pyridoxine-dependent seizures, gamma-hydroxybutyric aciduria, type II Hyperprolinemia, Sjogren-Larsson syndrome including cancer and Alzheimer's disease. Accumulation of large DNA variations data especially Single Amino acid Polymorphisms (SAPs) in public databases related to ALDH superfamily genes insisted us to conduct a survey on the disease associated mutations and predict their function impact on protein structure and function. Overall this study provides an update and highlights the importance of pathogenic mutations in associated diseases. Using KD4v and Project HOPE a computational based platform, we summarized all the deleterious properties of SAPs in ALDH superfamily genes by the providing valuable insight into structural alteration rendered due to mutation. We hope this review might provide a way to define the deleteriousness of a SAP and helps to understand the molecular basis of the associated disease and also permits precise diagnosis and treatment in the near future.

  11. The role of glutamate dehydrogenase in mammalian ammonia metabolism.

    PubMed

    Spanaki, Cleanthe; Plaitakis, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) catalyzes the reversible inter-conversion of glutamate to α-ketoglutarate and ammonia. High levels of GDH activity is found in mammalian liver, kidney, brain, and pancreas. In the liver, GDH reaction appears to be close-to-equilibrium, providing the appropriate ratio of ammonia and amino acids for urea synthesis in periportal hepatocytes. In addition, GDH produces glutamate for glutamine synthesis in a small rim of pericentral hepatocytes. Hence, hepatic GDH can be either a source for ammonia or an ammonia scavenger. In the kidney, GDH function produces ammonia from glutamate to control acidosis. In the human, the presence of two differentially regulated isoforms (hGDH1 and hGDH2) suggests a complex role for GDH in ammonia homeostasis. Whereas hGDH1 is sensitive to GTP inhibition, hGDH2 has dissociated its function from GTP control. Furthermore, hGDH2 shows a lower optimal pH than hGDH1. The hGDH2 enzyme is selectively expressed in human astrocytes and Sertoli cells, probably facilitating metabolic recycling processes essential for their supportive role. Here, we report that hGDH2 is also expressed in the epithelial cells lining the convoluted tubules of the renal cortex. As hGDH2 functions more efficiently under acidotic conditions without the operation of the GTP energy switch, its presence in the kidney may increase the efficacy of the organ to maintain acid base equilibrium.

  12. Function, kinetic properties, crystallization, and regulation of microbial malate dehydrogenase*

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi-Íñiguez, Tóshiko; Aburto-Rodríguez, Nelly; Vilchis-González, Ana Laura; Flores, María Elena

    2016-01-01

    Malate dehydrogenase (MDH) is an enzyme widely distributed among living organisms and is a key protein in the central oxidative pathway. It catalyzes the interconversion between malate and oxaloacetate using NAD+ or NADP+ as a cofactor. Surprisingly, this enzyme has been extensively studied in eukaryotes but there are few reports about this enzyme in prokaryotes. It is necessary to review the relevant information to gain a better understanding of the function of this enzyme. Our review of the data generated from studies in bacteria shows much diversity in their molecular properties, including weight, oligomeric states, cofactor and substrate binding affinities, as well as differences in the direction of the enzymatic reaction. Furthermore, due to the importance of its function, the transcription and activity of this enzyme are rigorously regulated. Crystal structures of MDH from different bacterial sources led to the identification of the regions involved in substrate and cofactor binding and the residues important for the dimer-dimer interface. This structural information allows one to make direct modifications to improve the enzyme catalysis by increasing its activity, cofactor binding capacity, substrate specificity, and thermostability. A comparative analysis of the phylogenetic reconstruction of MDH reveals interesting facts about its evolutionary history, dividing this superfamily of proteins into two principle clades and establishing relationships between MDHs from different cellular compartments from archaea, bacteria, and eukaryotes.

  13. Accelerated Lactate Dehydrogenase Activity Potentiates Osteoclastogenesis via NFATc1 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Man; Kwon, So Hyun; Lee, Seoung Hoon; Lee, Soo Young; Jeong, Daewon

    2016-01-01

    Osteoclasts seem to be metabolic active during their differentiation and bone-resorptive activation. However, the functional role of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), a tetrameric enzyme consisting of an A and/or B subunit that catalyzes interconversion of pyruvate to lactate, in RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation is not known. In this study, RANKL treatment induced gradual gene expression and activation of the LDH A2B2 isotype during osteoclast differentiation as well as the LDH A1B3 and B4 isotypes during osteoclast maturation after pre-osteoclast formation. Glucose consumption and lactate production in growth media were accelerated during osteoclast differentiation, together with enhanced expression of H+-lactate co-transporter and increased extracellular acidification, demonstrating that glycolytic metabolism was stimulated during differentiation. Further, oxygen consumption via mitochondria was stimulated during osteoclast differentiation. On the contrary, depletion of LDH-A or LDH-B subunit suppressed both glycolytic and mitochondrial metabolism, resulting in reduced mature osteoclast formation via decreased osteoclast precursor fusion and down-regulation of the osteoclastogenic critical transcription factor NFATc1 and its target genes. Collectively, our findings suggest that RANKL-induced LDH activation stimulates glycolytic and mitochondrial respiratory metabolism, facilitating mature osteoclast formation via osteoclast precursor fusion and NFATc1 signaling. PMID:27077737

  14. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 in cardiac protection: a new therapeutic target?

    PubMed Central

    Budas, Grant R; Disatnik, Marie- Hélène; Mochly-Rosen, Daria

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) is emerging as a key enzyme involved in cytoprotection in the heart. ALDH2 mediates both the detoxification of reactive aldehydes such as acetaldehyde and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE) and the bioactivation of nitroglycerin (GTN) to nitric oxide (NO). In addition, chronic nitrate treatment results in ALDH2 inhibition and contributes to nitrate tolerance. Our lab recently identified ALDH2 to be a key mediator of endogenous cytoprotection. We reported that ALDH2 is phosphorylated and activated by the survival kinase protein kinase C epsilon (PKCε) and found a strong inverse correlation between ALDH2 activity and infarct size. We also identified a small molecule ALDH2 activator (Alda-1) which reduces myocardial infarct size induced by ischemia/reperfusion in vivo. In this review, we discuss evidence that ALDH2 is a key mediator of endogenous survival signaling in the heart, suggest possible cardioprotective mechanisms mediated by ALDH2, and discuss potential clinical implications of these findings. PMID:20005475

  15. Sirtuin 4 is a lipoamidase regulating pyruvate dehydrogenase complex activity

    PubMed Central

    Mathias, Rommel A.; Greco, Todd M.; Oberstein, Adam; Budayeva, Hanna G.; Chakrabarti, Rumela; Rowland, Elizabeth A.; Kang, Yibin; Shenk, Thomas; Cristea, Ileana M.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Sirtuins (SIRTs) are critical enzymes that govern genome regulation, metabolism, and aging. Despite conserved deacetylase domains, mitochondrial SIRT4 and SIRT5 have little to no deacetylase activity, and a robust catalytic activity for SIRT4 has been elusive. Here, we establish SIRT4 as a cellular lipoamidase that regulates the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDH). Importantly, SIRT4 catalytic efficiency for lipoyl- and biotinyl-lysine modifications is superior to its deacetylation activity. PDH, which converts pyruvate to acetyl-CoA, has been known to be primarily regulated by phosphorylation of its E1 component. We determine that SIRT4 enzymatically hydrolyzes the lipoamide cofactors from the E2 component dihydrolipoyllysine acetyltransferase (DLAT), diminishing PDH activity. We demonstrate SIRT4-mediated regulation of DLAT lipoyl levels and PDH activity in cells and in vivo, in mouse liver. Furthermore, metabolic flux switching via glutamine stimulation induces SIRT4 lipoamidase activity to inhibit PDH, highlighting SIRT4 as a guardian of cellular metabolism. PMID:25525879

  16. Aldehyde dehydrogenase inhibition as a pathogenic mechanism in Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    Fitzmaurice, Arthur G.; Rhodes, Shannon L.; Lulla, Aaron; Murphy, Niall P.; Lam, Hoa A.; O’Donnell, Kelley C.; Barnhill, Lisa; Casida, John E.; Cockburn, Myles; Sagasti, Alvaro; Stahl, Mark C.; Maidment, Nigel T.; Ritz, Beate; Bronstein, Jeff M.

    2013-01-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder particularly characterized by the loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. Pesticide exposure has been associated with PD occurrence, and we previously reported that the fungicide benomyl interferes with several cellular processes potentially relevant to PD pathogenesis. Here we propose that benomyl, via its bioactivated thiocarbamate sulfoxide metabolite, inhibits aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH), leading to accumulation of the reactive dopamine metabolite 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetaldehyde (DOPAL), preferential degeneration of dopaminergic neurons, and development of PD. This hypothesis is supported by multiple lines of evidence. (i) We previously showed in mice the metabolism of benomyl to S-methyl N-butylthiocarbamate sulfoxide, which inhibits ALDH at nanomolar levels. We report here that benomyl exposure in primary mesencephalic neurons (ii) inhibits ALDH and (iii) alters dopamine homeostasis. It induces selective dopaminergic neuronal damage (iv) in vitro in primary mesencephalic cultures and (v) in vivo in a zebrafish system. (vi) In vitro cell loss was attenuated by reducing DOPAL formation. (vii) In our epidemiology study, higher exposure to benomyl was associated with increased PD risk. This ALDH model for PD etiology may help explain the selective vulnerability of dopaminergic neurons in PD and provide a potential mechanism through which environmental toxicants contribute to PD pathogenesis. PMID:23267077

  17. Differences in 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase regulation in liver and kidney.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, B C; Clotfelter, L A; Cheung, J Y; LaNoue, K F

    1992-01-01

    In response to acidosis, renal ammoniagenesis is stimulated, enhancing urinary buffering power, while hepatic ammoniagenesis and ureagenesis decrease, so as to spare bicarbonate consumed in the urea cycle. 2-Oxoglutarate (2-OG) levels can regulate ammoniagenesis in kidney and gluconeogenesis in liver and kidney. Since the activity of 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase (2-OGDH) has an important influence on cellular levels of 2-OG, this study evaluated the effects of pH on 2-OGDH in liver and kidney and found that: (1) the isolated enzyme from both organs has the same pH-sensitivity; (2) 2-OGDH flux measured in intact mitochondria was inhibited by increasing H+ in liver, but stimulated in kidney; (3) transport of 2-OG into the mitochondria was not rate-limiting; (4) liver mitochondrial 2-OGDH exhibited a strong preference for 2-OG generated within the mitochondria from glutamate-oxaloacetate transaminase (GOT), suggesting that channelling between GOT and 2-OGDH occurs. Since complexation between 2-OGDH and GOT occurs in vitro, we propose that the degree of complexation is higher in liver than in kidney, such that most of the 2-OGDH may be complexed to GOT in liver. In the liver the inherent H(+)-sensitivity of 2-OGDH is masked by the pH-sensitivity of GOT and the glutamate-aspartate carrier. PMID:1352447

  18. A mechanism of sulfite neurotoxicity: direct inhibition of glutamate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin; Vincent, Annette Shoba; Halliwell, Barry; Wong, Kim Ping

    2004-10-08

    Exposure of Neuro-2a and PC12 cells to micromolar concentrations of sulfite caused an increase in reactive oxygen species and a decrease in ATP. Likewise, the biosynthesis of ATP in intact rat brain mitochondria from the oxidation of glutamate was inhibited by micromolar sulfite. Glutamate-driven respiration increased the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), and this was abolished by sulfite but the MMP generated by oxidation of malate and succinate was not affected. The increased rate of production of NADH from exogenous NAD+ and glutamate added to rat brain mitochondrial extracts was inhibited by sulfite, and mitochondria preincubated with sulfite failed to reduce NAD+. Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) in rat brain mitochondrial extract was inhibited dose-dependently by sulfite as was the activity of a purified enzyme. An increase in the Km (glutamate) and a decrease in Vmax resulting in an attenuation in Vmax/Km (glutamate) at 100 microm sulfite suggest a mixed type of inhibition. However, uncompetitive inhibition was noted with decreases in both Km (NAD+) and Vmax, whereas Vmax/Km (NAD+) remained relatively constant. We propose that GDH is one target of action of sulfite, leading to a decrease in alpha-ketoglutarate and a diminished flux through the tricarboxylic acid cycle accompanied by a decrease in NADH through the mitochondrial electron transport chain, a decreased MMP, and a decrease in ATP synthesis. Because glutamate is a major metabolite in the brain, inhibition of GDH by sulfite could contribute to the severe phenotype of sulfite oxidase deficiency in human infants.

  19. Crystallographic and spectroscopic snapshots reveal a dehydrogenase in action

    SciTech Connect

    Huo, Lu; Davis, Ian; Liu, Fange; Andi, Babak; Esaki, Shingo; Iwaki, Hiroaki; Hasegawa, Yoshie; Orville, Allen M.; Liu, Aimin

    2015-01-07

    Aldehydes are ubiquitous intermediates in metabolic pathways and their innate reactivity can often make them quite unstable. There are several aldehydic intermediates in the metabolic pathway for tryptophan degradation that can decay into neuroactive compounds that have been associated with numerous neurological diseases. An enzyme of this pathway, 2-aminomuconate-6-semialdehyde dehydrogenase, is responsible for ‘disarming’ the final aldehydic intermediate. Here we show the crystal structures of a bacterial analogue enzyme in five catalytically relevant forms: resting state, one binary and two ternary complexes, and a covalent, thioacyl intermediate. We also report the crystal structures of a tetrahedral, thiohemiacetal intermediate, a thioacyl intermediate and an NAD+-bound complex from an active site mutant. These covalent intermediates are characterized by single-crystal and solution-state electronic absorption spectroscopy. The crystal structures reveal that the substrate undergoes an E/Z isomerization at the enzyme active site before an sp3-to-sp2 transition during enzyme-mediated oxidation.

  20. Green tea polyphenols modulate insulin secretion by inhibiting glutamate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Li, Changhong; Allen, Aron; Kwagh, Jae; Doliba, Nicolai M; Qin, Wei; Najafi, Habiba; Collins, Heather W; Matschinsky, Franz M; Stanley, Charles A; Smith, Thomas J

    2006-04-14

    Insulin secretion by pancreatic beta-cells is stimulated by glucose, amino acids, and other metabolic fuels. Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) has been shown to play a regulatory role in this process. The importance of GDH was underscored by features of hyperinsulinemia/hyperammonemia syndrome, where a dominant mutation causes the loss of inhibition by GTP and ATP. Here we report the effects of green tea polyphenols on GDH and insulin secretion. Of the four compounds tested, epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) and epicatechin gallate were found to inhibit GDH with nanomolar ED(50) values and were therefore found to be as potent as the physiologically important inhibitor GTP. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that EGCG inhibits BCH-stimulated insulin secretion, a process that is mediated by GDH, under conditions where GDH is no longer inhibited by high energy metabolites. EGCG does not affect glucose-stimulated insulin secretion under high energy conditions where GDH is probably fully inhibited. We have further shown that these compounds act in an allosteric manner independent of their antioxidant activity and that the beta-cell stimulatory effects are directly correlated with glutamine oxidation. These results demonstrate that EGCG, much like the activator of GDH (BCH), can facilitate dissecting the complex regulation of insulin secretion by pharmacologically modulating the effects of GDH.

  1. Nitrated carbon nanoblisters for high-performance glucose dehydrogenase bioanodes.

    PubMed

    de Souza, João C P; Iost, Rodrigo M; Crespilho, Frank N

    2016-03-15

    Recently, many strategies are being explored for efficiently wiring glucose dehydrogenase (GDh) enzymes capable of glucose (fuel) oxidation. For instance, the use of GDh NAD(+)-dependent for glucose oxidation is of great interest in biofuel cell technology because the enzyme are unaffected by the presence of molecular oxygen commonly present in electrolyte. Here we present the fabrication of flexible carbon fibers modified with nitrated carbon nanoblisters and their application as high-performance GDh bioanodes. These bioelectrodes could electro-oxidize glucose at -360 mV (vs. Ag/AgClsat) in the presence of a molecular oxygen saturated electrolyte with current densities higher than 1.0 mAcm(-2) at 0.0 V. It is corroborated by open circuit potential, where a potential stabilization occurs at -150 mV in a long term stability current-transient experiment. This value is in agreement with the quasi-steady current obtained at very low scan rate (0.1 mVs(-1)), where the onset potential for glucose oxidation is -180 mV. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy revealed that the nitrated blisters and edge-like carbon structures, enabling highly efficient enzyme immobilization and low overpotential for electron transfer, allowing for glucose oxidation with potential values close to the thermodynamic cofactor.

  2. Structure and function of lactate dehydrogenase from hagfish.

    PubMed

    Nishiguchi, Yoshikazu; Ito, Nobue; Okada, Mitsumasa

    2010-03-15

    The lactate dehydrogenases (LDHs) in hagfish have been estimated to be the prototype of those in higher vertebrates. The effects of high hydrostatic pressure from 0.1 to 100 MPa on LDH activities from three hagfishes were examined. The LDH activities of Eptatretus burgeri, living at 45-60 m, were completely lost at 5 MPa. In contrast, LDH-A and -B in Eptatretus okinoseanus maintained 70% of their activities even at 100 MPa. These results show that the deeper the habitat, the higher the tolerance to pressure. To elucidate the molecular mechanisms for adaptation to high pressure, we compared the amino acid sequences and three-dimensional structures of LDHs in these hagfish. There were differences in six amino acids (6, 10, 20, 156, 269, and 341). These amino acidresidues are likely to contribute to the stability of the E. okinoseanus LDH under high-pressure conditions. The amino acids responsible for the pressure tolerance of hagfish are the same in both human and hagfish LDHs, and one substitution that occurred as an adaptation during evolution is coincident with that observed in a human disease. Mutation of these amino acids can cause anomalies that may be implicated in the development of human diseases.

  3. Structure and Function of Lactate Dehydrogenase from Hagfish

    PubMed Central

    Nishiguchi, Yoshikazu; Ito, Nobue; Okada, Mitsumasa

    2010-01-01

    The lactate dehydrogenases (LDHs) in hagfish have been estimated to be the prototype of those in higher vertebrates. The effects of high hydrostatic pressure from 0.1 to 100 MPa on LDH activities from three hagfishes were examined. The LDH activities of Eptatretus burgeri, living at 45–60 m, were completely lost at 5 MPa. In contrast, LDH-A and -B in Eptatretus okinoseanus maintained 70% of their activities even at 100 MPa. These results show that the deeper the habitat, the higher the tolerance to pressure. To elucidate the molecular mechanisms for adaptation to high pressure, we compared the amino acid sequences and three-dimensional structures of LDHs in these hagfish. There were differences in six amino acids (6, 10, 20, 156, 269, and 341). These amino acidresidues are likely to contribute to the stability of the E. okinoseanus LDH under high-pressure conditions. The amino acids responsible for the pressure tolerance of hagfish are the same in both human and hagfish LDHs, and one substitution that occurred as an adaptation during evolution is coincident with that observed in a human disease. Mutation of these amino acids can cause anomalies that may be implicated in the development of human diseases. PMID:20411117

  4. Effect of 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase inhibitor on wound healing.

    PubMed

    Seo, Seung Yong; Han, Song-Iy; Bae, Chun Sik; Cho, Hoon; Lim, Sung Chul

    2015-06-01

    PGE2 is an important mediator of wound healing. It is degraded and inactivated by 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (15-PGDH). Various growth factors, type IV collagen, TIMP-2 and PGE2 are important mediators of inflammation involving wound healing. Overproduction of TGF-β and suppression of PGE2 are found in excessive wound scarring. If we make the condition downregulating growth factors and upregulating PGE2, the wound will have a positive effect which results in little scar formation after healing. TD88 is a 15-PGDH inhibitor based on thiazolinedione structure. We evaluated the effect of TD88 on wound healing. In 10 guinea pigs (4 control and 6 experimental groups), we made four 1cm diameter-sized circular skin defects on each back. TD88 and vehicle were applicated on the wound twice a day for 4 days in the experimental and control groups, respectively. Tissue samples were harvested for qPCR and histomorphometric analyses on the 2nd and 4th day after treatment. Histomorphometric analysis showed significant reepithelization in the experimental group. qPCR analysis showed significant decrease of PDGF, CTGF and TIMP-2, but significant increase of type IV collagen in the experimental group. Taken together TD88 could be a good effector on wound healing, especially in the aspects of prevention of scarring. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Isolation and partial characterization of the Drosophila alcohol dehydrogenase gene.

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, D A

    1980-01-01

    The alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH; alcohol: NAD+ oxidoreductase, EC 1.1.1.1) gene (Adh) of Drosophila melanogaster was isolated by utilizing a mutant strain in which the Adh locus is deleted. Adult RNA from wild-type flies was enriched in ADH sequences by gel electrophoresis and then used to prepare labeled cDNA for screening a bacteriophage lambda library of genomic Drosophila DNA. Of the clones that hybridized in the initial screen, one clone was identified that hybridized with labeled cDNA prepared from a wild-type Drosophila strain but did not hybridize with cDNA prepared from an Adh deletion strain. This clone was shown to contain ADH structural gene sequences by three criteria: in situ hybridization, in vitro translation of mRNA selected by hybridization to the cloned DNA, and comparison of the ADH protein sequence with a nucleotide sequence derived from the cloned DNA. Comparison of the restriction site maps from clones of three different wild-type Drosophila strains revealed the presence of a 200-nucleotide sequence in one strain that was absent from the other two strains. The ADH mRNA sequences were located within the cloned DNA by hybridization mapping experiments. Two intervening sequences were identified within Adh by S1 nuclease mapping experiments. Images PMID:6777776

  6. Green tea catechins: inhibitors of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Kao, Chung-Cheng; Wu, Bo-Tsung; Tsuei, Yi-Wei; Shih, Li-Jane; Kuo, Yu-Liang; Kao, Yung-Hsi

    2010-05-01

    Green tea catechins, especially (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), are known to regulate obesity and fat accumulation. We performed a kinetic analysis in a cell-free system to determine the mode of inhibition of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPDH; EC 1.1.1.8) by EGCG. GPDH catalyzes the beta-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH)-dependent reduction of dihydroxyacetone phosphate (DHAP) to yield glycerol-3-phosphate, which serves as one of the major precursors of triacylglycerols. We found that EGCG dose-dependently inhibited GPDH activity at a concentration of approximately 20 muM for 50 % inhibition. The IC (50) values of other green tea catechins, such as (-)-epicatechin, (-)-epicatechin-3-gallate, and (-)-epigallocatechin, were all above 100 microM. This suggests a catechin type-dependent effect. Based on double-reciprocal plots of the kinetic data, EGCG was a noncompetitive inhibitor of the GPDH substrates, NADH and DHAP, with respective inhibition constants (Ki) of 18 and 31 microM. Results of this study possibly support previous studies that EGCG mediates fat content. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart. New York.

  7. Immobilization and enzymatic properties of Bacillus megaterium glucose dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Baron, M.; Fontana, J.D.; Guimaraes, M.F.; Woodward, J.

    1996-12-31

    The enzymatic production of hydrogen gas from renewable sources of energy; e.g., cellulose, starch, lactose, can be obtained by coupling the reactions catalyzed by glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) and hydrogenase. In order to enhance the thermostability of GDH from Bacillus megaterium, the enzyme was immobilized by ionic adsorption using the polycationic polymer DEAE-(dextran)Sephadex. The effect of enzyme concentration on immobilization showed a tendency to increase the activity of the immobilized enzyme with the increase of the amount of added GDH. When the enzyme: support ratio was 15.97 U: 100 mg, the immobilization yield was 84.76%. The enzymatic profiles for the immobilized GDH were a little different when compared to those for free enzyme with respect to the effects of pH and temperature. Concerning the effect of incubation time carried at pH 7.5 and at 40{degrees}C, the maximum production of reduced coenzyme by the immobilized enzyme was reached within 4 h and it was maintained up to 16 h without loss of enzymatic activity. The coupling of the immobilized GDH activity with that for free alkaline cellulose (Novozym. 342) demonstrated the possibility for obtaining reduced coenzyme from the cellulose hydrolysis and the immobilized GDH could be reassayed 10 times maintaining its enzyme activity.

  8. Stabilization and reutilization of Bacillus megaterium glucose dehydrogenase by immobilization

    SciTech Connect

    Baron, M. |; Fontana, J.D.; Guimaraes, M.F.; Woodward, J.

    1997-12-31

    Glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) from Bacillus megaterium was immobilized using aminopropyl controlled-pore silica (CPS, average pore sizes of 170 and 500 {angstrom}) as a support and glutaraldehyde as a bifunctional crosslinking agent. The CPS-immobilized enzyme could be reused 12 times and the best results were obtained using aminopropyl CPS-500 and bovine serum albumin as a feeder for stabilizing the protein layer on the support. DEAE-Sephadex (A-25 and A-50) was also used as a support for immobilizing GDH, with yields of around 42% for A-25 and 25-30% for A-50. The effect of pH on the immobilization procedure showed pH 6.5 to be better than pH 7.5 with respect to the recovery of enzyme activity. Both preparations of DEAE-Sephadex immobilized GDH could be reused several times and were thermostable at 400{degrees}C for 7 h. The kinetic parameters as Michaelis constant and maximum rate were determined for the immobilized enzyme and compared with those for the freeform. 9 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Sequence variation of alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) paralogs in cactophilic Drosophila.

    PubMed Central

    Matzkin, Luciano M; Eanes, Walter F

    2003-01-01

    This study focuses on the population genetics of alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) in cactophilic Drosophila. Drosophila mojavensis and D. arizonae utilize cactus hosts, and each host contains a characteristic mixture of alcohol compounds. In these Drosophila species there are two functional Adh loci, an adult form (Adh-2) and a larval and ovarian form (Adh-1). Overall, the greater level of variation segregating in D. arizonae than in D. mojavensis suggests a larger population size for D. arizonae. There are markedly different patterns of variation between the paralogs across both species. A 16-bp intron haplotype segregates in both species at Adh-2, apparently the product of an ancient gene conversion event between the paralogs, which suggests that there is selection for the maintenance of the intron structure possibly for the maintenance of pre-mRNA structure. We observe a pattern of variation consistent with adaptive protein evolution in the D. mojavensis lineage at Adh-1, suggesting that the cactus host shift that occurred in the divergence of D. mojavensis from D. arizonae had an effect on the evolution of the larval expressed paralog. Contrary to previous work we estimate a recent time for both the divergence of D. mojavensis and D. arizonae (2.4 +/- 0.7 MY) and the age of the gene duplication (3.95 +/- 0.45 MY). PMID:12586706

  10. Aldehyde dehydrogenase inhibition as a pathogenic mechanism in Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Fitzmaurice, Arthur G; Rhodes, Shannon L; Lulla, Aaron; Murphy, Niall P; Lam, Hoa A; O'Donnell, Kelley C; Barnhill, Lisa; Casida, John E; Cockburn, Myles; Sagasti, Alvaro; Stahl, Mark C; Maidment, Nigel T; Ritz, Beate; Bronstein, Jeff M

    2013-01-08

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder particularly characterized by the loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. Pesticide exposure has been associated with PD occurrence, and we previously reported that the fungicide benomyl interferes with several cellular processes potentially relevant to PD pathogenesis. Here we propose that benomyl, via its bioactivated thiocarbamate sulfoxide metabolite, inhibits aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH), leading to accumulation of the reactive dopamine metabolite 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetaldehyde (DOPAL), preferential degeneration of dopaminergic neurons, and development of PD. This hypothesis is supported by multiple lines of evidence. (i) We previously showed in mice the metabolism of benomyl to S-methyl N-butylthiocarbamate sulfoxide, which inhibits ALDH at nanomolar levels. We report here that benomyl exposure in primary mesencephalic neurons (ii) inhibits ALDH and (iii) alters dopamine homeostasis. It induces selective dopaminergic neuronal damage (iv) in vitro in primary mesencephalic cultures and (v) in vivo in a zebrafish system. (vi) In vitro cell loss was attenuated by reducing DOPAL formation. (vii) In our epidemiology study, higher exposure to benomyl was associated with increased PD risk. This ALDH model for PD etiology may help explain the selective vulnerability of dopaminergic neurons in PD and provide a potential mechanism through which environmental toxicants contribute to PD pathogenesis.

  11. Crystal structure of dihydroorotate dehydrogenase from Leishmania major.

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, Artur T; Feliciano, Patricia R; Pinheiro, Matheus P; Nonato, M Cristina

    2012-08-01

    Dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH) is the fourth enzyme in the de novo pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway and has been exploited as the target for therapy against proliferative and parasitic diseases. In this study, we report the crystal structures of DHODH from Leishmania major, the species of Leishmania associated with zoonotic cutaneous leishmaniasis, in its apo form and in complex with orotate and fumarate molecules. Both orotate and fumarate were found to bind to the same active site and exploit similar interactions, consistent with a ping-pong mechanism described for class 1A DHODHs. Analysis of LmDHODH structures reveals that rearrangements in the conformation of the catalytic loop have direct influence on the dimeric interface. This is the first structural evidence of a relationship between the dimeric form and the catalytic mechanism. According to our analysis, the high sequence and structural similarity observed among trypanosomatid DHODH suggest that a single strategy of structure-based inhibitor design can be used to validate DHODH as a druggable target against multiple neglected tropical diseases such as Leishmaniasis, Sleeping sickness and Chagas' diseases.

  12. Reactivity of the sulfhydryl groups of soluble succinate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Vinogradov, A D; Gavrikova, E V; Zuevsky, V V

    1976-04-01

    Soluble succinate dehydrogenase prepared by butanol extraction reacts with N-ethylmaleimide according to first-order kinetics with respect to both remaining active enzyme and the inhibitor concentration. Binding of the sulfhydryl groups of the enzyme prevents its alkylation by N-ethylmaleimide and inhibition by oxaloacetate. A kinetic analysis of the inactivation of alkylating reagent in the presence of succinate or malonate suggests that N-ethylmaleimide acts as a site-directed inhibitor. The apparent first-order rate constant of alkylation increases between pH 5.8 and 7.8 indicating a pKa value for the enzyme sulfhydryl group equal to 7.0 at 22 degrees C in 50 mM Tris-sufate buffer. Certain anions (phosphate, citrate, maleate and acetate) decrease the reactivity of the enzyme towards the alkylating reagent. Succinate/phenazine methosulfate reductase activity measured in the presence of a saturating concentration of succinate shows the same pH-dependence as the alkylation rate by N-ethylmaleimide. The mechanism of the first step of succinate oxidation, including a nucleophilic attack of substrate by the active-site sulfhydryl group, is discussed.

  13. Phosphorylation of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex isolated from Ascaris suum

    SciTech Connect

    Thissen, J.; Komuniecki, R.

    1987-05-01

    The pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) from body wall muscle of the porcine nematode, Ascaris suum, plays a pivotal role in anaerobic mitochondrial metabolism. As in mammalian mitochondria, PDC activity is inhibited by the phosphorylation of the ..cap alpha..PDH subunit, catalyzed by an associated PDH/sub a/ kinase. However, in contrast to PDC's isolated from all other eukaryotic sources, phosphorylation decreases the mobility of the ..cap alpha..PDH subunit on SDS-PAGE and permits the separation of the phosphorylated and nonphosphorylated ..cap alpha..PDH's. Phosphorylation and the inactivation of the Ascaris PDC correspond directly, and the additional phosphorylation that occurs after complete inactivation in mammalian PDC's is not observed. The purified ascarid PDC incorporates 10 nmoles /sup 32/P/mg P. Autoradiography of the radiolabeled PDC separated by SDS-PAGE yields a band which corresponds to the phosphorylated ..cap alpha..PDH and a second, faint band which is present only during the first three minutes of PDC inactivation, intermediate between the phosphorylated and nonphosphorylated ..cap alpha..PDH subunit. Tryptic digests of the /sup 32/P-PDC yields one major phosphopeptide, when separated by HPLC, and its amino acid sequence currently is being determined.

  14. Metabolic engineering of lactate dehydrogenase rescues mice from acidosis.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Abhinav P; Rafi, Mohammad; Woods, Elliot C; Gardner, Austin B; Murthy, Niren

    2014-06-05

    Acidosis causes millions of deaths each year and strategies for normalizing the blood pH in acidosis patients are greatly needed. The lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) pathway has great potential for treating acidosis due to its ability to convert protons and pyruvate into lactate and thereby raise blood pH, but has been challenging to develop into a therapy because there are no pharmaceutical-based approaches for engineering metabolic pathways in vivo. In this report we demonstrate that the metabolic flux of the LDH pathway can be engineered with the compound 5-amino-2-hydroxymethylphenyl boronic acid (ABA), which binds lactate and accelerates the consumption of protons by converting pyruvate to lactate and increasing the NAD(+)/NADH ratio. We demonstrate here that ABA can rescue mice from metformin induced acidosis, by binding lactate, and increasing the blood pH from 6.7 to 7.2 and the blood NAD(+)/NADH ratio by 5 fold. ABA is the first class of molecule that can metabolically engineer the LDH pathway and has the potential to have a significant impact on medicine, given the large number of patients that suffer from acidosis.

  15. Crystallographic and spectroscopic snapshots reveal a dehydrogenase in action

    DOE PAGES

    Huo, Lu; Davis, Ian; Liu, Fange; ...

    2015-01-07

    Aldehydes are ubiquitous intermediates in metabolic pathways and their innate reactivity can often make them quite unstable. There are several aldehydic intermediates in the metabolic pathway for tryptophan degradation that can decay into neuroactive compounds that have been associated with numerous neurological diseases. An enzyme of this pathway, 2-aminomuconate-6-semialdehyde dehydrogenase, is responsible for ‘disarming’ the final aldehydic intermediate. Here we show the crystal structures of a bacterial analogue enzyme in five catalytically relevant forms: resting state, one binary and two ternary complexes, and a covalent, thioacyl intermediate. We also report the crystal structures of a tetrahedral, thiohemiacetal intermediate, a thioacylmore » intermediate and an NAD+-bound complex from an active site mutant. These covalent intermediates are characterized by single-crystal and solution-state electronic absorption spectroscopy. The crystal structures reveal that the substrate undergoes an E/Z isomerization at the enzyme active site before an sp3-to-sp2 transition during enzyme-mediated oxidation.« less

  16. The gene encoding proline dehydrogenase modulates sensorimotor gating in mice.

    PubMed

    Gogos, J A; Santha, M; Takacs, Z; Beck, K D; Luine, V; Lucas, L R; Nadler, J V; Karayiorgou, M

    1999-04-01

    Hemizygous cryptic deletions of the q11 band of human chromosome 22 have been associated with a number of psychiatric and behavioural phenotypes, including schizophrenia. Here we report the isolation and characterization of PRODH, a human homologue of Drosophila melanogaster sluggish-A (slgA), which encodes proline dehydrogenase responsible for the behavioural phenotype of the slgA mutant. PRODH is localized at chromosome 22q11 in a region deleted in some psychiatric patients. We also isolated the mouse homologue of slgA (Prodh), identified a mutation in this gene in the Pro/Re hyperprolinaemic mouse strain and found that these mice have a deficit in sensorimotor gating accompanied by regional neurochemical alterations in the brain. Sensorimotor gating is a neural filtering process that allows attention to be focused on a given stimulus, and is affected in patients with neuropsychiatric disorders. Furthermore, several lines of evidence suggest that proline may serve as a modulator of synaptic transmission in the mammalian brain. Our observations, in conjunction with the chromosomal location of PRODH, suggest a potential involvement of this gene in the 22q11-associated psychiatric and behavioural phenotypes.

  17. An animal model of human aldehyde dehydrogenase deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C.; Mann, J.; Yoshida, A.

    1994-09-01

    The genetic deficiency of ALDH2, a major mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase, is intimately related to alcohol sensitivity and the degree of predisposition to alcoholic diseases in humans. The ultimate biological role of ALDH2 can be exposed by knocking out the ALDH2 gene in an animal model. As the first step for this line of studies, we cloned and characterized the ALDH2 gene from mouse C57/6J strain which is associated with a high alcohol preference. The gene spans 26 kbp and is composed of 13 exons. Embryonic stem cells were transfected with a replacement vector which contains a partially deleted exon3, a positive selection cassette (pPgk Neo), exon 4 with an artificial stop codon, exons 5, 6, 7, and a negative selection cassette (pMCI-Tk). Genomic DNAs prepared from drug resistant clones were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction and by Southern blot analysis to distinguish random integration from homologous recombination. Out of 132 clones examined, 8 had undergone homologous recombination at one of the ALDH2 alleles. The cloned transformed embryonic stem cells with a disrupted ALDH2 allele were injected into blastocysts. Transplantation of the blastocysts into surrogate mother mice yielded chimeric mice. The role of ALDH2 in alcohol preference, alcohol sensitivity and other biological and behavioral characteristics can be elucidated by examining the heterozygous and homozygous mutant strains produced by breeding of chimeric mice.

  18. The PQQ-alcohol dehydrogenase of Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Manzo, Saúl; Contreras-Zentella, Martha; González-Valdez, Alejandra; Sosa-Torres, Martha; Arreguín-Espinoza, Roberto; Escamilla-Marván, Edgardo

    2008-06-30

    The oxidation of ethanol to acetic acid is the most characteristic process in acetic acid bacteria. Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus is rather unique among the acetic acid bacteria as it carries out nitrogen fixation and is a true endophyte, originally isolated from sugar cane. Aside its peculiar life style, Ga. diazotrophicus, possesses a constitutive membrane-bound oxidase system for ethanol. The Alcohol dehydrogenase complex (ADH) of Ga. diazotrophicus was purified to homogeneity from the membrane fraction. It-exhibited two subunits with molecular masses of 71.4 kDa and 43.5 kDa. A positive peroxidase reaction confirmed the presence of cytochrome c in both subunits. Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) of ADH was identified by UV-visible light and fluorescence spectroscopy. The enzyme was purified in its full reduced state; potassium ferricyanide induced its oxidation. Ethanol or acetaldehyde restored the full reduced state. The enzyme showed an isoelectric point (pI) of 6.1 and its optimal pH was 6.0. Both ethanol and acetaldehyde were oxidized at almost the same rate, thus suggesting that the ADH complex of Ga. diazotrophicus could be kinetically competent to catalyze, at least in vitro, the double oxidation of ethanol to acetic acid.

  19. RECIPIENT PRETRANSPLANT INOSINE MONOPHOSPHATE DEHYDROGENASE ACTIVITY IN NONMYELOABLATIVE HCT

    PubMed Central

    Bemer, Meagan J.; Risler, Linda J.; Phillips, Brian R.; Wang, Joanne; Storer, Barry E.; Sandmaier, Brenda M.; Duan, Haichuan; Raccor, Brianne S.; Boeckh, Michael J.; McCune, Jeannine S.

    2014-01-01

    Mycophenolic acid, the active metabolite of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF), inhibits inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) activity. IMPDH is the rate-limiting enzyme involved in de novo synthesis of guanosine nucleotides and catalyzes the oxidation of inosine 5’- monophosphate (IMP) to xanthosine 5’-monophosphate (XMP). We developed a highly sensitive liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry method to quantitate XMP concentrations in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PMNC) isolated from the recipient pretransplant and used this method to determine IMPDH activity in 86 nonmyeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) patients. The incubation procedure and analytical method yielded acceptable within-sample and within-individual variability. Considerable between-individual variability was observed (12.2-fold). Low recipient pretransplant IMPDH activity was associated with increased day +28 donor T-cell chimerism, more acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), lower neutrophil nadirs, and more cytomegalovirus reactivation, but not with chronic GVHD, relapse, non-relapse mortality, or overall mortality. We conclude that quantitation of the recipient’s pretransplant IMPDH activity in PMNC lysate could provide a useful biomarker to evaluate a recipient’s sensitivity to MMF, but confirmatory studies are needed. Further trials should be conducted to confirm our findings and to optimize postgrafting immunosuppression in nonmyeloablative HCT recipients. PMID:24923537

  20. Cloning and characterization of a ribitol dehydrogenase from Zymomonas mobilis.

    PubMed

    Moon, Hee-Jung; Tiwari, Manish; Jeya, Marimuthu; Lee, Jung-Kul

    2010-06-01

    Ribitol dehydrogenase (RDH) catalyzes the conversion of ribitol to D-ribulose. A novel RDH gene was cloned from Zymomonas mobilis subsp. mobilis ZM4 and overexpressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3). DNA sequence analysis revealed an open reading frame of 795 bp, capable of encoding a polypeptide of 266 amino acid residues with a calculated molecular mass of 28,426 Da. The gene was overexpressed in E. coli BL21(DE3) and the protein was purified as an active soluble form using glutathione S-transferase affinity chromatography. The molecular mass of the purified enzyme was estimated to be approximately 28 kDa by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel and approximately 58 KDa with gel filtration chromatography, suggesting that the enzyme is a homodimer. The enzyme had an optimal pH and temperature of 9.5 and 65 degrees C, respectively. Unlike previously characterized RDHs, Z. mobilis RDH (ZmRDH) showed an unusual dual coenzyme specificity, with a k(cat) of 4.83 s(-1) for NADH (k(cat)/K(m) = 27.3 s(-1) mM(-1)) and k(cat) of 2.79 s(-1) for NADPH (k(cat)/K(m) = 10.8 s(-1) mM(-1)). Homology modeling and docking studies of NAD+ and NADP+ into the active site of ZmRDH shed light on the dual coenzyme specificity of ZmRDH.