Science.gov

Sample records for l-type voltage-gated calcium

  1. L-type Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels in Conditioned Fear: A Genetic and Pharmacological Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKinney, Brandon C.; Sze, Wilson; White, Jessica A.; Murphy, Geoffrey G.

    2008-01-01

    Using pharmacological approaches, others have suggested that L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (L-VGCCs) mediate both consolidation and extinction of conditioned fear. In the absence of L-VGCC isoform-specific antagonists, we have begun to investigate the subtype-specific role of LVGCCs in consolidation and extinction of conditioned fear…

  2. Verapamil - L type voltage gated calcium channel inhibitor diminishes aggressive behavior in male Siamese fighting fish.

    PubMed

    Kania, B F; Dębski, B; Wrońska, D; Zawadzka, E

    2015-01-01

    Verapamil is a L-type voltage gated calcium channels inhibitor (VGCCI), which is a highly prescribed drug used in the treatment of hypertension, angina pectoris, cardiac arrhythmia and cluster headaches. Its common use caused its appearance in water environment. VGCC inhibit epinephrine release and cause many neuro-hormonal changes influencing also fish behavior. Siamese fighting fish was chosen to study the influence of verapamil given to the water on the beginning of experiment in 3 different concentrations of 0 (control), 8 and 160 μg · L-1, on aggressive behavior in these fish. The experimental fish were placed in individual glass containers for 3 weeks and the mirror test was used. The highest concentration led to a significant modulation of fish behavior after 1 week and the lower dose caused statistically significant behavioral changes after 2 weeks of verapamil treatment. Siamese fighting fish males exposed to verapamil had longer latencies to the first chase - 12.6 s (8 μg · L-1 of verapamil) and 18.8 s (160 μg · L-1 of verapamil) compared to 5.6 s in the control group, decreased attack frequency and shorter duration of these attacks. The number of attacks within 10 min was decreased from 38.3 in the control group to 27.1 and 16.1, respectively. Also the total duration of these attacks decreased from 354.8 (control) to 326.4 (decrease statistically insignificant) and to 194.8 s in verapamil treated groups. It was shown, that even relatively low concentrations of verapamil in water may have adverse effects on fish and probably other living organisms.

  3. The L-Type Voltage-Gated Calcium Channel Ca[subscript v]1.3 Mediates Consolidation, but Not Extinction, of Contextually Conditioned Fear in Mice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKinney, Brandon C.; Murphy, Geoffrey G.

    2006-01-01

    Using pharmacological techniques, it has been demonstrated that both consolidation and extinction of Pavlovian fear conditioning are dependent to some extent upon L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (LVGCCs). Although these studies have successfully implicated LVGCCs in Pavlovian fear conditioning, they do not provide information about the…

  4. Methamphetamine acutely inhibits voltage-gated calcium channels but chronically up-regulates L-type channels.

    PubMed

    Andres, Marilou A; Cooke, Ian M; Bellinger, Frederick P; Berry, Marla J; Zaporteza, Maribel M; Rueli, Rachel H; Barayuga, Stephanie M; Chang, Linda

    2015-07-01

    In neurons, calcium (Ca(2+) ) channels regulate a wide variety of functions ranging from synaptic transmission to gene expression. They also induce neuroplastic changes that alter gene expression following psychostimulant administration. Ca(2+) channel blockers have been considered as potential therapeutic agents for the treatment of methamphetamine (METH) dependence because of their ability to reduce drug craving among METH users. Here, we studied the effects of METH exposure on voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels using SH-SY5Y cells as a model of dopaminergic neurons. We found that METH has different short- and long-term effects. A short-term effect involves immediate (< 5 min) direct inhibition of Ca(2+) ion movements through Ca(2+) channels. Longer exposure to METH (20 min or 48 h) selectively up-regulates the expression of only the CACNA1C gene, thus increasing the number of L-type Ca(2+) channels. This up-regulation of CACNA1C is associated with the expression of the cAMP-responsive element-binding protein (CREB), a known regulator of CACNA1C gene expression, and the MYC gene, which encodes a transcription factor that putatively binds to a site proximal to the CACNA1C gene transcription initiation site. The short-term inhibition of Ca(2+) ion movement and later, the up-regulation of Ca(2+) channel gene expression together suggest the operation of cAMP-responsive element-binding protein- and C-MYC-mediated mechanisms to compensate for Ca(2+) channel inhibition by METH. Increased Ca(2+) current density and subsequent increased intracellular Ca(2+) may contribute to the neurodegeneration accompanying chronic METH abuse. Methamphetamine (METH) exposure has both short- and long-term effects. Acutely, methamphetamine directly inhibits voltage-gated calcium channels. Chronically, neurons compensate by up-regulating the L-type Ca(2+) channel gene, CACNA1C. This compensatory mechanism is mediated by transcription factors C-MYC and CREB, in which CREB is linked to the

  5. Circadian profiles in the embryonic chick heart: L-type voltage-gated calcium channels and signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Ko, Michael L; Shi, Liheng; Grushin, Kirill; Nigussie, Fikru; Ko, Gladys Y-P

    2010-10-01

    Circadian clocks exist in the heart tissue and modulate multiple physiological events, from cardiac metabolism to contractile function and expression of circadian oscillator and metabolic-related genes. Ample evidence has demonstrated that there are endogenous circadian oscillators in adult mammalian cardiomyocytes. However, mammalian embryos cannot be entrained independently to light-dark (LD) cycles in vivo without any maternal influence, but circadian genes are well expressed and able to oscillate in embryonic stages. The authors took advantage of using chick embryos that are independent of maternal influences to investigate whether embryonic hearts could be entrained under LD cycles in ovo. The authors found circadian regulation of L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (L-VGCCs), the ion channels responsible for the production of cardiac muscle contraction in embryonic chick hearts. The mRNA levels and protein expression of VGCCα1C and VGCCα1D are under circadian control, and the average L-VGCC current density is significantly larger when cardiomyocytes are recorded during the night than day. The phosphorylation states of several kinases involved in insulin signaling and cardiac metabolism, including extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk), stress-activated protein kinase (p38), protein kinase B (Akt), and glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β), are also under circadian control. Both Erk and p38 have been implicated in regulating cardiac contractility and in the development of various pathological states, such as cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure. Even though both Erk and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)-Akt signaling pathways participate in complex cellular processes regarding physiological or pathological states of cardiomyocytes, the circadian oscillators in the heart regulate these pathways independently, and both pathways contribute to the circadian regulation of L-VGCCs.

  6. Microdamage induced calcium efflux from bone matrix activates intracellular calcium signaling in osteoblasts via L-type and T-type voltage-gated calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Jung, Hyungjin; Best, Makenzie; Akkus, Ozan

    2015-07-01

    Mechanisms by which bone microdamage triggers repair response are not completely understood. It has been shown that calcium efflux ([Ca(2+)]E) occurs from regions of bone undergoing microdamage. Such efflux has also been shown to trigger intracellular calcium signaling ([Ca(2+)]I) in MC3T3-E1 cells local to damaged regions. Voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) are implicated in the entry of [Ca(2+)]E to the cytoplasm. We investigated the involvement of VGCC in the extracellular calcium induced intracellular calcium response (ECIICR). MC3T3-E1 cells were subjected to one dimensional calcium efflux from their basal aspect which results in an increase in [Ca(2+)]I. This increase was concomitant with membrane depolarization and it was significantly reduced in the presence of Bepridil, a non-selective VGCC inhibitor. To identify specific type(s) of VGCC in ECIICR, the cells were treated with selective inhibitors for different types of VGCC. Significant changes in the peak intensity and the number of [Ca(2+)]I oscillations were observed when L-type and T-type specific VGCC inhibitors (Verapamil and NNC55-0396, respectively) were used. So as to confirm the involvement of L- and T-type VGCC in the context of microdamage, cells were seeded on devitalized notched bone specimen, which were loaded to induce microdamage in the presence and absence of Verapamil and NNC55-0396. The results showed significant decrease in [Ca(2+)]I activity of cells in the microdamaged regions of bone when L- and T-type blockers were applied. This study demonstrated that extracellular calcium increase in association with damage depolarizes the cell membrane and the calcium ions enter the cell cytoplasm by L- and T-type VGCCs.

  7. Ginsenoside Rb1 selectively inhibits the activity of L-type voltage-gated calcium channels in cultured rat hippocampal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Zhi-ying; Chen, Li-min; Zhang, Jing; Pan, Xiao-dong; Zhu, Yuan-gui; Ye, Qin-yong; Huang, Hua-pin; Chen, Xiao-chun

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the effect of ginsenoside Rb1 on voltage-gated calcium currents in cultured rat hippocampal neurons and the modulatory mechanism. Methods: Cultured hippocampal neurons were prepared from Sprague Dawley rat embryos. Whole-cell configuration of the patch-clamp technique was used to record the voltage-gated calcium currents (VGCCs) from the hippocampal neurons,and the effect of Rb1 was examined. Results: Rb1 (2–100 μmol/L) inhibited VGCCs in a concentration-dependent manner, and the current was mostly recovered upon wash-out. The specific L-type Ca2+ channel inhibitor nifedipine (10 μmol/L) occluded Rb1-induced inhibition on VGCCs. Neither the selective N-type Ca2+ channel blocker ω-conotoxin-GVIA (1 μmol/L), nor the selective P/Q-type Ca2+ channel blocker ω-agatoxin IVA (30 nmol/L) diminished Rb1-sensitive VGCCs. Rb1 induced a leftward shift of the steady-state inactivation curve of ICa to a negative potential without affecting its activation kinetics or reversal potential in the I–V curve. The inhibitory effect of Rb1 was neither abolished by the adenylyl cyclase activator forskolin (10 μmol/L), nor by the PKA inhibitor H-89 (10 μmol/L). Conclusion: Ginsenoside Rb1 selectively inhibits the activity of L-type voltage-gated calcium channels, without affecting the N-type or P/Q-type Ca2+ channels in hippocampal neurons. cAMP-PKA signaling pathway is not involved in this effect. PMID:22407229

  8. Apo calmodulin binding to the L-type voltage-gated calcium channel Ca{sub v}1.2 IQ peptide

    SciTech Connect

    Lian Luyun . E-mail: lu-yun.lian@liverpool.ac.uk; Myatt, Daniel; Kitmitto, Ashraf . E-mail: ashraf.kitmitto@manchester.ac.uk

    2007-02-16

    The influx of calcium through the L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (LTCCs) is the trigger for the process of calcium-induced calcium release (CICR) from the sarcoplasmic recticulum, an essential step for cardiac contraction. There are two feedback mechanisms that regulate LTCC activity: calcium-dependent inactivation (CDI) and calcium-dependent facilitation (CDF), both of which are mediated by calmodulin (CaM) binding. The IQ domain (aa 1645-1668) housed within the cytoplasmic domain of the LTCC Ca{sub v}1.2 subunit has been shown to bind both calcium-loaded (Ca{sup 2+}CaM ) and calcium-free CaM (apoCaM). Here, we provide new data for the structural basis for the interaction of apoCaM with the IQ peptide using NMR, revealing that the apoCaM C-lobe residues are most significantly perturbed upon complex formation. In addition, we have employed transmission electron microscopy of purified LTCC complexes which shows that both apoCaM and Ca{sup 2+}CaM can bind to the intact channel.

  9. The L-Type voltage-gated calcium channel Cav1.3 mediates consolidation, but not extinction, of contextually conditioned fear in mice.

    PubMed

    McKinney, Brandon C; Murphy, Geoffrey G

    2006-01-01

    Using pharmacological techniques, it has been demonstrated that both consolidation and extinction of Pavlovian fear conditioning are dependent to some extent upon L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (LVGCCs). Although these studies have successfully implicated LVGCCs in Pavlovian fear conditioning, they do not provide information about the specific LVGCC isoform involved. Both of the major LVGCC subtypes found in the brain (Cav1.2 and Cav1.3) are targets of the pharmacological manipulations used in earlier work. In this study, we used mice in which the gene for the pore-forming subunit (alpha1D) Cav1.3 was deleted (Cav1.3 knockout mice) to elucidate its contribution to consolidation and extinction of conditioned fear. We find that Cav1.3 knockout mice exhibit significant impairments in consolidation of contextual fear conditioning. However, once sufficiently overtrained, the Cav1.3 knockout mice exhibit rates of extinction that are identical to that observed in wild-type mice. We also find that Cav1.3 knockout mice perform as well as wild-type mice on the hidden platform version of the Morris water maze, suggesting that the consolidation deficit in conditioned fear observed in the Cav1.3 knockout mice is not likely the result of an inability to encode the context, but may reflect an inability to make the association between the context and the unconditioned stimulus.

  10. N- and L-Type Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels Mediate Fast Calcium Transients in Axonal Shafts of Mouse Peripheral Nerve.

    PubMed

    Barzan, Ruxandra; Pfeiffer, Friederike; Kukley, Maria

    2016-01-01

    In the peripheral nervous system (PNS) a vast number of axons are accommodated within fiber bundles that constitute peripheral nerves. A major function of peripheral axons is to propagate action potentials along their length, and hence they are equipped with Na(+) and K(+) channels, which ensure successful generation, conduction and termination of each action potential. However little is known about Ca(2+) ion channels expressed along peripheral axons and their possible functional significance. The goal of the present study was to test whether voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels (VGCCs) are present along peripheral nerve axons in situ and mediate rapid activity-dependent Ca(2+) elevations under physiological circumstances. To address this question we used mouse sciatic nerve slices, Ca(2+) indicator Oregon Green BAPTA-1, and 2-photon Ca(2+) imaging in fast line scan mode (500 Hz). We report that transient increases in intra-axonal Ca(2+) concentration take place along peripheral nerve axons in situ when axons are stimulated electrically with single pulses. Furthermore, we show for the first time that Ca(2+) transients in peripheral nerves are fast, i.e., occur in a millisecond time-domain. Combining Ca(2+) imaging and pharmacology with specific blockers of different VGCCs subtypes we demonstrate that Ca(2+) transients in peripheral nerves are mediated mainly by N-type and L-type VGCCs. Discovery of fast Ca(2+) entry into the axonal shafts through VGCCs in peripheral nerves suggests that Ca(2+) may be involved in regulation of action potential propagation and/or properties in this system, or mediate neurotransmitter release along peripheral axons as it occurs in the optic nerve and white matter of the central nervous system (CNS).

  11. N- and L-Type Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels Mediate Fast Calcium Transients in Axonal Shafts of Mouse Peripheral Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Barzan, Ruxandra; Pfeiffer, Friederike; Kukley, Maria

    2016-01-01

    In the peripheral nervous system (PNS) a vast number of axons are accommodated within fiber bundles that constitute peripheral nerves. A major function of peripheral axons is to propagate action potentials along their length, and hence they are equipped with Na+ and K+ channels, which ensure successful generation, conduction and termination of each action potential. However little is known about Ca2+ ion channels expressed along peripheral axons and their possible functional significance. The goal of the present study was to test whether voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (VGCCs) are present along peripheral nerve axons in situ and mediate rapid activity-dependent Ca2+ elevations under physiological circumstances. To address this question we used mouse sciatic nerve slices, Ca2+ indicator Oregon Green BAPTA-1, and 2-photon Ca2+ imaging in fast line scan mode (500 Hz). We report that transient increases in intra-axonal Ca2+ concentration take place along peripheral nerve axons in situ when axons are stimulated electrically with single pulses. Furthermore, we show for the first time that Ca2+ transients in peripheral nerves are fast, i.e., occur in a millisecond time-domain. Combining Ca2+ imaging and pharmacology with specific blockers of different VGCCs subtypes we demonstrate that Ca2+ transients in peripheral nerves are mediated mainly by N-type and L-type VGCCs. Discovery of fast Ca2+ entry into the axonal shafts through VGCCs in peripheral nerves suggests that Ca2+ may be involved in regulation of action potential propagation and/or properties in this system, or mediate neurotransmitter release along peripheral axons as it occurs in the optic nerve and white matter of the central nervous system (CNS). PMID:27313508

  12. Suppression of Protective Responses upon Activation of L-Type Voltage Gated Calcium Channel in Macrophages during Mycobacterium bovis BCG Infection

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Deepika; Tiwari, Brijendra Kumar; Mehto, Subhash; Antony, Cecil; Kak, Gunjan; Singh, Yogendra; Natarajan, Krishnamurthy

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb) strains eliciting drug resistance has necessitated the need for understanding the complexities of host pathogen interactions. The regulation of calcium homeostasis by Voltage Gated Calcium Channel (VGCCs) upon M. tb infection has recently assumed importance in this area. We previously showed a suppressor role of VGCC during M. tb infections and recently reported the mechanisms of its regulation by M. tb. Here in this report, we further characterize the role of VGCC in mediating defence responses of macrophages during mycobacterial infection. We report that activation of VGCC during infection synergistically downmodulates the generation of oxidative burst (ROS) by macrophages. This attenuation of ROS is regulated in a manner which is dependent on Toll like Receptor (TLR) and also on the route of calcium influx, Protein Kinase C (PKC) and by Mitogen Activation Protein Kinase (MAPK) pathways. VGCC activation during infection increases cell survival and downmodulates autophagy. Concomitantly, pro-inflammatory responses such as IL-12 and IFN-γ secretion and the levels of their receptors on cell surface are inhibited. Finally, the ability of phagosomes to fuse with lysosomes in M. bovis BCG and M. tb H37Rv infected macrophages is also compromised when VGCC activation occurs during infection. The results point towards a well-orchestrated strategy adopted by mycobacteria to supress protective responses mounted by the host. This begins with the increase in the surface levels of VGCCs by mycobacteria and their antigens by well-controlled and regulated mechanisms. Subsequent activation of the upregulated VGCC following tweaking of calcium levels by molecular sensors in turn mediates suppressor responses and prepare the macrophages for long term persistent infection. PMID:27723836

  13. The reduction of EPSC amplitude in CA1 pyramidal neurons by the peroxynitrite donor SIN-1 requires Ca2+ influx via postsynaptic non-L-type voltage gated calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Zhaowei, Liu; Yongling, Xie; Jiajia, Yang; Zhuo, Yang

    2014-02-01

    The peroxynitrite free radical (ONOO(-)) modulation of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs) and spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs) was investigated in rat CA1 pyramidal neurons using the whole-cell patch clamp technique. SIN-1(3-morpholino-sydnonimine), which can lead the simultaneous generation of superoxide anion and nitric oxide, and then form the highly reactive species ONOO(-), induced dose-dependent inhibition in amplitudes of both mEPSCs and sEPSCs. The SIN-1 action on mEPSC amplitude was completely blocked by U0126, a selective MEK inhibitor, suggesting that MEK contributed to the action of ONOO(-) on mEPSCs. The effect of SIN-1 was completely occluded either in the presence of the calcium chelator EGTA or the non-selective calcium channel antagonist Cd(2+). Furthermore, the application of nifedipine (20 μM), the L-type calcium channel blocker, had no effect on the ONOO(-)-induced decrease in mEPSC amplitude, excluding a role for L-type voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels in this process. SIN-1 inhibited the frequency of sEPSCs but had no effect on mEPSC frequency, which suggested a presynaptic action potential-dependent the action of ONOO(-) at CA1 pyramidal neuron synapses. The best-known glutamatergic input to CA1 pyramidal neurons is via Schaffer collaterals from CA3 area. However, no changes were observed in slices treated with SIN-1 on the spontaneous firing rates of CA3 pyramidal neurons. These findings suggested that SIN-1 inhibited glutamatergic synaptic transmission of CA1 pyramidal neurons by a postsynaptic non-L-type voltage gated calcium channel-dependent mechanism.

  14. Gating of dopamine transmission by calcium and axonal N-, Q-, T- and L-type voltage-gated calcium channels differs between striatal domains

    PubMed Central

    Brimblecombe, Katherine R; Gracie, Caitlin J; Platt, Nicola J; Cragg, Stephanie J

    2015-01-01

    The axonal voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (VGCCs) that catalyse dopamine (DA) transmission are incompletely defined. Yet, they are critical to DA function and might prime subpopulations of DA neurons for parkinsonian degeneration. Previous studies of VGCCs will have encompassed those on striatal cholinergic interneurons, which strongly influence DA transmission. We identify which VGCCs on DA axons govern DA transmission, we determine their dynamic properties and reveal an underlying basis for differences between the caudate putamen (CPu) and nucleus accumbens (NAc). We detected DA release evoked electrically during nicotinic receptor blockade or optogenetically by light activation of channel rhodopsin-expressing DA axons in mouse striatal slices. Subtype-specific VGCC blockers indicated that N-, Q-, T- and L-VGCCs govern DA release in CPu, but in NAc, T and L-channels are relatively silent. The roles of the most dominant channels were inversely frequency-dependent, due to low-pass filtering of DA release by Ca2+-dependent relationships between initial release probability and short-term plasticity. Ca2+ concentration–response curves revealed that differences between CPu and NAc were due to greater underlying Ca2+ sensitivity of DA transmission from CPu axons. Functions for ‘silent’ L- and T-channels in NAc could be unmasked by elevating extracellular [Ca2+]. Furthermore, we identified a greater coupling between BAPTA-sensitive, fast Ca2+ transients and DA transmission in CPu axons, and evidence for endogenous fast buffering of Ca2+ in NAc. These data reveal that a range of VGCCs operate dynamically on DA axons, depending on local driving forces. Furthermore, they reveal dramatic differences in Ca2+ handling between axonal subpopulations that show different vulnerability to parkinsonian degeneration. PMID:25533038

  15. Pulsed electromagnetic field enhances brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression through L-type voltage-gated calcium channel- and Erk-dependent signaling pathways in neonatal rat dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuan; Yan, Xiaodong; Liu, Juanfang; Li, Ling; Hu, Xinghua; Sun, Honghui; Tian, Jing

    2014-09-01

    Although pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) exposure has been reported to promote neuronal differentiation, the mechanism is still unclear. Here, we aimed to examine the effects of PEMF exposure on brain-derived neurotrophic factor (Bdnf) mRNA expression and the correlation between the intracellular free calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) and Bdnf mRNA expression in cultured dorsal root ganglion neurons (DRGNs). Exposure to 50Hz and 1mT PEMF for 2h increased the level of [Ca(2+)]i and Bdnf mRNA expression, which was found to be mediated by increased [Ca(2+)]i from Ca(2+) influx through L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs). However, calcium mobilization was not involved in the increased [Ca(2+)]i and BDNF expression, indicating that calcium influx was one of the key factors responding to PEMF exposure. Moreover, PD098059, an extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk) inhibitor, strongly inhibited PEMF-dependant Erk1/2 activation and BDNF expression, indicating that Erk activation is required for PEMF-induced upregulation of BDNF expression. These findings indicated that PEMF exposure increased BDNF expression in DRGNs by activating Ca(2+)- and Erk-dependent signaling pathways.

  16. [Voltage gated calcium channels: structure, characteristics and terminology].

    PubMed

    Veizerová, L; Svetlík, J; Kettmann, V

    2007-07-01

    Voltage-gated Ca2+ channels are the major pathway of Ca2+ entry into the cells. Their activity is essential to couple electrical signals from the cell surface to physiological events in cells. Several pharmacologically, structurally and kinetically distinct calcium channel types have been identified at the electrophysiological and molecular levels. This review aims to describe the functional, structural and pharmacological properties of voltage-gated calcium channels.

  17. Suggestive evidence for association between L-type voltage-gated calcium channel (CACNA1C) gene haplotypes and bipolar disorder in Latinos: a family-based association study

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Suzanne; Xu, Chun; Ramirez, Mercedes; Zavala, Juan; Armas, Regina; Contreras, Salvador A; Contreras, Javier; Dassori, Albana; Leach, Robin J; Flores, Deborah; Jerez, Alvaro; Raventós, Henriette; Ontiveros, Alfonso; Nicolini, Humberto; Escamilla, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Through recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS), several groups have reported significant association between variants in the alpha 1C subunit of the L-type voltage-gated calcium channel (CACNA1C) and bipolar disorder (BP) in European and European-American cohorts. We performed a family-based association study to determine whether CACNA1C is associated with BP in the Latino population. Methods This study consisted of 913 individuals from 215 Latino pedigrees recruited from the United States, Mexico, Guatemala, and Costa Rica. The Illumina GoldenGate Genotyping Assay was used to genotype 58 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that spanned a 602.9 kb region encompassing the CACNA1C gene including two SNPs (rs7297582 and rs1006737) previously shown to associate with BP. Individual SNP and haplotype association analyses were performed using Family-Based Association Test (version 2.0.3) and Haploview (version 4.2) software. Results An eight-locus haplotype block that included these two markers showed significant association with BP (global marker permuted p = 0.0018) in the Latino population. For individual SNPs, this sample had insufficient power (10%) to detect associations with SNPs with minor effect (odds ratio = 1.15). Conclusions Although we were not able to replicate findings of association between individual CACNA1C SNPs rs7297582 and rs1006737 and BP, we were able to replicate the GWAS signal reported for CACNA1C through a haplotype analysis that encompassed these previously reported significant SNPs. These results provide additional evidence that CACNA1C is associated with BP and provides the first evidence that variations in this gene might play a role in the pathogenesis of this disorder in the Latino population. PMID:23437964

  18. Redox Regulation of Neuronal Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Jevtovic-Todorovic, Vesna

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Voltage-gated calcium channels are ubiquitously expressed in neurons and are key regulators of cellular excitability and synaptic transmitter release. There is accumulating evidence that multiple subtypes of voltage-gated calcium channels may be regulated by oxidation and reduction. However, the redox mechanisms involved in the regulation of channel function are not well understood. Recent Advances: Several studies have established that both T-type and high-voltage-activated subtypes of voltage-gated calcium channel can be redox-regulated. This article reviews different mechanisms that can be involved in redox regulation of calcium channel function and their implication in neuronal function, particularly in pain pathways and thalamic oscillation. Critical Issues: A current critical issue in the field is to decipher precise mechanisms of calcium channel modulation via redox reactions. In this review we discuss covalent post-translational modification via oxidation of cysteine molecules and chelation of trace metals, and reactions involving nitric oxide-related molecules and free radicals. Improved understanding of the roles of redox-based reactions in regulation of voltage-gated calcium channels may lead to improved understanding of novel redox mechanisms in physiological and pathological processes. Future Directions: Identification of redox mechanisms and sites on voltage-gated calcium channel may allow development of novel and specific ion channel therapies for unmet medical needs. Thus, it may be possible to regulate the redox state of these channels in treatment of pathological process such as epilepsy and neuropathic pain. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 880–891. PMID:24161125

  19. GPCR and voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCC) signaling complexes.

    PubMed

    Altier, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    Voltage-gated ion channels are transmembrane proteins that control nerve impulses and cell homeostasis. Signaling molecules that regulate ion channel activity and density at the plasma membrane must be specifically and efficiently coupled to these channels in order to control critical physiological functions such as action potential propagation. Although their regulation by G-protein receptor activation has been extensively explored, the assembly of ion channels into signaling complexes of GPCRs plays a fundamental role, engaging specific downstream -signaling pathways that trigger precise downstream effectors. Recent work has confirmed that GPCRs can intimately interact with ion channels and serve as -chaperone proteins that finely control their gating and trafficking in subcellular microdomains. This chapter aims to describe examples of GPCR-ion channel co-assembly, focusing mainly on signaling complexes between GPCRs and voltage-gated calcium channels.

  20. Characterization of L-type Voltage-Gated Ca2+ Channel Expression and Function in Developing CA3 Pyramidal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Morton, Russell A.; Norlin, Mackenzie S.; Vollmer, Cyndel C.; Valenzuela, C. Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Voltage gated calcium channels (VGCCs) play a major role during the development of the central nervous system (CNS). Ca2+ influx via VGCCs regulates axonal growth and neuronal migration as well as synaptic plasticity. Specifically, L-type VGCCs have been well characterized to be involved in the formation and refinement of the connections within the CA3 region of the hippocampus. The majority of the growth, formation, and refinement in the CNS occurs during the human third trimester. An equivalent developmental time period in rodents occurs during the first two weeks of post-natal life, and the expression pattern of L-type VGCCs during this time period has not been well characterized. In this study, we show that Cav1.2 channels are more highly expressed during this developmental period compared to adolescence (post-natal day 30) and that L-type VGCCs significantly contribute to the overall Ca2+ currents. These findings suggest that L-type VGCCs are functionally expressed during the crucial developmental period. PMID:23415785

  1. Age-related homeostatic midchannel proteolysis of neuronal L-type voltage-gated Ca²⁺ channels.

    PubMed

    Michailidis, Ioannis E; Abele-Henckels, Kathryn; Zhang, Wei K; Lin, Bochao; Yu, Yong; Geyman, Lawrence S; Ehlers, Michael D; Pnevmatikakis, Eftychios A; Yang, Jian

    2014-06-01

    Neural circuitry and brain activity depend critically on proper function of voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs), whose activity must be tightly controlled. We show that the main body of the pore-forming α1 subunit of neuronal L-type VGCCs, Cav1.2, is proteolytically cleaved, resulting in Cav1.2 fragment channels that separate but remain on the plasma membrane. This "midchannel" proteolysis is regulated by channel activity, involves the Ca(2+)-dependent protease calpain and the ubiquitin-proteasome system, and causes attenuation and biophysical alterations of VGCC currents. Recombinant Cav1.2 fragment channels mimicking the products of midchannel proteolysis do not form active channels on their own but, when properly paired, produce currents with distinct biophysical properties. Midchannel proteolysis increases dramatically with age and can be attenuated with an L-type VGCC blocker in vivo. Midchannel proteolysis represents a novel form of homeostatic negative-feedback processing of VGCCs that could profoundly affect neuronal excitability, neurotransmission, neuroprotection, and calcium signaling in physiological and disease states. PMID:24908485

  2. Age-related homeostatic mid-channel proteolysis of neuronal L-type voltage-gated Ca2+ channels

    PubMed Central

    Michailidis, Ioannis E.; Abele-Henckels, Kathryn; Zhang, Wei K.; Lin, Bochao; Yu, Yong; Geyman, Larry; Ehlers, Michael D.; Pnevmatikakis, Eftychios A.; Yang, Jian

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Neural circuitry and brain activity depend critically on proper function of voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs), whose activity must be tightly controlled. We show that the main body of the pore-forming α1 subunit of neuronal L-type VGCCs, Cav1.2, is proteolytically cleaved, resulting in Cav1.2 fragment-channels that separate but remain on the plasma membrane. This “gmid-channel” proteolysis is regulated by channel activity, involves the Ca2+-dependent protease calpain and the ubiquitin-proteasome system, and causes attenuation and biophysical alterations of VGCC currents. Recombinant Cav1.2 fragment-channels mimicking the products of mid-channel proteolysis do not form active channels on their own, but when properly paired, produce currents with distinct biophysical properties. Mid-channel proteolysis increases dramatically with age and can be attenuated with an L-type VGCC blocker in vivo. Mid-channel proteolysis represents a novel form of homeostatic negative-feedback processing of VGCCs that could profoundly affect neuronal excitability, neurotransmission, neuroprotection, and calcium signaling in physiological and disease states. PMID:24908485

  3. Cardiac voltage-gated calcium channel macromolecular complexes.

    PubMed

    Rougier, Jean-Sébastien; Abriel, Hugues

    2016-07-01

    Over the past 20 years, a new field of research, called channelopathies, investigating diseases caused by ion channel dysfunction has emerged. Cardiac ion channels play an essential role in the generation of the cardiac action potential. Investigators have largely determined the physiological roles of different cardiac ion channels, but little is known about the molecular determinants of their regulation. The voltage-gated calcium channel Ca(v)1.2 shapes the plateau phase of the cardiac action potential and allows the influx of calcium leading to cardiomyocyte contraction. Studies suggest that the regulation of Ca(v)1.2 channels is not uniform in working cardiomyocytes. The notion of micro-domains containing Ca(v)1.2 channels and different calcium channel interacting proteins, called macro-molecular complex, has been proposed to explain these observations. The objective of this review is to summarize the currently known information on the Ca(v)1.2 macromolecular complexes in the cardiac cell and discuss their implication in cardiac function and disorder. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cardiomyocyte Biology: Integration of Developmental and Environmental Cues in the Heart edited by Marcus Schaub and Hughes Abriel.

  4. Targeting voltage-gated calcium channels for neuropathic pain management

    PubMed Central

    Perret, Danielle; Luo, Z. David

    2009-01-01

    Voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCC) play obligatory roles in diverse physiological functions. Pathological conditions leading to changes in their biophysical properties and expression levels may cause malfunctions of VGCC mediated activities, resulting in disease states. It is believed that changes in VGCC properties under pain-inducing conditions may play a causal role in the development of chronic pain, including nerve injury-induced pain, or neuropathic pain. Over the past decades, preclinical and clinical research in developing VGCC blockers or modulators for chronic pain management has been fruitful, leading to some US Food and Drug Administration approved drugs currently available for chronic pain management. However, their efficacy in pain relief is limited in some patients and their long-term use is limited by their side effect profiles. Certainly, there is room for improvement in developing more subtype specific VGCC blockers or modulators for chronic pain conditions. In this review, we summarized the most recent preclinical and clinical studies related to chronic pain medications acting on the VGCC. We also included clinical trials aiming to expand the application of approved VGCC drugs to different pain states derived from various pathological conditions, as well as drug combination therapies trying to improve the efficacies and side effect profiles of current pain medications. PMID:19789072

  5. The Physiology, Pathology, and Pharmacology of Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels and Their Future Therapeutic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Zamponi, Gerald W.; Striessnig, Joerg; Koschak, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated calcium channels are required for many key functions in the body. In this review, the different subtypes of voltage-gated calcium channels are described and their physiologic roles and pharmacology are outlined. We describe the current uses of drugs interacting with the different calcium channel subtypes and subunits, as well as specific areas in which there is strong potential for future drug development. Current therapeutic agents include drugs targeting L-type CaV1.2 calcium channels, particularly 1,4-dihydropyridines, which are widely used in the treatment of hypertension. T-type (CaV3) channels are a target of ethosuximide, widely used in absence epilepsy. The auxiliary subunit α2δ-1 is the therapeutic target of the gabapentinoid drugs, which are of value in certain epilepsies and chronic neuropathic pain. The limited use of intrathecal ziconotide, a peptide blocker of N-type (CaV2.2) calcium channels, as a treatment of intractable pain, gives an indication that these channels represent excellent drug targets for various pain conditions. We describe how selectivity for different subtypes of calcium channels (e.g., CaV1.2 and CaV1.3 L-type channels) may be achieved in the future by exploiting differences between channel isoforms in terms of sequence and biophysical properties, variation in splicing in different target tissues, and differences in the properties of the target tissues themselves in terms of membrane potential or firing frequency. Thus, use-dependent blockers of the different isoforms could selectively block calcium channels in particular pathologies, such as nociceptive neurons in pain states or in epileptic brain circuits. Of important future potential are selective CaV1.3 blockers for neuropsychiatric diseases, neuroprotection in Parkinson’s disease, and resistant hypertension. In addition, selective or nonselective T-type channel blockers are considered potential therapeutic targets in epilepsy, pain, obesity, sleep, and

  6. Structural Basis for Pharmacology of Voltage-Gated Sodium and Calcium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, Teresa M.

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels initiate action potentials in nerve, muscle, and other electrically excitable cells. Voltage-gated calcium channels are activated by depolarization during action potentials, and calcium influx through them is the key second messenger of electrical signaling, initiating secretion, contraction, neurotransmission, gene transcription, and many other intracellular processes. Drugs that block sodium channels are used in local anesthesia and the treatment of epilepsy, bipolar disorder, chronic pain, and cardiac arrhythmia. Drugs that block calcium channels are used in the treatment of epilepsy, chronic pain, and cardiovascular disorders, including hypertension, angina pectoris, and cardiac arrhythmia. The principal pore-forming subunits of voltage-gated sodium and calcium channels are structurally related and likely to have evolved from ancestral voltage-gated sodium channels that are widely expressed in prokaryotes. Determination of the structure of a bacterial ancestor of voltage-gated sodium and calcium channels at high resolution now provides a three-dimensional view of the binding sites for drugs acting on sodium and calcium channels. In this minireview, we outline the different classes of sodium and calcium channel drugs, review studies that have identified amino acid residues that are required for their binding and therapeutic actions, and illustrate how the analogs of those key amino acid residues may form drug-binding sites in three-dimensional models derived from bacterial channels. PMID:25848093

  7. Calmodulin regulation (calmodulation) of voltage-gated calcium channels

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Johny, Manu

    2014-01-01

    Calmodulin regulation (calmodulation) of the family of voltage-gated CaV1-2 channels comprises a prominent prototype for ion channel regulation, remarkable for its powerful Ca2+ sensing capabilities, deep in elegant mechanistic lessons, and rich in biological and therapeutic implications. This field thereby resides squarely at the epicenter of Ca2+ signaling biology, ion channel biophysics, and therapeutic advance. This review summarizes the historical development of ideas in this field, the scope and richly patterned organization of Ca2+ feedback behaviors encompassed by this system, and the long-standing challenges and recent developments in discerning a molecular basis for calmodulation. We conclude by highlighting the considerable synergy between mechanism, biological insight, and promising therapeutics. PMID:24863929

  8. LRRK2 Regulates Voltage-Gated Calcium Channel Function

    PubMed Central

    Bedford, Cade; Sears, Catherine; Perez-Carrion, Maria; Piccoli, Giovanni; Condliffe, Steven B.

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated Ca2+ (CaV) channels enable Ca2+ influx in response to membrane depolarization. CaV2.1 channels are localized to the presynaptic membrane of many types of neurons where they are involved in triggering neurotransmitter release. Several signaling proteins have been identified as important CaV2.1 regulators including protein kinases, G-proteins and Ca2+ binding proteins. Recently, we discovered that leucine rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2), a protein associated with inherited Parkinson’s disease, interacts with specific synaptic proteins and influences synaptic transmission. Since synaptic proteins functionally interact with CaV2.1 channels and synaptic transmission is triggered by Ca2+ entry via CaV2.1, we investigated whether LRRK2 could impact CaV2.1 channel function. CaV2.1 channel properties were measured using whole cell patch clamp electrophysiology in HEK293 cells transfected with CaV2.1 subunits and various LRRK2 constructs. Our results demonstrate that both wild type (wt) LRRK2 and the G2019S LRRK2 mutant caused a significant increase in whole cell Ca2+ current density compared to cells expressing only the CaV2.1 channel complex. In addition, LRRK2 expression caused a significant hyperpolarizing shift in voltage-dependent activation while having no significant effect on inactivation properties. These functional changes in CaV2.1 activity are likely due to a direct action of LRRK2 as we detected a physical interaction between LRRK2 and the β3 CaV channel subunit via coimmunoprecipitation. Furthermore, effects on CaV2.1 channel function are dependent on LRRK2 kinase activity as these could be reversed via treatment with a LRRK2 inhibitor. Interestingly, LRRK2 also augmented endogenous voltage-gated Ca2+ channel function in PC12 cells suggesting other CaV channels could also be regulated by LRRK2. Overall, our findings support a novel physiological role for LRRK2 in regulating CaV2.1 function that could have implications for how mutations in LRRK2

  9. The Changing Landscape of Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels in Neurovascular Disorders and in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Cataldi, Mauro

    2013-01-01

    It is a common belief that voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCC) cannot carry toxic amounts of Ca2+ in neurons. Also, some of them as L-type channels are essential for Ca2+-dependent regulation of prosurvival gene-programs. However, a wealth of data show a beneficial effect of drugs acting on VGCCs in several neurodegenerative and neurovascular diseases. In the present review, we explore several mechanisms by which the “harmless” VGCCs may become “toxic” for neurons. These mechanisms could explain how, though usually required for neuronal survival, VGCCs may take part in neurodegeneration. We will present evidence showing that VGCCs can carry toxic Ca2+ when: a) their density or activity increases because of aging, chronic hypoxia or exposure to β-amyloid peptides or b) Ca2+-dependent action potentials carry high Ca2+ loads in pacemaker neurons. Besides, we will examine conditions in which VGCCs promote neuronal cell death without carrying excess Ca2+. This can happen, for instance, when they carry metal ions into the neuronal cytoplasm or when a pathological decrease in their activity weakens Ca2+-dependent prosurvival gene programs. Finally, we will explore the role of VGCCs in the control of nonneuronal cells that take part to neurodegeneration like those of the neurovascular unit or of microglia. PMID:24179464

  10. Differential Calcium Signaling Mediated by Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels in Rat Retinal Ganglion Cells and Their Unmyelinated Axons

    PubMed Central

    Sargoy, Allison; Sun, Xiaoping

    2014-01-01

    Aberrant calcium regulation has been implicated as a causative factor in the degeneration of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in numerous injury models of optic neuropathy. Since calcium has dual roles in maintaining homeostasis and triggering apoptotic pathways in healthy and injured cells, respectively, investigation of voltage-gated Ca channel (VGCC) regulation as a potential strategy to reduce the loss of RGCs is warranted. The accessibility and structure of the retina provide advantages for the investigation of the mechanisms of calcium signalling in both the somata of ganglion cells as well as their unmyelinated axons. The goal of the present study was to determine the distribution of VGCC subtypes in the cell bodies and axons of ganglion cells in the normal retina and to define their contribution to calcium signals in these cellular compartments. We report L-type Ca channel α1C and α1D subunit immunoreactivity in rat RGC somata and axons. The N-type Ca channel α1B subunit was in RGC somata and axons, while the P/Q-type Ca channel α1A subunit was only in the RGC somata. We patch clamped isolated ganglion cells and biophysically identified T-type Ca channels. Calcium imaging studies of RGCs in wholemounted retinas showed that selective Ca channel antagonists reduced depolarization-evoked calcium signals mediated by L-, N-, P/Q- and T-type Ca channels in the cell bodies but only by L-type Ca channels in the axons. This differential contribution of VGCC subtypes to calcium signals in RGC somata and their axons may provide insight into the development of target-specific strategies to spare the loss of RGCs and their axons following injury. PMID:24416240

  11. Voltage-gated calcium channels and their auxiliary subunits: physiology and pathophysiology and pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Dolphin, Annette C

    2016-10-01

    Voltage-gated calcium channels are essential players in many physiological processes in excitable cells. There are three main subdivisions of calcium channel, defined by the pore-forming α1 subunit, the CaV 1, CaV 2 and CaV 3 channels. For all the subtypes of voltage-gated calcium channel, their gating properties are key for the precise control of neurotransmitter release, muscle contraction and cell excitability, among many other processes. For the CaV 1 and CaV 2 channels, their ability to reach their required destinations in the cell membrane, their activation and the fine tuning of their biophysical properties are all dramatically influenced by the auxiliary subunits that associate with them. Furthermore, there are many diseases, both genetic and acquired, involving voltage-gated calcium channels. This review will provide a general introduction and then concentrate particularly on the role of auxiliary α2 δ subunits in both physiological and pathological processes involving calcium channels, and as a therapeutic target. PMID:27273705

  12. Voltage-gated calcium channels and their auxiliary subunits: physiology and pathophysiology and pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Dolphin, Annette C

    2016-10-01

    Voltage-gated calcium channels are essential players in many physiological processes in excitable cells. There are three main subdivisions of calcium channel, defined by the pore-forming α1 subunit, the CaV 1, CaV 2 and CaV 3 channels. For all the subtypes of voltage-gated calcium channel, their gating properties are key for the precise control of neurotransmitter release, muscle contraction and cell excitability, among many other processes. For the CaV 1 and CaV 2 channels, their ability to reach their required destinations in the cell membrane, their activation and the fine tuning of their biophysical properties are all dramatically influenced by the auxiliary subunits that associate with them. Furthermore, there are many diseases, both genetic and acquired, involving voltage-gated calcium channels. This review will provide a general introduction and then concentrate particularly on the role of auxiliary α2 δ subunits in both physiological and pathological processes involving calcium channels, and as a therapeutic target.

  13. Osteoblasts detect pericellular calcium concentration increase via neomycin-sensitive voltage gated calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xuanhao; Kishore, Vipuil; Fites, Kateri; Akkus, Ozan

    2012-11-01

    The mechanisms underlying the detection of critically loaded or micro-damaged regions of bone by bone cells are still a matter of debate. Our previous studies showed that calcium efflux originates from pre-failure regions of bone matrix and MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts respond to such efflux by an increase in the intracellular calcium concentration. The mechanisms by which the intracellular calcium concentration increases in response to an increase in the pericellular calcium concentration are unknown. Elevation of the intracellular calcium may occur via release from the internal calcium stores of the cell and/or via the membrane bound channels. The current study applied a wide range of pharmaceutical inhibitors to identify the calcium entry pathways involved in the process: internal calcium release from endoplasmic reticulum (ER, inhibited by thapsigargin and TMB-8), calcium receptor (CaSR, inhibited by calhex), stretch-activated calcium channel (SACC, inhibited by gadolinium), voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCC, inhibited by nifedipine, verapamil, neomycin, and ω-conotoxin), and calcium-induced-calcium-release channel (CICRC, inhibited by ryanodine and dantrolene). These inhibitors were screened for their effectiveness to block intracellular calcium increase by using a concentration gradient induced calcium efflux model which mimics calcium diffusion from the basal aspect of cells. The inhibitor(s) which reduced the intracellular calcium response was further tested on osteoblasts seeded on mechanically loaded notched cortical bone wafers undergoing damage. The results showed that only neomycin reduced the intracellular calcium response in osteoblasts, by 27%, upon extracellular calcium stimulus induced by concentration gradient. The inhibitory effect of neomycin was more pronounced (75% reduction in maximum fluorescence) for osteoblasts seeded on notched cortical bone wafers loaded mechanically to damaging load levels. These results imply that the increase in

  14. Hyperactivation of L-type voltage-gated Ca2+ channels in Caenorhabditis elegans striated muscle can result from point mutations in the IS6 or the IIIS4 segment of the α1 subunit.

    PubMed

    Lainé, Viviane; Ségor, Jean Rony; Zhan, Hong; Bessereau, Jean-Louis; Jospin, Maelle

    2014-11-01

    Several human diseases, including hypokalemic periodic paralysis and Timothy syndrome, are caused by mutations in voltage-gated calcium channels. The effects of these mutations are not always well understood, partially because of difficulties in expressing these channels in heterologous systems. The use of Caenorhabditis elegans could be an alternative approach to determine the effects of mutations on voltage-gated calcium channel function because all the main types of voltage-gated calcium channels are found in C. elegans, a large panel of mutations already exists and efficient genetic tools are available to engineer customized mutations in any gene. In this study, we characterize the effects of two gain-of-function mutations in egl-19, which encodes the L-type calcium channel α1 subunit. One of these mutations, ad695, leads to the replacement of a hydrophobic residue in the IIIS4 segment. The other mutation, n2368, changes a conserved glycine of IS6 segment; this mutation has been identified in patients with Timothy syndrome. We show that both egl-19 (gain-of-function) mutants have defects in locomotion and morphology that are linked to higher muscle tone. Using in situ electrophysiological approaches in striated muscle cells, we provide evidence that this high muscle tone is due to a shift of the voltage dependency towards negative potentials, associated with a decrease of the inactivation rate of the L-type Ca(2+) current. Moreover, we show that the maximal conductance of the Ca(2+) current is decreased in the strongest mutant egl-19(n2368), and that this decrease is correlated with a mislocalization of the channel. PMID:25214488

  15. Reciprocal Regulation of Reactive Oxygen Species and Phospho-CREB Regulates Voltage Gated Calcium Channel Expression during Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Selvakumar, Arti; Antony, Cecil; Singhal, Jhalak; Tiwari, Brijendra K.; Singh, Yogendra; Natarajan, Krishnamurthy

    2014-01-01

    Our previous work has demonstrated the roles played by L-type Voltage Gated Calcium Channels (VGCC) in regulating Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb) survival and pathogenesis. Here we decipher mechanisms and pathways engaged by the pathogen to regulate VGCC expression in macrophages. We show that M. tb and its antigen Rv3416 use phospho-CREB (pCREB), Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS), Protein Kinase C (PKC) and Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) to modulate VGCC expression in macrophages. siRNA mediated knockdown of MyD88, IRAK1, IRAK2 or TRAF6 significantly inhibited antigen mediated VGCC expression. Inhibiting Protein Kinase C (PKC) or MEK-ERK1/2 further increased VGCC expression. Interestingly, inhibiting intracellular calcium release upregulated antigen mediated VGCC expression, while inhibiting extracellular calcium influx had no significant effect. siRNA mediated knockdown of transcription factors c-Jun, SOX5 and CREB significantly inhibited Rv3416 mediated VGCC expression. A dynamic reciprocal cross-regulation between ROS and pCREB was observed that in turn governed VGCC expression with ROS playing a limiting role in the process. Further dissection of the mechanisms such as the interplay between ROS and pCREB would improve our understanding of the regulation of VGCC expression during M. tb infection. PMID:24797940

  16. Electromagnetic fields act via activation of voltage-gated calcium channels to produce beneficial or adverse effects.

    PubMed

    Pall, Martin L

    2013-08-01

    The direct targets of extremely low and microwave frequency range electromagnetic fields (EMFs) in producing non-thermal effects have not been clearly established. However, studies in the literature, reviewed here, provide substantial support for such direct targets. Twenty-three studies have shown that voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) produce these and other EMF effects, such that the L-type or other VGCC blockers block or greatly lower diverse EMF effects. Furthermore, the voltage-gated properties of these channels may provide biophysically plausible mechanisms for EMF biological effects. Downstream responses of such EMF exposures may be mediated through Ca(2+) /calmodulin stimulation of nitric oxide synthesis. Potentially, physiological/therapeutic responses may be largely as a result of nitric oxide-cGMP-protein kinase G pathway stimulation. A well-studied example of such an apparent therapeutic response, EMF stimulation of bone growth, appears to work along this pathway. However, pathophysiological responses to EMFs may be as a result of nitric oxide-peroxynitrite-oxidative stress pathway of action. A single such well-documented example, EMF induction of DNA single-strand breaks in cells, as measured by alkaline comet assays, is reviewed here. Such single-strand breaks are known to be produced through the action of this pathway. Data on the mechanism of EMF induction of such breaks are limited; what data are available support this proposed mechanism. Other Ca(2+) -mediated regulatory changes, independent of nitric oxide, may also have roles. This article reviews, then, a substantially supported set of targets, VGCCs, whose stimulation produces non-thermal EMF responses by humans/higher animals with downstream effects involving Ca(2+) /calmodulin-dependent nitric oxide increases, which may explain therapeutic and pathophysiological effects.

  17. Electromagnetic fields act via activation of voltage-gated calcium channels to produce beneficial or adverse effects

    PubMed Central

    Pall, Martin L

    2013-01-01

    The direct targets of extremely low and microwave frequency range electromagnetic fields (EMFs) in producing non-thermal effects have not been clearly established. However, studies in the literature, reviewed here, provide substantial support for such direct targets. Twenty-three studies have shown that voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) produce these and other EMF effects, such that the L-type or other VGCC blockers block or greatly lower diverse EMF effects. Furthermore, the voltage-gated properties of these channels may provide biophysically plausible mechanisms for EMF biological effects. Downstream responses of such EMF exposures may be mediated through Ca2+/calmodulin stimulation of nitric oxide synthesis. Potentially, physiological/therapeutic responses may be largely as a result of nitric oxide-cGMP-protein kinase G pathway stimulation. A well-studied example of such an apparent therapeutic response, EMF stimulation of bone growth, appears to work along this pathway. However, pathophysiological responses to EMFs may be as a result of nitric oxide-peroxynitrite-oxidative stress pathway of action. A single such well-documented example, EMF induction of DNA single-strand breaks in cells, as measured by alkaline comet assays, is reviewed here. Such single-strand breaks are known to be produced through the action of this pathway. Data on the mechanism of EMF induction of such breaks are limited; what data are available support this proposed mechanism. Other Ca2+-mediated regulatory changes, independent of nitric oxide, may also have roles. This article reviews, then, a substantially supported set of targets, VGCCs, whose stimulation produces non-thermal EMF responses by humans/higher animals with downstream effects involving Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent nitric oxide increases, which may explain therapeutic and pathophysiological effects. PMID:23802593

  18. How voltage-gated calcium channels gate forms of homeostatic synaptic plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Frank, C. Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Throughout life, animals face a variety of challenges such as developmental growth, the presence of toxins, or changes in temperature. Neuronal circuits and synapses respond to challenges by executing an array of neuroplasticity paradigms. Some paradigms allow neurons to up- or downregulate activity outputs, while countervailing ones ensure that outputs remain within appropriate physiological ranges. A growing body of evidence suggests that homeostatic synaptic plasticity (HSP) is critical in the latter case. Voltage-gated calcium channels gate forms of HSP. Presynaptically, the aggregate data show that when synapse activity is weakened, homeostatic signaling systems can act to correct impairments, in part by increasing calcium influx through presynaptic CaV2-type channels. Increased calcium influx is often accompanied by parallel increases in the size of active zones and the size of the readily releasable pool of presynaptic vesicles. These changes coincide with homeostatic enhancements of neurotransmitter release. Postsynaptically, there is a great deal of evidence that reduced network activity and loss of calcium influx through CaV1-type calcium channels also results in adaptive homeostatic signaling. Some adaptations drive presynaptic enhancements of vesicle pool size and turnover rate via retrograde signaling, as well as de novo insertion of postsynaptic neurotransmitter receptors. Enhanced calcium influx through CaV1 after network activation or single cell stimulation can elicit the opposite response—homeostatic depression via removal of excitatory receptors. There exist intriguing links between HSP and calcium channelopathies—such as forms of epilepsy, migraine, ataxia, and myasthenia. The episodic nature of some of these disorders suggests alternating periods of stable and unstable function. Uncovering information about how calcium channels are regulated in the context of HSP could be relevant toward understanding these and other disorders. PMID

  19. Arsenic induced neuronal apoptosis in guinea pigs is Ca2+ dependent and abrogated by chelation therapy: role of voltage gated calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Pachauri, Vidhu; Mehta, Ashish; Mishra, Deepshikha; Flora, Swaran J S

    2013-03-01

    Arsenic contaminated drinking water has affected more than 200 million people globally. Chronic arsenicism has also been associated with numerous neurological diseases. One of the prime mechanisms postulated for arsenic toxicity is reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediated oxidative stress. In this study, we explored the kinetic relationship of ROS with calcium and attempted to dissect the calcium ion channels responsible for calcium imbalance after arsenic exposure. We also explored if mono- or combinational chelation therapy prevents arsenic-induced (25ppm in drinking water for 4 months) neuronal apoptosis in a guinea pig animal model. Results indicate that chronic arsenic exposure caused a significant increase in ROS followed by NO and calcium influx. This calcium influx is mainly dependent on L-type voltage gated channels that disrupt mitochondrial membrane potential, increase bax/bcl2 levels and caspase 3 activity leading to apoptosis. Interestingly, blocking of ROS could completely reduce calcium influx whereas calcium blockage partially reduced ROS increase. While in general mono- and combinational chelation therapies were effective in reversing arsenic induced alteration, combinational therapy of DMSA and MiADMSA was most effective. Our results provide evidence for the role of L-type calcium channels in regulating arsenic-induced calcium influx and DMSA+MiADMSA combinational therapy may be a better protocol than monotherapy in mitigating chronic arsenicosis.

  20. Arsenic induced neuronal apoptosis in guinea pigs is Ca2+ dependent and abrogated by chelation therapy: role of voltage gated calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Pachauri, Vidhu; Mehta, Ashish; Mishra, Deepshikha; Flora, Swaran J S

    2013-03-01

    Arsenic contaminated drinking water has affected more than 200 million people globally. Chronic arsenicism has also been associated with numerous neurological diseases. One of the prime mechanisms postulated for arsenic toxicity is reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediated oxidative stress. In this study, we explored the kinetic relationship of ROS with calcium and attempted to dissect the calcium ion channels responsible for calcium imbalance after arsenic exposure. We also explored if mono- or combinational chelation therapy prevents arsenic-induced (25ppm in drinking water for 4 months) neuronal apoptosis in a guinea pig animal model. Results indicate that chronic arsenic exposure caused a significant increase in ROS followed by NO and calcium influx. This calcium influx is mainly dependent on L-type voltage gated channels that disrupt mitochondrial membrane potential, increase bax/bcl2 levels and caspase 3 activity leading to apoptosis. Interestingly, blocking of ROS could completely reduce calcium influx whereas calcium blockage partially reduced ROS increase. While in general mono- and combinational chelation therapies were effective in reversing arsenic induced alteration, combinational therapy of DMSA and MiADMSA was most effective. Our results provide evidence for the role of L-type calcium channels in regulating arsenic-induced calcium influx and DMSA+MiADMSA combinational therapy may be a better protocol than monotherapy in mitigating chronic arsenicosis. PMID:23376091

  1. The Role of Auxiliary Subunits for the Functional Diversity of Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Campiglio, Marta; Flucher, Bernhard E

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) represent the sole mechanism to convert membrane depolarization into cellular functions like secretion, contraction, or gene regulation. VGCCs consist of a pore-forming α1 subunit and several auxiliary channel subunits. These subunits come in multiple isoforms and splice-variants giving rise to a stunning molecular diversity of possible subunit combinations. It is generally believed that specific auxiliary subunits differentially regulate the channels and thereby contribute to the great functional diversity of VGCCs. If auxiliary subunits can associate and dissociate from pre-existing channel complexes, this would allow dynamic regulation of channel properties. However, most auxiliary subunits modulate current properties very similarly, and proof that any cellular calcium channel function is indeed modulated by the physiological exchange of auxiliary subunits is still lacking. In this review we summarize available information supporting a differential modulation of calcium channel functions by exchange of auxiliary subunits, as well as experimental evidence in support of alternative functions of the auxiliary subunits. At the heart of the discussion is the concept that, in their native environment, VGCCs function in the context of macromolecular signaling complexes and that the auxiliary subunits help to orchestrate the diverse protein–protein interactions found in these calcium channel signalosomes. Thus, in addition to a putative differential modulation of current properties, differential subcellular targeting properties and differential protein–protein interactions of the auxiliary subunits may explain the need for their vast molecular diversity. J. Cell. Physiol. 999: 00–00, 2015. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Cellular Physiology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J. Cell. Physiol. 230: 2019–2031, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25820299

  2. BARP suppresses voltage-gated calcium channel activity and Ca2+-evoked exocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Béguin, Pascal; Nagashima, Kazuaki; Mahalakshmi, Ramasubbu N.; Vigot, Réjan; Matsunaga, Atsuko; Miki, Takafumi; Ng, Mei Yong; Ng, Yu Jin Alvin; Lim, Chiaw Hwee; Tay, Hock Soon; Hwang, Le-Ann; Firsov, Dmitri; Tang, Bor Luen; Inagaki, Nobuya; Mori, Yasuo; Seino, Susumu

    2014-01-01

    Voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) are key regulators of cell signaling and Ca2+-dependent release of neurotransmitters and hormones. Understanding the mechanisms that inactivate VGCCs to prevent intracellular Ca2+ overload and govern their specific subcellular localization is of critical importance. We report the identification and functional characterization of VGCC β-anchoring and -regulatory protein (BARP), a previously uncharacterized integral membrane glycoprotein expressed in neuroendocrine cells and neurons. BARP interacts via two cytosolic domains (I and II) with all Cavβ subunit isoforms, affecting their subcellular localization and suppressing VGCC activity. Domain I interacts at the α1 interaction domain–binding pocket in Cavβ and interferes with the association between Cavβ and Cavα1. In the absence of domain I binding, BARP can form a ternary complex with Cavα1 and Cavβ via domain II. BARP does not affect cell surface expression of Cavα1 but inhibits Ca2+ channel activity at the plasma membrane, resulting in the inhibition of Ca2+-evoked exocytosis. Thus, BARP can modulate the localization of Cavβ and its association with the Cavα1 subunit to negatively regulate VGCC activity. PMID:24751537

  3. BARP suppresses voltage-gated calcium channel activity and Ca2+-evoked exocytosis.

    PubMed

    Béguin, Pascal; Nagashima, Kazuaki; Mahalakshmi, Ramasubbu N; Vigot, Réjan; Matsunaga, Atsuko; Miki, Takafumi; Ng, Mei Yong; Ng, Yu Jin Alvin; Lim, Chiaw Hwee; Tay, Hock Soon; Hwang, Le-Ann; Firsov, Dmitri; Tang, Bor Luen; Inagaki, Nobuya; Mori, Yasuo; Seino, Susumu; Launey, Thomas; Hunziker, Walter

    2014-04-28

    Voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) are key regulators of cell signaling and Ca(2+)-dependent release of neurotransmitters and hormones. Understanding the mechanisms that inactivate VGCCs to prevent intracellular Ca(2+) overload and govern their specific subcellular localization is of critical importance. We report the identification and functional characterization of VGCC β-anchoring and -regulatory protein (BARP), a previously uncharacterized integral membrane glycoprotein expressed in neuroendocrine cells and neurons. BARP interacts via two cytosolic domains (I and II) with all Cavβ subunit isoforms, affecting their subcellular localization and suppressing VGCC activity. Domain I interacts at the α1 interaction domain-binding pocket in Cavβ and interferes with the association between Cavβ and Cavα1. In the absence of domain I binding, BARP can form a ternary complex with Cavα1 and Cavβ via domain II. BARP does not affect cell surface expression of Cavα1 but inhibits Ca(2+) channel activity at the plasma membrane, resulting in the inhibition of Ca(2+)-evoked exocytosis. Thus, BARP can modulate the localization of Cavβ and its association with the Cavα1 subunit to negatively regulate VGCC activity.

  4. [Molecular immunology of voltage-gated calcium channel and Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Iwasa, K; Komai, K; Yasukawa, Y; Maruta, T; Takamori, M

    1997-12-01

    Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome(LEMS), an autoimmune disease that is often associated with small cell lung carcinoma(SCLC), impairs the quantal release of acetylcholine by directing antibodies against voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCC) in the motor nerve terminal. We focused attention on the P/Q type VGCC, to which there are antibodies in LEMS patients in higher frequency than antibodies to other types of VGCC. To search for antigenic sites in the molecular structure of alpha 1A subuuit of P/Q type VGCC in LEMS, we synthesized 4 peptides corresponding to the extracellular region (S5-S6 linker) of each of 4 domains that form alpha 1A subunit of VGCC. Also, LEMS patients' sera were studied by immunoprecipitation assay using these antigens. Peptides corresponding to the extracellular region (S5-S6 linker) of domains II and IV were specifically reactive with LEMS antibodies; their titiers respectively correlated with those of anti-P/Q type calcium channel (omega-conotoxin MVIIC-sensitive human cerebellum extret). Lewis rats were immunized with the domain II S5-S6 linker peptides conjugated with KLH. The immunized rats showed LEMS features characterized by reduced acetylcholine quantum content of endplate potentials and antibodies reactive with P/Q type VGCC. Our observations suggest 2 potential epitopes of LEMS antibodies. Synaptotagmin is a Ca2+ and phospholipid binding protein integrated in synaptic vesicle membranes. It plays a crucial role in neurotransmitter release, probably as a Ca2+ sensor for exocytosis of synaptic vesicles. The extracellular region of synaptotagmin was found antigenic for the induction of a rat model of LEMS. A proportion of human LEMS antibodies reacted with the recombinant synaptotagmin in immunoblot.

  5. The L-Type Calcium Channel Blocker Nifedipine Impairs Extinction, but Not Reduced Contingency Effects, in Mice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jami, Shekib; Barad, Mark; Cain, Christopher K.; Godsil, Bill P.

    2005-01-01

    We recently reported that fear extinction, a form of inhibitory learning, is selectively blocked by systemic administration of L-type voltage-gated calcium channel (LVGCC) antagonists, including nifedipine, in mice. We here replicate this finding and examine three reduced contingency effects after vehicle or nifedipine (40 mg/kg) administration.…

  6. Meta-Analysis of Public Microarray Datasets Reveals Voltage-Gated Calcium Gene Signatures in Clinical Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chih-Yang; Lai, Ming-Derg; Phan, Nam Nhut; Sun, Zhengda; Lin, Yen-Chang

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) are well documented to play roles in cell proliferation, migration, and apoptosis; however, whether VGCCs regulate the onset and progression of cancer is still under investigation. The VGCC family consists of five members, which are L-type, N-type, T-type, R-type and P/Q type. To date, no holistic approach has been used to screen VGCC family genes in different types of cancer. We analyzed the transcript expression of VGCCs in clinical cancer tissue samples by accessing ONCOMINE (www.oncomine.org), a web-based microarray database, to perform a systematic analysis. Every member of the VGCCs was examined across 21 different types of cancer by comparing mRNA expression in cancer to that in normal tissue. A previous study showed that altered expression of mRNA in cancer tissue may play an oncogenic role and promote tumor development; therefore, in the present findings, we focus only on the overexpression of VGCCs in different types of cancer. This bioinformatics analysis revealed that different subtypes of VGCCs (CACNA1C, CACNA1D, CACNA1B, CACNA1G, and CACNA1I) are implicated in the development and progression of diverse types of cancer and show dramatic up-regulation in breast cancer. CACNA1F only showed high expression in testis cancer, whereas CACNA1A, CACNA1C, and CACNA1D were highly expressed in most types of cancer. The current analysis revealed that specific VGCCs likely play essential roles in specific types of cancer. Collectively, we identified several VGCC targets and classified them according to different cancer subtypes for prospective studies on the underlying carcinogenic mechanisms. The present findings suggest that VGCCs are possible targets for prospective investigation in cancer treatment. PMID:26147197

  7. Meta-Analysis of Public Microarray Datasets Reveals Voltage-Gated Calcium Gene Signatures in Clinical Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chih-Yang; Lai, Ming-Derg; Phan, Nam Nhut; Sun, Zhengda; Lin, Yen-Chang

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) are well documented to play roles in cell proliferation, migration, and apoptosis; however, whether VGCCs regulate the onset and progression of cancer is still under investigation. The VGCC family consists of five members, which are L-type, N-type, T-type, R-type and P/Q type. To date, no holistic approach has been used to screen VGCC family genes in different types of cancer. We analyzed the transcript expression of VGCCs in clinical cancer tissue samples by accessing ONCOMINE (www.oncomine.org), a web-based microarray database, to perform a systematic analysis. Every member of the VGCCs was examined across 21 different types of cancer by comparing mRNA expression in cancer to that in normal tissue. A previous study showed that altered expression of mRNA in cancer tissue may play an oncogenic role and promote tumor development; therefore, in the present findings, we focus only on the overexpression of VGCCs in different types of cancer. This bioinformatics analysis revealed that different subtypes of VGCCs (CACNA1C, CACNA1D, CACNA1B, CACNA1G, and CACNA1I) are implicated in the development and progression of diverse types of cancer and show dramatic up-regulation in breast cancer. CACNA1F only showed high expression in testis cancer, whereas CACNA1A, CACNA1C, and CACNA1D were highly expressed in most types of cancer. The current analysis revealed that specific VGCCs likely play essential roles in specific types of cancer. Collectively, we identified several VGCC targets and classified them according to different cancer subtypes for prospective studies on the underlying carcinogenic mechanisms. The present findings suggest that VGCCs are possible targets for prospective investigation in cancer treatment.

  8. Voltage-gated calcium channels: Determinants of channel function and modulation by inorganic cations.

    PubMed

    Neumaier, Felix; Dibué-Adjei, Maxine; Hescheler, Jürgen; Schneider, Toni

    2015-06-01

    Voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) represent a key link between electrical signals and non-electrical processes, such as contraction, secretion and transcription. Evolved to achieve high rates of Ca(2+)-selective flux, they possess an elaborate mechanism for selection of Ca(2+) over foreign ions. It has been convincingly linked to competitive binding in the pore, but the fundamental question of how this is reconcilable with high rates of Ca(2+) transfer remains unanswered. By virtue of their similarity to Ca(2+), polyvalent cations can interfere with the function of VGCCs and have proven instrumental in probing the mechanisms underlying selective permeation. Recent emergence of crystallographic data on a set of Ca(2+)-selective model channels provides a structural framework for permeation in VGCCs, and warrants a reconsideration of their diverse modulation by polyvalent cations, which can be roughly separated into three general mechanisms: (I) long-range interactions with charged regions on the surface, affecting the local potential sensed by the channel or influencing voltage-sensor movement by repulsive forces (electrostatic effects), (II) short-range interactions with sites in the ion-conducting pathway, leading to physical obstruction of the channel (pore block), and in some cases (III) short-range interactions with extracellular binding sites, leading to non-electrostatic modifications of channel gating (allosteric effects). These effects, together with the underlying molecular modifications, provide valuable insights into the function of VGCCs, and have important physiological and pathophysiological implications. Allosteric suppression of some of the pore-forming Cavα1-subunits (Cav2.3, Cav3.2) by Zn(2+) and Cu(2+) may play a major role for the regulation of excitability by endogenous transition metal ions. The fact that these ions can often traverse VGCCs can contribute to the detrimental intracellular accumulation of metal ions following excessive

  9. Peptide neurotoxins that affect voltage-gated calcium channels: a close-up on ω-agatoxins.

    PubMed

    Pringos, Emilie; Vignes, Michel; Martinez, Jean; Rolland, Valerie

    2011-01-01

    Peptide neurotoxins found in animal venoms have gained great interest in the field of neurotransmission. As they are high affinity ligands for calcium, potassium and sodium channels, they have become useful tools for studying channel structure and activity. Peptide neurotoxins represent the clinical potential of ion-channel modulators across several therapeutic fields, especially in developing new strategies for treatment of ion channel-related diseases. The aim of this review is to overview the latest updates in the domain of peptide neurotoxins that affect voltage-gated calcium channels, with a special focus on ω-agatoxins.

  10. Osteoclast cytosolic calcium, regulated by voltage-gated calcium channels and extracellular calcium, controls podosome assembly and bone resorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyauchi, A.; Hruska, K. A.; Greenfield, E. M.; Duncan, R.; Alvarez, J.; Barattolo, R.; Colucci, S.; Zambonin-Zallone, A.; Teitelbaum, S. L.; Teti, A.

    1990-01-01

    The mechanisms of Ca2+ entry and their effects on cell function were investigated in cultured chicken osteoclasts and putative osteoclasts produced by fusion of mononuclear cell precursors. Voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (VGCC) were detected by the effects of membrane depolarization with K+, BAY K 8644, and dihydropyridine antagonists. K+ produced dose-dependent increases of cytosolic calcium ([Ca2+]i) in osteoclasts on glass coverslips. Half-maximal effects were achieved at 70 mM K+. The effects of K+ were completely inhibited by dihydropyridine derivative Ca2+ channel blocking agents. BAY K 8644 (5 X 10(-6) M), a VGCC agonist, stimulated Ca2+ entry which was inhibited by nicardipine. VGCCs were inactivated by the attachment of osteoclasts to bone, indicating a rapid phenotypic change in Ca2+ entry mechanisms associated with adhesion of osteoclasts to their resorption substrate. Increasing extracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]e) induced Ca2+ release from intracellular stores and Ca2+ influx. The Ca2+ release was blocked by dantrolene (10(-5) M), and the influx by La3+. The effects of [Ca2+]e on [Ca2+]i suggests the presence of a Ca2+ receptor on the osteoclast cell membrane that could be coupled to mechanisms regulating cell function. Expression of the [Ca2+]e effect on [Ca2+]i was similar in the presence or absence of bone matrix substrate. Each of the mechanisms producing increases in [Ca2+]i, (membrane depolarization, BAY K 8644, and [Ca2+]e) reduced expression of the osteoclast-specific adhesion structure, the podosome. The decrease in podosome expression was mirrored by a 50% decrease in bone resorptive activity. Thus, stimulated increases of osteoclast [Ca2+]i lead to cytoskeletal changes affecting cell adhesion and decreasing bone resorptive activity.

  11. Asymmetric arrangement of auxiliary subunits of skeletal muscle voltage-gated l-type Ca(2+) channel.

    PubMed

    Murata, K; Odahara, N; Kuniyasu, A; Sato, Y; Nakayama, H; Nagayama, K

    2001-03-23

    Highly purified L-type Ca(2+) channel complexes containing all five subunits (alpha(1), alpha(2), beta, gamma, and delta) and complexes of alpha(1)-beta subunits were obtained from skeletal muscle triad membranes by three-step purification and by 1% Triton X-100 treatment, respectively. Their structures and the subunit arrangements were analyzed by electron microscopy. Projection images of negatively stained Ca(2+) channels and alpha(1)-beta complexes were aligned, classified and averaged. The alpha(1)-beta complex showed a hollow trapezoid shape of 12 nm height. In top view, four asymmetric domains surrounded a central depression predicted to form the channel pore. The complete Ca(2+) channel complex exhibited the cylindrical shape of 20 nm in height binding a spherical domain on one edge. Further image analysis of higher complexes of the Ca(2+) channel using a monoclonal antibody against the beta subunit showed that the alpha(1)-beta complex forms the non-decorated side of the cylinder, which can traverse the membrane from outside the cell to the cytoplasm. Based on these results, we propose that the Ca(2+) channel exhibits an asymmetric arrangement of auxiliary subunits.

  12. Voltage-gated calcium channel currents in human coronary myocytes. Regulation by cyclic GMP and nitric oxide.

    PubMed Central

    Quignard, J F; Frapier, J M; Harricane, M C; Albat, B; Nargeot, J; Richard, S

    1997-01-01

    Voltage-gated Ca2+ channels contribute to the maintenance of contractile tone in vascular myocytes and are potential targets for vasodilating agents. There is no information available about their nature and regulation in human coronary arteries. We used the whole-cell voltage-clamp technique to characterize Ca2+-channel currents immediately after enzymatic dissociation and after primary culture of coronary myocytes taken from heart transplant patients. We recorded a dihydropyridine-sensitive L-type current in both freshly isolated and primary cultured cells. A T-type current was recorded only in culture. The L- (but not the T-) type current was inhibited by permeable analogues of cGMP in a dose-dependent manner. This effect was mimicked by the nitric oxide-generating agents S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP) and 3-morpholinosydnonimine which increased intracellular cGMP. Methylene blue, known to inhibit guanylate cyclase, antagonized the effect of SNAP. Inhibitions by SNAP and cGMP were not additive and seemed to occur through a common pathway. We conclude that (a) L-type Ca2+ channels are the major pathway for voltage-gated Ca2+ entry in human coronary myocytes; (b) their inhibition by agents stimulating nitric oxide and/or intracellular cGMP production is expected to contribute to vasorelaxation and may be involved in the therapeutic effect of nitrovasodilators; and (c) the expression of T-type Ca2+ channels in culture may be triggered by cell proliferation. PMID:9005986

  13. Regulation of N-type voltage-gated calcium channels and presynaptic function by cyclin-dependent kinase 5

    PubMed Central

    Su, Susan C.; Seo, Jinsoo; Pan, Jen Q.; Samuels, Benjamin Adam; Rudenko, Andrii; Ericsson, Maria; Neve, Rachael L.; Yue, David T.; Tsai, Li-Huei

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY N-type voltage-gated calcium channels (CaV2.2) localize to presynaptic nerve terminals and mediate key events including synaptogenesis and neurotransmission. While several kinases have been implicated in the modulation of calcium channels, their impact on presynaptic functions remains unclear. Here we report that the N-type calcium channel is a substrate for cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5). The pore-forming α1 subunit of the N-type calcium channel is phosphorylated in the C-terminal domain, and phosphorylation results in enhanced calcium influx due to increased channel open probability. Phosphorylation of the N-type calcium channel by Cdk5 facilitates neurotransmitter release and alters presynaptic plasticity by increasing the number of docked vesicles at the synaptic cleft. These effects are mediated by an altered interaction between N-type calcium channels and RIM1, which tethers presynaptic calcium channels to the active zone. Collectively, our results highlight a molecular mechanism by which N-type calcium channels are regulated by Cdk5 to affect presynaptic functions. PMID:22920258

  14. Effects of electromagnetic field exposure on conduction and concentration of voltage gated calcium channels: A Brownian dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Tekieh, Tahereh; Sasanpour, Pezhman; Rafii-Tabar, Hashem

    2016-09-01

    A three-dimensional Brownian Dynamics (BD) in combination with electrostatic calculations is employed to specifically study the effects of radiation of high frequency electromagnetic fields on the conduction and concentration profile of calcium ions inside the voltage-gated calcium channels. The electrostatic calculations are performed using COMSOL Multiphysics by considering dielectric interfaces effectively. The simulations are performed for different frequencies and intensities. The simulation results show the variations of conductance, average number of ions and the concentration profiles of ions inside the channels in response to high frequency radiation. The ionic current inside the channel increases in response to high frequency electromagnetic field radiation, and the concentration profiles show that the residency of ions in the channel decreases accordingly. PMID:27346366

  15. Current view on regulation of voltage-gated sodium channels by calcium and auxiliary proteins.

    PubMed

    Pitt, Geoffrey S; Lee, Seok-Yong

    2016-09-01

    In cardiac and skeletal myocytes, and in most neurons, the opening of voltage-gated Na(+) channels (NaV channels) triggers action potentials, a process that is regulated via the interactions of the channels' intercellular C-termini with auxiliary proteins and/or Ca(2+) . The molecular and structural details for how Ca(2+) and/or auxiliary proteins modulate NaV channel function, however, have eluded a concise mechanistic explanation and details have been shrouded for the last decade behind controversy about whether Ca(2+) acts directly upon the NaV channel or through interacting proteins, such as the Ca(2+) binding protein calmodulin (CaM). Here, we review recent advances in defining the structure of NaV intracellular C-termini and associated proteins such as CaM or fibroblast growth factor homologous factors (FHFs) to reveal new insights into how Ca(2+) affects NaV function, and how altered Ca(2+) -dependent or FHF-mediated regulation of NaV channels is perturbed in various disease states through mutations that disrupt CaM or FHF interaction. PMID:27262167

  16. Identification of State-Dependent Blockers for Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels Using a FLIPR-Based Assay.

    PubMed

    di Silvio, Alberto; Rolland, JeanFrancois; Stucchi, Michela

    2016-01-01

    The FLIPR (Fluorescent Imaging Plate Reader) system has been extensively used in the early stages of drug discovery for the identification of small molecules as a starting point for drug development, and for the pharmacological characterization of compounds. The main application of the system has been the measurement of intracellular Ca(2+) signals using fluorescent calcium indicators.This chapter describes the application of a protocol for the study and characterization of state-dependent blockers of Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels (VGCC) on the FLIPR(TETRA).The cell line suitable for the application of the protocol, and described hereafter, co-expresses the human CaV1.2 channel and the human inward rectifier K(+) channel Kir2.3. The presence of Kir2.3 allows the modulation of the plasma membrane potential and consequently of the state of the CaV1.2 channel by changing the extracellular K(+) concentration. In this way, CaV1.2 activity can be measured at different membrane voltages, corresponding to either the resting or partial inactivated state, by loading the cells with a calcium probe in extracellular low or high potassium buffer.

  17. Three dimensional neuronal cell cultures more accurately model voltage gated calcium channel functionality in freshly dissected nerve tissue.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yinzhi; Cheng, Ke; Kisaalita, William

    2012-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that neuronal cells cultured on traditional flat surfaces may exhibit exaggerated voltage gated calcium channel (VGCC) functionality. To gain a better understanding of this phenomenon, primary neuronal cells harvested from mice superior cervical ganglion (SCG) were cultured on two dimensional (2D) flat surfaces and in three dimensional (3D) synthetic poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA) and polystyrene (PS) polymer scaffolds. These 2D- and 3D-cultured cells were compared to cells in freshly dissected SCG tissues, with respect to intracellular calcium increase in response to high K(+) depolarization. The calcium increases were identical for 3D-cultured and freshly dissected, but significantly higher for 2D-cultured cells. This finding established the physiological relevance of 3D-cultured cells. To shed light on the mechanism behind the exaggerated 2D-cultured cells' functionality, transcriptase expression and related membrane protein distributions (caveolin-1) were obtained. Our results support the view that exaggerated VGCC functionality from 2D cultured SCG cells is possibly due to differences in membrane architecture, characterized by uniquely organized caveolar lipid rafts. The practical implication of use of 3D-cultured cells in preclinical drug discovery studies is that such platforms would be more effective in eliminating false positive hits and as such improve the overall yield from screening campaigns.

  18. L-type calcium channels: on the fast track to nuclear signaling.

    PubMed

    D'Arco, Marianna; Dolphin, Annette C

    2012-08-14

    Calcium signaling resulting from depolarization of neurons can trigger changes in transcription, and this response has been called excitation-transcription (E-T) coupling. In neurons, voltage-gated and ligand-gated calcium-permeable channels contribute to the increase in intracellular calcium. It appears that calcium signals mediated by specific voltage-gated calcium channels may have distinct roles in E-T coupling.

  19. A homology model of the pore domain of a voltage-gated calcium channel is consistent with available SCAM data.

    PubMed

    Bruhova, Iva; Zhorov, Boris S

    2010-03-01

    In the absence of x-ray structures of calcium channels, their homology models are used to rationalize experimental data and design new experiments. The modeling relies on sequence alignments between calcium and potassium channels. Zhen et al. (2005. J. Gen. Physiol. doi:10.1085/jgp.200509292) used the substituted cysteine accessibility method (SCAM) to identify pore-lining residues in the Ca(v)2.1 channel and concluded that their data are inconsistent with the symmetric architecture of the pore domain and published sequence alignments between calcium and potassium channels. Here, we have built K(v)1.2-based models of the Ca(v)2.1 channel with 2-(trimethylammonium)ethyl methanethiosulfonate (MTSET)-modified engineered cysteines and used Monte Carlo energy minimizations to predict their energetically optimal orientations. We found that depending on the position of an engineered cysteine in S6 and S5 helices, the ammonium group in the long flexible MTSET-modified side chain can orient into the inner pore, an interface between domains (repeats), or an interface between S5 and S6 helices. Different local environments of equivalent positions in the four repeats can lead to different SCAM results. The reported current inhibition by MTSET generally decreases with the predicted distances between the ammonium nitrogen and the pore axis. A possible explanation for outliers of this correlation is suggested. Our calculations rationalize the SCAM data, validate one of several published sequence alignments between calcium and potassium channels, and suggest similar spatial dispositions of S5 and S6 helices in voltage-gated potassium and calcium channels.

  20. An alcohol-sensing site in the calcium- and voltage-gated, large conductance potassium (BK) channel.

    PubMed

    Bukiya, Anna N; Kuntamallappanavar, Guruprasad; Edwards, Justin; Singh, Aditya K; Shivakumar, Bangalore; Dopico, Alex M

    2014-06-24

    Ethanol alters BK (slo1) channel function leading to perturbation of physiology and behavior. Site(s) and mechanism(s) of ethanol-BK channel interaction are unknown. We demonstrate that ethanol docks onto a water-accessible site that is strategically positioned between the slo1 calcium-sensors and gate. Ethanol only accesses this site in presence of calcium, the BK channel's physiological agonist. Within the site, ethanol hydrogen-bonds with K361. Moreover, substitutions that hamper hydrogen bond formation or prevent ethanol from accessing K361 abolish alcohol action without altering basal channel function. Alcohol interacting site dimensions are approximately 10.7 × 8.6 × 7.1 Å, accommodating effective (ethanol-heptanol) but not ineffective (octanol, nonanol) channel activators. This study presents: (i) to our knowledge, the first identification and characterization of an n-alkanol recognition site in a member of the voltage-gated TM6 channel superfamily; (ii) structural insights on ethanol allosteric interactions with ligand-gated ion channels; and (iii) a first step for designing agents that antagonize BK channel-mediated alcohol actions without perturbing basal channel function.

  1. An alcohol-sensing site in the calcium- and voltage-gated, large conductance potassium (BK) channel

    PubMed Central

    Bukiya, Anna N.; Kuntamallappanavar, Guruprasad; Edwards, Justin; Singh, Aditya K.; Shivakumar, Bangalore; Dopico, Alex M.

    2014-01-01

    Ethanol alters BK (slo1) channel function leading to perturbation of physiology and behavior. Site(s) and mechanism(s) of ethanol–BK channel interaction are unknown. We demonstrate that ethanol docks onto a water-accessible site that is strategically positioned between the slo1 calcium-sensors and gate. Ethanol only accesses this site in presence of calcium, the BK channel’s physiological agonist. Within the site, ethanol hydrogen-bonds with K361. Moreover, substitutions that hamper hydrogen bond formation or prevent ethanol from accessing K361 abolish alcohol action without altering basal channel function. Alcohol interacting site dimensions are approximately 10.7 × 8.6 × 7.1 Å, accommodating effective (ethanol-heptanol) but not ineffective (octanol, nonanol) channel activators. This study presents: (i) to our knowledge, the first identification and characterization of an n-alkanol recognition site in a member of the voltage-gated TM6 channel superfamily; (ii) structural insights on ethanol allosteric interactions with ligand-gated ion channels; and (iii) a first step for designing agents that antagonize BK channel-mediated alcohol actions without perturbing basal channel function. PMID:24927535

  2. Critical residues of the Caenorhabditis elegans unc-2 voltage-gated calcium channel that affect behavioral and physiological properties.

    PubMed

    Mathews, Eleanor A; García, Esperanza; Santi, Celia M; Mullen, Gregory P; Thacker, Colin; Moerman, Donald G; Snutch, Terrance P

    2003-07-23

    The Caenorhabditis elegans unc-2 gene encodes a voltage-gated calcium channel alpha1 subunit structurally related to mammalian dihydropyridine-insensitive high-threshold channels. In the present paper we describe the characterization of seven alleles of unc-2. Using an unc-2 promoter-tagged green fluorescent protein construct, we show that unc-2 is primarily expressed in motor neurons, several subsets of sensory neurons, and the HSN and VC neurons that control egg laying. Examination of behavioral phenotypes, including defecation, thrashing, and sensitivities to aldicarb and nicotine suggests that UNC-2 acts presynaptically to mediate both cholinergic and GABAergic neurotransmission. Sequence analysis of the unc-2 alleles shows that e55, ra605, ra606, ra609, and ra610 all are predicted to prematurely terminate and greatly reduce or eliminate unc-2 function. In contrast, the ra612 and ra614 alleles are missense mutations resulting in the substitution of highly conserved residues in the C terminus and the domain IVS4-IVS5 linker, respectively. Heterologous expression of a rat brain P/Q-type channel containing the ra612 mutation shows that the glycine to arginine substitution affects a variety of channel characteristics, including the voltage dependence of activation, steady-state inactivation, as well as channel kinetics. Overall, our findings suggest that UNC-2 plays a pivotal role in mediating a number of physiological processes in the nematode and also defines a number of critical residues important for calcium channel function in vivo. PMID:12878695

  3. Voltage-gated calcium channels: direct observation of the anomalous mole fraction effect at the single-channel level.

    PubMed Central

    Friel, D D; Tsien, R W

    1989-01-01

    Voltage-gated Ca channels are very efficient pores: even while exhibiting strong ionic selectivity, they are highly permeant to divalent cations. Studies of the mechanism of selectivity and ion permeation have demonstrated that whole-cell Ca channel current in mixtures of Ca and Ba ions can be smaller than with equimolar concentrations of either ion alone. This anomalous mole fraction effect (AMFE) has provided an important impetus for proposed mechanisms of ion selectivity and permeation that invoke multiple ion binding sites. However, recordings of unitary L-type Ca currents did not demonstrate the AMFE [Marban, E. & Yue, D.T. (1988) Biophys. J. 55, 594a (abstr.)], raising doubts about whether it is an expression of ion permeation through open Ca channels. We have made patch-clamp recordings from single L-type Ca channels in PC-12 pheochromocytoma cells. Our results demonstrate a significant AMFE at the single-channel level but also indicate that the AMFE can only be found under restrictive conditions of permeant ion concentration and membrane potential. While the AMFE is clear at 0 mV when permeant ions are present at 10 mM, it is not evident when the divalent cation concentration is increased to 110 mM or the membrane potential is hyperpolarized to -40 mV. We compared our experimental observations with predictions of a single-file, two-binding-site model of the Ca channel. The model accounts for our experimental results. It predicts an AMFE under conditions that favor ion-ion interactions, as long as the outer binding site is not saturated due to high permeant ion concentration or negative membrane potential. PMID:2544893

  4. Genetic disruption of voltage-gated calcium channels in psychiatric and neurological disorders

    PubMed Central

    Heyes, Samuel; Pratt, Wendy S.; Rees, Elliott; Dahimene, Shehrazade; Ferron, Laurent; Owen, Michael J.; Dolphin, Annette C.

    2015-01-01

    This review summarises genetic studies in which calcium channel genes have been connected to the spectrum of neuropsychiatric syndromes, from bipolar disorder and schizophrenia to autism spectrum disorders and intellectual impairment. Among many other genes, striking numbers of the calcium channel gene superfamily have been implicated in the aetiology of these diseases by various DNA analysis techniques. We will discuss how these relate to the known monogenic disorders associated with point mutations in calcium channels. We will then examine the functional evidence for a causative link between these mutations or single nucleotide polymorphisms and the disease processes. A major challenge for the future will be to translate the expanding psychiatric genetic findings into altered physiological function, involvement in the wider pathology of the diseases, and what potential that provides for personalised and stratified treatment options for patients. PMID:26386135

  5. The Evolution of the Four Subunits of Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels: Ancient Roots, Increasing Complexity, and Multiple Losses

    PubMed Central

    Moran, Yehu; Zakon, Harold H.

    2014-01-01

    The alpha subunits of voltage-gated calcium channels (Cavs) are large transmembrane proteins responsible for crucial physiological processes in excitable cells. They are assisted by three auxiliary subunits that can modulate their electrical behavior. Little is known about the evolution and roles of the various subunits of Cavs in nonbilaterian animals and in nonanimal lineages. For this reason, we mapped the phyletic distribution of the four channel subunits and reconstructed their phylogeny. Although alpha subunits have deep evolutionary roots as ancient as the split between plants and opistokonths, beta subunits appeared in the last common ancestor of animals and their close-relatives choanoflagellates, gamma subunits are a bilaterian novelty and alpha2/delta subunits appeared in the lineage of Placozoa, Cnidaria, and Bilateria. We note that gene losses were extremely common in the evolution of Cavs, with noticeable losses in multiple clades of subfamilies and also of whole Cav families. As in vertebrates, but not protostomes, Cav channel genes duplicated in Cnidaria. We characterized by in situ hybridization the tissue distribution of alpha subunits in the sea anemone Nematostella vectensis, a nonbilaterian animal possessing all three Cav subfamilies common to Bilateria. We find that some of the alpha subunit subtypes exhibit distinct spatiotemporal expression patterns. Further, all six sea anemone alpha subunit subtypes are conserved in stony corals, which separated from anemones 500 MA. This unexpected conservation together with the expression patterns strongly supports the notion that these subtypes carry unique functional roles. PMID:25146647

  6. Inhibition of voltage-gated calcium channels as common mode of action for (mixtures of) distinct classes of insecticides.

    PubMed

    Meijer, Marieke; Dingemans, Milou M L; van den Berg, Martin; Westerink, Remco H S

    2014-09-01

    Humans are exposed to distinct structural classes of insecticides with different neurotoxic modes of action. Because calcium homeostasis is essential for proper neuronal function and development, we investigated the effects of insecticides from different classes (pyrethroid: (α-)cypermethrin; organophosphate: chlorpyrifos; organochlorine: endosulfan; neonicotinoid: imidacloprid) and mixtures thereof on the intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i). Effects of acute (20 min) exposure to (mixtures of) insecticides on basal and depolarization-evoked [Ca(2+)]i were studied in vitro with Fura-2-loaded PC12 cells and high resolution single-cell fluorescence microscopy. The data demonstrate that cypermethrin, α-cypermethrin, endosulfan, and chlorpyrifos concentration-dependently decreased depolarization-evoked [Ca(2+)]i, with 50% (IC50) at 78nM, 239nM, 250nM, and 899nM, respectively. Additionally, acute exposure to chlorpyrifos or endosulfan (10μM) induced a modest increase in basal [Ca(2+)]i, amounting to 68 ± 8nM and 53 ± 8nM, respectively. Imidacloprid did not disturb basal or depolarization-evoked [Ca(2+)]i at 10μM. Following exposure to binary mixtures, effects on depolarization-evoked [Ca(2+)]i were within the expected effect additivity range, whereas the effect of the tertiary mixture was less than this expected additivity effect range. These results demonstrate that different types of insecticides inhibit depolarization-evoked [Ca(2+)]i in PC12 cells by inhibiting voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) in vitro at concentrations comparable with human occupational exposure levels. Moreover, the effective concentrations in this study are below those for earlier described modes of action. Because inhibition of VGCCs appears to be a common and potentially additive mode of action of several classes of insecticides, this target should be considered in neurotoxicity risk assessment studies.

  7. Seeing the forest through the trees: towards a unified view on physiological calcium regulation of voltage-gated sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Van Petegem, Filip; Lobo, Paolo A; Ahern, Christopher A

    2012-12-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (Na(V)s) underlie the upstroke of the action potential in the excitable tissues of nerve and muscle. After opening, Na(V)s rapidly undergo inactivation, a crucial process through which sodium conductance is negatively regulated. Disruption of inactivation by inherited mutations is an established cause of lethal cardiac arrhythmia, epilepsy, or painful syndromes. Intracellular calcium ions (Ca(2+)) modulate sodium channel inactivation, and multiple players have been suggested in this process, including the cytoplasmic Na(V) C-terminal region including two EF-hands and an IQ motif, the Na(V) domain III-IV linker, and calmodulin. Calmodulin can bind to the IQ domain in both Ca(2+)-bound and Ca(2+)-free conditions, but only to the DIII-IV linker in a Ca(2+)-loaded state. The mechanism of Ca(2+) regulation, and its composite effect(s) on channel gating, has been shrouded in much controversy owing to numerous apparent experimental inconsistencies. Herein, we attempt to summarize these disparate data and propose a novel, to our knowledge, physiological mechanism whereby calcium ions promote sodium current facilitation due to Ca(2+) memory at high-action-potential frequencies where Ca(2+) levels may accumulate. The available data suggest that this phenomenon may be disrupted in diseases where cytoplasmic calcium ion levels are chronically high and where targeted phosphorylation may decouple the Ca(2+) regulatory machinery. Many Na(V) disease mutations associated with electrical dysfunction are located in the Ca(2+)-sensing machinery and misregulation of Ca(2+)-dependent channel modulation is likely to contribute to disease phenotypes. PMID:23283222

  8. Inhibition of voltage-gated calcium currents in type II vestibular hair cells by cinnarizine.

    PubMed

    Arab, Sonja F; Düwel, Philip; Jüngling, Eberhard; Westhofen, Martin; Lückhoff, Andreas

    2004-06-01

    Cinnarizine is pharmaceutically used in conditions with vestibular vertigo such as Meniere's disease. It is thought to act on extra-vestibular targets. We hypothesized that cinnarizine, as a blocker of L-type Ca2+ channels, may directly target vestibular hair cells where Ca2+ currents are important for the mechano-electrical transduction and transmitter release. Our aim was to clarify whether cinnarizine affected voltage-dependent Ca2+ currents in vestibular type II hair cells. Such cells were isolated from inner ears of guinea pigs by enzymatic and mechanical dissection from the gelatinous otolithic membrane and studied with the patch-clamp technique in conventional whole-cell mode. Ca2+ currents were elicited by depolarizing pulses in a solution containing 1.8 mM Ca2+ and 40 mM Ba2+. These currents resembled L-type currents (I(Ca,L)) with respect to their voltage-dependence and their inhibition by nifedipine and Cd2+ but did not show time-dependent inactivation. The currents were inhibited by cinnarizine in a concentration-dependent and reversible manner. The IC50 was 1.5 microM. A block exceeding 80% was achieved with 10 microM. The onset of current block was faster with higher concentrations but the reversibility after wash-out was less, suggesting accumulation in the membrane. We conclude that these direct actions of cinnarizine on hair cells should be considered as molecular mechanisms contributing to therapeutic effects of cinnarizine in vertigo. PMID:15138660

  9. Differential beta-adrenergic regulation and phenotypic modulation of voltage-gated calcium currents in rat aortic myocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Neveu, D; Quignard, J F; Fernandez, A; Richard, S; Nargeot, J

    1994-01-01

    1. We studied the beta-adrenergic regulation of voltage-gated Ca2+ channel currents using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique (18-22 degrees C) in freshly isolated and in cultured (1-20 days) rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). These currents include a transient low-voltage-activated (LVA) current and two L-type-related high-voltage-activated currents (HVA1 and HVA2, respectively). 2. At 10 microM, the beta-adrenergic agonist, isoprenaline, increased the HVA2 current (65 +/- 30%, n = 10) but had no effect on LVA and HVA1 currents. This potentiation was dose dependent in the range 0.01-10 microM, developed with a slow time course and was mimicked by elevating intracellular cyclic AMP using the permeant analogue dibutyryl cyclic AMP (100 microM). 3. In the well-differentiated freshly isolated myocytes, only the HVA1 current was recorded. In cultured cells, a predominant frequency of occurrence of LVA and HVA1 currents was observed in modulated and differentiated myocytes, respectively. The occurrence of the HVA2 current was stable during culture but this current disappeared when the cells were confluent. It was retrieved when the confluent cells were dispersed and subcultured. 4. In conclusion, we present evidence for a differential beta-adrenergic regulation of three types of Ca2+ channel current in adult rat aortic VSMCs. The differential expression of these currents, associated with marked changes in cell phenotypes in vitro, suggests that they serve distinct physiological functions. Images Figure 7 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 PMID:7799219

  10. Novel approaches to examine the regulation of voltage-gated calcium channels in the heart.

    PubMed

    Morrow, John P; Marx, Steven O

    2015-01-01

    The cardiac L-type Ca(2+) channel plays a key role in cardiac excitation-contraction coupling, action potential duration, and gene expression. Abnormalities in CaV1.2 function, including increased long-opening-mode gating and blunted adrenergic responsiveness, are associated with heart failure and hypertrophy. The increased activation of CaV1.2, in turn, triggers Ca(2+) -responsive signaling pathways, which contribute to the pathogenesis of heart failure and hypertrophy. CaV1.2 in heart is associated with large supramolecular complexes that impact on channel trafficking, localization, turnover, and function. Much of the prevailing dogma relating to mechanisms underlying CaV1.2 trafficking and modulation is derived from studies using recombinant channels reconstituted in heterologous expression systems. However, recent results using knock-in mice indicate that several long-standing "facts" about CaV1.2 regulation derived from heterologous expression studies are not replicated in native heart, emphasizing the critical need for mechanistic studies in the context of actual cardiomyocytes. In this review, we discuss the use of the use of knockin and knockout mice as well as new tools, including doxycycline-induced expression of informative α1C mutants within cardiomyocytes to probe adrenergic regulation of CaV1.2. PMID:25966703

  11. Butanol isomers exert distinct effects on voltage-gated calcium channel currents and thus catecholamine secretion in adrenal chromaffin cells.

    PubMed

    McDavid, Sarah; Bauer, Mary Beth; Brindley, Rebecca L; Jewell, Mark L; Currie, Kevin P M

    2014-01-01

    Butanol (C4H10OH) has been used both to dissect the molecular targets of alcohols/general anesthetics and to implicate phospholipase D (PLD) signaling in a variety of cellular functions including neurotransmitter and hormone exocytosis. Like other primary alcohols, 1-butanol is a substrate for PLD and thereby disrupts formation of the intracellular signaling lipid phosphatidic acid. Because secondary and tertiary butanols do not undergo this transphosphatidylation, they have been used as controls for 1-butanol to implicate PLD signaling. Recently, selective pharmacological inhibitors of PLD have been developed and, in some cases, fail to block cellular functions previously ascribed to PLD using primary alcohols. For example, exocytosis of insulin and degranulation of mast cells are blocked by primary alcohols, but not by the PLD inhibitor FIPI. In this study we show that 1-butanol reduces catecholamine secretion from adrenal chromaffin cells to a much greater extent than tert-butanol, and that the PLD inhibitor VU0155056 has no effect. Using fluorescent imaging we show the effect of these drugs on depolarization-evoked calcium entry parallel those on secretion. Patch-clamp electrophysiology confirmed the peak amplitude of voltage-gated calcium channel currents (I(Ca)) is inhibited by 1-butanol, with little or no block by secondary or tert-butanol. Detailed comparison shows for the first time that the different butanol isomers exert distinct, and sometimes opposing, effects on the voltage-dependence and gating kinetics of I(Ca). We discuss these data with regard to PLD signaling in cellular physiology and the molecular targets of general anesthetics.

  12. Characterization of ST14A Cells for Studying Modulation of Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Roberts-Crowley, Mandy L.; Rittenhouse, Ann R.

    2015-01-01

    In medium spiny neurons (MSNs) of the striatum, dopamine D2 receptors (D2Rs) specifically inhibit the Cav1.3 subtype of L-type Ca2+ channels (LTCs). MSNs are heterogeneous in their expression of dopamine receptors making the study of D2R pathways difficult in primary neurons. Here, we employed the ST14A cell line, derived from embryonic striatum and characterized to have properties of MSNs, to study Cav1.3 current and its modulation by neurotransmitters. Round, undifferentiated ST14A cells exhibited little to no endogenous Ca2+ current while differentiated ST14A cells expressed endogenous Ca2+ current. Transfection with LTC subunits produced functional Cav1.3 current from round cells, providing a homogeneous model system compared to native MSNs for studying D2R pathways. However, neither endogenous nor recombinant Cav1.3 current was modulated by the D2R agonist quinpirole. We confirmed D2R expression in ST14A cells and also detected D1Rs, D4Rs, D5Rs, Gq, calcineurin and phospholipase A2 using RT-PCR and/or Western blot analysis. Phospholipase C β-1 (PLCβ-1) expression was not detected by Western blot analysis which may account for the lack of LTC modulation by D2Rs. These findings raise caution about the assumption that the presence of G-protein coupled receptors in cell lines indicates the presence of complete signaling cascades. However, exogenous arachidonic acid inhibited recombinant Cav1.3 current indicating that channels expressed in ST14A cells are capable of modulation since they respond to a known signaling molecule downstream of D2Rs. Thus, ST14A cells provide a MSN-like cell line for studying channel modulation and signaling pathways that do not involve activation of PLCβ-1. PMID:26147123

  13. CNS Voltage-gated Calcium Channel Gene Variation And Prolonged Recovery Following Sport-related Concussion

    PubMed Central

    McDevitt, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To examine the association between concussion duration and two calcium channel, voltage-dependent, R type, alpha 1E subunit (CACNA1E) single nucleotide polymorphisms (i.e., rs35737760 and rs704326). A secondary purpose was to examine the association between CACNA1E single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and three acute concussion severity scores (i.e., vestibule-ocular reflex test, balance error scoring scale, and Immediate Post-Concussion Assessment and Cognitive Testing). Methods: Forty athletes with a diagnosed concussion from a hospital concussion program completed a standardized initial evaluation. Concussion injury characteristics, acute signs and symptoms followed by an objective screening (i.e., vestibular ocular assessments, balance error scoring system test, and Immediate Post-Concussion Assessment and Cognitive Testing exam) were assessed. Enrolled participants provided salivary samples for isolation of DNA. Two exon SNPs rs35737760 and rs704326 within CACNA1E were genotyped. Results: There was a significant difference found between acute balance deficits and prolonged recovery group (X2 = 5.66, p = 0.017). There was an association found between the dominant model GG genotype (X2 = 5.41, p = 0.027) within the rs704326 SNP and prolonged recovery group. Significant differences were identified for the rs704326 SNP within the dominant model GG genotype (p = 0.030) for VOR scores by recovery. A significant difference was found between the rs704326 SNP codominant model AA (p = 0.042) and visual memory. There was an association between acute balance deficits and prolonged recovery (X2 = 5.66, p = 0.017) for the rs35737760 SNP. No significant associations between concussion severity and genotype for rs35737760 SNP. Conclusion: Athletes carrying the CACNA1E rs704326 homozygous genotype GG are at a greater risk of a prolonged recovery. Athletes that reported balance deficits at the time of injury were more likely to have prolonged recovery. These

  14. Comprehensive behavioral analysis of voltage-gated calcium channel beta-anchoring and -regulatory protein knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Nakao, Akito; Miki, Takafumi; Shoji, Hirotaka; Nishi, Miyuki; Takeshima, Hiroshi; Miyakawa, Tsuyoshi; Mori, Yasuo

    2015-01-01

    Calcium (Ca2+) influx through voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (VGCCs) induces numerous intracellular events such as neuronal excitability, neurotransmitter release, synaptic plasticity, and gene regulation. It has been shown that genes related to Ca2+ signaling, such as the CACNA1C, CACNB2, and CACNA1I genes that encode VGCC subunits, are associated with schizophrenia and other psychiatric disorders. Recently, VGCC beta-anchoring and -regulatory protein (BARP) was identified as a novel regulator of VGCC activity via the interaction of VGCC β subunits. To examine the role of the BARP in higher brain functions, we generated BARP knockout (KO) mice and conducted a comprehensive battery of behavioral tests. BARP KO mice exhibited greatly reduced locomotor activity, as evidenced by decreased vertical activity, stereotypic counts in the open field test, and activity level in the home cage, and longer latency to complete a session in spontaneous T-maze alteration test, which reached “study-wide significance.” Acoustic startle response was also reduced in the mutants. Interestingly, they showed multiple behavioral phenotypes that are seemingly opposite to those seen in the mouse models of schizophrenia and its related disorders, including increased working memory, flexibility, prepulse inhibition, and social interaction, and decreased locomotor activity, though many of these phenotypes are statistically weak and require further replications. These results demonstrate that BARP is involved in the regulation of locomotor activity and, possibly, emotionality. The possibility was also suggested that BARP KO mice may serve as a unique tool for investigating the pathogenesis/pathophysiology of schizophrenia and related disorders. Further evaluation of the molecular and physiological phenotypes of the mutant mice would provide new insights into the role of BARP in higher brain functions. PMID:26136667

  15. Calcium-dependent inactivation of L-type calcium channels in planar lipid bilayers.

    PubMed Central

    Haack, J A; Rosenberg, R L

    1994-01-01

    Intracellular Ca2+ can inhibit the activity of voltage-gated Ca channels by modulating the rate of channel inactivation. Ca(2+)-dependent inactivation of these channels may be a common negative feedback process important for regulating Ca2+ entry under physiological and pathological conditions. This article demonstrates that the inactivation of cardiac L-type Ca channels, reconstituted into planar lipid bilayers and studied in the presence of a dihydropyridine agonist, is sensitive to Ca2+. The rates and extents of inactivation, determined from ensemble averages of unitary Ba2+ currents, decreased when the calcium concentration facing the intracellular surface of the channel ([Ca2+]i) was lowered from approximately 10 microM to 20 nM by the addition of Ca2+ chelators. The rates and extents of Ba2+ current inactivation could also be increased by subsequent addition of Ca2+ raising the [Ca2+]i to 15 microM, thus demonstrating that the Ca2+ dependence of inactivation could be reversibly regulated by changes in [Ca2+]i. In addition, reconstituted Ca channels inactivated more quickly when the inward current was carried by Ca2+ than when it was carried by Ba2+, suggesting that local increases in [Ca2+]i could activate Ca(2+)-dependent inactivation. These data support models in which Ca2+ binds to the channel itself or to closely associated regulatory proteins to control the rate of channel inactivation, and are inconsistent with purely enzymatic models for channel inactivation. PMID:8038377

  16. Actions of a hydrogen sulfide donor (NaHS) on transient sodium, persistent sodium, and voltage-gated calcium currents in neurons of the subfornical organ

    PubMed Central

    Kuksis, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an endogenously found gasotransmitter that has been implicated in a variety of beneficial physiological functions. This study was performed to investigate the cellular mechanisms underlying actions of H2S previously observed in subfornical organ (SFO), where H2S acts to regulate blood pressure through a depolarization of the membrane and an overall increase in the excitability of SFO neurons. We used whole cell patch-clamp electrophysiology in the voltage-clamp configuration to analyze the effect of 1 mM NaHS, an H2S donor, on voltage-gated potassium, sodium, and calcium currents. We observed no effect of NaHS on potassium currents; however, both voltage-gated sodium currents (persistent and transient) and the N-type calcium current had a depolarized activation curve and an enhanced peak-induced current in response to a series of voltage-step and ramp protocols run in the control and NaHS conditions. These effects were not responsible for the previously observed depolarization of the membrane potential, as depolarizing effects of H2S were still observed following block of these conductances with tetrodotoxin (5 μM) and ω-conotoxin-GVIA (100 nM). Our studies are the first to investigate the effect of H2S on a variety of voltage-gated conductances in a single brain area, and although they do not explain mechanisms underlying the depolarizing actions of H2S on SFO neurons, they provide evidence of potential mechanisms through which this gasotransmitter influences the excitability of neurons in this important brain area as a consequence of the modulation of multiple ion channels. PMID:26180118

  17. Loss of β2-laminin alters calcium sensitivity and voltage-gated calcium channel maturation of neurotransmission at the neuromuscular junction

    PubMed Central

    Chand, Kirat K; Lee, Kah Meng; Schenning, Mitja P; Lavidis, Nickolas A; Noakes, Peter G

    2015-01-01

    β2-laminin is a key mediator in the differentiation and formation of the skeletal neuromuscular junction. Loss of β2-laminin results in significant structural and functional aberrations such as decreased number of active zones and reduced spontaneous release of transmitter. In vitro β2-laminin has been shown to bind directly to the pore forming subunit of P/Q-type voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs). Neurotransmission is initially mediated by N-type VGCCs, but by postnatal day 18 switches to P/Q-type VGCC dominance. The present study investigated the changes in neurotransmission during the switch from N- to P/Q-type VGCC-mediated transmitter release at β2-laminin-deficient junctions. Analysis of the relationship between quantal content and extracellular calcium concentrations demonstrated a decrease in the calcium sensitivity, but no change in calcium dependence at β2-laminin-deficient junctions. Electrophysiological studies on VGCC sub-types involved in transmitter release indicate N-type VGCCs remain the primary mediator of transmitter release at matured β2-laminin-deficient junctions. Immunohistochemical analyses displayed irregularly shaped and immature β2-laminin-deficient neuromuscular junctions when compared to matured wild-type junctions. β2-laminin-deficient junctions also maintained the presence of N-type VGCC clustering within the presynaptic membrane, which supported the functional findings of the present study. We conclude that β2-laminin is a key regulator in development of the NMJ, with its loss resulting in reduced transmitter release due to decreased calcium sensitivity stemming from a failure to switch from N- to P/Q-type VGCC-mediated synaptic transmission. PMID:25556799

  18. Role of calcium channels in cellular antituberculosis effects: Potential of voltage-gated calcium-channel blockers in tuberculosis therapy.

    PubMed

    Song, Lele; Cui, Ruina; Yang, Yourong; Wu, Xueqiong

    2015-10-01

    The immunity of human immune cells and their ability to inhibit Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) are key factors in the anti-MTB effect. However, MTB modulates the levels and activity of key intracellular second messengers, such as calcium, to evade protective immune responses. Recent studies suggest that inhibiting L-type calcium channel in immune cells using either antibodies or small interfering RNA increases calcium influx, upregulates the expression of proinflammation genes, and reduces MTB burden. First, we will review the key factors in calcium-signaling pathway that may affect the immunity of immune cells to MTB infection. Second, we will focus on the role of calcium channels in regulating cellular immunity to MTB. Finally, we will discuss the possibility of using calcium-channel blockers as anti-MTB chemotherapy drugs to enhance chemotherapy effects, shorten treatment period, and overcome drug resistance.

  19. siRNA screen for genes that affect Junín virus entry uncovers voltage-gated calcium channels as a therapeutic target

    PubMed Central

    Lavanya, Madakasira; Cuevas, Christian D.; Thomas, Monica; Cherry, Sara; Ross, Susan R.

    2014-01-01

    New world hemorrhagic fever arenaviruses infection of humans results in 15–30% mortality. We performed a high throughput siRNA screen with Junín virus glycoprotein-pseudotyped viruses to find potential host therapeutic targets. Voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCC) subunits, for which there are FDA-approved drugs, were identified in the screen. Knockdown of VGCC subunits or treatment with channel blockers diminished Junín virus-cell fusion and entry into cells and thereby decreased infection. Gabapentin, an FDA-approved drug used to treat neuropathic pain that targets the α2δ2 subunit, inhibited infection of mice by the Candid 1 vaccine strain of the virus. These findings demonstrate that VGCCs play a role in virus infection and have the potential to lead to therapeutic intervention of new world arenavirus infection. PMID:24068738

  20. Subunit composition of G(o) proteins functionally coupling galanin receptors to voltage-gated calcium channels.

    PubMed Central

    Kalkbrenner, F; Degtiar, V E; Schenker, M; Brendel, S; Zobel, A; Heschler, J; Wittig, B; Schultz, G

    1995-01-01

    The neuropeptide galanin is widely expressed in the central nervous system and other tissues and induces different cellular reactions, e.g. hormone release from pituitary and inhibition of insulin release from pancreatic B cells. By microinjection of antisense oligonucleotides we studied the question as to which G proteins mediate the galanin-induced inhibition of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels in the rat pancreatic B-cell line RINm5F and in the rat pituitary cell line GH3. Injection of antisense oligonucleotides directed against alpha 01, beta 2, beta 3, gamma 2 and gamma 4 G protein subunits reduced the inhibition of Ca2+ channel current which was induced by galanin, whereas no change was seen after injection of cells with antisense oligonucleotides directed against alpha i, alpha q, alpha 11, alpha 14, alpha 15, beta 1, beta 4, gamma 1, gamma 3, gamma 5, or gamma 7 G protein subunits or with sense control oligonucleotides. In view of these data and of previous results, we conclude that the galanin receptors in GH3 and in RINm5F cells couple mainly to the G(0) protein consisting of alpha 01 beta 2 gamma 2 to inhibit Ca2+ channels and use alpha 01beta 3 gamma 4 less efficiently. The latter G protein composition was previously shown to be used by muscarinic M4 receptors to inhibit Ca2+ channels. Images PMID:7588602

  1. The T-type voltage-gated calcium channel as a molecular target of the novel cognitive enhancer ST101: enhancement of long-term potentiation and CaMKII autophosphorylation in rat cortical slices.

    PubMed

    Moriguchi, Shigeki; Shioda, Norifumi; Yamamoto, Yui; Tagashira, Hideaki; Fukunaga, Kohji

    2012-04-01

    In this study, we report that spiro[imidazo[1,2-a]pyridine-3,2-indan]-2(3H)-one (ST101; previously coded as ZSET1446) targets T-type voltage-gated calcium channels in mediating improved cognition in the CNS. We prepared rat somatosensory cortical and hippocampal slices, treated them with 0.01 to 100 nM ST101, and performed immunoblotting and electrophysiological analyses using various voltage-gated calcium channel (VGCC) inhibitors. Treatment of rat cortical slices with a range of ST101 concentrations significantly increased calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) autophosphorylation following a bell-shaped dose-response curve, with 0.1 nM ST101 representing the maximally effective concentration. protein kinase Cα autophosphorylation was also significantly increased by 0.1 nM ST101 treatment. ST101 treatment had a moderate effect on CaMKII autophosphorylation but no effect on hippocampal protein kinase Cα autophosphorylation in slice preparations. Consistent with increased cortical CaMKII autophosphorylation, AMPA-type glutamate receptor subunit 1 (Ser-831) phosphorylation as a CaMKII post-synaptic substrate was significantly increased by treatment with 0.1-1 nM ST101, whereas phosphorylation of the pre-synaptic substrate synapsin I (Ser-603) remained unchanged. Notably, enhanced CaMKII autophosphorylation seen following 0.1 nM ST101 treatment was significantly inhibited by pre-treatment with 1 μM mibefradil, a T-type VGCC inhibitor, but not with N-type (ω-conotoxin), P/Q-type (ω-agatoxin) or L-type (nifedipine) VGCC inhibitors. Similarly, 0.1 nM ST101 significantly potentiated long-term potentiation in cortical but not hippocampal slices. Enhanced long-term potentiation in cortical slices was totally inhibited by 1 μM mibefadil treatment. Finally, whole-cell patch-clamp analysis of Neuro2A cells over-expressing recombinant human Ca(V) 3.1 (α1G) T-channels and treated with 0.1 nM ST101 showed significant increases in T-type VGCC currents

  2. EFFECTS OF SUBSCUTE EXPOSURE TO NANOMOLAR CONCENTRATIONS OF METHYLMERCURY ON VOLTAGE-GATES SODIUM AND CALCIUM CURRENTS IN PC12 CELLS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Methylmercury (CH3Hg+) alters the function of voltage-gated Na+ and Ca2+ channels in neuronal preparations following acute, in vitro, exposure. Because the developing nervous system is particularly sensitive to CH3Hg+ neurotoxicity, effects on voltage-gated Na+ (INa) and Ca2+ (IC...

  3. Inhibition of Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels After Subchronic and Repeated Exposure of PC12 Cells to Different Classes of Insecticides.

    PubMed

    Meijer, Marieke; Brandsema, Joske A R; Nieuwenhuis, Desirée; Wijnolts, Fiona M J; Dingemans, Milou M L; Westerink, Remco H S

    2015-10-01

    We previously demonstrated that acute inhibition of voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) is a common mode of action for (sub)micromolar concentrations of chemicals, including insecticides. However, because human exposure to chemicals is usually chronic and repeated, we investigated if selected insecticides from different chemical classes (organochlorines, organophosphates, pyrethroids, carbamates, and neonicotinoids) also disturb calcium homeostasis after subchronic (24 h) exposure and after a subsequent (repeated) acute exposure. Effects on calcium homeostasis were investigated with single-cell fluorescence (Fura-2) imaging of PC12 cells. Cells were depolarized with high-K(+) saline to study effects of subchronic or repeated exposure on VGCC-mediated Ca(2+) influx. The results demonstrate that except for carbaryl and imidacloprid, all selected insecticides inhibited depolarization (K(+))-evoked Ca(2+) influx after subchronic exposure (IC50's: approximately 1-10 µM) in PC12 cells. These inhibitory effects were not or only slowly reversible. Moreover, repeated exposure augmented the inhibition of the K(+)-evoked increase in intracellular calcium concentration induced by subchronic exposure to cypermethrin, chlorpyrifos, chlorpyrifos-oxon, and endosulfan (IC50's: approximately 0.1-4 µM). In rat primary cortical cultures, acute and repeated chlorpyrifos exposure also augmented inhibition of VGCCs compared with subchronic exposure. In conclusion, compared with subchronic exposure, repeated exposure increases the potency of insecticides to inhibit VGCCs. However, the potency of insecticides to inhibit VGCCs upon repeated exposure was comparable with the inhibition previously observed following acute exposure, with the exception of chlorpyrifos. The data suggest that an acute exposure paradigm is sufficient for screening chemicals for effects on VGCCs and that PC12 cells are a sensitive model for detection of effects on VGCCs.

  4. The mRNA of L-Type Calcium Channel Elevated in Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xi-Tao; Nagaba, Yasushi; Cross, Heide S.; Wrba, Fritz; Zhang, Lin; Guggino, Sandra E.

    2000-01-01

    Previous reports indicate that the mRNA for the cardiac isoform of the voltage-gated L-type calcium channel (α1C) is elevated in colon cancer. The aim of these experiments was to verify that the mRNA for α1C was significantly increased in tumors of two separate populations of patients when compared to normal adjacent mucosa. The second aim was to measure the distribution of α1C using immunocytochemistry in normal human colon and in colon cancer and to determine what might regulate the channel expression. Biopsies were taken from patients with various stages of colon cancer and nearby normal mucosa were used as control. RNA was prepared and mRNA level measured by semiquantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. The mRNA of the calcium channel was compared with other markers including β-actin. The mRNA for α1C was increased significantly in colon cancers compared to nearby adjacent mucosa. Using confocal microscopy α1C was localized mainly at the apical membrane in the surface epithelium of normal human colon with less distribution on the lateral and basal membranes. The channel was localized on the lateral and basal membranes in crypt cells. Calcium channel localization appeared to be nearer nuclei in colon cancer samples, in part because of the smaller size of the cells. Likewise, cultured Caco-2 and T84 cells showed a membrane distribution. Western blotting indicated that α1C protein was increased in nonconfluent cultures of colonic carcinoma cells compared to confluent cells and immunocytochemistry confirms that there is more calcium channel protein in cells that are nonconfluent. We conclude that the increase in mRNA of α1 subunit of the cardiac isoform of the L-type calcium channel may be a useful marker of colon cancer compared to other markers because the increase is large and this increase can be documented on small samples using a simple semiquantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. We found that α1C protein is

  5. Immunolocalization of a voltage-gated calcium channel β subunit in the tentacles and cnidocytes of the Portuguese man-of-war, Physalia physalis.

    PubMed

    Bouchard, Christelle; Anderson, Peter A V

    2014-12-01

    This study investigated the localization of a voltage-gated calcium channel (VGCC) β subunit in the tentacles and cnidocytes of the Portuguese man-of-war using confocal immunocytochemistry. An antibody specific to the Ca(2+) channel β subunit of the Portuguese-man-of-war (PpCaVβ) was generated, and characterized by Western immunoblotting. The antibody labeling was widespread in the ectoderm of cnidosacs of the tentacles. The binding of the antibody on isolated cnidocytes was distributed at the base of the cell and appeared as multiple strong fluorescent plaques located around the basal hemisphere of the cell. The distribution of PpCaVβ in the cnidocyte is consistent with previous studies on other hydrozoans that demonstrated that cnidocytes convey sensory information to other cnidocytes through chemical synapses in which the cnidocyte is pre-synaptic to elements of the animal's nervous system. Importantly and surprisingly, PpCaVβ did not localize to the apical surface of the cnidocyte where the exocytotic events involved in cnidocyst discharge are thought to take place. PMID:25572213

  6. Selectivity filters and cysteine-rich extracellular loops in voltage-gated sodium, calcium, and NALCN channels

    PubMed Central

    Stephens, Robert F.; Guan, W.; Zhorov, Boris S.; Spafford, J. David

    2015-01-01

    How nature discriminates sodium from calcium ions in eukaryotic channels has been difficult to resolve because they contain four homologous, but markedly different repeat domains. We glean clues from analyzing the changing pore region in sodium, calcium and NALCN channels, from single-cell eukaryotes to mammals. Alternative splicing in invertebrate homologs provides insights into different structural features underlying calcium and sodium selectivity. NALCN generates alternative ion selectivity with splicing that changes the high field strength (HFS) site at the narrowest level of the hourglass shaped pore where the selectivity filter is located. Alternative splicing creates NALCN isoforms, in which the HFS site has a ring of glutamates contributed by all four repeat domains (EEEE), or three glutamates and a lysine residue in the third (EEKE) or second (EKEE) position. Alternative splicing provides sodium and/or calcium selectivity in T-type channels with extracellular loops between S5 and P-helices (S5P) of different lengths that contain three or five cysteines. All eukaryotic channels have a set of eight core cysteines in extracellular regions, but the T-type channels have an infusion of 4–12 extra cysteines in extracellular regions. The pattern of conservation suggests a possible pairing of long loops in Domains I and III, which are bridged with core cysteines in NALCN, Cav, and Nav channels, and pairing of shorter loops in Domains II and IV in T-type channel through disulfide bonds involving T-type specific cysteines. Extracellular turrets of increasing lengths in potassium channels (Kir2.2, hERG, and K2P1) contribute to a changing landscape above the pore selectivity filter that can limit drug access and serve as an ion pre-filter before ions reach the pore selectivity filter below. Pairing of extended loops likely contributes to the large extracellular appendage as seen in single particle electron cryo-microscopy images of the eel Nav1 channel. PMID

  7. Calcium influx through L-type channels attenuates skeletal muscle contraction via inhibition of adenylyl cyclases.

    PubMed

    Menezes-Rodrigues, Francisco Sandro; Pires-Oliveira, Marcelo; Duarte, Thiago; Paredes-Gamero, Edgar Julian; Chiavegatti, Tiago; Godinho, Rosely Oliveira

    2013-11-15

    Skeletal muscle contraction is triggered by acetylcholine induced release of Ca(2+) from sarcoplasmic reticulum. Although this signaling pathway is independent of extracellular Ca(2+), L-type voltage-gated calcium channel (Cav) blockers have inotropic effects on frog skeletal muscles which occur by an unknown mechanism. Taking into account that skeletal muscle fiber expresses Ca(+2)-sensitive adenylyl cyclase (AC) isoforms and that cAMP is able to increase skeletal muscle contraction force, we investigated the role of Ca(2+) influx on mouse skeletal muscle contraction and the putative crosstalk between extracellular Ca(2+) and intracellular cAMP signaling pathways. The effects of Cav blockers (verapamil and nifedipine) and extracellular Ca(2+) chelator EGTA were evaluated on isometric contractility of mouse diaphragm muscle under direct electrical stimulus (supramaximal voltage, 2 ms, 0.1 Hz). Production of cAMP was evaluated by radiometric assay while Ca(2+) transients were assessed by confocal microscopy using L6 cells loaded with fluo-4/AM. Ca(2+) channel blockers verapamil and nifedipine had positive inotropic effect, which was mimicked by removal of extracellular Ca(+2) with EGTA or Ca(2+)-free Tyrode. While phosphodiesterase inhibitor IBMX potentiates verapamil positive inotropic effect, it was abolished by AC inhibitors SQ22536 and NYK80. Finally, the inotropic effect of verapamil was associated with increased intracellular cAMP content and mobilization of intracellular Ca(2+), indicating that positive inotropic effects of Ca(2+) blockers depend on cAMP formation. Together, our results show that extracellular Ca(2+) modulates skeletal muscle contraction, through inhibition of Ca(2+)-sensitive AC. The cross-talk between extracellular calcium and cAMP-dependent signaling pathways appears to regulate the extent of skeletal muscle contraction responses.

  8. Calcium-activated and voltage-gated potassium channels of the pancreatic islet impart distinct and complementary roles during secretagogue induced electrical responses

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, David A; Mendez, Felipe; Thompson, Michael; Torres, Jacqueline; Cochet, Olivia; Philipson, Louis H

    2010-01-01

    Glucose-induced β-cell action potential (AP) repolarization is regulated by potassium efflux through voltage gated (Kv) and calcium activated (KCa) potassium channels. Thus, ablation of the primary Kv channel of the β-cell, Kv2.1, causes increased AP duration. However, Kv2.1−/− islet electrical activity still remains sensitive to the potassium channel inhibitor tetraethylammonium. Therefore, we utilized Kv2.1−/− islets to characterize Kv and KCa channels and their respective roles in modulating the β-cell AP. The remaining Kv current present in Kv2.1−/−β-cells is inhibited with 5 μm CP 339818. Inhibition of the remaining Kv current in Kv2.1−/− mouse β-cells increased AP firing frequency by 39.6% but did not significantly enhance glucose stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS). The modest regulation of islet AP frequency by CP 339818 implicates other K+ channels, possibly KCa channels, in regulating AP repolarization. Blockade of the KCa channel BK with slotoxin increased β-cell AP amplitude by 28.2%, whereas activation of BK channels with isopimaric acid decreased β-cell AP amplitude by 30.6%. Interestingly, the KCa channel SK significantly contributes to Kv2.1−/− mouse islet AP repolarization. Inhibition of SK channels decreased AP firing frequency by 66% and increased AP duration by 67% only when Kv2.1 is ablated or inhibited and enhanced GSIS by 2.7-fold. Human islets also express SK3 channels and their β-cell AP frequency is significantly accelerated by 4.8-fold with apamin. These results uncover important repolarizing roles for both Kv and KCa channels and identify distinct roles for SK channel activity in regulating calcium- versus sodium-dependent AP firing. PMID:20643768

  9. The effects of piracetam and its novel peptide analogue GVS-111 on neuronal voltage-gated calcium and potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Solntseva, E I; Bukanova, J V; Ostrovskaya, R U; Gudasheva, T A; Voronina, T A; Skrebitsky, V G

    1997-07-01

    1. With the use of the two-microelectrode voltage-clamp method, three types of voltage-activated ionic currents were examined in isolated neurons of the snail Helix pomatia: high-threshold Ca2+ current (ICa), high-threshold Ca(2+)-dependent K+ current (IK(Ca)) and high-threshold K+ current independent of Ca2+ (IK(V)). 2. The effect of bath application of the nootropics piracetam and a novel piracetam peptide analog, ethyl ester of N-phenyl-acetyl-L-prolyl-glycine (GVS-111), on these three types of voltage-activated ionic currents was studied. 3. In more than half of the tested cells, ICa was resistant to both piracetam and GVS-111. In the rest of the cells, ICa decreased 19 +/- 7% with 2 mM of piracetam and 39 +/- 14% with 2 microM of GVS-111. 4. IK(V) in almost all cells tested was resistant to piracetam at concentrations up to 2 mM. However, IK(V) in two-thirds of the cells was sensitive to GVS-111, being suppressed 49 +/- 18% with 1 microM GVS-111. 5. IK(Ca) appeared to be the most sensitive current of those studied to both piracetam and GVS-111. Piracetam at 1 mM and GVS-111 at 0.1 microM decreased the amplitude of IK(Ca) in most of the cells examined by 49 +/- 19% and 69 +/- 24%, respectively. 6. The results suggest that piracetam and GVS-111 suppression of voltage-activated calcium and potassium currents of the neuronal membrane may regulate (both up and down) Ca2+ influx into neurons. PMID:9195198

  10. Calcium-Activated SK Channels Influence Voltage-Gated Ion Channels to Determine the Precision of Firing in Globus Pallidus Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Deister, Christopher A.; Chan, C. Savio; Surmeier, D. James; Wilson, Charles J.

    2012-01-01

    Globus pallidus (GP) neurons fire rhythmically in the absence of synaptic input, suggesting that they may encode their inputs as changes in the phase of their rhythmic firing. Action potential afterhyperpolarization (AHP) enhances precision of firing by ensuring that the ion channels recover from inactivation by the same amount on each cycle. Voltage-clamp experiments in slices showed that the longest component of the GP neuron’s AHP is blocked by apamin, a selective antagonist of calcium-activated SK channels. Application of 100 nm apamin also disrupted the precision of firing in perforated-patch and cell-attached recordings. SK channel blockade caused a small depolarization in spike threshold and made it more variable, but there was no reduction in the maximal rate of rise during an action potential. Thus, the firing irregularity was not caused solely by a reduction in voltage-gated Na+ channel availability. Subthreshold voltage ramps triggered a large outward current that was sensitive to the initial holding potential and had properties similar to the A-type K+ current in GP neurons. In numerical simulations, the availability of both Na+ and A-type K+ channels during autonomous firing were reduced when SK channels were removed, and a nearly equal reduction in Na+ and K+ subthreshold-activated ion channel availability produced a large decrease in the neuron’s slope conductance near threshold. This change made the neuron more sensitive to intrinsically generated noise. In vivo, this change would also enhance the sensitivity of GP neurons to small synaptic inputs. PMID:19571136

  11. Coactivation of metabotropic glutamate receptors and of voltage-gated calcium channels induces long-term depression in cerebellar Purkinje cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Daniel, H; Hemart, N; Jaillard, D; Crepel, F

    1992-01-01

    Using an in vitro slice preparation, we studied the effects, on parallel fiber (PF)-mediated EPSPs, of coactivation of metabotropic-glutamate receptors and of voltage-gated calcium (Ca) channels of Purkinje cells (PCs) by bath application of 50 microM trans-1-amino-cyclopentyl-1,3-dicarboxylate (trans-ACPD) and by direct depolarization of the cells, respectively. These effects were compared with changes in synaptic efficacy obtained when alpha-amino-3hydroxy-5-methylisoxalone-4-propionate (AMPA) receptors of PCs were also activated through stimulation of PFs during the pairing protocol, as well as when similar experiments were performed without trans-ACPD in the bath. In a control medium, pairing for 1 min of PF-mediated EPSPs evoked at 1 Hz with Ca spikes evoked by steady depolarization of PCs (n = 13) led to LTD of synaptic transmission in 9 cases whereas for the others EPSPs were not affected. No LTD occurred in 9 out of 10 other cells tested when PF stimulation was omitted during the 1 min period of Ca spike firing of PCs. Bath application of 50 microM trans-ACPD, in conjunction with the same pairing protocol as before (n = 8), led to a significantly larger LTD of PF-mediated EPSPs after washing out of this drug. Moreover, a clear-cut LTD of PF-mediated EPSPs was also observed in 5 of the 8 other cells, when PF stimulation was omitted during Ca spike firing in the presence of trans-ACPD.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Role of glycine residues highly conserved in the S2-S3 linkers of domains I and II of voltage-gated calcium channel alpha(1) subunits.

    PubMed

    Teng, Jinfeng; Iida, Kazuko; Ito, Masanori; Izumi-Nakaseko, Hiroko; Kojima, Itaru; Adachi-Akahane, Satomi; Iida, Hidetoshi

    2010-05-01

    The pore-forming component of voltage-gated calcium channels, alpha(1) subunit, contains four structurally conserved domains (I-IV), each of which contains six transmembrane segments (S1-S6). We have shown previously that a Gly residue in the S2-S3 linker of domain III is completely conserved from yeasts to humans and important for channel activity. The Gly residues in the S2-S3 linkers of domains I and II, which correspond positionally to the Gly in the S2-S3 linker of domain III, are also highly conserved. Here, we investigated the role of the Gly residues in the S2-S3 linkers of domains I and II of Ca(v)1.2. Each of the Gly residues was replaced with Glu or Gln to produce mutant Ca(v)1.2s; G182E, G182Q, G579E, G579Q, and the resulting mutants were transfected into BHK6 cells. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings showed that current-voltage relationships of the four mutants were the same as those of wild-type Ca(v)1.2. However, G182E and G182Q showed significantly smaller current densities because of mislocalization of the mutant proteins, suggesting that Gly(182) in domain I is involved in the membrane trafficking or surface expression of alpha(1) subunit. On the other hand, G579E showed a slower voltage-dependent current inactivation (VDI) compared to Ca(v)1.2, although G579Q showed a normal VDI, implying that Gly(579) in domain II is involved in the regulation of VDI and that the incorporation of a negative charge alters the VDI kinetics. Our findings indicate that the two conserved Gly residues are important for alpha(1) subunit to become functional.

  13. L-type Calcium Channel Auto-Regulation of Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Satin, Jonathan; Schroder, Elizabeth A.; Crump, Shawn M.

    2011-01-01

    L-type calcium channels (LTCC) impact the function of nearly all excitable cells. The classical LTCC function is to mediate trans-sarcolemmal Ca2+ flux. This review focuses on the contribution of a mobile segment of the LTCC that regulates ion channel function, and also serves as a regulator of transcription in the nucleus. Specifically we highlight recent work demonstrating an auto-feedback regulatory pathway whereby the LTCC transcription factor regulates the LTCC. Also discussed is acute and long-term regulation of function by the LTCC-transcription regulator. PMID:21295347

  14. α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazoleproprionic acid receptor activation protects against phencyclidine-induced caspase-3 activity by activating voltage-gated calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Timpe, Jennifer M; Wang, Cheng Z; Kim, Jisoo; Johnson, Kenneth M

    2014-12-01

    Phencyclidine (PCP) is a noncompetitive, open channel blocker of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-ion channel complex. When administered to immature animals, it is known to cause apoptotic neurodegeneration in several regions, and this is followed by olanzapine-sensitive, schizophrenia-like behaviors in late adolescence and adulthood. Clarification of its mechanism of action could yield data that would help to inform the treatment of schizophrenia. In our initial experiments, we found that α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazoleproprionic acid (AMPA) inhibited PCP-induced apoptosis in organotypic neonatal rat brain slices in a concentration-dependent and 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione-sensitive manner. Calcium signaling pathways are widely implicated in apoptosis, and PCP prevents calcium influx through NMDA receptor channels. We therefore hypothesized that AMPA could protect against this effect by activation of voltage-dependent calcium channels (VDCCs). In support of this hypothesis, pretreatment with the calcium channel blocker cadmium chloride eliminated AMPA-mediated protection against PCP. Furthermore, the L-type VDCC inhibitor nifedipine (10 µM) fully abrogated the effects of AMPA, suggesting that L-type VDCCs are required for AMPA-mediated protection against PCP-induced neurotoxicity. Whereas the P/Q-type inhibitor ω-agatoxin TK (200 nM) reduced AMPA protection by 51.7%, the N-type VDCC inhibitor ω-conotoxin (2 µM) had no effect. Decreased AMPA-mediated protection following cotreatment with K252a, a TrkB inhibitor, suggests that brain-derived neurotrophic factor signaling plays an important role. By analogy, these results suggest that activation of L-type, and to a lesser extent P/Q-type, VDCCs might be advantageous in treating conditions associated with diminished NMDAergic activity during early development. PMID:24995437

  15. L-type calcium channel modulates cystic kidney phenotype.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xingjian; Muntean, Brian S; Aal-Aaboda, Munaf S; Duan, Qiming; Zhou, Jing; Nauli, Surya M

    2014-09-01

    In polycystic kidney disease (PKD), abnormal proliferation and genomic instability of renal epithelia have been associated with cyst formation and kidney enlargement. We recently showed that L-type calcium channel (CaV1.2) is localized to primary cilia of epithelial cells. Previous studies have also shown that low intracellular calcium level was associated with the hyperproliferation phenotype in the epithelial cells. However, the relationship between calcium channel and cystic kidney phenotype is largely unknown. In this study, we generated cells with somatic deficient Pkd1 or Pkd2 to examine ciliary CaV1.2 function via lentiviral knockdown or pharmacological verapamil inhibition. Although inhibition of CaV1.2 expression or function did not change division and growth patterns in wild-type epithelium, it led to hyperproliferation and polyploidy in mutant cells. Lack of CaV1.2 in Pkd mutant cells also decreased the intracellular calcium level. This contributed to a decrease in CaM kinase activity, which played a significant role in regulating Akt and Erk signaling pathways. Consistent with our in vitro results, CaV1.2 knockdown in zebrafish and Pkd1 heterozygous mice facilitated the formation of kidney cysts. Larger cysts were developed faster in Pkd1 heterozygous mice with CaV1.2 knockdown. Overall, our findings emphasized the importance of CaV1.2 expression in kidneys with somatic Pkd mutation. We further suggest that CaV1.2 could serve as a modifier gene to cystic kidney phenotype.

  16. Aging Reduces L-Type Calcium Channel Current and the Vasodilatory Response of Small Mesenteric Arteries to Calcium Channel Blockers

    PubMed Central

    Albarwani, Sulayma A.; Mansour, Fathi; Khan, Abdul Aleem; Al-Lawati, Intisar; Al-Kaabi, Abdulla; Al-Busaidi, Al-Manar; Al-Hadhrami, Safa; Al-Husseini, Isehaq; Al-Siyabi, Sultan; Tanira, Musbah O.

    2016-01-01

    Calcium channel blockers (CCBs) are widely used to treat cardiovascular disease (CVD) including hypertension. As aging is an independent risk factor for CVD, the use of CCBs increases with increasing age. Hence, this study was designed to evaluate the effect of aging on the sensitivity of small mesenteric arteries to L-type voltage-gated calcium channel (LTCC) blockers and also to investigate whether there was a concomitant change in calcium current density. Third order mesenteric arteries from male F344 rats, aged 2.5–3 months (young) and 22–26 months (old) were mounted on wire myograph to measure the tension during isometric contraction. Arteries were contracted with 100 mM KCl and were then relaxed in a cumulative concentration-response dependent manner with nifedipine (0.1 nM–1 μM), verapamil (0.1 nM–10 μM), or diltiazem (0.1 nM–10 μM). Relaxation-concentration response curves produced by cumulative concentrations of three different CCBs in arteries of old rats were shifted to the right with statistically significant IC50s. pIC50 ± s.e.m: (8.37 ± 0.06 vs. 8.04 ± 0.05, 7.40 ± 0.07 vs. 6.81 ± 0.04, and 6.58 ± 0.07 vs. 6.34 ± 0.06) in young vs. old. It was observed that the maximal contractions induced by phenylephrine and reversed by sodium nitroprusside were not different between young and old groups. However, Bay K 8644 (1 μM) increased resting tension by 23 ± 4.8% in young arteries and 4.7 ± 1.6% in old arteries. LTCC current density were also significantly lower in old arteries (−2.77 ± 0.45 pA/pF) compared to young arteries (−4.5 ± 0.40 pA/pF); with similar steady-state activation and inactivation curves. Parallel to this reduction, the expression of Cav1.2 protein was reduced by 57 ± 5% in arteries from old rats compared to those from young rats. In conclusion, our results suggest that aging reduces the response of small mesenteric arteries to the vasodilatory effect of the CCBs and this may be due to, at least in part, reduced

  17. Dopamine midbrain neurons in health and Parkinson's disease: emerging roles of voltage-gated calcium channels and ATP-sensitive potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Dragicevic, E; Schiemann, J; Liss, B

    2015-01-22

    Dopamine (DA) releasing midbrain neurons are essential for multiple brain functions, such as voluntary movement, working memory, emotion and cognition. DA midbrain neurons within the substantia nigra (SN) and the ventral tegmental area (VTA) exhibit a variety of distinct axonal projections and cellular properties, and are differentially affected in diseases like schizophrenia, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and Parkinson's disease (PD). Apart from having diverse functions in health and disease states, DA midbrain neurons display distinct electrical activity patterns, crucial for DA release. These activity patterns are generated and modulated by specific sets of ion channels. Recently, two ion channels have been identified, not only contributing to these activity patterns and to functional properties of DA midbrain neurons, but also seem to render SN DA neurons particularly vulnerable to degeneration in PD and its animal models: L-type calcium channels (LTCCs) and ATP-sensitive potassium channels (K-ATPs). In this review, we focus on the emerging physiological and pathophysiological roles of these two ion channels (and their complex interplay with other ion channels), particularly in highly vulnerable SN DA neurons, as selective degeneration of these neurons causes the major motor symptoms of PD. PMID:25450964

  18. Dopamine midbrain neurons in health and Parkinson's disease: emerging roles of voltage-gated calcium channels and ATP-sensitive potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Dragicevic, E; Schiemann, J; Liss, B

    2015-01-22

    Dopamine (DA) releasing midbrain neurons are essential for multiple brain functions, such as voluntary movement, working memory, emotion and cognition. DA midbrain neurons within the substantia nigra (SN) and the ventral tegmental area (VTA) exhibit a variety of distinct axonal projections and cellular properties, and are differentially affected in diseases like schizophrenia, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and Parkinson's disease (PD). Apart from having diverse functions in health and disease states, DA midbrain neurons display distinct electrical activity patterns, crucial for DA release. These activity patterns are generated and modulated by specific sets of ion channels. Recently, two ion channels have been identified, not only contributing to these activity patterns and to functional properties of DA midbrain neurons, but also seem to render SN DA neurons particularly vulnerable to degeneration in PD and its animal models: L-type calcium channels (LTCCs) and ATP-sensitive potassium channels (K-ATPs). In this review, we focus on the emerging physiological and pathophysiological roles of these two ion channels (and their complex interplay with other ion channels), particularly in highly vulnerable SN DA neurons, as selective degeneration of these neurons causes the major motor symptoms of PD.

  19. TMEM16A is associated with voltage-gated calcium channels in mouse retina and its function is disrupted upon mutation of the auxiliary α2δ4 subunit

    PubMed Central

    Caputo, Antonella; Piano, Ilaria; Demontis, Gian Carlo; Bacchi, Niccolò; Casarosa, Simona; Santina, Luca Della; Gargini, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Photoreceptors rely upon highly specialized synapses to efficiently transmit signals to multiple postsynaptic targets. Calcium influx in the presynaptic terminal is mediated by voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCC). This event triggers neurotransmitter release, but also gates calcium-activated chloride channels (TMEM), which in turn regulate VGCC activity. In order to investigate the relationship between VGCC and TMEM channels, we analyzed the retina of wild type (WT) and Cacna2d4 mutant mice, in which the VGCC auxiliary α2δ4 subunit carries a nonsense mutation, disrupting the normal channel function. Synaptic terminals of mutant photoreceptors are disarranged and synaptic proteins as well as TMEM16A channels lose their characteristic localization. In parallel, calcium-activated chloride currents are impaired in rods, despite unaltered TMEM16A protein levels. Co-immunoprecipitation revealed the interaction between VGCC and TMEM16A channels in the retina. Heterologous expression of these channels in tsA-201 cells showed that TMEM16A associates with the CaV1.4 subunit, and the association persists upon expression of the mutant α2δ4 subunit. Collectively, our experiments show association between TMEM16A and the α1 subunit of VGCC. Close proximity of these channels allows optimal function of the photoreceptor synaptic terminal under physiological conditions, but also makes TMEM16A channels susceptible to changes occurring to calcium channels. PMID:26557056

  20. Stimulation of Synaptic Vesicle Exocytosis by the Mental Disease Gene DISC1 is Mediated by N-Type Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Willcyn; Thevathasan, Jervis Vermal; Lin, Qingshu; Lim, Kim Buay; Kuroda, Keisuke; Kaibuchi, Kozo; Bilger, Marcel; Soong, Tuck Wah; Fivaz, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Lesions and mutations of the DISC1 (Disrupted-in-schizophrenia-1) gene have been linked to major depression, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and autism, but the influence of DISC1 on synaptic transmission remains poorly understood. Using two independent genetic approaches—RNAi and a DISC1 KO mouse—we examined the impact of DISC1 on the synaptic vesicle (SV) cycle by population imaging of the synaptic tracer vGpH in hippocampal neurons. DISC1 loss-of-function resulted in a marked decrease in SV exocytic rates during neuronal stimulation and was associated with reduced Ca2+ transients at nerve terminals. Impaired SV release was efficiently rescued by elevation of extracellular Ca2+, hinting at a link between DISC1 and voltage-gated Ca2+ channels. Accordingly, blockade of N-type Cav2.2 channels mimics and occludes the effect of DISC1 inactivation on SV exocytosis, and overexpression of DISC1 in a heterologous system increases Cav2.2 currents. Collectively, these results show that DISC1-dependent enhancement of SV exocytosis is mediated by Cav2.2 and point to aberrant glutamate release as a probable endophenotype of major psychiatric disorders. PMID:27378904

  1. Essential, completely conserved glycine residue in the domain III S2-S3 linker of voltage-gated calcium channel alpha1 subunits in yeast and mammals.

    PubMed

    Iida, Kazuko; Teng, Jinfeng; Tada, Tomoko; Saka, Ayaka; Tamai, Masumi; Izumi-Nakaseko, Hiroko; Adachi-Akahane, Satomi; Iida, Hidetoshi

    2007-08-31

    Voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (VGCCs) mediate the influx of Ca2+ that regulates many cellular events, and mutations in VGCC genes cause serious hereditary diseases in mammals. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has only one gene encoding the putative pore-forming alpha1 subunit of VGCC, CCH1. Here, we identify a cch1 allele producing a completely nonfunctional Cch1 protein with a Gly1265 to Glu substitution present in the domain III S2-S3 cytoplasmic linker. Comparison of amino acid sequences of this linker among 58 VGCC alpha1 subunits from 17 species reveals that a Gly residue whose position corresponds to that of the Cch1 Gly1265 is completely conserved from yeasts to humans. Systematic amino acid substitution analysis using 10 amino acids with different chemical and structural properties indicates that the Gly1265 is essential for Cch1 function because of the smallest residue volume. Replacement of the Gly959 residue of a rat brain Cav1.2 alpha1 subunit (rbCII), positionally corresponding to the yeast Cch1 Gly1265, with Glu, Ser, Lys, or Ala results in the loss of Ba2+ currents, as revealed by the patch clamp method. These results suggest that the Gly residue in the domain III S2-S3 linker is functionally indispensable from yeasts to mammals. Because the Gly residue has never been studied in any VGCC, these findings provide new insights into the structure-function relationships of VGCCs.

  2. Stimulation of Synaptic Vesicle Exocytosis by the Mental Disease Gene DISC1 is Mediated by N-Type Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels.

    PubMed

    Tang, Willcyn; Thevathasan, Jervis Vermal; Lin, Qingshu; Lim, Kim Buay; Kuroda, Keisuke; Kaibuchi, Kozo; Bilger, Marcel; Soong, Tuck Wah; Fivaz, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Lesions and mutations of the DISC1 (Disrupted-in-schizophrenia-1) gene have been linked to major depression, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and autism, but the influence of DISC1 on synaptic transmission remains poorly understood. Using two independent genetic approaches-RNAi and a DISC1 KO mouse-we examined the impact of DISC1 on the synaptic vesicle (SV) cycle by population imaging of the synaptic tracer vGpH in hippocampal neurons. DISC1 loss-of-function resulted in a marked decrease in SV exocytic rates during neuronal stimulation and was associated with reduced Ca(2+) transients at nerve terminals. Impaired SV release was efficiently rescued by elevation of extracellular Ca(2+), hinting at a link between DISC1 and voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels. Accordingly, blockade of N-type Cav2.2 channels mimics and occludes the effect of DISC1 inactivation on SV exocytosis, and overexpression of DISC1 in a heterologous system increases Cav2.2 currents. Collectively, these results show that DISC1-dependent enhancement of SV exocytosis is mediated by Cav2.2 and point to aberrant glutamate release as a probable endophenotype of major psychiatric disorders. PMID:27378904

  3. Complex regulation of voltage-dependent activation and inactivation properties of retinal voltage-gated Cav1.4 L-type Ca2+ channels by Ca2+-binding protein 4 (CaBP4).

    PubMed

    Shaltiel, Lior; Paparizos, Christos; Fenske, Stefanie; Hassan, Sami; Gruner, Christian; Rötzer, Katrin; Biel, Martin; Wahl-Schott, Christian A

    2012-10-19

    Cav1.4 L-type Ca(2+) channels are crucial for synaptic transmission in retinal photoreceptors and bipolar neurons. Recent studies suggest that the activity of this channel is regulated by the Ca(2+)-binding protein 4 (CaBP4). In the present study, we explored this issue by examining functional effects of CaBP4 on heterologously expressed Cav1.4. We show that CaBP4 dramatically increases Cav1.4 channel availability. This effect crucially depends on the presence of the C-terminal ICDI (inhibitor of Ca(2+)-dependent inactivation) domain of Cav1.4 and is absent in a Cav1.4 mutant lacking the ICDI. Using FRET experiments, we demonstrate that CaBP4 interacts with the IQ motif of Cav1.4 and that it interferes with the binding of the ICDI domain. Based on these findings, we suggest that CaBP4 increases Cav1.4 channel availability by relieving the inhibitory effects of the ICDI domain on voltage-dependent Cav1.4 channel gating. We also functionally characterized two CaBP4 mutants that are associated with a congenital variant of human night blindness and other closely related nonstationary retinal diseases. Although both mutants interact with Cav1.4 channels, the functional effects of CaBP4 mutants are only partially preserved, leading to a reduction of Cav1.4 channel availability and loss of function. In conclusion, our study sheds new light on the functional interaction between CaBP4 and Cav1.4. Moreover, it provides insights into the mechanism by which CaBP4 mutants lead to loss of Cav1.4 function and to retinal disease. PMID:22936811

  4. Syntaxin-3 Binds and Regulates Both R- and L-Type Calcium Channels in Insulin-Secreting INS-1 832/13 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Li; Dolai, Subhankar; Kang, Youhou; Liang, Tao; Xie, Huanli; Qin, Tairan; Yang, Lu; Chen, Liangyi; Gaisano, Herbert Y.

    2016-01-01

    Syntaxin (Syn)-1A mediates exocytosis of predocked insulin-containing secretory granules (SGs) during first-phase glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) in part via its interaction with plasma membrane (PM)-bound L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (Cav). In contrast, Syn-3 mediates exocytosis of newcomer SGs that accounts for second-phase GSIS. We now hypothesize that the newcomer SG Syn-3 preferentially binds and modulates R-type Cav opening, which was postulated to mediate second-phase GSIS. Indeed, glucose-stimulation of pancreatic islet β-cell line INS-1 induced a predominant increase in interaction between Syn-3 and Cavα1 pore-forming subunits of R-type Cav2.3 and to lesser extent L-type Cavs, while confirming the preferential interactions between Syn-1A with L-type (Cav1.2, Cav1.3) Cavs. Consistently, direct binding studies employing heterologous HEK cells confirmed that Syn-3 preferentially binds Cav2.3, whereas Syn-1A prefers L-type Cavs. We then used siRNA knockdown (KD) of Syn-3 in INS-1 to study the endogenous modulatory actions of Syn-3 on Cav channels. Syn-3 KD enhanced Ca2+ currents by 46% attributed mostly to R- and L-type Cavs. Interestingly, while the transmembrane domain of Syn-1A is the putative functional domain modulating Cav activity, it is the cytoplasmic domain of Syn-3 that appears to modulate Cav activity. We conclude that Syn-3 may mimic Syn-1A in the ability to bind and modulate Cavs, but preferring Cav2.3 to perhaps participate in triggering fusion of newcomer insulin SGs during second-phase GSIS. PMID:26848587

  5. Voltage-Gated Hydrophobic Nanopores

    SciTech Connect

    Lavrik, Nickolay V

    2011-01-01

    Hydrophobicity is a fundamental property that is responsible for numerous physical and biophysical aspects of molecular interactions in water. Peculiar behavior is expected for water in the vicinity of hydrophobic structures, such as nanopores. Indeed, hydrophobic nanopores can be found in two distinct states, dry and wet, even though the latter is thermodynamically unstable. Transitions between these two states are kinetically hindered in long pores but can be much faster in shorter pores. As it is demonstrated for the first time in this paper, these transitions can be induced by applying a voltage across a membrane with a single hydrophobic nanopore. Such voltage-induced gating in single nanopores can be realized in a reversible manner through electrowetting of inner walls of the nanopores. The resulting I-V curves of such artificial hydrophobic nanopores mimic biological voltage-gated channels.

  6. Voltage-gated Proton Channels

    PubMed Central

    DeCoursey, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    Voltage-gated proton channels, HV1, have vaulted from the realm of the esoteric into the forefront of a central question facing ion channel biophysicists, namely the mechanism by which voltage-dependent gating occurs. This transformation is the result of several factors. Identification of the gene in 2006 revealed that proton channels are homologues of the voltage-sensing domain of most other voltage-gated ion channels. Unique, or at least eccentric, properties of proton channels include dimeric architecture with dual conduction pathways, perfect proton selectivity, a single-channel conductance ~103 smaller than most ion channels, voltage-dependent gating that is strongly modulated by the pH gradient, ΔpH, and potent inhibition by Zn2+ (in many species) but an absence of other potent inhibitors. The recent identification of HV1 in three unicellular marine plankton species has dramatically expanded the phylogenetic family tree. Interest in proton channels in their own right has increased as important physiological roles have been identified in many cells. Proton channels trigger the bioluminescent flash of dinoflagellates, facilitate calcification by coccolithophores, regulate pH-dependent processes in eggs and sperm during fertilization, secrete acid to control the pH of airway fluids, facilitate histamine secretion by basophils, and play a signaling role in facilitating B-cell receptor mediated responses in B lymphocytes. The most elaborate and best-established functions occur in phagocytes, where proton channels optimize the activity of NADPH oxidase, an important producer of reactive oxygen species. Proton efflux mediated by HV1 balances the charge translocated across the membrane by electrons through NADPH oxidase, minimizes changes in cytoplasmic and phagosomal pH, limits osmotic swelling of the phagosome, and provides substrate H+ for the production of H2O2 and HOCl, reactive oxygen species crucial to killing pathogens. PMID:23798303

  7. Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanck, Dorothy A.; Fozzard, Harry A.

    Voltage-gated sodium channels subserve regenerative excitation throughout the nervous system, as well as in skeletal and cardiac muscle. This excitation results from a voltage-dependent mechanism that increases regeneratively and selectively the sodium conductance of the channel e-fold for a 4-7 mV depolarization of the membrane with time constants in the range of tens of microseconds. Entry of Na+ into the cell without a companion anion depolarizes the cell. This depolarization, called the action potential, is propagated at rates of 1-20 meters/sec. In nerve it subserves rapid transmission of information and, in muscle cells, coordinates the trigger for contraction. Sodium-dependent action potentials depolarize the membrane to inside positive values of about 30-40 mV (approaching the electrochemical potential for the transmembrane sodium gradient). Repolarization to the resting potential (usually between -60 and -90 mV) occurs because of inactivation (closure) of sodium channels, which is assisted in different tissues by variable amounts of activation of voltage-gated potassium channels. This sequence results in all-or-nothing action potentials in nerve and fast skeletal muscle of 1-2 ms duration, and in heart muscle of 100-300 ms duration. Recovery of regenerative excitation, i.e., recovery of the ability of sodium channels to open, occurs after restoration of the resting potential with time constants of a few to several hundreds of milliseconds, depending on the channel isoform, and this rate controls the minimum interval for repetitive action potentials (refractory period).

  8. Voltage-gated proton channels.

    PubMed

    Decoursey, Thomas E

    2012-04-01

    Voltage-gated proton channels, HV1, have vaulted from the realm of the esoteric into the forefront of a central question facing ion channel biophysicists, namely, the mechanism by which voltage-dependent gating occurs. This transformation is the result of several factors. Identification of the gene in 2006 revealed that proton channels are homologues of the voltage-sensing domain of most other voltage-gated ion channels. Unique, or at least eccentric, properties of proton channels include dimeric architecture with dual conduction pathways, perfect proton selectivity, a single-channel conductance approximately 10(3) times smaller than most ion channels, voltage-dependent gating that is strongly modulated by the pH gradient, ΔpH, and potent inhibition by Zn(2+) (in many species) but an absence of other potent inhibitors. The recent identification of HV1 in three unicellular marine plankton species has dramatically expanded the phylogenetic family tree. Interest in proton channels in their own right has increased as important physiological roles have been identified in many cells. Proton channels trigger the bioluminescent flash of dinoflagellates, facilitate calcification by coccolithophores, regulate pH-dependent processes in eggs and sperm during fertilization, secrete acid to control the pH of airway fluids, facilitate histamine secretion by basophils, and play a signaling role in facilitating B-cell receptor mediated responses in B-lymphocytes. The most elaborate and best-established functions occur in phagocytes, where proton channels optimize the activity of NADPH oxidase, an important producer of reactive oxygen species. Proton efflux mediated by HV1 balances the charge translocated across the membrane by electrons through NADPH oxidase, minimizes changes in cytoplasmic and phagosomal pH, limits osmotic swelling of the phagosome, and provides substrate H(+) for the production of H2O2 and HOCl, reactive oxygen species crucial to killing pathogens.

  9. Hydrogen peroxide mediates oxidant-dependent stimulation of arterial smooth muscle L-type calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Chaplin, Nathan L; Amberg, Gregory C

    2012-05-01

    Changes in calcium and redox homeostasis influence multiple cellular processes. Dysregulation of these signaling modalities is associated with pathology in cardiovascular, neuronal, endocrine, and other physiological systems. Calcium and oxidant signaling mechanisms are frequently inferred to be functionally related. To address and clarify this clinically relevant issue in the vasculature we tested the hypothesis that the ubiquitous reactive oxygen molecule hydrogen peroxide mediates oxidant-dependent stimulation of cerebral arterial smooth muscle L-type calcium channels. Using a combinatorial approach including intact arterial manipulations, electrophysiology, and total internal reflection fluorescence imaging, we found that application of physiological levels of hydrogen peroxide to isolated arterial smooth muscle cells increased localized calcium influx through L-type calcium channels. Similarly, oxidant-dependent stimulation of L-type calcium channels by the vasoconstrictor ANG II was abolished by intracellular application of catalase. Catalase also prevented ANG II from increasing localized subplasmalemmal sites of increased oxidation previously associated with colocalized calcium influx through L-type channels. Furthermore, catalase largely attenuated the contractile response of intact cerebral arterial segments to ANG II. In contrast, enhanced dismutation of superoxide to hydrogen peroxide with SOD had no effect on ANG II-dependent stimulation of L-type calcium channels. From these data we conclude that hydrogen peroxide is important for oxidant-dependent regulation of smooth muscle L-type calcium channels and arterial function. These data also support the emerging concept of hydrogen peroxide as a biologically relevant oxidant second messenger in multiple cell types with a diverse array of physiological functions.

  10. Rhynchophylline-induced vasodilation in human mesenteric artery is mainly due to blockage of L-type calcium channels in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Peng-Yun; Zeng, Xiao-Rong; Cheng, Jun; Wen, Jing; Inoue, Isao; Yang, Yan

    2013-11-01

    Rhynchophylline (Rhy) is a pharmacologically active substance isolated from Uncaria rhynchophylla which has been used to treat cardiovascular diseases and has drawn considerable attention in recent years for its antihypertensive activities. We investigated the actions of Rhy on endothelium-denuded human mesenteric artery by tension measurement and its actions on high conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels (BKCa) currents and calcium currents (ICa) in freshly isolated smooth muscle cells using perforated patch clamp technique. Intracellular Ca(2+) level was measured in Fura-2-loaded cells. Rhy inhibited both the KCl and BayK-evoked mesenteric artery constrictions in a dose-dependent manner. K(+) channel blockers (TEA, glibenclamide, IbTX, and 4-AP) did not affect the vasorelaxing effect of Rhy. Rhy inhibited L-type voltage-gated Ca(2+) current (ICa,L) but had no significant effect on macroscopic BKCa current. Rhy preincubation markedly reduced the elevation of [Ca(2+)]i level induced by KCl depolarization. Caffeine-stimulated [Ca(2+)]i elevation was also decreased to some extent by pretreatment with Rhy for 20 min. Our results show that Rhy relaxes smooth muscles of human mesenteric resistance arteries, mainly due to inhibition of Ca(2+) influx by blockage of L-type Ca(2+) channels and thereby the decrease in [Ca(2+)]i. PMID:23812676

  11. Post-transcriptional modifications and “Calmodulation” of voltage-gated calcium channel function: Reflections by two collaborators of David T Yue

    PubMed Central

    Soong, Tuck Wah; Mori, Masayuki X

    2016-01-01

    This review article is written to specially pay tribute to David T. Yue who was an outstanding human being and an excellent scientist who exuded passion and creativity. He exemplified an inter-disciplinary scientist who was able to cross scientific boundaries effortlessly in order to provide amazing understanding on how calcium channels work. This article provides a glimpse of some of the research the authors have the privilege to collaborate with David and it attempts to provide the thinking behind some of the research done. In a wider context, we highlight that calcium channel function could be exquisitely modulated by interaction with a tethered calmodulin. Post-transcriptional modifications such as alternative splicing and RNA editing further influence the Ca2+-CaM mediated processes such as calcium dependent inhibition and/or facilitation. Besides modifications of electrophysiological and pharmacological properties, protein interactions with the channels could also be influenced in a splice-variant dependent manner. PMID:26054929

  12. Cardiovascular effects of CPU-23, a novel L-type calcium channel blocker with a unique molecular structure

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Hui; Earle, Mary L; Jiang, Yanfen; Loutzenhiser, Kathy A; Triggle, Christopher R

    1997-01-01

    antihypertensive and cardiac depressant effects due primarily to its action on L-type voltage-gated calcium channels. PMID:9421272

  13. L-type calcium channel β subunit modulates angiotensin II responses in cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Hermosilla, Tamara; Moreno, Cristian; Itfinca, Mircea; Altier, Christophe; Armisén, Ricardo; Stutzin, Andres; Zamponi, Gerald W; Varela, Diego

    2011-01-01

    Angiotensin II regulation of L-type calcium currents in cardiac muscle is controversial and the underlying signaling events are not completely understood. Moreover, the possible role of auxiliary subunit composition of the channels in Angiotensin II modulation of L-type calcium channels has not yet been explored. In this work we study the role of Ca(v)β subunits and the intracellular signaling responsible for L-type calcium current modulation by Angiotensin II. In cardiomyocytes, Angiotensin II exposure induces rapid inhibition of L-type current with a magnitude that is correlated with the rate of current inactivation. Semi-quantitative PCR of cardiomyocytes at different days of culture reveals changes in the Ca(v)β subunits expression pattern that are correlated with the rate of current inactivation and with Angiotensin II effect. Over-expression of individual b subunits in heterologous systems reveals that the magnitude of Angiotensin II inhibition is dependent on the Ca(v)β subunit isoform, with Ca(v)β(1b) containing channels being more strongly regulated. Ca(v)β(2a) containing channels were insensitive to modulation and this effect was partially due to the N-terminal palmitoylation sites of this subunit. Moreover, PLC or diacylglycerol lipase inhibition prevents the Angiotensin II effect on L-type calcium channels, while PKC inhibition with chelerythrine does not, suggesting a role of arachidonic acid in this process. Finally, we show that in intact cardiomyocytes the magnitude of calcium transients on spontaneous beating cells is modulated by Angiotensin II in a Ca(v)β subunit-dependent manner. These data demonstrate that Ca(v)β subunits alter the magnitude of inhibition of L-type current by Angiotensin II. PMID:21525790

  14. Altered expression of the voltage-gated calcium channel subunit α2δ-1: A comparison between two experimental models of epilepsy and a sensory nerve ligation model of neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Nieto-Rostro, M.; Sandhu, G.; Bauer, C.S.; Jiruska, P.; Jefferys, J.G.R.; Dolphin, A.C.

    2014-01-01

    The auxiliary α2δ-1 subunit of voltage-gated calcium channels is up-regulated in dorsal root ganglion neurons following peripheral somatosensory nerve damage, in several animal models of neuropathic pain. The α2δ-1 protein has a mainly presynaptic localization, where it is associated with the calcium channels involved in neurotransmitter release. Relevant to the present study, α2δ-1 has been shown to be the therapeutic target of the gabapentinoid drugs in their alleviation of neuropathic pain. These drugs are also used in the treatment of certain epilepsies. In this study we therefore examined whether the level or distribution of α2δ-1 was altered in the hippocampus following experimental induction of epileptic seizures in rats, using both the kainic acid model of human temporal lobe epilepsy, in which status epilepticus is induced, and the tetanus toxin model in which status epilepticus is not involved. The main finding of this study is that we did not identify somatic overexpression of α2δ-1 in hippocampal neurons in either of the epilepsy models, unlike the upregulation of α2δ-1 that occurs following peripheral nerve damage to both somatosensory and motor neurons. However, we did observe local reorganization of α2δ-1 immunostaining in the hippocampus only in the kainic acid model, where it was associated with areas of neuronal cell loss, as indicated by absence of NeuN immunostaining, dendritic loss, as identified by areas where microtubule-associated protein-2 immunostaining was missing, and reactive gliosis, determined by regions of strong OX42 staining. PMID:24641886

  15. Discovery of novel bridged tetrahydronaphthalene derivatives as potent T/L-type calcium channel blockers.

    PubMed

    Renneberg, Dorte; Hubler, Francis; Rey, Markus; Hess, Patrick; Delahaye, Stephane; Gatfield, John; Iglarz, Marc; Hilpert, Kurt

    2015-09-15

    Chemical evolution of mibefradil resulted in the identification of novel bridged tetrahydronaphthalene derivatives as potent T/L-type calcium channel blockers. A SAR study, in vitro and in vivo DMPK properties as well as the in vivo antihypertensive effect in rats are presented.

  16. [Discovering L-type calcium channels inhibitors of antihypertensive drugs based on drug repositioning].

    PubMed

    Liang, Ying-xi; He, Yu-su; Jiang, Lu-di; Yue, Qiao-xin; Cui, Shuai; Bin, Li; Ye, Xiao-tong; Zhang, Xiao-hua; Zhang, Yang-ling

    2015-09-01

    This study was amid to construct the pharmacophore model of L-type calcium channel antagonist in the application of screening Drugbank and TCMD. This paper repositions the approved drugs resulting from virtual screening and discusses the relocation-based drug discovery methods, screening antihypertensive drugs with L-type calcium channel function from TCMD. Qualitative hypotheses wre generated by HipHop separately on the basis of 12 compounds with antagonistic action on L-type calcium channel expressed in rabbit cardiac muscle. Datebase searching method was used to evaluate the generated hypotheses. The optimum hypothesis was used to search Drugbank and TCMD. This paper repositions the approved drugs and evaluates the antihypertensive effect of the chemical constituent of traditional Chinese medicine resulting from virtual screening by the matching score and literature. The results showed that optimum qualitative hypothesis is with six features, which were two hydrogen-bond acceptors, four hydrophobic groups, and the CAI value of 2.78. Screening Drugbank achieves 93 approved drugs. Screening TCMD achieves 285 chemical constituents of traditional Chinese medicine. It was concluded that the hypothesis is reliable and can be used to screen datebase. The approved drugs resulting from virtual screening, such as pravastatin, are potentially L-type calcium channels inhibitors. The chemical constituents of traditional Chinese medicine, such as Arctigenin III and Arctigenin are potentially antihypertensive drugs. It indicates that Drug Repositioning based on hypothesis is possible. PMID:26983215

  17. [Discovering L-type calcium channels inhibitors of antihypertensive drugs based on drug repositioning].

    PubMed

    Liang, Ying-xi; He, Yu-su; Jiang, Lu-di; Yue, Qiao-xin; Cui, Shuai; Bin, Li; Ye, Xiao-tong; Zhang, Xiao-hua; Zhang, Yang-ling

    2015-09-01

    This study was amid to construct the pharmacophore model of L-type calcium channel antagonist in the application of screening Drugbank and TCMD. This paper repositions the approved drugs resulting from virtual screening and discusses the relocation-based drug discovery methods, screening antihypertensive drugs with L-type calcium channel function from TCMD. Qualitative hypotheses wre generated by HipHop separately on the basis of 12 compounds with antagonistic action on L-type calcium channel expressed in rabbit cardiac muscle. Datebase searching method was used to evaluate the generated hypotheses. The optimum hypothesis was used to search Drugbank and TCMD. This paper repositions the approved drugs and evaluates the antihypertensive effect of the chemical constituent of traditional Chinese medicine resulting from virtual screening by the matching score and literature. The results showed that optimum qualitative hypothesis is with six features, which were two hydrogen-bond acceptors, four hydrophobic groups, and the CAI value of 2.78. Screening Drugbank achieves 93 approved drugs. Screening TCMD achieves 285 chemical constituents of traditional Chinese medicine. It was concluded that the hypothesis is reliable and can be used to screen datebase. The approved drugs resulting from virtual screening, such as pravastatin, are potentially L-type calcium channels inhibitors. The chemical constituents of traditional Chinese medicine, such as Arctigenin III and Arctigenin are potentially antihypertensive drugs. It indicates that Drug Repositioning based on hypothesis is possible.

  18. The cardiac L-type calcium channel distal carboxy terminus autoinhibition is regulated by calcium.

    PubMed

    Crump, Shawn M; Andres, Douglas A; Sievert, Gail; Satin, Jonathan

    2013-02-01

    The L-type calcium channel (LTCC) provides trigger Ca(2+) for sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca-release, and LTCC function is influenced by interacting proteins including the LTCC distal COOH terminus (DCT) and calmodulin. DCT is proteolytically cleaved and reassociates with the LTCC complex to regulate calcium channel function. DCT reduces LTCC barium current (I(Ba,L)) in reconstituted channel complexes, yet the contribution of DCT to LTCC Ca(2+) current (I(Ca,L)) in cardiomyocyte systems is unexplored. This study tests the hypothesis that DCT attenuates cardiomyocyte I(Ca,L). We measured LTCC current and Ca(2+) transients with DCT coexpressed in murine cardiomyocytes. We also heterologously coexpressed DCT and Ca(V)1.2 constructs with truncations corresponding to the predicted proteolytic cleavage site, Ca(V)1.2Δ1801, and a shorter deletion corresponding to well-studied construct, Ca(V)1.2Δ1733. DCT inhibited I(Ba,L) in cardiomyocytes, and in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells expressing Ca(V)1.2Δ1801 and Ca(V)1.2Δ1733. Ca(2+)-CaM relieved DCT block in cardiomyocytes and HEK cells. The selective block of I(Ba,L) combined with Ca(2+)-CaM effects suggested that DCT-mediated blockade may be relieved under conditions of elevated Ca(2+). We therefore tested the hypothesis that DCT block is dynamic, increasing under relatively low Ca(2+), and show that DCT reduced diastolic Ca(2+) at low stimulation frequencies but spared high frequency Ca(2+) entry. DCT reduction of diastolic Ca(2+) and relief of block at high pacing frequencies and under conditions of supraphysiological bath Ca(2+) suggests that a physiological function of DCT is to increase the dynamic range of Ca(2+) transients in response to elevated pacing frequencies. Our data motivate the new hypothesis that DCT is a native reverse use-dependent inhibitor of LTCC current.

  19. The N-terminal domain tethers the voltage-gated calcium channel β2e-subunit to the plasma membrane via electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions.

    PubMed

    Miranda-Laferte, Erick; Ewers, David; Guzman, Raul E; Jordan, Nadine; Schmidt, Silke; Hidalgo, Patricia

    2014-04-11

    The β-subunit associates with the α1 pore-forming subunit of high voltage-activated calcium channels and modulates several aspects of ion conduction. Four β-subunits are encoded by four different genes with multiple splice variants. Only two members of this family, β2a and β2e, associate with the plasma membrane in the absence of the α1-subunit. Palmitoylation on a di-cysteine motif located at the N terminus of β2a promotes membrane targeting and correlates with the unique ability of this protein to slow down inactivation. In contrast, the mechanism by which β2e anchors to the plasma membrane remains elusive. Here, we identified an N-terminal segment in β2e encompassing a cluster of positively charged residues, which is strictly required for membrane anchoring, and when transferred to the cytoplasmic β1b isoform it confers membrane localization to the latter. In the presence of negatively charged phospholipid vesicles, this segment binds to acidic liposomes dependently on the ionic strength, and the intrinsic fluorescence emission maxima of its single tryptophan blue shifts considerably. Simultaneous substitution of more than two basic residues impairs membrane targeting. Coexpression of the fast inactivating R-type calcium channels with wild-type β2e, but not with a β2e membrane association-deficient mutant, slows down inactivation. We propose that a predicted α-helix within this domain orienting parallel to the membrane tethers the β2e-subunit to the lipid bilayer via electrostatic interactions. Penetration of the tryptophan side chain into the lipidic core stabilizes the membrane-bound conformation. This constitutes a new mechanism for membrane anchoring among the β-subunit family that also sustains slowed inactivation.

  20. Myoscape controls cardiac calcium cycling and contractility via regulation of L-type calcium channel surface expression.

    PubMed

    Eden, Matthias; Meder, Benjamin; Völkers, Mirko; Poomvanicha, Montatip; Domes, Katrin; Branchereau, M; Marck, P; Will, Rainer; Bernt, Alexander; Rangrez, Ashraf; Busch, Matthias; Hrabě de Angelis, Martin; Heymes, Christophe; Rottbauer, Wolfgang; Most, Patrick; Hofmann, Franz; Frey, Norbert

    2016-01-01

    Calcium signalling plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of heart failure. Here we describe a cardiac protein named Myoscape/FAM40B/STRIP2, which directly interacts with the L-type calcium channel. Knockdown of Myoscape in cardiomyocytes decreases calcium transients associated with smaller Ca(2+) amplitudes and a lower diastolic Ca(2+) content. Likewise, L-type calcium channel currents are significantly diminished on Myoscape ablation, and downregulation of Myoscape significantly reduces contractility of cardiomyocytes. Conversely, overexpression of Myoscape increases global Ca(2+) transients and enhances L-type Ca(2+) channel currents, and is sufficient to restore decreased currents in failing cardiomyocytes. In vivo, both Myoscape-depleted morphant zebrafish and Myoscape knockout (KO) mice display impairment of cardiac function progressing to advanced heart failure. Mechanistically, Myoscape-deficient mice show reduced L-type Ca(2+)currents, cell capacity and calcium current densities as a result of diminished LTCC surface expression. Finally, Myoscape expression is reduced in hearts from patients suffering of terminal heart failure, implying a role in human disease. PMID:27122098

  1. Glucocorticoids specifically enhance L-type calcium current amplitude and affect calcium channel subunit expression in the mouse hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Chameau, Pascal; Qin, Yongjun; Spijker, Sabine; Smit, August Benjamin; Smit, Guus; Joëls, Marian

    2007-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that corticosterone enhances whole cell calcium currents in CA1 pyramidal neurons, through a pathway involving binding of glucocorticoid receptor homodimers to the DNA. We examined whether glucocorticoids show selectivity for L- over N-type of calcium currents. Moreover, we addressed the putative gene targets that eventually lead to the enhanced calcium currents. Electrophysiological recordings were performed in nucleated patches that allow excellent voltage control. Calcium currents in these patches almost exclusively involve N- and L-type channels. We found that L- but not N-type calcium currents were largely enhanced after treatment with a high dose of corticosterone sufficient to activate glucocorticoid receptors. Voltage dependency and kinetic properties of the currents were unaffected by the hormone. Nonstationary noise analysis suggests that the increased current is not caused by a larger unitary conductance, but rather to a doubling of the number of functional channels. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed that transcripts of the Ca(v)1 subunits encoding for the N- or L-type calcium channels are not upregulated in the mouse CA1 area; instead, a strong, direct, and consistent upregulation of the beta4 subunit was observed. This indicates that the corticosteroid-induced increase in number of L-type calcium channels is not caused by a simple transcriptional regulation of the pore-forming subunit of the channels.

  2. Cytoplasmic location of α1A voltage-gated calcium channel C-terminal fragment (Cav2.1-CTF) aggregate is sufficient to cause cell death.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Makoto; Obayashi, Masato; Ishiguro, Taro; Sato, Nozomu; Niimi, Yusuke; Ozaki, Kokoro; Mogushi, Kaoru; Mahmut, Yasen; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Tsuruta, Fuminori; Dolmetsch, Ricardo; Yamada, Mitsunori; Takahashi, Hitoshi; Kato, Takeo; Mori, Osamu; Eishi, Yoshinobu; Mizusawa, Hidehiro; Ishikawa, Kinya

    2013-01-01

    The human α1A voltage-dependent calcium channel (Cav2.1) is a pore-forming essential subunit embedded in the plasma membrane. Its cytoplasmic carboxyl(C)-tail contains a small poly-glutamine (Q) tract, whose length is normally 4∼19 Q, but when expanded up to 20∼33Q, the tract causes an autosomal-dominant neurodegenerative disorder, spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6). A recent study has shown that a 75-kDa C-terminal fragment (CTF) containing the polyQ tract remains soluble in normal brains, but becomes insoluble mainly in the cytoplasm with additional localization to the nuclei of human SCA6 Purkinje cells. However, the mechanism by which the CTF aggregation leads to neurodegeneration is completely elusive, particularly whether the CTF exerts more toxicity in the nucleus or in the cytoplasm. We tagged recombinant (r)CTF with either nuclear-localization or nuclear-export signal, created doxycyclin-inducible rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cell lines, and found that the CTF is more toxic in the cytoplasm than in the nucleus, the observations being more obvious with Q28 (disease range) than with Q13 (normal-length). Surprisingly, the CTF aggregates co-localized both with cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) and phosphorylated-CREB (p-CREB) in the cytoplasm, and Western blot analysis showed that the quantity of CREB and p-CREB were both decreased in the nucleus when the rCTF formed aggregates in the cytoplasm. In human brains, polyQ aggregates also co-localized with CREB in the cytoplasm of SCA6 Purkinje cells, but not in other conditions. Collectively, the cytoplasmic Cav2.1-CTF aggregates are sufficient to cause cell death, and one of the pathogenic mechanisms may be abnormal CREB trafficking in the cytoplasm and reduced CREB and p-CREB levels in the nuclei. PMID:23505410

  3. Functional importance of T-type voltage-gated calcium channels in the cardiovascular and renal system: news from the world of knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Pernille B L

    2015-02-15

    Over the years, it has been discussed whether T-type calcium channels Cav3 play a role in the cardiovascular and renal system. T-type channels have been reported to play an important role in renal hemodynamics, contractility of resistance vessels, and pacemaker activity in the heart. However, the lack of highly specific blockers cast doubt on the conclusions. As new T-type channel antagonists are being designed, the roles of T-type channels in cardiovascular and renal pathology need to be elucidated before T-type blockers can be clinically useful. Two types of T-type channels, Cav3.1 and Cav3.2, are expressed in blood vessels, the kidney, and the heart. Studies with gene-deficient mice have provided a way to investigate the Cav3.1 and Cav3.2 channels and their role in the cardiovascular system. This review discusses the results from these knockout mice. Evaluation of the literature leads to the conclusion that Cav3.1 and Cav3.2 channels have important, but different, functions in mice. T-type Cav3.1 channels affect heart rate, whereas Cav3.2 channels are involved in cardiac hypertrophy. In the vascular system, Cav3.2 activation leads to dilation of blood vessels, whereas Cav3.1 channels are mainly suggested to affect constriction. The Cav3.1 channel is also involved in neointima formation following vascular damage. In the kidney, Cav3.1 regulates plasma flow and Cav3.2 plays a role setting glomerular filtration rate. In conclusion, Cav3.1 and Cav3.2 are new therapeutic targets in several cardiovascular pathologies, but the use of T-type blockers should be specifically directed to the disease and to the channel subtype.

  4. Cytoplasmic Location of α1A Voltage-Gated Calcium Channel C-Terminal Fragment (Cav2.1-CTF) Aggregate Is Sufficient to Cause Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Makoto; Obayashi, Masato; Ishiguro, Taro; Sato, Nozomu; Niimi, Yusuke; Ozaki, Kokoro; Mogushi, Kaoru; Mahmut, Yasen; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Tsuruta, Fuminori; Dolmetsch, Ricardo; Yamada, Mitsunori; Takahashi, Hitoshi; Kato, Takeo; Mori, Osamu; Eishi, Yoshinobu; Mizusawa, Hidehiro; Ishikawa, Kinya

    2013-01-01

    The human α1A voltage-dependent calcium channel (Cav2.1) is a pore-forming essential subunit embedded in the plasma membrane. Its cytoplasmic carboxyl(C)-tail contains a small poly-glutamine (Q) tract, whose length is normally 4∼19 Q, but when expanded up to 20∼33Q, the tract causes an autosomal-dominant neurodegenerative disorder, spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6). A recent study has shown that a 75-kDa C-terminal fragment (CTF) containing the polyQ tract remains soluble in normal brains, but becomes insoluble mainly in the cytoplasm with additional localization to the nuclei of human SCA6 Purkinje cells. However, the mechanism by which the CTF aggregation leads to neurodegeneration is completely elusive, particularly whether the CTF exerts more toxicity in the nucleus or in the cytoplasm. We tagged recombinant (r)CTF with either nuclear-localization or nuclear-export signal, created doxycyclin-inducible rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cell lines, and found that the CTF is more toxic in the cytoplasm than in the nucleus, the observations being more obvious with Q28 (disease range) than with Q13 (normal-length). Surprisingly, the CTF aggregates co-localized both with cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) and phosphorylated-CREB (p-CREB) in the cytoplasm, and Western blot analysis showed that the quantity of CREB and p-CREB were both decreased in the nucleus when the rCTF formed aggregates in the cytoplasm. In human brains, polyQ aggregates also co-localized with CREB in the cytoplasm of SCA6 Purkinje cells, but not in other conditions. Collectively, the cytoplasmic Cav2.1-CTF aggregates are sufficient to cause cell death, and one of the pathogenic mechanisms may be abnormal CREB trafficking in the cytoplasm and reduced CREB and p-CREB levels in the nuclei. PMID:23505410

  5. Activity of Palythoa caribaeorum Venom on Voltage-Gated Ion Channels in Mammalian Superior Cervical Ganglion Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Lazcano-Pérez, Fernando; Castro, Héctor; Arenas, Isabel; García, David E.; González-Muñoz, Ricardo; Arreguín-Espinosa, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    The Zoanthids are an order of cnidarians whose venoms and toxins have been poorly studied. Palythoa caribaeorum is a zoanthid commonly found around the Mexican coastline. In this study, we tested the activity of P. caribaeorum venom on voltage-gated sodium channel (NaV1.7), voltage-gated calcium channel (CaV2.2), the A-type transient outward (IA) and delayed rectifier (IDR) currents of KV channels of the superior cervical ganglion (SCG) neurons of the rat. These results showed that the venom reversibly delays the inactivation process of voltage-gated sodium channels and inhibits voltage-gated calcium and potassium channels in this mammalian model. The compounds responsible for these effects seem to be low molecular weight peptides. Together, these results provide evidence for the potential use of zoanthids as a novel source of cnidarian toxins active on voltage-gated ion channels. PMID:27164140

  6. Activity of Palythoa caribaeorum Venom on Voltage-Gated Ion Channels in Mammalian Superior Cervical Ganglion Neurons.

    PubMed

    Lazcano-Pérez, Fernando; Castro, Héctor; Arenas, Isabel; García, David E; González-Muñoz, Ricardo; Arreguín-Espinosa, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    The Zoanthids are an order of cnidarians whose venoms and toxins have been poorly studied. Palythoa caribaeorum is a zoanthid commonly found around the Mexican coastline. In this study, we tested the activity of P. caribaeorum venom on voltage-gated sodium channel (NaV1.7), voltage-gated calcium channel (CaV2.2), the A-type transient outward (IA) and delayed rectifier (IDR) currents of KV channels of the superior cervical ganglion (SCG) neurons of the rat. These results showed that the venom reversibly delays the inactivation process of voltage-gated sodium channels and inhibits voltage-gated calcium and potassium channels in this mammalian model. The compounds responsible for these effects seem to be low molecular weight peptides. Together, these results provide evidence for the potential use of zoanthids as a novel source of cnidarian toxins active on voltage-gated ion channels. PMID:27164140

  7. The CaVβ Subunit Protects the I-II Loop of the Voltage-gated Calcium Channel CaV2.2 from Proteasomal Degradation but Not Oligoubiquitination.

    PubMed

    Page, Karen M; Rothwell, Simon W; Dolphin, Annette C

    2016-09-23

    CaVβ subunits interact with the voltage-gated calcium channel CaV2.2 on a site in the intracellular loop between domains I and II (the I-II loop). This interaction influences the biophysical properties of the channel and leads to an increase in its trafficking to the plasma membrane. We have shown previously that a mutant CaV2.2 channel that is unable to bind CaVβ subunits (CaV2.2 W391A) was rapidly degraded (Waithe, D., Ferron, L., Page, K. M., Chaggar, K., and Dolphin, A. C. (2011) J. Biol. Chem. 286, 9598-9611). Here we show that, in the absence of CaVβ subunits, a construct consisting of the I-II loop of CaV2.2 was directly ubiquitinated and degraded by the proteasome system. Ubiquitination could be prevented by mutation of all 12 lysine residues in the I-II loop to arginines. Including a palmitoylation motif at the N terminus of CaV2.2 I-II loop was insufficient to target it to the plasma membrane in the absence of CaVβ subunits even when proteasomal degradation was inhibited with MG132 or ubiquitination was prevented by the lysine-to-arginine mutations. In the presence of CaVβ subunit, the palmitoylated CaV2.2 I-II loop was protected from degradation, although oligoubiquitination could still occur, and was efficiently trafficked to the plasma membrane. We propose that targeting to the plasma membrane requires a conformational change in the I-II loop that is induced by binding of the CaVβ subunit. PMID:27489103

  8. The CaVβ Subunit Protects the I-II Loop of the Voltage-gated Calcium Channel CaV2.2 from Proteasomal Degradation but Not Oligoubiquitination*

    PubMed Central

    Page, Karen M.; Rothwell, Simon W.; Dolphin, Annette C.

    2016-01-01

    CaVβ subunits interact with the voltage-gated calcium channel CaV2.2 on a site in the intracellular loop between domains I and II (the I-II loop). This interaction influences the biophysical properties of the channel and leads to an increase in its trafficking to the plasma membrane. We have shown previously that a mutant CaV2.2 channel that is unable to bind CaVβ subunits (CaV2.2 W391A) was rapidly degraded (Waithe, D., Ferron, L., Page, K. M., Chaggar, K., and Dolphin, A. C. (2011) J. Biol. Chem. 286, 9598–9611). Here we show that, in the absence of CaVβ subunits, a construct consisting of the I-II loop of CaV2.2 was directly ubiquitinated and degraded by the proteasome system. Ubiquitination could be prevented by mutation of all 12 lysine residues in the I-II loop to arginines. Including a palmitoylation motif at the N terminus of CaV2.2 I-II loop was insufficient to target it to the plasma membrane in the absence of CaVβ subunits even when proteasomal degradation was inhibited with MG132 or ubiquitination was prevented by the lysine-to-arginine mutations. In the presence of CaVβ subunit, the palmitoylated CaV2.2 I-II loop was protected from degradation, although oligoubiquitination could still occur, and was efficiently trafficked to the plasma membrane. We propose that targeting to the plasma membrane requires a conformational change in the I-II loop that is induced by binding of the CaVβ subunit. PMID:27489103

  9. Prolactin stimulates the L-type calcium channel-mediated transepithelial calcium transport in the duodenum of male rats.

    PubMed

    Dorkkam, Nitita; Wongdee, Kannikar; Suntornsaratoon, Panan; Krishnamra, Nateetip; Charoenphandhu, Narattaphol

    2013-01-11

    Elevated plasma levels of prolactin (PRL) have been reported in several physiological and pathological conditions, such as lactation, prolactinoma, and dopaminergic antipsychotic drug uses. Although PRL is a calcium-regulating hormone that stimulates intestinal calcium absorption in lactating rats, whether PRL is capable of stimulating calcium absorption in male rats has been elusive. Herein, the transepithelial calcium transport and electrical characteristics were determined in ex vivo duodenal tissues of male rats by Ussing chamber technique. We found that PRL receptors were abundantly present in the basolateral membrane of the duodenal epithelial cells. PRL (200-800 ng/mL) markedly increased the active duodenal calcium transport in a dose-dependent fashion without effect on the transepithelial resistance. The PRL-enhanced active duodenal calcium transport was completely abolished by L-type calcium channel blocker (nifedipine) as well as inhibitors of the major basolateral calcium transporters, namely plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase and Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger. Several intracellular mediators, such as JAK2, MEK, PI3K and Src kinase, were involved in the PRL-enhanced transcellular calcium transport. Moreover, PRL also stimulated the paracellular calcium transport in the duodenum of male rats in a PI3K-dependent manner. In conclusion, PRL appeared to be a calcium-regulating hormone in male rats by enhancing the L-type calcium channel-mediated transcellular and the paracellular passive duodenal calcium transport. This phenomenon could help restrict or alleviate negative calcium balance and osteoporosis that often accompany hyperprolactinemia in male patients. PMID:23206706

  10. Functional heterogeneity of the four voltage sensors of a human L-type calcium channel

    PubMed Central

    Pantazis, Antonios; Savalli, Nicoletta; Sigg, Daniel; Neely, Alan; Olcese, Riccardo

    2014-01-01

    Excitation-evoked Ca2+ influx is the fastest and most ubiquitous chemical trigger for cellular processes, including neurotransmitter release, muscle contraction, and gene expression. The voltage dependence and timing of Ca2+ entry are thought to be functions of voltage-gated calcium (CaV) channels composed of a central pore regulated by four nonidentical voltage-sensing domains (VSDs I–IV). Currently, the individual voltage dependence and the contribution to pore opening of each VSD remain largely unknown. Using an optical approach (voltage-clamp fluorometry) to track the movement of the individual voltage sensors, we discovered that the four VSDs of CaV1.2 channels undergo voltage-evoked conformational rearrangements, each exhibiting distinct voltage- and time-dependent properties over a wide range of potentials and kinetics. The voltage dependence and fast kinetic components in the activation of VSDs II and III were compatible with the ionic current properties, suggesting that these voltage sensors are involved in CaV1.2 activation. This view is supported by an obligatory model, in which activation of VSDs II and III is necessary to open the pore. When these data were interpreted in view of an allosteric model, where pore opening is intrinsically independent but biased by VSD activation, VSDs II and III were each found to supply ∼50 meV (∼2 kT), amounting to ∼85% of the total energy, toward stabilizing the open state, with a smaller contribution from VSD I (∼16 meV). VSD IV did not appear to participate in channel opening. PMID:25489110

  11. Block of L-type calcium channels by charged dihydropyridines. Sensitivity to side of application and calcium

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    We have studied block of L-type calcium channels by intracellular and extracellular application of the ionized dihydropyridine derivatives amlodipine and SDZ 207-180. We find that extracellular application of either drug causes voltage-dependent block of calcium channels. However, neither drug is effective when applied intracellularly. The insensitivity of calcium channels to intracellular drug is not due to the low concentrations of cytosolic calcium, because voltage-dependent block by ionized amlodipine, SDZ 207-180, and the neutral drug nisoldipine persists under conditions in which Ca0 is buffered by EGTA. In fact, the time course of the development of block by the ionized but not neutral drug molecules studied, is slower in the presence than in the absence of calcium. Our results indicate that the DHP binding site of the L-type calcium channel is close to the extracellular surface of the cell membrane and that ionized DHP molecules may interact with the receptor in a manner that is uniquely affected by calcium. PMID:1658191

  12. Activation of L-type calcium channels is required for gap junction-mediated intercellular calcium signaling in osteoblastic cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorgensen, Niklas Rye; Teilmann, Stefan Cuoni; Henriksen, Zanne; Civitelli, Roberto; Sorensen, Ole Helmer; Steinberg, Thomas H.

    2003-01-01

    The propagation of mechanically induced intercellular calcium waves (ICW) among osteoblastic cells occurs both by activation of P2Y (purinergic) receptors by extracellular nucleotides, resulting in "fast" ICW, and by gap junctional communication in cells that express connexin43 (Cx43), resulting in "slow" ICW. Human osteoblastic cells transmit intercellular calcium signals by both of these mechanisms. In the current studies we have examined the mechanism of slow gap junction-dependent ICW in osteoblastic cells. In ROS rat osteoblastic cells, gap junction-dependent ICW were inhibited by removal of extracellular calcium, plasma membrane depolarization by high extracellular potassium, and the L-type voltage-operated calcium channel inhibitor, nifedipine. In contrast, all these treatments enhanced the spread of P2 receptor-mediated ICW in UMR rat osteoblastic cells. Using UMR cells transfected to express Cx43 (UMR/Cx43) we confirmed that nifedipine sensitivity of ICW required Cx43 expression. In human osteoblastic cells, gap junction-dependent ICW also required activation of L-type calcium channels and influx of extracellular calcium.

  13. Hydrogen Sulfide Inhibits L-Type Calcium Currents Depending upon the Protein Sulfhydryl State in Rat Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Haojan; Tang, Chaoshu; Jin, Hongfang; Du, Junbao

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a novel gasotransmitter that inhibits L-type calcium currents (I Ca, L). However, the underlying molecular mechanisms are unclear. In particular, the targeting site in the L-type calcium channel where H2S functions remains unknown. The study was designed to investigate if the sulfhydryl group could be the possible targeting site in the L-type calcium channel in rat cardiomyocytes. Cardiac function was measured in isolated perfused rat hearts. The L-type calcium currents were recorded by using a whole cell voltage clamp technique on the isolated cardiomyocytes. The L-type calcium channel containing free sulfhydryl groups in H9C2 cells were measured by using Western blot. The results showed that sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS, an H2S donor) produced a negative inotropic effect on cardiac function, which could be partly inhibited by the oxidant sulfhydryl modifier diamide (DM). H2S donor inhibited the peak amplitude of I Ca, L in a concentration-dependent manner. However, dithiothreitol (DTT), a reducing sulfhydryl modifier markedly reversed the H2S donor-induced inhibition of I Ca, L in cardiomyocytes. In contrast, in the presence of DM, H2S donor could not alter cardiac function and L type calcium currents. After the isolated rat heart or the cardiomyocytes were treated with DTT, NaHS could markedly alter cardiac function and L-type calcium currents in cardiomyocytes. Furthermore, NaHS could decrease the functional free sulfhydryl group in the L-type Ca2+ channel, which could be reversed by thiol reductant, either DTT or reduced glutathione. Therefore, our results suggest that H2S might inhibit L-type calcium currents depending on the sulfhydryl group in rat cardiomyocytes. PMID:22590646

  14. Mechanism of Electromechanical Coupling in Voltage-Gated Potassium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Blunck, Rikard; Batulan, Zarah

    2012-01-01

    Voltage-gated ion channels play a central role in the generation of action potentials in the nervous system. They are selective for one type of ion – sodium, calcium, or potassium. Voltage-gated ion channels are composed of a central pore that allows ions to pass through the membrane and four peripheral voltage sensing domains that respond to changes in the membrane potential. Upon depolarization, voltage sensors in voltage-gated potassium channels (Kv) undergo conformational changes driven by positive charges in the S4 segment and aided by pairwise electrostatic interactions with the surrounding voltage sensor. Structure-function relations of Kv channels have been investigated in detail, and the resulting models on the movement of the voltage sensors now converge to a consensus; the S4 segment undergoes a combined movement of rotation, tilt, and vertical displacement in order to bring 3–4e+ each through the electric field focused in this region. Nevertheless, the mechanism by which the voltage sensor movement leads to pore opening, the electromechanical coupling, is still not fully understood. Thus, recently, electromechanical coupling in different Kv channels has been investigated with a multitude of techniques including electrophysiology, 3D crystal structures, fluorescence spectroscopy, and molecular dynamics simulations. Evidently, the S4–S5 linker, the covalent link between the voltage sensor and pore, plays a crucial role. The linker transfers the energy from the voltage sensor movement to the pore domain via an interaction with the S6 C-termini, which are pulled open during gating. In addition, other contact regions have been proposed. This review aims to provide (i) an in-depth comparison of the molecular mechanisms of electromechanical coupling in different Kv channels; (ii) insight as to how the voltage sensor and pore domain influence one another; and (iii) theoretical predictions on the movement of the cytosolic face of the Kv channels during

  15. Aging-associated changes in L-type calcium channels in the left atria of dogs

    PubMed Central

    GAN, TIAN-YI; QIAO, WEIWEI; XU, GUO-JUN; ZHOU, XIAN-HUI; TANG, BAO-PENG; SONG, JIAN-GUO; LI, YAO-DONG; ZHANG, JIAN; LI, FA-PENG; MAO, TING; JIANG, TAO

    2013-01-01

    Action potential (AP) contours vary considerably between the fibers of normal adult and aged left atria. The underlying ionic and molecular mechanisms that mediate these differences remain unknown. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the L-type calcium current (ICa.L) and the L-type Ca2+ channel of the left atria may be altered with age to contribute to atrial fibrillation (AF). Two groups of mongrel dogs (normal adults, 2–2.5 years old and older dogs, >8 years old) were used in this study. The inducibility of AF was quantitated using the cumulative window of vulnerability (WOV). A whole-cell patch-clamp was used to record APs and ICa.L in left atrial (LA) cells obtained from the two groups of dogs. Protein and mRNA expression levels of the a1C (Cav1.2) subunit of the L-type calcium channel were assessed using western blotting and quantitative PCR (qPCR), respectively. Although the resting potential, AP amplitude and did not differ with age, the plateau potential was more negative and the APD90 was longer in the aged cells compared with that in normal adult cells. Aged LA cells exhibited lower peak ICa.L current densities than normal adult LA cells (P<0.05). In addition, the Cav1.2 mRNA and protein expression levels in LA cells were decreased in the aged group compared with those in the normal adult group. The lower AP plateau potential and the decreased ICa.L of LA cells in aged dogs may contribute to the slow and discontinuous conduction of the left atria. Furthermore, the reduction of the expression levels of Cav1.2 with age may be the molecular mechanism that mediates the decline in ICa.L with increasing age. PMID:24137290

  16. Voltage-gated potassium+ channel expression in coronary artery smooth muscle cells of SHR and WKY.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhi; Ma, Aiqun; Zhang, Yushun; Xi, Yutao; Fan, Lihong; Wang, Tingzhong; Zhang, Tingting

    2014-12-01

    This study aims to compare the expression of genes and the molecular characteristic of voltage-gated K(+) channels, which make great effort in maintaining and controlling smooth muscle contraction, cellular membrane potential, and intracellular calcium ion currents in artery smooth muscle cells of SHR and WKY. Expression of potassium ions family in coronary artery was detected through reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction quantitatively. Significant levels of voltage-gated K(+) channels α1.2, α1.5, and β1.1 expression were all proved to be significantly higher in smooth muscles of SHR than WKY. Whole-cell voltage-gated K(+) channel currents were larger in SHR artery smooth muscles than the ones of WKY. Moreover, the voltage dependence of voltage-gated potassium channel activation was more negative in artery smooth muscle of SHR than that of WKY, while voltage dependence of availability was not different. The above diversity of voltage-gated potassium channel detected in gene expression and electrical character in coronary artery smooth muscle of SHR than that of WKY might be an underling mechanism associated with the membrane potential depolarization in artery smooth muscle of SHR.

  17. Voltage-gated inward currents of morphologically identified cells of the frog taste disc.

    PubMed

    Suwabe, Takeshi; Kitada, Yasuyuki

    2004-01-01

    We used the patch clamp technique to record from taste cells in vertical slices of the bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana) taste disc. Cell types were identified by staining with Lucifer yellow in a pipette after recording their electrophysiological properties. Cells could be divided into the following three groups: type Ib (wing) cells with sheet-like apical processes, type II (rod) cells with single thick rod-like apical processes and type III (rod) cells with thin rod-like apical processes. No dye-coupling was seen either between cells of the same type or between cells of different types. We focused on the voltage-gated inward currents of the three types of cells. Type Ib and type II cells exhibited tetrodotoxin (TTX)-sensitive voltage-gated Na+ currents. Surprisingly, type III cells showed TTX-resistant voltage-gated Na+ currents and exhibited a lack of TTX-sensitive Na+ currents. TTX-resistant voltage-gated Na+ currents in taste cells are reported for the first time here. The time constant for the inactivating portion of the voltage-gated inward Na+ currents of type III cells was much larger than that of type Ib and type II cells. Therefore, slow inactivation of inward Na+ currents characterizes type III cells. Amplitudes of the maximum peak inward currents of type III cells were smaller than those of type Ib and type II cells. However, the density (pA/pF) of the maximum peak inward currents of type III cells was much higher than that of type Ib cells and close to that of type II cells. No evidence of the presence of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels in frog taste cells has been presented up to now. In this study, voltage-gated Ba2+ currents were observed in type III cells but not in type Ib and type II cells when the bath solution was a standard Ba2+ solution containing 25 mM Ba2+. Voltage-gated Ba2+ currents were blocked by addition of 2 mM CoCl2 to the standard Ba2+ solution, suggesting that type III cells possess the voltage-gated Ca2+ channels and they do classical

  18. The action of calcium channel blockers on recombinant L-type calcium channel α1-subunits

    PubMed Central

    Morel, Nicole; Buryi, Vitali; Feron, Olivier; Gomez, Jean-Pierre; Christen, Marie-Odile; Godfraind, Théophile

    1998-01-01

    CHO cells expressing the α1C-a subunit (cardiac isoform) and the α1C-b subunit (vascular isoform) of the voltage-dependent L-type Ca2+ channel were used to investigate whether tissue selectivity of Ca2+ channel blockers could be related to different affinities for α1C isoforms.Inward current evoked by the transfected α1 subunit was recorded by the patch-clamp technique in the whole-cell configuration.Neutral dihydropyridines (nifedipine, nisoldipine, (+)-PN200-110) were more potent inhibitors of α1C-b-subunit than of α1C-a-subunit. This difference was more marked at a holding potential of −100 mV than at −50 mV. SDZ 207-180 (an ionized dihydropyridine) exhibited the same potency on the two isoforms.Pinaverium (ionized non-dihydropyridine derivative) was 2 and 4 fold more potent on α1C-a than on α1C-b subunit at Vh of −100 mV and −50 mV, respectively. Effects of verapamil were identical on the two isoforms at both voltages.[3H]-(+)-PN 200-110 binding experiments showed that neutral dihydropyridines had a higher affinity for the α1C-b than for the α1C-a subunit. SDZ 207-180 had the same affinity for the two isoforms and pinaverium had a higher affinity for the α1C-a subunit than for the α1C-b subunit.These results indicate marked differences among Ca2+ channel blockers in their selectivity for the α1C-a and α1C-b subunits of the Ca2+ channel. PMID:9846638

  19. The action of calcium channel blockers on recombinant L-type calcium channel alpha1-subunits.

    PubMed

    Morel, N; Buryi, V; Feron, O; Gomez, J P; Christen, M O; Godfraind, T

    1998-11-01

    1. CHO cells expressing the alpha(1C-a) subunit (cardiac isoform) and the alpha(1C-b) subunit (vascular isoform) of the voltage-dependent L-type Ca2+ channel were used to investigate whether tissue selectivity of Ca2+ channel blockers could be related to different affinities for alpha1C isoforms. 2. Inward current evoked by the transfected alpha1 subunit was recorded by the patch-clamp technique in the whole-cell configuration. 3. Neutral dihydropyridines (nifedipine, nisoldipine, (+)-PN200-110) were more potent inhibitors of alpha(1C-)b-subunit than of alpha(1C-a)-subunit. This difference was more marked at a holding potential of -100 mV than at -50 mV. SDZ 207-180 (an ionized dihydropyridine) exhibited the same potency on the two isoforms. 4. Pinaverium (ionized non-dihydropyridine derivative) was 2 and 4 fold more potent on alpha(1C-a) than on alpha(1C-b) subunit at Vh of -100 mV and -50 mV, respectively. Effects of verapamil were identical on the two isoforms at both voltages. 5. [3H]-(+)-PN 200-110 binding experiments showed that neutral dihydropyridines had a higher affinity for the alpha(1C-b) than for the alpha(1C-a) subunit. SDZ 207-180 had the same affinity for the two isoforms and pinaverium had a higher affinity for the alpha(1C-a) subunit than for the alpha(1C-b) subunit. 6. These results indicate marked differences among Ca2+ channel blockers in their selectivity for the alpha(1C-a) and alpha(1C-b) subunits of the Ca2+ channel. PMID:9846638

  20. L-type cardiac calcium channels in doxorubicin cardiomyopathy in rats morphological, biochemical, and functional correlations.

    PubMed Central

    Keung, E C; Toll, L; Ellis, M; Jensen, R A

    1991-01-01

    Doxorubicin (DXR) is an effective antitumor agent in a wide spectrum of neoplasms. Chronic treatment is associated with cardiomyopathy and characteristic myocardial ultrastructural changes, which include swelling of the t tubules. Accordingly, we investigated excitation-contraction coupling in cardiomyopathic rat heart resulting from chronic DXR treatment. Using the whole-cell patch clamp technique, we studied the L-type calcium channel in single cells enzymatically isolated from normal (CTRL) and DXR rat hearts. Despite similar cell dimensions, the total membrane capacitance was significantly smaller in the DXR cells (138 +/- 9 pF) than in the CTRL cells (169 +/- 11 pF) (mean +/- SEM, n = 9, P less than 0.05). The mean current and the current density-voltage relationships of the CTRL and the DXR cells were significantly different (n = 9, P less than 0.001) with the maximal peak L-type calcium current (ICa) density increased from 6.4 +/- 0.9 in CTRL cells to 10.5 +/- 2.4 microA/cm2 in the DXR cells (P less than 0.05). There was no shift either in the current-voltage relationship or the steady-state inactivation curve in the two cell groups. However, the fast time constant of inactivation was increased at a membrane voltage of -10 to 10 mV. Calcium channel antagonist equilibrium binding assays using [3H]-PN200-110 revealed no difference in the maximal receptor binding capacity (CTRL, 194 +/- 27 and DXR 211 +/- 24 fmol/mg protein; P greater than 0.05, n = 6) and in receptor affinity (CTRL, 0.15 +/- 0.05 and DXR 0.13 +/- 0.03 nM; P less than 0.05). These data suggest that a decrease in effective capacitance might be associated with t-tubular damage. Despite this decrease, ICa was increased in the DXR cells. Such an increase may result from an alteration in the properties of the calcium channels and/or recruitment of "hibernating" channels in the remaining surface and t-tubular membranes. PMID:1645752

  1. Voltage-gated Potassium Channels as Therapeutic Drug Targets

    PubMed Central

    Wulff, Heike; Castle, Neil A.; Pardo, Luis A.

    2009-01-01

    The human genome contains 40 voltage-gated potassium channels (KV) which are involved in diverse physiological processes ranging from repolarization of neuronal or cardiac action potentials, over regulating calcium signaling and cell volume, to driving cellular proliferation and migration. KV channels offer tremendous opportunities for the development of new drugs for cancer, autoimmune diseases and metabolic, neurological and cardiovascular disorders. This review first discusses pharmacological strategies for targeting KV channels with venom peptides, antibodies and small molecules and then highlights recent progress in the preclinical and clinical development of drugs targeting KV1.x, KV7.x (KCNQ), KV10.1 (EAG1) and KV11.1 (hERG) channels. PMID:19949402

  2. Voltage-gated proton channels: what' next?

    PubMed Central

    DeCoursey, Thomas E

    2008-01-01

    This review is an attempt to identify and place in context some of the many questions about voltage-gated proton channels that remain unsolved. As the gene was identified only 2 years ago, the situation is very different than in fields where the gene has been known for decades. For the proton channel, most of the obvious and less obvious structure–function questions are still wide open. Remarkably, the proton channel protein strongly resembles the voltage-sensing domain of many voltage-gated ion channels, and thus offers a novel approach to study gating mechanisms. Another surprise is that the proton channel appears to function as a dimer, with two separate conduction pathways. A number of significant biological questions remain in dispute, unanswered, or in some cases, not yet asked. This latter deficit is ascribable to the intrinsic difficulty in evaluating the importance of one component in a complex system, and in addition, to the lack, until recently, of a means of performing an unambiguous lesion experiment, that is, of selectively eliminating the molecule in question. We still lack a potent, selective pharmacological inhibitor, but the identification of the gene has allowed the development of powerful new tools including proton channel antibodies, siRNA and knockout mice. PMID:18801839

  3. The negative inotropic action of canrenone is mediated by L-type calcium current blockade and reduced intracellular calcium transients

    PubMed Central

    Costa, AR; Torres, LB; Medei, E; Ricardo, RA; França, JP; Smaili, S; Nascimento, JHM; Oshiro, MEM; Bassani, JWM; Ferreira, AT; Tucci, PJF

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: Adding spironolactone to standard therapy in heart failure reduces morbidity and mortality, but the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. We analysed the effect of canrenone, the major active metabolite of spironolactone, on myocardial contractility and intracellular calcium homeostasis. Experimental approach: Left ventricular papillary muscles and cardiomyocytes were isolated from male Wistar rats. Contractility of papillary muscles was assessed with force transducers, Ca2+ transients by fluorescence and Ca2+ fluxes by electrophysiological techniques. Key results: Canrenone (300–600 µmol·L−1) reduced developed tension, maximum rate of tension increase and maximum rate of tension decay of papillary muscles. In cardiomyocytes, canrenone (50 µmol·L−1) reduced cell shortening and L-type Ca2+ channel current, whereas steady-state activation and inactivation, and reactivation curves were unchanged. Canrenone also decreased the Ca2+ content of the sarcoplasmic reticulum, intracellular Ca2+ transient amplitude and intracellular diastolic Ca2+ concentration. However, the time course of [Ca2+]i decline during transients evoked by caffeine was not affected by canrenone. Conclusion and implications: Canrenone reduced L-type Ca2+ channel current, amplitude of intracellular Ca2+ transients and Ca2+ content of sarcoplasmic reticulum in cardiomyocytes. These changes are likely to underlie the negative inotropic effect of canrenone. PMID:19663883

  4. Ion concentration-dependence of rat cardiac unitary L-type calcium channel conductance.

    PubMed Central

    Guia, A; Stern, M D; Lakatta, E G; Josephson, I R

    2001-01-01

    Little is known about the native properties of unitary cardiac L-type calcium currents (i(Ca)) measured with physiological calcium (Ca) ion concentration, and their role in excitation-contraction (E-C) coupling. Our goal was to chart the concentration-dependence of unitary conductance (gamma) to physiological Ca concentration and compare it to barium ion (Ba) conductance in the absence of agonists. In isolated, K-depolarized rat myocytes, i(Ca) amplitudes were measured using cell-attached patches with 2 to 70 mM Ca or 2 to 105 mM Ba in the pipette. At 0 mV, 2 mM of Ca produced 0.12 pA, and 2 mM of Ba produced 0.19 pA unitary currents. Unitary conductance was described by a Langmuir isotherm relationship with a maximum gammaCa of 5.3 +/- 0.2 pS (n = 15), and gammaBa of 15 +/- 1 pS (n = 27). The concentration producing half-maximal gamma, Kd(gamma), was not different between Ca (1.7 +/- 0.3 mM) and Ba (1.9 +/- 0.4 mM). We found that quasi-physiological concentrations of Ca produced currents that were as easily resolvable as those obtained with the traditionally used higher concentrations. This study leads to future work on the molecular basis of E-C coupling with a physiological concentration of Ca ions permeating the Ca channel. PMID:11371449

  5. Investigation of calcium antagonist-L-type calcium channel interactions by a vascular smooth muscle cell membrane chromatography method.

    PubMed

    Du, Hui; He, Jianyu; Wang, Sicen; He, Langchong

    2010-07-01

    The dissociation equilibrium constant (K(D)) is an important affinity parameter for studying drug-receptor interactions. A vascular smooth muscle (VSM) cell membrane chromatography (CMC) method was developed for determination of the K(D) values for calcium antagonist-L-type calcium channel (L-CC) interactions. VSM cells, by means of primary culture with rat thoracic aortas, were used for preparation of the cell membrane stationary phase in the VSM/CMC model. All measurements were performed with spectrophotometric detection (237 nm) at 37 degrees C. The K(D) values obtained using frontal analysis were 3.36 x 10(-6) M for nifedipine, 1.34 x 10(-6) M for nimodipine, 6.83 x 10(-7) M for nitrendipine, 1.23 x 10(-7) M for nicardipine, 1.09 x 10(-7) M for amlodipine, and 8.51 x 10(-8) M for verapamil. This affinity rank order obtained from the VSM/CMC method had a strong positive correlation with that obtained from radioligand binding assay. The location of the binding region was examined by displacement experiments using nitrendipine as a mobile-phase additive. It was found that verapamil occupied a class of binding sites on L-CCs different from those occupied by nitrendipine. In addition, nicardipine, amlodipine, and nitrendipine had direct competition at a single common binding site. The studies showed that CMC can be applied to the investigation of drug-receptor interactions.

  6. Salt Pumping by Voltage-Gated Nanochannels.

    PubMed

    Tagliazucchi, Mario; Szleifer, Igal

    2015-09-17

    This Letter investigates voltage-gated nanochannels, where both the potential applied to the conductive membrane containing the channel (membrane potential) and the potential difference between the solutions at both sides of the membrane (transmembrane potential) are independently controlled. The predicted conductance characteristics of these fixed-potential channels dramatically differ from those of the widely studied fixed-charge nanochannels, in which the membrane is insulating and has a fixed surface charge density. The difference arises because the transmembrane potential induces an inhomogeneous charge distribution on the surface of fixed-potential nanochannels. This behavior, related to bipolar electrochemistry, has some interesting and unexpected consequences for ion transport. For example, continuously oscillating the transmembrane potential, while holding the membrane potential at the potential for which it has zero charge in equilibrium, creates fluxes of neutral salt (fluxes of anions and cations in the same direction and number) through the channel, which is an interesting phenomenon for desalination applications.

  7. Philosophy of voltage-gated proton channels

    PubMed Central

    DeCoursey, Thomas E.; Hosler, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    In this review, voltage-gated proton channels are considered from a mainly teleological perspective. Why do proton channels exist? What good are they? Why did they go to such lengths to develop several unique hallmark properties such as extreme selectivity and ΔpH-dependent gating? Why is their current so minuscule? How do they manage to be so selective? What is the basis for our belief that they conduct H+ and not OH–? Why do they exist in many species as dimers when the monomeric form seems to work quite well? It is hoped that pondering these questions will provide an introduction to these channels and a way to logically organize their peculiar properties as well as to understand how they are able to carry out some of their better-established biological functions. PMID:24352668

  8. Salt Pumping by Voltage-Gated Nanochannels.

    PubMed

    Tagliazucchi, Mario; Szleifer, Igal

    2015-09-17

    This Letter investigates voltage-gated nanochannels, where both the potential applied to the conductive membrane containing the channel (membrane potential) and the potential difference between the solutions at both sides of the membrane (transmembrane potential) are independently controlled. The predicted conductance characteristics of these fixed-potential channels dramatically differ from those of the widely studied fixed-charge nanochannels, in which the membrane is insulating and has a fixed surface charge density. The difference arises because the transmembrane potential induces an inhomogeneous charge distribution on the surface of fixed-potential nanochannels. This behavior, related to bipolar electrochemistry, has some interesting and unexpected consequences for ion transport. For example, continuously oscillating the transmembrane potential, while holding the membrane potential at the potential for which it has zero charge in equilibrium, creates fluxes of neutral salt (fluxes of anions and cations in the same direction and number) through the channel, which is an interesting phenomenon for desalination applications. PMID:26722719

  9. Characterization of L-type calcium channel activity in atrioventricular nodal myocytes from rats with streptozotocin-induced Diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Yuill, Kathryn H; Al Kury, Lina T; Howarth, Frank Christopher

    2015-11-01

    Cardiovascular complications are common in patients with Diabetes mellitus (DM). In addition to changes in cardiac muscle inotropy, electrical abnormalities are also commonly observed in these patients. We have previously shown that spontaneous cellular electrical activity is altered in atrioventricular nodal (AVN) myocytes, isolated from the streptozotocin (STZ) rat model of type-1 DM. In this study, utilizing the same model, we have characterized the changes in L-type calcium channel activity in single AVN myocytes. Ionic currents were recorded from AVN myocytes isolated from the hearts of control rats and from those with STZ-induced diabetes. Patch-clamp recordings were used to assess the changes in cellular electrical activity in individual myocytes. Type-1 DM significantly altered the cellular characteristics of L-type calcium current. A reduction in peak ICaL density was observed, with no corresponding changes in the activation parameters of the current. L-type calcium channel current also exhibited faster time-dependent inactivation in AVN myocytes from diabetic rats. A negative shift in the voltage dependence of inactivation was also evident, and a slowing of restitution parameters. These findings demonstrate that experimentally induced type-1 DM significantly alters AVN L-type calcium channel cellular electrophysiology. These changes in ion channel activity may contribute to the abnormalities in cardiac electrical function that are associated with high mortality levels in patients with DM. PMID:26603460

  10. Enhanced currents through L-type calcium channels in cardiomyocytes disturb the electrophysiology of the dystrophic heart

    PubMed Central

    Obermair, Gerald J.; Cervenka, Rene; Dang, Xuan B.; Lukacs, Peter; Kummer, Stefan; Bittner, Reginald E.; Kubista, Helmut; Todt, Hannes; Hilber, Karlheinz

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), induced by mutations in the gene encoding for the cytoskeletal protein dystrophin, is an inherited disease characterized by progressive muscle weakness. Besides the relatively well characterized skeletal muscle degenerative processes, DMD is also associated with cardiac complications. These include cardiomyopathy development and cardiac arrhythmias. The current understanding of the pathomechanisms in the heart is very limited, but recent research indicates that dysfunctional ion channels in dystrophic cardiomyocytes play a role. The aim of the present study was to characterize abnormalities in L-type calcium channel function in adult dystrophic ventricular cardiomyocytes. By using the whole cell patch clamp technique, the properties of currents through calcium channels in ventricular cardiomyocytes isolated from the hearts of normal and dystrophic adult mice were compared. Besides the commonly used dystrophin-deficient mdx mouse model for human DMD, we also used mdx-utr mice which are both dystrophin- and utrophin-deficient. We found that calcium channel currents were significantly increased, and channel inactivation was reduced in dystrophic cardiomyocytes. Both effects enhance the calcium influx during an action potential (AP). Whereas the AP in dystrophic mouse cardiomyocytes was nearly normal, implementation of the enhanced dystrophic calcium conductance in a computer model of a human ventricular cardiomyocyte considerably prolonged the AP. Finally, the described dystrophic calcium channel abnormalities entailed alterations in the electrocardiograms of dystrophic mice. We conclude that gain of function in cardiac L-type calcium channels may disturb the electrophysiology of the dystrophic heart and thereby cause arrhythmias. PMID:24337461

  11. Dopamine Induces LTP Differentially in Apical and Basal Dendrites through BDNF and Voltage-Dependent Calcium Channels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Navakkode, Sheeja; Sajikumar, Sreedharan; Korte, Martin; Soong, Tuck Wah

    2012-01-01

    The dopaminergic modulation of long-term potentiation (LTP) has been studied well, but the mechanism by which dopamine induces LTP (DA-LTP) in CA1 pyramidal neurons is unknown. Here, we report that DA-LTP in basal dendrites is dependent while in apical dendrites it is independent of activation of L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (VDCC).…

  12. Pinaverium acts as L-type calcium channel blocker on smooth muscle of colon.

    PubMed

    Malysz, J; Farraway, L A; Christen, M O; Huizinga, J D

    1997-08-01

    The effect of pinaverium was electrophysiologically characterized and compared with the established L-type calcium channel blockers diltiazem, D600, and nitrendipine on canine colonic circular smooth muscle. Effects were studied on the electrical activity of the smooth muscle cells, in particular the spontaneously occurring slow wave. In addition, effects were examined on spontaneous contraction patterns and contractile activities generated by stimulation of cholinergic nerves or directly by stimulating muscarinic receptors. Effects were also examined on excitation of NO-releasing intrinsic nerves. Pinaverium bromide affected the slow wave by selectively inhibiting the plateau potential that is associated with generation of contractile activity. Pinaverium, similar to diltiazem and D600, produced reductions in cholinergic responses as well as spontaneous contractions. The IC50 values for inhibition of cholinergic responses for pinaverium, diltiazem, and D600 were 1.0 x 10(-6), 4.1 x 10(-7), and 5.3 x 10(-7) M, respectively. The IC50 values for inhibition of spontaneous contractile activity for pinaverium, diltiazem, and D600 were 3.8 x 10(-6), 9.7 x 10(-7), and 8.0 x 10(-7) M, respectively. Increases in contractility by carbachol were abolished by pretreatment with either pinaverium or D600. In addition, neither pinaverium nor D600 had any effects on the inhibitory NO-mediated relaxations. These data provide a rationale for the use of pinaverium in the treatment of colonic motor disorders where excessive contraction has to be suppressed. PMID:9360010

  13. Generation of slow wave type action potentials in the mouse small intestine involves a non-L-type calcium channel.

    PubMed

    Malysz, J; Richardson, D; Farraway, L; Christen, M O; Huizinga, J D

    1995-10-01

    Intrinsic electrical activities in various isolated segments of the mouse small intestine were recorded (i) to characterize action potential generation and (ii) to obtain a profile on the ion channels involved in initiating the slow wave type action potentials (slow waves). Gradients in slow wave frequency, resting membrane potential, and occurrence of spiking activity were found, with the proximal intestine exhibiting the highest frequency, the most hyperpolarized cell membrane, and the greatest occurrence of spikes. The slow waves were only partially sensitive to L-type calcium channel blockers. Nifedipine, verapamil, and pinaverium bromide abolished spikes that occurred on the plateau phase of the slow waves in all tissues. The activity that remained in the presence of L-type calcium channel blockers, the upstroke potential, retained a similar amplitude to the original slow wave and was of identical frequency. The upstroke potential was not sensitive to a reduction in extracellular chloride or to the sodium channel blockers tetrodotoxin and mexiletine. Abolishment of the Na+ gradient by removal of 120 mM extracellular Na+ reduced the upstroke potential frequency by 13 - 18% and its amplitude by 50 - 70% in the ileum. The amplitude was similarly reduced by Ni2+ (up to 5 mM), and by flufenamic acid (100 mu M), a nonspecific cation and chloride channel blocker. Gadolinium, a nonspecific blocker of cation and stretch-activated channels, had no effect. Throughout these pharmacological manipulations, a robust oscillation remained at 5 - 10 mV. This oscillation likely reflects pacemaker activity. It was rapidly abolished by removal of extracellular calcium but not affected by L-type calcium channel blockers. In summary, the mouse small intestine has been established as a model for research into slow wave generation and electrical pacemaker activity. The upstroke part of the slow wave has two components, the pacemaker component involves a non-L-type calcium channel

  14. Functional role of voltage gated Ca2+ channels in heart automaticity

    PubMed Central

    Mesirca, Pietro; Torrente, Angelo G.; Mangoni, Matteo E.

    2015-01-01

    Pacemaker activity of automatic cardiac myocytes controls the heartbeat in everyday life. Cardiac automaticity is under the control of several neurotransmitters and hormones and is constantly regulated by the autonomic nervous system to match the physiological needs of the organism. Several classes of ion channels and proteins involved in intracellular Ca2+ dynamics contribute to pacemaker activity. The functional role of voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) in heart automaticity and impulse conduction has been matter of debate for 30 years. However, growing evidence shows that VGCCs are important regulators of the pacemaker mechanisms and play also a major role in atrio-ventricular impulse conduction. Incidentally, studies performed in genetically modified mice lacking L-type Cav1.3 (Cav1.3−/−) or T-type Cav3.1 (Cav3.1−/−) channels show that genetic inactivation of these channels strongly impacts pacemaking. In cardiac pacemaker cells, VGCCs activate at negative voltages at the beginning of the diastolic depolarization and importantly contribute to this phase by supplying inward current. Loss-of-function of these channels also impairs atrio-ventricular conduction. Furthermore, inactivation of Cav1.3 channels promotes also atrial fibrillation and flutter in knockout mice suggesting that these channels can play a role in stabilizing atrial rhythm. Genomic analysis demonstrated that Cav1.3 and Cav3.1 channels are widely expressed in pacemaker tissue of mice, rabbits and humans. Importantly, human diseases of pacemaker activity such as congenital bradycardia and heart block have been attributed to loss-of-function of Cav1.3 and Cav3.1 channels. In this article, we will review the current knowledge on the role of VGCCs in the generation and regulation of heart rate and rhythm. We will discuss also how loss of Ca2+ entry through VGCCs could influence intracellular Ca2+ handling and promote atrial arrhythmias. PMID:25698974

  15. High-Frequency Stimulation-Induced Synaptic Potentiation in Dorsal and Ventral CA1 Hippocampal Synapses: The Involvement of NMDA Receptors, mGluR5, and (L-Type) Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papatheodoropoulos, Costas; Kouvaros, Stylianos

    2016-01-01

    The ability of the ventral hippocampus (VH) for long-lasting long-term potentiation (LTP) and the mechanisms underlying its lower ability for shortlasting LTP compared with the dorsal hippocampus (DH) are unknown. Using recordings of field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) from the CA1 field of adult rat hippocampal slices, we found that…

  16. Photocontrol of Voltage-Gated Ion Channel Activity by Azobenzene Trimethylammonium Bromide in Neonatal Rat Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Frolova, Sheyda R.; Gaiko, Olga; Tsvelaya, Valeriya A.; Pimenov, Oleg Y.; Agladze, Konstantin I.

    2016-01-01

    The ability of azobenzene trimethylammonium bromide (azoTAB) to sensitize cardiac tissue excitability to light was recently reported. The dark, thermally relaxed trans- isomer of azoTAB suppressed spontaneous activity and excitation propagation speed, whereas the cis- isomer had no detectable effect on the electrical properties of cardiomyocyte monolayers. As the membrane potential of cardiac cells is mainly controlled by activity of voltage-gated ion channels, this study examined whether the sensitization effect of azoTAB was exerted primarily via the modulation of voltage-gated ion channel activity. The effects of trans- and cis- isomers of azoTAB on voltage-dependent sodium (INav), calcium (ICav), and potassium (IKv) currents in isolated neonatal rat cardiomyocytes were investigated using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. The experiments showed that azoTAB modulated ion currents, causing suppression of sodium (Na+) and calcium (Ca2+) currents and potentiation of net potassium (K+) currents. This finding confirms that azoTAB-effect on cardiac tissue excitability do indeed result from modulation of voltage-gated ion channels responsible for action potential. PMID:27015602

  17. Ubiquitylation of voltage-gated sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Laedermann, Cédric J; Decosterd, Isabelle; Abriel, Hugues

    2014-01-01

    Ion channel proteins are regulated by different types of posttranslational modifications. The focus of this review is the regulation of voltage-gated sodium channels (Navs) upon their ubiquitylation. The amiloride-sensitive epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) was the first ion channel shown to be regulated upon ubiquitylation. This modification results from the binding of ubiquitin ligase from the Nedd4 family to a protein-protein interaction domain, known as the PY motif, in the ENaC subunits. Many of the Navs have similar PY motifs, which have been demonstrated to be targets of Nedd4-dependent ubiquitylation, tagging them for internalization from the cell surface. The role of Nedd4-dependent regulation of the Nav membrane density in physiology and disease remains poorly understood. Two recent studies have provided evidence that Nedd4-2 is downregulated in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons in both rat and mouse models of nerve injury-induced neuropathic pain. Using two different mouse models, one with a specific knockout of Nedd4-2 in sensory neurons and another where Nedd4-2 was overexpressed with the use of viral vectors, it was demonstrated that the neuropathy-linked neuronal hyperexcitability was the result of Nav1.7 and Nav1.8 overexpression due to Nedd4-2 downregulation. These studies provided the first in vivo evidence of the role of Nedd4-2-dependent regulation of Nav channels in a disease state. This ubiquitylation pathway may be involved in the development of symptoms and diseases linked to Nav-dependent hyperexcitability, such as pain, cardiac arrhythmias, epilepsy, migraine, and myotonias. PMID:24737239

  18. CNTF-ACM promotes mitochondrial respiration and oxidative stress in cortical neurons through upregulating L-type calcium channel activity.

    PubMed

    Sun, Meiqun; Liu, Hongli; Xu, Huanbai; Wang, Hongtao; Wang, Xiaojing

    2016-09-01

    A specialized culture medium termed ciliary neurotrophic factor-treated astrocyte-conditioned medium (CNTF-ACM) allows investigators to assess the peripheral effects of CNTF-induced activated astrocytes upon cultured neurons. CNTF-ACM has been shown to upregulate neuronal L-type calcium channel current activity, which has been previously linked to changes in mitochondrial respiration and oxidative stress. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate CNTF-ACM's effects upon mitochondrial respiration and oxidative stress in rat cortical neurons. Cortical neurons, CNTF-ACM, and untreated control astrocyte-conditioned medium (UC-ACM) were prepared from neonatal Sprague-Dawley rat cortical tissue. Neurons were cultured in either CNTF-ACM or UC-ACM for a 48-h period. Changes in the following parameters before and after treatment with the L-type calcium channel blocker isradipine were assessed: (i) intracellular calcium levels, (ii) mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), (iii) oxygen consumption rate (OCR) and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) formation, (iv) intracellular nitric oxide (NO) levels, (v) mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and (vi) susceptibility to the mitochondrial complex I toxin rotenone. CNTF-ACM neurons displayed the following significant changes relative to UC-ACM neurons: (i) increased intracellular calcium levels (p < 0.05), (ii) elevation in ΔΨm (p < 0.05), (iii) increased OCR and ATP formation (p < 0.05), (iv) increased intracellular NO levels (p < 0.05), (v) increased mitochondrial ROS production (p < 0.05), and (vi) increased susceptibility to rotenone (p < 0.05). Treatment with isradipine was able to partially rescue these negative effects of CNTF-ACM (p < 0.05). CNTF-ACM promotes mitochondrial respiration and oxidative stress in cortical neurons through elevating L-type calcium channel activity. PMID:27514537

  19. The L-type calcium channel Cav1.3 is required for proper hippocampal neurogenesis and cognitive functions.

    PubMed

    Marschallinger, Julia; Sah, Anupam; Schmuckermair, Claudia; Unger, Michael; Rotheneichner, Peter; Kharitonova, Maria; Waclawiczek, Alexander; Gerner, Philipp; Jaksch-Bogensperger, Heidi; Berger, Stefan; Striessnig, Jörg; Singewald, Nicolas; Couillard-Despres, Sebastien; Aigner, Ludwig

    2015-12-01

    L-type voltage gated Ca(2+) channels (LTCCs) are widely expressed within different brain regions including the hippocampus. The isoforms Cav1.2 and Cav1.3 have been shown to be involved in hippocampus-dependent learning and memory, cognitive functions that require proper hippocampal neurogenesis. In vitro, functional LTCCs are expressed on neuronal progenitor cells, where they promote neuronal differentiation. Expression of LTCCs on neural stem and progenitor cells within the neurogenic regions in the adult brain in vivo has not been examined so far, and a contribution of the individual isoforms Cav1.2 and Cav1.3 to adult neurogenesis remained to be clarified. To reveal the role of these channels we first evaluated the expression patterns of Cav1.2 and Cav1.3 in the hippocampal dentate gyrus and the subventricular zone (SVZ) in adult (2- and 3-month old) and middle-aged (15-month old) mice on mRNA and protein levels. We performed immunohistological analysis of hippocampal neurogenesis in adult and middle-aged Cav1.3(-/-) mice and finally addressed the importance of Cav1.3 for hippocampal function by evaluating spatial memory and depression-like behavior in adult Cav1.3(-/-) mice. Our results showed Cav1.2 and Cav1.3 expression at different stages of neuronal differentiation. While Cav1.2 was primarily restricted to mature NeuN(+) granular neurons, Cav1.3 was expressed in Nestin(+) neural stem cells and in mature NeuN(+) granular neurons. Adult and middle-aged Cav1.3(-/-) mice showed severe impairments in dentate gyrus neurogenesis, with significantly smaller dentate gyrus volume, reduced survival of newly generated cells, and reduced neuronal differentiation. Further, Cav1.3(-/-) mice showed impairment in the hippocampus dependent object location memory test, implicating Cav1.3 as an essential element for hippocampus-associated cognitive functions. Thus, modulation of LTCC activities may have a crucial impact on neurogenic responses and cognition, which should be

  20. Direct interaction of CaVβ with actin up-regulates L-type calcium currents in HL-1 cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Stölting, Gabriel; de Oliveira, Regina Campos; Guzman, Raul E; Miranda-Laferte, Erick; Conrad, Rachel; Jordan, Nadine; Schmidt, Silke; Hendriks, Johnny; Gensch, Thomas; Hidalgo, Patricia

    2015-02-20

    Expression of the β-subunit (CaVβ) is required for normal function of cardiac L-type calcium channels, and its up-regulation is associated with heart failure. CaVβ binds to the α1 pore-forming subunit of L-type channels and augments calcium current density by facilitating channel opening and increasing the number of channels in the plasma membrane, by a poorly understood mechanism. Actin, a key component of the intracellular trafficking machinery, interacts with Src homology 3 domains in different proteins. Although CaVβ encompasses a highly conserved Src homology 3 domain, association with actin has not yet been explored. Here, using co-sedimentation assays and FRET experiments, we uncover a direct interaction between CaVβ and actin filaments. Consistently, single-molecule localization analysis reveals streaklike structures composed by CaVβ2 that distribute over several micrometers along actin filaments in HL-1 cardiomyocytes. Overexpression of CaVβ2-N3 in HL-1 cells induces an increase in L-type current without altering voltage-dependent activation, thus reflecting an increased number of channels in the plasma membrane. CaVβ mediated L-type up-regulation, and CaVβ-actin association is prevented by disruption of the actin cytoskeleton with cytochalasin D. Our study reveals for the first time an interacting partner of CaVβ that is directly involved in vesicular trafficking. We propose a model in which CaVβ promotes anterograde trafficking of the L-type channels by anchoring them to actin filaments in their itinerary to the plasma membrane.

  1. Direct Interaction of CaVβ with Actin Up-regulates L-type Calcium Currents in HL-1 Cardiomyocytes*

    PubMed Central

    Stölting, Gabriel; de Oliveira, Regina Campos; Guzman, Raul E.; Miranda-Laferte, Erick; Conrad, Rachel; Jordan, Nadine; Schmidt, Silke; Hendriks, Johnny; Gensch, Thomas; Hidalgo, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Expression of the β-subunit (CaVβ) is required for normal function of cardiac L-type calcium channels, and its up-regulation is associated with heart failure. CaVβ binds to the α1 pore-forming subunit of L-type channels and augments calcium current density by facilitating channel opening and increasing the number of channels in the plasma membrane, by a poorly understood mechanism. Actin, a key component of the intracellular trafficking machinery, interacts with Src homology 3 domains in different proteins. Although CaVβ encompasses a highly conserved Src homology 3 domain, association with actin has not yet been explored. Here, using co-sedimentation assays and FRET experiments, we uncover a direct interaction between CaVβ and actin filaments. Consistently, single-molecule localization analysis reveals streaklike structures composed by CaVβ2 that distribute over several micrometers along actin filaments in HL-1 cardiomyocytes. Overexpression of CaVβ2-N3 in HL-1 cells induces an increase in L-type current without altering voltage-dependent activation, thus reflecting an increased number of channels in the plasma membrane. CaVβ mediated L-type up-regulation, and CaVβ-actin association is prevented by disruption of the actin cytoskeleton with cytochalasin D. Our study reveals for the first time an interacting partner of CaVβ that is directly involved in vesicular trafficking. We propose a model in which CaVβ promotes anterograde trafficking of the L-type channels by anchoring them to actin filaments in their itinerary to the plasma membrane. PMID:25533460

  2. Differential expression of T- and L-type voltage-dependent calcium channels in renal resistance vessels.

    PubMed

    Hansen, P B; Jensen, B L; Andreasen, D; Skøtt, O

    2001-09-28

    The distribution of voltage-dependent calcium channels in kidney pre- and postglomerular resistance vessels was determined at the molecular and functional levels. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis of microdissected rat preglomerular vessels and cultured smooth muscle cells showed coexpression of mRNAs for T-type subunits (Ca(V)3.1, Ca(V)3.2) and for an L-type subunit (Ca(V)1.2). The same expression pattern was observed in juxtamedullary efferent arterioles and outer medullary vasa recta. No calcium channel messages were detected in cortical efferent arterioles. Ca(V)1.2 protein was demonstrated by immunochemical labeling of rat preglomerular vasculature and juxtamedullary efferent arterioles and vasa recta. Cortical efferent arterioles were not immunopositive. Recordings of intracellular calcium concentration with digital fluorescence imaging microscopy showed a significant increase of calcium in response to K(+) (100 mmol/L) in isolated afferent arterioles (140+/-25%) and in juxtamedullary efferent arterioles (118+/-21%). These calcium responses were attenuated by the L-type antagonist calciseptine and by the T-type antagonist mibefradil. Intracellular calcium increased in response to K(+) in cortical efferent arterioles (21+/-9%). Mibefradil and nickel concentration dependently blocked K(+)-induced contraction of perfused rabbit afferent arterioles. Calciseptine blocked the contraction mediated by K(+) (EC(50) 8x10(-14)). S-(-)-Bay K 8644 had no effect on vascular diameter in the afferent arteriole. We conclude that voltage-dependent L- and T-type calcium channels are expressed and of functional significance in renal cortical preglomerular vessels, in juxtamedullary efferent arterioles, and in outer medullary vasa recta, but not in cortical efferent arterioles.

  3. L-Type Calcium Channels Do Not Play a Critical Role in Chest Blow Induced Ventricular Fibrillation: Commotio Cordis

    PubMed Central

    Madias, Christopher; Garlitski, Ann C.; Kalin, John; Link, Mark S.

    2016-01-01

    Background. In a commotio cordis swine model, ventricular fibrillation (VF) can be induced by a ball blow to the chest believed secondary to activation of mechanosensitive ion channels. The purpose of the current study is to evaluate whether stretch induced activation of the L-type calcium channel may cause intracellular calcium overload and underlie the VF in commotio cordis. Method and Results. Anesthetized juvenile swine received 6 chest wall strikes with a 17.9 m/s lacrosse ball timed to the vulnerable period for VF induction. Animals were randomized to IV verapamil (n = 6) or placebo (n = 6). There was no difference in the observed frequency of VF between verapamil (19/26: 73%) and placebo (20/36: 56%) treated animals (p = 0.16). There was also no significant difference in the combined endpoint of VF or nonsustained VF (21/26: 81% in verapamil versus 24/36: 67% in controls, p = 0.22). Conclusions. In this experimental model of commotio cordis, verapamil did not prevent VF induction. Thus, in commotio cordis it is unlikely that stretch activation of the L-type calcium channel with resultant intracellular calcium overload plays a prominent role. PMID:26925288

  4. L-Type Calcium Channels Do Not Play a Critical Role in Chest Blow Induced Ventricular Fibrillation: Commotio Cordis.

    PubMed

    Madias, Christopher; Garlitski, Ann C; Kalin, John; Link, Mark S

    2016-01-01

    Background. In a commotio cordis swine model, ventricular fibrillation (VF) can be induced by a ball blow to the chest believed secondary to activation of mechanosensitive ion channels. The purpose of the current study is to evaluate whether stretch induced activation of the L-type calcium channel may cause intracellular calcium overload and underlie the VF in commotio cordis. Method and Results. Anesthetized juvenile swine received 6 chest wall strikes with a 17.9 m/s lacrosse ball timed to the vulnerable period for VF induction. Animals were randomized to IV verapamil (n = 6) or placebo (n = 6). There was no difference in the observed frequency of VF between verapamil (19/26: 73%) and placebo (20/36: 56%) treated animals (p = 0.16). There was also no significant difference in the combined endpoint of VF or nonsustained VF (21/26: 81% in verapamil versus 24/36: 67% in controls, p = 0.22). Conclusions. In this experimental model of commotio cordis, verapamil did not prevent VF induction. Thus, in commotio cordis it is unlikely that stretch activation of the L-type calcium channel with resultant intracellular calcium overload plays a prominent role. PMID:26925288

  5. [ANALYSIS OF THE DINOFLAGELLATE PROROCENTRUM MINIMUM TRANSCRIPTOME: IDENTIFYING THE MEMBERS OF THE VOLTAGE-GATED CATION CHANNELS SUPERFAMILY].

    PubMed

    Pozdnyakov, I A; Skarlato, S O

    2015-01-01

    Dinoflagellates are an ecologically important group of aquatic single-cell eukaryotes. At the present time relatively little is known about physiological features that determine the role of these protists in natural ecosystems. Lack of knowledge on the diversity, structure, and functioning of dinoflagellate ion channels significantly hampers the interpretation of physiological reactions and adaptations in these microorganisms. We performed the analysis of the translated transcriptome databases that belong to two strains of the dinoflagellate Prorocentrum minimum in order to identify the members of the voltage-gated cation channels superfamily. We found out that transcriptomes of these potentially toxic microorganisms contained the homologues of: 1) inwardly rectifying potassium channels (K(ir)), 2) voltage-gated potassium channels (K(v)), 3) calcium-activated potassium channels (K(Ca)), 4) cyclic nucleotide-gated channels (EAG and HCN/CNG), 5) TRPV and TRPP channels, 6) two-pore calcium channels TPC, 7) voltage-gated sodium (Na(v)) and calcium (Ca(v)) channels, 8) voltage-gated proton channels (H(v)).

  6. Deletion of the L-type Calcium Channel CaV1.3 but not CaV1.2 Results in a Diminished sAHP in Mouse CA1 Pyramidal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Gamelli, Amy E.; McKinney, Brandon C.; White, Jessica A.; Murphy, Geoffrey G.

    2009-01-01

    Trains of action potentials in CA1 pyramidal neurons are followed by a prolonged calcium-dependent post-burst afterhyperpolarization (AHP) that serves to limit further firing to a sustained depolarizing input. A reduction in the AHP accompanies acquisition of several types of learning and increases in the AHP are correlated with age-related cognitive impairment. The AHP develops primarily as the result of activation of outward calcium-activated potassium currents; however the precise source of calcium for activation of the AHP remains unclear. There is substantial experimental evidence suggesting that calcium influx via voltage-gated L-type calcium channels (L-VGCCs) contributes to the generation of the AHP. Two L-VGCC subtypes are predominately expressed in the hippocampus, CaV1.2 and CaV1.3, however it is not known which L-VGCC subtype is involved in generation of the AHP. This ambiguity is due in large part to the fact that at present there are no subunit-specific agonists or antagonists. Therefore, using mice in which the gene encoding CaV1.2 or CaV1.3 was deleted, we sought to determine the impact of alterations in levels of these two L-VCGG subtypes on neuronal excitability. No differences in any AHP measure were seen between neurons from CaV1.2 knockout mice and controls. However, the total area of the AHP was significantly smaller in neurons from CaV1.3 knockout mice as compared to neurons from wildtype controls. A significant reduction in the amplitude of the AHP was also seen at the 1 sec time point in neurons from CaV1.3 knockout mice as compared to those from controls. Reductions in both the area and 1 sec amplitude suggest the involvement of calcium influx via CaV1.3 in the slow AHP (sAHP). Thus, the results of our study demonstrate that deletion of CaV1.3, but not CaV1.2, significantly impacts the generation of the sAHP. PMID:20014384

  7. L-type Ca2+ channels in heart and brain

    PubMed Central

    Striessnig, Jörg; Pinggera, Alexandra; Kaur, Gurjot; Bock, Gabriella; Tuluc, Petronel

    2014-01-01

    L-type calcium channels (Cav1) represent one of the three major classes (Cav1–3) of voltage-gated calcium channels. They were identified as the target of clinically used calcium channel blockers (CCBs; so-called calcium antagonists) and were the first class accessible to biochemical characterization. Four of the 10 known α1 subunits (Cav1.1–Cav1.4) form the pore of L-type calcium channels (LTCCs) and contain the high-affinity drug-binding sites for dihydropyridines and other chemical classes of organic CCBs. In essentially all electrically excitable cells one or more of these LTCC isoforms is expressed, and therefore it is not surprising that many body functions including muscle, brain, endocrine, and sensory function depend on proper LTCC activity. Gene knockouts and inherited human diseases have allowed detailed insight into the physiological and pathophysiological role of these channels. Genome-wide association studies and analysis of human genomes are currently providing even more hints that even small changes of channel expression or activity may be associated with disease, such as psychiatric disease or cardiac arrhythmias. Therefore, it is important to understand the structure–function relationship of LTCC isoforms, their differential contribution to physiological function, as well as their fine-tuning by modulatory cellular processes. PMID:24683526

  8. Oxidized Low-density Lipoprotein (ox-LDL) Cholesterol Induces the Expression of miRNA-223 and L-type Calcium Channel Protein in Atrial Fibrillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Fengping; Xu, Xin; Yuan, Shuguo; Tan, Liangqiu; Gao, Lingjun; Ma, Shaochun; Zhang, Shebin; Ma, Zhanzhong; Jiang, Wei; Liu, Fenglian; Chen, Baofeng; Zhang, Beibei; Pang, Jungang; Huang, Xiuyan; Weng, Jiaqiang

    2016-08-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained arrhythmia causing high morbidity and mortality. While changing of the cellular calcium homeostasis plays a critical role in AF, the L-type calcium channel α1c protein has suggested as an important regulator of reentrant spiral dynamics and is a major component of AF-related electrical remodeling. Our computational modeling predicted that miRNA-223 may regulate the CACNA1C gene which encodes the cardiac L-type calcium channel α1c subunit. We found that oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) cholesterol significantly up-regulates both the expression of miRNA-223 and L-type calcium channel protein. In contrast, knockdown of miRNA-223 reduced L-type calcium channel protein expression, while genetic knockdown of endogenous miRNA-223 dampened AF vulnerability. Transfection of miRNA-223 by adenovirus-mediated expression enhanced L-type calcium currents and promoted AF in mice while co-injection of a CACNA1C-specific miR-mimic counteracted the effect. Taken together, ox-LDL, as a known factor in AF-associated remodeling, positively regulates miRNA-223 transcription and L-type calcium channel protein expression. Our results implicate a new molecular mechanism for AF in which miRNA-223 can be used as an biomarker of AF rheumatic heart disease.

  9. Oxidized Low-density Lipoprotein (ox-LDL) Cholesterol Induces the Expression of miRNA-223 and L-type Calcium Channel Protein in Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    He, Fengping; Xu, Xin; Yuan, Shuguo; Tan, Liangqiu; Gao, Lingjun; Ma, Shaochun; Zhang, Shebin; Ma, Zhanzhong; Jiang, Wei; Liu, Fenglian; Chen, Baofeng; Zhang, Beibei; Pang, Jungang; Huang, Xiuyan; Weng, Jiaqiang

    2016-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained arrhythmia causing high morbidity and mortality. While changing of the cellular calcium homeostasis plays a critical role in AF, the L-type calcium channel α1c protein has suggested as an important regulator of reentrant spiral dynamics and is a major component of AF-related electrical remodeling. Our computational modeling predicted that miRNA-223 may regulate the CACNA1C gene which encodes the cardiac L-type calcium channel α1c subunit. We found that oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) cholesterol significantly up-regulates both the expression of miRNA-223 and L-type calcium channel protein. In contrast, knockdown of miRNA-223 reduced L-type calcium channel protein expression, while genetic knockdown of endogenous miRNA-223 dampened AF vulnerability. Transfection of miRNA-223 by adenovirus-mediated expression enhanced L-type calcium currents and promoted AF in mice while co-injection of a CACNA1C-specific miR-mimic counteracted the effect. Taken together, ox-LDL, as a known factor in AF-associated remodeling, positively regulates miRNA-223 transcription and L-type calcium channel protein expression. Our results implicate a new molecular mechanism for AF in which miRNA-223 can be used as an biomarker of AF rheumatic heart disease. PMID:27488468

  10. Oxidized Low-density Lipoprotein (ox-LDL) Cholesterol Induces the Expression of miRNA-223 and L-type Calcium Channel Protein in Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    He, Fengping; Xu, Xin; Yuan, Shuguo; Tan, Liangqiu; Gao, Lingjun; Ma, Shaochun; Zhang, Shebin; Ma, Zhanzhong; Jiang, Wei; Liu, Fenglian; Chen, Baofeng; Zhang, Beibei; Pang, Jungang; Huang, Xiuyan; Weng, Jiaqiang

    2016-08-04

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained arrhythmia causing high morbidity and mortality. While changing of the cellular calcium homeostasis plays a critical role in AF, the L-type calcium channel α1c protein has suggested as an important regulator of reentrant spiral dynamics and is a major component of AF-related electrical remodeling. Our computational modeling predicted that miRNA-223 may regulate the CACNA1C gene which encodes the cardiac L-type calcium channel α1c subunit. We found that oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) cholesterol significantly up-regulates both the expression of miRNA-223 and L-type calcium channel protein. In contrast, knockdown of miRNA-223 reduced L-type calcium channel protein expression, while genetic knockdown of endogenous miRNA-223 dampened AF vulnerability. Transfection of miRNA-223 by adenovirus-mediated expression enhanced L-type calcium currents and promoted AF in mice while co-injection of a CACNA1C-specific miR-mimic counteracted the effect. Taken together, ox-LDL, as a known factor in AF-associated remodeling, positively regulates miRNA-223 transcription and L-type calcium channel protein expression. Our results implicate a new molecular mechanism for AF in which miRNA-223 can be used as an biomarker of AF rheumatic heart disease.

  11. Oxidized Low-density Lipoprotein (ox-LDL) Cholesterol Induces the Expression of miRNA-223 and L-type Calcium Channel Protein in Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    He, Fengping; Xu, Xin; Yuan, Shuguo; Tan, Liangqiu; Gao, Lingjun; Ma, Shaochun; Zhang, Shebin; Ma, Zhanzhong; Jiang, Wei; Liu, Fenglian; Chen, Baofeng; Zhang, Beibei; Pang, Jungang; Huang, Xiuyan; Weng, Jiaqiang

    2016-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained arrhythmia causing high morbidity and mortality. While changing of the cellular calcium homeostasis plays a critical role in AF, the L-type calcium channel α1c protein has suggested as an important regulator of reentrant spiral dynamics and is a major component of AF-related electrical remodeling. Our computational modeling predicted that miRNA-223 may regulate the CACNA1C gene which encodes the cardiac L-type calcium channel α1c subunit. We found that oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) cholesterol significantly up-regulates both the expression of miRNA-223 and L-type calcium channel protein. In contrast, knockdown of miRNA-223 reduced L-type calcium channel protein expression, while genetic knockdown of endogenous miRNA-223 dampened AF vulnerability. Transfection of miRNA-223 by adenovirus-mediated expression enhanced L-type calcium currents and promoted AF in mice while co-injection of a CACNA1C-specific miR-mimic counteracted the effect. Taken together, ox-LDL, as a known factor in AF-associated remodeling, positively regulates miRNA-223 transcription and L-type calcium channel protein expression. Our results implicate a new molecular mechanism for AF in which miRNA-223 can be used as an biomarker of AF rheumatic heart disease. PMID:27488468

  12. Oxidative Modulation of Voltage-Gated Potassium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Sahoo, Nirakar; Hoshi, Toshinori

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Voltage-gated K+ channels are a large family of K+-selective ion channel protein complexes that open on membrane depolarization. These K+ channels are expressed in diverse tissues and their function is vital for numerous physiological processes, in particular of neurons and muscle cells. Potentially reversible oxidative regulation of voltage-gated K+ channels by reactive species such as reactive oxygen species (ROS) represents a contributing mechanism of normal cellular plasticity and may play important roles in diverse pathologies including neurodegenerative diseases. Recent Advances: Studies using various protocols of oxidative modification, site-directed mutagenesis, and structural and kinetic modeling provide a broader phenomenology and emerging mechanistic insights. Critical Issues: Physicochemical mechanisms of the functional consequences of oxidative modifications of voltage-gated K+ channels are only beginning to be revealed. In vivo documentation of oxidative modifications of specific amino-acid residues of various voltage-gated K+ channel proteins, including the target specificity issue, is largely absent. Future Directions: High-resolution chemical and proteomic analysis of ion channel proteins with respect to oxidative modification combined with ongoing studies on channel structure and function will provide a better understanding of how the function of voltage-gated K+ channels is tuned by ROS and the corresponding reducing enzymes to meet cellular needs. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 933–952. PMID:24040918

  13. Voltage-gated proton channel is expressed on phagosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Okochi, Yoshifumi; Sasaki, Mari; Iwasaki, Hirohide; Okamura, Yasushi

    2009-05-01

    Voltage-gated proton channel has been suggested to help NADPH oxidase activity during respiratory burst of phagocytes through its activities of compensating charge imbalance and regulation of pH. In phagocytes, robust production of reactive oxygen species occurs in closed membrane compartments, which are called phagosomes. However, direct evidence for the presence of voltage-gated proton channels in phagosome has been lacking. In this study, the expression of voltage-gated proton channels was studied by Western blot with the antibody specific to the voltage-sensor domain protein, VSOP/Hv1, that has recently been identified as the molecular correlate for the voltage-gated proton channel. Phagosomal membranes of neutrophils contain VSOP/Hv1 in accordance with subunits of NADPH oxidases, gp91, p22, p47 and p67. Superoxide anion production upon PMA activation was significantly reduced in neutrophils from VSOP/Hv1 knockout mice. These are consistent with the idea that voltage-gated proton channels help NADPH oxidase in phagocytes to produce reactive oxygen species.

  14. Regulation of L-type calcium channel by phospholemman in cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xue-Qian; Wang, JuFang; Song, Jianliang; Rabinowitz, Joseph; Chen, Xiongwen; Houser, Steven R; Peterson, Blaise Z; Tucker, Amy L; Feldman, Arthur M; Cheung, Joseph Y

    2015-07-01

    We evaluated whether phospholemman (PLM) regulates L-type Ca(2+) current (ICa) in mouse ventricular myocytes. Expression of α1-subunit of L-type Ca(2+) channels between wild-type (WT) and PLM knockout (KO) hearts was similar. Compared to WT myocytes, peak ICa (at -10 mV) from KO myocytes was ~41% larger, the inactivation time constant (τ(inact)) of ICa was ~39% longer, but deactivation time constant (τ(deact)) was similar. In the presence of isoproterenol (1 μM), peak ICa was ~48% larger and τ(inact) was ~144% higher in KO myocytes. With Ba(2+) as the permeant ion, PLM enhanced voltage-dependent inactivation but had no effect on τ(deact). To dissect the molecular determinants by which PLM regulated ICa, we expressed PLM mutants by adenovirus-mediated gene transfer in cultured KO myocytes. After 24h in culture, KO myocytes expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) had significantly larger peak ICa and longer τ(inact) than KO myocytes expressing WT PLM; thereby independently confirming the observations in freshly isolated myocytes. Compared to KO myocytes expressing GFP, KO myocytes expressing the cytoplasmic domain truncation mutant (TM43), the non-phosphorylatable S68A mutant, the phosphomimetic S68E mutant, and the signature PFXYD to alanine (ALL5) mutant all resulted in lower peak ICa. Expressing PLM mutants did not alter expression of α1-subunit of L-type Ca(2+) channels in cultured KO myocytes. Our results suggested that both the extracellular PFXYD motif and the transmembrane domain of PLM but not the cytoplasmic tail were necessary for regulation of peak ICa amplitude. We conclude that PLM limits Ca(2+) influx in cardiac myocytes by reducing maximal ICa and accelerating voltage-dependent inactivation.

  15. Benzonatate inhibition of voltage-gated sodium currents.

    PubMed

    Evans, M Steven; Maglinger, G Benton; Fletcher, Anita M; Johnson, Stephen R

    2016-02-01

    Benzonatate was FDA-approved in 1958 as an antitussive. Its mechanism of action is thought to be anesthesia of vagal sensory nerve fibers that mediate cough. Vagal sensory neurons highly express the Nav1.7 subtype of voltage-gated sodium channels, and inhibition of this channel inhibits the cough reflex. Local anesthetics inhibit voltage-gated sodium channels, but there are no reports of whether benzonatate affects these channels. Our hypothesis is that benzonatate inhibits Nav1.7 voltage-gated sodium channels. We used whole cell voltage clamp recording to test the effects of benzonatate on voltage-gated sodium (Na(+)) currents in two murine cell lines, catecholamine A differentiated (CAD) cells, which express primarily Nav1.7, and N1E-115, which express primarily Nav1.3. We found that, like local anesthetics, benzonatate strongly and reversibly inhibits voltage-gated Na(+) channels. Benzonatate causes both tonic and phasic inhibition. It has greater effects on channel inactivation than on activation, and its potency is much greater at depolarized potentials, indicating inactivated-state-specific effects. Na(+) currents in CAD cells and N1E-115 cells are similarly affected, indicating that benzonatate is not Na(+) channel subtype-specific. Benzonatate is a mixture of polyethoxy esters of 4-(butylamino) benzoic acid having varying degrees of hydrophobicity. We found that Na(+) currents are inhibited most potently by a benzonatate fraction containing the 9-ethoxy component. Detectable effects of benzonatate occur at concentrations as low as 0.3 μM, which has been reported in humans. We conclude that benzonatate has local anesthetic-like effects on voltage-gated sodium channels, including Nav1.7, which is a possible mechanism for cough suppression by the drug.

  16. Benzonatate inhibition of voltage-gated sodium currents.

    PubMed

    Evans, M Steven; Maglinger, G Benton; Fletcher, Anita M; Johnson, Stephen R

    2016-02-01

    Benzonatate was FDA-approved in 1958 as an antitussive. Its mechanism of action is thought to be anesthesia of vagal sensory nerve fibers that mediate cough. Vagal sensory neurons highly express the Nav1.7 subtype of voltage-gated sodium channels, and inhibition of this channel inhibits the cough reflex. Local anesthetics inhibit voltage-gated sodium channels, but there are no reports of whether benzonatate affects these channels. Our hypothesis is that benzonatate inhibits Nav1.7 voltage-gated sodium channels. We used whole cell voltage clamp recording to test the effects of benzonatate on voltage-gated sodium (Na(+)) currents in two murine cell lines, catecholamine A differentiated (CAD) cells, which express primarily Nav1.7, and N1E-115, which express primarily Nav1.3. We found that, like local anesthetics, benzonatate strongly and reversibly inhibits voltage-gated Na(+) channels. Benzonatate causes both tonic and phasic inhibition. It has greater effects on channel inactivation than on activation, and its potency is much greater at depolarized potentials, indicating inactivated-state-specific effects. Na(+) currents in CAD cells and N1E-115 cells are similarly affected, indicating that benzonatate is not Na(+) channel subtype-specific. Benzonatate is a mixture of polyethoxy esters of 4-(butylamino) benzoic acid having varying degrees of hydrophobicity. We found that Na(+) currents are inhibited most potently by a benzonatate fraction containing the 9-ethoxy component. Detectable effects of benzonatate occur at concentrations as low as 0.3 μM, which has been reported in humans. We conclude that benzonatate has local anesthetic-like effects on voltage-gated sodium channels, including Nav1.7, which is a possible mechanism for cough suppression by the drug. PMID:26386152

  17. Regulation of L-type calcium current by intracellular magnesium in rat cardiac myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Min; Tashiro, Michiko; Berlin, Joshua R

    2004-01-01

    The effects of changing cytosolic [Mg2+] ([Mg2+]i) on l-type Ca2+ currents were investigated in rat cardiac ventricular myocytes voltage-clamped with patch pipettes containing salt solutions with defined [Mg2+] and [Ca2+]. To control [Mg2+]i and cytosolic [Ca2+] ([Ca2+]i), the pipette solution included 30 mm citrate and 10 mm ATP along with 5 mm EGTA (slow Ca2+ buffer) or 15 mm EGTA plus 5 mm BAPTA (fast Ca2+ buffer). With pipette [Ca2+] ([Ca2+]p) set at 100 nm using a slow Ca2+ buffer and pipette [Mg2+] ([Mg2+]p) set at 0.2 mm, peak l-type Ca2+ current density (ICa) was 17.0 ± 2.2 pA pF−1. Under the same conditions, but with [Mg2+]p set to 1.8 mm, ICa was 5.6 ± 1.0 pA pF−1, a 64 ± 2.8% decrease in amplitude. This decrease in ICa was accompanied by an acceleration and a –8 mV shift in the voltage dependence of current inactivation. The [Mg2+]p-dependent decrease in ICa was not significantly different when myocytes were preincubated with 10 μm forskolin and 300 μm 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine and voltage-clamped with pipettes containing 50 μm okadaic acid, to maximize Ca2+ channel phosphorylation. However, when myocytes were voltage-clamped with pipettes containing protein phosphatase 2A, to promote channel dephosphorylation, ICa decreased only 25 ± 3.4% on changing [Mg2+]p from 0.2 to 1.8 mm. In the presence of 0.2 mm[Mg2+]p, changing channel phosphorylation conditions altered ICa over a 4-fold range; however, with 1.8 mm[Mg2+]p, these same manoeuvres had a much smaller effect on ICa. These data suggest that [Mg2+]i can antagonize the effects of phosphorylation on channel gating kinetics. Setting [Ca2+]p to 1, 100 or 300 nm also showed that the [Mg2+]p-induced reduction of ICa was smaller at the lowest [Ca2+]p, irrespective of channel phosphorylation conditions. This interaction between [Ca2+]i and [Mg2+]i to modulate ICa was not significantly affected by ryanodine, fast Ca2+ buffers or inhibitors of calmodulin, calmodulin-dependent kinase and

  18. Supramolecular Assemblies and Localized Regulation of Voltage-Gated Ion Channels

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Shuiping; Hall, Duane D.; Hell, Johannes W.

    2009-01-01

    This review addresses the localized regulation of voltage-gated ion channels by phosphorylation. Comprehensive data on channel regulation by associated protein kinases, phosphatases, and related regulatory proteins are mainly available for voltage-gated Ca2+ channels, which form the main focus of this review. Other voltage-gated ion channels and especially Kv7.1-3 (KCNQ1-3), the large- and small-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels BK and SK2, and the inward-rectifying K+ channels Kir3 have also been studied to quite some extent and will be included. Regulation of the L-type Ca2+ channel Cav1.2 by PKA has been studied most thoroughly as it underlies the cardiac fight-or-flight response. A prototypical Cav1.2 signaling complex containing the β2 adrenergic receptor, the heterotrimeric G protein Gs, adenylyl cyclase, and PKA has been identified that supports highly localized via cAMP. The type 2 ryanodine receptor as well as AMPA- and NMDA-type glutamate receptors are in close proximity to Cav1.2 in cardiomyocytes and neurons, respectively, yet independently anchor PKA, CaMKII, and the serine/threonine phosphatases PP1, PP2A, and PP2B, as is discussed in detail. Descriptions of the structural and functional aspects of the interactions of PKA, PKC, CaMKII, Src, and various phosphatases with Cav1.2 will include comparisons with analogous interactions with other channels such as the ryanodine receptor or ionotropic glutamate receptors. Regulation of Na+ and K+ channel phosphorylation complexes will be discussed in separate papers. This review is thus intended for readers interested in ion channel regulation or in localization of kinases, phosphatases, and their upstream regulators. PMID:19342611

  19. Population Density and Moment-based Approaches to Modeling Domain Calcium-mediated Inactivation of L-type Calcium Channels.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao; Hardcastle, Kiah; Weinberg, Seth H; Smith, Gregory D

    2016-03-01

    We present a population density and moment-based description of the stochastic dynamics of domain [Formula: see text]-mediated inactivation of L-type [Formula: see text] channels. Our approach accounts for the effect of heterogeneity of local [Formula: see text] signals on whole cell [Formula: see text] currents; however, in contrast with prior work, e.g., Sherman et al. (Biophys J 58(4):985-995, 1990), we do not assume that [Formula: see text] domain formation and collapse are fast compared to channel gating. We demonstrate the population density and moment-based modeling approaches using a 12-state Markov chain model of an L-type [Formula: see text] channel introduced by Greenstein and Winslow (Biophys J 83(6):2918-2945, 2002). Simulated whole cell voltage clamp responses yield an inactivation function for the whole cell [Formula: see text] current that agrees with the traditional approach when domain dynamics are fast. We analyze the voltage-dependence of [Formula: see text] inactivation that may occur via slow heterogeneous domain [[Formula: see text

  20. Intracellular calcium store filling by an L-type calcium current in the basolateral amygdala at subthreshold membrane potentials.

    PubMed

    Power, John M; Sah, Pankaj

    2005-01-15

    The long-term changes that underlie learning and memory are activated by rises in intracellular Ca2+ that activate a number of signalling pathways and trigger changes in gene transcription. Ca2+ rises due to influx via L-type voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels (L-VDCCs) and release from intracellular Ca2+ stores have been consistently implicated in the biochemical cascades that underlie the final changes in memory formation. Here, we show that pyramidal neurones in the basolateral amygdala express an L-VDCC that is active at resting membrane potentials. Subthreshold depolarization of neurones either by current injection or summating synaptic potentials led to a sustained rise in cytosolic Ca2+ that was blocked by the dihydropyridine nicardipine. Activation of metabotropic receptors released Ca2+ from intracellular Ca2+ stores. At hyperpolarized potentials, metabotropic-evoked store release ran down with repeated stimulation. Depolarization of cells to -50 mV, or maintaining them at the resting membrane potential, restored release from intracellular Ca2+ stores, an effect that was blocked by nicardipine. These results show that Ca2+ influx via a low-voltage-activated L-type Ca2+ current refills inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP(3))-sensitive intracellular Ca2+ stores, and maintains Ca2+ release and wave generation by metabotropic receptor activation.

  1. Intracellular calcium store filling by an L-type calcium current in the basolateral amygdala at subthreshold membrane potentials

    PubMed Central

    Power, John M; Sah, Pankaj

    2005-01-01

    The long-term changes that underlie learning and memory are activated by rises in intracellular Ca2+ that activate a number of signalling pathways and trigger changes in gene transcription. Ca2+ rises due to influx via L-type voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels (L-VDCCs) and release from intracellular Ca2+ stores have been consistently implicated in the biochemical cascades that underlie the final changes in memory formation. Here, we show that pyramidal neurones in the basolateral amygdala express an L-VDCC that is active at resting membrane potentials. Subthreshold depolarization of neurones either by current injection or summating synaptic potentials led to a sustained rise in cytosolic Ca2+ that was blocked by the dihydropyridine nicardipine. Activation of metabotropic receptors released Ca2+ from intracellular Ca2+ stores. At hyperpolarized potentials, metabotropic-evoked store release ran down with repeated stimulation. Depolarization of cells to −50 mV, or maintaining them at the resting membrane potential, restored release from intracellular Ca2+ stores, an effect that was blocked by nicardipine. These results show that Ca2+ influx via a low-voltage-activated L-type Ca2+ current refills inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3)-sensitive intracellular Ca2+ stores, and maintains Ca2+ release and wave generation by metabotropic receptor activation. PMID:15550460

  2. Vitamin E isomer δ-tocopherol enhances the efficiency of neural stem cell differentiation via L-type calcium channel.

    PubMed

    Deng, Sihao; Hou, Guoqiang; Xue, Zhiqin; Zhang, Longmei; Zhou, Yuye; Liu, Chao; Liu, Yanqing; Li, Zhiyuan

    2015-01-12

    The effects of the vitamin E isomer δ-tocopherol on neural stem cell (NSC) differentiation have not been investigated until now. Here we investigated the effects of δ-tocopherol on NSC neural differentiation, maturation and its possible mechanisms. Neonatal rat NSCs were grown in suspended neurosphere cultures, and were identified by their expression of nestin protein and their capacity for self-renewal. Treatment with a low concentration of δ-tocopherol induced a significant increase in the percentage of β-III-tubulin-positive cells. δ-Tocopherol also stimulated morphological maturation of neurons in culture. We further observed that δ-tocopherol stimulation increased the expression of voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels. Moreover, a L-type specific Ca(2+) channel blocker verapamil reduced the percentage of differentiated neurons after δ-tocopherol treatment, and blocked the effects of δ-tocopherol on NSC differentiation into neurons. Together, our study demonstrates that δ-tocopherol may act through elevation of L-type calcium channel activity to increase neuronal differentiation.

  3. Phenotypical manifestations of mutations in the genes encoding subunits of the cardiac voltage-dependent L-type calcium channel

    PubMed Central

    Napolitano, Carlo; Antzelevitch, Charles

    2011-01-01

    The L-type Cardiac Calcium Channel (LTCC) plays a prominent role in the electrical and mechanical function of the heart. Mutations in the LTCC have been associated with a number of inherited cardiac arrhythmia syndromes, including Timothy, Brugada and Early Repolarization syndromes. Elucidation of the genetic defects associated with these syndromes has led to a better understanding of molecular and cellular mechanisms and the development of novel therapeutic approaches to dealing with the arrhythmic manifestations. This review provides an overview of the molecular structure and function of the LTCC, the genetic defects in these channels known to contribute to inherited disorders and the underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms contributing to the development of life-threatening arrhythmias. PMID:21372292

  4. Orexin-A potentiates L-type calcium/barium currents in rat retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, F; Weng, S-J; Yang, X-L; Zhong, Y-M

    2015-10-01

    Two neuropeptides, orexin-A and orexin-B (also called hypocretin-1 and -2), have been implicated in sleep/wake regulation, feeding behaviors via the activation of two subtypes of G-protein-coupled receptors: orexin 1 and orexin 2 receptors (OX1R and OX2R). While the expression of orexins and orexin receptors is immunohistochemically revealed in retinal neurons, the function of these peptides in the retina is largely unknown. Using whole-cell patch-clamp recordings in rat retinal slices, we demonstrated that orexin-A increased L-type-like barium currents (IBa,L) in ganglion cells (GCs), and the effect was blocked by the selective OX1R antagonist SB334867, but not by the OX2R antagonist TCS OX2 29. The orexin-A effect was abolished by intracellular dialysis of GDP-β-S/GPAnt-2A, a Gq protein inhibitor, suggesting the mediation of Gq. Additionally, during internal dialysis of the phosphatidylinositol (PI)-phospholipase C (PLC) inhibitor U73122, orexin-A did not change the IBa,L of GCs, whereas the orexin-A effect persisted in the presence of the phosphatidylcholine (PC)-PLC inhibitor D609. The orexin-A-induced potentiation was not seen with internal infusion of Ca(2+)-free solution or when inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3)-sensitive Ca(2+) release from intracellular stores was blocked by heparin/xestospongins-C. Moreover, the orexin-A effect was mimicked by the protein kinase C (PKC) activator phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, but was eliminated when PKC was inhibited by bisindolylmaleimide IV (Bis-IV)/Gö6976. Neither adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP)-protein kinase A (PKA) nor guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP)-protein kinase G (PKG) signaling pathway was likely involved, as orexin-A persisted to potentiate the IBa,L of GCs no matter these two pathways were activated or inhibited. These results suggest that, by activating OX1R, orexin-A potentiates the IBa,L of rat GCs through a distinct Gq/PI-PLC/IP3/Ca(2+)/PKC signaling pathway.

  5. Local postsynaptic voltage-gated sodium channel activation in dendritic spines of olfactory bulb granule cells.

    PubMed

    Bywalez, Wolfgang G; Patirniche, Dinu; Rupprecht, Vanessa; Stemmler, Martin; Herz, Andreas V M; Pálfi, Dénes; Rózsa, Balázs; Egger, Veronica

    2015-02-01

    Neuronal dendritic spines have been speculated to function as independent computational units, yet evidence for active electrical computation in spines is scarce. Here we show that strictly local voltage-gated sodium channel (Nav) activation can occur during excitatory postsynaptic potentials in the spines of olfactory bulb granule cells, which we mimic and detect via combined two-photon uncaging of glutamate and calcium imaging in conjunction with whole-cell recordings. We find that local Nav activation boosts calcium entry into spines through high-voltage-activated calcium channels and accelerates postsynaptic somatic depolarization, without affecting NMDA receptor-mediated signaling. Hence, Nav-mediated boosting promotes rapid output from the reciprocal granule cell spine onto the lateral mitral cell dendrite and thus can speed up recurrent inhibition. This striking example of electrical compartmentalization both adds to the understanding of olfactory network processing and broadens the general view of spine function.

  6. Repeated cocaine treatment enhances HIV-1 Tat-induced cortical excitability via over-activation of L-type calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Napier, T Celeste; Chen, Lihua; Kashanchi, Fatah; Hu, Xiu-Ti

    2014-06-01

    The prefrontal cortex (PFC) is dysregulated in neuroAIDS and during cocaine abuse. Repeated cocaine treatment upregulates voltage gated L-type Ca(2+) channels in pyramidal neurons within the rat medial PFC (mPFC). L-type Ca(2+) channels are also upregulated by the HIV-1 neurotoxic protein, Tat, but the role of Tat in pyramidal cell function is unknown. This represents a major knowledge gap as PFC pyramidal neurons are important mediators of behaviors that are disrupted in neuroAIDS and by chronic cocaine exposure. To determine if L-channel-mediated Ca(2+) dysregulation in mPFC pyramidal neurons are a common neuropathogenic site for Tat and chronic cocaine, we evaluated the electrophysiological effects of recombinant Tat on these neurons in forebrain slices taken from rats 1-3 days after five, once-daily treatments of cocaine (15 mg/kg, ip) or saline. In saline-treated rats, bath-applied Tat facilitated membrane depolarization and firing. Ca(2+) influx was increased (indicated by prolonged Ca(2+) spikes) with low concentrations of Tat (10-40nM), but reduced by higher concentrations (80-160nM), the latter likely reflecting dysfunction associated with excessive excitation. Tat-mediated effects were detected during NMDA/AMPA receptor blockade, and abolished by blocking activated L-channels with diltiazem. In neurons from cocaine-treated rats, the Tat-induced effects on evoked firing and Ca(2+) spikes were significantly enhanced above that obtained with Tat in slices from saline-treated rats. Thus, glutamatergic receptor-independent over-activation of L-channels contributed to the Tat-induced hyper-reactivity of mPFC pyramidal neurons to excitatory stimuli, which was exacerbated in rats repeatedly exposed to cocaine. Such effects may contribute to the exaggerated neuropathology reported for HIV(+) cocaine-abusing individuals.

  7. Splice variants of the CaV1.3 L-type calcium channel regulate dendritic spine morphology

    PubMed Central

    Stanika, Ruslan; Campiglio, Marta; Pinggera, Alexandra; Lee, Amy; Striessnig, Jörg; Flucher, Bernhard E.; Obermair, Gerald J.

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic spines are the postsynaptic compartments of glutamatergic synapses in the brain. Their number and shape are subject to change in synaptic plasticity and neurological disorders including autism spectrum disorders and Parkinson’s disease. The L-type calcium channel CaV1.3 constitutes an important calcium entry pathway implicated in the regulation of spine morphology. Here we investigated the importance of full-length CaV1.3L and two C-terminally truncated splice variants (CaV1.342A and CaV1.343S) and their modulation by densin-180 and shank1b for the morphology of dendritic spines of cultured hippocampal neurons. Live-cell immunofluorescence and super-resolution microscopy of epitope-tagged CaV1.3L revealed its localization at the base-, neck-, and head-region of dendritic spines. Expression of the short splice variants or deletion of the C-terminal PDZ-binding motif in CaV1.3L induced aberrant dendritic spine elongation. Similar morphological alterations were induced by co-expression of densin-180 or shank1b with CaV1.3L and correlated with increased CaV1.3 currents and dendritic calcium signals in transfected neurons. Together, our findings suggest a key role of CaV1.3 in regulating dendritic spine structure. Under physiological conditions it may contribute to the structural plasticity of glutamatergic synapses. Conversely, altered regulation of CaV1.3 channels may provide an important mechanism in the development of postsynaptic aberrations associated with neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:27708393

  8. Voltage-gated calcium channel and antisense oligonucleotides thereto

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hruska, Keith A. (Inventor); Friedman, Peter A. (Inventor); Barry, Elizabeth L. R. (Inventor); Duncan, Randall L. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    An antisense oligonucleotide of 10 to 35 nucleotides in length that can hybridize with a region of the .alpha..sub.1 subunit of the SA-Cat channel gene DNA or mRNA is provided, together with pharmaceutical compositions containing and methods utilizing such antisense oligonucleotide.

  9. Calcium influx through L-type channels generates protein kinase M to induce burst firing of dopamine cells in the rat ventral tegmental area.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yudan; Dore, Jules; Chen, Xihua

    2007-03-23

    Enhanced activity of the dopaminergic system originating in the ventral tegmental area is implicated in addictive and psychiatric disorders. Burst firing increases dopamine levels at the synapse to signal novelty and salience. We have previously reported a calcium-dependent burst firing of dopamine cells mediated by L-type channels following cholinergic stimulation; this paper describes a cellular mechanism resulting in burst firing following L-type channel activation. Calcium influx through L-type channels following FPL 64176 or (S)-(-)-Bay K8644 induced burst firing independent of dopamine, glutamate, or calcium from the internal stores. Burst firing induced as such was completely blocked by the substrate site protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor chelerythrine but not by the diacylglycerol site inhibitor calphostin C. Western blotting analysis showed that FPL 64176 and (S)-(-)-Bay K8644 increased the cleavage of PKC to generate protein kinase M (PKM) and the specific calpain inhibitor MDL28170 blocked this increase. Prevention of PKM production by inhibiting calpain or depleting PKC blocked burst firing induction whereas direct loading of purified PKM into cells induced burst firing. Activation of the N-methyl-D-aspartic acid type glutamate or cholinergic receptors known to induce burst firing increased PKM expression. These results indicate that calcium influx through L-type channels activates a calcium-dependent protease that cleaves PKC to generate constitutively active and labile PKM resulting in burst firing of dopamine cells, a pathway that is involved in glutamatergic or cholinergic modulation of the central dopamine system.

  10. Identification and differential subcellular localization of the neuronal class C and class D L-type calcium channel alpha 1 subunits

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    To identify and localize the protein products of genes encoding distinct L-type calcium channels in central neurons, anti-peptide antibodies specific for the class C and class D alpha 1 subunits were produced. Anti-CNC1 directed against class C immunoprecipitated 75% of the L-type channels solubilized from rat cerebral cortex and hippocampus. Anti-CND1 directed against class D immunoprecipitated only 20% of the L-type calcium channels. Immunoblotting revealed two size forms of the class C L-type alpha 1 subunit, LC1 and LC2, and two size forms of the class D L-type alpha 1 subunit, LD1 and LD2. The larger isoforms had apparent molecular masses of approximately 200-210 kD while the smaller isoforms were 180-190 kD, as estimated from electrophoresis in gels polymerized from 5% acrylamide. Immunocytochemical studies using CNC1 and CND1 antibodies revealed that the alpha 1 subunits of both L-type calcium channel subtypes are localized mainly in neuronal cell bodies and proximal dendrites. Relatively dense labeling was observed at the base of major dendrites in many neurons. Staining in more distal dendritic regions was faint or undetectable with CND1, while a more significant level of staining of distal dendrites was observed with CNC1, particularly in the dentate gyrus and the CA2 and CA3 areas of the hippocampus. Class C calcium channels were concentrated in clusters, while class D calcium channels were generally distributed in the cell surface membrane of cell bodies and proximal dendrites. Our results demonstrate multiple size forms and differential localization of two subtypes of L-type calcium channels in the cell bodies and proximal dendrites of central neurons. The differential localization and multiple size forms may allow these two channel subtypes to participate in distinct aspects of electrical signal integration and intracellular calcium signaling in neuronal cell bodies. The preferential localization of these calcium channels in cell bodies and proximal

  11. Unusual Voltage-Gated Sodium Currents as Targets for Pain.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, C; Cummins, T R

    2016-01-01

    Pain is a serious health problem that impacts the lives of many individuals. Hyperexcitability of peripheral sensory neurons contributes to both acute and chronic pain syndromes. Because voltage-gated sodium currents are crucial to the transmission of electrical signals in peripheral sensory neurons, the channels that underlie these currents are attractive targets for pain therapeutics. Sodium currents and channels in peripheral sensory neurons are complex. Multiple-channel isoforms contribute to the macroscopic currents in nociceptive sensory neurons. These different isoforms exhibit substantial variations in their kinetics and pharmacology. Furthermore, sodium current complexity is enhanced by an array of interacting proteins that can substantially modify the properties of voltage-gated sodium channels. Resurgent sodium currents, atypical currents that can enhance recovery from inactivation and neuronal firing, are increasingly being recognized as playing potentially important roles in sensory neuron hyperexcitability and pain sensations. Here we discuss unusual sodium channels and currents that have been identified in nociceptive sensory neurons, describe what is known about the molecular determinants of the complex sodium currents in these neurons. Finally, we provide an overview of therapeutic strategies to target voltage-gated sodium currents in nociceptive neurons. PMID:27586296

  12. Scientific evidence contradicts findings and assumptions of Canadian Safety Panel 6: microwaves act through voltage-gated calcium channel activation to induce biological impacts at non-thermal levels, supporting a paradigm shift for microwave/lower frequency electromagnetic field action.

    PubMed

    Pall, Martin L

    2015-01-01

    This review considers a paradigm shift on microwave electromagnetic field (EMF) action from only thermal effects to action via voltage-gated calcium channel (VGCC) activation. Microwave/lower frequency EMFs were shown in two dozen studies to act via VGCC activation because all effects studied were blocked by calcium channel blockers. This mode of action was further supported by hundreds of studies showing microwave changes in calcium fluxes and intracellular calcium [Ca2+]i signaling. The biophysical properties of VGCCs/similar channels make them particularly sensitive to low intensity, non-thermal EMF exposures. Non-thermal studies have shown that in most cases pulsed fields are more active than are non-pulsed fields and that exposures within certain intensity windows have much large biological effects than do either lower or higher intensity exposures; these are both consistent with a VGCC role but inconsistent with only a heating/thermal role. Downstream effects of VGCC activation include calcium signaling, elevated nitric oxide (NO), NO signaling, peroxynitrite, free radical formation, and oxidative stress. Downstream effects explain repeatedly reported biological responses to non-thermal exposures: oxidative stress; single and double strand breaks in cellular DNA; cancer; male and female infertility; lowered melatonin/sleep disruption; cardiac changes including tachycardia, arrhythmia, and sudden cardiac death; diverse neuropsychiatric effects including depression; and therapeutic effects. Non-VGCC non-thermal mechanisms may occur, but none have been shown to have effects in mammals. Biologically relevant safety standards can be developed through studies of cell lines/cell cultures with high levels of different VGCCs, measuring their responses to different EMF exposures. The 2014 Canadian Report by a panel of experts only recognizes thermal effects regarding safety standards for non-ionizing radiation exposures. Its position is therefore contradicted by each

  13. Scientific evidence contradicts findings and assumptions of Canadian Safety Panel 6: microwaves act through voltage-gated calcium channel activation to induce biological impacts at non-thermal levels, supporting a paradigm shift for microwave/lower frequency electromagnetic field action.

    PubMed

    Pall, Martin L

    2015-01-01

    This review considers a paradigm shift on microwave electromagnetic field (EMF) action from only thermal effects to action via voltage-gated calcium channel (VGCC) activation. Microwave/lower frequency EMFs were shown in two dozen studies to act via VGCC activation because all effects studied were blocked by calcium channel blockers. This mode of action was further supported by hundreds of studies showing microwave changes in calcium fluxes and intracellular calcium [Ca2+]i signaling. The biophysical properties of VGCCs/similar channels make them particularly sensitive to low intensity, non-thermal EMF exposures. Non-thermal studies have shown that in most cases pulsed fields are more active than are non-pulsed fields and that exposures within certain intensity windows have much large biological effects than do either lower or higher intensity exposures; these are both consistent with a VGCC role but inconsistent with only a heating/thermal role. Downstream effects of VGCC activation include calcium signaling, elevated nitric oxide (NO), NO signaling, peroxynitrite, free radical formation, and oxidative stress. Downstream effects explain repeatedly reported biological responses to non-thermal exposures: oxidative stress; single and double strand breaks in cellular DNA; cancer; male and female infertility; lowered melatonin/sleep disruption; cardiac changes including tachycardia, arrhythmia, and sudden cardiac death; diverse neuropsychiatric effects including depression; and therapeutic effects. Non-VGCC non-thermal mechanisms may occur, but none have been shown to have effects in mammals. Biologically relevant safety standards can be developed through studies of cell lines/cell cultures with high levels of different VGCCs, measuring their responses to different EMF exposures. The 2014 Canadian Report by a panel of experts only recognizes thermal effects regarding safety standards for non-ionizing radiation exposures. Its position is therefore contradicted by each

  14. Characterisation of marrubenol, a diterpene extracted from Marrubium vulgare, as an L-type calcium channel blocker.

    PubMed

    El-Bardai, Sanae; Wibo, Maurice; Hamaide, Marie-Christine; Lyoussi, Badiaa; Quetin-Leclercq, Joelle; Morel, Nicole

    2003-12-01

    1. The objective of the present study was to investigate the mechanism of the relaxant activity of marrubenol, a diterpenoid extracted from Marrubium vulgare. In rat aorta, marrubenol was a more potent inhibitor of the contraction evoked by 100 mM KCl (IC50: 11.8+/-0.3 microM, maximum relaxation: 93+/-0.6%) than of the contraction evoked by noradrenaline (maximum relaxation: 30+/-1.5%). 2. In fura-2-loaded aorta, marrubenol simultaneously inhibited the Ca2+ signal and the contraction evoked by 100 mM KCl, and decreased the quenching rate of fura-2 fluorescence by Mn2+. 3. Patch-clamp data obtained in aortic smooth muscle cells (A7r5) indicated that marrubenol inhibited Ba2+ inward current in a voltage-dependent manner (KD: 8+/-2 and 40+/-6 microM at holding potentials of -50 and -100 mV, respectively). 4. These results showed that marrubenol inhibits smooth muscle contraction by blocking L-type calcium channels.

  15. Combined chronic blockade of hyper-active L-type calcium channels and NMDA receptors ameliorates HIV-1 associated hyper-excitability of mPFC pyramidal neurons.

    PubMed

    Khodr, Christina E; Chen, Lihua; Dave, Sonya; Al-Harthi, Lena; Hu, Xiu-Ti

    2016-10-01

    Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection induces neurological and neuropsychological deficits, which are associated with dysregulation of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and other vulnerable brain regions. We evaluated the impact of HIV infection in the mPFC and the therapeutic potential of targeting over-active voltage-gated L-type Ca(2+) channels (L-channel) and NMDA receptors (NMDAR), as modeled in HIV-1 transgenic (Tg) rats. Whole-cell patch-clamp recording was used to assess the membrane properties and voltage-sensitive Ca(2+) potentials (Ca(2+) influx) in mPFC pyramidal neurons. Neurons from HIV-1 Tg rats displayed reduced rheobase, spike amplitude and inwardly-rectifying K(+) influx, increased numbers of action potentials, and a trend of aberrant firing compared to those from non-Tg control rats. Neuronal hyper-excitation was associated with abnormally-enhanced Ca(2+) influx (independent of NMDAR), which was eliminated by acute L-channel blockade. Combined chronic blockade of over-active L-channels and NMDARs with open-channel blockers abolished HIV effects on spiking, aberrant firing and Ca(2+) potential half-amplitude duration, though not the reduced inward rectification. In contrast, individual chronic blockade of over-active L-channels or NMDARs did not alleviate HIV-induced mPFC hyper-excitability. These studies demonstrate that HIV alters mPFC neuronal activity by dysregulating membrane excitability and Ca(2+) influx through the L-channels. This renders these neurons more susceptible and vulnerable to excitatory stimuli, and could contribute to HIV-associated neuropathogenesis. Combined targeting of over-active L-channels/NMDARs alleviates HIV-induced dysfunction of mPFC pyramidal neurons, emphasizing a potential novel therapeutic strategy that may effectively decrease HIV-induced Ca(2+) dysregulation in the mPFC.

  16. Combined chronic blockade of hyper-active L-type calcium channels and NMDA receptors ameliorates HIV-1 associated hyper-excitability of mPFC pyramidal neurons.

    PubMed

    Khodr, Christina E; Chen, Lihua; Dave, Sonya; Al-Harthi, Lena; Hu, Xiu-Ti

    2016-10-01

    Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection induces neurological and neuropsychological deficits, which are associated with dysregulation of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and other vulnerable brain regions. We evaluated the impact of HIV infection in the mPFC and the therapeutic potential of targeting over-active voltage-gated L-type Ca(2+) channels (L-channel) and NMDA receptors (NMDAR), as modeled in HIV-1 transgenic (Tg) rats. Whole-cell patch-clamp recording was used to assess the membrane properties and voltage-sensitive Ca(2+) potentials (Ca(2+) influx) in mPFC pyramidal neurons. Neurons from HIV-1 Tg rats displayed reduced rheobase, spike amplitude and inwardly-rectifying K(+) influx, increased numbers of action potentials, and a trend of aberrant firing compared to those from non-Tg control rats. Neuronal hyper-excitation was associated with abnormally-enhanced Ca(2+) influx (independent of NMDAR), which was eliminated by acute L-channel blockade. Combined chronic blockade of over-active L-channels and NMDARs with open-channel blockers abolished HIV effects on spiking, aberrant firing and Ca(2+) potential half-amplitude duration, though not the reduced inward rectification. In contrast, individual chronic blockade of over-active L-channels or NMDARs did not alleviate HIV-induced mPFC hyper-excitability. These studies demonstrate that HIV alters mPFC neuronal activity by dysregulating membrane excitability and Ca(2+) influx through the L-channels. This renders these neurons more susceptible and vulnerable to excitatory stimuli, and could contribute to HIV-associated neuropathogenesis. Combined targeting of over-active L-channels/NMDARs alleviates HIV-induced dysfunction of mPFC pyramidal neurons, emphasizing a potential novel therapeutic strategy that may effectively decrease HIV-induced Ca(2+) dysregulation in the mPFC. PMID:27326669

  17. Heterogeneity of Calcium Channel/cAMP-Dependent Transcriptional Activation.

    PubMed

    Kobrinsky, Evgeny

    2015-01-01

    The major function of the voltage-gated calcium channels is to provide the Ca(2+) flux into the cell. L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (Cav1) serve as voltage sensors that couple membrane depolarization to many intracellular processes. Electrical activity in excitable cells affects gene expression through signaling pathways involved in the excitation-transcription (E-T) coupling. E-T coupling starts with activation of the Cav1 channel and results in initiation of the cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB)-dependent transcription. In this review we discuss the new quantitative approaches to measuring E-T signaling events. We describe the use of wavelet transform to detect heterogeneity of transcriptional activation in nuclei. Furthermore, we discuss the properties of discovered microdomains of nuclear signaling associated with the E-T coupling and the basis of the frequency-dependent transcriptional regulation.

  18. Melanopsin Phototransduction Contributes to Light-Evoked Choroidal Expansion and Rod L-Type Calcium Channel Function In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Berkowitz, Bruce A.; Schmidt, Tiffany; Podolsky, Robert H.; Roberts, Robin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose In humans, rodents, and pigeons, the dark → light transition signals nonretinal brain tissue to increase choroidal thickness, a major control element of choroidal blood flow, and thus of photoreceptor and retinal pigment epithelium function. However, it is unclear which photopigments in the retina relay the light signal to the brain. Here, we test the hypothesis that melanopsin (Opn4)-regulated phototransduction modulates light-evoked choroidal thickness expansion in mice. Methods Two-month-old C57Bl/6 wild-type (B6), 4- to 5-month-old C57Bl/6/129S6 wild-type (B6 + S6), and 2-month-old melanopsin knockout (Opn4−/−) on a B6 + S6 background were studied. Retinal anatomy was evaluated in vivo by optical coherence tomography and MRI. Choroidal thickness in dark and light were measured by diffusion-weighted MRI. Rod cell L-type calcium channel (LTCC) function in dark and light (manganese-enhanced MRI [MEMRI]) was also measured. Results Opn4−/− mice did not show the light-evoked expansion of choroidal thickness observed in B6 and B6 + S6 controls. Additionally, Opn4−/− mice had lower than normal rod cell and inner retinal LTCC function in the dark but not in the light. These deficits were not due to structural abnormalities because retinal laminar architecture and thickness, and choroidal thickness in the Opn4−/− mice were similar to controls. Conclusions First time evidence is provided that melanopsin phototransduction contributes to dark → light control of murine choroidal thickness. The data also highlight a contribution in vivo of melanopsin phototransduction to rod cell and inner retinal depolarization in the dark. PMID:27727394

  19. Opposite effects of phosphatase inhibitors on L-type calcium and delayed rectifier currents in frog cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Frace, A M; Hartzell, H C

    1993-01-01

    1. Application of the phosphatase inhibitors okadaic acid (OA) and microcystin (MC) to frog cardiomyocytes caused large increases in L-type calcium current (ICa) in the absence of beta-adrenergic agonists. The increase occurred without effects on the peak current-voltage relation or voltage-dependent inactivation. OA and MC caused a decrease in amplitude of delayed rectifier current (IK), which is opposite to the increase produced by cAMP-dependent phosphorylation. The decrease occurred without effects on voltage-dependent activation or reversal potential. 2. Analysis of the dose-response relations for OA and MC on ventricular cell ICa were best fitted with a single-site relationship with a K1/2 of 1.58 microM and 0.81 microM, respectively. These data suggest the predominant form of phosphatase active on ICa in this cell type is produced by protein phosphatase 1. Inhibition of phosphatase 2B (calcineurin) was without appreciable effect. 3. Reducing intracellular ATP levels was without effect on basal ICa suggesting that calcium channels may not need to be phosphorylated to open. ATP depletion was able to block completely the ICa increase induced by OA or MC. This demonstrates that the effects of OA and MC on ICa are mediated by a phosphorylation reaction. In contrast, ATP depletion totally abolished IK, suggesting either a requirement for ATP or phosphorylation for basal function of the delayed rectifier channel. 4. Internal perfusion of a peptide inhibitor (PKI(5-22)) of protein kinase A (PK-A) was without effect on basal current levels of ICa or IK, suggesting that this kinase is not phosphorylating these channels under basal conditions. Furthermore, although PKI is capable of completely blocking the response of ICa to isoprenaline or forskolin, PKI does not affect the increase in ICa induced by MC or OA. Inhibition of adenylate cyclase with acetylcholine or inhibition of PK-A with adenosine cyclic 3',5'-(Rp)-phosphothioate (Rp-cAMPS) also had no effect on the

  20. A highly energetic process couples calcium influx through L-type calcium channels to insulin secretion in pancreatic β-cells

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Seung-Ryoung; Reed, Benjamin J.; Sweet, Ian R.

    2009-01-01

    Calcium (Ca2+) influx is required for the sustained secretion of insulin and is accompanied by a large rate of energy usage. We hypothesize that the energy usage reflects a process [Ca2+/metabolic coupling process (CMCP)] that couples Ca2+ to insulin secretion by pancreatic islets. The aim of the study was to test this hypothesis by testing the effect of inhibiting candidate Ca2+-sensitive proteins proposed to play a critical role in the CMCP. The effects of the inhibitors on oxygen consumption rate (OCR), a reflection of ATP usage, and insulin secretion rate (ISR) were compared with those seen when L-type Ca2+ channels were blocked with nimodipine. We reasoned that if a downstream Ca2+-regulated site was responsible for the OCR associated with the CMCP, then its inhibition should mimic the effect of nimodipine. Consistent with previous findings, nimodipine decreased glucose-stimulated OCR by 36% and cytosolic Ca2+ by 46% and completely suppressed ISR in rat pancreatic islets. Inhibitors of three calmodulin-sensitive proteins (myosin light-chain kinase, calcineurin, and Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II) did not meet the criteria. In contrast, KN-62 severed the connection between Ca2+ influx, OCR, and ISR without interfering with Ca2+ influx. In the presence of nimodipine or KN-62, potentiators of ISR, acetylcholine, GLP-1, and arginine had little effect on insulin secretion, suggesting that the CMCP is also essential for the amplification of ISR. In conclusion, a KN-62-sensitive process directly mediates the effects of Ca2+ influx via L-type Ca2+ channels on OCR and ISR, supporting the essential role of the CMCP in mediating ISR. PMID:19584201

  1. Mechanism of voltage-gated channel formation in lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Guidelli, Rolando; Becucci, Lucia

    2016-04-01

    Although several molecular models for voltage-gated ion channels in lipid membranes have been proposed, a detailed mechanism accounting for the salient features of experimental data is lacking. A general treatment accounting for peptide dipole orientation in the electric field and their nucleation and growth kinetics with ion channel formation is provided. This is the first treatment that explains all the main features of the experimental current-voltage curves of peptides forming voltage-gated channels available in the literature. It predicts a regime of weakly voltage-dependent conductance, followed by one of strong voltage-dependent conductance at higher voltages. It also predicts values of the parameters expressing the exponential dependence of conductance upon voltage and peptide bulk concentration for both regimes, in good agreement with those reported in the literature. Most importantly, the only two adjustable parameters involved in the kinetics of nucleation and growth of ion channels can be varied over broad ranges without affecting the above predictions to a significant extent. Thus, the fitting of experimental current-voltage curves stems naturally from the treatment and depends only slightly upon the choice of the kinetic parameters. PMID:26768224

  2. Voltage-Gated Proton Channel in Human Glioblastoma Multiforme Cells.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro-Silva, Luisa; Queiroz, Fernanda Oliveira; da Silva, Annielle Mendes Brito; Hirata, Aparecida Emiko; Arcisio-Miranda, Manoel

    2016-07-20

    Solid tumors tend to have a more glycolytic metabolism leading to an accumulation of acidic metabolites in their cytosol, and consequently, their intracellular pH (pHi) turns critically lower if the cells do not handle the acid excess. Recently, it was proposed that the voltage gated proton channels (HV1) can regulate the pHi in several cancers. Here we report the functional expression of voltage gated proton channels in a human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cell line, the most common and lethal brain tumor. T98G cells presented an outward, slow activating voltage-dependent proton current, which was also ΔpH-dependent and inhibited by ZnCl2, characterizing it as being conducted by HV1 channels. Furthermore, blocking HV1 channels with ZnCl2 significantly reduced the pHi, cell survival, and migration, indicating an important role for HV1 for tumor proliferation and progression in GBM. Overall, our results suggest that HV1 channels can be a new therapeutic target for GBM. PMID:27225904

  3. Sarcoplasmic reticulum and L-type Ca²⁺ channel activity regulate the beat-to-beat stability of calcium handling in human atrial myocytes.

    PubMed

    Llach, Anna; Molina, Cristina E; Fernandes, Jacqueline; Padró, Josep; Cinca, Juan; Hove-Madsen, Leif

    2011-07-01

    Irregularities in intracellular calcium on a beat-to-beat basis can precede cardiac arrhythmia, but the mechanisms inducing such irregularities remain elusive. This study tested the hypothesis that sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) and L-type calcium channel activity determine the beat-to-beat response and its rate dependency. For this purpose, patch-clamp technique and confocal calcium imaging was used to record L-type calcium current (ICa) and visualize calcium in human atrial myocytes subjected to increasing stimulation frequencies (from 0.2 to 2 Hz). The beat-to-beat response was heterogeneous among a population of 133 myocytes, with 30 myocytes responding uniformly at all frequencies, while alternating and irregular responses were induced in 78 and 25 myocytes, respectively. Myocytes with uniform responses had the lowest frequency of calcium wave-induced transient inward currents (ITI; 0.4 ± 0.2 min⁻¹), ICa density (1.8 ± 0.3 pA pF⁻¹) and caffeine-releasable calcium load (6.2 ± 0.5 amol pF⁻¹), while those with alternating responses had the highest ITI frequency (1.8 ± 0.3 min⁻¹,P =0.003) and ICa density (2.4 ± 0.2 pA pF⁻¹, P =0.04). In contrast, the calcium load was highest in myocytes with irregular responses (8.5 ± 0.7 amol pF⁻¹, P =0.01). Accordingly, partial ICa inhibition reduced the incidence (from 78 to 44%, P <0.05) and increased the threshold frequency for beat-to-beat alternation (from 1.3 ± 0.2 to 1.9 ± 0.2 Hz, P <0.05). Partial inhibition of SR calcium release reduced the ITI frequency, increased calcium loading and favoured induction of irregular responses, while complete inhibition abolished beat-to-beat alternation at all frequencies. In conclusion, the beat-to-beat response was heterogeneous among human atrial myocytes subjected to increasing stimulation frequencies, and the nature and stability of the response were determined by the SR and L-type calcium channel activities, suggesting that these mechanisms are key to

  4. Effects of total flavones from Acanthopanax senticosus on L-type calcium channels, calcium transient and contractility in rat ventricular myocytes.

    PubMed

    Guan, Shengjiang; Ma, Juanjuan; Chu, Xi; Gao, Yonggang; Zhang, Ying; Zhang, Xuan; Zhang, Fenghua; Liu, Zhenyi; Zhang, Jianping; Chu, Li

    2015-04-01

    Acanthopanax senticosus (Rupr. et Maxim.) Harms (AS), a traditional herbal medicine, has been widely used to treat ischemic heart disease. However, the underlying cellular mechanisms of its benefits to cardiac function remain unclear. The present study examined the effects of total flavones from AS (TFAS) on L-type Ca(2+) channel currents (ICa-L ) using the whole cell patch-clamp technique and on intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+) ]i ) handling and cell contractility in rat ventricular myocytes with the aid of a video-based edge-detection system. Exposure to TFAS resulted in a concentration- and voltage-dependent blockade of ICa-L , with the half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50 ) of 283.12 µg/mL and the maximal inhibitory effect of 36.49 ± 1.95%. Moreover, TFAS not only increased the maximum current in the current-voltage relationship but also shifted the activation and inactivation curves of ICa-L toward the hyperpolarizing direction. Meanwhile, TFAS significantly reduced amplitudes of myocyte shortening and [Ca(2+) ]i with an increase in the time to 10% of the peak (Tp) and a decrease in the time to 10% of the baseline (Tr). Thus, the cardioprotective effects of TFAS may be attributed mainly to the attenuation of [Ca(2+) ]i through the direct inhibition of ICa-L in rat ventricular myocytes and consequent negative effect on myocardial contractility. PMID:25586009

  5. Nuclear translocation of the cardiac L-type calcium channel C-terminus is regulated by sex and 17β-estradiol.

    PubMed

    Mahmoodzadeh, S; Haase, H; Sporbert, A; Rharass, T; Panáková, D; Morano, I

    2016-08-01

    The cardiac voltage gated l-type Ca(2+) channel (Cav1.2) constitutes the main entrance gate for Ca(2+) that triggers cardiac contraction. Several studies showed that the distal C-terminus fragment of Cav1.2 α1C subunit (α1C-dCT) is proteolytically cleaved and shuttles between the plasma membrane and the nucleus, which is regulated both developmentally and by Ca(2+). However, the effects of sex and sex hormone 17β-estradiol (E2, estrogen) on α1C-dCT nuclear translocation are still unexplored. To investigate the sexual disparity in the α1C-dCT nuclear translocation, we first generated an antibody directed against a synthetic peptide (GRRASFHLE) located in α1C-dCT, and used it to probe ventricular myocytes from adult female and male mice. Immunocytochemistry of isolated mouse primary adult ventricular myocytes revealed both nuclear staining and cytosolic punctuate staining around the T-tubules. The ratio of nuclear to cytosolic intensity (Inuc/Icyt) was significantly higher in isolated female cardiomyocytes (1.42±0.05) compared to male cardiomyocytes (1.05±0.02). Western blot analysis of nuclear fraction confirmed these data. Furthermore, we found a significant decrease in nuclear staining intensity of α1C-dCT in both female and male cardiomyocytes upon serum withdrawal for 18h (Inuc/Icyt 1.05±0.02 and 0.89±0.02, respectively). Interestingly, subsequent E2 treatment (10(-8)M) for 8h normalized the intracellular distribution of α1C-dCT in male cardiomyocytes (Inuc/Icyt 1.04±0.02), but not in female cardiomyocytes. Acute treatment of male cardiomyocytes with E2 for 45min revealed a similar effect. This effect of E2 was revised by ICI indicating the involvement of ER in this signaling pathway. Taken together, our results showed that the shuttling of α1C-CT in cardiomyocytes is regulated in a sex-dependent manner, and E2-activated ER may play a role in the nuclear shuttling of α1C-dCT in male cardiomyocytes. This may explain, at least partly, the observed

  6. Biophysical Adaptations of Prokaryotic Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels.

    PubMed

    Vien, T N; DeCaen, P G

    2016-01-01

    This chapter describes the adaptive features found in voltage-gated sodium channels (NaVs) of prokaryotes and eukaryotes. These two families are distinct, having diverged early in evolutionary history but maintain a surprising degree of convergence in function. While prokaryotic NaVs are required for growth and motility, eukaryotic NaVs selectively conduct fast electrical currents for short- and long-range signaling across cell membranes in mammalian organs. Current interest in prokaryotic NaVs is stoked by their resolved high-resolution structures and functional features which are reminiscent of eukaryotic NaVs. In this chapter, comparisons between eukaryotic and prokaryotic NaVs are made to highlight the shared and unique aspects of ion selectivity, voltage sensitivity, and pharmacology. Examples of prokaryotic and eukaryotic NaV convergent evolution will be discussed within the context of their structural features. PMID:27586280

  7. The screw-helical voltage gating of ion channels.

    PubMed Central

    Keynes, R D; Elinder, F

    1999-01-01

    In the voltage-gated ion channels of every animal, whether they are selective for K+, Na+ or Ca2+, the voltage sensors are the S4 transmembrane segments carrying four to eight positive charges always separated by two uncharged residues. It is proposed that they move across the membrane in a screw-helical fashion in a series of three or more steps that each transfer a single electronic charge. The unit steps are stabilized by ion pairing between the mobile positive charges and fixed negative charges, of which there are invariably two located near the inner ends of segments S2 and S3 and a third near the outer end of either S2 or S3. Opening of the channel involves three such steps in each domain. PMID:10343407

  8. Sleep disturbances in voltage-gated potassium channel antibody syndrome.

    PubMed

    Barone, Daniel A; Krieger, Ana C

    2016-05-01

    Voltage-gated potassium channels (VGKCs) are a family of membrane proteins responsible for controlling cell membrane potential. The presence of antibodies (Ab) against neuronal VGKC complexes aids in the diagnosis of idiopathic and paraneoplastic autoimmune neurologic disorders. The diagnosis of VGKC Ab-associated encephalopathy (VCKC Ab syndrome) should be suspected in patients with subacute onset of disorientation, confusion, and memory loss in the presence of seizures or a movement disorder. VGKC Ab syndrome may present with sleep-related symptoms, and the purpose of this communication is to alert sleep and neurology clinicians of this still-under-recognized condition. In this case, we are presenting the VGKC Ab syndrome which improved after treatment with solumedrol. The prompt recognition and treatment of this condition may prevent the morbidity associated with cerebral atrophy and the mortality associated with intractable seizures and electrolyte disturbances.

  9. Mechanisms of Activation of Voltage-Gated Potassium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Grizel, A. V.; Glukhov, G. S.; Sokolova, O. S.

    2014-01-01

    Voltage-gated potassium ion channels (Kv) play an important role in a variety of cellular processes, including the functioning of excitable cells, regulation of apoptosis, cell growth and differentiation, the release of neurotransmitters and hormones, maintenance of cardiac activity, etc. Failure in the functioning of Kv channels leads to severe genetic disorders and the development of tumors, including malignant ones. Understanding the mechanisms underlying Kv channels functioning is a key factor in determining the cause of the diseases associated with mutations in the channels, and in the search for new drugs. The mechanism of activation of the channels is a topic of ongoing debate, and a consensus on the issue has not yet been reached. This review discusses the key stages in studying the mechanisms of functioning of Kv channels and describes the basic models of their activation known to date. PMID:25558391

  10. Voltage-gated sodium channels and metastatic disease

    PubMed Central

    Brackenbury, William J.

    2012-01-01

    Voltage-gated Na+ channels (VGSCs) are macromolecular protein complexes containing a pore-forming α subunit and smaller non-pore-forming β subunits. VGSCs are expressed in metastatic cells from a number of cancers. In these cells, Na+ current carried by α subunits enhances migration, invasion and metastasis in vivo. In contrast, the β subunits mediate cellular adhesion and process extension. The prevailing hypothesis is that VGSCs are upregulated in cancer, in general favoring an invasive/metastatic phenotype, although the mechanisms are still not fully clear. Expression of the Nav1.5 α subunit associates with poor prognosis in clinical breast cancer specimens, suggesting that VGSCs may have utility as prognostic markers for cancer progression. Furthermore, repurposing existing VGSC-blocking therapeutic drugs may provide a new strategy to improve outcomes in patients suffering from metastatic disease, which is the major cause of cancer-related deaths, and for which there is currently no cure. PMID:22992466

  11. Neurological perspectives on voltage-gated sodium channels

    PubMed Central

    Linley, John E.; Baker, Mark D.; Minett, Michael S.; Cregg, Roman; Werdehausen, Robert; Rugiero, François

    2012-01-01

    The activity of voltage-gated sodium channels has long been linked to disorders of neuronal excitability such as epilepsy and chronic pain. Recent genetic studies have now expanded the role of sodium channels in health and disease, to include autism, migraine, multiple sclerosis, cancer as well as muscle and immune system disorders. Transgenic mouse models have proved useful in understanding the physiological role of individual sodium channels, and there has been significant progress in the development of subtype selective inhibitors of sodium channels. This review will outline the functions and roles of specific sodium channels in electrical signalling and disease, focusing on neurological aspects. We also discuss recent advances in the development of selective sodium channel inhibitors. PMID:22961543

  12. Voltage gated sodium channels as drug discovery targets.

    PubMed

    Bagal, Sharan K; Marron, Brian E; Owen, Robert M; Storer, R Ian; Swain, Nigel A

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium (NaV) channels are a family of transmembrane ion channel proteins. They function by forming a gated, water-filled pore to help establish and control cell membrane potential via control of the flow of ions between the intracellular and the extracellular environments. Blockade of NaVs has been successfully accomplished in the clinic to enable control of pathological firing patterns that occur in a diverse range of conditions such as chronic pain, epilepsy, and cardiac arrhythmias. First generation sodium channel modulator drugs, despite low inherent subtype selectivity, preferentially act on over-excited cells which reduces undesirable side effects in the clinic. However, the limited therapeutic indices observed with the first generation demanded a new generation of sodium channel inhibitors. The structure, function and the state of the art in sodium channel modulator drug discovery are discussed in this chapter.

  13. Computer Simulations of Voltage-Gated Cation Channels

    PubMed Central

    Treptow, Werner; Klein, Michael L.

    2012-01-01

    The relentless growth in computational power has seen increasing applications of molecular dynamics (MD) simulation to the study of membrane proteins in realistic membrane environments, which include explicit membrane lipids, water and ions. The concomitant increasing availability of membrane protein structures for ion channels, and transporters -- to name just two examples -- has stimulated many of these MD studies. In the case of voltage-gated cation channels (VGCCs) recent computational works have focused on ion-conduction and gating mechanisms, along with their regulation by agonist/antagonist ligands. The information garnered from these computational studies is largely inaccessible to experiment and is crucial for understanding the interplay between the structure and function as well as providing new directions for experiments. This article highlights recent advances in probing the structure and function of potassium channels and offers a perspective on the challenges likely to arise in making analogous progress in characterizing sodium channels. PMID:22523619

  14. Shellfish Toxins Targeting Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fan; Xu, Xunxun; Li, Tingting; Liu, Zhonghua

    2013-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) play a central role in the generation and propagation of action potentials in excitable neurons and other cells and are targeted by commonly used local anesthetics, antiarrhythmics, and anticonvulsants. They are also common targets of neurotoxins including shellfish toxins. Shellfish toxins are a variety of toxic secondary metabolites produced by prokaryotic cyanobacteria and eukaryotic dinoflagellates in both marine and fresh water systems, which can accumulate in marine animals via the food chain. Consumption of shellfish toxin-contaminated seafood may result in potentially fatal human shellfish poisoning. This article provides an overview of the structure, bioactivity, and pharmacology of shellfish toxins that act on VGSCs, along with a brief discussion on their pharmaceutical potential for pain management. PMID:24287955

  15. Voltage gated sodium channels as drug discovery targets

    PubMed Central

    Bagal, Sharan K; Marron, Brian E; Owen, Robert M; Storer, R Ian; Swain, Nigel A

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium (NaV) channels are a family of transmembrane ion channel proteins. They function by forming a gated, water-filled pore to help establish and control cell membrane potential via control of the flow of ions between the intracellular and the extracellular environments. Blockade of NaVs has been successfully accomplished in the clinic to enable control of pathological firing patterns that occur in a diverse range of conditions such as chronic pain, epilepsy, and cardiac arrhythmias. First generation sodium channel modulator drugs, despite low inherent subtype selectivity, preferentially act on over-excited cells which reduces undesirable side effects in the clinic. However, the limited therapeutic indices observed with the first generation demanded a new generation of sodium channel inhibitors. The structure, function and the state of the art in sodium channel modulator drug discovery are discussed in this chapter. PMID:26646477

  16. Inhibition of voltage-gated sodium channels by sumatriptan bioisosteres

    PubMed Central

    Carbonara, Roberta; Carocci, Alessia; Roussel, Julien; Crescenzo, Giuseppe; Buonavoglia, Canio; Franchini, Carlo; Lentini, Giovanni; Camerino, Diana Conte; Desaphy, Jean-François

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are known to play a pivotal role in perception and transmission of pain sensations. Gain-of-function mutations in the genes encoding the peripheral neuronal sodium channels, hNav1.7–1.9, cause human painful diseases. Thus while treatment of chronic pain remains an unmet clinical need, sodium channel blockers are considered as promising druggable targets. In a previous study, we evaluated the analgesic activity of sumatriptan, an agonist of serotonin 5HT1B/D receptors, and some new chiral bioisosteres, using the hot plate test in the mouse. Interestingly, we observed that the analgesic effectiveness was not necessarily correlated to serotonin agonism. In this study, we evaluated whether sumatriptan and its congeners may inhibit heterologously expressed hNav1.7 sodium channels using the patch-clamp method. We show that sumatriptan blocks hNav1.7 channels only at very high, supratherapeutic concentrations. In contrast, its three analogs, namely 20b, (R)-31b, and (S)-22b, exert a dose and use-dependent sodium channel block. At 0.1 and 10 Hz stimulation frequencies, the most potent compound, (S)-22b, was 4.4 and 1.7 fold more potent than the well-known sodium channel blocker mexiletine. The compound induces a negative shift of voltage dependence of fast inactivation, suggesting higher affinity to the inactivated channel. Accordingly, we show that (S)-22b likely binds the conserved local anesthetic receptor within voltage-gated sodium channels. Combining these results with the previous ones, we hypothesize that use-dependent sodium channel blockade contributes to the analgesic activity of (R)-31b and (S)-22b. These later compounds represent promising lead compounds for the development of efficient analgesics, the mechanism of action of which may include a dual action on sodium channels and 5HT1D receptors. PMID:26257653

  17. Inhibition of voltage-gated sodium channels by sumatriptan bioisosteres.

    PubMed

    Carbonara, Roberta; Carocci, Alessia; Roussel, Julien; Crescenzo, Giuseppe; Buonavoglia, Canio; Franchini, Carlo; Lentini, Giovanni; Camerino, Diana Conte; Desaphy, Jean-François

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are known to play a pivotal role in perception and transmission of pain sensations. Gain-of-function mutations in the genes encoding the peripheral neuronal sodium channels, hNav1.7-1.9, cause human painful diseases. Thus while treatment of chronic pain remains an unmet clinical need, sodium channel blockers are considered as promising druggable targets. In a previous study, we evaluated the analgesic activity of sumatriptan, an agonist of serotonin 5HT1B/D receptors, and some new chiral bioisosteres, using the hot plate test in the mouse. Interestingly, we observed that the analgesic effectiveness was not necessarily correlated to serotonin agonism. In this study, we evaluated whether sumatriptan and its congeners may inhibit heterologously expressed hNav1.7 sodium channels using the patch-clamp method. We show that sumatriptan blocks hNav1.7 channels only at very high, supratherapeutic concentrations. In contrast, its three analogs, namely 20b, (R)-31b, and (S)-22b, exert a dose and use-dependent sodium channel block. At 0.1 and 10 Hz stimulation frequencies, the most potent compound, (S)-22b, was 4.4 and 1.7 fold more potent than the well-known sodium channel blocker mexiletine. The compound induces a negative shift of voltage dependence of fast inactivation, suggesting higher affinity to the inactivated channel. Accordingly, we show that (S)-22b likely binds the conserved local anesthetic receptor within voltage-gated sodium channels. Combining these results with the previous ones, we hypothesize that use-dependent sodium channel blockade contributes to the analgesic activity of (R)-31b and (S)-22b. These later compounds represent promising lead compounds for the development of efficient analgesics, the mechanism of action of which may include a dual action on sodium channels and 5HT1D receptors. PMID:26257653

  18. Calcium release near L-type calcium channels promotes beat-to-beat variability in ventricular myocytes from the chronic AV block dog.

    PubMed

    Antoons, Gudrun; Johnson, Daniel M; Dries, Eef; Santiago, Demetrio J; Ozdemir, Semir; Lenaerts, Ilse; Beekman, Jet D M; Houtman, Marien J C; Sipido, Karin R; Vos, Marc A

    2015-12-01

    Beat-to-beat variability of ventricular repolarization (BVR) has been proposed as a strong predictor of Torsades de Pointes (TdP). BVR is also observed at the myocyte level, and a number of studies have shown the importance of calcium handling in influencing this parameter. The chronic AV block (CAVB) dog is a model of TdP arrhythmia in cardiac hypertrophy, and myocytes from these animals show extensive remodeling, including of Ca(2+) handling. This remodeling process also leads to increased BVR. We aimed to determine the role that (local) Ca(2+) handling plays in BVR. In isolated LV myocytes an exponential relationship was observed between BVR magnitude and action potential duration (APD) at baseline. Inhibition of Ca(2+) release from sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) with thapsigargin resulted in a reduction of [Ca(2+)]i, and of both BVR and APD. Increasing ICaL in the presence of thapsigargin restored APD but BVR remained low. In contrast, increasing ICaL with preserved Ca(2+) release increased both APD and BVR. Inhibition of Ca(2+) release with caffeine, as with thapsigargin, reduced BVR despite maintained APD. Simultaneous inhibition of Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchange and ICaL decreased APD and BVR to similar degrees, whilst increasing diastolic Ca(2+). Buffering of Ca(2+) transients with BAPTA reduced BVR for a given APD to a greater extent than buffering with EGTA, suggesting subsarcolemmal Ca(2+) transients modulated BVR to a larger extent than the cytosolic Ca(2+) transient. In conclusion, BVR in hypertrophied dog myocytes, at any APD, is strongly dependent on SR Ca(2+) release, which may act through modulation of the l-type Ca(2+) current in a subsarcolemmal microdomain.

  19. Airway Defense Control Mediated via Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels.

    PubMed

    Kocmalova, M; Joskova, M; Franova, S; Banovcin, P; Sutovska, M

    2016-01-01

    Expression of voltage-gated sodium channels (Nav) takes place in the airways and the role of Nav1.7 and Nav1.8 in the control of airway's defense reflexes has been confirmed. The activation of Nav channels is crucial for cough initiation and airway smooth muscle reactivity, but it is unknown whether these channels regulate ciliary beating. This study evaluated the involvement of Nav1.7 and Nav1.8 channels in the airway defense mechanisms using their pharmacological blockers in healthy guinea pigs and in the experimental allergic asthma model. Asthma was modeled by ovalbumin sensitization over a period of 21 days. Blockade of Nav1.7 channels significantly decreased airway smooth muscle reactivity in vivo, the number of cough efforts, and the cilia beat frequency in healthy animals. In the allergic asthma model, blockade of Nav1.8 efficiently relieved symptoms of asthma, without adversely affecting cilia beat frequency. The study demonstrates that Nav1.8 channel antagonism has a potential to alleviate cough and bronchial hyperreactivity in asthma. PMID:27161110

  20. Mechanism of Inactivation in Voltage-Gated Na(+) Channels.

    PubMed

    Gawali, V S; Todt, H

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated Na(+) channels (VGSCs) initiate action potentials thereby giving rise to rapid transmission of electrical signals along cell membranes and between cells. Depolarization of the cell membrane causes VGSCs to open but also gives rise to a nonconducting state termed inactivation. Inactivation of VGSCs serves a critical physiologic function as it determines the extent of excitability of neurons and of muscle cells. Depending on the time course of development and removal of inactivation both "fast-" and "slow"-inactivated states have been described. Evidence from mutagenesis studies suggests that fast inactivation is produced by a block of the internal vestibule by a tethered inactivation particle that has been mapped to the internal linker between domains III and IV. The motion of this linker may be regulated by parts of the internal C-terminus. The molecular mechanism of slow inactivation is less clear. However, aside from a high number of mutagenesis studies, the recent availability of 3D structures of crystallized prokaryotic VGSCs offers insights into the molecular motions associated with slow inactivation. One possible scenario is that slow movements of the voltage sensors are transmitted to the external vestibule giving rise to a conformational change of this region. This molecular rearrangement is transmitted to the S6 segments giving rise to collapse of the internal vestibule. PMID:27586291

  1. Understanding Voltage Gating of Providencia stuartii Porins at Atomic Level.

    PubMed

    Song, Wanling; Bajaj, Harsha; Nasrallah, Chady; Jiang, Hualiang; Winterhalter, Mathias; Colletier, Jacques-Philippe; Xu, Yechun

    2015-05-01

    Bacterial porins are water-filled β-barrel channels that allow translocation of solutes across the outer membrane. They feature a constriction zone, contributed by the plunging of extracellular loop 3 (L3) into the channel lumen. Porins are generally in the open state, but undergo gating in response to external voltages. To date the underlying mechanism is unclear. Here we report results from molecular dynamics simulations on the two porins of Providenica stuartii, Omp-Pst1 and Omp-Pst2, which display distinct voltage sensitivities. Voltage gating was observed in Omp-Pst2, where the binding of cations in-between L3 and the barrel wall results in exposing a conserved aromatic residue in the channel lumen, thereby halting ion permeation. Comparison of Omp-Pst1 and Omp-Pst2 structures and trajectories suggests that their sensitivity to voltage is encoded in the hydrogen-bonding network anchoring L3 onto the barrel wall, as we observed that it is the strength of this network that governs the probability of cations binding behind L3. That Omp-Pst2 gating is observed only when ions flow against the electrostatic potential gradient of the channel furthermore suggests a possible role for this porin in the regulation of charge distribution across the outer membrane and bacterial homeostasis.

  2. Marine Toxins That Target Voltage-gated Sodium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Al-Sabi, Ahmed; McArthur, Jeff; Ostroumov, Vitaly; French, Robert J.

    2006-01-01

    Eukaryotic, voltage-gated sodium (NaV) channels are large membrane proteins which underlie generation and propagation of rapid electrical signals in nerve, muscle and heart. Nine different NaV receptor sites, for natural ligands and/or drugs, have been identified, based on functional analyses and site-directed mutagenesis. In the marine ecosystem, numerous toxins have evolved to disrupt NaV channel function, either by inhibition of current flow through the channels, or by modifying the activation and inactivation gating processes by which the channels open and close. These toxins function in their native environment as offensive or defensive weapons in prey capture or deterrence of predators. In composition, they range from organic molecules of varying size and complexity to peptides consisting of ~10–70 amino acids. We review the variety of known NaV-targeted marine toxins, outlining, where known, their sites of interaction with the channel protein and their functional effects. In a number of cases, these natural ligands have the potential applications as drugs in clinical settings, or as models for drug development.

  3. Voltage-Gated Ion Channels in Cancer Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Vidhya R.; Perez-Neut, Mathew; Kaja, Simon; Gentile, Saverio

    2015-01-01

    Changes of the electrical charges across the surface cell membrane are absolutely necessary to maintain cellular homeostasis in physiological as well as in pathological conditions. The opening of ion channels alter the charge distribution across the surface membrane as they allow the diffusion of ions such as K+, Ca++, Cl−, Na+. Traditionally, voltage-gated ion channels (VGIC) are known to play fundamental roles in controlling rapid bioelectrical signaling including action potential and/or contraction. However, several investigations have revealed that these classes of proteins can also contribute significantly to cell mitotic biochemical signaling, cell cycle progression, as well as cell volume regulation. All these functions are critically important for cancer cell proliferation. Interestingly, a variety of distinct VGICs are expressed in different cancer cell types, including metastasis but not in the tissues from which these tumors were generated. Given the increasing evidence suggesting that VGIC play a major role in cancer cell biology, in this review we discuss the role of distinct VGIC in cancer cell proliferation and possible therapeutic potential of VIGC pharmacological manipulation. PMID:26010603

  4. Understanding Voltage Gating of Providencia stuartii Porins at Atomic Level

    PubMed Central

    Song, Wanling; Bajaj, Harsha; Nasrallah, Chady; Jiang, Hualiang; Winterhalter, Mathias; Colletier, Jacques-Philippe; Xu, Yechun

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial porins are water-filled β-barrel channels that allow translocation of solutes across the outer membrane. They feature a constriction zone, contributed by the plunging of extracellular loop 3 (L3) into the channel lumen. Porins are generally in the open state, but undergo gating in response to external voltages. To date the underlying mechanism is unclear. Here we report results from molecular dynamics simulations on the two porins of Providenica stuartii, Omp-Pst1 and Omp-Pst2, which display distinct voltage sensitivities. Voltage gating was observed in Omp-Pst2, where the binding of cations in-between L3 and the barrel wall results in exposing a conserved aromatic residue in the channel lumen, thereby halting ion permeation. Comparison of Omp-Pst1 and Omp-Pst2 structures and trajectories suggests that their sensitivity to voltage is encoded in the hydrogen-bonding network anchoring L3 onto the barrel wall, as we observed that it is the strength of this network that governs the probability of cations binding behind L3. That Omp-Pst2 gating is observed only when ions flow against the electrostatic potential gradient of the channel furthermore suggests a possible role for this porin in the regulation of charge distribution across the outer membrane and bacterial homeostasis. PMID:25955156

  5. Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels: Biophysics, Pharmacology, and Related Channelopathies

    PubMed Central

    Savio-Galimberti, Eleonora; Gollob, Michael H.; Darbar, Dawood

    2012-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSC) are multi-molecular protein complexes expressed in both excitable and non-excitable cells. They are primarily formed by a pore-forming multi-spanning integral membrane glycoprotein (α-subunit) that can be associated with one or more regulatory β-subunits. The latter are single-span integral membrane proteins that modulate the sodium current (INa) and can also function as cell adhesion molecules. In vitro some of the cell-adhesive functions of the β-subunits may play important physiological roles independently of the α-subunits. Other endogenous regulatory proteins named “channel partners” or “channel interacting proteins” (ChiPs) like caveolin-3 and calmodulin/calmodulin kinase II (CaMKII) can also interact and modulate the expression and/or function of VGSC. In addition to their physiological roles in cell excitability and cell adhesion, VGSC are the site of action of toxins (like tetrodotoxin and saxitoxin), and pharmacologic agents (like antiarrhythmic drugs, local anesthetics, antiepileptic drugs, and newly developed analgesics). Mutations in genes that encode α- and/or β-subunits as well as the ChiPs can affect the structure and biophysical properties of VGSC, leading to the development of diseases termed sodium “channelopathies”.  This review will outline the structure, function, and biophysical properties of VGSC as well as their pharmacology and associated channelopathies and highlight some of the recent advances in this field. PMID:22798951

  6. VKCDB: voltage-gated K+ channel database updated and upgraded.

    PubMed

    Gallin, Warren J; Boutet, Patrick A

    2011-01-01

    The Voltage-gated K(+) Channel DataBase (VKCDB) (http://vkcdb.biology.ualberta.ca) makes a comprehensive set of sequence data readily available for phylogenetic and comparative analysis. The current update contains 2063 entries for full-length or nearly full-length unique channel sequences from Bacteria (477), Archaea (18) and Eukaryotes (1568), an increase from 346 solely eukaryotic entries in the original release. In addition to protein sequences for channels, corresponding nucleotide sequences of the open reading frames corresponding to the amino acid sequences are now available and can be extracted in parallel with sets of protein sequences. Channels are categorized into subfamilies by phylogenetic analysis and by using hidden Markov model analyses. Although the raw database contains a number of fragmentary, duplicated, obsolete and non-channel sequences that were collected in early steps of data collection, the web interface will only return entries that have been validated as likely K(+) channels. The retrieval function of the web interface allows retrieval of entries that contain a substantial fraction of the core structural elements of VKCs, fragmentary entries, or both. The full database can be downloaded as either a MySQL dump or as an XML dump from the web site. We have now implemented automated updates at quarterly intervals.

  7. Seizure suppression through manipulating splicing of a voltage-gated sodium channel

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Wei-Hsiang; He, Miaomiao

    2015-01-01

    Seizure can result from increased voltage-gated persistent sodium current expression. Although many clinically-approved antiepileptic drugs target voltage-gated persistent sodium current, none exclusively repress this current without also adversely affecting the transient voltage-gated sodium current. Achieving a more selective block has significant potential for the treatment of epilepsy. Recent studies show that voltage-gated persistent sodium current amplitude is regulated by alternative splicing offering the possibility of a novel route for seizure control. In this study we identify 291 splicing regulators that, on knockdown, alter splicing of the Drosophila voltage-gated sodium channel to favour inclusion of exon K, rather than the mutually exclusive exon L. This change is associated with both a significant reduction in voltage-gated persistent sodium current, without change to transient voltage-gated sodium current, and to rescue of seizure in this model insect. RNA interference mediated knock-down, in two different seizure mutants, shows that 95 of these regulators are sufficient to significantly reduce seizure duration. Moreover, most suppress seizure activity in both mutants, indicative that they are part of well conserved pathways and likely, therefore, to be optimal candidates to take forward to mammalian studies. We provide proof-of-principle for such studies by showing that inhibition of a selection of regulators, using small molecule inhibitors, is similarly effective to reduce seizure. Splicing of the Drosophila sodium channel shows many similarities to its mammalian counterparts, including altering the amplitude of voltage-gated persistent sodium current. Our study provides the impetus to investigate whether manipulation of splicing of mammalian voltage-gated sodium channels may be exploitable to provide effective seizure control. PMID:25681415

  8. Seizure suppression through manipulating splicing of a voltage-gated sodium channel.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wei-Hsiang; He, Miaomiao; Baines, Richard A

    2015-04-01

    Seizure can result from increased voltage-gated persistent sodium current expression. Although many clinically-approved antiepileptic drugs target voltage-gated persistent sodium current, none exclusively repress this current without also adversely affecting the transient voltage-gated sodium current. Achieving a more selective block has significant potential for the treatment of epilepsy. Recent studies show that voltage-gated persistent sodium current amplitude is regulated by alternative splicing offering the possibility of a novel route for seizure control. In this study we identify 291 splicing regulators that, on knockdown, alter splicing of the Drosophila voltage-gated sodium channel to favour inclusion of exon K, rather than the mutually exclusive exon L. This change is associated with both a significant reduction in voltage-gated persistent sodium current, without change to transient voltage-gated sodium current, and to rescue of seizure in this model insect. RNA interference mediated knock-down, in two different seizure mutants, shows that 95 of these regulators are sufficient to significantly reduce seizure duration. Moreover, most suppress seizure activity in both mutants, indicative that they are part of well conserved pathways and likely, therefore, to be optimal candidates to take forward to mammalian studies. We provide proof-of-principle for such studies by showing that inhibition of a selection of regulators, using small molecule inhibitors, is similarly effective to reduce seizure. Splicing of the Drosophila sodium channel shows many similarities to its mammalian counterparts, including altering the amplitude of voltage-gated persistent sodium current. Our study provides the impetus to investigate whether manipulation of splicing of mammalian voltage-gated sodium channels may be exploitable to provide effective seizure control.

  9. Dynamin Is Required for GnRH Signaling to L-Type Calcium Channels and Activation of ERK.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Brian S; Dang, An K; Murtazina, Dilyara A; Dozier, Melissa G; Whitesell, Jennifer D; Khan, Shaihla A; Cherrington, Brian D; Amberg, Gregory C; Clay, Colin M; Navratil, Amy M

    2016-02-01

    We have shown that GnRH-mediated engagement of the cytoskeleton induces cell movement and is necessary for ERK activation. It also has previously been established that a dominant negative form of the mechano-GTPase dynamin (K44A) attenuates GnRH activation of ERK. At present, it is not clear at what level these cellular events might be linked. To explore this, we used live cell imaging in the gonadotrope-derived αT3-1 cell line to determine that dynamin-green fluorescent protein accumulated in GnRH-induced lamellipodia and plasma membrane protrusions. Coincident with translocation of dynamin-green fluorescent protein to the plasma membrane, we demonstrated that dynamin colocalizes with the actin cytoskeleton and the actin binding protein, cortactin at the leading edge of the plasma membrane. We next wanted to assess the physiological significance of these findings by inhibiting dynamin GTPase activity using dynasore. We find that dynasore suppresses activation of ERK, but not c-Jun N-terminal kinase, after exposure to GnRH agonist. Furthermore, exposure of αT3-1 cells to dynasore inhibited GnRH-induced cyto-architectural rearrangements. Recently it has been discovered that GnRH induced Ca(2+) influx via the L-type Ca(2+) channels requires an intact cytoskeleton to mediate ERK phosphorylation. Interestingly, not only does dynasore attenuate GnRH-mediated actin reorganization, it also suppresses Ca(2+) influx through L-type Ca(2+) channels visualized in living cells using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. Collectively, our data suggest that GnRH-induced membrane remodeling events are mediated in part by the association of dynamin and cortactin engaging the actin cytoskeleton, which then regulates Ca(2+) influx via L-type channels to facilitate ERK phosphorylation. PMID:26696122

  10. Isolation, synthesis and characterization of ω-TRTX-Cc1a, a novel tarantula venom peptide that selectively targets L-type Cav channels.

    PubMed

    Klint, Julie K; Berecki, Géza; Durek, Thomas; Mobli, Mehdi; Knapp, Oliver; King, Glenn F; Adams, David J; Alewood, Paul F; Rash, Lachlan D

    2014-05-15

    Spider venoms are replete with peptidic ion channel modulators, often with novel subtype selectivity, making them a rich source of pharmacological tools and drug leads. In a search for subtype-selective blockers of voltage-gated calcium (CaV) channels, we isolated and characterized a novel 39-residue peptide, ω-TRTX-Cc1a (Cc1a), from the venom of the tarantula Citharischius crawshayi (now Pelinobius muticus). Cc1a is 67% identical to the spider toxin ω-TRTX-Hg1a, an inhibitor of CaV2.3 channels. We assembled Cc1a using a combination of Boc solid-phase peptide synthesis and native chemical ligation. Oxidative folding yielded two stable, slowly interconverting isomers. Cc1a preferentially inhibited Ba(2+) currents (IBa) mediated by L-type (CaV1.2 and CaV1.3) CaV channels heterologously expressed in Xenopus oocytes, with half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values of 825nM and 2.24μM, respectively. In rat dorsal root ganglion neurons, Cc1a inhibited IBa mediated by high voltage-activated CaV channels but did not affect low voltage-activated T-type CaV channels. Cc1a exhibited weak activity at NaV1.5 and NaV1.7 voltage-gated sodium (NaV) channels stably expressed in mammalian HEK or CHO cells, respectively. Experiments with modified Cc1a peptides, truncated at the N-terminus (ΔG1-E5) or C-terminus (ΔW35-V39), demonstrated that the N- and C-termini are important for voltage-gated ion channel modulation. We conclude that Cc1a represents a novel pharmacological tool for probing the structure and function of L-type CaV channels.

  11. Isolation, synthesis and characterization of ω-TRTX-Cc1a, a novel tarantula venom peptide that selectively targets L-type Cav channels.

    PubMed

    Klint, Julie K; Berecki, Géza; Durek, Thomas; Mobli, Mehdi; Knapp, Oliver; King, Glenn F; Adams, David J; Alewood, Paul F; Rash, Lachlan D

    2014-05-15

    Spider venoms are replete with peptidic ion channel modulators, often with novel subtype selectivity, making them a rich source of pharmacological tools and drug leads. In a search for subtype-selective blockers of voltage-gated calcium (CaV) channels, we isolated and characterized a novel 39-residue peptide, ω-TRTX-Cc1a (Cc1a), from the venom of the tarantula Citharischius crawshayi (now Pelinobius muticus). Cc1a is 67% identical to the spider toxin ω-TRTX-Hg1a, an inhibitor of CaV2.3 channels. We assembled Cc1a using a combination of Boc solid-phase peptide synthesis and native chemical ligation. Oxidative folding yielded two stable, slowly interconverting isomers. Cc1a preferentially inhibited Ba(2+) currents (IBa) mediated by L-type (CaV1.2 and CaV1.3) CaV channels heterologously expressed in Xenopus oocytes, with half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values of 825nM and 2.24μM, respectively. In rat dorsal root ganglion neurons, Cc1a inhibited IBa mediated by high voltage-activated CaV channels but did not affect low voltage-activated T-type CaV channels. Cc1a exhibited weak activity at NaV1.5 and NaV1.7 voltage-gated sodium (NaV) channels stably expressed in mammalian HEK or CHO cells, respectively. Experiments with modified Cc1a peptides, truncated at the N-terminus (ΔG1-E5) or C-terminus (ΔW35-V39), demonstrated that the N- and C-termini are important for voltage-gated ion channel modulation. We conclude that Cc1a represents a novel pharmacological tool for probing the structure and function of L-type CaV channels. PMID:24561180

  12. A novel dihydropyridine with 3-aryl meta-hydroxyl substitution blocks L-type calcium channels in rat cardiomyocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Galvis-Pareja, David; Zapata-Torres, Gerald; Hidalgo, Jorge; Ayala, Pedro; and others

    2014-08-15

    Rationale: Dihydropyridines are widely used for the treatment of several cardiac diseases due to their blocking activity on L-type Ca{sup 2+} channels and their renowned antioxidant properties. Methods: We synthesized six novel dihydropyridine molecules and performed docking studies on the binding site of the L-type Ca{sup 2+} channel. We used biochemical techniques on isolated adult rat cardiomyocytes to assess the efficacy of these molecules on their Ca{sup 2+} channel-blocking activity and antioxidant properties. The Ca{sup 2+} channel-blocking activity was evaluated by confocal microscopy on fluo-3AM loaded cardiomyocytes, as well as using patch clamp experiments. Antioxidant properties were evaluated by flow cytometry using the ROS sensitive dye 1,2,3 DHR. Results: Our docking studies show that a novel compound with 3-OH substitution inserts into the active binding site of the L-type Ca{sup 2+} channel previously described for nitrendipine. In biochemical assays, the novel meta-OH group in the aryl in C4 showed a high blocking effect on L-type Ca{sup 2+} channel as opposed to para-substituted compounds. In the tests we performed, none of the molecules showed antioxidant properties. Conclusions: Only substitutions in C2, C3 and C5 of the aryl ring render dihydropyridine compounds with the capacity of blocking LTCC. Based on our docking studies, we postulate that the antioxidant activity requires a larger group than the meta-OH substitution in C2, C3 or C5 of the dihydropyridine ring. - Highlights: • Dihydropyridine (DHP) molecules are widely used in cardiovascular disease. • DHPs block Ca{sup 2+} entry through LTCC—some DHPs have antioxidant activity as well. • We synthesized 6 new DHPs and tested their Ca{sup 2+} blocking and antioxidant activities. • 3-Aryl meta-hydroxyl substitution strongly increases their Ca{sup 2+} blocking activity. • 3-Aryl meta-hydroxyl substitution did not affect the antioxidant properties.

  13. Modulation by extracellular ATP of L-type calcium channels in guinea-pig single sinoatrial nodal cell.

    PubMed Central

    Qi, A. D.; Kwan, Y. W.

    1996-01-01

    1. The effects of extracellular adenosine 5'-triphosphate ([ATP]zero) on the L-type Ca2+ channel currents in guinea-pig single sinoatrial nodal (SAN) cells, isolated by enzymatic dissociation, were investigated by use of whole-cell patch-clamp techniques. 2. The application of [ATP]zero (2 microM-1 mM) produced an inhibitory effect on the L-type Ca2+ channel current peak amplitude (10 mM Ba2+ as charge carrier) in a concentration-dependent and reversible manner with an IC50 of 100 microM and a Hill coefficient of 1.83. 3. The presence of the adenosine receptor antagonists, 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX, 0.1 microM) and 8-phenyltheophylline (10 microM) did not affect the [ATP]zero-induced inhibition of the Ca2+ channel currents. Adenosine (100 microM) had little effect on the basal Ca2+ channel currents. Adenosine 500 microM, caused 23% inhibition of the Ca2+ channel current, which was abolished by 0.1 microM DPCPX. 4. The presence of the P2-purinoceptor antagonists, suramin (1, 10 and 100 microM), reactive blue 2 (1 and 10 microM) and pyridoxal-phosphate-6-azophenyl-2',4'-disulphonic acid (PPADS, 50 and 100 microM) failed to affect the inhibitory action of [ATP]zero on Ca2+ channel currents. 5. The relative rank order of potency of different nucleotides and nucleosides, at a concentration of 100 microM, on the inhibition of the Ca2+ channel currents is as follows: adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) = alpha,beta-methylene-ATP (alpha,beta MeATP) > > 2-methylthioATP (2-MeSATP) > or = adenosine 5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate) (ATP gamma S) > > uridine 5'-triphosphate (UTP) = adenosine 5'-diphosphate (ADP) > adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) > or = adenosine. 6. These results suggest that [ATP]zero may play an important role in the heart beat by inhibiting the L-type Ca2+ channel currents in single SAN cells. This inhibitory effect is not due to the formation of adenosine resulting from the enzymatic degradation of [ATP]zero. Based on the relative order of inhibitory

  14. Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels: Evolutionary History and Distinctive Sequence Features.

    PubMed

    Kasimova, M A; Granata, D; Carnevale, V

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (Nav) are responsible for the rising phase of the action potential. Their role in electrical signal transmission is so relevant that their emergence is believed to be one of the crucial factors enabling development of nervous system. The presence of voltage-gated sodium-selective channels in bacteria (BacNav) has raised questions concerning the evolutionary history of the ones in animals. Here we review some of the milestones in the field of Nav phylogenetic analysis and discuss some of the most important sequence features that distinguish these channels from voltage-gated potassium channels and transient receptor potential channels. PMID:27586287

  15. Spexin Enhances Bowel Movement through Activating L-type Voltage-dependent Calcium Channel via Galanin Receptor 2 in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Cheng-yuan; Zhang, Man; Huang, Tao; Yang, Li-ling; Fu, Hai-bo; Zhao, Ling; Zhong, Linda LD; Mu, Huai-xue; Shi, Xiao-ke; Leung, Christina FP; Fan, Bao-min; Jiang, Miao; Lu, Ai-ping; Zhu, Li-xin; Bian, Zhao-xiang

    2015-01-01

    A novel neuropeptide spexin was found to be broadly expressed in various endocrine and nervous tissues while little is known about its functions. This study investigated the role of spexin in bowel movement and the underlying mechanisms. In functional constipation (FC) patients, serum spexin levels were significantly decreased. Consistently, in starved mice, the mRNA of spexin was significantly decreased in intestine and colon. Spexin injection increased the velocity of carbon powder propulsion in small intestine and decreased the glass beads expulsion time in distal colon in mice. Further, spexin dose-dependently stimulated the intestinal/colonic smooth muscle contraction. Galanin receptor 2 (GALR2) antagonist M871, but not Galanin receptor 3 (GALR3) antagonist SNAP37899, effectively suppressed the stimulatory effects of spexin on intestinal/colonic smooth muscle contraction, which could be eliminated by extracellular [Ca2+] removal and L-type voltage-dependentCa2+ channel (VDCC) inhibitor nifedipine. Besides, spexin dramatically increased the [Ca2+]i in isolated colonic smooth muscle cells. These data indicate that spexin can act on GALR2 receptor to regulate bowel motility by activating L-type VDCC. Our findings provide evidence for important physiological roles of spexin in GI functions. Selective action on spexin pathway might have therapeutic effects on GI diseases with motility disorders. PMID:26160593

  16. NMDA receptors in mouse anterior piriform cortex initialize early odor preference learning and L-type calcium channels engage for long-term memory

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Bandhan; Yuan, Qi

    2016-01-01

    The interactions of L-type calcium channels (LTCCs) and NMDA receptors (NMDARs) in memories are poorly understood. Here we investigated the specific roles of anterior piriform cortex (aPC) LTCCs and NMDARs in early odor preference memory in mice. Using calcium imaging in aPC slices, LTCC activation was shown to be dependent on NMDAR activation. Either D-APV (NMDAR antagonist) or nifedipine (LTCC antagonist) reduced somatic calcium transients in pyramidal cells evoked by lateral olfactory tract stimulation. However, nifedipine did not further reduce calcium in the presence of D-APV. In mice that underwent early odor preference training, blocking NMDARs in the aPC prevented short-term (3 hr) and long-term (24 hr) odor preference memory, and both memories were rescued when BayK-8644 (LTCC agonist) was co-infused. However, activating LTCCs in the absence of NMDARs resulted in loss of discrimination between the conditioned odor and a similar odor mixture at 3 hr. Elevated synaptic AMPAR expression at 3 hr was prevented by D-APV infusion but restored when LTCCs were directly activated, mirroring the behavioral outcomes. Blocking LTCCs prevented 24 hr memory and spared 3 hr memory. These results suggest that NMDARs mediate stimulus-specific encoding of odor memory while LTCCs mediate intracellular signaling leading to long-term memory. PMID:27739540

  17. Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase and NADPH Redox Regulates Cardiac Myocyte L-Type Calcium Channel Activity and Myocardial Contractile Function

    PubMed Central

    Rawat, Dhwajbahadur K.; Hecker, Peter; Watanabe, Makino; Chettimada, Sukrutha; Levy, Richard J.; Okada, Takao; Edwards, John G.; Gupte, Sachin A.

    2012-01-01

    We recently demonstrated that a 17-ketosteroid, epiandrosterone, attenuates L-type Ca2+ currents (ICa-L) in cardiac myocytes and inhibits myocardial contractility. Because 17-ketosteroids are known to inhibit glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), the rate-limiting enzyme in the pentose phosphate pathway, and to reduce intracellular NADPH levels, we hypothesized that inhibition of G6PD could be a novel signaling mechanism which inhibit ICa-L and, therefore, cardiac contractile function. We tested this idea by examining myocardial function in isolated hearts and Ca2+ channel activity in isolated cardiac myocytes. Myocardial function was tested in Langendorff perfused hearts and ICa-L were recorded in the whole-cell patch configuration by applying double pulses from a holding potential of −80 mV and then normalized to the peak amplitudes of control currents. 6-Aminonicotinamide, a competitive inhibitor of G6PD, increased pCO2 and decreased pH. Additionally, 6-aminonicotinamide inhibited G6PD activity, reduced NADPH levels, attenuated peak ICa-L amplitudes, and decreased left ventricular developed pressure and ±dp/dt. Finally, dialyzing NADPH into cells from the patch pipette solution attenuated the suppression of ICa-L by 6-aminonicotinamide. Likewise, in G6PD-deficient mice, G6PD insufficiency in the heart decreased GSH-to-GSSG ratio, superoxide, cholesterol and acetyl CoA. In these mice, M-mode echocardiographic findings showed increased diastolic volume and end-diastolic diameter without changes in the fraction shortening. Taken together, these findings suggest that inhibiting G6PD activity and reducing NADPH levels alters metabolism and leads to inhibition of L-type Ca2+ channel activity. Notably, this pathway may be involved in modulating myocardial contractility under physiological and pathophysiological conditions during which the pentose phosphate pathway-derived NADPH redox is modulated (e.g., ischemia-reperfusion and heart failure). PMID:23071515

  18. Regulation of voltage-gated potassium channels by PI(4,5)P2

    PubMed Central

    Kruse, Martin; Hammond, Gerald R.V.

    2012-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P2) regulates activities of numerous ion channels including inwardly rectifying potassium (Kir) channels, KCNQ, TRP, and voltage-gated calcium channels. Several studies suggest that voltage-gated potassium (KV) channels might be regulated by PI(4,5)P2. Wide expression of KV channels in different cells suggests that such regulation could have broad physiological consequences. To study regulation of KV channels by PI(4,5)P2, we have coexpressed several of them in tsA-201 cells with a G protein–coupled receptor (M1R), a voltage-sensitive lipid 5-phosphatase (Dr-VSP), or an engineered fusion protein carrying both lipid 4-phosphatase and 5-phosphatase activity (pseudojanin). These tools deplete PI(4,5)P2 with application of muscarinic agonists, depolarization, or rapamycin, respectively. PI(4,5)P2 at the plasma membrane was monitored by Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) from PH probes of PLCδ1 simultaneously with whole-cell recordings. Activation of Dr-VSP or recruitment of pseudojanin inhibited KV7.1, KV7.2/7.3, and Kir2.1 channel current by 90–95%. Activation of M1R inhibited KV7.2/7.3 current similarly. With these tools, we tested for potential PI(4,5)P2 regulation of activity of KV1.1/KVβ1.1, KV1.3, KV1.4, and KV1.5/KVβ1.3, KV2.1, KV3.4, KV4.2, KV4.3 (with different KChIPs and DPP6-s), and hERG/KCNE2. Interestingly, we found a substantial removal of inactivation for KV1.1/KVβ1.1 and KV3.4, resulting in up-regulation of current density upon activation of M1R but no changes in activity upon activating only VSP or pseudojanin. The other channels tested except possibly hERG showed no alteration in activity in any of the assays we used. In conclusion, a depletion of PI(4,5)P2 at the plasma membrane by enzymes does not seem to influence activity of most tested KV channels, whereas it does strongly inhibit members of the KV7 and Kir families. PMID:22851677

  19. Coupling between the voltage-sensing and pore domains in a voltage-gated potassium channel.

    PubMed

    Schow, Eric V; Freites, J Alfredo; Nizkorodov, Alex; White, Stephen H; Tobias, Douglas J

    2012-07-01

    Voltage-dependent potassium (Kv), sodium (Nav), and calcium channels open and close in response to changes in transmembrane (TM) potential, thus regulating cell excitability by controlling ion flow across the membrane. An outstanding question concerning voltage gating is how voltage-induced conformational changes of the channel voltage-sensing domains (VSDs) are coupled through the S4-S5 interfacial linking helices to the opening and closing of the pore domain (PD). To investigate the coupling between the VSDs and the PD, we generated a closed Kv channel configuration from Aeropyrum pernix (KvAP) using atomistic simulations with experiment-based restraints on the VSDs. Full closure of the channel required, in addition to the experimentally determined TM displacement, that the VSDs be displaced both inwardly and laterally around the PD. This twisting motion generates a tight hydrophobic interface between the S4-S5 linkers and the C-terminal ends of the pore domain S6 helices in agreement with available experimental evidence.

  20. Modulation of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels in rat retinal ganglion cells by gabapentin.

    PubMed

    Farrell, Spring R; Sargoy, Allison; Brecha, Nicholas C; Barnes, Steven

    2014-01-01

    The α2δ auxiliary subunits of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (VGCCs) are important modulators of VGCC function. Gabapentin interacts with α2δ1 and α2δ2 subunits and is reported to reduce Ca2+ channel current amplitude (ICa). This study aimed to determine the effects of gabapentin on VGCCs in retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). Whole cell patch clamp was used to record ICa in isolated RGCs, and calcium imaging was used to measure Ca2+ transients from RGCs in situ. Immunohistochemistry was used to detect the presence of α2δ1-containing VGCCs in isolated RGCs in the absence and presence of gabapentin pretreatment. Acute administration of gabapentin reduced ICa and Ca2+ transients compared to control conditions. In isolated RGCs, pretreatment with gabapentin (4-18 h) reduced ICa, and cell surface α2δ1 staining was reduced compared to nonpretreated cells. Acute administration of gabapentin to isolated RGCs that had been pretreated further reduced ICa. These results show that gabapentin has both short-term and long-term mechanisms to reduce ICa in isolated RGCs. Some Ca2+ channel blockers have been shown to protect RGCs in retinal trauma suggesting that modulation of VGCCs by gabapentin may prevent the deleterious effects of elevated Ca2+ levels in RGCs in trauma and disease.

  1. Ca2+ signalling, voltage-gated Ca2+ channels and praziquantel in flatworm neuromusculature.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, R M

    2005-01-01

    Transient changes in calcium (Ca2+) levels regulate a wide variety of cellular processes, and cells employ both intracellular and extracellular sources of Ca2+ for signalling. Praziquantel, the drug of choice against schistosomiasis, disrupts Ca2+ homeostasis in adult worms. This review will focus on voltage-gated Ca2+ channels, which regulate levels of intracellular Ca2+ by coupling membrane depolarization to entry of extracellular Ca2+. Ca2+ channels are members of the ion channel superfamily and represent essential components of neurons, muscles and other excitable cells. Ca2+ channels are membrane protein complexes in which the pore-forming alpha1 subunit is modulated by auxiliary subunits such as beta and alpha2delta. Schistosomes express two Ca2+ channel beta subunit subtypes: a conventional subtype similar to beta subunits found in other vertebrates and invertebrates and a novel variant subtype with unusual structural and functional properties. The variant schistosome beta subunit confers praziquantel sensitivity to an otherwise praziquantel-insensitive mammalian Ca2+ channel, implicating it as a mediator of praziquantel action.

  2. Therapeutic scope of modulation of non-voltage-gated cation channels.

    PubMed

    Li, Su; Gosling, Martin; Poll, Chris T; Westwick, John; Cox, Brian

    2005-01-15

    Although widely regarded as attractive drug targets, less than a tenth of known ion channels are currently commercially exploited as therapeutic targets. Historically, drug discovery efforts on ion channel targets have been encumbered by a lack of molecular and structural information, sub-optimal screening technologies and a paucity of discriminating pharmacological tools. Although challenges remain, recent scientific and technological advances in the area of ion channel research and screening offer the exciting prospect of a new, more-predictive era of ion channel drug discovery. In this article, focusing primarily on non voltage gated cation channels, we describe the continuing evolution of approaches to ion channel drug discovery, highlight recent developments in the ion channel field and consider their potential impact on discovering and ascribing function to ion channel targets. We discuss the renaissance of known ion channel targets, such as nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and calcium-activated potassium channels, as well as the emergence of the transient receptor potential (TRP) channels as a gene family of cation channels with broad therapeutic potential.

  3. Therapeutic scope of modulation of non-voltage-gated cation channels.

    PubMed

    Li, Su; Gosling, Martin; Poll, Chris T; Westwick, John; Cox, Brian

    2004-12-15

    Although widely regarded as attractive drug targets, less than a tenth of known ion channels are currently commercially exploited as therapeutic targets. Historically, drug discovery efforts on ion channel targets have been encumbered by a lack of molecular and structural information, sub-optimal screening technologies and a paucity of discriminating pharmacological tools. Although challenges remain, recent scientific and technological advances in the area of ion channel research and screening offer the exciting prospect of a new, more-predictive era of ion channel drug discovery. In this article, focusing primarily on non-voltage-gated cation channels, we describe the continuing evolution of approaches to ion channel drug discovery, highlight recent developments in the ion channel field and consider their potential impact on discovering and ascribing function to ion channel targets. We discuss the renaissance of known ion channel targets, such as nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and calcium-activated potassium channels, as well as the emergence of the transient receptor potential (TRP) channels as a gene family of cation channels with broad therapeutic potential.

  4. Calcium involvement in the luminescence control of three ophiuroid species (Echinodermata).

    PubMed

    Dewael, Y; Mallefet, J

    2002-02-01

    Although it has been shown that calcium is involved in the control of the luminous reaction of many invertebrate phyla, its role in Echinoderms is poorly documented. The aim of this work was to carry out a comparative study of calcium requirement of KCl-induced light emission by arm segments and dissociated luminous cells from three ophiuroid species, Ophiopsila californica, O. aranea and Amphiura filiformis. Results show a gradual inhibition of the luminescence when preparations are incubated in artificial sea water with lowered calcium concentration. The calcium substitutes Ba(2+) and Sr(2+) could act either as blockers or as substitutes, depending on the ophiuroid species; while calcium blockers Co(2+), Ni(2+) and Cd(2+) inhibit light emission in A. filiformis and in O. californica, but not in O. aranea. The nature of putative calcium voltage-gated channel has been studied pharmacologically using 1,4-dihydropyridine, benzodiazepine, phenylalkylamine and trifluoroperazine. From our results, it is proposed that calcium could act via an L-type voltage-gated calcium channel in O. californica and A. filiformis but not in O. aranea. The precise role of calcium in luminescence control still remains unknown; it could act as a second messenger or as a co-factor of the luminous reaction.

  5. Alteration of the L-type calcium current in guinea-pig single ventricular myocytes by heptaminol hydrochloride.

    PubMed Central

    Peineau, N.; Mongo, K. G.; Le Guennec, J. Y.; Garnier, D.; Argibay, J. A.

    1992-01-01

    1. The effects of heptaminol on calcium current amplitude and characteristics were studied in single ventricular myocytes of guinea-pig by use of the whole cell configuration of the patch clamp technique. 2. A concentration-dependent decrease in ICa amplitude was observed. At heptaminol concentration as low as 10(-6) M, this effect was observed in only two cells (n = 6). At 10(-5) M the reduction of ICa was of 30 +/- 15% (n = 11). 3. The current recovery from inactivation at -40 mV holding potential (HP) seemed less sensitive to perfusion with heptaminol (greater than 10(-6) M). However, at -80 mV HP the overshoot of the recovery curve was decreased by heptaminol. 4. Both at -40 mV and -80 mV HP, heptaminol (10(-5) M) significantly increased the steady state inactivation of ICa. 5. As previously proposed by others to explain the effects of membrane active substances, the effects of heptaminol may result from alterations in cell membrane properties and possibly from an increase in intracellular free calcium ion concentration. PMID:1422567

  6. Electrical coupling between the human serotonin transporter and voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels.

    PubMed

    Ruchala, Iwona; Cabra, Vanessa; Solis, Ernesto; Glennon, Richard A; De Felice, Louis J; Eltit, Jose M

    2014-07-01

    Monoamine transporters have been implicated in dopamine or serotonin release in response to abused drugs such as methamphetamine or ecstasy (MDMA). In addition, monoamine transporters show substrate-induced inward currents that may modulate excitability and Ca(2+) mobilization, which could also contribute to neurotransmitter release. How monoamine transporters modulate Ca(2+) permeability is currently unknown. We investigate the functional interaction between the human serotonin transporter (hSERT) and voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels (CaV). We introduce an excitable expression system consisting of cultured muscle cells genetically engineered to express hSERT. Both 5HT and S(+)MDMA depolarize these cells and activate the excitation-contraction (EC)-coupling mechanism. However, hSERT substrates fail to activate EC-coupling in CaV1.1-null muscle cells, thus implicating Ca(2+) channels. CaV1.3 and CaV2.2 channels are natively expressed in neurons. When these channels are co-expressed with hSERT in HEK293T cells, only cells expressing the lower-threshold L-type CaV1.3 channel show Ca(2+) transients evoked by 5HT or S(+)MDMA. In addition, the electrical coupling between hSERT and CaV1.3 takes place at physiological 5HT concentrations. The electrical coupling between monoamine neurotransmitter transporters and Ca(2+) channels such as CaV1.3 is a novel mechanism by which endogenous substrates (neurotransmitters) or exogenous substrates (like ecstasy) could modulate Ca(2+)-driven signals in excitable cells. PMID:24854234

  7. S-nitrosothiols dilate the mesenteric artery more potently than the femoral artery by a cGMP and L-type calcium channel-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Liu, Taiming; Schroeder, Hobe J; Zhang, Meijuan; Wilson, Sean M; Terry, Michael H; Longo, Lawrence D; Power, Gordon G; Blood, Arlin B

    2016-08-31

    S-nitrosothiols (SNOs) are metabolites of NO with potent vasodilatory activity. Our previous studies in sheep indicated that intra-arterially infused SNOs dilate the mesenteric vasculature more than the femoral vasculature. We hypothesized that the mesenteric artery is more responsive to SNO-mediated vasodilation, and investigated various steps along the NO/cGMP pathway to determine the mechanism for this difference. In anesthetized adult sheep, we monitored the conductance of mesenteric and femoral arteries during infusion of S-nitroso-l-cysteine (L-cysNO), and found mesenteric vascular conductance increased (137 ± 3%) significantly more than femoral conductance (26 ± 25%). Similar results were found in wire myography studies of isolated sheep mesenteric and femoral arteries. Vasodilation by SNOs was attenuated in both vessel types by the presence of ODQ (sGC inhibitor), and both YC-1 (sGC agonist) and 8-Br-cGMP (cGMP analog) mediated more potent relaxation in mesenteric arteries than femoral arteries. The vasodilatory difference between mesenteric and femoral arteries was eliminated by antagonists of either protein kinase G or L-type Ca(2+) channels. Western immunoblots showed a larger L-type Ca(2+)/sGC abundance ratio in mesenteric arteries than in femoral arteries. Fetal sheep mesenteric arteries were more responsive to SNOs than adult mesenteric arteries, and had a greater L-Ca(2+)/sGC ratio (p = 0.047 and r = -0.906 for correlation between Emax and L-Ca(2+)/sGC). These results suggest that mesenteric arteries, especially those in fetus, are more responsive to SNO-mediated vasodilation than femoral arteries due to a greater role of the L-type calcium channel in the NO/cGMP pathway.

  8. Gain-of-function nature of Cav1.4 L-type calcium channels alters firing properties of mouse retinal ganglion cells

    PubMed Central

    Knoflach, Dagmar; Schicker, Klaus; Glösmann, Martin; Koschak, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    Proper function of Cav1.4 L-type calcium channels is crucial for neurotransmitter release in the retina. Our understanding about how different levels of Cav1.4 channel activity affect retinal function is still limited. In the gain-of-function mouse model Cav1.4-IT we expected a reduction in the photoreceptor dynamic range but still transmission toward retinal ganglion cells. A fraction of Cav1.4-IT ganglion cells responded to light stimulation in multielectrode array recordings from whole-mounted retinas, but showed a significantly delayed response onset. Another significant number of cells showed higher activity in darkness. In addition to structural remodeling observed at the first retinal synapse of Cav1.4-IT mice the functional data suggested a loss of contrast enhancement, a fundamental feature of our visual system. In fact, Cav1.4-IT mouse retinas showed a decline in spatial response and changes in their contrast sensitivity profile. Photoreceptor degeneration was obvious from the nodular structure of cone axons and enlarged pedicles which partly moved toward the outer nuclear layer. Loss of photoreceptors was also expressed as reduced expression of proteins involved in chemical and electrical transmission, as such metabotropic glutamate receptor mGluR6 and the gap junction protein Connexin 36. Such gross changes in retinal structure and function could also explain the diminished visual performance of CSNB2 patients. The expression pattern of the plasma-membrane calcium ATPase 1 which participates in the maintenance of the intracellular calcium homeostasis in photoreceptors was changed in Cav1.4-IT mice. This might be part of a protection mechanism against increased calcium influx, as this is suggested for Cav1.4-IT channels. PMID:26274509

  9. L-type calcium channels play a critical role in maintaining lens transparency by regulating phosphorylation of aquaporin-0 and myosin light chain and expression of connexins.

    PubMed

    Maddala, Rupalatha; Nagendran, Tharkika; de Ridder, Gustaaf G; Schey, Kevin L; Rao, Ponugoti Vasantha

    2013-01-01

    Homeostasis of intracellular calcium is crucial for lens cytoarchitecture and transparency, however, the identity of specific channel proteins regulating calcium influx within the lens is not completely understood. Here we examined the expression and distribution profiles of L-type calcium channels (LTCCs) and explored their role in morphological integrity and transparency of the mouse lens, using cDNA microarray, RT-PCR, immunoblot, pharmacological inhibitors and immunofluorescence analyses. The results revealed that Ca (V) 1.2 and 1.3 channels are expressed and distributed in both the epithelium and cortical fiber cells in mouse lens. Inhibition of LTCCs with felodipine or nifedipine induces progressive cortical cataract formation with time, in association with decreased lens weight in ex-vivo mouse lenses. Histological analyses of felodipine treated lenses revealed extensive disorganization and swelling of cortical fiber cells resembling the phenotype reported for altered aquaporin-0 activity without detectable cytotoxic effects. Analysis of both soluble and membrane rich fractions from felodipine treated lenses by SDS-PAGE in conjunction with mass spectrometry and immunoblot analyses revealed decreases in β-B1-crystallin, Hsp-90, spectrin and filensin. Significantly, loss of transparency in the felodipine treated lenses was preceded by an increase in aquaporin-0 serine-235 phosphorylation and levels of connexin-50, together with decreases in myosin light chain phosphorylation and the levels of 14-3-3ε, a phosphoprotein-binding regulatory protein. Felodipine treatment led to a significant increase in gene expression of connexin-50 and 46 in the mouse lens. Additionally, felodipine inhibition of LTCCs in primary cultures of mouse lens epithelial cells resulted in decreased intracellular calcium, and decreased actin stress fibers and myosin light chain phosphorylation, without detectable cytotoxic response. Taken together, these observations reveal a crucial

  10. Activation of protein kinase C and inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate receptors antagonistically modulate voltage-gated sodium channels in striatal neurons.

    PubMed

    Hourez, Raphaël; Azdad, Karima; Vanwalleghem, Gilles; Roussel, Céline; Gall, David; Schiffmann, Serge N

    2005-10-19

    Regulation of voltage-gated sodium channels is crucial to firing patterns that constitute the output of medium spiny neurons (MSN), projecting neurons of the striatum. This modulation is thus critical for the final integration of information processed within the striatum. It has been shown that the adenylate cyclase pathway reduces sodium currents in MSN through channel phosphorylation by cAMP-dependent protein kinase. However, it is unknown whether a phospholipase C (PLC)-mediated signaling cascade could also modulate voltage-gated sodium channels within MSN. Using the whole-cell patch clamp technique, we investigated the effects of activation of two key components in PLC-mediated signaling cascades: protein kinase C (PKC) and inositol-1,4,5-triphosphate (IP(3)) receptors on voltage-dependent sodium current. Cellular dialysis with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, an activator of PKC, significantly reduced peak sodium current amplitude, while adenophostin A, an activator of IP(3) receptors, significantly increased peak sodium current amplitude. This effect of adenophostin was abolished by calcium chelation or by FK506, an inhibitor of calcineurin. These results suggest an antagonistic role of PKC and IP(3) in the modulation of striatal voltage-gated sodium channels, peak current amplitude being decreased through phosphorylation by PKC and increased through dephosphorylation by calcineurin.

  11. Effects of the 1, 4-dihydropyridine L-type calcium channel blocker benidipine on bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhong-ping; Liao, Jia-cheng; Zhao, Chang; Cai, Dao-zhang

    2015-08-01

    Osteoporosis (OP) often increases the risk of bone fracture and other complications and is a major clinical problem. Previous studies have found that high blood pressure is associated with bone formation abnormalities, resulting in increased calcium loss. We have investigated the effect of the antihypertensive drug benidipine on bone marrow stromal cell (BMSC) differentiation into osteoblasts and bone formation under osteoporotic conditions. We used a combination of in vitro and in vivo approaches to test the hypothesis that benidipine promotes murine BMSC differentiation into osteoblasts. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP), osteocalcin (OCN), runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2), β-catenin, and low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5) protein expression was evaluated in primary femoral BMSCs from C57/BL6 mice cultured under osteogenic conditions for 2 weeks to examine the effects of benidipine. An ovariectomized (OVX) mouse model was used to investigate the effect of benidipine treatment for 3 months in vivo. We found that ALP, OCN, and RUNX2 expression was up-regulated and WNT/β-catenin signaling was enhanced in vitro and in vivo. In OVX mice that were intragastrically administered benidipine, bone parameters (trabecular thickness, bone mineral density, and trabecular number) in the distal femoral metaphysis were significantly increased compared with control OVX mice. Consistently, benidipine promoted BMSC differentiation into osteoblasts and protected against bone loss in OVX mice. Therefore, benidipine might be a suitable candidate for the treatment of patients with postmenopausal osteoporosis and hypertension.

  12. Inhibition of L-type calcium-channel activity by thapsigargin and 2,5-t-butylhydroquinone, but not by cyclopiazonic acid.

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, E J; Li, C C; Bangalore, R; Benson, T; Kass, R S; Hinkle, P M

    1994-01-01

    Thapsigargin (TG), 2,5-t-butylhydroquinone (tBHQ) and cyclopiazonic acid (CPA) all inhibit the initial Ca(2+)-response to thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) by depleting intracellular Ca2+ pools sensitive to inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3). Treatment of GH3 pituitary cells for 30 min with 5 nM TG, 500 nM tBHQ or 50 nM CPA completely eliminated the TRH-induced spike in intracellular free Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i). Higher concentrations of TG and tBHQ, but not CPA, were also found to inhibit strongly the activity of L-type calcium channels, as measured by the increase in [Ca2+]i or 45Ca2+ influx stimulated by depolarization. TG and tBHQ blocked high-K(+)-stimulated 45Ca2+ uptake, with IC50 values of 10 and 1 microM respectively. Maximal inhibition of L-channel activity was achieved 15-30 min after drug addition. Inhibition by tBHQ was reversible, whereas inhibition by TG was not. TG and CPA did not affect spontaneous [Ca2+]i oscillations when tested at concentrations adequate to deplete the IP3-sensitive Ca2+ pool. However, 20 microM TG and 10 microM tBHQ blocked [Ca2+]i oscillations completely. The effect of drugs on calcium currents was measured directly by using the patch-clamp technique. When added to the external bath, 10 microM CPA caused a sustained increase in the calcium-channel current amplitude over 8 min, 10 microM tBHQ caused a progressive inhibition, and 10 microM TG caused an enhancement followed by a sustained block of the calcium current over 8 min. In summary, CPA depletes IP3-sensitive Ca2+ stores and does not inhibit voltage-operated calcium channels. At sufficiently low concentrations, TG depletes IP3-sensitive stores without inhibiting L-channel activity, but, for tBHQ, inhibition of calcium channels occurs at concentrations close to those needed to block agonist mobilization of intracellular Ca2+. PMID:7520693

  13. Differential rescue of spatial memory deficits in aged rats by L-type voltage-dependent calcium channel and ryanodine receptor antagonism.

    PubMed

    Hopp, S C; D'Angelo, H M; Royer, S E; Kaercher, R M; Adzovic, L; Wenk, G L

    2014-11-01

    Age-associated memory impairments may result as a consequence of neuroinflammatory induction of intracellular calcium (Ca(+2)) dysregulation. Altered L-type voltage-dependent calcium channel (L-VDCC) and ryanodine receptor (RyR) activity may underlie age-associated learning and memory impairments. Various neuroinflammatory markers are associated with increased activity of both L-VDCCs and RyRs, and increased neuroinflammation is associated with normal aging. In vitro, pharmacological blockade of L-VDCCs and RyRs has been shown to be anti-inflammatory. Here, we examined whether pharmacological blockade of L-VDCCs or RyRs with the drugs nimodipine and dantrolene, respectively, could improve spatial memory and reduce age-associated increases in microglia activation. Dantrolene and nimodipine differentially attenuated age-associated spatial memory deficits but were not anti-inflammatory in vivo. Furthermore, RyR gene expression was inversely correlated with spatial memory, highlighting the central role of Ca(+2) dysregulation in age-associated memory deficits.

  14. Voltage-gated sodium channel (NaV) protein dissection creates a set of functional pore-only proteins

    PubMed Central

    Shaya, David; Kreir, Mohamed; Robbins, Rebecca A.; Wong, Stephanie; Hammon, Justus; Brüggemann, Andrea; Minor, Daniel L.

    2011-01-01

    Many voltage-gated ion channel (VGIC) superfamily members contain six-transmembrane segments in which the first four form a voltage-sensing domain (VSD) and the last two form the pore domain (PD). Studies of potassium channels from the VGIC superfamily together with identification of voltage-sensor only proteins have suggested that the VSD and the PD can fold independently. Whether such transmembrane modularity is common to other VGIC superfamily members has remained untested. Here we show, using protein dissection, that the Silicibacter pomeroyi voltage-gated sodium channel (NaVSp1) PD forms a stand-alone, ion selective pore (NaVSp1p) that is tetrameric, α-helical, and that forms functional, sodium-selective channels when reconstituted into lipid bilayers. Mutation of the NaVSp1p selectivity filter from LESWSM to LDDWSD, a change similar to that previously shown to alter ion selectivity of the bacterial sodium channel NaVBh1 (NaChBac), creates a calcium-selective pore-only channel, CaVSp1p. We further show that production of PDs can be generalized by making pore-only proteins from two other extremophile NaVs: one from the hydrocarbon degrader Alcanivorax borkumensis (NaVAb1p), and one from the arsenite oxidizer Alkalilimnicola ehrlichei (NaVAe1p). Together, our data establish a family of active pore-only ion channels that should be excellent model systems for study of the factors that govern both sodium and calcium selectivity and permeability. Further, our findings suggest that similar dissection approaches may be applicable to a wide range of VGICs and, thus, serve as a means to simplify and accelerate biophysical, structural, and drug development efforts. PMID:21746903

  15. Functional Reconstitution of a Voltage-Gated Potassium Channel in Giant Unilamellar Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Aimon, Sophie; Manzi, John; Schmidt, Daniel; Poveda Larrosa, Jose Antonio; Bassereau, Patricia; Toombes, Gilman E. S.

    2011-01-01

    Voltage-gated ion channels are key players in cellular excitability. Recent studies suggest that their behavior can depend strongly on the membrane lipid composition and physical state. In vivo studies of membrane/channel and channel/channel interactions are challenging as membrane properties are actively regulated in living cells, and are difficult to control in experimental settings. We developed a method to reconstitute functional voltage-gated ion channels into cell-sized Giant Unilamellar Vesicles (GUVs) in which membrane composition, tension and geometry can be controlled. First, a voltage-gated potassium channel, KvAP, was purified, fluorescently labeled and reconstituted into small proteoliposomes. Small proteoliposomes were then converted into GUVs via electroformation. GUVs could be formed using different lipid compositions and buffers containing low (5 mM) or near-physiological (100 mM) salt concentrations. Protein incorporation into GUVs was characterized with quantitative confocal microscopy, and the protein density of GUVs was comparable to the small proteoliposomes from which they were formed. Furthermore, patch-clamp measurements confirmed that the reconstituted channels retained potassium selectivity and voltage-gated activation. GUVs containing functional voltage-gated ion channels will allow the study of channel activity, distribution and diffusion while controlling membrane state, and should prove a powerful tool for understanding how the membrane modulates cellular excitability. PMID:21998666

  16. Kinetic modulation of guinea-pig cardiac L-type calcium channels by fendiline and reversal of the effects of Bay K 8644.

    PubMed

    Schreibmayer, W; Tripathi, O; Tritthart, H A

    1992-05-01

    1. The modulation of L-type calcium channel current (ICa) by fendiline, a diphenylalkylamine type of calcium channel blocker was investigated on guinea-pig ventricular myocytes by use of the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. 2. Fendiline-induced block of ICa is accompanied by modulation of the channel kinetics in a complex manner. The time course of ICa inactivation is significantly faster and the channel availability (f infinity) curve is shifted considerably to more negative potentials by fendiline. These findings can be interpreted qualitatively in terms of a modulated receptor. 3. When the 1,4-dihydropyridine agonist (4R, 4S)-Bay K 8644 was added in presence of 30 microM fendiline a further reduction of ICa instead of the expected stimulatory effect was observed. 4. A similar 'paradoxical' inhibition of ICa was produced by the pure agonist enantiomer (4S)-Bay K 8644. Thus this novel effect of Bay K 8644 cannot be attributed to changes in affinity of the 1,4-dihydropyridine receptor site for (4R)-Bay K 8644 during fendiline action. 5. The IC50 for fendiline was reduced to 3.0 +/- 0.1 microM (control value: 17.0 +/- 2.4 microM) and the Hill slope in its presence was increased to 1.90 +/- 0.1 (control value: 1.39 +/- 0.23) by 1 microM (4R, 4S)-Bay K 8644. 6. (4R,4S)-Bay K 8644 caused the expected stimulation of ICa in the presence of verapamil, diltiazem and nifedipine, overcoming the inhibitory effect of these calcium channel blockers. 7. The 'paradoxical' inhibitory effect of the agonist Bay K 8644 can be explained in terms of an allosteric interaction between fendiline and the dihydropyridine agonist.

  17. Perturbed atrial calcium handling in an ovine model of heart failure: potential roles for reductions in the L-type calcium current.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Jessica D; Caldwell, Jessica L; Horn, Margaux A; Bode, Elizabeth F; Richards, Mark A; Hall, Mark C S; Graham, Helen K; Briston, Sarah J; Greensmith, David J; Eisner, David A; Dibb, Katharine M; Trafford, Andrew W

    2015-02-01

    Heart failure (HF) is commonly associated with reduced cardiac output and an increased risk of atrial arrhythmias particularly during β-adrenergic stimulation. The aim of the present study was to determine how HF alters systolic Ca(2+) and the response to β-adrenergic (β-AR) stimulation in atrial myocytes. HF was induced in sheep by ventricular tachypacing and changes in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration studied in single left atrial myocytes under voltage and current clamp conditions. The following were all reduced in HF atrial myocytes; Ca(2+) transient amplitude (by 46% in current clamped and 28% in voltage clamped cells), SR dependent rate of Ca(2+) removal (kSR, by 32%), L-type Ca(2+) current density (by 36%) and action potential duration (APD90 by 22%). However, in HF SR Ca(2+) content was increased (by 19%) when measured under voltage-clamp stimulation. Inhibiting the L-type Ca(2+) current (ICa-L) in control cells reproduced both the decrease in Ca(2+) transient amplitude and increase of SR Ca(2+) content observed in voltage-clamped HF cells. During β-AR stimulation Ca(2+) transient amplitude was the same in control and HF cells. However, ICa-L remained less in HF than control cells whilst SR Ca(2+) content was highest in HF cells during β-AR stimulation. The decrease in ICa-L that occurs in HF atrial myocytes appears to underpin the decreased Ca(2+) transient amplitude and increased SR Ca(2+) content observed in voltage-clamped cells. PMID:25463272

  18. L-type calcium channels and MAP kinase contribute to thyrotropin-releasing hormone-induced depolarization in thalamic paraventricular nucleus neurons

    PubMed Central

    Kolaj, Miloslav; Zhang, Li

    2016-01-01

    In rat paraventricular thalamic nucleus (PVT) neurons, activation of thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) receptors enhances neuronal excitability via concurrent decrease in a G protein-coupled inwardly rectifying K (GIRK)-like conductance and opening of a cannabinoid receptor-sensitive transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC)-like conductance. Here, we investigated the calcium (Ca2+) contribution to the components of this TRH-induced response. TRH-induced membrane depolarization was reduced in the presence of intracellular BAPTA, also in media containing nominally zero [Ca2+]o, suggesting a critical role for both intracellular Ca2+ release and Ca2+ influx. TRH-induced inward current was unchanged by T-type Ca2+ channel blockade, but was decreased by blockade of high-voltage-activated Ca2+ channels (HVACCs). Both the pharmacologically isolated GIRK-like and the TRPC-like components of the TRH-induced response were decreased by nifedipine and increased by BayK8644, implying Ca2+ influx via L-type Ca2+ channels. Only the TRPC-like conductance was reduced by either thapsigargin or dantrolene, suggesting a role for ryanodine receptors and Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release in this component of the TRH-induced response. In pituitary and other cell lines, TRH stimulates MAPK. In PVT neurons, only the GIRK-like component of the TRH-induced current was selectively decreased in the presence of PD98059, a MAPK inhibitor. Collectively, the data imply that TRH-induced depolarization and inward current in PVT neurons involve both a dependency on extracellular Ca2+ influx via opening of L-type Ca2+ channels, a sensitivity of a TRPC-like component to intracellular Ca2+ release via ryanodine channels, and a modulation by MAPK of a GIRK-like conductance component. PMID:27009047

  19. Effects of Voltage-Gated K+ Channel on Cell Proliferation in Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Fan, Yuying; Wang, Shuye; Wang, Lianjie; He, Wanting; Zhang, Qiu; Li, Xiaoxia

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To study the effects and underlying mechanisms of voltage-gated K+ channels on the proliferation of multiple myeloma cells. Methods. RPMI-8226 MM cell line was used for the experiments. Voltage-gated K+ currents and the resting potential were recorded by whole-cell patch-clamp technique. RT-PCR detected Kv channel mRNA expression. Cell viability was analyzed with MTT assay. Cell counting system was employed to monitor cell proliferation. DNA contents and cell volume were analyzed by flow cytometry. Results. Currents recorded in RPMI-8226 cells were confirmed to be voltage-gated K+ channels. A high level of Kv1.3 mRNA was detected but no Kv3.1 mRNA was detected in RPMI-8226 cells. Voltage-gated K+ channel blocker 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) (2 mM) depolarized the resting potential from −42 ± 1.7 mV to −31.8 ± 2.8 mV (P < 0.01). The results of MTT assay showed that there was no significant cytotoxicity to RPMI-8226 cells when the 4-AP concentration was lower than 4 mM. 4-AP arrested cell cycle in G0/G1 phase. Cells were synchronized at the G1/S boundary by treatment of aphidicolin and released from the blockage by replacing the medium with normal culture medium or with culture medium containing 2 mM 4-AP. 4-AP produced no significant inhibitory effect on cell cycle compared with control cells (P > 0.05). Conclusions. In RPMI-8226, voltage-gated K+ channels are involved in proliferation and cell cycle progression its influence on the resting potential and cell volume may be responsible for this process; the inhibitory effect of the voltage-gated K+ channel blocker on RPMI-8226 cell proliferation is a phase-specific event. PMID:24995361

  20. An evolutionarily-unique heterodimeric voltage-gated cation channel found in aphids

    PubMed Central

    Amey, Joanna S.; O’Reilly, Andrias O.; Burton, Mark J.; Puinean, Alin M.; Mellor, Ian R.; Duce, Ian R.; Field, Linda M.; Wallace, B.A.; Williamson, Martin S.; Davies, T.G. Emyr

    2015-01-01

    We describe the identification in aphids of a unique heterodimeric voltage-gated sodium channel which has an atypical ion selectivity filter and, unusually for insect channels, is highly insensitive to tetrodotoxin. We demonstrate that this channel has most likely arisen by adaptation (gene fission or duplication) of an invertebrate ancestral mono(hetero)meric channel. This is the only identifiable voltage-gated sodium channel homologue in the aphid genome(s), and the channel’s novel selectivity filter motif (DENS instead of the usual DEKA found in other eukaryotes) may result in a loss of sodium selectivity, as indicated experimentally in mutagenised Drosophila channels. PMID:25637326

  1. An evolutionarily-unique heterodimeric voltage-gated cation channel found in aphids.

    PubMed

    Amey, Joanna S; O'Reilly, Andrias O; Burton, Mark J; Puinean, Alin M; Mellor, Ian R; Duce, Ian R; Field, Linda M; Wallace, B A; Williamson, Martin S; Davies, T G Emyr

    2015-02-27

    We describe the identification in aphids of a unique heterodimeric voltage-gated sodium channel which has an atypical ion selectivity filter and, unusually for insect channels, is highly insensitive to tetrodotoxin. We demonstrate that this channel has most likely arisen by adaptation (gene fission or duplication) of an invertebrate ancestral mono(hetero)meric channel. This is the only identifiable voltage-gated sodium channel homologue in the aphid genome(s), and the channel's novel selectivity filter motif (DENS instead of the usual DEKA found in other eukaryotes) may result in a loss of sodium selectivity, as indicated experimentally in mutagenised Drosophila channels.

  2. Calmodulin kinase II is involved in voltage-dependent facilitation of the L-type Cav1.2 calcium channel: Identification of the phosphorylation sites.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tae-Seong; Karl, Rosi; Moosmang, Sven; Lenhardt, Peter; Klugbauer, Norbert; Hofmann, Franz; Kleppisch, Thomas; Welling, Andrea

    2006-09-01

    Calcium-dependent facilitation of L-type calcium channels has been reported to depend on the function of calmodulin kinase II. In contrast, the mechanism for voltage-dependent facilitation is not clear. In HEK 293 cells expressing Ca(v)1.2, Ca(v)beta2a, and calmodulin kinase II, the calcium current measured at +30 mV was facilitated up to 1.5-fold by a 200-ms-long prepulse to +160 mV. This voltage-dependent facilitation was prevented by the calmodulin kinase II inhibitors KN93 and the autocamtide-2-related peptide. In cells expressing the Ca(v)1.2 mutation I1649E, a residue critical for the binding of Ca2+-bound calmodulin, facilitation was also abolished. Calmodulin kinase II was coimmunoprecipitated with the Ca(v)1.2 channel from murine heart and HEK 293 cells expressing Ca(v)1.2 and calmodulinkinase II. The precipitated Ca(v)1.2 channel was phosphorylated in the presence of calmodulin and Ca2+. Fifteen putative calmodulin kinase II phosphorylation sites were identified mostly in the carboxyl-terminal tail of Ca(v)1.2. Neither truncation at amino acid 1728 nor changing the II-III loop serines 808 and 888 to alanines affected facilitation of the calcium current. In contrast, facilitation was decreased by the single mutations S1512A and S1570A and abolished by the double mutation S1512A/S1570A. These serines flank the carboxyl-terminal EF-hand motif. Immunoprecipitation of calmodulin kinase II with the Ca(v)1.2 channel was not affected by the mutation S1512A/S1570A. The phosphorylation of the Ca(v)1.2 protein was strongly decreased in the S1512A/S1570A double mutant. These results suggest that voltage-dependent facilitation of the Ca(v)1.2 channel depends on the phosphorylation of Ser1512/Ser1570 by calmodulin kinase II. PMID:16820363

  3. New Findings on the Effects of Tannic Acid: Inhibition of L-Type Calcium Channels, Calcium Transient and Contractility in Rat Ventricular Myocytes.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Fengli; Chu, Xi; Wang, Hua; Zhang, Xuan; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Liu, Zhenyi; Guo, Hui; Liu, Hongying; Liu, Yang; Chu, Li; Zhang, Jianping

    2016-03-01

    Tannic acid (TA) is a group of water-soluble polyphenolic compounds that occur mainly in plant-derived feeds, food grains and fruits. Many studies have explored its biomedical properties, such as anticancer, antibacterial, antimutagenic, antioxidant, antidiabetic, antiinflammatory and antihypertensive activities. However, the effects of TA on the L-type Ca(2+) current (ICa-L) of cardiomyocytes remain undefined. The present study examined the effects of TA on ICa-L using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique and on intracellular Ca(2+) handling and cell contractility in rat ventricular myocytes with the aid of a video-based edge detection system. Exposure to TA resulted in a concentration- and voltage-dependent blockade of ICa-L, with the half maximal inhibitory concentration of 1.69 μM and the maximal inhibitory effect of 46.15%. Moreover, TA significantly inhibited the amplitude of myocyte shortening and peak value of Ca(2+) transient and increased the time to 10% of the peak. These findings provide new experimental evidence for the cellular mechanism of action of TA and may help to expand clinical treatments for cardiovascular disease. PMID:26762248

  4. Protein kinase C modulates the release of [3H]5-hydroxytryptamine in the spinal cord of the rat: the role of L-type voltage-dependent calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, V C; Jones, D J

    1992-11-01

    The present studies examined the relationship between protein kinase C (PKC) and L-type voltage-dependent calcium channels in modulating the release of neurotransmitter from K(+)-depolarized rat spinal cord synaptosomes. Activators of PKC, such as phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), mezerein and oleoyl acetylglycerol produced a concentration-dependent potentiation of K(+)-induced release of [3H]5-hydroxytryptamine ([3H]5-HT). Enhanced release was dependent on the concentration of both Ca2+ and K+ in the superfusion medium. Calcium-independent release of [3H]5-HT or release induced by the Ca2+ ionophore were unaffected by PKC activators. Calcium-dependent release of [3H]5-HT, evoked by K+, was enhanced under similar conditions by the L-type Ca2+ channel agonists Bay K 8644 and (+)-SDZ 202-791. Nimodipine, an L-type Ca2+ channel antagonist, while having no independent effect on K(+)-induced release of [3H]5-HT, abolished the potentiative effects of Bay K 8644 and PMA. Similarly, the PKC inhibitors, polymyxin B and staurosporine, blocked effects of both PMA and Bay K 8644 on K(+)-stimulated release of [3H]5-HT. Neither PMA nor Bay K 8644 altered the uptake of [3H]5-HT. These results suggest that PKC-dependent mechanisms utilize calcium influx, via the L-type calcium channel, to modulate release of neurotransmitter and indicate a possible functional link between PKC and L-type voltage-dependent calcium channels in the spinal cord.

  5. Regulation of voltage-gated potassium channels by PI(4,5)P2.

    PubMed

    Kruse, Martin; Hammond, Gerald R V; Hille, Bertil

    2012-08-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P(2)) regulates activities of numerous ion channels including inwardly rectifying potassium (K(ir)) channels, KCNQ, TRP, and voltage-gated calcium channels. Several studies suggest that voltage-gated potassium (K(V)) channels might be regulated by PI(4,5)P(2). Wide expression of K(V) channels in different cells suggests that such regulation could have broad physiological consequences. To study regulation of K(V) channels by PI(4,5)P(2), we have coexpressed several of them in tsA-201 cells with a G protein-coupled receptor (M(1)R), a voltage-sensitive lipid 5-phosphatase (Dr-VSP), or an engineered fusion protein carrying both lipid 4-phosphatase and 5-phosphatase activity (pseudojanin). These tools deplete PI(4,5)P(2) with application of muscarinic agonists, depolarization, or rapamycin, respectively. PI(4,5)P(2) at the plasma membrane was monitored by Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) from PH probes of PLCδ1 simultaneously with whole-cell recordings. Activation of Dr-VSP or recruitment of pseudojanin inhibited K(V)7.1, K(V)7.2/7.3, and K(ir)2.1 channel current by 90-95%. Activation of M(1)R inhibited K(V)7.2/7.3 current similarly. With these tools, we tested for potential PI(4,5)P(2) regulation of activity of K(V)1.1/K(V)β1.1, K(V)1.3, K(V)1.4, and K(V)1.5/K(V)β1.3, K(V)2.1, K(V)3.4, K(V)4.2, K(V)4.3 (with different KChIPs and DPP6-s), and hERG/KCNE2. Interestingly, we found a substantial removal of inactivation for K(V)1.1/K(V)β1.1 and K(V)3.4, resulting in up-regulation of current density upon activation of M(1)R but no changes in activity upon activating only VSP or pseudojanin. The other channels tested except possibly hERG showed no alteration in activity in any of the assays we used. In conclusion, a depletion of PI(4,5)P(2) at the plasma membrane by enzymes does not seem to influence activity of most tested K(V) channels, whereas it does strongly inhibit members of the K(V)7 and K(ir) families. PMID

  6. Impact of phosphomimetic and non-phosphorylatable mutations of phospholemman on L-type calcium channels gating in HEK 293T cells

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Kai; Wang, Yue-Peng; Zhou, Zhi-Wen; Jiang, Yi-Bo; Li, Wei; Chen, Xiao-Meng; Li, Yi-Gang

    2015-01-01

    Background: Phospholemman (PLM) is an important phosphorylation substrate for protein kinases A and C in the heart. Until now, the association between PLM phosphorylation status and L-type calcium channels (LTCCs) gating has not been fully understood. We investigated the kinetics of LTCCs in HEK 293T cells expressing phosphomimetic or nonphosphorylatable PLM mutants. Methods: The LTCCs gating was measured in HEK 293T cells transfected with LTCC and wild-type (WT) PLM, phosphomimetic or nonphosphorylatable PLM mutants: 6263AA, 6869AA, AAAA, 6263DD, 6869DD or DDDD. Results: WT PLM significantly slowed LTCCs activation and deactivation while enhanced voltage-dependent inactivation (VDI). PLM mutants 6869DD and DDDD significantly increased the peak of the currents. 6263DD accelerated channel activation, while 6263AA slowed it more than WT PLM. 6869DD significantly enhanced PLM-induced increase of VDI. AAAA slowed the channel activation more than 6263AA, and DDDD accelerated the channel VDI more than 6869DD. Conclusions: Our results demonstrate that phosphomimetic PLM could stimulate LTCCs and alter their dynamics, while PLM nonphosphorylatable mutant produced the opposite effects. PMID:25656605

  7. L-Type Voltage-Dependent Calcium Channel Currents of Cerebral Arterial Smooth Muscle Cells are Increased by 2-Week Hindlimb Unweighting in Rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Hao; Xue, Jun-Hui; Bai, Yun-Gang; Xie, Man-Jiang; Bao, Jun-Xiang; Ma, Jin

    2008-06-01

    To investigate alterations of L-type voltage-dependent calcium channel (CaL) in cerebral vascular smooth muscle cells isolated from rats subjected to a two-week simulated weightlessness, and influence of Bay K 8644 (an agonist of CaL) to the channel currents. Tail-suspended rat model was used to simulate the effects of microgravity. Whole-cell patch-clamp technique was used to record CaL currents before and after Bay K 8644 treatment, with intracellular Ca2+ concentration maintained physiological level. The corresponding parameters such as steady state activation and inactivation curves were also recorded. Whole-cell CaL current densities increased obviously, and sensitivity of CaL to Bay K 8644 also increased in cerebral vascular smooth muscle cells from suspension group. But membrane capacitance (Cm), access resistance (Ra), and other parameters of CaL such as steady state activation / inactivation curves have no significant changes compared with those of control group. These results suggest that enhanced CaL function of cerebrovascular smooth muscle cells induced by simulated microgravity may be one of the electrophysiological mechanisms that mediate enhanced vasoreactivity of cerebrovascular smooth muscle cells during adaptation to simulated weightlessness in rats.

  8. Simulated microgravity inhibits L-type calcium channel currents partially by the up-regulation of miR-103 in MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhongyang; Cao, Xinsheng; Zhang, Zhuo; Hu, Zebing; Zhang, Lianchang; Wang, Han; Zhou, Hua; Li, Dongtao; Zhang, Shu; Xie, Manjiang

    2015-01-01

    L-type voltage-sensitive calcium channels (LTCCs), particularly Cav1.2 LTCCs, play fundamental roles in cellular responses to mechanical stimuli in osteoblasts. Numerous studies have shown that mechanical loading promotes bone formation, whereas the removal of this stimulus under microgravity conditions results in a reduction in bone mass. However, whether microgravity exerts an influence on LTCCs in osteoblasts and whether this influence is a possible mechanism underlying the observed bone loss remain unclear. In the present study, we demonstrated that simulated microgravity substantially inhibited LTCC currents and suppressed Cav1.2 at the protein level in MC3T3-E1 osteoblast-like cells. In addition, reduced Cav1.2 protein levels decreased LTCC currents in MC3T3-E1 cells. Moreover, simulated microgravity increased miR-103 expression. Cav1.2 expression and LTCC current densities both significantly increased in cells that were transfected with a miR-103 inhibitor under mechanical unloading conditions. These results suggest that simulated microgravity substantially inhibits LTCC currents in osteoblasts by suppressing Cav1.2 expression. Furthermore, the down-regulation of Cav1.2 expression and the inhibition of LTCCs caused by mechanical unloading in osteoblasts are partially due to miR-103 up-regulation. Our study provides a novel mechanism for microgravity-induced detrimental effects on osteoblasts, offering a new avenue to further investigate the bone loss induced by microgravity. PMID:25627864

  9. Simulated microgravity inhibits L-type calcium channel currents partially by the up-regulation of miR-103 in MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhongyang; Cao, Xinsheng; Zhang, Zhuo; Hu, Zebing; Zhang, Lianchang; Wang, Han; Zhou, Hua; Li, Dongtao; Zhang, Shu; Xie, Manjiang

    2015-01-28

    L-type voltage-sensitive calcium channels (LTCCs), particularly Cav1.2 LTCCs, play fundamental roles in cellular responses to mechanical stimuli in osteoblasts. Numerous studies have shown that mechanical loading promotes bone formation, whereas the removal of this stimulus under microgravity conditions results in a reduction in bone mass. However, whether microgravity exerts an influence on LTCCs in osteoblasts and whether this influence is a possible mechanism underlying the observed bone loss remain unclear. In the present study, we demonstrated that simulated microgravity substantially inhibited LTCC currents and suppressed Cav1.2 at the protein level in MC3T3-E1 osteoblast-like cells. In addition, reduced Cav1.2 protein levels decreased LTCC currents in MC3T3-E1 cells. Moreover, simulated microgravity increased miR-103 expression. Cav1.2 expression and LTCC current densities both significantly increased in cells that were transfected with a miR-103 inhibitor under mechanical unloading conditions. These results suggest that simulated microgravity substantially inhibits LTCC currents in osteoblasts by suppressing Cav1.2 expression. Furthermore, the down-regulation of Cav1.2 expression and the inhibition of LTCCs caused by mechanical unloading in osteoblasts are partially due to miR-103 up-regulation. Our study provides a novel mechanism for microgravity-induced detrimental effects on osteoblasts, offering a new avenue to further investigate the bone loss induced by microgravity.

  10. Mechanisms of closed-state inactivation in voltage-gated ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Bähring, Robert; Covarrubias, Manuel

    2011-01-01

    Inactivation of voltage-gated ion channels is an intrinsic auto-regulatory process necessary to govern the occurrence and shape of action potentials and establish firing patterns in excitable tissues. Inactivation may occur from the open state (open-state inactivation, OSI) at strongly depolarized membrane potentials, or from pre-open closed states (closed-state inactivation, CSI) at hyperpolarized and modestly depolarized membrane potentials. Voltage-gated Na+, K+, Ca2+ and non-selective cationic channels utilize both OSI and CSI. Whereas there are detailed mechanistic descriptions of OSI, much less is known about the molecular basis of CSI. Here, we review evidence for CSI in voltage-gated cationic channels (VGCCs) and recent findings that shed light on the molecular mechanisms of CSI in voltage-gated K+ (Kv) channels. Particularly, complementary observations suggest that the S4 voltage sensor, the S4S5 linker and the main S6 activation gate are instrumental in the installment of CSI in Kv4 channels. According to this hypothesis, the voltage sensor may adopt a distinct conformation to drive CSI and, depending on the stability of the interactions between the voltage sensor and the pore domain, a closed-inactivated state results from rearrangements in the selectivity filter or failure of the activation gate to open. Kv4 channel CSI may efficiently exploit the dynamics of the subthreshold membrane potential to regulate spiking properties in excitable tissues. PMID:21098008

  11. Voltage-gated sodium channel modulation by scorpion α-toxins

    PubMed Central

    Bosmans, Frank; Tytgat, Jan

    2007-01-01

    Voltage-gated Na+ channels are integral membrane proteins that function as a gateway for a selective permeation of sodium ions across biological membranes. In this way, they are crucial players for the generation of action potentials in excitable cells. Voltage-gated Na+ channels are encoded by at least nine genes in mammals. The different isoforms have remarkably similar functional properties, but small changes in function and pharmacology are biologically well-defined, as underscored by mutations that cause several diseases and by modulation of a myriad of compounds respectively. This review will stress on the modulation of voltage-gated Na+ channels by scorpion alpha-toxins. Nature has designed these two classes of molecules as if they were predestined to each other: an inevitable ‘encounter’ between a voltage-gated Na+ channel isoform and an alpha-toxin from scorpion venom indeed results in a dramatically changed Na+ current phenotype with clear-cut consequences on electrical excitability and sometimes life or death. This fascinating aspect justifies an overview on scorpion venoms, their alpha-toxins and the Na+ channel targets they are built for, as well as on the molecular determinants that govern the selectivity and affinity of this ‘inseparable duo’. PMID:17087986

  12. Energetic role of the paddle motif in voltage gating of Shaker K+ channels

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yanping; Ramu, Yajamana; Shin, Hyeon-Gyu; Yamakaze, Jayden; Lu, Zhe

    2013-01-01

    Voltage-gated ion channels underlie rapid electric signaling in excitable cells. Electrophysiological studies have established that the N-terminal half of the fourth transmembrane segment (NTS4) of these channels functions as the primary voltage sensor, whereas crystallographic studies have shown that NTS4 is not located within a proteinaceous pore. Rather, NTS4 and the C-terminal half of S3 (CTS3 or S3b) form a helix-turn-helix motif, termed the voltage-sensor paddle. This unexpected structural finding raises two fundamental questions: does the paddle motif also exist in voltage-gated channels in a biological membrane and, if so, what is its function in voltage gating. Here, we provide evidence that the paddle motif exists in the open state of Drosophila Shaker voltage-gated K+ channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes and that CTS3 acts as an extracellular hydrophobic "stabilizer" for NTS4, biasing the gating chemical equilibrium towards the open state. PMID:23542156

  13. Compensatory T-type Ca2+ channel activity alters D2-autoreceptor responses of Substantia nigra dopamine neurons from Cav1.3 L-type Ca2+ channel KO mice

    PubMed Central

    Poetschke, Christina; Dragicevic, Elena; Duda, Johanna; Benkert, Julia; Dougalis, Antonios; DeZio, Roberta; Snutch, Terrance P.; Striessnig, Joerg; Liss, Birgit

    2015-01-01

    The preferential degeneration of Substantia nigra dopamine midbrain neurons (SN DA) causes the motor-symptoms of Parkinson’s disease (PD). Voltage-gated L-type calcium channels (LTCCs), especially the Cav1.3-subtype, generate an activity-related oscillatory Ca2+ burden in SN DA neurons, contributing to their degeneration and PD. While LTCC-blockers are already in clinical trials as PD-therapy, age-dependent functional roles of Cav1.3 LTCCs in SN DA neurons remain unclear. Thus, we analysed juvenile and adult Cav1.3-deficient mice with electrophysiological and molecular techniques. To unmask compensatory effects, we compared Cav1.3 KO mice with pharmacological LTCC-inhibition. LTCC-function was not necessary for SN DA pacemaker-activity at either age, but rather contributed to their pacemaker-precision. Moreover, juvenile Cav1.3 KO but not WT mice displayed adult wildtype-like, sensitised inhibitory dopamine-D2-autoreceptor (D2-AR) responses that depended upon both, interaction of the neuronal calcium sensor NCS-1 with D2-ARs, and on voltage-gated T-type calcium channel (TTCC) activity. This functional KO-phenotype was accompanied by cell-specific up-regulation of NCS-1 and Cav3.1-TTCC mRNA. Furthermore, in wildtype we identified an age-dependent switch of TTCC-function from contributing to SN DA pacemaker-precision in juveniles to pacemaker-frequency in adults. This novel interplay of Cav1.3 L-type and Cav3.1 T-type channels, and their modulation of SN DA activity-pattern and D2-AR-sensitisation, provide new insights into flexible age- and calcium-dependent activity-control of SN DA neurons and its pharmacological modulation. PMID:26381090

  14. Calmodulin and Ca2+ control of voltage gated Na+ channels

    PubMed Central

    Gabelli, Sandra B; Yoder, Jesse B; Tomaselli, Gordon F; Amzel, L Mario

    2016-01-01

    The structures of the cytosolic portion of voltage activated sodium channels (CTNav) in complexes with calmodulin and other effectors in the presence and the absence of calcium provide information about the mechanisms by which these effectors regulate channel activity. The most studied of these complexes, those of Nav1.2 and Nav1.5, show details of the conformations and the specific contacts that are involved in channel regulation. Another voltage activated sodium channel, Nav1.4, shows significant calcium dependent inactivation, while its homolog Nav1.5 does not. The available structures shed light on the possible localization of the elements responsible for this effect. Mutations in the genes of these 3 Nav channels are associated with several disease conditions: Nav1.2, neurological conditions; Nav1.4, syndromes involving skeletal muscle; and Nav1.5, cardiac arrhythmias. Many of these disease-specific mutations are located at the interfaces involving CTNav and its effectors. PMID:26218606

  15. Measuring Ca2+-Dependent Modulation of Voltage-Gated Ca2+ Channels in HEK-293T Cells.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Jessica R; Lee, Amy

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated Ca(2+) (Cav) channels regulate a variety of biological processes, such as muscle contraction, gene expression, and neurotransmitter release. Cav channels are subject to diverse forms of regulation, including those involving the Ca(2+) ions that permeate the pore. High voltage-activated Cav channels undergo Ca(2+)-dependent inactivation (CDI) and facilitation (CDF), which can regulate processes such as cardiac rhythm and synaptic plasticity. CDI and CDF differ slightly between Cav1 (L-type) and Cav2 (P/Q-, N-, and R-type) channels. Human embryonic kidney cells transformed with SV40 large T-antigen (HEK-293T) are advantageous for studying CDI and CDF of a particular type of Cav channel. HEK-293T cells do not express endogenous Cav channels, but Cav channels can be expressed exogenously at high levels in these cells by transient transfection. This protocol describes how to characterize and analyze Ca(2+)-dependent modulation of recombinant Cav channels in HEK-293T cells. PMID:27587775

  16. Anaesthetic Tricaine Acts Preferentially on Neural Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels and Fails to Block Directly Evoked Muscle Contraction

    PubMed Central

    Attili, Seetharamaiah; Hughes, Simon M.

    2014-01-01

    Movements in animals arise through concerted action of neurons and skeletal muscle. General anaesthetics prevent movement and cause loss of consciousness by blocking neural function. Anaesthetics of the amino amide-class are thought to act by blockade of voltage-gated sodium channels. In fish, the commonly used anaesthetic tricaine methanesulphonate, also known as 3-aminobenzoic acid ethyl ester, metacaine or MS-222, causes loss of consciousness. However, its role in blocking action potentials in distinct excitable cells is unclear, raising the possibility that tricaine could act as a neuromuscular blocking agent directly causing paralysis. Here we use evoked electrical stimulation to show that tricaine efficiently blocks neural action potentials, but does not prevent directly evoked muscle contraction. Nifedipine-sensitive L-type Cav channels affecting movement are also primarily neural, suggesting that muscle Nav channels are relatively insensitive to tricaine. These findings show that tricaine used at standard concentrations in zebrafish larvae does not paralyse muscle, thereby diminishing concern that a direct action on muscle could mask a lack of general anaesthesia. PMID:25090007

  17. L-type calcium channel blockers and substance P induce angiogenesis of cortical vessels associated with beta-amyloid plaques in an Alzheimer mouse model.

    PubMed

    Daschil, Nina; Kniewallner, Kathrin M; Obermair, Gerald J; Hutter-Paier, Birgit; Windisch, Manfred; Marksteiner, Josef; Humpel, Christian

    2015-03-01

    It is well established that L-type calcium channels (LTCCs) are expressed in astroglia. However, their functional role is still speculative, especially under pathologic conditions. We recently showed that the α1 subunit-like immunoreactivity of the CaV1.2 channel is strongly expressed in reactive astrocytes around beta-amyloid plaques in 11-month-old Alzheimer transgenic (tg) mice with the amyloid precursor protein London and Swedish mutations. The aim of the present study was to examine the cellular expression of all LTCC subunits around beta-amyloid plaques by in situ hybridization using (35)S-labeled oligonucleotides. Our data show that messenger RNAs (mRNAs) of the LTCC CaV1.2 α1 subunit as well as all auxiliary β and α2δ subunits, except α2δ-4, were expressed in the hippocampus of age-matched wild-type mice. It was unexpected to see, that cells directly located in the plaque core in the cortex expressed mRNAs for CaV1.2 α1, β2, β4, and α2δ-1, whereas no expression was detected in the halo. Furthermore, cells in the plaque core also expressed preprotachykinin-A mRNA, the precursor for substance P. By means of confocal microscopy, we demonstrated that collagen-IV-stained brain vessels in the cortex were associated with the plaque core and were immunoreactive for substance P. In cortical organotypic brain slices of adult Alzheimer mice, we could demonstrate that LTCC blockers increased angiogenesis, which was further potentiated by substance P. In conclusion, our data show that brain vessels associated with beta-amyloid plaques express substance P and an LTCC and may play a role in angiogenesis. PMID:25619662

  18. Inhibitory effect of the recombinant Phoneutria nigriventer Tx1 toxin on voltage-gated sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Silva, Anita O; Peigneur, Steve; Diniz, Marcelo R V; Tytgat, Jan; Beirão, Paulo S L

    2012-12-01

    Phoneutria nigriventer toxin Tx1 (PnTx1, also referred to in the literature as Tx1) exerts inhibitory effect on neuronal (Na(V)1.2) sodium channels in a way dependent on the holding potential, and competes with μ-conotoxins but not with tetrodotoxin for their binding sites. In the present study we investigated the electrophysiological properties of the recombinant toxin (rPnTx1), which has the complete amino acid sequence of the natural toxin with 3 additional residues: AM on the N-terminal and G on the C-terminal. At the concentration of 1.5 μM, the recombinant toxin inhibits Na(+) currents of dorsal root ganglia neurons (38.4 ± 6.1% inhibition at -80 mV holding potential) and tetrodotoxin-resistant Na(+) currents (26.2 ± 4.9% at the same holding potential). At -50 mV holding potential the inhibition of the total current reached 71.3 ± 2.3% with 1.5 μM rPnTx1. The selectivity of rPnTx1 was investigated on ten different isoforms of voltage-gated sodium channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes. The order of potency for rPnTx1 was: rNa(V)1.2 > rNa(V)1.7 ≈ rNa(V)1.4 ≥ rNa(V)1.3 > mNa(V)1.6 ≥ hNa(V)1.8. No effect was seen on hNa(V)1.5 and on the arthropods isoforms (DmNa(V)1, BGNa(V)1.1a and VdNa(V)1). The IC(50) for Na(V)1.2 was 33.7 ± 2.9 nM with a maximum inhibition of 83.3 ± 1.9%. The toxin did not alter the voltage-dependence of channel gating and was effective on Na(V)1.2 channels devoid of inactivation. It was ineffective on neuronal calcium channels. We conclude that rPnTx1 has a promising selectivity, and that it may be a valuable model to achieve pharmacological activities of interest for the treatment of channelopathies and neuropathic pain. PMID:22968173

  19. The role of voltage-gated potassium channels in the regulation of mouse uterine contractility

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Ryan C; McClure, Marisa C; Smith, Margaret A; Abel, Peter W; Bradley, Michael E

    2007-01-01

    Background Uterine smooth muscle cells exhibit ionic currents that appear to be important in the control of uterine contractility, but how these currents might produce the changes in contractile activity seen in pregnant myometrium has not been established. There are conflicting reports concerning the role of voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels and large-conductance, calcium-activated potassium (BK) channels in the regulation of uterine contractility. In this study we provide molecular and functional evidence for a role for Kv channels in the regulation of spontaneous contractile activity in mouse myometrium, and also demonstrate a change in Kv channel regulation of contractility in pregnant mouse myometrium. Methods Functional assays which evaluated the effects of channel blockers and various contractile agonists were accomplished by quantifying contractility of isolated uterine smooth muscle obtained from nonpregnant mice as well as mice at various stages of pregnancy. Expression of Kv channel proteins in isolated uterine smooth muscle was evaluated by Western blots. Results The Kv channel blocker 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) caused contractions in nonpregnant mouse myometrium (EC50 = 54 micromolar, maximal effect at 300 micromolar) but this effect disappeared in pregnant mice; similarly, the Kv4.2/Kv4.3 blocker phrixotoxin-2 caused contractions in nonpregnant, but not pregnant, myometrium. Contractile responses to 4-AP were not dependent upon nerves, as neither tetrodotoxin nor storage of tissues at room temperature significantly altered these responses, nor were responses dependent upon the presence of the endometrium. Spontaneous contractions and contractions in response to 4-AP did not appear to be mediated by BK, as the BK channel-selective blockers iberiotoxin, verruculogen, or tetraethylammonium failed to affect either spontaneous contractions or 4-AP-elicited responses. A number of different Kv channel alpha subunit proteins were found in isolated myometrium

  20. Nimodipine, an L-type calcium channel blocker attenuates mitochondrial dysfunctions to protect against 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine-induced Parkinsonism in mice.

    PubMed

    Singh, Alpana; Verma, Poonam; Balaji, Gillela; Samantaray, Supriti; Mohanakumar, Kochupurackal P

    2016-10-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD), the most common progressive neurodegenerative movement disorder, results from loss of dopaminergic neurons of substantia nigra pars compacta. These neurons exhibit Cav1.3 channel-dependent pacemaking activity. Epidemiological studies suggest reduced risk for PD in population under long-term antihypertensive therapy with L-type calcium channel antagonists. These prompted us to investigate nimodipine, an L-type calcium channel blocker for neuroprotective effect in cellular and animal models of PD. Nimodipine (0.1-10 μM) significantly attenuated 1-methyl-4-phenyl pyridinium ion-induced loss in mitochondrial morphology, mitochondrial membrane potential and increases in intracellular calcium levels in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cell line as measured respectively employing Mitotracker green staining, TMRM, and Fura-2 fluorescence, but only a feeble neuroprotective effect was observed in MTT assay. Nimodipine dose-dependently reduced 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-induced parkinsonian syndromes (akinesia and catalepsy) and loss in swimming ability in Balb/c mice. It attenuated MPTP-induced loss of dopaminergic tyrosine hydroxylase positive neurons in substantia nigra, improved mitochondrial oxygen consumption and inhibited reactive oxygen species production in the striatal mitochondria measured using dichlorodihydrofluorescein fluorescence, but failed to block striatal dopamine depletion. These results point to an involvement of L-type calcium channels in MPTP-induced dopaminergic neuronal death in experimental parkinsonism and more importantly provide evidences for nimodipine to improve mitochondrial integrity and function.

  1. Nimodipine, an L-type calcium channel blocker attenuates mitochondrial dysfunctions to protect against 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine-induced Parkinsonism in mice.

    PubMed

    Singh, Alpana; Verma, Poonam; Balaji, Gillela; Samantaray, Supriti; Mohanakumar, Kochupurackal P

    2016-10-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD), the most common progressive neurodegenerative movement disorder, results from loss of dopaminergic neurons of substantia nigra pars compacta. These neurons exhibit Cav1.3 channel-dependent pacemaking activity. Epidemiological studies suggest reduced risk for PD in population under long-term antihypertensive therapy with L-type calcium channel antagonists. These prompted us to investigate nimodipine, an L-type calcium channel blocker for neuroprotective effect in cellular and animal models of PD. Nimodipine (0.1-10 μM) significantly attenuated 1-methyl-4-phenyl pyridinium ion-induced loss in mitochondrial morphology, mitochondrial membrane potential and increases in intracellular calcium levels in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cell line as measured respectively employing Mitotracker green staining, TMRM, and Fura-2 fluorescence, but only a feeble neuroprotective effect was observed in MTT assay. Nimodipine dose-dependently reduced 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-induced parkinsonian syndromes (akinesia and catalepsy) and loss in swimming ability in Balb/c mice. It attenuated MPTP-induced loss of dopaminergic tyrosine hydroxylase positive neurons in substantia nigra, improved mitochondrial oxygen consumption and inhibited reactive oxygen species production in the striatal mitochondria measured using dichlorodihydrofluorescein fluorescence, but failed to block striatal dopamine depletion. These results point to an involvement of L-type calcium channels in MPTP-induced dopaminergic neuronal death in experimental parkinsonism and more importantly provide evidences for nimodipine to improve mitochondrial integrity and function. PMID:27395789

  2. Suppression of voltage-gated Na(+) channels and neuronal excitability by imperatorin.

    PubMed

    Wu, King-Chuen; Chen, Yi-Hung; Cheng, Ka-Shun; Kuo, Yueh-Hsiung; Yang, Chin-Tsang; Wong, Kar-Lok; Tu, Yuan-Kun; Chan, Paul; Leung, Yuk-Man

    2013-12-01

    Imperatorin is a naturally occurring furocoumarin compound isolated from plants such as Angelica archangelica and Cnidium monnieri. It has multiple pharmacological effects including anticonvulsant effects. Here we determined the effects of imperatorin on voltage-gated Na(+) channels (VGSC) using whole-cell patch clamp techniques in differentiated neuronal NG108-15 cells. We showed that imperatorin inhibited VGSC; such inhibition did not show state-dependence. Imperatorin caused a left shift in the steady-state inactivation curve without affecting activation gating. The inhibition of VGSC by imperatorin displayed a mild frequency-dependence. Imperatorin was also shown to inhibit VGSC and action potential amplitude without affecting voltage-gated K(+) channels in rat hippocampal CA1 neurons. In conclusion, our results suggest that imperatorin dampens neuronal excitability by inhibiting VGSC. PMID:24113522

  3. L-type calcium channels play a crucial role in the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, Li; Wang, Yu; Wang, Huan; Kong, Lingmin; Zhang, Liang; Chen, Xin; Ding, Yin

    2012-08-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We detect the functional Ca{sup 2+} currents and mRNA expression of VDCC{sub L} in rMSCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Blockage of VDCC{sub L} exert antiproliferative and apoptosis-inducing effects on rMSCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibiting VDCC{sub L} can suppress the ability of rMSCs to differentiate into osteoblasts. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer {alpha}1C of VDCC{sub L} may be a primary functional subunit in VDCC{sub L}-regulating rMSCs. -- Abstract: L-type voltage-dependent Ca{sup 2+} channels (VDCC{sub L}) play an important role in the maintenance of intracellular calcium homeostasis, and influence multiple cellular processes. They have been confirmed to contribute to the functional activities of osteoblasts. Recently, VDCC{sub L} expression was reported in mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), but the role of VDCC{sub L} in MSCs is still undetermined. The aim of this study was to determine whether VDCC{sub L} may be regarded as a new regulator in the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of rat MSC (rMSCs). In this study, we examined functional Ca{sup 2+} currents (I{sub Ca}) and mRNA expression of VDCC{sub L} in rMSCs, and then suppressed VDCC{sub L} using nifedipine (Nif), a VDCC{sub L} blocker, to investigate its role in rMSCs. The proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of MSCs were analyzed by MTT, flow cytometry, alkaline phosphatase (ALP), Alizarin Red S staining, RT-PCR, and real-time PCR assays. We found that Nif exerts antiproliferative and apoptosis-inducing effects on rMSCs. ALP activity and mineralized nodules were significantly decreased after Nif treatment. Moreover, the mRNA levels of the osteogenic markers, osteocalcin (OCN), bone sialoprotein (BSP), and runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2), were also down-regulated. In addition, we transfected {alpha}1C-siRNA into the cells to further confirm the role of VDCC{sub L} in rMSCs, and a similar effect on osteogenesis was found. These

  4. Encephalitis due to antibodies to voltage gated potassium channel (VGKC) with cerebellar involvement in a teenager.

    PubMed

    Langille, Megan M; Desai, Jay

    2015-01-01

    Encephalitis due to antibodies to voltage gated potassium channel (VGKC) typically presents with limbic encephalitis and medial temporal lobe involvement on neuroimaging. We describe a case of 13 year girl female with encephalitis due to antibodies to VGKC with signal changes in the cerebellar dentate nuclei bilaterally and clinical features that suggested predominant cerebellar involvement. These have never been reported previously in the literature. Our case expands the phenotypic spectrum of this rare condition.

  5. Pandinus imperator scorpion venom blocks voltage-gated potassium channels in GH3 cells.

    PubMed

    Pappone, P A; Lucero, M T

    1988-06-01

    We examined the effects of Pandinus imperator scorpion venom on voltage-gated potassium channels in cultured clonal rat anterior pituitary cells (GH3 cells) using the gigohm-seal voltage-clamp method in the whole-cell configuration. We found that Pandinus venom blocks the voltage-gated potassium channels of GH3 cells in a voltage-dependent and dose-dependent manner. Crude venom in concentrations of 50-500 micrograms/ml produced 50-70% block of potassium currents measured at -20 mV, compared with 25-60% block measured at +50 mV. The venom both decreased the peak potassium current and shifted the voltage dependence of potassium current activation to more positive potentials. Pandinus venom affected potassium channel kinetics by slowing channel opening, speeding deactivation slightly, and increasing inactivation rates. Potassium currents in cells exposed to Pandinus venom did not recover control amplitudes or kinetics even after 20-40 min of washing with venom-free solution. The concentration dependence of crude venom block indicates that the toxins it contains are effective in the nanomolar range of concentrations. The effects of Pandinus venom were mimicked by zinc at concentrations less than or equal to 0.2 mM. Block of potassium current by zinc was voltage dependent and resembled Pandinus venom block, except that block by zinc was rapidly reversible. Since zinc is found in crude Pandinus venom, it could be important in the interaction of the venom with the potassium channel. We conclude that Pandinus venom contains toxins that bind tightly to voltage-dependent potassium channels in GH3 cells. Because of its high affinity for voltage-gated potassium channels and its irreversibility, Pandinus venom may be useful in the isolation, mapping, and characterization of voltage-gated potassium channels.

  6. Voltage-Gated Proton Channels as Novel Drug Targets: From NADPH Oxidase Regulation to Sperm Biology

    PubMed Central

    Demaurex, Nicolas; Krause, Karl-Heinz

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Voltage-gated proton channels are increasingly implicated in cellular proton homeostasis. Proton currents were originally identified in snail neurons less than 40 years ago, and subsequently shown to play an important auxiliary role in the functioning of reactive oxygen species (ROS)-generating nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidases. Molecular identification of voltage-gated proton channels was achieved less than 10 years ago. Interestingly, so far, only one gene coding for voltage-gated proton channels has been identified, namely hydrogen voltage-gated channel 1 (HVCN1), which codes for the HV1 proton channel protein. Over the last years, the first picture of putative physiological functions of HV1 has been emerging. Recent Advances: The best-studied role remains charge and pH compensation during the respiratory burst of the phagocyte NADPH oxidase (NOX). Strong evidence for a role of HV1 is also emerging in sperm biology, but the relationship with the sperm NOX5 remains unclear. Probably in many instances, HV1 functions independently of NOX: for example in snail neurons, basophils, osteoclasts, and cancer cells. Critical Issues: Generally, ion channels are good drug targets; however, this feature has so far not been exploited for HV1, and hitherto no inhibitors compatible with clinical use exist. However, there are emerging indications for HV1 inhibitors, ranging from diseases with a strong activation of the phagocyte NOX (e.g., stroke) to infertility, osteoporosis, and cancer. Future Directions: Clinically useful HV1-active drugs should be developed and might become interesting drugs of the future. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 23, 490–513. PMID:24483328

  7. Outward Rectification of Voltage-Gated K+ Channels Evolved at Least Twice in Life History.

    PubMed

    Riedelsberger, Janin; Dreyer, Ingo; Gonzalez, Wendy

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated potassium (K+) channels are present in all living systems. Despite high structural similarities in the transmembrane domains (TMD), this K+ channel type segregates into at least two main functional categories-hyperpolarization-activated, inward-rectifying (Kin) and depolarization-activated, outward-rectifying (Kout) channels. Voltage-gated K+ channels sense the membrane voltage via a voltage-sensing domain that is connected to the conduction pathway of the channel. It has been shown that the voltage-sensing mechanism is the same in Kin and Kout channels, but its performance results in opposite pore conformations. It is not known how the different coupling of voltage-sensor and pore is implemented. Here, we studied sequence and structural data of voltage-gated K+ channels from animals and plants with emphasis on the property of opposite rectification. We identified structural hotspots that alone allow already the distinction between Kin and Kout channels. Among them is a loop between TMD S5 and the pore that is very short in animal Kout, longer in plant and animal Kin and the longest in plant Kout channels. In combination with further structural and phylogenetic analyses this finding suggests that outward-rectification evolved twice and independently in the animal and plant kingdom.

  8. Non-silent story on synonymous sites in voltage-gated ion channel genes.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Tong; Ko, Eun A; Gu, Wanjun; Lim, Inja; Bang, Hyoweon; Ko, Jae-Hong

    2012-01-01

    Synonymous mutations are usually referred to as "silent", but increasing evidence shows that they are not neutral in a wide range of organisms. We looked into the relationship between synonymous codon usage bias and residue importance of voltage-gated ion channel proteins in mice, rats, and humans. We tested whether translationally optimal codons are associated with transmembrane or channel-forming regions, i.e., the sites that are particularly likely to be involved in the closing and opening of an ion channel. Our hypothesis is that translationally optimal codons are preferred at the sites within transmembrane domains or channel-forming regions in voltage-gated ion channel genes to avoid mistranslation-induced protein misfolding or loss-of-function. Using the Mantel-Haenszel procedure, which applies to categorical data, we found that translationally optimal codons are more likely to be used at transmembrane residues and the residues involved in channel-forming. We also found that the conservation level at synonymous sites in the transmembrane region is significantly higher than that in the non-transmembrane region. This study provides evidence that synonymous sites in voltage-gated ion channel genes are not neutral. Silent mutations at channel-related sites may lead to dysfunction of the ion channel.

  9. Visual ecology and voltage-gated ion channels in insect photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Weckström, M; Laughlin, S B

    1995-01-01

    That particular membrane conductances are selected for expression to enable the efficient coding of biologically relevant signals is illustrated by recent work on insect photoreceptors. These studies exploit the richness of insect vision and the accessibility of insect photoreceptors to cellular analysis in both intact animal and isolated cell preparations. The distribution of voltage-gated conductances among photoreceptors of different species correlates with visual ecology. Delayed-rectifier K+ channels are found in the rapidly responding photoreceptors of fast-flying flies. The conductance's activation range and dynamics match light-induced signals, and enable a rapid response by reducing the membrane time constant. Slow-moving flies have slowly responding photoreceptors that lack the delayed rectifier, but express an inactivating K+ conductance that is metabolically less demanding. Complementing these findings, locust photoreceptor membranes are modulated diurnally. The delayed rectifier is exhibited during the day and the inactivating K+ current is exhibited at night. Insect photoreceptors also demonstrate the amplification of signals by voltage-gated Na+ channels. In drone-bee photoreceptors, voltage-gated Na+ channels combine with K+ channels to enhance the small transient signals produced by the image of a queen bee passing over the retina. This subthreshold amplifier operates most effectively over the range of light intensities at which drones pursue queens.

  10. Outward Rectification of Voltage-Gated K+ Channels Evolved at Least Twice in Life History.

    PubMed

    Riedelsberger, Janin; Dreyer, Ingo; Gonzalez, Wendy

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated potassium (K+) channels are present in all living systems. Despite high structural similarities in the transmembrane domains (TMD), this K+ channel type segregates into at least two main functional categories-hyperpolarization-activated, inward-rectifying (Kin) and depolarization-activated, outward-rectifying (Kout) channels. Voltage-gated K+ channels sense the membrane voltage via a voltage-sensing domain that is connected to the conduction pathway of the channel. It has been shown that the voltage-sensing mechanism is the same in Kin and Kout channels, but its performance results in opposite pore conformations. It is not known how the different coupling of voltage-sensor and pore is implemented. Here, we studied sequence and structural data of voltage-gated K+ channels from animals and plants with emphasis on the property of opposite rectification. We identified structural hotspots that alone allow already the distinction between Kin and Kout channels. Among them is a loop between TMD S5 and the pore that is very short in animal Kout, longer in plant and animal Kin and the longest in plant Kout channels. In combination with further structural and phylogenetic analyses this finding suggests that outward-rectification evolved twice and independently in the animal and plant kingdom. PMID:26356684

  11. Outward Rectification of Voltage-Gated K+ Channels Evolved at Least Twice in Life History

    PubMed Central

    Riedelsberger, Janin; Dreyer, Ingo; Gonzalez, Wendy

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated potassium (K+) channels are present in all living systems. Despite high structural similarities in the transmembrane domains (TMD), this K+ channel type segregates into at least two main functional categories—hyperpolarization-activated, inward-rectifying (Kin) and depolarization-activated, outward-rectifying (Kout) channels. Voltage-gated K+ channels sense the membrane voltage via a voltage-sensing domain that is connected to the conduction pathway of the channel. It has been shown that the voltage-sensing mechanism is the same in Kin and Kout channels, but its performance results in opposite pore conformations. It is not known how the different coupling of voltage-sensor and pore is implemented. Here, we studied sequence and structural data of voltage-gated K+ channels from animals and plants with emphasis on the property of opposite rectification. We identified structural hotspots that alone allow already the distinction between Kin and Kout channels. Among them is a loop between TMD S5 and the pore that is very short in animal Kout, longer in plant and animal Kin and the longest in plant Kout channels. In combination with further structural and phylogenetic analyses this finding suggests that outward-rectification evolved twice and independently in the animal and plant kingdom. PMID:26356684

  12. Major diversification of voltage-gated K+ channels occurred in ancestral parahoxozoans.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaofan; Liu, Hansi; Chu Luo, Jose; Rhodes, Sarah A; Trigg, Liana M; van Rossum, Damian B; Anishkin, Andriy; Diatta, Fortunay H; Sassic, Jessica K; Simmons, David K; Kamel, Bishoy; Medina, Monica; Martindale, Mark Q; Jegla, Timothy

    2015-03-01

    We examined the origins and functional evolution of the Shaker and KCNQ families of voltage-gated K(+) channels to better understand how neuronal excitability evolved. In bilaterians, the Shaker family consists of four functionally distinct gene families (Shaker, Shab, Shal, and Shaw) that share a subunit structure consisting of a voltage-gated K(+) channel motif coupled to a cytoplasmic domain that mediates subfamily-exclusive assembly (T1). We traced the origin of this unique Shaker subunit structure to a common ancestor of ctenophores and parahoxozoans (cnidarians, bilaterians, and placozoans). Thus, the Shaker family is metazoan specific but is likely to have evolved in a basal metazoan. Phylogenetic analysis suggested that the Shaker subfamily could predate the divergence of ctenophores and parahoxozoans, but that the Shab, Shal, and Shaw subfamilies are parahoxozoan specific. In support of this, putative ctenophore Shaker subfamily channel subunits coassembled with cnidarian and mouse Shaker subunits, but not with cnidarian Shab, Shal, or Shaw subunits. The KCNQ family, which has a distinct subunit structure, also appears solely within the parahoxozoan lineage. Functional analysis indicated that the characteristic properties of Shaker, Shab, Shal, Shaw, and KCNQ currents evolved before the divergence of cnidarians and bilaterians. These results show that a major diversification of voltage-gated K(+) channels occurred in ancestral parahoxozoans and imply that many fundamental mechanisms for the regulation of action potential propagation evolved at this time. Our results further suggest that there are likely to be substantial differences in the regulation of neuronal excitability between ctenophores and parahoxozoans.

  13. Simulation Studies of Ion Permeation and Selectivity in Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels.

    PubMed

    Ing, C; Pomès, R

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated ion channels are responsible for the generation and propagation of action potentials in electrically excitable cells. Molecular dynamics simulations have become a useful tool to study the molecular basis of ion transport in atomistic models of voltage-gated ion channels. The elucidation of several three-dimensional structures of bacterial voltage-gated sodium channels (Nav) in 2011 and 2012 opened the way to detailed computational investigations of this important class of membrane proteins. Here we review the numerous simulation studies of Na(+) permeation and selectivity in bacterial Nav channels published in the past 5years. These studies use a variety of simulation methodologies differing in force field parameters, molecular models, sampling algorithms, and simulation times. Although results disagree on the details of ion permeation mechanisms, they concur in the presence of two primary Na(+) binding sites in the selectivity filter and support a loosely coupled knock-on mechanism of Na(+) permeation. Comparative studies of Na(+), K(+), and Ca(2+) permeation reveal sites within Nav channels that are Na(+) selective, yet a consensus model of selectivity has not been established. We discuss the agreement between simulation and experimental results and propose strategies that may be used to resolve discrepancies between simulation studies in order to improve future computational studies of permeation and selectivity in ion channels. PMID:27586286

  14. An in vivo tethered toxin approach for the cell-autonomous inactivation of voltage-gated sodium channel currents in nociceptors

    PubMed Central

    Stürzebecher, Annika S; Hu, Jing; Smith, Ewan St John; Frahm, Silke; Santos-Torres, Julio; Kampfrath, Branka; Auer, Sebastian; Lewin, Gary R; Ibañez-Tallon, Inés

    2010-01-01

    Understanding information flow in sensory pathways requires cell-selective approaches to manipulate the activity of defined neurones. Primary afferent nociceptors, which detect painful stimuli, are enriched in specific voltage-gated sodium channel (VGSC) subtypes. Toxins derived from venomous animals can be used to dissect the contributions of particular ion currents to cell physiology. Here we have used a transgenic approach to target a membrane-tethered isoform of the conotoxin MrVIa (t-MrVIa) only to nociceptive neurones in mice. T-MrVIa transgenic mice show a 44 ± 7% reduction of tetrodotoxin-resistant (TTX-R) VGSC current densities. This inhibition is permanent, reversible and does not result in functional upregulation of TTX-sensitive (TTX-S) VGSCs, voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) or transient receptor potential (TRP) channels present in nociceptive neurones. As a consequence of the reduction of TTX-R VGSC currents, t-MrVIa transgenic mice display decreased inflammatory mechanical hypersensitivity, cold pain insensitivity and reduced firing of cutaneous C-fibres sensitive to noxious cold temperatures. These data validate the use of genetically encoded t-toxins as a powerful tool to manipulate VGSCs in specific cell types within the mammalian nervous system. This novel genetic methodology can be used for circuit mapping and has the key advantage that it enables the dissection of the contribution of specific ionic currents to neuronal function and to behaviour. PMID:20308253

  15. Molecular and functional interplay of voltage-gated Ca²⁺ channels with the cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Gandini, Maria A; Felix, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated calcium (CaV) channels conduct Ca(2+) ions into cells in response to depolarization and thereby contribute to regulate diverse biological events in a wide variety of tissues including nerves, glands and muscles. They are responsible for initiation of excitation-contraction and excitation-secretion coupling, and are involved in the regulation of protein phosphorylation and gene transcription, among many other intracellular events. The activity of CaV channels may be regulated by a number of cell surface receptors acting through G proteins as well as by protein phosphorylation and other post-translational modifications. Likewise, it is acknowledged that CaV channels are organized into active signaling platforms depending upon interactions with other molecules including cytoskeletal proteins. Diverse studies have shown that several cytoskeletal components may act as binding partners that help regulate, localize and determine cell surface expression of CaV channel in response to extracellular events. In this review, we survey the interaction of CaV channels with the cytoskeleton and its potential physiological implications.

  16. Gαi2- and Gαi3-Specific Regulation of Voltage-Dependent L-Type Calcium Channels in Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Dizayee, Sara; Kaestner, Sonja; Kuck, Fabian; Hein, Peter; Klein, Christoph; Piekorz, Roland P.; Meszaros, Janos; Matthes, Jan; Nürnberg, Bernd; Herzig, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Background Two pertussis toxin sensitive Gi proteins, Gi2 and Gi3, are expressed in cardiomyocytes and upregulated in heart failure. It has been proposed that the highly homologous Gi isoforms are functionally distinct. To test for isoform-specific functions of Gi proteins, we examined their role in the regulation of cardiac L-type voltage-dependent calcium channels (L-VDCC). Methods Ventricular tissues and isolated myocytes were obtained from mice with targeted deletion of either Gαi2 (Gαi2−/−) or Gαi3 (Gαi3−/−). mRNA levels of Gαi/o isoforms and L-VDCC subunits were quantified by real-time PCR. Gαi and Cavα1 protein levels as well as protein kinase B/Akt and extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2) phosphorylation levels were assessed by immunoblot analysis. L-VDCC function was assessed by whole-cell and single-channel current recordings. Results In cardiac tissue from Gαi2−/− mice, Gαi3 mRNA and protein expression was upregulated to 187±21% and 567±59%, respectively. In Gαi3−/− mouse hearts, Gαi2 mRNA (127±5%) and protein (131±10%) levels were slightly enhanced. Interestingly, L-VDCC current density in cardiomyocytes from Gαi2−/− mice was lowered (−7.9±0.6 pA/pF, n = 11, p<0.05) compared to wild-type cells (−10.7±0.5 pA/pF, n = 22), whereas it was increased in myocytes from Gαi3−/− mice (−14.3±0.8 pA/pF, n = 14, p<0.05). Steady-state inactivation was shifted to negative potentials, and recovery kinetics slowed in the absence of Gαi2 (but not of Gαi3) and following treatment with pertussis toxin in Gαi3−/−. The pore forming Cavα1 protein level was unchanged in all mouse models analyzed, similar to mRNA levels of Cavα1 and Cavβ2 subunits. Interestingly, at the cellular signalling level, phosphorylation assays revealed abolished carbachol-triggered activation of ERK1/2 in mice lacking Gαi2. Conclusion Our data provide novel evidence for an isoform-specific modulation of L-VDCC by G

  17. Visual Stimuli Evoked Action Potentials Trigger Rapidly Propagating Dendritic Calcium Transients in the Frog Optic Tectum Layer 6 Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Svirskis, Gytis; Baranauskas, Gytis; Svirskiene, Natasa; Tkatch, Tatiana

    2015-01-01

    The superior colliculus in mammals or the optic tectum in amphibians is a major visual information processing center responsible for generation of orientating responses such as saccades in monkeys or prey catching avoidance behavior in frogs. The conserved structure function of the superior colliculus the optic tectum across distant species such as frogs, birds monkeys permits to draw rather general conclusions after studying a single species. We chose the frog optic tectum because we are able to perform whole-cell voltage-clamp recordings fluorescence imaging of tectal neurons while they respond to a visual stimulus. In the optic tectum of amphibians most visual information is processed by pear-shaped neurons possessing long dendritic branches, which receive the majority of synapses originating from the retinal ganglion cells. Since the first step of the retinal input integration is performed on these dendrites, it is important to know whether this integration is enhanced by active dendritic properties. We demonstrate that rapid calcium transients coinciding with the visual stimulus evoked action potentials in the somatic recordings can be readily detected up to the fine branches of these dendrites. These transients were blocked by calcium channel blockers nifedipine CdCl2 indicating that calcium entered dendrites via voltage-activated L-type calcium channels. The high speed of calcium transient propagation, >300 μm in <10 ms, is consistent with the notion that action potentials, actively propagating along dendrites, open voltage-gated L-type calcium channels causing rapid calcium concentration transients in the dendrites. We conclude that such activation by somatic action potentials of the dendritic voltage gated calcium channels in the close vicinity to the synapses formed by axons of the retinal ganglion cells may facilitate visual information processing in the principal neurons of the frog optic tectum. PMID:26414356

  18. Computational modeling of inhibition of voltage-gated Ca channels: identification of different effects on uterine and cardiac action potentials

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Wing-Chiu; Ghouri, Iffath; Taggart, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    The uterus and heart share the important physiological feature whereby contractile activation of the muscle tissue is regulated by the generation of periodic, spontaneous electrical action potentials (APs). Preterm birth arising from premature uterine contractions is a major complication of pregnancy and there remains a need to pursue avenues of research that facilitate the use of drugs, tocolytics, to limit these inappropriate contractions without deleterious actions on cardiac electrical excitation. A novel approach is to make use of mathematical models of uterine and cardiac APs, which incorporate many ionic currents contributing to the AP forms, and test the cell-specific responses to interventions. We have used three such models—of uterine smooth muscle cells (USMC), cardiac sinoatrial node cells (SAN), and ventricular cells—to investigate the relative effects of reducing two important voltage-gated Ca currents—the L-type (ICaL) and T-type (ICaT) Ca currents. Reduction of ICaL (10%) alone, or ICaT (40%) alone, blunted USMC APs with little effect on ventricular APs and only mild effects on SAN activity. Larger reductions in either current further attenuated the USMC APs but with also greater effects on SAN APs. Encouragingly, a combination of ICaL and ICaT reduction did blunt USMC APs as intended with little detriment to APs of either cardiac cell type. Subsequent overlapping maps of ICaL and ICaT inhibition profiles from each model revealed a range of combined reductions of ICaL and ICaT over which an appreciable diminution of USMC APs could be achieved with no deleterious action on cardiac SAN or ventricular APs. This novel approach illustrates the potential for computational biology to inform us of possible uterine and cardiac cell-specific mechanisms. Incorporating such computational approaches in future studies directed at designing new, or repurposing existing, tocolytics will be beneficial for establishing a desired uterine specificity of action

  19. Mechanisms of pyrethroid insecticide-induced stimulation of calcium influx in neocortical neurons

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pyrethroid insecticides bind to voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) and modify their gating kinetics, thereby disrupting neuronal function. Pyrethroids have also been reported to alter the function of other channel types, including activation of voltage-gated Ca2+ calcium chann...

  20. Mechanisms of gain control by voltage-gated channels in intrinsically-firing neurons.

    PubMed

    Patel, Ameera X; Burdakov, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Gain modulation is a key feature of neural information processing, but underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In single neurons, gain can be measured as the slope of the current-frequency (input-output) relationship over any given range of inputs. While much work has focused on the control of basal firing rates and spike rate adaptation, gain control has been relatively unstudied. Of the limited studies on gain control, some have examined the roles of synaptic noise and passive somatic currents, but the roles of voltage-gated channels present ubiquitously in neurons have been less explored. Here, we systematically examined the relationship between gain and voltage-gated ion channels in a conductance-based, tonically-active, model neuron. Changes in expression (conductance density) of voltage-gated channels increased (Ca2+ channel), reduced (K+ channels), or produced little effect (h-type channel) on gain. We found that the gain-controlling ability of channels increased exponentially with the steepness of their activation within the dynamic voltage window (voltage range associated with firing). For depolarization-activated channels, this produced a greater channel current per action potential at higher firing rates. This allowed these channels to modulate gain by contributing to firing preferentially at states of higher excitation. A finer analysis of the current-voltage relationship during tonic firing identified narrow voltage windows at which the gain-modulating channels exerted their effects. As a proof of concept, we show that h-type channels can be tuned to modulate gain by changing the steepness of their activation within the dynamic voltage window. These results show how the impact of an ion channel on gain can be predicted from the relationship between channel kinetics and the membrane potential during firing. This is potentially relevant to understanding input-output scaling in a wide class of neurons found throughout the brain and other nervous systems

  1. Major diversification of voltage-gated K+ channels occurred in ancestral parahoxozoans.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaofan; Liu, Hansi; Chu Luo, Jose; Rhodes, Sarah A; Trigg, Liana M; van Rossum, Damian B; Anishkin, Andriy; Diatta, Fortunay H; Sassic, Jessica K; Simmons, David K; Kamel, Bishoy; Medina, Monica; Martindale, Mark Q; Jegla, Timothy

    2015-03-01

    We examined the origins and functional evolution of the Shaker and KCNQ families of voltage-gated K(+) channels to better understand how neuronal excitability evolved. In bilaterians, the Shaker family consists of four functionally distinct gene families (Shaker, Shab, Shal, and Shaw) that share a subunit structure consisting of a voltage-gated K(+) channel motif coupled to a cytoplasmic domain that mediates subfamily-exclusive assembly (T1). We traced the origin of this unique Shaker subunit structure to a common ancestor of ctenophores and parahoxozoans (cnidarians, bilaterians, and placozoans). Thus, the Shaker family is metazoan specific but is likely to have evolved in a basal metazoan. Phylogenetic analysis suggested that the Shaker subfamily could predate the divergence of ctenophores and parahoxozoans, but that the Shab, Shal, and Shaw subfamilies are parahoxozoan specific. In support of this, putative ctenophore Shaker subfamily channel subunits coassembled with cnidarian and mouse Shaker subunits, but not with cnidarian Shab, Shal, or Shaw subunits. The KCNQ family, which has a distinct subunit structure, also appears solely within the parahoxozoan lineage. Functional analysis indicated that the characteristic properties of Shaker, Shab, Shal, Shaw, and KCNQ currents evolved before the divergence of cnidarians and bilaterians. These results show that a major diversification of voltage-gated K(+) channels occurred in ancestral parahoxozoans and imply that many fundamental mechanisms for the regulation of action potential propagation evolved at this time. Our results further suggest that there are likely to be substantial differences in the regulation of neuronal excitability between ctenophores and parahoxozoans. PMID:25691740

  2. Major diversification of voltage-gated K+ channels occurred in ancestral parahoxozoans

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaofan; Liu, Hansi; Chu Luo, Jose; Rhodes, Sarah A.; Trigg, Liana M.; van Rossum, Damian B.; Anishkin, Andriy; Diatta, Fortunay H.; Sassic, Jessica K.; Simmons, David K.; Kamel, Bishoy; Medina, Monica; Martindale, Mark Q.; Jegla, Timothy

    2015-01-01

    We examined the origins and functional evolution of the Shaker and KCNQ families of voltage-gated K+ channels to better understand how neuronal excitability evolved. In bilaterians, the Shaker family consists of four functionally distinct gene families (Shaker, Shab, Shal, and Shaw) that share a subunit structure consisting of a voltage-gated K+ channel motif coupled to a cytoplasmic domain that mediates subfamily-exclusive assembly (T1). We traced the origin of this unique Shaker subunit structure to a common ancestor of ctenophores and parahoxozoans (cnidarians, bilaterians, and placozoans). Thus, the Shaker family is metazoan specific but is likely to have evolved in a basal metazoan. Phylogenetic analysis suggested that the Shaker subfamily could predate the divergence of ctenophores and parahoxozoans, but that the Shab, Shal, and Shaw subfamilies are parahoxozoan specific. In support of this, putative ctenophore Shaker subfamily channel subunits coassembled with cnidarian and mouse Shaker subunits, but not with cnidarian Shab, Shal, or Shaw subunits. The KCNQ family, which has a distinct subunit structure, also appears solely within the parahoxozoan lineage. Functional analysis indicated that the characteristic properties of Shaker, Shab, Shal, Shaw, and KCNQ currents evolved before the divergence of cnidarians and bilaterians. These results show that a major diversification of voltage-gated K+ channels occurred in ancestral parahoxozoans and imply that many fundamental mechanisms for the regulation of action potential propagation evolved at this time. Our results further suggest that there are likely to be substantial differences in the regulation of neuronal excitability between ctenophores and parahoxozoans. PMID:25691740

  3. Mechanisms of Gain Control by Voltage-Gated Channels in Intrinsically-Firing Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Ameera X.; Burdakov, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Gain modulation is a key feature of neural information processing, but underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In single neurons, gain can be measured as the slope of the current-frequency (input-output) relationship over any given range of inputs. While much work has focused on the control of basal firing rates and spike rate adaptation, gain control has been relatively unstudied. Of the limited studies on gain control, some have examined the roles of synaptic noise and passive somatic currents, but the roles of voltage-gated channels present ubiquitously in neurons have been less explored. Here, we systematically examined the relationship between gain and voltage-gated ion channels in a conductance-based, tonically-active, model neuron. Changes in expression (conductance density) of voltage-gated channels increased (Ca2+ channel), reduced (K+ channels), or produced little effect (h-type channel) on gain. We found that the gain-controlling ability of channels increased exponentially with the steepness of their activation within the dynamic voltage window (voltage range associated with firing). For depolarization-activated channels, this produced a greater channel current per action potential at higher firing rates. This allowed these channels to modulate gain by contributing to firing preferentially at states of higher excitation. A finer analysis of the current-voltage relationship during tonic firing identified narrow voltage windows at which the gain-modulating channels exerted their effects. As a proof of concept, we show that h-type channels can be tuned to modulate gain by changing the steepness of their activation within the dynamic voltage window. These results show how the impact of an ion channel on gain can be predicted from the relationship between channel kinetics and the membrane potential during firing. This is potentially relevant to understanding input-output scaling in a wide class of neurons found throughout the brain and other nervous systems

  4. Electrical resonance with voltage-gated ion channels: perspectives from biophysical mechanisms and neural electrophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Lin; Liu, Xiao-dong

    2016-01-01

    Electrical resonance, providing selective signal amplification at preferred frequencies, is a unique phenomenon of excitable membranes, which has been observed in the nervous system at the cellular, circuit and system levels. The mechanisms underlying electrical resonance have not been fully elucidated. Prevailing hypotheses attribute the resonance to voltage-gated ion channels on the membrane of single neurons. In this review, we follow this line of thinking to summarize and analyze the biophysical/molecular mechanisms, and also the physiological relevance of channel-mediated electrical resonance. PMID:26725736

  5. 18F-FDG PET/CT findings in voltage-gated potassium channel limbic encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Kamaleshwaran, Koramadai Karuppuswamy; Iyer, Rajesh Shankar; Antony, Joppy; Radhakrishnan, Edathuruthy Kalarickal; Shinto, Ajit

    2013-05-01

    Limbic encephalitis (LE) can be associated with cancer, viral infection, or be idiopathic. One such rare but treatable form is associated with voltage-gated potassium channel (VGKC) antibodies. Typical abnormalities are seen in FDG PET/CT. We report a 39-year-old female patient who presented with 3 months of progressive faciobrachial dystonic seizures and limbic encephalitis. Her serum and cerebrospinal fluid Lgi1 antibody titers were elevated. FDG PET/CT showed basal ganglial hypermetabolism and associated abnormalities. Serial MRI demonstrated atrophic changes predominantly involving the temporal lobes. She is on immunosuppressive therapy and shows clinical improvement with lowering of antibody titers.

  6. Gambierol, a toxin produced by the dinoflagellate Gambierdiscus toxicus, is a potent blocker of voltage-gated potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Cuypers, Eva; Abdel-Mottaleb, Yousra; Kopljar, Ivan; Rainier, Jon D; Raes, Adam L; Snyders, Dirk J; Tytgat, Jan

    2008-05-01

    In this study, we pharmacologically characterized gambierol, a marine polycyclic ether toxin which is produced by the dinoflagellate Gambierdiscus toxicus. Besides several other polycyclic ether toxins like ciguatoxins, this scarcely studied toxin is one of the compounds that may be responsible for ciguatera fish poisoning (CFP). Unfortunately, the biological target(s) that underlies CFP is still partly unknown. Today, ciguatoxins are described to specifically activate voltage-gated sodium channels by interacting with their receptor site 5. But some dispute about the role of gambierol in the CFP story shows up: some describe voltage-gated sodium channels as the target, while others pinpoint voltage-gated potassium channels as targets. Since gambierol was never tested on isolated ion channels before, it was subjected in this work to extensive screening on a panel of 17 ion channels: nine cloned voltage-gated ion channels (mammalian Na(v)1.1-Na(v)1.8 and insect Para) and eight cloned voltage-gated potassium channels (mammalian K(v)1.1-K(v)1.6, hERG and insect ShakerIR) expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes using two-electrode voltage-clamp technique. All tested sodium channel subtypes are insensitive to gambierol concentrations up to 10 microM. In contrast, K(v)1.2 is the most sensitive voltage-gated potassium channel subtype with almost full block (>97%) and an half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) of 34.5 nM. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study where the selectivity of gambierol is tested on isolated voltage-gated ion channels. Therefore, these results lead to a better understanding of gambierol and its possible role in CFP and they may also be useful in the development of more effective treatments. PMID:18313714

  7. Spontaneous and CRH-Induced Excitability and Calcium Signaling in Mice Corticotrophs Involves Sodium, Calcium, and Cation-Conducting Channels.

    PubMed

    Zemkova, Hana; Tomić, Melanija; Kucka, Marek; Aguilera, Greti; Stojilkovic, Stanko S

    2016-04-01

    Transgenic mice expressing the tdimer2(12) form of Discosoma red fluorescent protein under control of the proopiomelanocortin gene's regulatory elements are a useful model for studying corticotrophs. Using these mice, we studied the ion channels and mechanisms controlling corticotroph excitability. Corticotrophs were either quiescent or electrically active, with a 22-mV difference in the resting membrane potential (RMP) between the 2 groups. In quiescent cells, CRH depolarized the membrane, leading to initial single spiking and sustained bursting; in active cells, CRH further facilitated or inhibited electrical activity and calcium spiking, depending on the initial activity pattern and CRH concentration. The stimulatory but not inhibitory action of CRH on electrical activity was mimicked by cAMP independently of the presence or absence of arachidonic acid. Removal of bath sodium silenced spiking and hyperpolarized the majority of cells; in contrast, the removal of bath calcium did not affect RMP but reduced CRH-induced depolarization, which abolished bursting electrical activity and decreased the spiking frequency but not the amplitude of single spikes. Corticotrophs with inhibited voltage-gated sodium channels fired calcium-dependent action potentials, whereas cells with inhibited L-type calcium channels fired sodium-dependent spikes; blockade of both channels abolished spiking without affecting the RMP. These results indicate that the background voltage-insensitive sodium conductance influences RMP, the CRH-depolarization current is driven by a cationic conductance, and the interplay between voltage-gated sodium and calcium channels plays a critical role in determining the status and pattern of electrical activity and calcium signaling.

  8. PERCHLOROETHYLENE (PERC) INHIBITS FUNCTION OF VOLTAGE-GATED CALCIUM CHANNELS IN PHEOCHROMOCYTOMA CELLS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The industrial solvent perchloroethylene (PERC) is listed as a hazardous air pollutant in the 1990 Ammendments to Clean Air Act and is a known neurotoxicant. However, the mechanisms by which PERC alters nervous system function are poorly understood. In recent years, it has been d...

  9. Large conductance, calcium- and voltage-gated potassium (BK) channels: regulation by cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    Dopico, Alejandro M.; Bukiya, Anna N.; Singh, Aditya K.

    2012-01-01

    Cholesterol (CLR) is an essential component of eukaryotic plasma membranes. CLR regulates the membrane physical state, microdomain formation and the activity of membrane-spanning proteins, including ion channels. Large conductance, voltage- and Ca2+-gated K+ (BK) channels link membrane potential to cell Ca2+ homeostasis. Thus, they control many physiological processes and participate in pathophysiological mechanisms leading to human disease. Because plasmalemma BK channels cluster in CLR-rich membrane microdomains, a major driving force for studying BK channel-CLR interactions is determining how membrane CLR controls the BK current phenotype, including its pharmacology, channel sorting, distribution, and role in cell physiology. Since both BK channels and CLR tissue levels play a pathophysiological role in human disease, identifying functional and structural aspects of the CLR-BK channel interaction may open new avenues for therapeutic intervention. Here, we review the studies documenting membrane CLR-BK channel interactions, dissecting out the many factors that determine the final BK current response to changes in membrane CLR content. We also summarize work in reductionist systems where recombinant BK protein is studied in artificial lipid bilayers, which documents a direct inhibition of BK channel activity by CLR and builds a strong case for a direct interaction between CLR and the BK channel-forming protein. Bilayer lipid-mediated mechanisms in CLR action are also discussed. Finally, we review studies of BK channel function during hypercholesterolemia, and underscore the many consequences that the CLR-BK channel interaction brings to cell physiology and human disease. PMID:22584144

  10. Aging-associated changes in motor axon voltage-gated Na(+) channel function in mice.

    PubMed

    Moldovan, Mihai; Rosberg, Mette Romer; Alvarez, Susana; Klein, Dennis; Martini, Rudolf; Krarup, Christian

    2016-03-01

    Accumulating myelin abnormalities and conduction slowing occur in peripheral nerves during aging. In mice deficient of myelin protein P0, severe peripheral nervous system myelin damage is associated with ectopic expression of Nav1.8 voltage-gated Na(+) channels on motor axons aggravating the functional impairment. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of regular aging on motor axon function with particular emphasis on Nav1.8. We compared tibial nerve conduction and excitability measures by threshold tracking in 12 months (mature) and 20 months (aged) wild-type (WT) mice. With aging, deviations during threshold electrotonus were attenuated and the resting current-threshold slope and early refractoriness were increased. Modeling indicated that, in addition to changes in passive membrane properties, motor fibers in aged WT mice were depolarized. An increased Nav1.8 isoform expression was found by immunohistochemistry. The depolarizing excitability features were absent in Nav1.8 null mice, and they were counteracted in WT mice by a Nav1.8 blocker. Our data suggest that alteration in voltage-gated Na(+) channel isoform expression contributes to changes in motor axon function during aging. PMID:26923409

  11. Carvacrol modulates voltage-gated sodium channels kinetics in dorsal root ganglia.

    PubMed

    Joca, Humberto Cavalcante; Vieira, Daiana Cardoso Oliveira; Vasconcelos, Aliny Perreira; Araújo, Demetrius Antônio Machado; Cruz, Jader Santos

    2015-06-01

    Recent studies have shown that many of plant-derived compounds interact with specific ion channels and thereby modulate many sensing mechanisms, such as nociception. The monoterpenoid carvacrol (5-isopropyl-2-methylphenol) has an anti-nociceptive effect related to a reduction in neuronal excitability and voltage-gated Na(+) channels (NaV) inhibition in peripheral neurons. However, the detailed mechanisms of carvacrol-induced inhibition of neuronal NaV remain elusive. This study explores the interaction between carvacrol and NaV in isolated dorsal root ganglia neurons. Carvacrol reduced the total voltage-gated Na(+) current and tetrodotoxin-resistant (TTX-R) Na(+) current component in a concentration-dependent manner. Carvacrol accelerates current inactivation and induced a negative-shift in voltage-dependence of steady-state fast inactivation in total and TTX-R Na(+) current. Furthermore, carvacrol slowed the recovery from inactivation. Carvacrol provoked a leftward shift in both the voltage-dependence of steady-state inactivation and activation of the TTX-R Na(+) current component. In addition, carvacrol-induced inhibition of TTX-R Na(+) current was enhanced by an increase in stimulation frequency and when neurons were pre-conditioned with long depolarization pulse (5s at -50 mV). Taken all results together, we herein demonstrated that carvacrol affects NaV gating properties. The present findings would help to explain the mechanisms underlying the analgesic activity of carvacrol. PMID:25794844

  12. Menthol pain relief through cumulative inactivation of voltage-gated sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Gaudioso, Christelle; Hao, Jizhe; Martin-Eauclaire, Marie-France; Gabriac, Mélanie; Delmas, Patrick

    2012-02-01

    Menthol is a natural compound of plant origin known to produce cool sensation via the activation of the TRPM8 channel. It is also frequently part of topical analgesic drugs available in a pharmacy, although its mechanism of action is still unknown. Compelling evidence indicates that voltage-gated Na(+) channels are critical for experiencing pain sensation. We tested the hypothesis that menthol may block voltage-gated Na(+) channels in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. By use of a patch clamp, we evaluated the effects of menthol application on tetrodotoxin (TTX)-resistant Nav1.8 and Nav1.9 channel subtypes in DRG neurons, and on TTX-sensitive Na(+) channels in immortalized DRG neuron-derived F11 cells. The results indicate that menthol inhibits Na(+) channels in a concentration-, voltage-, and frequency-dependent manner. Menthol promoted fast and slow inactivation states, causing use-dependent depression of Na(+) channel activity. In current clamp recordings, menthol inhibited firing at high-frequency stimulation with minimal effects on normal neuronal activity. We found that low concentrations of menthol cause analgesia in mice, relieving pain produced by a Na(+) channel-targeting toxin. We conclude that menthol is a state-selective blocker of Nav1.8, Nav1.9, and TTX-sensitive Na(+) channels, indicating a role for Na(+) channel blockade in the efficacy of menthol as topical analgesic compound. PMID:22172548

  13. Voltage-Gated Proton Channels: Molecular Biology, Physiology, and Pathophysiology of the HV Family

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Voltage-gated proton channels (HV) are unique, in part because the ion they conduct is unique. HV channels are perfectly selective for protons and have a very small unitary conductance, both arguably manifestations of the extremely low H+ concentration in physiological solutions. They open with membrane depolarization, but their voltage dependence is strongly regulated by the pH gradient across the membrane (ΔpH), with the result that in most species they normally conduct only outward current. The HV channel protein is strikingly similar to the voltage-sensing domain (VSD, the first four membrane-spanning segments) of voltage-gated K+ and Na+ channels. In higher species, HV channels exist as dimers in which each protomer has its own conduction pathway, yet gating is cooperative. HV channels are phylogenetically diverse, distributed from humans to unicellular marine life, and perhaps even plants. Correspondingly, HV functions vary widely as well, from promoting calcification in coccolithophores and triggering bioluminescent flashes in dinoflagellates to facilitating killing bacteria, airway pH regulation, basophil histamine release, sperm maturation, and B lymphocyte responses in humans. Recent evidence that hHV1 may exacerbate breast cancer metastasis and cerebral damage from ischemic stroke highlights the rapidly expanding recognition of the clinical importance of hHV1. PMID:23589829

  14. Structure of Voltage-gated Two-pore Channel TPC1 from Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jiangtao; Zeng, Weizhong; Chen, Qingfeng; Lee, Changkeun; Chen, Liping; Yang, Yi; Cang, Chunlei; Ren, Dejian; Jiang, Youxing

    2015-01-01

    Two-pore channels (TPCs) contain two copies of a Shaker-like six-transmembrane (6-TM) domain in each subunit and are ubiquitously expressed in both animals and plants as organellar cation channels. Here, we present the first crystal structure of a vacuolar two-pore channel from Arabidopsis thaliana, AtTPC1, which functions as a homodimer. AtTPC1 activation requires both voltage and cytosolic Ca2+. Ca2+ binding to the cytosolic EF-hand domain triggers conformational changes coupled to the pair of pore-lining inner helices (IS6 helices) from the first 6-TM domains, whereas membrane potential only activates the second voltage-sensing domain (VSD2) whose conformational changes are coupled to the pair of inner helices (IIS6 helices) from the second 6-TM domains. Luminal Ca2+ or Ba2+ can modulate voltage activation by stabilizing VSD2 in the resting state and shifts voltage activation towards more positive potentials. Our Ba2+ bound AtTPC1 structure reveals a voltage sensor in the resting state, providing hitherto unseen structural insight into the general voltage-gating mechanism among voltage-gated channels. PMID:26689363

  15. Developmental expression of Kv1 voltage-gated potassium channels in the avian hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Doczi, Megan A; Vitzthum, Carl M; Forehand, Cynthia J

    2016-03-11

    Specialized hypothalamic neurons integrate the homeostatic balance between food intake and energy expenditure, processes that may become dysregulated during the development of diabetes, obesity, and other metabolic disorders. Shaker family voltage-gated potassium channels (Kv1) contribute to the maintenance of resting membrane potential, action potential characteristics, and neurotransmitter release in many populations of neurons, although hypothalamic Kv1 channel expression has been largely unexplored. Whole-cell patch clamp recordings from avian hypothalamic brain slices demonstrate a developmental shift in the electrophysiological properties of avian arcuate nucleus neurons, identifying an increase in outward ionic current that corresponds with action potential maturation. Additionally, RT-PCR experiments identified the early expression of Kv1.2, Kv1.3, and Kv1.5 mRNA in the embryonic avian hypothalamus, suggesting that these channels may underlie the electrophysiological changes observed in these neurons. Real-time quantitative PCR analysis on intact microdissections of embryonic hypothalamic tissue revealed a concomitant increase in Kv1.2 and Kv1.5 gene expression at key electrophysiological time points during development. This study is the first to demonstrate hypothalamic mRNA expression of Kv1 channels in developing avian embryos and may suggest a role for voltage-gated ion channel regulation in the physiological patterning of embryonic hypothalamic circuits governing energy homeostasis.

  16. Ionic selectivity and thermal adaptations within the voltage-gated sodium channel family of alkaliphilic Bacillus.

    PubMed

    DeCaen, Paul G; Takahashi, Yuka; Krulwich, Terry A; Ito, Masahiro; Clapham, David E

    2014-01-01

    Entry and extrusion of cations are essential processes in living cells. In alkaliphilic prokaryotes, high external pH activates voltage-gated sodium channels (Nav), which allows Na(+) to enter and be used as substrate for cation/proton antiporters responsible for cytoplasmic pH homeostasis. Here, we describe a new member of the prokaryotic voltage-gated Na(+) channel family (NsvBa; Non-selective voltage-gated, Bacillus alcalophilus) that is nonselective among Na(+), Ca(2+) and K(+) ions. Mutations in NsvBa can convert the nonselective filter into one that discriminates for Na(+) or divalent cations. Gain-of-function experiments demonstrate the portability of ion selectivity with filter mutations to other Bacillus Nav channels. Increasing pH and temperature shifts their activation threshold towards their native resting membrane potential. Furthermore, we find drugs that target Bacillus Nav channels also block the growth of the bacteria. This work identifies some of the adaptations to achieve ion discrimination and gating in Bacillus Nav channels. PMID:25385530

  17. Cloning and molecular characterization of a putative voltage-gated sodium channel gene in the crayfish.

    PubMed

    Coskun, Cagil; Purali, Nuhan

    2016-06-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channel genes and associated proteins have been cloned and studied in many mammalian and invertebrate species. However, there is no data available about the sodium channel gene(s) in the crayfish, although the animal has frequently been used as a model to investigate various aspects of neural cellular and circuit function. In the present work, by using RNA extracts from crayfish abdominal ganglia samples, the complete open reading frame of a putative sodium channel gene has firstly been cloned and molecular properties of the associated peptide have been analyzed. The open reading frame of the gene has a length of 5793 bp that encodes for the synthesis of a peptide, with 1930 amino acids, that is 82% similar to the α-peptide of a sodium channel in a neighboring species, Cancer borealis. The transmembrane topology analysis of the crayfish peptide indicated a pattern of four folding domains with several transmembrane segments, as observed in other known voltage-gated sodium channels. Upon analysis of the obtained sequence, functional regions of the putative sodium channel responsible for the selectivity filter, inactivation gate, voltage sensor, and phosphorylation have been predicted. The expression level of the putative sodium channel gene, as defined by a qPCR method, was measured and found to be the highest in nervous tissue. PMID:27032955

  18. Optical electrophysiology for probing function and pharmacology of voltage-gated ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongkang; Reichert, Elaine; Cohen, Adam E

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated ion channels mediate electrical dynamics in excitable tissues and are an important class of drug targets. Channels can gate in sub-millisecond timescales, show complex manifolds of conformational states, and often show state-dependent pharmacology. Mechanistic studies of ion channels typically involve sophisticated voltage-clamp protocols applied through manual or automated electrophysiology. Here, we develop all-optical electrophysiology techniques to study activity-dependent modulation of ion channels, in a format compatible with high-throughput screening. Using optical electrophysiology, we recapitulate many voltage-clamp protocols and apply to Nav1.7, a channel implicated in pain. Optical measurements reveal that a sustained depolarization strongly potentiates the inhibitory effect of PF-04856264, a Nav1.7-specific blocker. In a pilot screen, we stratify a library of 320 FDA-approved compounds by binding mechanism and kinetics, and find close concordance with patch clamp measurements. Optical electrophysiology provides a favorable tradeoff between throughput and information content for studies of NaV channels, and possibly other voltage-gated channels. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15202.001 PMID:27215841

  19. Amplification of small signals by voltage-gated sodium channels in drone photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Coles, J A; Schneider-Picard, G

    1989-04-01

    Photoreceptor cells of the drone, Apis mellifera male, have a voltage-gated Na+ membrane conductance that can be blocked by tetrodotoxin (TTX) and generates an action potential on abrupt depolarization: an action potential is triggered by the rising phase of a receptor potential evoked by an intense light flash (Autrum and von Zwehl 1964; Baumann 1968). We measured the intracellular voltage response to a small (9%), brief (30 ms) decrease in light intensity from a background, and found that its amplitude was decreased by 1 microM TTX. The response amplitude was maximal when the background intensity depolarized the cell to -38 mV. With intensities depolarizing the cell membrane to -45 to -33 mV the average response amplitude was decreased by TTX from 1.2 mV to 0.5 mV. TTX is also known to decrease the voltage noise during steady illumination (Ferraro et al. 1983) but, despite this, the ratio of peak-to-peak signal to noise was, on average, decreased by TTX. The results suggest that drone photoreceptors use voltage-gated Na+ channels for graded amplification of responses to small, rapid changes in light intensity.

  20. Menthol pain relief through cumulative inactivation of voltage-gated sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Gaudioso, Christelle; Hao, Jizhe; Martin-Eauclaire, Marie-France; Gabriac, Mélanie; Delmas, Patrick

    2012-02-01

    Menthol is a natural compound of plant origin known to produce cool sensation via the activation of the TRPM8 channel. It is also frequently part of topical analgesic drugs available in a pharmacy, although its mechanism of action is still unknown. Compelling evidence indicates that voltage-gated Na(+) channels are critical for experiencing pain sensation. We tested the hypothesis that menthol may block voltage-gated Na(+) channels in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. By use of a patch clamp, we evaluated the effects of menthol application on tetrodotoxin (TTX)-resistant Nav1.8 and Nav1.9 channel subtypes in DRG neurons, and on TTX-sensitive Na(+) channels in immortalized DRG neuron-derived F11 cells. The results indicate that menthol inhibits Na(+) channels in a concentration-, voltage-, and frequency-dependent manner. Menthol promoted fast and slow inactivation states, causing use-dependent depression of Na(+) channel activity. In current clamp recordings, menthol inhibited firing at high-frequency stimulation with minimal effects on normal neuronal activity. We found that low concentrations of menthol cause analgesia in mice, relieving pain produced by a Na(+) channel-targeting toxin. We conclude that menthol is a state-selective blocker of Nav1.8, Nav1.9, and TTX-sensitive Na(+) channels, indicating a role for Na(+) channel blockade in the efficacy of menthol as topical analgesic compound.

  1. Carvacrol modulates voltage-gated sodium channels kinetics in dorsal root ganglia.

    PubMed

    Joca, Humberto Cavalcante; Vieira, Daiana Cardoso Oliveira; Vasconcelos, Aliny Perreira; Araújo, Demetrius Antônio Machado; Cruz, Jader Santos

    2015-06-01

    Recent studies have shown that many of plant-derived compounds interact with specific ion channels and thereby modulate many sensing mechanisms, such as nociception. The monoterpenoid carvacrol (5-isopropyl-2-methylphenol) has an anti-nociceptive effect related to a reduction in neuronal excitability and voltage-gated Na(+) channels (NaV) inhibition in peripheral neurons. However, the detailed mechanisms of carvacrol-induced inhibition of neuronal NaV remain elusive. This study explores the interaction between carvacrol and NaV in isolated dorsal root ganglia neurons. Carvacrol reduced the total voltage-gated Na(+) current and tetrodotoxin-resistant (TTX-R) Na(+) current component in a concentration-dependent manner. Carvacrol accelerates current inactivation and induced a negative-shift in voltage-dependence of steady-state fast inactivation in total and TTX-R Na(+) current. Furthermore, carvacrol slowed the recovery from inactivation. Carvacrol provoked a leftward shift in both the voltage-dependence of steady-state inactivation and activation of the TTX-R Na(+) current component. In addition, carvacrol-induced inhibition of TTX-R Na(+) current was enhanced by an increase in stimulation frequency and when neurons were pre-conditioned with long depolarization pulse (5s at -50 mV). Taken all results together, we herein demonstrated that carvacrol affects NaV gating properties. The present findings would help to explain the mechanisms underlying the analgesic activity of carvacrol.

  2. Structure of the voltage-gated two-pore channel TPC1 from Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jiangtao; Zeng, Weizhong; Chen, Qingfeng; Lee, Changkeun; Chen, Liping; Yang, Yi; Cang, Chunlei; Ren, Dejian; Jiang, Youxing

    2016-03-10

    Two-pore channels (TPCs) contain two copies of a Shaker-like six-transmembrane (6-TM) domain in each subunit and are ubiquitously expressed in both animals and plants as organellar cation channels. Here we present the crystal structure of a vacuolar two-pore channel from Arabidopsis thaliana, AtTPC1, which functions as a homodimer. AtTPC1 activation requires both voltage and cytosolic Ca(2+). Ca(2+) binding to the cytosolic EF-hand domain triggers conformational changes coupled to the pair of pore-lining inner helices from the first 6-TM domains, whereas membrane potential only activates the second voltage-sensing domain, the conformational changes of which are coupled to the pair of inner helices from the second 6-TM domains. Luminal Ca(2+) or Ba(2+) can modulate voltage activation by stabilizing the second voltage-sensing domain in the resting state and shift voltage activation towards more positive potentials. Our Ba(2+)-bound AtTPC1 structure reveals a voltage sensor in the resting state, providing hitherto unseen structural insight into the general voltage-gating mechanism among voltage-gated channels. PMID:26689363

  3. Brivaracetam Differentially Affects Voltage-Gated Sodium Currents Without Impairing Sustained Repetitive Firing in Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Niespodziany, Isabelle; André, Véronique Marie; Leclère, Nathalie; Hanon, Etienne; Ghisdal, Philippe; Wolff, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Aims Brivaracetam (BRV) is an antiepileptic drug in Phase III clinical development. BRV binds to synaptic vesicle 2A (SV2A) protein and is also suggested to inhibit voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs). To evaluate whether the effect of BRV on VGSCs represents a relevant mechanism participating in its antiepileptic properties, we explored the pharmacology of BRV on VGSCs in different cell systems and tested its efficacy at reducing the sustained repetitive firing (SRF). Methods Brivaracetam investigations on the voltage-gated sodium current (INa) were performed in N1E-155 neuroblastoma cells, cultured rat cortical neurons, and adult mouse CA1 neurons. SRF was measured in cultured cortical neurons and in CA1 neurons. All BRV (100–300 μM) experiments were performed in comparison with 100 μM carbamazepine (CBZ). Results Brivaracetam and CBZ reduced INa in N1E-115 cells (30% and 40%, respectively) and primary cortical neurons (21% and 47%, respectively) by modulating the fast-inactivated state of VGSCs. BRV, in contrast to CBZ, did not affect INa in CA1 neurons and SRF in cortical and CA1 neurons. CBZ consistently inhibited neuronal SRF by 75–93%. Conclusions The lack of effect of BRV on SRF in neurons suggests that the reported inhibition of BRV on VGSC currents does not contribute to its antiepileptic properties. PMID:25444522

  4. Voltage-gated and ATP-sensitive K+ channels are associated with cell proliferation and tumorigenesis of human glioma.

    PubMed

    Ru, Qin; Tian, Xiang; Wu, Yu-Xiang; Wu, Ri-Hui; Pi, Ming-Shan; Li, Chao-Ying

    2014-02-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that potassium (K+) channels play important roles in the growth and development of human cancer. In the present study, we investigated the contribution of and the mechanism by which K+ channels control the proliferation and tumor development of U87-MG human glioma cells. A variety of K+ channel blockers and openers were used to differentiate the critical subtype of K+ channels involved. The in vitro data demonstrated that selective blockers of voltage-gated K+ (K(V)) channels or ATP-sensitive K+ (K(ATP)) channels significantly inhibited the proliferation of U87-MG cells, blocked the cell cycle at the G0/G1 phase and induced apoptosis. In the U87-MG xenograft model in nude mice, K(V) or K(ATP) channel blockers markedly suppressed tumor growth in vivo. Furthermore, electrophysiological results showed that KV or KATP channel blockers inhibited K(V)/K(ATP) channel currents as well as cell proliferation and tumor growth over the same concentration range. In contrast, iberiotoxin, a selective blocker of calcium-activated K+ channels, had no apparent effect on the cell proliferation, cell cycle or apoptosis of U87-MG cells. In addition, the results of fluorescence assays indicated that blockers of K(V) or K(ATP) channels attenuated intracellular Ca2+ signaling by blocking Ca2+ influx in U87-MG cells. Taken together, these data suggest that K(V) and K(ATP) channels play important roles in the proliferation of U87-MG cells and that the influence of K(V) and K(ATP) channels may be mediated by a Ca2+-dependent mechanism. PMID:24284968

  5. Metabotropic glutamate receptor modulation of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels involves multiple receptor subtypes in cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Choi, S; Lovinger, D M

    1996-01-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) modulation of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels was examined in isolated deep layer frontoparietal cortical neurons under conditions designed to isolate calcium-independent modulatory pathways. Trans-1-aminocyclopentane-1,3-dicarboxylate (t-ACPD), a nonspecific mGluR agonist, produced rapid and reversible inhibition of Ca2+ channels. This effect was mimicked by agonists for group I and group II, but not group III, mGluRs. Effects of group I and II agonists often were observed in the same neurons, but separate subgroups of neurons were unresponsive to the group I agonist quisqualate or the group II agonist 2-(2,3-dicarboxycyclopropyl) glycine (DCG-IV). Inhibition by quisqualate and DCG-IV was nonocclusive in neurons responding to both agonists. These agonists thus appear to act on different mGluRs. The mGluR antagonist alpha-methyl-4-carboxylphenylglycine attenuated inhibition by t-ACPD, quisqualate, and DCG-IV. Inhibition by quisqualate and DCG-IV was voltage-dependent. Although the effects of both agonists were greatly reduced by N-ethylmaleimide (NEM), inhibition by DCG-IV was more sensitive to NEM than inhibition by quisqualate. t-ACPD-induced inhibition was reduced by omega-conotoxin GVIA (omega-CgTx) and omega-agatoxin IVA (omega-AgTx) but was affected little by nifedipine. Inhibition by DCG-IV and quisqualate also was reduced by omega-CgTx. We conclude that multiple mGluR subtypes inhibit Ca2+ channels in cortical neurons and that N- and possibly P-type channels are inhibited. Modulation is via a rapid-onset, voltage-dependent mechanism that likely involves a pertussis toxin (PTX)-sensitive G-protein. Type I mGluRs may work via additional PTX-insensitive pathways.

  6. Gentamicin blocks the ACh-induced BK current in guinea pig type II vestibular hair cells by competing with Ca²⁺ at the L-type calcium channel.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hong; Guo, Chang-Kai; Wang, Yi; Zhou, Tao; Kong, Wei-Jia

    2014-04-22

    Type II vestibular hair cells (VHCs II) contain big-conductance Ca²⁺-dependent K⁺ channels (BK) and L-type calcium channels. Our previous studies in guinea pig VHCs II indicated that acetylcholine (ACh) evoked the BK current by triggering the influx of Ca²⁺ ions through L-type Ca²⁺ channels, which was mediated by M2 muscarinic ACh receptor (mAChRs). Aminoglycoside antibiotics, such as gentamicin (GM), are known to have vestibulotoxicity, including damaging effects on the efferent nerve endings on VHCs II. This study used the whole-cell patch clamp technique to determine whether GM affects the vestibular efferent system at postsynaptic M2-mAChRs or the membrane ion channels. We found that GM could block the ACh-induced BK current and that inhibition was reversible, voltage-independent, and dose-dependent with an IC₅₀ value of 36.3 ± 7.8 µM. Increasing the ACh concentration had little influence on GM blocking effect, but increasing the extracellular Ca²⁺ concentration ([Ca²⁺]₀) could antagonize it. Moreover, 50 µM GM potently blocked Ca²⁺ currents activated by (-)-Bay-K8644, but did not block BK currents induced by NS1619. These observations indicate that GM most likely blocks the M2 mAChR-mediated response by competing with Ca²⁺ at the L-type calcium channel. These results provide insights into the vestibulotoxicity of aminoglycoside antibiotics on mammalian VHCs II.

  7. Hlf is a genetic modifier of epilepsy caused by voltage-gated sodium channel mutations.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Nicole A; Kearney, Jennifer A

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in voltage-gated sodium channel genes cause several types of human epilepsies. Often, individuals with the same sodium channel mutation exhibit diverse phenotypes. This suggests that factors beyond the primary mutation influence disease severity, including genetic modifiers. Mouse epilepsy models with voltage-gated sodium channel mutations exhibit strain-dependent phenotype variability, supporting a contribution of genetic modifiers in epilepsy. The Scn2a(Q54) (Q54) mouse model has a strain-dependent epilepsy phenotype. Q54 mice on the C57BL/6J (B6) strain exhibit delayed seizure onset and improved survival compared to [B6xSJL/J]F1.Q54 mice. We previously mapped two dominant modifier loci that influence Q54 seizure susceptibility and identified Hlf (hepatic leukemia factor) as a candidate modifier gene at one locus. Hlf and other PAR bZIP transcription factors had previously been associated with spontaneous seizures in mice thought to be caused by down-regulation of the pyridoxine pathway. An Hlf targeted knockout mouse model was used to evaluate the effect of Hlf deletion on Q54 phenotype severity. Hlf(KO/KO);Q54 double mutant mice exhibited elevated frequency and reduced survival compared to Q54 controls. To determine if direct modulation of the pyridoxine pathway could alter the Q54 phenotype, mice were maintained on a pyridoxine-deficient diet for 6 weeks. Dietary pyridoxine deficiency resulted in elevated seizure frequency and decreased survival in Q54 mice compared to control diet. To determine if Hlf could modify other epilepsies, Hlf(KO/+) mice were crossed with the Scn1a(KO/+) Dravet syndrome mouse model to examine the effect on premature lethality. Hlf(KO/+);Scn1a(KO/+) offspring exhibited decreased survival compared to Scn1a(KO/+) controls. Together these results demonstrate that Hlf is a genetic modifier of epilepsy caused by voltage-gated sodium channel mutations and that modulation of the pyridoxine pathway can also influence phenotype

  8. Presence of voltage-gated potassium channel complex antibody in a case of genetic prion disease

    PubMed Central

    Jammoul, Adham; Lederman, Richard J; Tavee, Jinny; Li, Yuebing

    2014-01-01

    Voltage-gated potassium channel (VGKC) complex antibody-mediated encephalitis is a recently recognised entity which has been reported to mimic the clinical presentation of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). Testing for the presence of this neuronal surface autoantibody in patients presenting with subacute encephalopathy is therefore crucial as it may both revoke the bleak diagnosis of prion disease and allow institution of potentially life-saving immunotherapy. Tempering this optimistic view is the rare instance when a positive VGKC complex antibody titre occurs in a definite case of prion disease. We present a pathologically and genetically confirmed case of CJD with elevated serum VGKC complex antibody titres. This case highlights the importance of interpreting the result of a positive VGKC complex antibody with caution and in the context of the overall clinical manifestation. PMID:24903967

  9. Conotoxins That Could Provide Analgesia through Voltage Gated Sodium Channel Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Munasinghe, Nehan R.; Christie, MacDonald J.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic pain creates a large socio-economic burden around the world. It is physically and mentally debilitating, and many sufferers are unresponsive to current therapeutics. Many drugs that provide pain relief have adverse side effects and addiction liabilities. Therefore, a great need has risen for alternative treatment strategies. One rich source of potential analgesic compounds that has emerged over the past few decades are conotoxins. These toxins are extremely diverse and display selective activity at ion channels. Voltage gated sodium (NaV) channels are one such group of ion channels that play a significant role in multiple pain pathways. This review will explore the literature around conotoxins that bind NaV channels and determine their analgesic potential. PMID:26690478

  10. Modeling of the Binding of Peptide Blockers to Voltage-Gated Potassium Channels: Approaches and Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Novoseletsky, V. N.; Volyntseva, A. D.; Shaitan, K. V.; Kirpichnikov, M. P.; Feofanov, A. V.

    2016-01-01

    Modeling of the structure of voltage-gated potassium (KV) channels bound to peptide blockers aims to identify the key amino acid residues dictating affinity and provide insights into the toxin-channel interface. Computational approaches open up possibilities for in silico rational design of selective blockers, new molecular tools to study the cellular distribution and functional roles of potassium channels. It is anticipated that optimized blockers will advance the development of drugs that reduce over activation of potassium channels and attenuate the associated malfunction. Starting with an overview of the recent advances in computational simulation strategies to predict the bound state orientations of peptide pore blockers relative to KV-channels, we go on to review algorithms for the analysis of intermolecular interactions, and then take a look at the results of their application. PMID:27437138

  11. High grade glioma mimicking voltage gated potassium channel complex associated antibody limbic encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Athauda, Dilan; Delamont, R S; Pablo-Fernandez, E De

    2014-01-01

    Though raised titres of voltage gated potassium channel (VGKC) complex antibodies have been occasionally associated with extracranial tumours, mainly presenting as Morvan's Syndrome or neuromyotonia, they have not yet been reported to be associated with an intracranial malignancy. This is especially important as misdiagnosis of these conditions and delay of the appropriate treatment can have important prognostic implications. We describe a patient with a high grade glioma presenting with clinical, radiological, and serological features consistent with the diagnosis of VGKC antibody associated limbic encephalitis (LE). This is the first association between a primary brain tumour and high titre of VGKC complex antibodies. Clinicoradiological progression despite effective immunosuppressive treatment should prompt clinicians to look for alternative diagnoses. Further studies to elucidate a possible association between VGKC complex and other surface antigen antibodies with primary brain tumours should be carried out.

  12. Presence of voltage-gated potassium channel complex antibody in a case of genetic prion disease.

    PubMed

    Jammoul, Adham; Lederman, Richard J; Tavee, Jinny; Li, Yuebing

    2014-06-05

    Voltage-gated potassium channel (VGKC) complex antibody-mediated encephalitis is a recently recognised entity which has been reported to mimic the clinical presentation of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). Testing for the presence of this neuronal surface autoantibody in patients presenting with subacute encephalopathy is therefore crucial as it may both revoke the bleak diagnosis of prion disease and allow institution of potentially life-saving immunotherapy. Tempering this optimistic view is the rare instance when a positive VGKC complex antibody titre occurs in a definite case of prion disease. We present a pathologically and genetically confirmed case of CJD with elevated serum VGKC complex antibody titres. This case highlights the importance of interpreting the result of a positive VGKC complex antibody with caution and in the context of the overall clinical manifestation.

  13. Analysis and functional implications of phosphorylation of neuronal voltage-gated potassium channels

    PubMed Central

    Cerda, Oscar; Trimmer, James S.

    2012-01-01

    Phosphorylation is the most common and abundant posttranslational modification to eukaryotic proteins, regulating a plethora of dynamic cellular processes. Here, we review and discuss recent advances in our knowledge of the breadth and importance of reversible phosphorylation in regulating the expression, localization and function of mammalian neuronal voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels, key regulators of neuronal function. We highlight the role of modern mass spectrometric techniques and phosphospecific antibodies that reveal the extent and nature of phosphorylation at specific sites in Kv channels. We also emphasize the role of reversible phosphorylation in dynamically regulating diverse aspects of Kv channel biology. Finally, we discuss as important future directions the determination of the mechanistic basis for how altering phosphorylation state affects Kv channel expression, localization and function, the nature of macromolecular signaling complexes containing Kv channels and enzymes regulating their phosphorylation state, and the specific role of Kv channel phosphorylation in regulating neuronal function during physiological and pathophysiological events. PMID:20600597

  14. Venom Peptides From Cone Snails: Pharmacological Probes for Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels.

    PubMed

    Green, B R; Olivera, B M

    2016-01-01

    The venoms of cone snails provide a rich source of neuroactive peptides (conotoxins). Several venom peptide families have been identified that are either agonists (ι- and δ-conotoxins) or antagonists (μ- and μO-conotoxins) of voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs). Members of these conotoxin classes have been integral in identifying and characterizing specific neurotoxin binding sites on the channel. Furthermore, given the specificity of some of these peptides for one sodium channel subtype over another, conotoxins have also proven useful in exploring differences between VGSC subtypes. This chapter summarizes the current knowledge of the structure and function based on the results of conotoxin interactions with VGSCs and correlates the peptides with the phylogeny of the Conus species from which they were derived. PMID:27586281

  15. Mechanistic Insights into the Modulation of Voltage-Gated Ion Channels by Inhalational Anesthetics.

    PubMed

    Covarrubias, Manuel; Barber, Annika F; Carnevale, Vincenzo; Treptow, Werner; Eckenhoff, Roderic G

    2015-11-17

    General anesthesia is a relatively safe medical procedure, which for nearly 170 years has allowed life saving surgical interventions in animals and people. However, the molecular mechanism of general anesthesia continues to be a matter of importance and debate. A favored hypothesis proposes that general anesthesia results from direct multisite interactions with multiple and diverse ion channels in the brain. Neurotransmitter-gated ion channels and two-pore K+ channels are key players in the mechanism of anesthesia; however, new studies have also implicated voltage-gated ion channels. Recent biophysical and structural studies of Na+ and K+ channels strongly suggest that halogenated inhalational general anesthetics interact with gates and pore regions of these ion channels to modulate function. Here, we review these studies and provide a perspective to stimulate further advances.

  16. The voltage-gated proton channel: a riddle, wrapped in a mystery, inside an enigma

    PubMed Central

    DeCoursey, Thomas E.

    2016-01-01

    The main properties of voltage gated proton channels are described, along with what is known about how the channel protein structure accomplishes these functions. Just as protons are unique among ions, proton channels are unique among ion channels. Their four transmembrane helices sense voltage, the pH gradient, and conduct protons exclusively. Selectivity is achieved by the unique ability of H3O+ to protonate an Asp-Arg salt bridge. Pathognomonic sensitivity of gating to the pH gradient ensures channel opening only when acid extrusion will result, which is crucial to most biological functions. An exception occurs in dinoflagellates in which H+ influx through HV1 triggers the bioluminescent flash. Pharmacological interventions that promise to ameliorate cancer, asthma, brain damage in ischemic stroke, Alzheimer’s disease, autoimmune diseases, and numerous other conditions, await future progress. PMID:25964989

  17. Presence of voltage-gated potassium channel complex antibody in a case of genetic prion disease.

    PubMed

    Jammoul, Adham; Lederman, Richard J; Tavee, Jinny; Li, Yuebing

    2014-01-01

    Voltage-gated potassium channel (VGKC) complex antibody-mediated encephalitis is a recently recognised entity which has been reported to mimic the clinical presentation of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). Testing for the presence of this neuronal surface autoantibody in patients presenting with subacute encephalopathy is therefore crucial as it may both revoke the bleak diagnosis of prion disease and allow institution of potentially life-saving immunotherapy. Tempering this optimistic view is the rare instance when a positive VGKC complex antibody titre occurs in a definite case of prion disease. We present a pathologically and genetically confirmed case of CJD with elevated serum VGKC complex antibody titres. This case highlights the importance of interpreting the result of a positive VGKC complex antibody with caution and in the context of the overall clinical manifestation. PMID:24903967

  18. [Role of the voltage-gated sodium channels in the metastatic capacity of cancer cells].

    PubMed

    Hernández-Plata, Everardo

    2012-01-01

    The functional expression of voltage-gated sodium channels (Na(v)) in cancer cells is associated with an increase of metastatic potential. The activity of Na(v) channels modulates different cellular processes related to the development of the malignant phenotype, such as adhesion, galvanotaxis, motility and invasiveness. Among the great diversity of cancerous phenotypes, Na(v) channels expression is common in highly metastatic cells with their distribution following a primary tumor-specific pattern. The purpose of this paper is to review the literature, regarding to: the types of Na(v) channels expressed by different types of cancer cells, the cancer cellular processes in which they play important roles, and the molecular mechanisms by which these channels promote metastasis.

  19. Molecular basis of ion permeability in a voltage-gated sodium channel.

    PubMed

    Naylor, Claire E; Bagnéris, Claire; DeCaen, Paul G; Sula, Altin; Scaglione, Antonella; Clapham, David E; Wallace, B A

    2016-04-15

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are essential for electrical signalling across cell membranes. They exhibit strong selectivities for sodium ions over other cations, enabling the finely tuned cascade of events associated with action potentials. This paper describes the ion permeability characteristics and the crystal structure of a prokaryotic sodium channel, showing for the first time the detailed locations of sodium ions in the selectivity filter of a sodium channel. Electrostatic calculations based on the structure are consistent with the relative cation permeability ratios (Na(+) ≈ Li(+) ≫ K(+), Ca(2+), Mg(2+)) measured for these channels. In an E178D selectivity filter mutant constructed to have altered ion selectivities, the sodium ion binding site nearest the extracellular side is missing. Unlike potassium ions in potassium channels, the sodium ions in these channels appear to be hydrated and are associated with side chains of the selectivity filter residues, rather than polypeptide backbones. PMID:26873592

  20. The hitchhiker’s guide to the voltage-gated sodium channel galaxy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic voltage-gated sodium (Nav) channels contribute to the rising phase of action potentials and served as an early muse for biophysicists laying the foundation for our current understanding of electrical signaling. Given their central role in electrical excitability, it is not surprising that (a) inherited mutations in genes encoding for Nav channels and their accessory subunits have been linked to excitability disorders in brain, muscle, and heart; and (b) Nav channels are targeted by various drugs and naturally occurring toxins. Although the overall architecture and behavior of these channels are likely to be similar to the more well-studied voltage-gated potassium channels, eukaryotic Nav channels lack structural and functional symmetry, a notable difference that has implications for gating and selectivity. Activation of voltage-sensing modules of the first three domains in Nav channels is sufficient to open the channel pore, whereas movement of the domain IV voltage sensor is correlated with inactivation. Also, structure–function studies of eukaryotic Nav channels show that a set of amino acids in the selectivity filter, referred to as DEKA locus, is essential for Na+ selectivity. Structures of prokaryotic Nav channels have also shed new light on mechanisms of drug block. These structures exhibit lateral fenestrations that are large enough to allow drugs or lipophilic molecules to gain access into the inner vestibule, suggesting that this might be the passage for drug entry into a closed channel. In this Review, we will synthesize our current understanding of Nav channel gating mechanisms, ion selectivity and permeation, and modulation by therapeutics and toxins in light of the new structures of the prokaryotic Nav channels that, for the time being, serve as structural models of their eukaryotic counterparts. PMID:26712848

  1. Involvement of voltage-gated sodium channels blockade in the analgesic effects of orphenadrine.

    PubMed

    Desaphy, Jean-François; Dipalma, Antonella; De Bellis, Michela; Costanza, Teresa; Gaudioso, Christelle; Delmas, Patrick; George, Alfred L; Camerino, Diana Conte

    2009-04-01

    Orphenadrine is a drug acting on multiple targets, including muscarinic, histaminic, and NMDA receptors. It is used in the treatment of Parkinson's disease and in musculoskeletal disorders. It is also used as an analgesic, although its mechanism of action is still unknown. Both physiological and pharmacological results have demonstrated a critical role for voltage-gated sodium channels in many types of chronic pain syndromes. We tested the hypothesis that orphenadrine may block voltage-gated sodium channels. By using patch-clamp experiments, we evaluated the effects of the drug on whole-cell sodium currents in HEK293 cells expressing the skeletal muscle (Nav1.4), cardiac (Nav1.5) and neuronal (Nav1.1 and Nav1.7) subtypes of human sodium channels, as well as on whole-cell tetrodotoxin (TTX)-resistant sodium currents likely conducted by Nav1.8 and Nav1.9 channel subtypes in primary culture of rat DRG sensory neurons. The results indicate that orphenadrine inhibits sodium channels in a concentration-, voltage- and frequency-dependent manner. By using site-directed mutagenesis, we further show that orphenadrine binds to the same receptor as the local anesthetics. Orphenadrine affinities for resting and inactivated sodium channels were higher compared to those of known sodium channels blockers, such as mexiletine and flecainide. Low, clinically relevant orphenadrine concentration produces a significant block of Nav1.7, Nav1.8, and Nav1.9 channels, which are critical for experiencing pain sensations, indicating a role for sodium channel blockade in the clinical efficacy of orphenadrine as analgesic compound. On the other hand, block of Nav1.1 and Nav1.5 may contribute to the proconvulsive and proarrhythmic adverse reactions, especially observed during overdose. PMID:19217209

  2. Designing a C84 fullerene as a specific voltage-gated sodium channel blocker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilder, Tamsyn A.; Chung, Shin-Ho

    2013-07-01

    Fullerene derivatives demonstrate considerable potential for numerous biological applications, such as the effective inhibition of HIV protease. Recently, they were identified for their ability to indiscriminately block biological ion channels. A fullerene derivative which specifically blocks a particular ion channel could lead to a new set of drug leads for the treatment of various ion channel-related diseases. Here, we demonstrate their extraordinary potential by designing a fullerene which mimics some of the functions of μ-conotoxin, a peptide derived from cone snail venom which potently binds to the bacterial voltage-gated sodium channel (NavAb). We show, using molecular dynamics simulations, that the C84 fullerene with six lysine derivatives uniformly attached to its surface is selective to NavAb over a voltage-gated potassium channel (Kv1.3). The side chain of one of the lysine residues protrudes into the selectivity filter of the channel, while the methionine residues located just outside of the channel form hydrophobic contacts with the carbon atoms of the fullerene. The modified C84 fullerene strongly binds to the NavAb channel with an affinity of 46 nM but binds weakly to Kv1.3 with an affinity of 3 mM. This potent blocker of NavAb may serve as a structural template from which potent compounds can be designed for the targeting of mammalian Nav channels. There is a genuine need to target mammalian Nav channels as a form of treatment of various diseases which have been linked to their malfunction, such as epilepsy and chronic pain.

  3. Temperature dependence of proton permeation through a voltage-gated proton channel

    PubMed Central

    Kuno, Miyuki; Ando, Hiroyuki; Morihata, Hirokazu; Sakai, Hiromu; Mori, Hiroyuki; Sawada, Makoto

    2009-01-01

    Voltage-gated proton channels are found in many different types of cells, where they facilitate proton movement through the membrane. The mechanism of proton permeation through the channel is an issue of long-term interest, but it remains an open question. To address this issue, we examined the temperature dependence of proton permeation. Under whole cell recordings, rapid temperature changes within a few milliseconds were imposed. This method allowed for the measurement of current amplitudes immediately before and after a temperature jump, from which the ratios of these currents (Iratio) were determined. The use of Iratio for evaluating the temperature dependence minimized the contributions of factors other than permeation. Temperature jumps of various degrees (ΔT, −15 to 15°C) were applied over a wide temperature range (4–49°C), and the Q10s for the proton currents were evaluated from the Iratios. Q10 exhibited a high temperature dependence, varying from 2.2 at 10°C to 1.3 at 40°C. This implies that processes with different temperature dependencies underlie the observed Q10. A novel resistivity pulse method revealed that the access resistance with its low temperature dependence predominated in high temperature ranges. The measured temperature dependence of Q10 was decomposed into Q10 of the channel and of the access resistances. Finally, the Q10 for proton permeation through the voltage-gated proton channel itself was calculated and found to vary from 2.8 at 5°C to 2.2 at 45°C, as expected for an activation enthalpy of 64 kJ/mol. The thermodynamic features for proton permeation through proton-selective channels were discussed for the underlying mechanism. PMID:19720960

  4. Axons provide the secretory machinery for trafficking of voltage-gated sodium channels in peripheral nerve.

    PubMed

    González, Carolina; Cánovas, José; Fresno, Javiera; Couve, Eduardo; Court, Felipe A; Couve, Andrés

    2016-02-16

    The regulation of the axonal proteome is key to generate and maintain neural function. Fast and slow axoplasmic waves have been known for decades, but alternative mechanisms to control the abundance of axonal proteins based on local synthesis have also been identified. The presence of the endoplasmic reticulum has been documented in peripheral axons, but it is still unknown whether this localized organelle participates in the delivery of axonal membrane proteins. Voltage-gated sodium channels are responsible for action potentials and are mostly concentrated in the axon initial segment and nodes of Ranvier. Despite their fundamental role, little is known about the intracellular trafficking mechanisms that govern their availability in mature axons. Here we describe the secretory machinery in axons and its contribution to plasma membrane delivery of sodium channels. The distribution of axonal secretory components was evaluated in axons of the sciatic nerve and in spinal nerve axons after in vivo electroporation. Intracellular protein trafficking was pharmacologically blocked in vivo and in vitro. Axonal voltage-gated sodium channel mRNA and local trafficking were examined by RT-PCR and a retention-release methodology. We demonstrate that mature axons contain components of the endoplasmic reticulum and other biosynthetic organelles. Axonal organelles and sodium channel localization are sensitive to local blockade of the endoplasmic reticulum to Golgi transport. More importantly, secretory organelles are capable of delivering sodium channels to the plasma membrane in isolated axons, demonstrating an intrinsic capacity of the axonal biosynthetic route in regulating the axonal proteome in mammalian axons. PMID:26839409

  5. Axons provide the secretory machinery for trafficking of voltage-gated sodium channels in peripheral nerve

    PubMed Central

    González, Carolina; Cánovas, José; Fresno, Javiera; Couve, Eduardo; Court, Felipe A.; Couve, Andrés

    2016-01-01

    The regulation of the axonal proteome is key to generate and maintain neural function. Fast and slow axoplasmic waves have been known for decades, but alternative mechanisms to control the abundance of axonal proteins based on local synthesis have also been identified. The presence of the endoplasmic reticulum has been documented in peripheral axons, but it is still unknown whether this localized organelle participates in the delivery of axonal membrane proteins. Voltage-gated sodium channels are responsible for action potentials and are mostly concentrated in the axon initial segment and nodes of Ranvier. Despite their fundamental role, little is known about the intracellular trafficking mechanisms that govern their availability in mature axons. Here we describe the secretory machinery in axons and its contribution to plasma membrane delivery of sodium channels. The distribution of axonal secretory components was evaluated in axons of the sciatic nerve and in spinal nerve axons after in vivo electroporation. Intracellular protein trafficking was pharmacologically blocked in vivo and in vitro. Axonal voltage-gated sodium channel mRNA and local trafficking were examined by RT-PCR and a retention-release methodology. We demonstrate that mature axons contain components of the endoplasmic reticulum and other biosynthetic organelles. Axonal organelles and sodium channel localization are sensitive to local blockade of the endoplasmic reticulum to Golgi transport. More importantly, secretory organelles are capable of delivering sodium channels to the plasma membrane in isolated axons, demonstrating an intrinsic capacity of the axonal biosynthetic route in regulating the axonal proteome in mammalian axons. PMID:26839409

  6. Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 4-Induced Modulation of Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels in Hippocampal Neurons.

    PubMed

    Hong, Zhiwen; Jie, Pinghui; Tian, Yujing; Chen, Tingting; Chen, Lei; Chen, Ling

    2016-01-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) is reported to control the resting membrane potential and increase excitability in many types of cells. Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) play an important role in initiating action potentials in neurons. However, whether VGSCs can be modulated by the activation of TRPV4 in hippocampal pyramidal neurons remains unknown. In this study, we tested the effect of TRPV4 agonists (GSK1016790A and 4α-PDD) on voltage-gated sodium current (I Na) in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons and the protein levels of α/β-subunit of VGSCs in the hippocampus of mice subjected to intracerebroventricular (icv.) injection of GSK1016790A (GSK-injected mice). Herein, we report that I Na was inhibited by acute application of GSK1016790A or 4α-PDD. In the presence of TRPV4 agonists, the voltage-dependent inactivation curve shifted to the hyperpolarization, whereas the voltage-dependent activation curve remained unchanged. The TRPV4 agonist-induced inhibition of I Na was blocked by the TRPV4 antagonist or tetrodotoxin. Moreover, blocking protein kinase A (PKA) markedly attenuated the GSK1016790A-induced inhibition of I Na, whereas antagonism of protein kinase C or p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase did not change GSK1016790A action. Finally, the protein levels of Nav1.1, Nav1.2, and Nav1.6 in the hippocampus increased in GSK-injected mice, whereas those of Nav1.3 and Navβ1 remained nearly unchanged. We conclude that I Na is inhibited by the acute activation of TRPV4 through PKA signaling pathway in hippocampal pyramidal neurons, but protein expression of α-subunit of VGSCs is increased by sustained TRPV4 activation, which may compensate for the acute inhibition of I Na and provide a possibility for hyper-excitability upon sustained TRPV4 activation.

  7. Functional expression of voltage-gated sodium channels in primary cultures of human cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Daniel; Delgadillo, Dulce Maria; Hernández-Gallegos, Elizabeth; Ramírez-Domínguez, Martha Eugenia; Hinojosa, Luz María; Ortiz, Cindy Sharon; Berumen, Jaime; Camacho, Javier; Gomora, Juan Carlos

    2007-02-01

    Cervical cancer (CaC) is the third most frequent cause of death from cancer among women in the world and the first in females of developing countries. Several ion channels are upregulated in cancer, actually potassium channels have been suggested as tumor markers and therapeutic targets for CaC. Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSC) activity is involved in proliferation, motility, and invasion of prostate and breast cancer cells; however, the participation of this type of channels in CaC has not been explored. In the present study, we identified both at the molecular and electrophysiological level VGSC in primary cultures from human cervical carcinoma biopsies. With the whole cell patch clamp technique, we isolated and identified a voltage-gated Na(+) current as the main component of the inward current in all investigated cells. Sodium current was characterized by its kinetics, voltage dependence, sensitivity to tetrodotoxin (TTX) block and dependence to [Na(+)](o). By analyzing the expression of mRNAs encoding TTX-sensitive Na(+) channel alpha subunits with standard RT-PCR and specific primers, we detected Na(v)1.2, Na(v)1.4, Na(v)1.6, and Na(v)1.7 transcripts in total RNA obtained from primary cultures and biopsies of CaC. Restriction enzyme analysis of PCR products was consistent with the molecular nature of the corresponding genes. Notably, only transcripts for Na(v)1.4 sodium channels were detected in biopsies from normal cervix. The results show for the first time the functional expression of VGSC in primary cultures from human CaC, and suggest that these channels might be considered as potential molecular markers for this type of cancer.

  8. Mapping the gating and permeation pathways in the voltage-gated proton channel Hv1.

    PubMed

    Chamberlin, Adam; Qiu, Feng; Wang, Yibo; Noskov, Sergei Y; Larsson, H Peter

    2015-01-16

    Voltage-gated proton channels (Hv1) are ubiquitous throughout nature and are implicated in numerous physiological processes. The gene encoding for Hv1, however, was only identified in 2006. The lack of sufficient structural information of this channel has hampered the understanding of the molecular mechanism of channel activation and proton permeation. This study uses both simulation and experimental approaches to further develop existing models of the Hv1 channel. Our study provides insights into features of channel gating and proton permeation pathway. We compare open- and closed-state structures developed previously with a recent crystal structure that traps the channel in a presumably closed state. Insights into gating pathways were provided using a combination of all-atom molecular dynamics simulations with a swarm of trajectories with the string method for extensive transition path sampling and evolution. A detailed residue-residue interaction profile and a hydration profile were studied to map the gating pathway in this channel. In particular, it allows us to identify potential intermediate states and compare them to the experimentally observed crystal structure of Takeshita et al. (Takeshita K, Sakata S, Yamashita E, Fujiwara Y, Kawanabe A, Kurokawa T, et al. X-ray crystal structure of voltage-gated proton channel. Nature 2014). The mechanisms governing ion transport in the wild-type and mutant Hv1 channels were studied by a combination of electrophysiological recordings and free energy simulations. With these results, we were able to further refine ideas about the location and function of the selectivity filter. The refined structural models will be essential for future investigations of this channel and the development of new drugs targeting cellular proton transport.

  9. Hydrophobic plug functions as a gate in voltage-gated proton channels.

    PubMed

    Chamberlin, Adam; Qiu, Feng; Rebolledo, Santiago; Wang, Yibo; Noskov, Sergei Y; Larsson, H Peter

    2014-01-14

    Voltage-gated proton (Hv1) channels play important roles in the respiratory burst, in pH regulation, in spermatozoa, in apoptosis, and in cancer metastasis. Unlike other voltage-gated cation channels, the Hv1 channel lacks a centrally located pore formed by the assembly of subunits. Instead, the proton permeation pathway in the Hv1 channel is within the voltage-sensing domain of each subunit. The gating mechanism of this pathway is still unclear. Mutagenic and fluorescence studies suggest that the fourth transmembrane (TM) segment (S4) functions as a voltage sensor and that there is an outward movement of S4 during channel activation. Using thermodynamic mutant cycle analysis, we find that the conserved positively charged residues in S4 are stabilized by countercharges in the other TM segments both in the closed and open states. We constructed models of both the closed and open states of Hv1 channels that are consistent with the mutant cycle analysis. These structural models suggest that electrostatic interactions between TM segments in the closed state pull hydrophobic residues together to form a hydrophobic plug in the center of the voltage-sensing domain. Outward S4 movement during channel activation induces conformational changes that remove this hydrophobic plug and instead insert protonatable residues in the center of the channel that, together with water molecules, can form a hydrogen bond chain across the channel for proton permeation. This suggests that salt bridge networks and the hydrophobic plug function as the gate in Hv1 channels and that outward movement of S4 leads to the opening of this gate.

  10. Modulation of the voltage-gated potassium channel (Kv4.3) and the auxiliary protein (KChIP3) interactions by the current activator NS5806.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Walter G; Pham, Khoa; Miksovska, Jaroslava

    2014-11-14

    KChIP3 (potassium channel interacting protein 3) is a calcium-binding protein that binds at the N terminus of the Kv4 voltage-gated potassium channel through interactions at two contact sites and has been shown to regulate potassium current gating kinetics as well as channel trafficking in cardiac and neuronal cells. Using fluorescence spectroscopy, isothermal calorimetry, and docking simulations we show that the novel potassium current activator, NS5806, binds at a hydrophobic site on the C terminus of KChIP3 in a calcium-dependent manner, with an equilibrium dissociation constant of 2-5 μM in the calcium-bound form. We further determined that the association between KChIP3 and the hydrophobic N terminus of Kv4.3 is calcium-dependent, with an equilibrium dissociation constant in the apo-state of 70 ± 3 μM and 2.7 ± 0.1 μM in the calcium-bound form. NS5806 increases the affinity between KChIP3 and the N terminus of Kv4.3 (Kd = 1.9 ± 0.1 μM) in the presence and absence of calcium. Mutation of Tyr-174 or Phe-218 on KChIP3 abolished the enhancement of Kv4.3 site 1 binding in the apo-state, highlighting the role of these residues in drug and K4.3 binding. Kinetic studies show that NS5806 decreases the rate of dissociation between KChIP3 and the N terminus of KV4.3. Overall, these studies support the idea that NS5806 directly interacts with KChIP3 and modulates the interactions between this calcium-binding protein and the T1 domain of the Kv4.3 channels through reorientation of helix 10 on KChIP3. PMID:25228688

  11. Modulation of the Voltage-gated Potassium Channel (Kv4.3) and the Auxiliary Protein (KChIP3) Interactions by the Current Activator NS5806*

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Walter G.; Pham, Khoa; Miksovska, Jaroslava

    2014-01-01

    KChIP3 (potassium channel interacting protein 3) is a calcium-binding protein that binds at the N terminus of the Kv4 voltage-gated potassium channel through interactions at two contact sites and has been shown to regulate potassium current gating kinetics as well as channel trafficking in cardiac and neuronal cells. Using fluorescence spectroscopy, isothermal calorimetry, and docking simulations we show that the novel potassium current activator, NS5806, binds at a hydrophobic site on the C terminus of KChIP3 in a calcium-dependent manner, with an equilibrium dissociation constant of 2–5 μm in the calcium-bound form. We further determined that the association between KChIP3 and the hydrophobic N terminus of Kv4.3 is calcium-dependent, with an equilibrium dissociation constant in the apo-state of 70 ± 3 μm and 2.7 ± 0.1 μm in the calcium-bound form. NS5806 increases the affinity between KChIP3 and the N terminus of Kv4.3 (Kd = 1.9 ± 0.1 μm) in the presence and absence of calcium. Mutation of Tyr-174 or Phe-218 on KChIP3 abolished the enhancement of Kv4.3 site 1 binding in the apo-state, highlighting the role of these residues in drug and K4.3 binding. Kinetic studies show that NS5806 decreases the rate of dissociation between KChIP3 and the N terminus of KV4.3. Overall, these studies support the idea that NS5806 directly interacts with KChIP3 and modulates the interactions between this calcium-binding protein and the T1 domain of the Kv4.3 channels through reorientation of helix 10 on KChIP3. PMID:25228688

  12. Molecular basis of the interaction between gating modifier spider toxins and the voltage sensor of voltage-gated ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Carus H. Y.; King, Glenn F.; Mobli, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-sensor domains (VSDs) are modular transmembrane domains of voltage-gated ion channels that respond to changes in membrane potential by undergoing conformational changes that are coupled to gating of the ion-conducting pore. Most spider-venom peptides function as gating modifiers by binding to the VSDs of voltage-gated channels and trapping them in a closed or open state. To understand the molecular basis underlying this mode of action, we used nuclear magnetic resonance to delineate the atomic details of the interaction between the VSD of the voltage-gated potassium channel KvAP and the spider-venom peptide VSTx1. Our data reveal that the toxin interacts with residues in an aqueous cleft formed between the extracellular S1-S2 and S3-S4 loops of the VSD whilst maintaining lipid interactions in the gaps formed between the S1-S4 and S2-S3 helices. The resulting network of interactions increases the energetic barrier to the conformational changes required for channel gating, and we propose that this is the mechanism by which gating modifier toxins inhibit voltage-gated ion channels. PMID:27677715

  13. Aberrant Splicing Promotes Proteasomal Degradation of L-type CaV1.2 Calcium Channels by Competitive Binding for CaVβ Subunits in Cardiac Hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhenyu; Wang, Jiong-Wei; Yu, Dejie; Soon, Jia Lin; de Kleijn, Dominique P. V.; Foo, Roger; Liao, Ping; Colecraft, Henry M.; Soong, Tuck Wah

    2016-01-01

    Decreased expression and activity of CaV1.2 calcium channels has been reported in pressure overload-induced cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure. However, the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. Here we identified in rodents a splice variant of CaV1.2 channel, named CaV1.2e21+22, that contained the pair of mutually exclusive exons 21 and 22. This variant was highly expressed in neonatal hearts. The abundance of this variant was gradually increased by 12.5-folds within 14 days of transverse aortic banding that induced cardiac hypertrophy in adult mouse hearts and was also elevated in left ventricles from patients with dilated cardiomyopathy. Although this variant did not conduct Ca2+ ions, it reduced the cell-surface expression of wild-type CaV1.2 channels and consequently decreased the whole-cell Ca2+ influx via the CaV1.2 channels. In addition, the CaV1.2e21+22 variant interacted with CaVβ subunits significantly more than wild-type CaV1.2 channels, and competition of CaVβ subunits by CaV1.2e21+22 consequently enhanced ubiquitination and subsequent proteasomal degradation of the wild-type CaV1.2 channels. Our findings show that the resurgence of a specific neonatal splice variant of CaV1.2 channels in adult heart under stress may contribute to heart failure. PMID:27731386

  14. Intra-membrane Signaling Between the Voltage-Gated Ca2+-Channel and Cysteine Residues of Syntaxin 1A Coordinates Synchronous Release

    PubMed Central

    Bachnoff, Niv; Cohen-Kutner, Moshe; Trus, Michael; Atlas, Daphne

    2013-01-01

    The interaction of syntaxin 1A (Sx1A) with voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCC) is required for depolarization-evoked release. However, it is unclear how the signal is transferred from the channel to the exocytotic machinery and whether assembly of Sx1A and the calcium channel is conformationally linked to triggering synchronous release. Here we demonstrate that depolarization-evoked catecholamine release was decreased in chromaffin cells infected with semliki forest viral vectors encoding Sx1A mutants, Sx1AC271V, or Sx1AC272V, or by direct oxidation of these Sx1A transmembrane (TM) cysteine residues. Mutating or oxidizing these highly conserved Sx1A Cys271 and Cys272 equally disrupted the Sx1A interaction with the channel. The results highlight the functional link between the VGCC and the exocytotic machinery, and attribute the redox sensitivity of the release process to the Sx1A TM C271 and C272. This unique intra-membrane signal-transduction pathway enables fast signaling, and triggers synchronous release by conformational-coupling of the channel with Sx1A. PMID:23567899

  15. Molecular Basis of the Membrane Interaction of the β2e Subunit of Voltage-Gated Ca2+ Channels

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong-Il; Kang, Mooseok; Kim, Sangyeol; Lee, Juhwan; Park, Yongsoo; Chang, Iksoo; Suh, Byung-Chang

    2015-01-01

    The auxiliary β subunit plays an important role in the regulation of voltage-gated calcium (CaV) channels. Recently, it was revealed that β2e associates with the plasma membrane through an electrostatic interaction between N-terminal basic residues and anionic phospholipids. However, a molecular-level understanding of β-subunit membrane recruitment in structural detail has remained elusive. In this study, using a combination of site-directed mutagenesis, liposome-binding assays, and multiscale molecular-dynamics (MD) simulation, we developed a physical model of how the β2e subunit is recruited electrostatically to the plasma membrane. In a fluorescence resonance energy transfer assay with liposomes, binding of the N-terminal peptide (23 residues) to liposome was significantly increased in the presence of phosphatidylserine (PS) and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2). A mutagenesis analysis suggested that two basic residues proximal to Met-1, Lys-2 (K2) and Trp-5 (W5), are more important for membrane binding of the β2e subunit than distal residues from the N-terminus. Our MD simulations revealed that a stretched binding mode of the N-terminus to PS is required for stable membrane attachment through polar and nonpolar interactions. This mode obtained from MD simulations is consistent with experimental results showing that K2A, W5A, and K2A/W5A mutants failed to be targeted to the plasma membrane. We also investigated the effects of a mutated β2e subunit on inactivation kinetics and regulation of CaV channels by PIP2. In experiments with voltage-sensing phosphatase (VSP), a double mutation in the N-terminus of β2e (K2A/W5A) increased the PIP2 sensitivity of CaV2.2 and CaV1.3 channels by ∼3-fold compared with wild-type β2e subunit. Together, our results suggest that membrane targeting of the β2e subunit is initiated from the nonspecific electrostatic insertion of N-terminal K2 and W5 residues into the membrane. The PS-β2e interaction observed here

  16. Modulation of Voltage- and Ca2+-dependent Gating of CaV1.3 L-type Calcium Channels by Alternative Splicing of a C-terminal Regulatory Domain*

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Anamika; Gebhart, Mathias; Fritsch, Reinhard; Sinnegger-Brauns, Martina J.; Poggiani, Chiara; Hoda, Jean-Charles; Engel, Jutta; Romanin, Christoph; Striessnig, Jörg; Koschak, Alexandra

    2008-01-01

    Low voltage activation of CaV1.3 L-type Ca2+ channels controls excitability in sensory cells and central neurons as well as sinoatrial node pacemaking. CaV1.3-mediated pacemaking determines neuronal vulnerability of dopaminergic striatal neurons affected in Parkinson disease. We have previously found that in CaV1.4 L-type Ca2+ channels, activation, voltage, and calcium-dependent inactivation are controlled by an intrinsic distal C-terminal modulator. Because alternative splicing in the CaV1.3 α1 subunit C terminus gives rise to a long (CaV1.342) and a short form (CaV1.342A), we investigated if a C-terminal modulatory mechanism also controls CaV1.3 gating. The biophysical properties of both splice variants were compared after heterologous expression together with β3 and α2δ1 subunits in HEK-293 cells. Activation of calcium current through CaV1.342A channels was more pronounced at negative voltages, and inactivation was faster because of enhanced calcium-dependent inactivation. By investigating several CaV1.3 channel truncations, we restricted the modulator activity to the last 116 amino acids of the C terminus. The resulting CaV1.3ΔC116 channels showed gating properties similar to CaV1.342A that were reverted by co-expression of the corresponding C-terminal peptide C116. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer experiments confirmed an intramolecular protein interaction in the C terminus of CaV1.3 channels that also modulates calmodulin binding. These experiments revealed a novel mechanism of channel modulation enabling cells to tightly control CaV1.3 channel activity by alternative splicing. The absence of the C-terminal modulator in short splice forms facilitates CaV1.3 channel activation at lower voltages expected to favor CaV1.3 activity at threshold voltages as required for modulation of neuronal firing behavior and sinoatrial node pacemaking. PMID:18482979

  17. Voltage-gated sodium channels and cancer: is excitability their primary role?

    PubMed Central

    Roger, Sébastien; Gillet, Ludovic; Le Guennec, Jean-Yves; Besson, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (NaV) are molecular characteristics of excitable cells. Their activation, triggered by membrane depolarization, generates transient sodium currents that initiate action potentials in neurons and muscle cells. Sodium currents were discovered by Hodgkin and Huxley using the voltage clamp technique and reported in their landmark series of papers in 1952. It was only in the 1980's that sodium channel proteins from excitable membranes were molecularly characterized by Catterall and his collaborators. Non-excitable cells can also express NaV channels in physiological conditions as well as in pathological conditions. These NaV channels can sustain biological roles that are not related to the generation of action potentials. Interestingly, it is likely that the abnormal expression of NaV in pathological tissues can reflect the re-expression of a fetal phenotype. This is especially true in epithelial cancer cells for which these channels have been identified and sodium currents recorded, while it was not the case for cells from the cognate normal tissues. In cancers, the functional activity of NaV appeared to be involved in regulating the proliferative, migrative, and invasive properties of cells. This review is aimed at addressing the non-excitable roles of NaV channels with a specific emphasis in the regulation of cancer cell biology. PMID:26283962

  18. Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels as Therapeutic Targets for Treatment of Painful Diabetic Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Kharatmal, Shivsharan B; Singh, Jitendra N; Sharma, Shyam S

    2015-01-01

    Painful diabetic neuropathy (PDN) is one of most common complication of diabetes, usually affecting 50% of diabetic patients and remains important cause of morbidity, mortality and deterioration of quality of life. PDN is well characterised by chronic hyperglycemia, alterations in expression and kinetics of voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) and neuro-inflammation which together may result into sensorimotor deficits in peripheral nervous system. Peripheral nociceptive neurons express variety of sodium channel isoforms particularly Nav1.3, Nav1.7, Nav1.8 and Nav1.9, each play a key role in physiology of nociception by undergoing respective dynamic changes in expression and voltage-dependent gating properties. Thus, they are critical determinants of sensory neuronal excitability and associated neuropathic pain signal. Recent preclinical and clinical trial research has shed light on VGSCs as most compelling target in the treatment of PDN, a development that may open up new therapeutic approaches involving subtype selective sodium channel blockers to boost clinical efficacy, cost effectiveness, better tolerability and targeted treatment. In this review, we have summarized structure and functions of VGSCs and their involvement in the pathophysiology of neuropathic pain along with the current status of pharmacological interventions targeted at VGSCs in the treatment of diabetic neuropathy. PMID:26202189

  19. Trafficking regulates the subcellular distribution of voltage-gated sodium channels in primary sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Bao, Lan

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (Navs) comprise at least nine pore-forming α subunits. Of these, Nav1.6, Nav1.7, Nav1.8 and Nav1.9 are the most frequently studied in primary sensory neurons located in the dorsal root ganglion and are mainly localized to the cytoplasm. A large pool of intracellular Navs raises the possibility that changes in Nav trafficking could alter channel function. The molecular mediators of Nav trafficking mainly consist of signals within the Navs themselves, interacting proteins and extracellular factors. The surface expression of Navs is achieved by escape from the endoplasmic reticulum and proteasome degradation, forward trafficking and plasma membrane anchoring, and it is also regulated by channel phosphorylation and ubiquitination in primary sensory neurons. Axonal transport and localization of Navs in afferent fibers involves the motor protein KIF5B and scaffold proteins, including contactin and PDZ domain containing 2. Localization of Nav1.6 to the nodes of Ranvier in myelinated fibers of primary sensory neurons requires node formation and the submembrane cytoskeletal protein complex. These findings inform our understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying Nav trafficking in primary sensory neurons. PMID:26423360

  20. Biogenesis of the pore architecture of a voltage-gated potassium channel.

    PubMed

    Gajewski, Christine; Dagcan, Alper; Roux, Benoit; Deutsch, Carol

    2011-02-22

    The pore domain of voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels consists of transmembrane helices S5 and S6, the turret, the pore helix, the selectivity filter, and the loop preceding S6, with a tertiary reentrant structure between S5 and S6. Using biogenic intermediates, mass tagging (pegylation), and a molecular tape measure, we explored the possibility that the first stages of pore formation occur prior to oligomerization of the transmembrane core. Pegylation of introduced cysteines shows that the pore helix, but not the turret, forms a compact secondary structure in the terminal 20 Å of the ribosomal tunnel. We assessed the tertiary fold of the pore loop in monomeric constructs by determining the relative accessibilities of select cysteines using the kinetics of pegylation. Turret residues are accessible at the extracellular surface. In contrast, pore helix residues are less accessible. All-atom molecular dynamics simulations of a single Kv monomer in a solvated lipid membrane indicate that secondary and tertiary folds are stable over 650 ns. These results are consistent with acquisition of a tertiary reentrant pore architecture at the monomer stage of Kv biogenesis and begin to define a plausible sequence of folding events in the formation of Kv channels.

  1. Reverberation of excitation in neuronal networks interconnected through voltage-gated gap junction channels

    PubMed Central

    Maciunas, Kestutis; Snipas, Mindaugas; Paulauskas, Nerijus

    2016-01-01

    We combined Hodgkin–Huxley equations and gating models of gap junction (GJ) channels to simulate the spread of excitation in two-dimensional networks composed of neurons interconnected by voltage-gated GJs. Each GJ channel contains two fast and slow gates, each exhibiting current–voltage (I-V) rectification and gating properties that depend on transjunctional voltage (Vj). The data obtained show how junctional conductance (gj), which is necessary for synchronization of the neuronal network, depends on its size and the intrinsic firing rate of neurons. A phase shift between action potentials (APs) of neighboring neurons creates bipolar, short-lasting Vj spikes of approximately ±100 mV that induce Vj gating, leading to a small decay of gj, which can accumulate into larger decays during bursting activity of neurons. We show that I-V rectification of GJs in local regions of the two-dimensional network of neurons can lead to unidirectional AP transfer and consequently to reverberation of excitation. This reverberation can be initiated by a single electrical pulse and terminated by a low-amplitude pulse applied in a specific window of reverberation cycle. Thus, the model accounts for the influence of dynamically modulatable electrical synapses in shaping the function of a neuronal network and the formation of reverberation, which, as proposed earlier, may be important for the development of short-term memory and its consolidation into long-term memory. PMID:26880752

  2. A specialized molecular motion opens the Hv1 voltage-gated proton channel.

    PubMed

    Mony, Laetitia; Berger, Thomas K; Isacoff, Ehud Y

    2015-04-01

    The Hv1 proton channel is unique among voltage-gated channels for containing the pore and gate within its voltage-sensing domain. Pore opening has been proposed to include assembly of the selectivity filter between an arginine (R3) of segment S4 and an aspartate (D1) of segment S1. We determined whether gating involves motion of S1, using Ciona intestinalis Hv1. We found that channel opening is concomitant with solution access to the pore-lining face of S1, from the cytoplasm to deep inside the pore. Voltage- and patch-clamp fluorometry showed that this involves a motion of S1 relative to its surroundings. S1 motion and the S4 motion that precedes it are each influenced by residues on the other helix, thus suggesting a dynamic interaction between S1 and S4. Our findings suggest that the S1 of Hv1 has specialized to function as part of the channel's gate.

  3. Selectivity Mechanism of the Voltage-gated Proton Channel, HV1

    PubMed Central

    Dudev, Todor; Musset, Boris; Morgan, Deri; Cherny, Vladimir V.; Smith, Susan M. E.; Mazmanian, Karine; DeCoursey, Thomas E.; Lim, Carmay

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated proton channels, HV1, trigger bioluminescence in dinoflagellates, enable calcification in coccolithophores, and play multifarious roles in human health. Because the proton concentration is minuscule, exquisite selectivity for protons over other ions is critical to HV1 function. The selectivity of the open HV1 channel requires an aspartate near an arginine in the selectivity filter (SF), a narrow region that dictates proton selectivity, but the mechanism of proton selectivity is unknown. Here we use a reduced quantum model to elucidate how the Asp–Arg SF selects protons but excludes other ions. Attached to a ring scaffold, the Asp and Arg side chains formed bidentate hydrogen bonds that occlude the pore. Introducing H3O+ protonated the SF, breaking the Asp–Arg linkage and opening the conduction pathway, whereas Na+ or Cl– was trapped by the SF residue of opposite charge, leaving the linkage intact, thus preventing permeation. An Asp–Lys SF behaved like the Asp–Arg one and was experimentally verified to be proton-selective, as predicted. Hence, interacting acidic and basic residues form favorable AspH0–H2O0–Arg+ interactions with hydronium but unfavorable Asp––X–/X+–Arg+ interactions with anions/cations. This proposed mechanism may apply to other proton-selective molecules engaged in bioenergetics, homeostasis, and signaling. PMID:25955978

  4. Expression patterns, mutation detection and RNA interference of Rhopalosiphum padi voltage-gated sodium channel genes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Yayun; Peng, Xiong; Wang, Kang; Lin, Fangfei; Li, Yuting; Chen, Maohua

    2016-07-01

    The voltage-gated sodium channel (VGSC) is the target of sodium-channel-blocking insecticides. Traditionally, animals were thought to have only one VGSC gene comprising a α-subunit with four homologous domains (DI–DIV). The present study showed that Rhopalosiphum padi, an economically important crop pest, owned a unique heterodimeric VGSC (H1 and H2 subunits) encoded by two genes (Rpvgsc1 and Rpvgsc2), which is unusual in insects and other animals. The open reading frame (ORF) of Rpvgsc1 consisted 1150 amino acids, and the ORF of Rpvgsc2 had 957 amino acids. Rpvgsc1 showed 64.1% amino acid identity to DI–DII of Drosophila melanogaster VGSC and Rpvgsc2 showed 64.0% amino acid identity to DIII–DIV of D. melanogaster VGSC. A M918L mutation previously reported in pyrethroids-resistant strains of other insects was found in the IIS4-S6 region of R. padi field sample. The two R. padi VGSC genes were expressed at all developmental stages and showed similar expression patterns after treatment with beta-cypermethrin. Knockdown of Rpvgsc1 or Rpvgsc2 caused significant reduction in mortality rate of R. padi after exposure to beta-cypermethrin. These findings suggest that the two R. padi VGSC genes are both functional genes.

  5. Characterization of Voltage-Gated Potassium Channels in Human Neural Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schaarschmidt, Grit; Wegner, Florian; Schwarz, Sigrid C.; Schmidt, Hartmut; Schwarz, Johannes

    2009-01-01

    Background Voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels are among the earliest ion channels to appear during brain development, suggesting a functional requirement for progenitor cell proliferation and/or differentiation. We tested this hypothesis, using human neural progenitor cells (hNPCs) as a model system. Methodology/Principal Findings In proliferating hNPCs a broad spectrum of Kv channel subtypes was identified using quantitative real-time PCR with a predominant expression of the A-type channel Kv4.2. In whole-cell patch-clamp recordings Kv currents were separated into a large transient component characteristic for fast-inactivating A-type potassium channels (IA) and a small, sustained component produced by delayed-rectifying channels (IK). During differentiation the expression of IA as well as A-type channel transcripts dramatically decreased, while IK producing delayed-rectifiers were upregulated. Both Kv currents were differentially inhibited by selective neurotoxins like phrixotoxin-1 and α-dendrotoxin as well as by antagonists like 4-aminopyridine, ammoniumchloride, tetraethylammonium chloride and quinidine. In viability and proliferation assays chronic inhibition of the A-type currents severely disturbed the cell cycle and precluded proper hNPC proliferation, while the blockade of delayed-rectifiers by α-dendrotoxin increased proliferation. Conclusions/Significance These findings suggest that A-type potassium currents are essential for proper proliferation of immature multipotent hNPCs. PMID:19584922

  6. Voltage-gated Na+ channels: multiplicity of expression, plasticity, functional implications and pathophysiological aspects.

    PubMed

    Diss, J K J; Fraser, S P; Djamgoz, M B A

    2004-05-01

    Voltage-gated Na+ channels (VGSCs) are well known for mediating regenerative cell membrane depolarization and conduction of electrical signalling in nerves and muscles. However, VGSCs may also be expressed in traditionally "non-excitable" cell types, including lymphocytes, glia, fibroblasts and metastatic cancer cells of epithelial origin. Both the diversity and modulation of VGSC expression are far more complex than was initially apparent. There are at least 10 different genes that encode the alpha-subunits of VGSCs. Since VGSCs can contribute to a range of human disease conditions, it is important to understand both the control and consequences of VGSC functioning and how these aspects may be altered under pathophysiological conditions. Such mechanisms can be at the transcriptional, pre-translational or post-translational levels. This article reviews recent literature that has contributed to our understanding of how individual VGSC subtypes can generate their unique physiological signatures within different cell types. We also highlight emerging areas of interest, in particular, the finding of multiple expression of individual VGSC subtypes within single cells, the generation of alternative splice variants and the increasingly complex set of mechanisms of plasticity through which individual VGSC subtypes may be subtly controlled, including intracellular trafficking of VGSC protein. PMID:14963621

  7. Molecular mechanism of voltage sensing in voltage-gated proton channels.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Carlos; Rebolledo, Santiago; Perez, Marta E; Larsson, H Peter

    2013-03-01

    Voltage-gated proton (Hv) channels play an essential role in phagocytic cells by generating a hyperpolarizing proton current that electrically compensates for the depolarizing current generated by the NADPH oxidase during the respiratory burst, thereby ensuring a sustained production of reactive oxygen species by the NADPH oxidase in phagocytes to neutralize engulfed bacteria. Despite the importance of the voltage-dependent Hv current, it is at present unclear which residues in Hv channels are responsible for the voltage activation. Here we show that individual neutralizations of three charged residues in the fourth transmembrane domain, S4, all reduce the voltage dependence of activation. In addition, we show that the middle S4 charged residue moves from a position accessible from the cytosolic solution to a position accessible from the extracellular solution, suggesting that this residue moves across most of the membrane electric field during voltage activation of Hv channels. Our results show for the first time that the charge movement of these three S4 charges accounts for almost all of the measured gating charge in Hv channels. PMID:23401575

  8. Dynamic memory of a single voltage-gated potassium ion channel: A stochastic nonequilibrium thermodynamic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, Kinshuk

    2015-05-14

    In this work, we have studied the stochastic response of a single voltage-gated potassium ion channel to a periodic external voltage that keeps the system out-of-equilibrium. The system exhibits memory, resulting from time-dependent driving, that is reflected in terms of dynamic hysteresis in the current-voltage characteristics. The hysteresis loop area has a maximum at some intermediate voltage frequency and disappears in the limits of low and high frequencies. However, the (average) dissipation at long-time limit increases and finally goes to saturation with rising frequency. This raises the question: how diminishing hysteresis can be associated with growing dissipation? To answer this, we have studied the nonequilibrium thermodynamics of the system and analyzed different thermodynamic functions which also exhibit hysteresis. Interestingly, by applying a temporal symmetry analysis in the high-frequency limit, we have analytically shown that hysteresis in some of the periodic responses of the system does not vanish. On the contrary, the rates of free energy and internal energy change of the system as well as the rate of dissipative work done on the system show growing hysteresis with frequency. Hence, although the current-voltage hysteresis disappears in the high-frequency limit, the memory of the ion channel is manifested through its specific nonequilibrium thermodynamic responses.

  9. Voltage-gated potassium channels autoantibodies in a child with rasmussen encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Spitz, Marie-Aude; Dubois-Teklali, Fanny; Vercueil, Laurent; Sabourdy, Cécile; Nugues, Frédérique; Vincent, Angela; Oliver, Viviana; Bulteau, Christine

    2014-10-01

    Rasmussen encephalitis (RE) is a severe epileptic and inflammatory encephalopathy of unknown etiology, responsible for focal neurological signs and cognitive decline. The current leading hypothesis suggests a sequence of immune reactions induced by an indeterminate factor. This sequence is thought to be responsible for the production of autoantibody-mediated central nervous system degeneration. However, these autoantibodies are not specific to the disease and not all patients present with them. We report the case of a 4-year-old girl suffering from RE displaying some atypical features such as fast evolution and seizures of left parietal onset refractory to several antiepileptics, intravenous immunoglobulins, and corticosteroids. Serum autoantibodies directed against voltage-gated potassium channels (VGKC) were evidenced at 739 pM, a finding never previously reported in children. This screening was performed because of an increased signal in the temporolimbic areas on brain magnetic resonance imaging, which was similar to what is observed during limbic encephalitis. The patient experienced epilepsia partialis continua with progressive right hemiplegia and aphasia. She underwent left hemispherotomy at the age of 5.5 years after which she became seizure free with great cognitive improvement. First described in adults, VGKC autoantibodies have been recently described in children with various neurological manifestations. The implication of VGKC autoantibodies in RE is a new observation and opens up new physiopathological and therapeutic avenues of investigation.

  10. Models of the Structure and Voltage-Gating Mechanism of the Shaker K+ Channel

    PubMed Central

    Durell, Stewart R.; Shrivastava, Indira H.; Guy, H. Robert

    2004-01-01

    In the preceding, accompanying article, we present models of the structure and voltage-dependent gating mechanism of the KvAP bacterial K+ channel that are based on three types of evidence: crystal structures of portions of the KvAP protein, theoretical modeling criteria for membrane proteins, and biophysical studies of the properties of native and mutated voltage-gated channels. Most of the latter experiments were performed on the Shaker K+ channel. Some of these data are difficult to relate directly to models of the KvAP channel's structure due to differences in the Shaker and KvAP sequences. We have dealt with this problem by developing new models of the structure and gating mechanism of the transmembrane and extracellular portions of the Shaker channel. These models are consistent with almost all of the biophysical data. In contrast, much of the experimental data are incompatible with the “paddle” model of gating that was proposed when the KvAP crystal structures were first published. The general folding pattern and gating mechanisms of our current models are similar to some of our earlier models of the Shaker channel. PMID:15454416

  11. Functional Interaction between the Scaffold Protein Kidins220/ARMS and Neuronal Voltage-Gated Na+ Channels*

    PubMed Central

    Cesca, Fabrizia; Satapathy, Annyesha; Ferrea, Enrico; Nieus, Thierry; Benfenati, Fabio; Scholz-Starke, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Kidins220 (kinase D-interacting substrate of 220 kDa)/ankyrin repeat-rich membrane spanning (ARMS) acts as a signaling platform at the plasma membrane and is implicated in a multitude of neuronal functions, including the control of neuronal activity. Here, we used the Kidins220−/− mouse model to study the effects of Kidins220 ablation on neuronal excitability. Multielectrode array recordings showed reduced evoked spiking activity in Kidins220−/− hippocampal networks, which was compatible with the increased excitability of GABAergic neurons determined by current-clamp recordings. Spike waveform analysis further indicated an increased sodium conductance in this neuronal subpopulation. Kidins220 association with brain voltage-gated sodium channels was shown by co-immunoprecipitation experiments and Na+ current recordings in transfected HEK293 cells, which revealed dramatic alterations of kinetics and voltage dependence. Finally, an in silico interneuronal model incorporating the Kidins220-induced Na+ current alterations reproduced the firing phenotype observed in Kidins220−/− neurons. These results identify Kidins220 as a novel modulator of Nav channel activity, broadening our understanding of the molecular mechanisms regulating network excitability. PMID:26037926

  12. Local anesthetic and antiepileptic drug access and binding to a bacterial voltage-gated sodium channel.

    PubMed

    Boiteux, Céline; Vorobyov, Igor; French, Robert J; French, Christopher; Yarov-Yarovoy, Vladimir; Allen, Toby W

    2014-09-01

    Voltage-gated sodium (Nav) channels are important targets in the treatment of a range of pathologies. Bacterial channels, for which crystal structures have been solved, exhibit modulation by local anesthetic and anti-epileptic agents, allowing molecular-level investigations into sodium channel-drug interactions. These structures reveal no basis for the "hinged lid"-based fast inactivation, seen in eukaryotic Nav channels. Thus, they enable examination of potential mechanisms of use- or state-dependent drug action based on activation gating, or slower pore-based inactivation processes. Multimicrosecond simulations of NavAb reveal high-affinity binding of benzocaine to F203 that is a surrogate for FS6, conserved in helix S6 of Domain IV of mammalian sodium channels, as well as low-affinity sites suggested to stabilize different states of the channel. Phenytoin exhibits a different binding distribution owing to preferential interactions at the membrane and water-protein interfaces. Two drug-access pathways into the pore are observed: via lateral fenestrations connecting to the membrane lipid phase, as well as via an aqueous pathway through the intracellular activation gate, despite being closed. These observations provide insight into drug modulation that will guide further developments of Nav inhibitors. PMID:25136136

  13. Localization of voltage-gated K(+) channels in squid giant axons.

    PubMed

    Clay, J R; Kuzirian, A M

    2000-11-15

    We have localized the classical voltage-gated K(+) channel within squid giant axons by immunocytochemistry using the Kv1 antibody of Rosenthal et al. (1996). Widely dispersed patches of intense immunofluorescence were observed in the axonal membrane. Punctate immunofluorescence was also observed in the axoplasm and was localized to approximately 25-50-microm-wide column down the length of the nerve (axon diameter approximately 500 microm). Immunoelectronmicroscopy of the axoplasm revealed a K(+) channel containing vesicles, 30-50 nm in diameter, within this column. These and other vesicles of similar size were isolated from axoplasm using a novel combination of high-speed ultracentrifugation and controlled-pore size, glass bead separation column techniques. Approximately 1% of all isolated vesicles were labeled by K(+) channel immunogold reacted antibody. Incorporation of isolated vesicle fractions within an artificial lipid bilayer revealed K(+) channel electrical activity similar to that recorded directly from the axonal membrane by Llano et al. (1988). These K(+) channel-containing vesicles may be involved in cycling of K(+) channel protein into the axonal membrane. We have also isolated an axoplasmic fraction containing approximately 150-nm-diameter vesicles that may transport K(+) channels back to the cell body.

  14. Selectivity Mechanism of the Voltage-gated Proton Channel, HV1.

    PubMed

    Dudev, Todor; Musset, Boris; Morgan, Deri; Cherny, Vladimir V; Smith, Susan M E; Mazmanian, Karine; DeCoursey, Thomas E; Lim, Carmay

    2015-05-08

    Voltage-gated proton channels, HV1, trigger bioluminescence in dinoflagellates, enable calcification in coccolithophores, and play multifarious roles in human health. Because the proton concentration is minuscule, exquisite selectivity for protons over other ions is critical to HV1 function. The selectivity of the open HV1 channel requires an aspartate near an arginine in the selectivity filter (SF), a narrow region that dictates proton selectivity, but the mechanism of proton selectivity is unknown. Here we use a reduced quantum model to elucidate how the Asp-Arg SF selects protons but excludes other ions. Attached to a ring scaffold, the Asp and Arg side chains formed bidentate hydrogen bonds that occlude the pore. Introducing H3O(+) protonated the SF, breaking the Asp-Arg linkage and opening the conduction pathway, whereas Na(+) or Cl(-) was trapped by the SF residue of opposite charge, leaving the linkage intact, thus preventing permeation. An Asp-Lys SF behaved like the Asp-Arg one and was experimentally verified to be proton-selective, as predicted. Hence, interacting acidic and basic residues form favorable AspH(0)-H2O(0)-Arg(+) interactions with hydronium but unfavorable Asp(-)-X(-)/X(+)-Arg(+) interactions with anions/cations. This proposed mechanism may apply to other proton-selective molecules engaged in bioenergetics, homeostasis, and signaling.

  15. Selectivity Mechanism of the Voltage-gated Proton Channel, HV1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudev, Todor; Musset, Boris; Morgan, Deri; Cherny, Vladimir V.; Smith, Susan M. E.; Mazmanian, Karine; Decoursey, Thomas E.; Lim, Carmay

    2015-05-01

    Voltage-gated proton channels, HV1, trigger bioluminescence in dinoflagellates, enable calcification in coccolithophores, and play multifarious roles in human health. Because the proton concentration is minuscule, exquisite selectivity for protons over other ions is critical to HV1 function. The selectivity of the open HV1 channel requires an aspartate near an arginine in the selectivity filter (SF), a narrow region that dictates proton selectivity, but the mechanism of proton selectivity is unknown. Here we use a reduced quantum model to elucidate how the Asp-Arg SF selects protons but excludes other ions. Attached to a ring scaffold, the Asp and Arg side chains formed bidentate hydrogen bonds that occlude the pore. Introducing H3O+ protonated the SF, breaking the Asp-Arg linkage and opening the conduction pathway, whereas Na+ or Cl- was trapped by the SF residue of opposite charge, leaving the linkage intact, thus preventing permeation. An Asp-Lys SF behaved like the Asp-Arg one and was experimentally verified to be proton-selective, as predicted. Hence, interacting acidic and basic residues form favorable AspH0-H2O0-Arg+ interactions with hydronium but unfavorable Asp--X-/X+-Arg+ interactions with anions/cations. This proposed mechanism may apply to other proton-selective molecules engaged in bioenergetics, homeostasis, and signaling.

  16. In vivo potency of different ligands on voltage-gated sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Safrany-Fark, Arpad; Petrovszki, Zita; Kekesi, Gabriella; Liszli, Peter; Benedek, Gyorgy; Keresztes, Csilla; Horvath, Gyongyi

    2015-09-01

    The Ranvier nodes of thick myelinated nerve fibers contain almost exclusively voltage-gated sodium channels (Navs), while the unmyelinated fibers have several receptors (e.g., cannabinoid, transient receptor potential vanilloid receptor 1), too. Therefore, a nerve which contains only motor fibers can be an appropriate in vivo model for selective influence of Navs. The goals were to evaluate the potency of local anesthetic drugs on such a nerve in vivo; furthermore, to investigate the effects of ligands with different structures (arachidonic acid, anandamide, capsaicin and nisoxetine) that were proved to inhibit Navs in vitro with antinociceptive properties. The marginal mandibular branch of the facial nerve was explored in anesthetized Wistar rats; after its stimulation, the electrical activity of the vibrissae muscles was registered following the perineural injection of different drugs. Lidocaine, bupivacaine and ropivacaine evoked dose-dependent decrease in electromyographic activity, i.e., lidocaine had lower potency than bupivacaine or ropivacaine. QX-314 did not cause any effect by itself, but its co-application with lidocaine produced a prolonged inhibition. Nisoxetine had a very low potency. While anandamide and capsaicin in high doses caused about 50% decrease in the amplitude of action potential, arachidonic acid did not influence the responses. We proved that the classical local anesthetics have high potency on motor nerves, suggesting that this method might be a reliable model for selective targeting of Navs in vivo circumstances. It is proposed that the effects of these endogenous lipids and capsaicin on sensory fibers are not primarily mediated by Navs.

  17. Expression patterns, mutation detection and RNA interference of Rhopalosiphum padi voltage-gated sodium channel genes

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Yayun; Peng, Xiong; Wang, Kang; Lin, Fangfei; Li, Yuting; Chen, Maohua

    2016-01-01

    The voltage-gated sodium channel (VGSC) is the target of sodium-channel-blocking insecticides. Traditionally, animals were thought to have only one VGSC gene comprising a α-subunit with four homologous domains (DI–DIV). The present study showed that Rhopalosiphum padi, an economically important crop pest, owned a unique heterodimeric VGSC (H1 and H2 subunits) encoded by two genes (Rpvgsc1 and Rpvgsc2), which is unusual in insects and other animals. The open reading frame (ORF) of Rpvgsc1 consisted 1150 amino acids, and the ORF of Rpvgsc2 had 957 amino acids. Rpvgsc1 showed 64.1% amino acid identity to DI–DII of Drosophila melanogaster VGSC and Rpvgsc2 showed 64.0% amino acid identity to DIII–DIV of D. melanogaster VGSC. A M918L mutation previously reported in pyrethroids-resistant strains of other insects was found in the IIS4-S6 region of R. padi field sample. The two R. padi VGSC genes were expressed at all developmental stages and showed similar expression patterns after treatment with beta-cypermethrin. Knockdown of Rpvgsc1 or Rpvgsc2 caused significant reduction in mortality rate of R. padi after exposure to beta-cypermethrin. These findings suggest that the two R. padi VGSC genes are both functional genes. PMID:27439594

  18. Combinatorial augmentation of voltage-gated KCNQ potassium channels by chemical openers

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Qiaojie; Sun, Haiyan; Zhang, Yangming; Nan, Fajun; Li, Min

    2008-01-01

    Noninactivating potassium current formed by KCNQ2 (Kv7.2) and KCNQ3 (Kv7.3) subunits resembles neuronal M-currents which are activated by voltage and play a critical role in controlling membrane excitability. Activation of voltage-gated potassium channels by a chemical opener is uncommon. Therefore, the mechanisms of action are worthy further investigation. Retigabine and zinc pyrithione are two activators for KCNQ channels but their molecular interactions with KCNQ channel remain largely elusive. Here we report that retigabine and zinc pyrithione recognize two different sites of KCNQ2 channels. Their agonistic actions are noncompetitive and allow for simultaneous binding of two different activators on the same channel complex, hence giving rise to combinatorial potentiation with characteristic properties of both openers. Examining their effects on mutant channels, we showed zinc pyrithione is capable of opening nonconductive channels and coapplication of zinc pyrithione and retigabine could restore a disease mutant channel similar to wild type. Our results indicate two independent activator binding sites present in KCNQ channels. The resultant combinatorial potentiation by multiple synthetic chemical openers indicates that KCNQ channels are accessible to various types and combinations of pharmacological regulation. PMID:18272489

  19. Expression patterns, mutation detection and RNA interference of Rhopalosiphum padi voltage-gated sodium channel genes.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Yayun; Peng, Xiong; Wang, Kang; Lin, Fangfei; Li, Yuting; Chen, Maohua

    2016-01-01

    The voltage-gated sodium channel (VGSC) is the target of sodium-channel-blocking insecticides. Traditionally, animals were thought to have only one VGSC gene comprising a α-subunit with four homologous domains (DI-DIV). The present study showed that Rhopalosiphum padi, an economically important crop pest, owned a unique heterodimeric VGSC (H1 and H2 subunits) encoded by two genes (Rpvgsc1 and Rpvgsc2), which is unusual in insects and other animals. The open reading frame (ORF) of Rpvgsc1 consisted 1150 amino acids, and the ORF of Rpvgsc2 had 957 amino acids. Rpvgsc1 showed 64.1% amino acid identity to DI-DII of Drosophila melanogaster VGSC and Rpvgsc2 showed 64.0% amino acid identity to DIII-DIV of D. melanogaster VGSC. A M918L mutation previously reported in pyrethroids-resistant strains of other insects was found in the IIS4-S6 region of R. padi field sample. The two R. padi VGSC genes were expressed at all developmental stages and showed similar expression patterns after treatment with beta-cypermethrin. Knockdown of Rpvgsc1 or Rpvgsc2 caused significant reduction in mortality rate of R. padi after exposure to beta-cypermethrin. These findings suggest that the two R. padi VGSC genes are both functional genes. PMID:27439594

  20. On the Natural and Unnatural History of the Voltage-Gated Na(+) Channel.

    PubMed

    Moczydlowski, E G

    2016-01-01

    This review glances at the voltage-gated sodium (Na(+)) channel (NaV) from the skewed perspective of natural history and the history of ideas. Beginning with the earliest natural philosophers, the objective of biological science and physiology was to understand the basis of life and discover its intimate secrets. The idea that the living state of matter differs from inanimate matter by an incorporeal spirit or mystical force was central to vitalism, a doctrine based on ancient beliefs that persisted until the last century. Experimental electrophysiology played a major role in the abandonment of vitalism by elucidating physiochemical mechanisms that explained the electrical excitability of muscle and nerve. Indeed, as a principal biomolecule underlying membrane excitability, the NaV channel may be considered as the physical analog or surrogate for the vital spirit once presumed to animate higher forms of life. NaV also epitomizes the "other secret of life" and functions as a quantal transistor element of biological intelligence. Subplots of this incredible but true story run the gamut from electric fish to electromagnetism, invention of the battery, venomous animals, neurotoxins, channelopathies, arrhythmia, anesthesia, astrobiology, etc.

  1. Computational Structural Pharmacology and Toxicology of Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels.

    PubMed

    Zhorov, B S; Tikhonov, D B

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are targets for many toxins and medically important drugs. Despite decades of intensive studies in industry and academia, atomic mechanisms of action are still not completely understood. The major cause is a lack of high-resolution structures of eukaryotic channels and their complexes with ligands. In these circumstances a useful approach is homology modeling that employs as templates X-ray structures of potassium channels and prokaryotic sodium channels. On one hand, due to inherent limitations of this approach, results should be treated with caution. In particular, models should be tested against relevant experimental data. On the other hand, docking of drugs and toxins in homology models provides a unique possibility to integrate diverse experimental data provided by mutational analysis, electrophysiology, and studies of structure-activity relations. Here we describe how homology modeling advanced our understanding of mechanisms of several classes of ligands. These include tetrodotoxins and mu-conotoxins that block the outer pore, local anesthetics that block of the inner pore, batrachotoxin that binds in the inner pore but, paradoxically, activates the channel, pyrethroid insecticides that activate the channel by binding at lipid-exposed repeat interfaces, and scorpion alpha and beta-toxins, which bind between the pore and voltage-sensing domains and modify the channel gating. We emphasize importance of experimental data for elaborating the models. PMID:27586283

  2. Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels: Mechanistic Insights From Atomistic Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Oakes, V; Furini, S; Domene, C

    2016-01-01

    The permeation of ions and other molecules across biological membranes is an inherent requirement of all cellular organisms. Ion channels, in particular, are responsible for the conduction of charged species, hence modulating the propagation of electrical signals. Despite the universal physiological implications of this property, the molecular functioning of ion channels remains ambiguous. The combination of atomistic structural data with computational methodologies, such as molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, is now considered routine to investigate structure-function relationships in biological systems. A fuller understanding of conduction, selectivity, and gating, therefore, is steadily emerging due to the applicability of these techniques to ion channels. However, because their structure is known at atomic resolution, studies have consistently been biased toward K(+) channels, thus the molecular determinants of ionic selectivity, activation, and drug blockage in Na(+) channels are often overlooked. The recent increase of available crystallographic data has eminently encouraged the investigation of voltage-gated sodium (NaV) channels via computational methods. Here, we present an overview of simulation studies that have contributed to our understanding of key principles that underlie ionic conduction and selectivity in Na(+) channels, in comparison to the K(+) channel analogs. PMID:27586285

  3. The Molecular Basis of Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Interactions with the Shaker Voltage-Gated Potassium Channel

    PubMed Central

    Yazdi, Samira; Stein, Matthias; Elinder, Fredrik; Andersson, Magnus; Lindahl, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated potassium (KV) channels are membrane proteins that respond to changes in membrane potential by enabling K+ ion flux across the membrane. Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) induce channel opening by modulating the voltage-sensitivity, which can provide effective treatment against refractory epilepsy by means of a ketogenic diet. While PUFAs have been reported to influence the gating mechanism by electrostatic interactions to the voltage-sensor domain (VSD), the exact PUFA-protein interactions are still elusive. In this study, we report on the interactions between the Shaker KV channel in open and closed states and a PUFA-enriched lipid bilayer using microsecond molecular dynamics simulations. We determined a putative PUFA binding site in the open state of the channel located at the protein-lipid interface in the vicinity of the extracellular halves of the S3 and S4 helices of the VSD. In particular, the lipophilic PUFA tail covered a wide range of non-specific hydrophobic interactions in the hydrophobic central core of the protein-lipid interface, while the carboxylic head group displayed more specific interactions to polar/charged residues at the extracellular regions of the S3 and S4 helices, encompassing the S3-S4 linker. Moreover, by studying the interactions between saturated fatty acids (SFA) and the Shaker KV channel, our study confirmed an increased conformational flexibility in the polyunsaturated carbon tails compared to saturated carbon chains, which may explain the specificity of PUFA action on channel proteins. PMID:26751683

  4. On the Natural and Unnatural History of the Voltage-Gated Na(+) Channel.

    PubMed

    Moczydlowski, E G

    2016-01-01

    This review glances at the voltage-gated sodium (Na(+)) channel (NaV) from the skewed perspective of natural history and the history of ideas. Beginning with the earliest natural philosophers, the objective of biological science and physiology was to understand the basis of life and discover its intimate secrets. The idea that the living state of matter differs from inanimate matter by an incorporeal spirit or mystical force was central to vitalism, a doctrine based on ancient beliefs that persisted until the last century. Experimental electrophysiology played a major role in the abandonment of vitalism by elucidating physiochemical mechanisms that explained the electrical excitability of muscle and nerve. Indeed, as a principal biomolecule underlying membrane excitability, the NaV channel may be considered as the physical analog or surrogate for the vital spirit once presumed to animate higher forms of life. NaV also epitomizes the "other secret of life" and functions as a quantal transistor element of biological intelligence. Subplots of this incredible but true story run the gamut from electric fish to electromagnetism, invention of the battery, venomous animals, neurotoxins, channelopathies, arrhythmia, anesthesia, astrobiology, etc. PMID:27586279

  5. VOLTAGE-GATED POTASSIUM CHANNELS AT THE CROSSROADS OF NEURONAL FUNCTION, ISCHEMIC TOLERANCE, AND NEURODEGENERATION

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Niyathi Hegde; Aizenman, Elias

    2013-01-01

    Voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels are widely expressed in the central and peripheral nervous system, and are crucial mediators of neuronal excitability. Importantly, these channels also actively participate in cellular and molecular signaling pathways that regulate the life and death of neurons. Injury-mediated increased K+ efflux through Kv2.1 channels promotes neuronal apoptosis, contributing to widespread neuronal loss in neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease and stroke. In contrast, some forms of neuronal activity can dramatically alter Kv2.1 channel phosphorylation levels and influence their localization. These changes are normally accompanied by modifications in channel voltage-dependence, which may be neuroprotective within the context of ischemic injury. Kv1 and Kv7 channel dysfunction leads to neuronal hyperexcitability that critically contributes to the pathophysiology of human clinical disorders such as episodic ataxia and epilepsy. This review summarizes the neurotoxic, neuroprotective, and neuroregulatory roles of Kv channels, and highlights the consequences of Kv channel dysfunction on neuronal physiology. The studies described in this review thus underscore the importance of normal Kv channel function in neurons, and emphasize the therapeutic potential of targeting Kv channels in the treatment of a wide range of neurological diseases. PMID:24323720

  6. Molecular determinants of prokaryotic voltage-gated sodium channels for recognition of local anesthetics.

    PubMed

    Shimomura, Takushi; Irie, Katsumasa; Fujiyoshi, Yoshinori

    2016-08-01

    Local anesthetics (LAs) inhibit mammalian voltage-gated Na(+) channels (Navs) and are thus clinically important. LAs also inhibit prokaryotic Navs (BacNavs), which have a simpler structure than mammalian Navs. To elucidate the detailed mechanisms of LA inhibition to BacNavs, we used NavBh, a BacNav from Bacillus halodurans, to analyze the interactions of several LAs and quaternary ammoniums (QAs). Based on the chemical similarity of QA with the tertiary-alkylamine (TAA) group of LAs, QAs were used to determine the residues required for the recognition of TAA by NavBh. We confirmed that two residues, Thr220 and Phe227, are important for LA binding; a methyl group of Thr220 is important for recognizing both QAs and LAs, whereas Phe227 is involved in holding blockers at the binding site. In addition, we found that NavBh holds blockers in a closed state, consistent with the large inner cavity observed in the crystal structures of BacNavs. These findings reveal the inhibition mechanism of LAs in NavBh, where the methyl group of Thr220 provides the main receptor site for the TAA group and the bulky phenyl group of Phe227 holds the blockers inside the large inner cavity. These two residues correspond to the two LA recognition residues in mammalian Navs, which suggests the relevance of the LA recognition between BacNavs and mammalian Navs. PMID:27273848

  7. Structural model of the open-closed-inactivated cycle of prokaryotic voltage-gated sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Bagnéris, Claire; Naylor, Claire E; McCusker, Emily C; Wallace, B A

    2015-01-01

    In excitable cells, the initiation of the action potential results from the opening of voltage-gated sodium channels. These channels undergo a series of conformational changes between open, closed, and inactivated states. Many models have been proposed for the structural transitions that result in these different functional states. Here, we compare the crystal structures of prokaryotic sodium channels captured in the different conformational forms and use them as the basis for examining molecular models for the activation, slow inactivation, and recovery processes. We compare structural similarities and differences in the pore domains, specifically in the transmembrane helices, the constrictions within the pore cavity, the activation gate at the cytoplasmic end of the last transmembrane helix, the C-terminal domain, and the selectivity filter. We discuss the observed differences in the context of previous models for opening, closing, and inactivation, and present a new structure-based model for the functional transitions. Our proposed prokaryotic channel activation mechanism is then compared with the activation transition in eukaryotic sodium channels.

  8. The voltage-gated sodium channel: a major target of marine neurotoxins.

    PubMed

    Mattei, César; Legros, Christian

    2014-12-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (Nav) are key components for nerve excitability. They initiate and propagate the action potential in excitable cells, throughout the central and peripheral nervous system, thus enabling a variety of physiological functions to be achieved. The rising phase of the action potential is driven by the opening of Nav channels which activate rapidly and carry Na(+) ions in the intracellular medium, and ends with the Na(+) current inactivation. The biophysical properties of these channels have been elucidated, through the use of pharmacological agents that disrupt the molecular mechanism of the channel functioning. Among them, marine toxins produced by venomous animals or microorganisms have been crucial to map the different allosteric binding sites of the channels, understand their mode of action and represent an emerging source of therapeutic agents to alleviate or cure Na(+) channels-linked human diseases. In this article, we review recent discoveries on the molecular and biophysical properties of the Na(+) channel as a target for marine neurotoxins, and present the ongoing developments of pharmacological agents as therapeutic tools.

  9. Crystal structure of a voltage-gated K+ channel pore module in a closed state in lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Santos, Jose S; Asmar-Rovira, Guillermo A; Han, Gye Won; Liu, Wei; Syeda, Ruhma; Cherezov, Vadim; Baker, Kent A; Stevens, Raymond C; Montal, Mauricio

    2012-12-14

    Voltage-gated K(+) channels underlie the electrical excitability of cells. Each subunit of the functional tetramer consists of the tandem fusion of two modules, an N-terminal voltage-sensor and a C-terminal pore. To investigate how sensor coupling to the pore generates voltage-dependent channel opening, we solved the crystal structure and characterized the function of a voltage-gated K(+) channel pore in a lipid membrane. The structure of a functional channel in a membrane environment at 3.1 Å resolution establishes an unprecedented connection between channel structure and function. The structure is unique in delineating an ion-occupied ready to conduct selectivity filter, a confined aqueous cavity, and a closed activation gate, embodying a dynamic entity trapped in an unstable closed state.

  10. Atom-by-atom engineering of voltage-gated ion channels: magnified insights into function and pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Pless, Stephan A; Kim, Robin Y; Ahern, Christopher A; Kurata, Harley T

    2015-06-15

    Unnatural amino acid incorporation into ion channels has proven to be a valuable approach to interrogate detailed hypotheses arising from atomic resolution structures. In this short review, we provide a brief overview of some of the basic principles and methods for incorporation of unnatural amino acids into proteins. We also review insights into the function and pharmacology of voltage-gated ion channels that have emerged from unnatural amino acid mutagenesis approaches.

  11. Solution structure and alanine scan of a spider toxin that affects the activation of mammalian voltage-gated sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Corzo, Gerardo; Sabo, Jennifer K; Bosmans, Frank; Billen, Bert; Villegas, Elba; Tytgat, Jan; Norton, Raymond S

    2007-02-16

    Magi 5, from the hexathelid spider Macrothele gigas, is a 29-residue polypeptide containing three disulfide bridges. It binds specifically to receptor site 4 on mammalian voltage-gated sodium channels and competes with scorpion beta-toxins, such as Css IV from Centruroides suffusus suffusus. As a consequence, Magi 5 shifts the activation voltage of the mammalian rNav1.2a channel to more hyperpolarized voltages, whereas the insect channel, DmNav1, is not affected. To gain insight into toxin-channel interactions, Magi 5 and 23 analogues were synthesized. The three-dimensional structure of Magi 5 in aqueous solution was determined, and its voltage-gated sodium channel-binding surfaces were mapped onto this structure using data from electrophysiological measurements on a series of Ala-substituted analogues. The structure clearly resembles the inhibitor cystine knot structural motif, although the triple-stranded beta-sheet typically found in that motif is partially distorted in Magi 5. The interactive surface of Magi 5 toward voltage-gated sodium channels resembles in some respects the Janus-faced atracotoxins, with functionally important charged residues on one face of the toxin and hydrophobic residues on the other. Magi 5 also resembles the scorpion beta-toxin Css IV, which has distinct nonpolar and charged surfaces that are critical for channel binding and has a key Glu involved in voltage sensor trapping. These two distinct classes of toxin, with different amino acid sequences and different structures, may utilize similar groups of residues on their surface to achieve the common end of modifying voltage-gated sodium channel function.

  12. Atom-by-atom engineering of voltage-gated ion channels: Magnified insights into function and pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Pless, Stephan A; Kim, Robin Y; Ahern, Christopher A; Kurata, Harley T

    2015-01-01

    Unnatural amino acid incorporation into ion channels has proven to be a valuable approach to interrogate detailed hypotheses arising from atomic resolution structures. In this short review, we provide a brief overview of some of the basic principles and methods for incorporation of unnatural amino acids into proteins. We also review insights into the function and pharmacology of voltage-gated ion channels that have emerged from unnatural amino acid mutagenesis approaches. PMID:25640301

  13. Calcium Channel Signaling Complexes with Receptors and Channels.

    PubMed

    Zamponi, Gerald W

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated calcium channels are not only mediators of cell signalling events, but also are recipients of signalling inputs from G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) and their associated second messenger pathways. The coupling of GPCRs to calcium channels is optimized through the formation of receptor-channel complexes. In addition, this provides a mechanism for receptorchannel co-trafficking to and from the plasma membrane. On the other hand, voltage-gated calcium channel activity affects other types of ion channels such as voltage-and calcium-activated potassium channels. Coupling efficiency between these two families of channels is also enhanced through the formation of channel-channel complexes. This review provides a concise overview of the current state of knowledge on the physical interactions between voltage-gated calcium channels and members of the GPCR family, and with other types of ion channels.

  14. Asymmetric synthesis and evaluation of a hydroxyphenylamide voltage-gated sodium channel blocker in human prostate cancer xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Gary C.; Kong, Yali; Paige, Mikell; Li, Zhang; Merrick, Ellen C.; Hansen, Todd; Suy, Simeng; Wang, Kan; Dakshanamurthy, Sivanesan; Cordova, Antoinette; McManus, Owen B.; Williams, Brande S.; Chruszcz, Maksymilian; Minor, Wladek; Patel, Manoj K.; Brown, Milton L.

    2013-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are known to be expressed in neurons and other excitable cells. Recently, voltage-gated sodium channels have been found to be expressed in human prostate cancer cells. α-Hydroxy-α-phenylamides are a new class of small molecules that have demonstrated potent inhibition of voltage-gated sodium channels. The hydroxyamide motif, an isostere of a hydantoin ring, provides an active scaffold from which several potent racemic sodium channel blockers have been derived. With little known about chiral preferences, the development of chiral syntheses to obtain each pure enantiomer for evaluation as sodium channel blockers is important. Using Seebach and Frater's chiral template, cyclocondensation of (R)-3-chloromandelic acid with pivaldehyde furnished both the cis- and trans-2,5-disubsituted dioxolanones. Using this chiral template, we synthesized both enantiomers of 2-(3-chlorophenyl)-2-hydroxynonanamide, and evaluated their ability to functionally inhibit hNav isoforms, human prostate cancer cells and xenograft. Enantiomers of lead demonstrated significant ability to reduce prostate cancer in vivo. PMID:22364743

  15. Molecular dynamics of ion transport through the open conformation of a bacterial voltage-gated sodium channel.

    PubMed

    Ulmschneider, Martin B; Bagnéris, Claire; McCusker, Emily C; Decaen, Paul G; Delling, Markus; Clapham, David E; Ulmschneider, Jakob P; Wallace, B A

    2013-04-16

    The crystal structure of the open conformation of a bacterial voltage-gated sodium channel pore from Magnetococcus sp. (NaVMs) has provided the basis for a molecular dynamics study defining the channel's full ion translocation pathway and conductance process, selectivity, electrophysiological characteristics, and ion-binding sites. Microsecond molecular dynamics simulations permitted a complete time-course characterization of the protein in a membrane system, capturing the plethora of conductance events and revealing a complex mixture of single and multi-ion phenomena with decoupled rapid bidirectional water transport. The simulations suggest specific localization sites for the sodium ions, which correspond with experimentally determined electron density found in the selectivity filter of the crystal structure. These studies have also allowed us to identify the ion conductance mechanism and its relation to water movement for the NavMs channel pore and to make realistic predictions of its conductance properties. The calculated single-channel conductance and selectivity ratio correspond closely with the electrophysiology measurements of the NavMs channel expressed in HEK 293 cells. The ion translocation process seen in this voltage-gated sodium channel is clearly different from that exhibited by members of the closely related family of voltage-gated potassium channels and also differs considerably from existing proposals for the conductance process in sodium channels. These studies simulate sodium channel conductance based on an experimentally determined structure of a sodium channel pore that has a completely open transmembrane pathway and activation gate.

  16. FIBROBLAST GROWTH FACTOR HOMOLOGOUS FACTORS CONTROL NEURONAL EXCITABILITY THROUGH MODULATION OF VOLTAGE GATED SODIUM CHANNELS

    PubMed Central

    Goldfarb, Mitchell; Schoorlemmer, Jon; Williams, Anthony; Diwakar, Shyam; Wang, Qing; Huang, Xiao; Giza, Joanna; Tchetchik, Dafna; Kelley, Kevin; Vega, Ana; Matthews, Gary; Rossi, Paola; Ornitz, David M.; D’Angelo, Egidio

    2007-01-01

    SUMMARY Nerve cells integrate and encode complex synaptic inputs into action potential outputs through a process termed intrinsic excitability. Here we report the essential contribution of fibroblast growth factor homologous factors (FHFs), a family of voltage-gated sodium channel binding proteins, to this process. In mouse cerebellar slice recordings, wild-type and Fhf1−/− granule neurons generate sustained trains of action potentials up to high frequencies (~60 Hz), but Fhf4−/− neurons typically fire for only 100 milliseconds, and Fhf1−/−Fhf4−/− neurons often fire only once. Additionally, the voltage threshold for spike generation is 9 mV higher in Fhf1−/−Fhf4−/− neurons compared to wild-type cells. The severity of ataxia and motor weakness in mutant mice parallels the degree of intrinsic excitability deficits in mutant neurons. While density, distribution, isotype, and activation of sodium channels in Fhf1−/−Fhf4−/− neurons are similar to those of wild-type cells, channels in Fhf1−/−Fhf4−/− neurons undergo inactivation at more negative membrane potential, inactivate more rapidly, and are slower to recover from the inactivated state. Altered sodium channel physiology is sufficient to explain excitability deficits, as tested in a granule cell computer model. These findings provide a physiological understanding for spinocerebellar ataxia syndrome associated with human Fhf4 mutation and suggest a broad role for FHFs in the control of excitability throughout the central nervous system. PMID:17678857

  17. Post-translational modifications of voltage-gated sodium channels in chronic pain syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Laedermann, Cedric J.; Abriel, Hugues; Decosterd, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    In the peripheral sensory nervous system the neuronal expression of voltage-gated sodium channels (Navs) is very important for the transmission of nociceptive information since they give rise to the upstroke of the action potential (AP). Navs are composed of nine different isoforms with distinct biophysical properties. Studying the mutations associated with the increase or absence of pain sensitivity in humans, as well as other expression studies, have highlighted Nav1.7, Nav1.8, and Nav1.9 as being the most important contributors to the control of nociceptive neuronal electrogenesis. Modulating their expression and/or function can impact the shape of the AP and consequently modify nociceptive transmission, a process that is observed in persistent pain conditions. Post-translational modification (PTM) of Navs is a well-known process that modifies their expression and function. In chronic pain syndromes, the release of inflammatory molecules into the direct environment of dorsal root ganglia (DRG) sensory neurons leads to an abnormal activation of enzymes that induce Navs PTM. The addition of small molecules, i.e., peptides, phosphoryl groups, ubiquitin moieties and/or carbohydrates, can modify the function of Navs in two different ways: via direct physical interference with Nav gating, or via the control of Nav trafficking. Both mechanisms have a profound impact on neuronal excitability. In this review we will discuss the role of Protein Kinase A, B, and C, Mitogen Activated Protein Kinases and Ca++/Calmodulin-dependent Kinase II in peripheral chronic pain syndromes. We will also discuss more recent findings that the ubiquitination of Nav1.7 by Nedd4-2 and the effect of methylglyoxal on Nav1.8 are also implicated in the development of experimental neuropathic pain. We will address the potential roles of other PTMs in chronic pain and highlight the need for further investigation of PTMs of Navs in order to develop new pharmacological tools to alleviate pain. PMID

  18. Post-translational modifications of voltage-gated sodium channels in chronic pain syndromes.

    PubMed

    Laedermann, Cedric J; Abriel, Hugues; Decosterd, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    In the peripheral sensory nervous system the neuronal expression of voltage-gated sodium channels (Navs) is very important for the transmission of nociceptive information since they give rise to the upstroke of the action potential (AP). Navs are composed of nine different isoforms with distinct biophysical properties. Studying the mutations associated with the increase or absence of pain sensitivity in humans, as well as other expression studies, have highlighted Nav1.7, Nav1.8, and Nav1.9 as being the most important contributors to the control of nociceptive neuronal electrogenesis. Modulating their expression and/or function can impact the shape of the AP and consequently modify nociceptive transmission, a process that is observed in persistent pain conditions. Post-translational modification (PTM) of Navs is a well-known process that modifies their expression and function. In chronic pain syndromes, the release of inflammatory molecules into the direct environment of dorsal root ganglia (DRG) sensory neurons leads to an abnormal activation of enzymes that induce Navs PTM. The addition of small molecules, i.e., peptides, phosphoryl groups, ubiquitin moieties and/or carbohydrates, can modify the function of Navs in two different ways: via direct physical interference with Nav gating, or via the control of Nav trafficking. Both mechanisms have a profound impact on neuronal excitability. In this review we will discuss the role of Protein Kinase A, B, and C, Mitogen Activated Protein Kinases and Ca++/Calmodulin-dependent Kinase II in peripheral chronic pain syndromes. We will also discuss more recent findings that the ubiquitination of Nav1.7 by Nedd4-2 and the effect of methylglyoxal on Nav1.8 are also implicated in the development of experimental neuropathic pain. We will address the potential roles of other PTMs in chronic pain and highlight the need for further investigation of PTMs of Navs in order to develop new pharmacological tools to alleviate pain. PMID

  19. Blockade of voltage-gated sodium channels inhibits invasion of endocrine-resistant breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    MOHAMMED, FATIMA H.; KHAJAH, MAITHAM A.; YANG, MING; BRACKENBURY, WILLIAM J.; LUQMANI, YUNUS A.

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated Na+ channels (VGSCs) are membrane proteins which are normally expressed in excitable cells but have also been detected in cancer cells, where they are thought to be involved in malignancy progression. In this study we examined the ion current and expression profile of VGSC (Nav1.5) in estrogen receptor (ER)-positive (MCF-7) and silenced (pII) breast cancer cells and its possible influence on their proliferation, motility and invasion. VGSC currents were analysed by whole cell patch clamp recording. Nav1.5 expression and localization, in response to EGF stimulation, was examined by western blotting and immunofluorescence respectively. Cell invasion (under-agarose and Matrigel assays), motility (wound healing assay) and proliferation (MTT assay) were assessed in pII cells in response to VGSC blockers, phenytoin (PHT) and tetrodotoxin (TTX), or by siRNA knockdown of Nav1.5. The effect of PHT and TTX on modulating EGF-induced phosphorylation of Akt and ERK1/2 was determined by western blotting. Total matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) was determined using a fluorometric-based activity assay. The level of various human proteases was detected by using proteome profiler array kit. VGSC currents were detected in pII cells, but were absent in MCF-7. Nav1.5 showed cytoplasmic and perinuclear expression in both MCF-7 and pII cells, with enhanced expression upon EGF stimulation. Treatment of pII cells with PHT, TTX or siRNA significantly reduced invasion towards serum components and EGF, in part through reduction of P-ERK1/2 and proteases such as cathepsin E, kallikrein-10 and MMP-7, as well as total MMP activity. At high concentrations, PHT inhibited motility while TTX reduced cell proliferation. Pharmacological or genetic blockade of Nav1.5 may serve as a potential anti-metastatic therapy for breast cancer. PMID:26718772

  20. Interleukin-10 down-regulates voltage gated sodium channels in rat dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Shen, Kai-Feng; Zhu, He-Quan; Wei, Xu-Hong; Wang, Jun; Li, Yong-Yong; Pang, Rui-Ping; Liu, Xian-Guo

    2013-09-01

    The over-expression of voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons following peripheral nerve injury contributes to neuropathic pain by generation of the ectopic discharges of action potentials. However, mechanisms underlying the change in VGSCs' expression are poorly understood. Our previous work has demonstrated that the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-α up-regulates VGSCs. In the present work we tested if anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10, which had been proven to be effective for treating neuropathic pain, had the opposite effect. Western blot and immunofluorescence results showed that IL-10 receptor was localized in DRG neurons. Recombinant rat IL-10 (200 pg/ml) not only reduced the densities of TTX-sensitive and Nav1.8 currents in control DRG neurons, but also reversed the increase of the sodium currents induced by rat recombinant TNF-α (100 pg/ml), as revealed by patch-clamp recordings. Consistent with the electrophysiological results, real-time PCR and western blot revealed that IL-10 (200 pg/ml) down-regulated VGSCs in both mRNA and protein levels and reversed the up-regulation of VGSCs by TNF-α. Moreover, repetitive intrathecal administration of rrIL-10 for 3 days (4 times per day) attenuated mechanical allodynia in L5 spinal nerve ligation model and profoundly inhibited the excitability of DRG neurons. These results suggested that the down-regulation of the sodium channels in DRG neurons might contribute to the therapeutic effect of IL-10 on neuropathic pain. PMID:23357618

  1. PIST (GOPC) modulates the oncogenic voltage-gated potassium channel KV10.1

    PubMed Central

    Herrmann, Solveig; Ninkovic, Milena; Kohl, Tobias; Pardo, Luis A.

    2013-01-01

    Although crucial for their correct function, the mechanisms controlling surface expression of ion channels are poorly understood. In the case of the voltage-gated potassium channel KV10.1, this is determinant not only for its physiological function in brain, but also for its pathophysiology in tumors and possible use as a therapeutic target. The Golgi resident protein PIST binds several membrane proteins, thereby modulating their expression. Here we describe a PDZ domain-mediated interaction of KV10.1 and PIST, which enhances surface levels of KV10.1. The functional, but not the physical interaction of both proteins is dependent on the coiled-coil and PDZ domains of PIST; insertion of eight amino acids in the coiled-coil domain to render the neural form of PIST (nPIST) and the corresponding short isoform in an as-of-yet unknown form abolishes the effect. In addition, two new isoforms of PIST (sPIST and nsPIST) lacking nearly the complete PDZ domain were cloned and shown to be ubiquitously expressed. PIST and KV10.1 co-precipitate from native and expression systems. nPIST also showed interaction, but did not alter the functional expression of the channel. We could not document physical interaction between KV10.1 and sPIST, but it reduced KV10.1 functional expression in a dominant-negative manner. nsPIST showed weak physical interaction and no functional effect on KV10.1. We propose these isoforms to work as modulators of PIST function via regulating the binding on interaction partners. PMID:23966943

  2. A novel anticonvulsant modulates voltage-gated sodium channel inactivation and prevents kindling-induced seizures.

    PubMed

    Ashraf, Muhammad N; Gavrilovici, Cezar; Shah, Syed U Ali; Shaheen, Farzana; Choudhary, Muhammad I; Rahman, Atta-ur; Fahnestock, Margaret; Simjee, Shabana U; Poulter, Michael O

    2013-09-01

    Here, we explore the mechanism of action of isoxylitone (ISOX), a molecule discovered in the plant Delphinium denudatum, which has been shown to have anticonvulsant properties. Patch-clamp electrophysiology assayed the activity of ISOX on voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) in both cultured neurons and brain slices isolated from controls and rats with experimental epilepsy(kindling model). Quantitative transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) (QPCR) assessed brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA expression in kindled rats, and kindled rats treated with ISOX. ISOX suppressed sodium current (I(Na)) showing an IC50 value of 185 nM in cultured neurons. ISOX significantly slowed the recovery from inactivation (ISOX τ = 18.7 ms; Control τ = 9.4 ms; p < 0.001). ISOX also enhanced the development of inactivation by shifting the Boltzmann curve to more hyperpolarized potentials by -11.2 mV (p < 0.05). In naive and electrically kindled cortical neurons, the IC50 for sodium current block was identical to that found in cultured neurons. ISOX prevented kindled stage 5 seizures and decreased the enhanced BDNF mRNA expression that is normally associated with kindling (p < 0.05). Overall, our data show that ISOX is a potent inhibitor of VGSCs that stabilizes steady-state inactivation while slowing recovery and enhancing inactivation development. Like many other sodium channel blocker anti-epileptic drugs, the suppression of BDNF mRNA expression that usually occurs with kindling is likely a secondary outcome that nevertheless would suppress epileptogenesis. These data show a new class of anti-seizure compound that inhibits sodium channel function and prevents the development of epileptic seizures.

  3. Ranolazine inhibits voltage-gated mechanosensitive sodium channels in human colon circular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Neshatian, Leila; Strege, Peter R; Rhee, Poong-Lyul; Kraichely, Robert E; Mazzone, Amelia; Bernard, Cheryl E; Cima, Robert R; Larson, David W; Dozois, Eric J; Kline, Crystal F; Mohler, Peter J; Beyder, Arthur; Farrugia, Gianrico

    2015-09-15

    Human jejunum smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs) express the SCN5A-encoded voltage-gated, mechanosensitive sodium channel NaV1.5. NaV1.5 contributes to small bowel excitability, and NaV1.5 inhibitor ranolazine produces constipation by an unknown mechanism. We aimed to determine the presence and molecular identity of Na(+) current in the human colon smooth muscle and to examine the effects of ranolazine on Na(+) current, mechanosensitivity, and smooth muscle contractility. Inward currents were recorded by whole cell voltage clamp from freshly dissociated human colon SMCs at rest and with shear stress. SCN5A mRNA and NaV1.5 protein were examined by RT-PCR and Western blots, respectively. Ascending human colon strip contractility was examined in a muscle bath preparation. SCN5A mRNA and NaV1.5 protein were identified in human colon circular muscle. Freshly dissociated human colon SMCs had Na(+) currents (-1.36 ± 0.36 pA/pF), shear stress increased Na(+) peaks by 17.8 ± 1.8% and accelerated the time to peak activation by 0.7 ± 0.3 ms. Ranolazine (50 μM) blocked peak Na(+) current by 43.2 ± 9.3% and inhibited shear sensitivity by 25.2 ± 3.2%. In human ascending colon strips, ranolazine decreased resting tension (31%), reduced the frequency of spontaneous events (68%), and decreased the response to smooth muscle electrical field stimulation (61%). In conclusion, SCN5A-encoded NaV1.5 is found in human colonic circular smooth muscle. Ranolazine blocks both peak amplitude and mechanosensitivity of Na(+) current in human colon SMCs and decreases contractility of human colon muscle strips. Our data provide a likely mechanistic explanation for constipation induced by ranolazine. PMID:26185330

  4. Effect of dielectric interface on charge aggregation in the voltage-gated K+ ion channel

    PubMed Central

    Adhya, Lipika; Mapder, Tarunendu; Adhya, Samit

    2015-01-01

    Background: There is experimental evidence of many cases of stable macromolecular conformations with charged amino-acids facing lipid, an arrangement thought to be energetically unfavourable. Methods and Objectives: Employing classical electrostatics, we show that, this is not necessarily the case and studied the physical basis of the specific role of proximity of charges to the dielectric interface between two different environments. We illustrate how self and induced energies due to the dielectric medium polarization, on either side of the interface, contribute differentially to the stability of a pair of charges and hence the mutual conformation of the S3b-S4 α-helix pair of the voltage-gated K+ channel. Results and Conclusion: We show that (1) a pair of opposite charges on either side of lipid-protein interface confers significant stability; (2) hydrophobic media has an important role in holding together two similar repelling charges; (3) dielectric interface has stabilizing effect on a pair of charges, when an ion is closer to its interface than its neighboring charge; (4) in spite of the presence of dielectric interface, there is a nonexistence of any dielectric effect, when an ion is equidistant from its image and neighboring charge. We also demonstrate that, variation in dielectric media of the surrounding environment confers new mutual conformations to S3b-S4 α-helices of voltage sensor domain at zero potential, especially lipid environment on the helix side, which improved stability to the configuration by lowering the potential energy. Our results provide an answer to the long standing question of why charges face hydrophobic lipid membranes in the stable conformation of a protein. PMID:25810659

  5. Voltage-gated potassium channel-complex autoimmunity and associated clinical syndromes.

    PubMed

    Irani, Sarosh R; Vincent, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated potassium channel (VGKC)-complex antibodies are defined by the radioimmunoprecipitation of Kv1 potassium channel subunits from brain tissue extracts and were initially discovered in patients with peripheral nerve hyperexcitability (PNH). Subsequently, they were found in patients with PNH plus psychosis, insomnia, and dysautonomia, collectively termed Morvan's syndrome (MoS), and in a limbic encephalopathy (LE) with prominent amnesia and frequent seizures. Most recently, they have been described in patients with pure epilepsies, especially in patients with the novel and distinctive semiology termed faciobrachial dystonic seizures (FBDS). In each of these conditions, there is a close correlation between clinical measures and antibody levels. The VGKC-complex is a group of proteins that are strongly associated in situ and after extraction in mild detergent. Two major targets of the autoantibodies are leucine-rich glioma-inactivated 1 (LGI1) and contactin-associated protein 2 (CASPR2). The patients with PNH or MoS are most likely to have CASPR2 antibodies, whereas LGI1 antibodies are found characteristically in patients with FBDS and LE. Crucially, each of these conditions has a good response to immunotherapies, often corticosteroids and plasma exchange, although optimal regimes require further study. VGKC-complex antibodies have also been described in neuropathic pain syndromes, chronic epilepsies, a polyradiculopathy in porcine abattoir workers, and some children with status epilepticus. Increasingly, however, the antigenic targets in these patients are not defined and in some cases the antibodies may be secondary rather than the primary cause. Future serologic studies should define all the antigenic components of the VGKC-complex, and further inform mechanisms of antibody pathogenicity and related inflammation.

  6. Activation of conventional kinesin motors in clusters by Shaw voltage-gated K+ channels

    PubMed Central

    Barry, Joshua; Xu, Mingxuan; Gu, Yuanzheng; Dangel, Andrew W.; Jukkola, Peter; Shrestha, Chandra; Gu, Chen

    2013-01-01

    Summary The conventional kinesin motor transports many different cargos to specific locations in neurons. How cargos regulate motor function remains unclear. Here we focus on KIF5, the heavy chain of conventional kinesin, and report that the Kv3 (Shaw) voltage-gated K+ channel, the only known tetrameric KIF5-binding protein, clusters and activates KIF5 motors during axonal transport. Endogenous KIF5 often forms clusters along axons, suggesting a potential role of KIF5-binding proteins. Our biochemical assays reveal that the high-affinity multimeric binding between the Kv3.1 T1 domain and KIF5B requires three basic residues in the KIF5B tail. Kv3.1 T1 competes with the motor domain and microtubules, but not with kinesin light chain 1 (KLC1), for binding to the KIF5B tail. Live-cell imaging assays show that four KIF5-binding proteins, Kv3.1, KLC1 and two synaptic proteins SNAP25 and VAMP2, differ in how they regulate KIF5B distribution. Only Kv3.1 markedly increases the frequency and number of KIF5B-YFP anterograde puncta. Deletion of Kv3.1 channels reduces KIF5 clusters in mouse cerebellar neurons. Therefore, clustering and activation of KIF5 motors by Kv3 regulate the motor number in carrier vesicles containing the channel proteins, contributing not only to the specificity of Kv3 channel transport, but also to the cargo-mediated regulation of motor function. PMID:23487040

  7. Clinical relevance of voltage-gated potassium channel–complex antibodies in children

    PubMed Central

    Hacohen, Yael; Singh, Rahul; Rossi, Meghan; Lang, Bethan; Hemingway, Cheryl; Lim, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess the clinical and immunologic findings in children with voltage-gated potassium channel (VGKC)-complex antibodies (Abs). Methods: Thirty-nine of 363 sera, referred from 2 pediatric centers from 2007 to 2013, had been reported positive (>100 pM) for VGKC-complex Abs. Medical records were reviewed retrospectively and the patients' condition was independently classified as inflammatory (n = 159) or noninflammatory (n = 204). Positive sera (>100 pM) were tested/retested for the VGKC-complex Ab–positive complex proteins LGI1 and CASPR2, screened for binding to live hippocampal neurons, and 12 high-titer sera (>400 pM) tested by radioimmunoassay for binding to VGKC Kv1 subunits with or without intracellular postsynaptic density proteins. Results: VGKC-complex Abs were found in 39 children, including 20% of encephalopathies and 7.6% of other conditions (p = 0.001). Thirty children had inflammatory conditions and 9 had noninflammatory etiologies but titers >400 pM (n = 12) were found only in inflammatory diseases (p < 0.0001). Four sera, including from 2 children with coexisting NMDA receptor Abs and one with Guillain-Barré syndrome and Abs to both LGI1 and CASPR2, bound to hippocampal neurons. None of the sera bound detectably to VGKC Kv1 subunits on live HEK cells, but 4 of 12 >400 pM sera immunoprecipitated VGKC Kv1 subunits, with or without postsynaptic densities, extracted from transfected cells. Conclusion: Positive VGKC-complex Abs cannot be taken to indicate a specific clinical syndrome in children, but appear to be a nonspecific biomarker of inflammatory neurologic diseases, particularly of encephalopathy. Some of the Abs may bind to intracellular epitopes on the VGKC subunits, or to the intracellular interacting proteins, but in many the targets remain undefined. PMID:26296514

  8. Regulation of persistent Na current by interactions between β subunits of voltage-gated Na channels

    PubMed Central

    Aman, Teresa K.; Grieco-Calub, Tina M.; Chen, Chunling; Rusconi, Raffaella; Slat, Emily A.; Isom, Lori L.; Raman, Indira M.

    2009-01-01

    The β subunits of voltage-gated Na channels (Scnxb) regulate the gating of pore-forming α subunits, as well as their trafficking and localization. In heterologous expression systems, β1, β2, and β3 subunits influence inactivation and persistent current in different ways. To test how the β4 protein regulates Na channel gating, we transfected β4 into HEK cells stably expressing NaV1.1. Unlike a free peptide with a sequence from the β4 cytoplasmic domain, the full-length β4 protein did not block open channels. Instead, β4 expression favored open states by shifting activation curves negative, decreasing the slope of the inactivation curve, and increasing the percentage of non-inactivating current. Consequently, persistent current tripled in amplitude. Expression of β1 or chimeric subunits including the β1 extracellular domain, however, favored inactivation. Co-expressing NaV1.1 and β4 with β1 produced tiny persistent currents, indicating that β1 overcomes the effects of β4 in heterotrimeric channels. In contrast, β1C121W, which contains an extracellular epilepsy-associated mutation, did not counteract the destabilization of inactivation by β4, and also required unusually large depolarizations for channel opening. In cultured hippocampal neurons transfected with β4, persistent current was slightly but significantly increased. Moreover, in β4-expressing neurons from Scn1b and Scn1b/Scn2b null mice, entry into inactivated states was slowed. These data suggest that β1 and β4 have antagonistic roles, the former favoring inactivation and the latter favoring activation. Because increased Na channel availability may facilitate action potential firing, these results suggest a mechanism for seizure susceptibility of both mice and humans with disrupted β1 subunits. PMID:19228957

  9. Fibroblast growth factor 14 is an intracellular modulator of voltage-gated sodium channels

    PubMed Central

    Lou, Jun-Yang; Laezza, Fernanda; Gerber, Benjamin R; Xiao, Maolei; Yamada, Kathryn A; Hartmann, Hali; Craig, Ann Marie; Nerbonne, Jeanne M; Ornitz, David M

    2005-01-01

    Genetic ablation of the fibroblast growth factor (Fgf) 14 gene in mice or a missense mutation in Fgf14 in humans causes ataxia and cognitive deficits. These phenotypes suggest that the neuronally expressed Fgf14 gene is essential for regulating normal neuronal activity. Here, we demonstrate that FGF14 interacts directly with multiple voltage-gated Na+ (Nav) channel α subunits heterologously expressed in non-neuronal cells or natively expressed in a murine neuroblastoma cell line. Functional studies reveal that these interactions result in the potent inhibition of Nav channel currents (INa) and in changes in the voltage dependence of channel activation and inactivation. Deletion of the unique amino terminus of the splice variant of Fgf14, Fgf14-1b, or expression of the splice variant Fgf14-1a modifies the modulatory effects on INa, suggesting an important role for the amino terminus domain of FGF14 in the regulation of Nav channels. To investigate the function of FGF14 in neurones, we directly expressed Fgf14 in freshly isolated primary rat hippocampal neurones. In these cells, the addition of FGF14-1a–GFP or FGF14-1b–GFP increased INa density and shifted the voltage dependence of channel activation and inactivation. In fully differentiated neurones, FGF14-1a–GFP or FGF14-1b–GFP preferentially colocalized with endogenous Nav channels at the axonal initial segment, a critical region for action potential generation. Together, these findings implicate FGF14 as a unique modulator of Nav channel activity in the CNS and provide a possible mechanism to explain the neurological phenotypes observed in mice and humans with mutations in Fgf14. PMID:16166153

  10. Functional and molecular characterization of voltage-gated sodium channels in uteri from nonpregnant rats.

    PubMed

    Seda, Marian; Pinto, Francisco M; Wray, Susan; Cintado, Cristina G; Noheda, Pedro; Buschmann, Helmut; Candenas, Luz

    2007-11-01

    We investigated the function and expression of voltage-gated Na(+) channels (VGSC) in the uteri of nonpregnant rats using organ bath techniques, intracellular [Ca(2+)] fluorescence measurements, and RT-PCR. In longitudinally arranged whole-tissue uterine strips, veratridine, a VGSC activator, caused the rapid appearance of phasic contractions of irregular frequency and amplitude. After 50-60 min in the continuous presence of veratridine, rhythmic contractions of very regular frequency and slightly increasing amplitude occurred and were sustained for up to 12 h. Both the early and late components of the contractile response to veratridine were inhibited in a concentration-dependent manner by tetrodotoxin (TTX). In small strips dissected from the uterine longitudinal smooth muscle layer and loaded with Fura-2, veratridine also caused rhythmic contractions, accompanied by transient increases in [Ca(2+)](i), which were abolished by treatment with 0.1 microM TTX. Using end-point and real-time quantitative RT-PCR, we detected the presence of the VGSC alpha subunits Scn2a1, Scn3a, Scn5a, and Scn8a in the cDNA from longitudinal muscle. The mRNAs of the auxiliary beta subunits Scbn1b, Scbn2b, Scbn4b, and traces of Scn3b were also present. These data show for the first time that Scn2a1, Scn3a, Scn5a, and Scn8a, as well as all VGSC beta subunits are expressed in the longitudinal smooth muscle layer of the rat myometrium. In addition, our data show that TTX-sensitive VGSC are able to mediate phasic contractions maintained over long periods of time in the uteri of nonpregnant rats.

  11. Ranolazine inhibits voltage-gated mechanosensitive sodium channels in human colon circular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Neshatian, Leila; Strege, Peter R; Rhee, Poong-Lyul; Kraichely, Robert E; Mazzone, Amelia; Bernard, Cheryl E; Cima, Robert R; Larson, David W; Dozois, Eric J; Kline, Crystal F; Mohler, Peter J; Beyder, Arthur; Farrugia, Gianrico

    2015-09-15

    Human jejunum smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs) express the SCN5A-encoded voltage-gated, mechanosensitive sodium channel NaV1.5. NaV1.5 contributes to small bowel excitability, and NaV1.5 inhibitor ranolazine produces constipation by an unknown mechanism. We aimed to determine the presence and molecular identity of Na(+) current in the human colon smooth muscle and to examine the effects of ranolazine on Na(+) current, mechanosensitivity, and smooth muscle contractility. Inward currents were recorded by whole cell voltage clamp from freshly dissociated human colon SMCs at rest and with shear stress. SCN5A mRNA and NaV1.5 protein were examined by RT-PCR and Western blots, respectively. Ascending human colon strip contractility was examined in a muscle bath preparation. SCN5A mRNA and NaV1.5 protein were identified in human colon circular muscle. Freshly dissociated human colon SMCs had Na(+) currents (-1.36 ± 0.36 pA/pF), shear stress increased Na(+) peaks by 17.8 ± 1.8% and accelerated the time to peak activation by 0.7 ± 0.3 ms. Ranolazine (50 μM) blocked peak Na(+) current by 43.2 ± 9.3% and inhibited shear sensitivity by 25.2 ± 3.2%. In human ascending colon strips, ranolazine decreased resting tension (31%), reduced the frequency of spontaneous events (68%), and decreased the response to smooth muscle electrical field stimulation (61%). In conclusion, SCN5A-encoded NaV1.5 is found in human colonic circular smooth muscle. Ranolazine blocks both peak amplitude and mechanosensitivity of Na(+) current in human colon SMCs and decreases contractility of human colon muscle strips. Our data provide a likely mechanistic explanation for constipation induced by ranolazine.

  12. Stabilization of the conductive conformation of a voltage-gated K+ (Kv) channel: the lid mechanism.

    PubMed

    Santos, Jose S; Syeda, Ruhma; Montal, Mauricio

    2013-06-01

    Voltage-gated K(+) (Kv) channels are molecular switches that sense membrane potential and in response open to allow K(+) ions to diffuse out of the cell. In these proteins, sensor and pore belong to two distinct structural modules. We previously showed that the pore module alone is a robust yet dynamic structural unit in lipid membranes and that it senses potential and gates open to conduct K(+) with unchanged fidelity. The implication is that the voltage sensitivity of K(+) channels is not solely encoded in the sensor. Given that the coupling between sensor and pore remains elusive, we asked whether it is then possible to convert a pore module characterized by brief openings into a conductor with a prolonged lifetime in the open state. The strategy involves selected probes targeted to the filter gate of the channel aiming to modulate the probability of the channel being open assayed by single channel recordings from the sensorless pore module reconstituted in lipid bilayers. Here we show that the premature closing of the pore is bypassed by association of the filter gate with two novel open conformation stabilizers: an antidepressant and a peptide toxin known to act selectively on Kv channels. Such stabilization of the conductive conformation of the channel is faithfully mimicked by the covalent attachment of fluorescein at a cysteine residue selectively introduced near the filter gate. This modulation prolongs the occupancy of permeant ions at the gate. It is this longer embrace between ion and gate that we conjecture underlies the observed stabilization of the conductive conformation. This study provides a new way of thinking about gating.

  13. Lysine and the Na+/K+ Selectivity in Mammalian Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Liu, Huihui; Xia, Mengdie; Gong, Haipeng

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium (Nav) channels are critical in the generation and transmission of neuronal signals in mammals. The crystal structures of several prokaryotic Nav channels determined in recent years inspire the mechanistic studies on their selection upon the permeable cations (especially between Na+ and K+ ions), a property that is proposed to be mainly determined by residues in the selectivity filter. However, the mechanism of cation selection in mammalian Nav channels lacks direct explanation at atomic level due to the difference in amino acid sequences between mammalian and prokaryotic Nav homologues, especially at the constriction site where the DEKA motif has been identified to determine the Na+/K+ selectivity in mammalian Nav channels but is completely absent in the prokaryotic counterparts. Among the DEKA residues, Lys is of the most importance since its mutation to Arg abolishes the Na+/K+ selectivity. In this work, we modeled the pore domain of mammalian Nav channels by mutating the four residues at the constriction site of a prokaryotic Nav channel (NavRh) to DEKA, and then mechanistically investigated the contribution of Lys in cation selection using molecular dynamics simulations. The DERA mutant was generated as a comparison to understand the loss of ion selectivity caused by the K-to-R mutation. Simulations and free energy calculations on the mutants indicate that Lys facilitates Na+/K+ selection by electrostatically repelling the cation to a highly Na+-selective location sandwiched by the carboxylate groups of Asp and Glu at the constriction site. In contrast, the electrostatic repulsion is substantially weakened when Lys is mutated to Arg, because of two intrinsic properties of the Arg side chain: the planar geometric design and the sparse charge distribution of the guanidine group. PMID:27584582

  14. The intimate and controversial relationship between voltage-gated proton channels and the phagocyte NADPH oxidase.

    PubMed

    DeCoursey, Thomas E

    2016-09-01

    One of the most fascinating and exciting periods in my scientific career entailed dissecting the symbiotic relationship between two membrane transporters, the Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate reduced form (NADPH) oxidase complex and voltage-gated proton channels (HV 1). By the time I entered this field, there had already been substantial progress toward understanding NADPH oxidase, but HV 1 were known only to a tiny handful of cognoscenti around the world. Having identified the first proton currents in mammalian cells in 1991, I needed to find a clear function for these molecules if the work was to become fundable. The then-recent discoveries of Henderson, Chappell, and colleagues in 1987-1988 that led them to hypothesize interactions of both molecules during the respiratory burst of phagocytes provided an excellent opportunity. In a nutshell, both transporters function by moving electrical charge across the membrane: NADPH oxidase moves electrons and HV 1 moves protons. The consequences of electrogenic NADPH oxidase activity on both membrane potential and pH strongly self-limit this enzyme. Fortunately, both consequences specifically activate HV 1, and HV 1 activity counteracts both consequences, a kind of yin-yang relationship. Notwithstanding a decade starting in 1995 when many believed the opposite, these are two separate molecules that function independently despite their being functionally interdependent in phagocytes. The relationship between NADPH oxidase and HV 1 has become a paradigm that somewhat surprisingly has now extended well beyond the phagocyte NADPH oxidase - an industrial strength producer of reactive oxygen species (ROS) - to myriad other cells that produce orders of magnitude less ROS for signaling purposes. These cells with their seven NADPH oxidase (NOX) isoforms provide a vast realm of mechanistic obscurity that will occupy future studies for years to come. PMID:27558336

  15. Lysine and the Na+/K+ Selectivity in Mammalian Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Mengdie

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium (Nav) channels are critical in the generation and transmission of neuronal signals in mammals. The crystal structures of several prokaryotic Nav channels determined in recent years inspire the mechanistic studies on their selection upon the permeable cations (especially between Na+ and K+ ions), a property that is proposed to be mainly determined by residues in the selectivity filter. However, the mechanism of cation selection in mammalian Nav channels lacks direct explanation at atomic level due to the difference in amino acid sequences between mammalian and prokaryotic Nav homologues, especially at the constriction site where the DEKA motif has been identified to determine the Na+/K+ selectivity in mammalian Nav channels but is completely absent in the prokaryotic counterparts. Among the DEKA residues, Lys is of the most importance since its mutation to Arg abolishes the Na+/K+ selectivity. In this work, we modeled the pore domain of mammalian Nav channels by mutating the four residues at the constriction site of a prokaryotic Nav channel (NavRh) to DEKA, and then mechanistically investigated the contribution of Lys in cation selection using molecular dynamics simulations. The DERA mutant was generated as a comparison to understand the loss of ion selectivity caused by the K-to-R mutation. Simulations and free energy calculations on the mutants indicate that Lys facilitates Na+/K+ selection by electrostatically repelling the cation to a highly Na+-selective location sandwiched by the carboxylate groups of Asp and Glu at the constriction site. In contrast, the electrostatic repulsion is substantially weakened when Lys is mutated to Arg, because of two intrinsic properties of the Arg side chain: the planar geometric design and the sparse charge distribution of the guanidine group. PMID:27584582

  16. Adaptive evolution of voltage-gated sodium channels: The first 800 million years

    PubMed Central

    Zakon, Harold H.

    2012-01-01

    Voltage-gated Na+-permeable (Nav) channels form the basis for electrical excitability in animals. Nav channels evolved from Ca2+ channels and were present in the common ancestor of choanoflagellates and animals, although this channel was likely permeable to both Na+ and Ca2+. Thus, like many other neuronal channels and receptors, Nav channels predated neurons. Invertebrates possess two Nav channels (Nav1 and Nav2), whereas vertebrate Nav channels are of the Nav1 family. Approximately 500 Mya in early chordates Nav channels evolved a motif that allowed them to cluster at axon initial segments, 50 million years later with the evolution of myelin, Nav channels “capitalized” on this property and clustered at nodes of Ranvier. The enhancement of conduction velocity along with the evolution of jaws likely made early gnathostomes fierce predators and the dominant vertebrates in the ocean. Later in vertebrate evolution, the Nav channel gene family expanded in parallel in tetrapods and teleosts (∼9 to 10 genes in amniotes, 8 in teleosts). This expansion occurred during or after the late Devonian extinction, when teleosts and tetrapods each diversified in their respective habitats, and coincided with an increase in the number of telencephalic nuclei in both groups. The expansion of Nav channels may have allowed for more sophisticated neural computation and tailoring of Nav channel kinetics with potassium channel kinetics to enhance energy savings. Nav channels show adaptive sequence evolution for increasing diversity in communication signals (electric fish), in protection against lethal Nav channel toxins (snakes, newts, pufferfish, insects), and in specialized habitats (naked mole rats). PMID:22723361

  17. Voltage-gated Ca2+ influx and mitochondrial Ca2+ initiate secretion from Aplysia neuroendocrine cells.

    PubMed

    Hickey, C M; Groten, C J; Sham, L; Carter, C J; Magoski, N S

    2013-10-10

    Neuroendocrine secretion often requires prolonged voltage-gated Ca(2+) entry; however, the ability of Ca(2+) from intracellular stores, such as endoplasmic reticulum or mitochondria, to elicit secretion is less clear. We examined this using the bag cell neurons, which trigger ovulation in Aplysia by releasing egg-laying hormone (ELH) peptide. Secretion from cultured bag cell neurons was observed as an increase in plasma membrane capacitance following Ca(2+) influx evoked by a 5-Hz, 1-min train of depolarizing steps under voltage-clamp. The response was similar for step durations of ≥ 50 ms, but fell off sharply with shorter stimuli. The capacitance change was attenuated by replacing external Ca(2+) with Ba(2+), blocking Ca(2+) channels, buffering intracellular Ca(2+) with EGTA, disrupting synaptic protein recycling, or genetic knock-down of ELH. Regarding intracellular stores, liberating mitochondrial Ca(2+) with the protonophore, carbonyl cyanide-p-trifluoromethoxyphenyl-hydrazone (FCCP), brought about an EGTA-sensitive elevation of capacitance. Conversely, no change was observed to Ca(2+) released from the endoplasmic reticulum or acidic stores. Prior exposure to FCCP lessened the train-induced capacitance increase, suggesting overlap in the pool of releasable vesicles. Employing GTP-γ-S to interfere with endocytosis delayed recovery (presumed membrane retrieval) of the capacitance change following FCCP, but not the train. Finally, secretion was correlated with reproductive behavior, in that neurons isolated from animals engaged in egg-laying presented a greater train-induced capacitance elevation vs quiescent animals. The bag cell neuron capacitance increase is consistent with peptide secretion requiring high Ca(2+), either from influx or stores, and may reflect the all-or-none nature of reproduction.

  18. Eicosapentaenoic acid inhibits voltage-gated sodium channels and invasiveness in prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, T; Kubota, N; Tsutsumi, T; Oguri, A; Imuta, H; Jo, T; Oonuma, H; Soma, M; Meguro, K; Takano, H; Nagase, T; Nagata, T

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: The voltage-gated Na+ channels (Nav) and their corresponding current (INa) are involved in several cellular processes, crucial to metastasis of cancer cells. We investigated the effects of eicosapentaenoic (EPA), an omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid, on INa and metastatic functions (cell proliferation, endocytosis and invasion) in human and rat prostate cancer cell lines (PC-3 and Mat-LyLu cells). Experimental approach: The whole-cell voltage clamp technique and conventional/quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction analysis were used. The presence of Nav proteins was shown by immunohistochemical methods. Alterations in the fatty acid composition of phospholipids after treatment with EPA and metastatic functions were also examined. Key results: A transient inward Na+ current (INa), highly sensitive to tetrodotoxin, and NaV proteins were found in these cells. Expression of NaV1.6 and NaV1.7 transcripts (SCN8A and SCN9A) was predominant in PC-3 cells, while NaV1.7 transcript (SCN9A) was the major component in Mat-LyLu cells. Tetrodotoxin or synthetic small interfering RNA targeted for SCN8A and SCN9A inhibited metastatic functions (endocytosis and invasion), but failed to inhibit proliferation in PC-3 cells. Exposure to EPA produced a rapid and concentration-dependent suppression of INa. In cells chronically treated (up to 72h) with EPA, the EPA content of cell lipids increased time-dependently, while arachidonic acid content decreased. Treatment of PC-3 cells with EPA decreased levels of mRNA for SCN9A and SCN8A, cell proliferation, invasion and endocytosis. Conclusion and implications: Treatment with EPA inhibited INa directly and also indirectly, by down-regulation of Nav mRNA expression in prostate cancer cells, thus inhibiting their metastatic potential. PMID:19154441

  19. Voltage-gated Ca2+ influx and mitochondrial Ca2+ initiate secretion from Aplysia neuroendocrine cells.

    PubMed

    Hickey, C M; Groten, C J; Sham, L; Carter, C J; Magoski, N S

    2013-10-10

    Neuroendocrine secretion often requires prolonged voltage-gated Ca(2+) entry; however, the ability of Ca(2+) from intracellular stores, such as endoplasmic reticulum or mitochondria, to elicit secretion is less clear. We examined this using the bag cell neurons, which trigger ovulation in Aplysia by releasing egg-laying hormone (ELH) peptide. Secretion from cultured bag cell neurons was observed as an increase in plasma membrane capacitance following Ca(2+) influx evoked by a 5-Hz, 1-min train of depolarizing steps under voltage-clamp. The response was similar for step durations of ≥ 50 ms, but fell off sharply with shorter stimuli. The capacitance change was attenuated by replacing external Ca(2+) with Ba(2+), blocking Ca(2+) channels, buffering intracellular Ca(2+) with EGTA, disrupting synaptic protein recycling, or genetic knock-down of ELH. Regarding intracellular stores, liberating mitochondrial Ca(2+) with the protonophore, carbonyl cyanide-p-trifluoromethoxyphenyl-hydrazone (FCCP), brought about an EGTA-sensitive elevation of capacitance. Conversely, no change was observed to Ca(2+) released from the endoplasmic reticulum or acidic stores. Prior exposure to FCCP lessened the train-induced capacitance increase, suggesting overlap in the pool of releasable vesicles. Employing GTP-γ-S to interfere with endocytosis delayed recovery (presumed membrane retrieval) of the capacitance change following FCCP, but not the train. Finally, secretion was correlated with reproductive behavior, in that neurons isolated from animals engaged in egg-laying presented a greater train-induced capacitance elevation vs quiescent animals. The bag cell neuron capacitance increase is consistent with peptide secretion requiring high Ca(2+), either from influx or stores, and may reflect the all-or-none nature of reproduction. PMID:23876326

  20. The effects of huwentoxin-I on the voltage-gated sodium channels of rat hippocampal and cockroach dorsal unpaired median neurons.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meichi; Rong, Mingqiang; Xiao, Yucheng; Liang, Songping

    2012-03-01

    Huwentoxin-I (HWTX-I) is a 33-residue peptide isolated from the venom of Ornithoctonus huwena and could inhibit TTX-sensitive voltage-gated sodium channels and N-type calcium channels in mammalian dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. However, the effects of HWTX-I on mammalian central neuronal and insect sodium channel subtypes remain unknown. In this study, we found that HWTX-I potently inhibited sodium channels in rat hippocampal and cockroach dorsal unpaired median (DUM) neurons with the IC(50) values of 66.1±5.2 and 4.80±0.58nM, respectively. Taken together with our previous work on DRG neurons (IC(50)≈55nM), the order of sodium channel sensitivity to HWTX-I inhibition was insect central DUM≫mammalian peripheral>mammalian central neurons. HWTX-I exhibited no effect on the steady-state activation and inactivation of sodium channels in rat hippocampal and cockroach DUM neurons. PMID:22094230

  1. Electrophysiological characterization of a novel small peptide from the venom of Conus californicus that targets voltage-gated neuronal Ca2+ channels.

    PubMed

    Bernaldez, Johanna; López, Omar; Licea, Alexei; Salceda, Emilio; Arellano, Rogelio O; Vega, Rosario; Soto, Enrique

    2011-01-01

    Conus californicus belongs to a genus of marine gastropods with more than 700 extant species. C. californicus has been shown to be distantly related to all Conus species, but showing unusual biological features. We report a novel peptide isolated from C. californicus with a significant inhibitory action over neuronal voltage-gated calcium channels. The new toxin is formed by 13-amino acid residues with two disulfide bonds, whose sequence (NCPAGCRSQGCCM) is strikingly different from regular ω-conotoxins. In the HPLC purification procedure, the venom fraction eluted in the first 10-15 min produced a significant decrease (54% ± 3%) of the Ca(2+) current in Xenopus laevis oocytes transfected with purified rat-brain mRNA. A specific peptide obtained from the elution at 13 min decreased the Ca(2+) current in the adult rat dorsal-root ganglion neurons in a primary culture by 34% ± 2%. The cysteine pattern of this peptide corresponds to the framework XVI described for the M-superfamily of conopeptides and is unprecedented among Conus peptides acting on Ca(2+) channels. PMID:20920515

  2. Sine-wave electrical stimulation initiates a voltage-gated potassium channel-dependent soft tissue response characterized by induction of hemocyte recruitment and collagen deposition.

    PubMed

    Franklin, Brandon M; Maroudas, Eleni; Osborn, Jeffrey L

    2016-06-01

    Soft tissue repair is a complex process that requires specific communication between multiple cell types to orchestrate effective restoration of physiological functions. Macrophages play a critical role in this wound healing process beginning at the onset of tissue injury. Understanding the signaling mechanisms involved in macrophage recruitment to the wound site is an essential step for developing more effective clinical therapies. Macrophages are known to respond to electrical fields, but the underlying cellular mechanisms mediating this response is unknown. This study demonstrated that low-amplitude sine-wave electrical stimulation (ES) initiates a soft tissue response in the absence of injury in Procambarus clarkii This cellular response was characterized by recruitment of macrophage-like hemocytes to the stimulation site indicated by increased hemocyte density at the site. ES also increased tissue collagen deposition compared to sham treatment (P < 0.05). Voltage-gated potassium (KV) channel inhibition with either 4-aminopyridine or astemizole decreased both hemocyte recruitment and collagen deposition compared to saline infusion (P < 0.05), whereas inhibition of calcium-permeable channels with ruthenium red did not affect either response to ES Thus, macrophage-like hemocytes in P. clarkii elicit a wound-like response to exogenous ES and this is accompanied by collagen deposition. This response is mediated by KV channels but independent of Ca(2+) channels. We propose a significant role for KV channels that extends beyond facilitating Ca(2+) transport via regulation of cellular membrane potentials during ES of soft tissue.

  3. ω-Phonetoxin-IIA: a calcium channel blocker from the spider Phoneutria nigriventer.

    PubMed

    Cassola, A C; Jaffe, H; Fales, H M; Afeche, S C; Magnoli, F; Cipolla-Neto, J

    1998-07-01

    A peptide with neurotoxic effect on mammals, purified from the venom of the spider Phoneutria nigriventer, was studied regarding its primary structure and its effects on voltage-gated calcium channels. The peptide, named ω-phonetoxin-IIA, has 76 amino acids residues, with 14 Cys forming 7 disulphide bonds, and a molecular weight of 8362.7 Da. The neurotoxicity is a consequence of the peptide’s blocking effects on high-voltage-activated (HVA) calcium channels. N-type HVA calcium channels of rat dorsal root ganglion neurons are blocked with affinity in the sub-nanomolar concentration range. The toxin also blocks L-type channels of rat β pancreatic cells, with an affinity 40 times lower. Although not studied in detail, evidence indicates that the toxin also blocks other types of HVA calcium channels, such as P and Q. No effect was observed on low-voltage-activated, T-type calcium channels. The significant homologies between ω-phonetoxin-IIA and the peptides of the ω-agatoxin-III family, and the overlapping inhibitory effects on calcium channels are discussed in terms of the structure-activity relationship.

  4. Upregulation of voltage-gated Na+ channels by long-term activation of the ghrelin-growth hormone secretagogue receptor in clonal GC somatotropes.

    PubMed

    Dominguez, Belisario; Felix, Ricardo; Monjaraz, Eduardo

    2009-05-01

    A central question in adenohypophyseal cell physiology concerns the role of transmembrane ionic fluxes in the initiation of the hormone secretion process. In the current report, we investigated the effects of the growth hormone (GH) secretagogues ghrelin and GH-releasing peptide-6 (GHRP-6) on the regulation of the functional expression of voltage-gated Na(+) channels using the tumoral somatotrope GC cell line as a model. Cells were cultured under control conditions or in presence of the GH secretagogues (GHS) for 96 h, and Na(+) currents (I(Na)) were characterized in whole cell patch-clamp experiments. GHS treatment significantly increased I(Na) density in a dose-dependent manner. The effects of GHRP-6 were accompanied by an augment in conductance without changes in the kinetics and the voltage dependence of the currents, suggesting an increase in the number of channels in the cell membrane. Sustained inhibition of L-type Ca(2+) channel activity decreased I(Na) density and prevented the effects of the GHS, whereas long-term exposure to an L-channel agonist increased I(Na) density and enhanced the actions of GHRP-6, indicating that Ca(2+) entry through these channels plays a role in the regulation of Na(+) channel expression. Likewise, GHRP-6 failed to enhance Na(+) channel expression in the presence of membrane-permeable inhibitors of protein kinases A and C, as well as the Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent kinase II. Conversely, treatment with a cAMP analog or a protein kinase C activator enhanced both basal and GHS-induced secretion of GH measured by enzyme-linked immunoassay, suggesting that GHRP-6 acting through the ghrelin receptor and different signaling pathways enhances Na(+) channel membrane expression, which favors hormone release from GC somatotropes.

  5. Exercise intensity-dependent reverse and adverse remodeling of voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels in mesenteric arteries from spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu; Zhang, Hanmeng; Zhang, Yanyan; Lu, Ni; Zhang, Lin; Shi, Lijun

    2015-10-01

    Exercise can be regarded as a drug for treating hypertension, and the 'dosage' (intensity/volume) is therefore of great importance. L-type voltage-gated Ca(2+) (Cav1.2) channels on the plasma membrane of vascular smooth muscle cells have a pivotal role in modulating the vascular tone, and the upregulation of Cav1.2 channels is a hallmark feature of hypertension. The present study investigated the beneficial and adverse effects of exercise at different intensities on the remodeling of the Cav1.2 channel in mesenteric arteries (MAs) of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs). Moderate- (SHR-M, 18-20 m min(-1)) and high-intensity (SHR-H, 26-28 m min(-1)) aerobic exercise training groups were created for SHRs and lasted for 8 weeks (1 h per day, 5 d per week). Age-matched sedentary SHRs and normotensive Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKY) were used as controls. The mesenteric arterial mechanical and functional properties were evaluated. Moderate-intensity exercise training induced a lower systolic blood pressure and heart rate in these rats compared with sedentary SHRs. BayK 8644 and nifedipine induced vasoconstriction and dose-dependent vasorelaxation, respectively, in the mesenteric arterial rings. Moderate-intensity exercise significantly suppressed the increase in BayK 8644-induced vasoconstriction, tissue sensitivity to nifedipine, Cav1.2 channel current density and Cav1.2 α1C-subunit protein expression in MAs from SHRs. However, high-intensity exercise training aggravated all of these hypertension-associated functional and molecular alterations of Cav1.2 channels. These results indicate that moderate-intensity aerobic training may act as a drug and effectively reverse the remodeling of Cav1.2 channels in hypertension to restore the vascular function in MAs, but that high-intensity exercise exaggerates the adverse remodeling of Cav1.2 channels and worsens the vascular function. PMID:25902901

  6. Reduced availability of voltage-gated sodium channels by depolarization or blockade by tetrodotoxin boosts burst firing and catecholamine release in mouse chromaffin cells

    PubMed Central

    Vandael, David H F; Ottaviani, Matteo M; Legros, Christian; Lefort, Claudie; Guérineau, Nathalie C; Allio, Arianna; Carabelli, Valentina; Carbone, Emilio

    2015-01-01

    Action potential (AP) firing in mouse chromaffin cells (MCCs) is mainly sustained by Cav1.3 L-type channels that drive BK and SK currents and regulate the pacemaking cycle. As secretory units, CCs optimally recruit Ca2+ channels when stimulated, a process potentially dependent on the modulation of the AP waveform. Our previous work has shown that a critical determinant of AP shape is voltage-gated sodium channel (Nav) channel availability. Here, we studied the contribution of Nav channels to firing patterns and AP shapes at rest (−50 mV) and upon stimulation (−40 mV). Using quantitative RT-PCR and immunoblotting, we show that MCCs mainly express tetrodotoxin (TTX)-sensitive, fast-inactivating Nav1.3 and Nav1.7 channels that carry little or no Na+ current during slow ramp depolarizations. Time constants and the percentage of recovery from fast inactivation and slow entry into closed-state inactivation are similar to that of brain Nav1.3 and Nav1.7 channels. The fraction of available Nav channels is reduced by half after 10 mV depolarization from −50 to −40 mV. This leads to low amplitude spikes and a reduction in repolarizing K+ currents inverting the net current from outward to inward during the after-hyperpolarization. When Nav channel availability is reduced by up to 20% of total, either by TTX block or steady depolarization, a switch from tonic to burst firing is observed. The spontaneous occurrence of high frequency bursts is rare under control conditions (14% of cells) but leads to major Ca2+-entry and increased catecholamine release. Thus, Nav1.3/Nav1.7 channel availability sets the AP shape, burst-firing initiation and regulates catecholamine secretion in MCCs. Nav channel inactivation becomes important during periods of high activity, mimicking stress responses. PMID:25620605

  7. (2R,3S,2”R,3”R)-manniflavanone, a new gastrointestinal smooth muscle L-type calcium channel inhibitor, which underlies the spasmolytic properties of Garcinia buchananii stem bark extract

    PubMed Central

    Balemba, Onesmo B.; Lösch, Sofie; Patterson, Savannah; McMillan, John S.; Hofmann, Thomas; Mawe, Gary M.; Stark, Timo D.

    2016-01-01

    Garcinia buchananii Baker stem bark extract (GBB) is a traditional medication of diarrhea and dysentery in sub-Saharan Africa. It is believed that GBB causes gastrointestinal smooth muscle relaxation. The aim of this study was to determine whether GBB has spasmolytic actions and identify compounds underlying these actions. Calcium (Ca2+) imaging was used to analyze the effect of GBB on Ca2+ flashes and Ca2+ waves in guinea pig gallbladder and distal colon smooth muscle. Intracellular microelectrode recording was used to determine the effect of GBB, six fractions of GBB, M1–5 and M7, and (2R,3S,2”R,3”R)-manniflavanone, a compound isolated from M3 on action potentials in gallbladder smooth muscle. The technique was also used to analyze the effect of GBB, M3, and (2R,3S,2”R,3”R)-manniflavanone on action potentials in the circular muscle of mouse and guinea pig distal colons, and the effect of GBB and (2R,3S,2”R,3”R)-manniflavanone on slow waves in porcine ileum. GBB inhibited Ca2+ flashes and Ca2+ waves. GBB, M3 and (2R,3S,2”R,3”R)-manniflavanone inhibited action potentials. L-type Ca2+ channel activator Bay K 8644 increased the discharge of action potentials in mouse colon but did not trigger or increase action potentials in the presence of GBB and (2R,3S,2”R,3”R)-manniflavanone. GBB and (2R,3S,2”R,3”R)-manniflavanone inhibited action potentials in the presence of Bay K 8644. GBB and (2R,3S,2”R,3”R)-manniflavanone reduced the amplitude but did not alter the frequency of slow waves in the porcine ileum. In conclusion, GBB and (2R,3S,2”R,3”R)-manniflavanone relax smooth muscle by inhibiting L-type Ca2+ channels, thus have potential for use as therapies of gastrointestinal smooth muscle spasms, and arrhythmias. PMID:26081368

  8. Targeting the voltage sensor of Kv7.2 voltage-gated K+ channels with a new gating-modifier

    PubMed Central

    Peretz, Asher; Pell, Liat; Gofman, Yana; Haitin, Yoni; Shamgar, Liora; Patrich, Eti; Kornilov, Polina; Gourgy-Hacohen, Orit; Ben-Tal, Nir; Attali, Bernard

    2010-01-01

    The pore and gate regions of voltage-gated cation channels have been often targeted with drugs acting as channel modulators. In contrast, the voltage-sensing domain (VSD) was practically not exploited for therapeutic purposes, although it is the target of various toxins. We recently designed unique diphenylamine carboxylates that are powerful Kv7.2 voltage-gated K+ channel openers or blockers. Here we show that a unique Kv7.2 channel opener, NH29, acts as a nontoxin gating modifier. NH29 increases Kv7.2 currents, thereby producing a hyperpolarizing shift of the activation curve and slowing both activation and deactivation kinetics. In neurons, the opener depresses evoked spike discharges. NH29 dampens hippocampal glutamate and GABA release, thereby inhibiting excitatory and inhibitory postsynaptic currents. Mutagenesis and modeling data suggest that in Kv7.2, NH29 docks to the external groove formed by the interface of helices S1, S2, and S4 in a way that stabilizes the interaction between two conserved charged residues in S2 and S4, known to interact electrostatically, in the open state of Kv channels. Results indicate that NH29 may operate via a voltage-sensor trapping mechanism similar to that suggested for scorpion and sea-anemone toxins. Reflecting the promiscuous nature of the VSD, NH29 is also a potent blocker of TRPV1 channels, a feature similar to that of tarantula toxins. Our data provide a structural framework for designing unique gating-modifiers targeted to the VSD of voltage-gated cation channels and used for the treatment of hyperexcitability disorders. PMID:20713704

  9. Divergent biophysical properties, gating mechanisms, and possible functions of the two skeletal muscle CaV1.1 calcium channel splice variants

    PubMed Central

    Tuluc, Petronel; Flucher, Bernhard E.

    2014-01-01

    Voltage-gated calcium channels are multi-subunit protein complexes that specifically allow calcium ions to enter the cell in response to membrane depolarization. But, for many years it seemed that the skeletal muscle calcium channel CaV1.1 is the exception. The classical splice variant CaV1.1a activates slowly, has a very small current amplitude and poor voltage sensitivity. In fact adult muscle fibers work perfectly well even in the absence of calcium influx. Recently a new splice variant of the skeletal muscle calcium channel CaV1.1e has been characterized. The lack of the 19 amino acid exon 29 in this splice variant results in a rapidly activating calcium channel with high current amplitude and good voltage sensitivity. CaV1.1e is the dominant channel in embryonic muscle, where the expression of this high calcium-conducting CaV1.1 isoform readily explains developmental processes depending on L-type calcium currents. Moreover, the availability of these two structurally similar but functionally distinct channel variants facilitates the analysis of the molecular mechanisms underlying the unique current properties of the classical CaV1.1a channel. PMID:22057633

  10. Reversible dementia: two nursing home patients with voltage-gated potassium channel antibody-associated limbic encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Reintjes, Wesley; Romijn, Marloes D M; Hollander, Daan; Ter Bruggen, Jan P; van Marum, Rob J

    2015-09-01

    Voltage-gated potassium channel antibody-associated limbic encephalitis (VGKC-LE) is a rare disease that is a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge for medical practitioners. Two patients with VGKC-LE, both developing dementia are presented. Following treatment, both patients showed remarkable cognitive and functional improvement enabling them to leave the psychogeriatric nursing homes they both were admitted to. Patients with VGKC-LE can have a major cognitive and functional improvement even after a diagnostic delay of more than 1 year. Medical practitioners who treat patients with unexplained cognitive decline, epileptic seizures, or psychiatric symptoms should be aware of LE as an underlying rare cause.

  11. Possible relationship of brain cytoplasmic tetrodotoxin-sensitive protein to voltage-gated sodium channel shown by monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Pinchuk, G V; Malysheva, M K; Pinchuk, L N; Gerasymenko, O V; Zhukareva, V A

    1990-02-01

    Biochemical events leading to the formation of mature membrane-associated sodium channel proteins are not completely understood. We have recently purified a protein from the cytoplasm of brain cells, which is able to become incorporated into liposomes and induce neurotoxin-dependent sodium permeability. Here we report data on a monoclonal antibody derived against this protein. This antibody crossreacts with cell membrane preparations. The antibody binding to viable neuroblastoma cells is inhibited by veratrine, indicating that membrane molecules antigenically related to the cytoplasmic protein may also be related to the voltage-gated sodium channel.

  12. A monitor and control system for high voltage, gating, and triggering of a scintillating fiber active target

    SciTech Connect

    Baumbaugh, B.; Bishop, J.; Gardner, R.W.; Mountain, R.J.; Ruchti, R.; Baumbaugh, A.; Knickerbocker, K.

    1987-10-01

    A monitor and control system has been designed, constructed and tested at Notre Dame for the purpose of controlling all aspects of a Scintillating Fiber Active Target system used in High Energy Physics Experimentation. The SFT Active Target system requires control of high voltages, gating, trigger counters, and monitoring. In addition, it resides in a radioactive area with very limited access. The control system uses a Leading Edge microcomputer, two specialized Z80-based processors, associated DACs, ADCs, discrete semiconductors, linear ICs, and TTL and MECL logic. All of the hardware and software is custom-built; its design and performance is discussed. 5 refs., 4 figs.

  13. A monitor and control system for high voltage, gating, and triggering of a scintillating fiber active target

    SciTech Connect

    Baumbaugh, B.; Bishop, J.; Gardner, R.W.; Mountain, R.J.; Ruchti, R.; Baumbaugh, A.; Knickerbocker, K.

    1988-02-01

    A monitor and control system has been designed, constructed and tested at Notre Dame for the purpose of controlling all aspects of a Scintillating Fiber Acxtive Target system used in High Energy Physics Experimentation. The SFT Active Target system requires control of high voltages, gating, trigger counters, and monitoring. In addition, it resides in a radioactive area with very limited access. The control system uses a Leading Edge microcomputer, two specialized Z80-based processors, associated DACs, ADCs, discrete semiconductors, linear ICs and TTL and MECL logic. All of the hardware and software is custom-built; its design and performance is discussed.

  14. Blood pressure and risk of cancer progression - A possible connection with salt and voltage-gated sodium channel.

    PubMed

    Djamgoz, Mustafa B A

    2015-11-01

    Although it is well known that high blood pressure promotes cancer, the underlying cause(s) is not well understood. Here, we advance the hypothesis that the extracellular sodium level could be a contributing factor. The hypothesis is based upon emerging evidence showing (i) that voltage-gated sodium channels are expressed de novo in cancer cells and tissues, and (ii) that the influx of sodium from the extracellular medium into cancer cells, mediated by the channel activity, promotes their metastatic potential. Clinical and lifestyle implications of the hypothesis are discussed.

  15. Blood pressure and risk of cancer progression - A possible connection with salt and voltage-gated sodium channel.

    PubMed

    Djamgoz, Mustafa B A

    2015-11-01

    Although it is well known that high blood pressure promotes cancer, the underlying cause(s) is not well understood. Here, we advance the hypothesis that the extracellular sodium level could be a contributing factor. The hypothesis is based upon emerging evidence showing (i) that voltage-gated sodium channels are expressed de novo in cancer cells and tissues, and (ii) that the influx of sodium from the extracellular medium into cancer cells, mediated by the channel activity, promotes their metastatic potential. Clinical and lifestyle implications of the hypothesis are discussed. PMID:26272607

  16. Amitriptyline and carbamazepine utilize voltage-gated ion channel suppression to impair excitability of sensory dorsal horn neurons in thin tissue slice: An in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Matthias; Czorlich, Patrick; Nagaraj, Chandran; Schnöbel-Ehehalt, Rose; Li, Yingji; Kwapiszewska, Grazyna; Olschewski, Horst; Heschl, Stefan; Olschewski, Andrea

    2016-08-01

    Amitriptyline, carbamazepine and gabapentin are often used for the treatment of neuropathic pain. However, their analgesic action on central sensory neurons is still not fully understood. Moreover, the expression pattern of their target ion channels is poorly elucidated in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord. Thus, we performed patch-clamp investigations in visualized neurons of lamina I-III of the spinal cord. The expression of the different voltage-gated ion channels, as the targets of these drugs, was detected by RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Neurons of the lamina I-III express the TTX-sensitive voltage-gated Na(+) as well as voltage-gated K(+) subunits assembling the fast inactivating (A-type) currents and the delayed rectifier K(+) currents. Our pharmacological studies show that tonically-firing, adapting-firing and single spike neurons responded dose-dependently to amitriptyline and carbamazepine. The ion channel inhibition consecutively reduced the firing rate of tonically-firing and adapting-firing neurons. This study provides evidence for the distribution of voltage-gated Na(+) and K(+) subunits in lamina I-III of the spinal cord and for the action of drugs used for the treatment of neuropathic pain. Our work confirms that modulation of voltage-gated ion channels in the central nervous system contributes to the antinociceptive effects of these drugs. PMID:26945616

  17. Voltage-gated ion transport through semiconducting conical nanopores formed by metal nanoparticle-assisted plasma etching.

    PubMed

    James, Teena; Kalinin, Yevgeniy V; Chan, Chih-Chieh; Randhawa, Jatinder S; Gaevski, Mikhail; Gracias, David H

    2012-07-11

    Nanopores with conical geometries have been found to rectify ionic current in electrolytes. While nanopores in semiconducting membranes are known to modulate ionic transport through gated modification of pore surface charge, the fabrication of conical nanopores in silicon (Si) has proven challenging. Here, we report the discovery that gold (Au) nanoparticle (NP)-assisted plasma etching results in the formation of conical etch profiles in Si. These conical profiles result due to enhanced Si etch rates in the vicinity of the Au NPs. We show that this process provides a convenient and versatile means to fabricate conical nanopores in Si membranes and crystals with variable pore-diameters and cone-angles. We investigated ionic transport through these pores and observed that rectification ratios could be enhanced by a factor of over 100 by voltage gating alone, and that these pores could function as ionic switches with high on-off ratios of approximately 260. Further, we demonstrate voltage gated control over protein transport, which is of importance in lab-on-a-chip devices and biomolecular separations.

  18. The Proton-Driven Rotor of ATP Synthase: Ohmic Conductance (10 fS), and Absence of Voltage Gating

    PubMed Central

    Feniouk, Boris A.; Kozlova, Maria A.; Knorre, Dmitry A.; Cherepanov, Dmitry A.; Mulkidjanian, Armen Y.; Junge, Wolfgang

    2004-01-01

    The membrane portion of F0F1-ATP synthase, F0, translocates protons by a rotary mechanism. Proton conduction by F0 was studied in chromatophores of the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus. The discharge of a light-induced voltage jump was monitored by electrochromic absorption transients to yield the unitary conductance of F0. The current-voltage relationship of F0 was linear from 7 to 70 mV. The current was extremely proton-specific (>107) and varied only slightly (≈threefold) from pH 6 to 10. The maximum conductance was ≈10 fS at pH 8, equivalent to 6240 H+ s−1 at 100-mV driving force, which is an order-of-magnitude greater than of coupled F0F1. There was no voltage-gating of F0 even at low voltage, and proton translocation could be driven by ΔpH alone, without voltage. The reported voltage gating in F0F1 is thus attributable to the interaction of F0 with F1 but not to F0 proper. We simulated proton conduction by a minimal rotary model including the rotating c-ring and two relay groups mediating proton exchange between the ring and the respective membrane surface. The data fit attributed pK values of ≈6 and ≈10 to these relays, and placed them close to the membrane/electrolyte interface. PMID:15189903

  19. The insecticidal neurotoxin Aps III is an atypical knottin peptide that potently blocks insect voltage-gated sodium channels

    PubMed Central

    Bende, Niraj S.; Kang, Eunji; Herzig, Volker; Bosmans, Frank; Nicholson, Graham M.; Mobli, Mehdi; King, Glenn F.

    2013-01-01

    One of the most potent insecticidal venom peptides described to date is Aps III from the venom of the trapdoor spider Apomastus schlingeri. Aps III is highly neurotoxic to lepidopteran crop pests, making it a promising candidate for bioinsecticide development. However, its disulfide-connectivity, three-dimensional structure, and mode of action have not been determined. Here we show that recombinant Aps III (rAps III) is an atypical knottin peptide; three of the disulfide bridges form a classical inhibitor cystine knot motif while the fourth disulfide acts as a molecular staple that restricts the flexibility of an unusually large β hairpin loop that often houses the pharmacophore in this class of toxins. We demonstrate that the irreversible paralysis induced in insects by rAps III results from a potent block of insect voltage-gated sodium channels. Channel block by rAps III is voltage-independent insofar as it occurs without significant alteration in the voltage-dependence of channel activation or steady-state inactivation. Thus, rAps III appears to be a pore blocker that plugs the outer vestibule of insect voltage-gated sodium channels. This mechanism of action contrasts strikingly with virtually all other sodium channel modulators isolated from spider venoms that act as gating modifiers by interacting with one or more of the four voltage-sensing domains of the channel. PMID:23473802

  20. Resin-acid derivatives as potent electrostatic openers of voltage-gated K channels and suppressors of neuronal excitability

    PubMed Central

    Ottosson, Nina E; Wu, Xiongyu; Nolting, Andreas; Karlsson, Urban; Lund, Per-Eric; Ruda, Katinka; Svensson, Stefan; Konradsson, Peter; Elinder, Fredrik

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated ion channels generate cellular excitability, cause diseases when mutated, and act as drug targets in hyperexcitability diseases, such as epilepsy, cardiac arrhythmia and pain. Unfortunately, many patients do not satisfactorily respond to the present-day drugs. We found that the naturally occurring resin acid dehydroabietic acid (DHAA) is a potent opener of a voltage-gated K channel and thereby a potential suppressor of cellular excitability. DHAA acts via a non-traditional mechanism, by electrostatically activating the voltage-sensor domain, rather than directly targeting the ion-conducting pore domain. By systematic iterative modifications of DHAA we synthesized 71 derivatives and found 32 compounds more potent than DHAA. The most potent compound, Compound 77, is 240 times more efficient than DHAA in opening a K channel. This and other potent compounds reduced excitability in dorsal root ganglion neurons, suggesting that resin-acid derivatives can become the first members of a new family of drugs with the potential for treatment of hyperexcitability diseases. PMID:26299574

  1. Two-pore channels provide insight into the evolution of voltage-gated Ca2+ and Na+ channels

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Taufiq; Cai, Xinjiang; Brailoiu, G. Cristina; Abood, Mary E.; Brailoiu, Eugen; Patel, Sandip

    2015-01-01

    Four-domain voltage-gated Ca2+ and Na+ channels (CaV, NaV) underpin nervous system function and likely emerged upon intragenic duplication of a primordial two-domain precursor. To investigate if two-pore channels (TPCs) may represent an intermediate in this evolutionary transition, we performed molecular docking simulations with a homology model of TPC1, which suggested that the pore region could bind antagonists of CaV or NaV. CaV or NaV antagonists blocked NAADP-evoked Ca2+ signals in sea urchin egg preparations and in intact cells that overexpressed TPC1. By sequence analysis and inspection of the model, we predicted a noncanonical selectivity filter in animal TPCs in which the carbonyl groups of conserved asparagine residues are positioned to coordinate cations. In contrast, a distinct clade of TPCs (TPCR) in several unicellular species had ion selectivity filters with acidic residues more akin to CaV. TPCRs were predicted to interact strongly with CaV antagonists. Our data suggest that acquisition of a “blueprint” pharmacological profile and changes in ion selectivity within four-domain voltage-gated ion channels may have predated intragenic duplication of an ancient two-domain ancestor. PMID:25406377

  2. Voltage-gated sodium channel as a target for metastatic risk reduction with re-purposed drugs

    PubMed Central

    Koltai, Tomas

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the exact role of sodium channel proteins in migration, invasion and metastasis and understand the possible anti-invasion and anti-metastatic activity of repurposed drugs with voltage gated sodium channel blocking properties. Material and methods: A review of the published medical literature was performed searching for pharmaceuticals used in daily practice, with inhibitory activity on voltage gated sodium channels. For every drug found, the literature was reviewed in order to define if it may act against cancer cells as an anti-invasion and anti-metastatic agent and if it was tested with this purpose in the experimental and clinical settings. Results: The following pharmaceuticals that fulfill the above mentioned effects, were found: phenytoin, carbamazepine, valproate, lamotrigine, ranolazine, resveratrol, ropivacaine, lidocaine, mexiletine, flunarizine, and riluzole. Each of them are independently described and analyzed. Conclusions: The above mentioned pharmaceuticals have shown anti-metastatic and anti-invasion activity and many of them deserve to be tested in well-planned clinical trials as adjunct therapies for solid tumors and as anti-metastatic agents. Antiepileptic drugs like phenytoin, carbamazepine and valproate and the vasodilator flunarizine emerged as particularly useful for anti-metastatic purposes. PMID:27408684

  3. Exploring conformational states of the bacterial voltage-gated sodium channel NavAb via molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Amaral, Cristiano; Carnevale, Vincenzo; Klein, Michael L; Treptow, Werner

    2012-12-26

    The X-ray structure of the bacterial voltage-gated sodium channel NavAb has been reported in a conformation with a closed conduction pore. Comparison between this structure and the activated-open and resting-closed structures of the voltage-gated Kv1.2 potassium channel suggests that the voltage-sensor domains (VSDs) of the reported structure are not fully activated. Using the aforementioned structures of Kv1.2 as templates, molecular dynamics simulations are used to identify analogous functional conformations of NavAb. Specifically, starting from the NavAb crystal structure, conformations of the membrane-bound channel are sampled along likely pathways for activation of the VSD and opening of the pore domain. Gating charge computations suggest that a structural rearrangement comparable to that occurring between activated-open and resting-closed states is required to explain experimental values of the gating charge, thereby confirming that the reported VSD structure is likely an intermediate along the channel activation pathway. Our observation that the X-ray structure exhibits a low pore domain-opening propensity further supports this notion. The present molecular dynamics study also identifies conformations of NavAb that are seemingly related to the resting-closed and activated-open states. Our findings are consistent with recent structural and functional studies of the orthologous channels NavRh, NaChBac, and NavMs and offer possible structures for the functionally relevant conformations of NavAb.

  4. Nonlinear conductance and heterogeneity of voltage-gated ion channels allow defining electrical surface domains in cell membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cervera, Javier; Manzanares, José A.; Mafe, Salvador

    2015-07-01

    The membrane potential of a cell measured by typical electrophysiological methods is only an average magnitude and experimental techniques allowing a more detailed mapping of the cell surface have shown the existence of spatial domains with locally different electric potentials and currents. Electrical potentials in non-neural cells are regulated by the nonlinear conductance of membrane ion channels. Voltage-gated potassium channels participate in cell hyperpolarization/depolarization processes and control the electrical signals over the cell surface, constituting good candidates to study basic biological questions on a more simplified scale than the complex cell membrane. These channels show also a high heterogeneity, making it possible to analyze the effects of diversity in the electrical responses of channels localized on spatial domains. We use a phenomenological approach of voltage gating that reproduces the observed rectification characteristics of inward rectifying potassium channels and relate the threshold voltage heterogeneity of the channels to the establishment of spatial domains with different electrical sensitivities. Although our model is only a limited picture of the whole cell membrane, it shows that domains with different ion channels may permit or suppress steady state bioelectrical signals over the cell surface according to their particular voltage sensitivity. Also, the nonlinear electrical coupling of channels with different threshold potentials can lead to a rich variety of bioelectrical phenomena, including regions of membrane potential bi-stability.

  5. Direct Interaction between the Voltage Sensors Produces Cooperative Sustained Deactivation in Voltage-gated H+ Channel Dimers.

    PubMed

    Okuda, Hiroko; Yonezawa, Yasushige; Takano, Yu; Okamura, Yasushi; Fujiwara, Yuichiro

    2016-03-11

    The voltage-gated H(+) channel (Hv) is a voltage sensor domain-like protein consisting of four transmembrane segments (S1-S4). The native Hv structure is a homodimer, with the two channel subunits functioning cooperatively. Here we show that the two voltage sensor S4 helices within the dimer directly cooperate via a π-stacking interaction between Trp residues at the middle of each segment. Scanning mutagenesis showed that Trp situated around the original position provides the slow gating kinetics characteristic of the dimer's cooperativity. Analyses of the Trp mutation on the dimeric and monomeric channel backgrounds and analyses with tandem channel constructs suggested that the two Trp residues within the dimer are functionally coupled during Hv deactivation but are less so during activation. Molecular dynamics simulation also showed direct π-stacking of the two Trp residues. These results provide new insight into the cooperative function of voltage-gated channels, where adjacent voltage sensor helices make direct physical contact and work as a single unit according to the gating process. PMID:26755722

  6. Microglial voltage-gated sodium channels modulate cellular response in Alzheimer's disease--a new perspective on an old problem.

    PubMed

    Cătălin, Bogdan; Mitran, Smaranda; Ciorbagiu, Mihai; Osiac, Eugen; Bălşeanu, Tudor Adrian; Mogoantă, LaurenŢiu; Dinescu, Sorin Nicolae; Albu, Carmen Valeria; Mirea, Cecil Sorin; Vîlcea, Ionică Daniel; Iancău, Maria; Sfredel, Veronica

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) determines gradual loss of cognition and memory function, eventually leading to clinical manifest dementia. The pathogenic mechanisms of AD remain elusive and treatment options unsatisfactory, targeting only symptoms like memory loss, behavior changes, sleep disorders and seizures. These therapies are not stopping the disease's progression, at their best they can only delay it. Accumulating evidence suggests that AD is associated with a microglial dysfunction. Microglia are resident immune cells that provide continuous surveillance within the brain. When excessively activated, microglial response can also have detrimental effects via the exacerbation of inflammatory processes and release of neurotoxic substances. Recently, it was recognized that microglia express voltage-gated ion channels, in particularly voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSC). Pharmacological block of VGSC has been attempted symptomatically in AD to control the epileptic features often associated with AD, as well as to relieve detrimental behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia. The success of VGSC treatment in AD was unexpectedly variable, ranging from very beneficial to plain detrimental. This variability could not be satisfactorily explained solely by the neuronal effects. This article will try to discuss possible implication of microglial VGSC dysfunction in AD according to available data, own personal experience of the authors and propose a new way to investigate its possible implications. PMID:25826483

  7. Lack of variation in voltage-gated sodium channels of common bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) exposed to neurotoxic algal blooms.

    PubMed

    Cammen, Kristina M; Rosel, Patricia E; Wells, Randall S; Read, Andrew J

    2014-12-01

    In coastal marine ecosystems, neurotoxins produced by harmful algal blooms (HABs) often result in large-scale mortality events of many marine species. Historical and frequent exposure to HABs therefore may provide a strong selective pressure for adaptations that result in toxin resistance. Neurotoxin resistance has independently evolved in a variety of terrestrial and marine species via mutations in genes encoding the toxin binding sites within the voltage-gated sodium channel gene complex. Accordingly, we tested the hypothesis that genetic variation in the putative binding site of brevetoxins in common bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) explains differences among individuals or populations in resistance to harmful Karenia brevis blooms in the Gulf of Mexico. We found very little variation in the sodium channel exons encoding the putative brevetoxin binding site among bottlenose dolphins from central-west Florida and the Florida Panhandle. Our study included samples from several bottlenose dolphin mortality events associated with HABs, but we found no association between genetic variation and survival. We observed a significant effect of geographic region on genetic variation for some sodium channel isoforms, but this can be primarily explained by rare private alleles and is more likely a reflection of regional genetic differentiation than the cause of different levels of HAB resistance between regions. In contrast to many other previously studied neurotoxin-resistant species, we conclude that bottlenose dolphins have not evolved resistance to HABs via mutations in genes encoding the brevetoxin binding site on the voltage-gated sodium channels.

  8. The insecticidal neurotoxin Aps III is an atypical knottin peptide that potently blocks insect voltage-gated sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Bende, Niraj S; Kang, Eunji; Herzig, Volker; Bosmans, Frank; Nicholson, Graham M; Mobli, Mehdi; King, Glenn F

    2013-05-15

    One of the most potent insecticidal venom peptides described to date is Aps III from the venom of the trapdoor spider Apomastus schlingeri. Aps III is highly neurotoxic to lepidopteran crop pests, making it a promising candidate for bioinsecticide development. However, its disulfide-connectivity, three-dimensional structure, and mode of action have not been determined. Here we show that recombinant Aps III (rAps III) is an atypical knottin peptide; three of the disulfide bridges form a classical inhibitor cystine knot motif while the fourth disulfide acts as a molecular staple that restricts the flexibility of an unusually large β hairpin loop that often houses the pharmacophore in this class of toxins. We demonstrate that the irreversible paralysis induced in insects by rAps III results from a potent block of insect voltage-gated sodium channels. Channel block by rAps III is voltage-independent insofar as it occurs without significant alteration in the voltage-dependence of channel activation or steady-state inactivation. Thus, rAps III appears to be a pore blocker that plugs the outer vestibule of insect voltage-gated sodium channels. This mechanism of action contrasts strikingly with virtually all other sodium channel modulators isolated from spider venoms that act as gating modifiers by interacting with one or more of the four voltage-sensing domains of the channel.

  9. Sine-wave electrical stimulation initiates a voltage-gated potassium channel-dependent soft tissue response characterized by induction of hemocyte recruitment and collagen deposition.

    PubMed

    Franklin, Brandon M; Maroudas, Eleni; Osborn, Jeffrey L

    2016-06-01

    Soft tissue repair is a complex process that requires specific communication between multiple cell types to orchestrate effective restoration of physiological functions. Macrophages play a critical role in this wound healing process beginning at the onset of tissue injury. Understanding the signaling mechanisms involved in macrophage recruitment to the wound site is an essential step for developing more effective clinical therapies. Macrophages are known to respond to electrical fields, but the underlying cellular mechanisms mediating this response is unknown. This study demonstrated that low-amplitude sine-wave electrical stimulation (ES) initiates a soft tissue response in the absence of injury in Procambarus clarkii This cellular response was characterized by recruitment of macrophage-like hemocytes to the stimulation site indicated by increased hemocyte density at the site. ES also increased tissue collagen deposition compared to sham treatment (P < 0.05). Voltage-gated potassium (KV) channel inhibition with either 4-aminopyridine or astemizole decreased both hemocyte recruitment and collagen deposition compared to saline infusion (P < 0.05), whereas inhibition of calcium-permeable channels with ruthenium red did not affect either response to ES Thus, macrophage-like hemocytes in P. clarkii elicit a wound-like response to exogenous ES and this is accompanied by collagen deposition. This response is mediated by KV channels but independent of Ca(2+) channels. We propose a significant role for KV channels that extends beyond facilitating Ca(2+) transport via regulation of cellular membrane potentials during ES of soft tissue. PMID:27335435

  10. The L-type Ca2+ Channel Blocker Nifedipine Inhibits Mycelial Growth, Sporulation, and Virulence of Phytophthora capsici

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Peiqing; Gong, Jie; Ding, Xueling; Jiang, Yue; Chen, Guoliang; Li, Benjin; Weng, Qiyong; Chen, Qinghe

    2016-01-01

    The oomycete vegetable pathogen Phytophthora capsici causes significant losses of important vegetable crops worldwide. Calcium and other plant nutrients have been used in disease management of oomycete pathogens. Calcium homeostasis and signaling is essential for numerous biological processes, and Ca2+ channel blockers prevent excessive Ca2+ influx into the fungal cell. However, it is not known whether voltage-gated Ca2+ channel blockers improve control over oomycete pathogens. In the present study, we compared the inhibitory effects of CaCl2 and the extracellular Ca2+ chelator EDTA on mycelial growth and found that calcium assimilation plays a key role in P. capsici mycelial growth. Next, we involved the voltage-gated Ca2+ channel blockers verapamil (VP) and nifedipine (NFD) to analyze the effect of Ca2+ channel blockers on mycelial growth and sporulation; the results suggested that NFD, but not VP, caused significant inhibition. Ion rescue in an NFD-induced inhibition assay suggested that NFD-induced inhibition is calcium-dependent. In addition, NFD increased P. capsici sensitivity to H2O2 in a calcium-dependent manner, and extracellular calcium rescued it. Furthermore, NFD inhibited the virulence and gene expression related to its pathogenicity. These results suggest that NFD inhibits mycelial growth, sporulation, and virulence of P. capsici. PMID:27540377

  11. The L-type Ca(2+) Channel Blocker Nifedipine Inhibits Mycelial Growth, Sporulation, and Virulence of Phytophthora capsici.

    PubMed

    Liu, Peiqing; Gong, Jie; Ding, Xueling; Jiang, Yue; Chen, Guoliang; Li, Benjin; Weng, Qiyong; Chen, Qinghe

    2016-01-01

    The oomycete vegetable pathogen Phytophthora capsici causes significant losses of important vegetable crops worldwide. Calcium and other plant nutrients have been used in disease management of oomycete pathogens. Calcium homeostasis and signaling is essential for numerous biological processes, and Ca(2+) channel blockers prevent excessive Ca(2+) influx into the fungal cell. However, it is not known whether voltage-gated Ca(2+) channel blockers improve control over oomycete pathogens. In the present study, we compared the inhibitory effects of CaCl2 and the extracellular Ca(2+) chelator EDTA on mycelial growth and found that calcium assimilation plays a key role in P. capsici mycelial growth. Next, we involved the voltage-gated Ca(2+) channel blockers verapamil (VP) and nifedipine (NFD) to analyze the effect of Ca(2+) channel blockers on mycelial growth and sporulation; the results suggested that NFD, but not VP, caused significant inhibition. Ion rescue in an NFD-induced inhibition assay suggested that NFD-induced inhibition is calcium-dependent. In addition, NFD increased P. capsici sensitivity to H2O2 in a calcium-dependent manner, and extracellular calcium rescued it. Furthermore, NFD inhibited the virulence and gene expression related to its pathogenicity. These results suggest that NFD inhibits mycelial growth, sporulation, and virulence of P. capsici. PMID:27540377

  12. Anti-addiction drug ibogaine inhibits voltage-gated ionic currents: A study to assess the drug's cardiac ion channel profile

    SciTech Connect

    Koenig, Xaver; Kovar, Michael; Rubi, Lena; Mike, Agnes K.; Lukacs, Peter; Gawali, Vaibhavkumar S.; Todt, Hannes; Hilber, Karlheinz; Sandtner, Walter

    2013-12-01

    The plant alkaloid ibogaine has promising anti-addictive properties. Albeit not licenced as a therapeutic drug, and despite hints that ibogaine may perturb the heart rhythm, this alkaloid is used to treat drug addicts. We have recently reported that ibogaine inhibits human ERG (hERG) potassium channels at concentrations similar to the drugs affinity for several of its known brain targets. Thereby the drug may disturb the heart's electrophysiology. Here, to assess the drug's cardiac ion channel profile in more detail, we studied the effects of ibogaine and its congener 18-Methoxycoronaridine (18-MC) on various cardiac voltage-gated ion channels. We confirmed that heterologously expressed hERG currents are reduced by ibogaine in low micromolar concentrations. Moreover, at higher concentrations, the drug also reduced human Na{sub v}1.5 sodium and Ca{sub v}1.2 calcium currents. Ion currents were as well reduced by 18-MC, yet with diminished potency. Unexpectedly, although blocking hERG channels, ibogaine did not prolong the action potential (AP) in guinea pig cardiomyocytes at low micromolar concentrations. Higher concentrations (≥ 10 μM) even shortened the AP. These findings can be explained by the drug's calcium channel inhibition, which counteracts the AP-prolonging effect generated by hERG blockade. Implementation of ibogaine's inhibitory effects on human ion channels in a computer model of a ventricular cardiomyocyte, on the other hand, suggested that ibogaine does prolong the AP in the human heart. We conclude that therapeutic concentrations of ibogaine have the propensity to prolong the QT interval of the electrocardiogram in humans. In some cases this may lead to cardiac arrhythmias. - Highlights: • We study effects of anti-addiction drug ibogaine on ionic currents in cardiomyocytes. • We assess the cardiac ion channel profile of ibogaine. • Ibogaine inhibits hERG potassium, sodium and calcium channels. • Ibogaine’s effects on ion channels are a

  13. Voltage-gated ion channelopathies: inherited disorders caused by abnormal sodium, chloride, and calcium regulation in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, E P

    1995-01-01

    The pathological genetic defects in the inherited myotonias and periodic paralyses were recently elucidated using molecular genetic studies. These disorders are usually transmitted as a dominant trait from an affected parent to a child. The many clinical symptoms include cold-induced uncontrollable contraction of muscle, potassium-induced contraction and paralysis, myotonia with dramatic muscular hypertrophy, muscle stiffness, and insulin-induced paralysis (in males). Horses afflicted with the disorder can suddenly collapse, despite an impressive physique. In the past three years, these clinically defined disorders have been shown to share a common etiology: subtle defects of ion channels in the muscle-fiber membrane. Although the specific ion channel involved varies depending on the disease, most patients have single amino acid changes in the channel proteins, with both normal and mutant channels present in each muscle fiber. For each patient, we can now establish a precise molecular diagnosis in the face of overlapping clinical symptoms and begin specific pharmacological treatment based on the primary problem. These studies have also provided insight into basic muscle biology and emphasize the careful regulation of ions in muscle excitation.

  14. Molecular and biophysical basis of glutamate and trace metal modulation of voltage-gated Cav2.3 calcium channels

    PubMed Central

    Vitko, Iuliia; Lazarenko, Roman M.; Orestes, Peihan; Todorovic, Slobodan M.

    2012-01-01

    Here, we describe a new mechanism by which glutamate (Glu) and trace metals reciprocally modulate activity of the Cav2.3 channel by profoundly shifting its voltage-dependent gating. We show that zinc and copper, at physiologically relevant concentrations, occupy an extracellular binding site on the surface of Cav2.3 and hold the threshold for activation of these channels in a depolarized voltage range. Abolishing this binding by chelation or the substitution of key amino acid residues in IS1–IS2 (H111) and IS2–IS3 (H179 and H183) loops potentiates Cav2.3 by shifting the voltage dependence of activation toward more negative membrane potentials. We demonstrate that copper regulates the voltage dependence of Cav2.3 by affecting gating charge movements. Thus, in the presence of copper, gating charges transition into the “ON” position slower, delaying activation and reducing the voltage sensitivity of the channel. Overall, our results suggest a new mechanism by which Glu and trace metals transiently modulate voltage-dependent gating of Cav2.3, potentially affecting synaptic transmission and plasticity in the brain. PMID:22371363

  15. Conjoint occurrence of GABAB receptor antibodies in Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome with antibodies to the voltage gated calcium channel.

    PubMed

    Dogan Onugoren, Müjgan; Rauschka, Helmut; Bien, Christian G

    2014-08-15

    Antibodies (abs) to the GABAB receptor have been recently found to be responsible for immune-mediated encephalitis with dominant seizures. They are in approximately 50% of cases associated with small-cell lung cancer (SCLC). GABAB receptors are mainly located in the hippocampus, thalamus and cerebellum in the presynaptic and postsynaptic regions of synapses. The main function of these receptors is to reduce activity states of neurons. In some instances, GABAB receptor abs in these patients were accompanied by other antibodies, among them VGCC abs (Lancaster et al., 2010, Boronat et al., 2011). VGCC abs cause paraneoplastic Lambert Eaton myasthenic syndrome (LEMS) by reduction of presynaptic VGCCs (Titulaer et al., 2011). In the domain of CNS disease, VGCC abs have been found in association with paraneoplastic cerebellar ataxia (Mason et al., 1997) and rarely and at low titres also in other paraneoplastic encephalopathies together with Hu abs (Lennon et al., 1995). It has been a long-standing debate if abs in paraneoplastic conditions associate rather with the neurological syndrome or the tumour. Here, we describe the conjoint occurrence of abs to the GABAB receptor and to the VGCC in a patient with SCLC presenting only symptoms of the peripheral nervous system giving another example of the latter hypothesis. PMID:24929678

  16. Exon 11 skipping of SCN10A coding for voltage-gated sodium channels in dorsal root ganglia.

    PubMed

    Schirmeyer, Jana; Szafranski, Karol; Leipold, Enrico; Mawrin, Christian; Platzer, Matthias; Heinemann, Stefan H

    2014-01-01

    The voltage-gated sodium channel Na(V)1.8 (encoded by SCN10A) is predominantly expressed in dorsal root ganglia(DRG) and plays a critical role in pain perception. We analyzed SCN10A transcripts isolated from human DRGs using deep sequencing and found a novel splice variant lacking exon 11, which codes for 98 amino acids of the domain I/II linker. Quantitative PCR analysis revealed an abundance of this variant of up to 5–10% in human, while no such variants were detected in mouse or rat. Since no obvious functional differences between channels with and without the exon-11 sequence were detected, it is suggested that SCN10A exon 11 skipping in humans is a tolerated event. PMID:24763188

  17. Asymmetric synthesis of crambescin A-C carboxylic acids and their inhibitory activity on voltage-gated sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Nakazaki, Atsuo; Nakane, Yoshiki; Ishikawa, Yuki; Yotsu-Yamashita, Mari; Nishikawa, Toshio

    2016-06-21

    Synthesis of both enantiomers of crambescin B carboxylic acid is described. A cis-enyne starting material was epoxidized under the conditions of Katsuki asymmetric epoxidation to give 95% ee of the epoxide, which was transformed to crambescin B carboxylic acid via bromocation-triggered cascade cyclization as the key step. Enantiomerically pure crambescin A and C carboxylic acids were also synthesized from the product of the cascade reaction. Structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies against voltage-gated sodium channel (VGSC) inhibition using those synthetic compounds revealed that the natural enantiomer of crambescin B carboxylic acid was most active and comparable to tetrodotoxin, and the unalkylated cyclic guanidinium structure is indispensible, while the carboxylate moiety is not important. The absolute stereochemistry of crambescin A was determined by a comparison of the methyl ester derived from natural crambescin A with that derived from the stereochemically defined crambescin A carboxylic acid synthesized in this study.

  18. The voltage-gated proton channel Hv1 is expressed in pancreatic islet β-cells and regulates insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qing; Che, Yongzhe; Li, Qiang; Zhang, Shangrong; Gao, Ying-Tang; Wang, Yifan; Wang, Xudong; Xi, Wang; Zuo, Weiyan; Li, Shu Jie

    2015-12-25

    The voltage-gated proton channel Hv1 is a potent acid extruder that participates in the extrusion of the intracellular acid. Here, we showed for the first time, Hv1 is highly expressed in mouse and human pancreatic islet β-cells, as well as β-cell lines. Imaging studies demonstrated that Hv1 resides in insulin-containing granules in β-cells. Knockdown of Hv1 with RNA interference significantly reduces glucose- and K(+)-induced insulin secretion in isolated islets and INS-1 (832/13) β-cells and has an impairment on glucose- and K(+)-induced intracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis. Our data demonstrated that the expression of Hv1 in pancreatic islet β-cells regulates insulin secretion through regulating Ca(2+) homeostasis. PMID:26559003

  19. A case study of voltage-gated potassium channel antibody-related limbic encephalitis with PET/MRI findings

    PubMed Central

    Day, Brian K.; Eisenman, Lawrence; Black, Joseph; Maccotta, Luigi; Hogan, R. Edward

    2015-01-01

    Preclinical and clinical studies have demonstrated the significance of inflammation and autoantibodies in epilepsy, and the use of immunotherapies in certain situations has become an established practice. Temporal lobe epilepsy can follow paraneoplastic or nonparaneoplastic limbic encephalitis associated with antibodies directed against brain antigens. Here, we focus on a patient with worsening confusion and temporal lobe seizures despite treatment with antiepileptic medications. Serial brain MRIs did not conclusively reveal structural abnormalities, so the patient underwent brain PET/MRI to simultaneously evaluate brain structure and function, revealing bitemporal abnormalities. The patient was diagnosed with voltage-gated potassium channel antibody-related limbic encephalitis based on clinical presentation, imaging findings, and antibody testing. Treatment included the addition of a second antiepileptic agent and oral steroids. His seizures and cognitive deficits improved and stabilized. PMID:26106579

  20. Application of stochastic automata networks for creation of continuous time Markov chain models of voltage gating of gap junction channels.

    PubMed

    Snipas, Mindaugas; Pranevicius, Henrikas; Pranevicius, Mindaugas; Pranevicius, Osvaldas; Paulauskas, Nerijus; Bukauskas, Feliksas F

    2015-01-01

    The primary goal of this work was to study advantages of numerical methods used for the creation of continuous time Markov chain models (CTMC) of voltage gating of gap junction (GJ) channels composed of connexin protein. This task was accomplished by describing gating of GJs using the formalism of the stochastic automata networks (SANs), which allowed for very efficient building and storing of infinitesimal generator of the CTMC that allowed to produce matrices of the models containing a distinct block structure. All of that allowed us to develop efficient numerical methods for a steady-state solution of CTMC models. This allowed us to accelerate CPU time, which is necessary to solve CTMC models, ~20 times. PMID:25705700