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Sample records for l-type voltage-gated calcium

  1. L-type Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels in Conditioned Fear: A Genetic and Pharmacological Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKinney, Brandon C.; Sze, Wilson; White, Jessica A.; Murphy, Geoffrey G.

    2008-01-01

    Using pharmacological approaches, others have suggested that L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (L-VGCCs) mediate both consolidation and extinction of conditioned fear. In the absence of L-VGCC isoform-specific antagonists, we have begun to investigate the subtype-specific role of LVGCCs in consolidation and extinction of conditioned fear…

  2. L-type Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels in Conditioned Fear: A Genetic and Pharmacological Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKinney, Brandon C.; Sze, Wilson; White, Jessica A.; Murphy, Geoffrey G.

    2008-01-01

    Using pharmacological approaches, others have suggested that L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (L-VGCCs) mediate both consolidation and extinction of conditioned fear. In the absence of L-VGCC isoform-specific antagonists, we have begun to investigate the subtype-specific role of LVGCCs in consolidation and extinction of conditioned fear…

  3. Melanocortin 4 receptor constitutive activity inhibits L-type voltage-gated calcium channels in neurons.

    PubMed

    Agosti, F; Cordisco Gonzalez, S; Martinez Damonte, V; Tolosa, M J; Di Siervi, N; Schioth, H B; Davio, C; Perello, M; Raingo, J

    2017-03-27

    The melanocortin 4 receptor (MC4R) is a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that is expressed in several brain nuclei playing a crucial role in the regulation of energy balance controlling the homeostasis of the organism. It displays both agonist-evoked and constitutive activity, and moreover, it can couple to different G proteins. Most of the research on MC4R has been focused on agonist-induced activity, while the molecular and cellular basis of MC4R constitutive activity remains scarcely studied. We have previously shown that neuronal N-type voltage-gated calcium channels (CaV2.2) are inhibited by MC4R agonist-dependent activation, while the CaV subtypes that carry L- and P/Q-type current are not. Here, we tested the hypothesis that MC4R constitutive activity can affect CaV, with focus on the channel subtypes that can control transcriptional activity coupled to depolarization (L-type, CaV1.2/1.3) and neurotransmitter release (N- and P/Q-type, CaV2.2 and CaV2.1). We found that MC4R constitutive activity inhibits specifically CaV1.2/1.3 and CaV2.1 subtypes of CaV. We also explored the signaling pathways mediating this inhibition, and thus propose that agonist-dependent and basal MC4R activation modes signal differentially through Gs and Gi/o pathways to impact on different CaV subtypes. In addition, we found that chronic incubation with MC4R endogenous inverse agonist, agouti and agouti-related peptide (AgRP), occludes CaV inhibition in a cell line and in amygdaloid complex cultured neurons as well. Thus, we define new mechanisms of control of the main mediators of depolarization-induced calcium entry into neurons by a GPCR that displays constitutive activity.

  4. L-type voltage-gated calcium channels in conditioned fear: A genetic and pharmacological analysis

    PubMed Central

    McKinney, Brandon C.; Sze, Wilson; White, Jessica A.; Murphy, Geoffrey G.

    2008-01-01

    Using pharmacological approaches, others have suggested that L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (L-VGCCs) mediate both consolidation and extinction of conditioned fear. In the absence of L-VGCC isoform-specific antagonists, we have begun to investigate the subtype-specific role of LVGCCs in consolidation and extinction of conditioned fear using a molecular genetics approach. Previously, we used this approach to demonstrate that the Cav1.3 isoform mediates consolidation, but not extinction, of contextually conditioned fear. Here, we used mice in which the gene for the L-VGCC pore-forming subunit Cav1.2 was conditionally deleted in forebrain excitatory neurons (Cav1.2cKO mice) to address the role of Cav1.2 in consolidation and extinction of conditioned fear. We demonstrate that Cav1.2cKO mice consolidate and extinguish conditioned fear as well as control littermates. These data suggest that Cav1.2 is not critical for these processes and together with our previous data argue against a role for either of the brain-expressed L-VGCCs (Cav1.2 or Cav1.3) in extinction of conditioned fear. Additionally, we present data demonstrating that the L-VGCC antagonist nifedipine, which has been used in previous conditioned fear extinction studies, impairs locomotion, and induces an aversive state. We further demonstrate that this aversive state can enter into associations with conditioned stimuli that are present at the time that it is experienced, suggesting that previous studies using nifedipine were likely confounded by drug toxicity. Taken together, our genetic and pharmacological data argue against a role for Cav1.2 in consolidation of conditioned fear as well as a role for L-VGCCs in extinction of conditioned fear. PMID:18441291

  5. Verapamil - L type voltage gated calcium channel inhibitor diminishes aggressive behavior in male Siamese fighting fish.

    PubMed

    Kania, B F; Dębski, B; Wrońska, D; Zawadzka, E

    2015-01-01

    Verapamil is a L-type voltage gated calcium channels inhibitor (VGCCI), which is a highly prescribed drug used in the treatment of hypertension, angina pectoris, cardiac arrhythmia and cluster headaches. Its common use caused its appearance in water environment. VGCC inhibit epinephrine release and cause many neuro-hormonal changes influencing also fish behavior. Siamese fighting fish was chosen to study the influence of verapamil given to the water on the beginning of experiment in 3 different concentrations of 0 (control), 8 and 160 μg · L-1, on aggressive behavior in these fish. The experimental fish were placed in individual glass containers for 3 weeks and the mirror test was used. The highest concentration led to a significant modulation of fish behavior after 1 week and the lower dose caused statistically significant behavioral changes after 2 weeks of verapamil treatment. Siamese fighting fish males exposed to verapamil had longer latencies to the first chase - 12.6 s (8 μg · L-1 of verapamil) and 18.8 s (160 μg · L-1 of verapamil) compared to 5.6 s in the control group, decreased attack frequency and shorter duration of these attacks. The number of attacks within 10 min was decreased from 38.3 in the control group to 27.1 and 16.1, respectively. Also the total duration of these attacks decreased from 354.8 (control) to 326.4 (decrease statistically insignificant) and to 194.8 s in verapamil treated groups. It was shown, that even relatively low concentrations of verapamil in water may have adverse effects on fish and probably other living organisms.

  6. Retinoschisin Facilitates the Function of L-Type Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Liheng; Ko, Michael L.; Ko, Gladys Y.-P.

    2017-01-01

    Modulation of ion channels by extracellular proteins plays critical roles in shaping synaptic plasticity. Retinoschisin (RS1) is an extracellular adhesive protein secreted from photoreceptors and bipolar cells, and it plays an important role during retinal development, as well as in maintaining the stability of retinal layers. RS1 is known to form homologous octamers and interact with molecules on the plasma membrane including phosphatidylserine, sodium-potassium exchanger complex, and L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (LTCCs). However, how this physical interaction between RS1 and ion channels might affect the channel gating properties is unclear. In retinal photoreceptors, two major LTCCs are Cav1.3 (α1D) and Cav1.4 (α1F) with distinct biophysical properties, functions and distributions. Cav1.3 is distributed from the inner segment (IS) to the synaptic terminal and is responsible for calcium influx to the photoreceptors and overall calcium homeostasis. Cav1.4 is only expressed at the synaptic terminal and is responsible for neurotransmitter release. Mutations of the gene encoding Cav1.4 cause X-linked incomplete congenital stationary night blindness type 2 (CSNB2), while null mutations of Cav1.3 cause a mild decrease of retinal light responses in mice. Even though RS1 is known to maintain retinal architecture, in this study, we present that RS1 interacts with both Cav1.3 and Cav1.4 and regulates their activations. RS1 was able to co-immunoprecipitate with Cav1.3 and Cav1.4 from porcine retinas, and it increased the LTCC currents and facilitated voltage-dependent activation in HEK cells co-transfected with RS1 and Cav1.3 or Cav1.4, thus providing evidence of a functional interaction between RS1 and LTCCs. The interaction between RS1 and Cav1.3 did not change the calcium-dependent inactivation of Cav1.3. In mice lacking RS1, the expression of Cav1.3 and Cav1.4 in the retina decreased, while in mice with Cav1.4 deletion, the retinal level of RS1 decreased

  7. Retinoschisin, a New Binding Partner for L-type Voltage-gated Calcium Channels in the Retina*

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Liheng; Jian, Kuihuan; Ko, Michael L.; Trump, Dorothy; Ko, Gladys Y.-P.

    2009-01-01

    The L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (L-VGCCs) are activated under high depolarization voltages. They are vital for diverse biological events, including cell excitability, differentiation, and synaptic transmission. In retinal photoreceptors, L-VGCCs are responsible for neurotransmitter release and are under circadian influences. However, the mechanism of L-VGCC regulation in photoreceptors is not fully understood. Here, we show that retinoschisin, a highly conserved extracellular protein, interacts with the L-VGCCα1D subunit and regulates its activities in a circadian manner. Mutations in the gene encoding retinoschisin (RS1) cause retinal disorganization that leads to early onset of macular degeneration. Since ion channel activities can be modulated through interactions with extracellular proteins, disruption of these interactions can alter physiology and be the root cause of disease states. Co-immunoprecipitation and mammalian two-hybrid assays showed that retinoschisin and the N-terminal fragment of the L-VGCCα1 subunit physically interacted with one another. The expression and secretion of retinoschisin are under circadian regulation with a peak at night and nadir during the day. Inhibition of L-type VGCCs decreased membrane-bound retinoschisin at night. Overexpression of a missense RS1 mutant gene, R141G, into chicken cone photoreceptors caused a decrease of L-type VGCC currents at night. Our findings demonstrate a novel bidirectional relationship between an ion channel and an extracellular protein; L-type VGCCs regulate the circadian rhythm of retinoschisin secretion, whereas secreted retinoschisin feeds back to regulate L-type VGCCs. Therefore, physical interactions between L-VGCCα1 subunits and retinoschisin play an important role in the membrane retention of L-VGCCα1 subunits and photoreceptor-bipolar synaptic transmission. PMID:19074145

  8. The L-Type Voltage-Gated Calcium Channel Ca[subscript v]1.3 Mediates Consolidation, but Not Extinction, of Contextually Conditioned Fear in Mice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKinney, Brandon C.; Murphy, Geoffrey G.

    2006-01-01

    Using pharmacological techniques, it has been demonstrated that both consolidation and extinction of Pavlovian fear conditioning are dependent to some extent upon L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (LVGCCs). Although these studies have successfully implicated LVGCCs in Pavlovian fear conditioning, they do not provide information about the…

  9. Like Extinction, Latent Inhibition of Conditioned Fear in Mice Is Blocked by Systemic Inhibition of L-Type Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blouin, Ashley M.; Cain, Chris K.; Barad, Mike

    2004-01-01

    Having recently shown that extinction of conditioned fear depends on L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (LVGCCs), we have been seeking other protocols that require this unusual induction mechanism. We tested latent inhibition (LI) of fear, because LI resembles extinction except that cue exposures precede, rather than follow, cue-shock pairing.…

  10. The L-Type Voltage-Gated Calcium Channel Ca[subscript v]1.3 Mediates Consolidation, but Not Extinction, of Contextually Conditioned Fear in Mice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKinney, Brandon C.; Murphy, Geoffrey G.

    2006-01-01

    Using pharmacological techniques, it has been demonstrated that both consolidation and extinction of Pavlovian fear conditioning are dependent to some extent upon L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (LVGCCs). Although these studies have successfully implicated LVGCCs in Pavlovian fear conditioning, they do not provide information about the…

  11. Like Extinction, Latent Inhibition of Conditioned Fear in Mice Is Blocked by Systemic Inhibition of L-Type Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blouin, Ashley M.; Cain, Chris K.; Barad, Mike

    2004-01-01

    Having recently shown that extinction of conditioned fear depends on L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (LVGCCs), we have been seeking other protocols that require this unusual induction mechanism. We tested latent inhibition (LI) of fear, because LI resembles extinction except that cue exposures precede, rather than follow, cue-shock pairing.…

  12. Methamphetamine acutely inhibits voltage-gated calcium channels but chronically up-regulates L-type channels.

    PubMed

    Andres, Marilou A; Cooke, Ian M; Bellinger, Frederick P; Berry, Marla J; Zaporteza, Maribel M; Rueli, Rachel H; Barayuga, Stephanie M; Chang, Linda

    2015-07-01

    In neurons, calcium (Ca(2+) ) channels regulate a wide variety of functions ranging from synaptic transmission to gene expression. They also induce neuroplastic changes that alter gene expression following psychostimulant administration. Ca(2+) channel blockers have been considered as potential therapeutic agents for the treatment of methamphetamine (METH) dependence because of their ability to reduce drug craving among METH users. Here, we studied the effects of METH exposure on voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels using SH-SY5Y cells as a model of dopaminergic neurons. We found that METH has different short- and long-term effects. A short-term effect involves immediate (< 5 min) direct inhibition of Ca(2+) ion movements through Ca(2+) channels. Longer exposure to METH (20 min or 48 h) selectively up-regulates the expression of only the CACNA1C gene, thus increasing the number of L-type Ca(2+) channels. This up-regulation of CACNA1C is associated with the expression of the cAMP-responsive element-binding protein (CREB), a known regulator of CACNA1C gene expression, and the MYC gene, which encodes a transcription factor that putatively binds to a site proximal to the CACNA1C gene transcription initiation site. The short-term inhibition of Ca(2+) ion movement and later, the up-regulation of Ca(2+) channel gene expression together suggest the operation of cAMP-responsive element-binding protein- and C-MYC-mediated mechanisms to compensate for Ca(2+) channel inhibition by METH. Increased Ca(2+) current density and subsequent increased intracellular Ca(2+) may contribute to the neurodegeneration accompanying chronic METH abuse. Methamphetamine (METH) exposure has both short- and long-term effects. Acutely, methamphetamine directly inhibits voltage-gated calcium channels. Chronically, neurons compensate by up-regulating the L-type Ca(2+) channel gene, CACNA1C. This compensatory mechanism is mediated by transcription factors C-MYC and CREB, in which CREB is linked to the

  13. Diminished Vision in Healthy Aging Is Associated with Increased Retinal L-Type Voltage Gated Calcium Channel Ion Influx

    PubMed Central

    Bissig, David; Goebel, Dennis; Berkowitz, Bruce A.

    2013-01-01

    Extensive evidence implicates an increase in hippocampal L-type voltage-gated calcium channel (L-VGCC) expression, and ion influx through these channels, in age-related cognitive declines. Here, we ask if this “calcium hypothesis" applies to the neuroretina: Is increased influx via L-VGCCs related to the well-documented but poorly-understood vision declines in healthy aging? In Long-Evans rats we find a significant age-related increase in ion flux through retinal L-VGCCs in vivo (manganese-enhanced MRI (MEMRI)) that are longitudinally linked with progressive vision declines (optokinetic tracking). Importantly, the degree of retinal Mn2+ uptake early in adulthood significantly predicted later visual contrast sensitivity declines. Furthermore, as in the aging hippocampus, retinal expression of a drug-insensitive L-VGCC isoform (α1D) increased – a pattern confirmed in vivo by an age-related decline in sensitivity to L-VGCC blockade. These data highlight mechanistic similarities between retinal and hippocampal aging, and raise the possibility of new treatment targets for minimizing vision loss during healthy aging. PMID:23457553

  14. Sigma-1 receptor stimulation attenuates calcium influx through activated L-type Voltage Gated Calcium Channels in purified retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Brett H; Park, Yong; Daudt, Donald R; Ma, Hai-Ying; Akopova, Irina; Stankowska, Dorota L; Clark, Abbot F; Yorio, Thomas

    2013-02-01

    Sigma-1 receptors (σ-1rs) exert neuroprotective effects on retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) both in vivo and in vitro. This receptor has unique properties through its actions on several voltage-gated and ligand-gated channels. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role that σ-1rs play in regulating cell calcium dynamics through activated L-type Voltage Gated Calcium Channels (L-type VGCCs) in purified RGCs. RGCs were isolated from P3-P7 Sprague-Dawley rats and purified by sequential immunopanning using a Thy1.1 antibody. Calcium imaging was used to measure changes in intracellular calcium after depolarizing the cells with potassium chloride (KCl) in the presence or absence of two σ-1r agonists [(+)-SKF10047 and (+)-Pentazocine], one σ-1r antagonist (BD1047), and one L-type VGCC antagonist (Verapamil). Finally, co-localization studies were completed to assess the proximity of σ-1r with L-type VGCCs in purified RGCs. VGCCs were activated using KCl (20 mM). Pre-treatment with a known L-type VGCC blocker demonstrated a 57% decrease of calcium ion influx through activated VGCCs. Calcium imaging results also demonstrated that σ-1r agonists, (+)-N-allylnormetazocine hydrochloride [(+)-SKF10047] and (+)-Pentazocine, inhibited calcium ion influx through activated VGCCs. Antagonist treatment using BD1047 demonstrated a potentiation of calcium ion influx through activated VGCCs and abolished all inhibitory effects of the σ-1r agonists on VGCCs, implying that these ligands were acting through the σ-1r. An L-type VGCC blocker (Verapamil) also inhibited KCl activated VGCCs and when combined with the σ-1r agonists there was not a further decline in calcium entry suggesting similar mechanisms. Lastly, co-localization studies demonstrated that σ-1rs and L-type VGCCs are co-localized in purified RGCs. Taken together, these results indicated that σ-1r agonists can inhibit KCl induced calcium ion influx through activated L-type VGCCs in purified RGCs. This is the

  15. Microdamage induced calcium efflux from bone matrix activates intracellular calcium signaling in osteoblasts via L-type and T-type voltage-gated calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Jung, Hyungjin; Best, Makenzie; Akkus, Ozan

    2015-07-01

    Mechanisms by which bone microdamage triggers repair response are not completely understood. It has been shown that calcium efflux ([Ca(2+)]E) occurs from regions of bone undergoing microdamage. Such efflux has also been shown to trigger intracellular calcium signaling ([Ca(2+)]I) in MC3T3-E1 cells local to damaged regions. Voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) are implicated in the entry of [Ca(2+)]E to the cytoplasm. We investigated the involvement of VGCC in the extracellular calcium induced intracellular calcium response (ECIICR). MC3T3-E1 cells were subjected to one dimensional calcium efflux from their basal aspect which results in an increase in [Ca(2+)]I. This increase was concomitant with membrane depolarization and it was significantly reduced in the presence of Bepridil, a non-selective VGCC inhibitor. To identify specific type(s) of VGCC in ECIICR, the cells were treated with selective inhibitors for different types of VGCC. Significant changes in the peak intensity and the number of [Ca(2+)]I oscillations were observed when L-type and T-type specific VGCC inhibitors (Verapamil and NNC55-0396, respectively) were used. So as to confirm the involvement of L- and T-type VGCC in the context of microdamage, cells were seeded on devitalized notched bone specimen, which were loaded to induce microdamage in the presence and absence of Verapamil and NNC55-0396. The results showed significant decrease in [Ca(2+)]I activity of cells in the microdamaged regions of bone when L- and T-type blockers were applied. This study demonstrated that extracellular calcium increase in association with damage depolarizes the cell membrane and the calcium ions enter the cell cytoplasm by L- and T-type VGCCs.

  16. Regulation of L-type Voltage Gated Calcium Channel CACNA1S in Macrophages upon Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection.

    PubMed

    Antony, Cecil; Mehto, Subhash; Tiwari, Brijendra K; Singh, Yogendra; Natarajan, Krishnamurthy

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrated earlier the inhibitory role played by Voltage Gated Calcium Channels (VGCCs) in regulating Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb) survival and pathogenesis. In this report, we investigated mechanisms and key players that regulate the surface expression of VGCC-CACNA1S by Rv2463 and M. tb infection in macrophages. Our earlier work identified Rv2463 to be expressed at early times post infection in macrophages that induced suppressor responses to dendritic cells and macrophages. Our results in this study demonstrate a role of MyD88 independent TLR pathway in mediating CACNA1S expression. Dissecting the role for second messengers, we show that calcium homeostasis plays a key role in CACNA1S expression during M. tb infection. Using siRNAs against molecular sensors of calcium regulation, we show an involvement of ER associated Stromal Interaction Molecules 1 and 2 (STIM1 and STIM2), and transcription factor pCREB, towards CACNA1S expression that also involved the MyD88 independent pathway. Interestingly, reactive oxygen species played a negative role in M. tb mediated CACNA1S expression. Further, a cross-regulation of ROS and pCREB was noted that governed CACNA1S expression. Characterizing the mechanisms governing CACNA1S expression would improve our understanding of the regulation of VGCC expression and its role in M. tb pathogenesis during M. tb infection.

  17. Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamponi, Gerald Werner

    Voltage Gated Calcium Channels is the first comprehensive book in the calcium channel field, encompassing over thirty years of progress towards our understanding of calcium channel structure, function, regulation, physiology, pharmacology, and genetics. This book balances contributions from many of the leading authorities in the calcium channel field with fresh perspectives from risings stars in the area, taking into account the most recent literature and concepts. This is the only all-encompassing calcium channel book currently available, and is an essential resource for academic researchers at all levels in the areas neuroscience, biophysics, and cardiovascular sciences, as well as to researchers in the drug discovery area.

  18. Apo calmodulin binding to the L-type voltage-gated calcium channel Ca{sub v}1.2 IQ peptide

    SciTech Connect

    Lian Luyun . E-mail: lu-yun.lian@liverpool.ac.uk; Myatt, Daniel; Kitmitto, Ashraf . E-mail: ashraf.kitmitto@manchester.ac.uk

    2007-02-16

    The influx of calcium through the L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (LTCCs) is the trigger for the process of calcium-induced calcium release (CICR) from the sarcoplasmic recticulum, an essential step for cardiac contraction. There are two feedback mechanisms that regulate LTCC activity: calcium-dependent inactivation (CDI) and calcium-dependent facilitation (CDF), both of which are mediated by calmodulin (CaM) binding. The IQ domain (aa 1645-1668) housed within the cytoplasmic domain of the LTCC Ca{sub v}1.2 subunit has been shown to bind both calcium-loaded (Ca{sup 2+}CaM ) and calcium-free CaM (apoCaM). Here, we provide new data for the structural basis for the interaction of apoCaM with the IQ peptide using NMR, revealing that the apoCaM C-lobe residues are most significantly perturbed upon complex formation. In addition, we have employed transmission electron microscopy of purified LTCC complexes which shows that both apoCaM and Ca{sup 2+}CaM can bind to the intact channel.

  19. Localization and functional modification of L-type voltage-gated calcium channels in equine spermatozoa from fresh and frozen semen.

    PubMed

    Albrizio, M; Moramarco, A M; Nicassio, M; Micera, E; Zarrilli, A; Lacalandra, G M

    2015-02-01

    It is well known that insemination of cryopreserved semen always results in lower fertility when compared with fresh semen, but there is an increased interest and demand for frozen equine semen by the major breeder associations because of the utility arising from semen already "on hand" at breeding time. In this article, we report that equine sperm cells express L-type voltage-gated calcium channels; their localization is restricted to sperm neck and to the principal piece of the tail in both fresh and frozen-thawed spermatozoa. We also studied the causes of cryoinjury at the membrane level focusing on the function of L-type calcium channels. We report that in cryopreserved spermatozoa the mean basal value of [Ca(2+)]i is higher than that of spermatozoa from fresh semen (447.130 vs. 288.3 nM; P < 0.001) and L-type channels function differently in response to their agonist and antagonist in relation to semen condition (fresh or frozen-thawed). We found that on addition of agonist to the culture medium, the increase in intracellular calcium concentrations ([Ca(2+)]i) was greater in frozen semen than in fresh semen (Δ[Ca(2+)]i = 124.59 vs. 16.04 nM; P < 0.001), whereas after the addition of antagonist the decrease in [Ca(2+)]i was lower in frozen semen than in fresh semen (Δ[Ca(2+)]i = 32.5 vs. 82.5 nM; P < 0.001). In this article, we also discuss the impact of cryopreservation on sperm physiology.

  20. The L-Type voltage-gated calcium channel Cav1.3 mediates consolidation, but not extinction, of contextually conditioned fear in mice.

    PubMed

    McKinney, Brandon C; Murphy, Geoffrey G

    2006-01-01

    Using pharmacological techniques, it has been demonstrated that both consolidation and extinction of Pavlovian fear conditioning are dependent to some extent upon L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (LVGCCs). Although these studies have successfully implicated LVGCCs in Pavlovian fear conditioning, they do not provide information about the specific LVGCC isoform involved. Both of the major LVGCC subtypes found in the brain (Cav1.2 and Cav1.3) are targets of the pharmacological manipulations used in earlier work. In this study, we used mice in which the gene for the pore-forming subunit (alpha1D) Cav1.3 was deleted (Cav1.3 knockout mice) to elucidate its contribution to consolidation and extinction of conditioned fear. We find that Cav1.3 knockout mice exhibit significant impairments in consolidation of contextual fear conditioning. However, once sufficiently overtrained, the Cav1.3 knockout mice exhibit rates of extinction that are identical to that observed in wild-type mice. We also find that Cav1.3 knockout mice perform as well as wild-type mice on the hidden platform version of the Morris water maze, suggesting that the consolidation deficit in conditioned fear observed in the Cav1.3 knockout mice is not likely the result of an inability to encode the context, but may reflect an inability to make the association between the context and the unconditioned stimulus.

  1. Circadian phase-dependent effect of nitric oxide on L-type voltage-gated calcium channels in avian cone photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Michael L.; Shi, Liheng; Huang, Cathy Chia-Yu; Grushin, Kirill; Park, So-Young; Ko, Gladys Y.-P.

    2014-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) plays an important role in phase-shifting of circadian neuronal activities in the suprachiasmatic nucleus and circadian behavior activity rhythms. In the retina, NO production is increased in a light-dependent manner. While endogenous circadian oscillators in retinal photoreceptors regulate their physiological states, it is not clear whether NO also participates in the circadian regulation of photoreceptors. In the present study, we demonstrate that NO is involved in the circadian phase-dependent regulation of L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (L-VGCCs). In chick cone photoreceptors, the L-VGCCα1 subunit expression and the maximal L-VGCC currents are higher at night, and both Ras-MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase)-Erk (extracellular-signal-regulated kinase) and Ras-phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K)-protein kinase B (Akt) are part of the circadian output pathways regulating L-VGCCs. The NO-cGMP-protein kinase G (PKG) pathway decreases L-VGCCα1 subunit expression and L-VGCC currents at night, but not during the day, and exogenous NO donor or cGMP decreases the phosphorylation of Erk and Akt at night. The protein expression of neural NO synthase (nNOS) is also under circadian control, with both nNOS and NO production being higher during the day. Taken together, NO/cGMP/PKG signaling is involved as part of the circadian output pathway to regulate L-VGCCs in cone photoreceptors. PMID:23895452

  2. Transcript scanning reveals novel and extensive splice variations in human l-type voltage-gated calcium channel, Cav1.2 alpha1 subunit.

    PubMed

    Tang, Zhen Zhi; Liang, Mui Cheng; Lu, Songqing; Yu, Dejie; Yu, Chye Yun; Yue, David T; Soong, Tuck Wah

    2004-10-22

    The L-type (Cav1.2) voltage-gated calcium channels play critical roles in membrane excitability, gene expression, and muscle contraction. The generation of splice variants by the alternative splicing of the poreforming Cav1.2 alpha1-subunit (alpha(1)1.2) may thereby provide potent means to enrich functional diversity. To date, however, no comprehensive scan of alpha(1)1.2 splice variation has been performed, particularly in the human context. Here we have undertaken such a screen, exploiting recently developed "transcript scanning" methods to probe the human gene. The degree of variation turns out to be surprisingly large; 19 of the 55 exons comprising the human alpha(1)1.2 gene were subjected to alternative splicing. Two of these are previously unrecognized exons and two others were not known to be spliced. Comparisons of fetal and adult heart and brain uncovered a large IVS3-S4 variability resulting from combinatorial utilization of exons 31-33. Electrophysiological characterization of such IVS3-S4 variation revealed unmistakable shifts in the voltage dependence of activation, according to an interesting correlation between increased IVS3-S4 linker length and activation at more depolarized potentials. Steady-state inactivation profiles remained unaltered. This systematic portrait of splice variation furnishes a reference library for comprehending combinatorial arrangements of Cav1.2 splice exons, especially as they impact development, physiology, and disease.

  3. Mechanisms of NMDA Receptor- and Voltage-Gated L-Type Calcium Channel-Dependent Hippocampal LTP Critically Rely on Proteolysis That Is Mediated by Distinct Metalloproteinases.

    PubMed

    Wiera, Grzegorz; Nowak, Daria; van Hove, Inge; Dziegiel, Piotr; Moons, Lieve; Mozrzymas, Jerzy W

    2017-02-01

    Long-term potentiation (LTP) is widely perceived as a memory substrate and in the hippocampal CA3-CA1 pathway, distinct forms of LTP depend on NMDA receptors (nmdaLTP) or L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (vdccLTP). LTP is also known to be effectively regulated by extracellular proteolysis that is mediated by various enzymes. Herein, we investigated whether in mice hippocampal slices these distinct forms of LTP are specifically regulated by different metalloproteinases (MMPs). We found that MMP-3 inhibition or knock-out impaired late-phase LTP in the CA3-CA1 pathway. Interestingly, late-phase LTP was also decreased by MMP-9 blockade. When both MMP-3 and MMP-9 were inhibited, both early- and late-phase LTP was impaired. Using immunoblotting, in situ zymography, and immunofluorescence, we found that LTP induction was associated with an increase in MMP-3 expression and activity in CA1 stratum radiatum. MMP-3 inhibition and knock-out prevented the induction of vdccLTP, with no effect on nmdaLTP. L-type channel-dependent LTP is known to be impaired by hyaluronic acid digestion. We found that slice treatment with hyaluronidase occluded the effect of MMP-3 blockade on LTP, further confirming a critical role for MMP-3 in this form of LTP. In contrast to the CA3-CA1 pathway, LTP in the mossy fiber-CA3 projection did not depend on MMP-3, indicating the pathway specificity of the actions of MMPs. Overall, our study indicates that the activation of perisynaptic MMP-3 supports L-type channel-dependent LTP in the CA1 region, whereas nmdaLTP depends solely on MMP-9. Various types of long-term potentiation (LTP) are correlated with distinct phases of memory formation and retrieval, but the underlying molecular signaling pathways remain poorly understood. Extracellular proteases have emerged as key players in neuroplasticity phenomena. The present study found that L-type calcium channel-dependent LTP in the CA3-CA1 hippocampal projection is critically regulated by the activity

  4. Functional proteins involved in regulation of intracellular Ca(2+) for drug development: chronic nicotine treatment upregulates L-type high voltage-gated calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Katsura, Masashi; Ohkuma, Seitaro

    2005-03-01

    Neurochemical mechanisms underlying drug dependence and withdrawal syndrome remain unclear. In this review, we discuss how chronic nicotine exposure to neurons affects expression of diazepam binding inhibitor (DBI), an endogenous anxiogenic neuropeptide supposed to be a common substance participating drug dependence, and function of L-type high voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels (HVCCs). We also discuss the functional interaction between DBI and L-type HVCCs in nicotine dependence. Both DBI levels and [(45)Ca(2+)] influx significantly increased in the brain from mice treated with nicotine for long term, which was further enhanced after abrupt cessation of nicotine and was abolished by nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) antagonists. Similar responses of DBI expression and L-type HVCC function were observed in cerebral cortical neurons after sustained exposure to nicotine. In addition, increased DBI expression was inhibited by antagonists of nAChR and L-type HVCCs. Sustained exposure of neurons to nicotine significantly enhanced expression of alpha(1) and alpha(2)/delta(1) subunits for L-type HVCCs and caused an increase in the B(max) value of [(3)H]verapamil binding to the particulate fractions. Therefore, it is concluded that the alterations in DBI expression is mediated via increased influx of Ca(2+) through upregulated L-type HVCCs and these neurochemical changes have a close relationship with development of nicotine dependence and/or its withdrawal syndrome.

  5. N- and L-Type Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels Mediate Fast Calcium Transients in Axonal Shafts of Mouse Peripheral Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Barzan, Ruxandra; Pfeiffer, Friederike; Kukley, Maria

    2016-01-01

    In the peripheral nervous system (PNS) a vast number of axons are accommodated within fiber bundles that constitute peripheral nerves. A major function of peripheral axons is to propagate action potentials along their length, and hence they are equipped with Na+ and K+ channels, which ensure successful generation, conduction and termination of each action potential. However little is known about Ca2+ ion channels expressed along peripheral axons and their possible functional significance. The goal of the present study was to test whether voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (VGCCs) are present along peripheral nerve axons in situ and mediate rapid activity-dependent Ca2+ elevations under physiological circumstances. To address this question we used mouse sciatic nerve slices, Ca2+ indicator Oregon Green BAPTA-1, and 2-photon Ca2+ imaging in fast line scan mode (500 Hz). We report that transient increases in intra-axonal Ca2+ concentration take place along peripheral nerve axons in situ when axons are stimulated electrically with single pulses. Furthermore, we show for the first time that Ca2+ transients in peripheral nerves are fast, i.e., occur in a millisecond time-domain. Combining Ca2+ imaging and pharmacology with specific blockers of different VGCCs subtypes we demonstrate that Ca2+ transients in peripheral nerves are mediated mainly by N-type and L-type VGCCs. Discovery of fast Ca2+ entry into the axonal shafts through VGCCs in peripheral nerves suggests that Ca2+ may be involved in regulation of action potential propagation and/or properties in this system, or mediate neurotransmitter release along peripheral axons as it occurs in the optic nerve and white matter of the central nervous system (CNS). PMID:27313508

  6. Suppression of Protective Responses upon Activation of L-Type Voltage Gated Calcium Channel in Macrophages during Mycobacterium bovis BCG Infection

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Deepika; Tiwari, Brijendra Kumar; Mehto, Subhash; Antony, Cecil; Kak, Gunjan; Singh, Yogendra; Natarajan, Krishnamurthy

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb) strains eliciting drug resistance has necessitated the need for understanding the complexities of host pathogen interactions. The regulation of calcium homeostasis by Voltage Gated Calcium Channel (VGCCs) upon M. tb infection has recently assumed importance in this area. We previously showed a suppressor role of VGCC during M. tb infections and recently reported the mechanisms of its regulation by M. tb. Here in this report, we further characterize the role of VGCC in mediating defence responses of macrophages during mycobacterial infection. We report that activation of VGCC during infection synergistically downmodulates the generation of oxidative burst (ROS) by macrophages. This attenuation of ROS is regulated in a manner which is dependent on Toll like Receptor (TLR) and also on the route of calcium influx, Protein Kinase C (PKC) and by Mitogen Activation Protein Kinase (MAPK) pathways. VGCC activation during infection increases cell survival and downmodulates autophagy. Concomitantly, pro-inflammatory responses such as IL-12 and IFN-γ secretion and the levels of their receptors on cell surface are inhibited. Finally, the ability of phagosomes to fuse with lysosomes in M. bovis BCG and M. tb H37Rv infected macrophages is also compromised when VGCC activation occurs during infection. The results point towards a well-orchestrated strategy adopted by mycobacteria to supress protective responses mounted by the host. This begins with the increase in the surface levels of VGCCs by mycobacteria and their antigens by well-controlled and regulated mechanisms. Subsequent activation of the upregulated VGCC following tweaking of calcium levels by molecular sensors in turn mediates suppressor responses and prepare the macrophages for long term persistent infection. PMID:27723836

  7. Recombinant human ZP3-induced sperm acrosome reaction: evidence for the involvement of T- and L-type voltage-gated calcium channels.

    PubMed

    José, Omar; Hernández-Hernández, Oscar; Chirinos, Mayel; González-González, María Elena; Larrea, Fernando; Almanza, Angélica; Felix, Ricardo; Darszon, Alberto; Treviño, Claudia L

    2010-05-14

    For successful fertilization mammalian spermatozoa must undergo the acrosome reaction (AR), an exocytotic event that allows this cell to penetrate the outer layer of the oocyte, the zona pellucida (ZP). Four glycoproteins (ZP1-ZP4) compose the human ZP, being ZP3 the physiological inductor of the AR. This process requires changes in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) involving not fully understood mechanisms. Even in mouse sperm, the pharmacologically documented participation of voltage-gated Ca(2+) (Ca(V)) channels and store-operated channels (SOCs) in the ZP-induced AR is being debated. The situation in human sperm is even less clear due to the limited availability of human ZP. Here, we used recombinant human ZP3 (rhZP3) produced in baculovirus-infected Sf9 cells to investigate the involvement of Ca(V) channels in the human sperm AR. Our findings showed that Ni(2+) and mibefradil at concentrations that block T-type or Ca(V)3 channels, and nimodipine and diltiazem that block L-type or Ca(V)1 channels, significantly inhibited the rhZP3-initiated AR. On the other hand, the AR was insensitive to concentrations of omega-Agatoxin IVA, omega-Conotoxin GVIA and SNX-482 that block P/Q, N and R-type channels, respectively (Ca(V)2 channels). Our overall findings suggest that Ca(V)1 and Ca(V)3 channels participate in human sperm AR. Consistent with this, we detected in human sperm transcripts for the Ca(V)1 auxiliary subunits, alpha(2)delta, beta(1), beta(2) and beta(4), but not the neuronal specific isoforms beta(3) and gamma(2).

  8. The reduction of EPSC amplitude in CA1 pyramidal neurons by the peroxynitrite donor SIN-1 requires Ca2+ influx via postsynaptic non-L-type voltage gated calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Zhaowei, Liu; Yongling, Xie; Jiajia, Yang; Zhuo, Yang

    2014-02-01

    The peroxynitrite free radical (ONOO(-)) modulation of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs) and spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs) was investigated in rat CA1 pyramidal neurons using the whole-cell patch clamp technique. SIN-1(3-morpholino-sydnonimine), which can lead the simultaneous generation of superoxide anion and nitric oxide, and then form the highly reactive species ONOO(-), induced dose-dependent inhibition in amplitudes of both mEPSCs and sEPSCs. The SIN-1 action on mEPSC amplitude was completely blocked by U0126, a selective MEK inhibitor, suggesting that MEK contributed to the action of ONOO(-) on mEPSCs. The effect of SIN-1 was completely occluded either in the presence of the calcium chelator EGTA or the non-selective calcium channel antagonist Cd(2+). Furthermore, the application of nifedipine (20 μM), the L-type calcium channel blocker, had no effect on the ONOO(-)-induced decrease in mEPSC amplitude, excluding a role for L-type voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels in this process. SIN-1 inhibited the frequency of sEPSCs but had no effect on mEPSC frequency, which suggested a presynaptic action potential-dependent the action of ONOO(-) at CA1 pyramidal neuron synapses. The best-known glutamatergic input to CA1 pyramidal neurons is via Schaffer collaterals from CA3 area. However, no changes were observed in slices treated with SIN-1 on the spontaneous firing rates of CA3 pyramidal neurons. These findings suggested that SIN-1 inhibited glutamatergic synaptic transmission of CA1 pyramidal neurons by a postsynaptic non-L-type voltage gated calcium channel-dependent mechanism.

  9. Gating of dopamine transmission by calcium and axonal N-, Q-, T- and L-type voltage-gated calcium channels differs between striatal domains

    PubMed Central

    Brimblecombe, Katherine R; Gracie, Caitlin J; Platt, Nicola J; Cragg, Stephanie J

    2015-01-01

    The axonal voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (VGCCs) that catalyse dopamine (DA) transmission are incompletely defined. Yet, they are critical to DA function and might prime subpopulations of DA neurons for parkinsonian degeneration. Previous studies of VGCCs will have encompassed those on striatal cholinergic interneurons, which strongly influence DA transmission. We identify which VGCCs on DA axons govern DA transmission, we determine their dynamic properties and reveal an underlying basis for differences between the caudate putamen (CPu) and nucleus accumbens (NAc). We detected DA release evoked electrically during nicotinic receptor blockade or optogenetically by light activation of channel rhodopsin-expressing DA axons in mouse striatal slices. Subtype-specific VGCC blockers indicated that N-, Q-, T- and L-VGCCs govern DA release in CPu, but in NAc, T and L-channels are relatively silent. The roles of the most dominant channels were inversely frequency-dependent, due to low-pass filtering of DA release by Ca2+-dependent relationships between initial release probability and short-term plasticity. Ca2+ concentration–response curves revealed that differences between CPu and NAc were due to greater underlying Ca2+ sensitivity of DA transmission from CPu axons. Functions for ‘silent’ L- and T-channels in NAc could be unmasked by elevating extracellular [Ca2+]. Furthermore, we identified a greater coupling between BAPTA-sensitive, fast Ca2+ transients and DA transmission in CPu axons, and evidence for endogenous fast buffering of Ca2+ in NAc. These data reveal that a range of VGCCs operate dynamically on DA axons, depending on local driving forces. Furthermore, they reveal dramatic differences in Ca2+ handling between axonal subpopulations that show different vulnerability to parkinsonian degeneration. PMID:25533038

  10. Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels in Nociception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, Takahiro; Adams, David J.

    Voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) are a large and functionally diverse group of membrane ion channels ubiquitously expressed throughout the central and peripheral nervous systems. VGCCs contribute to various physiological processes and transduce electrical activity into other cellular functions. This chapter provides an overview of biophysical properties of VGCCs, including regulation by auxiliary subunits, and their physiological role in neuronal functions. Subsequently, then we focus on N-type calcium (Cav2.2) channels, in particular their diversity and specific antagonists. We also discuss the role of N-type calcium channels in nociception and pain transmission through primary sensory dorsal root ganglion neurons (nociceptors). It has been shown that these channels are expressed predominantly in nerve terminals of the nociceptors and that they control neurotransmitter release. To date, important roles of N-type calcium channels in pain sensation have been elucidated genetically and pharmacologically, indicating that specific N-type calcium channel antagonists or modulators are particularly useful as therapeutic drugs targeting chronic and neuropathic pain.

  11. Voltage-gated Calcium Channels and Autism Spectrum Disorders.

    PubMed

    Breitenkamp, Alexandra F; Matthes, Jan; Herzig, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder is a complex-genetic disease and its etiology is unknown for the majority of cases. So far, more than one hundred different susceptibility genes were detected. Voltage-gated calcium channels are among the candidates linked to autism spectrum disorder by results of genetic studies. Mutations of nearly all pore-forming and some auxiliary subunits of voltage gated calcium channels have been revealed from investigations of autism spectrum disorder patients and populations. Though there are only few electrophysiological characterizations of voltage-gated calcium channel mutations found in autistic patients these studies suggest their functional relevance. In summary, both genetic and functional data suggest a potential role of voltage-gated calcium channels in autism spectrum disorder. Future studies require refinement of the clinical and systems biological concepts of autism spectrum disorder and an appropriate holistic approach at the molecular level, e.g. regarding all facets of calcium channel functions.

  12. A new functional role for mechanistic/mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) in the circadian regulation of L-type voltage-gated calcium channels in avian cone photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Huang, Cathy Chia-Yu; Ko, Michael Lee; Ko, Gladys Yi-Ping

    2013-01-01

    In the retina, the L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (L-VGCCs) are responsible for neurotransmitter release from photoreceptors and are under circadian regulation. Both the current densities and protein expression of L-VGCCs are significantly higher at night than during the day. However, the underlying mechanisms of circadian regulation of L-VGCCs in the retina are not completely understood. In this study, we demonstrated that the mechanistic/mammalian target of rapamycin complex (mTORC) signaling pathway participated in the circadian phase-dependent modulation of L-VGCCs. The activities of the mTOR cascade, from mTORC1 to its downstream targets, displayed circadian oscillations throughout the course of a day. Disruption of mTORC1 signaling dampened the L-VGCC current densities, as well as the protein expression of L-VGCCs at night. The decrease of L-VGCCs at night by mTORC1 inhibition was in part due to a reduction of L-VGCCα1 subunit translocation from the cytosol to the plasma membrane. Finally, we showed that mTORC1 was downstream of the phosphatidylionositol 3 kinase-protein kinase B (PI3K-AKT) signaling pathway. Taken together, mTORC1 signaling played a role in the circadian regulation of L-VGCCs, in part through regulation of ion channel trafficking and translocation, which brings to light a new functional role for mTORC1: the modulation of ion channel activities.

  13. A New Functional Role for Mechanistic/Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Complex 1 (mTORC1) in the Circadian Regulation of L-Type Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels in Avian Cone Photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Cathy Chia-Yu; Ko, Michael Lee; Ko, Gladys Yi-Ping

    2013-01-01

    In the retina, the L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (L-VGCCs) are responsible for neurotransmitter release from photoreceptors and are under circadian regulation. Both the current densities and protein expression of L-VGCCs are significantly higher at night than during the day. However, the underlying mechanisms of circadian regulation of L-VGCCs in the retina are not completely understood. In this study, we demonstrated that the mechanistic/mammalian target of rapamycin complex (mTORC) signaling pathway participated in the circadian phase-dependent modulation of L-VGCCs. The activities of the mTOR cascade, from mTORC1 to its downstream targets, displayed circadian oscillations throughout the course of a day. Disruption of mTORC1 signaling dampened the L-VGCC current densities, as well as the protein expression of L-VGCCs at night. The decrease of L-VGCCs at night by mTORC1 inhibition was in part due to a reduction of L-VGCCα1 subunit translocation from the cytosol to the plasma membrane. Finally, we showed that mTORC1 was downstream of the phosphatidylionositol 3 kinase-protein kinase B (PI3K-AKT) signaling pathway. Taken together, mTORC1 signaling played a role in the circadian regulation of L-VGCCs, in part through regulation of ion channel trafficking and translocation, which brings to light a new functional role for mTORC1: the modulation of ion channel activities. PMID:23977383

  14. Suggestive evidence for association between L-type voltage-gated calcium channel (CACNA1C) gene haplotypes and bipolar disorder in Latinos: a family-based association study

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Suzanne; Xu, Chun; Ramirez, Mercedes; Zavala, Juan; Armas, Regina; Contreras, Salvador A; Contreras, Javier; Dassori, Albana; Leach, Robin J; Flores, Deborah; Jerez, Alvaro; Raventós, Henriette; Ontiveros, Alfonso; Nicolini, Humberto; Escamilla, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Through recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS), several groups have reported significant association between variants in the alpha 1C subunit of the L-type voltage-gated calcium channel (CACNA1C) and bipolar disorder (BP) in European and European-American cohorts. We performed a family-based association study to determine whether CACNA1C is associated with BP in the Latino population. Methods This study consisted of 913 individuals from 215 Latino pedigrees recruited from the United States, Mexico, Guatemala, and Costa Rica. The Illumina GoldenGate Genotyping Assay was used to genotype 58 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that spanned a 602.9 kb region encompassing the CACNA1C gene including two SNPs (rs7297582 and rs1006737) previously shown to associate with BP. Individual SNP and haplotype association analyses were performed using Family-Based Association Test (version 2.0.3) and Haploview (version 4.2) software. Results An eight-locus haplotype block that included these two markers showed significant association with BP (global marker permuted p = 0.0018) in the Latino population. For individual SNPs, this sample had insufficient power (10%) to detect associations with SNPs with minor effect (odds ratio = 1.15). Conclusions Although we were not able to replicate findings of association between individual CACNA1C SNPs rs7297582 and rs1006737 and BP, we were able to replicate the GWAS signal reported for CACNA1C through a haplotype analysis that encompassed these previously reported significant SNPs. These results provide additional evidence that CACNA1C is associated with BP and provides the first evidence that variations in this gene might play a role in the pathogenesis of this disorder in the Latino population. PMID:23437964

  15. A new role for AMP-activated protein kinase in the circadian regulation of L-type voltage-gated calcium channels in late-stage embryonic retinal photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Huang, Cathy C Y; Shi, Liheng; Lin, Chia-Hung; Kim, Andy Jeesu; Ko, Michael L; Ko, Gladys Y-P

    2015-11-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a cellular energy sensor, which is activated when the intracellular ATP production decreases. The activities of AMPK display circadian rhythms in various organs and tissues, indicating that AMPK is involved in the circadian regulation of cellular metabolism. In vertebrate retina, the circadian clocks regulate many aspects of retinal function and physiology, including light/dark adaption, but whether and how AMPK was involved in the retinal circadian rhythm was not known. We hypothesized that the activation of AMPK (measured as phosphorylated AMPK) in the retina was under circadian control, and AMPK might interact with other intracellular signaling molecules to regulate photoreceptor physiology. We combined ATP assays, western blots, immunostaining, patch-clamp recordings, and pharmacological treatments to decipher the role of AMPK in the circadian regulation of photoreceptor physiology. We found that the overall retinal ATP content displayed a diurnal rhythm that peaked at early night, which was nearly anti-phase to the diurnal and circadian rhythms of AMPK phosphorylation. AMPK was also involved in the circadian phase-dependent regulation of photoreceptor L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (L-VGCCs), the ion channel essential for sustained neurotransmitter release. The activation of AMPK dampened the L-VGCC currents at night with a corresponding decrease in protein expression of the L-VGCCα1 pore-forming subunit, while inhibition of AMPK increased the L-VGCC current during the day. AMPK appeared to be upstream of extracellular-signal-regulated kinase and mammalian/mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) but downstream of adenylyl cyclase in regulating the circadian rhythm of L-VGCCs. Hence, as a cellular energy sensor, AMPK integrates into the cell signaling network to regulate the circadian rhythm of photoreceptor physiology. We found that in chicken embryonic retina, the activation of AMP-activated protein

  16. Redox Regulation of Neuronal Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Jevtovic-Todorovic, Vesna

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Voltage-gated calcium channels are ubiquitously expressed in neurons and are key regulators of cellular excitability and synaptic transmitter release. There is accumulating evidence that multiple subtypes of voltage-gated calcium channels may be regulated by oxidation and reduction. However, the redox mechanisms involved in the regulation of channel function are not well understood. Recent Advances: Several studies have established that both T-type and high-voltage-activated subtypes of voltage-gated calcium channel can be redox-regulated. This article reviews different mechanisms that can be involved in redox regulation of calcium channel function and their implication in neuronal function, particularly in pain pathways and thalamic oscillation. Critical Issues: A current critical issue in the field is to decipher precise mechanisms of calcium channel modulation via redox reactions. In this review we discuss covalent post-translational modification via oxidation of cysteine molecules and chelation of trace metals, and reactions involving nitric oxide-related molecules and free radicals. Improved understanding of the roles of redox-based reactions in regulation of voltage-gated calcium channels may lead to improved understanding of novel redox mechanisms in physiological and pathological processes. Future Directions: Identification of redox mechanisms and sites on voltage-gated calcium channel may allow development of novel and specific ion channel therapies for unmet medical needs. Thus, it may be possible to regulate the redox state of these channels in treatment of pathological process such as epilepsy and neuropathic pain. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 880–891. PMID:24161125

  17. cAMP-dependent protein kinase and Ca2+ influx through L-type voltage-gated calcium channels mediate Raf-independent activation of extracellular regulated kinase in response to glucagon-like peptide-1 in pancreatic beta-cells.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Edith; Pritchard, Catrin; Herbert, Terence P

    2002-12-13

    Glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP1) is a G(s)-coupled receptor agonist that exerts multiple effects on pancreatic beta-cells, including the stimulation of insulin gene expression and secretion. In this report, we show that treatment of the mouse pancreatic beta-cell line MIN6 with GLP1 leads to the glucose-dependent activation of Erk. These effects are mimicked by forskolin, a direct activator of adenylate cyclase, and blocked by H89, an inhibitor of cAMP-dependent protein kinase. Additionally, we provide evidence that GLP1-stimulated activation of Erk requires an influx of calcium through L-type voltage-gated calcium channels and the activation of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II. GLP1-stimulated activation of Erk is blocked by inhibitors of MEK, but GLP1 does not induce the activation of A-Raf, B-Raf, C-Raf, or Ras. Additionally, dominant negative forms of Ras(N17) and Rap1(N17) fail to block GLP1-stimulated activation of Erk. In conclusion, our results indicate that, in the presence of stimulatory concentrations of glucose, GLP1 stimulates the activation of Erk through a mechanism dependent on MEK but independent of both Raf and Ras. This requires 1) the activation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase, 2) an influx of extracellular Ca(2+) through L-type voltage-gated calcium channels, and 3) the activation of CaM kinase II.

  18. Transport of the alpha subunit of the voltage gated L-type calcium channel through the sarcoplasmic reticulum occurs prior to localization to triads and requires the beta subunit but not Stac3 in skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Linsley, Jeremy W; Hsu, I-Uen; Wang, Wenjia; Kuwada, John Y

    2017-09-01

    Contraction of skeletal muscle is initiated by excitation-contraction (EC) coupling during which membrane voltage is transduced to intracellular Ca(2+) release. EC coupling requires L-type voltage gated Ca2+ channels (the dihydropyridine receptor or DHPR) located at triads, which are junctions between the transverse (T) tubule and sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) membranes, that sense membrane depolarization in the T tubule membrane. Reduced EC coupling is associated with ageing, and disruptions of EC coupling result in congenital myopathies for which there are few therapies. The precise localization of DHPRs to triads is critical for EC coupling, yet trafficking of the DHPR to triads is not well understood. Using dynamic imaging of zebrafish muscle fibers, we find that DHPR is transported along the longitudinal SR in a microtubule-independent mechanism. Furthermore, transport of DHPR in the SR membrane is differentially affected in null mutants of Stac3 or DHPRβ, two essential components of EC coupling. These findings reveal previously unappreciated features of DHPR motility within the SR prior to assembly at triads. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. New Role of P/Q-type Voltage-gated Calcium Channels: From Transmitter Release to Contraction of Renal Vasculature.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Pernille B L

    2015-05-01

    Voltage-gated calcium channels are important for the depolarization-evoked contraction of vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs), with L-type channels being the classical channel involved in this mechanism. However, it has been demonstrated that the CaV2.1 subunit, which encodes a neuronal isoform of the voltage-gated calcium channels (P/Q-type), is also expressed and contributes functionally to contraction of renal blood vessels in both mice and humans. Furthermore, preglomerular vascular SMCs and aortic SMCs coexpress L-, P-, and Q-type calcium channels within the same cell. Calcium channel blockers are widely used as pharmacological treatments. However, calcium channel antagonists vary in their selectivity for the various calcium channel subtypes, and the functional contribution from P/Q-type channels as compared with L-type should be considered. Confirming the presence of P/Q-type voltage-gated calcium channels in other types of vascular SMCs could be important when investigating phenomena such as hypertension, migraine, and other diseases known to involve SMCs and voltage-gated calcium channels. The purpose of this review was to give a short overview of the possible roles of P/Q-type calcium channels within the vascular system with special focus on the renal vasculature.

  20. Characterization of L-type Voltage-Gated Ca2+ Channel Expression and Function in Developing CA3 Pyramidal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Morton, Russell A.; Norlin, Mackenzie S.; Vollmer, Cyndel C.; Valenzuela, C. Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Voltage gated calcium channels (VGCCs) play a major role during the development of the central nervous system (CNS). Ca2+ influx via VGCCs regulates axonal growth and neuronal migration as well as synaptic plasticity. Specifically, L-type VGCCs have been well characterized to be involved in the formation and refinement of the connections within the CA3 region of the hippocampus. The majority of the growth, formation, and refinement in the CNS occurs during the human third trimester. An equivalent developmental time period in rodents occurs during the first two weeks of post-natal life, and the expression pattern of L-type VGCCs during this time period has not been well characterized. In this study, we show that Cav1.2 channels are more highly expressed during this developmental period compared to adolescence (post-natal day 30) and that L-type VGCCs significantly contribute to the overall Ca2+ currents. These findings suggest that L-type VGCCs are functionally expressed during the crucial developmental period. PMID:23415785

  1. Age-related homeostatic mid-channel proteolysis of neuronal L-type voltage-gated Ca2+ channels

    PubMed Central

    Michailidis, Ioannis E.; Abele-Henckels, Kathryn; Zhang, Wei K.; Lin, Bochao; Yu, Yong; Geyman, Larry; Ehlers, Michael D.; Pnevmatikakis, Eftychios A.; Yang, Jian

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Neural circuitry and brain activity depend critically on proper function of voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs), whose activity must be tightly controlled. We show that the main body of the pore-forming α1 subunit of neuronal L-type VGCCs, Cav1.2, is proteolytically cleaved, resulting in Cav1.2 fragment-channels that separate but remain on the plasma membrane. This “gmid-channel” proteolysis is regulated by channel activity, involves the Ca2+-dependent protease calpain and the ubiquitin-proteasome system, and causes attenuation and biophysical alterations of VGCC currents. Recombinant Cav1.2 fragment-channels mimicking the products of mid-channel proteolysis do not form active channels on their own, but when properly paired, produce currents with distinct biophysical properties. Mid-channel proteolysis increases dramatically with age and can be attenuated with an L-type VGCC blocker in vivo. Mid-channel proteolysis represents a novel form of homeostatic negative-feedback processing of VGCCs that could profoundly affect neuronal excitability, neurotransmission, neuroprotection, and calcium signaling in physiological and disease states. PMID:24908485

  2. Suggestive evidence for association between L-type voltage-gated calcium channel (CACNA1C) gene haplotypes and bipolar disorder in Latinos: a family-based association study.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Suzanne; Xu, Chun; Ramirez, Mercedes; Zavala, Juan; Armas, Regina; Contreras, Salvador A; Contreras, Javier; Dassori, Albana; Leach, Robin J; Flores, Deborah; Jerez, Alvaro; Raventós, Henriette; Ontiveros, Alfonso; Nicolini, Humberto; Escamilla, Michael

    2013-03-01

      Through recent genome-wide association studies (GWASs), several groups have reported significant association between variants in the calcium channel, voltage-dependent, L-type, alpha 1C subunit (CACNA1C) and bipolar disorder (BP) in European and European-American cohorts. We performed a family-based association study to determine whether CACNA1C is associated with BP in the Latino population.   This study included 913 individuals from 215 Latino pedigrees recruited from the USA, Mexico, Guatemala, and Costa Rica. The Illumina GoldenGate Genotyping Assay was used to genotype 58 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that spanned a 602.9-kb region encompassing the CACNA1C gene including two SNPs (rs7297582 and rs1006737) previously shown to associate with BP. Individual SNP and haplotype association analyses were performed using Family-Based Association Test (version 2.0.3) and Haploview (version 4.2) software.   An eight-locus haplotype block that included these two markers showed significant association with BP (global marker permuted p = 0.0018) in the Latino population. For individual SNPs, this sample had insufficient power (10%) to detect associations with SNPs with minor effect (odds ratio = 1.15).   Although we were not able to replicate findings of association between individual CACNA1C SNPs rs7297582 and rs1006737 and BP, we were able to replicate the GWAS signal reported for CACNA1C through a haplotype analysis that encompassed these previously reported significant SNPs. These results provide additional evidence that CACNA1C is associated with BP and provides the first evidence that variations in this gene might play a role in the pathogenesis of this disorder in the Latino population. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  3. Voltage-gated calcium channel autoimmune cerebellar degeneration

    PubMed Central

    McKasson, Marilyn; Clawson, Susan A.; Hill, Kenneth E.; Wood, Blair; Carlson, Noel; Bromberg, Mark; Greenlee, John E.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To describe response to treatment in a patient with autoantibodies against voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) who presented with autoimmune cerebellar degeneration and subsequently developed Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome (LEMS), and to study the effect of the patient's autoantibodies on Purkinje cells in rat cerebellar slice cultures. Methods: Case report and study of rat cerebellar slice cultures incubated with patient VGCC autoantibodies. Results: A 53-year-old man developed progressive incoordination with ataxic speech. Laboratory evaluation revealed VGCC autoantibodies without other antineuronal autoantibodies. Whole-body PET scans 6 and 12 months after presentation detected no malignancy. The patient improved significantly with IV immunoglobulin G (IgG), prednisone, and mycophenolate mofetil, but worsened after IV IgG was halted secondary to aseptic meningitis. He subsequently developed weakness with electrodiagnostic evidence of LEMS. The patient's IgG bound to Purkinje cells in rat cerebellar slice cultures, followed by neuronal death. Reactivity of the patient's autoantibodies with VGCCs was confirmed by blocking studies with defined VGCC antibodies. Conclusions: Autoimmune cerebellar degeneration associated with VGCC autoantibodies may precede onset of LEMS and may improve with immunosuppressive treatment. Binding of anti-VGCC antibodies to Purkinje cells in cerebellar slice cultures may be followed by cell death. Patients with anti-VGCC autoantibodies may be at risk of irreversible neurologic injury over time, and treatment should be initiated early. PMID:27088118

  4. Role of voltage-gated calcium channels in potassium-stimulated aldosterone secretion from rat adrenal zona glomerulosa cells.

    PubMed

    Uebele, Victor N; Nuss, Cindy E; Renger, John J; Connolly, Thomas M

    2004-10-01

    The mineralocorticoid aldosterone plays an important role in the regulation of plasma electrolyte homeostasis. Exposure of acutely isolated rat adrenal zona glomerulosa cells to elevated K(+) activates voltage-gated calcium channels and initiates a calcium-dependent increase in aldosterone synthesis. We developed a novel 96-well format aldosterone secretion assay to rapidly evaluate the effect of known T- and L-type calcium channel antagonists on K(+)-stimulated aldosterone secretion and better define the role of voltage-gated calcium channels in this process. Reported T-type antagonists, mibefradil and Ni(2+), and selected L-type antagonist dihydropyridines, inhibited K(+)-stimulated aldosterone synthesis. Dihydropyridine-mediated inhibition occurred at concentrations which had no effect on rat alpha1H T-type Ca(2+) currents. In contrast, below 10 microM, the L-type antagonists verapamil and diltiazem showed only minimal inhibitory effects. To examine the selectivity of the calcium channel antagonist-mediated inhibition, we established an aldosterone secretion assay in which 8Br-cAMP stimulates aldosterone secretion independent of extracellular calcium. Mibefradil remained inhibitory in this assay, while the dihydropyridines had only limited effects. Taken together, these data demonstrate a role for the L-type calcium channel in K(+)-stimulated aldosterone secretion. Further, they confirm the need for selective T-type calcium channel antagonists to better address the role of T-type channels in K(+)-stimulated aldosterone secretion.

  5. Regulation of voltage gated calcium channels by GPCRs and post-translational modification.

    PubMed

    Huang, Junting; Zamponi, Gerald W

    2016-10-18

    Calcium entry via voltage gated calcium channels mediates a wide range of physiological functions, whereas calcium channel dysregulation has been associated with numerous pathophysiological conditions. There are myriad cell signaling pathways that act on voltage gated calcium channels to fine tune their activities and to regulate their cell surface expression. These regulatory mechanisms include the activation of G protein-coupled receptors and downstream phosphorylation events, and their control over calcium channel trafficking through direct physical interactions. Calcium channels also undergo post-translational modifications that alter both function and density of the channels in the plasma membrane. Here we focus on select aspects of these regulatory mechanisms and highlight recent developments.

  6. Comparative impact of voltage-gated calcium channels and NMDA receptors on mitochondria-mediated neuronal injury

    PubMed Central

    Stanika, Ruslan I.; Villanueva, Idalis; Kazanina, Galina; Andrews, S. Brian; Pivovarova, Natalia B.

    2012-01-01

    Glutamate excitotoxicity, a major component of many neurodegenerative disorders, is characterized by excessive calcium influx selectively through NMDA receptors (NMDARs). However, there is a substantial uncertainty concerning why other known routes of significant calcium entry, in particular voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs), are not similarly toxic. Here, we report that in the majority of neurons in rat hippocampal and cortical cultures, maximal L-type VGCC activation induces much lower calcium loading than toxic NMDAR activation. Consequently, few depolarization-activated neurons exhibit calcium deregulation and cell death. Activation of alternative routes of calcium entry induced neuronal death in proportion to the degree of calcium loading. In a small subset of neurons depolarization evoked stronger calcium elevations, approaching those induced by toxic NMDA. These neurons were characterized by elevated expression of VGCCs and enhanced voltage-gated calcium currents, mitochondrial dysfunction and cell death. Preventing VGCC-dependent mitochondrial calcium loading resulted in stronger cytoplasmic calcium elevations, whereas inhibiting mitochondrial calcium clearance accelerated mitochondrial depolarization. Both observations further implicate mitochondrial dysfunction in VGCC-mediated cell death. Results indicate that neuronal vulnerability tracks the extent of calcium loading but does not appear to depend explicitly on the route of calcium entry. PMID:22573686

  7. The Physiology, Pathology, and Pharmacology of Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels and Their Future Therapeutic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Zamponi, Gerald W.; Striessnig, Joerg; Koschak, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated calcium channels are required for many key functions in the body. In this review, the different subtypes of voltage-gated calcium channels are described and their physiologic roles and pharmacology are outlined. We describe the current uses of drugs interacting with the different calcium channel subtypes and subunits, as well as specific areas in which there is strong potential for future drug development. Current therapeutic agents include drugs targeting L-type CaV1.2 calcium channels, particularly 1,4-dihydropyridines, which are widely used in the treatment of hypertension. T-type (CaV3) channels are a target of ethosuximide, widely used in absence epilepsy. The auxiliary subunit α2δ-1 is the therapeutic target of the gabapentinoid drugs, which are of value in certain epilepsies and chronic neuropathic pain. The limited use of intrathecal ziconotide, a peptide blocker of N-type (CaV2.2) calcium channels, as a treatment of intractable pain, gives an indication that these channels represent excellent drug targets for various pain conditions. We describe how selectivity for different subtypes of calcium channels (e.g., CaV1.2 and CaV1.3 L-type channels) may be achieved in the future by exploiting differences between channel isoforms in terms of sequence and biophysical properties, variation in splicing in different target tissues, and differences in the properties of the target tissues themselves in terms of membrane potential or firing frequency. Thus, use-dependent blockers of the different isoforms could selectively block calcium channels in particular pathologies, such as nociceptive neurons in pain states or in epileptic brain circuits. Of important future potential are selective CaV1.3 blockers for neuropsychiatric diseases, neuroprotection in Parkinson’s disease, and resistant hypertension. In addition, selective or nonselective T-type channel blockers are considered potential therapeutic targets in epilepsy, pain, obesity, sleep, and

  8. Development and validation a LC-MS/MS method for determination of L-type voltage-gated calcium channel and NMDA receptor antagonist NGP1-01 in mouse serum

    PubMed Central

    Jogiraju, Harini; Zhou, Xiang; Gobburi, Ashta Lakshmi Prasad; Pedada, Kiran K.; Geldenhuys, Werner J.; Van der Schyf, Cornelis J.; Crish, Samuel D.; Anderson, David J.

    2016-01-01

    NGP1-01 (8-benzylamino-8, 11-oxapentacyclo [5.4.0.02, 6.03, 10.05, 9] undecane) is a heterocyclic cage compound with multifunctional calcium channel blocking activity that has been demonstrated to be neuroprotective in several neurodegenerative models. A sensitive internal standard LC-MS/MS method was developed and validated to quantify NGP1-01 in mouse serum. The internal standard (IS) was 8-phenylethyl-8, 11-oxapentacyclo [5.4.0.0(2, 6).0(3, 10).0(5, 9)] undecane. Sample preparation involved a protein precipitation procedure by addition of acetonitrile. Chromatographic separation was carried out on a Phenomenex Kinetex phenyl-hexyl column (100 x 2.1 mm, 2.6 μm) employing a gradient (45% isocratic 3 min, 45% to 95% linear gradient 6 min, 95% isocratic 3 min) of an elution mobile phase of 5 mM ammonium acetate in 100% acetonitrile mixing with an application mobile phase of 5 mM ammonium acetate in 2% acetonitrile. Detection was achieved by a QTrap 5500 mass spectrometer (AB Sciex) employing electrospray ionization in the positive mode with multiple-reaction-monitoring (MRM) for NGP1-01 (m/z 266 → 91) and IS (m/z 280 → 105). The method validation was carried out in accordance with Food and Drug Administration (FDA) guidelines. The method had a linear range of at least 0.5–50 ng/mL with a correlation coefficient 0.999. The intra-assay and inter-assay precisions (%CV) were equal to or within the range of 1.0 to 4.3% and the accuracies (% relative error) equal to or within −2.5% to 3.4%. The analyte was stable for at least 2 months at −20°C, for at least 8 h at room temperature and for at least three freeze thaw cycles. The extraction recovery was 94.9 to 105.0%, with a %CV ≤ 9.5%. The technique was found to be free of any matrix effects as determined by experiments involving five different lots of mouse serum. Cross-talk interferences were not present. Two different gradient slope chromatography runs were done on dosed mouse serum samples to assess a

  9. Development and validation of an LC-MS/MS method for determination of the L-type voltage-gated calcium channel/NMDA receptor antagonist NGP1-01 in mouse serum.

    PubMed

    Jogiraju, Harini; Zhou, Xiang; Gobburi, Ashta Lakshmi Prasad; Pedada, Kiran K; Geldenhuys, Werner J; Van der Schyf, Cornelis J; Crish, Samuel D; Anderson, David J

    2014-07-15

    NGP1-01 (8-benzylamino-8,11-oxapentacyclo[5.4.0.0(2,6).0(3,10).0(5,9)]undecane) is a heterocyclic cage compound with multifunctional calcium channel blocking activity that has been demonstrated to be neuroprotective in several neurodegenerative models. A sensitive internal standard LC-MS/MS method was developed and validated to quantify NGP1-01 in mouse serum. The internal standard (IS) was 8-(2-phenylethylamino)-8,11-oxapentacyclo[5.4.0.0(2,6).0(3,10).0(5,9)]undecane. Sample preparation involved a protein precipitation procedure by addition of acetonitrile. Chromatographic separation was carried out on a Phenomenex Kinetex phenyl-hexyl column (100 mm×2.1mm, 2.6 μm) employing a gradient (45% isocratic 3 min, 45-95% linear gradient 6 min, 95% isocratic 3 min) of an elution mobile phase of 5mM ammonium acetate in 100% acetonitrile mixing with an application mobile phase of 5mM ammonium acetate in 2% acetonitrile. Detection was achieved by a QTrap 5500 mass spectrometer (AB Sciex) employing electrospray ionization in the positive mode with multiple-reaction-monitoring (MRM) for NGP1-01 (m/z 266→91) and IS (m/z 280→105). The method validation was carried out in accordance with Food and Drug Administration (FDA) guidelines. The method had a linear range of at least 0.5-50 ng/mL with a correlation coefficient 0.999. The intra-assay and inter-assay precisions (%CV) were equal to or within the range of 1.0-4.3% and the accuracies (% relative error) equal to or within -2.5% to 3.4%. The analyte was stable for at least 2 months at -20°C, for at least 8h at room temperature and for at least three freeze-thaw cycles. The extraction recovery was 94.9 to 105.0%, with a %CV ≤ 9.5%. The technique was found to be free of any matrix effects as determined by experiments involving five different lots of mouse serum. Cross-talk interferences were not present. Two different gradient slope chromatography runs were done on dosed mouse serum samples to assess a possible positive

  10. Disruption of the IS6-AID Linker Affects Voltage-gated Calcium Channel Inactivation and Facilitation

    PubMed Central

    Findeisen, Felix

    2009-01-01

    Two processes dominate voltage-gated calcium channel (CaV) inactivation: voltage-dependent inactivation (VDI) and calcium-dependent inactivation (CDI). The CaVβ/CaVα1-I-II loop and Ca2+/calmodulin (CaM)/CaVα1–C-terminal tail complexes have been shown to modulate each, respectively. Nevertheless, how each complex couples to the pore and whether each affects inactivation independently have remained unresolved. Here, we demonstrate that the IS6–α-interaction domain (AID) linker provides a rigid connection between the pore and CaVβ/I-II loop complex by showing that IS6-AID linker polyglycine mutations accelerate CaV1.2 (L-type) and CaV2.1 (P/Q-type) VDI. Remarkably, mutations that either break the rigid IS6-AID linker connection or disrupt CaVβ/I-II association sharply decelerate CDI and reduce a second Ca2+/CaM/CaVα1–C-terminal–mediated process known as calcium-dependent facilitation. Collectively, the data strongly suggest that components traditionally associated solely with VDI, CaVβ and the IS6-AID linker, are essential for calcium-dependent modulation, and that both CaVβ-dependent and CaM-dependent components couple to the pore by a common mechanism requiring CaVβ and an intact IS6-AID linker. PMID:19237593

  11. Calmodulin regulation (calmodulation) of voltage-gated calcium channels

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Johny, Manu

    2014-01-01

    Calmodulin regulation (calmodulation) of the family of voltage-gated CaV1-2 channels comprises a prominent prototype for ion channel regulation, remarkable for its powerful Ca2+ sensing capabilities, deep in elegant mechanistic lessons, and rich in biological and therapeutic implications. This field thereby resides squarely at the epicenter of Ca2+ signaling biology, ion channel biophysics, and therapeutic advance. This review summarizes the historical development of ideas in this field, the scope and richly patterned organization of Ca2+ feedback behaviors encompassed by this system, and the long-standing challenges and recent developments in discerning a molecular basis for calmodulation. We conclude by highlighting the considerable synergy between mechanism, biological insight, and promising therapeutics. PMID:24863929

  12. Voltage-gated calcium and sodium channels mediate Sema3A retrograde signaling that regulates dendritic development.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Naoya; Aoki, Reina; Chen, Sandy; Jitsuki-Takahashi, Aoi; Ohura, Shunsuke; Kamiya, Haruyuki; Goshima, Yoshio

    2016-01-15

    Growing axons rely on local signaling at the growth cone for guidance cues. Semaphorin3A (Sema3A), a secreted repulsive axon guidance molecule, regulates synapse maturation and dendritic branching. We previously showed that local Sema3A signaling in the growth cones elicits retrograde retrograde signaling via PlexinA4 (PlexA4), one component of the Sema3A receptor, thereby regulating dendritic localization of AMPA receptor GluA2 and proper dendritic development. In present study, we found that nimodipine (voltage-gated L-type Ca(2+) channel blocker) and tetrodotoxin (TTX; voltage-gated Na(+) channel blocker) suppress Sema3A-induced dendritic localization of GluA2 and dendritic branch formation in cultured hippocampal neurons. The local application of nimodipine or TTX to distal axons suppresses retrograde transport of Venus-Sema3A that has been exogenously applied to the distal axons. Sema3A facilitates axonal transport of PlexA4, which is also suppressed in neurons treated with either TTX or nimodipine. These data suggest that voltage-gated calcium and sodium channels mediate Sema3A retrograde signaling that regulates dendritic GluA2 localization and branch formation.

  13. Voltage-gated calcium channels of Paramecium cilia.

    PubMed

    Lodh, Sukanya; Yano, Junji; Valentine, Megan S; Van Houten, Judith L

    2016-10-01

    Paramecium cells swim by beating their cilia, and make turns by transiently reversing their power stroke. Reversal is caused by Ca(2+) entering the cilium through voltage-gated Ca(2+) (CaV) channels that are found exclusively in the cilia. As ciliary Ca(2+) levels return to normal, the cell pivots and swims forward in a new direction. Thus, the activation of the CaV channels causes cells to make a turn in their swimming paths. For 45 years, the physiological characteristics of the Paramecium ciliary CaV channels have been known, but the proteins were not identified until recently, when the P. tetraurelia ciliary membrane proteome was determined. Three CaVα1 subunits that were identified among the proteins were cloned and confirmed to be expressed in the cilia. We demonstrate using RNA interference that these channels function as the ciliary CaV channels that are responsible for the reversal of ciliary beating. Furthermore, we show that Pawn (pw) mutants of Paramecium that cannot swim backward for lack of CaV channel activity do not express any of the three CaV1 channels in their ciliary membrane, until they are rescued from the mutant phenotype by expression of the wild-type PW gene. These results reinforce the correlation of the three CaV channels with backward swimming through ciliary reversal. The PwB protein, found in endoplasmic reticulum fractions, co-immunoprecipitates with the CaV1c channel and perhaps functions in trafficking. The PwA protein does not appear to have an interaction with the channel proteins but affects their appearance in the cilia. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  14. Voltage-gated calcium channels of Paramecium cilia

    PubMed Central

    Lodh, Sukanya; Valentine, Megan S.; Van Houten, Judith L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Paramecium cells swim by beating their cilia, and make turns by transiently reversing their power stroke. Reversal is caused by Ca2+ entering the cilium through voltage-gated Ca2+ (CaV) channels that are found exclusively in the cilia. As ciliary Ca2+ levels return to normal, the cell pivots and swims forward in a new direction. Thus, the activation of the CaV channels causes cells to make a turn in their swimming paths. For 45 years, the physiological characteristics of the Paramecium ciliary CaV channels have been known, but the proteins were not identified until recently, when the P. tetraurelia ciliary membrane proteome was determined. Three CaVα1 subunits that were identified among the proteins were cloned and confirmed to be expressed in the cilia. We demonstrate using RNA interference that these channels function as the ciliary CaV channels that are responsible for the reversal of ciliary beating. Furthermore, we show that Pawn (pw) mutants of Paramecium that cannot swim backward for lack of CaV channel activity do not express any of the three CaV1 channels in their ciliary membrane, until they are rescued from the mutant phenotype by expression of the wild-type PW gene. These results reinforce the correlation of the three CaV channels with backward swimming through ciliary reversal. The PwB protein, found in endoplasmic reticulum fractions, co-immunoprecipitates with the CaV1c channel and perhaps functions in trafficking. The PwA protein does not appear to have an interaction with the channel proteins but affects their appearance in the cilia. PMID:27707864

  15. Differential effects of crambescins and crambescidin 816 in voltage-gated sodium, potassium and calcium channels in neurons.

    PubMed

    Martín, Víctor; Vale, Carmen; Bondu, Stéphanie; Thomas, Olivier P; Vieytes, Mercedes R; Botana, Luís M

    2013-01-18

    Crambescins and crambescidins are two families of guanidine alkaloids from the marine sponge Crambe crambe. Although very little information about their biological effect has been reported, it is known that crambescidin 816 (Cramb816) blocks calcium channels in a neuroblastoma X glioma cell line. Taking this into account, and the fact that ion channels are frequent targets for natural toxins, we examined the effect of Cramb816 and three compounds from the crambescin family, norcrambescin A2 (NcrambA2), crambescin A2 (CrambA2), and crambescin C1 (CrambC1), in the main voltage-dependent ion channels in neurons: sodium, potassium, and calcium channels. Electrophysiological recordings of voltage gated sodium, potassium, and calcium currents, in the presence of these guanidine alkaloids, were performed in cortical neurons from embryonic mice. Different effects were discovered: crambescins inhibited K(+) currents with the following potency: NcrambA2 > CrambC1 > CrambA2, while Cramb816 lacked an effect. Only CrambC1 and Cramb816 partially blocked Na(+) total current. However, Cramb816 partially blocked Ca(2+) , while NcrambA2 did not. Since the blocking effect of Cramb816 on calcium currents has not been previously reported in detail, we further pharmacologically isolated the two main fractions of HVA Ca(2+) channels in neurons and investigated the Cramb816 effect on them. Here, we revealed that Cav1 or L-type calcium channels are the main target for Cramb816. These two families of guanidine alkaloids clearly showed a structure-activity relationship with the crambescins acting on voltage-gated potassium channels, while Cramb816 blocks the voltage-gated calcium channel Cav1 with higher potency than nifedipine. The novel evidence that Cramb816 partially blocked CaV and NaV channels in neurons suggests that this compound might be involved in decreasing the neurotransmitter release and synaptic transmission in the central nervous system. The findings presented here provide

  16. Comparative impact of voltage-gated calcium channels and NMDA receptors on mitochondria-mediated neuronal injury.

    PubMed

    Stanika, Ruslan I; Villanueva, Idalis; Kazanina, Galina; Andrews, S Brian; Pivovarova, Natalia B

    2012-05-09

    Glutamate excitotoxicity, a major component of many neurodegenerative disorders, is characterized by excessive calcium influx selectively through NMDARs. However, there is a substantial uncertainty concerning why other known routes of significant calcium entry, in particular, VGCCs, are not similarly toxic. Here, we report that in the majority of neurons in rat hippocampal and cortical cultures, maximal L-type VGCC activation induces much lower calcium loading than toxic NMDAR activation. Consequently, few depolarization-activated neurons exhibit calcium deregulation and cell death. Activation of alternative routes of calcium entry induced neuronal death in proportion to the degree of calcium loading. In a small subset of neurons, depolarization evoked stronger calcium elevations, approaching those induced by toxic NMDA. These neurons were characterized by elevated expression of VGCCs and enhanced voltage-gated calcium currents, mitochondrial dysfunction and cell death. Preventing VGCC-dependent mitochondrial calcium loading resulted in stronger cytoplasmic calcium elevations, whereas inhibiting mitochondrial calcium clearance accelerated mitochondrial depolarization. Both observations further implicate mitochondrial dysfunction in VGCC-mediated cell death. Results indicate that neuronal vulnerability tracks the extent of calcium loading but does not appear to depend explicitly on the route of calcium entry.

  17. Differential Calcium Signaling Mediated by Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels in Rat Retinal Ganglion Cells and Their Unmyelinated Axons

    PubMed Central

    Sargoy, Allison; Sun, Xiaoping

    2014-01-01

    Aberrant calcium regulation has been implicated as a causative factor in the degeneration of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in numerous injury models of optic neuropathy. Since calcium has dual roles in maintaining homeostasis and triggering apoptotic pathways in healthy and injured cells, respectively, investigation of voltage-gated Ca channel (VGCC) regulation as a potential strategy to reduce the loss of RGCs is warranted. The accessibility and structure of the retina provide advantages for the investigation of the mechanisms of calcium signalling in both the somata of ganglion cells as well as their unmyelinated axons. The goal of the present study was to determine the distribution of VGCC subtypes in the cell bodies and axons of ganglion cells in the normal retina and to define their contribution to calcium signals in these cellular compartments. We report L-type Ca channel α1C and α1D subunit immunoreactivity in rat RGC somata and axons. The N-type Ca channel α1B subunit was in RGC somata and axons, while the P/Q-type Ca channel α1A subunit was only in the RGC somata. We patch clamped isolated ganglion cells and biophysically identified T-type Ca channels. Calcium imaging studies of RGCs in wholemounted retinas showed that selective Ca channel antagonists reduced depolarization-evoked calcium signals mediated by L-, N-, P/Q- and T-type Ca channels in the cell bodies but only by L-type Ca channels in the axons. This differential contribution of VGCC subtypes to calcium signals in RGC somata and their axons may provide insight into the development of target-specific strategies to spare the loss of RGCs and their axons following injury. PMID:24416240

  18. Cloning and functional expression of a voltage-gated calcium channel alpha1 subunit from jellyfish.

    PubMed

    Jeziorski, M C; Greenberg, R M; Clark, K S; Anderson, P A

    1998-08-28

    Voltage-gated Ca2+ channels in vertebrates comprise at least seven molecular subtypes, each of which produces a current with distinct kinetics and pharmacology. Although several invertebrate Ca2+ channel alpha1 subunits have also been cloned, their functional characteristics remain unclear, as heterologous expression of a full-length invertebrate channel has not previously been reported. We have cloned a cDNA encoding the alpha1 subunit of a voltage-gated Ca2+ channel from the scyphozoan jellyfish Cyanea capillata, one of the earliest existing organisms to possess neural and muscle tissue. The deduced amino acid sequence of this subunit, named CyCaalpha1, is more similar to vertebrate L-type channels (alpha1S, alpha1C, and alpha1D) than to non-L-type channels (alpha1A, alpha1B, and alpha1E) or low voltage-activated channels (alpha1G). Expression of CyCaalpha1 in Xenopus oocytes produces a high voltage-activated Ca2+ current that, unlike vertebrate L-type currents, is only weakly sensitive to 1,4-dihydropyridine or phenylalkylamine Ca2+ channel blockers and is not potentiated by the agonist S(-)-BayK 8644. In addition, the channel is less permeable to Ba2+ than to Ca2+ and is more permeable to Sr2+. CyCaalpha1 thus represents an ancestral L-type alpha1 subunit with significant functional differences from mammalian L-type channels.

  19. Mapping CRMP3 domains involved in dendrite morphogenesis and voltage-gated calcium channel regulation.

    PubMed

    Quach, Tam T; Wilson, Sarah M; Rogemond, Veronique; Chounlamountri, Naura; Kolattukudy, Pappachan E; Martinez, Stephanie; Khanna, May; Belin, Marie-Francoise; Khanna, Rajesh; Honnorat, Jerome; Duchemin, Anne-Marie

    2013-09-15

    Although hippocampal neurons are well-distinguished by the morphological characteristics of their dendrites and their structural plasticity, the mechanisms involved in regulating their neurite initiation, dendrite growth, network formation and remodeling are still largely unknown, in part because the key molecules involved remain elusive. Identifying new dendrite-active cues could uncover unknown molecular mechanisms that would add significant understanding to the field and possibly lead to the development of novel neuroprotective therapy because these neurons are impaired in many neuropsychiatric disorders. In our previous studies, we deleted the gene encoding CRMP3 in mice and identified the protein as a new endogenous signaling molecule that shapes diverse features of the hippocampal pyramidal dendrites without affecting axon morphology. We also found that CRMP3 protects dendrites against dystrophy induced by prion peptide PrP(106-126). Here, we report that CRMP3 has a profound influence on neurite initiation and dendrite growth of hippocampal neurons in vitro. Our deletional mapping revealed that the C-terminus of CRMP3 probably harbors its dendritogenic capacity and supports an active transport mechanism. By contrast, overexpression of the C-terminal truncated CRMP3 phenocopied the effect of CRMP3 gene deletion with inhibition of neurite initiation or decrease in dendrite complexity, depending on the stage of cell development. In addition, this mutant inhibited the activity of CRMP3, in a similar manner to siRNA. Voltage-gated calcium channel inhibitors prevented CRMP3-induced dendritic growth and somatic Ca(2+) influx in CRMP3-overexpressing neurons was augmented largely via L-type channels. These results support a link between CRMP3-mediated Ca(2+) influx and CRMP3-mediated dendritic growth in hippocampal neurons.

  20. Differential distribution of voltage-gated calcium channels in dopaminergic neurons of the rat retina.

    PubMed

    Witkovsky, Paul; Shen, Changpeng; McRory, John

    2006-07-20

    We studied by immunocytochemistry and Western blots the identity and cellular distribution of voltage-gated calcium channels within dopaminergic neurons of the rat retina. The aim was to associate particular calcium channel subtypes with known activities of the neuron (e.g., transmitter release from axon terminals). Five voltage-gated calcium channels were identified: alpha1A, alpha1B, alpha1E, alpha1F, and alpha1H. All of these, except the alpha1B subtype, were found within dopaminergic perikarya. The alpha1B channels were concentrated at axon terminal rings, together with alpha1A calcium channels. In contrast, alpha1H calcium channels were most abundant in the dendrites, and alpha1F calcium channels were restricted to the perikaryon. The alpha1E calcium channel was present at such a low density that its cellular distribution beyond the perikaryon could not be determined. Our findings are consistent with the available pharmacological data indicating that alpha1A and alpha1B calcium channels control the major fraction of dopamine release in the rat retina. (c) 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Hypoxic increase in nitric oxide generation of rat sensory neurons requires activation of mitochondrial complex II and voltage-gated calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Henrich, M; Paddenberg, R; Haberberger, R V; Scholz, A; Gruss, M; Hempelmann, G; Kummer, W

    2004-01-01

    Recently, we have demonstrated that sensory neurons of rat lumbar dorsal root ganglia (DRG) respond to hypoxia with an activation of endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase (eNOS) resulting in enhanced NO production associated with mitochondria which contributes to resistance against hypoxia. Extracellular calcium is essential to this effect. In the present study on rat DRG slices, we set out to determine what types of calcium channels operate under hypoxia, and which upstream events contribute to their activation, thereby focusing upon mitochondrial complex II. Both the metallic ions Cd2+ and Ni2+, known to inhibit voltage-gated calcium channels and T-type channels, respectively, and verapamil and nifedipine, typical blocker of L-type calcium channels completely prevented the hypoxic neuronal NO generation. Inhibition of complex II by thenoyltrifluoroacetone at the ubiquinon binding site or by 3-nitropropionic acid at the substrate binding site largely diminished hypoxic-induced NO production while having an opposite effect under normoxia. An additional blockade of voltage-gated calcium channels entirely abolished the hypoxic response. The complex II inhibitor malonate inhibited both normoxic and hypoxic NO generation. These data show that complex II activity is required for increased hypoxic NO production. Since succinate dehydrogenase activity of complex II decreased at hypoxia, as measured by histochemistry and densitometry, we propose a hypoxia-induced functional switch of complex II from succinate dehydrogenase to fumarate reductase, which subsequently leads to activation of voltage-gated calcium channels resulting in increased NO production by eNOS.

  2. The α2δ subunits of voltage-gated calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Dolphin, Annette C

    2013-07-01

    Voltage-gated calcium channels consist of the main pore-forming α1 subunit, together, except in the case of the T-type channels, with β and α2δ and sometimes γ subunits, which are collectively termed auxiliary or accessory subunits. This review will concentrate on the properties and role of the α2δ subunits of these channels. These proteins are largely extracellular, membrane-associated proteins which influence the trafficking, localization, and biophysical properties of the channels. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Calcium channels.

  3. Down-regulation of endogenous KLHL1 decreases voltage-gated calcium current density.

    PubMed

    Perissinotti, Paula P; Ethington, Elizabeth G; Cribbs, Leanne; Koob, Michael D; Martin, Jody; Piedras-Rentería, Erika S

    2014-05-01

    The actin-binding protein Kelch-like 1 (KLHL1) can modulate voltage-gated calcium channels in vitro. KLHL1 interacts with actin and with the pore-forming subunits of Cav2.1 and CaV3.2 calcium channels, resulting in up-regulation of P/Q and T-type current density. Here we tested whether endogenous KLHL1 modulates voltage gated calcium currents in cultured hippocampal neurons by down-regulating the expression of KLHL1 via adenoviral delivery of shRNA targeted against KLHL1 (shKLHL1). Control adenoviruses did not affect any of the neuronal properties measured, yet down-regulation of KLHL1 resulted in HVA current densities ~68% smaller and LVA current densities 44% smaller than uninfected controls, with a concomitant reduction in α(1A) and α(1H) protein levels. Biophysical analysis and western blot experiments suggest Ca(V)3.1 and 3.3 currents are also present in shKLHL1-infected neurons. Synapsin I levels, miniature postsynaptic current frequency, and excitatory and inhibitory synapse number were reduced in KLHL1 knockdown. This study corroborates the physiological role of KLHL1 as a calcium channel modulator and demonstrates a novel, presynaptic role.

  4. Characterization of voltage-gated calcium currents in freshly isolated smooth muscle cells from rat tail main artery.

    PubMed

    Petkov, G V; Fusi, F; Saponara, S; Gagov, H S; Sgaragli, G P; Boev, K K

    2001-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to characterize voltage-gated Ca2+ currents in smooth muscle cells freshly isolated from rat tail main artery in the presence of 5 mmol L(-1) external Ca2+. Calcium currents were identified on the basis of their voltage dependencies and sensitivity to nifedipine, Ni2+ and cinnarizine. In the majority of the cells studied, T- and L-type currents were observed, while the remaining cells showed predominantly L-type currents. In the latter group of cells, holding potential change from -50 to either -70 or -90 mV increased the corresponding inward current amplitude while its voltage activation threshold remained unchanged. The steady state inactivation of L-type Ca2+ channels showed half-maximal inactivation at -38 mV. A Ca2+-dependent inactivation was also evident. Nifedipine (3 micromol L(-1)) blocked L-type but not T-type Ca2+ currents. Ni2+ (50 micromol L(-1)) as well as cinnarizine (1 micromol L(-1)) suppressed the nifedipine-resistant, T-type component of the currents. At higher concentrations, both Ni2+ (0.3-1 mmol L(-1)) and cinnarizine (10 micromol L(-1)) blocked the net inward current. Replacement of Ca2+ with 10 mmol L(-)1 Ba2+ significantly increased the amplitude of L-type Ca2+ currents. These results demonstrate that smooth muscle cells freshly isolated from rat tail main artery may be divided into two populations, one expressing both L- and T-type and the other only L-type Ca2+ channels. Furthermore, this report shows that in arterial smooth muscle cells cinnarizine potently inhibited T-type currents at low concentrations (1 micromol L(-1)) but also blocked L-type Ca2+ currents at higher concentrations (10 micromol L(-1)).

  5. Epigenetic regulation of L-type voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels in mesenteric arteries of aging hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Liao, Jingwen; Zhang, Yanyan; Ye, Fang; Zhang, Lin; Chen, Yu; Zeng, Fanxing; Shi, Lijun

    2016-11-24

    Accumulating evidence has shown that epigenetic regulation is involved in hypertension and aging. L-type voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels (LTCCs), the dominant channels in vascular myocytes, greatly contribute to arteriole contraction and blood pressure (BP) control. We investigated the dynamic changes and epigenetic regulation of LTCC in the mesenteric arteries of aging hypertensive rats. LTCC function was evaluated by using microvascular rings and whole-cell patch-clamp in the mesenteric arteries of male Wistar-Kyoto rats and spontaneously hypertensive rats at established hypertension (3 month old) and an aging stage (16 month old), respectively. The expression of the LTCC α1C subunit was determined in the rat mesenteric microcirculation. The expression of miR-328, which targets α1C mRNA, and the DNA methylation status at the promoter region of the α1C gene (CACNA1C) were also determined. In vitro experiments were performed to assess α1C expression after transfection of the miR-328 mimic into cultured vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). The results showed that hypertension superimposed with aging aggravated BP and vascular remodeling. Both LTCC function and expression were significantly increased in hypertensive arteries and downregulated with aging. miR-328 expression was inhibited in hypertension, but increased with aging. There was no significant difference in the mean DNA methylation of CACNA1C among groups, whereas methylation was enhanced in the hypertensive group at specific sites on a CpG island located upstream of the gene promoter. Overexpression of miR-328 inhibited the α1C level of cultured VSMCs within 48 h. The results of the present study indicate that the dysfunction of LTCCs may exert an epigenetic influence at both pre- and post-transcriptional levels during hypertension pathogenesis and aging progression. miR-328 negatively regulated LTCC expression in both aging and hypertension.Hypertension Research advance online publication, 24

  6. Reciprocal Regulation of Reactive Oxygen Species and Phospho-CREB Regulates Voltage Gated Calcium Channel Expression during Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Selvakumar, Arti; Antony, Cecil; Singhal, Jhalak; Tiwari, Brijendra K.; Singh, Yogendra; Natarajan, Krishnamurthy

    2014-01-01

    Our previous work has demonstrated the roles played by L-type Voltage Gated Calcium Channels (VGCC) in regulating Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb) survival and pathogenesis. Here we decipher mechanisms and pathways engaged by the pathogen to regulate VGCC expression in macrophages. We show that M. tb and its antigen Rv3416 use phospho-CREB (pCREB), Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS), Protein Kinase C (PKC) and Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) to modulate VGCC expression in macrophages. siRNA mediated knockdown of MyD88, IRAK1, IRAK2 or TRAF6 significantly inhibited antigen mediated VGCC expression. Inhibiting Protein Kinase C (PKC) or MEK-ERK1/2 further increased VGCC expression. Interestingly, inhibiting intracellular calcium release upregulated antigen mediated VGCC expression, while inhibiting extracellular calcium influx had no significant effect. siRNA mediated knockdown of transcription factors c-Jun, SOX5 and CREB significantly inhibited Rv3416 mediated VGCC expression. A dynamic reciprocal cross-regulation between ROS and pCREB was observed that in turn governed VGCC expression with ROS playing a limiting role in the process. Further dissection of the mechanisms such as the interplay between ROS and pCREB would improve our understanding of the regulation of VGCC expression during M. tb infection. PMID:24797940

  7. Electromagnetic fields act via activation of voltage-gated calcium channels to produce beneficial or adverse effects

    PubMed Central

    Pall, Martin L

    2013-01-01

    The direct targets of extremely low and microwave frequency range electromagnetic fields (EMFs) in producing non-thermal effects have not been clearly established. However, studies in the literature, reviewed here, provide substantial support for such direct targets. Twenty-three studies have shown that voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) produce these and other EMF effects, such that the L-type or other VGCC blockers block or greatly lower diverse EMF effects. Furthermore, the voltage-gated properties of these channels may provide biophysically plausible mechanisms for EMF biological effects. Downstream responses of such EMF exposures may be mediated through Ca2+/calmodulin stimulation of nitric oxide synthesis. Potentially, physiological/therapeutic responses may be largely as a result of nitric oxide-cGMP-protein kinase G pathway stimulation. A well-studied example of such an apparent therapeutic response, EMF stimulation of bone growth, appears to work along this pathway. However, pathophysiological responses to EMFs may be as a result of nitric oxide-peroxynitrite-oxidative stress pathway of action. A single such well-documented example, EMF induction of DNA single-strand breaks in cells, as measured by alkaline comet assays, is reviewed here. Such single-strand breaks are known to be produced through the action of this pathway. Data on the mechanism of EMF induction of such breaks are limited; what data are available support this proposed mechanism. Other Ca2+-mediated regulatory changes, independent of nitric oxide, may also have roles. This article reviews, then, a substantially supported set of targets, VGCCs, whose stimulation produces non-thermal EMF responses by humans/higher animals with downstream effects involving Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent nitric oxide increases, which may explain therapeutic and pathophysiological effects. PMID:23802593

  8. Electromagnetic fields act via activation of voltage-gated calcium channels to produce beneficial or adverse effects.

    PubMed

    Pall, Martin L

    2013-08-01

    The direct targets of extremely low and microwave frequency range electromagnetic fields (EMFs) in producing non-thermal effects have not been clearly established. However, studies in the literature, reviewed here, provide substantial support for such direct targets. Twenty-three studies have shown that voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) produce these and other EMF effects, such that the L-type or other VGCC blockers block or greatly lower diverse EMF effects. Furthermore, the voltage-gated properties of these channels may provide biophysically plausible mechanisms for EMF biological effects. Downstream responses of such EMF exposures may be mediated through Ca(2+) /calmodulin stimulation of nitric oxide synthesis. Potentially, physiological/therapeutic responses may be largely as a result of nitric oxide-cGMP-protein kinase G pathway stimulation. A well-studied example of such an apparent therapeutic response, EMF stimulation of bone growth, appears to work along this pathway. However, pathophysiological responses to EMFs may be as a result of nitric oxide-peroxynitrite-oxidative stress pathway of action. A single such well-documented example, EMF induction of DNA single-strand breaks in cells, as measured by alkaline comet assays, is reviewed here. Such single-strand breaks are known to be produced through the action of this pathway. Data on the mechanism of EMF induction of such breaks are limited; what data are available support this proposed mechanism. Other Ca(2+) -mediated regulatory changes, independent of nitric oxide, may also have roles. This article reviews, then, a substantially supported set of targets, VGCCs, whose stimulation produces non-thermal EMF responses by humans/higher animals with downstream effects involving Ca(2+) /calmodulin-dependent nitric oxide increases, which may explain therapeutic and pathophysiological effects.

  9. Voltage gated sodium and calcium channel blockers for the treatment of chronic inflammatory pain.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Wahida; Dickenson, Anthony H

    2013-12-17

    The inflammatory response is a natural response of the body that occurs immediately following tissue damage, which may be due to injury, infection or disease. The acute inflammatory response is an essential mechanism that promotes healing and a key aspect is the ensuing pain, which warns the subject to protect the site of injury. Thus, it is common to see a zone of primary sensitization as well as consequential central sensitization that generally, is maintained by a peripheral drive from the zone of tissue injury. Inflammation associated with chronic pain states, such as rheumatoid and osteoarthritis, cancer and migraine etc. is deleterious to health and often debilitating for the patient. Thus there is a large unmet clinical need. The mechanisms underlying both acute and chronic inflammatory pain are extensive and complex, involving a diversity of cell types, receptors and proteins. Among these the contribution of voltage gated sodium and calcium channels on peripheral nociceptors is critical for nociceptive transmission beyond the peripheral transducers and changes in their distribution, accumulation, clustering and functional activities have been linked to both inflammatory and neuropathic pain. The latter has been the main area for trials and use of drugs that modulate ion channels such as carbamazepine and gabapentin, but given the large peripheral drive that follows tissue damage, there is a clear rationale for blocking voltage gated sodium and calcium channels in these pain states. It has been hypothesized that pain of inflammatory origin may evolve into a condition that resembles neuropathic pain, but mixed pains such as low back pain and cancer pain often include elements of both pain states. This review considers the therapeutic potential for sodium and calcium channel blockers for the treatment of chronic inflammatory pain states. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Differential CaMKII regulation by voltage-gated calcium channels in the striatum.

    PubMed

    Pasek, Johanna G; Wang, Xiaohan; Colbran, Roger J

    2015-09-01

    Calcium signaling regulates synaptic plasticity and many other functions in striatal medium spiny neurons to modulate basal ganglia function. Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) is a major calcium-dependent signaling protein that couples calcium entry to diverse cellular changes. CaMKII activation results in autophosphorylation at Thr286 and sustained calcium-independent CaMKII activity after calcium signals dissipate. However, little is known about the mechanisms regulating striatal CaMKII. To address this, mouse brain slices were treated with pharmacological modulators of calcium channels and punches of dorsal striatum were immunoblotted for CaMKII Thr286 autophosphorylation as an index of CaMKII activation. KCl depolarization increased levels of CaMKII autophosphorylation ~2-fold; this increase was blocked by an LTCC antagonist and was mimicked by treatment with pharmacological LTCC activators. The chelation of extracellular calcium robustly decreased basal CaMKII autophosphorylation within 5min and increased levels of total CaMKII in cytosolic fractions, in addition to decreasing the phosphorylation of CaMKII sites in the GluN2B subunit of NMDA receptors and the GluA1 subunit of AMPA receptors. We also found that the maintenance of basal levels of CaMKII autophosphorylation requires low-voltage gated T-type calcium channels, but not LTCCs or R-type calcium channels. Our findings indicate that CaMKII activity is dynamically regulated by multiple calcium channels in the striatum thus coupling calcium entry to key downstream substrates.

  11. Voltage-gated calcium channels function as Ca2+-activated signaling receptors.

    PubMed

    Atlas, Daphne

    2014-02-01

    Voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) are transmembrane cell surface proteins responsible for multifunctional signals. In response to voltage, VGCCs trigger synaptic transmission, drive muscle contraction, and regulate gene expression. Voltage perturbations open VGCCs enabling Ca(2+) binding to the low affinity Ca(2+) binding site of the channel pore. Subsequent to permeation, Ca(2+) targets selective proteins to activate diverse signaling pathways. It is becoming apparent that the Ca(2+)-bound channel triggers secretion in excitable cells and drives contraction in cardiomyocytes prior to Ca(2+) permeation. Here, I highlight recent data implicating receptor-like function of the Ca(2+)-bound channel in converting external Ca(2+) into an intracellular signal. The two sequential mechanistic perspectives of VGCC function are discussed in the context of the prevailing and long-standing current models of depolarization-evoked secretion and cardiac contraction. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Voltage-gated calcium channel subunits from platyhelminths: potential role in praziquantel action.

    PubMed

    Jeziorski, Michael C; Greenberg, Robert M

    2006-05-31

    Voltage-gated calcium (Ca2+) channels provide the pathway for Ca2+ influxes that underlie Ca2+ -dependent responses in muscles, nerves and other excitable cells. They are also targets of a wide variety of drugs and toxins. Ca2+ channels are multisubunit protein complexes consisting of a pore-forming alpha(1) subunit and other modulatory subunits, including the beta subunit. Here, we review the structure and function of schistosome Ca2+ channel subunits, with particular emphasis on variant Ca2+ channel beta subunits (Ca(v)betavar) found in these parasites. In particular, we examine the role these beta subunits may play in the action of praziquantel, the current drug of choice against schistosomiasis. We also present evidence that Ca(v)betavar homologs are found in other praziquantel-sensitive platyhelminths such as the pork tapeworm, Taenia solium, and that these variant beta subunits may thus represent a platyhelminth-specific gene family.

  13. Voltage-gated calcium channel subunits from platyhelminths: Potential role in praziquantel action✩

    PubMed Central

    Jeziorski, Michael C.; Greenberg, Robert M.

    2013-01-01

    Voltage-gated calcium (Ca2+) channels provide the pathway for Ca2+ influxes that underlie Ca2+-dependent responses in muscles, nerves and other excitable cells. They are also targets of a wide variety of drugs and toxins. Ca2+ channels are multisubunit protein complexes consisting of a pore-forming α1 subunit and other modulatory subunits, including the β subunit. Here, we review the structure and function of schistosome Ca2+ channel subunits, with particular emphasis on variant Ca2+ channel β subunits (Cavβvar) found in these parasites. In particular, we examine the role these β subunits may play in the action of praziquantel, the current drug of choice against schistosomiasis. We also present evidence that Cavβvar homologs are found in other praziquantel-sensitive platyhelminths such as the pork tapeworm, Taenia solium, and that these variant β subunits may thus represent a platyhelminth-specific gene family. PMID:16545816

  14. The role of auxiliary subunits for the functional diversity of voltage-gated calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Campiglio, Marta; Flucher, Bernhard E

    2015-09-01

    Voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) represent the sole mechanism to convert membrane depolarization into cellular functions like secretion, contraction, or gene regulation. VGCCs consist of a pore-forming α(1) subunit and several auxiliary channel subunits. These subunits come in multiple isoforms and splice-variants giving rise to a stunning molecular diversity of possible subunit combinations. It is generally believed that specific auxiliary subunits differentially regulate the channels and thereby contribute to the great functional diversity of VGCCs. If auxiliary subunits can associate and dissociate from pre-existing channel complexes, this would allow dynamic regulation of channel properties. However, most auxiliary subunits modulate current properties very similarly, and proof that any cellular calcium channel function is indeed modulated by the physiological exchange of auxiliary subunits is still lacking. In this review we summarize available information supporting a differential modulation of calcium channel functions by exchange of auxiliary subunits, as well as experimental evidence in support of alternative functions of the auxiliary subunits. At the heart of the discussion is the concept that, in their native environment, VGCCs function in the context of macromolecular signaling complexes and that the auxiliary subunits help to orchestrate the diverse protein-protein interactions found in these calcium channel signalosomes. Thus, in addition to a putative differential modulation of current properties, differential subcellular targeting properties and differential protein-protein interactions of the auxiliary subunits may explain the need for their vast molecular diversity.

  15. Fetal calcium regulates branching morphogenesis in the developing human and mouse lung: involvement of voltage-gated calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Sarah C; Finney, Brenda A; Lazarou, Maria; Rosser, Anne E; Scherf, Caroline; Adriaensen, Dirk; Kemp, Paul J; Riccardi, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    Airway branching morphogenesis in utero is essential for optimal postnatal lung function. In the fetus, branching morphogenesis occurs during the pseudoglandular stage (weeks 9-17 of human gestation, embryonic days (E)11.5-16.5 in mouse) in a hypercalcaemic environment (~1.7 in the fetus vs. ~1.1-1.3 mM for an adult). Previously we have shown that fetal hypercalcemia exerts an inhibitory brake on branching morphogenesis via the calcium-sensing receptor. In addition, earlier studies have shown that nifedipine, a selective blocker of L-type voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels (VGCC), inhibits fetal lung growth, suggesting a role for VGCC in lung development. The aim of this work was to investigate the expression of VGCC in the pseudoglandular human and mouse lung, and their role in branching morphogenesis. Expression of L-type (CaV1.2 and CaV1.3), P/Q type (CaV2.1), N-type (CaV2.2), R-type (CaV2.3), and T-type (CaV3.2 and CaV3.3) VGCC was investigated in paraffin sections from week 9 human fetal lungs and E12.5 mouse embryos. Here we show, for the first time, that Cav1.2 and Cav1.3 are expressed in both the smooth muscle and epithelium of the developing human and mouse lung. Additionally, Cav2.3 was expressed in the lung epithelium of both species. Incubating E12.5 mouse lung rudiments in the presence of nifedipine doubled the amount of branching, an effect which was partly mimicked by the Cav2.3 inhibitor, SNX-482. Direct measurements of changes in epithelial cell membrane potential, using the voltage-sensitive fluorescent dye DiSBAC2(3), demonstrated that cyclic depolarisations occur within the developing epithelium and coincide with rhythmic occlusions of the lumen, driven by the naturally occurring airway peristalsis. We conclude that VGCC are expressed and functional in the fetal human and mouse lung, where they play a role in branching morphogenesis. Furthermore, rhythmic epithelial depolarisations evoked by airway peristalsis would allow for branching to match

  16. How voltage-gated calcium channels gate forms of homeostatic synaptic plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Frank, C. Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Throughout life, animals face a variety of challenges such as developmental growth, the presence of toxins, or changes in temperature. Neuronal circuits and synapses respond to challenges by executing an array of neuroplasticity paradigms. Some paradigms allow neurons to up- or downregulate activity outputs, while countervailing ones ensure that outputs remain within appropriate physiological ranges. A growing body of evidence suggests that homeostatic synaptic plasticity (HSP) is critical in the latter case. Voltage-gated calcium channels gate forms of HSP. Presynaptically, the aggregate data show that when synapse activity is weakened, homeostatic signaling systems can act to correct impairments, in part by increasing calcium influx through presynaptic CaV2-type channels. Increased calcium influx is often accompanied by parallel increases in the size of active zones and the size of the readily releasable pool of presynaptic vesicles. These changes coincide with homeostatic enhancements of neurotransmitter release. Postsynaptically, there is a great deal of evidence that reduced network activity and loss of calcium influx through CaV1-type calcium channels also results in adaptive homeostatic signaling. Some adaptations drive presynaptic enhancements of vesicle pool size and turnover rate via retrograde signaling, as well as de novo insertion of postsynaptic neurotransmitter receptors. Enhanced calcium influx through CaV1 after network activation or single cell stimulation can elicit the opposite response—homeostatic depression via removal of excitatory receptors. There exist intriguing links between HSP and calcium channelopathies—such as forms of epilepsy, migraine, ataxia, and myasthenia. The episodic nature of some of these disorders suggests alternating periods of stable and unstable function. Uncovering information about how calcium channels are regulated in the context of HSP could be relevant toward understanding these and other disorders. PMID

  17. Alternative splicing: functional diversity among voltage-gated calcium channels and behavioral consequences.

    PubMed

    Lipscombe, Diane; Andrade, Arturo; Allen, Summer E

    2013-07-01

    Neuronal voltage-gated calcium channels generate rapid, transient intracellular calcium signals in response to membrane depolarization. Neuronal Ca(V) channels regulate a range of cellular functions and are implicated in a variety of neurological and psychiatric diseases including epilepsy, Parkinson's disease, chronic pain, schizophrenia, and bipolar disorder. Each mammalian Cacna1 gene has the potential to generate tens to thousands of Ca(V) channels by alternative pre-mRNA splicing, a process that adds fine granulation to the pool of Ca(V) channel structures and functions. The precise composition of Ca(V) channel splice isoform mRNAs expressed in each cell are controlled by cell-specific splicing factors. The activity of splicing factors are in turn regulated by molecules that encode various cellular features, including cell-type, activity, metabolic states, developmental state, and other factors. The cellular and behavioral consequences of individual sites of Ca(V) splice isoforms are being elucidated, as are the cell-specific splicing factors that control splice isoform selection. Altered patterns of alternative splicing of Ca(V) pre-mRNAs can alter behavior in subtle but measurable ways, with the potential to influence drug efficacy and disease severity. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Calcium channels.

  18. The localization of two voltage-gated calcium channels in the pyloric network of the lobster stomatogastric ganglion.

    PubMed

    French, L B; Lanning, C C; Harris-Warrick, R M

    2002-01-01

    Voltage-gated calcium channels are critical to all aspects of nervous system function, with differing roles within the neuronal somata, at synaptic terminals, and at the neuromuscular junction. We have developed antibodies against two voltage-gated Ca(2+) channel genes from the spiny lobster, Panulirus interruptus, which are homologous to the Drosophila Ca1A (a P/Q-type channel) and Ca1D (an L-type channel) genes. Using these antibodies, we have found that each channel shows unique patterns of localization within the stomatogastric nervous system. Both antibodies stain somata of most of the neurons in the pyloric network to varying degrees. The high degree of variability in staining intensity within individual pyloric cell classes supports the hypothesis of Golowasch et al. (1999a,b) that individual cells can vary in their composition of ionic currents and still have similar firing properties. Anti-Ca1A stains structures in the neuropil, some of which are terminals of axons descending from higher ganglia; however, the majority of these are neither neurites nor blood vessels, but may instead be glial cells or other support elements. Anti-Ca1A labeling was also prominent in the peripheral axons of pyloric motoneurons as they enter muscles, indicating that this channel may be involved in regulation of synaptic transmission onto the foregut muscles. Anti-Ca1D does not label neurites in the neuropil of the stomatogastric ganglion. It stains glial cells in the stomatogastric ganglion in the region of their nuclei, presumably from protein being produced in the perinuclear rough endoplasmic reticulum, en route to the glial cell periphery. While anti-Ca1D labeling is seen in a patchy distribution along peripheral pyloric axons, it was never seen near the muscle. We conclude that the localization of these two calcium channels is tightly controlled within the stomatogastric nervous system, but we cannot conclusively demonstrate that Ca1A and/or Ca1D channels play roles in

  19. The voltage-gated calcium channel functions as the molecular switch of synaptic transmission.

    PubMed

    Atlas, Daphne

    2013-01-01

    Transmitter release is a fast Ca(2+)-dependent process triggered in response to membrane depolarization. It involves two major calcium-binding proteins, the voltage-gated calcium channel (VGCC) and the vesicular protein synaptotagmin (syt1). Ca(2+) binding triggers transmitter release with a time response of conformational changes that are too fast to be accounted for by Ca(2+) binding to syt1. In contrast, conformation-triggered release, which engages Ca(2+) binding to VGCC, better accounts for the fast rate of the release process. Here, we summarize findings obtained from heterologous expression systems, neuroendocrine cells, and reconstituted systems, which reveal the molecular mechanism by which Ca(2+) binding to VGCC triggers exocytosis prior to Ca(2+) entry into the cell. This review highlights the molecular aspects of an intramembrane signaling mechanism in which a signal is propagated from the channel transmembrane (TM) domain to the TM domain of syntaxin 1A to trigger transmitter release. It discusses fundamental problems of triggering transmitter release by syt1 and suggests a classification of docked vesicles that might explain synchronous transmitter release, spontaneous release, and facilitation of transmitter release.

  20. Arsenic induced neuronal apoptosis in guinea pigs is Ca2+ dependent and abrogated by chelation therapy: role of voltage gated calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Pachauri, Vidhu; Mehta, Ashish; Mishra, Deepshikha; Flora, Swaran J S

    2013-03-01

    Arsenic contaminated drinking water has affected more than 200 million people globally. Chronic arsenicism has also been associated with numerous neurological diseases. One of the prime mechanisms postulated for arsenic toxicity is reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediated oxidative stress. In this study, we explored the kinetic relationship of ROS with calcium and attempted to dissect the calcium ion channels responsible for calcium imbalance after arsenic exposure. We also explored if mono- or combinational chelation therapy prevents arsenic-induced (25ppm in drinking water for 4 months) neuronal apoptosis in a guinea pig animal model. Results indicate that chronic arsenic exposure caused a significant increase in ROS followed by NO and calcium influx. This calcium influx is mainly dependent on L-type voltage gated channels that disrupt mitochondrial membrane potential, increase bax/bcl2 levels and caspase 3 activity leading to apoptosis. Interestingly, blocking of ROS could completely reduce calcium influx whereas calcium blockage partially reduced ROS increase. While in general mono- and combinational chelation therapies were effective in reversing arsenic induced alteration, combinational therapy of DMSA and MiADMSA was most effective. Our results provide evidence for the role of L-type calcium channels in regulating arsenic-induced calcium influx and DMSA+MiADMSA combinational therapy may be a better protocol than monotherapy in mitigating chronic arsenicosis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Altered voltage-gated calcium channels in rat inferior colliculus neurons contribute to alcohol withdrawal seizures.

    PubMed

    N'Gouemo, Prosper

    2015-08-01

    We have previously reported that enhanced susceptibility to alcohol withdrawal seizures (AWS) parallels the enhancement of the current density of high-threshold voltage-gated Ca(2+) (CaV) channels in rat inferior colliculus (IC) neurons. However, whether this increased current density is a cause or consequence of AWS is unclear. Here, I report changes in the current density of CaV channels in IC neurons during the course of alcohol withdrawal and the potential anticonvulsant effect of intra-IC infusions of L- and P-type CaV channel antagonists. Whole-cell currents were activated by depolarizing pulses using barium as the charge carrier. Currents and seizure susceptibility were evaluated in control animals 3h after alcohol intoxication, as well as 3h (before AWS), 24h (when AWS susceptibility is maximal), and 48h (when AWS susceptibility is no longer present) after alcohol withdrawal. Nifedipine, nimodipine (L-type antagonists) or ω-agatoxin TK (P-type antagonist) were infused intra-IC to probe the role of CaV channels in the pathogenesis of AWS. CaV current density and conductance in IC neurons were significantly increased 3 and 24h after alcohol withdrawal compared with the control group or the group tested 3h following ethanol intoxication. Blockade of L-type CaV channels within the IC completely suppressed AWS, and inhibition of P-type channels reduced AWS severity. These findings suggest that the enhancement of CaV currents in IC neurons occurs prior to AWS onset and that alterations in L- and P-type CaV channels in these neurons may underlie the pathogenesis of AWS.

  2. Altered voltage-gated calcium channels in rat inferior colliculus neurons contribute to alcohol withdrawal seizures

    PubMed Central

    N’Gouemo, Prosper

    2015-01-01

    We have previously reported that enhanced susceptibility to alcohol withdrawal seizures (AWS) parallels the enhancement of the current density of high-threshold voltage-gated Ca2+ (CaV) channels in rat inferior colliculus (IC) neurons. However, whether this increased current density is a cause or consequence of AWS is unclear. Here, I report changes in the current density of CaV channels in IC neurons during the course of alcohol withdrawal and the potential anticonvulsant effect of intra-IC infusions of L- and P-type CaV channel antagonists. Whole-cell currents were activated by depolarizing pulses using barium as the charge carrier. Currents and seizure susceptibility were evaluated in control animals 3 h after alcohol intoxication, as well as 3 h (before AWS), 24 h (when AWS susceptibility is maximal), and 48 h (when AWS susceptibility is no longer present) after alcohol withdrawal. Nifedipine, nimodipine (L-type antagonists) or ω-agatoxin TK (P-type antagonist) were infused intra-IC to probe the role of CaV channels in the pathogenesis of AWS. CaV current density and conductance in IC neurons were significantly increased 3 and 24 h after alcohol withdrawal compared with the control group or the group tested 3 h following ethanol intoxication. Blockade of L-type CaV channels within the IC completely suppressed AWS, and inhibition of P-type channels reduced AWS severity. These findings suggest that the enhancement of CaV currents in IC neurons occurs prior to AWS onset and that alterations in L- and P-type CaV channels in these neurons may underlie the pathogenesis of AWS. PMID:25914156

  3. The Role of Auxiliary Subunits for the Functional Diversity of Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Campiglio, Marta; Flucher, Bernhard E

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) represent the sole mechanism to convert membrane depolarization into cellular functions like secretion, contraction, or gene regulation. VGCCs consist of a pore-forming α1 subunit and several auxiliary channel subunits. These subunits come in multiple isoforms and splice-variants giving rise to a stunning molecular diversity of possible subunit combinations. It is generally believed that specific auxiliary subunits differentially regulate the channels and thereby contribute to the great functional diversity of VGCCs. If auxiliary subunits can associate and dissociate from pre-existing channel complexes, this would allow dynamic regulation of channel properties. However, most auxiliary subunits modulate current properties very similarly, and proof that any cellular calcium channel function is indeed modulated by the physiological exchange of auxiliary subunits is still lacking. In this review we summarize available information supporting a differential modulation of calcium channel functions by exchange of auxiliary subunits, as well as experimental evidence in support of alternative functions of the auxiliary subunits. At the heart of the discussion is the concept that, in their native environment, VGCCs function in the context of macromolecular signaling complexes and that the auxiliary subunits help to orchestrate the diverse protein–protein interactions found in these calcium channel signalosomes. Thus, in addition to a putative differential modulation of current properties, differential subcellular targeting properties and differential protein–protein interactions of the auxiliary subunits may explain the need for their vast molecular diversity. J. Cell. Physiol. 999: 00–00, 2015. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Cellular Physiology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J. Cell. Physiol. 230: 2019–2031, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25820299

  4. A role for L-type calcium channels in the maturation of parvalbumin-containing hippocampal interneurons.

    PubMed

    Jiang, M; Swann, J W

    2005-01-01

    While inhibitory interneurons are well recognized to play critical roles in the brain, relatively little is know about the molecular events that regulate their growth and differentiation. Calcium ions are thought to be important in neuronal development and L-type voltage gated Ca(+2) channels have been implicated in activity-dependent mechanisms of early-life. However, few studies have examined the role of these channels in the maturation of interneurons. The studies reported here were conducted in hippocampal slice cultures and indicate that the L-type Ca(+2) channel agonists and antagonists accelerate and suppress respectively the growth of parvalbumin-containing interneurons. The effects of channel blockade were reversible suggesting they are not the result of interneuronal cell death. Results from immunoblotting showed that these drugs have similar effects on the expression of the GABA synthetic enzymes, glutamic acid decarboxylase65, glutamic acid decarboxylase67 and the vesicular GABA transporter. This suggests that L-type Ca(+2) channels regulate not only parvalbumin expression but also interneuron development. These effects are likely mediated by actions on the interneurons themselves since the alpha subunits of L-type channels, voltage-gated calcium channel subunit 1.2 and voltage-gated calcium channel subunit 1.3 were found to be highly expressed in neonatal mouse hippocampus and co-localized with parvalbumin in interneurons. Results also showed that while these interneurons can contain either subunit, voltage-gated calcium channel subunit 1.3 was more widely expressed. Taken together results suggest that an important subset of developing interneurons expresses L-type Ca(+2) channels alpha subunits, voltage-gated calcium channel subunit 1.2 and especially voltage-gated calcium channel subunit 1.3 and that these channels likely regulate the development of these interneurons in an activity-dependent manner.

  5. Resveratrol attenuates cortical neuron activity: roles of large conductance calcium-activated potassium channels and voltage-gated sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ya-Jean; Chan, Ming-Huan; Chen, Linyi; Wu, Sheng-Nan; Chen, Hwei-Hisen

    2016-05-21

    Resveratrol, a phytoalexin found in grapes and red wine, exhibits diverse pharmacological activities. However, relatively little is known about whether resveratrol modulates the ion channels in cortical neurons. The large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels (BKCa) and voltage-gated sodium channels were expressed in cortical neurons and play important roles in regulation of neuronal excitability. The present study aimed to determine the effects of resveratrol on BKCa currents and voltage-gated sodium currents in cortical neurons. Resveratrol concentration-dependently increased the current amplitude and the opening activity of BKCa channels, but suppressed the amplitude of voltage-gated sodium currents. Similar to the BKCa channel opener NS1619, resveratrol decreased the firing rate of action potentials. In addition, the enhancing effects of BKCa channel blockers tetraethylammonium (TEA) and paxilline on action potential firing were sensitive to resveratrol. Our results indicated that the attenuation of action potential firing rate by resveratrol might be mediated through opening the BKCa channels and closing the voltage-gated sodium channels. As BKCa channels and sodium channels are critical molecular determinants for seizure generation, our findings suggest that regulation of these two channels in cortical neurons probably makes a considerable contribution to the antiseizure activity of resveratrol.

  6. Touch responsiveness in zebrafish requires voltage-gated calcium channel 2.1b.

    PubMed

    Low, Sean E; Woods, Ian G; Lachance, Mathieu; Ryan, Joel; Schier, Alexander F; Saint-Amant, Louis

    2012-07-01

    The molecular and physiological basis of the touch-unresponsive zebrafish mutant fakir has remained elusive. Here we report that the fakir phenotype is caused by a missense mutation in the gene encoding voltage-gated calcium channel 2.1b (CACNA1Ab). Injection of RNA encoding wild-type CaV2.1 restores touch responsiveness in fakir mutants, whereas knockdown of CACNA1Ab via morpholino oligonucleotides recapitulates the fakir mutant phenotype. Fakir mutants display normal current-evoked synaptic communication at the neuromuscular junction but have attenuated touch-evoked activation of motor neurons. NMDA-evoked fictive swimming is not affected by the loss of CaV2.1b, suggesting that this channel is not required for motor pattern generation. These results, coupled with the expression of CACNA1Ab by sensory neurons, suggest that CaV2.1b channel activity is necessary for touch-evoked activation of the locomotor network in zebrafish.

  7. Functional expression of voltage-gated calcium channels in human melanoma.

    PubMed

    Das, A; Pushparaj, C; Bahí, N; Sorolla, A; Herreros, J; Pamplona, R; Vilella, R; Matias-Guiu, X; Martí, R M; Cantí, C

    2012-03-01

    The expression of voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) has not been reported previously in melanoma cells in spite of increasing evidence of a role of VGCCs in tumorigenesis and tumour progression. To address this issue we have performed an extensive RT-PCR analysis of VGCC expression in human melanocytes and a range of melanoma cell lines and biopsies. In addition, we have tested the functional expression of these channels using Ca(2+) imaging techniques and examined their relevance for the viability and proliferation of the melanoma cells. Our results show that control melanocytes and melanoma cells express channel isoforms belonging to the Ca(v) 1 and Ca(v) 2 gene families. Importantly, the expression of low voltage-activated Ca(v) 3 (T-type) channels is restricted to melanoma. We have confirmed the function of T-type channels as mediators of constitutive Ca(2+) influx in melanoma cells. Finally, pharmacological and gene silencing approaches demonstrate a role for T-type channels in melanoma viability and proliferation. These results encourage the analysis of T-type VGCCs as targets for therapeutic intervention in melanoma tumorigenesis and/or tumour progression.

  8. Densin-180 controls the trafficking and signaling of L-type voltage-gated Cav1.2 Ca(2+) channels at excitatory synapses.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shiyi; Stanika, Ruslan I; Wang, Xiaohan; Hagen, Jussara; Kennedy, Mary B; Obermair, Gerald J; Colbran, Roger J; Lee, Amy

    2017-03-31

    Voltage-gated Cav1.2 and Cav1.3 (L-type) Ca(2+) channels regulate neuronal excitability, synaptic plasticity, and learning and memory. Densin-180 (densin) is an excitatory synaptic protein that promotes Ca(2+)-dependent facilitation of voltage-gated Cav1.3 Ca(2+) channels in transfected cells. Mice lacking densin (densin KO) exhibit defects in synaptic plasticity, spatial memory, and increased anxiety-related behaviors --phenotypes that more closely match those in mice lacking Cav1.2 than Cav1.3. Thus, we investigated the functional impact of densin on Cav1.2. We report that densin is an essential regulator of Cav1.2 in neurons, but has distinct modulatory effects compared to its regulation of Cav1.3. Densin binds to the N-terminal domain of Cav1.2 but not Cav1.3, and increases Cav1.2 currents in transfected cells and in neurons. In transfected cells, densin accelerates the forward trafficking of Cav1.2 channels without affecting their endocytosis. Consistent with a role for densin in increasing the number of postsynaptic Cav1.2 channels, overexpression of densin increases the clustering of Cav1.2 in dendrites of hippocampal neurons in culture. Compared to wild-type mice, the cell-surface levels of Cav1.2 in the brain as well as Cav1.2 current density and signaling to the nucleus are reduced in neurons from densin KO mice. We conclude that densin is an essential regulator of neuronal Cav1 channels and ensures efficient Cav1.2 Ca(2+) signaling at excitatory synapses.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENTThe number and localization of voltage-gated Cav Ca(2+) channels are crucial determinants of neuronal excitability and synaptic transmission. We report that a protein that is highly enriched at excitatory synapses in the brain, densin-180, enhances the cell-surface trafficking and postsynaptic localization of Cav1.2 L-type Ca(2+) channels in neurons. This interaction promotes coupling of Cav1.2 channels to activity-dependent gene transcription. Our results reveal a mechanism that

  9. Clinical Features of Neuromuscular Disorders in Patients with N-Type Voltage-Gated Calcium Channel Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Totzeck, Andreas; Mummel, Petra; Kastrup, Oliver; Hagenacker, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Neuromuscular junction disorders affect the pre- or postsynaptic nerve to muscle transmission due to autoimmune antibodies. Members of the group like myasthenia gravis and Lambert-Eaton syndrome have pathophysiologically distinct characteristics. However, in practice, distinction may be difficult. We present a series of three patients with a myasthenic syndrome, dropped-head syndrome, bulbar and respiratory muscle weakness and positive testing for anti-N-type voltage-gated calcium channel antibodies. In two cases anti-acetylcholin receptor antibodies were elevated, anti-P/Q-type voltage-gated calcium channel antibodies were negative. All patients initially responded to pyridostigmine with a non-response in the course of the disease. While one patient recovered well after treatment with intravenous immunoglobulins, 3,4-diaminopyridine, steroids and later on immunosuppression with mycophenolate mofetil, a second died after restriction of treatment due to unfavorable cancer diagnosis, the third patient declined treatment. Although new antibodies causing neuromuscular disorders were discovered, clinical distinction has not yet been made. Our patients showed features of pre- and postsynaptic myasthenic syndrome as well as severe dropped-head syndrome and bulbar and axial muscle weakness, but only anti-N-type voltage-gated calcium channel antibodies were positive. When administered, one patient benefited from 3,4-diaminopyridine. We suggest that this overlap-syndrome should be considered especially in patients with assumed seronegative myasthenia gravis and lack of improvement under standard therapy. PMID:28078065

  10. A role for voltage gated T-type calcium channels in mediating "capacitative" calcium entry?

    PubMed

    Gackière, Florian; Bidaux, Gabriel; Lory, Philippe; Prevarskaya, Natalia; Mariot, Pascal

    2006-04-01

    Calcium entry through plasma membrane calcium channels is one of the most important cell signaling mechanism involved in such diverse functions as secretion, contraction and cell growth by regulating gene expression, proliferation and apoptosis. The identity of plasma membrane calcium channels, the main regulators of calcium entry, involved in cell proliferation has been thus extensively sought. Among these, a calcium entry pathway called capacitative calcium entry (CCE), activated by calcium store depletion, is particularly important in non-excitable cells. Though this capacitative calcium entry is generally supposed to occur through TRP channels there is some evidence that voltage-dependent T-type calcium channels may contribute to calcium entry after store depletion. Here we show that though mibefradil, a T-type calcium channel blocker, is able to reduce capacitative calcium entry induced by either thapsigargin or ATP, this was not mimicked by any other T-type calcium channel inhibitors even in cells overexpressing alpha(1H) T-type calcium channels, leading us to conclude that T-type calcium channels are not responsible for the capacitative calcium entry observed in different cancer cell lines. On the contrary, we show that the action of mibefradil on capacitative calcium entry is due to an action on store-operated calcium channels.

  11. Apo states of calmodulin and CaBP1 control CaV1 voltage-gated calcium channel function through direct competition for the IQ domain.

    PubMed

    Findeisen, Felix; Rumpf, Christine H; Minor, Daniel L

    2013-09-09

    In neurons, binding of calmodulin (CaM) or calcium-binding protein 1 (CaBP1) to the CaV1 (L-type) voltage-gated calcium channel IQ domain endows the channel with diametrically opposed properties. CaM causes calcium-dependent inactivation and limits calcium entry, whereas CaBP1 blocks calcium-dependent inactivation (CDI) and allows sustained calcium influx. Here, we combine isothermal titration calorimetry with cell-based functional measurements and mathematical modeling to show that these calcium sensors behave in a competitive manner that is explained quantitatively by their apo-state binding affinities for the IQ domain. This competition can be completely blocked by covalent tethering of CaM to the channel. Further, we show that Ca(2+)/CaM has a sub-picomolar affinity for the IQ domain that is achieved without drastic alteration of calcium-binding properties. The observation that the apo forms of CaM and CaBP1 compete with each other demonstrates a simple mechanism for direct modulation of CaV1 function and suggests a means by which excitable cells may dynamically tune CaV activity. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. The L-Type Calcium Channel Blocker Nifedipine Impairs Extinction, but Not Reduced Contingency Effects, in Mice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jami, Shekib; Barad, Mark; Cain, Christopher K.; Godsil, Bill P.

    2005-01-01

    We recently reported that fear extinction, a form of inhibitory learning, is selectively blocked by systemic administration of L-type voltage-gated calcium channel (LVGCC) antagonists, including nifedipine, in mice. We here replicate this finding and examine three reduced contingency effects after vehicle or nifedipine (40 mg/kg) administration.…

  13. The L-Type Calcium Channel Blocker Nifedipine Impairs Extinction, but Not Reduced Contingency Effects, in Mice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jami, Shekib; Barad, Mark; Cain, Christopher K.; Godsil, Bill P.

    2005-01-01

    We recently reported that fear extinction, a form of inhibitory learning, is selectively blocked by systemic administration of L-type voltage-gated calcium channel (LVGCC) antagonists, including nifedipine, in mice. We here replicate this finding and examine three reduced contingency effects after vehicle or nifedipine (40 mg/kg) administration.…

  14. Peptide Neurotoxins that Affect Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels: A Close-Up on ω-Agatoxins

    PubMed Central

    Pringos, Emilie; Vignes, Michel; Martinez, Jean; Rolland, Valerie

    2011-01-01

    Peptide neurotoxins found in animal venoms have gained great interest in the field of neurotransmission. As they are high affinity ligands for calcium, potassium and sodium channels, they have become useful tools for studying channel structure and activity. Peptide neurotoxins represent the clinical potential of ion-channel modulators across several therapeutic fields, especially in developing new strategies for treatment of ion channel-related diseases. The aim of this review is to overview the latest updates in the domain of peptide neurotoxins that affect voltage-gated calcium channels, with a special focus on ω-agatoxins. PMID:22069688

  15. Mapping of a human brain voltage-gated calcium channel to human chromosome 12p13-pter

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, W.; Hoang, D.Q.; Montal, M. ); McPherson, J.D.; Wasmuth, J.J. ); Evans, G.A. )

    1992-12-01

    Degenerate DNA oligomers coding for highly conserved regions of the voltage-gated calcium channel were synthesized for the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using DNA from a human brain cDNA library as template. PCR amplified a 640-bp DNA fragment from the human brain cDNA library. Sequencing revealed that this fragment encodes part of a protein highly homologous to a subtype of the dihydropyridine-sensitive calcium channel cloned from rabbit heart and rat brain. Southern analysis of panels of somatic cell hybrids mapped the 640-bp fragment, CACNL1A1, to human chromosome 12p13-pter. 17 refs., 2 figs.

  16. Apo-states of calmodulin and CaBP1 control CaV1 voltage-gated calcium channel function through direct competition for the IQ domain

    PubMed Central

    Findeisen, Felix; Rumpf, Christine; Minor, Daniel L.

    2013-01-01

    In neurons, binding of calmodulin (CaM) or calcium-binding protein 1 (CaBP1) to the CaV1 (L-type) voltage-gated calcium channel IQ domain endows the channel with diametrically opposed properties. CaM causes calcium-dependent inactivation (CDI) and limits calcium entry, whereas CaBP1 blocks CDI and allows sustained calcium influx. Here, we combine isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) with cell-based functional measurements and mathematical modeling to show that these calcium sensors behave in a competitive manner that is explained quantitatively by their apo-state binding affinities for the IQ domain. This competition can be completely blocked by covalent tethering of CaM to the channel. Further, we show that Ca2+/CaM has a sub-picomolar affinity for the IQ domain that is achieved without drastic alteration of calcium binding properties. The observation that the apo-forms of CaM and CaBP1 compete with each other demonstrates a simple mechanism for direct modulation of CaV1 function and suggests a means by which excitable cells may dynamically tune CaV activity. PMID:23811053

  17. Osteoclast cytosolic calcium, regulated by voltage-gated calcium channels and extracellular calcium, controls podosome assembly and bone resorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyauchi, A.; Hruska, K. A.; Greenfield, E. M.; Duncan, R.; Alvarez, J.; Barattolo, R.; Colucci, S.; Zambonin-Zallone, A.; Teitelbaum, S. L.; Teti, A.

    1990-01-01

    The mechanisms of Ca2+ entry and their effects on cell function were investigated in cultured chicken osteoclasts and putative osteoclasts produced by fusion of mononuclear cell precursors. Voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (VGCC) were detected by the effects of membrane depolarization with K+, BAY K 8644, and dihydropyridine antagonists. K+ produced dose-dependent increases of cytosolic calcium ([Ca2+]i) in osteoclasts on glass coverslips. Half-maximal effects were achieved at 70 mM K+. The effects of K+ were completely inhibited by dihydropyridine derivative Ca2+ channel blocking agents. BAY K 8644 (5 X 10(-6) M), a VGCC agonist, stimulated Ca2+ entry which was inhibited by nicardipine. VGCCs were inactivated by the attachment of osteoclasts to bone, indicating a rapid phenotypic change in Ca2+ entry mechanisms associated with adhesion of osteoclasts to their resorption substrate. Increasing extracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]e) induced Ca2+ release from intracellular stores and Ca2+ influx. The Ca2+ release was blocked by dantrolene (10(-5) M), and the influx by La3+. The effects of [Ca2+]e on [Ca2+]i suggests the presence of a Ca2+ receptor on the osteoclast cell membrane that could be coupled to mechanisms regulating cell function. Expression of the [Ca2+]e effect on [Ca2+]i was similar in the presence or absence of bone matrix substrate. Each of the mechanisms producing increases in [Ca2+]i, (membrane depolarization, BAY K 8644, and [Ca2+]e) reduced expression of the osteoclast-specific adhesion structure, the podosome. The decrease in podosome expression was mirrored by a 50% decrease in bone resorptive activity. Thus, stimulated increases of osteoclast [Ca2+]i lead to cytoskeletal changes affecting cell adhesion and decreasing bone resorptive activity.

  18. Voltage-gated calcium channel currents in human coronary myocytes. Regulation by cyclic GMP and nitric oxide.

    PubMed Central

    Quignard, J F; Frapier, J M; Harricane, M C; Albat, B; Nargeot, J; Richard, S

    1997-01-01

    Voltage-gated Ca2+ channels contribute to the maintenance of contractile tone in vascular myocytes and are potential targets for vasodilating agents. There is no information available about their nature and regulation in human coronary arteries. We used the whole-cell voltage-clamp technique to characterize Ca2+-channel currents immediately after enzymatic dissociation and after primary culture of coronary myocytes taken from heart transplant patients. We recorded a dihydropyridine-sensitive L-type current in both freshly isolated and primary cultured cells. A T-type current was recorded only in culture. The L- (but not the T-) type current was inhibited by permeable analogues of cGMP in a dose-dependent manner. This effect was mimicked by the nitric oxide-generating agents S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP) and 3-morpholinosydnonimine which increased intracellular cGMP. Methylene blue, known to inhibit guanylate cyclase, antagonized the effect of SNAP. Inhibitions by SNAP and cGMP were not additive and seemed to occur through a common pathway. We conclude that (a) L-type Ca2+ channels are the major pathway for voltage-gated Ca2+ entry in human coronary myocytes; (b) their inhibition by agents stimulating nitric oxide and/or intracellular cGMP production is expected to contribute to vasorelaxation and may be involved in the therapeutic effect of nitrovasodilators; and (c) the expression of T-type Ca2+ channels in culture may be triggered by cell proliferation. PMID:9005986

  19. Impaired Fear Extinction Due to a Deficit in Ca(2+) Influx Through L-Type Voltage-Gated Ca(2+) Channels in Mice Deficient for Tenascin-C.

    PubMed

    Morellini, Fabio; Malyshev, Aleksey; Volgushev, Maxim; Chistiakova, Marina; Papashvili, Giorgi; Fellini, Laetitia; Kleene, Ralf; Schachner, Melitta; Dityatev, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Mice deficient in the extracellular matrix glycoprotein tenascin-C (TNC(-/-)) express a deficit in specific forms of hippocampal synaptic plasticity, which involve the L-type voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels (L-VGCCs). The mechanisms underlying this deficit and its functional implications for learning and memory have not been investigated. In line with previous findings, we report on impairment in theta-burst stimulation (TBS)-induced long-term potentiation (LTP) in TNC(-/-) mice in the CA1 hippocampal region and its rescue by the L-VGCC activator Bay K-8644. We further found that the overall pattern of L-VGCC expression in the hippocampus in TNC(-/-) mice was normal, but Western blot analysis results uncovered upregulated expression of the Cav1.2 and Cav1.3 α-subunits of L-VGCCs. However, these L-VGCCs were not fully functional in TNC(-/-) mice, as demonstrated by Ca(2+) imaging, which revealed a reduction of nifedipine-sensitive Ca(2+) transients in CA1 pyramidal neurons. TNC(-/-) mice showed normal learning and memory in the contextual fear conditioning paradigm but impaired extinction of conditioned fear responses. Systemic injection of the L-VGCC blockers nifedipine and diltiazem into wild-type mice mimicked the impairment of fear extinction observed in TNC(-/-) mice. The deficiency in TNC(-/-) mice substantially occluded the effects of these drugs. Our results suggest that TNC-mediated modulation of L-VGCC activity is essential for fear extinction.

  20. Tolperisone-type drugs inhibit spinal reflexes via blockade of voltage-gated sodium and calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Kocsis, Pál; Farkas, Sándor; Fodor, László; Bielik, Norbert; Thán, Márta; Kolok, Sándor; Gere, Anikó; Csejtei, Mónika; Tarnawa, István

    2005-12-01

    The spinal reflex depressant mechanism of tolperisone and some of its structural analogs with central muscle relaxant action was investigated. Tolperisone (50-400 microM), eperisone, lanperisone, inaperisone, and silperisone (25-200 microM) dose dependently depressed the ventral root potential of isolated hemisected spinal cord of 6-day-old rats. The local anesthetic lidocaine (100-800 microM) produced qualitatively similar depression of spinal functions in the hemicord preparation, whereas its blocking effect on afferent nerve conduction was clearly stronger. In vivo, tolperisone and silperisone as well as lidocaine (10 mg/kg intravenously) depressed ventral root reflexes and excitability of motoneurons. However, in contrast with lidocaine, the muscle relaxant drugs seemed to have a more pronounced action on the synaptic responses than on the excitability of motoneurons. Whole-cell measurements in dorsal root ganglion cells revealed that tolperisone and silperisone depressed voltage-gated sodium channel conductance at concentrations that inhibited spinal reflexes. Results obtained with tolperisone and its analogs in the [3H]batrachotoxinin A 20-alpha-benzoate binding in cortical neurons and in a fluorimetric membrane potential assay in cerebellar neurons further supported the view that blockade of sodium channels may be a major component of the action of tolperisone-type centrally acting muscle relaxant drugs. Furthermore, tolperisone, eperisone, and especially silperisone had a marked effect on voltage-gated calcium channels, whereas calcium currents were hardly influenced by lidocaine. These data suggest that tolperisone-type muscle relaxants exert their spinal reflex inhibitory action predominantly via a presynaptic inhibition of the transmitter release from the primary afferent endings via a combined action on voltage-gated sodium and calcium channels.

  1. Cholesterol Influences Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels and BK-Type Potassium Channels in Auditory Hair Cells

    PubMed Central

    Purcell, Erin K.; Liu, Liqian; Thomas, Paul V.; Duncan, R. Keith

    2011-01-01

    The influence of membrane cholesterol content on a variety of ion channel conductances in numerous cell models has been shown, but studies exploring its role in auditory hair cell physiology are scarce. Recent evidence shows that cholesterol depletion affects outer hair cell electromotility and the voltage-gated potassium currents underlying tall hair cell development, but the effects of cholesterol on the major ionic currents governing auditory hair cell excitabilityare unknown. We investigated the effects of a cholesterol-depleting agent (methyl beta cyclodextrin, MβCD) on ion channels necessary for the early stages of sound processing. Large-conductance BK-type potassium channels underlie temporal processing and open in a voltage- and calcium-dependent manner. Voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) are responsible for calcium-dependent exocytosis and synaptic transmission to the auditory nerve. Our results demonstrate that cholesterol depletion reduced peak steady-state calcium-sensitive (BK-type) potassiumcurrent by 50% in chick cochlear hair cells. In contrast, MβCD treatment increased peak inward calcium current (∼30%), ruling out loss of calcium channel expression or function as a cause of reduced calcium-sensitive outward current. Changes in maximal conductance indicated a direct impact of cholesterol on channel number or unitary conductance. Immunoblotting following sucrose-gradient ultracentrifugation revealed BK expression in cholesterol-enriched microdomains. Both direct impacts of cholesterol on channel biophysics, as well as channel localization in the membrane, may contribute to the influence of cholesterol on hair cell physiology. Our results reveal a new role for cholesterol in the regulation of auditory calcium and calcium-activated potassium channels and add to the growing evidence that cholesterol is a key determinant in auditory physiology. PMID:22046269

  2. Analgesic effect of a broad-spectrum dihydropyridine inhibitor of voltage-gated calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Gadotti, Vinicius M; Bladen, Chris; Zhang, Fang Xiong; Chen, Lina; Gündüz, Miyase Gözde; Şimşek, Rahime; Şafak, Cihat; Zamponi, Gerald W

    2015-12-01

    Voltage-activated calcium channels are important facilitators of nociceptive transmission in the primary afferent pathway. Consequently, molecules that block these channels are of potential use as pain therapeutics. Our group has recently reported on the identification of a novel class of dihydropyridines (DHPs) that included compounds with preferential selectivity for T-type over L-type channels. Among those compounds, M4 was found to be an equipotent inhibitor of both Cav1.2 L- and Cav3.2 T-type calcium channels. Here, we have further characterized the effects of this compound on other types of calcium channels and examined its analgesic effect when delivered either spinally (i.t.) or systemically (i.p.) to mice. Both delivery routes resulted in antinociception in a model of acute pain. Furthermore, M4 was able to reverse mechanical hyperalgesia produced by nerve injury when delivered intrathecally. M4 retained partial activity when delivered to Cav3.2 null mice, indicating that this compound acts on multiple targets. Additional whole-cell patch clamp experiments in transfected tsA-201 cells revealed that M4 also effectively blocks Cav3.3 (T-type) and Cav2.2 (N-type) currents. Altogether, our data indicate that broad-spectrum inhibition of multiple calcium channel subtypes can lead to potent analgesia in rodents.

  3. Pharmacology of L-type Calcium Channels: Novel Drugs for Old Targets?

    PubMed Central

    Striessnig, Jörg; Ortner, Nadine J.; Pinggera, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    Inhibition of voltage-gated L-type calcium channels by organic calcium channel blockers is a well-established pharmacodynamic concept for the treatment of hypertension and cardiac ischemia. Since decades these antihypertensives (such as the dihydropyridines amlodipine, felodipine or nifedipine) belong to the most widely prescribed drugs 
world-wide. Their tolerability is excellent because at therapeutic doses their pharmacological effects in humans are limited to the cardiovascular system. During the last years substantial progress has been made to reveal the physiological role of different L-type calcium channel isoforms in many other tissues, including the brain, endocrine and sensory cells. 
Moreover, there is accumulating evidence about their involvement in various human diseases, such as Parkinson's disease, neuropsychiatric disorders and hyperaldosteronism. In this review we discuss the pathogenetic role of L-type calcium channels, potential new indications for existing or isoform-selective compounds and strategies to minimize potential side effects. PMID:25966690

  4. Impaired Fear Extinction Due to a Deficit in Ca2+ Influx Through L-Type Voltage-Gated Ca2+ Channels in Mice Deficient for Tenascin-C

    PubMed Central

    Morellini, Fabio; Malyshev, Aleksey; Volgushev, Maxim; Chistiakova, Marina; Papashvili, Giorgi; Fellini, Laetitia; Kleene, Ralf; Schachner, Melitta; Dityatev, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Mice deficient in the extracellular matrix glycoprotein tenascin-C (TNC−/−) express a deficit in specific forms of hippocampal synaptic plasticity, which involve the L-type voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (L-VGCCs). The mechanisms underlying this deficit and its functional implications for learning and memory have not been investigated. In line with previous findings, we report on impairment in theta-burst stimulation (TBS)-induced long-term potentiation (LTP) in TNC−/− mice in the CA1 hippocampal region and its rescue by the L-VGCC activator Bay K-8644. We further found that the overall pattern of L-VGCC expression in the hippocampus in TNC−/− mice was normal, but Western blot analysis results uncovered upregulated expression of the Cav1.2 and Cav1.3 α-subunits of L-VGCCs. However, these L-VGCCs were not fully functional in TNC−/− mice, as demonstrated by Ca2+ imaging, which revealed a reduction of nifedipine-sensitive Ca2+ transients in CA1 pyramidal neurons. TNC−/− mice showed normal learning and memory in the contextual fear conditioning paradigm but impaired extinction of conditioned fear responses. Systemic injection of the L-VGCC blockers nifedipine and diltiazem into wild-type mice mimicked the impairment of fear extinction observed in TNC−/− mice. The deficiency in TNC−/− mice substantially occluded the effects of these drugs. Our results suggest that TNC-mediated modulation of L-VGCC activity is essential for fear extinction. PMID:28824389

  5. Regulation of N-type voltage-gated calcium channels and presynaptic function by cyclin-dependent kinase 5

    PubMed Central

    Su, Susan C.; Seo, Jinsoo; Pan, Jen Q.; Samuels, Benjamin Adam; Rudenko, Andrii; Ericsson, Maria; Neve, Rachael L.; Yue, David T.; Tsai, Li-Huei

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY N-type voltage-gated calcium channels (CaV2.2) localize to presynaptic nerve terminals and mediate key events including synaptogenesis and neurotransmission. While several kinases have been implicated in the modulation of calcium channels, their impact on presynaptic functions remains unclear. Here we report that the N-type calcium channel is a substrate for cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5). The pore-forming α1 subunit of the N-type calcium channel is phosphorylated in the C-terminal domain, and phosphorylation results in enhanced calcium influx due to increased channel open probability. Phosphorylation of the N-type calcium channel by Cdk5 facilitates neurotransmitter release and alters presynaptic plasticity by increasing the number of docked vesicles at the synaptic cleft. These effects are mediated by an altered interaction between N-type calcium channels and RIM1, which tethers presynaptic calcium channels to the active zone. Collectively, our results highlight a molecular mechanism by which N-type calcium channels are regulated by Cdk5 to affect presynaptic functions. PMID:22920258

  6. Effects of electromagnetic field exposure on conduction and concentration of voltage gated calcium channels: A Brownian dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Tekieh, Tahereh; Sasanpour, Pezhman; Rafii-Tabar, Hashem

    2016-09-01

    A three-dimensional Brownian Dynamics (BD) in combination with electrostatic calculations is employed to specifically study the effects of radiation of high frequency electromagnetic fields on the conduction and concentration profile of calcium ions inside the voltage-gated calcium channels. The electrostatic calculations are performed using COMSOL Multiphysics by considering dielectric interfaces effectively. The simulations are performed for different frequencies and intensities. The simulation results show the variations of conductance, average number of ions and the concentration profiles of ions inside the channels in response to high frequency radiation. The ionic current inside the channel increases in response to high frequency electromagnetic field radiation, and the concentration profiles show that the residency of ions in the channel decreases accordingly.

  7. Towards a Unified Theory of Calmodulin Regulation (Calmodulation) of Voltage-Gated Calcium and Sodium Channels.

    PubMed

    Ben-Johny, Manu; Dick, Ivy E; Sang, Lingjie; Limpitikul, Worawan B; Kang, Po Wei; Niu, Jacqueline; Banerjee, Rahul; Yang, Wanjun; Babich, Jennifer S; Issa, John B; Lee, Shin Rong; Namkung, Ho; Li, Jiangyu; Zhang, Manning; Yang, Philemon S; Bazzazi, Hojjat; Adams, Paul J; Joshi-Mukherjee, Rosy; Yue, Daniel N; Yue, David T

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated Na and Ca(2+) channels represent two major ion channel families that enable myriad biological functions including the generation of action potentials and the coupling of electrical and chemical signaling in cells. Calmodulin regulation (calmodulation) of these ion channels comprises a vital feedback mechanism with distinct physiological implications. Though long-sought, a shared understanding of the channel families remained elusive for two decades as the functional manifestations and the structural underpinnings of this modulation often appeared to diverge. Here, we review recent advancements in the understanding of calmodulation of Ca(2+) and Na channels that suggest a remarkable similarity in their regulatory scheme. This interrelation between the two channel families now paves the way towards a unified mechanistic framework to understand vital calmodulin-dependent feedback and offers shared principles to approach related channelopathic diseases. An exciting era of synergistic study now looms.

  8. Towards a unified theory of calmodulin regulation (calmodulation) of voltage-gated calcium and sodium channels

    PubMed Central

    Yue, David T.

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated Na and Ca2+ channels represent two major ion channel families that enable myriad biological functions including the generation of action potentials and the coupling of electrical and chemical signaling in cells. Calmodulin regulation (calmodulation) of these ion channels comprises a vital feedback mechanism with distinct physiological implications. Though long-sought, a shared understanding of the channel families remained elusive for two decades as the functional manifestations and the structural underpinnings of this modulation often appeared to diverge. Here, we review recent advancements in the understanding of calmodulation of Ca2+ and Na channels that suggest a remarkable similarity in their regulatory scheme. This interrelation between the two channel families now paves the way towards a unified mechanistic framework to understand vital calmodulin-dependent feedback and offers shared principles to approach related channelopathic diseases. An exciting era of synergistic study now looms. PMID:25966688

  9. Current view on regulation of voltage-gated sodium channels by calcium and auxiliary proteins.

    PubMed

    Pitt, Geoffrey S; Lee, Seok-Yong

    2016-09-01

    In cardiac and skeletal myocytes, and in most neurons, the opening of voltage-gated Na(+) channels (NaV channels) triggers action potentials, a process that is regulated via the interactions of the channels' intercellular C-termini with auxiliary proteins and/or Ca(2+) . The molecular and structural details for how Ca(2+) and/or auxiliary proteins modulate NaV channel function, however, have eluded a concise mechanistic explanation and details have been shrouded for the last decade behind controversy about whether Ca(2+) acts directly upon the NaV channel or through interacting proteins, such as the Ca(2+) binding protein calmodulin (CaM). Here, we review recent advances in defining the structure of NaV intracellular C-termini and associated proteins such as CaM or fibroblast growth factor homologous factors (FHFs) to reveal new insights into how Ca(2+) affects NaV function, and how altered Ca(2+) -dependent or FHF-mediated regulation of NaV channels is perturbed in various disease states through mutations that disrupt CaM or FHF interaction.

  10. The role of voltage-gated calcium channels in neurotransmitter phenotype specification: Coexpression and functional analysis in Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Brittany B; Miller, Lauren E; Herbst, Wendy A; Saha, Margaret S

    2014-08-01

    Calcium activity has been implicated in many neurodevelopmental events, including the specification of neurotransmitter phenotypes. Higher levels of calcium activity lead to an increased number of inhibitory neural phenotypes, whereas lower levels of calcium activity lead to excitatory neural phenotypes. Voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) allow for rapid calcium entry and are expressed during early neural stages, making them likely regulators of activity-dependent neurotransmitter phenotype specification. To test this hypothesis, multiplex fluorescent in situ hybridization was used to characterize the coexpression of eight VGCC α1 subunits with the excitatory and inhibitory neural markers xVGlut1 and xVIAAT in Xenopus laevis embryos. VGCC coexpression was higher with xVGlut1 than xVIAAT, especially in the hindbrain, spinal cord, and cranial nerves. Calcium activity was also analyzed on a single-cell level, and spike frequency was correlated with the expression of VGCC α1 subunits in cell culture. Cells expressing Cav 2.1 and Cav 2.2 displayed increased calcium spiking compared with cells not expressing this marker. The VGCC antagonist diltiazem and agonist (-)BayK 8644 were used to manipulate calcium activity. Diltiazem exposure increased the number of glutamatergic cells and decreased the number of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic cells, whereas (-)BayK 8644 exposure decreased the number of glutamatergic cells without having an effect on the number of GABAergic cells. Given that the expression and functional manipulation of VGCCs are correlated with neurotransmitter phenotype in some, but not all, experiments, VGCCs likely act in combination with a variety of other signaling factors to determine neuronal phenotype specification.

  11. The active-zone protein Munc13 controls the use-dependence of presynaptic voltage-gated calcium channels

    PubMed Central

    Calloway, Nathaniel; Gouzer, Géraldine; Xue, Mingyu; Ryan, Timothy A

    2015-01-01

    Presynaptic calcium channel function is critical for converting electrical information into chemical communication but the molecules in the active zone that sculpt this function are poorly understood. We show that Munc13, an active-zone protein essential for exocytosis, also controls presynaptic voltage-gated calcium channel (VGCC) function dictating their behavior during various forms of activity. We demonstrate that in vitro Munc13 interacts with voltage-VGCCs via a pair of basic residues in Munc13's C2B domain. We show that elimination of this interaction by either removal of Munc13 or replacement of Munc13 with a Munc13 C2B mutant alters synaptic VGCC's response to and recovery from high-frequency action potential bursts and alters calcium influx from single action potential stimuli. These studies illustrate a novel form of synaptic modulation and show that Munc13 is poised to profoundly impact information transfer at nerve terminals by controlling both vesicle priming and the trigger for exocytosis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07728.001 PMID:26196145

  12. Role of Calcium and Calpain in the Downregulation of Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel Expression by the Pyrethroid Pesticide Deltamethrin

    PubMed Central

    Magby, Jason P.; Richardson, Jason R.

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (Nav) are essential for initiation and propagation of action potentials. Previous in vitro studies reported that exposure to the Nav toxins veratridine and α scorpion toxin cause persistent downregulation of Nav mRNA in vitro. However the mechanism of this downregulation is not well characterized. Here, we report that the type-II pyrethroid deltamethrin, which has a similar mechanism as these toxins, elicited an approximate 25% reduction in Nav 1.2 and Nav 1.3 mRNA in SK-N-AS cells. Deltamethrin-induced decreases of Nav mRNA were blocked with the Nav antagonist tetrodotoxin, demonstrating a primary role for interaction with Nav. Pre-treatment with the intracellular calcium chelator BAPTA-AM and the calpain inhibitor PD-150606 also prevented these decreases, identifying a role for intracellular calcium and calpain activation. Because alterations in Nav expression and function can result in neurotoxicity, additional studies are warranted to determine whether or not such effects occur in vivo. PMID:25358543

  13. An alcohol-sensing site in the calcium- and voltage-gated, large conductance potassium (BK) channel

    PubMed Central

    Bukiya, Anna N.; Kuntamallappanavar, Guruprasad; Edwards, Justin; Singh, Aditya K.; Shivakumar, Bangalore; Dopico, Alex M.

    2014-01-01

    Ethanol alters BK (slo1) channel function leading to perturbation of physiology and behavior. Site(s) and mechanism(s) of ethanol–BK channel interaction are unknown. We demonstrate that ethanol docks onto a water-accessible site that is strategically positioned between the slo1 calcium-sensors and gate. Ethanol only accesses this site in presence of calcium, the BK channel’s physiological agonist. Within the site, ethanol hydrogen-bonds with K361. Moreover, substitutions that hamper hydrogen bond formation or prevent ethanol from accessing K361 abolish alcohol action without altering basal channel function. Alcohol interacting site dimensions are approximately 10.7 × 8.6 × 7.1 Å, accommodating effective (ethanol-heptanol) but not ineffective (octanol, nonanol) channel activators. This study presents: (i) to our knowledge, the first identification and characterization of an n-alkanol recognition site in a member of the voltage-gated TM6 channel superfamily; (ii) structural insights on ethanol allosteric interactions with ligand-gated ion channels; and (iii) a first step for designing agents that antagonize BK channel-mediated alcohol actions without perturbing basal channel function. PMID:24927535

  14. An alcohol-sensing site in the calcium- and voltage-gated, large conductance potassium (BK) channel.

    PubMed

    Bukiya, Anna N; Kuntamallappanavar, Guruprasad; Edwards, Justin; Singh, Aditya K; Shivakumar, Bangalore; Dopico, Alex M

    2014-06-24

    Ethanol alters BK (slo1) channel function leading to perturbation of physiology and behavior. Site(s) and mechanism(s) of ethanol-BK channel interaction are unknown. We demonstrate that ethanol docks onto a water-accessible site that is strategically positioned between the slo1 calcium-sensors and gate. Ethanol only accesses this site in presence of calcium, the BK channel's physiological agonist. Within the site, ethanol hydrogen-bonds with K361. Moreover, substitutions that hamper hydrogen bond formation or prevent ethanol from accessing K361 abolish alcohol action without altering basal channel function. Alcohol interacting site dimensions are approximately 10.7 × 8.6 × 7.1 Å, accommodating effective (ethanol-heptanol) but not ineffective (octanol, nonanol) channel activators. This study presents: (i) to our knowledge, the first identification and characterization of an n-alkanol recognition site in a member of the voltage-gated TM6 channel superfamily; (ii) structural insights on ethanol allosteric interactions with ligand-gated ion channels; and (iii) a first step for designing agents that antagonize BK channel-mediated alcohol actions without perturbing basal channel function.

  15. Voltage-gated calcium channels: direct observation of the anomalous mole fraction effect at the single-channel level.

    PubMed Central

    Friel, D D; Tsien, R W

    1989-01-01

    Voltage-gated Ca channels are very efficient pores: even while exhibiting strong ionic selectivity, they are highly permeant to divalent cations. Studies of the mechanism of selectivity and ion permeation have demonstrated that whole-cell Ca channel current in mixtures of Ca and Ba ions can be smaller than with equimolar concentrations of either ion alone. This anomalous mole fraction effect (AMFE) has provided an important impetus for proposed mechanisms of ion selectivity and permeation that invoke multiple ion binding sites. However, recordings of unitary L-type Ca currents did not demonstrate the AMFE [Marban, E. & Yue, D.T. (1988) Biophys. J. 55, 594a (abstr.)], raising doubts about whether it is an expression of ion permeation through open Ca channels. We have made patch-clamp recordings from single L-type Ca channels in PC-12 pheochromocytoma cells. Our results demonstrate a significant AMFE at the single-channel level but also indicate that the AMFE can only be found under restrictive conditions of permeant ion concentration and membrane potential. While the AMFE is clear at 0 mV when permeant ions are present at 10 mM, it is not evident when the divalent cation concentration is increased to 110 mM or the membrane potential is hyperpolarized to -40 mV. We compared our experimental observations with predictions of a single-file, two-binding-site model of the Ca channel. The model accounts for our experimental results. It predicts an AMFE under conditions that favor ion-ion interactions, as long as the outer binding site is not saturated due to high permeant ion concentration or negative membrane potential. PMID:2544893

  16. Genetic disruption of voltage-gated calcium channels in psychiatric and neurological disorders

    PubMed Central

    Heyes, Samuel; Pratt, Wendy S.; Rees, Elliott; Dahimene, Shehrazade; Ferron, Laurent; Owen, Michael J.; Dolphin, Annette C.

    2015-01-01

    This review summarises genetic studies in which calcium channel genes have been connected to the spectrum of neuropsychiatric syndromes, from bipolar disorder and schizophrenia to autism spectrum disorders and intellectual impairment. Among many other genes, striking numbers of the calcium channel gene superfamily have been implicated in the aetiology of these diseases by various DNA analysis techniques. We will discuss how these relate to the known monogenic disorders associated with point mutations in calcium channels. We will then examine the functional evidence for a causative link between these mutations or single nucleotide polymorphisms and the disease processes. A major challenge for the future will be to translate the expanding psychiatric genetic findings into altered physiological function, involvement in the wider pathology of the diseases, and what potential that provides for personalised and stratified treatment options for patients. PMID:26386135

  17. The Evolution of the Four Subunits of Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels: Ancient Roots, Increasing Complexity, and Multiple Losses

    PubMed Central

    Moran, Yehu; Zakon, Harold H.

    2014-01-01

    The alpha subunits of voltage-gated calcium channels (Cavs) are large transmembrane proteins responsible for crucial physiological processes in excitable cells. They are assisted by three auxiliary subunits that can modulate their electrical behavior. Little is known about the evolution and roles of the various subunits of Cavs in nonbilaterian animals and in nonanimal lineages. For this reason, we mapped the phyletic distribution of the four channel subunits and reconstructed their phylogeny. Although alpha subunits have deep evolutionary roots as ancient as the split between plants and opistokonths, beta subunits appeared in the last common ancestor of animals and their close-relatives choanoflagellates, gamma subunits are a bilaterian novelty and alpha2/delta subunits appeared in the lineage of Placozoa, Cnidaria, and Bilateria. We note that gene losses were extremely common in the evolution of Cavs, with noticeable losses in multiple clades of subfamilies and also of whole Cav families. As in vertebrates, but not protostomes, Cav channel genes duplicated in Cnidaria. We characterized by in situ hybridization the tissue distribution of alpha subunits in the sea anemone Nematostella vectensis, a nonbilaterian animal possessing all three Cav subfamilies common to Bilateria. We find that some of the alpha subunit subtypes exhibit distinct spatiotemporal expression patterns. Further, all six sea anemone alpha subunit subtypes are conserved in stony corals, which separated from anemones 500 MA. This unexpected conservation together with the expression patterns strongly supports the notion that these subtypes carry unique functional roles. PMID:25146647

  18. Steroid hormone regulation of the voltage-gated, calcium-activated potassium channel expression in developing muscular and neural systems.

    PubMed

    Garrison, Sheldon L; Witten, Jane L

    2010-11-01

    A precise organization of gene expression is required for developing neural and muscular systems. Steroid hormones can control the expression of genes that are critical for development. In this study we test the hypothesis that the steroid hormone ecdysone regulates gene expression of the voltage-gated calcium-activated potassium ion channel, Slowpoke or KCNMA1. Late in adult development of the tobacco hawkmoth Manduca sexta, slowpoke (msslo) levels increased contributing to the maturation of the dorsal longitudinal flight muscles (DLMs) and CNS. We show that critical components of ecdysteroid gene regulation were present during upreglation of msslo in late adult DLM and CNS development. Ecdysteroid receptor complex heterodimeric partner proteins, the ecdysteroid receptor (EcR) and ultraspiracle (USP), and the ecdysone-induced early gene, msE75B, were expressed at key developmental time points, suggesting that ecdysteroids direct aspects of gene expression in the DLMs during these late developmental stages. We provide evidence that ecdysteroids suppress msslo transcription in the DLMs; when titers decline msslo transcript levels increase. These results are consistent with msslo being a downstream gene in an ecdysteroid-mediated gene cascade during DLM development. We also show that the ecdysteroids regulate msslo transcript levels in the developing CNS. These results will contribute to our understanding of how the spatiotemporal regulation of slowpoke transcription contributes to tailoring cell excitability to the differing physiological and behavioral demands during development.

  19. Targeting voltage-gated calcium channels: developments in peptide and small-molecule inhibitors for the treatment of neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Vink, S; Alewood, PF

    2012-01-01

    Chronic pain affects approximately 20% of people worldwide and places a large economic and social burden on society. Despite the availability of a range of analgesics, this condition is inadequately treated, with complete alleviation of symptoms rarely occurring. In the past 30 years, the voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) have been recognized as potential targets for analgesic development. Although the majority of the research has been focused on Cav2.2 in particular, other VGCC subtypes such as Cav3.2 have recently come to the forefront of analgesic research. Venom peptides from marine cone snails have been proven to be a valuable tool in neuroscience, playing a major role in the identification and characterization of VGCC subtypes and producing the first conotoxin-based drug on the market, the ω-conotoxin, ziconotide. This peptide potently and selectively inhibits Cav2.2, resulting in analgesia in chronic pain states. However, this drug is only available via intrathecal administration, and adverse effects and a narrow therapeutic window have limited its use in the clinic. Other Cav2.2 inhibitors are currently in development and offer the promise of an improved route of administration and safety profile. This review assesses the potential of targeting VGCCs for analgesic development, with a main focus on conotoxins that block Cav2.2 and the developments made to transform them into therapeutics. PMID:22725651

  20. Inhibition of Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels as Common Mode of Action for (Mixtures of) Distinct Classes of Insecticides

    PubMed Central

    Meijer, Marieke; Dingemans, Milou M.L.; van den Berg, Martin; Westerink, Remco H.S.

    2014-01-01

    Humans are exposed to distinct structural classes of insecticides with different neurotoxic modes of action. Because calcium homeostasis is essential for proper neuronal function and development, we investigated the effects of insecticides from different classes (pyrethroid: (α-)cypermethrin; organophosphate: chlorpyrifos; organochlorine: endosulfan; neonicotinoid: imidacloprid) and mixtures thereof on the intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i). Effects of acute (20 min) exposure to (mixtures of) insecticides on basal and depolarization-evoked [Ca2+]i were studied in vitro with Fura-2-loaded PC12 cells and high resolution single-cell fluorescence microscopy. The data demonstrate that cypermethrin, α-cypermethrin, endosulfan, and chlorpyrifos concentration-dependently decreased depolarization-evoked [Ca2+]i, with 50% (IC50) at 78nM, 239nM, 250nM, and 899nM, respectively. Additionally, acute exposure to chlorpyrifos or endosulfan (10μM) induced a modest increase in basal [Ca2+]i, amounting to 68 ± 8nM and 53 ± 8nM, respectively. Imidacloprid did not disturb basal or depolarization-evoked [Ca2+]i at 10μM. Following exposure to binary mixtures, effects on depolarization-evoked [Ca2+]i were within the expected effect additivity range, whereas the effect of the tertiary mixture was less than this expected additivity effect range. These results demonstrate that different types of insecticides inhibit depolarization-evoked [Ca2+]i in PC12 cells by inhibiting voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) in vitro at concentrations comparable with human occupational exposure levels. Moreover, the effective concentrations in this study are below those for earlier described modes of action. Because inhibition of VGCCs appears to be a common and potentially additive mode of action of several classes of insecticides, this target should be considered in neurotoxicity risk assessment studies. PMID:24913802

  1. Seeing the forest through the trees: towards a unified view on physiological calcium regulation of voltage-gated sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Van Petegem, Filip; Lobo, Paolo A; Ahern, Christopher A

    2012-12-05

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (Na(V)s) underlie the upstroke of the action potential in the excitable tissues of nerve and muscle. After opening, Na(V)s rapidly undergo inactivation, a crucial process through which sodium conductance is negatively regulated. Disruption of inactivation by inherited mutations is an established cause of lethal cardiac arrhythmia, epilepsy, or painful syndromes. Intracellular calcium ions (Ca(2+)) modulate sodium channel inactivation, and multiple players have been suggested in this process, including the cytoplasmic Na(V) C-terminal region including two EF-hands and an IQ motif, the Na(V) domain III-IV linker, and calmodulin. Calmodulin can bind to the IQ domain in both Ca(2+)-bound and Ca(2+)-free conditions, but only to the DIII-IV linker in a Ca(2+)-loaded state. The mechanism of Ca(2+) regulation, and its composite effect(s) on channel gating, has been shrouded in much controversy owing to numerous apparent experimental inconsistencies. Herein, we attempt to summarize these disparate data and propose a novel, to our knowledge, physiological mechanism whereby calcium ions promote sodium current facilitation due to Ca(2+) memory at high-action-potential frequencies where Ca(2+) levels may accumulate. The available data suggest that this phenomenon may be disrupted in diseases where cytoplasmic calcium ion levels are chronically high and where targeted phosphorylation may decouple the Ca(2+) regulatory machinery. Many Na(V) disease mutations associated with electrical dysfunction are located in the Ca(2+)-sensing machinery and misregulation of Ca(2+)-dependent channel modulation is likely to contribute to disease phenotypes. Copyright © 2012 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Upregulation of Voltage-Gated Calcium Channel Cav1.3 in Bovine Somatotropes Treated with Ghrelin

    PubMed Central

    Salinas Zarate, V. M.; Magdaleno Méndez, A.; Domínguez Mancera, B.; Rodríguez Andrade, A.; Barrientos Morales, M.; Cervantes Acosta, P.; Hernández Beltrán, A.; Romero Salas, D.; Flores Hernández, J. L. V.; Monjaraz Guzmán, E.; Félix Grijalva, D. R.

    2013-01-01

    1.2 and Cav1.3 pore-forming subunits of L-type channels. The treatment with Ghrelin significantly increased the Cav1.3 subunit expression, suggeting that the chronic stimulation of the GHS receptor with Ghrelin or GHRP-6 increases the number of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels at the cell surface of BS. PMID:24455243

  3. Inhibition of voltage-gated calcium currents in type II vestibular hair cells by cinnarizine.

    PubMed

    Arab, Sonja F; Düwel, Philip; Jüngling, Eberhard; Westhofen, Martin; Lückhoff, Andreas

    2004-06-01

    Cinnarizine is pharmaceutically used in conditions with vestibular vertigo such as Meniere's disease. It is thought to act on extra-vestibular targets. We hypothesized that cinnarizine, as a blocker of L-type Ca2+ channels, may directly target vestibular hair cells where Ca2+ currents are important for the mechano-electrical transduction and transmitter release. Our aim was to clarify whether cinnarizine affected voltage-dependent Ca2+ currents in vestibular type II hair cells. Such cells were isolated from inner ears of guinea pigs by enzymatic and mechanical dissection from the gelatinous otolithic membrane and studied with the patch-clamp technique in conventional whole-cell mode. Ca2+ currents were elicited by depolarizing pulses in a solution containing 1.8 mM Ca2+ and 40 mM Ba2+. These currents resembled L-type currents (I(Ca,L)) with respect to their voltage-dependence and their inhibition by nifedipine and Cd2+ but did not show time-dependent inactivation. The currents were inhibited by cinnarizine in a concentration-dependent and reversible manner. The IC50 was 1.5 microM. A block exceeding 80% was achieved with 10 microM. The onset of current block was faster with higher concentrations but the reversibility after wash-out was less, suggesting accumulation in the membrane. We conclude that these direct actions of cinnarizine on hair cells should be considered as molecular mechanisms contributing to therapeutic effects of cinnarizine in vertigo.

  4. A Voltage-Gated Calcium Channel Regulates Lysosomal Fusion with Endosomes and Autophagosomes and Is Required for Neuronal Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yongping; Shang, Weina; Nagarkar Jaiswal, Sonal; di Ronza, Alberto; Jaiswal, Manish; Yamamoto, Shinya; Sandoval, Hector; Duraine, Lita; Sardiello, Marco; Sillitoe, Roy V.; Venkatachalam, Kartik; Fan, Hengyu; Bellen, Hugo J.; Tong, Chao

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy helps deliver sequestered intracellular cargo to lysosomes for proteolytic degradation and thereby maintains cellular homeostasis by preventing accumulation of toxic substances in cells. In a forward mosaic screen in Drosophila designed to identify genes required for neuronal function and maintenance, we identified multiple cacophony (cac) mutant alleles. They exhibit an age-dependent accumulation of autophagic vacuoles (AVs) in photoreceptor terminals and eventually a degeneration of the terminals and surrounding glia. cac encodes an α1 subunit of a Drosophila voltage-gated calcium channel (VGCC) that is required for synaptic vesicle fusion with the plasma membrane and neurotransmitter release. Here, we show that cac mutant photoreceptor terminals accumulate AV-lysosomal fusion intermediates, suggesting that Cac is necessary for the fusion of AVs with lysosomes, a poorly defined process. Loss of another subunit of the VGCC, α2δ or straightjacket (stj), causes phenotypes very similar to those caused by the loss of cac, indicating that the VGCC is required for AV-lysosomal fusion. The role of VGCC in AV-lysosomal fusion is evolutionarily conserved, as the loss of the mouse homologues, Cacna1a and Cacna2d2, also leads to autophagic defects in mice. Moreover, we find that CACNA1A is localized to the lysosomes and that loss of lysosomal Cacna1a in cerebellar cultured neurons leads to a failure of lysosomes to fuse with endosomes and autophagosomes. Finally, we show that the lysosomal CACNA1A but not the plasma-membrane resident CACNA1A is required for lysosomal fusion. In summary, we present a model in which the VGCC plays a role in autophagy by regulating the fusion of AVs with lysosomes through its calcium channel activity and hence functions in maintaining neuronal homeostasis. PMID:25811491

  5. PIP2 in pancreatic β-cells regulates voltage-gated calcium channels by a voltage-independent pathway.

    PubMed

    de la Cruz, Lizbeth; Puente, Erika I; Reyes-Vaca, Arturo; Arenas, Isabel; Garduño, Julieta; Bravo-Martínez, Jorge; Garcia, David E

    2016-10-01

    Phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) is a membrane phosphoinositide that regulates the activity of many ion channels. Influx of calcium primarily through voltage-gated calcium (CaV) channels promotes insulin secretion in pancreatic β-cells. However, whether CaV channels are regulated by PIP2, as is the case for some non-insulin-secreting cells, is unknown. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether CaV channels are regulated by PIP2 depletion in pancreatic β-cells through activation of a muscarinic pathway induced by oxotremorine methiodide (Oxo-M). CaV channel currents were recorded by the patch-clamp technique. The CaV current amplitude was reduced by activation of the muscarinic receptor 1 (M1R) in the absence of kinetic changes. The Oxo-M-induced inhibition exhibited the hallmarks of voltage-independent regulation and did not involve PKC activation. A small fraction of the Oxo-M-induced CaV inhibition was diminished by a high concentration of Ca(2+) chelator, whereas ≥50% of this inhibition was prevented by diC8-PIP2 dialysis. Localization of PIP2 in the plasma membrane was examined by transfecting INS-1 cells with PH-PLCδ1, which revealed a close temporal association between PIP2 hydrolysis and CaV channel inhibition. Furthermore, the depletion of PIP2 by a voltage-sensitive phosphatase reduced CaV currents in a way similar to that observed following M1R activation. These results indicate that activation of the M1R pathway inhibits the CaV channel via PIP2 depletion by a Ca(2+)-dependent mechanism in pancreatic β- and INS-1 cells and thereby support the hypothesis that membrane phospholipids regulate ion channel activity by interacting with ion channels.

  6. Molecular cloning and characterization of the human voltage-gated calcium channel alpha(2)delta-4 subunit.

    PubMed

    Qin, Ning; Yagel, Susan; Momplaisir, Mary-Lou; Codd, Ellen E; D'Andrea, Michael R

    2002-09-01

    The voltage-gated calcium channel is composed of a pore-forming alpha(1) subunit and several regulatory subunits: alpha(2)delta, beta, and gamma. We report here the identification of a novel alpha(2)delta subunit, alpha(2)delta-4, from the expressed sequence tag database followed by its cloning and characterization. The novel alpha(2)delta-4 subunit gene contains 39 exons spanning about 130 kilobases and is co-localized with the CHCNA1C gene (alpha(1C) subunit) on human chromosome 12p13.3. Alternative splicing of the alpha(2)delta-4 gene gives rise to four potential variants, a through d. The open reading frame of human alpha(2)delta-4a is composed of 3363 base pairs encoding a protein with 1120 residues and a calculated molecular mass of 126 kDa. The alpha(2)delta-4a subunit shares 30, 32, and 61% identity with the human calcium channel alpha(2)delta-1, alpha(2)delta-2, and alpha(2)delta-3 subunits, respectively. Primary sequence comparison suggests that alpha(2)delta-4 lacks the gabapentin binding motifs characterized for alpha(2)delta-1 and alpha(2)delta-2; this was confirmed by a [(3)H]gabapentin-binding assay. In human embryonic kidney 293 cells, the alpha(2)delta-4 subunit associated with Ca(V)1.2 and beta(3) subunits and significantly increased Ca(V)1.2/beta(3)-mediated Ca(2+) influx. Immunohistochemical study revealed that the alpha(2)delta-4 subunit has limited distribution in special cell types of the pituitary, adrenal gland, colon, and fetal liver. Whether the alpha(2)delta-4 subunit plays a distinct physiological role in select endocrine tissues remains to be demonstrated.

  7. Butanol Isomers Exert Distinct Effects on Voltage-Gated Calcium Channel Currents and Thus Catecholamine Secretion in Adrenal Chromaffin Cells

    PubMed Central

    Brindley, Rebecca L.; Jewell, Mark L.; Currie, Kevin P. M.

    2014-01-01

    Butanol (C4H10OH) has been used both to dissect the molecular targets of alcohols/general anesthetics and to implicate phospholipase D (PLD) signaling in a variety of cellular functions including neurotransmitter and hormone exocytosis. Like other primary alcohols, 1-butanol is a substrate for PLD and thereby disrupts formation of the intracellular signaling lipid phosphatidic acid. Because secondary and tertiary butanols do not undergo this transphosphatidylation, they have been used as controls for 1-butanol to implicate PLD signaling. Recently, selective pharmacological inhibitors of PLD have been developed and, in some cases, fail to block cellular functions previously ascribed to PLD using primary alcohols. For example, exocytosis of insulin and degranulation of mast cells are blocked by primary alcohols, but not by the PLD inhibitor FIPI. In this study we show that 1-butanol reduces catecholamine secretion from adrenal chromaffin cells to a much greater extent than tert-butanol, and that the PLD inhibitor VU0155056 has no effect. Using fluorescent imaging we show the effect of these drugs on depolarization-evoked calcium entry parallel those on secretion. Patch-clamp electrophysiology confirmed the peak amplitude of voltage-gated calcium channel currents (ICa) is inhibited by 1-butanol, with little or no block by secondary or tert-butanol. Detailed comparison shows for the first time that the different butanol isomers exert distinct, and sometimes opposing, effects on the voltage-dependence and gating kinetics of ICa. We discuss these data with regard to PLD signaling in cellular physiology and the molecular targets of general anesthetics. PMID:25275439

  8. Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) inhibits voltage-gated T-type calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, M; Gilbert, G; Lory, P; Marthan, R; Quignard, J F; Savineau, J P

    2012-06-01

    Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and its sulfated form, DHEAS, are the most abundant steroid hormones in the mammalian blood flow. DHEA may have beneficial effects in various pathophysiological conditions such as cardiovascular diseases or deterioration of the sense of well-being. However to date, the cellular mechanism underlying DHEA action remains elusive and may involve ion channel modulation. In this study, we have characterized the effect of DHEA on T-type voltage-activated calcium channels (T-channels), which are involved in several cardiovascular and neuronal diseases. Using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique, we demonstrate that DHEA inhibits the three recombinant T-channels (Ca(V)3.1, Ca(V)3.2 and Ca(V)3.3) expressed in NG108-15 cell line, as well as native T-channels in pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells. This effect of DHEA is both concentration (IC(50) between 2 and 7μM) and voltage-dependent and results in a significant shift of the steady-state inactivation curves toward hyperpolarized potentials. Consequently, DHEA reduces window T-current and inhibits membrane potential oscillations induced by Ca(V)3 channels. DHEA inhibition is not dependent on the activation of nuclear androgen or estrogen receptors and implicates a PTX-sensitive Gi protein pathway. Functionally, DHEA and the T-type inhibitor NNC 55-0396 inhibited KCl-induced contraction of pulmonary artery rings and their effect was not cumulative. Altogether, the present data demonstrate that DHEA inhibits T-channels by a Gi protein dependent pathway. DHEA-induced alteration in T-channel activity could thus account for its therapeutic action and/or physiological effects. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Physiology and Evolution of Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels in Early Diverging Animal Phyla: Cnidaria, Placozoa, Porifera and Ctenophora.

    PubMed

    Senatore, Adriano; Raiss, Hamad; Le, Phuong

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated calcium (Cav) channels serve dual roles in the cell, where they can both depolarize the membrane potential for electrical excitability, and activate transient cytoplasmic Ca(2+) signals. In animals, Cav channels play crucial roles including driving muscle contraction (excitation-contraction coupling), gene expression (excitation-transcription coupling), pre-synaptic and neuroendocrine exocytosis (excitation-secretion coupling), regulation of flagellar/ciliary beating, and regulation of cellular excitability, either directly or through modulation of other Ca(2+)-sensitive ion channels. In recent years, genome sequencing has provided significant insights into the molecular evolution of Cav channels. Furthermore, expanded gene datasets have permitted improved inference of the species phylogeny at the base of Metazoa, providing clearer insights into the evolution of complex animal traits which involve Cav channels, including the nervous system. For the various types of metazoan Cav channels, key properties that determine their cellular contribution include: Ion selectivity, pore gating, and, importantly, cytoplasmic protein-protein interactions that direct sub-cellular localization and functional complexing. It is unclear when these defining features, many of which are essential for nervous system function, evolved. In this review, we highlight some experimental observations that implicate Cav channels in the physiology and behavior of the most early-diverging animals from the phyla Cnidaria, Placozoa, Porifera, and Ctenophora. Given our limited understanding of the molecular biology of Cav channels in these basal animal lineages, we infer insights from better-studied vertebrate and invertebrate animals. We also highlight some apparently conserved cellular functions of Cav channels, which might have emerged very early on during metazoan evolution, or perhaps predated it.

  10. Physiology and Evolution of Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels in Early Diverging Animal Phyla: Cnidaria, Placozoa, Porifera and Ctenophora

    PubMed Central

    Senatore, Adriano; Raiss, Hamad; Le, Phuong

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated calcium (Cav) channels serve dual roles in the cell, where they can both depolarize the membrane potential for electrical excitability, and activate transient cytoplasmic Ca2+ signals. In animals, Cav channels play crucial roles including driving muscle contraction (excitation-contraction coupling), gene expression (excitation-transcription coupling), pre-synaptic and neuroendocrine exocytosis (excitation-secretion coupling), regulation of flagellar/ciliary beating, and regulation of cellular excitability, either directly or through modulation of other Ca2+-sensitive ion channels. In recent years, genome sequencing has provided significant insights into the molecular evolution of Cav channels. Furthermore, expanded gene datasets have permitted improved inference of the species phylogeny at the base of Metazoa, providing clearer insights into the evolution of complex animal traits which involve Cav channels, including the nervous system. For the various types of metazoan Cav channels, key properties that determine their cellular contribution include: Ion selectivity, pore gating, and, importantly, cytoplasmic protein-protein interactions that direct sub-cellular localization and functional complexing. It is unclear when these defining features, many of which are essential for nervous system function, evolved. In this review, we highlight some experimental observations that implicate Cav channels in the physiology and behavior of the most early-diverging animals from the phyla Cnidaria, Placozoa, Porifera, and Ctenophora. Given our limited understanding of the molecular biology of Cav channels in these basal animal lineages, we infer insights from better-studied vertebrate and invertebrate animals. We also highlight some apparently conserved cellular functions of Cav channels, which might have emerged very early on during metazoan evolution, or perhaps predated it. PMID:27867359

  11. Comprehensive behavioral analysis of voltage-gated calcium channel beta-anchoring and -regulatory protein knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Nakao, Akito; Miki, Takafumi; Shoji, Hirotaka; Nishi, Miyuki; Takeshima, Hiroshi; Miyakawa, Tsuyoshi; Mori, Yasuo

    2015-01-01

    Calcium (Ca(2+)) influx through voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels (VGCCs) induces numerous intracellular events such as neuronal excitability, neurotransmitter release, synaptic plasticity, and gene regulation. It has been shown that genes related to Ca(2+) signaling, such as the CACNA1C, CACNB2, and CACNA1I genes that encode VGCC subunits, are associated with schizophrenia and other psychiatric disorders. Recently, VGCC beta-anchoring and -regulatory protein (BARP) was identified as a novel regulator of VGCC activity via the interaction of VGCC β subunits. To examine the role of the BARP in higher brain functions, we generated BARP knockout (KO) mice and conducted a comprehensive battery of behavioral tests. BARP KO mice exhibited greatly reduced locomotor activity, as evidenced by decreased vertical activity, stereotypic counts in the open field test, and activity level in the home cage, and longer latency to complete a session in spontaneous T-maze alteration test, which reached "study-wide significance." Acoustic startle response was also reduced in the mutants. Interestingly, they showed multiple behavioral phenotypes that are seemingly opposite to those seen in the mouse models of schizophrenia and its related disorders, including increased working memory, flexibility, prepulse inhibition, and social interaction, and decreased locomotor activity, though many of these phenotypes are statistically weak and require further replications. These results demonstrate that BARP is involved in the regulation of locomotor activity and, possibly, emotionality. The possibility was also suggested that BARP KO mice may serve as a unique tool for investigating the pathogenesis/pathophysiology of schizophrenia and related disorders. Further evaluation of the molecular and physiological phenotypes of the mutant mice would provide new insights into the role of BARP in higher brain functions.

  12. Targeting voltage-gated calcium channels: developments in peptide and small-molecule inhibitors for the treatment of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Vink, S; Alewood, P F

    2012-11-01

    Chronic pain affects approximately 20% of people worldwide and places a large economic and social burden on society. Despite the availability of a range of analgesics, this condition is inadequately treated, with complete alleviation of symptoms rarely occurring. In the past 30 years, the voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) have been recognized as potential targets for analgesic development. Although the majority of the research has been focused on Ca(v) 2.2 in particular, other VGCC subtypes such as Ca(v) 3.2 have recently come to the forefront of analgesic research. Venom peptides from marine cone snails have been proven to be a valuable tool in neuroscience, playing a major role in the identification and characterization of VGCC subtypes and producing the first conotoxin-based drug on the market, the ω-conotoxin, ziconotide. This peptide potently and selectively inhibits Ca(v) 2.2, resulting in analgesia in chronic pain states. However, this drug is only available via intrathecal administration, and adverse effects and a narrow therapeutic window have limited its use in the clinic. Other Ca(v) 2.2 inhibitors are currently in development and offer the promise of an improved route of administration and safety profile. This review assesses the potential of targeting VGCCs for analgesic development, with a main focus on conotoxins that block Ca(v) 2.2 and the developments made to transform them into therapeutics. © 2012 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2012 The British Pharmacological Society.

  13. Amyloid Precursor Protein Protects Neuronal Network Function after Hypoxia via Control of Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels.

    PubMed

    Hefter, Dimitri; Kaiser, Martin; Weyer, Sascha W; Papageorgiou, Ismini E; Both, Martin; Kann, Oliver; Müller, Ulrike C; Draguhn, Andreas

    2016-08-10

    Acute cerebral ischemia and chronic neurovascular diseases share various common mechanisms with neurodegenerative diseases, such as disturbed cellular calcium and energy homeostasis and accumulation of toxic metabolites. A link between these conditions may be constituted by amyloid precursor protein (APP), which plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease, but has also been associated with the response to acute hypoxia and regulation of calcium homeostasis. We therefore studied hypoxia-induced loss of function and recovery upon reoxygenation in hippocampal slices of mice lacking APP (APP(-/-)) or selectively expressing its soluble extracellular domain (APPsα-KI). Transient hypoxia disrupted electrical activity at the network and cellular level. In mice lacking APP, these impairments were significantly more severe, showing increased rise of intracellular calcium, faster loss of function, and higher incidence of spreading depression. Likewise, functional recovery upon reoxygenation was much slower and less complete than in controls. Most of these deficits were rescued by selective expression of the soluble extracellular fragment APPsα, or by pharmacological block of L-type calcium channels. We conclude that APP supports neuronal resistance toward acute hypoxia. This effect is mediated by the secreted APPsα-domain and involves L-type calcium channels. Amyloid precursor protein (APP) is involved in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease, but its normal function in the brain remains elusive. Here, we describe a neuroprotective role of the protein in acute hypoxia. Functional recovery of mouse hippocampal networks after transient reduction of oxygen supply was strongly impaired in animals lacking APP. Most protective effects are mediated by the soluble extracellular fragment APPsα and involve L-type calcium channels. Thus, APP contributes to calcium homeostasis in situations of metabolic stress. This finding may shed light on the physiological

  14. Short-term facilitation at a detonator synapse requires the distinct contribution of multiple types of voltage-gated calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Chamberland, Simon; Evstratova, Alesya; Tóth, Katalin

    2017-04-14

    Neuronal calcium elevations are shaped by several key parameters, including the properties, density, and the spatial location of voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs). These features allow presynaptic terminals to translate complex firing frequencies and tune the amount of neurotransmitter released. While synchronous neurotransmitter release relies on both P/Q- and N-type VGCCs at hippocampal MF-CA3 synapses, the specific contribution of VGCCs to calcium dynamics, neurotransmitter release and short-term facilitation remains unknown. Here, we used random-access two-photon calcium imaging together with electrophysiology in acute mouse hippocampal slices to dissect the roles of P/Q- and N-type VGCCs. Our results show that N-type VGCCs control glutamate release at a limited number of release sites through highly localized Ca(2+) elevations and support short-term facilitation by enhancing multivesicular release. In contrast, Ca(2+) entry via P/Q-type VGCCs promotes the recruitment of additional release sites through spatially homogeneous Ca(2+) elevations. Altogether, our results highlight the specialized contribution of P/Q- and N-types VGCCs to neurotransmitter release.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENTIn presynaptic terminals, neurotransmitter release is dynamically regulated by the transient opening of different types of voltage-gated calcium channels. Hippocampal giant mossy fiber terminals display extensive short-term facilitation during repetitive activity, with a large several fold postsynaptic response increase. Though, how giant mossy fiber terminals leverage distinct types of voltage-gated calcium channels to mediate short-term facilitation remains unexplored. Here, we find that P/Q- and N-type VGCCs generate different spatial patterns of calcium elevations in giant mossy fiber terminals and support short-term facilitation through specific participation in two mechanisms. While N-type VGCCs contribute only to the synchronization of multivesicular release, P/Q-type VGCCs

  15. Inhibition of voltage-gated calcium channels as common mode of action for (mixtures of) distinct classes of insecticides.

    PubMed

    Meijer, Marieke; Dingemans, Milou M L; van den Berg, Martin; Westerink, Remco H S

    2014-09-01

    Humans are exposed to distinct structural classes of insecticides with different neurotoxic modes of action. Because calcium homeostasis is essential for proper neuronal function and development, we investigated the effects of insecticides from different classes (pyrethroid: (α-)cypermethrin; organophosphate: chlorpyrifos; organochlorine: endosulfan; neonicotinoid: imidacloprid) and mixtures thereof on the intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i). Effects of acute (20 min) exposure to (mixtures of) insecticides on basal and depolarization-evoked [Ca(2+)]i were studied in vitro with Fura-2-loaded PC12 cells and high resolution single-cell fluorescence microscopy. The data demonstrate that cypermethrin, α-cypermethrin, endosulfan, and chlorpyrifos concentration-dependently decreased depolarization-evoked [Ca(2+)]i, with 50% (IC50) at 78nM, 239nM, 250nM, and 899nM, respectively. Additionally, acute exposure to chlorpyrifos or endosulfan (10μM) induced a modest increase in basal [Ca(2+)]i, amounting to 68 ± 8nM and 53 ± 8nM, respectively. Imidacloprid did not disturb basal or depolarization-evoked [Ca(2+)]i at 10μM. Following exposure to binary mixtures, effects on depolarization-evoked [Ca(2+)]i were within the expected effect additivity range, whereas the effect of the tertiary mixture was less than this expected additivity effect range. These results demonstrate that different types of insecticides inhibit depolarization-evoked [Ca(2+)]i in PC12 cells by inhibiting voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) in vitro at concentrations comparable with human occupational exposure levels. Moreover, the effective concentrations in this study are below those for earlier described modes of action. Because inhibition of VGCCs appears to be a common and potentially additive mode of action of several classes of insecticides, this target should be considered in neurotoxicity risk assessment studies. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf

  16. Loss of β2-laminin alters calcium sensitivity and voltage-gated calcium channel maturation of neurotransmission at the neuromuscular junction.

    PubMed

    Chand, Kirat K; Lee, Kah Meng; Schenning, Mitja P; Lavidis, Nickolas A; Noakes, Peter G

    2015-01-01

    Neuromuscular junctions from β2-laminin-deficient mice exhibit lower levels of calcium sensitivity. Loss of β2-laminin leads to a failure in switching from N- to P/Q-type voltage-gated calcium channel (VGCC)-mediated transmitter release that normally occurs with neuromuscular junction maturation. The motor nerve terminals from β2-laminin-deficient mice fail to up-regulate the expression of P/Q-type VGCCs clusters and down-regulate N-type VGCCs clusters, as they mature. There is decreased co-localisation of presynaptic specialisations in β2-laminin-deficient neuromuscular junctions as a consequence of lesser P/Q-type VGCC expression. These findings support the idea that β2-laminin is critical in the organisation and maintenance of active zones at the neuromuscular junction via its interaction with P/Q-type VGCCs, which aid in stabilisation of the synapse. β2-laminin is a key mediator in the differentiation and formation of the skeletal neuromuscular junction. Loss of β2-laminin results in significant structural and functional aberrations such as decreased number of active zones and reduced spontaneous release of transmitter. In vitro β2-laminin has been shown to bind directly to the pore forming subunit of P/Q-type voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs). Neurotransmission is initially mediated by N-type VGCCs, but by postnatal day 18 switches to P/Q-type VGCC dominance. The present study investigated the changes in neurotransmission during the switch from N- to P/Q-type VGCC-mediated transmitter release at β2-laminin-deficient junctions. Analysis of the relationship between quantal content and extracellular calcium concentrations demonstrated a decrease in the calcium sensitivity, but no change in calcium dependence at β2-laminin-deficient junctions. Electrophysiological studies on VGCC sub-types involved in transmitter release indicate N-type VGCCs remain the primary mediator of transmitter release at matured β2-laminin-deficient junctions

  17. Intracellular calcium oscillations in strongly metastatic human breast and prostate cancer cells: control by voltage-gated sodium channel activity.

    PubMed

    Rizaner, Nahit; Onkal, Rustem; Fraser, Scott P; Pristerá, Alessandro; Okuse, Kenji; Djamgoz, Mustafa B A

    2016-10-01

    The possible association of intracellular Ca(2+) with metastasis in human cancer cells is poorly understood. We have studied Ca(2+) signaling in human prostate and breast cancer cell lines of strongly versus weakly metastatic potential in a comparative approach. Intracellular free Ca(2+) was measured using a membrane-permeant fluorescent Ca(2+)-indicator dye (Fluo-4 AM) and confocal microscopy. Spontaneous Ca(2+) oscillations were observed in a proportion of strongly metastatic human prostate and breast cancer cells (PC-3M and MDA-MB-231, respectively). In contrast, no such oscillations were observed in weakly/non metastatic LNCaP and MCF-7 cells, although a rise in the resting Ca(2+) level could be induced by applying a high-K(+) solution. Various parameters of the oscillations depended on extracellular Ca(2+) and voltage-gated Na(+) channel activity. Treatment with either tetrodotoxin (a general blocker of voltage-gated Na(+) channels) or ranolazine (a blocker of the persistent component of the channel current) suppressed the Ca(2+) oscillations. It is concluded that the functional voltage-gated Na(+) channel expression in strongly metastatic cancer cells makes a significant contribution to generation of oscillatory intracellular Ca(2+) activity. Possible mechanisms and consequences of the Ca(2+) oscillations are discussed.

  18. Actions of a hydrogen sulfide donor (NaHS) on transient sodium, persistent sodium, and voltage-gated calcium currents in neurons of the subfornical organ.

    PubMed

    Kuksis, Markus; Ferguson, Alastair V

    2015-09-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an endogenously found gasotransmitter that has been implicated in a variety of beneficial physiological functions. This study was performed to investigate the cellular mechanisms underlying actions of H2S previously observed in subfornical organ (SFO), where H2S acts to regulate blood pressure through a depolarization of the membrane and an overall increase in the excitability of SFO neurons. We used whole cell patch-clamp electrophysiology in the voltage-clamp configuration to analyze the effect of 1 mM NaHS, an H2S donor, on voltage-gated potassium, sodium, and calcium currents. We observed no effect of NaHS on potassium currents; however, both voltage-gated sodium currents (persistent and transient) and the N-type calcium current had a depolarized activation curve and an enhanced peak-induced current in response to a series of voltage-step and ramp protocols run in the control and NaHS conditions. These effects were not responsible for the previously observed depolarization of the membrane potential, as depolarizing effects of H2S were still observed following block of these conductances with tetrodotoxin (5 μM) and ω-conotoxin-GVIA (100 nM). Our studies are the first to investigate the effect of H2S on a variety of voltage-gated conductances in a single brain area, and although they do not explain mechanisms underlying the depolarizing actions of H2S on SFO neurons, they provide evidence of potential mechanisms through which this gasotransmitter influences the excitability of neurons in this important brain area as a consequence of the modulation of multiple ion channels.

  19. Loss of β2-laminin alters calcium sensitivity and voltage-gated calcium channel maturation of neurotransmission at the neuromuscular junction

    PubMed Central

    Chand, Kirat K; Lee, Kah Meng; Schenning, Mitja P; Lavidis, Nickolas A; Noakes, Peter G

    2015-01-01

    β2-laminin is a key mediator in the differentiation and formation of the skeletal neuromuscular junction. Loss of β2-laminin results in significant structural and functional aberrations such as decreased number of active zones and reduced spontaneous release of transmitter. In vitro β2-laminin has been shown to bind directly to the pore forming subunit of P/Q-type voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs). Neurotransmission is initially mediated by N-type VGCCs, but by postnatal day 18 switches to P/Q-type VGCC dominance. The present study investigated the changes in neurotransmission during the switch from N- to P/Q-type VGCC-mediated transmitter release at β2-laminin-deficient junctions. Analysis of the relationship between quantal content and extracellular calcium concentrations demonstrated a decrease in the calcium sensitivity, but no change in calcium dependence at β2-laminin-deficient junctions. Electrophysiological studies on VGCC sub-types involved in transmitter release indicate N-type VGCCs remain the primary mediator of transmitter release at matured β2-laminin-deficient junctions. Immunohistochemical analyses displayed irregularly shaped and immature β2-laminin-deficient neuromuscular junctions when compared to matured wild-type junctions. β2-laminin-deficient junctions also maintained the presence of N-type VGCC clustering within the presynaptic membrane, which supported the functional findings of the present study. We conclude that β2-laminin is a key regulator in development of the NMJ, with its loss resulting in reduced transmitter release due to decreased calcium sensitivity stemming from a failure to switch from N- to P/Q-type VGCC-mediated synaptic transmission. PMID:25556799

  20. Responsiveness of voltage-gated calcium channels in SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells on quasi-three-dimensional micropatterns formed with poly (l-lactic acid).

    PubMed

    Wu, Ze-Zhi; Wang, Zheng-Wei; Zhang, Li-Guang; An, Zhi-Xing; Zhong, Dong-Huo; Huang, Qi-Ping; Luo, Mei-Rong; Liao, Yan-Jian; Jin, Liang; Li, Chen-Zhong; Kisaalita, William S

    2013-01-01

    In this study, quasi-three-dimensional (3D) microwell patterns were fabricated with poly (l-lactic acid) for the development of cell-based assays, targeting voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs). SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells were interfaced with the microwell patterns and found to grow as two dimensional (2D), 3D, and near two dimensional (N2D), categorized on the basis of the cells' location in the pattern. The capability of the microwell patterns to support 3D cell growth was evaluated in terms of the percentage of the cells in each growth category. Cell spreading was analyzed in terms of projection areas under light microscopy. SH-SY5Y cells' VGCC responsiveness was evaluated with confocal microscopy and a calcium fluorescent indicator, Calcium Green™-1. The expression of L-type calcium channels was evaluated using immunofluorescence staining with DM-BODIPY. It was found that cells within the microwells, either N2D or 3D, showed more rounded shapes and less projection areas than 2D cells on flat poly (l-lactic acid) substrates. Also, cells in microwells showed a significantly lower VGCC responsiveness than cells on flat substrates, in terms of both response magnitudes and percentages of responsive cells, upon depolarization with 50 mM K(+). This lower VGCC responsiveness could not be explained by the difference in L-type calcium channel expression. For the two patterns addressed in this study, N2D cells consistently exhibited an intermediate value of either projection areas or VGCC responsiveness between those for 2D and 3D cells, suggesting a correlative relation between cell morphology and VGCC responsiveness. These results suggest that the pattern structure and therefore the cell growth characteristics were critical factors in determining cell VGCC responsiveness and thus provide an approach for engineering cell functionality in cell-based assay systems and tissue engineering scaffolds.

  1. Responsiveness of voltage-gated calcium channels in SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells on quasi-three-dimensional micropatterns formed with poly (l-lactic acid)

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ze-Zhi; Wang, Zheng-Wei; Zhang, Li-Guang; An, Zhi-Xing; Zhong, Dong-Huo; Huang, Qi-Ping; Luo, Mei-Rong; Liao, Yan-Jian; Jin, Liang; Li, Chen-Zhong; Kisaalita, William S

    2013-01-01

    Introduction In this study, quasi-three-dimensional (3D) microwell patterns were fabricated with poly (l-lactic acid) for the development of cell-based assays, targeting voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs). Methods and materials SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells were interfaced with the microwell patterns and found to grow as two dimensional (2D), 3D, and near two dimensional (N2D), categorized on the basis of the cells’ location in the pattern. The capability of the microwell patterns to support 3D cell growth was evaluated in terms of the percentage of the cells in each growth category. Cell spreading was analyzed in terms of projection areas under light microscopy. SH-SY5Y cells’ VGCC responsiveness was evaluated with confocal microscopy and a calcium fluorescent indicator, Calcium Green™-1. The expression of L-type calcium channels was evaluated using immunofluorescence staining with DM-BODIPY. Results It was found that cells within the microwells, either N2D or 3D, showed more rounded shapes and less projection areas than 2D cells on flat poly (l-lactic acid) substrates. Also, cells in microwells showed a significantly lower VGCC responsiveness than cells on flat substrates, in terms of both response magnitudes and percentages of responsive cells, upon depolarization with 50 mM K+. This lower VGCC responsiveness could not be explained by the difference in L-type calcium channel expression. For the two patterns addressed in this study, N2D cells consistently exhibited an intermediate value of either projection areas or VGCC responsiveness between those for 2D and 3D cells, suggesting a correlative relation between cell morphology and VGCC responsiveness. Conclusion These results suggest that the pattern structure and therefore the cell growth characteristics were critical factors in determining cell VGCC responsiveness and thus provide an approach for engineering cell functionality in cell-based assay systems and tissue engineering scaffolds. PMID

  2. Stapled Voltage-Gated Calcium Channel (CaV) α-Interaction Domain (AID) Peptides Act As Selective Protein-Protein Interaction Inhibitors of CaV Function.

    PubMed

    Findeisen, Felix; Campiglio, Marta; Jo, Hyunil; Abderemane-Ali, Fayal; Rumpf, Christine H; Pope, Lianne; Rossen, Nathan D; Flucher, Bernhard E; DeGrado, William F; Minor, Daniel L

    2017-06-21

    For many voltage-gated ion channels (VGICs), creation of a properly functioning ion channel requires the formation of specific protein-protein interactions between the transmembrane pore-forming subunits and cystoplasmic accessory subunits. Despite the importance of such protein-protein interactions in VGIC function and assembly, their potential as sites for VGIC modulator development has been largely overlooked. Here, we develop meta-xylyl (m-xylyl) stapled peptides that target a prototypic VGIC high affinity protein-protein interaction, the interaction between the voltage-gated calcium channel (CaV) pore-forming subunit α-interaction domain (AID) and cytoplasmic β-subunit (CaVβ). We show using circular dichroism spectroscopy, X-ray crystallography, and isothermal titration calorimetry that the m-xylyl staples enhance AID helix formation are structurally compatible with native-like AID:CaVβ interactions and reduce the entropic penalty associated with AID binding to CaVβ. Importantly, electrophysiological studies reveal that stapled AID peptides act as effective inhibitors of the CaVα1:CaVβ interaction that modulate CaV function in an CaVβ isoform-selective manner. Together, our studies provide a proof-of-concept demonstration of the use of protein-protein interaction inhibitors to control VGIC function and point to strategies for improved AID-based CaV modulator design.

  3. Stapled Voltage-Gated Calcium Channel (CaV) α-Interaction Domain (AID) Peptides Act As Selective Protein–Protein Interaction Inhibitors of CaV Function

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    For many voltage-gated ion channels (VGICs), creation of a properly functioning ion channel requires the formation of specific protein–protein interactions between the transmembrane pore-forming subunits and cystoplasmic accessory subunits. Despite the importance of such protein–protein interactions in VGIC function and assembly, their potential as sites for VGIC modulator development has been largely overlooked. Here, we develop meta-xylyl (m-xylyl) stapled peptides that target a prototypic VGIC high affinity protein–protein interaction, the interaction between the voltage-gated calcium channel (CaV) pore-forming subunit α-interaction domain (AID) and cytoplasmic β-subunit (CaVβ). We show using circular dichroism spectroscopy, X-ray crystallography, and isothermal titration calorimetry that the m-xylyl staples enhance AID helix formation are structurally compatible with native-like AID:CaVβ interactions and reduce the entropic penalty associated with AID binding to CaVβ. Importantly, electrophysiological studies reveal that stapled AID peptides act as effective inhibitors of the CaVα1:CaVβ interaction that modulate CaV function in an CaVβ isoform-selective manner. Together, our studies provide a proof-of-concept demonstration of the use of protein–protein interaction inhibitors to control VGIC function and point to strategies for improved AID-based CaV modulator design. PMID:28278376

  4. siRNA screen for genes that affect Junín virus entry uncovers voltage-gated calcium channels as a therapeutic target

    PubMed Central

    Lavanya, Madakasira; Cuevas, Christian D.; Thomas, Monica; Cherry, Sara; Ross, Susan R.

    2014-01-01

    New world hemorrhagic fever arenaviruses infection of humans results in 15–30% mortality. We performed a high throughput siRNA screen with Junín virus glycoprotein-pseudotyped viruses to find potential host therapeutic targets. Voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCC) subunits, for which there are FDA-approved drugs, were identified in the screen. Knockdown of VGCC subunits or treatment with channel blockers diminished Junín virus-cell fusion and entry into cells and thereby decreased infection. Gabapentin, an FDA-approved drug used to treat neuropathic pain that targets the α2δ2 subunit, inhibited infection of mice by the Candid 1 vaccine strain of the virus. These findings demonstrate that VGCCs play a role in virus infection and have the potential to lead to therapeutic intervention of new world arenavirus infection. PMID:24068738

  5. Hypericum perforatum modulates apoptosis and calcium mobilization through voltage-gated and TRPM2 calcium channels in neutrophil of patients with Behcet's disease.

    PubMed

    Nazıroğlu, Mustafa; Sahin, Mehmet; Ciğ, Bilal; Aykur, Mehmet; Erturan, Ijlal; Ugan, Yunus

    2014-03-01

    Behcet's disease (BD) is a chronic, inflammatory, and multisystemic condition although its pathogenesis is uncertain. Main component of St. John's wort (Hypericum perforatum, HP) is hyperforin and induces antiinflammatory and antioxidant properties. We aimed to investigate effects of HP on oxidative stress, apoptosis, and cytosolic-free Ca²⁺ [Ca²⁺](i) concentration in neutrophil of BD patients. Nine new-diagnosed active patients with BD and nine control subjects were included in the study. Disease activity was considered by clinical findings. Neutrophil samples were obtained from the patients and controls. The neutrophils from patients were divided into three subgroups and were incubated with HP, voltage-gated calcium channel (VGCC) blockers, (verapamil+dilitiazem) and non-specific TRPM2 channel blocker (2-aminoethyl diphenylborinate, 2-APB), respectively. The neutrophils were stimulated by fMLP as a Ca²⁺-concentration agonist and oxidative stress former. Caspase-3, caspase-9, apoptosis, lipid peroxidation, and [Ca²⁺](i) values were high in the patient groups, although cell viability, glutathione (GSH), and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) values were low in patient group. However, the [Ca²⁺](i), caspase-3, and caspase-9 values decreased markedly in patient+HP group although GSH and GSH-Px values increased in the group. The [Ca²⁺](i) concentration was also decreased in the patient group by V+D, 2-APB, and HP incubations. In conclusion, we observed the importance of neutrophil Ca²⁺ entry, apoptosis, and oxidative stress through gating VGCC and TRPM2 channels in the neutrophils in the pathogenesis and activation of the patients with BD. HP induced protective effects on oxidative stress by modulating Ca²⁺ influx in BD patients.

  6. EFFECTS OF SUBSCUTE EXPOSURE TO NANOMOLAR CONCENTRATIONS OF METHYLMERCURY ON VOLTAGE-GATES SODIUM AND CALCIUM CURRENTS IN PC12 CELLS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Methylmercury (CH3Hg+) alters the function of voltage-gated Na+ and Ca2+ channels in neuronal preparations following acute, in vitro, exposure. Because the developing nervous system is particularly sensitive to CH3Hg+ neurotoxicity, effects on voltage-gated Na+ (INa) and Ca2+ (IC...

  7. EFFECTS OF SUBSCUTE EXPOSURE TO NANOMOLAR CONCENTRATIONS OF METHYLMERCURY ON VOLTAGE-GATES SODIUM AND CALCIUM CURRENTS IN PC12 CELLS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Methylmercury (CH3Hg+) alters the function of voltage-gated Na+ and Ca2+ channels in neuronal preparations following acute, in vitro, exposure. Because the developing nervous system is particularly sensitive to CH3Hg+ neurotoxicity, effects on voltage-gated Na+ (INa) and Ca2+ (IC...

  8. ConBr, A Lectin Purified from the Seeds of Canavalia brasiliensis, Protects Against Ischemia in Organotypic Culture of Rat Hippocampus: Potential Implication of Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels.

    PubMed

    Rieger, D K; Navarro, E; Buendia, I; Parada, E; González-Lafuente, L; Leon, R; Costa, A P; Heinrich, I A; Nascimento, K S; Cavada, B S; Lopez, M G; Egea, J; Leal, R B

    2017-02-01

    Lectins are proteins that bind cellular glycans and can modulate various neuronal functions. We have evaluated the neuroprotective effect of ConBr, a lectin purified from the seeds of Canavalia brasiliensis in a model of rat organotypic hippocampal cultures (OHCs) exposed to oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD). OGD for 15 min followed by 24 h re-oxygenation significantly increased cell death, caused mitochondrial depolarization and increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) in CA1 region of OHCs. ConBr (0.1 μg/mL) added during the re-oxygenation period counteracted cell death, mitochondrial depolarization and overproduction of ROS induced by OGD. Moreover, ConBr restored the levels of Akt and ERK1 phosphorylation that were reduced by OGD. Modulation of intracellular Ca(2+) by ConBr was evaluated in isolated hippocampal neurons loaded with the fluorescent calcium dye Fluo-4/AM. ConBr (0.1 and 1 µg/mL) reduced by 25-30 % the Ca(2+) increment induced by 70 mM K(+). A sub effective concentration of ConBr (0.01 µg/mL) together with a sub effective concentration of the L-type calcium channel antagonist nifedipine (0.3 µM) conferred a synergic neuroprotective effect in OHCs subjected to OGD. In conclusion, ConBr provides OHCs neuroprotection against OGD. The mechanism was not fully addressed but it may involve modulation of L-type voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels by ConBr.

  9. Restoration of motor defects caused by loss of Drosophila TDP-43 by expression of the voltage-gated calcium channel, Cacophony, in central neurons.

    PubMed

    Lembke, Kayly M; Scudder, Charles; Morton, David B

    2017-08-28

    Defects in the RNA-binding protein, TDP-43, are known to cause a variety of neurodegenerative disease including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar dementia (FTLD). A variety of experimental systems have shown that neurons are sensitive to TDP-43 expression levels, yet the specific functional defects resulting from TDP-43 dysregulation have not been well described. Using the Drosophila TDP-43 orthologue TBPH, we previously showed that TBPH null animals display locomotion defects as third instar larvae. Furthermore, loss of TBPH caused a reduction in cacophony, a type II voltage-gated calcium channel, expression and that genetically restoring cacophony in motor neurons in TBPH mutant animals was sufficient to rescue the locomotion defects. In the present study, we examined the relative contributions of NMJ physiology and the motor program to the locomotion defects and identified subsets of neurons that require cacophony expression to rescue the defects. At the NMJ, we showed mEPP amplitudes and frequency require TBPH. Cacophony expression in motor neurons rescued mEPP frequency but not mEPP amplitude. We also showed that TBPH mutants displayed reduced motor neuron bursting and coordination during crawling and restoring cacophony selectively in two pairs of cells located in the brain, the AVM001b/2b neurons, also rescued the locomotion and motor defects, but not the defects in NMJ physiology. These results suggest that the behavioral defects associated with loss of TBPH throughout the nervous system can be associated with defects in a small number of genes in a limited number of central neurons, rather than peripheral defects.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENTTDP-43 dysfuction is a common feature in neurodegenerative diseases including ALS, FTLD, and Alzheimer's disease. Loss and gain of function models have shown neurons are sensitive to TDP-43 expression levels, but the specific defects caused by TDP-43 loss of function have not been described in

  10. Inhibition of Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels After Subchronic and Repeated Exposure of PC12 Cells to Different Classes of Insecticides.

    PubMed

    Meijer, Marieke; Brandsema, Joske A R; Nieuwenhuis, Desirée; Wijnolts, Fiona M J; Dingemans, Milou M L; Westerink, Remco H S

    2015-10-01

    We previously demonstrated that acute inhibition of voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) is a common mode of action for (sub)micromolar concentrations of chemicals, including insecticides. However, because human exposure to chemicals is usually chronic and repeated, we investigated if selected insecticides from different chemical classes (organochlorines, organophosphates, pyrethroids, carbamates, and neonicotinoids) also disturb calcium homeostasis after subchronic (24 h) exposure and after a subsequent (repeated) acute exposure. Effects on calcium homeostasis were investigated with single-cell fluorescence (Fura-2) imaging of PC12 cells. Cells were depolarized with high-K(+) saline to study effects of subchronic or repeated exposure on VGCC-mediated Ca(2+) influx. The results demonstrate that except for carbaryl and imidacloprid, all selected insecticides inhibited depolarization (K(+))-evoked Ca(2+) influx after subchronic exposure (IC50's: approximately 1-10 µM) in PC12 cells. These inhibitory effects were not or only slowly reversible. Moreover, repeated exposure augmented the inhibition of the K(+)-evoked increase in intracellular calcium concentration induced by subchronic exposure to cypermethrin, chlorpyrifos, chlorpyrifos-oxon, and endosulfan (IC50's: approximately 0.1-4 µM). In rat primary cortical cultures, acute and repeated chlorpyrifos exposure also augmented inhibition of VGCCs compared with subchronic exposure. In conclusion, compared with subchronic exposure, repeated exposure increases the potency of insecticides to inhibit VGCCs. However, the potency of insecticides to inhibit VGCCs upon repeated exposure was comparable with the inhibition previously observed following acute exposure, with the exception of chlorpyrifos. The data suggest that an acute exposure paradigm is sufficient for screening chemicals for effects on VGCCs and that PC12 cells are a sensitive model for detection of effects on VGCCs. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford

  11. L-type calcium channels refine the neural population code of sound level.

    PubMed

    Grimsley, Calum Alex; Green, David Brian; Sivaramakrishnan, Shobhana

    2016-12-01

    The coding of sound level by ensembles of neurons improves the accuracy with which listeners identify how loud a sound is. In the auditory system, the rate at which neurons fire in response to changes in sound level is shaped by local networks. Voltage-gated conductances alter local output by regulating neuronal firing, but their role in modulating responses to sound level is unclear. We tested the effects of L-type calcium channels (CaL: CaV1.1-1.4) on sound-level coding in the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICC) in the auditory midbrain. We characterized the contribution of CaL to the total calcium current in brain slices and then examined its effects on rate-level functions (RLFs) in vivo using single-unit recordings in awake mice. CaL is a high-threshold current and comprises ∼50% of the total calcium current in ICC neurons. In vivo, CaL activates at sound levels that evoke high firing rates. In RLFs that increase monotonically with sound level, CaL boosts spike rates at high sound levels and increases the maximum firing rate achieved. In different populations of RLFs that change nonmonotonically with sound level, CaL either suppresses or enhances firing at sound levels that evoke maximum firing. CaL multiplies the gain of monotonic RLFs with dynamic range and divides the gain of nonmonotonic RLFs with the width of the RLF. These results suggest that a single broad class of calcium channels activates enhancing and suppressing local circuits to regulate the sensitivity of neuronal populations to sound level. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  12. Deltamethrin affects the expression of voltage-gated calcium channel α1 subunits and the locomotion, egg-laying, foraging behavior of Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Rune; Yu, Xing; Tan, Xing; Ye, Shan; Ding, Zhong

    2017-05-01

    Deltamethrin belongs to the class of synthetic pyrethroids, which are being widely used as insecticides in agricultural practices. Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) are the primary targets of these chemicals for toxicity to insects. Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) does not have VGSCs but is susceptible to deltamethrin. Recent findings have suggested that pyrethroids can affect voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs). However, it remains elusive whether deltamethrin induces toxicity to C. elegans via modulating the activity of VGCCs. To identify the potential target of deltamethrin, we exposed C. elegans to different concentrations of deltamethrin and Ca(2+) channel blockers for different times, characterized the behavioral toxicity of deltamethrin on C. elegans, and determined the expression of egl-19, unc-2, and cca-1, which encode the α1-subunit of the L-, R/N/P/Q-, and T-type VGCC, respectively. We found that deltamethrin inhibited the locomotion, egg-laying and foraging ability of C. elegans in a concentration dependent manner. We also showed that body length of worms on agar plates containing 200mgL(-1) deltamethrin for 12h was not significantly different from controls, whereas the cholinesterase inhibitor carbofuran caused hypercontraction which is a characteristic of organophosphates and carbamates, suggesting that deltamethrin's mode of action is distinct from those nematicides. In addition, unc-2 was significantly up-regulated following 0.05mgL(-1) deltamethrin exposure for 24h; while egl-19 and cca-1 were significantly up-regulated following 5 and 50mgL(-1) deltamethrin exposure for 24h. Further tests of worms' sensitivity and expression of three α1-subunits of VGCC to Ca(2+) channel blockers indicate that deltamethrin may induce toxic behavior C. elegans via modulation of the expression of the α1-subunits of VGCC. This study provides insights into the linkage between deltamethrin-induced toxic behavior and the regulation of α1-subunits of VGCC

  13. Development of small molecules that mimic the binding of omega-conotoxins at the N-type voltage-gated calcium channel.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Christina I; Smythe, Mark L; Lewis, Richard J

    2004-01-01

    Cone snails (Conidae) are marine predators with some extraordinary features. Their venom contains a hundred or more peptides that target numerous ion channels and receptors in mammals, including several that are involved in disease. omega-Conotoxins from fish hunting snails are 24-27 residue peptides with a rigid 4-loop cysteine framework that target the N-type voltage-gated calcium channel (VGCC). Two omega-conotoxins, MVIIA and CVID are currently in clinical development for chronic pain management (Ziconotide or Prialt, and AM336, respectively). In an attempt to develop small molecule equivalents of CVID, we defined the Calpha-Cbeta vectors of the residues believed to be important for binding to the N-type VGCC. Using these vectors, we undertook a virtual screening of virtual libraries approach to identify compounds that matched the pharmacophore. Cyclic pentapeptides containing residues of loop 2 of CVID, with one or more being a D-amino acid were designed and synthesised and were found to be active at the N-type VGCC (IC50 approximately 20 microM). Agreeing with the specificity profile of CVID, molecules were inactive at the P/Q-type VGCC.

  14. Calcium- and voltage-gated potassium (BK) channel activators in the 5β-cholanic acid-3α-ol analogue series with modifications in the lateral chain.

    PubMed

    Bukiya, Anna N; Patil, Shivaputra A; Li, Wei; Miller, Duane D; Dopico, Alex M

    2012-10-01

    Large conductance, calcium- and voltage-gated potassium (BK) channels regulate various physiological processes and represent an attractive target for drug discovery. Numerous BK channel activators are available. However, these agents usually interact with the ubiquitously distributed channel-forming subunit and thus cannot selectively target a particular tissue. We performed a structure-activity relationship study of lithocholic acid (LCA), a cholane that activates BK channels via the accessory BK β1 subunit. The latter protein is highly abundant in smooth muscle but scarce in most other tissues. Modifications to the LCA lateral chain length and functional group yielded two novel smooth muscle BK channel activators in which the substituent at C24 has a small volume and a net negative charge. Our data provide detailed structural information that will be useful to advance a pharmacophore in search of β1 subunit-selective BK channel activators. These compounds are expected to evoke smooth muscle relaxation, which would be beneficial in the pharmacotherapy of prevalent human disorders associated with increased smooth muscle contraction, such as systemic hypertension, cerebral or coronary vasospasm, bronchial asthma, bladder hyperactivity, and erectile dysfunction.

  15. Selectivity filters and cysteine-rich extracellular loops in voltage-gated sodium, calcium, and NALCN channels

    PubMed Central

    Stephens, Robert F.; Guan, W.; Zhorov, Boris S.; Spafford, J. David

    2015-01-01

    How nature discriminates sodium from calcium ions in eukaryotic channels has been difficult to resolve because they contain four homologous, but markedly different repeat domains. We glean clues from analyzing the changing pore region in sodium, calcium and NALCN channels, from single-cell eukaryotes to mammals. Alternative splicing in invertebrate homologs provides insights into different structural features underlying calcium and sodium selectivity. NALCN generates alternative ion selectivity with splicing that changes the high field strength (HFS) site at the narrowest level of the hourglass shaped pore where the selectivity filter is located. Alternative splicing creates NALCN isoforms, in which the HFS site has a ring of glutamates contributed by all four repeat domains (EEEE), or three glutamates and a lysine residue in the third (EEKE) or second (EKEE) position. Alternative splicing provides sodium and/or calcium selectivity in T-type channels with extracellular loops between S5 and P-helices (S5P) of different lengths that contain three or five cysteines. All eukaryotic channels have a set of eight core cysteines in extracellular regions, but the T-type channels have an infusion of 4–12 extra cysteines in extracellular regions. The pattern of conservation suggests a possible pairing of long loops in Domains I and III, which are bridged with core cysteines in NALCN, Cav, and Nav channels, and pairing of shorter loops in Domains II and IV in T-type channel through disulfide bonds involving T-type specific cysteines. Extracellular turrets of increasing lengths in potassium channels (Kir2.2, hERG, and K2P1) contribute to a changing landscape above the pore selectivity filter that can limit drug access and serve as an ion pre-filter before ions reach the pore selectivity filter below. Pairing of extended loops likely contributes to the large extracellular appendage as seen in single particle electron cryo-microscopy images of the eel Nav1 channel. PMID

  16. Expression and cellular localization of the voltage-gated calcium channel α2δ3 in the rodent retina

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Luis Pérez de Sevilla; Sargoy, Allison; Fernández-Sánchez, Laura; Rodriguez, Allen; Liu, Janelle; Cuenca, Nicolás; Brecha, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    High voltage activated calcium channels are hetero-oligomeric protein complexes that mediate multiple cellular processes including the influx of extracellular Ca2+, neurotransmitter release, gene transcription and synaptic plasticity. These channels consist of a primary α1 pore-forming subunit, which is associated with an extracellular α2δ subunit and an intracellular β auxiliary subunit, which alter the gating properties and trafficking of the calcium channel. The cellular localization of the α2δ3 subunit in the mouse and rat retina is unknown. In this study, using RT-PCR a single band at ~305 bp corresponding to the predicted size of the α2δ3 subunit fragment was in mouse and rat retina and brain homogenates. Western blotting of rodent retina and brain homogenates showed a single 123 kDa band. Immunohistochemistry using an affinity purified antibody to the α2δ3 subunit revealed immunoreactive cell bodies in the ganglion cell layer (GCL) and inner nuclear layer (INL), and immunoreactive processes in the inner plexiform layer (IPL) and the outer plexiform layer (OPL). α2δ3 immunoreactivity was localized to multiple cell types, including ganglion, amacrine and bipolar cells, and photoreceptors, but not by horizontal cells. The expression of the α2δ3 calcium channel subunit to multiple cell types suggests this subunit participates widely in Ca channel-mediated signaling in the retina. PMID:25631988

  17. Pharmacoresistant Cav 2·3 (E-type/R-type) voltage-gated calcium channels influence heart rate dynamics and may contribute to cardiac impulse conduction.

    PubMed

    Galetin, Thomas; Tevoufouet, Etienne E; Sandmeyer, Jakob; Matthes, Jan; Nguemo, Filomain; Hescheler, Jürgen; Weiergräber, Marco; Schneider, Toni

    2013-07-01

    Voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels regulate cardiac automaticity, rhythmicity and excitation-contraction coupling. Whereas L-type (Cav 1·2, Cav 1·3) and T-type (Cav 3·1, Cav 3·2) channels are widely accepted for their functional relevance in the heart, the role of Cav 2·3 Ca(2+) channels expressing R-type currents remains to be elucidated. We have investigated heart rate dynamics in control and Cav 2·3-deficient mice using implantable electrocardiogram radiotelemetry and pharmacological injection experiments. Autonomic block revealed that the intrinsic heart rate does not differ between both genotypes. Systemic administration of isoproterenol resulted in a significant reduction in interbeat interval in both genotypes. It remained unaffected after administering propranolol in Cav 2·3(-|-) mice. Heart rate from isolated hearts as well as atrioventricular conduction for both genotypes differed significantly. Additionally, we identified and analysed the developmental expression of two splice variants, i.e. Cav 2·3c and Cav 2·3e. Using patch clamp technology, R-type currents could be detected in isolated prenatal cardiomyocytes and be related to R-type Ca(2+) channels. Our results indicate that on the systemic level, the pharmacologically inducible heart rate range and heart rate reserve are impaired in Cav 2·3 (-|-) mice. In addition, experiments on Langendorff perfused hearts elucidate differences in basic properties between both genotypes. Thus, Cav 2·3 does not only contribute to the cardiac autonomous nervous system but also to intrinsic rhythm propagation. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. A Polybasic Plasma Membrane Binding Motif in the I-II Linker Stabilizes Voltage-gated CaV1.2 Calcium Channel Function.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Gurjot; Pinggera, Alexandra; Ortner, Nadine J; Lieb, Andreas; Sinnegger-Brauns, Martina J; Yarov-Yarovoy, Vladimir; Obermair, Gerald J; Flucher, Bernhard E; Striessnig, Jörg

    2015-08-21

    L-type voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels (LTCCs) regulate many physiological functions like muscle contraction, hormone secretion, gene expression, and neuronal excitability. Their activity is strictly controlled by various molecular mechanisms. The pore-forming α1-subunit comprises four repeated domains (I-IV), each connected via an intracellular linker. Here we identified a polybasic plasma membrane binding motif, consisting of four arginines, within the I-II linker of all LTCCs. The primary structure of this motif is similar to polybasic clusters known to interact with polyphosphoinositides identified in other ion channels. We used de novo molecular modeling to predict the conformation of this polybasic motif, immunofluorescence microscopy and live cell imaging to investigate the interaction with the plasma membrane, and electrophysiology to study its role for Cav1.2 channel function. According to our models, this polybasic motif of the I-II linker forms a straight α-helix, with the positive charges facing the lipid phosphates of the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane. Membrane binding of the I-II linker could be reversed after phospholipase C activation, causing polyphosphoinositide breakdown, and was accelerated by elevated intracellular Ca(2+) levels. This indicates the involvement of negatively charged phospholipids in the plasma membrane targeting of the linker. Neutralization of four arginine residues eliminated plasma membrane binding. Patch clamp recordings revealed facilitated opening of Cav1.2 channels containing these mutations, weaker inhibition by phospholipase C activation, and reduced expression of channels (as quantified by ON-gating charge) at the plasma membrane. Our data provide new evidence for a membrane binding motif within the I-II linker of LTCC α1-subunits essential for stabilizing normal Ca(2+) channel function. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. Agomelatine and duloxetine synergistically modulates apoptotic pathway by inhibiting oxidative stress triggered intracellular calcium entry in neuronal PC12 cells: role of TRPM2 and voltage-gated calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Akpinar, Abdullah; Uğuz, Abdülhadi Cihangir; Nazıroğlu, Mustafa

    2014-05-01

    Calcium ion (Ca(2+)) is one of the universal second messengers, which acts in a wide range of cellular processes. Results of recent studies indicated that ROS generated by depression leads to loss of endoplasmic reticulum-Ca(2+) homeostasis, oxidative stress, and apoptosis. Agomelatine and duloxetine are novel antidepressant and antioxidant drugs and may reduce oxidative stress, apoptosis, and Ca(2+) entry through TRPM2 and voltage-gated calcium channels. We tested the effects of agomelatine, duloxetine, and their combination on oxidative stress, Ca(2+) influx, mitochondrial depolarization, apoptosis, and caspase values in the PC-12 neuronal cells. PC-12 neuronal cells were exposed in cell culture and exposed to appropriate non-toxic concentrations and incubation times for agomelatine were determined in the neurons by assessing cell viability. Then PC-12 cells were incubated with agomelatine and duloxetine for 24 h. Treatment of cultured PC-12 cells with agomelatine, duloxetine, and their combination results in a protection on apoptosis, caspase-3, caspase-9, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, cytosolic ROS production, glutathione peroxidase, reduced glutathione, and lipid peroxidation, values. Ca(2+) entry through non-specific TRPM2 channel blocker (2-APB) and voltage-gated Ca(2+) channel blockers (verapamil and diltiazem) was modulated by agomelatine and duloxetine. However, effects of duloxetine on the Ca(2+) entry through TRPM2 channels were higher than in agomelatine. Results of current study suggest that the agomelatine and duloxetine are useful against apoptotic cell death and oxidative stress in PC-12 cells, which seem to be dependent on mitochondrial damage and increased levels of intracellular Ca(2+) through activation of TRPM2 and voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels.

  20. Expression of Voltage-Gated Calcium Channel α2δ4 Subunits in the Mouse and Rat Retina

    PubMed Central

    De Sevilla Müller, Luis Pérez; Liu, Janelle; Solomon, Alexander; Rodriguez, Allen; Brecha, Nicholas C.

    2013-01-01

    High-voltage activated Ca channels participate in multiple cellular functions, including transmitter release, excitation, and gene transcription. Ca channels are heteromeric proteins consisting of a pore-forming α1 subunit and auxiliary α2δ and β subunits. Although there are reports of α2δ4 subunit mRNA in the mouse retina and localization of the α2δ4 subunit immunoreactivity to salamander photoreceptor terminals, there is a limited overall understanding of its expression and localization in the retina. α2δ4 subunit expression and distribution in the mouse and rat retina were evaluated by using reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, western blot, and immunohistochemistry with specific primers and a well-characterized antibody to the α2δ4 subunit. α2δ4 subunit mRNA and protein are present in mouse and rat retina, brain, and liver homogenates. Immunostaining for the α2δ4 subunit is mainly localized to Müller cell processes and endfeet, photoreceptor terminals, and photoreceptor outer segments. This subunit is also expressed in a few displaced ganglion cells and bipolar cell dendrites. These findings suggest that the α2δ4 subunit participates in the modulation of L-type Ca2+ current regulating neurotransmitter release from photoreceptor terminals and Ca2+-dependent signaling pathways in bipolar and Müller cells. PMID:23296739

  1. The effects of piracetam and its novel peptide analogue GVS-111 on neuronal voltage-gated calcium and potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Solntseva, E I; Bukanova, J V; Ostrovskaya, R U; Gudasheva, T A; Voronina, T A; Skrebitsky, V G

    1997-07-01

    1. With the use of the two-microelectrode voltage-clamp method, three types of voltage-activated ionic currents were examined in isolated neurons of the snail Helix pomatia: high-threshold Ca2+ current (ICa), high-threshold Ca(2+)-dependent K+ current (IK(Ca)) and high-threshold K+ current independent of Ca2+ (IK(V)). 2. The effect of bath application of the nootropics piracetam and a novel piracetam peptide analog, ethyl ester of N-phenyl-acetyl-L-prolyl-glycine (GVS-111), on these three types of voltage-activated ionic currents was studied. 3. In more than half of the tested cells, ICa was resistant to both piracetam and GVS-111. In the rest of the cells, ICa decreased 19 +/- 7% with 2 mM of piracetam and 39 +/- 14% with 2 microM of GVS-111. 4. IK(V) in almost all cells tested was resistant to piracetam at concentrations up to 2 mM. However, IK(V) in two-thirds of the cells was sensitive to GVS-111, being suppressed 49 +/- 18% with 1 microM GVS-111. 5. IK(Ca) appeared to be the most sensitive current of those studied to both piracetam and GVS-111. Piracetam at 1 mM and GVS-111 at 0.1 microM decreased the amplitude of IK(Ca) in most of the cells examined by 49 +/- 19% and 69 +/- 24%, respectively. 6. The results suggest that piracetam and GVS-111 suppression of voltage-activated calcium and potassium currents of the neuronal membrane may regulate (both up and down) Ca2+ influx into neurons.

  2. L-type calcium channel: Clarifying the "oxygen sensing hypothesis".

    PubMed

    Cserne Szappanos, Henrietta; Viola, Helena; Hool, Livia C

    2017-03-18

    The heart is able to respond acutely to changes in oxygen tension. Since ion channels can respond rapidly to stimuli, the "ion channel oxygen sensing hypothesis" has been proposed to explain acute adaptation of cells to changes in oxygen demand. However the exact mechanism for oxygen sensing continues to be debated. Mitochondria consume the lion's share of oxygen in the heart, fuelling the production of ATP that drives excitation and contraction. Mitochondria also produce reactive oxygen species that are capable of altering the redox state of proteins. The cardiac L-type calcium channel is responsible for maintaining excitation and contraction. Recently, the reactive cysteine on the cardiac L-type calcium channel was identified. These data clarified that the channel does not respond directly to changes in oxygen tension, but rather responds to cellular redox state. This leads to acute alterations in cell signalling responsible for the development of arrhythmias and pathology.

  3. Spinal blockage of P/Q- or N-type voltage-gated calcium channels modulates functional and symptomatic changes related to haemorrhagic cystitis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Silva, R B M; Sperotto, N D M; Andrade, E L; Pereira, T C B; Leite, C E; de Souza, A H; Bogo, M R; Morrone, F B; Gomez, M V; Campos, M M

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Spinal voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) are pivotal regulators of painful and inflammatory alterations, representing attractive therapeutic targets. We examined the effects of epidural administration of the P/Q- and N-type VGCC blockers Tx3-3 and Phα1β, respectively, isolated from the spider Phoneutria nigriventer, on symptomatic, inflammatory and functional changes allied to mouse cyclophosphamide (CPA)-induced haemorrhagic cystitis (HC). The effects of P. nigriventer-derived toxins were compared with those displayed by MVIIC and MVIIA, extracted from the cone snail Conus magus. Experimental Approach HC was induced by a single i.p. injection of CPA (300 mg·kg–1). Dose- and time-related effects of spinally administered P/Q and N-type VGCC blockers were assessed on nociceptive behaviour and macroscopic inflammation elicited by CPA. The effects of toxins were also evaluated on cell migration, cytokine production, oxidative stress, functional cystometry alterations and TRPV1, TRPA1 and NK1 receptor mRNA expression. Key Results The spinal blockage of P/Q-type VGCC by Tx3-3 and MVIIC or N-type VGCC by Phα1β attenuated nociceptive and inflammatory events associated with HC, including bladder oxidative stress and cytokine production. CPA produced a slight increase in bladder TRPV1 and TRPA1 mRNA expression, which was reversed by all the toxins tested. Noteworthy, Phα1β strongly prevented bladder neutrophil migration, besides HC-related functional alterations, and its effects were potentiated by co-injecting the selective NK1 receptor antagonist CP-96345. Conclusions and Implications Our results shed new light on the role of spinal P/Q and N-type VGCC in bladder dysfunctions, pointing out Phα1β as a promising alternative for treating complications associated with CPA-induced HC. PMID:25298144

  4. Targeting of Voltage-Gated Calcium Channel α2δ-1 Subunit to Lipid Rafts Is Independent from a GPI-Anchoring Motif

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Philip; Etheridge, Sarah; Song, Lele; Shah, Riddhi; Fitzgerald, Elizabeth M.; Jones, Owen T.

    2011-01-01

    Voltage-gated calcium channels (Cav) exist as heteromultimers comprising a pore-forming α1 with accessory β and α2δ subunits which modify channel trafficking and function. We previously showed that α2δ-1 (and likely the other mammalian α2δ isoforms - α2δ-2, 3 and 4) is required for targeting Cavs to lipid rafts, although the mechanism remains unclear. Whilst originally understood to have a classical type I transmembrane (TM) topology, recent evidence suggests the α2δ subunit contains a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchor that mediates its association with lipid rafts. To test this notion, we have used a strategy based on the expression of chimera, where the reported GPI-anchoring sequences in the gabapentinoid-sensitive α2δ-1 subunit have been substituted with those of a functionally inert Type I TM-spanning protein – PIN-G. Using imaging, electrophysiology and biochemistry, we find that lipid raft association of PIN-α2δ is unaffected by substitution of the GPI motif with the TM domain of PIN-G. Moreover, the presence of the GPI motif alone is not sufficient for raft localisation, suggesting that upstream residues are required. GPI-anchoring is susceptible to phosphatidylinositol-phospholipase C (PI-PLC) cleavage. However, whilst raft localisation of PIN-α2δ is disrupted by PI-PLC treatment, this is assay-dependent and non-specific effects of PI-PLC are observed on the distribution of the endogenous raft marker, caveolin, but not flotillin. Taken together, these data are most consistent with a model where α2δ-1 retains its type I transmembrane topology and its targeting to lipid rafts is governed by sequences upstream of the putative GPI anchor, that promote protein-protein, rather than lipid-lipid interactions. PMID:21695204

  5. Calcium-Activated SK Channels Influence Voltage-Gated Ion Channels to Determine the Precision of Firing in Globus Pallidus Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Deister, Christopher A.; Chan, C. Savio; Surmeier, D. James; Wilson, Charles J.

    2012-01-01

    Globus pallidus (GP) neurons fire rhythmically in the absence of synaptic input, suggesting that they may encode their inputs as changes in the phase of their rhythmic firing. Action potential afterhyperpolarization (AHP) enhances precision of firing by ensuring that the ion channels recover from inactivation by the same amount on each cycle. Voltage-clamp experiments in slices showed that the longest component of the GP neuron’s AHP is blocked by apamin, a selective antagonist of calcium-activated SK channels. Application of 100 nm apamin also disrupted the precision of firing in perforated-patch and cell-attached recordings. SK channel blockade caused a small depolarization in spike threshold and made it more variable, but there was no reduction in the maximal rate of rise during an action potential. Thus, the firing irregularity was not caused solely by a reduction in voltage-gated Na+ channel availability. Subthreshold voltage ramps triggered a large outward current that was sensitive to the initial holding potential and had properties similar to the A-type K+ current in GP neurons. In numerical simulations, the availability of both Na+ and A-type K+ channels during autonomous firing were reduced when SK channels were removed, and a nearly equal reduction in Na+ and K+ subthreshold-activated ion channel availability produced a large decrease in the neuron’s slope conductance near threshold. This change made the neuron more sensitive to intrinsically generated noise. In vivo, this change would also enhance the sensitivity of GP neurons to small synaptic inputs. PMID:19571136

  6. Calcium influx through L-type channels attenuates skeletal muscle contraction via inhibition of adenylyl cyclases.

    PubMed

    Menezes-Rodrigues, Francisco Sandro; Pires-Oliveira, Marcelo; Duarte, Thiago; Paredes-Gamero, Edgar Julian; Chiavegatti, Tiago; Godinho, Rosely Oliveira

    2013-11-15

    Skeletal muscle contraction is triggered by acetylcholine induced release of Ca(2+) from sarcoplasmic reticulum. Although this signaling pathway is independent of extracellular Ca(2+), L-type voltage-gated calcium channel (Cav) blockers have inotropic effects on frog skeletal muscles which occur by an unknown mechanism. Taking into account that skeletal muscle fiber expresses Ca(+2)-sensitive adenylyl cyclase (AC) isoforms and that cAMP is able to increase skeletal muscle contraction force, we investigated the role of Ca(2+) influx on mouse skeletal muscle contraction and the putative crosstalk between extracellular Ca(2+) and intracellular cAMP signaling pathways. The effects of Cav blockers (verapamil and nifedipine) and extracellular Ca(2+) chelator EGTA were evaluated on isometric contractility of mouse diaphragm muscle under direct electrical stimulus (supramaximal voltage, 2 ms, 0.1 Hz). Production of cAMP was evaluated by radiometric assay while Ca(2+) transients were assessed by confocal microscopy using L6 cells loaded with fluo-4/AM. Ca(2+) channel blockers verapamil and nifedipine had positive inotropic effect, which was mimicked by removal of extracellular Ca(+2) with EGTA or Ca(2+)-free Tyrode. While phosphodiesterase inhibitor IBMX potentiates verapamil positive inotropic effect, it was abolished by AC inhibitors SQ22536 and NYK80. Finally, the inotropic effect of verapamil was associated with increased intracellular cAMP content and mobilization of intracellular Ca(2+), indicating that positive inotropic effects of Ca(2+) blockers depend on cAMP formation. Together, our results show that extracellular Ca(2+) modulates skeletal muscle contraction, through inhibition of Ca(2+)-sensitive AC. The cross-talk between extracellular calcium and cAMP-dependent signaling pathways appears to regulate the extent of skeletal muscle contraction responses.

  7. Raised activity of L-type calcium channels renders neurons prone to form paroxysmal depolarization shifts.

    PubMed

    Rubi, Lena; Schandl, Ulla; Lagler, Michael; Geier, Petra; Spies, Daniel; Gupta, Kuheli Das; Boehm, Stefan; Kubista, Helmut

    2013-09-01

    Neuronal L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (LTCCs) are involved in several physiological functions, but increased activity of LTCCs has been linked to pathology. Due to the coupling of LTCC-mediated Ca(2+) influx to Ca(2+)-dependent conductances, such as KCa or non-specific cation channels, LTCCs act as important regulators of neuronal excitability. Augmentation of after-hyperpolarizations may be one mechanism that shows how elevated LTCC activity can lead to neurological malfunctions. However, little is known about other impacts on electrical discharge activity. We used pharmacological up-regulation of LTCCs to address this issue on primary rat hippocampal neurons. Potentiation of LTCCs with Bay K8644 enhanced excitatory postsynaptic potentials to various degrees and eventually resulted in paroxysmal depolarization shifts (PDS). Under conditions of disturbed Ca(2+) homeostasis, PDS were evoked frequently upon LTCC potentiation. Exposing the neurons to oxidative stress using hydrogen peroxide also induced LTCC-dependent PDS. Hence, raising LTCC activity had unidirectional effects on brief electrical signals and increased the likeliness of epileptiform events. However, long-lasting seizure-like activity induced by various pharmacological means was affected by Bay K8644 in a bimodal manner, with increases in one group of neurons and decreases in another group. In each group, isradipine exerted the opposite effect. This suggests that therapeutic reduction in LTCC activity may have little beneficial or even adverse effects on long-lasting abnormal discharge activities. However, our data identify enhanced activity of LTCCs as one precipitating cause of PDS. Because evidence is continuously accumulating that PDS represent important elements in neuropathogenesis, LTCCs may provide valuable targets for neuroprophylactic therapy.

  8. Electrophysiological evidence for voltage-gated calcium channel 2 (Cav2) modulation of mechano- and thermosensitive spinal neuronal responses in a rat model of osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, W.; Patel, R.; Dickenson, A.H.

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) remains one of the greatest healthcare burdens in western society, with chronic debilitating pain-dominating clinical presentation yet therapeutic strategies are inadequate in many patients. Development of better analgesics is contingent on improved understanding of the molecular mechanisms mediating OA pain. Voltage-gated calcium channels 2.2 (Cav2.2) play a critical role in spinal nociceptive transmission, therefore blocking Cav2.2 activity represents an attractive opportunity for OA pain treatment, but the only available licensed Cav2.2 antagonist ziconitide (PrilatTM) is of limited use. TROX-1 is an orally available, use dependent and state-selective Cav2 antagonist, exerting its analgesic effect primarily via Cav2.2 blockade, with an improved therapeutic window compared with ziconitide. Using a rat model of monosodium iodoacetate (MIA), 2 mg, induced OA we used in vivo electrophysiology to assess the effects of spinal or systemic administration of TROX-1 on the evoked activity of wide dynamic range spinal dorsal horn neurons in response to electrical, natural mechanical (dynamic brush and von Frey 2, 8, 26 and 6 g) and thermal (40, 45 and 45 °C) stimuli applied to the peripheral receptive field. MIA injection into the knee joint resulted in mechanical hypersensitivity of the ipsilateral hind paw and weight-bearing asymmetry. Spinal administration of TROX-1 (0.1 and 1 μg/50 μl) produced a significant dose-related inhibition of dynamic brush, mechanical (von Frey filament (vF) 8, 26 and 60 g) and noxious thermal-(45 and 48 °C) evoked neuronal responses in MIA rats only. Systemic administration of TROX-1 produced a significant inhibition of the mechanical-(vF 8, 26 and 60 g) evoked neuronal responses in MIA rats. TROX-1 did not produce any significant effect on any neuronal measure in Sham controls. Our in vivo electrophysiological results demonstrate a pathological state-dependent effect of TROX-1, which suggests an increased

  9. Pre-clinical evaluation of voltage-gated calcium channel blockers derived from the spider P. nigriventer in glioma progression.

    PubMed

    Nicoletti, Natália Fontana; Erig, Thaís Cristina; Zanin, Rafael Fernandes; Roxo, Marcelo Ricardo; Ferreira, Nelson Pires; Gomez, Marcus Vinicius; Morrone, Fernanda Bueno; Campos, Maria Martha

    2017-04-01

    This study investigated the effects of P/Q- and N-type voltage-gated calcium channel (VGCC) blockers derived from P. nigriventer in glioma progression, by means of in vitro and in vivo experiments. Glioma cells M059J, U-138MG and U-251MG were used to evaluate the antiproliferative effects of P/Q- and N-type VGCC inhibitors PhTx3-3 and Phα1β from P. nigriventer (0.3-100 pM), in comparison to MVIIC and MVIIA from C. magus (0.3-100 pM), respectively. The toxins were also analyzed in a glioma model induced by implantation of GL261 mouse cells. PhTx3-3, Phα1β and MVIIA displayed significant inhibitory effects on the proliferation and viability of all tested glioma cell lines, and evoked cell death mainly with apoptosis characteristics, as indicated by Annexin V/propidium iodide (PI) positivity. The antiproliferative effects of toxins were confirmed by flow cytometry using Ki67 staining. None of the tested toxins altered the proliferation rates of the N9 non-tumor glial cell line. Noteworthy, the administration of the preferential N-type VGCC inhibitors, Phα1β (50 pmol/site; i.c.v.), its recombinant form CTK 01512-2 (50 pmol/site; i.c.v. and i.t.), or MVIIA (10 pmol/site; i.c.v.) caused significant reductions of tumor areas in vivo. N-type VGCC inhibition by Phα1β, CTK 01512-2, and MVIIA led to a marked increase of GFAP-activated astrocytes, and Iba-1-positive microglia, in the peritumoral region, which might explain, at least in part, the inhibitory effects of the toxins in tumor development. This study provides novel evidence on the potential effects of P. nigriventer-derived P/Q-, and mainly, N-type VGCC inhibitors, in glioma progression. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Identification and synthesis of [1,2,4]triazolo[3,4-a]phthalazine derivatives as high-affinity ligands to the alpha 2 delta-1 subunit of voltage gated calcium channel.

    PubMed

    Lebsack, Alec D; Gunzner, Janet; Wang, Bowei; Pracitto, Richard; Schaffhauser, Hervé; Santini, Angelina; Aiyar, Jayashree; Bezverkov, Robert; Munoz, Benito; Liu, Wensheng; Venkatraman, Shankar

    2004-05-17

    We have identified and synthesized a series of [1,2,4]triazolo[3,4-a]phthalazine derivatives as high-affinity ligands to alpha 2 delta-1 subunit of voltage gated calcium channels. Structure-activity relationship studies directed toward improving the potency and physical properties of 2 lead to the discovery of 20 (IC(50)=15 nM) and (S)-22 (IC(50)=30 nM). A potent and selective radioligand, [(3)H]-(S)-22 was also synthesized to demonstrate that this ligand binds to the same site as gabapentin.

  11. New expression profiles of voltage-gated ion channels in arteries exposed to high blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Cox, Robert H; Rusch, Nancy J

    2002-01-01

    The diameters of small arteries and arterioles are tightly regulated by the dynamic interaction between Ca(2+) and K(+) channels in the vascular smooth muscle cells. Calcium influx through voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels induces vasoconstriction, whereas the opening of K(+) channels mediates hyperpolarization, inactivation of voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels, and vasodilation. Three types of voltage-sensitive ion channels have been highly implicated in the regulation of resting vascular tone. These include the L-type Ca(2+) (Ca(L)) channels, voltage-gated K(+) (K(V)) channels, and high-conductance voltage- and Ca(2+)-sensitive K(+) (BK(Ca)) channels. Recently, abnormal expression profiles of these ion channels have been identified as part of the pathogenesis of arterial hypertension and other vasospastic diseases. An increasing number of studies suggest that high blood pressure may trigger cellular signaling cascades that dynamically alter the expression profile of arterial ion channels to further modify vascular tone. This article will briefly review the properties of Ca(L), K(V), and BK(Ca) channels, present evidence that their expression profile is altered during systemic hypertension, and suggest potential mechanisms by which the signal of elevated blood pressure may result in altered ion channel expression. A final section will discuss emerging concepts and opportunities for the development of new vasoactive drugs, which may rely on targeting disease-specific changes in ion channel expression as a mechanism to lower vascular tone during hypertensive diseases.

  12. Aging Reduces L-Type Calcium Channel Current and the Vasodilatory Response of Small Mesenteric Arteries to Calcium Channel Blockers

    PubMed Central

    Albarwani, Sulayma A.; Mansour, Fathi; Khan, Abdul Aleem; Al-Lawati, Intisar; Al-Kaabi, Abdulla; Al-Busaidi, Al-Manar; Al-Hadhrami, Safa; Al-Husseini, Isehaq; Al-Siyabi, Sultan; Tanira, Musbah O.

    2016-01-01

    Calcium channel blockers (CCBs) are widely used to treat cardiovascular disease (CVD) including hypertension. As aging is an independent risk factor for CVD, the use of CCBs increases with increasing age. Hence, this study was designed to evaluate the effect of aging on the sensitivity of small mesenteric arteries to L-type voltage-gated calcium channel (LTCC) blockers and also to investigate whether there was a concomitant change in calcium current density. Third order mesenteric arteries from male F344 rats, aged 2.5–3 months (young) and 22–26 months (old) were mounted on wire myograph to measure the tension during isometric contraction. Arteries were contracted with 100 mM KCl and were then relaxed in a cumulative concentration-response dependent manner with nifedipine (0.1 nM–1 μM), verapamil (0.1 nM–10 μM), or diltiazem (0.1 nM–10 μM). Relaxation-concentration response curves produced by cumulative concentrations of three different CCBs in arteries of old rats were shifted to the right with statistically significant IC50s. pIC50 ± s.e.m: (8.37 ± 0.06 vs. 8.04 ± 0.05, 7.40 ± 0.07 vs. 6.81 ± 0.04, and 6.58 ± 0.07 vs. 6.34 ± 0.06) in young vs. old. It was observed that the maximal contractions induced by phenylephrine and reversed by sodium nitroprusside were not different between young and old groups. However, Bay K 8644 (1 μM) increased resting tension by 23 ± 4.8% in young arteries and 4.7 ± 1.6% in old arteries. LTCC current density were also significantly lower in old arteries (−2.77 ± 0.45 pA/pF) compared to young arteries (−4.5 ± 0.40 pA/pF); with similar steady-state activation and inactivation curves. Parallel to this reduction, the expression of Cav1.2 protein was reduced by 57 ± 5% in arteries from old rats compared to those from young rats. In conclusion, our results suggest that aging reduces the response of small mesenteric arteries to the vasodilatory effect of the CCBs and this may be due to, at least in part, reduced

  13. Erk1/2 inhibit synaptic vesicle exocytosis through L type calcium channels

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Jaichandar; Morozov, Alexei

    2011-01-01

    L type calcium channels play only a minor role in basal neurotransmitter release in brain neurons, but contribute significantly after induction of plasticity. Very little is known about mechanisms that enable L type calcium channel participation in neurotransmitter release. Here, using mouse primary cortical neurons, we found that inhibition of Erk1/2 enhanced synaptic vesicle exocytosis by increasing calcium influx through L type calcium channels. Furthermore, inhibition of Erk1/2 increased the surface fraction of these channels. These findings indicate a novel inhibitory effect of Erk1/2 on synaptic transmission through L type calcium channels. PMID:21430174

  14. TMEM16A is associated with voltage-gated calcium channels in mouse retina and its function is disrupted upon mutation of the auxiliary α2δ4 subunit

    PubMed Central

    Caputo, Antonella; Piano, Ilaria; Demontis, Gian Carlo; Bacchi, Niccolò; Casarosa, Simona; Santina, Luca Della; Gargini, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Photoreceptors rely upon highly specialized synapses to efficiently transmit signals to multiple postsynaptic targets. Calcium influx in the presynaptic terminal is mediated by voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCC). This event triggers neurotransmitter release, but also gates calcium-activated chloride channels (TMEM), which in turn regulate VGCC activity. In order to investigate the relationship between VGCC and TMEM channels, we analyzed the retina of wild type (WT) and Cacna2d4 mutant mice, in which the VGCC auxiliary α2δ4 subunit carries a nonsense mutation, disrupting the normal channel function. Synaptic terminals of mutant photoreceptors are disarranged and synaptic proteins as well as TMEM16A channels lose their characteristic localization. In parallel, calcium-activated chloride currents are impaired in rods, despite unaltered TMEM16A protein levels. Co-immunoprecipitation revealed the interaction between VGCC and TMEM16A channels in the retina. Heterologous expression of these channels in tsA-201 cells showed that TMEM16A associates with the CaV1.4 subunit, and the association persists upon expression of the mutant α2δ4 subunit. Collectively, our experiments show association between TMEM16A and the α1 subunit of VGCC. Close proximity of these channels allows optimal function of the photoreceptor synaptic terminal under physiological conditions, but also makes TMEM16A channels susceptible to changes occurring to calcium channels. PMID:26557056

  15. Stimulation of Synaptic Vesicle Exocytosis by the Mental Disease Gene DISC1 is Mediated by N-Type Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Willcyn; Thevathasan, Jervis Vermal; Lin, Qingshu; Lim, Kim Buay; Kuroda, Keisuke; Kaibuchi, Kozo; Bilger, Marcel; Soong, Tuck Wah; Fivaz, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Lesions and mutations of the DISC1 (Disrupted-in-schizophrenia-1) gene have been linked to major depression, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and autism, but the influence of DISC1 on synaptic transmission remains poorly understood. Using two independent genetic approaches—RNAi and a DISC1 KO mouse—we examined the impact of DISC1 on the synaptic vesicle (SV) cycle by population imaging of the synaptic tracer vGpH in hippocampal neurons. DISC1 loss-of-function resulted in a marked decrease in SV exocytic rates during neuronal stimulation and was associated with reduced Ca2+ transients at nerve terminals. Impaired SV release was efficiently rescued by elevation of extracellular Ca2+, hinting at a link between DISC1 and voltage-gated Ca2+ channels. Accordingly, blockade of N-type Cav2.2 channels mimics and occludes the effect of DISC1 inactivation on SV exocytosis, and overexpression of DISC1 in a heterologous system increases Cav2.2 currents. Collectively, these results show that DISC1-dependent enhancement of SV exocytosis is mediated by Cav2.2 and point to aberrant glutamate release as a probable endophenotype of major psychiatric disorders. PMID:27378904

  16. A homolog of mammalian, voltage-gated calcium channels mediates yeast pheromone-stimulated Ca2+ uptake and exacerbates the cdc1(Ts) growth defect.

    PubMed Central

    Paidhungat, M; Garrett, S

    1997-01-01

    Previous studies attributed the yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) cdc1(Ts) growth defect to loss of an Mn2+-dependent function. In this report we show that cdc1(Ts) temperature-sensitive growth is also associated with an increase in cytosolic Ca2+. We identified two recessive suppressors of the cdc1(Ts) temperature-sensitive growth which block Ca2+ uptake and accumulation, suggesting that cytosolic Ca2+ exacerbates or is responsible for the cdc1(Ts) growth defect. One of the cdc1(Ts) suppressors is identical to a gene, MID1, recently implicated in mating pheromone-stimulated Ca2+ uptake. The gene (CCH1) corresponding to the second suppressor encodes a protein that bears significant sequence similarity to the pore-forming subunit (alpha1) of plasma membrane, voltage-gated Ca2+ channels from higher eukaryotes. Strains lacking Mid1 or Cch1 protein exhibit a defect in pheromone-induced Ca2+ uptake and consequently lose viability upon mating arrest. The mid1delta and cch1delta mutants also display reduced tolerance to monovalent cations such as Li+, suggesting a role for Ca2+ uptake in the calcineurin-dependent ion stress response. Finally, mid1delta cch1delta double mutants are, by both physiological and genetic criteria, identical to single mutants. These and other results suggest Mid1 and Cch1 are components of a yeast Ca2+ channel that may mediate Ca2+ uptake in response to mating pheromone, salt stress, and Mn2+ depletion. PMID:9343395

  17. Signal transduction of pregnenolone sulfate in insulinoma cells: activation of Egr-1 expression involving TRPM3, voltage-gated calcium channels, ERK, and ternary complex factors.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Sabine I; Müller, Isabelle; Mannebach, Stefanie; Endo, Takeshi; Thiel, Gerald

    2011-03-25

    The neurosteroid pregnenolone sulfate acts on the nervous system by modifying neurotransmission and receptor functions, thus influencing synaptic strength, neuronal survival, and neurogenesis. Here we show that pregnenolone sulfate induces a signaling cascade in insulinoma cells leading to enhanced expression of the zinc finger transcription factor Egr-1 and Egr-1-responsive target genes. Pharmacological and genetic experiments revealed that influx of Ca(2+) ions via transient receptor potential M3 and voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels, elevation of the cytosolic Ca(2+) level, and activation of ERK are essential for connecting pregnenolone sulfate stimulation with enhanced Egr-1 biosynthesis. Expression of a dominant-negative mutant of Elk-1, a key regulator of gene transcription driven by a serum response element, attenuated Egr-1 expression following stimulation, indicating that Elk-1 or related ternary complex factors connect the transcription of the Egr-1 gene with the pregnenolone sulfate-induced intracellular signaling cascade elicited by the initial influx of Ca(2+). The newly synthesized Egr-1 was biologically active and bound under physiological conditions to the regulatory regions of the Pdx-1, Synapsin I, and Chromogranin B genes. Pdx-1 is a major regulator of insulin gene transcription. Accordingly, elevated insulin promoter activity and increased mRNA levels of insulin could be detected in pregnenolone sulfate-stimulated insulinoma cells. Likewise, the biosynthesis of synapsin I, a synaptic vesicle protein that is found at secretory granules in insulinoma cells, was stimulated in pregnenolone sulfate-treated INS-1 cells. Together, these data show that pregnenolone sulfate induces a signaling cascade in insulinoma cells that is very similar to the signaling cascade induced by glucose in β-cells.

  18. Voltage-Gated Hydrophobic Nanopores

    SciTech Connect

    Lavrik, Nickolay V

    2011-01-01

    Hydrophobicity is a fundamental property that is responsible for numerous physical and biophysical aspects of molecular interactions in water. Peculiar behavior is expected for water in the vicinity of hydrophobic structures, such as nanopores. Indeed, hydrophobic nanopores can be found in two distinct states, dry and wet, even though the latter is thermodynamically unstable. Transitions between these two states are kinetically hindered in long pores but can be much faster in shorter pores. As it is demonstrated for the first time in this paper, these transitions can be induced by applying a voltage across a membrane with a single hydrophobic nanopore. Such voltage-induced gating in single nanopores can be realized in a reversible manner through electrowetting of inner walls of the nanopores. The resulting I-V curves of such artificial hydrophobic nanopores mimic biological voltage-gated channels.

  19. Voltage-gated sodium channels

    PubMed Central

    Abdelsayed, Mena; Sokolov, Stanislav

    2013-01-01

    Epilepsy is a brain disorder characterized by seizures and convulsions. The basis of epilepsy is an increase in neuronal excitability that, in some cases, may be caused by functional defects in neuronal voltage gated sodium channels, Nav1.1 and Nav1.2. The effects of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) as effective therapies for epilepsy have been characterized by extensive research. Most of the classic AEDs targeting Nav share a common mechanism of action by stabilizing the channel’s fast-inactivated state. In contrast, novel AEDs, such as lacosamide, stabilize the slow-inactivated state in neuronal Nav1.1 and Nav1.7 isoforms. This paper reviews the different mechanisms by which this stabilization occurs to determine new methods for treatment. PMID:23531742

  20. Voltage-gated Proton Channels

    PubMed Central

    DeCoursey, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    Voltage-gated proton channels, HV1, have vaulted from the realm of the esoteric into the forefront of a central question facing ion channel biophysicists, namely the mechanism by which voltage-dependent gating occurs. This transformation is the result of several factors. Identification of the gene in 2006 revealed that proton channels are homologues of the voltage-sensing domain of most other voltage-gated ion channels. Unique, or at least eccentric, properties of proton channels include dimeric architecture with dual conduction pathways, perfect proton selectivity, a single-channel conductance ~103 smaller than most ion channels, voltage-dependent gating that is strongly modulated by the pH gradient, ΔpH, and potent inhibition by Zn2+ (in many species) but an absence of other potent inhibitors. The recent identification of HV1 in three unicellular marine plankton species has dramatically expanded the phylogenetic family tree. Interest in proton channels in their own right has increased as important physiological roles have been identified in many cells. Proton channels trigger the bioluminescent flash of dinoflagellates, facilitate calcification by coccolithophores, regulate pH-dependent processes in eggs and sperm during fertilization, secrete acid to control the pH of airway fluids, facilitate histamine secretion by basophils, and play a signaling role in facilitating B-cell receptor mediated responses in B lymphocytes. The most elaborate and best-established functions occur in phagocytes, where proton channels optimize the activity of NADPH oxidase, an important producer of reactive oxygen species. Proton efflux mediated by HV1 balances the charge translocated across the membrane by electrons through NADPH oxidase, minimizes changes in cytoplasmic and phagosomal pH, limits osmotic swelling of the phagosome, and provides substrate H+ for the production of H2O2 and HOCl, reactive oxygen species crucial to killing pathogens. PMID:23798303

  1. Design, synthesis and pharmacological evaluation of pyrimidobenzothiazole-3-carboxylate derivatives as selective L-type calcium channel blockers.

    PubMed

    Chikhale, Rupesh; Thorat, Sonali; Pant, Amit; Jadhav, Ankush; Thatipamula, Krishna Chary; Bansode, Ratnadeep; Bhargavi, G; Karodia, Nazira; Rajasekharan, M V; Paradkar, Anant; Khedekar, Pramod

    2015-10-15

    L-type voltage gated calcium channels play essential role in contraction of various skeletal and vascular smooth muscles, thereby plays important role in regulating blood pressure. Dihydropyridine receptors have been targeted for development of newer antihypertensive agents, one of the structurally analogs nucleus dihydropyrimidines have been reported earlier by us as a potential agent toward development of calcium channel modulator. A pre-synthetic QSAR was run and on the basis of structure activity relationship a series of twenty three molecules was synthesized and studied by myosin light chain kinase assay (MLCK), Angiotensin Converting Enzyme (ACE) colorimetric assay, non-invasive blood pressure (NIBP) and invasive blood pressure (IBP) methods. Molecules with significant efficacy were studied for their single crystal X-ray diffraction, molecular docking, molecular dynamics and post-synthetic QSAR. The NIBP and IBP methods screened molecules with better percentage inhibition versus time compared to standard drug Nifedipine. The lead compound ethyl 2-methyl-4-(3-nitrophenyl)-4H-pyrimido [2,1-b] [1,3] benzothiazole-3-carboxylate (26) presented a triclinic structure with polymeric chain packing in lattice. 26 exhibited IC50 on MLCK assay of 2.1±1.7 μM with selectivity of L-type calcium channels and comparative to Nifedipine. It offered satisfactory physicochemical properties with partition coefficient of (ClogP) 4.64. Its pharmacokinetic profile is also good with Cmax at 0.40 μg/ml by oral route with Tmax reaching in 0.5 h which means in 30 min. 26 also exhibits superior t1/2 of 5.4 h and oral bioavailability of (F) 56.75% with an AUC0-∞ of 0.84 μg h/ml. Molecular docking studies indicates toward the interaction of lead compound via hydrogen bonds with Lys144, Glu181 and Asp183, it forms the Van der Walls interactions with Ser18, Asp20, Asn187, Pro185, Glu180, Glu181 and Arg10 with Glide score and Glide energy to be -3.602 and -47.098, respectively. Post

  2. Cinnamaldehyde inhibits L-type calcium channels in mouse ventricular cardiomyocytes and vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Collazo, Julio; Alonso-Carbajo, Lucía; López-Medina, Ana I; Alpizar, Yeranddy A; Tajada, Sendoa; Nilius, Bernd; Voets, Thomas; López-López, José Ramón; Talavera, Karel; Pérez-García, María Teresa; Alvarez, Julio L

    2014-11-01

    Cinnamaldehyde (CA), a major component of cinnamon, is known to have important actions in the cardiovascular system, including vasorelaxation and decrease in blood pressure. Although CA-induced activation of the chemosensory cation channel TRPA1 seems to be involved in these phenomena, it has been shown that genetic ablation of Trpa1 is insufficient to abolish CA effects. Here, we confirm that CA relaxes rat aortic rings and report that it has negative inotropic and chronotropic effects on isolated mouse hearts. Considering the major role of L-type Ca(2+) channels in the control of the vascular tone and cardiac contraction, we used whole-cell patch-clamp to test whether CA affects L-type Ca(2+) currents in mouse ventricular cardiomyocytes (VCM, with Ca(2+) as charge carrier) and in mesenteric artery smooth muscle cells (VSMC, with Ba(2+) as charge carrier). We found that CA inhibited L-type currents in both cell types in a concentration-dependent manner, with little voltage-dependent effects. However, CA was more potent in VCM than in VSMC and caused opposite effects on the rate of inactivation. We found these divergences to be at least in part due to the use of different charge carriers. We conclude that CA inhibits L-type Ca(2+) channels and that this effect may contribute to its vasorelaxing action. Importantly, our results demonstrate that TRPA1 is not a specific target of CA and indicate that the inhibition of voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels should be taken into account when using CA to probe the pathophysiological roles of TRPA1.

  3. The Caenorhabditis elegans voltage-gated calcium channel subunits UNC-2 and UNC-36 and the calcium-dependent kinase UNC-43/CaMKII regulate neuromuscular junction morphology.

    PubMed

    Caylor, Raymond C; Jin, Yishi; Ackley, Brian D

    2013-05-10

    The conserved Caenorhabditis elegans proteins NID-1/nidogen and PTP-3A/LAR-RPTP function to efficiently localize the presynaptic scaffold protein SYD-2/α-liprin at active zones. Loss of function in these molecules results in defects in the size, morphology and spacing of neuromuscular junctions. Here we show that the Cav2-like voltage-gated calcium channel (VGCC) proteins, UNC-2 and UNC-36, and the calmodulin kinase II (CaMKII), UNC-43, function to regulate the size and morphology of presynaptic domains in C. elegans. Loss of function in unc-2, unc-36 or unc-43 resulted in slightly larger GABAergic neuromuscular junctions (NMJs), but could suppress the synaptic morphology defects found in nid-1/nidogen or ptp-3/LAR mutants. A gain-of-function mutation in unc-43 caused defects similar to those found in nid-1 mutants. Mutations in egl-19, Cav1-like, or cca-1, Cav3-like, α1 subunits, or the second α2/δ subunit, tag-180, did not suppress nid-1, suggesting a specific interaction between unc-2 and the synaptic extracellular matrix (ECM) component nidogen. Using a synaptic vesicle marker in time-lapse microscopy studies, we observed GABAergic motor neurons adding NMJ-like structures during late larval development. The synaptic bouton addition appeared to form in at least two ways: (1) de novo formation, where a cluster of vesicles appeared to coalesce, or (2) when a single punctum became enlarged and then divided to form two discrete fluorescent puncta. In comparison to wild type animals, we found unc-2 mutants exhibited reduced NMJ dynamics, with fewer observed divisions during a similar stage of development. We identified UNC-2/UNC-36 VGCCs and UNC-43/CaMKII as regulators of C. elegans synaptogenesis. UNC-2 has a modest role in synapse formation, but a broader role in regulating dynamic changes in the size and morphology of synapses that occur during organismal development. During the late 4th larval stage (L4), wild type animals exhibit synaptic morphologies that

  4. The Caenorhabditis elegans voltage-gated calcium channel subunits UNC-2 and UNC-36 and the calcium-dependent kinase UNC-43/CaMKII regulate neuromuscular junction morphology

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The conserved Caenorhabditis elegans proteins NID-1/nidogen and PTP-3A/LAR-RPTP function to efficiently localize the presynaptic scaffold protein SYD-2/α-liprin at active zones. Loss of function in these molecules results in defects in the size, morphology and spacing of neuromuscular junctions. Results Here we show that the Cav2-like voltage-gated calcium channel (VGCC) proteins, UNC-2 and UNC-36, and the calmodulin kinase II (CaMKII), UNC-43, function to regulate the size and morphology of presynaptic domains in C. elegans. Loss of function in unc-2, unc-36 or unc-43 resulted in slightly larger GABAergic neuromuscular junctions (NMJs), but could suppress the synaptic morphology defects found in nid-1/nidogen or ptp-3/LAR mutants. A gain-of-function mutation in unc-43 caused defects similar to those found in nid-1 mutants. Mutations in egl-19, Cav1-like, or cca-1, Cav3-like, α1 subunits, or the second α2/δ subunit, tag-180, did not suppress nid-1, suggesting a specific interaction between unc-2 and the synaptic extracellular matrix (ECM) component nidogen. Using a synaptic vesicle marker in time-lapse microscopy studies, we observed GABAergic motor neurons adding NMJ-like structures during late larval development. The synaptic bouton addition appeared to form in at least two ways: (1) de novo formation, where a cluster of vesicles appeared to coalesce, or (2) when a single punctum became enlarged and then divided to form two discrete fluorescent puncta. In comparison to wild type animals, we found unc-2 mutants exhibited reduced NMJ dynamics, with fewer observed divisions during a similar stage of development. Conclusions We identified UNC-2/UNC-36 VGCCs and UNC-43/CaMKII as regulators of C. elegans synaptogenesis. UNC-2 has a modest role in synapse formation, but a broader role in regulating dynamic changes in the size and morphology of synapses that occur during organismal development. During the late 4th larval stage (L4), wild type animals

  5. Sinomenine protects against ischaemic brain injury: involvement of co-inhibition of acid-sensing ion channel 1a and L-type calcium channels

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wen-Ning; Wu, Peng-Fei; Chen, Xiang-Long; Zhang, Zui; Gu, Jun; Yang, Yuan-Jian; Xiong, Qiu-Ju; Ni, Lan; Wang, Fang; Chen, Jian-Guo

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Sinomenine (SN), a bioactive alkaloid, has been utilized clinically to treat rheumatoid arthritis in China. Our preliminary experiments indicated that it could protect PC12 cells from oxygen-glucose deprivation-reperfusion (OGD-R), we thus investigated the possible effects of SN on cerebral ischaemia and the related mechanism. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Middle cerebral artery occlusion in rats was used as an animal model of ischaemic stroke in vivo. The mechanisms of the effects of SN were investigated in vitro using whole-cell patch-clamp recording, calcium imaging in PC12 cells and rat cortical neurons subjected to OGD-R. KEY RESULTS Pretreatment with SN (10 and 30 mg·kg−1, i.p.) significantly decreased brain infarction and the overactivation of calcium-mediated events in rats subjected to 2 h ischaemia followed by 24 h reperfusion. Extracellular application of SN inhibited the currents mediated by acid-sensing ion channel 1a and L-type voltage-gated calcium channels, in the rat cultured neurons, in a concentration-dependent manner. These inhibitory effects contribute to the neuroprotection of SN against OGD-R and extracellular acidosis-induced cytotoxicity. More importantly, administration of SN (30 mg·kg−1, i.p.) at 1 and 2 h after cerebral ischaemia also decreased brain infarction and improved functional recovery. CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS SN exerts potent protective effects against ischaemic brain injury when administered before ischaemia or even after the injury. The inhibitory effects of SN on acid-sensing ion channel 1a and L-type calcium channels are involved in this neuroprotection. PMID:21585344

  6. Voltage-gated ion channels in dendrites of hippocampal pyramidal neurons.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xixi; Johnston, Daniel

    2006-12-01

    The properties and distribution of voltage-gated ion channels contribute to electrical signaling in neuronal dendrites. The apical dendrites of CA1 pyramidal neurons in hippocampus express a wide variety of sodium, calcium, potassium, and other voltage-gated channels. In this report, we provide some new evidence for the role of the delayed-rectifier K(+) channel in shaping the dendritic action potential at different membrane potentials.

  7. AKAP-anchored PKA maintains neuronal L-type calcium channel activity and NFAT transcriptional signaling.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Jonathan G; Sanderson, Jennifer L; Gorski, Jessica A; Scott, John D; Catterall, William A; Sather, William A; Dell'Acqua, Mark L

    2014-06-12

    L-type voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (LTCC) couple neuronal excitation to gene transcription. LTCC activity is elevated by the cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase (PKA) and depressed by the Ca2+-dependent phosphatase calcineurin (CaN), and both enzymes are localized to the channel by A-kinase anchoring protein 79/150 (AKAP79/150). AKAP79/150 anchoring of CaN also promotes LTCC activation of transcription through dephosphorylation of the nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT). We report here that the basal activity of AKAP79/150-anchored PKA maintains neuronal LTCC coupling to CaN-NFAT signaling by preserving LTCC phosphorylation in opposition to anchored CaN. Genetic disruption of AKAP-PKA anchoring promoted redistribution of the kinase out of postsynaptic dendritic spines, profound decreases in LTCC phosphorylation and Ca2+ influx, and impaired NFAT movement to the nucleus and activation of transcription. Thus, LTCC-NFAT transcriptional signaling in neurons requires precise organization and balancing of PKA and CaN activities in the channel nanoenvironment, which is only made possible by AKAP79/150 scaffolding.

  8. AKAP-Anchored PKA Maintains Neuronal L-type Calcium Channel Activity and NFAT Transcriptional Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Jonathan G.; Sanderson, Jennifer L.; Gorski, Jessica A.; Scott, John D.; Catterall, William A.; Sather, William A.; Dell’Acqua, Mark L.

    2014-01-01

    Summary In neurons, Ca2+ influx through L-type voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (LTCC) couples electrical activity to changes in transcription. LTCC activity is elevated by the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) and depressed by the Ca2+-dependent phosphatase calcineurin (CaN), with both enzymes localized to the channel by A-kinase anchoring protein (AKAP) 79/150. AKAP79/150 anchoring of CaN also promotes LTCC activation of transcription through dephosphorylation of the nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT). We report here that genetic disruption of PKA anchoring to AKAP79/150 also interferes with LTCC activation of CaN-NFAT signaling in neurons. Disruption of AKAP-PKA anchoring promoted redistribution of the kinase out of dendritic spines, profound decreases in LTCC phosphorylation and Ca2+ influx, and impaired NFAT movement to the nucleus and activation of transcription. Our findings support a model wherein basal activity of AKAP79/150-anchored PKA opposes CaN to preserve LTCC phosphorylation, thereby sustaining LTCC activation of CaN-NFAT signaling to the neuronal nucleus. PMID:24835999

  9. Hysteresis in voltage-gated channels.

    PubMed

    Villalba-Galea, Carlos A

    2016-09-30

    Ion channels constitute a superfamily of membrane proteins found in all living creatures. Their activity allows fast translocation of ions across the plasma membrane down the ion's transmembrane electrochemical gradient, resulting in a difference in electrical potential across the plasma membrane, known as the membrane potential. A group within this superfamily, namely voltage-gated channels, displays activity that is sensitive to the membrane potential. The activity of voltage-gated channels is controlled by the membrane potential, while the membrane potential is changed by these channels' activity. This interplay produces variations in the membrane potential that have evolved into electrical signals in many organisms. These signals are essential for numerous biological processes, including neuronal activity, insulin release, muscle contraction, fertilization and many others. In recent years, the activity of the voltage-gated channels has been observed not to follow a simple relationship with the membrane potential. Instead, it has been shown that the activity of voltage-gated channel displays hysteresis. In fact, a growing number of evidence have demonstrated that the voltage dependence of channel activity is dynamically modulated by activity itself. In spite of the great impact that this property can have on electrical signaling, hysteresis in voltage-gated channels is often overlooked. Addressing this issue, this review provides examples of voltage-gated ion channels displaying hysteretic behavior. Further, this review will discuss how Dynamic Voltage Dependence in voltage-gated channels can have a physiological role in electrical signaling. Furthermore, this review will elaborate on the current thoughts on the mechanism underlying hysteresis in voltage-gated channels.

  10. Inactivation of Gating Currents of L-Type Calcium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Shirokov, Roman; Ferreira, Gonzalo; Yi, Jianxun; Ríos, Eduardo

    1998-01-01

    In studies of gating currents of rabbit cardiac Ca channels expressed as α1C/β2a or α1C/β2a/α2δ subunit combinations in tsA201 cells, we found that long-lasting depolarization shifted the distribution of mobile charge to very negative potentials. The phenomenon has been termed charge interconversion in native skeletal muscle (Brum, G., and E. Ríos. 1987. J. Physiol. (Camb.). 387:489–517) and cardiac Ca channels (Shirokov, R., R. Levis, N. Shirokova, and E. Ríos. 1992. J. Gen. Physiol. 99:863–895). Charge 1 (voltage of half-maximal transfer, V1/2 ≃ 0 mV) gates noninactivated channels, while charge 2 (V1/2 ≃ −90 mV) is generated in inactivated channels. In α1C/β2a cells, the available charge 1 decreased upon inactivating depolarization with a time constant τ ≃ 8, while the available charge 2 decreased upon recovery from inactivation (at −200 mV) with τ ≃ 0.3 s. These processes therefore are much slower than charge movement, which takes <50 ms. This separation between the time scale of measurable charge movement and that of changes in their availability, which was even wider in the presence of α2δ, implies that charges 1 and 2 originate from separate channel modes. Because clear modal separation characterizes slow (C-type) inactivation of Na and K channels, this observation establishes the nature of voltage-dependent inactivation of L-type Ca channels as slow or C-type. The presence of the α2δ subunit did not change the V1/2 of charge 2, but sped up the reduction of charge 1 upon inactivation at 40 mV (to τ ≃ 2 s), while slowing the reduction of charge 2 upon recovery (τ ≃ 2 s). The observations were well simulated with a model that describes activation as continuous electrodiffusion (Levitt, D. 1989. Biophys. J. 55:489–498) and inactivation as discrete modal change. The effects of α2δ are reproduced assuming that the subunit lowers the free energy of the inactivated mode. PMID:9607938

  11. Role of voltage-gated calcium channels in the regulation of aldosterone production from zona glomerulosa cells of the adrenal cortex.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Paula Q; Guagliardo, Nick A; Klein, Peter M; Hu, Changlong; Breault, David T; Beenhakker, Mark P

    2016-10-15

    Zona glomerulosa cells (ZG) of the adrenal gland constantly integrate fluctuating ionic, hormonal and paracrine signals to control the synthesis and secretion of aldosterone. These signals modulate Ca(2+) levels, which provide the critical second messenger to drive steroid hormone production. Angiotensin II is a hormone known to modulate the activity of voltage-dependent L- and T-type Ca(2+) channels that are expressed on the plasma membrane of ZG cells in many species. Because the ZG cell maintains a resting membrane voltage of approximately -85 mV and has been considered electrically silent, low voltage-activated T-type Ca(2+) channels are assumed to provide the primary Ca(2+) signal that drives aldosterone production. However, this view has recently been challenged by human genetic studies identifying somatic gain-of-function mutations in L-type CaV 1.3 channels in aldosterone-producing adenomas of patients with primary hyperaldosteronism. We provide a review of these assumptions and challenges, and update our understanding of the state of the ZG cell in a layer in which native cellular associations are preserved. This updated view of Ca(2+) signalling in ZG cells provides a unifying mechanism that explains how transiently activating CaV 3.2 channels can generate a significant and recurring Ca(2+) signal, and how CaV 1.3 channels may contribute to the Ca(2+) signal that drives aldosterone production.

  12. Altered expression of the voltage-gated calcium channel subunit α2δ-1: A comparison between two experimental models of epilepsy and a sensory nerve ligation model of neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Nieto-Rostro, M.; Sandhu, G.; Bauer, C.S.; Jiruska, P.; Jefferys, J.G.R.; Dolphin, A.C.

    2014-01-01

    The auxiliary α2δ-1 subunit of voltage-gated calcium channels is up-regulated in dorsal root ganglion neurons following peripheral somatosensory nerve damage, in several animal models of neuropathic pain. The α2δ-1 protein has a mainly presynaptic localization, where it is associated with the calcium channels involved in neurotransmitter release. Relevant to the present study, α2δ-1 has been shown to be the therapeutic target of the gabapentinoid drugs in their alleviation of neuropathic pain. These drugs are also used in the treatment of certain epilepsies. In this study we therefore examined whether the level or distribution of α2δ-1 was altered in the hippocampus following experimental induction of epileptic seizures in rats, using both the kainic acid model of human temporal lobe epilepsy, in which status epilepticus is induced, and the tetanus toxin model in which status epilepticus is not involved. The main finding of this study is that we did not identify somatic overexpression of α2δ-1 in hippocampal neurons in either of the epilepsy models, unlike the upregulation of α2δ-1 that occurs following peripheral nerve damage to both somatosensory and motor neurons. However, we did observe local reorganization of α2δ-1 immunostaining in the hippocampus only in the kainic acid model, where it was associated with areas of neuronal cell loss, as indicated by absence of NeuN immunostaining, dendritic loss, as identified by areas where microtubule-associated protein-2 immunostaining was missing, and reactive gliosis, determined by regions of strong OX42 staining. PMID:24641886

  13. Dorsal root ganglion neurons become hyperexcitable and increase expression of voltage-gated T-type calcium channels (Cav3.2) in paclitaxel-induced peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Tatsui, Claudio Esteves; Rhines, Laurence D; North, Robert Y; Harrison, Daniel S; Cassidy, Ryan M; Johansson, Caj A; Kosturakis, Alyssa K; Edwards, Denaya D; Zhang, Hongmei; Dougherty, Patrick M

    2017-03-01

    Here, it is shown that paclitaxel-induced neuropathy is associated with the development of spontaneous activity (SA) and hyperexcitability in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons that is paralleled by increased expression of low-voltage-activated calcium channels (T-type; Cav3.2). The percentage of DRG neurons showing SA and the overall mean rate of SA were significantly higher at day 7 in rats receiving paclitaxel treatment than in rats receiving vehicle. Cav3.2 expression was increased in L4-L6 DRG and spinal cord segments in paclitaxel-treated rats, localized to small calcitonin gene-related peptide and isolectin B4 expressing DRG neurons and to glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive spinal cord cells. Cav3.2 expression was also co-localized with toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in both the DRG and the dorsal horn. T-type current amplitudes and density were increased at day 7 after paclitaxel treatment. Perfusion of the TLR4 agonist lipopolysaccharide directly activated DRG neurons, whereas this was prevented by pretreatment with the specific T-type calcium channel inhibitor ML218 hydrochloride. Paclitaxel-induced behavioral hypersensitivity to mechanical stimuli in rats was prevented but not reversed by spinal administration of ML218 hydrochloride or intravenous injection of the TLR4 antagonist TAK242. Paclitaxel induced inward current and action potential discharges in cultured human DRG neurons, and this was blocked by ML218 hydrochloride pretreatment. Furthermore, ML218 hydrochloride decreased firing frequency in human DRG, where spontaneous action potentials were present. In summary, Cav3.2 in concert with TLR4 in DRG neurons appears to contribute to paclitaxel-induced neuropathy.

  14. Intracellular calcium elevation during plateau potentials mediated by extrasynaptic NMDA receptor activation in rat hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons is primarily due to calcium entry through voltage-gated calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Oda, Yoshiaki; Kodama, Satoshi; Tsuchiya, Sadahiro; Inoue, Masashi; Miyakawa, Hiroyoshi

    2014-05-01

    We reported previously that plateau potentials mediated by extrasynaptic N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) can be induced either by synaptic stimulation in the presence of glutamate transporter antagonist or by iontophoresis of NMDA in rat hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons. To examine whether the plateau potentials are accompanied by an elevation of intracellular Ca2+ and to determine the source of Ca2+ elevation, we performed Ca2+ imaging during the plateau potential. Neurons were loaded with Ca2+ indicator fluo-4, and the plateau potentials were generated either synaptically in the presence of glutamate transporter antagonist or by iontophoretically applying NMDA. We have found that a transient elevation in intracellular Ca2+ accompanies the plateau potential. The synaptically induced plateau potential and the Ca2+ elevation were blocked by 5,7-dichlorokynurenic acid (5,7-dCK), an antagonist for the glycine-binding sites of NMDAR. A mixture of Cd2+ and tetrodotoxin did not block NMDA-induced plateau potentials, but completely abolished the accompanying Ca2+ elevation in both the presence and absence of Mg2+ ions in the bathing solution. The NMDA-induced plateau potential was blocked by further adding 5,7-dCK. Our results show that the NMDAR-mediated plateau potential is accompanied by elevation of intracellular Ca2+ that is primarily caused by the influx of Ca2+ through voltage-gated Ca2+ channels. © 2014 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Activity of Palythoa caribaeorum Venom on Voltage-Gated Ion Channels in Mammalian Superior Cervical Ganglion Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Lazcano-Pérez, Fernando; Castro, Héctor; Arenas, Isabel; García, David E.; González-Muñoz, Ricardo; Arreguín-Espinosa, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    The Zoanthids are an order of cnidarians whose venoms and toxins have been poorly studied. Palythoa caribaeorum is a zoanthid commonly found around the Mexican coastline. In this study, we tested the activity of P. caribaeorum venom on voltage-gated sodium channel (NaV1.7), voltage-gated calcium channel (CaV2.2), the A-type transient outward (IA) and delayed rectifier (IDR) currents of KV channels of the superior cervical ganglion (SCG) neurons of the rat. These results showed that the venom reversibly delays the inactivation process of voltage-gated sodium channels and inhibits voltage-gated calcium and potassium channels in this mammalian model. The compounds responsible for these effects seem to be low molecular weight peptides. Together, these results provide evidence for the potential use of zoanthids as a novel source of cnidarian toxins active on voltage-gated ion channels. PMID:27164140

  16. Tryptophan hydroxylase is modulated by L-type calcium channels in the rat pineal gland.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Roseli; Scialfa, Julieta Helena; Terra, Ilza Mingarini; Cipolla-Neto, José; Simonneaux, Valérie; Afeche, Solange Castro

    2008-02-27

    Calcium is an important second messenger in the rat pineal gland, as well as cAMP. They both contribute to melatonin synthesis mediated by the three main enzymes of the melatonin synthesis pathway: tryptophan hydroxylase, arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase and hydroxyindole-O-methyltransferase. The cytosolic calcium is elevated in pinealocytes following alpha(1)-adrenergic stimulation, through IP(3)-and membrane calcium channels activation. Nifedipine, an L-type calcium channel blocker, reduces melatonin synthesis in rat pineal glands in vitro. With the purpose of investigating the mechanisms involved in melatonin synthesis regulation by the L-type calcium channel, we studied the effects of nifedipine on noradrenergic stimulated cultured rat pineal glands. Tryptophan hydroxylase, arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase and hydroxyindole-O-methyltransferase activities were quantified by radiometric assays and 5-hydroxytryptophan, serotonin, N-acetylserotonin and melatonin contents were quantified by HPLC with electrochemical detection. The data showed that calcium influx blockaded by nifedipine caused a decrease in tryptophan hydroxylase activity, but did not change either arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase or hydroxyindole-O-methyltransferase activities. Moreover, there was a reduction of 5-hydroxytryptophan, serotonin, N-acetylserotonin and melatonin intracellular content, as well as a reduction of serotonin and melatonin secretion. Thus, it seems that the calcium influx through L-type high voltage-activated calcium channels is essential for the full activation of tryptophan hydroxylase leading to melatonin synthesis in the pineal gland.

  17. Gating mechanisms of voltage-gated proton channels.

    PubMed

    Okamura, Yasushi; Fujiwara, Yuichiro; Sakata, Souhei

    2015-01-01

    Hv1 is a voltage-gated proton-selective channel that plays critical parts in host defense, sperm motility, and cancer progression. Hv1 contains a conserved voltage-sensor domain (VSD) that is shared by a large family of voltage-gated ion channels, but it lacks a pore domain. Voltage sensitivity and proton conductivity are conferred by a unitary VSD that consists of four transmembrane helices. The architecture of Hv1 differs from that of cation channels that form a pore in the center among multiple subunits (as in most cation channels) or homologous repeats (as in voltage-gated sodium and calcium channels). Hv1 forms a dimer in which a cytoplasmic coiled coil underpins the two protomers and forms a single, long helix that is contiguous with S4, the transmembrane voltage-sensing segment. The closed-state structure of Hv1 was recently solved using X-ray crystallography. In this article, we discuss the gating mechanism of Hv1 and focus on cooperativity within dimers and their sensitivity to metal ions.

  18. The Fabry disease-associated lipid Lyso-Gb3 enhances voltage-gated calcium currents in sensory neurons and causes pain.

    PubMed

    Choi, L; Vernon, J; Kopach, O; Minett, M S; Mills, K; Clayton, P T; Meert, T; Wood, J N

    2015-05-06

    Fabry disease is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder characterised by accumulation of glycosphingolipids, and accompanied by clinical manifestations, such as cardiac disorders, renal failure, pain and peripheral neuropathy. Globotriaosylsphingosine (lyso-Gb3), a deacylated form of globotriaosylceramide (Gb3), has emerged as a marker of Fabry disease. We investigated the link between Gb3, lyso-Gb3 and pain. Plantar administration of lyso-Gb3 or Gb3 caused mechanical allodynia in healthy mice. In vitro application of 100nM lyso-Gb3 caused uptake of extracellular calcium in 10% of sensory neurons expressing nociceptor markers, rising to 40% of neurons at 1μM, a concentration that may occur in Fabry disease patients. Peak current densities of voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels were substantially enhanced by application of 1μM lyso-Gb3. These studies suggest a direct role for lyso-Gb3 in the sensitisation of peripheral nociceptive neurons that may provide an opportunity for therapeutic intervention in the treatment of Fabry disease-associated pain.

  19. Functional importance of T-type voltage-gated calcium channels in the cardiovascular and renal system: news from the world of knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Pernille B L

    2015-02-15

    Over the years, it has been discussed whether T-type calcium channels Cav3 play a role in the cardiovascular and renal system. T-type channels have been reported to play an important role in renal hemodynamics, contractility of resistance vessels, and pacemaker activity in the heart. However, the lack of highly specific blockers cast doubt on the conclusions. As new T-type channel antagonists are being designed, the roles of T-type channels in cardiovascular and renal pathology need to be elucidated before T-type blockers can be clinically useful. Two types of T-type channels, Cav3.1 and Cav3.2, are expressed in blood vessels, the kidney, and the heart. Studies with gene-deficient mice have provided a way to investigate the Cav3.1 and Cav3.2 channels and their role in the cardiovascular system. This review discusses the results from these knockout mice. Evaluation of the literature leads to the conclusion that Cav3.1 and Cav3.2 channels have important, but different, functions in mice. T-type Cav3.1 channels affect heart rate, whereas Cav3.2 channels are involved in cardiac hypertrophy. In the vascular system, Cav3.2 activation leads to dilation of blood vessels, whereas Cav3.1 channels are mainly suggested to affect constriction. The Cav3.1 channel is also involved in neointima formation following vascular damage. In the kidney, Cav3.1 regulates plasma flow and Cav3.2 plays a role setting glomerular filtration rate. In conclusion, Cav3.1 and Cav3.2 are new therapeutic targets in several cardiovascular pathologies, but the use of T-type blockers should be specifically directed to the disease and to the channel subtype.

  20. Cytoplasmic Location of α1A Voltage-Gated Calcium Channel C-Terminal Fragment (Cav2.1-CTF) Aggregate Is Sufficient to Cause Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Makoto; Obayashi, Masato; Ishiguro, Taro; Sato, Nozomu; Niimi, Yusuke; Ozaki, Kokoro; Mogushi, Kaoru; Mahmut, Yasen; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Tsuruta, Fuminori; Dolmetsch, Ricardo; Yamada, Mitsunori; Takahashi, Hitoshi; Kato, Takeo; Mori, Osamu; Eishi, Yoshinobu; Mizusawa, Hidehiro; Ishikawa, Kinya

    2013-01-01

    The human α1A voltage-dependent calcium channel (Cav2.1) is a pore-forming essential subunit embedded in the plasma membrane. Its cytoplasmic carboxyl(C)-tail contains a small poly-glutamine (Q) tract, whose length is normally 4∼19 Q, but when expanded up to 20∼33Q, the tract causes an autosomal-dominant neurodegenerative disorder, spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6). A recent study has shown that a 75-kDa C-terminal fragment (CTF) containing the polyQ tract remains soluble in normal brains, but becomes insoluble mainly in the cytoplasm with additional localization to the nuclei of human SCA6 Purkinje cells. However, the mechanism by which the CTF aggregation leads to neurodegeneration is completely elusive, particularly whether the CTF exerts more toxicity in the nucleus or in the cytoplasm. We tagged recombinant (r)CTF with either nuclear-localization or nuclear-export signal, created doxycyclin-inducible rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cell lines, and found that the CTF is more toxic in the cytoplasm than in the nucleus, the observations being more obvious with Q28 (disease range) than with Q13 (normal-length). Surprisingly, the CTF aggregates co-localized both with cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) and phosphorylated-CREB (p-CREB) in the cytoplasm, and Western blot analysis showed that the quantity of CREB and p-CREB were both decreased in the nucleus when the rCTF formed aggregates in the cytoplasm. In human brains, polyQ aggregates also co-localized with CREB in the cytoplasm of SCA6 Purkinje cells, but not in other conditions. Collectively, the cytoplasmic Cav2.1-CTF aggregates are sufficient to cause cell death, and one of the pathogenic mechanisms may be abnormal CREB trafficking in the cytoplasm and reduced CREB and p-CREB levels in the nuclei. PMID:23505410

  1. Spinal morphine but not ziconotide or gabapentin analgesia is affected by alternative splicing of voltage-gated calcium channel CaV2.2 pre-mRNA.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yu-Qiu; Andrade, Arturo; Lipscombe, Diane

    2013-12-26

    Presynaptic voltage-gated calcium Ca(V)2.2 channels play a privileged role in spinal level sensitization following peripheral nerve injury. Direct and indirect inhibitors of Ca(V)2.2 channel activity in spinal dorsal horn are analgesic in chronic pain states. Ca(V)2.2 channels represent a family of splice isoforms that are expressed in different combinations according to cell-type. A pair of mutually exclusive exons in the Ca(V)2.2 encoding Cacna1b gene, e37a and e37b, differentially influence morphine analgesia. In mice that lack exon e37a, which is enriched in nociceptors, the analgesic efficacy of intrathecal morphine against noxious thermal stimuli is reduced. Here we ask if sequences unique to e37a influence: the development of abnormal thermal and mechanical sensitivity associated with peripheral nerve injury; and the actions of two other classes of analgesics that owe part or all of their efficacy to Ca(V)2.2 channel inhibition. We find that: i) the analgesic efficacy of morphine, but not ziconotide or gabapentin, is reduced in mice lacking e37a, ii) the induction and maintenance of behaviors associated with sensitization that accompany peripheral nerve injury, do not require e37a-specific sequence, iii) intrathecal morphine, but not ziconotide or gabapentin analgesia to thermal stimuli is significantly lower in wild-type mice after peripheral nerve injury, iv) the analgesic efficacy of ziconotide and gabapentin to mechanical stimuli is reduced following nerve injury, and iv) intrathecal morphine analgesia to thermal stimuli in mice lacking e37a is not further reduced by peripheral nerve injury. Our findings show that the analgesic action of morphine, but not ziconotide or gabapentin, to thermal stimuli is linked to which Cacna1b exon, e37a or e37b, is selected during alternative pre-mRNA splicing.

  2. Novel mechanism of voltage-gated N-type (Cav2.2) calcium channel inhibition revealed through α-conotoxin Vc1.1 activation of the GABA(B) receptor.

    PubMed

    Huynh, Thuan G; Cuny, Hartmut; Slesinger, Paul A; Adams, David J

    2015-02-01

    Neuronal voltage-gated N-type (Cav2.2) calcium channels are expressed throughout the nervous system and regulate neurotransmitter release and hence synaptic transmission. They are predominantly modulated via G protein-coupled receptor activated pathways, and the well characterized Gβγ subunits inhibit Cav2.2 currents. Analgesic α-conotoxin Vc1.1, a peptide from predatory marine cone snail venom, inhibits Cav2.2 channels by activating pertussis toxin-sensitive Gi/o proteins via the GABAB receptor (GABA(B)R) and potently suppresses pain in rat models. Using a heterologous GABA(B)R expression system, electrophysiology, and mutagenesis, we showed α-conotoxin Vc1.1 modulates Cav2.2 via a different pathway from that of the GABA(B)R agonists GABA and baclofen. In contrast to GABA and baclofen, Vc1.1 changes Cav2.2 channel kinetics by increasing the rate of activation and shifting its half-maximum inactivation to a more hyperpolarized potential. We then systematically truncated the GABA(B)(1a) C terminus and discovered that removing the proximal carboxyl terminus of the GABA(B)(1a) subunit significantly reduced Vc1.1 inhibition of Cav2.2 currents. We propose a novel mechanism by which Vc1.1 activates GABA(B)R and requires the GABA(B)(1a) proximal carboxyl terminus domain to inhibit Cav2.2 channels. These findings provide important insights into how GABA(B)Rs mediate Cav2.2 channel inhibition and alter nociceptive transmission. Copyright © 2015 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  3. The CaVβ Subunit Protects the I-II Loop of the Voltage-gated Calcium Channel CaV2.2 from Proteasomal Degradation but Not Oligoubiquitination*

    PubMed Central

    Page, Karen M.; Rothwell, Simon W.; Dolphin, Annette C.

    2016-01-01

    CaVβ subunits interact with the voltage-gated calcium channel CaV2.2 on a site in the intracellular loop between domains I and II (the I-II loop). This interaction influences the biophysical properties of the channel and leads to an increase in its trafficking to the plasma membrane. We have shown previously that a mutant CaV2.2 channel that is unable to bind CaVβ subunits (CaV2.2 W391A) was rapidly degraded (Waithe, D., Ferron, L., Page, K. M., Chaggar, K., and Dolphin, A. C. (2011) J. Biol. Chem. 286, 9598–9611). Here we show that, in the absence of CaVβ subunits, a construct consisting of the I-II loop of CaV2.2 was directly ubiquitinated and degraded by the proteasome system. Ubiquitination could be prevented by mutation of all 12 lysine residues in the I-II loop to arginines. Including a palmitoylation motif at the N terminus of CaV2.2 I-II loop was insufficient to target it to the plasma membrane in the absence of CaVβ subunits even when proteasomal degradation was inhibited with MG132 or ubiquitination was prevented by the lysine-to-arginine mutations. In the presence of CaVβ subunit, the palmitoylated CaV2.2 I-II loop was protected from degradation, although oligoubiquitination could still occur, and was efficiently trafficked to the plasma membrane. We propose that targeting to the plasma membrane requires a conformational change in the I-II loop that is induced by binding of the CaVβ subunit. PMID:27489103

  4. Beta-escin diminishes voltage-gated calcium current rundown in perforated patch-clamp recordings from rat primary afferent neurons.

    PubMed

    Sarantopoulos, Constantine; McCallum, J Bruce; Kwok, Wai-Meng; Hogan, Quinn

    2004-10-15

    Perforated patch recordings of neuronal calcium currents (I(Ca)) with amphotericin B or nystatin reduce dialysis of intracellular constituents and current rundown, but can be difficult and frequently unsuccessful. We investigated the saponin beta-escin as a putative ionophore for perforated patch I(Ca) recordings in acutely dissociated, rat dorsal root ganglion neurons. I(Ca) was recorded in time-course studies after including either beta-escin (50 microM), or amphotericin B (240 microg/ml) as perforating ionophores in the internal pipette solution, in comparison to standard ruptured-patch technique, using suction. Perforated patches were allowed to take place spontaneously. The percentage loss of I(Ca) per min (within the first 20 min) was significantly less after beta-escin (0.0518%) (n = 18), versus either amphotericin (1.82%) (n = 12) or standard patch (4.52%) (n = 7), (P < 0.001). The slope of the rundown after linear fit was also less after beta-escin (P < 0.001). Minimal "steady-state" access resistance (R(a)) of 6.6 +/- 1.6 MOmega was achieved within 7.1 +/- 9.3 min following perforation with beta-escin, 7.9 +/- 3.5 MOmega within 44 =/- 14 min after amphotericin B, and 6.8 +/- 1.9 MOmega with standard patch (P < 0.05 for R(a), and P < 0.01 for permeabilization time, respectively). Success rates were 59% with beta-escin versus 27% with amphotericin. Leak >10% of peak I(Ca) was present in 25% of cells after beta-escin versus 20% after amphotericin, and 12% after standard technique. Perforated patches using beta-escin were stable for 15-60 min. We conclude that beta-escin may be used as an alternative ionophore for perforated patch-clamp studies in neurons, and results in minimal rundown that can facilitate long-term recordings of I(Ca). Limited rundown may be due to better preservation of cytosolic ATP content.

  5. 5E- and 5Z-farnesylacetones from Sargassum siliquastrum as novel selective L-type calcium channel blockers.

    PubMed

    Shin, Woon-Seob; Oh, Sangtae; An, Sung-Wan; Park, Gab-Man; Kwon, Daeho; Ham, Jungyeob; Lee, Seokjoon; Park, Byong-Gon

    2013-04-01

    A specific blocker of L-type Ca(2+) channels may be useful in decreasing arterial tone by reducing the open-state probability of L-type Ca(2+) channels. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the farnesylacetones, which are major active constituents of Sargassum siliquastrum, regarding their vasodilatation efficacies, selectivities toward L-type Ca(2+) channels, and in vivo antihypertensive activities. The application of 5E-(farnesylacetone 311) or 5Z-farnesylacetone (farnesylacetone 312) induced concentration-dependent vasodilatation effects on the basilar artery that was pre-contracted with depolarization and showed an ignorable potential role of endothelial-derived nitric oxide. We also tested farnesylacetone 311 or 312 to determine their pharmacological profiles for the blockade of native L-type Ca(2+) channels in basilar arterial smooth muscle cells (BASMCs) and ventricular myocytes (VMCs), cloned L- (α1C/β2a/α2δ), N- (α1B/β1b/α2δ), and T-type Ca(2+) channels (α1G, α1H, and α1I). Farnesylacetone 311 or 312 showed greater selectivity toward the L-type Ca(2+) channels among the tested voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels. The ranked order of the potency for farnesylacetone 311 was cloned α1C≒L-type (BASMC)≒L-type (VMCs)>α1B>α1H>α1I>α1G and that for farnesylacetone 312 was cloned α1C≒L-type (BASMCs)≒L-type (VMCs)>α1H>α1G>α1B>α1I. The oral administration of the farnesylacetone 311 (80mg/kg) conferred potent, long-lasting antihypertensive activity in spontaneous hypertensive rats, but it did not alter the heart rate. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. CACNA1D de novo mutations in autism spectrum disorders activate Cav1.3 L-type calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Pinggera, Alexandra; Lieb, Andreas; Benedetti, Bruno; Lampert, Michaela; Monteleone, Stefania; Liedl, Klaus R; Tuluc, Petronel; Striessnig, Jörg

    2015-05-01

    Cav1.3 voltage-gated L-type calcium channels (LTCCs) are part of postsynaptic neuronal signaling networks. They play a key role in brain function, including fear memory and emotional and drug-taking behaviors. A whole-exome sequencing study identified a de novo mutation, p.A749G, in Cav1.3 α1-subunits (CACNA1D), the second main LTCC in the brain, as 1 of 62 high risk-conferring mutations in a cohort of patients with autism and intellectual disability. We screened all published genetic information available from whole-exome sequencing studies and identified a second de novo CACNA1D mutation, p.G407R. Both mutations are present only in the probands and not in their unaffected parents or siblings. We functionally expressed both mutations in tsA-201 cells to study their functional consequences using whole-cell patch-clamp. The mutations p.A749G and p.G407R caused dramatic changes in channel gating by shifting (~15 mV) the voltage dependence for steady-state activation and inactivation to more negative voltages (p.A749G) or by pronounced slowing of current inactivation during depolarizing stimuli (p.G407R). In both cases, these changes are compatible with a gain-of-function phenotype. Our data, together with the discovery that Cav1.3 gain-of-function causes primary aldosteronism with seizures, neurologic abnormalities, and intellectual disability, suggest that Cav1.3 gain-of-function mutations confer a major part of the risk for autism in the two probands and may even cause the disease. Our findings have immediate clinical relevance because blockers of LTCCs are available for therapeutic attempts in affected individuals. Patients should also be explored for other symptoms likely resulting from Cav1.3 hyperactivity, in particular, primary aldosteronism. Copyright © 2015 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Arterial Smooth Muscle Mitochondria Amplify Hydrogen Peroxide Microdomains Functionally Coupled to L-Type Calcium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Chaplin, Nathan L.; Nieves-Cintrón, Madeline; Fresquez, Adriana M.; Navedo, Manuel F.; Amberg, Gregory C.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Mitochondria are key integrators of convergent intracellular signaling pathways. Two important second messengers modulated by mitochondria are calcium and reactive oxygen species. To date, coherent mechanisms describing mitochondrial integration of calcium and oxidative signaling in arterial smooth muscle are incomplete. Objective To address and add clarity to this issue we tested the hypothesis that mitochondria regulate subplasmalemmal calcium and hydrogen peroxide microdomain signaling in cerebral arterial smooth muscle. Methods and Results Using an image-based approach we investigated the impact of mitochondrial regulation of L-type calcium channels on subcellular calcium and ROS signaling microdomains in isolated arterial smooth muscle cells. Our single cell observations were then related experimentally to intact arterial segments and to living animals. We found that subplasmalemmal mitochondrial amplification of hydrogen peroxide microdomain signaling stimulates L-type calcium channels and that this mechanism strongly impacts the functional capacity of the vasoconstrictor angiotensin II. Importantly, we also found that disrupting this mitochondrial amplification mechanism in vivo normalized arterial function and attenuated the hypertensive response to systemic endothelial dysfunction. Conclusions From these observations we conclude that mitochondrial amplification of subplasmalemmal calcium and hydrogen peroxide microdomain signaling is a fundamental mechanism regulating arterial smooth muscle function. As the principle components involved are fairly ubiquitous and positioning of mitochondria near the plasma membrane is not restricted to arterial smooth muscle, this mechanism could occur in many cell types and contribute to pathological elevations of intracellular calcium and increased oxidative stress associated with many diseases. PMID:26390880

  8. Voltage-Gated R-Type Calcium Channel Inhibition via Human μ-, δ-, and κ-opioid Receptors Is Voltage-Independently Mediated by Gβγ Protein Subunits.

    PubMed

    Berecki, Géza; Motin, Leonid; Adams, David J

    2016-01-01

    Elucidating the mechanisms that modulate calcium channels via opioid receptor activation is fundamental to our understanding of both pain perception and how opioids modulate pain. Neuronal voltage-gated N-type calcium channels (Cav2.2) are inhibited by activation of G protein-coupled opioid receptors (ORs). However, inhibition of R-type (Cav2.3) channels by μ- or κ-ORs is poorly defined and has not been reported for δ-ORs. To investigate such interactions, we coexpressed human μ-, δ-, or κ-ORs with human Cav2.3 or Cav2.2 in human embryonic kidney 293 cells and measured depolarization-activated Ba(2+) currents (IBa). Selective agonists of μ-, δ-, and κ-ORs inhibited IBa through Cav2.3 channels by 35%. Cav2.2 channels were inhibited to a similar extent by κ-ORs, but more potently (60%) via μ- and δ-ORs. Antagonists of δ- and κ-ORs potentiated IBa amplitude mediated by Cav2.3 and Cav2.2 channels. Consistent with G protein βγ (Gβγ) interaction, modulation of Cav2.2 was primarily voltage-dependent and transiently relieved by depolarizing prepulses. In contrast, Cav2.3 modulation was voltage-independent and unaffected by depolarizing prepulses. However, Cav2.3 inhibition was sensitive to pertussis toxin and to intracellular application of guanosine 5'-[β-thio]diphosphate trilithium salt and guanosine 5'-[γ-thio]triphosphate tetralithium salt. Coexpression of Gβγ-specific scavengers-namely, the carboxyl terminus of the G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 or membrane-targeted myristoylated-phosducin-attenuated or abolished Cav2.3 modulation. Our study reveals the diversity of OR-mediated signaling at Cav2 channels and identifies neuronal Cav2.3 channels as potential targets for opioid analgesics. Their novel modulation is dependent on pre-existing OR activity and mediated by membrane-delimited Gβγ subunits in a voltage-independent manner.

  9. L-type calcium channels regulate filopodia stability and cancer cell invasion downstream of integrin signalling

    PubMed Central

    Jacquemet, Guillaume; Baghirov, Habib; Georgiadou, Maria; Sihto, Harri; Peuhu, Emilia; Cettour-Janet, Pierre; He, Tao; Perälä, Merja; Kronqvist, Pauliina; Joensuu, Heikki; Ivaska, Johanna

    2016-01-01

    Mounting in vitro, in vivo and clinical evidence suggest an important role for filopodia in driving cancer cell invasion. Using a high-throughput microscopic-based drug screen, we identify FDA-approved calcium channel blockers (CCBs) as potent inhibitors of filopodia formation in cancer cells. Unexpectedly, we discover that L-type calcium channels are functional and frequently expressed in cancer cells suggesting a previously unappreciated role for these channels during tumorigenesis. We further demonstrate that, at filopodia, L-type calcium channels are activated by integrin inside-out signalling, integrin activation and Src. Moreover, L-type calcium channels promote filopodia stability and maturation into talin-rich adhesions through the spatially restricted regulation of calcium entry and subsequent activation of the protease calpain-1. Altogether we uncover a novel and clinically relevant signalling pathway that regulates filopodia formation in cancer cells and propose that cycles of filopodia stabilization, followed by maturation into focal adhesions, directs cancer cell migration and invasion. PMID:27910855

  10. Myoscape controls cardiac calcium cycling and contractility via regulation of L-type calcium channel surface expression.

    PubMed

    Eden, Matthias; Meder, Benjamin; Völkers, Mirko; Poomvanicha, Montatip; Domes, Katrin; Branchereau, M; Marck, P; Will, Rainer; Bernt, Alexander; Rangrez, Ashraf; Busch, Matthias; Hrabě de Angelis, Martin; Heymes, Christophe; Rottbauer, Wolfgang; Most, Patrick; Hofmann, Franz; Frey, Norbert

    2016-04-28

    Calcium signalling plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of heart failure. Here we describe a cardiac protein named Myoscape/FAM40B/STRIP2, which directly interacts with the L-type calcium channel. Knockdown of Myoscape in cardiomyocytes decreases calcium transients associated with smaller Ca(2+) amplitudes and a lower diastolic Ca(2+) content. Likewise, L-type calcium channel currents are significantly diminished on Myoscape ablation, and downregulation of Myoscape significantly reduces contractility of cardiomyocytes. Conversely, overexpression of Myoscape increases global Ca(2+) transients and enhances L-type Ca(2+) channel currents, and is sufficient to restore decreased currents in failing cardiomyocytes. In vivo, both Myoscape-depleted morphant zebrafish and Myoscape knockout (KO) mice display impairment of cardiac function progressing to advanced heart failure. Mechanistically, Myoscape-deficient mice show reduced L-type Ca(2+)currents, cell capacity and calcium current densities as a result of diminished LTCC surface expression. Finally, Myoscape expression is reduced in hearts from patients suffering of terminal heart failure, implying a role in human disease.

  11. Effect of shenmai injection on L-type calcium current of diaphragmatic muscle in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Limin; Xiong, Shengdao; Niu, Ruji; Xu, Yongjian; Zhang, Zhengxiang

    2004-01-01

    In this study, whole cell patch clamp recording technique was employed to investigate the effect of Shenmai Injection (SMI) on L-type calcium current of diaphragmatic muscle in rats. The result showed that when the diaphragmatic muscle cell was held at -80 mV and depolarized to +60 mV, 10 microl/ml, 50 microl/ml and 100 microl/ml SMI enhanced the inner peak L-type calcium current from -(6.8 +/- 0.7) pA/pF (n=7) to -(7.3 +/- 0.8) pA/pF (P>0.05, n=7), -(8.6 +/- 1.0) pA/pF (P<0.05, n=7) and -(9.4 +/- 1.2) pA/pF (P<0.05, n=7), respectively, The rates of L-type calcium current were increased by (7.34 +/- 2.37)%, (25.72 +/- 5.94)%, and (38.16 +/- 7.33)%, respectively. However, it had no significant effect on maximal activation potential and reversal potential. Our results suggested that SMI could activate the calcium channel of the diaphragmatic fibers of the rats, increase the influx of Ca2+, and enhance the contractility of diaphragmatic muscles.

  12. Effect of propionyl-L-carnitine on L-type calcium channels in human heart sarcolemma

    SciTech Connect

    Bevilacqua, M.; Vago, T.; Norbiato, G. )

    1991-02-01

    Propionyl-L-carnitine (PC) protects perfused rat hearts against damage by ischemia-reperfusion. Activation of L-type calcium channel play a role on ischemia-reperfusion damage. Therefore, we studied the effect of PC on some properties of L-type calcium channels in an in vitro preparation from human myocardium sarcolemma (from patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy). Binding of the L-type calcium channel blockers isradipine ({sup 3}H)-PN 200-110 (PN) to plasma membrane preparations revealed a single population of binding sites (total number: Bmax = 213 +/- 34 fM/mg protein and affinity: Kd = 152 +/- 19 nM; n = 6). The characteristics of these binding sites were evaluated in the presence and in the absence of Ca{sup 2}{sup +} and of calcium blockers (D-888, a verapamillike drug, and diltiazem). Incubation in a Ca{sup 2}{sup +}-containing buffer increased the affinity of PN binding sites. Binding sites for PN were modulated by organic calcium channel blockers; in competition isotherms at 37{degree}C, D-888 (desmethoxyverapamil) decreased the PN binding, whereas diltiazem increased it. These results strongly suggest that the site labelled by PN is the voltage-operated calcium channel of the human myocardium. The addition of PC (1 mM) to plasma membranes labelled with PN at 37{degree}C decreased the affinity of the binding; this effect was counteracted by the addition of Ca{sup 2}{sup +} to the medium. This result was consistent with a competition between Ca{sup 2}{sup +} and PC. The effect of PC incubation at 4{degree}C was the opposite; at this temperature PC increased the affinity of the binding sites and the effect was obscured by Ca{sup 2}{sup +}.

  13. L-Type Calcium Channels Are Required for One Form of Hippocampal Mossy Fiber LTP

    PubMed Central

    Kapur, Ajay; Yeckel, Mark F.; Gray, Richard; Johnston, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    The requirement of postsynaptic calcium influx via L-type channels for the induction of long-term potentiation (LTP) of mossy fiber input to CA3 pyramidal neurons was tested for two different patterns of stimulation. Two types of LTP-inducing stimuli were used based on the suggestion that one of them, brief high-frequency stimulation (B-HFS), induces LTP postsynaptically, whereas the other pattern, long high-frequency stimulation (L-HFS), induces mossy fiber LTP presynaptically. To test whether or not calcium influx into CA3 pyramidal neurons is necessary for LTP induced by either pattern of stimulation, nimodipine, a L-type calcium channel antagonist, was added during stimulation. In these experiments nimodipine blocked the induction of mossy fiber LTP when B-HFS was given [34 ± 5% (mean ± SE) increase in control versus 7 ± 4% in nimodipine, P < 0.003]; in contrast, nimodipine did not block the induction of LTP with L-HFS (107 ± 10% in control vs. 80 ± 9% in nimodipine, P > 0.05). Administration of nimodipine after the induction of LTP had no effect on the expression of LTP. In addition, B- and L-HFS delivered directly to commissural/ associational fibers in stratum radiatum failed to induce a N-methyl-d-aspartate-independent form of LTP, obviating the possibility that the presumed mossy fiber LTP resulted from potentiation of other synapses. Nimodipine had no effect on calcium transients recorded from mossy fiber presynaptic terminals evoked with the B-HFS paradigm but reduced postsynaptic calcium transients. Our results support the hypothesis that induction of mossy fiber LTP by B-HFS is mediated postsynaptically and requires entry of calcium through L-type channels into CA3 neurons. PMID:9535977

  14. Mechanism of electromechanical coupling in voltage-gated potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Blunck, Rikard; Batulan, Zarah

    2012-01-01

    Voltage-gated ion channels play a central role in the generation of action potentials in the nervous system. They are selective for one type of ion - sodium, calcium, or potassium. Voltage-gated ion channels are composed of a central pore that allows ions to pass through the membrane and four peripheral voltage sensing domains that respond to changes in the membrane potential. Upon depolarization, voltage sensors in voltage-gated potassium channels (Kv) undergo conformational changes driven by positive charges in the S4 segment and aided by pairwise electrostatic interactions with the surrounding voltage sensor. Structure-function relations of Kv channels have been investigated in detail, and the resulting models on the movement of the voltage sensors now converge to a consensus; the S4 segment undergoes a combined movement of rotation, tilt, and vertical displacement in order to bring 3-4e(+) each through the electric field focused in this region. Nevertheless, the mechanism by which the voltage sensor movement leads to pore opening, the electromechanical coupling, is still not fully understood. Thus, recently, electromechanical coupling in different Kv channels has been investigated with a multitude of techniques including electrophysiology, 3D crystal structures, fluorescence spectroscopy, and molecular dynamics simulations. Evidently, the S4-S5 linker, the covalent link between the voltage sensor and pore, plays a crucial role. The linker transfers the energy from the voltage sensor movement to the pore domain via an interaction with the S6 C-termini, which are pulled open during gating. In addition, other contact regions have been proposed. This review aims to provide (i) an in-depth comparison of the molecular mechanisms of electromechanical coupling in different Kv channels; (ii) insight as to how the voltage sensor and pore domain influence one another; and (iii) theoretical predictions on the movement of the cytosolic face of the Kv channels during gating.

  15. Mechanism of Electromechanical Coupling in Voltage-Gated Potassium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Blunck, Rikard; Batulan, Zarah

    2012-01-01

    Voltage-gated ion channels play a central role in the generation of action potentials in the nervous system. They are selective for one type of ion – sodium, calcium, or potassium. Voltage-gated ion channels are composed of a central pore that allows ions to pass through the membrane and four peripheral voltage sensing domains that respond to changes in the membrane potential. Upon depolarization, voltage sensors in voltage-gated potassium channels (Kv) undergo conformational changes driven by positive charges in the S4 segment and aided by pairwise electrostatic interactions with the surrounding voltage sensor. Structure-function relations of Kv channels have been investigated in detail, and the resulting models on the movement of the voltage sensors now converge to a consensus; the S4 segment undergoes a combined movement of rotation, tilt, and vertical displacement in order to bring 3–4e+ each through the electric field focused in this region. Nevertheless, the mechanism by which the voltage sensor movement leads to pore opening, the electromechanical coupling, is still not fully understood. Thus, recently, electromechanical coupling in different Kv channels has been investigated with a multitude of techniques including electrophysiology, 3D crystal structures, fluorescence spectroscopy, and molecular dynamics simulations. Evidently, the S4–S5 linker, the covalent link between the voltage sensor and pore, plays a crucial role. The linker transfers the energy from the voltage sensor movement to the pore domain via an interaction with the S6 C-termini, which are pulled open during gating. In addition, other contact regions have been proposed. This review aims to provide (i) an in-depth comparison of the molecular mechanisms of electromechanical coupling in different Kv channels; (ii) insight as to how the voltage sensor and pore domain influence one another; and (iii) theoretical predictions on the movement of the cytosolic face of the Kv channels during

  16. Sex-dependent modulation of age-related cognitive decline by the L-type calcium channel gene Cacna1c (Cav 1.2).

    PubMed

    Zanos, Panos; Bhat, Shambhu; Terrillion, Chantelle E; Smith, Robert J; Tonelli, Leonardo H; Gould, Todd D

    2015-10-01

    Increased calcium influx through L-type voltage-gated calcium channels has been implicated in the neuronal dysfunction underlying age-related memory declines. The present study aimed to test the specific role of Cacna1c (which encodes Cav 1.2) in modulating age-related memory dysfunction. Short-term, spatial and contextual/emotional memory was evaluated in young and aged, wild-type as well as mice with one functional copy of Cacna1c (haploinsufficient), using the novel object recognition, Y-maze and passive avoidance tasks, respectively. Hippocampal expression of Cacna1c mRNA was measured by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Ageing was associated with object recognition and contextual/emotional memory deficits, and a significant increase in hippocampal Cacna1c mRNA expression. Cacna1c haploinsufficiency was associated with decreased Cacna1c mRNA expression in both young and old animals. However, haploinsufficient mice did not manifest an age-related increase in expression of this gene. Behaviourally, Cacna1c haploinsufficiency prevented object recognition deficits during ageing in both male and female mice. A significant correlation between higher Cacna1c levels and decreased object recognition performance was observed in both sexes. Also, a sex-dependent protective role of decreased Cacna1c levels in contextual/emotional memory loss has been observed, specifically in male mice. These data provide evidence for an association between increased hippocampal Cacna1c expression and age-related cognitive decline. Additionally, they indicate an interaction between the Cacna1c gene and sex in the modulation of age-related contextual memory declines.

  17. Activation of L-type calcium channels is required for gap junction-mediated intercellular calcium signaling in osteoblastic cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorgensen, Niklas Rye; Teilmann, Stefan Cuoni; Henriksen, Zanne; Civitelli, Roberto; Sorensen, Ole Helmer; Steinberg, Thomas H.

    2003-01-01

    The propagation of mechanically induced intercellular calcium waves (ICW) among osteoblastic cells occurs both by activation of P2Y (purinergic) receptors by extracellular nucleotides, resulting in "fast" ICW, and by gap junctional communication in cells that express connexin43 (Cx43), resulting in "slow" ICW. Human osteoblastic cells transmit intercellular calcium signals by both of these mechanisms. In the current studies we have examined the mechanism of slow gap junction-dependent ICW in osteoblastic cells. In ROS rat osteoblastic cells, gap junction-dependent ICW were inhibited by removal of extracellular calcium, plasma membrane depolarization by high extracellular potassium, and the L-type voltage-operated calcium channel inhibitor, nifedipine. In contrast, all these treatments enhanced the spread of P2 receptor-mediated ICW in UMR rat osteoblastic cells. Using UMR cells transfected to express Cx43 (UMR/Cx43) we confirmed that nifedipine sensitivity of ICW required Cx43 expression. In human osteoblastic cells, gap junction-dependent ICW also required activation of L-type calcium channels and influx of extracellular calcium.

  18. Activation of L-type calcium channels is required for gap junction-mediated intercellular calcium signaling in osteoblastic cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorgensen, Niklas Rye; Teilmann, Stefan Cuoni; Henriksen, Zanne; Civitelli, Roberto; Sorensen, Ole Helmer; Steinberg, Thomas H.

    2003-01-01

    The propagation of mechanically induced intercellular calcium waves (ICW) among osteoblastic cells occurs both by activation of P2Y (purinergic) receptors by extracellular nucleotides, resulting in "fast" ICW, and by gap junctional communication in cells that express connexin43 (Cx43), resulting in "slow" ICW. Human osteoblastic cells transmit intercellular calcium signals by both of these mechanisms. In the current studies we have examined the mechanism of slow gap junction-dependent ICW in osteoblastic cells. In ROS rat osteoblastic cells, gap junction-dependent ICW were inhibited by removal of extracellular calcium, plasma membrane depolarization by high extracellular potassium, and the L-type voltage-operated calcium channel inhibitor, nifedipine. In contrast, all these treatments enhanced the spread of P2 receptor-mediated ICW in UMR rat osteoblastic cells. Using UMR cells transfected to express Cx43 (UMR/Cx43) we confirmed that nifedipine sensitivity of ICW required Cx43 expression. In human osteoblastic cells, gap junction-dependent ICW also required activation of L-type calcium channels and influx of extracellular calcium.

  19. Otilonium bromide inhibits calcium entry through L-type calcium channels in human intestinal smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Strege, P R; Evangelista, S; Lyford, G L; Sarr, M G; Farrugia, G

    2004-04-01

    Otilonium bromide (OB) is used as an intestinal antispasmodic. The mechanism of action of OB is not completely understood. As Ca(2+) entry into intestinal smooth muscle is required to trigger contractile activity, our hypothesis was that OB blocked Ca(2+) entry through L-type Ca(2+) channels. Our aim was to determine the effects of OB on Ca(2+), Na(+) and K(+) ion channels in human jejunal circular smooth muscle cells and on L-type Ca(2+) channels expressed heterologously in HEK293 cells. Whole cell currents were recorded using standard patch clamp techniques. Otilonium bromide (0.09-9 micromol L(-1)) was used as this reproduced clinical intracellular concentrations. In human circular smooth muscle cells, OB inhibited L-type Ca(2+) current by 25% at 0.9 micromol L(-1) and 90% at 9 micromol L(-1). Otilonium bromide had no effect on Na(+) or K(+) currents. In HEK293 cells, 1 micromol L(-1) OB significantly inhibited the expressed L-type Ca(2+) channels. Truncation of the alpha(1C) subunit C and N termini did not block the inhibitory effects of OB. Otilonium bromide inhibited Ca(2+) entry through L-type Ca(2+) at concentrations similar to intestinal tissue levels. This effect may underlie the observed muscle relaxant effects of the drug.

  20. L-Type Calcium Channel blockers and Parkinson’s Disease in Denmark

    PubMed Central

    Ritz, Beate; Rhodes, Shannon L.; Qian, Lei; Schernhammer, Eva; Olsen, Jorgen; Friis, Soren

    2010-01-01

    Objective Investigate L-type calcium channel blockers of the dihydropyridine class for association with Parkinson’s disease because these drugs traverse the blood brain barrier, are potentially neuroprotective, and have previously been evaluated for impact on PD risk. Methods We identified 1,931 patients with a first time diagnosis for PD between 2001 and 2006 as reported in the Danish national hospital/outpatient database and density matched them by birth year and sex to 9,651 controls from the population register. Index date for cases and their corresponding controls was advanced to date of first recorded prescription for anti-Parkinson drugs, if prior to first PD diagnosis in the hospital records. Prescriptions were determined from the national pharmacy database. In our primary analyses, we excluded all calcium channel blockers prescriptions 2-years before index date/PD diagnosis. Results Employing logistic regression analysis adjusting for age, sex, diagnosis of chronic pulmonary obstructive disorder, and Charlson co-morbidity score we found that subjects prescribed centrally acting calcium channel blockers (excludes amlodipine) between 1995 and two years prior to the index date were less likely to develop Parkinson’s disease (Odds Ratio 0.73; 95% Confidence Interval 0.54-0.97); this 27% risk reduction did not differ with length or intensity of use. Risk estimates were close to null for the peripherally acting drug amlodipine and for other antihypertensive medications. Interpretation Our data suggest a potential neuroprotective role for centrally acting L-type calcium channel blockers of the dihydropyridine class in PD that should be further investigated in studies that can distinguish between types of L-Type channel blockers. PMID:20437557

  1. Novel 1, 4-dihydropyridines for L-type calcium channel as antagonists for cadmium toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Saddala, Madhu Sudhana; Kandimalla, Ramesh; Adi, Pradeepkiran Jangampalli; Bhashyam, Sainath Sri; Asupatri, Usha Rani

    2017-01-01

    The present study, we design and synthesize the novel dihydropyridine derivatives, i.e., 3 (a-e) and 5 (a-e) and evaluated, anticonvulsant activity. Initially due to the lacuna of LCC, we modeled the protein through modeller 9.15v and evaluated through servers. Docking studies were performed with the synthesized compounds and resulted two best compounds, i.e., 5a, 5e showed the best binding energies. The activity of intracellular Ca2+ measurements was performed on two cell lines: A7r5 (rat aortic smooth muscle cells) and SH-SY5Y (human neuroblastoma cells). The 5a and 5e compounds was showing the more specific activity on L-type calcium channels, i.e. A7r5 (IC50 = 0.18 ± 0.02 and 0.25 ± 0.63 μg/ml, respectively) (containing only L-type channels) than SH-SY5Y (i.e. both L-type and T-type channels) (IC50 = 8 ± 0.23 and 10 ± 0.18 μg/ml, respectively) with intracellular calcium mobility similar to amlodipine. Finally, both in silico and in vitro results exploring two derivatives 5a and 5e succeeded to treat cadmium toxicity. PMID:28345598

  2. Hydrogen Sulfide Inhibits L-Type Calcium Currents Depending upon the Protein Sulfhydryl State in Rat Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Haojan; Tang, Chaoshu; Jin, Hongfang; Du, Junbao

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a novel gasotransmitter that inhibits L-type calcium currents (I Ca, L). However, the underlying molecular mechanisms are unclear. In particular, the targeting site in the L-type calcium channel where H2S functions remains unknown. The study was designed to investigate if the sulfhydryl group could be the possible targeting site in the L-type calcium channel in rat cardiomyocytes. Cardiac function was measured in isolated perfused rat hearts. The L-type calcium currents were recorded by using a whole cell voltage clamp technique on the isolated cardiomyocytes. The L-type calcium channel containing free sulfhydryl groups in H9C2 cells were measured by using Western blot. The results showed that sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS, an H2S donor) produced a negative inotropic effect on cardiac function, which could be partly inhibited by the oxidant sulfhydryl modifier diamide (DM). H2S donor inhibited the peak amplitude of I Ca, L in a concentration-dependent manner. However, dithiothreitol (DTT), a reducing sulfhydryl modifier markedly reversed the H2S donor-induced inhibition of I Ca, L in cardiomyocytes. In contrast, in the presence of DM, H2S donor could not alter cardiac function and L type calcium currents. After the isolated rat heart or the cardiomyocytes were treated with DTT, NaHS could markedly alter cardiac function and L-type calcium currents in cardiomyocytes. Furthermore, NaHS could decrease the functional free sulfhydryl group in the L-type Ca2+ channel, which could be reversed by thiol reductant, either DTT or reduced glutathione. Therefore, our results suggest that H2S might inhibit L-type calcium currents depending on the sulfhydryl group in rat cardiomyocytes. PMID:22590646

  3. Effect of resveratrol on L-type calcium current in rat ventricular myocytes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li-ping; Yin, Jing-xiang; Liu, Zheng; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Qing-shan; Zhao, Juan

    2006-02-01

    To study the effect of resveratrol on L-type calcium current (I(Ca-L)) in isolated rat ventricular myocytes and the mechanisms underlying these effects. I(Ca-L) was examined in isolated single rat ventricular myocytes by using the whole cell patch-clamp recording technique. Resveratrol (10-40 micromol/L) reduced the peak amplitude of I(Ca-L) and shifted the current-voltage (I-V) curve upwards in a concentration-dependent manner. Resveratrol (10, 20, 40 micromol/L) decreased the peak amplitude of I(Ca-L) from -14.2+/-1.5 pA/pF to -10.5+/-1.5 pA/pF (P<0.05), -7.5+/-2.4 pA/pF (P<0.01), and -5.2+/-1.2 pA/pF (P<0.01), respectively. Resveratrol (40 micromol/L) shifted the steady-state activation curve of I(Ca-L) to the right and changed the half-activation potential (V0.5) from -19.4+/-0.4 mV to -15.4+/-1.9 mV (P<0.05). Resveratrol at a concentration of 40 micromol/L did not affect the steady-state inactivation curve of I(Ca-L), but did markedly shift the time-dependent recovery curve of I(Ca-L) to the right, and slow down the recovery of I(Ca-L) from inactivation. Sodium orthovanadate (Na(3)VO(4); 1 mmol/L), a potent inhibitor of tyrosine phosphatase, significantly inhibited the effects of resveratrol (P<0.01). Resveratrol inhibited I(Ca-L) mainly by inhibiting the activation of L-type calcium channels and slowing down the recovery of L-type calcium channels from inactivation. This inhibitory effect of resveratrol was mediated by the inhibition of protein tyrosine kinase in rat ventricular myocytes.

  4. Potentiation of prolactin secretion following lactotrope escape from dopamine action. II. Phosphorylation of the alpha(1) subunit of L-type, voltage-dependent calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Hernández, M E; del Mar Hernández, M; Díaz-Muñoz, M; Clapp, C; de la Escalera, G M

    1999-07-01

    Modulation of Ca(2+) channels has been shown to alter cellular functions. It can play an important role in the amplification of signals in the endocrine system, including the pleiotropically regulated pituitary lactotropes. Prolactin (PRL) secretion is tonically inhibited by dopamine (DA), the escape from which triggers acute episodes of hormone secretion. The magnitude of these episodes is explained by a potentiation of the PRL-releasing action of secretagogues such as thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH). While the mechanisms of this potentiation are not fully understood, it is known to be mimicked by the dihydropyridine, L-type Ca(2+) channel agonist Bay K 8644 and blocked by nifedipine and methoxyverapamil. The potentiation is also blocked by inhibitors of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase and protein kinase C. We recently described that the escape from tonic actions of DA results in increased macroscopic Ca(2+) currents in GH(4)C(1) lactotropic clonal cells transfected with a cDNA encoding the long form of the human D(2)-DA receptor. Here we show that the withdrawal from DA potentiates the PRL-releasing action of TRH in GH(4)C(1)/D(2)-DAR cells to the same extent as in enriched lactotropes in primary culture. In both experimental models a low density of dihydropyridine receptors was shown by (+)-[(3)H]PN200-110 binding. Photoaffinity labelling with the dihydropyridine [(3)H]azidopine revealed a protein consistent with the alpha(1) subunit of L-type Ca(2+) channels of 165-170 kDa. In both experimental models, the facilitation of TRH action triggered by the escape from DA was correlated with an enhanced rate of phosphorylation of this putative alpha(1) subunit, the nature of which was further supported by immunoprecipitation with selective antibodies directed against the alpha(1C) and alpha(1D) subunit of voltage-gated calcium channels. We propose that PKA- and PKC-dependent phosphorylation of the alpha(1) subunit of high voltage activated, L-type Ca(2

  5. Cardiac L-type calcium current is increased in a model of hyperaldosteronism in the rat.

    PubMed

    Martin-Fernandez, Beatriz; Miana, María; De Las Heras, Natalia; Ruiz-Hurtado, Gema; Fernandez-Velasco, María; Bas, Manuel; Ballesteros, Sandra; Lahera, Vicente; Cachofeiro, Victoria; Delgado, Carmen

    2009-06-01

    Accumulating evidence supports the importance of aldosterone as an independent risk factor in the pathophysiology of cardiovascular disease. It has been postulated that aldosterone could contribute to ventricular arrhythmogeneity by modulation of cardiac ionic channels. The aim of this study was to analyse ex vivo the electrophysiological characteristics of the L-type cardiac calcium current (I(CaL)) in a model of hyperaldosteronism in the rat. Aldosterone was administered for 3 weeks, and cardiac collagen deposition and haemodynamic parameters were analysed. In addition, RT-PCR and patch-clamp techniques were applied to study cardiac L-type Ca(2+) channels in isolated cardiomyocytes. Administration of aldosterone induced maladaptive cardiac remodelling that was related to increased collagen deposition, diastolic dysfunction and cardiac hypertrophy. In addition, ventricular myocytes isolated from the aldosterone-treated group showed increased I(CaL) density and conductance and prolongation of the action potential duration. No changes in kinetics or in voltage dependence of activation and inactivation of I(CaL) were observed, but relative expression of Ca(V)1.2 mRNA levels was higher in cardiomyocytes isolated from the aldosterone-treated group. The present study demonstrates that aldosterone treatment induces myocardial fibrosis, cardiac hypertrophy, increase of I(CaL) density, upregulation of L-type Ca(2+) channels and prolongation of action potential duration. It could be proposed that aldosterone, through these mechanisms, might exert pro-arrhythmic effects in the pathological heart.

  6. L-type calcium channels in exocytosis and endocytosis of chromaffin cells.

    PubMed

    Nanclares, Carmen; Baraibar, Andrés M; Gandía, Luis

    2017-09-02

    The coexistence of different subtypes of voltage-dependent calcium channels (VDCC) within the same chromaffin cell (CC) and the marked interspecies variability in the proportion of VDCC subtypes that are present in the plasmalemma of the CCs raises the question on their roles in controlling different physiological functions. Particularly relevant seems to be the role of VDCCs in the regulation of the exocytotic neurotransmitter release process, and its tightly coupled membrane retrieval (endocytosis) process since both are Ca(2+)-dependent processes. This review is focused on the role of Ca(2+) influx through L-type VDCC in the regulation of these two processes. It is currently accepted that the different VDCC subtypes (i.e., T, L, N, P/Q, R) contribute to exocytosis proportionally to their density of expression and gating properties. However, the pattern of stimulation defines a preferential role of the different subtypes of VDCC on exocytosis and endocytosis. Thus, L-type channels seem to control catecholamine release induced by prolonged stimuli while fast exocytosis in response to short square depolarizing pulses or action potentials is mediated by Ca(2+) entering CCs through P/Q channels. The pattern of stimulation also influences the endocytotic process, and thus, electrophysiological data suggest the sustained Ca(2+) entry through slow-inactivating L-type channels could be responsible for the activation of fast endocytosis.

  7. Voltage-gated Potassium Channels as Therapeutic Drug Targets

    PubMed Central

    Wulff, Heike; Castle, Neil A.; Pardo, Luis A.

    2009-01-01

    The human genome contains 40 voltage-gated potassium channels (KV) which are involved in diverse physiological processes ranging from repolarization of neuronal or cardiac action potentials, over regulating calcium signaling and cell volume, to driving cellular proliferation and migration. KV channels offer tremendous opportunities for the development of new drugs for cancer, autoimmune diseases and metabolic, neurological and cardiovascular disorders. This review first discusses pharmacological strategies for targeting KV channels with venom peptides, antibodies and small molecules and then highlights recent progress in the preclinical and clinical development of drugs targeting KV1.x, KV7.x (KCNQ), KV10.1 (EAG1) and KV11.1 (hERG) channels. PMID:19949402

  8. Voltage-gated proton channels: what' next?

    PubMed Central

    DeCoursey, Thomas E

    2008-01-01

    This review is an attempt to identify and place in context some of the many questions about voltage-gated proton channels that remain unsolved. As the gene was identified only 2 years ago, the situation is very different than in fields where the gene has been known for decades. For the proton channel, most of the obvious and less obvious structure–function questions are still wide open. Remarkably, the proton channel protein strongly resembles the voltage-sensing domain of many voltage-gated ion channels, and thus offers a novel approach to study gating mechanisms. Another surprise is that the proton channel appears to function as a dimer, with two separate conduction pathways. A number of significant biological questions remain in dispute, unanswered, or in some cases, not yet asked. This latter deficit is ascribable to the intrinsic difficulty in evaluating the importance of one component in a complex system, and in addition, to the lack, until recently, of a means of performing an unambiguous lesion experiment, that is, of selectively eliminating the molecule in question. We still lack a potent, selective pharmacological inhibitor, but the identification of the gene has allowed the development of powerful new tools including proton channel antibodies, siRNA and knockout mice. PMID:18801839

  9. Calcium signaling in mast cells: focusing on L-type calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yoshihiro; Inoue, Toshio; Ra, Chisei

    2012-01-01

    Mast cells play central roles in adaptive and innate immunity. IgE-dependent stimulation of the high-affinity IgE receptor (FcεRI) results in rapid secretion of various proinflammatory chemical mediators and cytokines. All of the outputs depend to certain degrees on an increase in the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration, and influx of Ca(2+) from the extracellular space is often required for their full activation. There is strong evidence that FcεRI stimulation induces two different modes of Ca(2+) influx, store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE) and non-SOCE, which are activated in response to endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) store depletion and independently of Ca(2+) store depletion, respectively, in mast cells. Although Ca(2+) release-activated Ca(2+) channels are the major route of SOCE, recent evidence indicates that they are not the only Ca(2+) channels activated by Ca(2+) store depletion. The recent data suggest that L-type Ca(2+) channels, which were thought to be a characteristic feature of excitable cells, exist in mast cells to mediate non-SOCE, which is critical for protecting mast cells against activation-induced mitochondrial cell death. In this chapter, we provide an overview of recent advances in our understanding of Ca(2+) signaling in mast cells with a special attention to the emerging role for the L-type Ca(2+) channels as a regulator of mast cell survival.

  10. [Effect of shenmai injection on L-type calcium channel of diaphragmatic muscle cells in rats].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Li-min; Xiong, Sheng-dao; Niu, Ru-ji

    2003-08-01

    To explore the effect of Shenmai Injection (SMI) on L-type calcium channel of diaphragmatic muscle cells in rats. Single diaphragmatic muscle cell of rats was obtained by the acute enzyme isolation method and the standard whole-cell patch clamp technique was used to record the inward peak L-type calcium current (IPLC) and current-voltage relationship curve of diaphragmatic muscle cells of 7 rats, and to compare the effects of SMI in various concentrations on them. When keeping the electric potential at -80 mV, stimulation frequency 0.5 Hz, clamp time 300 ms, stepped voltage 10 mV, and depolarized to +60 mV, 10 microliters/ml of SMI could only cause the mean IPLC of rat's diaphragmatic muscle cells increased from -6.9 +/- 0.6 pA/pF to -7.5 +/- 0.7 pA/pF, the amplification being (9.2 +/- 2.8)%, comparison between those of pre-treatment and post-treatment showed insignificant difference. But when the concentration of SMI increased to 50 microliters/ml and 100 microliters/ml, the mean IPLC increased to -8.4 +/- 0.6 pA/pF and -9.2 +/- 0.6 pA/pF, respectively, and the amplification was (22.4 +/- 1.7)% and (34.6 +/- 4.6)% respectively, showing significant difference to that of pre-treatment (P < 0.05). However, SMI showed no significant effect on maximal activation potential and reversal potential. SMI can activate the calcium channel of diaphragmatic muscle cells in rats, increase the influx of Ca2+, so as to strengthen the contraction of diaphragmatic muscle, which may be one of the ionic channel mechanisms of SMI in treating diaphragmatic muscle fatigue in clinical practice.

  11. Fluoride affects calcium homeostasis and osteogenic transcription factor expressions through L-type calcium channels in osteoblast cell line.

    PubMed

    Duan, Xiao-Qin; Zhao, Zhi-Tao; Zhang, Xiu-Yun; Wang, Ying; Wang, Huan; Liu, Da-Wei; Li, Guang-Sheng; Jing, Ling

    2014-12-01

    Osteoblast L-type voltage-dependent calcium channels (VDCC) play important roles in maintaining intracellular homeostasis and influencing multiple cellular processes. In particular, they contribute to the activities and functions of osteoblasts (OBs). In order to study how L-type VDCC modulate calcium ion (Ca(2+)) homeostasis and the expression of osteogenic transcription factors in OBs exposed to fluoride, MC3T3-E1 cells were exposed to a gradient of concentrations of fluoride (0, 2.0, 5.0, 10.0 mg/L) in combination with 10 μM nifedipine, a specific inhibitor of VDCC, for 48 h. We examined messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein levels of Cav1.2, the main subunit of VDCC, and c-fos, c-jun, runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2), osterix (OSX), and intracellular free Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]i) concentrations in MC3T3-E1 cells. Our results showed that [Ca(2+)]i levels increased in a dose-dependent manner with increase in concentration of fluoride. Meantime, results indicated that lower concentrations of fluoride (less than 5 mg/L, especially 2 mg/L) can lead to high expression of Cav1.2 and enhance osteogenic function, while high concentration of fluoride (10 mg/L) can induce decreased Cav1.2 and osteogenic transcriptional factors in MC3T3E1 cells exposed to fluoride. However, the levels of [Ca(2+)]i, Cav1.2, c-fos, c-jun, Runx2, and OSX induced by fluoride were significantly altered and even reversed in the presence of nifedipine. These results demonstrate that L-type calcium channels play a crucial role in Ca(2+) homeostasis and they affect the expression of osteogenic transcription factors in fluoride-treated osteoblasts.

  12. L-type Calcium Channel Cav1.2 Is Required for Maintenance of Auditory Brainstem Nuclei*

    PubMed Central

    Ebbers, Lena; Satheesh, Somisetty V.; Janz, Katrin; Rüttiger, Lukas; Blosa, Maren; Hofmann, Franz; Morawski, Markus; Griesemer, Désirée; Knipper, Marlies; Friauf, Eckhard; Nothwang, Hans Gerd

    2015-01-01

    Cav1.2 and Cav1.3 are the major L-type voltage-gated Ca2+ channels in the CNS. Yet, their individual in vivo functions are largely unknown. Both channel subunits are expressed in the auditory brainstem, where Cav1.3 is essential for proper maturation. Here, we investigated the role of Cav1.2 by targeted deletion in the mouse embryonic auditory brainstem. Similar to Cav1.3, loss of Cav1.2 resulted in a significant decrease in the volume and cell number of auditory nuclei. Contrary to the deletion of Cav1.3, the action potentials of lateral superior olive (LSO) neurons were narrower compared with controls, whereas the firing behavior and neurotransmission appeared unchanged. Furthermore, auditory brainstem responses were nearly normal in mice lacking Cav1.2. Perineuronal nets were also unaffected. The medial nucleus of the trapezoid body underwent a rapid cell loss between postnatal days P0 and P4, shortly after circuit formation. Phosphorylated cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), nuclear NFATc4, and the expression levels of p75NTR, Fas, and FasL did not correlate with cell death. These data demonstrate for the first time that both Cav1.2 and Cav1.3 are necessary for neuronal survival but are differentially required for the biophysical properties of neurons. Thus, they perform common as well as distinct functions in the same tissue. PMID:26242732

  13. Long term regulation of cardiac L-type calcium channel by small G proteins.

    PubMed

    Magyar, J; Jenes, A; Kistamás, K; Ruzsnavszky, F; Nánási, P P; Satin, J; Szentandrássy, N; Bányász, T

    2011-01-01

    Calcium ions are crucial elements of excitation-contraction coupling in cardiac myocytes. The intracellular Ca(2+ ) concentration changes continously during the cardiac cycle, but the Ca(2+ ) entering to the cell serves as an intracellular second messenger, as well. The Ca(2+ ) as a second messenger influences the activity of many intracellular signalling pathways and regulates gene expression. In cardiac myocytes the major pathway for Ca(2+ ) entry into cells is L-type calcium channel (LTCC). The precise control of LTCC function is essential for maintaining the calcium homeostasis of cardiac myocytes. Dysregulation of LTCC may result in different diseases like cardiac hypertrophy, arrhytmias, heart failure. The physiological and pathological structural changes in the heart are induced in part by small G proteins. These proteins are involved in wide spectrum of cell biological functions including protein transport, regulation of cell proliferation, migration, apoptosis, and cytoskeletal rearrangement. Understanding the crosstalk between small G proteins and LTCC may help to understand the pathomechanism of different cardiac diseases and to develop a new generation of genetically-encoded Ca(2+ ) channel inhibitors.

  14. Salt Pumping by Voltage-Gated Nanochannels.

    PubMed

    Tagliazucchi, Mario; Szleifer, Igal

    2015-09-17

    This Letter investigates voltage-gated nanochannels, where both the potential applied to the conductive membrane containing the channel (membrane potential) and the potential difference between the solutions at both sides of the membrane (transmembrane potential) are independently controlled. The predicted conductance characteristics of these fixed-potential channels dramatically differ from those of the widely studied fixed-charge nanochannels, in which the membrane is insulating and has a fixed surface charge density. The difference arises because the transmembrane potential induces an inhomogeneous charge distribution on the surface of fixed-potential nanochannels. This behavior, related to bipolar electrochemistry, has some interesting and unexpected consequences for ion transport. For example, continuously oscillating the transmembrane potential, while holding the membrane potential at the potential for which it has zero charge in equilibrium, creates fluxes of neutral salt (fluxes of anions and cations in the same direction and number) through the channel, which is an interesting phenomenon for desalination applications.

  15. Voltage-Gated Lipid Ion Channels

    PubMed Central

    Blicher, Andreas; Heimburg, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Synthetic lipid membranes can display channel-like ion conduction events even in the absence of proteins. We show here that these events are voltage-gated with a quadratic voltage dependence as expected from electrostatic theory of capacitors. To this end, we recorded channel traces and current histograms in patch-experiments on lipid membranes. We derived a theoretical current-voltage relationship for pores in lipid membranes that describes the experimental data very well when assuming an asymmetric membrane. We determined the equilibrium constant between closed and open state and the open probability as a function of voltage. The voltage-dependence of the lipid pores is found comparable to that of protein channels. Lifetime distributions of open and closed events indicate that the channel open distribution does not follow exponential statistics but rather power law behavior for long open times. PMID:23823188

  16. Philosophy of voltage-gated proton channels

    PubMed Central

    DeCoursey, Thomas E.; Hosler, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    In this review, voltage-gated proton channels are considered from a mainly teleological perspective. Why do proton channels exist? What good are they? Why did they go to such lengths to develop several unique hallmark properties such as extreme selectivity and ΔpH-dependent gating? Why is their current so minuscule? How do they manage to be so selective? What is the basis for our belief that they conduct H+ and not OH–? Why do they exist in many species as dimers when the monomeric form seems to work quite well? It is hoped that pondering these questions will provide an introduction to these channels and a way to logically organize their peculiar properties as well as to understand how they are able to carry out some of their better-established biological functions. PMID:24352668

  17. A potent 1,4-dihydropyridine L-type calcium channel blocker, benidipine, promotes osteoblast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Nishiya, Y; Kosaka, N; Uchii, M; Sugimoto, S

    2002-01-01

    During their differentiation, osteoblasts sequentially express type I collagen, alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and osteocalcin, and then undergo mineral deposition. Among dihydropyridine-type calcium channel blockers, only benidipine stimulated ALP activity of osteoblastic cells derived from neonatal mouse calvaria. To identify the molecular target of benidipine and elucidate the mechanism of action of the drug in osteoblasts, the mouse osteoblastic cell line MC3T3-E1 was used. Benidipine prompted ALP activity and ALP transcription induced by ascorbic acid, and mineral deposition by ascorbic acid and b-glycerophosphate. Benidipine, however, did not change collagen accumulation. MC3T3-E1 cells expressed the L-type Ca channel a1C subunit throughout the differentiation process, and Ca influx by potassium ions and Bay K 8644, an agonist, was strongly attenuated by benidipine. Each one of three structurally different classes of Ca channel blockers, nifedipine, verapamil, and diltiazem stimulated ALP activity, although at much higher concentrations of ca. 100 nM than benidipine, 1 pM. These results suggest that benidipine directly exerts its effect on osteoblasts and promotes osteoblast differentiation after the step of collagen accumulation by blocking the L-type Ca channel. Since benidipine blocked Ca influx more potently than the three other Ca channel blockers, the unique and potent osteoblast differentiating ability of benidipine may be due to its high affinity for Ca channel together with its high membrane retaining ability, as has been previously reported.

  18. Forskolin Regulates L-Type Calcium Channel through Interaction between Actinin 4 and β3 Subunit in Osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuemei; Li, Fangping; Guo, Lin; Hei, Hongya; Tian, Lulu; Peng, Wen; Cai, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-dependent L-type calcium channels that permit cellular calcium influx are essential in calcium-mediated modulation of cellular signaling. Although the regulation of voltage-dependent L-type calcium channels is linked to many factors including cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) activity and actin cytoskeleton, little is known about the detailed mechanisms underlying the regulation in osteoblasts. Our present study investigated the modulation of L-type calcium channel activities through the effects of forskolin on actin reorganization and on its functional interaction with actin binding protein actinin 4. The results showed that forskolin did not significantly affect the trafficking of pore forming α1c subunit and its interaction with actin binding protein actinin 4, whereas it significantly increased the expression of β3 subunit and its interaction with actinin 4 in osteoblast cells as assessed by co-immunoprecipitation, pull-down assay, and immunostaining. Further mapping showed that the ABD and EF domains of actinin 4 were interaction sites. This interaction is independent of PKA phosphorylation. Knockdown of actinin 4 significantly decreased the activities of L-type calcium channels. Our study revealed a new aspect of the mechanisms by which the forskolin activation of adenylyl cyclase - cAMP cascade regulates the L-type calcium channel in osteoblast cells, besides the PKA mediated phosphorylation of the channel subunits. These data provide insight into the important role of interconnection among adenylyl cyclase, cAMP, PKA, the actin cytoskeleton, and the channel proteins in the regulation of voltage-dependent L-type calcium channels in osteoblast cells.

  19. In vitro characterization of L-type calcium channels and their contribution to firing behavior in invertebrate respiratory neurons.

    PubMed

    Spafford, J David; Dunn, Tyler; Smit, August B; Syed, Naweed I; Zamponi, Gerald W

    2006-01-01

    L-type calcium channel activity has been associated with a number of cytoplasmic responses, including gene transcription and activation of calcium-dependent enzymes, yet their direct contribution to the electrical activities of neurons has remained largely unexplored. Here we report the cloning and functional characterization of a molluscan L-type calcium channel homologue, LCa(v)1, and investigate its role in coordinating neuronal firing patterns. The LCav1 channel exhibits many hallmarks of vertebrate L-type channels in that it is high-voltage activated, slowly inactivating, and dihydropyridine sensitive and displays calcium-dependent inactivation in recording solutions with standard EGTA concentrations. We show that despite comprising less than approximately 20% of the total whole cell current in identified Lymnaea respiratory network neurons, the L-type channels are essential for maintaining rhythmic action potential discharges without being involved in synaptic release. Our data therefore suggest an important role of L-type calcium channels in maintaining rhythmical pattern activity underlying breathing behavior in Lymnaea.

  20. The role of L-type calcium channels in the development and expression of behavioral sensitization to ethanol.

    PubMed

    Broadbent, Julie

    2013-10-11

    Behavioral sensitization is thought to play a significant role in drug addiction. L-type calcium channels have been implicated in sensitization to stimulant and opiate drugs but it is unclear if these channels also contribute to sensitization to ethanol. The effects of three L-type calcium channel blockers, nifedipine (1-7.5 mg/kg), diltiazem (12.5-50 mg/kg), and verapamil (12.5 and 25 mg/kg), on sensitization to ethanol (2 g/kg) were examined in DBA/2J mice. All three blockers reduced but did not prevent expression of sensitization. Only nifedipine blocked acquisition of sensitization. Nifedipine and verapamil decreased blood ethanol levels. The current findings suggest L-type calcium channels do not play a substantial role in sensitization to ethanol and that the neural mechanisms underlying sensitization to ethanol are distinct from those mediating sensitization to stimulants and opiates.

  1. The Role of L-Type Calcium Channels in the Development and Expression of Behavioral Sensitization to Ethanol

    PubMed Central

    Broadbent, Julie

    2013-01-01

    Behavioral sensitization is thought to play a significant role in drug addiction. L-type calcium channels have been implicated in sensitization to stimulant and opiate drugs but it is unclear if these channels also contribute to sensitization to ethanol. The effects of three L-type calcium channel blockers, nifedipine (1 – 7.5 mg/kg), diltiazem (12.5 – 50 mg/kg), and verapamil (12.5 and 25 mg/kg), on sensitization to ethanol (2 g/kg) were examined in DBA/2J mice. All three blockers reduced but did not prevent expression of sensitization. Only nifedipine blocked acquisition of sensitization. Nifedipine and verapamil decreased blood ethanol levels. The current findings suggest L-type calcium channels do not play a substantial role in sensitization to ethanol and that the neural mechanisms underlying sensitization to ethanol are distinct from those mediating sensitization to stimulants and opiates. PMID:23994059

  2. Exhaustive exercise decreases L-type calcium current by activating endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yanzhuo; Kong, Lingfeng; Qi, Shuying; Wang, Dongmei

    2017-04-01

    This study investigated effects of exhaustive exercise on L-type calcium current (ICa,L) and the putative intracellular cascade responsible for the effects. Rats were randomly divided into three treatment groups: sedentary (without exercise), exercised to exhaustion and salubrinal injection before each exhaustive exercise period. Exercise group rats were forced to swim until exhaustion each time for 9 days with 5% body weight attached to the head. Salubrinal (1 mg/kg) or an equivalent volume of placebo solution (dimethyl sulfoxide) was injected via the intraperitoneal route daily for the first 3 days, followed by subcutaneous injections of salubrinal (0.5 mg/kg) or placebo solution daily for 9 days (starting 30 min before exercise). After a 1-day recovery period, whole-cell patch clamping was used to investigate the L-type Ca2+ current (ICa,L), with sedentary control rats. Additionally, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) chaperone protein levels were analyzed. Exhaustive exercise triggered ER stress, demonstrated by elevated expression of ER stress markers: phospho-eIF2α, CCAT/enhancer-binding homologous protein (CHOP) and caspase-12. Compared to controls, ICa,L was inhibited by exhaustive exercise, which was blocked by salubrinal, a selective eIF2α dephosphorylation inhibitor used to inhibit ER stress. These results suggest that ER stress participates in regulation of ICa,L. However, exhaustive exercise did not change the voltage dependence of steady-state activation and inactivation of ICaL, and salubrinal infusion caused no difference in voltage dependence of steady-state activation and inactivation of ICa,L. Exhaustive exercise activates ER stress, thus inhibiting ICaL, which may change the action potential duration and contribute to proarrhythmia.

  3. Otilonium bromide inhibits muscle contractions via L-type calcium channels in the rat colon.

    PubMed

    Martin, M T; Hove-Madsen, L; Jimenez, M

    2004-04-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate in vitro the effect of otilonium bromide (OB) on the mechanical and electrical activities of the rat colonic smooth muscle using muscle bath, microelectrodes and patch-clamp techniques. Otilonium bromide dose dependently inhibited the spontaneous activity (logIC(50) +/- SE: -5.31 +/- 0.05). This effect was not modified by TTX (10(-6) mol L(-1)). Cyclic depolarizations were abolished by OB (10(-4) mol L(-1)). Electrical field stimulation induced inhibitory junction potentials (IJPs) followed by a depolarization with superimposed spikes causing a contraction. In the presence of OB (10(-4) mol L(-1)) IJPs were recorded, but spikes and contractions were abolished. Otilonium bromide (3 x 10(-6) mol L(-1)) inhibited inward current obtained in isolated cells (amphotericin perforated patch technique). The otilonium-sensitive current amplitude was maximal (75pA) around 0 mV. The effect of different doses of OB was tested by depolarizing cells from -70 mV to 0 mV. OB dose dependently inhibited the inward current with an EC(50) of 885 nmol L(-1). Abolishment of the otilonium-sensitive current by 3 x 10(-6) mol L(-1) nifedipine confirmed that it was an L-type Ca(2+) current. Our results show that OB inhibits the spontaneous and triggered muscular contractions. This effect is produced by the inhibition of muscular action potentials carried by L-type calcium current, confirming the spasmolytic properties of OB.

  4. Ion concentration-dependence of rat cardiac unitary L-type calcium channel conductance.

    PubMed Central

    Guia, A; Stern, M D; Lakatta, E G; Josephson, I R

    2001-01-01

    Little is known about the native properties of unitary cardiac L-type calcium currents (i(Ca)) measured with physiological calcium (Ca) ion concentration, and their role in excitation-contraction (E-C) coupling. Our goal was to chart the concentration-dependence of unitary conductance (gamma) to physiological Ca concentration and compare it to barium ion (Ba) conductance in the absence of agonists. In isolated, K-depolarized rat myocytes, i(Ca) amplitudes were measured using cell-attached patches with 2 to 70 mM Ca or 2 to 105 mM Ba in the pipette. At 0 mV, 2 mM of Ca produced 0.12 pA, and 2 mM of Ba produced 0.19 pA unitary currents. Unitary conductance was described by a Langmuir isotherm relationship with a maximum gammaCa of 5.3 +/- 0.2 pS (n = 15), and gammaBa of 15 +/- 1 pS (n = 27). The concentration producing half-maximal gamma, Kd(gamma), was not different between Ca (1.7 +/- 0.3 mM) and Ba (1.9 +/- 0.4 mM). We found that quasi-physiological concentrations of Ca produced currents that were as easily resolvable as those obtained with the traditionally used higher concentrations. This study leads to future work on the molecular basis of E-C coupling with a physiological concentration of Ca ions permeating the Ca channel. PMID:11371449

  5. L-Type Calcium Channel Inhibition Contributes to the Proarrhythmic Effects of Aconitine in Human Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jianjun; Wang, Xiangchong; Chung, Ying Ying; Koh, Cai Hong; Liu, Zhenfeng; Guo, Huicai; Yuan, Qiang; Wang, Chuan; Su, Suwen; Wei, Heming

    2017-01-01

    Aconitine (ACO) is well-known for causing lethal ventricular tachyarrhythmias. While cardiac Na+ channel opening during repolarization has long been documented in animal cardiac myocytes, the cellular effects and mechanism of ACO in human remain unexplored. This study aimed to assess the proarrhythmic effects of ACO in human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CMs). ACO concentration-dependently (0.3 ~ 3.0 μM) shortened the action potentials (AP) durations (APD) in ventricular-like hiPSC-CMs by > 40% and induced delayed after-depolarization. Laser-scanning confocal calcium imaging analysis showed that ACO decreased the duration and amplitude of [Ca2+]i transients and increased in the beating frequencies by over 60%. Moreover, ACO was found to markedly reduce the L-type calcium channel (LTCC) currents (ICa,L) in hiPSC-CMs associated with a positive-shift of activation and a negative shift of inactivation. ACO failed to alter the peak and late Na+ currents (INa) in hiPSC-CMs while it drastically increased the late INa in Guinea-pig ventricular myocytes associated with enhanced activation/delayed inactivation of INa at -55 mV~ -85 mV. Further, the effects of ACO on ICa,L, INa and the rapid delayed rectifier potassium current (Ikr) were validated in heterologous expression systems by automated voltage-clamping assays and a moderate suppression of Ikr was observed in addition to concentration-dependent ICa,L inhibition. Lastly, increased beating frequency, decreased Ca2+ wave and shortened field potential duration were recorded from hiPSC-CMs by microelectrode arrays assay. In summary, our data demonstrated that LTCC inhibition could play a main role in the proarrhythmic action of ACO in human cardiomyocytes. PMID:28056022

  6. Phospholemman Modulates the Gating of Cardiac L-Type Calcium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xianming; Gao, Guofeng; Guo, Kai; Yarotskyy, Viktor; Huang, Congxin; Elmslie, Keith S.; Peterson, Blaise Z.

    2010-01-01

    Ca2+ entry through L-type calcium channels (CaV1.2) is critical in shaping the cardiac action potential and initiating cardiac contraction. Modulation of CaV1.2 channel gating directly affects myocyte excitability and cardiac function. We have found that phospholemman (PLM), a member of the FXYD family and regulator of cardiac ion transport, coimmunoprecipitates with CaV1.2 channels from guinea pig myocytes, which suggests PLM is an endogenous modulator. Cotransfection of PLM in HEK293 cells slowed CaV1.2 current activation at voltages near the threshold for activation, slowed deactivation after long and strong depolarizing steps, enhanced the rate and magnitude of voltage-dependent inactivation (VDI), and slowed recovery from inactivation. However, Ca2+-dependent inactivation was not affected. Consistent with slower channel closing, PLM significantly increased Ca2+ influx via CaV1.2 channels during the repolarization phase of a human cardiac action potential waveform. Our results support PLM as an endogenous regulator of CaV1.2 channel gating. The enhanced VDI induced by PLM may help protect the heart under conditions such as ischemia or tachycardia where the channels are depolarized for prolonged periods of time and could induce Ca2+ overload. The time and voltage-dependent slowed deactivation could represent a gating shift that helps maintain Ca2+ influx during the cardiac action potential waveform plateau phase. PMID:20371314

  7. Rem-GTPase regulates cardiac myocyte L-type calcium current

    PubMed Central

    Magyar, Janos; Kiper, Carmen E.; Sievert, Gail; Cai, Weikang; Shi, Geng-Xian; Crump, Shawn M.; Li, Liren; Niederer, Steven; Smith, Nic; Andres, Douglas A.; Satin, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Rationale: The L-type calcium channels (LTCC) are critical for maintaining Ca2+-homeostasis. In heterologous expression studies, the RGK-class of Ras-related G-proteins regulates LTCC function; however, the physiological relevance of RGK–LTCC interactions is untested. Objective: In this report we test the hypothesis that the RGK protein, Rem, modulates native Ca2+ current (ICa,L) via LTCC in murine cardiomyocytes. Methods and Results: Rem knockout mice (Rem−/−) were engineered, and ICa,L and Ca2+-handling properties were assessed. Rem−/− ventricular cardiomyocytes displayed increased ICa,L density. ICa,L activation was shifted positive on the voltage axis, and β-adrenergic stimulation normalized this shift compared with wild-type ICa,L. Current kinetics, steady-state inactivation, and facilitation was unaffected by Rem−/−. Cell shortening was not significantly different. Increased ICa,L density in the absence of frank phenotypic differences motivated us to explore putative compensatory mechanisms. Despite the larger ICa,L density, Rem−/− cardiomyocyte Ca2+ twitch transient amplitude was significantly less than that compared with wild type. Computer simulations and immunoblot analysis suggests that relative dephosphorylation of Rem−/− LTCC can account for the paradoxical decrease of Ca2+ transients. Conclusions: This is the first demonstration that loss of an RGK protein influences ICa,L in vivo in cardiac myocytes. PMID:22854599

  8. Investigation of calcium antagonist-L-type calcium channel interactions by a vascular smooth muscle cell membrane chromatography method.

    PubMed

    Du, Hui; He, Jianyu; Wang, Sicen; He, Langchong

    2010-07-01

    The dissociation equilibrium constant (K(D)) is an important affinity parameter for studying drug-receptor interactions. A vascular smooth muscle (VSM) cell membrane chromatography (CMC) method was developed for determination of the K(D) values for calcium antagonist-L-type calcium channel (L-CC) interactions. VSM cells, by means of primary culture with rat thoracic aortas, were used for preparation of the cell membrane stationary phase in the VSM/CMC model. All measurements were performed with spectrophotometric detection (237 nm) at 37 degrees C. The K(D) values obtained using frontal analysis were 3.36 x 10(-6) M for nifedipine, 1.34 x 10(-6) M for nimodipine, 6.83 x 10(-7) M for nitrendipine, 1.23 x 10(-7) M for nicardipine, 1.09 x 10(-7) M for amlodipine, and 8.51 x 10(-8) M for verapamil. This affinity rank order obtained from the VSM/CMC method had a strong positive correlation with that obtained from radioligand binding assay. The location of the binding region was examined by displacement experiments using nitrendipine as a mobile-phase additive. It was found that verapamil occupied a class of binding sites on L-CCs different from those occupied by nitrendipine. In addition, nicardipine, amlodipine, and nitrendipine had direct competition at a single common binding site. The studies showed that CMC can be applied to the investigation of drug-receptor interactions.

  9. N-type and L-type calcium channels mediate glycinergic synaptic inputs to retinal ganglion cells of tiger salamanders.

    PubMed

    Bieda, Mark C; Copenhagen, David R

    2004-01-01

    Synaptically localized calcium channels shape the timecourse of synaptic release, are a prominent site for neuromodulation, and have been implicated in genetic disease. In retina, it is well established that L-type calcium channels play a major role in mediating release of glutamate from the photoreceptors and bipolar cells. However, little is known about which calcium channels are coupled to synaptic exocytosis of glycine, which is primarily released by amacrine cells. A recent report indicates that glycine release from spiking AII amacrine cells relies exclusively upon L-type calcium channels. To identify calcium channel types controlling neurotransmitter release from the population of glycinergic neurons that drive retinal ganglion cells, we recorded electrical and potassium evoked inhibitory synaptic currents (IPSCs) from these postsynaptic neurons in retinal slices from tiger salamanders. The L-channel antagonist nifedipine strongly inhibited release and FPL64176, an L-channel agonist, greatly enhanced it, indicating a significant role for L-channels. omega-Conotoxin MVIIC, an N/P/Q-channel antagonist, strongly inhibited release, indicating an important role for non-L channels. While the P/Q-channel blocker omega-Aga IVA produced only small effects, the N-channel blocker omega-conotoxin GVIA strongly inhibited release. Hence, N-type and L-type calcium channels appear to play major roles, overall, in mediating synaptic release of glycine onto retinal ganglion cells.

  10. Simulated GABA synaptic input and L-type calcium channels form functional microdomains in hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons.

    PubMed

    Hemond, Peter J; O'Boyle, Michael P; Roberts, Carson B; Delgado-Reyes, Alfonso; Hemond, Zoe; Suter, Kelly J

    2012-06-27

    Hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons integrate the multiple internal and external cues that regulate sexual reproduction. In contrast to other neurons that exhibit extensive dendritic arbors, GnRH neurons usually have a single dendrite with relatively little branching. This largely precludes the integration strategy in which a single dendritic branch serves as a unit of integration. In the present study, we identify a gradient in L-type calcium channels in dendrites of mouse GnRH neurons and its interaction with GABAergic and glutamatergic inputs. Higher levels of L-type calcium channels are in somata/proximal dendrites (i.e., 0-26 μm) and distal dendrites (∼130 μm dendrite length), but intervening midlengths of dendrite (∼27-130 μm) have reduced L-type calcium channels. Using uncaging of GABA, there is a decreasing GABAergic influence along the dendrite and the impact of GABA(A) receptors is dependent on activation of L-type calcium channels. This results in amplification of proximal GABAergic signals and attenuation of distal dendritic signals. Most interestingly, the intervening dendritic regions create a filter through which only relatively high-amplitude, low-frequency GABAergic signaling to dendrites elicits action potentials. The findings of the present study suggest that GnRH dendrites adopt an integration strategy whereby segments of single nonbranching GnRH dendrites create functional microdomains and thus serve as units of integration.

  11. Characterization of L-type calcium channel activity in atrioventricular nodal myocytes from rats with streptozotocin-induced Diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Yuill, Kathryn H; Al Kury, Lina T; Howarth, Frank Christopher

    2015-11-01

    Cardiovascular complications are common in patients with Diabetes mellitus (DM). In addition to changes in cardiac muscle inotropy, electrical abnormalities are also commonly observed in these patients. We have previously shown that spontaneous cellular electrical activity is altered in atrioventricular nodal (AVN) myocytes, isolated from the streptozotocin (STZ) rat model of type-1 DM. In this study, utilizing the same model, we have characterized the changes in L-type calcium channel activity in single AVN myocytes. Ionic currents were recorded from AVN myocytes isolated from the hearts of control rats and from those with STZ-induced diabetes. Patch-clamp recordings were used to assess the changes in cellular electrical activity in individual myocytes. Type-1 DM significantly altered the cellular characteristics of L-type calcium current. A reduction in peak ICaL density was observed, with no corresponding changes in the activation parameters of the current. L-type calcium channel current also exhibited faster time-dependent inactivation in AVN myocytes from diabetic rats. A negative shift in the voltage dependence of inactivation was also evident, and a slowing of restitution parameters. These findings demonstrate that experimentally induced type-1 DM significantly alters AVN L-type calcium channel cellular electrophysiology. These changes in ion channel activity may contribute to the abnormalities in cardiac electrical function that are associated with high mortality levels in patients with DM.

  12. Dopamine Induces LTP Differentially in Apical and Basal Dendrites through BDNF and Voltage-Dependent Calcium Channels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Navakkode, Sheeja; Sajikumar, Sreedharan; Korte, Martin; Soong, Tuck Wah

    2012-01-01

    The dopaminergic modulation of long-term potentiation (LTP) has been studied well, but the mechanism by which dopamine induces LTP (DA-LTP) in CA1 pyramidal neurons is unknown. Here, we report that DA-LTP in basal dendrites is dependent while in apical dendrites it is independent of activation of L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (VDCC).…

  13. Dopamine Induces LTP Differentially in Apical and Basal Dendrites through BDNF and Voltage-Dependent Calcium Channels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Navakkode, Sheeja; Sajikumar, Sreedharan; Korte, Martin; Soong, Tuck Wah

    2012-01-01

    The dopaminergic modulation of long-term potentiation (LTP) has been studied well, but the mechanism by which dopamine induces LTP (DA-LTP) in CA1 pyramidal neurons is unknown. Here, we report that DA-LTP in basal dendrites is dependent while in apical dendrites it is independent of activation of L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (VDCC).…

  14. Functional role of voltage gated Ca2+ channels in heart automaticity

    PubMed Central

    Mesirca, Pietro; Torrente, Angelo G.; Mangoni, Matteo E.

    2015-01-01

    Pacemaker activity of automatic cardiac myocytes controls the heartbeat in everyday life. Cardiac automaticity is under the control of several neurotransmitters and hormones and is constantly regulated by the autonomic nervous system to match the physiological needs of the organism. Several classes of ion channels and proteins involved in intracellular Ca2+ dynamics contribute to pacemaker activity. The functional role of voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) in heart automaticity and impulse conduction has been matter of debate for 30 years. However, growing evidence shows that VGCCs are important regulators of the pacemaker mechanisms and play also a major role in atrio-ventricular impulse conduction. Incidentally, studies performed in genetically modified mice lacking L-type Cav1.3 (Cav1.3−/−) or T-type Cav3.1 (Cav3.1−/−) channels show that genetic inactivation of these channels strongly impacts pacemaking. In cardiac pacemaker cells, VGCCs activate at negative voltages at the beginning of the diastolic depolarization and importantly contribute to this phase by supplying inward current. Loss-of-function of these channels also impairs atrio-ventricular conduction. Furthermore, inactivation of Cav1.3 channels promotes also atrial fibrillation and flutter in knockout mice suggesting that these channels can play a role in stabilizing atrial rhythm. Genomic analysis demonstrated that Cav1.3 and Cav3.1 channels are widely expressed in pacemaker tissue of mice, rabbits and humans. Importantly, human diseases of pacemaker activity such as congenital bradycardia and heart block have been attributed to loss-of-function of Cav1.3 and Cav3.1 channels. In this article, we will review the current knowledge on the role of VGCCs in the generation and regulation of heart rate and rhythm. We will discuss also how loss of Ca2+ entry through VGCCs could influence intracellular Ca2+ handling and promote atrial arrhythmias. PMID:25698974

  15. Cnidarian Toxins Acting on Voltage-Gated Ion Channels

    PubMed Central

    Messerli, Shanta M.; Greenberg, Robert M.

    2006-01-01

    Voltage-gated ion channels generate electrical activity in excitable cells. As such, they are essential components of neuromuscular and neuronal systems, and are targeted by toxins from a wide variety of phyla, including the cnidarians. Here, we review cnidarian toxins known to target voltage-gated ion channels, the specific channel types targeted, and, where known, the sites of action of cnidarian toxins on different channels.

  16. Familial hemiplegic migraine type 1 mutations W1684R and V1696I alter G protein-mediated regulation of Ca(V)2.1 voltage-gated calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Garza-López, Edgar; Sandoval, Alejandro; González-Ramírez, Ricardo; Gandini, María A; Van den Maagdenberg, Arn; De Waard, Michel; Felix, Ricardo

    2012-08-01

    Familial hemiplegic migraine type 1 (FHM-1) is a monogenic form of migraine with aura that is characterized by recurrent attacks of a typical migraine headache with transient hemiparesis during the aura phase. In a subset of patients, additional symptoms such as epilepsy and cerebellar ataxia are part of the clinical phenotype. FHM-1 is caused by missense mutations in the CACNA1A gene that encodes the pore-forming subunit of Ca(V)2.1 voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels. Although the functional effects of an increasing number of FHM-1 mutations have been characterized, knowledge on the influence of most of these mutations on G protein regulation of channel function is lacking. Here, we explored the effects of G protein-dependent modulation on mutations W1684R and V1696I which cause FHM-1 with and without cerebellar ataxia, respectively. Both mutations were introduced into the human Ca(V)2.1α(1) subunit and their functional consequences investigated after heterologous expression in human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK-293) cells using patch-clamp recordings. When co-expressed along with the human μ-opioid receptor, application of the agonist [d-Ala2, N-MePhe4, Gly-ol]-enkephalin (DAMGO) inhibited currents through both wild-type (WT) and mutant Ca(V)2.1 channels, which is consistent with the known modulation of these channels by G protein-coupled receptors. Prepulse facilitation, which is a way to characterize the relief of direct voltage-dependent G protein regulation, was reduced by both FHM-1 mutations. Moreover, the kinetic analysis of the onset and decay of facilitation showed that the W1684R and V1696I mutations affect the apparent dissociation and reassociation rates of the Gβγ dimer from the channel complex, suggesting that the G protein-Ca(2+) channel affinity may be altered by the mutations. These biophysical studies may shed new light on the pathophysiology underlying FHM-1.

  17. Calcium dynamics during NMDA-induced membrane potential oscillations in lamprey spinal neurons--contribution of L-type calcium channels (CaV1.3).

    PubMed

    Wang, Di; Grillner, Sten; Wallén, Peter

    2013-05-15

      NMDA receptor-dependent, intrinsic membrane potential oscillations are an important element in the operation of the lamprey locomotor network. They involve a cyclic influx of calcium, leading to an activation of calcium-activated potassium (KCa) channels that in turn contributes to the termination of the depolarized plateau and membrane repolarization. In this study, we have investigated the calcium dynamics in different regions of lamprey spinal neurons during membrane potential oscillations, using confocal calcium imaging in combination with intracellular recordings. Calcium fluctuations were observed in both soma and dendrites, timed to the oscillations. The calcium level increased sharply at the onset of membrane depolarization, to reach its maximum by the end of the plateau. The calcium peak in distal dendrites typically occurred earlier than in the soma during the oscillatory cycle. The L-type calcium channel blocker nimodipine increased the duration of the depolarized plateau phase in most cells tested, whereas the agonist Bay K 8644 decreased plateau duration. Bay K 8644 increased the amplitude of calcium fluctuations, particularly in distal dendrites, whereas nimodipine caused a decrease, suggesting that L-type low-voltage-activated calcium channels are mainly localized in these regions. Our results thus indicate that dendritic CaV1.3-like calcium channels are activated during NMDA-mediated membrane potential oscillations. This calcium influx activates KCa channels involved in plateau termination.

  18. Physiological roles of voltage-gated proton channels in leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    Demaurex, Nicolas; El Chemaly, Antoun

    2010-01-01

    Voltage-gated proton channels are designed to extrude large quantities of cytosolic acid in response to depolarising voltages. The discovery of the Hvcn1 gene and the generation of mice lacking the channel molecule have confirmed several postulated functions of proton channels in leukocytes. In neutrophils and macrophages, proton channels are required for high-level production of superoxide anions by the phagocytic NADPH oxidase, a bactericidal enzyme essential for host defence against infections. In B lymphocytes, proton channels are required for low-level production of superoxide that boosts the production of antibodies. Proton channels sustain the activity of immune cells in several ways. By extruding excess cytosolic acid, proton channels prevent deleterious acidification of the cytosol and at the same time deliver protons required for chemical conversion of the superoxide secreted by membrane oxidases. By moving positive charges across membranes, proton channels limit the depolarisation of the plasma membrane, promoting the electrogenic activity of NADPH oxidases and the entry of calcium ions into cells. Acid extrusion by proton channels is not restricted to leukocytes but also mediates the intracellular alkalinisation required for the activation of spermatozoids. Proton channels are therefore multitalented channels that control male fertility as well as our innate and adaptive immunity. PMID:20693294

  19. Regulation of the L-type calcium channel by alpha 5beta 1 integrin requires signaling between focal adhesion proteins.

    PubMed

    Wu, X; Davis, G E; Meininger, G A; Wilson, E; Davis, M J

    2001-08-10

    The L-type calcium channel is the major calcium influx pathway in vascular smooth muscle and is regulated by integrin ligands, suggesting an important link between extracellular matrix and vascular tone regulation in tissue injury and remodeling. We examined the role of integrin-linked tyrosine kinases and focal adhesion proteins in regulation of L-type calcium current in single vascular myocytes. Soluble tyrosine kinase inhibitors blocked the increase in current produced by alpha(5) integrin antibody or fibronectin, whereas tyrosine phosphatase inhibition enhanced the effect. Cell dialysis with an antibody to focal adhesion kinase or with FRNK, the C-terminal noncatalytic domain of focal adhesion kinase, produced moderate (24 or 18%, respectively) inhibition of basal current but much greater inhibition (63 or 68%, respectively) of integrin-enhanced current. A c-Src antibody and peptide inhibitors of the Src homology-2 domain or a putative Src tyrosine phosphorylation site on the channel produced similar inhibition. Antibodies to the cytoskeletal proteins paxillin and vinculin, but not alpha-actinin, inhibited integrin-dependent current by 65-80%. Therefore, alpha(5)beta(1) integrin appears to regulate a tyrosine phosphorylation cascade involving Src and various focal adhesion proteins that control the function of the L-type calcium channel. This interaction may represent a novel mechanism for control of calcium influx in vascular smooth muscle and other cell types.

  20. High-Frequency Stimulation-Induced Synaptic Potentiation in Dorsal and Ventral CA1 Hippocampal Synapses: The Involvement of NMDA Receptors, mGluR5, and (L-Type) Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papatheodoropoulos, Costas; Kouvaros, Stylianos

    2016-01-01

    The ability of the ventral hippocampus (VH) for long-lasting long-term potentiation (LTP) and the mechanisms underlying its lower ability for shortlasting LTP compared with the dorsal hippocampus (DH) are unknown. Using recordings of field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) from the CA1 field of adult rat hippocampal slices, we found that…

  1. High-Frequency Stimulation-Induced Synaptic Potentiation in Dorsal and Ventral CA1 Hippocampal Synapses: The Involvement of NMDA Receptors, mGluR5, and (L-Type) Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papatheodoropoulos, Costas; Kouvaros, Stylianos

    2016-01-01

    The ability of the ventral hippocampus (VH) for long-lasting long-term potentiation (LTP) and the mechanisms underlying its lower ability for shortlasting LTP compared with the dorsal hippocampus (DH) are unknown. Using recordings of field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) from the CA1 field of adult rat hippocampal slices, we found that…

  2. Enhanced currents through L-type calcium channels in cardiomyocytes disturb the electrophysiology of the dystrophic heart

    PubMed Central

    Obermair, Gerald J.; Cervenka, Rene; Dang, Xuan B.; Lukacs, Peter; Kummer, Stefan; Bittner, Reginald E.; Kubista, Helmut; Todt, Hannes; Hilber, Karlheinz

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), induced by mutations in the gene encoding for the cytoskeletal protein dystrophin, is an inherited disease characterized by progressive muscle weakness. Besides the relatively well characterized skeletal muscle degenerative processes, DMD is also associated with cardiac complications. These include cardiomyopathy development and cardiac arrhythmias. The current understanding of the pathomechanisms in the heart is very limited, but recent research indicates that dysfunctional ion channels in dystrophic cardiomyocytes play a role. The aim of the present study was to characterize abnormalities in L-type calcium channel function in adult dystrophic ventricular cardiomyocytes. By using the whole cell patch clamp technique, the properties of currents through calcium channels in ventricular cardiomyocytes isolated from the hearts of normal and dystrophic adult mice were compared. Besides the commonly used dystrophin-deficient mdx mouse model for human DMD, we also used mdx-utr mice which are both dystrophin- and utrophin-deficient. We found that calcium channel currents were significantly increased, and channel inactivation was reduced in dystrophic cardiomyocytes. Both effects enhance the calcium influx during an action potential (AP). Whereas the AP in dystrophic mouse cardiomyocytes was nearly normal, implementation of the enhanced dystrophic calcium conductance in a computer model of a human ventricular cardiomyocyte considerably prolonged the AP. Finally, the described dystrophic calcium channel abnormalities entailed alterations in the electrocardiograms of dystrophic mice. We conclude that gain of function in cardiac L-type calcium channels may disturb the electrophysiology of the dystrophic heart and thereby cause arrhythmias. PMID:24337461

  3. Enhanced currents through L-type calcium channels in cardiomyocytes disturb the electrophysiology of the dystrophic heart.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Xaver; Rubi, Lena; Obermair, Gerald J; Cervenka, Rene; Dang, Xuan B; Lukacs, Peter; Kummer, Stefan; Bittner, Reginald E; Kubista, Helmut; Todt, Hannes; Hilber, Karlheinz

    2014-02-15

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), induced by mutations in the gene encoding for the cytoskeletal protein dystrophin, is an inherited disease characterized by progressive muscle weakness. Besides the relatively well characterized skeletal muscle degenerative processes, DMD is also associated with cardiac complications. These include cardiomyopathy development and cardiac arrhythmias. The current understanding of the pathomechanisms in the heart is very limited, but recent research indicates that dysfunctional ion channels in dystrophic cardiomyocytes play a role. The aim of the present study was to characterize abnormalities in L-type calcium channel function in adult dystrophic ventricular cardiomyocytes. By using the whole cell patch-clamp technique, the properties of currents through calcium channels in ventricular cardiomyocytes isolated from the hearts of normal and dystrophic adult mice were compared. Besides the commonly used dystrophin-deficient mdx mouse model for human DMD, we also used mdx-utr mice, which are both dystrophin- and utrophin-deficient. We found that calcium channel currents were significantly increased, and channel inactivation was reduced in dystrophic cardiomyocytes. Both effects enhance the calcium influx during an action potential (AP). Whereas the AP in dystrophic mouse cardiomyocytes was nearly normal, implementation of the enhanced dystrophic calcium conductance in a computer model of a human ventricular cardiomyocyte considerably prolonged the AP. Finally, the described dystrophic calcium channel abnormalities entailed alterations in the electrocardiograms of dystrophic mice. We conclude that gain of function in cardiac L-type calcium channels may disturb the electrophysiology of the dystrophic heart and thereby cause arrhythmias.

  4. Novel function of α1D L-type calcium channel in the atria.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Ujala; Aromolaran, Ademuyiwa S; Fabris, Frank; Lazaro, Deana; Kassotis, John; Qu, Yongxia; Boutjdir, Mohamed

    2017-01-22

    Ca entry through atrial L-type Calcium channels (α1C and α1D) play an important role in muscular contraction, regulation of gene expression, and release of hormones including atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP). α1D Ca channel is exclusively expressed in atria, and has been shown to play a key role in the pathogenesis of atrial fibrillation. Recent data have shown that the small conductance calcium-activated potassium channel, SK4 is also atrial specific and also contributes prominently to the secretion of ANP and BNP. However, its functional role in the heart is still poorly understood. Here we used α1D gene heterozygous (α1D(+/-)) mice and HL-1 cells to determine the functional contribution of SK4 channels to α1D-dependent regulation of ANP and BNP secretion in response to endothelin (ET), and/or mechanical stretch. Immunoprecipitation with α1D specific antibody and western blotting with SK4 specific antibody on the immuno-precipitated protein complex showed a band at 50 KDa confirming the presence of SK4 in the complex and provided evidence of interaction between SK4 and α1D channels. Using RT-PCR, we observed a 2.9 fold decrease in expression of Cacna1d (gene encoding α1D) mRNA in atria from α1D(+/-)mice. The decrease in α1D mRNA corresponded with a 4.2 fold decrease in Kcnn4 (gene encoding SK4) mRNA from α1D(+/-) mice. These changes were paralleled with a 77% decrease in BNP serum levels from α1D(+/-) mice. When α1D was knocked down in HL-1cardiomyocytes using CRISPR/Cas9 technology, a 97% decrease in secreted BNP was observed even in cells subjected to stretch and endothelin. In conclusion, our data are first to show that α1D Ca and SK4 channels are coupled in the atria, and that deletion of α1D leads to decreased SK4 mRNA and BNP secretion providing evidence for a novel role of α1D in atrial endocrine function. Elucidating the regulatory factors that underlie the secretory function of atria will identify

  5. Binding and selectivity in L-type calcium channels: a mean spherical approximation.

    PubMed Central

    Nonner, W; Catacuzzeno, L; Eisenberg, B

    2000-01-01

    L-type calcium channels are Ca(2+) binding proteins of great biological importance. They generate an essential intracellular signal of living cells by allowing Ca(2+) ions to move across the lipid membrane into the cell, thereby selecting an ion that is in low extracellular abundance. Their mechanism of selection involves four carboxylate groups, containing eight oxygen ions, that belong to the side chains of the "EEEE" locus of the channel protein, a setting similar to that found in many Ca(2+)-chelating molecules. This study examines the hypothesis that selectivity in this locus is determined by mutual electrostatic screening and volume exclusion between ions and carboxylate oxygens of finite diameters. In this model, the eight half-charged oxygens of the tethered carboxylate groups of the protein are confined to a subvolume of the pore (the "filter"), but interact spontaneously with their mobile counterions as ions interact in concentrated bulk solutions. The mean spherical approximation (MSA) is used to predict ion-specific excess chemical potentials in the filter and baths. The theory is calibrated using a single experimental observation, concerning the apparent dissociation constant of Ca(2+) in the presence of a physiological concentration of NaCl. When ions are assigned their independently known crystal diameters and the carboxylate oxygens are constrained, e.g., to a volume of 0.375 nm(3) in an environment with an effective dielectric coefficient of 63.5, the hypothesized selectivity filter produces the shape of the calcium binding curves observed in experiment, and it predicts Ba(2+)/Ca(2+) and Na(+)/Li(+) competition, and Cl(-) exclusion as observed. The selectivities for Na(+), Ca(2+), Ba(2+), other alkali metal ions, and Cl(-) thus can be predicted by volume exclusion and electrostatic screening alone. Spontaneous coordination of ions and carboxylates can produce a wide range of Ca(2+) selectivities, depending on the volume density of carboxylate

  6. Activation of L-type calcium channel in twitch skeletal muscle fibres of the frog.

    PubMed Central

    Francini, F; Bencini, C; Squecco, R

    1996-01-01

    1. The activation of the L-type calcium current (ICa) was studied in normally polarized (-100 mV) cut skeletal muscle fibres of the frog with the double Vaseline-gap voltage-clamp technique. Both external and internal solutions were Ca2+ buffered. Solutions were made in order to minimize all but the Ca2+ current. 2. The voltage-dependent components of the time course of activation were determined by two procedures: fast and slow components were evaluated by multiexponential fitting to current traces elicited by long voltage pulses (5 s) after removing inactivation; fast components were also determined by short voltage pulses having different duration (0.5-70 ms). 3. The components of deactivation were evaluated after removing the charge-movement current from the total tail current by the difference between two short (50 and 70 ms) voltage pulses to 10 mV, moving the same intramembrane charge. Two exponential components, fast and slow (time constants, 6 +/- 0.3 and 90 +/- 7 ms at -100 mV; n = 26), were found. 4. The time onset of ICa was evaluated either by multiexponential fitting to the ICa activation or by pulses of different duration to test the beginning of the 'on' and 'off' inequality. This was at about 2 ms, denoting that it was very early. 5. The time constant vs. voltage plots indicated the presence of four voltage-dependent components in the activation pathway. Various kinetic models are discussed. Models with independent transitions, like a Hodgkin-Huxley scheme, were excluded. Suitable models were a five-state sequential and a four-state cyclic with a branch scheme. The latter gave the best simulation of the data. 6. The steady-state activation curve saturated at high potentials. It had a half-voltage value of 1 +/- 0.2 mV and the opening probability was only 0.82 +/- 0.2 at 20 mV (n = 32). This result implies a larger number of functional calcium channels than was previously supposed and is in agreement with the number of dihydropyridine (DHP

  7. Allosteric Voltage Gating of Potassium Channels I

    PubMed Central

    Horrigan, Frank T.; Cui, Jianmin; Aldrich, Richard W.

    1999-01-01

    Activation of large conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels is controlled by both cytoplasmic Ca2+ and membrane potential. To study the mechanism of voltage-dependent gating, we examined mSlo Ca2+-activated K+ currents in excised macropatches from Xenopus oocytes in the virtual absence of Ca2+ (<1 nM). In response to a voltage step, IK activates with an exponential time course, following a brief delay. The delay suggests that rapid transitions precede channel opening. The later exponential time course suggests that activation also involves a slower rate-limiting step. However, the time constant of IK relaxation [τ(IK)] exhibits a complex voltage dependence that is inconsistent with models that contain a single rate limiting step. τ(IK) increases weakly with voltage from −500 to −20 mV, with an equivalent charge (z) of only 0.14 e, and displays a stronger voltage dependence from +30 to +140 mV (z = 0.49 e), which then decreases from +180 to +240 mV (z = −0.29 e). Similarly, the steady state GK–V relationship exhibits a maximum voltage dependence (z = 2 e) from 0 to +100 mV, and is weakly voltage dependent (z ≅ 0.4 e) at more negative voltages, where Po = 10−5–10−6. These results can be understood in terms of a gating scheme where a central transition between a closed and an open conformation is allosterically regulated by the state of four independent and identical voltage sensors. In the absence of Ca2+, this allosteric mechanism results in a gating scheme with five closed (C) and five open (O) states, where the majority of the channel's voltage dependence results from rapid C–C and O–O transitions, whereas the C–O transitions are rate limiting and weakly voltage dependent. These conclusions not only provide a framework for interpreting studies of large conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channel voltage gating, but also have important implications for understanding the mechanism of Ca2+ sensitivity. PMID:10436003

  8. Flufenamic acid decreases neuronal excitability through modulation of voltage-gated sodium channel gating.

    PubMed

    Yau, Hau-Jie; Baranauskas, Gytis; Martina, Marco

    2010-10-15

    The electrophysiological phenotype of individual neurons critically depends on the biophysical properties of the voltage-gated channels they express. Differences in sodium channel gating are instrumental in determining the different firing phenotypes of pyramidal cells and interneurons; moreover, sodium channel modulation represents an important mechanism of action for many widely used CNS drugs. Flufenamic acid (FFA) is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug that has been long used as a blocker of calcium-dependent cationic conductances. Here we show that FFA inhibits voltage-gated sodium currents in hippocampal pyramidal neurons; this effect is dose-dependent with IC(50) = 189 μm. We used whole-cell and nucleated patch recordings to investigate the mechanisms of FFA modulation of TTX-sensitive voltage-gated sodium current. Our data show that flufenamic acid slows down the inactivation process of the sodium current, while shifting the inactivation curve ~10 mV toward more hyperpolarized potentials. The recovery from inactivation is also affected in a voltage-dependent way, resulting in slower recovery at hyperpolarized potentials. Recordings from acute slices demonstrate that FFA reduces repetitive- and abolishes burst-firing in CA1 pyramidal neurons. A computational model based on our data was employed to better understand the mechanisms of FFA action. Simulation data support the idea that FFA acts via a novel mechanism by reducing the voltage dependence of the sodium channel fast inactivation rates. These effects of FFA suggest that it may be an effective anti-epileptic drug.

  9. Cholinergic modulation of the basal L-type calcium current in ferret right ventricular myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Bett, Glenna C L; Dai, Shuiping; Campbell, Donald L

    2002-01-01

    The effects of the cholinergic muscarinic agonist carbachol (CCh) on the basal L-type calcium current, ICa,L, in ferret right ventricular (RV) myocytes were studied using whole cell patch clamp. CCh produced two major effects: (i) in all myocytes, extracellular application of CCh inhibited ICa,L in a reversible concentration-dependent manner; and (ii) in many (but not all) myocytes, upon washout CCh produced a significant transient stimulation of ICa,L (‘rebound stimulation’). Inhibitory effects could be observed at 1 × 10−10m CCh. The mean steady-state inhibitory concentration-response relationship was shallow and could be described with a single Hill equation (maximum inhibition = 34.5 %, IC50 = 4 × 10−8m, Hill coefficient n = 0.60). Steady-state inhibition (1 or 10 μM CCh) had no significant effect on ICa,L selectivity or macroscopic (i) activation characteristics, (ii) inactivation kinetics, (iii) steady-state inactivation or (iv) kinetics of recovery from inactivation. Maximal inhibition of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity (preincubation of myocytes in 1 mm l-NMMA (NG-monomethyl-l-arginine) + 1 mm l-NNA (NG-nitro-l-arginine) for 2–3 h plus inclusion of 1 mm l-NMMA + 1 mm l-NNA in the patch pipette solution) produced no significant attenuation of the CCh-mediated inhibition of ICa,L. Protocols involving (i) the nitric oxide (NO) scavenger PTIO (2-phenyl-4,4,5,5,-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide; 200 μM), (ii) imposition of a ‘cGMP clamp’ (100 μM 8-Bromo-cGMP), and (iii) inhibition of soluble guanylyl cyclase (ODQ (1H-[1,2,4,]oxadiazolo(4,3,-a)quinoxalin-1-one), 50 μM) all failed to attenuate CCh-mediated inhibition of Ica,L. While CCh consistently inhibited basal ICa,L in all RV myocytes studied, not all myocytes displayed rebound stimulation upon CCh washout. However, there was no difference between CCh-mediated inhibition of ICa,L between these two RV myocyte types, and in myocytes displaying rebound stimulation neither ODQ nor 8

  10. New mechanisms of antiplatelet activity of nifedipine, an L-type calcium channel blocker.

    PubMed

    Chou, Tz-Chong

    2014-01-01

    Platelet hyperactivity often occursd in hypertensive patients and is a key factor in the development of cardiovascular diseases including thrombosis and atherosclerosis. Nifedipine, an L-type calcium channel blocker, is widely used for hypertension and coronary heart disease therapy. In addition, nifedipine is known to exhibit an antiplatelet activity, but the underlying mechanisms involved remain unclear. Several transcription factors such as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) exist in platelets and have an ability to regulate platelet aggregation through a non-genomic mechanism. The present article focuses on describing the mechanisms of the antiplatelet activity of nifedipine via PPAR activation. It has been demonstrated that nifedipine treatment increases the activity and intracellular amount of PPAR-β/-γ in activated platelets. Moreover, the antiplatelet activity of nifedipine is mediated by PPAR-β/-γ-dependent upon the up-regulation of the PI3K/AKT/NO/cyclic GMP/PKG pathway, and inhibition of protein kinase Cα (PKCα) activity via an interaction between PPAR-β/-γ and PKCα. Furthermore, suppressing NF-κB activation by nifedipine through enhanced association of PPAR-β/-γ with NF-κB has also been observed in collagen-stimulated platelets. Blocking PPAR-β/-γ activity or increasing NF-κB activation greatly reverses the antiplatelet activity and inhibition of intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization, PKCα activity, and surface glycoprotein IIb/IIIa expression caused by nifedipine. Thus, PPAR-β/-γ- dependent suppression of NF-κB activation also contributes to the antiplatelet activity of nifedipine. Consistently, administration of nifedipine markedly reduces fluorescein sodium-induced vessel thrombus formation in mice, which is considerably inhibited when the PPAR-β/-γ antagonists are administrated simultaneously. Collectively, these results provide important information regarding the mechanism by

  11. Voltage-gated proton channel is expressed on phagosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Okochi, Yoshifumi; Sasaki, Mari; Iwasaki, Hirohide; Okamura, Yasushi

    2009-05-01

    Voltage-gated proton channel has been suggested to help NADPH oxidase activity during respiratory burst of phagocytes through its activities of compensating charge imbalance and regulation of pH. In phagocytes, robust production of reactive oxygen species occurs in closed membrane compartments, which are called phagosomes. However, direct evidence for the presence of voltage-gated proton channels in phagosome has been lacking. In this study, the expression of voltage-gated proton channels was studied by Western blot with the antibody specific to the voltage-sensor domain protein, VSOP/Hv1, that has recently been identified as the molecular correlate for the voltage-gated proton channel. Phagosomal membranes of neutrophils contain VSOP/Hv1 in accordance with subunits of NADPH oxidases, gp91, p22, p47 and p67. Superoxide anion production upon PMA activation was significantly reduced in neutrophils from VSOP/Hv1 knockout mice. These are consistent with the idea that voltage-gated proton channels help NADPH oxidase in phagocytes to produce reactive oxygen species.

  12. Voltage-gated proton channel is expressed on phagosomes.

    PubMed

    Okochi, Yoshifumi; Sasaki, Mari; Iwasaki, Hirohide; Okamura, Yasushi

    2009-05-01

    Voltage-gated proton channel has been suggested to help NADPH oxidase activity during respiratory burst of phagocytes through its activities of compensating charge imbalance and regulation of pH. In phagocytes, robust production of reactive oxygen species occurs in closed membrane compartments, which are called phagosomes. However, direct evidence for the presence of voltage-gated proton channels in phagosome has been lacking. In this study, the expression of voltage-gated proton channels was studied by Western blot with the antibody specific to the voltage-sensor domain protein, VSOP/Hv1, that has recently been identified as the molecular correlate for the voltage-gated proton channel. Phagosomal membranes of neutrophils contain VSOP/Hv1 in accordance with subunits of NADPH oxidases, gp91, p22, p47 and p67. Superoxide anion production upon PMA activation was significantly reduced in neutrophils from VSOP/Hv1 knockout mice. These are consistent with the idea that voltage-gated proton channels help NADPH oxidase in phagocytes to produce reactive oxygen species.

  13. Further characterization of the effect of ethanol on voltage-gated Ca2+ channel function in developing CA3 hippocampal pyramidal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Morton, Russell A.; Valenzuela, C. Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Developmental ethanol exposure damages the hippocampus, a brain region involved in learning and memory. Alterations in synaptic transmission and plasticity may play a role in this effect of ethanol. We previously reported that acute and repeated exposure to ethanol during the 3rd trimester-equivalent inhibits long-term potentiation of GABAA receptor-dependent synaptic currents in CA3 pyramidal neurons through a mechanism that depends on retrograde release of brain-derived neurotrophic factor driven by activation of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (Zucca and Valenzuela, 2010). We found evidence indicating that voltage-gated Ca2+ channels are inhibited in the presence of ethanol, an effect that may play a role in its mechanism of action. Here, we further investigated the acute effect of ethanol on the function of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels in CA3 pyramidal neurons using Ca2+ imaging techniques. These experiments revealed that acute ethanol exposure inhibits voltage-gated Ca2+ channels both in somatic and proximal dendritic compartments. To investigate the long-term consequences of ethanol on voltage-gated Ca2+ channels, we used patch-clamp electrophysiological techniques to assess the function of L-type voltage-gated Ca2+ channels during and following ten days of vapor ethanol exposure. During ethanol withdrawal periods, the function of these channels was not significantly affected by vapor chamber exposure. Taken together with our previous findings, our results suggest that 3rd trimester-equivalent ethanol exposure transiently inhibits L-type voltage-gated Ca2+ channel function in CA3 pyramidal neurons and that compensatory mechanisms restore their function during ethanol withdrawal. Transient inhibition of these channels by ethanol may be, in part, responsible for the hippocampal abnormalities associated with developmental exposure to this agent. PMID:26711851

  14. PKC-mediated modulation of L-type calcium channels may contribute to fat-induced insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    McCarty, Mark F

    2006-01-01

    Increased intracellular free calcium [Ca2+]i has been noted in adipocytes, platelets, and leukocytes of subjects with insulin resistance syndrome or allied disorders. In rodent studies, measures which increase [Ca2+]i in adipocytes and skeletal muscle are associated with impaired insulin signaling, attributable at least in part to diminished ability of insulin to activate phosphoserine phosphatase-1 (PP-1). In fat-fed insulin resistant rats, pre-treatment with a drug that selectively chelates intracellular calcium eliminates about half of the decrement in insulin-stimulated glucose uptake induced by fat feeding; since this chelator does not influence the insulin sensitivity of chow-fed rats, it is reasonable to suspect that fat feeding boosts [Ca2+]i in skeletal muscle, and that this effect is partially responsible for the associated reduction in insulin sensitivity. Clinical insulin resistance is associated with increased levels of triglycerides and other fatty acid metabolites in muscle fibers; this can give rise to diacylglycerol-mediated activation of PKC, which in turn compromises insulin signaling by triggering kinase cascades that phosphorylate IRS-1 on key serine residues. Yet there is also evidence that, in skeletal muscle, PKC activity up-regulates the function of L-type calcium channels, increasing their maximal conductance while left-shifting their voltage dependence. Thus, the PKC activation associated with fat overexposure might be expected to boost basal [Ca2+]i in skeletal muscle, potentially impeding insulin-mediated activation of PP-1. This hypothesis is consistent with several clinical studies demonstrating that long-acting inhibitors of L-type calcium channels can improve insulin sensitivity in overweight hypertensives; it should be readily testable in rodent models of fat-induced insulin resistance. Since parathyroid hormone can act on adipocytes and muscle to boost [Ca2+]i, mild secondary hyperparathyroidism associated with low calcium intakes

  15. CNTF-ACM promotes mitochondrial respiration and oxidative stress in cortical neurons through upregulating L-type calcium channel activity.

    PubMed

    Sun, Meiqun; Liu, Hongli; Xu, Huanbai; Wang, Hongtao; Wang, Xiaojing

    2016-09-01

    A specialized culture medium termed ciliary neurotrophic factor-treated astrocyte-conditioned medium (CNTF-ACM) allows investigators to assess the peripheral effects of CNTF-induced activated astrocytes upon cultured neurons. CNTF-ACM has been shown to upregulate neuronal L-type calcium channel current activity, which has been previously linked to changes in mitochondrial respiration and oxidative stress. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate CNTF-ACM's effects upon mitochondrial respiration and oxidative stress in rat cortical neurons. Cortical neurons, CNTF-ACM, and untreated control astrocyte-conditioned medium (UC-ACM) were prepared from neonatal Sprague-Dawley rat cortical tissue. Neurons were cultured in either CNTF-ACM or UC-ACM for a 48-h period. Changes in the following parameters before and after treatment with the L-type calcium channel blocker isradipine were assessed: (i) intracellular calcium levels, (ii) mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), (iii) oxygen consumption rate (OCR) and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) formation, (iv) intracellular nitric oxide (NO) levels, (v) mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and (vi) susceptibility to the mitochondrial complex I toxin rotenone. CNTF-ACM neurons displayed the following significant changes relative to UC-ACM neurons: (i) increased intracellular calcium levels (p < 0.05), (ii) elevation in ΔΨm (p < 0.05), (iii) increased OCR and ATP formation (p < 0.05), (iv) increased intracellular NO levels (p < 0.05), (v) increased mitochondrial ROS production (p < 0.05), and (vi) increased susceptibility to rotenone (p < 0.05). Treatment with isradipine was able to partially rescue these negative effects of CNTF-ACM (p < 0.05). CNTF-ACM promotes mitochondrial respiration and oxidative stress in cortical neurons through elevating L-type calcium channel activity.

  16. Autoimmune Voltage-Gated Potassium Channelopathy Presenting With Catecholamine Excess.

    PubMed

    Stepp, K Amy; Folker, Christin; Tanzer, Marie; Hayman, Jennifer; Reynolds, Thomas; Mallory, Leah

    2017-07-01

    Autoimmune voltage-gated potassium channelopathies have been associated with a range of neurological presenting symptoms, including central, peripheral, and autonomic dysfunction. We describe a 12-year-old boy who presented with nine months of pain, anxiety, and 30-pound weight loss. He was admitted for failure to thrive, then noted to be persistently hypertensive and tachycardic. Plasma metanephrines and urine metanephrines and catecholamines were elevated. Extensive investigation for causes of elevated catecholamines, such as hyperthyroidism or catecholamine-secreting tumor, was negative. A paraneoplastic panel was positive for voltage-gated potassium channel antibodies. Treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin and pulse methylprednisolone led to complete resolution of symptoms, weight gain, and normalization of vital signs and plasma metanephrines. Voltage-gated potassium channel antibodies should be considered as part of the differential in patients presenting with elevated metanephrine and catecholamine secretion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. L-type Ca2+ channels in heart and brain

    PubMed Central

    Striessnig, Jörg; Pinggera, Alexandra; Kaur, Gurjot; Bock, Gabriella; Tuluc, Petronel

    2014-01-01

    L-type calcium channels (Cav1) represent one of the three major classes (Cav1–3) of voltage-gated calcium channels. They were identified as the target of clinically used calcium channel blockers (CCBs; so-called calcium antagonists) and were the first class accessible to biochemical characterization. Four of the 10 known α1 subunits (Cav1.1–Cav1.4) form the pore of L-type calcium channels (LTCCs) and contain the high-affinity drug-binding sites for dihydropyridines and other chemical classes of organic CCBs. In essentially all electrically excitable cells one or more of these LTCC isoforms is expressed, and therefore it is not surprising that many body functions including muscle, brain, endocrine, and sensory function depend on proper LTCC activity. Gene knockouts and inherited human diseases have allowed detailed insight into the physiological and pathophysiological role of these channels. Genome-wide association studies and analysis of human genomes are currently providing even more hints that even small changes of channel expression or activity may be associated with disease, such as psychiatric disease or cardiac arrhythmias. Therefore, it is important to understand the structure–function relationship of LTCC isoforms, their differential contribution to physiological function, as well as their fine-tuning by modulatory cellular processes. PMID:24683526

  18. Deletion of the L-type Calcium Channel CaV1.3 but not CaV1.2 Results in a Diminished sAHP in Mouse CA1 Pyramidal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Gamelli, Amy E.; McKinney, Brandon C.; White, Jessica A.; Murphy, Geoffrey G.

    2009-01-01

    Trains of action potentials in CA1 pyramidal neurons are followed by a prolonged calcium-dependent post-burst afterhyperpolarization (AHP) that serves to limit further firing to a sustained depolarizing input. A reduction in the AHP accompanies acquisition of several types of learning and increases in the AHP are correlated with age-related cognitive impairment. The AHP develops primarily as the result of activation of outward calcium-activated potassium currents; however the precise source of calcium for activation of the AHP remains unclear. There is substantial experimental evidence suggesting that calcium influx via voltage-gated L-type calcium channels (L-VGCCs) contributes to the generation of the AHP. Two L-VGCC subtypes are predominately expressed in the hippocampus, CaV1.2 and CaV1.3, however it is not known which L-VGCC subtype is involved in generation of the AHP. This ambiguity is due in large part to the fact that at present there are no subunit-specific agonists or antagonists. Therefore, using mice in which the gene encoding CaV1.2 or CaV1.3 was deleted, we sought to determine the impact of alterations in levels of these two L-VCGG subtypes on neuronal excitability. No differences in any AHP measure were seen between neurons from CaV1.2 knockout mice and controls. However, the total area of the AHP was significantly smaller in neurons from CaV1.3 knockout mice as compared to neurons from wildtype controls. A significant reduction in the amplitude of the AHP was also seen at the 1 sec time point in neurons from CaV1.3 knockout mice as compared to those from controls. Reductions in both the area and 1 sec amplitude suggest the involvement of calcium influx via CaV1.3 in the slow AHP (sAHP). Thus, the results of our study demonstrate that deletion of CaV1.3, but not CaV1.2, significantly impacts the generation of the sAHP. PMID:20014384

  19. Preparation and preclinical evaluation of 68Ga-DOTA-amlodipine for L-type calcium channel imaging

    PubMed Central

    Firuzyar, Tahereh; Jalilian, Amir Reza; Aboudzadeh, Mohammad Reza; Sadeghpour, Hossein; Shafiee-Ardestani, Mahdi; Khalaj, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Aim: In order to develop a possible tracer for L-type calcium channel imaging, we here report the development of a Ga-68 amlodipine derivative for possible PET imaging. Materials and Methods: Amlodipine DOTA conjugate was synthesized, characterized and went through calcium channel blockade, toxicity, apoptosis/necrosis tests. [68Ga] DOTA AMLO was prepared at optimized conditions followed by stability tests, partition coefficient determination and biodistribution studies using tissue counting and co incidence imaging up to 2 h. Results: [68Ga] DOTA AMLO was prepared at pH 4–5 in 7–10 min at 95°C in high radiochemical purity (>99%, radio thin layer chromatography; specific activity: 1.9–2.1 GBq/mmol) and was stable up to 4 h with a log P of −0.94. Calcium channel rich tissues including myocardium, and tissues with smooth muscle cells such as colon, intestine, and lungs demonstrated significant uptake. Co incidence images supported the biodistribution data up to 2 h. Conclusions: The complex can be a candidate for further positron emission tomography imaging for L type calcium channels. PMID:27833311

  20. Calcium entry through L-type calcium channels is essential for neurite regeneration in cultured sympathetic neurons.

    PubMed

    Kulbatski, Iris; Cook, Douglas J; Tator, Charles H

    2004-03-01

    Previous work showed that a post-neuritotomy rise in [Ca2+]i is required for regeneration. We tested the following hypotheses in cultured sympathetic neurons: (1) blocking L-type channels at the time of injury inhibits regeneration; (2) enhancing Ca2+ entry through L-type Ca2+ channels enhances regeneration; (3) L-type Ca2+ channel distribution is predominantly on the soma and proximal neurites of uninjured and injured neurons. To visualize L-type Ca2+ channels and block Ca2+ influx, the fluorescent dihydropyridine antagonist, DM-BODIPY, was used. Our results show that regeneration is markedly inhibited by the antagonist when administered 20 min. prior to injury, in the presence or absence of nerve growth factor (NGF) (p < 0.0001). Severe degeneration of proximal and distal neurites was seen 48 h after injury. Regeneration was minimally inhibited by the antagonist when administered 5 min after injury (p < 0.05), but not inhibited when administered 2 or 24 h after injury (p > 0.05). We found that L-type channels are distributed ubiquitously on the soma and neurites of uninjured and injured cells, and on regenerating neurites. The addition of the L-type channel agonist, BayK8644, (1 microM) 20 min prior to injury enhanced neurite length at 24 h post-injury (p = 0.002). Blocking L-type channels did not affect the viability of uninjured or injured cells. For the first time, it has been shown that Ca2+ entry through L-type Ca2+ channels is essential for post-neuritotomy sympathetic neurite regeneration, and that this effect shows a strict temporal dependency. We also demonstrated that regeneration can be enhanced by increasing Ca2+ influx through L-type channels.

  1. L-type calcium channels and calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II differentially mediate behaviors associated with nicotine withdrawal in mice.

    PubMed

    Jackson, K J; Damaj, M I

    2009-07-01

    Smoking is a widespread health problem. Because the nicotine withdrawal syndrome is a major contributor to continued smoking and relapse, it is important to understand the molecular and behavioral mechanisms of nicotine withdrawal to generate more effective smoking cessation therapies. Studies suggest a role for calcium-dependent mechanisms, such as L-type calcium channels and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), in the effects of nicotine dependence; however, the role of these mechanisms in nicotine-mediated behaviors is unclear. Thus, the goal of this study was to elucidate the role of L-type calcium channels and CaMKII in nicotine withdrawal behaviors. Using both pharmacological and genetic methods, our results show that L-type calcium channels are involved in physical, but not affective, nicotine withdrawal behaviors. Although our data do provide evidence of a role for CaMKII in nicotine withdrawal behaviors, our pharmacological and genetic assessments yielded different results concerning the specific role of the kinase. Pharmacological data suggest that CaMKII is involved in somatic signs and affective nicotine withdrawal, and activity level is decreased after nicotine withdrawal, whereas the genetic assessments yielded results suggesting that CaMKII is involved only in the anxiety-related response, yet the kinase activity may be increased after nicotine withdrawal; thus, future studies are necessary to clarify the precise behavioral specifics of the relevance of CaMKII in nicotine withdrawal behaviors. Overall, our data show that L-type calcium channels and CaMKII are relevant in nicotine withdrawal and differentially mediate nicotine withdrawal behaviors.

  2. Mapping of dihydropyridine binding residues in a less sensitive invertebrate L-type calcium channel (LCa v 1).

    PubMed

    Senatore, Adriano; Boone, Adrienne; Lam, Stanley; Dawson, Taylor F; Zhorov, Boris; Spafford, J David

    2011-01-01

    Invertebrate L-type calcium channel, LCa(v) 1, isolated from the pond snail Lymnaea stagnalis is nearly indistinguishable from mammalian Ca(v) 1.2 (α1C) calcium channel in biophysical characteristics observed in vitro. These L-type channels are likely constrained within a narrow range of biophysical parameters to perform similar functions in the snail and mammalian cardiovascular systems. What distinguishes snail and mammalian L-type channels is a difference in dihydropyridine sensitivity: 100 nM isradipine exhibits a significant block of mammalian Ca(v) 1.2 currents without effect on snail LCa(v)1 currents. The native snail channel serves as a valuable surrogate for validating key residue differences identified from previous experimental and molecular modeling work. As predicted, three residue changes in LCa(v)1 (N_3o18, F_3i10, and I_4i12) replaced with DHP-sensing residues in respective positions of Ca(v) 1.2, (Q_3o18, Y_3i10, and M_4i12) raises the potency of isradipine block of LCa(v)1 channels to that of mammalian Ca(v) 1.2. Interestingly, the single N_3o18_Q mutation in LCa(v) 1 channels lowers DHP sensitivity even further and the triple mutation bearing enhanced isradipine sensitivity, still retains a reduced potency of agonist, (S)-Bay K8644.

  3. Effects of the T/L-type calcium channel blocker benidipine on albuminuria and plasma aldosterone concentration. A pilot study involving switching from L-type calcium channel blockers to benidipine.

    PubMed

    Tani, Shigemasa; Takahashi, Atsuhiko; Nagao, Ken; Hirayama, Atsushi

    2014-01-01

    Albuminuria and a high plasma aldosterone concentration (PAC) are prognosis factors predicting a poor outcome for cardiovascular disease. We examined here the effects of benidipine, a T/L-type calcium channel blocker (CCB), on albuminuria and PAC.Thirty-one patients with essential hypertension who received an L-type CCB and achieved the target blood pressure (BP) indicated by the Treatment Guidelines of the Japan Society of Hypertension (JSH2009) were investigated. The Ltype CCB under treatment was switched to benidipine at a dose in which equivalent BP reduction was expected. BP and estimated glomerular filtration rate at 6 months after switching to benidipine were not significantly different from those at baseline. The urinary-albumin-creatinine ratio (UACR) decreased significantly by 36.9% (P = 0.001). No significant change was observed in plasma renin activity (P = 0.063). The PAC of all patients decreased significantly by 11.8% (P = 0.002). When analyzed by daily doses of benidipine, the PAC appeared to have decreased in patients who received 4 mg per day of benidipine (n = 14), although statistical significance was not reached (P = 0.096). The PAC in patients who received 8 mg per day of benidipine (n =17) was significantly reduced by 13.2% (P = 0.017).In hypertensive patients whose BP is controlled by L-type CCB, switching to the T/L-type CCB benidipine maintained BP control and reduced UACR. In addition, the high dose of benidipine reduced the PAC independent of BP control. These results suggest the T/L-type CCB benidipine may contribute to cardio-renal protection in addition to lowering BP.

  4. L-type calcium channels in sympathetic α3β2-nAChR-mediated cerebral nitrergic neurogenic vasodilation.

    PubMed

    Wu, C Y-C; Lee, R H-C; Chen, P-Y; Tsai, A P-Y; Chen, M-F; Kuo, J-S; Lee, T J-F

    2014-08-01

    Nicotine stimulation of α3β2-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (α3β2-nAChRs) located on sympathetic nerves innervating basilar arteries causes calcium-dependent noradrenaline release, leading to activation of parasympathetic nitrergic nerves and dilation of basilar arteries. This study aimed to investigate the major subtype of calcium channels located on cerebral peri-vascular sympathetic nerves, which is involved in nicotine-induced α3β2-nAChR-mediated nitrergic vasodilation in basilar arteries. Nicotine- and transmural nerve stimulation (TNS)-induced dilation of isolated porcine basilar arteries was examined using in vitro tissue bath. Nicotine-induced calcium influx, nicotine-induced noradrenaline release and nicotine-induced inward currents were evaluated in rat superior cervical ganglion (SCG) neurones, peri-vascular sympathetic nerves of porcine basilar arteries and α3β2-nAChRs-expressing oocytes respectively. mRNA and protein expression of Cav 1.2 and Cav 1.3 channels were detected by RT-PCR, Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Nicotine-induced vasodilation was not affected by ω-agatoxin TK (selective P/Q-type calcium channel blocker) or ω-conotoxin GVIA (N-type calcium channel blocker). The vasodilation, however, was inhibited by nicardipine (L-type calcium channel blocker) in concentrations which did not affect TNS-induced vasodilation, suggesting the specific blockade. Nicardipine concentration-dependently inhibited nicotine-induced calcium influx in rat SCG neurones and reduced nicotine-induced noradrenaline release from peri-vascular sympathetic nerves of porcine basilar arteries. Nicardipine (10 μm), which significantly blocked nicotine-induced vasorelaxation by 70%, did not appreciably affect nicotine-induced inward currents in α3β2-nAChRs-expressing oocytes. Furthermore, the mRNAs and proteins of Cav 1.2 and Cav 1.3 channels were expressed in porcine SCG and peri-vascular nerve terminals. The sympathetic neuronal calcium influx

  5. Supramolecular Assemblies and Localized Regulation of Voltage-Gated Ion Channels

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Shuiping; Hall, Duane D.; Hell, Johannes W.

    2009-01-01

    This review addresses the localized regulation of voltage-gated ion channels by phosphorylation. Comprehensive data on channel regulation by associated protein kinases, phosphatases, and related regulatory proteins are mainly available for voltage-gated Ca2+ channels, which form the main focus of this review. Other voltage-gated ion channels and especially Kv7.1-3 (KCNQ1-3), the large- and small-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels BK and SK2, and the inward-rectifying K+ channels Kir3 have also been studied to quite some extent and will be included. Regulation of the L-type Ca2+ channel Cav1.2 by PKA has been studied most thoroughly as it underlies the cardiac fight-or-flight response. A prototypical Cav1.2 signaling complex containing the β2 adrenergic receptor, the heterotrimeric G protein Gs, adenylyl cyclase, and PKA has been identified that supports highly localized via cAMP. The type 2 ryanodine receptor as well as AMPA- and NMDA-type glutamate receptors are in close proximity to Cav1.2 in cardiomyocytes and neurons, respectively, yet independently anchor PKA, CaMKII, and the serine/threonine phosphatases PP1, PP2A, and PP2B, as is discussed in detail. Descriptions of the structural and functional aspects of the interactions of PKA, PKC, CaMKII, Src, and various phosphatases with Cav1.2 will include comparisons with analogous interactions with other channels such as the ryanodine receptor or ionotropic glutamate receptors. Regulation of Na+ and K+ channel phosphorylation complexes will be discussed in separate papers. This review is thus intended for readers interested in ion channel regulation or in localization of kinases, phosphatases, and their upstream regulators. PMID:19342611

  6. L-type calcium channel gating is modulated by bradykinin with a PKC-dependent mechanism in NG108-15 cells.

    PubMed

    Toselli, Mauro; Taglietti, Vanni

    2005-05-01

    Bradykinin (BK) excites dorsal root ganglion cells, leading to the sensation of pain. The actions of BK are thought to be mediated by heterotrimeric G protein-regulated pathways. Indeed there is strong evidence that in different cell types BK is involved in phosphoinositide breakdown following activation of G(q/11). In the present study we show that the Ca(2+) current flowing through L-type voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels in NG108-15 cells (differentiated in vitro to acquire a neuronal phenotype), measured using the whole-cell patch clamp configuration, is reversibly inhibited by BK in a voltage-independent fashion, suggesting a cascade process where a second messenger system is involved. This inhibitory action of BK is mimicked by the application of 1,2-oleoyl-acetyl glycerol (OAG), an analog of diacylglycerol that activates PKC. Interestingly, OAG occluded the effects of BK and both effects were blocked by selective PKC inhibitors. The down modulation of single L-type Ca(2+) channels by BK and OAG was also investigated in cell-attached patches. Our results indicate that the inhibitory action of BK involves activation of PKC and mainly shows up in a significant reduction of the probability of channel opening, caused by an increase and clustering of null sweeps in response to BK.

  7. Actions and Mechanisms of Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids on Voltage-Gated Ion Channels

    PubMed Central

    Elinder, Fredrik; Liin, Sara I.

    2017-01-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) act on most ion channels, thereby having significant physiological and pharmacological effects. In this review we summarize data from numerous PUFAs on voltage-gated ion channels containing one or several voltage-sensor domains, such as voltage-gated sodium (NaV), potassium (KV), calcium (CaV), and proton (HV) channels, as well as calcium-activated potassium (KCa), and transient receptor potential (TRP) channels. Some effects of fatty acids appear to be channel specific, whereas others seem to be more general. Common features for the fatty acids to act on the ion channels are at least two double bonds in cis geometry and a charged carboxyl group. In total we identify and label five different sites for the PUFAs. PUFA site 1: The intracellular cavity. Binding of PUFA reduces the current, sometimes as a time-dependent block, inducing an apparent inactivation. PUFA site 2: The extracellular entrance to the pore. Binding leads to a block of the channel. PUFA site 3: The intracellular gate. Binding to this site can bend the gate open and increase the current. PUFA site 4: The interface between the extracellular leaflet of the lipid bilayer and the voltage-sensor domain. Binding to this site leads to an opening of the channel via an electrostatic attraction between the negatively charged PUFA and the positively charged voltage sensor. PUFA site 5: The interface between the extracellular leaflet of the lipid bilayer and the pore domain. Binding to this site affects slow inactivation. This mapping of functional PUFA sites can form the basis for physiological and pharmacological modifications of voltage-gated ion channels. PMID:28220076

  8. Oxidized Low-density Lipoprotein (ox-LDL) Cholesterol Induces the Expression of miRNA-223 and L-type Calcium Channel Protein in Atrial Fibrillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Fengping; Xu, Xin; Yuan, Shuguo; Tan, Liangqiu; Gao, Lingjun; Ma, Shaochun; Zhang, Shebin; Ma, Zhanzhong; Jiang, Wei; Liu, Fenglian; Chen, Baofeng; Zhang, Beibei; Pang, Jungang; Huang, Xiuyan; Weng, Jiaqiang

    2016-08-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained arrhythmia causing high morbidity and mortality. While changing of the cellular calcium homeostasis plays a critical role in AF, the L-type calcium channel α1c protein has suggested as an important regulator of reentrant spiral dynamics and is a major component of AF-related electrical remodeling. Our computational modeling predicted that miRNA-223 may regulate the CACNA1C gene which encodes the cardiac L-type calcium channel α1c subunit. We found that oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) cholesterol significantly up-regulates both the expression of miRNA-223 and L-type calcium channel protein. In contrast, knockdown of miRNA-223 reduced L-type calcium channel protein expression, while genetic knockdown of endogenous miRNA-223 dampened AF vulnerability. Transfection of miRNA-223 by adenovirus-mediated expression enhanced L-type calcium currents and promoted AF in mice while co-injection of a CACNA1C-specific miR-mimic counteracted the effect. Taken together, ox-LDL, as a known factor in AF-associated remodeling, positively regulates miRNA-223 transcription and L-type calcium channel protein expression. Our results implicate a new molecular mechanism for AF in which miRNA-223 can be used as an biomarker of AF rheumatic heart disease.

  9. Oxidized Low-density Lipoprotein (ox-LDL) Cholesterol Induces the Expression of miRNA-223 and L-type Calcium Channel Protein in Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    He, Fengping; Xu, Xin; Yuan, Shuguo; Tan, Liangqiu; Gao, Lingjun; Ma, Shaochun; Zhang, Shebin; Ma, Zhanzhong; Jiang, Wei; Liu, Fenglian; Chen, Baofeng; Zhang, Beibei; Pang, Jungang; Huang, Xiuyan; Weng, Jiaqiang

    2016-08-04

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained arrhythmia causing high morbidity and mortality. While changing of the cellular calcium homeostasis plays a critical role in AF, the L-type calcium channel α1c protein has suggested as an important regulator of reentrant spiral dynamics and is a major component of AF-related electrical remodeling. Our computational modeling predicted that miRNA-223 may regulate the CACNA1C gene which encodes the cardiac L-type calcium channel α1c subunit. We found that oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) cholesterol significantly up-regulates both the expression of miRNA-223 and L-type calcium channel protein. In contrast, knockdown of miRNA-223 reduced L-type calcium channel protein expression, while genetic knockdown of endogenous miRNA-223 dampened AF vulnerability. Transfection of miRNA-223 by adenovirus-mediated expression enhanced L-type calcium currents and promoted AF in mice while co-injection of a CACNA1C-specific miR-mimic counteracted the effect. Taken together, ox-LDL, as a known factor in AF-associated remodeling, positively regulates miRNA-223 transcription and L-type calcium channel protein expression. Our results implicate a new molecular mechanism for AF in which miRNA-223 can be used as an biomarker of AF rheumatic heart disease.

  10. Voltage-gated sodium channels contribute to action potentials and spontaneous contractility in isolated human lymphatic vessels.

    PubMed

    Telinius, Niklas; Majgaard, Jens; Kim, Sukhan; Katballe, Niels; Pahle, Einar; Nielsen, Jørn; Hjortdal, Vibeke; Aalkjaer, Christian; Boedtkjer, Donna Briggs

    2015-07-15

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSC) play a key role for initiating action potentials (AP) in excitable cells. VGSC in human lymphatic vessels have not been investigated. In the present study, we report the electrical activity and APs of small human lymphatic collecting vessels, as well as mRNA expression and function of VGSC in small and large human lymphatic vessels. The VGSC blocker TTX inhibited spontaneous contractions in six of 10 spontaneously active vessels, whereas ranolazine, which has a narrower VGSC blocking profile, had no influence on spontaneous activity. TTX did not affect noradrenaline-induced contractions. The VGSC opener veratridine induced contractions in a concentration-dependent manner (0.1-30 μm) eliciting a stable tonic contraction and membrane depolarization to -18 ± 0.6 mV. Veratridine-induced depolarizations and contractions were reversed ∼80% by TTX, and were dependent on Ca(2+) influx via L-type calcium channels and the sodium-calcium exchanger in reverse mode. Molecular analysis determined NaV 1.3 to be the predominantly expressed VGSC isoform. Electrophysiology of mesenteric lymphatics determined the resting membrane potential to be -45 ± 1.7 mV. Spontaneous APs were preceded by a slow depolarization of 5.3 ± 0.6 mV after which a spike was elicited that almost completely repolarized before immediately depolarizing again to plateau. Vessels transiently hyperpolarized prior to returning to the resting membrane potential. TTX application blocked APs. We have shown that VGSC are necessary for initiating and maintaining APs and spontaneous contractions in human lymphatic vessels and our data suggest the main contribution from comes NaV 1.3. We have also shown that activation of these channels augments the contractile activity of the vessels. © 2015 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2015 The Physiological Society.

  11. Regulation of L-type calcium channel by phospholemman in cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xue-Qian; Wang, JuFang; Song, Jianliang; Rabinowitz, Joseph; Chen, Xiongwen; Houser, Steven R; Peterson, Blaise Z; Tucker, Amy L; Feldman, Arthur M; Cheung, Joseph Y

    2015-07-01

    We evaluated whether phospholemman (PLM) regulates L-type Ca(2+) current (ICa) in mouse ventricular myocytes. Expression of α1-subunit of L-type Ca(2+) channels between wild-type (WT) and PLM knockout (KO) hearts was similar. Compared to WT myocytes, peak ICa (at -10 mV) from KO myocytes was ~41% larger, the inactivation time constant (τ(inact)) of ICa was ~39% longer, but deactivation time constant (τ(deact)) was similar. In the presence of isoproterenol (1 μM), peak ICa was ~48% larger and τ(inact) was ~144% higher in KO myocytes. With Ba(2+) as the permeant ion, PLM enhanced voltage-dependent inactivation but had no effect on τ(deact). To dissect the molecular determinants by which PLM regulated ICa, we expressed PLM mutants by adenovirus-mediated gene transfer in cultured KO myocytes. After 24h in culture, KO myocytes expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) had significantly larger peak ICa and longer τ(inact) than KO myocytes expressing WT PLM; thereby independently confirming the observations in freshly isolated myocytes. Compared to KO myocytes expressing GFP, KO myocytes expressing the cytoplasmic domain truncation mutant (TM43), the non-phosphorylatable S68A mutant, the phosphomimetic S68E mutant, and the signature PFXYD to alanine (ALL5) mutant all resulted in lower peak ICa. Expressing PLM mutants did not alter expression of α1-subunit of L-type Ca(2+) channels in cultured KO myocytes. Our results suggested that both the extracellular PFXYD motif and the transmembrane domain of PLM but not the cytoplasmic tail were necessary for regulation of peak ICa amplitude. We conclude that PLM limits Ca(2+) influx in cardiac myocytes by reducing maximal ICa and accelerating voltage-dependent inactivation.

  12. Regulation of L-type calcium channel by phospholemman in cardiac myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xue-Qian; Wang, JuFang; Song, Jianliang; Rabinowitz, Joseph; Chen, Xiongwen; Houser, Steven R.; Peterson, Blaise Z.; Tucker, Amy L.; Feldman, Arthur M.; Cheung, Joseph Y.

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated whether phospholemman (PLM) regulates L-type Ca2+ current (ICa) in mouse ventricular myocytes. Expression of α1-subunit of L-type Ca2+ channels between wild-type (WT) and PLM knockout (KO) hearts was similar. Compared to WT myocytes, peak ICa (at −10 mV) from KO myocytes was ~41% larger, the inactivation time constant (τinact) of ICa was ~39% longer, but deactivation time constant (τdeact) was similar. In the presence of isoproterenol (1 µM), peak ICa was ~48% larger and τinact was ~144% higher in KO myocytes. With Ba2+ as the permeant ion, PLM enhanced voltage-dependent inactivation but had no effect on τdeact. To dissect the molecular determinants by which PLM regulated ICa, we expressed PLM mutants by adenovirus- mediated gene transfer in cultured KO myocytes. After 24 h in culture, KO myocytes expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) had significantly larger peak ICa and longer τinact than KO myocytes expressing WT PLM; thereby independently confirming the observations in freshly isolated myocytes. Compared to KO myocytes expressing GFP, KO myocytes expressing the cytoplasmic domain truncation mutant (TM43), the non-phosphorylable S68A mutant, the phosphomimetic S68E mutant, and the signature PFXYD to alanine (ALL5) mutant all resulted in lower peak ICa. Expressing PLM mutants did not alter expression of α1-subunit of L-type Ca2+ channels in cultured KO myocytes. Our results suggested that both the extracellular PFXYD motif and the transmembrane domain of PLM but not the cytoplasmic tail were necessary for regulation of peak ICa amplitude. We conclude that PLM limits Ca2+ influx in cardiac myocytes by reducing maximal ICa and accelerating voltage-dependent inactivation. PMID:25918050

  13. Immunohistological demonstration of CaV3.2 T-type voltage-gated calcium channel expression in soma of dorsal root ganglion neurons and peripheral axons of rat and mouse

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Kirstin E.; Lunardi, Nadia; Boscolo, Annalisa; Dong, Xinzhong; Erisir, Alev; Jevtovic-Todorovic, Vesna; Todorovic, Slobodan M.

    2013-01-01

    Previous behavioural studies have revealed that CaV3.2 T-type calcium channels support peripheral nociceptive transmission and electrophysiological studies have established the presence of T-currents in putative nociceptive sensory neurons of dorsal root ganglion (DRG). To date, however, the localization pattern of this key nociceptive channel in the soma and peripheral axons of these cells has not been demonstrated due to lack of isoform-selective anti-CaV3.2 antibodies. In the present study a new polyclonal CaV3.2 antibody is used to localize CaV3.2 expression in rodent DRG neurons using different staining techniques including confocal and electron microscopy. Confocal microscopy of both acutely dissociated cells and short-term cultures demonstrated strong immunofluorescence of anti-CaV3.2 antibody that was largely confined to smaller diameter DRG neurons where it co-localized with established immuno-markers of unmyelinated nociceptors, such as, CGRP, IB4 and peripherin. In contrast, a smaller proportion of these CaV3.2-labeled DRG cells also co-expressed NF-200, a marker of myelinated sensory neurons. In the rat sciatic nerve preparation, confocal microscopy demonstrated anti-CaV3.2 immunofluorescence which was co-localized with both peripherin and NF-200. Further, electron microscopy revealed immuno-gold labelling of CaV3.2 preferentially in association with un-myelinated sensory fibres from mouse sciatic nerve. Finally, we demonstrated the expression of CaV3.2 channels in peripheral nerve endings of mouse hindpaw skin as shown by co-localisation with Mrgpd-GFP-positive fibres. The CaV3.2 expression within the soma and peripheral axons of nociceptive sensory neurons further demonstrates the importance of this channel in peripheral pain transmission. PMID:23867767

  14. Short-term exposure to L-type calcium channel blocker, verapamil, alters the expression pattern of calcium-binding proteins in the brain of goldfish, Carassius auratus.

    PubMed

    Palande, Nikhil V; Bhoyar, Rahul C; Biswas, Saikat P; Jadhao, Arun G

    2015-01-01

    The influx of calcium ions (Ca(2+)) is responsible for various physiological events including neurotransmitter release and synaptic modulation. The L-type voltage dependent calcium channels (L-type VDCCs) transport Ca(2+) across the membrane. Calcium-binding proteins (CaBPs) bind free cytosolic Ca(2+) and prevent excitotoxicity caused by sudden increase in cytoplasmic Ca(2+). The present study was aimed to understand the regulation of expression of neuronal CaBPs, namely, calretinin (CR) and parvalbumin (PV) following blockade of L-type VDCCs in the CNS of Carassius auratus. Verapamil (VRP), a potent L-type VDCC blocker, selectively blocks Ca(2+) entry at the plasma membrane level. VRP present in the aquatic environment at a very low residual concentration has shown ecotoxicological effects on aquatic animals. Following acute exposure for 96h, median lethal concentration (LC50) for VRP was found to be 1.22mg/L for goldfish. At various doses of VRP, the behavioral alterations were observed in the form of respiratory difficulty and loss of body balance confirming the cardiovascular toxicity caused by VRP at higher doses. In addition to affecting the cardiovascular system, VRP also showed effects on the nervous system in the form of altered expression of PV. When compared with controls, the pattern of CR expression did not show any variations, while PV expression showed significant alterations in few neuronal populations such as the pretectal nucleus, inferior lobes, and the rostral corpus cerebellum. Our result suggests possible regulatory effect of calcium channel blockers on the expression of PV. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Lateral mobility of L-type calcium channels in synaptic terminals of retinal bipolar cells.

    PubMed

    Thoreson, Wallace B; Mercer, Aaron J; Cork, Karlene M; Szalewski, Robert J

    2013-01-01

    Efficient and precise release of glutamate from retinal bipolar cells is ensured by the positioning of L-type Ca(2+) channels close to release sites at the base of the synaptic ribbon. We investigated whether Ca(2+) channels at bipolar cell ribbon synapses are fixed in position or capable of moving in the membrane. We tracked the movements of individual L-type Ca(2+) channels in bipolar cell terminals after labeling channels with quantum dots (QDs) attached to α(2)δ(4) accessory Ca(2+) channel subunits via intermediary antibodies. We found that individual Ca(2+) channels moved within a confined domain of 0.13-0.15 μm(2) in bipolar cell terminals, similar to ultrastructural estimates of the surface area of the active zone beneath the ribbon. Disruption of actin expanded the confinement domain indicating that cytoskeletal interactions help to confine channels at the synapse, but the relatively large diffusion coefficients of 0.3-0.45 μm(2)/s suggest that channels are not directly anchored to actin. Unlike photoreceptor synapses, removing membrane cholesterol did not change domain size, indicating that lipid rafts are not required to confine Ca(2+) channels at bipolar cell ribbon synapses. The ability of Ca(2+) channels to move within the presynaptic active zone suggests that regulating channel mobility may affect release from bipolar cell terminals.

  16. Contribution of downregulation of L-type calcium currents to delayed neuronal death in rat hippocampus after global cerebral ischemia and reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Ming; Yang, Jian-Ming; Hu, De-Hui; Hou, Feng-Qing; Zhao, Miao; Zhu, Xin-Hong; Wang, Ying; Li, Jian-Guo; Hu, Ping; Chen, Liang; Qin, Lu-Ning; Gao, Tian-Ming

    2007-05-09

    Transient forebrain ischemia induces delayed, selective neuronal death in the CA1 region of the hippocampus. The underlying molecular mechanisms are as yet unclear, but it is known that activation of L-type Ca2+ channels specifically increases the expression of a group of genes required for neuronal survival. Accordingly, we examined temporal changes in L-type calcium-channel activity in CA1 and CA3 pyramidal neurons of rat hippocampus after transient forebrain ischemia by patch-clamp techniques. In vulnerable CA1 neurons, L-type Ca2+-channel activity was persistently downregulated after ischemic insult, whereas in invulnerable CA3 neurons, no change occurred. Downregulation of L-type calcium channels was partially caused by oxidation modulation in postischemic channels. Furthermore, L-type but neither N-type nor P/Q-type Ca2+-channel antagonists alone significantly inhibited the survival of cultured hippocampal neurons. In contrast, specific L-type calcium-channel agonist remarkably reduced neuronal cell death and restored the inhibited channels induced by nitric oxide donor. More importantly, L-type calcium-channel agonist applied after reoxygenation or reperfusion significantly decreased neuronal injury in in vitro oxygen-glucose deprivation ischemic model and in animals subjected to forebrain ischemia-reperfusion. Together, the present results suggest that ischemia-induced inhibition of L-type calcium currents may give rise to delayed death of neurons in the CA1 region, possibly via oxidation mechanisms. Our findings may lead to a new perspective on neuronal death after ischemic insult and suggest that a novel therapeutic approach, activation of L-type calcium channels, could be tested at late stages of reperfusion for stroke treatment.

  17. Quercetin induces insulin secretion by direct activation of L-type calcium channels in pancreatic beta cells

    PubMed Central

    Bardy, G; Virsolvy, A; Quignard, J F; Ravier, M A; Bertrand, G; Dalle, S; Cros, G; Magous, R; Richard, S; Oiry, C

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Quercetin is a natural polyphenolic flavonoid that displays anti-diabetic properties in vivo. Its mechanism of action on insulin-secreting beta cells is poorly documented. In this work, we have analysed the effects of quercetin both on insulin secretion and on the intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) in beta cells, in the absence of any co-stimulating factor. Experimental Approach Experiments were performed on both INS-1 cell line and rat isolated pancreatic islets. Insulin release was quantified by the homogeneous time-resolved fluorescence method. Variations in [Ca2+]i were measured using the ratiometric fluorescent Ca2+ indicator Fura-2. Ca2+ channel currents were recorded with the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. Key Results Quercetin concentration-dependently increased insulin secretion and elevated [Ca2+]i. These effects were not modified by the SERCA inhibitor thapsigargin (1 μmol·L−1), but were nearly abolished by the L-type Ca2+ channel antagonist nifedipine (1 μmol·L−1). Similar to the L-type Ca2+ channel agonist Bay K 8644, quercetin enhanced the L-type Ca2+ current by shifting its voltage-dependent activation towards negative potentials, leading to the increase in [Ca2+]i and insulin secretion. The effects of quercetin were not inhibited in the presence of a maximally active concentration of Bay K 8644 (1 μmol·L−1), with the two drugs having cumulative effects on [Ca2+]i. Conclusions and Implications Taken together, our results show that quercetin stimulates insulin secretion by increasing Ca2+ influx through an interaction with L-type Ca2+ channels at a site different from that of Bay K 8644. These data contribute to a better understanding of quercetin's mechanism of action on insulin secretion. PMID:23530660

  18. L-type calcium channel blockers enhance 5-HTP-induced antinociception in mice.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jian-hui; Li, Jun-xu; Wang, Xu-hua; Chen, Bi; Lu, Ying; Zhang, Pan; Han, Rong; Ye, Xiang-feng

    2004-05-01

    To investigate the involvement of L-type Ca(2+) channels in antinociceptive action induced by the 5-HT precursor, 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP). Female Kunming mice were treated with either 5-HTP (20-80 mg/kg, ip) alone, or the combination of 5-HTP and fluoxetine (2-8 mg/kg, ip), pargyline (15-60 mg/kg, ip), nimodipine (2.5-10 mg/kg, ip), nifedipine (2.5-10 mg/kg, ip), verapamil (2.5-10 mg/kg, ip), CaCl(2) (5-20 mmol/L, icv), or EGTA (0.5-3 mmol/L, icv) prior to the hot-plate test (55 degree, hind-paw licking latency). In addition, locomotor activity in mice treated with 5-HTP alone was measured using an ambulometer with five activity boxes. Ip injection of 5-HTP alone had no influence on the spontaneous locomotor activity, whereas dose-dependently increased the latency to licking hind-paw in the hot-plate test in mice. The inhibitory effects of 5-HTP on nociceptive response were significantly enhanced by fluoxetine in the mouse hot-plate test. At a sub-effective dose, pargyline could cause a leftward shift in the dose-response curve of 5-HTP-induced antinociception. Co-administration with 5-HTP and nimodipine, nifedipine, or verapamil obviously potentiated the antinociceptive effects elicited by 5-HTP. Interestingly, 5-HTP-induced antinociception was antagonized by CaCl(2) and enhanced by EGTA injected icv in the mouse hot-plate test. These findings suggest that systemic administration of 5-HTP may yield the antinociceptive effects, which are related to Ca(2+) influx from extracellular fluid through L-type Ca(2+) channels.

  19. Inhibition of voltage-gated potassium channels mediates uncarboxylated osteocalcin-regulated insulin secretion in rat pancreatic β cells.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jingying; Zhong, Xiangqin; Ding, Yaqin; Bai, Tao; Wang, Hui; Wu, Hongbin; Liu, Yunfeng; Yang, Jing; Zhang, Yi

    2016-04-15

    Insulin secretion from pancreatic β cells is important to maintain glucose homeostasis and is regulated by electrical activities. Uncarboxylated osteocalcin, a bone-derived protein, has been reported to regulate glucose metabolism by increasing insulin secretion, stimulating β cell proliferation and improving insulin sensitivity. But the underlying mechanisms of uncarboxylated osteocalcin-modulated insulin secretion remain unclear. In the present study, we investigated the relationship of uncarboxylated osteocalcin-regulated insulin secretion and voltage-gated potassium (KV) channels, voltage-gated calcium channels in rat β cells. Insulin secretion was measured by radioimmunoassay. Channel currents and membrane action potentials were recorded using the conventional whole-cell patch-clamp technique. Calcium imaging system was used to analyze intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i). The data show that under 16.7mmol/l glucose conditions uncarboxylated osteocalcin alone increased insulin secretion and [Ca(2+)]i, but with no such effects on insulin secretion and [Ca(2+)]i in the presence of a KV channel blocker, tetraethylammonium chloride. In the patch-clamp experiments, uncarboxylated osteocalcin lengthened action potential duration and significantly inhibited KV currents, but had no influence on the characteristics of voltage-gated calcium channels. These results indicate that KV channels are involved in uncarboxylated osteocalcin-regulated insulin secretion in rat pancreatic β cells. By inhibiting KV channels, uncarboxylated osteocalcin prolongs action potential duration, increases intracellular Ca(2+) concentration and finally promotes insulin secretion. This finding provides new insight into the mechanisms of osteocalcin-modulated insulin secretion.

  20. Sigma receptor activation inhibits voltage-gated sodium channels in rat intracardiac ganglion neurons

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongling; Katnik, Christopher; Cuevas, Javier

    2010-01-01

    Sigma (σ) receptors have been shown to regulate multiple ion channel types in intracardiac ganglion neurons, including voltage-gated calcium and potassium channels. However, the inhibition of these channels alone cannot fully account for σ receptor-induced changes in neuronal excitability previously reported. Whole-cell patch clamp experiments were conducted under current-clamp mode in isolated intracardiac neurons from neonatal rats to assess the effects of σ receptor activation on the active membrane properties of these cells. Bath application of the pan-selective σ receptor agonist, 1,3-Di-o-tolylguanidine (DTG), and the σ-1-selective agonist, (+)-pentazocine, significantly increased the action potential latency and decreased action potential overshoot in response to depolarizing current ramps, which suggests inhibition of voltage-gated sodium channels. Whole-cell voltage clamp experiments showed that these σ agonists reversibly decrease depolarization-activated Na+ currents in these cells at all potentials tested. The peak currents generated by membrane depolarizations were decreased in a dose dependent manner with IC50 values for DTG and (+)-pentazocine of 32 μM and 49 μM, respectively. The σ-1 receptor-selective antagonist, BD 1063 (100 nM), inhibited DTG (30 μM) block of Na+ currents by ∼ 50%, suggesting that the effects are mediated by activation of σ-1 receptors. DTG also shifted the steady-state inactivation curve of Na+ channels to more negative potentials, with the membrane potential of half-activation shifting from -49 mV to -63 mV in the absence and presence of 30 μM DTG, respectively. Taken together, these results suggest that σ-1 receptor activation decreases intracardiac ganglion neuron excitability by modulating voltage-gated Na+ channels. PMID:21383893

  1. Lateral Mobility of Presynaptic L-Type Calcium Channels at Photoreceptor Ribbon Synapses

    PubMed Central

    Mercer, Aaron J.; Chen, Minghui; Thoreson, Wallace B.

    2011-01-01

    At most synapses, presynaptic Ca2+ channels are positioned near vesicle release sites, and increasing this distance reduces synaptic strength. We examined the lateral membrane mobility of presynaptic L-type Ca2+ channels at photoreceptor ribbon synapses of the tiger salamander (Ambystoma tigrinum) retina. Movements of individual Ca2+ channels were tracked by coupling quantum dots to an antibody against the extracellular α2δ4 Ca2+ channel subunit. α2δ4 antibodies labeled photoreceptor terminals and co-localized with antibodies to synaptic vesicle protein SV2 and Ca2+ channel CaV1.4 α1 subunits. The results show that Ca2+ channels are dynamic and move within a confined region beneath the synaptic ribbon. The size of this confinement area is regulated by actin and membrane cholesterol. Fusion of nearby synaptic vesicles caused jumps in Ca2+ channel position, propelling them towards the outer edge of the confinement domain. Channels rebounded rapidly towards the center. Thus, although CaV channels are mobile, molecular scaffolds confine them beneath the ribbon to maintain neurotransmission even at high release rates. PMID:21430141

  2. Modifying L-type calcium current kinetics: consequences for cardiac excitation and arrhythmia dynamics.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Aman; Sato, Daisuke; Shiferaw, Yohannes; Baher, Ali; Xie, Lai-Hua; Peralta, Robert; Olcese, Riccardo; Garfinkel, Alan; Qu, Zhilin; Weiss, James N

    2008-01-15

    The L-type Ca current (I(Ca,L)), essential for normal cardiac function, also regulates dynamic action potential (AP) properties that promote ventricular fibrillation. Blocking I(Ca,L) can prevent ventricular fibrillation, but only at levels suppressing contractility. We speculated that, instead of blocking I(Ca,L), modifying its shape by altering kinetic features could produce equivalent anti-fibrillatory effects without depressing contractility. To test this concept experimentally, we overexpressed a mutant Ca-insensitive calmodulin (CaM(1234)) in rabbit ventricular myocytes to inhibit Ca-dependent I(Ca,L) inactivation, combined with the ATP-sensitive K current agonist pinacidil or I(Ca,L) blocker verapamil to maintain AP duration (APD) near control levels. Cell shortening was enhanced in pinacidil-treated myocytes, but depressed in verapamil-treated myocytes. Both combinations flattened APD restitution slope and prevented APD alternans, similar to I(Ca,L) blockade. To predict the arrhythmogenic consequences, we simulated the cellular effects using a new AP model, which reproduced flattening of APD restitution slope and prevention of APD/Ca(i) transient alternans but maintained a normal Ca(i) transient. In simulated two-dimensional cardiac tissue, these changes prevented the arrhythmogenic spatially discordant APD/Ca(i) transient alternans and spiral wave breakup. These findings provide a proof-of-concept test that I(Ca,L) can be targeted to increase dynamic wave stability without depressing contractility, which may have promise as an antifibrillatory strategy.

  3. Animal Toxins Influence Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel Function

    PubMed Central

    Gilchrist, John

    2017-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium (Nav) channels are essential contributors to neuronal excitability, making them the most commonly targeted ion channel family by toxins found in animal venoms. These molecules can be used to probe the functional aspects of Nav channels on a molecular level and to explore their physiological role in normal and diseased tissues. This chapter summarizes our existing knowledge of the mechanisms by which animal toxins influence Nav channels as well as their potential application in designing therapeutic drugs. PMID:24737238

  4. The voltage-gated potassium channels and their relatives.

    PubMed

    Yellen, Gary

    2002-09-05

    The voltage-gated potassium channels are the prototypical members of a family of membrane signalling proteins. These protein-based machines have pores that pass millions of ions per second across the membrane with astonishing selectivity, and their gates snap open and shut in milliseconds as they sense changes in voltage or ligand concentration. The architectural modules and functional components of these sophisticated signalling molecules are becoming clear, but some important links remain to be elucidated.

  5. RIM - binding proteins (RBPs) couple Rab3 - interacting molecules (RIMs) to voltage - gated Ca2+ channels

    PubMed Central

    Hibino, H.; Pironkova, R.; Onwumere, O.; Vologodskaia, M.; Hudspeth, A. J.; Lesage, F.

    2007-01-01

    Summary Ca2+ influx through voltage-gated channels initiates the exocytotic fusion of synaptic vesicles to the plasma membrane. Here we show that RIM-binding proteins (RBPs), which associate with Ca2+ channels in hair cells, photoreceptors, and neurons, interact with α1D (L-type) and α1B (N-type) Ca2+-channel subunits. RBPs contain three Src homology 3 domains that bind to proline-rich motifs in α1 subunits and Rab3-interacting molecules (RIMs). Overexpression in PC12 cells of fusion proteins that suppress the interactions of RBPs with RIMs and α1 augments the exocytosis triggered by depolarization. RBPs may regulate the strength of synaptic transmission by creating a functional link between the synaptic-vesicle tethering apparatus, which includes RIMs and Rab3, and the fusion machinery, which includes Ca2+ channels and the SNARE complex. PMID:11988172

  6. Broad-spectrum antiemetic efficacy of the L-type calcium channel blocker amlodipine in the least shrew (Cryptotis parva).

    PubMed

    Zhong, Weixia; Chebolu, Seetha; Darmani, Nissar A

    2014-05-01

    The dihydropyridine l-type calcium (Ca(2+)) channel blockers nifedipine and amlodipine reduce extracellular Ca(2+) entry into cells. They are widely used for the treatment of hypertensive disorders. We have recently demonstrated that extracellular Ca(2+) entry via l-type Ca(2+) channels is involved in emesis and that nifedipine has broad-spectrum antiemetic activity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antiemetic efficacy of the longer-acting l-type Ca(2+) channel blocker, amlodipine. Fully effective emetic doses of diverse emetogens such as the l-type Ca(2+) channel agonist (FPL 64176) as well as selective and/or nonselective agonists of serotonergic 5-HT3 (e.g. 5-HT or 2-Me-5-HT)-, dopamine D2 (e.g. apomorphine or quinpirole)-, cholinergic M1 (e.g. pilocarpine or McN-A343)- and tachykininergic NK1 (e.g. GR73632)-receptors, were administered intraperitoneally (i.p.) in the least shrew to induce vomiting. The broad-spectrum antiemetic potential of amlodipine was evaluated against these emetogens. Subcutaneous (s.c.) administration of amlodipine (0.5-10mg/kg) attenuated in a dose-dependent and potent manner both the frequency and percentage of shrews vomiting in response to intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of FPL 64176 (10mg/kg), 5-HT (5mg/kg), 2-Me-5-HT (5mg/kg), apomorphine (2mg/kg), quinpirole (2mg/kg), pilocarpine (2mg/kg), McN-A343 (2mg/kg), or GR73632 (5mg/kg). A combination of non-effective doses of amlodipine (0.5mg/kg, s.c.) and the 5-HT3 receptor antagonist palonosetron (0.05 mg/kg, s.c.) was more effective against FPL 64176-induced vomiting than their corresponding doses tested alone. Amlodipine by itself suppressed the frequency of acute cisplatin (10mg/kg, i.p)-induced vomiting in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, a combination of a non-effective dose of amlodipine (1mg/kg) potentiated the antiemetic efficacy of a semi-effective dose of palonosetron (0.5mg/kg, s.c.) against acute vomiting caused by cisplatin. We confirm that influx of

  7. Voltage-gated calcium channel and antisense oligonucleotides thereto

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hruska, Keith A. (Inventor); Friedman, Peter A. (Inventor); Barry, Elizabeth L. R. (Inventor); Duncan, Randall L. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    An antisense oligonucleotide of 10 to 35 nucleotides in length that can hybridize with a region of the .alpha..sub.1 subunit of the SA-Cat channel gene DNA or mRNA is provided, together with pharmaceutical compositions containing and methods utilizing such antisense oligonucleotide.

  8. Ion-dependent Inactivation of Barium Current through L-type Calcium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Gonzalo; Yi, Jianxun; Ríos, Eduardo; Shirokov, Roman

    1997-01-01

    It is widely believed that Ba2+ currents carried through L-type Ca2+ channels inactivate by a voltage- dependent mechanism similar to that described for other voltage-dependent channels. Studying ionic and gating currents of rabbit cardiac Ca2+ channels expressed in different subunit combinations in tsA201 cells, we found a phase of Ba2+ current decay with characteristics of ion-dependent inactivation. Upon a long duration (20 s) depolarizing pulse, IBa decayed as the sum of two exponentials. The slow phase (τ ≈ 6 s, 21°C) was parallel to a reduction of gating charge mobile at positive voltages, which was determined in the same cells. The fast phase of current decay (τ ≈ 600 ms), involving about 50% of total decay, was not accompanied by decrease of gating currents. Its amplitude depended on voltage with a characteristic U-shape, reflecting reduction of inactivation at positive voltages. When Na+ was used as the charge carrier, decay of ionic current followed a single exponential, of rate similar to that of the slow decay of Ba2+ current. The reduction of Ba2+ current during a depolarizing pulse was not due to changes in the concentration gradients driving ion movement, because Ba2+ entry during the pulse did not change the reversal potential for Ba2+. A simple model of Ca2+-dependent inactivation (Shirokov, R., R. Levis, N. Shirokova, and E. Ríos. 1993. J. Gen. Physiol. 102:1005–1030) robustly accounts for fast Ba2+ current decay assuming the affinity of the inactivation site on the α1 subunit to be 100 times lower for Ba2+ than Ca2+. PMID:9101404

  9. The Involvement of Ser1898 of the Human L-Type Calcium Channel in Evoked Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Bachnoff, Niv; Cohen-Kutner, Moshe; Atlas, Daphne

    2011-01-01

    A PKA consensus phosphorylation site S1928 at the α11.2 subunit of the rabbit cardiac L-type channel, CaV1.2, is involved in the regulation of CaV1.2 kinetics and affects catecholamine secretion. This mutation does not alter basal CaV1.2 current properties or regulation of CaV1.2 current by PKA and the beta-adrenergic receptor, but abolishes CaV1.2 phosphorylation by PKA. Here, we test the contribution of the corresponding PKA phosphorylation site of the human α11.2 subunit S1898, to the regulation of catecholamine secretion in bovine chromaffin cells. Chromaffin cells were infected with a Semliki-Forest viral vector containing either the human wt or a mutated S1898A α11.2 subunit. Both subunits harbor a T1036Y mutation conferring nifedipine insensitivity. Secretion evoked by depolarization in the presence of nifedipine was monitored by amperometry. Depolarization-triggered secretion in cells infected with either the wt α11.2 or α11.2/S1898A mutated subunit was elevated to a similar extent by forskolin. Forskolin, known to directly activate adenylyl-cyclase, increased the rate of secretion in a manner that is largely independent of the presence of S1898. Our results are consistent with the involvement of additional PKA regulatory site(s) at the C-tail of α11.2, the pore forming subunit of CaV1.2. PMID:22216029

  10. Population Density and Moment-based Approaches to Modeling Domain Calcium-mediated Inactivation of L-type Calcium Channels.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao; Hardcastle, Kiah; Weinberg, Seth H; Smith, Gregory D

    2016-03-01

    We present a population density and moment-based description of the stochastic dynamics of domain [Formula: see text]-mediated inactivation of L-type [Formula: see text] channels. Our approach accounts for the effect of heterogeneity of local [Formula: see text] signals on whole cell [Formula: see text] currents; however, in contrast with prior work, e.g., Sherman et al. (Biophys J 58(4):985-995, 1990), we do not assume that [Formula: see text] domain formation and collapse are fast compared to channel gating. We demonstrate the population density and moment-based modeling approaches using a 12-state Markov chain model of an L-type [Formula: see text] channel introduced by Greenstein and Winslow (Biophys J 83(6):2918-2945, 2002). Simulated whole cell voltage clamp responses yield an inactivation function for the whole cell [Formula: see text] current that agrees with the traditional approach when domain dynamics are fast. We analyze the voltage-dependence of [Formula: see text] inactivation that may occur via slow heterogeneous domain [[Formula: see text

  11. Orexin-A potentiates L-type calcium/barium currents in rat retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, F; Weng, S-J; Yang, X-L; Zhong, Y-M

    2015-10-01

    Two neuropeptides, orexin-A and orexin-B (also called hypocretin-1 and -2), have been implicated in sleep/wake regulation, feeding behaviors via the activation of two subtypes of G-protein-coupled receptors: orexin 1 and orexin 2 receptors (OX1R and OX2R). While the expression of orexins and orexin receptors is immunohistochemically revealed in retinal neurons, the function of these peptides in the retina is largely unknown. Using whole-cell patch-clamp recordings in rat retinal slices, we demonstrated that orexin-A increased L-type-like barium currents (IBa,L) in ganglion cells (GCs), and the effect was blocked by the selective OX1R antagonist SB334867, but not by the OX2R antagonist TCS OX2 29. The orexin-A effect was abolished by intracellular dialysis of GDP-β-S/GPAnt-2A, a Gq protein inhibitor, suggesting the mediation of Gq. Additionally, during internal dialysis of the phosphatidylinositol (PI)-phospholipase C (PLC) inhibitor U73122, orexin-A did not change the IBa,L of GCs, whereas the orexin-A effect persisted in the presence of the phosphatidylcholine (PC)-PLC inhibitor D609. The orexin-A-induced potentiation was not seen with internal infusion of Ca(2+)-free solution or when inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3)-sensitive Ca(2+) release from intracellular stores was blocked by heparin/xestospongins-C. Moreover, the orexin-A effect was mimicked by the protein kinase C (PKC) activator phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, but was eliminated when PKC was inhibited by bisindolylmaleimide IV (Bis-IV)/Gö6976. Neither adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP)-protein kinase A (PKA) nor guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP)-protein kinase G (PKG) signaling pathway was likely involved, as orexin-A persisted to potentiate the IBa,L of GCs no matter these two pathways were activated or inhibited. These results suggest that, by activating OX1R, orexin-A potentiates the IBa,L of rat GCs through a distinct Gq/PI-PLC/IP3/Ca(2+)/PKC signaling pathway.

  12. Vitamin E isomer δ-tocopherol enhances the efficiency of neural stem cell differentiation via L-type calcium channel.

    PubMed

    Deng, Sihao; Hou, Guoqiang; Xue, Zhiqin; Zhang, Longmei; Zhou, Yuye; Liu, Chao; Liu, Yanqing; Li, Zhiyuan

    2015-01-12

    The effects of the vitamin E isomer δ-tocopherol on neural stem cell (NSC) differentiation have not been investigated until now. Here we investigated the effects of δ-tocopherol on NSC neural differentiation, maturation and its possible mechanisms. Neonatal rat NSCs were grown in suspended neurosphere cultures, and were identified by their expression of nestin protein and their capacity for self-renewal. Treatment with a low concentration of δ-tocopherol induced a significant increase in the percentage of β-III-tubulin-positive cells. δ-Tocopherol also stimulated morphological maturation of neurons in culture. We further observed that δ-tocopherol stimulation increased the expression of voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels. Moreover, a L-type specific Ca(2+) channel blocker verapamil reduced the percentage of differentiated neurons after δ-tocopherol treatment, and blocked the effects of δ-tocopherol on NSC differentiation into neurons. Together, our study demonstrates that δ-tocopherol may act through elevation of L-type calcium channel activity to increase neuronal differentiation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Voltage-sensing domain of voltage-gated proton channel Hv1 shares mechanism of block with pore domains

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Liang; Pathak, Medha M.; Kim, Iris H.; Ta, Dennis; Tombola, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Voltage-gated sodium, potassium, and calcium channels are made of a pore domain (PD) controlled by four voltage-sensing domains (VSDs). The PD contains the ion permeation pathway and the activation gate located on the intracellular side of the membrane. A large number of small molecules are known to inhibit the PD by acting as open channel blockers. The voltage-gated proton channel Hv1 is made of two VSDs and lacks the PD. The location of the activation gate in the VSD is unknown and open channel blockers for VSDs have not yet been identified. Here we describe a class of small molecules which act as open channel blockers on the Hv1 VSD and find that a highly conserved phenylalanine in the charge transfer center of the VSD plays a key role in blocker binding. We then use one of the blockers to show that Hv1 contains two intracellular and allosterically-coupled gates. PMID:23352164

  14. Scientific evidence contradicts findings and assumptions of Canadian Safety Panel 6: microwaves act through voltage-gated calcium channel activation to induce biological impacts at non-thermal levels, supporting a paradigm shift for microwave/lower frequency electromagnetic field action.

    PubMed

    Pall, Martin L

    2015-01-01

    This review considers a paradigm shift on microwave electromagnetic field (EMF) action from only thermal effects to action via voltage-gated calcium channel (VGCC) activation. Microwave/lower frequency EMFs were shown in two dozen studies to act via VGCC activation because all effects studied were blocked by calcium channel blockers. This mode of action was further supported by hundreds of studies showing microwave changes in calcium fluxes and intracellular calcium [Ca2+]i signaling. The biophysical properties of VGCCs/similar channels make them particularly sensitive to low intensity, non-thermal EMF exposures. Non-thermal studies have shown that in most cases pulsed fields are more active than are non-pulsed fields and that exposures within certain intensity windows have much large biological effects than do either lower or higher intensity exposures; these are both consistent with a VGCC role but inconsistent with only a heating/thermal role. Downstream effects of VGCC activation include calcium signaling, elevated nitric oxide (NO), NO signaling, peroxynitrite, free radical formation, and oxidative stress. Downstream effects explain repeatedly reported biological responses to non-thermal exposures: oxidative stress; single and double strand breaks in cellular DNA; cancer; male and female infertility; lowered melatonin/sleep disruption; cardiac changes including tachycardia, arrhythmia, and sudden cardiac death; diverse neuropsychiatric effects including depression; and therapeutic effects. Non-VGCC non-thermal mechanisms may occur, but none have been shown to have effects in mammals. Biologically relevant safety standards can be developed through studies of cell lines/cell cultures with high levels of different VGCCs, measuring their responses to different EMF exposures. The 2014 Canadian Report by a panel of experts only recognizes thermal effects regarding safety standards for non-ionizing radiation exposures. Its position is therefore contradicted by each

  15. Science Signaling Podcast for 24 January 2017: Tissue-specific regulation of L-type calcium channels

    PubMed Central

    Hell, Johannes W.; Navedo, Manuel F.; VanHook, Annalisa M.

    2017-01-01

    This Podcast features an interview with Johannes Hell and Manuel Navedo, senior authors of two Research Articles that appear in the 24 January 2017 issue of Science Signaling, about tissue-specific regulation of the L-type calcium channel CaV1.2. This channel is present in many tissues, including the heart, vasculature, and brain, and allows calcium to flow into cells when it is activated. Signaling through the β-adrenergic receptor (βAR) stimulates CaV1.2 activity in heart cells and neurons to accelerate heart rate and increase neuronal excitability, respectively. Using mouse models, Qian et al. found that βAR-mediated enhancement of CaV1.2 activity in the brain required phosphorylation of Ser1928, whereas βAR-mediated enhancement of CaV1.2 activity in the heart did not require phosphorylation of this residue. In a related study, Nystoriak et al. demonstrated that phosphorylation of Ser1928 in arterial myocytes was required for vasoconstriction during acute hyperglycemia and in diabetic mice. These findings demonstrate tissue-specific differences in CaV1.2 regulation and suggest that it may be possible to design therapies to target this channel in specific tissues. PMID:28119457

  16. Science Signaling Podcast for 24 January 2017: Tissue-specific regulation of L-type calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Hell, Johannes W; Navedo, Manuel F; VanHook, Annalisa M

    2017-01-24

    This Podcast features an interview with Johannes Hell and Manuel Navedo, senior authors of two Research Articles that appear in the 24 January 2017 issue of Science Signaling, about tissue-specific regulation of the L-type calcium channel CaV1.2. This channel is present in many tissues, including the heart, vasculature, and brain, and allows calcium to flow into cells when it is activated. Signaling through the β-adrenergic receptor (βAR) stimulates CaV1.2 activity in heart cells and neurons to accelerate heart rate and increase neuronal excitability, respectively. Using mouse models, Qian et al found that βAR-mediated enhancement of CaV1.2 activity in the brain required phosphorylation of Ser(1928), whereas βAR-mediated enhancement of CaV1.2 activity in the heart did not require phosphorylation of this residue. In a related study, Nystoriak et al demonstrated that phosphorylation of Ser(1928) in arterial myocytes was required for vasoconstriction during acute hyperglycemia and in diabetic mice. These findings demonstrate tissue-specific differences in CaV1.2 regulation and suggest that it may be possible to design therapies to target this channel in specific tissues.Listen to Podcast. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  17. Splice variants of the CaV1.3 L-type calcium channel regulate dendritic spine morphology

    PubMed Central

    Stanika, Ruslan; Campiglio, Marta; Pinggera, Alexandra; Lee, Amy; Striessnig, Jörg; Flucher, Bernhard E.; Obermair, Gerald J.

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic spines are the postsynaptic compartments of glutamatergic synapses in the brain. Their number and shape are subject to change in synaptic plasticity and neurological disorders including autism spectrum disorders and Parkinson’s disease. The L-type calcium channel CaV1.3 constitutes an important calcium entry pathway implicated in the regulation of spine morphology. Here we investigated the importance of full-length CaV1.3L and two C-terminally truncated splice variants (CaV1.342A and CaV1.343S) and their modulation by densin-180 and shank1b for the morphology of dendritic spines of cultured hippocampal neurons. Live-cell immunofluorescence and super-resolution microscopy of epitope-tagged CaV1.3L revealed its localization at the base-, neck-, and head-region of dendritic spines. Expression of the short splice variants or deletion of the C-terminal PDZ-binding motif in CaV1.3L induced aberrant dendritic spine elongation. Similar morphological alterations were induced by co-expression of densin-180 or shank1b with CaV1.3L and correlated with increased CaV1.3 currents and dendritic calcium signals in transfected neurons. Together, our findings suggest a key role of CaV1.3 in regulating dendritic spine structure. Under physiological conditions it may contribute to the structural plasticity of glutamatergic synapses. Conversely, altered regulation of CaV1.3 channels may provide an important mechanism in the development of postsynaptic aberrations associated with neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:27708393

  18. Cloning of the human skeletal muscle {alpha}{sub 1} subunit of the dihydropyridine-sensitive L-type calcium channel (CACNL1A3)

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, K.; Powers, P.A.; Gregg, R.G.

    1994-12-01

    Skeletal muscle contraction is initiated by release of calcium stored in the sarcoplasmic reticulum in response to membrane depolarization transduced by the L-type voltage-dependent calcium channels (VDCCs) present in the transverse tubule. The L-type VDCC purified from rabbit skeletal muscle transverse tubules is a pentamer composed of {alpha}{sub 1}, {alpha}{sub 2}, {Beta},{delta}, and {gamma} subunits. Here, we report the sequence of the human {alpha}{sub 1} subunit. 8 refs., 1 fig.

  19. Modulation of L-type calcium current by intracellular magnesium in differentiating cardiomyocytes derived from induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Nguemo, Filomain; Semmler, Judith; Reppel, Michael; Hescheler, Jürgen

    2014-06-15

    Intracellular Mg(2+), which is implicated in arrhythmogenesis and transient cardiac ischemia, inhibits L-type Ca(2+) calcium channel current (ICaL) of adult cardiomyocytes (CMs). We take the advantage of an in vitro model of CMs based on induced pluripotent stem cells to investigate the effects of intracellular Mg(2+) on the phosphorylation or dephosphorylation processes of L-type Ca(2+) channels (LTCCs) at early and late stages of cardiac cell differentiation. Using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique, we demonstrate that increasing intracellular Mg(2+) concentration [Mg(2+)]i from 0.2 to 5 mM markedly reduced the peak of ICaL density, showing less effect on both the activation and inactivation properties in the late differentiation stage (LDS) of CMs more so than in the early differentiation stage (EDS). Increasing the [Mg(2+)]i from 0.2 to 2 mM in the presence of cAMP-dependent protein kinase A significantly decreased ICaL in LDS (70%) and in EDS (36%) CMs. In addition, the effect of forskolin was greatly attenuated in the presence of 2 mM [Mg(2+)]i in LDS but not in EDS CMs. The effect of forskolin was enhanced in the presence of ATP-γ-S in LDS CMs compared with EDS CMs. The exposure of both EDS and LDS CMs to 2 mM [Mg(2+)]i considerably reduced the effects of isobutylmethylxanthine (IBMX) and okadaic acid on ICaL. Our results provide evidence for differential regulation of LTCCs activities by cytosolic Mg(2+) concentration in developing cardiac cells and confirm that Mg(2+) acts under conditions that favor opening of the LTCCs caused by channel phosphorylation.

  20. Contribution of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels to homosynaptic long-term depression in the CA1 region in vitro.

    PubMed

    Christie, B R; Schexnayder, L K; Johnston, D

    1997-03-01

    Homosynaptic long-term depression (LTD) of synaptic efficacy was induced in field excitatory postsynaptic potentials by administration of 900 pulses at either 1 or 3 Hz in 2- to 3-wk-old Sprague-Dawley rats. The stimulation was administered via a bipolar stimulating electrode placed immediately adjacent to the recording electrode in the stratum radiatum region of the hippocampal CA1 subfield. Equivalent LTD induction occurred whether the slices were maintained at room temperature or at 32 degrees C. Lowering bath Ca2+ to 0 mM, or increasing it to 4 mM, prevented the induction of the depression. The NMDA receptor antagonist D,L-2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid (50 microM) reversibly blocked the induction of homosynaptic LTD. In addition, the L-type voltage-gated calcium channel (VGCC) antagonist nimodipine (10 microM) and the R- and T-type VGCC antagonist NiCl2 (25 microM) also prevented homosynaptic LTD induction. These results indicate that in addition to N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor activity, Ca2+ influx via VGCCs can play an important role in the induction and expression of LTD induced by low-frequency stimulation in the hippocampal formation.

  1. Antialbuminuric advantage of cilnidipine compared with L-type calcium channel blockers in type 2 diabetic patients with normoalbuminuria and microalbuminuria.

    PubMed

    Fukumoto, Shinya; Ishimura, Eiji; Motoyama, Koka; Morioka, Tomoaki; Kimoto, Eiji; Wakikawa, Ken; Shoji, Shigeichi; Koyama, Hidenori; Shoji, Tetsuo; Emoto, Masanori; Nishizawa, Yoshiki; Inaba, Masaaki

    2012-07-01

    We evaluated the antialbuminuric advantage of cilnidipine, an N/L-type calcium channel blocker (CCB), compared with L-type CCBs in diabetic patients with normoalbuminuria and microalbuminuria. The study was a multicenter, non-randomized crossover trial. Participants were 90 type 2 diabetic patients exhibiting either normo- or microalbuminuria, and undergoing CCB treatment for ≥6 months prior to study entry. The CCB at the time of entry was continued for the first 6 months (Period 1). Treatment was subsequently switched from cilnidipine to an L-type CCB, or vice versa, for the second 6-month observation period (Period 2). During Period 1, the L-type CCB group showed a significant increase of urinary albumin excretion (UAE) over time, while the cilnidipine group showed no significant elevation. During Period 2, switching of the treatment from the L-type CCB to cilnidipine resulted in significant reduction of the UAE, whereas switching from cilnidipine to the L-type CCB resulted in no significant change in the UAE. This study demonstrated that the antialbuminuric effect of Cilnidipine, but not the L-type CCBs, was sustained even in patients treated for a long time. In addition, the antialbuminuric effect can be anticipated after switching from an L-type CCB to cilnidipine, but not vice versa.

  2. Voltage-gated ion channels in human pancreatic beta-cells: electrophysiological characterization and role in insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Braun, Matthias; Ramracheya, Reshma; Bengtsson, Martin; Zhang, Quan; Karanauskaite, Jovita; Partridge, Chris; Johnson, Paul R; Rorsman, Patrik

    2008-06-01

    To characterize the voltage-gated ion channels in human beta-cells from nondiabetic donors and their role in glucose-stimulated insulin release. Insulin release was measured from intact islets. Whole-cell patch-clamp experiments and measurements of cell capacitance were performed on isolated beta-cells. The ion channel complement was determined by quantitative PCR. Human beta-cells express two types of voltage-gated K(+) currents that flow through delayed rectifying (K(V)2.1/2.2) and large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (BK) channels. Blockade of BK channels (using iberiotoxin) increased action potential amplitude and enhanced insulin secretion by 70%, whereas inhibition of K(V)2.1/2.2 (with stromatoxin) was without stimulatory effect on electrical activity and secretion. Voltage-gated tetrodotoxin (TTX)-sensitive Na(+) currents (Na(V)1.6/1.7) contribute to the upstroke of action potentials. Inhibition of Na(+) currents with TTX reduced glucose-stimulated (6-20 mmol/l) insulin secretion by 55-70%. Human beta-cells are equipped with L- (Ca(V)1.3), P/Q- (Ca(V)2.1), and T- (Ca(V)3.2), but not N- or R-type Ca(2+) channels. Blockade of L-type channels abolished glucose-stimulated insulin release, while inhibition of T- and P/Q-type Ca(2+) channels reduced glucose-induced (6 mmol/l) secretion by 60-70%. Membrane potential recordings suggest that L- and T-type Ca(2+) channels participate in action potential generation. Blockade of P/Q-type Ca(2+) channels suppressed exocytosis (measured as an increase in cell capacitance) by >80%, whereas inhibition of L-type Ca(2+) channels only had a minor effect. Voltage-gated T-type and L-type Ca(2+) channels as well as Na(+) channels participate in glucose-stimulated electrical activity and insulin secretion. Ca(2+)-activated BK channels are required for rapid membrane repolarization. Exocytosis of insulin-containing granules is principally triggered by Ca(2+) influx through P/Q-type Ca(2+) channels.

  3. Prolonged Infusion of Inhibitors of Calcineurin or L-Type Calcium Channels Does Not Block Mossy Fiber Sprouting in a Model of Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Ingram, Elizabeth A.; Toyoda, Izumi; Wen, Xiling; Buckmaster, Paul S.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose It would be useful to selectively block granule cell axon (mossy fiber) sprouting to test its functional role in temporal lobe epileptogenesis. Targeting axonal growth cones may be an effective strategy to block mossy fiber sprouting. L-type calcium channels and calcineurin, a calcium-activated phosphatase, are critical for normal growth cone function. Previous studies have provided encouraging evidence that blocking L-type calcium channels or inhibiting calcineurin during epileptogenic treatments suppresses mossy fiber sprouting. Methods Rats were treated systemically with pilocarpine to induce status epilepticus, which lasted at least 2 hours. Then, osmotic pumps and cannulae were implanted to infuse calcineurin inhibitors (FK506 or cyclosporin A) or an L-type calcium channel blocker (nicardipine) into the dorsal dentate gyrus. After 28 days of continuous infusion, extent of mossy fiber sprouting was evaluated with Timm-staining and stereological methods. Results Percentages of volumes of the granule cell layer + molecular layer that were Timm-positive were similar in infused and noninfused hippocampi. Conclusions These findings suggest inhibiting calcineurin or L-type calcium channels does not block mossy fiber sprouting in the pilocarpine-treated rat model of temporal lobe epilepsy. PMID:18616558

  4. Sex and regional differences in rabbit right ventricular L-type calcium current levels and mathematical modelling of arrhythmia vulnerability.

    PubMed

    Kalik, Zane M; Mike, Joshua L; Slipski, Cassandra; Wright, Moriah; Jalics, Jozsi Z; Womble, Mark D

    2017-07-01

    What is the central question of this study? Regional variations of ventricular L-type calcium current (ICa-L ) amplitude may underlie the increased arrhythmia risk in adult females. Current amplitude variations have been described for the left ventricle but not for the right ventricle. What is the main finding and its importance? Adult female rabbit right ventricular base myocytes exhibit elevated ICa-L compared with female apex or male myocytes. Oestrogen upregulated ICa-L in cultured female myocytes. Mathematical simulations modelling long QT syndrome type 2 demonstrated that elevated ICa-L prolonged action potentials and induced early after-depolarizations. Thus, ventricular arrhythmias in adult females may be associated with an oestrogen-induced upregulation of ICa-L . Previous studies have shown that adult rabbit left ventricular myocytes exhibit sex and regional differences in L-type calcium current (ICa-L ) levels that contribute to increased female susceptibility to arrhythmogenic early after-depolarizations (EADs). We used patch-clamp recordings from isolated adult male and female rabbit right ventricular myocytes to determine apex-base differences in ICa-L density and used mathematical modelling to examine the contribution of ICa-L to EAD formation. Current density measured at 0 mV in female base myocytes was 67% higher than in male base myocytes and 55% higher than in female apex myocytes. No differences were observed between male and female apex myocytes, between male apex and base myocytes, or in the voltage dependences of ICa-L activation or inactivation. The role of oestrogen was investigated using cultured adult female right ventricular base myocytes. After 2 days, 17β-estradiol (1 nm) produced a 65% increase in ICa-L density compared with untreated control myocytes, suggesting an oestrogen-induced upregulation of ICa-L . Action potential simulations using a modified Luo-Rudy cardiomyocyte model showed that increased ICa-L density, at the level

  5. Deciphering voltage-gated Na(+) and Ca(2+) channels by studying prokaryotic ancestors.

    PubMed

    Catterall, William A; Zheng, Ning

    2015-09-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (NaVs) and calcium channels (CaVs) are involved in electrical signaling, contraction, secretion, synaptic transmission, and other physiological processes activated in response to depolarization. Despite their physiological importance, the structures of these closely related proteins have remained elusive because of their size and complexity. Bacterial NaVs have structures analogous to a single domain of eukaryotic NaVs and CaVs and are their likely evolutionary ancestor. Here we review recent work that has led to new understanding of NaVs and CaVs through high-resolution structural studies of their prokaryotic ancestors. New insights into their voltage-dependent activation and inactivation, ion conductance, and ion selectivity provide realistic structural models for the function of these complex membrane proteins at the atomic level. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Amino acid substitutions in the FXYD motif enhance phospholemman-induced modulation of cardiac L-type calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Guo, Kai; Wang, Xianming; Gao, Guofeng; Huang, Congxin; Elmslie, Keith S; Peterson, Blaise Z

    2010-11-01

    We have found that phospholemman (PLM) associates with and modulates the gating of cardiac L-type calcium channels (Wang et al., Biophys J 98: 1149-1159, 2010). The short 17 amino acid extracellular NH(2)-terminal domain of PLM contains a highly conserved PFTYD sequence that defines it as a member of the FXYD family of ion transport regulators. Although we have learned a great deal about PLM-dependent changes in calcium channel gating, little is known regarding the molecular mechanisms underlying the observed changes. Therefore, we investigated the role of the PFTYD segment in the modulation of cardiac calcium channels by individually replacing Pro-8, Phe-9, Thr-10, Tyr-11, and Asp-12 with alanine (P8A, F9A, T10A, Y11A, D12A). In addition, Asp-12 was changed to lysine (D12K) and cysteine (D12C). As expected, wild-type PLM significantly slows channel activation and deactivation and enhances voltage-dependent inactivation (VDI). We were surprised to find that amino acid substitutions at Thr-10 and Asp-12 significantly enhanced the ability of PLM to modulate Ca(V)1.2 gating. T10A exhibited a twofold enhancement of PLM-induced slowing of activation, whereas D12K and D12C dramatically enhanced PLM-induced increase of VDI. The PLM-induced slowing of channel closing was abrogated by D12A and D12C, whereas D12K and T10A failed to impact this effect. These studies demonstrate that the PFXYD motif is not necessary for the association of PLM with Ca(V)1.2. Instead, since altering the chemical and/or physical properties of the PFXYD segment alters the relative magnitudes of opposing PLM-induced effects on Ca(V)1.2 channel gating, PLM appears to play an important role in fine tuning the gating kinetics of cardiac calcium channels and likely plays an important role in shaping the cardiac action potential and regulating Ca(2+) dynamics in the heart.

  7. Amino acid substitutions in the FXYD motif enhance phospholemman-induced modulation of cardiac L-type calcium channels

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Kai; Wang, Xianming; Gao, Guofeng; Huang, Congxin; Elmslie, Keith S.

    2010-01-01

    We have found that phospholemman (PLM) associates with and modulates the gating of cardiac L-type calcium channels (Wang et al., Biophys J 98: 1149–1159, 2010). The short 17 amino acid extracellular NH2-terminal domain of PLM contains a highly conserved PFTYD sequence that defines it as a member of the FXYD family of ion transport regulators. Although we have learned a great deal about PLM-dependent changes in calcium channel gating, little is known regarding the molecular mechanisms underlying the observed changes. Therefore, we investigated the role of the PFTYD segment in the modulation of cardiac calcium channels by individually replacing Pro-8, Phe-9, Thr-10, Tyr-11, and Asp-12 with alanine (P8A, F9A, T10A, Y11A, D12A). In addition, Asp-12 was changed to lysine (D12K) and cysteine (D12C). As expected, wild-type PLM significantly slows channel activation and deactivation and enhances voltage-dependent inactivation (VDI). We were surprised to find that amino acid substitutions at Thr-10 and Asp-12 significantly enhanced the ability of PLM to modulate CaV1.2 gating. T10A exhibited a twofold enhancement of PLM-induced slowing of activation, whereas D12K and D12C dramatically enhanced PLM-induced increase of VDI. The PLM-induced slowing of channel closing was abrogated by D12A and D12C, whereas D12K and T10A failed to impact this effect. These studies demonstrate that the PFXYD motif is not necessary for the association of PLM with CaV1.2. Instead, since altering the chemical and/or physical properties of the PFXYD segment alters the relative magnitudes of opposing PLM-induced effects on CaV1.2 channel gating, PLM appears to play an important role in fine tuning the gating kinetics of cardiac calcium channels and likely plays an important role in shaping the cardiac action potential and regulating Ca2+ dynamics in the heart. PMID:20720179

  8. Regulation of cough and action potentials by voltage-gated Na channels.

    PubMed

    Carr, Michael J

    2013-10-01

    The classical role ascribed to voltage-gated Na channels is the conduction of action potentials. Some excitable tissues such as cardiac muscle and skeletal muscle predominantly express a single voltage-gated Na channels isoform. Of the nine voltage-gated Na channels, seven are expressed in neurons, of these Nav 1.7, 1.8 and 1.9 are expressed in sensory neurons including vagal sensory neurons that innervate the airways and initiate cough. Nav 1.7 and Nav 1.9 are of particular interest as they represent two extremes in the functional diversity of voltage-gated Na channels. Voltage-gated Na channel isoforms expressed in airway sensory neurons produce multiple distinct Na currents that underlie distinct aspects of sensory neuron function. The interaction between voltage-gated Na currents underlies the characteristic ability of airway sensory nerves to encode encounters with irritant stimuli into action potential discharge and evoke the cough reflex.

  9. On the Evolution of Voltage Gated Ion Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenner, Michael

    2006-03-01

    This talk summarizes some ideas, calculations and data analysis/collection surrounding the structure and evolution of ion channels, in particular voltage gated sodium channels. The great advantage of ion channels is that they are individual proteins whose function has long been known and is readily inferred through voltage measurements. Their evolution can be tracked through the growing data base of sequences. Kinetic data is readily available, showing important differences between nearly identical channels. I will discuss our efforts to collate available functional data on voltage gated sodium channels into an 'ion channel property space' . We then use this dataset to infer underlying kinetic models, and to create evolutionary trees based on the function of the channels. Finally, I will discuss our endeavors to how ion channels evolved to be the way they are: Examples of questions we would like to answer include: to what extent do design principles dictate the details of the kinetic schemes of ion channels, such as (a) the symmetry of the sodium and potassium channels (or lack thereof), as reflected in their kinetic schemes ; (b) the coupling of sodium channel kinetics to potassium channel kinetics; or (c) activation/inactivation of the channels themselves.

  10. Excitability constraints on voltage-gated sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Angelino, Elaine; Brenner, Michael P

    2007-09-01

    We study how functional constraints bound and shape evolution through an analysis of mammalian voltage-gated sodium channels. The primary function of sodium channels is to allow the propagation of action potentials. Since Hodgkin and Huxley, mathematical models have suggested that sodium channel properties need to be tightly constrained for an action potential to propagate. There are nine mammalian genes encoding voltage-gated sodium channels, many of which are more than approximately 90% identical by sequence. This sequence similarity presumably corresponds to similarity of function, consistent with the idea that these properties must be tightly constrained. However, the multiplicity of genes encoding sodium channels raises the question: why are there so many? We demonstrate that the simplest theoretical constraints bounding sodium channel diversity--the requirements of membrane excitability and the uniqueness of the resting potential--act directly on constraining sodium channel properties. We compare the predicted constraints with functional data on mammalian sodium channel properties collected from the literature, including 172 different sets of measurements from 40 publications, wild-type and mutant, under a variety of conditions. The data from all channel types, including mutants, obeys the excitability constraint; on the other hand, channels expressed in muscle tend to obey the constraint of a unique resting potential, while channels expressed in neuronal tissue do not. The excitability properties alone distinguish the nine sodium channels into four different groups that are consistent with phylogenetic analysis. Our calculations suggest interpretations for the functional differences between these groups.

  11. Multimeric nature of voltage-gated proton channels.

    PubMed

    Koch, Hans P; Kurokawa, Tatsuki; Okochi, Yoshifumi; Sasaki, Mari; Okamura, Yasushi; Larsson, H Peter

    2008-07-01

    Voltage-gated potassium channels are comprised of four subunits, and each subunit has a pore domain and a voltage-sensing domain (VSD). The four pore domains assemble to form one single central pore, and the four individual VSDs control the gate of the pore. Recently, a family of voltage-gated proton channels, such as H(V) or voltage sensor only protein (VSOP), was discovered that contain a single VSD but no pore domain. It has been assumed that VSOP channels are monomeric and contain a single VSD that functions as both the VSD and the pore domain. It remains unclear, however, how a protein that contains only a VSD and no pore domain can conduct ions. Using fluorescence measurements and immunoprecipitation techniques, we show here that VSOP channels are expressed as multimeric channels. Further, FRET experiments on constructs with covalently linked subunits show that VSOP channels are dimers. Truncation of the cytoplasmic regions of VSOP reduced the dimerization, suggesting that the dimerization is caused mainly by cytoplasmic protein-protein interactions. However, these N terminus- and C terminus-deleted channels displayed large proton currents. Therefore, we conclude that even though VSOP channels are expressed mainly as dimers in the cell membrane, single VSOP subunits could function independently as proton channels.

  12. Biophysical properties of the voltage gated proton channel HV1

    PubMed Central

    Musset, Boris; DeCoursey, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The biophysical properties of the voltage gated proton channel (HV1) are the key elements of its physiological function. The voltage gated proton channel is a unique molecule that in contrast to all other ion channels is exclusively selective for protons. Alone among proton channels, it has voltage and time dependent gating like other “classical” ion channels. HV1 is furthermore a sensor for the pH in the cell and the surrounding media. Its voltage dependence is strictly coupled to the pH gradient across the membrane. This regulation restricts opening of the channel to specific voltages at any given pH gradient, therefore allowing HV1 to perform its physiological task in the tissue it is expressed in. For HV1 there is no known blocker. The most potent channel inhibitor is zinc (Zn2+) which prevents channel opening. An additional characteristic of HV1 is its strong temperature dependence of both gating and conductance. In contrast to single-file water filled pores like the gramicidin channel, HV1 exhibits pronounced deuterium effects and temperature effects on conduction, consistent with a different conduction mechanism than other ion channels. These properties may be explained by the recent identification of an aspartate in the pore of HV1 that is essential to its proton selectivity. PMID:23050239

  13. Multimeric nature of voltage-gated proton channels

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Hans P.; Kurokawa, Tatsuki; Okochi, Yoshifumi; Sasaki, Mari; Okamura, Yasushi; Larsson, H. Peter

    2008-01-01

    Voltage-gated potassium channels are comprised of four subunits, and each subunit has a pore domain and a voltage-sensing domain (VSD). The four pore domains assemble to form one single central pore, and the four individual VSDs control the gate of the pore. Recently, a family of voltage-gated proton channels, such as HV or voltage sensor only protein (VSOP), was discovered that contain a single VSD but no pore domain. It has been assumed that VSOP channels are monomeric and contain a single VSD that functions as both the VSD and the pore domain. It remains unclear, however, how a protein that contains only a VSD and no pore domain can conduct ions. Using fluorescence measurements and immunoprecipitation techniques, we show here that VSOP channels are expressed as multimeric channels. Further, FRET experiments on constructs with covalently linked subunits show that VSOP channels are dimers. Truncation of the cytoplasmic regions of VSOP reduced the dimerization, suggesting that the dimerization is caused mainly by cytoplasmic protein–protein interactions. However, these N terminus- and C terminus-deleted channels displayed large proton currents. Therefore, we conclude that even though VSOP channels are expressed mainly as dimers in the cell membrane, single VSOP subunits could function independently as proton channels. PMID:18583477

  14. THE CRYSTAL STRUCTURE OF A VOLTAGE-GATED SODIUM CHANNEL

    PubMed Central

    Payandeh, Jian; Scheuer, Todd; Zheng, Ning; Catterall, William A.

    2011-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels initiate electrical signaling in excitable cells and are the molecular targets for drugs and disease mutations, but the structural basis for their voltage-dependent activation, ion selectivity, and drug block is unknown. Here, we report the crystal structure of a voltage-gated Na+-channel from Arcobacter butzleri (NavAb) captured in a closed-pore conformation with four activated voltage-sensors at 2.7 Å resolution. The arginine gating charges make multiple hydrophilic interactions within the voltage-sensor, including unanticipated hydrogen bonds to the protein backbone. Comparisons to previous open-pore potassium channel structures suggest that the voltage-sensor domains and the S4-S5 linkers dilate the central pore by pivoting together around a hinge at the base of the pore module. The NavAb selectivity filter is short, ~6.5 Å wide, and water-filled, with four acidic side-chains surrounding the narrowest part of the ion conduction pathway. This unique structure presents a high field-strength anionic coordination site, which confers Na+-selectivity through partial dehydration via direct interaction with glutamate side-chains. Fenestrations in the sides of the pore module are unexpectedly penetrated by fatty acyl chains that extend into the central cavity, and these portals are large enough for the entry of small, hydrophobic pore-blocking drugs. PMID:21743477

  15. Accelerated Inactivation of the L-type Calcium Current Due to a Mutation in CACNB2b Underlies Brugada Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Cordeiro, Jonathan M; Marieb, Mark; Pfeiffer, Ryan; Calloe, Kirstine; Burashnikov, Elena; Antzelevitch, Charles

    2009-01-01

    Background Recent studies have demonstrated an association between mutations in CACNA1c or CACNB2b and Brugada syndrome (BrS). Previously described mutations all caused a loss of function secondary to a reduction of peak calcium current (ICa). We describe a novel CACNB2b mutation associated with BrS in which loss of function is caused by accelerated inactivation of ICa. Methods and Results The proband, a 32 yo male, displayed a Type I ST segment elevation in two right precordial ECG leads following a procainamide challenge. EP study was positive with induction of polymorphic VT/VF. Interrogation of implanted ICD revealed brief episodes of very rapid ventricular tachycardia. He was also diagnosed with vasovagal syncope. Genomic DNA was isolated from lymphocytes. All exons and intron borders of 15 ion channel genes were amplified and sequenced. The only mutation uncovered was a missense mutation (T11I) in CACNB2b. We expressed WT or T11I CACNB2b in TSA201 cells co-transfected with WT CACNA1c and CACNA2d. Patch clamp analysis showed no significant difference between WT and T11I in peak ICa density, steady-state inactivation or recovery from inactivation. However, both fast and slow decay of ICa were significantly faster in mutant channels between 0 and +20 mV. Action potential voltage clamp experiments showed that total charge was reduced by almost half compared to WT. Conclusions We report the first BrS mutation in CaCNB2b resulting in accelerated inactivation of L-type calcium channel current. Our results suggest that the faster current decay results in a loss-of-function responsible for the Brugada phenotype. PMID:19358333

  16. Phosphoinositide 3-kinase gamma mediates angiotensin II-induced stimulation of L-type calcium channels in vascular myocytes.

    PubMed

    Quignard, J F; Mironneau, J; Carricaburu, V; Fournier, B; Babich, A; Nurnberg, B; Mironneau, C; Macrez, N

    2001-08-31

    Previous results have shown that in rat portal vein myocytes the betagamma dimer of the G(13) protein transduces the angiotensin II-induced stimulation of calcium channels and increase in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration through activation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K). In the present work we determined which class I PI3K isoforms were involved in this regulation. Western blot analysis indicated that rat portal vein myocytes expressed only PI3Kalpha and PI3Kgamma and no other class I PI3K isoforms. In the intracellular presence of an anti-p110gamma antibody infused by the patch clamp pipette, both angiotensin II- and Gbetagamma-mediated stimulation of Ca(2+) channel current were inhibited, whereas intracellular application of an anti-p110alpha antibody had no effect. The anti-PI3Kgamma antibody also inhibited the angiotensin II- and Gbetagamma-induced production of phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate. In Indo-1 loaded cells, the angiotensin II-induced increase in [Ca(2+)](i) was inhibited by intracellular application of the anti-PI3Kgamma antibody, whereas the anti-PI3Kalpha antibody had no effect. The specificity of the anti-PI3Kgamma antibody used in functional experiments was ascertained by showing that this antibody did not recognize recombinant PI3Kalpha in Western blot experiments. Moreover, anti-PI3Kgamma antibody inhibited the stimulatory effect of intracellularly infused recombinant PI3Kgamma on Ca(2+) channel current without altering the effect of recombinant PI3Kalpha. Our results show that, although both PI3Kgamma and PI3Kalpha are expressed in vascular myocytes, the angiotensin II-induced stimulation of vascular L-type calcium channel and increase of [Ca(2+)](i) involves only the PI3Kgamma isoform.

  17. Interactions between calcium channels and SK channels in midbrain dopamine neurons and their impact on pacemaker regularity: Contrasting roles of N- and L-type channels.

    PubMed

    de Vrind, Veronne; Scuvée-Moreau, Jacqueline; Drion, Guillaume; Hmaied, Cyrine; Philippart, Fabian; Engel, Dominique; Seutin, Vincent

    2016-10-05

    Although small-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (SK) channels and various types of voltage-gated Ca(2+) (Cav) channels have been described in midbrain dopaminergic neurons, the nature of their interactions is unclear. More particularly, the role of various Cav channel types in either promoting irregularity of firing (by generating an inward current during SK channel blockade) or promoting regularity of firing (by providing the source of Ca(2+) for the activation of SK channels) has not been systematically explored. We addressed this question using intracellular and extracellular recordings from substantia nigra, pars compacta (SNc), dopaminergic neurons in rat midbrain slices. Neurons were pharmacologically isolated from their differences. When examining the ability of various Cav channel blockers to inhibit the SK-mediated afterhyperpolarization (AHP), we found that only the N-type Cav channel blocker ω-conotoxin-GVIA was able to reduce the apamin-sensitive AHP, but only partially (~40%). Specific blockers of L, P/Q, T or R channels had no effect on this AHP. Combining ω-conotoxin-GVIA and other specific blockers did not yield greater block and even the broad Cav blocker Cd(2+) induced a submaximal (~75%) effect. Extracellular recordings examining firing regularity yielded congruent results: none of the specific blockers was able to increase firing irregularity to the extent that the specific SK blocker apamin did. The irregularity of firing observed with apamin could only be reversed by blocking L-type Ca(2+) channels. Thus various sources of Ca(2+) appear to be required for SK channel activation in SNc neurons (some of them still unidentified), ensuring robustness of pacemaking regularity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Purified omega-conotoxin GVIA receptor of rat brain resembles a dihydropyridine-sensitive L-type calcium channel.

    PubMed Central

    McEnery, M W; Snowman, A M; Sharp, A H; Adams, M E; Snyder, S H

    1991-01-01

    The omega-conotoxin GVIA (CTX) receptor has been purified 1900-fold to apparent homogeneity by monitoring both reversible binding of 125I-labeled CTX (125I-CTX) and photoincorporation of N-hydroxysuccinimidyl-4-azidobenzoate-125I-CTX (HSA-125I-CTX). Photoincorporation of HSA-125I-CTX into a 230-kDa protein exhibits a pharmacologic and chromatographic profile indicating that the 230-kDa protein is the CTX-binding subunit of the receptor. The pharmacologic specificity of 125I-CTX binding to the purified CTX receptor closely resembles that of the native membrane-bound form with respect to sensitivity towards CTX (Kd = 32 pM) and other peptide toxin antagonists. The purified CTX receptor comprises the 230-kDa protein (alpha 1) and four additional proteins with apparent molecular masses of 140 (alpha 2), 110, 70 (beta 2), and 60 (beta 1) kDa. This subunit structure closely resembles that of the 1,4-dihydropyridine-sensitive L-type calcium channel. Images PMID:1662383

  19. Enhanced effect of VEGF165 on L-type calcium currents in guinea-pig cardiac ventricular myocytes.

    PubMed

    Xing, Wenlu; Gao, Chuanyu; Qi, Datun; Zhang, You; Hao, Peiyuan; Dai, Guoyou; Yan, Ganxin

    2017-01-01

    The mechanisms of vascular endothelial growth factor 165 (VEGF165) on electrical properties of cardiomyocytes have not been fully elucidated. The aim of this study is to test the hypothesis that VEGF165, an angiogenesis-initiating factor, affects L-type calcium currents (ICa,L) and cell membrane potential in cardiac myocytes by acting on VEGF type-2 receptors (VEGFR2). ICa,L and action potentials (AP) were recorded by the whole-cell patch clamp method in isolated guinea-pig ventricular myocytes treated with different concentrations of VEGF165 proteins. Using a VEGFR2 inhibitor, we also tested the receptor of VEGF165 in cardiomyocytes. We found that VEGF165 increased ICa,L in a concentration-dependent manner. SU5416, a VEGFR2 inhibitor, almost completely eliminated VEGF165-induced ICa,L increase. VEGF165 had no significant influence on action potential 90 (APD90) and other properties of AP. We conclude that in guinea-pig ventricular myocytes, ICa,L can be increased by VEGF165 in a concentration-dependent manner through binding to VEGFR2 without causing any significant alteration to action potential duration. Results of this study may further expound the safety of VEGF165 when used in the intervention of heart diseases.

  20. Cholinergic modulation of L-type calcium current in isolated sensory hair cells of the statocyst of octopus, Eledone cirrhosa.

    PubMed

    Chrachri, Abdesslam; Williamson, Roddy

    2004-04-22

    Whole-cell voltage-clamp recordings from dissociated hair cells of the statocyst of octopus, Eledone cirrhosa, demonstrated that application of ACh, carbachol or muscarine (10 microM) reversibly decreased the amplitude of L-type calcium current (I(Ca,L)), while nicotine (10-100 microM) did not have any effect. Furthermore, atropine blocked the effect of ACh and agonists suggesting that ACh reduces I(Ca,L) through activation of muscarinic receptors. Internal dialysis of these cells with guanosine 5'-O-3-thiotriphosphate (GTPgammaS), a non-hydrolysable GTP analogue, mimicked the ACh-induced inhibition of I(Ca,L) and occluded any further ACh-induced inhibition. Internal dialysis of these hair cells with guanosine 5'-O-(2-thiodiphosphate) (GDPbetaS) reduced the ACh-induced inhibition I(Ca,L). The inhibitory effects of ACh were abolished by pre-incubation of these cells with pretussis toxin (PTX) suggesting that ACh-induced inhibition of I(Ca,L) involves a PTX-sensitive G protein pathway.

  1. Serum response factor regulates smooth muscle contractility via myotonic dystrophy protein kinases and L-type calcium channels

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Moon Young; Park, Chanjae; Ha, Se Eun; Park, Paul J.; Berent, Robyn M.; Jorgensen, Brian G.; Corrigan, Robert D.; Grainger, Nathan; Blair, Peter J.; Slivano, Orazio J.; Miano, Joseph M.; Ward, Sean M.; Smith, Terence K.; Sanders, Kenton M.

    2017-01-01

    Serum response factor (SRF) transcriptionally regulates expression of contractile genes in smooth muscle cells (SMC). Lack or decrease of SRF is directly linked to a phenotypic change of SMC, leading to hypomotility of smooth muscle in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. However, the molecular mechanism behind SRF-induced hypomotility in GI smooth muscle is largely unknown. We describe here how SRF plays a functional role in the regulation of the SMC contractility via myotonic dystrophy protein kinase (DMPK) and L-type calcium channel CACNA1C. GI SMC expressed Dmpk and Cacna1c genes into multiple alternative transcriptional isoforms. Deficiency of SRF in SMC of Srf knockout (KO) mice led to reduction of SRF-dependent DMPK, which down-regulated the expression of CACNA1C. Reduction of CACNA1C in KO SMC not only decreased intracellular Ca2+ spikes but also disrupted their coupling between cells resulting in decreased contractility. The role of SRF in the regulation of SMC phenotype and function provides new insight into how SMC lose their contractility leading to hypomotility in pathophysiological conditions within the GI tract. PMID:28152551

  2. Purified omega-conotoxin GVIA receptor of rat brain resembles a dihydropyridine-sensitive L-type calcium channel

    SciTech Connect

    McEnery, M.W.; Snowman, A.M.; Sharp, A.H.; Snyder, S.H. ); Adams, M.E. )

    1991-12-15

    The {omega}-conotoxin GVIA (CTX) receptor has been purified 1,900-fold to apparent homogeneity by monitoring both reversible binding of {sup 125}I-labeled CTX ({sup 125}I-CTX) and photoincorporation of N-hydroxysuccinimidyl-4-azidobenzoate-{sup 125}I-CTX (HSA-{sup 125}I-CTX). Photoincorporation of HSA-{sup 125}I-CTX into a 230-kDa protein exhibits a pharmacologic and chromatographic profile indicating that the 230-kDa protein is the CTX-binding subunit of the receptor. The pharmacologic specificity of {sup 125}I-CTX binding to the purified CTX receptor closely resembles that of the native membrane-bound form with respect to sensitivity towards CTX and other peptide toxin antagonists. The purified CTX receptor comprises the 230-kDa protein ({alpha}{sub 1}) and four additional proteins with apparent molecular masses of 140 ({alpha}{sub 2}), 110, 70 ({beta}{sub 2}), and 60({beta}{sub 1}) kDa. This subunit structure closely resembles that of the 1,4-dihydropyridine-sensitive L-type calcium channel.

  3. ß-Adrenoceptor Activation Enhances L-Type Calcium Channel Currents in Anterior Piriform Cortex Pyramidal Cells of Neonatal Mice: Implication for Odor Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghosh, Abhinaba; Mukherjee, Bandhan; Chen, Xihua; Yuan, Qi

    2017-01-01

    Early odor preference learning occurs in one-week-old rodents when a novel odor is paired with a tactile stimulation mimicking maternal care. ß-Adrenoceptors and L-type calcium channels (LTCCs) in the anterior piriform cortex (aPC) are critically involved in this learning. However, whether ß-adrenoceptors interact directly with LTCCs in aPC…

  4. Perforated patch recording of L-type calcium current with beta-escin in guinea pig ventricular myocytes.

    PubMed

    Fu, Li-Ying; Wang, Fang; Chen, Xue-Song; Zhou, Hong-Yi; Yao, Wei-Xing; Xia, Guo-Jin; Jiang, Ming-Xing

    2003-11-01

    To establish a perforated patch recording (PPR) mode with beta-escin and compare L-type calcium current (I(Ca,L)) recorded under PPR and normal whole-cell recording (WCR) condition in isolated guinea-pig ventricular myocytes. Single myocytes were dissociated by enzymatic dissociation method. beta-escin was added to the pipette solution to perforate the cell membrane and obtain PPR mode. I(Ca,L) was recorded using PPR and WCR techniques. beta-Escin 20, 25, and 30 micromol/L could permeabilize the cell membrane and obtain PPR mode. With beta-escin 25 micromol/L, the success rate was highest (16/17, 94 %) and the time required for permibilization was 2-15 (8+/-4) min. Run-down of I(Ca,L) was considerably slower in PPR than in WCR condition. The amplitude of I(Ca,L) was decreased by 36 % at 20 min after the formation of WCR, while it was slowly decreased by 8 % at 30 min after the formation of PPR. The current-voltage relation (I-V) curves, activation and inactivation curves of I(Ca,L) were not significantly different between WCR and PPR. The inactivation rate of ICa,L was slower in PPR than in WCR, the faster inactivation time constant (tau(f)) was longer in PPR than in WCR at membrane potentials of -20 mV -- +10 mV (n=6, P<0.05), and the slower time constant (tau(s)) was also longer in PPR than in WCR at membrane potentials of -10 mV to +10 mV (n=6, P<0.05). There was no significant difference between the activation rate in WCR and PPR. Using beta-escin 25 micromol/L can easily obtain stable PPR in isolated guinea-pig ventricular myocytes, and this method is useful in dealing with channels, which show run-down under normal WCR such as L-type Ca channel.

  5. Expression and 1,4-dihydropyridine-binding properties of brain L-type calcium channel isoforms.

    PubMed

    Sinnegger-Brauns, Martina J; Huber, Irene G; Koschak, Alexandra; Wild, Claudia; Obermair, Gerald J; Einzinger, Ursula; Hoda, Jean-Charles; Sartori, Simone B; Striessnig, Jörg

    2009-02-01

    The L-type calcium channel (LTCC) isoforms Ca(v)1.2 and Ca(v)1.3 display similar 1,4-dihydropyridine (DHP) binding properties and are both expressed in mammalian brain. Recent work implicates Ca(v)1.3 channels as interesting drug targets, but no isoform-selective modulators exist. It is also unknown to what extent Ca(v)1.1 and Ca(v)1.4 contribute to L-type-specific DHP binding activity in brain. To address this question and to determine whether DHPs can discriminate between Ca(v)1.2 and Ca(v)1.3 binding pockets, we combined radioreceptor assays and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). We bred double mutants (Ca(v)-DM) from mice expressing mutant Ca(v)1.2 channels [Ca(v)1.2DHP(-/-)] lacking high affinity for DHPs and from Ca(v)1.3 knockouts [Ca(v)1.3(-/-)]. (+)-[(3)H]isradipine binding to Ca(v)1.2DHP(-/-) and Ca(v)-DM brains was reduced to 15.1 and 4.4% of wild type, respectively, indicating that Ca(v)1.3 accounts for 10.7% of brain LTCCs. qPCR revealed that Ca(v)1.1 and Ca(v)1.4 alpha(1) subunits comprised 0.08% of the LTCC transcripts in mouse whole brain, suggesting that they cannot account for the residual binding. Instead, this could be explained by low-affinity binding (127-fold K(d) increase) to the mutated Ca(v)1.2 channels. Inhibition of (+)-[(3)H]isradipine binding to Ca(v)1.2DHP(-/-) (predominantly Ca(v)1.3) and wild-type (predominantly Ca(v)1.2) brain membranes by unlabeled DHPs revealed a 3- to 4-fold selectivity of nitrendipine and nifedipine for the Ca(v)1.2 binding pocket, a finding further confirmed with heterologously expressed channels. This suggests that small differences in their binding pockets may allow development of isoform-selective modulators for LTCCs and that, because of their very low expression, Ca(v)1.1 and Ca(v)1.4 are unlikely to serve as drug targets to treat CNS diseases.

  6. TAURINE REGULATION OF VOLTAGE-GATED CHANNELS IN RETINAL NEURONS

    PubMed Central

    Rowan, Matthew JM; Bulley, Simon; Purpura, Lauren; Ripps, Harris; Shen, Wen

    2017-01-01

    Taurine activates not only Cl−-permeable ionotropic receptors, but also receptors that mediate metabotropic responses. The metabotropic property of taurine was revealed in electrophysiological recordings obtained after fully blocking Cl−-permeable receptors with an inhibitory “cocktail” consisting of picrotoxin, SR95531, and strychnine. We found that taurine’s metabotropic effects regulate voltage-gated channels in retinal neurons. After applying the inhibitory cocktail, taurine enhanced delayed outward rectifier K+ channels preferentially in Off-bipolar cells, and the effect was completely blocked by the specific PKC inhibitor, GF109203X. Additionally, taurine also acted through a metabotropic pathway to suppress both L- and N-type Ca2+ channels in retinal neurons, which were insensitive to the potent GABAB receptor inhibitor, CGP55845. This study reinforces our previous finding that taurine in physiological concentrations produces a multiplicity of metabotropic effects that precisely govern the integration of signals being transmitted from the retina to the brain. PMID:23392926

  7. Biophysical Adaptations of Prokaryotic Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels.

    PubMed

    Vien, T N; DeCaen, P G

    2016-01-01

    This chapter describes the adaptive features found in voltage-gated sodium channels (NaVs) of prokaryotes and eukaryotes. These two families are distinct, having diverged early in evolutionary history but maintain a surprising degree of convergence in function. While prokaryotic NaVs are required for growth and motility, eukaryotic NaVs selectively conduct fast electrical currents for short- and long-range signaling across cell membranes in mammalian organs. Current interest in prokaryotic NaVs is stoked by their resolved high-resolution structures and functional features which are reminiscent of eukaryotic NaVs. In this chapter, comparisons between eukaryotic and prokaryotic NaVs are made to highlight the shared and unique aspects of ion selectivity, voltage sensitivity, and pharmacology. Examples of prokaryotic and eukaryotic NaV convergent evolution will be discussed within the context of their structural features. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Mechanisms of Activation of Voltage-Gated Potassium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Grizel, A. V.; Glukhov, G. S.; Sokolova, O. S.

    2014-01-01

    Voltage-gated potassium ion channels (Kv) play an important role in a variety of cellular processes, including the functioning of excitable cells, regulation of apoptosis, cell growth and differentiation, the release of neurotransmitters and hormones, maintenance of cardiac activity, etc. Failure in the functioning of Kv channels leads to severe genetic disorders and the development of tumors, including malignant ones. Understanding the mechanisms underlying Kv channels functioning is a key factor in determining the cause of the diseases associated with mutations in the channels, and in the search for new drugs. The mechanism of activation of the channels is a topic of ongoing debate, and a consensus on the issue has not yet been reached. This review discusses the key stages in studying the mechanisms of functioning of Kv channels and describes the basic models of their activation known to date. PMID:25558391

  9. Voltage-gated sodium channels and pain-related disorders.

    PubMed

    Kanellopoulos, Alexandros H; Matsuyama, Ayako

    2016-12-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) are heteromeric transmembrane protein complexes. Nine homologous members, SCN1A-11A, make up the VGSC gene family. Sodium channel isoforms display a wide range of kinetic properties endowing different neuronal types with distinctly varied firing properties. Among the VGSCs isoforms, Nav1.7, Nav1.8 and Nav1.9 are preferentially expressed in the peripheral nervous system. These isoforms are known to be crucial in the conduction of nociceptive stimuli with mutations in these channels thought to be the underlying cause of a variety of heritable pain disorders. This review provides an overview of the current literature concerning the role of VGSCs in the generation of pain and heritable pain disorders. © 2016 The Author(s). published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  10. The screw-helical voltage gating of ion channels.

    PubMed Central

    Keynes, R D; Elinder, F

    1999-01-01

    In the voltage-gated ion channels of every animal, whether they are selective for K+, Na+ or Ca2+, the voltage sensors are the S4 transmembrane segments carrying four to eight positive charges always separated by two uncharged residues. It is proposed that they move across the membrane in a screw-helical fashion in a series of three or more steps that each transfer a single electronic charge. The unit steps are stabilized by ion pairing between the mobile positive charges and fixed negative charges, of which there are invariably two located near the inner ends of segments S2 and S3 and a third near the outer end of either S2 or S3. Opening of the channel involves three such steps in each domain. PMID:10343407

  11. Voltage-gated sodium channels and metastatic disease.

    PubMed

    Brackenbury, William J

    2012-01-01

    Voltage-gated Na (+) channels (VGSCs) are macromolecular protein complexes containing a pore-forming α subunit and smaller non-pore-forming β subunits. VGSCs are expressed in metastatic cells from a number of cancers. In these cells, Na (+) current carried by α subunits enhances migration, invasion and metastasis in vivo. In contrast, the β subunits mediate cellular adhesion and process extension. The prevailing hypothesis is that VGSCs are upregulated in cancer, in general favoring an invasive/metastatic phenotype, although the mechanisms are still not fully clear. Expression of the Nav 1.5 α subunit associates with poor prognosis in clinical breast cancer specimens, suggesting that VGSCs may have utility as prognostic markers for cancer progression. Furthermore, repurposing existing VGSC-blocking therapeutic drugs may provide a new strategy to improve outcomes in patients suffering from metastatic disease, which is the major cause of cancer-related deaths, and for which there is currently no cure.

  12. Shellfish toxins targeting voltage-gated sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fan; Xu, Xunxun; Li, Tingting; Liu, Zhonghua

    2013-11-28

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) play a central role in the generation and propagation of action potentials in excitable neurons and other cells and are targeted by commonly used local anesthetics, antiarrhythmics, and anticonvulsants. They are also common targets of neurotoxins including shellfish toxins. Shellfish toxins are a variety of toxic secondary metabolites produced by prokaryotic cyanobacteria and eukaryotic dinoflagellates in both marine and fresh water systems, which can accumulate in marine animals via the food chain. Consumption of shellfish toxin-contaminated seafood may result in potentially fatal human shellfish poisoning. This article provides an overview of the structure, bioactivity, and pharmacology of shellfish toxins that act on VGSCs, along with a brief discussion on their pharmaceutical potential for pain management.

  13. Taurine regulation of voltage-gated channels in retinal neurons.

    PubMed

    Rowan, Matthew J M; Bulley, Simon; Purpura, Lauren A; Ripps, Harris; Shen, Wen

    2013-01-01

    Taurine activates not only Cl(-)-permeable ionotropic receptors but also receptors that mediate metabotropic responses. The metabotropic property of taurine was revealed in electrophysiological recordings obtained after fully blocking Cl(-)-permeable receptors with an inhibitory "cocktail" consisting of picrotoxin, SR95531, and strychnine. We found that taurine's metabotropic effects regulate voltage-gated channels in retinal neurons. After applying the inhibitory cocktail, taurine enhanced delayed outward rectifier K(+) channels preferentially in Off-bipolar cells, and the effect was completely blocked by the specific PKC inhibitor, GF109203X. Additionally, taurine also acted through a metabotropic pathway to suppress both L- and N-type Ca(2+) channels in retinal neurons, which were insensitive to the potent GABA(B) receptor inhibitor, CGP55845. This study reinforces our previous finding that taurine in physiological concentrations produces a multiplicity of metabotropic effects that precisely govern the integration of signals being transmitted from the retina to the brain.

  14. Neurological perspectives on voltage-gated sodium channels

    PubMed Central

    Linley, John E.; Baker, Mark D.; Minett, Michael S.; Cregg, Roman; Werdehausen, Robert; Rugiero, François

    2012-01-01

    The activity of voltage-gated sodium channels has long been linked to disorders of neuronal excitability such as epilepsy and chronic pain. Recent genetic studies have now expanded the role of sodium channels in health and disease, to include autism, migraine, multiple sclerosis, cancer as well as muscle and immune system disorders. Transgenic mouse models have proved useful in understanding the physiological role of individual sodium channels, and there has been significant progress in the development of subtype selective inhibitors of sodium channels. This review will outline the functions and roles of specific sodium channels in electrical signalling and disease, focusing on neurological aspects. We also discuss recent advances in the development of selective sodium channel inhibitors. PMID:22961543

  15. Shellfish Toxins Targeting Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fan; Xu, Xunxun; Li, Tingting; Liu, Zhonghua

    2013-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) play a central role in the generation and propagation of action potentials in excitable neurons and other cells and are targeted by commonly used local anesthetics, antiarrhythmics, and anticonvulsants. They are also common targets of neurotoxins including shellfish toxins. Shellfish toxins are a variety of toxic secondary metabolites produced by prokaryotic cyanobacteria and eukaryotic dinoflagellates in both marine and fresh water systems, which can accumulate in marine animals via the food chain. Consumption of shellfish toxin-contaminated seafood may result in potentially fatal human shellfish poisoning. This article provides an overview of the structure, bioactivity, and pharmacology of shellfish toxins that act on VGSCs, along with a brief discussion on their pharmaceutical potential for pain management. PMID:24287955

  16. Neurotoxins and Their Binding Areas on Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Marijke; Peigneur, Steve; Tytgat, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) are large transmembrane proteins that conduct sodium ions across the membrane and by doing so they generate signals of communication between many kinds of tissues. They are responsible for the generation and propagation of action potentials in excitable cells, in close collaboration with other channels like potassium channels. Therefore, genetic defects in sodium channel genes can cause a wide variety of diseases, generally called “channelopathies.” The first insights into the mechanism of action potentials and the involvement of sodium channels originated from Hodgkin and Huxley for which they were awarded the Nobel Prize in 1963. These concepts still form the basis for understanding the function of VGSCs. When VGSCs sense a sufficient change in membrane potential, they are activated and consequently generate a massive influx of sodium ions. Immediately after, channels will start to inactivate and currents decrease. In the inactivated state, channels stay refractory for new stimuli and they must return to the closed state before being susceptible to a new depolarization. On the other hand, studies with neurotoxins like tetrodotoxin (TTX) and saxitoxin (STX) also contributed largely to our today’s understanding of the structure and function of ion channels and of VGSCs specifically. Moreover, neurotoxins acting on ion channels turned out to be valuable lead compounds in the development of new drugs for the enormous range of diseases in which ion channels are involved. A recent example of a synthetic neurotoxin that made it to the market is ziconotide (Prialt®, Elan). The original peptide, ω-MVIIA, is derived from the cone snail Conus magus and now FDA/EMA-approved for the management of severe chronic pain by blocking the N-type voltage-gated calcium channels in pain fibers. This review focuses on the current status of research on neurotoxins acting on VGSC, their contribution to further unravel the structure and

  17. Subtype-selective targeting of voltage-gated sodium channels

    PubMed Central

    England, Steve; de Groot, Marcel J

    2009-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are key to the initiation and propagation of action potentials in electrically excitable cells. Molecular characterization has shown there to be nine functional members of the family, with a high degree of sequence homology between the channels. This homology translates into similar biophysical and pharmacological properties. Confidence in some of the channels as drug targets has been boosted by the discovery of human mutations in the genes encoding a number of them, which give rise to clinical conditions commensurate with the changes predicted from the altered channel biophysics. As a result, they have received much attention for their therapeutic potential. Sodium channels represent well-precedented drug targets as antidysrhythmics, anticonvulsants and local anaesthetics provide good clinical efficacy, driven through pharmacology at these channels. However, electrophysiological characterization of clinically useful compounds in recombinant expression systems shows them to be weak, with poor selectivity between channel types. This has led to the search for subtype-selective modulators, which offer the promise of treatments with improved clinical efficacy and better toleration. Despite developments in high-throughput electrophysiology platforms, this has proven very challenging. Structural biology is beginning to offer us a greater understanding of the three-dimensional structure of voltage-gated ion channels, bringing with it the opportunity to do real structure-based drug design in the future. This discipline is still in its infancy, but developments with the expression and purification of prokaryotic sodium channels offer the promise of structure-based drug design in the not too distant future. PMID:19845672

  18. Melanopsin Phototransduction Contributes to Light-Evoked Choroidal Expansion and Rod L-Type Calcium Channel Function In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Berkowitz, Bruce A.; Schmidt, Tiffany; Podolsky, Robert H.; Roberts, Robin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose In humans, rodents, and pigeons, the dark → light transition signals nonretinal brain tissue to increase choroidal thickness, a major control element of choroidal blood flow, and thus of photoreceptor and retinal pigment epithelium function. However, it is unclear which photopigments in the retina relay the light signal to the brain. Here, we test the hypothesis that melanopsin (Opn4)-regulated phototransduction modulates light-evoked choroidal thickness expansion in mice. Methods Two-month-old C57Bl/6 wild-type (B6), 4- to 5-month-old C57Bl/6/129S6 wild-type (B6 + S6), and 2-month-old melanopsin knockout (Opn4−/−) on a B6 + S6 background were studied. Retinal anatomy was evaluated in vivo by optical coherence tomography and MRI. Choroidal thickness in dark and light were measured by diffusion-weighted MRI. Rod cell L-type calcium channel (LTCC) function in dark and light (manganese-enhanced MRI [MEMRI]) was also measured. Results Opn4−/− mice did not show the light-evoked expansion of choroidal thickness observed in B6 and B6 + S6 controls. Additionally, Opn4−/− mice had lower than normal rod cell and inner retinal LTCC function in the dark but not in the light. These deficits were not due to structural abnormalities because retinal laminar architecture and thickness, and choroidal thickness in the Opn4−/− mice were similar to controls. Conclusions First time evidence is provided that melanopsin phototransduction contributes to dark → light control of murine choroidal thickness. The data also highlight a contribution in vivo of melanopsin phototransduction to rod cell and inner retinal depolarization in the dark. PMID:27727394

  19. Expression of the alpha(2)delta subunit interferes with prepulse facilitation in cardiac L-type calcium channels.

    PubMed Central

    Platano, D; Qin, N; Noceti, F; Birnbaumer, L; Stefani, E; Olcese, R

    2000-01-01

    We investigated the role of the accessory alpha(2)delta subunit on the voltage-dependent facilitation of cardiac L-type Ca(2+) channels (alpha(1C)). alpha(1C) Channels were coexpressed in Xenopus oocytes with beta(3) and alpha(2)delta calcium channel subunits. In alpha(1C) + beta(3), the amplitude of the ionic current (measured during pulses to 10 mV) was in average approximately 1.9-fold larger after the application of a 200-ms prepulse to +80 mV. This phenomenon, commonly referred to as voltage-dependent facilitation, was not observed when alpha(2)delta was coexpressed with alpha(1C) + beta(3). In alpha(1C) + beta(3), the prepulse produced a left shift ( approximately 40 mV) of the activation curve. Instead, the activation curve for alpha(1C) + beta(3) + alpha(2)delta was minimally affected by the prepulse and had a voltage dependence very similar to the G-V curve of the alpha(1C) + beta(3) channel facilitated by the prepulse. Coexpression of alpha(2)delta with alpha(1C) + beta(3) seems to mimic the prepulse effect by shifting the activation curve toward more negative potentials, leaving little room for facilitation. The facilitation of alpha(1C) + beta(3) was associated with an increase of the charge movement. In the presence of alpha(2)delta, the charge remained unaffected after the prepulse. Coexpression of alpha(2)delta seems to set all the channels in a conformational state from where the open state can be easily reached, even without prepulse. PMID:10827975

  20. An L-type calcium channel agonist, bay K8644, extends the window of intervention against ischemic neuronal injury.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hong-hai; Li, Shu-ji; Wang, Pu; Yan, Hua-cheng; Cao, Xiong; Hou, Feng-qin; Fang, Ying-ying; Zhu, Xin-hong; Gao, Tian-ming

    2013-02-01

    Our previous data indicate that the inhibition of L-type calcium channels (LTCCs) might be the cause of post-ischemic neuronal injury and that the activation of LTCCs can give rise to neuroprotection. In the present study, we aimed to profile the intervention window of Bay K8644, an LTCC agonist, and determine the involved mechanisms. The four vessel occlusion and oxygen-glucose deprivation models were employed to mimic ischemia/reperfusion damage in vivo and in vitro. Neuronal injury was analyzed using Nissl and Fluoro-Jade B staining in vivo and Hoechst 33342 and propidium iodide staining in vitro. The behavioral effects were tested using the Morris water maze. The phosphorylation of P38, Jun N-terminal kinase, and extracellular-regulated kinase (ERK) was detected by Western blotting. Our results show that Bay K8644 administered as late as 24 h after reperfusion prevented CA1 neuronal death and ameliorated the deficiencies in spatial learning performance induced by global ischemia. In oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD), Bay K8644 delivered from 1 to 12 h after re-oxygenation reduced neuronal death. The decrease in p-ERK1/2 that was observed at 1 h after OGD was reversed by Bay K8644, and the effect of Bay K8644 was blocked by treatment with U0126 and MEK kinase dead transfection. Moreover, similar to Bay K8644, FPL 64176, another potent LTCC agonist, extends the window of intervention against neuronal injury in an in vitro model of ischemia. In conclusion, our data suggest that opening LTCCs may be a practicable approach for stroke therapy.

  1. Melanopsin Phototransduction Contributes to Light-Evoked Choroidal Expansion and Rod L-Type Calcium Channel Function In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Berkowitz, Bruce A; Schmidt, Tiffany; Podolsky, Robert H; Roberts, Robin

    2016-10-01

    In humans, rodents, and pigeons, the dark → light transition signals nonretinal brain tissue to increase choroidal thickness, a major control element of choroidal blood flow, and thus of photoreceptor and retinal pigment epithelium function. However, it is unclear which photopigments in the retina relay the light signal to the brain. Here, we test the hypothesis that melanopsin (Opn4)-regulated phototransduction modulates light-evoked choroidal thickness expansion in mice. Two-month-old C57Bl/6 wild-type (B6), 4- to 5-month-old C57Bl/6/129S6 wild-type (B6 + S6), and 2-month-old melanopsin knockout (Opn4-/-) on a B6 + S6 background were studied. Retinal anatomy was evaluated in vivo by optical coherence tomography and MRI. Choroidal thickness in dark and light were measured by diffusion-weighted MRI. Rod cell L-type calcium channel (LTCC) function in dark and light (manganese-enhanced MRI [MEMRI]) was also measured. Opn4-/- mice did not show the light-evoked expansion of choroidal thickness observed in B6 and B6 + S6 controls. Additionally, Opn4-/- mice had lower than normal rod cell and inner retinal LTCC function in the dark but not in the light. These deficits were not due to structural abnormalities because retinal laminar architecture and thickness, and choroidal thickness in the Opn4-/- mice were similar to controls. First time evidence is provided that melanopsin phototransduction contributes to dark → light control of murine choroidal thickness. The data also highlight a contribution in vivo of melanopsin phototransduction to rod cell and inner retinal depolarization in the dark.

  2. Differential regulation of voltage-gated Ca2+ currents and metabotropic glutamate receptor activity by measles virus infection in rat cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Günther, Christine; Laube, Mandy; Liebert, Uwe-Gerd; Kraft, Robert

    2012-01-06

    Measles virus (MV) infection may lead to severe chronic CNS disease processes, including MV-induced encephalitis. Because the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) is a major determinant of the (patho-)physiological state in all cells we asked whether important Ca(2+) conducting pathways are affected by MV infection in cultured cortical rat neurons. Patch-clamp measurements revealed a decrease in voltage-gated Ca(2+) currents during MV-infection, while voltage-gated K(+) currents and NMDA-evoked currents were unaffected. Calcium-imaging experiments using 50mM extracellular KCl showed reduced [Ca(2+)](i) increases in MV-infected neurons, confirming a decreased activity of voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels. In contrast, the group-I metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) agonist DHPG evoked changes in [Ca(2+)](i) that were increased in MV-infected cells. Our results show that MV infection conversely regulates Ca(2+) signals induced by group-I mGluRs and by voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels, suggesting that these physiological impairments may contribute to an altered function of cortical neurons during MV-induced encephalitis.

  3. Voltage Gated Proton Channels Find Their Dream Job Managing the Respiratory Burst in Phagocytes

    PubMed Central

    DeCoursey, Thomas E.

    2011-01-01

    The voltage gated proton channel bears surprising resemblance to the voltage-sensing domain (S1–S4) of other voltage gated ion channels, but is a dimer with two conduction pathways. The proton channel seems designed for efficient proton extrusion from cells. In phagocytes, it facilitates the production of reactive oxygen species by NADPH oxidase. PMID:20134026

  4. Pharmacological Inhibition of Voltage-gated Ca2+ Channels for Chronic Pain Relief

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seungkyu

    2013-01-01

    Chronic pain is a major therapeutic problem as the current treatment options are unsatisfactory with low efficacy and deleterious side effects. Voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (VGCCs), which are multi-complex proteins consisting of α1, β, γ, and α2δ subunits, play an important role in pain signaling. These channels are involved in neurogenic inflammation, excitability, and neurotransmitter release in nociceptors. It has been previously shown that N-type VGCCs (Cav2.2) are a major pain target. U.S. FDA approval of three Cav2.2 antagonists, gabapentin, pregabalin, and ziconotide, for chronic pain underlies the importance of this channel subtype. Also, there has been increasing evidence that L-type (Cav1.2) or T-type (Cav3.2) VGCCs may be involved in pain signaling and chronic pain. In order to develop novel pain therapeutics and to understand the role of VGCC subtypes, discovering subtype selective VGCC inhibitors or methods that selectively target the inhibitor into nociceptors would be essential. This review describes the various VGCC subtype inhibitors and the potential of utilizing VGCC subtypes as targets of chronic pain. Development of VGCC subtype inhibitors and targeting them into nociceptors will contribute to a better understanding of the roles of VGCC subtypes in pain at a spinal level as well as development of a novel class of analgesics for chronic pain. PMID:24396337

  5. Nuclear translocation of the cardiac L-type calcium channel C-terminus is regulated by sex and 17β-estradiol.

    PubMed

    Mahmoodzadeh, S; Haase, H; Sporbert, A; Rharass, T; Panáková, D; Morano, I

    2016-08-01

    The cardiac voltage gated l-type Ca(2+) channel (Cav1.2) constitutes the main entrance gate for Ca(2+) that triggers cardiac contraction. Several studies showed that the distal C-terminus fragment of Cav1.2 α1C subunit (α1C-dCT) is proteolytically cleaved and shuttles between the plasma membrane and the nucleus, which is regulated both developmentally and by Ca(2+). However, the effects of sex and sex hormone 17β-estradiol (E2, estrogen) on α1C-dCT nuclear translocation are still unexplored. To investigate the sexual disparity in the α1C-dCT nuclear translocation, we first generated an antibody directed against a synthetic peptide (GRRASFHLE) located in α1C-dCT, and used it to probe ventricular myocytes from adult female and male mice. Immunocytochemistry of isolated mouse primary adult ventricular myocytes revealed both nuclear staining and cytosolic punctuate staining around the T-tubules. The ratio of nuclear to cytosolic intensity (Inuc/Icyt) was significantly higher in isolated female cardiomyocytes (1.42±0.05) compared to male cardiomyocytes (1.05±0.02). Western blot analysis of nuclear fraction confirmed these data. Furthermore, we found a significant decrease in nuclear staining intensity of α1C-dCT in both female and male cardiomyocytes upon serum withdrawal for 18h (Inuc/Icyt 1.05±0.02 and 0.89±0.02, respectively). Interestingly, subsequent E2 treatment (10(-8)M) for 8h normalized the intracellular distribution of α1C-dCT in male cardiomyocytes (Inuc/Icyt 1.04±0.02), but not in female cardiomyocytes. Acute treatment of male cardiomyocytes with E2 for 45min revealed a similar effect. This effect of E2 was revised by ICI indicating the involvement of ER in this signaling pathway. Taken together, our results showed that the shuttling of α1C-CT in cardiomyocytes is regulated in a sex-dependent manner, and E2-activated ER may play a role in the nuclear shuttling of α1C-dCT in male cardiomyocytes. This may explain, at least partly, the observed

  6. Effects of total flavones from Acanthopanax senticosus on L-type calcium channels, calcium transient and contractility in rat ventricular myocytes.

    PubMed

    Guan, Shengjiang; Ma, Juanjuan; Chu, Xi; Gao, Yonggang; Zhang, Ying; Zhang, Xuan; Zhang, Fenghua; Liu, Zhenyi; Zhang, Jianping; Chu, Li

    2015-04-01

    Acanthopanax senticosus (Rupr. et Maxim.) Harms (AS), a traditional herbal medicine, has been widely used to treat ischemic heart disease. However, the underlying cellular mechanisms of its benefits to cardiac function remain unclear. The present study examined the effects of total flavones from AS (TFAS) on L-type Ca(2+) channel currents (ICa-L ) using the whole cell patch-clamp technique and on intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+) ]i ) handling and cell contractility in rat ventricular myocytes with the aid of a video-based edge-detection system. Exposure to TFAS resulted in a concentration- and voltage-dependent blockade of ICa-L , with the half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50 ) of 283.12 µg/mL and the maximal inhibitory effect of 36.49 ± 1.95%. Moreover, TFAS not only increased the maximum current in the current-voltage relationship but also shifted the activation and inactivation curves of ICa-L toward the hyperpolarizing direction. Meanwhile, TFAS significantly reduced amplitudes of myocyte shortening and [Ca(2+) ]i with an increase in the time to 10% of the peak (Tp) and a decrease in the time to 10% of the baseline (Tr). Thus, the cardioprotective effects of TFAS may be attributed mainly to the attenuation of [Ca(2+) ]i through the direct inhibition of ICa-L in rat ventricular myocytes and consequent negative effect on myocardial contractility.

  7. Effects of 17beta-estradiol and IGF-1 on L-type voltage-activated and stretch-activated calcium currents in cultured rat cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Julio C; López-Zapata, Diego F; Pinzón, Oscar A

    2014-01-01

    Calcium transport pathways are key factors for understanding how changes in the cytoplasmic calcium concentration are associated with neuroprotection because calcium is involved in the onset of death signaling in neurons. This study characterized the effects of 17β-estradiol and IGF-1 on voltage-activated and stretch-activated calcium channels in rat cultured cortical neurons. The whole-cell patch-clamp technique, using a voltage steps protocol or by applying positive pressure into the micropipette, was used on 7-10 day cultured neurons from a Wistar rat cortex, and pharmacological characterization was performed on these neurons. Both 17β-estradiol and IGF-1 inhibited the currents mediated by L-type voltage-activated calcium channels, although the IGF-1 effects were lower than those of 17β-estradiol. The effect of both hormones together was greater than the sum of the effects of the individual agents. Unlike IGF-1, 17β-estradiol decreased the current mediated by stretch-activated channels. The inhibition of the classical receptors of these hormones did not affect the results. Both hormones regulate voltage-activated calcium channels in a synergistic way, but only 17β-estradiol has an inhibitory effect on stretch-activated calcium channels. These effects are not mediated by classical receptors and may be relevant to the neuroprotective effects of both hormones because they diminish calcium entry into the neuron and decrease the possibility for the onset of apoptotic signaling.

  8. Role of voltage gated Ca2+ channels in rat visceral hypersensitivity change induced by 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Visceral pain is common symptom involved in many gastrointestinal disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease. The underlying molecular mechanisms remain elusive. We investigated the molecular mechanisms and the role for voltage gated calcium channel (VGCC) in the pathogenesis in a rat model of 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS) induced visceral inflammatory hypersensitivity. Results Using Agilent cDNA arrays, we found 172 genes changed significantly in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) of TNBS treated rats. Among these changed genes, Cav1.2 and Cav2.3 were significantly up-regulated. Then the RT-PCR and Western blot further confirmed the up-regulation of Cav1.2 and Cav2.3. The whole cell patch clamp recording of acutely dissociated colonic specific DRG neurons showed that the peak IBa density was significantly increased in colonic neurons of TNBS treated rats compared with control rats (−127.82 ± 20.82 pA/pF Vs −91.67 ± 19.02 pA/pF, n = 9, *P < 0.05). To distinguish the different type of calcium currents with the corresponding selective channel blockers, we found that L-type (−38.56 ± 3.97 pA/pF Vs −25.75 ± 3.35 pA/pF, n = 9, * P < 0.05) and R-type (−13.31 ± 1.36 pA/pF Vs −8.60 ± 1.25 pA/pF, n = 9, * P < 0.05) calcium current density were significantly increased in colonic DRG neurons of TNBS treated rats compared with control rats. In addition, pharmacological blockade with L-type antagonist (nimodipine) and R-type antagonist (SNX-482) with intrathecal injection attenuates visceral pain in TNBS induced inflammatory visceral hypersensitivity. Conclusion Cav1.2 and Cav2.3 in colonic primary sensory neurons play an important role in visceral inflammatory hyperalgesia, which maybe the potential therapeutic targets. PMID:23537331

  9. Marine Toxins That Target Voltage-gated Sodium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Al-Sabi, Ahmed; McArthur, Jeff; Ostroumov, Vitaly; French, Robert J.

    2006-01-01

    Eukaryotic, voltage-gated sodium (NaV) channels are large membrane proteins which underlie generation and propagation of rapid electrical signals in nerve, muscle and heart. Nine different NaV receptor sites, for natural ligands and/or drugs, have been identified, based on functional analyses and site-directed mutagenesis. In the marine ecosystem, numerous toxins have evolved to disrupt NaV channel function, either by inhibition of current flow through the channels, or by modifying the activation and inactivation gating processes by which the channels open and close. These toxins function in their native environment as offensive or defensive weapons in prey capture or deterrence of predators. In composition, they range from organic molecules of varying size and complexity to peptides consisting of ~10–70 amino acids. We review the variety of known NaV-targeted marine toxins, outlining, where known, their sites of interaction with the channel protein and their functional effects. In a number of cases, these natural ligands have the potential applications as drugs in clinical settings, or as models for drug development.

  10. Transcriptional regulation of voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels.

    PubMed

    González-Ramírez, Ricardo; Felix, Ricardo

    2017-03-31

    The transcriptional regulation of voltage-gated Ca(2+) (CaV ) channels is an emerging research area that promises to improve our understanding of how many relevant physiological events are shaped in the central nervous system, the skeletal muscle, and other tissues. Interestingly, a picture of how transcription of CaV channel subunit genes is controlled is evolving with the identification of the promoter regions required for tissue-specific expression, and the identification of transcription factors that control their expression. These promoters share several characteristics that include multiple transcriptional start sites, lack of a TATA box, and the presence of elements conferring tissue-selective expression. Likewise, changes in CaV channel expression occur throughout development, following ischemia, seizures, or chronic drug administration. This review focuses on insights achieved regarding the control of CaV channel gene expression. To further understand the complexities of expression and to increase the possibilities of detecting CaV channel alterations causing human disease, a deeper knowledge on the structure of the 5' upstream regions of the genes encoding these remarkable proteins will be necessary. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  11. Voltage-gated sodium channels: biophysics, pharmacology, and related channelopathies.

    PubMed

    Savio-Galimberti, Eleonora; Gollob, Michael H; Darbar, Dawood

    2012-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSC) are multi-molecular protein complexes expressed in both excitable and non-excitable cells. They are primarily formed by a pore-forming multi-spanning integral membrane glycoprotein (α-subunit) that can be associated with one or more regulatory β-subunits. The latter are single-span integral membrane proteins that modulate the sodium current (I(Na)) and can also function as cell adhesion molecules. In vitro some of the cell-adhesive functions of the β-subunits may play important physiological roles independently of the α-subunits. Other endogenous regulatory proteins named "channel partners" or "channel interacting proteins" (ChiPs) like caveolin-3 and calmodulin/calmodulin kinase II (CaMKII) can also interact and modulate the expression and/or function of VGSC. In addition to their physiological roles in cell excitability and cell adhesion, VGSC are the site of action of toxins (like tetrodotoxin and saxitoxin), and pharmacologic agents (like antiarrhythmic drugs, local anesthetics, antiepileptic drugs, and newly developed analgesics). Mutations in genes that encode α- and/or β-subunits as well as the ChiPs can affect the structure and biophysical properties of VGSC, leading to the development of diseases termed sodium "channelopathies".  This review will outline the structure, function, and biophysical properties of VGSC as well as their pharmacology and associated channelopathies and highlight some of the recent advances in this field.

  12. Voltage-Gated Na+ Channels: Not Just for Conduction.

    PubMed

    Kruger, Larisa C; Isom, Lori L

    2016-06-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs), composed of a pore-forming α subunit and up to two associated β subunits, are critical for the initiation of the action potential (AP) in excitable tissues. Building on the monumental discovery and description of sodium current in 1952, intrepid researchers described the voltage-dependent gating mechanism, selectivity of the channel, and general structure of the VGSC channel. Recently, crystal structures of bacterial VGSC α subunits have confirmed many of these studies and provided new insights into VGSC function. VGSC β subunits, first cloned in 1992, modulate sodium current but also have nonconducting roles as cell-adhesion molecules and function in neurite outgrowth and neuronal pathfinding. Mutations in VGSC α and β genes are associated with diseases caused by dysfunction of excitable tissues such as epilepsy. Because of the multigenic and drug-resistant nature of some of these diseases, induced pluripotent stem cells and other novel approaches are being used to screen for new drugs and further understand how mutations in VGSC genes contribute to pathophysiology.

  13. Voltage-gated sodium channel blockers as immunomodulators.

    PubMed

    Roselli, Francesco; Livrea, Paolo; Jirillo, Emilio

    2006-01-01

    Several Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels (VGSC) are widely expressed on lymphocytes and macrophages but their role in immune function is still debated. Nevertheless, Na(+) influx through VGSC is required for lymphocytes activation and proliferation, since these responses are blocked by Na(+)-free medium or by VGSC blockers. These effects may be mediated by the reduced intracellular Na(+) levels, which in turn may impair the activity of Na(+)/Ca(++) exchanger resulting in reduced intracellular Ca(++) levels during lymphocyte activation. Furthermore, in Jurkat cell line VGSC appear to be involved in cell volume regulation, migration in artificial matrix and cell death by apoptosis. VGSC play a role in macrophage function as well, and VGSC blockers impair both phagocytosis and inflammatory responses. Several VGSC blockers have shown immunomodulatory properties in mice models, skewing the immune response toward a Th2-mediated response, while suppressing Th1-mediated responses, and VGSC already used in clinical practice are known to modulate immunoglobulin (Ig) levels both in mice and in humans. These effects suggest that VGSC blockers may find clinical application in the treatment of autoimmune and inflammatory disease. However, many of these drugs induce a number of severe side effects. The relevance of VGSC function in immune regulation suggest that the testing of newly patented VGSC blockers for their effect on immunity may be worthwhile.

  14. Screening for voltage-gated sodium channel interacting peptides.

    PubMed

    Meng, Er; Cai, Tian-Fu; Zhang, Hui; Tang, Si; Li, Meng-Jie; Li, Wen-Ying; Huang, Peng-Fei; Liu, Kai; Wu, Lei; Zhu, Ling-Yun; Liu, Long; Peng, Kuan; Dai, Xian-Dong; Jiang, Hui; Zeng, Xiong-Zhi; Liang, Song-Ping; Zhang, Dong-Yi

    2014-04-02

    The voltage-gated sodium channel (VGSC) interacting peptide is of special interest for both basic research and pharmaceutical purposes. In this study, we established a yeast-two-hybrid based strategy to detect the interaction(s) between neurotoxic peptide and the extracellular region of VGSC. Using a previously reported neurotoxin JZTX-III as a model molecule, we demonstrated that the interactions between JZTX-III and the extracellular regions of its target hNav1.5 are detectable and the detected interactions are directly related to its activity. We further applied this strategy to the screening of VGSC interacting peptides. Using the extracellular region of hNav1.5 as the bait, we identified a novel sodium channel inhibitor SSCM-1 from a random peptide library. This peptide selectively inhibits hNav1.5 currents in the whole-cell patch clamp assays. This strategy might be used for the large scale screening for target-specific interacting peptides of VGSCs or other ion channels.

  15. Understanding Voltage Gating of Providencia stuartii Porins at Atomic Level.

    PubMed

    Song, Wanling; Bajaj, Harsha; Nasrallah, Chady; Jiang, Hualiang; Winterhalter, Mathias; Colletier, Jacques-Philippe; Xu, Yechun

    2015-05-01

    Bacterial porins are water-filled β-barrel channels that allow translocation of solutes across the outer membrane. They feature a constriction zone, contributed by the plunging of extracellular loop 3 (L3) into the channel lumen. Porins are generally in the open state, but undergo gating in response to external voltages. To date the underlying mechanism is unclear. Here we report results from molecular dynamics simulations on the two porins of Providenica stuartii, Omp-Pst1 and Omp-Pst2, which display distinct voltage sensitivities. Voltage gating was observed in Omp-Pst2, where the binding of cations in-between L3 and the barrel wall results in exposing a conserved aromatic residue in the channel lumen, thereby halting ion permeation. Comparison of Omp-Pst1 and Omp-Pst2 structures and trajectories suggests that their sensitivity to voltage is encoded in the hydrogen-bonding network anchoring L3 onto the barrel wall, as we observed that it is the strength of this network that governs the probability of cations binding behind L3. That Omp-Pst2 gating is observed only when ions flow against the electrostatic potential gradient of the channel furthermore suggests a possible role for this porin in the regulation of charge distribution across the outer membrane and bacterial homeostasis.

  16. Animal toxins acting on voltage-gated potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Mouhat, Stéphanie; Andreotti, Nicolas; Jouirou, Besma; Sabatier, Jean-Marc

    2008-01-01

    Animal venoms are rich natural sources of bioactive compounds, including peptide toxins acting on the various types of ion channels, i.e. K(+), Na(+), Cl(-) and Ca(2+). Among K+ channel-acting toxins, those selective for voltage-gated K(+) (Kv) channels are widely represented and have been isolated from the venoms of numerous animal species, such as scorpions, sea anemones, snakes, marine cone snails and spiders. The toxins characterized hitherto contain between 22 and 60 amino acid residues, and are cross-linked by two to four disulfide bridges. Depending on their types of fold, toxins can be classified in eight structural categories, which showed a combination of beta-strands, helices, or a mixture of both. The main architectural motifs thereof are referred to as alpha/beta scaffold and inhibitor cystine knot (ICK). A detailed analysis of toxin structures and pharmacological selectivities indicates that toxins exhibiting a similar type of fold can exert their action on several subtypes of Kv channels, whereas a particular Kv channel can be targeted by toxins that possess unrelated folds. Therefore, it appears that the ability of structurally divergent toxins to interact with a particular Kv channel relies onto a similar spatial distribution of amino acid residues that are key to the toxin-channel interaction (rather than the type of toxin fold). The diversity of Kv channel blockers and their therapeutic value in the potential treatment of a number of specific human diseases, especially autoimmune disorders, inflammatory neuropathies and cancer, are reviewed.

  17. Resurgent current of voltage-gated Na+ channels

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Amanda H; Raman, Indira M

    2014-01-01

    Resurgent Na+ current results from a distinctive form of Na+ channel gating, originally identified in cerebellar Purkinje neurons. In these neurons, the tetrodotoxin-sensitive voltage-gated Na+ channels responsible for action potential firing have specialized mechanisms that reduce the likelihood that they accumulate in fast inactivated states, thereby shortening refractory periods and permitting rapid, repetitive, and/or burst firing. Under voltage clamp, step depolarizations evoke transient Na+ currents that rapidly activate and quickly decay, and step repolarizations elicit slower channel reopening, or a ‘resurgent’ current. The generation of resurgent current depends on a factor in the Na+ channel complex, probably a subunit such as NaVβ4 (Scn4b), which blocks open Na+ channels at positive voltages, competing with the fast inactivation gate, and unblocks at negative voltages, permitting recovery from an open channel block along with a flow of current. Following its initial discovery, resurgent Na+ current has been found in nearly 20 types of neurons. Emerging research suggests that resurgent current is preferentially increased in a variety of clinical conditions associated with altered cellular excitability. Here we review the biophysical, molecular and structural mechanisms of resurgent current and their relation to the normal functions of excitable cells as well as pathophysiology. PMID:25172941

  18. Seizure suppression through manipulating splicing of a voltage-gated sodium channel.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wei-Hsiang; He, Miaomiao; Baines, Richard A

    2015-04-01

    Seizure can result from increased voltage-gated persistent sodium current expression. Although many clinically-approved antiepileptic drugs target voltage-gated persistent sodium current, none exclusively repress this current without also adversely affecting the transient voltage-gated sodium current. Achieving a more selective block has significant potential for the treatment of epilepsy. Recent studies show that voltage-gated persistent sodium current amplitude is regulated by alternative splicing offering the possibility of a novel route for seizure control. In this study we identify 291 splicing regulators that, on knockdown, alter splicing of the Drosophila voltage-gated sodium channel to favour inclusion of exon K, rather than the mutually exclusive exon L. This change is associated with both a significant reduction in voltage-gated persistent sodium current, without change to transient voltage-gated sodium current, and to rescue of seizure in this model insect. RNA interference mediated knock-down, in two different seizure mutants, shows that 95 of these regulators are sufficient to significantly reduce seizure duration. Moreover, most suppress seizure activity in both mutants, indicative that they are part of well conserved pathways and likely, therefore, to be optimal candidates to take forward to mammalian studies. We provide proof-of-principle for such studies by showing that inhibition of a selection of regulators, using small molecule inhibitors, is similarly effective to reduce seizure. Splicing of the Drosophila sodium channel shows many similarities to its mammalian counterparts, including altering the amplitude of voltage-gated persistent sodium current. Our study provides the impetus to investigate whether manipulation of splicing of mammalian voltage-gated sodium channels may be exploitable to provide effective seizure control. © The Author (2015). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain.

  19. Seizure suppression through manipulating splicing of a voltage-gated sodium channel

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Wei-Hsiang; He, Miaomiao

    2015-01-01

    Seizure can result from increased voltage-gated persistent sodium current expression. Although many clinically-approved antiepileptic drugs target voltage-gated persistent sodium current, none exclusively repress this current without also adversely affecting the transient voltage-gated sodium current. Achieving a more selective block has significant potential for the treatment of epilepsy. Recent studies show that voltage-gated persistent sodium current amplitude is regulated by alternative splicing offering the possibility of a novel route for seizure control. In this study we identify 291 splicing regulators that, on knockdown, alter splicing of the Drosophila voltage-gated sodium channel to favour inclusion of exon K, rather than the mutually exclusive exon L. This change is associated with both a significant reduction in voltage-gated persistent sodium current, without change to transient voltage-gated sodium current, and to rescue of seizure in this model insect. RNA interference mediated knock-down, in two different seizure mutants, shows that 95 of these regulators are sufficient to significantly reduce seizure duration. Moreover, most suppress seizure activity in both mutants, indicative that they are part of well conserved pathways and likely, therefore, to be optimal candidates to take forward to mammalian studies. We provide proof-of-principle for such studies by showing that inhibition of a selection of regulators, using small molecule inhibitors, is similarly effective to reduce seizure. Splicing of the Drosophila sodium channel shows many similarities to its mammalian counterparts, including altering the amplitude of voltage-gated persistent sodium current. Our study provides the impetus to investigate whether manipulation of splicing of mammalian voltage-gated sodium channels may be exploitable to provide effective seizure control. PMID:25681415

  20. Comparative analysis of the kinetic characteristics of L-type calcium channels in cardiac cells of hibernators.

    PubMed Central

    Alekseev, A E; Markevich, N I; Korystova, A F; Terzic, A; Kokoz, Y M

    1996-01-01

    An undefined property of L-type Ca2+ channels is believed to underlie the unique phenotype of hibernating hearts. Therefore, L-type Ca2+ channels in single cardiomyocytes isolated from hibernating versus awake ground-squirrels (Citellus undulatus) were compared using the perforated mode of the patch-clamp technique, and interpreted by way of a kinetic model of Ca2+ channel behavior based upon the concept of independence of the activation and inactivation processes. We find that, in hibernating ground-squirrels, the cardiac L-type Ca2+ current is lower in magnitude when compared to awake animals. Both in the awake or hibernating states, kinetics of L-type Ca2+ channels could be described by a d2f1(2)f2 model with an activation and two inactivation processes. The activation (or d) process relates to the movement of the gating charge. The slow (or f1) inactivation is associated with movement of gating charge and is current-dependent. The rapid (or f2) inactivation is a complex process which cannot be represented as a single-step conformational transition induced by the gating charge movement, and is regulated by beta-adrenoceptor stimulation. When compared to awake animals, the kinetic properties of Ca2+ channels from hibernating ground-squirrels differed in the following parameters: (1) pronounced shift (15-20 mV) toward depolarization in the normalized conductance of both inactivation components, and moderate shift in the activation component; (2) 1.5-2-fold greater time constants; and (3) two-fold greater activation gating charge. Thus, L-type Ca2+ channels apparently switch their phenotype during the hibernating transition. Stimulation of beta-adrenoceptors by isoproterenol, reversed the hibernating kinetic- (but not amplitude-) phenotype toward the awake type. Therefore, an aberrance in the beta-adrenergic system can not fully explain the observed changes in the L-type Ca2+ current. This suggests that during hibernation additional mechanisms may reduce the single

  1. Regulation of voltage-gated Ca(2+) currents by Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II in resting sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Kostic, Sandra; Pan, Bin; Guo, Yuan; Yu, Hongwei; Sapunar, Damir; Kwok, Wai-Meng; Hudmon, Andy; Wu, Hsiang-En; Hogan, Quinn H

    2014-09-01

    Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) is recognized as a key element in encoding depolarization activity of excitable cells into facilitated voltage-gated Ca(2+) channel (VGCC) function. Less is known about the participation of CaMKII in regulating VGCCs in resting cells. We examined constitutive CaMKII control of Ca(2+) currents in peripheral sensory neurons acutely isolated from dorsal root ganglia (DRGs) of adult rats. The small molecule CaMKII inhibitor KN-93 (1.0μM) reduced depolarization-induced ICa by 16-30% in excess of the effects produced by the inactive homolog KN-92. The specificity of CaMKII inhibition on VGCC function was shown by the efficacy of the selective CaMKII blocking peptide autocamtide-2-related inhibitory peptide in a membrane-permeable myristoylated form, which also reduced VGCC current in resting neurons. Loss of VGCC currents is primarily due to reduced N-type current, as application of mAIP selectively reduced N-type current by approximately 30%, and prior N-type current inhibition eliminated the effect of mAIP on VGCCs, while prior block of L-type channels did not reduce the effect of mAIP on total ICa. T-type currents were not affected by mAIP in resting DRG neurons. Transduction of sensory neurons in vivo by DRG injection of an adeno-associated virus expressing AIP also resulted in a loss of N-type currents. Together, these findings reveal a novel molecular adaptation whereby sensory neurons retain CaMKII support of VGCCs despite remaining quiescent.

  2. Isolation, synthesis and characterization of ω-TRTX-Cc1a, a novel tarantula venom peptide that selectively targets L-type Cav channels.

    PubMed

    Klint, Julie K; Berecki, Géza; Durek, Thomas; Mobli, Mehdi; Knapp, Oliver; King, Glenn F; Adams, David J; Alewood, Paul F; Rash, Lachlan D

    2014-05-15

    Spider venoms are replete with peptidic ion channel modulators, often with novel subtype selectivity, making them a rich source of pharmacological tools and drug leads. In a search for subtype-selective blockers of voltage-gated calcium (CaV) channels, we isolated and characterized a novel 39-residue peptide, ω-TRTX-Cc1a (Cc1a), from the venom of the tarantula Citharischius crawshayi (now Pelinobius muticus). Cc1a is 67% identical to the spider toxin ω-TRTX-Hg1a, an inhibitor of CaV2.3 channels. We assembled Cc1a using a combination of Boc solid-phase peptide synthesis and native chemical ligation. Oxidative folding yielded two stable, slowly interconverting isomers. Cc1a preferentially inhibited Ba(2+) currents (IBa) mediated by L-type (CaV1.2 and CaV1.3) CaV channels heterologously expressed in Xenopus oocytes, with half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values of 825nM and 2.24μM, respectively. In rat dorsal root ganglion neurons, Cc1a inhibited IBa mediated by high voltage-activated CaV channels but did not affect low voltage-activated T-type CaV channels. Cc1a exhibited weak activity at NaV1.5 and NaV1.7 voltage-gated sodium (NaV) channels stably expressed in mammalian HEK or CHO cells, respectively. Experiments with modified Cc1a peptides, truncated at the N-terminus (ΔG1-E5) or C-terminus (ΔW35-V39), demonstrated that the N- and C-termini are important for voltage-gated ion channel modulation. We conclude that Cc1a represents a novel pharmacological tool for probing the structure and function of L-type CaV channels. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Psychiatric presentation of voltage-gated potassium channel antibody-associated encephalopathy. Case report.

    PubMed

    Parthasarathi, U D; Harrower, T; Tempest, M; Hodges, J R; Walsh, C; McKenna, P J; Fletcher, P C

    2006-08-01

    Voltage-gated potassium channel antibody encephalopathy, a rare cause of limbic encephalopathy, typically presents with memory impairment and seizures. Psychiatric symptoms have not been emphasised in the literature. Here we describe a 58-year-old man who presented with panic attacks and psychogenic non-epileptic seizures and, later on, developed delusions and hallucinations and then confusion. He was found to have antibodies to voltage-gated potassium channels. Treatment with immuno-modulatory therapy resulted in almost complete recovery.

  4. Regulation of voltage-gated potassium channels by PI(4,5)P2

    PubMed Central

    Kruse, Martin; Hammond, Gerald R.V.

    2012-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P2) regulates activities of numerous ion channels including inwardly rectifying potassium (Kir) channels, KCNQ, TRP, and voltage-gated calcium channels. Several studies suggest that voltage-gated potassium (KV) channels might be regulated by PI(4,5)P2. Wide expression of KV channels in different cells suggests that such regulation could have broad physiological consequences. To study regulation of KV channels by PI(4,5)P2, we have coexpressed several of them in tsA-201 cells with a G protein–coupled receptor (M1R), a voltage-sensitive lipid 5-phosphatase (Dr-VSP), or an engineered fusion protein carrying both lipid 4-phosphatase and 5-phosphatase activity (pseudojanin). These tools deplete PI(4,5)P2 with application of muscarinic agonists, depolarization, or rapamycin, respectively. PI(4,5)P2 at the plasma membrane was monitored by Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) from PH probes of PLCδ1 simultaneously with whole-cell recordings. Activation of Dr-VSP or recruitment of pseudojanin inhibited KV7.1, KV7.2/7.3, and Kir2.1 channel current by 90–95%. Activation of M1R inhibited KV7.2/7.3 current similarly. With these tools, we tested for potential PI(4,5)P2 regulation of activity of KV1.1/KVβ1.1, KV1.3, KV1.4, and KV1.5/KVβ1.3, KV2.1, KV3.4, KV4.2, KV4.3 (with different KChIPs and DPP6-s), and hERG/KCNE2. Interestingly, we found a substantial removal of inactivation for KV1.1/KVβ1.1 and KV3.4, resulting in up-regulation of current density upon activation of M1R but no changes in activity upon activating only VSP or pseudojanin. The other channels tested except possibly hERG showed no alteration in activity in any of the assays we used. In conclusion, a depletion of PI(4,5)P2 at the plasma membrane by enzymes does not seem to influence activity of most tested KV channels, whereas it does strongly inhibit members of the KV7 and Kir families. PMID:22851677

  5. Calciseptine, a peptide isolated from black mamba venom, is a specific blocker of the L-type calcium channel.

    PubMed

    de Weille, J R; Schweitz, H; Maes, P; Tartar, A; Lazdunski, M

    1991-03-15

    The venom of the black mamba contains a 60-amino acid peptide called calciseptine. The peptide has been fully sequenced. It is a smooth muscle relaxant and an inhibitor of cardiac contractions. Its physiological action resembles that of drugs, such as the 1,4-dihydropyridines, which are important in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Calciseptine, like the 1,4-dihydropyridines, selectively blocks L-type Ca2+ channels and is totally inactive on other voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels such as N-type and T-type channels. To our knowledge, it is the only natural polypeptide that has been shown to be a specific inhibitor of L-type Ca2+ channels.

  6. Coupling between the voltage-sensing and pore domains in a voltage-gated potassium channel.

    PubMed

    Schow, Eric V; Freites, J Alfredo; Nizkorodov, Alex; White, Stephen H; Tobias, Douglas J

    2012-07-01

    Voltage-dependent potassium (Kv), sodium (Nav), and calcium channels open and close in response to changes in transmembrane (TM) potential, thus regulating cell excitability by controlling ion flow across the membrane. An outstanding question concerning voltage gating is how voltage-induced conformational changes of the channel voltage-sensing domains (VSDs) are coupled through the S4-S5 interfacial linking helices to the opening and closing of the pore domain (PD). To investigate the coupling between the VSDs and the PD, we generated a closed Kv channel configuration from Aeropyrum pernix (KvAP) using atomistic simulations with experiment-based restraints on the VSDs. Full closure of the channel required, in addition to the experimentally determined TM displacement, that the VSDs be displaced both inwardly and laterally around the PD. This twisting motion generates a tight hydrophobic interface between the S4-S5 linkers and the C-terminal ends of the pore domain S6 helices in agreement with available experimental evidence.

  7. The voltage-gated proton channel Hv1/VSOP inhibits neutrophil granule release.

    PubMed

    Okochi, Yoshifumi; Aratani, Yasuaki; Adissu, Hibret A; Miyawaki, Nana; Sasaki, Mari; Suzuki, Kazuo; Okamura, Yasushi

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophil granule exocytosis is crucial for host defense and inflammation. Neutrophils contain 4 types of granules, the exocytotic release of which is differentially regulated. This exocytosis is known to be driven by diverse mediators, including calcium and nucleotides, but the precise molecular mechanism remains largely unknown. We show in the present study that voltage-gated proton (Hv) channels are necessary for the proper release of azurophilic granules in neutrophils. On activation of NADPH oxidase by PMA and IgG, neutrophils derived from Hvcn1 gene knockout mouse exhibited greater secretion of MPO and elastase than WT cells. In contrast, release of LTF enriched in specific granules was not enhanced in these cells. The excess release of azurophilic granules in Hv1/VSOP-deficient neutrophils was suppressed by inhibiting NADPH oxidase activity and, in part, by valinomycin, a potassium ionophore. In addition, Hv1/VSOP-deficient mice exhibited more severe lung inflammation after intranasal Candida albicans infection than WT mice. These findings suggest that the Hv channel acts to specifically dampen the release of azurophilic granules through, in part, the suppression of increased positive charges at the plasma membrane accompanied by the activation of NADPH oxidase in neutrophils. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  8. Ca2+ signalling, voltage-gated Ca2+ channels and praziquantel in flatworm neuromusculature.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, R M

    2005-01-01

    Transient changes in calcium (Ca2+) levels regulate a wide variety of cellular processes, and cells employ both intracellular and extracellular sources of Ca2+ for signalling. Praziquantel, the drug of choice against schistosomiasis, disrupts Ca2+ homeostasis in adult worms. This review will focus on voltage-gated Ca2+ channels, which regulate levels of intracellular Ca2+ by coupling membrane depolarization to entry of extracellular Ca2+. Ca2+ channels are members of the ion channel superfamily and represent essential components of neurons, muscles and other excitable cells. Ca2+ channels are membrane protein complexes in which the pore-forming alpha1 subunit is modulated by auxiliary subunits such as beta and alpha2delta. Schistosomes express two Ca2+ channel beta subunit subtypes: a conventional subtype similar to beta subunits found in other vertebrates and invertebrates and a novel variant subtype with unusual structural and functional properties. The variant schistosome beta subunit confers praziquantel sensitivity to an otherwise praziquantel-insensitive mammalian Ca2+ channel, implicating it as a mediator of praziquantel action.

  9. A novel dihydropyridine with 3-aryl meta-hydroxyl substitution blocks L-type calcium channels in rat cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Galvis-Pareja, David; Zapata-Torres, Gerald; Hidalgo, Jorge; Ayala, Pedro; Pedrozo, Zully; Ibarra, Cristián; Diaz-Araya, Guillermo; Hall, Andrew R; Vicencio, Jose Miguel; Nuñez-Vergara, Luis; Lavandero, Sergio

    2014-08-15

    Dihydropyridines are widely used for the treatment of several cardiac diseases due to their blocking activity on L-type Ca(2+) channels and their renowned antioxidant properties. We synthesized six novel dihydropyridine molecules and performed docking studies on the binding site of the L-type Ca(2+) channel. We used biochemical techniques on isolated adult rat cardiomyocytes to assess the efficacy of these molecules on their Ca(2+) channel-blocking activity and antioxidant properties. The Ca(2+) channel-blocking activity was evaluated by confocal microscopy on fluo-3AM loaded cardiomyocytes, as well as using patch clamp experiments. Antioxidant properties were evaluated by flow cytometry using the ROS sensitive dye 1,2,3 DHR. Our docking studies show that a novel compound with 3-OH substitution inserts into the active binding site of the L-type Ca(2+) channel previously described for nitrendipine. In biochemical assays, the novel meta-OH group in the aryl in C4 showed a high blocking effect on L-type Ca(2+) channel as opposed to para-substituted compounds. In the tests we performed, none of the molecules showed antioxidant properties. Only substitutions in C2, C3 and C5 of the aryl ring render dihydropyridine compounds with the capacity of blocking LTCC. Based on our docking studies, we postulate that the antioxidant activity requires a larger group than the meta-OH substitution in C2, C3 or C5 of the dihydropyridine ring. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Regulation of Postsynaptic Stability by the L-type Calcium Channel CaV1.3 and its Interaction with PDZ Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Stanika, Ruslan I.; Flucher, Bernhard E.; Obermair, Gerald J.

    2015-01-01

    Alterations in dendritic spine morphology and postsynaptic structure are a hallmark of neurological disorders. Particularly spine pruning of striatal medium spiny neurons and aberrant rewiring of corticostriatal synapses have been associated with the pathology of Parkinson’s disease and L-DOPA induced dyskinesia, respectively. Owing to its low activation threshold the neuronal L-type calcium channel CaV1.3 is particularly critical in the control of neuronal excitability and thus in the calcium-dependent regulation of neuronal functions. CaV1.3 channels are located in dendritic spines and contain a C-terminal class 1 PDZ domain-binding sequence. Until today the postsynaptic PDZ domain proteins shank, densin-180, and erbin have been shown to interact with CaV1.3 channels and to modulate their current properties. Interestingly experimental evidence suggests an involvement of all three PDZ proteins as well as CaV1.3 itself in regulating dendritic and postsynaptic morphology. Here we briefly review the importance of CaV1.3 and its proposed interactions with PDZ proteins for the stability of dendritic spines. With a special focus on the pathology associated with Parkinson’s disease, we discuss the hypothesis that CaV1.3 L-type calcium channels may be critical modulators of dendritic spine stability. PMID:25966696

  11. Dynamin Is Required for GnRH Signaling to L-Type Calcium Channels and Activation of ERK

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Brian S.; Dang, An K.; Murtazina, Dilyara A.; Dozier, Melissa G.; Whitesell, Jennifer D.; Khan, Shaihla A.; Cherrington, Brian D.; Amberg, Gregory C.; Clay, Colin M.

    2016-01-01

    We have shown that GnRH-mediated engagement of the cytoskeleton induces cell movement and is necessary for ERK activation. It also has previously been established that a dominant negative form of the mechano-GTPase dynamin (K44A) attenuates GnRH activation of ERK. At present, it is not clear at what level these cellular events might be linked. To explore this, we used live cell imaging in the gonadotrope-derived αT3–1 cell line to determine that dynamin-green fluorescent protein accumulated in GnRH-induced lamellipodia and plasma membrane protrusions. Coincident with translocation of dynamin-green fluorescent protein to the plasma membrane, we demonstrated that dynamin colocalizes with the actin cytoskeleton and the actin binding protein, cortactin at the leading edge of the plasma membrane. We next wanted to assess the physiological significance of these findings by inhibiting dynamin GTPase activity using dynasore. We find that dynasore suppresses activation of ERK, but not c-Jun N-terminal kinase, after exposure to GnRH agonist. Furthermore, exposure of αT3–1 cells to dynasore inhibited GnRH-induced cyto-architectural rearrangements. Recently it has been discovered that GnRH induced Ca2+ influx via the L-type Ca2+ channels requires an intact cytoskeleton to mediate ERK phosphorylation. Interestingly, not only does dynasore attenuate GnRH-mediated actin reorganization, it also suppresses Ca2+ influx through L-type Ca2+ channels visualized in living cells using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. Collectively, our data suggest that GnRH-induced membrane remodeling events are mediated in part by the association of dynamin and cortactin engaging the actin cytoskeleton, which then regulates Ca2+ influx via L-type channels to facilitate ERK phosphorylation. PMID:26696122

  12. Inflammatory cytokine signaling in insulin producing beta-cells enhances the colocalization correlation coefficient between L-type voltage-dependent calcium channel and calcium-sensing receptor.

    PubMed

    Parkash, Jai

    2008-08-01

    The immunological processes in type 1 diabetes and metabolic/inflammatory disorder in type 2 diabetes converge on common signaling pathway(s) leading to beta-cell death in these two diseases. The cytokine-mediated beta-cell death seems to be dependent on voltage-dependent calcium channel (VDCC)-mediated Ca2+ entry. The Ca2+ handling molecular networks control the homeostasis of [Ca2+]i in the beta-cell. The activity and membrane density of VDCC are regulated by several mechanisms including G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). CaR is a 123-kDa seven transmembrane extracellular Ca2+ sensing protein that belongs to GPCR family C. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), is a cytokine widely known to activate nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) transcription in beta-cells. To obtain a better understanding of TNF-alpha-induced molecular interactions between CaR and VDCC, confocal fluorescence measurements were performed on insulin-producing beta-cells exposed to varying concentrations of TNF-alpha and the results are discussed in the light of increased colocalization correlation coefficient. The insulin producing beta-cells were exposed to 5, 10, 20, 30, and 50 ng/ml TNF-alpha for 24 h at 37 degrees . The cells were then immunolabelled with antibodies directed against CaR, VDCC, and NF-kappaB. The confocal fluorescence imaging data showed enhancement in the colocalization correlation coefficient between CaR and VDCC in beta-cells exposed to TNF-alpha thereby indicating increased membrane delimited spatial interactions between these two membrane proteins. TNF-alpha-induced colocalization of VDCC with CaR was inhibited by nimodipine, an inhibitor of L-type VDCC thereby suggesting that VDCC activity is required for spatial interactions with CaR. The 3-D confocal fluorescence imaging data also demonstrated that addition of TNF-alpha to RIN cells led to the translocation of NF-kappaB from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. Such molecular interactions between CaR and VDCC in tissues

  13. Modulation by extracellular ATP of L-type calcium channels in guinea-pig single sinoatrial nodal cell.

    PubMed Central

    Qi, A. D.; Kwan, Y. W.

    1996-01-01

    1. The effects of extracellular adenosine 5'-triphosphate ([ATP]zero) on the L-type Ca2+ channel currents in guinea-pig single sinoatrial nodal (SAN) cells, isolated by enzymatic dissociation, were investigated by use of whole-cell patch-clamp techniques. 2. The application of [ATP]zero (2 microM-1 mM) produced an inhibitory effect on the L-type Ca2+ channel current peak amplitude (10 mM Ba2+ as charge carrier) in a concentration-dependent and reversible manner with an IC50 of 100 microM and a Hill coefficient of 1.83. 3. The presence of the adenosine receptor antagonists, 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX, 0.1 microM) and 8-phenyltheophylline (10 microM) did not affect the [ATP]zero-induced inhibition of the Ca2+ channel currents. Adenosine (100 microM) had little effect on the basal Ca2+ channel currents. Adenosine 500 microM, caused 23% inhibition of the Ca2+ channel current, which was abolished by 0.1 microM DPCPX. 4. The presence of the P2-purinoceptor antagonists, suramin (1, 10 and 100 microM), reactive blue 2 (1 and 10 microM) and pyridoxal-phosphate-6-azophenyl-2',4'-disulphonic acid (PPADS, 50 and 100 microM) failed to affect the inhibitory action of [ATP]zero on Ca2+ channel currents. 5. The relative rank order of potency of different nucleotides and nucleosides, at a concentration of 100 microM, on the inhibition of the Ca2+ channel currents is as follows: adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) = alpha,beta-methylene-ATP (alpha,beta MeATP) > > 2-methylthioATP (2-MeSATP) > or = adenosine 5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate) (ATP gamma S) > > uridine 5'-triphosphate (UTP) = adenosine 5'-diphosphate (ADP) > adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) > or = adenosine. 6. These results suggest that [ATP]zero may play an important role in the heart beat by inhibiting the L-type Ca2+ channel currents in single SAN cells. This inhibitory effect is not due to the formation of adenosine resulting from the enzymatic degradation of [ATP]zero. Based on the relative order of inhibitory

  14. A novel dihydropyridine with 3-aryl meta-hydroxyl substitution blocks L-type calcium channels in rat cardiomyocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Galvis-Pareja, David; Zapata-Torres, Gerald; Hidalgo, Jorge; Ayala, Pedro; and others

    2014-08-15

    Rationale: Dihydropyridines are widely used for the treatment of several cardiac diseases due to their blocking activity on L-type Ca{sup 2+} channels and their renowned antioxidant properties. Methods: We synthesized six novel dihydropyridine molecules and performed docking studies on the binding site of the L-type Ca{sup 2+} channel. We used biochemical techniques on isolated adult rat cardiomyocytes to assess the efficacy of these molecules on their Ca{sup 2+} channel-blocking activity and antioxidant properties. The Ca{sup 2+} channel-blocking activity was evaluated by confocal microscopy on fluo-3AM loaded cardiomyocytes, as well as using patch clamp experiments. Antioxidant properties were evaluated by flow cytometry using the ROS sensitive dye 1,2,3 DHR. Results: Our docking studies show that a novel compound with 3-OH substitution inserts into the active binding site of the L-type Ca{sup 2+} channel previously described for nitrendipine. In biochemical assays, the novel meta-OH group in the aryl in C4 showed a high blocking effect on L-type Ca{sup 2+} channel as opposed to para-substituted compounds. In the tests we performed, none of the molecules showed antioxidant properties. Conclusions: Only substitutions in C2, C3 and C5 of the aryl ring render dihydropyridine compounds with the capacity of blocking LTCC. Based on our docking studies, we postulate that the antioxidant activity requires a larger group than the meta-OH substitution in C2, C3 or C5 of the dihydropyridine ring. - Highlights: • Dihydropyridine (DHP) molecules are widely used in cardiovascular disease. • DHPs block Ca{sup 2+} entry through LTCC—some DHPs have antioxidant activity as well. • We synthesized 6 new DHPs and tested their Ca{sup 2+} blocking and antioxidant activities. • 3-Aryl meta-hydroxyl substitution strongly increases their Ca{sup 2+} blocking activity. • 3-Aryl meta-hydroxyl substitution did not affect the antioxidant properties.

  15. Electrical coupling between the human serotonin transporter and voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels.

    PubMed

    Ruchala, Iwona; Cabra, Vanessa; Solis, Ernesto; Glennon, Richard A; De Felice, Louis J; Eltit, Jose M

    2014-07-01

    Monoamine transporters have been implicated in dopamine or serotonin release in response to abused drugs such as methamphetamine or ecstasy (MDMA). In addition, monoamine transporters show substrate-induced inward currents that may modulate excitability and Ca(2+) mobilization, which could also contribute to neurotransmitter release. How monoamine transporters modulate Ca(2+) permeability is currently unknown. We investigate the functional interaction between the human serotonin transporter (hSERT) and voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels (CaV). We introduce an excitable expression system consisting of cultured muscle cells genetically engineered to express hSERT. Both 5HT and S(+)MDMA depolarize these cells and activate the excitation-contraction (EC)-coupling mechanism. However, hSERT substrates fail to activate EC-coupling in CaV1.1-null muscle cells, thus implicating Ca(2+) channels. CaV1.3 and CaV2.2 channels are natively expressed in neurons. When these channels are co-expressed with hSERT in HEK293T cells, only cells expressing the lower-threshold L-type CaV1.3 channel show Ca(2+) transients evoked by 5HT or S(+)MDMA. In addition, the electrical coupling between hSERT and CaV1.3 takes place at physiological 5HT concentrations. The electrical coupling between monoamine neurotransmitter transporters and Ca(2+) channels such as CaV1.3 is a novel mechanism by which endogenous substrates (neurotransmitters) or exogenous substrates (like ecstasy) could modulate Ca(2+)-driven signals in excitable cells.

  16. Sigma-1 Receptor Antagonism Restores Injury-Induced Decrease of Voltage-Gated Ca2+ Current in Sensory Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Bin; Guo, Yuan; Kwok, Wai-Meng; Hogan, Quinn

    2014-01-01

    Sigma-1 receptor (σ1R), an endoplasmic reticulum–chaperone protein, can modulate painful response after peripheral nerve injury. We have demonstrated that voltage-gated calcium current is inhibited in axotomized sensory neurons. We examined whether σ1R contributes to the sensory dysfunction of voltage-gated calcium channel (VGCC) after peripheral nerve injury through electrophysiological approach in dissociated rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. Animals received either skin incision (Control) or spinal nerve ligation (SNL). Both σ1R agonists, (+)pentazocine (PTZ) and DTG [1,3-di-(2-tolyl)guanidine], dose dependently inhibited calcium current (ICa) with Ba2+ as charge carrier in control sensory neurons. The inhibitory effect of σ1R agonists on ICa was blocked by σ1R antagonist, BD1063 (1-[2-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)ethyl]-4-m​ethylpiperazine dihydrochloride) or BD1047 (N-[2-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)ethyl]-N-m​ethyl-2-(dimethylamino)ethylamine dihydrobromide). PTZ and DTG showed similar effect on ICa in axotomized fifth DRG neurons (SNL L5). Both PTZ and DTG shifted the voltage-dependent activation and steady-state inactivation of VGCC to the left and accelerated VGCC inactivation rate in both Control and axotomized L5 SNL DRG neurons. The σ1R antagonist, BD1063 (10 μM), increases ICa in SNL L5 neurons but had no effect on Control and noninjured fourth lumbar neurons in SNL rats. Together, the findings suggest that activation of σR1 decreases ICa in sensory neurons and may play a pivotal role in pain generation. PMID:24891452

  17. Spexin Enhances Bowel Movement through Activating L-type Voltage-dependent Calcium Channel via Galanin Receptor 2 in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Cheng-yuan; Zhang, Man; Huang, Tao; Yang, Li-ling; Fu, Hai-bo; Zhao, Ling; Zhong, Linda LD; Mu, Huai-xue; Shi, Xiao-ke; Leung, Christina FP; Fan, Bao-min; Jiang, Miao; Lu, Ai-ping; Zhu, Li-xin; Bian, Zhao-xiang

    2015-01-01

    A novel neuropeptide spexin was found to be broadly expressed in various endocrine and nervous tissues while little is known about its functions. This study investigated the role of spexin in bowel movement and the underlying mechanisms. In functional constipation (FC) patients, serum spexin levels were significantly decreased. Consistently, in starved mice, the mRNA of spexin was significantly decreased in intestine and colon. Spexin injection increased the velocity of carbon powder propulsion in small intestine and decreased the glass beads expulsion time in distal colon in mice. Further, spexin dose-dependently stimulated the intestinal/colonic smooth muscle contraction. Galanin receptor 2 (GALR2) antagonist M871, but not Galanin receptor 3 (GALR3) antagonist SNAP37899, effectively suppressed the stimulatory effects of spexin on intestinal/colonic smooth muscle contraction, which could be eliminated by extracellular [Ca2+] removal and L-type voltage-dependentCa2+ channel (VDCC) inhibitor nifedipine. Besides, spexin dramatically increased the [Ca2+]i in isolated colonic smooth muscle cells. These data indicate that spexin can act on GALR2 receptor to regulate bowel motility by activating L-type VDCC. Our findings provide evidence for important physiological roles of spexin in GI functions. Selective action on spexin pathway might have therapeutic effects on GI diseases with motility disorders. PMID:26160593

  18. A comparison between calcium channel blocking drugs with different potencies for T- and L-type channels in preventing atrial electrical remodeling.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, Narutaka; Mitamura, Hideo; Tanimoto, Kojiro; Fukuda, Yukiko; Kinebuchi, Osamu; Kurita, Yasuo; Shiroshita-Takeshita, Akiko; Miyoshi, Shunichiro; Hara, Motoki; Takatsuki, Seiji; Ogawa, Satoshi

    2004-09-01

    Calcium overload plays a key role in the development of atrial electrical remodeling. The effect of an L-type Ca channel blocker in preventing this remodeling has been reported to be short lasting, partly due to down-regulation of this channel and persisting Ca entry through the T-type Ca channel. To prove if efonidipine, a dual L- and T-type Ca channel blocker exerts a greater effect than an L-type Ca channel blocker verapamil, 21 dogs underwent rapid atrial pacing at 400 bpm for 14 days, pretreatment with efonidipine in 7 (E), verapamil in 7 (V), and none in 7 (C). We measured the atrial effective refractory period (ERP) serially during 14 days of rapid pacing. In response to rapid pacing, ERP decreased progressively in C. In contrast, in E and V, ERP remained greater than ERP in C (P < 0.01) on days 2 through 7. However, on the 14th day, ERP in V decreased to the level seen in C, whereas ERP in E remained significantly longer than ERPs in C or V (P < 0.01). The blockade L-type Ca channel alone is not sufficient, but the addition of a T-type Ca channel blockade shows a more sustained effect to prevent atrial electrical remodeling.

  19. Kv3 voltage-gated potassium channels regulate neurotransmitter release from mouse motor nerve terminals.

    PubMed

    Brooke, Ruth E; Moores, Thomas S; Morris, Neil P; Parson, Simon H; Deuchars, Jim

    2004-12-01

    Voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels are critical to regulation of neurotransmitter release throughout the nervous system but the roles and identity of the subtypes involved remain unclear. Here we show that Kv3 channels regulate transmitter release at the mouse neuromuscular junction (NMJ). Light- and electron-microscopic immunohistochemistry revealed Kv3.3 and Kv3.4 subunits within all motor nerve terminals of muscles examined [transversus abdominus, lumbrical and flexor digitorum brevis (FDB)]. To determine the roles of these Kv3 subunits, intracellular recordings were made of end-plate potentials (EPPs) in FDB muscle fibres evoked by electrical stimulation of tibial nerve. Tetraethylammonium (TEA) applied at low concentrations (0.05-0.5 mM), which blocks only a few known potassium channels including Kv3 channels, did not affect muscle fibre resting potential but significantly increased the amplitude of all EPPs tested. Significantly, this effect of TEA was still observed in the presence of the large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channel blockers iberiotoxin (25-150 nM) and Penitrem A (100 nM), suggesting a selective action on Kv3 subunits. Consistent with this, 15-microM 4-aminopyridine, which blocks Kv3 but not large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels, enhanced evoked EPP amplitude. Unexpectedly, blood-depressing substance-I, a toxin selective for Kv3.4 subunits, had no effect at 0.05-1 microM. The combined presynaptic localization of Kv3 subunits and pharmacological enhancement of EPP amplitude indicate that Kv3 channels regulate neurotransmitter release from presynaptic terminals at the NMJ.

  20. L-Type calcium channel blockers: from diltiazem to 1,2,4-oxadiazol-5-ones via thiazinooxadiazol-3-one derivatives.

    PubMed

    Budriesi, Roberta; Cosimelli, Barbara; Ioan, Pierfranco; Ugenti, Maria Paola; Carosati, Emanuele; Frosini, Maria; Fusi, Fabio; Spisani, Raffaella; Saponara, Simona; Cruciani, Gabriele; Novellino, Ettore; Spinelli, Domenico; Chiarini, Alberto

    2009-04-23

    The research of compounds with L-type calcium channels (LTCCs) blocking activity continued with heterocyclic compounds containing the 1,2,4-oxadiazol-5-one ring. For a series of 22 new derivatives of 3-aryl-4[(Z)-(1-methyl-2-alkylsulphanyl-vinyl)][1,2,4]oxadiazol-5(4H)-ones, which represent the "frozen" open chain counterpart of the cyclic aryl-thiazinooxadiazolones previously examined, we report here the synthesis and the characterization as LTCC blockers, evaluated on isolated tissues of guinea pig. The most interesting compound, 8b, was tested also on L-type calcium current recorded in isolated rat tail artery myocytes. Overall, six compounds were more potent than diltiazem, and binding assays confirmed the direct interaction with the benzothiazepine binding site. As the cyclic aryl-thiazinooxadiazolones, p-bromine substituted compounds were generally more potent than the corresponding p-chlorine ones. A saturated or unsaturated alkyl chain or a bulky group at the sulfur atom were detrimental to the potency, while the compounds with S-methyl groups, i.e., thioether (8b), sulfoxide (16a,b), and sulfone (17b), gave the best results.

  1. Effects of the N/L-type calcium channel blocker cilnidipine on nephropathy and uric acid metabolism in hypertensive patients with chronic kidney disease (J-CIRCLE study).

    PubMed

    Uchida, Shunya; Takahashi, Masato; Sugawara, Masahiro; Saito, Tomoaki; Nakai, Kazuhiko; Fujita, Masami; Mochizuki, Koichi; Shin, Isu; Morita, Takashi; Hikita, Tomoyuki; Itakura, Hironao; Takahashi, Yuko; Mizuno, Shigeki; Ohno, Yasumi; Ito, Kageki; Ito, Takafumi; Soma, Masayoshi

    2014-10-01

    This study assessed the urinary albumin/creatinine ratio (ACR) and uric acid metabolism in 70 hypertensive patients with chronic kidney disease in whom urinary ACR had remained ≥30 mg/g under the treatment of the L-type calcium channel blocker amlodipine. Three months after switching to the N/L-type calcium channel blocker cilnidipine, blood pressure (BP) did not change; however, urinary ACR significantly decreased with cilnidipine. Serum uric acid levels showed no significant change. In cases where uric acid production had been high (urinary uric acid/creatinine ratio ≥0.5), the urinary uric acid/creatinine ratio decreased significantly after cilnidipine treatment, suggesting that cilnidipine can suppress excessive uric acid formation. These results suggest that switching from amlodipine to cilnidipine results in a significant reduction in urinary ACR as well as significant reduction in uric acid production. Thus, cilnidipine is more useful than amlodipine in improving albuminuria and uric acid metabolism in hypertensive patients with chronic kidney disease.

  2. Gentamicin Blocks the ACh-Induced BK Current in Guinea Pig Type II Vestibular Hair Cells by Competing with Ca2+ at the l-Type Calcium Channel

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hong; Guo, Chang-Kai; Wang, Yi; Zhou, Tao; Kong, Wei-Jia

    2014-01-01

    Type II vestibular hair cells (VHCs II) contain big-conductance Ca2+-dependent K+ channels (BK) and l-type calcium channels. Our previous studies in guinea pig VHCs II indicated that acetylcholine (ACh) evoked the BK current by triggering the influx of Ca2+ ions through l-type Ca2+ channels, which was mediated by M2 muscarinic ACh receptor (mAChRs). Aminoglycoside antibiotics, such as gentamicin (GM), are known to have vestibulotoxicity, including damaging effects on the efferent nerve endings on VHCs II. This study used the whole-cell patch clamp technique to determine whether GM affects the vestibular efferent system at postsynaptic M2-mAChRs or the membrane ion channels. We found that GM could block the ACh-induced BK current and that inhibition was reversible, voltage-independent, and dose-dependent with an IC50 value of 36.3 ± 7.8 μM. Increasing the ACh concentration had little influence on GM blocking effect, but increasing the extracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]o) could antagonize it. Moreover, 50 μM GM potently blocked Ca2+ currents activated by (−)-Bay-K8644, but did not block BK currents induced by NS1619. These observations indicate that GM most likely blocks the M2 mAChR-mediated response by competing with Ca2+ at the l-type calcium channel. These results provide insights into the vestibulotoxicity of aminoglycoside antibiotics on mammalian VHCs II. PMID:24758923

  3. NMDA receptors in mouse anterior piriform cortex initialize early odor preference learning and L-type calcium channels engage for long-term memory

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Bandhan; Yuan, Qi

    2016-01-01

    The interactions of L-type calcium channels (LTCCs) and NMDA receptors (NMDARs) in memories are poorly understood. Here we investigated the specific roles of anterior piriform cortex (aPC) LTCCs and NMDARs in early odor preference memory in mice. Using calcium imaging in aPC slices, LTCC activation was shown to be dependent on NMDAR activation. Either D-APV (NMDAR antagonist) or nifedipine (LTCC antagonist) reduced somatic calcium transients in pyramidal cells evoked by lateral olfactory tract stimulation. However, nifedipine did not further reduce calcium in the presence of D-APV. In mice that underwent early odor preference training, blocking NMDARs in the aPC prevented short-term (3 hr) and long-term (24 hr) odor preference memory, and both memories were rescued when BayK-8644 (LTCC agonist) was co-infused. However, activating LTCCs in the absence of NMDARs resulted in loss of discrimination between the conditioned odor and a similar odor mixture at 3 hr. Elevated synaptic AMPAR expression at 3 hr was prevented by D-APV infusion but restored when LTCCs were directly activated, mirroring the behavioral outcomes. Blocking LTCCs prevented 24 hr memory and spared 3 hr memory. These results suggest that NMDARs mediate stimulus-specific encoding of odor memory while LTCCs mediate intracellular signaling leading to long-term memory. PMID:27739540

  4. NMDA receptors in mouse anterior piriform cortex initialize early odor preference learning and L-type calcium channels engage for long-term memory.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Bandhan; Yuan, Qi

    2016-10-14

    The interactions of L-type calcium channels (LTCCs) and NMDA receptors (NMDARs) in memories are poorly understood. Here we investigated the specific roles of anterior piriform cortex (aPC) LTCCs and NMDARs in early odor preference memory in mice. Using calcium imaging in aPC slices, LTCC activation was shown to be dependent on NMDAR activation. Either D-APV (NMDAR antagonist) or nifedipine (LTCC antagonist) reduced somatic calcium transients in pyramidal cells evoked by lateral olfactory tract stimulation. However, nifedipine did not further reduce calcium in the presence of D-APV. In mice that underwent early odor preference training, blocking NMDARs in the aPC prevented short-term (3 hr) and long-term (24 hr) odor preference memory, and both memories were rescued when BayK-8644 (LTCC agonist) was co-infused. However, activating LTCCs in the absence of NMDARs resulted in loss of discrimination between the conditioned odor and a similar odor mixture at 3 hr. Elevated synaptic AMPAR expression at 3 hr was prevented by D-APV infusion but restored when LTCCs were directly activated, mirroring the behavioral outcomes. Blocking LTCCs prevented 24 hr memory and spared 3 hr memory. These results suggest that NMDARs mediate stimulus-specific encoding of odor memory while LTCCs mediate intracellular signaling leading to long-term memory.

  5. Autocrine interleukin-6 drives skin-derived mesenchymal stem cell trafficking via regulating voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels.

    PubMed

    Ke, Fang; Zhang, Lingyun; Liu, Zhaoyuan; Liu, Jinlin; Yan, Sha; Xu, Zhenyao; Bai, Jing; Zhu, Huiyuan; Lou, Fangzhou; Wang, Hong; Shi, Yufang; Jiang, Yong; Su, Bing; Wang, Honglin

    2014-10-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have demonstrated promising therapeutic potential for a variety of diseases including autoimmune disorders. A fundamental requirement for MSC-mediated in vivo immunosuppression is their effective trafficking. However the mechanism underlying MSC trafficking remains elusive. Here we report that skin-derived MSCs (S-MSCs) secrete high levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6) in inflammatory conditions. Disruption of the il6 or its signaling transducer gp130 blocks voltage-gated calcium (Ca(2+) ) channels (VGCC) critically required for cell contraction involved in the sequential adhesion and de-adhesion events during S-MSC migration. Deletion of il6 gene leads to a severe defect in S-MSC's trafficking and immunosuppressive function in vivo. Thus, this unexpected requirement of autocrine IL-6 for activating Ca(2+) channels uncovers a previously unrecognized link between the IL-6 signaling and the VGCC and provides novel mechanistic insights for the trafficking and immunomodulatory activities of S-MSCs.

  6. Effect of Charge Substitutions at Residue His-142 on Voltage Gating of Connexin43 Channels

    PubMed Central

    Shibayama, Junko; Gutiérrez, Cristina; González, Daniel; Kieken, Fabien; Seki, Akiko; Requena Carrión, Jesus; Sorgen, Paul L.; Taffet, Steven M.; Barrio, Luis C.; Delmar, Mario

    2006-01-01

    Previous studies indicate that the carboxyl terminal of connexin43 (Cx43CT) is involved in fast transjunctional voltage gating. Separate studies support the notion of an intramolecular association between Cx43CT and a region of the cytoplasmic loop (amino acids 119–144; referred to as “L2”). Structural analysis of L2 shows two α-helical domains, each with a histidine residue in its sequence (H126 and H142). Here, we determined the effect of H142 replacement by lysine, alanine, and glutamate on the voltage gating of Cx43 channels. Mutation H142E led to a significant reduction in the frequency of occurrence of the residual state and a prolongation of dwell open time. Macroscopically, there was a large reduction in the fast component of voltage gating. These results resembled those observed for a mutant lacking the carboxyl terminal (CT) domain. NMR experiments showed that mutation H142E significantly decreased the Cx43CT-L2 interaction and disrupted the secondary structure of L2. Overall, our data support the hypothesis that fast voltage gating involves an intramolecular particle-receptor interaction between CT and L2. Some of the structural constrains of fast voltage gating may be shared with those involved in the chemical gating of Cx43. PMID:16963503

  7. Differential expression of voltage-gated K+ and Ca2+ currents in bipolar cells in the zebrafish retinal slice.

    PubMed

    Connaughton, V P; Maguire, G

    1998-04-01

    Whole-cell voltage-gated currents were recorded from bipolar cells in the zebrafish retinal slice. Two physiological populations of bipolar cells were identified. In the first, depolarizing voltage steps elicited a rapidly activating A-current that reached peak amplitude < or = 5 ms of step onset. IA was antagonized by external tetraethylammonium or 4-aminopyridine, and by intracellular caesium. The second population expressed a delayed rectifying potassium current (IK) that reached peak amplitude > or = 10 ms after step onset and did not inactivate. IK was antagonized by internal caesium and external tetraethylammonium. Bipolar cells expressing IK also expressed a time-dependent h-current at membrane potentials < -50 mV. Ih was sensitive to external caesium and barium, and was also reduced by Na+-free Ringer. In both groups, a calcium current (ICa) and a calcium-dependent potassium current (IK(Ca)) were identified. Depolarizing voltage steps > -50 mV activated ICa, which reached peak amplitude between -20 and -10 mV. ICa was eliminated in Ca+2-free Ringer and blocked by cadmium and cobalt, but not tetrodotoxin. In most cells, Ica was transient, activating rapidly at -50 mV. This current was antagonized by nickel. The remaining bipolar cells expressed a nifedipine-sensitive sustained current that activated between -40 and -30 mV, with both slower kinetics and smaller amplitude than transient ICa. IK(Ca) was elicited by membrane depolarizations > -20 mV. Bipolar cells in the zebrafish retinal slice preparation express an array of voltage-gated currents which contribute to non-linear I-V characteristics. The zebrafish retinal slice preparation is well-suited to patch clamp analyses of membrane mechanisms and provides a suitable model for studying genetic defects in visual system development.

  8. Voltage-gated and agonist-mediated rises in intracellular Ca2+ in rat clonal pituitary cells (GH3) held under voltage clamp.

    PubMed Central

    Benham, C D

    1989-01-01

    1. Intracellular free calcium (Ca2+i) was estimated in single GH3 cells by dual wavelength emission spectrofluorimetry using the Ca2+ indicator dye Indo-1, while cells were held under voltage clamp using patch clamp techniques. 2. Depolarization of cells evoked a transient rise in Ca2+i that increased with increasing duration of depolarization to a peak at about 10 s. 3. Calcium transients showed a bell-shaped dependence on the amplitude of the depolarizing pulse. They were abolished in the absence of extracellular calcium and by application of 10 microM-nifedipine. 4. Thyrotrophin-releasing hormone (TRH) evoked a transient rise in Ca2+i that was followed by a more sustained period of elevated Ca2+i in some cells. The transient phase of the response but not the sustained phase was seen in the absence of extracellular calcium. 5. Ca2+i transients evoked by depolarization were not affected by pre-release of internal Ca2+ stores with TRH. 6. The results demonstrate that voltage-gated Ca2+ entry and Ca2+ store release can each elevate cytoplasmic free calcium in GH3 cells and may both be important for stimulus-secretion coupling. Non-voltage-gated Ca2+ entry is not a major source of Ca2+ under these conditions. PMID:2517986

  9. Voltage-gated and agonist-mediated rises in intracellular Ca2+ in rat clonal pituitary cells (GH3) held under voltage clamp.

    PubMed

    Benham, C D

    1989-08-01

    1. Intracellular free calcium (Ca2+i) was estimated in single GH3 cells by dual wavelength emission spectrofluorimetry using the Ca2+ indicator dye Indo-1, while cells were held under voltage clamp using patch clamp techniques. 2. Depolarization of cells evoked a transient rise in Ca2+i that increased with increasing duration of depolarization to a peak at about 10 s. 3. Calcium transients showed a bell-shaped dependence on the amplitude of the depolarizing pulse. They were abolished in the absence of extracellular calcium and by application of 10 microM-nifedipine. 4. Thyrotrophin-releasing hormone (TRH) evoked a transient rise in Ca2+i that was followed by a more sustained period of elevated Ca2+i in some cells. The transient phase of the response but not the sustained phase was seen in the absence of extracellular calcium. 5. Ca2+i transients evoked by depolarization were not affected by pre-release of internal Ca2+ stores with TRH. 6. The results demonstrate that voltage-gated Ca2+ entry and Ca2+ store release can each elevate cytoplasmic free calcium in GH3 cells and may both be important for stimulus-secretion coupling. Non-voltage-gated Ca2+ entry is not a major source of Ca2+ under these conditions.

  10. ATP-sensitive Potassium Channels and L-type Calcium Channels are Involved in Morphine-induced Hyperalgesia after Nociceptive Sensitization in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi, Shamseddin; Azarian, Shaho; Ebrahimi, Sayede Shohre; Rezayof, Ameneh

    2014-01-01

    Introduction We investigated the role of ATP-sensitive potassium channels and L-type calcium channels in morphine-induced hyperalgesia after nociceptive sensitization. Methods We used a hotplate apparatus to assess pain behavior in male NMRI mice. Nociceptive sensitization was induced by three days injection of morphine and five days of drug free. On day 9 of the schedule, pain behavior test was performed for evaluating the effects of morphine by itself and along with nimodipine, a blocker of L-type calcium channels and diazoxide, an opener of ATP-sensitive potassium channels. All drugs were injected through an intraperitoneal route. Results The results showed that morphine (7.5, 10 and 15 mg/kg) induced analgesia in normal mice, which was prevented by naloxone (1 mg/kg). After nociceptive sensitization, analgesic effect of morphine (10 and 15 mg/kg) was significantly decreased in sensitized mice. The results showed that nimodipine (2.5, 5, 10 and 20 mg/kg) had no significant effect on pain behavior test in either normal or sensitized mice. However, nimodipine (20 mg/ kg) along with morphine (10 and 15 mg/kg) caused more decrease in morphine analgesia in sensitized mice. Furthermore, diazoxide by itself (0.25, 1, 5 and 20 mg/kg) had also no significant effect on pain behavior in both normal and sensitized mice, but at dose of 20 mg/kg along with morphine (10 and 15 mg/kg) decreased analgesic effect of morphine in sensitized mice. Discussion It can be concluded that potassium and calcium channels have some roles in decrease of analgesic effect of morphine after nociceptive sensitization induced by pretreatment of morphine. PMID:25337379

  11. Phosphorylation of the Consensus Sites of Protein Kinase A on α1D L-type Calcium Channel*

    PubMed Central

    Ramadan, Omar; Qu, Yongxia; Wadgaonkar, Raj; Baroudi, Ghayath; Karnabi, Eddy; Chahine, Mohamed; Boutjdir, Mohamed

    2009-01-01

    The novel α1D L-type Ca2+ channel is expressed in supraventricular tissue and has been implicated in the pacemaker activity of the heart and in atrial fibrillation. We recently demonstrated that PKA activation led to increased α1D Ca2+ channel activity in tsA201 cells by phosphorylation of the channel protein. Here we sought to identify the phosphorylated PKA consensus sites on the α1 subunit of the α1D Ca2+ channel by generating GST fusion proteins of the intracellular loops, N terminus, proximal and distal C termini of the α1 subunit of α1D Ca2+ channel. An in vitro PKA kinase assay was performed for the GST fusion proteins, and their phosphorylation was assessed by Western blotting using either anti-PKA substrate or anti-phosphoserine antibodies. Western blotting showed that the N terminus and C terminus were phosphorylated. Serines 1743 and 1816, two PKA consensus sites, were phosphorylated by PKA and identified by mass spectrometry. Site directed mutagenesis and patch clamp studies revealed that serines 1743 and 1816 were major functional PKA consensus sites. Altogether, biochemical and functional data revealed that serines 1743 and 1816 are major functional PKA consensus sites on the α1 subunit of α1D Ca2+ channel. These novel findings provide new insights into the autonomic regulation of the α1D Ca2+ channel in the heart. PMID:19074150

  12. Alteration of the L-type calcium current in guinea-pig single ventricular myocytes by heptaminol hydrochloride.

    PubMed Central

    Peineau, N.; Mongo, K. G.; Le Guennec, J. Y.; Garnier, D.; Argibay, J. A.

    1992-01-01

    1. The effects of heptaminol on calcium current amplitude and characteristics were studied in single ventricular myocytes of guinea-pig by use of the whole cell configuration of the patch clamp technique. 2. A concentration-dependent decrease in ICa amplitude was observed. At heptaminol concentration as low as 10(-6) M, this effect was observed in only two cells (n = 6). At 10(-5) M the reduction of ICa was of 30 +/- 15% (n = 11). 3. The current recovery from inactivation at -40 mV holding potential (HP) seemed less sensitive to perfusion with heptaminol (greater than 10(-6) M). However, at -80 mV HP the overshoot of the recovery curve was decreased by heptaminol. 4. Both at -40 mV and -80 mV HP, heptaminol (10(-5) M) significantly increased the steady state inactivation of ICa. 5. As previously proposed by others to explain the effects of membrane active substances, the effects of heptaminol may result from alterations in cell membrane properties and possibly from an increase in intracellular free calcium ion concentration. PMID:1422567

  13. An update on transcriptional and post-translational regulation of brain voltage-gated sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Onwuli, Donatus O; Beltran-Alvarez, Pedro

    2016-03-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are essential proteins in brain physiology, as they generate the sodium currents that initiate neuronal action potentials. Voltage-gated sodium channels expression, localisation and function are regulated by a range of transcriptional and post-translational mechanisms. Here, we review our understanding of regulation of brain voltage-gated sodium channels, in particular SCN1A (NaV1.1), SCN2A (NaV1.2), SCN3A (NaV1.3) and SCN8A (NaV1.6), by transcription factors, by alternative splicing, and by post-translational modifications. Our focus is strongly centred on recent research lines, and newly generated knowledge.

  14. Ciguatoxins: Cyclic Polyether Modulators of Voltage-gated Iion Channel Function

    PubMed Central

    Nicholson, Graham M.; Lewis, Richard J.

    2006-01-01

    Ciguatoxins are cyclic polyether toxins, derived from marine dinoflagellates, which are responsible for the symptoms of ciguatera poisoning. Ingestion of tropical and subtropical fin fish contaminated by ciguatoxins results in an illness characterised by neurological, cardiovascular and gastrointestinal disorders. The pharmacology of ciguatoxins is characterised by their ability to cause persistent activation of voltage-gated sodium channels, to increase neuronal excitability and neurotransmitter release, to impair synaptic vesicle recycling, and to cause cell swelling. It is these effects, in combination with an action to block voltage-gated potassium channels at high doses, which are believed to underlie the complex of symptoms associated with ciguatera. This review examines the sources, structures and pharmacology of ciguatoxins. In particular, attention is placed on their cellular modes of actions to modulate voltage-gated ion channels and other Na+-dependent mechanisms in numerous cell types and to current approaches for detection and treatment of ciguatera.

  15. Sea anemone venom as a source of insecticidal peptides acting on voltage-gated Na+ channels

    PubMed Central

    Bosmans, Frank; Tytgat, Jan

    2007-01-01

    Sea anemones produce a myriad of toxic peptides and proteins of which a large group acts on voltage-gated Na+ channels. However, in comparison to other organisms, their venoms and toxins are poorly studied. Most of the known voltage-gated Na+ channel toxins isolated from sea anemone venoms act on neurotoxin receptor site 3 and inhibit the inactivation of these channels. Furthermore, it seems that most of these toxins have a distinct preference for crustaceans. Given the close evolutionary relationship between crustaceans and insects, it is not surprising that sea anemone toxins also profoundly affect insect voltage-gated Na+ channels, which constitutes the scope of this review. For this reason, these peptides can be considered as insecticidal lead compounds in the development of insecticides. PMID:17224168

  16. Increased O2 consumption and positive inotropy caused by cyclic GMP reduction are not altered after L-type calcium channel blockade.

    PubMed

    Leone, R J; Naim, K L; Scholz, P M; Weiss, H R

    1998-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that increased O2 consumption and inotropy after reduction of myocardial cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) are mediated through L-type calcium channels. Anesthetized, open-chest New Zealand white rabbits were divided into four groups. Hearts were exposed to control vehicle (n = 8); LY83583 (LY, 10(-3) mol/l, guanylate cyclase inhibitor, (n = 9); nifedipine (nif, 10(-4) mol/l, L-type calcium channel blocker, n = 8), or nif+LY (n = 6). Vehicle or compound was applied topically to the epicardium for 15 min. Subepicardial (EPI) blood flow increased (from 213 +/- 22 to 323 +/- 24 ml/ min/100 g) in the presence of LY, as did subendocardial (ENDO) blood flow (from 238 +/- 20 to 333 +/- 38 ml/min/ 100 g). O2 consumption increased in the presence of LY:18.0 +/- 1.0 (EPI) and 17.0 +/- 0.6 (ENDO) ml O2/min/100 g as compared with 9.5 +/- 2.0 (EPI) and 10.6 +/- 2.5 (ENDO) in the control group. The increase in O2 consumption with LY was undiminished in the presence of nif (nif+LY group 21.0 +/- 3.0 ml O2/min/100 g EPI and 22.1 +/- 3.8 ENDO). Nif alone decreased left ventricular dP/dtmax from (2,762 +/- 197 to 2,413 +/- 316 mm Hg/s) and maximal rate of change in wall thickness (dW/dtmax from 13.5 +/- 2.0 to 9.5 +/- 0.8 mm/s), while percent change of wall thickness (from 21.3 +/- 3.3 to 31.3 +/- 7.2) and dW/dtmax (from 13.3 +/- 3.0 to 15.3 +/- 2.3 mm/s) increased in the nif+LY group. Thus, the positive O2 consumption and inotropic effects of decreasing cGMP were undiminished by nif. These results suggest that the cGMP reduction induced increases in O2 consumption and that inotropy may not be mediated through L-type calcium channels.

  17. Roscovitine, a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, affects several gating mechanisms to inhibit cardiac L-type (Ca(V)1.2) calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Yarotskyy, V; Elmslie, K S

    2007-10-01

    L-type calcium channels (Ca((V))1.2) play an important role in cardiac contraction. Roscovitine, a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor and promising anticancer drug, has been shown to affect Ca((V))1.2 by inhibiting current amplitude and slowing activation. This research investigates the mechanism by which roscovitine inhibits Ca((V))1.2 channels. Ca((V))1.2 channels were transfected into HEK 293 cells, using the calcium phosphate precipitation method, and currents were measured using the whole-cell patch clamp technique. Roscovitine slows activation at all voltages, which precludes one previously proposed mechanism. In addition, roscovitine enhances voltage-dependent, but not calcium-dependent inactivation. This enhancement resulted from both an acceleration of inactivation and a slowing of the recovery from inactivation. Internally applied roscovitine failed to affect Ca((V))1.2 currents, which supports a kinase-independent mechanism and extracellular binding site. Unlike the dihydropyridines, closed state inactivation was not affected by roscovitine. Inactivation was enhanced in a dose-dependent manner with an IC(50)=29.5+/-12 microM, which is close to that for slow activation and inhibition. We conclude that roscovitine binds to an extracellular site on Ca((V))1.2 channels to inhibit current by both slowing activation and enhancing inactivation. Purine-based drugs could become a new option for treatment of diseases that benefit from L-channel inhibition such as cardiac arrhythmias and hypertension.

  18. Amyloid Precursor Protein Regulates Cav1.2 L-type Calcium Channel Levels and Function to Influence GABAergic Short-term Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Li; Wang, Zilai; Wang, Baiping; Justice, Nicholas J.; Zheng, Hui

    2010-01-01

    Amyloid precursor protein (APP) has been strongly implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Although impaired synaptic function is believed to be an early and causative event in AD, how APP physiologically regulates synaptic properties remains poorly understood. Here, we report a critical role for APP in the regulation of L-type calcium channels (LTCC) in GABAergic inhibitory neurons in striatum and hippocampus. APP deletion in mice leads to an increase in the levels of Cav1.2, the pore-forming subunit of LTCCs, and subsequent increases in GABAergic calcium currents (ICa 2+) that can be reversed by re-introduction of APP. Upregulated levels of Cav1.2 result in reduced GABAergic paired-pulse inhibition (PPI) and increased GABAergic post-tetanic potentiation (PTP) in both striatal and hippocampal neurons, indicating that APP modulates synaptic properties of GABAergic neurons by regulating Cav1.2. Furthermore, APP physically interacts with Cav1.2, suggesting a mechanism in which loss of APP leads to an inappropriate accumulation and aberrant activity of Cav1.2. These results provide a direct link between APP and calcium signaling and might help explain how altered APP regulation leads to changes in synaptic function that occur with AD. PMID:20016080

  19. Phenotype-dependent role of the L-type calcium current in embryonic stem cell derived cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Dan, Pauline; Zeng, Zheng; Li, Ying; Qu, Yang; Hove-Madsen, Leif; Tibbits, Glen F

    2014-01-01

    Although the L-type Ca2+ current (ICa,L) plays an important role in cardiac contractility and pacemaking, its role in embryonic stem-cell derived cardiomyocytes (ESC-CMs) has not yet been explored in detail. We used patch-clamp techniques to characterize ICa,L, action potential properties, and nifedipine (an ICa,L blocker) sensitivity on spontaneously contracting embryoid bodies (EBs) or isolated ESC-CMs. Cellular preparations exhibited differential sensitivity to nifedipine, with substantial variation in the dose required to abolish automaticity. Isolated ESC-CMs expressing nodal-like action potentials were highly sensitive to nifedipine; 1 nM significantly decreased firing rate, diastolic depolarization rate (DDR), and upstroke velocity, and 10 nM completely abolished spontaneous activity. In contrast, ESC-CMs expressing atrial-like action potentials were relatively nifedipine-resistant, requiring 10 μM to arrest automaticity; 1 μM significantly decreased upstroke velocity while the firing rate and DDR were unaffected. Nodal-like cells exhibited a more negative voltage for half-maximal ICa activation (-30 ± 1 mV vs. -20 ± 3 mV; p<0.05) and slower inactivation (71 ± 10 ms vs. 43 ± 3 ms; p<0.05) than atrial-like cells. Our data indicate that ICa,L differentially regulates automaticity and chronotropy in nodal-like ESC-CMs, and primarily links excitation to contraction in atrial-like ESC-CMs by contributing to the upstroke phase of the action potential. PMID:24660113

  20. Allosteric interactions at L-type calcium channels between FPL 64176 and the enantiomers of the dihydropyridine Bay K 8644.

    PubMed

    Usowicz, M M; Gigg, M; Jones, L M; Cheung, C W; Hartley, S A

    1995-11-01

    Functional interactions between the enantiomers of the dihydropyridine 1,4-dihydro-2,6-dimethyl-5-nitro-4-[2-(trifluoromethyl)-phenyl]-3-pyridi ne carboxylic acid methyl ester (Bay K 8644) and the benzoylpyrrole methyl 2,5-dimethyl-4-[2(phenylmethyl)benzoyl]-H-pyrrole-3-carboxylate (FPL 64176) were investigated on L-type Ca++ channels in guinea pig ileal longitudinal smooth muscle. The effects of these drugs, when applied individually, were as described in earlier studies. For instance, both (-)-(S)-Bay K 8644 and FPL 64176 caused concentration-dependent contraction, which is consistent with Ca++ channel activation, whereas (+)-(R)-Bay K 8644 gave concentration-dependent relaxation, which is consistent with Ca++ channel inhibition. The activities of the different drugs were dependent on the extracellular levels of KCI. When applied in combination, however, the responses evoked were not those predicted from the effects of the drugs applied individually. Contractions produced by FPL 64176 (25 nM to 1 microM) were abolished in the presence of 100 nM (-)-(S)-Bay K 8644 but were potentiated by 10 to 150 nM (+)-(R)-Bay K 8644 and inhibited by 1 microM (+)-(R)-Bay K 8644. Conversely, contractile responses to (-)-(S)-Bay K 8644 were abolished by 100 nM FPL 64176. In the presence of 1 microM FPL 64176, however, (-)-(S)-Bay K 8644 gave concentration-dependent relaxation of the muscle, which is consistent with Ca++ channel inhibition.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Microdomain-Specific Modulation of L-Type Calcium Channels Leads to Triggered Ventricular Arrhythmia in Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Alonso, Jose L.; Bhargava, Anamika; O’Hara, Thomas; Glukhov, Alexey V.; Schobesberger, Sophie; Bhogal, Navneet; Sikkel, Markus B.; Mansfield, Catherine; Korchev, Yuri E.; Lyon, Alexander R.; Punjabi, Prakash P.; Nikolaev, Viacheslav O.; Trayanova, Natalia A.

    2016-01-01

    Rationale: Disruption in subcellular targeting of Ca2+ signaling complexes secondary to changes in cardiac myocyte structure may contribute to the pathophysiology of a variety of cardiac diseases, including heart failure (HF) and certain arrhythmias. Objective: To explore microdomain-targeted remodeling of ventricular L-type Ca2+ channels (LTCCs) in HF. Methods and Results: Super-resolution scanning patch-clamp, confocal and fluorescence microscopy were used to explore the distribution of single LTCCs in different membrane microdomains of nonfailing and failing human and rat ventricular myocytes. Disruption of membrane structure in both species led to the redistribution of functional LTCCs from their canonical location in transversal tubules (T-tubules) to the non-native crest of the sarcolemma, where their open probability was dramatically increased (0.034±0.011 versus 0.154±0.027, P<0.001). High open probability was linked to enhance calcium–calmodulin kinase II–mediated phosphorylation in non-native microdomains and resulted in an elevated ICa,L window current, which contributed to the development of early afterdepolarizations. A novel model of LTCC function in HF was developed; after its validation with experimental data, the model was used to ascertain how HF-induced T-tubule loss led to altered LTCC function and early afterdepolarizations. The HF myocyte model was then implemented in a 3-dimensional left ventricle model, demonstrating that such early afterdepolarizations can propagate and initiate reentrant arrhythmias. Conclusions: Microdomain-targeted remodeling of LTCC properties is an important event in pathways that may contribute to ventricular arrhythmogenesis in the settings of HF-associated remodeling. This extends beyond the classical concept of electric remodeling in HF and adds a new dimension to cardiovascular disease. PMID:27572487

  2. The distribution and targeting of neuronal voltage-gated ion channels.

    PubMed

    Lai, Helen C; Jan, Lily Y

    2006-07-01

    Voltage-gated ion channels have to be at the right place in the right number to endow individual neurons with their specific character. Their biophysical properties together with their spatial distribution define the signalling characteristics of a neuron. Improper channel localization could cause communication defects in a neuronal network. This review covers recent studies of mechanisms for targeting voltage-gated ion channels to axons and dendrites, including trafficking, retention and endocytosis pathways for the preferential localization of particular ion channels. We also discuss how the spatial localization of these channels might contribute to the electrical excitability of neurons, and consider the need for future work in this emerging field.

  3. An evolutionarily-unique heterodimeric voltage-gated cation channel found in aphids

    PubMed Central

    Amey, Joanna S.; O’Reilly, Andrias O.; Burton, Mark J.; Puinean, Alin M.; Mellor, Ian R.; Duce, Ian R.; Field, Linda M.; Wallace, B.A.; Williamson, Martin S.; Davies, T.G. Emyr

    2015-01-01

    We describe the identification in aphids of a unique heterodimeric voltage-gated sodium channel which has an atypical ion selectivity filter and, unusually for insect channels, is highly insensitive to tetrodotoxin. We demonstrate that this channel has most likely arisen by adaptation (gene fission or duplication) of an invertebrate ancestral mono(hetero)meric channel. This is the only identifiable voltage-gated sodium channel homologue in the aphid genome(s), and the channel’s novel selectivity filter motif (DENS instead of the usual DEKA found in other eukaryotes) may result in a loss of sodium selectivity, as indicated experimentally in mutagenised Drosophila channels. PMID:25637326

  4. S-nitrosothiols dilate the mesenteric artery more potently than the femoral artery by a cGMP and L-type calcium channel-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Liu, Taiming; Schroeder, Hobe J; Zhang, Meijuan; Wilson, Sean M; Terry, Michael H; Longo, Lawrence D; Power, Gordon G; Blood, Arlin B

    2016-08-31

    S-nitrosothiols (SNOs) are metabolites of NO with potent vasodilatory activity. Our previous studies in sheep indicated that intra-arterially infused SNOs dilate the mesenteric vasculature more than the femoral vasculature. We hypothesized that the mesenteric artery is more responsive to SNO-mediated vasodilation, and investigated various steps along the NO/cGMP pathway to determine the mechanism for this difference. In anesthetized adult sheep, we monitored the conductance of mesenteric and femoral arteries during infusion of S-nitroso-l-cysteine (L-cysNO), and found mesenteric vascular conductance increased (137 ± 3%) significantly more than femoral conductance (26 ± 25%). Similar results were found in wire myography studies of isolated sheep mesenteric and femoral arteries. Vasodilation by SNOs was attenuated in both vessel types by the presence of ODQ (sGC inhibitor), and both YC-1 (sGC agonist) and 8-Br-cGMP (cGMP analog) mediated more potent relaxation in mesenteric arteries than femoral arteries. The vasodilatory difference between mesenteric and femoral arteries was eliminated by antagonists of either protein kinase G or L-type Ca(2+) channels. Western immunoblots showed a larger L-type Ca(2+)/sGC abundance ratio in mesenteric arteries than in femoral arteries. Fetal sheep mesenteric arteries were more responsive to SNOs than adult mesenteric arteries, and had a greater L-Ca(2+)/sGC ratio (p = 0.047 and r = -0.906 for correlation between Emax and L-Ca(2+)/sGC). These results suggest that mesenteric arteries, especially those in fetus, are more responsive to SNO-mediated vasodilation than femoral arteries due to a greater role of the L-type calcium channel in the NO/cGMP pathway.

  5. Ion permeation and glutamate residues linked by Poisson-Nernst-Planck theory in L-type calcium channels.

    PubMed Central

    Nonner, W; Eisenberg, B

    1998-01-01

    L-type Ca channels contain a cluster of four charged glutamate residues (EEEE locus), which seem essential for high Ca specificity. To understand how this highly charged structure might produce the currents and selectivity observed in this channel, a theory is needed that relates charge to current. We use an extended Poisson-Nernst-Planck (PNP2) theory to compute (mean) Coulombic interactions and thus to examine the role of the mean field electrostatic interactions in producing current and selectivity. The pore was modeled as a central cylinder with tapered atria; the cylinder (i.e., "pore proper") contained a uniform volume density of fixed charge equivalent to that of one to four carboxyl groups. The pore proper was assigned ion-specific, but spatially uniform, diffusion coefficients and excess chemical potentials. Thus electrostatic selection by valency was computed self-consistently, and selection by other features was also allowed. The five external parameters needed for a system of four ionic species (Na, Ca, Cl, and H) were determined analytically from published measurements of thre limiting conductances and two critical ion concentrations, while treating the pore as a macroscopic ion-exchange system in equilibrium with a uniform bath solution. The extended PNP equations were solved with these parameters, and the predictions were compared to currents measured in a variety of solutions over a range of transmembrane voltages. The extended PNP theory accurately predicted current-voltage relations, anomalous mole fraction effects in the observed current, saturation effects of varied Ca and Na concentrations, and block by protons. Pore geometry, dielectric permittivity, and the number of carboxyl groups had only weak effects. The successful prediction of Ca fluxes in this paper demonstrates that ad hoc electrostatic parameters, multiple discrete binding sites, and logistic assumptions of single-file movement are all unnecessary for the prediction of permeation in

  6. Ion permeation and glutamate residues linked by Poisson-Nernst-Planck theory in L-type calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Nonner, W; Eisenberg, B

    1998-09-01

    L-type Ca channels contain a cluster of four charged glutamate residues (EEEE locus), which seem essential for high Ca specificity. To understand how this highly charged structure might produce the currents and selectivity observed in this channel, a theory is needed that relates charge to current. We use an extended Poisson-Nernst-Planck (PNP2) theory to compute (mean) Coulombic interactions and thus to examine the role of the mean field electrostatic interactions in producing current and selectivity. The pore was modeled as a central cylinder with tapered atria; the cylinder (i.e., "pore proper") contained a uniform volume density of fixed charge equivalent to that of one to four carboxyl groups. The pore proper was assigned ion-specific, but spatially uniform, diffusion coefficients and excess chemical potentials. Thus electrostatic selection by valency was computed self-consistently, and selection by other features was also allowed. The five external parameters needed for a system of four ionic species (Na, Ca, Cl, and H) were determined analytically from published measurements of thre limiting conductances and two critical ion concentrations, while treating the pore as a macroscopic ion-exchange system in equilibrium with a uniform bath solution. The extended PNP equations were solved with these parameters, and the predictions were compared to currents measured in a variety of solutions over a range of transmembrane voltages. The extended PNP theory accurately predicted current-voltage relations, anomalous mole fraction effects in the observed current, saturation effects of varied Ca and Na concentrations, and block by protons. Pore geometry, dielectric permittivity, and the number of carboxyl groups had only weak effects. The successful prediction of Ca fluxes in this paper demonstrates that ad hoc electrostatic parameters, multiple discrete binding sites, and logistic assumptions of single-file movement are all unnecessary for the prediction of permeation in

  7. Stereoselective behavior of the functional diltiazem analogue 1-[(4-chlorophenyl)sulfonyl]-2-(2-thienyl)pyrrolidine, a new L-type calcium channel blocker.

    PubMed

    Carosati, Emanuele; Budriesi, Roberta; Ioan, Pierfranco; Cruciani, Gabriele; Fusi, Fabio; Frosini, Maria; Saponara, Simona; Gasparrini, Francesco; Ciogli, Alessia; Villani, Claudio; Stephens, Philip J; Devlin, Frank J; Spinelli, Domenico; Chiarini, Alberto

    2009-11-12

    We studied the stereoselective behavior of 1-[(4-chlorophenyl)sulfonyl]-2-(2-thienyl)pyrrolidine, a recently described blocker of cardiovascular L-type calcium channels that binds to the diltiazem site. Given the stereocenter at C-2 of the pyrrolidine ring, the two enantiomers were separated by chiral HPLC and, using VCD in conjunction with DFT calculations of chiroptical properties, the absolute configuration was assigned as R-(+)/S-(-). For both forms, functional, electrophysiological, and binding properties were studied and the three-dimensional superimpositions of the two enantiomers over diltiazem were obtained in silico. The significant differences observed for the two enantiomers well agreed with the experimental data, and molecular regions were hypothesized as responsible for the cardiac stereoselectivity and vascular stereospecificity.

  8. L-type calcium channels may regulate neurite initiation in cultured chick embryo brain neurons and N1E-115 neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Audesirk, G; Audesirk, T; Ferguson, C; Lomme, M; Shugarts, D; Rosack, J; Caracciolo, P; Gisi, T; Nichols, P

    1990-08-01

    The intracellular free Ca2+ concentration, [Ca2+]i, plays an important role in regulating neurite growth in cultured neurons. Insofar as [Ca2+]i is partly a function of Ca2+ influx through voltage-sensitive calcium channels (VSCC), Ca2+ entry through VSCC should influence neurite growth. Vertebrate neurons may possess several types of VSCC. The most frequently described VSCC types are usually designated L, T and N. In most preparations, these VSCC types respond differently to certain pharmacological agents, including Cd2+, Ni2+, the dihydropyridines nifedipine and BAY K8644, and the aminoglycoside antibiotics. We used these agents to study the role of Ca2+ influx in regulating neurite initiation and length in cultures of chick embryo brain neurons and N1E-115 mouse neuroblastoma cells. In chick neurons, nifedipine and Cd2+ (less than 50 microM), which have been reported to inhibit L-type channels, reduced neurite initiation, but not mean neurite length. Ni2+ (less than 100 microM), reported to inhibit T-type channels, had no effect on either initiation or length. Low concentrations of most aminoglycosides (less than 300 microM), reported to inhibit N-type channels, had no effect on neurite initiation, but high concentrations of streptomycin (great than 300 microM), reported to inhibit both L- and N-type channels, reduced neurite initiation. BAY K8644, which enhances current flow through L-type channels, had no effect except at high concentration (50 microM), which inhibited initiation. N1E-115 neuroblastoma cells have been reported to contain L-type and T-type channels, but thus far no channel similar to the N-type has been described. In cultured N1E-115 cells, nifedipine (5 microM), Cd2+ (5 microM), and streptomycin (200 microM) reduced neurite initiation, while nickel (50 microM) and neomycin (100 microM) did not affect initiation. None of these agents altered neurite length. In N1E-115 cells, whole-cell voltage clamp recordings showed that nifedipine and Cd2

  9. The activation of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors downregulates transient outward potassium and L-type calcium currents in rat models of depression.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin; Shi, Shaobo; Yang, Hongjie; Qu, Chuan; Chen, Yuting; Liang, Jinjun; Yang, Bo

    2017-08-01

    Major depression is an important clinical factor in ventricular arrhythmia. Patients diagnosed with major depression overexpress N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs). Previous studies found that chronic NMDAR activation increases susceptibility to ventricular arrhythmias. We aimed to explore the mechanisms by which NMDAR activation may increase susceptibility to ventricular arrhythmias. Male rats were randomly assigned to either normal environments as control (CTL) group or 4 wk of chronic mild stress (CMS) to produce a major depression disorder (MDD) model group. After 4 wk of CMS, depression-like behaviors were measured in both groups. Varying doses (1-100 μM) of NMDA and 10 μM NMDA antagonist (MK-801) were perfused through ventricular myocytes isolated from MDD rats to measure the L-type calcium current (ICa-L) and transient outward potassium current (Ito). Structural remodeling was assessed using serial histopathology including Masson's trichrome dye. Electrophysiological characteristics were evaluated using Langendorff perfusion. Depression-like behaviors were observed in MDD rats. MDD rats showed longer action potential durations at 90% repolarization and higher susceptibility to ventricular arrhythmias than CTL rats. MDD rats showed lower ICa-L and Ito current densities than CTL rats. Additionally, NMDA reduced both currents in a concentration-dependent manner, whereas there was no significant impact on the currents when perfused with MK-801. MDD rats exhibited significantly more fibrosis areas in heart tissue and reduced expression of Kv4.2, Kv4.3, and Cav1.2. We observed that acute NMDAR activation led to downregulation of potassium and L-type calcium currents in a rat model of depression, which may be the mechanism underlying ventricular arrhythmia promotion by depression. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  10. Actions of the digitalis analogue strophanthidin on action potentials and L-type calcium current in single cells isolated from the rabbit atrioventricular node.

    PubMed Central

    Hancox, J. C.; Levi, A. J.

    1996-01-01

    1. The atrioventricular node (AVN) of the heart is vital to normal cardiac function and is a major site of antiarrhythmic drug action. This study describes the effects of the cardiac glycoside analogue strophanthidin on spontaneous action potentials and L-type calcium current recorded from single AVN cells isolated from the rabbit heart. 2. With a standard KCl-based internal dialysis solution, exposure to 50 microM strophanthidin produced a progressive depolarization of the maximum diastolic potential and a reduction in action potential amplitude and upstroke velocity. Sustained application resulted in the loss of action potentials and occurrence of spontaneous 'bell-shaped' depolarizations. 3. Cells were whole-cell voltage clamped at -40 mV and depolarizing voltage clamps applied. With a standard KCl-based internal dialysis solution, exposure to 50 microM strophanthidin caused a large reduction of ICa,L at all potentials between -30 and +40 mV (n = 4). At + 10 mV, the mean ICa,L amplitude was reduced from -232 +/- 65 pA to -48 +/- 26 pA (P < 0.05; 1 test; n = 5 cells). 4. To record ICa,L more selectively, cells were dialysed with a Cs-based pipette solution. A short strophanthidin exposure reduced ICa,L amplitude from -250 +/- 31 pA to -88 +/- 19 pA (P < 0.001; n = 8 cells). For both KCl and CsCl-based solutions it was observed that sustained exposure to strophanthidin for several minutes caused spontaneous inward fluctuations in the membrane current record similar to the 'ITI' (arrhythmogenic oscillatory transient inward) current shown for other cardiac cells. 5. When the calcium chelator BAPTA was added to the pipette solution (10 mM), the reduction in ICa,L by strophanthidin was largely eliminated (P > 0.1), and no spontaneous inward current fluctuations were observed after sustained exposure to strophanthidin (n = 8 cells). 6. When external Ca in the perfusate was replaced with Ba, strophanthidin did not significantly reduce the Ba current through L-type

  11. Effects of the 1, 4-dihydropyridine L-type calcium channel blocker benidipine on bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhong-ping; Liao, Jia-cheng; Zhao, Chang; Cai, Dao-zhang

    2015-08-01

    Osteoporosis (OP) often increases the risk of bone fracture and other complications and is a major clinical problem. Previous studies have found that high blood pressure is associated with bone formation abnormalities, resulting in increased calcium loss. We have investigated the effect of the antihypertensive drug benidipine on bone marrow stromal cell (BMSC) differentiation into osteoblasts and bone formation under osteoporotic conditions. We used a combination of in vitro and in vivo approaches to test the hypothesis that benidipine promotes murine BMSC differentiation into osteoblasts. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP), osteocalcin (OCN), runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2), β-catenin, and low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5) protein expression was evaluated in primary femoral BMSCs from C57/BL6 mice cultured under osteogenic conditions for 2 weeks to examine the effects of benidipine. An ovariectomized (OVX) mouse model was used to investigate the effect of benidipine treatment for 3 months in vivo. We found that ALP, OCN, and RUNX2 expression was up-regulated and WNT/β-catenin signaling was enhanced in vitro and in vivo. In OVX mice that were intragastrically administered benidipine, bone parameters (trabecular thickness, bone mineral density, and trabecular number) in the distal femoral metaphysis were significantly increased compared with control OVX mice. Consistently, benidipine promoted BMSC differentiation into osteoblasts and protected against bone loss in OVX mice. Therefore, benidipine might be a suitable candidate for the treatment of patients with postmenopausal osteoporosis and hypertension.

  12. L-type calcium channels play a critical role in maintaining lens transparency by regulating phosphorylation of aquaporin-0 and myosin light chain and expression of connexins.

    PubMed

    Maddala, Rupalatha; Nagendran, Tharkika; de Ridder, Gustaaf G; Schey, Kevin L; Rao, Ponugoti Vasantha

    2013-01-01

    Homeostasis of intracellular calcium is crucial for lens cytoarchitecture and transparency, however, the identity of specific channel proteins regulating calcium influx within the lens is not completely understood. Here we examined the expression and distribution profiles of L-type calcium channels (LTCCs) and explored their role in morphological integrity and transparency of the mouse lens, using cDNA microarray, RT-PCR, immunoblot, pharmacological inhibitors and immunofluorescence analyses. The results revealed that Ca (V) 1.2 and 1.3 channels are expressed and distributed in both the epithelium and cortical fiber cells in mouse lens. Inhibition of LTCCs with felodipine or nifedipine induces progressive cortical cataract formation with time, in association with decreased lens weight in ex-vivo mouse lenses. Histological analyses of felodipine treated lenses revealed extensive disorganization and swelling of cortical fiber cells resembling the phenotype reported for altered aquaporin-0 activity without detectable cytotoxic effects. Analysis of both soluble and membrane rich fractions from felodipine treated lenses by SDS-PAGE in conjunction with mass spectrometry and immunoblot analyses revealed decreases in β-B1-crystallin, Hsp-90, spectrin and filensin. Significantly, loss of transparency in the felodipine treated lenses was preceded by an increase in aquaporin-0 serine-235 phosphorylation and levels of connexin-50, together with decreases in myosin light chain phosphorylation and the levels of 14-3-3ε, a phosphoprotein-binding regulatory protein. Felodipine treatment led to a significant increase in gene expression of connexin-50 and 46 in the mouse lens. Additionally, felodipine inhibition of LTCCs in primary cultures of mouse lens epithelial cells resulted in decreased intracellular calcium, and decreased actin stress fibers and myosin light chain phosphorylation, without detectable cytotoxic response. Taken together, these observations reveal a crucial

  13. Gain-of-function nature of Cav1.4 L-type calcium channels alters firing properties of mouse retinal ganglion cells

    PubMed Central

    Knoflach, Dagmar; Schicker, Klaus; Glösmann, Martin; Koschak, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    Proper function of Cav1.4 L-type calcium channels is crucial for neurotransmitter release in the retina. Our understanding about how different levels of Cav1.4 channel activity affect retinal function is still limited. In the gain-of-function mouse model Cav1.4-IT we expected a reduction in the photoreceptor dynamic range but still transmission toward retinal ganglion cells. A fraction of Cav1.4-IT ganglion cells responded to light stimulation in multielectrode array recordings from whole-mounted retinas, but showed a significantly delayed response onset. Another significant number of cells showed higher activity in darkness. In addition to structural remodeling observed at the first retinal synapse of Cav1.4-IT mice the functional data suggested a loss of contrast enhancement, a fundamental feature of our visual system. In fact, Cav1.4-IT mouse retinas showed a decline in spatial response and changes in their contrast sensitivity profile. Photoreceptor degeneration was obvious from the nodular structure of cone axons and enlarged pedicles which partly moved toward the outer nuclear layer. Loss of photoreceptors was also expressed as reduced expression of proteins involved in chemical and electrical transmission, as such metabotropic glutamate receptor mGluR6 and the gap junction protein Connexin 36. Such gross changes in retinal structure and function could also explain the diminished visual performance of CSNB2 patients. The expression pattern of the plasma-membrane calcium ATPase 1 which participates in the maintenance of the intracellular calcium homeostasis in photoreceptors was changed in Cav1.4-IT mice. This might be part of a protection mechanism against increased calcium influx, as this is suggested for Cav1.4-IT channels. PMID:26274509

  14. L-Type Calcium Channels Play a Critical Role in Maintaining Lens Transparency by Regulating Phosphorylation of Aquaporin-0 and Myosin Light Chain and Expression of Connexins

    PubMed Central

    Maddala, Rupalatha; Nagendran, Tharkika; de Ridder, Gustaaf G.; Schey, Kevin L.; Rao, Ponugoti Vasantha

    2013-01-01

    Homeostasis of intracellular calcium is crucial for lens cytoarchitecture and transparency, however, the identity of specific channel proteins regulating calcium influx within the lens is not completely understood. Here we examined the expression and distribution profiles of L-type calcium channels (LTCCs) and explored their role in morphological integrity and transparency of the mouse lens, using cDNA microarray, RT-PCR, immunoblot, pharmacological inhibitors and immunofluorescence analyses. The results revealed that Ca (V) 1.2 and 1.3 channels are expressed and distributed in both the epithelium and cortical fiber cells in mouse lens. Inhibition of LTCCs with felodipine or nifedipine induces progressive cortical cataract formation with time, in association with decreased lens weight in ex-vivo mouse lenses. Histological analyses of felodipine treated lenses revealed extensive disorganization and swelling of cortical fiber cells resembling the phenotype reported for altered aquaporin-0 activity without detectable cytotoxic effects. Analysis of both soluble and membrane rich fractions from felodipine treated lenses by SDS-PAGE in conjunction with mass spectrometry and immunoblot analyses revealed decreases in β-B1-crystallin, Hsp-90, spectrin and filensin. Significantly, loss of transparency in the felodipine treated lenses was preceded by an increase in aquaporin-0 serine-235 phosphorylation and levels of connexin-50, together with decreases in myosin light chain phosphorylation and the levels of 14-3-3ε, a phosphoprotein-binding regulatory protein. Felodipine treatment led to a significant increase in gene expression of connexin-50 and 46 in the mouse lens. Additionally, felodipine inhibition of LTCCs in primary cultures of mouse lens epithelial cells resulted in decreased intracellular calcium, and decreased actin stress fibers and myosin light chain phosphorylation, without detectable cytotoxic response. Taken together, these observations reveal a crucial

  15. Tetrodotoxin blocks L-type Ca2+ channels in canine ventricular cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Hegyi, Bence; Bárándi, László; Komáromi, István; Papp, Ferenc; Horváth, Balázs; Magyar, János; Bányász, Tamás; Krasznai, Zoltán; Szentandrássy, Norbert; Nánási, Péter P

    2012-08-01

    Tetrodotoxin (TTX) is believed to be the most selective inhibitor of voltage-gated fast Na(+) channels in excitable tissues, including nerve, skeletal muscle, and heart, although TTX sensitivity of the latter is lower than the former by at least three orders of magnitude. In the present study, the TTX sensitivity of L-type Ca(2+) current (I (Ca)) was studied in isolated canine ventricular cells using conventional voltage clamp and action potential voltage clamp techniques. TTX was found to block I (Ca) in a reversible manner without altering inactivation kinetics of I (Ca). Fitting results to the Hill equation, an IC(50) value of 55 ± 2 μM was obtained with a Hill coefficient of unity (1.0 ± s0.04). The current was fully abolished by 1 μM nisoldipine, indicating that it was really I (Ca). Under action potential voltage clamp conditions, the TTX-sensitive current displayed the typical fingerprint of I (Ca), which was absent in the presence of nisoldipine. Stick-and-ball models for Cav1.2 and Nav1.5 channel proteins were constructed to explain the differences observed between action of TTX on cardiac I (Ca) and I (Na). This is the first report demonstrating TTX to interact with L-type calciu