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Sample records for l-type voltage-gated calcium

  1. L-type Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels in Conditioned Fear: A Genetic and Pharmacological Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKinney, Brandon C.; Sze, Wilson; White, Jessica A.; Murphy, Geoffrey G.

    2008-01-01

    Using pharmacological approaches, others have suggested that L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (L-VGCCs) mediate both consolidation and extinction of conditioned fear. In the absence of L-VGCC isoform-specific antagonists, we have begun to investigate the subtype-specific role of LVGCCs in consolidation and extinction of conditioned fear…

  2. Melanocortin 4 receptor constitutive activity inhibits L-type voltage-gated calcium channels in neurons.

    PubMed

    Agosti, F; Cordisco Gonzalez, S; Martinez Damonte, V; Tolosa, M J; Di Siervi, N; Schioth, H B; Davio, C; Perello, M; Raingo, J

    2017-03-27

    The melanocortin 4 receptor (MC4R) is a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that is expressed in several brain nuclei playing a crucial role in the regulation of energy balance controlling the homeostasis of the organism. It displays both agonist-evoked and constitutive activity, and moreover, it can couple to different G proteins. Most of the research on MC4R has been focused on agonist-induced activity, while the molecular and cellular basis of MC4R constitutive activity remains scarcely studied. We have previously shown that neuronal N-type voltage-gated calcium channels (CaV2.2) are inhibited by MC4R agonist-dependent activation, while the CaV subtypes that carry L- and P/Q-type current are not. Here, we tested the hypothesis that MC4R constitutive activity can affect CaV, with focus on the channel subtypes that can control transcriptional activity coupled to depolarization (L-type, CaV1.2/1.3) and neurotransmitter release (N- and P/Q-type, CaV2.2 and CaV2.1). We found that MC4R constitutive activity inhibits specifically CaV1.2/1.3 and CaV2.1 subtypes of CaV. We also explored the signaling pathways mediating this inhibition, and thus propose that agonist-dependent and basal MC4R activation modes signal differentially through Gs and Gi/o pathways to impact on different CaV subtypes. In addition, we found that chronic incubation with MC4R endogenous inverse agonist, agouti and agouti-related peptide (AgRP), occludes CaV inhibition in a cell line and in amygdaloid complex cultured neurons as well. Thus, we define new mechanisms of control of the main mediators of depolarization-induced calcium entry into neurons by a GPCR that displays constitutive activity.

  3. Verapamil - L type voltage gated calcium channel inhibitor diminishes aggressive behavior in male Siamese fighting fish.

    PubMed

    Kania, B F; Dębski, B; Wrońska, D; Zawadzka, E

    2015-01-01

    Verapamil is a L-type voltage gated calcium channels inhibitor (VGCCI), which is a highly prescribed drug used in the treatment of hypertension, angina pectoris, cardiac arrhythmia and cluster headaches. Its common use caused its appearance in water environment. VGCC inhibit epinephrine release and cause many neuro-hormonal changes influencing also fish behavior. Siamese fighting fish was chosen to study the influence of verapamil given to the water on the beginning of experiment in 3 different concentrations of 0 (control), 8 and 160 μg · L-1, on aggressive behavior in these fish. The experimental fish were placed in individual glass containers for 3 weeks and the mirror test was used. The highest concentration led to a significant modulation of fish behavior after 1 week and the lower dose caused statistically significant behavioral changes after 2 weeks of verapamil treatment. Siamese fighting fish males exposed to verapamil had longer latencies to the first chase - 12.6 s (8 μg · L-1 of verapamil) and 18.8 s (160 μg · L-1 of verapamil) compared to 5.6 s in the control group, decreased attack frequency and shorter duration of these attacks. The number of attacks within 10 min was decreased from 38.3 in the control group to 27.1 and 16.1, respectively. Also the total duration of these attacks decreased from 354.8 (control) to 326.4 (decrease statistically insignificant) and to 194.8 s in verapamil treated groups. It was shown, that even relatively low concentrations of verapamil in water may have adverse effects on fish and probably other living organisms.

  4. Like Extinction, Latent Inhibition of Conditioned Fear in Mice Is Blocked by Systemic Inhibition of L-Type Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blouin, Ashley M.; Cain, Chris K.; Barad, Mike

    2004-01-01

    Having recently shown that extinction of conditioned fear depends on L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (LVGCCs), we have been seeking other protocols that require this unusual induction mechanism. We tested latent inhibition (LI) of fear, because LI resembles extinction except that cue exposures precede, rather than follow, cue-shock pairing.…

  5. The L-Type Voltage-Gated Calcium Channel Ca[subscript v]1.3 Mediates Consolidation, but Not Extinction, of Contextually Conditioned Fear in Mice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKinney, Brandon C.; Murphy, Geoffrey G.

    2006-01-01

    Using pharmacological techniques, it has been demonstrated that both consolidation and extinction of Pavlovian fear conditioning are dependent to some extent upon L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (LVGCCs). Although these studies have successfully implicated LVGCCs in Pavlovian fear conditioning, they do not provide information about the…

  6. Methamphetamine acutely inhibits voltage-gated calcium channels but chronically up-regulates L-type channels.

    PubMed

    Andres, Marilou A; Cooke, Ian M; Bellinger, Frederick P; Berry, Marla J; Zaporteza, Maribel M; Rueli, Rachel H; Barayuga, Stephanie M; Chang, Linda

    2015-07-01

    In neurons, calcium (Ca(2+) ) channels regulate a wide variety of functions ranging from synaptic transmission to gene expression. They also induce neuroplastic changes that alter gene expression following psychostimulant administration. Ca(2+) channel blockers have been considered as potential therapeutic agents for the treatment of methamphetamine (METH) dependence because of their ability to reduce drug craving among METH users. Here, we studied the effects of METH exposure on voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels using SH-SY5Y cells as a model of dopaminergic neurons. We found that METH has different short- and long-term effects. A short-term effect involves immediate (< 5 min) direct inhibition of Ca(2+) ion movements through Ca(2+) channels. Longer exposure to METH (20 min or 48 h) selectively up-regulates the expression of only the CACNA1C gene, thus increasing the number of L-type Ca(2+) channels. This up-regulation of CACNA1C is associated with the expression of the cAMP-responsive element-binding protein (CREB), a known regulator of CACNA1C gene expression, and the MYC gene, which encodes a transcription factor that putatively binds to a site proximal to the CACNA1C gene transcription initiation site. The short-term inhibition of Ca(2+) ion movement and later, the up-regulation of Ca(2+) channel gene expression together suggest the operation of cAMP-responsive element-binding protein- and C-MYC-mediated mechanisms to compensate for Ca(2+) channel inhibition by METH. Increased Ca(2+) current density and subsequent increased intracellular Ca(2+) may contribute to the neurodegeneration accompanying chronic METH abuse. Methamphetamine (METH) exposure has both short- and long-term effects. Acutely, methamphetamine directly inhibits voltage-gated calcium channels. Chronically, neurons compensate by up-regulating the L-type Ca(2+) channel gene, CACNA1C. This compensatory mechanism is mediated by transcription factors C-MYC and CREB, in which CREB is linked to the

  7. Diminished Vision in Healthy Aging Is Associated with Increased Retinal L-Type Voltage Gated Calcium Channel Ion Influx

    PubMed Central

    Bissig, David; Goebel, Dennis; Berkowitz, Bruce A.

    2013-01-01

    Extensive evidence implicates an increase in hippocampal L-type voltage-gated calcium channel (L-VGCC) expression, and ion influx through these channels, in age-related cognitive declines. Here, we ask if this “calcium hypothesis" applies to the neuroretina: Is increased influx via L-VGCCs related to the well-documented but poorly-understood vision declines in healthy aging? In Long-Evans rats we find a significant age-related increase in ion flux through retinal L-VGCCs in vivo (manganese-enhanced MRI (MEMRI)) that are longitudinally linked with progressive vision declines (optokinetic tracking). Importantly, the degree of retinal Mn2+ uptake early in adulthood significantly predicted later visual contrast sensitivity declines. Furthermore, as in the aging hippocampus, retinal expression of a drug-insensitive L-VGCC isoform (α1D) increased – a pattern confirmed in vivo by an age-related decline in sensitivity to L-VGCC blockade. These data highlight mechanistic similarities between retinal and hippocampal aging, and raise the possibility of new treatment targets for minimizing vision loss during healthy aging. PMID:23457553

  8. Sigma-1 receptor stimulation attenuates calcium influx through activated L-type Voltage Gated Calcium Channels in purified retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Brett H; Park, Yong; Daudt, Donald R; Ma, Hai-Ying; Akopova, Irina; Stankowska, Dorota L; Clark, Abbot F; Yorio, Thomas

    2013-02-01

    Sigma-1 receptors (σ-1rs) exert neuroprotective effects on retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) both in vivo and in vitro. This receptor has unique properties through its actions on several voltage-gated and ligand-gated channels. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role that σ-1rs play in regulating cell calcium dynamics through activated L-type Voltage Gated Calcium Channels (L-type VGCCs) in purified RGCs. RGCs were isolated from P3-P7 Sprague-Dawley rats and purified by sequential immunopanning using a Thy1.1 antibody. Calcium imaging was used to measure changes in intracellular calcium after depolarizing the cells with potassium chloride (KCl) in the presence or absence of two σ-1r agonists [(+)-SKF10047 and (+)-Pentazocine], one σ-1r antagonist (BD1047), and one L-type VGCC antagonist (Verapamil). Finally, co-localization studies were completed to assess the proximity of σ-1r with L-type VGCCs in purified RGCs. VGCCs were activated using KCl (20 mM). Pre-treatment with a known L-type VGCC blocker demonstrated a 57% decrease of calcium ion influx through activated VGCCs. Calcium imaging results also demonstrated that σ-1r agonists, (+)-N-allylnormetazocine hydrochloride [(+)-SKF10047] and (+)-Pentazocine, inhibited calcium ion influx through activated VGCCs. Antagonist treatment using BD1047 demonstrated a potentiation of calcium ion influx through activated VGCCs and abolished all inhibitory effects of the σ-1r agonists on VGCCs, implying that these ligands were acting through the σ-1r. An L-type VGCC blocker (Verapamil) also inhibited KCl activated VGCCs and when combined with the σ-1r agonists there was not a further decline in calcium entry suggesting similar mechanisms. Lastly, co-localization studies demonstrated that σ-1rs and L-type VGCCs are co-localized in purified RGCs. Taken together, these results indicated that σ-1r agonists can inhibit KCl induced calcium ion influx through activated L-type VGCCs in purified RGCs. This is the

  9. Microdamage induced calcium efflux from bone matrix activates intracellular calcium signaling in osteoblasts via L-type and T-type voltage-gated calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Jung, Hyungjin; Best, Makenzie; Akkus, Ozan

    2015-07-01

    Mechanisms by which bone microdamage triggers repair response are not completely understood. It has been shown that calcium efflux ([Ca(2+)]E) occurs from regions of bone undergoing microdamage. Such efflux has also been shown to trigger intracellular calcium signaling ([Ca(2+)]I) in MC3T3-E1 cells local to damaged regions. Voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) are implicated in the entry of [Ca(2+)]E to the cytoplasm. We investigated the involvement of VGCC in the extracellular calcium induced intracellular calcium response (ECIICR). MC3T3-E1 cells were subjected to one dimensional calcium efflux from their basal aspect which results in an increase in [Ca(2+)]I. This increase was concomitant with membrane depolarization and it was significantly reduced in the presence of Bepridil, a non-selective VGCC inhibitor. To identify specific type(s) of VGCC in ECIICR, the cells were treated with selective inhibitors for different types of VGCC. Significant changes in the peak intensity and the number of [Ca(2+)]I oscillations were observed when L-type and T-type specific VGCC inhibitors (Verapamil and NNC55-0396, respectively) were used. So as to confirm the involvement of L- and T-type VGCC in the context of microdamage, cells were seeded on devitalized notched bone specimen, which were loaded to induce microdamage in the presence and absence of Verapamil and NNC55-0396. The results showed significant decrease in [Ca(2+)]I activity of cells in the microdamaged regions of bone when L- and T-type blockers were applied. This study demonstrated that extracellular calcium increase in association with damage depolarizes the cell membrane and the calcium ions enter the cell cytoplasm by L- and T-type VGCCs.

  10. Regulation of L-type Voltage Gated Calcium Channel CACNA1S in Macrophages upon Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection.

    PubMed

    Antony, Cecil; Mehto, Subhash; Tiwari, Brijendra K; Singh, Yogendra; Natarajan, Krishnamurthy

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrated earlier the inhibitory role played by Voltage Gated Calcium Channels (VGCCs) in regulating Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb) survival and pathogenesis. In this report, we investigated mechanisms and key players that regulate the surface expression of VGCC-CACNA1S by Rv2463 and M. tb infection in macrophages. Our earlier work identified Rv2463 to be expressed at early times post infection in macrophages that induced suppressor responses to dendritic cells and macrophages. Our results in this study demonstrate a role of MyD88 independent TLR pathway in mediating CACNA1S expression. Dissecting the role for second messengers, we show that calcium homeostasis plays a key role in CACNA1S expression during M. tb infection. Using siRNAs against molecular sensors of calcium regulation, we show an involvement of ER associated Stromal Interaction Molecules 1 and 2 (STIM1 and STIM2), and transcription factor pCREB, towards CACNA1S expression that also involved the MyD88 independent pathway. Interestingly, reactive oxygen species played a negative role in M. tb mediated CACNA1S expression. Further, a cross-regulation of ROS and pCREB was noted that governed CACNA1S expression. Characterizing the mechanisms governing CACNA1S expression would improve our understanding of the regulation of VGCC expression and its role in M. tb pathogenesis during M. tb infection.

  11. Apo calmodulin binding to the L-type voltage-gated calcium channel Ca{sub v}1.2 IQ peptide

    SciTech Connect

    Lian Luyun . E-mail: lu-yun.lian@liverpool.ac.uk; Myatt, Daniel; Kitmitto, Ashraf . E-mail: ashraf.kitmitto@manchester.ac.uk

    2007-02-16

    The influx of calcium through the L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (LTCCs) is the trigger for the process of calcium-induced calcium release (CICR) from the sarcoplasmic recticulum, an essential step for cardiac contraction. There are two feedback mechanisms that regulate LTCC activity: calcium-dependent inactivation (CDI) and calcium-dependent facilitation (CDF), both of which are mediated by calmodulin (CaM) binding. The IQ domain (aa 1645-1668) housed within the cytoplasmic domain of the LTCC Ca{sub v}1.2 subunit has been shown to bind both calcium-loaded (Ca{sup 2+}CaM ) and calcium-free CaM (apoCaM). Here, we provide new data for the structural basis for the interaction of apoCaM with the IQ peptide using NMR, revealing that the apoCaM C-lobe residues are most significantly perturbed upon complex formation. In addition, we have employed transmission electron microscopy of purified LTCC complexes which shows that both apoCaM and Ca{sup 2+}CaM can bind to the intact channel.

  12. Localization and functional modification of L-type voltage-gated calcium channels in equine spermatozoa from fresh and frozen semen.

    PubMed

    Albrizio, M; Moramarco, A M; Nicassio, M; Micera, E; Zarrilli, A; Lacalandra, G M

    2015-02-01

    It is well known that insemination of cryopreserved semen always results in lower fertility when compared with fresh semen, but there is an increased interest and demand for frozen equine semen by the major breeder associations because of the utility arising from semen already "on hand" at breeding time. In this article, we report that equine sperm cells express L-type voltage-gated calcium channels; their localization is restricted to sperm neck and to the principal piece of the tail in both fresh and frozen-thawed spermatozoa. We also studied the causes of cryoinjury at the membrane level focusing on the function of L-type calcium channels. We report that in cryopreserved spermatozoa the mean basal value of [Ca(2+)]i is higher than that of spermatozoa from fresh semen (447.130 vs. 288.3 nM; P < 0.001) and L-type channels function differently in response to their agonist and antagonist in relation to semen condition (fresh or frozen-thawed). We found that on addition of agonist to the culture medium, the increase in intracellular calcium concentrations ([Ca(2+)]i) was greater in frozen semen than in fresh semen (Δ[Ca(2+)]i = 124.59 vs. 16.04 nM; P < 0.001), whereas after the addition of antagonist the decrease in [Ca(2+)]i was lower in frozen semen than in fresh semen (Δ[Ca(2+)]i = 32.5 vs. 82.5 nM; P < 0.001). In this article, we also discuss the impact of cryopreservation on sperm physiology.

  13. Circadian phase-dependent effect of nitric oxide on L-type voltage-gated calcium channels in avian cone photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Michael L.; Shi, Liheng; Huang, Cathy Chia-Yu; Grushin, Kirill; Park, So-Young; Ko, Gladys Y.-P.

    2014-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) plays an important role in phase-shifting of circadian neuronal activities in the suprachiasmatic nucleus and circadian behavior activity rhythms. In the retina, NO production is increased in a light-dependent manner. While endogenous circadian oscillators in retinal photoreceptors regulate their physiological states, it is not clear whether NO also participates in the circadian regulation of photoreceptors. In the present study, we demonstrate that NO is involved in the circadian phase-dependent regulation of L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (L-VGCCs). In chick cone photoreceptors, the L-VGCCα1 subunit expression and the maximal L-VGCC currents are higher at night, and both Ras-MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase)-Erk (extracellular-signal-regulated kinase) and Ras-phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K)-protein kinase B (Akt) are part of the circadian output pathways regulating L-VGCCs. The NO-cGMP-protein kinase G (PKG) pathway decreases L-VGCCα1 subunit expression and L-VGCC currents at night, but not during the day, and exogenous NO donor or cGMP decreases the phosphorylation of Erk and Akt at night. The protein expression of neural NO synthase (nNOS) is also under circadian control, with both nNOS and NO production being higher during the day. Taken together, NO/cGMP/PKG signaling is involved as part of the circadian output pathway to regulate L-VGCCs in cone photoreceptors. PMID:23895452

  14. Functional proteins involved in regulation of intracellular Ca(2+) for drug development: chronic nicotine treatment upregulates L-type high voltage-gated calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Katsura, Masashi; Ohkuma, Seitaro

    2005-03-01

    Neurochemical mechanisms underlying drug dependence and withdrawal syndrome remain unclear. In this review, we discuss how chronic nicotine exposure to neurons affects expression of diazepam binding inhibitor (DBI), an endogenous anxiogenic neuropeptide supposed to be a common substance participating drug dependence, and function of L-type high voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels (HVCCs). We also discuss the functional interaction between DBI and L-type HVCCs in nicotine dependence. Both DBI levels and [(45)Ca(2+)] influx significantly increased in the brain from mice treated with nicotine for long term, which was further enhanced after abrupt cessation of nicotine and was abolished by nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) antagonists. Similar responses of DBI expression and L-type HVCC function were observed in cerebral cortical neurons after sustained exposure to nicotine. In addition, increased DBI expression was inhibited by antagonists of nAChR and L-type HVCCs. Sustained exposure of neurons to nicotine significantly enhanced expression of alpha(1) and alpha(2)/delta(1) subunits for L-type HVCCs and caused an increase in the B(max) value of [(3)H]verapamil binding to the particulate fractions. Therefore, it is concluded that the alterations in DBI expression is mediated via increased influx of Ca(2+) through upregulated L-type HVCCs and these neurochemical changes have a close relationship with development of nicotine dependence and/or its withdrawal syndrome.

  15. N- and L-Type Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels Mediate Fast Calcium Transients in Axonal Shafts of Mouse Peripheral Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Barzan, Ruxandra; Pfeiffer, Friederike; Kukley, Maria

    2016-01-01

    In the peripheral nervous system (PNS) a vast number of axons are accommodated within fiber bundles that constitute peripheral nerves. A major function of peripheral axons is to propagate action potentials along their length, and hence they are equipped with Na+ and K+ channels, which ensure successful generation, conduction and termination of each action potential. However little is known about Ca2+ ion channels expressed along peripheral axons and their possible functional significance. The goal of the present study was to test whether voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (VGCCs) are present along peripheral nerve axons in situ and mediate rapid activity-dependent Ca2+ elevations under physiological circumstances. To address this question we used mouse sciatic nerve slices, Ca2+ indicator Oregon Green BAPTA-1, and 2-photon Ca2+ imaging in fast line scan mode (500 Hz). We report that transient increases in intra-axonal Ca2+ concentration take place along peripheral nerve axons in situ when axons are stimulated electrically with single pulses. Furthermore, we show for the first time that Ca2+ transients in peripheral nerves are fast, i.e., occur in a millisecond time-domain. Combining Ca2+ imaging and pharmacology with specific blockers of different VGCCs subtypes we demonstrate that Ca2+ transients in peripheral nerves are mediated mainly by N-type and L-type VGCCs. Discovery of fast Ca2+ entry into the axonal shafts through VGCCs in peripheral nerves suggests that Ca2+ may be involved in regulation of action potential propagation and/or properties in this system, or mediate neurotransmitter release along peripheral axons as it occurs in the optic nerve and white matter of the central nervous system (CNS). PMID:27313508

  16. Suppression of Protective Responses upon Activation of L-Type Voltage Gated Calcium Channel in Macrophages during Mycobacterium bovis BCG Infection

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Deepika; Tiwari, Brijendra Kumar; Mehto, Subhash; Antony, Cecil; Kak, Gunjan; Singh, Yogendra; Natarajan, Krishnamurthy

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb) strains eliciting drug resistance has necessitated the need for understanding the complexities of host pathogen interactions. The regulation of calcium homeostasis by Voltage Gated Calcium Channel (VGCCs) upon M. tb infection has recently assumed importance in this area. We previously showed a suppressor role of VGCC during M. tb infections and recently reported the mechanisms of its regulation by M. tb. Here in this report, we further characterize the role of VGCC in mediating defence responses of macrophages during mycobacterial infection. We report that activation of VGCC during infection synergistically downmodulates the generation of oxidative burst (ROS) by macrophages. This attenuation of ROS is regulated in a manner which is dependent on Toll like Receptor (TLR) and also on the route of calcium influx, Protein Kinase C (PKC) and by Mitogen Activation Protein Kinase (MAPK) pathways. VGCC activation during infection increases cell survival and downmodulates autophagy. Concomitantly, pro-inflammatory responses such as IL-12 and IFN-γ secretion and the levels of their receptors on cell surface are inhibited. Finally, the ability of phagosomes to fuse with lysosomes in M. bovis BCG and M. tb H37Rv infected macrophages is also compromised when VGCC activation occurs during infection. The results point towards a well-orchestrated strategy adopted by mycobacteria to supress protective responses mounted by the host. This begins with the increase in the surface levels of VGCCs by mycobacteria and their antigens by well-controlled and regulated mechanisms. Subsequent activation of the upregulated VGCC following tweaking of calcium levels by molecular sensors in turn mediates suppressor responses and prepare the macrophages for long term persistent infection. PMID:27723836

  17. Recombinant human ZP3-induced sperm acrosome reaction: evidence for the involvement of T- and L-type voltage-gated calcium channels.

    PubMed

    José, Omar; Hernández-Hernández, Oscar; Chirinos, Mayel; González-González, María Elena; Larrea, Fernando; Almanza, Angélica; Felix, Ricardo; Darszon, Alberto; Treviño, Claudia L

    2010-05-14

    For successful fertilization mammalian spermatozoa must undergo the acrosome reaction (AR), an exocytotic event that allows this cell to penetrate the outer layer of the oocyte, the zona pellucida (ZP). Four glycoproteins (ZP1-ZP4) compose the human ZP, being ZP3 the physiological inductor of the AR. This process requires changes in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) involving not fully understood mechanisms. Even in mouse sperm, the pharmacologically documented participation of voltage-gated Ca(2+) (Ca(V)) channels and store-operated channels (SOCs) in the ZP-induced AR is being debated. The situation in human sperm is even less clear due to the limited availability of human ZP. Here, we used recombinant human ZP3 (rhZP3) produced in baculovirus-infected Sf9 cells to investigate the involvement of Ca(V) channels in the human sperm AR. Our findings showed that Ni(2+) and mibefradil at concentrations that block T-type or Ca(V)3 channels, and nimodipine and diltiazem that block L-type or Ca(V)1 channels, significantly inhibited the rhZP3-initiated AR. On the other hand, the AR was insensitive to concentrations of omega-Agatoxin IVA, omega-Conotoxin GVIA and SNX-482 that block P/Q, N and R-type channels, respectively (Ca(V)2 channels). Our overall findings suggest that Ca(V)1 and Ca(V)3 channels participate in human sperm AR. Consistent with this, we detected in human sperm transcripts for the Ca(V)1 auxiliary subunits, alpha(2)delta, beta(1), beta(2) and beta(4), but not the neuronal specific isoforms beta(3) and gamma(2).

  18. The reduction of EPSC amplitude in CA1 pyramidal neurons by the peroxynitrite donor SIN-1 requires Ca2+ influx via postsynaptic non-L-type voltage gated calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Zhaowei, Liu; Yongling, Xie; Jiajia, Yang; Zhuo, Yang

    2014-02-01

    The peroxynitrite free radical (ONOO(-)) modulation of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs) and spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs) was investigated in rat CA1 pyramidal neurons using the whole-cell patch clamp technique. SIN-1(3-morpholino-sydnonimine), which can lead the simultaneous generation of superoxide anion and nitric oxide, and then form the highly reactive species ONOO(-), induced dose-dependent inhibition in amplitudes of both mEPSCs and sEPSCs. The SIN-1 action on mEPSC amplitude was completely blocked by U0126, a selective MEK inhibitor, suggesting that MEK contributed to the action of ONOO(-) on mEPSCs. The effect of SIN-1 was completely occluded either in the presence of the calcium chelator EGTA or the non-selective calcium channel antagonist Cd(2+). Furthermore, the application of nifedipine (20 μM), the L-type calcium channel blocker, had no effect on the ONOO(-)-induced decrease in mEPSC amplitude, excluding a role for L-type voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels in this process. SIN-1 inhibited the frequency of sEPSCs but had no effect on mEPSC frequency, which suggested a presynaptic action potential-dependent the action of ONOO(-) at CA1 pyramidal neuron synapses. The best-known glutamatergic input to CA1 pyramidal neurons is via Schaffer collaterals from CA3 area. However, no changes were observed in slices treated with SIN-1 on the spontaneous firing rates of CA3 pyramidal neurons. These findings suggested that SIN-1 inhibited glutamatergic synaptic transmission of CA1 pyramidal neurons by a postsynaptic non-L-type voltage gated calcium channel-dependent mechanism.

  19. Gating of dopamine transmission by calcium and axonal N-, Q-, T- and L-type voltage-gated calcium channels differs between striatal domains

    PubMed Central

    Brimblecombe, Katherine R; Gracie, Caitlin J; Platt, Nicola J; Cragg, Stephanie J

    2015-01-01

    The axonal voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (VGCCs) that catalyse dopamine (DA) transmission are incompletely defined. Yet, they are critical to DA function and might prime subpopulations of DA neurons for parkinsonian degeneration. Previous studies of VGCCs will have encompassed those on striatal cholinergic interneurons, which strongly influence DA transmission. We identify which VGCCs on DA axons govern DA transmission, we determine their dynamic properties and reveal an underlying basis for differences between the caudate putamen (CPu) and nucleus accumbens (NAc). We detected DA release evoked electrically during nicotinic receptor blockade or optogenetically by light activation of channel rhodopsin-expressing DA axons in mouse striatal slices. Subtype-specific VGCC blockers indicated that N-, Q-, T- and L-VGCCs govern DA release in CPu, but in NAc, T and L-channels are relatively silent. The roles of the most dominant channels were inversely frequency-dependent, due to low-pass filtering of DA release by Ca2+-dependent relationships between initial release probability and short-term plasticity. Ca2+ concentration–response curves revealed that differences between CPu and NAc were due to greater underlying Ca2+ sensitivity of DA transmission from CPu axons. Functions for ‘silent’ L- and T-channels in NAc could be unmasked by elevating extracellular [Ca2+]. Furthermore, we identified a greater coupling between BAPTA-sensitive, fast Ca2+ transients and DA transmission in CPu axons, and evidence for endogenous fast buffering of Ca2+ in NAc. These data reveal that a range of VGCCs operate dynamically on DA axons, depending on local driving forces. Furthermore, they reveal dramatic differences in Ca2+ handling between axonal subpopulations that show different vulnerability to parkinsonian degeneration. PMID:25533038

  20. Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels in Nociception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, Takahiro; Adams, David J.

    Voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) are a large and functionally diverse group of membrane ion channels ubiquitously expressed throughout the central and peripheral nervous systems. VGCCs contribute to various physiological processes and transduce electrical activity into other cellular functions. This chapter provides an overview of biophysical properties of VGCCs, including regulation by auxiliary subunits, and their physiological role in neuronal functions. Subsequently, then we focus on N-type calcium (Cav2.2) channels, in particular their diversity and specific antagonists. We also discuss the role of N-type calcium channels in nociception and pain transmission through primary sensory dorsal root ganglion neurons (nociceptors). It has been shown that these channels are expressed predominantly in nerve terminals of the nociceptors and that they control neurotransmitter release. To date, important roles of N-type calcium channels in pain sensation have been elucidated genetically and pharmacologically, indicating that specific N-type calcium channel antagonists or modulators are particularly useful as therapeutic drugs targeting chronic and neuropathic pain.

  1. Voltage-gated Calcium Channels and Autism Spectrum Disorders.

    PubMed

    Breitenkamp, Alexandra F; Matthes, Jan; Herzig, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder is a complex-genetic disease and its etiology is unknown for the majority of cases. So far, more than one hundred different susceptibility genes were detected. Voltage-gated calcium channels are among the candidates linked to autism spectrum disorder by results of genetic studies. Mutations of nearly all pore-forming and some auxiliary subunits of voltage gated calcium channels have been revealed from investigations of autism spectrum disorder patients and populations. Though there are only few electrophysiological characterizations of voltage-gated calcium channel mutations found in autistic patients these studies suggest their functional relevance. In summary, both genetic and functional data suggest a potential role of voltage-gated calcium channels in autism spectrum disorder. Future studies require refinement of the clinical and systems biological concepts of autism spectrum disorder and an appropriate holistic approach at the molecular level, e.g. regarding all facets of calcium channel functions.

  2. A new functional role for mechanistic/mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) in the circadian regulation of L-type voltage-gated calcium channels in avian cone photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Huang, Cathy Chia-Yu; Ko, Michael Lee; Ko, Gladys Yi-Ping

    2013-01-01

    In the retina, the L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (L-VGCCs) are responsible for neurotransmitter release from photoreceptors and are under circadian regulation. Both the current densities and protein expression of L-VGCCs are significantly higher at night than during the day. However, the underlying mechanisms of circadian regulation of L-VGCCs in the retina are not completely understood. In this study, we demonstrated that the mechanistic/mammalian target of rapamycin complex (mTORC) signaling pathway participated in the circadian phase-dependent modulation of L-VGCCs. The activities of the mTOR cascade, from mTORC1 to its downstream targets, displayed circadian oscillations throughout the course of a day. Disruption of mTORC1 signaling dampened the L-VGCC current densities, as well as the protein expression of L-VGCCs at night. The decrease of L-VGCCs at night by mTORC1 inhibition was in part due to a reduction of L-VGCCα1 subunit translocation from the cytosol to the plasma membrane. Finally, we showed that mTORC1 was downstream of the phosphatidylionositol 3 kinase-protein kinase B (PI3K-AKT) signaling pathway. Taken together, mTORC1 signaling played a role in the circadian regulation of L-VGCCs, in part through regulation of ion channel trafficking and translocation, which brings to light a new functional role for mTORC1: the modulation of ion channel activities.

  3. A New Functional Role for Mechanistic/Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Complex 1 (mTORC1) in the Circadian Regulation of L-Type Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels in Avian Cone Photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Cathy Chia-Yu; Ko, Michael Lee; Ko, Gladys Yi-Ping

    2013-01-01

    In the retina, the L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (L-VGCCs) are responsible for neurotransmitter release from photoreceptors and are under circadian regulation. Both the current densities and protein expression of L-VGCCs are significantly higher at night than during the day. However, the underlying mechanisms of circadian regulation of L-VGCCs in the retina are not completely understood. In this study, we demonstrated that the mechanistic/mammalian target of rapamycin complex (mTORC) signaling pathway participated in the circadian phase-dependent modulation of L-VGCCs. The activities of the mTOR cascade, from mTORC1 to its downstream targets, displayed circadian oscillations throughout the course of a day. Disruption of mTORC1 signaling dampened the L-VGCC current densities, as well as the protein expression of L-VGCCs at night. The decrease of L-VGCCs at night by mTORC1 inhibition was in part due to a reduction of L-VGCCα1 subunit translocation from the cytosol to the plasma membrane. Finally, we showed that mTORC1 was downstream of the phosphatidylionositol 3 kinase-protein kinase B (PI3K-AKT) signaling pathway. Taken together, mTORC1 signaling played a role in the circadian regulation of L-VGCCs, in part through regulation of ion channel trafficking and translocation, which brings to light a new functional role for mTORC1: the modulation of ion channel activities. PMID:23977383

  4. Suggestive evidence for association between L-type voltage-gated calcium channel (CACNA1C) gene haplotypes and bipolar disorder in Latinos: a family-based association study

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Suzanne; Xu, Chun; Ramirez, Mercedes; Zavala, Juan; Armas, Regina; Contreras, Salvador A; Contreras, Javier; Dassori, Albana; Leach, Robin J; Flores, Deborah; Jerez, Alvaro; Raventós, Henriette; Ontiveros, Alfonso; Nicolini, Humberto; Escamilla, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Through recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS), several groups have reported significant association between variants in the alpha 1C subunit of the L-type voltage-gated calcium channel (CACNA1C) and bipolar disorder (BP) in European and European-American cohorts. We performed a family-based association study to determine whether CACNA1C is associated with BP in the Latino population. Methods This study consisted of 913 individuals from 215 Latino pedigrees recruited from the United States, Mexico, Guatemala, and Costa Rica. The Illumina GoldenGate Genotyping Assay was used to genotype 58 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that spanned a 602.9 kb region encompassing the CACNA1C gene including two SNPs (rs7297582 and rs1006737) previously shown to associate with BP. Individual SNP and haplotype association analyses were performed using Family-Based Association Test (version 2.0.3) and Haploview (version 4.2) software. Results An eight-locus haplotype block that included these two markers showed significant association with BP (global marker permuted p = 0.0018) in the Latino population. For individual SNPs, this sample had insufficient power (10%) to detect associations with SNPs with minor effect (odds ratio = 1.15). Conclusions Although we were not able to replicate findings of association between individual CACNA1C SNPs rs7297582 and rs1006737 and BP, we were able to replicate the GWAS signal reported for CACNA1C through a haplotype analysis that encompassed these previously reported significant SNPs. These results provide additional evidence that CACNA1C is associated with BP and provides the first evidence that variations in this gene might play a role in the pathogenesis of this disorder in the Latino population. PMID:23437964

  5. A new role for AMP-activated protein kinase in the circadian regulation of L-type voltage-gated calcium channels in late-stage embryonic retinal photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Huang, Cathy C Y; Shi, Liheng; Lin, Chia-Hung; Kim, Andy Jeesu; Ko, Michael L; Ko, Gladys Y-P

    2015-11-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a cellular energy sensor, which is activated when the intracellular ATP production decreases. The activities of AMPK display circadian rhythms in various organs and tissues, indicating that AMPK is involved in the circadian regulation of cellular metabolism. In vertebrate retina, the circadian clocks regulate many aspects of retinal function and physiology, including light/dark adaption, but whether and how AMPK was involved in the retinal circadian rhythm was not known. We hypothesized that the activation of AMPK (measured as phosphorylated AMPK) in the retina was under circadian control, and AMPK might interact with other intracellular signaling molecules to regulate photoreceptor physiology. We combined ATP assays, western blots, immunostaining, patch-clamp recordings, and pharmacological treatments to decipher the role of AMPK in the circadian regulation of photoreceptor physiology. We found that the overall retinal ATP content displayed a diurnal rhythm that peaked at early night, which was nearly anti-phase to the diurnal and circadian rhythms of AMPK phosphorylation. AMPK was also involved in the circadian phase-dependent regulation of photoreceptor L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (L-VGCCs), the ion channel essential for sustained neurotransmitter release. The activation of AMPK dampened the L-VGCC currents at night with a corresponding decrease in protein expression of the L-VGCCα1 pore-forming subunit, while inhibition of AMPK increased the L-VGCC current during the day. AMPK appeared to be upstream of extracellular-signal-regulated kinase and mammalian/mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) but downstream of adenylyl cyclase in regulating the circadian rhythm of L-VGCCs. Hence, as a cellular energy sensor, AMPK integrates into the cell signaling network to regulate the circadian rhythm of photoreceptor physiology. We found that in chicken embryonic retina, the activation of AMP-activated protein

  6. Redox Regulation of Neuronal Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Jevtovic-Todorovic, Vesna

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Voltage-gated calcium channels are ubiquitously expressed in neurons and are key regulators of cellular excitability and synaptic transmitter release. There is accumulating evidence that multiple subtypes of voltage-gated calcium channels may be regulated by oxidation and reduction. However, the redox mechanisms involved in the regulation of channel function are not well understood. Recent Advances: Several studies have established that both T-type and high-voltage-activated subtypes of voltage-gated calcium channel can be redox-regulated. This article reviews different mechanisms that can be involved in redox regulation of calcium channel function and their implication in neuronal function, particularly in pain pathways and thalamic oscillation. Critical Issues: A current critical issue in the field is to decipher precise mechanisms of calcium channel modulation via redox reactions. In this review we discuss covalent post-translational modification via oxidation of cysteine molecules and chelation of trace metals, and reactions involving nitric oxide-related molecules and free radicals. Improved understanding of the roles of redox-based reactions in regulation of voltage-gated calcium channels may lead to improved understanding of novel redox mechanisms in physiological and pathological processes. Future Directions: Identification of redox mechanisms and sites on voltage-gated calcium channel may allow development of novel and specific ion channel therapies for unmet medical needs. Thus, it may be possible to regulate the redox state of these channels in treatment of pathological process such as epilepsy and neuropathic pain. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 880–891. PMID:24161125

  7. cAMP-dependent protein kinase and Ca2+ influx through L-type voltage-gated calcium channels mediate Raf-independent activation of extracellular regulated kinase in response to glucagon-like peptide-1 in pancreatic beta-cells.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Edith; Pritchard, Catrin; Herbert, Terence P

    2002-12-13

    Glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP1) is a G(s)-coupled receptor agonist that exerts multiple effects on pancreatic beta-cells, including the stimulation of insulin gene expression and secretion. In this report, we show that treatment of the mouse pancreatic beta-cell line MIN6 with GLP1 leads to the glucose-dependent activation of Erk. These effects are mimicked by forskolin, a direct activator of adenylate cyclase, and blocked by H89, an inhibitor of cAMP-dependent protein kinase. Additionally, we provide evidence that GLP1-stimulated activation of Erk requires an influx of calcium through L-type voltage-gated calcium channels and the activation of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II. GLP1-stimulated activation of Erk is blocked by inhibitors of MEK, but GLP1 does not induce the activation of A-Raf, B-Raf, C-Raf, or Ras. Additionally, dominant negative forms of Ras(N17) and Rap1(N17) fail to block GLP1-stimulated activation of Erk. In conclusion, our results indicate that, in the presence of stimulatory concentrations of glucose, GLP1 stimulates the activation of Erk through a mechanism dependent on MEK but independent of both Raf and Ras. This requires 1) the activation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase, 2) an influx of extracellular Ca(2+) through L-type voltage-gated calcium channels, and 3) the activation of CaM kinase II.

  8. New Role of P/Q-type Voltage-gated Calcium Channels: From Transmitter Release to Contraction of Renal Vasculature.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Pernille B L

    2015-05-01

    Voltage-gated calcium channels are important for the depolarization-evoked contraction of vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs), with L-type channels being the classical channel involved in this mechanism. However, it has been demonstrated that the CaV2.1 subunit, which encodes a neuronal isoform of the voltage-gated calcium channels (P/Q-type), is also expressed and contributes functionally to contraction of renal blood vessels in both mice and humans. Furthermore, preglomerular vascular SMCs and aortic SMCs coexpress L-, P-, and Q-type calcium channels within the same cell. Calcium channel blockers are widely used as pharmacological treatments. However, calcium channel antagonists vary in their selectivity for the various calcium channel subtypes, and the functional contribution from P/Q-type channels as compared with L-type should be considered. Confirming the presence of P/Q-type voltage-gated calcium channels in other types of vascular SMCs could be important when investigating phenomena such as hypertension, migraine, and other diseases known to involve SMCs and voltage-gated calcium channels. The purpose of this review was to give a short overview of the possible roles of P/Q-type calcium channels within the vascular system with special focus on the renal vasculature.

  9. Characterization of L-type Voltage-Gated Ca2+ Channel Expression and Function in Developing CA3 Pyramidal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Morton, Russell A.; Norlin, Mackenzie S.; Vollmer, Cyndel C.; Valenzuela, C. Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Voltage gated calcium channels (VGCCs) play a major role during the development of the central nervous system (CNS). Ca2+ influx via VGCCs regulates axonal growth and neuronal migration as well as synaptic plasticity. Specifically, L-type VGCCs have been well characterized to be involved in the formation and refinement of the connections within the CA3 region of the hippocampus. The majority of the growth, formation, and refinement in the CNS occurs during the human third trimester. An equivalent developmental time period in rodents occurs during the first two weeks of post-natal life, and the expression pattern of L-type VGCCs during this time period has not been well characterized. In this study, we show that Cav1.2 channels are more highly expressed during this developmental period compared to adolescence (post-natal day 30) and that L-type VGCCs significantly contribute to the overall Ca2+ currents. These findings suggest that L-type VGCCs are functionally expressed during the crucial developmental period. PMID:23415785

  10. Age-related homeostatic mid-channel proteolysis of neuronal L-type voltage-gated Ca2+ channels

    PubMed Central

    Michailidis, Ioannis E.; Abele-Henckels, Kathryn; Zhang, Wei K.; Lin, Bochao; Yu, Yong; Geyman, Larry; Ehlers, Michael D.; Pnevmatikakis, Eftychios A.; Yang, Jian

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Neural circuitry and brain activity depend critically on proper function of voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs), whose activity must be tightly controlled. We show that the main body of the pore-forming α1 subunit of neuronal L-type VGCCs, Cav1.2, is proteolytically cleaved, resulting in Cav1.2 fragment-channels that separate but remain on the plasma membrane. This “gmid-channel” proteolysis is regulated by channel activity, involves the Ca2+-dependent protease calpain and the ubiquitin-proteasome system, and causes attenuation and biophysical alterations of VGCC currents. Recombinant Cav1.2 fragment-channels mimicking the products of mid-channel proteolysis do not form active channels on their own, but when properly paired, produce currents with distinct biophysical properties. Mid-channel proteolysis increases dramatically with age and can be attenuated with an L-type VGCC blocker in vivo. Mid-channel proteolysis represents a novel form of homeostatic negative-feedback processing of VGCCs that could profoundly affect neuronal excitability, neurotransmission, neuroprotection, and calcium signaling in physiological and disease states. PMID:24908485

  11. Voltage-gated calcium channel autoimmune cerebellar degeneration

    PubMed Central

    McKasson, Marilyn; Clawson, Susan A.; Hill, Kenneth E.; Wood, Blair; Carlson, Noel; Bromberg, Mark; Greenlee, John E.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To describe response to treatment in a patient with autoantibodies against voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) who presented with autoimmune cerebellar degeneration and subsequently developed Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome (LEMS), and to study the effect of the patient's autoantibodies on Purkinje cells in rat cerebellar slice cultures. Methods: Case report and study of rat cerebellar slice cultures incubated with patient VGCC autoantibodies. Results: A 53-year-old man developed progressive incoordination with ataxic speech. Laboratory evaluation revealed VGCC autoantibodies without other antineuronal autoantibodies. Whole-body PET scans 6 and 12 months after presentation detected no malignancy. The patient improved significantly with IV immunoglobulin G (IgG), prednisone, and mycophenolate mofetil, but worsened after IV IgG was halted secondary to aseptic meningitis. He subsequently developed weakness with electrodiagnostic evidence of LEMS. The patient's IgG bound to Purkinje cells in rat cerebellar slice cultures, followed by neuronal death. Reactivity of the patient's autoantibodies with VGCCs was confirmed by blocking studies with defined VGCC antibodies. Conclusions: Autoimmune cerebellar degeneration associated with VGCC autoantibodies may precede onset of LEMS and may improve with immunosuppressive treatment. Binding of anti-VGCC antibodies to Purkinje cells in cerebellar slice cultures may be followed by cell death. Patients with anti-VGCC autoantibodies may be at risk of irreversible neurologic injury over time, and treatment should be initiated early. PMID:27088118

  12. Regulation of voltage gated calcium channels by GPCRs and post-translational modification.

    PubMed

    Huang, Junting; Zamponi, Gerald W

    2016-10-18

    Calcium entry via voltage gated calcium channels mediates a wide range of physiological functions, whereas calcium channel dysregulation has been associated with numerous pathophysiological conditions. There are myriad cell signaling pathways that act on voltage gated calcium channels to fine tune their activities and to regulate their cell surface expression. These regulatory mechanisms include the activation of G protein-coupled receptors and downstream phosphorylation events, and their control over calcium channel trafficking through direct physical interactions. Calcium channels also undergo post-translational modifications that alter both function and density of the channels in the plasma membrane. Here we focus on select aspects of these regulatory mechanisms and highlight recent developments.

  13. The Physiology, Pathology, and Pharmacology of Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels and Their Future Therapeutic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Zamponi, Gerald W.; Striessnig, Joerg; Koschak, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated calcium channels are required for many key functions in the body. In this review, the different subtypes of voltage-gated calcium channels are described and their physiologic roles and pharmacology are outlined. We describe the current uses of drugs interacting with the different calcium channel subtypes and subunits, as well as specific areas in which there is strong potential for future drug development. Current therapeutic agents include drugs targeting L-type CaV1.2 calcium channels, particularly 1,4-dihydropyridines, which are widely used in the treatment of hypertension. T-type (CaV3) channels are a target of ethosuximide, widely used in absence epilepsy. The auxiliary subunit α2δ-1 is the therapeutic target of the gabapentinoid drugs, which are of value in certain epilepsies and chronic neuropathic pain. The limited use of intrathecal ziconotide, a peptide blocker of N-type (CaV2.2) calcium channels, as a treatment of intractable pain, gives an indication that these channels represent excellent drug targets for various pain conditions. We describe how selectivity for different subtypes of calcium channels (e.g., CaV1.2 and CaV1.3 L-type channels) may be achieved in the future by exploiting differences between channel isoforms in terms of sequence and biophysical properties, variation in splicing in different target tissues, and differences in the properties of the target tissues themselves in terms of membrane potential or firing frequency. Thus, use-dependent blockers of the different isoforms could selectively block calcium channels in particular pathologies, such as nociceptive neurons in pain states or in epileptic brain circuits. Of important future potential are selective CaV1.3 blockers for neuropsychiatric diseases, neuroprotection in Parkinson’s disease, and resistant hypertension. In addition, selective or nonselective T-type channel blockers are considered potential therapeutic targets in epilepsy, pain, obesity, sleep, and

  14. Disruption of the IS6-AID Linker Affects Voltage-gated Calcium Channel Inactivation and Facilitation

    PubMed Central

    Findeisen, Felix

    2009-01-01

    Two processes dominate voltage-gated calcium channel (CaV) inactivation: voltage-dependent inactivation (VDI) and calcium-dependent inactivation (CDI). The CaVβ/CaVα1-I-II loop and Ca2+/calmodulin (CaM)/CaVα1–C-terminal tail complexes have been shown to modulate each, respectively. Nevertheless, how each complex couples to the pore and whether each affects inactivation independently have remained unresolved. Here, we demonstrate that the IS6–α-interaction domain (AID) linker provides a rigid connection between the pore and CaVβ/I-II loop complex by showing that IS6-AID linker polyglycine mutations accelerate CaV1.2 (L-type) and CaV2.1 (P/Q-type) VDI. Remarkably, mutations that either break the rigid IS6-AID linker connection or disrupt CaVβ/I-II association sharply decelerate CDI and reduce a second Ca2+/CaM/CaVα1–C-terminal–mediated process known as calcium-dependent facilitation. Collectively, the data strongly suggest that components traditionally associated solely with VDI, CaVβ and the IS6-AID linker, are essential for calcium-dependent modulation, and that both CaVβ-dependent and CaM-dependent components couple to the pore by a common mechanism requiring CaVβ and an intact IS6-AID linker. PMID:19237593

  15. Calmodulin regulation (calmodulation) of voltage-gated calcium channels

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Johny, Manu

    2014-01-01

    Calmodulin regulation (calmodulation) of the family of voltage-gated CaV1-2 channels comprises a prominent prototype for ion channel regulation, remarkable for its powerful Ca2+ sensing capabilities, deep in elegant mechanistic lessons, and rich in biological and therapeutic implications. This field thereby resides squarely at the epicenter of Ca2+ signaling biology, ion channel biophysics, and therapeutic advance. This review summarizes the historical development of ideas in this field, the scope and richly patterned organization of Ca2+ feedback behaviors encompassed by this system, and the long-standing challenges and recent developments in discerning a molecular basis for calmodulation. We conclude by highlighting the considerable synergy between mechanism, biological insight, and promising therapeutics. PMID:24863929

  16. Voltage-gated calcium and sodium channels mediate Sema3A retrograde signaling that regulates dendritic development.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Naoya; Aoki, Reina; Chen, Sandy; Jitsuki-Takahashi, Aoi; Ohura, Shunsuke; Kamiya, Haruyuki; Goshima, Yoshio

    2016-01-15

    Growing axons rely on local signaling at the growth cone for guidance cues. Semaphorin3A (Sema3A), a secreted repulsive axon guidance molecule, regulates synapse maturation and dendritic branching. We previously showed that local Sema3A signaling in the growth cones elicits retrograde retrograde signaling via PlexinA4 (PlexA4), one component of the Sema3A receptor, thereby regulating dendritic localization of AMPA receptor GluA2 and proper dendritic development. In present study, we found that nimodipine (voltage-gated L-type Ca(2+) channel blocker) and tetrodotoxin (TTX; voltage-gated Na(+) channel blocker) suppress Sema3A-induced dendritic localization of GluA2 and dendritic branch formation in cultured hippocampal neurons. The local application of nimodipine or TTX to distal axons suppresses retrograde transport of Venus-Sema3A that has been exogenously applied to the distal axons. Sema3A facilitates axonal transport of PlexA4, which is also suppressed in neurons treated with either TTX or nimodipine. These data suggest that voltage-gated calcium and sodium channels mediate Sema3A retrograde signaling that regulates dendritic GluA2 localization and branch formation.

  17. Differential Calcium Signaling Mediated by Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels in Rat Retinal Ganglion Cells and Their Unmyelinated Axons

    PubMed Central

    Sargoy, Allison; Sun, Xiaoping

    2014-01-01

    Aberrant calcium regulation has been implicated as a causative factor in the degeneration of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in numerous injury models of optic neuropathy. Since calcium has dual roles in maintaining homeostasis and triggering apoptotic pathways in healthy and injured cells, respectively, investigation of voltage-gated Ca channel (VGCC) regulation as a potential strategy to reduce the loss of RGCs is warranted. The accessibility and structure of the retina provide advantages for the investigation of the mechanisms of calcium signalling in both the somata of ganglion cells as well as their unmyelinated axons. The goal of the present study was to determine the distribution of VGCC subtypes in the cell bodies and axons of ganglion cells in the normal retina and to define their contribution to calcium signals in these cellular compartments. We report L-type Ca channel α1C and α1D subunit immunoreactivity in rat RGC somata and axons. The N-type Ca channel α1B subunit was in RGC somata and axons, while the P/Q-type Ca channel α1A subunit was only in the RGC somata. We patch clamped isolated ganglion cells and biophysically identified T-type Ca channels. Calcium imaging studies of RGCs in wholemounted retinas showed that selective Ca channel antagonists reduced depolarization-evoked calcium signals mediated by L-, N-, P/Q- and T-type Ca channels in the cell bodies but only by L-type Ca channels in the axons. This differential contribution of VGCC subtypes to calcium signals in RGC somata and their axons may provide insight into the development of target-specific strategies to spare the loss of RGCs and their axons following injury. PMID:24416240

  18. Mapping CRMP3 domains involved in dendrite morphogenesis and voltage-gated calcium channel regulation.

    PubMed

    Quach, Tam T; Wilson, Sarah M; Rogemond, Veronique; Chounlamountri, Naura; Kolattukudy, Pappachan E; Martinez, Stephanie; Khanna, May; Belin, Marie-Francoise; Khanna, Rajesh; Honnorat, Jerome; Duchemin, Anne-Marie

    2013-09-15

    Although hippocampal neurons are well-distinguished by the morphological characteristics of their dendrites and their structural plasticity, the mechanisms involved in regulating their neurite initiation, dendrite growth, network formation and remodeling are still largely unknown, in part because the key molecules involved remain elusive. Identifying new dendrite-active cues could uncover unknown molecular mechanisms that would add significant understanding to the field and possibly lead to the development of novel neuroprotective therapy because these neurons are impaired in many neuropsychiatric disorders. In our previous studies, we deleted the gene encoding CRMP3 in mice and identified the protein as a new endogenous signaling molecule that shapes diverse features of the hippocampal pyramidal dendrites without affecting axon morphology. We also found that CRMP3 protects dendrites against dystrophy induced by prion peptide PrP(106-126). Here, we report that CRMP3 has a profound influence on neurite initiation and dendrite growth of hippocampal neurons in vitro. Our deletional mapping revealed that the C-terminus of CRMP3 probably harbors its dendritogenic capacity and supports an active transport mechanism. By contrast, overexpression of the C-terminal truncated CRMP3 phenocopied the effect of CRMP3 gene deletion with inhibition of neurite initiation or decrease in dendrite complexity, depending on the stage of cell development. In addition, this mutant inhibited the activity of CRMP3, in a similar manner to siRNA. Voltage-gated calcium channel inhibitors prevented CRMP3-induced dendritic growth and somatic Ca(2+) influx in CRMP3-overexpressing neurons was augmented largely via L-type channels. These results support a link between CRMP3-mediated Ca(2+) influx and CRMP3-mediated dendritic growth in hippocampal neurons.

  19. Hypoxic increase in nitric oxide generation of rat sensory neurons requires activation of mitochondrial complex II and voltage-gated calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Henrich, M; Paddenberg, R; Haberberger, R V; Scholz, A; Gruss, M; Hempelmann, G; Kummer, W

    2004-01-01

    Recently, we have demonstrated that sensory neurons of rat lumbar dorsal root ganglia (DRG) respond to hypoxia with an activation of endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase (eNOS) resulting in enhanced NO production associated with mitochondria which contributes to resistance against hypoxia. Extracellular calcium is essential to this effect. In the present study on rat DRG slices, we set out to determine what types of calcium channels operate under hypoxia, and which upstream events contribute to their activation, thereby focusing upon mitochondrial complex II. Both the metallic ions Cd2+ and Ni2+, known to inhibit voltage-gated calcium channels and T-type channels, respectively, and verapamil and nifedipine, typical blocker of L-type calcium channels completely prevented the hypoxic neuronal NO generation. Inhibition of complex II by thenoyltrifluoroacetone at the ubiquinon binding site or by 3-nitropropionic acid at the substrate binding site largely diminished hypoxic-induced NO production while having an opposite effect under normoxia. An additional blockade of voltage-gated calcium channels entirely abolished the hypoxic response. The complex II inhibitor malonate inhibited both normoxic and hypoxic NO generation. These data show that complex II activity is required for increased hypoxic NO production. Since succinate dehydrogenase activity of complex II decreased at hypoxia, as measured by histochemistry and densitometry, we propose a hypoxia-induced functional switch of complex II from succinate dehydrogenase to fumarate reductase, which subsequently leads to activation of voltage-gated calcium channels resulting in increased NO production by eNOS.

  20. The α2δ subunits of voltage-gated calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Dolphin, Annette C

    2013-07-01

    Voltage-gated calcium channels consist of the main pore-forming α1 subunit, together, except in the case of the T-type channels, with β and α2δ and sometimes γ subunits, which are collectively termed auxiliary or accessory subunits. This review will concentrate on the properties and role of the α2δ subunits of these channels. These proteins are largely extracellular, membrane-associated proteins which influence the trafficking, localization, and biophysical properties of the channels. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Calcium channels.

  1. Down-regulation of endogenous KLHL1 decreases voltage-gated calcium current density.

    PubMed

    Perissinotti, Paula P; Ethington, Elizabeth G; Cribbs, Leanne; Koob, Michael D; Martin, Jody; Piedras-Rentería, Erika S

    2014-05-01

    The actin-binding protein Kelch-like 1 (KLHL1) can modulate voltage-gated calcium channels in vitro. KLHL1 interacts with actin and with the pore-forming subunits of Cav2.1 and CaV3.2 calcium channels, resulting in up-regulation of P/Q and T-type current density. Here we tested whether endogenous KLHL1 modulates voltage gated calcium currents in cultured hippocampal neurons by down-regulating the expression of KLHL1 via adenoviral delivery of shRNA targeted against KLHL1 (shKLHL1). Control adenoviruses did not affect any of the neuronal properties measured, yet down-regulation of KLHL1 resulted in HVA current densities ~68% smaller and LVA current densities 44% smaller than uninfected controls, with a concomitant reduction in α(1A) and α(1H) protein levels. Biophysical analysis and western blot experiments suggest Ca(V)3.1 and 3.3 currents are also present in shKLHL1-infected neurons. Synapsin I levels, miniature postsynaptic current frequency, and excitatory and inhibitory synapse number were reduced in KLHL1 knockdown. This study corroborates the physiological role of KLHL1 as a calcium channel modulator and demonstrates a novel, presynaptic role.

  2. Characterization of voltage-gated calcium currents in freshly isolated smooth muscle cells from rat tail main artery.

    PubMed

    Petkov, G V; Fusi, F; Saponara, S; Gagov, H S; Sgaragli, G P; Boev, K K

    2001-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to characterize voltage-gated Ca2+ currents in smooth muscle cells freshly isolated from rat tail main artery in the presence of 5 mmol L(-1) external Ca2+. Calcium currents were identified on the basis of their voltage dependencies and sensitivity to nifedipine, Ni2+ and cinnarizine. In the majority of the cells studied, T- and L-type currents were observed, while the remaining cells showed predominantly L-type currents. In the latter group of cells, holding potential change from -50 to either -70 or -90 mV increased the corresponding inward current amplitude while its voltage activation threshold remained unchanged. The steady state inactivation of L-type Ca2+ channels showed half-maximal inactivation at -38 mV. A Ca2+-dependent inactivation was also evident. Nifedipine (3 micromol L(-1)) blocked L-type but not T-type Ca2+ currents. Ni2+ (50 micromol L(-1)) as well as cinnarizine (1 micromol L(-1)) suppressed the nifedipine-resistant, T-type component of the currents. At higher concentrations, both Ni2+ (0.3-1 mmol L(-1)) and cinnarizine (10 micromol L(-1)) blocked the net inward current. Replacement of Ca2+ with 10 mmol L(-)1 Ba2+ significantly increased the amplitude of L-type Ca2+ currents. These results demonstrate that smooth muscle cells freshly isolated from rat tail main artery may be divided into two populations, one expressing both L- and T-type and the other only L-type Ca2+ channels. Furthermore, this report shows that in arterial smooth muscle cells cinnarizine potently inhibited T-type currents at low concentrations (1 micromol L(-1)) but also blocked L-type Ca2+ currents at higher concentrations (10 micromol L(-1)).

  3. Epigenetic regulation of L-type voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels in mesenteric arteries of aging hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Liao, Jingwen; Zhang, Yanyan; Ye, Fang; Zhang, Lin; Chen, Yu; Zeng, Fanxing; Shi, Lijun

    2016-11-24

    Accumulating evidence has shown that epigenetic regulation is involved in hypertension and aging. L-type voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels (LTCCs), the dominant channels in vascular myocytes, greatly contribute to arteriole contraction and blood pressure (BP) control. We investigated the dynamic changes and epigenetic regulation of LTCC in the mesenteric arteries of aging hypertensive rats. LTCC function was evaluated by using microvascular rings and whole-cell patch-clamp in the mesenteric arteries of male Wistar-Kyoto rats and spontaneously hypertensive rats at established hypertension (3 month old) and an aging stage (16 month old), respectively. The expression of the LTCC α1C subunit was determined in the rat mesenteric microcirculation. The expression of miR-328, which targets α1C mRNA, and the DNA methylation status at the promoter region of the α1C gene (CACNA1C) were also determined. In vitro experiments were performed to assess α1C expression after transfection of the miR-328 mimic into cultured vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). The results showed that hypertension superimposed with aging aggravated BP and vascular remodeling. Both LTCC function and expression were significantly increased in hypertensive arteries and downregulated with aging. miR-328 expression was inhibited in hypertension, but increased with aging. There was no significant difference in the mean DNA methylation of CACNA1C among groups, whereas methylation was enhanced in the hypertensive group at specific sites on a CpG island located upstream of the gene promoter. Overexpression of miR-328 inhibited the α1C level of cultured VSMCs within 48 h. The results of the present study indicate that the dysfunction of LTCCs may exert an epigenetic influence at both pre- and post-transcriptional levels during hypertension pathogenesis and aging progression. miR-328 negatively regulated LTCC expression in both aging and hypertension.Hypertension Research advance online publication, 24

  4. Reciprocal Regulation of Reactive Oxygen Species and Phospho-CREB Regulates Voltage Gated Calcium Channel Expression during Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Selvakumar, Arti; Antony, Cecil; Singhal, Jhalak; Tiwari, Brijendra K.; Singh, Yogendra; Natarajan, Krishnamurthy

    2014-01-01

    Our previous work has demonstrated the roles played by L-type Voltage Gated Calcium Channels (VGCC) in regulating Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb) survival and pathogenesis. Here we decipher mechanisms and pathways engaged by the pathogen to regulate VGCC expression in macrophages. We show that M. tb and its antigen Rv3416 use phospho-CREB (pCREB), Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS), Protein Kinase C (PKC) and Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) to modulate VGCC expression in macrophages. siRNA mediated knockdown of MyD88, IRAK1, IRAK2 or TRAF6 significantly inhibited antigen mediated VGCC expression. Inhibiting Protein Kinase C (PKC) or MEK-ERK1/2 further increased VGCC expression. Interestingly, inhibiting intracellular calcium release upregulated antigen mediated VGCC expression, while inhibiting extracellular calcium influx had no significant effect. siRNA mediated knockdown of transcription factors c-Jun, SOX5 and CREB significantly inhibited Rv3416 mediated VGCC expression. A dynamic reciprocal cross-regulation between ROS and pCREB was observed that in turn governed VGCC expression with ROS playing a limiting role in the process. Further dissection of the mechanisms such as the interplay between ROS and pCREB would improve our understanding of the regulation of VGCC expression during M. tb infection. PMID:24797940

  5. Electromagnetic fields act via activation of voltage-gated calcium channels to produce beneficial or adverse effects.

    PubMed

    Pall, Martin L

    2013-08-01

    The direct targets of extremely low and microwave frequency range electromagnetic fields (EMFs) in producing non-thermal effects have not been clearly established. However, studies in the literature, reviewed here, provide substantial support for such direct targets. Twenty-three studies have shown that voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) produce these and other EMF effects, such that the L-type or other VGCC blockers block or greatly lower diverse EMF effects. Furthermore, the voltage-gated properties of these channels may provide biophysically plausible mechanisms for EMF biological effects. Downstream responses of such EMF exposures may be mediated through Ca(2+) /calmodulin stimulation of nitric oxide synthesis. Potentially, physiological/therapeutic responses may be largely as a result of nitric oxide-cGMP-protein kinase G pathway stimulation. A well-studied example of such an apparent therapeutic response, EMF stimulation of bone growth, appears to work along this pathway. However, pathophysiological responses to EMFs may be as a result of nitric oxide-peroxynitrite-oxidative stress pathway of action. A single such well-documented example, EMF induction of DNA single-strand breaks in cells, as measured by alkaline comet assays, is reviewed here. Such single-strand breaks are known to be produced through the action of this pathway. Data on the mechanism of EMF induction of such breaks are limited; what data are available support this proposed mechanism. Other Ca(2+) -mediated regulatory changes, independent of nitric oxide, may also have roles. This article reviews, then, a substantially supported set of targets, VGCCs, whose stimulation produces non-thermal EMF responses by humans/higher animals with downstream effects involving Ca(2+) /calmodulin-dependent nitric oxide increases, which may explain therapeutic and pathophysiological effects.

  6. Electromagnetic fields act via activation of voltage-gated calcium channels to produce beneficial or adverse effects

    PubMed Central

    Pall, Martin L

    2013-01-01

    The direct targets of extremely low and microwave frequency range electromagnetic fields (EMFs) in producing non-thermal effects have not been clearly established. However, studies in the literature, reviewed here, provide substantial support for such direct targets. Twenty-three studies have shown that voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) produce these and other EMF effects, such that the L-type or other VGCC blockers block or greatly lower diverse EMF effects. Furthermore, the voltage-gated properties of these channels may provide biophysically plausible mechanisms for EMF biological effects. Downstream responses of such EMF exposures may be mediated through Ca2+/calmodulin stimulation of nitric oxide synthesis. Potentially, physiological/therapeutic responses may be largely as a result of nitric oxide-cGMP-protein kinase G pathway stimulation. A well-studied example of such an apparent therapeutic response, EMF stimulation of bone growth, appears to work along this pathway. However, pathophysiological responses to EMFs may be as a result of nitric oxide-peroxynitrite-oxidative stress pathway of action. A single such well-documented example, EMF induction of DNA single-strand breaks in cells, as measured by alkaline comet assays, is reviewed here. Such single-strand breaks are known to be produced through the action of this pathway. Data on the mechanism of EMF induction of such breaks are limited; what data are available support this proposed mechanism. Other Ca2+-mediated regulatory changes, independent of nitric oxide, may also have roles. This article reviews, then, a substantially supported set of targets, VGCCs, whose stimulation produces non-thermal EMF responses by humans/higher animals with downstream effects involving Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent nitric oxide increases, which may explain therapeutic and pathophysiological effects. PMID:23802593

  7. Differential CaMKII regulation by voltage-gated calcium channels in the striatum.

    PubMed

    Pasek, Johanna G; Wang, Xiaohan; Colbran, Roger J

    2015-09-01

    Calcium signaling regulates synaptic plasticity and many other functions in striatal medium spiny neurons to modulate basal ganglia function. Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) is a major calcium-dependent signaling protein that couples calcium entry to diverse cellular changes. CaMKII activation results in autophosphorylation at Thr286 and sustained calcium-independent CaMKII activity after calcium signals dissipate. However, little is known about the mechanisms regulating striatal CaMKII. To address this, mouse brain slices were treated with pharmacological modulators of calcium channels and punches of dorsal striatum were immunoblotted for CaMKII Thr286 autophosphorylation as an index of CaMKII activation. KCl depolarization increased levels of CaMKII autophosphorylation ~2-fold; this increase was blocked by an LTCC antagonist and was mimicked by treatment with pharmacological LTCC activators. The chelation of extracellular calcium robustly decreased basal CaMKII autophosphorylation within 5min and increased levels of total CaMKII in cytosolic fractions, in addition to decreasing the phosphorylation of CaMKII sites in the GluN2B subunit of NMDA receptors and the GluA1 subunit of AMPA receptors. We also found that the maintenance of basal levels of CaMKII autophosphorylation requires low-voltage gated T-type calcium channels, but not LTCCs or R-type calcium channels. Our findings indicate that CaMKII activity is dynamically regulated by multiple calcium channels in the striatum thus coupling calcium entry to key downstream substrates.

  8. Voltage-gated calcium channels function as Ca2+-activated signaling receptors.

    PubMed

    Atlas, Daphne

    2014-02-01

    Voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) are transmembrane cell surface proteins responsible for multifunctional signals. In response to voltage, VGCCs trigger synaptic transmission, drive muscle contraction, and regulate gene expression. Voltage perturbations open VGCCs enabling Ca(2+) binding to the low affinity Ca(2+) binding site of the channel pore. Subsequent to permeation, Ca(2+) targets selective proteins to activate diverse signaling pathways. It is becoming apparent that the Ca(2+)-bound channel triggers secretion in excitable cells and drives contraction in cardiomyocytes prior to Ca(2+) permeation. Here, I highlight recent data implicating receptor-like function of the Ca(2+)-bound channel in converting external Ca(2+) into an intracellular signal. The two sequential mechanistic perspectives of VGCC function are discussed in the context of the prevailing and long-standing current models of depolarization-evoked secretion and cardiac contraction.

  9. Fetal calcium regulates branching morphogenesis in the developing human and mouse lung: involvement of voltage-gated calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Sarah C; Finney, Brenda A; Lazarou, Maria; Rosser, Anne E; Scherf, Caroline; Adriaensen, Dirk; Kemp, Paul J; Riccardi, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    Airway branching morphogenesis in utero is essential for optimal postnatal lung function. In the fetus, branching morphogenesis occurs during the pseudoglandular stage (weeks 9-17 of human gestation, embryonic days (E)11.5-16.5 in mouse) in a hypercalcaemic environment (~1.7 in the fetus vs. ~1.1-1.3 mM for an adult). Previously we have shown that fetal hypercalcemia exerts an inhibitory brake on branching morphogenesis via the calcium-sensing receptor. In addition, earlier studies have shown that nifedipine, a selective blocker of L-type voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels (VGCC), inhibits fetal lung growth, suggesting a role for VGCC in lung development. The aim of this work was to investigate the expression of VGCC in the pseudoglandular human and mouse lung, and their role in branching morphogenesis. Expression of L-type (CaV1.2 and CaV1.3), P/Q type (CaV2.1), N-type (CaV2.2), R-type (CaV2.3), and T-type (CaV3.2 and CaV3.3) VGCC was investigated in paraffin sections from week 9 human fetal lungs and E12.5 mouse embryos. Here we show, for the first time, that Cav1.2 and Cav1.3 are expressed in both the smooth muscle and epithelium of the developing human and mouse lung. Additionally, Cav2.3 was expressed in the lung epithelium of both species. Incubating E12.5 mouse lung rudiments in the presence of nifedipine doubled the amount of branching, an effect which was partly mimicked by the Cav2.3 inhibitor, SNX-482. Direct measurements of changes in epithelial cell membrane potential, using the voltage-sensitive fluorescent dye DiSBAC2(3), demonstrated that cyclic depolarisations occur within the developing epithelium and coincide with rhythmic occlusions of the lumen, driven by the naturally occurring airway peristalsis. We conclude that VGCC are expressed and functional in the fetal human and mouse lung, where they play a role in branching morphogenesis. Furthermore, rhythmic epithelial depolarisations evoked by airway peristalsis would allow for branching to match

  10. The role of auxiliary subunits for the functional diversity of voltage-gated calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Campiglio, Marta; Flucher, Bernhard E

    2015-09-01

    Voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) represent the sole mechanism to convert membrane depolarization into cellular functions like secretion, contraction, or gene regulation. VGCCs consist of a pore-forming α(1) subunit and several auxiliary channel subunits. These subunits come in multiple isoforms and splice-variants giving rise to a stunning molecular diversity of possible subunit combinations. It is generally believed that specific auxiliary subunits differentially regulate the channels and thereby contribute to the great functional diversity of VGCCs. If auxiliary subunits can associate and dissociate from pre-existing channel complexes, this would allow dynamic regulation of channel properties. However, most auxiliary subunits modulate current properties very similarly, and proof that any cellular calcium channel function is indeed modulated by the physiological exchange of auxiliary subunits is still lacking. In this review we summarize available information supporting a differential modulation of calcium channel functions by exchange of auxiliary subunits, as well as experimental evidence in support of alternative functions of the auxiliary subunits. At the heart of the discussion is the concept that, in their native environment, VGCCs function in the context of macromolecular signaling complexes and that the auxiliary subunits help to orchestrate the diverse protein-protein interactions found in these calcium channel signalosomes. Thus, in addition to a putative differential modulation of current properties, differential subcellular targeting properties and differential protein-protein interactions of the auxiliary subunits may explain the need for their vast molecular diversity.

  11. How voltage-gated calcium channels gate forms of homeostatic synaptic plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Frank, C. Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Throughout life, animals face a variety of challenges such as developmental growth, the presence of toxins, or changes in temperature. Neuronal circuits and synapses respond to challenges by executing an array of neuroplasticity paradigms. Some paradigms allow neurons to up- or downregulate activity outputs, while countervailing ones ensure that outputs remain within appropriate physiological ranges. A growing body of evidence suggests that homeostatic synaptic plasticity (HSP) is critical in the latter case. Voltage-gated calcium channels gate forms of HSP. Presynaptically, the aggregate data show that when synapse activity is weakened, homeostatic signaling systems can act to correct impairments, in part by increasing calcium influx through presynaptic CaV2-type channels. Increased calcium influx is often accompanied by parallel increases in the size of active zones and the size of the readily releasable pool of presynaptic vesicles. These changes coincide with homeostatic enhancements of neurotransmitter release. Postsynaptically, there is a great deal of evidence that reduced network activity and loss of calcium influx through CaV1-type calcium channels also results in adaptive homeostatic signaling. Some adaptations drive presynaptic enhancements of vesicle pool size and turnover rate via retrograde signaling, as well as de novo insertion of postsynaptic neurotransmitter receptors. Enhanced calcium influx through CaV1 after network activation or single cell stimulation can elicit the opposite response—homeostatic depression via removal of excitatory receptors. There exist intriguing links between HSP and calcium channelopathies—such as forms of epilepsy, migraine, ataxia, and myasthenia. The episodic nature of some of these disorders suggests alternating periods of stable and unstable function. Uncovering information about how calcium channels are regulated in the context of HSP could be relevant toward understanding these and other disorders. PMID

  12. Alternative splicing: functional diversity among voltage-gated calcium channels and behavioral consequences.

    PubMed

    Lipscombe, Diane; Andrade, Arturo; Allen, Summer E

    2013-07-01

    Neuronal voltage-gated calcium channels generate rapid, transient intracellular calcium signals in response to membrane depolarization. Neuronal Ca(V) channels regulate a range of cellular functions and are implicated in a variety of neurological and psychiatric diseases including epilepsy, Parkinson's disease, chronic pain, schizophrenia, and bipolar disorder. Each mammalian Cacna1 gene has the potential to generate tens to thousands of Ca(V) channels by alternative pre-mRNA splicing, a process that adds fine granulation to the pool of Ca(V) channel structures and functions. The precise composition of Ca(V) channel splice isoform mRNAs expressed in each cell are controlled by cell-specific splicing factors. The activity of splicing factors are in turn regulated by molecules that encode various cellular features, including cell-type, activity, metabolic states, developmental state, and other factors. The cellular and behavioral consequences of individual sites of Ca(V) splice isoforms are being elucidated, as are the cell-specific splicing factors that control splice isoform selection. Altered patterns of alternative splicing of Ca(V) pre-mRNAs can alter behavior in subtle but measurable ways, with the potential to influence drug efficacy and disease severity. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Calcium channels.

  13. The localization of two voltage-gated calcium channels in the pyloric network of the lobster stomatogastric ganglion.

    PubMed

    French, L B; Lanning, C C; Harris-Warrick, R M

    2002-01-01

    Voltage-gated calcium channels are critical to all aspects of nervous system function, with differing roles within the neuronal somata, at synaptic terminals, and at the neuromuscular junction. We have developed antibodies against two voltage-gated Ca(2+) channel genes from the spiny lobster, Panulirus interruptus, which are homologous to the Drosophila Ca1A (a P/Q-type channel) and Ca1D (an L-type channel) genes. Using these antibodies, we have found that each channel shows unique patterns of localization within the stomatogastric nervous system. Both antibodies stain somata of most of the neurons in the pyloric network to varying degrees. The high degree of variability in staining intensity within individual pyloric cell classes supports the hypothesis of Golowasch et al. (1999a,b) that individual cells can vary in their composition of ionic currents and still have similar firing properties. Anti-Ca1A stains structures in the neuropil, some of which are terminals of axons descending from higher ganglia; however, the majority of these are neither neurites nor blood vessels, but may instead be glial cells or other support elements. Anti-Ca1A labeling was also prominent in the peripheral axons of pyloric motoneurons as they enter muscles, indicating that this channel may be involved in regulation of synaptic transmission onto the foregut muscles. Anti-Ca1D does not label neurites in the neuropil of the stomatogastric ganglion. It stains glial cells in the stomatogastric ganglion in the region of their nuclei, presumably from protein being produced in the perinuclear rough endoplasmic reticulum, en route to the glial cell periphery. While anti-Ca1D labeling is seen in a patchy distribution along peripheral pyloric axons, it was never seen near the muscle. We conclude that the localization of these two calcium channels is tightly controlled within the stomatogastric nervous system, but we cannot conclusively demonstrate that Ca1A and/or Ca1D channels play roles in

  14. A role for L-type calcium channels in the maturation of parvalbumin-containing hippocampal interneurons.

    PubMed

    Jiang, M; Swann, J W

    2005-01-01

    While inhibitory interneurons are well recognized to play critical roles in the brain, relatively little is know about the molecular events that regulate their growth and differentiation. Calcium ions are thought to be important in neuronal development and L-type voltage gated Ca(+2) channels have been implicated in activity-dependent mechanisms of early-life. However, few studies have examined the role of these channels in the maturation of interneurons. The studies reported here were conducted in hippocampal slice cultures and indicate that the L-type Ca(+2) channel agonists and antagonists accelerate and suppress respectively the growth of parvalbumin-containing interneurons. The effects of channel blockade were reversible suggesting they are not the result of interneuronal cell death. Results from immunoblotting showed that these drugs have similar effects on the expression of the GABA synthetic enzymes, glutamic acid decarboxylase65, glutamic acid decarboxylase67 and the vesicular GABA transporter. This suggests that L-type Ca(+2) channels regulate not only parvalbumin expression but also interneuron development. These effects are likely mediated by actions on the interneurons themselves since the alpha subunits of L-type channels, voltage-gated calcium channel subunit 1.2 and voltage-gated calcium channel subunit 1.3 were found to be highly expressed in neonatal mouse hippocampus and co-localized with parvalbumin in interneurons. Results also showed that while these interneurons can contain either subunit, voltage-gated calcium channel subunit 1.3 was more widely expressed. Taken together results suggest that an important subset of developing interneurons expresses L-type Ca(+2) channels alpha subunits, voltage-gated calcium channel subunit 1.2 and especially voltage-gated calcium channel subunit 1.3 and that these channels likely regulate the development of these interneurons in an activity-dependent manner.

  15. Altered voltage-gated calcium channels in rat inferior colliculus neurons contribute to alcohol withdrawal seizures.

    PubMed

    N'Gouemo, Prosper

    2015-08-01

    We have previously reported that enhanced susceptibility to alcohol withdrawal seizures (AWS) parallels the enhancement of the current density of high-threshold voltage-gated Ca(2+) (CaV) channels in rat inferior colliculus (IC) neurons. However, whether this increased current density is a cause or consequence of AWS is unclear. Here, I report changes in the current density of CaV channels in IC neurons during the course of alcohol withdrawal and the potential anticonvulsant effect of intra-IC infusions of L- and P-type CaV channel antagonists. Whole-cell currents were activated by depolarizing pulses using barium as the charge carrier. Currents and seizure susceptibility were evaluated in control animals 3h after alcohol intoxication, as well as 3h (before AWS), 24h (when AWS susceptibility is maximal), and 48h (when AWS susceptibility is no longer present) after alcohol withdrawal. Nifedipine, nimodipine (L-type antagonists) or ω-agatoxin TK (P-type antagonist) were infused intra-IC to probe the role of CaV channels in the pathogenesis of AWS. CaV current density and conductance in IC neurons were significantly increased 3 and 24h after alcohol withdrawal compared with the control group or the group tested 3h following ethanol intoxication. Blockade of L-type CaV channels within the IC completely suppressed AWS, and inhibition of P-type channels reduced AWS severity. These findings suggest that the enhancement of CaV currents in IC neurons occurs prior to AWS onset and that alterations in L- and P-type CaV channels in these neurons may underlie the pathogenesis of AWS.

  16. The Role of Auxiliary Subunits for the Functional Diversity of Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Campiglio, Marta; Flucher, Bernhard E

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) represent the sole mechanism to convert membrane depolarization into cellular functions like secretion, contraction, or gene regulation. VGCCs consist of a pore-forming α1 subunit and several auxiliary channel subunits. These subunits come in multiple isoforms and splice-variants giving rise to a stunning molecular diversity of possible subunit combinations. It is generally believed that specific auxiliary subunits differentially regulate the channels and thereby contribute to the great functional diversity of VGCCs. If auxiliary subunits can associate and dissociate from pre-existing channel complexes, this would allow dynamic regulation of channel properties. However, most auxiliary subunits modulate current properties very similarly, and proof that any cellular calcium channel function is indeed modulated by the physiological exchange of auxiliary subunits is still lacking. In this review we summarize available information supporting a differential modulation of calcium channel functions by exchange of auxiliary subunits, as well as experimental evidence in support of alternative functions of the auxiliary subunits. At the heart of the discussion is the concept that, in their native environment, VGCCs function in the context of macromolecular signaling complexes and that the auxiliary subunits help to orchestrate the diverse protein–protein interactions found in these calcium channel signalosomes. Thus, in addition to a putative differential modulation of current properties, differential subcellular targeting properties and differential protein–protein interactions of the auxiliary subunits may explain the need for their vast molecular diversity. J. Cell. Physiol. 999: 00–00, 2015. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Cellular Physiology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J. Cell. Physiol. 230: 2019–2031, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25820299

  17. Functional expression of voltage-gated calcium channels in human melanoma.

    PubMed

    Das, A; Pushparaj, C; Bahí, N; Sorolla, A; Herreros, J; Pamplona, R; Vilella, R; Matias-Guiu, X; Martí, R M; Cantí, C

    2012-03-01

    The expression of voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) has not been reported previously in melanoma cells in spite of increasing evidence of a role of VGCCs in tumorigenesis and tumour progression. To address this issue we have performed an extensive RT-PCR analysis of VGCC expression in human melanocytes and a range of melanoma cell lines and biopsies. In addition, we have tested the functional expression of these channels using Ca(2+) imaging techniques and examined their relevance for the viability and proliferation of the melanoma cells. Our results show that control melanocytes and melanoma cells express channel isoforms belonging to the Ca(v) 1 and Ca(v) 2 gene families. Importantly, the expression of low voltage-activated Ca(v) 3 (T-type) channels is restricted to melanoma. We have confirmed the function of T-type channels as mediators of constitutive Ca(2+) influx in melanoma cells. Finally, pharmacological and gene silencing approaches demonstrate a role for T-type channels in melanoma viability and proliferation. These results encourage the analysis of T-type VGCCs as targets for therapeutic intervention in melanoma tumorigenesis and/or tumour progression.

  18. Touch responsiveness in zebrafish requires voltage-gated calcium channel 2.1b.

    PubMed

    Low, Sean E; Woods, Ian G; Lachance, Mathieu; Ryan, Joel; Schier, Alexander F; Saint-Amant, Louis

    2012-07-01

    The molecular and physiological basis of the touch-unresponsive zebrafish mutant fakir has remained elusive. Here we report that the fakir phenotype is caused by a missense mutation in the gene encoding voltage-gated calcium channel 2.1b (CACNA1Ab). Injection of RNA encoding wild-type CaV2.1 restores touch responsiveness in fakir mutants, whereas knockdown of CACNA1Ab via morpholino oligonucleotides recapitulates the fakir mutant phenotype. Fakir mutants display normal current-evoked synaptic communication at the neuromuscular junction but have attenuated touch-evoked activation of motor neurons. NMDA-evoked fictive swimming is not affected by the loss of CaV2.1b, suggesting that this channel is not required for motor pattern generation. These results, coupled with the expression of CACNA1Ab by sensory neurons, suggest that CaV2.1b channel activity is necessary for touch-evoked activation of the locomotor network in zebrafish.

  19. Densin-180 controls the trafficking and signaling of L-type voltage-gated Cav1.2 Ca(2+) channels at excitatory synapses.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shiyi; Stanika, Ruslan I; Wang, Xiaohan; Hagen, Jussara; Kennedy, Mary B; Obermair, Gerald J; Colbran, Roger J; Lee, Amy

    2017-03-31

    Voltage-gated Cav1.2 and Cav1.3 (L-type) Ca(2+) channels regulate neuronal excitability, synaptic plasticity, and learning and memory. Densin-180 (densin) is an excitatory synaptic protein that promotes Ca(2+)-dependent facilitation of voltage-gated Cav1.3 Ca(2+) channels in transfected cells. Mice lacking densin (densin KO) exhibit defects in synaptic plasticity, spatial memory, and increased anxiety-related behaviors --phenotypes that more closely match those in mice lacking Cav1.2 than Cav1.3. Thus, we investigated the functional impact of densin on Cav1.2. We report that densin is an essential regulator of Cav1.2 in neurons, but has distinct modulatory effects compared to its regulation of Cav1.3. Densin binds to the N-terminal domain of Cav1.2 but not Cav1.3, and increases Cav1.2 currents in transfected cells and in neurons. In transfected cells, densin accelerates the forward trafficking of Cav1.2 channels without affecting their endocytosis. Consistent with a role for densin in increasing the number of postsynaptic Cav1.2 channels, overexpression of densin increases the clustering of Cav1.2 in dendrites of hippocampal neurons in culture. Compared to wild-type mice, the cell-surface levels of Cav1.2 in the brain as well as Cav1.2 current density and signaling to the nucleus are reduced in neurons from densin KO mice. We conclude that densin is an essential regulator of neuronal Cav1 channels and ensures efficient Cav1.2 Ca(2+) signaling at excitatory synapses.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENTThe number and localization of voltage-gated Cav Ca(2+) channels are crucial determinants of neuronal excitability and synaptic transmission. We report that a protein that is highly enriched at excitatory synapses in the brain, densin-180, enhances the cell-surface trafficking and postsynaptic localization of Cav1.2 L-type Ca(2+) channels in neurons. This interaction promotes coupling of Cav1.2 channels to activity-dependent gene transcription. Our results reveal a mechanism that

  20. Clinical Features of Neuromuscular Disorders in Patients with N-Type Voltage-Gated Calcium Channel Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Totzeck, Andreas; Mummel, Petra; Kastrup, Oliver; Hagenacker, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Neuromuscular junction disorders affect the pre- or postsynaptic nerve to muscle transmission due to autoimmune antibodies. Members of the group like myasthenia gravis and Lambert-Eaton syndrome have pathophysiologically distinct characteristics. However, in practice, distinction may be difficult. We present a series of three patients with a myasthenic syndrome, dropped-head syndrome, bulbar and respiratory muscle weakness and positive testing for anti-N-type voltage-gated calcium channel antibodies. In two cases anti-acetylcholin receptor antibodies were elevated, anti-P/Q-type voltage-gated calcium channel antibodies were negative. All patients initially responded to pyridostigmine with a non-response in the course of the disease. While one patient recovered well after treatment with intravenous immunoglobulins, 3,4-diaminopyridine, steroids and later on immunosuppression with mycophenolate mofetil, a second died after restriction of treatment due to unfavorable cancer diagnosis, the third patient declined treatment. Although new antibodies causing neuromuscular disorders were discovered, clinical distinction has not yet been made. Our patients showed features of pre- and postsynaptic myasthenic syndrome as well as severe dropped-head syndrome and bulbar and axial muscle weakness, but only anti-N-type voltage-gated calcium channel antibodies were positive. When administered, one patient benefited from 3,4-diaminopyridine. We suggest that this overlap-syndrome should be considered especially in patients with assumed seronegative myasthenia gravis and lack of improvement under standard therapy. PMID:28078065

  1. The L-Type Calcium Channel Blocker Nifedipine Impairs Extinction, but Not Reduced Contingency Effects, in Mice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jami, Shekib; Barad, Mark; Cain, Christopher K.; Godsil, Bill P.

    2005-01-01

    We recently reported that fear extinction, a form of inhibitory learning, is selectively blocked by systemic administration of L-type voltage-gated calcium channel (LVGCC) antagonists, including nifedipine, in mice. We here replicate this finding and examine three reduced contingency effects after vehicle or nifedipine (40 mg/kg) administration.…

  2. Mapping of a human brain voltage-gated calcium channel to human chromosome 12p13-pter

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, W.; Hoang, D.Q.; Montal, M. ); McPherson, J.D.; Wasmuth, J.J. ); Evans, G.A. )

    1992-12-01

    Degenerate DNA oligomers coding for highly conserved regions of the voltage-gated calcium channel were synthesized for the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using DNA from a human brain cDNA library as template. PCR amplified a 640-bp DNA fragment from the human brain cDNA library. Sequencing revealed that this fragment encodes part of a protein highly homologous to a subtype of the dihydropyridine-sensitive calcium channel cloned from rabbit heart and rat brain. Southern analysis of panels of somatic cell hybrids mapped the 640-bp fragment, CACNL1A1, to human chromosome 12p13-pter. 17 refs., 2 figs.

  3. Osteoclast cytosolic calcium, regulated by voltage-gated calcium channels and extracellular calcium, controls podosome assembly and bone resorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyauchi, A.; Hruska, K. A.; Greenfield, E. M.; Duncan, R.; Alvarez, J.; Barattolo, R.; Colucci, S.; Zambonin-Zallone, A.; Teitelbaum, S. L.; Teti, A.

    1990-01-01

    The mechanisms of Ca2+ entry and their effects on cell function were investigated in cultured chicken osteoclasts and putative osteoclasts produced by fusion of mononuclear cell precursors. Voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (VGCC) were detected by the effects of membrane depolarization with K+, BAY K 8644, and dihydropyridine antagonists. K+ produced dose-dependent increases of cytosolic calcium ([Ca2+]i) in osteoclasts on glass coverslips. Half-maximal effects were achieved at 70 mM K+. The effects of K+ were completely inhibited by dihydropyridine derivative Ca2+ channel blocking agents. BAY K 8644 (5 X 10(-6) M), a VGCC agonist, stimulated Ca2+ entry which was inhibited by nicardipine. VGCCs were inactivated by the attachment of osteoclasts to bone, indicating a rapid phenotypic change in Ca2+ entry mechanisms associated with adhesion of osteoclasts to their resorption substrate. Increasing extracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]e) induced Ca2+ release from intracellular stores and Ca2+ influx. The Ca2+ release was blocked by dantrolene (10(-5) M), and the influx by La3+. The effects of [Ca2+]e on [Ca2+]i suggests the presence of a Ca2+ receptor on the osteoclast cell membrane that could be coupled to mechanisms regulating cell function. Expression of the [Ca2+]e effect on [Ca2+]i was similar in the presence or absence of bone matrix substrate. Each of the mechanisms producing increases in [Ca2+]i, (membrane depolarization, BAY K 8644, and [Ca2+]e) reduced expression of the osteoclast-specific adhesion structure, the podosome. The decrease in podosome expression was mirrored by a 50% decrease in bone resorptive activity. Thus, stimulated increases of osteoclast [Ca2+]i lead to cytoskeletal changes affecting cell adhesion and decreasing bone resorptive activity.

  4. Voltage-gated calcium channel currents in human coronary myocytes. Regulation by cyclic GMP and nitric oxide.

    PubMed Central

    Quignard, J F; Frapier, J M; Harricane, M C; Albat, B; Nargeot, J; Richard, S

    1997-01-01

    Voltage-gated Ca2+ channels contribute to the maintenance of contractile tone in vascular myocytes and are potential targets for vasodilating agents. There is no information available about their nature and regulation in human coronary arteries. We used the whole-cell voltage-clamp technique to characterize Ca2+-channel currents immediately after enzymatic dissociation and after primary culture of coronary myocytes taken from heart transplant patients. We recorded a dihydropyridine-sensitive L-type current in both freshly isolated and primary cultured cells. A T-type current was recorded only in culture. The L- (but not the T-) type current was inhibited by permeable analogues of cGMP in a dose-dependent manner. This effect was mimicked by the nitric oxide-generating agents S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP) and 3-morpholinosydnonimine which increased intracellular cGMP. Methylene blue, known to inhibit guanylate cyclase, antagonized the effect of SNAP. Inhibitions by SNAP and cGMP were not additive and seemed to occur through a common pathway. We conclude that (a) L-type Ca2+ channels are the major pathway for voltage-gated Ca2+ entry in human coronary myocytes; (b) their inhibition by agents stimulating nitric oxide and/or intracellular cGMP production is expected to contribute to vasorelaxation and may be involved in the therapeutic effect of nitrovasodilators; and (c) the expression of T-type Ca2+ channels in culture may be triggered by cell proliferation. PMID:9005986

  5. Tolperisone-type drugs inhibit spinal reflexes via blockade of voltage-gated sodium and calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Kocsis, Pál; Farkas, Sándor; Fodor, László; Bielik, Norbert; Thán, Márta; Kolok, Sándor; Gere, Anikó; Csejtei, Mónika; Tarnawa, István

    2005-12-01

    The spinal reflex depressant mechanism of tolperisone and some of its structural analogs with central muscle relaxant action was investigated. Tolperisone (50-400 microM), eperisone, lanperisone, inaperisone, and silperisone (25-200 microM) dose dependently depressed the ventral root potential of isolated hemisected spinal cord of 6-day-old rats. The local anesthetic lidocaine (100-800 microM) produced qualitatively similar depression of spinal functions in the hemicord preparation, whereas its blocking effect on afferent nerve conduction was clearly stronger. In vivo, tolperisone and silperisone as well as lidocaine (10 mg/kg intravenously) depressed ventral root reflexes and excitability of motoneurons. However, in contrast with lidocaine, the muscle relaxant drugs seemed to have a more pronounced action on the synaptic responses than on the excitability of motoneurons. Whole-cell measurements in dorsal root ganglion cells revealed that tolperisone and silperisone depressed voltage-gated sodium channel conductance at concentrations that inhibited spinal reflexes. Results obtained with tolperisone and its analogs in the [3H]batrachotoxinin A 20-alpha-benzoate binding in cortical neurons and in a fluorimetric membrane potential assay in cerebellar neurons further supported the view that blockade of sodium channels may be a major component of the action of tolperisone-type centrally acting muscle relaxant drugs. Furthermore, tolperisone, eperisone, and especially silperisone had a marked effect on voltage-gated calcium channels, whereas calcium currents were hardly influenced by lidocaine. These data suggest that tolperisone-type muscle relaxants exert their spinal reflex inhibitory action predominantly via a presynaptic inhibition of the transmitter release from the primary afferent endings via a combined action on voltage-gated sodium and calcium channels.

  6. Pharmacology of L-type Calcium Channels: Novel Drugs for Old Targets?

    PubMed Central

    Striessnig, Jörg; Ortner, Nadine J.; Pinggera, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    Inhibition of voltage-gated L-type calcium channels by organic calcium channel blockers is a well-established pharmacodynamic concept for the treatment of hypertension and cardiac ischemia. Since decades these antihypertensives (such as the dihydropyridines amlodipine, felodipine or nifedipine) belong to the most widely prescribed drugs 
world-wide. Their tolerability is excellent because at therapeutic doses their pharmacological effects in humans are limited to the cardiovascular system. During the last years substantial progress has been made to reveal the physiological role of different L-type calcium channel isoforms in many other tissues, including the brain, endocrine and sensory cells. 
Moreover, there is accumulating evidence about their involvement in various human diseases, such as Parkinson's disease, neuropsychiatric disorders and hyperaldosteronism. In this review we discuss the pathogenetic role of L-type calcium channels, potential new indications for existing or isoform-selective compounds and strategies to minimize potential side effects. PMID:25966690

  7. Analgesic effect of a broad-spectrum dihydropyridine inhibitor of voltage-gated calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Gadotti, Vinicius M; Bladen, Chris; Zhang, Fang Xiong; Chen, Lina; Gündüz, Miyase Gözde; Şimşek, Rahime; Şafak, Cihat; Zamponi, Gerald W

    2015-12-01

    Voltage-activated calcium channels are important facilitators of nociceptive transmission in the primary afferent pathway. Consequently, molecules that block these channels are of potential use as pain therapeutics. Our group has recently reported on the identification of a novel class of dihydropyridines (DHPs) that included compounds with preferential selectivity for T-type over L-type channels. Among those compounds, M4 was found to be an equipotent inhibitor of both Cav1.2 L- and Cav3.2 T-type calcium channels. Here, we have further characterized the effects of this compound on other types of calcium channels and examined its analgesic effect when delivered either spinally (i.t.) or systemically (i.p.) to mice. Both delivery routes resulted in antinociception in a model of acute pain. Furthermore, M4 was able to reverse mechanical hyperalgesia produced by nerve injury when delivered intrathecally. M4 retained partial activity when delivered to Cav3.2 null mice, indicating that this compound acts on multiple targets. Additional whole-cell patch clamp experiments in transfected tsA-201 cells revealed that M4 also effectively blocks Cav3.3 (T-type) and Cav2.2 (N-type) currents. Altogether, our data indicate that broad-spectrum inhibition of multiple calcium channel subtypes can lead to potent analgesia in rodents.

  8. Regulation of N-type voltage-gated calcium channels and presynaptic function by cyclin-dependent kinase 5

    PubMed Central

    Su, Susan C.; Seo, Jinsoo; Pan, Jen Q.; Samuels, Benjamin Adam; Rudenko, Andrii; Ericsson, Maria; Neve, Rachael L.; Yue, David T.; Tsai, Li-Huei

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY N-type voltage-gated calcium channels (CaV2.2) localize to presynaptic nerve terminals and mediate key events including synaptogenesis and neurotransmission. While several kinases have been implicated in the modulation of calcium channels, their impact on presynaptic functions remains unclear. Here we report that the N-type calcium channel is a substrate for cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5). The pore-forming α1 subunit of the N-type calcium channel is phosphorylated in the C-terminal domain, and phosphorylation results in enhanced calcium influx due to increased channel open probability. Phosphorylation of the N-type calcium channel by Cdk5 facilitates neurotransmitter release and alters presynaptic plasticity by increasing the number of docked vesicles at the synaptic cleft. These effects are mediated by an altered interaction between N-type calcium channels and RIM1, which tethers presynaptic calcium channels to the active zone. Collectively, our results highlight a molecular mechanism by which N-type calcium channels are regulated by Cdk5 to affect presynaptic functions. PMID:22920258

  9. Effects of electromagnetic field exposure on conduction and concentration of voltage gated calcium channels: A Brownian dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Tekieh, Tahereh; Sasanpour, Pezhman; Rafii-Tabar, Hashem

    2016-09-01

    A three-dimensional Brownian Dynamics (BD) in combination with electrostatic calculations is employed to specifically study the effects of radiation of high frequency electromagnetic fields on the conduction and concentration profile of calcium ions inside the voltage-gated calcium channels. The electrostatic calculations are performed using COMSOL Multiphysics by considering dielectric interfaces effectively. The simulations are performed for different frequencies and intensities. The simulation results show the variations of conductance, average number of ions and the concentration profiles of ions inside the channels in response to high frequency radiation. The ionic current inside the channel increases in response to high frequency electromagnetic field radiation, and the concentration profiles show that the residency of ions in the channel decreases accordingly.

  10. Towards a unified theory of calmodulin regulation (calmodulation) of voltage-gated calcium and sodium channels

    PubMed Central

    Yue, David T.

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated Na and Ca2+ channels represent two major ion channel families that enable myriad biological functions including the generation of action potentials and the coupling of electrical and chemical signaling in cells. Calmodulin regulation (calmodulation) of these ion channels comprises a vital feedback mechanism with distinct physiological implications. Though long-sought, a shared understanding of the channel families remained elusive for two decades as the functional manifestations and the structural underpinnings of this modulation often appeared to diverge. Here, we review recent advancements in the understanding of calmodulation of Ca2+ and Na channels that suggest a remarkable similarity in their regulatory scheme. This interrelation between the two channel families now paves the way towards a unified mechanistic framework to understand vital calmodulin-dependent feedback and offers shared principles to approach related channelopathic diseases. An exciting era of synergistic study now looms. PMID:25966688

  11. Towards a Unified Theory of Calmodulin Regulation (Calmodulation) of Voltage-Gated Calcium and Sodium Channels.

    PubMed

    Ben-Johny, Manu; Dick, Ivy E; Sang, Lingjie; Limpitikul, Worawan B; Kang, Po Wei; Niu, Jacqueline; Banerjee, Rahul; Yang, Wanjun; Babich, Jennifer S; Issa, John B; Lee, Shin Rong; Namkung, Ho; Li, Jiangyu; Zhang, Manning; Yang, Philemon S; Bazzazi, Hojjat; Adams, Paul J; Joshi-Mukherjee, Rosy; Yue, Daniel N; Yue, David T

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated Na and Ca(2+) channels represent two major ion channel families that enable myriad biological functions including the generation of action potentials and the coupling of electrical and chemical signaling in cells. Calmodulin regulation (calmodulation) of these ion channels comprises a vital feedback mechanism with distinct physiological implications. Though long-sought, a shared understanding of the channel families remained elusive for two decades as the functional manifestations and the structural underpinnings of this modulation often appeared to diverge. Here, we review recent advancements in the understanding of calmodulation of Ca(2+) and Na channels that suggest a remarkable similarity in their regulatory scheme. This interrelation between the two channel families now paves the way towards a unified mechanistic framework to understand vital calmodulin-dependent feedback and offers shared principles to approach related channelopathic diseases. An exciting era of synergistic study now looms.

  12. Current view on regulation of voltage-gated sodium channels by calcium and auxiliary proteins.

    PubMed

    Pitt, Geoffrey S; Lee, Seok-Yong

    2016-09-01

    In cardiac and skeletal myocytes, and in most neurons, the opening of voltage-gated Na(+) channels (NaV channels) triggers action potentials, a process that is regulated via the interactions of the channels' intercellular C-termini with auxiliary proteins and/or Ca(2+) . The molecular and structural details for how Ca(2+) and/or auxiliary proteins modulate NaV channel function, however, have eluded a concise mechanistic explanation and details have been shrouded for the last decade behind controversy about whether Ca(2+) acts directly upon the NaV channel or through interacting proteins, such as the Ca(2+) binding protein calmodulin (CaM). Here, we review recent advances in defining the structure of NaV intracellular C-termini and associated proteins such as CaM or fibroblast growth factor homologous factors (FHFs) to reveal new insights into how Ca(2+) affects NaV function, and how altered Ca(2+) -dependent or FHF-mediated regulation of NaV channels is perturbed in various disease states through mutations that disrupt CaM or FHF interaction.

  13. The role of voltage-gated calcium channels in neurotransmitter phenotype specification: Coexpression and functional analysis in Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Brittany B; Miller, Lauren E; Herbst, Wendy A; Saha, Margaret S

    2014-08-01

    Calcium activity has been implicated in many neurodevelopmental events, including the specification of neurotransmitter phenotypes. Higher levels of calcium activity lead to an increased number of inhibitory neural phenotypes, whereas lower levels of calcium activity lead to excitatory neural phenotypes. Voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) allow for rapid calcium entry and are expressed during early neural stages, making them likely regulators of activity-dependent neurotransmitter phenotype specification. To test this hypothesis, multiplex fluorescent in situ hybridization was used to characterize the coexpression of eight VGCC α1 subunits with the excitatory and inhibitory neural markers xVGlut1 and xVIAAT in Xenopus laevis embryos. VGCC coexpression was higher with xVGlut1 than xVIAAT, especially in the hindbrain, spinal cord, and cranial nerves. Calcium activity was also analyzed on a single-cell level, and spike frequency was correlated with the expression of VGCC α1 subunits in cell culture. Cells expressing Cav 2.1 and Cav 2.2 displayed increased calcium spiking compared with cells not expressing this marker. The VGCC antagonist diltiazem and agonist (-)BayK 8644 were used to manipulate calcium activity. Diltiazem exposure increased the number of glutamatergic cells and decreased the number of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic cells, whereas (-)BayK 8644 exposure decreased the number of glutamatergic cells without having an effect on the number of GABAergic cells. Given that the expression and functional manipulation of VGCCs are correlated with neurotransmitter phenotype in some, but not all, experiments, VGCCs likely act in combination with a variety of other signaling factors to determine neuronal phenotype specification.

  14. The active-zone protein Munc13 controls the use-dependence of presynaptic voltage-gated calcium channels

    PubMed Central

    Calloway, Nathaniel; Gouzer, Géraldine; Xue, Mingyu; Ryan, Timothy A

    2015-01-01

    Presynaptic calcium channel function is critical for converting electrical information into chemical communication but the molecules in the active zone that sculpt this function are poorly understood. We show that Munc13, an active-zone protein essential for exocytosis, also controls presynaptic voltage-gated calcium channel (VGCC) function dictating their behavior during various forms of activity. We demonstrate that in vitro Munc13 interacts with voltage-VGCCs via a pair of basic residues in Munc13's C2B domain. We show that elimination of this interaction by either removal of Munc13 or replacement of Munc13 with a Munc13 C2B mutant alters synaptic VGCC's response to and recovery from high-frequency action potential bursts and alters calcium influx from single action potential stimuli. These studies illustrate a novel form of synaptic modulation and show that Munc13 is poised to profoundly impact information transfer at nerve terminals by controlling both vesicle priming and the trigger for exocytosis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07728.001 PMID:26196145

  15. Genetic disruption of voltage-gated calcium channels in psychiatric and neurological disorders

    PubMed Central

    Heyes, Samuel; Pratt, Wendy S.; Rees, Elliott; Dahimene, Shehrazade; Ferron, Laurent; Owen, Michael J.; Dolphin, Annette C.

    2015-01-01

    This review summarises genetic studies in which calcium channel genes have been connected to the spectrum of neuropsychiatric syndromes, from bipolar disorder and schizophrenia to autism spectrum disorders and intellectual impairment. Among many other genes, striking numbers of the calcium channel gene superfamily have been implicated in the aetiology of these diseases by various DNA analysis techniques. We will discuss how these relate to the known monogenic disorders associated with point mutations in calcium channels. We will then examine the functional evidence for a causative link between these mutations or single nucleotide polymorphisms and the disease processes. A major challenge for the future will be to translate the expanding psychiatric genetic findings into altered physiological function, involvement in the wider pathology of the diseases, and what potential that provides for personalised and stratified treatment options for patients. PMID:26386135

  16. Targeting voltage-gated calcium channels: developments in peptide and small-molecule inhibitors for the treatment of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Vink, S; Alewood, P F

    2012-11-01

    Chronic pain affects approximately 20% of people worldwide and places a large economic and social burden on society. Despite the availability of a range of analgesics, this condition is inadequately treated, with complete alleviation of symptoms rarely occurring. In the past 30 years, the voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) have been recognized as potential targets for analgesic development. Although the majority of the research has been focused on Ca(v) 2.2 in particular, other VGCC subtypes such as Ca(v) 3.2 have recently come to the forefront of analgesic research. Venom peptides from marine cone snails have been proven to be a valuable tool in neuroscience, playing a major role in the identification and characterization of VGCC subtypes and producing the first conotoxin-based drug on the market, the ω-conotoxin, ziconotide. This peptide potently and selectively inhibits Ca(v) 2.2, resulting in analgesia in chronic pain states. However, this drug is only available via intrathecal administration, and adverse effects and a narrow therapeutic window have limited its use in the clinic. Other Ca(v) 2.2 inhibitors are currently in development and offer the promise of an improved route of administration and safety profile. This review assesses the potential of targeting VGCCs for analgesic development, with a main focus on conotoxins that block Ca(v) 2.2 and the developments made to transform them into therapeutics.

  17. Steroid hormone regulation of the voltage-gated, calcium-activated potassium channel expression in developing muscular and neural systems.

    PubMed

    Garrison, Sheldon L; Witten, Jane L

    2010-11-01

    A precise organization of gene expression is required for developing neural and muscular systems. Steroid hormones can control the expression of genes that are critical for development. In this study we test the hypothesis that the steroid hormone ecdysone regulates gene expression of the voltage-gated calcium-activated potassium ion channel, Slowpoke or KCNMA1. Late in adult development of the tobacco hawkmoth Manduca sexta, slowpoke (msslo) levels increased contributing to the maturation of the dorsal longitudinal flight muscles (DLMs) and CNS. We show that critical components of ecdysteroid gene regulation were present during upreglation of msslo in late adult DLM and CNS development. Ecdysteroid receptor complex heterodimeric partner proteins, the ecdysteroid receptor (EcR) and ultraspiracle (USP), and the ecdysone-induced early gene, msE75B, were expressed at key developmental time points, suggesting that ecdysteroids direct aspects of gene expression in the DLMs during these late developmental stages. We provide evidence that ecdysteroids suppress msslo transcription in the DLMs; when titers decline msslo transcript levels increase. These results are consistent with msslo being a downstream gene in an ecdysteroid-mediated gene cascade during DLM development. We also show that the ecdysteroids regulate msslo transcript levels in the developing CNS. These results will contribute to our understanding of how the spatiotemporal regulation of slowpoke transcription contributes to tailoring cell excitability to the differing physiological and behavioral demands during development.

  18. Targeting voltage-gated calcium channels: developments in peptide and small-molecule inhibitors for the treatment of neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Vink, S; Alewood, PF

    2012-01-01

    Chronic pain affects approximately 20% of people worldwide and places a large economic and social burden on society. Despite the availability of a range of analgesics, this condition is inadequately treated, with complete alleviation of symptoms rarely occurring. In the past 30 years, the voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) have been recognized as potential targets for analgesic development. Although the majority of the research has been focused on Cav2.2 in particular, other VGCC subtypes such as Cav3.2 have recently come to the forefront of analgesic research. Venom peptides from marine cone snails have been proven to be a valuable tool in neuroscience, playing a major role in the identification and characterization of VGCC subtypes and producing the first conotoxin-based drug on the market, the ω-conotoxin, ziconotide. This peptide potently and selectively inhibits Cav2.2, resulting in analgesia in chronic pain states. However, this drug is only available via intrathecal administration, and adverse effects and a narrow therapeutic window have limited its use in the clinic. Other Cav2.2 inhibitors are currently in development and offer the promise of an improved route of administration and safety profile. This review assesses the potential of targeting VGCCs for analgesic development, with a main focus on conotoxins that block Cav2.2 and the developments made to transform them into therapeutics. PMID:22725651

  19. The Evolution of the Four Subunits of Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels: Ancient Roots, Increasing Complexity, and Multiple Losses

    PubMed Central

    Moran, Yehu; Zakon, Harold H.

    2014-01-01

    The alpha subunits of voltage-gated calcium channels (Cavs) are large transmembrane proteins responsible for crucial physiological processes in excitable cells. They are assisted by three auxiliary subunits that can modulate their electrical behavior. Little is known about the evolution and roles of the various subunits of Cavs in nonbilaterian animals and in nonanimal lineages. For this reason, we mapped the phyletic distribution of the four channel subunits and reconstructed their phylogeny. Although alpha subunits have deep evolutionary roots as ancient as the split between plants and opistokonths, beta subunits appeared in the last common ancestor of animals and their close-relatives choanoflagellates, gamma subunits are a bilaterian novelty and alpha2/delta subunits appeared in the lineage of Placozoa, Cnidaria, and Bilateria. We note that gene losses were extremely common in the evolution of Cavs, with noticeable losses in multiple clades of subfamilies and also of whole Cav families. As in vertebrates, but not protostomes, Cav channel genes duplicated in Cnidaria. We characterized by in situ hybridization the tissue distribution of alpha subunits in the sea anemone Nematostella vectensis, a nonbilaterian animal possessing all three Cav subfamilies common to Bilateria. We find that some of the alpha subunit subtypes exhibit distinct spatiotemporal expression patterns. Further, all six sea anemone alpha subunit subtypes are conserved in stony corals, which separated from anemones 500 MA. This unexpected conservation together with the expression patterns strongly supports the notion that these subtypes carry unique functional roles. PMID:25146647

  20. Seeing the forest through the trees: towards a unified view on physiological calcium regulation of voltage-gated sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Van Petegem, Filip; Lobo, Paolo A; Ahern, Christopher A

    2012-12-05

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (Na(V)s) underlie the upstroke of the action potential in the excitable tissues of nerve and muscle. After opening, Na(V)s rapidly undergo inactivation, a crucial process through which sodium conductance is negatively regulated. Disruption of inactivation by inherited mutations is an established cause of lethal cardiac arrhythmia, epilepsy, or painful syndromes. Intracellular calcium ions (Ca(2+)) modulate sodium channel inactivation, and multiple players have been suggested in this process, including the cytoplasmic Na(V) C-terminal region including two EF-hands and an IQ motif, the Na(V) domain III-IV linker, and calmodulin. Calmodulin can bind to the IQ domain in both Ca(2+)-bound and Ca(2+)-free conditions, but only to the DIII-IV linker in a Ca(2+)-loaded state. The mechanism of Ca(2+) regulation, and its composite effect(s) on channel gating, has been shrouded in much controversy owing to numerous apparent experimental inconsistencies. Herein, we attempt to summarize these disparate data and propose a novel, to our knowledge, physiological mechanism whereby calcium ions promote sodium current facilitation due to Ca(2+) memory at high-action-potential frequencies where Ca(2+) levels may accumulate. The available data suggest that this phenomenon may be disrupted in diseases where cytoplasmic calcium ion levels are chronically high and where targeted phosphorylation may decouple the Ca(2+) regulatory machinery. Many Na(V) disease mutations associated with electrical dysfunction are located in the Ca(2+)-sensing machinery and misregulation of Ca(2+)-dependent channel modulation is likely to contribute to disease phenotypes.

  1. Inhibition of Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels as Common Mode of Action for (Mixtures of) Distinct Classes of Insecticides

    PubMed Central

    Meijer, Marieke; Dingemans, Milou M.L.; van den Berg, Martin; Westerink, Remco H.S.

    2014-01-01

    Humans are exposed to distinct structural classes of insecticides with different neurotoxic modes of action. Because calcium homeostasis is essential for proper neuronal function and development, we investigated the effects of insecticides from different classes (pyrethroid: (α-)cypermethrin; organophosphate: chlorpyrifos; organochlorine: endosulfan; neonicotinoid: imidacloprid) and mixtures thereof on the intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i). Effects of acute (20 min) exposure to (mixtures of) insecticides on basal and depolarization-evoked [Ca2+]i were studied in vitro with Fura-2-loaded PC12 cells and high resolution single-cell fluorescence microscopy. The data demonstrate that cypermethrin, α-cypermethrin, endosulfan, and chlorpyrifos concentration-dependently decreased depolarization-evoked [Ca2+]i, with 50% (IC50) at 78nM, 239nM, 250nM, and 899nM, respectively. Additionally, acute exposure to chlorpyrifos or endosulfan (10μM) induced a modest increase in basal [Ca2+]i, amounting to 68 ± 8nM and 53 ± 8nM, respectively. Imidacloprid did not disturb basal or depolarization-evoked [Ca2+]i at 10μM. Following exposure to binary mixtures, effects on depolarization-evoked [Ca2+]i were within the expected effect additivity range, whereas the effect of the tertiary mixture was less than this expected additivity effect range. These results demonstrate that different types of insecticides inhibit depolarization-evoked [Ca2+]i in PC12 cells by inhibiting voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) in vitro at concentrations comparable with human occupational exposure levels. Moreover, the effective concentrations in this study are below those for earlier described modes of action. Because inhibition of VGCCs appears to be a common and potentially additive mode of action of several classes of insecticides, this target should be considered in neurotoxicity risk assessment studies. PMID:24913802

  2. Inhibition of voltage-gated calcium channels as common mode of action for (mixtures of) distinct classes of insecticides.

    PubMed

    Meijer, Marieke; Dingemans, Milou M L; van den Berg, Martin; Westerink, Remco H S

    2014-09-01

    Humans are exposed to distinct structural classes of insecticides with different neurotoxic modes of action. Because calcium homeostasis is essential for proper neuronal function and development, we investigated the effects of insecticides from different classes (pyrethroid: (α-)cypermethrin; organophosphate: chlorpyrifos; organochlorine: endosulfan; neonicotinoid: imidacloprid) and mixtures thereof on the intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i). Effects of acute (20 min) exposure to (mixtures of) insecticides on basal and depolarization-evoked [Ca(2+)]i were studied in vitro with Fura-2-loaded PC12 cells and high resolution single-cell fluorescence microscopy. The data demonstrate that cypermethrin, α-cypermethrin, endosulfan, and chlorpyrifos concentration-dependently decreased depolarization-evoked [Ca(2+)]i, with 50% (IC50) at 78nM, 239nM, 250nM, and 899nM, respectively. Additionally, acute exposure to chlorpyrifos or endosulfan (10μM) induced a modest increase in basal [Ca(2+)]i, amounting to 68 ± 8nM and 53 ± 8nM, respectively. Imidacloprid did not disturb basal or depolarization-evoked [Ca(2+)]i at 10μM. Following exposure to binary mixtures, effects on depolarization-evoked [Ca(2+)]i were within the expected effect additivity range, whereas the effect of the tertiary mixture was less than this expected additivity effect range. These results demonstrate that different types of insecticides inhibit depolarization-evoked [Ca(2+)]i in PC12 cells by inhibiting voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) in vitro at concentrations comparable with human occupational exposure levels. Moreover, the effective concentrations in this study are below those for earlier described modes of action. Because inhibition of VGCCs appears to be a common and potentially additive mode of action of several classes of insecticides, this target should be considered in neurotoxicity risk assessment studies.

  3. Upregulation of Voltage-Gated Calcium Channel Cav1.3 in Bovine Somatotropes Treated with Ghrelin

    PubMed Central

    Salinas Zarate, V. M.; Magdaleno Méndez, A.; Domínguez Mancera, B.; Rodríguez Andrade, A.; Barrientos Morales, M.; Cervantes Acosta, P.; Hernández Beltrán, A.; Romero Salas, D.; Flores Hernández, J. L. V.; Monjaraz Guzmán, E.; Félix Grijalva, D. R.

    2013-01-01

    1.2 and Cav1.3 pore-forming subunits of L-type channels. The treatment with Ghrelin significantly increased the Cav1.3 subunit expression, suggeting that the chronic stimulation of the GHS receptor with Ghrelin or GHRP-6 increases the number of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels at the cell surface of BS. PMID:24455243

  4. Inhibition of voltage-gated calcium currents in type II vestibular hair cells by cinnarizine.

    PubMed

    Arab, Sonja F; Düwel, Philip; Jüngling, Eberhard; Westhofen, Martin; Lückhoff, Andreas

    2004-06-01

    Cinnarizine is pharmaceutically used in conditions with vestibular vertigo such as Meniere's disease. It is thought to act on extra-vestibular targets. We hypothesized that cinnarizine, as a blocker of L-type Ca2+ channels, may directly target vestibular hair cells where Ca2+ currents are important for the mechano-electrical transduction and transmitter release. Our aim was to clarify whether cinnarizine affected voltage-dependent Ca2+ currents in vestibular type II hair cells. Such cells were isolated from inner ears of guinea pigs by enzymatic and mechanical dissection from the gelatinous otolithic membrane and studied with the patch-clamp technique in conventional whole-cell mode. Ca2+ currents were elicited by depolarizing pulses in a solution containing 1.8 mM Ca2+ and 40 mM Ba2+. These currents resembled L-type currents (I(Ca,L)) with respect to their voltage-dependence and their inhibition by nifedipine and Cd2+ but did not show time-dependent inactivation. The currents were inhibited by cinnarizine in a concentration-dependent and reversible manner. The IC50 was 1.5 microM. A block exceeding 80% was achieved with 10 microM. The onset of current block was faster with higher concentrations but the reversibility after wash-out was less, suggesting accumulation in the membrane. We conclude that these direct actions of cinnarizine on hair cells should be considered as molecular mechanisms contributing to therapeutic effects of cinnarizine in vertigo.

  5. PIP2 in pancreatic β-cells regulates voltage-gated calcium channels by a voltage-independent pathway.

    PubMed

    de la Cruz, Lizbeth; Puente, Erika I; Reyes-Vaca, Arturo; Arenas, Isabel; Garduño, Julieta; Bravo-Martínez, Jorge; Garcia, David E

    2016-10-01

    Phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) is a membrane phosphoinositide that regulates the activity of many ion channels. Influx of calcium primarily through voltage-gated calcium (CaV) channels promotes insulin secretion in pancreatic β-cells. However, whether CaV channels are regulated by PIP2, as is the case for some non-insulin-secreting cells, is unknown. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether CaV channels are regulated by PIP2 depletion in pancreatic β-cells through activation of a muscarinic pathway induced by oxotremorine methiodide (Oxo-M). CaV channel currents were recorded by the patch-clamp technique. The CaV current amplitude was reduced by activation of the muscarinic receptor 1 (M1R) in the absence of kinetic changes. The Oxo-M-induced inhibition exhibited the hallmarks of voltage-independent regulation and did not involve PKC activation. A small fraction of the Oxo-M-induced CaV inhibition was diminished by a high concentration of Ca(2+) chelator, whereas ≥50% of this inhibition was prevented by diC8-PIP2 dialysis. Localization of PIP2 in the plasma membrane was examined by transfecting INS-1 cells with PH-PLCδ1, which revealed a close temporal association between PIP2 hydrolysis and CaV channel inhibition. Furthermore, the depletion of PIP2 by a voltage-sensitive phosphatase reduced CaV currents in a way similar to that observed following M1R activation. These results indicate that activation of the M1R pathway inhibits the CaV channel via PIP2 depletion by a Ca(2+)-dependent mechanism in pancreatic β- and INS-1 cells and thereby support the hypothesis that membrane phospholipids regulate ion channel activity by interacting with ion channels.

  6. Butanol Isomers Exert Distinct Effects on Voltage-Gated Calcium Channel Currents and Thus Catecholamine Secretion in Adrenal Chromaffin Cells

    PubMed Central

    Brindley, Rebecca L.; Jewell, Mark L.; Currie, Kevin P. M.

    2014-01-01

    Butanol (C4H10OH) has been used both to dissect the molecular targets of alcohols/general anesthetics and to implicate phospholipase D (PLD) signaling in a variety of cellular functions including neurotransmitter and hormone exocytosis. Like other primary alcohols, 1-butanol is a substrate for PLD and thereby disrupts formation of the intracellular signaling lipid phosphatidic acid. Because secondary and tertiary butanols do not undergo this transphosphatidylation, they have been used as controls for 1-butanol to implicate PLD signaling. Recently, selective pharmacological inhibitors of PLD have been developed and, in some cases, fail to block cellular functions previously ascribed to PLD using primary alcohols. For example, exocytosis of insulin and degranulation of mast cells are blocked by primary alcohols, but not by the PLD inhibitor FIPI. In this study we show that 1-butanol reduces catecholamine secretion from adrenal chromaffin cells to a much greater extent than tert-butanol, and that the PLD inhibitor VU0155056 has no effect. Using fluorescent imaging we show the effect of these drugs on depolarization-evoked calcium entry parallel those on secretion. Patch-clamp electrophysiology confirmed the peak amplitude of voltage-gated calcium channel currents (ICa) is inhibited by 1-butanol, with little or no block by secondary or tert-butanol. Detailed comparison shows for the first time that the different butanol isomers exert distinct, and sometimes opposing, effects on the voltage-dependence and gating kinetics of ICa. We discuss these data with regard to PLD signaling in cellular physiology and the molecular targets of general anesthetics. PMID:25275439

  7. Physiology and Evolution of Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels in Early Diverging Animal Phyla: Cnidaria, Placozoa, Porifera and Ctenophora

    PubMed Central

    Senatore, Adriano; Raiss, Hamad; Le, Phuong

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated calcium (Cav) channels serve dual roles in the cell, where they can both depolarize the membrane potential for electrical excitability, and activate transient cytoplasmic Ca2+ signals. In animals, Cav channels play crucial roles including driving muscle contraction (excitation-contraction coupling), gene expression (excitation-transcription coupling), pre-synaptic and neuroendocrine exocytosis (excitation-secretion coupling), regulation of flagellar/ciliary beating, and regulation of cellular excitability, either directly or through modulation of other Ca2+-sensitive ion channels. In recent years, genome sequencing has provided significant insights into the molecular evolution of Cav channels. Furthermore, expanded gene datasets have permitted improved inference of the species phylogeny at the base of Metazoa, providing clearer insights into the evolution of complex animal traits which involve Cav channels, including the nervous system. For the various types of metazoan Cav channels, key properties that determine their cellular contribution include: Ion selectivity, pore gating, and, importantly, cytoplasmic protein-protein interactions that direct sub-cellular localization and functional complexing. It is unclear when these defining features, many of which are essential for nervous system function, evolved. In this review, we highlight some experimental observations that implicate Cav channels in the physiology and behavior of the most early-diverging animals from the phyla Cnidaria, Placozoa, Porifera, and Ctenophora. Given our limited understanding of the molecular biology of Cav channels in these basal animal lineages, we infer insights from better-studied vertebrate and invertebrate animals. We also highlight some apparently conserved cellular functions of Cav channels, which might have emerged very early on during metazoan evolution, or perhaps predated it. PMID:27867359

  8. Physiology and Evolution of Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels in Early Diverging Animal Phyla: Cnidaria, Placozoa, Porifera and Ctenophora.

    PubMed

    Senatore, Adriano; Raiss, Hamad; Le, Phuong

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated calcium (Cav) channels serve dual roles in the cell, where they can both depolarize the membrane potential for electrical excitability, and activate transient cytoplasmic Ca(2+) signals. In animals, Cav channels play crucial roles including driving muscle contraction (excitation-contraction coupling), gene expression (excitation-transcription coupling), pre-synaptic and neuroendocrine exocytosis (excitation-secretion coupling), regulation of flagellar/ciliary beating, and regulation of cellular excitability, either directly or through modulation of other Ca(2+)-sensitive ion channels. In recent years, genome sequencing has provided significant insights into the molecular evolution of Cav channels. Furthermore, expanded gene datasets have permitted improved inference of the species phylogeny at the base of Metazoa, providing clearer insights into the evolution of complex animal traits which involve Cav channels, including the nervous system. For the various types of metazoan Cav channels, key properties that determine their cellular contribution include: Ion selectivity, pore gating, and, importantly, cytoplasmic protein-protein interactions that direct sub-cellular localization and functional complexing. It is unclear when these defining features, many of which are essential for nervous system function, evolved. In this review, we highlight some experimental observations that implicate Cav channels in the physiology and behavior of the most early-diverging animals from the phyla Cnidaria, Placozoa, Porifera, and Ctenophora. Given our limited understanding of the molecular biology of Cav channels in these basal animal lineages, we infer insights from better-studied vertebrate and invertebrate animals. We also highlight some apparently conserved cellular functions of Cav channels, which might have emerged very early on during metazoan evolution, or perhaps predated it.

  9. Intracellular calcium oscillations in strongly metastatic human breast and prostate cancer cells: control by voltage-gated sodium channel activity.

    PubMed

    Rizaner, Nahit; Onkal, Rustem; Fraser, Scott P; Pristerá, Alessandro; Okuse, Kenji; Djamgoz, Mustafa B A

    2016-10-01

    The possible association of intracellular Ca(2+) with metastasis in human cancer cells is poorly understood. We have studied Ca(2+) signaling in human prostate and breast cancer cell lines of strongly versus weakly metastatic potential in a comparative approach. Intracellular free Ca(2+) was measured using a membrane-permeant fluorescent Ca(2+)-indicator dye (Fluo-4 AM) and confocal microscopy. Spontaneous Ca(2+) oscillations were observed in a proportion of strongly metastatic human prostate and breast cancer cells (PC-3M and MDA-MB-231, respectively). In contrast, no such oscillations were observed in weakly/non metastatic LNCaP and MCF-7 cells, although a rise in the resting Ca(2+) level could be induced by applying a high-K(+) solution. Various parameters of the oscillations depended on extracellular Ca(2+) and voltage-gated Na(+) channel activity. Treatment with either tetrodotoxin (a general blocker of voltage-gated Na(+) channels) or ranolazine (a blocker of the persistent component of the channel current) suppressed the Ca(2+) oscillations. It is concluded that the functional voltage-gated Na(+) channel expression in strongly metastatic cancer cells makes a significant contribution to generation of oscillatory intracellular Ca(2+) activity. Possible mechanisms and consequences of the Ca(2+) oscillations are discussed.

  10. Actions of a hydrogen sulfide donor (NaHS) on transient sodium, persistent sodium, and voltage-gated calcium currents in neurons of the subfornical organ.

    PubMed

    Kuksis, Markus; Ferguson, Alastair V

    2015-09-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an endogenously found gasotransmitter that has been implicated in a variety of beneficial physiological functions. This study was performed to investigate the cellular mechanisms underlying actions of H2S previously observed in subfornical organ (SFO), where H2S acts to regulate blood pressure through a depolarization of the membrane and an overall increase in the excitability of SFO neurons. We used whole cell patch-clamp electrophysiology in the voltage-clamp configuration to analyze the effect of 1 mM NaHS, an H2S donor, on voltage-gated potassium, sodium, and calcium currents. We observed no effect of NaHS on potassium currents; however, both voltage-gated sodium currents (persistent and transient) and the N-type calcium current had a depolarized activation curve and an enhanced peak-induced current in response to a series of voltage-step and ramp protocols run in the control and NaHS conditions. These effects were not responsible for the previously observed depolarization of the membrane potential, as depolarizing effects of H2S were still observed following block of these conductances with tetrodotoxin (5 μM) and ω-conotoxin-GVIA (100 nM). Our studies are the first to investigate the effect of H2S on a variety of voltage-gated conductances in a single brain area, and although they do not explain mechanisms underlying the depolarizing actions of H2S on SFO neurons, they provide evidence of potential mechanisms through which this gasotransmitter influences the excitability of neurons in this important brain area as a consequence of the modulation of multiple ion channels.

  11. Responsiveness of voltage-gated calcium channels in SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells on quasi-three-dimensional micropatterns formed with poly (l-lactic acid)

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ze-Zhi; Wang, Zheng-Wei; Zhang, Li-Guang; An, Zhi-Xing; Zhong, Dong-Huo; Huang, Qi-Ping; Luo, Mei-Rong; Liao, Yan-Jian; Jin, Liang; Li, Chen-Zhong; Kisaalita, William S

    2013-01-01

    Introduction In this study, quasi-three-dimensional (3D) microwell patterns were fabricated with poly (l-lactic acid) for the development of cell-based assays, targeting voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs). Methods and materials SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells were interfaced with the microwell patterns and found to grow as two dimensional (2D), 3D, and near two dimensional (N2D), categorized on the basis of the cells’ location in the pattern. The capability of the microwell patterns to support 3D cell growth was evaluated in terms of the percentage of the cells in each growth category. Cell spreading was analyzed in terms of projection areas under light microscopy. SH-SY5Y cells’ VGCC responsiveness was evaluated with confocal microscopy and a calcium fluorescent indicator, Calcium Green™-1. The expression of L-type calcium channels was evaluated using immunofluorescence staining with DM-BODIPY. Results It was found that cells within the microwells, either N2D or 3D, showed more rounded shapes and less projection areas than 2D cells on flat poly (l-lactic acid) substrates. Also, cells in microwells showed a significantly lower VGCC responsiveness than cells on flat substrates, in terms of both response magnitudes and percentages of responsive cells, upon depolarization with 50 mM K+. This lower VGCC responsiveness could not be explained by the difference in L-type calcium channel expression. For the two patterns addressed in this study, N2D cells consistently exhibited an intermediate value of either projection areas or VGCC responsiveness between those for 2D and 3D cells, suggesting a correlative relation between cell morphology and VGCC responsiveness. Conclusion These results suggest that the pattern structure and therefore the cell growth characteristics were critical factors in determining cell VGCC responsiveness and thus provide an approach for engineering cell functionality in cell-based assay systems and tissue engineering scaffolds. PMID

  12. Stapled Voltage-Gated Calcium Channel (CaV) α-Interaction Domain (AID) Peptides Act As Selective Protein-Protein Interaction Inhibitors of CaV Function.

    PubMed

    Findeisen, Felix; Campiglio, Marta; Jo, Hyunil; Abderemane-Ali, Fayal; Rumpf, Christine H; Pope, Lianne; Rossen, Nathan D; Flucher, Bernhard E; DeGrado, William F; Minor, Daniel L

    2017-03-17

    For many voltage-gated ion channels (VGICs), creation of a properly functioning ion channel requires the formation of specific protein-protein interactions between the transmembrane pore-forming subunits and cystoplasmic accessory subunits. Despite the importance of such protein-protein interactions in VGIC function and assembly, their potential as sites for VGIC modulator development has been largely overlooked. Here, we develop meta-xylyl (m-xylyl) stapled peptides that target a prototypic VGIC high affinity protein-protein interaction, the interaction between the voltage-gated calcium channel (CaV) pore-forming subunit α-interaction domain (AID) and cytoplasmic β-subunit (CaVβ). We show using circular dichroism spectroscopy, X-ray crystallography, and isothermal titration calorimetry that the m-xylyl staples enhance AID helix formation are structurally compatible with native-like AID:CaVβ interactions and reduce the entropic penalty associated with AID binding to CaVβ. Importantly, electrophysiological studies reveal that stapled AID peptides act as effective inhibitors of the CaVα1:CaVβ interaction that modulate CaV function in an CaVβ isoform-selective manner. Together, our studies provide a proof-of-concept demonstration of the use of protein-protein interaction inhibitors to control VGIC function and point to strategies for improved AID-based CaV modulator design.

  13. siRNA screen for genes that affect Junín virus entry uncovers voltage-gated calcium channels as a therapeutic target

    PubMed Central

    Lavanya, Madakasira; Cuevas, Christian D.; Thomas, Monica; Cherry, Sara; Ross, Susan R.

    2014-01-01

    New world hemorrhagic fever arenaviruses infection of humans results in 15–30% mortality. We performed a high throughput siRNA screen with Junín virus glycoprotein-pseudotyped viruses to find potential host therapeutic targets. Voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCC) subunits, for which there are FDA-approved drugs, were identified in the screen. Knockdown of VGCC subunits or treatment with channel blockers diminished Junín virus-cell fusion and entry into cells and thereby decreased infection. Gabapentin, an FDA-approved drug used to treat neuropathic pain that targets the α2δ2 subunit, inhibited infection of mice by the Candid 1 vaccine strain of the virus. These findings demonstrate that VGCCs play a role in virus infection and have the potential to lead to therapeutic intervention of new world arenavirus infection. PMID:24068738

  14. Hypericum perforatum modulates apoptosis and calcium mobilization through voltage-gated and TRPM2 calcium channels in neutrophil of patients with Behcet's disease.

    PubMed

    Nazıroğlu, Mustafa; Sahin, Mehmet; Ciğ, Bilal; Aykur, Mehmet; Erturan, Ijlal; Ugan, Yunus

    2014-03-01

    Behcet's disease (BD) is a chronic, inflammatory, and multisystemic condition although its pathogenesis is uncertain. Main component of St. John's wort (Hypericum perforatum, HP) is hyperforin and induces antiinflammatory and antioxidant properties. We aimed to investigate effects of HP on oxidative stress, apoptosis, and cytosolic-free Ca²⁺ [Ca²⁺](i) concentration in neutrophil of BD patients. Nine new-diagnosed active patients with BD and nine control subjects were included in the study. Disease activity was considered by clinical findings. Neutrophil samples were obtained from the patients and controls. The neutrophils from patients were divided into three subgroups and were incubated with HP, voltage-gated calcium channel (VGCC) blockers, (verapamil+dilitiazem) and non-specific TRPM2 channel blocker (2-aminoethyl diphenylborinate, 2-APB), respectively. The neutrophils were stimulated by fMLP as a Ca²⁺-concentration agonist and oxidative stress former. Caspase-3, caspase-9, apoptosis, lipid peroxidation, and [Ca²⁺](i) values were high in the patient groups, although cell viability, glutathione (GSH), and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) values were low in patient group. However, the [Ca²⁺](i), caspase-3, and caspase-9 values decreased markedly in patient+HP group although GSH and GSH-Px values increased in the group. The [Ca²⁺](i) concentration was also decreased in the patient group by V+D, 2-APB, and HP incubations. In conclusion, we observed the importance of neutrophil Ca²⁺ entry, apoptosis, and oxidative stress through gating VGCC and TRPM2 channels in the neutrophils in the pathogenesis and activation of the patients with BD. HP induced protective effects on oxidative stress by modulating Ca²⁺ influx in BD patients.

  15. ConBr, A Lectin Purified from the Seeds of Canavalia brasiliensis, Protects Against Ischemia in Organotypic Culture of Rat Hippocampus: Potential Implication of Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels.

    PubMed

    Rieger, D K; Navarro, E; Buendia, I; Parada, E; González-Lafuente, L; Leon, R; Costa, A P; Heinrich, I A; Nascimento, K S; Cavada, B S; Lopez, M G; Egea, J; Leal, R B

    2017-02-01

    Lectins are proteins that bind cellular glycans and can modulate various neuronal functions. We have evaluated the neuroprotective effect of ConBr, a lectin purified from the seeds of Canavalia brasiliensis in a model of rat organotypic hippocampal cultures (OHCs) exposed to oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD). OGD for 15 min followed by 24 h re-oxygenation significantly increased cell death, caused mitochondrial depolarization and increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) in CA1 region of OHCs. ConBr (0.1 μg/mL) added during the re-oxygenation period counteracted cell death, mitochondrial depolarization and overproduction of ROS induced by OGD. Moreover, ConBr restored the levels of Akt and ERK1 phosphorylation that were reduced by OGD. Modulation of intracellular Ca(2+) by ConBr was evaluated in isolated hippocampal neurons loaded with the fluorescent calcium dye Fluo-4/AM. ConBr (0.1 and 1 µg/mL) reduced by 25-30 % the Ca(2+) increment induced by 70 mM K(+). A sub effective concentration of ConBr (0.01 µg/mL) together with a sub effective concentration of the L-type calcium channel antagonist nifedipine (0.3 µM) conferred a synergic neuroprotective effect in OHCs subjected to OGD. In conclusion, ConBr provides OHCs neuroprotection against OGD. The mechanism was not fully addressed but it may involve modulation of L-type voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels by ConBr.

  16. EFFECTS OF SUBSCUTE EXPOSURE TO NANOMOLAR CONCENTRATIONS OF METHYLMERCURY ON VOLTAGE-GATES SODIUM AND CALCIUM CURRENTS IN PC12 CELLS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Methylmercury (CH3Hg+) alters the function of voltage-gated Na+ and Ca2+ channels in neuronal preparations following acute, in vitro, exposure. Because the developing nervous system is particularly sensitive to CH3Hg+ neurotoxicity, effects on voltage-gated Na+ (INa) and Ca2+ (IC...

  17. Inhibition of Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels After Subchronic and Repeated Exposure of PC12 Cells to Different Classes of Insecticides.

    PubMed

    Meijer, Marieke; Brandsema, Joske A R; Nieuwenhuis, Desirée; Wijnolts, Fiona M J; Dingemans, Milou M L; Westerink, Remco H S

    2015-10-01

    We previously demonstrated that acute inhibition of voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) is a common mode of action for (sub)micromolar concentrations of chemicals, including insecticides. However, because human exposure to chemicals is usually chronic and repeated, we investigated if selected insecticides from different chemical classes (organochlorines, organophosphates, pyrethroids, carbamates, and neonicotinoids) also disturb calcium homeostasis after subchronic (24 h) exposure and after a subsequent (repeated) acute exposure. Effects on calcium homeostasis were investigated with single-cell fluorescence (Fura-2) imaging of PC12 cells. Cells were depolarized with high-K(+) saline to study effects of subchronic or repeated exposure on VGCC-mediated Ca(2+) influx. The results demonstrate that except for carbaryl and imidacloprid, all selected insecticides inhibited depolarization (K(+))-evoked Ca(2+) influx after subchronic exposure (IC50's: approximately 1-10 µM) in PC12 cells. These inhibitory effects were not or only slowly reversible. Moreover, repeated exposure augmented the inhibition of the K(+)-evoked increase in intracellular calcium concentration induced by subchronic exposure to cypermethrin, chlorpyrifos, chlorpyrifos-oxon, and endosulfan (IC50's: approximately 0.1-4 µM). In rat primary cortical cultures, acute and repeated chlorpyrifos exposure also augmented inhibition of VGCCs compared with subchronic exposure. In conclusion, compared with subchronic exposure, repeated exposure increases the potency of insecticides to inhibit VGCCs. However, the potency of insecticides to inhibit VGCCs upon repeated exposure was comparable with the inhibition previously observed following acute exposure, with the exception of chlorpyrifos. The data suggest that an acute exposure paradigm is sufficient for screening chemicals for effects on VGCCs and that PC12 cells are a sensitive model for detection of effects on VGCCs.

  18. Calcium- and voltage-gated potassium (BK) channel activators in the 5β-cholanic acid-3α-ol analogue series with modifications in the lateral chain.

    PubMed

    Bukiya, Anna N; Patil, Shivaputra A; Li, Wei; Miller, Duane D; Dopico, Alex M

    2012-10-01

    Large conductance, calcium- and voltage-gated potassium (BK) channels regulate various physiological processes and represent an attractive target for drug discovery. Numerous BK channel activators are available. However, these agents usually interact with the ubiquitously distributed channel-forming subunit and thus cannot selectively target a particular tissue. We performed a structure-activity relationship study of lithocholic acid (LCA), a cholane that activates BK channels via the accessory BK β1 subunit. The latter protein is highly abundant in smooth muscle but scarce in most other tissues. Modifications to the LCA lateral chain length and functional group yielded two novel smooth muscle BK channel activators in which the substituent at C24 has a small volume and a net negative charge. Our data provide detailed structural information that will be useful to advance a pharmacophore in search of β1 subunit-selective BK channel activators. These compounds are expected to evoke smooth muscle relaxation, which would be beneficial in the pharmacotherapy of prevalent human disorders associated with increased smooth muscle contraction, such as systemic hypertension, cerebral or coronary vasospasm, bronchial asthma, bladder hyperactivity, and erectile dysfunction.

  19. Selectivity filters and cysteine-rich extracellular loops in voltage-gated sodium, calcium, and NALCN channels

    PubMed Central

    Stephens, Robert F.; Guan, W.; Zhorov, Boris S.; Spafford, J. David

    2015-01-01

    How nature discriminates sodium from calcium ions in eukaryotic channels has been difficult to resolve because they contain four homologous, but markedly different repeat domains. We glean clues from analyzing the changing pore region in sodium, calcium and NALCN channels, from single-cell eukaryotes to mammals. Alternative splicing in invertebrate homologs provides insights into different structural features underlying calcium and sodium selectivity. NALCN generates alternative ion selectivity with splicing that changes the high field strength (HFS) site at the narrowest level of the hourglass shaped pore where the selectivity filter is located. Alternative splicing creates NALCN isoforms, in which the HFS site has a ring of glutamates contributed by all four repeat domains (EEEE), or three glutamates and a lysine residue in the third (EEKE) or second (EKEE) position. Alternative splicing provides sodium and/or calcium selectivity in T-type channels with extracellular loops between S5 and P-helices (S5P) of different lengths that contain three or five cysteines. All eukaryotic channels have a set of eight core cysteines in extracellular regions, but the T-type channels have an infusion of 4–12 extra cysteines in extracellular regions. The pattern of conservation suggests a possible pairing of long loops in Domains I and III, which are bridged with core cysteines in NALCN, Cav, and Nav channels, and pairing of shorter loops in Domains II and IV in T-type channel through disulfide bonds involving T-type specific cysteines. Extracellular turrets of increasing lengths in potassium channels (Kir2.2, hERG, and K2P1) contribute to a changing landscape above the pore selectivity filter that can limit drug access and serve as an ion pre-filter before ions reach the pore selectivity filter below. Pairing of extended loops likely contributes to the large extracellular appendage as seen in single particle electron cryo-microscopy images of the eel Nav1 channel. PMID

  20. Expression and cellular localization of the voltage-gated calcium channel α2δ3 in the rodent retina.

    PubMed

    Pérez de Sevilla Müller, Luis; Sargoy, Allison; Fernández-Sánchez, Laura; Rodriguez, Allen; Liu, Janelle; Cuenca, Nicolás; Brecha, Nicholas

    2015-07-01

    High-voltage-activated calcium channels are hetero-oligomeric protein complexes that mediate multiple cellular processes, including the influx of extracellular Ca(2+), neurotransmitter release, gene transcription, and synaptic plasticity. These channels consist of a primary α(1) pore-forming subunit, which is associated with an extracellular α(2)δ subunit and an intracellular β auxiliary subunit, which alter the gating properties and trafficking of the calcium channel. The cellular localization of the α(2)δ(3) subunit in the mouse and rat retina is unknown. In this study using RT-PCR, a single band at ∼ 305 bp corresponding to the predicted size of the α(2)δ(3) subunit fragment was found in mouse and rat retina and brain homogenates. Western blotting of rodent retina and brain homogenates showed a single 123-kDa band. Immunohistochemistry with an affinity-purified antibody to the α(2)δ(3) subunit revealed immunoreactive cell bodies in the ganglion cell layer and inner nuclear layer and immunoreactive processes in the inner plexiform layer and the outer plexiform layer. α(2)δ(3) immunoreactivity was localized to multiple cell types, including ganglion, amacrine, and bipolar cells and photoreceptors, but not horizontal cells. The expression of the α(2)δ(3) calcium channel subunit to multiple cell types suggests that this subunit participates widely in Ca-channel-mediated signaling in the retina.

  1. Expression and cellular localization of the voltage-gated calcium channel α2δ3 in the rodent retina

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Luis Pérez de Sevilla; Sargoy, Allison; Fernández-Sánchez, Laura; Rodriguez, Allen; Liu, Janelle; Cuenca, Nicolás; Brecha, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    High voltage activated calcium channels are hetero-oligomeric protein complexes that mediate multiple cellular processes including the influx of extracellular Ca2+, neurotransmitter release, gene transcription and synaptic plasticity. These channels consist of a primary α1 pore-forming subunit, which is associated with an extracellular α2δ subunit and an intracellular β auxiliary subunit, which alter the gating properties and trafficking of the calcium channel. The cellular localization of the α2δ3 subunit in the mouse and rat retina is unknown. In this study, using RT-PCR a single band at ~305 bp corresponding to the predicted size of the α2δ3 subunit fragment was in mouse and rat retina and brain homogenates. Western blotting of rodent retina and brain homogenates showed a single 123 kDa band. Immunohistochemistry using an affinity purified antibody to the α2δ3 subunit revealed immunoreactive cell bodies in the ganglion cell layer (GCL) and inner nuclear layer (INL), and immunoreactive processes in the inner plexiform layer (IPL) and the outer plexiform layer (OPL). α2δ3 immunoreactivity was localized to multiple cell types, including ganglion, amacrine and bipolar cells, and photoreceptors, but not by horizontal cells. The expression of the α2δ3 calcium channel subunit to multiple cell types suggests this subunit participates widely in Ca channel-mediated signaling in the retina. PMID:25631988

  2. Pharmacoresistant Cav 2·3 (E-type/R-type) voltage-gated calcium channels influence heart rate dynamics and may contribute to cardiac impulse conduction.

    PubMed

    Galetin, Thomas; Tevoufouet, Etienne E; Sandmeyer, Jakob; Matthes, Jan; Nguemo, Filomain; Hescheler, Jürgen; Weiergräber, Marco; Schneider, Toni

    2013-07-01

    Voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels regulate cardiac automaticity, rhythmicity and excitation-contraction coupling. Whereas L-type (Cav 1·2, Cav 1·3) and T-type (Cav 3·1, Cav 3·2) channels are widely accepted for their functional relevance in the heart, the role of Cav 2·3 Ca(2+) channels expressing R-type currents remains to be elucidated. We have investigated heart rate dynamics in control and Cav 2·3-deficient mice using implantable electrocardiogram radiotelemetry and pharmacological injection experiments. Autonomic block revealed that the intrinsic heart rate does not differ between both genotypes. Systemic administration of isoproterenol resulted in a significant reduction in interbeat interval in both genotypes. It remained unaffected after administering propranolol in Cav 2·3(-|-) mice. Heart rate from isolated hearts as well as atrioventricular conduction for both genotypes differed significantly. Additionally, we identified and analysed the developmental expression of two splice variants, i.e. Cav 2·3c and Cav 2·3e. Using patch clamp technology, R-type currents could be detected in isolated prenatal cardiomyocytes and be related to R-type Ca(2+) channels. Our results indicate that on the systemic level, the pharmacologically inducible heart rate range and heart rate reserve are impaired in Cav 2·3 (-|-) mice. In addition, experiments on Langendorff perfused hearts elucidate differences in basic properties between both genotypes. Thus, Cav 2·3 does not only contribute to the cardiac autonomous nervous system but also to intrinsic rhythm propagation.

  3. Agomelatine and duloxetine synergistically modulates apoptotic pathway by inhibiting oxidative stress triggered intracellular calcium entry in neuronal PC12 cells: role of TRPM2 and voltage-gated calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Akpinar, Abdullah; Uğuz, Abdülhadi Cihangir; Nazıroğlu, Mustafa

    2014-05-01

    Calcium ion (Ca(2+)) is one of the universal second messengers, which acts in a wide range of cellular processes. Results of recent studies indicated that ROS generated by depression leads to loss of endoplasmic reticulum-Ca(2+) homeostasis, oxidative stress, and apoptosis. Agomelatine and duloxetine are novel antidepressant and antioxidant drugs and may reduce oxidative stress, apoptosis, and Ca(2+) entry through TRPM2 and voltage-gated calcium channels. We tested the effects of agomelatine, duloxetine, and their combination on oxidative stress, Ca(2+) influx, mitochondrial depolarization, apoptosis, and caspase values in the PC-12 neuronal cells. PC-12 neuronal cells were exposed in cell culture and exposed to appropriate non-toxic concentrations and incubation times for agomelatine were determined in the neurons by assessing cell viability. Then PC-12 cells were incubated with agomelatine and duloxetine for 24 h. Treatment of cultured PC-12 cells with agomelatine, duloxetine, and their combination results in a protection on apoptosis, caspase-3, caspase-9, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, cytosolic ROS production, glutathione peroxidase, reduced glutathione, and lipid peroxidation, values. Ca(2+) entry through non-specific TRPM2 channel blocker (2-APB) and voltage-gated Ca(2+) channel blockers (verapamil and diltiazem) was modulated by agomelatine and duloxetine. However, effects of duloxetine on the Ca(2+) entry through TRPM2 channels were higher than in agomelatine. Results of current study suggest that the agomelatine and duloxetine are useful against apoptotic cell death and oxidative stress in PC-12 cells, which seem to be dependent on mitochondrial damage and increased levels of intracellular Ca(2+) through activation of TRPM2 and voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels.

  4. L-type calcium channel: Clarifying the "oxygen sensing hypothesis".

    PubMed

    Cserne Szappanos, Henrietta; Viola, Helena; Hool, Livia C

    2017-03-18

    The heart is able to respond acutely to changes in oxygen tension. Since ion channels can respond rapidly to stimuli, the "ion channel oxygen sensing hypothesis" has been proposed to explain acute adaptation of cells to changes in oxygen demand. However the exact mechanism for oxygen sensing continues to be debated. Mitochondria consume the lion's share of oxygen in the heart, fuelling the production of ATP that drives excitation and contraction. Mitochondria also produce reactive oxygen species that are capable of altering the redox state of proteins. The cardiac L-type calcium channel is responsible for maintaining excitation and contraction. Recently, the reactive cysteine on the cardiac L-type calcium channel was identified. These data clarified that the channel does not respond directly to changes in oxygen tension, but rather responds to cellular redox state. This leads to acute alterations in cell signalling responsible for the development of arrhythmias and pathology.

  5. Calcium influx through L-type channels attenuates skeletal muscle contraction via inhibition of adenylyl cyclases.

    PubMed

    Menezes-Rodrigues, Francisco Sandro; Pires-Oliveira, Marcelo; Duarte, Thiago; Paredes-Gamero, Edgar Julian; Chiavegatti, Tiago; Godinho, Rosely Oliveira

    2013-11-15

    Skeletal muscle contraction is triggered by acetylcholine induced release of Ca(2+) from sarcoplasmic reticulum. Although this signaling pathway is independent of extracellular Ca(2+), L-type voltage-gated calcium channel (Cav) blockers have inotropic effects on frog skeletal muscles which occur by an unknown mechanism. Taking into account that skeletal muscle fiber expresses Ca(+2)-sensitive adenylyl cyclase (AC) isoforms and that cAMP is able to increase skeletal muscle contraction force, we investigated the role of Ca(2+) influx on mouse skeletal muscle contraction and the putative crosstalk between extracellular Ca(2+) and intracellular cAMP signaling pathways. The effects of Cav blockers (verapamil and nifedipine) and extracellular Ca(2+) chelator EGTA were evaluated on isometric contractility of mouse diaphragm muscle under direct electrical stimulus (supramaximal voltage, 2 ms, 0.1 Hz). Production of cAMP was evaluated by radiometric assay while Ca(2+) transients were assessed by confocal microscopy using L6 cells loaded with fluo-4/AM. Ca(2+) channel blockers verapamil and nifedipine had positive inotropic effect, which was mimicked by removal of extracellular Ca(+2) with EGTA or Ca(2+)-free Tyrode. While phosphodiesterase inhibitor IBMX potentiates verapamil positive inotropic effect, it was abolished by AC inhibitors SQ22536 and NYK80. Finally, the inotropic effect of verapamil was associated with increased intracellular cAMP content and mobilization of intracellular Ca(2+), indicating that positive inotropic effects of Ca(2+) blockers depend on cAMP formation. Together, our results show that extracellular Ca(2+) modulates skeletal muscle contraction, through inhibition of Ca(2+)-sensitive AC. The cross-talk between extracellular calcium and cAMP-dependent signaling pathways appears to regulate the extent of skeletal muscle contraction responses.

  6. Targeting of Voltage-Gated Calcium Channel α2δ-1 Subunit to Lipid Rafts Is Independent from a GPI-Anchoring Motif

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Philip; Etheridge, Sarah; Song, Lele; Shah, Riddhi; Fitzgerald, Elizabeth M.; Jones, Owen T.

    2011-01-01

    Voltage-gated calcium channels (Cav) exist as heteromultimers comprising a pore-forming α1 with accessory β and α2δ subunits which modify channel trafficking and function. We previously showed that α2δ-1 (and likely the other mammalian α2δ isoforms - α2δ-2, 3 and 4) is required for targeting Cavs to lipid rafts, although the mechanism remains unclear. Whilst originally understood to have a classical type I transmembrane (TM) topology, recent evidence suggests the α2δ subunit contains a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchor that mediates its association with lipid rafts. To test this notion, we have used a strategy based on the expression of chimera, where the reported GPI-anchoring sequences in the gabapentinoid-sensitive α2δ-1 subunit have been substituted with those of a functionally inert Type I TM-spanning protein – PIN-G. Using imaging, electrophysiology and biochemistry, we find that lipid raft association of PIN-α2δ is unaffected by substitution of the GPI motif with the TM domain of PIN-G. Moreover, the presence of the GPI motif alone is not sufficient for raft localisation, suggesting that upstream residues are required. GPI-anchoring is susceptible to phosphatidylinositol-phospholipase C (PI-PLC) cleavage. However, whilst raft localisation of PIN-α2δ is disrupted by PI-PLC treatment, this is assay-dependent and non-specific effects of PI-PLC are observed on the distribution of the endogenous raft marker, caveolin, but not flotillin. Taken together, these data are most consistent with a model where α2δ-1 retains its type I transmembrane topology and its targeting to lipid rafts is governed by sequences upstream of the putative GPI anchor, that promote protein-protein, rather than lipid-lipid interactions. PMID:21695204

  7. Spinal blockage of P/Q- or N-type voltage-gated calcium channels modulates functional and symptomatic changes related to haemorrhagic cystitis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Silva, R B M; Sperotto, N D M; Andrade, E L; Pereira, T C B; Leite, C E; de Souza, A H; Bogo, M R; Morrone, F B; Gomez, M V; Campos, M M

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Spinal voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) are pivotal regulators of painful and inflammatory alterations, representing attractive therapeutic targets. We examined the effects of epidural administration of the P/Q- and N-type VGCC blockers Tx3-3 and Phα1β, respectively, isolated from the spider Phoneutria nigriventer, on symptomatic, inflammatory and functional changes allied to mouse cyclophosphamide (CPA)-induced haemorrhagic cystitis (HC). The effects of P. nigriventer-derived toxins were compared with those displayed by MVIIC and MVIIA, extracted from the cone snail Conus magus. Experimental Approach HC was induced by a single i.p. injection of CPA (300 mg·kg–1). Dose- and time-related effects of spinally administered P/Q and N-type VGCC blockers were assessed on nociceptive behaviour and macroscopic inflammation elicited by CPA. The effects of toxins were also evaluated on cell migration, cytokine production, oxidative stress, functional cystometry alterations and TRPV1, TRPA1 and NK1 receptor mRNA expression. Key Results The spinal blockage of P/Q-type VGCC by Tx3-3 and MVIIC or N-type VGCC by Phα1β attenuated nociceptive and inflammatory events associated with HC, including bladder oxidative stress and cytokine production. CPA produced a slight increase in bladder TRPV1 and TRPA1 mRNA expression, which was reversed by all the toxins tested. Noteworthy, Phα1β strongly prevented bladder neutrophil migration, besides HC-related functional alterations, and its effects were potentiated by co-injecting the selective NK1 receptor antagonist CP-96345. Conclusions and Implications Our results shed new light on the role of spinal P/Q and N-type VGCC in bladder dysfunctions, pointing out Phα1β as a promising alternative for treating complications associated with CPA-induced HC. PMID:25298144

  8. Calcium-Activated SK Channels Influence Voltage-Gated Ion Channels to Determine the Precision of Firing in Globus Pallidus Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Deister, Christopher A.; Chan, C. Savio; Surmeier, D. James; Wilson, Charles J.

    2012-01-01

    Globus pallidus (GP) neurons fire rhythmically in the absence of synaptic input, suggesting that they may encode their inputs as changes in the phase of their rhythmic firing. Action potential afterhyperpolarization (AHP) enhances precision of firing by ensuring that the ion channels recover from inactivation by the same amount on each cycle. Voltage-clamp experiments in slices showed that the longest component of the GP neuron’s AHP is blocked by apamin, a selective antagonist of calcium-activated SK channels. Application of 100 nm apamin also disrupted the precision of firing in perforated-patch and cell-attached recordings. SK channel blockade caused a small depolarization in spike threshold and made it more variable, but there was no reduction in the maximal rate of rise during an action potential. Thus, the firing irregularity was not caused solely by a reduction in voltage-gated Na+ channel availability. Subthreshold voltage ramps triggered a large outward current that was sensitive to the initial holding potential and had properties similar to the A-type K+ current in GP neurons. In numerical simulations, the availability of both Na+ and A-type K+ channels during autonomous firing were reduced when SK channels were removed, and a nearly equal reduction in Na+ and K+ subthreshold-activated ion channel availability produced a large decrease in the neuron’s slope conductance near threshold. This change made the neuron more sensitive to intrinsically generated noise. In vivo, this change would also enhance the sensitivity of GP neurons to small synaptic inputs. PMID:19571136

  9. Electrophysiological evidence for voltage-gated calcium channel 2 (Cav2) modulation of mechano- and thermosensitive spinal neuronal responses in a rat model of osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, W.; Patel, R.; Dickenson, A.H.

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) remains one of the greatest healthcare burdens in western society, with chronic debilitating pain-dominating clinical presentation yet therapeutic strategies are inadequate in many patients. Development of better analgesics is contingent on improved understanding of the molecular mechanisms mediating OA pain. Voltage-gated calcium channels 2.2 (Cav2.2) play a critical role in spinal nociceptive transmission, therefore blocking Cav2.2 activity represents an attractive opportunity for OA pain treatment, but the only available licensed Cav2.2 antagonist ziconitide (PrilatTM) is of limited use. TROX-1 is an orally available, use dependent and state-selective Cav2 antagonist, exerting its analgesic effect primarily via Cav2.2 blockade, with an improved therapeutic window compared with ziconitide. Using a rat model of monosodium iodoacetate (MIA), 2 mg, induced OA we used in vivo electrophysiology to assess the effects of spinal or systemic administration of TROX-1 on the evoked activity of wide dynamic range spinal dorsal horn neurons in response to electrical, natural mechanical (dynamic brush and von Frey 2, 8, 26 and 6 g) and thermal (40, 45 and 45 °C) stimuli applied to the peripheral receptive field. MIA injection into the knee joint resulted in mechanical hypersensitivity of the ipsilateral hind paw and weight-bearing asymmetry. Spinal administration of TROX-1 (0.1 and 1 μg/50 μl) produced a significant dose-related inhibition of dynamic brush, mechanical (von Frey filament (vF) 8, 26 and 60 g) and noxious thermal-(45 and 48 °C) evoked neuronal responses in MIA rats only. Systemic administration of TROX-1 produced a significant inhibition of the mechanical-(vF 8, 26 and 60 g) evoked neuronal responses in MIA rats. TROX-1 did not produce any significant effect on any neuronal measure in Sham controls. Our in vivo electrophysiological results demonstrate a pathological state-dependent effect of TROX-1, which suggests an increased

  10. Pre-clinical evaluation of voltage-gated calcium channel blockers derived from the spider P. nigriventer in glioma progression.

    PubMed

    Nicoletti, Natália Fontana; Erig, Thaís Cristina; Zanin, Rafael Fernandes; Roxo, Marcelo Ricardo; Ferreira, Nelson Pires; Gomez, Marcus Vinicius; Morrone, Fernanda Bueno; Campos, Maria Martha

    2017-04-01

    This study investigated the effects of P/Q- and N-type voltage-gated calcium channel (VGCC) blockers derived from P. nigriventer in glioma progression, by means of in vitro and in vivo experiments. Glioma cells M059J, U-138MG and U-251MG were used to evaluate the antiproliferative effects of P/Q- and N-type VGCC inhibitors PhTx3-3 and Phα1β from P. nigriventer (0.3-100 pM), in comparison to MVIIC and MVIIA from C. magus (0.3-100 pM), respectively. The toxins were also analyzed in a glioma model induced by implantation of GL261 mouse cells. PhTx3-3, Phα1β and MVIIA displayed significant inhibitory effects on the proliferation and viability of all tested glioma cell lines, and evoked cell death mainly with apoptosis characteristics, as indicated by Annexin V/propidium iodide (PI) positivity. The antiproliferative effects of toxins were confirmed by flow cytometry using Ki67 staining. None of the tested toxins altered the proliferation rates of the N9 non-tumor glial cell line. Noteworthy, the administration of the preferential N-type VGCC inhibitors, Phα1β (50 pmol/site; i.c.v.), its recombinant form CTK 01512-2 (50 pmol/site; i.c.v. and i.t.), or MVIIA (10 pmol/site; i.c.v.) caused significant reductions of tumor areas in vivo. N-type VGCC inhibition by Phα1β, CTK 01512-2, and MVIIA led to a marked increase of GFAP-activated astrocytes, and Iba-1-positive microglia, in the peritumoral region, which might explain, at least in part, the inhibitory effects of the toxins in tumor development. This study provides novel evidence on the potential effects of P. nigriventer-derived P/Q-, and mainly, N-type VGCC inhibitors, in glioma progression.

  11. Identification and synthesis of [1,2,4]triazolo[3,4-a]phthalazine derivatives as high-affinity ligands to the alpha 2 delta-1 subunit of voltage gated calcium channel.

    PubMed

    Lebsack, Alec D; Gunzner, Janet; Wang, Bowei; Pracitto, Richard; Schaffhauser, Hervé; Santini, Angelina; Aiyar, Jayashree; Bezverkov, Robert; Munoz, Benito; Liu, Wensheng; Venkatraman, Shankar

    2004-05-17

    We have identified and synthesized a series of [1,2,4]triazolo[3,4-a]phthalazine derivatives as high-affinity ligands to alpha 2 delta-1 subunit of voltage gated calcium channels. Structure-activity relationship studies directed toward improving the potency and physical properties of 2 lead to the discovery of 20 (IC(50)=15 nM) and (S)-22 (IC(50)=30 nM). A potent and selective radioligand, [(3)H]-(S)-22 was also synthesized to demonstrate that this ligand binds to the same site as gabapentin.

  12. Aging Reduces L-Type Calcium Channel Current and the Vasodilatory Response of Small Mesenteric Arteries to Calcium Channel Blockers

    PubMed Central

    Albarwani, Sulayma A.; Mansour, Fathi; Khan, Abdul Aleem; Al-Lawati, Intisar; Al-Kaabi, Abdulla; Al-Busaidi, Al-Manar; Al-Hadhrami, Safa; Al-Husseini, Isehaq; Al-Siyabi, Sultan; Tanira, Musbah O.

    2016-01-01

    Calcium channel blockers (CCBs) are widely used to treat cardiovascular disease (CVD) including hypertension. As aging is an independent risk factor for CVD, the use of CCBs increases with increasing age. Hence, this study was designed to evaluate the effect of aging on the sensitivity of small mesenteric arteries to L-type voltage-gated calcium channel (LTCC) blockers and also to investigate whether there was a concomitant change in calcium current density. Third order mesenteric arteries from male F344 rats, aged 2.5–3 months (young) and 22–26 months (old) were mounted on wire myograph to measure the tension during isometric contraction. Arteries were contracted with 100 mM KCl and were then relaxed in a cumulative concentration-response dependent manner with nifedipine (0.1 nM–1 μM), verapamil (0.1 nM–10 μM), or diltiazem (0.1 nM–10 μM). Relaxation-concentration response curves produced by cumulative concentrations of three different CCBs in arteries of old rats were shifted to the right with statistically significant IC50s. pIC50 ± s.e.m: (8.37 ± 0.06 vs. 8.04 ± 0.05, 7.40 ± 0.07 vs. 6.81 ± 0.04, and 6.58 ± 0.07 vs. 6.34 ± 0.06) in young vs. old. It was observed that the maximal contractions induced by phenylephrine and reversed by sodium nitroprusside were not different between young and old groups. However, Bay K 8644 (1 μM) increased resting tension by 23 ± 4.8% in young arteries and 4.7 ± 1.6% in old arteries. LTCC current density were also significantly lower in old arteries (−2.77 ± 0.45 pA/pF) compared to young arteries (−4.5 ± 0.40 pA/pF); with similar steady-state activation and inactivation curves. Parallel to this reduction, the expression of Cav1.2 protein was reduced by 57 ± 5% in arteries from old rats compared to those from young rats. In conclusion, our results suggest that aging reduces the response of small mesenteric arteries to the vasodilatory effect of the CCBs and this may be due to, at least in part, reduced

  13. Erk1/2 inhibit synaptic vesicle exocytosis through L type calcium channels

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Jaichandar; Morozov, Alexei

    2011-01-01

    L type calcium channels play only a minor role in basal neurotransmitter release in brain neurons, but contribute significantly after induction of plasticity. Very little is known about mechanisms that enable L type calcium channel participation in neurotransmitter release. Here, using mouse primary cortical neurons, we found that inhibition of Erk1/2 enhanced synaptic vesicle exocytosis by increasing calcium influx through L type calcium channels. Furthermore, inhibition of Erk1/2 increased the surface fraction of these channels. These findings indicate a novel inhibitory effect of Erk1/2 on synaptic transmission through L type calcium channels. PMID:21430174

  14. Dopamine midbrain neurons in health and Parkinson's disease: emerging roles of voltage-gated calcium channels and ATP-sensitive potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Dragicevic, E; Schiemann, J; Liss, B

    2015-01-22

    Dopamine (DA) releasing midbrain neurons are essential for multiple brain functions, such as voluntary movement, working memory, emotion and cognition. DA midbrain neurons within the substantia nigra (SN) and the ventral tegmental area (VTA) exhibit a variety of distinct axonal projections and cellular properties, and are differentially affected in diseases like schizophrenia, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and Parkinson's disease (PD). Apart from having diverse functions in health and disease states, DA midbrain neurons display distinct electrical activity patterns, crucial for DA release. These activity patterns are generated and modulated by specific sets of ion channels. Recently, two ion channels have been identified, not only contributing to these activity patterns and to functional properties of DA midbrain neurons, but also seem to render SN DA neurons particularly vulnerable to degeneration in PD and its animal models: L-type calcium channels (LTCCs) and ATP-sensitive potassium channels (K-ATPs). In this review, we focus on the emerging physiological and pathophysiological roles of these two ion channels (and their complex interplay with other ion channels), particularly in highly vulnerable SN DA neurons, as selective degeneration of these neurons causes the major motor symptoms of PD.

  15. TMEM16A is associated with voltage-gated calcium channels in mouse retina and its function is disrupted upon mutation of the auxiliary α2δ4 subunit

    PubMed Central

    Caputo, Antonella; Piano, Ilaria; Demontis, Gian Carlo; Bacchi, Niccolò; Casarosa, Simona; Santina, Luca Della; Gargini, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Photoreceptors rely upon highly specialized synapses to efficiently transmit signals to multiple postsynaptic targets. Calcium influx in the presynaptic terminal is mediated by voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCC). This event triggers neurotransmitter release, but also gates calcium-activated chloride channels (TMEM), which in turn regulate VGCC activity. In order to investigate the relationship between VGCC and TMEM channels, we analyzed the retina of wild type (WT) and Cacna2d4 mutant mice, in which the VGCC auxiliary α2δ4 subunit carries a nonsense mutation, disrupting the normal channel function. Synaptic terminals of mutant photoreceptors are disarranged and synaptic proteins as well as TMEM16A channels lose their characteristic localization. In parallel, calcium-activated chloride currents are impaired in rods, despite unaltered TMEM16A protein levels. Co-immunoprecipitation revealed the interaction between VGCC and TMEM16A channels in the retina. Heterologous expression of these channels in tsA-201 cells showed that TMEM16A associates with the CaV1.4 subunit, and the association persists upon expression of the mutant α2δ4 subunit. Collectively, our experiments show association between TMEM16A and the α1 subunit of VGCC. Close proximity of these channels allows optimal function of the photoreceptor synaptic terminal under physiological conditions, but also makes TMEM16A channels susceptible to changes occurring to calcium channels. PMID:26557056

  16. Stimulation of Synaptic Vesicle Exocytosis by the Mental Disease Gene DISC1 is Mediated by N-Type Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Willcyn; Thevathasan, Jervis Vermal; Lin, Qingshu; Lim, Kim Buay; Kuroda, Keisuke; Kaibuchi, Kozo; Bilger, Marcel; Soong, Tuck Wah; Fivaz, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Lesions and mutations of the DISC1 (Disrupted-in-schizophrenia-1) gene have been linked to major depression, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and autism, but the influence of DISC1 on synaptic transmission remains poorly understood. Using two independent genetic approaches—RNAi and a DISC1 KO mouse—we examined the impact of DISC1 on the synaptic vesicle (SV) cycle by population imaging of the synaptic tracer vGpH in hippocampal neurons. DISC1 loss-of-function resulted in a marked decrease in SV exocytic rates during neuronal stimulation and was associated with reduced Ca2+ transients at nerve terminals. Impaired SV release was efficiently rescued by elevation of extracellular Ca2+, hinting at a link between DISC1 and voltage-gated Ca2+ channels. Accordingly, blockade of N-type Cav2.2 channels mimics and occludes the effect of DISC1 inactivation on SV exocytosis, and overexpression of DISC1 in a heterologous system increases Cav2.2 currents. Collectively, these results show that DISC1-dependent enhancement of SV exocytosis is mediated by Cav2.2 and point to aberrant glutamate release as a probable endophenotype of major psychiatric disorders. PMID:27378904

  17. Design, synthesis and pharmacological evaluation of pyrimidobenzothiazole-3-carboxylate derivatives as selective L-type calcium channel blockers.

    PubMed

    Chikhale, Rupesh; Thorat, Sonali; Pant, Amit; Jadhav, Ankush; Thatipamula, Krishna Chary; Bansode, Ratnadeep; Bhargavi, G; Karodia, Nazira; Rajasekharan, M V; Paradkar, Anant; Khedekar, Pramod

    2015-10-15

    L-type voltage gated calcium channels play essential role in contraction of various skeletal and vascular smooth muscles, thereby plays important role in regulating blood pressure. Dihydropyridine receptors have been targeted for development of newer antihypertensive agents, one of the structurally analogs nucleus dihydropyrimidines have been reported earlier by us as a potential agent toward development of calcium channel modulator. A pre-synthetic QSAR was run and on the basis of structure activity relationship a series of twenty three molecules was synthesized and studied by myosin light chain kinase assay (MLCK), Angiotensin Converting Enzyme (ACE) colorimetric assay, non-invasive blood pressure (NIBP) and invasive blood pressure (IBP) methods. Molecules with significant efficacy were studied for their single crystal X-ray diffraction, molecular docking, molecular dynamics and post-synthetic QSAR. The NIBP and IBP methods screened molecules with better percentage inhibition versus time compared to standard drug Nifedipine. The lead compound ethyl 2-methyl-4-(3-nitrophenyl)-4H-pyrimido [2,1-b] [1,3] benzothiazole-3-carboxylate (26) presented a triclinic structure with polymeric chain packing in lattice. 26 exhibited IC50 on MLCK assay of 2.1±1.7 μM with selectivity of L-type calcium channels and comparative to Nifedipine. It offered satisfactory physicochemical properties with partition coefficient of (ClogP) 4.64. Its pharmacokinetic profile is also good with Cmax at 0.40 μg/ml by oral route with Tmax reaching in 0.5 h which means in 30 min. 26 also exhibits superior t1/2 of 5.4 h and oral bioavailability of (F) 56.75% with an AUC0-∞ of 0.84 μg h/ml. Molecular docking studies indicates toward the interaction of lead compound via hydrogen bonds with Lys144, Glu181 and Asp183, it forms the Van der Walls interactions with Ser18, Asp20, Asn187, Pro185, Glu180, Glu181 and Arg10 with Glide score and Glide energy to be -3.602 and -47.098, respectively. Post

  18. Signal transduction of pregnenolone sulfate in insulinoma cells: activation of Egr-1 expression involving TRPM3, voltage-gated calcium channels, ERK, and ternary complex factors.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Sabine I; Müller, Isabelle; Mannebach, Stefanie; Endo, Takeshi; Thiel, Gerald

    2011-03-25

    The neurosteroid pregnenolone sulfate acts on the nervous system by modifying neurotransmission and receptor functions, thus influencing synaptic strength, neuronal survival, and neurogenesis. Here we show that pregnenolone sulfate induces a signaling cascade in insulinoma cells leading to enhanced expression of the zinc finger transcription factor Egr-1 and Egr-1-responsive target genes. Pharmacological and genetic experiments revealed that influx of Ca(2+) ions via transient receptor potential M3 and voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels, elevation of the cytosolic Ca(2+) level, and activation of ERK are essential for connecting pregnenolone sulfate stimulation with enhanced Egr-1 biosynthesis. Expression of a dominant-negative mutant of Elk-1, a key regulator of gene transcription driven by a serum response element, attenuated Egr-1 expression following stimulation, indicating that Elk-1 or related ternary complex factors connect the transcription of the Egr-1 gene with the pregnenolone sulfate-induced intracellular signaling cascade elicited by the initial influx of Ca(2+). The newly synthesized Egr-1 was biologically active and bound under physiological conditions to the regulatory regions of the Pdx-1, Synapsin I, and Chromogranin B genes. Pdx-1 is a major regulator of insulin gene transcription. Accordingly, elevated insulin promoter activity and increased mRNA levels of insulin could be detected in pregnenolone sulfate-stimulated insulinoma cells. Likewise, the biosynthesis of synapsin I, a synaptic vesicle protein that is found at secretory granules in insulinoma cells, was stimulated in pregnenolone sulfate-treated INS-1 cells. Together, these data show that pregnenolone sulfate induces a signaling cascade in insulinoma cells that is very similar to the signaling cascade induced by glucose in β-cells.

  19. A homolog of mammalian, voltage-gated calcium channels mediates yeast pheromone-stimulated Ca2+ uptake and exacerbates the cdc1(Ts) growth defect.

    PubMed Central

    Paidhungat, M; Garrett, S

    1997-01-01

    Previous studies attributed the yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) cdc1(Ts) growth defect to loss of an Mn2+-dependent function. In this report we show that cdc1(Ts) temperature-sensitive growth is also associated with an increase in cytosolic Ca2+. We identified two recessive suppressors of the cdc1(Ts) temperature-sensitive growth which block Ca2+ uptake and accumulation, suggesting that cytosolic Ca2+ exacerbates or is responsible for the cdc1(Ts) growth defect. One of the cdc1(Ts) suppressors is identical to a gene, MID1, recently implicated in mating pheromone-stimulated Ca2+ uptake. The gene (CCH1) corresponding to the second suppressor encodes a protein that bears significant sequence similarity to the pore-forming subunit (alpha1) of plasma membrane, voltage-gated Ca2+ channels from higher eukaryotes. Strains lacking Mid1 or Cch1 protein exhibit a defect in pheromone-induced Ca2+ uptake and consequently lose viability upon mating arrest. The mid1delta and cch1delta mutants also display reduced tolerance to monovalent cations such as Li+, suggesting a role for Ca2+ uptake in the calcineurin-dependent ion stress response. Finally, mid1delta cch1delta double mutants are, by both physiological and genetic criteria, identical to single mutants. These and other results suggest Mid1 and Cch1 are components of a yeast Ca2+ channel that may mediate Ca2+ uptake in response to mating pheromone, salt stress, and Mn2+ depletion. PMID:9343395

  20. Cinnamaldehyde inhibits L-type calcium channels in mouse ventricular cardiomyocytes and vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Collazo, Julio; Alonso-Carbajo, Lucía; López-Medina, Ana I; Alpizar, Yeranddy A; Tajada, Sendoa; Nilius, Bernd; Voets, Thomas; López-López, José Ramón; Talavera, Karel; Pérez-García, María Teresa; Alvarez, Julio L

    2014-11-01

    Cinnamaldehyde (CA), a major component of cinnamon, is known to have important actions in the cardiovascular system, including vasorelaxation and decrease in blood pressure. Although CA-induced activation of the chemosensory cation channel TRPA1 seems to be involved in these phenomena, it has been shown that genetic ablation of Trpa1 is insufficient to abolish CA effects. Here, we confirm that CA relaxes rat aortic rings and report that it has negative inotropic and chronotropic effects on isolated mouse hearts. Considering the major role of L-type Ca(2+) channels in the control of the vascular tone and cardiac contraction, we used whole-cell patch-clamp to test whether CA affects L-type Ca(2+) currents in mouse ventricular cardiomyocytes (VCM, with Ca(2+) as charge carrier) and in mesenteric artery smooth muscle cells (VSMC, with Ba(2+) as charge carrier). We found that CA inhibited L-type currents in both cell types in a concentration-dependent manner, with little voltage-dependent effects. However, CA was more potent in VCM than in VSMC and caused opposite effects on the rate of inactivation. We found these divergences to be at least in part due to the use of different charge carriers. We conclude that CA inhibits L-type Ca(2+) channels and that this effect may contribute to its vasorelaxing action. Importantly, our results demonstrate that TRPA1 is not a specific target of CA and indicate that the inhibition of voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels should be taken into account when using CA to probe the pathophysiological roles of TRPA1.

  1. Voltage-Gated Hydrophobic Nanopores

    SciTech Connect

    Lavrik, Nickolay V

    2011-01-01

    Hydrophobicity is a fundamental property that is responsible for numerous physical and biophysical aspects of molecular interactions in water. Peculiar behavior is expected for water in the vicinity of hydrophobic structures, such as nanopores. Indeed, hydrophobic nanopores can be found in two distinct states, dry and wet, even though the latter is thermodynamically unstable. Transitions between these two states are kinetically hindered in long pores but can be much faster in shorter pores. As it is demonstrated for the first time in this paper, these transitions can be induced by applying a voltage across a membrane with a single hydrophobic nanopore. Such voltage-induced gating in single nanopores can be realized in a reversible manner through electrowetting of inner walls of the nanopores. The resulting I-V curves of such artificial hydrophobic nanopores mimic biological voltage-gated channels.

  2. Sinomenine protects against ischaemic brain injury: involvement of co-inhibition of acid-sensing ion channel 1a and L-type calcium channels

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wen-Ning; Wu, Peng-Fei; Chen, Xiang-Long; Zhang, Zui; Gu, Jun; Yang, Yuan-Jian; Xiong, Qiu-Ju; Ni, Lan; Wang, Fang; Chen, Jian-Guo

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Sinomenine (SN), a bioactive alkaloid, has been utilized clinically to treat rheumatoid arthritis in China. Our preliminary experiments indicated that it could protect PC12 cells from oxygen-glucose deprivation-reperfusion (OGD-R), we thus investigated the possible effects of SN on cerebral ischaemia and the related mechanism. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Middle cerebral artery occlusion in rats was used as an animal model of ischaemic stroke in vivo. The mechanisms of the effects of SN were investigated in vitro using whole-cell patch-clamp recording, calcium imaging in PC12 cells and rat cortical neurons subjected to OGD-R. KEY RESULTS Pretreatment with SN (10 and 30 mg·kg−1, i.p.) significantly decreased brain infarction and the overactivation of calcium-mediated events in rats subjected to 2 h ischaemia followed by 24 h reperfusion. Extracellular application of SN inhibited the currents mediated by acid-sensing ion channel 1a and L-type voltage-gated calcium channels, in the rat cultured neurons, in a concentration-dependent manner. These inhibitory effects contribute to the neuroprotection of SN against OGD-R and extracellular acidosis-induced cytotoxicity. More importantly, administration of SN (30 mg·kg−1, i.p.) at 1 and 2 h after cerebral ischaemia also decreased brain infarction and improved functional recovery. CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS SN exerts potent protective effects against ischaemic brain injury when administered before ischaemia or even after the injury. The inhibitory effects of SN on acid-sensing ion channel 1a and L-type calcium channels are involved in this neuroprotection. PMID:21585344

  3. AKAP-anchored PKA maintains neuronal L-type calcium channel activity and NFAT transcriptional signaling.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Jonathan G; Sanderson, Jennifer L; Gorski, Jessica A; Scott, John D; Catterall, William A; Sather, William A; Dell'Acqua, Mark L

    2014-06-12

    L-type voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (LTCC) couple neuronal excitation to gene transcription. LTCC activity is elevated by the cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase (PKA) and depressed by the Ca2+-dependent phosphatase calcineurin (CaN), and both enzymes are localized to the channel by A-kinase anchoring protein 79/150 (AKAP79/150). AKAP79/150 anchoring of CaN also promotes LTCC activation of transcription through dephosphorylation of the nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT). We report here that the basal activity of AKAP79/150-anchored PKA maintains neuronal LTCC coupling to CaN-NFAT signaling by preserving LTCC phosphorylation in opposition to anchored CaN. Genetic disruption of AKAP-PKA anchoring promoted redistribution of the kinase out of postsynaptic dendritic spines, profound decreases in LTCC phosphorylation and Ca2+ influx, and impaired NFAT movement to the nucleus and activation of transcription. Thus, LTCC-NFAT transcriptional signaling in neurons requires precise organization and balancing of PKA and CaN activities in the channel nanoenvironment, which is only made possible by AKAP79/150 scaffolding.

  4. Inactivation of Gating Currents of L-Type Calcium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Shirokov, Roman; Ferreira, Gonzalo; Yi, Jianxun; Ríos, Eduardo

    1998-01-01

    In studies of gating currents of rabbit cardiac Ca channels expressed as α1C/β2a or α1C/β2a/α2δ subunit combinations in tsA201 cells, we found that long-lasting depolarization shifted the distribution of mobile charge to very negative potentials. The phenomenon has been termed charge interconversion in native skeletal muscle (Brum, G., and E. Ríos. 1987. J. Physiol. (Camb.). 387:489–517) and cardiac Ca channels (Shirokov, R., R. Levis, N. Shirokova, and E. Ríos. 1992. J. Gen. Physiol. 99:863–895). Charge 1 (voltage of half-maximal transfer, V1/2 ≃ 0 mV) gates noninactivated channels, while charge 2 (V1/2 ≃ −90 mV) is generated in inactivated channels. In α1C/β2a cells, the available charge 1 decreased upon inactivating depolarization with a time constant τ ≃ 8, while the available charge 2 decreased upon recovery from inactivation (at −200 mV) with τ ≃ 0.3 s. These processes therefore are much slower than charge movement, which takes <50 ms. This separation between the time scale of measurable charge movement and that of changes in their availability, which was even wider in the presence of α2δ, implies that charges 1 and 2 originate from separate channel modes. Because clear modal separation characterizes slow (C-type) inactivation of Na and K channels, this observation establishes the nature of voltage-dependent inactivation of L-type Ca channels as slow or C-type. The presence of the α2δ subunit did not change the V1/2 of charge 2, but sped up the reduction of charge 1 upon inactivation at 40 mV (to τ ≃ 2 s), while slowing the reduction of charge 2 upon recovery (τ ≃ 2 s). The observations were well simulated with a model that describes activation as continuous electrodiffusion (Levitt, D. 1989. Biophys. J. 55:489–498) and inactivation as discrete modal change. The effects of α2δ are reproduced assuming that the subunit lowers the free energy of the inactivated mode. PMID:9607938

  5. Voltage-gated ion channels in dendrites of hippocampal pyramidal neurons.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xixi; Johnston, Daniel

    2006-12-01

    The properties and distribution of voltage-gated ion channels contribute to electrical signaling in neuronal dendrites. The apical dendrites of CA1 pyramidal neurons in hippocampus express a wide variety of sodium, calcium, potassium, and other voltage-gated channels. In this report, we provide some new evidence for the role of the delayed-rectifier K(+) channel in shaping the dendritic action potential at different membrane potentials.

  6. Tryptophan hydroxylase is modulated by L-type calcium channels in the rat pineal gland.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Roseli; Scialfa, Julieta Helena; Terra, Ilza Mingarini; Cipolla-Neto, José; Simonneaux, Valérie; Afeche, Solange Castro

    2008-02-27

    Calcium is an important second messenger in the rat pineal gland, as well as cAMP. They both contribute to melatonin synthesis mediated by the three main enzymes of the melatonin synthesis pathway: tryptophan hydroxylase, arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase and hydroxyindole-O-methyltransferase. The cytosolic calcium is elevated in pinealocytes following alpha(1)-adrenergic stimulation, through IP(3)-and membrane calcium channels activation. Nifedipine, an L-type calcium channel blocker, reduces melatonin synthesis in rat pineal glands in vitro. With the purpose of investigating the mechanisms involved in melatonin synthesis regulation by the L-type calcium channel, we studied the effects of nifedipine on noradrenergic stimulated cultured rat pineal glands. Tryptophan hydroxylase, arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase and hydroxyindole-O-methyltransferase activities were quantified by radiometric assays and 5-hydroxytryptophan, serotonin, N-acetylserotonin and melatonin contents were quantified by HPLC with electrochemical detection. The data showed that calcium influx blockaded by nifedipine caused a decrease in tryptophan hydroxylase activity, but did not change either arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase or hydroxyindole-O-methyltransferase activities. Moreover, there was a reduction of 5-hydroxytryptophan, serotonin, N-acetylserotonin and melatonin intracellular content, as well as a reduction of serotonin and melatonin secretion. Thus, it seems that the calcium influx through L-type high voltage-activated calcium channels is essential for the full activation of tryptophan hydroxylase leading to melatonin synthesis in the pineal gland.

  7. Hysteresis in voltage-gated channels.

    PubMed

    Villalba-Galea, Carlos A

    2016-09-30

    Ion channels constitute a superfamily of membrane proteins found in all living creatures. Their activity allows fast translocation of ions across the plasma membrane down the ion's transmembrane electrochemical gradient, resulting in a difference in electrical potential across the plasma membrane, known as the membrane potential. A group within this superfamily, namely voltage-gated channels, displays activity that is sensitive to the membrane potential. The activity of voltage-gated channels is controlled by the membrane potential, while the membrane potential is changed by these channels' activity. This interplay produces variations in the membrane potential that have evolved into electrical signals in many organisms. These signals are essential for numerous biological processes, including neuronal activity, insulin release, muscle contraction, fertilization and many others. In recent years, the activity of the voltage-gated channels has been observed not to follow a simple relationship with the membrane potential. Instead, it has been shown that the activity of voltage-gated channel displays hysteresis. In fact, a growing number of evidence have demonstrated that the voltage dependence of channel activity is dynamically modulated by activity itself. In spite of the great impact that this property can have on electrical signaling, hysteresis in voltage-gated channels is often overlooked. Addressing this issue, this review provides examples of voltage-gated ion channels displaying hysteretic behavior. Further, this review will discuss how Dynamic Voltage Dependence in voltage-gated channels can have a physiological role in electrical signaling. Furthermore, this review will elaborate on the current thoughts on the mechanism underlying hysteresis in voltage-gated channels.

  8. Role of voltage-gated calcium channels in the regulation of aldosterone production from zona glomerulosa cells of the adrenal cortex.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Paula Q; Guagliardo, Nick A; Klein, Peter M; Hu, Changlong; Breault, David T; Beenhakker, Mark P

    2016-10-15

    Zona glomerulosa cells (ZG) of the adrenal gland constantly integrate fluctuating ionic, hormonal and paracrine signals to control the synthesis and secretion of aldosterone. These signals modulate Ca(2+) levels, which provide the critical second messenger to drive steroid hormone production. Angiotensin II is a hormone known to modulate the activity of voltage-dependent L- and T-type Ca(2+) channels that are expressed on the plasma membrane of ZG cells in many species. Because the ZG cell maintains a resting membrane voltage of approximately -85 mV and has been considered electrically silent, low voltage-activated T-type Ca(2+) channels are assumed to provide the primary Ca(2+) signal that drives aldosterone production. However, this view has recently been challenged by human genetic studies identifying somatic gain-of-function mutations in L-type CaV 1.3 channels in aldosterone-producing adenomas of patients with primary hyperaldosteronism. We provide a review of these assumptions and challenges, and update our understanding of the state of the ZG cell in a layer in which native cellular associations are preserved. This updated view of Ca(2+) signalling in ZG cells provides a unifying mechanism that explains how transiently activating CaV 3.2 channels can generate a significant and recurring Ca(2+) signal, and how CaV 1.3 channels may contribute to the Ca(2+) signal that drives aldosterone production.

  9. Altered expression of the voltage-gated calcium channel subunit α2δ-1: A comparison between two experimental models of epilepsy and a sensory nerve ligation model of neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Nieto-Rostro, M.; Sandhu, G.; Bauer, C.S.; Jiruska, P.; Jefferys, J.G.R.; Dolphin, A.C.

    2014-01-01

    The auxiliary α2δ-1 subunit of voltage-gated calcium channels is up-regulated in dorsal root ganglion neurons following peripheral somatosensory nerve damage, in several animal models of neuropathic pain. The α2δ-1 protein has a mainly presynaptic localization, where it is associated with the calcium channels involved in neurotransmitter release. Relevant to the present study, α2δ-1 has been shown to be the therapeutic target of the gabapentinoid drugs in their alleviation of neuropathic pain. These drugs are also used in the treatment of certain epilepsies. In this study we therefore examined whether the level or distribution of α2δ-1 was altered in the hippocampus following experimental induction of epileptic seizures in rats, using both the kainic acid model of human temporal lobe epilepsy, in which status epilepticus is induced, and the tetanus toxin model in which status epilepticus is not involved. The main finding of this study is that we did not identify somatic overexpression of α2δ-1 in hippocampal neurons in either of the epilepsy models, unlike the upregulation of α2δ-1 that occurs following peripheral nerve damage to both somatosensory and motor neurons. However, we did observe local reorganization of α2δ-1 immunostaining in the hippocampus only in the kainic acid model, where it was associated with areas of neuronal cell loss, as indicated by absence of NeuN immunostaining, dendritic loss, as identified by areas where microtubule-associated protein-2 immunostaining was missing, and reactive gliosis, determined by regions of strong OX42 staining. PMID:24641886

  10. Dorsal root ganglion neurons become hyperexcitable and increase expression of voltage-gated T-type calcium channels (Cav3.2) in paclitaxel-induced peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Tatsui, Claudio Esteves; Rhines, Laurence D; North, Robert Y; Harrison, Daniel S; Cassidy, Ryan M; Johansson, Caj A; Kosturakis, Alyssa K; Edwards, Denaya D; Zhang, Hongmei; Dougherty, Patrick M

    2017-03-01

    Here, it is shown that paclitaxel-induced neuropathy is associated with the development of spontaneous activity (SA) and hyperexcitability in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons that is paralleled by increased expression of low-voltage-activated calcium channels (T-type; Cav3.2). The percentage of DRG neurons showing SA and the overall mean rate of SA were significantly higher at day 7 in rats receiving paclitaxel treatment than in rats receiving vehicle. Cav3.2 expression was increased in L4-L6 DRG and spinal cord segments in paclitaxel-treated rats, localized to small calcitonin gene-related peptide and isolectin B4 expressing DRG neurons and to glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive spinal cord cells. Cav3.2 expression was also co-localized with toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in both the DRG and the dorsal horn. T-type current amplitudes and density were increased at day 7 after paclitaxel treatment. Perfusion of the TLR4 agonist lipopolysaccharide directly activated DRG neurons, whereas this was prevented by pretreatment with the specific T-type calcium channel inhibitor ML218 hydrochloride. Paclitaxel-induced behavioral hypersensitivity to mechanical stimuli in rats was prevented but not reversed by spinal administration of ML218 hydrochloride or intravenous injection of the TLR4 antagonist TAK242. Paclitaxel induced inward current and action potential discharges in cultured human DRG neurons, and this was blocked by ML218 hydrochloride pretreatment. Furthermore, ML218 hydrochloride decreased firing frequency in human DRG, where spontaneous action potentials were present. In summary, Cav3.2 in concert with TLR4 in DRG neurons appears to contribute to paclitaxel-induced neuropathy.

  11. The Fabry disease-associated lipid Lyso-Gb3 enhances voltage-gated calcium currents in sensory neurons and causes pain.

    PubMed

    Choi, L; Vernon, J; Kopach, O; Minett, M S; Mills, K; Clayton, P T; Meert, T; Wood, J N

    2015-05-06

    Fabry disease is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder characterised by accumulation of glycosphingolipids, and accompanied by clinical manifestations, such as cardiac disorders, renal failure, pain and peripheral neuropathy. Globotriaosylsphingosine (lyso-Gb3), a deacylated form of globotriaosylceramide (Gb3), has emerged as a marker of Fabry disease. We investigated the link between Gb3, lyso-Gb3 and pain. Plantar administration of lyso-Gb3 or Gb3 caused mechanical allodynia in healthy mice. In vitro application of 100nM lyso-Gb3 caused uptake of extracellular calcium in 10% of sensory neurons expressing nociceptor markers, rising to 40% of neurons at 1μM, a concentration that may occur in Fabry disease patients. Peak current densities of voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels were substantially enhanced by application of 1μM lyso-Gb3. These studies suggest a direct role for lyso-Gb3 in the sensitisation of peripheral nociceptive neurons that may provide an opportunity for therapeutic intervention in the treatment of Fabry disease-associated pain.

  12. Activity of Palythoa caribaeorum Venom on Voltage-Gated Ion Channels in Mammalian Superior Cervical Ganglion Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Lazcano-Pérez, Fernando; Castro, Héctor; Arenas, Isabel; García, David E.; González-Muñoz, Ricardo; Arreguín-Espinosa, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    The Zoanthids are an order of cnidarians whose venoms and toxins have been poorly studied. Palythoa caribaeorum is a zoanthid commonly found around the Mexican coastline. In this study, we tested the activity of P. caribaeorum venom on voltage-gated sodium channel (NaV1.7), voltage-gated calcium channel (CaV2.2), the A-type transient outward (IA) and delayed rectifier (IDR) currents of KV channels of the superior cervical ganglion (SCG) neurons of the rat. These results showed that the venom reversibly delays the inactivation process of voltage-gated sodium channels and inhibits voltage-gated calcium and potassium channels in this mammalian model. The compounds responsible for these effects seem to be low molecular weight peptides. Together, these results provide evidence for the potential use of zoanthids as a novel source of cnidarian toxins active on voltage-gated ion channels. PMID:27164140

  13. Functional importance of T-type voltage-gated calcium channels in the cardiovascular and renal system: news from the world of knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Pernille B L

    2015-02-15

    Over the years, it has been discussed whether T-type calcium channels Cav3 play a role in the cardiovascular and renal system. T-type channels have been reported to play an important role in renal hemodynamics, contractility of resistance vessels, and pacemaker activity in the heart. However, the lack of highly specific blockers cast doubt on the conclusions. As new T-type channel antagonists are being designed, the roles of T-type channels in cardiovascular and renal pathology need to be elucidated before T-type blockers can be clinically useful. Two types of T-type channels, Cav3.1 and Cav3.2, are expressed in blood vessels, the kidney, and the heart. Studies with gene-deficient mice have provided a way to investigate the Cav3.1 and Cav3.2 channels and their role in the cardiovascular system. This review discusses the results from these knockout mice. Evaluation of the literature leads to the conclusion that Cav3.1 and Cav3.2 channels have important, but different, functions in mice. T-type Cav3.1 channels affect heart rate, whereas Cav3.2 channels are involved in cardiac hypertrophy. In the vascular system, Cav3.2 activation leads to dilation of blood vessels, whereas Cav3.1 channels are mainly suggested to affect constriction. The Cav3.1 channel is also involved in neointima formation following vascular damage. In the kidney, Cav3.1 regulates plasma flow and Cav3.2 plays a role setting glomerular filtration rate. In conclusion, Cav3.1 and Cav3.2 are new therapeutic targets in several cardiovascular pathologies, but the use of T-type blockers should be specifically directed to the disease and to the channel subtype.

  14. Spinal morphine but not ziconotide or gabapentin analgesia is affected by alternative splicing of voltage-gated calcium channel CaV2.2 pre-mRNA.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yu-Qiu; Andrade, Arturo; Lipscombe, Diane

    2013-12-26

    Presynaptic voltage-gated calcium Ca(V)2.2 channels play a privileged role in spinal level sensitization following peripheral nerve injury. Direct and indirect inhibitors of Ca(V)2.2 channel activity in spinal dorsal horn are analgesic in chronic pain states. Ca(V)2.2 channels represent a family of splice isoforms that are expressed in different combinations according to cell-type. A pair of mutually exclusive exons in the Ca(V)2.2 encoding Cacna1b gene, e37a and e37b, differentially influence morphine analgesia. In mice that lack exon e37a, which is enriched in nociceptors, the analgesic efficacy of intrathecal morphine against noxious thermal stimuli is reduced. Here we ask if sequences unique to e37a influence: the development of abnormal thermal and mechanical sensitivity associated with peripheral nerve injury; and the actions of two other classes of analgesics that owe part or all of their efficacy to Ca(V)2.2 channel inhibition. We find that: i) the analgesic efficacy of morphine, but not ziconotide or gabapentin, is reduced in mice lacking e37a, ii) the induction and maintenance of behaviors associated with sensitization that accompany peripheral nerve injury, do not require e37a-specific sequence, iii) intrathecal morphine, but not ziconotide or gabapentin analgesia to thermal stimuli is significantly lower in wild-type mice after peripheral nerve injury, iv) the analgesic efficacy of ziconotide and gabapentin to mechanical stimuli is reduced following nerve injury, and iv) intrathecal morphine analgesia to thermal stimuli in mice lacking e37a is not further reduced by peripheral nerve injury. Our findings show that the analgesic action of morphine, but not ziconotide or gabapentin, to thermal stimuli is linked to which Cacna1b exon, e37a or e37b, is selected during alternative pre-mRNA splicing.

  15. The CaVβ Subunit Protects the I-II Loop of the Voltage-gated Calcium Channel CaV2.2 from Proteasomal Degradation but Not Oligoubiquitination*

    PubMed Central

    Page, Karen M.; Rothwell, Simon W.; Dolphin, Annette C.

    2016-01-01

    CaVβ subunits interact with the voltage-gated calcium channel CaV2.2 on a site in the intracellular loop between domains I and II (the I-II loop). This interaction influences the biophysical properties of the channel and leads to an increase in its trafficking to the plasma membrane. We have shown previously that a mutant CaV2.2 channel that is unable to bind CaVβ subunits (CaV2.2 W391A) was rapidly degraded (Waithe, D., Ferron, L., Page, K. M., Chaggar, K., and Dolphin, A. C. (2011) J. Biol. Chem. 286, 9598–9611). Here we show that, in the absence of CaVβ subunits, a construct consisting of the I-II loop of CaV2.2 was directly ubiquitinated and degraded by the proteasome system. Ubiquitination could be prevented by mutation of all 12 lysine residues in the I-II loop to arginines. Including a palmitoylation motif at the N terminus of CaV2.2 I-II loop was insufficient to target it to the plasma membrane in the absence of CaVβ subunits even when proteasomal degradation was inhibited with MG132 or ubiquitination was prevented by the lysine-to-arginine mutations. In the presence of CaVβ subunit, the palmitoylated CaV2.2 I-II loop was protected from degradation, although oligoubiquitination could still occur, and was efficiently trafficked to the plasma membrane. We propose that targeting to the plasma membrane requires a conformational change in the I-II loop that is induced by binding of the CaVβ subunit. PMID:27489103

  16. L-type calcium channels regulate filopodia stability and cancer cell invasion downstream of integrin signalling

    PubMed Central

    Jacquemet, Guillaume; Baghirov, Habib; Georgiadou, Maria; Sihto, Harri; Peuhu, Emilia; Cettour-Janet, Pierre; He, Tao; Perälä, Merja; Kronqvist, Pauliina; Joensuu, Heikki; Ivaska, Johanna

    2016-01-01

    Mounting in vitro, in vivo and clinical evidence suggest an important role for filopodia in driving cancer cell invasion. Using a high-throughput microscopic-based drug screen, we identify FDA-approved calcium channel blockers (CCBs) as potent inhibitors of filopodia formation in cancer cells. Unexpectedly, we discover that L-type calcium channels are functional and frequently expressed in cancer cells suggesting a previously unappreciated role for these channels during tumorigenesis. We further demonstrate that, at filopodia, L-type calcium channels are activated by integrin inside-out signalling, integrin activation and Src. Moreover, L-type calcium channels promote filopodia stability and maturation into talin-rich adhesions through the spatially restricted regulation of calcium entry and subsequent activation of the protease calpain-1. Altogether we uncover a novel and clinically relevant signalling pathway that regulates filopodia formation in cancer cells and propose that cycles of filopodia stabilization, followed by maturation into focal adhesions, directs cancer cell migration and invasion. PMID:27910855

  17. Voltage-Gated R-Type Calcium Channel Inhibition via Human μ-, δ-, and κ-opioid Receptors Is Voltage-Independently Mediated by Gβγ Protein Subunits.

    PubMed

    Berecki, Géza; Motin, Leonid; Adams, David J

    2016-01-01

    Elucidating the mechanisms that modulate calcium channels via opioid receptor activation is fundamental to our understanding of both pain perception and how opioids modulate pain. Neuronal voltage-gated N-type calcium channels (Cav2.2) are inhibited by activation of G protein-coupled opioid receptors (ORs). However, inhibition of R-type (Cav2.3) channels by μ- or κ-ORs is poorly defined and has not been reported for δ-ORs. To investigate such interactions, we coexpressed human μ-, δ-, or κ-ORs with human Cav2.3 or Cav2.2 in human embryonic kidney 293 cells and measured depolarization-activated Ba(2+) currents (IBa). Selective agonists of μ-, δ-, and κ-ORs inhibited IBa through Cav2.3 channels by 35%. Cav2.2 channels were inhibited to a similar extent by κ-ORs, but more potently (60%) via μ- and δ-ORs. Antagonists of δ- and κ-ORs potentiated IBa amplitude mediated by Cav2.3 and Cav2.2 channels. Consistent with G protein βγ (Gβγ) interaction, modulation of Cav2.2 was primarily voltage-dependent and transiently relieved by depolarizing prepulses. In contrast, Cav2.3 modulation was voltage-independent and unaffected by depolarizing prepulses. However, Cav2.3 inhibition was sensitive to pertussis toxin and to intracellular application of guanosine 5'-[β-thio]diphosphate trilithium salt and guanosine 5'-[γ-thio]triphosphate tetralithium salt. Coexpression of Gβγ-specific scavengers-namely, the carboxyl terminus of the G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 or membrane-targeted myristoylated-phosducin-attenuated or abolished Cav2.3 modulation. Our study reveals the diversity of OR-mediated signaling at Cav2 channels and identifies neuronal Cav2.3 channels as potential targets for opioid analgesics. Their novel modulation is dependent on pre-existing OR activity and mediated by membrane-delimited Gβγ subunits in a voltage-independent manner.

  18. L-Type Calcium Channels Are Required for One Form of Hippocampal Mossy Fiber LTP

    PubMed Central

    Kapur, Ajay; Yeckel, Mark F.; Gray, Richard; Johnston, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    The requirement of postsynaptic calcium influx via L-type channels for the induction of long-term potentiation (LTP) of mossy fiber input to CA3 pyramidal neurons was tested for two different patterns of stimulation. Two types of LTP-inducing stimuli were used based on the suggestion that one of them, brief high-frequency stimulation (B-HFS), induces LTP postsynaptically, whereas the other pattern, long high-frequency stimulation (L-HFS), induces mossy fiber LTP presynaptically. To test whether or not calcium influx into CA3 pyramidal neurons is necessary for LTP induced by either pattern of stimulation, nimodipine, a L-type calcium channel antagonist, was added during stimulation. In these experiments nimodipine blocked the induction of mossy fiber LTP when B-HFS was given [34 ± 5% (mean ± SE) increase in control versus 7 ± 4% in nimodipine, P < 0.003]; in contrast, nimodipine did not block the induction of LTP with L-HFS (107 ± 10% in control vs. 80 ± 9% in nimodipine, P > 0.05). Administration of nimodipine after the induction of LTP had no effect on the expression of LTP. In addition, B- and L-HFS delivered directly to commissural/ associational fibers in stratum radiatum failed to induce a N-methyl-d-aspartate-independent form of LTP, obviating the possibility that the presumed mossy fiber LTP resulted from potentiation of other synapses. Nimodipine had no effect on calcium transients recorded from mossy fiber presynaptic terminals evoked with the B-HFS paradigm but reduced postsynaptic calcium transients. Our results support the hypothesis that induction of mossy fiber LTP by B-HFS is mediated postsynaptically and requires entry of calcium through L-type channels into CA3 neurons. PMID:9535977

  19. Effect of propionyl-L-carnitine on L-type calcium channels in human heart sarcolemma

    SciTech Connect

    Bevilacqua, M.; Vago, T.; Norbiato, G. )

    1991-02-01

    Propionyl-L-carnitine (PC) protects perfused rat hearts against damage by ischemia-reperfusion. Activation of L-type calcium channel play a role on ischemia-reperfusion damage. Therefore, we studied the effect of PC on some properties of L-type calcium channels in an in vitro preparation from human myocardium sarcolemma (from patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy). Binding of the L-type calcium channel blockers isradipine ({sup 3}H)-PN 200-110 (PN) to plasma membrane preparations revealed a single population of binding sites (total number: Bmax = 213 +/- 34 fM/mg protein and affinity: Kd = 152 +/- 19 nM; n = 6). The characteristics of these binding sites were evaluated in the presence and in the absence of Ca{sup 2}{sup +} and of calcium blockers (D-888, a verapamillike drug, and diltiazem). Incubation in a Ca{sup 2}{sup +}-containing buffer increased the affinity of PN binding sites. Binding sites for PN were modulated by organic calcium channel blockers; in competition isotherms at 37{degree}C, D-888 (desmethoxyverapamil) decreased the PN binding, whereas diltiazem increased it. These results strongly suggest that the site labelled by PN is the voltage-operated calcium channel of the human myocardium. The addition of PC (1 mM) to plasma membranes labelled with PN at 37{degree}C decreased the affinity of the binding; this effect was counteracted by the addition of Ca{sup 2}{sup +} to the medium. This result was consistent with a competition between Ca{sup 2}{sup +} and PC. The effect of PC incubation at 4{degree}C was the opposite; at this temperature PC increased the affinity of the binding sites and the effect was obscured by Ca{sup 2}{sup +}.

  20. Sex-dependent modulation of age-related cognitive decline by the L-type calcium channel gene Cacna1c (Cav 1.2).

    PubMed

    Zanos, Panos; Bhat, Shambhu; Terrillion, Chantelle E; Smith, Robert J; Tonelli, Leonardo H; Gould, Todd D

    2015-10-01

    Increased calcium influx through L-type voltage-gated calcium channels has been implicated in the neuronal dysfunction underlying age-related memory declines. The present study aimed to test the specific role of Cacna1c (which encodes Cav 1.2) in modulating age-related memory dysfunction. Short-term, spatial and contextual/emotional memory was evaluated in young and aged, wild-type as well as mice with one functional copy of Cacna1c (haploinsufficient), using the novel object recognition, Y-maze and passive avoidance tasks, respectively. Hippocampal expression of Cacna1c mRNA was measured by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Ageing was associated with object recognition and contextual/emotional memory deficits, and a significant increase in hippocampal Cacna1c mRNA expression. Cacna1c haploinsufficiency was associated with decreased Cacna1c mRNA expression in both young and old animals. However, haploinsufficient mice did not manifest an age-related increase in expression of this gene. Behaviourally, Cacna1c haploinsufficiency prevented object recognition deficits during ageing in both male and female mice. A significant correlation between higher Cacna1c levels and decreased object recognition performance was observed in both sexes. Also, a sex-dependent protective role of decreased Cacna1c levels in contextual/emotional memory loss has been observed, specifically in male mice. These data provide evidence for an association between increased hippocampal Cacna1c expression and age-related cognitive decline. Additionally, they indicate an interaction between the Cacna1c gene and sex in the modulation of age-related contextual memory declines.

  1. Activation of L-type calcium channels is required for gap junction-mediated intercellular calcium signaling in osteoblastic cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorgensen, Niklas Rye; Teilmann, Stefan Cuoni; Henriksen, Zanne; Civitelli, Roberto; Sorensen, Ole Helmer; Steinberg, Thomas H.

    2003-01-01

    The propagation of mechanically induced intercellular calcium waves (ICW) among osteoblastic cells occurs both by activation of P2Y (purinergic) receptors by extracellular nucleotides, resulting in "fast" ICW, and by gap junctional communication in cells that express connexin43 (Cx43), resulting in "slow" ICW. Human osteoblastic cells transmit intercellular calcium signals by both of these mechanisms. In the current studies we have examined the mechanism of slow gap junction-dependent ICW in osteoblastic cells. In ROS rat osteoblastic cells, gap junction-dependent ICW were inhibited by removal of extracellular calcium, plasma membrane depolarization by high extracellular potassium, and the L-type voltage-operated calcium channel inhibitor, nifedipine. In contrast, all these treatments enhanced the spread of P2 receptor-mediated ICW in UMR rat osteoblastic cells. Using UMR cells transfected to express Cx43 (UMR/Cx43) we confirmed that nifedipine sensitivity of ICW required Cx43 expression. In human osteoblastic cells, gap junction-dependent ICW also required activation of L-type calcium channels and influx of extracellular calcium.

  2. Novel 1, 4-dihydropyridines for L-type calcium channel as antagonists for cadmium toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Saddala, Madhu Sudhana; Kandimalla, Ramesh; Adi, Pradeepkiran Jangampalli; Bhashyam, Sainath Sri; Asupatri, Usha Rani

    2017-01-01

    The present study, we design and synthesize the novel dihydropyridine derivatives, i.e., 3 (a-e) and 5 (a-e) and evaluated, anticonvulsant activity. Initially due to the lacuna of LCC, we modeled the protein through modeller 9.15v and evaluated through servers. Docking studies were performed with the synthesized compounds and resulted two best compounds, i.e., 5a, 5e showed the best binding energies. The activity of intracellular Ca2+ measurements was performed on two cell lines: A7r5 (rat aortic smooth muscle cells) and SH-SY5Y (human neuroblastoma cells). The 5a and 5e compounds was showing the more specific activity on L-type calcium channels, i.e. A7r5 (IC50 = 0.18 ± 0.02 and 0.25 ± 0.63 μg/ml, respectively) (containing only L-type channels) than SH-SY5Y (i.e. both L-type and T-type channels) (IC50 = 8 ± 0.23 and 10 ± 0.18 μg/ml, respectively) with intracellular calcium mobility similar to amlodipine. Finally, both in silico and in vitro results exploring two derivatives 5a and 5e succeeded to treat cadmium toxicity. PMID:28345598

  3. Hydrogen Sulfide Inhibits L-Type Calcium Currents Depending upon the Protein Sulfhydryl State in Rat Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Haojan; Tang, Chaoshu; Jin, Hongfang; Du, Junbao

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a novel gasotransmitter that inhibits L-type calcium currents (I Ca, L). However, the underlying molecular mechanisms are unclear. In particular, the targeting site in the L-type calcium channel where H2S functions remains unknown. The study was designed to investigate if the sulfhydryl group could be the possible targeting site in the L-type calcium channel in rat cardiomyocytes. Cardiac function was measured in isolated perfused rat hearts. The L-type calcium currents were recorded by using a whole cell voltage clamp technique on the isolated cardiomyocytes. The L-type calcium channel containing free sulfhydryl groups in H9C2 cells were measured by using Western blot. The results showed that sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS, an H2S donor) produced a negative inotropic effect on cardiac function, which could be partly inhibited by the oxidant sulfhydryl modifier diamide (DM). H2S donor inhibited the peak amplitude of I Ca, L in a concentration-dependent manner. However, dithiothreitol (DTT), a reducing sulfhydryl modifier markedly reversed the H2S donor-induced inhibition of I Ca, L in cardiomyocytes. In contrast, in the presence of DM, H2S donor could not alter cardiac function and L type calcium currents. After the isolated rat heart or the cardiomyocytes were treated with DTT, NaHS could markedly alter cardiac function and L-type calcium currents in cardiomyocytes. Furthermore, NaHS could decrease the functional free sulfhydryl group in the L-type Ca2+ channel, which could be reversed by thiol reductant, either DTT or reduced glutathione. Therefore, our results suggest that H2S might inhibit L-type calcium currents depending on the sulfhydryl group in rat cardiomyocytes. PMID:22590646

  4. Cardiac L-type calcium current is increased in a model of hyperaldosteronism in the rat.

    PubMed

    Martin-Fernandez, Beatriz; Miana, María; De Las Heras, Natalia; Ruiz-Hurtado, Gema; Fernandez-Velasco, María; Bas, Manuel; Ballesteros, Sandra; Lahera, Vicente; Cachofeiro, Victoria; Delgado, Carmen

    2009-06-01

    Accumulating evidence supports the importance of aldosterone as an independent risk factor in the pathophysiology of cardiovascular disease. It has been postulated that aldosterone could contribute to ventricular arrhythmogeneity by modulation of cardiac ionic channels. The aim of this study was to analyse ex vivo the electrophysiological characteristics of the L-type cardiac calcium current (I(CaL)) in a model of hyperaldosteronism in the rat. Aldosterone was administered for 3 weeks, and cardiac collagen deposition and haemodynamic parameters were analysed. In addition, RT-PCR and patch-clamp techniques were applied to study cardiac L-type Ca(2+) channels in isolated cardiomyocytes. Administration of aldosterone induced maladaptive cardiac remodelling that was related to increased collagen deposition, diastolic dysfunction and cardiac hypertrophy. In addition, ventricular myocytes isolated from the aldosterone-treated group showed increased I(CaL) density and conductance and prolongation of the action potential duration. No changes in kinetics or in voltage dependence of activation and inactivation of I(CaL) were observed, but relative expression of Ca(V)1.2 mRNA levels was higher in cardiomyocytes isolated from the aldosterone-treated group. The present study demonstrates that aldosterone treatment induces myocardial fibrosis, cardiac hypertrophy, increase of I(CaL) density, upregulation of L-type Ca(2+) channels and prolongation of action potential duration. It could be proposed that aldosterone, through these mechanisms, might exert pro-arrhythmic effects in the pathological heart.

  5. Calcium signaling in mast cells: focusing on L-type calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yoshihiro; Inoue, Toshio; Ra, Chisei

    2012-01-01

    Mast cells play central roles in adaptive and innate immunity. IgE-dependent stimulation of the high-affinity IgE receptor (FcεRI) results in rapid secretion of various proinflammatory chemical mediators and cytokines. All of the outputs depend to certain degrees on an increase in the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration, and influx of Ca(2+) from the extracellular space is often required for their full activation. There is strong evidence that FcεRI stimulation induces two different modes of Ca(2+) influx, store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE) and non-SOCE, which are activated in response to endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) store depletion and independently of Ca(2+) store depletion, respectively, in mast cells. Although Ca(2+) release-activated Ca(2+) channels are the major route of SOCE, recent evidence indicates that they are not the only Ca(2+) channels activated by Ca(2+) store depletion. The recent data suggest that L-type Ca(2+) channels, which were thought to be a characteristic feature of excitable cells, exist in mast cells to mediate non-SOCE, which is critical for protecting mast cells against activation-induced mitochondrial cell death. In this chapter, we provide an overview of recent advances in our understanding of Ca(2+) signaling in mast cells with a special attention to the emerging role for the L-type Ca(2+) channels as a regulator of mast cell survival.

  6. Fluoride affects calcium homeostasis and osteogenic transcription factor expressions through L-type calcium channels in osteoblast cell line.

    PubMed

    Duan, Xiao-Qin; Zhao, Zhi-Tao; Zhang, Xiu-Yun; Wang, Ying; Wang, Huan; Liu, Da-Wei; Li, Guang-Sheng; Jing, Ling

    2014-12-01

    Osteoblast L-type voltage-dependent calcium channels (VDCC) play important roles in maintaining intracellular homeostasis and influencing multiple cellular processes. In particular, they contribute to the activities and functions of osteoblasts (OBs). In order to study how L-type VDCC modulate calcium ion (Ca(2+)) homeostasis and the expression of osteogenic transcription factors in OBs exposed to fluoride, MC3T3-E1 cells were exposed to a gradient of concentrations of fluoride (0, 2.0, 5.0, 10.0 mg/L) in combination with 10 μM nifedipine, a specific inhibitor of VDCC, for 48 h. We examined messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein levels of Cav1.2, the main subunit of VDCC, and c-fos, c-jun, runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2), osterix (OSX), and intracellular free Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]i) concentrations in MC3T3-E1 cells. Our results showed that [Ca(2+)]i levels increased in a dose-dependent manner with increase in concentration of fluoride. Meantime, results indicated that lower concentrations of fluoride (less than 5 mg/L, especially 2 mg/L) can lead to high expression of Cav1.2 and enhance osteogenic function, while high concentration of fluoride (10 mg/L) can induce decreased Cav1.2 and osteogenic transcriptional factors in MC3T3E1 cells exposed to fluoride. However, the levels of [Ca(2+)]i, Cav1.2, c-fos, c-jun, Runx2, and OSX induced by fluoride were significantly altered and even reversed in the presence of nifedipine. These results demonstrate that L-type calcium channels play a crucial role in Ca(2+) homeostasis and they affect the expression of osteogenic transcription factors in fluoride-treated osteoblasts.

  7. Voltage-gated Potassium Channels as Therapeutic Drug Targets

    PubMed Central

    Wulff, Heike; Castle, Neil A.; Pardo, Luis A.

    2009-01-01

    The human genome contains 40 voltage-gated potassium channels (KV) which are involved in diverse physiological processes ranging from repolarization of neuronal or cardiac action potentials, over regulating calcium signaling and cell volume, to driving cellular proliferation and migration. KV channels offer tremendous opportunities for the development of new drugs for cancer, autoimmune diseases and metabolic, neurological and cardiovascular disorders. This review first discusses pharmacological strategies for targeting KV channels with venom peptides, antibodies and small molecules and then highlights recent progress in the preclinical and clinical development of drugs targeting KV1.x, KV7.x (KCNQ), KV10.1 (EAG1) and KV11.1 (hERG) channels. PMID:19949402

  8. Long term regulation of cardiac L-type calcium channel by small G proteins.

    PubMed

    Magyar, J; Jenes, A; Kistamás, K; Ruzsnavszky, F; Nánási, P P; Satin, J; Szentandrássy, N; Bányász, T

    2011-01-01

    Calcium ions are crucial elements of excitation-contraction coupling in cardiac myocytes. The intracellular Ca(2+ ) concentration changes continously during the cardiac cycle, but the Ca(2+ ) entering to the cell serves as an intracellular second messenger, as well. The Ca(2+ ) as a second messenger influences the activity of many intracellular signalling pathways and regulates gene expression. In cardiac myocytes the major pathway for Ca(2+ ) entry into cells is L-type calcium channel (LTCC). The precise control of LTCC function is essential for maintaining the calcium homeostasis of cardiac myocytes. Dysregulation of LTCC may result in different diseases like cardiac hypertrophy, arrhytmias, heart failure. The physiological and pathological structural changes in the heart are induced in part by small G proteins. These proteins are involved in wide spectrum of cell biological functions including protein transport, regulation of cell proliferation, migration, apoptosis, and cytoskeletal rearrangement. Understanding the crosstalk between small G proteins and LTCC may help to understand the pathomechanism of different cardiac diseases and to develop a new generation of genetically-encoded Ca(2+ ) channel inhibitors.

  9. Voltage-gated proton channels: what' next?

    PubMed Central

    DeCoursey, Thomas E

    2008-01-01

    This review is an attempt to identify and place in context some of the many questions about voltage-gated proton channels that remain unsolved. As the gene was identified only 2 years ago, the situation is very different than in fields where the gene has been known for decades. For the proton channel, most of the obvious and less obvious structure–function questions are still wide open. Remarkably, the proton channel protein strongly resembles the voltage-sensing domain of many voltage-gated ion channels, and thus offers a novel approach to study gating mechanisms. Another surprise is that the proton channel appears to function as a dimer, with two separate conduction pathways. A number of significant biological questions remain in dispute, unanswered, or in some cases, not yet asked. This latter deficit is ascribable to the intrinsic difficulty in evaluating the importance of one component in a complex system, and in addition, to the lack, until recently, of a means of performing an unambiguous lesion experiment, that is, of selectively eliminating the molecule in question. We still lack a potent, selective pharmacological inhibitor, but the identification of the gene has allowed the development of powerful new tools including proton channel antibodies, siRNA and knockout mice. PMID:18801839

  10. Forskolin Regulates L-Type Calcium Channel through Interaction between Actinin 4 and β3 Subunit in Osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuemei; Li, Fangping; Guo, Lin; Hei, Hongya; Tian, Lulu; Peng, Wen; Cai, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-dependent L-type calcium channels that permit cellular calcium influx are essential in calcium-mediated modulation of cellular signaling. Although the regulation of voltage-dependent L-type calcium channels is linked to many factors including cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) activity and actin cytoskeleton, little is known about the detailed mechanisms underlying the regulation in osteoblasts. Our present study investigated the modulation of L-type calcium channel activities through the effects of forskolin on actin reorganization and on its functional interaction with actin binding protein actinin 4. The results showed that forskolin did not significantly affect the trafficking of pore forming α1c subunit and its interaction with actin binding protein actinin 4, whereas it significantly increased the expression of β3 subunit and its interaction with actinin 4 in osteoblast cells as assessed by co-immunoprecipitation, pull-down assay, and immunostaining. Further mapping showed that the ABD and EF domains of actinin 4 were interaction sites. This interaction is independent of PKA phosphorylation. Knockdown of actinin 4 significantly decreased the activities of L-type calcium channels. Our study revealed a new aspect of the mechanisms by which the forskolin activation of adenylyl cyclase - cAMP cascade regulates the L-type calcium channel in osteoblast cells, besides the PKA mediated phosphorylation of the channel subunits. These data provide insight into the important role of interconnection among adenylyl cyclase, cAMP, PKA, the actin cytoskeleton, and the channel proteins in the regulation of voltage-dependent L-type calcium channels in osteoblast cells.

  11. A potent 1,4-dihydropyridine L-type calcium channel blocker, benidipine, promotes osteoblast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Nishiya, Y; Kosaka, N; Uchii, M; Sugimoto, S

    2002-01-01

    During their differentiation, osteoblasts sequentially express type I collagen, alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and osteocalcin, and then undergo mineral deposition. Among dihydropyridine-type calcium channel blockers, only benidipine stimulated ALP activity of osteoblastic cells derived from neonatal mouse calvaria. To identify the molecular target of benidipine and elucidate the mechanism of action of the drug in osteoblasts, the mouse osteoblastic cell line MC3T3-E1 was used. Benidipine prompted ALP activity and ALP transcription induced by ascorbic acid, and mineral deposition by ascorbic acid and b-glycerophosphate. Benidipine, however, did not change collagen accumulation. MC3T3-E1 cells expressed the L-type Ca channel a1C subunit throughout the differentiation process, and Ca influx by potassium ions and Bay K 8644, an agonist, was strongly attenuated by benidipine. Each one of three structurally different classes of Ca channel blockers, nifedipine, verapamil, and diltiazem stimulated ALP activity, although at much higher concentrations of ca. 100 nM than benidipine, 1 pM. These results suggest that benidipine directly exerts its effect on osteoblasts and promotes osteoblast differentiation after the step of collagen accumulation by blocking the L-type Ca channel. Since benidipine blocked Ca influx more potently than the three other Ca channel blockers, the unique and potent osteoblast differentiating ability of benidipine may be due to its high affinity for Ca channel together with its high membrane retaining ability, as has been previously reported.

  12. The role of L-type calcium channels in the development and expression of behavioral sensitization to ethanol.

    PubMed

    Broadbent, Julie

    2013-10-11

    Behavioral sensitization is thought to play a significant role in drug addiction. L-type calcium channels have been implicated in sensitization to stimulant and opiate drugs but it is unclear if these channels also contribute to sensitization to ethanol. The effects of three L-type calcium channel blockers, nifedipine (1-7.5 mg/kg), diltiazem (12.5-50 mg/kg), and verapamil (12.5 and 25 mg/kg), on sensitization to ethanol (2 g/kg) were examined in DBA/2J mice. All three blockers reduced but did not prevent expression of sensitization. Only nifedipine blocked acquisition of sensitization. Nifedipine and verapamil decreased blood ethanol levels. The current findings suggest L-type calcium channels do not play a substantial role in sensitization to ethanol and that the neural mechanisms underlying sensitization to ethanol are distinct from those mediating sensitization to stimulants and opiates.

  13. The Role of L-Type Calcium Channels in the Development and Expression of Behavioral Sensitization to Ethanol

    PubMed Central

    Broadbent, Julie

    2013-01-01

    Behavioral sensitization is thought to play a significant role in drug addiction. L-type calcium channels have been implicated in sensitization to stimulant and opiate drugs but it is unclear if these channels also contribute to sensitization to ethanol. The effects of three L-type calcium channel blockers, nifedipine (1 – 7.5 mg/kg), diltiazem (12.5 – 50 mg/kg), and verapamil (12.5 and 25 mg/kg), on sensitization to ethanol (2 g/kg) were examined in DBA/2J mice. All three blockers reduced but did not prevent expression of sensitization. Only nifedipine blocked acquisition of sensitization. Nifedipine and verapamil decreased blood ethanol levels. The current findings suggest L-type calcium channels do not play a substantial role in sensitization to ethanol and that the neural mechanisms underlying sensitization to ethanol are distinct from those mediating sensitization to stimulants and opiates. PMID:23994059

  14. Philosophy of voltage-gated proton channels

    PubMed Central

    DeCoursey, Thomas E.; Hosler, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    In this review, voltage-gated proton channels are considered from a mainly teleological perspective. Why do proton channels exist? What good are they? Why did they go to such lengths to develop several unique hallmark properties such as extreme selectivity and ΔpH-dependent gating? Why is their current so minuscule? How do they manage to be so selective? What is the basis for our belief that they conduct H+ and not OH–? Why do they exist in many species as dimers when the monomeric form seems to work quite well? It is hoped that pondering these questions will provide an introduction to these channels and a way to logically organize their peculiar properties as well as to understand how they are able to carry out some of their better-established biological functions. PMID:24352668

  15. Salt Pumping by Voltage-Gated Nanochannels.

    PubMed

    Tagliazucchi, Mario; Szleifer, Igal

    2015-09-17

    This Letter investigates voltage-gated nanochannels, where both the potential applied to the conductive membrane containing the channel (membrane potential) and the potential difference between the solutions at both sides of the membrane (transmembrane potential) are independently controlled. The predicted conductance characteristics of these fixed-potential channels dramatically differ from those of the widely studied fixed-charge nanochannels, in which the membrane is insulating and has a fixed surface charge density. The difference arises because the transmembrane potential induces an inhomogeneous charge distribution on the surface of fixed-potential nanochannels. This behavior, related to bipolar electrochemistry, has some interesting and unexpected consequences for ion transport. For example, continuously oscillating the transmembrane potential, while holding the membrane potential at the potential for which it has zero charge in equilibrium, creates fluxes of neutral salt (fluxes of anions and cations in the same direction and number) through the channel, which is an interesting phenomenon for desalination applications.

  16. Ion concentration-dependence of rat cardiac unitary L-type calcium channel conductance.

    PubMed Central

    Guia, A; Stern, M D; Lakatta, E G; Josephson, I R

    2001-01-01

    Little is known about the native properties of unitary cardiac L-type calcium currents (i(Ca)) measured with physiological calcium (Ca) ion concentration, and their role in excitation-contraction (E-C) coupling. Our goal was to chart the concentration-dependence of unitary conductance (gamma) to physiological Ca concentration and compare it to barium ion (Ba) conductance in the absence of agonists. In isolated, K-depolarized rat myocytes, i(Ca) amplitudes were measured using cell-attached patches with 2 to 70 mM Ca or 2 to 105 mM Ba in the pipette. At 0 mV, 2 mM of Ca produced 0.12 pA, and 2 mM of Ba produced 0.19 pA unitary currents. Unitary conductance was described by a Langmuir isotherm relationship with a maximum gammaCa of 5.3 +/- 0.2 pS (n = 15), and gammaBa of 15 +/- 1 pS (n = 27). The concentration producing half-maximal gamma, Kd(gamma), was not different between Ca (1.7 +/- 0.3 mM) and Ba (1.9 +/- 0.4 mM). We found that quasi-physiological concentrations of Ca produced currents that were as easily resolvable as those obtained with the traditionally used higher concentrations. This study leads to future work on the molecular basis of E-C coupling with a physiological concentration of Ca ions permeating the Ca channel. PMID:11371449

  17. L-Type Calcium Channel Inhibition Contributes to the Proarrhythmic Effects of Aconitine in Human Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jianjun; Wang, Xiangchong; Chung, Ying Ying; Koh, Cai Hong; Liu, Zhenfeng; Guo, Huicai; Yuan, Qiang; Wang, Chuan; Su, Suwen; Wei, Heming

    2017-01-01

    Aconitine (ACO) is well-known for causing lethal ventricular tachyarrhythmias. While cardiac Na+ channel opening during repolarization has long been documented in animal cardiac myocytes, the cellular effects and mechanism of ACO in human remain unexplored. This study aimed to assess the proarrhythmic effects of ACO in human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CMs). ACO concentration-dependently (0.3 ~ 3.0 μM) shortened the action potentials (AP) durations (APD) in ventricular-like hiPSC-CMs by > 40% and induced delayed after-depolarization. Laser-scanning confocal calcium imaging analysis showed that ACO decreased the duration and amplitude of [Ca2+]i transients and increased in the beating frequencies by over 60%. Moreover, ACO was found to markedly reduce the L-type calcium channel (LTCC) currents (ICa,L) in hiPSC-CMs associated with a positive-shift of activation and a negative shift of inactivation. ACO failed to alter the peak and late Na+ currents (INa) in hiPSC-CMs while it drastically increased the late INa in Guinea-pig ventricular myocytes associated with enhanced activation/delayed inactivation of INa at -55 mV~ -85 mV. Further, the effects of ACO on ICa,L, INa and the rapid delayed rectifier potassium current (Ikr) were validated in heterologous expression systems by automated voltage-clamping assays and a moderate suppression of Ikr was observed in addition to concentration-dependent ICa,L inhibition. Lastly, increased beating frequency, decreased Ca2+ wave and shortened field potential duration were recorded from hiPSC-CMs by microelectrode arrays assay. In summary, our data demonstrated that LTCC inhibition could play a main role in the proarrhythmic action of ACO in human cardiomyocytes. PMID:28056022

  18. The role of solvation in the binding selectivity of the L-type calcium channel.

    PubMed

    Boda, Dezső; Henderson, Douglas; Gillespie, Dirk

    2013-08-07

    We present grand canonical Monte Carlo simulation results for a reduced model of the L-type calcium channel. While charged residues of the protein amino acids in the selectivity filter are treated explicitly, most of the degrees of freedom (including the rest of the protein and the solvent) are represented by their dielectric response, i.e., dielectric continua. The new aspect of this paper is that the dielectric coefficient in the channel is different from that in the baths. The ions entering the channel, thus, cross a dielectric boundary at the entrance of the channel. Simulating this case has been made possible by our recent methodological development [D. Boda, D. Henderson, B. Eisenberg, and D. Gillespie, J. Chem. Phys. 135, 064105 (2011)]. Our main focus is on the effect of solvation energy (represented by the Born energy) on monovalent vs. divalent ion selectivity in the channel. We find no significant change in selectivity by changing the dielectric coefficient in the channel because the larger solvation penalty is counterbalanced by the enhanced Coulomb attraction inside the channel as soon as we use the Born radii (fitted to experimental hydration energies) to compute the solvation penalty from the Born equation.

  19. Rem-GTPase regulates cardiac myocyte L-type calcium current

    PubMed Central

    Magyar, Janos; Kiper, Carmen E.; Sievert, Gail; Cai, Weikang; Shi, Geng-Xian; Crump, Shawn M.; Li, Liren; Niederer, Steven; Smith, Nic; Andres, Douglas A.; Satin, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Rationale: The L-type calcium channels (LTCC) are critical for maintaining Ca2+-homeostasis. In heterologous expression studies, the RGK-class of Ras-related G-proteins regulates LTCC function; however, the physiological relevance of RGK–LTCC interactions is untested. Objective: In this report we test the hypothesis that the RGK protein, Rem, modulates native Ca2+ current (ICa,L) via LTCC in murine cardiomyocytes. Methods and Results: Rem knockout mice (Rem−/−) were engineered, and ICa,L and Ca2+-handling properties were assessed. Rem−/− ventricular cardiomyocytes displayed increased ICa,L density. ICa,L activation was shifted positive on the voltage axis, and β-adrenergic stimulation normalized this shift compared with wild-type ICa,L. Current kinetics, steady-state inactivation, and facilitation was unaffected by Rem−/−. Cell shortening was not significantly different. Increased ICa,L density in the absence of frank phenotypic differences motivated us to explore putative compensatory mechanisms. Despite the larger ICa,L density, Rem−/− cardiomyocyte Ca2+ twitch transient amplitude was significantly less than that compared with wild type. Computer simulations and immunoblot analysis suggests that relative dephosphorylation of Rem−/− LTCC can account for the paradoxical decrease of Ca2+ transients. Conclusions: This is the first demonstration that loss of an RGK protein influences ICa,L in vivo in cardiac myocytes. PMID:22854599

  20. Investigation of calcium antagonist-L-type calcium channel interactions by a vascular smooth muscle cell membrane chromatography method.

    PubMed

    Du, Hui; He, Jianyu; Wang, Sicen; He, Langchong

    2010-07-01

    The dissociation equilibrium constant (K(D)) is an important affinity parameter for studying drug-receptor interactions. A vascular smooth muscle (VSM) cell membrane chromatography (CMC) method was developed for determination of the K(D) values for calcium antagonist-L-type calcium channel (L-CC) interactions. VSM cells, by means of primary culture with rat thoracic aortas, were used for preparation of the cell membrane stationary phase in the VSM/CMC model. All measurements were performed with spectrophotometric detection (237 nm) at 37 degrees C. The K(D) values obtained using frontal analysis were 3.36 x 10(-6) M for nifedipine, 1.34 x 10(-6) M for nimodipine, 6.83 x 10(-7) M for nitrendipine, 1.23 x 10(-7) M for nicardipine, 1.09 x 10(-7) M for amlodipine, and 8.51 x 10(-8) M for verapamil. This affinity rank order obtained from the VSM/CMC method had a strong positive correlation with that obtained from radioligand binding assay. The location of the binding region was examined by displacement experiments using nitrendipine as a mobile-phase additive. It was found that verapamil occupied a class of binding sites on L-CCs different from those occupied by nitrendipine. In addition, nicardipine, amlodipine, and nitrendipine had direct competition at a single common binding site. The studies showed that CMC can be applied to the investigation of drug-receptor interactions.

  1. N-type and L-type calcium channels mediate glycinergic synaptic inputs to retinal ganglion cells of tiger salamanders.

    PubMed

    Bieda, Mark C; Copenhagen, David R

    2004-01-01

    Synaptically localized calcium channels shape the timecourse of synaptic release, are a prominent site for neuromodulation, and have been implicated in genetic disease. In retina, it is well established that L-type calcium channels play a major role in mediating release of glutamate from the photoreceptors and bipolar cells. However, little is known about which calcium channels are coupled to synaptic exocytosis of glycine, which is primarily released by amacrine cells. A recent report indicates that glycine release from spiking AII amacrine cells relies exclusively upon L-type calcium channels. To identify calcium channel types controlling neurotransmitter release from the population of glycinergic neurons that drive retinal ganglion cells, we recorded electrical and potassium evoked inhibitory synaptic currents (IPSCs) from these postsynaptic neurons in retinal slices from tiger salamanders. The L-channel antagonist nifedipine strongly inhibited release and FPL64176, an L-channel agonist, greatly enhanced it, indicating a significant role for L-channels. omega-Conotoxin MVIIC, an N/P/Q-channel antagonist, strongly inhibited release, indicating an important role for non-L channels. While the P/Q-channel blocker omega-Aga IVA produced only small effects, the N-channel blocker omega-conotoxin GVIA strongly inhibited release. Hence, N-type and L-type calcium channels appear to play major roles, overall, in mediating synaptic release of glycine onto retinal ganglion cells.

  2. Simulated GABA synaptic input and L-type calcium channels form functional microdomains in hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons.

    PubMed

    Hemond, Peter J; O'Boyle, Michael P; Roberts, Carson B; Delgado-Reyes, Alfonso; Hemond, Zoe; Suter, Kelly J

    2012-06-27

    Hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons integrate the multiple internal and external cues that regulate sexual reproduction. In contrast to other neurons that exhibit extensive dendritic arbors, GnRH neurons usually have a single dendrite with relatively little branching. This largely precludes the integration strategy in which a single dendritic branch serves as a unit of integration. In the present study, we identify a gradient in L-type calcium channels in dendrites of mouse GnRH neurons and its interaction with GABAergic and glutamatergic inputs. Higher levels of L-type calcium channels are in somata/proximal dendrites (i.e., 0-26 μm) and distal dendrites (∼130 μm dendrite length), but intervening midlengths of dendrite (∼27-130 μm) have reduced L-type calcium channels. Using uncaging of GABA, there is a decreasing GABAergic influence along the dendrite and the impact of GABA(A) receptors is dependent on activation of L-type calcium channels. This results in amplification of proximal GABAergic signals and attenuation of distal dendritic signals. Most interestingly, the intervening dendritic regions create a filter through which only relatively high-amplitude, low-frequency GABAergic signaling to dendrites elicits action potentials. The findings of the present study suggest that GnRH dendrites adopt an integration strategy whereby segments of single nonbranching GnRH dendrites create functional microdomains and thus serve as units of integration.

  3. Calcium dynamics during NMDA-induced membrane potential oscillations in lamprey spinal neurons--contribution of L-type calcium channels (CaV1.3).

    PubMed

    Wang, Di; Grillner, Sten; Wallén, Peter

    2013-05-15

      NMDA receptor-dependent, intrinsic membrane potential oscillations are an important element in the operation of the lamprey locomotor network. They involve a cyclic influx of calcium, leading to an activation of calcium-activated potassium (KCa) channels that in turn contributes to the termination of the depolarized plateau and membrane repolarization. In this study, we have investigated the calcium dynamics in different regions of lamprey spinal neurons during membrane potential oscillations, using confocal calcium imaging in combination with intracellular recordings. Calcium fluctuations were observed in both soma and dendrites, timed to the oscillations. The calcium level increased sharply at the onset of membrane depolarization, to reach its maximum by the end of the plateau. The calcium peak in distal dendrites typically occurred earlier than in the soma during the oscillatory cycle. The L-type calcium channel blocker nimodipine increased the duration of the depolarized plateau phase in most cells tested, whereas the agonist Bay K 8644 decreased plateau duration. Bay K 8644 increased the amplitude of calcium fluctuations, particularly in distal dendrites, whereas nimodipine caused a decrease, suggesting that L-type low-voltage-activated calcium channels are mainly localized in these regions. Our results thus indicate that dendritic CaV1.3-like calcium channels are activated during NMDA-mediated membrane potential oscillations. This calcium influx activates KCa channels involved in plateau termination.

  4. Regulation of the L-type calcium channel by alpha 5beta 1 integrin requires signaling between focal adhesion proteins.

    PubMed

    Wu, X; Davis, G E; Meininger, G A; Wilson, E; Davis, M J

    2001-08-10

    The L-type calcium channel is the major calcium influx pathway in vascular smooth muscle and is regulated by integrin ligands, suggesting an important link between extracellular matrix and vascular tone regulation in tissue injury and remodeling. We examined the role of integrin-linked tyrosine kinases and focal adhesion proteins in regulation of L-type calcium current in single vascular myocytes. Soluble tyrosine kinase inhibitors blocked the increase in current produced by alpha(5) integrin antibody or fibronectin, whereas tyrosine phosphatase inhibition enhanced the effect. Cell dialysis with an antibody to focal adhesion kinase or with FRNK, the C-terminal noncatalytic domain of focal adhesion kinase, produced moderate (24 or 18%, respectively) inhibition of basal current but much greater inhibition (63 or 68%, respectively) of integrin-enhanced current. A c-Src antibody and peptide inhibitors of the Src homology-2 domain or a putative Src tyrosine phosphorylation site on the channel produced similar inhibition. Antibodies to the cytoskeletal proteins paxillin and vinculin, but not alpha-actinin, inhibited integrin-dependent current by 65-80%. Therefore, alpha(5)beta(1) integrin appears to regulate a tyrosine phosphorylation cascade involving Src and various focal adhesion proteins that control the function of the L-type calcium channel. This interaction may represent a novel mechanism for control of calcium influx in vascular smooth muscle and other cell types.

  5. Dopamine Induces LTP Differentially in Apical and Basal Dendrites through BDNF and Voltage-Dependent Calcium Channels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Navakkode, Sheeja; Sajikumar, Sreedharan; Korte, Martin; Soong, Tuck Wah

    2012-01-01

    The dopaminergic modulation of long-term potentiation (LTP) has been studied well, but the mechanism by which dopamine induces LTP (DA-LTP) in CA1 pyramidal neurons is unknown. Here, we report that DA-LTP in basal dendrites is dependent while in apical dendrites it is independent of activation of L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (VDCC).…

  6. Enhanced currents through L-type calcium channels in cardiomyocytes disturb the electrophysiology of the dystrophic heart.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Xaver; Rubi, Lena; Obermair, Gerald J; Cervenka, Rene; Dang, Xuan B; Lukacs, Peter; Kummer, Stefan; Bittner, Reginald E; Kubista, Helmut; Todt, Hannes; Hilber, Karlheinz

    2014-02-15

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), induced by mutations in the gene encoding for the cytoskeletal protein dystrophin, is an inherited disease characterized by progressive muscle weakness. Besides the relatively well characterized skeletal muscle degenerative processes, DMD is also associated with cardiac complications. These include cardiomyopathy development and cardiac arrhythmias. The current understanding of the pathomechanisms in the heart is very limited, but recent research indicates that dysfunctional ion channels in dystrophic cardiomyocytes play a role. The aim of the present study was to characterize abnormalities in L-type calcium channel function in adult dystrophic ventricular cardiomyocytes. By using the whole cell patch-clamp technique, the properties of currents through calcium channels in ventricular cardiomyocytes isolated from the hearts of normal and dystrophic adult mice were compared. Besides the commonly used dystrophin-deficient mdx mouse model for human DMD, we also used mdx-utr mice, which are both dystrophin- and utrophin-deficient. We found that calcium channel currents were significantly increased, and channel inactivation was reduced in dystrophic cardiomyocytes. Both effects enhance the calcium influx during an action potential (AP). Whereas the AP in dystrophic mouse cardiomyocytes was nearly normal, implementation of the enhanced dystrophic calcium conductance in a computer model of a human ventricular cardiomyocyte considerably prolonged the AP. Finally, the described dystrophic calcium channel abnormalities entailed alterations in the electrocardiograms of dystrophic mice. We conclude that gain of function in cardiac L-type calcium channels may disturb the electrophysiology of the dystrophic heart and thereby cause arrhythmias.

  7. Binding and selectivity in L-type calcium channels: a mean spherical approximation.

    PubMed Central

    Nonner, W; Catacuzzeno, L; Eisenberg, B

    2000-01-01

    L-type calcium channels are Ca(2+) binding proteins of great biological importance. They generate an essential intracellular signal of living cells by allowing Ca(2+) ions to move across the lipid membrane into the cell, thereby selecting an ion that is in low extracellular abundance. Their mechanism of selection involves four carboxylate groups, containing eight oxygen ions, that belong to the side chains of the "EEEE" locus of the channel protein, a setting similar to that found in many Ca(2+)-chelating molecules. This study examines the hypothesis that selectivity in this locus is determined by mutual electrostatic screening and volume exclusion between ions and carboxylate oxygens of finite diameters. In this model, the eight half-charged oxygens of the tethered carboxylate groups of the protein are confined to a subvolume of the pore (the "filter"), but interact spontaneously with their mobile counterions as ions interact in concentrated bulk solutions. The mean spherical approximation (MSA) is used to predict ion-specific excess chemical potentials in the filter and baths. The theory is calibrated using a single experimental observation, concerning the apparent dissociation constant of Ca(2+) in the presence of a physiological concentration of NaCl. When ions are assigned their independently known crystal diameters and the carboxylate oxygens are constrained, e.g., to a volume of 0.375 nm(3) in an environment with an effective dielectric coefficient of 63.5, the hypothesized selectivity filter produces the shape of the calcium binding curves observed in experiment, and it predicts Ba(2+)/Ca(2+) and Na(+)/Li(+) competition, and Cl(-) exclusion as observed. The selectivities for Na(+), Ca(2+), Ba(2+), other alkali metal ions, and Cl(-) thus can be predicted by volume exclusion and electrostatic screening alone. Spontaneous coordination of ions and carboxylates can produce a wide range of Ca(2+) selectivities, depending on the volume density of carboxylate

  8. Functional role of voltage gated Ca2+ channels in heart automaticity

    PubMed Central

    Mesirca, Pietro; Torrente, Angelo G.; Mangoni, Matteo E.

    2015-01-01

    Pacemaker activity of automatic cardiac myocytes controls the heartbeat in everyday life. Cardiac automaticity is under the control of several neurotransmitters and hormones and is constantly regulated by the autonomic nervous system to match the physiological needs of the organism. Several classes of ion channels and proteins involved in intracellular Ca2+ dynamics contribute to pacemaker activity. The functional role of voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) in heart automaticity and impulse conduction has been matter of debate for 30 years. However, growing evidence shows that VGCCs are important regulators of the pacemaker mechanisms and play also a major role in atrio-ventricular impulse conduction. Incidentally, studies performed in genetically modified mice lacking L-type Cav1.3 (Cav1.3−/−) or T-type Cav3.1 (Cav3.1−/−) channels show that genetic inactivation of these channels strongly impacts pacemaking. In cardiac pacemaker cells, VGCCs activate at negative voltages at the beginning of the diastolic depolarization and importantly contribute to this phase by supplying inward current. Loss-of-function of these channels also impairs atrio-ventricular conduction. Furthermore, inactivation of Cav1.3 channels promotes also atrial fibrillation and flutter in knockout mice suggesting that these channels can play a role in stabilizing atrial rhythm. Genomic analysis demonstrated that Cav1.3 and Cav3.1 channels are widely expressed in pacemaker tissue of mice, rabbits and humans. Importantly, human diseases of pacemaker activity such as congenital bradycardia and heart block have been attributed to loss-of-function of Cav1.3 and Cav3.1 channels. In this article, we will review the current knowledge on the role of VGCCs in the generation and regulation of heart rate and rhythm. We will discuss also how loss of Ca2+ entry through VGCCs could influence intracellular Ca2+ handling and promote atrial arrhythmias. PMID:25698974

  9. High-Frequency Stimulation-Induced Synaptic Potentiation in Dorsal and Ventral CA1 Hippocampal Synapses: The Involvement of NMDA Receptors, mGluR5, and (L-Type) Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papatheodoropoulos, Costas; Kouvaros, Stylianos

    2016-01-01

    The ability of the ventral hippocampus (VH) for long-lasting long-term potentiation (LTP) and the mechanisms underlying its lower ability for shortlasting LTP compared with the dorsal hippocampus (DH) are unknown. Using recordings of field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) from the CA1 field of adult rat hippocampal slices, we found that…

  10. Familial hemiplegic migraine type 1 mutations W1684R and V1696I alter G protein-mediated regulation of Ca(V)2.1 voltage-gated calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Garza-López, Edgar; Sandoval, Alejandro; González-Ramírez, Ricardo; Gandini, María A; Van den Maagdenberg, Arn; De Waard, Michel; Felix, Ricardo

    2012-08-01

    Familial hemiplegic migraine type 1 (FHM-1) is a monogenic form of migraine with aura that is characterized by recurrent attacks of a typical migraine headache with transient hemiparesis during the aura phase. In a subset of patients, additional symptoms such as epilepsy and cerebellar ataxia are part of the clinical phenotype. FHM-1 is caused by missense mutations in the CACNA1A gene that encodes the pore-forming subunit of Ca(V)2.1 voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels. Although the functional effects of an increasing number of FHM-1 mutations have been characterized, knowledge on the influence of most of these mutations on G protein regulation of channel function is lacking. Here, we explored the effects of G protein-dependent modulation on mutations W1684R and V1696I which cause FHM-1 with and without cerebellar ataxia, respectively. Both mutations were introduced into the human Ca(V)2.1α(1) subunit and their functional consequences investigated after heterologous expression in human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK-293) cells using patch-clamp recordings. When co-expressed along with the human μ-opioid receptor, application of the agonist [d-Ala2, N-MePhe4, Gly-ol]-enkephalin (DAMGO) inhibited currents through both wild-type (WT) and mutant Ca(V)2.1 channels, which is consistent with the known modulation of these channels by G protein-coupled receptors. Prepulse facilitation, which is a way to characterize the relief of direct voltage-dependent G protein regulation, was reduced by both FHM-1 mutations. Moreover, the kinetic analysis of the onset and decay of facilitation showed that the W1684R and V1696I mutations affect the apparent dissociation and reassociation rates of the Gβγ dimer from the channel complex, suggesting that the G protein-Ca(2+) channel affinity may be altered by the mutations. These biophysical studies may shed new light on the pathophysiology underlying FHM-1.

  11. New mechanisms of antiplatelet activity of nifedipine, an L-type calcium channel blocker.

    PubMed

    Chou, Tz-Chong

    2014-01-01

    Platelet hyperactivity often occursd in hypertensive patients and is a key factor in the development of cardiovascular diseases including thrombosis and atherosclerosis. Nifedipine, an L-type calcium channel blocker, is widely used for hypertension and coronary heart disease therapy. In addition, nifedipine is known to exhibit an antiplatelet activity, but the underlying mechanisms involved remain unclear. Several transcription factors such as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) exist in platelets and have an ability to regulate platelet aggregation through a non-genomic mechanism. The present article focuses on describing the mechanisms of the antiplatelet activity of nifedipine via PPAR activation. It has been demonstrated that nifedipine treatment increases the activity and intracellular amount of PPAR-β/-γ in activated platelets. Moreover, the antiplatelet activity of nifedipine is mediated by PPAR-β/-γ-dependent upon the up-regulation of the PI3K/AKT/NO/cyclic GMP/PKG pathway, and inhibition of protein kinase Cα (PKCα) activity via an interaction between PPAR-β/-γ and PKCα. Furthermore, suppressing NF-κB activation by nifedipine through enhanced association of PPAR-β/-γ with NF-κB has also been observed in collagen-stimulated platelets. Blocking PPAR-β/-γ activity or increasing NF-κB activation greatly reverses the antiplatelet activity and inhibition of intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization, PKCα activity, and surface glycoprotein IIb/IIIa expression caused by nifedipine. Thus, PPAR-β/-γ- dependent suppression of NF-κB activation also contributes to the antiplatelet activity of nifedipine. Consistently, administration of nifedipine markedly reduces fluorescein sodium-induced vessel thrombus formation in mice, which is considerably inhibited when the PPAR-β/-γ antagonists are administrated simultaneously. Collectively, these results provide important information regarding the mechanism by

  12. Allosteric Voltage Gating of Potassium Channels I

    PubMed Central

    Horrigan, Frank T.; Cui, Jianmin; Aldrich, Richard W.

    1999-01-01

    Activation of large conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels is controlled by both cytoplasmic Ca2+ and membrane potential. To study the mechanism of voltage-dependent gating, we examined mSlo Ca2+-activated K+ currents in excised macropatches from Xenopus oocytes in the virtual absence of Ca2+ (<1 nM). In response to a voltage step, IK activates with an exponential time course, following a brief delay. The delay suggests that rapid transitions precede channel opening. The later exponential time course suggests that activation also involves a slower rate-limiting step. However, the time constant of IK relaxation [τ(IK)] exhibits a complex voltage dependence that is inconsistent with models that contain a single rate limiting step. τ(IK) increases weakly with voltage from −500 to −20 mV, with an equivalent charge (z) of only 0.14 e, and displays a stronger voltage dependence from +30 to +140 mV (z = 0.49 e), which then decreases from +180 to +240 mV (z = −0.29 e). Similarly, the steady state GK–V relationship exhibits a maximum voltage dependence (z = 2 e) from 0 to +100 mV, and is weakly voltage dependent (z ≅ 0.4 e) at more negative voltages, where Po = 10−5–10−6. These results can be understood in terms of a gating scheme where a central transition between a closed and an open conformation is allosterically regulated by the state of four independent and identical voltage sensors. In the absence of Ca2+, this allosteric mechanism results in a gating scheme with five closed (C) and five open (O) states, where the majority of the channel's voltage dependence results from rapid C–C and O–O transitions, whereas the C–O transitions are rate limiting and weakly voltage dependent. These conclusions not only provide a framework for interpreting studies of large conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channel voltage gating, but also have important implications for understanding the mechanism of Ca2+ sensitivity. PMID:10436003

  13. PKC-mediated modulation of L-type calcium channels may contribute to fat-induced insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    McCarty, Mark F

    2006-01-01

    Increased intracellular free calcium [Ca2+]i has been noted in adipocytes, platelets, and leukocytes of subjects with insulin resistance syndrome or allied disorders. In rodent studies, measures which increase [Ca2+]i in adipocytes and skeletal muscle are associated with impaired insulin signaling, attributable at least in part to diminished ability of insulin to activate phosphoserine phosphatase-1 (PP-1). In fat-fed insulin resistant rats, pre-treatment with a drug that selectively chelates intracellular calcium eliminates about half of the decrement in insulin-stimulated glucose uptake induced by fat feeding; since this chelator does not influence the insulin sensitivity of chow-fed rats, it is reasonable to suspect that fat feeding boosts [Ca2+]i in skeletal muscle, and that this effect is partially responsible for the associated reduction in insulin sensitivity. Clinical insulin resistance is associated with increased levels of triglycerides and other fatty acid metabolites in muscle fibers; this can give rise to diacylglycerol-mediated activation of PKC, which in turn compromises insulin signaling by triggering kinase cascades that phosphorylate IRS-1 on key serine residues. Yet there is also evidence that, in skeletal muscle, PKC activity up-regulates the function of L-type calcium channels, increasing their maximal conductance while left-shifting their voltage dependence. Thus, the PKC activation associated with fat overexposure might be expected to boost basal [Ca2+]i in skeletal muscle, potentially impeding insulin-mediated activation of PP-1. This hypothesis is consistent with several clinical studies demonstrating that long-acting inhibitors of L-type calcium channels can improve insulin sensitivity in overweight hypertensives; it should be readily testable in rodent models of fat-induced insulin resistance. Since parathyroid hormone can act on adipocytes and muscle to boost [Ca2+]i, mild secondary hyperparathyroidism associated with low calcium intakes

  14. CNTF-ACM promotes mitochondrial respiration and oxidative stress in cortical neurons through upregulating L-type calcium channel activity.

    PubMed

    Sun, Meiqun; Liu, Hongli; Xu, Huanbai; Wang, Hongtao; Wang, Xiaojing

    2016-09-01

    A specialized culture medium termed ciliary neurotrophic factor-treated astrocyte-conditioned medium (CNTF-ACM) allows investigators to assess the peripheral effects of CNTF-induced activated astrocytes upon cultured neurons. CNTF-ACM has been shown to upregulate neuronal L-type calcium channel current activity, which has been previously linked to changes in mitochondrial respiration and oxidative stress. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate CNTF-ACM's effects upon mitochondrial respiration and oxidative stress in rat cortical neurons. Cortical neurons, CNTF-ACM, and untreated control astrocyte-conditioned medium (UC-ACM) were prepared from neonatal Sprague-Dawley rat cortical tissue. Neurons were cultured in either CNTF-ACM or UC-ACM for a 48-h period. Changes in the following parameters before and after treatment with the L-type calcium channel blocker isradipine were assessed: (i) intracellular calcium levels, (ii) mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), (iii) oxygen consumption rate (OCR) and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) formation, (iv) intracellular nitric oxide (NO) levels, (v) mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and (vi) susceptibility to the mitochondrial complex I toxin rotenone. CNTF-ACM neurons displayed the following significant changes relative to UC-ACM neurons: (i) increased intracellular calcium levels (p < 0.05), (ii) elevation in ΔΨm (p < 0.05), (iii) increased OCR and ATP formation (p < 0.05), (iv) increased intracellular NO levels (p < 0.05), (v) increased mitochondrial ROS production (p < 0.05), and (vi) increased susceptibility to rotenone (p < 0.05). Treatment with isradipine was able to partially rescue these negative effects of CNTF-ACM (p < 0.05). CNTF-ACM promotes mitochondrial respiration and oxidative stress in cortical neurons through elevating L-type calcium channel activity.

  15. Flufenamic acid decreases neuronal excitability through modulation of voltage-gated sodium channel gating.

    PubMed

    Yau, Hau-Jie; Baranauskas, Gytis; Martina, Marco

    2010-10-15

    The electrophysiological phenotype of individual neurons critically depends on the biophysical properties of the voltage-gated channels they express. Differences in sodium channel gating are instrumental in determining the different firing phenotypes of pyramidal cells and interneurons; moreover, sodium channel modulation represents an important mechanism of action for many widely used CNS drugs. Flufenamic acid (FFA) is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug that has been long used as a blocker of calcium-dependent cationic conductances. Here we show that FFA inhibits voltage-gated sodium currents in hippocampal pyramidal neurons; this effect is dose-dependent with IC(50) = 189 μm. We used whole-cell and nucleated patch recordings to investigate the mechanisms of FFA modulation of TTX-sensitive voltage-gated sodium current. Our data show that flufenamic acid slows down the inactivation process of the sodium current, while shifting the inactivation curve ~10 mV toward more hyperpolarized potentials. The recovery from inactivation is also affected in a voltage-dependent way, resulting in slower recovery at hyperpolarized potentials. Recordings from acute slices demonstrate that FFA reduces repetitive- and abolishes burst-firing in CA1 pyramidal neurons. A computational model based on our data was employed to better understand the mechanisms of FFA action. Simulation data support the idea that FFA acts via a novel mechanism by reducing the voltage dependence of the sodium channel fast inactivation rates. These effects of FFA suggest that it may be an effective anti-epileptic drug.

  16. Preparation and preclinical evaluation of 68Ga-DOTA-amlodipine for L-type calcium channel imaging

    PubMed Central

    Firuzyar, Tahereh; Jalilian, Amir Reza; Aboudzadeh, Mohammad Reza; Sadeghpour, Hossein; Shafiee-Ardestani, Mahdi; Khalaj, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Aim: In order to develop a possible tracer for L-type calcium channel imaging, we here report the development of a Ga-68 amlodipine derivative for possible PET imaging. Materials and Methods: Amlodipine DOTA conjugate was synthesized, characterized and went through calcium channel blockade, toxicity, apoptosis/necrosis tests. [68Ga] DOTA AMLO was prepared at optimized conditions followed by stability tests, partition coefficient determination and biodistribution studies using tissue counting and co incidence imaging up to 2 h. Results: [68Ga] DOTA AMLO was prepared at pH 4–5 in 7–10 min at 95°C in high radiochemical purity (>99%, radio thin layer chromatography; specific activity: 1.9–2.1 GBq/mmol) and was stable up to 4 h with a log P of −0.94. Calcium channel rich tissues including myocardium, and tissues with smooth muscle cells such as colon, intestine, and lungs demonstrated significant uptake. Co incidence images supported the biodistribution data up to 2 h. Conclusions: The complex can be a candidate for further positron emission tomography imaging for L type calcium channels. PMID:27833311

  17. Deletion of the L-type Calcium Channel CaV1.3 but not CaV1.2 Results in a Diminished sAHP in Mouse CA1 Pyramidal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Gamelli, Amy E.; McKinney, Brandon C.; White, Jessica A.; Murphy, Geoffrey G.

    2009-01-01

    Trains of action potentials in CA1 pyramidal neurons are followed by a prolonged calcium-dependent post-burst afterhyperpolarization (AHP) that serves to limit further firing to a sustained depolarizing input. A reduction in the AHP accompanies acquisition of several types of learning and increases in the AHP are correlated with age-related cognitive impairment. The AHP develops primarily as the result of activation of outward calcium-activated potassium currents; however the precise source of calcium for activation of the AHP remains unclear. There is substantial experimental evidence suggesting that calcium influx via voltage-gated L-type calcium channels (L-VGCCs) contributes to the generation of the AHP. Two L-VGCC subtypes are predominately expressed in the hippocampus, CaV1.2 and CaV1.3, however it is not known which L-VGCC subtype is involved in generation of the AHP. This ambiguity is due in large part to the fact that at present there are no subunit-specific agonists or antagonists. Therefore, using mice in which the gene encoding CaV1.2 or CaV1.3 was deleted, we sought to determine the impact of alterations in levels of these two L-VCGG subtypes on neuronal excitability. No differences in any AHP measure were seen between neurons from CaV1.2 knockout mice and controls. However, the total area of the AHP was significantly smaller in neurons from CaV1.3 knockout mice as compared to neurons from wildtype controls. A significant reduction in the amplitude of the AHP was also seen at the 1 sec time point in neurons from CaV1.3 knockout mice as compared to those from controls. Reductions in both the area and 1 sec amplitude suggest the involvement of calcium influx via CaV1.3 in the slow AHP (sAHP). Thus, the results of our study demonstrate that deletion of CaV1.3, but not CaV1.2, significantly impacts the generation of the sAHP. PMID:20014384

  18. L-type calcium channels and calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II differentially mediate behaviors associated with nicotine withdrawal in mice.

    PubMed

    Jackson, K J; Damaj, M I

    2009-07-01

    Smoking is a widespread health problem. Because the nicotine withdrawal syndrome is a major contributor to continued smoking and relapse, it is important to understand the molecular and behavioral mechanisms of nicotine withdrawal to generate more effective smoking cessation therapies. Studies suggest a role for calcium-dependent mechanisms, such as L-type calcium channels and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), in the effects of nicotine dependence; however, the role of these mechanisms in nicotine-mediated behaviors is unclear. Thus, the goal of this study was to elucidate the role of L-type calcium channels and CaMKII in nicotine withdrawal behaviors. Using both pharmacological and genetic methods, our results show that L-type calcium channels are involved in physical, but not affective, nicotine withdrawal behaviors. Although our data do provide evidence of a role for CaMKII in nicotine withdrawal behaviors, our pharmacological and genetic assessments yielded different results concerning the specific role of the kinase. Pharmacological data suggest that CaMKII is involved in somatic signs and affective nicotine withdrawal, and activity level is decreased after nicotine withdrawal, whereas the genetic assessments yielded results suggesting that CaMKII is involved only in the anxiety-related response, yet the kinase activity may be increased after nicotine withdrawal; thus, future studies are necessary to clarify the precise behavioral specifics of the relevance of CaMKII in nicotine withdrawal behaviors. Overall, our data show that L-type calcium channels and CaMKII are relevant in nicotine withdrawal and differentially mediate nicotine withdrawal behaviors.

  19. L-type Ca2+ channels in heart and brain

    PubMed Central

    Striessnig, Jörg; Pinggera, Alexandra; Kaur, Gurjot; Bock, Gabriella; Tuluc, Petronel

    2014-01-01

    L-type calcium channels (Cav1) represent one of the three major classes (Cav1–3) of voltage-gated calcium channels. They were identified as the target of clinically used calcium channel blockers (CCBs; so-called calcium antagonists) and were the first class accessible to biochemical characterization. Four of the 10 known α1 subunits (Cav1.1–Cav1.4) form the pore of L-type calcium channels (LTCCs) and contain the high-affinity drug-binding sites for dihydropyridines and other chemical classes of organic CCBs. In essentially all electrically excitable cells one or more of these LTCC isoforms is expressed, and therefore it is not surprising that many body functions including muscle, brain, endocrine, and sensory function depend on proper LTCC activity. Gene knockouts and inherited human diseases have allowed detailed insight into the physiological and pathophysiological role of these channels. Genome-wide association studies and analysis of human genomes are currently providing even more hints that even small changes of channel expression or activity may be associated with disease, such as psychiatric disease or cardiac arrhythmias. Therefore, it is important to understand the structure–function relationship of LTCC isoforms, their differential contribution to physiological function, as well as their fine-tuning by modulatory cellular processes. PMID:24683526

  20. Further characterization of the effect of ethanol on voltage-gated Ca2+ channel function in developing CA3 hippocampal pyramidal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Morton, Russell A.; Valenzuela, C. Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Developmental ethanol exposure damages the hippocampus, a brain region involved in learning and memory. Alterations in synaptic transmission and plasticity may play a role in this effect of ethanol. We previously reported that acute and repeated exposure to ethanol during the 3rd trimester-equivalent inhibits long-term potentiation of GABAA receptor-dependent synaptic currents in CA3 pyramidal neurons through a mechanism that depends on retrograde release of brain-derived neurotrophic factor driven by activation of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (Zucca and Valenzuela, 2010). We found evidence indicating that voltage-gated Ca2+ channels are inhibited in the presence of ethanol, an effect that may play a role in its mechanism of action. Here, we further investigated the acute effect of ethanol on the function of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels in CA3 pyramidal neurons using Ca2+ imaging techniques. These experiments revealed that acute ethanol exposure inhibits voltage-gated Ca2+ channels both in somatic and proximal dendritic compartments. To investigate the long-term consequences of ethanol on voltage-gated Ca2+ channels, we used patch-clamp electrophysiological techniques to assess the function of L-type voltage-gated Ca2+ channels during and following ten days of vapor ethanol exposure. During ethanol withdrawal periods, the function of these channels was not significantly affected by vapor chamber exposure. Taken together with our previous findings, our results suggest that 3rd trimester-equivalent ethanol exposure transiently inhibits L-type voltage-gated Ca2+ channel function in CA3 pyramidal neurons and that compensatory mechanisms restore their function during ethanol withdrawal. Transient inhibition of these channels by ethanol may be, in part, responsible for the hippocampal abnormalities associated with developmental exposure to this agent. PMID:26711851

  1. Mapping of dihydropyridine binding residues in a less sensitive invertebrate L-type calcium channel (LCa v 1).

    PubMed

    Senatore, Adriano; Boone, Adrienne; Lam, Stanley; Dawson, Taylor F; Zhorov, Boris; Spafford, J David

    2011-01-01

    Invertebrate L-type calcium channel, LCa(v) 1, isolated from the pond snail Lymnaea stagnalis is nearly indistinguishable from mammalian Ca(v) 1.2 (α1C) calcium channel in biophysical characteristics observed in vitro. These L-type channels are likely constrained within a narrow range of biophysical parameters to perform similar functions in the snail and mammalian cardiovascular systems. What distinguishes snail and mammalian L-type channels is a difference in dihydropyridine sensitivity: 100 nM isradipine exhibits a significant block of mammalian Ca(v) 1.2 currents without effect on snail LCa(v)1 currents. The native snail channel serves as a valuable surrogate for validating key residue differences identified from previous experimental and molecular modeling work. As predicted, three residue changes in LCa(v)1 (N_3o18, F_3i10, and I_4i12) replaced with DHP-sensing residues in respective positions of Ca(v) 1.2, (Q_3o18, Y_3i10, and M_4i12) raises the potency of isradipine block of LCa(v)1 channels to that of mammalian Ca(v) 1.2. Interestingly, the single N_3o18_Q mutation in LCa(v) 1 channels lowers DHP sensitivity even further and the triple mutation bearing enhanced isradipine sensitivity, still retains a reduced potency of agonist, (S)-Bay K8644.

  2. Voltage-gated proton channel is expressed on phagosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Okochi, Yoshifumi; Sasaki, Mari; Iwasaki, Hirohide; Okamura, Yasushi

    2009-05-01

    Voltage-gated proton channel has been suggested to help NADPH oxidase activity during respiratory burst of phagocytes through its activities of compensating charge imbalance and regulation of pH. In phagocytes, robust production of reactive oxygen species occurs in closed membrane compartments, which are called phagosomes. However, direct evidence for the presence of voltage-gated proton channels in phagosome has been lacking. In this study, the expression of voltage-gated proton channels was studied by Western blot with the antibody specific to the voltage-sensor domain protein, VSOP/Hv1, that has recently been identified as the molecular correlate for the voltage-gated proton channel. Phagosomal membranes of neutrophils contain VSOP/Hv1 in accordance with subunits of NADPH oxidases, gp91, p22, p47 and p67. Superoxide anion production upon PMA activation was significantly reduced in neutrophils from VSOP/Hv1 knockout mice. These are consistent with the idea that voltage-gated proton channels help NADPH oxidase in phagocytes to produce reactive oxygen species.

  3. Effects of the T/L-type calcium channel blocker benidipine on albuminuria and plasma aldosterone concentration. A pilot study involving switching from L-type calcium channel blockers to benidipine.

    PubMed

    Tani, Shigemasa; Takahashi, Atsuhiko; Nagao, Ken; Hirayama, Atsushi

    2014-01-01

    Albuminuria and a high plasma aldosterone concentration (PAC) are prognosis factors predicting a poor outcome for cardiovascular disease. We examined here the effects of benidipine, a T/L-type calcium channel blocker (CCB), on albuminuria and PAC.Thirty-one patients with essential hypertension who received an L-type CCB and achieved the target blood pressure (BP) indicated by the Treatment Guidelines of the Japan Society of Hypertension (JSH2009) were investigated. The Ltype CCB under treatment was switched to benidipine at a dose in which equivalent BP reduction was expected. BP and estimated glomerular filtration rate at 6 months after switching to benidipine were not significantly different from those at baseline. The urinary-albumin-creatinine ratio (UACR) decreased significantly by 36.9% (P = 0.001). No significant change was observed in plasma renin activity (P = 0.063). The PAC of all patients decreased significantly by 11.8% (P = 0.002). When analyzed by daily doses of benidipine, the PAC appeared to have decreased in patients who received 4 mg per day of benidipine (n = 14), although statistical significance was not reached (P = 0.096). The PAC in patients who received 8 mg per day of benidipine (n =17) was significantly reduced by 13.2% (P = 0.017).In hypertensive patients whose BP is controlled by L-type CCB, switching to the T/L-type CCB benidipine maintained BP control and reduced UACR. In addition, the high dose of benidipine reduced the PAC independent of BP control. These results suggest the T/L-type CCB benidipine may contribute to cardio-renal protection in addition to lowering BP.

  4. L-type calcium channel gating is modulated by bradykinin with a PKC-dependent mechanism in NG108-15 cells.

    PubMed

    Toselli, Mauro; Taglietti, Vanni

    2005-05-01

    Bradykinin (BK) excites dorsal root ganglion cells, leading to the sensation of pain. The actions of BK are thought to be mediated by heterotrimeric G protein-regulated pathways. Indeed there is strong evidence that in different cell types BK is involved in phosphoinositide breakdown following activation of G(q/11). In the present study we show that the Ca(2+) current flowing through L-type voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels in NG108-15 cells (differentiated in vitro to acquire a neuronal phenotype), measured using the whole-cell patch clamp configuration, is reversibly inhibited by BK in a voltage-independent fashion, suggesting a cascade process where a second messenger system is involved. This inhibitory action of BK is mimicked by the application of 1,2-oleoyl-acetyl glycerol (OAG), an analog of diacylglycerol that activates PKC. Interestingly, OAG occluded the effects of BK and both effects were blocked by selective PKC inhibitors. The down modulation of single L-type Ca(2+) channels by BK and OAG was also investigated in cell-attached patches. Our results indicate that the inhibitory action of BK involves activation of PKC and mainly shows up in a significant reduction of the probability of channel opening, caused by an increase and clustering of null sweeps in response to BK.

  5. Oxidized Low-density Lipoprotein (ox-LDL) Cholesterol Induces the Expression of miRNA-223 and L-type Calcium Channel Protein in Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    He, Fengping; Xu, Xin; Yuan, Shuguo; Tan, Liangqiu; Gao, Lingjun; Ma, Shaochun; Zhang, Shebin; Ma, Zhanzhong; Jiang, Wei; Liu, Fenglian; Chen, Baofeng; Zhang, Beibei; Pang, Jungang; Huang, Xiuyan; Weng, Jiaqiang

    2016-08-04

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained arrhythmia causing high morbidity and mortality. While changing of the cellular calcium homeostasis plays a critical role in AF, the L-type calcium channel α1c protein has suggested as an important regulator of reentrant spiral dynamics and is a major component of AF-related electrical remodeling. Our computational modeling predicted that miRNA-223 may regulate the CACNA1C gene which encodes the cardiac L-type calcium channel α1c subunit. We found that oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) cholesterol significantly up-regulates both the expression of miRNA-223 and L-type calcium channel protein. In contrast, knockdown of miRNA-223 reduced L-type calcium channel protein expression, while genetic knockdown of endogenous miRNA-223 dampened AF vulnerability. Transfection of miRNA-223 by adenovirus-mediated expression enhanced L-type calcium currents and promoted AF in mice while co-injection of a CACNA1C-specific miR-mimic counteracted the effect. Taken together, ox-LDL, as a known factor in AF-associated remodeling, positively regulates miRNA-223 transcription and L-type calcium channel protein expression. Our results implicate a new molecular mechanism for AF in which miRNA-223 can be used as an biomarker of AF rheumatic heart disease.

  6. Oxidized Low-density Lipoprotein (ox-LDL) Cholesterol Induces the Expression of miRNA-223 and L-type Calcium Channel Protein in Atrial Fibrillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Fengping; Xu, Xin; Yuan, Shuguo; Tan, Liangqiu; Gao, Lingjun; Ma, Shaochun; Zhang, Shebin; Ma, Zhanzhong; Jiang, Wei; Liu, Fenglian; Chen, Baofeng; Zhang, Beibei; Pang, Jungang; Huang, Xiuyan; Weng, Jiaqiang

    2016-08-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained arrhythmia causing high morbidity and mortality. While changing of the cellular calcium homeostasis plays a critical role in AF, the L-type calcium channel α1c protein has suggested as an important regulator of reentrant spiral dynamics and is a major component of AF-related electrical remodeling. Our computational modeling predicted that miRNA-223 may regulate the CACNA1C gene which encodes the cardiac L-type calcium channel α1c subunit. We found that oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) cholesterol significantly up-regulates both the expression of miRNA-223 and L-type calcium channel protein. In contrast, knockdown of miRNA-223 reduced L-type calcium channel protein expression, while genetic knockdown of endogenous miRNA-223 dampened AF vulnerability. Transfection of miRNA-223 by adenovirus-mediated expression enhanced L-type calcium currents and promoted AF in mice while co-injection of a CACNA1C-specific miR-mimic counteracted the effect. Taken together, ox-LDL, as a known factor in AF-associated remodeling, positively regulates miRNA-223 transcription and L-type calcium channel protein expression. Our results implicate a new molecular mechanism for AF in which miRNA-223 can be used as an biomarker of AF rheumatic heart disease.

  7. Regulation of L-type calcium channel by phospholemman in cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xue-Qian; Wang, JuFang; Song, Jianliang; Rabinowitz, Joseph; Chen, Xiongwen; Houser, Steven R; Peterson, Blaise Z; Tucker, Amy L; Feldman, Arthur M; Cheung, Joseph Y

    2015-07-01

    We evaluated whether phospholemman (PLM) regulates L-type Ca(2+) current (ICa) in mouse ventricular myocytes. Expression of α1-subunit of L-type Ca(2+) channels between wild-type (WT) and PLM knockout (KO) hearts was similar. Compared to WT myocytes, peak ICa (at -10 mV) from KO myocytes was ~41% larger, the inactivation time constant (τ(inact)) of ICa was ~39% longer, but deactivation time constant (τ(deact)) was similar. In the presence of isoproterenol (1 μM), peak ICa was ~48% larger and τ(inact) was ~144% higher in KO myocytes. With Ba(2+) as the permeant ion, PLM enhanced voltage-dependent inactivation but had no effect on τ(deact). To dissect the molecular determinants by which PLM regulated ICa, we expressed PLM mutants by adenovirus-mediated gene transfer in cultured KO myocytes. After 24h in culture, KO myocytes expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) had significantly larger peak ICa and longer τ(inact) than KO myocytes expressing WT PLM; thereby independently confirming the observations in freshly isolated myocytes. Compared to KO myocytes expressing GFP, KO myocytes expressing the cytoplasmic domain truncation mutant (TM43), the non-phosphorylatable S68A mutant, the phosphomimetic S68E mutant, and the signature PFXYD to alanine (ALL5) mutant all resulted in lower peak ICa. Expressing PLM mutants did not alter expression of α1-subunit of L-type Ca(2+) channels in cultured KO myocytes. Our results suggested that both the extracellular PFXYD motif and the transmembrane domain of PLM but not the cytoplasmic tail were necessary for regulation of peak ICa amplitude. We conclude that PLM limits Ca(2+) influx in cardiac myocytes by reducing maximal ICa and accelerating voltage-dependent inactivation.

  8. Short-term exposure to L-type calcium channel blocker, verapamil, alters the expression pattern of calcium-binding proteins in the brain of goldfish, Carassius auratus.

    PubMed

    Palande, Nikhil V; Bhoyar, Rahul C; Biswas, Saikat P; Jadhao, Arun G

    2015-01-01

    The influx of calcium ions (Ca(2+)) is responsible for various physiological events including neurotransmitter release and synaptic modulation. The L-type voltage dependent calcium channels (L-type VDCCs) transport Ca(2+) across the membrane. Calcium-binding proteins (CaBPs) bind free cytosolic Ca(2+) and prevent excitotoxicity caused by sudden increase in cytoplasmic Ca(2+). The present study was aimed to understand the regulation of expression of neuronal CaBPs, namely, calretinin (CR) and parvalbumin (PV) following blockade of L-type VDCCs in the CNS of Carassius auratus. Verapamil (VRP), a potent L-type VDCC blocker, selectively blocks Ca(2+) entry at the plasma membrane level. VRP present in the aquatic environment at a very low residual concentration has shown ecotoxicological effects on aquatic animals. Following acute exposure for 96h, median lethal concentration (LC50) for VRP was found to be 1.22mg/L for goldfish. At various doses of VRP, the behavioral alterations were observed in the form of respiratory difficulty and loss of body balance confirming the cardiovascular toxicity caused by VRP at higher doses. In addition to affecting the cardiovascular system, VRP also showed effects on the nervous system in the form of altered expression of PV. When compared with controls, the pattern of CR expression did not show any variations, while PV expression showed significant alterations in few neuronal populations such as the pretectal nucleus, inferior lobes, and the rostral corpus cerebellum. Our result suggests possible regulatory effect of calcium channel blockers on the expression of PV.

  9. Supramolecular Assemblies and Localized Regulation of Voltage-Gated Ion Channels

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Shuiping; Hall, Duane D.; Hell, Johannes W.

    2009-01-01

    This review addresses the localized regulation of voltage-gated ion channels by phosphorylation. Comprehensive data on channel regulation by associated protein kinases, phosphatases, and related regulatory proteins are mainly available for voltage-gated Ca2+ channels, which form the main focus of this review. Other voltage-gated ion channels and especially Kv7.1-3 (KCNQ1-3), the large- and small-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels BK and SK2, and the inward-rectifying K+ channels Kir3 have also been studied to quite some extent and will be included. Regulation of the L-type Ca2+ channel Cav1.2 by PKA has been studied most thoroughly as it underlies the cardiac fight-or-flight response. A prototypical Cav1.2 signaling complex containing the β2 adrenergic receptor, the heterotrimeric G protein Gs, adenylyl cyclase, and PKA has been identified that supports highly localized via cAMP. The type 2 ryanodine receptor as well as AMPA- and NMDA-type glutamate receptors are in close proximity to Cav1.2 in cardiomyocytes and neurons, respectively, yet independently anchor PKA, CaMKII, and the serine/threonine phosphatases PP1, PP2A, and PP2B, as is discussed in detail. Descriptions of the structural and functional aspects of the interactions of PKA, PKC, CaMKII, Src, and various phosphatases with Cav1.2 will include comparisons with analogous interactions with other channels such as the ryanodine receptor or ionotropic glutamate receptors. Regulation of Na+ and K+ channel phosphorylation complexes will be discussed in separate papers. This review is thus intended for readers interested in ion channel regulation or in localization of kinases, phosphatases, and their upstream regulators. PMID:19342611

  10. Contribution of downregulation of L-type calcium currents to delayed neuronal death in rat hippocampus after global cerebral ischemia and reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Ming; Yang, Jian-Ming; Hu, De-Hui; Hou, Feng-Qing; Zhao, Miao; Zhu, Xin-Hong; Wang, Ying; Li, Jian-Guo; Hu, Ping; Chen, Liang; Qin, Lu-Ning; Gao, Tian-Ming

    2007-05-09

    Transient forebrain ischemia induces delayed, selective neuronal death in the CA1 region of the hippocampus. The underlying molecular mechanisms are as yet unclear, but it is known that activation of L-type Ca2+ channels specifically increases the expression of a group of genes required for neuronal survival. Accordingly, we examined temporal changes in L-type calcium-channel activity in CA1 and CA3 pyramidal neurons of rat hippocampus after transient forebrain ischemia by patch-clamp techniques. In vulnerable CA1 neurons, L-type Ca2+-channel activity was persistently downregulated after ischemic insult, whereas in invulnerable CA3 neurons, no change occurred. Downregulation of L-type calcium channels was partially caused by oxidation modulation in postischemic channels. Furthermore, L-type but neither N-type nor P/Q-type Ca2+-channel antagonists alone significantly inhibited the survival of cultured hippocampal neurons. In contrast, specific L-type calcium-channel agonist remarkably reduced neuronal cell death and restored the inhibited channels induced by nitric oxide donor. More importantly, L-type calcium-channel agonist applied after reoxygenation or reperfusion significantly decreased neuronal injury in in vitro oxygen-glucose deprivation ischemic model and in animals subjected to forebrain ischemia-reperfusion. Together, the present results suggest that ischemia-induced inhibition of L-type calcium currents may give rise to delayed death of neurons in the CA1 region, possibly via oxidation mechanisms. Our findings may lead to a new perspective on neuronal death after ischemic insult and suggest that a novel therapeutic approach, activation of L-type calcium channels, could be tested at late stages of reperfusion for stroke treatment.

  11. Voltage-gated sodium channels contribute to action potentials and spontaneous contractility in isolated human lymphatic vessels.

    PubMed

    Telinius, Niklas; Majgaard, Jens; Kim, Sukhan; Katballe, Niels; Pahle, Einar; Nielsen, Jørn; Hjortdal, Vibeke; Aalkjaer, Christian; Boedtkjer, Donna Briggs

    2015-07-15

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSC) play a key role for initiating action potentials (AP) in excitable cells. VGSC in human lymphatic vessels have not been investigated. In the present study, we report the electrical activity and APs of small human lymphatic collecting vessels, as well as mRNA expression and function of VGSC in small and large human lymphatic vessels. The VGSC blocker TTX inhibited spontaneous contractions in six of 10 spontaneously active vessels, whereas ranolazine, which has a narrower VGSC blocking profile, had no influence on spontaneous activity. TTX did not affect noradrenaline-induced contractions. The VGSC opener veratridine induced contractions in a concentration-dependent manner (0.1-30 μm) eliciting a stable tonic contraction and membrane depolarization to -18 ± 0.6 mV. Veratridine-induced depolarizations and contractions were reversed ∼80% by TTX, and were dependent on Ca(2+) influx via L-type calcium channels and the sodium-calcium exchanger in reverse mode. Molecular analysis determined NaV 1.3 to be the predominantly expressed VGSC isoform. Electrophysiology of mesenteric lymphatics determined the resting membrane potential to be -45 ± 1.7 mV. Spontaneous APs were preceded by a slow depolarization of 5.3 ± 0.6 mV after which a spike was elicited that almost completely repolarized before immediately depolarizing again to plateau. Vessels transiently hyperpolarized prior to returning to the resting membrane potential. TTX application blocked APs. We have shown that VGSC are necessary for initiating and maintaining APs and spontaneous contractions in human lymphatic vessels and our data suggest the main contribution from comes NaV 1.3. We have also shown that activation of these channels augments the contractile activity of the vessels.

  12. Actions and Mechanisms of Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids on Voltage-Gated Ion Channels

    PubMed Central

    Elinder, Fredrik; Liin, Sara I.

    2017-01-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) act on most ion channels, thereby having significant physiological and pharmacological effects. In this review we summarize data from numerous PUFAs on voltage-gated ion channels containing one or several voltage-sensor domains, such as voltage-gated sodium (NaV), potassium (KV), calcium (CaV), and proton (HV) channels, as well as calcium-activated potassium (KCa), and transient receptor potential (TRP) channels. Some effects of fatty acids appear to be channel specific, whereas others seem to be more general. Common features for the fatty acids to act on the ion channels are at least two double bonds in cis geometry and a charged carboxyl group. In total we identify and label five different sites for the PUFAs. PUFA site 1: The intracellular cavity. Binding of PUFA reduces the current, sometimes as a time-dependent block, inducing an apparent inactivation. PUFA site 2: The extracellular entrance to the pore. Binding leads to a block of the channel. PUFA site 3: The intracellular gate. Binding to this site can bend the gate open and increase the current. PUFA site 4: The interface between the extracellular leaflet of the lipid bilayer and the voltage-sensor domain. Binding to this site leads to an opening of the channel via an electrostatic attraction between the negatively charged PUFA and the positively charged voltage sensor. PUFA site 5: The interface between the extracellular leaflet of the lipid bilayer and the pore domain. Binding to this site affects slow inactivation. This mapping of functional PUFA sites can form the basis for physiological and pharmacological modifications of voltage-gated ion channels. PMID:28220076

  13. Immunohistological demonstration of CaV3.2 T-type voltage-gated calcium channel expression in soma of dorsal root ganglion neurons and peripheral axons of rat and mouse

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Kirstin E.; Lunardi, Nadia; Boscolo, Annalisa; Dong, Xinzhong; Erisir, Alev; Jevtovic-Todorovic, Vesna; Todorovic, Slobodan M.

    2013-01-01

    Previous behavioural studies have revealed that CaV3.2 T-type calcium channels support peripheral nociceptive transmission and electrophysiological studies have established the presence of T-currents in putative nociceptive sensory neurons of dorsal root ganglion (DRG). To date, however, the localization pattern of this key nociceptive channel in the soma and peripheral axons of these cells has not been demonstrated due to lack of isoform-selective anti-CaV3.2 antibodies. In the present study a new polyclonal CaV3.2 antibody is used to localize CaV3.2 expression in rodent DRG neurons using different staining techniques including confocal and electron microscopy. Confocal microscopy of both acutely dissociated cells and short-term cultures demonstrated strong immunofluorescence of anti-CaV3.2 antibody that was largely confined to smaller diameter DRG neurons where it co-localized with established immuno-markers of unmyelinated nociceptors, such as, CGRP, IB4 and peripherin. In contrast, a smaller proportion of these CaV3.2-labeled DRG cells also co-expressed NF-200, a marker of myelinated sensory neurons. In the rat sciatic nerve preparation, confocal microscopy demonstrated anti-CaV3.2 immunofluorescence which was co-localized with both peripherin and NF-200. Further, electron microscopy revealed immuno-gold labelling of CaV3.2 preferentially in association with un-myelinated sensory fibres from mouse sciatic nerve. Finally, we demonstrated the expression of CaV3.2 channels in peripheral nerve endings of mouse hindpaw skin as shown by co-localisation with Mrgpd-GFP-positive fibres. The CaV3.2 expression within the soma and peripheral axons of nociceptive sensory neurons further demonstrates the importance of this channel in peripheral pain transmission. PMID:23867767

  14. Modifying L-type calcium current kinetics: consequences for cardiac excitation and arrhythmia dynamics.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Aman; Sato, Daisuke; Shiferaw, Yohannes; Baher, Ali; Xie, Lai-Hua; Peralta, Robert; Olcese, Riccardo; Garfinkel, Alan; Qu, Zhilin; Weiss, James N

    2008-01-15

    The L-type Ca current (I(Ca,L)), essential for normal cardiac function, also regulates dynamic action potential (AP) properties that promote ventricular fibrillation. Blocking I(Ca,L) can prevent ventricular fibrillation, but only at levels suppressing contractility. We speculated that, instead of blocking I(Ca,L), modifying its shape by altering kinetic features could produce equivalent anti-fibrillatory effects without depressing contractility. To test this concept experimentally, we overexpressed a mutant Ca-insensitive calmodulin (CaM(1234)) in rabbit ventricular myocytes to inhibit Ca-dependent I(Ca,L) inactivation, combined with the ATP-sensitive K current agonist pinacidil or I(Ca,L) blocker verapamil to maintain AP duration (APD) near control levels. Cell shortening was enhanced in pinacidil-treated myocytes, but depressed in verapamil-treated myocytes. Both combinations flattened APD restitution slope and prevented APD alternans, similar to I(Ca,L) blockade. To predict the arrhythmogenic consequences, we simulated the cellular effects using a new AP model, which reproduced flattening of APD restitution slope and prevention of APD/Ca(i) transient alternans but maintained a normal Ca(i) transient. In simulated two-dimensional cardiac tissue, these changes prevented the arrhythmogenic spatially discordant APD/Ca(i) transient alternans and spiral wave breakup. These findings provide a proof-of-concept test that I(Ca,L) can be targeted to increase dynamic wave stability without depressing contractility, which may have promise as an antifibrillatory strategy.

  15. Broad-spectrum antiemetic efficacy of the L-type calcium channel blocker amlodipine in the least shrew (Cryptotis parva).

    PubMed

    Zhong, Weixia; Chebolu, Seetha; Darmani, Nissar A

    2014-05-01

    The dihydropyridine l-type calcium (Ca(2+)) channel blockers nifedipine and amlodipine reduce extracellular Ca(2+) entry into cells. They are widely used for the treatment of hypertensive disorders. We have recently demonstrated that extracellular Ca(2+) entry via l-type Ca(2+) channels is involved in emesis and that nifedipine has broad-spectrum antiemetic activity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antiemetic efficacy of the longer-acting l-type Ca(2+) channel blocker, amlodipine. Fully effective emetic doses of diverse emetogens such as the l-type Ca(2+) channel agonist (FPL 64176) as well as selective and/or nonselective agonists of serotonergic 5-HT3 (e.g. 5-HT or 2-Me-5-HT)-, dopamine D2 (e.g. apomorphine or quinpirole)-, cholinergic M1 (e.g. pilocarpine or McN-A343)- and tachykininergic NK1 (e.g. GR73632)-receptors, were administered intraperitoneally (i.p.) in the least shrew to induce vomiting. The broad-spectrum antiemetic potential of amlodipine was evaluated against these emetogens. Subcutaneous (s.c.) administration of amlodipine (0.5-10mg/kg) attenuated in a dose-dependent and potent manner both the frequency and percentage of shrews vomiting in response to intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of FPL 64176 (10mg/kg), 5-HT (5mg/kg), 2-Me-5-HT (5mg/kg), apomorphine (2mg/kg), quinpirole (2mg/kg), pilocarpine (2mg/kg), McN-A343 (2mg/kg), or GR73632 (5mg/kg). A combination of non-effective doses of amlodipine (0.5mg/kg, s.c.) and the 5-HT3 receptor antagonist palonosetron (0.05 mg/kg, s.c.) was more effective against FPL 64176-induced vomiting than their corresponding doses tested alone. Amlodipine by itself suppressed the frequency of acute cisplatin (10mg/kg, i.p)-induced vomiting in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, a combination of a non-effective dose of amlodipine (1mg/kg) potentiated the antiemetic efficacy of a semi-effective dose of palonosetron (0.5mg/kg, s.c.) against acute vomiting caused by cisplatin. We confirm that influx of

  16. Ion-dependent Inactivation of Barium Current through L-type Calcium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Gonzalo; Yi, Jianxun; Ríos, Eduardo; Shirokov, Roman

    1997-01-01

    It is widely believed that Ba2+ currents carried through L-type Ca2+ channels inactivate by a voltage- dependent mechanism similar to that described for other voltage-dependent channels. Studying ionic and gating currents of rabbit cardiac Ca2+ channels expressed in different subunit combinations in tsA201 cells, we found a phase of Ba2+ current decay with characteristics of ion-dependent inactivation. Upon a long duration (20 s) depolarizing pulse, IBa decayed as the sum of two exponentials. The slow phase (τ ≈ 6 s, 21°C) was parallel to a reduction of gating charge mobile at positive voltages, which was determined in the same cells. The fast phase of current decay (τ ≈ 600 ms), involving about 50% of total decay, was not accompanied by decrease of gating currents. Its amplitude depended on voltage with a characteristic U-shape, reflecting reduction of inactivation at positive voltages. When Na+ was used as the charge carrier, decay of ionic current followed a single exponential, of rate similar to that of the slow decay of Ba2+ current. The reduction of Ba2+ current during a depolarizing pulse was not due to changes in the concentration gradients driving ion movement, because Ba2+ entry during the pulse did not change the reversal potential for Ba2+. A simple model of Ca2+-dependent inactivation (Shirokov, R., R. Levis, N. Shirokova, and E. Ríos. 1993. J. Gen. Physiol. 102:1005–1030) robustly accounts for fast Ba2+ current decay assuming the affinity of the inactivation site on the α1 subunit to be 100 times lower for Ba2+ than Ca2+. PMID:9101404

  17. The Involvement of Ser1898 of the Human L-Type Calcium Channel in Evoked Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Bachnoff, Niv; Cohen-Kutner, Moshe; Atlas, Daphne

    2011-01-01

    A PKA consensus phosphorylation site S1928 at the α11.2 subunit of the rabbit cardiac L-type channel, CaV1.2, is involved in the regulation of CaV1.2 kinetics and affects catecholamine secretion. This mutation does not alter basal CaV1.2 current properties or regulation of CaV1.2 current by PKA and the beta-adrenergic receptor, but abolishes CaV1.2 phosphorylation by PKA. Here, we test the contribution of the corresponding PKA phosphorylation site of the human α11.2 subunit S1898, to the regulation of catecholamine secretion in bovine chromaffin cells. Chromaffin cells were infected with a Semliki-Forest viral vector containing either the human wt or a mutated S1898A α11.2 subunit. Both subunits harbor a T1036Y mutation conferring nifedipine insensitivity. Secretion evoked by depolarization in the presence of nifedipine was monitored by amperometry. Depolarization-triggered secretion in cells infected with either the wt α11.2 or α11.2/S1898A mutated subunit was elevated to a similar extent by forskolin. Forskolin, known to directly activate adenylyl-cyclase, increased the rate of secretion in a manner that is largely independent of the presence of S1898. Our results are consistent with the involvement of additional PKA regulatory site(s) at the C-tail of α11.2, the pore forming subunit of CaV1.2. PMID:22216029

  18. Population Density and Moment-based Approaches to Modeling Domain Calcium-mediated Inactivation of L-type Calcium Channels.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao; Hardcastle, Kiah; Weinberg, Seth H; Smith, Gregory D

    2016-03-01

    We present a population density and moment-based description of the stochastic dynamics of domain [Formula: see text]-mediated inactivation of L-type [Formula: see text] channels. Our approach accounts for the effect of heterogeneity of local [Formula: see text] signals on whole cell [Formula: see text] currents; however, in contrast with prior work, e.g., Sherman et al. (Biophys J 58(4):985-995, 1990), we do not assume that [Formula: see text] domain formation and collapse are fast compared to channel gating. We demonstrate the population density and moment-based modeling approaches using a 12-state Markov chain model of an L-type [Formula: see text] channel introduced by Greenstein and Winslow (Biophys J 83(6):2918-2945, 2002). Simulated whole cell voltage clamp responses yield an inactivation function for the whole cell [Formula: see text] current that agrees with the traditional approach when domain dynamics are fast. We analyze the voltage-dependence of [Formula: see text] inactivation that may occur via slow heterogeneous domain [[Formula: see text

  19. Inhibition of voltage-gated potassium channels mediates uncarboxylated osteocalcin-regulated insulin secretion in rat pancreatic β cells.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jingying; Zhong, Xiangqin; Ding, Yaqin; Bai, Tao; Wang, Hui; Wu, Hongbin; Liu, Yunfeng; Yang, Jing; Zhang, Yi

    2016-04-15

    Insulin secretion from pancreatic β cells is important to maintain glucose homeostasis and is regulated by electrical activities. Uncarboxylated osteocalcin, a bone-derived protein, has been reported to regulate glucose metabolism by increasing insulin secretion, stimulating β cell proliferation and improving insulin sensitivity. But the underlying mechanisms of uncarboxylated osteocalcin-modulated insulin secretion remain unclear. In the present study, we investigated the relationship of uncarboxylated osteocalcin-regulated insulin secretion and voltage-gated potassium (KV) channels, voltage-gated calcium channels in rat β cells. Insulin secretion was measured by radioimmunoassay. Channel currents and membrane action potentials were recorded using the conventional whole-cell patch-clamp technique. Calcium imaging system was used to analyze intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i). The data show that under 16.7mmol/l glucose conditions uncarboxylated osteocalcin alone increased insulin secretion and [Ca(2+)]i, but with no such effects on insulin secretion and [Ca(2+)]i in the presence of a KV channel blocker, tetraethylammonium chloride. In the patch-clamp experiments, uncarboxylated osteocalcin lengthened action potential duration and significantly inhibited KV currents, but had no influence on the characteristics of voltage-gated calcium channels. These results indicate that KV channels are involved in uncarboxylated osteocalcin-regulated insulin secretion in rat pancreatic β cells. By inhibiting KV channels, uncarboxylated osteocalcin prolongs action potential duration, increases intracellular Ca(2+) concentration and finally promotes insulin secretion. This finding provides new insight into the mechanisms of osteocalcin-modulated insulin secretion.

  20. Orexin-A potentiates L-type calcium/barium currents in rat retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, F; Weng, S-J; Yang, X-L; Zhong, Y-M

    2015-10-01

    Two neuropeptides, orexin-A and orexin-B (also called hypocretin-1 and -2), have been implicated in sleep/wake regulation, feeding behaviors via the activation of two subtypes of G-protein-coupled receptors: orexin 1 and orexin 2 receptors (OX1R and OX2R). While the expression of orexins and orexin receptors is immunohistochemically revealed in retinal neurons, the function of these peptides in the retina is largely unknown. Using whole-cell patch-clamp recordings in rat retinal slices, we demonstrated that orexin-A increased L-type-like barium currents (IBa,L) in ganglion cells (GCs), and the effect was blocked by the selective OX1R antagonist SB334867, but not by the OX2R antagonist TCS OX2 29. The orexin-A effect was abolished by intracellular dialysis of GDP-β-S/GPAnt-2A, a Gq protein inhibitor, suggesting the mediation of Gq. Additionally, during internal dialysis of the phosphatidylinositol (PI)-phospholipase C (PLC) inhibitor U73122, orexin-A did not change the IBa,L of GCs, whereas the orexin-A effect persisted in the presence of the phosphatidylcholine (PC)-PLC inhibitor D609. The orexin-A-induced potentiation was not seen with internal infusion of Ca(2+)-free solution or when inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3)-sensitive Ca(2+) release from intracellular stores was blocked by heparin/xestospongins-C. Moreover, the orexin-A effect was mimicked by the protein kinase C (PKC) activator phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, but was eliminated when PKC was inhibited by bisindolylmaleimide IV (Bis-IV)/Gö6976. Neither adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP)-protein kinase A (PKA) nor guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP)-protein kinase G (PKG) signaling pathway was likely involved, as orexin-A persisted to potentiate the IBa,L of GCs no matter these two pathways were activated or inhibited. These results suggest that, by activating OX1R, orexin-A potentiates the IBa,L of rat GCs through a distinct Gq/PI-PLC/IP3/Ca(2+)/PKC signaling pathway.

  1. RIM - binding proteins (RBPs) couple Rab3 - interacting molecules (RIMs) to voltage - gated Ca2+ channels

    PubMed Central

    Hibino, H.; Pironkova, R.; Onwumere, O.; Vologodskaia, M.; Hudspeth, A. J.; Lesage, F.

    2007-01-01

    Summary Ca2+ influx through voltage-gated channels initiates the exocytotic fusion of synaptic vesicles to the plasma membrane. Here we show that RIM-binding proteins (RBPs), which associate with Ca2+ channels in hair cells, photoreceptors, and neurons, interact with α1D (L-type) and α1B (N-type) Ca2+-channel subunits. RBPs contain three Src homology 3 domains that bind to proline-rich motifs in α1 subunits and Rab3-interacting molecules (RIMs). Overexpression in PC12 cells of fusion proteins that suppress the interactions of RBPs with RIMs and α1 augments the exocytosis triggered by depolarization. RBPs may regulate the strength of synaptic transmission by creating a functional link between the synaptic-vesicle tethering apparatus, which includes RIMs and Rab3, and the fusion machinery, which includes Ca2+ channels and the SNARE complex. PMID:11988172

  2. Voltage-gated calcium channel and antisense oligonucleotides thereto

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hruska, Keith A. (Inventor); Friedman, Peter A. (Inventor); Barry, Elizabeth L. R. (Inventor); Duncan, Randall L. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    An antisense oligonucleotide of 10 to 35 nucleotides in length that can hybridize with a region of the .alpha..sub.1 subunit of the SA-Cat channel gene DNA or mRNA is provided, together with pharmaceutical compositions containing and methods utilizing such antisense oligonucleotide.

  3. The voltage-gated potassium channels and their relatives.

    PubMed

    Yellen, Gary

    2002-09-05

    The voltage-gated potassium channels are the prototypical members of a family of membrane signalling proteins. These protein-based machines have pores that pass millions of ions per second across the membrane with astonishing selectivity, and their gates snap open and shut in milliseconds as they sense changes in voltage or ligand concentration. The architectural modules and functional components of these sophisticated signalling molecules are becoming clear, but some important links remain to be elucidated.

  4. Science Signaling Podcast for 24 January 2017: Tissue-specific regulation of L-type calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Hell, Johannes W; Navedo, Manuel F; VanHook, Annalisa M

    2017-01-24

    This Podcast features an interview with Johannes Hell and Manuel Navedo, senior authors of two Research Articles that appear in the 24 January 2017 issue of Science Signaling, about tissue-specific regulation of the L-type calcium channel CaV1.2. This channel is present in many tissues, including the heart, vasculature, and brain, and allows calcium to flow into cells when it is activated. Signaling through the β-adrenergic receptor (βAR) stimulates CaV1.2 activity in heart cells and neurons to accelerate heart rate and increase neuronal excitability, respectively. Using mouse models, Qian et al found that βAR-mediated enhancement of CaV1.2 activity in the brain required phosphorylation of Ser(1928), whereas βAR-mediated enhancement of CaV1.2 activity in the heart did not require phosphorylation of this residue. In a related study, Nystoriak et al demonstrated that phosphorylation of Ser(1928) in arterial myocytes was required for vasoconstriction during acute hyperglycemia and in diabetic mice. These findings demonstrate tissue-specific differences in CaV1.2 regulation and suggest that it may be possible to design therapies to target this channel in specific tissues.Listen to Podcast.

  5. Science Signaling Podcast for 24 January 2017: Tissue-specific regulation of L-type calcium channels

    PubMed Central

    Hell, Johannes W.; Navedo, Manuel F.; VanHook, Annalisa M.

    2017-01-01

    This Podcast features an interview with Johannes Hell and Manuel Navedo, senior authors of two Research Articles that appear in the 24 January 2017 issue of Science Signaling, about tissue-specific regulation of the L-type calcium channel CaV1.2. This channel is present in many tissues, including the heart, vasculature, and brain, and allows calcium to flow into cells when it is activated. Signaling through the β-adrenergic receptor (βAR) stimulates CaV1.2 activity in heart cells and neurons to accelerate heart rate and increase neuronal excitability, respectively. Using mouse models, Qian et al. found that βAR-mediated enhancement of CaV1.2 activity in the brain required phosphorylation of Ser1928, whereas βAR-mediated enhancement of CaV1.2 activity in the heart did not require phosphorylation of this residue. In a related study, Nystoriak et al. demonstrated that phosphorylation of Ser1928 in arterial myocytes was required for vasoconstriction during acute hyperglycemia and in diabetic mice. These findings demonstrate tissue-specific differences in CaV1.2 regulation and suggest that it may be possible to design therapies to target this channel in specific tissues. PMID:28119457

  6. Scientific evidence contradicts findings and assumptions of Canadian Safety Panel 6: microwaves act through voltage-gated calcium channel activation to induce biological impacts at non-thermal levels, supporting a paradigm shift for microwave/lower frequency electromagnetic field action.

    PubMed

    Pall, Martin L

    2015-01-01

    This review considers a paradigm shift on microwave electromagnetic field (EMF) action from only thermal effects to action via voltage-gated calcium channel (VGCC) activation. Microwave/lower frequency EMFs were shown in two dozen studies to act via VGCC activation because all effects studied were blocked by calcium channel blockers. This mode of action was further supported by hundreds of studies showing microwave changes in calcium fluxes and intracellular calcium [Ca2+]i signaling. The biophysical properties of VGCCs/similar channels make them particularly sensitive to low intensity, non-thermal EMF exposures. Non-thermal studies have shown that in most cases pulsed fields are more active than are non-pulsed fields and that exposures within certain intensity windows have much large biological effects than do either lower or higher intensity exposures; these are both consistent with a VGCC role but inconsistent with only a heating/thermal role. Downstream effects of VGCC activation include calcium signaling, elevated nitric oxide (NO), NO signaling, peroxynitrite, free radical formation, and oxidative stress. Downstream effects explain repeatedly reported biological responses to non-thermal exposures: oxidative stress; single and double strand breaks in cellular DNA; cancer; male and female infertility; lowered melatonin/sleep disruption; cardiac changes including tachycardia, arrhythmia, and sudden cardiac death; diverse neuropsychiatric effects including depression; and therapeutic effects. Non-VGCC non-thermal mechanisms may occur, but none have been shown to have effects in mammals. Biologically relevant safety standards can be developed through studies of cell lines/cell cultures with high levels of different VGCCs, measuring their responses to different EMF exposures. The 2014 Canadian Report by a panel of experts only recognizes thermal effects regarding safety standards for non-ionizing radiation exposures. Its position is therefore contradicted by each

  7. Splice variants of the CaV1.3 L-type calcium channel regulate dendritic spine morphology

    PubMed Central

    Stanika, Ruslan; Campiglio, Marta; Pinggera, Alexandra; Lee, Amy; Striessnig, Jörg; Flucher, Bernhard E.; Obermair, Gerald J.

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic spines are the postsynaptic compartments of glutamatergic synapses in the brain. Their number and shape are subject to change in synaptic plasticity and neurological disorders including autism spectrum disorders and Parkinson’s disease. The L-type calcium channel CaV1.3 constitutes an important calcium entry pathway implicated in the regulation of spine morphology. Here we investigated the importance of full-length CaV1.3L and two C-terminally truncated splice variants (CaV1.342A and CaV1.343S) and their modulation by densin-180 and shank1b for the morphology of dendritic spines of cultured hippocampal neurons. Live-cell immunofluorescence and super-resolution microscopy of epitope-tagged CaV1.3L revealed its localization at the base-, neck-, and head-region of dendritic spines. Expression of the short splice variants or deletion of the C-terminal PDZ-binding motif in CaV1.3L induced aberrant dendritic spine elongation. Similar morphological alterations were induced by co-expression of densin-180 or shank1b with CaV1.3L and correlated with increased CaV1.3 currents and dendritic calcium signals in transfected neurons. Together, our findings suggest a key role of CaV1.3 in regulating dendritic spine structure. Under physiological conditions it may contribute to the structural plasticity of glutamatergic synapses. Conversely, altered regulation of CaV1.3 channels may provide an important mechanism in the development of postsynaptic aberrations associated with neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:27708393

  8. Cloning of the human skeletal muscle {alpha}{sub 1} subunit of the dihydropyridine-sensitive L-type calcium channel (CACNL1A3)

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, K.; Powers, P.A.; Gregg, R.G.

    1994-12-01

    Skeletal muscle contraction is initiated by release of calcium stored in the sarcoplasmic reticulum in response to membrane depolarization transduced by the L-type voltage-dependent calcium channels (VDCCs) present in the transverse tubule. The L-type VDCC purified from rabbit skeletal muscle transverse tubules is a pentamer composed of {alpha}{sub 1}, {alpha}{sub 2}, {Beta},{delta}, and {gamma} subunits. Here, we report the sequence of the human {alpha}{sub 1} subunit. 8 refs., 1 fig.

  9. Antialbuminuric advantage of cilnidipine compared with L-type calcium channel blockers in type 2 diabetic patients with normoalbuminuria and microalbuminuria.

    PubMed

    Fukumoto, Shinya; Ishimura, Eiji; Motoyama, Koka; Morioka, Tomoaki; Kimoto, Eiji; Wakikawa, Ken; Shoji, Shigeichi; Koyama, Hidenori; Shoji, Tetsuo; Emoto, Masanori; Nishizawa, Yoshiki; Inaba, Masaaki

    2012-07-01

    We evaluated the antialbuminuric advantage of cilnidipine, an N/L-type calcium channel blocker (CCB), compared with L-type CCBs in diabetic patients with normoalbuminuria and microalbuminuria. The study was a multicenter, non-randomized crossover trial. Participants were 90 type 2 diabetic patients exhibiting either normo- or microalbuminuria, and undergoing CCB treatment for ≥6 months prior to study entry. The CCB at the time of entry was continued for the first 6 months (Period 1). Treatment was subsequently switched from cilnidipine to an L-type CCB, or vice versa, for the second 6-month observation period (Period 2). During Period 1, the L-type CCB group showed a significant increase of urinary albumin excretion (UAE) over time, while the cilnidipine group showed no significant elevation. During Period 2, switching of the treatment from the L-type CCB to cilnidipine resulted in significant reduction of the UAE, whereas switching from cilnidipine to the L-type CCB resulted in no significant change in the UAE. This study demonstrated that the antialbuminuric effect of Cilnidipine, but not the L-type CCBs, was sustained even in patients treated for a long time. In addition, the antialbuminuric effect can be anticipated after switching from an L-type CCB to cilnidipine, but not vice versa.

  10. Prolonged Infusion of Inhibitors of Calcineurin or L-Type Calcium Channels Does Not Block Mossy Fiber Sprouting in a Model of Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Ingram, Elizabeth A.; Toyoda, Izumi; Wen, Xiling; Buckmaster, Paul S.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose It would be useful to selectively block granule cell axon (mossy fiber) sprouting to test its functional role in temporal lobe epileptogenesis. Targeting axonal growth cones may be an effective strategy to block mossy fiber sprouting. L-type calcium channels and calcineurin, a calcium-activated phosphatase, are critical for normal growth cone function. Previous studies have provided encouraging evidence that blocking L-type calcium channels or inhibiting calcineurin during epileptogenic treatments suppresses mossy fiber sprouting. Methods Rats were treated systemically with pilocarpine to induce status epilepticus, which lasted at least 2 hours. Then, osmotic pumps and cannulae were implanted to infuse calcineurin inhibitors (FK506 or cyclosporin A) or an L-type calcium channel blocker (nicardipine) into the dorsal dentate gyrus. After 28 days of continuous infusion, extent of mossy fiber sprouting was evaluated with Timm-staining and stereological methods. Results Percentages of volumes of the granule cell layer + molecular layer that were Timm-positive were similar in infused and noninfused hippocampi. Conclusions These findings suggest inhibiting calcineurin or L-type calcium channels does not block mossy fiber sprouting in the pilocarpine-treated rat model of temporal lobe epilepsy. PMID:18616558

  11. Amino acid substitutions in the FXYD motif enhance phospholemman-induced modulation of cardiac L-type calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Guo, Kai; Wang, Xianming; Gao, Guofeng; Huang, Congxin; Elmslie, Keith S; Peterson, Blaise Z

    2010-11-01

    We have found that phospholemman (PLM) associates with and modulates the gating of cardiac L-type calcium channels (Wang et al., Biophys J 98: 1149-1159, 2010). The short 17 amino acid extracellular NH(2)-terminal domain of PLM contains a highly conserved PFTYD sequence that defines it as a member of the FXYD family of ion transport regulators. Although we have learned a great deal about PLM-dependent changes in calcium channel gating, little is known regarding the molecular mechanisms underlying the observed changes. Therefore, we investigated the role of the PFTYD segment in the modulation of cardiac calcium channels by individually replacing Pro-8, Phe-9, Thr-10, Tyr-11, and Asp-12 with alanine (P8A, F9A, T10A, Y11A, D12A). In addition, Asp-12 was changed to lysine (D12K) and cysteine (D12C). As expected, wild-type PLM significantly slows channel activation and deactivation and enhances voltage-dependent inactivation (VDI). We were surprised to find that amino acid substitutions at Thr-10 and Asp-12 significantly enhanced the ability of PLM to modulate Ca(V)1.2 gating. T10A exhibited a twofold enhancement of PLM-induced slowing of activation, whereas D12K and D12C dramatically enhanced PLM-induced increase of VDI. The PLM-induced slowing of channel closing was abrogated by D12A and D12C, whereas D12K and T10A failed to impact this effect. These studies demonstrate that the PFXYD motif is not necessary for the association of PLM with Ca(V)1.2. Instead, since altering the chemical and/or physical properties of the PFXYD segment alters the relative magnitudes of opposing PLM-induced effects on Ca(V)1.2 channel gating, PLM appears to play an important role in fine tuning the gating kinetics of cardiac calcium channels and likely plays an important role in shaping the cardiac action potential and regulating Ca(2+) dynamics in the heart.

  12. Accelerated Inactivation of the L-type Calcium Current Due to a Mutation in CACNB2b Underlies Brugada Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Cordeiro, Jonathan M; Marieb, Mark; Pfeiffer, Ryan; Calloe, Kirstine; Burashnikov, Elena; Antzelevitch, Charles

    2009-01-01

    Background Recent studies have demonstrated an association between mutations in CACNA1c or CACNB2b and Brugada syndrome (BrS). Previously described mutations all caused a loss of function secondary to a reduction of peak calcium current (ICa). We describe a novel CACNB2b mutation associated with BrS in which loss of function is caused by accelerated inactivation of ICa. Methods and Results The proband, a 32 yo male, displayed a Type I ST segment elevation in two right precordial ECG leads following a procainamide challenge. EP study was positive with induction of polymorphic VT/VF. Interrogation of implanted ICD revealed brief episodes of very rapid ventricular tachycardia. He was also diagnosed with vasovagal syncope. Genomic DNA was isolated from lymphocytes. All exons and intron borders of 15 ion channel genes were amplified and sequenced. The only mutation uncovered was a missense mutation (T11I) in CACNB2b. We expressed WT or T11I CACNB2b in TSA201 cells co-transfected with WT CACNA1c and CACNA2d. Patch clamp analysis showed no significant difference between WT and T11I in peak ICa density, steady-state inactivation or recovery from inactivation. However, both fast and slow decay of ICa were significantly faster in mutant channels between 0 and +20 mV. Action potential voltage clamp experiments showed that total charge was reduced by almost half compared to WT. Conclusions We report the first BrS mutation in CaCNB2b resulting in accelerated inactivation of L-type calcium channel current. Our results suggest that the faster current decay results in a loss-of-function responsible for the Brugada phenotype. PMID:19358333

  13. Enhanced effect of VEGF165 on L-type calcium currents in guinea-pig cardiac ventricular myocytes.

    PubMed

    Xing, Wenlu; Gao, Chuanyu; Qi, Datun; Zhang, You; Hao, Peiyuan; Dai, Guoyou; Yan, Ganxin

    2017-01-01

    The mechanisms of vascular endothelial growth factor 165 (VEGF165) on electrical properties of cardiomyocytes have not been fully elucidated. The aim of this study is to test the hypothesis that VEGF165, an angiogenesis-initiating factor, affects L-type calcium currents (ICa,L) and cell membrane potential in cardiac myocytes by acting on VEGF type-2 receptors (VEGFR2). ICa,L and action potentials (AP) were recorded by the whole-cell patch clamp method in isolated guinea-pig ventricular myocytes treated with different concentrations of VEGF165 proteins. Using a VEGFR2 inhibitor, we also tested the receptor of VEGF165 in cardiomyocytes. We found that VEGF165 increased ICa,L in a concentration-dependent manner. SU5416, a VEGFR2 inhibitor, almost completely eliminated VEGF165-induced ICa,L increase. VEGF165 had no significant influence on action potential 90 (APD90) and other properties of AP. We conclude that in guinea-pig ventricular myocytes, ICa,L can be increased by VEGF165 in a concentration-dependent manner through binding to VEGFR2 without causing any significant alteration to action potential duration. Results of this study may further expound the safety of VEGF165 when used in the intervention of heart diseases.

  14. Serum response factor regulates smooth muscle contractility via myotonic dystrophy protein kinases and L-type calcium channels

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Moon Young; Park, Chanjae; Ha, Se Eun; Park, Paul J.; Berent, Robyn M.; Jorgensen, Brian G.; Corrigan, Robert D.; Grainger, Nathan; Blair, Peter J.; Slivano, Orazio J.; Miano, Joseph M.; Ward, Sean M.; Smith, Terence K.; Sanders, Kenton M.

    2017-01-01

    Serum response factor (SRF) transcriptionally regulates expression of contractile genes in smooth muscle cells (SMC). Lack or decrease of SRF is directly linked to a phenotypic change of SMC, leading to hypomotility of smooth muscle in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. However, the molecular mechanism behind SRF-induced hypomotility in GI smooth muscle is largely unknown. We describe here how SRF plays a functional role in the regulation of the SMC contractility via myotonic dystrophy protein kinase (DMPK) and L-type calcium channel CACNA1C. GI SMC expressed Dmpk and Cacna1c genes into multiple alternative transcriptional isoforms. Deficiency of SRF in SMC of Srf knockout (KO) mice led to reduction of SRF-dependent DMPK, which down-regulated the expression of CACNA1C. Reduction of CACNA1C in KO SMC not only decreased intracellular Ca2+ spikes but also disrupted their coupling between cells resulting in decreased contractility. The role of SRF in the regulation of SMC phenotype and function provides new insight into how SMC lose their contractility leading to hypomotility in pathophysiological conditions within the GI tract. PMID:28152551

  15. Purified omega-conotoxin GVIA receptor of rat brain resembles a dihydropyridine-sensitive L-type calcium channel

    SciTech Connect

    McEnery, M.W.; Snowman, A.M.; Sharp, A.H.; Snyder, S.H. ); Adams, M.E. )

    1991-12-15

    The {omega}-conotoxin GVIA (CTX) receptor has been purified 1,900-fold to apparent homogeneity by monitoring both reversible binding of {sup 125}I-labeled CTX ({sup 125}I-CTX) and photoincorporation of N-hydroxysuccinimidyl-4-azidobenzoate-{sup 125}I-CTX (HSA-{sup 125}I-CTX). Photoincorporation of HSA-{sup 125}I-CTX into a 230-kDa protein exhibits a pharmacologic and chromatographic profile indicating that the 230-kDa protein is the CTX-binding subunit of the receptor. The pharmacologic specificity of {sup 125}I-CTX binding to the purified CTX receptor closely resembles that of the native membrane-bound form with respect to sensitivity towards CTX and other peptide toxin antagonists. The purified CTX receptor comprises the 230-kDa protein ({alpha}{sub 1}) and four additional proteins with apparent molecular masses of 140 ({alpha}{sub 2}), 110, 70 ({beta}{sub 2}), and 60({beta}{sub 1}) kDa. This subunit structure closely resembles that of the 1,4-dihydropyridine-sensitive L-type calcium channel.

  16. Contribution of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels to homosynaptic long-term depression in the CA1 region in vitro.

    PubMed

    Christie, B R; Schexnayder, L K; Johnston, D

    1997-03-01

    Homosynaptic long-term depression (LTD) of synaptic efficacy was induced in field excitatory postsynaptic potentials by administration of 900 pulses at either 1 or 3 Hz in 2- to 3-wk-old Sprague-Dawley rats. The stimulation was administered via a bipolar stimulating electrode placed immediately adjacent to the recording electrode in the stratum radiatum region of the hippocampal CA1 subfield. Equivalent LTD induction occurred whether the slices were maintained at room temperature or at 32 degrees C. Lowering bath Ca2+ to 0 mM, or increasing it to 4 mM, prevented the induction of the depression. The NMDA receptor antagonist D,L-2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid (50 microM) reversibly blocked the induction of homosynaptic LTD. In addition, the L-type voltage-gated calcium channel (VGCC) antagonist nimodipine (10 microM) and the R- and T-type VGCC antagonist NiCl2 (25 microM) also prevented homosynaptic LTD induction. These results indicate that in addition to N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor activity, Ca2+ influx via VGCCs can play an important role in the induction and expression of LTD induced by low-frequency stimulation in the hippocampal formation.

  17. Expression and 1,4-dihydropyridine-binding properties of brain L-type calcium channel isoforms.

    PubMed

    Sinnegger-Brauns, Martina J; Huber, Irene G; Koschak, Alexandra; Wild, Claudia; Obermair, Gerald J; Einzinger, Ursula; Hoda, Jean-Charles; Sartori, Simone B; Striessnig, Jörg

    2009-02-01

    The L-type calcium channel (LTCC) isoforms Ca(v)1.2 and Ca(v)1.3 display similar 1,4-dihydropyridine (DHP) binding properties and are both expressed in mammalian brain. Recent work implicates Ca(v)1.3 channels as interesting drug targets, but no isoform-selective modulators exist. It is also unknown to what extent Ca(v)1.1 and Ca(v)1.4 contribute to L-type-specific DHP binding activity in brain. To address this question and to determine whether DHPs can discriminate between Ca(v)1.2 and Ca(v)1.3 binding pockets, we combined radioreceptor assays and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). We bred double mutants (Ca(v)-DM) from mice expressing mutant Ca(v)1.2 channels [Ca(v)1.2DHP(-/-)] lacking high affinity for DHPs and from Ca(v)1.3 knockouts [Ca(v)1.3(-/-)]. (+)-[(3)H]isradipine binding to Ca(v)1.2DHP(-/-) and Ca(v)-DM brains was reduced to 15.1 and 4.4% of wild type, respectively, indicating that Ca(v)1.3 accounts for 10.7% of brain LTCCs. qPCR revealed that Ca(v)1.1 and Ca(v)1.4 alpha(1) subunits comprised 0.08% of the LTCC transcripts in mouse whole brain, suggesting that they cannot account for the residual binding. Instead, this could be explained by low-affinity binding (127-fold K(d) increase) to the mutated Ca(v)1.2 channels. Inhibition of (+)-[(3)H]isradipine binding to Ca(v)1.2DHP(-/-) (predominantly Ca(v)1.3) and wild-type (predominantly Ca(v)1.2) brain membranes by unlabeled DHPs revealed a 3- to 4-fold selectivity of nitrendipine and nifedipine for the Ca(v)1.2 binding pocket, a finding further confirmed with heterologously expressed channels. This suggests that small differences in their binding pockets may allow development of isoform-selective modulators for LTCCs and that, because of their very low expression, Ca(v)1.1 and Ca(v)1.4 are unlikely to serve as drug targets to treat CNS diseases.

  18. Regulation of cough and action potentials by voltage-gated Na channels.

    PubMed

    Carr, Michael J

    2013-10-01

    The classical role ascribed to voltage-gated Na channels is the conduction of action potentials. Some excitable tissues such as cardiac muscle and skeletal muscle predominantly express a single voltage-gated Na channels isoform. Of the nine voltage-gated Na channels, seven are expressed in neurons, of these Nav 1.7, 1.8 and 1.9 are expressed in sensory neurons including vagal sensory neurons that innervate the airways and initiate cough. Nav 1.7 and Nav 1.9 are of particular interest as they represent two extremes in the functional diversity of voltage-gated Na channels. Voltage-gated Na channel isoforms expressed in airway sensory neurons produce multiple distinct Na currents that underlie distinct aspects of sensory neuron function. The interaction between voltage-gated Na currents underlies the characteristic ability of airway sensory nerves to encode encounters with irritant stimuli into action potential discharge and evoke the cough reflex.

  19. On the Evolution of Voltage Gated Ion Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenner, Michael

    2006-03-01

    This talk summarizes some ideas, calculations and data analysis/collection surrounding the structure and evolution of ion channels, in particular voltage gated sodium channels. The great advantage of ion channels is that they are individual proteins whose function has long been known and is readily inferred through voltage measurements. Their evolution can be tracked through the growing data base of sequences. Kinetic data is readily available, showing important differences between nearly identical channels. I will discuss our efforts to collate available functional data on voltage gated sodium channels into an 'ion channel property space' . We then use this dataset to infer underlying kinetic models, and to create evolutionary trees based on the function of the channels. Finally, I will discuss our endeavors to how ion channels evolved to be the way they are: Examples of questions we would like to answer include: to what extent do design principles dictate the details of the kinetic schemes of ion channels, such as (a) the symmetry of the sodium and potassium channels (or lack thereof), as reflected in their kinetic schemes ; (b) the coupling of sodium channel kinetics to potassium channel kinetics; or (c) activation/inactivation of the channels themselves.

  20. Biophysical properties of the voltage gated proton channel HV1

    PubMed Central

    Musset, Boris; DeCoursey, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The biophysical properties of the voltage gated proton channel (HV1) are the key elements of its physiological function. The voltage gated proton channel is a unique molecule that in contrast to all other ion channels is exclusively selective for protons. Alone among proton channels, it has voltage and time dependent gating like other “classical” ion channels. HV1 is furthermore a sensor for the pH in the cell and the surrounding media. Its voltage dependence is strictly coupled to the pH gradient across the membrane. This regulation restricts opening of the channel to specific voltages at any given pH gradient, therefore allowing HV1 to perform its physiological task in the tissue it is expressed in. For HV1 there is no known blocker. The most potent channel inhibitor is zinc (Zn2+) which prevents channel opening. An additional characteristic of HV1 is its strong temperature dependence of both gating and conductance. In contrast to single-file water filled pores like the gramicidin channel, HV1 exhibits pronounced deuterium effects and temperature effects on conduction, consistent with a different conduction mechanism than other ion channels. These properties may be explained by the recent identification of an aspartate in the pore of HV1 that is essential to its proton selectivity. PMID:23050239

  1. An L-type calcium channel agonist, bay K8644, extends the window of intervention against ischemic neuronal injury.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hong-hai; Li, Shu-ji; Wang, Pu; Yan, Hua-cheng; Cao, Xiong; Hou, Feng-qin; Fang, Ying-ying; Zhu, Xin-hong; Gao, Tian-ming

    2013-02-01

    Our previous data indicate that the inhibition of L-type calcium channels (LTCCs) might be the cause of post-ischemic neuronal injury and that the activation of LTCCs can give rise to neuroprotection. In the present study, we aimed to profile the intervention window of Bay K8644, an LTCC agonist, and determine the involved mechanisms. The four vessel occlusion and oxygen-glucose deprivation models were employed to mimic ischemia/reperfusion damage in vivo and in vitro. Neuronal injury was analyzed using Nissl and Fluoro-Jade B staining in vivo and Hoechst 33342 and propidium iodide staining in vitro. The behavioral effects were tested using the Morris water maze. The phosphorylation of P38, Jun N-terminal kinase, and extracellular-regulated kinase (ERK) was detected by Western blotting. Our results show that Bay K8644 administered as late as 24 h after reperfusion prevented CA1 neuronal death and ameliorated the deficiencies in spatial learning performance induced by global ischemia. In oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD), Bay K8644 delivered from 1 to 12 h after re-oxygenation reduced neuronal death. The decrease in p-ERK1/2 that was observed at 1 h after OGD was reversed by Bay K8644, and the effect of Bay K8644 was blocked by treatment with U0126 and MEK kinase dead transfection. Moreover, similar to Bay K8644, FPL 64176, another potent LTCC agonist, extends the window of intervention against neuronal injury in an in vitro model of ischemia. In conclusion, our data suggest that opening LTCCs may be a practicable approach for stroke therapy.

  2. Expression of the alpha(2)delta subunit interferes with prepulse facilitation in cardiac L-type calcium channels.

    PubMed Central

    Platano, D; Qin, N; Noceti, F; Birnbaumer, L; Stefani, E; Olcese, R

    2000-01-01

    We investigated the role of the accessory alpha(2)delta subunit on the voltage-dependent facilitation of cardiac L-type Ca(2+) channels (alpha(1C)). alpha(1C) Channels were coexpressed in Xenopus oocytes with beta(3) and alpha(2)delta calcium channel subunits. In alpha(1C) + beta(3), the amplitude of the ionic current (measured during pulses to 10 mV) was in average approximately 1.9-fold larger after the application of a 200-ms prepulse to +80 mV. This phenomenon, commonly referred to as voltage-dependent facilitation, was not observed when alpha(2)delta was coexpressed with alpha(1C) + beta(3). In alpha(1C) + beta(3), the prepulse produced a left shift ( approximately 40 mV) of the activation curve. Instead, the activation curve for alpha(1C) + beta(3) + alpha(2)delta was minimally affected by the prepulse and had a voltage dependence very similar to the G-V curve of the alpha(1C) + beta(3) channel facilitated by the prepulse. Coexpression of alpha(2)delta with alpha(1C) + beta(3) seems to mimic the prepulse effect by shifting the activation curve toward more negative potentials, leaving little room for facilitation. The facilitation of alpha(1C) + beta(3) was associated with an increase of the charge movement. In the presence of alpha(2)delta, the charge remained unaffected after the prepulse. Coexpression of alpha(2)delta seems to set all the channels in a conformational state from where the open state can be easily reached, even without prepulse. PMID:10827975

  3. Melanopsin Phototransduction Contributes to Light-Evoked Choroidal Expansion and Rod L-Type Calcium Channel Function In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Berkowitz, Bruce A.; Schmidt, Tiffany; Podolsky, Robert H.; Roberts, Robin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose In humans, rodents, and pigeons, the dark → light transition signals nonretinal brain tissue to increase choroidal thickness, a major control element of choroidal blood flow, and thus of photoreceptor and retinal pigment epithelium function. However, it is unclear which photopigments in the retina relay the light signal to the brain. Here, we test the hypothesis that melanopsin (Opn4)-regulated phototransduction modulates light-evoked choroidal thickness expansion in mice. Methods Two-month-old C57Bl/6 wild-type (B6), 4- to 5-month-old C57Bl/6/129S6 wild-type (B6 + S6), and 2-month-old melanopsin knockout (Opn4−/−) on a B6 + S6 background were studied. Retinal anatomy was evaluated in vivo by optical coherence tomography and MRI. Choroidal thickness in dark and light were measured by diffusion-weighted MRI. Rod cell L-type calcium channel (LTCC) function in dark and light (manganese-enhanced MRI [MEMRI]) was also measured. Results Opn4−/− mice did not show the light-evoked expansion of choroidal thickness observed in B6 and B6 + S6 controls. Additionally, Opn4−/− mice had lower than normal rod cell and inner retinal LTCC function in the dark but not in the light. These deficits were not due to structural abnormalities because retinal laminar architecture and thickness, and choroidal thickness in the Opn4−/− mice were similar to controls. Conclusions First time evidence is provided that melanopsin phototransduction contributes to dark → light control of murine choroidal thickness. The data also highlight a contribution in vivo of melanopsin phototransduction to rod cell and inner retinal depolarization in the dark. PMID:27727394

  4. Neurotoxins and Their Binding Areas on Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Marijke; Peigneur, Steve; Tytgat, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) are large transmembrane proteins that conduct sodium ions across the membrane and by doing so they generate signals of communication between many kinds of tissues. They are responsible for the generation and propagation of action potentials in excitable cells, in close collaboration with other channels like potassium channels. Therefore, genetic defects in sodium channel genes can cause a wide variety of diseases, generally called “channelopathies.” The first insights into the mechanism of action potentials and the involvement of sodium channels originated from Hodgkin and Huxley for which they were awarded the Nobel Prize in 1963. These concepts still form the basis for understanding the function of VGSCs. When VGSCs sense a sufficient change in membrane potential, they are activated and consequently generate a massive influx of sodium ions. Immediately after, channels will start to inactivate and currents decrease. In the inactivated state, channels stay refractory for new stimuli and they must return to the closed state before being susceptible to a new depolarization. On the other hand, studies with neurotoxins like tetrodotoxin (TTX) and saxitoxin (STX) also contributed largely to our today’s understanding of the structure and function of ion channels and of VGSCs specifically. Moreover, neurotoxins acting on ion channels turned out to be valuable lead compounds in the development of new drugs for the enormous range of diseases in which ion channels are involved. A recent example of a synthetic neurotoxin that made it to the market is ziconotide (Prialt®, Elan). The original peptide, ω-MVIIA, is derived from the cone snail Conus magus and now FDA/EMA-approved for the management of severe chronic pain by blocking the N-type voltage-gated calcium channels in pain fibers. This review focuses on the current status of research on neurotoxins acting on VGSC, their contribution to further unravel the structure and

  5. Shellfish toxins targeting voltage-gated sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fan; Xu, Xunxun; Li, Tingting; Liu, Zhonghua

    2013-11-28

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) play a central role in the generation and propagation of action potentials in excitable neurons and other cells and are targeted by commonly used local anesthetics, antiarrhythmics, and anticonvulsants. They are also common targets of neurotoxins including shellfish toxins. Shellfish toxins are a variety of toxic secondary metabolites produced by prokaryotic cyanobacteria and eukaryotic dinoflagellates in both marine and fresh water systems, which can accumulate in marine animals via the food chain. Consumption of shellfish toxin-contaminated seafood may result in potentially fatal human shellfish poisoning. This article provides an overview of the structure, bioactivity, and pharmacology of shellfish toxins that act on VGSCs, along with a brief discussion on their pharmaceutical potential for pain management.

  6. The screw-helical voltage gating of ion channels.

    PubMed Central

    Keynes, R D; Elinder, F

    1999-01-01

    In the voltage-gated ion channels of every animal, whether they are selective for K+, Na+ or Ca2+, the voltage sensors are the S4 transmembrane segments carrying four to eight positive charges always separated by two uncharged residues. It is proposed that they move across the membrane in a screw-helical fashion in a series of three or more steps that each transfer a single electronic charge. The unit steps are stabilized by ion pairing between the mobile positive charges and fixed negative charges, of which there are invariably two located near the inner ends of segments S2 and S3 and a third near the outer end of either S2 or S3. Opening of the channel involves three such steps in each domain. PMID:10343407

  7. Taurine regulation of voltage-gated channels in retinal neurons.

    PubMed

    Rowan, Matthew J M; Bulley, Simon; Purpura, Lauren A; Ripps, Harris; Shen, Wen

    2013-01-01

    Taurine activates not only Cl(-)-permeable ionotropic receptors but also receptors that mediate metabotropic responses. The metabotropic property of taurine was revealed in electrophysiological recordings obtained after fully blocking Cl(-)-permeable receptors with an inhibitory "cocktail" consisting of picrotoxin, SR95531, and strychnine. We found that taurine's metabotropic effects regulate voltage-gated channels in retinal neurons. After applying the inhibitory cocktail, taurine enhanced delayed outward rectifier K(+) channels preferentially in Off-bipolar cells, and the effect was completely blocked by the specific PKC inhibitor, GF109203X. Additionally, taurine also acted through a metabotropic pathway to suppress both L- and N-type Ca(2+) channels in retinal neurons, which were insensitive to the potent GABA(B) receptor inhibitor, CGP55845. This study reinforces our previous finding that taurine in physiological concentrations produces a multiplicity of metabotropic effects that precisely govern the integration of signals being transmitted from the retina to the brain.

  8. Voltage-gated sodium channels and metastatic disease.

    PubMed

    Brackenbury, William J

    2012-01-01

    Voltage-gated Na (+) channels (VGSCs) are macromolecular protein complexes containing a pore-forming α subunit and smaller non-pore-forming β subunits. VGSCs are expressed in metastatic cells from a number of cancers. In these cells, Na (+) current carried by α subunits enhances migration, invasion and metastasis in vivo. In contrast, the β subunits mediate cellular adhesion and process extension. The prevailing hypothesis is that VGSCs are upregulated in cancer, in general favoring an invasive/metastatic phenotype, although the mechanisms are still not fully clear. Expression of the Nav 1.5 α subunit associates with poor prognosis in clinical breast cancer specimens, suggesting that VGSCs may have utility as prognostic markers for cancer progression. Furthermore, repurposing existing VGSC-blocking therapeutic drugs may provide a new strategy to improve outcomes in patients suffering from metastatic disease, which is the major cause of cancer-related deaths, and for which there is currently no cure.

  9. Mechanisms of Activation of Voltage-Gated Potassium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Grizel, A. V.; Glukhov, G. S.; Sokolova, O. S.

    2014-01-01

    Voltage-gated potassium ion channels (Kv) play an important role in a variety of cellular processes, including the functioning of excitable cells, regulation of apoptosis, cell growth and differentiation, the release of neurotransmitters and hormones, maintenance of cardiac activity, etc. Failure in the functioning of Kv channels leads to severe genetic disorders and the development of tumors, including malignant ones. Understanding the mechanisms underlying Kv channels functioning is a key factor in determining the cause of the diseases associated with mutations in the channels, and in the search for new drugs. The mechanism of activation of the channels is a topic of ongoing debate, and a consensus on the issue has not yet been reached. This review discusses the key stages in studying the mechanisms of functioning of Kv channels and describes the basic models of their activation known to date. PMID:25558391

  10. Neurological perspectives on voltage-gated sodium channels

    PubMed Central

    Linley, John E.; Baker, Mark D.; Minett, Michael S.; Cregg, Roman; Werdehausen, Robert; Rugiero, François

    2012-01-01

    The activity of voltage-gated sodium channels has long been linked to disorders of neuronal excitability such as epilepsy and chronic pain. Recent genetic studies have now expanded the role of sodium channels in health and disease, to include autism, migraine, multiple sclerosis, cancer as well as muscle and immune system disorders. Transgenic mouse models have proved useful in understanding the physiological role of individual sodium channels, and there has been significant progress in the development of subtype selective inhibitors of sodium channels. This review will outline the functions and roles of specific sodium channels in electrical signalling and disease, focusing on neurological aspects. We also discuss recent advances in the development of selective sodium channel inhibitors. PMID:22961543

  11. Shellfish Toxins Targeting Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fan; Xu, Xunxun; Li, Tingting; Liu, Zhonghua

    2013-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) play a central role in the generation and propagation of action potentials in excitable neurons and other cells and are targeted by commonly used local anesthetics, antiarrhythmics, and anticonvulsants. They are also common targets of neurotoxins including shellfish toxins. Shellfish toxins are a variety of toxic secondary metabolites produced by prokaryotic cyanobacteria and eukaryotic dinoflagellates in both marine and fresh water systems, which can accumulate in marine animals via the food chain. Consumption of shellfish toxin-contaminated seafood may result in potentially fatal human shellfish poisoning. This article provides an overview of the structure, bioactivity, and pharmacology of shellfish toxins that act on VGSCs, along with a brief discussion on their pharmaceutical potential for pain management. PMID:24287955

  12. Differential regulation of voltage-gated Ca2+ currents and metabotropic glutamate receptor activity by measles virus infection in rat cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Günther, Christine; Laube, Mandy; Liebert, Uwe-Gerd; Kraft, Robert

    2012-01-06

    Measles virus (MV) infection may lead to severe chronic CNS disease processes, including MV-induced encephalitis. Because the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) is a major determinant of the (patho-)physiological state in all cells we asked whether important Ca(2+) conducting pathways are affected by MV infection in cultured cortical rat neurons. Patch-clamp measurements revealed a decrease in voltage-gated Ca(2+) currents during MV-infection, while voltage-gated K(+) currents and NMDA-evoked currents were unaffected. Calcium-imaging experiments using 50mM extracellular KCl showed reduced [Ca(2+)](i) increases in MV-infected neurons, confirming a decreased activity of voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels. In contrast, the group-I metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) agonist DHPG evoked changes in [Ca(2+)](i) that were increased in MV-infected cells. Our results show that MV infection conversely regulates Ca(2+) signals induced by group-I mGluRs and by voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels, suggesting that these physiological impairments may contribute to an altered function of cortical neurons during MV-induced encephalitis.

  13. Voltage Gated Proton Channels Find Their Dream Job Managing the Respiratory Burst in Phagocytes

    PubMed Central

    DeCoursey, Thomas E.

    2011-01-01

    The voltage gated proton channel bears surprising resemblance to the voltage-sensing domain (S1–S4) of other voltage gated ion channels, but is a dimer with two conduction pathways. The proton channel seems designed for efficient proton extrusion from cells. In phagocytes, it facilitates the production of reactive oxygen species by NADPH oxidase. PMID:20134026

  14. Effects of total flavones from Acanthopanax senticosus on L-type calcium channels, calcium transient and contractility in rat ventricular myocytes.

    PubMed

    Guan, Shengjiang; Ma, Juanjuan; Chu, Xi; Gao, Yonggang; Zhang, Ying; Zhang, Xuan; Zhang, Fenghua; Liu, Zhenyi; Zhang, Jianping; Chu, Li

    2015-04-01

    Acanthopanax senticosus (Rupr. et Maxim.) Harms (AS), a traditional herbal medicine, has been widely used to treat ischemic heart disease. However, the underlying cellular mechanisms of its benefits to cardiac function remain unclear. The present study examined the effects of total flavones from AS (TFAS) on L-type Ca(2+) channel currents (ICa-L ) using the whole cell patch-clamp technique and on intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+) ]i ) handling and cell contractility in rat ventricular myocytes with the aid of a video-based edge-detection system. Exposure to TFAS resulted in a concentration- and voltage-dependent blockade of ICa-L , with the half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50 ) of 283.12 µg/mL and the maximal inhibitory effect of 36.49 ± 1.95%. Moreover, TFAS not only increased the maximum current in the current-voltage relationship but also shifted the activation and inactivation curves of ICa-L toward the hyperpolarizing direction. Meanwhile, TFAS significantly reduced amplitudes of myocyte shortening and [Ca(2+) ]i with an increase in the time to 10% of the peak (Tp) and a decrease in the time to 10% of the baseline (Tr). Thus, the cardioprotective effects of TFAS may be attributed mainly to the attenuation of [Ca(2+) ]i through the direct inhibition of ICa-L in rat ventricular myocytes and consequent negative effect on myocardial contractility.

  15. Nuclear translocation of the cardiac L-type calcium channel C-terminus is regulated by sex and 17β-estradiol.

    PubMed

    Mahmoodzadeh, S; Haase, H; Sporbert, A; Rharass, T; Panáková, D; Morano, I

    2016-08-01

    The cardiac voltage gated l-type Ca(2+) channel (Cav1.2) constitutes the main entrance gate for Ca(2+) that triggers cardiac contraction. Several studies showed that the distal C-terminus fragment of Cav1.2 α1C subunit (α1C-dCT) is proteolytically cleaved and shuttles between the plasma membrane and the nucleus, which is regulated both developmentally and by Ca(2+). However, the effects of sex and sex hormone 17β-estradiol (E2, estrogen) on α1C-dCT nuclear translocation are still unexplored. To investigate the sexual disparity in the α1C-dCT nuclear translocation, we first generated an antibody directed against a synthetic peptide (GRRASFHLE) located in α1C-dCT, and used it to probe ventricular myocytes from adult female and male mice. Immunocytochemistry of isolated mouse primary adult ventricular myocytes revealed both nuclear staining and cytosolic punctuate staining around the T-tubules. The ratio of nuclear to cytosolic intensity (Inuc/Icyt) was significantly higher in isolated female cardiomyocytes (1.42±0.05) compared to male cardiomyocytes (1.05±0.02). Western blot analysis of nuclear fraction confirmed these data. Furthermore, we found a significant decrease in nuclear staining intensity of α1C-dCT in both female and male cardiomyocytes upon serum withdrawal for 18h (Inuc/Icyt 1.05±0.02 and 0.89±0.02, respectively). Interestingly, subsequent E2 treatment (10(-8)M) for 8h normalized the intracellular distribution of α1C-dCT in male cardiomyocytes (Inuc/Icyt 1.04±0.02), but not in female cardiomyocytes. Acute treatment of male cardiomyocytes with E2 for 45min revealed a similar effect. This effect of E2 was revised by ICI indicating the involvement of ER in this signaling pathway. Taken together, our results showed that the shuttling of α1C-CT in cardiomyocytes is regulated in a sex-dependent manner, and E2-activated ER may play a role in the nuclear shuttling of α1C-dCT in male cardiomyocytes. This may explain, at least partly, the observed

  16. Pharmacological Inhibition of Voltage-gated Ca2+ Channels for Chronic Pain Relief

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seungkyu

    2013-01-01

    Chronic pain is a major therapeutic problem as the current treatment options are unsatisfactory with low efficacy and deleterious side effects. Voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (VGCCs), which are multi-complex proteins consisting of α1, β, γ, and α2δ subunits, play an important role in pain signaling. These channels are involved in neurogenic inflammation, excitability, and neurotransmitter release in nociceptors. It has been previously shown that N-type VGCCs (Cav2.2) are a major pain target. U.S. FDA approval of three Cav2.2 antagonists, gabapentin, pregabalin, and ziconotide, for chronic pain underlies the importance of this channel subtype. Also, there has been increasing evidence that L-type (Cav1.2) or T-type (Cav3.2) VGCCs may be involved in pain signaling and chronic pain. In order to develop novel pain therapeutics and to understand the role of VGCC subtypes, discovering subtype selective VGCC inhibitors or methods that selectively target the inhibitor into nociceptors would be essential. This review describes the various VGCC subtype inhibitors and the potential of utilizing VGCC subtypes as targets of chronic pain. Development of VGCC subtype inhibitors and targeting them into nociceptors will contribute to a better understanding of the roles of VGCC subtypes in pain at a spinal level as well as development of a novel class of analgesics for chronic pain. PMID:24396337

  17. Role of voltage gated Ca2+ channels in rat visceral hypersensitivity change induced by 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Visceral pain is common symptom involved in many gastrointestinal disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease. The underlying molecular mechanisms remain elusive. We investigated the molecular mechanisms and the role for voltage gated calcium channel (VGCC) in the pathogenesis in a rat model of 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS) induced visceral inflammatory hypersensitivity. Results Using Agilent cDNA arrays, we found 172 genes changed significantly in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) of TNBS treated rats. Among these changed genes, Cav1.2 and Cav2.3 were significantly up-regulated. Then the RT-PCR and Western blot further confirmed the up-regulation of Cav1.2 and Cav2.3. The whole cell patch clamp recording of acutely dissociated colonic specific DRG neurons showed that the peak IBa density was significantly increased in colonic neurons of TNBS treated rats compared with control rats (−127.82 ± 20.82 pA/pF Vs −91.67 ± 19.02 pA/pF, n = 9, *P < 0.05). To distinguish the different type of calcium currents with the corresponding selective channel blockers, we found that L-type (−38.56 ± 3.97 pA/pF Vs −25.75 ± 3.35 pA/pF, n = 9, * P < 0.05) and R-type (−13.31 ± 1.36 pA/pF Vs −8.60 ± 1.25 pA/pF, n = 9, * P < 0.05) calcium current density were significantly increased in colonic DRG neurons of TNBS treated rats compared with control rats. In addition, pharmacological blockade with L-type antagonist (nimodipine) and R-type antagonist (SNX-482) with intrathecal injection attenuates visceral pain in TNBS induced inflammatory visceral hypersensitivity. Conclusion Cav1.2 and Cav2.3 in colonic primary sensory neurons play an important role in visceral inflammatory hyperalgesia, which maybe the potential therapeutic targets. PMID:23537331

  18. Comparative analysis of the kinetic characteristics of L-type calcium channels in cardiac cells of hibernators.

    PubMed Central

    Alekseev, A E; Markevich, N I; Korystova, A F; Terzic, A; Kokoz, Y M

    1996-01-01

    An undefined property of L-type Ca2+ channels is believed to underlie the unique phenotype of hibernating hearts. Therefore, L-type Ca2+ channels in single cardiomyocytes isolated from hibernating versus awake ground-squirrels (Citellus undulatus) were compared using the perforated mode of the patch-clamp technique, and interpreted by way of a kinetic model of Ca2+ channel behavior based upon the concept of independence of the activation and inactivation processes. We find that, in hibernating ground-squirrels, the cardiac L-type Ca2+ current is lower in magnitude when compared to awake animals. Both in the awake or hibernating states, kinetics of L-type Ca2+ channels could be described by a d2f1(2)f2 model with an activation and two inactivation processes. The activation (or d) process relates to the movement of the gating charge. The slow (or f1) inactivation is associated with movement of gating charge and is current-dependent. The rapid (or f2) inactivation is a complex process which cannot be represented as a single-step conformational transition induced by the gating charge movement, and is regulated by beta-adrenoceptor stimulation. When compared to awake animals, the kinetic properties of Ca2+ channels from hibernating ground-squirrels differed in the following parameters: (1) pronounced shift (15-20 mV) toward depolarization in the normalized conductance of both inactivation components, and moderate shift in the activation component; (2) 1.5-2-fold greater time constants; and (3) two-fold greater activation gating charge. Thus, L-type Ca2+ channels apparently switch their phenotype during the hibernating transition. Stimulation of beta-adrenoceptors by isoproterenol, reversed the hibernating kinetic- (but not amplitude-) phenotype toward the awake type. Therefore, an aberrance in the beta-adrenergic system can not fully explain the observed changes in the L-type Ca2+ current. This suggests that during hibernation additional mechanisms may reduce the single

  19. Understanding Voltage Gating of Providencia stuartii Porins at Atomic Level.

    PubMed

    Song, Wanling; Bajaj, Harsha; Nasrallah, Chady; Jiang, Hualiang; Winterhalter, Mathias; Colletier, Jacques-Philippe; Xu, Yechun

    2015-05-01

    Bacterial porins are water-filled β-barrel channels that allow translocation of solutes across the outer membrane. They feature a constriction zone, contributed by the plunging of extracellular loop 3 (L3) into the channel lumen. Porins are generally in the open state, but undergo gating in response to external voltages. To date the underlying mechanism is unclear. Here we report results from molecular dynamics simulations on the two porins of Providenica stuartii, Omp-Pst1 and Omp-Pst2, which display distinct voltage sensitivities. Voltage gating was observed in Omp-Pst2, where the binding of cations in-between L3 and the barrel wall results in exposing a conserved aromatic residue in the channel lumen, thereby halting ion permeation. Comparison of Omp-Pst1 and Omp-Pst2 structures and trajectories suggests that their sensitivity to voltage is encoded in the hydrogen-bonding network anchoring L3 onto the barrel wall, as we observed that it is the strength of this network that governs the probability of cations binding behind L3. That Omp-Pst2 gating is observed only when ions flow against the electrostatic potential gradient of the channel furthermore suggests a possible role for this porin in the regulation of charge distribution across the outer membrane and bacterial homeostasis.

  20. Transcriptional regulation of voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels.

    PubMed

    González-Ramírez, Ricardo; Felix, Ricardo

    2017-03-31

    The transcriptional regulation of voltage-gated Ca(2+) (CaV ) channels is an emerging research area that promises to improve our understanding of how many relevant physiological events are shaped in the central nervous system, the skeletal muscle, and other tissues. Interestingly, a picture of how transcription of CaV channel subunit genes is controlled is evolving with the identification of the promoter regions required for tissue-specific expression, and the identification of transcription factors that control their expression. These promoters share several characteristics that include multiple transcriptional start sites, lack of a TATA box, and the presence of elements conferring tissue-selective expression. Likewise, changes in CaV channel expression occur throughout development, following ischemia, seizures, or chronic drug administration. This review focuses on insights achieved regarding the control of CaV channel gene expression. To further understand the complexities of expression and to increase the possibilities of detecting CaV channel alterations causing human disease, a deeper knowledge on the structure of the 5' upstream regions of the genes encoding these remarkable proteins will be necessary. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  1. Voltage-gated sodium channels: biophysics, pharmacology, and related channelopathies.

    PubMed

    Savio-Galimberti, Eleonora; Gollob, Michael H; Darbar, Dawood

    2012-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSC) are multi-molecular protein complexes expressed in both excitable and non-excitable cells. They are primarily formed by a pore-forming multi-spanning integral membrane glycoprotein (α-subunit) that can be associated with one or more regulatory β-subunits. The latter are single-span integral membrane proteins that modulate the sodium current (I(Na)) and can also function as cell adhesion molecules. In vitro some of the cell-adhesive functions of the β-subunits may play important physiological roles independently of the α-subunits. Other endogenous regulatory proteins named "channel partners" or "channel interacting proteins" (ChiPs) like caveolin-3 and calmodulin/calmodulin kinase II (CaMKII) can also interact and modulate the expression and/or function of VGSC. In addition to their physiological roles in cell excitability and cell adhesion, VGSC are the site of action of toxins (like tetrodotoxin and saxitoxin), and pharmacologic agents (like antiarrhythmic drugs, local anesthetics, antiepileptic drugs, and newly developed analgesics). Mutations in genes that encode α- and/or β-subunits as well as the ChiPs can affect the structure and biophysical properties of VGSC, leading to the development of diseases termed sodium "channelopathies".  This review will outline the structure, function, and biophysical properties of VGSC as well as their pharmacology and associated channelopathies and highlight some of the recent advances in this field.

  2. Voltage-Gated Na+ Channels: Not Just for Conduction.

    PubMed

    Kruger, Larisa C; Isom, Lori L

    2016-06-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs), composed of a pore-forming α subunit and up to two associated β subunits, are critical for the initiation of the action potential (AP) in excitable tissues. Building on the monumental discovery and description of sodium current in 1952, intrepid researchers described the voltage-dependent gating mechanism, selectivity of the channel, and general structure of the VGSC channel. Recently, crystal structures of bacterial VGSC α subunits have confirmed many of these studies and provided new insights into VGSC function. VGSC β subunits, first cloned in 1992, modulate sodium current but also have nonconducting roles as cell-adhesion molecules and function in neurite outgrowth and neuronal pathfinding. Mutations in VGSC α and β genes are associated with diseases caused by dysfunction of excitable tissues such as epilepsy. Because of the multigenic and drug-resistant nature of some of these diseases, induced pluripotent stem cells and other novel approaches are being used to screen for new drugs and further understand how mutations in VGSC genes contribute to pathophysiology.

  3. Voltage-gated sodium channel blockers as immunomodulators.

    PubMed

    Roselli, Francesco; Livrea, Paolo; Jirillo, Emilio

    2006-01-01

    Several Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels (VGSC) are widely expressed on lymphocytes and macrophages but their role in immune function is still debated. Nevertheless, Na(+) influx through VGSC is required for lymphocytes activation and proliferation, since these responses are blocked by Na(+)-free medium or by VGSC blockers. These effects may be mediated by the reduced intracellular Na(+) levels, which in turn may impair the activity of Na(+)/Ca(++) exchanger resulting in reduced intracellular Ca(++) levels during lymphocyte activation. Furthermore, in Jurkat cell line VGSC appear to be involved in cell volume regulation, migration in artificial matrix and cell death by apoptosis. VGSC play a role in macrophage function as well, and VGSC blockers impair both phagocytosis and inflammatory responses. Several VGSC blockers have shown immunomodulatory properties in mice models, skewing the immune response toward a Th2-mediated response, while suppressing Th1-mediated responses, and VGSC already used in clinical practice are known to modulate immunoglobulin (Ig) levels both in mice and in humans. These effects suggest that VGSC blockers may find clinical application in the treatment of autoimmune and inflammatory disease. However, many of these drugs induce a number of severe side effects. The relevance of VGSC function in immune regulation suggest that the testing of newly patented VGSC blockers for their effect on immunity may be worthwhile.

  4. Screening for voltage-gated sodium channel interacting peptides.

    PubMed

    Meng, Er; Cai, Tian-Fu; Zhang, Hui; Tang, Si; Li, Meng-Jie; Li, Wen-Ying; Huang, Peng-Fei; Liu, Kai; Wu, Lei; Zhu, Ling-Yun; Liu, Long; Peng, Kuan; Dai, Xian-Dong; Jiang, Hui; Zeng, Xiong-Zhi; Liang, Song-Ping; Zhang, Dong-Yi

    2014-04-02

    The voltage-gated sodium channel (VGSC) interacting peptide is of special interest for both basic research and pharmaceutical purposes. In this study, we established a yeast-two-hybrid based strategy to detect the interaction(s) between neurotoxic peptide and the extracellular region of VGSC. Using a previously reported neurotoxin JZTX-III as a model molecule, we demonstrated that the interactions between JZTX-III and the extracellular regions of its target hNav1.5 are detectable and the detected interactions are directly related to its activity. We further applied this strategy to the screening of VGSC interacting peptides. Using the extracellular region of hNav1.5 as the bait, we identified a novel sodium channel inhibitor SSCM-1 from a random peptide library. This peptide selectively inhibits hNav1.5 currents in the whole-cell patch clamp assays. This strategy might be used for the large scale screening for target-specific interacting peptides of VGSCs or other ion channels.

  5. Marine Toxins That Target Voltage-gated Sodium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Al-Sabi, Ahmed; McArthur, Jeff; Ostroumov, Vitaly; French, Robert J.

    2006-01-01

    Eukaryotic, voltage-gated sodium (NaV) channels are large membrane proteins which underlie generation and propagation of rapid electrical signals in nerve, muscle and heart. Nine different NaV receptor sites, for natural ligands and/or drugs, have been identified, based on functional analyses and site-directed mutagenesis. In the marine ecosystem, numerous toxins have evolved to disrupt NaV channel function, either by inhibition of current flow through the channels, or by modifying the activation and inactivation gating processes by which the channels open and close. These toxins function in their native environment as offensive or defensive weapons in prey capture or deterrence of predators. In composition, they range from organic molecules of varying size and complexity to peptides consisting of ~10–70 amino acids. We review the variety of known NaV-targeted marine toxins, outlining, where known, their sites of interaction with the channel protein and their functional effects. In a number of cases, these natural ligands have the potential applications as drugs in clinical settings, or as models for drug development.

  6. Resurgent current of voltage-gated Na+ channels

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Amanda H; Raman, Indira M

    2014-01-01

    Resurgent Na+ current results from a distinctive form of Na+ channel gating, originally identified in cerebellar Purkinje neurons. In these neurons, the tetrodotoxin-sensitive voltage-gated Na+ channels responsible for action potential firing have specialized mechanisms that reduce the likelihood that they accumulate in fast inactivated states, thereby shortening refractory periods and permitting rapid, repetitive, and/or burst firing. Under voltage clamp, step depolarizations evoke transient Na+ currents that rapidly activate and quickly decay, and step repolarizations elicit slower channel reopening, or a ‘resurgent’ current. The generation of resurgent current depends on a factor in the Na+ channel complex, probably a subunit such as NaVβ4 (Scn4b), which blocks open Na+ channels at positive voltages, competing with the fast inactivation gate, and unblocks at negative voltages, permitting recovery from an open channel block along with a flow of current. Following its initial discovery, resurgent Na+ current has been found in nearly 20 types of neurons. Emerging research suggests that resurgent current is preferentially increased in a variety of clinical conditions associated with altered cellular excitability. Here we review the biophysical, molecular and structural mechanisms of resurgent current and their relation to the normal functions of excitable cells as well as pathophysiology. PMID:25172941

  7. Seizure suppression through manipulating splicing of a voltage-gated sodium channel

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Wei-Hsiang; He, Miaomiao

    2015-01-01

    Seizure can result from increased voltage-gated persistent sodium current expression. Although many clinically-approved antiepileptic drugs target voltage-gated persistent sodium current, none exclusively repress this current without also adversely affecting the transient voltage-gated sodium current. Achieving a more selective block has significant potential for the treatment of epilepsy. Recent studies show that voltage-gated persistent sodium current amplitude is regulated by alternative splicing offering the possibility of a novel route for seizure control. In this study we identify 291 splicing regulators that, on knockdown, alter splicing of the Drosophila voltage-gated sodium channel to favour inclusion of exon K, rather than the mutually exclusive exon L. This change is associated with both a significant reduction in voltage-gated persistent sodium current, without change to transient voltage-gated sodium current, and to rescue of seizure in this model insect. RNA interference mediated knock-down, in two different seizure mutants, shows that 95 of these regulators are sufficient to significantly reduce seizure duration. Moreover, most suppress seizure activity in both mutants, indicative that they are part of well conserved pathways and likely, therefore, to be optimal candidates to take forward to mammalian studies. We provide proof-of-principle for such studies by showing that inhibition of a selection of regulators, using small molecule inhibitors, is similarly effective to reduce seizure. Splicing of the Drosophila sodium channel shows many similarities to its mammalian counterparts, including altering the amplitude of voltage-gated persistent sodium current. Our study provides the impetus to investigate whether manipulation of splicing of mammalian voltage-gated sodium channels may be exploitable to provide effective seizure control. PMID:25681415

  8. Regulation of Postsynaptic Stability by the L-type Calcium Channel CaV1.3 and its Interaction with PDZ Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Stanika, Ruslan I.; Flucher, Bernhard E.; Obermair, Gerald J.

    2015-01-01

    Alterations in dendritic spine morphology and postsynaptic structure are a hallmark of neurological disorders. Particularly spine pruning of striatal medium spiny neurons and aberrant rewiring of corticostriatal synapses have been associated with the pathology of Parkinson’s disease and L-DOPA induced dyskinesia, respectively. Owing to its low activation threshold the neuronal L-type calcium channel CaV1.3 is particularly critical in the control of neuronal excitability and thus in the calcium-dependent regulation of neuronal functions. CaV1.3 channels are located in dendritic spines and contain a C-terminal class 1 PDZ domain-binding sequence. Until today the postsynaptic PDZ domain proteins shank, densin-180, and erbin have been shown to interact with CaV1.3 channels and to modulate their current properties. Interestingly experimental evidence suggests an involvement of all three PDZ proteins as well as CaV1.3 itself in regulating dendritic and postsynaptic morphology. Here we briefly review the importance of CaV1.3 and its proposed interactions with PDZ proteins for the stability of dendritic spines. With a special focus on the pathology associated with Parkinson’s disease, we discuss the hypothesis that CaV1.3 L-type calcium channels may be critical modulators of dendritic spine stability. PMID:25966696

  9. Regulation of voltage-gated Ca(2+) currents by Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II in resting sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Kostic, Sandra; Pan, Bin; Guo, Yuan; Yu, Hongwei; Sapunar, Damir; Kwok, Wai-Meng; Hudmon, Andy; Wu, Hsiang-En; Hogan, Quinn H

    2014-09-01

    Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) is recognized as a key element in encoding depolarization activity of excitable cells into facilitated voltage-gated Ca(2+) channel (VGCC) function. Less is known about the participation of CaMKII in regulating VGCCs in resting cells. We examined constitutive CaMKII control of Ca(2+) currents in peripheral sensory neurons acutely isolated from dorsal root ganglia (DRGs) of adult rats. The small molecule CaMKII inhibitor KN-93 (1.0μM) reduced depolarization-induced ICa by 16-30% in excess of the effects produced by the inactive homolog KN-92. The specificity of CaMKII inhibition on VGCC function was shown by the efficacy of the selective CaMKII blocking peptide autocamtide-2-related inhibitory peptide in a membrane-permeable myristoylated form, which also reduced VGCC current in resting neurons. Loss of VGCC currents is primarily due to reduced N-type current, as application of mAIP selectively reduced N-type current by approximately 30%, and prior N-type current inhibition eliminated the effect of mAIP on VGCCs, while prior block of L-type channels did not reduce the effect of mAIP on total ICa. T-type currents were not affected by mAIP in resting DRG neurons. Transduction of sensory neurons in vivo by DRG injection of an adeno-associated virus expressing AIP also resulted in a loss of N-type currents. Together, these findings reveal a novel molecular adaptation whereby sensory neurons retain CaMKII support of VGCCs despite remaining quiescent.

  10. Inflammatory cytokine signaling in insulin producing beta-cells enhances the colocalization correlation coefficient between L-type voltage-dependent calcium channel and calcium-sensing receptor.

    PubMed

    Parkash, Jai

    2008-08-01

    The immunological processes in type 1 diabetes and metabolic/inflammatory disorder in type 2 diabetes converge on common signaling pathway(s) leading to beta-cell death in these two diseases. The cytokine-mediated beta-cell death seems to be dependent on voltage-dependent calcium channel (VDCC)-mediated Ca2+ entry. The Ca2+ handling molecular networks control the homeostasis of [Ca2+]i in the beta-cell. The activity and membrane density of VDCC are regulated by several mechanisms including G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). CaR is a 123-kDa seven transmembrane extracellular Ca2+ sensing protein that belongs to GPCR family C. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), is a cytokine widely known to activate nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) transcription in beta-cells. To obtain a better understanding of TNF-alpha-induced molecular interactions between CaR and VDCC, confocal fluorescence measurements were performed on insulin-producing beta-cells exposed to varying concentrations of TNF-alpha and the results are discussed in the light of increased colocalization correlation coefficient. The insulin producing beta-cells were exposed to 5, 10, 20, 30, and 50 ng/ml TNF-alpha for 24 h at 37 degrees . The cells were then immunolabelled with antibodies directed against CaR, VDCC, and NF-kappaB. The confocal fluorescence imaging data showed enhancement in the colocalization correlation coefficient between CaR and VDCC in beta-cells exposed to TNF-alpha thereby indicating increased membrane delimited spatial interactions between these two membrane proteins. TNF-alpha-induced colocalization of VDCC with CaR was inhibited by nimodipine, an inhibitor of L-type VDCC thereby suggesting that VDCC activity is required for spatial interactions with CaR. The 3-D confocal fluorescence imaging data also demonstrated that addition of TNF-alpha to RIN cells led to the translocation of NF-kappaB from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. Such molecular interactions between CaR and VDCC in tissues

  11. Modulation by extracellular ATP of L-type calcium channels in guinea-pig single sinoatrial nodal cell.

    PubMed Central

    Qi, A. D.; Kwan, Y. W.

    1996-01-01

    1. The effects of extracellular adenosine 5'-triphosphate ([ATP]zero) on the L-type Ca2+ channel currents in guinea-pig single sinoatrial nodal (SAN) cells, isolated by enzymatic dissociation, were investigated by use of whole-cell patch-clamp techniques. 2. The application of [ATP]zero (2 microM-1 mM) produced an inhibitory effect on the L-type Ca2+ channel current peak amplitude (10 mM Ba2+ as charge carrier) in a concentration-dependent and reversible manner with an IC50 of 100 microM and a Hill coefficient of 1.83. 3. The presence of the adenosine receptor antagonists, 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX, 0.1 microM) and 8-phenyltheophylline (10 microM) did not affect the [ATP]zero-induced inhibition of the Ca2+ channel currents. Adenosine (100 microM) had little effect on the basal Ca2+ channel currents. Adenosine 500 microM, caused 23% inhibition of the Ca2+ channel current, which was abolished by 0.1 microM DPCPX. 4. The presence of the P2-purinoceptor antagonists, suramin (1, 10 and 100 microM), reactive blue 2 (1 and 10 microM) and pyridoxal-phosphate-6-azophenyl-2',4'-disulphonic acid (PPADS, 50 and 100 microM) failed to affect the inhibitory action of [ATP]zero on Ca2+ channel currents. 5. The relative rank order of potency of different nucleotides and nucleosides, at a concentration of 100 microM, on the inhibition of the Ca2+ channel currents is as follows: adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) = alpha,beta-methylene-ATP (alpha,beta MeATP) > > 2-methylthioATP (2-MeSATP) > or = adenosine 5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate) (ATP gamma S) > > uridine 5'-triphosphate (UTP) = adenosine 5'-diphosphate (ADP) > adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) > or = adenosine. 6. These results suggest that [ATP]zero may play an important role in the heart beat by inhibiting the L-type Ca2+ channel currents in single SAN cells. This inhibitory effect is not due to the formation of adenosine resulting from the enzymatic degradation of [ATP]zero. Based on the relative order of inhibitory

  12. A novel dihydropyridine with 3-aryl meta-hydroxyl substitution blocks L-type calcium channels in rat cardiomyocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Galvis-Pareja, David; Zapata-Torres, Gerald; Hidalgo, Jorge; Ayala, Pedro; and others

    2014-08-15

    Rationale: Dihydropyridines are widely used for the treatment of several cardiac diseases due to their blocking activity on L-type Ca{sup 2+} channels and their renowned antioxidant properties. Methods: We synthesized six novel dihydropyridine molecules and performed docking studies on the binding site of the L-type Ca{sup 2+} channel. We used biochemical techniques on isolated adult rat cardiomyocytes to assess the efficacy of these molecules on their Ca{sup 2+} channel-blocking activity and antioxidant properties. The Ca{sup 2+} channel-blocking activity was evaluated by confocal microscopy on fluo-3AM loaded cardiomyocytes, as well as using patch clamp experiments. Antioxidant properties were evaluated by flow cytometry using the ROS sensitive dye 1,2,3 DHR. Results: Our docking studies show that a novel compound with 3-OH substitution inserts into the active binding site of the L-type Ca{sup 2+} channel previously described for nitrendipine. In biochemical assays, the novel meta-OH group in the aryl in C4 showed a high blocking effect on L-type Ca{sup 2+} channel as opposed to para-substituted compounds. In the tests we performed, none of the molecules showed antioxidant properties. Conclusions: Only substitutions in C2, C3 and C5 of the aryl ring render dihydropyridine compounds with the capacity of blocking LTCC. Based on our docking studies, we postulate that the antioxidant activity requires a larger group than the meta-OH substitution in C2, C3 or C5 of the dihydropyridine ring. - Highlights: • Dihydropyridine (DHP) molecules are widely used in cardiovascular disease. • DHPs block Ca{sup 2+} entry through LTCC—some DHPs have antioxidant activity as well. • We synthesized 6 new DHPs and tested their Ca{sup 2+} blocking and antioxidant activities. • 3-Aryl meta-hydroxyl substitution strongly increases their Ca{sup 2+} blocking activity. • 3-Aryl meta-hydroxyl substitution did not affect the antioxidant properties.

  13. β-Adrenoceptor activation enhances L-type calcium channel currents in anterior piriform cortex pyramidal cells of neonatal mice: implication for odor learning.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Abhinaba; Mukherjee, Bandhan; Chen, Xihua; Yuan, Qi

    2017-03-01

    Early odor preference learning occurs in one-week-old rodents when a novel odor is paired with a tactile stimulation mimicking maternal care. β-Adrenoceptors and L-type calcium channels (LTCCs) in the anterior piriform cortex (aPC) are critically involved in this learning. However, whether β-adrenoceptors interact directly with LTCCs in aPC pyramidal cells is unknown. Here we show that pyramidal cells expressed significant LTCC currents that declined with age. β-Adrenoceptor activation via isoproterenol age-dependently enhanced LTCC currents. Nifedipine-sensitive, isoproterenol enhancement of calcium currents was only observed in post-natal day 7-10 mice. APC β-adrenoceptor activation induced early odor preference learning was blocked by nifedipine coinfusion.

  14. Coupling between the voltage-sensing and pore domains in a voltage-gated potassium channel.

    PubMed

    Schow, Eric V; Freites, J Alfredo; Nizkorodov, Alex; White, Stephen H; Tobias, Douglas J

    2012-07-01

    Voltage-dependent potassium (Kv), sodium (Nav), and calcium channels open and close in response to changes in transmembrane (TM) potential, thus regulating cell excitability by controlling ion flow across the membrane. An outstanding question concerning voltage gating is how voltage-induced conformational changes of the channel voltage-sensing domains (VSDs) are coupled through the S4-S5 interfacial linking helices to the opening and closing of the pore domain (PD). To investigate the coupling between the VSDs and the PD, we generated a closed Kv channel configuration from Aeropyrum pernix (KvAP) using atomistic simulations with experiment-based restraints on the VSDs. Full closure of the channel required, in addition to the experimentally determined TM displacement, that the VSDs be displaced both inwardly and laterally around the PD. This twisting motion generates a tight hydrophobic interface between the S4-S5 linkers and the C-terminal ends of the pore domain S6 helices in agreement with available experimental evidence.

  15. Spexin Enhances Bowel Movement through Activating L-type Voltage-dependent Calcium Channel via Galanin Receptor 2 in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Cheng-yuan; Zhang, Man; Huang, Tao; Yang, Li-ling; Fu, Hai-bo; Zhao, Ling; Zhong, Linda LD; Mu, Huai-xue; Shi, Xiao-ke; Leung, Christina FP; Fan, Bao-min; Jiang, Miao; Lu, Ai-ping; Zhu, Li-xin; Bian, Zhao-xiang

    2015-01-01

    A novel neuropeptide spexin was found to be broadly expressed in various endocrine and nervous tissues while little is known about its functions. This study investigated the role of spexin in bowel movement and the underlying mechanisms. In functional constipation (FC) patients, serum spexin levels were significantly decreased. Consistently, in starved mice, the mRNA of spexin was significantly decreased in intestine and colon. Spexin injection increased the velocity of carbon powder propulsion in small intestine and decreased the glass beads expulsion time in distal colon in mice. Further, spexin dose-dependently stimulated the intestinal/colonic smooth muscle contraction. Galanin receptor 2 (GALR2) antagonist M871, but not Galanin receptor 3 (GALR3) antagonist SNAP37899, effectively suppressed the stimulatory effects of spexin on intestinal/colonic smooth muscle contraction, which could be eliminated by extracellular [Ca2+] removal and L-type voltage-dependentCa2+ channel (VDCC) inhibitor nifedipine. Besides, spexin dramatically increased the [Ca2+]i in isolated colonic smooth muscle cells. These data indicate that spexin can act on GALR2 receptor to regulate bowel motility by activating L-type VDCC. Our findings provide evidence for important physiological roles of spexin in GI functions. Selective action on spexin pathway might have therapeutic effects on GI diseases with motility disorders. PMID:26160593

  16. Effects of the N/L-type calcium channel blocker cilnidipine on nephropathy and uric acid metabolism in hypertensive patients with chronic kidney disease (J-CIRCLE study).

    PubMed

    Uchida, Shunya; Takahashi, Masato; Sugawara, Masahiro; Saito, Tomoaki; Nakai, Kazuhiko; Fujita, Masami; Mochizuki, Koichi; Shin, Isu; Morita, Takashi; Hikita, Tomoyuki; Itakura, Hironao; Takahashi, Yuko; Mizuno, Shigeki; Ohno, Yasumi; Ito, Kageki; Ito, Takafumi; Soma, Masayoshi

    2014-10-01

    This study assessed the urinary albumin/creatinine ratio (ACR) and uric acid metabolism in 70 hypertensive patients with chronic kidney disease in whom urinary ACR had remained ≥30 mg/g under the treatment of the L-type calcium channel blocker amlodipine. Three months after switching to the N/L-type calcium channel blocker cilnidipine, blood pressure (BP) did not change; however, urinary ACR significantly decreased with cilnidipine. Serum uric acid levels showed no significant change. In cases where uric acid production had been high (urinary uric acid/creatinine ratio ≥0.5), the urinary uric acid/creatinine ratio decreased significantly after cilnidipine treatment, suggesting that cilnidipine can suppress excessive uric acid formation. These results suggest that switching from amlodipine to cilnidipine results in a significant reduction in urinary ACR as well as significant reduction in uric acid production. Thus, cilnidipine is more useful than amlodipine in improving albuminuria and uric acid metabolism in hypertensive patients with chronic kidney disease.

  17. Gentamicin Blocks the ACh-Induced BK Current in Guinea Pig Type II Vestibular Hair Cells by Competing with Ca2+ at the l-Type Calcium Channel

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hong; Guo, Chang-Kai; Wang, Yi; Zhou, Tao; Kong, Wei-Jia

    2014-01-01

    Type II vestibular hair cells (VHCs II) contain big-conductance Ca2+-dependent K+ channels (BK) and l-type calcium channels. Our previous studies in guinea pig VHCs II indicated that acetylcholine (ACh) evoked the BK current by triggering the influx of Ca2+ ions through l-type Ca2+ channels, which was mediated by M2 muscarinic ACh receptor (mAChRs). Aminoglycoside antibiotics, such as gentamicin (GM), are known to have vestibulotoxicity, including damaging effects on the efferent nerve endings on VHCs II. This study used the whole-cell patch clamp technique to determine whether GM affects the vestibular efferent system at postsynaptic M2-mAChRs or the membrane ion channels. We found that GM could block the ACh-induced BK current and that inhibition was reversible, voltage-independent, and dose-dependent with an IC50 value of 36.3 ± 7.8 μM. Increasing the ACh concentration had little influence on GM blocking effect, but increasing the extracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]o) could antagonize it. Moreover, 50 μM GM potently blocked Ca2+ currents activated by (−)-Bay-K8644, but did not block BK currents induced by NS1619. These observations indicate that GM most likely blocks the M2 mAChR-mediated response by competing with Ca2+ at the l-type calcium channel. These results provide insights into the vestibulotoxicity of aminoglycoside antibiotics on mammalian VHCs II. PMID:24758923

  18. NMDA receptors in mouse anterior piriform cortex initialize early odor preference learning and L-type calcium channels engage for long-term memory.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Bandhan; Yuan, Qi

    2016-10-14

    The interactions of L-type calcium channels (LTCCs) and NMDA receptors (NMDARs) in memories are poorly understood. Here we investigated the specific roles of anterior piriform cortex (aPC) LTCCs and NMDARs in early odor preference memory in mice. Using calcium imaging in aPC slices, LTCC activation was shown to be dependent on NMDAR activation. Either D-APV (NMDAR antagonist) or nifedipine (LTCC antagonist) reduced somatic calcium transients in pyramidal cells evoked by lateral olfactory tract stimulation. However, nifedipine did not further reduce calcium in the presence of D-APV. In mice that underwent early odor preference training, blocking NMDARs in the aPC prevented short-term (3 hr) and long-term (24 hr) odor preference memory, and both memories were rescued when BayK-8644 (LTCC agonist) was co-infused. However, activating LTCCs in the absence of NMDARs resulted in loss of discrimination between the conditioned odor and a similar odor mixture at 3 hr. Elevated synaptic AMPAR expression at 3 hr was prevented by D-APV infusion but restored when LTCCs were directly activated, mirroring the behavioral outcomes. Blocking LTCCs prevented 24 hr memory and spared 3 hr memory. These results suggest that NMDARs mediate stimulus-specific encoding of odor memory while LTCCs mediate intracellular signaling leading to long-term memory.

  19. NMDA receptors in mouse anterior piriform cortex initialize early odor preference learning and L-type calcium channels engage for long-term memory

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Bandhan; Yuan, Qi

    2016-01-01

    The interactions of L-type calcium channels (LTCCs) and NMDA receptors (NMDARs) in memories are poorly understood. Here we investigated the specific roles of anterior piriform cortex (aPC) LTCCs and NMDARs in early odor preference memory in mice. Using calcium imaging in aPC slices, LTCC activation was shown to be dependent on NMDAR activation. Either D-APV (NMDAR antagonist) or nifedipine (LTCC antagonist) reduced somatic calcium transients in pyramidal cells evoked by lateral olfactory tract stimulation. However, nifedipine did not further reduce calcium in the presence of D-APV. In mice that underwent early odor preference training, blocking NMDARs in the aPC prevented short-term (3 hr) and long-term (24 hr) odor preference memory, and both memories were rescued when BayK-8644 (LTCC agonist) was co-infused. However, activating LTCCs in the absence of NMDARs resulted in loss of discrimination between the conditioned odor and a similar odor mixture at 3 hr. Elevated synaptic AMPAR expression at 3 hr was prevented by D-APV infusion but restored when LTCCs were directly activated, mirroring the behavioral outcomes. Blocking LTCCs prevented 24 hr memory and spared 3 hr memory. These results suggest that NMDARs mediate stimulus-specific encoding of odor memory while LTCCs mediate intracellular signaling leading to long-term memory. PMID:27739540

  20. Electrical coupling between the human serotonin transporter and voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels.

    PubMed

    Ruchala, Iwona; Cabra, Vanessa; Solis, Ernesto; Glennon, Richard A; De Felice, Louis J; Eltit, Jose M

    2014-07-01

    Monoamine transporters have been implicated in dopamine or serotonin release in response to abused drugs such as methamphetamine or ecstasy (MDMA). In addition, monoamine transporters show substrate-induced inward currents that may modulate excitability and Ca(2+) mobilization, which could also contribute to neurotransmitter release. How monoamine transporters modulate Ca(2+) permeability is currently unknown. We investigate the functional interaction between the human serotonin transporter (hSERT) and voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels (CaV). We introduce an excitable expression system consisting of cultured muscle cells genetically engineered to express hSERT. Both 5HT and S(+)MDMA depolarize these cells and activate the excitation-contraction (EC)-coupling mechanism. However, hSERT substrates fail to activate EC-coupling in CaV1.1-null muscle cells, thus implicating Ca(2+) channels. CaV1.3 and CaV2.2 channels are natively expressed in neurons. When these channels are co-expressed with hSERT in HEK293T cells, only cells expressing the lower-threshold L-type CaV1.3 channel show Ca(2+) transients evoked by 5HT or S(+)MDMA. In addition, the electrical coupling between hSERT and CaV1.3 takes place at physiological 5HT concentrations. The electrical coupling between monoamine neurotransmitter transporters and Ca(2+) channels such as CaV1.3 is a novel mechanism by which endogenous substrates (neurotransmitters) or exogenous substrates (like ecstasy) could modulate Ca(2+)-driven signals in excitable cells.

  1. Sigma-1 Receptor Antagonism Restores Injury-Induced Decrease of Voltage-Gated Ca2+ Current in Sensory Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Bin; Guo, Yuan; Kwok, Wai-Meng; Hogan, Quinn

    2014-01-01

    Sigma-1 receptor (σ1R), an endoplasmic reticulum–chaperone protein, can modulate painful response after peripheral nerve injury. We have demonstrated that voltage-gated calcium current is inhibited in axotomized sensory neurons. We examined whether σ1R contributes to the sensory dysfunction of voltage-gated calcium channel (VGCC) after peripheral nerve injury through electrophysiological approach in dissociated rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. Animals received either skin incision (Control) or spinal nerve ligation (SNL). Both σ1R agonists, (+)pentazocine (PTZ) and DTG [1,3-di-(2-tolyl)guanidine], dose dependently inhibited calcium current (ICa) with Ba2+ as charge carrier in control sensory neurons. The inhibitory effect of σ1R agonists on ICa was blocked by σ1R antagonist, BD1063 (1-[2-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)ethyl]-4-m​ethylpiperazine dihydrochloride) or BD1047 (N-[2-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)ethyl]-N-m​ethyl-2-(dimethylamino)ethylamine dihydrobromide). PTZ and DTG showed similar effect on ICa in axotomized fifth DRG neurons (SNL L5). Both PTZ and DTG shifted the voltage-dependent activation and steady-state inactivation of VGCC to the left and accelerated VGCC inactivation rate in both Control and axotomized L5 SNL DRG neurons. The σ1R antagonist, BD1063 (10 μM), increases ICa in SNL L5 neurons but had no effect on Control and noninjured fourth lumbar neurons in SNL rats. Together, the findings suggest that activation of σR1 decreases ICa in sensory neurons and may play a pivotal role in pain generation. PMID:24891452

  2. ATP-sensitive Potassium Channels and L-type Calcium Channels are Involved in Morphine-induced Hyperalgesia after Nociceptive Sensitization in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi, Shamseddin; Azarian, Shaho; Ebrahimi, Sayede Shohre; Rezayof, Ameneh

    2014-01-01

    Introduction We investigated the role of ATP-sensitive potassium channels and L-type calcium channels in morphine-induced hyperalgesia after nociceptive sensitization. Methods We used a hotplate apparatus to assess pain behavior in male NMRI mice. Nociceptive sensitization was induced by three days injection of morphine and five days of drug free. On day 9 of the schedule, pain behavior test was performed for evaluating the effects of morphine by itself and along with nimodipine, a blocker of L-type calcium channels and diazoxide, an opener of ATP-sensitive potassium channels. All drugs were injected through an intraperitoneal route. Results The results showed that morphine (7.5, 10 and 15 mg/kg) induced analgesia in normal mice, which was prevented by naloxone (1 mg/kg). After nociceptive sensitization, analgesic effect of morphine (10 and 15 mg/kg) was significantly decreased in sensitized mice. The results showed that nimodipine (2.5, 5, 10 and 20 mg/kg) had no significant effect on pain behavior test in either normal or sensitized mice. However, nimodipine (20 mg/ kg) along with morphine (10 and 15 mg/kg) caused more decrease in morphine analgesia in sensitized mice. Furthermore, diazoxide by itself (0.25, 1, 5 and 20 mg/kg) had also no significant effect on pain behavior in both normal and sensitized mice, but at dose of 20 mg/kg along with morphine (10 and 15 mg/kg) decreased analgesic effect of morphine in sensitized mice. Discussion It can be concluded that potassium and calcium channels have some roles in decrease of analgesic effect of morphine after nociceptive sensitization induced by pretreatment of morphine. PMID:25337379

  3. Kv3 voltage-gated potassium channels regulate neurotransmitter release from mouse motor nerve terminals.

    PubMed

    Brooke, Ruth E; Moores, Thomas S; Morris, Neil P; Parson, Simon H; Deuchars, Jim

    2004-12-01

    Voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels are critical to regulation of neurotransmitter release throughout the nervous system but the roles and identity of the subtypes involved remain unclear. Here we show that Kv3 channels regulate transmitter release at the mouse neuromuscular junction (NMJ). Light- and electron-microscopic immunohistochemistry revealed Kv3.3 and Kv3.4 subunits within all motor nerve terminals of muscles examined [transversus abdominus, lumbrical and flexor digitorum brevis (FDB)]. To determine the roles of these Kv3 subunits, intracellular recordings were made of end-plate potentials (EPPs) in FDB muscle fibres evoked by electrical stimulation of tibial nerve. Tetraethylammonium (TEA) applied at low concentrations (0.05-0.5 mM), which blocks only a few known potassium channels including Kv3 channels, did not affect muscle fibre resting potential but significantly increased the amplitude of all EPPs tested. Significantly, this effect of TEA was still observed in the presence of the large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channel blockers iberiotoxin (25-150 nM) and Penitrem A (100 nM), suggesting a selective action on Kv3 subunits. Consistent with this, 15-microM 4-aminopyridine, which blocks Kv3 but not large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels, enhanced evoked EPP amplitude. Unexpectedly, blood-depressing substance-I, a toxin selective for Kv3.4 subunits, had no effect at 0.05-1 microM. The combined presynaptic localization of Kv3 subunits and pharmacological enhancement of EPP amplitude indicate that Kv3 channels regulate neurotransmitter release from presynaptic terminals at the NMJ.

  4. Phosphorylation of the Consensus Sites of Protein Kinase A on α1D L-type Calcium Channel*

    PubMed Central

    Ramadan, Omar; Qu, Yongxia; Wadgaonkar, Raj; Baroudi, Ghayath; Karnabi, Eddy; Chahine, Mohamed; Boutjdir, Mohamed

    2009-01-01

    The novel α1D L-type Ca2+ channel is expressed in supraventricular tissue and has been implicated in the pacemaker activity of the heart and in atrial fibrillation. We recently demonstrated that PKA activation led to increased α1D Ca2+ channel activity in tsA201 cells by phosphorylation of the channel protein. Here we sought to identify the phosphorylated PKA consensus sites on the α1 subunit of the α1D Ca2+ channel by generating GST fusion proteins of the intracellular loops, N terminus, proximal and distal C termini of the α1 subunit of α1D Ca2+ channel. An in vitro PKA kinase assay was performed for the GST fusion proteins, and their phosphorylation was assessed by Western blotting using either anti-PKA substrate or anti-phosphoserine antibodies. Western blotting showed that the N terminus and C terminus were phosphorylated. Serines 1743 and 1816, two PKA consensus sites, were phosphorylated by PKA and identified by mass spectrometry. Site directed mutagenesis and patch clamp studies revealed that serines 1743 and 1816 were major functional PKA consensus sites. Altogether, biochemical and functional data revealed that serines 1743 and 1816 are major functional PKA consensus sites on the α1 subunit of α1D Ca2+ channel. These novel findings provide new insights into the autonomic regulation of the α1D Ca2+ channel in the heart. PMID:19074150

  5. Alteration of the L-type calcium current in guinea-pig single ventricular myocytes by heptaminol hydrochloride.

    PubMed Central

    Peineau, N.; Mongo, K. G.; Le Guennec, J. Y.; Garnier, D.; Argibay, J. A.

    1992-01-01

    1. The effects of heptaminol on calcium current amplitude and characteristics were studied in single ventricular myocytes of guinea-pig by use of the whole cell configuration of the patch clamp technique. 2. A concentration-dependent decrease in ICa amplitude was observed. At heptaminol concentration as low as 10(-6) M, this effect was observed in only two cells (n = 6). At 10(-5) M the reduction of ICa was of 30 +/- 15% (n = 11). 3. The current recovery from inactivation at -40 mV holding potential (HP) seemed less sensitive to perfusion with heptaminol (greater than 10(-6) M). However, at -80 mV HP the overshoot of the recovery curve was decreased by heptaminol. 4. Both at -40 mV and -80 mV HP, heptaminol (10(-5) M) significantly increased the steady state inactivation of ICa. 5. As previously proposed by others to explain the effects of membrane active substances, the effects of heptaminol may result from alterations in cell membrane properties and possibly from an increase in intracellular free calcium ion concentration. PMID:1422567

  6. Increased O2 consumption and positive inotropy caused by cyclic GMP reduction are not altered after L-type calcium channel blockade.

    PubMed

    Leone, R J; Naim, K L; Scholz, P M; Weiss, H R

    1998-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that increased O2 consumption and inotropy after reduction of myocardial cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) are mediated through L-type calcium channels. Anesthetized, open-chest New Zealand white rabbits were divided into four groups. Hearts were exposed to control vehicle (n = 8); LY83583 (LY, 10(-3) mol/l, guanylate cyclase inhibitor, (n = 9); nifedipine (nif, 10(-4) mol/l, L-type calcium channel blocker, n = 8), or nif+LY (n = 6). Vehicle or compound was applied topically to the epicardium for 15 min. Subepicardial (EPI) blood flow increased (from 213 +/- 22 to 323 +/- 24 ml/ min/100 g) in the presence of LY, as did subendocardial (ENDO) blood flow (from 238 +/- 20 to 333 +/- 38 ml/min/ 100 g). O2 consumption increased in the presence of LY:18.0 +/- 1.0 (EPI) and 17.0 +/- 0.6 (ENDO) ml O2/min/100 g as compared with 9.5 +/- 2.0 (EPI) and 10.6 +/- 2.5 (ENDO) in the control group. The increase in O2 consumption with LY was undiminished in the presence of nif (nif+LY group 21.0 +/- 3.0 ml O2/min/100 g EPI and 22.1 +/- 3.8 ENDO). Nif alone decreased left ventricular dP/dtmax from (2,762 +/- 197 to 2,413 +/- 316 mm Hg/s) and maximal rate of change in wall thickness (dW/dtmax from 13.5 +/- 2.0 to 9.5 +/- 0.8 mm/s), while percent change of wall thickness (from 21.3 +/- 3.3 to 31.3 +/- 7.2) and dW/dtmax (from 13.3 +/- 3.0 to 15.3 +/- 2.3 mm/s) increased in the nif+LY group. Thus, the positive O2 consumption and inotropic effects of decreasing cGMP were undiminished by nif. These results suggest that the cGMP reduction induced increases in O2 consumption and that inotropy may not be mediated through L-type calcium channels.

  7. Amyloid Precursor Protein Regulates Cav1.2 L-type Calcium Channel Levels and Function to Influence GABAergic Short-term Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Li; Wang, Zilai; Wang, Baiping; Justice, Nicholas J.; Zheng, Hui

    2010-01-01

    Amyloid precursor protein (APP) has been strongly implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Although impaired synaptic function is believed to be an early and causative event in AD, how APP physiologically regulates synaptic properties remains poorly understood. Here, we report a critical role for APP in the regulation of L-type calcium channels (LTCC) in GABAergic inhibitory neurons in striatum and hippocampus. APP deletion in mice leads to an increase in the levels of Cav1.2, the pore-forming subunit of LTCCs, and subsequent increases in GABAergic calcium currents (ICa 2+) that can be reversed by re-introduction of APP. Upregulated levels of Cav1.2 result in reduced GABAergic paired-pulse inhibition (PPI) and increased GABAergic post-tetanic potentiation (PTP) in both striatal and hippocampal neurons, indicating that APP modulates synaptic properties of GABAergic neurons by regulating Cav1.2. Furthermore, APP physically interacts with Cav1.2, suggesting a mechanism in which loss of APP leads to an inappropriate accumulation and aberrant activity of Cav1.2. These results provide a direct link between APP and calcium signaling and might help explain how altered APP regulation leads to changes in synaptic function that occur with AD. PMID:20016080

  8. Allosteric interactions at L-type calcium channels between FPL 64176 and the enantiomers of the dihydropyridine Bay K 8644.

    PubMed

    Usowicz, M M; Gigg, M; Jones, L M; Cheung, C W; Hartley, S A

    1995-11-01

    Functional interactions between the enantiomers of the dihydropyridine 1,4-dihydro-2,6-dimethyl-5-nitro-4-[2-(trifluoromethyl)-phenyl]-3-pyridi ne carboxylic acid methyl ester (Bay K 8644) and the benzoylpyrrole methyl 2,5-dimethyl-4-[2(phenylmethyl)benzoyl]-H-pyrrole-3-carboxylate (FPL 64176) were investigated on L-type Ca++ channels in guinea pig ileal longitudinal smooth muscle. The effects of these drugs, when applied individually, were as described in earlier studies. For instance, both (-)-(S)-Bay K 8644 and FPL 64176 caused concentration-dependent contraction, which is consistent with Ca++ channel activation, whereas (+)-(R)-Bay K 8644 gave concentration-dependent relaxation, which is consistent with Ca++ channel inhibition. The activities of the different drugs were dependent on the extracellular levels of KCI. When applied in combination, however, the responses evoked were not those predicted from the effects of the drugs applied individually. Contractions produced by FPL 64176 (25 nM to 1 microM) were abolished in the presence of 100 nM (-)-(S)-Bay K 8644 but were potentiated by 10 to 150 nM (+)-(R)-Bay K 8644 and inhibited by 1 microM (+)-(R)-Bay K 8644. Conversely, contractile responses to (-)-(S)-Bay K 8644 were abolished by 100 nM FPL 64176. In the presence of 1 microM FPL 64176, however, (-)-(S)-Bay K 8644 gave concentration-dependent relaxation of the muscle, which is consistent with Ca++ channel inhibition.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Autocrine interleukin-6 drives skin-derived mesenchymal stem cell trafficking via regulating voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels.

    PubMed

    Ke, Fang; Zhang, Lingyun; Liu, Zhaoyuan; Liu, Jinlin; Yan, Sha; Xu, Zhenyao; Bai, Jing; Zhu, Huiyuan; Lou, Fangzhou; Wang, Hong; Shi, Yufang; Jiang, Yong; Su, Bing; Wang, Honglin

    2014-10-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have demonstrated promising therapeutic potential for a variety of diseases including autoimmune disorders. A fundamental requirement for MSC-mediated in vivo immunosuppression is their effective trafficking. However the mechanism underlying MSC trafficking remains elusive. Here we report that skin-derived MSCs (S-MSCs) secrete high levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6) in inflammatory conditions. Disruption of the il6 or its signaling transducer gp130 blocks voltage-gated calcium (Ca(2+) ) channels (VGCC) critically required for cell contraction involved in the sequential adhesion and de-adhesion events during S-MSC migration. Deletion of il6 gene leads to a severe defect in S-MSC's trafficking and immunosuppressive function in vivo. Thus, this unexpected requirement of autocrine IL-6 for activating Ca(2+) channels uncovers a previously unrecognized link between the IL-6 signaling and the VGCC and provides novel mechanistic insights for the trafficking and immunomodulatory activities of S-MSCs.

  10. S-nitrosothiols dilate the mesenteric artery more potently than the femoral artery by a cGMP and L-type calcium channel-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Liu, Taiming; Schroeder, Hobe J; Zhang, Meijuan; Wilson, Sean M; Terry, Michael H; Longo, Lawrence D; Power, Gordon G; Blood, Arlin B

    2016-08-31

    S-nitrosothiols (SNOs) are metabolites of NO with potent vasodilatory activity. Our previous studies in sheep indicated that intra-arterially infused SNOs dilate the mesenteric vasculature more than the femoral vasculature. We hypothesized that the mesenteric artery is more responsive to SNO-mediated vasodilation, and investigated various steps along the NO/cGMP pathway to determine the mechanism for this difference. In anesthetized adult sheep, we monitored the conductance of mesenteric and femoral arteries during infusion of S-nitroso-l-cysteine (L-cysNO), and found mesenteric vascular conductance increased (137 ± 3%) significantly more than femoral conductance (26 ± 25%). Similar results were found in wire myography studies of isolated sheep mesenteric and femoral arteries. Vasodilation by SNOs was attenuated in both vessel types by the presence of ODQ (sGC inhibitor), and both YC-1 (sGC agonist) and 8-Br-cGMP (cGMP analog) mediated more potent relaxation in mesenteric arteries than femoral arteries. The vasodilatory difference between mesenteric and femoral arteries was eliminated by antagonists of either protein kinase G or L-type Ca(2+) channels. Western immunoblots showed a larger L-type Ca(2+)/sGC abundance ratio in mesenteric arteries than in femoral arteries. Fetal sheep mesenteric arteries were more responsive to SNOs than adult mesenteric arteries, and had a greater L-Ca(2+)/sGC ratio (p = 0.047 and r = -0.906 for correlation between Emax and L-Ca(2+)/sGC). These results suggest that mesenteric arteries, especially those in fetus, are more responsive to SNO-mediated vasodilation than femoral arteries due to a greater role of the L-type calcium channel in the NO/cGMP pathway.

  11. Differential expression of voltage-gated K+ and Ca2+ currents in bipolar cells in the zebrafish retinal slice.

    PubMed

    Connaughton, V P; Maguire, G

    1998-04-01

    Whole-cell voltage-gated currents were recorded from bipolar cells in the zebrafish retinal slice. Two physiological populations of bipolar cells were identified. In the first, depolarizing voltage steps elicited a rapidly activating A-current that reached peak amplitude < or = 5 ms of step onset. IA was antagonized by external tetraethylammonium or 4-aminopyridine, and by intracellular caesium. The second population expressed a delayed rectifying potassium current (IK) that reached peak amplitude > or = 10 ms after step onset and did not inactivate. IK was antagonized by internal caesium and external tetraethylammonium. Bipolar cells expressing IK also expressed a time-dependent h-current at membrane potentials < -50 mV. Ih was sensitive to external caesium and barium, and was also reduced by Na+-free Ringer. In both groups, a calcium current (ICa) and a calcium-dependent potassium current (IK(Ca)) were identified. Depolarizing voltage steps > -50 mV activated ICa, which reached peak amplitude between -20 and -10 mV. ICa was eliminated in Ca+2-free Ringer and blocked by cadmium and cobalt, but not tetrodotoxin. In most cells, Ica was transient, activating rapidly at -50 mV. This current was antagonized by nickel. The remaining bipolar cells expressed a nifedipine-sensitive sustained current that activated between -40 and -30 mV, with both slower kinetics and smaller amplitude than transient ICa. IK(Ca) was elicited by membrane depolarizations > -20 mV. Bipolar cells in the zebrafish retinal slice preparation express an array of voltage-gated currents which contribute to non-linear I-V characteristics. The zebrafish retinal slice preparation is well-suited to patch clamp analyses of membrane mechanisms and provides a suitable model for studying genetic defects in visual system development.

  12. Effect of Charge Substitutions at Residue His-142 on Voltage Gating of Connexin43 Channels

    PubMed Central

    Shibayama, Junko; Gutiérrez, Cristina; González, Daniel; Kieken, Fabien; Seki, Akiko; Requena Carrión, Jesus; Sorgen, Paul L.; Taffet, Steven M.; Barrio, Luis C.; Delmar, Mario

    2006-01-01

    Previous studies indicate that the carboxyl terminal of connexin43 (Cx43CT) is involved in fast transjunctional voltage gating. Separate studies support the notion of an intramolecular association between Cx43CT and a region of the cytoplasmic loop (amino acids 119–144; referred to as “L2”). Structural analysis of L2 shows two α-helical domains, each with a histidine residue in its sequence (H126 and H142). Here, we determined the effect of H142 replacement by lysine, alanine, and glutamate on the voltage gating of Cx43 channels. Mutation H142E led to a significant reduction in the frequency of occurrence of the residual state and a prolongation of dwell open time. Macroscopically, there was a large reduction in the fast component of voltage gating. These results resembled those observed for a mutant lacking the carboxyl terminal (CT) domain. NMR experiments showed that mutation H142E significantly decreased the Cx43CT-L2 interaction and disrupted the secondary structure of L2. Overall, our data support the hypothesis that fast voltage gating involves an intramolecular particle-receptor interaction between CT and L2. Some of the structural constrains of fast voltage gating may be shared with those involved in the chemical gating of Cx43. PMID:16963503

  13. L-type calcium channels may regulate neurite initiation in cultured chick embryo brain neurons and N1E-115 neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Audesirk, G; Audesirk, T; Ferguson, C; Lomme, M; Shugarts, D; Rosack, J; Caracciolo, P; Gisi, T; Nichols, P

    1990-08-01

    The intracellular free Ca2+ concentration, [Ca2+]i, plays an important role in regulating neurite growth in cultured neurons. Insofar as [Ca2+]i is partly a function of Ca2+ influx through voltage-sensitive calcium channels (VSCC), Ca2+ entry through VSCC should influence neurite growth. Vertebrate neurons may possess several types of VSCC. The most frequently described VSCC types are usually designated L, T and N. In most preparations, these VSCC types respond differently to certain pharmacological agents, including Cd2+, Ni2+, the dihydropyridines nifedipine and BAY K8644, and the aminoglycoside antibiotics. We used these agents to study the role of Ca2+ influx in regulating neurite initiation and length in cultures of chick embryo brain neurons and N1E-115 mouse neuroblastoma cells. In chick neurons, nifedipine and Cd2+ (less than 50 microM), which have been reported to inhibit L-type channels, reduced neurite initiation, but not mean neurite length. Ni2+ (less than 100 microM), reported to inhibit T-type channels, had no effect on either initiation or length. Low concentrations of most aminoglycosides (less than 300 microM), reported to inhibit N-type channels, had no effect on neurite initiation, but high concentrations of streptomycin (great than 300 microM), reported to inhibit both L- and N-type channels, reduced neurite initiation. BAY K8644, which enhances current flow through L-type channels, had no effect except at high concentration (50 microM), which inhibited initiation. N1E-115 neuroblastoma cells have been reported to contain L-type and T-type channels, but thus far no channel similar to the N-type has been described. In cultured N1E-115 cells, nifedipine (5 microM), Cd2+ (5 microM), and streptomycin (200 microM) reduced neurite initiation, while nickel (50 microM) and neomycin (100 microM) did not affect initiation. None of these agents altered neurite length. In N1E-115 cells, whole-cell voltage clamp recordings showed that nifedipine and Cd2

  14. Actions of the digitalis analogue strophanthidin on action potentials and L-type calcium current in single cells isolated from the rabbit atrioventricular node.

    PubMed Central

    Hancox, J. C.; Levi, A. J.

    1996-01-01

    1. The atrioventricular node (AVN) of the heart is vital to normal cardiac function and is a major site of antiarrhythmic drug action. This study describes the effects of the cardiac glycoside analogue strophanthidin on spontaneous action potentials and L-type calcium current recorded from single AVN cells isolated from the rabbit heart. 2. With a standard KCl-based internal dialysis solution, exposure to 50 microM strophanthidin produced a progressive depolarization of the maximum diastolic potential and a reduction in action potential amplitude and upstroke velocity. Sustained application resulted in the loss of action potentials and occurrence of spontaneous 'bell-shaped' depolarizations. 3. Cells were whole-cell voltage clamped at -40 mV and depolarizing voltage clamps applied. With a standard KCl-based internal dialysis solution, exposure to 50 microM strophanthidin caused a large reduction of ICa,L at all potentials between -30 and +40 mV (n = 4). At + 10 mV, the mean ICa,L amplitude was reduced from -232 +/- 65 pA to -48 +/- 26 pA (P < 0.05; 1 test; n = 5 cells). 4. To record ICa,L more selectively, cells were dialysed with a Cs-based pipette solution. A short strophanthidin exposure reduced ICa,L amplitude from -250 +/- 31 pA to -88 +/- 19 pA (P < 0.001; n = 8 cells). For both KCl and CsCl-based solutions it was observed that sustained exposure to strophanthidin for several minutes caused spontaneous inward fluctuations in the membrane current record similar to the 'ITI' (arrhythmogenic oscillatory transient inward) current shown for other cardiac cells. 5. When the calcium chelator BAPTA was added to the pipette solution (10 mM), the reduction in ICa,L by strophanthidin was largely eliminated (P > 0.1), and no spontaneous inward current fluctuations were observed after sustained exposure to strophanthidin (n = 8 cells). 6. When external Ca in the perfusate was replaced with Ba, strophanthidin did not significantly reduce the Ba current through L-type

  15. L-Type Calcium Channels Play a Critical Role in Maintaining Lens Transparency by Regulating Phosphorylation of Aquaporin-0 and Myosin Light Chain and Expression of Connexins

    PubMed Central

    Maddala, Rupalatha; Nagendran, Tharkika; de Ridder, Gustaaf G.; Schey, Kevin L.; Rao, Ponugoti Vasantha

    2013-01-01

    Homeostasis of intracellular calcium is crucial for lens cytoarchitecture and transparency, however, the identity of specific channel proteins regulating calcium influx within the lens is not completely understood. Here we examined the expression and distribution profiles of L-type calcium channels (LTCCs) and explored their role in morphological integrity and transparency of the mouse lens, using cDNA microarray, RT-PCR, immunoblot, pharmacological inhibitors and immunofluorescence analyses. The results revealed that Ca (V) 1.2 and 1.3 channels are expressed and distributed in both the epithelium and cortical fiber cells in mouse lens. Inhibition of LTCCs with felodipine or nifedipine induces progressive cortical cataract formation with time, in association with decreased lens weight in ex-vivo mouse lenses. Histological analyses of felodipine treated lenses revealed extensive disorganization and swelling of cortical fiber cells resembling the phenotype reported for altered aquaporin-0 activity without detectable cytotoxic effects. Analysis of both soluble and membrane rich fractions from felodipine treated lenses by SDS-PAGE in conjunction with mass spectrometry and immunoblot analyses revealed decreases in β-B1-crystallin, Hsp-90, spectrin and filensin. Significantly, loss of transparency in the felodipine treated lenses was preceded by an increase in aquaporin-0 serine-235 phosphorylation and levels of connexin-50, together with decreases in myosin light chain phosphorylation and the levels of 14-3-3ε, a phosphoprotein-binding regulatory protein. Felodipine treatment led to a significant increase in gene expression of connexin-50 and 46 in the mouse lens. Additionally, felodipine inhibition of LTCCs in primary cultures of mouse lens epithelial cells resulted in decreased intracellular calcium, and decreased actin stress fibers and myosin light chain phosphorylation, without detectable cytotoxic response. Taken together, these observations reveal a crucial

  16. L-type calcium channels play a critical role in maintaining lens transparency by regulating phosphorylation of aquaporin-0 and myosin light chain and expression of connexins.

    PubMed

    Maddala, Rupalatha; Nagendran, Tharkika; de Ridder, Gustaaf G; Schey, Kevin L; Rao, Ponugoti Vasantha

    2013-01-01

    Homeostasis of intracellular calcium is crucial for lens cytoarchitecture and transparency, however, the identity of specific channel proteins regulating calcium influx within the lens is not completely understood. Here we examined the expression and distribution profiles of L-type calcium channels (LTCCs) and explored their role in morphological integrity and transparency of the mouse lens, using cDNA microarray, RT-PCR, immunoblot, pharmacological inhibitors and immunofluorescence analyses. The results revealed that Ca (V) 1.2 and 1.3 channels are expressed and distributed in both the epithelium and cortical fiber cells in mouse lens. Inhibition of LTCCs with felodipine or nifedipine induces progressive cortical cataract formation with time, in association with decreased lens weight in ex-vivo mouse lenses. Histological analyses of felodipine treated lenses revealed extensive disorganization and swelling of cortical fiber cells resembling the phenotype reported for altered aquaporin-0 activity without detectable cytotoxic effects. Analysis of both soluble and membrane rich fractions from felodipine treated lenses by SDS-PAGE in conjunction with mass spectrometry and immunoblot analyses revealed decreases in β-B1-crystallin, Hsp-90, spectrin and filensin. Significantly, loss of transparency in the felodipine treated lenses was preceded by an increase in aquaporin-0 serine-235 phosphorylation and levels of connexin-50, together with decreases in myosin light chain phosphorylation and the levels of 14-3-3ε, a phosphoprotein-binding regulatory protein. Felodipine treatment led to a significant increase in gene expression of connexin-50 and 46 in the mouse lens. Additionally, felodipine inhibition of LTCCs in primary cultures of mouse lens epithelial cells resulted in decreased intracellular calcium, and decreased actin stress fibers and myosin light chain phosphorylation, without detectable cytotoxic response. Taken together, these observations reveal a crucial

  17. Gain-of-function nature of Cav1.4 L-type calcium channels alters firing properties of mouse retinal ganglion cells

    PubMed Central

    Knoflach, Dagmar; Schicker, Klaus; Glösmann, Martin; Koschak, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    Proper function of Cav1.4 L-type calcium channels is crucial for neurotransmitter release in the retina. Our understanding about how different levels of Cav1.4 channel activity affect retinal function is still limited. In the gain-of-function mouse model Cav1.4-IT we expected a reduction in the photoreceptor dynamic range but still transmission toward retinal ganglion cells. A fraction of Cav1.4-IT ganglion cells responded to light stimulation in multielectrode array recordings from whole-mounted retinas, but showed a significantly delayed response onset. Another significant number of cells showed higher activity in darkness. In addition to structural remodeling observed at the first retinal synapse of Cav1.4-IT mice the functional data suggested a loss of contrast enhancement, a fundamental feature of our visual system. In fact, Cav1.4-IT mouse retinas showed a decline in spatial response and changes in their contrast sensitivity profile. Photoreceptor degeneration was obvious from the nodular structure of cone axons and enlarged pedicles which partly moved toward the outer nuclear layer. Loss of photoreceptors was also expressed as reduced expression of proteins involved in chemical and electrical transmission, as such metabotropic glutamate receptor mGluR6 and the gap junction protein Connexin 36. Such gross changes in retinal structure and function could also explain the diminished visual performance of CSNB2 patients. The expression pattern of the plasma-membrane calcium ATPase 1 which participates in the maintenance of the intracellular calcium homeostasis in photoreceptors was changed in Cav1.4-IT mice. This might be part of a protection mechanism against increased calcium influx, as this is suggested for Cav1.4-IT channels. PMID:26274509

  18. Effects of the 1, 4-dihydropyridine L-type calcium channel blocker benidipine on bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhong-ping; Liao, Jia-cheng; Zhao, Chang; Cai, Dao-zhang

    2015-08-01

    Osteoporosis (OP) often increases the risk of bone fracture and other complications and is a major clinical problem. Previous studies have found that high blood pressure is associated with bone formation abnormalities, resulting in increased calcium loss. We have investigated the effect of the antihypertensive drug benidipine on bone marrow stromal cell (BMSC) differentiation into osteoblasts and bone formation under osteoporotic conditions. We used a combination of in vitro and in vivo approaches to test the hypothesis that benidipine promotes murine BMSC differentiation into osteoblasts. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP), osteocalcin (OCN), runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2), β-catenin, and low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5) protein expression was evaluated in primary femoral BMSCs from C57/BL6 mice cultured under osteogenic conditions for 2 weeks to examine the effects of benidipine. An ovariectomized (OVX) mouse model was used to investigate the effect of benidipine treatment for 3 months in vivo. We found that ALP, OCN, and RUNX2 expression was up-regulated and WNT/β-catenin signaling was enhanced in vitro and in vivo. In OVX mice that were intragastrically administered benidipine, bone parameters (trabecular thickness, bone mineral density, and trabecular number) in the distal femoral metaphysis were significantly increased compared with control OVX mice. Consistently, benidipine promoted BMSC differentiation into osteoblasts and protected against bone loss in OVX mice. Therefore, benidipine might be a suitable candidate for the treatment of patients with postmenopausal osteoporosis and hypertension.

  19. An update on transcriptional and post-translational regulation of brain voltage-gated sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Onwuli, Donatus O; Beltran-Alvarez, Pedro

    2016-03-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are essential proteins in brain physiology, as they generate the sodium currents that initiate neuronal action potentials. Voltage-gated sodium channels expression, localisation and function are regulated by a range of transcriptional and post-translational mechanisms. Here, we review our understanding of regulation of brain voltage-gated sodium channels, in particular SCN1A (NaV1.1), SCN2A (NaV1.2), SCN3A (NaV1.3) and SCN8A (NaV1.6), by transcription factors, by alternative splicing, and by post-translational modifications. Our focus is strongly centred on recent research lines, and newly generated knowledge.

  20. Ciguatoxins: Cyclic Polyether Modulators of Voltage-gated Iion Channel Function

    PubMed Central

    Nicholson, Graham M.; Lewis, Richard J.

    2006-01-01

    Ciguatoxins are cyclic polyether toxins, derived from marine dinoflagellates, which are responsible for the symptoms of ciguatera poisoning. Ingestion of tropical and subtropical fin fish contaminated by ciguatoxins results in an illness characterised by neurological, cardiovascular and gastrointestinal disorders. The pharmacology of ciguatoxins is characterised by their ability to cause persistent activation of voltage-gated sodium channels, to increase neuronal excitability and neurotransmitter release, to impair synaptic vesicle recycling, and to cause cell swelling. It is these effects, in combination with an action to block voltage-gated potassium channels at high doses, which are believed to underlie the complex of symptoms associated with ciguatera. This review examines the sources, structures and pharmacology of ciguatoxins. In particular, attention is placed on their cellular modes of actions to modulate voltage-gated ion channels and other Na+-dependent mechanisms in numerous cell types and to current approaches for detection and treatment of ciguatera.

  1. Tetrodotoxin blocks L-type Ca2+ channels in canine ventricular cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Hegyi, Bence; Bárándi, László; Komáromi, István; Papp, Ferenc; Horváth, Balázs; Magyar, János; Bányász, Tamás; Krasznai, Zoltán; Szentandrássy, Norbert; Nánási, Péter P

    2012-08-01

    Tetrodotoxin (TTX) is believed to be the most selective inhibitor of voltage-gated fast Na(+) channels in excitable tissues, including nerve, skeletal muscle, and heart, although TTX sensitivity of the latter is lower than the former by at least three orders of magnitude. In the present study, the TTX sensitivity of L-type Ca(2+) current (I (Ca)) was studied in isolated canine ventricular cells using conventional voltage clamp and action potential voltage clamp techniques. TTX was found to block I (Ca) in a reversible manner without altering inactivation kinetics of I (Ca). Fitting results to the Hill equation, an IC(50) value of 55 ± 2 μM was obtained with a Hill coefficient of unity (1.0 ± s0.04). The current was fully abolished by 1 μM nisoldipine, indicating that it was really I (Ca). Under action potential voltage clamp conditions, the TTX-sensitive current displayed the typical fingerprint of I (Ca), which was absent in the presence of nisoldipine. Stick-and-ball models for Cav1.2 and Nav1.5 channel proteins were constructed to explain the differences observed between action of TTX on cardiac I (Ca) and I (Na). This is the first report demonstrating TTX to interact with L-type calcium current in the heart.

  2. Axonal voltage-gated ion channels as pharmacological targets for pain.

    PubMed

    Moldovan, Mihai; Alvarez, Susana; Romer Rosberg, Mette; Krarup, Christian

    2013-05-15

    Upon peripheral nerve injury (caused by trauma or disease process) axons of the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) somatosensory neurons have the ability to sprout and regrow/remyelinate to reinnervate distant target tissue or form a tangled scar mass called a neuroma. This regenerative response can become maladaptive leading to a persistent and debilitating pain state referred to as chronic pain corresponding to the clinical description of neuropathic/chronic inflammatory pain. There is little agreement to what causes peripheral chronic pain other than hyperactivity of the nociceptive DRG neurons which ultimately depends on the function of voltage-gated ion channels. This review focuses on the pharmacological modulators of voltage-gated ion channels known to be present on axonal membrane which represents by far the largest surface of DRG neurons. Blockers of voltage-gated Na(+) channels, openers of voltage-gated K(+) channels and blockers of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channels that were found to reduce neuronal activity were also found to be effective in neuropathic and inflammatory pain states. The isoforms of these channels present on nociceptive axons have limited specificity. The rationale for considering axonal voltage-gated ion channels as targets for pain treatment comes from the accumulating evidence that chronic pain states are associated with a dysregulation of these channels that could alter their specificity and make them more susceptible to pharmacological modulation. This drives the need for further development of subtype-specific voltage-gated ion channels modulators, as well as clinically available neurophysiological techniques for monitoring axonal ion channel function in peripheral nerves.

  3. Preventing Effect of L-Type Calcium Channel Blockade on Electrophysiological Alterations in Dentate Gyrus Granule Cells Induced by Entorhinal Amyloid Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Pourbadie, Hamid Gholami; Naderi, Nima; Mehranfard, Nasrin; Janahmadi, Mahyar; Khodagholi, Fariba; Motamedi, Fereshteh

    2015-01-01

    The entorhinal cortex (EC) is one of the earliest affected brain regions in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). EC-amyloid pathology induces synaptic failure in the dentate gyrus (DG) with resultant behavioral impairment, but there is little known about its impact on neuronal properties in the DG. It is believed that calcium dyshomeostasis plays a pivotal role in the etiology of AD. Here, the effect of the EC amyloid pathogenesis on cellular properties of DG granule cells and also possible neuroprotective role of L-type calcium channel blockers (CCBs), nimodipine and isradipine, were investigated. The amyloid beta (Aβ) 1–42 was injected bilaterally into the EC of male rats and one week later, electrophysiological properties of DG granule cells were assessed. Voltage clamp recording revealed appearance of giant sIPSC in combination with a decrease in sEPSC frequency which was partially reversed by CCBs in granule cells from Aβ treated rats. EC amyloid pathogenesis induced a significant reduction of input resistance (Rin) accompanied by a profound decreased excitability in the DG granule cells. However, daily administration of CCBs, isradipine or nimodipine (i.c.v. for 6 days), almost preserved the normal excitability against Aβ. In conclusion, lower tendency to fire AP along with reduced Rin suggest that DG granule cells might undergo an alteration in the membrane ion channel activities which finally lead to the behavioral deficits observed in animal models and patients with early-stage Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:25689857

  4. An evolutionarily-unique heterodimeric voltage-gated cation channel found in aphids

    PubMed Central

    Amey, Joanna S.; O’Reilly, Andrias O.; Burton, Mark J.; Puinean, Alin M.; Mellor, Ian R.; Duce, Ian R.; Field, Linda M.; Wallace, B.A.; Williamson, Martin S.; Davies, T.G. Emyr

    2015-01-01

    We describe the identification in aphids of a unique heterodimeric voltage-gated sodium channel which has an atypical ion selectivity filter and, unusually for insect channels, is highly insensitive to tetrodotoxin. We demonstrate that this channel has most likely arisen by adaptation (gene fission or duplication) of an invertebrate ancestral mono(hetero)meric channel. This is the only identifiable voltage-gated sodium channel homologue in the aphid genome(s), and the channel’s novel selectivity filter motif (DENS instead of the usual DEKA found in other eukaryotes) may result in a loss of sodium selectivity, as indicated experimentally in mutagenised Drosophila channels. PMID:25637326

  5. MicroRNAs are essential for stretch-induced vascular smooth muscle contractile differentiation via microRNA (miR)-145-dependent expression of L-type calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Turczynska, Karolina M; Sadegh, Mardjaneh Karbalaei; Hellstrand, Per; Swärd, Karl; Albinsson, Sebastian

    2012-06-01

    Stretch of the vascular wall is an important stimulus to maintain smooth muscle contractile differentiation that is known to depend on L-type calcium influx, Rho-activation, and actin polymerization. The role of microRNAs in this response was investigated using tamoxifen-inducible and smooth muscle-specific Dicer KO mice. In the absence of Dicer, which is required for microRNA maturation, smooth muscle microRNAs were completely ablated. Stretch-induced contractile differentiation and Rho-dependent cofilin-2 phosphorylation were dramatically reduced in Dicer KO vessels. On the other hand, acute stretch-sensitive growth signaling, which is independent of influx through L-type calcium channels, was not affected by Dicer KO. Contractile differentiation induced by the actin polymerizing agent jasplakinolide was not altered by deletion of Dicer, suggesting an effect upstream of actin polymerization. Basal and stretch-induced L-type calcium channel expressions were both decreased in Dicer KO portal veins, and inhibition of L-type channels in control vessels mimicked the effects of Dicer deletion. Furthermore, inhibition of miR-145, a highly expressed microRNA in smooth muscle, resulted in a similar reduction of L-type calcium channel expression. This was abolished by the Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II inhibitor KN93, suggesting that Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IIδ, a target of miR-145 and up-regulated in Dicer KO, plays a role in the regulation of L-type channel expression. These results show that microRNAs play a crucial role in stretch-induced contractile differentiation in the vascular wall in part via miR-145-dependent regulation of L-type calcium channels.

  6. Regulation of voltage-gated potassium channels by PI(4,5)P2.

    PubMed

    Kruse, Martin; Hammond, Gerald R V; Hille, Bertil

    2012-08-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P(2)) regulates activities of numerous ion channels including inwardly rectifying potassium (K(ir)) channels, KCNQ, TRP, and voltage-gated calcium channels. Several studies suggest that voltage-gated potassium (K(V)) channels might be regulated by PI(4,5)P(2). Wide expression of K(V) channels in different cells suggests that such regulation could have broad physiological consequences. To study regulation of K(V) channels by PI(4,5)P(2), we have coexpressed several of them in tsA-201 cells with a G protein-coupled receptor (M(1)R), a voltage-sensitive lipid 5-phosphatase (Dr-VSP), or an engineered fusion protein carrying both lipid 4-phosphatase and 5-phosphatase activity (pseudojanin). These tools deplete PI(4,5)P(2) with application of muscarinic agonists, depolarization, or rapamycin, respectively. PI(4,5)P(2) at the plasma membrane was monitored by Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) from PH probes of PLCδ1 simultaneously with whole-cell recordings. Activation of Dr-VSP or recruitment of pseudojanin inhibited K(V)7.1, K(V)7.2/7.3, and K(ir)2.1 channel current by 90-95%. Activation of M(1)R inhibited K(V)7.2/7.3 current similarly. With these tools, we tested for potential PI(4,5)P(2) regulation of activity of K(V)1.1/K(V)β1.1, K(V)1.3, K(V)1.4, and K(V)1.5/K(V)β1.3, K(V)2.1, K(V)3.4, K(V)4.2, K(V)4.3 (with different KChIPs and DPP6-s), and hERG/KCNE2. Interestingly, we found a substantial removal of inactivation for K(V)1.1/K(V)β1.1 and K(V)3.4, resulting in up-regulation of current density upon activation of M(1)R but no changes in activity upon activating only VSP or pseudojanin. The other channels tested except possibly hERG showed no alteration in activity in any of the assays we used. In conclusion, a depletion of PI(4,5)P(2) at the plasma membrane by enzymes does not seem to influence activity of most tested K(V) channels, whereas it does strongly inhibit members of the K(V)7 and K(ir) families.

  7. Calmodulin and Ca(2+) control of voltage gated Na(+) channels.

    PubMed

    Gabelli, Sandra B; Yoder, Jesse B; Tomaselli, Gordon F; Amzel, L Mario

    2016-01-01

    The structures of the cytosolic portion of voltage activated sodium channels (CTNav) in complexes with calmodulin and other effectors in the presence and the absence of calcium provide information about the mechanisms by which these effectors regulate channel activity. The most studied of these complexes, those of Nav1.2 and Nav1.5, show details of the conformations and the specific contacts that are involved in channel regulation. Another voltage activated sodium channel, Nav1.4, shows significant calcium dependent inactivation, while its homolog Nav1.5 does not. The available structures shed light on the possible localization of the elements responsible for this effect. Mutations in the genes of these 3 Nav channels are associated with several disease conditions: Nav1.2, neurological conditions; Nav1.4, syndromes involving skeletal muscle; and Nav1.5, cardiac arrhythmias. Many of these disease-specific mutations are located at the interfaces involving CTNav and its effectors.

  8. L-type calcium channels and MAP kinase contribute to thyrotropin-releasing hormone-induced depolarization in thalamic paraventricular nucleus neurons

    PubMed Central

    Kolaj, Miloslav; Zhang, Li

    2016-01-01

    In rat paraventricular thalamic nucleus (PVT) neurons, activation of thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) receptors enhances neuronal excitability via concurrent decrease in a G protein-coupled inwardly rectifying K (GIRK)-like conductance and opening of a cannabinoid receptor-sensitive transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC)-like conductance. Here, we investigated the calcium (Ca2+) contribution to the components of this TRH-induced response. TRH-induced membrane depolarization was reduced in the presence of intracellular BAPTA, also in media containing nominally zero [Ca2+]o, suggesting a critical role for both intracellular Ca2+ release and Ca2+ influx. TRH-induced inward current was unchanged by T-type Ca2+ channel blockade, but was decreased by blockade of high-voltage-activated Ca2+ channels (HVACCs). Both the pharmacologically isolated GIRK-like and the TRPC-like components of the TRH-induced response were decreased by nifedipine and increased by BayK8644, implying Ca2+ influx via L-type Ca2+ channels. Only the TRPC-like conductance was reduced by either thapsigargin or dantrolene, suggesting a role for ryanodine receptors and Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release in this component of the TRH-induced response. In pituitary and other cell lines, TRH stimulates MAPK. In PVT neurons, only the GIRK-like component of the TRH-induced current was selectively decreased in the presence of PD98059, a MAPK inhibitor. Collectively, the data imply that TRH-induced depolarization and inward current in PVT neurons involve both a dependency on extracellular Ca2+ influx via opening of L-type Ca2+ channels, a sensitivity of a TRPC-like component to intracellular Ca2+ release via ryanodine channels, and a modulation by MAPK of a GIRK-like conductance component. PMID:27009047

  9. Calcium-dependent inactivation of calcium channels in the medial striatum increases at eye opening.

    PubMed

    Evans, R C; Herin, G A; Hawes, S L; Blackwell, K T

    2015-04-01

    Influx of calcium through voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) is essential for striatal function and plasticity. VGCCs expressed in striatal neurons have varying kinetics, voltage dependences, and densities resulting in heterogeneous subcellular calcium dynamics. One factor that determines the calcium dynamics in striatal medium spiny neurons is inactivation of VGCCs. Aside from voltage-dependent inactivation, VGCCs undergo calcium-dependent inactivation (CDI): inactivating in response to an influx of calcium. CDI is a negative feedback control mechanism; however, its contribution to striatal neuron function is unknown. Furthermore, although the density of VGCC expression changes with development, it is unclear whether CDI changes with development. Because calcium influx through L-type calcium channels is required for striatal synaptic depression, a change in CDI could contribute to age-dependent changes in striatal synaptic plasticity. Here we use whole cell voltage clamp to characterize CDI over developmental stages and across striatal regions. We find that CDI increases at the age of eye opening in the medial striatum but not the lateral striatum. The developmental increase in CDI mostly involves L-type channels, although calcium influx through non-L-type channels contributes to the CDI in both age groups. Agents that enhance protein kinase A (PKA) phosphorylation of calcium channels reduce the magnitude of CDI after eye opening, suggesting that the developmental increase in CDI may be related to a reduction in the phosphorylation state of the L-type calcium channel. These results are the first to show that modifications in striatal neuron properties correlate with changes to sensory input.

  10. Coupling between Voltage Sensors and Activation Gate in Voltage-gated K+ Channels

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zhe; Klem, Angela M.; Ramu, Yajamana

    2002-01-01

    Current through voltage-gated K+ channels underlies the action potential encoding the electrical signal in excitable cells. The four subunits of a voltage-gated K+ channel each have six transmembrane segments (S1–S6), whereas some other K+ channels, such as eukaryotic inward rectifier K+ channels and the prokaryotic KcsA channel, have only two transmembrane segments (M1 and M2). A voltage-gated K+ channel is formed by an ion-pore module (S5–S6, equivalent to M1–M2) and the surrounding voltage-sensing modules. The S4 segments are the primary voltage sensors while the intracellular activation gate is located near the COOH-terminal end of S6, although the coupling mechanism between them remains unknown. In the present study, we found that two short, complementary sequences in voltage-gated K+ channels are essential for coupling the voltage sensors to the intracellular activation gate. One sequence is the so called S4–S5 linker distal to the voltage-sensing S4, while the other is around the COOH-terminal end of S6, a region containing the actual gate-forming residues. PMID:12407078

  11. Lipid-dependent gating of a voltage-gated potassium channel

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Hui; Liu, Weiran; Anderson, Lingyan Y.; Jiang, Qiu-Xing

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies hypothesized that phospholipids stabilize two voltage-sensing arginine residues of certain voltage-gated potassium channels in activated conformations. It remains unclear how lipids directly affect these channels. Here, by examining the conformations of the KvAP in different lipids, we showed that without voltage change, the voltage-sensor domains switched from the activated to the resting state when their surrounding lipids were changed from phospholipids to nonphospholipids. Such lipid-determined conformational change was coupled to the ion-conducting pore, suggesting that parallel to voltage gating, the channel is gated by its annular lipids. Our measurements recognized that the energetic cost of lipid-dependent gating approaches that of voltage gating, but kinetically it appears much slower. Our data support that a channel and its surrounding lipids together constitute a functional unit, and natural nonphospholipids such as cholesterol should exert strong effects on voltage-gated channels. Our first observation of lipid-dependent gating may have general implications to other membrane proteins. PMID:21427721

  12. Mechanisms of closed-state inactivation in voltage-gated ion channels.

    PubMed

    Bähring, Robert; Covarrubias, Manuel

    2011-02-01

    Inactivation of voltage-gated ion channels is an intrinsic auto-regulatory process necessary to govern the occurrence and shape of action potentials and establish firing patterns in excitable tissues. Inactivation may occur from the open state (open-state inactivation, OSI) at strongly depolarized membrane potentials, or from pre-open closed states (closed-state inactivation, CSI) at hyperpolarized and modestly depolarized membrane potentials. Voltage-gated Na(+), K(+), Ca(2+) and non-selective cationic channels utilize both OSI and CSI. Whereas there are detailed mechanistic descriptions of OSI, much less is known about the molecular basis of CSI. Here, we review evidence for CSI in voltage-gated cationic channels (VGCCs) and recent findings that shed light on the molecular mechanisms of CSI in voltage-gated K(+) (Kv) channels. Particularly, complementary observations suggest that the S4 voltage sensor, the S4S5 linker and the main S6 activation gate are instrumental in the installment of CSI in Kv4 channels. According to this hypothesis, the voltage sensor may adopt a distinct conformation to drive CSI and, depending on the stability of the interactions between the voltage sensor and the pore domain, a closed-inactivated state results from rearrangements in the selectivity filter or failure of the activation gate to open. Kv4 channel CSI may efficiently exploit the dynamics of the subthreshold membrane potential to regulate spiking properties in excitable tissues.

  13. Energetic role of the paddle motif in voltage gating of Shaker K(+) channels.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yanping; Ramu, Yajamana; Shin, Hyeon-Gyu; Yamakaze, Jayden; Lu, Zhe

    2013-05-01

    Voltage-gated ion channels underlie rapid electric signaling in excitable cells. Electrophysiological studies have established that the N-terminal half of the fourth transmembrane segment ((NT)S4) of these channels is the primary voltage sensor, whereas crystallographic studies have shown that (NT)S4 is not located within a proteinaceous pore. Rather, (NT)S4 and the C-terminal half of S3 ((CT)S3 or S3b) form a helix-turn-helix motif, termed the voltage-sensor paddle. This unexpected structural finding raises two fundamental questions: does the paddle motif also exist in voltage-gated channels in a biological membrane, and, if so, what is its function in voltage gating? Here, we provide evidence that the paddle motif exists in the open state of Drosophila Shaker voltage-gated K(+) channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes and that (CT)S3 acts as an extracellular hydrophobic 'stabilizer' for (NT)S4, thus biasing the gating chemical equilibrium toward the open state.

  14. Voltage-gated sodium channel modulation by scorpion α-toxins

    PubMed Central

    Bosmans, Frank; Tytgat, Jan

    2007-01-01

    Voltage-gated Na+ channels are integral membrane proteins that function as a gateway for a selective permeation of sodium ions across biological membranes. In this way, they are crucial players for the generation of action potentials in excitable cells. Voltage-gated Na+ channels are encoded by at least nine genes in mammals. The different isoforms have remarkably similar functional properties, but small changes in function and pharmacology are biologically well-defined, as underscored by mutations that cause several diseases and by modulation of a myriad of compounds respectively. This review will stress on the modulation of voltage-gated Na+ channels by scorpion alpha-toxins. Nature has designed these two classes of molecules as if they were predestined to each other: an inevitable ‘encounter’ between a voltage-gated Na+ channel isoform and an alpha-toxin from scorpion venom indeed results in a dramatically changed Na+ current phenotype with clear-cut consequences on electrical excitability and sometimes life or death. This fascinating aspect justifies an overview on scorpion venoms, their alpha-toxins and the Na+ channel targets they are built for, as well as on the molecular determinants that govern the selectivity and affinity of this ‘inseparable duo’. PMID:17087986

  15. New Findings on the Effects of Tannic Acid: Inhibition of L-Type Calcium Channels, Calcium Transient and Contractility in Rat Ventricular Myocytes.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Fengli; Chu, Xi; Wang, Hua; Zhang, Xuan; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Liu, Zhenyi; Guo, Hui; Liu, Hongying; Liu, Yang; Chu, Li; Zhang, Jianping

    2016-03-01

    Tannic acid (TA) is a group of water-soluble polyphenolic compounds that occur mainly in plant-derived feeds, food grains and fruits. Many studies have explored its biomedical properties, such as anticancer, antibacterial, antimutagenic, antioxidant, antidiabetic, antiinflammatory and antihypertensive activities. However, the effects of TA on the L-type Ca(2+) current (ICa-L) of cardiomyocytes remain undefined. The present study examined the effects of TA on ICa-L using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique and on intracellular Ca(2+) handling and cell contractility in rat ventricular myocytes with the aid of a video-based edge detection system. Exposure to TA resulted in a concentration- and voltage-dependent blockade of ICa-L, with the half maximal inhibitory concentration of 1.69 μM and the maximal inhibitory effect of 46.15%. Moreover, TA significantly inhibited the amplitude of myocyte shortening and peak value of Ca(2+) transient and increased the time to 10% of the peak. These findings provide new experimental evidence for the cellular mechanism of action of TA and may help to expand clinical treatments for cardiovascular disease.

  16. Renal-protective effect of T-and L-type calcium channel blockers in hypertensive patients: an Amlodipine-to-Benidipine Changeover (ABC) study.

    PubMed

    Ohishi, Mitsuru; Takagi, Takashi; Ito, Norihisa; Terai, Minako; Tatara, Yuji; Hayashi, Norihiro; Shiota, Atsushi; Katsuya, Tomohiro; Rakugi, Hiromi; Ogihara, Toshio

    2007-09-01

    Both strict blood pressure control and efferent artery dilatation are critical in reducing proteinuria, which in turn helps to regulate blood pressure. Benidipine, an L- and T-type calcium channel blocker, has the potential for increased effectiveness compared with L-type-dominant calcium channel blockers such as amlodipine. Therefore, we evaluated blood pressure and proteinuria after changeover from amlodipine to benidipine in poorly controlled hypertensive patients. Fifty-eight hypertensive outpatients undergoing amlodipine treatment and unable to achieve optimal blood pressure as determined by Japanese Society of Hypertension Guidelines for the Management of Hypertention (JSH 2004) were changed over to benidipine treatment. We measured blood pressure and pulse rate and assessed urinary protein excretion before and after changeover. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure dropped from 151/90 mmHg to 140/81 mmHg (p<0.0001). Mean blood pressure (p<0.0001) and pulse pressure (p=0.0069) were also reduced, but pulse rate increased from 75 bpm to 78 bpm (p=0.0047). Urinary protein excretion adjusted for urinary creatinine was reduced from 0.35 +/- 0.82 to 0.22 +/- 0.55 g/g creatinine (p=0.0119). The urinary protein reduction was observed only in patients with renin-angiotensin inhibition (p=0.0216). By switching from amlodipine to benidipine treatment, more than 80% of patients reduced their blood pressure, and more than 40% achieved optimal blood pressure. Higher urinary protein excretion (p<0.0001), lower glomerular filtration rate (p=0.0011) and presence of diabetes (p=0.0284) were correlated with reduction of urinary proteins during changeover. Taken together, our results suggest that benidipine may have greater efficacy than amlodipine in reducing blood pressure and proteinuria.

  17. Time-dependent molecular memory in single voltage-gated sodium channel.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Tapan K; Sikdar, S K

    2007-10-01

    Excitability in neurons is associated with firing of action potentials and requires the opening of voltage-gated sodium channels with membrane depolarization. Sustained membrane depolarization, as seen in pathophysiological conditions like epilepsy, can have profound implications on the biophysical properties of voltage-gated ion channels. Therefore, we sought to characterize the effect of sustained membrane depolarization on single voltage-gated Na+ channels. Single-channel activity was recorded in the cell-attached patch-clamp mode from the rNa(v)1.2 alpha channels expressed in CHO cells. Classical statistical analysis revealed complex nonlinear changes in channel dwell times and unitary conductance of single Na+ channels as a function of conditioning membrane depolarization. Signal processing tools like weighted wavelet Z (WWZ) and discrete Fourier transform analyses attributed a "pseudo-oscillatory" nature to the observed nonlinear variation in the kinetic parameters. Modeling studies using the hidden Markov model (HMM) illustrated significant changes in kinetic states and underlying state transition rate constants upon conditioning depolarization. Our results suggest that sustained membrane depolarization induces novel nonlinear properties in voltage-gated Na+ channels. Prolonged membrane depolarization also induced a "molecular memory" phenomenon, characterized by clusters of dwell time events and strong autocorrelation in the dwell time series similar to that reported recently for single enzyme molecules. The persistence of such molecular memory was found to be dependent on the duration of depolarization. Voltage-gated Na+ channel with the observed time-dependent nonlinear properties and the molecular memory phenomenon may determine the functional state of the channel and, in turn, the excitability of a neuron.

  18. Simulated microgravity inhibits L-type calcium channel currents partially by the up-regulation of miR-103 in MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhongyang; Cao, Xinsheng; Zhang, Zhuo; Hu, Zebing; Zhang, Lianchang; Wang, Han; Zhou, Hua; Li, Dongtao; Zhang, Shu; Xie, Manjiang

    2015-01-28

    L-type voltage-sensitive calcium channels (LTCCs), particularly Cav1.2 LTCCs, play fundamental roles in cellular responses to mechanical stimuli in osteoblasts. Numerous studies have shown that mechanical loading promotes bone formation, whereas the removal of this stimulus under microgravity conditions results in a reduction in bone mass. However, whether microgravity exerts an influence on LTCCs in osteoblasts and whether this influence is a possible mechanism underlying the observed bone loss remain unclear. In the present study, we demonstrated that simulated microgravity substantially inhibited LTCC currents and suppressed Cav1.2 at the protein level in MC3T3-E1 osteoblast-like cells. In addition, reduced Cav1.2 protein levels decreased LTCC currents in MC3T3-E1 cells. Moreover, simulated microgravity increased miR-103 expression. Cav1.2 expression and LTCC current densities both significantly increased in cells that were transfected with a miR-103 inhibitor under mechanical unloading conditions. These results suggest that simulated microgravity substantially inhibits LTCC currents in osteoblasts by suppressing Cav1.2 expression. Furthermore, the down-regulation of Cav1.2 expression and the inhibition of LTCCs caused by mechanical unloading in osteoblasts are partially due to miR-103 up-regulation. Our study provides a novel mechanism for microgravity-induced detrimental effects on osteoblasts, offering a new avenue to further investigate the bone loss induced by microgravity.

  19. L-Type Voltage-Dependent Calcium Channel Currents of Cerebral Arterial Smooth Muscle Cells are Increased by 2-Week Hindlimb Unweighting in Rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Hao; Xue, Jun-Hui; Bai, Yun-Gang; Xie, Man-Jiang; Bao, Jun-Xiang; Ma, Jin

    2008-06-01

    To investigate alterations of L-type voltage-dependent calcium channel (CaL) in cerebral vascular smooth muscle cells isolated from rats subjected to a two-week simulated weightlessness, and influence of Bay K 8644 (an agonist of CaL) to the channel currents. Tail-suspended rat model was used to simulate the effects of microgravity. Whole-cell patch-clamp technique was used to record CaL currents before and after Bay K 8644 treatment, with intracellular Ca2+ concentration maintained physiological level. The corresponding parameters such as steady state activation and inactivation curves were also recorded. Whole-cell CaL current densities increased obviously, and sensitivity of CaL to Bay K 8644 also increased in cerebral vascular smooth muscle cells from suspension group. But membrane capacitance (Cm), access resistance (Ra), and other parameters of CaL such as steady state activation / inactivation curves have no significant changes compared with those of control group. These results suggest that enhanced CaL function of cerebrovascular smooth muscle cells induced by simulated microgravity may be one of the electrophysiological mechanisms that mediate enhanced vasoreactivity of cerebrovascular smooth muscle cells during adaptation to simulated weightlessness in rats.

  20. Effects of wenxin keli on the action potential and L-type calcium current in rats with transverse aortic constriction-induced heart failure.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu; Li, Yang; Guo, Lili; Chen, Wen; Zhao, Mingjing; Gao, Yonghong; Wu, Aiming; Lou, Lixia; Wang, Jie; Liu, Xiaoqiu; Xing, Yanwei

    2013-01-01

    Objective. We investigated the effects of WXKL on the action potential (AP) and the L-type calcium current (I Ca-L) in normal and hypertrophied myocytes. Methods. Forty male rats were randomly divided into two groups: the control group and the transverse aortic constriction- (TAC-) induced heart failure group. Cardiac hypertrophy was induced by TAC surgery, whereas the control group underwent a sham operation. Eight weeks after surgery, single cardiac ventricular myocytes were isolated from the hearts of the rats. The APs and I Ca-L were recorded using the whole-cell patch clamp technique. Results. The action potential duration (APD) of the TAC group was prolonged compared with the control group and was markedly shortened by WXKL treatment in a dose-dependent manner. The current densities of the I Ca-L in the TAC group treated with 5 g/L WXKL were significantly decreased compared with the TAC group. We also determined the effect of WXKL on the gating mechanism of the I Ca-L in the TAC group. We found that WXKL decreased the I Ca-L by accelerating the inactivation of the channels and delaying the recovery time from inactivation. Conclusions. The results suggest that WXKL affects the AP and blocked the I Ca-L, which ultimately resulted in the treatment of arrhythmias.

  1. Effects of Wenxin Keli on the Action Potential and L-Type Calcium Current in Rats with Transverse Aortic Constriction-Induced Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu; Li, Yang; Guo, Lili; Chen, Wen; Zhao, Mingjing; Gao, Yonghong; Wu, Aiming; Lou, Lixia; Wang, Jie; Liu, Xiaoqiu; Xing, Yanwei

    2013-01-01

    Objective. We investigated the effects of WXKL on the action potential (AP) and the L-type calcium current (ICa-L) in normal and hypertrophied myocytes. Methods. Forty male rats were randomly divided into two groups: the control group and the transverse aortic constriction- (TAC-) induced heart failure group. Cardiac hypertrophy was induced by TAC surgery, whereas the control group underwent a sham operation. Eight weeks after surgery, single cardiac ventricular myocytes were isolated from the hearts of the rats. The APs and ICa-L were recorded using the whole-cell patch clamp technique. Results. The action potential duration (APD) of the TAC group was prolonged compared with the control group and was markedly shortened by WXKL treatment in a dose-dependent manner. The current densities of the ICa-L in the TAC group treated with 5 g/L WXKL were significantly decreased compared with the TAC group. We also determined the effect of WXKL on the gating mechanism of the ICa-L in the TAC group. We found that WXKL decreased the ICa-L by accelerating the inactivation of the channels and delaying the recovery time from inactivation. Conclusions. The results suggest that WXKL affects the AP and blocked the ICa-L, which ultimately resulted in the treatment of arrhythmias. PMID:24319478

  2. Cav1.2, but not Cav1.3, L-type calcium channel subtype mediates nicotine-induced conditioned place preference in miceo.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yudan; Harding, Meghan; Dore, Jules; Chen, Xihua

    2017-04-03

    Nicotine use is one of the most common forms of drug addiction. Although L-type calcium channels (LTCCs) are involved in nicotine addiction, the contribution of the two primary LTCC subtypes (Cav1.2 and 1.3) is unknown. This study aims to determine the contribution of these two LTCC subtypes to nicotine-induced conditioned place preference (CPP) responses by using transgenic mouse models that do not express Cav1.3 (Cav1.3(-/-)) or contain a mutation in the dihydropyridine (DHP) site of the Cav1.2 (Cav1.2DHP(-/-)). We found a hyperbolic dose dependent nicotine (0.1-1mg/kg; 0.5mg/kg optimum) effect on place preference in wild type (WT) mice, that could be prevented by the DHP LTCC blocker nifedipine pretreatment. Similarly, Cav1.3(-/-) mice showed nicotine-induced place preference which was antagonized by nifedipine. In contrast, nifedipine pretreatment of Cav1.2DHP(-/-) mice had no effect on nicotine-induced CPP responses, suggesting an involvement of Cav1.2 subtype in the nicotine-induced CPP response. Nifedipine alone failed to produce either conditioned place aversion or CPP in WT mice. These results collectively indicate Cav1.2, but not Cav1.3 LTCC subtype regulates, at least in part, the reinforcing effects of nicotine use.

  3. Simulated microgravity inhibits L-type calcium channel currents partially by the up-regulation of miR-103 in MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhongyang; Cao, Xinsheng; Zhang, Zhuo; Hu, Zebing; Zhang, Lianchang; Wang, Han; Zhou, Hua; Li, Dongtao; Zhang, Shu; Xie, Manjiang

    2015-01-01

    L-type voltage-sensitive calcium channels (LTCCs), particularly Cav1.2 LTCCs, play fundamental roles in cellular responses to mechanical stimuli in osteoblasts. Numerous studies have shown that mechanical loading promotes bone formation, whereas the removal of this stimulus under microgravity conditions results in a reduction in bone mass. However, whether microgravity exerts an influence on LTCCs in osteoblasts and whether this influence is a possible mechanism underlying the observed bone loss remain unclear. In the present study, we demonstrated that simulated microgravity substantially inhibited LTCC currents and suppressed Cav1.2 at the protein level in MC3T3-E1 osteoblast-like cells. In addition, reduced Cav1.2 protein levels decreased LTCC currents in MC3T3-E1 cells. Moreover, simulated microgravity increased miR-103 expression. Cav1.2 expression and LTCC current densities both significantly increased in cells that were transfected with a miR-103 inhibitor under mechanical unloading conditions. These results suggest that simulated microgravity substantially inhibits LTCC currents in osteoblasts by suppressing Cav1.2 expression. Furthermore, the down-regulation of Cav1.2 expression and the inhibition of LTCCs caused by mechanical unloading in osteoblasts are partially due to miR-103 up-regulation. Our study provides a novel mechanism for microgravity-induced detrimental effects on osteoblasts, offering a new avenue to further investigate the bone loss induced by microgravity. PMID:25627864

  4. Surface dynamics of voltage-gated ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Heine, Martin; Ciuraszkiewicz, Anna; Voigt, Andreas; Heck, Jennifer; Bikbaev, Arthur

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Neurons encode information in fast changes of the membrane potential, and thus electrical membrane properties are critically important for the integration and processing of synaptic inputs by a neuron. These electrical properties are largely determined by ion channels embedded in the membrane. The distribution of most ion channels in the membrane is not spatially uniform: they undergo activity-driven changes in the range of minutes to days. Even in the range of milliseconds, the composition and topology of ion channels are not static but engage in highly dynamic processes including stochastic or activity-dependent transient association of the pore-forming and auxiliary subunits, lateral diffusion, as well as clustering of different channels. In this review we briefly discuss the potential impact of mobile sodium, calcium and potassium ion channels and the functional significance of this for individual neurons and neuronal networks. PMID:26891382

  5. 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) mechanism of action: modulation of L-type calcium channels leading to calcium uptake and intermediate filament phosphorylation in cerebral cortex of young rats.

    PubMed

    Zanatta, Leila; Goulart, Paola Bez; Gonçalves, Renata; Pierozan, Paula; Winkelmann-Duarte, Elisa C; Woehl, Viviane Mara; Pessoa-Pureur, Regina; Silva, Fátima Regina Mena Barreto; Zamoner, Ariane

    2012-10-01

    The involvement of calcium-mediated signaling pathways in the mechanism of action of 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) (1,25D) is currently demonstrated. In this study we found that 1,25D induces nongenomic effects mediated by membrane vitamin D receptor (VDRm) by modulating intermediate filament (IF) phosphorylation and calcium uptake through L-type voltage-dependent calcium channels (L-VDCC) in cerebral cortex of 10 day-old rats. Results showed that the mechanism of action of 1,25D involves intra- and extracellular calcium levels, as well as the modulation of chloride and potassium channels. The effects of L-VDCCs on membrane voltage occur over a broad potential range and could involve depolarizing or hyperpolarizing coupling modes, supporting a cross-talk among Ca(2+) uptake and potassium and chloride channels. Also, the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase inactivation by ouabain mimicked the 1,25D action on (45)Ca(2+) uptake. The Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase inhibition observed herein might lead to intracellular Na(+) accumulation with subsequent L-VDCC opening and consequently increased (45)Ca(2+) (calcium, isotope of mass 45) uptake. Moreover, the 1,25D effect is dependent on the activation of the following protein kinases: cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA), Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (PKCaMII), phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and mitogen-activated protein kinase p38 (p38(MAPK)). The modulation of calcium entry into neural cells by the 1,25D we are highlighting, might take a role in the regulation of a plethora of intracellular processes. Considering that vitamin D deficiency can lead to brain illness, 1,25D may be a possible candidate to be used, at least as an adjuvant, in the pharmacological therapy of neuropathological conditions.

  6. Anaesthetic Tricaine Acts Preferentially on Neural Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels and Fails to Block Directly Evoked Muscle Contraction

    PubMed Central

    Attili, Seetharamaiah; Hughes, Simon M.

    2014-01-01

    Movements in animals arise through concerted action of neurons and skeletal muscle. General anaesthetics prevent movement and cause loss of consciousness by blocking neural function. Anaesthetics of the amino amide-class are thought to act by blockade of voltage-gated sodium channels. In fish, the commonly used anaesthetic tricaine methanesulphonate, also known as 3-aminobenzoic acid ethyl ester, metacaine or MS-222, causes loss of consciousness. However, its role in blocking action potentials in distinct excitable cells is unclear, raising the possibility that tricaine could act as a neuromuscular blocking agent directly causing paralysis. Here we use evoked electrical stimulation to show that tricaine efficiently blocks neural action potentials, but does not prevent directly evoked muscle contraction. Nifedipine-sensitive L-type Cav channels affecting movement are also primarily neural, suggesting that muscle Nav channels are relatively insensitive to tricaine. These findings show that tricaine used at standard concentrations in zebrafish larvae does not paralyse muscle, thereby diminishing concern that a direct action on muscle could mask a lack of general anaesthesia. PMID:25090007

  7. The β Subunit of Voltage-Gated Ca2+ Channels

    PubMed Central

    Buraei, Zafir; Yang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Calcium regulates a wide spectrum of physiological processes such as heartbeat, muscle contraction, neuronal communication, hormone release, cell division, and gene transcription. Major entry-ways for Ca2+ in excitable cells are high-voltage activated (HVA) Ca2+channels. These are plasma membrane proteins composed of several subunits, including α1, α2δ, β, and γ. Although the principal α1 subunit (Cavα1) contains the channel pore, gating machinery and most drug binding sites, the cytosolic auxiliary β subunit (Cavβ) plays an essential role in regulating the surface expression and gating properties of HVA Ca2+ channels. Cavβ is also crucial for the modulation of HVA Ca2+ channels by G proteins, kinases, and the Ras-related RGK GTPases. New proteins have emerged in recent years that modulate HVA Ca2+ channels by binding to Cavβ. There are also indications that Cavβ may carry out Ca2+ channel-independent functions, including directly regulating gene transcription. All four subtypes of Cavβ, encoded by different genes, have a modular organization, consisting of three variable regions, a conserved guanylate kinase (GK) domain, and a conserved Src-homology 3 (SH3) domain, placing them into the membrane-associated guanylate kinase (MAGUK) protein family. Crystal structures of Cavβs reveal how they interact with Cavα1, open new research avenues, and prompt new inquiries. In this article, we review the structure and various biological functions of Cavβ, with both a historical perspective as well as an emphasis on recent advances. PMID:20959621

  8. The cardiac L-type calcium channel alpha subunit is a target for direct redox modification during oxidative stress - the role of cysteine residues in the alpha interacting domain.

    PubMed

    Muralidharan, Padmapriya; Cserne Szappanos, Henrietta; Ingley, Evan; Hool, Livia C

    2017-03-17

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in the Western world. The incidence of cardiovascular disease is predicted to further rise with the increase in obesity and diabetes and with the ageing population. Even though the survival rate from ischemic heart disease has improved over the past 30 years, many patients progress to a chronic pathological condition, known as cardiac hypertrophy that is associated with an increase in morbidity and mortality. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and calcium play an essential role in mediating cardiac hypertrophy. The L-type calcium channel is the main route for calcium influx into cardiac myocytes. There is now good evidence for a direct role for the L-type calcium channel in the development of cardiac hypertrophy. Cysteines on the channel are targets for redox modification and glutathionylation of the channel can modulate the function of the channel protein leading to the onset of pathology. The cysteine responsible for modification of L-type calcium channel function has now been identified. Detailed understanding of the role of cysteines as possible targets during oxidative stress may assist in designing therapy to prevent the development of hypertrophy and heart failure. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  9. Solution structure of two insect-specific spider toxins and their pharmacological interaction with the insect voltage-gated Na+ channel.

    PubMed

    Ferrat, G; Bosmans, F; Tytgat, J; Pimentel, C; Chagot, B; Gilles, N; Nakajima, T; Darbon, H; Corzo, G

    2005-05-01

    Delta-paluIT1 and delta-paluIT2 are toxins purified from the venom of the spider Paracoelotes luctuosus. Similar in sequence to mu-agatoxins from Agelenopsis aperta, their pharmacological target is the voltage-gated insect sodium channel, of which they alter the inactivation properties in a way similar to alpha-scorpion toxins, but they bind on site 4 in a way similar to beta-scorpion toxins. We determined the solution structure of the two toxins by use of two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques followed by distance geometry and molecular dynamics. The structures of delta-paluIT1 and delta-paluIT2 belong to the inhibitory cystine knot structural family, i.e. a compact disulfide-bonded core from which four loops emerge. Delta-paluIT1 and delta-paluIT2 contain respectively two- and three-stranded anti-parallel beta-sheets as unique secondary structure. We compare the structure and the electrostatic anisotropy of those peptides to other sodium and calcium channel toxins, analyze the topological juxtaposition of key functional residues, and conclude that the recognition of insect voltage-gated sodium channels by these toxins involves the beta-sheet, in addition to loops I and IV. Besides the position of culprit residues on the molecular surface, difference in dipolar moment orientation is another determinant of receptor binding and biological activity differences. We also demonstrate by electrophysiological experiments on the cloned insect voltage-gated sodium channel, para, heterologuously co-expressed with the tipE subunit in Xenopus laevis oocytes, that delta-paluIT1 and delta-paluIT2 procure an increase of Na+ current. delta-PaluIT1-OH seems to have less effect when the same concentrations are used.

  10. Effects of L-type calcium channel and human ether-a-go-go related gene blockers on the electrical activity of the human heart: a simulation study

    PubMed Central

    Zemzemi, Nejib; Rodriguez, Blanca

    2015-01-01

    Aims Class III and IV drugs affect cardiac human ether-a-go-go related gene (IKr) and L-type calcium (ICaL) channels, resulting in complex alterations in repolarization with both anti- and pro-arrhythmic consequences. Interpretation of their effects on cellular and electrocardiogram (ECG)-based biomarkers for risk stratification is challenging. As pharmaceutical compounds often exhibit multiple ion channel effects, our goal is to investigate the simultaneous effect of ICaL and IKr block on human ventricular electrophysiology from ionic to ECG level. Methods and results Simulations are conducted using a human body torso bidomain model, which includes realistic representation of human membrane kinetics, anatomy, and fibre orientation. A simple block pore model is incorporated to simulate drug-induced ICaL and IKr blocks, for drug dose = 0, IC50, 2× IC50, 10× IC50, and 30× IC50. Drug effects on human ventricular activity are quantified for different degrees and combinations of ICaL and IKr blocks from the ionic to the body surface ECG level. Electrocardiogram simulations show that ICaL block results in shortening of the QT interval, ST elevation, and reduced T-wave amplitude, caused by reduction in action potential duration and action potential amplitude during the plateau phase, and in repolarization times. In contrast, IKr block results in QT prolongation and reduced T-wave amplitude. When ICaL and IKr blocks are combined, the degree of ICaL block strongly determines QT interval whereas the effect of IKr block is more pronounced on the T-wave amplitude. Conclusion Our simulation study provides new insights into the combined effect of ICaL and IKr blocks on human ventricular activity using a multiscale computational human torso model. PMID:25228500

  11. How do voltage-gated sodium channels enhance migration and invasiveness in cancer cells?

    PubMed

    Besson, Pierre; Driffort, Virginie; Bon, Émeline; Gradek, Frédéric; Chevalier, Stéphan; Roger, Sébastien

    2015-10-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are abnormally expressed in tumors, often as neonatal isoforms, while they are not expressed, or only at a low level, in the matching normal tissue. The level of their expression and their activity is related to the aggressiveness of the disease and to the formation of metastases. A vast knowledge on the regulation of their expression and functioning has been accumulated in normal excitable cells. This helped understand their regulation in cancer cells. However, how voltage-gated sodium channels impose a pro-metastatic behavior to cancer cells is much less documented. This aspect will be addressed in the review. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane channels and transporters in cancers.

  12. Suppression of voltage-gated Na(+) channels and neuronal excitability by imperatorin.

    PubMed

    Wu, King-Chuen; Chen, Yi-Hung; Cheng, Ka-Shun; Kuo, Yueh-Hsiung; Yang, Chin-Tsang; Wong, Kar-Lok; Tu, Yuan-Kun; Chan, Paul; Leung, Yuk-Man

    2013-12-05

    Imperatorin is a naturally occurring furocoumarin compound isolated from plants such as Angelica archangelica and Cnidium monnieri. It has multiple pharmacological effects including anticonvulsant effects. Here we determined the effects of imperatorin on voltage-gated Na(+) channels (VGSC) using whole-cell patch clamp techniques in differentiated neuronal NG108-15 cells. We showed that imperatorin inhibited VGSC; such inhibition did not show state-dependence. Imperatorin caused a left shift in the steady-state inactivation curve without affecting activation gating. The inhibition of VGSC by imperatorin displayed a mild frequency-dependence. Imperatorin was also shown to inhibit VGSC and action potential amplitude without affecting voltage-gated K(+) channels in rat hippocampal CA1 neurons. In conclusion, our results suggest that imperatorin dampens neuronal excitability by inhibiting VGSC.

  13. Voltage-Gated Proton Channels as Novel Drug Targets: From NADPH Oxidase Regulation to Sperm Biology

    PubMed Central

    Demaurex, Nicolas; Krause, Karl-Heinz

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Voltage-gated proton channels are increasingly implicated in cellular proton homeostasis. Proton currents were originally identified in snail neurons less than 40 years ago, and subsequently shown to play an important auxiliary role in the functioning of reactive oxygen species (ROS)-generating nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidases. Molecular identification of voltage-gated proton channels was achieved less than 10 years ago. Interestingly, so far, only one gene coding for voltage-gated proton channels has been identified, namely hydrogen voltage-gated channel 1 (HVCN1), which codes for the HV1 proton channel protein. Over the last years, the first picture of putative physiological functions of HV1 has been emerging. Recent Advances: The best-studied role remains charge and pH compensation during the respiratory burst of the phagocyte NADPH oxidase (NOX). Strong evidence for a role of HV1 is also emerging in sperm biology, but the relationship with the sperm NOX5 remains unclear. Probably in many instances, HV1 functions independently of NOX: for example in snail neurons, basophils, osteoclasts, and cancer cells. Critical Issues: Generally, ion channels are good drug targets; however, this feature has so far not been exploited for HV1, and hitherto no inhibitors compatible with clinical use exist. However, there are emerging indications for HV1 inhibitors, ranging from diseases with a strong activation of the phagocyte NOX (e.g., stroke) to infertility, osteoporosis, and cancer. Future Directions: Clinically useful HV1-active drugs should be developed and might become interesting drugs of the future. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 23, 490–513. PMID:24483328

  14. Voltage-gated channel properties of epithelial cells in porcine vomeronasal organ.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Tetsuya; Takei, Ryo; Gautam, Shree Hari; Otsuguro, Ken-Ichi; Ohta, Toshio; Ito, Shigeo; Habara, Yoshiaki; Saito, Toshiyuki

    2008-08-29

    Bipolar vomeronasal sensory neurons (VSNs) in the vomeronasal organ (VNO) are believed to detect pheromones in most mammals. The vomeronasal sensory epithelium (VSE) is composed of VSNs and supporting cells. There are morphological differences in VNOs between species. Many electrophysiological experiments have been performed on rodent VSEs but few on other mammals. We therefore investigated voltage-gated channel properties of cells in the porcine VSE using slice whole-cell voltage-clamp techniques. In immunohistochemical study of the porcine VSE, most PGP9.5-immunoreactive cells were found between the middle and basal region, and negative cells were distributed in the apical to middle region. Depolarizing pulses to epithelial cells from -90mV produced transient inward Na+ channel currents and sustained outward K+ channel currents with various amplitudes. The distribution of cells having high and low Na+ current densities was mostly consistent with the histological distribution of VSNs and supporting cells, respectively. The half-inactivation voltage of voltage-gated Na+ channels in supporting cells was 26mV more negative than that in VSNs. Voltage-gated K+ channel currents in both cell types were suppressed by tetraethylammonium to the same extent. VSNs possessed TTX-sensitive voltage-gated Na+ channels and Ni2+ -sensitive T-type Ca2+ channels. These results suggest that the histological distribution of porcine vomeronasal epithelial cells is more similar to the dog and goat than to rodents, and that the electrophysiological characteristics of porcine vomeronasal epithelial cells are similar to those of rodents. It is also suggested that porcine VSNs detecting pheromones generate action potentials through these channels.

  15. Magnetic skyrmion transistor: skyrmion motion in a voltage-gated nanotrack

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xichao; Zhou, Yan; Ezawa, Motohiko; Zhao, G. P.; Zhao, Weisheng

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic skyrmions are localized and topologically protected spin configurations, which are of both fundamental and applied interests for future electronics. In this work, we propose a voltage-gated skyrmion transistor within the well-established framework of micromagnetics. Its operating conditions and processes have been theoretically investigated and demonstrated, in which the gate voltage can be used to switch on/off a circuit. Our results provide the first time guidelines for practical realization of hybrid skyrmionic-electronic devices. PMID:26087287

  16. Outward Rectification of Voltage-Gated K+ Channels Evolved at Least Twice in Life History.

    PubMed

    Riedelsberger, Janin; Dreyer, Ingo; Gonzalez, Wendy

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated potassium (K+) channels are present in all living systems. Despite high structural similarities in the transmembrane domains (TMD), this K+ channel type segregates into at least two main functional categories-hyperpolarization-activated, inward-rectifying (Kin) and depolarization-activated, outward-rectifying (Kout) channels. Voltage-gated K+ channels sense the membrane voltage via a voltage-sensing domain that is connected to the conduction pathway of the channel. It has been shown that the voltage-sensing mechanism is the same in Kin and Kout channels, but its performance results in opposite pore conformations. It is not known how the different coupling of voltage-sensor and pore is implemented. Here, we studied sequence and structural data of voltage-gated K+ channels from animals and plants with emphasis on the property of opposite rectification. We identified structural hotspots that alone allow already the distinction between Kin and Kout channels. Among them is a loop between TMD S5 and the pore that is very short in animal Kout, longer in plant and animal Kin and the longest in plant Kout channels. In combination with further structural and phylogenetic analyses this finding suggests that outward-rectification evolved twice and independently in the animal and plant kingdom.

  17. Outward Rectification of Voltage-Gated K+ Channels Evolved at Least Twice in Life History

    PubMed Central

    Riedelsberger, Janin; Dreyer, Ingo; Gonzalez, Wendy

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated potassium (K+) channels are present in all living systems. Despite high structural similarities in the transmembrane domains (TMD), this K+ channel type segregates into at least two main functional categories—hyperpolarization-activated, inward-rectifying (Kin) and depolarization-activated, outward-rectifying (Kout) channels. Voltage-gated K+ channels sense the membrane voltage via a voltage-sensing domain that is connected to the conduction pathway of the channel. It has been shown that the voltage-sensing mechanism is the same in Kin and Kout channels, but its performance results in opposite pore conformations. It is not known how the different coupling of voltage-sensor and pore is implemented. Here, we studied sequence and structural data of voltage-gated K+ channels from animals and plants with emphasis on the property of opposite rectification. We identified structural hotspots that alone allow already the distinction between Kin and Kout channels. Among them is a loop between TMD S5 and the pore that is very short in animal Kout, longer in plant and animal Kin and the longest in plant Kout channels. In combination with further structural and phylogenetic analyses this finding suggests that outward-rectification evolved twice and independently in the animal and plant kingdom. PMID:26356684

  18. Monocyte Chemotactic Protein-1 Regulates Voltage-Gated K+ Channels and Macrophage Transmigration

    PubMed Central

    Gendelman, Howard E.; Ding, Shengyuan; Gong, Nan; Liu, Jianuo; Ramirez, Servio H.; Persidsky, Yuri; Mosley, R. Lee; Wang, Tong; Volsky, David J.; Xiong, Huangui

    2009-01-01

    Progressive human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 infection and virus-induced neuroinflammatory responses effectuates monocyte-macrophage transmigration across the blood-brain barrier (BBB). A key factor in mediating these events is monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1). Upregulated glial-derived MCP-1 in HIV-1 infected brain tissues generates a gradient for monocyte recruitment into the nervous system. We posit that the inter-relationships between MCP-1, voltage gated ion channels, cell shape and volume, and cell mobility underlie monocyte transmigration across the BBB. In this regard, MCP-1 serves both as a chemoattractant and an inducer of monocyte-macrophage ion flux affecting cell shape and mobility. To address this hypothesis, MCP-1 treated bone marrow derived macrophages (BMM) were analyzed for gene and protein expression, electrophysiology, and capacity to migrate across a laboratory constructed BBB. MCP-1 enhanced K+ channel gene (KCNA3) and channel protein expression. Electrophysiological studies revealed that MCP-1 increased outward K+ currents in a dose dependent manner. In vitro studies demonstrated that MCP-1 increased BMM migration across an artificial BBB and the MCP-1-induced BMM migration was blocked by tetraethylammonium, a voltage-gated K+ channel blocker. Together these data demonstrated that MCP-1 affects macrophage migratory movement through regulation of voltage-gated K+ channels and as such, provides a novel therapeutic strategy for neuroAIDS PMID:19034671

  19. Major diversification of voltage-gated K+ channels occurred in ancestral parahoxozoans.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaofan; Liu, Hansi; Chu Luo, Jose; Rhodes, Sarah A; Trigg, Liana M; van Rossum, Damian B; Anishkin, Andriy; Diatta, Fortunay H; Sassic, Jessica K; Simmons, David K; Kamel, Bishoy; Medina, Monica; Martindale, Mark Q; Jegla, Timothy

    2015-03-03

    We examined the origins and functional evolution of the Shaker and KCNQ families of voltage-gated K(+) channels to better understand how neuronal excitability evolved. In bilaterians, the Shaker family consists of four functionally distinct gene families (Shaker, Shab, Shal, and Shaw) that share a subunit structure consisting of a voltage-gated K(+) channel motif coupled to a cytoplasmic domain that mediates subfamily-exclusive assembly (T1). We traced the origin of this unique Shaker subunit structure to a common ancestor of ctenophores and parahoxozoans (cnidarians, bilaterians, and placozoans). Thus, the Shaker family is metazoan specific but is likely to have evolved in a basal metazoan. Phylogenetic analysis suggested that the Shaker subfamily could predate the divergence of ctenophores and parahoxozoans, but that the Shab, Shal, and Shaw subfamilies are parahoxozoan specific. In support of this, putative ctenophore Shaker subfamily channel subunits coassembled with cnidarian and mouse Shaker subunits, but not with cnidarian Shab, Shal, or Shaw subunits. The KCNQ family, which has a distinct subunit structure, also appears solely within the parahoxozoan lineage. Functional analysis indicated that the characteristic properties of Shaker, Shab, Shal, Shaw, and KCNQ currents evolved before the divergence of cnidarians and bilaterians. These results show that a major diversification of voltage-gated K(+) channels occurred in ancestral parahoxozoans and imply that many fundamental mechanisms for the regulation of action potential propagation evolved at this time. Our results further suggest that there are likely to be substantial differences in the regulation of neuronal excitability between ctenophores and parahoxozoans.

  20. L-type calcium channels play a crucial role in the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, Li; Wang, Yu; Wang, Huan; Kong, Lingmin; Zhang, Liang; Chen, Xin; Ding, Yin

    2012-08-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We detect the functional Ca{sup 2+} currents and mRNA expression of VDCC{sub L} in rMSCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Blockage of VDCC{sub L} exert antiproliferative and apoptosis-inducing effects on rMSCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibiting VDCC{sub L} can suppress the ability of rMSCs to differentiate into osteoblasts. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer {alpha}1C of VDCC{sub L} may be a primary functional subunit in VDCC{sub L}-regulating rMSCs. -- Abstract: L-type voltage-dependent Ca{sup 2+} channels (VDCC{sub L}) play an important role in the maintenance of intracellular calcium homeostasis, and influence multiple cellular processes. They have been confirmed to contribute to the functional activities of osteoblasts. Recently, VDCC{sub L} expression was reported in mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), but the role of VDCC{sub L} in MSCs is still undetermined. The aim of this study was to determine whether VDCC{sub L} may be regarded as a new regulator in the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of rat MSC (rMSCs). In this study, we examined functional Ca{sup 2+} currents (I{sub Ca}) and mRNA expression of VDCC{sub L} in rMSCs, and then suppressed VDCC{sub L} using nifedipine (Nif), a VDCC{sub L} blocker, to investigate its role in rMSCs. The proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of MSCs were analyzed by MTT, flow cytometry, alkaline phosphatase (ALP), Alizarin Red S staining, RT-PCR, and real-time PCR assays. We found that Nif exerts antiproliferative and apoptosis-inducing effects on rMSCs. ALP activity and mineralized nodules were significantly decreased after Nif treatment. Moreover, the mRNA levels of the osteogenic markers, osteocalcin (OCN), bone sialoprotein (BSP), and runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2), were also down-regulated. In addition, we transfected {alpha}1C-siRNA into the cells to further confirm the role of VDCC{sub L} in rMSCs, and a similar effect on osteogenesis was found. These

  1. Computational modeling of inhibition of voltage-gated Ca channels: identification of different effects on uterine and cardiac action potentials

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Wing-Chiu; Ghouri, Iffath; Taggart, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    The uterus and heart share the important physiological feature whereby contractile activation of the muscle tissue is regulated by the generation of periodic, spontaneous electrical action potentials (APs). Preterm birth arising from premature uterine contractions is a major complication of pregnancy and there remains a need to pursue avenues of research that facilitate the use of drugs, tocolytics, to limit these inappropriate contractions without deleterious actions on cardiac electrical excitation. A novel approach is to make use of mathematical models of uterine and cardiac APs, which incorporate many ionic currents contributing to the AP forms, and test the cell-specific responses to interventions. We have used three such models—of uterine smooth muscle cells (USMC), cardiac sinoatrial node cells (SAN), and ventricular cells—to investigate the relative effects of reducing two important voltage-gated Ca currents—the L-type (ICaL) and T-type (ICaT) Ca currents. Reduction of ICaL (10%) alone, or ICaT (40%) alone, blunted USMC APs with little effect on ventricular APs and only mild effects on SAN activity. Larger reductions in either current further attenuated the USMC APs but with also greater effects on SAN APs. Encouragingly, a combination of ICaL and ICaT reduction did blunt USMC APs as intended with little detriment to APs of either cardiac cell type. Subsequent overlapping maps of ICaL and ICaT inhibition profiles from each model revealed a range of combined reductions of ICaL and ICaT over which an appreciable diminution of USMC APs could be achieved with no deleterious action on cardiac SAN or ventricular APs. This novel approach illustrates the potential for computational biology to inform us of possible uterine and cardiac cell-specific mechanisms. Incorporating such computational approaches in future studies directed at designing new, or repurposing existing, tocolytics will be beneficial for establishing a desired uterine specificity of action

  2. Voltage-gated sodium channel modulation by sigma-receptors in cardiac myocytes and heterologous systems.

    PubMed

    Johannessen, Molly; Ramachandran, Subramaniam; Riemer, Logan; Ramos-Serrano, Andrea; Ruoho, Arnold E; Jackson, Meyer B

    2009-05-01

    The sigma-receptor, a broadly distributed integral membrane protein with a novel structure, is known to modulate various voltage-gated K(+) and Ca(2+) channels through a mechanism that involves neither G proteins nor phosphorylation. The present study investigated the modulation of the heart voltage-gated Na(+) channel (Na(v)1.5) by sigma-receptors. The sigma(1)-receptor ligands [SKF-10047 and (+)-pentazocine] and sigma(1)/sigma(2)-receptor ligands (haloperidol and ditolylguanidine) all reversibly inhibited Na(v)1.5 channels to varying degrees in human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK-293) cells and COS-7 cells, but the sigma(1)-receptor ligands were less effective in COS-7 cells. The same four ligands also inhibited Na(+) current in neonatal mouse cardiac myocytes. In sigma(1)-receptor knockout myocytes, the sigma(1)-receptor-specific ligands were far less effective in modulating Na(+) current, but the sigma(1)/sigma(2)-receptor ligands modulated Na(+) channels as well as in wild type. Photolabeling with the sigma(1)-receptor photoprobe [(125)I]-iodoazidococaine demonstrated that sigma(1)-receptors were abundant in heart and HEK-293 cells, but scarce in COS-7 cells. This difference was consistent with the greater efficacy of sigma(1)-receptor-specific ligands in HEK-293 cells than in COS-7 cells. sigma-Receptors modulated Na(+) channels despite the omission of GTP and ATP from the patch pipette solution. sigma-Receptor-mediated inhibition of Na(+) current had little if any voltage dependence and produced no change in channel kinetics. Na(+) channels represent a new addition to the large number of voltage-gated ion channels modulated by sigma-receptors. The modulation of Na(v)1.5 channels by sigma-receptors in the heart suggests an important pathway by which drugs can alter cardiac excitability and rhythmicity.

  3. A voltage-gated H+ channel underlying pH homeostasis in calcifying coccolithophores.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Alison R; Chrachri, Abdul; Wheeler, Glen; Goddard, Helen; Brownlee, Colin

    2011-06-01

    Marine coccolithophorid phytoplankton are major producers of biogenic calcite, playing a significant role in the global carbon cycle. Predicting the impacts of ocean acidification on coccolithophore calcification has received much recent attention and requires improved knowledge of cellular calcification mechanisms. Uniquely amongst calcifying organisms, coccolithophores produce calcified scales (coccoliths) in an intracellular compartment and secrete them to the cell surface, requiring large transcellular ionic fluxes to support calcification. In particular, intracellular calcite precipitation using HCO₃⁻ as the substrate generates equimolar quantities of H+ that must be rapidly removed to prevent cytoplasmic acidification. We have used electrophysiological approaches to identify a plasma membrane voltage-gated H+ conductance in Coccolithus pelagicus ssp braarudii with remarkably similar biophysical and functional properties to those found in metazoans. We show that both C. pelagicus and Emiliania huxleyi possess homologues of metazoan H(v)1 H+ channels, which function as voltage-gated H+ channels when expressed in heterologous systems. Homologues of the coccolithophore H+ channels were also identified in a diversity of eukaryotes, suggesting a wide range of cellular roles for the H(v)1 class of proteins. Using single cell imaging, we demonstrate that the coccolithophore H+ conductance mediates rapid H+ efflux and plays an important role in pH homeostasis in calcifying cells. The results demonstrate a novel cellular role for voltage gated H+ channels and provide mechanistic insight into biomineralisation by establishing a direct link between pH homeostasis and calcification. As the coccolithophore H+ conductance is dependent on the trans-membrane H+ electrochemical gradient, this mechanism will be directly impacted by, and may underlie adaptation to, ocean acidification. The presence of this H+ efflux pathway suggests that there is no obligate use of H

  4. Charybdotoxin blocks voltage-gated K+ channels in human and murine T lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    A variety of scorpion venoms and purified toxins were tested for effects on ion channels in human T lymphocytes, a human T leukemia cell line (Jurkat), and murine thymocytes, using the whole-cell patch-clamp method. Nanomolar concentrations of charbdotoxin (CTX), a purified peptide component of Leiurus quinquestriatus venom known to block Ca2+- activated K+ channels from muscle, blocked "type n" voltage-gated K+ channels in human T lymphoid cells. The Na+ channels occasionally expressed in these cells were unaffected by the toxin. From the time course of development and removal of K+ channel block we determined the rates of CTX binding and unbinding. CTX blocks K+ channels in Jurkat cells with a Kd value between 0.5 and 1.5 nM. Of the three types of voltage-gated K+ channels present in murine thymocytes, types n and n' are blocked by CTX at nanomolar concentrations. The third variety of K+ channels, "type l," is unaffected by CTX. Noxiustoxin (NTX), a purified toxin from Centruroides noxius known to block Ca2+-activated K+ channels, also blocked type n K+ channels with a high degree of potency (Kd = 0.2 nM). In addition, several types of crude scorpion venoms from the genera Androctonus, Buthus, Centruroides, and Pandinus blocked type n channels. We conclude that CTX and NTX are not specific for Ca2+ activated K+ channels and that purified scorpion toxins will provide useful probes of voltage-gated K+ channels in T lymphocytes. The existence of high-affinity sites for scorpion toxin binding may help to classify structurally related K+ channels and provide a useful tool for their biochemical purification. PMID:2475579

  5. The effect of dendritic voltage-gated conductances on the neuronal impedance: a quantitative model.

    PubMed

    Káli, Szabolcs; Zemankovics, Rita

    2012-10-01

    Neuronal impedance characterizes the magnitude and timing of the subthreshold response of a neuron to oscillatory input at a given frequency. It is known to be influenced by both the morphology of the neuron and the presence of voltage-gated conductances in the cell membrane. Most existing theoretical accounts of neuronal impedance considered the effects of voltage-gated conductances but neglected the spatial extent of the cell, while others examined spatially extended dendrites with a passive or spatially uniform quasi-active membrane. We derived an explicit mathematical expression for the somatic input impedance of a model neuron consisting of a somatic compartment coupled to an infinite dendritic cable which contained voltage-gated conductances, in the more general case of non-uniform dendritic membrane potential. The validity and generality of this model was verified through computer simulations of various model neurons. The analytical model was then applied to the analysis of experimental data from real CA1 pyramidal neurons. The model confirmed that the biophysical properties and predominantly dendritic localization of the hyperpolarization-activated cation current I (h) were important determinants of the impedance profile, but also predicted a significant contribution from a depolarization-activated fast inward current. Our calculations also implicated the interaction of I (h) with amplifying currents as the main factor governing the shape of the impedance-frequency profile in two types of hippocampal interneuron. Our results provide not only a theoretical advance in our understanding of the frequency-dependent behavior of nerve cells, but also a practical tool for the identification of candidate mechanisms that determine neuronal response properties.

  6. Nonlinearity of a Voltage-Gated Potassium Channel Revealed by the Mechanical Susceptibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariyaratne, Amila; Zocchi, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    The voltage-gated potassium channel from Aeropyrum pernix operates by coupling the voltage-driven motion of a charged group of amino acids to the opening and closing of the pore. In this experiment, we drive this charged group with an ac field and observe the effect on the gating. The measurements for different frequencies and amplitudes of the forcing reveal an essential nonlinearity in the mechanical behavior of the molecule. Within a continuum-mechanics description, we extract the effective dissipation parameter γ for this conformational motion and find γ≈0.2g/s, similar to recent nanorheology measurements on the conformational motion of an enzyme.

  7. Neuronal voltage-gated sodium channel subtypes: key roles in inflammatory and neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Ekberg, J; Adams, D J

    2006-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) play an important role in neuronal excitability. Regulation of VGSC activity is a complex phenomenon that occurs at multiple levels in the cell, including transcriptional regulation, post-translational modification and membrane insertion and retrieval. Multiple VGSC subtypes exist that vary in their biophysical and pharmacological properties and tissue distribution. Any alteration of the VGSC subtype profile of a neuron or the mechanisms that regulate VGSC activity can cause significant changes in neuronal excitability. Inflammatory and neuropathic pain states are characterised by alterations in VGSC subtype composition and activity in sensory neurons. This review focuses on the VGSC subtypes involved in such pain states.

  8. Electrical resonance with voltage-gated ion channels: perspectives from biophysical mechanisms and neural electrophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Lin; Liu, Xiao-dong

    2016-01-01

    Electrical resonance, providing selective signal amplification at preferred frequencies, is a unique phenomenon of excitable membranes, which has been observed in the nervous system at the cellular, circuit and system levels. The mechanisms underlying electrical resonance have not been fully elucidated. Prevailing hypotheses attribute the resonance to voltage-gated ion channels on the membrane of single neurons. In this review, we follow this line of thinking to summarize and analyze the biophysical/molecular mechanisms, and also the physiological relevance of channel-mediated electrical resonance. PMID:26725736

  9. Functional properties of cardiac L-type calcium channels transiently expressed in HEK293 cells. Roles of alpha 1 and beta subunits

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    The cardiac dihydropyridine-sensitive calcium channel was transiently expressed in HEK293 cells by transfecting the rabbit cardiac calcium channel alpha 1 subunit (alpha 1C) alone or in combination with the rabbit calcium channel beta subunit cloned from skeletal muscle. Transfection with alpha 1C alone leads to the expression of inward, voltage-activated, calcium or barium currents that exhibit dihydropyridine sensitivity and voltage- as well as calcium-dependent inactivation. Coexpression of the skeletal muscle beta subunit increases current density and the number of high-affinity dihydropyridine binding sites and also affects the macroscopic kinetics of the current. Recombinant alpha 1C beta channels exhibit a slowing of activation and a faster inactivation rate when either calcium or barium carries the charge. Our data suggest that both an increase in the number of channels as well as modulatory effects on gating underlie the modifications observed upon beta subunit coexpression. PMID:7539049

  10. Cannabinoid receptor type 1 activation by arachidonylcyclopropylamide in rat aortic rings causes vasorelaxation involving calcium-activated potassium channel subunit alpha-1 and calcium channel, voltage-dependent, L type, alpha 1C subunit.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Pastor, E; Andrade, F; Sánchez-Pastor, J M; Elizalde, A; Huerta, M; Virgen-Ortiz, A; Trujillo, X; Rodríguez-Hernández, A

    2014-04-15

    Cannabinoids are key regulators of vascular tone, some of the mechanisms involved include the activation of cannabinoid receptor types 1 and 2 (CB); the transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily V, member 1 (TRPV1); and non-(CB(1))/non-CB2 receptors. Here, we used the potent, selective CB(1) agonist arachidonylcyclopropylamide (ACPA) to elucidate the mechanism underlying vascular tone regulation. Immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy revealed that CB(1) was expressed in smooth muscle and endothelial cells in rat aorta. We performed isometric tension recordings in aortic rings that had been pre-contracted with phenylephrine. In these conditions, ACPA caused vasorelaxation in an endothelium-independent manner. To confirm that the effect of ACPA was mediated by CB(1) receptor, we repeated the experiment after blocking these receptors with a selective antagonist, AM281. In these conditions, ACPA did not cause vasorelaxation. We explored the role of K(+) channels in the effect of ACPA by applying high-K(+) solution to induce contraction in aortic rings. In these conditions, the ACPA-induced vasorelaxation was about half that observed with phenylephrine-induced contraction. Thus, K(+) channels were involved in the ACPA effect. Furthermore, the vasorelaxation effect was similarly reduced when we specifically blocked calcium-activated potassium channel subunit alpha-1 (KCa1.1) (MaxiK; BKCa) prior to adding ACPA. Finally, ACPA-induced vasorelaxation was also diminished when we specifically blocked the calcium channel, voltage-dependent, L type, alpha 1C subunit (Ca(v)1.2). These results showed that ACPA activation of CB(1) in smooth muscle caused vasorelaxation of aortic rings through a mechanism involving the activation of K(Ca)1.1 and the inhibition of Ca(v)1.2.

  11. Mechanisms of pyrethroid insecticide-induced stimulation of calcium influx in neocortical neurons

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pyrethroid insecticides bind to voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) and modify their gating kinetics, thereby disrupting neuronal function. Pyrethroids have also been reported to alter the function of other channel types, including activation of voltage-gated Ca2+ calcium chann...

  12. An aqueous H+ permeation pathway in the voltage-gated proton channel Hv1

    PubMed Central

    Sands, Zara A; Sansom, Mark S P; Clapham, David E

    2014-01-01

    Hv1 voltage-gated proton channels mediate rapid and selective transmembrane H+ flux and are gated by both voltage and pH gradients. Selective H+ transfer in membrane proteins is commonly achieved by Grotthuss proton ‘hopping’ in chains of ionizable amino acid side chains and intraprotein water molecules. To identify whether ionizable residues are required for proton permeation in Hv1, we neutralized candidate residues and measured expressed voltage-gated H+ currents. Unexpectedly, charge neutralization was insufficient to abrogate either the Hv1 conductance or coupling of pH gradient and voltage-dependent activation. Molecular dynamics simulations revealed water molecules in the central crevice of Hv1 model structures but not in homologous voltage-sensor domain (VSD) structures. Our results indicate that Hv1 most likely forms an internal water wire for selective proton transfer and that interactions between water molecules and S4 arginines may underlie coupling between voltage- and pH-gradient sensing. PMID:20543828

  13. Optical electrophysiology for probing function and pharmacology of voltage-gated ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongkang; Reichert, Elaine; Cohen, Adam E

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated ion channels mediate electrical dynamics in excitable tissues and are an important class of drug targets. Channels can gate in sub-millisecond timescales, show complex manifolds of conformational states, and often show state-dependent pharmacology. Mechanistic studies of ion channels typically involve sophisticated voltage-clamp protocols applied through manual or automated electrophysiology. Here, we develop all-optical electrophysiology techniques to study activity-dependent modulation of ion channels, in a format compatible with high-throughput screening. Using optical electrophysiology, we recapitulate many voltage-clamp protocols and apply to Nav1.7, a channel implicated in pain. Optical measurements reveal that a sustained depolarization strongly potentiates the inhibitory effect of PF-04856264, a Nav1.7-specific blocker. In a pilot screen, we stratify a library of 320 FDA-approved compounds by binding mechanism and kinetics, and find close concordance with patch clamp measurements. Optical electrophysiology provides a favorable tradeoff between throughput and information content for studies of NaV channels, and possibly other voltage-gated channels. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15202.001 PMID:27215841

  14. Modulation of a voltage-gated Na+ channel by sevoflurane involves multiple sites and distinct mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Barber, Annika F; Carnevale, Vincenzo; Klein, Michael L; Eckenhoff, Roderic G; Covarrubias, Manuel

    2014-05-06

    Halogenated inhaled general anesthetic agents modulate voltage-gated ion channels, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are not understood. Many general anesthetic agents regulate voltage-gated Na(+) (NaV) channels, including the commonly used drug sevoflurane. Here, we investigated the putative binding sites and molecular mechanisms of sevoflurane action on the bacterial NaV channel NaChBac by using a combination of molecular dynamics simulation, electrophysiology, and kinetic analysis. Structural modeling revealed multiple sevoflurane interaction sites possibly associated with NaChBac modulation. Electrophysiologically, sevoflurane favors activation and inactivation at low concentrations (0.2 mM), and additionally accelerates current decay at high concentrations (2 mM). Explaining these observations, kinetic modeling suggests concurrent destabilization of closed states and low-affinity open channel block. We propose that the multiple effects of sevoflurane on NaChBac result from simultaneous interactions at multiple sites with distinct affinities. This multiple-site, multiple-mode hypothesis offers a framework to study the structural basis of general anesthetic action.

  15. Molecular mapping of general anesthetic sites in a voltage-gated ion channel.

    PubMed

    Barber, Annika F; Liang, Qiansheng; Amaral, Cristiano; Treptow, Werner; Covarrubias, Manuel

    2011-10-05

    Several voltage-gated ion channels are modulated by clinically relevant doses of general anesthetics. However, the structural basis of this modulation is not well understood. Previous work suggested that n-alcohols and inhaled anesthetics stabilize the closed state of the Shaw2 voltage-gated (Kv) channel (K-Shaw2) by directly interacting with a discrete channel site. We hypothesize that the inhibition of K-Shaw2 channels by general anesthetics is governed by interactions between binding and effector sites involving components of the channel's activation gate. To investigate this hypothesis, we applied Ala/Val scanning mutagenesis to the S4-S5 linker and the post-PVP S6 segment, and conducted electrophysiological analysis to evaluate the energetic impact of the mutations on the inhibition of the K-Shaw2 channel by 1-butanol and halothane. These analyses identified residues that determine an apparent binding cooperativity and residue pairs that act in concert to modulate gating upon anesthetic binding. In some instances, due to their critical location, key residues also influence channel gating. Complementing these results, molecular dynamics simulations and in silico docking experiments helped us visualize possible anesthetic sites and interactions. We conclude that the inhibition of K-Shaw2 by general anesthetics results from allosteric interactions between distinct but contiguous binding and effector sites involving inter- and intrasubunit interfaces.

  16. Bidirectional regulation of dendritic voltage-gated potassium channels by the fragile X mental retardation protein.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hye Young; Ge, Woo-Ping; Huang, Wendy; He, Ye; Wang, Gordon X; Rowson-Baldwin, Ashley; Smith, Stephen J; Jan, Yuh Nung; Jan, Lily Yeh

    2011-11-17

    How transmitter receptors modulate neuronal signaling by regulating voltage-gated ion channel expression remains an open question. Here we report dendritic localization of mRNA of Kv4.2 voltage-gated potassium channel, which regulates synaptic plasticity, and its local translational regulation by fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) linked to fragile X syndrome (FXS), the most common heritable mental retardation. FMRP suppression of Kv4.2 is revealed by elevation of Kv4.2 in neurons from fmr1 knockout (KO) mice and in neurons expressing Kv4.2-3'UTR that binds FMRP. Moreover, treating hippocampal slices from fmr1 KO mice with Kv4 channel blocker restores long-term potentiation induced by moderate stimuli. Surprisingly, recovery of Kv4.2 after N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR)-induced degradation also requires FMRP, likely due to NMDAR-induced FMRP dephosphorylation, which turns off FMRP suppression of Kv4.2. Our study of FMRP regulation of Kv4.2 deepens our knowledge of NMDAR signaling and reveals a FMRP target of potential relevance to FXS.

  17. Carvacrol modulates voltage-gated sodium channels kinetics in dorsal root ganglia.

    PubMed

    Joca, Humberto Cavalcante; Vieira, Daiana Cardoso Oliveira; Vasconcelos, Aliny Perreira; Araújo, Demetrius Antônio Machado; Cruz, Jader Santos

    2015-06-05

    Recent studies have shown that many of plant-derived compounds interact with specific ion channels and thereby modulate many sensing mechanisms, such as nociception. The monoterpenoid carvacrol (5-isopropyl-2-methylphenol) has an anti-nociceptive effect related to a reduction in neuronal excitability and voltage-gated Na(+) channels (NaV) inhibition in peripheral neurons. However, the detailed mechanisms of carvacrol-induced inhibition of neuronal NaV remain elusive. This study explores the interaction between carvacrol and NaV in isolated dorsal root ganglia neurons. Carvacrol reduced the total voltage-gated Na(+) current and tetrodotoxin-resistant (TTX-R) Na(+) current component in a concentration-dependent manner. Carvacrol accelerates current inactivation and induced a negative-shift in voltage-dependence of steady-state fast inactivation in total and TTX-R Na(+) current. Furthermore, carvacrol slowed the recovery from inactivation. Carvacrol provoked a leftward shift in both the voltage-dependence of steady-state inactivation and activation of the TTX-R Na(+) current component. In addition, carvacrol-induced inhibition of TTX-R Na(+) current was enhanced by an increase in stimulation frequency and when neurons were pre-conditioned with long depolarization pulse (5s at -50 mV). Taken all results together, we herein demonstrated that carvacrol affects NaV gating properties. The present findings would help to explain the mechanisms underlying the analgesic activity of carvacrol.

  18. Gating motions in voltage-gated potassium channels revealed by coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Treptow, Werner; Marrink, Siewert-J; Tarek, Mounir

    2008-03-20

    Voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels are ubiquitous transmembrane proteins involved in electric signaling of excitable tissues. A fundamental property of these channels is the ability to open or close in response to changes in the membrane potential. To date, their structure-based activation mechanism remains unclear, and there is a large controversy on how these gates function at the molecular level, in particular, how movements of the voltage sensor domain are coupled to channel gating. So far, all mechanisms proposed for this coupling are based on the crystal structure of the open voltage-gated Kv1.2 channel and structural models of the closed form based on electrophysiology experiments. Here, we use coarse-grain (CG) molecular dynamics simulations that allow conformational changes from the open to the closed form of the channel (embedded in its membrane environment) to be followed. Despite the low specificity of the CG force field, the obtained closed structure satisfies several experimental constraints. The overall results suggest a gating mechanism in which a lateral displacement the S4-S5 linker leads to a closing of the gate. Only a small up-down movement of the S4 helices is noticed. Additionally, the study suggests a peculiar upward motion of the intracellular tetramerization domain of the channel, hence providing a molecular view on how this domain may further regulate conduction in Kv channels.

  19. Modulation of a voltage-gated Na+ channel by sevoflurane involves multiple sites and distinct mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Barber, Annika F.; Carnevale, Vincenzo; Klein, Michael L.; Eckenhoff, Roderic G.; Covarrubias, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Halogenated inhaled general anesthetic agents modulate voltage-gated ion channels, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are not understood. Many general anesthetic agents regulate voltage-gated Na+ (NaV) channels, including the commonly used drug sevoflurane. Here, we investigated the putative binding sites and molecular mechanisms of sevoflurane action on the bacterial NaV channel NaChBac by using a combination of molecular dynamics simulation, electrophysiology, and kinetic analysis. Structural modeling revealed multiple sevoflurane interaction sites possibly associated with NaChBac modulation. Electrophysiologically, sevoflurane favors activation and inactivation at low concentrations (0.2 mM), and additionally accelerates current decay at high concentrations (2 mM). Explaining these observations, kinetic modeling suggests concurrent destabilization of closed states and low-affinity open channel block. We propose that the multiple effects of sevoflurane on NaChBac result from simultaneous interactions at multiple sites with distinct affinities. This multiple-site, multiple-mode hypothesis offers a framework to study the structural basis of general anesthetic action. PMID:24753583

  20. Voltage-Gated Proton Channels: Molecular Biology, Physiology, and Pathophysiology of the HV Family

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Voltage-gated proton channels (HV) are unique, in part because the ion they conduct is unique. HV channels are perfectly selective for protons and have a very small unitary conductance, both arguably manifestations of the extremely low H+ concentration in physiological solutions. They open with membrane depolarization, but their voltage dependence is strongly regulated by the pH gradient across the membrane (ΔpH), with the result that in most species they normally conduct only outward current. The HV channel protein is strikingly similar to the voltage-sensing domain (VSD, the first four membrane-spanning segments) of voltage-gated K+ and Na+ channels. In higher species, HV channels exist as dimers in which each protomer has its own conduction pathway, yet gating is cooperative. HV channels are phylogenetically diverse, distributed from humans to unicellular marine life, and perhaps even plants. Correspondingly, HV functions vary widely as well, from promoting calcification in coccolithophores and triggering bioluminescent flashes in dinoflagellates to facilitating killing bacteria, airway pH regulation, basophil histamine release, sperm maturation, and B lymphocyte responses in humans. Recent evidence that hHV1 may exacerbate breast cancer metastasis and cerebral damage from ischemic stroke highlights the rapidly expanding recognition of the clinical importance of hHV1. PMID:23589829

  1. Aging-associated changes in motor axon voltage-gated Na(+) channel function in mice.

    PubMed

    Moldovan, Mihai; Rosberg, Mette Romer; Alvarez, Susana; Klein, Dennis; Martini, Rudolf; Krarup, Christian

    2016-03-01

    Accumulating myelin abnormalities and conduction slowing occur in peripheral nerves during aging. In mice deficient of myelin protein P0, severe peripheral nervous system myelin damage is associated with ectopic expression of Nav1.8 voltage-gated Na(+) channels on motor axons aggravating the functional impairment. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of regular aging on motor axon function with particular emphasis on Nav1.8. We compared tibial nerve conduction and excitability measures by threshold tracking in 12 months (mature) and 20 months (aged) wild-type (WT) mice. With aging, deviations during threshold electrotonus were attenuated and the resting current-threshold slope and early refractoriness were increased. Modeling indicated that, in addition to changes in passive membrane properties, motor fibers in aged WT mice were depolarized. An increased Nav1.8 isoform expression was found by immunohistochemistry. The depolarizing excitability features were absent in Nav1.8 null mice, and they were counteracted in WT mice by a Nav1.8 blocker. Our data suggest that alteration in voltage-gated Na(+) channel isoform expression contributes to changes in motor axon function during aging.

  2. How do taste cells lacking synapses mediate neurotransmission? CALHM1, a voltage-gated ATP channel

    PubMed Central

    Taruno, Akiyuki; Matsumoto, Ichiro; Ma, Zhongming; Marambaud, Philippe; Foskett, J. Kevin

    2014-01-01

    CALHM1 was recently demonstrated to be a voltage-gated ATP-permeable ion channel and to serve as a bona fide conduit for ATP release from sweet-, umami-, and bitter-sensing type II taste cells. Calhm1 is expressed in taste buds exclusively in type II cells and its product has structural and functional similarities with connexins and pannexins, two families of channel protein candidates for ATP release by type II cells. Calhm1 knockout in mice leads to loss of perception of sweet, umami, and bitter compounds and to impaired gustatory nerve responses to these tastants. These new studies validate the concept of ATP as the primary neurotransmitter from type II cells to gustatory neurons. Furthermore, they identify voltage-gated ATP release through CALHM1 as an essential molecular mechanism of ATP release in taste buds. We discuss these new findings, as well as unresolved issues in peripheral taste signaling that we hope will stimulate future research. PMID:24105910

  3. Brivaracetam Differentially Affects Voltage-Gated Sodium Currents Without Impairing Sustained Repetitive Firing in Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Niespodziany, Isabelle; André, Véronique Marie; Leclère, Nathalie; Hanon, Etienne; Ghisdal, Philippe; Wolff, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Aims Brivaracetam (BRV) is an antiepileptic drug in Phase III clinical development. BRV binds to synaptic vesicle 2A (SV2A) protein and is also suggested to inhibit voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs). To evaluate whether the effect of BRV on VGSCs represents a relevant mechanism participating in its antiepileptic properties, we explored the pharmacology of BRV on VGSCs in different cell systems and tested its efficacy at reducing the sustained repetitive firing (SRF). Methods Brivaracetam investigations on the voltage-gated sodium current (INa) were performed in N1E-155 neuroblastoma cells, cultured rat cortical neurons, and adult mouse CA1 neurons. SRF was measured in cultured cortical neurons and in CA1 neurons. All BRV (100–300 μM) experiments were performed in comparison with 100 μM carbamazepine (CBZ). Results Brivaracetam and CBZ reduced INa in N1E-115 cells (30% and 40%, respectively) and primary cortical neurons (21% and 47%, respectively) by modulating the fast-inactivated state of VGSCs. BRV, in contrast to CBZ, did not affect INa in CA1 neurons and SRF in cortical and CA1 neurons. CBZ consistently inhibited neuronal SRF by 75–93%. Conclusions The lack of effect of BRV on SRF in neurons suggests that the reported inhibition of BRV on VGSC currents does not contribute to its antiepileptic properties. PMID:25444522

  4. Subtype-specific block of voltage-gated K(+) channels by μ-conopeptides.

    PubMed

    Leipold, Enrico; Ullrich, Florian; Thiele, Markus; Tietze, Alesia A; Terlau, Heinrich; Imhof, Diana; Heinemann, Stefan H

    2017-01-22

    The neurotoxic cone snail peptide μ-GIIIA specifically blocks skeletal muscle voltage-gated sodium (NaV1.4) channels. The related conopeptides μ-PIIIA and μ-SIIIA, however, exhibit a wider activity spectrum by also inhibiting the neuronal NaV channels NaV1.2 and NaV1.7. Here we demonstrate that those μ-conopeptides with a broader target range also antagonize select subtypes of voltage-gated potassium channels of the KV1 family: μ-PIIIA and μ-SIIIA inhibited KV1.1 and KV1.6 channels in the nanomolar range, while being inactive on subtypes KV1.2-1.5 and KV2.1. Construction and electrophysiological evaluation of chimeras between KV1.5 and KV1.6 revealed that these toxins block KV channels involving their pore regions; the subtype specificity is determined in part by the sequence close to the selectivity filter but predominantly by the so-called turret domain, i.e. the extracellular loop connecting the pore with transmembrane segment S5. Conopeptides μ-SIIIA and μ-PIIIA, thus, are not specific for NaV channels, and the known structure of some KV channel subtypes may provide access to structural insight into the molecular interaction between μ-conopeptides and their target channels.

  5. Voltage-gated potassium channel KCNV2 (Kv8.2) contributes to epilepsy susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Jorge, Benjamin S.; Campbell, Courtney M.; Miller, Alison R.; Rutter, Elizabeth D.; Gurnett, Christina A.; Vanoye, Carlos G.; George, Alfred L.; Kearney, Jennifer A.

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in voltage-gated ion channels are responsible for several types of epilepsy. Genetic epilepsies often exhibit variable severity in individuals with the same mutation, which may be due to variation in genetic modifiers. The Scn2aQ54 transgenic mouse model has a sodium channel mutation and exhibits epilepsy with strain-dependent severity. We previously mapped modifier loci that influence Scn2aQ54 phenotype severity and identified Kcnv2, encoding the voltage-gated potassium channel subunit Kv8.2, as a candidate modifier. In this study, we demonstrate a threefold increase in hippocampal Kcnv2 expression associated with more severe epilepsy. In vivo exacerbation of the phenotype by Kcnv2 transgenes supports its identification as an epilepsy modifier. The contribution of KCNV2 to human epilepsy susceptibility is supported by identification of two nonsynonymous variants in epilepsy patients that alter function of Kv2.1/Kv8.2 heterotetrameric potassium channels. Our results demonstrate that altered potassium subunit function influences epilepsy susceptibility and implicate Kcnv2 as an epilepsy gene. PMID:21402906

  6. Unfolding of a temperature-sensitive domain controls voltage-gated channel activation

    PubMed Central

    Arrigoni, Cristina; Rohaim, Ahmed; Shaya, David; Findeisen, Felix; Stein, Richard A.; Nurva, Shailika Reddy; Mishra, Smriti; Mchaourab, Hassane S.; Minor, Daniel L.

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated ion channels (VGICs) are outfitted with diverse cytoplasmic domains that impact function. To examine how such elements may affect VGIC behavior, we addressed how the bacterial voltage-gated sodium channel (BacNaV) C-terminal cytoplasmic domain (CTD) affects function. Our studies show that the BacNaV CTD exerts a profound influence on gating through a temperature-dependent unfolding transition in a discrete cytoplasmic domain, the neck domain, proximal to the pore. Structural and functional studies establish that the BacNaV CTD comprises a bi-partite four-helix bundle that bears an unusual hydrophilic core whose integrity is central to the unfolding mechanism and that couples directly to the channel activation gate. Together, our findings define a general principle for how the widespread four-helix bundle cytoplasmic domain architecture can control VGIC responses, uncover a mechanism underlying the diverse BacNaV voltage dependencies, and demonstrate that a discrete domain can encode the temperature dependent response of a channel. PMID:26919429

  7. Cloning and molecular characterization of a putative voltage-gated sodium channel gene in the crayfish.

    PubMed

    Coskun, Cagil; Purali, Nuhan

    2016-06-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channel genes and associated proteins have been cloned and studied in many mammalian and invertebrate species. However, there is no data available about the sodium channel gene(s) in the crayfish, although the animal has frequently been used as a model to investigate various aspects of neural cellular and circuit function. In the present work, by using RNA extracts from crayfish abdominal ganglia samples, the complete open reading frame of a putative sodium channel gene has firstly been cloned and molecular properties of the associated peptide have been analyzed. The open reading frame of the gene has a length of 5793 bp that encodes for the synthesis of a peptide, with 1930 amino acids, that is 82% similar to the α-peptide of a sodium channel in a neighboring species, Cancer borealis. The transmembrane topology analysis of the crayfish peptide indicated a pattern of four folding domains with several transmembrane segments, as observed in other known voltage-gated sodium channels. Upon analysis of the obtained sequence, functional regions of the putative sodium channel responsible for the selectivity filter, inactivation gate, voltage sensor, and phosphorylation have been predicted. The expression level of the putative sodium channel gene, as defined by a qPCR method, was measured and found to be the highest in nervous tissue.

  8. PERCHLOROETHYLENE (PERC) INHIBITS FUNCTION OF VOLTAGE-GATED CALCIUM CHANNELS IN PHEOCHROMOCYTOMA CELLS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The industrial solvent perchloroethylene (PERC) is listed as a hazardous air pollutant in the 1990 Ammendments to Clean Air Act and is a known neurotoxicant. However, the mechanisms by which PERC alters nervous system function are poorly understood. In recent years, it has been d...

  9. Inhibition of voltage-gated calcium channels by sequestration of beta subunits.

    PubMed

    Cuchillo-Ibañez, Inmaculada; Aldea, Marcos; Brocard, Jacques; Albillos, Almudena; Weiss, Norbert; Garcia, Antonio G; De Waard, Michel

    2003-11-28

    The auxiliary Ca(v)beta subunit is essential for functional expression of high-voltage activated Ca(2+) channels. Here, we describe a lure sequence designed to sequester the Ca(v)beta subunits in transfected bovine chromaffin cells. This sequence is composed of the extracellular and transmembrane domains of the alpha chain of the human CD8, the I-II loop of Ca(v)2.1 subunit, and EGFP. We showed that expressing the CD8-I-II-EGFP sequence in chromaffin cells led to a >50% decrease in overall Ca(2+) current density. Although this decrease involved all the Ca(2+) channel types (L, N, P/Q, R), the proportion of each type supporting the remaining current was altered. A similar effect was observed after transfection when measuring the functional role of Ca(2+) channels in catecholamine release by chromaffin cells: global decrease of release and change of balance between the different channel types supporting it. Possible explanations for this apparent discrepancy are further discussed.

  10. Large conductance, calcium- and voltage-gated potassium (BK) channels: regulation by cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    Dopico, Alejandro M.; Bukiya, Anna N.; Singh, Aditya K.

    2012-01-01

    Cholesterol (CLR) is an essential component of eukaryotic plasma membranes. CLR regulates the membrane physical state, microdomain formation and the activity of membrane-spanning proteins, including ion channels. Large conductance, voltage- and Ca2+-gated K+ (BK) channels link membrane potential to cell Ca2+ homeostasis. Thus, they control many physiological processes and participate in pathophysiological mechanisms leading to human disease. Because plasmalemma BK channels cluster in CLR-rich membrane microdomains, a major driving force for studying BK channel-CLR interactions is determining how membrane CLR controls the BK current phenotype, including its pharmacology, channel sorting, distribution, and role in cell physiology. Since both BK channels and CLR tissue levels play a pathophysiological role in human disease, identifying functional and structural aspects of the CLR-BK channel interaction may open new avenues for therapeutic intervention. Here, we review the studies documenting membrane CLR-BK channel interactions, dissecting out the many factors that determine the final BK current response to changes in membrane CLR content. We also summarize work in reductionist systems where recombinant BK protein is studied in artificial lipid bilayers, which documents a direct inhibition of BK channel activity by CLR and builds a strong case for a direct interaction between CLR and the BK channel-forming protein. Bilayer lipid-mediated mechanisms in CLR action are also discussed. Finally, we review studies of BK channel function during hypercholesterolemia, and underscore the many consequences that the CLR-BK channel interaction brings to cell physiology and human disease. PMID:22584144

  11. Spontaneous and CRH-Induced Excitability and Calcium Signaling in Mice Corticotrophs Involves Sodium, Calcium, and Cation-Conducting Channels.

    PubMed

    Zemkova, Hana; Tomić, Melanija; Kucka, Marek; Aguilera, Greti; Stojilkovic, Stanko S

    2016-04-01

    Transgenic mice expressing the tdimer2(12) form of Discosoma red fluorescent protein under control of the proopiomelanocortin gene's regulatory elements are a useful model for studying corticotrophs. Using these mice, we studied the ion channels and mechanisms controlling corticotroph excitability. Corticotrophs were either quiescent or electrically active, with a 22-mV difference in the resting membrane potential (RMP) between the 2 groups. In quiescent cells, CRH depolarized the membrane, leading to initial single spiking and sustained bursting; in active cells, CRH further facilitated or inhibited electrical activity and calcium spiking, depending on the initial activity pattern and CRH concentration. The stimulatory but not inhibitory action of CRH on electrical activity was mimicked by cAMP independently of the presence or absence of arachidonic acid. Removal of bath sodium silenced spiking and hyperpolarized the majority of cells; in contrast, the removal of bath calcium did not affect RMP but reduced CRH-induced depolarization, which abolished bursting electrical activity and decreased the spiking frequency but not the amplitude of single spikes. Corticotrophs with inhibited voltage-gated sodium channels fired calcium-dependent action potentials, whereas cells with inhibited L-type calcium channels fired sodium-dependent spikes; blockade of both channels abolished spiking without affecting the RMP. These results indicate that the background voltage-insensitive sodium conductance influences RMP, the CRH-depolarization current is driven by a cationic conductance, and the interplay between voltage-gated sodium and calcium channels plays a critical role in determining the status and pattern of electrical activity and calcium signaling.

  12. p75 and TrkA signaling regulate sympathetic neuronal firing patterns via differential modulation of voltage-gated currents

    PubMed Central

    Luther, Jason A.; Birren, Susan J.

    2012-01-01

    Neurotrophins such as nerve growth factor (NGF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) act through the tropomyosin-related receptor tyrosine kinases (Trk) and the pan-neurotrophin receptor (p75) to regulate complex developmental and functional properties of neurons. While NGF activates both receptor types in sympathetic neurons, differential signaling through TrkA and p75 can result in widely divergent functional outputs for neuronal survival, growth, and synaptic function. Here we show that TrkA and p75 signaling have opposing effects on the firing properties of sympathetic neurons, and define a mechanism whereby the relative level of signaling through these two receptors sets firing patterns via coordinate regulation of a set of ionic currents. We show that signaling through the p75 pathway causes sympathetic neurons to fire in a phasic pattern showing marked accommodation. Signaling through the NGF-specific TrkA on the other hand causes cells to fire tonically. Neurons switch rapidly between firing patterns, on the order of minutes to hours. We show that changes in firing patterns are caused by neurotrophin-dependent regulation of at least four voltage-gated currents; the sodium current and the M-type, delayed rectifier and calcium-dependent potassium currents. Neurotrophin release, and thus receptor activation, varies among somatic tissues and physiological state. Thus, these data suggest that target-derived neurotrophins may be an important determinant of the characteristic electrical properties of sympathetic neurons and therefore regulate the functional output of the sympathetic nervous system. PMID:19403809

  13. Nuclear life of the voltage-gated Cacnb4 subunit and its role in gene transcription regulation.

    PubMed

    Ronjat, Michel; Kiyonaka, Shigeki; Barbado, Maud; De Waard, Michel; Mori, Yasuo

    2013-01-01

    The pore-forming subunit of voltage-gated calcium channels is associated to auxiliary subunits among which the cytoplasmic β subunit. The different isoforms of this subunit control both the plasma membrane targeting and the biophysical properties of the channel moiety. In a recent study, we demonstrated that the Cacnb4 (β 4) isoform is at the center of a new signaling pathway that connects neuronal excitability and gene transcription. This mechanism relies on nuclear targeting of β 4 triggered by neuronal electrical stimulation. This re-localization of β 4 is promoted by its interaction with Ppp2r5d a regulatory subunit of PP2A in complex with PP2A itself. The formation, as well as the nuclear translocation, of the β 4/ Ppp2r5d/ PP2A complex is totally impaired by the premature R482X stops mutation of β 4 that has been previously associated with juvenile epilepsy. Taking as a case study the tyrosine hydroxylase gene that is strongly upregulated in brain of lethargic mice, deficient for β 4 expression, we deciphered the molecular steps presiding to this signaling pathway. Here we show that expression of wild-type β 4 in HEK293 cells results in the regulation of several genes, while expression of the mutated β 4 (β 1-481) produces a different set of gene regulation. Several genes regulated by β 4 in HEK293 cells were also regulated upon neuronal differentiation of NG108-15 cells that induces nuclear translocation of β 4 suggesting a link between β 4 nuclear targeting and gene regulation.

  14. Hlf is a genetic modifier of epilepsy caused by voltage-gated sodium channel mutations.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Nicole A; Kearney, Jennifer A

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in voltage-gated sodium channel genes cause several types of human epilepsies. Often, individuals with the same sodium channel mutation exhibit diverse phenotypes. This suggests that factors beyond the primary mutation influence disease severity, including genetic modifiers. Mouse epilepsy models with voltage-gated sodium channel mutations exhibit strain-dependent phenotype variability, supporting a contribution of genetic modifiers in epilepsy. The Scn2a(Q54) (Q54) mouse model has a strain-dependent epilepsy phenotype. Q54 mice on the C57BL/6J (B6) strain exhibit delayed seizure onset and improved survival compared to [B6xSJL/J]F1.Q54 mice. We previously mapped two dominant modifier loci that influence Q54 seizure susceptibility and identified Hlf (hepatic leukemia factor) as a candidate modifier gene at one locus. Hlf and other PAR bZIP transcription factors had previously been associated with spontaneous seizures in mice thought to be caused by down-regulation of the pyridoxine pathway. An Hlf targeted knockout mouse model was used to evaluate the effect of Hlf deletion on Q54 phenotype severity. Hlf(KO/KO);Q54 double mutant mice exhibited elevated frequency and reduced survival compared to Q54 controls. To determine if direct modulation of the pyridoxine pathway could alter the Q54 phenotype, mice were maintained on a pyridoxine-deficient diet for 6 weeks. Dietary pyridoxine deficiency resulted in elevated seizure frequency and decreased survival in Q54 mice compared to control diet. To determine if Hlf could modify other epilepsies, Hlf(KO/+) mice were crossed with the Scn1a(KO/+) Dravet syndrome mouse model to examine the effect on premature lethality. Hlf(KO/+);Scn1a(KO/+) offspring exhibited decreased survival compared to Scn1a(KO/+) controls. Together these results demonstrate that Hlf is a genetic modifier of epilepsy caused by voltage-gated sodium channel mutations and that modulation of the pyridoxine pathway can also influence phenotype

  15. Non-voltage-gated Ca2+ influx through mechanosensitive ion channels in aortic baroreceptor neurons.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, M J; Sharma, R V; Wachtel, R E; Chapleau, M W; Waite, L J; Bhalla, R C; Abboud, F M

    1997-06-01

    The mechanisms underlying mechanotransduction in baroreceptor neurons (BRNs) are undefined. In this study, we specifically identified aortic baroreceptor neurons in primary neuronal cell cultures from nodose ganglia of rats. Aortic baroreceptor neurons were identified by labeling their soma with the fluorescent dye 1,1'-dioleyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethylin-docarbocyanine (DiI) applied to the aortic arch. Using Ca2+ imaging with fura 2, we examined these BRNs for evidence of Ca2+ influx and determined its mechanosensitivity and voltage dependence. Mechanical stimuli were produced by ejecting buffer from a micropipette onto the cell surface with a pneumatic picopump, producing a shift in the center of mass of the cell that was related to intensity of stimulation. Ninety-three percent of DiI-labeled neurons responded to mechanical stimulation with an increase in [Ca2+]i. The magnitude of the increases in [Ca2+]i was directly related to the intensity of the stimulus and required the presence of external Ca2+. The trivalent cations Gd3+ or La3+ in equimolar concentrations (20 mumol/L) eliminated the K(+)-induced rises in [Ca2+]i, demonstrating that both trivalent cations are equally effective at blocking voltage-gated Ca2+ channels in these baroreceptor neurons. In contrast, the mechanically induced increases in [Ca2+]i were blocked by Gd3+ (20 mumol/L) only and not by La3+ (20 mumol/L). Stretch-activated channels (SACs) have been shown in other preparations to be blocked by Gd3+ specifically. Our data demonstrate that (1) BRNs, specifically identified as projecting to the aortic arch, have ion channels that are sensitive to mechanical stimuli; (2) mechanically induced Ca2+ influx in these cells is mediated by a Gd(3+)-sensitive ion channel and not by voltage-gated Ca2+ channels; (3) the magnitude of the Ca2+ influx is dependent on the intensity of the stimulus and the degree and duration of deformation; and (4) repeated stimuli of the same intensity result in comparable

  16. 3,4-Diaminopyridine masks the inhibition of noradrenaline release from chick sympathetic neurons via presynaptic alpha 2-adrenoceptors: insights into the role of N- and L-type calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Dolezal, V; Huang, H Y; Schobert, A; Hertting, G

    1996-05-20

    We have investigated the participation of the N-type (omega-conotoxin GVIA-sensitive) and L-type (nifedipine-sensitive) calcium channels in the alpha 2-adrenoceptor mediated autoinhibition of the release of [3H]noradrenaline from chick sympathetic neurons in culture. Blockade of 3,4-diaminopyridine-sensitive potassium channels resulted in tetrodotoxin-sensitive and calcium-dependent increase of the release of [3H]noradrenaline evoked by electrical stimulation. Nifedipine attenuated the evoked release under control conditions by 20%, but in the presence of 3,4-diaminopyridine by 51%, while omega-conotoxin decreased the release under control conditions by 87% and in the presence of 3,4-diaminopyridine by only 43%. The L-type calcium channel activator Bay k 8644 increased the evoked release of the transmitter both in the absence and in the presence of 3,4-diaminopyridine. Under control conditions, the alpha 2-adrenoceptor agonist UK 14304 decreased the evoked release by 57% and the alpha 2-adrenoceptor antagonist rauwolscine increased it by 14%. Nifedipine did not prevent this modulation. In the presence of 3,4-diaminopyridine, UK 14304 lost its effect on the release of noradrenaline, but its inhibitory action was restored when nifedipine, but not omega-conotoxin, was added. Changes in the increase of intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) evoked by electrical stimulation, measured in the cell processes by microfluorimetry, paralleled the changes in the release of [3H]noradrenaline. Under control conditions, nifedipine attenuated the rise of intracellular calcium by only 16%, while omega-conotoxin did so by 66%. 3,4-Diaminopyridine enhanced the evoked rise of [Ca2+]i; in its presence the rise of intracellular calcium was about equally reduced by nifedipine and omega-conotoxin (by 46 and 36%, respectively). These effects were additive. UK 14304 diminished the peak concentration of [Ca2+]i elicited by the standard electrical stimulation by 31% and rauwolscine

  17. Activation of CRH receptor type 1 expressed on glutamatergic neurons increases excitability of CA1 pyramidal neurons by the modulation of voltage-gated ion channels.

    PubMed

    Kratzer, Stephan; Mattusch, Corinna; Metzger, Michael W; Dedic, Nina; Noll-Hussong, Michael; Kafitz, Karl W; Eder, Matthias; Deussing, Jan M; Holsboer, Florian; Kochs, Eberhard; Rammes, Gerhard

    2013-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) plays an important role in a substantial number of patients with stress-related mental disorders, such as anxiety disorders and depression. CRH has been shown to increase neuronal excitability in the hippocampus, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. The effects of CRH on neuronal excitability were investigated in acute hippocampal brain slices. Population spikes (PS) and field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSP) were evoked by stimulating Schaffer-collaterals and recorded simultaneously from the somatic and dendritic region of CA1 pyramidal neurons. CRH was found to increase PS amplitudes (mean ± Standard error of the mean; 231.8 ± 31.2% of control; n = 10) while neither affecting fEPSPs (104.3 ± 4.2%; n = 10) nor long-term potentiation (LTP). However, when Schaffer-collaterals were excited via action potentials (APs) generated by stimulation of CA3 pyramidal neurons, CRH increased fEPSP amplitudes (119.8 ± 3.6%; n = 8) and the magnitude of LTP in the CA1 region. Experiments in slices from transgenic mice revealed that the effect on PS amplitude is mediated exclusively by CRH receptor 1 (CRHR1) expressed on glutamatergic neurons. The effects of CRH on PS were dependent on phosphatase-2B, L- and T-type calcium channels and voltage-gated potassium channels but independent on intracellular Ca(2+)-elevation. In patch-clamp experiments, CRH increased the frequency and decay times of APs and decreased currents through A-type and delayed-rectifier potassium channels. These results suggest that CRH does not affect synaptic transmission per se, but modulates voltage-gated ion currents important for the generation of APs and hence elevates by this route overall neuronal activity.

  18. Activation of CRH receptor type 1 expressed on glutamatergic neurons increases excitability of CA1 pyramidal neurons by the modulation of voltage-gated ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Kratzer, Stephan; Mattusch, Corinna; Metzger, Michael W.; Dedic, Nina; Noll-Hussong, Michael; Kafitz, Karl W.; Eder, Matthias; Deussing, Jan M.; Holsboer, Florian; Kochs, Eberhard; Rammes, Gerhard

    2013-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) plays an important role in a substantial number of patients with stress-related mental disorders, such as anxiety disorders and depression. CRH has been shown to increase neuronal excitability in the hippocampus, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. The effects of CRH on neuronal excitability were investigated in acute hippocampal brain slices. Population spikes (PS) and field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSP) were evoked by stimulating Schaffer-collaterals and recorded simultaneously from the somatic and dendritic region of CA1 pyramidal neurons. CRH was found to increase PS amplitudes (mean ± Standard error of the mean; 231.8 ± 31.2% of control; n = 10) while neither affecting fEPSPs (104.3 ± 4.2%; n = 10) nor long-term potentiation (LTP). However, when Schaffer-collaterals were excited via action potentials (APs) generated by stimulation of CA3 pyramidal neurons, CRH increased fEPSP amplitudes (119.8 ± 3.6%; n = 8) and the magnitude of LTP in the CA1 region. Experiments in slices from transgenic mice revealed that the effect on PS amplitude is mediated exclusively by CRH receptor 1 (CRHR1) expressed on glutamatergic neurons. The effects of CRH on PS were dependent on phosphatase-2B, L- and T-type calcium channels and voltage-gated potassium channels but independent on intracellular Ca2+-elevation. In patch-clamp experiments, CRH increased the frequency and decay times of APs and decreased currents through A-type and delayed-rectifier potassium channels. These results suggest that CRH does not affect synaptic transmission per se, but modulates voltage-gated ion currents important for the generation of APs and hence elevates by this route overall neuronal activity. PMID:23882180

  19. SCN9A mutations define primary erythermalgia as a neuropathic disorder of voltage gated sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Drenth, Joost P H; te Morsche, Rene H M; Guillet, Gerard; Taieb, Alain; Kirby, R Lee; Jansen, Jan B M J

    2005-06-01

    Primary erythermalgia is a rare disorder characterized by recurrent attacks of red, warm and painful hands, and/or feet. We previously localized the gene for primary erythermalgia to a 7.94 cM region on chromosome 2q. Recently, Yang et al identified two missense mutations of the sodium channel alpha subunit SCN9A in patients with erythermalgia. The presence of voltage-gated sodium channels in sensory neurons is thought to play a crucial role in several chronic painful neuropathies. We examined four different families and two sporadic cases and detected missense sequence variants in SCN9A to be present in primary erythermalgia patients. A total of five of six mutations were located in highly conserved regions. One family with autosomal dominantly inherited erythermalgia was double heterozygous for two separate SCN9A mutations. These data establish primary erythermalgia as a neuropathic disorder and offers hope for treatment of this incapacitating painful disorder.

  20. Differential distribution of voltage-gated ion channels in cortical neurons: implications for epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Child, Nicholas D; Benarroch, Eduardo E

    2014-03-18

    Neurons contain different functional somatodendritic and axonal domains, each with a characteristic distribution of voltage-gated ion channels, synaptic inputs, and function. The dendritic tree of a cortical pyramidal neuron has 2 distinct domains, the basal and the apical dendrites, both containing dendritic spines; the different domains of the axon are the axonal initial segment (AIS), axon proper (which in myelinated axons includes the node of Ranvier, paranodes, juxtaparanodes, and internodes), and the axon terminals. In the cerebral cortex, the dendritic spines of the pyramidal neurons receive most of the excitatory synapses; distinct populations of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic interneurons target specific cellular domains and thus exert different influences on pyramidal neurons. The multiple synaptic inputs reaching the somatodendritic region and generating excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) and inhibitory postsynaptic potentials (IPSPs) sum and elicit changes in membrane potential at the AIS, the site of initiation of the action potential.

  1. Evolution of voltage-gated ion channels at the emergence of Metazoa.

    PubMed

    Moran, Yehu; Barzilai, Maya Gur; Liebeskind, Benjamin J; Zakon, Harold H

    2015-02-15

    Voltage-gated ion channels are large transmembrane proteins that enable the passage of ions through their pore across the cell membrane. These channels belong to one superfamily and carry pivotal roles such as the propagation of neuronal and muscular action potentials and the promotion of neurotransmitter secretion in synapses. In this review, we describe in detail the current state of knowledge regarding the evolution of these channels with a special emphasis on the metazoan lineage. We highlight the contribution of the genomic revolution to the understanding of ion channel evolution and for revealing that these channels appeared long before the appearance of the first animal. We also explain how the elucidation of channel selectivity properties and function in non-bilaterian animals such as cnidarians (sea anemones, corals, jellyfish and hydroids) can contribute to the study of channel evolution. Finally, we point to open questions and future directions in this field of research.

  2. Mechanistic Insights into the Modulation of Voltage-Gated Ion Channels by Inhalational Anesthetics.

    PubMed

    Covarrubias, Manuel; Barber, Annika F; Carnevale, Vincenzo; Treptow, Werner; Eckenhoff, Roderic G

    2015-11-17

    General anesthesia is a relatively safe medical procedure, which for nearly 170 years has allowed life saving surgical interventions in animals and people. However, the molecular mechanism of general anesthesia continues to be a matter of importance and debate. A favored hypothesis proposes that general anesthesia results from direct multisite interactions with multiple and diverse ion channels in the brain. Neurotransmitter-gated ion channels and two-pore K+ channels are key players in the mechanism of anesthesia; however, new studies have also implicated voltage-gated ion channels. Recent biophysical and structural studies of Na+ and K+ channels strongly suggest that halogenated inhalational general anesthetics interact with gates and pore regions of these ion channels to modulate function. Here, we review these studies and provide a perspective to stimulate further advances.

  3. Mechanistic Insights into the Modulation of Voltage-Gated Ion Channels by Inhalational Anesthetics

    PubMed Central

    Covarrubias, Manuel; Barber, Annika F.; Carnevale, Vincenzo; Treptow, Werner; Eckenhoff, Roderic G.

    2015-01-01

    General anesthesia is a relatively safe medical procedure, which for nearly 170 years has allowed life saving surgical interventions in animals and people. However, the molecular mechanism of general anesthesia continues to be a matter of importance and debate. A favored hypothesis proposes that general anesthesia results from direct multisite interactions with multiple and diverse ion channels in the brain. Neurotransmitter-gated ion channels and two-pore K+ channels are key players in the mechanism of anesthesia; however, new studies have also implicated voltage-gated ion channels. Recent biophysical and structural studies of Na+ and K+ channels strongly suggest that halogenated inhalational general anesthetics interact with gates and pore regions of these ion channels to modulate function. Here, we review these studies and provide a perspective to stimulate further advances. PMID:26588560

  4. Regulation of KCNQ/Kv7 family voltage-gated K(+) channels by lipids.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Keenan C; Sanders, Charles R

    2017-04-01

    Many years of studies have established that lipids can impact membrane protein structure and function through bulk membrane effects, by direct but transient annular interactions with the bilayer-exposed surface of protein transmembrane domains, and by specific binding to protein sites. Here, we focus on how phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) impact ion channel function and how the structural details of the interactions of these lipids with ion channels are beginning to emerge. We focus on the Kv7 (KCNQ) subfamily of voltage-gated K(+) channels, which are regulated by both PIP2 and PUFAs and play a variety of important roles in human health and disease. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Lipid order/lipid defects and lipid-control of protein activity edited by Dirk Schneider.

  5. Artificial phosphorylation sites modulate the activity of a voltage-gated potassium channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariyaratne, Amila; Zocchi, Giovanni

    2015-03-01

    The KvAP potassium channel is representative of a family of voltage-gated ion channels where the membrane potential is sensed by a transmembrane helix containing several positively charged arginines. Previous work by Wang and Zocchi [A. Wang and G. Zocchi, PLoS ONE 6, e18598 (2011), 10.1371/journal.pone.0018598] showed how a negatively charged polyelectrolyte attached in proximity to the voltage sensing element can bias the opening probability of the channel. Here we introduce three phosphorylation sites at the same location and show that the response curve of the channel shifts by about 20 mV upon phosphorylation, while other characteristics such as the single-channel conductance are unaffected. In summary, we construct an artificial phosphorylation site which confers allosteric regulation to the channel.

  6. Investigating the structural bases of voltage-gating model channels by using perfectly aligned multilayer samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Huey W.

    1988-09-01

    One dimensional quasi crystals of perfect multilayers, in which ion channels are uniformly oriented within parallel membranes, can be used to study the structural base of channel conductivities. We have developed 1) the techniques for preparing such multilayer samples and 2) the spectroscopic methods (circular dichroism and x-ray diffraction) for extracting structural information from these samples. The sample variables include electric field, water content, ion concentrations, etc. We have observed conformation changes of alamethicin with water content, a result in favor of the barrel model (rather than the flip-flop model) for the channel. Our goal is to probe the conformation changes of the channels as we vary the sample variables, in order to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of voltage gating.

  7. Modeling of the Binding of Peptide Blockers to Voltage-Gated Potassium Channels: Approaches and Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Novoseletsky, V. N.; Volyntseva, A. D.; Shaitan, K. V.; Kirpichnikov, M. P.; Feofanov, A. V.

    2016-01-01

    Modeling of the structure of voltage-gated potassium (KV) channels bound to peptide blockers aims to identify the key amino acid residues dictating affinity and provide insights into the toxin-channel interface. Computational approaches open up possibilities for in silico rational design of selective blockers, new molecular tools to study the cellular distribution and functional roles of potassium channels. It is anticipated that optimized blockers will advance the development of drugs that reduce over activation of potassium channels and attenuate the associated malfunction. Starting with an overview of the recent advances in computational simulation strategies to predict the bound state orientations of peptide pore blockers relative to KV-channels, we go on to review algorithms for the analysis of intermolecular interactions, and then take a look at the results of their application. PMID:27437138

  8. Chronic haloperidol increases voltage-gated Na+ currents in mouse cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weiqiang; Zhu, Fangfang; Guo, Jingfang; Sheng, Jiangtao; Li, Wenli; Zhao, Xiangfeng; Wang, Gefei; Li, Kangsheng

    2014-07-18

    Typical antipsychotics are characterized by extrapyramidal syndrome (EPS). Previous studies demonstrated that typical antipsychotics could inhibit neuronal voltage-gated sodium channel (VGSC). However, EPS typically emerge only upon prolonged exposure. As a result, we examined effects of haloperidol, a prototype typical antipsychotic, on neuronal VGSC upon incubation for varying duration. Briefly, VGSC currents were activated and recorded using a whole-cell patch-clamp technique in primary culture of mouse cortical neurons. VGSC activity was inhibited by acute haloperidol exposure (for minutes), but enhanced in a time- and concentration-dependent manner by chronic haloperidol exposure (for hours). The effects of chronic haloperidol were associated with increased expression of VGSC subunits as well as corresponding electrophysiological channel properties. In summary, we found enhanced VGSC currents upon chronic haloperidol exposure in cortical neurons in contrast to inhibition by acute haloperidol exposure. Such a results may contribute to EPS of typical antipsychotics.

  9. The voltage-gated proton channel: a riddle, wrapped in a mystery, inside an enigma

    PubMed Central

    DeCoursey, Thomas E.

    2016-01-01

    The main properties of voltage gated proton channels are described, along with what is known about how the channel protein structure accomplishes these functions. Just as protons are unique among ions, proton channels are unique among ion channels. Their four transmembrane helices sense voltage, the pH gradient, and conduct protons exclusively. Selectivity is achieved by the unique ability of H3O+ to protonate an Asp-Arg salt bridge. Pathognomonic sensitivity of gating to the pH gradient ensures channel opening only when acid extrusion will result, which is crucial to most biological functions. An exception occurs in dinoflagellates in which H+ influx through HV1 triggers the bioluminescent flash. Pharmacological interventions that promise to ameliorate cancer, asthma, brain damage in ischemic stroke, Alzheimer’s disease, autoimmune diseases, and numerous other conditions, await future progress. PMID:25964989

  10. Venom Peptides From Cone Snails: Pharmacological Probes for Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels.

    PubMed

    Green, B R; Olivera, B M

    2016-01-01

    The venoms of cone snails provide a rich source of neuroactive peptides (conotoxins). Several venom peptide families have been identified that are either agonists (ι- and δ-conotoxins) or antagonists (μ- and μO-conotoxins) of voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs). Members of these conotoxin classes have been integral in identifying and characterizing specific neurotoxin binding sites on the channel. Furthermore, given the specificity of some of these peptides for one sodium channel subtype over another, conotoxins have also proven useful in exploring differences between VGSC subtypes. This chapter summarizes the current knowledge of the structure and function based on the results of conotoxin interactions with VGSCs and correlates the peptides with the phylogeny of the Conus species from which they were derived.

  11. Analysis and functional implications of phosphorylation of neuronal voltage-gated potassium channels

    PubMed Central

    Cerda, Oscar; Trimmer, James S.

    2012-01-01

    Phosphorylation is the most common and abundant posttranslational modification to eukaryotic proteins, regulating a plethora of dynamic cellular processes. Here, we review and discuss recent advances in our knowledge of the breadth and importance of reversible phosphorylation in regulating the expression, localization and function of mammalian neuronal voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels, key regulators of neuronal function. We highlight the role of modern mass spectrometric techniques and phosphospecific antibodies that reveal the extent and nature of phosphorylation at specific sites in Kv channels. We also emphasize the role of reversible phosphorylation in dynamically regulating diverse aspects of Kv channel biology. Finally, we discuss as important future directions the determination of the mechanistic basis for how altering phosphorylation state affects Kv channel expression, localization and function, the nature of macromolecular signaling complexes containing Kv channels and enzymes regulating their phosphorylation state, and the specific role of Kv channel phosphorylation in regulating neuronal function during physiological and pathophysiological events. PMID:20600597

  12. Voltage-gated sodium channels: pharmaceutical targets via anticonvulsants to treat epileptic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Abdelsayed, Mena; Sokolov, Stanislav

    2013-01-01

    Epilepsy is a brain disorder characterized by seizures and convulsions. The basis of epilepsy is an increase in neuronal excitability that, in some cases, may be caused by functional defects in neuronal voltage gated sodium channels, Nav1.1 and Nav1.2. The effects of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) as effective therapies for epilepsy have been characterized by extensive research. Most of the classic AEDs targeting Nav share a common mechanism of action by stabilizing the channel's fast-inactivated state. In contrast, novel AEDs, such as lacosamide, stabilize the slow-inactivated state in neuronal Nav1.1 and Nav1.7 isoforms. This paper reviews the different mechanisms by which this stabilization occurs to determine new methods for treatment.

  13. Conotoxins That Could Provide Analgesia through Voltage Gated Sodium Channel Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Munasinghe, Nehan R.; Christie, MacDonald J.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic pain creates a large socio-economic burden around the world. It is physically and mentally debilitating, and many sufferers are unresponsive to current therapeutics. Many drugs that provide pain relief have adverse side effects and addiction liabilities. Therefore, a great need has risen for alternative treatment strategies. One rich source of potential analgesic compounds that has emerged over the past few decades are conotoxins. These toxins are extremely diverse and display selective activity at ion channels. Voltage gated sodium (NaV) channels are one such group of ion channels that play a significant role in multiple pain pathways. This review will explore the literature around conotoxins that bind NaV channels and determine their analgesic potential. PMID:26690478

  14. Voltage-gated pinning in a magnetic domain-wall conduit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franken, J. H.; Yin, Y.; Schellekens, A. J.; van den Brink, A.; Swagten, H. J. M.; Koopmans, B.

    2013-09-01

    In spintronic devices relying on magnetic domain-wall (DW) motion, robust control over the DW position is required. We use electric-field control of perpendicular magnetic anisotropy to create a voltage-gated pinning site in a microstructured Pt/Co/AlOx DW conduit. A DW pins at the edge of a gate electrode, and the strength of pinning can be tuned linearly and reversibly with an efficiency of 0.22(1) mT/V. This result is supported by a micromagnetic model, taking full account of the anisotropy step at the gate edge, which is directly caused by a change in the electron density due to the choice of material.

  15. Two-pore channels (TPCs): Novel voltage-gated ion channels with pleiotropic functions.

    PubMed

    Feijóo-Bandín, Sandra; García-Vence, María; García-Rúa, Vanessa; Roselló-Lletí, Esther; Portolés, Manuel; Rivera, Miguel; González-Juanatey, José Ramón; Lago, Francisca

    2017-01-02

    Two-pore channels (TPC1-3) comprise a subfamily of the eukaryotic voltage-gated ion channels (VGICs) superfamily that are mainly expressed in acidic stores in plants and animals. TPCS are widespread across the animal kingdom, with primates, mice and rats lacking TPC3, and mainly act as Ca(+) and Na(+) channels, although it was also suggested that they could be permeable to other ions. Nowadays, TPCs have been related to the development of different diseases, including Parkinson´s disease, obesity or myocardial ischemia. Due to this, their study has raised the interest of the scientific community to try to understand their mechanism of action in order to be able to develop an efficient drug that could regulate TPCs activity. In this review, we will provide an updated view regarding TPCs structure, function and activation, as well as their role in different pathophysiological processes.

  16. Axons provide the secretory machinery for trafficking of voltage-gated sodium channels in peripheral nerve

    PubMed Central

    González, Carolina; Cánovas, José; Fresno, Javiera; Couve, Eduardo; Court, Felipe A.; Couve, Andrés

    2016-01-01

    The regulation of the axonal proteome is key to generate and maintain neural function. Fast and slow axoplasmic waves have been known for decades, but alternative mechanisms to control the abundance of axonal proteins based on local synthesis have also been identified. The presence of the endoplasmic reticulum has been documented in peripheral axons, but it is still unknown whether this localized organelle participates in the delivery of axonal membrane proteins. Voltage-gated sodium channels are responsible for action potentials and are mostly concentrated in the axon initial segment and nodes of Ranvier. Despite their fundamental role, little is known about the intracellular trafficking mechanisms that govern their availability in mature axons. Here we describe the secretory machinery in axons and its contribution to plasma membrane delivery of sodium channels. The distribution of axonal secretory components was evaluated in axons of the sciatic nerve and in spinal nerve axons after in vivo electroporation. Intracellular protein trafficking was pharmacologically blocked in vivo and in vitro. Axonal voltage-gated sodium channel mRNA and local trafficking were examined by RT-PCR and a retention-release methodology. We demonstrate that mature axons contain components of the endoplasmic reticulum and other biosynthetic organelles. Axonal organelles and sodium channel localization are sensitive to local blockade of the endoplasmic reticulum to Golgi transport. More importantly, secretory organelles are capable of delivering sodium channels to the plasma membrane in isolated axons, demonstrating an intrinsic capacity of the axonal biosynthetic route in regulating the axonal proteome in mammalian axons. PMID:26839409

  17. The hitchhiker’s guide to the voltage-gated sodium channel galaxy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic voltage-gated sodium (Nav) channels contribute to the rising phase of action potentials and served as an early muse for biophysicists laying the foundation for our current understanding of electrical signaling. Given their central role in electrical excitability, it is not surprising that (a) inherited mutations in genes encoding for Nav channels and their accessory subunits have been linked to excitability disorders in brain, muscle, and heart; and (b) Nav channels are targeted by various drugs and naturally occurring toxins. Although the overall architecture and behavior of these channels are likely to be similar to the more well-studied voltage-gated potassium channels, eukaryotic Nav channels lack structural and functional symmetry, a notable difference that has implications for gating and selectivity. Activation of voltage-sensing modules of the first three domains in Nav channels is sufficient to open the channel pore, whereas movement of the domain IV voltage sensor is correlated with inactivation. Also, structure–function studies of eukaryotic Nav channels show that a set of amino acids in the selectivity filter, referred to as DEKA locus, is essential for Na+ selectivity. Structures of prokaryotic Nav channels have also shed new light on mechanisms of drug block. These structures exhibit lateral fenestrations that are large enough to allow drugs or lipophilic molecules to gain access into the inner vestibule, suggesting that this might be the passage for drug entry into a closed channel. In this Review, we will synthesize our current understanding of Nav channel gating mechanisms, ion selectivity and permeation, and modulation by therapeutics and toxins in light of the new structures of the prokaryotic Nav channels that, for the time being, serve as structural models of their eukaryotic counterparts. PMID:26712848

  18. Designing a C84 fullerene as a specific voltage-gated sodium channel blocker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilder, Tamsyn A.; Chung, Shin-Ho

    2013-07-01

    Fullerene derivatives demonstrate considerable potential for numerous biological applications, such as the effective inhibition of HIV protease. Recently, they were identified for their ability to indiscriminately block biological ion channels. A fullerene derivative which specifically blocks a particular ion channel could lead to a new set of drug leads for the treatment of various ion channel-related diseases. Here, we demonstrate their extraordinary potential by designing a fullerene which mimics some of the functions of μ-conotoxin, a peptide derived from cone snail venom which potently binds to the bacterial voltage-gated sodium channel (NavAb). We show, using molecular dynamics simulations, that the C84 fullerene with six lysine derivatives uniformly attached to its surface is selective to NavAb over a voltage-gated potassium channel (Kv1.3). The side chain of one of the lysine residues protrudes into the selectivity filter of the channel, while the methionine residues located just outside of the channel form hydrophobic contacts with the carbon atoms of the fullerene. The modified C84 fullerene strongly binds to the NavAb channel with an affinity of 46 nM but binds weakly to Kv1.3 with an affinity of 3 mM. This potent blocker of NavAb may serve as a structural template from which potent compounds can be designed for the targeting of mammalian Nav channels. There is a genuine need to target mammalian Nav channels as a form of treatment of various diseases which have been linked to their malfunction, such as epilepsy and chronic pain.

  19. Comparative Effects of Halogenated Inhaled Anesthetics on Voltage-gated Na+ Channel Function

    PubMed Central

    OuYang, Wei; Herold, Karl F.; Hemmings, Hugh C.

    2009-01-01

    Background Inhibition of voltage-gated Na+ channels (Nav) is implicated in the synaptic actions of volatile anesthetics. We studied the effects of the major halogenated inhaled anesthetics (halothane, isoflurane, sevoflurane, enflurane and desflurane) on Nav1.4, a well characterized pharmacological model for Nav effects. Methods Na+ currents (INa) from rat Nav1.4 α-subunits heterologously expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells were analyzed by whole cell voltage-clamp electrophysiological recording. Results Halogenated inhaled anesthetics reversibly inhibited Nav1.4 in a concentration- and voltage-dependent manner at clinical concentrations. At equi-anesthetic concentrations, peak INa was inhibited with a rank order of desflurane > halothane ≈ enflurane > isoflurane ≈ sevoflurane from a physiological holding potential (−80 mV). This suggests that the contribution of Na+ channel block to anesthesia might vary in an agent-specific manner. From a hyperpolarized holding potential that minimizes inactivation (−120 mV), peak INa was inhibited with a rank order of potency for tonic inhibition of peak INa of halothane > isoflurane ≈ sevoflurane > enflurane > desflurane. Desflurane produced the largest negative shift in voltage-dependence of fast inactivation consistent with its more prominent voltage-dependent effects. A comparison between isoflurane and halothane showed that halothane produced greater facilitation of current decay, slowing of recovery from fast inactivation, and use-dependent block than isoflurane. Conclusions Five halogenated inhaled anesthetics all inhibit a voltage-gated Na+ channel by voltage- and use-dependent mechanisms. Agent-specific differences in efficacy for Na+ channel inhibition due to differential state-dependent mechanisms creates pharmacologic diversity that could underlie subtle differences in anesthetic and nonanesthetic actions. PMID:19225394

  20. Elastic and Muscular Arteries Differ in Structure, Basal NO Production and Voltage-Gated Ca2+-Channels

    PubMed Central

    Leloup, Arthur J. A.; Van Hove, Cor E.; Heykers, Annick; Schrijvers, Dorien M.; De Meyer, Guido R. Y.; Fransen, Paul

    2015-01-01

    In the last decades, the search for mechanisms underlying progressive arterial stiffening and for interventions to avoid or reverse this process has gained much attention. In general, arterial stiffening displays regional variation and is, for example, during aging more prominent in elastic than in muscular arteries. We hypothesize that besides passive also active regulators of arterial compliance [i.e., endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) function] differ between these arteries. Hence, it is conceivable that these vessel types will display different time frames of stiffening. To investigate this hypothesis segments of muscular arteries such as femoral and mesenteric arteries and elastic arteries such as the aorta and carotid artery were isolated from female C57Bl6 mice (5–6 months of age, n = 8). Both microscopy and passive stretching of the segments in a myograph confirmed that passive mechanical properties (elastin, collagen) of elastic and muscular arteries were significantly different. Endothelial function, more specifically basal nitric oxide (NO) efficacy, and VSMC function, more specifically L-type voltage-gated Ca2+ channel (VGCC)-mediated contractions, were determined by α1-adrenoceptor stimulation with phenylephrine (PE) and by gradual depolarization with elevated extracellular K+ in the absence and presence of eNOS inhibition with L-NAME. PE-mediated isometric contractions significantly increased after inhibition of NO release with L-NAME in elastic, but not in muscular vessel segments. This high basal eNOS activity in elastic vessels was also responsible for shifts of K+ concentration-contraction curves to higher external K+. VGCC-mediated contractions were similarly affected by depolarization with elevated K+ in muscular artery segments or in elastic artery segments in the absence of basal NO. However, K+-induced contractions were inhibited by the VGCC blocker diltiazem with significantly higher sensitivity in the muscular arteries

  1. Elastic and Muscular Arteries Differ in Structure, Basal NO Production and Voltage-Gated Ca(2+)-Channels.

    PubMed

    Leloup, Arthur J A; Van Hove, Cor E; Heykers, Annick; Schrijvers, Dorien M; De Meyer, Guido R Y; Fransen, Paul

    2015-01-01

    In the last decades, the search for mechanisms underlying progressive arterial stiffening and for interventions to avoid or reverse this process has gained much attention. In general, arterial stiffening displays regional variation and is, for example, during aging more prominent in elastic than in muscular arteries. We hypothesize that besides passive also active regulators of arterial compliance [i.e., endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) function] differ between these arteries. Hence, it is conceivable that these vessel types will display different time frames of stiffening. To investigate this hypothesis segments of muscular arteries such as femoral and mesenteric arteries and elastic arteries such as the aorta and carotid artery were isolated from female C57Bl6 mice (5-6 months of age, n = 8). Both microscopy and passive stretching of the segments in a myograph confirmed that passive mechanical properties (elastin, collagen) of elastic and muscular arteries were significantly different. Endothelial function, more specifically basal nitric oxide (NO) efficacy, and VSMC function, more specifically L-type voltage-gated Ca(2+) channel (VGCC)-mediated contractions, were determined by α1-adrenoceptor stimulation with phenylephrine (PE) and by gradual depolarization with elevated extracellular K(+) in the absence and presence of eNOS inhibition with L-NAME. PE-mediated isometric contractions significantly increased after inhibition of NO release with L-NAME in elastic, but not in muscular vessel segments. This high basal eNOS activity in elastic vessels was also responsible for shifts of K(+) concentration-contraction curves to higher external K(+). VGCC-mediated contractions were similarly affected by depolarization with elevated K(+) in muscular artery segments or in elastic artery segments in the absence of basal NO. However, K(+)-induced contractions were inhibited by the VGCC blocker diltiazem with significantly higher sensitivity in the muscular

  2. Ca2+ transport properties and determinants of anomalous mole fraction effects of single voltage-gated Ca2+ channels in hair cells from bullfrog saccule

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Contreras, Adrian; Nonner, Wolfgang; Yamoah, Ebenezer N

    2002-01-01

    We studied the permeation properties of two distinct single voltage-gated Ca2+ channels in bullfrog saccular hair cells to assess the roles of the channels as physiological Ca2+ transporters and multi-ion pores. By varying the permeant ions (Ba2+, Ca2+) and concentrations (2–70 mm), we estimated the affinity constant (KD) of the two channels as follows (mm): L-type channel, KD,Ba = 7.4 ± 1.0, KD,Ca = 7.1 ± 2.2 (n = 7); non-L-type channel, KD,Ba = 5.3 ± 3.2, KD,Ca = 2.0 ± 1.0 (n = 8). Using ionic concentrations close to physiological conditions (2 mm Ca2+ and 1.0 mm Mg2+), the conductance of the L-type channel was ∼2 pS. We determined the mechanisms by which ions traverse the pore of these single Ca2+ channels, using mixtures of Ba2+ and Ca2+ at total concentrations above (70 mm) or close to (5 mm) the KD of the channels. We found evidence for an anomalous mole fraction effect (AMFE) only when the total divalent ion concentration was 5 mm, consistent with a multi-ion pore. We show that AMFE arises from the boundaries between the pore and bulk solution in the atria of the channel, which is derived from the presence of depletion zones that become apparent at low divalent cation concentrations. The present findings provide an explanation as to why previous whole-cell Ca2+ currents that were recorded in quasi-physiological Ca2+ concentrations (∼2–5 mm) showed clear AMFE, whereas single Ca2+ channel currents that were recorded routinely at high Ca2+ concentrations (20–110 mm) did not. PMID:11826161

  3. Molecular basis of the interaction between gating modifier spider toxins and the voltage sensor of voltage-gated ion channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, Carus H. Y.; King, Glenn F.; Mobli, Mehdi

    2016-09-01

    Voltage-sensor domains (VSDs) are modular transmembrane domains of voltage-gated ion channels that respond to changes in membrane potential by undergoing conformational changes that are coupled to gating of the ion-conducting pore. Most spider-venom peptides function as gating modifiers by binding to the VSDs of voltage-gated channels and trapping them in a closed or open state. To understand the molecular basis underlying this mode of action, we used nuclear magnetic resonance to delineate the atomic details of the interaction between the VSD of the voltage-gated potassium channel KvAP and the spider-venom peptide VSTx1. Our data reveal that the toxin interacts with residues in an aqueous cleft formed between the extracellular S1-S2 and S3-S4 loops of the VSD whilst maintaining lipid interactions in the gaps formed between the S1-S4 and S2-S3 helices. The resulting network of interactions increases the energetic barrier to the conformational changes required for channel gating, and we propose that this is the mechanism by which gating modifier toxins inhibit voltage-gated ion channels.

  4. Molecular basis of the interaction between gating modifier spider toxins and the voltage sensor of voltage-gated ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Carus H. Y.; King, Glenn F.; Mobli, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-sensor domains (VSDs) are modular transmembrane domains of voltage-gated ion channels that respond to changes in membrane potential by undergoing conformational changes that are coupled to gating of the ion-conducting pore. Most spider-venom peptides function as gating modifiers by binding to the VSDs of voltage-gated channels and trapping them in a closed or open state. To understand the molecular basis underlying this mode of action, we used nuclear magnetic resonance to delineate the atomic details of the interaction between the VSD of the voltage-gated potassium channel KvAP and the spider-venom peptide VSTx1. Our data reveal that the toxin interacts with residues in an aqueous cleft formed between the extracellular S1-S2 and S3-S4 loops of the VSD whilst maintaining lipid interactions in the gaps formed between the S1-S4 and S2-S3 helices. The resulting network of interactions increases the energetic barrier to the conformational changes required for channel gating, and we propose that this is the mechanism by which gating modifier toxins inhibit voltage-gated ion channels. PMID:27677715

  5. Reduction in neuronal L-type calcium channel activity in a double knock-in mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Thibault, Olivier; Pancani, Tristano; Landfield, Philip W.; Norris, Christopher M.

    2012-01-01

    Increased function of neuronal L-type voltage-sensitive Ca2+ channels (L-VSCCs) is strongly linked to impaired memory and altered hippocampal synaptic plasticity in aged rats. However, no studies have directly assessed L-VSCC function in any of the common mouse models of Alzheimer’s disease where neurologic deficits are typically more robust. Here, we used cell-attached patch-clamp recording techniques to measure L-VSCC activity in CA1 pyramidal neurons of partially dissociated hippocampal “zipper” slices prepared from 14-month-old wild-type mice and memory-impaired APP/PS1 double knock-in mice. Surprisingly, the functional channel density of L-VSCCs was significantly reduced in the APP/PS1 group. No differences in voltage dependency and unitary conductance of L-VSCCs were observed. The results suggest that mechanisms for Ca2+ dysregulation can differ substantially between animal models of normal aging and models of pathological aging. PMID:22265986

  6. L-type voltage-dependent calcium channel is involved in the snake venom group IA secretory phospholipase A2-induced neuronal apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Yagami, Tatsurou; Yamamoto, Yasuhiro; Kohma, Hiromi; Nakamura, Tsutomu; Takasu, Nobuo; Okamura, Noboru

    2013-03-01

    Snake venom group IA secretory phospholipase A2 (sPLA2-IA) is known as a neurotoxin. Snake venom sPLA2s are neurotoxic in vivo and in vitro, causing synergistic neurotoxicity to cortical cultures when applied with toxic concentrations of glutamate. However, it has not yet been cleared sufficiently how sPLA2-IA exerts neurotoxicity. Here, we found sPLA2-IA induced neuronal cell death in a concentration-dependent manner. This death was a delayed response requiring a latent time for 6h. sPLA2-IA-induced neuronal cell death was accompanied with apoptotic blebbing, condensed chromatin, and fragmented DNA, exhibiting apoptotic features. NMDA receptor blockers suppressed the neurotoxicity of sPLA2-IA, but an AMPA receptor blocker did not. Interestingly, L-type voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channel (L-VDCC) blocker significantly protected neurons from the sPLA2-IA-induced apoptosis. On the other hand, neither N-VDCC blockers nor P/Q-VDCC blocker did. In conclusion, we demonstrated that sPLA2-IA induced neuronal cell death via apoptosis. Furthermore, the present study suggests that not only NMDA receptor but also L-VDCC contributed to the neurotoxicity of snake venom sPLA2-IA.

  7. Binding mechanisms of 1,4-dihydropyridine derivatives to L-type calcium channel Cav1.2: a molecular modeling study.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lei; Li, Dan; Tao, Li; Yang, Yanling; Li, Youyong; Hou, Tingjun

    2016-02-01

    L-type Ca(2+) channels (LTCCs), the heteromultimeric proteins, are associated with electrical signaling and provide the key link between electrical signals and non-electrical processes. 1,4-Dihydropyridine (DHP) derivatives are a major class of blockers for LTCCs, and have experienced widespread use in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. However, the precise knowledge of the binding mechanism of these ligands to LTCCs at the atomic level has remained unknown because of the unavailability of the crystal structures of LTCCs. In this study, homology modeling, molecular docking, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, free energy calculations and decomposition were employed to explore the structural requirement of the binding of DHP derivatives to human Cav1.2, a member of LTCCs. The binding conformations of the DHPs in the active site of Cav1.2 were predicted, and the rank of the binding free energies of Cav1.2/DHPs is generally consistent with the experimental data. The structural analysis shows that most studied ligands fit into a hydrophobic pocket formed by Phe1129, Ile1173, Phe1176, Met1177 and Met1509, and form aryl-aryl interaction with Phe1129 or Tyr1508. The consistency between the predictions and experimental data suggest that the developed model is reliable and can be used as a valuable platform for the structure-based design of new potent ligands of Cav1.2.

  8. Ca2+–calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II represses cardiac transcription of the L-type calcium channel α1C-subunit gene (Cacna1c) by DREAM translocation

    PubMed Central

    Ronkainen, Jarkko J; Hänninen, Sandra L; Korhonen, Topi; Koivumäki, Jussi T; Skoumal, Reka; Rautio, Sini; Ronkainen, Veli-Pekka; Tavi, Pasi

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Recent studies have demonstrated that changes in the activity of calcium–calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) induce a unique cardiomyocyte phenotype through the regulation of specific genes involved in excitation–contraction (E–C)-coupling. To explain the transcriptional effects of CaMKII we identified a novel CaMKII-dependent pathway for controlling the expression of the pore-forming α-subunit (Cav1.2) of the L-type calcium channel (LTCC) in cardiac myocytes. We show that overexpression of either cytosolic (δC) or nuclear (δB) CaMKII isoforms selectively downregulate the expression of the Cav1.2. Pharmacological inhibition of CaMKII activity induced measurable changes in LTCC current density and subsequent changes in cardiomyocyte calcium signalling in less than 24 h. The effect of CaMKII on the α1C-subunit gene (Cacna1c) promoter was abolished by deletion of the downstream regulatory element (DRE), which binds transcriptional repressor DREAM/calsenilin/KChIP3. Imaging DREAM–GFP (green fluorescent protein)-expressing cardiomyocytes showed that CaMKII potentiates the calcium-induced nuclear translocation of DREAM. Thereby CaMKII increases DREAM binding to the DRE consensus sequence of the endogenous Cacna1c gene. By mathematical modelling we demonstrate that the LTCC downregulation through the Ca2+–CaMKII–DREAM cascade constitutes a physiological feedback mechanism enabling cardiomyocytes to adjust the calcium intrusion through LTCCs to the amount of intracellular calcium detected by CaMKII. PMID:21486818

  9. D5 (not D1) dopamine receptors potentiate burst-firing in neurons of the subthalamic nucleus by modulating an L-type calcium conductance.

    PubMed

    Baufreton, Jérôme; Garret, Maurice; Rivera, Alicia; de la Calle, Adélaïda; Gonon, François; Dufy, Bernard; Bioulac, Bernard; Taupignon, Anne

    2003-02-01

    Dopamine is a crucial factor in basal ganglia functioning. In current models of basal ganglia, dopamine is postulated to act on striatal neurons. However, it may also act on the subthalamic nucleus (STN), a key nucleus in the basal ganglia circuit. The data presented here were obtained in brain slices using whole-cell patch clamp. They reveal that D5 dopamine receptors strengthen electrical activity in the subset of subthalamic neurons endowed with burst-firing capacity, resulting in longer discharges of spontaneous or evoked bursts. To distinguish between D1 and D5 subtypes, the action of agonists in the D1/D5 receptor family was first investigated on rat subthalamic neurons. Single-cell reverse transcription-PCR profiling showed that burst-competent neurons only expressed D5 receptors. Accordingly, receptors localized in postsynaptic membranes within the STN were labeled by a D5-specific antibody. Second, agonists in the D1/D5 family were tested in mouse brain slices. It was found that these agonists were active in D1 receptor knock-out mice in a similar way to wild-type mice or rats. This proved that D5 rather than D1 receptors were involved. Pharmacological tools (dihydropyridines, omega-conotoxins, and calciseptine) were used to identify the target of D5 receptors as an L-type channel. This was reached via G-protein and protein kinase A. The action of dopamine on D5 receptors therefore shapes neuronal activity. It contributes to normal information processing in basal ganglia outside striatum. This finding may be useful in drug therapy for various disorders involving changes in STN activity, such as Parkinson's disease and related disorders.

  10. Calcium regulates cyclic compression-induced early changes in chondrocytes during in vitro cartilage tissue formation.

    PubMed

    Raizman, Igal; De Croos, J N Amritha; Pilliar, Robert; Kandel, Rita A

    2010-10-01

    A single application of cyclic compression (1kPa, 1Hz, 30min) to bioengineered cartilage results in improved tissue formation through sequential catabolic and anabolic changes mediated via cell shape changes that are regulated by α5β1 integrin and membrane-type metalloprotease (MT1-MMP). To determine if calcium was involved in this process, the role of calcium in regulating cell shape changes, MT1-MMP expression and integrin activity in response to mechanical stimulation was examined. Stimulation-induced changes in cell shape and MT1-MMP expression were abolished by chelation of extracellular calcium, and this effect was reversed by re-introduction of calcium. Spreading was inhibited by blocking stretch-activated channels (with gadolinium), while retraction was prevented by blocking the L-Type voltage-gated channel (with nifedipine); both compounds inhibited MT1-MMP upregulation. Calcium A23187 ionophore restored cellular response further supporting a role for these channels. Calcium regulated the integrin-mediated signalling pathway, which was facilitated through Src kinase. Both calcium- and integrin-mediated pathways converged on ERK-MAPK in response to stimulation. While both integrins and calcium signalling mediate chondrocyte mechanotransduction, calcium appears to play the major regulatory role. Understanding the underlying molecular mechanisms involved in chondrocyte mechanotransduction may lead to the development of improved bioengineered cartilage.

  11. Bromoenol Lactone Inhibits Voltage-Gated Ca2+ and Transient Receptor Potential Canonical ChannelsS⃞

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Saikat; Berwick, Zachary C.; Bartlett, Paula J.; Kumar, Sanjay; Thomas, Andrew P.; Sturek, Michael; Tune, Johnathan D.

    2011-01-01

    Circulating hormones stimulate the phospholipase Cβ (PLC)/Ca2+ influx pathway to regulate numerous cell functions, including vascular tone. It was proposed previously that Ca2+-independent phospholipase A2 (iPLA2)-dependent store-operated Ca2+ influx channels mediate hormone-induced contractions in isolated arteries, because bromoenol lactone (BEL), a potent irreversible inhibitor of iPLA2, inhibited such contractions. However, the effects of BEL on other channels implicated in mediating hormone-induced vessel contractions, specifically voltage-gated Ca2+ (CaV1.2) and transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC) channels, have not been defined clearly. Using isometric tension measurements, we found that thapsigargin-induced contractions were ∼34% of those evoked by phenylephrine or KCl. BEL completely inhibited not only thapsigargin- but also phenylephrine- and KCl-induced ring contractions, suggesting that CaV1.2 and receptor-operated TRPC channels also may be sensitive to BEL. Therefore, we investigated the effects of BEL on heterologously expressed CaV1.2 and TRPC channels in human embryonic kidney cells, a model system that allows probing of individual protein function without interference from other signaling elements of native cells. We found that low micromolar concentrations of BEL inhibited CaV1.2, TRPC5, TRPC6, and heteromeric TRPC1–TRPC5 channels in an iPLA2-independent manner. BEL also attenuated PLC activity, suggesting that the compound may inhibit TRPC channel activity in part by interfering with an initial PLC-dependent step required for TRPC channel activation. Conversely, BEL did not affect endogenous voltage-gated K+ channels in human embryonic kidney cells. Our findings support the hypothesis that iPLA2-dependent store-operated Ca2+ influx channels and iPLA2-independent hormone-operated TRPC channels can serve as smooth muscle depolarization triggers to activate CaV1.2 channels and to regulate vascular tone. PMID:21795434

  12. Gambierol Inhibition of Voltage-Gated Potassium Channels Augments Spontaneous Ca2+ Oscillations in Cerebrocortical Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Zhengyu; Cui, Yanjun; Busse, Eric; Mehrotra, Suneet; Rainier, Jon D.

    2014-01-01

    Gambierol is a marine polycyclic ether toxin produced by the marine dinoflagellate Gambierdiscus toxicus and is a member of the ciguatoxin toxin family. Gambierol has been demonstrated to be either a low-efficacy partial agonist/antagonist of voltage-gated sodium channels or a potent blocker of voltage-gated potassium channels (Kvs). Here we examined the influence of gambierol on intact cerebrocortical neurons. We found that gambierol produced both a concentration-dependent augmentation of spontaneous Ca2+ oscillations, and an inhibition of Kv channel function with similar potencies. In addition, an array of selective as well as universal Kv channel inhibitors mimicked gambierol in augmenting spontaneous Ca2+ oscillations in cerebrocortical neurons. These data are consistent with a gambierol blockade of Kv channels underlying the observed increase in spontaneous Ca2+ oscillation frequency. We also found that gambierol produced a robust stimulation of phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2). Gambierol-stimulated ERK1/2 activation was dependent on both inotropic [N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA)] and type I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) inasmuch as MK-801 [NMDA receptor inhibitor; (5S,10R)-(+)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[a,d]cyclohepten-5,10-imine maleate], S-(4)-CGP [S-(4)-carboxyphenylglycine], and MTEP [type I mGluR inhibitors; 3-((2-methyl-4-thiazolyl)ethynyl) pyridine] attenuated the response. In addition, 2-aminoethoxydiphenylborane, an inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor inhibitor, and U73122 (1-[6-[[(17b)-3-methoxyestra-1,3,5(10)-trien-17-yl]amino]hexyl]-1H-pyrrole-2,5-dione), a phospholipase C inhibitor, both suppressed gambierol-induced ERK1/2 activation, further confirming the role of type I mGluR-mediated signaling in the observed ERK1/2 activation. Finally, we found that gambierol produced a concentration-dependent stimulation of neurite outgrowth that was mimicked by 4-aminopyridine, a universal potassium

  13. Molecular Basis of the Membrane Interaction of the β2e Subunit of Voltage-Gated Ca(2+) Channels.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Il; Kang, Mooseok; Kim, Sangyeol; Lee, Juhwan; Park, Yongsoo; Chang, Iksoo; Suh, Byung-Chang

    2015-09-01

    The auxiliary β subunit plays an important role in the regulation of voltage-gated calcium (CaV) channels. Recently, it was revealed that β2e associates with the plasma membrane through an electrostatic interaction between N-terminal basic residues and anionic phospholipids. However, a molecular-level understanding of β-subunit membrane recruitment in structural detail has remained elusive. In this study, using a combination of site-directed mutagenesis, liposome-binding assays, and multiscale molecular-dynamics (MD) simulation, we developed a physical model of how the β2e subunit is recruited electrostatically to the plasma membrane. In a fluorescence resonance energy transfer assay with liposomes, binding of the N-terminal peptide (23 residues) to liposome was significantly increased in the presence of phosphatidylserine (PS) and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2). A mutagenesis analysis suggested that two basic residues proximal to Met-1, Lys-2 (K2) and Trp-5 (W5), are more important for membrane binding of the β2e subunit than distal residues from the N-terminus. Our MD simulations revealed that a stretched binding mode of the N-terminus to PS is required for stable membrane attachment through polar and nonpolar interactions. This mode obtained from MD simulations is consistent with experimental results showing that K2A, W5A, and K2A/W5A mutants failed to be targeted to the plasma membrane. We also investigated the effects of a mutated β2e subunit on inactivation kinetics and regulation of CaV channels by PIP2. In experiments with voltage-sensing phosphatase (VSP), a double mutation in the N-terminus of β2e (K2A/W5A) increased the PIP2 sensitivity of CaV2.2 and CaV1.3 channels by ∼3-fold compared with wild-type β2e subunit. Together, our results suggest that membrane targeting of the β2e subunit is initiated from the nonspecific electrostatic insertion of N-terminal K2 and W5 residues into the membrane. The PS-β2e interaction observed here

  14. Molecular Basis of the Membrane Interaction of the β2e Subunit of Voltage-Gated Ca2+ Channels

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong-Il; Kang, Mooseok; Kim, Sangyeol; Lee, Juhwan; Park, Yongsoo; Chang, Iksoo; Suh, Byung-Chang

    2015-01-01

    The auxiliary β subunit plays an important role in the regulation of voltage-gated calcium (CaV) channels. Recently, it was revealed that β2e associates with the plasma membrane through an electrostatic interaction between N-terminal basic residues and anionic phospholipids. However, a molecular-level understanding of β-subunit membrane recruitment in structural detail has remained elusive. In this study, using a combination of site-directed mutagenesis, liposome-binding assays, and multiscale molecular-dynamics (MD) simulation, we developed a physical model of how the β2e subunit is recruited electrostatically to the plasma membrane. In a fluorescence resonance energy transfer assay with liposomes, binding of the N-terminal peptide (23 residues) to liposome was significantly increased in the presence of phosphatidylserine (PS) and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2). A mutagenesis analysis suggested that two basic residues proximal to Met-1, Lys-2 (K2) and Trp-5 (W5), are more important for membrane binding of the β2e subunit than distal residues from the N-terminus. Our MD simulations revealed that a stretched binding mode of the N-terminus to PS is required for stable membrane attachment through polar and nonpolar interactions. This mode obtained from MD simulations is consistent with experimental results showing that K2A, W5A, and K2A/W5A mutants failed to be targeted to the plasma membrane. We also investigated the effects of a mutated β2e subunit on inactivation kinetics and regulation of CaV channels by PIP2. In experiments with voltage-sensing phosphatase (VSP), a double mutation in the N-terminus of β2e (K2A/W5A) increased the PIP2 sensitivity of CaV2.2 and CaV1.3 channels by ∼3-fold compared with wild-type β2e subunit. Together, our results suggest that membrane targeting of the β2e subunit is initiated from the nonspecific electrostatic insertion of N-terminal K2 and W5 residues into the membrane. The PS-β2e interaction observed here

  15. Multi-site Phosphorylation of Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel α Subunits from Rat Brain

    PubMed Central

    Berendt, Frank J.; Park, Kang-Sik; Trimmer, James S.

    2010-01-01

    Reversible phosphorylation of ion channels underlies cellular plasticity in mammalian neurons. Voltage-gated sodium or Nav channels underlie action potential initiation and propagation, dendritic excitability, and many other aspects of neuronal excitability. Various protein kinases have been suggested to phosphorylate the primary α subunit of Nav channels, affecting diverse aspects of channel function. Previous studies of Nav α subunit phosphorylation have led to the identification of a small set of phosphorylation sites important in meditating aspects of Nav channel function. Here we use nanoflow liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (nano-LC MS/MS) on Nav α subunits affinity-purified from rat brain with two distinct monoclonal antibodies to identify 15 phosphorylation sites on Nav1.2, 12 of which have not been previously reported. We also found 3 novel phosphorylation sites on Nav1.1. In general, commonly used phosphorylation site prediction algorithms did not accurately predict these novel in vivo phosphorylation sites. Our results demonstrate that specific Nav α subunits isolated from rat brain are highly phosphorylated, and suggest extensive modulation of Nav channel activity in mammalian brain. Identification of phosphorylation sites using monoclonal antibody-based immunopurification and mass spectrometry is an effective approach to define the phosphorylation status of Nav channels and important membrane proteins in mammalian brain. PMID:20131913

  16. Characterization of Voltage-Gated Potassium Channels in Human Neural Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schaarschmidt, Grit; Wegner, Florian; Schwarz, Sigrid C.; Schmidt, Hartmut; Schwarz, Johannes

    2009-01-01

    Background Voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels are among the earliest ion channels to appear during brain development, suggesting a functional requirement for progenitor cell proliferation and/or differentiation. We tested this hypothesis, using human neural progenitor cells (hNPCs) as a model system. Methodology/Principal Findings In proliferating hNPCs a broad spectrum of Kv channel subtypes was identified using quantitative real-time PCR with a predominant expression of the A-type channel Kv4.2. In whole-cell patch-clamp recordings Kv currents were separated into a large transient component characteristic for fast-inactivating A-type potassium channels (IA) and a small, sustained component produced by delayed-rectifying channels (IK). During differentiation the expression of IA as well as A-type channel transcripts dramatically decreased, while IK producing delayed-rectifiers were upregulated. Both Kv currents were differentially inhibited by selective neurotoxins like phrixotoxin-1 and α-dendrotoxin as well as by antagonists like 4-aminopyridine, ammoniumchloride, tetraethylammonium chloride and quinidine. In viability and proliferation assays chronic inhibition of the A-type currents severely disturbed the cell cycle and precluded proper hNPC proliferation, while the blockade of delayed-rectifiers by α-dendrotoxin increased proliferation. Conclusions/Significance These findings suggest that A-type potassium currents are essential for proper proliferation of immature multipotent hNPCs. PMID:19584922

  17. The Molecular Basis of Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Interactions with the Shaker Voltage-Gated Potassium Channel

    PubMed Central

    Yazdi, Samira; Stein, Matthias; Elinder, Fredrik; Andersson, Magnus; Lindahl, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated potassium (KV) channels are membrane proteins that respond to changes in membrane potential by enabling K+ ion flux across the membrane. Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) induce channel opening by modulating the voltage-sensitivity, which can provide effective treatment against refractory epilepsy by means of a ketogenic diet. While PUFAs have been reported to influence the gating mechanism by electrostatic interactions to the voltage-sensor domain (VSD), the exact PUFA-protein interactions are still elusive. In this study, we report on the interactions between the Shaker KV channel in open and closed states and a PUFA-enriched lipid bilayer using microsecond molecular dynamics simulations. We determined a putative PUFA binding site in the open state of the channel located at the protein-lipid interface in the vicinity of the extracellular halves of the S3 and S4 helices of the VSD. In particular, the lipophilic PUFA tail covered a wide range of non-specific hydrophobic interactions in the hydrophobic central core of the protein-lipid interface, while the carboxylic head group displayed more specific interactions to polar/charged residues at the extracellular regions of the S3 and S4 helices, encompassing the S3-S4 linker. Moreover, by studying the interactions between saturated fatty acids (SFA) and the Shaker KV channel, our study confirmed an increased conformational flexibility in the polyunsaturated carbon tails compared to saturated carbon chains, which may explain the specificity of PUFA action on channel proteins. PMID:26751683

  18. Voltage-gated potassium currents within the dorsal vagal nucleus: inhibition by BDS toxin.

    PubMed

    Dallas, Mark L; Morris, Neil P; Lewis, David I; Deuchars, Susan A; Deuchars, Jim

    2008-01-16

    Voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels are essential components of neuronal excitability. The Kv3.4 channel protein is widely distributed throughout the central nervous system (CNS), where it can form heteromeric or homomeric Kv3 channels. Electrophysiological studies reported here highlight a functional role for this channel protein within neurons of the dorsal vagal nucleus (DVN). Current clamp experiments revealed that blood depressing substance (BDS) and intracellular dialysis of an anti-Kv3.4 antibody prolonged the action potential duration. In addition, a BDS sensitive, voltage-dependent, slowly inactivating outward current was observed in voltage clamp recordings from DVN neurons. Electrical stimulation of the solitary tract evoked EPSPs and IPSPs in DVN neurons and BDS increased the average amplitude and decreased the paired pulse ratio, consistent with a presynaptic site of action. This presynaptic modulation was action potential dependent as revealed by ongoing synaptic activity. Given the role of the Kv3 proteins in shaping neuronal excitability, these data highlight a role for homomeric Kv3.4 channels in spike timing and neurotransmitter release in low frequency firing neurons of the DVN.

  19. Characterization of an insect heterodimeric voltage-gated sodium channel with unique alternative splicing mode.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xuan-Zhao; Pei, Yu-Xia; Lei, Wei; Wang, Ke-Yi; Shang, Feng; Jiang, Hong-Bo; Wang, Jin-Jun

    2017-01-01

    Recent discovery of the heterodimeric voltage-gated sodium channels (Nav) in two aphid species, Acyrthosiphon pisum and Myzus persicae, aroused interest in exploring whether this kind of channel is conserved for aphids. Herewith, we aim to provide evidence for the conservation of heterodimeric Navs in aphids and investigate whether they have unique splicing patterns. We found that the only identifiable Nav from Toxoptera citricida consisted of two subunits, forming a heterodimeric Nav, which carried an atypical "DENS" ion selectivity filter and a conventional "MFM" inactivation gate, confirming the heterodimeric Navs' conservation within aphids. These unique heterodimeric channels may form a new Nav subfamily, specific to aphids. A more ancient member of four-domain Nav homolog was well preserved in T. citricida, carrying a typical "DEEA" and "MFL" motif. The presence of "DENS" in mammalian Naxs and "DEKT" in a fungus Nav suggested that the heterodimeric Navs may still preserve Na(+) permeability. Sequencing 46 clones from nymphs and adults exposed unique splicing patterns for this heterodimeric Nav from T. citricida, revealing 7 alternatively spliced exons, evidencing that exon 5 was no longer unique to Bombyx mori, and exon k/l was semi-mutually exclusive. Two previously undescribed optional exons and a SNP site seemingly unique to aphids were identified. In conclusion, the dimeric Navs might form a new aphids-specific heterodimeric Nav subfamily. This dimeric Nav from T. citricida was characterized with distinguishable alternative splicing modes, exemplified by the discovery of two novel alternative exons and unique usage patterns of alternative exons.

  20. KCNE1 and KCNE3: The yin and yang of voltage-gated K(+) channel regulation.

    PubMed

    Abbott, Geoffrey W

    2016-01-15

    The human KCNE gene family comprises five genes encoding single transmembrane-spanning ion channel regulatory subunits. The primary function of KCNE subunits appears to be regulation of voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels, and the best-understood KCNE complexes are with the KCNQ1 Kv α subunit. Here, we review the often opposite effects of KCNE1 and KCNE3 on Kv channel biology, with an emphasis on regulation of KCNQ1. Slow-activating IKs channel complexes formed by KCNQ1 and KCNE1 are essential for human ventricular myocyte repolarization, while constitutively active KCNQ1-KCNE3 channels are important in the intestine. Inherited sequence variants in human KCNE1 and KCNE3 cause cardiac arrhythmias but by different mechanisms, and each is important for hearing in unique ways. Because of their contrasting effects on KCNQ1 function, KCNE1 and KCNE3 have proved invaluable tools in the mechanistic understanding of how channel gating can be manipulated, and each may also provide a window into novel insights and new therapeutic opportunities in K(+) channel pharmacology. Finally, findings from studies of Kcne1(-/-) and Kcne3(-/-) mouse lines serve to illustrate the complexity of KCNE biology and KCNE-linked disease states.

  1. Diet-induced obesity causes long QT and reduces transcription of voltage-gated potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Huang, Haiyan; Amin, Vaibhav; Gurin, Michael; Wan, Elaine; Thorp, Edward; Homma, Shunichi; Morrow, John P

    2013-06-01

    In humans, obesity is associated with long QT, increased frequency of premature ventricular complexes, and sudden cardiac death. The mechanisms of the pro-arrhythmic electrophysiologic remodeling of obesity are poorly understood. We tested the hypothesis that there is decreased expression of voltage-gated potassium channels in the obese heart, leading to long QT. Using implanted telemeters, we found that diet-induced obese (DIO) wild-type mice have impaired cardiac repolarization, demonstrated by long QT, as well as more frequent ventricular ectopy, similar to obese humans. DIO mice have reduced protein and mRNA levels of the potassium channel Kv1.5 caused by a reduction of the transcription factor cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB) in DIO hearts. We found that CREB knock-down by siRNA reduces Kv1.5, CREB binds to the Kv1.5 promoter in the heart, and CREB increases transcription of mouse and human Kv1.5 promoters. The reduction in CREB protein during lipotoxicity can be rescued by inhibiting protein kinase D (PKD). Our results identify a mechanism for obesity-induced electrophysiologic remodeling in the heart, namely PKD-induced reduction of CREB, which in turn decreases expression of the potassium channel Kv1.5.

  2. Dynamic memory of a single voltage-gated potassium ion channel: A stochastic nonequilibrium thermodynamic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Kinshuk

    2015-05-01

    In this work, we have studied the stochastic response of a single voltage-gated potassium ion channel to a periodic external voltage that keeps the system out-of-equilibrium. The system exhibits memory, resulting from time-dependent driving, that is reflected in terms of dynamic hysteresis in the current-voltage characteristics. The hysteresis loop area has a maximum at some intermediate voltage frequency and disappears in the limits of low and high frequencies. However, the (average) dissipation at long-time limit increases and finally goes to saturation with rising frequency. This raises the question: how diminishing hysteresis can be associated with growing dissipation? To answer this, we have studied the nonequilibrium thermodynamics of the system and analyzed different thermodynamic functions which also exhibit hysteresis. Interestingly, by applying a temporal symmetry analysis in the high-frequency limit, we have analytically shown that hysteresis in some of the periodic responses of the system does not vanish. On the contrary, the rates of free energy and internal energy change of the system as well as the rate of dissipative work done on the system show growing hysteresis with frequency. Hence, although the current-voltage hysteresis disappears in the high-frequency limit, the memory of the ion channel is manifested through its specific nonequilibrium thermodynamic responses.

  3. Dynamic memory of a single voltage-gated potassium ion channel: A stochastic nonequilibrium thermodynamic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, Kinshuk

    2015-05-14

    In this work, we have studied the stochastic response of a single voltage-gated potassium ion channel to a periodic external voltage that keeps the system out-of-equilibrium. The system exhibits memory, resulting from time-dependent driving, that is reflected in terms of dynamic hysteresis in the current-voltage characteristics. The hysteresis loop area has a maximum at some intermediate voltage frequency and disappears in the limits of low and high frequencies. However, the (average) dissipation at long-time limit increases and finally goes to saturation with rising frequency. This raises the question: how diminishing hysteresis can be associated with growing dissipation? To answer this, we have studied the nonequilibrium thermodynamics of the system and analyzed different thermodynamic functions which also exhibit hysteresis. Interestingly, by applying a temporal symmetry analysis in the high-frequency limit, we have analytically shown that hysteresis in some of the periodic responses of the system does not vanish. On the contrary, the rates of free energy and internal energy change of the system as well as the rate of dissipative work done on the system show growing hysteresis with frequency. Hence, although the current-voltage hysteresis disappears in the high-frequency limit, the memory of the ion channel is manifested through its specific nonequilibrium thermodynamic responses.

  4. Voltage-Gated Potassium Channel Antibody Paraneoplastic Limbic Encephalitis Associated with Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Alcantara, Marion; Bennani, Omar; Verdure, Pierre; Leprêtre, Stéphane; Tilly, Hervé; Jardin, Fabrice

    2013-01-01

    Among paraneoplastic syndromes (PNS) associated with malignant hemopathies, there are few reports of PNS of the central nervous system and most of them are associated with lymphomas. Limbic encephalitis is a rare neurological syndrome classically diagnosed in the context of PNS. We report the case of a 81-year-old man who presented with a relapsed acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with minimal maturation. He was admitted for confusion with unfavorable evolution as he presented a rapidly progressive dementia resulting in death. A brain magnetic resonance imaging, performed 2 months after the onset, was considered normal. An electroencephalogram showed non-specific bilateral slow waves. We received the results of the blood screening of neuronal autoanti-bodies after the patient's death and detected the presence of anti-voltage-gated potassium channel (VGKC) antibodies at 102 pmol/l (normal at <30 pmol/l). Other etiologic studies, including the screening for another cause of rapidly progressive dementia, were negative. To our knowledge, this is the first case of anti-VGKC paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis related to AML. PMID:23898271

  5. Expression patterns, mutation detection and RNA interference of Rhopalosiphum padi voltage-gated sodium channel genes.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Yayun; Peng, Xiong; Wang, Kang; Lin, Fangfei; Li, Yuting; Chen, Maohua

    2016-07-21

    The voltage-gated sodium channel (VGSC) is the target of sodium-channel-blocking insecticides. Traditionally, animals were thought to have only one VGSC gene comprising a α-subunit with four homologous domains (DI-DIV). The present study showed that Rhopalosiphum padi, an economically important crop pest, owned a unique heterodimeric VGSC (H1 and H2 subunits) encoded by two genes (Rpvgsc1 and Rpvgsc2), which is unusual in insects and other animals. The open reading frame (ORF) of Rpvgsc1 consisted 1150 amino acids, and the ORF of Rpvgsc2 had 957 amino acids. Rpvgsc1 showed 64.1% amino acid identity to DI-DII of Drosophila melanogaster VGSC and Rpvgsc2 showed 64.0% amino acid identity to DIII-DIV of D. melanogaster VGSC. A M918L mutation previously reported in pyrethroids-resistant strains of other insects was found in the IIS4-S6 region of R. padi field sample. The two R. padi VGSC genes were expressed at all developmental stages and showed similar expression patterns after treatment with beta-cypermethrin. Knockdown of Rpvgsc1 or Rpvgsc2 caused significant reduction in mortality rate of R. padi after exposure to beta-cypermethrin. These findings suggest that the two R. padi VGSC genes are both functional genes.

  6. Pyrethroid Insecticides Directly Activate Microglia Through Interaction With Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Muhammad M; Liu, Jason; Richardson, Jason R

    2017-01-01

    Microglia are considered to be the resident immune cells of the central nervous system and contribute significantly to ongoing neuroinflammation in a variety of neurodegenerative diseases. Recently, we and others identified that voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSC) are present on microglia cells and contribute to excessive accumulation of intracellular Na(+ )and release of major pro-inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). Based on this finding and the fact that pyrethroid pesticides act on VGSC, we hypothesized that exposure of microglia to the pyrethroid pesticides, permethrin and deltamethrin, would activate microglia and increase the release of TNF-α. BV2 cells or primary microglia were treated with 0-5 µM deltamethrin or permethrin in the presence or absence of tetrodotoxin (TTX), a VGSC blocker for 24-48 h. Both pyrethroids caused a rapid Na(+ )influx and increased accumulation of intracellular sodium [(Na(+))i] in the microglia in a dose- and time-dependent manner, which was significantly reduced by TTX. Furthermore, deltamethrin and permethrin increased the release of TNF-α in a dose- and time-dependent manner, which was significantly reduced by pre-treatment of cells with TTX. These results demonstrate that pyrethroid pesticides may directly activate microglial cells through their interaction with microglial VGSC. Because neuroinflammation plays a key role in many neurodegenerative diseases, these data provide an additional mechanism by which exposure to pyrethroid insecticides may contribute to neurodegeneration.

  7. Voltage-gated Na+ channels: multiplicity of expression, plasticity, functional implications and pathophysiological aspects.

    PubMed

    Diss, J K J; Fraser, S P; Djamgoz, M B A

    2004-05-01

    Voltage-gated Na+ channels (VGSCs) are well known for mediating regenerative cell membrane depolarization and conduction of electrical signalling in nerves and muscles. However, VGSCs may also be expressed in traditionally "non-excitable" cell types, including lymphocytes, glia, fibroblasts and metastatic cancer cells of epithelial origin. Both the diversity and modulation of VGSC expression are far more complex than was initially apparent. There are at least 10 different genes that encode the alpha-subunits of VGSCs. Since VGSCs can contribute to a range of human disease conditions, it is important to understand both the control and consequences of VGSC functioning and how these aspects may be altered under pathophysiological conditions. Such mechanisms can be at the transcriptional, pre-translational or post-translational levels. This article reviews recent literature that has contributed to our understanding of how individual VGSC subtypes can generate their unique physiological signatures within different cell types. We also highlight emerging areas of interest, in particular, the finding of multiple expression of individual VGSC subtypes within single cells, the generation of alternative splice variants and the increasingly complex set of mechanisms of plasticity through which individual VGSC subtypes may be subtly controlled, including intracellular trafficking of VGSC protein.

  8. Persistent current blockers of voltage-gated sodium channels: a clinical opportunity for controlling metastatic disease.

    PubMed

    Djamgoz, Mustafa B A; Onkal, Rustem

    2013-01-01

    A range of experimental and clinical data suggests strongly (i) that metastatic progression in carcinomas is accompanied (maybe even preceded) by upregulation of functional voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) and (ii) that VGSC activity enhances cancer cell invasiveness. First, this review outlines the available in vitro and in vivo evidence for the VGSC expression and its proposed pathophysiological role. Second, we question the mechanism(s) whereby VGSC activity can induce such a cancer-promoting effect. We advance the hypothesis that it is the hypoxia-sensitive persistent component of the VGSC current (INaP) that is central to the phenomenon. Indeed, blockers of INaP are very effective in suppressing cancer cell invasiveness in vitro. Based upon these data, UK and international patent applications have been filed which describe the use of INaP blockers, like ranolazine ("Ranexa") and riluzole ("Rilutex"), as anti-metastatic agents. Importantly, since these drugs are already in clinical use, against conditions like cardiac angina and amyotrophic lateral scelerosis, there are no issues of dosage, unacceptable side effects or long-term use. Thus, INaP blockers have the potential to turn cancer into a chronic condition.

  9. Conotoxins targeting neuronal voltage-gated sodium channel subtypes: potential analgesics?

    PubMed

    Knapp, Oliver; McArthur, Jeffrey R; Adams, David J

    2012-11-08

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSC) are the primary mediators of electrical signal amplification and propagation in excitable cells. VGSC subtypes are diverse, with different biophysical and pharmacological properties, and varied tissue distribution. Altered VGSC expression and/or increased VGSC activity in sensory neurons is characteristic of inflammatory and neuropathic pain states. Therefore, VGSC modulators could be used in prospective analgesic compounds. VGSCs have specific binding sites for four conotoxin families: μ-, μO-, δ- and ί-conotoxins. Various studies have identified that the binding site of these peptide toxins is restricted to well-defined areas or domains. To date, only the μ- and μO-family exhibit analgesic properties in animal pain models. This review will focus on conotoxins from the μ- and μO-families that act on neuronal VGSCs. Examples of how these conotoxins target various pharmacologically important neuronal ion channels, as well as potential problems with the development of drugs from conotoxins, will be discussed.

  10. Voltage-gated sodium channels as therapeutic targets in epilepsy and other neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Mantegazza, Massimo; Curia, Giulia; Biagini, Giuseppe; Ragsdale, David S; Avoli, Massimo

    2010-04-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) are key mediators of intrinsic neuronal and muscle excitability. Abnormal VGSC activity is central to the pathophysiology of epileptic seizures, and many of the most widely used antiepileptic drugs, including phenytoin, carbamazepine, and lamotrigine, are inhibitors of VGSC function. These antiepileptic drugs might also be efficacious in the treatment of other nervous system disorders, such as migraine, multiple sclerosis, neurodegenerative diseases, and neuropathic pain. In this Review, we summarise the structure and function of VGSCs and their involvement in the pathophysiology of several neurological disorders. We also describe the biophysical and molecular bases for the mechanisms of action of antiepileptic VGSC blockers and discuss the efficacy of these drugs in the treatment of epileptic and non-epileptic disorders. Overall, clinical and experimental data indicate that these drugs are efficacious for a range of diseases, and that the development of drugs with enhanced selectivity for specific VGSC isoforms might be an effective and novel approach for the treatment of several neurological diseases.

  11. Local anesthetic and antiepileptic drug access and binding to a bacterial voltage-gated sodium channel.

    PubMed

    Boiteux, Céline; Vorobyov, Igor; French, Robert J; French, Christopher; Yarov-Yarovoy, Vladimir; Allen, Toby W

    2014-09-09

    Voltage-gated sodium (Nav) channels are important targets in the treatment of a range of pathologies. Bacterial channels, for which crystal structures have been solved, exhibit modulation by local anesthetic and anti-epileptic agents, allowing molecular-level investigations into sodium channel-drug interactions. These structures reveal no basis for the "hinged lid"-based fast inactivation, seen in eukaryotic Nav channels. Thus, they enable examination of potential mechanisms of use- or state-dependent drug action based on activation gating, or slower pore-based inactivation processes. Multimicrosecond simulations of NavAb reveal high-affinity binding of benzocaine to F203 that is a surrogate for FS6, conserved in helix S6 of Domain IV of mammalian sodium channels, as well as low-affinity sites suggested to stabilize different states of the channel. Phenytoin exhibits a different binding distribution owing to preferential interactions at the membrane and water-protein interfaces. Two drug-access pathways into the pore are observed: via lateral fenestrations connecting to the membrane lipid phase, as well as via an aqueous pathway through the intracellular activation gate, despite being closed. These observations provide insight into drug modulation that will guide further developments of Nav inhibitors.

  12. Anti-voltage-gated potassium channel Kv1.4 antibodies in myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Romi, Fredrik; Suzuki, Shigeaki; Suzuki, Norihiro; Petzold, Axel; Plant, Gordon T; Gilhus, Nils Erik

    2012-07-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune disease characterized by skeletal muscle weakness mainly caused by acetylcholine receptor antibodies. MG can be divided into generalized and ocular, and into early-onset (<50 years of age) and late-onset (≥50 years of age). Anti-Kv1.4 antibodies targeting α-subunits (Kv1.4) of the voltage-gated potassium K(+) channel occurs frequently among patients with severe MG, accounting for 18% of a Japanese MG population. The aim of this study was to characterize the clinical features and serological associations of anti-Kv1.4 antibodies in a Caucasian MG population with mild and localized MG. Serum samples from 129 Caucasian MG patients with mainly ocular symptoms were tested for the presence of anti-Kv1.4 antibodies and compared to clinical and serological parameters. There were 22 (17%) anti-Kv1.4 antibody-positive patients, most of them women with late-onset MG, and all of them with mild MG. This contrasts to the Japanese anti-Kv1.4 antibody-positive patients who suffered from severe MG with bulbar symptoms, myasthenic crisis, thymoma, myocarditis and prolonged QT time on electrocardiography, despite equal anti-Kv1.4 antibody occurrence in both populations. No other clinical or serological parameters influenced anti-Kv1.4 antibody occurrence.

  13. X-ray crystal structure of voltage-gated proton channel.

    PubMed

    Takeshita, Kohei; Sakata, Souhei; Yamashita, Eiki; Fujiwara, Yuichiro; Kawanabe, Akira; Kurokawa, Tatsuki; Okochi, Yoshifumi; Matsuda, Makoto; Narita, Hirotaka; Okamura, Yasushi; Nakagawa, Atsushi

    2014-04-01

    The voltage-gated proton channel Hv1 (or VSOP) has a voltage-sensor domain (VSD) with dual roles of voltage sensing and proton permeation. Its gating is sensitive to pH and Zn(2+). Here we present a crystal structure of mouse Hv1 in the resting state at 3.45-Å resolution. The structure showed a 'closed umbrella' shape with a long helix consisting of the cytoplasmic coiled coil and the voltage-sensing helix, S4, and featured a wide inner-accessible vestibule. Two out of three arginines in S4 were located below the phenylalanine constituting the gating charge-transfer center. The extracellular region of each protomer coordinated a Zn(2+), thus suggesting that Zn(2+) stabilizes the resting state of Hv1 by competing for acidic residues that otherwise form salt bridges with voltage-sensing positive charges on S4. These findings provide a platform for understanding the general principles of voltage sensing and proton permeation.

  14. Selectivity Mechanism of the Voltage-gated Proton Channel, HV1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudev, Todor; Musset, Boris; Morgan, Deri; Cherny, Vladimir V.; Smith, Susan M. E.; Mazmanian, Karine; Decoursey, Thomas E.; Lim, Carmay

    2015-05-01

    Voltage-gated proton channels, HV1, trigger bioluminescence in dinoflagellates, enable calcification in coccolithophores, and play multifarious roles in human health. Because the proton concentration is minuscule, exquisite selectivity for protons over other ions is critical to HV1 function. The selectivity of the open HV1 channel requires an aspartate near an arginine in the selectivity filter (SF), a narrow region that dictates proton selectivity, but the mechanism of proton selectivity is unknown. Here we use a reduced quantum model to elucidate how the Asp-Arg SF selects protons but excludes other ions. Attached to a ring scaffold, the Asp and Arg side chains formed bidentate hydrogen bonds that occlude the pore. Introducing H3O+ protonated the SF, breaking the Asp-Arg linkage and opening the conduction pathway, whereas Na+ or Cl- was trapped by the SF residue of opposite charge, leaving the linkage intact, thus preventing permeation. An Asp-Lys SF behaved like the Asp-Arg one and was experimentally verified to be proton-selective, as predicted. Hence, interacting acidic and basic residues form favorable AspH0-H2O0-Arg+ interactions with hydronium but unfavorable Asp--X-/X+-Arg+ interactions with anions/cations. This proposed mechanism may apply to other proton-selective molecules engaged in bioenergetics, homeostasis, and signaling.

  15. Trafficking regulates the subcellular distribution of voltage-gated sodium channels in primary sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Bao, Lan

    2015-09-30

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (Navs) comprise at least nine pore-forming α subunits. Of these, Nav1.6, Nav1.7, Nav1.8 and Nav1.9 are the most frequently studied in primary sensory neurons located in the dorsal root ganglion and are mainly localized to the cytoplasm. A large pool of intracellular Navs raises the possibility that changes in Nav trafficking could alter channel function. The molecular mediators of Nav trafficking mainly consist of signals within the Navs themselves, interacting proteins and extracellular factors. The surface expression of Navs is achieved by escape from the endoplasmic reticulum and proteasome degradation, forward trafficking and plasma membrane anchoring, and it is also regulated by channel phosphorylation and ubiquitination in primary sensory neurons. Axonal transport and localization of Navs in afferent fibers involves the motor protein KIF5B and scaffold proteins, including contactin and PDZ domain containing 2. Localization of Nav1.6 to the nodes of Ranvier in myelinated fibers of primary sensory neurons requires node formation and the submembrane cytoskeletal protein complex. These findings inform our understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying Nav trafficking in primary sensory neurons.

  16. Expression patterns, mutation detection and RNA interference of Rhopalosiphum padi voltage-gated sodium channel genes

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Yayun; Peng, Xiong; Wang, Kang; Lin, Fangfei; Li, Yuting; Chen, Maohua

    2016-01-01

    The voltage-gated sodium channel (VGSC) is the target of sodium-channel-blocking insecticides. Traditionally, animals were thought to have only one VGSC gene comprising a α-subunit with four homologous domains (DI–DIV). The present study showed that Rhopalosiphum padi, an economically important crop pest, owned a unique heterodimeric VGSC (H1 and H2 subunits) encoded by two genes (Rpvgsc1 and Rpvgsc2), which is unusual in insects and other animals. The open reading frame (ORF) of Rpvgsc1 consisted 1150 amino acids, and the ORF of Rpvgsc2 had 957 amino acids. Rpvgsc1 showed 64.1% amino acid identity to DI–DII of Drosophila melanogaster VGSC and Rpvgsc2 showed 64.0% amino acid identity to DIII–DIV of D. melanogaster VGSC. A M918L mutation previously reported in pyrethroids-resistant strains of other insects was found in the IIS4-S6 region of R. padi field sample. The two R. padi VGSC genes were expressed at all developmental stages and showed similar expression patterns after treatment with beta-cypermethrin. Knockdown of Rpvgsc1 or Rpvgsc2 caused significant reduction in mortality rate of R. padi after exposure to beta-cypermethrin. These findings suggest that the two R. padi VGSC genes are both functional genes. PMID:27439594

  17. VOLTAGE-GATED POTASSIUM CHANNELS AT THE CROSSROADS OF NEURONAL FUNCTION, ISCHEMIC TOLERANCE, AND NEURODEGENERATION

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Niyathi Hegde; Aizenman, Elias

    2013-01-01

    Voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels are widely expressed in the central and peripheral nervous system, and are crucial mediators of neuronal excitability. Importantly, these channels also actively participate in cellular and molecular signaling pathways that regulate the life and death of neurons. Injury-mediated increased K+ efflux through Kv2.1 channels promotes neuronal apoptosis, contributing to widespread neuronal loss in neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease and stroke. In contrast, some forms of neuronal activity can dramatically alter Kv2.1 channel phosphorylation levels and influence their localization. These changes are normally accompanied by modifications in channel voltage-dependence, which may be neuroprotective within the context of ischemic injury. Kv1 and Kv7 channel dysfunction leads to neuronal hyperexcitability that critically contributes to the pathophysiology of human clinical disorders such as episodic ataxia and epilepsy. This review summarizes the neurotoxic, neuroprotective, and neuroregulatory roles of Kv channels, and highlights the consequences of Kv channel dysfunction on neuronal physiology. The studies described in this review thus underscore the importance of normal Kv channel function in neurons, and emphasize the therapeutic potential of targeting Kv channels in the treatment of a wide range of neurological diseases. PMID:24323720

  18. Biogenesis of the pore architecture of a voltage-gated potassium channel.

    PubMed

    Gajewski, Christine; Dagcan, Alper; Roux, Benoit; Deutsch, Carol

    2011-02-22

    The pore domain of voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels consists of transmembrane helices S5 and S6, the turret, the pore helix, the selectivity filter, and the loop preceding S6, with a tertiary reentrant structure between S5 and S6. Using biogenic intermediates, mass tagging (pegylation), and a molecular tape measure, we explored the possibility that the first stages of pore formation occur prior to oligomerization of the transmembrane core. Pegylation of introduced cysteines shows that the pore helix, but not the turret, forms a compact secondary structure in the terminal 20 Å of the ribosomal tunnel. We assessed the tertiary fold of the pore loop in monomeric constructs by determining the relative accessibilities of select cysteines using the kinetics of pegylation. Turret residues are accessible at the extracellular surface. In contrast, pore helix residues are less accessible. All-atom molecular dynamics simulations of a single Kv monomer in a solvated lipid membrane indicate that secondary and tertiary folds are stable over 650 ns. These results are consistent with acquisition of a tertiary reentrant pore architecture at the monomer stage of Kv biogenesis and begin to define a plausible sequence of folding events in the formation of Kv channels.

  19. The sorting receptor Rer1 controls Purkinje cell function via voltage gated sodium channels

    PubMed Central

    Valkova, Christina; Liebmann, Lutz; Krämer, Andreas; Hübner, Christian A.; Kaether, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    Rer1 is a sorting receptor in the early secretory pathway that controls the assembly and the cell surface transport of selected multimeric membrane protein complexes. Mice with a Purkinje cell (PC) specific deletion of Rer1 showed normal polarization and differentiation of PCs and normal development of the cerebellum. However, PC-specific loss of Rer1 led to age-dependent motor deficits in beam walk, ladder climbing and gait. Analysis of brain sections revealed a specific degeneration of PCs in the anterior cerebellar lobe in old animals. Electrophysiological recordings demonstrated severe deficits in spontaneous action potential generation. Measurements of resurgent currents indicated decreased surface densities of voltage-gated sodium channels (Nav), but not changes in individual channels. Analysis of mice with a whole brain Rer1-deletion demonstrated a strong down-regulation of Nav1.6 and 1.1 in the absence of Rer1, whereas protein levels of the related Cav2.1 and of Kv3.3 and 7.2 channels were not affected. The data suggest that Rer1 controls the assembly and transport of Nav1.1 and 1.6, the principal sodium channels responsible for recurrent firing, in PCs. PMID:28117367

  20. Nonequilibrium response of a voltage gated sodium ion channel and biophysical characterization of dynamic hysteresis.

    PubMed

    Pal, Krishnendu; Das, Biswajit; Gangopadhyay, Gautam

    2017-02-21

    Here we have studied the dynamic as well as the non-equilibrium thermodynamic response properties of voltage-gated Na-ion channel. Using sinusoidally oscillating external voltage protocol we have both kinetically and energetically studied the non-equilibrium steady state properties of dynamic hysteresis in details. We have introduced a method of estimating the work done associated with the dynamic memory due to a cycle of oscillating voltage. We have quantitatively characterised the loop area of ionic current which gives information about the work done to sustain the dynamic memory only for ion conduction, while the loop area of total entropy production rate gives the estimate of work done for overall gating dynamics. The maximum dynamic memory of Na-channel not only depends on the frequency and amplitude but it also depends sensitively on the mean of the oscillating voltage and here we have shown how the system optimize the dynamic memory itself in the biophysical range of field parameters. The relation between the average ionic current with increasing frequency corresponds to the nature of the average dissipative work done at steady state. It is also important to understand that the utilization of the energy from the external field can not be directly obtained only from the measurement of ionic current but also requires nonequilibrium thermodynamic study.

  1. In vivo potency of different ligands on voltage-gated sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Safrany-Fark, Arpad; Petrovszki, Zita; Kekesi, Gabriella; Liszli, Peter; Benedek, Gyorgy; Keresztes, Csilla; Horvath, Gyongyi

    2015-09-05

    The Ranvier nodes of thick myelinated nerve fibers contain almost exclusively voltage-gated sodium channels (Navs), while the unmyelinated fibers have several receptors (e.g., cannabinoid, transient receptor potential vanilloid receptor 1), too. Therefore, a nerve which contains only motor fibers can be an appropriate in vivo model for selective influence of Navs. The goals were to evaluate the potency of local anesthetic drugs on such a nerve in vivo; furthermore, to investigate the effects of ligands with different structures (arachidonic acid, anandamide, capsaicin and nisoxetine) that were proved to inhibit Navs in vitro with antinociceptive properties. The marginal mandibular branch of the facial nerve was explored in anesthetized Wistar rats; after its stimulation, the electrical activity of the vibrissae muscles was registered following the perineural injection of different drugs. Lidocaine, bupivacaine and ropivacaine evoked dose-dependent decrease in electromyographic activity, i.e., lidocaine had lower potency than bupivacaine or ropivacaine. QX-314 did not cause any effect by itself, but its co-application with lidocaine produced a prolonged inhibition. Nisoxetine had a very low potency. While anandamide and capsaicin in high doses caused about 50% decrease in the amplitude of action potential, arachidonic acid did not influence the responses. We proved that the classical local anesthetics have high potency on motor nerves, suggesting that this method might be a reliable model for selective targeting of Navs in vivo circumstances. It is proposed that the effects of these endogenous lipids and capsaicin on sensory fibers are not primarily mediated by Navs.

  2. Functional Interaction between the Scaffold Protein Kidins220/ARMS and Neuronal Voltage-Gated Na+ Channels*

    PubMed Central

    Cesca, Fabrizia; Satapathy, Annyesha; Ferrea, Enrico; Nieus, Thierry; Benfenati, Fabio; Scholz-Starke, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Kidins220 (kinase D-interacting substrate of 220 kDa)/ankyrin repeat-rich membrane spanning (ARMS) acts as a signaling platform at the plasma membrane and is implicated in a multitude of neuronal functions, including the control of neuronal activity. Here, we used the Kidins220−/− mouse model to study the effects of Kidins220 ablation on neuronal excitability. Multielectrode array recordings showed reduced evoked spiking activity in Kidins220−/− hippocampal networks, which was compatible with the increased excitability of GABAergic neurons determined by current-clamp recordings. Spike waveform analysis further indicated an increased sodium conductance in this neuronal subpopulation. Kidins220 association with brain voltage-gated sodium channels was shown by co-immunoprecipitation experiments and Na+ current recordings in transfected HEK293 cells, which revealed dramatic alterations of kinetics and voltage dependence. Finally, an in silico interneuronal model incorporating the Kidins220-induced Na+ current alterations reproduced the firing phenotype observed in Kidins220−/− neurons. These results identify Kidins220 as a novel modulator of Nav channel activity, broadening our understanding of the molecular mechanisms regulating network excitability. PMID:26037926

  3. Voltage-gated sodium channels and cancer: is excitability their primary role?

    PubMed Central

    Roger, Sébastien; Gillet, Ludovic; Le Guennec, Jean-Yves; Besson, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (NaV) are molecular characteristics of excitable cells. Their activation, triggered by membrane depolarization, generates transient sodium currents that initiate action potentials in neurons and muscle cells. Sodium currents were discovered by Hodgkin and Huxley using the voltage clamp technique and reported in their landmark series of papers in 1952. It was only in the 1980's that sodium channel proteins from excitable membranes were molecularly characterized by Catterall and his collaborators. Non-excitable cells can also express NaV channels in physiological conditions as well as in pathological conditions. These NaV channels can sustain biological roles that are not related to the generation of action potentials. Interestingly, it is likely that the abnormal expression of NaV in pathological tissues can reflect the re-expression of a fetal phenotype. This is especially true in epithelial cancer cells for which these channels have been identified and sodium currents recorded, while it was not the case for cells from the cognate normal tissues. In cancers, the functional activity of NaV appeared to be involved in regulating the proliferative, migrative, and invasive properties of cells. This review is aimed at addressing the non-excitable roles of NaV channels with a specific emphasis in the regulation of cancer cell biology. PMID:26283962

  4. Decreased voltage-gated potassium currents in rat dorsal root ganglion neurons after chronic constriction injury.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yun; Wu, Yang; Zhao, Bo; Xia, Zhongyuan

    2016-01-20

    Voltage-gated potassium channels (KV) regulate pain transmission by controlling neuronal excitability. Changes in KV expression patterns may thus contribute toward hyperalgesia following nerve injury. The aim of this study was to characterize KV current density in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons following chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the right sciatic nerve, a robust model of post-traumatic neuropathic pain. The study examined changes in small-diameter potassium ion currents (<30 µm) in neurons in the L4-L6 DRG following CCI by whole-cell patch-clamping and the association with post-CCI mechanical and thermal nociceptive thresholds. Compared with the control group, 7 days after CCI, the mechanical force and temperature required to elicit ipsilateral foot withdrawal decreased significantly, indicating tactile allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia. Post-CCI neurons had a significantly lower rheobase current and depolarized resting membrane potential than controls, suggesting KV current downregulation. Some ipsilateral DRG neurons also had spontaneous action potentials and repetitive firing. There was a 55% reduction in the total KV current density caused by a 55% decrease in the sustained delayed rectifier potassium ion current (IK) density and a 17% decrease in the transient A-type potassium ion current (IA) density. These results indicated that changes in DRG neuron IK and IA current density and concomitant afferent hyperexcitability may contribute toward neuropathic pain following injury. The rat CCI model may prove valuable for examining pathogenic mechanisms and potential therapies, such as KV channel modulators.

  5. Reverberation of excitation in neuronal networks interconnected through voltage-gated gap junction channels

    PubMed Central

    Maciunas, Kestutis; Snipas, Mindaugas; Paulauskas, Nerijus

    2016-01-01

    We combined Hodgkin–Huxley equations and gating models of gap junction (GJ) channels to simulate the spread of excitation in two-dimensional networks composed of neurons interconnected by voltage-gated GJs. Each GJ channel contains two fast and slow gates, each exhibiting current–voltage (I-V) rectification and gating properties that depend on transjunctional voltage (Vj). The data obtained show how junctional conductance (gj), which is necessary for synchronization of the neuronal network, depends on its size and the intrinsic firing rate of neurons. A phase shift between action potentials (APs) of neighboring neurons creates bipolar, short-lasting Vj spikes of approximately ±100 mV that induce Vj gating, leading to a small decay of gj, which can accumulate into larger decays during bursting activity of neurons. We show that I-V rectification of GJs in local regions of the two-dimensional network of neurons can lead to unidirectional AP transfer and consequently to reverberation of excitation. This reverberation can be initiated by a single electrical pulse and terminated by a low-amplitude pulse applied in a specific window of reverberation cycle. Thus, the model accounts for the influence of dynamically modulatable electrical synapses in shaping the function of a neuronal network and the formation of reverberation, which, as proposed earlier, may be important for the development of short-term memory and its consolidation into long-term memory. PMID:26880752

  6. Expression patterns, mutation detection and RNA interference of Rhopalosiphum padi voltage-gated sodium channel genes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Yayun; Peng, Xiong; Wang, Kang; Lin, Fangfei; Li, Yuting; Chen, Maohua

    2016-07-01

    The voltage-gated sodium channel (VGSC) is the target of sodium-channel-blocking insecticides. Traditionally, animals were thought to have only one VGSC gene comprising a α-subunit with four homologous domains (DI–DIV). The present study showed that Rhopalosiphum padi, an economically important crop pest, owned a unique heterodimeric VGSC (H1 and H2 subunits) encoded by two genes (Rpvgsc1 and Rpvgsc2), which is unusual in insects and other animals. The open reading frame (ORF) of Rpvgsc1 consisted 1150 amino acids, and the ORF of Rpvgsc2 had 957 amino acids. Rpvgsc1 showed 64.1% amino acid identity to DI–DII of Drosophila melanogaster VGSC and Rpvgsc2 showed 64.0% amino acid identity to DIII–DIV of D. melanogaster VGSC. A M918L mutation previously reported in pyrethroids-resistant strains of other insects was found in the IIS4-S6 region of R. padi field sample. The two R. padi VGSC genes were expressed at all developmental stages and showed similar expression patterns after treatment with beta-cypermethrin. Knockdown of Rpvgsc1 or Rpvgsc2 caused significant reduction in mortality rate of R. padi after exposure to beta-cypermethrin. These findings suggest that the two R. padi VGSC genes are both functional genes.

  7. The voltage-gated proton channel Hv1 enhances brain damage from ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Wu, Long-Jun; Wu, Gongxiong; Akhavan Sharif, M Reza; Baker, Amanda; Jia, Yonghui; Fahey, Frederic H; Luo, Hongbo R; Feener, Edward P; Clapham, David E

    2012-03-04

    Phagocytic cell NADPH oxidase (NOX) generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) as part of innate immunity. Unfortunately, ischemia can also induce this pathway and inflict damage on native cells. The voltage-gated proton channel Hv1 enables NOX function by compensating cellular loss of electrons with protons. Accordingly, we investigated whether NOX-mediated brain damage in stroke can be inhibited by suppression of Hv1. We found that mouse and human brain microglia, but not neurons or astrocytes, expressed large Hv1-mediated currents. Hv1 was required for NOX-dependent ROS generation in brain microglia in situ and in vivo. Mice lacking Hv1 were protected from NOX-mediated neuronal death and brain damage 24 h after stroke. These results indicate that Hv1-dependent ROS production is responsible for a substantial fraction of brain damage at early time points after ischemic stroke and provide a rationale for Hv1 as a therapeutic target for the treatment of ischemic stroke.

  8. Neuregulin directly decreases voltage-gated sodium current in hippocampal ErbB4-expressing interneurons.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Megan J; Leiva-Salcedo, Elias; Buonanno, Andres

    2012-10-03

    The Neuregulin 1 (NRG1)/ErbB4 signaling pathway has been genetically and functionally implicated in the etiology underlying schizophrenia, and in the regulation of glutamatergic pyramidal neuron function and plasticity. However, ErbB4 receptors are expressed in subpopulations of GABAergic interneurons, but not in hippocampal or cortical pyramidal neurons, indicating that NRG1 effects on principal neurons are indirect. Consistent with these findings, NRG1 effects on hippocampal long-term potentiation at CA1 pyramidal neuron synapses in slices are mediated indirectly by dopamine. Here we studied whether NRG/ErbB signaling directly regulates interneuron intrinsic excitability by pharmacologically isolating ErbB4-expressing neurons in rat dissociated hippocampal cultures, which lack dopaminergic innervation. We found that NRG1 acutely attenuates ErbB4-expressing interneuron excitability by depolarizing the firing threshold; neurons treated with the pan-ErbB inhibitor PD158780 or negative for ErbB4 were unaffected. These effects of NRG1 are primarily attributable to decreased voltage-gated sodium channel activity, as current density was attenuated by ∼60%. In stark contrast, NRG1 had minor effects on whole-cell potassium currents. Our data reveal the direct actions of NRG1 signaling in ErbB4-expressing interneurons, and offer novel insight into how NRG1/ErbB4 signaling can impact hippocampal activity.

  9. A specialized molecular motion opens the Hv1 voltage-gated proton channel

    PubMed Central

    Isacoff, Ehud Y.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The Hv1 proton channel is unique among voltage-gated channels for containing the pore and gate within its voltage-sensing domain (VSD). Opening of the pore has been proposed to include assembly of the selectivity filter between the third arginine (R3) of S4 and an aspartate of S1 (D1). We asked whether gating involves a motion of S1 using Ciona intestinalis Hv1. We find that channel opening is concomitant with solution access from the cytoplasm deep into the pore-lining face of S1. Voltage- and patch-clamp fluorometry show that this involves a motion of S1 relative to its surround. S1 motion, and the S4 motion that precedes it, are each influenced by residues on the other helix, suggesting a dynamic interaction between S1 and S4. Our findings suggest that the S1 of Hv1 has specialized to function as part of the channel's gate. PMID:25730777

  10. Crystal structure of dimeric cardiac L-type calcium channel regulatory domains bridged by Ca[superscript 2+]·calmodulins

    SciTech Connect

    Fallon, Jennifer L.; Baker, Mariah R.; Xiong, Liangwen; Loy, Ryan E.; Yang, Guojun; Dirksen, Robert T.; Hamilton, Susan L.; Quiocho, Florante A.

    2009-11-10

    Voltage-dependent calcium channels (Ca(V)) open in response to changes in membrane potential, but their activity is modulated by Ca(2+) binding to calmodulin (CaM). Structural studies of this family of channels have focused on CaM bound to the IQ motif; however, the minimal differences between structures cannot adequately describe CaM's role in the regulation of these channels. We report a unique crystal structure of a 77-residue fragment of the Ca(V)1.2 alpha(1) subunit carboxyl terminus, which includes a tandem of the pre-IQ and IQ domains, in complex with Ca(2+).CaM in 2 distinct binding modes. The structure of the Ca(V)1.2 fragment is an unusual dimer of 2 coiled-coiled pre-IQ regions bridged by 2 Ca(2+).CaMs interacting with the pre-IQ regions and a canonical Ca(V)1-IQ-Ca(2+).CaM complex. Native Ca(V)1.2 channels are shown to be a mixture of monomers/dimers and a point mutation in the pre-IQ region predicted to abolish the coiled-coil structure significantly reduces Ca(2+)-dependent inactivation of heterologously expressed Ca(V)1.2 channels.

  11. Ligand based approach to L-type calcium channel by imidazo[2,1-b]thiazole-1,4-dihydropyridines: from heart activity to brain affinity.

    PubMed

    Locatelli, Alessandra; Cosconati, Sandro; Micucci, Matteo; Leoni, Alberto; Marinelli, Luciana; Bedini, Andrea; Ioan, Pierfranco; Spampinato, Santi Mario; Novellino, Ettore; Chiarini, Alberto; Budriesi, Roberta

    2013-05-23

    The synthesis, characterization, and functional in vitro assay in cardiac and smooth muscle (vascular and nonvascular) of a series of 4-imidazo[2,1-b]thiazole-1,4-dihydropyridines are reported. To define the calcium blocker nature of the imidazo[2,1-b]thiazole-1,4-DHPs and their selectivity on Cav1.2 and Cav1.3 isoforms, we performed binding studies on guinea pig atrial and ventricular membranes on intact cells expressing the cloned Cav1.2a subunit and on rat brain cortex. To get major insights into the reasons for the affinity for Cav1.2 and/or Cav1.3, molecular modeling studies were also undertaken. Some physicochemical and pharmacokinetic properties of selected compounds were calculated and compared. All the biological data collected and reported herein allowed us to rationalize the structure-activity relationship of the 4-imidazo[2,1-b]thiazole-1,4-DHPs and to identify which of these enhanced the activity at the central level.

  12. Simulating the Activation of Voltage Sensing Domain for a Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel Using Polarizable Force Field.

    PubMed

    Sun, Rui-Ning; Gong, Haipeng

    2017-03-02

    Voltage-gated sodium (NaV) channels play vital roles in the signal transduction of excitable cells. Upon activation of a NaV channel, the change of transmembrane voltage triggers conformational change of the voltage sensing domain, which then elicits opening of the pore domain and thus allows an influx of Na(+) ions. Description of this process with atomistic details is in urgent demand. In this work, we simulated the partial activation process of the voltage sensing domain of a prokaryotic NaV channel using a polarizable force field. We not only observed the conformational change of the voltage sensing domain from resting to preactive state, but also rigorously estimated the free energy profile along the identified reaction pathway. Comparison with the control simulation using an additive force field indicates that voltage-gating thermodynamics of NaV channels may be inaccurately described without considering the electrostatic polarization effect.

  13. The depressant scorpion neurotoxin LqqIT2 selectively modulates the insect voltage-gated sodium channel.

    PubMed

    Bosmans, Frank; Martin-Eauclaire, Marie-France; Tytgat, Jan

    2005-03-15

    LqqIT2 is a depressant neurotoxin present in the venom of the Leiurus quinquestriatus quinquestriatus scorpion, one of the world's most dangerous scorpions endemic to dry habitats in Africa and Asia. In order to determine its efficacy, potency and selectivity, LqqIT2 was subjected for the first time to an electrophysiological and pharmacological comparison between two different cloned sodium channels expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Aside from typical beta-toxin effects, LqqIT2 also affected the inactivation process and ion selectivity of the insect voltage-gated sodium channel. The most interesting feature of LqqIT2 is its total insect-selectivity. At a concentration of 1 microM, the insect-voltage-gated sodium channel, para, was profoundly modulated while its mammalian counterpart, the rat brain Na(v)1.2 channel, was not affected. This trait offers excellent prospects for the development of novel insecticides.

  14. Regulation of voltage-gated sodium current by endogenous Src family kinases in cochlear spiral ganglion neurons in culture.

    PubMed

    Feng, Shuang; Pflueger, Melissa; Lin, Shuang-Xiu; Groveman, Bradley R; Su, Jiping; Yu, Xian-Min

    2012-04-01

    Voltage-gated sodium (Na+) and potassium (K+)channels have been found to be regulated by Src family kinases(SFKs).However, how these channels are regulated by SFKs in cochlear spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) remains unknown.Here, we report that altering the activity of endogenous SFKs modulated voltage-gated Na+, but not K+, currents recorded in embryonic SGNs in culture. Voltage-gated Na+ current was suppressed by inhibition of endogenous SFKs or just Src and potentiated by the activation of these enzymes. Detailed investigations showed that under basal conditions, SFK inhibitor application did not significantly affect the voltage-dependent activation, but shifted the steady-state inactivation curves of Na+ currents and delayed the recovery of Na+ currents from inactivation. Application of Src specific inhibitor, Src40–58,not only shifted the inactivation curve but also delayed the recovery of Na+ currents and moved the voltage-dependent activation curve towards the left. The pre-inhibition of SFKs occluded all the effects induced by Src40–58 application, except the left shift of the activation curve. The activation of SFKs did not change either steady-state inactivation or recovery of Na+ currents, but caused the left shift of the activation curve.SFK inhibitor application effectively prevented all the effects induced by SFK activation, suggesting that both the voltage-dependent activation and steady-state inactivation of Na+ current are subjects of SFK regulation. The different effects induced by activation versus inhibition of SFKs implied that under basal conditions, endogenously active and inactive SFKs might be differentially involved in the regulation of voltage-gated Na+ channels in SGNs.

  15. Solution structure and alanine scan of a spider toxin that affects the activation of mammalian voltage-gated sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Corzo, Gerardo; Sabo, Jennifer K; Bosmans, Frank; Billen, Bert; Villegas, Elba; Tytgat, Jan; Norton, Raymond S

    2007-02-16

    Magi 5, from the hexathelid spider Macrothele gigas, is a 29-residue polypeptide containing three disulfide bridges. It binds specifically to receptor site 4 on mammalian voltage-gated sodium channels and competes with scorpion beta-toxins, such as Css IV from Centruroides suffusus suffusus. As a consequence, Magi 5 shifts the activation voltage of the mammalian rNav1.2a channel to more hyperpolarized voltages, whereas the insect channel, DmNav1, is not affected. To gain insight into toxin-channel interactions, Magi 5 and 23 analogues were synthesized. The three-dimensional structure of Magi 5 in aqueous solution was determined, and its voltage-gated sodium channel-binding surfaces were mapped onto this structure using data from electrophysiological measurements on a series of Ala-substituted analogues. The structure clearly resembles the inhibitor cystine knot structural motif, although the triple-stranded beta-sheet typically found in that motif is partially distorted in Magi 5. The interactive surface of Magi 5 toward voltage-gated sodium channels resembles in some respects the Janus-faced atracotoxins, with functionally important charged residues on one face of the toxin and hydrophobic residues on the other. Magi 5 also resembles the scorpion beta-toxin Css IV, which has distinct nonpolar and charged surfaces that are critical for channel binding and has a key Glu involved in voltage sensor trapping. These two distinct classes of toxin, with different amino acid sequences and different structures, may utilize similar groups of residues on their surface to achieve the common end of modifying voltage-gated sodium channel function.

  16. Effect of capsaicin on voltage-gated currents of trigeminal neurones in cell culture and slice preparations.

    PubMed

    Balla, Z; Szoke, E; Czéh, G; Szolcsányi, J

    2001-01-01

    Effects of capsaicin on voltage-gated currents were examined in vitro by whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from small neurones of rat trigeminal ganglia either in slice preparations or in different cell cultures. Cells were classified as sensitive to capsaicin if they responded with inward current and/or conductance change to the agent in nanomolar concentration. Capsaicin (150 to 330 nM) in sensitive cells reduced the mixed inward current evoked by depolarizing step or ramp commands in all preparations. In cultured cells, the inward current was depressed to 32.78 +/- 26.42% (n = 27) of the control. Both the tetrodotoxin-sensitive and -resistant inward currents were affected. The data support the concept that capsaicin besides acting on VR-1 receptors inhibits also some voltage gated channels. In 34 cultured cells, capsaicin increased the slope conductance to 170.5 +/- 68%. Percentage of capsaicin sensitive cells observed in nerve growth factor-treated cultured cell populations was higher (77.8%) than in the two other preparations (14.3 or 38.8%). It is concluded that 1) depression of the voltage-gated currents may play an important role in the functional desensitization of the sensory receptors and in the analgesic effect induced by the agent and 2) cell body of sensory neurones under native condition seems less sensitive to capsaicin then that of cells cultured in the presence of nerve growth factor.

  17. Nuclear calcium sensors reveal that repetition of trains of synaptic stimuli boosts nuclear calcium signaling in CA1 pyramidal neurons.

    PubMed

    Bengtson, C Peter; Freitag, H Eckehard; Weislogel, Jan-Marek; Bading, Hilmar

    2010-12-15

    Nuclear calcium is a key signal in the dialogue between synapse and nucleus that controls the genomic responses required for persistent adaptations, including memory and acquired neuroprotection. The amplitude and duration of nuclear calcium transients specify activity-induced transcriptional changes. However, the precise relationship between synaptic input and nuclear calcium output is unknown. Here, we used stereotaxic delivery to the rat brain of recombinant adeno-associated viruses encoding nuclear-targeted calcium sensors to assess nuclear calcium transients in CA1 pyramidal neurons after stimulation of the Schaffer collaterals. We show that in acute hippocampal slices, a burst of synaptic activity elicits a nuclear calcium signal with a regenerative component at above-threshold stimulation intensities. Using classical stimulation paradigms (i.e., high-frequency stimulation (HFS) and θ burst stimulation (TBS)) to induce early LTP (E-LTP) and transcription-dependent late LTP (L-LTP), we found that the magnitude of nuclear calcium signals and the number of action potentials activated by synaptic stimulation trains are greatly amplified by their repetition. Nuclear calcium signals and action potential generation were reduced by blockade of either NMDA receptors or L-type voltage-gated calcium channels, but not by procedures that lead to internal calcium store depletion or by blockade of metabotropic glutamate receptors. These findings identify a repetition-induced switch in nuclear calcium signaling that correlates with the transition from E-LTP to L-LTP, and may explain why the transcription-dependent phase of L-LTP is not induced by a single HFS or TBS but requires repeated trains of activity. Recombinant, nuclear-targeted indicators may prove useful for further analysis of nuclear calcium signaling in vivo.

  18. Effect of dexamethasone on voltage-gated Na+ channel in cultured human bronchial smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Toshiaki; Jo, Taisuke; Meguro, Kentaro; Oonuma, Hitoshi; Ma, Ji; Kubota, Nami; Imuta, Hiroyuki; Takano, Haruhito; Iida, Haruko; Nagase, Takahide; Nagata, Taiji

    2008-06-06

    Voltage-gated Na(+) channel (I(Na)) encoded by SCN9A mRNA is expressed in cultured human bronchial smooth muscle cells. We investigated the effects of dexamethasone on I(Na), by using whole-cell voltage clamp techniques, reverse transcriptase/polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Acute application of dexamethasone (10(-6) M) did not affect I(Na). However, the percentage of the cells with I(Na) was significantly less in cells pretreated with dexamethasone for 48 h, and the current-density of I(Na) adjusted by cell capacitance in cells with I(Na) was also decreased in cells treated with dexamethasone. RT-PCR analysis showed that alpha and beta subunits mRNA of I(Na) mainly consisted of SCN9A and SCN1beta, respectively. Treatment with dexamethasone for 24-48 h inhibited the expression of SCN9A mRNA. The inhibitory effect of dexamethasone was concentration-dependent, and was observed at a concentration higher than 0.1 nM. The effect of dexamethasone on SCN9A mRNA was not blocked by spironolactone, but inhibited by mifepristone. The inhibitory effects of dexamethasone on SCN9A mRNA could not be explained by the changes of the stabilization of mRNA measured by using actinomycin D. These results suggest that dexamethasone inhibited I(Na) encoded by SCN9A mRNA in cultured human bronchial smooth muscle cells by inhibiting the transcription via the glucocorticoid receptor.

  19. Regulation of membrane excitability: a convergence on voltage-gated sodium conductance.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wei-Hsiang; Baines, Richard A

    2015-02-01

    The voltage-gated sodium channel (Nav) plays a key role in regulation of neuronal excitability. Aberrant regulation of Nav expression and/or function can result in an imbalance in neuronal activity which can progress to epilepsy. Regulation of Nav activity is achieved by coordination of a multitude of mechanisms including RNA alternative splicing and translational repression. Understanding of these regulatory mechanisms is complicated by extensive genetic redundancy: the mammalian genome encodes ten Navs. By contrast, the genome of the fruitfly, Drosophila melanogaster, contains just one Nav homologue, encoded by paralytic (DmNa v ). Analysis of splicing in DmNa v shows variants exhibit distinct gating properties including varying magnitudes of persistent sodium current (INaP). Splicing by Pasilla, an identified RNA splicing factor, alters INaP magnitude as part of an activity-dependent mechanism. Enhanced INaP promotes membrane hyperexcitability that is associated with seizure-like behaviour in Drosophila. Nova-2, a mammalian Pasilla homologue, has also been linked to splicing of Navs and, moreover, mouse gene knockouts display seizure-like behaviour.Expression level of Navs is also regulated through a mechanism of translational repression in both flies and mammals. The translational repressor Pumilio (Pum) can bind to Na v transcripts and repress the normal process of translation, thus regulating sodium current (INa) density in neurons. Pum2-deficient mice exhibit spontaneous EEG abnormalities. Taken together, aberrant regulation of Nav function and/or expression is often epileptogenic. As such, a better understanding of regulation of membrane excitability through RNA alternative splicing and translational repression of Navs should provide new leads to treat epilepsy.

  20. Regulation of persistent Na current by interactions between beta subunits of voltage-gated Na channels.

    PubMed

    Aman, Teresa K; Grieco-Calub, Tina M; Chen, Chunling; Rusconi, Raffaella; Slat, Emily A; Isom, Lori L; Raman, Indira M

    2009-02-18

    The beta subunits of voltage-gated Na channels (Scnxb) regulate the gating of pore-forming alpha subunits, as well as their trafficking and localization. In heterologous expression systems, beta1, beta2, and beta3 subunits influence inactivation and persistent current in different ways. To test how the beta4 protein regulates Na channel gating, we transfected beta4 into HEK (human embryonic kidney) cells stably expressing Na(V)1.1. Unlike a free peptide with a sequence from the beta4 cytoplasmic domain, the full-length beta4 protein did not block open channels. Instead, beta4 expression favored open states by shifting activation curves negative, decreasing the slope of the inactivation curve, and increasing the percentage of noninactivating current. Consequently, persistent current tripled in amplitude. Expression of beta1 or chimeric subunits including the beta1 extracellular domain, however, favored inactivation. Coexpressing Na(V)1.1 and beta4 with beta1 produced tiny persistent currents, indicating that beta1 overcomes the effects of beta4 in heterotrimeric channels. In contrast, beta1(C121W), which contains an extracellular epilepsy-associated mutation, did not counteract the destabilization of inactivation by beta4 and also required unusually large depolarizations for channel opening. In cultured hippocampal neurons transfected with beta4, persistent current was slightly but significantly increased. Moreover, in beta4-expressing neurons from Scn1b and Scn1b/Scn2b null mice, entry into inactivated states was slowed. These data suggest that beta1 and beta4 have antagonistic roles, the former favoring inactivation, and the latter favoring activation. Because increased Na channel availability may facilitate action potential firing, these results suggest a mechanism for seizure susceptibility of both mice and humans with disrupted beta1 subunits.

  1. Clinical relevance of voltage-gated potassium channel–complex antibodies in children

    PubMed Central

    Hacohen, Yael; Singh, Rahul; Rossi, Meghan; Lang, Bethan; Hemingway, Cheryl; Lim, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess the clinical and immunologic findings in children with voltage-gated potassium channel (VGKC)-complex antibodies (Abs). Methods: Thirty-nine of 363 sera, referred from 2 pediatric centers from 2007 to 2013, had been reported positive (>100 pM) for VGKC-complex Abs. Medical records were reviewed retrospectively and the patients' condition was independently classified as inflammatory (n = 159) or noninflammatory (n = 204). Positive sera (>100 pM) were tested/retested for the VGKC-complex Ab–positive complex proteins LGI1 and CASPR2, screened for binding to live hippocampal neurons, and 12 high-titer sera (>400 pM) tested by radioimmunoassay for binding to VGKC Kv1 subunits with or without intracellular postsynaptic density proteins. Results: VGKC-complex Abs were found in 39 children, including 20% of encephalopathies and 7.6% of other conditions (p = 0.001). Thirty children had inflammatory conditions and 9 had noninflammatory etiologies but titers >400 pM (n = 12) were found only in inflammatory diseases (p < 0.0001). Four sera, including from 2 children with coexisting NMDA receptor Abs and one with Guillain-Barré syndrome and Abs to both LGI1 and CASPR2, bound to hippocampal neurons. None of the sera bound detectably to VGKC Kv1 subunits on live HEK cells, but 4 of 12 >400 pM sera immunoprecipitated VGKC Kv1 subunits, with or without postsynaptic densities, extracted from transfected cells. Conclusion: Positive VGKC-complex Abs cannot be taken to indicate a specific clinical syndrome in children, but appear to be a nonspecific biomarker of inflammatory neurologic diseases, particularly of encephalopathy. Some of the Abs may bind to intracellular epitopes on the VGKC subunits, or to the intracellular interacting proteins, but in many the targets remain undefined. PMID:26296514

  2. Antipsychotics, chlorpromazine and haloperidol inhibit voltage-gated proton currents in BV2 microglial cells.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hyewon; Song, Jin-Ho

    2014-09-05

    Microglial dysfunction and neuroinflammation are thought to contribute to the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. Some antipsychotic drugs have anti-inflammatory activity and can reduce the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines and reactive oxygen species from activated microglial cells. Voltage-gated proton channels on the microglial cells participate in the generation of reactive oxygen species and neuronal toxicity by supporting NADPH oxidase activity. In the present study, we examined the effects of two typical antipsychotics, chlorpromazine and haloperidol, on proton currents in microglial BV2 cells using the whole-cell patch clamp method. Chlorpromazine and haloperidol potently inhibited proton currents with IC50 values of 2.2 μM and 8.4 μM, respectively. Chlorpromazine and haloperidol are weak bases that can increase the intracellular pH, whereby they reduce the proton gradient and affect channel gating. Although the drugs caused a marginal positive shift of the activation voltage, they did not change the reversal potential. This suggested that proton current inhibition was not due to an alteration of the intracellular pH. Chlorpromazine and haloperidol are strong blockers of dopamine receptors. While dopamine itself did not affect proton currents, it also did not alter proton current inhibition by the two antipsychotics, indicating dopamine receptors are not likely to mediate the proton current inhibition. Given that proton channels are important for the production of reactive oxygen species and possibly pro-inflammatory cytokines, the anti-inflammatory and antipsychotic activities of chlorpromazine and haloperidol may be partly derived from their ability to inhibit microglial proton currents.

  3. Stabilization of the conductive conformation of a voltage-gated K+ (Kv) channel: the lid mechanism.

    PubMed

    Santos, Jose S; Syeda, Ruhma; Montal, Mauricio

    2013-06-07

    Voltage-gated K(+) (Kv) channels are molecular switches that sense membrane potential and in response open to allow K(+) ions to diffuse out of the cell. In these proteins, sensor and pore belong to two distinct structural modules. We previously showed that the pore module alone is a robust yet dynamic structural unit in lipid membranes and that it senses potential and gates open to conduct K(+) with unchanged fidelity. The implication is that the voltage sensitivity of K(+) channels is not solely encoded in the sensor. Given that the coupling between sensor and pore remains elusive, we asked whether it is then possible to convert a pore module characterized by brief openings into a conductor with a prolonged lifetime in the open state. The strategy involves selected probes targeted to the filter gate of the channel aiming to modulate the probability of the channel being open assayed by single